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Full text of "Municipal history of Essex County in Massachusetts"

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MUNICIPAL HISTORY 

OF 

ESSEX COUNTY 

IN 

MASSACHUSETTS 



TERCENTENARY EDITION 



A classified work, devoted to the County's remarkable 

growth in all lines of human endeavor; 

more especially to within a 

period of fifty years 



BENJ. F. ARRINGTON 
Editor-in-Chief 



VOLUME IV. 



1922 

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



K'm 






THE new' . 

I PUBLIC Lir,^.\R, 

A3TC3H. LSNOX A^-a I 
I TILS^N FOUNDATIONS 
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COPYRIGHT 

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING CO. 

1922 



ESSEX COUNTY 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



241 



Buckley came to the United States when he was a 
boy, and has spent his entire time in this country 
since. The mother came to this country when she 
was a young girl, and lived here until her death, 
in 1895. 

Mr. Buckley received a practical education in the 
public schools of his native city, then, when he had 
finished the regular course, went out into the indus- 
trial world. He worked first for the F. T. Ward 
Company, of Salem, then prominent provision deal- 
ers, remaining with them for a period of four years. 
Later he became an employee of the Abbott-Rogers 
Shoe Company, of Salem, where he remained for a 
short time, going thereafter to Richard Quirk, of 
Salem, also a manufacturer of shoes. Up to the 
present time Mr. Buckley has continued in the shoe 
business, and has been associated with the follov/- 
ing companies: J. Dane, of Salem; M. Shortell & 
Sons, of Salem; James Tullock, the Burns Shoe 
Company, and the Farwell Shoe Company, of Dan- 
vers; Charles B. Fuller & Sons, Dennis Brady, and 
Cass & Dailey, of Salem; V. K. & H. Jones, Therill 
Bacheler Company, and Joseph Caunt Company, of 
Lynn; Blarston Brothers, of Danvers; the Allen 
Foster Willet Company, of Lynn; J. Brovim & Son, 
and D. D. Lafavour & Sons, of Salem; and is now 
with the Ebon Martin Company, of Marblehead. 
Mr. Buckley is familiar with every detail of the shoe 
industry, and is a recognized authority on shoes 
and leathers. 

From 1909 to 1919, Mr. Buckley held the office 
of business agent for the United Shoe Workers of 
America. He is a member of the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, being connected with the Essex Court, 
of Salem, and with the John Bertram Lodge, of 
Salem Workmen. He is a member of St. James 
Church. 

In 1900 Patrick J. Buckley maiTied Mary J. 
Buckley, of Salem, and they have two children, 
Mary E., and Arthur J. 



G. EDWIN BENNETT— For thirty years previ- 
ous to his death, which occuri-ed June 11, 1918, G. 
Edwin Bennett was engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness at Lynn, Massachusetts. During his sixty-four 
years of life all of which he spent in his native 
place, he was officially identified with a number of 
her leading institutions, and was ever a zealous ad- 
vocate and supporter of her most vital and essen- 
tial interests. 

G. Edwin Bennett was bom in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, August 27, 1854, the son of Jeremiah and 
Adeline (Gumey) Bennett. Jeremiah Bennett serv- 
ed the cause of the Union during the Civil War and 
while in action was severely wounded, the effects 
from which later caused his death. The boy re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of his 
native place and after terminating his studies, en- 
tered the shoe business in which he continued until 
1883 when he established himself in the real estate 
business. He was thus engaged exclusively up to 
the time of his death and had built up a large and 
extremely flourishing trade. He was a member of 
the Chamber of Commerce. His political affiliations 

Essex — 2 — 16 



were with the Republicans and while he never held 
office, his influence was often felt in political cir- 
cles, his advice upon questions of public moment 
being frequently solicited by those in authority and 
by leaders of the organization. Ever ready to res- 
pond to any deseiwing call made upon him he was 
widely charitable, and in his religious affiliations he 
attended St. Paul's Episcopal church. 

Mr. Bennett maiTied, first, Gertrude York, who 
died in Lynn, leaving one child, Helen, who married 
Malcolm McLeod of Lynn. Mr. Bennett married, 
second, in 1897, Eugenia Pearl, and to them were 
born two children: PhUip E., who is now, 1921, tak- 
ing a special course at Dartmouth College, having 
graduated from the institution in 1920; Mary E., 
who is at home. 



ANGELO MARIO ZARRELLA, M. D., one of 

the prominent young physicians of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, although but vei-y recently having opened 
his office, gives promise of a successful future in his 
chosen profession. 

Dr. Zarrella was born in Boston, August 13, 1893, 
and is a son of Ciriaco and Consiglia Zarrella. The 
family consists of five children, one daughter, La- 
vina, and three sons besides the young Lynn doctor, 
Joseph, George, who died in 1916, and a younger 
son, George. The father is a successful wholesale 
and retail fiiiit dealer in Boston. 

Dr. Zarrella was educated in Boston, passing 
through the gi'ammar and high schools of that city, 
then entering Tufts College, he took the medical 
course, and was gi-aduated in 191C, with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. He went to the LjTin Hos- 
pital as interne, remaining for sixteen months; 
then passed the Massachusetts State Board in Sep- 
tember, 191G. He enlisted for service in the army 
during the A^'orld War, but was rejected. He 
was at the Carney Hospital in Boston during Oc- 
tober and November, 1917, and had charge of the 
Out-Patient Surgery Department; and was visiting 
physician to Child Welfare House, Lynn. Then 
from November of that year to January, 1919, he 
was associated with Dr. Bowen as his assistant. 
In 1919 he opened an office in Lynn, for the gen- 
eral practice of medicine and surgery. He is tak- 
ing a position well up in the ranks of the medical 
profession, and his success is undoubtedly only a 
matter of time. 

Dr. Zan-ella is a member of the Lynn Medical 
Fraternity; of the Massachusetts Bledical Society; 
and of the American Medical Association. In pol- 
itical affiliation, he is a Republican. 

Dr. Angelo Mario Zanella married Elizabeth A. 
Goss, of Rye, New Hampshire, who is a graduate 
nurse of Lynn Hospital. The date of her gradua- 
tion was August 5, 1918. Dr. and Mrs. ZaiTella are 
members of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church. 



JAMES A. LIACOS— One of the successful at- 
torneys of Peabody, Massachusetts, and a man who, 
although having been established but a short time, 
has already made a name for himself in the public 
life of the community, is James A. Liacos, a native 



242 



ESSEX COUNTY 



of Elasson, Greece, bom there March 31, 1881. 

James A. Liacos received the elementary portion 
of his education in the public schools of his native 
place, subsequently matriculating at Diconomon 
College, from which he was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1898. For the fol- 
lowing three years he taught languages in the 
schools there, and then in 1904 came to this country 
and securfid work in mills at Lowell and Ayer, 
Massachusetts, later coming to Peabody when he 
decided that he would make the United States his 
permanent home. Devoting himself to the study 
of English, he took a course in bookkeeping at the 
Salem Commercial School, and in 1913 returned to 
Greece for the purpose of bringing back with him 
his father and mother. In September, 1914, having 
decided upon the profession of law for his career, 
he entered Northeastern Law School at Boston, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, in 1918. Throughout his school 
and college years he had proved himself an intel- 
ligent and painstaking student, and at their close 
came to the opening of his career, unusually well- 
equipped both with natural gifts and a training 
that was the result of conscientious effort. In the 
latter part of 1918, he opened an office in Peabody 
Square, and this has remained his headquai-ters ever 
since. He has served as interpreter in many im- 
portant cases and in many States, and at the same 
time is proving himself to be a most capable and 
conscientious attorney. He is affiliated witli the 
Essex County Bar Association, and is a prominent 
member in the Greek Orthodox church. 

In June, 1910, Mr. Liacos was united in man-iage 
■with Alice Harden, of Roxbury, Massachusetts. 
There is no issue. Such is the life of James A. 
Liacos a self-made man, starting in this country 
poor in finances but rich in shrewdness and fore- 
sight, traits which go to make up a man among 
men. Quick to grasp the necessity of mingling 
with the nation's successful men, he adapted him- 
self to circumstances, and took advantage of every 
opportunity which would bring him in contact with 
the worth while things of life. Today he stands as 
one of the most prominent and respected citizens 
of the community. 



WILLIAM B. GRAVES, who conducts a popular 
bowling alley in Lynn, is a prominent and repre- 
sentative citizen, and is descended from ancestors 
who bore a part in the early history of this coun- 
try and of other nations. 

Capt. Elisha Graves, Mr. Graves' great-grand- 
father, was captain of an American vessel, which 
took an active part in the French Revolution, in 
1801. In 1819 he was given a medal for rescuing 
lives at sea, and received also a share of the cargo 
on board the vessel saved. He rescued passengers 
and crew. 

Frank W. Graves, Mr. Graves' father, was for 
many years engaged in the plumbing business in 
Lynn. He married Harriet B. McKinney, of On- 
arga, Illinois. 

William B. Graves, son of Frank W. and Harriet 



B. (McKinney) Graves, was bom in Lynn, Novem- 
ber 26, 1875. Receiving his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Lynn and Swampscott, he early went 
to work, being first employed in the plant of the 
Morrell Leather Company, of Salem. He continued 
there for five years, then branched out for himself, 
and opened a bowling alley, in which business he 
has since been engaged. He has a fine up-to-date 
place, and is very successful in his chosen line of 
activity. 

Fraternally Mr. Graves is a member of Bay State 
Lodge, No. 40, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is president of the Odd Fellows' Bowling 
League, and is president of the Lynn City Bowling 
League. 

In March, 1902, William B. Graves married 
Grace Ellen Cook, of West Medway, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Andrew and Ida (Gilmore) Cook, of 
Milford, Massachusetts. Mrs. Graves' father served 
in the Civil War, an uncle served in the Spanish- 
American War, and a brother, Edward Cook, was 
killed in action in the World War. Mrs. Graves 
is president of the Daughters of Veterans; a mem- 
ber of the Spanish- American Auxiliary; and also 
a member of Myrtle Lodge of Rebeckahs. 



JEAN MARIE MISSUD is a thorough musician 
and composer, and as an arranger of high-class 
musical programs, has no superiors. The Salem 
Cadet Band, of which he is the organizer and 
leader, is well known throughout both continents, 
which is due entirely to Mr. Missud's wonderful 
leadership. 

Jean Marie Missud was born in Nice, France, 
AprO 25, 1852, the son of Joseph and Augustine 
(Barralli) Missud. His father was a sea faring 
man. The boy, Jean M., attended public schools 
of his native place untU graduating from the local 
high school, when in February, 1870, he enlisted 
as a musician in France, in the United States Navy, 
making a nine months' cruise, and receiving his 
honorable discharge upon landing in the United 
States. Since a lad of thirteen he had studied the 
clarionet, and continued to play this particular in- 
strument although at the same time he was studying 
the technique of the various band instruments. In 
1878 he came to Salem, after having played in 
bands in Boston and New York, and organized the 
Salem Cadet Band. This band has played in all of 
the large cities of the United States, Canada and 
also in the island of Bermuda. In 1896 the band 
went to London with the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, and while there the organiza- 
tion was greatly appreciated by prominent music 
lovers. The band is composed of fifty musicians, 
when requu'ed. 

Mr. Missud has written many musical compo- 
sitions, among them being the "Chilian Dance," the 
"Manana" and a serenade called "Magnolia." On 
July 15, 1907, he was awarded a certificate of 
honor from the president of his native place, where 
his compositions had been received, and he has also 
received a certificate of merit from the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, Philadelphia Lodge. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



243 



In politics he is a Republican, and takes the keen 
interest in the organization which is demanded 
of every good citizen. He also holds membership 
in the Salem Club. 

On December 13, 1883, Mr. Missud was united 
in marriage with Emma Austin Walden, daughter 
of Joseph and Mary (Austin) Walden. Mr. and 
Mrs. Missud are the parents of two children: J. 
Walden, a traveling salesman, married Eleanor Ab- 
bott, they have one child, Jean Walden. Marie, 
wife of B. E. Schwarz, of Brockton, Massachusetts, 
they are the parents of one child, Nanine. 



WILLIAM H. DAY, JR.— A constructive spirit 
in the administration of public affairs is a force 
the value of which cannot be estimated — nor can 
its effects be determined. In Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, such a force is the present secretary of the 
Chamber of Commerce, William H. Day, Jr., who 
has served in that capacity for a period of six 
years, and in other public offices previously. 

William H. Day, Jr., was bom in Marblehead, 
Massachusetts, in the year 1885, son of William H. 
and Mai-y A. Day. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Marblehead, Massachusetts; Alton, 
New Hampshire, and Beverly, Massachusetts, as 
the family fortunes made these changes advisable. 
Circumstances forced the lad to leave school at 
the age of sixteen, he then entering the employ 
of the Boston & Maine raillroad as messenger boy. 
He was not, however, to remain long in a sub- 
ordinate position, but was soon sent to Overshort 
as damage clerk, then through the billing depart- 
ment, and on up the ladder, until, in 1910, he 
was made chief clerk of the Lynn offices of the 
company. 

This career so favorably attracted the attention 
of Lynn's business men that when the present 
Chamber of Commerce came into existance in 1913, 
Mr. Day was the unanimous choice of the mem- 
bership for the position of transpoi-tation man- 
ager. His railroad experience was invaluable, giv- 
ing the inside knowledge of the railway companies' 
point of view, and also the logical point of pro- 
cedure from the point of view of the public. 
Through Mr. Day's efforts the present through-car 
service, bet^veen Lynn and the great shipping cen- 
ters of the country, w^as established. He appear- 
ed before governmental bodies, national and State, 
in an effort to secure readjustment of existing 
rates, rules and practices, both by rail and water, 
and as a result, Lynn sliippers and receivers of 
freight have been greatly benefited. In the some- 
what lesser, but still vital matter of the street 
railway service, he has intei-vened for the public 
in many cases relating to the public service. 

Mr. Day is regional vice-president and a director 
of the National Industrial Traffic League, the 
largest shippers' organization of its kind in the 
world, also is a director and member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the New England Traffic 
League. During the war period, 1917-18, Mr. Day 
was one of two shippers representatives selected 
by the railroad administration at Washington to 



serve on the New England rate committee, which 
body recommended the rates and rules governing 
the movement of freight traffic in New England 
during the period of government control. Every 
step of this constructive activity has widely ad- 
vertised the city of Lynn as a center of indus- 
trial and commercial progress. Now, as secre- 
tary of the Lynn Chamber of Commerce, Mr. 
Day's work is perhaps less spectacular, but none 
the less valuable to the community, and produc- 
tive of fai-reaching advantage to the people. 

Dm-ing the war period, Mr. Day, in addition 
to sei-ving on the railroad administration, took 
an active part in Liberty Loan drives, as a mem- 
ber of Lynn's executive committee. He planned 
the Greater War Chest Campaign; was interested 
in every Red Cross and Red 'Triangle Drive; served 
on the local fuel committee in 1917; was local fuel 
administrator in 1920, and later acted as the 
local fuel distributor. He is a big organization 
man, belonging to twenty-one clubs and societies, 
a member of the Masonic order, holding the thirty- 
second degree, is a noble of the Mystic Slirine, 
president of the Marblehead Masonic Club, and is 
president of the Essex County Associated Boards 
of Ti-ade, an organization made up of delegates 
from all commercial bodies in the county, some 
fifteen in number. 

Mr. Day man-ied Clara Wright, of Marblehead, 
July 20, 1904, and they are the parents of a 
daughter, Thelma, and a son, Webster. 



ALBERT IRVING COUCH— Immediately school 
years were over, Albert I. Couch, now an honored 
member of the banking fraternity of Lawi-ence, 
Massachusetts, entered business life, and from 1885 
until the present (1922) he has been identified 
\vith the mercantile and financial interests of 
Lawrence. The family is an ancient one in New 
England, this branch settling at an early date in 
New Hampshire. 

Mr. Couch comes of an ancient English family, 
one that has long been identified with New Eng- 
land. The ancestor, Joseph Couch, was of Kittery, 
Maine, as early as March 30, 1662, where he was 
a shipbuilder. His son, William Couch, removed 
to Newbury, Massachusetts, but his son, Joseph 
(2) Couch, became one of the early settlers of 
Boscawen, New Hampshire. He married Alice 
Rowell, and they were the parents of a son, Ben- 
jamin Couch, a Revolutionai-y soldier, whose de- 
scendants settled in Webster, New Hampshire, 
whence came Albert I. Couch. 

Albert Irving Couch was bom in Webster, New 
Hampshire, July 12, 1867, son of Walter S. and 
Sarah W. Couch, his maternal ancestor a soldier 
of the Revolution. After graduating from the 
Lawrence High School in 1885, Mr. Couch 
began his business career as bookkeeper with 
the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, of 
Lawrence, and there spent four years. In 1899 he 
was appointed teller of the Essex Savings Bank, 
Lawrence, and for twelve years remained in that 
capacity with that institution. In 1901 he was 



244 



ESSEX COUNTY 



elected treasurer of the Lawrence Savings Bank, 
but in 1902 returned to the Essex Savings Bank 
as treasurer. Two decades have since intervened 
and the association remains unbroken, Mr. Couch 
continuing the honored head of the financial de- 
partment of this consei-vative and highly rated 
institution. He is also a director of the Bay State 
National Bank, Lavirence, and president of the 
Morris Plan Bank, also of Lawrence. 

A man of affairs above all else, Mr. Couch is 
not unmindful of the obligations of citizenship 
and takes a deep interest in community affairs. 
He is a director of the Lawi-ence Young Men';; 
Christian Association, a member of the Lawrence 
Street Congiegational Church, a Republican in his 
political opinions, and a member of the Merrimack 
Valley Country Club. 

Mr. Couch man-ied, June 17, 1896, Alice Mabel 
Eaton, of Lawrence, Massachusetts. 



WILLIAM DAVIS TWISS was bom at Thorn- 
ton's Feri-y, a village of Hillsboro county. New 
Hampshire, on the Men-imac river, eleven miles 
south of Manchester, December 2, 1864. Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, later became the family home, and 
in that city he was educated in public schools. 
At the age of fourteen he entered the employ of 
the Russell Paper Company, and five years later, 
March 1, 1883, he began his sei-vice with the 
Everett Mills, of Lawience, a sei'vice that has 
continued until the present, 1922, a period of 
thirty-nine years. He began as a clerk in 188.3, 
was promoted to the grade of assistant paymaster, 
then paymaster, then superintendent, a position he 
filled for twenty-five years, until April 22, 1921, 
when he was made agent, his present position. He 
is also tnistee of the Broadway Savings Bank, 
of Lawrence, and interested in many Lawrence 
organizations. 

Mr. Twiss is a member of Trinity Congregational 
Church, and of its board of assessors, vice-presi- 
dent of Lawrence Boys' Club, Incorporated; mem- 
ber of Lawrence City Mission, Lawrence Rotary 
Club and Merrimack Valley Country Club. He is 
affiliated with Monadnock Lodge, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, and of Kearsarge Encamp- 
ment, No. 14.5, of the same order. He is a mem- 
ber of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, and 
in politics is a Republican. 

In Lawi-ence, May 9, 1888, Mr. Twiss married 
Margaret Elizabeth Rowe, daughter of John S. 
and Mercy Rowe, her father a jeweler. Mr. and 
Mrs. Twiss are the parents of two children: 
Beatrice Margaret, a graduate of Wellesley Col- 
lege, 1913, manned George Gibson Brown, of 
Lawrence; and Catherine Davis, a graduate of 
Wellesley College, 1921, married Kenneth Colman 
Allen, of Portland, Maine. 



ORLANDO F. HATCH— Nearly half a century 
ago Orlando F. Hatch came from East Boston to 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, and was for many 
years associated with his father and brother in 
the firm, L. M. Hatch & Sons, ship joiners and 



contractors. They were expert at fine joiner work, 
their specialty the finishing of the cabins on ships 
built in the local yards. They were widely known 
in their specialty, having no superiors in fine 
joiner work, but shipbuilding waned, and with few 
new ships being built there were few cabins to 
be finished, the firm then becoming general build- 
ing contractors and lumber dealei-s. They finished 
the cabins of the last merchant sailing vessel 
built on the Merrimack river in 1902. The father, 
Lot M. Hatch, continued active in the firm until 
his death in 1904, thirty-one years having elapsed 
since he founded the firm, L. M. Hatch & Sons. 
The brothers, Orlando F. and Willard A. Hatch, 
continued the business under the old fiiTn name 
for two years after their father's retirement, then 
re-organized as Hatch Brothers, as at present. 
They have in recent years withdrawn from gen- 
eral contracting and given their entire attention 
to their lumber yard and building supply business 
at their yards and offices on Bartlett street, New- 
buryport; the business is a prosperous one and 
handles a volume of business eveiy year. 

This branch of the Hatch family traces from 
one of the oldest New England families, the Ameri- 
can ancestor, William Hatch, a sturdy Pilgrim, 
v/ho sailed from Sandwich, England, and settled in 
Scituate, Massachusetts, as early as 1635. Through 
the generations succeeding liim the Hatch family 
has given to the Colony, to the New England 
States, and to the Nation, many men with dis- 
tinguished record in the arts of war and peace, 
Orlando F. Hatch being one who gave worthy 
service to the Nation in the gi-eat test of the 
"sixties." 

Orlando F. Hatch, eldest of the four sons of 
Lot M. and Nancy M. (Hall) Hatch, was bom in 
Nobleboro, Maine, October 26, 1845. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Newcastle, at Lin- 
coln Academy (Maine) and Bryant & Stratton 
Business College, Boston. After leaving school he 
leamed the ship joiners trade under his skilled 
father, the family then residing in East Boston. 
In 1873 the father moved his business to Nev/- 
buryport, where Orlando F. and Willard A. joined 
him as stated, and the firm of L. M. Hatch & 
Sons was formed, now Hatch Brothers. 

In 1864 Orlando F. Hatch entered the United 
States Navy; enlisted on board the United States 
frigate "Sabine," at Portland, Maine; was trans- 
fen-ed to the receiving ship "Ohio," at Charles- 
tovm Navy Yard, and assigned to the United States 
ship "Mahaska," attached to the East Gulf Squad- 
ron, dischai-ged in June, 1865. Mr. Hatch is a 
member of the A. W. Bartlett Post, No. 49, Grand 
Army of the Republic, Department of Massa- 
chusetts, wliich he served as commander during 
the years 1919-20-21. During his incumbency, 
largely through his efforts, the mortgage on Me- 
morial Hall, dedicated to the memory of the 
soldiers and sailors of Newburyport who served 
in the Civil War, was discharged. He was a mem- 
ber of the Atkinson Common Soldiers and Sailors 
Monument Association which secured to the city 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



245 



the statue of "The Volunteer" and Memorial Tab- 
lets beai'ing 14S1 names of all soldiers and sailors 
of Newburyport who sei-ved from 1861 to 1865, 
which is located at Atkinson Common. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hatch for years have been loyal and hard 
working members of the Belleville Improvement 
Society, being- charter members, and contributed in 
a material manner to the development of Atkin- 
son Common from a field into what is now one 
of the most beautiful pai'ks in tliis section. Mr. 
Hatch still remains as a member of the Atldn- 
son Common commissioners, and take an active 
interest in current events. 

Mr. Hatch married Sarah B. Carlton, in East 
Boston, Massachusetts, February 8, 1872, Rev. 
George H. Vibbert, pastor of th( Univoisalist 
church, officiating. Soon after their man-iage, New- 
buryport became the family home and there Mr. 
Hatch has been in business continuously. Mr;-.. 
Hatch is a daughter of Oliver O. and Sarah B. 
(Osgood) Carlton, her father bom in North An- 
dover, Massachusetts, died in 1865, her mother, of 
New Hampsliii'e family, dying in 1881, both of 
whom were of old Colonial families. Mr. and 
Mrs. Orlando F. Hatch are the parents of three 
children: Willard A., Frank L., and Laura C. 



JEREMIAH JOSEPH DOHERTY— One of the 

foremost men in the legal profession in Essex 
county, Massachusetts, is Jeremiah Joseph (J. 
Joseph) Doherty, long prominent in many lines of 
activity, and now clerk of the District Court of 
Southern Essex. 

Mr. Doherty is a son of Jeremiah Doherty, a 
sturdy eighteenth century pioneer, of Irish bkth, 
who bore a noble part in the history of his adopt- 
ed counti-y. He was bom in County Tipperai-y, 
Ireland, and came to this countiy about 1850, lo- 
cating in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he was 
employed in the mills. In 1863 he enlisted in 
Company B, Fourth United States Volunteer 
Heavy Artillery, and served to the end of the 
war. He was an honored member of the Grand 
Ai-my of the Republic, Post No. 5, of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, and was a member of St. Mai-y's Church, 
of Lynn; he died in 1893. He mai-ried Margaret 
E. Landrigan, who v/as born in Tipperai-y, Ireland, 
and died in 1914. They were the parents of a 
daughter and two sons: Mai-y E., now deceased; 
Jeremiah Joseph, whose name heads this review; 
and Thomas A., a prominent dentist of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, popular in social and club circles, 
single, and a member of the Knights of Colum- 
bus. 

Jeremiah Joseph Doherty was bom in Lynn, 
Massachusetts, on Januai-y 11, 1878. Gaining his 
early education in St. Mary's Parochial School, 
he was graduated from that institution in 1890. 
He then entered the Lynn High School, electing 
the classical course, and was graduated in 189.5. 
Following this, he was, for one year, in the acad- 
emic department of Harvard University, then 
entered Boston University Law School, from which 
he was gradated three years later. Mr. Doherty 



was admitted to the Essex county bar in Feb- 
ruary, 1900, beginning the practice of law im- 
mediately thereafter. He was most successful 
from the beginning, and in 1906 was appointed 
assistant clerk of the Lynn Police Court, now 
the District Court of Southern Essex. In 1911 
Mr. Doherty was appointed by Governor Foss 
clerk of this court, and was re-appointed to the 
same office in 1916 by Governor Coolidge. He still 
ably fills this exacting office. 

In public life Mr. Doherty is thus a prominent 
figure, but although a leader of the Republican 
party in this county, he is far from being a 
politician. During the World War he served as 
secretary of the Local Draft Board, No. 1, for a 
period of nineteen months. 

In various activities Mr. Doherty is a well 
known figure. He is an influential member of 
the Essex County Bar Association, and is secre- 
tary of the Lynn Bar Association. He is a mem- 
ber of the Lynn Republican Club, and also of the 
Essex RepubUcan Club. He is a member of the 
Knights of Columbus, and an active worker for 
the interest of the order; also a member of the 
Harvard Club, of Lynn. 

Mr. Doherty married (first) Josephine V. Connor, 
daughter of Dennis Connor, of Revere, Massachu- 
setts, who died on April 3, 1914. He mai-ried (sec- 
ond) on October 19, 1919, Mrs. Nora G. WhaJen, 
widow of Thomas F. Whalen. Mrs. Doherty was 
bom in Boston, on January 6, 1886, and is a 
daughter of Timothy and Nora (Mara) Sullivan, 
her parents having been bom in Ireland. Mrs. 
Nora G. (Whalen) Doherty is the mother of four 
children: Mary M., Thomas F., Genevieve R., and 
Helena C. Whalen. The family are members of 
St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, of Lynn. 



ANDREW J. SWEETSER — The surname 
Sweetser is identical with Swetser and Switzer, 
both of which are still in use by various branches 
of the family. Concerning the origin of the name. 
Lower suggests that it was applied by the English 
to natives of Switzerland. The term was used 
especially for the foreign soldiers imported into 
England for use in the various wars, and in gen- 
eral came to be used for a mercenary soldier. 
This, however, was a later development, for the 
name -v{as in use in England long before mer- 
cenaries in any number were brought into the 
kingdom. In the Close Rolls of the twenty-ninth 
year of the regn of Edward III. we find the entry 
"Richard Swetesire." The name is not a common 
one either in England or America, and the family 
is not numerous. 

The New England Sweetsers and their branches 
throughout the United States descend from one 
progenitor, Seth Sweetser, who was admitted an 
inhabitant at Charlestown, Massachusetts, in the 
year 1637. Seth Sweetser, the immigrant ancestor 
and founder, was bom in 1606, and emigrated to 
the New England colonies from Tring, in Hertford- 
shire, a place thirty miles distant from London. 
He settled in Charlestown in 1637, and was ad- 



246 



ESSEX COUNTY 



mitted to the church there, January 8, 1638. On 
March 14, 1638-39, he became a freeman. He was 
a shoemaker by ti-ade. A letter from his cousin, 
Daniel Field, dated at Tring, May 10, 1642, has 
been preserved. It mentions his cousin Crane, 
father Lake, Aunt Hoten, his brothers, and sister 
Elis. It notifies him that he was to receive a 
butt of leather for which he was to pay ten 
pounds to Thomas Welch or Goodman Fowler; 
it also conveys messages of love to William Phil- 
lips and his wife. Seth Sweetser made a deed 
of gift to his son, Benjamin Sweetser, in 1660, and 
died May 27, 1662, aged fifty-six years. His will 
was signed May 24, 1662, and proved June 17 fol- 
lowing. He bequeathed to wife Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter Sarah, son Samuel Blanchard and his wife 
Mai-y, daughter Hannah Fitch, and to his wife's 
three children by an earlier marriage. His son, 
Benjamin Sweetser, and Edward Drinker, were ex- 
ecutors; Mr. Richard Russell and "my brother 
Thomas Gold" overseers. His first wife Bethia 
was admitted to the church, September 9, 1639. 
He man-ied (second), Api-il, 1661, Elizabeth 
Oakes, widow of Thomas Oakes, of Cambridge. 
His widow maiTied (third) Samuel Hayward. Seth 
Sweetser left only one son to perpetuate the 
name. 

Benjamin Sweetser, son of Seth and Bethia 
Sweetser, was born in Tring, England, about 
1632, and died July 22, 1718, in Charlestown, where 
he settled with his parents in early childhood. 
He inherited his father's homestead, and followed 
the trade of last-maker in Charlestown. He was a 
prominent Baptist at the time that denomination 
was being oppressed by the Puritans, and was 
fined fifty pounds and imprisoned for his re- 
ligious views. His will, dated May 5, 1716, was 
proved August 12, 1718. He married Abigail 
Wigglesworth, bom 1632, died July 22, 1718, aged 
eighty-six years, according to her gravestone. 
From Benjamin Sweetser and his wife are de- 
scended all of the name in New England today 
who trace their ancestry to the Colonial period. 
In successive generations the family has produced 
many men of considerable prominence in business, 
financial and professional life in New England. 

Moses Mansfield Sweetser, of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, founder of a well knowm tobacco busi- 
ness, and a well known figure in mercantile circles 
in Lynn in the last half of the nineteenth century, 
was a lineal descendant of Benjamin Sweetser, 
above mentioned. He was bom at Sweetser Cor- 
ner (named for the family, which has been set- 
tled in that vicinity for generations), Cliftondale, 
Massachusetts, March 20, 1801, and died in Lynn, 
aged seveAty-three years. He was educated in 
the public schools of Cliftondale, and began his 
business career in Lynn, with which city he was 
identified until his death. In 1861, Mr. Sweetser 
established himself in the tobacco business. The 
venture proved highly successful and he conducted 
it with lucrative returns for several years, even- 
tually disposing of his interests to the Perry 
Lorrillard Tobacco Company. He was the inven- 



tor of the Macaboy snuff boxes. 

Mr. Sweetser was widely known throughout 
Lynn, and was a vital influence in religious circles 
in the city for many years. For a long period he 
was a leading layman in the Methodist church, 
preaching on occasions. He was an able public 
speaker, forceful, eloquent, and thoroughly well 
informed. It was largely through his activities in 
the matter that Brigham Young was driven out 
of Salem. Although he lent his support un- 
stintedly to every movement to advance civic wel- 
fare, he remained aloof from politics, and was in 
no sense of the word an office-seeker. In later 
life he became deeply interested in spiritualism, 
and was active in research in this field, and for 
many years was president of the Spiritualist 
church. 

In 1821, Moses M. Sweetser married, in Lynn, 
Mary Reed Dixon, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Reed) Dixon, member of a prominent old New 
England family. She died at the age of forty- 
seven years. Issue: 1. Moses, bom 1823. 2. Wil- 
liam Heni-y, bom 1824. 3. Alonzo, born 1827. 4. 
Mary Reed, bom 1828. 5. Elizabeth R., bom 1830. 
6. Andrew Jackson, of whom further. 7. Frances 
D., bom 1833. 8. Annie M, bom 133.5. 9. Harriet 
A. 10. Clarissa C, bom 1838; married Charles 
Jeffrey, whom she survives, and resides at No. 174 
Broadway, Lynn, (see following sketch). 11. 
George W., born 1840. 12. Henrietta, bom 1842. 
All the children, with the exceptions of Clarissa 
C. and Andrew Jackson are now deceased. 

Andrew Jackson Sweetser, foui-th son and sixth 
child of Moses Mansfield and Mary Reed (Dixon) 
Sweetser, was bom in North Salem, Massach- 
setts, March 10, 1831. He obtained his early edu- 
cational training in the public schools of his 
birthplace, and as a young man entered the hotel 
business, which he followed vrith uniform success 
in various parts of the country for many years. 
Mr. Sweetser now lives retired in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, at the ripe old age of ninety years. His 
personal qualifications for the work he followed 
for so long were the determining factors of his 
prosperous continuance therein. Professional en- 
tertainment came naturally to him and the guests 
of his establishments never failed to return when 
circumstances brought them again to the vicinity. 
The charm of his cordial manner and his sincere 
anxiety for the comfort and satisfaction of his 
patrons attracted a generous clientele, and in the 
course of his business life he made many firm 
friends among the thousands of men in all walks 
of life who came under his roof. There is no 
business in which the personal equation is more 
prominent than in hotel keeping, and the open 
secret of Mr. Sweetser's popularity and success 
in his calling was the pleasant atmosphere of 
welcome that pervaded his establishments, an at- 
mosphere that came from his genial, kindly pres- 
ence. Mr. Sweetser is a Spiritualist in religious 
belief, strong in the faith that was his father's. 

Mr. Sweetser married (second) in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1883, Pauline W. Waldron, daughter 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



247 



of Charles H. Waldron. They are the parents of 
one son, Charles H., who is a Spiritualistic me- 
dium. The family home is at No. 426 Broadway, 
Lynn. 



CHARLES JEFFREY— The life work of Charles 
Jeffrey, performed in the last half of the nine- 
teenth century, can be summed up in the state- 
ment that he met every obligation, shirked no 
duty, and returned a good account of his steward- 
ship. What makes this record of interest and im- 
portance is not his material accomplishments, but 
the spirit that animated him in all of his effort, 
the influence for good that he exerted upon the 
large circle of his friends. He labored in produc- 
tive, essential fields, and throughout the seventy- 
five years of his life walked among his fellows 
in virtue and honor, a man among men, upright 
and respected. 

Son of .Johri and Maiy (Larabee) Jeffrey, Charles 
Jeffrey, was bom on the old Turnpike, now East- 
em avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts, March 15, 1820, 
and died in that city, June 29, 1895. John Jeff- 
rey was a faiTner and later in life became a shoe- 
maker, continuing active in that calling during the 
days of hand-made boots and shoes. Their chil- 
dren were: John, Samuel, Frank, William, Mehit- 
able, Mary, Joseph, and Charles, of whom fui^ 
ther. 

Charles Jeffrey enjoyed few of the educational 
advantages that the average youth bom into his 
station of life considei-s his by right today, at- 
tending school only during the winter months 
and becoming a bread-winner at the early age of 
seven years. At this time he worked on his 
father's' farm during the summer, and in the 
shops of Lynn when there was no need for farm 
labor at home. The hardships of liis lot did 
little but to ciystallize his determination to take 
advantage of whatever opportunities for self- 
improvement came his way, and in his later years 
he had so far made up for the handicap of earlier 
years that there were few men whose store of 
useful knowledge was more complete and exact. 
He continued work on the farm and in the shops 
until his man-iage, when he devoted himself more 
closely to tmck farming, a line in which his 
industry and fair dealing v/on him a generous 
measure of success. He was a Republican in 
political sympathy, but his home and his business 
were his principal interests, and depite the fact 
that his standing in the community would have 
assured him of heavy support he consistently held 
aloof from public ofSce. 

Mr. Jeffrey married, in 1860, Clarissa C. Sweot- 
ser, bom in Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1838, daugh- 
ter of Moses M. and Maiy R. (Dixon) Sweetser, 
(see preceding sketch). Since the death of her 
husband, Mrs. Jeffrey has continued her residence 
at the home at No. 430 Broadway, LjTin, the scene 
of their ideal companionship of so many years. 
Mrs. Jeffrey and her brother, Andrew J. Sweet- 
ser, are the only survivors of a family of six 
sons and six daughters. 



This is the period when all the world looks to 
New England, and when New England herself 
pays tribute to the human elements that have 
made her gi-eat. Fitting and proper is it to look 
back to the Pilgrim and Puritan fathers and to 
recognize anew their gift to humanity. But had 
the torch that they lighted not been carefully 
watched by the generations that followed, had 
not fuel of patriotism, conscience, high-minded 
endeavor been supplied in abundance, the goodly 
heritage would have been lost. It is the lives 
of such men as Charles Jeffrey, substantial, law- 
abiding, progi-essive-minded citizens, that have 
provided the medium through which the benefits 
of the courage and exalted ideals of yester-year 
have been transmitted to the present. 



CHARLES N. KELLY— Through long affilia- 
tion with the city of Haverhill, Mr. Kelly has 
become widely known and there he is deeply ap- 
preciated for his public spirit. Throughout his 
career he has been an ardent exponent of the 
trade slogan, "Hitch your heart to Haverliill,'" 
and both his private and his public activities have 
been characterized by farsighted vision and sound 
judgment. He has grown from a small beginning 
to his present position, and has long been active 
in the movement tending towards city betterment, 
his administration as president of the Chamber 
of Commerce one of the most gratifying the cham- 
ber has to i-ecall. He is a man of ready initiative, 
genial and companionable, making friends easily 
and naturally. 

Mr. Kelly comes of the oldest Kelly stock in the 
United States, the original settlers having landed 
at Newbury, (now Rowley) Massachusetts, where 
they founded a peiinanent home, although later 
generations have scattered to many parts of the 
country. He is a son of Prescott and Mary Jane 
(Austin) Kelly, his father a successful farmer 
and lumberman. The family is of English origin. 
Charles N. Kelly was bom in Salem, New 
Hampshire, July 24, 1854, there was educated 
in the public schools, and there spent the first 
twenty years of his life. In 1874, he located in 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he later became a 
member of the firm, Kelly Brothers, contractors 
and builders. He has, during the more than four 
decades of Haverhill residence, successfully man- 
aged several lines of business through his con- 
tracting operations, and was the first president of 
the Haverhill Master Builders' Association, or- 
ganized in 1916. This organization led to closer 
relationship between the different building firms 
and the benefits have been far-reaching. 

Mr. Kelly has always been a public-spiiited 
citizen, serving in many capacities in public life. 
He was elected president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce in 1918, serving as chief executive of this 
organization for two years. He has served as a 
member of its board of directors and its various 
committees at different times since 1902, and re- 
cently rendered valuable service as a member of 
the transportation and bridge committees of the 



248 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Chamber. Under the old form of govei-nment, Mr. 
Kelly was alderman in 1886 for a term of one 
year, and subsequently served as councilman for 
two temis. He was also a member of the Board 
of Water Commissioners when that department 
was first taken over by the city. He is a direc- 
tor of the Haverhill National Bank, and a trus- 
tee of the Haverhill Savings Bank. During the 
World War period, 1917-18, he acted as chair- 
man of the finance committee of the Haverhill 
chapter of the Red Cross, and aided in all foi-ms 
of war work possible. Politically holding inde- 
pendent convictions, he has bi-ought to those pub- 
lic offices to wMch he has been called the im- 
partial spirit v/hich counts for the public good 
rather than for any party advantage. His more 
personal interests include membership in all the 
Masonic bodies of Haverhill, in the Pawtucket 
Club and the Rotary Club. He is a member of 
the Universalist church, of Haverhill, and very 
active in its work, being trustee of the Boys' 
Club of the church. 

On July 12, 1922, Governor Channing Co.x ap- 
pointed Edmund C. \Ventv>'orth and Charles N. 
Kelly as members of the special commission to 
have charge of the consti'uction of the new Haver- 
hill bridge. Under the act of the Legislature, two 
citizens of Essex county were to be named by 
the governor to serve with the members of the 
county commission as a special bridge commission. 
The bill did not stipulate that the cppoinleas 
should be residents of Haverhill, although bot'i 
are. 

Mr. Kelly married, in 1900, in Dover, New 
Hampshire, Lydia Abie Laskey, daughter of 

Lewis B. and (Tuttle) Laskey, of Dover. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are the parents of six chil- 
dren: Natenis, John A., Ruth, George, Barbara 
and Jeanette. The family home is in Ipswich. 



DR. ALFRED PRESTON BOWEN, one of 
Lynn's leading physicians, was born in that city, 
Api-il 21, 1877, and is a son of Joseph Herbert 
and Ca)'oline Ray (Browne) Bowcn. The doc- 
tor's father was bom in Lynn, and his mother in 
Peabody. Both died in Lynn, in 1902. 

Receiving his early education in the public 
schools of Ljoin, Dr. Bowen, as a young man, 
was graduated from the English High School, 
then pursued his professional studies at Harvard 
University, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1899. Dr. Bowen is one of the eighteen 
original members who organized the Lynn Hos- 
pital, and is still connected with that institution. 
He has built up an extensive general practice in 
the city and vicinity. 



ERNEST G. IVIITCHELL, formeriy president 
of the State National Bank of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, v/as bom in that city July 2G, 1881. son of 
Eben A. and Annie J. (Philips) Mitchell. He 
was educated in the public schools, and the Hoyt 
School, and his first occupation in the business 
world was as a clerk in the National Sectiritv 



Bank, now the Security Trust Company, remain- 
ing there for sixteen years, and during the last 
seven years of this period was manager of the 
branch of the Security Trust Company at West 
Lynn. IVIr. Mitchell was next associated with the 
State National Bank, as cashier, and on June 1, 
1918, was appointed treasurer of this institution, 
of wliich later he was president, being appointed 
January 11, 1921. This institution is now out of 
business. 

Mr. Mitchell is very active fraternally, and is a 
member of the lodge, chapter, council and com- 
mandeiy of the Masonic order; Scottish Rite; 
Lodge of Perfection; Princes of Jerusalem; Rose 
Croi.x; Massachusetts Consistory; and Aleppo 
Temple. His clubs are: Oxford Club; Homestead 
Goli Club; Tedesco Club, and the Pen Dragon 
Club. 

Mr. Mitchell man-ied, April 30, 1904, Elizabeth 
Victoria Carter Ritchy, daughter of Harry and 
Helena (Carter) Ritchy, and they are the par- 
ents of a son, Stuart, born March 30, 1906, and 
a daughter, Dorothy E., born May 10, 1910. With 
his family, Mr. Mitchell attends the Unitarian 
church. 



OSCAR A. MARTIN, manufacturer, head of the 
O. A. Martin Wood Heel Company, of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, and treasurer of the shoe manu- 
facturing firm of Martin & Daurier, was born in 
Salem, New Hampshire, July 16, 1862, the son 
of Nehemiah and Gustie (Davis) Martin. His 
father, who died in 1909 at Haverhill, was for the 
greater part of his life connected with the lumber 
industry of New Hampshire and Maine, and the 
Davis family, from which his mother came, was 
of Nottingham, New Hampshire. 

Oscar A. Martin was not far advanced in boy- 
hood when the family came to Haverhill, so liis 
schooling, in consequence, was obtained in the 
public schools of Salem and Haverhill. He closed 
his school days in the latter place, then began to 
work for Goodrich & Porter, of Haverhill. He 
remained in their employ for eight years, and for 
ten years, thereafter, was agent for the Ross 
Heel Company. At the end of that time he de- 
cided to enter into business for himself, seeing 
an opportunity in the manufacture of wood heels 
for the Massachusetts shoe industry. He estab- 
lished the O. A. Martin Wood Heel Company, of 
Haverhill, and opened a manufacturing plant at 
No. 22 Wasliington street. In the course of time, 
expansion of his business made it necessary for 
him to open another factory, which he did, at 
Georgetown. His present plant is in the new 
Schmidt building, on Washington street, Haverhill, 
where he has capacity for the manufacture of 2,400 
dozen wood heels a day. Mr. Martin is also one 
of the principals of a shoe manufacturing busi- 
ness, that of Martin & Daurier, makers of high- 
grade ladies' shoes; he is treasurer of that com- 
pany, the factory of which is situated at No. 60 
Wingate street, Haverhill. 

Fraternally, he is a member of the Junior 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



249 



Order United American Mechanics; socially, be be- 
longs to the Pentucket Club, and religiously he is 
an Episcopalian, a member of Grace Church. 

Mr. Martin married, in 1882, Mary Sanderson, 
daughter of George \V. and Abigail (Warner) San- 
derson. Her father, a clergyman, was pastor of .1 
Dover, New Hampshire church, and that was the 
home town of the mother and their daughter. 
Mrs. Martin. Later, the Rev. Sanderson was for 
many years at Watertown. 



JOHN REILLEY HAVERTY is one of the 

steadily advancing lawyers of the younger set of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. His gi-owing- success in 
his chosen profession occassions no surprise with 
those who know his sterling character and re- 
markable .powers. His cleverness and wit, his skill 
in argument, the tenacity with which he holds 
fast to a stand he has taken, his thorough ground- 
ing in the law, with his sti-ict integi'ity and loyalty 
to client and friend, make him of the highest type 
in the legal profession, and only the future years 
can tell how far and fast he will travel along 
the road he has chosen. 

Patrick G. Haverty, father of John R. Haverty, 
was a native of Andover, Massachusetts, having 
first seen the light of day there in 1859. He early 
removed to Lawrence, Massachusetts, where for 
more than a third of a century he was a master 
blacksmith. He died in 1915. The mother, for- 
merly Elizabeth Martha Connolly, was also of 
Andover, born 1861, and now living in Lawrence. 
She is a daughter of John T. Connolly, a native 
of County Cork, Ireland, emigrated to America 
and located in South Andover, Massachusetts, 
where he became a well known genei'al contrac- 
tor. He enlisted in the Civil War in 1861, and 
served for a period of about three years. He h"d 
quite a reputation as a writer of songs, both 
words and music, especially songs for the vaude- 
ville stage and labor songs. He was known as a 
promoter of amateur theatricals thirty-five years 
ago in Lawrence and the surrounding country. He 
married Ehza Williamson, a native of Andover, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Frank Williamson, a 
native of County Cork, Ireland. 

John Reilley Haverty is of Lawrence birth, born 
March 3, 1893, and received the elements of his 
education in the graded schools of the city, gradu- 
ating from High School with the class of 1912. 
Entering the Catholic University of Washington, 
D. C, he spent three years, going from there to 
Georgetown University, from which he was gi-ad- 
uated LL.B. in 1916, then to Boston University, 
where he was graduated with the degree of Master 
of Laws in 1917. Admittance to the bar at Boston' 
came the same year. He is now a member of the 
Lawrence Bar Association. With this thorough 
preparation and recognized ability, his association 
in law practice was much sought and he finally 
settled upon the office of John C. Sanborn, a 
very eminent lawyer of the city, who died in 1920, 
as the seat of his legal operations. With tlic 
death of his associate he established other con- 



nections, and in 1920 became one of the firm of 
Mahoney, Haverty & Carey, conducting a general 
law practice, with offices in the Bay State build- 
ing. 

Mr. Haverty has not forgotten the land of his 
fathers, and is the forceful president of thd 
Fi-iends of Irish Freedom Association. Much of 
the success of this society is due to his wise 
leadership. He is also vice-president of the Massa- 
chusetts State Council of the Friends of Irish 
Freedom Association. He is a member and advo- 
cate of the Knights of Columbus; Ancient Order 
of Hibernians, Division No. 8; the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 65; the 
Merrimack Valley Country Club, and the Gratton 
Club. He is an Independent in politics; was vei-y 
active in the Red Cross, Liberty Loan and other 
movements during the World War, also was on 
the legal advisory board. Mr. Haverty is a 
member of Saint Patrick's Church (Catholic) of 
Lavirence. 



GEORGE P. MORRIS— Prominent in the indus- 
trial world of Essex county, Massachusetts, George 
P. Mon-is, sole owner of the George P. Blorris & 
Company leather factory, of Lynn, has built his 
success upon broad experience definitely sought 
with the purpose of preparing for executive re- 
sponsibility. 

BIr. Morris was bom in St. Louis, Missouri, 
November 5, 1882, and is a son of Henry J. and 
Elizabeth (Blertian) Morris, his father being a 
prominent interior decorator of Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Acquiring his early education in the public 
schools of Boston, where the family then resided, 
Mr. Moi-ris took up special studies through the 
International Correspondence School, then entered 
the shoe industry in Roxbury, remaining in this 
connection for eight years. Realizing the great 
opportunities in this and allied industries for suc- 
cess, he mapped out a most practical course. Go- 
ing to many different points throughout the East, 
he worked in various shoe factories, studying the 
general requirements of the trade, then, in 1917, 
came to Lynn, and with this accumulated knowl- 
edge one of his most valuable assets, founded the 
business of which he is owner and manager, and is 
now manufacturing fine leather for the shoe 
trades and meeting with gratifying success. Mr, 
Monis is a member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, and the Knights of the Maccabees, of 
Binghamton, New York. 

Mr. Morris married, in 1915, Claudia Berube, of 
Lynn, daughter of Philip and Marie (Sampson) 
Berube. Mrs. Morris' father was well known as a 
road contractor until his death in 1893; her 
mother was a native of Canada. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mon-is have two children: Thomas H., and Marie 
E. The family attend St. Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church, of Lynn. 



OSCAR R. BODWELL— Long prominent in real 
estate circles in Danvers, Massachusetts, Oscar 



250 



ESSEX COUNTY 



R. Bodwell has for the past three years held a 
leading position in the industrial world of Dan- 
vers as president of the New England Electric 
Lamp Company. 

Mr. Bodwell is a son of David and Caroline E. 
(Sanborn) Bodwell, long residents of this city. 
David Bodwell was born in Methuen, Massachu- 
setts, coming to Danvers as a young man, and 
during his active lifetime was connected with the 
shoe industry. 

Bom in Danvers in 1866, Mr. Bodwell, as a 
boy, attended the public schools of the city, and 
acquired a practical education. For three or four 
years, thereafter, he followed farming, then wa.s 
employed in the shoe industry for several years 
as shoe cutter. Becoming deeply interested in the 
development of the city from a commercial stand- 
point, Mr. Bodwell then entered the real e.;tatc 
field, taking up, also, its customary allied inter- 
est, insurance. He followed along these lines until 
1918, when he became president of the New Eng- 
land Lamp Company, in which capacity he is now 
carrying forward the business of that concern 
along progi'essive lines. Mr. Bodwell is a member 
of the Free and Accepted Masons, and of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Bodwell married Alice P. Turner, of Dan- 
vers, and they attend the Danvers Highlands Con- 
gregational Church. 



JAMES B. ALLEN— Identified with the general 
progress of Cliftondale in a very practical way 
as a member of the firm of R. T. Allen & 
Brothers, James B. Allen is bearing a part in the 
prosperity of the county of Essex, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Allen is a son of Stewart and Mary (Boothe) 
Allen, residents of Hammond, New York. His 
father died in 1914. 

Mr. Allen vi'as bom in Hammond, November 
29, 1884, and received his early education in the 
public schools of that community, and attended 
the Hammond High School, after which he had the 
advantage of a course at the New York Ti-ade 
School. Upon the completion of this course, Mr. 
Allen came to Cliftondale in 1904, where his 
brother Robert T. has long been at the head of a 
thriving hardware business, in whose employ he 
worked for some years. In 1916 the business was 
incorporated, and James B. Allen was received into 
the organization, in the office of vice-president, 
which office he still holds. Under the name of 
R. T. Allen & Brothers, this concern is doing a 
very extensive business as dealers in hardware, 
paints, oils and other supplies in this general 
class, and they also do a vei-y considerable plumb- 
ing and heating business, holding a prominent 
position in their field in this section of the county. 
In the public life of the community Mr. Allen is 
deeply interested, and always stands ready to do 
his part in every movement which tends towards 
the bettering of conditions in the town of which 
he is a resident. He is a member of the Clifton- 
dale Board of Trade, and fraternally holds mem- 
hership in William Sutton Lodge, Free and Ac- 



cepted Masons, in Henry J. Mills Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, and in Zebulon Council, Royal and 
Select Masters, and is also a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Allen married, in 1910, Grace M. Stone, of 
Vassalboro, Maine, daughter of Jonathan and 
Lillian (Holmes) Stone. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have 
four children: Donald S., born in September, 
1911; Norman S., bom in February, 1914; Roger 
Blaine, born in May, 1916; and Philip Pei-shing, 
bom in September, 1918. Mr. Allen has five 
brothers and two sisters. 



WILLIAM JAMES LEMUEL ROOP— It is in- 
teresting to note that the operations of the New 
England Sand & Gi-avel Company have been iden- 
tified by scientists to be in the original bed of the 
Ipswich river. Almost equally interesting is the 
method of extraction, the company employing 
rather unique methods for refining and commer- 
cializing the sand and gravel. William J. L. Roop, 
a civil engineer, is vice-president and general man- 
ager of the company, and it is the public opinion 
that a great part of the improvements and ef- 
ficiency of operation is due to his initiative and 
inventive ability. William J. L. Roop was bom in 
Norristown, Pennsylvana, February 13, 1891, son 
of William Reed and Barbara H. (Williams) Roop, 
his father bom in Germantown, Pennsylvania, his 
mother in Mansfield, Ohio. William R. Roop, a 
railroad engineer, died in 1920. 

William J. L. Roop was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Norristown, Drexel Institute of 
Philadelphia, and the International Correspondence 
School, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, primarily pui^ 
suing the study of civil engineering, later taking 
coui'ses in telephone engineering in night school, 
graduating in 1912. He entered the employ of the 
engineer of Montgomeiy county, Pennsylvania, and 
having had considerable experience gained by 
summer vacation work, Mr. Roop soon won pro- 
motion to the position of assistant engineer. De- 
sirous of gaining training in business methods, he 
resigned his promotion as assistant engineer, and 
became an employe of the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany, of Pennsylvania, as a draftsman in the 
plant engineering department, and with that com- 
pany and plant rapidly rose through successive 
promotions to chief draftsman, specification writer, 
and district engineer. But he was ambitious for 
further experience and in accepting the position 
as superintendent of a dredging and construction 
company of Philadelphia, he entered a difficult and 
comparatively new field of engineering, but he 
met the demands made upon him and advanced to 
the position of chief engineer. 

During the war period 1917-18, he was identi- 
fied with important constructive work under the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, and the ordnance 
department. Later he opened private offices in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as consulting and in- 
vestigating engineer, so continuing until his ac- 
ceptance of the position of general manager of the 
New England Sand & Gravel Company. In 1921 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



251 



has was advanced to fm-ther responsibility by 
election to the office of vice-president of the com- 
pany which was organized and incorporated in 
1915. Mr. Roop's professional club is the Engi 
neers' of Philadelphia, and he has numerous other 
affiliations. He is a member of Sigma Phi of 
Norristown High School, Pennsylvania; F. A. F. 
N., an exclusive secret society of Non-istown; 
Alpha Phi, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Beta 
Chapter Omicron Delta, of Melrose, Massachu- 
setts; is a thirty-second degi-ee member of the 
Masonic order, a noble of Aleppo Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of 
Boston, and a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. His social clubs are: the Salem, 
of Salem; the Boston Athletic and the Vesper 
Country, of Lowell, Massachusetts. 

In 1914 Mr. Roop married, in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, Martha M. Morehead, of that city, 
daughter of Gustavus and Mai'cella (Andrews) 
Morehead; her father, of a Virginia family, died in 
1913, her mother, a Philadelphian, died in 1914. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roop are the parents of two chil- 
dren: Martha Jane, bom in March, 1917, William 
Reed (2), born in November, 1920. The family 
home is in Melrose, Massachusetts. 



FRED L. MOSHER, prominent among the 
younger successful business men of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, is a son of Lewis M. and Nellie 
(Pinnette) Mosher. 

After completing his education, he learned the 
business of electrical contractor, and engaged in 
this line of work on his own account, in 1911, 
continuing successfully until his enlistment in the 
army in 1917. On his return to civilian life, in 
1919, Mr. Mosher took up the thread of his busi- 
ness, locating at No. 5 White street, Haverhill, 
and has added to his early success in the four 
years which have passed, employing on an aver- 
age eight men. Of an enteiijrising nature, Mr. 
Mosher has ever been watching for favorable 
business opportunities to enlarge his activities, and 
in 1920 became a partner in the Haverhill Top 
Lift Corporation, the other coi-porators being 
Chester Paul and Joseph Samson; eventually he 
purchased the interests of the latter two men and 
is now the sole owner of the thriving business. 
The plant covers 2500 feet of working space and 
seven men are employed. Mi-. Mosher is a mem- 
ber of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce; he 
was a member of Camp Utility, located at Camp 
Devens, where he remained for nineteen months, 
and was discharged, May 10, 1919, with the wai- 
rant of sergeant. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Knights of Columbus. He attends St. 
James Catholic Church, of Haverhill. 

In 1920, Mr. Mosher married Frances C. Fur- 
long, of Lowell, Massachusetts. 



was bom September 12, 1803, and died August 6, 
1881, and his mother, Hannah (Boden) Green, was 
born January 9, 1806, and died December 25, 
1896. 

Samuel Henderson Green was a salesman for a 
shoe finding house and also was engaged in manu- 
factming shoe counters and heels. He was well 
and favorably knovsTi in Lynn, where he passed 
his life and was always active in the public affairs 
of that city. His fraternal connections were with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he was 
a member of the Oxford Club. During his life- 
time he was a regular attendant of the Univer- 
salist church. 

Mr. Green's ancestry includes several distinguish- 
ed members, among them being his great-grand- 
father, who was the pilot of the ship cai-rying the 
Great Constitution into Marblehead; he was 
wounded and moved to his position at the 
steering wheel in a chair. 

Mr. Green married Mary A. Wardwell, bom at 
Swampscott, Massachusetts, October 31, 1854, 
daughter of Ezra Holt and Rosanna Story (Blan- 
chard) Wardwell. Ezra Holt Wardwell was bom 
in Lynn, July 10, 1827, and died January 24, 1882. 
His wife was bom in Lynn, September 16, 1831, 
and died October 21, 1882. The great-grandfather 
of PJrs. Green, Joseph Blaney, was upset in a boat 
by a shark and swallowed in Swampscott Harbor. 
He came from Blarney Castle, Ireland, the first 
Blaney families settling in Swampscott in a house 
built in 1641. Mrs. Green has a photogi-aph of 
this house. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Green: 1. 
Arthur Wardwell, born in Lynn, September 8, 
1874, is a practicing dentist, at present in govern- 
ment service in Washington, D. C. He served in 
the Spanish-American War and also went to the 
Me.xican Border in 1916. During the World War 
he was in France, and was commissioned cap- 
tain. 2. Jennie, born in Lynn, March 9, 1878, mar- 
ried Arthur G. Stern, bom in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, December 19, 1876, jeweler in Lynn. 

Mrs. Green has three grandchildren two, the 
son and daughter of Arthur W. Green, namely: 
Arthur H. Green, born in Ljmn, January 29, 1906, 
and Marion Wardwell Green, born January 25, 
1908. The only child of Mrs. Jennie (Green) Stern 
is Henderson Arthur Stem, born November 28, 
1916. 



SAMUEL HENDERSON GREEN, for many 
years engaged in the shoe industry in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, was bom there October 24, 1850, and 
died July 20, 1900. His father, Samuel H. Green, 



COLIN DUNLOPE KERR— In various branches 
of industrial and business activity the name of 
Kerr has for many years been identified with the 
history of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Father and 
son, since 1868, have been prominent in tliis city, 
Colin Dunlope KeiT, the father, having come to 
this country from Scotland prior to that date, and 
Albert L. Kerr, the son, (see sketch following) 
having been a leader in insurance circles for the 
past decade. 

Colin Dunlope Kerr was bom in Renfrewshire, 
Scotland, on June 22, 1846. The family removing 
to Glasgow in his childhood, it was there that he 
received his education in the public schools. After 



252 



ESSEX COUNTY 



completing his studies he worked at the Kerr SUk 
Worsted Mill, in Glasgow, Scotland, remaining 
there until 1865, when he came to the United 
States. Locating in Dover, New Hampshire, he 
remained there for a period of three years, then, 
in 1868, came to Lawrence, Massachusetts. Here, 
in association with a brother, Peter Kerr, Mr. Kerr 
went into the painting business, under the firm 
name of Peter Kerr & Company. The brother, 
Peter, retired from the concern in 1870, and from 
that time on Cohn D. Ken* conducted the busi- 
ness alone, until his retirement in 1910. In 1878 
Mr. Kerr took the contract for the painting of the 
shoe machinery made by the McKay Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, of Lawi-ence, and was with this 
concern during the remainder of his active busi- 
ness career, a period of service covering thirty- 
two years. 

During his long residence and business activity 
in Lawrence, Mr. Kerr has become widely known 
in many branches of public interest. In 1888 he 
became a shareholder and also a director in tiU 
Lawrence Co-operative Bank. He has been chair- 
man of the Security Committee of that institu- 
tion for many years; a number of years aero h? 
was elected vice-president of this bank, and later, 
president, which office he now ably fills. He has 
been treasurer of the United Presbyterian Church 
of LavvTence since 1898. 

Mr. Kerr is a charter member of the Lawa-once 
Caledonian Club, and at present the member of 
longest standing in that organization. He served 
for three years as chief of the club, and has 
since been its treasurer. He is a member of Tus- 
can Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. 

On October 25, 1872, Mr. Ken- mamed Jennie 
Hamilton, and tliey are the parents of two sons 
and two daughters: 1. James A., now a resident 
of Providence, Rhode Island. 2. Albert L., a sketch 
of whom follows. 3. Mrs. Charles A. Robinson, of 
Lowell. 4. Mrs. William R. Smith, of Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 



ALBERT L. KERR, second son of Colin Dun- 
lope Kerr (see preceding sketch) was bom in 
La\vrence, Massachusetts, on December 28, 1880. 
He received a thoroughly practical education in 
the schools of Lavin-ence, first attending the public 
schools, and then the high school, and later taking 
a course at the Manual Training School. With 
this preparation in 1900, he began the work of 
machine designer, starting as draftsman with the 
Brown & Sharpe Company, of Providence, Rhode 
Island, one of the leading machinery manufacturing 
concerns in America. The young man's future 
was most promising in this field, but in 1911 he 
was induced to make a radical change in his line 
of endeavor. Entering the insurance business at 
that time in Lawrence, Mr. Kerr has achieved 
marked success, and is now district manager of the 
New England Mutual Insurance Company in this 
district. 

Mr. Kerr is a member of the Lawrence Life 
UnderAvriters' Association, and also of the Boston 



Underwriters' Association, and is an influential 
member of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. 
In public life Mr. Kerr is steadily gaining promi- 
nence, and his ability and standing were recog- 
nized at the last city election by placing him in the 
State Legislature as representative of the city of 
Lawrence. 

Fraternally, Albert L. Kerr is widely known. 
He is a member of William B. Gale Lodge, No. 
140, Knights of Pythias, of Lawrence; of Enteir 
prise Lodge, No. 22, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Pawtucket, Rhode Island; and of 
Phoenician Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Lawrence. He is a popular member of the Law- 
rence Caledonian Club. 

Albert L. Kerr married, on November 5, 1907, 
at Newpoi't, Rhode Island, Jennie Burford, of 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and they have two chil- 
dren: Colin H. and Albert L., Jr. The family at- 
tend the services of the Presbyterian church. 



REV. JAMES THOMAS O'REILLY, since 1886 
pastor of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, was born at Lansingburg, 
New York, May 1, 1851, son of Edward and Mary 
(McGrane) O'Reilly. After completing the ad- 
vanced courses of study at St. Mary's Academy, 
Troy, New York, he entered Villanova College, 
Villnnova, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, whence 
he was graduated, class of 1871. He studied the- 
ologj^ became a member of the Order of St. 
Augustine, and on March 15, 1874, was ordained 
to the priesthood of the Roman Catholic church. 

Father O'Reilly was an insti-uctor at Villanova 
College, 1874-76; procurator of the college in 1876; 
pastor of St. Denis' Church, West Haverford, 
Pennsylvania, 1876-79; pastor of St. John's Church, 
Schaghticoke, New York, 1879-1886; pastor of St. 
Mary's Church, Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1886 
until the present (1922) his parish within the 
limits of the archdiocese of Boston. Father 
O'Reilly is president of the Catholic Total Absti- 
nence Union, and deeply beloved in the parish 
which he has served continuously for thirty-six 
years, 1886-1922. 



WILLIAM B. LITTLEFIELD— For many years 
active in the industrial world of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, William B. Littlefield retired from all par- 
ticipation in business twenty years before his 
death, wliich occurred on May 4, 1921. 

Mr. Littlefield was a son of Horace and Dorcas 
(Shorey) Littlefield. Horace Littlefield was a 
prominent wheelwright of Wells, Maine, in his 
younger days, later also carrying on extensive 
farming operations there. Both he and his wife 
were of Maine birth. He died about 1897, aged 
eighty-five years, when his son William B. was 
aDout fifteen years of age. 

William B. Littlefield was bom in Wells, Maine, 
on the homestead farm, which he owned at the 
time of his death. He received a practical edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native town, 
and with that foundation built his later success. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



253 



Coming to Lynn at the age of eighteen years, he 
entered the employ of J. N. Buffum, on Union 
street, then a small box manufacturing establish- 
ment, also dealing in lumber. For eight years 
the young man worked for this firm, gaining a 
practical knowledge of the business. He then en- 
tered into a partnership with Mr. Buifum, the 
arrangement continuing for six years. At the end 
of that time Mr. Littlefield bought out his part- 
ner, and became sole owner of the business. He 
formed a partnership with Mr. George H. Plum- 
mer, and the business was carried on for manr 
years as Littlefield & Plummer, and later Little- 
field & Plummer Corporation. They greatly en- 
larged its scope, and built a large new structure 
for the accommodation. They took up the manu- 
facture of paper boxes as well as wood, and even- 
tually employed one hundred and fifty hands. 
Eighteen or twenty years before his death Mr. 
Littlefield and Mr. Plummer both retired from 
active participation in the business, leaving it to 
the younger partners, and the business is now car- 
ried on as Littlefield & Moulton. 

In the financial world of Lynn, Mr. Littlefield 
was prominent for thirty years. He was one of 
the organizers of the Manufacturei-s' National 
Bank of Lynn, and at its organization in 1891, was 
elected vice-president. Upon the death of the 
first president, he was elected president of the 
uistitution, which office he ably filled until a short 
time ago. In fraternal circles in Lynn, Mr. Little- 
field was well known. He was a member of the 
Bay State Lodge, No. 40, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, also of Palestine Encampment. He 
was a member of the Park Club, and of the Ox- 
ford Club, both Lynn organizations. Politically he 
was a supporter of the Republican party, and wa^ 
prominent in Republican aifairs in Lynn, but al- 
ways consistently declined political preferment 

He married (first) Susan A. Gitchell. of V/elN 
Mame, and (second) Horatia A. Littlefield, of 
North Berwick, Maine, who survives him. 

WILLIAM E. BIDDLE, prominent business man 
and manufacturer of Amesbury, Massachusetts, 
was born there Januaiy 1, 1883, son of William 
E. and Zelma F. (Hodgkins) Biddle. He was 
educated m the public schools, the Phillips Exeter 
Academy and Harvard University, for two years a 
member of the class of 1905. He then became as- 
sociated vnth his father in manufacturing car- 
nage parts and building carriage bodies. Mr. Bid- 
die diligently applied himself to the mastering of 
the business, and as the years passed was able to 
resume greater responsibilities; in 1906, he be- 
came vice-president, and in 1908 president and 
general manager, now being in complete charge 
or affairs. He has also interested himself in sev- 
eral other business firms, being a partner of the 
Amesbury Brass & Foundry Company; treasurer 
of the Colchester Mill Company; trustee of the 
Provident Institute of Savings; and director of the 
Powow River National Bank. Mr. Biddle is al- 
ways to be found foremost in any movement that 



tends towards the general welfare; he was a mem- 
ber of the Liberty Loan Committee during tha 
World War, and chairman of Amesbury Branch 
of the Red Cross. Mr. Biddle is a member of 
the Amesbury Club; the Ould Newbui-y Golf Club; 
the Oldtown Country Club, the Harvard clubs of 
Boston and New York, the Menimack Valley 
Country Club, the Powder House Hill Country 
Club, and the Detroit Athletic Club. 

He married, April 25, 1906, Grace Webster 
Goodwin, daughter of George and Frances (Web- 
ster) Goodwin, and their children are: William 
E. Jr., bom March 1, 1907, and Frances, born 
June 6, 1909. The family attend St. James Epis- 
copal Church. 



FRANK M. ALLEY— For thirty-five years a 
leading undertaker in Lynn, Massachusetts, Frank 
M. Alley perfoi-med well and faithfully a duty 
of especial significance to the community, and in 
his passing, the work which had so long been en- 
trusted to him was lain down for other hands to 
take up. 

Mr. Alley was bom in Lynn, January 10, 1837, 
in a house which then stood at the point where 
Mount Pleasant street intersects with Essex street 
today. He was a son of John (4) Alley, who 
was a native of Haverhill, and Susan D., his wife, 
who was born in Marblehead. 

Receiving his education in liis native city, Mr. 
Alley was scarcely well launched upon his career 
before the breaking out of the Civil War called 
the young men of the day to the colors. He en- 
listed eagerly at the first call, and was a member 
of the Twenty-third Regiment, Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, serving throughout the period of 
the war, and even beyond, not being mustered out 
until July, 1865. Almost immediately after his en- 
listment, he was assigned to the Hospital Corps, 
and his usefulness there was so marked that he 
was retained in that branch of the service as 
assistant to the surgeons. 

Upon his return to Lynn after the war, Mr. 
Alley entered the shoe industry, but continued in 
this line of effort only until he had completed the 
necessary technical studies to qualify for the pro- 
fession of undertaking. He soon received his cei- 
tificate, and for thirty-five years was engaged 
actively in tliis work, commanding a very large 
patronage. 

Nineteen years before his death, Mr. Alley re- 
tired from active business, but continued in- 
terested in fraternal and benevolent activities. He 
was a member of General Lander Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, and of Mount Carmel 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, holding the 
thirty-second degree in that order. He was a 
member of the Masonic order for more than 
fifty years, and had been the recipient of the 
Henry Price Medal a short time before his death, 
in honor of his half century of membership, be- 
ing one of the few m.en in this city to possess 
that distinction. He was a member of Bay State 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 



254 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Mystic Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
He joined the Odd Fellows in 1868. 

Mr. Alley died at about six o'clock on the 
morning of December 28, 1920, at his residence 
at No. 10 Lincoln street, where he had lived for 
about thirty-eight years. The immediate cause of 
his death was heart trouble, but his age being 
nearly eighty-four years, lus sti-ength had been 
gradually failing for some time. 

Mr. Alley was sui-vived by his wife, Mary A. 
Alley, and a sister, Mrs. Louis Granger, of Lynn. 



THOMAS HENRY O'SHEA, who stood high in 
the banking world of Salem, Massachusetts, broad- 
ly interested in every branch of public endeavor 
and philanthropy, was a representative of a large 
group of citizens of Essex county, Massachusetts. 
Mr. O'Shea was born in North Salem, April 8, 
1867, a son of Martin and Catherine (Bums) 
O'Shea. Martin O'Shea was one of the solid cit- 
izens of Essex county, Massachusetts, of Irish 
extraction, and by occupation an engineer. 

Receiving a practical education in the public 
schools of Peabody, Thomas Heni-y O'Shea through 
all his career looked toward the future of the city 
of Salem, in whose institutions he took the deep- 
est interest. He was a director of the Nauinkeag 
Trust Company, and was vice-president and direc- 
tor of the Wanen National Bank. The former in- 
stitution, one of the leading financial organizations 
of Salem, benefitted by the sound judgment and 
progressive mind of Mr. O'Shea, and in the latter 
institution, in Peabody, he was one of the mov- 
ing spirits. He was a trustee of the J. B. Thomas 
Hospital and a liberal contributor to its support. 

During the World War, Mr. O'Shea gave very 
generously to all drives and all movements in sup- 
port of the American Expeditionary Forces. He 
also gave the Red Cross an office in one of the 
O'Shea buildings, rent free, during the period of 
the war and for nearly a year thereafter. Fra- 
ternally and in a social way, Mr. O'Shea was 
widely known. He was a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, and of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. He was also a member of 
the Salem Club, and of the Charitable Irish Society 
of Boston. 

On November 28, 1894, Mr. O'Shea married, at 
Peabody, Catherine Teresa Hayes, daughter of 
John J. and Mary (Mahoney) Hayes. Mr. and 
Mrs. O'Shea were the parents of two children: 
Thomas Joseph, born August .5, 1897; Catherine 
Mane, bom June 15, 1902. The family are mem- 
bers of St. John's Catholic Church. 



WILLIAM E. ARNOLD, partner in the Haver- 
hill firm of Arnold & Burke, garage owners, was 
bom in Nova Scotia, Canada, January 11, 1900, 
son of John E. and Bessie (Lane) Amold, who 
were both of that province of the Dominion of 
Canada. 

The Arnold family moved into the United States 
not long after the birth of William E., and for 



many years have lived in Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
where the father, John E. Arnold, is connected 
with the shoe manufacturing industry. It was in 
Haverhill that William E. Amold was educated, 
and in the vicinity he has worked since leaving 
school. For four years after leaving school he 
was in the employ of J. Ellison, and then went 
into business for himself, trading under his own 
name at No. 52 Main street, Bradford, Massachu- 
setts, and developing a satisfactory trucking busi- 
ness. Later, however, he entered into business 
partnership with Mr. Bui-ke, and the two now 
have a promising garage and automobile repair 
business in Haverhill, their gai-age and repaii* 
shop being situated at No. 225 River street. 
Mr. Arnold is showing definite enterprise and alert 
activity. 



RALPH M. DAWLEY— Undoubtedly traveling 
broadens the mind. So much is evident in the 
case of Ralph M. Dawley, of Newbui-yport, Massa- 
chusetts. He is a man with a broad observing 
mind, and a keen intellect, notwithstanding that 
his academic education apparently ended when he 
was only nine years old. His world-wide travel 
began then, and has been continued intermittently 
until quite recently. He has landed in vei-y many 
countines, as may be imagined when it is known 
that he has traveled around the world three 
times. 

Ralph M. Dawley was born in Sand Lake, Mich- 
igan, on July 20, 1879, son of John and Sarah 
(Mosher) Dawley. His mother was of Sand Lake, 
Michigan, and died in 1919, a year before the death 
of his father, who was a cattle dealer, and origi- 
nally of Oswego, New York. Ralph M. was one 
of the six children, three sons and three daughters, 
born to his parents. His early life was spent in 
his native place in Michigan, but he was evi- 
dently of adventurous spirit, for he was only nine 
years old when he cast aside his school books and 
ventured on the long, long trip across the Atlantic 
Ocean to England, the voyage being all the more 
venturesome by being made on a cattle boat. 
When in England, his adventurous spirit drew him 
into the ranks of the British anny, in which he 
enlisted as a drummer boy, and served as such 
for tliree years and two months. He then re- 
turned to the United States, and later made one 
trip to France, enlisting upon his return in the 
Thirty-third Michigan Volunteer Regiment, raised 
for war service against Spain. With that regi- 
ment he went on active service to Cuba, and 
after the pacification of that island and the return 
of his regiment to the United States, he enlisted 
in the Regular ai-my, being commissioned a sec- 
ond lieutenant of infantry and ordered to do duty 
with the Third United States Infantry. He was 
honorably discharged in 1902, after the Philippine 
and Porto Rican troubles were over. Soon after- 
wards, he found civil employment in the Schenec- 
tady plant of the General Electric Company. 
Later, he was sent to Brazil by the General Elec- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



255 



trie Machine Company. He returned along the 
Pacific Ocean, landing at San Francisco, California, 
traveling overland to New York City. A man of 
distinct versatility, and with an aptitude for me- 
chanics, he spent the period, 1904-08, in the auto- 
mobile trade, but in the latter year veered to aero- 
planes. He became connected with the Curtiss 
Aeroplane Company, and by that firm was sent to 
Singapore, Malay Straits, and India, with the 
hydroplane, the "Nancy Bess." In 1910 he re- 
turned to the United States, and for the next two 
years was with the Thomas Auto Company, as 
tester. The next four or five years were passed 
in the employ of various concerns, but soon after 
the United States entered the World War, in 
1917, Mr. Dawley again cast aside civil affairs 
and enlisted for war service. He enlisted in the 
United States navy, as aviation instructor, and was 
assigned for duty at Squantum Field, later being 
at Norfolk, Virginia. At the end of the war, Mr. 
Dawley had the rating of chief petty officer. 
After re-entering civil life, he came to Newbury- 
port, and has since been the manager of the 
garage owned by Hannah Gillis. His knowledge of 
autos and his business ability are evident in the 
development of that garage business since he has 
been manager of it, it being today one of the 
most complete and up-to-date in the city of New- 
buryport. Mr. Dawley has also a garage business 
of his own at Salisbury Beach, and expects to do 
well there. He has rapidly made friends in New- 
buryport and vicinity. Mr. Dawley is a member 
of the Independent Order of Foresters, and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

Mr. Dawley was mamed, in 1904, to Edna 
Convercise, daughter of Samuel and Sarah E 
(Gardiner) Convercise, of Troy, New York Sam- 
uel Convercise died in 1889. 



Father De Bern is an honorary member of the 
Knights of Columbus, being formerly chaplain of 
the local organization, and is a member of many 
organizations for the civic and social betterment 
of the community. During the recent period of 
war with Gennany, he was most active in the 
support of the cause of the Allies, and intimately 
connected with the different movements having for 
their object the welfare of the men in the ser- 
vice. 

Life holds no more beautiful relationship than 
that v/hich a Catholic priest bears to his people 
and his people bear to him. He is one who never 
falters, whose helping hand is never withdrawn, 
whose patience is without end, and whose heart 
is ever true. For through sunshine and rain, 
through happiness and disaster, through peace 
and war, through virtue and misery, come what 
will within the range of human experience, in its 
midst you will find the priest toiling not for him- 
self, but for those he loves and for whom he 
stands ready to die so they may have happiness 
both here and hereafter. This is the type of 
priest, this is the manner of friend, this is the 
kind of pastor Father De Bern is to all with whom 
he comes in contact; a noble man, full of courage, 
zeal, and devotion, with deep and abiding re- 
ligious faith. 



REV F. FRANCIS V. De BEM-As pastor of 
Our Lady of Good Voyage, one of the most promi- 
nent Ivoman Catholic parishes in the city of Glou- 
cester Massachusetts, Rev. F. Francis V. DeBem is 
well known as a zealous, learned and eloouent 
dmne, and a public-spirited citizen 

F. Francis V. DeBem was bom in Boston, 
Massachusetts, November 5, 1867. When he was 
but one year old he was taken by his parents to 
I'aya Island, the Azores, and there he obtained 
tus elementary education, after which he entered 
the seminary of the Island of Terceira, where he 
took a lyceum scientific course and was ordained 
pnest m September, 1890, at the seminary by the 

fson r- '■''"''' ^'^''"^ S°"=^^- On December 1, 
18J0, he came to Gloucester to the original parish 
^th Archbishop Williams. Here he supervised 
the budding of a wooden structure, which was 

tS't'o' '"'r ': ''''■ ""''' Father'DeBem con 
tinned to conduct services until February 20 1914 
when the building was destroyed bj fire after 
Which upon the same site, he supervised the build- 
of th. l^T church and has continued as rector 
of the pansh up to the present time. 



JOSEPH EBEN BODWELL— There are names 
which fittingly find a place in the permanent rec- 
ords of any city, and in Lynn, Massachusetts, one 
of these names is Joseph Eben Bodwell, whose 
influence upon the real estate market of the pass- 
ing generation was constructive to an unusual 
degree. 

Joseph E. Bodwell was born in Reading, Massa- 
chusetts. His parents removing to Lynn when he 
was a child of five years, it was here that the 
boy received his education, which was limited to 
the common school course at the Burkett School, 
from which he was graduated. As a young man 
the lure of the sea called him, and he sliipped on 
the merchant marine, his initial trip being to India. 
He followed the sea for eight or ten years, retir- 
ing as first officer of the "Prince George," of the 
Dominion Atlantic railroad. Returning thereafter 
to Lynn, he entered the real estate field in this 
city, and was active in tliis business until his 
death, which occurred in March, 1917. He was 
very successful, from his standpoint, as an in- 
dividual operator, but will longest be remember- 
ed for his participation in a movement wliich is 
still fruitful of great good to the real estate busi- 
ness in this vicinity, and through it to the pub- 
lic in general. Mr. Bodwell early became affili- 
ated with other real estate dealers in Lynn, form- 
ing the Real Estate Exchange of Lynn, which still 
exists, largely devoted to its original purposes in 
the Lynn Exchange of the present day. This or- 
ganization of progressive business men meets for 
conference on general real estate topics and their 
relation to the community-at-large. 



256 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Mr. Bodwell was a member of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, of the Woodmen of the World, 
and of the Knights of Pythias. He never lost his 
fondness for the sea, and held membership in the 
Lynn Yacht Club until his death, taking the 
keenest delight in an occasional sail. He attended 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Lynn. 

Mr. Bodwell married Fannie E. Smyth, and they 
were the parents of one son, Frederick E., now a 
prominent real estate man in this city. 



FRED RUPERT CAMPBELL, an ente:-prising 
manufacturer of Lynn, and prominent in fratei-nal 
circles, is broadly active in the progress of the 
city. He was born in Lynn, December 6, 1878, a 
son of Edward Thomas and Augusta J. (Oakes) 
Campbell, for many years residents of this city. 
Gaining his education in the public schools of 
the city, Mr. Campbell, in association with his 
brother, Charles Edward Campbell, whose life is 
reviewed elsewhere in this work, has reached a 
prominent position among electrical manufacturers 
in this part of the State. The business was for- 
merly located on Central square, and for a time 
embraced a retail store, dealing in electrical sup- 
plies of every kind. Twice selling out, the second 
time to the General Electric Company, the business 
was removed to Stewart street, absorbing the busi- 
ness of Charles E. Howard in 1915, and in 1916 
the fine new building of the Campbell Electric 
Company was erected and equipped for the special 
line of work tumed out. This consists of X-ray 
equipment, such as is used in hospitals and by 
physicians, many varieties of electrical equipments, 
transformers and automatic switching devices. 
This business is one of the successful interests in 
its field in this section. In addition to holding an 
interest in this business, Mr. Campbell is treasurer 
of the X-ray Foot-0-Scope Corporation, and active 
in its management. He is also a director of the 
State National Bank, of Lynn, and of the Lynn 
Morris Plan Company, and is a member of the 
Lynn Chamber of Commerce. 

Fraternally Mr. Campbell is a member of the 
Golden Fleece Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
of Sutton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; of Olivet 
Commandery, Knights Templar; and is also a 
member of the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of Peter 
Woodland Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and of Lynn 
Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He attends the Episcopal church. 

On November 24, 1904, Mr. Campbell married 
Amy E. Fletcher, daughter of Nathan B. and 
Emily Clapp (Lewis) Fletcher. Mr. and Mrs. 
Campbell have two daughters: Doris Evelyn, born 
November 18, 190.5; and Ruth Fletcher, bom De- 
cember 25, 1913. 



electrical devices of especial significance to the 
public. 

Mr. Campbell was bom in Lynn, January 11, 
1881, and is a son of Edward T. and Augusta J. 
(Oakes) Campbell. After completing the course 
of the public schools of his native city, Mr. 
Campbell was employed in a shoe faatory for a 
short time, then went to Boston and Medford, 
doing experimental work on telephones. Follow- 
ing this line of activity for about three years, 
he then opened a small shop in Lynn, and did 
electrical work on a very modest scale. By con- 
stant effort he increased the business materially, 
and in 1900 opened a larger shop at No. 54 Cen- 
tral square, his plant first being in the basement, 
then on the top floor of the building, eventually 
expanding to fill the entire top floor. In 1906 Mr. 
Campbell added to his interests by opening a 
retail store, handling electrical supplies of all 
kinds, and this continued until 1909, when he sold 
out his entire business and made a fresh start, 
this time locating in the Fabian building on Union 
street. There he manufactured incandescent lamps 
and x-ray tubes for about three years, when he 
sold out to the General Electric Company. Re- 
moving to Stewart street, he still continued in 
the manufacturing branch of the business, and in 
1915 purchased the business of Charles E. Howard, 
one year later erecting the Campbell Electric 
building, his present fine structure, equipping it in 
the most modem and approved manner. Here 
he specializes in the manufacture of x-ray equip- 
ment for the use of hospitals and physicians, 
electrical equipments, transformers, and automatic 
switcliing devices. He is doing a constantly in- 
creased business, and is one of the successful 
men in this field in Essex county. His brother, 
Fred R. Campbell, has long been associated with 
him. (q.v.) 

Mr. Campbell is a member of the Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons and of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He is a member of the 
Rotary Club, and attends the Episcopal Church 
of the Incarnation. In 1909 Mr. Campbell mar- 
ried Laura C. Chellis. 



CHARLES EDWARD CAMPBELI^-Achieving 
success entirely by his own efforts, Charles E. 
Campbell, of Lynn, now conducts an impoi-tant 
business in the manufacture of many different 



HARRY D. BUTTERFIELD— Part-owner of 
the Haverhill Service Station, Harry D. Butter- 
field and his brother, Frank W., are developing 
a good business in automobile service, supplies, 
and vulcanizing in their native city, Haverhill, 
Massachusetts. 

Harry D. Butterfield was bom in Haverhill on 
September 5, 1879, son of David L. and Abbie A. 
(Wells) Butterfield, the former originally of West 
Sumner, Maine, and the latter of Wells, same 
State. David L. Butterfield was connected with 
the shoe manufacturing industry. He died in 1912, 
having lived the greater part of his business life 
in Haverhill, in which city his son, Harry D., 
received the whole of his schooling, which con- 
tinued until he was twenty years old. He passed 
through the high school, graduating with the class 




<^^^^^ifyL^^^ ^ . C-^^ 



^Z'-t-^f-x. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



257 



of 1899. Soon, thereafter, he found employment 
with the Electric Railroad Company. For six short 
periods he sei-ved that public service coi-pora- 
tion, and then for shoi-t periods worked for vari- 
ous local concerns connected \vith the automobile 
industry. He became expert in auto repairing. 
However, for three years, he worked in the shoe 
factories of F. M. Hodgson and L. M. Dudley, 
leaving the employ of the last-named in order 
to join his brother, Frank W, in an independent 
enterprise. They purchased the automobile busi- 
ness of Baker & Wells, on Winter street, Haver- 
hill, and at once foi-med the trading partnership 
known as the Haverhill Sei-vice Station. They 
also entered extensively into trading in tires and 
automobile accessories, and soon had considerable 
vulcanizing work at their plant. Altogether, they 
have a satisfactory business, and are active and 
enterpiising. 

The brothers are well known among the younger 
business men of Haverhill, Han-y D. being a mem- 
ber of the Haveriiill Chamber of Commerce. He 
does not belong to any of the fraternal orders, 
but is interested in the affairs of his home 
town. By religious belief he is a Universalist, 
and attends the local church of that denomina- 
tion. 

Mr. Butteriield married, in 1904. Bertha L. Cur- 
rier, of Haverhill, daughter of Castanas and Har- 
riett (Pearson) Cuii-ier, the latter of a Haverhill 
family. Castanas Currier was of Natick, Massa- 
chusetts, a baker by trade, who died in 1911. 
Mr. and Mrs. Buttei-field have four children: 
Marion L., born in 1906; David C, bom in 1913: 
Robert W., born in 1917; and Fred C, bom in 
1920. 



dren, Florence Benjamin Trotter, who is now the 
wife of Lavsrence Perkins, and William W. Trot- 
ter, who was named for his paternal grand- 
father. 



CHARLES W. TROTTER was bom at Augusta, 
Maine, in April, 18.51, a son of WOliam and Mar- 
garet (Webber) Trotter. His father was an iron 
moulder. Mr. Trotter has two sisters, Caroline 
E. and Emma J. Trotter; and one brother, Fran- 
cis P. Trotter. 

Mr. Trotter received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Augusta. Like his father, he de- 
cided to become an iron moulder. From Augusta 
he moved to Meadville, Pennsylvania, v/here he 
worked at his trade. After spending some time 
at Meadville, however, he decided to return to 
his native State, and accordingly settled at Win- 
throp, Maine. In 1881 he became a resident of 
Salem, Massachusetts, where he lived until 1914. 
In 1914 he moved from Salem to Danvers, where 
he now lives. Mr. Trotter followed his trade for 
forty years, at the end of wliich time, in 1910, 
he retired. He attends the Maple Street Congre- 
gational Church, of which his wife is a member. 
He is a member of the Workmen's Association. 

Mr. Trotter married Caroline Richmond, of 
Winthrop, Maine. Mrs. Trotter is a daughter of 
George Z. and Ellen (Benjamin) Richmond. Her 
father was bom at Rockland, Maine. She was his 
only child. Mr. and Mrs. Trotter have two chil- 

ilsacx— 2— 17 



WILLIAM W. TROTTER — For years identified 
with the incandescent lamp industry in Danvers, 
and now an expert in his hne, William W. Trotter 
is also well known in many circles of activity in 
this vicinity. Mr. Trotter is a son of Charles W. 
Trotter, who was bom in Maine, in 1850, later 
coming to Salem, Massachusetts, where he fol- 
lowed the trade of iron moulding- He married 
Caroline Richmond, of Maine, and they had two 
children: Florence Benjamin, now Mrs. Lawrence 
Perkins, and William W., whose name heads this 
review. 

William W. Trotter was bom in Salem, Decem- 
ber 14, 1883. Gaining a practical education in the 
grammar and high schools of his native city, he 
entered the employ of the Boston & Maine rail- 
road, in the Salem freight office. Here he re- 
mained for a period of three years, thereafter 
becoming connected with the Bay State Lamp 
Company, now the Hygrade Lamp Company, where 
he remained for three years. Continuing in the 
lamp business permanently. Mr. Trotter was with 
several different manufacturers, each for a short 
period, then in 1913 became associated with the 
Atlantic Lamp Company, in which concern he is 
still a prominent executive. 

In the public service of Danvers. Mr. Trotter 
has been more or less active for a number of 
years, and in 1919 was elected to the town water 
board, still serving in tliis branch of activity- 
Fraternally he is a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons, and is also a member of the 
Masonic Club- He is a member of the Now-and- 
then Club, of Salem, and of the Homestead Golf 
Club. 

In 1914, Mr- Trotter married Viola Rundette, 
of Danvers. and they attend the Maple Street 
Congregational Church, of which Mr. Trotter is a 
trustee. 



WILLIAM DOOLEY POWERS— After his re- 
turn from the naval service of his country, which 
he entered a volunteer upon the declaration of a 
state of war between the United States and Ger- 
many, Mr. Powers resumed his trade of sign 
painting and in his native Lynn established the 
prosperous business which he conducts today 
(1922). under the firm name The Powers Com- 
pany. He is a son of William D. and Calverta 
(Van Tassel) Powers, his father of Maine birth 
and family (bom in Bath), his mother bom in 
Digby, Nova Scotia. After the removal of the 
family to Lynn. Massachusetts, Mr. Powers en- 
gaged in the express business until his passing in 
1909. 

William Dooley Powers was born in Lynn, May 
26, 1888, and was educated in Lynn public schools. 
After school days ended he was employed in Glen- 



258 



ESSEX COUNTY 



more, then for eighteen months was with the Lynn 
Record Holder Company. He sptnt the following 
four years connected with the printing trade, then 
spent six years as foreman at the plant of the 
General Electric Company, of East Boston. He 
gave up that position to form an association with 
J- N- Pike,, cigar manufacturer and dealer, con- 
tinued in that line for years, ending in li)13. He 
then entered the employ of his brother, who, with 
a Mr. Brown, was conducting a sign making busi- 
ness under the trade name Powers & Brown. For 
three years he remained with him. learning sign 
painting and designing, and became quite expert 
as a sign \\Titer, but the war with Germany in- 
terrupted his business career. 

Soon after the United States declared war 
against Germany, Mr. Powers enlisted in the 
United States navy, his service beginning May 
SO, 1917, and terminating with his honorable dis- 
charge March 15, 1910, ranking as chief petty 
officer. After his return from the navy he re- 
sumed sign painting, forming a partnership with 
George B. Polando, Jr.. and operating as Polando 
& Powers. Later that partnership was dissolved, 
Mr. Powers then becoming a partner with L. W. 
Anderson, they beginning their association as 
Anderson & Powers. A change was made, and 
under the firm narr.e The Powers Company, sigT. 
painters, at No. 10 Central avenue, Lynn, a large 
and prosperous sign painting business is conducted. 
The business of the company is the maldng of 
.signs and the designing of display advertising, a 
line they have developed to a high state of 
efficiency and success. Mr. Powers is a meiribev 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellov/--, and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of 
Lynn. His frank and open manner, cheerful and 
happy disposition has won him many friends, and 
he is very popular in the city which has been 
his life-time home. 

He man-ied, in 1921, Agnes Hennessy, daughter 
of William and Mary Hennessy, of Augusta. 
Maine. The family home which Mr. Powers has 
purchased is No. 60 Tudor street, Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts. 



ELMER O. PUTNAM v.-as born at Danvers. 
Mas.sachusetts, in the year 1872. His grandfather, 
Adrian Putnam, established a lumber mill and ice 
business in the year 1820. When he died, his son. 
O. F. Putnam, father of Elmer O. Putnam, ac- 
quired the property and managed it for fifty 
years. O. F. Putnam was bom at Danvers. He 
married Adeline Batchelder and had five children: 
George O-, who is now sixty-two years old; Lucy 
F., who is now sixty years old, a well knowTi 
school teacher; Elmer O., of whom further; Lil- 
lian B., wife of George Brown; Fannie, died 
aged twelve years. 

Elmer O. Putnam received his early education 
in the public schools of Massachusetts. After his 
graduation from high school, he entered his 
father's employment, and spent twenty-five years 



working in the lumber mill and ice factory which 
had been established by his grandfather. He 
was the proprietor of these properties at the 
time of his death. October 6, 1921. He was a 
member of the Maple Street Congregational 
Church. He belonged to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and to the Rebekahs. 

Mr. Putnam married Nettie M. Pitman. Mr. 
and Mrs. Putnam had four children: Otis F., bom 
in 1899; Lillian Francis, bom in 1905; Ruth and 
Robert E., twins, bom in 1913. 



EUGENE HORTON— The present active head 
of one of the very old business houses of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, is Eugene Horton, v/hose manage- 
ment of the hat and fur business of Amos B. 
Chase has placed that firm in the lead along this 
line in the city of Lynn. 

Eugene Horton was bom in Swampscott, Massa- 
cliusetts, on July 5, 1871, and is a son of George 
and Ellen Horton. After the death of his mother, 
which occun-ed while he was still a very young 
child, the boy was cared for by his grandmother. 
He received a thoroughly pi-actical education in 
the public schools of his native town, then, at the 
age of sixteen years, entered the business world 
in the employ of P. B. Mansfield & Company, 
then owners of the business with which Mr. Hor- 
ton has always been connected. This business was 
established in 1830 by Samuel Mansfield, father 
of P. B. Mansfield. Samuel Mansfield, the founder 
of the business, was a man of remarkable am- 
bition and physical endurance. He lived in Salem, 
and it was his custom to walk to and from his 
business in Lynn. The business passed out of 
the hands of the younger Mr. Mansfield, being 
purchased by Amos P. Chase. Since the death of 
Mr. Chase, which occurred two years ago, Mr. 
Hoi-ton has been the active head of the business, 
and will eventually assume full control. This 
house is an important one in their line, that of 
furriers and hatters. 

Mr. Horton is prominent outside his business- 
He is a well known member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and is a member 
of the Rotary Club, and of the Swampscott Club. 
He also is a member of the Masonic ordei", and 
a noble of Aleppo Temple. 

Mr- Horton married Miss E. A. Cleary of Lynn, 
Massachusetts. 



FREDERICK W. LIBBY — For more than 
twenty-five years Frederick W. Libby has been 
a building contractor in Amesbury, and creditable 
evidences of his ability as such are to be seen in 
many places in the district. He has had a good 
business, and a good lumber business in addition, 
and has necessarily become widely known. Fred- 
erick W. Libby was born in Gray. Maine, on 
March 1, 18G7, son of Charies E. and Elizabeth 
(Crocker) Libby- His father was of a Maine fam- 
ily, bom in Gray on April 2, 1835, but his mother 
■was born in Nova Scotia, on November 15, 1839. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



259 



Both lived to venerable age, Charles E. Libby. who 
was a carpenter for the greater part of his life, 
reaching the age of eighty-five years, death not 
coming until 1920; and his wife died only three 
years earlier, in 1917. Both were esteemed by a 
wide circle of true friends. 

Their son, Frederick W. Libby, grew to man- 
hood in his native place. He was educated in the 
public schools of Gray, Maine, and after leaving 
school spent about two years in farming in his 
home. For the next three years he did well as a 
hauler, after which he associated with his father, 
thereby learning the trade of carpenter, and gain- 
ing a good knowledge of the building trade of 
cai-penter, and gaining a good knowledge of the 
building trade. Eventually, in 1888, he came to 
Amesbuiy, and for the next seven years was in 
the employ of Pike Bros., contractors of that 
place. In 1895 he was in a position to enter 
into business for himself. He did so in that 
year, and has ever since been in independent 
business. The name of F. W. Libby, builder and 
contractor, and dealer in lumber, is, and for long 
has been, well known in the district- Mr. Libby 
is a Republican, but does not appear to have 
keenly followed politics. At all events, he has not 
taken public office, which his standing in the 
community might have gained for him had he 
been so disposed. His church is the Baptist, and 
he has been a member of the Amesbury church 
for many years. 

He married (first), in 1888, Grace Hamilton, of 
North Yarmouth, Maine. She was born in May, 
1868, and died in 1903. In 1906, Mr. Libby mai- 
ried (second), Grace G. Dow, of Salisbury, Massa- 
chusetts. She was born on January 14, 1883. Mr. 
Libby has four children, all born to his first 
wife, they are: Harvey P., bora on September 11. 
1889; Frederick Urban, bom November 22, 1892; 
Preble Hamilton, born in October, 1895; and Wal- 
ter Fred, bom March 1, 1899. 



...WILLIAM F. FLYNN— The Flynn Coal Com- 
pany of Salem, Massachusetts, was founded by 
Maurice E. and William F. Flynn, sons of Maurice 
and Anna (Joyce) Flynn, both bom in Ireland. 
Maurice Flynn came to the United States in 
youthful manhood, and settled in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, where he became a foreman of city em- 
ployees. He died in Salem, March 28, 1893. He 
manned Anna Joyce, who came from Ireland to 
the United States in girlhood and spent most of 
her life in Salem, where she died in 1885. 

William F. Flynn was bom in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, January 20, 1877, and was there edu- 
cated in the public schools. After leaving school 
he secured employment in a shoe factory and there 
continued until 1910, when, with his brother, 
Maurice E., he founded the Flynn Coal Company, 
of Salem, Massachusetts, and is conducting a 
prosperous business. 

The brothers are members of the New England 
Coal Dealers' Association, and both are communi- 



cants of the Church of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion of Salem; the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; Fraternal Order of Eagles; Cath- 
olic Order of Foresters; Washington Associates, 
and Father Mathew Total Abstinence and Benevol- 
ent Society. They are good business men, and 
very popular in the city in which their lives have 
been spent. 



HORACE MARTIN SALKINS— For many years 
active in the shoe industry in Essex county, Massa- 
chusetts, and latterly turning his business experi- 
ence and ability to good account in the automobile 
sei-vice business, Horace Martin Salkins is truly 
representative of the energetic American business 
man. Mr. Salkins is a son of James Young and 
Mary Hanley (High) Salldns, of Marblehead. 
James Y. Salkins was bom in West Newbury, 
Massachusetts, and came to Marblehead when he 
was a boy. He became a fisherman, and for many 
years fished the grand banks. He died in 1919- 
The mother died two years previously. 

Horace Martin Salkins was bom in Marblehe". \ 
on December 20, 1875, and received his education 
in the public schools of the town. He was inter- 
ested in a business life, and upon his completion 
of the school course, entered the shoe business as 
a jobber, continuing along this line for about 
twenty-five years. At the end of that time he 
made a radical change in his field of effort, en- 
tering the automobile business as manager of the 
State Street Garage, of Marblehead. In this ex- 
acting position Mr. Salkins is more than success- 
ful. He is placing this business at the head in 
its Une, and is being recognized as one of the 
sig-nificant figures in the business world of Marble- 
head of today. Mr. Salkins is a member of the 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Independent 
Order of Odd P^ellows. He is a member of St. 
Michael's Episcopal Church. 

In 1906 Mr. Salkins married Martha Redding 
Goss, of Marblehead, daughter of George S- and 
Etta (^yLlkins) Goss, of this place. Mr. Goss 
was for many years a prominent grocer of Marble- 
head, but died in 1911. 



OWEN H. DALEY, partner in the automobile 
supply business conducted under the trading name 
of the Haverhill Tire Shop, was born in Saugus, 
Massachusetts, but has spent the greater part of 
his life in Haverhill. He was born on August 
13, 1864, but was still in infancy when the family 
took up residence in Haverhill, and the whole of 
his schooling was obtained in the public schools 
of that city. His parents, Owen and Rose (Mc- 
Cabe) Daley, who both were boi-n in County 
Armagh, Ireland, became American citizens, 
though his father, who became connected with the 
Massachusetts shoe industi-y, died in 1886, in 
Haverhill. His mother is still living. 

After leaving school, Owen H. Daley decided to 
enter a shoe factory. His first employers were 
Messrs. Field and Thayer, of Haverhill, but sub- 



260 



ESSEX COUNTY 



sequently he was, for short periods, connected 
with several local concerns at different times. 
Eventually, however, he entered the employ of the 
R. A. Splain Company, of Haverhill, that company 
doing perhaps the largest mail order business in 
spirituous liquors in New England. Daley served 
that company for twenty years. In 1920, however, 
he took up another line, and with a friend, Mr. 
J. H. Cleary, bought Mr. Langelim's automobile 
supply business in Haverhill, and then formed the 
Haverhill Tire Shop Company to conduct and 
expand it. They have a good business in auto 
tires, make a specialty of Ford parts, carry a 
general line of accessories and supplies, and main- 
tain an efficient service station. Mr. Daley is a 
Roman Catholic by religious belief; he is a mem- 
ber of the local chapter of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, and has for many years been identified with 
the Ancient Order of Hibernians. He also be- 
longs to the Loyal Order of Moose, and to the 
Nonpariel Club. In his early manhood, he was 
for three years a member of a militia unit of the 
State. 

In 1893 Mr. Daley married Katharine Toner, of 
Dover, New Hampshire, daughter of Owen and 
Bridget (Carbary) Toner, both of whom were of 
Irish birth, the former deceased since 1900. Mr. 
and Mrs. Daley have one daughter, Mary K. 



in Andover, and attends St. Augustine's Church, 
of that town- 



JOHN F. McDONOUGH, contractor of Andover, 
Massachusetts, was bom June 13, 1887, at North 
Andover, son of Martin McDonough, a native of 
Cork, Ireland, who died in 1920- The latter is sur- 
vived by his wife, Katharine (Mahoney) Mc- 
Donough, of Ireland, now Living in Andover. 

Mr. McDonough attended the public schools of 
North Andover, and was a member of the class 
of 1903 at high school. He went to work for 
J. D. Costello, a contractor, and was with him 
for four years during which time he learned the 
fundamentals of the business. For a year he 
was engaged in business on his own account as a 
merchant, and then returned to the conti-acting 
line, working for E. W. Pitman. For the next 
few years he held various positions and was fore- 
man of the Street Department of the town of 
Andover, for five years. 

In 1913, he engaged in the contracting business 
on his own account, and was attaining success 
when the World War swept the country. He en- 
listed and was assigned to the Quartermaster's De- 
partment, and served through the war, being dis- 
charged in March, 1919, with the rank of first 
sergeant. When he returned to Andover. Mr. Mc- 
Donough took up his contracting work and now 
has added to it in many ways. He is one of 
the leading men in his line in Andover and has 
received many contracts from leading citizens for 
the laying of walks and other similar work. Fra- 
ternally Mr. McDonough is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Knights of Columbus, the Andover Club, and the 
New Independent Irish Club. He makes his home 



CHARLES E. VALLIERE— Coming from a 
family of inventors, it is not surprising that 
Charles E. Valliere. a young and enterprising busi- 
ness man of Lynn, Massachusetts, should also have 
successfully entered the field of invention. The 
motoi^driven ice sled he recently patented is likely 
to bring him profit as well as prominence. A 
demonstration of the sled in use was given by 
Mr. Valliere in Lynn, and the Lynn "Item" car- 
ried a very good description of the invention. 

Charles E. Valliere was bom in Concord, New 
Hampshire. April 23, 1898, the thirteenth of four- 
teen children bom to Ferdinand J- and Amanda 
(la Flaunne) Valliere- The family is of French- 
Canadian antecedents, both parents being of Que- 
bec, Canada, where they had a farming estate. 
Both parents are still living, and of their fourteen 
children seven were sons. It would seem that 
the family came into Massachusetts early in the 
boyhood of Charles E., for he was educated in 
the public schools of Lynn, and eventually at the 
Manual Training School, where he obtained the 
diploma as mechanical draughtsman in graduating. 
He was in educational work for some time, being 
for two years in charge of the printing depart- 
ment at Corbett School. In 1916, however, he 
joined his three brothers in establishing the Wes- 
tern Avenue (Lynn) Garage, the exact location be- 
ing at No. 444 Western avenue. Their garage is 
completed and up-to-date, with all the appliances 
necessary for proper and efficient meeting of all 
demands in service, gas, oil, and all machine re- 
pairs. 

The ice sled, of which Mr. Charles E. Valliere 
is the inventor, has been before referred to here- 
in, and it is not proper here to review the full 
achievements in invention of the Valliere family, 
but it may be stated that Alfonse Valliere, brother 
of Charles E., has devised many instruments, and 
has many patents now pending. He is interested 
particularly in aviation, and has himself come into 
public notice as an aviator. Another brother, 
George, has applied his inventive aptitude to things 
electrical, and is an authority on electrical devices. 
They, the brothers Valliere, may all be placed in 
the class of progressive young business men of 
Lynn, where they are of course well-known. Mr. 
Charles E. Valliere is a member of the Roman 
Catholic Church, and of the Knights of Columbus 
fraternity. He is unmarried. 



GEORGE A. CHILDS, son of Martin W. and 
Georgia S. (Whittier) Childs, was born in Deer- 
field, New Hampshire, February 18, 1865. When 
a young man he entered the undertaking business 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts, and in 1895 became 
the active partner in the firm of Dole & Childs. 
whose undertaking establishment, located at 39 
Main street, continued under his management until 
his death on July 18. 1921. At the time of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



261 



death his firm was the oldest of its kind in 
Haverhill and had acquired a prestige that tes- 
tified strongly to the usefulness and high standing 
of Mr. Childs in his community. His profession 
was one in which success is possible only to a man 
who conducts it with a spirit of deep sympathy 
with liis fellow-men and of devotion to their tragic 
needs. Such a man was Mr. Childs; yet his 
business sense was so practical, and his judgment 
so reliable, that throughout his life he was con- 
stantly expected to fill positions of responsibility 
and to assume duties that are reserved for leaders. 
Mr. Childs held membership in many fraternal 
orders and clubs, and on boards and committees 
of important institutions- He gave freely to the 
poor with unostentatious charity, and treated 
all men as his brothers. He was sui-vived by a 
widow, Elizabeth V. (Tourtillotte) Childs, daugh- 
ter of Josiah and Lura (BajTon) Tourtillotte, and 
by a son, Edwai'd B. Childs, bom of a former 
man-iage, now a student at Dartmouth College. 
The following resolutions of the Haverhill Cham- 
ber of Commerce amply testify to the esteem in 
which Mr. Childs was held: 

Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, 
Haverhill, Massachusetts. 

Resolutions: Whereas, in His wisdom the 
All-loving Father has called to his Eternal Home 
our friend and fellow-worker, George A. Childs; 
and 

Whereas, our departed brother was, for many 
years, treasurer and a director of the Haverhill 
Chamber of Commerce, eminently faithful in his 
office of trust, active and helpful in the delibera- 
tions and achievements of the board of direc- 
tors; high-minded, amiable and of gentle man- 
ners; in his daily vocation ministering tenderly 
to the bereaved; loyal to Haverhill, an upholder 
of organized community effort, a good citizen; 
Therefore, be it 

Resolved, that the Directors of the Haverhill 
Chamber of Commerce herein record their grief 
at the passing of their one-time associate and 
their heartfelt sympathy with those dear to him 
who are left behind. And, be it further 

Resolved, that these resolutions be conveyed 
to the family of the deceased, and that a copy 
be spread upon the records of tliis Chamber. 

The Directors of the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce. 

by (signed) FRED W. HEARS, 

President and Director. 
Haverhill, Mass., 

July 21, 1921. 



PERLEY H. HARGRAVES. owner of a good 
auto-trimming business in Merrimac, was born in 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, on October 17, 1887, son 
of Frank H. Hargraves, a trader of Merrimac, and 
Minnie (Miller) Hargraves, who died in 189-4, and 
who was of a Haverhill family- 

In his boyhood and youth he attended the pub- 
lic schools of Haverhill, eventually graduating 
from the high school. Thereafter, for a couple 
of years, he was in the employ of Haverhill 
druggists, spending about a year with George E. 



Crane, and a like period with George P. Holden. 
After leaving Mr. Holden, he went to Merrimac, 
and entered into an entirely different line. For 
the next three years he worked for the Walker 
Carriage Company, of Merrimac, leaving that firm 
so that he might work for the J. B. Judkins Com- 
pany, of same place. A year later, he went to 
Medford, Massachusetts, where for a short time 
he was in the employ of the Teel Manufacturing 
Company. Next, for a while, he was in Waltham, 
Massachusetts, working in the plant of the Metz 
Automobile Company, and following that, he was 
for about a year in Amesbury, where he was 
connected with the Biddle & Smart Company of 
that place- Returning to Merrimac, he found oc- 
cupation in the plant of the Memmac Body Com- 
pany, with which company he remained for about 
a year. At the end of that time he was per- 
suaded to enter into business for himself, and for 
the next eighteen months he gave his time wholly 
to the management of a restaurant he had pur- 
chased. However, it did not seem to promise as 
substantial an advantage as should come in fol- 
lowing the automobile business, so he gave up 
the restaurant, and opened business for liimself 
as an auto t.-immer, in Merrimac- The enterprise 
is developing satisfactorily. 

Mr- Hargraves is a Republican, though he has 
not actively followed politics. He is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Riverside 
Lodge, of Merrimac, and the Loyal Order of 
Moose, of Haverhill. During t! -^ stress of the 
World War, when all the men of draft age were 
drawn from State troops into ttie federal forces, 
Mr- Hargi-aves enlisted in the Massachusetts State 
Guard, serving in Company D, of the Sixteenth 
Regiment, for two years, as a private. 

He was married on March 29, 1913, to Annie 
Mary Pease, who was bom in Merrimac on March 
29, 1885, to James and Mattie (Heath) Pease. 
The mother of Mrs- Hargraves died in 1917, but 
the father is still actively in business president of 
the James Pease Company, of Merrimac, carriage 
makers- Mr. and Mrs. Har;_,;:;ves are members 
of the Congregational church, in fact, the Har- 
gTaves family have been Congregationalists for 
several generations- Rev- Daniel R. Hargiaves, 
grandfather of Pevley H. Hargraves, was for many 
years in ministerial charge in Hiverliill, retiring 
in old age. 



LEROY BENJAMIN PATTERN, postmaster 
and enterprising merchant of Rocks Village, near 
MeiTimac, Massachusetts, is a native of the place, 
bom there on March 18, 1897- His grandfather, 
John Pattern, lived in Menimac pi'actically the 
whole of his life, which ended in 1920. His grand- 
mother, IMargaret (Stewart) Pattern, was of West 
Newbui-y. She is still living. His father, Ben- 
jamin P. P. Pattern was bom in Merrimac, and 
was in merchandising business there until his 
death, in 1908- His mother. Flora M. (Osborne) 
Pattern, was born in Rocks Village, where she 



262 



ESSEX COUNTY 



still lives. So that the Pattern family is well 
known in the Merrimac district. LeRoy B. Pat- 
tern was educated in the village schools, and at 
Merrimac. When liis schooldays were over, he 
found employment in the ^ocery store of Horace 
Emery, remaining with him for about a year. For 
the next five years he was in government sei-vice, 
as mail carrier, leaving at the end of that time 
so that he might enter into business for himself- 
He opened a grocery store in his native place, and 
has since developed a satisfactory business. 

He has entered actively into local public affairs, 
has been postmaster of Rocks Village since 1919, 
and is a member of the Rocks Village volunteer 
fire department- Politically he is a Republican; 
religiously he is a Baptist, a member of the Rock-s 
Village church of that denomination. 

Mr. Pattern was married in 1917 to Agnes H. 
Gleed, daughter of William and Esther (Bailey) 
Gleed, of Rocks Village, where the foi-mer is con- 
nected with shoe manufacturing. Mrs. Pattern 
was boi-n in Rocks Village on December 23, 1900. 
They have one child, Louis Pattern, born July 12, 
1920. 



ELMER E. BROWN— For the past twelve years 
Elmer E. Brown, of Lawrence, has been actively 
identified with the physical growth and develop- 
ment of the city- Mr- Brown is a son of Horace 
and Ada E- Brown, who reside at No- 432 Howard 
street, Lawrence, the father having been a con- 
tractor and builder, now retired. 

Elmer E- Brown was bom in Belfast, Maine, De- 
cember 12, 1882. The family removing to Law- 
rence when he was only one year old, it was in 
the Lawience schools that he received his educa- 
tion. Spending his earlier years in various ac- 
tivities, he entered the building field independently, 
in the year 1909, and has since attained wide 
prominence along this line. He has built resi- 
dences, almost entirely, and in connection %vith 
this business has handled real estate extensively. 
In 1920, in association with Fred Eastman, Jr., 
Mr. BrovvTi organized the Massachusetts Realty 
Company. This concern has large real estate 
holdings, and is building many residences on one 
of their best plots of ground at the present time. 

Mr. Brown, as head of this business, is well 
kno\vn in the building trades, and is president of 
the Master Builders' Association, of Lawrence- 
He is also a member of the Lawrence Chamber of 
Commerce. Fraternally he is a member of Tus- 
can Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Knights 
of Pythias, and is also an active member of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. His business 
is located at No- 329 Essex street, and he re.sides 
at No. 86 Elm street, Andover, Massachusetts- 



and retired- He is an old veteran of the mail 
service, but has a title which antedates that. 
being a veteran of the Civil War. He is one of 
nine brothers and a sister, children of Daniel 
and Adeline Whipple, all of these living to a 
good old age. The wonderful life of John F. 
Whipple began in Ipswich, Massachusetts, August 
20, 1841, and he is now enjoying octogenarian 
honors in Danvers, Massachusetts. 

John F. Whipple attended South West District 
School, going thence to the academy at New Lon- 
don, New Hampshire, now known as Colby Acad- 
emy, there continuing a student for two and one- 
half years. After leaving school he became his 
father's farm assistant, and at times was in the 
employ of neighborhood farmers- When war broke 
out between the North and South, he at once 
enlisted, serving, until honorably discharged, in 
Company L, First Regiment, Massachusetts Heavy 
Artillery- He escaped all the perils of war, al- 
though taking part in many battles, until Peters- 
burg, in June, 1864, when in the charge at the 
crater, he was shot through the leg and breast, 
and on the day General Lee surrendered, Mr- 
Whipple lost an arm through a shot from one 
of our cannons- 

Upon his recovery, Mr. Whipple was employed 
in Boston, Massachusetts, until May 18, 1869, go- 
ing thence into the sei-vice of the post office in 
Salem, Massachusetts, as a letter carrier. He con- 
tinued in the postal service for forty-sLx years, 
resigning in 1915, aged seventy-five years. In 
1873, he was elected justice of the peace, and 
that office he has now held for forty-nine years, 
being still in office. He is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, the United Order of Amer- 
ican Mechanics, and since 1866 has been a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, sei-ving as Sunday 
school superintendent for ten years, nov,' being the 
senior member of the board of deacons. 

John F- Whipple manned, in Saco, Maine, June 
17, 1871, Cornelia E. Hood, daughter of John and 
Rebecca Hood. Their only son, Guy M. Whipple, 
is a giaduate of Brown University, and is a pro- 
fessor in Michigan. 



JOHN F. WHIPPLE— For forty-six years, 
through sunshine and storm, heat and cold, pleas- 
ant days and dreary ones, John F. Whipple car- 
ried the United States mail over a route in Salem, 
Massachusetts, but finally paid tribute to the years 



CLIFFORD ELWELL STANLEY— For a con- 
siderable period the name of Stanley has been 
connected with the electrical business in Salem, 
Massachusetts, and Clifford Elwell Stanley is now 
the head of the business which his father founded. 
As an electrical contractor and engineer, he is 
placing the name high on the list in this line of 
endeavor. 

Mr. Stanley is a son of Francis S- and Bessie 
(Butler) Stanley, both of whom are now de- 
ceased- Fi-ancis S- Stanley was formerly connect- 
ed with the firm of W. S. Lee & Company, but in 
1907 e.stablished an independent business in gen- 
eral electrical work of all kinds. He died Sep- 
tember 9, 1918. Besides Clifford Elwell, whose 
name heads this review, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
were the parents of three daughters and another 
son: Edna F., now the wife of .Albert Norman. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



263 



of Salem; Dorothy Mae; Barbara Larkin; and 
Harold Irwin, now a student. 

Clifford Elwell Stanley was bom in Salem, 
Massachusetts, September 20, 1897. He received 
his early education in the public schools of his 
native city, then spent two years in the Salem 
High School. Thereafter he entered the Massa- 
chusetts Nautical School, at Boston, where he 
remained for two years, completing his studies 
in October, 1916. Mr. Stanley then enlisted in 
the United States Merchant Marine, sei-ving until 
1918. At the death of his father, he returned to 
Salem, and taking over the business, is now 
carrying on a constantly increasing interest in all 
kinds of electrical contracting and engineering, 
having also a full line of electrical supplies. 
Still a young man. and with the best years of 
life before him, Mr- Stanley is certain to become 
one of the leading men in his Line in tliis section- 
Mr. Stanley is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and of Salem Lodge, Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks- His church 
membership is with the Baptist denomination. He 
is unman-ied. 



CHARLES C. STECK, an engineer by profes- 
sion, and undoubtedly a capable executive, now 
of Newburyport, Massachusetts, has vdthin a 
couple of years developed a manufacturing busi- 
ness which, in its specialty, is said to be one of 
the largest in that section of Massachusetts, 
where so many large shoe manufacturing and 
allied plants are in operation. Mr. Steck establish- 
ed the Three Line Counter Company to manu- 
facture fibre counters, and his plant now finds 
employment for about 175 men, the capacity pro- 
duction being 200,000 countei-s a day, quite a 
substantial output, it would seem. The company 
was incoi-porated in 1919, and Mr. Steck has had 
the management of it since its establishment. 
The plant covers a floor space of 40,000 squai-e 
feet, and, as may be imagined, it is an appreciable 
induustry of Newbui-yport. 

Charles C. Steck was born in Wheaton, Illinois, 
March 24, 1884, son of Calvin and Louisa (Pinch) 
Steck, of Naperville, Illinois, where the former 
is in business as a merchant. They were the 
parents of three children, all sons, one of whom, 
however, is now deceased- Charles C- Steck at- 
tended the public schools of Naperville, Illinois, 
and eventually graduated from the high school of 
that place in the class of 1900- Later, he entered 
Wheaton College, graduating therefrom in 1906. 
He entered upon professional work, was for two 
years at the University of Chicago, and later was 
at the New Hampshire State College- He was 
connected with the engineering division of that 
college until 1917, when he entered National ser- 
vice, war having come, and such a war as called 
for the most strenuous service of people of all 
ages, of nations, not armies only. Mr. Steck was 
assigned to National work in e.xecutive capacity 
with the New Hampshire State Food Administra- 
tion, and during the time of stress gave his time 



zealously to such work, which was not an un- 
important part of the National effort- In 1919 
he came to Newbui-yport to establish the busi- 
ness before referred to. His business address is 
No. 44 Merrimac street, Newburyport, and private 
address. No. 9 Summit place, that city, where 
he has rapidly made many friends. He is of a 
genial personality, and is looked upon as an alert, 
progressive man of business, and one who should 
prove an asset to the town in its general affairs- 
Mr. Steck married, in 1909, Jennie Kinsman, of 
lov.'a, daughter of Herman Kinsman, who was a 
fai-mer until his death in 1916. Mr. and Mrs- 
Steck have three children: Helen S-. bom in 
1912; Kenneth K-, born in 1917; Richard S.. tv/in 
of Kenneth K- 



C. ERNEST BROWN, of the Brown Sign Com- 
pany of Haverhill, has been in the sign-painting 
and display advertising business for more than 
fifteen years in Haverhill, and is well known 
throughout the district. Charles Ernest Brown was 
bom in Georgetown, Massachusetts, May 4, 1874. 
son of Charles Henry and Sarah A- (Oilman) 
Brown, of that place. The former was originally 
of Boxford, Massachusetts, and passed most of 
his life in i-ailroad service, latterly as conductor on 
the Boston and Maine railroad. 

Charles Ernest Brown spent part of his boy- 
hood in Georgetown, attending the public schools 
there, and eventually entered Enfield High School, 
where he gi-aduated. Having decided to become an 
engineer, he spent his first two years, after leaving 
school, as a stationary engineer. He left that 
work to take up carpentry, and later entered a 
shoe factory, remaining at such occupations until 
1896. He had an aptitude for drawing and design 
work, and changed occupations again to take up 
sign painting, never going back to his old trades. 
For ten years from 189G he worked for others at 
sign-painting, but in 1906 he acquired the sign- 
painting and advertising business of the Oland D- 
Ray Company, at Haverhill. He continued in that 
business independently until 1914, when he sold to 
Ernest L. Kimball, the firm name being then 
changed to The Kimball System- Mr. Brown re- 
mained with the company as manager until 1916, 
Vvhen he was offered better remuneration to man- 
age the business of the Star Sign and Paint Com- 
pany, also of Haverhill. He managed the afi^airs 
of that company for a year, and acted similarly 
for like period for the Essex Sign Company, of 
Haverhill- In 1918, however, he again ventured 
into independent business, establishing the Brown 
Sign Company, of which he is sole owner. He is 
doing a good business. 

Mr- Brown is a member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose, and also the Junior Order United Ameri- 
can lilechanics. He is a man of strong purpose, 
and has given close study to some subjects. By 
religious conviction he is a Spiritualist, member of 
the Haverhill church of that sect. 

He has been twice married. His first wife was 
Abbee M- Harris, of HaverhiU. They were mar- 



264 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ried in 1898, she died in 1908. In that year Mr- 
Brown married Belle J. Griffith, also of Haver- 
hill. There was no issue to the first marriage; 
his children bom to his second wife are: Donald 
J., and Clifton E. 



LEVI C. WADE, Jr — In the past seven years, 
Levi C. Wade, Jr., of Lynn, Massachusetts, has 
built up an impoi-tant business in one of the allied 
branches of the shoe industry. 

Mr. Wade is a son of Levi C. and Margaret 
(Rogers) Wade- The elder Mr. Wade was dis- 
tinguished in various lines of individual enterprise 
and public endeavor. He was a native of old 
Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now a part of the 
city of Pittsburgh, and later lived for a consider- 
able period in Newton, Massachusetts. He was 
an attorney by profession, specializing in cor- 
poration law. He was president of the Mexican 
Central railroad, and was a director of the Santa 
Fe railroad. He was a member of the Massachu- 
setts House of Representatives, of 1879, and 
served as speaker of the house, thereby gaining 
the distinction of being the only man in Newton 
ever holding that position. He was associated 
in a business way with E.x-Govemor Brackett. 
Levi C Wade, Sr., died in 1891, at the age of 
forty-nine years. His wife, who was bom in 
Bath, Maine, died in 1921. 

Levi C. Wade, Jr., was bom in Newton, Massa- 
chusetts, July 22, 188.5. He received his education 
in the public schools of that city. Having been 
still a child at his father's death, he early took 
up the responsibilities of life, and worked at the 
machinist's trade, soon establishing himself in 
Lynn, in the manufacture of gas engines. Con- 
tinuing in this business until 1914, he then took 
up the manufacture of mold equipment for rub- 
ber goods, making heels and soles his specialties. 
He has since continued along this line, and has de- 
veloped a prosperous and active business interest. 
Mr. Wade is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Marblehead Lodge, and Lynn En- 
campment. He is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church, of Springfield, Massachusetts. 

In 1904, Mr. Wade married Jane R. L. Woodfin, 
of Marblehead, and they have four children: Levi 
C (3), Margaret E., Robert and Philip. Mrs. 
Wade is a daughter of Frank and Mai-y E. Wood- 
fin, of Marblehead, her father being prominent in 
the express business there. 



JOHN H. FEUGILL— The work of the designer 
is of peculiar interest, because it has to do with 
the beginnings, and in Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
one of the leading men behind the building trades 
is John H. Feugill, architect. 

Mr. Feugill was born in Methuen, Massachusetts, 
December 2, 1878, and received his education in 
the public schools of Lawrence. He early decided 
upon architecture as a profession, and to further 
his ambition entered the employ of Boston ai- 
chitects, making a study of the work and all its 



allied branches. Later on he was employed for a 
time with Lawrence architects, and about 1910 
opened an office in Lawi'ence and established him- 
self in business along this line. He has been very 
successful, and has been identified with many in- 
teresting and important building enterprises. He 
is recognized as a prominent man in the profes- 
sion, and for a number of years taught architec- 
tural drawing in the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. 

On February 22, 1905, Mr. Feugill married, in 
Methuen, Alice A. Howard, of that place. They 
have three daughters: Hilda, who is now a stu- 
dent at the Methuen High School; Eva; Laura; 
both the younger daughters are now attending 
the public schools of Methuen. The family re- 
sides at No. 12 Union street, Methuen, and they 
attend St. John's Episcopal Church. 



ALEXANDER WILSON was bom at GaUa- 
shiels, Scotland, March 18, 1879, a son of James 
W. and Helen M. (McDonaldson) Wilson, both 
of whom were bom in Scotland. Mr. Wilson's 
father, who was a roofing contractor, came to 
the United States while Mr. Wilson was quite 
young, and died at Haverhill, Massachusetts, Janu- 
ary 2, 1921. 

Mr- Wilson was educated in the public schools 
of Haverhill. After leaving school, he spent four 
years in the service of Henry & Weeks, and then 
associated himself with Ivis father in the conduct 
of the business which had been established by his 
father in 1890. When his father died, Mr. Wilson 
assumed full control of the business and con- 
tinues it under the name of the James W. Wilson 
Company. His offices are at No. 30 Pleasant 
street, Haverhill, and he deals in slate, copper, 
tin, and gi'avel roofing. He also receives con- 
tracts for metal and cornice work, and the in- 
stallation of skylights and gutter.s His establish- 
ment is the largest of its kind in Haverhill, and 
he has an enviable reputation throughout the 
business world. Mr. Wilson attends the Portland 
Street Baptist Church. He is a Mason, and be- 
longs to various Masonic bodies, including the 
chapter. He is also a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Wilson has one son, James N. Wilson, who 
was bom in 1906. 



GRACE MICHAUD — An interesting business 
organization of Salem, Massachusetts, is the 
Michaud Shoe Company, whose name indicates 
the line of activity in which it is engaged. One 
of the heads of this business is Grace Michaud. 

Mrs. Blichaud was bom in Lynn, Massachusetts, 
in April, 1897, a daughter of Napoleon and Rose 
Bergeron, of that city. Receiving her early edu- 
cation at St. Jean de Baptiste parochial school, 
in Lynn, she thereafter took a course at the Bur- 
dette Business College, from which she was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1912. For the next two 
years she was in the employ of the M. Mindeck 






'°?*i*?* 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



266 



Company, of Lynn, then went to Salem, becoming 
a partner in the E. Michaud Company, of that 
city, manufacturers of shoes, the other partner 
being J. Eugene Michaud, of Salem. In February, 
1919, the name of the firm was changed to the 
Michaud Shoe Company, the pai-tners still being 
the same- 

On April 19, 1915, Gi-ace Bergeron man-ied J- 
Eugene Michaud, a son of George and Georgiana 
Michau*!, of Salem. Mr. and Mrs. Michaud are 
the parents of three children: Henry, Girard, 
and Dorothy. Mr. Michaud is a member of the 
Salem Chamber of Commerce, and the family be- 
longs to St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church. 



Bertha Rena, Lillian Elizabeth, Harold Willis, 
Carrie Madella, Abbie Nichols, Charles Sanford, 
Mabel Ethelene, and Robert Ingersoll, Six of 
these children living at the present time. 



WILLIS ELMER DAUGHTY— Bom of sturdy 
Maine ance^tiy, and himself a man of gi'eat en- 
ergy and broad interests, Willis Elmer Daughty, 
who is well remembered in industrial and real 
estate circles of Swampscott, brought to bear upon 
the life of his day the force of an upright and 
fearless, but unassuming, character. 

Mr. Daughty was bom in Topsham, Maine, July 
26, 1861, a son of Charles and Mary Daughty, 
both of whom were also natives of the Pine Tree 
State- Receiving a practical education in the 
public schools of his native to\vn, Mr. Daughtj' 
was first employed as a farmer, but did not con- 
tinue in agricultural work for any length of time. 
Coming to Essex county, Massachusetts, he secured 
a position with the Gifford Furniture Company, 
leaders in their line at that time- Later on he 
became connected with Souther & Bubier, the 
well known firm of leather merchants, with whom 
he was associated until his death. A tireless 
worker, and of thrifty habits, he was soon pre- 
pared to make some investment which would ac- 
crue future benefit- With large faith in the future 
of this section, he acquired real estate as rapidly 
as he was able to take it over- The increasing 
value of his holdings amply vindicated his wis- 
dorA, but he was no less assiduous in his atten- 
tion to the leather business, and had no thought 
of retiring from his activities Ln that line for 
many years to come. 

In connection with his personal interests, Mr- 
Daughty was broadly active in the public welfare. 
He was a leading member of the Improvement 
Club, of Swampscott, and for two years served on 
the Board of Health, and a member of the ways 
and means committee- He was always interested 
in military aifairs, and was a member of Com- 
pany D, Lynn Cadets. He was a member of Evei- 
ett Lodge, Knights of Pj-thias, of Lynn. Into all 
these various activities, Mr. Daughty threv/ the 
power of his executive ability, thereby perhaps 
shortening his days of usefulness. He died Feb- 
ruary 2, 1909, when only forty-eight years of age- 

Mr. Daughty married, November 1, 1880, Carrie 
Elizabeth Philbrick, of Rumford, Maine, daughter 
of Stephen and Caroline (Davis) Philbrick. Her 
father was a native of Rumford, but her mother 
was bom in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Mr. and 
Mrs. Daughty were the parents of eight children: 



ALFRED W. ST. LAURENT— Beginning life 
at an early age in the mills, Alfred W. St. Laur- 
ent, of Lynn, has risen by his own efforts to a 
position of independence in the business world, 
and is now a successful undertaker and insurance 
broker. 

Mr. St. Laurent was born in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, September 8, 1891, and is a son of Alfred 
and Marie (Gagnon) St. Laurent- His father was 
a native of Quebec, and his mother of New Bruns- 
wick. Receiving his early education in the public 
schools of Salem, Mr. St. Laurent took a course 
at Bi-yant & Stratton's Business College, of Bos- 
ton, then entered the employ of the Naumkeag 
Mills. Later he acted as agent for the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company for a period of 
eight years, then was with the General Electric 
Company for a time, first as draftsman, and then 
as salesman. Meanwhile Mr. St- Laurent had 
looked into the future, and deciding upon a pei^ 
manent field of effort, had prepared himself at 
the Boston School of Anatomy and Embalming, 
and in 1915 opened an undertaking establishment. 
He has since continued in this business, with con- 
stantly increasing success. 

Mr. St. Laurent is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, No. 117, of West 
Lynn; of Valladolid Lodge, No. 170, Knights of 
Columbus; of the Societe St- Jean de Baptiste 
Union; of Old St. Jean de Baptiste, of Lj-nn; of 
Assumption Lodge, No. 34, of Canada, Indepen- 
dent Order of Foresters; of Assumption Lodge, 
United States of America; Franco- American Order 
of Foresters; of Massachusetts Embalmers Asso- 
ciation, located at 250 West Sixth street. Lowell, 
and of the Elks Club. During the World War, Mr. 
St- Laui-ent was active in all drives, and made 
many speeches in Lynn to advance the Liberty 
Loans. 

In 1912 Mr- St- Laurent man-ied Florildal Li- 
mard, of Quebec, Canada, daughter of August and 
Ellen (Beaulieu) Limard, of Quebec. Mr, and Mrs. 
St. Laurent have two children, Jeannette and Ar- 
mand. 



FRANK INGALLS BLANCHARD— Alert and 
progressive as a man of affairs, and estimable as 
an individual, Frank Ingalls Blanchard was a rep- 
resentative man of Essex county. It was a gi-eat 
shock to his friends when he was cut down in 
the prime of life, and the career which had been 
so promising came to an untimely end- Mr. Blan- 
chard came of old Colonial ancestry, and he was 
a direct descendant of Captain Myles Blanchard, 
who carried provisions to a boat in distress off 
Kings' Beach, Swampscott, when no other boat 
succeeded in reaching it. This was in the early 
days of Colonial history. 

Horace W. Blanchard, father of Frank I. Blan- 



266 



ESSEX COUNTY 



chard, lived at No. 120 Puritan road, Swampscott, 
for a period of forty-four years, and died there 
December 9, 1917, after surviving his son for up- 
wards of three years. He man-ied Eunice H. An- 
drews, of West Gloucester, who now resides at 
No. 17 Reddington road, Swampscott. 

Frank Ingalls Blanchard was born on what is 
now known as Puritan road, December 25, 1874. 
and died March 1.5, 191-5. Receiving his eariy edu- 
cation in the public schools of Swampscott, Mr- 
Blanchard made special preparations for his career 
at the Bi-yant & Stratton Business College, Bea- 
ton, then entered the employ of Hosmer, Codding 
& Company, where he continued for a period of 
twelve years. Thereafter he became associated 
with H W. Marion, of Newton, New Jersey, in the 
capacity of traveling salesman, and continued in 
this connection until the time of his decease. 
In various interests, Mr. Blanchard was well 
known. He was a member of the Wayfarers Club, 
of Swampscott, and was also a member of the 
Swampscott Club. He was a member of the Massa- 
chusetts branch of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. He attended the services of the Con- 
gregational church. 

On October 23, 1901, Mr. Blanchard married 
Han-iet Clark, of Danvers, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of James N. and Mary (Martin) Clark- Mr. 
Clai-k, who was born in Wenhani, died in the year 
1880, but his wife still survives him, and is still 
a resident of Danvers. Mr. and Mrs. Blancharci 
have one son, Philip Andrews, bom December 2, 
1904. 

In business circles, in the social organizations 
of which he was a valued member, Mr. Bianchaid 
will long be remembered. His genial personality 
won liim a host of friends, and his genuine worth 
made him a man whose loss left a vacant place 
in evei-y group of which he had been a member. 



Mr. Putnam was more than once called to pul>- 
lic service, first as a councilman, and later served 
as alderman for three years during his residence 
in Newburyport. He was a man of deeply sincere 
religious faith, and was a member of the Old 
South Church, of Newburyport, and later of St. 
Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church, of Lynn. 

In 18.55, Mr. Putnam man-ied Hannah Prescott 
Parks, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and they 
were the parents of ten children: Grace W., Inez 
J., Mary H., Jolin S., Albert E., WUlard S., Emma 
L., Herbert L., Florence T., and Frank. Mrs. 
Putnam was a daughter of Solomon and Charlotte 
(Stringer) Parks, of Portsmouth. 

The news of the passing of John J. Putnam 
brought sadness to a large circle of his friends. 
But the record he left of a long life of usefulness 
to mankind might well prove an inspiration to 
those who follow him. 



JOHN JAMES PUTNAM— In the permanent 
records of Essex county, the name of John James 
Putnam desei-ves a place of honor. An upright 
and industrious citizen, who bore his part in the 
presei-vation of the Union, as well as in the every- 
day matters of civic life, he was always prepared 
to meet the responsibilities of life with courage 
and fortitude. Mr. Putnam was born in Newbm-y- 
port, Massachusetts, July 1, 1834, and was a son 
of John and Rebecca (Blanchard) Putnam, of Dan- 
vers, also in this county. 

Educated in the public schools of Newburyport. 
in early life he went to sea as a fisherman, but 
later became a shoemaker. This occupation he 
followed throughout his active life, and was thus 
engaged for about forty years. He then retired 
from active v/ork, but as long as he lived kept in 
touch with the forward movement of public af- 
fairs. At the time of the Civil War, Mr. Put- 
nam enlisted in Company A, 48th Artillery, and 
served under Colonel Stone. For many years, in 
later life, he was a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, continuing his identification with 
this organization up to the time of his death. 



FREDERIC BRIGHAM LITCHMAN— Thirty- 
five years ago, (1887) Fred. B. Litchman started 
a job printing business in Marblehead, and to 
use his own way of putting it: "am still at it." 
The years have brought him prosperity as a 
business man, the confidence of his community, 
the honors of politics and of the fraternal orders 
with which he is affiliated. He is a son of 
Charles H. and M. Annie (Shirley) Litchman, 
both of ancient New England families, his father a 
past great incohonee of the Improved Order of 
Red Men; member of the Industrial Commission, 
serving under tv/o presidents, McKinley and 
Roosevelt, a one time general secretary of the 
Knights of Labor, newspaper editor, publisher, 
public speaker, and member of the State Legis- 
lature. 

Fred B. Litchman was bom in Marblehead, 
Massachusetts, August 26, 1869, and there edu- 
cated in the public schools. At the age of eigh- 
teen, in 1887, he started in business for himself 
as a job printer and has continued that business 
until the present (1922). In 1898 he added com- 
mercial photography and "Finishing for Amateurs" 
to his business and has continued both lines 
until the present. 

In politics, Mr. Litchman is a Republican and 
was a follower of Colonel Roosevelt in his pro- 
gressive revolt. Mr. Litchman v/as a member o' 
the Town Board of Auditors, 1894-1900. inclusive, 
town assessor, 1901 to the present (1922), and 
chairman of the board since 1906, he also having 
performed service on the Essex Senatorial Com- 
mittee. Fratemally, Mr. Litchman is affiliated 
with the Order of United American Mechanics, 
ex-state councilor and member of the National 
Council; member of the Improved Order of Red 
Men, past sachem of Manataug Tribe, No. 1, and 
member of the Great Council of Massachusetts; 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, past noble 
grand of Atlantic Lodge, No. .55, and member of 
the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts; and mem- 
ber of Lynn Encampment, No. 58, of the same 
order. He is also past president of the Mugford 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



267 



Association, member of the M. A. Pickett Associa- 
tion, member of the Marblehead Young Men's 
Christian Association, the Essex Club, and the 
Universalist church. 

Mr. Litchman married, November 12, 1902, 
Coralie Mason, bom November 2, 1875, at Marble- 
head, daughter of Isaac W. Jr., and Elizabeth 
Ellen (Cole) Mason. 



EDWARD KAVANAGH, who before his death 
was one of the leading dniggists of Essex, Mas- 
sachusetts, was a son of Edward and Elizabeth 
(Tibbets) Kavanagh. The father was engaged 
for many years as a broker in the city of Boston, 
following this business until his death in 1890, 
at the age of seventy years. The mother was born 
in Peabody, and died in 1886. 

Mr. Kavanagh was bom in Peabody, July 13, 
1860. He attended the public schools of hi? 
native town, then entered the employ of Dan 
Grosvenor, of Peabody, a leading druggist of that 
day. Remaining there for fifteen years, he worked 
in various drug stores for a short time there- 
after, then, in 1901, came to Essex, and founded 
the business which he successfully continued until 
his death. 

Mr. Kavanagh v;as a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, of Essex, and his religious affiliation wa3 
as a member of the Episcopal church, of Ipsvdch, 
Massachusetts. 



GEORGE J. LAEMMLE— JOHN L. WEBER— 
The business known as the Weber-Laemmle Tan- 
nery Company, of Salem, had its birth, January 
1, 1921, the owners, George J. Laemmle and John 
L. Weber. 

The following changes are incidental to the 
taking-over of the large plant in Peabody: Name 
— Lorraine Tanning Company; address — Caller and 
Walnut streets, Peabody, Massachusetts; president 
and tannei-y manager, George L. Laemmle; treas- 
urer and sales manager, Russell C. Wood. Products 
sold by Rousmaniere, Williams & Company. 
Branch offices — New York, Cincinnati, St. Louis, 
Chicago. 

George J. Laemmle, president of the Weber- 
Laemmle Tannery Company, was bom in New 
York, March 11, 1887, there attended the public 
schools, his education being completed at Pratt 
Institute, Brooklyn, New York. After leaving the 
Institute he entered the employ of the Bamelt 
Leather Company, of Little Falls, New York, 
there remaining four years, leaving to go with the 
Ohio Leather Company, of Girard, Ohio, with 
whom he remained for three years, then spent 
three years with the Armstrong Leather Company, 
of Peabody, Massachusetts. He finally resigned 
his position with that company to enter the tan- 
ning business for himself in Salem. He is a 
member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 
of Salem, the Knights of Columbus, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, of Salem, and the 
Homestead Golf Club, of Danvers. 



Mr. Laemmle married, in 1911, Clara H. Westler, 
of New York, and they are the parents of a son, 
George J. Jr., and two daughters, Clara May and 
Viola C. Mr. Laemmle is a son of George and 
Catherine Laemmle, of New York, his father en- 
gaged in the wholesale milk business until 1902, 
when he retired. 

John L. Weber, treasurer of the Webei^Laemmle 
Tannery Company, was bom in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, February 11, 1877, son of Nicholas and Mary 
(Klein) Weber. Nicholas Weber was bom in Al- 
sace, France, and fought in the French army dur- 
ing the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-71. In 1872 
he came to the United States and established the 
Weber Leather Company, of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
which he conducted until his death in 1900. His 
wife, Mary (Klien) Weber, died in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. 

John L. Weber, after completing school years, 
became associated wath his father in the leather 
business, and after the death of his father, in 
1900, he joined vnth his five brothers and until 
1912 these six sons of the founder conducted the 
business of the Weber Leather Company. In 1912 
the company dissolved, John L. Weber going to 
London, England, in the employ of Sir Percy 
Daniels. Shortly after Mr. Weber's return from 
London he became plant superintendent and chief 
tanner for H. S. & M. W. Snyder, Inc., continu- 
ing until the organization of the Webei^Laemm.le 
Tannei-y Company, January 1, 1921. Mr. Weber is 
a Catholic in religion, a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, Salem Chamber of Commerce, and the 
Colonial Club. 

Mr. Weber married Mary I. Gug, and they are 
the parents of four children: John N., Leo Fran- 
cis, Marion I., and Alice M. Weber. 



OLIVER J. AUDET — By a consecrated devotion 
to the trade of printing, Oliver J. Audet, of New- 
burjTJort, Massachusetts, has attained unusually 
lugh standing among the printers of Essex county. 
Beginning early in life to learn his vocation, 
when thoroughly prepared, he, by a strange con- 
trast, established himself in one of the oldest 
printing plants in the United States. The New- 
buryport Herald Press, which he bought, was one 
of the first eight papers to be published in this 
country, and was at the time of its demise, over a 
century and a half old. 

Oliver J. Audet was bom March 21, 1888, at 
Sherbrook, Province of Quebec, Canada, the son 
of Frank X. and Wilhemena (Lucas) Audet, well 
known citizen of Sherbrook who later came to 
Vermont. Frank X. Audet was a prosperous wheel- 
w^^ght and carpenter, who had a name for ability 
and reliability. Oliver J. received the greater part 
of his education in the public schools of Granite- 
ville, Vermont, but at the age of fifteen began to 
contribute to his own support. He secured a posi- 
tion in a print shop, and began to lay there 
the foundation of what later became a g^reat skill 



268 



ESSEX COUNTY 



in his trade. To leam all sides of printing, after 
four years in his first place, he traveled through 
the northeastern part of the United States, and 
before going into business for himself had worked 
in most of the best printing concerns in New 
England. 

In 191.'3 he bought the "Newburyport Herald," 
principally to own the fine plant and equipment 
that went with the newspaper. The paper was 
once known as the "Old Benjamin Franklin Press" 
and was one of the first news sheets to become 
estabhshed in this country. But the old must 
make way for the new, and shortly after the 
paper's one hundred and fifty-first anniversary of 
its birth, it ceased publication, as the rapidly 
developing business in job printing required the 
use of the whole plant. However, the shop still 
goes under the old trade name of the Newburj'- 
port Herald Press. Mr. Audet is a Republican 
voter, and fraternizes with the Newbui-yport Lodge, 
No. 1601, Loyal Order of Moose. He served for 
four years as sergeant of Company B, First Regi- 
ment, Vermont National Guard. 

On June 15, 1914, he was married, at New- 
buryport, to Edith Mary Hudson, daughter ol 
Joseph H. and Martha (Holden) Hudson, promi- 
nent residents of the city. Mr. and Mrs. Audet 
have one son, Harold Hudson Audet, born Octo- 
ber 10, 1918. 



HERBERT W. BURKHARDT— The Corona 
Company of Salem, Massachusetts, was organized 
by Herbert VV. Burkhardt in 1917, he conducting 
the business alone until 1919, when he admitted 
W. W. Peck to a partnership, they in 1920 ad- 
mitting Captain Charles Bourching, these now con- 
stituting the present ownership (1921). Herbert 
W. Burkhardt is a son of George F. Burkhardt, 
who was engaged in the brewing business in Bos- 
ton until his death in 1910. 

Herbert W. Burkhardt was bom in Boston, 
Massachusetts, March 9, 1886, and there attended 
the public schools. He finished his studies at Lee 
School, Biltmore, North Carolina, with the grad- 
uating class of 1906, then for eleven years was 
engaged as a forestry expert. In 1907 he organ- 
ized The Corona Company of Salem, for the 
manufacture of all kinds of drinks, and has built 
up a very large and profitable business. He is a 
member of the Salem Board of Trade, and of the 
Lutheran church, holding his membership in Bos- 
ton. 



JAMES NELSON HAMMOND— For many 
years active in the industrial world of Essex 
county, Massachusetts, James Nelson Hammond 
bore a pai-t in the progress of the community and 
the Commonwealth, and although a number of 
I years have passed since he left his work in other 
hands and went out into the "Great Unknown," 
he is still remembered as a staunch friend and a 
progressive citizen. 

James Nelson Hammond was bom in Natick, 



March 19, 1826, and educated in the public schools 
of that day. He early took up the responsibilities 
of life, and became employed in the manufacture 
of shoes, which he continued for fifteen years. 
Later he went into business for himself, handling 
express in Marlboro and Wayland, Massachu- 
setts, and also between those points, building up a 
successful business. After a considerable period, 
he disposed of his interests in this field, and 
entered upon a new industry, the manufacture of 
soda water. In this he was very successful, and 
developed a large business, in which he was en- 
gaged up to the time of his death. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hammond was a member of 
the Knights of Pythias, and he was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He was broadly 
interested in public progress, and always abreast 
of the times, although never an aspirant for public 
honors. 

Mr. Hammond's first wife, Susan R. Hammond, 
died on Easter Day of the year 1884. On June 
18, 1888, he manied Johanna Frances Collins. 
He was the father of four children: James Nel- 
son; Ellen Frances; John Nelson, who served 
with the 101st Artillery, 26th Division, American 
Expeditionary Forces, in France, receiving his dis- 
charge in May, 1919; and Edvnn Lee, who during 
the World War was commander of the aviation 
forces of the Great Lakes, remaining in this ser- 
vice until his discharge in July, 1919. 

As a respected citizen, as a beloved husband, as 
a revered father, James Nelson Hammond left in 
the hearts of those who knew him a void which 
has never been filled. He departed this life in 
1904, but his name will long command well- 
deserved honor in the annals of Essex county. 



WILLIAM H. BIGELOW, a native of Glou- 
cester, Massachusetts, but for many years resident 
in Lynn, where he is well-known, was born April 
25, 1875, the son of George and Jane (McGrath) 
Bigelow. His father was bom in Scotland, and his 
mother in Newfoundland. The foiTner died in 1909 
after an energetic life, the greater part of which 
was spent in this country. The family home was 
in Gloucester, Massachusetts, for very many years, 
and there the son, William H., went to school. 
He attended the public schools, and for some 
years after leaving was a coachman for various 
Anns in Boston and New York. In 1907 he en- 
tered the employ of J. P. Blood, of Lynn. He 
worked for him for three years, leaving to take a 
position with the Peerless Cement Company, of 
Lynn. Three years later he entered into business 
for himself, establishing the Shoe City Cement 
Company. The plant has been at the same ad- 
dress, 589 Washington street, Lynn, ever since, 
and has been satisfactorily developed by Mr. Bige- 
low during the ten years he has operated it. 

He has taken quite an active part in public 
and business affairs of Lynn, and has been especial- 
ly prominent in fraternal matters. For many 
years he has been delegate from Lynn to various 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



269 



conventions of fraternal organizations. Among 
those to which he belongs are the Knights of 
Columbus; the Elks; Moose; and Red Men. Mr. 
Bigelow is prominent in the local Kiwanis Club, 
being chairman of membership council. He also 
is a member of the Lynn Driving Club. 

Mr. Bigelow married in 1911 Lottie M. Jepson, 
of Swampscott. Mrs. Bigelow is of British pai- 
entage, daughter of Harry and Annie (MacDonald) 
Jepson, the former an Englishman by birth, and 
a silversmith by trade, while the latter, her 
mother, was of Scottish birth. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bigelow have four children: Anna M., bom in 
1912; Charlotte, bora in 1914; William H. Jr., 
born in 1916; and Neil Edward, born in 1919. 



GEORGE OTIS SMITH— For many years ac- 
tive in the industrial world of Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts, and also prominent in fraternal orders, 
George Otis Smith was a man thoroughly repre- 
sentative of the best citizenship, and although 
eight years have gone by since his passing, his 
name is often spoken of among those who knew 
him with the reverent respect which is eminently 
fitting. 

Mr. Smith was born in Newburjrport, November 
21, 1847, and came of a family of New England 
people always highly respected^ being a son of 
Edward and Sarah (Jackman) Smith. Receiving 
only the advantages of a pubUc school education, 
Mr. Smith early entered the world of industry, 
and being of a mechanical turn of mind, chose 
a career along this line of effort. For thirty-five 
years he was master mechanic at the hat shop 
in Newburyport. A thorough and careful work- 
man, yet quick, and capable in an emergency, he 
was very highly esteemed by liis employers, and 
was counted among the experts in his line. K 
death, on September 23, 1913, removed from this 
community a valued worker, an honored citizen 
and a beloved husband. 

Mr. Smith was a man who never sought public 
life, but fraternally he was widely known. I; 
was a prominent member of the Masonic order, 
and was a leading figure in the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, having been through all chair - 
and at the time of his death held the office of 
captain of cantons. 

Mr. Smith married Mary A. Nutter, who was 
bom in Amesbury, Massachusetts, December 18, 
1849, and was a daughter of Charles and Lydia 
A. (Repeal) Nutter, the family dating back to 
the War of 1812. Mrs. Smith is a prominent 
member of the Rebekahs, having been through 
all chairs of this order up to the highest degree, 
and now is past deputy. Mrs. Smith now resides 
in Amesbury. 



Connell. His parents were both of Irish birth, 
and for a while after coming to this country 
Patrick Connell was connected with the Massa- 
chusetts shoe manufacturing industry, later be- 
coming a merchant at West Newbury; he died 
in 1906. 

John Connell grew to manhood in his native 
place, attending the public school and afterwards 
finding employment in the plant of J. M. Stover, 
of Lowell, vrith whom he was connected for 
twenty-five years. He rose to responsible position, 
and for more than twenty years was foreman 
and eventually superintendent of the plant. He 
remained with Mr. Stover until the latter retired. 
During his time with Mr. Stover, Mr. Connell 
was also connected with his father in the coal 
business in West Newburyport, under the firm 
name of P. Connell & Son. This enterprise was 
continued until the death of the father in 1905. 
Soon aftei-wards, John Connell moved to Haver- 
hill, where in 1909 he started in business there as 
a coal merchant, his coal yard and business quar- 
ters being at No. 105 Prospect street. There he 
has continued until now, and has worked up a 
good connection. The business now is incorpor- 
porated and trades under the name of the Connell 
Coal Company, John Connell being treasurer. 
Mr. Connell is a member of the Haverhill Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and has many friends in the 
city. 

Mr. Connell married, in 1885, Margaret F. 
Cooney, of West Newbui-y, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Bartholomew and Hannah (Dacey) Cooney, 
who were both born in Ireland, but were long 
resident in this counti-y. Bartholomew Cooney 
was a comb maker, and died in 1903. Mr. and 
Mrs. Connell are the parents of eight children, 
as follows: Sherman J.; J. Everett; Helena J.; 
Mary E.; Edward M.; Richard H.; Arthur W.; 
and M. Florence. Three of the sons saw military 
service during the World War: Edward M. held a 
commission in the air service; Arthui- W. was in 
the Student Army Training Corps; and Richard 
H. in the United States navy. 



JOHN CONNELL, a well known coal merchant 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts, is a native of Essex 
county, and has lived his whole life in Mas3a- 
chusetts. He wa bom on July 19, 1857, at West 
Newbury, son of Patrick and Ellen (Murphy) 



ED. BERTRAM TRUMBULL— A deep sea 
sailor and master of ships, Captain Trumbull for 
twenty-two years braved the dangers of the deep, 
then retired to a well-earned home in Salem, 
where he is well known in business and civic life. 
During those years on shipboard, he rounded the 
Cape of Good Hope forty-four times, made seven 
voyages to India, and three times circumnavigated 
the world, visiting the islands of the Pacific, and 
the ports of China and Japan. He is a son of 
Captain Ed. H. Trumbull, a master mariner and 
vessel owner of Salem, where Tmmbulls have 
long been seated. 

Ed. Bertram Trumbull, son of Captain Ed. H. 
and Mary Ann Trumbull, was bom in Salem, 
Massachusetts, April 28, 1853. He attended Salem 
schools until fifteen years of age, then went to 
sea "before the mast," going through every phase 



7^,?0i^ 



270 



ESSEX COUNTY 



of a sailor's life before reaching the quarter-deck. 
He made three voyages as a forecastle hand, and 
rose through the petty offices to the rank of first 
mate, and for nine voyages sailed under that 
rating. He then was made master of a barqui 
in which he made seven voyages to East Indian 
ports before retiring. He was a brave and intrepid 
master, and a skilled navigator, holding the con- 
fidence of his ofiicers and crew. 

In 1892 Captain Trumbull, with others, or- 
ganized the Storage Warehouse Company, and 
erected a large fii-eproof warehouse on New Bridge 
street, Salem. He is also master and treasurer of 
the Salem Marine Society, a member of the Salem 
Club, and of the Universalist church. His home 
is at No. 90 Federal street, Salem, Massachusetts. 



RUSSELL BULLOCK, of Essex, is one of the 
group of younger men who are carrying forward 
the practical activities of the community. Mr. 
Bullock was bom in Essex, May 7, 1897, and is 
a son of Arthur M. and Althea (Story) Bullock. 
The elder Mr. Bullock is employed with the 
United Shoe Machinery Company, of Beverly, 
Massachusetts. As a boy Mr. Bullock attended the 
public schools of Essex, then for about three 
years was engaged in farming. Thereafter, he 
entered the employ of the United Shoe Machine 
Company, in Beverly, then returned to Essex, 
and became associated with the Charles W. Mears 
Ice Company, where he has since been employed. 

In 1918 Mr. Bullock enlisted in tlie United 
States Marine Corps, and was stationed at Paris 
Island, until September of that year, when ho 
joined the American Expeditionary Forces in 
France. There he took part in the Meuse Ar- 
gonne. He was discharged from the sei-vice at 
Camp Quantico, Virginia, in August, 1919, and 
returned immediately thereafter to Essex and to 
his former employment. Mr. Bullock is a mem- 
ber of the American Legion, and a member of 
the Universalist church, of Essex. 



EDWIN L. BLACKBURN, of the manufacturing 
firm of Blackburn & Haseltine, of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 
November 6, 1889, son of Lewis C. and Mary S. 
(Smith) Blackburn. Mr. Blackburn was educated 
in the public schools and attended the Haverhill 
Business College. His first experience in bu.siness 
was in the office of the Pacific Mills, and hir. 
second was with the Haseltine & Colby Manufac- 
turing Company, makers of women's turned shoes, 
with a capacity of five hundred pair a day. Mr. 
Blackburn acquii-ed an interest in this company 
and succeeded Mr. Colby as partner, the firm 
name changing in 1919 to its present form. 

Mr. Blackburn married in 1907 Mary A. Shar- 
key, daughter of Patrick and Mary (Tiemey) 
Sharkey, and their children are: M. Dorothea, M. 
Viola, E. Raymond, and R. Marjorie. 



Enstrom is now a manufacturer of fine tools in 
Lynn. Mr. Enstrom is a son of Olef John En- 
strom, now deceased, who was bom in Sweden, 
March 23, 1826, and was a man of considerable 
prominence in his native country, being principal 
of a school. He manied Mary Linbeck, who was 
born in Sweden, February 28, 1838. 

Olef Axel Enstrom was bom in Sweden, Sep- 
tember 5, 1881, and educated in the public schools 
of his native land. Coming to the United States 
in 1903, he was employed in various activities 
until 1909, when he entered the employ of the 
Waltham Watch Company, of Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts, with whom he remained for two years. 
Then coming to Lynn, he was employed on watch 
work here until 1916, after which he was in Re- 
vere, Massachusetts, for a period of four years. 
Then returning to Lynn in July, 1920, Mr. Enstrom 
established his present factory for the manufacture 
of fine tools, and although not yet two years 
have passed, he has developed a thriving business 
which promises much for the future under h:?, 
capable management. In the public affairs of his 
adopted country, Mr. Enstrom takes a deep in- 
terest, and supports the Republican party. He 
attends the Bajjtist church in Lynn. 

Mr. Enstrom married, October 22, 1905, Hannah 
Lillydale, of Lynn, who was bom in this city. 
May 19, 1875, and is a daughter of Carl and 
Christian Lillydale, her father being a builder in 
Lynn. Mr. and Mrs. Enstrom have three chil- 
dren: Sijne Marion, bom June 9, 1906; Robert 
Axel, bom March 5, 1911; and Richard Melvin, 
born May 29, 1919. The two older children attend 
the public schools of Lynn. 



OLEF AXEL ENSTROM— Long identified with 
the watch industry in Massachusetts, Olef Axel 



LOUIS LETOILE, of Haverhill, was bom in the 

United States, of French-Canadian parents, but 
his grandfather, Prospere Letoile, was bom in 
France. His father, also Prospere Letoile, was 
bom in 1850, and had fourteen children, ten of 
whom are still living, among them Louis. 

Louis Letoile was born at St. John, Maine, 
September 4, 1882, but his boyhood and youth were 
spent in Canada. He was educated in Canadian 
grammar schools, and after leaving school assisted 
his father in the work of the home farm for 
some time. He was only twenty-one year;; o 
when he married, and for some time before thn' 
he was working for Samuel Whittimore, a bric^' 
manufacturer, of Haverhill, who was destined to 
become his father-in-law. However, Loms Letoile 
w"ent from that trade to roofing and tinninir, an'' 
for seventeen years was with James Wilson, of 
Haverhill, in that line of business. In 1920, he de- 
cided to venture into business for himself, and 
from then to the present he has done a satis- 
factoi-y volume of work in roofing, slate, tin, and 
copper. His address is No. 10 Eighteenth avf- 
nue, Haverhill. He is a member of the local 
lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose, and is a mem 
ber of the Catholic church. 

Mr. Letoile married, in Haverhill, in 1903, Jean- 
nette Whittimore, who was bom in New York City, 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



271 



n 1881, daughter of Samuel and Matilde (Leyvesy) 
Whittimore. Mr. and Mrs. Letoile have fovu- chil- 
dren: Willie, bom in 1908; George, born in 1910; 
Emile, bom in 1913; and Leo, bom in 1916. 



FRANK L. DONOVAN was bom in Silver 
Lake, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, Septem- 
ber 16, 1877, and is a son of John F. and Mary 
J. Donovan, natives of Pennsylvania, who are now 
residents of Methuen, Massachusetts. John F. 
Donovan is a veteran of the Civil War, having 
served for three years with the 17th Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infanti-y. He is a farmer 
by occupation. 

Receiving his early education in the public 
schools of his native place, Frank L. Donovan at- 
tended high school at Montrose, county seat of 
Susquehanna county, then, at the age of nineteen 
years, came to Lawrence, and engaged in the 
retail tobacco business, in which branch of ac- 
tivity he continued for twenty years, or until 191G. 
Meanwhile, Mr. Donovan had been connected for 
years wth the niilitai-y service, both State and 
National. In 1897 he joined the Massachusetts 
National Guard, and saw service in Cuba with 
Company F, 9th Regiment, Massachusetts Infan- 
try, with the rank of corporal, accompanying Gen- 
eral Shafter to Santiago. He was in Cuba for 
four months. In 1900 he was appointed seconi 
lieutenant of the same organization; in 1902 he 
was promoted to first lieutenant; in 1904 to cap- 
tain, and in 1912 to major. In June, 1916, Majo;- 
Donovan saw service on the Mexican border, then, 
v?ith the intervention of the United States in 
Europe, early in 1917 he went to Fort Sill, Okla- 
homa, where he spent several months in a machine 
gun training school. In August, 1917, he rejoined 
his regiment, which had become the 101st Infan- 
try, Massachusetts National Guard, and, as major 
of this regiment, became a part of the 26th Di- 
vision, American Expeditionary Forces. He saw 
service in France for nineteen months, and was 
discharged in April, 1919, and upon his return to 
civilian life established a garage and service 
station, under the name of the Donovan Motor 
Company, which he has now disposed of. Mr. Don- 
ovan is a member of the Spanish War Veterans, 
of the American Legion, and of the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars. 

Mr. Donovan married, on January 1, 1900. 
Lawrence, Anna Keating, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, and they have six children, two boys and 
four girls. The family are members of St. Law- 
rence Roman Catholic Church of Lawrence. 



PAUL N. CHAPUT, real estate and insurance 
man of Salem, Massachusetts, was bom in St. 
Damase, Canada, on September 2.5, 1862, and is a 
son of Edouard and Philonise (Duchene) Chaput. 
The family left their Canada home and removed 
to Salem m 1876, and he received the greater 
share of his education in the schools of Salem 
attending school in the morning and working in 



the mills in the afternoon, in order to help his 
father in the care of his five brothers and one 
sister. For a long time he attended evening 
school regularly, taking the advanced studies 
which would prepare him for a business career. 
In 188.5 he started in the retail grocery business in 
Salem, beginning in a modest way. Having a nat- 
ural talent for business, and being honest and 
straightforward in all his dealings, he was soon 
on the way to success. This first business he car- 
ried on uninteiTuptedly for twenty-three years. 
After the grocery store was an established and 
assured thing, he acquired a shoe store, then later 
on a general hardware business, and still later an- 
other gi-ocery store. So at one time he owned 
four stores — two gi-oceries, one shoe and one hard- 
ware store. In 1908 he made a radical change 
in his line of business. He sold out all his stores 
and established liimself in the fire insurance and 
real estate business. He became agent for fifteen 
different companies, and sole agent for some old 
line companies. Making his own way in this 
branch of business activity, Mr. Chaput has placed 
liimself among the foremost men in this business, 
and himself owns large holdings in real estate. 

Aside from the interests outlined above, Mr. 
Chaput is treasurer of Le Coun-ier Publishing 
Company, publishing the French weekly news- 
paper, "Le Courier de Salem," and the "Le Cour- 
rier de Lynn." He was one of the original or- 
ganizers of the company which launched tliis 
periodical in 1902. Mr. Chaput is a member of the 
City Council from the Fifth Ward. In 1894 he 
was on the Board of Aldermen as alderman-at- 
large. For five years, from 1903 to 1907 inclu- 
sive, he was on the committees for streets, 
bridges, sewers, and public property, on the mili- 
tary aid committee and on the committee on re- 
counts. He was also a member of the commit- 
tee formed to draft a new form of govemment 
for the city of Salem. He is a Republican, and is 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and vice- 
president of the Bay State Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, of Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Chaput is a strong believer in total absti- 
nence, and has spent a great deal of time and 
labor in advancing that cause in this vicinity. He 
is a member and for many years has been an 
enthusiastic worker in the No License League, and 
in the Father Matthew Total Abstinence Society 
of Salem; and is a member and director of the 
Total Abstinence Society of Massachusetts. He 
is also a member of the Salem Associated Chari- 
ties. In fratemal circles Mr. Chaput is a promi- 
nent figure. He is a member of the Society of 
St. Jean de Baptiste, the Union of St. Jean de 
Baptiste of America, the Artizans, the Catholic 
Foresters, the United Workmen of America, and 
St. Joseph's Mutual Benefit Association. 

Mr. Chaput married, in Lynn, Massachusetts, in 
November, 1886, Josephine Brulotte, daughter of 
Isadora and Delphine (Ratte) Brulotte. They are 
members of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church. 



272 



ESSEX COUNTY 



GEORGE M. BYARD, who for thirty years has 
been in business in Haverhill, latterly in the 
automobile business, was bom in Sedgwick, Maine, 
September 23, 18G8, the son of James P. and 
Mary E. (Means) Byard, of that place, the former 
a merchant, now deceased. 

George M. Byard was educated in the public 
schools of his native place, and after leaving 
school worked for his father, who owned a gen- 
eral store. In 1890 he came to Haverhill, and 
entered into business partnership with a Mr. Ather- 
ton, the partnership name being Atherton & 
Byard. The business association continued until 
1918, when Mr. Byard withdrew from the partner^ 
ship, which during its very many years of con- 
tinuance had been conducted at No. 15 Washing- 
ton square, Haverhill. After a needed vacation, 
Mr. Byard again entered energetically into busi- 
ness, establishing himself at No. 8 White street 
in April, 1919, his line being autos and auto 
supplies. In February, 1921, the business was re- 
moved to the rear of No. 15 Essex street, where 
he has ample salesroom and garage space. Hav- 
ing lived in Haverhill for more than thirty years, 
Mr. Byard is well known in that vicinity, and ho 
is considered a good business man. 

Mr. Byard married, in 1889, Alice L. Eaton, 
daughter of John G. and Olivia (Russell) Eaton, 
of Sedgwick, Maine. They have two children: 
Roy P., now a veteran of the World War, with 
overseas record, and eighteen months war senico 
in a supply train; and Lloyd E., also an ex-service 
man, stationed at Camp Merritt, 1917-19. 



JAMES E. SHEA, was bom at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, on November 25, 1892, and is a son of 
James J. and Armie P. (Brown) Shea. His father 
is in the Government Postal Service at Boston. 
His mother was born in England, and came to the 
United States from Manchester, England. 

Mr. Shea received his early education in the 
public schools of Roxbury, Massachusetts, grad- 
uating from the high school with the class of 
1910. After his school rays were over, Mr. Shea 
decided to become a sign painter, and foiTned a 
connection with the O. J. Gude Company, of New 
York City, for the purpose of learning the trade. 
He later associated himself with the Los Angeles 
Sign and Scenery Company. After leaving the Los 
Angeles Sign and Scenei-y Company, he spent 
seven years in the service of the Haverhill Sign 
Company. At the end of this period, feeling fully 
equipped for the management of a business of his 
own, he entered into partnership vwth T. B. Bo- 
land, under the firm name of the Essex Sign 
Company; the partners conduct a sign painting 
business, with offices at the rear of No. 138 Merri- 
mack street, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Shea enlisted during the World War in the 
United States navy on July 24, 1917, and was 
assigned to the medical department, Naval Radio 
Station, Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was later 
transferred to the U. S. S. "Newport News," on 



which ship he remained until his discharge. Mr. 
Shea is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and also belongs to the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

Mr. Shea married, in 1915, Bertha W. Sullivan, 
of Bradford, Massachusetts. Mrs. Shea, who was 
a daughter of Michael C. and Elizabeth J. 
(Brown) Sullivan, of Ireland, died in 1919. Her 
father was a stationary engineer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shea had one son, James E. Jr., deceased. 



RICHARD T. FENNESSEY has, for the past 
twenty years or more, been active in the business 
and pubUc life of Danvers, Massachusetts, and 
for several years of this period filled the office of 
postmaster. 

Mr. Fennessey was born in Danvers, April 25, 
1873, and is a son of William J. and Rebecca 
(Corey) Fennessey. William J. Fennessey was 
identified with the shoe industry during the greater 
part of his active life. Three children were bom 
to William J. and Rebecca (Corey) Fennessey: 
Richard T., of whom further; Mary J., and Charles. 

Gaining a thoroughly practical education in the 
gi'ammar and high schools of the town, Richard 
T. Fennessey was thereafter engaged for three 
years in the bakery business with his brother. 
He then became a salesman for Cobb, Bates & 
Yei-xa, in which connection he remained for two 
years, later becoming associated vsrith Ralph 
WheelvvTight in the gi'ocei-y business for two 
years. Following these activities, Mr. Fennessey, 
for a considerable period, handled the Lynn 
agency for the Pi-udential Life Insurance Com- 
pany, wi-iting fii'e insurance at the same time. 
The fire insurance business developed so rapidly 
that in the end he was obliged to give up the 
original line upon which he started and devote 
himself to fire insurance exclusively. 

By political choice a Democrat, Mr. Fennessey 
long ago became a factor in the public life of 
Danvers. From 1901 to 1916 he was treasurer of 
the Democratic Town Committee, and from 1912 
to 1916 he was chairman of that committee. On 
September 4, 1916, he was appointed postmaster 
of Danvers, and he has the distinction of being 
the youngest postmaster who ever served this 
tovm. 

Mr. Fennessey is a member of the Danvers 
Board of Ti-ade, and is a member and ex-president 
of the Retail Clerks' Association. He is a member 
of the Irish Historical Society of the United 
States; is past chief ranger of the Massachusetts 
Catholic Order of Foresters; past sachem of Aga- 
wam Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men; and is 
a member of the Knights of Columbus. His re- 
ligious faith is that of the Roman Catholic. 



J. EDWARD CLEARY, part-owner of the 
Haverhill Tire Shop, in which business is em- 
braced the trading in tires. Ford automobile parts, 
accessories, oil, gas, and service to automobile 
owners, is actively conducting a productive busi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



273 



ness enterprise in his home town. He was born 
in Haverliill, Massachusetts, on December 24, 
18S9, son of Patrick and Mary (O'Brien) Cleary. 
His parents were respected Haverhill residents, 
though his father will be remembered well by 
only some of the older residents, as his death oc- 
curred twenty-eight years ago, in 1894. After 
passing through Haverhill public schools, J. Ed- 
ward Cleary found employment with J. H. Win- 
chell, for whom he worked for twelve years. For 
eight years, thereafter, he was private chauffeur 
for R. A. Splain, leaving at the end of that time 
to enter into business for himself. He formed 
business partnersliip with O. H. Daley, and they 
acquired the business of J. H. Langelim, who 
had an established automobile supply business in 
Haverhill. After the transfer, the partners estab- 
lished the Haverhill Tire Shop, and since, as 
above noted, have been large dealers in automobile 
tires. Ford automobile parts, and, in general, 
automobile accessories. They also own a service 
station, which is well situated on Lafayette Square. 
Altogether, the business is an appreciable one. 
Mr. Cleary is well known to many people in 
Haverhill. He is a member of the Roman Cath- 
olic church, and the local body of the Knights 
of Columbus. 

Mr. Cleary married, in 1912, Rosalie Lucier, of 
Haverhill, daughter of Albert and Delia (Laurent) 
Lucier, the former now a patrolman at Lawi-ence, 
Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Cleary have three 
children: Curtiss Adams, who was born in 1913; 
Dorothy, bom in 1916; and Marjorie, born in 
1918. 



ALFRED J. MARTEL— One of the most com- 
pletely equipped and modern undertaking establish- 
ments in Lawrence, Massachusetts, is that of 
Alfred J. Martel, who is receiving the patronage 
of the leading families of this section. 

Mr. Martel was bom in Chicoutimi, Province 
of Quebec, in 1879, and came to Massachusetts 
at the age of six years with his parents, the fam- 
ily locating in Webster. It was there that the 
boy attended the parochial and public schools, and 
acquired a practical foundation for the future. 
He finished his studies at the Brochu Academy, 
at Southbridge, Massachusetts, and was graduated 
from that institution in 1896. Immediately there- 
after, Mr. Martel entered the employ of the lead- 
ing undertakers of that place, remaining with 
them for a period of nine years. 

In 1915 Mr. Martel entered the undertaking 
business for himself, making his start in San- 
ford, Maine. Three years later, however, he re- 
moved to Lawrence and established the present 
business. He has developed a considerable inter- 
est, and his business, which is modem in every 
way, with fine motor equipment, is constantly 
growing, and as a licensed embalmer, Mr. Martel 
is keeping abreast of every forward movement 
in his profession. 

Mr. Martel is a member of the Benevolent and 



Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 65; of the 
French Artisans, and of the Catholic Order of 
Foresters. He is also a member of St. Joseph's 
Society, and of the Council of Chenier. He is a 
member of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce; 
his religious faith places his membership in St. 
Anne's Roman Catholic Chui-ch, and he is a mem- 
ber of the Societe St. Jean de Baptiste. 

Mr. Martel manied, in 1905, Sylvina Lafrance, 
of Southbridge, Massachusetts, and they have one 
daughter, Andrea. 



ERNEST N. OILMAN— Very old residents of 
Haverhill will perhaps remember the Thompson 
Express, which began to operate in 1845. For 
many years the business was conducted under 
that name, and it may be deemed to be still in 
business, for the Carter Russell Company of the 
present is the direct successor of that early ex- 
press line. The business has of course been very 
much expanded, and the present company is really 
an amalgamation of several express companies of 
Haverhill, but its beginning was in the Thompson 
Express of 1845. The company today conducts 
the largest express service in Haverhill and vicin- 
ity, employs fifty people in Haverhill and Boston, 
and has constant need for eight large motor 
trucks. 

Ernest N. Oilman, of Haverhill, is the owner of 
the Carter Russell Company. He was born in 
Exeter, New Hampshire, on December 3, 1856, son 
of John and CaroUne F. (Chapman) GOman, and 
grandson of John Oilman, of New Hampshire. 
Both grandfather and father were engaged in the 
lumber business, the latter for many years in 
New Brunswick, Canada. Emest N. Oilman was 
educated in Exeter, New Hampshire, schools, and 
also for the greater part of his life was identi- 
fied with lumbering. He came to Haverhill and 
acquired the Carter Russell Company. It has 
been considerably developed since he came into 
possession, and today, with fifty persons steadily 
employed, it is a large business. He is a mem- 
ber of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, and 
fraternally is a Mason, a member of the Merrimac 
lodge of Haverhill. 

Mr. Oilman married Edith L. Shannon, of 
Haverhill, and to them were born two children, 
one of whom is now living. Their first bom, John 
S., is deceased; their surviving son is Emest P. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oilman are members of the Con- 
gregational church, of Bradford. 



TERRY ARDEN NEWHALL— An enterprising 
coal merchant in Lynn, Terry A. Newhall is bear- 
ing a part in the general prosperity of the com- 
munity. 

Mr. Newhall was bom in Lynn, September 27, 
1872, and is a son of Timothy Alley and Sarah 
(Stacy) Newhall, formerly of this city. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of Lynn, 
and after such industrial activities as he followed 
immediately thereafter, he entered the coal busi- 



274 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ness at the age of twenty-one years. He has 
continued in this branch of mercantile endeavor 
until the present time (1922). 



JAMES AUGUSTUS KEEFE, a time type of 
the alert, ambitious business man found in many 
American cities, was born in Andover, Massachu- 
setts, in 186."), and died at Haverhill. He at- 
tended school in Andover, and when a young 
man, came to Haverhill, where through his busi- 
ness operations he was to become prominent and 
successful. 

One of the very first clothing stores to be 
opened in Haverhill was the one started by Mr. 
Keefe, which he continued to expand and manage 
until his death. There are many of the older 
residents who remember the first venture made by 
Mr. Keefe, and his subsequent success, who can 
contrast the present day with that time. Mr. 
Keefe was a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and of St. James' Church. 

Mr. Keefe married Johanna Powers, bom in 
Haverhill, in 1867, daughter of Nicholas Powers. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Keefe were: William 
J., Dorothy, James A., Elsie, Winifred, Katherine, 
and Charlotte. The mother of this family and her 
children live on the old homestead in Haverhill, 
and all are attendants of St. James' Church. 



HARRY CARVETH was born in Cornwall, 

England, in 1891, son of Harry and Agnes 
(Mitchell) Carveth. His parents were natives of 
Comwell, and there his father died in 1891. The 
son was educated in the public schools, and his 
first experience in business was as a clerk in a 
general store. After three years at this occupa- 
tion he entered the business of general gardening, 
and this work led him to accept a position as 
kennel manager for Lady Decies, of Ascot, Eng- 
land. Mr. Carveth was always a great lover of 
animals, and until 1914 he remained at Ascot. In 
the latter year he left his native land and came 
to America, locating at Hamilton. There he en- 
tered the employ of the Robert Jordan Kennels, 
work similar to that which he had been following 
in England. After two years he went into the 
garage business, working for George Checketts of 
Hamilton, and three years later he bought the 
business of his employer, which he conducted under 
the name of the Hamilton and Wenham Garage. 

In 1917 Mr. Carveth, with true American spirit, 
enlisted in the Depot Brigade, located at Camp 
Devens, and in February, 1918, was transferred to 
the 5th Division, 5th Ammunition Train, and for 
fifteen months served overseas with the American 
Expeditionary Forces. He was discharged July 31, 
1919, with the rank of corporal. Mr. Carveth re- 
turned to Hamilton and took up the thread of his 



business where he had left it to defend his adopted 
country, although at the same time he was render- 
ing aid to his native land. At the present time 
Mr. Carvath is employed in Salem, Massachusetts. 
He is a member of the American Legion Post, No. 
182, Gordon Prince Post of Hamilton. 

Mr. Carveth married, in 1911, Florence Robert 
Hore, of Cornwall, and they attend the Methodist 
church, of Hamilton. 



BERTRAM W. MEARS— One of the leading ice 
dealers in Essex is Bertram W. Mears, who was 
born and reared in this town, and comes of New 
England ancestry. Mr. Mears was bom October 
7, 1884, and is a son of Charles W. and Nellie M. 
(Thurston) Mears. The elder Mr. Mears is a 
wholesale dealer in ice, doing business here in 
Essex. The mother was bom in Wolfboro, New 
Hampshire. 

Receiving a practical education in the public 
schools, Bertram W. Mears later took charge of 
the plant of the Chelsea Ice Company, of Chelsea, 
Massachusetts, remaining with that concern for 
seven years. He then spent about a year in the 
employ of the General Electric Company, of Lynn, 
after which he returned to Essex. He has since 
been engaged in the retail ice business, under the 
name of the B. W. Mears Ice Company, and ia 
very successful in his chosen field of activity. Mr. 
Mears is interested in every phase of public ad- 
vancement. He has been road surveyor for the 
past seven years. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, of uniform rank, and is a member of 
the American Order of Foresters. In 1905 Mr. 
Mears married Annie E. Kenney, of East Boston, 
and they attend the Congregational church. 



PATRICK A. McSWEENEY, son of Dennis 
and Mary McSweeney, was bom in Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, August 11, 1873, and there was educated 
in the public schools. He began business life as a 
shoe factory worker and so continued for several 
years. He then entered the real estate and in- 
surance field, his agency now well established and 
widely known. He is president and trustee of the 
Loring Realty Company, a director of the Salem 
Trust Company, and has other varied and im- 
portant interests. Mr. McSweeney is secretary of 
Salem Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; treasurer of Father Mathew Total Abstin- 
ence Society; member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles; Knights of Columbus, and the Roman 
Catholic church. 

He married, in Peabody, Massachusetts, Novem- 
ber 21, 1900, Mary E. Regan, daughter of Michael 
and Mary Regan. Mr. and Mrs. McSweeney are 
the parents of three children: Mary A., bom De- 
cember 27, 1901; William H., bom December 17, 
1902; and Morgan J., bom May 29, 1915. 



THE NO' ^^"'>K 
PUBLIC LIBK^R' 

ASTOR, LENOX 




JiUcl^Ajf yvjuL^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



321 



HERBERT WEED— Widely known in Eastern 

Massachusetts and leaders in their field in Lynn, the 
firm of Sanborn & Weed, architects, is taking a prom- 
inent place in the continual advance movement in the 
world of construction. 

Mr. Weed, the junior member of this firm, was born 
in Lynn, November l, 1889, and is a son of Frederick 
Ellsworth and Gertrude (Ward) Weed, long residents 
of this city. As a boy Mr. Weed attended the public 
schools of Lynn, and also covered the high school 
course, then, later, attended the Lynn Evening School 
of Mechanical and .Architectural Drawing, still later 
also taking a course at the Boston Architectural Club 
of Construction and Design. These higher courses 
were carried through after he had taken his place 
among the workers of the world, his first position being 
as office boy in the office where he is now a partner, in 
the employ of Mr. Sanborn. Putting forth every effort 
to achieve success in his chosen field, Mr. Weed rose 
from the position of office boy, filling all the different 
positions in turn. He was a trusted assistant and well 
known in the profession when the United States inter- 
vened in the World War. The necessary restrictions 
placed upon the building trades by the government 
relieved him of much responsibility, and he was chosen 
for technical work in the plant oi the General Electric 
Company of Lynn, and during the period of the war 
he continued with that concern. Then, in 1919, with 
building restrictions removed, and the impetus given 
the building trades, by the bringing into action of 
deferred plans for expansion and construction, Mr. 
Weed returned to his duties in the office of Mr. San- 
born, at the same time becoming a member of the firm. 
He has since been an active factor in the progress of 
the concern, and has designed a number of noteworthy 
structures, including the Olympic Theatre, of Lynn, the 
Grossman building, "The Breakers," home for the 
American Legion, Post No. 6, and many fine resi- 
dences. With his long training under Mr. Sanborn's 
direction, he is taking a leading position in the pro- 
fession. 

Mr. Weed is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
the Kiwanis Club. He finds his favorite relaxation in 
music. 

On September 14, 1912, Mr. Weed married Beatrice 
A. Abbot, daughter of Joseph Benjamin Abbot, of 
Swampscott, Massachusetts, and they have two sons : 
Gilbert Calvin, and Warren .A.bbot. 



GEORGE H. MARQUETTE— Born in Haverhill 
almost four decades ago, for almost a generation 
actively in business in the city, and latterly as the 
head of a well established manufacturing concern of 
the place, George H. Marquette may be looked upon 
as a representative resident. 

George Henry Marquette was born on March 10, 
1883, the son of George and Elizabeth Marquette. After 
passing through the public schools of the city, George 
IL Marquette began business life in the employ of the 
New England Telephone Company, and was connected 
with the Haverhill branch of that public service com- 
pany for four years, leaving to enter the employ of 

Essex — 2 — 21 



C. W. Arnold, a cut sole manufacturer, of Haverhill. 
He remained in his employ for fourteen years, begin- 
ning as shipping clerk, and gradually working up to 
salesman. He was a successful traveling salesman for 
that firm for several years prior to 1915, in which 
year he started the F. .Archibald Company, of Haver- 
hill, engaged in the cut sole business, an association 
which continued to mutual advantage until June I, 
1918, when Mr. Marquette started the firm of the G. H. 
Marquette Company, and in January, 191 9, took E. A. 
Sheridan as an active partner and doing business under 
the name of Sheridan & Marquette. It was not long 
before Mr. Marquette had to assume full direction of 
the business, Mr. Sheridan dying. Eventually, Mr. 
Marquette, with the cooperation of Henry N. Bean, 
established the firm of Marquette & Company, which 
soon entered upon a satisfactory volume of production. 
The plant is situated on River street, and the company 
specializes in women's cut soles for high class lines of 
welt shoes. 

Mr. Marquette is well known in the Massachusetts 
shoe industry, and has a fair share of the local trade 
with manufacturers. He is a member of all the local 
Masonic bodies, is affiliated with the Commercial Trav- 
elers' Association, and socially belongs to the Agawam 
and Pentucket clubs. He is a Baptist, a member of 
the First Baptist Church of Haverhill. 

Mr. Marquette has been twice married. In 1906 he 
married Angle M. Yeaton, who died in 1912, having 
given birth to one child, a daughter, Patience Alden, 
who was born in 1907. In 191 6 Mr. Marquette mar- 
ried (second) Bertha E. Herzog, daughter of Carl and 
Minnie (Zuber) Herzog, who were of German birth, 
but had long been residents of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, where the former is still living in retirement. 
The children of George H. and Bertha E. (Herzog) 
Marquette are: Eliese, born in 1918; and Nance, born 
in 1919. Mr. and Mrs. Marquette live at No. 21 Fern- 
wood avenue, Haverhill. 



JOSEPH R. BOYD— Among the growing manufac- 
turing concerns connected with the Haverhill shoe 
manufacturing industry is the Boyd Leather Company, 
of which Joseph R. Boyd is the owner. It is less than 
three years since the company was established, yet it 
may now be stated to be well established and showing 
a promising expansion, due of course to the capable 
direction Mr. Boyd has held over its operations. 

Joseph R. Boyd was born in Arcadia, Nova Scotia, 
on February 23, 1880, son of George F. and Mary 
CRobbins) Boyd, of that place. The former was a 
shoe maker, and died in 1902, but the mother of Joseph 
R. Boyd survived her husband for eighteen years, her 
demise not occurring until 1920. 

Joseph R. Boyd rose to manhood in his native place. 
He attended the Arcadia school in his boyhood and 
youth, and after leaving school, worked for four years 
in the tannery of Joseph Robbins, at Arcadia, thus 
gaining good knowledge of leather. He came to Haver- 
hill in 1899, and for a year thereafter worked for Len- 
nox & Briggs Company, his next employers being Pros- 
ser & Smith, with which firm he stayed for two and a 
half years. For a while he was with W. W. Appleton, 



322 



ESSEX COUNTY 



and later with George H. Webster, both of Haverhill, 
and his last years of service were with the Durkee 
Leather Company, of Haverhill. He was foreman in 
the plant of that company for five years, leaving them 
in 1 919 to establish the Boyd Leather Company. He 
opened a manufacturing plant at No. 317 Groveland 
street, Haverhill, in September, 1919, and since has 
specialized in the manufacture of children's soles, taps, 
and counters. He knows the leather and shoe business 
thoroughly, and is active and enterprising, so there is 
no good reason for believing that his first years of 
good independent business will not be followed by 
others just as good, and that his volume of production 
will not continue to increase as the years pass. Mr. 
Boyd applies himself closely to his business. 

Mr. Boyd married (first), in 1906, Minerva R. Tay- 
lor, of Amesbury, who died in 1907, having borne him 
a son, Kenneth T., born in that year. More than four 
years later, in December, 191 1, Mr. Boyd married (sec- 
ond) Alice L. Glines, of Haverhill, daughter of Fer- 
naldo A. and Martha D. (Hamlin) Glines, the former 
a butcher in Haverhill until his death, which occurred 
in 1913. To Joseph R. and Alice L. (Glines) Boyd has 
been born one child, a daughter, Dorothy L., born in 
1916. 



URBAN W. LEAVITT— In the year 1865, which 
brought an end to the Civil War, the two Hanscom 
brothers established themselves in business in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, as hardware merchants, at No. 30 
Main street. The business is still being continued, and 
what is more has grown until its trading embraces not 
only local trade, but a considerable volume of trading 
throughout the northern states, and especially in New 
England. The business was conducted for thirty-five 
years under the name of Hanscom Brothers, in 1900 
becoming the Hanscom Hardware Company. It, how- 
ever, still remained a private partnership, corporate 
powers not being sought until 1908, when it became the 
Hanscom Hardware Company, Inc., under which name 
it has since been conducted. When the company was 
reconstructed and incorporated in 1908, John Mason 
became president, and Urban W. Leavitt the treasurer 
of the new company, and these two men are still the 
chief executives. The business has expanded to note- 
worthy dimensions, and latterly the company has 
required three buildings for the proper conduct of its 
business. They have about 45,000 square feet of floor 
space, and use it all, which is an indication of the 
extent of their trading. It is said that the business of 
the Hanscom Hardware Company, Inc., is about double 
that of any other Haverhill hardware firm. They man- 
ufacture the well known Saggahew brand of sporting 
goods, which is in demand throughout the northern and 
eastern States. 

Urban W. Leavitt is a native of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, born in the city on December 28, 1886, son of 
George E. and Laura A. (Whittaker) Leavitt, of that 
place, where the former was in business, as contractor 
and builder, until his death in 1891. Urban W. was 
then only in his fifth year, but his mother was able to 
care for him, and he was educated in the Haverhill 
public schools, being able to remain in school until he 
had passed through the high school, a member of the 



class of 1905. He afterwards took a course at the 
Haverhill Business College. He showed good business 
aptitude very soon after entering commercial afltairs, 
and soon became credit man with the Hanscom Hard- 
ware Company, Inc., three years later taking part in 
the reconstruction of the company, and becoming its 
treasurer, which capacity he has since held. 

Mr. Leavitt is a Mason, holding membership up to 
the commandery, and belongs to Haverhill bodies of 
that order. Socially he belongs to the Agawam Club, 
of Haverhill. He is widely known in the city and 
vicinity. 

Mr. Leavitt married, in 1914, Florence White, of 
Haverhill, daughter of J. W. and Hattie F. (Silloway) 
White, the former a merchant of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts. Mr. and Mrs. Leavitt have two children: Laura 
Frances, born in 1015; and Christine Louise, born in 
1917. 



FATHER JOSEPH HECTOR COTfi, of Ames- 
bury, Massachusetts, was born in Saint Francois, Que- 
bec, Canada, July 28, 1873, son of Alfred and Alize 
(Paul) Cote, who were both of Canadian birth. He 
was educated for the priesthood at the seminary in 
Nicolet, Canada, and was ordained to the priesthood on 
July 2, 1899. Entering upon work in holy orders as 
curate at Nicolet, Canada, he remained there in that 
capacity for four years, until March of 1903, when he 
was appointed to a curacy in the United States. For 
the next two years he was curate in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, and for eight years thereafter was pastor at 
Shirley, Massachusetts, leaving that parish in 1913 to 
come to Amesbury as pastor of the Sacred Heart Church 
of that place. That has been his station and office 
since, but in addition Father Cote is head of the Sacred 
Heart Parochial School, which is in high standing 
among the schools of Essex county. Its enrollment is 
now about four hundred and fifty scholars, and its 
curriculum is equal to that of other public schools of 
its class. The school teaching staff consists of eleven 
sisters of a Catholic order. 

The Sacred Heart Church is one of the oldest French- 
Canadian Catholic churches in the Amesbury district, 
and the parish embraces more than 2,000 people. Father 
Cote is widely respected in that part of Massachusetts, 
as is Father Bernard, curate at Amesbury. 



RALPH WALDO BARNARD, business man, of 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, was born in Candia, New 
Hampshire, March 27, 1894, son of James L. and Ida 
May (Sargent) Barnard. His father was engaged in 
the shoe industry until his retirement in 1915. 

The public schools of Haverhill and the Peterboro 
School for Boys afforded Mr. Barnard his early edu- 
cation, and soon after leaving school he went to work 
in Boston, Massachusetts, where he was employed by 
the Boston Optical Company, remaining for a year, at 
the end of which time he returned to Haverhill, and 
there following the same line of business, was employed 
by the M. J. Fowler Company, in the capacity of fore- 
man of the bench-room, where the making and repair- 
ing of glasses is carried on. For eleven years he 
remained with this company, adding to his experience 
and knowledge of the business ; in 1919 he became a 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



323 



registered optometrist, and two years later engaged in 
business on his own account, associating himself with 
E. W. Longfellow, of Newburyport. Fraternally, Mr. 
Barnard is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Knights of Pytliias. 

Mr. Barnard married, in 191 7, Doris Haseltine Bailey, 
of Haverhill, and their children are: Doris Barbara, 
and Ralph Waldo, Jr. Mrs. Barnard's father, David 
Bailey, is engaged in the clothing business in Haver- 
hill. With his family Mr. Barnard attends the First 
Baptist Church of Newburyport, Massachusetts. 



HERBERT EASTMAN KENNEY, pharmacist, of 
Swampscott, Massachusetts, was born July 11, 1868, in 
Littleton, New Hampshire, son of Lorenzo and Martha 
A, (Eastman) Kenney. He was educated in the public 
and high schools of his native town, subsequently 
attending the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy at 
Boston, graduating in 1890 with his degree. Returning 
to Littleton, Mr. Kenney was employed there as a 
druggist for eight years, after which time he became 
associated with the Riker-Jaynes Company, where he 
remained for fifteen years, being located part of the 
time at Boston and part at Lynn. The present branch 
store at Lynn was opened and started by Mr. Kenney. 
In igi5 he engaged in the drug business for himself at 
Swampscott, under the name of the Puritan Drug 
Company. 

Mr. Kenney is a member of the Masonic Club, and 
the Masonic lodge and chapter at Swampscott, the 
council and commandery at Lynn, and the consistory at 
Nashua, New Hampshire. With his family he attends 
the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Kenney married, April 9, 1895, Lizzie JiL Bailey, 
daughter of Richard C. Bailey, and their daughter 
Berniece was born November 9, 1896, at Littleton. 



FRANK H. THOMPSON— The city of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, has of course long been widely known as a 
shoe manufacturing centre, but in connection with its 
shoe industry it has one unique distinction — within it 
is the only American factory in which celluloid box 
toes are manufactured. It is an appreciable industry, 
and the enterprise and initiative of the men at the 
head of this firm, the Preble-Thompson Company, Inc., 
have developed a business which now reaches to inter- 
national markets, with prospects of steady expansion, 
both in this country and abroad. 

Frank H. Thompson, the president of this Lynn 
company, was bom in Northwood, New Hampshire, 
July 4, 1866, son of Charles N. and Martha S. (Sea- 
ward) Thompson. The former died in 1905. He was a 
farmer at Barrington, New Hampshire, while his wife 
was of Strafford, New Hampshire. 

Frank H. Thompson was educated in the public 
schools of Dover, New Hampshire. After leaving 
school he entered the shoe factory of W. W. Williams 
2nd T. G. Plant, at Lynn, and there learned how to 
make shoes. His next employers were Messrs. \ViI- 
liams and Clark, of Lynn. He remained with that 
company for twenty-five years, and for almost all the 
time was in responsible position. Indeed, for the 
greater part of the twenty-five years he was in full 
charge of the plant, and his record of service to that 



company is an enviable one. He left them in 1913 in 
order to take up the manufacture of celluloid box toes, 
and for that purpose he and George L. Preble formed 
the Preble-Thompson Company, and began to manu- 
facture in a small factory on Almond street. In 1914 
the prospect of success was so good, indeed the demand 
for their unique product was so definite, that the part- 
ners moved to larger quarters at No. 334 Broad street, 
which is still the business address of the company. The 
plant uses about 3,000 square feet of floor space, which 
is sufficient for the present, though the indications of 
expansion are by no means indefinite. The company 
was incorporated in 1914, and the following then became, 
and still are, the officers of the Preble-Thompson Com- 
pany, Inc. : Frank H. Thompson, president ; Charles 
Balcom, vice-president ; George L. Preble, secretary. 

Fraternally, Mr. Thompson is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. Socially he belongs to the Oxford 
Club, and he also is a member of the Homestead Golf 
Club, of Danvers. 

Mr. Thompson married, October 7, 1884, Annie B. 
Estabrook, daughter of John and Annie (Bowser) Esta- 
brook, of Sackton, New Brunswick, where Mr. Esta- 
brook is a contractor. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have 
two children : Florence, who was born in 1887 ; and 
Martha, born in 1890, who married William F. Lucke, 
who is connected with Sheridan Brothers, of New York 
City, and they have a daughter, Eunice F. Lucke. 



DR. JAMES JOHNSTON McVEY, since 1909 a 
practicing dentist in Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom 
in St. John, New Brunswick, in 1875, son of Andrew 
and Mary (Baxter) McVey, of that place. The schools 
of his native city afforded him his education, and he later 
attended the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, then 
engaged in the drug business while he studied dentistry, 
receiving his degree of D. M. D. from Tufts College, 
in iQog. Immediately he returned to Haverhill and 
engaged in the practice of his profession at No. 191 
Merrimac street, and he has met with well deserved 
success. During the World War, 1917-18, Dr. McVey 
was president of the Haverhill Dental Society, in 
charge of the enlisted men, and he was school dentist 
for the two years, 1917-19. He is a member of the 
Haverhill Dental Association ; and the Northeastern 
Dental Association, of which he is also a director. 

Dr. McVey married, in igi2, Blanche E. Garvin, of 
Haverhill, and they attend the Centre Congregational 
Church, Dr. McVey being a member of the Men's Club 
of that institution ; he also is a member of the Ward- 
hill Young Men's Club. 



JOSEPH H. JACQUES, jeweler, of Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, was born at St. Pierre, Canada, July 21, 
1871, son of Prudent and .Agnes (Hamel) Jacques, of 
Lotbiniere, Canada, where his father was engaged in 
farming all his life; his mother died in 1912. 

Joseph H. Jacques was educated in the public schools 
of Manchester, New Hampshire, and after leaving 
school began to learn the textile business in the same 
city. Four years later he decided to learn the trade of 
watchmaker and jeweler. He worked for others in that 
trade until 1905, when he opened as a jeweler in Haver- 
hill. Since that year he has been steadily developing 



324 



ESSEX COUNTY 



a good business. His store is located at No. 17 Esse.x 
street, and he has had good success. 

Mr. Jacques is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce, belongs to a Canadian fraternal order, the St. 
Jean Baptiste Patriot, and also is a member of the 
Independent Foresters of America. In religion he is a 
Catholic, a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, of 
Haverhill. 

Mr. Jacques married, in 1899, Petronille Duquette, of 
Worcester, Massachusetts. 



local civic authorities as a special police officer. Polit- 
ically he is a Republican. 

Mr. Wallace married, July 31, 1905, Ellen M. Barry, 
of Merrimac. 



LYSANDER D. CUDWORTH was born at North 
Woburn, Massachusetts, on January 4, 1855, and is a 
son of John R. and Nancy B. (Stiles) Cudworth. Mr. 
Cudworth's father, who was born at Greenfield, New 
Hampshire, and died in 1886, was a shoe manufacturer. 
His mother, Nancy B. (Stiles) Cudworth, was a native 
of Vermont. 

Mr. Cudworth received his early education in the 
public schools of Chelsea, Massachusetts. After his 
graduation from the Chelsea High School, Mr. Cud- 
worth became associated with his brother, G. L. Cud- 
worth, in the shoe manufacturing business. This asso- 
ciation lasted for five years and then, in 1S89, Mr. Cud- 
worth, who has always had decided artistic tastes, left 
his brother and engaged in the business of sign paint- 
ing at Chelsea. He remained at Chelsea until 1905, 
when he removed to Haverhill. He is still engaged in 
the sign painting business, having his offices at No. 60 
Fleet street. Aside from his business, Mr. Cudworth 
has a wide reputation as a painter of great technical 
ability and deep artistic feeling. His paintings have 
won recognition for him from artists and the general 
public throughout the State. He has never married. 



CHARLIE EDGAR WALLACE, owner of the 

Wallace Ice Company, of Merrimac, Massachusetts, 
was born in Taylor Village, New Brunswick, on Novem- 
ber 4, 1875. son of James Levi and Clara (Steves) 
Wallace, of that place. James Levi Wallace was a 
wood-worker until his death, which occurred in 1913, 
three years before the death of his wife. 

Charlie E. Wallace was still a boy when the Wallace 
family took up residence in Merrimac. He was edu- 
cated in the public school of his native place in Canada, 
and later in the schools of Merrimac. For the long 
period of twenty-five years after leaving school he was 
connected with the I. B. Little Company, of Merrimac, 
dealers in carriage materials. After leaving the Little 
Company, he was for two years in the employ of the 
Walker, Wells Company, of Amesbury. When he left 
it was to enter into business for himself, although in an 
altogether different line. He bought out the Stapler 
Ice Company, continuing it under the name of the Wal- 
lace Ice Company, and he has since held to that busi- 
ness, with appreciable success. 

Mr. Wallace is well known in the Merrimac district, 
and belongs to several fraternal organizations. He is a 
member of Riverside Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows ; Ancient Order of United Workmen ; 
Rebekah Lodge; United Commercial Travellers' Asso- 
ciation, of Haverhill, and to the local Grange. For 
two years he consented in an emergency to assist the 



WILLFRED WEYMOUTH LUFKIN, a promi- 
nent citizen of Essex, Massachusetts, was born there 
March 10, 1879, and was educated in the public schools 
and the Gloucester High School. The career of a news- 
paper correspondent attracted him at an early age, and 
after several years of preparation he took up this pro- 
fession in which he was engaged for a time. Mr. Luf- 
kin has been very active in public matters, and from 
1917 to 1919 he was a member of the Massachusetts 
Constitutional Convention, also a member of Congress 
from the Sixth Massachusetts District during the 
Sixty-fifth, Sixty-sixth and Sixty-seventh congresses. 
Mr. Lufkin, at the present time, occupies the position 
of collector of customs of the port of Boston and dis- 
trict of Massachusetts, having resigned his seat in 
Congress on July I, 1921, to accept this appointment at 
the hands of President Warren G. Harding. 

Fraternally he is a Mason, a member of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks ; also the Knights 
of Pythias; and the Grange. His clubs are: the Army 
and Navy Club of Washington; the National Press 
Club of that city ; the City Club of Boston ; the Salem 
and Colonial clubs of Salem, Massachusetts ; the Wa- 
chusett and Agawam clubs of Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts ; the Union Club of Beverly, and the Common- 
wealth Club of Gloucester. 

Mr. Lufkin married, November 7, 1914, Georgia Story, 
daughter of Arthur and Margie Story, and they are 
the parents of three daughters and a son : Willf red, Jr., 
Constance G., Edith, and Elizabeth. 



LEROY CLIFTON RIDLON, manufacturer, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was born at Hiram, Maine, 
July 20, 1884, son of Herbert H. and Susie E. (Ridlon) 
Ridlon, the latter having the same name as her hus- 
band, but no relation. His father, Herbert H. Ridlon, 
was a native of Porter, Maine, and was for many years 
engaged in the lumber industry. Mr. Ridlon's mother 
was also a native of Porter. 

Leroy C. Ridlon's education was obtained in the 
public schools, and after leaving school he entered the 
business of shoe manufacturing, with an idea in mind 
to learn the business. For six years he was with the 
firm of E. J. Goodwin, then took up another branch of 
the industry, the wood heel business. In the fall of 
1919 he started his own business, having as a partner a 
Mr. Wilbur, the firm name being Wilbur & Ridlon, 
and this arrangement continued until the end of that 
year. Then Mr. Ridlon bought the interests of Mr. 
Cass, and in the early part of 1920 formed a partner- 
ship with a Mr. Kendall, under the firm name of the 
Kendall Shoe Company, Inc., and this is now one of 
the important industries of Haverhill. Mr. Ridlon is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias ; of the Grange ; the 
Improved Order of Red Men ; and of the Loyal Order 
of Moose. For three years he was a member of Com- 
pany F, Eighth Massachusetts Regiment. 

Mr. Ridlon married, in 1905, Elizabeth McLaughlin, 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



325 



of Haverhill, daughter of John and Janet McLaughhn, 
natives of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Ridlon are the 
parents of five children: Janet E., Mary F., Percy H., 
Donald L., and James B. With his family he attends 
the Trinity Episcopal Church of Haverhill. 



William H. Redfern. Another child, Mildred, died in 
1910. Mr. Redfern and his family attend the Central 
Methodist Church, of Lawrence. 



WILLIAM E. REDFERN, of the Bellevue Monu- 
mental Works, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born 
December 7, 1870, in Meriden, Connecticut, son of 
William H. and Elizabeth (Shepley) Redfern. Wil- 
liam H. Redfern was a veteran of the Civil War, serv- 
ing in Company A, loth New York Heavy Artillery, and 
was wounded at the battle of Petersburg Heights; he 
is now deceased. The mother of Mr. Redfern makes 
her home in Providence, Rhode Island. His father was 
engaged for many years in the retail shoe business in 
Woonsocket, retiring in later life to farming. 

When William E. Redfern was a small boy his par- 
ents removed to Woonsocket, Rhode Island, and there 
he attended school at North Smithfield, and resided 
there until he was seventeen years of age. For a few 
years Mr. Redfern was employed in a textile mill, 
becoming overseer and having the direction of eighty- 
five girls. In 1890 he began his apprenticeship at the 
stone cutting trade. Five years later he went to South 
Framingham and worked at the same occupation ; at 
the end of two years he was foreman of the works. 
In March, 1S97, Mr. Redfern founded his present busi- 
ness in Lawrence, the Bellevue Monumental Works. In 
this venture he met with success, which has increased 
steadily with the passing years. For a quarter of a 
century he has been cutting monuments in Lawrence 
and is widely known for the high class workmanship of 
his product, and is doing one of the largest businesses 
in this section of the State. 

In 1887 Mr. Redfern joined Company A, Sons of 
Veterans Guards, which later was known as Company 
L, First Rhode Island Militia. After serving six years 
he was discharged with the rank of first sergeant He 
then joined Company E, 6th Massachusetts Militia, at 
Framingham, and ser\'ed two years, attaining the rank 
of corporal. In 1914 he was elected second lieutenant 
of Company L, 8th Massachusetts National Guard, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1914, and April 13, 1916, received his com- 
mission of first lieutenant and was sent to the Mexican 
Border on June 19, 1916. Mr. Redfern served in the 
World War as first lieutenant, being stationed at Lynn- 
field. Massachusetts. He is a charter member of John 
A. Brackett Camp, Sons of Veterans, and is now sec- 
retary of that organization. 

In fraternal afiiliation Mr. Redfern is a Mason, and is 
past master of Phoenician Lodge. He is a thirty-sec- 
ond degree Mason of the Scottish Rites ; member of 
Mt. Sinai Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Lawrence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters, Bethany Command- 
ery. Knights Templar, of which he is adjutant; and 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is worthy patron of Lawrence Chap- 
ter, Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. Redfern instructs 
the cadets of the Methuen High School in military tac- 
tics in addition to his many other interests. 

On November 24, 1898, at Woonsocket, Mr. Redfern 
married Ida E. Orchard, daughter of William Orchard, 
of that place, and their children are: Doris E., and 



LEVERETT PIERCE— The Pierce family records 
date back in Colonial annals to the seventeenth cen- 
tury, and the generations from that of the American 
ancestor to that of Leverett Pierce, manufacturer of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, have given many capable men to 
the nation, among them Franklin Pierce, fourteenth 
President of the United States. 

Leverett Pierce, father of our subject, was born in 
Hardwick, Massachusetts, and died in 1882. He was a 
farmer for the greater part of his life, but during the 
Civil War was in military service, taking part in most 
of the major battles of that long military struggle, and 
eventually becoming a veteran. He was a member of 
the loth Massachusetts Regiment. He married Mary 
L. Benoit, of the Massachusetts family of that name. 
She died in 1890. 

Leverett Pierce, son of Leverett and Mary L. (Ben- 
oit) Pierce, was born in Ware. Massachusetts, on 
February 18, 1873. He was educated in the public 
schools of Natick. After leaving school he entered a 
shoe factory, that of J. W. Walcott, at Natick. For him 
he worked for about two years, then returned to his 
native place, where he remained for about a year. 
Next he was at North Brookfield, Massachusetts, and 
there for nine years was in the factory of E. A. & A. H. 
Batchellor, for the last two years as machine adjuster. 
In 1901 he came to Lynn, and for more than two years 
thereafter was machine adjuster for A. E. Little, of that 
city. In 1903 he became connected with the Singer 
Company of Lynn. With tliat company he remained 
imtil 1916, for the last five years as foreman of the 
repair department. However, in 1916, he decided to 
venture into business for himself, or rather into a busi- 
ness partnership. He associated with Joseph M. Hatch, 
and they jointly formed the firm of Hatch & Pierce. 
The firm later became the J. H. Naugle Machine Com- 
pany, as has elsewhere been noted in the volume, Mr. 
Hatch being the president, Mr. Pierce vice-president and 
treasurer. Their line of manufacture is shoe machin- 
ery, and they specialize in shoe stitching machinery. 
They have the largest business in that line in the city, 
it is stated. 

Mr. Pierce married, in 1896, Bertha A. Lamson, 
daughter of J. D. and Mary A. (Partridge) Lamson, 
of North Brookfield, where the former was baggage 
master for many years. He died in 1900, but Mrs. 
Lamson, who was of a Leicester, Massachusetts, fam- 
ily, is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce have one child, 
Pauline L., who is now the wife of Everett C. Howe; 
they reside in Lynn. 



FREDERICK B. DAY--The Union Blacking Com- 
pany, of Lynn, Massachusetts, was established in 1899, 
and incorporated in 1905. The first president of the 
company was J. G. Redshaw, who remained connected 
with it and in that office until his death in 1912. After 
his death his son, J. G. Redshaw, Jr., was made pres- 
ident, but resigned in 191 7. Frederick B. Day then 
becoming president. Later in that year, when Mr. Day 
left to join the United States army for service during 



326 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the World War, George S. Rouse was made president, 
Mr. Day becoming treasurer. 

Frederick B. Day was born in East Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, May II, 1893, the son of Frederick W. and 
Fannie M. (Lewis) Day, of East Boston, Massachu- 
setts. His father was a druggist there until his death, 
which occurred in 1900. The son, Frederick B., was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Boston, and graduated 
from the high school in the class of 1908. After further 
preparatory study, he entered Harvard University, 
where he continued his studies for three years. For 
the ne.xt four or five years he engaged in business, 
gaining a varied experience of commercial life. For 
two years after leaving college he was in Akron, Ohio, 
and there was connected with the auto tire industry of 
that place. 

During the World War he enlisted in the Tank Corps. 
He was honorably discharged in April, 1919, and soon 
afterwards resumed his position as a member of the 
Union Blacking Company, Inc. That connection he 
still holds. The plant and offices of the company are 
at No. 49 Oxford street, Lynn. Mr. Day is a Protes- 
tant. He is unmarried. 



Mr. Pingree is a Republican ; and is a member of 
the American Legion, and Knights of Columbus, of 
Haverhill. He attends the Nativity Roman Catholic 
Church of Merrimac. 



FRANK PERRY PINGREE, of Merrimac, Massa- 
chusetts, an ex-service man, who is entitled to wear 
iUree wound chevrons and many battleclasps, was born 
in Lawrence, Massachusetts, on June 23, 1898. He 
comes of a family well known in that part of Massa- 
chusetts. His grandfather, Isaac Pingree, was origi- 
nally of Nova Scotia, but eventually of Massachusetts. 
He was an engineer until he retired in 1892. His wife, 
Martha (Furbush) Pingree, who is still living, was born 
in Eliot, Maine. Their son, Frank C. Pingree, was 
born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. For the last thirty- 
five years he has been in the employ of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad Company, at Lawrence. He married 
Clara Dawley, of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, but later 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Their son, Frank P. Pin- 
gree, is now of Merrimac. 

Frank P. Pingree was educated in the schools of 
Lawrence and Haverhill, Massachusetts, and after 
leaving school went into the employ of Fred Mears, a 
dairyman. That has been Mr. Pingree's line of busi- 
ness ever since, though for some time before enlisting, 
in 1917, he was in business for himself, as a milk and 
dairy products dealer in Haverhill. The nation entered 
a state of war with Germany in 1917, and in July of 
that year young Pingree enlisted in the loist Massa- 
chusetts Field Artillery, and was assigned to the Sup- 
ply Company of that regiment. For some time the regi- 
ment was stationed at Boxford, Massachusetts, but 
went overseas in September, 191 7, and between that 
time and the end of the war, participated in most of 
the hardest fighting in which American troops were 
engaged. Mr. Pingree was present in the following 
major battles: Toul sector, Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, 
Verdun, and Argonne Forest. He was wounded tliree 
times in action, and was not discharged from military 
hospitals until April 30, 1919. He reached the grade of 
wagoner during his military service, and holds a cer- 
tificate of honorable discharge. Soon after entering civil 
life again he returned to dairying, and now has a good 
business of his own in Merrimac. 



EDWARD DIERAUER was born at Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, on June 27, 1895, and is a son of August T. 
and Katherine (Frye) Dierauer, both of whom were 
natives of Switzerland. Mr. Dierauer's father, who was 
a designer, died in 1906. 

Mr. Dierauer received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Haverhill, Massachusetts. He was a 
member of the graduating class of the Haverhill High 
School of 1913, and immediately after his graduation 
proceeded to the Bryant & Stratton Business College of 
Boston, where he completed a full course of study, 
graduating in 1915. 

Mr. Dierauer entered the business world as a book- 
keeper for the United Shoe Company at Beverly, Mas- 
sachusetts. He held this position for one year and a 
half and then entered the service of Pendergast, Mar- 
tin & Company, manufacturers of shoes, with whom he 
remained until July i, 1919. On that date he became 
the president of the Martin, Dierauer Company, Inc. 
Mr. Dierauer owes nothing to luck, but everything to 
industry and an intelligent use of opportunities that 
lay before him. Becoming president of a company at 
the age of twenty-four, he is perhaps the youngest of 
the Haverhill group of manufacturers. His company 
specializes in the production of ladies' fine turn shoes, 
and the factory at No. 64 Wingate street, has a capacity 
of si.x hundred pairs a day. 

Mr. Dierauer is a member of the First Congrega- 
tional Church. He is a Mason, and belongs to various 
Masonic bodies, including the Aleppo Shrine and the 
Knights Templar. He is a member of the Agawam 
Club. Having pronounced musical tastes, Mr. Dierauer 
is a valued member of the Shrine band and has been 
connected with various musical organizations since 
1909. He is unmarried. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE FRANKLIN CORNING— 

From the year 1865, when as a lad of twelve years he 
entered the British marine service, until 1884, when his 
ship, the "Vendome." was burned on the North Sea, 
George Franklin Corning followed the sea, becoming 
master at the age of twenty-six. His first ship, the 
"Novara," burned at sea March 8, 1882, and his last 
ship, the "Vendome," met the same fate two years later, 
his wife and infant son being on board, but although 
the ship burned to the water's edge, all on board were 
rescued by a British vessel and landed in safety In 
Rotterdam, These two experiences coming so closely 
together decided Captain Corning to abandon the sea, 
and he located in his home town, Lynn, Massachusetts, 
where he engaged in the restaurant business until his 
passing nearly forty years later. He was a son of 
Daniel B. and Margaret (Goodwin) Corning, who at 
the time of the birth of their son, George F., were 
residing at Beaver River, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 
George F. being one of the younger sons of the family. 
George F. Coming was born April 25, 1853, and died 
in Lynn, Massachusetts. February 7, 1922. His school 
years ending at the age of twelve, his seafaring life 



THE NE"W VOKK 
^'rBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
OEN FOOMDATIOKS| 





^^^^^^-Oi^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



327 



then began. His brother Joseph was captain of a 
ship, and with him the lad first sailed. He became in 
time an able seaman, then an officer, and finally, in 1879, 
at the age of twenty-six, was appointed captain of the 
new British ship, "Novara." He sailed that ship suc- 
cessfully for two years, then in November, sailed from 
Shields, England, with a cargo of coal, coke, bricks 
and potash, to l>e delivered at San Francisco, California. 
All went well until March 8, 1882, when smoke was 
seen issuing from the hatches, which revealed spontan- 
eous combustion of the cargo. The hatches were bat- 
tered down and made tight the pumps set at work, 
and everything possible was done to extinguish the fire, 
but without avail. The crew began making all neces- 
sary preparations for leaving the vessel. On the morn- 
ing of March 13th, the flames first appeared around 
the mainmast. On the evening of that day, about six 
o'clock, the vessel was abandoned. There were three 
boats in all that left the ship. Captain Coming was in 
one boat, with nine men and a dog. In another boat 
was the first mate, and in the third and smallest boat, 
the second mate and three men. The three boats kept 
as close together as possible, sailing thus for two days, 
but on the third day, Captain Corning and his crew 
lost sight of the others. The weather was good most 
of the time, and on March 22nd. a sail was sighted, 
which proved to be the American ship "Republic," Cap- 
tain Holmes, from Liverpool, bound for Wilmington, 
California. They reached San Francisco April i8th, 
and there telegraphed the owner first information of the 
disaster. 

On his return to his home port, Captain Corning was 
put in command of another new ship, the "Vendome." 
After his marriage, Mrs. Corning accompanied her hus- 
band on several voyages, the last being in 1887, when 
the "Vendome," bound for New York to Amsterdam, 
was burned in the North Sea, and Mrs. Corning, with 
her infant son, Grover T., together with the ship's com- 
pany, were rescued by the British barge "Stillwater," 
and landed in Rotterdam. 

Shortly after this last disaster Captain Corning aban- 
doned the sea, locating in Lynn, Massachusetts, where 
he entered the restaurant business, forming a partner- 
ship with his father-in-law, James Wyman, they con- 
ducting VVyman's Restaurant, at Munroe and Washing- 
ton streets, very successfully until the death of the 
senior partner, when Captain Corning continued the 
business under the same firm name. For thirty-one 
years he was a member of Washington Street Baptist 
Church, and was a man highly esteemed and greatly 
beloved. 

Captain Corning married. May 3, 1884, in Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, Florence N. Wyman, daughter of James 
and Adelaide S. Wyman, and they arc the parents of a 
daughter, Florence Gladys, and of two sons, Grover 
Trites, born in 1887, who was in the disaster at sea 
with his parents, later serving in the Aviation Corps of 
the United States navy during the World War, 1917-18; 
and Douglass Duval, also an aviator of the United 
States army, 1917-18, having the rank of ensign; he 
was an aviator instructor at Pensacola, Florida. Mrs. 
Coming survives her husband, and resides at No. 58 
Hamilton street. 



BYZANT J. MANOOGIAN, M. D.— The man of 

merit and distinction, who by his own efforts has 
attained a prominent position in any field and by his 
personal worth commands a high place, is certainly 
deserving of biographic honors, and as such a one we 
present Dr. Byzant J. Manoogian. Especial comment 
is unnecessary as to his high standing in the community 
in which he has located his field of activity, but the 
outline of his career cannot fail to be of interest. 

Born in Ada-Bazar, Turkey, March 18, 1878, Byzant 
J. Manoogian is a son of John and Denchali Manoogian. 
He obtained his elementary education in the American 
schools which had been established in Bardezag, Tur- 
key. In 1896 he came to the United States, where for 
two years he was employed in Butler Hospital, at 
Providence, Rhode Island, then accepted a position as a 
male nurse in the Massachusetts General Hospital at 
Boston, for two years ; later he worked on a farm in 
New Jersey, then engaged in the blacksmith trade for 
five years. In 1907 he entered Boston University, where 
he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1911. 
He then served an interneship of a few months at the 
Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital at Boston, after 
which he established himself in the active practice of his 
profession in this city for alx)ut six months, subse- 
quently coming to Peabody, to his present location. No. 
16 Washington street. 

Dr. Manoogian is a member of the American Med- 
ical Association, the Massachusetts Medical Association, 
the Massachusetts Surgical and Gynecological Associ- 
ation, the New England Association of Physical Ther- 
apeutics, and is a member of the staff of the Thomas 
Hospital. In politics he is a Republican, but has never 
sought political office. Dr. Manoogian is a member of 
the Peabody Doctors' Club. 

On August 31, 1910, Dr. Manoogian was united in 
marriage with Margaret Annie McLauflin, of Hamil- 
ton, Massachusetts ; she was a graduate nurse of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital of Boston. To Dr. and 
Mrs. Manoogian have been born four children: Olive 
M., Byzant Gregory, Haig Richardson, and Robert 
Chambers. 

It is difficult to foretell the future of a successful 
physician who is still in early middle life, but with his 
natural ability and exceptional attainments Dr. Man- 
oogian seems to give promise for a brilliant future. 



LEWIS OF LYNN— For thirty-eight years Joseph 
Carleton Lewis has been in business in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, as a sign painter. He is undoubtedly the pio- 
neer sign painter of Lynn, and is, it is believed, the 
pioneer in that line in the whole of Essex county. 

Mr. Lewis is a native of Lynn, born in the city on 
January 13, 1863, son of John C. and Susan M. (Alley) 
Lewis. His mother died in 1898, and his father, who 
was a shoe maker, died in 1912. 

Joseph C. Lewis attended Lynn schools in his boy- 
hood, and was also a student at Ingall's School. Enter- 
ing upon a business career, it was not long before he 
became confident that he was more adapted for artis- 
tic work than any other. He was only twenty years 
old when he went into business for himself in Lynn, 
as a sign painter, trading under his own name. His 



328 



ESSEX COUNTY 



place of business at the outset was on Market street. 
From there he moved to Central Square, and subse- 
quently to No. 150 Monroe street, which was destined 
to be his business address for twenty-five years. His 
next move was to No. 27 Central avenue, and later to 
No. 153 Oxford street, and finally to his present address, 
No. 71 Monroe street. In all his long association with 
the business people of Essex county it probably cannot 
be said that he was wittingly guilty of poor workman- 
ship. Indeed, had he not given general satisfaction, he 
could not have held a good business connection for so 
many years. Generally he has had the confidence of all 
who have had need of anytliing in his line. In the main, 
his business has consisted of commercial signs and 
show cards, electric signs, and poster advertising of all 
kinds. It is safe to say that he has at some time done 
work for almost every well-established company in the 
Lynn district. 

Mr. Lewis is an active fraternal member, belonging 
to all the Masonic bodies up to the Shrine; to the local 
body of the Improved Order of Red Men; and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. He also is a 
member of the Swampscott Masonic Club. He belongs 
to the Lynn Chamber of Commerce, to the Kiwanis Club, 
and also to the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Mr. Lewis married, in 1889, Annie Florence Churchill, 
of Lynn, daughter of William and Sarah E. (Clarke) 
Churchill, the former a Lynn police officer. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lewis have one child, a son. Earl C, who was 
born in 1893. He served in the naval forces during the 
World War, enlisting in the United States navy in 
1917. Soon afterwards he was assigned to duty at the 
submarine base. New London, Connecticut, as machin- 
ist's mate. Before he was discharged from the navy 
he had risen to commissioned rank, being an ensign in 
the latter part of his service. He was honorably dis- 
charged as such in April, 1919. He is now mechanical 
engineer for the General Electric Company. 



FRANK A. BRYANT, manufacturer, of Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, is a native son of that town, where he 
was born September 12, 1889, the son of George W. 
and Mary (Higgins) Bryant. In 1907 he graduated 
from the high school, then attended Ainsley Academy, 
and later Bryant & Stratton's Business College, gradu- 
ating in 1910. Soon after this time he entered the 
employ of Biddle & Smart, of Amesbury, as stock clerk, 
then worked his way upward until he became purchas- 
ing agent, so continuing until the outbreak of the 
World War. Mr. Bryant was among the first to vol- 
unteer his services, and he was commissioned first lieu- 
tenant of the .\viation Corps. 

Upon his return to civil life Mr. Bryant became a 
partner of the firm of the Bryant Body Company, Inc., 
builders of automobile bodies, the following the officers 
of the company: President, J. J. O'Brien; vice-presi- 
dent, James H. Walker; treasurer, Frank A. Bryant; 
secretary, James Miller. Mr. Bryant is a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of 
the Amesbury Club. 



forty years I have been in the same business, in the same 
city and on the same street in which I started." Now 
the business is the oldest of its kind in the United 
States. 

Frank Eddy Dudley was bom in Candia, New Hamp- 
shire, April 10, 1864, of parents who were both bom in, 
and were long residents of that State. The father, 
Alvin Dana Dudley, and mother, Judith C. (Cook) 
Dudley, were well known and loved dwellers in Candia. 
Coming to Haverhill, Massachusetts, Alvin Dana and 
.A. J. Dudley (the latter an elder brother) engaged in 
trade, and during the year 1873 formed a partnership 
concern for the manufacturing of ladies' slipper trim- 
mings, ribbons, buckles, etc. 

Frank Eddy Dudley, after the usual period of school 
work, began, in 1880, that which has since been his voca- 
tion, at that time entering the employ of his father and 
brother. Beginning at the very bottom, he put in ten 
years of steady endeavor before being admitted to the 
firm. In 1905 came the death of Alvin Dana Dudley, 
and two years later A. J. Dudley was taken, leaving the 
business to be carried on by Frank E. Dudley and 
Charles Dana Dudley, his nephew, who, in 1905, became 
a member of the concern. Frank E. Dudley is now 
(1921) president and general manager. His unremit- 
ting endeavors have led to a large expansion of the 
firm's trade, and they now have branch agencies at 
Rochester, New York, Burlington, New Jersey, and 
Montreal, Canada. In 1923 the company will celebrate 
its fiftieth anniversary. 

Mr. Dudley's political interest is as a Republican; he 
is a member of the Pentucket Club and of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. He holds religious fellowship with 
the Universalist church. 

Mr. Dudley married, in Haverhill, Alice B. Bishof, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Brown Bishof, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts. Mr. Bishof is the well-known 
gentleman who for twenty-four years served as county 
commissioner of Essex county, Massachusetts, and acted 
for many years as chairman of the board, and in retir- 
ing from this office, left a surplus of many thousands 
of dollars in the county treasury as a result of his able 
supervision. Mr. and Mrs. Dudley are the parents of 
three daughters : i. Linda, now the wife of George 
Sisavick, residing in Staft'ord Springs, Connecticut, he 
being engaged in the bond business. They have three 
daughters : Vera, Beatrice and Mildred. 2. Evelyn, 
who married (first) Walter S. Wright, who passed 
away in 1918, and by this union there is one daughter, 
Janice; Mrs. Wright married (second), in 1920, C. T. 
W. Tigh, and they reside in Riverside, Connecticut, 
where he is connected with the bond business. 3. Alice, 
the wife of Raymond R. McCormond ; they reside in 
Wallingford, Connecticut, where he is professor of 
mathematics in Choat School. By this union there are 
three children: Alice, Raymond R., Jr., and Jean. 



FRANK EDDY DUDLEY— In this day of varying 
occupations and rapid business changes it is unusual for 
a man to be able to say, as can Mr. Dudley : "For over 



HAROLD MABRE WATERHOUSE, of Merri- 

mac, Massachusetts, conies of an old Merrimac family 
on his father's side, while his maternal lineage leads 
back, in American generations, to the earliest decades of 
the Massachusetts colony, and earlier to the Virginia 
colony. 

Harold M. Waterhouse was born in Merrimac, Sep- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



329 



tember 20, 1899, son of Charles L. and Isabelle Nichols 
(Sargent) Waterhouse, both natives of Merrimac, and 
grandson of Alvin M. Waterhouse, who was born in 
Enfield, New Hampshire, but was in business in Merri- 
mac, as a carriage builder, almost until his death, which 
occurred in 1900. 

The maternal descent in the Sargent family is worthy 
of record in civic, military, academic, and literary annals 
of colony, state and nation. The progenitor of Amer- 
ican generations of the Sargent family was Richard 
Sargent, an officer in the Royal navy of Great Britain. 
He was born in England, son of William Sargent, and 
was early in the colony of Virginia, and is of record in 
the Ipswich, Massachusetts, colony about 1634. About 
1636 he removed to Salisbury, Massachusetts. He was 
born in 1602, and died in 1675. The first-born of his 
ten children was Thomas Sargent, who was born in 
1643, at Aniesbury, and died in 1706. aged sixty -two 
years. It is thought probable that he lived at Bear 
Hill, where members of Merrimac branches of the Sar- 
gent family still hold estate. Thomas Sargent married 
Rachel Barnes, of Amesbury, in 1668, and they had ten 
children. The descent is again in the eldest son, 
Thomas Sargent, Jr., who was bom in i66g. He married 
Mary Stevens, of West Amesbury, in 1702, and died 
in 1719. The oldest son, Moses Sargent, born in West 
Amesbury, in 1707, married Sarah Bagley, in 1727. 
Their oldest son, Christopher Sargent, was born in 
West Amesbury, in 1740, and died there in 1830. He 
married Anna Sargent, in 1759. Their first-born was 
Steven Sargent, born in 1778. He married Polly Nich- 
ols, in 1802, and their son, Moses (2), who was bom 
in 1808, and died in 1894, married Miss Persis Crane, 
issue being Isabelle Nichols Sargent, who married 
Charles Luther Waterhouse, of Merrimac, Massachu- 
setts, as above mentioned. 

Charles L. Waterhouse, father of Harold M. Water- 
house, was born in Merrimac, Massachusetts, April 23, 
1870, and has been a respected resident of that place 
throughout his life. Latterly he has branched from his 
father's trade, that of carriage-building, into the manu- 
facturing of automobile bodies. His wife, Isabelle N. 
(Sargent) Waterhouse, is two years his junior, having 
been born in Merrimac on November 22, 1872. Ten chil- 
dren have been born to them : Moses Sargent, who was 
born on April i, 1892; Lewis Osborne, born January 9, 
1894; Alvin Raymond, bom in July, 1896; Bernice 
Elizabeth, bom on January 11, 1898; Harold Mabre, 
of whom further; Charles Luther, Jr. bom November 
22, IQOI ; Marion Crane, born November i, 1903; Per- 
sis Ruth, born November 22, 1907 ; Doris Isabelle, bom 
October 11, 1911; Alice Howe, bom May i, 1914, died 
May 28, 1916. 

Harold M. Waterhouse, fifth child of Charles L. and 
Isabelle Nichols (Sargent) Waterhouse, was born Sep- 
tember 20, 1899. He was educated in the public schools 
of Merrimac, graduating in due course from the Mer- 
rimac High School. Later he took the course at the 
Essex County Agricultural School. After leaving 
school he worked for a while for the Gray & Davis 
Company, of Amesbury, and later for J. B. Judkins, 
of Merrimac, but it was not long after leaving the agri- 
cultural school that he was busily farming. He has 
since held to agricultural pursuits, and has charge of the 



Old Oak Farm, at Merrimac, where he has proved that 
he is a discerning and energetic farmer, who is apply- 
ing his scientific knowledge of the industry to good 
advantage. 

Mr. Waterhouse is well known in Merrimac; he 
belongs to the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders, being 
a member of Bethany lodge of the former, and the 
Riverside lodge of Odd Fellows ; he also is a member 
of Merrimac Grange. By political allegiance he is a 
Republican. Mr. Waterhouse attends the Pilgrim Con- 
gregational Church of Merrimac. He is unmarried. 



ALEXANDER MORRISON was born at Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, on January 10, 1890, and is a son 
of John L. and Jane H. (Hill) Morrison. His father, 
who was born June 17, 1865, at Andover, Massachu- 
setts, has been engaged in carriage repairing on his own 
account for many years there. His wife, Jane H. (Hill) 
Morrison, who is still living, is a daughter of John 
Hill, of Andover. They were the parents of three 
children: .Alexander, of whom further; Frederick, of 
Andover; and Phillips, who was captain of ordnance at 
Aberdeen Proving Grounds during the World War, and 
died in the service; he was then the youngest captain 
in the United States army. Mr, Morrison is a member 
of St. Matthew's Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; of 
Rose Croix, in Lowell; Massachusetts Consistory; and 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, at Boston. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison 
attend and support the Old South Congregational 
Church of .'Vndover. 

Alexander Morrison received his early education in 
the public schools of Andover. Later he proceeded to 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which 
he graduated as a member of the class of 1914, receiv- 
ing his B. S. degree; he specialized in chemical engi- 
neering. After having completed his studies, Mr. Mor- 
rison accepted a position in the chemical department of 
the American Woolen Company. He has been con- 
nected with this company ever since, and at present 
holds the position of assistant chemist. 

Mr. Morrison is a member of the South Congrega- 
tional Church of Andover. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. He is a member of the American Association 
of Textile Chemists and Colorists, and the American 
Chemical Society. He also belongs to the Masonic 
order, being a member of St. Matthew's Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Andover; Massachusetts Con- 
sistory; and Aleppo Temple Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Boston. 

Mr. Morrison married, in 1916, Mildred F. Wildes, 
daughter of Eugene L. Wildes, of Hamilton, Massa- 
chusetts ; she was born at Hamilton on December 8, 
1890. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have one son, Lincoln 
Wildes Morrison, who was born on May 18, 1918. 



HOWARD L. WEBBER— A prominent shoe manu- 
facturer and a leading citizen of Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, Howard L. Webber was born there February 12, 
1881. His father was also in the shoe business as a retail 
dealer. Mr. Webber, Sr., was a native of Bradford, 
New Hampshire, and died in 1881. He was a veteran 
of the Civil War, and a member of the local Grand 



330 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Army of the Republic Post. Mr. Webber married Olive 
M. Wood. 

The early education of Howard L. Webber was ob- 
tained in the public schools of Haverhill. After finish- 
ing his schooling he went to work for the Troy Laun- 
dry Company, of Haverhill, where he remained for two 
years. Then he went to work for the Gale Shoe Manu- 
facturing Company, of Haverhill, and this marked the 
turning point in his career. For fourteen years he 
remained with this firm, working his way upward, by 
diligent effort, to overseer of the cutting department. 
Mr. Webber resigned his position to enter the shoe 
business on his own account, taking as a partner, I. J. 
Webster, and the firm name became the Webster- Webber 
Shoe Company. They manufactured women's Goodyear 
welt shoes and this arrangement was successfully con- 
tinued until 1914. 

In October of the latter year Mr. Webber formed a 
new company to manufacture women's turned shoes, 
making a specialty of white shoes. J. S. Moore was 
admitted as a partner, and the name of the firm became 
the Webber Shoe Company. Their place of business is 
located in the Esse.x Associate building, on Esse.x street, 
and there they have successfully carried on their manu- 
facturing for seven years. Each succeeding year brings 
them an increase in business from satisfied customers, 
and both members of the firm are well and favorably 
known among the business men of Esse.x county. Mr. 
Webber is a Mason, a member of the lodge at Haver- 
hill, and also is a member of the Pentucket Club. 

Mr. Webber married, in 1910, Bessie P. Brown, of 
Groveland, and they are the parents of a daughter, Bar- 
bara E. Webber. 



ALDEN M. WORCESTER, city marshal of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, one of the best known and highly 
respected of Haverhill's public servants, and a member 
of the police force for almost forty years, was born in 
Columbia, Maine, November 9, 1850, the son of Moses 
Worcester, a lumberman of Maine, and his wife. Dia- 
dem B. (Smith) Worcester, who survived her husband 
for many years, she dying in 1889. 

Alden M. Worcester attended the common school of 
his native place, and for several years after leaving 
school worked in the woods of Maine, as lumberman. 
In 1864 he came to Haverhill and worked in shoe fac- 
tories for about one year, then went back to Maine and 
worked in the woods. He returned again to Haverhill 
and worked in the shoe factories for two years, then 
joined the police force, as patrolman. In January, 1873, 
he was promoted to sergeantcy, twelve years later, in 
1885, becoming captain. In the following year, 1886, he 
was appointed city marshal, and served as such for 
four years, and afterwards resumed his patrol duty. 
For almost another two decades, until 1919, he actively 
followed such duties in the city administration, when 
he again became city marshal, which post he still holds. 
It may be readily appreciated that there are few persons 
in Haverhill so well known; and it may also be inferred 
that such long service means a consistent, faithful per- 
formance of duty through the decades. 

Mr. Worcester is a Mason of the thirty-second degree, 
and also is affiliated with the local body of the Knights 
of Pythias. His church is the Universalist. 



Mr. Worcester married, in 1877, Runie Etta Dormand, 
daughter of Leonard and Priscilla (Barton) Dormand, 
of Maine. One child was born to them, a son, Harold 
D., in 1888. He resides in Cincinnati, Ohio, and is an 
automobile supply salesman. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, and a member of the Grace Methodist 
Church. He married Pauline Dutrie, who died in April, 
1921. 

GEORGE P. POOR— Energetically directing a suc- 
cessful business, which finds steady employment for 
about two hundred and fifty people of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, George P. Poor may be looked upon as 
a worthy native son of that place. 

Mr. Poor was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, 
on October 26, 1886, son of Benjamin F. Poor, a re- 
spected wholesale provision merchant, in business for 
many years in Newburyport, and his wife Alvana Wes- 
ton (Card) Poor, who is still living, and was originally 
of Newcastle, New Hampshire. Benjamin F. and 
Alvana Weston (Card) Poor were the parents of four 
children, the two sons being Ben Perley, and George 
P., of whom further. 

George P. Poor, with his brother and sisters, attended 
the Newburyport public schools, and eventually passed 
into the high school, graduating in 1901. He also took 
a business course at the Salem Commercial School. 
For four years after leaving school he was in the 
employ of the North Eastern Telephone Company. In 
1915, however, he was one of the organizers and prin- 
cipals of the firm of Fern & Poor, shoe manufacturers. 
At the outset, the company's plant was at No. 371 High 
street, Newburyport, but larger quarters eventually 
became necessary. Since 1919 the company has been 
located at No. 102 Merrimac street, where they have 
25,000 square feet of floor space available. The company 
was incorporated in 1915, under the same name, and 
since that time the executives have been: Benjamin F. 
Poor, president ; and George P. Poor, treasurer and 
general manager. The company specializes in a medium 
grade of women's turn shoes, and the plant is capable 
of producing twelve hundred pairs a day. The company 
is well known to the trade, and the large demand there 
is for their make of shoes would indicate that quality 
as well as price enters into their operations. Mr. Poor 
is a good business man, quite active and enterprising, 
and in addition to his manufacturing house, is also one 
of the principals of a jobbing house, being president 
of the H. M. Johnson Company, of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts. He is necessarily well known in Newburyport, 
and also is generally esteemed by business people, and 
by many others who come into close association with 
him. He is a Mason, up to and including the chapter, 
and also is a member of the Newbury Golf Club. 

Mr. Poor married, in 191 5, Marion H. Spaulding, of 
Newburyport, daughter of Louis Spaulding, a wholesale 
provision merchant in that place, and they have two 
children: Edith, born in 1916; and Ben P., born in 1918. 



JAMES BAILLIE, president of the North Star 
Chemical Works, at No. 13 Railroad street, Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 
September, 1877, and in his native land spent the years 
until 1910. He was educated in an Edinburgh prep- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



33^ 



aratory school, Herriot Watt College, Edinburgh, and 
Central School of Pharmacy, same place, and became 
an expert chemist, leaving a good position in 1910 to 
come to the United States, where for ten years he was 
engaged as chief chemist with a pharmaceutical manu- 
facturing company in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 1914 
he organized the North Star Chemical Works, and in 
1 91 6, in order to be near the source of raw supply, he 
moved from Minneapolis to Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
The business of the company is extracting the greases 
from raw wool and scouring waste liquors, which when 
purified furnislies the product known to the chemical 
trade as lanolin. This is a business created by war- 
time necessities, the lanolin used in the country having 
all been imported from Germany prior to the war. 

During the war period the North Star Chemical 
Works supplied the government with a large amount of 
lanolin, which was used as the base for a paste used 
by the soldiers to protect them from mustard gas burns. 
This part was made according to a formula prepared 
by officers of the medical service with suggestions by 
Mr. Baillie. Another product of the North Star Chem- 
ical Works is a wool fat used by veterinarians, and 
also a sterilizing and disinfecting agent. The business 
is a prosperous one, and Mr. Baillie is a complete 
master of its every detail. In addition to their plant 
on Railroad street the works include a recovery plant 
on the South Side, and a similar plant in Norton, Mas- 
sachusetts. Even with these sources of supply for the 
refinery, they are largely buyers of wool fat, which is 
shipped to them from different plants throughout the 
country equipped with centrifugal methods of recovering 
wool grease, which methods originated in the United 
States with the North Star Chemical Works. In addi- 
tion to the home market the firm exports largely to 
Europe, Asia and South America. 

Mr. Baillie is a member of Lawrence Chamber of 
Commerce ; Grecian Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
and the Caledonian Club. 

Mr. Baillie married, in Scotland, in 1905, Margaret 
C. Dobbie, and they are the parents of five children : 
Hannah Wallace: Catherine Margaret; Andrew; John, 
and William Wallace. The family home is at Mcthuen, 
Massachusetts, the family attendants of the United Con- 
gregational church. 



WILLIAM H. HIGGINS, of Andover and Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, is a son of Henry C. and Eliza 
A. (Abbott) Higgins. His father, a Civil War veteran, 
was born in East Randolph, Vermont but is now de- 
ceased. His mother, Eliza A. (Abbott) Higgins, daugh- 
ter of Noah Abbott, was born in Andover, Massachu- 
setts, where her son, William H. Higgins was born, 
March 3, 1864. He was educated in the public schools, 
and upon arriving at man's estate, started a sale 
exchange and livery business in Andover, which he has 
very successfully conducted for about thirty years. He 
had in the meantime become the owner of a good 
farm, and in 1910 began operating it under his personal 
management, continuing until 1918. He then began 
operating in real estate, with offices at No. 575 Essex 
street, Lawrence, with a branch office at Andover. 
where he also has a store for the sale of novelties. He 
has built up a good real estate, mortgage and insurance 



business, his dealings being in residence, commercial and 
farm properties. 

Mr. Higgins is a member of the Masonic order, 
affiliated with St. Matthew's Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons ; Mt. Sinai Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Law- 
rence Council, Royal and Select Masters ; Bethany 
Commandery, Knights Templar ; Massachusetts Con-i 
sistory, and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of 
Christ Protestant Episcopal Church, at Andover. In 
politics he is a Republican, but not an office seeker. 

On October 20, l8g6, Mr. Higgins married, at An- 
dover, Helen I. Barnett, daughter of William Barnett, 
of Andover, and they are the parents of two sons : 
William B. and Loring A. 

William B. Higgins enlisted in the National Guard 
and saw service on the Mexican Border as a member 
of Battery C. Later this battery went overseas with 
the 26th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, to 
France. He entered the service as first lieutenant of 
Battery C, Heavy Artillery, and attained the rank of 
captain. After several months of hard service as an 
artillery officer, he was transferred to the Radio Divi- 
sion, and later served as staff intelligence officer. He is 
now a captain of the Massachusetts National Guard. 

Loring A. Higgins enlisted in the Coast Artillery and 
was at once sent overseas, where he was transferred to 
Battery D, 148th Regiment, 66th Field Artillery Brigade, 
and later was assigned to the Army of Occupation after 
the Armistice was signed. The family home is No. 15 
Chestnut street, Andover, Massachusetts, the town of 
Mr. Higgins' birth, the birthplace of his mother and of 
his sons. He is widely known as an able, energetic 
business man and as a good citizen, public-spirited and 
progressive. 

THE ANDREW WILSON COMPANY, INC.. of 

Lawrence, Massachusetts, was founded in 1897 by 
Andrew Wilson, a native of Scotland, where he was born 
in 1856; he died in 1912. Mr. Wilson came to .Ames- 
bury, Massachusetts, in 1882, and engaged in the roofing 
business on a small scale. Later the business was 
removed to Lawrence and from this time it increased 
and expanded. The firm contracted for all kinds of 
roofing work, tar, gravel, slate and copper, also sheet 
metal work. They manufactured steel clothes lockers, 
steel barrels and metal boxes, and have contracts for 
special metal work in the textile mills. Skylights and 
cornices are also part of the work. During the World 
War the firm was engaged in the work of manufac- 
turing metal boxes and metal cylinders, also metal 
lockers for the government transports. In 1912, upon 
the death of Andrew Wilson, the business was incor- 
porated, and his sons, Alexander E. and Walter C. 
Wilson, were made president and treasurer, respectively. 

Mr. Wilson married Violet Chisholm, and their chil- 
dren were : Alexander E., and Walter C, both of 
extended mention below. 

Alexander E. Wilson was bom in Galashiels, Scot- 
land, November 4, 1881, and as a boy attended the public 
schools of Amesbury, Massachusetts. In 1899 he en- 
tered the employ of his father, continuing until the 
death of the latter, at which time he was made presi- 
dent of the corporation. 

Mr. Wilson is a Mason, a member of Phoenician 



332 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; also a member of 
Monadnock Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
the Caledonian Club, and the Scotch Charitable Society 
of Boston. He married, in Bradford, Massachusetts, 
September 24, 1914, E. Romena McClintock, of Bradford, 
and their children are: John A.; Alexander M., and 
Robert F. Mr. Wilson and his family attend the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Lawrence, and they 
make their home at No. 33 Dartmouth street. 

Walter C. Wilson, the second son of Andrew and 
Violet (Chisholm) Wilson, was born in Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, June 19, 1888, and attended the public 
schools there and the Lawrence High School. He 
entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, grad- 
uating in 191 1 as a chemical engineer, and the following 
year went to Newark, New Jersey, where he followed 
his profession. Upon the incorporation of the Andrew 
Wilson Company, he was made treasurer of the cor- 
poration, which office he now holds. 

Mr. Wilson is a member of the American Chemical 
and Engineering Society, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of Phoenician Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. 
He also is a member of the Merrimac Valley Country 
Club, and the Caledonian Club. 

Mr. Wilson married, in Lawrence, in 1916, Alice 
Marion Andrew, and their children are: Jean and 
Andrew Wilson. Mr. Wilson and his family attend the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church, and their home is 
at No. 1046 Esse.x street. 



ALFRED A. PHILLIPS, one of the most success- 
ful citizens and business men of Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, is not a native of that city, but has lived there 
several years. He was born in England in 1885, son of 
Alexander and Elizabeth Phillips, and after completing 
his education, found employment with various firms in 
his native town until coming to America. Soon after 
his arrival in this country, he located in Haverhill, 
where after a time he was in a position to engage in 
business on his own account. He is one of the 
owners of Albert A. Phillips, Inc., and has met with 
well deserved success in this venture. He is a member 
of the Sons of St. George, and the Loyal Order of 
Moose. Since becoming a resident of Haverhill, Mr. 
Phillips has made its public interests his interests and 
is always willing to share his part of the civic burden. 

Mr. Phillips married Ida L. London, daughter of 
Joseph and Rebecca London, and they are the parents 
of three children: Alexander H., born in 191 1; Beatrice 
L., bom in 1913; and Elizabeth N., bom in 1917. 



JOSEPH E. TROMBLA, undertaker, of Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, has been connected with that city during 
the last two decades, and among the residents of that 
place he has been placed in high esteem, especially by 
his work for the Young Men's Christian Association of 
Amesbury. He was born in Dixon, Illinois, July 24, 
1865, son of Daniel and Elizabeth Ann (Courtright) 
Trombla, the former a native of Toledo, Ohio, a soldier 
of the Civil War, and in civil life a carpenter and far- 
mer until his death. He was a member of the Thir- 
teenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War, 
and served as a private. The rigors of the campaign- 
ing and directly a forced march incapacitated him, and 



he was eventually discharged from military service 
because of physical disability. The mother of Joseph 
E. Trombla was of a Pennsylvania family. 

Sometime after the birth of Joseph E. the Trombla 
family went to reside in Nebraska, and the boy was 
educated mainly in the public schools of Friend, 
Nebraska. His education included the high school 
course, and later in life, when he decided to become an 
undertaker, he became a student at the Boston School 
of Anatomy and Embalming, the diploma of which he 
holds. However, long before taking up that profession, 
he did capable work in several different lines of effort, 
and has proved himself to be a man of distinct ver- 
satility and superior intelligence. For three years after 
leaving high school, he was a teacher in the public 
schools of Nebraska. He left that profession to enter 
commercial business, and for that purpose went to 
Omaha and there became connected with the Pacific 
E-xpress Company. He remained in the employ of that 
company at Omaha for twelve years, then came east. 
Soon, thereafter, began his long association with Ames- 
bury, Massachusetts. For seven years after taking up 
residence there he was engaged in mercantile business 
there, giving up that business when appointed secretary 
of the Amesbury Young Men's Christian Association. 
He was local secretary of that organization for ten 
years, and in consequence is now widely known to 
most of the young business men of .Amesbury of to- 
day. During the World War he felt a desire to do 
work of a more national character and work that would 
have a more direct bearing on the struggle, so he 
resigned his appointment and entered the employ of 
the Gray & Davis Company, and was appointed a fore- 
man in the ammunition plant. When the war work was 
at an end he resolved to fit himself for entering the 
undertaking profession in Amesbury. He eventually 
graduated from the Boston School of Anatomy and 
Embalming and became an undertaker in Amesbury. 
He is giving good and appreciated service, and so 
might be said to be succeeding. 

Fraternally Mr. Trombla belongs to several orders, 
including the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Powan River Lodge, Harmony Encampment, Colfax 
Rebekahs, of Amesbury; Askus Santorums, of Haver- 
hill, and the John A. Douglas Camp, Sons of Veter- 
ans. Politically he is a Republican and has followed 
national politics with a somewhat active interest, for 
three years being a member of the Republican State 
Committee. He also is a member of the Amesbury 
Chamber of Commerce. 

A review of his life also must record his three 
3ears of military service in the Nebraska National 
Guard, 1888-91. Later, during the World War, in fact, 
when State National Guard troops were mustered into 
Federal service, he served in the emergency troops of 
Massachusetts. He was a sergeant of the Massachusetts 
State Guards from 1917 to 1919. His church affilia- 
tion is Congregational, he being a member of the 
church in Amesbury. 

Mr. Trombla married, in 1894, Margaret McRoberts, 
of Toronto, Canada, and they have two children, both 
of whom were born in Omaha, Nebraska; they are: 
Daniel C, born April 2, 1895; and Joseph Edward, born 
December 7, 1897. 




e^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



333 



MARTIN B. CRANE, postmaster of Merrimac, 
Massachusetts, from 1913 until 1921. was born in Willi- 
niantic, Connecticut. October 7, 1S60, son of Patrick 
and Bridget (Hart) Crane, both of whom were born 
in Sligo, Ireland. They emigrated to this country and 
settled in Connecticut. Patrick Crane was a farmer in 
Willimantic for the remainder of his life, which ended 
in 1880. His wife lived a widowhood of seventeen 
years, her death occurring in 1897. 

Martin B. Crane was reared in Connecticut. He 
attended the Willimantic public schools, and after leav- 
ing school, entered the factory of the Willimantic Linen 
Company, in the employ of which company he remained 
for three years. He next went to Hartford, and there 
worked for the S. N. Hart Carriage Company, of that 
place, for a short while, before going to New Britain, 
Connecticut, and there working for the Graham Com- 
pany for about a year, and for Banning & Company 
and the Arch Street Carriage Company, both of New 
Britain, for about a year each. Coming into Massa- 
chusetts, he settled in Merrimac, and for the next six 
years was an employee of the Steven Brothers Company. 
He worked for several other Merrimac companies, 
among them the Pease Company, Judkins Company, 
and the J. Lancaster Company, before entering Federal 
service in 1913, when he was appointed postmaster of 
Merrimac by President Wilson, serving from that year 
until 1921 ; he is a popular citizen of Merrimac. 

Politically Mr. Crane is a Democrat; fraternally he 
belongs to the .\ncient Order of United Workmen, and 
to the Amesbury body of the Knights of Columbus. By 
religious faith he is a Catholic, member of the Nativity 
Roman Catholic Church, Merrimac. While living in 
Connecticut, he served for four years in the Connec- 
ticut State Guard, being a member of Company E, of 
the Third Regiment of Infantry. 

Mr. Crane married, in 1892, at Merrimac, Margaret 
Lawton, of that place, and they have five children: 
Ellen Mary, born August 27, 1893; Mildred Margaret, 
born January 15, 1895; Gladys Veronica, born July 4, 
1896; Katherine Agnes, born November 16, 1897; and 
Andrew Lawton Patrick, who was bom on June 28, 
1901. 



JULIUS B. EMMERT— One of the leading under- 
takers of Lawrence, Massachusetts, is Julius B. Em- 
niert, whose show rooms, at No. 93 East Haverhill 
street, are the finest in the city. 

Mr. Emmert was born in Germany, November 29, 
1872, and is a son of Carl J. and Bertha Emmert, his 
father now being retired from business. 

Coming to New York City in 1880, Mr. Emmert at- 
tended the public schools of the city for a few years, 
also learning art wood finishing as a trade. This occu- 
pation he followed until 1892, when he came to Law- 
rence. Here he entered the employ of the Briggs & 
Allyn Manufacturing Company, where he remained for 
a period of two years. He then decided upon his 
future field of effort, and entered the Egyptian School 
of Embalming, in Boston, studying under Professor 
F. A. Sullivan, and was graduated from this institu- 
tion in June, 1895. For a few months he was in the 
employ of Conlin & Ryan, prominent Lawrence under- 
takers of that day, then, in the fall of the same year, 



founded the present business at the same address. The 
venture proved more than successful, and later Mr. 
Emmert erected the present handsome building, designed 
particularly for its present purpose, spacious and mod- 
ern in every way. Mr. Emmert has kept pace with 
the times, and now for some years has had a complete 
motor equipment. He commands a large share of the 
best patronage. 

Mr. Emmert is a member of the Massachusetts Under- 
takers' Association, and of the Lawrence Chamber of 
Commerce. He served on the Board of Health of Law- 
rence in 1916. Fraternally he is prominent, being a 
member of Grecian Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
the chapter, council and commandery, of Lawrence; 
Scottish Rite, of Lowell; Massachusetts Consistory, 
and .Aleppo Temple, .'\ncient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He also is a member of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and 
several local German societies. 

In May, 1899, Mr. Emmert married Ella M. Dietz, 
of Paterson, New Jersey, and they have three children : 
Julius F., born August 7, 1902, a graduate of the Bos- 
ton School of Anatomy and Sanitary Science, and now 
associated with his father in business ; he is also a 
student at Boston University; Clemens B., born May 
12. 1905, and now a student at the Lawrence High 
School; and Ella B. E., born July 29, 1909, who is now 
in grammar school. 



DOOLING & COFFEY, book and job printers, 

located at No. 200H East Essex street, Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, was founded January i, 1907, by John C. Dool- 
ing, of Peabody, and James E. Coffey, of Salem. The 
business was begun at the present address nearly fifteen 
\ears ago and has continued, without change of part- 
ners or location, a very prosperous career. The firm 
ranks well in the business world, Is a member of 
Salem Chamber of Commerce, and the partners are 
both well and favorably known as craftsmen, business 
men and citizens. 

John C. Dooling, senior member of the firm, was 
born in Peabody, Massachusetts, and was there edu- 
cated in the public schools. James E. Coffey was born 
in Salem, Massachusetts, and educated in the public 
schools. Both men are practical printers, and they 
conduct a high grade print shop. 



WILLIAM E. BOYLE, druggist, of Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, was born September 21, 1882, in that 
city, son of Matthias and Harriet H. (Bartlett) Boyle, 
of Amesbury. His education was obtained in the public 
schools of his native town. His first experience in 
business was as a clerk in the drug business, as an 
employee of J. Frank Nason, where he continued for 
five years. Following this, he was employed in various 
drug stores until 191 1, when he started in business on 
his own account, and has now completed ten success- 
ful years. 

Mr. Boyle married, in 1906, Mary Gertrude Lowell, 
daughter of Fred A. and Ann (Caswell) Lowell, and 
their children are: Marjorie E., born March 14, 1908; 
Elmore L., born February 13, 191 1; and Barbara, born 
April I, 1918. 



334 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ANNIE C. (BRANN) BEAL— Among the active 
leading business women of Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
is Mrs. Annie C. (Brann) Beal, who is superintendent 
and manager of the Haverhill plant acquired by the 
Beal Brothers in 1889. The business was established 
in 1865 by John Maners. and passed to the Beal broth- 
ers twenty-four years later, at which time the plant was 
at No. 72 Merrimac street. There it was continued and 
developed for the next seventeen years, in 1906 being 
removed to Middlesex street, Bradford, which is the 
present address. The company has, however, in addi- 
tion, a large plant at Lowell, Massachusetts, and it is 
said that tlieir business is the largest of its kind in the 
Haverhill district. Mrs. Beal has manifested superior 
aptitude for business affairs, and has helped to main- 
tain the business in progressive development. 

Annie C. (Brann) Beal was born in Dover, Maine, 
on February 10, 1859. She was educated in the Dover 
public schools, and at Foxcroft Academy. She married 
Fred C. Beal, Sr., a dyer and cleaner by trade, and a 
native of Bangor, Maine. One child was born to them, 
Fred C, Jr., of whom further. 

Fred C. Beal, Jr. was born on January 30, 1883, and 
grew up in his native place, Dover, New Hampshire, 
where in early life he attended the elementary public 
schools. When his parents came to Haverhill to live, 
Fred C, Jr. became a student of the Haverhill High 
School. After leaving school he became associated 
with the family business, and in course of time became 
a valuable associate. He is well known in Haverhill, 
especially in Masonic and business circles. He is a 
member of all the Masonic bodies, and is active in the 
Rotary Club of Haverhill. Socially he belongs to the 
Agawam Club. 

Fred C. Beal, Jr. married, in July, 191 1, Florence 
Vernard, of Salisbury, New Hampshire, daughter of 
William and Sadie (Eaton) Vernard, the latter of Sal- 
isbury, and the former of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 
William Vernard was connected with the shoe manu- 
facturing industry, and died in 191 1. Fred C. Jr. and 
Florence (Vernard) Beal have two children: Elinor V., 
born in 1913; and Janet B., born in 1917. 



JOHN ELLIOTT— For twenty-five years a well- 
known and respected funeral director of Newburyport, 
Iv'Iassachusetts, and for forty years a responsible resi- 
dent in the United States, John Elliott, who is of Scot- 
tish birth, comes into place as a worthy American cit- 
izen and a representative man of Essex county, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Mr. Elliott was born in Scotland, on November 14, 
1868, son of John and Mary E. (Telford) Elliott. John 
Elliott, Sr., was a farm overseer, and died in 191 1. His 
wife died in 1872, when John, Jr., who was the second 
of their four children, was only four years old, and he 
was not yet fourteen years old when he came to the 
United States, in 1882. His education had been obtained 
in the public schools of his native place, and he prob- 
ably was farther advanced in academics than the aver- 
age American boy of fourteen would be, because Brit- 
ish children, as a rule, enter school at an earlier age 
than American children, and the British school year is 
much longer than the average American school year. 
At all events, when he came to this country, he imme- 



diately began to work, entering a Massachusetts shoe 
factory. During the next fourteen years he worked in 
many factories, remaining connected with the Massa- 
chusetts shoe industry until September, 1896, when he 
formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, the two 
establishing an undertaking business in Newburyport. 
The company was known as Pike & Elliott, and the 
funeral parlors were originally at No. 46 Pleasant 
street. The partnership continued until igoo, when Mr. 
Elliott became sole owner, thereafter operating under 
his own name. In 191 1 he removed to Merrimac 
street, in the Odd Fellows building, which has been his 
business address ever since. For many years Mr. 
Elliott has been one of the leading funeral directors of 
Newburyport, and has the confidence of the people in 
general. 

Inuring his long residence and public service in New- 
buryport, Mr. Elliott has to some e.xtent entered into 
pul)lic movements, though he has had to devote the 
greater part of his time to his professional work. For 
a while he was a member of the City Council. He is a 
director of the Homoeopathic Hospital; belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church ; is a Mason to the Knights 
Templar degree ; is affiliated with three branches of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belongs to the 
.\ncient Order of United Workmen, and also to the 
Knights of Malta. Socially he holds membership in the 
North End Yacht and the Dalton clubs. 

Mr. Elliott married, in 1896, Mary D. Pike, daughter 
of William C. and Susan (Sullivan) Pike, of Newbury- 
port. The Pike family is one of the historic families 
of Colonial New England, several scions of that house 
coming prominently into national annals. The father 
of Mrs. Elliott was a carpenter by trade, and died in 
1905 ; her mother was originally of Bucksport, Maine. 
Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have two children: John Telford, 
born in 1897; and William F., born in 1905. 



BARTHOLOMEW J. CREEDEN, master-plumber, 
of Newburyport, Massachusetts, is widely known in that 
district. He is an alert, enterprising man, of strong 
personality, and is especially respected in plumbing 
circles. So much is clearly indicated by the honors 
conferred upon him by fellow-members of the Plumbers' 
Union, at Brockton, Massachusetts ; he has been pres- 
ident of that body eight times, being reelected seven 
times. He represented the union at the Toledo (Ohio) 
Convention ; was delegate to the Building and Trades 
Council, of Brockton, Massachusetts, and was also 
elected delegate to the District Council at Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Mr. Creeden was bom in Newburyport on September 
19, 1886, son of Patrick and Ellen (Riordan) Creeden. 
His mother, who was bom in Ireland, is still living, 
but his father, a former captain of police in Newbury- 
port, died in 1905. Bartholomew J. was the third of 
the six children of Patrick and Ellen (Riordan) Cree- 
den. He has four brothers, and all were reared in 
Newburyport. They all attended the public schools of 
that place, Bartholomew J. graduating eventually from 
the high school, in the class of 1901. After leaving 
school he became apprenticed to a local plumber, his 
own brother, and in due course completed his inden- 
tures. Soon afterwards he went to Haverhill, Massa- 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



335 



chusetts, where for a year he was in the employ of Saw- 
yer & Dean. For a like period he worked for J. J. 
Powers, at Brockton, and for five years thereafter was 
with the J. T. Corcoran Company. After a further 
three years spent in the employ of Hobert & Farrell, 
Inc., Mr. Creeden, in 1920, returned to Newburyport 
and became a master plumber himself, opening a shop 
under his own name on Middle street, Newburyport. 
His business, which embraces all phases of plumbing, 
heating, tin and sheet metal work, is steadily increas- 
ing, and is quite satisfactory. He is particularly ener- 
getic, and is proving that he is a good business man as 
well as an expert tradesman. Fratenially, Mr. Creeden 
is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and in general he is popular among those who 
know him. 

Mr. Creeden married, in 1918, Nora O'Connell, of 
Newburyport, daughter of Morris and Johanna (Ham- 
ilton) O'Connell, both of whom were born in Ireland. 
Morris O'Connell was a fisherman, and died in 1906. 



GEORGE B. SMART— The business conducted by 
Mr. Smart at Xo. 61 Esse.\ street, Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, must bring back early recollections to even 
the oldest residents. It is over seventy-five years since 
Mr. Smart's father established that business, and there 
has been no change of address since. 

George B. Smart, Jr., was born in Lawrence, on Sep- 
tember 9, 1864, son of George B. and Matilda (Chand- 
ler) Smart. His father was born in Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, and was a sheet metal worker by trade; he died 
in 1899. His wife was of Maine, and she died in 1897. 
They were the parents of six children, George B., Jr., 
being the first-born. 

George B. Smart was educated in local schools, and 
at Bryant and Stratton's Business College at Boston, 
Massachusetts. After graduating therefrom, young Mr. 
Smart returned to Lawrence, and for a while worked 
for J. F. Bingham. Soon, however, he associated with 
his father in the latter's sheet metal work business, and 
ever since the son has worked in the shop on Essex 
street. When his father died in 1899, he took over the 
whole of the business, and latterly the work has changed 
somewhat. The bulk of his business is now confined to 
n-ill work, although he at times undertakes quite a lot 
of outside tin, copper and sheet metal work. Mr. Smart 
has held closely to his own business, but he is much 
respected, and has a wide circle of friends. He is a 
member of Trinity Church, of Lawrence. 

He married, in 1889, Elizabeth Gesing, of Lawrence, 
daughter of William E. Gesing, an overseer, who died 
in 1897. 



ROBERT J. SIM was bom in Salem, in the section 

which is now Peabody, Massachusetts, March 14, 1854, 
at the family home on Washington street. He attended 
the public schools of Peabody and after school years 
were finished he spent two years on a farm. From the 
farm he entered the leather business and so continued 
for ten years, going thence to his father's employ, the 
latter a manufacturer of morocco leather. About 1880 
he was admitted a member of the firm. The Peter Sim 
Company, and so continues, a successful leather manu- 
facturer. 



Mr. Sim is a member of Peabody Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; member of Peabody Chamber 
of Commerce; and a member of the Peabody Club; he 
attends the Congregational church. 

Mr. Sim married, in 1886, Ella F. Berry, of Beverly, 
Massachusetts, and they are the parents of two sons : 
Albert B., deceased ; and Robert B., who served in the 
United States army during the World War, 1917-18, 
and was honorably discharged at Camp Devens, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1918. Mr. Sim has spent his life in his 
native Peabody, the greater part of it in the leather 
business. He is widely known in the trade, and highly 
esteemed as a man of high character and strong busi- 
ness ability. 



E. RUSSELL MOULTON— Broadly interested in 
the industrial activities of the city of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, E. Russell Moulton has become one of the most 
prominent men in the shoe industry in this city. 

Mr. Moulton was bom in Lynn, on January 2, 1875, 
and is a son of Gilman and Addie (Littlefield) Moul- 
ton. Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of this city, he was graduated from the Lynn Classical 
High School in the class of 1892. In July of that year 
he entered the employ of Littlefield & Plummer, wood 
and paper bo.x manufacturers, of Lynn. Learning the 
business, and developing a practical ability for this line 
of effort, Mr. Moulton, ten years later, was admitted 
as a partner of the firm, William B. Littlefield being 
the senior partner at that time. Later his interest was 
purchased by Charles A. Littlefield, and the business 
was then conducted under the name of Littlefield & 
Moulton, this association of interests still continuing. 
They make many kinds of wood and paper boxes, and 
the industry has come to be one of the most important 
in the city. The Littlefield & Moulton Company has, 
within the past few years, bought out the V. K. & A. H. 
Jones & Thomas Company, one of the largest shoe 
manufacturing concerns in the city of Lynn, and they 
are conducting both industries at this time, Mr. Moul- 
ton being treasurer of the shoe business. 

As an active executive of these two important con- 
cerns, Mr. Moulton stands high in the business world of 
Lynn. He is furthermore a director of the Lynn Stor- 
age Battery Company, and treasurer and director of 
the George K. Kelly Company, of Lynn and Haverhill. 
Mr. Moulton is an influential member of the Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Personally, Mr. Moulton is prominent in fraternal and 
club circles. He holds the thirty-second degree in the 
Masonic order; is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks; and is a member of the Swamp- 
scott Masonic Club, and of the Oxford Club. 

On December 20, 1919, Mr. Moulton married Ruth 
Madora Johnson, daughter of Thure and Augustine 
Johnson, of Lynn. 



DANE MACHINE COMPANY— For thirty years 
the business now known as the Dane Machine Company 
was conducted in Salem, Massachusetts, under the name 
of J. W. Dane, the business being incorporated in 1919, 
as the Dane Machine Company, Inc., by Joseph H. 
Poor, Frederick L. Warner and John Little, all of 
Salem. The business of the company is the manufac- 



336 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ture of machines used in tlie hide and leather business 
by tanners and mcinufacturers. 

Frederick L. Warner, son of Frederick E. and Mabel 
F. (Smith) Warner, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 
March lo, 1895. He completed the course of public 
school instruction, grammar and high, then entered 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, whence he was 
graduated, class of 191 6. From "Tech" he entered the 
employ of the Eagle Iron Foundry of Salem, and there 
remained until 191 7, when he left to enter the service of 
the United States then at war with Germany. He 
enlisted in Company D, lOist Engineers in June, 1917, 
was sent overseas with the American Expeditionary 
Forces, saw service in France, and was honorably dis- 
charged, March 4, 1918, with the rank of captain. After 
the war he formed the connection that now exists with 
the Dane Machine Company, Inc. Mr. Warner is a 
member of the Masonic order; his church membership 
is with the Universalist church of Salem. 



JOHN LITTLE, now an honored resident of Salem, 
Massachusetts, was born in the Province of New Bruns- 
wick, Dominion of Canada, November 9, 1867, the 
son of Robert Little, a shoe factory man of New Bruns- 
wick, Canada, who died there in 1895. He married 
Jane Hudson, of New Brunswick, who also died there, 
but at an earlier date, her death occurring in 1880. 

John Little was educated in the public schools of New 
Brunswick. He was employed at the locality known as 
Little's Mills, and there learned the carpenter's trade. 
He also learned the millwright's trade and was employed 
at both trades alternately for about five years, when 
he came to the United States, locating in Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts. His first work in Salem was with the Bos- 
ton & Maine railroad in their car shops, where his skill 
as a wood worker kept him with the company for a 
number of years. In 1901 he entered the employ of the 
Vaughn Machine Company of Salem, remaining with 
that company until 1905, when they moved their plant 
to Peabody, Mr. Little being induced to accompany 
them. He continued in that employ until George C. 
Vaughn acquired the Vaughn Machine Company, and 
organized the Vaughn & Rude Company, Mr. Little 
going with that company as an expert. For ten years he 
was with the Vaughn & Rude Company of Peabody, 
finally leaving to enter the employ of the Merrill Ma- 
chine Company, of Salem. In 1918 he became a partner 
in the Dane Machine Company of Salem, and continued 
as the plant manager until March, 1922, when he re- 
turned to his former employers, now known as the J. 
W. Aulson Company. Here Mr. Little's inventive gen- 
ius is a great asset to the firm. This brief review shows 
Mr. Little as a man of energy and enterprise, expert as 
a mechanic, a good manager and capable business man. 

John Little is a member of John Endicott Lodge, 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a man highly 
esteemed in his community, and has a wealth of friends. 

Mr. Little married, in Salem, Mariah Hanson, a native 
of Nova Scotia. Mr. and Mrs. Little have four chil- 
dren : Genevieve, who is the wife of Murrey Friend, and 
they have a daughter. Norma ; Blanche, Pauline, and 
Eleanor. Mr. and Mrs. Little reside at No. 46 High- 
land avenue, Salem, Massachusetts. 



FERDINAND ALMON BUTLER was born at 
Springvale, Maine, on June 12, 1877, and is a son of 
Ferdinand A. and Jennie M. (Giles) Butler. His 
father, for whom he was named, was a merchant. Mr. 
Butler's parents both lived in Maine all their lives, and 
both died there. 

Mr. Butler received his early education in the public 
schools of Maine. He attended high school at Salem, 
Massachusetts, and after graduating from the Salem 
High School, proceeded to the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. He also is a graduate of the Salem 
Commercial School, and taught two years in that insti- 
tution. In 1899 Mr. Butler established himself in the 
bicycle business at Danvers. Two years later he became 
a dealer in plumbing, heating supplies and fixtures. He 
now conducts both a bicycle and a plumbing and heat- 
ing business in a store on Maple street, Danvers. 

Mr. Butler is a member of the Maple Street Congre- 
gational Church, and past president of the Maple Street 
Men's Club. He is very active in Masonic circles, being 
a past master of Amity Lodge, and proxy for his lodge 
to the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts, a past 
high priest of Holten Royal Arch Chapter of Danvers; 
an ofticer in Sutton Lodge of Perfection of Salem ; and 
a member of Jubilee Council, Princes of Jerusalem, and 
F.mmanuel Chapter of Rose Croix, both of Salem. He 
is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the 
Massachusetts Consistory, and belongs to Aleppo Tem- 
ple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine 
of Boston. He also is a member of and was one of the 
charter members of the Danvers Masonic Club. He 
was a charter member and the first worthy patron oi 
Mount Burnet Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, of 
Danvers. 

Mr. Butler married Serena Perry, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. James O. Perry, of Danvers, Mr. Perry being 
for years one of the leading merchants In that town. 
Mr. and Mrs. Butler have two children living: Eliza- 
beth Butler, born in 1910; and Caroline Butler, born in 
1914. 



JAMES L. TOOHEY, of the firm of Robinson- 
Toohey Company, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, holds a 
leading place among the men engaged in mercantile 
pursuits in that city. There is no other firm equal to 
this company in size in New England outside of Boston. 

Mr. Toohey was born January 14, 1886, in North 
Andover, Massachusetts, the son of William J. Toohey, 
a mill-wright, now living retired in North Andover. 
Mr. Toohey's mother, Maria Toohey, died some years 
ago. 

As a boy Mr. Toohey attended the public schools and 
the Johnson High School. Very soon after this time 
he engaged in business as a clerk with the firm of San- 
born & Robinson, hardware dealers, the latter being 
his partner in the present firm. This firm was founded 
originally by C. A. Metcalf, and upon his death his 
business was purchased by James B. Robinson, who 
had worked for him as a clerk, Edward M. Sanborn, 
and Mr. E. Austin, the firm name being Sanborn, Austin 
& Robinson; this partnership formed the beginning of 
the present business. After the withdrawal of Mr. 
Austin the firm name necessarily changed to include the 
owners' names, Sanborn & Robinson, and this arrange- 



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337 



ment continued to the year 1 907, when Mr. Sanborn 
withdrew. 

During the years Mr. Toohey had worked as a clerk, 
he had diligently applied himself to learning the busi- 
ness, and was rewarded with his opportunity to enter 
the partnership in 1907, when Mr. Sanborn withdrew. 
At this same time M. T. Doyle was also admitted to the 
firm and the business carried on under the name of the 
Robinson Hardware Company. In 1914 Mr. Doyle 
retired, and the name became the Robinson-Toohey Com- 
pany, continuing as such to the present time. 

As the automobile began to replace carriages, the 
enterprising members of this firm, with keen perception, 
realized the necessity of expansion, and while previ- 
ously the hardware business had been the chief inter- 
est, it has been gradually superseded by the automobile 
department, and now at Nos. 10-20 Winter street are 
excellent showrooms, covering a large area of floor 
space, and a service station, with every facility. This 
firm also has the agency for the Cadillac, Durant, and 
Nash cars. With the combined departments, fifty-two 
employees are needed. The building now occupied by 
the firm was purchased in August, 1919, and previous to 
this time had been located at the corner of Essex and 
Amesbury streets, and when founded in 1852 was located 
at No. 327 Essex street. 

Mr. Toohey is active in civic affairs in Lawrence and 
North Andover, and for seven years has been a member 
of the Advisory Committee in the latter place, serving 
as chairman for the past four years. He is a member 
of the Merrimac Valley Country Club, of Lawrence ; the 
Rotary Club, of Lawrence; the North Andover Club; 
the Chamber of Commerce, of Lawrence; and the 
North Andover Civic Association. Fraternally he is 
a fourth degree member of the Knights of Columbus, in 
Lawrence. 

Mr. Toohey married, at North Andover, Katherine G. 
Egan, and they are the parents of two sons and a daugh- 
ter : James L., Jr.; Frederick; and Mary. The family 
attend St. Michael's Church in North Andover. 



JOHN F. QUINN — Among the prominent merchants 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, John F. Quinn holds a 
significant position in the hardware business and its 
allied lines of merchandising. Mr. Quinn is a son of 
Lawrence and Ellen (Coughlin) Quinn, both of whom 
are now deceased. The father came to the United 
States from Ireland in his youth, and was employed 
here in the textile mills. 

John F. Quinn was born in Lawrence, in 1868, and 
received his education in the public schools of this' city. 
In early life he was a house painter by trade, and fol- 
lowed this line of activity until 1907, for the last twelve 
or fifteen years of that time as a contracting painter. 
In 1907 he opened a paint and supply store, which has 
gradually developed into the present business of general 
hardware, as well as paint supplies, wall papers, and 
all lines usually affiliated with this business. About ten 
years ago he dropped the painting branch of his busi- 
ness. He carries on a very active wholesale depart- 
ment, and is a large jobber of wall paper. 

Mr. Quinn is well and favorably known in business 
circles in Lawrence. He is a Democrat and served as 
Essex — 2 — 22 



a member of the Common Council for one term. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus; 
he is a member of the St. Laurence's Roman Catholic 
Church. 

Mr. Quinn married, in 1909, Mary A. Lawlor, and 
they are the parents of five children: John F., Mary A., 
Catherine E., Eleanor R., and Lawrence M. The fam- 
ily reside in Methuen. 



JOSEPH L. BELLEVILLE, of Lynn, who is now 
one of the successful undertakers and funeral directors 
of the day, is a native of Lynn, and was born May 16, 
1S89. He is a son of Isiase and Caroline (Joyal) 
Belleville, both natives of Quebec, Canada. 

Receiving his early education in the public and paro- 
chial schools of Lynn, Mr. Belleville entered Nicolet 
College, in Quebec. Canada, from which institution he 
was graduated in due course. In looking forward to 
his career he became interested in the undertaking busi- 
ness, and after the necessary preparation, started in 
business for himself in this field of endeavor, in the 
year 1910. He has carried on the business under his 
own name continuously since. 

On September 7, 1917, Mr. Belleville enlisted as a 
private, in Company C, 301st Field Artillery. He served 
at Camp Devens for a period of eleven months, then 
served six months in France, and was discharged May 
21, 1919, with the rank of Sergeant of Band. 

Mr. Belleville is a member of Lynn Lodge, No. 117, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Vallado- 
lid Lodge, No. 170, Knights of Columbus, of both the 
local and national orders of St. Jean de Baptiste, and of 
the Franco-Foresters. On May 21, 1919, Mr. Belleville 
married Aurore Morin, of Marlboro, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Odilon and Lydia (Hebert) Morin, both of 
Quebec, Canada. 

Mr. Belleville is a Republican. He has been active in 
his party, both as a candidate and worker. His under- 
taking establishment is fitted with modem equipment 
and well deserves the liberal patronage which it 
commands. 



FRANK BOWNES, a prominent manufacturer of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, has achieved well deserved suc- 
cess. From a very modest beginning he has established 
a flourishing business and has a wide market for his 
product. 

Mr. Bownes was born February 10, 1886, in Sheffield, 
England, son of William Henry and Annie Elizabeth 
(Biggin) Bownes. William Henry Bownes was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Bownes Brothers, Ltd., builders of 
fine carriages in Sheffield. He was born at Woodsets, 
Yorkshire county, England, and died October i, 1908, 
at Salem, Massachusetts, whence he had emigrated in 
Tune, 1894. His wife, Annie Elizabeth Biggin, was born 
at Sheffield, June 12, 1856, and with their son accom- 
panied her husband to America. They settled in Salem 
immediately upon their arrival and Mr. Bownes engaged 
in blacksmith ing work on his own account, being very 
successful. 

Frank Bownes attended the public schools of Salem 
and the high school for one year. He then worked 
with his father for a year, leaving to enter the employ 



338 



ESSEX COUNTY 



of the late Henry K. Mansfield, a prominent retail 
druggist. Subsequently he entered the wholesale drug 
business, following this occupation for seven years. 
On May 31, 1909, he entered business for himself to 
manufacture shellac varnish; his start was made at 
No. 23 Derby street, Salem, and his partner was Wilbur 
F. Hedden, now deceased. Two years later this part- 
nership was dissolved, but Mr. Bownes continued in 
business and in 1913 the location was removed to 
Market street. Soon after this time the big Salem fire 
occurred, and immediately after it the State police 
started a rigid investigation of property to condemn all 
buildings considered dangerous and liable to fire. The 
building occupied by Mr. Bownes was among those 
considered unsafe, and this was particularly so on 
account of the nature of the business and the inflam- 
mable materials used in manufacture: It was a large 
wooden frame building with living apartments above the 
paint shop. As a consequence, Mr. Bownes was noti- 
fied to vacate in forty-eight hours, and it was very dif- 
ficult to find a suitable place. It was several months 
before he was again located and able to do business, 
which was at No. 59 Monroe street, Lynn, in the mod- 
ern brick building previously occupied by the Collins 
Hardware Company. However, this forced move proved 
«o be the very best thing that could have happened, as 
the greater facilities in the new building enabled Mr. 
Bownes to enlarge his business and to accomplish more, 
and the progress has been much greater than ever could 
have been in the old store. 

In 1920 Mr. Bownes became interested in the Water- 
proof Paint and Varnish Company, at Watertown, 
Massachusetts, and there manufactures a line of paint 
and varnish products, known under the trade name of 
the "Red Oval Line." The excellence of all the products 
of Mr. Bownes' manufacture is known wherever paints 
and varnishes are used, and he is held in high esteem 
among the business men of Essex county. Mr. Bownes 
is fraternally affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Bownes married, in November, 1909, Betsey M. 
Amable, of Danvers, Massachusetts, and they make 
their home in Salem. 



upon in Peabody as one of the foremost practitioners 
of his day. He is frequently called in consultation, and 
does a great deal of X-ray work. He is a recognized 
authority in his profession, and is much sought for 
medical services of a public nature. He is on the sur- 
gical staff of the Thomas Memorial Hospital, of Pea- 
body; was school physician for a considerable period; 
and is examining physician for the old line insurance 
companies. He is a graduate fellow of the American 
Medical Association ; a member of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society; a member of the Peabody Doctors' 
Club; of the Massachusetts Society of Examining Phy- 
sicians; and of the Medical Veterans of the World 
War. He was secretary of the Medical Advisory 
Board, No. 28, of Massachusetts; and a member of 
tlie Medical Service Corps. 

Dr. Kelley's college fraternity is Alpha Kappa Kappa. 
He is a member of the Boston City Hospital Alumni 
Association; and the Providence Lying-In Hospital 
Alumni Association. He is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus; of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks; and of the Peabody Rotary Club; and is a 
trustee of the Peabody Institute. 

In political matters, the doctor declines to pledge 
himself to any party, casting his vote independently for 
the candidate which he believes will best serve the 
public, and fearlessly throwing his influence on the side 
of right. 

Dr. Kelley married, on October 12, 1914. Mary E. 
Reynolds, daughter of Richard and Margaret (Small) 
Reynolds, of Woburn, Massachusetts. Mrs. Kelley's 
parents are now both deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Kelley 
have three children : Thomas Reynolds, Eleanor Lor- 
aine, and Lawrence Kendall, Jr. The family are mem- 
bers of the Roman Catholic church. 



LAWRENCE KENDALL KELLEY, M. D., is one 

of the leading physicians of Peabody, Massachusetts. 
Well established in a wide and successful practice, enjoy- 
ing the confidence and respect of the public, he holds 
a high and influential position in the city and in his 
profession. 

Dr. Kelley is the only child of Thomas and Cather- 
ine A. (Long) Kelley. His father is a veteran in the 
watch repairing business ; his mother is now deceased. 

Dr. Kelley was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, on 
January 8, 1887. He received his early education at 
St. James' Parochial School, then entered Tufts Med- 
ical School, from which he was graduated in 1912, with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He passed the 
Massachusetts State Board in 1012, and then became 
interne at the Boston City Hospital. There he remained 
for two years, then spent four months at the Providence 
Lying-in Hospital. He opened an office at Peabody, 
Massachusetts, in 1914, and entered upon the general 
practice of medicine and surgery D-- Kelley is looked 



HAROLD MEYER SISKIND— There has come in 
these modern times a new type of citizenship, and its 
keynote is helpfulness. Society demands that all of 
its parts shall contribute something to the public well- 
being. Each may choose his method of so doing, but 
none may withhold service and be called a good citizen. 

Harold Meyer Siskind is a good lawyer. He has 
the mind, the training, the character that makes for 
high standing in his profession. To the legal type of 
mind is added business acumen and a money sense that 
is carrying him far and fast on the road to wealth. He 
is, however, more than a fine lawyer and successful 
business man; he is a good citizen in the fullest mean- 
ing of the word. The presence of need he considers a 
command for his services, and he gives them freely, 
wisely and constantly. He has been the benefactor of 
the community and is becoming known and appreci- 
ated. 

Harold Meyer Siskind is a native of Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, born on February 25, 1894- His father, Dr. 
Alexander L., and mother, Rebecca (Herman) Siskind, 
are well known in Lawrence, the former being an emi- 
nent physician, as well as a bank director and large real 
estate owner in the city. 

Harold Meyer Siskind is an alumnus of Lawrence 
High School, class of 1912. He went to Phillips An- 
dover Academy to prepare for Boston University, and 
was graduated from the Academy in 1914, and from 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



339 



the law department of Boston University in 1917, receiv- 
ing from the latter the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Admitted to the bar the same year, he started the prac- 
tice of law in Lawrence with the firm of Eaton & Chan- 
dler, remaining there for three years. 

With the year 1920 came the opportunity of opening 
his own law offices. He began the handling of his 
growing law business alone and secured his own office, 
and is now of the firm of McAnally, Peirce & Siskind, 
Bay State building. Rooms Nos. 724-727, inclusive. He 
is a member of the Essex County and Lawrence (Mas- 
sachusetts) Bar associations. 

.Among his many business interests are those in the 
theatrical and amusement world. He is president of the 
Victoria Company, operators of the Victoria Theatre; 
and president and treasurer of the Capitol Amusement 
Company, and treasurer of the Broadway Company, of 
Lawrence. For two years he has been a director of the 
very large Chamber of Commerce, and is now vice- 
president of it; he belongs to the Zeta Beta Tau fra- 
ternity, Boston L^niversity. 

During the World War much of his energy was 
given to the different movements in his city, being a 
very efficient captain of the various Liberty Loan cam- 
paigns, serving also on the Legal Advisory Board. In 
any effort made looking toward civic betterment, Mr. 
Siskind has been prompt in giving aid. He is serving 
(1921) as Jewish juvenile probation officer; is a past 
president of the Young Men's Hebrew Association ; 
and holds membership in the Temple Emanuel Church, 
being one of its directors and trustees. 



DAVID ALBERT ACKER was bom at Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, .\pril 3, 1867, and is a son of Henry and 
Barbary Ellen (Lloy) Acker. His grandfather, Henry 
.'\cker. was born at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, as was 
also the subject's father, Henry Acker, who became a 
farmer. He led a very retired life, devoting himself 
to the management of his farm, and taking no part in 
politics or other public concerns. He died at the age 
of seventy-six years. Mr. Acker's mother was Scotch 
by birth. 

Mr. Acker received his early education in the public 
schools, and spent two years in high school. At the 
age of twenty-one, he moved to Burlington, Massachu- 
setts, and was for four years engaged in farming. .\t 
the age of twenty-five, Mr. Acker decided to enter the 
business world and established himself as a contractor 
at Waltham. Massachusetts. In 190J, he moved to 
Methuen, Massachusetts, where he now lives, an(d 
engaged in various business enterprises until, some 
time later, he became connected with the Abathaw 
Construction Company, of Boston. This connection 
lasted for nine years, at the end of which time, in 
April, 1920, Mr. Acker resigned in order to take charge 
of the affairs of the Universal Tide Power Company, 
at Lawrence. This is a large Massachusetts corpora- 
tion which has been formed in order to demonstrate 
and develop the patented inventions of John A. Knowl- 
ton. The company has constructed a large plant at 
Saugus, Massachusetts, where the devices of the com- 
pany can be demonstrated. Mr. Knowlton, the treasurer 
of the company, is a resident of Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Mr. .Acker is a member of the Episcopal church. He 
is a Republican in politics, and had charge of the cam- 
paign for the nomination of Senator Hiram Johnson 
of California for President of the United States, at 
Lawrence, in 1920. Mr. Acker belongs to the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, and is a member of the Lawrence 
lodge of that order. He is also a member of the Loyal 
Order of Moose and belongs to the Lawrence lodge of 
the organization. 

He married Naomi S. Daniels, at Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts, November 16, 1892. Mrs. Acker is a daugh- 
ter of John W. and Emma (Readon) Daniels, and was 
born in Nova Scotia. Her father was a deep sea diver. 
Mr. and Mrs. Acker have four sons: i. Ralph Robert- 
son .Acker, born September 11, 1894, served with the 
Seventy-sixth Connecticut Infantry during the World 
War, and was in active service overseas for eleven 
months. In Tune, 1921, he graduated from Wentworth 
Institute, at Boston, as draftsman and engineer, and is 
now a teacher in a Nashua, New Hampshire, public 
school. 2. Albert Clayton Acker, born September 6, 
1898, is a student at Dartmouth College, class of 1922. 
He enlisted in a unit recruited from the college, and 
was ready to sail for France as an officer when the 
.'\rmistice was signed and the war came to an end. 3. 
Wilber Weston Acker, born September 26, 1899. 4. 
Henry Palmer Acker, born January 12, 1901. 



ARTHUR W. LONVAL, a progressive merchant of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, was born in Amesbury, Septem- 
ber 7, 1878, son of Joseph N. and Marguerite (Kliveen) 
Lonval. .After completing the courses in the public and 
high schools of that city, he started his business career 
as a clerk in the men's furnishing store of C. W. Saw- 
yer. By diligence and thrift, and with a knowledge of 
the business which he learned by strict application to 
his duties, Mr. Lonval was preparing the way to opening 
a similar business on his own account. In 1900 he left 
Amesbury and came to Lynn, where five years later he 
engaged in business for himself. He was a successful 
clerk and it naturally follows that he has become a suc- 
cessful merchant and is highly respected among the 
citizens of Lynn. Mr. Lonval is a member of the 
Swampscott Masonic Club; of the Oxford Club; and a 
director of the State National Bank. With his family 
he attends the Episcopal church and aids in its support. 

Mr. Lonval married, September 23, 1903, Edith F. 
Meader, daughter of John Meader, of Newburyport, 
and they are the parents of a daughter, born January 
29. 1905- 

THOMAS RILEY— A citizen of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, since his boyhood, Thomas Riley, overseer of 
the wool-washing department of the Arlington Mills of 
that city, has achieved a place of prominence in the 
industrial and civic life of that community through his 
uprightness and his active work in the welfare of others. 

Mr. Riley is a native of the country that has sent so 
many good Americans to this side of the water, and he 
was bom in County Cavan, Ireland, March 14, 1851. 
His father, John Riley, was a native of this same 
county, and died in 1858. The mother of Thomas 
Riley, Marguerite O'Brien, was a native of County 
Cork, Ireland, whose death preceded that of her hus- 
band's five years. 



340 



ESSEX COUNTY 



In the summer of l?65, when this country was just 
coming to the end of the conflict that had torn it 
asunder for four years, Thomas Riley came to America, 
and located in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he ob- 
tained his education. After leaving school he obtained 
employment setting bobbins in the Pacific Mills, where 
he remained for three years. In 1874 he made a trip 
to his native land and was gone nearly a year, returning 
to America in the fall of 1875. In September of the 
same year Mr. Riley went to work for the Arlington 
Mills in the wool-washing department, and in due 
course of time his diligence and ability were noted and 
he was promoted through the various positions until 
he became overseer of the department in 1894 and has 
since been the active head of this department. 

Mr. Riley has seen the business output increase from 
800 pounds of wool a week to the present output of 
1,000,000 pounds, and with this increase in the volume 
of business, and the many other details that naturally 
became a part of it, Mr. Riley has kept step and has 
maintained the same high efficiency of management at 
all times. He has the distinction of being the oldest 
man in point of service in the Arlington Mills, having 
completed forty-seven consecutive years in their employ, 
and a short time ago was presented with a pin in 
recognition of these faithful years of service. At the 
completion of his half century mark, Mr. Riley will 
receive the diamond service emblem of recognition. 

Much of Mr. Riley's time outside of business is taken 
up with the work of charitable organizations, and there 
are many needy citizens of Lawrence whose needs are 
lessened through his thoughtfulness and work, partic- 
ularly with the St. Vincent de Paul Society, widely 
recognized as one of the foremost charitable organi- 
zations. 

Mr. Riley married, in 1889, Julia Ring, daughter of 
Jeremiah Ring, of Boston ; she was born in County 
Cork. Mr. and Mrs. Riley are the parents of two 
daughters: Marguerite A., born May 18, 1896; and 
Mary V., born June 23, 1898, both now being engaged 
as school teachers in Lawrence. Mr. Riley and his 
family attend St. Mary's Church of Lawrence, and he 
is a member of the Holy Name Society of this church, 
and otherwise active in many of its organizations. 



CHARLES JOSEPH GOLDMAN, LL. B., of 

Lynn, whose name is gaining wide recognition in Essex 
county, Massachusetts, was born December 16, 1887, in 
Boston, and is a son of Harris and Rose Goldman, for- 
merly of that city, but for many years residents of 
Lj'nn. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
and the Classical High School of Lynn, he then entered 
Boston University, from which he was graduated, cum 
hude, in 1909, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Following this he took post-graduate work at Harvard 
University, and has since carried on the general prac- 
tice of law in Essex and Suffolk counties, in this State. 
He became associated with Judge Henry T. Summers, 
of the Superior Court, and Ex-Mayor Charles Neal 
Barney, with whom he practiced for seven years before 
engaging in business for himself. 

Mr. Goldman enlisted in the Reserve Force of the 
United States navy as second-class seaman during the 



World War, and was later attached to the United 
States Naval Aviation Detachment. He is a member 
of the American Legion. In public life Mr. Goldman 
has served as secretary of the Lynn Republican Club, 
and is also ex-secretary of the Lynn Republican City 
Committee. He holds the thirty-second degree in the 
Masonic order, is a member of the Massachusetts Con- 
sistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite ; and .Aleppo 
Temple. Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Boston. He is a member of the Zeta Beta 
Tau fraternity. 

Mr. Goldman married, April 2, 1919, Marian A. 
Leavitt, of Boston, daughter of Gertrude Leavitt, and 
they reside in Lynn with their two sons : James J. and 
Robert S. 



RICHARD J. SPENCER, of Cliftondale, Essex 
county, Massachusetts, is one of those forward-looking 
men whose vision of the future includes not only his 
personal success, but comprises also the broad and 
Increasing prosperity and importance of the community 
of which he is a resident. 

Mr. Spencer is a son of Thomas T. Spencer, who 
has for many years carried on large farming opera- 
tions in Maiden, Massachusetts, and conducts an exten- 
sive milk business in that city. Mr. Spencer is now 
(1922) the owner of the well-known Oaklandale Farm, 
which is one of the show places of this vicinity. He 
married Julia A. Mahoney, of Maiden, who is also 
still living. 

Richard J. Spencer, son of Thomas T. and Julia A. 
(Mahoney) Spencer, was born in Maiden, August 24, 
1890, and received a thoroughly practical education in 
the public and high schools of Maiden, being gradujited 
from high school in the class of 1908. After completing 
his studies he remained with his father on the farm for 
a time, but determining upon a business career, he went 
to Boston, where he learned the plumbing trade with 
R. H. James & Company, of that city, being with that 
concern for three years. Removing thereafter to Lynn, 
he was first employed by George Caswell, then later by 
F. H. White. In 1913 Mr. Spencer started in business 
for himself in Lynn, in association with a partner, 
under the firm name of Oine & Spencer, with head- 
quarters on Broadway. After about two years he 
bought out Mr. Oine, and has since continued business 
alone, under his own name. He is now located at 
Cliftondale, and is doing a thriving business in plumb- 
ing and heating, having a very complete stock and 
equipment. He also does everything in the tin and sheet 
metal line. 

In the community interests of Cliftondale Mr. Spencer 
always supports any advance movement, but his busi- 
ness activities prevent him from taking a leading part 
in political afTairs. He is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus. 

Mr. Spencer married, in 1914, Alfreda Magg, of 
West Lynn, daughter of William A. and Martha ( Wie- 
gert) Magg, of West Lynn. Mrs. Spencer's father, 
who was a machinist, died in 191 2, but her mother is 
still living. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer have two daughters 
and a son: Dorothea, born March 14, 1917; Mary Ger- 
trude, born in 1919; and Richard J., Jr., born October 
26, 1921. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



341 



JOHN W. SUMNER, manufacturer of sole leather 
counters, of Lynn, Massachusetts, was born in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, March 16, 1887, son of Arthur B. 
Sumner. The latter founded the business of which his 
son is now the head, and for thirty-seven years suc- 
cessfully managed its operation. It was established in 
1883, in Haverhill, by Mr. Sumner and his brother, 
they doing business as Sumner Brothers. Later this 
partnership was dissolved and Arthur B. Sumner then 
did business under the name of the Haverhill Counter 
Company for several years. The business was moved to 
Lynn in 1905. 

John \V. Sumner attended the public schools, Mitch- 
ell's Military College, and the Bryant & Stratton Busi- 
ness College of Boston. Immediately after completing 
his formal education, Mr. Sumner entered the employ 
of his father and in 1912 was admitted to partnership. 
At this same time the firm name was changed to A. B. 
Sumner & Son. When the elder Mr. Sumner retired in 
1920 his son assumed the management and responsibil- 
ities, and a year later the name was changed to John 
W. Sumner. 

Mr. Sumner is a member of the Mystic Shrine; and 
Lynn Commandery, Knights Templar; his clubs include 
the Oxford, the Neighborhood, the Homestead Golf, 
and the Tedesco Country. He enlisted in the Regular 
army in September, 1918, and was stationed at Camp 
Johnston, Florida, where he served as a private in 
Motor Company No. 2, Motor Transport Corps. 

Mr. Sumner married Carrie George, of Lynn, daugh- 
ter of Willis W. and M. Josephine (Tapley) George. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sumner are the parents of two sons: 
Louis B. and John W., Jr. 



his country during the World War, from .August, 1917, 
until February, 1918, serving in the Marine Corps, sta- 
tioned at Paris Island, South Carolina; and Miriam P. 



SAMUEL E. KNAPP— In 1910 Mr. Knapp estab- 
lished himself in Salem, Massachusetts, and there is 
head of a good business. He is of the English Knapp 
family, this branch seated in Hanover, Massachusetts. 
Samuel E. Knapp was a son of Joseph F. Knapp, of 
Hanover, Massachusetts, who was engaged in the shoe 
business until his death in 1869. He married Mary A. 
Downing, of East Wakefield, New Hampshire, who 
died in Peabody, Massachusetts, in 1897. 

Samuel E. Knapp, son of Joseph F. and Mary A. 
(Downing) Knapp, was born in Farmington, New 
Hampshire, March 20, 1866, and was educated in the 
public schools of Haverhill, Massachusetts. After leav- 
ing school he learned the tanner's trade with Phillips 
& Cashman, remaining with that firm six years. At 
the end of that period, about thirty-six years ago, he 
engaged in business for himself in Peabody. Later he 
moved to Tapleyville, Massachusetts, there operating a 
tannery until burned out in 1910. He then located in 
Salem, where he is conducting a successful business. 
He is a tanning expert and master of the business which 
he has followed from youth. 

Mr. Knapp is a member of the Salem Chamber of 
Commerce; is a member and a deacon of the Advent 
Church, also superintendent of the Sunday school; and 
in politics is a Republican. 

Mr. Knapp married, July 13, 1889, Sarah Pierce, of 
Peabody, and they are the parents of : Ruth G., Alma 
P.; Margaret; Harold E., who was in the service of 



CHARLES O. HALI One of the many allied 

interests which stand back of the shoe industry is the 
pattern plant of which Charles O. Hall is the head and 
owner, doing business under the name of the Lynn 
Pattern Works. 

Mr. Hall was born in Newcastle, Maine, November 
22, 1877, and is a son of Lincoln and Miranda (Hodg- 
kins) Hall, then prosperous farming people of that 
section. The elder Mr. Hall died in 1918, but his wife, 
who was born in Jefferson, Maine, died in 1913. 

Charles O. Hall gained a thoroughly practical educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native town, then came 
to Middlesex county, Massachusetts, where he entered 
the employ of the General Electric Company, of Ever- 
ett, in their machine pattern department. He remained 
with this concern for about nine years, and thereafter 
came to Lynn, and established himself in the pattern 
business. He has built up an extensive trade, and makes 
both wood and metal patterns, and all kinds of castings, 
specializing in patterns for sole rounding machines. 

Mr. Hall is a member of the Lynn Chamber of Com- 
merce. Fraternally he holds membership in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of 
Pythias, both of Salem, and is a member of the Salem 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Hall married Celeste L. Nash, of Jefferson, 
Maine, daughter of Wilson and Lucy A. (Ross) Nash, 
of that place. Mrs. Hall's mother died in 1901. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hall have two sons : Harry S., and Elston M. 
The elder son is a student at the Salem High School, 
class of 1924. The family reside in Salem. 



ALONZO EDWARD QUICK— In the city of Lynn 
the name of Alonzo E. Quick is well known, as that of 
one of the most highly esteemed undertakers. Mr. 
Quick is also broadly active in every phase of public 
interest. He is a son of Francis R. and Frances J. 
Quick, long residents of Westchester county. New York. 

Mr. Quick was born in Golden's Bridge, Westchester 
county, New York, June 14, 1868, and was educated in 
the graded schools of the neighboring town of Katonah. 
At the age of eighteen years he entered the employ of 
Hoyt Brothers, a prominent undertaking concern of 
that town, remaining with them for several years. In 
1891 he came to Lynn, and shortly afterwards became 
associated with John W. Darcy, then a leading under- 
taker of this city. About a year later they formed a 
partnership under the firm name of Darcy & Quick, 
which endured until the death of the senior partner in 
1914. Mr. Quick then took over the entire business, and 
has since conducted it very successfully, winning his 
way to a high position in the confidence and respect of 
the people. He has adopted the modern equipments as 
they have come forth from time to time. With head- 
quarters at Nos. 204 and 206 South Common street, he 
is widely sought for the duties of his profession. 

Mr. Quick is a member of the Massachusetts Under- 
takers' Association, and of the National Selected Morti- 
cians. He is a member of the Lynn Chamber of Cora- 



342 



ESSEX COUNTY 



merce, and takes a deep interest in every advance move- 
ment. During the World War Mr. Quick was very 
prominent in all the activities in support of the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces, and took a leading part in 
all Liberty Loan drives. He is a member of the Free 
and Accepted Masons, of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and of the Rotary Club. In 1904 Alonzo Ed- 
ward Quick married Mabel M., daughter of John W., 
and .-Mice M. Darcy, of Lynn; and they have three chil- 
dren : J. Randolph, Mabel R., and Alonzo E., Jr. 



JAMES F. BARRY— In the leather industry in 
Esse.x county, Massachusetts, the name of Barry is 
well known in connection with the production of fine 
goat and sheep skins, used for colored footwear, and 
velvet ooze leather. 

James F. Barry was born in Ireland, May 15, 1864, 
and is a son of Patrick and Mary Barry, both now 
deceased. The elder Mr. Barry was a tanner by trade 
and was for many years employed in this industry in 
Essex county, principally in Peabody. 

Coming to the United States with his parents in 
1870, James F. Barry received a practical education in 
the public and grammar schools of Peabody, the neces- 
sity of becoming self-supporting precluding a higher 
education. Following the line in which his father was 
employed, the young man learned the tanner's trade, in 
the employ of Pemberton Brothers, of this city. With 
characteristic independence Mr. Barry started in busi- 
ness for himself, in 1894. Beginning in a small way he 
built up a thriving business, and two years after the 
start was obliged to secure larger and more suitable 
quarters. He located at No. 48 Foster street, where he 
has done business for the past twenty-five years. Dur- 
ing that period Mr. Barry has seen wonderful develop- 
ment in the methods of dyeing and treating skins, and 
has kept pace with this advance in every respect. His 
long experience has been particularly valuable in the 
past few years in meeting conditions due to the popu- 
larity of colored footwear, especially in the production 
of velvet ooze leather. He manufactures all colors in 
kid and sheep skins. In connection with the production 
end of the business, Mr. Barry has developed a very 
considerable interest in selling direct to the consumer, 
and his plans for expansion in the very near future 
include the establishment of a retail store in the city of 
Boston. 

Mr. Barry is a member of the Peabody Chamber of 
Commerce, and fraternally is affiliated with the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Barry married Margaret Brennan, of Salem, and 
they have four children : Margaret E., now Mrs. Burke, 
of Lynn; Alicia M., the wife of James McNeff ; James 
T. ; and Arthur J., now (1922) a student in Exeter 
Academy. 



WILLIAM C. CROWLEY— Widely interested in 
commercial and civic progress in Andover, Massachu- 
setts, William C. Crowley is a prominent figure in many 
circles here. He was born in Andover, October 25, 
1871, the son of Cornelius and Ellen (Burns) Crowley, 
both born in Ireland. He received his early education 
in the public schools of the town, later attending Can- 
non's Commercial College, in Lawrence, and there gain- 



. ing practical preparation for success in the business 
world. Entering the employ of Arthur Bliss, then a 
leading Andover druggist, in 1885, Mr. Crowley re- 
mained with him for nearly twenty years, first in a sub- 
ordinate capacity, later bearing more responsibility, and 
eventually thoroughly mastering the business. In 1907 
Mr. Crowley started for himself in the same business, 
and is now one of the leading men of the day in this 
line of endeavor. 

In connection with the main interest outlined above, 
Mr. Crowley owns a tailoring and men's furnishing 
establishment, which is also contributing materially to 
his success. 

For many years Mr. Crowley has been active in civic 
matters in Andover. He has been chairman of the 
Democratic Town Committee for the past seventeen 
years. By no means entirely in a political sense, he has 
always been interested in the betterment of conditions 
in the community and the advancement of the general 
good. During the World War, 1917-18, Mr. Crowley 
was treasurer of the Red Cross, and was a member of 
the United States Food Administration, also on the 
local Committee on Public Safety. He has for some 
years filled the local office of Sealer of Weights and 
Measures. 

Mr. Crowley is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Retail Druggists, of the Massachusetts Phar- 
maceutical Association, and of the Massachusetts Seal- 
ers' Association. Fraternally he is prominent in An- 
dover Council, No. 1078, Knights of Columbus. He is 
also a member of the Andover Club. 

On July 10, 1907, Mr. Crowley married Mary Buck- 
ley, daughter of Daniel Buckley, of Andover, and they 
have three sons: William C, Jr., born April 13. 1909; 
Woodrow Wilson, born July 2, 1912; and Paul, born 
October 29, 1914. The family are members of St. 
Augustine's Parish, and the children attend St August- 
ine's Parochial School. 



JOHN BROADHURST— A rising young architect, 
whose work is attracting much favorable attention, is 
John Broadhurst, of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Mr. 
Broadhurst is a son of Walter and Mary (Cooper) 
Broadhurst, who were born in England, and are now 
residents of Andover, Essex county. Massachusetts. 
Walter Broadhurst is associated with the Pacific Mills, 
in the print works. 

John Broadhurst was bom in Derbyshire, England, 
on March 19, 1886, and came to this country with his 
parents at the age of four years. Receiving his early 
education in the parochial schools of Lawrence, where 
the family located, he left school at the age of thirteen 
years to enter the world of industry. He had a settled 
ambition, however, and circumstances could not deter 
him from accomplishing it. Before his graduation from 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology he was 
employed in an architect's office for seven years. He 
also studied architecture at night. He was graduated 
from the Institute with the degree of B. S. in 1915. 
Thereafter, Mr. Broadhurst was in the employ of local 
architects for about three years, then opened an office 
for himself. He has attained, already, a marked degree 
of success, having done some of the best work of the 
day in the recent building operations in Lawrence. He 



;„f-KUB»^^' 



lOR. 



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^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



343 



has designed a large number of residences, and one of 
the most noteworthy of his designs of public buildings 
is a modern theatre on Broadway. Another is the $ioo,- 
ooo Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church — St. Francis ; 
other buildings are "The Electrical House," which is 
his own residence and which when opened was visited 
by 9,000 people; the Lyons theatre and office building, 
at Methuen ; and St. Monica's parochial residence, 
Methucn. Nor is his field confined to the local build- 
ing world ; he has designed buildings for a number of 
out-of-town mercantile and industrial organizations, 
notably the Carlyle Cord Tire Company building, of 
Stamford, Connecticut. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Broadhurst is well known, 
being a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, No. 65, and of Lawrence Council, Knights of 
Columbus. 

In 1909 Mr. Broadhurst married, in Lawrence, Ellen 
M. Livingstone, daughter of Thomas and Jane (Horm- 
by) Livingstone, and they have two children: Doro- 
thy M,, horn July 13, 191 1, and Leonard L., born 
December 25, 1913. The family are members of St. 
Mary's Roman Catholic Church. 



WILLIAM J. DOHERTY— .^ lifelong resident of 
Andover, Massachusetts, and for many years promi- 
nent as a contractor and builder, William J. Doherty 
has borne a part in the constructive activities of the 
town for the past sixteen years. 

Mr. Doherty was bom in Andover. on July 27, 1869, 
and is a son of John and Margaret (Hart) Doherty, 
both deceased. John Doherty was a gardener by occu- 
pation, but was killed in a railroad accident in Andover. 

Acquiring a practical education in the public schools 
of Andover, Mr. Doherty, as a young man, entered the 
employ of the Craighead & Kintz Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Ballard Vale, Massachusetts, where he remained 
for three years. Thereafter he worked for George S. 
Cole, of Andover, for a similar period, and while in this 
connection, learned the carpenter's trade. He then was 
associated with Hardy & Cole, in Andover, for about 
fifteen years, following this trade. In 1905 Mr. Doherty 
started in business for himself, along the line of con- 
tracting. He was successful from the beginning, and 
has come to a point where he holds a leading position 
in this branch of endeavor in this vicinity. Mr. Doherty 
does business under his own name, W. J. Doherty, Car- 
penter and Builder. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Doherty is prominent. He 
was a charter member of Andover Council, No. 1078, 
Knights of Columbus, and has been a member of Mer- 
rimac Council, Royal Arcanum, of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, for thirty-one years. In the public life of the 
town he has held the responsible position of election 
officer for the past twenty-eight years. 

On June 20, 1899, Mr- Doherty married Josephine 
Powers, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, and they have 
five children : John P. S., now employed in the adver- 
tising department of the Lawrence "Eagle-Tribune ;" 
William A., student at St. Rita Hall, at Villanova, 
Pennsylvania; Margaret, now (1922) in parochial 
school ; Joseph, also in parochial school ; and James, 
five years of age. The family are members of St. 
Augustine's Parish, of Andover. 



WILLIS RICHARDSON, for several years a resi- 
dent of Lawrence, Massachusetts, is making a business 
success in a line allied with the metal trades. He was 
born in Pittsville, Maryland, on February 17, i888. 
Receiving a thorough grounding in the essentials of 
education in the public schools of Pittsville, he took up 
telegraphy, and in 1900 accepted a position as a rail- 
way telegraph operator. Later, however, he turned to 
mechanical work, and in 1914 began welding. He 
became an expert at this art, and coming to Lawrence 
in 1916, entered the employ of the F. T. Abell Com- 
jjany, where he remained for about two years. In July, 
191S, Mr. Richardson started in business for himself, 
and now has a large and rapidly growing business in 
the acetylene welding of metals. This business is by 
no means confined to the city of Lawrence, but extends 
to states as far west as the Mississippi Valley. Mr. 
Richardson is located at Lowell street, Lawrence, in a 
building which he specially constructed for the busi- 
ness, and it is one of the best equipped welding shops 
in New England ; he is doing business under the name of 
the Auto Welding Company. 

Mr. Richardson married, in 1912, in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, Marie Simonds, of that city, and they have 
two daughters, Edith and Grace. The family resides 
at No. 70 Boxford street. South Lawrence, and attends 
the Episcopal church. 



NAPOLEON OUELLETT— Closely identified with 
the physical growth and development of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, is Napoleon Ouellett, the well-known con- 
tractor of No. I Harbor street, who besides the import- 
ant business he carries on as a building contractor, 
owns large real estate holdings in the city and its 
environs. 

Mr. Ouellett was born in Quebec, Canada, on Sep- 
tember 9, 1874, and is a son of Napoleon and Osite 
(Correar) Ouellett. The father owned a flour and saw 
mill in Canada, and did custom milling for the resi- 
dents of a large farming region. After completing his 
grammar school studies the son worked with his father 
for five years. Then the family removed to Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, where Napoleon the elder entered the employ 
of the Trask Roofing Company, and learned the tin- 
smith and roofing trade. When he became skilled in 
this work he started in business for himself, and his 
son worked with him, also learning the trade. After 
his father's death the younger man carried on the busi- 
ness alone. Possessed of excellent business ability, and 
an industrious and capable worker, Mr. Ouellett was 
more than ordinarily successful from the start. He 
was deeply interested in the real estate situation in the 
rapidly growing city, and when he was able to command 
a little capital invested it in that class of property. By 
judicious turns and far-sighted investments, he was 
enabled gradually to increase his holdings, until now 
he is one of the important individual owners of real 
estate operating in Salem. The great fire of 1914 did 
serious damage to much of his property, but in the 
rebuilding of the city he handled a large amount of 
work, and by careful management was enabled to 
recoup his losses. He recently built a very beautiful 
modern apartment house, called the Napoleon Apart- 
ments. Mr. Ouellett is a thoroughgoing American, and 



344 



ESSEX COUNTY 



a supporter of the policies of the Republican party. He 
keeps in close touch with the city government, and is a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

He married, in Canada, on February 15, 1909, Mary 
Laura Leveille, who was also born in Canada, and their 
eight children are: Cecile, Irene, Mary Laura, Helene, 
Napoleon, Jr., Girard, Rita, and Elizabeth Yvonne. Mr. 
Ouellett is himself one of ten children, he having four 
brothers and five sisters. The family have always been 
devout attendants upon the services of the Roman 
Catholic church, and since coming to Salem have been 
members of St. Joseph's Church. 



HENRY CURTIS WINN, one of the most success- 
ful business men of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was born 
November 27, i860, in Burnham, Maine, son of Lyman 
and Harriet N. (Perkins) Winn. The former was 
engaged in farming at Eurnham for many years and 
lived to the advanced age of eighty-two years. Mrs. 
Winn was also a native of Burnham, and she died in 
1901. After completing his formal education Mr. Winn 
learned the machinist's trade while working for the 
F. S. Perkins Company of Lowell, Massachusetts, and 
when he had completed his apprenticeship, went to Marl- 
boro, Massachusetts, where he was employed at this 
occupation for two years. At the end of this time he 
came to Haverhill and entered the employ of the Haver- 
hill Iron Works, and was subsequently employed in a 
mechanical capacity by various firms ; each new posi- 
tion he held not only gave him more experience but 
also enlarged his skill, and it was natural that after a 
time he would turn to the automobile repair work, 
then in its early stages. After four years Mr. Winn 
engaged in the business of automobile repairing on his 
own account, taking as a partner Frank Bailey, of 
Haverhill, and the firm name was Winn & Bailey, con- 
tinuing in this form until 1918, when Mr. Bailey sold 
his interest to Mr. Winn, and at the same time the 
business was removed to Haverhill and the name 
changed to Kenoza Garage, with Mr. Winn as manager. 
An accessory store was opened in connection with the 
garage; the latter has a storage space of 3,750 square 
feet, and is one of the largest in Haverhill. Mr. Winn 
is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce 
and also of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

In 1884 he married Annie W. Whitten, of Burnham, 
Maine, and their children are : Lyman E., foreman of 
the Kenoza Garage; and Doris B., a graduate of Dr. 
Arnold's Physical Culture School of New Haven, and 
is now a teacher at the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation in Portland, Maine. 



ARTHUR E. STEINERT, who is in the contract- 
ing field in Lawrence, Massachusetts, has within the 
past few years become identified with the progress of 
the city. Mr. Steinert is a son of Otto E. and Emily 
Steinert, of this city. Otto E. Steinert was born in 
Lawrence, and for the past thirty years has been a well- 
known figure in building circles in this vicinity. 

Arthur E. Steinert was born in Lawrence, on August 
8, 1888. He received his early education in the public 
schools, attended the evening high school while he 
assisted his father during the day, then completed his 
formal studies with a course at the Lawrence Commer- 



cial College. Having already chosen his line of future 
endeavor, the young man then learned the trade of car- 
penter and builder with his father. Beginning in 1904, 
he worked with his father until his enlistment for the 
World War in the United States navy, on June 4, 1918. 
The need of skilled labor of every kind was so great 
that he was immediately detailed as chief carpenter to 
the naval ammunition depot, at Hingham, Massachu- 
setts, where he served until his discharge, in January, 
1919. Returning to Lawrence, Mr. Steinert made a 
definite start for himself in the construction world, open- 
ing an office in the Bay State building. He has made 
a most promising beginning, handling general construc- 
tion, and thus far specializing in residences and com- 
mercial buildings. 

Mr. Steinert is a member of the Lawrence Master 
Builders' Association, and of the Home Club. Frater- 
nally he is well known, being a member of Grecian 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; Mount Sinai Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, Royal and 
Select Masters ; Bethany Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar ; and is also a member of Aleppo Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston. 
He also is a member of Essex Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. Mr. Steinert resides at No. 288 High street, 
Lawrence. 



EDWARD PERLEY ELDREDGE— For a num- 
ber of years prominent in the business world of East- 
ern Massachusetts, and now devoting his practical abil- 
ity and experience to the public service, Edward Perley 
Eldredge, city clerk of Beverly, Massachusetts, is a 
representative citizen of Essex county. 

Mr. Eldredge is a son of Perley Gillam and Mary 
Augusta (Kennison) Eldredge. Perley G. Eldredge 
was born in Beverly, and served in the Civil War, but 
never was in any active engagement, entering the serv- 
ice late in the period of the war. Thus he served for 
only three months as a member of the 8th Massachu- 
setts Infantry, unattached. He was mustered out at 
Readville, Massachusetts. He died at the age of seventy- 
seven, in 1919. His wife, who was also bom in Bev- 
erly, still resides here, and is seventy-three years of age. 

Edward Perley Eldredge was bom in Beverly, on 
May 21, 1872. He received his early education in the 
public schools of this city, then continued his studies at 
the part-time high school. This preparation he followed 
with a course at Burdette's Business College, this also 
being in part-time hours. The young man spent some 
time with the John M. Carriave Paper Company, then 
later was with the United Shoe Machinery Corporation, 
holding a responsible position in their order department 
for thirteen years. 

Having been practically a lifetime resident of Bev- 
erly, Mr. Eldredge has been, ever since his majority, 
more or less interested in the public life of the city. He 
has always supported the Republican party, and of 
more recent years has been a leader in party affairs. 
For several years he was financial secretary of the 
Beverly Republican Club. Thus, Mr. Eldredge's elec- 
tion, in 1918, to the office of city clerk was in the natural 
course. The choice of the people has been amply vindi- 
cated in his service since assuming the duties of this 
office. He is often referred to as the "right man in the 





yjT'i^^ U^lf^-zr-z^Vc^^^^. , 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



345 



right place," and is bearing an important part in the 
city government. 

Mr. Eldredge married, in Beverly, Emily Reed Craig, 
a daughter of William J. and Ella L. Craig. The fam- 
ily are members of the Baptist church. 



ALBERT HENRY RICHARDSON— Holding a 

position of broad public responsibility, Albert H. Rich- 
ardson, of Beverly, Massachusetts, is closely identified 
with the physical growth and progress of the city as 
city engineer. Mr. Richardson was born in Essex, 
. Massachusetts, on October 22, 1884, and is a son of 
William A. and Grace (Burnham) Richardson, long 
residents of Essex. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools of 
his native place, the young man also covered the high 
school course. During this time, and through his early 
employment, Mr. Richardson took advantage of spare 
hours to fit himself for the place higher up. He was 
first employed as rodman in the engineering depart- 
ment of the city of Beverly, then, in time, his studies, 
together with the practical experience which he was 
gaining meanwhile, fitted him for his present position 
at the head of this department. He was made city 
engineer of Beverly in 1917, and still ably fills this 
office. Mr. Richardson is deeply interested in every 
phase of public progress, and politically supports the 
Republican party. He is also a member of the Repub- 
lican Club, and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, of Beverly. 

Mr. Richardson married, in 1907, Edith A. Twitchell, 
daughter of Charles E. Twitchell, of this city. Mr. and 
Mrs. Richardson have two sons: Kenneth W., and 
Gordon T. They reside on Cabot street, and attend the 
services of the Dane Street Congregational Church. 



WILLIAM CHARLES GOODRICH— The field 
of undertaking and funeral directing is represented in 
Lynn by a large group of men whose methods and 
equipment are the most modern to be found in this 
business, and among these men Mr. Goodrich is a 
leader. 

Mr. Goodrich was bom in Alfred, York county, 
Maine, and is a son of Jacob M. and Augusta A. Good- 
rich, the date of his birth having been October 26, 1881. 
The elder Mr. Goodrich was an undertaker in Alfred 
until his death, which occurred in 1900, and after the 
young man completed his education in the high school 
of his native town, he became associated with his father 
in business at the age of eighteen years. The death of 
his father taking place about a year later, he went to 
Portland with the intention of completing his prepara- 
tions for following the undertaking profession, and to 
that end entered the employ of Hay & Peabody, of 
Portland, as an apprentice. The wages he received, 
however, were insufficient to provide for his mother, 
who was more or less dependent upon him, and he 
sought a more remunerative opportunity in electrical 
work, having had a little experience in that field, pro- 
curing a position in Portland which he filled for several 
years. Never despairing of returning to his chosen 
profession, he later availed himself of an opportunity 
which offered, and going to Boston secured a position 
with the undertaking firm of W. H. Graham, Inc., prom- 



inent funeral directors of that city. There, in three 
years, he rose to the position of manager, and remained 
with the concern for several years. Thereafter coming 
to Lynn, he founded his present business, at No. 57 
Monroe street, in Lynn, and has since built up one of 
the leading mortuary establishments of the city. 

Mr. Goodrich is well known fraternally, holding 
membership in the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of 
Red Men, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
is a member of the State of Maine Club, of Lynn, and 
a member of the Lynn Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. For relaxation he seeks the great out-of-doors, 
and takes an occasional hunting and fishing trip in the 
wilds. In November, 1916, Mr. Goodrich married Mar- 
garet Langill, daughter of Angus and Margaret Lan- 
gill, of Dorchester, Massachusetts, and they have one 
son, William, born in 1918. 



ARTHUR PARKER CHICKERING— Nearly a 

quarter of a century has elapsed since Mr. Chickering 
began his legal practice in North Andover and Boston, 
those years, 1896-1921, having returned him richly the 
honors of his profession. 

Arthur Parker Chickering was born in North An- 
dover, Massachusetts. December 2, 1872, the son of 
William W. and Ruth (Brierley) Chickering. There 
he attended public school, and after graduating from 
high school, attended the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology for two years. About this time he became 
interested in law and decided to adopt it as a profes- 
sion so, with this end in view, he accordingly matricu- 
lated at Boston University Law School and was grad- 
uated from this institution in 1896 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. That same year he was admitted to 
the bar and established himself in the practice of his 
chosen profession, opening offices both in Boston and 
North Andover, and these locations have remained his 
headquarters ever since. The papers which Mr. Chick- 
ering prepares are exceptionally strong, and present the 
matter under consideration in a manner which admits of 
little dispute. He has a broad, comprehensive grasp of 
all questions that come before him and is particularly 
fitted for affiairs requiring executive and administra- 
tive ability. Aside from his law practice Mr. Chicker- 
ing is connected with several business and manufactur- 
ing corporations. He has been moderator of North 
Andover for over twenty years. He is very fond of 
music and also devotes a great deal of his time to 
reading. 



DR. WILLIAM C. TANNEBRING— Prominent 

in the ranks of the dental profession in Beverly, Mas- 
sachusetts, is Dr. Tannebring, who in connection with 
his regular practice, is also a part time instructor at 
Tufts College. 

Dr. Tannebring was born in West Warren, Massachu- 
setts, on June 2, 1889, and is a son of Charles F. and 
Anna (Heidel) Tannebring, of West Warren. Receiv- 
ing his early education in the public schools of his native 
town, the young man entered the Palmer High School, 
of Palmer, Massachusetts, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1908. Then, with his choice of a profession 
determined, he became a student at Tufts College Dental 



546 



ESSEX COUNTY 



School, and was graduated from that institution in the 
class of 191 1. He came to Beverly before the close of 
that year, and purchased the old-established dental prac- 
tice of Dr. A. M. Bruce, long well known in Beverly, 
and now deceased. Dr. Tannebring has been very suc- 
cessful in his private practice here, and is located in 
the Endicott building, the scope of his business con- 
stantly broadening. Since the time of his graduation he 
has been connected with Tufts College as part time 
instructor. 

Enlisting for service in the World War, 1917-18, Dr. 
Tannebring was commissioned first lieutenant of the 
Dental Reserve, but was never called for active service. 
Dr. Tannebring is a member of the Metropolitan, Essex 
County, and Northeastern Dental societies. Fraternally 
he is a member of Liberty Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons ; and of Amity Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. 
He is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. His college fraternity is the Psi 
Omega. In political matters he supports the Repub- 
lican party, but has little leisure to devote to public 
activities. He attends the Congregational church. 

On June 2, 1913, Dr. Tannebring married, in Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, .^daline Derbyshire, daughter of 
Senator James H. and Adaline (Ashton) Derbyshire. 
Dr. and Mrs. Tannebring have two children : William 
C, Jr., born August 9, 1918; and Barbara, born Decem- 
ber 8, 1919. 



JAMES PATRICK DONAHUE— Belonging to a 

family of Irish origin, but for three generations resi- 
dent in Amesbury, Massachusetts, James P. Donahue, 
chief of police, of Merrimac, Massachusetts, is dis- 
tinctly American, even though he still lias some of the 
happy characteristics of his Celtic forebears. 

James Patrick Donahue was born in Amesbury, Mas- 
sachusetts, on March 16, 1894, son of Patrick J. and 
Nora (Mulryan) Donahue, and grandson of Bartholeme 
and Nora (Donahue) Donahue. His grandfather was 
born on the Island of Arran, on the west coast of 
Scotland. He became a stationary engineer after emi- 
grating to this country with his wife, who was a native 
of Ireland. She lived to a great age, being ninety years 
old when death came to her in 1920. The family set- 
tled in Amesbury, Massachusetts, and there their son, 
Patrick J., father of James P. Donahue, was born. He 
is still alive, and latterly has been in the automobile 
business. He married Nora Mulryan, who was born in 
County Galway, Ireland, and died in 1920, in Ames- 
bury. Massachusetts. 

James P. Donahue was educated in the public schools 
of Merrimac, Massachusetts. .\fter his schooldays 
were ended, he entered the employ of the Jonah & 
George Company, of Merrimac, but about a year later, 
went to Haverhill, and there for the next five years 
worked for the Macree Brothers Company of that place, 
for three years as an apprentice and for two years as 
a journeyman metal worker, leaving at the end of that 
time to become chief of police of Merrimac, which 
appointment he was offered and accepted in March, 

1916. He is still chief of police, but when the United 
States entered into a state of war with Germany in 

1917, Chief of Police Donahue gave up his civic 
appointment and enlisted as a seaman in the United 



States navy. He was assigned to duty at the subma- 
rine base at New London, Connecticut, and was later 
transferred to the U. S. S. "Savannah," remaining in 
Federal service until .August, 1919, and in the latter 
part of his service had a rating of first class ship- 
fitter. He was not forgotten by the people of Merrimac, 
and his civil post was only temporarily filled during his 
war service. He returned to Merrimac after being dis- 
charged from the navy, and was immediately asked to 
resume his former position of chief of police. Since 
that time he has been chief, and is widely known and 
popular. 

Mr. Donahue is a member of the Church of the 
Nativity (Roman Catholic), of Merrimac, and belongs 
to the Knights of Columbus and the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians. He also is a member of the .American 
Legion and the Patrons of Husbandry. Politically he 
is a Republican. He is unmarried. 

John J. Donahue, brother of Chief of Police Dona- 
hue, was born in Merrimac, Massachusetts, on July 19, 
1898, and was educated in the public schools of the 
town. He is now an active young business man of 
Merrimac, following his father's line — the automobile 
business. 



ALEXANDER ROBERTS, JR.— The name Alex- 
ander Roberts has been well known to business people 
of Haverhill for several decades in connection with 
paper-stock dealings, Alexander Robert, Sr. having 
established such a business in the city more than forty 
years ago, in 1880. He is now deceased, but some of 
his sons are still in the city, conducting a trading house 
which in reality is a continuation of that founded by 
the father in 1.880. 

Alexander Roberts, Jr., head of the Alexander Rob- 
erts Company of Haverhill, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, February 26, 1868, son of .Alexander and Jane 
(Booth) Roberts, both of Yorkshire, England. The 
father died March 3, 1915. He was born in 1835. He 
was a mill spinner, which he followed for the greater 
part of his life, and latterly was a merchant. The 
mother died in 1916, in Haverhill, Massachusetts, where 
she had lived for so many years and was much respected. 
They were Protestants in religious belief, and both of 
estimable life, and were blessed with thirteen children, 
ten of whom were sons, among them Alexander, Jr. 
Most of the children were reared in Haverhill, and 
attended the local public schools. 

After Alexander Roberts, Jr. left school, he joined 
his father in business in Haverhill, and for twenty- 
five years thereafter they were associates in business, 
the son latterly being manager of the firm. In 1910, 
he decided to branch out for himself, and then formed 
the firm of Alexander Roberts, Jr. He has maintained 
the business in operation on Hale street, Haverhill, ever 
since. While working for his father, he built the build- 
ing still occupied by the firm, and soon after the death 
of his father he and his brother, George, organized the 
Alexander Roberts Company, which to-day is stated to 
Ije the largest in its line in the district. In their build- 
ing they have 20,000 square feet of floor space, and the 
volume of trading has been considerably increased dur- 
ing the last decade. Mr. Roberts does not enter much 
into public afifairs, but he is a member and regular 




^/T^p^ ^^ <^^r^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



347 



attendant at the Riverside Congregational Church, 
Haverhill, and belongs to the local body of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Also he is a member of 
the Pcntucket Club. 

Mr. Roberts married, September 29, ig02, at Haver- 
hill, Mary Brainard, who was born in Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts, in 1872, daughter of William and Aro- 
linc Augusta (Thayer) Brainard, the former named a 
machinist and inventor. They have no children. 



JOHN D. NEWALL — The marble and granite in- 
dustry has contributed largely to the industrial pros- 
perity of several of the Xew England states. Very 
often several generations of a family engage in this 
work and become widely known as skilled artisans. 
The Newall family, of whom John D. Newall, of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, is a worthy scion, has been in the 
stone business for over a hundred years. The founder 
of the business, Andrew Newall, lived in Dalbeattie, 
Scotland, and his son, Andrew Newall, Jr., followed 
the same occupation there and in Liverpool, England. 
He married Ann Booth, of New Abbey, Scotland, and 
some years later came to America. Naturally, Mr. 
Newall located in a town where the stone industry was 
an important one, and for many years he lived at 
Westerly, Rhode Island. 

John D. Newall, their son. was born in Liverpool, 
England, December 24, 1858. While he was yet an 
infant, his parents returned to Scotland, locating again 
at Dalbeattie. There John D. attended the Scottish 
public schools. In 1873 he came to Westerly, Rhode 
Island, where he attended school for a time. There he 
learned the art of stone cutting, starting in 1880, later 
removing to Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he was 
in charge of stone work. In ig02 Mr. Newall settled 
in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he established him- 
self in monumental and building work in marble and 
granite. For about half a century Mr. Newall has fol- 
lowed this industry and is among the oldest stonecutters 
in New England ; his present place of business is at 
No. 51 Blanchard street, Lawrence. He has the repu- 
tation of being one of the most skilled monument men 
in New England. Mr. Newall is a member of the Cal- 
edonian Lodge of Lawrence. 

Mr. Newall married, in Westerly, Rhode Island, in 
1885, Elizabeth Gilchrist, of that place, and they are the 
parents of two sons : James G., associated with his 
father in business ; and John Douglas, Jr., a chemist 
and dyer in the textile mills. Mr. Newall and his fam- 
ily attend the Parker Street Methodist Church. 



GORDON M. COOK— Active in his early life in 
different branches of endeavor, Gordon M. Cook, of 
Lynn, has spent the past twenty-five years in the truck- 
ing business. Mr. Cook is a son of Manasseh Cook, 
of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. He followed the sea 
throughout his lifetime, and was captain of the good 
ship, "M. E. Cann." He died in 1918, at the age of 
eighty years. He married Henrietta Perry, of Yar- 
mouth, who died in 191 1. 

Gordon M. Cook was born in Yarmouth, October 25, 
1868, and was educated in the public schools of that 
city. After completing his studies he went to work 
as a landscape gardener, continuing for about two years. 



Later, coming to Chelsea, Massachusetts, he started to 
learn the plumber's trade. After working thus for two 
years, he was associated with .Albert Burnham for two 
years, in connection with the construction of the Revere 
Water Works. Coming to Lynn in 1889, he was 
employed by the H. A. Pervear Company, then later 
handled a retail milk route for about two years, then 
working as conductor on the old Lynn & Boston horse 
car line for about a year and a half. Still later he was 
for three years on the Belt line, as conductor. Then 
about 1896, he established the trucking business which 
is now a leader in this line of endeavor in Lynn. He is 
doing an extensive business under the name of the 
Gordon M. Cook Trucking Company. 

Mr. Cook is a member of the Lynn Chamber of Com- 
merce. Fraternally he is prominent, being a member 
of Lynn Encampment, Loyal Order of Moose, of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Paul Revere 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of the Oriental Order of 
Humanity, and of the Lodge of Perfection, of which he 
is Vice-Grand High Secretary. He is a member of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, of Lynn, and of 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church, and is inter- 
ested in all progress. In 1893 Mr. Cook married 
Rebecca M. Watts, of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and 
they have one son, Raymond M., who is a member of 
the Boy Scouts of America. Mrs. Cook is a daughter 
of William and Margaret Matilda (Hart) Watts, of 
Cape Breton. Her father, who was a farmer, died in 
1879, and her mother died in 1887. 



WILLIAM ILSLEY— When a young man of eight- 
een, William Ilsley entered the service of the Mer- 
chants' National Bank of Newburyport, and the asso- 
ciation then formed has continued without interruption 
during the more than three decades which have since 
intervened. He rose rapidly in rank and has long been 
cashier and a director of the institution which he entered 
as messenger. He is a son of Nathan and Elizabeth 
(Short) Ilsley and of the eighth generation of the fam- 
ily founded in New England by William Ilsley, who 
came in the ship "Confidence," in 1638, settling in 
Newbury. 

William Ilsley was born at Newbury, Massachusetts, 
March 2, 1873, and there was educated in the public 
schools, finishing by graduation from Putnam Free 
School, class of 1891. His first position was with the 
Merchant's National Bank as messenger, his term 
beginning in 1891. He passed from messenger to junior 
clerk, to bookkeeper, to teller, to assistant cashier and, 
in 1898, at the age of twenty-five, he was appointed 
cashier, a position he has now held for nearly a quarter 
of a century. Two j-ears after being made cashier he 
was elected a director of the bank and still holds that 
place in the bank's management. He has given the 
best of his life to the Merchants' National and in that 
institution, where he is best known, his strong quali- 
ties as a financier are thoroughly recognized and appre- 
ciated. 

Other corporations in which he is officially interested 
are : The Newburyport Building Association, which he 
serves as treasurer ; The Newburyport Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, of which he is trustee and a member of 
the board of investment ; and the Institution for Sav- 



348 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ings. In civic affairs he is a public-spirited, interested 
citizen, sening as treasurer of the Newburyport Civic 
League, member of the Chamber of Commerce and a 
director of the Young Men's Christian Association. His 
fraternal order is the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; his clubs, the Dalton and the old Newbury Golf. 
With his family he attends the First Church of New- 
bur>', and for twenty-five years has been chairman of 
the parish committee. 

Mr. lisley married, June 4, 1902, Elizabeth Hale Lit- 
tle, daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Hale) Little. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ilsley are the parents of a daughter, Lucre- 
tia Little Ilsley, born September 20, 1906. 



HENRY B. LANE, one of the prominent men in 
industrial and public matters in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, has been identified with the business of E. Frank 
Lewis, of that city, for almost half a century, and now 
holds the office of superintendent of this plant, which 
is the largest of its kind in the country. During the 
years Mr. Lane has been engaged in this business, he 
has seen many changes and many advances along the 
lines of progress, but with the progressiveness and the 
aggressive spirit which has characterized his career, he 
has kept in constant touch with each new method. 

Henry B. Lane was born September 15, 1864, at 
Sharon, Massachusetts, son of Patrick Lane, a native 
of County Cork, Ireland, whose death occurred in l8g6, 
and Catharine (Murphy) Lane, also of County Cork, 
and who died in 1907. 

Mr. Lane's education was obtained in the public 
schools, and after one year in high school he went to 
work in the plant of which he is now superintendent. 
Their business is wool-scouring, and the plant was then 
located at VValpole, Massachusetts. Mr. Lane began at 
the very bottom as an operative, and steadily and con- 
sistently advanced to the position he now holds. Under 
his supervision Mr. Lane has 450 men, and he is held 
in high esteem by all those with whom he comes in 
contact. 

In politics Mr. Lane is a Republican. He has always 
been active in public affairs and has been honored with 
the offices of councilman and alderman, serving in these 
offices in i8q8, and 1899 to 1902, respectively. His fra- 
ternal connections are with the Knights of Columbus ; 
the Foresters (Catholic Order), and the St. Vincent de 
Paul Society. 

Mr. Lane married, in 1899, Bridget E. Dooley, of 
Lawrence, and they attend St. Patrick's Roman Cath- 
olic Church. 



WILLIAM N. BROWNE— Known throughout 
Essex county, Massachusetts, and drawing much of 
his business, which is one of the largest in his line in 
the district, from other places than Newburyport, Wil- 
liam N. Browne, a sign painter of that place, has no 
reason to be dissatisfied with the business he has devel- 
oped since he opened in Newburyport. 

William N. Browne was born in Gloucester, Massa- 
chusetts, on August 4, 186s, son of James and Mary 
(Nichols) Browne, both of that historic and romantic 
place. His father, as might have been expected, took 
to seafaring or fishing occupations as he grew to man- 
hood. Indeed, he was only nine years old when he 



first went to sea, and he was master of a Gloucester 
vessel before he was nineteen. His wife died in 1881, 
but he lived until 1899. active almost until the year of 
his death. They were the parents of four children, two 
of whom were sons, William N. being the elder. 

William N. Browne was given a good education in 
his native place. He passed from the elementary into 
the high school of Gloucester, Massachusetts, being 
of the class of 1880. Soon, thereafter, he went to work 
for Mr. Hall, of Gloucester. Later he came to New- 
buryport, and there entered into the sign-painting busi- 
ness, remaining in the place for six years. Apparently 
business was not quite as good as he had hoped, so he 
went to Boston, Massachusetts, where he worked at his 
trade. Next, he was in business in his home town, 
Gloucester, and later went to Lawrence, where he 
remained for eleven years, and then went to New Lon- 
don, Connecticut, for a short time, following his trade 
in each place. In 1913 he again came to Newburyport, 
and for the last eight years has steadily and satisfac- 
torily followed his trade in that place, developing a 
worth-while business throughout the county, and under- 
taking much outside work. When he first came, in 
1913, he took quarters in the old Sears-Roebuck build- 
ing, but soon had to find larger quarters, his business 
having expanded very much. Finally he took the place 
he now has on Merrimac street, and there finds good 
facility for his work. He has a good reputation, both 
in business and personally, and his handiwork is con- 
spicuously evident in many places. 

Mr. Browne married, in 1906, Delia Corey, of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, daughter of Nelson and Olive 
(Agnew) Corey; her father, who was connected with 
railroad work, was of the Province of Quebec, Canada. 
Mr. and Mrs. Browne have three children : William, 
born in 1909; Arthur, born in 1913; and Olive, born in 
1921. 

HERBERT W. PORTER, merchant, partner in the 
Haverhill firm of Porter & Wicks, electrical contractors 
and dealers, is a native of Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
and is giving indications of succeeding well in business 
in his home town. He was born on March 26, 1893, 
son of Wilbur S. and Ella M. (Pyne) Porter, then of 
Haverhill. His father is an upholsterer by trade, and 
is now in business in the State of New Jersey; his 
mother is of a Nova Scotian family. 

Herbert W. Porter received the whole of his academic 
education in public schools of Haverhill, graduating 
from the high school with the class of 1912. Soon, 
thereafter, he entered the employ of H. W. Kimball, 
of Haverhill, with whom he remained for three years. 
Then followed five years of service with D. G. Fox, 
after which young Porter formed a business partner- 
ship with E. B. Wicks, the two, in 1920, locating at No. 
14 West street, as electrical contractors and dealers in 
electrical supplies. The partners are enterprising, ener- 
getic young men, and have good chance of succeeding. 

Mr. Porter married, in 1915, Ethel Leighton, daugh- 
ter of Charles S. and Abbie L. (Goss) Leighton, of 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, where the former is in 
business as a shoe-cutter. Mr. and Mrs. Porter have 
three children : Kenneth Wilbur, now four years old ; 
Eleanor Elizabeth; and Shirley Priscilla. Mr. and Mrs. 
Porter are members of Grace Church, Haverhill. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



349 



HAROLD S. STUART, paymaster and cashier of 
the E. Frank Lewis Mills, Lawrence, Massachusetts, is 
one of the younger citizens of that town who has 
achieved success early in Hfe. Mr. Stuart was born 
May 19, 1890, at Calais, Maine, son of Augustus Stuart, 
also of Calais, where he was engaged in mill work, and 
Emma A. (Prescott) Stuart, whose ancestry can be 
traced to Colonel Prescott of Bunker Hill fame. She 
died in 1897 and is survived by her husband. 

Harold S. Stuart attended the public schools of 
Calais, and was a member of the high school class of 
1908. His first important work was as an accountant with 
the Boston & Maine Railroad Company, for five years. 
At the end of this time on December 7, 1917, he enlisted 
in the United States army and was sent to Fort Slocum, 
Jacksonville, Florida, being assigned to the Quarter- 
master's Corps. Thence he went to Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, and was discharged May i, 1919, at Baltimore, 
Maryland, with the rank of second lieutenant. 

After his return to civil life, Mr. Stuart entered the 
employ of E. Frank Lewis, as paymaster, and after the 
death of Mr. Stratton, the cashier, he was appointed to 
this position, which he holds in connection with his other 
duties. Mr. Stuart is a member of Monadnock Lodge, 
No. 145, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of 
Phoenician Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of Law- 
rence. 

Mr. Stuart married, November 3, 1920, Florence G. 
Burnham, of Lawrence, and they attend St. Augustine's 
Episcopal Church. 



HARRY LINCOLN RICHARDSON— One of the 

foremost undertaking establishments of Lynn is that 
of H. L. Richardson, which is located at No. 170 Union 
street, and commands a wide patronage among the leading 
families of this vicinity. 

Mr. Richardson, who has for the past four years been 
owner and manager of this business, has been identified 
with it since the year 1900. He was born in Lynnfield, 
Massachusetts, May 15, 1865, and after completing a 
common school education, assisted his father in the 
meat and provision business in Lynnfield for about two 
years. Then, at the age of eighteen years, he went to 
New York City, and there was employed for four years 
in the carpet industry. This work not appealing to him 
as a permanent field of effort, he returned to his native 
town, and was associated with his father until igoo, 
when his uncle. Earl A. Mower, offered him a position in 
his undertaking parlors, which he accepted. He con- 
tinued in this business as assistant, up to the time of Mr. 
Mower's death, which occurred October 13, 1917. He 
then succeeded to the business, and has since conducted 
it alone, with constantly increasing success. 

Mr. Richardson is a member of Mount Carmel Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, also of Mount Carmel Ixidge of Masons. 
He attends the Central Congregational Church. On Octo- 
ber IS, 1890, Mr. Richardson married Jessie Mower, 
niece of Earl A. Mower, and they are the parents of 
seven children. 



native of Vermont, was engaged in the business of 
manufacturing shoes during the greater part of his 
lifetime. He died in 1904. Mr. Daniels' mother, like 
himself, was born at Rowley, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Daniels received his early education in the public 
schools of his native State. When his school days were 
over, he embarked upon a business career by associating 
himself with F. L. Burke, with whom he remained for 
ten years. After leaving Mr. Burke, he entered into 
the service of various firms at Lynn, Massachusetts, and 
finally came to Haverhill, where, with Mr. Trainor as a 
partner, he established the firm of Daniels & Trainor. 
Later, he founded the Haverhill Heel Company, which 
afterwards became known as A. W. Daniels & Son. In 
course of time, Mr. Daniels disposed of this business to 
good advantage and in 1920 bought out the Slipper City 
Top Lift Company, establishing his place of business 
at the rear of No. 24 Main street, Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, where he was located from April, 1920, when 
the company passed under his control, until November, 
1920, when he sold the business and now resides in 
Orlando, Florida, where he is engaged in fruit raising. 

Mr. Daniels married Charlotte Belmont, of Boston, 
Massachusetts, in 1891, a daughter of John De Belmont, 
an accountant, of Bordeaux, France, and his wife, Elinor 
(Locke) De Belmont. Her father now lives in the 
United States. Her mother was born at Marblehead, 
Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Daniels had eight chil- 
dren : Leroy G. ; Rhoda Ella : Louis A. ; Wyman M. ; 
Elsie M. ; Burrill Belmont, deceased ; Doris B. ; and 
Gilbert H. Daniels. Wyman M. Daniels enlisted in the 
United States army and served for eighteen months in 
France. He was assigned to Battery A. 102nd Field 
Artillery. He received his discharge from the service 
in April, 1919. 



A. W. DANIELS was born at Rowley, Massachu- 
setts, on April 15, 1873. and is a son of Amos B. and 
Lucy M. (Neilan) Daniels. His father, who was a 



GEORGE BURTON STILES, of Groveland, Mas- 
sachusetts, and also well known in the Haverhill district, 
was born in Andover, Massachusetts, on December 23, 
1889, son of George W. and Susan C. (Simonds) Stiles. 
His mother was born in Middleton, Massachusetts, and 
died in 191 5. His paternal descent, however, is from one 
of the prominent Colonial New England families. Stiles 
Pond and Stiles Grove at Boxford, Massachusetts, were 
so named early in the Colonial settlement in honor of 
the grand ancestor of the Stiles family, which since that 
time has given several prominent men to the eastern 
states and the Republic. Ezra Stiles, licensed to preach 
in 1749, preached to the Stockbridge Indians, and later, 
for more than twenty years, was president of Yale Col- 
lege. He was a historian, and his diary and bound 
manuscripts, preserved at Yale, fill forty-five volumes. 
George W. .Stiles, father of George B., was a carpenter 
and mechanic, and for sixteen years was head mechanic at 
Phillips Andover Academy. He is still living at Andover. 

George B. Stiles spent his early years at Andover, and 
attended the elementary public schools there, later going 
to Lawrence, where he attended a commercial school, in 
1907. Soon, thereafter, he came to Haverhill, and opened 
a plumbing and heating shop on Grand street. About a 
year later, however, he went to Elm Park, Groveland, 
where he did good business until Labor Day of 1918, 
when he removed to his present location, No. 282 Main 
street, Groveland. However, he no longer works at the 



350 



ESSEX COUNTY 



plumbing and heating trade, finding that there are better 
opportunities in the automobile business. For the last 
two years he has devoted the whole of his time to auto 
supplies, accessories, repairs, gas and oil, and has worked 
up quite a satisfactory business in those years. 

Mr, Stiles is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and 
the Junior Order of American Mechanics. During the 
World War he was for a short period in the United 
States Merchant Marine, working up and down the 
coast on a collier, but later went to Annatol, New Jer- 
sey, in the capacity of a steam fitter, serving there, until 
the signing of the Armistice, in a T. N. T. shell-loading 
plant. 

Mr. Stiles married, in August, 1920, Lillian Keighley, 
daughter of William H. and Sophia (Townsley) Keigh- 
ley. an English family, the father a cabinet-maker until 
he died in 1920. 



WILBUR A. LITTLEFIELD— Owning a good 
business which finds employment for twenty-five people, 
Wilbur A. Littlefield, of the Littlefield Family Laundry, 
has reached a satisfactory place among the successful 
people of Newburyport, Massachusetts. His business 
record indicates that he is a man of good executive 
capacity, of versatility, initiative and enterprise. 

Mr. Littlefield was born on August 19, 1873, at New- 
fields, New Hampshire, son of George S. and Abbie M. 
(Smith) Littlefield, of that place, and has shown during 
his business career much of the steady characteristics of 
his father, an iron moulder, who worked for forty-two 
years in one shop, that of the Swampscott Machinery 
Company, of Newfields, New Hampshire. George S. Lit- 
tlefield died in 191 1, about thirty-four years after the 
demise of his wife, Abbie M. (Smith) Littlefield, who 
was born in Newmarket, New Hampshire, and died in 
1877, Wilbur A. then being only four years old. 

Wilbur A. Littlefield was educated in the public schools 
of Newfields and Newmarket, New Hampshire, eventually 
graduating from the Newmarket High School in the 
class of 1891. Almost immediately thereafter he found 
employment in the plant with which his father was con- 
nected, the Swampscott Machinery Company, though he 
served in clerical capacity. He was five years in the 
employ of that company, for the greater part of the time 
as bookkeeper. Next he became connected with the Gale 
Manufacturing Company, of Exeter, New Hampshire. 
He remained with them for fifteen years, and proved 
that he was not only a good office man but a capable 
factory executive. At the outset he was bookkeeper for 
the Gale Company, but successively and successfully he 
became foreman in the plant. He left them in order to 
enter the printing business, and for eight years he asso- 
ciated with Leonard J. Hunt, a printer of Exeter. New 
Hampshire. Mr. Littlefield taking the commercial end 
of the business. In 1913 he came to Newburyport for 
the purpose of establishing a laundry, which he thought 
would be successful in the place. Mr. Littlefield has 
conducted the laundry business, which bears his name for 
eight years, with increasing success. His is said to be 
the largest laundry in Newburyport. It is situated at No. 
48 Kent street, and there uses about 6,000 square feet of 
floor space. The equipment is the most modern he could 
buy, and Mr. Littlefield has given many indications of 
his thoroughness, and of his determination to give good 



service. That undoubtedly is the secret of his success, 
because most things in this world are reciprocal ; one gets 
what he gives. Mr. Littlefield has become well acquainted 
with the people of Newbury[X3rt, and has many firm 
friends there. 

Mr. Littlefield married, in 1S95, Ruth W. Wiswall, of 
Durham, New Hampshire, daughter of Henry T. and 
Elizabeth (Garland) Wiswall, the latter of a Dover, 
New Hampshire family, and the former a lawyer of 
Exeter, that State. Mr. and Mrs. Littlefield have four 
children: Elizabeth W., born in 1899, and now a gradu- 
ate of Mount Holyoke College ; Anna A., born in 1900, 
and now at Middlebury College. Vermont, where she will 
be of the class of 1922; George F., born in 1904, now at 
Kents Hill, Maine, where he will graduate from the 
seminary in 1922 ; and Thomas E., born in 1905, and of 
the class of 1922 at Tilton Seminary, New Hampshire. 
The children are therefore being afforded every educa- 
tional advantage. 



ROLAND A. PRESCOTT— In the responsible posi- 
tion of cashier of the Essex Company, Roland A, Pres- 
cott, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, is identified with the 
industrial progress of this region. Mr. Prescott is a son 
of Abbott and Lydia A. (Gale) Prescott, of North 
Andover. The Prescott family were among the earliest 
settlers in North Andover, and Abbott Prescott, who was 
born there, was a carpenter and builder practically all his 
life. 

Roland A. Prescott was born in North Andover, Mas- 
sachusetts, November 13. 1874. He received his early 
education in the public schools of the town, and also 
attended Cannon's Commercial College. In 1895 he 
became associated with the Essex Company, at their 
office in Lawrence, and in 1896 entered the accounting 
department under Robert H. Tewksbury, then cashier. 
Continuing with this concern, Mr. Prescott advanced 
from time to time, and in July, of 1910, upon the death 
of Mr. Tewksbury, he became cashier, which position he 
still holds. The Essex Company stands behind the 
greater part of the industrial world of Lawrence, con- 
trolling the water power of the Merrimac river at this 
point. The company also handles real estate extensively, 
and Mr. Prescott is in charge of sales in this branch of 
their business. He is a director of the Bay State National 
Bank, and a trustee of the Lawrence Savings Bank. 

Mr. Prescott is prominent fraternally, being a member 
of Cochichewick Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
North Andover, and past master of the lodge ; a member 
of the Past Masters' Association of the Eleventh Masonic 
District of Massachusetts; a member of Mount Sinai 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; of Lawrence Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; of Bethany Commandery, No. 
17, Knights Templar: of Lowell Lodge of Perfection; 
of Lowell Council, Princes of Jerusalem: of Mount 
Calvary Chapter, Rose Croix ; and of the Massachusetts 
Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, holding the 
thirty-second Masonic degree. He is also a member of 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, of Boston, and is a member of Lawrence 
Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. He also affiliates 
with Wauwinet Lodge. No. iii. Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of North Andover, of which he is past 
grand, and Kearsarge Encampment, No. 36. 



■^•i. 













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BIOGRAPHICAL 



351 



On December 19, 1906, Mr. Prescott married Jessie J. 
Pedler, daughter of William S. Pedler, of Lawrence, and 
they attend Trinity Congregational Church. 



FRANK HERBERT GALLOWAY, D. M. D., 

who is in successful dental practice in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, was born in Washington, New Jersey, on 
May 16, 1892, son of Thomas E. and Anna (Gerard) 
Galloway, both now (1922) living. His father, who is 
in tlie wholesale produce business, was born in England, 
his mother in New Jersey. They had five children, four 
of whom were sons. Dr. Frank H. Galloway being the 
second-born. The family moved to Lawrence when he 
was in infancy, and he was educated in the public 
schools of that city. From the grammar school he went 
to Lawrence High School, graduating therefrom in the 
class of 191 1. He then went to Lowell Textile School 
for a year, from there going to Harvard Dental College. 
He received his professional degree in 1916, and in that 
year opened an office for practice at No. 608 Bay State 
building, Lawrence, which is still his address, and he has 
in the meantime developed very satisfactory connections, 
his clientele being quite wide. He has a good reputation 
as a dentist. 

During the war Dr. Galloway was in service, being 
commissioned a first lieutenant and assigned to the Den- 
tal Corps. He is a member of the Blue lodge of the 
Masonic order, and is an Episcopalian, a member of St. 
John's Church, of Lawrence. 

Dr. Galloway married, in 1918, Marion B. Beach, of 
Lawrence, daughter of Irving E. and Ida (Brown) 
Beach, a soap manufacturer of the place. Dr. and Mrs. 
Galloway have one child, a daughter, L. Marguerite, 
born in 1919. 

ELLSWORTH HAPGOOD— Ellsworth Hapgood, 

business man of Lynn, Massachusetts, was born Febru- 
ary 2'5, 1861 at West Acton, Massachusetts, son of 
Andrew and Eliza (Adams) Hapgood. His father, 
Andrew Hapgood, was a farmer in Acton and his 
mother was a native of HoUis, Massachusetts. 

The public schools afforded Mr. Hapgood his educa- 
tion and subsequently he worked in the grocery store of 
S. S. Perkins on Lewis street, Lynn, for about three 
years. In 1885 he established Hapgood's Express ser- 
vice and is still doing business under the same name, it 
being the oldest in Lynn. Starting in a modest way, the 
business grew until at one time Mr. Hapgood was using 
in the neighborhood of thirty head of horses. Keeping 
abreast of the times, he has replaced his horses with 
modern powerful motor trucks. 

Mr. Hapgood married Eliza Taber of Salem in 1891, 
daughter of William and Frances (Gower) Taber of 
Boston. They are the parents of four children : Edna 
F. ; Mabel E. ; Esther, wife of W. L. Johnson, have one 
child, Philip Ellsworth ; Raymond E. Hapgood. 



ALDRED AUGUSTUS JENNE— The Jenne fam- 
ily is well known in Haverhill, Massachusetts, and some 
of its members are actively identified with the automobile 
industry in that vicinity. Aldred A. Jenne and his father 
have a good business in that line in this town, and the 
rapidity of its development has come by the exercise of 
aggressive qualities and enterprising activity. 



Aldred Augustus Jenne is still in his early manhood, 
having been born on September 20, 1898, at Windham, 
Greene county, New York. He is the son of John F. 
(2) and Lela A. (Christian) Jenne, and grandson of 
John F. and Julia C. (Newcomb) Jenne. The grand- 
father, John F., comes notably into National and State 
history. He was a soldier of the Northern army during 
the Civil War, and comes into New Jersey State annals 
in military capacity also, being at one time adjutant- 
general of the military forces of the State. He was a 
thirty-second degree Mason ajid for a period was in the 
Federal diplomatic service, being United States minister 
to Mexico. Three children were born to John F. and 
Julia C. (Newcomb) Jenne: John F. (2), of whom 
further ; William ; and Margaret. 

John F. (2) Jenne spent his early years in Jersey 
City, New Jersey, where he was born in 1878. He was 
married to Lela A. Christian, of Ashland, Greene county, 
New York, in 1896, and three children were born to 
them : Aldred Augustus, of whom further ; Donald C, 
born in igoi ; and Phyllis, born in 1909. 

Aldred A. Jenne received his elementary schooling in 
Boston, Massachusetts, where the family resided for some 
years. Later the Jennes came to live in Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, and he attended the public schools there, 
graduating eventually from the Haverhill High School, 
in the class of 191 8. He also took a commercial course 
at the Bryant & Stratton Business College at Boston, 
and for a while was an undergraduate at the New Hamp- 
shire State College. However, having begun his busi- 
ness career, he decided not to complete the college 
course. For eighteen months he was in the employ of 
the Taylor, Goodwin Company, of Haverhill, in the 
capacity of bookkeeper, but in April, 1920, he formed a 
business partner.ship with his father, they then constitut- 
ing the Jenne Motor Sales Company. Their place of 
business is at No. 455 River street, Haverhill, and they 
are entering into most of the sales and service branches 
of the automobile business. They have the agency in 
the district for the Westcott car, have one of the largest 
repair and service stations in Haverhill, and enter exten- 
sively into the sale of tires, accessories, supplies, gas and 
oil. Both are active in the business, which ought to 
continue to expand. 

Aldred A. Jenne was too young to enter the Regular 
army during the World War in 1917-18, and at that 
time was at the New Hampshire State College, but he 
enlisted in the Students' Army Training Corps at that 
place and was in training for four months. His frater- 
nity is the Sigma Alpha Epsilon, of New Hampshire 
State College. He is a member of the North Congrega- 
tional Church of Haverhill. 

Mr. Jenne was married, in Haverhill, on August 20, 
1920, to Eleanor Clarke Quinney, daughter of Mrs. Ada 
S. Quinney, of Winter street, Haverhill. 



GEORGE A. HUNTING— As treasurer of the 

Lawrence Knitting Company of Methuen, Massachusetts, 
George A. Hunting ranks among the leading business 
men of his community. This progressive manufacturing 
plant has made rapid progress in the past years and the 
output of its factory finds a ready market throughout 
the country owing to the excellence of the product and 



352 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the high standard of the business ethics of those in 
charge. 

Mr. Hunting was born at New London, New Hamp- 
shire, August 23, 1859, and was educated in the public 
schools and at the Colby Academy. His father, A. R. 
Hunting, was a farmer, a native of New Hampshire, 
and he died in 1902, being survived by his wife, Clara E. 
Burt, a native of Vermont, for five years. 

After leaving school Mr. Hunting was employed in 
Tilton, and was located at Laconia, for three years, where 
he worked in a hosiery manufacturing plant, gaining 
experience that would in later years be of great value 
to him. In 1885 he came to Methuen and for a time 
was employed there by the Knitted Fabric Company ; in 
1898 he was one of the corporators of the Lawrence 
Knitting Company and was appointed treasurer of this 
company, which office he has since held. There are now 
about fifty operatives employed by the company, and 
several well knowni makes of hosiery are manufactured 
there. 

Mr. Hunting is a man of efficiency and progressive 
ideas and much credit is due to him for the success of 
the company of which he is an executive part. He is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias, and attends the 
Methodist church. 

Mr. Hunting married (first), in 1885, Nellie V. Colby, 
of Vermont, and she died in 1897; in 1901 he married 
(second) Myra E. Deane, who was born in Maine, and 
they make their home in Methuen. 



WILLIAM F. LUNT, of Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts, has won his way to a position of prominence in 
the community through constructive activities in the real 
estate and insurance business. 

Mr. Lunt was born in Newburyport, July 8, 1870, and 
is a son of William P. and Elizabeth B. (Questrom) 
Lunt. In the public schools of his native city he 
acquired a practical education, then, at the age of six- 
teen years, started out in the real estate and insurance 
business, which he has followed continuously since, and 
in which he has become a leader. In 1886 he became 
associated with Mr. Chase, and in 1893 the firm of Chase 
& Lunt, a partnership, was organized. The partners 
still operate together in both real estate and insurance. 

In fraternal and club circles Mr. Lunt is well known. 
He is a member of St. Mark's Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons ; of Newburyport Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; is a member of the Delta Club, the Dalton Qub, 
and of the Old Newburyport Golf and the American 
Yacht clubs. He is a member of the Business Men's 
Association, and is a trustee of the Newburyport Build- 
ing Association. He attends the Unitarian church, and is 
actively interested in the work of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, of which he is a iriember. 

On October g, 1895, Mr. Lunt married Emma L. 
Quinlan, and they have one son, William Malcolm, who 
was born July 14, 1909. 



1887. son of Louis Frank and Augusta (Arlitt) Eidam, 
who were both of German birth, but many years resident 
in the United States. Louis Frank Eidam was a physician 
in Lawrence ; he died in 1899, eight years after the 
demise of his wife. They had four children, and of 
their three sons Louis M. was the youngest. He 
received his education mainly in the schools of Law- 
rence, graduating ultimately from the high school, class 
of 1905; he then entered Lowell Textile College. Enter- 
ing business life eventually, he found work with the 
Woolworth Company, remaining with them for two years. 
For some time after that he was in the employ of C. J. 
Alexander, and later was connected with the Lawrence 
Electric Supply Company. In 1914 he established his 
present business, at the outset only occupying window 
space at a store on Essex street, but his business grew 
rapidly, and he soon erected a building of his own on 
Lawrence street, Lawrence. Finally he removed to his 
present address, No. 2 Lawrence street, where he has 
good facilities for the handling of his large business. 
He carries a most comprehensive line, and his stock is 
rapidly turned over. 

Fraternally, Mr. Eidam belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias, and Phoenician Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons. His church is the Riverside Congregational. 

Mr. Eidam married, in 191 1, Isabelle P. Hinchcliffe, 
daughter of Charles Hinchcliffe, of Lawrence, a wool 
sorter. Mr. and Mrs. Eidam have two children : Isabelle 
A., born in 1913; and Louis (Tharles, born in 1917. 



LOUIS M. EIDAM — Among the enterprising busi- 
ness men of Lawrence. Massachusetts, must be included 
Louis M. Eidam, who has probably the largest business 
in tires, auto accessories, gas and oil in Lawrence. 

Mr, Eidam is a native of Lawrence, born here June 18. 



JOSEPH A. GARRY— Sometimes a man's success 
in life is not achieved in the profession originally under- 
taken, as in the case of Joseph A. Garry, of Methuen, 
Massachusetts, who learned the trade of pharmacist, but 
who, after several years in this business disposed of his 
interests and now is the owner of the leading garage 
and auto accessory store in Methuen. 

Mr. Garry was born July 3, 1891. in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, son of Murt Garry, of County Mayo, Ireland, 
who was engaged in mill work and as a merchant for 
many years until his death in 1909. His mother, .A.nne 
Fox, was of Quebec, Canada, and she died in 1906. 

Joseph A. Garry obtained his education in the schools 
of Methuen ; he was a member of the high school class 
of 1910. Following this he attended the Massachusetts 
College of Pharmacy at Boston, and subsequently was 
employed by George B. Holden, of Haverhill, and later 
was with the Hall & Lyon Company, of the same city. 

In 1916 Mr. Garry bought a pharmacy in Lawrence and 
continued successfully until 1919, when he disposed of his 
business and established a garage on Broadway, in 
Methuen, under the name of Garry's Garage, one of the 
most modern and up-to-date garages in Methuen. In 
addition to the repair work a full line of accessories is 
carried and the volume of business is very satisfactory. 

Mr. Garry is a member of Lawrence Lodge, No. 65, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; the Methuen 
Club; Phi Chi fraternity (Massachusetts College of 
Pharmacy) ; and the Merrimack Valley Country Club. 

Mr. Garry married, in 1915, Ruth B. Palmer, daugh- 
ter of William Palmer, of Providence. Mr. and Mrs. 
Garry are members of St. Monica's Roman Catholic 
Church of Methuen. 




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BIOGRAPHICAL 



353 



N. ALLEN LINDSEY— In the death of every man 
who has borne an active and constructive part in the 
progress of society, the community sustains a loss much 
to be regretted. Too few men, in this day, expend their 
energies in any effort but that which shall be definitely 
profitable to themselves. N. Allen Lindsey, of Marble- 
head, Massachusetts, was a man who gave of himself — 
of his time and energies and abilities, for the good of 
those about him. Successful in his business activities, 
he was always ready to lend his support to a worthy 
cause. 

Mr. Lindsey was a son of Nathaniel and Sally Quill 
(Allen) Lindsey. Nathaniel Lindsey was born in Mar- 
blehead, and was a lifelong resident of that town. He 
was for many years engaged in the bakery business. 

N, Allen Lindsey was born in Marblehead, on May 22, 
1853. He was educated in the public schools of that 
day, receiving a simple, but practical preparation for the 
responsibilities of life. On completing his studies he 
entered the printing industry in a small way. The 
young man liked the work, and found himself well 
adapted to it, finally determining to make it his life 
work. He accordingly bought out the firm of Rhodes & 
Leak, and continued the business on his own account. 
Under the name of the N. A. Lindsey Ojmpany, he con- 
ducted this business with constantly increasing success, 
until the time of his death, in July. 1916. 

In all his relations with the public Mr. Lindsey was 
a man of the highest honor, and was broadly interested 
in the public welfare. He was a Trustee of the Abbott 
Library, and was Tree Warden of Marblehead for a 
period of two years, accepting no remuneration whatever 
for his labors in this connection. He attended the Con- 
gregational Qiurch, and did much to promote the tem- 
perance movement in Marblehead. 

Mr. Lindsey was a member of the Rechabite Society, 
of Marblehead, and was a member of the Appalachian 
Mountain Club, of Boston. In December, 1889, Mr. 
Lindsey married Georgiana, daughter of George H. and 
Hannah R. (Felton) Martin. Mr. Martin was in the 
grocery business in Marblehead for many years. 



He was married, in 1914, to Ruth A. Daniels, daughter 
of George H. and Adalaide Daniels, of Haverhill. They 
have one child, Janice Arleen. 



NORMAN KEIGHLEY, jeweler, of Haverhill, was 

born in Rawdon, England, February 7, 1884, son of 
Walter and Ellen (Shires) Keighley, both of British 
birth. His father, who died in 1906, was a cloth 
designer. 

Norman Keighley came to this country about Novem- 
ber, 1907, at the age of twenty-three years. He received 
the greater part of his education in the public schools of 
England, and after leaving school was apprenticed to 
J. Hemsworth, watchmaker, with whom he remained for 
nine years. For a further three years, he worked for 
F. Snyder, of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Coming to 
Haverhill in 1910, he opened up a store under his own 
name on Railroad square, and there, until November, 1920, 
he remained in business. His present jewelry shop, or 
store, is at No. 6 Washington street. 

Mr. Keighley is succeeding well in his line. He is 
a popular Mason, belongs to the Sons of St. George and 
the Knights of Malta, and, socially, to the Pentucket 
and Agawam clubs. He is a member of the North 
Church. 

Essex — 2 — 23 



GEORGE A. MacKENZIE, electrical contractor of 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, is a native of Pictou, Nova 
Scotia, where he was born, February 18, 1875, son of 
Ale.>:ander and Mary (Love) MacKenzie. His father 
was a native of Westville, Nova Scotia, and was employed 
as underground manager for the Inter-Colonial Coal 
Company until his death in 1896, which was occasioned 
by an accident while at work. Mrs. MacKenzie died in 
1875. 

George A. MacKenzie attended the schools of his 
native city and then entered the employ of the .American 
Bell Telephone Company, being transferred to their 
Providence, Rhode Island, department, and there he 
learned the trade of electrician, following this occupation 
for five years. From Providence he went to Boston, 
Massachusetts, and there entered the employ of the New 
England Telephone Company, remaining for three years, 
thence removing to Newburyport, to enter the employ of 
the E. P. Shaw Company. After three years in the 
employ of that firm, Mr. MacKenzie became chief elec- 
trician for the Bay State Cotton Corporation, and after 
eight years there, engaged in business for himself as an 
electrical contractor, under the firm name of George A. 
MacKenzie & Company. With his many years of experi- 
ence behind him, and with a thorough knowledge of his 
business, Mr. MacKenzie's present success was assured. 

Mr. MacKenzie is active in the civic and fraternal life 
of Newburyport, and although non-partisan in politics, 
is, nevertheless, anxious to do his share as a citizen. He 
is a member of the Eagles ; the Loyal Order of Moose ; 
and at one time was captain of the fire department there, 
now being a member of the Massachusetts State Fire- 
men's Association and of the Veteran Association of 
Firemen in Newburyport. 

Mr. MacKenzie married, September 19, 1901, Kate E. 
Kelleher, of Newburyport. 



ALFRED H. DURKEE— To actually have sailed 
the seven seas, to have visited every port on the globe, to 
have commanded sailing vessels and steamships, and then 
later to have become a prosperous manufacturer ashore, 
surely this is life indeed and one that comes to few. 
And few there be that have the genius and parts to 
grasp such varied opportunities when they present 
themselves. Alfred H. Durkee, born in Nova Scotia, 
December 9, i860, was one of these few. His father, 
James Durkee, and mother, Elizabeth (Dennis) Durkee, 
were native born Nova Scotians. The father, who died 
in 1914, w^as for the greater part of his later life a suc- 
cessful manufacturer of boxes and furniture. 

Alfred H. Durkee was educated in the public schools 
of Nova Scotia, and later studied in and graduated from 
schools of navigation, without which preparation he could 
not have risen so quickly to eminence upon the sea. For 
more than thirty years he was a follower of the sea, 
rising quickly to the position of mate and then of cap- 
tain. As captain of sailing craft, he made many long 
voyages around the world, then, as the steamship gradu- 



354 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ally replaced the sailing vessel, he began to take com- 
mand of steamships in the merchant marine. In 1908 
Captain Durkee determined to leave the sea and gain 
a livelihood ashore. It was at this time that he moved 
to Haverhill. His first enterprise, that of manufacturing 
shoe counters, was a rather small one, which he con- 
ducted in partnership with his brother, Evlann, their place 
of business being at No. 118 Phoenix Row, Haverhill, 
Massachusetts. Later, finding that "he travels fastest 
who travels alone," he established himself under the 
business title of the "Durkee Counter Company," as a 
manufacturer at No. 20 Phoeni.x Row, in Haverhill. 
Besides counters he fabricates soles and taps for men's 
and women's shoes, which he sells directly from the 
factory. His individuality and his original methods 
have enabled him to build up a solid business. 

Fraternally, Mr. Durkee has the rather rare distinc- 
tion of having been initiated into the Masonic order in 
Calcutta, during a residence there. He now is a Knight 
Templar, also belongs to the Shrine, and is a member of 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, of Boston. He holds membership in the 
Pentucket Club, belongs to the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce, and is a member of the Ancient and Honor- 
able Artillery Company, of Boston, Massachusetts. He 
is also a director of the Pentucket Savings Bank. He 
and his family are members of the First Baptist Church, 
ef Haverhill, 

Mr. Durkee married, in Nova Scotia, Alice M. Mc- 
Cormick, and their one daughter, Inda Frances, has 
had the unique distinction of being born on the far-off 
Indian ocean, March 14, 1900. Miss Durkee is an artist, 
and in 1921 was a student at the School of Arts, Saratoga 
Springs, New York. 

Few men have traveled so widely or seen the world so 
well as Mr. Durkee. In trade, his individuality and 
original methods have built for him a business on solid 
lines, and his varied life and experience have made him 
a personality one delights to meet. 



ANDREW M. GRAHAM, a merchant of Newbury- 
port, Massachusetts, was born there September 29, 1857, 
and is now one of the oldest business men of that city. 
He is a son of John and Ellen E. (Whalen) Graham, 
and was educated in the public schools, starting to work 
at an early age in a grocery store. He continued work- 
ing as a clerk until 1884 and in this year became associ- 
ated with his father in the meat and provision business, 
which he has since successfully carried on. The part- 
nership was unbroken until 1901, when the elder Mr. 
Graham died, and then the son assumed the full respon- 
sibility, which his years of experience enabled him to do. 

Mr. Graham married, September 29, 1891, Mary 
Hetherman, and they are the parents of a daughter, 
Mary, and of a son, John Graham, a veteran of the 
World War. 



ELMER HARLAND TAYLOR is one of the enter- 
prising business men of Newburyport. He acquired, and 
has since operated, the Davis Machine Company in 1920, 
and the next year opened a garage in the rear of his 
machine shop. There is every indication that Mr. Taylor 
will succeed in both enterprises, because he is a man of 
much practical experience and pronounced energy. 



Mr. Taylor was born in Amesbury, Massachusetts, on 
February 25, 1886, son of Worthington and Ida (Walker) 
Taylor. His parents were both of Amesbury, and they 
had three children, Elmer H. being the only son. His 
mother died in 1894, but his father, who is a carriage 
worker and trimmer, is still living. 

As a boy Elmer Harland Taylor attended the public 
schools of Amesbury, passing through the high school, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 1904. For 
three years, thereafter, he was in the employ of S. R. 
Bailey & Company, of Amesbury. That was followed 
by three years at the Powow Foundry, after which he 
went to Laconia to work, where he remained for about 
a year, going back to Manchester, New Hampshire for 
a short while. He afterwards came to Newburyport 
and entered the employ of the G. W. Richardson Com- 
pany, with which company he was connected for twelve 
years, for the greater part of the time being the fore- 
man of the plant. In 1920, as before mentioned, he 
acquired the business and plant of the Davis Machine 
Company, of Newburyport, the change of ownership 
bringing a change of trading name. Mr. Taylor now 
trades in that connection as E. H. Taylor, and has 
sought to bring all kinds of machine work and repairing 
into the scope of his business. In addition he has built 
in the rear of his plant an up-to-date garage, that busi- 
ness being entirely distinct from the machine work enter- 
prise, and is now known as. the Hudson & Taylor Garage. 

Mr. Taylor is a member of the Masonic order, and the 
Loyal Order of Moose. He attends closely to his busi- 
ness, and in both enterprises is trying by good service 
to bring increasing trade. 

Mr. Taylor married, in 1907, Helen Hudson, of New- 
buryport, daughter of Joseph Hudson, who was of 
English birth, but now lives in Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts, a retired business man of that place. They have one 
child, Worthington Hudson Taylor, who was born in 
1909. 



WARREN F. ABRAMS— After almost four decades 
of residence and active participation in business in 
Haverhill, Warren Franklin Abrams, now one of the 
largest florists in Haverhill and vicinity, may be con- 
sidered to be widely known in Haverhill and Essex 
county. Undoubtedly he is, for he has been the head of 
a substantial florist business in Haverhill for more than 
twenty years, that business bringing him into contact with 
all classes of Haverhill residents. 

Mr. Abrams was born in Kingston, New Hampshire, 
on November 13, 1864, the son of Lyman H. and Mary 
E. (Young) Abrams of that place. His father, who 
died in 1915, was a minister, well known and respected 
in many parts of New England during his years of 
activity in the church ministry. For very many years 
the family lived in Kingston, and there Warren F. 
received his education, attending the public schools of the 
place. For five years after leaving school, he found 
employment in his native place, working in the shoe 
shop of Qaron Tuck, of that place. In 1882 he came 
to Haverhill, Massachusetts, which has been his place 
of abode and business ever since. Soon after coming to 
Haverhill he worked for George H. Nichols, of that 
city, and during the next eighteen years was in the 
employ of various local shoe companies. In 1899 he 





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BIOGRAPHICAL 



355 



decided to venture into business for himself as a florist, 
and did so in that year, trading under his own name, at 
No. 19 Proctor street, where the space at his disposal 
was only 16 feet by 8 feet. From there he removed to 
a lot on Observatory avenue, where he remained for 
more than fourteen years, moving in 1914 to another lot 
at No. 38 Observatory avenue, where he built his present 
greenhouse, and where he has had opportunity to expand 
in many branches of floriculture. During his long period 
of business in Haverhill he has developed with the 
assistance of his son, a worth-while business, which is 
one of the largest and best known in that line in Essex 
county, Massachusetts. 

Mr. .Abrams belongs to local bodies of several fraternal 
orders, being identified with the Knights of Malta, Odd 
Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and Red Men organiza- 
tions. He is a Methodist, member of Grace Methodist 
Oiurch of Haverhill. 

Mr. .A.brams married, in 1888, Ella F. Marshall, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, daughter of Joseph A. and 
Mary A. (Manser) Marshall, both of Nova Scotia, and 
both deceased, the former passing away in 1917 and the 
latter in 191 !. Joseph A. Marshall was a contractor and 
mason in Nova Scotia. Mr. and Mrs. Abrams have two 
children : Charles W., and Arthur P. Both sons are 
veterans of the World War. The military service of 
Arthur P. Abrams began when he enlisted on October 
S, 1917. and was sent to Camp Devens. Massachusetts. 
He was soon transferred to Camp Gordon, Georgia, and 
from there went overseas, with the 307th Sanitary Com- 
pany, Field Hospital, Eighty-second Division. He was 
in active service in France for about a year, and was 
present in several of the major battles — St. Mihiel, Toul, 
and Argonne fronts. He finally returned to this country, 
and was honorably discharged at Camp Dix, New Jersey, 
on May 10, 1919. He at once became associated with his 
father in business, and is one of Haverhill's most popular 
business men. The military record of Charles W. 
Abrams began at Camp Sherman. Chillicothe, Ohio ; he 
went overseas and served in Italy, returning to the 
United States in May, 1919. He is now located in 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he is manager of the College 
Conservatories. 



NORWELL ATHERTON PHILLIPS— Although 

his professional career has not yet embraced many 
years, Norwell Atherton Phillips, who now lives in 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, and is manager of the Merri- 
mac A'alley Power and Building Company, has held some 
responsible positions, and gives promise of advancing 
well as an engineer. 

Mr. Phillips was born in Chatham, Massachusetts, the 
son of Jacob F. and Inez H. (Ellis) Phillips. His father 
was a native of Harwich, Massachusetts, born there, 
July 31. 1867, and there he has lived for the greater part 
of his life, being the owner of a good farming estate. 
The mother of Norwell A. Phillips was also of Harwich, 
although it was not her birthplace. She was born on 
October 14, 1877, and died at Harwich, in 191 1. 

Norwell A. Phillips was reared to manhood in his 
native place. He attended the Harwich public schools, 
including the high, and afterwards became a student at 
the Carnegie Institute of Technology at Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, graduating from that well known technical 



college in the class of 1917. Soon, thereafter, he secured 
employment with the Rondolph & Holbrook Power and 
Electric Company, serving them for a year in the capacity 
of business manager. He next secured appointment as 
power engineer for the Union Light and Power Com- 
pany, and was stationed at that company's plant at 
Franklin, Massachusetts, for a year. He left that com- 
pany to take his present office, that of manager for the 
Merrimac Valley Power and Building Company, so it 
would seem that he is advancing in his profession very 
satisfactorily. 

Mr. Phillips is a Republican in political allegiance; he 
is a member of the Amesbury Chamber of Commerce 
and fraternally is a Mason, being a member of Pilgrim 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of Harwich, Massa- 
chusetts, and of the Lodge of Perfection (Scottish Rite). 
In his religious preference he is a Congregationalist. 

Mr. Phillips married, in 1920, Grace Giles, of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, who was born on September 21, 
1896, daughter of Edward C. and Cora M. (Lewis) 
Giles. The Giles family is of Haverhill, where Mr. 
Giles is well known, especially in shoe inanufacturing 
circles; Cora M. (Lewis) Giles, however, was born in 
Boothbay, Maine. 

Like most other young and able-bodied men of .Amer- 
ica, Mr. Phillips cast aside his own personal affairs 
during the World War. He voluntarily enlisted not man> 
months after war was declared, joining the Signal Corps 
of the United States army on August 10, 1917. He was 
in military service until February 15, 1919, being then 
honorably discharged in the grade of sergeant. 



EDWARD A. LOOMIS, a member of the under- 
taking firm of the Kimball, Hall & Loomis Company, of 
the Bradford district of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was 
born August 12, 1867, in Boston, son of Charles E. 
Loomis, of that city. The latter was engaged in the 
shoe industry until his death. He married Katherine 
King, of Alexandria, Virginia. 

The public schools of Haverhill afforded Mr. Loomis 
his education, and soon after leaving school he went to 
work for Joseph Cummings, a prominent undertaker of 
Haverhill. He remained there for two years and was 
then employed by the N. F. Centre Company, leaving 
there a year later to enter the shoe business, remaining 
in that for four years and then entering the employ of 
Richards & Dole, undertakers. Three years later they 
dissolved partnership, and George A. Childs then became 
a partner of Mr. Dole's, Mr. Loomis remaining with 
them for seven years. He then accepted a position with 
Charles A. Twombly, with whom he remained a year. At 
the end of this time he became one of the corporators 
of the Kimball, Hall & Loomis Company, an undertaking 
firm originally founded in 1912 by .Allison A. Kimball, 
William A. Hall and Mr. Loomis. This firm bought the 
interest of Frank H. Ballard. Mr. Ballard's place of 
business was at No. 29 Fifth avenue, Haverhill, and a 
year after the new firm started they reinoved it to No. 
69 Main street, Bradford, where they have since remained, 
the leading members of their profession in that district. 

Fraternally, Mr. Loomis is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows; the Knights of Pythias, 
and the Masonic order, affiliating with Pentucket Chapter, 



356 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Royal Arch Masons. He is also a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Loomis married (first), in 1890, Minnie Brown, 
of Chicago, Illinois, and she died in 1897 ; he married 
(second), in iQOi, Emily Schlenker, of Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, and they attend and aid in the support of the 
Baptist church of that city. 



WILLIAM E. HOW, a business man of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, was born January 10, 1858, the son of 
Dr. James C. and Helen L. (Whitney) How, the former 
a practicing physician in Haverhill; he died in 1888. His 
wife was a native of Oneida Castle, New York, and she 
died in 1913. 

The early education of William E. How was obtained 
in the public schools of Haverhill, and at Amherst 
College, class of 1881. Subsequent to leaving college, 
Mr. How worked as a reporter and later was editor 
of the Haverhill "Daily Bulletin," and of the Man- 
chester "Mirror." He was the writer of editorials on 
the Lowell "Times" and held a similar position on the 
Syracuse "Herald," continuing in this line of work for 
about fourteen years. He resigned from newspaper 
work to enter business on his own account as a sta- 
tioner, locating at No. 27 Washington Square ; this busi- 
ness has been located there for a half century and is the 
oldest store of its kind in Haverhill. 

Fraternally, Mr. How is a Mason ; he is also a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; the 
Rotary Club and the U. O. G. C. He is active in a pub- 
lic way, having been president of the Haverhill Adver- 
tising Club, and a director of the Chamber of Commerce, 
and was one of the most active citizens in having white 
lights installed in that city. He was the first secretary 
of the first Board of Trade. 



FREDERICK L. CLARK, active head of the F. L. 
Clark Last Remodeling Company, was born December 
26, 1892, at Bradford, Massachusetts, son of J. Lewis and 
Susan (McCabe) Clark. The mother was a native of 
West Newton. Prince Edward Island, and the father a 
native of Vermont. Mr. Clark's grandfather, James H. 
Clark, was a veteran of the Civil War, serving with the 
Vermont Heavy Artillery. 

Mr. Clark attended school in Bradford and Haverhill 
and also attended the Haverhill Business College. For 
the five years following the completion of his schooling, 
he was at Bangor, Maine, employed by the Great North- 
ern Paper Company. On his return to Haverhill in 1919 
he succeeded his "father in the management of the last 
manufacturing business, continuing to the present time. 

During the World War Mr. Qark served overseas 
for fourteen months. He was a member of the Medical 
Department of the Second Cavalry until the forming of 
Base Hospital No. 66, in November, 1917, and was with 
same until its disbanding, February 27, 1919. He is 
actively interested in all public affairs of Haverhill and 
holds a prominent position among the younger business 
men of that city. 



Whitney was engaged in the bakery business for many 
years, and with his wife attended the Baptist church. 
They spent their last days in Lynn. 

William R. Whitney's early education was received in 
the grammar and high schools of Lynn, and soon after 
completing the courses in the latter institution, he entered 
the business world at the age of si.xteen years in the 
employ of Samuel J. Hollis, a pioneer shoe manufac- 
turer of Lynn. For thirteen years Mr. Whitney worked 
as a salesman for Mr. Hollis and during this time was 
learning each detail of the shoe manufacturing business, 
which had become the leading industry of that section of 
the State. He went to Kennebunk. Maine, to assume 
the management of the Mason & Cobb Company of that 
place, thence to Manchester, New Hampshire, where for 
two years he was superintendent of the Crafts & Greene 
Company. The following eleven years were spent in 
Richmond, Virginia, as superintendent of the Davis Shoe 
Company, and returning North again, Mr. Whitney 
located in Raymond, New Hampshire, in a similar posi- 
tion with the Chase, Qiamberlain Company there. His 
experience, gained in the most practical way, was of 
untold value to him, and for many years Mr. Whitney 
had cherished the hope of all ambitious men to enter 
business on his own account, which he did in May, 
1920, at which time he bought the Sheridan Brothers' 
business in Haverhill, manufacturers of ladies' footwear, 
and which the following month was incorporated, with 
Mr. Whitney as president, and Thurman Leslie, for- 
merly with Clapp & Tapley, of Danvers, as treasurer. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, and also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows ; he attends the First 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Whitney married, June 2, 1886, Susan L. Emer- 
ton, daughter of Ezra M. Emerton, born in 1862. 



WILLIAM R. WHITNEY, manufacturer of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, was born July 31, i8'3, in Lynn, the son 
of James and Lucy Ann (Sturgis) Whitney, the former 
a native of Boston, the latter of Barnstable. James 



LOUIS P. BERWICK — An enterprising young busi- 
ness man of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and one who 
knows his business, is Louis P. Berwick, who is an 
expert electrician, specializing in electrical repairs of 
automobiles. 

Mr. Berwick is a native of Lawrence, born in the city 
on November 6, 1890, son of Frank G. and Elizabeth 
Isabelle (Brozzs) Berwick, his father being of English 
birth. His mother was of Methuen, Massachusetts, and 
died in 1910, his father is now in South Barre, Massa- 
chusetts, a mill superintendent for the Willis Company. 

Louis P. Berwick is the eldest of four children, three 
of whom were sons. His education was obtained mainly 
in the public schools of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and he 
later took a business course at a business college in 
Scranton, Pennsylvania. His first employers were the 
American Woolen Company, and for some time after 
leaving school he worked in the textile mills of that 
company in Lawrence. Eventually, however, he took up 
electrical construction work for the Lawrence Electrical 
Supply Company. During the World War, 1917-18. Mr. 
Berwick was stationed at the Charlestown Navy Yard, 
where he was assistant in the electric and storage bat- 
teries department. He was honorably discharged from 
the United States navy on February 18, 1919, and resumed 
civilian occupations. On September i, 1919, he ventured 
into business for himself, opening in the Back Bay 
garage, in Lawrence. The following June he removed 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



357 



his business to his present address, corner of Knox and 
Jackson streets. There he confines his electrical work 
to automobile repairs, and is stated to be the most expert 
man in this line in Lawrence. Indeed, in electrical appa- 
ratus and batteries in general, he seems to have compre- 
hensive knowledge, and his advice is often sought to 
clear difficult problems of electrical construction. 

Mr. Berwick is a member of Lawrence Lodge, No. 65, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the 
Knights of Columbus of Lawrence. In his church affilia- 
tion he is a member of St. Laurence's Catholic Church, 
of Lawrence. 

Mr. Berwick married, in 1914, Yvonne Camire, who 
was born in St. Flavie, Canada, of French-Canadian 
parents, Joseph A. and Flore (Couture) Camire, who 
later came to Lawrence, where Mr. Camire is now 
employed as a carpenter in the Pacific Mills. Mr. and 
Mrs. Berwick have four children : Thorndyke Louis, 
born in 1915 ; Marie Louise, born in 1916; Flore Mar- 
celle, born in 1919; and Louis Philip, Jr., born in 1920. 



FRED L. FOSTER, of Lynn, Massachusetts, began 
life in the industrial world of Lynn, and after serving 
in the L^nited States army, returned to his native city to 
take up executive work in the same line. 

Mr. Foster is a son of Lin wood R. and Clara L. 
(Knight) Foster, long residents of Lynn. Linwood R. 
Foster was born in Parsonfield, York county, Maine, and 
came to Lynn in his youth. He has for many years been 
a shoe salesman here, first for the Thomas & Tarr Com- 
pany, and later for the Eastman Shoe Company. The 
mother was a native of Naples, Maine. 

Fred L. Foster was born in Lynn, on December 29, 
1894. He received a practical education in the public 
schools of this city, then went to work for the J. H. 
Sutherland Company, where he remained until 1916. For 
a year thereafter he was in the employ of A. E. Little & 
Company, of Lynn, and from there he enlisted in the 
aviation service of the United States army. Transferred 
two months later to the ordnance department, he was 
stationed at Camp Travis, Texas, then later was sent to 
the Wentworth Institute, in Boston, where he took up 
a course in gas engines. He was honorably discharged 
from the service February 7, 1919. 

On October 15, 1919, Mr. Foster became a member of 
the firm of the Whitcomb Pattern Company, Inc., and 
was elected president of the company. As the head of 
this rapidly growing interest, he is now a part of the 
industry which bears so large a share in the prosperity 
of the city. Mr. Foster is a member of the Lynn 
Chamber of Commerce, and is interested in every phase of 
civic advancement. He is a member of the First Uni- 
versalist Church of Lynn. 

Mr. Foster married, in 1917. Gladys E. White, of 
Lynn, daughter of John T. and Elizabeth (Richmond) 
White. Mrs. Foster's father has long been engaged in 
the shoe industry here. Her mother was born in Con- 
cord. New Hampshire. 



Mr. Varney has given his earnest support to all move- 
ments calculated to advance business development. He 
is a business man of keen ability and has attained a high 
degree of success. 

Penn Varney was born at Wolfeboro, New Hamp- 
shire, November 15, 1859, the son of Augustus J. and 
Mercy (Hussey) Varney, both old and respected resi- 
dents of the town. The education of the boy Penn was 
obtained in the public schools of his native place. In 
1882 he came to Lynn and started to learn architectural 
drafting with H. K. Wheeler. Being naturally adapted to 
this particular line of work, he soon made rapid strides 
and in 1888 established himself in business. As an archi- 
tect Mr. Varney is well known not only in Lynn but in 
Schenectady, New York, where the pul)lic library, the 
Gleason building, the Brown building, the Vendome 
Hotel and the private residence of H. S. De Forest are 
fruits of his labors, as well as the Elks' Home at Amster- 
dam, New York ; the Porteous Mitchell and Braun 
building of Portland, Maine ; Saco and Biddeford Insti- 
tution of Savings at Saco, Maine; Sanford Town Hall at 
Sanford, Maine; public library at Barre, Vermont; 
Classical High school, Lynn, Massachusetts ; and the 
First National Bank Building at Skowhegan, Maine. At 
present, 1921, Mr. Varney is at work on the plans for 
the Gardner Memorial building and Town Hall, whose 
cost of erection it is estimated will be one-half million 
dollars. 

On June 13, 1893, Penn Varney was united in marriage 
with Emma L. Hussey, daughter of Samuel B. and 
Caroline M. (Doe) Hussey. Mr. and Mrs. Varney are 
the parents of one child, Kenneth P., born November 6, 
1898. 

The career of Mr. Varney from its beginning is 
characterized by much hard work and persistent expen- 
diture of energy, and the substantial position which he 
has come to occupy in the life of the community is the 
obvious and appropriate reward of application and men- 
tal qualifications of a high order. He is devoted to his 
home and finds his chief happiness in the intimate inter- 
course of his own hearthstone, although he has a great 
host of friends whose devotion he returns in kind. 



PENN VARNEY— .\ prominent figure in the busi- 
ness life in Lynn, Massachusetts, where he is established 
as an architect, is Penn Varney. The welfare and 
advancement of the city has always been uppermost in 
his mind, and since coming to this community in 1882, 



WILLIAM M. CAMPBELL, owner of a good busi- 
ness in Lawrence, Massachusetts, has quite an interest- 
ing record and much of it is connected with military 
affairs. He is a veteran of the Spanish-.\merican War, 
and has come into note as a marksman. 

Mr. Campbell was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, on 
July 15, 1873, son of Joseph M. and Annie M. (Thorn) 
Campbell. As the patronymic indicates, he is of Scottish 
antecedents. Both of his parents were born in Scotland, 
his mother in Banff. After coming to this country, his 
father was identified with the Massachusetts shoe manu- 
facturing industry. He died in 1918, survived by his 
widow and their six children, three sons and three 
daughters, William M. being their first-torn. The family 
lived in Lynn, Massachusetts, and there William M. and 
his brothers and sisters received the greater part of their 
education. After leaving school, William M. Campbell 
found employment in the machine shop of David Knox, 
at Lynn, Massachusetts. He remained with him for 
seventeen years, for the greater part of that time being 
foreman of the plant. In 1906 he decided to venture into 



358 



ESSEX COUNTY 



business for himself, in a different line, however. He 
went to the city of Salem, Massachusetts, and there 
opened a laundry, which became known as the Up-to- 
Date Laundry. He continued that enterprise for two 
years, but after he had acquired the Lawrence business 
of L. H. Farns worth, he transferred his activities to that 
city. Mr, Campbell is an enterprising and distinctly ener- 
getic man, and soon developed Campbell's Wet Wash 
Laundry, under which name his Lawrence business was 
conducted, and it became a well-paying concern. He 
has held to the business ever since, and by efficient and 
good service, has expanded his operations until he has, 
it is stated, the largest wet-wash laundry in Lawrence. 
His laundry plant, at No. 26 Island street, occupies an 
entire building, giving him over 5,000 square feet of floor 
space for this purpose, and in it Mr. Campbell finds 
almost constant employment for about thirty people. 

Mr. Campbell has a military record extending over 
nine years, including one year of war service in Cuba 
during the Spanish-.\merican War. He went to Cuba 
with the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, and in Com- 
pany D rose rapidly. He was finally honorably dis- 
charged with the grade of sergeant-major. But he 
continued his interest in military affairs after reentering 
civil life, and joined the State forces. He has come 
especially into note as a marksman. He holds the Dis- 
tinguished Marksman Medal, which is the highest honor 
possible in competitive shooting, and he led the entire 
State one year in revolver shooting. He was a valued 
member of the State team, and took part notably in 
many competitions. 

Mr. Campbell is a member of the Spanish War Vet- 
erans Association ; belongs to the Lawrence Fish and 
Game Association, and the Haverhill Yacht Oub ; and 
fraternally is an Odd Fellow. By religious belief he is 
a Presbyterian, a member of the Lawrence church. 

Mr. Campbell married, in 1896, Alice M. Durkee, of 
Nova Scotia, and they have one child, Dorothy H., who 
was born in 1903. 



HIRAM C. STRAKER, chief engineer and master 
mechanic of the Pemberton Mills, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, is highly skilled in his line of work, having had 
many years of actual experience combined with natural 
ability. 

Mr. Straker was born in the Province of Quebec, 
Canada, March 3, 1876, son of Thomas Straker, a native 
of Yorkshire, England, who died in i8g8. He had been 
engaged in the real estate business and was also an 
extensive dealer in horses. His mother was Mary 
(Wallace) Straker, of Scotland, who died the same 
year as her husband. 

The public schools and St. John's Military Academy 
were the sources of Mr. Strakcr's early education, and 
at a very early age his aptitude for mechanical work was 
apparent. His first position was with the Massey and 
Sawyer Company, in Manitoba, Canada, and in i8g8 he 
removed to North Andovcr, Massachusetts, where he 
was assistant master mechanic of the Suttons Mills. 
After four years he went to Lowell, as engineer of the 
Lowell Machine Company, remaining for five years. 

For three years, from 1909 to 1912, Mr. Straker con- 
ducted a school for instruction in steam engineering, a 
subject on which he is a widely known authority, and he 



has written several articles on the subject. His school 
was in Lowell, and he had 450 pupils enrolled ; he con- 
tinued very successful for three years, but then dis- 
continued the school owing to ill health, finding it imper- 
ative to retire from active business for a long period. 
Many of the former pupils of this school have achieved 
recognition for their work in various parts of the 
county and Mr. Straker takes much pride in their suc- 
cess. 

After recovering his health, Mr. Straker went to 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, and there obtained a position 
as master mechanic of the Standish Worsted Company, 
and in 191 7 came to Methuen, where he accepted the 
position which he now holds. There is perhaps no man 
in Essex county better informed on his subject than Mr. 
Straker, and many of the articles which he writes are 
published in the technical magazines. He is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; the Loyal 
Order of Moose, and the National and International 
Association of Engineers. 

Mr. Straker married, December 25, 1910, Agnes Ruth 
Murray, of Quebec, Canada, and they are the parents 
of a son, Camplin Murray Straker, born Decemlier 5, 
1919. 



JAMES E. SUTCLIFFE, who ranks as the second 

largest manufacturer of leather heels in Lyim and who 
during the World War was a United States Government 
contractor, was born in Todmorden, Yorkshire, England, 
on December 5, 1866, son of Joseph and Sarah C. (Hors- 
fall) Sutcliffe, the former a corduroy manufacturer in 
England, where he died in 1891, and his widow in the 
following year. 

James E. Sutcliffe did not come to the United States 
until he was about twenty-one years old. He was edu- 
cated in English public schools, and crossed to this country 
in 1887. He settled in Lynn, Massachusetts, and for 
thirty-two years was in the employ of local firms, serving 
Rice & Hutchins, Littlefield & Moulton, Joseph Conant, 
Winch Brothers, and for each of these manufacturers 
he was for some time superintendent of their factory. 
On January i, 1919, he became owner of the manufactur- 
ing business formerly conducted at No. 2 Box' Place 
(commonly known as Lucky Lane), Lynn, by the firm 
of Kenney & Besant. He stayed there, however, only a 
short time, for its quarters were altogether too small for 
his business, which grew very rapidly. He found more 
commodious quarters at No. 41 Wyman street, and he 
bought the building there situated. He quickly adapted 
it to his purposes, and installed fifty drying machines, or 
double the number he had been able to find room for in 
the old factory. Mr. Sutcliffe specializes in leather heels, 
and his new factory has a capacity of 30.000 heels a day. 
Altogether the plant uses 19,000 square feet of floor 
space, and the factory finds employment for forty per- 
sons, Mr. Sutcliffe fortunately being able to avoid labor 
troubles by drawing his help from the community, which 
plan effects an appreciable saving to the workers in car- 
fare, the saving giving them a higher rating than down- 
town factory hands have. Mr. Sutcliffe's operations are 
governed by a very effective motto "Quality Counts," and 
in consequence his product is not difficult to sell. It is 
said that no jobbers ever visit his plant, and during and 
immediately succeeding the World War Mr. Sutcliffe 




Jwt. ^iPOAy ^i^^^ 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



359 



had more business almost than he could cope with. He 
had a large export trade, and made a large number of 
heels for United States soldiers. 

Before coming to this country, Mr. Sutcliffe served 
for three years in the Volunteer branch of the British 
army, and, as will later herein be noted, two of his sons 
were in the United States service during the World War. 

Mr. Sutcliffe married, in 1895, Sadie Caroline Cough- 
lin, of Prince Edward Island. She was the daughter of 
John and Caroline (MacWilliams) Coughlin. Her father 
was a sea captain, and later a farmer on Prince Edward 
Island, where he died in 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Sutcliffe 
have four children : Young Edward, who was born in 
1896; Dean Cooper, who was born in 1898; Gladys 
Caroline, born in 1901 ; and Katharine Goodale, born in 
1906. The elder son. Young Edward, was in the United 
States Naval Aviation Corps during the World War. 
He enlisted on January 5, 1918, and was sent to Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, and transferred from there to the 
Naval Observatory at Washington, D. C, later going to 
Key West, Florida, where he was stationed at the close 
of the war. He was honorably discharged in December, 
1918, having then the grade of quartermaster. The other 
son. Dean Cooper, was accepted into the United States 
armed forces, but was not assigned to duty until the day 
of the Armistice, November 11, 1918. The elder daugh- 
ter, Gladys C, has shown very promising talent as a 
vocalist. As a soprano soloist she is coming into increas- 
ing notice, and in October, 1921, made her debut on the 
concert platform. 



JOHN W. ALEXANDER, one of the most promi- 
nent officials in the mill industry in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, and also a leading citizen of that city, is highly 
esteemed among his contemporaries. He was born June 
30, 1871, in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of John Alex- 
ander, a native of Fifeshire, Scotland, where he was 
engaged in manufacturing, and where he died in 1901, 
aged about si.xty-six years. The mother of John W., 
Elizabeth (Walker) Alexander, died in Fifeshire, Scot- 
land, in 1894. 

Mr. Alexander attended school in Scotland, and when 
he was eighteen years old, came to the United States. 
Through association with his father he had acquired 
some experience in manufacturing lines, and naturally 
sought similar work in America. His first employment 
was in New Bedford, for Pales & Jenks, of Pawtucket, as 
an erector of textile machinery. While there he attended 
the textile school. From there he went to Fitchburg and 
spent ten j'ears as a loom-fixer with the Parkhill Manu- 
facturing Company, thence removing to several other 
towns in Massachusetts, working as overseer and super- 
intendent of weaving. In Easthampton, Massachusetts, 
he worked for a firm, the first in America to weave tire 
fabric, and Mr. Alexander had a responsible part in this 
initial production. This industry has now extended 
throughout the country, and is one of the important 
industries of Massachusetts. Mr. Alexander continued as 
superintendent of this plant until 1914, in which year he 
was offered the superintendency of the Katama Mills of 
Lawrence, which position he accepted, also being made 
agent of those mills, the product is tire fabric. For 
almost eight years he has been located in the latter city 



and during this time has won a high place in the esteem 
of the leading business men there. 

Mr. Alexander has that personality that makes him a 
born leader of men ; he makes friends verj' easily and 
what is still better, he has the ability to hold friendship. 
On an average there are 450 men in his employ, and 
during normal conditions more than 160,000 pounds of 
cotton pass through the mills each week. 

During the Soudan War Mr. Alexander felt the call 
of duty, and served four years in the service of the 
British army, as a member of the renowned Black Watch. 
He is a member of several fraternal organizations, among 
them being Ionic Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Easthampton ; Massachusetts Consistory ; and Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Boston. He is also a member of the Man- 
chester Unity of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
at Northampton, Massachusetts ; and the Scottish Clan 
Leslie, of Fitchburg. From boyhood Mr. Alexander has 
been interested in music, and studied voice culture in 
Edinburgh. He has a bass voice, and has sung in choirs in 
all the cities he lived in prior to coming to Lawrence. 

Mr. .'Mexander married, in 1895, Isabella K. Hay, of 
Scotland, daughter of John and Jeanette (Dalgleish) 
Hay, of that place, and they are the parents of four chil- 
dren : Janet J., Hope C, William H. and Hazel I. Mr. 
Alexander and his family attend the Methodist church of 
Lawrence. 

LAURENCE USHER FULLER— Prominent in the 

insurance world of Lynn, Massachusetts, Mr. Fuller is 
taking a very practical part in the general advance of 
Essex county. Mr. Fuller is a son of Charles S. and 
Addie G. (Usher) Fuller, his father having been for 
many years a leading shoe manufacturer in this city. 

Laurence Usher Fuller was born in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, March 31, 1881. and received his early education in 
the public schools of the city. Taking a preparatory 
course in the Haverford Preparatory School of Phila- 
delphia. Pennsylvania, he entered the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, where he studied for two years. 
His first employment was in an apprentice course with 
the General Electric Company, of Lynn, then he became 
associated with his father as assistant in the office of the 
shoe factory in Salem, and continued there until his 
father's death. The concern was then reorganized, and 
Mr. Fuller withdrew his interest, forming an association 
with Fred H. Vickary. in the insurance business in Lynn. 
This is known as the Thos. B. Knight Company, and has 
become a very successful and influential concern. 

Mr. Fuller is broadly interested in civic affairs, but has 
never found time to accept public office. He is a member 
of the Oxford Club, and of the Unitarian church. 

On June 30. 1915, Mr. Fuller married Anabel Ingalls, 
daughter of Charles F. and Helen (Kimball) Ingalls. 



WILLIAM H. FRANKLIN, JR., master plumber 
of Merrimac, Massachusetts, has lived in that place and 
Haverhill for the greater part of his life. He was born 
in Brooklyn, New York, October 29, 1888, son of Wil- 
liam H. and Margaret (Myers) Franklin, both natives 
of New York City, the former born in September, 1862. 
Indeed, the Franklin family is an old New York City 



36o 



ESSEX COUNTY 



family, Thomas Franklin, grandfather of William H., Jr., 
also having been born there. He was a marine engineer, 
and as such served in the United States Navy during the 
Civil War. His sons were Cherry and William H. The 
latter was a brassworker, and for some years after he had 
married Miss Margaret Myers, lived in Brooklyn. 
Eventually, however, the family came to Merrimac, Mas- 
sachusetts, which was thereafter the place of abode of the 
Franklins. The children of William H. and Margaret 
(Myers) Franklin are: William H., Jr., the subject of 
this sketch ; George Edward, born in Brooklyn, January 
24, 1 891 ; and Walter, born in Merrimac, Massachusetts, 
in June, 1905. The parents are still living, and are 
respected citizens of Merrimac. They are Congrega- 
tionalists. 

William H. Franklin was reared in Brooklyn, and 
there attended elementary school. Before he had passed 
out of the graded school, however, the family moved to 
Merrimac, and there the son continued his education, 
passing from the graded to the high schools. After leav- 
ing school, he began to earn money as a minor employee 
of the New York City brokerage firm of Thomas Denny 
& Company. He remained in New York in that line of 
business for about two years, then coming to Haverhill. 
The next fourteen years of his life were spent in the 
employ of O. F. Bennett, plumber, of Haverhill. Under 
him he learned that trade which he has held to ever since. 
After fourteen years with Mr. Bennett, he went to 
Worcester, Massachusetts, where for a year he worked 
for the Tucker Rice Company. He then went to Squan- 
tum, Massachusetts, where he worked at his trade in the 
shipyard of the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company for 
about a year. In 1919 he returned to Haverhill, and for 
twelve months or so found employment with the Murphy 
Company. In 1920, he resolved to enter into business for 
himself in Merrimac. He now has a good plumbing and 
steam fitting business and has good prospects of develop- 
ing it substantially. 

Mr. Franklin served one enlistment in the Sixteenth 
Regiment of the Massachusetts State Guard, belonging to 
Company D, and rising to the grade of sergeant. He is 
a member of the Massachusetts Master Plumbers' Asso- 
ciation. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic and 
American Mechanics orders, being master of the Bethany 
Lodge of Merrimac, of the former. In religious faith, 
he is a Congregationalist. 

Mr. Franklin was married, at Merrimac, Massachu- 
setts, May 29, 1910, to Mabel Ella Pease, born there May 
20, 1892, daughter of John Thomas Pease, carriage 
maker. They have four children: William H. (3), 
born October 28, 191 1 ; Helen Edith, born May 20, 1913 ; 
Charlotte Christina, born November 25, 1914; and John 
Thomas, born December 5, 1919. 



FRANK C. NEWHALL— In the civic annals of the 
town of Lynnfield, Massachusetts, for several genera- 
tions past the name of Newhall is somewhat frequently 
encountered. The Newhall family is one of the oldest 
in Lynnfield, and Frank C. Newhall is one of the promi- 
nent citizens of this generation. He has served as select- 
man, as a member of the Board of Health, as a forest 
warden, and as an overseer of the poor. His father was 
a selectman and road commissioner for twenty-five years. 



Frank Chandler Newhall was Ixirn in Lynnfield, 
October 29, 1879, son of Frank and Urilda J. (Putnam) 
Newhall. His father was a farmer, and his mother 
belonged to a South Danvers family, one of the noted 
Colonial New England families. Both parents are still 
living. 

Frank C. Newhall, as a boy, attended the Lynnfield 
public schools, and later entered the Peabody High 
School, after graduating from which he took the course 
at the Salem Commercial School. He was thus well 
equipped for commercial business. However, for a while, 
he stayed with his father, and helped him in the work of 
the farm. Soon, however, he began to work up a milk 
route, and from that early enterprise has grown his 
present substantial milk business in Lynnfield. 

He has always manifested much interest in the public 
affairs and general prosperity of his native place, and has 
been quite ready to take a part in the responsibilities of 
the town administration. He is popular in Lynnfield, and, 
as before stated, is a selectman, and has undertaken other 
public duties. He is also an active member of the local 
Grange. 

Mr. Newhall married, in 1901, Ethel M. Kelly, of Lynn, 
daughter of Daniel N. and Susan F. (Wells) Kelly, the 
former a shoe manufacturer of Danvers, who died in 
1910, and the mother, who still lives, is of Lynn. Mr. and 
Mrs. Newhall have two children : Albert F., born in 
1902; and Eleanor F., born in 1910. 



WILLIAM H. COLBERT— Now just at the prime 
of his powers, Mr. Colbert, a native son, reviews a half 
century of life spent in Salem, Massachusetts, his present 
home. He began as a boy of twelve in a shoe factory 
and for nearly forty years has made his own way. He 
was a lad of fourteen when he began with the Philadel- 
phia & Reading Coal and Iron Company, and from that 
time until the present, 1921, he has been engaged in the 
coal business. 

John Colbert, of County Cork, Ireland, came to the 
United States in boyhood and found a home in Salem, 
Massachusetts. Later he entered the service of the old 
Eastern railroad and continued in that employ until his 
death. He married Hannah O'Leary, also born in 
County Cork. 

William H. Colbert, son of John and Hannah 
(O'Leary) Colbert, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 
December 14, 1870, and there was educated in the public 
schools. He began his wage-earning career in a Salem 
shoe factory, but two years later, entered the employ of 
the Philadelphia & Reading Coal and Iron (Company in 
Salem, beginning at the bottom of the ladder and contin- 
uing in ever-increasing position of responsibility until 
becoming foreman of the coal pockets. He continued 
with that company fifteen years, until 1899, having entered 
their employ when a boy of fourteen, as water boy. In 
his upward rise he was for a time engineer of one of the 
coal hoisting engines, but the greater part of his term 
was as foreman. This experience in handling coal so 
familiarized him with the business that in 1899 he decided 
to go into the retail coal business for himself. 

Mr. Colbert formed a partnership with his brother, 
Dennis W. Colbert, and in 1899 they opened a retail coal 
yard, trading as the Colbert Brothers Coal Company, of 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



361 



Salem. They conducted a very successful business for 
fifteen years, William H. Colbert buying his brother's 
interest in 1914 and continuing the business alone, but 
under the old name, Colbert Brothers. He is well known 
in the city and has won an honorable position among 
Salem business men. 

From 1900 until 1903 Mr. Colbert represented his 
ward in the Common Council. In 1905 he was elected 
alderman and served through reelections until 1914. He 
is a member of the Salem Chamber of Commerce; Salem 
Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; Cath- 
olic Order of Foresters; John Bertram Lodge, United 
Order of American Workmen ; and the Enterprise Social 
Club. In religious faith he is a Catholic, a member of 
Immaculate Conception Church. 

Mr. Colbert married, in 1895, Margaret S. Callahan, 
of Salem, and they are the parents of two daughters : 
Helena M., who is in charge of the bookkeeping depart- 
ment of Colbert Brothers Coal Company ; and Anna M. 



In September, 1917, Mr. Simpson married Gertrude M. 
Whiston, of Chicago, Illinois, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Josephine Mary. 



ALBERT E. SIMPSON— With long experience in 

his chosen field of endeavor, Mr. Simpson, of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, has worked his way up from the beginning 
to membership in the firm with which he has been con- 
nected for upwards of fourteen years. 

Albert E. Simpson was born in Leicester, England, in 
1879. and is a son of Edwin Simpson, a native of that 
city, who has been engaged in the shoe industry there all 
his life. 

Receiving his education in the schools of Leicester, 
with a supplementary course at the Workmens' Col- 
lege, he began life in the shoe factories of Leicester, 
remaining there until 1907, when he came to this country. 
Locating in Lynn, he entered the employ of A. R. King 
& Company, of Lynn, but after about si.x months left this 
firm and became associated with Williams & Clarke. 
For another six months he was employed here, then 
entered the factory of H. W. Whitcomb & Company, of 
which he is now part owner. As Mr. Simpson was con- 
nected with the Walker, Kempson & Stevens Company, 
Ltd., of Leicester, England, as shoe designer, he was 
especially fitted to take up the responsibilities of the 
Whitcomb factory, in the manufacture of patterns. 
Eventually, in 191S, Mr. Simpson became part owner of 
the business. 

The Whitcomb Pattern Company was founded in 1886 
by Henry W. Whitcomb. who is known in the shoe indus- 
try from coast to coast as one of the leading designers of 
the country, and his patterns have been in universal 
demand in the United States for many years, and also 
in several foreign countries. 

As the Whitcomb Pattern Company, Inc., Mr. Simp- 
son, in association with Fred L. Foster, whose life is 
reviewed elsewhere in this work, is carrying forward this 
important industry. Mr. Foster is president of the com- 
pany, and Mr. Simpson is treasurer. The high standard 
of excellence set by Mr. Whitcomb is still the measure 
of achievement for the present corporation. 

Mr. Simpson is a member of the Lynn Chamber of 
Commerce. In public matters he is deeply interested, 
and was an active member of the soliciting committee 
during the Liberty Loan drives. He is a member of 
Golden Fleece Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Lynn. 



FREDERICK W. KENNEDY was born at Pas- 
coag, Rhode Island, on October 29, 1870, and is a son 
of Frederick and Charlotte (Maher) Kennedy. His 
father was born in County Cork, Ireland, and died in 
Harrisville, Rhode Island, in 1909, aged about seventy- 
five years. He came to America with his wife and located 
in Rhode Island, where he was employed in the textile 
mills until his death. Mr. Kennedy's mother, who was 
also born in Ireland, is still liN-ing in Harrisville, Rhode 
Island. 

Frederick W. Kennedy received his early education in 
the public schools of Pascoag and after having completed 
his studies, obtained employment with William Tinkahn 
& Company, of Harrisville, Rhode Island, where he 
worked in the pattern department. He was steadily pro- 
moted by the management of the company until, when 
he finally left the service of the firm in 1910, he held the 
position of designer. In 191 1 he moved to Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, and entered the service of the United 
States Worsted Company. He has remained there ever 
since and at present holds the position of designer for 
that company. 

Mr. Kennedy is a Catholic, a member of Saint Patrick's 
Catholic Church at Lawrence. He is a member of the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Foresters of America, 
and of the Lawrence British Club. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

Mr. Kennedy married, in 1901, Estelle A. Mack, daugh- 
ter of James H. Mack, of Mapleville, Rhode Island. Mrs. 
Kennedy was born at Mapleville, on November 24, 1880. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have five children : Frederick J., 
Raymond E., Marion A., Ambrose J., and Justine M. 
Kennedy. 



GEORGE E. LANE— For thirty-three years, 1886- 
1919, George W. Lane was engaged in the retail coal' 
business in Salem. Massachusetts, having purchased, in 
1886, the business of Augustus T. Brooks, of Salem. 
From that year until 1900 he conducted it as the George 
W. Lane Company, but in the latter year he admitted 
his son, George E. Lane, as a partner, and they carried 
on the business under the firm name of George W. Lane 
& Son. George W. Lane passed away in March, 1919, 
at the great age of ninety, having been born January 5, 
1829, in Hampton, New Hampshire. From youth until 
1886 he was a resident of Hampton, but in that year he 
came to Salem, Massachusetts, where he was engaged as 
a retail coal dealer until his death. He married Mary F. 
Towle, of Hampton, New Hampshire, and they were the 
parents of George E. Lane, of further mention. 

George E. Lane was born in Hampton', New Hamp- 
shire, March 20, 1859, and there was educated in the 
public schools. After leaving school he went West, 
where he was engaged in mercantile life. He continued 
in that line until the year 1900, when he was admitted to 
a partnership in the retail coal business in Salem with his 
father, under the firm name of George W. Lane & Son. 
For nineteen years father and son continued in business, 
the son, however, carrying the heavier burden of man- 
agement, for the father was an old man, although an 



^62 



ESSEX COUNTY 



unusually active one for his years. Since the death of 
George W. Lane, in 1919, the son, George E. Lane, has 
conducted the business alone. 

George E. Lane is a member of the Masonic order and 
the Masonic Club of Salem ; member of the Salem 
Chamber of Commerce ; and attends the Methodist Epis- 
copal church of Salem. Mr. Lane married, in 1888, 
Cora A. Woodward, of Nebraska, and they are the 
parents of five children : Mary, married Charles A. 
Whipple, of Salem; George W. (2), married Beatrice 
Scarlett, of Salem; Sarah F., Leon W., and Lucille M. 
The family are attendants of the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Salem. 



WELLINGTON F. ROGERS— Born in Salem, 
Massachusetts, Mr. Rogers became a resident of Marble- 
head, Massachusetts, in 1897, and there has since resided, 
his position, chief engineer of the Marblehead Building 
Association. He is a son of Tristram and Martha 
(Woodman) Rogers, his father a shoe manufacturer, 
born in Byfield, Massachusetts, his mother born in 
Frankfort, Maine. Tristram and Martha (Woodman) 
Rogers were the parents of four children: Wellington 
F., of further mention ; Madeline, died in Providence, 
Rhode Island ; Everett Elmer, who also died in Provi- 
dence ; and Cora G., deceased. 

Wellington F. Rogers was born in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, June 8, 1856, but received his education in the 
public schools of Lynn, Massachusetts, where his father 
was engaged as a shoe manufacturer. After completing 
his school years, he became a machinist, been continuously 
in service on both land and sea. He is an expert 
machinist, and a competent engineer, his present engage- 
ment being with the Marblehead Building Association, a 
position he has held since 1897. 

During his youthful years of manhood Mr. Rogers 
served four years as a private of Company L National 
Guard, of Lynn, Massachusetts. He was chancellor 
commander of the Knights of Pythias, 1908-1919; com- 
mander of the Marblehead Post, Sons of Veterans, 1917- 
1921 ; and is a member of the Protestant Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. Rogers married, in Lynn, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 3, 1908, Mary E. Bailey, born in Woodstock, Ver- 
mont, May 2, 1865, daughter of John and Laura M. 
(Hathaway) Bailey, her parents born in Woodstock. 
Mrs. Laura M. (Hathaway) Bailey died in April, 1918. 



GEORGE EBEN NICHOLS— Born and educated 
in Marblehead, Massachusetts, George Eben Nichols has 
there continued a resident, choosing the business of under- 
taker, and conducting since 1906 a mortuary establish- 
ment under his own name. He comes from an old time- 
honored New England family, and is a son of Alfred M. 
and Sedelia E. M. (Leavitt) Nichols, his father a union 
veteran and member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

George Eben Nichols was born in Marblehead, Massa- 
chusetts, ,A.pril 24, 1879, and there educated in the public 
schools. He early became familiar with the undertaking 
business, and after deciding to make funeral direction his 
life-work, entered Massachusetts College of Embalming 
and mastered that branch of his business. In 1906 he 
established an undertaking establishment in Marblehead 
under his own name and has now conducted it for 



fifteen years. He ranks high as a funeral director, and 
has the distinction of being the oldest undertaker in the 
town. For three years he was a member of the Marble- 
head Board of Health ; is a member of the Board of 
Trade ; the Young Men's Christian Association, of which 
he is a director; the Masonic order; the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; Massachusetts Humane Society; 
old North Congregational Church ; the Marblehead His- 
torical Society; the Visiting Nurses Society and the 
Order of American Mechanics. 

Mr. Nichols married, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 19, 1907, Lucy Ellen Jefifrey, daughter of 
Augustus M. Jefltrey. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols are the 
parents of two children : George Jeffrey and Sabra 
Elkins. Mrs. Nichols died November 30, 1921. 



PHILIP L. HARDY, a general contractor of An- 
dover, Massachusetts, was born in that city, December 26, 
1890, and has attained his success within its confines. 
His father, Lewis T. Hardy, of Andover, was one of the 
leading citizens there during his day. He was also a 
contractor, chief of the fire department, a director in the 
Andover Savings Bank, and the Merrimac Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company. His death occurred in 1916, and his 
wife, Harriett R. (Abbott) Hardy, died the same year. 

The education of Philip L. Hardy was obtained in the 
public and high schools of Andover ; he graduated in 
1907 from the latter institution and then attended the 
Lowell Textile School. Subsequent to leaving school, 
Mr. Hardy was employed by L. E. Locke in the con- 
tracting business, and he was then associated with his 
father's company for two years, following which time he 
engaged in similar business for himself under the firm 
name of P. L. Hardy. He has been very successful in 
his undertaking and has a fine knowledge of the busi- 
ness. Although young in years, Mr. Hardy has been 
awarded several important contracts, and the manner in 
which he has carried out his agreements has enhanced the 
esteem in which he is held by his fellow business men. 
He has not only upheld the honorable name made by his 
father in the same line of business as a member of the 
firm of Hardy & Cole for thirty-five years, but he has 
further added to this honor. The senior firm was widely 
known throughout New England and the son is well on 
the road to duplicate its success. 

Mr. Hardy's fraternal connections are with the Masons 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; he is 
also a member of the Andover Oub, and with his wife 
attends the South Congregational Church. 

Mr. Hardy married, in 1916, Ann V. Gillen, daughter 
of James Gillen, of Andover, and they are the parents 
of a daughter, Helen R. Hardy, born in 1918. 



THOMAS H. BOLAND was born at Lowell, Mas- 
sachusetts, on April 10. 1892, and is a son of Peter J. 
and Catharine (Fleming) Boland. Mr. Boland's father 
was born in Ireland, and a blacksmith by trade ; he died 
in 1900. Catharine (Fleming) Boland was born in Eng- 
land. 

Mr. Boland received his early education in the public 
schools of Lowell and is a graduate of the evening high 
school of that city. He began his business career at 
George E. Maker's picture framing establishment at 
Lowell. After spending three years with Mr. Maker, he 








A.- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



363 



entered the Kimball System, of Lowell, and remained 
with his new associates for five years as a sign painter. 
He then decided to move to Haverhill, and upon arriving 
there, established his own business, the Essex Sign Com- 
pany. He continued to manage this business success- 
fully from 191 5, when he founded it, until November, 
1917, when he enlisted in the United States army. After 
his enlistment in the army, on November 16, 1917, Mr. 
Boland was assigned to Langley Field as a member of 
the 368th Aeroplane Squadron, where he remained until 
January 14, 1919, when he received his discharge from the 
service. 

When the period of his military service was over, Mr. 
Boland returned to Haverhill, and on November i, 1919, 
reopened his business, which he conducts under the old 
name of the Essex Sign Company, with ofiices at the rear 
of a lot on Merrimack street. In addition to his active 
work in the Essex Sign Company, Mr. Boland is the 
junior partner of Twombly & Boland, Funeral Directors, 
at No. 89 Main street, Bradford. Massachusetts. 

Mr. Boland married, in 1918, Mary Cronin, of Haver- 
hill, a daughter of James J. and Mary V. (Cummings) 
Cronin. Her father was born in Ireland, and is at pres- 
ent the proprietor of a grocery store at Haverhill ; her 
mother was born in Wales. Mr. and Mrs. Boland have 
one daughter, Mary V. Boland, who was born in 1920; 
she is named after her maternal grandmother. 



rence, and they have three children : Gertrude H., 
who married Perley Prescott, of Methuen, and has one 
child Arlene ; Mabel A., who married George C. Martin, 
of Lawrence; and Herbert, who is now in business with 
his father. 



HENRY C. GEBELEIN— The business of H. C. 
Gebelein & Son, plumbers and steam fitters, of Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, has been long established. Henry C. 
Gebelein is widely known in Lawrence, and has shown a 
helpful interest in public affairs. 

Mr. Gebelein was born in Bavaria, Germany, on No- 
vember 3, 1866, son of George and Marguerite (Benker) 
Gebelein. The father died in 1889, and the mother in 
1895. They were the parents of seven children, four sons 
and three daughters, Henry C. being the third child. The 
latter was fifteen years old when he came to America, 
joining a brother already located in Somerville, Massa- 
chusetts. His schooling was obtained principally in 
Germany, and after coming to this country he attended 
night school to master the English language. After set- 
tling in Boston, Massachusetts, he found work with the 
Aiken Company. Later he was employed by Block 
Brothers, at Harvard Square, but in 1887 he came to 
Lawrence. Massachusetts, and became connected with 
John F. Bingham. Later he worked for T. P. Smart, 
remaining in his employ for fifteen years, until 1904, when 
he decided to enter into business for himself, in plumbing, 
steam fitting, heating and kindred lines. He first located 
at No. 666 Broadway, a year later removHng to No. 35 
Newberry street, which has ever since been his place of 
business. The firm of H. C. Gebelein & Son has a good 
reputation in the Lawrence district, its work being relia- 
ble. 

At one time Mr. Gebelein took active part in civic 
afTairs. He was for two years, 1906 and 1907, a Demo- 
cratic member of the City Council, and in other ways 
was energetic in affairs of the place. He is a member 
of the Loyal Order of Moose, the German Sick Benevo- 
lent societies, the Schiller-Friehart Lodge, the Bavarian 
Reading and Progressive Society, and Central Hall. 

Mr. Gebelein married, in 1889, Lena Hebsch, of Law- 



CHARLES LESTER WESTON is a native of 

Lynn, Massachusetts, and has spent practically his whole 
life in the city, and while he has been connected with the 
paper-box manufacturing industry ever since leaving 
school, he has only been in business for himself for about 
two years ; nevertheless, he is now at the head of a busi- 
ness which finds constant employment for about thirty- 
five people of Lynn. 

Charles L. Weston was born on October 4, 1888, son 
of Charles Oliver and Lalia (Bohaker) Weston. Both 
of his parents are still living, his father being a native 
of Lynn, and his mother of Nova Scotia. His father 
has been responsibly connected with the Massachusetts 
shoe industry for the greater part of his life. 

Mr. Weston was educated in the public schools of his 
native place, passing eventually through the Lynn High 
School. After graduating therefrom, he took a com- 
mercial course at the Burdette Business College, Boston. 
His first employers were Littlefield & Moulton, makers 
of paper boxes. With that firm he remained for four- 
teen years, during which time he gained comprehensive 
knowledge of the paper business. Latterly, he had charge 
of the company's paper room. He severed his connection 
with Littlefield & Moulton in December, 1919, and im- 
mediately thereafter he opened in business for himself, in 
the same line, establishing the Lynn Paper Box Com- 
pany. His place of business was at No. 503 Eastern 
avenue, Lynn, his plant at the outset finding barely 
enough work to keep three men busy, but it now finds 
steady employment for thirty-five people. Enlargement 
after enlargement has been necessary, and now the com- 
pany uses the whole of the available 5,000 feet of floor 
space. Mr. Weston is an expert in paper boxes, and 
quality and good workmanship are in his estimation the 
first essentials of a healthy business. His business has 
consequently expanded well during the short time he has 
directed its operations. Mr. Weston is a member of the 
local Blue Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and of the 
Swampscott Masonic Gub. 

Mr. Weston married, in 191 1, Bertha May Gourley, of 
Lynn, daughter of Prescott and Arphia Gourley, of Nova 
Scotia. They have two children : Prescott Lester, born 
in 1912; and Roger Oliver, born in 1918. 



LOUIS H. McALOON— As a contractor and 
builder, Louis H. McAIoon of North Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, has developed a business which reaches into 
various cities and towns of Essex county. His life- 
story is of interest in this connection. He was born in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, March 8, 1875, and is a son 
of Owen and Margaret (Daw) McAloon. Owen Mc- 
AIoon was born in Ireland, and came to America in his 
youth. He located in Lawrence, and became a prominent 
painting contractor there. The mother was from North 
Andover. 

Attending the public schools of Lawrence until he was 
fifteen years of age, Louis H. McAloon came to North 
Andover in 1890, and here learned the carpenter's trade. 



364 



ESSEX COUNTY 



He early began taking building contracts on his own 
responsibility, and has made a noteworthy success in this 
branch of business activity. Factories, public buildings, 
residences, and particularly country homes, are all in- 
cluded in the range of work he handles. In 1916 he 
built the Essex County Agricultural School ; and other 
school buildings, including the Edwards School, in Bev- 
erly, the John Breen School and the Oliver School, in 
Lawrence, and the Essex County Training School, the 
elementary school in that city. One of the public build- 
ings in North Andover which he built is the North 
Andover Fire Station. For the past eight years Mr. Mc- 
Aloon has been an engineer of the North Andover Fire 
Department, and from 1915 to 1920, was chief of the 
fire department. During his tenure of this office, he 
installed complete motor equipment. Mr. McAloon has 
always been active in public affairs, always working for 
the permanent good and constant progress of the com- 
munity. 

In 1903 Mr. McAIoon married Hannah Sullivan, 
daughter of Timothy Sullivan, of North Andover, and 
they have six children : Gertrude, Louis, Jr., Eileen, Wil- 
liam, Mary and Vincent. 



LEON O. ROSS— One of the most hustling and up- 
to-date leaders of the younger business generation of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, is Leon O. Ross, who in 1921 
was engaged in manufacturing modern heels for shoes. 
His grandfather, James Cranshaw, a Massachusetts man, 
was a veteran of the Civil War. He served in the Mas- 
sachusetts Cavalry Troop all through the years of strife, 
although at one time he was severely wounded. His 
father, Charles O. Ross, a native of Newburyport, bom 
in 1863, was one of the leading contractors and builders 
in Haverhill. 

Leon O. Ross was bom in Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
May II, 1886. His education began in the public schools 
and after completing the grammar grades he attended 
Haverhill High School, graduating in 1906. Forseeing 
his tastes in business and wishing to secure a proper edu- 
cation for the satisfying of them, he spent two years 
of study in the Haverhill Business College faking a com- 
mercial course. Soon after leaving business college he 
joined his father in the contracting and building trade in 
Haverhill, under the firm name of Charles O. Ross & 
Sons, contractors and builders. During the five years 
he remained in this firm he saw many of Haverhill's 
homes and business buildings erected, and is justly proud 
of his share in their construction. In 1913 he reached 
out after something more individual and, associating 
himself with Sidney C. Baker, became an important 
manufacturer of wooden heels. In the Wood Heel Man- 
ufacturers' Association to which he belongs, he is on the 
membership committee which passes on all applicants for 
admittance to that body. Politically he holds to Repub- 
lican principles and policies. He is one of the Haverhill 
Chamber of Commerce which has aided so much in the 
progress of that city, and is an active attendant of the 
services of the Congregational church. 



Andover Steam Laundry, and treasurer of the Welch 
Company, Inc., holds a position of well-deserved promi- 
nence among the business men of Andover. 

Mr. Rand was born at North Andover, Massachusetts, 
November 24. 1884, son of Joseph A, Rand, of New 
Hampshire, during his active life an overseer in the 
mills there, and Jennie (Craig) Rand, of Andover. 

Mr. Rand's education was obtained in the public 
schools, and his first position in business was as a clerk 
in a meat and provision store. After four years he 
worked for another firm along the same line and then 
spent six years as a private chauffeur. Removing to 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Mr. Rand returned to his 
original occupation, except that he engaged in business 
for himself, but after two and one-half years he returned 
to Andover and there purchased the ownership and sole 
interests of the Andover Steam Laundry Company, 
which he has successfully managed to the present time. 

Mr. Rand is one of the public-spirited men of Andover 
and is keenly interested in all that pertains to the gen- 
eral welfare. 

Mr. Rand is a member of the Andover Club ; St. 
Matthew's Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; Massa- 
chusetts Consistory ; Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and Andover Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On April 14, 1914, Mr. Rand married Nellie F. Flint, 
of Andover, and they are the parents of two sons : John 
Appleton, born in 1915; and Abbott Flint, torn in 19:8. 
With his family he attends and aids in the support of 
the Episcopal church of Andover. 



JOSEPH A. RAND— When a man attains success 
early in life it proves that the qualities of ambition and 
ability are well blended in his character. Although not 
yet forty years of age, Joseph A. Rand, owner of the 



WILBUR L. SENECHAI^Well known in Ames- 
bury, where he has been in independent business since 
1914, Wilbur L. Senechal, electrical contractor, has 
found employment in Amesbury ever since he left school. 

He was born in Augusta, Maine, October 11, 1883, son 
of Louis and Mary (Carons) Senechal. He comes of 
a French family, which in later generations became 
French-Canadian. His father, Louis Senechal, was born 
in Fraserville, Canada, but eventually came into the 
United States. He was a mill operative for the greater 
part of his life. The mother of Mr. Senechal of Ames- 
bury was also of Canadian birth, torn in St. Josephs. 

Wilbur L. Senechal was educated in the public schools 
of Augusta and Lewiston, Maine, and took a collegiate 
course at the St. Joseph's Institute, Troy, New York. 
His first employers were the Gray & Davis Company, of 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, with which company he re- 
mained for four years. For six years thereafter, he was 
an employee of the Walker-Wells Company, of Ames- 
bury, leaving their employ to enter into business for him- 
self in Amesbury, as an electrical contractor. That was 
in 1914, and since that year he has had quite a satisfac- 
tory business, and soon became well established. Need- 
less to say he is well known in the vicinity of Amesbury. 
Fraternally he belongs to the St. Jean de Baptist organ- 
ization. He is also a member of the Lafayette Natural- 
ization Club, and, being a Catholic, he is a helpful mem- 
ber of the Sacred Heart Church of Amesbury. 

In 1912, Mr. Senechal married Aurora Plante, who 
was born in Amesbury in 1884, but whose descent is also 
French-Canadian. Her father, Fabian Plante, was born 
in Montreal, Canada; her mother, Amanda (Quay) 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



36s 



Plante in Quebec, Canada. Mr. Plante was a wood- 
worker and died in igii. Mr. and Mrs. Senechal have 
six children : Louis Wilbur, Raymond Wilbur, Leo Hec- 
tor, .'Mbert Joseph, Robert Alphonse and Irene Frances. 



JOSEPH SHERLOCK, one of the representative 
business men of Methuen, Massachusetts, is a native of 
Chester, England. He was born at Dukinfield, October 
21, 1880, the son of William Sherlock, a wool-comber, 
and Elizabeth (Mannifield) Sherlock, both natives of 
England. They came to .America with their family in 
1884 and located in Lawrence, where the father was 
employed in the mills until about the time of his death, 
which occurred in January, 1921. 

Mr. Sherlock attended the public schools of Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, and at an early age went to work in the 
worsted mills in Lawrence. He spent some time in all 
of the departments, from carding to spinning, and mas- 
tered each detail as he went along. 

In 1900 Mr. Sherlock learned the trade of operating 
the machines used in the manufacture of clothing at the 
plant of the Methuen Napper Clothing Company, then 
owned by Edward Whittaker. After three or four years 
he became foreman and continued in that position until 
the death of Mr. Whittaker in 1913, when he became 
manager of the business and two years later he bought 
it. The product goes to all mills manufacturing napped 
fabrics, such as cotton flannels, blankets, and coatings. 

Mr. Sherlock is a Republican, and although not an 
office seeker, takes a keen interest in the welfare of 
Methuen. He has many fraternal connections, being a 
member of John Hancock Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons of Methuen, of which he is past master, and he 
is now (1922) president of the Past Masters' Association 
of the Eleventh Masonic District ; member of Mt. Sinai 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Lawrence; Lawrence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; Bethany Command- 
ery, Knights Templar ; Massachusetts Consistory, of 
Boston ; and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of 
Hope Lodge. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Methuen. His clubs are the Methuen, and the Merrimac 
Valley Country. 

Mr. Sherlock married, March 29, 1905. Elizabeth A. 
Whittaker, daughter of Edward and Eliza (Knowles) 
Whittaker. Mrs. Sherlock was born in Germany, April 
2, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Sherlock are the parents of the 
following children : Joseph W., born August 23, 1906 ; 
Howard W., born July 12, 1912; Dorothy E., born Octo- 
ber 6, 1914; and Donald E., born May 17, 1917. The 
family attend and aid in the support of the Congrega- 
tional church of Methuen, 



HARRY W. STEERE^— The Steere family is well 
known in Amesbury. Harry W. Steere, who for more 
than twenty years has been connected with the Charles 
Wing Company, was born in the place, and his father 
has spent most of his business life in .\mesbury. 
I Harry W. Steere was born July 8, 1876, and received 

■ the greater part of his academic education in Amesbury 
public schools, attending the high school eventually. 
Later, he was a student at the Mitchell's Boys' School at 
Billerica, Massachusetts. His parents, Marquis D. F. 
and Anna E. (Wing) S'eere, have been well regarded 



Ainesbury residents for very many years. The mother 
was born in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, but the father was 
born in Pascoag, Rhode Island. For the greater part of 
his life he was agent in Amesbury for the Hamilton 
Mills Company, and they reared their children in Ames- 
bury. Their son, Harry W., after leaving school entered 
the employ of the Charles Wing Company of -Amesbury, 
the ow^ners of which company were members of his 
mother's family. He has ever since been loyal to them, 
and for the greater part of his connection with them has 
been in responsible office. At present he is secretary of 
the corporation, and one of the department heads. 

Mr. Steere has manifested almost equal constancy in 
his public service. For twenty-eight years he has been 
actively connected with the fire department of Amesbury, 
and for the last eighteen years has been its assistant 
chief. Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally 
is a Mason, member of the Warren and Powow River 
lodges of that order. He is a member of the Orthodox 
church of Amesbury. In his life record is one term of 
military service ; for one enlistment period he was a 
luember of Company B, Eighth Regiment, Massachu- 
setts State Militia. 

Mr. Steere was married, in 1902, to Maria C. Peter- 
son, of Swedish birth, born in 1875. They have five 
children: Harry W., Jr., Carl W., Anna L., Edith R. 
and Syrama S. 



BERNARD A. McLEAN— Although he has only 
been in Amesbury for a few years, Bernard A. McLean 
has gone ahead among the capable business men of the 
place. He is manager of a very busy store and a director 
of the local chamber of commerce. 

Bernard A. McLean was born in Everett, Massachu- 
setts, September 9, 1888, son of Frank A. and Annie 
(Hanley) McLean, who were both born in Sidney, Cape 
Breton, Canada, the father, Christmas Day, 1866, and 
the mother, March 27, 1868. The family later came into 
Massachusetts, and for many years Frank A. McLean 
was engaged in the contracting business in Maiden, of 
that State. His business, however, was in many other 
cities also, and Bernard A., born in Everett, spent part 
of his boyhood in Charlestown, Massachusetts. \t dif- 
ferent times he attended the public schools of both 
places. When his schooldays were finally at an end he 
found his first employment with the Loose Wiles Biscuit 
Company, at Chelsea, Massachusetts, working for the 
greater part of the time as shipping clerk. He was, 
however, an enterprising young man of good address and 
much confidence, and for si.x years after leaving the bis- 
cuit company was a salesman for the Lorillard Tobacco 
Company, leaving that work eventually to accept the 
management of the Chelsea business of the Charles Dryer 
Company of that place. Three years later he became 
connected with the nationally-known Frank W. Wool- 
worth Company. He was sent to Amesbury in 1918. and 
since that time has been manager of the Amesbury store 
of the Woolworth Company. The multitudinous variety 
and the great volume of sales, that must necessarily come 
to bring success in a business of that class, call for man- 
aging qualities of high order. Such qualities Mr. McLean 
obviously must possess. 

While giving every required attention to his own busi- 
ness responsibilities, Mr. McLean is quite active in the 



366 



ESSEX COUNTY 



functioning of the Amesbury Chamber of Commerce, and 
is rapidly increasing his acquaintanceship with the busi- 
ness people of the place. In ijolitics he is non-partisan, 
and seems to belong to no fraternal orders. However, 
he is a consistent Catholic, and a member of St. Joseph's 
Catholic Church of Amesbury. 

Mr. Mcl^ean was married, in 1908, to Susan Mildred 
McHatton, who was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, 
February 22, 1888. They have four children : Charles 
B., born October 9, 1909; Leo F., born June 7, 1913; 
Bernardette, born July 8, 1917; and Helen Reta, born 
March 8, 1919. 



In 1903 Mr. Peltier was married to Cora Eva Herbert, 
who was born in Amesbury, October 25, 1883. They 
have si.x children : Mildred M., Dorothy H., Arline Rose, 
Roland, Norman and Lucille. 



ARTHUR J. PELTIER— One of the largest and 
most up-to-date grocery and provision markets in the 
Amesbury district is that of Arthur J. Peltier. The 
name is well known in that town, for Mr. Peltier has 
been connected with business there, in one connection or 
another, almost since he left school, and his father was 
for very many years in business in Amesbury, as a 
grocery and provision merchant. 

Arthur J. Peltier was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
December S. 1882, son of Simeon and Caroline (Hill) 
Peltier. Both of his parents were born in Canada, and 
his paternal descent is French-Canadian. His father was 
born October 5, 1858, and with his wife eventually came 
into the United States, ultimately settling in Amesbury, 
where his wife died in igo8. Their son, Arthur J., was 
in infancy when the family came to Amesbury, and the 
whole of his schooling was obtained in St. Joseph's 
Parochial School of Amesbury. After leaving school he 
began his business career by associating with his father 
for five years in the latter's grocery and provision busi- 
ness in Amesbury. At the end of that time he felt that 
he was capable of entering into business for himself in 
the same line. For two years he maintained a store of 
his own, but gave it up when he felt that there would be 
better results accruing from time given to another line. 
He became connected with the Scott Grain Company of 
Amesbury, but a year later was identified with the 
Healey Laundry Company. Within a year he was with 
the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, and actively 
followed the life insurance business for two and a half 
years. Next he was in the employ of Ernest Woodman, 
meat and provision merchant, the connection lasting 
about a year. Then followed a brief period of inde- 
pendent business, in confectionery, but he gave that up to 
work for Burbank's Market. He was with that firm for 
two and a half years, which brings his life story to 1913, 
when he again ventured into business for himself in his 
original line, groceries and provisions. Ever since he 
has conducted that business, which has, since 1913, 
grown to considerable dimensions. He now employs five 
assistants in his market, and is stated to have the best 
business in that line in Amesbury. Mr. Peltier has cer- 
tainly shown himself to be a man of versatility, and has 
finally reached good success. 

He is a member and director of the Amesbury Cham- 
ber of Commerce, is a Republican in politics, belongs to 
the Lafayette Club of Amesbury, and to the following 
named fraternal orders : St. Jean de Baptist, Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and Knights of Columbus, of 
Amesbury. He is a member of the Sacred Heart Cath- 
olic Church of Amesbury. 



WILLIAM SHERIDAN ROGERS, the efficient 
and respected chief of police of Amesbury, was born in 
Brovvnville, Maine, October 5, 1865, son of William S. 
and Mary Elizabeth (Hobbs) Rogers, both of whom 
were natives of Brownville, Maine, the former born there 
in 1828, and the latter in 1837. William S. Rogers, Sr., 
died in 1902, but his widow is still living, being now 
(1921) eighty-four years old. Her husband, in civil life, 
was a mason by trade, but he had a fine Civil War 
record, being a veteran of that war. He served for three 
years with the First Maine Cavalry, being a private of 
Company B. Later he was a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, registered in the Milo, Maine, post. 

William S. Rogers, the son, was educated in the public 
schools of Brownville, Maine, passing eventually 
through the high school. For fifteen years thereafter he 
remained near home, engaging in farming and lumbering. 
But at the end of that period he came to Boston, and for 
the next twelve months was in the employ of the Hough- 
ton & Dutton Company. Coming to Amesbury, he next 
served the Boston & Maine Railroad Company for six 
years, residing in Amesbury. Then followed a period 
of service to local carriage builders. In 1903, however, 
Rogers became a member of the police force of Ames- 
bury. Four years later, he resigned from the Amesbury 
force to accept appointment as chief of police in Salis- 
bury, Massachusetts. A year later he returned to 
Amesbury and resumed his connection with the local 
police force. For eight years he did regular duty as 
patrolman, and in 1016 became chief of police. He has 
since held that office, to his credit, the police force having 
become an efficient body under his direction. Politically, 
Chief of Police Rogers is a Republican; fraternally he 
belongs to the Elks, of Newburyport, and to the ."Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He is a member of the 
Universalis! church of .Amesbury. 

He has been married twice. In 1899 he was married 
to Margaret Lynch, of Amesbury, Massachusetts. She 
died in 1906, and three years later Mr. Rogers married 
Josie Lynch, also of Amesbury. Two children were born 
to the first wife: Bernice M. and William S. To his 
second wife, six children have been txjrn : Gilbert, Paul- 
ine A., Russell R., Frank A., Virginia M. and Elinore A. 



VAUGHN ULMONT AIKEN, milk dealer of Mer- 
rimac, Massachusetts, was born in Barnstead, New 
Hampshire, October 4, 1893, son of David L. and Annie 
(Francis) Aiken, both of New Hamp.shire families, the 
former of Barnstead and the latter of Concord, later of 
Merrimac, Massachusetts. David L. Aiken followed 
carpentry for the greater part of his adult years. The 
family home was in Barnstead, New Hampshire, and 
there the son, Vaughn U., went to school. He passed 
through the public schools, and for some years there- 
after worked in his native place. For four years he was 
a teamster, or to be more correct a teaming contractor, 
for he was in business for himself. Later he came to 
Haverhill, and for about a year worked in the factory of 
the George B. Leavitt Shoe Company, of that place. A 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



367 



further three years he spent with the Ruddock Shoe 
Company, and then went into business as a dealer in milk 
and dairy products in Merrimac. trading under his own 
name. He has developed an extensive business, deliver- 
ing about four hundred quarts of milk a day, and having 
a large cream business in addition. Trading in other 
dairy products also tends to make his total turnover a 
worth-while one. He is, it is said, the largest dealer in 
milk and cream on the Merrimac side of Haverhill. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Aiken belongs to local lodges of the Odd 
Fellows and American Mechanic orders. Socially, he is 
a member of the Oxford Club, of Merrimac. Religiously, 
he is a Congregationalist, attending the Merrimac church 
of that denomination. 

He was married, in 1915. to Alice E. Purdy, of Ames- 
bury, Massachusetts, daughter of Austin and Mary Etta 
(Foss) Purdy. Her father was originally of Nova 
Scotia, and later of Haverhill, where he now lives and 
follows the trade of baker. The mother of Mrs. Aiken, 
however, belongs to an Amesbury family. 

Many generation of the Aiken family will be found in 
the vital records of New Hampshire. Jacob Aiken, 
grandfather of Vaughn U., was born in Barnstead. that 
State, where he was a cooper almost to his death, which 
occurred in 1903, three years after the death of his wife, 
Abbie, who also was a native of Barnstead. 



JOHN J. GRIFFIN, ex-serviceman, a veteran of 
Chateau-Thierry and other major battles of the World 
War, and now in business in Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
one of the owners of the Locust Garage business, on 
Locust street, was born in Webster, Massachusetts, June 
2, 1887, the son of John P. and Catherine (Farrell) 
Griffin, both of Webster, where the former was engaged 
in the textile business. John J., however, was only three 
years old when his mother died. In his boyhood he at- 
tended the St. Louis Parochial School, at Webster, Mas- 
sachusetts, and also became a graduate of the high school. 
After leaving school he entered the employ of the A. J. 
Bates Shoe Company, of Webster, Massachusetts, and 
there remained for the next six years, when he went to 
Lawrence. Massachusetts, to enter the employ of the 
Kimball Shoe Company, which company he served for 
ten years, there being a break in the service, however, as 
in 1917 he had to cast aside personal affairs and enlist in 
the armed forces of the nation then at war with Ger- 
many. Mr. Griffin enlisted in the artillery, and was 
assigned to Headquarters Company, 102nd Artillery, of 
the famous Twenty-sixth Division, the New England 
Division. His regiment was in some of the hardest 
fighting in which American troops engaged, and many 
battle clasps are above Griffin's war medal. He was 
present in the following major battles of the war : Toul- 
Verdun ; second battle of the Marne; Argonne; and 
Chateau-Thierry. He was honorably discharged with 
the rank of corporal, on April 29, 1919, after which he 
again took up his civil connection with the Kimball Shoe 
Company. In 1921 he left their employ to enter into 
business for himself. For that purpose he associated 
with Harry W. Robertson, of Haverhill, and the two 
now conduct the Locust Garage, at Haverhill. 

Mr. Griffin is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce, and fraternally is affiliated with the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, a member of a Lawrence, Massachusetts, 



eyrie. He also is a member of St. Lawrence Roman 
Catholic Church, Lawrence, Massachusetts. He is un- 
married. . 

HARRY WILLIAM ROBERTSON, part owner 

of the Locust Garage, Locust street, Haverhill, is a native 
of Haverhill though he has spent most of his life in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. He was born in Haverhill, 
August 29, 1890, son of Andrew G. and Eta A. Robert- 
son, the former originally of New York, and the latter 
of a Haverhill family. Andrew G. Robertson was a 
musician by profession, and the family settled at Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, where Harry W. attended school. 
He passed through the grammar and high schools of that 
city, and also took a commercial course at the Lawrence 
Commercial School. Thus equipped for a business life, 
he entered the employ of the Pacific Mills Company, 
Lawrence. In the capacity of bookkeeper in the dye 
works department he remained with that company for 
about a year, then found a better appointment with the 
George A. Home Company, also of Lawrence, which 
firm he served for two years. He next entered the 
employ of the A. J. Wills Motor Car Company, serving 
that company until 1921, when he decided to venture into 
business for himself. He associated with John J. Griffin, 
and the two, as partners, established the Locust Garage, 
on Locust street, Haverhill. The garage has floor 
space of three thousand five hundred square feet, and 
finds employment for seven men, doing general automo- 
bile repair work, but specializing on Hudson and Essex 
cars. Both partners are enterprising active men, both 
are members of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, 
and belong to the Eagles fraternity. Mr. Robertson in 
religious faith is an Episcopalian, and is a member of 
the Episcopal church of Haverhill. 

He was married in 1914 to Mary May Foley, of 
Rougshaw, New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada. 



LEONARD A. TILTON was born in Groveland, 
Massachusetts, June 30, 1873, son of Newton N. 
and Harriet L. (Carlton) Tilton, the former being 
engaged as a foreman in the shoe industry the greater 
part of his active life, and both being natives of Grove- 
land. Young Tilton was educated in the schools of 
Groveland, and after leaving the high school went to 
work for J. H. Thompson of Haverhill, as a clerk. 
After three years he resigned and entered the employ of 
the Haverhill, Georgetown & Danvers Railroad Com- 
pany where he remained for ten years, then becoming 
associated with the Dole & Childs Undertaking Firm 
where he remained until 1919 when he engaged in busi- 
ness on his own account under the name of Leonard A. 
Tilton, embalmcr and funeral director. He is a member 
of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce. 

Fraternally he is a member of Sagahew Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons ; Oriental Lodge of Perfection, 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite; Merrimac Council, No. 
9. Junior Order of United American Mechanics; Pales- 
tine Lodge, No. 26, Waldemar Council Uniform Rank 
Knights of Pythias ; and Mutual Relief Lodge. No. 83, 
Haverhill Encampment, No. 78, and Canton Eagle, No. 
40, Patriarchs Militant, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

In 1903, he married Lillian Spry, of Haverhill, and they 
attend the Trinity Episcopal Church of Groveland. 



368 



ESSEX COUNTY 



HAROLD E. MILLER, of Haverhill, a young man 
who is making good in the Massachusetts shoe industry 
and now probably the youngest responsible executive of 
an important plant in the Haverhill district, was born in 
Lynn, Massachusetts, June 15, 1897, son of Alfred K. 
and Mary L. (Loughlin) Miller, the latter of a Con- 
necticut family. His father was born in 1866, and for 
many years has been a grocer in Lynn. Harold E. 
Miller of Haverhill has one younger sister, Grace F. 

Mr. Miller in boyhood attended the Lynn schools, 
taking a course also in the Pickering Grammar School 
at that place, and was prepared for commercial affairs at 
the Burdette Business School. For nine years after 
leaving school he was in the employ of the T. W. 
Gardiner Company of Lynn, having office and production 
responsibilities ; then followed eighteen months with the 
United Last Company, Boston. In 1921 he came to 
Haverhill to become manager in the Haverhill plant, 
which is the largest in its line in the Haverhill district, 
and is a branch of the United Last Company. The 
Haverhill plant finds employment for seventy-five per- 
sons, has 30,000 square feet of floor space, and a capacity 
production of one thousand pairs a day. 

Fraternally, Mr. Miller belongs to the Order of Red 
Men, being a member of lodge No. 82, of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts. He is a Baptist. Mr. Miller is an ex-service 
man, having enlisted in the United States Army during 
the World War. He was assigned to the One Hundred 
and Fiftieth Heavy Artillery Battery, and stationed at 
Portland, Maine. He was discharged with a certificate 
of honorable discharge, December 24, 1918. 

A few months prior to that, September 9, 1918, he was 
married, at Lynn, Massachusetts, to Florence L. Kenison, 
born in Bridgeton, Maine, in 1895, daughter of William 
Kenison, a millwright at Lynn. 



PERRY E. ELLIOTT, owner of one of the best 
supply houses in the Haverhill district, in plumbing, 
steam-fitting, heating, and sheet metal work lines, was 
born February 13, 1857, in Nova Scotia, the son of 
Isaac A. and Mary (Bowlby) Elliott, the former a farmer 
in that part of the Dominion of Canada. 

Mr. Elliott spent his boyhood in his home town, at- 
tended the local schools, and when his schooldays were 
over he assisted his father in the working of the paren- 
tal farm. He was twenty-four years old when, in 1881, 
he came to Haverhill, Massachusetts. He farmed in, 
or near, Haverhill for six years, and after spending an- 
otlier year in a shoe factory, entered the steam fitting 
business, which was his business for more than thirty 
years. He became established independently in a plumb- 
ing and steam fitting business in 1909, his first store and 
workshop being on Merrimac street, Haverhill. Five 
years later, he removed to West street, and six years 
later, in 1919, to Emerson street, Haverhill. The busi- 
ness has been satisfactorily developed, and he has car- 
ried through some important heating and plumbing con- 
tracts. In September, 1921, he sold his business to his 
nephew, C. McNeily, and bought a controlling interest 
in the Sayward Hardware Company, on Washington 
street, Haverhill. He is well known throughout Essex 
county and has a good share of the county trade in his 
line. Fraternally, he is a Mason, belonging to the 



local chapter. He is also a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, and of the Centre Church 
of Haverhill. 

In 1890, he was married to Josephine H. Miller, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Hannah (Peary) Miller, of Yarmouth, 
Nova Scotia. They have two children: Lowell A. and 
Glendon M. Lowell A. is a veteran of the World War, 
having served in Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland, during 
the war. He received a commission, and at present 
holds the grade of first lieutenant in the United States 
Army. Glendon M. is now at Dartmouth College, Han- 
over, New Hampshire. 



JAMES B. EWART, a well-known and active resi- 
dent of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and actively engaged in 
real estate and insurance business in that city as well as 
in its public affairs, was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, 
March 4, 1868, the son of John and Sarah J. (Bailey) 
Ewart. John Ewart was born in Manchester, England, 
of Scottish parents, and was for many years in the 
employ of the Boston and Maine railroad, indeed, until 
his death in 1916, which occurred at the age of seventy- 
four. His mother was of a Lawrence family, daughter 
of John Bailey, who was roadmaster at the time the 
railroad was built into Lawrence, and had the distinction 
recently of completing fifty years of continuous service 
with the Boston & Maine Railroad Company. 

James B. Ewart was educated in Lawrence schools, 
attending the elementary and high schools. Soon, there- 
after, he became an employee of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company, and served them for seven years. 
Then, in 1891, he became a clerk in the Essex Savings 
Bank of Lawrence. With that bank he remained con- 
nected until 191 1, for the greater part of the time as 
teller. He left the banking profession to enter into busi- 
ness for himself, in the lines of real estate and insurance, 
and that business he has ever since conducted. 

Mr. Ewart has evidently entered very definitely into 
public afifairs of Lawrence, so much is evident by the 
responsibilities placed upon his shoulders during the 
stress of the World War period. He was chairman of 
the North Andover committees for the last three Liberty 
Loan drives, and is at present chairman of the Building 
Committee of the North Andover War Memorial. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the local lodges of the 
Knights of Pythias and the Royal Arcanum. 

His community interest is perhaps best indicated by 
his choral record. He has followed elevating musical 
effort in Lawrence for more than a generation, and has 
studied music with some of Boston's leading teachers. 
When he was twelve years old he began singing in church 
choirs, and sang continuously until January, 1921. He 
has a fine tenor voice. For nearly eighteen years he was 
musical director of choirs. In fact, he has just com- 
pleted forty years of service in various church choirs of 
Lawrence and Haverhill, and for many years has been 
a member of the Lawrence Street Congregational 
Church choir, of Lawrence. And during those many 
years of choral association he has participated in many 
of the principal musical events of the community. He 
has been a member of the Chadwick Club, a Lawrence 
musical organization, for more than a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Ewart married, in 1894, Editli M. Dame, of Law- 



r THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, I-ET40X 

I TILDEN FOUNDATIONS I 





<^><5^-rr-2^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



369 



rence, daughter of B. F. Dame, former principal of the 
Oliver Grammar School, of Lawrence. They have one 
child, a son, Raymond J., who married Dorothy Deering, 
of Biddeford, Maine; he is now associated with his 
father in business. 



WILLIAM GARNET DODGE— With life experi- 
ence in shoe production, William G. Dodge, of Newbury- 
port, Massachusetts, is treasurer and general manager of 
the Nathan D. Dodge Shoe Company. He is a son of 
Nathan Dane and Matilda (Hinsdale) Dodge. The 
elder Mr. Dodge began the manufacture of shoes in 
Newbury port in 1866, and long since attained a point 
where his product was recognized the world over as one 
of superior quality. Nathan D. Dodge died in California 
in 1915. He was long prominent in both the business and 
social life of the city, and has the distinction of having 
laid the corner stone of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation building, and having been the first president of 
that organization in Newburyport. He also served the 
city as alderman, and was a bank director. 

William G. Dodge was born in Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts, August 14, 1882, and received his education in 
the public and high schools of this city. At the age of 
seventeen years he entered his father's shoe factory, and 
worked at all the different operations in the manufacture 
of shoes. At the age of twenty-one years he struck out 
for himself, and going to Fitchburg, Massachusetts, be- 
came associated with E. AI. Dickerson, of that city, as 
superintendent of their shoe factory. He remained at 
this plant for four years, then went to the Dunn & 
McCarthy plant, at Auburn, New York, where he con- 
tinued for one year in the capacity of production manager. 
Thereafter he returned to Newburyport, and started in 
business for himself. Beginning entirely alone, he cut 
shoes himself, sent them out to be stitched, then had them 
made at Seabrook, New Hampshire, finishing, packing 
and shipping personally. After working thus for a few 
months on small capital, Mr. Dodge's father, on Janu- 
ary I, 1908, entered into cooperation with him under the 
name of Nathan D. Dodge & Son, the name later being 
changed to the Nathan D. Dodge Shoe Company. Fully 
appreciating the value of his father's reputation in the 
shoe world, the younger Mr. Dodge took advantage of 
the use of the old name, and adopted it for the corpora- 
tion of the Nathan D. Dodge Shoe Company. For a 
few years William G. Dodge sold the entire product of 
the company, holding the position of treasurer and gen- 
eral manager. The business has grown to a very large 
interest, is capitalized at $500,000, and in the year 1020 
the concern did business amounting to $2,000,000. The 
output consists of turned low shoes only, in ladies' styles, 
and the plant is conceded to be the largest in the United 
States devoted exclusively to this branch of shoe manu- 
facture. 

The Dodge family, which is one of the oldest in Essex 
county, has always been prominent in social and public 
activities. William G. Dodge is a trustee of the New- 
buryport Five Cent Savings Bank, and is also a trustee 
of the Anna Jacques Hospital. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of St. John's Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
King Cyrus Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and of New- 
buryport Commandery, No. 3, Knights Templar; and of 

Essex — 2 — 24 



Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the Dalton Club, and 
of the Old Newburyport Golf Qub, and president of 
the Young Men's Christian Association. He is a trustee 
of the Central Congregational Church of Newburyport, 
and sings in the choir of the church. He was elected the 
first president of the newly-organized Newburyport 
Chamber of Commerce, and to the City Council in 1922. 
On June 22, 1915, Air. Dodge married Ellen D. Bryan, 
a sister of William T. Bryan, a prominent retail shoe 
dealer of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dodge are the parents of three sons: William G., Jr., 
born January 5, 1917, died two days later; William R., 
born January 22, 1918; and James Dane, born October 
12, 1921. 



MICHAEL J. O'BRIEN, a prominent shoe mer- 
chant of Amesbury, Massachusetts, was born in that 
town November 24, 1873, son of Michael O'Brien, a native 
of Galway, Ireland, whose death occurred in 1905. His 
mother, Margaret Graney, was also a native of Galway. 
Mr. O'Brien was educated in the public and parochial 
schools of Amesbury, and soon after leaving school went 
to work for the Hamilton Woolen Mills, one of the lead- 
ing industries of that town, where he was employed for 
a quarter of a century. During the years he worked 
there Mr. O'Brien had been preparing himself for a 
future time when he would engage in business for him- 
self, and this opportunity came in 1913. In this year he 
started a shoe store under the firm name of O'Brien's 
Shoe Store and has now completed ten successful years. 
Mr. O'Brien has been active in the public and military 
life of Amesbury ; he is a Democrat and served for six 
years as a member of the Common Council. He was a 
member of Company B, Eighth Regiment, Massachusetts 
State Guard, for nine years. 

Mr. O'Brien is a member of the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians ; the Holy Name Society ; the American Asso- 
ciation of Recognition of the Irish Republic. 

Mr. O'Brien married, in 1905, Julia A. Moran, born 
in 1881, at Galway, and their children are: Raymond 
M. ; John; Mary: Edward T. ; Joseph; William; Robert; 
and Earl Francis. The family attend and support the 
good works of the Church of St. Joseph, of Amesbury. 



ORVILLE FRANCIS BENNETT, for many years 
located in Haverhill, Massachusetts, in the plumbing con- 
tracting business, was born August 16, 1874, in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, son of John N. and Fidelia (Paine) 
Bennett. His father was a sheet metal worker and for 
many years lived in Fall River. He obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools and subsequently served his 
apprenticeship at the sheet metal trade. He was em- 
ployed by various firms until 1886, in which year he 
established a business of his own, located on Bridge 
street, Haverhill, Massachusetts, later moving to Water 
street, also of this city. A brother was admitted to 
partnership with him, and the firm name became J. N. 
Bennett & Company. Three years later the name was 
changed to Bennett Brothers. In 1889 J. N. Bennett 
withdrew from the partnership and Frank White of this 
city was admitted, and the firm name became W. C. Ben- 
nett & Company. On July I, 1907, the entire interests 



37° 



ESSEX COUNTY 



were purchased by Orville F. Bennett and he became the 
sole owner. His place of business is located at No. 38 
Emerson street, of this city. 

Mr. Bennett is a domestic engineer, is well versed in 
all lines of his craft, and takes contracts for plumbing, 
heating and sheet metal work. He is a member of the 
Junior Order of American Mechanics and, for a year, 
served on the executive committee of the Massachusetts 
State Master Plumbers' Association. Fraternally Mr. 
Bennett is a member of the Masonic Order, affiliating 
with Merrimac Lodge, Pentucket Chapter, Haverhill 
Council, Merrimac Valley Lodge of Perfection, Haverhill 
Conimandery, No. 14, and the Aleppo Shrine. He also 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias, and is a member of 
the Pentucket Club. Mr. Bennett was a member of 
Company F, Eighth Regiment, and for ten years served 
on the Haverhill Fire Department. With his family he 
attends the Universalist church. 

Mr. Bennett married Cora E. Kane, in 1909. and has 
two children : a daughter, Hazel Caroline, and a son, 
Orville Damon Bennett. 



ELI PLUMMER WENTWORTH. for many years 
a leading manufacturer of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was 
born April 22, 1834, in Middleton, New Hampshire, son 
of Ebenezer and Sophia (Roberts') VVentworth. The 
public schools of his native home afforded him his edu- 
cation, and at an early age he started to make his own 
way in the world. At that time the business of manu- 
facturing shoes was fast progressing from the hand 
work to the more progressive machine manufacture, and 
many departments were maintained which made a cer- 
tain part of the shoe. Mr. Wentworth made a specialty 
of manufacturing cut-sole leather, and for over twenty 
years was successfully engaged in this business. He 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and attended 
the North Congregational Church of Haverhill. 

Mr. Wentworth married, in November, 1865, Abbie 
Frances Parker, daughter of Leonard and Mary (Spiller) 
Parker, and their son, Arthur H. Wentworth, succeeded 
to the management of his father's business. Mr. Went- 
worth passed away in October, 1897. 



MEDORA A. (GORMAN) FEEHAN— Among the 
capable citizens who move in business circles of Haver- 
hill must be included Medora A. (Gorman) Feehan, 
who is sole owner and manager of the Gorman Shoe 
Company, which operates an appreciable manufacturing 
plant in the city. That, however, is not her only qual- 
ification for inclusion among the worthwhile people of 
Haverhill. She has the almost unique distinction of 
being probably the first woman in that part of Massa- 
chusetts to gain a pharmaceutical diploma and enter 
into business as a druggist. 

Medora A. (Gorman) Feehan was born in New York 
City, July 27, 1877, daughter of James H. and Mary 
T. (Conway) Gorman, and granddaughter of John 
Gorman and his wife, Mary Sheridan. The grandfather 
was born in County Limerick, Ireland, and after coming 
to this country spent most of his time in Rochester. 
New York, where he became superintendent of a shoe 
factory. They had five children, John, Sam, Julia, Mary, 
and James H. The last-named learned the business of 
shoe manufacturing in his father's plant, probably, but 



was one of the principals of a company in Haverhill 
early in the eighties. The firm of Gorman & Lowry, 
shoe manufacturers, was formed in 1881. It was a 
private partnership, and under the partnership a plant 
was established in Washington Square. Two years 
later, however, the partnership was dissolved, Mr. 
Lowry retiring. Mr. Gorman then organized the Gor- 
man Shoe Company, of which he was sole owner, and 
under the firm name the plant has been operated ever 
since. The present capacity is about 450 pairs of high- 
grade shoes a day, that production providing employ- 
ment for about one hundred factory hands. Since the 
death of her father, Mrs. Feehan has been sole owner 
of the business, and has successfully taken over the 
management of its affairs. Her father, James H. Gor- 
man, married Mary T. Conway, and two children were 
born to them : John S. and Medora A., of further 
mention. 

Medora A. was educated in Haverhill schools, attend- 
ing first the St. James' Parochial School, and progress- 
ing to the Haverhill High School, from which she was 
graduated in the class of 1893. She early manifested a 
strong character and intellectuality, and, having decided 
to enter professional life, she took the course in phar- 
macy at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, suc- 
cessfully graduating as pharmacist in 1898. She entered 
upon a professional career in her home town, Haver- 
hill, and was, it is stated, the first of her sex to qual- 
ify as a druggist there. Mrs. Feehan has also given 
clear indication of her capability in another profession. 
She is a writer of no mean ability, has contributed to 
current magazines, and is the author of more perma- 
nent works. 

Mrs. Feehan is an active churchwoman, member of 
St. James' Roman Catholic Church, of Haverhill, pres- 
ident of the Catholic Women's Club of St. James Parish, 
and director of the League of Catholic Women of Bos- 
ton. She is also a member of the Boston Philomathia 
Club, an organization of Boston College alumni. 

She was married, August 4, 1919, at Haverhill, to 
Charles J. Feehan, born in 1873, son of Albert K. and 
Sarah Feehan, the former a gardener by occupation, a 
good Catholic, and father of five children : Charles J., 
Emma, Ella, Sarah and Frank. 



EDWARD S. FICKETT— From 1866 until his pass- 
ing, more than half a century later, Edward S. Fickett 
was a resident of Georgetown, Massachusetts, spending 
that entire period in the public service as educator and 
town treasurer. He was a man of education, possessed 
fine literary and artistic tastes coupled with an acute 
business sense. He was of Maine birth and ancestry, 
his family seated in pre-Revolutionary days at Scarbor- 
ough and Cape Elizabeth, John, John (2), Nathaniel, 
Zebulon, Daniel, Benjamin, and Captain Benjamin 
Fickett, all serving in the Colonial army during the War 
for Independence. They were grandsons or great- 
grandsons of Thomas Fickett, a shipwright of Kittery, 
Maine, and his wife, Isabella (Roberts) Fickett, of 
Falmouth. 

The American ancestor was John Fickett, who may 
have been a Frenchman and perhaps a Huguenot, for 
the only time he ever signed his name to a public docu- 
ment that has been preserved, he spelled his name Jean. 




J(^ruU>^,/^U'*^r'a\^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



371 



This would establish his French ancestry, but there is 
the further fact that many French came to Northern 
New England. He was in New Hampshire, February 
20, 1680, and had a son, John, who was the son of 
Thomas and Isabella (Roberts) Fickett, the ancestors of 
the Cape Elizabeth, Maine, branch to which Edward S. 
Fickett belonged. He was tlie son of Amos P. and 
Eunice L. (Small) Fickett, his father a farmer, who 
died in 1878. 

Edward S. Fickett was born at Cape Elizabeth, Cum- 
berland county, Maine, January 20, 1836, and died in 
Worcester, Worcester county, Massachusetts, February 
II, 1922. He attended the district schools, prepared in 
West Brook Seminary, and pursued a full college course, 
finishing with graduation in 1863. He chose the pro- 
fession of a pedagogue, and for a few years taught in 
Maine and Massachusetts public schools. This itinerant 
teacher's life continued until 1866, when, at the age 
of thirty, he located in Georgetown, Massachusetts, and 
for twenty-eight years was associated with the public 
school system of that town as principal of schools. He 
continued at the head of the school system in George- 
town until 1894, and during that period raised the 
schools to a high plane of efficiency and became one of 
the well known and most highly regarded educators of 
the State. 

During the ensuing twenty-five years. 1894-1919, Ed- 
ward S. Fickett was treasurer of the Georgetown Sav- 
ings Bank, and for a number of years retained his con- 
nection with schools as a member of the school com- 
mittee. He was also for several years president of the 
Union Building Association of Georgetown, was for 
years president of the Peabody Library, and a trustee 
until his death, and a member of the Georgetown Liter- 
ary Club. In religious faith he was a long time member 
of the First Congregational Churcli, of Georgetown. 
For more than thirty-two years he was secretary of 
Georgetown Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; was a 
companion of Royal Arch Masonry ; and a Knights 
Templar, highly esteemed by his brethren of the order. 

Mr. Fickett married, in 1884, Fannie M. Crockett, of 
Gorham, Maine, daughter of Hezekiah R. and Eunice 
H. (Harmon) Crockett, her father dying in 1882, her 
mother in 1867. Mrs. Fickett survives her husband, and 
spends her winters in Worcester, her summers in 
Georgetown, Massachusetts. 



JOHN BIRD— Among the worthy Civil War vet- 
erans is John Bird, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, who 
was only fifteen years old when, in 1861, he enlisted 
for war service as a drummer boy. After his first 
enlistment term had expired, he reenlisted in the forces 
of the Union, and served until the end of the war. 
Fuller service one could hardly give to his country. 

John Bird was born at Concord, New Hampshire, on 
June 2, 1846, the son of John and Ellen (McCarthy) 
Bird, both of whom were born in Ireland. The father, 
John Bird, Sr., was a contractor, and John, Jr., was 
only twelve years old when his father died in 1858. 
John and Ellen (McCarthy) Bird had four children, 
three of whom were sons. In 1861 John, Jr., entered 
the army, and after being honorably discharged from 
military service in Company K, of the 3rd New Hamp- 



shire Regiment, he reenlisted for a further term in the 
United States navy, serving on the "Conemaugh." His 
final discharge came on June 6, 1865, after which he 
industriously turned to civilian occupations, finding his 
first work with the candy manufacturing company of 
Harriman Brothers, on Essex street, Lawrence. He 
served that company steadily for seven years, after 
which he went to Boston. In that city he remained for 
more than twenty years, finding constant work, though 
not for the whole period, with the same employer. In 
January, 1893, he was again in Lawrence, and on Janu- 
ary 16, 1893, went into business for himself, as a candy 
manufacturer, opening on the street in which he first 
found employment after coming out of the navy. He 
remained on Essex street until 1896, then removed to 
No. 275 Broadway, which has since been his business 
address. He has traded under the firm name of John 
Bird & Sons, and his business has been a substantial 
one for many years. 

Mr. Bird is a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, Post No. 39, and is much esteemed by those 
who know him well. He is a man of strong character, 
and during his long residence in Lawrence has made a 
wide circle of friends there. 

Mr. Bird married, in 1870, Margaret Ahearn, daugh- 
ter of Simon and Hannah (Gallagher) Ahearn. Both 
of her parents were deceased prior to her marriage, her 
father having died in i860, and her mother in 1866. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bird were destined to continue in marital hap- 
piness for a very long time, and Mrs. Bird's death did 
not come until after they had celebrated the golden 
anniversary of their wedding. Mrs. Bird died July 19, 
IQ2I, survived by her husband and their six children. 
The children are as follows : Rachel; John F. ; Louis A. ; 
Viola, who married John M. Murphy; Annie, who 
married Fred Dufton; and Mary G. Mr. Bird and his 
family are members of St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
Church. 



GEORGE E. TOZIER, merchant, of Haverhill, is a 
native of the district, born in Bradford, February 17, 
1865, the son of Edward H. and Margaret (Harris) 
Tozier, of Bradford, later of Haverhill. His father 
for the greater part of his life was connected with the 
shoe manufacturing industry; he died in 1914 at 
Haverhill. 

George E. Tozier received the whole of his academic 
education in the public schools of Haverhill, and in 
course of time entered a shoe factory, that of John 
Carey. He learned the trade there, and later worked in 
the Hovey and Weeks plant for three years, making 
lasts. Then he went to Boston, and remained there a 
year, after which he returned to Haverhill, and for the 
following three years worked in a shoe factory, which 
brings his life story to the time when he went to work 
for his brother in the drug business in Haverhill, his 
store being No. 14 Washington street, and known as 
that of N. C. Tozier & Company until 1913. In that 
year (George E. Tozier withdrew to enter into independ- 
ent business. He opened a store on Railroad square, 
and dealt in cameras, kodaks and photo supplies. Even- 
tually, he removed to his present location. No. 6 Wash- 
ington street, where he conducts a good business. He 



372 



ESSEX COUNTY 



is well known in the citj', and is a member of the local 
bodies of Odd Fellows and Knights of Malta orders. 
He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Tozier was married in 1890, and he has a son, 
Ralph Ray Tozier. 



erine E. The latter died in 1914 at the age of twenty 
years. The family attend the First Baptist Church, of 
Haverhill. 



ALBERT STEVERSON GATES— Among the sub- 
stantial business men of Haverhill is Albert Steverson 
Gates, contractor and builder, who since 1910 has car- 
ried through successfully several large contracts. He 
was born in Danville, New Hampshire, June 15, 1887, 
son of John Henry and Hattie A. (Harris) Gates, who 
were both of Prince Edward Island, Canada, the for- 
mer a farmer by occupation and deceased since 1905. 

Albert S. Gates was educated in schools of Danville, 
and later took the preparatory collegiate course at the 
Atkinson Academy, graduating therefrom in the class 
of 1898. Soon after leaving school, he went to New 
York City, and entered the employ of the Bradley Con- 
struction Company. For seven years he was connected 
with that company, gaining experience on several im- 
portant contracts. In 1910 he came to Haverhill, which 
has since been his place of abode and business. He has 
since 1910 been in business for himself as a public 
works contractor and general builder, his business 
address being No. 140 Merrimack street. Mr. Gates is 
now well known in the city. By religious belief he is a 
Congregationalist, and attends the Haverhill church of 
that denomination. 

He has been twice married. His first wife was Agnes 
E. Carey, of New York, and they were married in 1908. 
She died in 1913, and in 1915 Mr. Gates married (sec- 
ond) Leila Dawley, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel P. and Julia A. Dawley, of Connec- 
ticut, the former a steamfitter by trade. By the first 
union there were two children : Albert S., Jr. ; and Har- 
riett A. By the second union there were two children : 
Oliver L., born in 191 7; and Carroll, born in 1918. 



WILLIAM H. WEST was born in Dover, Maine, 
July 12, 1867, son of James H. West, of London, Eng- 
land, a sea captain, who later settled in Dover, where 
he died in 1874. The latter married Mary E. Day, of 
Dover, and her death occurred in 1919. Captain West 
was a veteran of the Civil War, serving with the Maine 
Infantry, and he was a member of the Dover Grand 
Army of the Republic Post. 

William H. West attended school at Dover and the 
Foxcroft Academy, and then went to work for the Pru- 
dential Insurance Company, where he remained for a 
year, resigning to enter the employ of the General Elec- 
tric Company, remaining for two years. At the end of 
this time he came to Haverhill and engaged in the shoe 
business until 1901, when he engaged in the shoe con- 
tract business for himself. His largest customer is the 
firm of George F. Carlton, of Haverhill, manufacturers 
of high grade men's turned shoes. Mr. West's factory 
covers 2,500 square feet, and thirty men are employed. 
He is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of Com- 
merce, and fraternally is a Mason, affiliated with the 
Masonic lodge of that city. 

In 1892, Mr. West married Mabel M. Priest, of Haver- 
hill, and their children are : Harry L., Ruth P., Kath- 



EDWARD MITCHELL, part owner of the House- 
hold Furniture Company, of Haverhill, and well known 
as a musician in that city, was born at North .\ndover, 
Massachusetts, July 13, 1882, the son of David and 
Susan B. (Caird) Mitchell, both of Scottish birth, the 
former a machinist by trade. 

Edward Mitchell grew to manhood in his home town, 
and after having passed through the public schools was 
apprenticed to Davis & Furber Machine Company, with 
whom he remained five years as machinist. The young 
man had marked inclination for music, and eventually 
became a teacher of instrumental music, following that 
profession for three years, and then associated himself 
with the W. H. Godfrey Furniture Company, of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts. He remained with this concern 
until 1909, when he became connected with the People's 
Furniture Company, of Haverhill, with which company 
he remained for several years. He also was with Mr. 
Rosengard for one year, but in 1918 went into partner- 
ship with W. L. Jennings, and the two established the 
Household Furniture Company. They have since traded 
under that name, and are successful. 

Mr. Mitchell has come somewhat prominently before 
the general public in that part of Massachusetts because 
of his fondness for music. He founded the Mitchell 
Orchestra, and is its leader, and as such has directed 
several excellent performances in Haverhill. He is enthu- 
siastic in all matters pertaining to music, one connection 
being that of financial secretary of the Musicians' Union. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason, member of Merrimac Lodge, 
also of the local lodge of Knights of Pythias, and the 
Loyal Order of Moose. His life story also must make 
record of his service in the United States Army. He 
enlisted in the regular army, and served for eighteen 
months in Cuba (1906-07). 

In 1910 Mr. Mitchell married Nellie M. Messenger, 
daughter of Edgar Messenger, a woodworker, resident in 
Haverhill, Essex county, Massachusetts. 



RAY C. DURGIN, a leading furniture merchant of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was born February 12. 1876, 
at Rye Beach, New Hampshire, son of Oscar C. Durgin. 
The latter was a native of Exeter, New Hampshire, where 
he was engaged in the painting business until his death in 
1890, He married Jennie Nickett, of Exeter. 

Ray C. Durgin attended school in Exeter, and then 
entered the employ of Gale Brothers, of that place, and 
there worked himself upward to an executive position, in 
all remaining for nine years, at which time he left to go 
to Nashua, New Hampshire, where he worked for the 
firm of W. D. Brackett & Company, and there also held 
an official position. After three years he resigned to go 
to South Framingham, and there was in charge of the 
cutting room for six years. Subsequent to this time Mr. 
Durgin was in the employ of various shoe companies in 
Haverhill, learning the business in all detail. However, 
another and better opportunity presented itself to enter 
the furniture business on his own account, which he did 
in 1919, and has now completed two years of successful 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



373 



business. Mr. Durgin is also very active in public mat- 
ters, and served as a member of the Prohibition State 
Committee of New Hampshire in 1904; he is an Inde- 
pendent in politics, and was the founder of the Citizens' 
League of Haverhill. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Good Templars and organized several lodges in New 
Hampshire and Massachusetts: he is also a member of 
the New England Lodge of Protection, the American 
Mechanics, and the American Benefit Association. 

In 1908, Mr. Durgin married Ethel Boynton Hatch, of 
Framingham. 

LLOYD JOHNSON, World War veteran and part- 
ner in the tirm of Johnson & Richardson, electrical con- 
tractors and dealers, representatives in Haverhill for the 
Maclite batteries, has spent the greater part of his life 
in that city. He was born in Calais, Maine, December 5, 
1895, son of George A. and Nellie M. (Spinney) John- 
son, both of Calais, the former a trainer of horses until 
his death, which occurred in 1913. 

Lloyd Johnson attended the elementary public school 
of his native place, and, when the family moved to Haver- 
hill, went to the ptiblic schools there, eventually graduat- 
ing from Haverhill High School. He also took a com- 
mercial course at the Haverhill Business College. His 
business career began with three years of service in the 
Safety Gas Lighter Company, of Haverhill. Then fol- 
lowed a year in the employ of the Hamel Shoe Machinery 
Company, which brings his life up to 1917, the first year 
of America's participation in the World War. Johnson 
set aside his own aflfairs, and enlisted as a private in the 
United States Army. He was assigned to Battery A, of 
the One Hundred and Second Field Artillery, Twenty- 
sixth Division, which was one of the early divisions to 
go overseas. Johnson passed through the greatest battles 
in which American troops took part, his service record 
showing that he was present in the following major 
battles : Toul, Verdun, Second Battle of the Marne, 
Chateau Thierry, Argonne, St. Mihiel. He was also at 
Scharn Deane, Ypres, and Schepres. The New England 
Division (the Twenty-sixth) won great renown, and 
bore some of the most desperate fighting of the war. 
Most of its units returned in March and April, 1919. 
Johnson was honorably discharged on April 29, 1919, in 
the grade of corporal. Soon thereafter he again entered 
actively into civil affairs. For a while he was in the 
employ of the John H. Cross Shoe Company, Haverhill, 
but in (1921) he forined a business partnership with 
Charles H. Richardson, the two forthwith opening a 
store and repair shop at No. 61^ White street, Haver- 
hill, and trading as Johnson & Richardson. They pur- 
posed doing a general class of repair work, but intended 
to specialize in ignition and battery repairs. They are 
the agents, in Haverhill and vicinity, for the Maclite bat- 
teries, and are starting well, so there is every prospect 
that they, being enterprising, active men, will succeed. 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the local lodges of the 
American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
and also of his regimental organization. Battery A Club. 
Fraternally, he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, 
Pythian Lodge. He is also a member of the Haverhill 
Chamber of Commerce. He is a man of steady character- 
istics, and a member of the Episcopal church of Haver- 
hill. Mr. Johnson is unmarried. 



EDWARD P. SMITH, manufacturer of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, was born in South Berwick, Maine, Sep- 
tember 6, 1872. Charles A. Smith, his father, was a 
native of Holland, Vermont, where he died in 1877. He 
was a salesman for many years. Carrie Belle (Chap- 
man) Smith, mother of Mr. Smith, was a native of 
Little Valley, Pennsylvania. 

Edward P. Smith attended the public schools of Dover, 
New Hampshire, and also the Dover High School. Sub- 
sequently he went to work as a telegraph operator in 
Quebec in the Grand Trunk Station, resigning at the 
end of two years to engage in the shoe business, asso- 
ciated with the Woodbury Company. After five years 
he was in business for himself as a dealer in brushes. 
After three years he went on the rOad as a salesman of 
brushes, and after six years located in Derry, New 
Hampshire, where the shoe business again engaged his 
attention. The Sears-Roebuck Com.pany had a box shop 
at Springvale, Maine, and they made an offer to Mr. 
Smith to take charge of their interests there, which he 
accepted, remaining three years. Thence he went to 
Haverhill, and engaged in business for himself. 

Smith's White Line Specialties were founded in 1916 
in Bradford, by Mr. Smith, to manufacture blacking and 
stains, shoe dressing and shoe specialties. The business 
was continued in Bradford until the summer of 1918, and 
since that time has been located on Locust street, Haver- 
hill. On August 18, 1918, the name of the firm was 
changed to Smith's White Line Specialties Company, Mr. 
Smith having associated himself with Mr. Edward A. 
Witherell, one of Haverhill's most popular and leading 
shoe manufacturers. The products are sent all over the 
country, and the business is the only one of its kind in 
the United States. Mr. Smith is a member of the Super- 
intendents' and Foremen's Association, of Haverhill; a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce; and of the Aga- 
wam Club. 

Mr. Smith married, in 191 1, Jenny E. Berry, of Maine. 



CHARLES HENRY BLUNT, for many years a 
faithful public servant, holding an official position in the 
United States post office at Haverhill, Massachusetts, was 
born there in 1839, and died June 23, 1913. He attended 
the public schools of Haverhill, and at an early age went 
to work for a firm in that city. Aiter some years he 
was appointed to an official post in the Haverhill post 
office and this office he held until his death. In perform- 
ing the duties of his position Mr. Blunt justified the 
wisdom of those responsible for his appointment; he was 
ever faithful, courteous and pleasing to all, and at his 
death was widely mourned by all those whose privilege it 
was to come in daily contact with him. Mr. Blunt's 
father, Joshua Blunt, served his country during the Civil 
War; his mother was Jane (Chessly) Blunt. 

Mr. Blunt married Susan Burnham, of West New- 
bury, Massachusetts, daughter of Moses and Susan 
(Sawyer) Burnham, and granddaughter of Thomas and 
Lydia (Hanson) Burnham. 



ALLEN G. COLLINS, of the Collins & Staples 
Shoe Company, was born March 10, 1S89, in Kingston, 
New Hampshire. His father, L. Waldo Collins, was 
engaged in the shoe business there, and his mother, Elvira 



374 



ESSEX COUNTY 



C. (Gordon) Collins, was a native of Danville, New 
Hampshire. 

Allen G. Collins was educated in the public schools 
and the Kingston High School ; he also attended the 
Sanborn Seminary. He went to work for his father in 
Kingston, and for eight years was superintendent of the 
factory. In 1915 he engaged in the shoe business on his 
own account in Haverhill, Massachusetts, under the firm 
name of the A. G. Collins Shoe Company, continuing 
this arrangement until 1919, in which year he became 
associated with Urdix L. Staples. Subsequently the name 
was changed to Collins & Staples. They are manufac- 
turers of a high-grade line of ladies' turned slippers, and 
have attained well deserved success in their business 
venture. Mr. Collins is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, and fraternally is a member of the Masonic 
order, the Odd Fellows and the Eastern Star. His clubs 
are the Pentucket and Agawam of Haverhill. 



WALTER L. FLINT was born in 1861, at No. 47 
Poplar street, Danvers, Massachusetts, and is a son of 
Samuel and Emily (Shaw) Flint. Mr. Flint's father was 
born at Danvers, and was for many years engaged in 
the business of a butcher. Mr. Flint was one of a very 
large family, having no less than eight brothers and 
two sisters. 

Mr. Flint received his early education in the public 
schools of his native town. After leaving school, he 
worked for several years in a market and then established 
himself in business as a butcher. This business he has 
conducted successfully for the last forty years. In 1920 
he acquired a farm, which he has managed in addition to 
carrying on his market business. He still lives at No. 47 
Poplar street, Danvers, in the house where he was born. 

Mr. Flint married Katherine Keneally, and they are the 
parents of five children : Arthur E. ; Lizzie C, who is the 
wife of William Conroy, they the parents of six children; 
Pauline, who is the wife of Harry Hayford; Helen; and 
Marion Flint. 



EVERETT C. HILTON was born at Andover, 
Massachusetts, November 16, 1885, son of Henry Hil- 
ton, a textile worker and native of England, who died 
in 1894, in Andover, and Sarah A. (Battye) Hilton, also 
a native of England, but now living in Andover. 

Everett C. Hilton was educated in the public schools 
of Andover, and at an early age went to work in one of 
the industries of that town. His is one of those interest- 
ing careers such as the youth of any town may read and 
profit from. Starting out in life with nothing but his 
own initiative, native ability and ambition, he forged 
ahead, intelligently directing his industry, and the pass- 
ing years brought the inevitable reward. 

Mr. Hilton's first position was as a sweeper with the 
Tyer Rubber Company of Andover, and his progress 
from the very beginning was steady and consistent until 
his first important reward came in 191.1, when he was 
appointed superintendent of Mill No. i. Four years 
later he was made general superintendent of the entire 
plant, and now has under his supervision 500 employees. 
The product turned out by this concern is druggist's 
rubber sundries. Mr. Hilton is very well liked among 
his men and is highly esteemed among his fellow- 
citizens. 



Although greatly interested in all matters of public 
interest, Mr. Hilton does not seek any office, but has 
served as a member of the School Board. He is a 
member of the Meadow Brook Golf Club, of North 
Reading; the Andover Club and St. Matthew's Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; he attends Christ Episcopal 
Church, of Andover. 



THERON ETHELBERT LARRABEE— A man 

t)r company having a business wajits others to know 
what that business is and who owns it. His most direct 
way to tell this is by a sign that can not be overlooked 
and which says the most in the least space. Theron 
Etiielbert Larrabee when a youth recognized this need 
and thoroughly prepared himself to meet and satisfy it. 
He is a sign designer and sole owner of the Haverhill 
(Massachusetts) Sign Company, a concern that has been 
well and favorably known throughout the city and out- 
lying districts for more than forty years. 

His father, Charles Theodore Larrabee, was a native 
of Ayers Village, Massachusetts, born January 25, 1870, 
and his mother, Cora Francis (Young) Larrabee, came 
from Manchester, New Hampshire. 

Theron Ethelbert Larrabee began his life in Brad- 
ford, Massachusetts, April 4, 1894. To the public 
schools he went first, completing all they could give him 
up through the third year in high school, when it seemed 
best to go at once to a technical college. He therefore 
went to Lawrence Institute and later to Wentworth 
Institute, in both of which he specialized in machine 
drafting, showing marked ability and advancing with 
great speed. Returning to Haverhill, he secured a posi- 
tion with the Haverhill Sign Company, which has been 
in existence for two decades; with the progressiveness 
that is noteworthy of Mr. Larrabee he sought to control 
the concern and purchased it August i, 1920. Under 
his able leadership the business has grown rapidly and 
is in a position to take care of all demands for com- 
mercial signs. It is also taking up the making of elec- 
tric signs so that in a few years there will be little in its 
line that the company can not do. It has not confined its 
trade to the city, but has built up a large business at the 
beaches. The firm is located at No. 11 Merrimac street, 
Haverhill. Mr. Larrabee belongs to the city Chamber 
of Commerce, and also to Passaquoi Tribe, Improved 
Order of Red Men. He is an interested attendant and 
member of the First Church of Christ (Scientist). His 
home is made in Bradford. 

Mr. Larrabee married, in Haverhill, June 19, 1916, 
Lida Frances Yeaton, a native of Haverhill. She is the 
daughter of William J. Yeaton, born in New Hamp- 
shire, who followed the shoe trade in the city for some 
years, and of Nellie (Raymond) Yeaton. Of this union 
there are two children: Virginia May, born in May, 
1918; and Richard Theron, born in June, 1920. 



FREDERICK HAMBLETON— For many years a 
prominent and leading citizen of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, taking an active part in the business world, Fred- 
erick Hambleton now holds the position of general 
superintendent of the United States Bobbin and Shuttle 
Company of that city. 

Mr. Hambleton was born January 5, 1875, at Derby- 
shire, England, son of David Hambleton, of England, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



375 



long engaged in the bobbin business there, where he died 
in 1913. His wife, Sarah Ann (.Wells) Hanibleton, died 
in 1888. 

The education of Mr. Hanibleton was obtained in 
the public schools of Lachute, Canada, and at an early 
age started to learn the trade of machinist, in the employ 
of the George W. David Company, of Nashua, New 
Hampshire. .At the end of three years he removed to 
Merrimack, New Hampshire, and there engaged in the 
bdbbin and shuttle business on his own account, subse- 
quently admitting his brother as a partner, the business 
being carried on under the firm name of the Hambleton 
Brothers Company. For a period of twenty years this 
partnership continued and a very successful business 
was built up; in 1919 an opportunity came to dispose of 
their interests to the firm now employing Mr. Hamble- 
ton, and in 1919 he assumed his present position at 
Lawrence. 

Mr. Hambleton is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and the Masonic order, including both 
the York and the Scottish Rites; also is a member of the 
New England Order of Protection; the Eastern Star; 
and the Rebekalis. In politics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Hambleton married (first), in 1897, Annie C. 
Smith, born at New Brunswick, Canada, and she died in 
igi2. He married (second) Helen V. Guild, of Derry, 
New Hampshire, in 1921. By his first marriage Mr. 
Hambleton is the father of Gertrude L. Hambleton, a 
graduate of Simmons College, in the class of 1919, now 
engaged in secretarial work at the Young Women's 
Christian Association at Montreal, Canada; Herbert L., 
a graduate of Brown University, in the class of 1921; 
and Vera E., now attending Laselle Seminary, at 
Auburndale, Massachusetts. Mr. Hambleton and the 
members of his family attend the Lawrence Episcopal 
church. 



GEORGE RICHARDSON, general superintendent 
of the Kimhardt Mills Company, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, was born in Galashiels, Scotland, January 22, 
1871, and there attended school. At a very early age he 
started to work in the textile mills of his native land, 
and in 1898, the year he came to America, he had ac- 
quired a very extensive knowledge of his occupation. 
Soon after settling in Lawrence, Massachusetts, Mr. 
Richardson obtained employment with the Kunhardt 
Mills Company in their designing department; there his 
skill was noticed and appreciated to the extent that he 
was made superintendent of that department, and this 
position he continued to fill in a most able manner until 
1917, in which year he was appointed general superin- 
tendent of the mills. Mr. Richardson is one of the fore- 
most men in textile lines in Essex county, and he has 
also been elected a member of the board of directors of 
the mills. In politics he is a Republican, and is inter- 
ested in all civic matters in Lawrence. He is a member 
of the Caledonian Club of that city. 

Mr. Richardson married, in 1899, Ellen McGhee, of 
Galashiels, born there in 1876, and their children are: 
I. Harold Lawrence, born February 14, 1900; he served 
in the United States Army during the World War, with 
the air force, and was discharged in 1919. 2. Percy 
Laurie, who was born February 18, 1904. 3. Donald 
P., who was born in December, 191 1. 



JOHN P. GILMORE, one of the most progressive 

and public-spirited citizens of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
and an overseer of the Katama Mills of that city, was 
born at New Bedford, Massachusetts, August 26, 1878, 
the son of William Gilmore, a farmer and native of 
County Sligo, Ireland, and Anne (McQuillan) Gilmore. 

Mr. Gilmore was educated in the public scliools of 
New Bedford, and soon after leaving school, went to 
work in the mill of the City Manufacturing Company, 
starting as a sweeper, and by diligent and painstaking 
work, passed through the various positions to that of 
second hand. With his experience thus gained, Mr. Gil- 
more removed to Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and was 
located there for two years, engaged in mill work. At 
the end of this time he returned to New Bedford, where 
he remained until 1915, in the employ of the New Eng- 
land Cotton Company, and in the latter year held the 
position of overseer. A year later he came to Lawrence, 
and there obtained a similar position with the Katama 
Mills, one of the largest industries of that city, and has 
now under his supervision about 190 employees. 

In the civic matters of Lawrence Mr. Gilmore has 
more than a passing interest, and any movement for the 
general welfare of the city always receives his loyal 
support His fraternal connection is with the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Gilmore married, in 1910, Helen Murry, of New 
Bedford, and they are the parents of a son, John J. Gil- 
more, Jr., born in 1913, and of a daughter, Dorothy, 
born in 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore and their children 
attend St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church of Law- 
rence. 



FRANK KILBORN, one of the leading men in in- 
dustrial lines in Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born at 
Orleans, Vermont, June 4, i860, son of Alonzo A. Kil- 
born, a native of Quebec, Canada, and for many years 
a contractor and builder. He died in 1916, and his wife, 
Eliza (Tilton) Kilborn, also a native of Canada, sur- 
vived him four years. 

Mr. Kilborn was educated in the public schools and 
then attended evening school for a term, during which 
time he was employed at Framingham, Massachusetts, 
and three years later he came to Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, where he entered the employ of the Lawrence 
Machine Company in the pattern-making department. 
He worked as a journeyman for eight years and then 
was made foreman of this department, holding this posi- 
tion until 1909, when a new company was organized and 
Mr. Kilborn was appointed to the office of superintend- 
ent and manager. Mr. Kilborn has continued in these 
positions to the present time, and is well known among 
the foremost citizens of Lawrence. He is a member 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Encampment. 

Mr. Kilborn married, in 1886, Ella Powell, of Ver- 
mont, and they are the parents of one son, Clarence 
Powell Kilborn, bom in 1888. Mr. Kilborn and his 
family are members of the Universalist church. 



JAMES LEE POTTER— As general manager of 
the Newburyport (Massachusetts) Electric and Gas Com- 
pany, J. Lee Potter is bearing a part in the progress and 
welfare of the city. He was born in South Gardiner, 



376 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Maine, October 15, 1889, and is a son of James Edwin 
and Henriette Potter. Receiving a thoroughly practical 
education in the public and high schools of his native 
town, he became operator in the electrical station at 
Greenfield, Massachusetts, learning the business. He 
continued there for six years, then was transferred to 
the Mount Tom junction at Holyoke, where he became 
assistant engineer of electrical work at a new plant then 
in process of construction, remaining for four years. 
He then returned to Greenfield, to the commercial 
department of his former employers, two years later 
becoming associated with the Amherst (Massachusetts) 
Gas Company, as superintendent. There, however, he 
remained for only six months, and his next step was 
to Newburyport, where he assumed the responsibilities 
of his present position. 

Mr. Potter is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He attends the Congregational church. 

On September 8, 1916, Mr. Potter married Bessie 
Gertrude Thayer, daughter of Edward C. Thayer, and 
they have one son, James Russell, born October 19, 
1918. 



LEON F. RAINVILLE, JR.— Holding quite an im- 
portant position for a man so young, Leon F. Rainville, 
Jr., manager in the Lawrence district for the motor 
transportation firm of Youlden, Smith & Hopkins, gives 
definite indication that he will succeed in life. 

Mr. Rainville was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
on December 10, 1899, son of Leon F. and Josephine 
(Poirier) Rainville. His father was born in Lawrence, 
but his mother is a native of Taftsville, Connecticut. 
They are both living (1922) and his father is still 
actively engaged in business. Leon F., Jr. is the third 
of the six children born to his parents, there being 
four sons and two daughters. The family are Catholics, 
and attend the Sacred Heart Church of Lawrence. 

Leon F. Rainville, Jr., was educated in the public 
schools of his native place, graduating in 191 5 from the 
high school. He began his business life by working in 
a shoe store, that of C. J. Tetreau, of Lawrence. There 
he remained until the National call came after the en- 
trance of the nation into the World War. Leon F., Jr., 
enlisted voluntarily on December 10, 1917, choosing what 
was probably the most dangerous, yet the most glorious, 
arm of the service — aviation. He was assigned to mili- 
tary duty at Fort Slocum, and soon afterwards left for 
Camp Di.x, New Jersey. Later he was transferred to 
Kelly Field, Texas, the famous flying headquarters. He 
then went to England for seven months, as a machine 
gun instructor in the Air Service, and then was trans- 
ferred to service in France, in the same line of duty, for 
eleven months, until the armistice was signed. He was 
honorably discharged from the United States army, in 
March, 1919, at Camp Devens, and returned to Law- 
rence. He quickly adjusted himself to civil life, and is 
making good in business affairs. 



May (Richmond) Little, who now reside in Plymouth, 
England. 

Mr. Little had attended the schools of England previ- 
ous to coming to this country, and after locating in 
Rockville, Connecticut, he took a special course in 
mathematics, which completed his formal education. 
After completing this course he went to work in the 
designing room of the Hockanum Mills of Rockville, and 
was employed there for eight years, gaining great 
experience. Thence he removed to Warren, Massa- 
chusetts, and was employed as a designer by the Sayles 
& Jenks Company, and subsequently was promoted to 
the oflSce of assistant superintendent. For seven and 
one-half years he was with the latter firm and then 
went to Indian Orchard, Massachusetts, in the interests 
of the Rhode Island Worsted Company, as superintend- 
ent, and held a similar position with the Waucantuck 
Mills, at Uxbridge. In 1914 Mr. Little came to Law- 
rence and assumed the position of agent of the Inter- 
national Worsted Mills and has since continued in this 
office. During his term of office the number of looms 
in the mills has greatly increased, and there are 250 
employees under his supervision. 

Mr. Little served for five years in the Massachusetts 
State Militia ; he is a member of Quaboag Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Warren, Massachusetts, of the 
Foresters of America, and the Methuen Club. 

He married, in 1895, Jennie Redmond, of England, 
and they are the parents of two children : Arthur 
Thomas, born in 1898; and Dorothy M., born in 1906. 
With his family Mr. Little attends the Episcopal church 
of Methuen, and he is also active in all the public 
matters of the town. 



SIDNEY H. LITTLE, agent of the International 
Worsted Mills of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born 
September 17, 1872, at Wiltshire, England, and in 1888 
came to the United States. He is the son of William 
Little, a native of England, a skilled machinist, and 



ARTHUR SMITH— It does not very often happen 
that a man is especially skilled in more than one line, 
and such a man proves himself to be possessed of more 
than ordinary ability. Such is the case of Arthur Smith, 
chief designer and overseer of finishing and shipping 
of the Pemberton Mills of Lawrence. Mr. Smith is 
acknowledged to be the foremost designer in this section 
of the country, and he is also very widely known m 
musical circles as a musician of considerable ability. 

Mr. Smith was born January 31, 1880, at Bradford, 
England, son of Obadiah S. Smith, a warehouse packer 
by occupation, and Elizabeth (Hopkins) Smith, who 
died in 1908. Both parents came to America and re- 
sided in Methuen. 

Arthur Smith was educated in the public schools of 
England, and in 1893 came to the United States, where 
he first obtained employment at the Arlington Mills at 
Lawrence, first working in the weaving-room. He was 
then with the Gaunt Mills in Methuen, later entering 
the employ of the Pemberton Mills, as pattern weaver. 

In order to obtain more instruction regarding the 
theory of his work, Mr. Smith entered the Lowell Tex- 
tile School, where he pursued studies for six years, 
graduating with an average percentage of ninety-eight 
and three-quarters per cent. His courses comprised 
warp preparation, plain and fancy weaving, designing 
(five courses), and textile costs. He then returned to 
the Pemberton Mills as chief of the designing depart- 
ment, and for the past three years he has also been 
overseer of the finishing and shipping room, in addition 



/■\. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



377 



to other duties. For seventeen years he has lield these 
various positions and has achieved wide recognition for 
his ability. 

Outside of his business interests, Mr. Smith is much 
interested in music and is an active worker in promot- 
ing musical affairs for the general public. He is director 
of the John Hancock Masonic Glee Club, of Methuen, 
comprising thirty-five voices ; organist and choir direc- 
tor of the Parker Street Methodist Episcopal Church, 
of South Lawrence; and he is always called upon to 
direct and instruct any of the local musical productions. 
Mr. Smith is financial secretary of the American Ben- 
efit Society; and is a member of John Hancock Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Methuen. 

Mr. Smith married, in igoo, Martha A. Scholes, 
daughter of John Scholes, a reed maker, and Susan 
(Hughes) Scholes, both natives of England. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith are the parents of three children : Beatrice 
M., born in 1903; Gertrude A., born in 1908; and Ruth 
H., born in 1910. The family attend the Parker Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church, at South Lawrence. 



JOHN E. NOBLE was born June i, 1871, In Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, and is one of those men who have 
attained success in their business careers within the 
confines of their native city. He is a son of James A. 
Noble, who was a native of Maine, and a master 
mechanic by occupation. He was the founder of the 
Noble & Wood Machine Shop, of Hoosic Falls, New 
York, manufacturers of paper mill machinery, and 
actively engaged in business until a few years before 
his death, which occurred in 1920, at the age of seventy- 
three years and ten months, at St. Petersburg, Florida. 
Mr. Noble was in the Civil War, serving four years, 
nine months and eleven days under General Sheridan 
for the most part, and he was wounded in the battle 
of Cedar Creek, October 15, 1862. He enlisted in Com- 
pany G, 30th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Mr. 
Noble is survived by his widow, Diana (Preston) Noble, 
a native of England, and five sons : Frederick W. ; John 
E., of further mention; Arthur M. ; Clarence W.; and 
Herbert D. 

John E. Noble was educated in the public schools of 
Lawrence, and his first position was with the Holling- 
worth Company, at Groton, Massachusetts, where he 
remained for four years, thence removing to Palmers 
Falls, New York, entering the employ of the Hudson 
River Pulp and Paper Company, where he was located 
for six years. During the years from this time until 
1913 Mr. Noble was variously employed in New Hamp- 
shire and Massachusetts, but always along the lines of 
the paper industry, and he is to-day recognized as an 
authorit>' on all paper mill machinery. 

In 1913 he became associated with the Champion Inter- 
national Company, as superintendent of the paper depart- 
ment, and holds this position at the present time, hav- 
ing under his supervision one hundred employes. Mr. 
Noble has introduced an efficiency system, founded on 
his extensive experience and his wide knowledge of 
paper manufacture, which enables the operatives to 
produce with their machines the greatest amount of 
paper stock possible, and in many other ways Mr. Noble 
has brought the department under his charge up to the 



highest basis. He is a genial man, and well liked by 
those with whom he comes in daily contact. 

Mr. Noble married, in 1896, Minnie E. Richards, 
daughter of Benjamin and Mary E. (Smart) Richards, 
the former a native of Belfast, Maine, and the latter of 
Whitehall. Benjamin Richards was engaged in paper 
mill work many years. Mr. and Mrs. Noble are the 
parents of a daughter, Mildred A. Noble. They are 
attendants of the Methodist church of Lawrence. 



ARTHUR S. EVERETT, who for twenty years has 
been superintendent of the shops of the Hamblet Ma- 
chine Company, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, is very 
well known in that vicinity. He is classed among the 
responsible business executives, and is esteemed by 
those who know him well. He is a worthy scion of one 
of New England's oldest families. His great-grand- 
father, David Everett, was a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary War, from Dedham, Massachusetts. 

.Arthur S. Everett was born in Peru, New Y'ork, 
March 22, 1864, son of George E. and Adelia (Soper) 
Everett, of New York. His father was a farmer, and 
died there in 1916, but his mother died many years 
earlier, in 1885. They had si.x children, four sons and 
two daughters, Arthur S. being the second born. 

Mr. Everett was educated in the schools of his native 
place and at Albany Business College. After leaving 
school he came to Lawrence, Massachusetts, and learned 
the trade of machinist in the shops of the Dustin Ma- 
chine Company, with which company he remained con- 
nected for thirteen years. When George W. Hamblet 
took over the plant, Mr. Everett continued to work as a 
machinist in the shop of the Hamblet Machine Company. 
He has worked in that shop ever since, and gradually 
was given increasing responsibility until in 1901 he was 
appointed superintendent. He is still superintendent of 
that important machine shop, the product, paper mill 
machinery, which has been maintained by him at a high 
standard. He is well liked and respected by the men, 
and has many firm friends among the leading people of 
the district. Incidentally his life's story indicates that 
he is a loyal and steadfast man, as well as a capable 
artisan and business executive. 

Mr. Everett is a member of Phoenician Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; and Monadnock Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. By religious convic- 
tion a Baptist, he has long been a member of Calvary 
Baptist Church, being a member of the board of direc- 
tors and of the building committee for the new church. 
In his political views Mr. Everett is a Republican, but 
is not a politician, aiding however, any movements for 
the public good. 

Mr. Everett married, in 1892, Harriet G. Doane, who 
was born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. They have two 
children : Grace, born in 1893 ; and Charles Arthur, born 
in 1898. 

J. W. EMERSON FARRELL, undertaker, of Ha- 
verhill, Massachusetts, was born in Amesbury, same 
State, October 13, 1879, son of Rev. John W. Farrell, 
pastor of the Baptist church of Gray, Maine, formerly 
of Amesbury. The latter married Abbie A. Gordon, of 
New Hampton, New Hampshire, and her death occurred 
in 1920. 



378 



ESSEX COUNTY 



J. W. Emerson Farrell attended the public schools of 
Amesbury and then was a student at the New Hamp- 
ton College, graduating in 1900. The year following he 
spent at Exeter, New Hampshire, in the drug business, 
being employed by the Exeter Drug Company. In 1901 
he entered the employ of Edward J. Gilmore, undertaker, 
to learn the business with a view to entering this same 
field on his own account. This he did in 1909, upon his 
return to Haverhill, establishing headquarters at No. 
41 Main street. His parlors are up-to-date in every 
respect, with a lady attendant, and Mr. Farrell holds a 
respected position among the citizens of that city. 

Mr. Farrell is a member of the Masonic order; 
Knights of Pythias ; Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company of Boston : Ancient Order of United Work- 
men ; Junior Order of United American Mechanics; the 
Grange; Pentucket Club; .^gawam Club; the Wachu- 
.sett Club; and the Rotary Club, all of Haverhill; and 
also is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

In 1909 Mr. Farrell married A. Regina Farrell, of 
Crookston, Minnesota, and they are the parents of a 
daughter, Verna Lucille Farrell. The family attend and 
aid in the support of the Congregational church of 
Haverhill. 

ERNEST A. JOHNSON was born at Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, on December 26, 1879, and is a son of 
Eric and Helen (Elfstrom) Johnson. Mr. Johnson 
received his early education in the schools of Lawrence, 
but left school at the age of fourteen years and obtained 
employment, in September, 1894, as an office boy at the 
Washington Mills. The great changes that have taken 
place in business conditions is indicated by the fact that 
when Mr. Johnson first began to work he received a 
salary of only $4.25 for a week of fifty-eight hours' 
work. This condition did not last long in his case, how- 
ever, for he was steadily promoted as his industry and 
ability were recognized. In 1808 he was promoted from 
rhe men's wear department to the position of assistant 
to Moses Shuttleworth, who was at that time the super- 
intendent of the worsted yam department. Not long 
after, about 1901, Mr. Johnson became the superintend- 
ent of No. s Mill, worsted yarn department; this mill 
has about 11,084 spinning spindles. About 1904 Mr. 
Johnson was again promoted, this time to the position 
of superintendent of No. i Mill, worsted yarn depart- 
ment, which has 16,320 spinning spindles. 

Mr. Johnson was naturally energetic and desirous of 
increasing his knowledge of the technical methods used 
in his chosen industry, and in order to satisfy this desire 
and increase his value as a trained worker, he attended 
the Lowell Textile School during the evening sessions. 
He received certificates for the courses in worsted and 
woolen spinning, and also in dressing and weaving, 
which he completed. About the year 1906 Mr. Johnson 
began to learn the principles of dressing, weaving, loom 
fixing, mending, burling, and finishing, working at all 
these operations in each department, and thus acquir- 
ing a thorough practical knowledge of every step in the 
manufacture of cloth. About the year 1908 he became 
superintendent of the finishing department and held that 
position until about 1919, when he became assistant 
agent, the position he holds at the present time. 



Mr. Johnson is a member of Phoenician Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; the Home Club; and the Merri- 
mac V'alley Country Club. 

Mr. Johnson married Mary F. Lamont, daughter of 
Alexander and Elizabeth (Dick) Lamont, of Andover, 
and they have one son, Ernest A., Jr., born September 
3, 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson attend Trinity Congre- 
gational Church at Lawrence. They reside at Shaws- 
heen Village, Andover, Massachusetts. 



WILFRED J. GOYETTE— Although he has been 
in business for himself in Newburyport only a short 
while, Wilfred J. Goyette has been making headway 
rapidly, as an automobile painter. His workmanship 
has been good, and he has therefore created good con- 
nections for himself in his line, which embraces all 
phases of the automobile painting and lettering busi- 
ness, and also carriage painting. 

He was born in Manchester, New Hampshire, March 
14, 1890, and spent his early years in his home town 
and Haverhill, Massachusetts. He attended the public 
schools of Manchester, Massachusetts, then entered the 
college at Sherebrook, Canada, which was the home of 
his parents, Joseph and Delphine (Le Blanc) Goyette. 
The former was a contractor by occupation, and spent 
the greater part of his life in the province of Quebec, 
Canada; he died in Manchester, Massachusetts in 1902. 
He and his wife were the parents of fifteen children, 
Wilfred J. being the youngest. After his schooldays were 
finally over, he, Wilfred J., found employment in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, and for five years thereafter worked 
for Young Brothers of that place. Then he returned to 
Canada, and for the next three years was in Montreal, 
after which he went to Detroit, Michigan, where he was 
in the employ of Lees Brothers. Coming again into 
Massachusetts and Essex county, in 1920, he settled at 
Newburyport, and opened in business for himself, as 
before stated. He has given indication that he is an 
energetic man, and an expert in his line. His business 
enterprise in Newburyport has therefore good prospect 
of proving to be much to his advantage. 

Mr. Goyette was married, in 1919, to Mrs. Eva E. 
(Fowler) Merrill, of Rings Island, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Avana Fowler, of Rings Island, Massachu- 
setts, where he is still living (1922). 



GUY ELLSWORTH NICKERSON, manager of 
the Amesbury Electric Light Company, is a native of 
that city, born there September 13, 1884, son of George 
W. and Annie Isabelle (Emerson) Nickerson, and 
grandson of Ephraim and Abbie (Milliken) Nickerson. 
Ephraim Nickerson was a native of Maine, where he 
was engaged in business as a box manufacturer until his 
death in 1885. He served in the Civil War, and held a 
commission. He was a member of the Major How 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of Merrimac. His 
wife survived him several years, her death occurring in 
1909. George W. Nickerson, their son, and father of 
Guy E. Nickerson, was born in Andover, Massachusetts, 
September 25, 1859, and for many years was engaged in 
the automobile business in Amesbury. Mrs. Annie I. 
(Emerson) Nickerson was born at Ayers Village, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 16, 1861. 

Guy E. Nickerson attended the public schools and the 









,*.o' 






AO'i- 







(jfl^ G^^^jlA^^. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



379 



Amesbury High School, and for three years following 
was employed by the New England Telephone Com- 
pany of his home city, subsequently being employed as 
an electrician for the Amesbury Electric Light Com- 
pany. He resigned this position to become night oper- 
ator for the Boston Elevated Company, where he 
remained until 1909, in which year he returned to the 
Amesbury Electric Light Company, of which he is now 
manager, as previously stated. 

In politics he is a Republican, and served four years 
as a member of the School Board. Fraternally. Mr. 
Nickerson is a member of Warren Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; Trinity Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; Amesbury Council, Royal and Select Masters; 
Merrimac Valley Lodge of Perfection ; Princes of Jeru- 
salem; Massachusetts Consistory, all being affiliations of 
the Masonic order. He is also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Harmony En- 
campment. He is a clerk of St. James' Episcopal 
Church. 

Mr. Nickerson married, in 1905, Frances E. Hickey, 
born July 26, 1885, in .■\mesbury. 



HERBERT S. BAYLEY, a member of the firm of 
the Bailey & Bayley Company, manufacturers, of Hav- 
erhill, Massachusetts, was born in that city, July 18, 
1885. and was educated in the public schools, the 
Haverhill High School, and the Massachusetts Nautical 
School, where he graduated in 1906. For the succeeding 
five years Mr. Bayley was employed in the shoe busi- 
ness by the A. A. Ordway Company, and for three years 
by the Byfield SnufT Company, at Byfield, Massachu- 
setts. From this time until 1919 he was employed as 
salesman by various concerns, and in the latter year 
formed a partnership with Walter S. Bailey, to manu- 
facture heel pads, box toes and felt and buckram. Their 
factory, located at No. 118 Phoenix avenue, now occu- 
pies about 2,000 square feet of floor space, and the 
greater part of the work is done by machinery. Mr. 
Bayley is a member of Merrimac Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; and the .'Kgawam Club. 

Mr. Bayley married, in igi8, Dorothy F. Jones, of 
Chicago, Illinois, and they are the parents of a son, 
Russell Jones Bayley. born March 2, 1921. 



ROBERT R. GASKELL, JR., the first man to be 
elected to the office of tax collector of the city of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, which office he now holds, was 
born in that city, January 20, 1877, son of Robert R. 
Gaskell, a native of Bolton. England, now engaged in 
textile lines in Lawrence. His mother, Mary E. (Tib- 
betts) Gaskell, was born in Wolfboro, New Hampshire, 
and now resides in Lawrence. 

Mr. Gaskell obtained his early education in the public 
schools of Lawrence, and for the next two or three 
years worked in local industries. For the next twenty 
years he was employed as a salesman, traveling through- 
out the eastern states until becoming the agent of 
Davis Brothers, of Boston, Massachusetts, selling talk- 
ing machines; he located in Lawrence, remaining there 
for five years. At the end of this time Mr. Gaskell was 
appointed to the office of tax collector of Lawrence, and 
is the first man to hold this office, as previously the work 



of tax collector had been taken care of by the city 
treasurer. Mr. Gaskell has continued to hold the posi- 
tion to the present time, discharging his duties in a 
most satisfactory manner. He is a member of the Re- 
publican party and an active worker in that party's 
interests. Fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks; and the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles. 

Mr. Gaskell married (first), in 1894, Annie McMahon, 
born in 1875, at Lawrence, died in 1905, and she was 
the mother of the following children: Josephine; Mar- 
garet; Mary; Thomas; Anastasia; Marion; and Joseph. 
Mr. Gaskell married (second), in February, 1910, Mrs. 
William G. Gibbs, of Lawrence. The family residence 
is at No. 40 South Broadway, Lawrence. 



BENJAMIN V. CONANT was born at Topsfield, 
Massachusetts, in 1878. He is a son of Benjamin and 
Margaret (Starrett) Conant. His father, who was a 
farmer, was born at Beverly, Massachusetts. Mr. Con- 
ant has one sister, Clarissa, who lives at Danvers, Mas- 
sachusetts; and three brothers: Arthur H., who lives 
at Georgetown, Massachusetts; Clarence L., who 
resides at Danvers; and Frank S., of Ossipee, New 
Hampshire. 

Mr. Conant received his education in the public 
schools of Topsfield. He started in the milk business 
when he was only fifteen years old and has continued 
in the same business ever since. In 190J he moved to 
Danvers, where his place of business is located at No. 
33 Summer street. 

Mr. Conant is a member of the Maple Street Congre- 
gational Church. He is a Mason and belongs to .'\mity 
Lodge, of which he was worshipful master during the 
years 1920 and 1921. He also is a member of Holten 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and Salem Council, Royal 
and Select Masters. Mrs. Conant is a member of the 
Eastern Star. 

Mr. Conant married Nellie Beatrice Gilland, of 
Salem; they have no children. 



MICHAEL F. SHUGRUE, founder of the business 
which bears his name in Haverhill, Massachusetts, was 
born there October 25, 1890, and died June 15, 1920. He 
was educated in St. James' Parochial School, and soon 
after leaving school, went to work in the shoe industry, 
continuing until 1910, in which year he entered business 
on his own account, for the first four years carrying a 
complete line of jewelry, and later, ready-to-wear cloth- 
ing for men and women was added and also talking 
machines, everything being sold on a credit basis. Upon 
the death of Mr. Shugrue, the business was taken over 
by his wife and is now successfully carried on under her 
able management. She is the only woman in Essex 
county, and perhaps the State, in the credit business. 

Mrs. Laura F. (Lessard) Shugrue was born in New- 
1>uryport, October 3, 1896, daughter of Theodore and 
Willimine (Belanger) Lessard, her father now living in 
Haverhill, Massachusetts. After her education in the 
parochial school, she worked in the shoe industry until 
1914, in which year she married Mr. Shugrue, and they 
were the parents of a daughter, Laura L., born August 
21, 1919. The family attended the Catholic church, and 



38o 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Mr. Shiigrue was a member of the Knights of CoUim- 
bus. Mrs. Shugrue is a member of the Catholic Daugh- 
ters of America. 



WILLIAM T. WALKE was born in Cornwall, 
England, .April g, 1S71, son of Thomas and Lucy (Dart) 
Walke. Thomas VValke was born in Plymouth, Eng- 
land, later settling in Cornwall, where he was engaged 
as a gardener. The lad William T. was educated in 
Cornwall public school and there spent the first eighteen 
years of his life. In 1889 he came to the United States 
and was first employed as a gardener by John S. Far- 
low, of Newton, Massachusetts. He remained in that 
position six years, then paid a visit to his English 
home. After his return to the United States he was 
employed on the Forbes estate at Byfield, Massachu- 
setts, and a year later came to Salem, where he entered 
the employ of Mrs. G. M. Julian, the florist, remaining 
for two years. He then established in business for him- 
self in Salem under the name of The Loring .\venue 
Conservatory. He started business with but three small 
hot-houses and now does a very large wholesale and 
retail business in flowers, plants and shrubs. 

Mr. Walke is a member of the National Association 
of Florists, and the leader in his line of business in 
Salem. He is a member of Essex Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Salem; Washington Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; Salem Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; Windsor Lewis Conimandery. Knights Tem- 
plar: all bodies of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, 
including Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine; Sons of St. George; and is a past 
noble grand of Salem Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He takes an interest in the welfare of his 
city, and aids, through membership, the Chamber of 
Commerce in all forward movements. 

Mr. Walke married, in June, 1898, Caroline Osgood, 
of Salem, and they are the parents of eight children: 
Gertrude, Bertram, Lucy, William (2), Florence, Fran- 
cis, Henry, and Edith. 



HENRY FRANCIS CALLAHAN, D. M. D.— 

Among the younger dentists of Peabody, Massachusetts, 
possibly none is in better standing than Dr. Callahan, 
and none has before him the prospect of a more bril- 
liant career. 

Dr. Callahan was born in Peabody, Massachusetts, 
October 18, 1895, the son of John Joseph and Julia 
(Sweeney) Callahan, both deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Callahan were born three children : Henry Francis, of 
further mention ; John J., an accountant, and a grad- 
uate of Suffolk Law School, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws; and William J., who served in the United 
States army during the World War and is now a mem- 
ber of the Medical Reserve Corps, 

The elementary education of Henry Francis Calla- 
han was obtained in the public schools of his native 
place, after which he matriculated at Tufts Dental Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1918, with the 
degree of Doctor of Medical Dentistry. The same 
year he passed the Massachusetts State Board exami- 
nations and then immediately returned to Peabody, 
where he opened an office at No. 7 Central street and 
engaged in the practice of his profession. This has 



been his headquarters ever since, and the liberal patron- 
age which has come to him attests his superior under- 
standing of the principles of dentistry. 

Dr. Callahan is a member of the Essex County Medi- 
cal Society, and affiliates with the Knights of Colum- 
bus and the I.,oyal Order of Moose. His political 
preference is with the Democratic party. A Roman 
Catholic in his religious views, he attends St. John's 
Church of that denomination. Dr. Callahan is as yet 
unmarried. 



BURT G. WEBSTER, a business man of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, was born in the city of Lawrence, 
that State, July 7, 1S63, son of Henry K. Webster, of 
Manchester, New Hampshire, and Elsa A. (Johnson) 
Webster. The former was engaged in the grain busi- 
ness, and died in 1920. 

Burt G. Webster was educated in the public schools, 
and was engaged in the real estate business on his own 
account at an early age. After a few years he discon- 
tinued this line and bought a bowling alley, which he 
successfully conducted for about four years. He then 
bought a garage, and is also owner of the Haverhill 
Taxicab Company. This business is the largest of its 
kind in Haverhill. Mr. Webster is a Mason, and a 
member of the Wachusett Club. 

Mr. Webster married, in 1S90, Ella E. Smith, daugh- 
ter of John and Lucy (Ladesey) Smith, of New York 
State. They are the parents of two sons: Chase W., 
and Benn R. The latter is in the regular army, and has 
been stationed in China for the last two vears. 



IRVING NOYES, box manufacturer of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, and treasurer and general manager of 
the A. Dalton Company of that city, is also among the 
foremost citizens there. He was born in that city 
March 25, 1875, the son of Raymond Noyes, of Atkin- 
son, New Hampshire, and Laura E. (Stockbridge) 
Noyes, also of New Hampshire. The former was 
engaged in the banking business the greater part of his 
life, and also served as tax collector for six years. 

Irving Noyes obtained his formal education in the 
public and high schools of his native city and soon 
afterwards entered the employ of the Taylor & Good- 
win Lumber Company, and after a year entered the 
employ of John Owens & Company, remaining until 
1903. Mr. Noyes then left John Owens & Company, 
where he was foreman and accepted a similar position 
with the A. Dalton Company. In 1908 Mr. Noyes 
became a member of this firm, which firm was estab- 
lished in January, 1895, by Annie Dalton, to manufacture 
a general line of wood and paper boxes, their business 
being confined largely to the shoe industry's needs. 
The business was ably carried on under the supervision 
of Miss Dalton until 1914, in which year Miss Dalton 
died, and Mr. Noyes assumed the full responsibility of 
the business. At this time Albert S. Eaton was 
admitted as president of the company, and Raymond 
Noyes as vice-president, and the business was carried 
on under the same name. In 1920 Mr. Eaton died, 
and Raymond Noyes was elected president, with Irving 
Noyes as treasurer and general manager. The growth 
and development of the business can be seen in a com- 
parison between the original output of about 2,000 boxes 




^e^rW Vi^/Scc^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



381 



a day to the present number of 25,000. From a modest 
start in a cellar on Phoenix Row, the increase in manu- 
facture demanded the modern factory now in use, cov- 
ering 20,000 square feet of floor space. 

Mr. Noyes is a member of the Association of National 
Paper Box Manufacturers, and of the Manufacturers' 
Association, and Associated Industries of Massachu- 
setts. He is also a director and has an interest in the 
Newton Box Companj', and is a member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

In 1897 Mr. Noyes married Minnie P. Eaton, of 
Haverhill, and their children are: Marjorie E., and 
Harlan S. Noyes. Mrs. Noyes is a daughter of Albert 
S. and Abbie E. Eaton, of Haverhill. Mr. and Mrs. 
Noyes attend the First Congregational Church of Brad- 
ford, and Mr. Noyes is a member of the finance commit- 
tee of that church. 



GEORGE W. BATTYE was born at Danvers, 
Massachusetts, July 31, 1856, and is a son of James and 
Sarah (Bailey) Battye, both of whom were born in 
England. James Battye, who was a weaver by trade, 
came to the United States when he was about thirty 
years of age. He fought for the Union in the Civil 
War, and towards the end of his term contracted a 
fever of which he died eleven days after he was mus- 
tered out of the service. Of his children only three, 
Mr. Battye, and his two sisters, Rhoda, the widow of 
John H. Parker, who is now a resident of Danvers, 
and Ella, now Mrs. Fred Thomas, who lives at Pea- 
body, Massachusetts, are living. 

Mr. Battye was educated in the public schools of 
Danvers. He became a farmer when his school days 
were over, but after spending four or five years on the 
land, turned back to city life and went to work in a 
shoe shop. There, in the three years that followed, he 
gained a practical knowledge of business methods. He 
then entered the service of the Pike & Whipple Com- 
pany, carriage manufacturers. He spent twenty-si.x years 
in the company's service and then, in partnership with 
A. H. Porter and C. H. Whipple, purchased the inter- 
est of Mr. Pike, the senior partner. Mr. Battye, with 
his partners, conducted the business successfully for 
eighteen years, at the end of which time, in January, 
1520, Mr. Battye sold his interest in the business and 
retired. 

In the course of his long and active life, Mr. Battye 
found time to serve as a member of the State Militia. 
He was a sergeant of the Eighth Regiment, Company K, 
of Danvers, from 1890 to 1893. He was a member of 
the Danvers Fire Department for seven years, and has 
been an engineer of the Fire Department for the past 
twenty-eight years, since 1893. 

Mr. Battye is an Episcopalian. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Improved Order of Red Men for the last 
forty years, and a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows for a quarter of a century. He became 
a Mason in 1920. 

Mr. Battye married Mary E. Blanchard, a daughter 
of James Edward and Armenia (Stone) Blanchard, of 
Peabody, Massachusetts. Mrs. Battye's father was born 
at Franklin, New Hampshire, and followed the trade 
of a carpenter. Mrs. Battye was born at Sandwich, 
New Hampshire, before her parents moved to Massa- 



chusetts. She has one sister, who is now Mrs. Nancy 
Tauch, and a brother, John Blanchard, who died in 
Beverly. Mr. and Mrs. Battye have no children, but 
reared as their own, since the age of five weeks, Mabel 
Blanchard, daughter of Lewis E. and Gertrude L. 
(Glover) Blanchard. She is now the wife of Chester 
E. Wheeler, of Danvers, and they have a son, Donald 
Battj'e Wheeler. 

DAVID A. TEEL, who was born in Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, fifty-eight years ago, is now treasurer of 
the Newburyport Counter Company, and has an envi- 
able reputation in his native city. He is well known to 
many of the older residents, and generally esteemed by 
them. He was born on December 13, 1863, the son of 
John T. and Paulina (Kimball) Teel, both of York, 
Maine, where his father was a shipbuilder. David A. 
was one of eleven children, his parents having four 
sons and seven daughters. His father originally fol- 
lowed his trade in Maine, but later in Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, which was the home of the family for 
many years. David A. Teel was only eight years old, 
however, when his father died in 1871. He was an 
orphan at eleven, his mother dying in 1874. By that 
time he had almost passed through the Newburyport 
elementary school, and was able to take up the serious 
affairs of life. For many years after leaving school he 
worked at the trade of his father, that of shipbuilding, 
later transferring his energy to the leather business of 
a brother, J. H. Teel, in whose plant he worked for 
several years. There, and during the ten succeeding 
years of service to Walter Smith, he gained compre- 
hensive knowledge of leather, and in 1902 was influenced 
to enter into that business for himself. In that year, in 
partnership with Charles Stevens and John H. Teel, 
he established the Newburyport Counter Company, and 
opened a factory at No. 282 Merrimac street. The plant 
has ever since been steadily operated, and now has a 
capacity of 30,000 pairs of counters a day, and finds 
employment for twenty-five persons. The factory uses 
about 10,000 square feet of floor space, and turns out a 
reliable product Mr. Teel is the principal stockholder. 
The present members of the firm are: Daniel J. Kelle- 
her, president; David A. Teel, treasurer; Charles W. 
Stevens ; and Mrs. John H. Teel. 

Mr. Teel was married, in 191 5, to Helen F. Hatch, 
of Newburyport, daughter of Horace and Florence 
(Gemignani) Hatch, the former now in business as a 
painter in the city. She is Mr. Teel's second wife, and 
both of Mr. Teel's children were born to him by his 
first wife. His children are: Ethel G., who married 
Mr. Fairbanks ; and Louis K. 



JOHN S. LARRABEE is one of those men who 
know the shoe trade from the bottom to the top, for he 
has traveled the whole distance, not by leaps and bounds, 
but step by step. Starting at the age of nineteen, he 
has spent his working life with one firm and now is a 
greatly esteemed partner in that same concern. A man 
as faithful to his friends as he has been to his work, 
dependable under stress or difficulty, helpful always, 
Mr. Larrabee has won for himself an enviable place 
in the hearts and minds of his fellows. His father, 
Lemuel H. Larrabee, was in the shoe industry of Ken- 



382 



ESSEX COUNTY 



nebunk, Maine. His mother was Lucretia (Stevens) 
Larrabee. , 

John S. Larrabee was born at Kennebunk, Maine, 
October 12, 1873. At the age of nineteen he went to 
work in a shoe shop, the Kimball Brothers factory, at 
Kennebunk, one of the oldest and most important of its 
kind, having been founded in l86i, at Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts. By faithful, hard work he gained for him- 
self steady advancement, being made foreman of the 
finishing department in 1892, foreman of the making 
department in 1893, at which time the plant was moved 
from Kennebunk, Maine, to Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
In 1898, he was made superintendent. When the com- 
pany was incorporated in 1919, Mr. Larrabee became a 
member and the name vras changed to The Alfred 
Kimball Shoe Company. It is one of the most import- 
ant shoe manufacturing concerns in the city, employing 
over three hundred and fifty operatives, doing a busi- 
ness in the fiscal year of 1919-20, of over a million and 
a half dollars, and catering to a trade as widespread as 
the South and West and Cuba. 

Mr. Larrabee is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, in Lawrence. Fraternally, he is a member of 
Tuscan Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Mt. 
Sinai Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Lawrence Coun- 
cil, Royal and Select Masters; Bethany Commandery, 
Knights Templar ; and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, being past chancellor 
commander of Quintaro Lodge, of Lawrence. Both 
Mr. Larrabee and his family are interested and helpful 
members of the Congregational church. 

In 1899, at Lawrence, Massachusetts, he married 
Marcia Dean Bancroft, daughter of George Bancroft, a 
well-known wholesaler of beef in Lawrence, and his 
wife, Julia (Gowan) Bancroft. Their residence is in 
Lawrence. Mr. and Mrs. Larrabee have one child, 
Julia Lucretia, born July 2, 1909. 



JAMES M. McLEOD, of the jewelry firm of Wood- 
bury & McLeod, was born in Cumberland, Nova Scotia, 
February 4, 1884, son of Alexander D. and Elizabeth 
(Bruce) McLeod. The former was engaged in the pro- 
vision business at Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, for many 
years, until his death in 1915. His wife, who died in 
1920, was a native of Pictou, Nova Scotia. 

Mr. McLeod was educated in the public schools of his 
native town and also attended school in Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, whence he had removed with his par- 
ents. For eight years following the completion of his 
formal education Mr. McLeod worked in the shoe indus- 
try, resigning from this occupation to work for E. J. 
Hodgdon as a watch salesman, also selling diamonds. 
After two years he entered this business on his own 
account, entering into partnership with J. E. Woodbury, 
under the firm name of Woodbury & McLeod, carry- 
ing a line of jewelry, watches and talking machines, 
with a place of business located at No. 47 Merrimack 
street, where they remained until 1920. At this time 
larger quarters were needed to take care of the fast 
growing business and, accordingly, they moved to No. 
174 Merrimack street; their new quarters have twenty- 
five feet of frontage and sixty feet depth, and Messrs. 



Woodbury & McLeod are the largest dealers in watches 
and diamonds in Haverhill. 

Mr. McLeod is a member of the Masonic order, affil- 
iating with Pentucket Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; he 
is also a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and the .^gawam Club. 

Mr. McLeod married, in 1907, Agnes Grace Estes, of 
Bradford, Massachusetts, and their children are : Mar- 
jorie Grace, Paul A., Stewart S., Arline, and James M., 
Jr. With his family Mr. McLeod is a member of the 
Presbyterian church of Haverhill. 



DR. JAMES HAROLD POWERS, one of the 

leading younger members of the dental fraternity of 
Essex county, Massachusetts, was born in this city, 
February I, 1894, the son of John and Mary T. (Mul- 
cahy) Powers. John Powers was assistant superin- 
tendent of the Danvers Bleachery for many years, and 
died in Peabody, October 10, 1917. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Powers were born two children : James Harold, of 
further mention ; and John A., superintendent of the 
C. F. Mulcahy Company. 

James Harold Powers obtained the elementary portion 
of his education in the local public schools and then 
entered St. John's Preparatory School at Danvers, Mas- 
sachusetts, subsequently matriculating at Tufts Dental 
College, from which he was graduated in 1918, with the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine. That same year 
he passed the Massachusetts State Board examinations, 
after which he enlisted in the United States Navy, but 
was not called to active service, and on April I, 1919, 
began his professional career at Peabody, in the O'Shea 
building, moving, however, to No. 297 Essex street, 
Salem, in February, 1921. He is thorough and painstak- 
ing in his treatment of every patient who consults him, 
and by reading and research keeps well informed on all 
matters pertaining to the profession. In 1918 Dr. 
Powers was appointed dental examiner for the United 
States Public Health Service in the Seventh Massa- 
chusetts District, his duties consisting of the care of 
soldiers, sailors and marines who come under the 
Bureau of War Risk Insurance. Dr. Powers holds 
membership in the leading dental organizations, among 
them being the American Dental Association, the New 
England Dental Association, and the Essex County 
Dental Society. In politics Dr. Powers is an Independ- 
ent, preferring to remain free from all partisan influ- 
ences in the exercise of his own judgment on public 
issues. In religion he is a Roman Catholic, and is a 
prominent member of St. John's Roman Catholic Church 
of Peabody. 

RICHARD J. SHEA— One of the best known men 
in Lawrence, Massachusetts, is Richard J. Shea, who for 
twenty-five years was clerk of the City Council, and 
for very long city auditor. Indeed, he has the distinc- 
tion of being longer in office as auditor than any other 
man now living in the State of Massachusetts. 

Mr. Shea was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, on 
May 30, 1855, son of Michael and Margaret (Bradley) 
Shea. His mother was born in the city of Cork, Ire- 
land, and she died in Lawrence in 1890; his father was 
born in the County of Cork, and lived until 1917. He 



THE NEVi? YORK " , 
1 PUBLIC LIBRARY' 

ASTOR, L,E?NOX . 

Lnrr.F.NFOUNDA'^tONSJ 





InviL^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



383 



was a veteran of the Civil War, service which brought 
him honorable place in American records, and also 
many sincere friends and comrades in Lawrence. Mich- 
ael and Margaret (Bradley) Shea had six children, 
two sons and four daughters, Richard J., being the first- 
boni. He was still in early boyhood when his father 
went away to war. His education was obtained in the 
Lawrence public school, and afterwards he took a busi- 
ness course at the Lawrence Commercial School. En- 
tering business life, he was for a short while in the 
Pacific Mills in Lawrence, but soon went into the 
grocer)- business, which line he followed for fourteen 
years, then went to Salem for a short while, and 
returning to Lawrence worked for the Spigot River 
Commission. He was thus employed until January, 
1886. when he was appointed clerk of the Common 
Council of Lawrence. At the same time he was elected 
city auditor, and he held both these offices continu- 
ously, until 1912, when the Council was abolished. He, 
however, is still city auditor, a proud distinction, for 
he has the State record as such. 

Mr. Shea has necessarily been more or less promi- 
nent in most of the public movements in Lawrence 
during the last few decades. He was secretary of the 
Democratic City Committee; is paymaster of the State 
Aid of Soldiers' Relief, and belongs to several fraternal 
orders. He is a member of the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians ; the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, of which he is senior past exalted ruler; and the 
Foresters. Needless to say, Mr. Shea has a wide circle 
of friends. He is a member of St. Mary's Roman Cath- 
olic Church. 

Mr. Shea married, in 1899, Anna L. Herbst, who was 
born in Germany. They have two children : Richard 
J., Jr., who was born in 1900; and Margaret, born in 
1907. The son was a member of the Students' Army 
Training Corps, at Villanova College, and later, for a 
short period, was stationed at Camp Lee, Virginia. 



CHARLES L. WARE, steam and power engineer 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was bom in Frederickton, 
New Brunswick, November 5, 1875. son of Walter B. 
Ware, born in 1853. at Wrentham, Massachusetts, now 
engaged in the lumber business, and Eunice (Newcomb) 
Ware, born April 6, 1853, at Pictou, Nova Scotia, who 
died in 1898. 

Mr. Ware was educated in the public schools of Rut- 
land and Springfield, Massachusetts, and soon after 
leaving school went to work for the Lakeville Woolen 
Company, at West Rutland, Massachusetts, where he 
remained for four years, and then was employed at the 
Massachusetts State Primary School. A year was 
spent in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, employed by the 
Manville Company there, and thence Mr. Ware removed 
to Worcester, Massachusetts, where he worked for 
almost five years as engineer of the E. D. Thayer Com- 
pany. Following this position, Mr. Ware was em- 
ployed by the .\merican Steel and Wire Company of 
that city, and later removed to Norwood, Massachusetts, 
and entered the employ of Winslow Brothers, as assist- 
ant master mechanic. After three years an opportunity 
came to fill the position of chief engineer of the Mystic 
Dye Works at Medford, Massachusetts, and Mr. Ware 
remained there three years. He then became master 



mechanic of the Hockanum Mills at Rockville, Connec- 
ticut, and after six years there, held a similar position 
with the Standish Worsted Company, of Plymouth. 
Until 1918 he was chief engineer of the .\ssabet Mills 
of the American Woolen Company, at Maynard, Mas- 
sachusetts, and in the latter year he was appointed 
engineer of steam and water power for all the mills of 
the above company, with headquarters at Lawrence, 
which position he now holds. Mr. Ware's vast experi- 
ence in his line of work has been of untold value to him, 
and each succeeding employer received the benefits 
derived from previous experiences. 

Mr. Ware is a Republican; a member of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers of New York; and 
fraternally he is a member of Fayette Lodge, No. 69, 
Free and Accepted Masons of Rockville, Connecticut; 
Adoniram Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Rockville; 
Adoniram Council, Royal and Select Masters, of Rock- 
ville: and a member of the Blue Room Club, of Boston; 
and the National Association of Stationary Engineers. 

Mr. Ware married, in 1898, Helen Moulton, born 
July 7, 1873, at Rutland. Massachusetts, daughter of 
Menzies R. Moulton, and they are the parents of : Myrtle 
H. Ware, born at Norwood, in 1901; and Miriam E. 
Ware, born in 1904, at Medford. 



RALPH W. PRESCOTT was born in the State of 

Maine in 186S. His father. John Prescott, was the 
owner and proprietor of a Maine farm. 

Mr. Prescott was educated in the public schools of 
his native State. After his studies were completed, he 
occupied himself with agricultural work until he was 
thirty-four years old, becoming a farmer like his father. 
In 1903 he moved to Danvers, Massachusetts, and after 
obtaining temporary employment as a farmer for a few 
months, he began to raise poultry for the market. He 
spent four years in the poultry business and then became 
a manufacturer of concrete blocks for building purposes. 
Mr. Prescott has conducted this business successfully 
for the past eleven years and finds his product in great 
demand as building material for houses, garages, and 
other structures. 

Mr. Prescott attends the L'niversalist church. He is 
a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and belongs to the lodge at Salem. 

Mr. Prescott married Alice E. Keyes, of Winthrop, 
Maine, and they are the parents of a son, Ralph W. 
Prescott, Jr. 



CHARLES E. TYLER, retired shoe manufacturer. 
Civil War soldier, and for many years identified with 
the town administration of Georgetown, Massachusetts, 
as well as with its general public affairs, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts. July 7, 1839, the son of Caleb 
Greenleaf and Rooxbie L. (Chaplin) Tyler. His mother 
was originally of Georgetown, but his father, who died 
in i860, was for several years a merchant in Montgom- 
ery, Alabama. 

Mr. Tyler was educated in Georgetown public schools, 
and also attended the Putnam Free School, after leav- 
ing which he worked in his father's store for three years. 
He next entered the shoe factory of a relative, H. P. 
Chaplin, with whom he remained for seven years, after 
which, having mastered the trade, he became a manu- 



384 



ESSEX COUNTY 



facturer himself, oiiening in independent business as 
such, under the trading name of Charles E. Tyler. Six 
years later he sold his business and went to Bangor, 
Maine, where for ten years he operated a moccasin fac- 
tory. In 1883 he returned to Georgetown and became 
the head of Little & Company, Inc., manufacturers of 
shoes. In 1886 he retired altogether from business, and 
since that time has lived in Georgetown, devoting his 
time to public and communal affairs. He has been a 
Mason for fifty-two years, and for very many years has 
been a member of the local post of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. His Civil War service was with the 
50th Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry. He served 
for about thirteen months, then was honorably dis- 
charged at Wenham, Massachusetts. 

In the public affairs of Georgetown he is of record 
as follows: Chairman of the board of selectmen: over- 
seer of the poor; town auditor; chairman of the board 
of assessors; and also as trustee of the Peabody Library, 
the Georgetown Savings Bank, and the Board of Invest- 
ments. In several other capacities he has helped in com- 
munity affairs. 

Mr. Tyler married, November 8, 1862, Caroline N. 
Harriman, daughter of William Brown Harriman, shoe 
manufacturer of Georgetown, and his wife, Olive (Nel- 
son) Harriman. Mr. and Mrs. Tyler have no living 
children, both of their two children dying in early 
infancy. 



AUGUSTUS PEABODY LORING, JR.— Among 
the younger members of professional men in Beverly, 
Massachusetts, Augustus Peabody Loring, Jr., is a 
noteworthy figure. He was born in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, on April 16, 1885, and is a son of Augustus and 
Ellen (Gardner) Loring, long residents of that city. 
As a boy Mr. Loring attended the Noble and Green- 
ough schools, of Boston. Massachusetts, and later 
entered Harvard University, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1908, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. But 
his chosen career was the law, and he followed this 
course with legal studies at Harvard Law School, and 
also at the Boston L^niversity Law School. 

Mr. Loring became associated with Alfred Bowditch, 
the well known Boston trustee, specializing in the man- 
agement of estates. Mr, Loring has been largely instru- 
mental in the growth and development of the business 
since that time, and is now the active head of the firm. 
They handle some very important work, and act as 
trustees for many of the famous estates in this vicinity. 
The offices of the company are at No. in Devonshire 
street, in Boston, but Mr. Loring resides in Beverly. 

In social and fraternal circles in both places Mr. 
Loring is widely known and popular. He is, a member 
of the Free and Accepted Masons, of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the Somerset 
Club, and the Exchange Qub, both of Boston, and is 
also a member of the L^nion Club, of Beverly. His 
religious convictions place his membership with the 
Unitarian church. 

Mr. Loring married Rosamond Bowditch, daughter 
of Alfred and Mary L. (Rief) Bowditch, of Boston, 
and they have four children : Mary D. ; Rose ; Augustus 
P., 3d; and Ellen Gardner. 



C. E. BRAGDON— One of the leading hardware 
stores of the town of Danvers, Massachusetts, is that 
of C. E. Bragdon, whose long experience in this line 
of business in Boston gives him an unusual advantage 
in anticipating the requirements of the local trade. 

Mr. Bragdon is a son of William E. and Nancy E. 
(Boardman) Bragdon. William E. Bragdon was a 
machinist by occupation, and the family were for many 
years residents of Gloucester, Massachusetts. There 
were four daughters, Susan, Grace, Annie. Jennie, and 
the one son, whose name heads this review, was the 
youngest child, 

C. E. Bragdon was born in Salem, Massachusetts, in 
1885, and received his education in the public and high 
schools of that city. He entered the business world in 
the employ of C. H. Price, a prominent druggist of 
that day in Salem, but did not remain permanently in 
this business. After a short time he went to Boston 
and entered the employ of Frye, Phipps & Company, a 
large wholesale hardware concern, with whom he 
remained for fourteen years. From 1906 until igi6 he 
represented the company on the road in the capacity of 
salesman. On November i, 1916, Mr. Bragdon entered 
the retail hardware business in Danvers, succeeding 
L. J. Ross, at the old location at No. 53 Maple street. 
This store was founded by Mr. Ross in 1891. and was 
even then a prosperous interest. Under Mr. Bragdon's 
hand the 'business has grown and developed widely, and 
is now a leading source of supply for the vicinity of 
Danvers. 

Mr. Bragdon is prominent in the trade, and is now a 
member of the board of directors of the New England 
Hardware Association, having been elected to that posi- 
tion in March, 1920. Fraternally, Mr. Bragdon holds 
the thirty-second degree in the Masonic order. Politi- 
cally, he is affiliated with the Republican party. He is 
a member of the Salem Tabernacle, and was superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school in 1913 and 1914. 

Mr. Bragdon married Elizabeth Graham, of Salem, 
and they have two daughters: Lucille E., born in 
1906, and Nancy E,, born in 1916. 



PERCY HAROLD FERNALD— Portsmouth (New 
Hampshire) Navy Yard stands on land which 
was once owned by the ancestors of Percy Harold 
Fernald, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, and his wife's 
genealogy is rich in (Colonial New England connections. 

Percy Harold Fernald was born in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, on March 14, 1875, son of Charles and 
Lucy (Keene) Fernald, of Kittery, Maine, his father a 
shipbuilder. 

Percy H. Fernald attended the public schools of 
Portsmouth, and after leaving school, found employ- 
ment as telegraph messenger in his native place, even- 
tually becoming an operator. This brought him some- 
what into line with things electrical, and from the needle 
instrument he went into the employ of Morris Swartz, 
an electrical contractor, at Portsmouth. There he 
learned the trade, and in course of time became an 
electrician, finding work as such with the Portsmouth 
Electric Company. In 1901 he came to Newburyport 
and entered into connection with James Dickins, for 
whom he worked until 1913. when he went into business 
in Newburyport for himself, as an electrical contractor. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



385 



He at first rented a store and shop at No. 4 Middle 
street, but eventually increasing business caused him 
to seek larger quarters, which he found at No. 38 
Pleasant street, his present address. Mr. Fernald has 
shown that he has expert knowledge of his trade, and 
that he is also an alert, enterprising business man. His 
present establishment is stated to be very complete, his 
stock the largest in Newburyport in that line. 

Mr. Fernald is one of the aggressive business men of 
the city and is quite popular among them. He attends 
the Central Church, and shows a generous interest in 
church and communal movements. He is a member of 
St. Mark's Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; and 
King Cyrus Chapter. Royal Arch Masons. 

Mr. Fernald married, in 1S97, Grace M. Clark, of 
Dover, New Hampshire, daughter of Joseph and Helen 
(Estes) Clark, of that place, and a descendant of notable 
Colonial New England houses. Both families are 
among the oldest in New England, and have given to 
the nation and to the New England states many dis- 
tinguished sons. Mr. and Mrs. Percy H. Fernald 
have three children : Martha Estes, who was born in 
1898; Arthur Herbert, born in IQOO; and Helen Cather- 
ine, born in 1903. 



WILLIAM HENRY SEARS, JR., was born at 
Kingsley Falls, Canada, on July 16, 1875, and is a son 
of William H. and Sarah (Robinson) Sears, both Can- 
adians. The elder Mr. Sears, who was the proprietor 
of an hotel, died in 1919. 

William H. Sears, Jr., received his early education 
in the public schools of Newburyport, Massachusetts. 
After completing his studies he went to Louisville. Ken- 
tucky, where he entered the service of R. M. Hughes & 
Company. In 1894, after having spent four years at 
Louisville, Mr. Sears came to Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
and obtained a position with Harold F. Blake, a manu- 
facturer of shoe patterns. He remained with Mr, Blake 
for some years, and then entered the service of Mr. 
Bourque, his present partner. In 1910 he formed a 
"partnership with Mr. Bourque, under the firm name of 
Bourque & Sears. Up to the present time the partners, 
whose offices are at No. 64 Wingate street, have devoted 
themselves exclusively to the manufacture and sale of 
shoe patterns. 

Mr, Sears is a member of the Masonic order, and 
belongs to all the Masonic bodies in the York Rite, 
including the fourteenth in the Scottish Rite, also the 
Mystic Shrine; he also is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

Mr. Sears married Georgia Blanche .Atkins, of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, in 1898, she a daughter of Edward 
and Annette (Perkins) Atkins, the former a native of 
Rochester, New Hampshire, who engaged in the shoe 
manufacturing industry. Mrs. Atkins was born at 
Altonbay, New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Sears have 
no children. 



EPES SARGENT — For many years a resident of 
Essex. Massachusetts, Epes Sargent has been identified 
with the ship-building industry for more than thirty 
years. 

Mr. Sargent was born in Petite Riviere, Nova Scotia, 
April 29, 1863, and is a son of William H. and Edna 
Essex — 2 — 25 



Burnham (Perkins) Sargent. The elder Mr. Sargent 
was a native of Bayview, Gloucester, Massachusetts, 
and was engaged in the shoe business until his death in 
1874. His wife died in Esse.x in 1903. 

Coming with the family to Essex in his childhood, Mr. 
Sargent was educated in the public schools of this town. 
Later he was interested in the manufacture of fishing 
tackle, in the employ of the H. W. Mears Company, of 
Essex, then became connected with the James & Son 
shipyards, and has remained with this concern contin- 
uously since. He has been closely identified with much 
of the finest work which has gone out from these yards, 
and was one of the inboard joiners on the "Mayflower," 
which was launched in the spring of 1921. 

In the public life of the city Mr. Sargent has long 
been a prominent figure. His first public service was 
as town auditor, and thereafter, for twenty-five consecu- 
tive years, he served as town clerk. He has been a 
member of the Volunteer Fire Department for thirty- 
seven years, and is now filling the position of engineer 
for the second time. 

Mr. Sargent is a member of Starr King Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias: is a charter member of Fernwood 
Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen; and is a 
member of Ocean Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is a member of the Univcrsalist church 
of Esse.x. 

Mr. Sargent married, in 1885, Caddie F. Cook, of 
Essex, and they have one daughter, Seola Florence. 



HENRY N. BOURQUE was born on September 26, 
1874, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, and is a son of Xiste 
Bourque and Olive (Vellaire) Bourque. Mr. Bourque's 
father was a French Canadian, engaged in the shoe 
manufacturing industry; he died in 1917. His mother 
was a native of Vermont. 

Mr. Bourque received his early education in the 
public schools of Haverhill. After completing his 
studies he entered the employment of the Webster 
Machinery Company, where he worked for three years. 
He then decided to engage in the leather industrv and 
spent eight years working for various firms, thus acquir- 
ing a thorough knowledge of the industry. At the end 
of this period, feeling himself fully qualified by knowl- 
edge and experience to engage in business for himself, 
Mr. Bourque formed a partnership with Mr. Brown. 
Under the firm name of Bourque & Brown, the partners 
engaged in the leather industry and met with complete 
success. After a time, however, Mr. Bourque withdrew 
from the firm and established himself in business as an 
individual. His enterprise prospered, and at length, in 
1910, he took William Henry Sears, who had been in 
his employment for some time, into partnership with 
him. The firm is now known as Bourque & Sears, and 
its offices are at No. 64 Wingate street, Haverhill. Up 
to the present time the partners have engaged exclusively 
in the manufacture and sale of shoe patterns. Mr. 
Bourque is a member of the Knights of Pj'thias, and 
also belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men. 

Mr. Bourque married, in 1897, Mary Roston, of Eng- 
land, the daughter of Edward P. and Mary Roston. 
Both of her parents were English by birth. Edward P. 
Roston, Mrs. Bourque's father, who was a barber, died 
in 1913. Mr. and Mrs. Bourque have no children. 



386 



ESSEX COUNTY 



EDWARD E. CHASE— In the many branches of 
the public service there is none which holds greater 
responsibility than that of the fire department. In Lynn, 
Massachusetts, Edward E. Chase is the capable chief 
of the fire department. A man of fine executive ability, 
and devoted to the progress and success of his depart- 
ment, lie is carrying forward its interests, inspiring the 
rank and file to the highest achievement, and making 
history which will hold a thrill of satisfaction for future 
generations. 

Mr. Chase is a son of Zachariah J. Chase, who was 
born in Poland, Maine, and came to Essex county in his 
youth. He was one of the original partners of the Z. J. 
Chase & Sons Ice Company, of Lynn, which he was 
instrumental in organizing. He was one of the prin- 
cipals in its development, and was connected with this 
business the remainder of his lifetime. He died about 
three years ago. He married Harriet Moon, who was 
born in Lynn, Massachusetts, and was the daughter of 
English parents. She died eight years ago in this city. 

Edward E. Chase, son of Zachariah J. and Harriet 
(Moon) Chase, was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, on 
June 8, 1862. He received his early education in the 
public schools of the city, then completed his studies 
at the high school. At fifteen years of age he started 
life in the ice business, which he followed up to the time 
he was fifty. He was in the employ of the Lynn Ice 
Company for seven years, then on June i, 1886. he 
became interested for himself in the firm of Z. J. Chase 
& Sons, which was comprised of his father, himself and 
his brothers. 

In this capacity Mr. Chase became a well-known 
figure in the business life of the city. On March 8, 
1885, he became identified with the Lynn Fire Depart- 
ment as a call man, and on March 12, 1899, was 
appointed call captain. As time passed he became more 
and more important in the department, filling the office 
of lieutenant for a period of five years. Then, for per- 
sonal reasons, Mr. Chase resigned from this office, once 
more holding the less responsible position of call man. 
Later on, the demands of other affairs releasing him, it 
was with great satisfaction to his friends, and also to the 
general public, that the news became known of his 
appointment, on December 13, 1912, as chief of the fire 
department of the city of Lynn, Massachusetts. He still 
holds that position, administering the affairs under his 
charge with the judgment and efficiency which have 
marked every step in his public career. 

Mr. Chase is now at work on a record which will be 
of permanent value to the people of Lynn, not only as 
a community, but as individuals, and that is a history 
of the Volunteer and Paid Fire departments of the city 
of Lynn. His long service in the department, familiariz- 
ing him with the legends of the early days, and giving 
him a clear insight into the life-story of the individuals 
who make up this splendid force, has prepared him to 
place this history before the public in its true relation 
to the people, and with its full significance apparent. 

Mr. Chase is a member of the International Associa- 
tion of Fire Engineers. In public life, so far as political 
affiliations are concerned, Mr. Chase is independent of 
party obligations, and will give unreserved support to 
no aggregation of public sentiment. He thinks for 
himself, as his father did, in the days when to think for 



himself required courage in any man. He is a member 
of the Massachusetts Fire Chiefs' Club. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Chase is popular and widely 
known. He is a member of the Free and .\ccepted 
Masons; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both 
the lodge and the encampment: the Improved Order of 
Red Men ; the Knights of Pythias, and the Rebekahs. 
He attends the Maple Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church, of Lynn. 

On May 5, 1887, Mr. Chase married Myra P. Crowell, 
born in Salem, Massachusetts, daughter of James P. 
and Rosetta (Avery) Crowell. Mr. Crowell was a 
tailor, and lived to the age of ninety-four. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chase have had three children, but only one is 
living. Alma, the wife of Harold E. Hunt, assistant 
manager of J. B. Blood's Market, in Lynn, and they 
have two children, Lendall and Calvert. 



JOHN J. KENNEDY— In Salem, Massachusetts, 
John J. Kennedy first saw the light, there was educated, 
and there he is now well established in the insurance 
business. He is a son of John Kennedy, who was an 
employee of the United States Custom House at Salem 
until his death in 1900. John Kennedy married Mar- 
garet Howe, of Salem, who also passed away in 1909. 

John J. Kennedy was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 
October 26, 1892, and there was educated in St. Mary's 
Parochial School. After completing his studies he 
secured a position as salesman with the P. J. Kennedy 
Company of Boston, Massachusetts, and for nine years 
he remained with that company. He then resigned and 
entered the life insurance business as agent for the 
John Hancock Company. He remained with that com- 
pany two years, then established a general insurance 
office under his own name. He has been very success- 
ful and has built up a strong and profitable agency. 

During the World War, 1917-18, Mr. Kennedy enlisted 
in the 12th Depot Brigade, stationed at Camp Devens, 
but soon contracted a disability and was honorably dis- 
charged. He is a member of the Salem Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, the Knights of Columbus, and the American 
Legion. He is a member of the Church of the Immacu- 
late Conception, and a man highly esteemed. Mr. Ken- 
nedy represents in his agency these companies : Law 
Union and Rock ; British-.\merican ; Virginia Fire and 
Marine; Great Lakes Insurance Company; Massachu- 
setts Bonding and Insurance Company; Ocean Accident 
and Guarantee Corporation ; New Amsterdam ; Conti- 
nental Casualty; and Union Central Life Insurance 
Company. 



CHESTER C. BURNHAM, long active in the busi- 
ness and social life of Essex, Massachusetts, was born 
there, March 15, 1861, and is a son of George Franks 
and Martha M. (Stanwood) Burnham. His father, a 
lifelong resident of Essex, was a shipbuilder in his 
younger days, and later conducted a general store until 
his death, November 20, 1893. His mother, who was 
born in Ipswich, died January 10, 1915, at the age of 
seventy-one years. 

Receiving a practical education in the schools of 
Essex, Mr. Burnham entered the employ of S. B. Fuller 




^cifrrTi^aC^ &, ^'^/oa^^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



3«7 



& Son. shoe manufacturers of Essex, remaining with 
them for about three years. He then went to Lynn, 
where he was employed in the factory of B. F. Spinney 
& Son, remaining there for about one year. Thereafter 
returning to Essex, he followed the shore for a short 
time, then later became associated with his father in 
the general store. This was the first store of its kind 
in Essex, and since the death of the founder, his son 
has carried on the business under his own name, with 
gratifying success. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Burnham has always been 
prominent. He was one of the founders of Starr King 
Lodge. Knights of Pythias, named after Thomas Starr 
King, and organized May 13, 1890; also a member of 
the uniformed rank, Knights of Pythias. He has long 
been a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks in Essex, and was a founder of the Essex Post 
of the American Legion. He is a member of the Uni- 
versalist church of Essex. 

Mr. Burnham married, in 1880, Laura M. Andrews, 
of Essex, and they have two daughters: Neva C, and 
Nettie H. Their two grandsons are Chester O. Riggs, 
and Rav Burnham Butler. 



ELIZABETH ANN LETHBRIDGE— In the dry 

goods business in Manchester, Massachusetts, Elizabeth 
Ann Lethbridge holds a position of prominence. She 
was born in Catalina, Newfoundland, and is a daughter 
of Ezekiel and Abigail (Pardy) Lethbridge, of that 
place. Ezekiel Lethbridge was a native of Newfound- 
land, and for the greater part of his life followed the 
sea as captain of a sailing vessel. The mother was born 
in Bonavista, Newfoundland. 

Coming to Manchester, Massachusetts, when a young 
girl. Miss Lethbridge gained her education in the public 
and high schools of the town. When graduated from 
high school she won the Appleton gold medal, awarded 
by the town of Manchester for the best student of the 
year 1901. Shortly after her graduation Miss Leth- 
bridge entered the employ of George Foster Allen, 
a leading dry goods merchant of Manchester at that 
time, remaining there for eight years. When Mr. Allen 
sold the business to Harry G. Nichols she remained 
with the store, but about a year later resigned to accept 
a responsible position in the dry goods business con- 
ducted by Harry S. Tappan. Continuing there for one 
year, she founded her present business on February 22, 
1911. and is still going forward in her chosen field of 
business endeavor. Her first location was on Union 
street, where she remained for one year, but for the 
past eleven years the store has been at the present loca- 
tion on Beach street. 

Miss Lethbridge is a member of the Women's Relief 
Corps of Manchester, and of Pocahontas Lodge. She 
is a member of the Red Cross, and during the World 
War was very active as a teacher in Red Cross work. 
She is a member of the Baptist church of Manchester. 



a member of the Gloucester Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic. Mr. Poole married Harriet B. Piggies, of 
Gloucester, and she died in 1914; he died in igi/. 

Alfred T. Poole was educated in the public schools, 
and following in his father's line, learned the painter's 
trade, which occupation he followed from 1884 until 
1914; leaving Gloucester in 1889 for Boston, where he 
remained until 1894, then removing to Hamilton, Mr. 
Poole engaged in the painting business for himself, 
discontinuing it in 1914 to become proprietor of a 
variety store, which occupied his attention for a year. 
The duties of chief of police demanded his entire atten- 
tion and Mr. Poole gave up his other interests in order 
that he might devote his energies to this office. 

In 1900 Mr. Poole was elected constable, and each 
succeeding year was reelected to this office. In 1907 
and 1908 he was appointed chief of police and again in 
1915, which office he now holds. 

Mr. Poole married, in 1888, Minnie F. Duriss, of 
Cambridge, and she died in 1910. Their children were: 
Frank H. ; Thomas A.; Martha E. ; James E. ; William 
F. ; Albert N., and Josephine G. James E. Poole, the 
third son, enlisted at the age of nineteen years, in 1916, 
in the United States army and served with the troops 
in Mexico, a member of the loist Field Artillery, Bat- 
tery D, as corporal. In 1917 he was again called for 
duty from Salem and was commissioned sergeant. He 
served for eighteen months overseas with the American 
Expeditionary Forces. He was badly gassed while on 
duty in France, and was discharged in April, 1920. The 
family attend the Methodist Episcopal church of 
Hamilton. 



ALFRED T. POOLE, chief of police of Hamilton. 
Massachusetts, was born in Gloucester, that State, June 
10, 1866. Thomas S. Poole, his father, was also of 
Gloucester, and was in the painting business there. 
During the Civil War he served from his home town, 
holding the rank of corporal at his discharge. He was 



GEORGE H. GIBNEY— As one of the most public- 
spirited citizens of Hamilton, Massachusetts, George H. 
Gibney has often been called upon to hold positions of 
trust and responsibility. He is among the leading busi- 
ness men of that place, being engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business for the past twenty-one years. 
Mr. Gibney was born October 24, 1858, in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, son of John and Elizabeth A. (Brown) Gib- 
ney. His father was engaged in the tanning business 
until his death, which occurred in 1890. His mother 
was a native of Rye, New Hampshire. 

Mr. Gibney was educated in the public schools, and 
after leaving school, worked in the leather business with 
his father for five years. He then went to Hamilton, 
where he followed farming for a short time, returning 
again to Salem and to the leather business. After two 
years Mr. Gibney again took up farming on the old 
Gibney Farm, where he remained until 1890. Fronj 
1890 to 1900 he was engaged in business as a teaming 
contractor. Since 1900 he has been in the real estate 
business as above mentioned. 

Mr. Gibney has given much of his time to public 
service ; he has never been too busy to heed its call. 
In 1891 he was elected selectman and served for three 
years ; in 1898 he was again elected to this office and 
has held it since that time. In 1898 Mr. Gibney was 
made town assessor, which office he still holds, and in 
1902 he represented the interests of his party, as repre- 
sentative to the General Court of Massachusetts. The 
number of years Mr. Gibney has held office is suffi- 
cient warrant of the esteem in which he is held, and 



^^8S 



ESSEX COUNTY 



he has also served as chairman of the Republican Com- 
mittee for several years; overseer of the poor; member 
of the Board of Heahh; and a member of the Cemetery 
Committee. 

Mr. Gibney married, in 1889, Annie L. Whipple, of 
Hamilton, daughter of Alonzo and Abbie (Kenney) 
Whipple, and they attend the Episcopal church of 
Hamilton. 



ARTHUR C. CUMINGS, prominent business man 
of South Hamilton, Massachusetts, and holder of sev- 
eral public offices, was born February 20, 1870, in Tops- 
field, that State. His father, Alfred Cumings, died in 
1903; he was a farmer during his active lifetime. The 
mother of Mr. Cumings was a native of Maine, and 
she died in 1894. 

Mr. Cumings attended the public schools and after- 
wards entered the employ of the Boston & Maine rail- 
road as baggage master, remaining for six years. He 
then engaged in business for himself, at first on a mod- 
erate scale, which has grown steadily. Automobiles 
and ta.xi service have replaced the livery of the early 
days and the business is carried on under the firm name 
of Arthur C. Cumings' Taxi Service. 

Mr. Cumings has been active in public service, and 
for twelve years served as selectman, and for a sim- 
ilar period held the office of overseer of the poor and 
member of the Board of Health. For two years he has 
been a member of the board of assessors of South Ham- 
ilton. He is a member of Liberty Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; Wenbam and Hamilton granges; and 
is also a member of the Masonic Club, and the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks of Beverly. 

Mr. Cumings married, in 1890, Elizabeth B. Merrill, 
of Wenham, Massachusetts, and their children are : 
Arthur Merrill ; Florence A. ; Charles Francis. With 
his family Mr. Cumings attends the Methodist church 
of Hamilton. 



EDWARD J. READY— There is perhaps no citizen 
of Hamilton, Massachusetts, better known than Edward 
J. Ready, the genial ticket agent of that place. Since 
the time he completed his formal education, Mr. Ready 
has been identified with the Boston & Maine Railroad 
Company. He was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 
1879, the son of Edmund and Mary (Doyle) Ready. 
His father was of Ipswich, where he was long engaged 
as a landscape gardener; he died in 1912, and Mrs. 
Ready died in 1910. 

Mr. Ready is very active in the public life of Hamil- 
ton and has several times been honored with positions 
of trust and responsibility, sufficient warrant of the 
esteem in which he is held by the townspeople. He is 
a member of the Finance Board ; the Advisory Board, 
and the Park Commission; secretary of the Public 
Safety Committee of Hamilton ; and chairman of the 
State Guard. He is a veteran of the Spanish War, and 
was first sergeant of Company G, of the Massachusetts 
State Guard. 

Fraternally, Mr. Ready is a member of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks; the Men's Club of 
Hamilton; and the Knights of Pythias. In connection 
with his business interests he is also a member of the 



\'eteran Telegraphers' Association, Order of Railroad 
Telegraphers. 

Mr. Ready married, in 1910, Clarissa E. Chandler, of 
Hamilton, and they are the parents of a daughter, Wil- 
helmina C. Ready. With his family Mr. Ready attends 
the Episcopal church of Hamilton and aids in the sup- 
port of its good works. 



FRANK H. STETSON— With a remarkable record 
of service with one company, Frank H. Stetson now 
holds a position commensurate with his wide exper-* 
ience and years of faithful service, that of superintend- 
ent of the U S Bobbin & Shuttle Company, of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Stetson was born at Norway, Maine, April 21, 
1851, son of Edward Stetson, a carpenter of Kingston, 
Maine, and Sarah B. Richards, of Goffstown, New 
Hampshire. His education was obtained in the public 
schools of Nashua, New Hampshire, and soon after 
leaving school he started to learn the bobbin business 
with the Josephus Baldwin Company, of Nashua, where 
he remained for three years. At the end of this time he 
served an apprenticeship to the machinist's trade, and 
then entered the employ of the Eaton & Ayre Bobbin 
Company, also of Nashua. After two years in the 
employ of this firm and with further practical experi- 
ence gained, Mr. Stetson removed to Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, and entered the employ of the Coburn Shuttle 
Company, remaining there for twelve years. During 
the last two years of this time he was foreman, and 
following this position Mr. Stetson was employed for 
two years by the J, S. Jaques & Sons Company, shuttle 
manufacturers, of Lowell. 

The firm that next employed him was the U S Bobbin 
& Shuttle Company and to the present time he has been 
identified with this company, progressing from time to 
time through promotions, and in 1918 was appointed to 
the position of superintendent. 

Mr. Stetson brings to this office a thorough knowl- 
edge of his work and ability, broadened by his many 
years of service. He is held in high esteem among his 
fellow-citizens and business contemporaries, and is well 
known among the leading citizens of Lawrence. 

Mr. Stetson is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, in Lawrence; Monadnock Lodge 
and Lawrence Encampment, of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows ; and in politics is an Independent. 

Mr. Stetson married, in 1877, Alice A. Brownsett, 
born at Stanstead, Canada, February 2, 1857. Mr. 
Stetson is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and 
from 1866 to 1868 served in the Nashua Light Guards. 
He also served for seventeen years as a member of the 
Volunteer Fire Department of Lawrence, from 1889 to 
1906. Mr. and Mrs. Stetson are the parents of two 
children: Frederick B., born July 4, 1878, died Janu- 
ary 20, 1900; Clinton J., born December 17, 1879. The 
family attend and aid in the support of the Universalist 
church. 



LEONARDO W. CARTER— The hardware busi- 
ness in Manchester, Massachusetts, of which Leonardo 
W. Carter is one of the active managers, is a prosperous 
and growing interest. Mr. Carter was born at sea, ofT 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



389 



the Cape of Good Hope, in August, 1880, and it was 
1881 before he arrived in Manchester. He is a son of 
John W. and Carrie \V. (Haskell) Carter. Both Mr. 
Carter's parents are old residents of Manchester, and 
his father has been in the hardware business here for 
the greater part of his life. 

Receiving a thoroughly practical education in the 
public schools of Manchester, Mr. Carter, as a young 
man, went to work for the Boston & Maine railroad. 
His first position was that of mail carrier, then he 
served as baggage master, and later as station master. 
His connection with the railroad continued for a period 
of about nine years. Thereafter he filled a position as 
chauffeur for about eight years. 

His father passing away, Mr. Carter entered the 
hardware business in Manchester, under the firm name 
of the Carter Hardware Company. The partners of this 
concern are John H. Carter, Mrs. Ralph Burnham, and 
Leonardo \V. Carter, the latter being largely identified 
in the management of the business, and it is becoming a 
very prosperous interest. 

In the public life of the town. Mr. Carter is taking 
a prominent part. He has been tax assessor for the 
past six years, and is secretary of the Horticultural 
Society of Manchester. In the fraternal world he is 
also well known, being a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Mr. Carter married, in 1904, Maude Clark, daughter 
of Herbert W. and Marie (Lintner) Clark, of Man- 
chester. Mr. Clark has long been prominent in the real 
estate business in Beverly. Mr. and Mrs. Carter attend 
the Congregational church of Manchester. 



WILLIAM P. DAY — For many years one of the 
well-known citizens of Beverly Farms. Massachusetts, 
William P. Day was born in Gloucester, and died at the 
former place January 6, ipog. His parents were Isaac 
and Sarah Day, and his education was obtained in the 
public schools of Beverly Farms and Gloucester. At an 
early age he became an apprentice to the painter's 
trade, which occupation he followed throughout his life- 
time. For many years previous to his death, Mr. Day 
was engaged in painting for different painting contrac- 
tors, and was held in high esteem among his fellow- 
citizens. He always took an active interest in all mat- 
ters of a public nature, and after taking up his residence 
in the community of Beverly Farms, was always to be 
found a leader in matters pertaining to the general 
welfare. 

Mr. Day married Caroline C. Parsons, born at Glou- 
cester, April 30, 1852, daughter of Winthrop and Lucy 
(Parsons) Parsons, and she now survives her husband. 
They were the parents of five children: i. William H., 
bom at Gloucester, January 2, 1881. now following his 
father's occupation: he married Maude Blanchard, born 
June 7, 1S81. at Salem, New Hampshire, and they are 
the parents of two sons: George W.. born January 22, 
1904 ; and Harold R., bom September 3, 1907. 2. (Irace 
B., born .August 19, 1883. and is now the wife of 
George S. Williams, and they reside at Beverly Farms. 
3-4. Harn,' F., and Arthur M. (twins) ; the former 
married Maude Gouleppe; the latter died at the age 
of thirty-one years. 5. George A. R. Mr. and Mrs. 



Day attended the Methodist church. Mrs. Day now 
resides at No. 135 Hart street, Beverly Farms, Massa- 
chusetts. 

CHESTER H. KNOWLES. pharmacist and owner 
of the C. H. Knowles Drug Company, was born July 
7, 1S80, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the son of Charles 
W. and Jennie C. (Morrison) Knowles, both of Bev- 
erly. Mr. Knowles was a salesman by occupation. 

Chester H. Knowles was educated in the schools of 
Beverly. The drug business interested him from a 
youth and he entered the store of C. H. & J. Price, of 
Salem, Massachusetts, to learn the business. After three 
years he temporarily discontinued his studies to enlist 
in the Hospital Corps of the United States army, and 
served all through the Spanish-American War. He 
was discharged February 14, 1899. and soon after this 
time Mr. Knowles took up the thread of his studies 
where he had left them. He entered the drug store of 
William C. Gregory, remaining two years, and then was 
with S. M. Moore of Danvers, Massachusetts, and sub- 
sequently with the John H. Moore Company of Beverly. 

Mr. Knowles was associated with the latter com- 
pany until August, 1914. In the latter year he removed 
to Hamilton and bought the drug business of the estate 
of Horace E. .\ndrews, forming a partnership with 
John H. Moore of Beverly, Massachusetts, under the 
firm name of C. H. Knowles Company. This arrange- 
ment continued until December I, 1919, when Mr. 
Knowles purchased Mr. Moore's interest but continued 
to use the same firm name. 

Mr. Knowles is a member of the Masonic order; the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the Hamilton 
Grange; and the Spanish War Veterans of Beverly. 

Mr. Knowles married, in 1906, Laura .\. Forness, of 
Beverly, daughter of Francis and Isabella (Abbott) 
Forness. Francis Forness was engaged in the shoe 
industry, retiring in 191 1: his wife died in 1919. Mr. 
and Mrs. Knowles attend the Congregational church of 
Beverly. 

DONALD MacKENZIE— A name long prominent 
in the construction world of Beverly Farms. Massa- 
chusetts, is that of Donald MacKenzie, who spent the 
greater part of his active life in this community, and 
was a carpenter by trade. A man of high personal 
integrity, and of kindly spirit toward all, he will long 
be remembered by all those who knew him. 

Mr. MacKenzie was born in Scotland, and comes of 
the good old clan of that name which has given the 
world so many men who are fine and upright, as well 
as great. Mr. MacKenzie came to this country as a 
young man, and established himself in Beverly Farms as 
a carpenter. Although, perhaps, he was not as widely 
known as many of his name, he gave to the world the 
same skill of hand and the same courage and faith that 
bore him through all his perplexities and left his name 
one to be remembered and cherished. He died Novem- 
ber 17, 1915, at the age of eighty-six years, and at the 
time of his death was totally blind, and had been for 
many years. 

Mr. MacKenzie married Mary J. MacBride, who was 
born in County Down, Ireland, August 15, 1853. and 
who still survives him. Mrs. MacKenzie has resided in 
Beverly for forty-nine years, and has lived in the house 



390 



ESSEX COUNTY 



which is now her home for twenty years. For some time 
she has been the manager of a prosperous httle busi- 
ness, in the form of a hand laundry, which handles 
work for the most exclusive trade. Mr. and Mrs. Mac- 
Kenzie's children are: i. Donald, Jr., who married 
Maude Eddy: he is a well-known painter in Beverly. 2. 
Mary Jane, the wife of Ernest Worthy lake; they have 
three children: Mary, Barbara and Marjorie. 3. 
Johanna, the wife of Bert. A. MacKenzie; they have two 
children: Mary and Bertram, twins. Mrs. MacKenzie 
is a member of St. Margaret's Roman Catholic Church ; 
the children attend the Baptist church, and Mr. Mac- 
Kenzie attended the Presbyterian. 



FREDERICK W. LANE— Identified for many years 
with the painting business in Manchester, Massachu- 
setts, Frederick W. Lane bore a part in the progress of 
this city, from his coming in 186S to the time of his 
death in 1917. 

Frederick W. Lane was a son of Frederick Lane, who 
was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and throughout 
his lifetime was engaged as a seaman and shipbuilder. 
He married Judith Storey, of Rockport, Massachusetts, 
and they were the parents of three children: Harriette; 
Frederick VV., of whom further; and Orville. 

Frederick W. Lane was born in Gloucester, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1849, and received a practical education in 
the public schools of his native place. Becoming a 
resident of Manchester at the age of nineteen years, he 
entered the house painting business, and continued in 
this field of endeavor during the remainder of his life- 
time, in the employ of his cousin, E. A. Lane. He 
was a man of fine character, bearing the responsibilities 
of life with a lofty spirit, and in his death the com- 
munity, as well as his friends and family, sustained a 
loss which will long be deeply regretted. Mr. Lane 
was a devout member of the Universalist church, and 
a man of kindly Christian spirit. 

After coming to Manchester Mr. Lane married Mary 
M. (Harvie) Burgess, widow of James Burgess, of 
Nova Scotia, and daughter of .Abel and Ruth (Masters) 
Harvie, of Nova Scotia. Abel Harvie was a prosperous 
farmer there. Mr. and Mrs. Harvie were the parents of 
seven children: William H., Alonzo, Ezekiel N., Mar- 
garet D.. George A., Robert P., and Mary M., wife of 
Frederick W. Lane. Mrs. Lane still survives her hus- 
band, and resides with her eldest daughter, by her 
former marriage, Miss Alberta M. Burgess, a graduate 
nurse, at No. 96 School street, Manchester. The house 
in which they live was built prior to the Indian wars, 
and is one of the landmarks of Manchester. Mrs. Lane 
is a member of the Congregational church, and the 
Women's Relief Corps. 



JOHN DANFORTH— The insurance business now 
known as Dalton & Danforth, located at No. 218 Essex 
street, Salem, Massachusetts, was established before 
1838, and is now (1921) the oldest insurance agency in 
the city. John Danforth. a native son, conducted an 
independent agency in Salem for several years. In 1918 
he became associated with J. Frank Dalton, and the firm 
of Dalton & Danforth has continued the business founded 
so many years ago. Dalton & Danforth represent the 
following companies, which companies carry fire, acci- 



dent, fidelity, plate glass and life: Liverpool & Lon- 
don & Globe; Scottish Union & National; Mutual Pro- 
tection; Traders & Mechanics; London Guarantee and 
Accident; New Jersey Fidelity and Plate Glass, and 
Pacific Fire Insurance Company; and the General Acci- 
dent, Fire and Life Corporation; in all he represents 
over twenty well known companies. 

John Danforth was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 
December 19, 1880, and there has passed his years, 
forty-one. He was educated in the public schools of 
the city. Leaving school at the age of seventeen, he 
worked in various places, gaining valuable training. 
About 1910 he established an insurance agency in Salem, 
Massachusetts, successfully conducted the business alone 
until 1918, when he became associated with J. Frank 
Dalton, they continuing as partners in the firm of 
Dalton & Danforth. Mr. Danforth is a notary public, 
appointed November I, 1914, and re-appointed Novem- 
ber 2, 1921. He is a member of the Bank Officers' 
Association of Boston, and of the Colonial Club of 
Salem. He is master of Essex Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Salem; a member of the Masonic 
Club, and the Now and Then Association. 



CHARLES NATHANIEL PERLEY, one of the 

leading grocers of Danvers, Massachusetts, is an 
eminently practical man in a business which, perhaps, 
more than in any other, is exacting in detail. This 
business has been in the Perley family since it was 
first founded in 1800. Amos Proctor Perley, Mr. Per- 
ley's father, was born in Boxford, Massachusetts, and 
came to Danvers in 1829, at that time succeeding to the 
business theretofore conducted by John Perley. .\mos 
Proctor Perley married Sarah Felton Batchelder, of 
Danvers. 

Charles N. Perley, son of Amos Proctor and Sarah 
Felton (Batchelder) Perley, was born in Danvers. Feb- 
ruary 26, 1851. He received his early education in the 
public schools of his native town, and was also gradu- 
ated from the high school. He then entered the Bryant 
& Stratton Business College, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
making a thorough preparation for the business career 
which he had anticipated since boyhood. He worked 
with his father for a number of years, eventually suc- 
ceeding to the business in 1885, up to which time the 
store was known as the A. P. Perley Company. He 
has since continued the business uninterruptedly at the 
same location. No. I Maple street. 

Mr. Perley has for many years been more or less 
closely identified with the public life of Danvers. A 
Democrat by political choice, he served two terms as 
postmaster under the Cleveland administrations. He 
has also served as selectman at the insistent demand of 
his fellow-townsmen, and was honored by election as 
representative to the State Legislature in 1902. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Perley is prominent, being a member of 
the Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Knights of 
Pythias. He attends the Congregational church. 

Mr. Perley married, December 13, 1876, Ella Frances 
Woodbury, and they are the parents of five children: 
Bertram Procter; Marion Woodbury; Rollin Harmon; 
Sarah Edith, who is the wife of Oscar Perkins, and they 
have one son, Oscar Perkins, Jr. ; and Charles Nathan- 
iel. Jr. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



391 



WILLIAM FITZGERALD— Coming to this coun- 
try in his youth, and from that time on a resident of 
Essex county, Massachusetts, William Fitzgerald, of 
Lawrence, became a very prosperous and widely known 
citizen. His death, on November 2. 1918, as a result 
of injuries sustained in an automobile accident a few 
days previously, was a great shock to his many personal 
friends and business associates. 

Mr. Fitzgerald was a son of Michael and Ellen (Finn) 
Fitzgerald. Michael Fitzgerald was born in Ireland in 
1800, and died in 1870, after about ten years' residence 
in the United States. He was a man of quiet tastes, a 
shoemaker by trade, whose chief pleasure was the relax- 
ation of the family circle. 

William Fitzgerald was born in Tipperary, Ireland, 
on August 15, 1843. He came to this country with his 
family, in .August, i860, after completing his education 
in his native land. Arriving in New York City, the 
family came to Massachusetts, locating in Ballard Vale, 
in Essex county, and here William Fitzgerald began his 
career. In every branch of endeavor to which he applied 
his talents he was successful, and when he came to 
Lawrence, in 1867, it was to bring his young wife to a 
new home which he had built on Valley street. He 
opened a small general store, which he developed to a 
considerable interest, later going into the retail liquor 
business. He prospered greatly, and acquired large 
holdings in real estate, eventually developing a real 
estate business, which was the principal interest of his 
later years. 

Mr. Fitzgerald was a prominent member of the Real 
Estate Dealers' Association, and was an influential 
member of the board of directors of the Lawrence 
Trust Company. He was a member of the Holy Name 
Society of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, and 
was a leader in its benevolent activities. 

Of recent years Mr. Fitzgerald had turned over much 
of the responsibility, which he had hitherto carried, to 
his son, who was associated with him in business, and 
had spent the winters in Bermuda, or at Palm Beach, 
Florida. He was exceedingly fond of travel, and had 
several times been abroad, always accompanied by 
members of his family, whose companionship he ahv.iys 
sought when enjoying leisure. 

On October 30, 1918, when motoring near this city, 
the automobile turned turtle and Mr. Fitzgerald received 
internal injuries which resulted in his death, on Satur- 
day, November 2nd, three days later. He is deeply 
mourned by his devoted family. At the time of his death 
he was making preparations for the usual trip South for 
the winter, his wife expecting to accompany him, as 
was his unfailing wish. The sad nature of the end 
added to the grief, which was shared also by many 
personal friends, and his business acquaintances were 
shocked to learn of his sudden death. He will long 
be remembered by those who knew him as a genial 
man, a fond parent, a devoted husband, and a generous 
supporter of the church of which he was a member. 

Mr. Fitzgerald married (first), on November ig, 1864, 
Margaret Dawson, who died in early life. He married 
(second) Elizabeth Farrell, on .\ugust 15, 1881, and she 
still survives him. 

Five children also survive him: i. Ellen J., now Mrs. 
Robert Sheehan. 2. Mary L., who married (first) 



Edward M. Cotter, who died, leaving a son and 
daughter, William and Frances; she married (second) 
Charles Smith. 3. John J. 4. William A. 5. E. Made- 
line. 



FRED PERKINS ANDREWS, who has success- 
fully conducted a news and insurance business in 
Georgetown, Massachusetts, since 1905, was born in 
Topsfield, Massachusetts, January 3, 1871, the son of 
Joseph E. and Mary E. (Chapman) Andrews, the 
former a farmer, and of an old Massachusetts family. 

Fred P. Andrews was raised in the wholesome envir- 
onment of a New England farming home, and attended 
the Topsfield Public School, Eastern District. Later 
he took the course at the business college in Haverhill, 
and studied English literature and expression at Hunting- 
ton Chambers, Boston, Massachusetts. Entering upon 
a business career, he was from 1892 to 1896 on the 
steward's staff at the Hotel Sinclair, Bethlehem, New 
Hampshire, and the Royal Poincianna Hotel at Palm 
Beach, Florida. From 1896 until 1905 Mr. Andrews 
was one of the executives of a Massachusetts shoe 
manufacturing firm, but in 1905 he acquired the busi- 
ness of C. E. Jewett, at Georgetown. He has ever 
since held to that business, having a fine news and book 
store, and a wide connection in fire insurance. 

Mr. Andrews has entered actively into the functioning 
of local fraternal bodies. He is past grand of Protec- 
tion Lodge, No. 147, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and of Haverhill Encampment, same order; mem- 
ber of Bethany Lodge of Rebekas; the C. C. Dame 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, all of Georgetown, 
Massachusetts ; and of Birmingham Lodge, Rochester, 
New Hampshire, of Knights. He also is a member of 
the Protection Club of Georgetown, and of the local 
Congregational church. 

Mr. Andrews married, July 27, 1910, at Georgetown, 
Massachusetts, Mary C. Whitney, daughter of James 
C. and Harriet R. (Austin) Whitney. They have two 
children: Bruce Gibson, born May 23, 1912; and 
Berenice Whitney, born April 8, 1915. 



WILLIAM E. BURKE was born at Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, on April 8, igoo, and is a son of William E. 
and Rose A. (Finnin) Burke. Mr. Burke's father, who 
was a manufacturer of bicycles, died in I9i5- In addi- 
tion to being a manufacturer of bicycles, the elder Mr. 
Burke was also a dealer in them and an expert in 
bicycle repairing. Mr. Burke's mother was a native of 
Haverhill. 

After graduating from the public schools of Haver- 
hill, in which he received his education, young Mr. 
Burke obtained employment repairing bicycles. He 
spent three years in this work and then established him- 
self in business. After directing his own establishment 
for two years, Mr. Burke received an offer of employ- 
ment with J. Ellison, which he accepted. He worked 
for Mr. Ellison for two years and then, having had a 
great deal of practical experience, decided to go into 
the automobile repairing business. Accordingly, he estab- 
lished himself in business under his own name at No. 
301 Primrose street. He met with great success and 
remained in business at this address until 1921, when he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Arnold and moved to 



392 



ESSEX COUNTY 



No. 22S River street, where, together with Mr. Arnold, 
he is engaged in the management of a garage and 
automobile repairing establishment. Mr. Burke is a 
Catholic, and a member of the Knights of Columbus. 

Mr. Burke married Lolalia Arnold, of Nova Scotia, 
in 1920, daughter of John E. Arnold, a shoe manufac- 
turer, and his wife, Bessie E. Arnold, of Nova Scotia. 



WILLIAM J. YOUNG, in 1889, laid the foundation 
of what is now the W. J. Young Machinery Company, 
Inc., in a very modest way, as a manufacturer of a 
special line of shoe machinery. For thirteen years the 
company continued under his sole management, growing 
in size with each year until 1902, when it was incor- 
porated, and tlie name changed to its present form, the 
corporators being : George B. Grover, president ; Wil- 
liam J. Young, treasurer. 

Mr. Young was born November 2, 1864, in Annapolis 
county. Nova Scotia, son of Lindley Young, of that 
place, where he was engaged as a shipbuilder until 
1872, in which year he came to Lynn, Massachusetts, and 
there resided until his death in 1895. Mr. Young's 
mother was Sarah Durland, of Nova Scotia, and sub- 
sequently of Lynn. 

His family having removed to Lynn, it was there 
that Mr. Young obtained his education, and his first 
business experience was in the leather business as an 
employee of the T. W. Tyler Company, of Lynn, 
remaining for seven years, resigning in 1885 to engage 
in business on his own account. 

Two years later the quarters where the manufactur- 
ing was carried on were burned and for eight months 
temporary quarters were secured in a basement on 
Willow street. Later the business was removed to its 
present quarters at No. 416 Union street, and this 
building was purchased by the W. J. Young Machinery 
Company, Inc., in 1920. The machines manufactured 
by the company are extensively used, in the United States 
and foreign countries, in the manufacture of counters 
and heels, and to their other work they have added the 
manufacture of nails for boots and shoes. Mr. Young 
is a member of the Chamber of Commerce of Lynn ; 
also of the Lynn Rotary Club. 

Mr. Young married, in 1889, Susie Sederquest, of 
Lynn, a daughter of the late Rev. George W. Seder- 
quest, and their children are: i. Edith Margaret, a 
graduate of Smith College, who was later a student at 
Simmons College, in Boston, for one year; subsequently 
she was an instructor in commercial subjects in the 
schools of Swampscott for two years, and at Burdett 
College for a similar time. 2. Herman A., who is a 
graduate of Bowdoin College, and enlisted during the 
World War, in April, 191 7, in the United States navy, 
being transferred at a later date to the Harvard Cadet 
School, there attaining the rank of ensign. He served 
overseas for two years as an executive officer on a 
mine-sweeper, and received his discharge in 1919, with 
the rank of lieutenant, junior grade. After completing 
his college course, he became identified with his father's 
business, and starting from the bottom, is thoroughly 
learning the manufacture of the machines in detail, 

Mr. Young and his family are members of the Advent 
Christian Church in Lynn, and reside in Peabody, 
Massachusetts. 



ALLEN SHOW PRINT— In 1879 the name Allen 
first became known in Beverly, Massachusetts, in con- 
nection with the printing business. In that year the late 
Irving W. Allen came to the city, a young man of 
twenty, and established himself as a printer in the 
Lafavor block on Cabot street. The enterprise, which 
was started in a small way, soon outgrew its surround- 
ings and was moved to the J. W. Porter building, sub- 
sequently being removed to its present site, the second 
floor of the Association building, at No. 91 Rantoul 
street, in 1909; Eleven years later the founder died, 
and the business was then carried on by Archer I. Allen 
and Herman K. Allen, his sons. Equipped with all 
modern presses, the company employs forty men who 
are active in the printing of posters. 

Irving W. Allen, the founder of the Allen Show 
Print, was born at Essex, Massachusetts, in 1859. After 
completing his studies in the local grammar school he 
served an apprenticeship to the printer's trade, and in 
1879, as mentioned above, came to Beverly and estab- 
lished himself in the printing business, and during the 
years that followed previous to his death, he conducted 
its affairs most successfully, being recognized as a man 
of prominence in the business circles of the city. 

.''it the age of si.xty-one Irving W. Allen closed his 
career, rich in fulfillment, passing away November 6, 
1920, leaving as a monument to himself a successful 
business, to the furtherance of which he had given his 
untiring devotion and energy. Although he displayed 
always a keen interest in the welfare of the city which 
had been his home for many years, he remained strictly 
aloof from public and political life, but possessed, how- 
ever, the gift of making and holding friendships, stand- 
ing high in the regard of many to whom his death came 
as a deep grief. 



CHARLES O. KELLY, Civil War soldier, well 
known in Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he has lived 
for many decades, was born in Salem, New Hamp- 
shire, July 15, 1849, the son of Francis B. and Mary A. 
(Vitturn) Kelly, the former a shoe worker and farmer, 
and the latter a member of a Sandwich branch of an 
old Colonial family of New Hampshire. 

Charles O. Kelly received the customary education 
afforded by the public schools of that period, and when 
old enough began to work in the shoe factory of J. R. 
Wheeler. Later he worked in the factory of Kelly, 
Gifford & Chase. He was only twelve years old when 
the Civil War began, but nevertheless he was a soldier 
before its close. He enlisted in February, 1865, in 
Company H, of the i8th New Hampshire Regiment, 
and saw active service in Virginia. He was stationed at 
Petersburg, that State, from March 27, 1865, in con- 
nection with the pursuit of General Lee and his ulti- 
mate surrender. That campaign ended the war, and 
for some time after the assassination of President Lin- 
coln, Kelly's regiment was stationed in the Federal 
capital, and there, during the trial of the Lincoln con- 
spirators, Kelly did provost duty. He was honorably 
discharged from the army at Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, on July 27, 1865. The ne.xt fifteen years or so 
Mr. Kelly spent in his home State, employed for the 
greater part of the time in shoe manufacturing. He 
first came to Haverhill in 1881, although his residence 



t THE NEW YORK 
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I ASTOR, LENOX 

I TIT.n EN FOUNDATIONS 




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BIOGRAPHICAL 



393 



was not continuous until 1883. After the fire in Febru- 
ary, 1S82, he went to work for Furbur Brothers, but 
later worked for J. W. Winchell. In 1889 he decided 
to take up insurance work with John Smith, remaining 
associated with him for some three or four years, until 
1893, when he occupied an office with Mr. Smith's son, 
but did business for himself there until he resolved to 
open an office in the same line independently. He rented 
an office at No. 174 Merrimack street until 191S, then 
removed to No. 3 Washington Square, where, notwith- 
standing his age, he keenly and successfully entered into 
all lines of insurance. 

Comrade Kelly belongs to Major How Post, No. 47, 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, and he is a mem- 
ber of the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Kelly married, in 187J, Eunice C. Gardner, daugh- 
ter of Jonathan B. and Martha Hobbs (Wilson) Gard- 
ner, the former a shoemaker and farmer of Salem, New 
Hampshire, and her mother originally of Pelham. They 
have three children: Flora M. Crowell ; Lilla M. ; and 
Agnes W. Nutter. 



OSCAR FERN — Although not a native-born Amer- 
ican, Oscar Fern has lived in America for almost 
twenty years, and for more than eleven years has been 
among the active business men of Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts. He was born in Sweden, on January I, 1886, 
one of the eight children, four sons and four daugh- 
ters, born to Johann and Caroline Fern, who were both 
of Swedish birth. Johann Fern was a slaughterman, 
and owned an abattoir in the city of Bjuv; he died in 

1913- 

Oscar Fern was educated in Sweden, attending the 
public schools of his native place, and by the time his 
schooldays were over he had received instruction approx- 
imately equal to that possible in the high schools of 
America. He was seventeen years old when he crossed 
the ocean to this country. Soon after landing, in 1903, 
he came to Massachusetts, and found employment in 
the shoe factory of T. D. Barry, at Brockton, for two 
years. He spent the next five years in the employ of 
W. L. Douglas, of Brockton. In 1910 he came to New- 
burj'port, and there for the next two years was con- 
nected with the Ellis Shoe Company. For a similar 
period he was connected with Dodge Brothers, but in 
1914 he branched out for himself, or rather joined 
another in a business partnership, the outcome of which 
vras the firm of the Fern & Poor Company, established 
in that year. The first plant of the company was situ- 
ated at Central Wharf, but as the business expanded it 
became necessary to seek larger quarters, which they 
found on Merrimac street, where they still are. The 
partners decided to seek corporate powers in 1915, and 
under the reconstruction Mr. Fern became president, 
and George P. Poor, treasurer ; there has been no 
change since. However, in 1920, Mr. Fern became inter- 
ested in establishing another shoe manufacturing com- 
pany, that which took the corporate name of the Fern 
Shoe Company, of which firm Henr>- T. Cutter is 
president, and Mr. Fern, treasurer. The plant is at 
No. 41 Water street, Newburyport, and the line of 
manufacture, women's turn shoes, of which the plant 
is capable of making 600 pairs a day. In the Fern & 
Poor plant about 250 people find almost constant em- 



ployment, and about 150 are employed in the Fern Shoe 
Company factory. It will therefore be seen that Mr. 
Fern has by his enterprise appreciably aided the dis- 
trict. As to the product, it is said that an enviable 
reputation has been developed by Mr. Fern and his 
associates by reason of the reliable quality of their 
product. 

Personally, Mr. Fern is well liked among the busi- 
ness people of Newburyport and district. He has not 
entered much into public afifairs, but has advanced in 
Masonic degree to, and including, the Shrine. He also 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias, and to the Dalton 
Club. 

In 1913, at Newburyport, Mr. Fern was married to 
Edith Francis Poor, daughter of Benjamin F. and 
.\lvina (Card) Poor, of Newburyport, the former a 
retail butcher of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Fern have 
one child, a daughter, Thyra Alvina, who was born on 
January 30, 1920. 



JOHN W. GOODHUE— One of the leading men in 
mercantile activities in Ipswich, Massachusetts, is John 
W. Goodhue, who through his comprehensive hardware 
business is identified with many branches of industry in 
this section. 

Mr. Goodhue was born in 1858, and is a son of John 
B. and Sarah E. (Comery) Goodhue. He received a 
thoroughly practical education in the public schools, 
then at the age of sixteen years became connected with 
the Isinglass industry, as an assistant in a Norwood 
factory. Continuing for only one year along this line, 
however, Mr. Goodhue then came to Ipswich and entered 
the employ of Theodore Cogswell at his grocery store in 
this town. For a period of eleven years he remained 
with Mr. Cogswell, gaining a large fund of valuable 
business experience. In 1886 he started in business for 
himself, as a dealer in hardware, beginning modestly, 
but developing a large and important business. For the 
past thirty-five years he has been an important factor 
in the hardware trade in this vicinity, and is still a 
leader in his field. He handles a very complete assort- 
ment of paints and oils, as well as a general line of 
hardware and fine mechanics' tools, and modern farm- 
ing tools and machinery, and gasoline engines, supply- 
ing the needs of the rural districts. His store is ad- 
vantageously located on Market street, Ipswich. 

Mr. Goodhue is a Republican, and in fraternal affilia- 
tion a member of the Free and Accepted Masons; he 
attends the South Congregational Church. He was 
elected to the State Legislature in 1906, and served on 
the Fish and Game Commission, and the Commission 
on Counties. 

Mr. Goodhue married Blanche R. Brown, daughter of 
Augustine and Susan M. (Russell) Brown. They have 
three children : Paul and Pauline, twins, born Novem- 
ber 25, 1899; and John J., born May i, 1901. Paul 
Goodhue enlisted in the United States army for service 
in the World War, and became a lieutenant of infantry. 



AMOS BREED CHASE— In the mercantile world 
of Lynn, Massachusetts, the late Amos B. Chase is 
remembered as a man of progressive spirit and genial 
personality. Mr. Chase was born in Stratham, New 
Hampshire, October 28, 1852, and was a son of Levi 



394 



ESSEX COUNTY 



and Priscilla (Breed) Chase. After a thoroughly prac- 
tical common school education Mr. Chase went to work 
at the age of fourteen years, having been first employed 
by a relative, Oliver Breed. In 1874 he entered the em- 
ploy of Perley Mansfield, of Lynn, a prominent dealer 
in men's furnishings at that time. Some years later Mr. 
Chase bought out his employer, and since that time the 
business conducted under the name of Amos B. Chase 
constitutes one of the most attractive stores of its line 
in the city. Since the death of Mr. Chase the business 
has been retained by his wife, who keeps a general over- 
sight of the affairs at the store. 

Mr. Chase possessed a wide circle of friends in Lynn 
and vicinity, and was a member of the Oxford Club. 
For several years he was trustee of the Insane Associ- 
ation, at Worcester, and was appointed by the Governor 
of Massachusetts. He resigned shortly before his death. 
He was often solicited to run for mayor of Lynn, but 
steadfastly refused to enter public life. 

Mr. Chase married Sarah A. Chase, daughter of 
Nathan and Mary Ann (Thayer) Chase. Their son. 
Prof. George Henry Chase, is a prominent educator at 
Harvard University. He married Freda Mark, a daugh- 
ter of Prof. Edward Mark, of Harvard University. 
They have two sons : Thomas, and Richard Chase. 

In the death of Amos B. Chase, a man of sterling 
worth, in sympathy with all advance, dropped out of the 
circles in which he had moved. He died December 25, 
1918, but his memory will long be cherished by all who 
knew him. Mr. Chase and his family had long been 
members of the Universalist church. 



WYLIE O'BRIEN, resident in Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, almost continuously since 1892, and for more 
than a decade the proprietor of a large express business, 
as well as, latterly, of one of the largest storage and 
warehouse enterprises in Haverhill, was born in Cum- 
berland county. Nova Scotia, May 5, 1873, the son of 
Joseph and Matilda (Chase) O'Brien, the former a 
farmer by occupation. 

Wylie O'Brien passed his boyhood in Nova Scotia, 
where he attended the public school near his home. 
After leaving school he assisted his father in the work- 
ing of the home farm for about two years, then went 
to Chelsea, Nova Scotia, and for six months worked 
there for George Emery, who operated a mahogany mill. 
In 1892 Wylie O'Brien removed to Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, where, with the exception of a few years spent 
in Nova Scotia, he has ever since lived. For fifteen 
years after coming to Haverhill he was in the employ 
of Carter, Russell & Company, owners of an express 
business. In 1906 he went to Canada and for almost 
three years was in Hants county. Nova Scotia, passing 
that time in lumbering enterprises. Returning to Massa- 
chusetts, and to Haverhill, in the fall of 1909, he 
acquired by purchase the express business of John Cad- 
man, taking possession and direction on December l6th. 
He still operates the business, though not at the original 
address. Soon after buying it he changed the trading 
name to the Boston & Haverhill Express Company, and 
his business address then was at No. 78 Washington 
street. Expansion of business caused him to remove 
eventually to No. 35 Wingate street, and utimately to 



No. 93 Essex street, which is his present business loca- 
tion. He also owns the Haverhill Storage and Ware- 
house Company, whose warehouses are situated at Nos. 
145 to 151 Essex street, Haverhill. He established that 
business in 1914, and it is the largest and best known in 
Haverhill and Boston for all storage excepting furni- 
ture. Mr. O'Brien is respected for his energ>-, and by 
hard work and good service has succeeded well in life. 
On January i, 1921, Mr. O'Brien married Harriet 
Smith, of Hartford, Connecticut. 



ROSCOE S. MILLS— In the foremost group of 
business men in Haverhill, Massachusetts, stands Roscoe 
S. Mills, whose activities in the field of real estate and 
insurance have constituted a force for civic and econ- 
omic progress during the dozen years of his residence 
in this city. Mr. Mills is a son of Elwin C. and Sarah 
M. (Davis) Mills, his father long a prominent farmer 
and contractor of Lebanon, Maine, and his mother a 
native of Sandown, New Hampshire. 

Roscoe S. Mills was born in Sandown, New Hamp- 
shire, August 12, 1881, and receiving his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native place, continued 
his studies in the nearby town of Kingston, at the San- 
born Seminary, gaining a practical preparation for his 
future. Upon leaving school Mr. Mills availed himself 
of the opportunity which lay nearest at hand, and be- 
came a part of the great shoe industry, working in 
plants at Sandown and Hampstead for a period of about 
ten years. Not being satisfied, however, to remain 
indefinitely as a unit in an organization controlled by 
others. Mr. Mills came to Haverhill in 1910, and opened 
an office, entering real estate and insurance brokerage. 
His success was assured from the beginning, and with 
the growth of his business he saw the possibilities in 
an aggressive policy of expansion. Accordingly, he 
established other offices, one at Merrimac, Massachu- 
setts, and another at Hillsboro, New Hampshire, and 
others in communities of lesser importance. His inter- 
est centers in the Haverhill office, which is under his 
personal management, capable assistants going forward 
under his supervision. He handles general insurance and 
real estate, and is a leader in this field in Haverhill, and 
also in those communities reached by his branch offices. 

A Republican by political affiliation, Mr. Mills has 
never sought public honors, but has borne his part in 
the public service when called upon to do so. While a 
resident of Hampstead he served for two years on the 
Board of Selectmen, and also filled the office of chief 
of police, and other minor offices. Fraternally Mr. Mills 
is well known. Long a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, he has been through all chairs in this order, 
and has been master of the Hampstead Lodge. He is 
past state counselor of the Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics, and is a member and past master 
of the Hampstead Grange. He is a familiar figure at 
the club rooms of the Pentucket Club of Haverhill, of 
which he has been a member for several years, and 
with his family he attends the Congregational Church. 

Mr. Mills married (first) Carrie C. McNeill, of 
Hampstead, New Hampshire, who left one child, Syd- 
ney R., now a student at Haverhill High School. He 
married (second) Mildred B. Osgood, daughter of 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



395 



Charles H. and Francella (Eastman) Osgood, of Hamp- 
stead, her father being a prominent merchant of that 
place. 



MOSES NELSON BOARDMAN, a merchant and 
owner of a business established almost fifty years ago, 
was born in Georgetown, Massachusetts, in 1846, the 
son of Daniel and Mehitable D. (Nelson) Boardman, 
the former of Newbur>-, Massachusetts, and the latter 
originally of Georgetown. Daniel Boardman, who died 
in 1891, was a soldier during the Civil War, and by 
trade a shoemaker. 

Moses N. Boardman's whole life has been spent in the 
vicinity of Ckorgetown, with the exception of a few 
years spent in Topsfield. Massachusetts. He attended 
Georgetown schools in his boyhood, and after leaving 
school his first employment was as the driver of a 
butcher's wagon, which work kept him at Topsfield for 
two years, after which he returned to Georgetown and 
entered a shoe factory. On May 20, 1873, he entered into 
a business partnership, establishing the firm of Board- 
man & Nelson, and opening a general merchandizing and 
hardware store at South Georgetown, the store being 
situated in the Adams block, where the Union block 
now is. Four years later he returned to Georgetown, 
where he conducted a fairly successful business for the 
the next fifteen years, then again going to South George- 
town and opening a store. However, he returned to 
Georgetown in i8g8, and ever since has been the owner 
of the store he now is identified with, the business done 
being an appreciable one in many lines, general mer- 
chandise, hardware, paints, and agricultural implements. 

Mr. Boardman has established some enviable records 
in fraternal interest ; for fifty-three years he has been a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
belonging to Georgetown Lodge since 1868; and for 
twenty-five years he has been treasurer of the George- 
town Masonic Blue Lodge. For fifteen years he was 
road commissioner in the Georgetown civic administra- 
tion, and in several other ways has helped in public 
affairs. He is a member of the First Congregational 
Church of Georgetown. 

Mr. Boardman married, in 1867, at Topsfield, Massa- 
chusetts, Martha L. Leach, daughter of Thomas and 
Louisa (Morgan) Leach, the former originally of Man- 
chester, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Boardman have 
one child, a son, Seth Howard. 



PETER A. TESSIER, one of the leading shoe man- 
ufacturers of Haverhill. Massachusetts, is the second 
generation of his family to follow this occupation. His 
father, Peter H. Tessier, was a native of St. De Moise, 
Canada, and was engaged in the shoe business until his 
death in 1903. His later years were spent in Haver- 
hill. He married Annie Pennette, of Canada, and she 
died in 1879. 

Since the days when Mr. Tessier's father was engaged 
in the manufacture of shoes there have been many 
changes ; the expansion of the shoe industry during the 
last half century has been amazingly great. Machinery 
has replaced much of the laborious work originally done 
by hand and this progress and increase has been so 
regular and steady that it has not attracted the attention 
and admiration that it is entitled to. 



Peter A. Tessier was born September 21, 1877, in 
Haverhill. Aiter completing the public school courses, 
Mr. Lessier took a course at a business college and sub- 
sequently entered the business of manufacturing shoes 
on his own account. Mr. Tessier made a specialty of 
women's turned shoes, which he continued for many 
years under the name of the Peter A. Tessier Shoe 
Compan)-. In 1905 he began to take contracts for shoes 
and the increase of his business warranted the taking of 
a partner. He entered into partnership with Albert U. 
Bowdoin (see following sketch), and the firm name was 
changed to the Tessier & Bowdoin Company. There is 
no more resourceful business man than the manufacturer 
of shoes, and one conspicuous feature of this industry 
is that it grew to great strength through the operation 
of natural causes. 

Fraternally, Mr. Tessier is a member of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks ; the Foresters 
(Catholic order) ; and St. Jean Baptiste Union. His 
church affiliation is as a member of St. Joseph's Roman 
Catholic Church. 

Mr. Tessier married, in 1905, Annie Aucalir, of Can- 
ada, and their children are : Raymond A., Irene P., 
Louise M., Howard L., and Evelene R. 



ALBERT U. BOWDOIN, of the firm of Tessier & 
Bowdoin Company, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, prom- 
inent manufacturers of women's shoes, was born April 
21, 1878, in Rockport, that State, son of James W. and 
Addie M. (Perry) Bowdoin. His father was a resident 
of Beverly for many years and was engaged in the 
nursery business. Mrs. Bowdoin was a native of Salem, 
and died in 1914. 

Albert U. Bowdoin attended the public and high 
schools of Haverhill, Massachusetts, and at an early 
age began to learn the business of manufacturing shoes, 
one of the chief industries of that section of the State. 
For twelve years he was with the shoe firm of Chesley 
& Rugg Company, rising to a position of foreman. 
Subsequently he was two years employed with the A. W. 
Greeley Company in a similar capacity, and his third 
place of employment was with the George L. Webster 
Company. There Mr. Bowdoin remained for two years, 
at the end of which time he formed a partnership with 
Peter A. Tessier (see preceding sketch), to manufac- 
ture shoes. They make a specialty of high grade turned 
shoes for women. In January, 1921, a third member was 
admitted to the firm, George W. Lawrence, of Haver- 
hill (see following sketch), and the firm name is the 
Tessier & Bowdoin Company. Mr. Bowdoin is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Haverhill. 

Mr. Bowdoin married, in 1906, Maria A. Forbes, of 
Seabrook, New Hampshire, and they attend the Bap- 
tist church of Haverhill. 



GEORGE W. LAWRENCE— Ample proof of the 
truth that industry and ambitious effort will bring its 
reward is found in the career of George W. Lawrence, 
a member of the firm of the Tessier & Bowdoin Com- 
pany, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, shoe manufacturers. 

Mr. Lawrence was bom in Haverhill, September 2, 
1883, and there attended the public schools. Immedi- 
ately he went to work for the firm of Chick Brothers, 



396 



ESSEX COUNTY 



starting in the cutting room. Although practically every 
portion of the shoe is made by machinery, each individ- 
ual workman does a part of the construction, and before 
it is completed the shoe passes through several hands. 
In this way it is possible to go through the dilTerent 
departments and thus acquire a wide knowledge of the 
manufacture. Such was the idea in the mind of Mr. 
Lawrence, who realized that before he could command 
a position of trust and responsibility he must first prove 
his worth. Consequently, he resigned after five years 
to accept a position as assistant foreman of the lining 
room of the S. S. Ruddock Company. There he 
remained for two years, then went to Derry, New 
Hampshire, where he was in charge of the trimming 
room of the F. M. Hodson Company. After a year Mr. 
Lawrence returned to Haverhill and entered the employ 
of the Chesley & Rugg Company. All the while Mr. 
Lawrence was gaining a broader knowledge of the 
industry and adding to his experience, and after a year 
with the above firm, was associated with the Cushman 
& Hibbert Company in a similar capacity. The next 
firm to employ Mr. Lawrence was the Haseltine & 
Colby Company ; he rose from foreman to assistant 
superintendent, but in 1916, resigned this place to accept 
a better one with the Tessier & Bowdoin Company (of 
mention in the two preceding sketches). He was super- 
intendent of this company until i()2l, in which year he 
was admitted a partner of the firm. 

Mr. Lawrence's father. Napoleon Lawrence, was a 
native of Montreal, Canada, and for twenty years or 
more he was superintendent of the Chick Brothers Com- 
pany, where his son first entered on his business career. 
The mother of Mr. Lawrence was Mary McDonald, a 
native of Nova Scotia. 

Mr. Lawrence married, in April, 1921, Dorothy H. 
Newman, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, and they attend 
the Sacred Heart Church of Bradford, Massachusetts. 



FRED W. GEORGE, prominent in the business life 

of Haverhill. Massachusetts, was born in Newton, New 
Hampshire. January 25, 1869, son of Ezra J. and Mary 
J. (Rowe) George, of Newton. Ezra J. George was 
engaged in the shoe industry until his death in 1899. 
His wife, Mrs. Mary J. (Rowe) George, died in 1895: 
she was a native of Franklin, New Hampshire. 

Fred W. George attended the public schools and high 
school, and then was employed by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company for five years, resigning to enter 
business on his own account, having purchased the busi- 
ness of H. H. Story of Merrimac; he also opened a 
branch store in .^mesbury. A complete line of sporting 
goods was carried, and Mr. George spent ten successful 
years in this business. At the end of this time he 
resigned to return to the railroad work and for fifteen 
years was baggage master on the line between Boston 
and Portland. 

In October, 1917, Mr. George resigned his railroad 
position to become a partner of the Dutra Tobacco 
Company of Haverhill, being associated with Albert P. 
Wadleigh of Merrimac, each having an equal interest 
in the business. The Dutra Tobacco Company is an old 
established business of forty years' existence and is the 
largest wholesale distributor of tobacco products in 



Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hamp- 
shire. 

Fraternally, Mr. George is a member of Bethany 
Lodge, Free and .Accepted Masons, of Merrimac; River- 
side Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and 
is a charter member of Maple Leaf Lodge of Rebekahs, 
of Danvers. In politics he is a Republican, and has 
served as tax collector of Merrimac from 1910 to the 
present time, and is treasurer of the Republican Town 
Committee, having served in this office since igi6. He 
is also a member of the Haverhill Chamber of Com- 
merce and of the Merrimac Improvement Association. 

Mr. George married, in 1901, Gertrude W. Sherman, 
of Merrimac, and they attend the Universalist church of 
Haverhill. 



JAMES PATTERSON, wholesale confectioner, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, is among those successful men 
who came from foreign countries to a new land and in 
spite of the handicaps of the strange language, customs, 
etc., attained a place among their new surroundings. 

Mr. Patterson was born February 13, 1888, in Greece, 
where he remained until he was twenty-three years of 
age. At that time he came to America, locating in 
Haverhill, where he found employment in a confec- 
tionery store, remaining long enough to learn the busi- 
ness and to lay aside sufficient funds to engage in a 
similar business on his own account. Since the begin- 
ning Mr. Patterson has been very successful and is now 
in both the wholesale and retail confectioner's business, 
supplying many of Haverhill's stores with candies and 
other goods. He is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce; the Greek Orthodox church; and is a staunch 
Republican, taking much interest in the civic matters 
of Haverhill. 



JOSEPH W. MEEHAN— Two enterprising young 
men of Amesbury, Joseph W. Meehan and Harold S. 
Toggerson, are rapidly developing quite a satisfactory 
business. The Auto Special Body Company, in which 
enterprise the men named are partners, is equipped to 
handle all kinds of auto-top repairing, and in the making 
of special bodies, tops, painting and trimming, the com- 
pany is showing expeditious and good work at their 
plant, which is at the old pumping station. No. 248 Main 
street, Amesbury. 

Joseph W. Meehan was born in Amesbury, Massa- 
chusetts, June 19, 1897, son of Joseph M. C. and Mary 
Elizabeth (Ryder) Meehan. His mother was born in 
Amesbury, September 8, 1873. and his father in New- 
ton, Massachusetts, March 2, 1869. The family has lived 
in Amesbury for very many years, and for a long time 
Joseph M. C. Meehan, the - father, has been master 
mechanic for the Biddle & Smart Company, carriage 
manufacturers of Am.esbury. His son, Joseph W. 
Meehan. was educated in St. Joseph's Parochial School 
of Amesbury, and from there entered the .\mesbury 
High School, from which he was graduated in the class 
of 1916. Before entering business, young Meehan took 
the commercial course at the Haverhill Commercial 
School, and his first four years of business endeavor 
were spent in the employ of the Biddle & Smart Com- 
pany. He took up the executive branch of the work, and 






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BIOGRAPHICAL 



397 



v.as soon advanced in responsibility in the office of the 
company. During the war he was in mihtary service, 
and while not of draft age he enlisted in Company B, 
Sixteenth Regiment of Massachusetts State troops, the 
National Guard, and had the war continued into the 
next year would undoubtedly have entered a federal 
unit of the army, for he had passed examination for 
entrance to an officers" training camp before the Armis- 
tice came to put an end to all further military prepara- 
tions. He enlisted in the State regiment in 1918 and 
was honorably discharged in 1919, having then the regi- 
mental grade of corporal. In 1920 he formed a business 
association with Harold S. Toggerson, and the two 
established the .\uto Special Body Company of .Ames- 
bury, in which enterprise they are succeeding well. 

Mr. Meehan is a member of the Knights of Columbus 
of Amesbury, St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, of 
Amesbury, and is a Democrat in politics. He is unmar- 
ried. 



BYRON HUNTINGTON SARGENT, a native of 
Merrimac and one of its most progressive business men, 
was born. February 26, 1882. son of Edward B. and 
Ellen H. (Sargent) Sargent. The Sargent family is one 
of the oldest Colonial families of that part of Massa- 
chusetts, and residence has been continuous in the 
Colony and State since 1634. as has been noted elsewhere 
in this work {vide. Homer Roscoe Sargent). Edward 
B. Sargent, father of Byron H., was much esteemed in 
Merrimac, and was very helpful in many phases of its 
affairs. He was in successful business in Merrimac until 
his death, which occurred in 1901. He dealt extensively 
in coal and wood, and was one of the substantial men of 
the town. For fifteen years he was president of the First 
National Bank, and for four years was president of the 
Merrimac Savings Bank. His wife, Ellen H. Sargent, 
was of Philadelphia. 

Their son. Byron H., was educated in the Merrimac 
public schools, and after passing through high school 
he became associated with his father in the latter's coal 
business in Merrimac, eventually taking over full direc- 
tion of the business. He is now sole owner and manager 
of the Sargent Coal Company, of Merrimac. the trading 
of which is not confined only to Merrimac. 

Like his father, he has entered much into the affairs 
of the town, and has held public and .semi-public office. 
For ten years be has been sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, and is prominently identified with banking 
interests, being president of the First National Bank of 
Merrimac, and trustee on the investment committee of 
the Merrimac Savings Bank. Fraternally, he is a 
Mason and Odd Fellow, belonging to Bethany and 
Riverside lodges of Merrimac, respectively. He is also 
a member of the Commercial Travelers' Association, 
and of the Oxford and Home clubs of Merrimac. His 
church is the Congregational. 

Mr. Sargent was married, in 1909, to Abbie W. Smart, 
of Merrimac. They have one child. Eleanor S., who 
was born June 28, igio. 



before him, also his grandparents, and all have been 
of that solid, industrious order that make for vigor and 
progress in the life of a city. 

Daniel E. Goodwin, father of Edward J. Goodwin, 
was born January 21, 1851. .\t one period of his career 
he was probably the largest dealer in milk and dairy 
products in the town; he married Annie (Casey) Good- 
win, of Newburyport. 

Edward J. Goodwin, who was born twenty-three years 
later to the day, January 21, 1874. was at first interested 
in his father's vocation, but in later years branched out 
in other lines. After varied endeavors he started in his 
native town as a shoe manufacturer, in 1911. His 
chances for success were not what one could call very 
promising, for his total capital consisted of $150 and a 
rather limited experience. His first place of business 
was at No. 55 Wingate street, where he remained for 
two years. Needing more room, he moved to No. 196 
Esse.x street, which was satisfactory for three years, but 
again requiring better quarters, changed back to Win- 
gate street. No. 64, and again, a year later, to No. 83 
Essex street, and again, after a year, to his present 
location. No. 14 Walnut street. He here has extensive 
floor space in a fine up-to-date factory and is meeting 
an ever-increasing prosperity. He had as a partner for 
some time N. H. Seldon. but is now in business solely 
for himself. Mr. Goodwin's specialty for most of the 
time was the making of infants' shoes, but in recent 
years he branched out in the manufacture of ladies' 
slippers for street and house wear. He has a branch 
sales office at No. 113 Lincoln street, Boston. In 1921 
there were in his employ upward of 100 operators, and 
the factory was finishing 3,600 pairs a day. Mr. Good- 
win holds membership in the Chamber of Commerce. 
He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and also of the Larchmont Club. 

On July 28, 1896, Mr. Goodwin married, at Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, Margaret H. King, daughter of Patrick 
and Anne (Connolly) King, of Haverhill. 



EDWARD J. GOODWIN— The name Goodwin is 

well and honorably known in Newburyport. Massachu- 
setts. Not only was Edward J. Goodwin born and 
brought up there, but so w^ere his father and mother 



HERBERT E. BAXTER— Among the carriage and 
carriage body manufacturers of Essex county, Massachu- 
setts. Herbert E. Baxter, of Amesbury, must be well 
known, for he has been in the business for almost thirty 
years, latterly as the sole owner of the Hinckley & Bax- 
ter Company, of Amesbury. 

Mr. Baxter was born in Martland, Nova Scotia, on 
January 29, 1856, son of William and Isabelle (Middle- 
man) Baxter, the former originally of Aberdeen, Scot- 
land, and the latter of Nova Scotia. He was raised in 
Martland, Nova Scotia, his father being a merchant 
there. 

In his boyhood Herbert E. Baxter attended the public 
schools of his native place, and for about four years 
after leaving school, worked for a carriage manufac- 
turer near his home. Having learned the carriage- 
making trade, he came to Amesbury. Massachusetts, 
where for the ne.xt twenty-one years he was in the 
employ of the Briggs Carriage Company, for the greater 
part of the period being foreman of the plant. Later, 
for short periods, he worked in other body shops in 
Amesbury, but in 1914 formed a business partnership 
with Arthur Hinckley, of Amesbury. The two formed 
the Hinckley & Baxter Company, and were soon well 



398 



ESSEX COUNTY 



established as carriage-body manufacturers in Ames- 
bury. However, the year 1914 had not passed before 
Mr. Hinckley died. Mr. Baxter then had to take over 
the entire business, and he has been sole owner and 
manager ever since. The business is an appreciable 
local industry, and has brought Mr. Ba.xter well for- 
ward in Ames'bury. He is looked upon as one of the 
reliable substantial business men of the district. 

Politically, Mr. Baxter is a Republican; fraternally, 
he is a Mason of many affiliations, being a member of 
Warren Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; Trinity 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Amesbury Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; Newburyport Commandery, 
Lodge No. 3, Knights Templar; Aleppo Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and 
Merrimac Valley Lodge of Perfection. He also belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, of Amesbury. His club is 
the Amesbury. 

Mr. Baxter married, in 1880, Emily Morrill, of Ames- 
bury, where she was born on March 4, 1849. She died 
in 1918, the mother of two children: Elton B., born 
May 12, 1883; and Maud, born May 11, 1884. 



ANTHONY RALLIS— Very well known in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, and a leader among the people of 
Grecian origin, Anthony Rallis, head of the Rallis 
Paper Company of Haverhill, has come into a useful 
place quite early in life. He was born in Edremid, Asia 
Minor, January 17, 1890, son of Christopher and Apho- 
dite (Michaelids) Rallis, who were born in Greece, the 
former a merchant, still living. 

Anthony Rallis spent his youth in his native place, 
Asia Minor, and was afforded education about equal to 
that of the high schools of this country. But in 1906, 
when he came to this country, it was necessary for him 
immediately to study the English language, and also 
other academic subjects. He attended the Haverhill 
Evening High School, and later was a student at the 
North Eastern College of Boston, Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. He entered business life as an 
employee of Mr. Winchell, of Haverhill. Two years 
later he became an assistant foreman at the Pentucket 
Mills, continuing in that responsibility for about two 
years. At different times he also worked for several 
other local concerns before starting in business for him- 
self, which he did in April, 1921, establishing the firm 
now known as the Rallis Paper Company. His business 
address is No. 50 Locust street, Haverhill, and he is an 
earnest, capable young man. He has come somewhat 
into public notice, and has the respect of his neighbors, 
for he is a justice of the peace, and president of the 
Greek Community. He is also identified with the Pan- 
Hellenic L^nion of America. He also holds commission 
as notary public. He is a member of the Greek Ortho- 
dox church. 

Mr. Rallis married, in 1913, Parthenopy Tatamany, 
who was born in Greece, and they have three children: 
Olympia, born in 1916; and their twin children, Emanuel 
and Theopandros, born in 1918. 



(Drolet) Bishop, of Sorell, Canada. They were married 
in Canada, and there for some years afterwards Salaime 
Bishop followed his trade, carpentry. Their children 
were: William; Alexander; Edward; Louise; Annie; 
Josepliine; and Charles H., of whom further. 

Before the birth of Charles H. Bishop the family had 
moved into the United States and settled in Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, in which city the boy was educated. He 
attended the public schools, and after his schooldays 
were over, began the serious work of life as a tele- 
graph messenger in the employ of the Western Union 
Telegraph Company. For a year he filled this position, 
receiving a salary of $3.00 a week. At the end of that 
time he was able to find better-paid employment with 
tlie Spaulding Company, of Haverhill. He served that 
company for a year, and for a similar period was in the 
employ of the Griffin Brothers Shoe Company, of Haver- 
hill. For three years, thereafter, he was connected with 
the N. S. Chase & Son Shoe Company, of Haverhill, 
then followed a period of service in an altogether dif- 
ferent line of business that of catering. He was with the 
Hunt Corporation, restaurant owners, for seven years, 
and after leaving that company was connected with 
Fred Cook, in the same line, for six months, and for a 
short while was working in the Life Saving Cafe. 
Next he is found with a restaurant of his own at Salis- 
bury Beach. He conducted it during the summer 
months, and then returned to Haverhill, and for the 
next eighteen months was connected with the Savoy 
Hotel, of Haverhill. For a further five years he worked 
in the Life Saving Cafe, and then again went into inde- 
pendent business. He now has two good restaurants, 
and is prospering. He was one of the organizers of the 
Gelinas Wood Heel Company, of Merrimac, and is its 
president. 

Mr. Bishop is a member of the Roman Catholic 
church, attending the Church of the Nativity at Merri- 
mac; he belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters, 
Court St. Joseph. Also, he is a member of the Oxford 
Club, of Merrimac. 

Mr. Bishop married, September 20, 1910, at Haver- 
hill, Marion A. Roberge, born in Sherbrooke, Canada, 
May 10, 1882, daughter of Louis and Celine (Germaine) 
Roberge, the former a carpenter by trade, and of French- 
Canadian antecedents. 



CHARLES H. BISHOP, restaurant owner and 
president of the Gelinas Wood Heel Company, of Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, is a native of Haverhill, born there 
September s, 1879, son of Salaime and Mary Ann 



JAMES H. WALKER— One of the oldest indus- 
tries of Essex county, Massachusetts, the Walker Body 
Company, was founded in 1898 by George Walker, Sr., 
father of the present head of the company, and its 
original purpose was for the manufacture of carriages. 
Two years later the Stevens plant at Merrimac, Massa- 
chusetts, engaged in a similar line of manufacture, was 
purchased, and the Amesbury plant was moved to that 
town. With the advent of tlie automobile and other 
changes, the business was gradually changed to the 
manufacture of automobile bodies, and in 191 1 a branch 
was again established in Amesbury. Two years later 
this part of the business was incorporated under the 
name of the Walker-Wells Company, the corporators 
being: George Walker, Sr., Harlan P. Wells, James 
H. Walker, Henry Miller. With the passing of the 
years the business has expanded to a large extent and 
there are now four plants located in Amesbury, the 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



399 



scene of the original start, and the Merrimac plant has 
been consolidated with the plant in Ames'bury. At the 
present time the line of manufacture includes automobile 
bodies and accessories, the latter being principally metal 
stampings. The floor space covered by the plants is 
four hundred thousand square feet, and the business 
gives employment to eight hundred men. 

James H, Walker, son of George and Georgina 
(Hume) Walker, was born at Amesbury, August 24, 
1872. He was educated in the public schools there and 
the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College at Boston. 
Soon alter leaving school Mr. Walker became asso- 
ciated with his father in the carriage business, continuing 
with the company until the incorporation in 1913. at 
which time he was one of the corporators. 

Mr. Walker has also taken a keen interest in public 
matters, and as a member of the I^epublican party, he 
represented that party's interests in the Massachusetts 
State Senate during the term 1905- 1906. He is a director 
of the Powow River National Bank of Amesbury, and 
is interested in the Bryant Body Company, having organ- 
ized same, in the Amesbury Lamp and Plating Com- 
pany, and in the Powow Manufacturing Company. He 
is an attendant at the Main Street Congregational 
Church. In these relationships he ranks among the 
foremost and esteemed citizens of .'\mesbury. 



PATRICK CREEDON— In his long and active 
career in the city of Salem, Massachusetts, Patrick 
Creedon has filled prominent positions in many branches 
of endeavor, always constructive, always progressive, 
and always definitely contributing to the public pros- 
perity as well as to his own success. 

Patrick Creedon was born in County Cork, Ireland, 
on December 4, 1861, and is a son of John and Nora 
(Goggin) Creedon. He was educated in the National 
schools of his native land, and at the age of eighteen 
years came to America to build his future in the "land 
of opportunity." He located first at Melrose, Massa- 
chusetts, where he remained for two years, then spent 
one year in Stoneham, also in this State. During this 
time he was interested in various activities, and in 1895 
he came to Salem. At the time of the big leather strike 
he purchased the leather business of Timothy Calla- 
han, and from that time until the present he has been 
more or less interested in this line of production, first 
as a manufacturer, and later in a jobbing way. He has 
made many trips abroad in connection with this busi- 
ness, and has a ver>- large following in England. He 
has established himself so deeply in the confidence of his 
clientele that if he cables any of his friends that he has 
a line to offer, they order on the strength of his unsup- 
ported statement. 

At the time of the great fire in Salem, in 1914, Mr. 
Creedon's plant was wiped out, and since then other 
interests have so filled his time that he has not con- 
tinued in the manufacturing branch of the leather busi- 
ness. After the fire Mr. Creedon at once took a hand 
in the rebuilding operations which demanded such a 
vast volume of concerted effort to cope with the situa- 
tion. He went into the re-inforced concrete business and 
built many factories and dwellings in the devastated 
district, also building his own residence. Furthermore, 
he '-uilt a large garage, where he now conducts an 



important business, and adjoining this structure is the 
factory occupied by the United Tanning Machine Com- 
pany. 

In his garage business Mr. Creedon has recently 
developed a wide-reaching interest. On his last trip 
abroad he found a market for used cars and motorcycles, 
and will, in future, send them over in large lots. Con- 
nected with his garage is a machine shop, fully equipped, 
where he puts these machines in perfect order for ship- 
ment abroad. 

In the public life of the city Mr. Creedon has always 
taken a deep interest, although he has never been per- 
suaded to accept public office. He is a staunch sup- 
porter of the Democratic party, and has long taken a 
leading part in the progress of the party in this county. 
Holding as he does a prominent position in various 
activities, Mr. Creedon may feel a large degree of satis- 
faction in the fact that he has achieved all by his own 
unaided efforts. 

Mr. Creedon is an influential member of the Knights 
of Columbus, and is a member of St.' James' Roman 
Catholic Church. He has a brother, Peter, in this coun- 
try, but his parents are both deceased, his father having 
died in Ireland, after which the mother crossed the 
ocean in her old age, and spent her last days with her 
son Peter. 

Mr. Creedon married, in 1894, Mary M. Brophy, of 
Salem, and they have three children: Frances: Marye; 
and William. 



URDIX L. STAPLES— Among the men, natives of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, who have attained their suc- 
cess within its confines, Urdix L. Staples holds a promi- 
nent place. Mr. Staples was born February 12, 18S3, 
in Haverhill, son of Edward M. and Arzelia (Glazier) 
Staples. Edward M. Staples was a building contractor. 

Mr. Staples was educated in the public and high 
schools of Haverhill and subsequently entered business 
college. His first experience in business was as a clerk 
with the retail shoe firm of the George T. Evans Com- 
pany, where he remained for seven years. He then 
entered the manufacturing end of the business with the 
F. J. Thompson Company, Inc. He worked upward 
from an apprentice to superintendent of the plant. 
After ten years of faithful and industrious service he 
was made a stockholder of the company, resigning his 
position in 1919 to become a partner of the Collins Shoe 
Company, where he continues to the present time. 

Mr. Staples is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Haverhill, and fraternally is a member of the 
Masonic order. 

Mr. Staples married, in 1905, Myrtle M. Hayes, of 
Haverhill, and their children are: Robert S., Dorothy 
H., and Homer L. 



ELLSWORTH J. CULLEN was born at East Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, in 1890. He was educated in the 
public schools of East Boston and Somerville and is 
a graduate of the Somerville High School. He began 
his career in the business world by entering the service 
of the Somerville Coal Company. When the Company 
purchased the Danvers Coal Company, Mr. Cullen 
became the manager of that branch of the business. Two 
years later he purchased the business from its new 



400 



ESSEX COUNTY 



owners and began to operate it for himself. He moved 
to Danvers, Massachusetts, on September 17, 1910, and 
seven years later took over all of the railroad tracks 
owned by the firm of Pettengill & Divelly, thus estab- 
lisliing transportation for his supplies of coal by land as 
well as by tidewater. 

The Danvers Coal Company is the oldest business of 
its kind at Danvers. It was founded nearly one hundred 
years ago by Nathaniel Merriam, and the landing wharf 
upon which the coal is unloaded is still known as Mer- 
riam's wharf. When Nathaniel Merriam retired, the 
business was purchased by Warren & Hood, who, in 
turn, sold it to Messrs, Lore and Russell, and from 
them it passed into the hands of George Russell, and 
later to the Danvers Coal Company, and thus to Mr. 
Cullen, who now owns and operates it as the Danvers 
Coal Company. 

Mr. Cullen is a director of the Danvers National 
Bank, and has been for several years a member of the 
Danvers Finance Committee. He belongs to the Cath- 
olic church, and is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus. He is also a member of Salem Lodge, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Cullen married Gertrude J. McKenna, and they 
have two children: George Leo, and Walter Joseph 
Cullen. 



FERDINAND DUPRE— Many have come from 
Canada to New England seeking their fortune. Ferdi- 
nand Dupre is one of those who came and found it. 
Always a man of quick decisions, he never hesitated 
when opportunity presented itself— he seized it at once. 
From a worker in a feed store to eminence in many lines 
and many places is a long distance, yet Mr. Dupre has 
been over the route, step by step, until now he has valu- 
able interests in Haverhill, Massachusetts, in Portland, 
Maine, and in Boston, Massachusetts, in Canada and 
elsewhere, and is recognized as a leader in business and 
in civics. His success has not resulted from blind luck, 
but from the faculty of always being wide awake, of 
seeing straight and clearly, of deciding promptly, and 
then pushing ahead with indomitable grit and vigor. He 
has earned that which he has attained. 

His father, Francois Dupre, was a lumberman, land- 
owner, and farmer in the Province of Quebec, Canada ; 
his mother, Rosalie Sharon, was of the same province. 

Ferdinand Dupre was born on a farm in the Province 
of Quebec, November i, 1863. His education came from 
the lower schools and the high school of his native place. 
But he was not to be a farmer, so coming from Haver- 
hill shortly after his fifteenth birthday, he went to 
work for Joseph Dupre, a relative, as handy boy in a 
feed and grain house. Soon he came to the turning point 
where he had to decide whether his life should be spent 
working for another or as his own boss. What his 
decision was may be seen in the fact that he soon 
became a partner in the business in which he had started, 
and he began to organize or buy other interests, over 
which he retained control. He created the Haverhill 
Milling Company, and later branched out into the coal 
trade with J. & T. Marin, at No. 262 Winter street, 
Haverhill. In April, IQ17, the Haverhill Coal Supply 
Company was organized, with himself as its manager 
and director. This in a few years became the largest 



concern of its kind in the city, with offices at No. 4 
Esse.x street. This address is also the home of another 
business of which he is general manager and treasurer, 
the Broadway Realty Associates, Inc., dealers in real 
estate and also in all types of insurance. He is general 
manager and treasurer of the Bay State Brick and 
Stone Company. Outside of Haverhill he is among 
other things, part owner of the Lajoie Coal Company, 
of Lowell, Massachusetts, of which he is president, and 
a director of the Keystone Coal Company, of Portland, 
Maine. 

His popularity and ready helpfulness have brought him 
into many organizations other than business enterprises. 
For twenty-five years he has been a most valued member 
of the Chamber of Commerce, both in Haverhill and in 
Boston. It is years since he joined the Grange Society. 
Some of his clubs are the Wauchesset and Rochambeau. 
He is also a member of La Societe of St. Jean Baptiste. 
During the World War. 191 7-18, he was one of the 
hardest workers in the Red Cross drives for funds, to 
which he subscribed most liberally. 

As was natural, Mr. Dupre went to Canada for his 
bride, where he was married, February 16, 1885, to Her- 
maide Marin, daughter of Joseph and Adelaide (Val- 
court) Marin. Of this union came two children: Henry 
J., bom February 29. 1886, who was actively engaged in 
business with his father when the influenza epidemic of 
the war period laid its hand on him and he was taken; 
Eva Josephine, born January 11, 1896, who is now the 
wife of Dr. Lucien R. Cliaput, of Haverhill. Mr. 
Dupre and family have been for years connected with 
St. Joseph's Catholic Church, which has been the recip- 
ient from his hand of many benefactions. 



THURMAN LESLIE, treasurer of Sheridan Bros., 
Inc., shoe manufacturers, of Haverhill, was born in Dan- 
vers, January 31, 1884, son of William H. and Mary Me- 
lissa (Weaver) Leslie, of Danvers. William H. Leslie 
was a Civil War soldier, member of Company B. nth 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. In later life he was a 
manufacturer of shoe he6ls, his plant being in Danvers. 
He was a Republican for many years, almost from the 
stirring days just prior to the Civil War when the party 
came into existence, and he was a good Methodist. He 
was twice married, five children, all sons, were born to 
him by his first wife, and his second wife bore him 
three sons and two daughters. He died in 1885, aged 
fifty-four years. Mary Melissa (Weaver) Leslie was 
born at Port George, Nova Scotia, Canada. 

Thurman Leslie passed his boyhood mainly in Dan- 
vers. He attended the public school of Danvers and 
eventually graduated from the Danvers High School in 
the class of 1902. Soon thereafter he began his busi- 
ness career, and was in the employ of Arthur T. Way, 
of Salem, Massachusetts, for two and a half years, there 
gaining knowledge of the leather industry. Next he 
worked for B. N. Moore & Sons, at Peabody and Bos- 
ton, for four years, and for eight years thereafter was 
in the employ of the F. E. Jones Company, of Boston. 
He left at the end of that time to take connection with 
The Clapp Tapley Company, of Danvers, shoe manu- 
facturers, holding that connection until. May, 1920, when 
he joined William R. Whitney in taking over the busi- 
ness of Sheridan Brothers, at No. 92 Essex street. Ha- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



401 



verhill. The reorganization was successfully effected 
and took the trading name of Sheridan Bros., Inc., of 
which Mr. William R. Whitney became president, and 
Mr. Leslie treasurer. They are still the executives, and 
in direction of the company which has been well devel- 
oped, the output of women's shoes (McKay) being now 
one thousand pairs a day. The company has 15,000 
square feet of floor space in its plant, and finds steady 
employment for one hundred employees. 

Mr. Leslie has not entered much into public affairs, 
but at one time (1919-20) was a member of the Finance 
Committee of Danvers. He is a Mason, and at present 
worshipful master of Mosaic Lodge. He also belongs 
to the Danvers Masonic Club and to the Boston City 
Club. By religious preference he is a Methodist, mem- 
ber of the Danvers Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Leslie married, December 18, 191 1, at Danvers, 
Massachusetts, Helen D. Smart, born there in 1885, 
daughter of Willis E. and Ida M. (Webster) Smart, 
the former a grocer. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie have two 
children: Harding Bruce, born April 13, 1917; and 
Hugh Dearborn, born December 20, 1920. 



WILLIAM GEORGE NICOL TYRIE was born 
in Scotland. July 31. 1883. and is a son of David and 
Helen (Malcolm) Tyrie, who were both natives of 
Scotland. Mr. Tyrie's father is a reed and comb maker. 

Mr. Tyrie was educated in the schools of Scotland. 
He began his business career by spending three and a 
half years in the factory of Lowson & Company, then 
deciding to learn the plumbing business, entered the 
service of David McBeth, as an apprentice. He spent 
six years in the employment of Mr. McBeth and then, 
having acquired a thorough knowledge of plumbing, 
went to the city of Kirriemuir, Scotland, and entered 
the service of Alexander Reed. In 1907 he came to the 
United States and settled at Haverhill, where for a 
year and a half he was associated with the Haverhill 
House Heating Company. He then entered the service 
of McAree Brothers, remaining with them until 1913, 
when he established a business of his own, the Haver- 
hill Plumbing Company, at No. 28 How street. This 
business he still directs with entire success. Mr. Tyrie 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and belongs to 
the Order of Scottish Clans. 

Mr. Tyrie married, in 1909, Margaret Steele Nicol, 
who was born in Scotland, a daughter of James and 
Rose (Henderson) Nicol. both of whom were natives of 
Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Tyrie have four sons : David 
William, who was born in igii ; Arthur Armistead, who 
was born in 1913 ; James Henderson, who was born in 
1916; and Wallace RoUey, born in 1921. 



EDWARD L. DUMONT, although young in years, 
has already attained success in his chosen line of work. 
Through his own industry and attention to detail he 
forged ahead and to-day holds a well-deserved place 
among the business men of Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
His father, David Dumont, was a native of St. Louis, 
Canada, where he was engaged in the shoe industry. 
In those days shoemaking in winter and farming in 
summer furnished occupations to many men who were 
thrifty and thus they provided themselves with corn- 
Essex — 2 — 26 



fort. The children of these parents were accustomed 
to help in the work after school hours and it was in 
this way that Edward L. Dumont first realized his incli- 
nation toward mechanical ability. His mother was Eliz- 
abeth Manseau, of Haverhill. 

Edward L. Dumont was born May 31, 1887, in Haver- 
hill. Massachusetts, and received his education in the 
public schools of that city. Soon afterward he learned 
the machinist's trade at the plant of the Duplessus 
Machine Company and there he remained for three 
years. His next place of employment was with the 
Briggs & Belmer Company, of Haverhill, remaining 
there a year. An opportunity then presented itself to 
enter the florist business and this occupation he followed 
for a year's time. The automobile business was just 
beginning to expand at this time and Mr. Dumont was 
quick to appreciate the opportunities offered in this field 
for a skillful mechanic and for four years he followed 
garage work. With a thorough knowledge of the mech- 
anism of the cars, Mr. Dumont sought a position as 
private driver and after eight years was in a position to 
enter business on his own account. At this time he 
bought the J. R. Smith Company, of Haverhill, and has 
met with success in his venture. Mr. Dumont uses the 
same firm name which has become synonymous with 
service. 

Mr. Dumont's time is practically all taken in the care 
of his business, so does not have much leisure for fra- 
ternal affiliations or public affairs, yet he realizes his 
duty as a citizen and is always willing to lend his aid 
whenever called upon. He is a member of the Forest- 
ers of America, and of St. Jean Baptiste Union. 



ERNEST CLARENCE PRESCOTT, now in inde- 
pendent business in Haverhill, Massachusetts, was born 
in Salem, Massachusetts, August 22, 1869. son of Alden 
J. and Lydia A. (Pettingill) Prescott. both of Methuen, 
Massachusetts, where Josiah Prescott, grandfather of 
Ernest C. Prescott, was also born. Josiah Prescott. a 
Baptist, and by trade a farmer and shoemaker, married 
Mehitable Carlton, and to them were born seven chil- 
dren, four sons and three daughters, among them Alden 
J., who was born in January, 1832, and died in 1896. He 
was also a Baptist, was a Democrat by political prefer- 
ence, and by occupation also a shoemaker. His wife, 
Lydia A. (Pettingill) Prescott, bore him three chil- 
dren : Julia A., born in Salem, New Hampshire, March 
4, 1867; Winifred L., born in Salem, New Hampshire; 
and Ernest C, born in Salem, New Hampshire, August 
22, 1869. 

The last named was educated in the public schools of 
Salem, Methuen and Haverhill, in the shoe factories of 
which places his father at different times was employed, 
and when his schooldays were over he entered the employ 
of W. F. and J. A. Blake, of Granite street, Haverhill, 
as errand boy. He remained with them for five years, 
latterly as shipping clerk, and at the end of that time 
felt that he could enter into business for himself. He 
did so, having a plant at No. 79 Washington street, 
Haverhill, his branch of the shoe industry being cutting, 
trimming, and perforating. Later he worked on a gen- 
eral line of upper leathers, trading as E. C. Prescott. 
Eventually, he gave up that business and went to South 



402 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Carolina, where he remained for two years, engaged in 
the turpentine business. He then went to California, 
remaining for six years, where he established the Wear- 
well Shoe and Repair Company, and this business is 
still in existence there. He sold this and then returned 
to his native State, settling in Haverhill, and for the 
following two years was connected with J. L. Adams, 
a leather dealer of Haverhill. In 1916 he resumed his 
old business, that of leather dealer, and he has quite 
satisfactorily developed his business at No. 140 Wash- 
ington street, Haverhill, where he trades as E. C. Pres- 
cott. Politically, he is a Republican ; he is a member of 
Masonic bodies, also the Shrine, is a member of the 
First Baptist Church, of Haverhill; and belongs to the 
Pentucket Club. 

Mr. Prescott married, in 1894, at Haverhill, Maude A. 
Gregg, who was born in Londonderry, New Hampshire, 
January 26, 1874, daughter of Walter F. and Ellen A. 
(Spinney) Gregg, of that place, the former a shoe 
salesman by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Prescott have 
one child, Pauline Z., born July 29, 1895. She was given 
a good education, commencing in the elementary school 
of Haverhill, and including two years of high school in 
Los Angeles, California, and two years in Haverhill 
High School, after which she was a student at Mount 
Ida College, Newtown, New Hampshire, eventually 
graduating therefrom. 



SAMUEL J. DURKEE— One of the prominent utili- 
tarian business establishments of Lynn, is that of Sam- 
uel J. Durkee, dry cleaner of rugs, clothing, furs, 
feathers, and every kind of fabric which requires this 
method of cleansing or renovation. 

Mr. Durkee comes of Nova Scotia stock, and his 
grandfather, William Henry Durkee, was a farmer, 
owning extensive lands there, and personally managing 
his large interests. 

Charles William Durkee, Mr. Durkee's father, was a 
native of Nova Scotia, but came to Essex county, and 
for many years was prominent in the construction world 
of this section as a painting contractor, doing business 
with his partner, under the firm name of Durkee & 
Daley. He died in May, 1917. His wife was Mary B. 
Corning, also of Nova Scotia. They were the parents 
of three sons and five daughters. The younger son is 
prominent in the laundry business in Lynn. 

Samuel J. Durkee, elder son of Charles William 
Durkee and Mary B. (Corning) Durkee, was born in 
Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, October 22, 1871. Acquiring 
his education in the public schools of his native city, Mr. 
Durkee, as a young man, became connected with the 
Nugars Laundry & Dye Works, of Halifax, Nova Sco- 
tia, where he learned much of value to his subsequent 
career. Thereafter he went to Rochester, New York, 
and there thoroughly mastered the business in which he 
is now engaged. Coming to Lynn about 191 1, he built 
a dry-cleaning establishment, taking advantage of all 
the latest developments of modern science as applied 
to this branch of endeavor. The plant is very large, and 
in every particular conforms to the Massachusetts laws, 
pertaining to the nature of materials used in the process 
of cleaning. Twenty-three skilled operatives are em- 
ployed, and they handle everj'thing which can be 
cleansed by their processes. They keep four motor 



cars busy, delivering work to all parts of the State. In 
connection with the main plant, Mr. Durkee also has an 
extensive plant for the distillation of benzol, which is 
used in their cleaning work. 

As a member of the National Dry Cleaners' Associa- 
tion, Mr. Durkee is able to keep in the forefront of the 
business, and he is also a member of the New Eng- 
land branch of this organization. He is a member of 
the Chamber of Commerce of Lynn. 

With his large business interests, Mr. Durkee has 
little leisure for outside activities, but is an active 
worker in the Lynn Young Men's Christian Association. 

Samuel J. Durkee married Minnie F. Wilmot, who 
was born in Illinois, and is a daughter of William W. 
Wilmot, who was for some years, a well-known painter 
in Lowell, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Durkee have 
one son, Walter Kingston, born in 1895, and now in the 
lumber business in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with John 
Blodgett. Walter Kingston Durkee was with the 201st 
Field Artillery, in the World War, and acted as chauf- 
feur for General Craig. 



NORMAN BAINE DURKEE— Meeting one of the 
everyday needs of the people, Norman Baine Durkee, 
of Lynn, Massachusetts, is enjoying a generous meas- 
ure of success. He is a native of Nova Scotia, and his 
grandfather, William Henry Durkee, owned large agri- 
cultural interests in that country. 

Charles William Durkee, son of William Henry Dur- 
kee, was born in Nova Scotia, but later came to Essex 
county, where he became prominent as a member of the 
firm of painting contractors, Durkee & Daley. He mar- 
ried Mary B. Corning, and died in May, 1917. 

Norman Baine Durkee, son of Charles William and 
Mary B. (Corning) Durkee, was born in Hebron, Nova 
Scotia, January 30, 1877. Coming to Lynn at the age 
of ten years, he completed in the public schools of 
Lynn, the education which had been begun in his native 
town. At the age of twenty-one he started in the 
laundry business with James W. Whyte, in Lynn, con- 
tinuing this partnership for a period of seven years. 
In i8g8 Mr. Durkee founded the present business, of 
which he has always been sole proprietor. In addition 
to wet wash and regular laundry work, he handles the 
cleaning of rugs and various articles. For some time 
he also owned a plant in Peabody, Massachusetts, but 
several years ago sold that plant to his brother-in-law, 
Edward K. Roche, who still carries on the business. 
Mr. Durkee has since devoted his entire attention to 
the Lynn interests, developing one of the most up-to-date 
plants in this section, which he built especially for the 
purpose. This comprises commodious buildings, with the 
most modern equipment, in which about thirty-eight 
workers are regularly employed. 

Mr. Durkee is one of eight children, and is the 
youngest son of the family of three sons and five 
daughters. His brother, Samuel J. Durkee, whose life 
is reviewed in preceding sketch, is in an allied busi- 
ness in this city, being a specialist in dry-cleaning. Of 
the five sisters, all are living but one. 

In various interests Mr. Durkee is well known. He 
is a member of the Lynn Chamber of Commerce, and 
of the National Laundrymen's Association. In frater- 
nal circles he is well known, being a member of Golden 





'A^AftjJ'- 







i-i^^^ 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



403 



Fleece Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Lynn, and 
of the East Lynn Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is also a member of the Masonic Club. 
Politically Mr. Durkee supports the Republican party. 
He is a trustee of both St. Luke's and the Broadway 
Methodist Episcopal churches. 

On March ig, 1897, Mr. Durkee married Lottie Isabel 
Roberts, daughter of Thomas C. and Nettie (Latham) 
Roberts, whose father was for some time a prominent 
Lynn grocer. Mr. and Mrs. Durkee have two sons and 
one daughter: Elmer Laurence, born August 23, i8gg; 
Harold Norman, born June 3, 1902; and Annette Es- 
telle, born January 7, 1905. The younger son is now a 
student at the Middleburg Academy. 



ULYSSES M. CORSON, chief of police of Swamp- 
scott, Massachusetts, was born June 18, 1864, at Dover, 
same State, son of Martin Van Buren and Emeline M. 
(Sleeper) Corson, and at the age of two years was 
brought by his parents to Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
where he attended the public schools. Soon after leav- 
ing school Mr. Corson engaged in the meat and pro- 
vision business for himself, continuing thus employed 
for five years, and then became a shoe cutter, which 
occupation he followed for fourteen years, becoming 
foreman of the cutting room for one of the large Haver- 
hill manufacturers. In igo2 Mr. Corson settled in Lynn, 
where he followed shoe cutting, and in 1906 removed to 
Swampscott, where the following year he was appointed 
to the office of chief of police, an office he has since 
held, discharging his duties in a most able manner. 

Fraternally. Mr. Corson is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias; the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; Improved Order of Red Men; Massachusetts 
Chiefs' Association; and the International Chiefs' 
Association. 

Mr. Corson married. April 14, 1889, Bessie C. Moore, 
daughter of Clinton S. Moore, of Allentown, New Hamp- 
shire, and they attend the Universalist church. 



FRANK E. YOUNG, who has lived very many years 
ill Haverhill, Massachusetts, and for the greater part of 
his business life has been identified with the shoe and 
leather industries of Massachusetts, was born in Deer- 
field. New Hampshire, July 18, 1854, son of Joseph and 
Josephine (Hall) Young. His mother was of a Can- 
dia. New Hampshire, family, and died in 1898, but his 
father was of Deerfield, New Hampshire, though later 
of Candia, and then of Haverhill, Massachusetts. He 
was in the shoe manufacturing business almost until 
the year of his death, 1907. 

Frank E. Young was educated in the public schools 
of Candia, and after leaving school, went to work for 
his father, in whose plant he remained for twelve years, 
then, coming to Haverhill, he found responsible em- 
ployment in the factory of the Thing & Ricker Company, 
which firm he served for three years. He next worked 
for the C. T. Ford Company, of Haverhill, and remained 
with them for two years. Next, for a year, he was with 
E. C. Dow, after which he became foreman for the 
James R. Thing Company. Working in that capacity, 
and for the same company, he passed seven years, by 
which time he had accumulated sufficient capital to 
vesture into business for himself. He formed business 



partnership with Joseph Carr, of Haverhill, and the 
two established the firm of F. E. Young Company, of 
Haverhill. Their line of manufacture was soles and 
top-lifts, and for a year the partnership continued, Mr. 
Carr then selling his interest to Frank E. Watson, the 
firm name then being changed to the Watson, Young 
Company, and as such the business was conducted for 
five years. With the dissolution of partnership then, 
Mr. Young took over the plant, and for the next twelve 
years carried it on alone. Indeed, he added to it the 
plant of the J. H. Summer Company, which he acquired. 
At the end of that time, however, he had made up his 
mind to retire altogether from business, and with that 
object in view, sold both plants to John C. Hill. For 
the next two years he was out of business altogether, 
and during the period was not in good health. He 
decided to reenter business, and accepted an offer made 
by the Chapman Tap and Counter Company, of Haver- 
hill. For two years he was superintendent of their plant, 
and then once again went into business for himself, in 
his old line, soles and top-lifts. .As such, he has con- 
tinued actively to produce to the present. 

Mr. Young is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce, and having lived so long in the place, is nat- 
urally interested in its general affairs. He is a Baptist, 
member of the Freewill Baptist Church, of Haverhill. 

Mr. Young married, in 1878, .\nnie L. Bartlette, of 
Northwood, New Hampshire. 



GEORGE M. TOBIAS, proprietor of the Tobias 
Printing Company, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, has 
attained his success through his own intelligently directed 
efforts. Mr. Tobias was born April 22. 1895, in Russia, 
son of Moses Tobias, a lawyer of that country. He was 
educated in the public schools, and in 1910 came to 
America. The printing business was his first occupa- 
tion, and for four years he worked at this business as 
salesman in Lynn, Massachusetts. In the latter year he 
went to Haverhill and started in business for himself, 
doing all his work with a hand press. In 1919 he pur- 
chased the Fred V. Hooke Printing Plant, one of the 
oldest firms in Haverhill, and the business is now con- 
ducted under the name of the Tobias Printing Com- 
pany. Mr. Tobias prints in six different languages, and 
his plant is up-to-date in equipment. 



THE LINDSEY & HALL COMPANY, of which 
C. Irving Lindsey is the head, is one of the many 
important firms which are intimately identified with the 
great shoe industry. This business was founded in 
1884 by the late George A. Bodwell, who developed a 
thriving interest, and later admitted as a partner W. 
Howard McConnell, who took full charge after the 
death of Mr. Bodwell, which occurred in November of 
1908. For three years Mr. McConnell carried the affairs 
of the concern forward successfully, then his own 
untimely death, in 191 1, again brought changes. 

In March, of igi2, the present concern purchased this 
business, but no change was made in the name for about 
four years, except such as to indicate its incorporation, 
and as George A. Bodwell & Company. Inc., the concern 
constantly became a greater and more significant force 
in its field of activity. On February I, 1916. the name 
of the corporation was changed to the Lindsey & Hall 



404 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Company, with C. Irving Lindsey as president and gen- 
eral manager. 

For more tlian thirty-six years the business has been 
in continuous operation, manufacturing a very com- 
plete Hne of high grade men's and women's cut soles, 
and deahng in those forms of sole leather offal known 
to the trade as bends, strips, butts, etc. During all 
these years, up to April, 1920, the concern has been 
located at Nos. iii and 113 Oxford street, but in Janu- 
ary of 1920 the present modern, five-story brick build- 
ing at No. 93 Willow street was purchased and com- 
pletely remodeled, and on April ist of that year the 
concern moved in. They now occupy the extensive 
lower floors of the building. This concern has built up 
an enviable reputation for reliability and fair dealing, 
and in every respect is still going forward. 



GIRDLER STACEY— In the passing of Mr. Stacey, 
one of the leading citizens of Marblehead, Massachu- 
setts, the community lost a man of many activities, and 
one always progressive, abreast of the times, and inter- 
ested broadly in the welfare of the people. 

Mr. Stacey was born in Marblehead, August 10, 1857, 
and received his education in the public schools of the 
town. At the age of fifteen years he entered the employ 
of James Grader, who conducted a wholesale confec- 
tionery store in Marblehead at that time. He continued 
with Mr. Grader until the latter retired, when he became 
proprietor of the store. Later he took up the manu- 
facture of fine confectionery, and from that time on 
made his own product. In all he was connected with 
the confectionery business for a period of forty-three 
years, and during that time never changed his location, 
occupying until his death the building in which, as a 
boy, he first went to work. 

Mr. Stacey was a man of tireless industry, filling 
every moment with some progressive activity. In con- 
nection with his main business interest he also carried on 
other matters. For many years he was a Marblehead 
operator for the Western Union Telegraph Company, 
and for thirty-six years was manager for the company at 
the Marblehead station, retiring from that office about 
five years ago. He also acted as Marblehead reporter 
for the Boston "Herald." 

In the public life of the city Mr. Stacey was a force 
for progress. A staunch supporter of the Republican 
party, he nevertheless refused consistently to counten- 
ance any act or move which sacrificed the people for 
the party. He served for many years as a member of 
the Republican Town Committee. He was long a mem- 
ber of the Marblehead Board of Health, and for years 
its chairman, also at one time serving as clerk of the 
board. He was a director of the Marblehead Savings 
Bank, and served as a member on the board of electric 
light commissioners. He attained more than local note 
as a weather expert, few people in this vicinity being 
able to compete with him in accuracy of forecast. 

Mr. Stacey was a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, also of the Royal Arch Masons, of Salem, 
Massachusetts, and was a director of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. He was a devout member of 
Old North Congregational Church, and was for years 
a worker in the Old North Men's Club. 

In 1882 Mr. Stacey married Annie B. Felton, and 



their daughter, Alice A., is now Mrs. Stewart, of 
Marblehead. Besides his wife and daughter, Mr. Stacey 
is survived by a brother, Louis Stacey, and three sis- 
ters: Mrs. Theodore Brown, of Melrose; Mrs. Jennie 
Gage, of Haverhill; and Mrs. Nellie Harris, of Mans- 
field. Mr. Stacey died February 7, 1921, and his death 
left a vacant place in many circles. His memory will 
long be cherished in Marblehead by the many friends 
he left behind, as well as by the members of his family. 



JOSEPH HONORE CHOUINARD— .\ successful 
merchant and business man of Salem, Massachusetts, 
where he is engaged in business as an optometrist, opti- 
cian and jeweler, is a native of Quebec, Canada, where 
his birth occurred July 7, 1888. He is the son of Hermel 
and Emma (Bourgault) Chouinard. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hermel Chouinard have been born fourteen children, 
among them Joseph Honore, of further mention ; John 
T., a contractor at East Jafifrey, New Hampshire; Omer, 
associated with John T. in business ; and Adelard, now 
residing with Joseph Honore. 

Joseph Honore Chouinard received the elementary 
portion of his education in the public schools of his 
native place and St. Anne de la Pocatiere College, then 
he entered the university at Laval, where he took a two 
years' course in civil engineering and a six months' 
course in optometry. In 1909 he moved with his parents 
to East Jaffrey, New Hampshire, and worked for a 
short time there, subsequently coming to Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, where he passed the State board examinations 
on' optometry in 1912, and worked at his profession for 
the .following two years with J. E. Cheney, after which 
being desirous of establishing himself in business, he 
opened his office at No. 112 Lafayette street, where the 
business was burned out in 1914. He reopened at No. 
120 Lafayette street, after the rebuilding. Here he car- 
ries a high grade line of jewelry and photographers' 
supplies, and at the same time conducts a successful 
business as an optometrist, his establishment being the 
last word in modern ec|uipment. It has been due exclu- 
sively to his own efforts that his business has grown 
to its present large proportions, and he is looked upon 
by his associates and fellow-citizens as a most capable 
business man and successful merchant. 

In politics Mr. Chouinard is a Republican, but is no 
office seeker. He has always taken an active interest 
in charitable and philanthropic work, and during the 
World War was a devoted worker in the drives which 
the Red Cross made. He is a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Opticians' Association, and affiliates with the 
Young Men's Christian Association, and La Societe St. 
Jean the Baptiste of America. In religion he is a 
Roman Catholic and attends St. Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church of Salem. 

In January 6, 1914, Mr. Chouinard married (first) 
Elizabeth Lantin, who died July 26, 1918. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Chouinard were born three children: Conrade; 
Loretta; and Joseph H.. Jr. Mr. Chouinard married 
(second). May 16, 1921, Mila Vanasse, and they reside 
at No. 16 Willow avenue. 



HENRY I. YALE. D. M. D.— Among the profes- 
fessional men of Peabody, Massachusetts, Dr. Henry 
I. Yale admittedly occupies a leading place, gained 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



405 



through natural ability, combined with close application 
and perseverance, factors that have contributed most in 
this country toward making our successful men, for a 
man's material inheritance may be squandered without 
leaving him better, but what he gains through his own 
efiforts has a double blessing attached, from the value of 
the possession and the benefit of the experience to the 
spiritual and mental growth of the possessor. 

Henry I. Yale was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 
March 16, 1888, the son of P. Henry and Georgiana 
(Alywin) Yale. He was amply fitted by preliminary 
educaticm in the public schools of his native place, and 
after deciding upon the profession of dentistry for his 
career he entered the Medical Department of Tufts 
College, from which he was graduated in 1914, with the 
degree of Doctor of Medical Dentistry, and that same 
year passed the Massachusetts State board examinations. 
In the latter part of 1914 Dr. Yale came to Peabody and 
opened an office on his own account at No. 18 Main 
street, where he has since continued. Here he has 
developed a large and high class practice, so that he is 
now regarded as among the leaders of his profession in 
this community. 

Besides his professional activities Dr. Yale is an 
energetic participant in the public life of Peabody, and 
is well known in many different departments of its 
affairs. In politics he is an Independent. He is also 
prominent in fraternal and social circles here, and is 
affiliated with a large number of organizations of dif- 
ferent character. He is a memter of the various pro- 
fessional organizations, including the American Dental 
Association, member and secretary of the North Eastern 
Massachusetts Dental Society, the Peabody Dental 
Society, Tufts Alumni, Psi Omega fraternity, and out- 
side of these he belongs to the local order of the Knights 
of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and the Rotary Club. In religion he is a Roman 
Catholic and attends St. John's Roman Catholic Church 
of Peabody. 

Dr. Yale married (first), on July 27, 1916, Margaret 
J. Conwell, who died September 16, 1918, leaving one 
son, Arthur A, Dr. Yale married (second) Doris A. 
Fellows, daughter of George and Eunice (Trask) 
Fellows. 



JOHN D. DODGE — As president and manager of 
the Lawrence Knitting Company of Methuen, Massa- 
chusetts. John D. Dodge holds a place among the 
leading business men of the town. He was born 
December 2;}, 1849, at Francestown, New Hampshire, 
son of William B. Dodge, also of Francestown, where 
he was a mason by trade, and Rebecca (Patch) Dodge. 
The former died in 1865, and the latter in i860. After 
attending the public schools of Francestown, Mr. Dodge 
entered the employ of the Ipswich Mills Company, con- 
tinuing there until he engaged in business for himself. 

The Lawrence Hosiery Company was founded by 
Wendell & Mellidge, and they were succeeded by Mr. 
Dodge and his partners, James Ingalls and G. E. Foss. 
In 1890 the business was carried on under the name of 
the Methuen Knitting Company, continuing for four 
years, until the death of Mr. Ingalls. At this time Mr. 
Dodge purchased Mr. Foss's interests, and in 1898 
formed a corporation under the name of the Lawrence 



Knitting Company, for the manufacturing of hosiery, 
and he became president and manager of the company, 
and George Hunting, treasurer. This arrangement has 
continued to the present time and a large volume of 
•business is carried on, the product being shipped all 
over the country. Fraternally Mr. Dodge is a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
is active in municipal affairs in Methuen. 

Mr. Dodge married, September 3, 1871, Helen A. 
Manson, of Kittery, Maine, and the following children 
were born to them: Effie L., wife of Earnest Munroe; 
Carrie L., now deceased; and Bessie E., also deceased. 



THE MARK E. KELLEY COMPANY, INC., of 

Peabody, Massachusetts, was incorporated March 16, 
1919, the corporators being Mark E. Kelley and George 
A. Barnaby. They are thorouglily equipped with the 
most modern machinery for general contracting work, 
including sewers, water mains and concrete work of 
any description. In addition to their contract work 
they carry a complete line of cement, patent plaster, 
wire lath, fire clay and fire brick. Among the buildings 
erected by this company may be mentioned the Central 
Fire Alarm building, built in 1920. The majority of 
the sidewalks in the city of Peabody have been built 
by the company, which in itself is sufficient warrant of 
the high standard of their workmanship. Both mem- 
bers of the corporation are graduates of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, and previous to his present 
work Mr. Barnaby traveled extensively as coal inspector 
for various railroads; he was also town engineer of 
Peabody in 1913. Both Mr. Kelley and Mr. Barnaby 
are members of the Chamber of Commerce; the Rotary 
Club, and the Peabody Club. 



LEONARD SIMMONS LITTLE was born at New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, on January 14, 1886, and is 
a son of Amos P. and Anna (Simmons) Little. His 
father, who was born at New Bedford, was engaged for 
some time as a civil engineer. He later became district 
and factory manager for the National Biscuit Com- 
pany, and later formed a connection with the Loose- 
Wiles Biscuit Company. The elder Mr. Little died in 
1915. His widow, who was born at Fairhaven, Massa- 
chusetts, is still living. 

Mr. Little received his early education in the schools 
of Providence, Rhode Island. He later proceeded to 
the Classical High School, and after graduating there- 
from, entered Brown University. He completed his 
studies at the University and graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1907. After his graduation, Mr. 
Little accepted a position as chemist with the Appo- 
naug Company, but laiter held the position of dyer with 
the same concern and remained in their service until 
19H, when he established himself in business. He 
formed a company, which was known as the Narragan- 
sett Chemical Company, of Providence, Rhode Island, 
and held the position of treasurer in the company until 
1914, when he gave up the business and accepted a 
position as overseer and later became superintendent, 
with the United States Finishing Company, of Paw- 
tucket, Rhode Island. He spent six years in the service 
of the United States Finishing Company, remaining 
with them until 1920, when he formed a connection with 



4o6 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the Pacific Print Works of Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
This establishment is the largest print works in the 
world, and Mr. Little holds the position of assistant 
superintendent of the works. 

Mr. Little is a member of the Congregational church 
of Andover. In politics he is a Republican. He is at 
present a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and 
belongs to the Lawrence Industrial Relations Club. He 
is also a member of the Taylor Society; the American 
Society of Chemists and Colorers of Boston. Massa- 
chusetts; the American Chemical Society; and the 
Providence Engineering Society. Mr. Little also is a 
member of St. Matthew's Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, the Merrimac Valley Country Club, 
and Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 

Mr. Little married, in 1909, Aniey W. Williams, of 
Providence, Rhode Island. Mrs. Little is a descendant 
of the historic Roger Williams, the founder of Provi- 
dence. Mr. and Mrs. Little have two sons: Robert 
Williams, who was born on March 18, 1910; and George 
Westcott, who was born on August i, 191 1. 



JOHN WILLIAM MacLEAN— The surname of 
MacLean is one of the oldest patronymics. William 
Buchanan, who wrote in 1820 on the origin of Scottish 
surnames, states that the name of MacLean is "descended 
from that of Fitzgerald of Ireland, being once the most 
potent surname of any other of English extraction in 
that kingdom." It is claimed by leading Irish genealo- 
gists that the Fitzgeralds or Geraldines were of Italian 
origin. The family was in Normandy long before the 
Conquest. Seignior Giraldo was a principal officer 
under William the Conqueror, by whom he was made 
Lord of Windsor. In 1169 Maurice Fitzgerald, grand- 
son of Giraldo, was sent to Ireland in command of 
English troops to suppress a rebellion against the King 
of Leinster. As a reward for his success in the under- 
taking, Fitzgerald received large grants of Irish terri- 
tory and thus the family became established in Ireland. 

The surname MacLean is a contraction of MacGillean, 
said to be a prominent branch of the Fitzgerald Sept 
or Clan. The family emigrated to Scotland at a time 
when the history of those countries was still traditionary. 
They were among the most loyal at Largs and Bannock- 
burn. MacLean became a lieutenant of McDonald, 
Lord of the Isles. 

Allan MacLean, the first of his family in this country, 
was born in Scotland; he was a carpenter and came to 
Nova Scotia, where he lived the rest of his life-time. 
He married Isabella Benvie, and they had five children, 
the second eldest son being John William MacLean, of 
whom further. 

John William MacLean was born in Nova Scotia, 
February 4, 1S60. He attended the schools there, and 
when fourteen years of age came to the United States, 
where he completed his schooling, .'\fter leaving school 
he worked for four or five years on a farm and then 
worked for a manufacturer of shoes, first as a cutter. 
Later he learned to manufacture lasts, and for five 
years was manager for the R. L. Cleveland Company. 
However, this work did not appeal to Mr. MacLean as 
an occupation and in 191,^ he engaged in the grocery 
business on his own account in Danvers, Massachusetts. 
In this venture he has been very successful; of a pleas- 



ing personality, and having a desire to please, he has 
succeeded in building up a large trade, and is well 
known among his fellow business men. Mr. MacLean 
is a Mason, third degree; he is a member of the Con- 
gregational church. 

Mr. MacLean married Elizabeth Knight Prentiss, of 
Danvers, and they have three children: Charlotte A.; 
Valentine; and Grace G. 



MICHAEL T. DOYLE— In one of the practical 
lines of lousiness endeavor in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
Michael T. Doyle is making his own success and con- 
tributing to the general prosperity of the city. Mr. 
Doyle was born in Limerick, Ireland, on December 16, 
1879, and is a son of Maurice J. and Honora (Ken- 
nedy) Doyle, who are now also residents of Lawrence, 
the elder Mr. Doyle having been for a number of years 
in the employ of the city. 

Coming to the United States with his parents when 
about six years of age, Michael T. Doyle has been a 
resident of Lawrence since 1885, and here he received a 
thoroughly practical education in the parochial and 
public schools. In 1896, at the age of seventeen years, 
the young man entered the "business world in the employ 
of Sanborn & Robinson, prominent hardware dealers of 
that day, and remained with them for a period of 
eighteen years. Then, in 1914, with this experience 
behind him. Mr. Doyle started in business for himself 
along the same line. In the past seven years he has 
built up a large and constantly growing business in 
hardware, paints, oils and varnishes, and also carries a 
complete line of sporting goods and automobile sup- 
plies. 

Mr. Doyle is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Lawrence, and interested in all civic progress. 
He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks Lodge, No. 65; of the Knights of Columbus; 
and of the Holy Name Society of St. Mary's Church. 
He is also a member of the Catholic Club. 

Mr. Doyle married, in Lawrence. Amanda M. Colvin, 
and they are the parents of three children: William A., 
a high school student, and associated with his father in 
business; Maurice J.; and Rita C. Mr. and Mrs. Doyle 
reside at No. 74 Park street. 



MAHLON D. CURRIER— As general superin- 
tendent of the Champion International Company of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, Mahlon D. Currier holds one 
of the responsible positions of the industrial world of 
Lawrence, and is among the leading citizens of that 
city. 

Mr. Currier was born November 28, 1857, in New 
Hampshire, son of Benjamin G. and Mary P. (Wheeler) 
Currier, both natives of New Hampshire. The former 
was a veteran of the Civil War, a member of Company 
K, Fifteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, and was 
located for a time in Louisiana; he took part in the 
battle of Port Hudson. Originally there were twelve 
hundred men in this regiment and when it returned 
there were but three hundred. Mr. Currier died in 1873. 

Mahlon D. Currier was educated in the public schools 
of Lawrence, and his first position was with the Russell 
Paper Company, as runner-boy, in 1873. By diligent 
effort and attention to his work, Mr. Currier worked his 



<^. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



407 



way upward by degrees and held the offices of clerk, 
pay-master, and eventually becatne superintendent of 
the plant. In due course of time this company was 
consolidated with other companies, and the Champion 
International Paper Company was formed, of which Mr. 
Currier became general superintendent, which position 
he has since ably filled, having under his supervision 
si.x hundred or more employes. The paper made by this 
company is enameled book or coated paper, and the 
company supplies very many of the leading publications 
using this high grade paper. 

Mr. Currier has always been active in public and 
fraternal affairs. He is a member of Phoenecian Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Mt. Sinai Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons ; Lawrence Council, Royal and Select 
Masters ; Bethany Commandery, Knights Templar. He 
is also a member of Lowell Lodge of Perfection, Scot- 
tish Rite Masonry; Lowell Council, Princes of Jeru- 
salem; Massachusetts Consistory, Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, with the thirty-second degree. He is a 
member of Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Xobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston. Mr. Currier 
is a past grand of Meonadnock Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and a past chief patriarch of 
Kearsarge Encampment. He is also a member of Crys- 
tal Rebekah Lodge and a past patron of Lawrence 
Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. 

Mr. Currier was one of the founders of the Lawrence 
Canoe Club in 1885, and was its first commodore, an 
office which he has held a numlier of years at different 
times. He is the only founder who still retains his mem- 
bership in the club. 

Mr. Currier became active in bicycling in 1882, when 
the first high wheels, or "ordinarys," as they were called, 
came into use in Lawrence. He was president of the 
Lawrence Bicycle Club for a number of years. Through 
the efforts of the Lawrence Bicycle Club the League 
of Esse.x County Wheelmen was formed in Lawrence 
at that time, and Mr. Currier was the president of this 
league for four years. In 1884 and 1885 Mr. Currier 
was chief counsel of Massachusetts in the League of 
.American Wheelmen, and still retains his membership 
in that organization, being one of the oldest in years of 
membership. Mr. Currier is a member of the Appalach- 
ian Mountain Club, the National Geographic Society, 
the National Historical Society, the Lawrence Natural 
History Society, the Young Men's Christian Association, 
and the L^niversalist church, of which he has 'been treas- 
urer for forty years. Mr. Currier is unmarried. 



SAMUEL ARTHUR HEARS— In the business life 
of Essex, Massachusetts, Samuel .A. Mears is taking a 
practical place, having become interested in business 
since his return from France. 

Mr. Mears was born in Essex, and is a son of Samuel 
A. and .Annie J. (Perkins) Mears, of Essex. The elder 
Mr. Mears was for a long time engaged in the insur- 
ance business in Salem. The mother was a native of 
Wenham, Massachusetts. 

Samuel A. Mears was born in Essex, October 19, 
1890, and received his education in the public schools 
of the town. Thereafter he took up farming, which he 
followed for a number of years, later working on the 
Bay State railroad for four years. It was here that the 



World War found him, and he early enlisted in the 
United States army. He was first assigned to the Depot 
Brigade, then was transferred to Camp Merritt, New 
Jersey, and became a member of Company M, 102nd 
Infantry, a Connecticut regiment. He served for eleven 
months with the American Expeditionary Force in 
France, and was discharged from Camp Devens. Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1919. Returning to Essex after his dis- 
charge, Mr. Mears entered the retail ice business in 
association with Charles W. Mears of this place. 

Mr. Mears is a member of the .'\merican Legion, the 
Knights of Pythias, and the West Gloucester State 
Grange. He attends the Methodist Episcopal cliurch. 



ARTHUR J. BROOKS— One of the leading con- 
tractors of the day in Newburyport is Arthur J. Brooks, 
who also handles lumber and builders' supplies exten- 
sively. 

Mr. Brooks was born January 17, :868, and is a son 
of Charles H. and Hannah M. (Moore) Brooks, of 
Freedom, New Hampshire. Acquiring his early edu- 
cation in the public schools, he completed his studies at 
Parsonfield Seminary, in Maine. Coming to Newbury- 
port at the age of eighteen years, he followed farming 
for about six months, working for a short time there- 
after as a butcher. He then became interested in the 
carpenter's trade, from which developed his permanent 
business interest. In 1892 Mr. Brooks started in busi- 
ness for himself, in the line of building and contracting, 
then, in 1913, when he had developed a large business, 
added another branch by the purchase of the Coleman 
Wharf Extension, and since that time has built up a 
far-reaching trade in all kinds of contracting essentials. 
He has also continued his activities in the contracting 
line, and many of the finer structures of this section 
stand to his credit. A few of these are: The French 
Catholic church, the cold storage plant, the Odd Fellows 
Hall, the W. D. Dodge shoe factory, and W. D. Han- 
nah shoe factory, the wood-working plant at the Towie 
Manufacturing Company, all these located at Newbury- 
port, Massachusetts; also the Second Congregational 
Church, St. John's Memorial, Knights of Pythias and 
Grange halls, all at West Newbury; and the cold 
storage plant at Cape Cod and one at Nova Scotia; and 
many fine public buildings, industrial plants and resi- 
dences might be added to the list. Mr. Brooks is now 
located on Mercantile walk, Merrimac street, New- 
buryport, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Brooks is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is brigadier general (retired) of the 
First Brigade, Department of Massachusetts, and is 
commodore of the North End Boat Club. His religious 
convictions place his membership with the Baptist 
church. 

On January 25, 1887, Mr. Brooks married Alice M. 
Chase, and they adopted a daughter, Katherine G. 



HfiRIGAULT PELLETIER— Bearing a construc- 
tive part in the general progress, as editor of "Le Cour- 
rier de Lawrence." Herigault Pelletier is also advancing 
the welfare of the community in the real estate and fire 
insurance business. 

Mr. Pelletier was born in Montreal, Canada, on July 
9, 1884, son of J. H. L. and Josephine (Powell) Pelle- 



4o8 



ESSEX COUNTY 



tier. Acquiring his early education in the schools of 
Montreal, he entered Montreal College, Laval Univer- 
sity, from which he was graduated in 1903, with the 
degree of B. L. The initial work of his career was as 
instructor in French in the Berlitz International School 
of Languages in New York, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, 
and Boston, Massachusetts. In 1917 Mr. Pelletier 
attended Harvard Law School for one year, then taught 
French literature in the Dussault School of Languages, 
in Boston, for a period of two years. 

In the spring of 1919 Mr. Pelletier went to Lowell, 
Massachusetts, as editor of the French daily newspaper, 
"L'Etoile," which is published there. He remained in 
Lowell until his purchase of the only French newspaper 
in Essex county, Massachusetts, "Le Courrier de Law- 
rence," of which he is now the owner and editor. 
Arthur Beaucage is manager of the subscription depart- 
ment. The paper has a very wide circulation, by no 
aneans confined to the vicinity of Lawrence. 

In the public life of Lawrence, Mr. Pelletier is deeply 
interested, keeping in touch with every phase of civic 
advance, but outside of his editorial work he has little 
leisure for public activities. 

Mr. Pelletier married, in Boston, Massachusetts, on 
July 3, 1919, Desiree Kerr, and they have an infant son, 
Herigault, Jr. 



REV. J. LOUIS DUCLOS— Sacred Heart Church 
was started as a mission or division of St. Anne's Par- 
ish. Lawrence, Massachusetts, by Rev. J. M. Portal in 
1898. he erecting the building which first served both 
as chapel and school. For a few years the priests from 
St. Anne's attended the religious needs of the little 
congregation, but in 1904 Sacred Heart became a 
separate parish. Rev. E. Vinas, the first pastor, being 
installed in 1905. In 1906, the parish having so increased 
in size, an assistant was appointed. Rev. Francis Morcel. 
The latter was succeeded as assistant by Father Hamet, 
who later succeeded to the pastorate and started the 
erection of a new house of worship, which was completed 
in 1914. To this parish came in June. 1916, Rev. J. 
Louis Duclos, succeeding Father Hamet as pastor. 

Father Duclos, in 1919, inaugurated a drive for funds 
which enabled the parish to cancel the debt on the 
church, and create a fund for a convent building, which 
was placed in charge of the Sisters at Christmas, 1920. 
Sacred Heart is now a parish of about seven hundred 
and fifty French-speaking families of South Lawrence, 
Massachusetts. About six hundred and twenty-five 
scholars attend the parochial school and are. under the 
instruction of Sisters of the Holy Union. Both the 
pastor. Father J. L. Duclos and his assistant. Father 
M. Janisson, are members of the Marist Fathers, or 
Fathers of the Society of Mary. 

Father Duclos was born in Medford, Massachusetts, 
January i, 1877, and until fifteen years of age attended 
the public schools of Cambridge, Massachusetts. From 
1892 until 1896 he was a student at St. Mary's College, 
Van Buren, Maine, and from 1896 until 1898 he was a 
student at a Marist Novitiate Theological Seminary in 
Maryland. He completed his studies in theology in the 
Marist College in Washington, D. C, and was ordained 
a priest of the Roman Catholic church June 21, 1901. 
From graduation until 1904 he was assigned to duty as an 



instructor in a Marist College at .'\tlanta, Georgia, and 
from there went to Jefiferson College in Louisiana, where 
he remained a year, and then, in 1905, went to All Hal- 
low's College, Salt Lake City, as spiritual director and 
econome until 1912. In 1913 he was appointed assistant 
pastor at St. Anne's Parish in Lawrence, and continued 
there until 19 16, when he was assigned to the pastorate 
of Sacred Heart Church, Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
The parish has prospered under his administration of 
its afifairs, the school enlarged, the convent built, the debt 
paid, and the spiritual life of the parish quickened. 



EDWARD N. CUMMINGS, manufacturer, of 
.Amesbury, Massachusetts, was born in Haverhill, 
November 11, 1873, son of Nelson P. Cummings. After 
completing his formal education, Mr. Cummings was 
associated with the carriage industry, following this line 
of business for fifteen years, most of this time as sales- 
man. As the automobile began to replace the carriage, 
Mr. Cummings turned his attention to the former busi- 
ness, and with G. W. J. Murphy, of Merrimac, Massa- 
chusetts, formed the G. W. J. Murphy Company in 
190S, manufacturers of automobile accessories. Some 
years later Mr. Murphy retired from the business. 

Mr. Cummings is amon.g the well-known business 
men of Amesbury, and he is a member of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce. Fraternally, Mr. Cummings 
is a member of the Masonic order, and of the .'Vmesbury 
Club, and attends the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Cummings married, in 1903, Emma M. Hughes, 
and their son, Edward N., Jr., was born June 28, 1906. 



WILLIAM ALBERT HALL, undertaker, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was born July 23, 1857, in 
Barrington, New Hampshire, son of Isaac Y. and 
Cynthia A. Hall, natives of New Hampshire, both born 
in 1836, and, a remarkable fact, both now living. 

William A. Hall was educated in the public schools, 
and for some years followed agricultural pursuits, until 
his removal to Haverhill, when he entered the shoe 
industry, working at this occupation for six years. Mr. 
Hall had always been musically inclined, but had never 
thought of it as a vocation until about 1894, when he 
had an opportunity to play in an orchestra, in which 
position he remained until 1896. In the latter year he 
went to work for C. A. Twombly Company and learned 
the undertaking profession, leaving the above-named 
firm in 1912 to en.gage in similar business on his own 
account, and in which he has met with success. Mr. 
Hall is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of Com- 
merce, and also of the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Hall married, in 1899, Emma L. Watkins, of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. They are attendants of 
the Methodist church of Bradford. 



CHARLES BAKER was born in Beverly, in the 
section which is now Danvers, Massachusetts, in the 
house at No. 220 Conant street, in which he now resides, 
September 16, 1850, and is the only living child of 
Andrew C. and Dorinda (Trask) Baker. Andrew C. 
Baker was born at Wenham, Massachusetts. He 
bought the farm on which his son now resides, at an 
early date, and here died. He lived the life of a farmer 
and drover. In addition to managing his farm prop- 




^Ac^i.^ (J9,»^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



409 



erty, he bought hogs at the Brighton stockyard, some- 
times over a thousand a week, and these he sold all 
over Massachusetts and New Hampshire; he employed 
from six to eight drovers. 

Charles Baker received his education in the public 
schools of Danvers, Massachusetts. Like his father, he 
had a great affection for the land, and early decided to 
spend his life in the pursuit of agriculture. He has 
never turned aside from farming, but has devoted his 
entire life to the management of liis farm. He is a 
member of the Hawthorne Club. 

Mr. Baker married Hattie M. (Davis) Clark, the widow 
of Albion Clark, and daughter of Darwin and Harriet 
(Paige) Davis. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have two children: 
Lena, who is now the wife of Horace Bushby, and 
they have one child, a son, Sidney Baker Bushby, and 
reside in Danvers; and Walter, who, with his father, 
looks after the farm. 



St. Paul, Minnesota. Her maternal grandparents were 
Patrick and Agnes (Nivelle) Fitzpatrick, of St. John's, 
Newfoundland, the former connected with the New- 
foundland fishing industry. 



GEORGE F. CAVANAUGH— Continuing a busi- 
ness which was established in 1856, and with which he 
himself has been connected for twenty-seven years, 
Cieorge F. Cavanaugh, tinsmith, owner of the Newbury- 
port business known as Fuller & Cavanaugh, has become 
widely known in that city. He is the oldest estabHshed 
tinsmith of that place, and his business is correspond- 
ingly important. 

Mr. Cavanaugh was born in St. John's, Newfound- 
land, on March 29, 1869, son of James and Susanna 
(Hennesey) Cavanaugh, both of whom were of St. 
John's. His father was a carpenter, and died in 1897 ; 
his mother died in 1874. when he was only five years 
old. 

George F. Cavanaugh was reared in St. John's, and 
passed through the public schools of Newfoundland. In 
1887, when he was eighteen years old, he came into the 
United States, and until 1894 worked as a tinsmith for 
various firms. In the year named he entered into busi- 
ness partnership with Mr. Fuller, and the two pur- 
chased the business in Newburyport conducted by John 
Sumner. It had been established by Mr. Sumner in 
1856, and with the change of ownership in 1894 it became 
Fuller & Cavanaugh. As such, business was steadily 
continued until 1916, when Mr. Cavanaugh became sole 
owner. He is considered to be one of the most skillful 
men in his line in the Newburyport district, and has a 
good business. He is of the class that take especial 
pride in their work, and that pride prompts him not 
only to do a good job well, but to keep pace with the 
times and be able to oflFer the most modern and useful 
advice in problems that come into his line. 

Mr. Cavanaugh is a member of the Catholic church, 
and belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters. He 
also is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Cavanaugh married (first), in 1889, Agnes A. 
Fitzpatrick, of St. John's, Newfoundland, who died. In 
1917 Mr. Cavanaugh married (second) Jane Gingrais, 
of Fisherville, Massachusetts. Mr. Cavanaugh is one 
of six children, he being the only son, and unfortu- 
nately, he has been unable to continue the family name, 
only one child, a daughter. Lillian A., being born to 
him. She was a daughter by his first wife, and is 
herself now married, her husband being Carl Miller, of 



FRANK L. BURTON, who is a well known resident 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born in that town, 
and there has lived almost the whole of his life. For the 
last fifteen years he has been in successful business for 
himself. 

Mr. Burton was born on June 29, 1879, son of Edward 
M. and Catherine (Collins) Burton, who were both 
natives of County Cork, Ireland. However, they both 
lived in the United States for the greater part of their 
lives. Edward M. Burton, a mason by trade, dying in 
IQ17, and his widow in 1921. They had nine children, 
seven sons and two daughters, Frank L. being the 
youngest child. 

Frank L. Burton was educated in the public schools 
of Lawrence, and after leaving school at once entered 
cc.mmercial life. For the first seven years of his busi- 
ness career he was a clerk in the employ of H. J. 
Koellen, of Lawrence, but in 1906, branched out for him- 
self, as a dealer in spirituous liquors, opening a store 
on South Broadway, Lawrence. He did good business 
there until 1919, when the passing of the National Pro- 
hibition Act rendered his business inoperative. Flow- 
ever, he has proved himself to be a man of energy, 
versatility, and enterprise, and when one avenue of 
trade was closed to him, he was quite ready to busy 
himself in proceeding along other lines. When he closed 
his liquor business he opened a battery and service sta- 
tion at No. 125 South Broadway, and between that time 
and the present has developed quite a substantial busi- 
ness in the new line. He caters to a high class trade, 
and carries a comprehensive stock of accessories and 
supplies. 

Mr. Burton is popular in many circles, and during the 
last decade or so has taken a helpful interest in more 
than one public movement in his home city. He is a 
member of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church of 
Lawrence, and fraternally belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. He is unmarried. 



JOHN L. HAYDEN was born at Guysborough, 
Nova Scotia, on February 14, 1886, and is a son of 
John and Miriam (Stewart) Hayden, of Nova Scotia. 
His father is a sea captain. 

Mr. Hayden received his early education in the public 
schools of Nova Scotia. After leaving school, he 
found employment with various firms, but soon decided 
to adopt the life of a soldier, and enlisted in the United 
States army. He was assigned to Troop H, of the 
First United States Cavalry, and was stationed at Fort 
Riley, Kansas, where he remained for four months, his 
longest encampment being at Fort Clark, Texas, at the 
end of which period, on June 2, 1907, he received his 
discharge from the service. 

Shortly after his discharge from the army, Mr. Hay- 
den joined a surveying party, which was being sent to 
Labrador by the Taylor Engineering Company, and 
spent a year in the Northern wilds. This did not, 
however, satisfy Mr. Hayden's taste for adventure, so 
he became a lumberman and spent five years in various 



4IO 



ESSEX COUNTY 



logging camps, including one year in Western Canada. 
At length, in 1913, he settled at Haverhill, and two 
years later, in 1915, he established an ice and trucking 
business, under the firm name of Hayden Brothers. Mr. 
Hayden was successful in this venture from the begin- 
ning and continued to direct it without change until 
1019, when he took Mr. Marcotte in as a partner. The 
firm name was then changed to Hayden & Marcotte. 
The partners have their place of business at No. 10 
Central street, Bradford, Massachusetts, and serve a 
steadily increasing number of customers. They have 
acquired an enviable reputation in the business world 
and are universally respected. 

Mr. Hayden is a member of the Haverhill Chamber 
of Commerce, and the Loyal Order of Moose. He has 
never married. 



JOHN G. COX, a sheet metal worker and roofer, 
now in independent business in Lynn, Massachusetts, 
was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, March 5, 1892, 
son of Hugh J. and Jane (Holroyd) Cox, formerly of 
that place, but now of Revere, Massachusetts. Hugh 
J. Cox is still living, and by trade is a rigger; his wife 
died in 1912, having borne him eight children, six of 
whom were sons. Two of the sons saw service, one 
in the United States army and one in the navy, during 
the World War. John G. Co.x also was in military 
service ; he enlisted on May 22, 19:9, and was sent to 
Wentworth Institute, where he continued in training 
until December 5, 1919. 

Going back in this review to his schooldays, John G. 
Cox was educated in the public schools of Medford and 
Revere, Massachusetts, and after leaving school, entered 
the employ of the William A. Murtfeldt Company, of 
Boston. There he learned the trade of sheet metal 
working during the more than four years he was with 
that company. For about two years after leaving them 
he was with Hertach & Fay, of Lynn. Later he was 
in educational work, teaching the trade of sheet metal 
working at the Quincy Industrial School, Quincy, Mas- 
sachusetts. Eventually he entered into business for 
himself in Lynn. He trades under his own name, at 
No. 81 Pleasant street, Lynn, and his business embraces 
sheet metal working, roofing, repairing of auto radiators, 
and in fact embraces all kinds of metal repair work, in 
which Mr. Co.x is expert. He has no reason to regret 
his entry into independent business, and he is getting 
the success that comes out of good workmanship and 
steady application to business. He is unmarried. 



GEORGE W. TUCKER, who for many years car- 
ried on a good insurance business in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 
1876, son of James A. and Rachel F. (Gofif) Tucker, 
the former of Providence, and the latter of South Ber- 
wick, Maine. His father, who died in 1913, was engaged 
in the te.xtile business almost until the year of his death. 
Soon after the birth of George W., the Tucker family 
came to live at Ipswich, Massachusetts, and there the 
boy went to school. He passed through the elementary 
grades and into the high school of Ipswich, and after 
leaving the latter, found his first employment, as fire- 
man, on the Boston and Maine railroad. He has had a 
somewhat varied career. After five years as fireman, 



he became connected with a wholesale bakery, and three 
years later entered into the wholesale and retail fruit 
business for himself. He followed that line for about 
three years, then gave up his business to become man- 
ager of the Lawrence Public Market. After two years 
in that responsibility, he decided to again venture into 
business for himself, but this time the line he entered 
was real estate and insurance, for which he seems to be 
especially adapted, for he has followed it ever since, 
with steady success. It must be stated also that for 
twelve years Mr. Tucker followed professional work, 
being a skilled musician, and playing with many of the 
foremost bands of Massachusetts. Withal. Mr. Tucker 
has manifested enterprising versatility. He has given 
a good deal of his time to community work, especially 
in musical events. 

Mr. Tucker married, in 1891, .^nna R. Baker, of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, and they have three children : 
Lillian G. ; Raymond B. ; and Elsie G. 



JOSEPH ISIDORE VALLIERES, who for years 
was connected with the Massachusetts shoe manufac- 
turing industry at Newburyport and Haverhill, and lat- 
terly has been devoting the whole of his time to a good 
farming property at Merrimac, was torn in Suncook, 
New Hampshire, on November 24, 1884, son of Adolphe 
and Angelina (Roberts) Vallieres. The paternal 
descent is from a French-Canadian family, the father 
of Joseph I. Vallieres having been born in Sherbrooke, 
Canada. The mother's family (Roberts), however, was 
of New Hampshire, .Angelina Roberts having been born 
in Henniker, New Hampshire. She is still living, but 
her husband died in 1909. For the greater part of his 
life he was engaged in the textile business, latterly in 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts. 

Joseph I. Vallieres was educated in the public schools 
of Manchester, New Hampshire, and at St. Mary's 
Parochial School, at same place. Soon after leaving 
school young Vallieres went to Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts, and there for three years was in the employ 
of the Ellis Shoe Company. He next entered the fac- 
tory of the Gale Shoe Company, at Haverhill, and with 
that company he remained connected for eight years, 
leaving eventually to take over the operation of a farm 
he had bought in Merrimac. That has been his line of 
effort ever since, apparently with satisfactory result. 
Mr. Vallieres is well known and respected in Merrimac 
and Haverhill. Politically he is a Democrat ; and he 
is a member of the Nativity Roman Catholic Church 
of Merrimac. 

Mr. Vallieres married into a French-Canadian fam- 
ily, in 1916, his wife being Alma Lajoie, of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Francois Zavier and Elodie 
(Cerat) Lajoie. Her father was connected with shoe 
manufacturing in Haverhill until his death in 1912. Her 
mother is still living; she was of Montreal, Canada, 
originally. 



WILLIAM C. CAMPBELL, the prominent florist 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born in Arbroath, 
Scotland, on August 27, 1875, and is a son of William 
and Catherine (Cargill) Campbell. The elder Mr. 
Campbell was a farmer. 

Educated in the schools of his native country, and 




O-^^otr ^ /KJc.Xa<^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



411 



reared in the open, Mr. Campbell became interested in 
the florist's business in his youth, and followed it for 
five years in Scotland, in the employ of established and 
experienced men. Thus it was with a practical work- 
ing knowledge of the business that he came to America, 
locating in Lawrence in i8g6. He entered the employ of 
a Methuen florist, later working for others. In 1912 he 
engaged in business for himself, and has since conducted 
a constantly increasing business in this line. His name 
is now a leader in this field in Lawrence, and he is doing 
a very extensive business, handling a large share of the 
trade hereabouts, being a member of the Florists' Tele- 
graph Delivery. Mr. Campbell is a member of the Law- 
rence Chamber of Commerce, and of the Society of 
American Florists. 

In social circles Mr. Campbell is widely known. He 
is a member of the Rotary Club ; is chief of the Cale- 
donian Club; a member of Grecian Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; of Essex Lodge, Knights of Pythias; 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge 
No. 65; the Home Club; and also is a member of the 
Scots Charitable Society of Boston. 

On February 4, 1913, Mr. Campbell married, in Law- 
rence, Sarah Mosson, daughter of Frank and Mary 
(Foran) Mosson, of this city, and they have one child, 
Evelyn Mary. The family reside at No. 27 Orchard 
street, and attend the Presbyterian church. 



a,« a man of fine character, such a man as no city can 
afford to lose, but a man whose memory is an inspira- 
tion to those who knew him. 



ALBERT L. NICHOLS, one of the prominent men 
in the printing business in the city of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, placed on the annals of Essex county a record of 
usefulness and steady advancement in business, frater- 
nal, social and religious activity, and in his passing the 
city lost a representative man. 

Mr. Nichols was born in Lynn, January 31, 1871. and 
v;as a son of George Herbert and Sarah Abbie (Plum- 
ber) Nichols. The elder Mr. Nichols was an early 
printer of Lynn, and served in the Civil War in defense 
of the Union. 

Receiving a practical education in the public schools 
of Lynn, Mr. Nichols, as a young man, entered the 
printing business with his father. This business was 
established many years ago by George H. and W. A. 
Nichols, and throughout his entire career ."Mbert L. 
Nichols was an active member of this firm. The busi- 
ness, which is located at No. 545 Washington street, 
this city, is one of the leading enterprises of the kind, 
and handles a wide trade. 

Fraternally, Mr. Nichols was well known, being a 
member of Mount Carmel Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Sutton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; also Regis 
Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. He was a mem- 
ber of the West Lynn Yacht Club; West Lynn Lodge, 
No. 65, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Fra- 
ternity Encampment, No. 67, of the same order; and of 
the Firemen's Relief Association, in the work of which 
organization he was deeply interested. 

On October 3, 1809, Mr. Nichols married Lydia A. 
Foster, daughter of Fulton and Annie I. (Smith) Fos- 
ter. Mrs. Nichols was born in Nova Scotia, but has 
been a resident of Lynn since 1883. 

.•Mbert L. Nichols died in December, 1914, when 
scarcely past the prime of life. In many circles in Lynn 
his presence is missed, and he will long be remembered 



EARLE RAYMOND DAVIS, who is rated high 
among shoe manufacturing executives of the Haverhill 
district, was born in Dover, New Hampshire, on March 
7, 1884, son of Charles F. and Claribelle (Leighton) 
Davis. His paternal descent is from an old Maine fam- 
ily, his father having been born in Biddeford, that State. 
His mother was born in Farmington, New Hampshire, 
and died in 191 1. By profession, his father was a cer- 
tified public accountant, and lived until 1917. During 
the boyhood of Earle R., the family lived in Brockton, 
Massachusetts, and in the excellent public schools of 
that city he was educated, remaining in school until he 
had graduated from the Brockton High School, with 
the class of 1899. Soon, thereafter, he entered actively 
into business affairs, becoming an employee of the Burt 
& Packard Company, shoe manufacturers, of Brockton, 
which company he served for five years. For twelve 
years thereafter, he was in the employ of John H. 
Cloudman, of Farmington, New Hampshire, leaving 
them to go to Salem, Massachusetts, where for three 
years he was a responsible official in the plant of 
Marston & Brookes. Then he went to New York 
City, where for a year he was general foreman for H. 
Jacobs. Next he is found in a Chicago (Illinois) plant, 
that of the Flexible Shoe Company, and for eighteen 
months he was assistant superintendent there. Coming 
to Haverhill in 1918 to take up the position of superin- 
tendent in the large factory of the Cushman & Hebert 
Shoe Company, he has remained here, and still holds 
the same appointment, which is an important one, and 
gives him good standing in shoe and leather circles of 
Haverhill and Bradford. 

Mr. Davis holds closely to business, and the only fra- 
ternal order to which he now belongs is the Knights of 
Pythias. In 1901 Mr. Davis traveled abroad, visiting 
the West Indies and South America, traveling exten- 
sively in the latter country ; also England. 

Mr. Davis married, in 1914, Mildred Blair, daughter 
of Charles and Lihian (Whitney) Blair, of Gardiner, 
Maine. Mrs. Davis' mother is still living, but her father, 
who was a merchant at Gardiner, died in 191 1. Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis have three children : Carroll G., who was 
born in 1915; Edgar R., born in 1917; and George Wes- 
ley, born in 1919. 



SAMUEL L. ATWOOD, of Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, is the only violin maker in Essex county, Massa- 
chusetts, but he is probably better known as a shoe 
manufacturer than as a maker of violins, for he was 
connected with the Massachusetts shoe industry for 
more than forty years before he took up his present 
line of manufacture. 

Mr. Atwood was born at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 
on October 11, 1853, son of Hawes and Eliza Jane 
(Lawton) Atwood, the former a native of Cape Cod, 
and the latter of a Maine family. Hawes Atwood was 
a sea captain ; he married in Cape Cod, and died in 
Lynn, Massachusetts. He was a Methodist. Eliza Jane 
(Lawton) Atwood, mother of Samuel L., died in Ha- 
verhill in 1906. She was the daughter of Thomas Law- 



412 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ton, who was born in Damriscotta, Maine. He was a 
soldier of the War of 1812, and later a sea captain. 
His children were: Thomas; Samuel; Leander ; Lydia; 
Sally; Susan; Eliza Jane; and Louisa. 

Samuel L. Atwood spent his boyhood and nonage in 
the parental home at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, attended 
public school there, and for about two years after leav- 
ing school worked on the home farm. Then for nine 
years he followed his father, going to sea. He was 
still a young man, however, when he went to Boston and 
entered a shoe factory. He worked at that trade in 
Boston for fourteen years, and then came to Haverhill, 
where for the next thirty years he was actively identi- 
fied with the shoe manufacturing industry. At the end 
of that time he decided to go into business for himself 
as a maker of violins, a rather unique change of occu- 
pation. This had been his hobby in his youth, and 
before 1870 he began making violins. He has found 
good business in that line of manufacture, being the 
only manufacturer of violins in that part of Massachu- 
setts. Fraternally, Mr. Atwood is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, a member of a 
Charlestown, Massachusetts, lodge ; religiously he is a 
Methodist. 

Mr. Atwood married, at Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
on Christmas Day of 1880, Ida Baxter, who was born 
in Charlestown in 1861, and died in Haverhill in 1890. 
She was the daughter of William and May (Flanders) 
Baxter, the former a machinist by trade, and resident of 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. To Mr. and Mrs. Atwood 
two children were born : Edith Gertrude, who died in 
1919; and William Baxter Atwood, now a foreman in a 
Haverhill shoe factory, and married to Miss Lena Rol- 
lins, of York, Maine. 



WALTER AUSTIN GUPTILL— Prominent among 
the business men of Lynn, Massachusetts, is Walter A. 
Guptill, whose broad and comprehensive experience in 
his particular field of activity has made the Osmond 
Pharmacy, of which he is the head, one of the foremost 
business organizations of its kind in the city. Mr. Gup- 
till is a son of George Alonzo Guptill, long a resident of 
Portland, Maine, and for thirty years a wholesale 
grocer in that city, also widely known as a charter 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks in Portland. He died in the year 1903. He mar- 
ried Jennie Jennings, who was a music teacher before 
her marriage. 

Walter Austin Guptill, son of George Alonzo and 
Jennie (Jennings) Guptill, was born in Portland, Maine, 
November 6, 1878. He was educated in the public 
schools and the evening high school in the city of Boston, 
but at the early age of fourteen years entered the employ 
of George Fred Williams, long a prominent Boston 
attorney, then Congressman, in the capacity of office boy. 
At the age of seventeen years Mr. Guptill secured a 
position, which for him was the beginning of a useful 
career, with a German chemist of East Boston, with 
whom he remained until 191 1. during that time enjoying 
invaluable privileges of study and research in connection 
with his duties as an assistant. He then became asso- 
ciated with the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, of Brook- 
line, Massachusetts, having full charge of their phar- 
macy in Brookline for a period of three years. In 1914 



Mr. Guptill came to Lynn, and one year later bought 
out the A. M. Bailey Drug Company, whose business he 
continued under the corporation which he organized at 
the time, and of which he is president. The store is 
now known as the Osmond Pharmacy, dispensers of the 
better-class druggists' sundries and prescriptions. 

Mr. Guptill now stands among the successful and 
well known men of Esse.x county. He is broadly inter- 
ested in every phase of the general advance, and polit- 
ically thinks and acts independently. His religious faith 
is that of the Roman Catholic. 

In 1898, in East Boston, Mr. Guptill married Helen 
Moran, daughter of James and Helen (O'Neil) Moran, 
of Canada, and they are the parents of seven children : 
George L. ; Sheridan, deceased; Genevieve, who is the 
wife of Lloyd W. Meserve, and they have an infant son, 
Walter F. ; Marguerite; Blanche, deceased; Monica; 
and Walter A., Jr. 



HENRY W. ANDREWS, of Essex, Massachusetts, 
who has been active in somewhat different fields of en- 
deavor since his youth, is one of the successful men of 
this town. 

Mr. Andrews was born in Essex, February 17, 1870, 
and died November 2, 1921. He was a son of Henry 
Andrews, the oldest resident of Essex at this time 
(1921). He is ninety-two years of age, and in good 
health. Up to the time of his retirement from active 
labor he had spent his lifetime on the farm. He mar- 
ried Emily Burnham, of Essex, who died in 1908, at the 
age of seventy-two years. Henry Andrews moved to 
Woodville, Massachusetts, in April, 1922. 

Receiving his education in the public schools of Essex, 
Henry W. Andrews became interested in the butcher 
business, which he followed for twelve years. There- 
after he took up milling and the raising of strawberries, 
in which line of enterprise he is still successfully 
engaged. 

Mr, .Andrews is a member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose, and of the Order of United American Mechan- 
ics, and is a member of the Universalist church. 

Mr. Andrews married, in 1898, Minnie F. Hibbard, of 
Essex, and they have two children : Henry F., who was 
a member of the United States Merchant Marine, of 
Boston, and served during the World War in 1918; and 
Burton E. 



JAMES JOSEPH LIFFIN— For many years active 
in the business world of Essex county, Massachusetts, 
and long identified with the hotel business, James Joseph 
Liffin, of Lynn, became one of the widely-known men 
of this city, and his death, on January 6, 1921, was a 
shock to many friends who esteemed him highly. 

Mr. Liffin was born in Beverly, Massachusetts, .August 
18, i860, and was a son of Thomas and Mary (Lane) 
Lifiin, both his parents having been natives of Ireland. 
Educated in the public and high schools of his native 
city, Mr. Liffin, as a young man, entered the morocco 
leather business, in the employ of Lynch Brothers, of 
Beverly, and continued there until he was about thirty 
years of age. In 1890 he came to Lynn, and here he 
became manager of the Hotel Seymour, which was 
then owned by W. W. Davis. Later he purchased the 
Lynnfield Hotel, and for some years operated it under 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



413 



the name of the Hotel Sauntaug. Still later, for a time, 
Mr. Liffiii was manager of the retail department of 
Hoyt Brothers, liquor dealers, located on Washington 
street, in Lynn. For two years thereafter he retired 
from business, but not content to lay aside his business 
interests permanently, he took over the Seymour Hotel 
in 1910, on a lease from A. S. Newhall, then owner, and 
successfully conducted this high-class caravansery until 
the time of his death. Genial as a host, and broadly 
efficient as a manager, no detail escaping him, he was a 
rarely capable man, and his passing left a vacancy 
which will long be felt by those to whom he was friend 
as well as host. 

Mr. Liffin was a life-member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 117, and was a 
member of the Roman Catholic church. 

On September 25, 1891, Mr. Liffin married, in Bev- 
erly, Ellen Joseph Harrigan, who died January 26, 191 7. 
They were the parents of two sons: Harold Dugan and 
Leonard Gookin, both of further mention. 

Harold D. Liffin was born November 4, 1893, and edu- 
cated in the public and high schools of Lynn. He early 
became identified with the hotel business in association 
with his father, and is now engaged, in association with 
his brother, in operating the Seymour Hotel, having 
taken charge upon his father's death. He is a member 
of the Knights of Columbus, of Lynn, and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 117. His 
religious connection is with St. Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church. He married, December 25, 1918, in Lynn, 
Beatrice A. Arey, daughter of Robert and Alma (Malen- 
faut) Arey. 

Leonard G. Liffin was born May 31, 1896, and also 
educated in the public and high schools of Lynn. He 
served in the World War as a member of the 348th 
Infantry, 87th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, 
seeing service on the battle fronts in France. Since 
his return to civilian life he has been identified with his 
elder brother in the management of the Seymour Hotel, 
in Lynn. He is a member of St. Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church, and the Knights of Columbus, of Lynn. 



Mr. Sullivan belongs to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks of Beverly, and is a member of the 
Roman Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart. 

Mr. Sullivan married, in 1913, Mary H. Holmes, of 
Grand River, Nova Scotia, who died February 18, 1920. 



WILLIAM H. SULLIVAN, who has for some 
years been prominent in the business world of Man- 
chester, Massachusetts, and for several years has served 
the public in a responsible capacity, was born in Bos- 
ton, same State, on July 25, 1873. He is a son of 
Timothy J. and Catherine (Jefferds) Sullivan, both 
natives of County Kerry, Ireland. Timothy J. Sullivan 
came to the Llnited States when a boy, and during the 
greater part of his lifetime was engaged in the livery 
business in Wellesley, Massachusetts ; he died in 1906. 

Gaining his early education in the public schools of his 
native city, Mr. Sullivan was, for a considerable time, a 
student at Boston College. But not caring to enter a 
professional field, he left college to take up the harness 
business in Manchester. Later in 1909, he was made chief 
of police of Manchester, serving one year. Returning to 
the harness business, he continued for three years in 
this branch of mercantile endeavor, then was again 
elected chief of police. This position he has since con- 
tinued to fill, and is still the head of the efficient organ- 
ization which guards the safety of the citizens of 
Manchester. 



JOSEPH R. VATCHER— With broad preparation 
for the responsibilities of his career, and filling a posi- 
tion of trust, Joseph R. Vatcher is representative of the 
large group of younger men who are contributing to 
the progress of Essex county. 

Mr. Vatcher was born on the island of Newfoundland, 
September 15, 1891, and is a son of Robert and Zip- 
porah J. (Parsons) Vatcher, of Lynn. The elder Mr. 
Vatcher died in 1914. 

Coming to the United States as a child with his par- 
ents, Mr. Vatcher received his early education in the 
public schools of Lynn. He is a graduate of the Shep- 
ard Grammar and the English High schools. He after- 
wards attended the Northeastern College, at Boston, 
Massachusetts, completing his studies in 1916. Previous 
to that date, however, Mr. Vatcher had been employed 
on the Lynn "Item" for three years, and in 1913 had 
entered the Manufacturers' National Bank, in the 
capacity of assistant to the discount clerk. He has con- 
tinued in this institution until the present time, and has 
advanced until he is now assistant cashier. 

When the Llnited States intervened in the European 
War, Mr. Vatcher enlisted in Company B, 102nd Ma- 
chine Gun Battalion, Massachusetts National Guard, and 
was stationed at Allston, Massachusetts. In September, 
1917, he sailed for overseas duty with the American 
Expeditionary Forces. He was promoted to lieutenant 
on the field in France. He took an active part in the 
battles of Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel and Verdun, and 
was twice cited for bravery on the field. He was dis- 
charged in .'\pril, 1919, with the rank of lieutenant. 

Mr. Vatcher is a member of Golden Fleece Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Lynn, holding the office 
of marshal ; is a member of Mount Olivet Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons ; of G. F. Yates Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; and of the Boston Lodge of Perfection. He 
is a member of the Oxford Club, and of the Swamp- 
scott Masonic Club, and is a member of the American 
Legion. His religious faith places his membership with 
the Methodist church. 

Mr. Vatcher married, in 1921, Harriet Campbell, 
daughter of Joseph F. Campbell, of Bath, Maine. 



HENRY G. HATHORNE was bom at Lynn. Mas- 
sachusetts, on October 18, 1846, and is a son of Henry 
G. and Helen M. (Fay) Hathorne. He is a direct 
descendant of Major William Hathorne, who settled in 
Salem in 1632. 

Mr. Hathorne received his early education in the 
public schools of Lynn, and in due course proceeded to 
A. D. Bill's Commercial College at Boston for business 
training. He entered the dry goods business at West 
Lynn after completing his education, spending five years 
in his first position. He then entered a wholesale dry 
goods house, and after two years of this experience, 
returned to the retail trade with S. J. Weinberg of 
Lynn. His connection with Mr. Weinberg lasted for 
eleven years, at the end of which time Mr. Hathorne 



414 



ESSEX COUNTY 



became associated with T. W. Rogers of that place. 
Seven years later, in 1891, he came to Dan vers and 
entered the real estate business, with which he has been 
connected ever since. For the past ten years, Mr. Ha- 
thorne has been the township assessor. 

Mr. Hathorne is a Mason of the thirty-second degree. 
He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion through John Fay of the battle of Le.xington fame ; 
he also is a member of the Grange ; and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He attends the First 
Congregational Church of Danvers. 

Mr. Hathorne married Lizzie A. Chase, of Exeter, 
New Hampshire; she died November 9, 1921. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Hathorne two children were born, a son and 
a daughter: Florence F., who is the wife of Deputy 
Sheriff Walter H. Brown; they are the parents of a 
daughter, Dorothy Brown, and they reside at Peabody, 
Massachusetts; Arthur L., married Lovett Dwinell; 
they are the parents of two sons, Henry and Louis, and 
they reside in Dorchester, Massachusetts. 



Mr. Gowen married Blanche A. Bagley, of St. Johns- 
bury, Vermont, daughter of Curtis H. and Edwarda 
Bagley, and they have one child, Donald H. 



HOWARD E. GOWEN— In one of the responsible 
positions in the social fabric of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
Howard E. Gowen is bearing a constructive and broadly 
significant part in the progress of the city. 

Mr. Gowen was born in Springvale, Maine, September 
13. 1875, and is a son of Howard L. and Ella M. Gowen. 
The family removing to Lynn when he was five years 
of age, Mr. Gowen received his early education in the 
public schools of this city, completing his studies with 
his course at the Classical High School. His first occu- 
pation was in the capacity of clerk in the employ of 
Small & Jones, leading tea and coffee merchants of that 
day, with whom he remained for three years. After 
that period Mr. Gowen entered the same business for 
himself, following it for a time, but eventually sold 
out. He then entered the Colb & Putnam shoe factory, 
as a heeling machine operator, and it was here that the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American War found him. 
Enlisting in the Eighth Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, he was thereafter transferred to the Sec- 
ond United States Cavalry, from which branch of the 
service he received his honorable discharge. After re- 
turning to Lynn. Mr. Gowen entered the employ of the 
General Electric Company, as clerk in their oflice, 
remaining in this connection for about eight months, 
then resi.gning to become identified with the Lynn post 
office. Serving first as substitute letter carrier, under 
Postmaster Howard K. Sanderson, he remained for a 
period of eighteen years, during that time working up 
to the office of assistant postmaster. Mr. Gowen resigned 
from this position to accept the office of membership 
secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association, of 
Lynn, in November, 1918. He is still filling this posi- 
tion, and his work is counting as an active force for the 
good of the organization, and through it. of the general 
public. In December of the same year Mr. Gowen was 
elected councillor-at-large. 

In various interests of the city Mr. Gowen is also 
interested, and fraternally holds membership with the 
Free and Accepted Masons, also with the Sons of the 
American Revolution. He is superintendent of the Sun- 
day school of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Lynn, and is secretary of the Inter-church Union. 



EDWIN COLLYER LEWIS— With a record of 
twenty-eight years' service in the employ of the same 
financial institution, Edwin Collyer Lewis, of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, holds an enviable position in the financial 
world of Essex county. , 

Mr. Lewis was born in Lynn, August 13, 1872, and 
is a son of Edwin D. and Eliza E. (Collyer) Lewis. 
Educated in the institutions of Lynn, and reared in the 
traditions of this city, Mr. Lewis, at the age of twenty- 
one years, became treasurer of the Lynn Equitable Co- 
operative Bank, and having served in that capacity dur- 
ing the intervening years, still holds that ofiice. His 
activities have broadened materially, however, by his 
subsequent connections with other leading corporations 
of this city, and he is now a director of the Security 
Trust Company, and also a director of the Lynn Manu- 
facturers' and Merchants' Fire Insurance Company. 

Fraternally, Mr. Lewis is affiliated with the Free and 
Accepted Masons, and he is a member of the Oxford 
Club and of the Homestead Golf Club. He is broadly 
interested in the general civic advance, but has never 
taken a leading part in public affairs. He is a member 
of the First Universalist Church of Lynn. 

On November 12, 1002, Mr. Lewis married Ethel M. 
Tolman, daughter of E. B. Tolman, and they have four 
daughters : Dorothy Standish, Elsie Hathaway, Bertha 
Elizabeth, and Helen Warren. 



WILLIAM G. HORTON— To the rural interests 
in the vicinity of Ipswich, Massachusetts, the name of 
William G. Horton stands, in a business sense, for 
supplies of a high quality which meet the requirements 
of the agriculturist and stock grower. 

Mr. Horton was born in Ipswich on January 14, 1857, 
and is a son of Joseph and Lucy (Robinson) Horton. 
He received a thorough grounding in the essentials of 
education at the public schools of the town, then, when 
a very young lad, even before leaving school, worked as 
a helper around the farm. Continuing thus until sev- 
enteen years of age, he then branched out for himself 
in an independent business along the line of hay and 
grain. Beginning in a small way, he developed the busi- 
ness and broadened its scope until for years he has 
been one of the leaders in this field of mercantile en- 
deavor, taking care of many of the needs of the farmer, 
including fertilizers and seeds, farming tools of various 
kinds and the supplies always in demand by poultrymen. 

While interested in every phase of public progress, 
Mr. Horton takes an active part in few matters outside 
his business, but has for a number of years been a 
director of the Ipswich Savings Bank. He is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
attends the South Congregational Church. 

Mr. Horton married Caroline Burnham, daughter of 
Foster and Helen Burnham. 



BENJAMIN S. NEWHALL was born at Danvers, 
Massachusetts, in 1S74, and is a son of Benjamin E. and 
Carrie (Derby) Newhall. His father and mother were 
both born at Salem, Massachusetts, but resided in Dan- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



415 



vers at the time of the birth of Benjamin S. They had 
four children, the other three being Alice H., Walter, 
and Frank W. Mr. Newhall's father was for many 
years the cashier of the First National Bank of Danvers. 
Benjamin S. Newhall received his early education in 
the public schools of Danvers, and was trained for a 
.business career at the Burdett Business College of 
Boston. After his studies were completed, he entered 
the banking business in Boston, where he spent ten 
years. At the end of this time Mr. Newhall entered the 
United States Reclamation Service and spent eight years 
in the State of VN'yoming. He later returned to Massa- 
chusetts, and became a resident of Danvers, where he 
now lives. He is at present engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business there, and has been for the past 
three years on the Board of Town Assessors, of which 
he is clerk. 

During the World War, Mr. Newhall served as sec- 
retary of the Public Safety and Fuel Committee. He 
was a member of the non-commissioned staff of the 
Eighth Regiment in the years 1900 to 1906, and he is a 
member of the Light Infantry Veterans' Association. 
He is a member of the Masonic order, the Danvers 
Masonic Club, and the Homestead Golf Club. He 
attends the First Unitarian Church of Salem. Mr. New- 
hall has never married. 



JOHN MORRILL NICHOLS, who holds a posi- 
tion of trust in the community, is also prominent fra- 
ternally, and bore a part in the World War. 

Mr. Nichols was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, October 
14, 1891, and is a son of Melville Herbert and Susan 
(S'ork) Nichols, former residents of Burlington, in the 
adjoining county of Middlesex. His mother was born 
in Lynn, and died in July, 1920. His father now lives 
at Danvers, Massachusetts. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools of 
Lynn. Mr. Nichols later attended the Pace & Pace 
School, of Boston. He was first employed by the 
Security Trust Company, of Lynn, in the capacity of 
messenger, rising to receiving teller. He later entered 
the State National Bank, as paying teller, but remained 
here for only si.x months, leaving to accept the office of 
treasurer of the West Lynn Trust Company, which he 
still holds (1921). 

In 1917 Mr. Nichols enlisted as a private in the Med- 
ical Department of the United States army. He served 
at Fort Ethan Allen, in Vermont, also at the Port of 
Embarkation (Hoboken), and at Camp Sevier, South 
Carolina. 

Mr. Nichols is a member of Richard W. Brown Lodge, 
No. 106, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of 
Damascus Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; and of 
Caldwell Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 
He is also a member of Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston ; and of 
the Swampscott Masonic Club. He attends St. Stephen's 
Episcopal Church, of Lynn. 

Mr. Nichols married Mabelle Bond, of Lynn, and they 
have one child, John M., Jr. 



Mr. Fall was born in Ipswich on October 30, 1850, 
and is a son of T. B. and Harriet (Lord) Fall. Edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native place, Mr. Fall, 
at the age of fourteen, took his place in the world of 
industry as a helper on the farm. Five years later he 
took up the carpenter's trade, and was very successful 
in that line of work. He followed this trade for twelve 
years in the employ of D. A. Hodgkins, of Ipswich. 
His experience along this line convinced him of the 
breadth of opportunity in supplying the building trades. 
Accordingly, he entered the lumber business in 1877. 
In 1890, in connection with the lumber business, he 
began to handle coal, and the latter interest developed 
so rapidly that in 1896 he dropped the earlier business 
and has since handled only coal and fuel wood. He is 
still thus actively engaged and has become a leader in 
this field hereabouts. With his excellent location on 
Brown Square, which is near the railroads, he is in a 
position to serve the public to the greatest advantage. 

In the civic and financial interests of Ipswich Mr. 
Fall is widely prominent. He was a member of the 
Board of Selectmen in 1S94-5, and was town representa- 
tive to the State Legislature in 1892. He is now 
assessor for the town of Ipswich. For a number of 
years he has been vice-president and director of the 
Ipswich Savings Bank. 

For forty-five years Mr. Fall has been a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is also a 
mem'ber of the Free and Accepted Masons, and of the 
Improved Order of Red Men. His religious convic- 
tions place his membership with the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 



GEORGE FALL, an eminently practical man of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, is making a success in a prac- 
tical field of mercantile activity. 



EVERETT B. JAMES, the present owner of one of 
the prominent shipyards of Essex county, Massachusetts, 
has spent his entire career in the ship-building industry. 

Mr. James is a son of John F. and Hannah M. 
(Andrews) James, of Essex. The elder Mr. James was 
engaged in ship-building throughout his lifetime, and 
died in 1920. 

Born in Essex, March 12, 1864, Everett B. James, as 
a boy, acquired his education in the public schools of his 
native town. Always interested in the work done at 
his father's shipyard, he entered the employ of the 
firm, Tarr & James, in 1881. This business was 
founded in 1838 by John James, and was first known as 
the James & McKenzie Company. After the death of 
Mr. McKenzie, which occurred in 1874, it became the 
Tarr & James Company, Washington Tarr purchasing 
the interest of Mr. McKenzie. There was no change 
thereafter until 1912, when Everett B. James became a 
partner. At that time the name became John F. James 
& Son, the personnel of the firm continuing thus until 
the death of the father in 1920. Since then the son has 
been sole owner of the business. 

This shipyard is widely noted for the production of 
sailing craft. Among the many boats they have 
launched should be mentioned the "Esperanto," the 
"Rose Dorothea," the "Lottie Haskins," the "Admiral 
Dewey," etc. At the present time wide interest is cen- 
tered in the "Mayflower," which has just been built for 
the Mayflower Association. She is one hundred forty- 
three feet long, drawing si.xteen feet of water, and was 
launched on Tuesday, April 12, and ready to sail the 



4i6 



ESSEX COUNTY 



latter part of that month (1921). In the spring of 1922 
he launched the "Puritan," a candidate cup challenger 
for the Fisherman's International Race. 

As head of this important business interest, Mr. James 
is one of the leading men of Essex. He has served in 
public ofifi.ce on the Board of Selectmen, on the school 
committee, and as town clerk. He is a member of the 
Universalist churcli of Esse.x; and a member of Starr 
King Lodge, Knights of Pythias in Essex. 

On October 11, 18S7, Mr. James married Eleanor L. 
Andrews, of Essex, and they have three children: 
Eleanor, Martha L., and John. The son is a student 
at Wentworth Institute at Boston, and served for a 
short time in the World War. 



EDWARD NELSON TODD has for more than 
thirty years been actively connected with the insurance 
business in Boston, Massachusetts, always retaining his 
residence in the city of Lynn, which is his native place. 

Mr. Todd was born in Lynn, June 15, 1866, and is a 
son of Nelson and Lorency (Barnard) Todd. His 
father was a native of this county, having been born in 
Rowley, but his mother was born in Bridgeton, Maine. 
Receiving his early education in the public schools of 
Lynn, Mr. Todd attended Dean Academy, and was 
graduated from that institution with the class of 1885. 
Later he became identified with the shoe business in 
association with the Langworthy Shoe Company. This 
partnership was dissolved at the time of the great fire in 
Lynn in 1889, Mr. Todd then becoming associated with 
O'Brion, Russell & Company, with offices at No. 108 
Water street, Boston, Massachusetts, with which firm 
he is still associated. 

Although his business interests are in Boston, Mr. 
Todd has always been deeply interested in the social 
and civic advance of his native city. He is a mem'ber 
of the Insurance Federation of Massachusetts, of the 
Society of Mayflower Descendants and of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. He also is a member of 
Mount Carmel Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Lynn Lodge, No. 117 Bene\'olent and Protective Order 
of Elks; the Oxford Club; and the Unitarian church 
and the Unitarian Laymen's League. 

On September 15, 1903, Edward N. Todd married Ethel 
Safford, daughter of Morton D. and Georgiana (Ray- 
mond) SafTord, and they have one daughter, Doris. 



CHARLES L. LOVELL — Prominent in the busi- 
ness world of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Charles L. 
Lovell is meeting the needs of the people and finding 
individual success in his efforts for the public good. 

Mr. Lovell was born in East Boston, Massachusetts, 
October .31, 1878, and is a son of Clarence P. and Mary 
F. (Fowle) Lovell. As a boy he attended the public 
schools of Boston, gaining a thorough grounding in the 
fundamentals of education. He entered the business 
world in the employ of E. P. Lewis, a large wholesale 
confectioner, in the capacity of travelling salesman, and 
continued in this line of effort for a period of five years. 
At the end of that time he became associated with the 
Ipswich Mills, where he remained, in different capaci- 
ties for eleven years. Then, in 1910, Mr. Lovell bought 
out the coal business of J. S. Glover, in Ipswich, and 



since that time has carried on the business with ever- 
increasing success, under the name of C. L. Lovell. 

In civic matters Mr. Lovell takes the interest of the 
progressive citizen, but never seeks prominence in the 
public service. He is a mem'ber of the Blue Lodge and 
Chapter, Free and Accepted Masons, at Ispwich; St. 
George Commandery, Knights Templar, at Beverly; 
and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine, at Boston; he attends the Episcopal 
church. 

On June 18, 1907, Mr. Lovell married Ellen .Augusta, 
daughter of Jacob P. and Ellen A. (Emery) Torrey, of 
Newburyport, Massachusetts. They have two daugh- 
ters: Gertrude, born May 9, 1908; and Gretchen, born 
January 13, 1913. 



JOHN H. CARROLL— The Lawrence Plating 
Company is the successor of a business established by 
the late Henry C. Carroll, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
in 1879, at Methuen. It was removed to Lawrence in 
1890, and in 1914 was merged with the business of 
Carroll Brothers, which firm had its start in Boston in 

1909. Since 1914 the Lawrence Plating Company has 
been owned and managed by John H. Carroll, son of 
the founder. 

John H. Carroll was born in Laconia, New Hamp- 
shire, on May 10, 1873, son of Henry C. and Bridget 
(Henry) Carroll. His father, who died in 1914, was 
born in County Cork, Ireland, and it was probably 
after he came to this country that he took up the trade 
of nickel-plating. His wife, Bridget (Henry) Carroll, 
was a native of Vermont, but the family is of Irish 
origin. She is still living, having survived her husband 
and one of her two sons, and a daughter, Catharine, the 
wife of Thomas C. McCullough. Her only living son 
is John H. Carroll, of Lawrence. He received his 
schooling in Lawrence, Massachusetts, attending the 
public schools. For some time after leaving school he 
worked for his father, and learned the trade of nickel- 
plating. His brother, who was younger, also learned this 
trade, and in 1909 the two went to Boston, Massachu- 
setts, and there opened in business for themselves, as 
Carroll Brothers, nickel-platers. The partnership, how- 
ever, was soon ended, Mr. Carroll's brother dying in 

1910. From that time until 1914, John C. Carroll car- 
ried on the Boston business under the original name. 
However, the death of his father, in 1914, materially 
altered the plans of the surviving son. He was then 
compelled to merge the two businesses, his own in 
Boston and his father's in Lawrence, and for better 
handling, established himself at Lawrence, forming the 
Lawrence Plating Company, which he has operated to 
the present. He has a good business, meeting the bulk 
of the requirements of that section. Mr. Carroll is a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, of Law- 
rence. 

Mr. Carroll married, in 1892, Agnes Tracy, who was 
born in England. They have two children: i. Henry 
C, born in 1893; he is a veteran of the World War, 
having enlisted on May 27, 1918, as a private in the 
United States Infantry, and was assigned to the 109th 
Regiment of Infantry, of the Twenty-eighth Division. 



.,,.%K Ll^.NOX 
TILDES <•' 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



417 



He was with his regiment overseas for nine months, and 
in the battle of the Argonne Forest was wounded. After 
periods of treatment in Base Hospitals. Nos. 81 and 24, 
he returned home to the United States, and was honor- 
ably discharged from the service on May 10, 1919, at 
Camp Dix, New Jersey. 2. John D.. born in 1900; he 
enlisted in the submarine service, in September, 1917, 
and saw much service at the Panama Canal. He was 
discharged February 13, 1922. 



LATHROP BROTHERS— In the field of practical 
daily necessities, Lathrop Brothers, of Ipswich, Massa- 
chusetts, are prominent as retail distributors of coal, 
wood and ice. This concern is a partnership, consisting 
of Wallace J. and Charles \V. Lathrop, men prominent 
in fraternal as well as business circles. 

Wallace J. Lathrop was born January 1, 1874, and 
is a son of Albert and Hetty (Beach^ Lathrop. He 
received a thorough grounding in the essentials of edu- 
cation in the public schools of Nova Scotia. He then 
became interested in a commercial career, and coming to 
Essex county, located permanently in Ipswich. He has 
been in the ice business for about fifteen years, and in 
October, 1915, extended the business to include the 
handling of coal and wood; his brother Charles is a 
partner in the business, and they have carried their 
united interests forward to unusual success. Mr. 
Lathrop is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and 
also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Wallace J. Lathrop married (first), in June, 1907, 
Lila Maygett, daughter of John Maygett: she died April 
4, 1920. Mr. Lathrop married (second), in June, 1921, 
Gladys Anthony, of Ipswich, a daughter of James 
Anthony. 

Charles W. Lathrop was born in Nova Scotia, and 
was also educated in the schools of Nova Scotia. Early 
in life he entered the business world, and several years 
ago became a resident of Esse.x county, becoming asso- 
ciated with his 'brother in the business interest above 
outlined. He has borne a prominent part in its develop- 
ment, and is now one of the solid business men of 
Ipswich. He also is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is interested in all public progress. 

Charles W. Lathrop married Mabel Beckerton, and 
they have one child, a son, Russell Lathrop. 



ARTHUR C. DAMON— A native and lifelong resi- 
dent of Ipswich, Massachusetts. Arthur C. Damon has 
for many years been identified with the business progress 
of the town in various fields of endeavor. 

Mr. Damon was born in Ipswich, October 10, 1869, 
and is a son of Curtis and Annie (Kimball) Damon. 
Laying the foundations of his career in the practical 
course of the Ipswich public schools, Mr. Damon, as a 
young man, made his special preparations at Comer's 
Commercial School, in Boston, Massachusetts. At the 
age of eighteen years he became associated with his 
father in the house furnishing business, as clerk. In 
1891, about four years thereafter, he started in business 
for himself, handling house furnishings, and he stills 
successfully conducts that business. In 1917 A. C. 
Damon and his brother formed a partnership in the 

Essex — 2 — 27 



real estate and insurance business, and they together 
operate this business under the name of Damon & 
Damon, being representatives of several of the well 
established lines. 

As the active head of these interests, Arthur C. 
Damon is widely known in the community, and is influ- 
ential in financial circles. He is clerk of the Ipswich 
Savings Bank, also being a member of the Board of 
Investments of this institution. 

On April 12, 1894, Mr. Damon married Carrie Green- 
law, daughter of Eben and Mary Greenlaw, of Ocean- 
ville, Maine. They have since resided in Ipswich, and 
attend the First Congregational Church. 



STEWART J. HADLEY— Taking advantage of the 
deveWpinent of the automobile and its constantly 
increasing use, Stewart J. Hadley, of Essex, Massachu- 
setts, is building up a large patronage for his garage. 

Mr. Hadley was born in Guysborough, Nova Scotia, 
.August 27, 1884, and is a son of David E. and Susan 
E. (MacDonald) Hadley. The family removing to 
Massachusetts in Mr. Hadley's childhood, it was in 
the public schools of Gloucester that he received his 
education. After leaving school he took up his father's 
trade, that of a blacksmith, and followed it for a period 
of sixteen years. Then, keeping abreast of the times, 
he turned his attention to the automobile, and founded 
the garage which he still conducts in Essex. He has 
been quite successful and the business is steadily 
growing. 

Mr. Hadlej' is well known in this section, and has 
served the people for several years as assistant town 
constable. He is a mem'ber of the Knights of Pythias, 
and attends the Congregational church of Esse.x. 

Mr. Hadley married, in 1904, Lucy C. Herrick, of 
West Gloucester, Massachusetts, and they have five 
children: Roland L., Harriet L., Bessie M., Ellen B., 
and Stewart Russell. 



EDWARD QUINTON MOULTON, a Civil War 
veteran, widely known and generally respected in the 
vicinity of Lynnfield, Massachusetts, was born in New 
York City, October 9, 1848, son of Joseph S. and Mary 
E. (Johnson) Moulton. His father was a shoe manu- 
facturer, and originally of West Peabody, Massachu- 
setts: he died in 1896. His mother was of an old 
Virginia family, and she died in 1850, before their son, 
Edward Quinton Moulton, was two years old. He was 
the youngest of six children, his two brothers and three 
sisters being as follows, in order of birth: Clarence, 
Lizzie, Jennie, Joseph, and Grace. The family took up 
residence in Lynnfield, and Edward Q. as a boy attended 
public schools there. He was still at school when the 
Civil War began and as soon as he could leave school 
he enlisted in the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment. He 
was a member of Company I, the commander of which 
was Captain E. H. Staton, of Salem, Massachusetts. He 
saw considerable active warfare before his enlistment 
expired, and when that happened, he reenlisted in the 
Third Massachusetts Cavalry, with which regiment he 
served until the end of the war. Returning home to 
Lynnfield, he learned the trade of carpentry, which he 
followed for thirteen years, then, his father being a shoe 



4i8 



ESSEX COUNTY 



manufacturer, he decided to become connected with the 
shoe industry also, so gave up carpentering, and for a 
while was a shoe manufacturer. Eventually he went 
back to his old trade, and has ever since been a car- 
penter, following the trade even now. Throughout his 
life he has been a responsible resident and a reliable 
tradesman. He is a member of Lynnfield Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, and at one time was a member 
of the Park Commission of Lynnfield. 

Mr. Moulton married, in September, 1871, Etta Fuller, 
of Danvers, Massachusetts, daughter of Elijah and 
Sarah (Furbush) Fuller, of that place, where Mr. Fuller 
was a shoemaker. Mrs. Fuller was originally from 
Maine. Mr. and Mrs. Moulton are the parents of three 
living children, and one deceased, the latter only living 
to be si.x months old. The living children are: Arthur 
E.; Mabel L., the wife of George R. Stratton; and 
Harry P. 



HARRY CLAY ALLEN— With a thorough training 
for his career along practical lines, and the natural busi- 
ness ability without which training counts for little, 
Harry Clay Allen, secretary of Robert T. Allen & 
Brothers, Inc., is contributing to the business progress 
of Cliftondale, Massachusetts. Mr. Allen is a son of 
Stewart and Mary (Boothe) Allen, of Hammond, New 
York. His father, who was a farmer, died in 1914, but 
his mother is still living. They had six sons and two 
daughters. 

Mr. Allen was born in Hammond, St. Lawrence 
county. New York, June 11, 1887, and attended the 
schools of his native place, including the high school, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 1905. His 
education was completed with a course at the Water- 
town (New York) Business College. After finishing 
his studies, Mr. Allen took up railroading, in which line 
of endeavor he remained for about nine years. Then 
locating in Cliftondale in 1916, he became associated with 
his brothers in the present business, established by 
Robert T. Allen in the year 1899; since its incorporation 
in 1916 the personnel of the company has been as fol- 
lows: President, Robert T. Allen; vice-president, 
James B. Allen, (q. v.), and secretary, Harry C. Allen. 
The business includes a comprehensive mercantile line 
of paints, oils and varnish, and an extensive and strictly 
up-to-date plumbing and heating business, and stands 
among the leading enterprises of this scope in the 
county. 

Mr. Allen is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons (all bodies including the Shrine), and also of 
the Improved Order of Red Men. He keeps in touch 
with all matters of public import, but takes only the 
interest of the progressive citizen in political affairs, and 
has never aspired to public office. With his family, he 
attends the Congregational church. 

Mr. Allen married, in 1919, Sarah E. Thorburn, of 
Marblehead, Massachusetts, daughter of George H. and 
Abbie (Lohan) Thorburn, of Marblehead. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen have a son, Harry C, Jr., born in November, 
1920. 



received his early education in the public schools of 
Danvers, and later completed a course of study in the 
Sprague Correspondence Law School. He is the owner 
and proprietor of a farm which he conducted success- 
fully for over thirty years, but now has a grocery and 
provision store, which he has managed successfully for 
the past eight years. 

Mr. Bradstreet is a Republican in politics, and has 
been a member of the Republican Town Committee for 
twenty years, serving as treasurer of that body for one 
year. He was a member of the Board of Assessors for 
one year, and served as selectman in 1910. In 1913 he 
was elected a member of the Massachusetts State Legis- 
lature, serving a two years' term. 

Mr. Bradstreet is a m.ember of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and belongs to the Danvers Lodge and 
the Rebekah Lodge of that order; he also is a past 
noble grand of the same organization. He belongs to 
the Naumkeag Camp of Salem; the Danvers Historical 
Society; and the Essex County Republican Club. He 
is a member of the Knights' of Pythias, belonging to 
the Danvers Lodge of that order, in which he is a 
past chancellor. He is very active in Masonic circles, 
being a member of Mosaic Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and Holton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. He 
has served as chaplain for the Masons. He is a member 
of St. George Commandery, Knights Templar; and 
belongs to the Danvers Lodge, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. 

Mr. Bradstreet is a corporator of the Danvers Savings 
Bank. For the past fifteen years he has been a member 
of Emmanuel Church at Beverly, and has served as 
superintendent of the Sunday school for nineteen years. 
He is also a deacon of the church, and has served as 
chairman of the i\dvisory Committee, an office he still 
holds, and he is the chairman of the trustees of the 
church. 

Mr. Bradstreet married (first) Cordelia W. Staples, 
who died, leaving five children: i. Emma, the wife of 
Charles R. Chevalier, they the parents of two children: 
Elizabeth and Charles R., Jr. 2. Olive W., deceased, 
who married Ernest F. Doty, and they were the parents 
of two children: Winthrop E. and Mildred, the latter 
deceased. 3. Cora S., a well-known teacher of the 
piano. 4. Florence F., the wife of Stephen F. Kimball, 
and they have two children: Stephen F., Jr., and Bar- 
bara. 5. William H., who married Murle Owen; they 
have three children: Alvah J., Olive and William H., 
Jr. Mr. Bradstreet adopted Lydia Staples when she 
was fourteen years of age, and she is a school teacher at 
Augusta, Maine. Mr. Bradstreet married (second) 
Bertha Lovett, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren: Dudley L., and Ethel L. 



ALVAH J. BRADSTREET was born in 1862, at 
No. 7 Bridge street, Danvers, Massachusetts, and is a 
son of William and Judith (Fullerton) Bradstreet. He 



JOSEPH A. DONOVAN— While serving in that 
capacity, it is said that the youngest fire chief in New 
England was Joseph A. Donovan, of Lynnfield, Massa- 
chusetts. He was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 5, 1893, a son of Milaaei F. and Mary A. 
(Gibney) Donovan, who are still living. His mother 
was of a Salem, Massachusetts family, but the Donovan 
home is in Lynn, where M. F. Donovan is a retired 
shoe manufacturer. 

Joseph A. Donovan passed his schooldays in Lynn, 




yl/CinxAx /■ ^A.xx{;l!id^i^^/~'^ 



[J 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC Library 

AS-rOK, LENOX 
TILDEM FOUNDATIONS! 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



419 



attending the public schools. After leaving school he 
was in the hotel business for five years, from 1912 to 
1917, then, with the entry of the United States into the 
World War, Mr. Donovan left Lynnfield to enlist in 
the United States Navy. His hotel e.x|)erience brought 
him assignment as chief steward, and he held that 
capacity throughout his national service. He was dis- 
charged in September, 1918, and soon, thereafter, returned 
home, and reentered hotel business. This was only for a 
few months, however, for on January 5, iQig, he severed 
his connection with the hotel. On May 17th of that year 
he formed a partnership with Mr. Harper, the two estab- 
lishing the firm of Harper & Donovan, to enter the 
garage and automobile supply business. On November 
10, 1920, Mr. Donovan acquired the interest of his 
partner, and assumed full control, the company name 
being changed to the J. A. Donovan Company. The 
business was rather unique, and comprehensive. There 
was an up-to-date garage and service station, a consid- 
erable oil and gas business, the company handling three 
kinds of gas, and in addition there was a first-class 
general store, carrying a full line of supplies. .'\lso, Mr. 
Donovan operated a popcorn machine, and this side 
line seems to have been quite lucrative, so much so 
that it has been stated that Mr. Donovan probably sells 
more than any other man in the county. The store is in 
a very favorable situation; checking by State officials 
indicates that a greater number of autos pass the corner 
on which Mr. Donovan's store stands than pass any 
other junction of roads in the district. And that fact 
has contributed much to the growth of Mr. Donovan's 
business. He is a man of distinct initiative, and is, it 
is stated, the originator of the idea of the individual 
garage, or at all events was the first to put it into 
practice in the vicinity. He is a progressive, active 
citizen, ready to personally help in public work. As 
before stated, he served for a time as fire chief of Lynn- 
field, and was an efficient civic official. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and the Knights of Columbus. He also belongs to 
the Grange. 

Mr. Donovan married, October ig, 1921, Mary E. 
Higgins, of Danvers, a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
(Joyce) Higgins. Mrs. Donovan is a graduate of the 
Carney Hospital, South Boston, Massachusetts. 



CALVIN LUTHER WORDEN, president and 
treasurer of the C. L. Worden Company, Inc., of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, is one of the active young business men 
of that place. He was born in New Brunswick, Canada, 
on March 29, 1886, son of Gabriel and Elizabeth 
(Thorne) Worden. His mother, who died in 1904, was 
of a New Brunswick family, but his father's home was 
in New Jersey, and there earlier branches of the family 
were of distinguished record. Rear-Admiral Worden, 
of the United States navy, was a grand-uncle of Calvin 
Luther Worden. The last-named was one of seven 
children, four sons and three daughters, born to Gabriel 
and Elizabeth (Thorne) Worden, and part of his boy- 
hood was spent in New Brunswick. His father was 
engaged in the lumber business, and that took him first 
to New Brunswick, and later into New Hampshire, the 
family then living at Portsmouth, where Calvin L. con- 
tinued his schooling. He was eighteen years old when he 



came to Lynn, in 1904. He entered the employ of the 
Ideal Machinery Company, working in their shops for 
three years. For a further seven years he was connected 
with L. D. Rcybbins, of Lynn, working in the shops 
(repairing). In 1914, however, he became an automobile 
driver for A. W. Pinkham, serving him for two years. 
For a further two years he was in Salem, Massachusetts, 
where he had charge of an automobile garage business. 
In 1918 he returned to Lynn, and then established the 
firm of C. L. Worden Company, opening a garage, and 
entering into the business of overhauling and repairing 
automobiles, vulcanizing, and dealing in auto supplies. 
He has continued that business to the present, and has 
developed it very satisfactorily. In 1920 the company 
received a charter of incorporation, and Mr. Worden is 
president and treasurer of the corporate firm, the C. L. 
Worden Company, Inc. The garage and the repair and 
vulcanizing shops are situated on Eastern avenue, near 
Floating Bridge, Lynn. 

Mr. Worden belongs to several fraternal orders, 
including the Masonic, Odd Fellows, Moose and the 
Knights of Pythias. In his younger days he was much 
interested in naval affairs; in 1907 he enlisted in the 
United States Naval Reserves, being assigned to Com- 
pany E. He served for five years, until 1912. and his 
rank at the time of discharge was as gunner's mate. In 
that year he won the first prize as marksman in the 
competition open to all naval reserve units of the State. 

Mr. Worden married, in 1912, Elizabeth Childs Hay- 
den, of Concord, New Hampshire, daughter of Herbert 
W. and Euphremia (Childs) Hayden, both living, the 
former originally of Quincy, Massachusetts, and a 
marble and granite worker by trade, and the latter of 
a New Brunswick family. Mr. and Mrs. Worden have 
five children: Emily L., born in 1913; Elmer T., born 
in 1914; Douglas W., born in 1915; Isatelle, born in 
1917; and Beth, born in 1920. 



MICHAEL JOSEPH CONNOLLY, one of the 
organizers of the Lynn Paper Stock Company and now 
sole owner of it, has not been in business in Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, for many years, but in the short time he has 
been there he has made many friends, and has developed 
an appreciable business. He was born in lona, Prince 
Edward Island, Canada, on July 18, 1872, son of 
Bernard and Alice (McKenna) Connolly, both of Prince 
Edward Island, where the former still is actively fol- 
lowing farming occupations. 

Michael J. Connolly was reared on the island, and 
attended the public schools of his native place, .\fter- 
wards, he took the collegiate course at St. Dunstan's 
College, at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. His 
subsequent career has been somewhat unusually varied. 
For many years he was in professional life. .'Kfter leav- 
ing college he was for four years a teacher in Canada, 
then came into the United States, and after spending a 
year at the Dental College in New York City, went to 
Boston, and for the next five years was in the employ 
of J. J. Graham, a dealer in paper stock, of that city. 
Mr. Graham's business was an extensive one, and Mr. 
Connolly, for the greater part of the five years, was his 
foreman and general manager. He left him to start in 
business for himself at Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
There he established the firm of Connolly & Company, 



420 



ESSEX COUNTY 



dealers in paper stock. In May, igiS, he came to Lynn, 
and with Mr. Koritzky, organized the Lynn Paper Stock 
Company. The partnership continued until March 31, 
1921, when Mr. Connolly acquired the whole of the 
business. He has since held full control of its affairs, 
and is, without doubt, the largest dealer in his line in 
Lynn, the present standing of the business being 
directly due to his careful management. Mr. Connolly 
is a member of the Catholic church, and of the Knights 
of Columbus. 

Mr. Connolly married, July 18, igio, Mary B. Walsh, 
daughter of Edward and Jane (Curran) Walsh, of 
Prince Edward Island. Both of the parents of Mrs. 
Connolly are living, her father still actively farming at 
Summerville, Prince Edward Island. Mr. and Mrs. 
Connolly have five children: Evelyn R., born in 191 1; 
Mary Rita, born in 1913: Girard, born in 1915; Joseph, 
born in 1917; and Francis, born in 1919. Mr. Connolly 
and family reside at Melrose, Massachusetts. 



CHARLES W. BAMFORD, who was for many 
years active in the industrial world of Essex county, 
Massachusetts, and for the past thirty-four years has 
been town clerk of Ipswich, is a native of this town, 
and as a veteran of the Civil War, has long been hon- 
ored as a leading citizen of the community. 

Mr. Bamford was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, on 
June 2, 1842, and is a son of Charles and Mary (Patch) 
Bamford. Acquiring his early educational training in 
the public schools of Ipswich, he attended high school 
until he was fifteen years of age, then went out into the 
industrial world and made his start in life. His first 
employment was as a hosiery knitter, then, later, he 
worked as a machinist for a time. Going to Lynn, he 
worked as shoe cutter for a time, then was associated 
with Ignatius Dodge, of Ipswich, for about two years, 
as shoemaker, doing general work. . 

It was here that Lincoln's call for volunteers in 1861 
found the young man, who responded at once, enlisting 
in Company L, First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 
He served with honor, as private first, then was pro- 
moted to corporal, and still later was again promoted to 
sergeant, then to regimental commissary sergeant and 
was mustered out of the service August 16, 1865. 

Returning to Ipswich, Mr. Bamford again took up the 
civilian life, becoming associated with his father in the 
hosiery business, manufacturing by the old hand-frame 
methods, which later were superseded by power 
machinery. A num'ber of years later Mr. Bamford was 
associated with the Ipswich Mills for ten years. 

During his business activities Mr. Bamford had, of 
necessity, become a familiar figure in the historic old 
town of Ipswich, and when in 1888, it became necessary 
to elect a new town clerk, it was with a gratifying 
majority that the choice of the people placed Mr. Bam- 
ford in this office. He has served uninterruptedly since, 
and still fulfills the duties of this office with the ability 
of long practical experience. 

Mr, Bamford is at the present time commander of 
the James Appleton Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 
and has been for the past twenty-four years. He is a 
member of John T. Hurd Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of which lodge he is past master. 

Mr. Bamford married, in 1866, Lydia M. Averill, and 



of their three sons, Chester W., Harry M., and Charles, 
the latter two died in infancy. Chester W. reached 
manhood, and married Lucy S. Stone; he is now 
deceased, passing away at about the age of fifty years; 
he was treasurer and collector of the town of Ipswich 
at the time of his death. Mr. Bamford's grandson, 
Rodney Chester Bamford, was killed in action during 
the World War at Argonne Forest, September 28, 1918, 
and another grandson. Lieutenant Robert T. Bamford, 
LInited States Navy, lost a foot in the World War, and 
is now one of the Board of Selectman of Ipswich. 



JOHN ROBERT GRAHAM, rising from a sub- 
ordinate position in the employ of the city of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, has, by his own efforts, reached a high pomt 
of efficiency in his department and now stands at the 
head. 

Mr. Graham, who is of Scotch-Irish descent, was born 
October 27, 1865, and is a son of Robert C. and Eliza 
Graham, who both came to this country when they were 
very young. 

John Robert Graham received his formal education in 
the public schools of Lynn, leaving school at the age 
of fifteen years to go to work. But he was not satis- 
fied to go forward on such limited opportunities, and 
during the early years of his activity in the world of 
industry he spent all his spare time in study and attend- 
ing the evening schools of the city. His first employ- 
ment was in a shoe factory, but after about a year in 
this work he secured a position in the street depart- 
ment of the city of Lynn, and has now for nearly thirty 
years been identified with the work of that department. 
Beginning as an ordinary laborer, he made the most of 
every opportunity that came his way, and in 191 1, under 
Commissioner McPhetres, was appointed foreman. 
Making good in every particular in this position, he was 
made general foreman in 1916. On the death of Com- 
missioner McPhetres, Mr. Graham was elected to fill 
the unexpired term thus left vacant, and was reelected 
the following year for a full term, the vote of the people 
ratifying his appointment with a good majority. In 
1916 the commission form of government was abolished, 
and a council body formed, which elects and appoints 
the various city officials, but Mr. Graham has repeatedly 
received his reappointment, and as a thoroughly capable 
and experienced executive, is still serving the city in 
this capacity. 

Mr. Graham is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and of the Lynn Encampment of the 
same order, and also of the Orientals, a social branch 
of the order. He is also a member of the Loyal Order 
of Moose. He attends the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Graham married, November 24, 1893, Mary M. 
Smith, and they are the parents of three children: Bea- 
trice M., Blanche L., and J. Archibald. 



JAMES H. CLIFFORD COMPANY— Built upon 
a definite idea, the business of the James H. Clifford 
Company, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, established more 
than fifty years ago, is covering a broad scope to-day. 
In the development of this idea, the Cliffords are indeed 
"Makers of Homes Beautiful." 

James H. Clifford, Sr., the founder of this business, was 
born at St. John, New Brunswick, in the year 1845, and 






'J-/, 



■^Ar.c 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



421 



came to Lawrence with his father, Thomas Clifford, the 
first decorator in this city. Their work together con- 
sisted largely in general painting. In 1870 James H. Clif- 
ford, Sr., went into business for himself, devoting more 
attention to the interior branch of this field of endeavor. 
His idea was the harmonizing of exterior and interior 
decorations, particularly in the homes of the city, and 
although the firm has handled many contracts in con- 
nection with the completion or re-finishing of public 
buildings, their especial pride has always been, as their 
advertising slogan indicates, the making of homes beau- 
tiful. The original location of the business was at No. 
331 Common street, but after thirty years of constant 
growth and development, the business was removed, in 
1900, to No. 400 Essex street. Nineteen years later, the 
business having outgrown these quarters, the present 
location was purchased (May, 1919), and the concern 
new occupies the entire building at No. 430 Essex 
street, five spacious floors. In connection with the gen- 
eral decorating business, the salesrooms include rug 
departments, electric floor lamps, house furnishings and 
hangings, and a very complete line of wall paper. 

The elder Mr. Clifford, who died in 191 1, had in his 
later years turned over the active management of the 
business into the hands of his sons, Thomas P., and 
James H. Clifford, Jr. The firm holds a seat in the 
Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. 

James H. Clifford, Sr. married, in 1866, Mary Leahn, 
ot Lawrence. They were the parents of three sons and 
six daughters, as follows: Thomas F.; James H., Jr.; 
Charles \., a prominent Lawrence attorney; Elizabeth, 
deceased ; Catherine, wife of Dr. John T. Cahill, of 
Lawrence; Blanche; Loyola, widow of the late Charles 
A. Holihan, of Lawrence; Sarah; and Mary E. The 
family are members of St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
Church. 



THOMAS F. CLIFFORD— Following the same 
branch of endeavor in which his father and grandfather 
were long prominent. Thomas F. Clifford is now the 
head of the James H. Clifford Company, of Lawrence, 
decorators and home furnishers. 

Thomas F. Clifford was born in Lawrence, in the year 
1873. and received a practical education in the public 
schools of this city. Interested from childhood in the 
work in which his father was engaged, as soon as the 
boy had completed his studies he entered the employ of 
his father, quickly becoming an active factor in the 
progress of the business, which was at that time located 
at No. 331 Common street. With the expansion of the 
business greater responsibilities fell to the share of the 
younger man, especially with the removal of the busi- 
ness to its second location at No. 400 Essex street. 
When James H. Clifford, Sr., the foimder, wished to 
retire from the active management of the now very 
extensive interest, Thomas F. Clifford assumed the 
duties which he laid down, and has since been the head 
of the concern. Since coming to the present location, 
at No. 430 Essex street, the James H. Clifford Com- 
pany is one of the leading firms in this line outside of 
the city of Boston. In the fraternal world Mr. Clifford 
is well known, being a member of Lodge No. 65, Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks, and also a member 
of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 



In November, 1900, Mr. Clifford married Teresa 
Healy, of Lawrence, and they have one son, Charles 
Edward. 

James H. Clifford, Jr., brother of Thomas F. Clif- 
ford, who is associated with him in business, was born 
in Lawrence, in 1879, and educated in the schools of the 
city and PhilHps-Andover Academy, from which he was 
graduated in 1900. Thereafter for eight years he was 
engaged in the dyeing business, then became a member 
of the present firm. James H. Clifford is also a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
is a member of the Merrimack Valley Country Club. 

He married, in December, 1910, Bertha A. Griffin, of 
Lawrence, and they have four children : Bertha, Mary, 
Elizabeth, and James. They attend St. Mary's Roman 
Catholic Church. 



FRANK E. BURNHAM. one of the leading men in 
the contracting field in Essex, Massachusetts, has been 
active in construction work for many years. Mr. Burn- 
ham was born in Essex, September 23, 1853, and is a 
son of Josephus and Helen Burnham. The elder Mr. 
Burnham was throughout his entire career engaged in 
shipbuilding, and died in 1881. His wife survived him 
for thirty-si.x years, passing away in Essex in 1917. 

Gaining his education in the public schools of Essex, 
Mr. Burnham took up his first employment with the 
Hamlin Company, of Newton, Massachusetts, where he 
learned the trade of mason, and thereafter remained 
with the same concern for four years. Then returning 
to Essex, Mr. Burnham went into business for himself, 
along the line of masonry and contracting, under his 
own name, and meeting with excellent success, has con- 
tinued in this business up to the present time. 

Mr. Burnham is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
of Essex, and of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, of Gloucester, Massachusetts. He attends the Con- 
gregational church of Essex, and has been clerk of the 
parish for thirty years. 

Mr. Burnham married, in 1876. in Chicago, Illinoi^, 
Clara M. Burnham, of Essex, and they have three chil- 
dren : Roy G., who is an instructor in the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, at Cambridge; Margaret 
E., who is very active in Baptist mission work in Bos- 
ton ; and Louis B., associated with his father in busi- 
ness, who married Charlotte Mitchell, of Cochituate, 
Massachusetts, and has a daughter, Barbara. 



CHARLES EDWARD OBER— Among the large 
group of prominent Beverly citizens whose business 
interests are in Boston, Massachusetts, is Charles Ed- 
ward Ober. dealer in bonds, whose office is located at 
No. 60 State street. Boston. 

Mr. Ober was born in Beverly, November 4, 1869, and 
is a son of Edward H. and Mary E. (Diggins) Ober. 
With his early education secured in the public schools 
of Beverly, Mr. Ober also covered the high school 
course here, then at once entered the world of business. 
Going to Boston, he started, at the age of eighteen, as 
messenger boy with Adams, Blodget & Co., of that 
city. From that time until the present Mr. Ober has 
never made a change, remaining with the same company 
and its successor, Blodget & Co., for a continuous 
period of upwards of forty years. Beginning in a sub- 



422 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ordinate position, he made his way upward from one to 
another position of greater responsibility, and for the 
past fourteen years has been a member of the firm, 
having been received as a partner in the year 1908. 

In connection with his principal business interest Mr. 
Ober is active in Beverly financial circles. He is vice- 
president of the Beverly National Bank, a director of 
the Beverly Co-operative Bank, and a trustee of the 
Beverly Savings Bank. He is a member of the Red 
Cross, and interested in all benevolent organizations. 

Fraternally, Mr. Ober is connected with the Free and 
Accepted Masons, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He takes only the interest of the progressive 
citizen in public afifairs, supporting the Republican party. 
He attends the Dane Street Congregational Church. 

Mr. Ober married, in June, 1903, Elizabeth Hill, 
daughter of Hugh and Mary (Webster) Hill, and they 
have one son, Edward H., born September 20, 1904. 



EDSON CUMMINGS WALKER, of Merrimac, 
Massachusetts, well known throughout that district, and 
especially to those connected with farming, has lived in 
Merrimac since boyhood. He was born in Deerfield, 
New Hampshire, September 30, 1879, son of Rev. Henry 
Olin (2) and Mary Adeline (Coburn) Walker, and 
descendant of Phillip Walker, who was in the Massa- 
chusetts colony early in the seventeenth century. Phil- 
lip Walker died in 1679. His birth date is not known, 
but about 1654 he married Jane Butterworth, of Reho- 
both, Massachusetts, who died in 1702, or Joane Metcalf, 
of Dedham. He was the father of the following chil- 
dren : Samuel, born in February, 1655, died August 12, 
1712; Sarah, born February 16, 1657, died August 2, 
1693; Phillip (2), of whom further; Elizabeth, twin 
with Phillip, born in March, 1662, died in 1664; Mary, 
bom in May, 1663,^ died May 8, 1694; Experience, date 
of birth not known, died November 10, 1674; Elizabeth, 
born April i, 1666. died December 8, 1704; Michael, 
born March i, 1667, died February, 1677; Ebenezer, born 
in November, 1676, died March 13, 1718; and Martha, 
dates of birth and death not known. 

(II) Phillip (2) Walker, son of Phillip (i) and Jane 
(Butterworth) Walker or Joane (Metcalf) Walker, was 
born in March, 1662, and died February 17, 1739. He 
was a farmer, and was twice married. He married 
(first) Mary Bowden ; she died in 1694. His second 
wife was Sarah Bowden; she died in 1739. The chil- 
dren born of the first marriage were : Ebenezer, born 
October 21, 1688; James, born September 3, 1690, died 
November 28, 1747; Phillip (3), born August 13, 1693, 
died November 5, 1742. The children of second mar- 
riage were : Sarah, born January 8, 1695 ; Esther, born 
in 1697; Mary, born March 19, 1699; Jane, born March 
21, 1702; Nathaniel, born January 31, 1703, died April 
20, 1783; Daniel, of whom further; Stephen, born Au- 
gust 7, 1709. 

(III) Daniel Walker, son of Phillip (2) and Sarah 
(Bowden) Walker, was born October 10, 1706. He 
took part in the expedition that resulted in the taking of 
Quebec in 1759, but in civil life was a farmer. He 
married, January i, 1729, Mary Perry, of Rehobeth, 
Massachusetts. Their children were: Mary, born Sep- 
tember 6, 1730, died August 19, 1777; Mehitable, bom 
in 1731; Mehitable (2), born September 22, 1733, died 



in Providence, Rhode Island; Sarah, born September 2, 
1735; Daniel, born March 11, 1736, died in 1777; Gideon, 
of whom further; Rebecca, bom June 14, 1740; Esther, 
horn June 9, 1742, died in 1773; Nathan, born May 4, 

1744, died October 19, 1823; Keziah, born January 6, 

1745, died November I, 1747; John, born September I, 
1748, died October 15, 1748; Ichabod, born December 
23, 1749, died March 21, 1832. 

(IV) Gideon Walker, son of Daniel and Mary 
(Perry) Walker, was born in Attleboro, Massachusetts, 
November 20, 1738, and died November 2, 1793, in 
Whiting, Vermont, where he moved in 1784. He was 
married to Rachel Foster, of Attleboro, in 1764-65. She 
was born April 21, 1743, and died March 31, 1815. 
Their children were: Jessie, born July 21, 1767, died 
February 17, 1822; Rachel, bom August 4, 1769, died 
March 13, 1849; Lucy, died when one year old; Levi, 
born May 22, 1772, died July 27, 1822; Amos Elmore, 
born May 25, 1775, died January 19, 1850; James Otis, 
of whom further; Gideon, born in June, 1782, died 
March 7, 1859; Samuel Beach, born December 17, 1784, 
died October 10, 1842. 

(V) James Otis Walker, son of Gideon and Rachel 
(Foster) Walker, was born at Whiting, Vermont, on 
August 6, 1778. He was a fanner, and became a prom- 
inent Mason. He died on November 27, 1857, survived 
by his second wife. He married (first) on October 12, 
1798, Mary Olin, of Shaftsbury, Vermont. She died on 
February 28, 1806, and on December 4th of that year 
he married (second) Eunice Marsh, of Clarendon, Ver- 
mont. She was born on December 25, 1779, and died 
on December 22, 1858. There was one child born to him 
by his first wife, a son, Benjamin Foster, born June 14, 
1800, died October 11, 1814. To the second marriage 
came: Henry Olin, born on August 13, 1807, died July 
9, 1878; Daniel M., of whom further; and Juliet, born 
January 13, 181 1, died May 27, 1900. 

(VI) Daniel Marsh Walker, son of James Otis and 
Eunice (Marsh) Walker, was born at Whiting, Vermont, 
on February 10, 1809, died September 19, 1875. He 
married (first) Cornelia Austin Smith, at Whiting, Ver- 
mont, on November II, 1830. Between 1835 and 1839 
he married Marcia Polly Needham, also of Whiting, 
where she was born on October 13, 1815. His children 
by his first wife were : Cornelia Helen, born October 5, 
1831, died August 26, 1888; Sarah Jane, born May 8, 
1833, died December 26, 1917; Henry Olin (2) of whom 
further. Born to him by his second wife were : Lucinda 
Smith, born February 25, 1839, died July 23, 1905 ; Mary 
Anna, born January 24, 1841, died November 30, 1855. 

(VII) Rev. Henry Olin (2) Walker, son of Daniel 
and Cornelia Austin (Smith) Walker, was born at 
Whiting, Vermont, October 15, 1835. He was a clergy- 
man for the greater part of his life. He retired from 
the ministry in 1886, and died in 1914. He married 
(first) Mary Adeline Coburn, November 26, 1863, who 
was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, on October 13, 
1843, and died on February 19, 1905. He married (sec- 
ond) Mrs. Jennie C. Wallace, of Merrimac, Massachu- 
setts, July 31, 1906, who survives him. 

(VIII) Edson Cummings Walker was still in early 
boyhood when the family came to live in Merrimac, 
Massachusetts. In the public schools of Merrimac and 
Haverhill he was educated, and after leaving the public 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



423 



school he was for a further three years at the Whittier 
School of Merrimac. After his schooldays were over 
he applied himself to farming occupations, and has ever 
since held to that industry. He has been successful in 
dairying, and has a good farming property. 

Politically, Mr. Walker is a Republican; fraternally 
he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and to the Rebekah auxiliary. In the former he has 
advanced as far as noble grand of Riverside Lodge of 
Merrimac. He is also a past master of the Merrimac 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. By religious convic- 
tion and observance he is a Baptist, a member of the 
local church. 

Mr. Walker married, September 2, 1903. Grace Mabel 
Moser, daughter of Edwin Byron and Grace Lillian 
(Eaton) Moser, of Merrimac, Massachusetts. They 
have two children : Henry Phillip, born August 17, 
1909; and John Olin, born October 3, 1913. 



ALEXANDER MUNRO, JR., one of the successful 
merchants of .\mesbury, Massachusetts, was born in 
Huntly, .■\berdeenshire. Scotland, the son of Alexander 
and Jessie (Leslie) Munro, b'rth of good ScottisK fam- 
ilies and both of Scottish birth, the former born in 
.\berdeen in 1833, and the latter in Glen Livet, Banff- 
shire, in the same year. Alexander Munro, Sr., was a 
merchant tailor until his retirement in 191 1; his wife 
died in Scotland in 1868. 

Alexander Munro, Jr. was educated in the public 
schools of Aberdeen, Scotland, and there served his 
apprenticeship. Three years later, in 1876, he came to 
America, settling in Boston, Massachusetts, where he 
entered the employ of Gilchrist. Smith & Company. 
Later he was an employee of the Churchill Company. 
Three years were thus passed, and he next became con- 
nected with the Gilchrist Company, as buyer, beginning 
then a mutually profitable association, which continued 
for twenty-seven years. At the end of that time he 
became connected with the R. H. Stearns Company, 
only for a short period, however, leaving them to become 
merchandise man for the William H. Brine Company. 
Three years later he became superintendent for the 
Leslie Dry Goods Company of Haverhill. He held that 
responsibility for three years, leaving to become an 
employer himself. He acquired the branch store at 
.\mesbury of the Simonds & .•\dams Company in 1911, 
and still owns it, having successfully conducted that 
business for the last ten years as the Munro Department 
Store. 

Mr. Munro is one of the leading retail merchants of 
the town, and has been helpful in more than one public 
movement. He is a member and director of the Ames- 
bury Chamber of Commerce; and is a consistent mem- 
ber of the Amesbury Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Munro married, in 1891. .\da G. Halliday, who 
was born in Kentville, Nova Scotia, on July 7, 1871. 
They have four children : Alexander James, born Feb- 
ruary 19, 1893; Jessie A., born April 7, 1897; Donald 
L.. born January 23, 1909; and Dorothy L., born Decem- 
ber 17, IQII. 



Gallagher. His father was bom in Portland in 1846, 
and was also engaged there in the drug business until 
his retirement from business in 1906. 

James T. Gallagher was educated in the public and 
high schools and then entered Bowdoin College. On 
October 14, 1901, he passed the Maine Board of Phar- 
macy examinations, having the distinction of being the 
youngest man to pass this board. He then entered the 
employ of the Schlotterbeck & Foss Company, of Port- 
land, where he remained for five years. Mr. Gallagher 
then went to Boston, where he was manager for Melvin 
Badger, of that city. At the end of this period he 
engaged in the drug business on his own account in 
Boston, Massachusetts, and after seven years, removed 
to Amesbury, where he has since continued very suc- 
cessfully and at the present time owns the largest drug 
business in that town. 

Mr. Gallagher is a Republican and takes a very active 
part in civic matters. During the different war drives 
at the time of the World War, he aided through his 
work and enthusiasm, and was manager of many of the 
campaigns. He is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

In addition to his local interests, Mr. Gallagher owns 
considerable land in Maine and Florida, where he 
engages in the real estate business quite extensively. In 
partnership with Mr. Price he purchased the property of 
the Amesbury Fair Grounds, and turned these grounds 
over to the use of the .'\mesbury Ball Team. Frater- 
nally, Mr. Gallagher is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks of Newburyport, and the 
Loyal Order of Moose, of which organization he is past 
exalted ruler. He also is a member of the Wachusett 
Club. 

Mr. Gallagher married, May 20, 1901, Mary E. Tre- 
frery, born June 15, 1883, at Portland, Maine, and their 
children are: Frank E., born February 2, 1906; and 
Frederick K., born April 18, 1909. With his family Mr. 
Gallagher attends the Catholic church of Amesbury. 



JAMES T. GALLAGHER, the leading druggist of 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, was born December 20, 1883, 
in Portland, Maine, son of Hugh and Mary E. (Carlin) 



JACOB HASKELL, whose name will remain among 
the honored and prominent citizens of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, long after the granite buildings built by him 
in that city have given place to newer and more mod- 
ern ones, was born in April, 181 5, on a farm in Maine, 
and died at Salem, Massachusetts, at the age of ninety- 
three. Mr. Haskell's educational opportunities were 
extremely limited, and as was customary with country 
boys of his day, he worked on the home farm until he 
was about twenty years of age. At this time he came 
to Massachusetts and there learned the trade of a 
mason, which he followed as a journeyman for many 
years. In later years, Mr. Haskell engaged in business 
for himself as a contractor and builder and received 
many public contracts from the city of Salem. On the 
first Salem court house, built in 1841, he worked as a 
journeyman, and also worked on the second court house 
of this city, built just twenty years later, and he lived 
to see the completion of the third building. The Salem 
Reservoir, built in 1866, was also the work of Mr. 
Haskell, of which he was the contractor. Jacob Has- 
kell was also in the ice business in Salem many years. 
He retired more than twenty years before his death 
from all active business. In politics he was a strong 



424 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Republican. He was prominent in the Universalist 
church, very charitable and public spirited. 

Mr. Haskell married, in 1840, Cynthia R. Hood, and 
their children were: Mary P., born July 20, 1843, and 
died in March, 1912; George, born December 15, 1845; 
he was engaged in the wholesale produce business in 
Salem as a manager, but is now retired; and Cynthia 
R., wife of C. R. Wilkins, of Danvers. The family 
residence is on the old Sears farm. No. 269 Locust 
street, Danvers, Massachusetts. 



PATRICK H. MORRIS, who was born in .\mes- 
bury forty-six years ago, has held loyally to his home 
town throughout his life, and for more than a decade 
has been one of its successful merchants. 

Mr. Morris was born on November 8, 1875, son of 
Patrick H., Sr., and Mary (Martin) Morris, both of 
whom were born in Ireland, the father in Galway and 
the mother in County Tyrone. After coming to Amer- 
ica and to Massachusetts, the father entered the textile 
business, and followed that line until his death, which 
occurred in 1901. 

Patrick H. Morris, the son, received the whole of his 
education in Amesbury schools, public and parochial, 
and after leaving school began his business life in the 
employ of the John H. Clark Carriage Company. He 
served that company for ten years, and then became con- 
nected with S. S. Beloff, also of Amesbury, the line 
being entirely different, that of tobacco. He remained 
with Mr. Beloff for ten years, leaving to enter into busi- 
ness for himself. Since 191 1 Mr. Morris has been a 
wholesale and retail tobacconist in Amesbury, with very 
satisfactory results. He is an energetic, enterprising and 
well known business man, belongs to the Amesbury 
Chamber of Commerce, and is interested in the progress 
of the town. Politically he is a Democrat. He is a 
good Catholic, and for many years has been a member 
of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church of Amesbury. 
He is unmarried. 



JOSEPH H. COMLEY, florist, of Amesbury, Mas- 
sachusetts, and an ex-service man of overseas record, 
was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, March 14, 
1895, son of Joseph J. and Mary (Mcintosh) Comley, 
both of whom were born in Massachusetts, the former 
in Worcester, in January, 1865, and the latter in West 
Newbury, in January, 1869. Joseph J. Comley is a 
florist, and for years has done a good business in his 
Newburyport and Amesbury stores. He was married 
in December, 1892, and five children were born to them. 
In order of birth the children are: Mary Ridgeway; 
Joseph H., of whom further; Winthrop M. ; Gertrude 
E. ; and Sylvia G. The home of the family was in 
Newburyport, and there Joseph H. attended school, 
passing through the public schools, elementary and high. 
Entering business life, young Comley associated with 
his father in the florist and nurseryman line of effort, 
and the business has gone well ahead since that time. 

When the World War came in 191 7, Joseph H. Com- 
ley was ready to go. He enlisted in the United States 
army on October 15, 19T7, and soon thereafter was 
assigned to duty and instruction at Fort Banks, Boston 
harbor, where he remained until June, 1918, then sailing 



for the French front with a casual company. In France 
he was transferred to the Sixth Cavalry, which was 
formerly General Pershing's own command. With that 
regiment of the Regular army he served for a year in 
France, and was held in France long after the cessa- 
tion of hostilities. Returning eventually to the United 
States, Comley was honorably discharged, at Newport 
News, Virginia, on July 22, 1919, with the grade of 
cook. Soon thereafter he returned to his home, and 
again entered business association with his father. He 
now has charge of the Amesbury branch of the busi- 
ness. Politically Mr. Comley is a Republican ; by relig- 
ious faith he is a Baptist, a member of the Amesbury 
church. 



ARCHIE SNOW McKEEN, photographic artist, 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts, an authority on matters of 
reproduction by photography, was born on January 23, 
1874, at Phillips, Maine, son of William Henry and 
Nellie A. (Golder) McKeen. His father was a car- 
penter by trade, and lived the greater part of his life 
in the State of Maine, his death occurring on Septem- 
ber 3, 1903. His mother, who was of the (bolder fam- 
ily of Strong, Maine, died in 1908. 

Archie Snow McKeen attended the common school 
of his native place, and was of the class of 1891 in the 
Phillips High School, graduating from same. Even 
before he had left school, it was obvious that he was 
much interested in photography, and eventually he 
decided to make that his life work. He followed such 
work in various places in his home State, having studios 
at Phillips, Rangeley Lakes, Center Harbor, and Win- 
nepesaukee Lake, and did some good work in the lake 
country. Later he came to Beverly, Massachusetts, and 
eventually to Haverhill. In 1903 he succeeded to the 
photographic business of Mr. Anderson, of Haverhill, 
the business with the change becoming the McKeen 
Studios. It has always been at the same address, No. 
66 Merrimac street, and it is obviously a lucrative busi- 
ness, made so perhaps by Mr. McKeen's excellence in 
photographic art. His work has been more than once 
favorably noticed in expert circles. 

Mr. McKeen has no time to enter into public affairs, 
but is affiliated with some of the local bodies of fra- 
ternal orders, among them the Knights of Pythias, and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. McKeen married, on January 20, 1909, Florence 
J. Whittier, daughter of John and Hattie E. (Nealley) 
Whittier, the former a merchant of Methuen, Massa- 
chusetts. They have three children : Russell William, 
who was born in 1913: Philip Golder, born in 1915; and 
Edna Whittier, born in 1920. 



CRAWFORD H. STOCKER— For many years 
identified with the business world of Saugus, Massa- 
chusetts, his native town, Crawford H. Stocker has won 
his way to a position of influence in the community. Mr. 
Stocker is a son of William M. and Ella A. (Hawkes) 
Stocker, long well and favorably known in Saugus. 
The elder Mr. Stocker was a merchant here for many 
years, and was a veteran of the Civil War, but died in 
1910. 

Crawford H. Stocker was born in Saugus, March 11, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



425 



1875, and received his early education in the public 
schools of his native town. Early ambitious to enter a 
business career, he then took a course at Bryant & 
Stratton's Business College, in Boston. His first posi- 
tion was with the Indian Mutual Insurance Company, 
where he remained for about one year, after which he 
became connected with the Boston Board of Marine 
Underwriters, where he continued for several years. 
Then coming to Cliftondale about 1900, Mr. Stocker 
established a coal and wood business here, under his 
own name, and has continued uninterruptedly until the 
present time. He has been very successful, and in every 
phase of his relations with the public has commanded 
their highest respect and esteem. 

Mr. Stocker is a member of the Saugus Board of 
Trade and of the Lynn Chamber of Commerce. He is 
a director of the Saugus Bank, and is a chairman of 
the investment committee of that institution. Frater- 
nally, he holds membership in the Free and Accepted 
Masons, and in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Stocker married, in 1902, Louisa M. Hawkes, of 
Amherst, Massachusetts. Mrs. Stocker is a daughter of 
Walter R. and Nellie (Fisher) Hawkes, her father 
being a prominent florist of Westboro, Massachusetts, 
and her mother a native of Medway, also in this State. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stocker are the parents of two children: 
Crawford H., Jr., who was born in 1904; and Margery 
M., born in 1908. The members of the family are 
widely known and popular in social circles in this 
county. 



ALFRED E. DEMERS was born in the city of 
Durham, Canada, on July 18, 1872, and is a son of 
Honore Demers, a carpenter by trade, and his wife, 
Adaline (Bournase) Demers, who was born in Quebec, 
Canada. His father died in 1909. 

Mr. Demers was educated in the public schools of 
Manchester, New Hampshire. After his education was 
completed he obtained employment at a mill in Man- 
chester and worked there for five years. He then spent 
nineteen years in the service of the Craft & Green Shoe 
Manufacturing Company, at Manchester. During the 
last eleven years he spent with Craft & Green, Mr. 
Demers occupied the position of foreman, in charge of 
the making and finishing rooms. In 1909 he decided to 
leave Manchester and came to Haverhill. He became 
foreman for the E. Bottomley Company, remaining with 
that firm until 1919. He then, after ten years spent in 
the service of the E. Bottomley Company, entered into 
partnership with Mr. Crowell, establishing the Demers 
& Crowell Company, which specializes in the manufac- 
ture of ladies' turn slippers and comfort shoes. The 
factory, which is located at No. 203 River street, Haver- 
hill, has 2,700 square feet of floor space, and an aver- 
age production of 500 pairs of shoes a day. Mr. Demers 
is a Catholic. He is a member of the Catholic Forest- 
ers of America. 

Mr. Demers married (first), in 1897, Julia Conlon, 
of New York State; she died in 1900. Mr. Demers 
married (second), in 1910, Mrs. Esther (Laramy) Frost, 
of New York State, she a daughter of Charles and Mary 
(White) Laramy. same State. Her father is a bo.x 
manufacturer and farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Demers have 
no children. 



ANDREW (3) NICHOLS was born at Danvers, 
now Peabody, Massachusetts, on September 17, 1837, 
and died September 18, 1921, and was a son of Dr. 
Andrew (2) and Mary Holyoke (Ward) Nichols. His 
grandfather, whose name also was Andrew, was born 
on Nichols street, in Danvers, Massachusetts, and was a 
farmer and one of the town officers. He married his 
cousin, Eunice Nichols, and tliey had four children: 
Elizabeth ; John, from whom Mr. Nichols purchased 
the land upon which he built his homestead at No. 98 
Preston street, Danvers; Andrew (2), of whom further; 
and Abel. 

Andrew (2) Nichols, Mr. Nichols' father, was born 
at the family homestead, Danvers. He was a physician 
and naturalist. He married (second) Mary Holyoke 
Ward, and they had two children: Andrew (3), and 
Mary W. Nichols. 

Andrew (3) Nichols received his early education in 
the public schools of Danvers, now Peabody, Massa- 
chusetts. From Danvers he moved to Salem, where he 
became a pupil of the Bowditch High School, from 
which he graduated. He then accepted a position in 
the Insolvency Court. .At the time he held this position, 
the registry of deeds was still housed in the old stone 
building, which was later abandoned when the Insol- 
vency Court was merged with the Probate Court. The 
indoor work at Salem proved too severe a tax upon 
Mr. Nichols' health and he was obliged to seek an open 
air occupation. Accordingly, he decided to take up 
farming, so bought the farm and built the homestead at 
No. 98 Preston street, Danvers, from his Uncle John, 
a son of the first Andrew Nichols. He directed the 
work of the farm for a number of years and then, in 
addition took up the profession of civil engineering. 
He had a natural aptitude for this profession and soon 
acquired a wide reputation as an engineer of uncommon 
energy and ability. He was the engineer in charge of 
the installation of the Danvers Water Works and later 
of the Peabody Water Works. He planned many of 
the finest roads in Danvers, and among others, laid out 
the Valley road which runs from Danvers to Topsfield. 
Mr. Nichols was for many years a member of the Dan- 
vers School Committee. He spent much spare time on 
local history and was an acknowledged authority on the 
history of Danvers, Salem, Peabody, Middleton and 
Topsfield. 

He was clerk of the LInitarian Congregational Society 
of Danvers from its organization in 1865 until his death, 
a period of fifty-six years. He also was an expert on 
titles of real estate. In spite of his great age he con- 
tinued to lead an active life and to manage his various 
business enterprises until 1919, when he retired, owing 
to a severe illness. 

Mr. Nichols married Elizabeth P. Stanley, of Salem. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nichols had eight children: i. Andrew 
(4), who married Mary Ann Bill, and they had 
three children: Annie Bowlman (Nichols) Brewster; 
Dr. Andrew (5) Nichols; and Marion Nichols. Both 
Andrew (4) Nichols and his wife are now dead. 2. 
Elizabeth Hunt, who died in her ninth year. 3. John 
Holyoke, M. D., who married Oda Howe; they have 
no children. He is the superintendent of the Tewks- 
bury State Infirmary. 4. Joshua Ward, who succeeded 
to the management of the family homestead at No. 98 



426 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Preston street, Danvers. He married (first) Clara 
Louise Ballou, who was the mother of his two children: 
John and Florence Nichols; and (second) Maud Kim- 
ball. 5. Mary Eliot, a teacher. 6. William Stanley, who 
entered the ministry and is at present in charge of a 
church at Montpelier, Vermont. He married Nellie E. 
Johnson. They have two children : Edward Holyoke, 
and Nathan Paddock Nichols. 7. Nellie Chapman, who 
married Charles H. Preston, and they have three chil- 
dren : Ruth S.. Charles P., and Stanley N. Preston. 8. 
Margaret Appleton, a teacher. Mr. Nichols had ten 
grandchildren and one great-grandchild, David Tree- 
man Brewster, 3rd. 



WILLIAM D. GRAHAM was born November i, 
1888, in Haverhill. Massachusetts, son of David W. 
Graham, a shoe worker formerly of Eastport, Maine, 
and Minnie (Brewster) Graham. The public and high 
schools of Haverhill afforded Mr. Graham his early 
education and he also received private instruction from 
Herman Williams of Haverhill. , His first business ex- 
perience was obtained with Lawrence Lyons, of Boston, 
with whom he was employed as an advertising artist, 
and after a year went to work in the same line of busi- 
ness on his own account, under the name of William D. 
Graham Company of Haverhill and Boston, Massachu- 
setts, remaining four years in this line, and then became 
associated with the Ra>Tnond Syndicate of, Boston. 
After several successful years with this firm, Mr. Gra- 
ham returned to Haverhill and was with the "Telegram 
Press" until 1918, when he went in the art-sign busi- 
ness, and in this venture has been very successful ; he 
makes his headquarters in Haverhill, and through his 
artistic and superior work has built up a large and 
thriving business. 

Mr. Graham married, in 1913, Joyce E. Fletcher, 
daughter of Joseph Fletcher, of Nova Scotia, and Kezia 
(Daken) Fletcher. Mr. Fletcher was a carpenter and 
followed his trade in Foxcroft. Maine, where he died 
in 1914; his wife is now a resident of Boston. Mr. and 
Mrs. Graham are the parents of a daughter, Dorothy 
Fletcher Graham. 



EDWIN S. LANE — One of the important industries 
of Amesbury, Massachusetts, for many years before the 
automobile succeeded the horse-drawn vehicle was the 
business of carriage building, and many prominent and 
influential citizens of the past generation were engaged 
in this line of work. One of those who attained suc- 
cess, both financially and other ways, was Edwin S. 
Lane, who for many years was one of the useful men of 
Amesbury; he was active in many ways outside of his 
business interests, and ever interested in all progres- 
sive movements. 

Mr. Lane was born in Hampton, New Hainpshire, 
May 13, 1845, and died in 1902, at Amesbury. He was 
educated in the district schools of his native town and 
Hampton Academy, and at an early age began to make 
his own living. He apprenticed himself to learn the 
trade of carriage making, and as a journeyman, located 
in Amesbury. Subsequently he engaged in business for 
himself, and his high quality of workmanship soon 
brought him increased trade. In 1885 he retired, selling 
his business to his brother. This business developed 



and increased many times over the start, and carriages 
built in his factory were known to be all that skilled 
workmanship and art could manufacture. 

Mr. Lane married Anna G. Tucker, born in Salisbury 
Point, April 12, 1846, and they were the parents of 
three sons : George O. ; Harvey S. ; and Harlan S. ; 
also of two daughters : Cora Belle and Gertrude M. 
Lane. There also are four grandchildren. 



JOHN P. TRUE— On September 27, 1917, the town 
of Amesbury, Massachusetts, lost one of its most influ- 
ential and prominent citizens in the death of John P. 
True. Mr. True was born in a house situated on the 
town line between Seabrook and Southampton, New 
Hampshire. February 27, 1826. His younger days were 
spent on the homestead, attending school during the 
winter months and working about the farm in the 
summer. Later, when finishing school, Mr. True con- 
tinued to engage in farming, and was thus employed for 
several years. He became interested in tanning leather 
and this led into the manufacturing end of this busi- 
ness ; subsequently, Mr. True removed to Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, and there manufactured leather goods, 
meeting with well-deserved success. 

Mr. True married Mary A. Wells Morrell, daughter 
of Jeremiah and Mary (Wells) Morrell, natives of 
Salisbury, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. True were the 
parents of a son, born in Salisbury, now residing in 
Framingham, Massachusetts. They were also the par- 
ents of a daughter, Addie L. True, who resides at the 
homestead in Amesbury. Mrs. True is now deceased. 



JOHN BROWN GORDON— Of the eighty-five 
residents of Haverhill, Massachusetts, who were mem- 
bers of the Haverhill Fire Department in 1882, the 
number living could probably be counted on the fingers 
of one hand, and of the number only one is still in 
active service. He is Chief (jordon, who has been chief 
of the Haverhill Fire Department for thirty-two years, 
and will probably be until he of his own accord elects 
to resign. He is now in his seventy-second year, but his 
life has been an active one, and he is still an enthusiastic 
and useful public servant. 

John Brown Gordon was born in Sandown, New 
Hampshire, on June 10, 1849, son of James R. and Lucy 
(Wells) Gordon, the latter a native of Sandown, New 
Hampshire. James R. Gordon, born in Brentwood, New 
Hampshire, was a blacksmith at Sandown and Chester, 
New Hampshire, for the greater part of his life, and 
died in 1876. He worked for the Under Edge Tool 
Company when they first started in business. 

John B. Gordon, in his boyhood, attended the Chester, 
New Hampshire, public schools, and took a higher 
course at the Chester Academy, where one of his pre- 
ceptors was John K. Lord, of Hanover, New Hamp- 
shire. He also finds pleasure in recalling that while at 
the academy he shared desks with Daniel Chester 
French, who became so noted a sculptor, among whose 
works is "The Minute Man of Concord," at Concord, 
Massachusetts. After his schooling was at an end, 
John B. Gordon began to work for his father, and 
learned the trade of blacksmith. Mr. Gordon was of 
an observing and inventive mind, and while working at 
the smithy thought out the principle of the detachable 




^^^^^r/'^STTvW^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



427 



caulk on horse shoes. He perfected the device, and put 
it into use, but it was never patented, and he therefore 
did not benefit financially as fully as he might have. 
A caulk following the same principle is to-day in very 
general use. Fifty years have passed since Chief Gor- 
don came to Haverhill and opened a smithy on Court 
street. The shop he started under his own name in 
1872, was, it has been stated, the largest of its kind that 
Haverhill has ever had. 

Forty years ago Mr. Gordon joined the local fire 
department. He is still an active member; indeed has 
been continuously chief since 1893; and during the 
thirty-two years as such he has had to deal with many 
threatening conflagrations. It is in great measure due 
to the vigilance and careful inspection Chief Gordon 
has given, that Haverhill has not experienced disas- 
trous fires like those which have menaced, and in some 
cases wiped out, other eastern cities. Mr. Gordon was 
elected captain in 1883; appointed call chief in i8go, and 
in the same year became permanent chief of the fire de- 
partment. During his decades of public service. Chief 
Gordon has been the recipient of many tokens of the 
respect and appreciation of his comrades, and of the 
public in general. 

Chief Gordon is a member of the local body of the 
Knights of Pythias, and for very many years has been 
a member of the Haverhill Baptist Church. 

Chief Gordon married, in 1877, Jennie P. Abbott, of 
Ossipee, New Hampshire, daughter of Henry R. and 
Phoebe (Bicksford) Abbott, of New England families. 
Her mother was born in Rochester, New Hampshire, and 
her father, Henry R. Abbott, in North Berwick, Maine. 
He followed the ancestral occupation of farming, and 
died on October 24, 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon have 
one child, a son, Louis J., who was born in Newton, 
New Hampshire, in 1879. He is now resident in Wel- 
lesley, Massachusetts, and is of the New England Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company of that place. He mar- 
ried Frances Milner, of New Brunswick, arid the ne.xt 
generation of the Gordon family is represented in their 
children : Rich Milner and Eileen Gordon. 



STANISLAS FUGERE was born in St. Valier, 
Quebec, Canada, on December 3. 1883, and is a son of 
Maglorie and Julie (Bourgault) Fugere. When he was 
a child of six his parents removed to the United States, 
locating in Salem, Massachusetts. There he attended 
the public schools and Jolliette College, learning rapidly, 
and making many friends among his schoolmates. On 
looking about for a field of activity at the close of his 
college course, the young man decided on a business 
career. He started in the grocery business in Salem, 
and continued there for nine years. He was induced 
to go to Easthampton, Massachusetts, and removing 
there, conducted a grocery business in that city for nine 
years. 

Mr. Fugere then made a radical change in his line of 
business ; disposing of his interest in the grocery store, 
he took a preparatory course to fit himself for his new 
field. He entered the New England Institute of Anat- 
omy, from which he was graduated in 1913. He passed 
the examinations of the Massachusetts State Board, 
and in that same year opened an office at Salem as an 
undertaker and embalmer. Well fitted by nature for 



work of this kind, requiring, as it does, tact and a sin- 
cere appreciation of the serious things of life, Mr. 
Fugere has established himself among the people of 
Salem, and commands the work in this line from the 
best families of the city and vicinity. He is cordially 
liked and respected, and has advanced to a position 
where he does a really successful business. 

Mr. Fugere has many social and fraternal connec- 
tions. He is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose; 
the Artisan's Order of Mutual Protection; La Societe 
St. Jean Eaptiste; Union St. Jean Baptiste of America; 
and of the Catholic Foresters of America. Politically 
he is affiliated with the Republican party, and is a 
staunch supporter of its policies. 

Mr. Fugere married, in Clinton, Massachusetts, on 
February 12, 1906, Alma Robinson, of that place. They 
have six children, as follows: Wilfred, who studied 
for the priesthood at Assumption College, Worcester, 
for two years, is now at the Salem High School; 
Emilie; Cecile; Bernatte; Raymond; and Claire. The 
family are members of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic 
Church. 



GEORGE DUFFETT— One of the well-known 
manufacturers of heels in Lynn, Massachusetts, that 
important centre of shoe manufacturing, is George Duf- 
fett, sole owner now of the firm of DufTett & Green, 
established twenty-three years ago. 

George Duffett was born in Newfoundland on August 
30, 1867, the son of John and Diana (Sutton) Duffett, 
of that part of the Dominion of Canada. John Duffett 
was a ship carpenter, and died in 1918, but his wife, the 
mother of George Duffett, of Lynn, died when the latter 
was only twelve years old, in 1879. She was the mother 
of six children. John DuflFett married (second) Emily 
Sparks, and of this union five children were born. 

George Duflfett attended the public schools of his 
native place in his boyhood, but was not very old when 
he took to the sea, at the outset accompanying his father 
to the fishing grounds, and for several years thereafter 
being connected with the fishing industry of Newfound- 
land. Eventually he entered the service of the Canadian 
Government, revenue department, and for three years 
was a special officer on a revenue cutter. However, in 
1 891, he came to the United States, and settled in Lynn, 
Massachusetts. For a year after coming he was in the 
employ of the Lynn Gas and Electric Company; for the 
next six years he was in the factory of the Bowen Heel 
Company of Lynn. There he learned that branch of the 
shoe industry, and at the end of six years of service he 
resolved to start in independent business in the same 
line. He formed partnership with Mr. Green, and the 
two established the firm of Duffett & Green, and began 
to manufacture heels for the local shoe manufacturers. 
In 1900 Mr. Duffett acquired the interest of his part- 
ner, and since has been sole owner of the business, 
which he now conducts under his own name. His plant 
is situated at No. 519 Eastern avenue, Lynn, and is 
equipped with the most modern machinery. The factory 
finds steady work for twenty-five persons, has 6,000 
feet of floor space, and a capacity for 20,000 heels a 
day. Mr. Duffett is therefore one of the largest manu- 
facturers of heels in the Lynn district. 

Mr. DufTet has long been a Mason, having advanced 



428 



ESSEX COUNTY 



to the commandery. He is a member of the Swamp- 
scott Masonic Club, and also belongs to the local bodies 
of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Duffett married, in 1900, Flora A. Strong, also of 
Newfoundland, where her father was a fisherman. She 
is the daughter of Samuel and Catharine (Gooby) 
Strong. Mr. and Mrs. Duffett have two children: 
Marion I., who was born in 1905 ; and Ruth E., bom in 
1907. Both children show marked musical ability. 



Mr. Simpson married, in 1914, Mary A. Pendergast, 
born at Lowell, Massachusetts, April 7, 1885, and they 
are the parents of a son, Andrew Lawrence Simpson, 
born June 28, 1916. 



JOHN KIRBY — For si-xty-two years a resident of 
Danvers, Massachusetts, and for the greater part of 
that time active in the industrial world, John Kirby 
lived a life of usefulness, and was always interested in 
the progress of events. He passed away in September, 
1921, at the age of eighty-five years. 

Mr. Kirby was bom in County Kerr>', Ireland, on 
February I, 1836, and there received a practical educa- 
tion in the National schools of his native land. Coming 
to the United States in 1853, he located in Natick, Mas- 
sachusetts, later removing to Danvers. Since 1859 Mr. 
Kirby had been a resident of Danvers, early establish- 
ing himself as a shoemaker. He trained his children to 
useful activities, and his sons became successful busi- 
ness men. In 1898 Mr. Kirby's two sons bought what 
was then known as the Rice block. This is an old but 
substantial structure, built in 1847, and here they con- 
duct a market, shoe store, and shoe repairing shop. 

Mr. Kirby married, in i860, in Danvers, Mary J. Hal- 
lessey, who was born in Ireland; she died in February, 
1918. They had five children: Ellen; Mary; P. Henry; 
John F. ; and Margaret. The members of Mr. Kirby's 
family belong to the Roman Catholic church. 



JOHN HENRY SIMPSON, assistant superintend- 
ent of the Farwell Bleachery Company, was born in 
Lancashire, England, October 30, 1879, the son of Henry 
Simpson, also born in Lancashire, in 1847, and died in 
1888; he w-as engaged in textile lines during his active 
life. Mr. Simpson's mother, Catherine (Kenna) Simp- 
son, was a native of Belfast, Ireland, and died in 1920, 
aged seventy-three years. 

After attending the public schools of his home town, 
John H. Simpson came to America, and was a student 
at the Lowell High School. After leaving school he 
went to work, his first position being with the Merri- 
mac Print Works, where he remained for six years, 
and at the time of resigning, had worked upward to the 
position of foreman. 

Mr. Simpson removed to Providence, Rhode Island, 
and there entered the employ of the United States Fin- 
ishing Company, and after five years returned to Massa- 
chusetts, to the city of Lawrence, and secured a posi- 
tion as foreman of the Farwell Bleachery Company, in 
the finishing department. After two years there he 
went to New Jersey, where he held a similar position 
with the Standard Bleachery at Carleton Hill, Passaic 
county, later becoming superintendent of the finishing 
room. Returning again to Lawrence at the end of two 
years, Mr. Simpson became assistant superintendent of 
the Farwell Bleachery Company, which position he now 
holds. He is a man skilled in his line of work, and is 
well known among the leading citizens of Lawrence. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



FREDERICK WILLIAM MATHISON, who owns 
Mathison's Garage at Merrimac, Massachusetts, is a 
native of Lawrence, same State, born there on June 17, 
1892. His parents, Olef and Caroline (King) Mathison, 
were of European birth, his father having been born in 
Sweden, and his mother in Hamburg, Germany. They 
did not meet, however, until both were in this country, 
and after marriage they made their home in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, where Frederick William spent all the 
years of his childhood and youth. He was able to pass 
through the Lawrence High School before giving up 
academic studies and taking up the serious work of life. 
His first employment, however, was not in Lawrence. 
He went to New York and there worked as a clerk for 
more than two years in the store of the James H. Dun- 
ham Dry Goods Company. Returning to Lawrence, he 
spent the next two years in the employ of a relative, 
August Mathison, a building contractor there. Next he 
worked for Otto Steinard, also of Lawrence and also 
in the contracting business. However, a year later he 
began to work as a carpenter for E. W. Pitman & Com- 
pany, of Lawrence, and with that company he remained 
for five years, at the end of that period taking up inde- 
pendent business as a carpenter and contractor in Law- 
rence. He continued as a master carpenter until 1917, 
when he moved to Merrimac, and there worked for the 
J. B. Judkins Company for a year. During the time of 
the World War, he enrolled in the vital shipbuilding 
effort. He entered government service, and for a year 
(1918) was a foreman for the government in the Shat- 
tuck shipyard, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The ' 
emergency over, he returned to Massachusetts, and for a 
while found work at Amesbury, making automobile 
bodies for the Amesbury Body Company. Following 
that line, he eventually again took up residence in Mer- 
rimac, and worked in the plant of the Merrimac Body 
Company for about a year. In 1920 he decided to open 
independently in the automobile repair and supply busi- 
ness at Merrimac. He established what is known as 
Mathison's Garage, and has had no reason to be disap- 
pointed in the enterprise, which is developing satisfac- 
torily. Mr. Mathison is of optimistic spirit, and is alert 
and enterprising. 

Politically he is a Republican, and fraternally a Mason 
and Odd Fellow, belonging to the Bethany (Merrimac) 
lodge of the former, and the Lawrence body of Odd 
Fellows. He is a member of the Baptist church of 
Lawrence. 

Mr. Mathison has been twice married. His first wife, 
whom he married in 1915, was Florence Latervase. of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, who died in 1917; one child, 
a daughter, Dorothy Carolina, was born of this mar- 
riage, April 22, 1916. He married (second), in 1919, 
Agnes Fitzgerald, of Merrimac. 



HARLAND A. SAWYER, general manager of the 
Amesbury Electric Light Company, of Amesbury, Mas- 
sachusetts, was born in that town January 21, 1868, son 
of Aaron and Lois D. (Jones) Sawyer. He attended 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



429 



the public schools, and in 1890 graduated from Cornell 
University. Immediately, Mr. Sawyer engaged in busi- 
ness for himself as an electrical contractor, and fol- 
lowed this occupation for several successful years. His 
knowledge of electrical matters, both in theory and prac- 
tice, made him a very desirable man for the interests 
of the lighting plant of Amesbury, and he became asso- 
ciated with this company as superintendent in 19:2, soon 
after becoming manager, and in 1920 was appointed gen- 
eral manager, which office he now capably holds. 

An able man of affairs, Mr. Sawyer has held several 
other important offices, among them being : Manager of 
the Merrimac Power and Building Company; president 
and director of the Amesbury National Bank ; and 
director of the Powow River National Bank, which he 
served as vice-president in 1920. Mr. Sawyer is a mem- 
ber of the firm of the Sargent Coal Company, and a 
former treasurer of the Board of Trade, of Amesbury, 
which office he has held since the organization of this 
body. He is a member of the New England section of 
the National Electric Light Association. 

On November 16, 1892, Mr. Sawyer married Harriet 
E. Mason, daughter of Charles W. and Cornelia R. 
(Rogers) Mason, of New Haven, Vermont, and she 
died December 6, 1919. They were the parents of a 
daughter, Lois M., born May 29, 1904. Mr. Sawyer 
attends the Christian Science church, as did Mrs. Saw- 
yer before her passing away. 



EDGAR H. MURPHY, who for eight years has 
conducted a growing plumbing and sheet metal business 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts, under the trading name of 
the E. H. Murphy Company, was born in Skowhegan, 
Maine, June 26, 1882, son of Lyman D. and Andell L. 
(Levett) Murphy, the latter of an Athens, Maine, fam- 
ily, and the former of Skowhegan, Maine, where he was 
engaged in the electrical business. 

Edgar H. Murphy was educated in the public schools 
of Skowhegan, graduating from the high school of that 
place with the class of 1901. Soon afterwards he began 
a commercial course at Gray's Business College, Port- 
land, Maine. After graduating therefrom he began his 
business career in the employ of the N. S. Stewart 
Company, of Skowhegan. They were plumbers, and in 
their employ Mr. Murphy served an apprenticeship at 
that trade. Eventually he came to Haverhill, where 
he found employment at his trade with Murray & Dug- 
dale, remaining with them until 1913, when he decided 
to start in business for himself. He established the firm 
of the E. H. Murphy Company in that year, and has 
since steadily developed that business. This company 
caters to general plumbing needs, sheet metal and heat- 
ing, also welding, and carries a full line of supplies, 
and also specializes in Gurney heaters. Their place of 
business is at the corner of White and Vine streets, 
Haverhill. 

Mr. Murphy has interestedly followed public affairs, 
especially those of his own city; he is a member of the 
Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, and belongs to many 
fraternal orders. He belongs to Saggahew Lodge of 
Masons, and formerly to Somerset Lodge, of Skow- 
hegan, Maine, and to Somerset Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of the same place. While resid- 
ing in Maine, he took an active part in military afifairs. 



For six years he was a first lieutenant of Company E, 
Maine National Guard, Second Maine Regiment, but 
since he has been in Massachusetts and in business for 
himself, he has not been able to follow military incli- 
nations. His business calls for most of his time, and 
he has eight men working for him. He is a member 
of the Master Plumbers' Association, and socially be- 
longs to the Agawam and Wachusett clubs, of Haver- 
hill. By religious conviction he is a Congregationalist, 
and a member of the North Congregational Men's Club, 
of Haverhill. 

Mr. Murphy married, in 1902, Frances Altana Emer- 
son, of his native place. They have one child, Altana 
Emerson Murphy. 



ERNEST K. HIGH was born at Westbrook, Maine, 
on October 31, 1893, and is a son of William and Betsy 
(Kinmond) High. His father, who was born in Scot- 
land, was a sailor and served as a mariner under both 
the British and American flags. His mother, who was 
also born in Scotland, is now a resident of Methuen, 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. High received his early education in the public 
schools of Methuen, whither his family had moved while 
he was still quite yoimg. He also attended Cannon's 
Commercial School and took various courses in the 
La Salle Extension University, .^fter having com- 
pleted his studies in 1909, he obtained employment at 
the Pacific Mills, where he has worked ever since. He 
has held the position of assistant paymaster since 1917, 
and at the present time has charge of the paymaster's 
office at the Pacific Print Works. 

Mr. High is a member of the First Congregational 
Church of Methuen. In politics he is a Republican. He 
is a member of John Hancock Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Methuen; Lowell Council, Royal 
and Select Masters; Boston Consistory; and .\leppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also is a member of Clan McPherson. 

Mr. High married Bertha Fisher, of North Adams, 
Massachusetts, in 1917. Mrs. High was born on August 
4, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. High have no children. 



THEODORE KENNEDY was born at Pea'body, 
Massachusetts, in 1871, and is a son of Jackson and 
Mary Elizabeth (Goodwin) Kennedy. His father, who 
was a mason by trade, was born in Maine, but lived at 
Danvers, Massachusetts, during the greater part of his 
life. He had a large family, consisting of six sons and 
three daughters. His children, in the order of their 
ages, are: Jackson; Emma; Herbert; Nora; Theodore, 
of whom further; Bertha; Homer; Ralph; and Harold. 

Mr. Kennedy received his education in the public 
schools of Peabody. He early developed a strong 
affection for the land and decided to take up the study 
of agriculture. With the exception of a few years 
spent in the teaming and hauling business, his life has 
been devoted to his chosen calling, and he is well known 
as a progressive and energetic farmer and dairyman, 
and keeps on an average fifteen head of milch cows. He 
settled at Danvers, Massachusetts, where he now lives, 
in March, 1912. He attends the Baptist church. 

Mr. Kennedy married Bessie Shaw, who was born in 
Nova Scotia. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have six chil- 



430 



ESSEX COUNTY 



dren : Raymond, who married Nina Grey ; Blanche, 
who married George Shaw; Lena, the wife of Sumner 
Simm ; Pearl; Ruth, the wife of Harry W. Grover; and 
Herman. 



MAURICE J. MAHONEY— For more than seventy 
years a resident of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and for 
upwards of fifty years at the head of his present under- 
taking business. Maurice J. Mahoney is a figure of wide 
prominence in this vicinity. 

Mr. Mahoney is a son of John J. Mahoney, who was 
born in Ireland in 1826. He came to this country in 
1850, locating in Lawrence, with his little family. He 
filled the position of sexton for Father O'Donnell, the 
first priest of St. Mary's Parish, then founded the pres- 
ent undertaking business on January i, 1865. He placed 
it on a firm foundation, and saw the business grow to 
an important interest, but was denied the full fruits of 
his own success by his death on December 19, 1873, in 
the prime of life. The undertaking business which 
John J. Mahoney founded is now the oldest house in 
the city in this line of endeavor. 

Maurice J. Mahoney was born in County Cork, Ire- 
land, on .August 15, 1847. Coming to Lawrence with his 
parents when only three years of age, it was in the 
public schools of this city that he received his education. 
He started life in the industrial world as a machine shop 
apprentice, serving from 1863 to 1865. Thereafter he 
followed the machinist's trade for about eight years. 
The death of his father, however, changed the course of 
his future. He took over the undertaking business laid 
down by his father, conducting it for the estate. Even- 
tually he decided to continue it, and with the neces- 
sary preparation, received his license on February 24, 
1874. He has since conducted the business continuously, 
and although his sons are now associated with him, and 
are taking much of the responsibility from his shoul- 
ders, he still holds the management and general over- 
sight of the business. He has always kept up with the 
progress of the times, and now has a complete motor 
equipment of the most modern type. 

In various interests outside his business Mr. Mahoney 
bears a part. For sixteen years he was a member of 
the School Committee of Lawrence. He is a member 
of the Knights of Columbus, of which order he was a 
charter member, and was first grand knight of Law- 
rence Council, No. 67. He is a member of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 65, and is also 
a member of St. Mary's Holy Name Society. He has 
for many years been a member of the Lawrence Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

For seventy years Mr. Mahoney has been a member of 
St. Mary's Parish, and for a period of fifty years he 
sang baritone in the choir of the church. 

On October 10, 1877, Mr. Mahoney married Ellen A. 
Holihan, of Lawrence. They are the parents of four- 
teen children, of whom eleven are now living : I. John 
William, associated with his father in business, who 
served two years with the 26th Division, loist Infantry, 
and loist Ammunition Train, American Expeditionary 
Forces, holding the rank of captain and regimental 
adjutant of the loist Ammunition Train; he is a mem- 
ber of the American Legion, Post No. 15, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars; Military Order of the United States, 



Massachusetts Commandery ; Lawrence Council, No. 67, 
Knights of Columbus ; Lawrence Lodge, No. 65, Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks; Division i. Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, of Lawrence ; Lawrence .'\erie, 
Fraternal Order of Eagles; and many clubs. He mar- 
ried Marguerite White, daughter of Joseph T. White, 
of Lawrence, and they have one daughter, Rose, born 
March 31, 1921. 2. Mary E., wife of Francis A. Guini- 
van, of Philadelphia, and they have one daughter, Rose- 
mary. 3. Maurice J., Jr., who married Dorothy Keefe, 
of Lawrence, and they have one son, Maurice J., 3rd. 
4. Theresa A., wife of Patrick J. Donovan, of Andover, 
Massachusetts; they are the parents of four children: 
William, John, Eleanora, Charles. 5. Vincent A., resident 
agent of the Aetna Life Insurance Company, in Law- 
rence. 6. J. Aloyse, who was supervisor of music in the 
Lawrence schools, and who died in 1919. 7. Joseph A., 
also associated with, his father in business. 8. Captain 
Charles A., of the United States army, a West Point 
graduate, of the Fourth Division, 59th Regiment, Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces, who was wounded in battle, 
and who served as provost marshal of the city of Lon- 
don. 9. Genevieve E. 10. Madeline E., who is the wife 
of Frank L- Carey, a prominent Lawrence attorney; 
they have one daughter, Marie, n. Eleanor H. 12. 
Claire F. The other two children are deceased. The 
family home is at No. 180 Hampshire street, in 
Lawrence. 



CHARLES E. COLLINS, agent of the Methuen 

Mills, at Methuen, and the Pemberton Mills, at Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, has been the architect of his own 
life. Through his industry, ambition and ability he 
carved his way upward through the various positions 
to the important office he holds to-day. 

Mr. Collins was born October 2, 1868, at Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, son of Edward Collins, of that town, and 
Rebecca G. (Symonds) Collins. The former survives 
his wife, whose death occurred in 1918. In his day 
Edward Collins was one of the foremost men of Salem. 
He was a salesman in his active days in coal and bark 
lines, dealing principally with tanneries. He was born 
in Salem, in 1838, and was several times honored with 
public office. He was a member of the Salem School 
Board for many years; for two years served in the 
Common Council; was overseer of the poor; repre- 
sentative to the Legislature for two terms ; treasurer 
of the Fifth Congressional District, and for a quarter 
of a century chairman of the Republican Committee of 
Ward Five. 

Charles E. Collins was educated in the public schools 
of Salem and was a member of the Salem High School, 
class of 1886. His first experience in the business world 
was in the employ of the Nevin's Manufacturing Com- 
pany, remaining for five years, thence removing to 
Methuen, Massachusetts, where he entered the employ 
of the Methuen Mills. For a time he worked in the 
office of the mills and then was appointed overseer of 
one of the departments. His next promotion was to 
the position of superintendent, and soon after this he 
was appointed agent of the two plants of the company, 
a position entailing great responsibility and one which 
he has very ably filled. These mills carry 50,000 spin- 
dles and 1,500 looms. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



431 



Mr. Collins is a Republican, but not an active politi- 
cian. He is a member of the National Cotton Manu- 
facturers' .Association, and the Methuen Home Club. 

Mr. Collins married, in 1914. Vesta V. French, of 
Aroostook county, Maine. They attend the First Bap- 
tist Church of Methuen. 



CHARLES HEYWOOD GREEN— The first to 
build a garage in the Lewis street section of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, was Charles Heywood Green, an enterprising 
business man. He is benefiting by his initiative in that, 
and also perhaps more notably in another unique enter- 
prise which has made him known throughout New 
England. His extensive and well-organized touring 
parties, especially his White Mountain tours, have added 
very materially to his prestige in his native town, and 
outside. 

Mr. Green was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, October 
I, 1888, son of Charles L. and Susie F. (Hill) Green, of 
Lynn. His father, who died in 1919, was a salesman, 
and as a Lynn resident was much respected. 

Charles H. Green was educated in the public schools 
of Lynn, and also of Mount Hermon. After leaving 
school he was for three years in the employ of the 
United States Shoe Machinery Company, and at the 
end of that time left them to venture into business for 
himself. He opened a grocery store, under his own 
name, at Swampscott, and developed it to some extent, 
but was influenced to sell it and take advantage of other 
opportunities which were in sight if he gave his time 
to another line of business. He built a garage at No. 
142 Lewis street, Lynn, and was the pioneer in that 
business in that part of the city. He has since con- 
ducted a very active business. His garage is complete 
and up-to-date in every particular, and his other busi- 
ness development has so expanded his automobile busi- 
ness that it has been found necessary to erect new 
buildings, so as to properly cope with the volume of 
trade. Mr. Green is a man of clear vision and original- 
ity of thought, quick to act when he sees an opportu- 
nity. And out of the original idea he has quite rapidly 
developed an appreciable business in automobile tours 
throughout the East. His White Mountain Tours have 
become very popular, and he is now getting the returns 
that come out of resolutely followed initiative. He is 
quite young yet, and has not been in business for very 
many years, but it is astonishing what a number of 
people throughout New England know of him and his 
tours. 

Mr. Green married, in 1912, Gladys B. Ham, of Lynn. 
They have two children : Doris Phillips, who was born 
in 1914; and Margaret Famsworth, born in 1918. 



CHARLES E. MATTESON. general superintendent 
of the Farwell Bleachery Company, of Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, was born January 19, 1872, in Hyde Park, 
Massachusetts, son of Charles N. Matteson, who was 
born in July, 1840, in Coventry, Rhode Island, where 
he was engaged in textile pursuits. The latter served 
three years during the Civil War in the Third Rhode 
Island Heavy Artillery, and was a member of San ford 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of North Adams. 
Massachusetts, where he resided during his latter years. 



He married Mary Gorton, also of Coventry, and her 
death occurred in 1879. 

Charles E. Matteson was educated in the public and 
high schools and also attended Brown University, and 
these courses were supplemented with a course in the 
International Correspondence School. The first position 
held by Mr. Matteson was with the Arnold Print 
Works of North Adams, and there he was employed in 
the engineering department. In all. he remained there 
for twelve years and during this time was advanced to 
the positions of foreman and assistant engineer, respec- 
tively. 

The native State of his father next claimed his resi- 
dence, and there he was employed by the Sayles Bleach- 
ery Company, holding the position of mechanical super- 
intendent for three years. This work brought him in 
contact with the Dominion Textile Company of Can- 
ada, and there he held a similar position for two years, 
then returning to Massachusetts, he assumed the posi- 
tion of superintendent of the Farwell Bleachery Com- 
pany of Lawrence, which he has ably held to the pres- 
ent time. 

Mr. Matteson is among the well-known and esteemed 
citizens of Lawrence, and as a member of the Repub- 
lican party, takes an active interest in all public matters. 
He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of North ,'\dams, and Lawrence Lodge, No. 65, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Matteson married, in 1893, Amelia MacNulty, 
born April 15, 1873, at North Adams, and their chil- 
dren are: Ernest; Agnes; Helen; and Mildred, all born 
in North Adams. Ernest Matteson, the eldest child, 
enlisted in the United States navy, and was stationed 
at Newport, Rhode Island, from 191 7 to 1919, and then 
discharged with the rank of first class seaman. 



JAMES E. KNIFE, assistant treasurer of the Haver- 
hill Trust Company, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was 
born at Exeter, New Hampshire, February 2, 1891, and 
was educated in the public schools of that place. In 
1908 he graduated from the high school, and spent the 
following year at the Haverhill Business College. On 
July 15, 1909, Mr. Knipe entered the employ of the 
Haverhill Trust Company. 

Mr. Knipe is a Republican in politics, actively inter- 
ested in all public affairs. He served in the World 
War, serving thirteen months. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Knights of Columbus; he resides at No. 
35 Chandler street, Bradford District. 

Mr. Knipe married, at West Newbury, Massachu- 
setts, April 21, 1919, M. Irene Powers, born at Haver- 
hill, daughter of Dennis and Mary A. (Moylan) 
Powers. 



KARL S. BRACKETT, florist, of Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, was born in Brockton, Massachusetts, Octo- 
ber 9, 1878, the son of Walter F. and Jennie (Starkey) 
Brackett. His father, who is still living, was a teacher 
for the greater part of his adult years. He was of a 
Massachusetts family, but in the maternal line. Karl S. 
Brackett comes of a Maine family. 

Mr. Brackett was well educated, for after passing 
through the public schools of Chester and Haverhill, 



432 



ESSEX COUNTY 



and being otherwise prepared, he entered Dartmouth 
College, from which, eventually, with the class of 1904, 
he was graduated. After leaving college, he was for 
some years connected with the New England Telephone 
Company, but in 1914 resolved to open in business for 
himself as a florist and horticulturist. His store is at 
No. 38 Winter street, Haverhill, and he has done a 
satisfactory business to the present time. 

Mr. Brackett is one of the active business men of 
Haverhill, taking a helpful interest in the public affairs 
that concern his city. He is a member of the Haver- 
hill Chamber of Commerce, and the local Rotary Club; 
he also belongs to the Agawam Club. Fraternally he is 
affiliated with the Masonic order. Knights of Pythias, 
and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

Mr. Brackett married, in 1904, Gertrude Harding, 
daughter of Albert G. and Alice G. (Cheney) Harding, 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts. They have one child, a 
daughter, Dorothy M. 



ELLIS LAYCOCK, general agent of the three mills 
owned by the United States Worsted Company, with 
headquarters in Lawrence, Massachusetts, is a native 
of Cowling, Yorkshire, England, where he was born 
September 2, 1864. He obtained his education in the 
public schools of Bradford, England, and then started 
his business career in his father's employ, he being a 
textile manufacturer in Bradford. At the age of 
eighteen years Mr. Laycock left his native land and 
came to Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he obtained 
employment with the Pacific Mills Company, as a 
weaver, remaining there about five years, after which 
time he returned to England, and in order to perfect 
his experience and develop his natural ability, attended 
the textile school at Bradford for a time. After his 
graduation he went to South Africa and for five years 
was engaged in railroad construction work, gaining 
experiences of value to him in any walk of life. 

Returning again to the United States, he was located 
in the southern states, working in various mills for 
some years, gradually coming northward, and working 
as loom fixer in the Lorraine Mills in Rhode Island, and 
as loom fitter for the Crompton & Knowles Company 
at Worcester. Mr. Laycock was employed for five 
years at Unionville, Massachusetts, in the interests of 
the Worcester Textile Company, there holding the posi- 
tion of boss weaver and boss finisher, later becoming 
overseer. After leaving Worcester Mr. Laycock was 
employed in Lowell, still as overseer in textile indus- 
tries, and when the Lowell concern, the Muketaquid 
Mill, was merged with the United States Worsted Com- 
pany in 1909, he was appointed superintendent. Two 
years later he came to Lawrence, Massachusetts, in the 
interests of the same company and was made superin- 
tendent there, holding this position until 1913, in which 
year he was appointed general agent of the three mills, 
Mr. Laycock has proved himself worthy of the respon- 
sible position he holds, and his vast experience com- 
bined with his theoretical training make an ideal combi- 
nation for his post. 

Mr. Laycock is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Lawrence: of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, and in political faith is a Republican, His 
fraternal affiliations include : Member of the Independ- 



ent Order of Odd Fellows; the Masonic order, belong- 
ing to Excelsior Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Franklin, Massachusetts ; and Royal Arch Masons' 
Chapter, in Lowell. 

Mr. Laycock married, in 1896, Emily Brown, born in 
.\pril, 1864, at Stockport, England, and they are the 
parents of the following children : Ethel, born in March, 
1897, died in 1918; Edward Arthur, born in April, 
1900; Albert, born in May, 1902: and Clarence, born in 
June, 1905. Of these children the eldest son, Edward 
Arthur, served in the Students' Corps of Dartmouth 
College, and is now a member of the Boston "Evening 
Globe" staff, and the second son, Albert, is learning 
the textile business by practical experience, working 
for the United States Worsted Company of Lawrence. 



FREDERICK O'KEIFF— Well known in mercan- 
tile circles in Essex, Massachusetts, Frederick O'Keiff 
is following a practical line of business endeavor. Mr. 
O'Keiff is a son of Dennis and Ada A. (Smith) O'Keiff, 
of Ellsworth, Maine. Dennis O'Keiff is a veteran of the 
Civil War, and is a member of Post No. 45, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Ellsworth. 

Frederick O'Keiff was born in Ellsworth, Hancock 
county, Maine, January 18, 1882, and received his edu- 
.cation in the public schools of his native place. After 
completing his school course he took up railroading, 
which he followed until 1919, when he became manager 
of the Essex store for the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea 
Company, which position he is now filling, with excel- 
lent success. 

In 1905 Mr. O'Keiff married Cecelia McGlinchey, 
daughter of Miles and Margaret McGlinchey, who were 
both born in Ireland. Mr. McKlinchey was in the pro- 
vision business, and died in 1896. The mother still sur- 
vives her, and resides in Somerville, Massachusetts. 
Mr. and Mrs, O'Keiff have five children : Agnes, Mary, 
Cecelia, Dorothy, and Francis. The family are mem- 
bers of St. .Ann's Roman Catholic Church, of Essex. 



EDWIN PAYSON STANLEY, of Manchester, 
Massachusetts, who is among the rapidly thinning ranks 
of the Civil War veterans, is still actively engaged in 
useful endeavor in a public capacity. As treasurer of 
the town of Manchester for the past thirty years, his 
life story is of interest to the people. 

Mr. Stanley was born in Manchester, Massachusetts, 
on May 26, 1844, and is a son of Paul and Statera 
(Pert) Stanley, the father having been an old-time 
cabinetmaker, and a life-time resident of Manchester. 
Educated in the public schools, Mr. Stanley was still a 
youth when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted in 
December, 1861, when in the eighteenth year of his age, 
and served until 1863. He was taken prisoner on July 
30, 1862, but was later exchanged. In a six days' battle 
at Glendale, he was severely wounded and was taken 
prisoner at the time. In 1863 he was discharged as 
totally disabled. 

With his health permanently broken, the young man 
went to Colorado, where he spent the next two years 
trying to recuperate. Returning, thereafter, to his 
native town, he worked for himself, as a painter, con- 
tinuing along this line for about twelve years, when he 
was obliged to give up active work for a time. In 







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BIOGRAPHICAL 



433 



March, 1888, Mr. Stanley was elected tax collector for 
the town of Manchester, which position he held for three 
years. His services in this capacity were so acceptable 
to the people that he was elected town treasurer in 1891, 
and has been continuously reelected to this position 
since, now still ably fulfilling his duties. 

Mr. Stanley was made department commander of the 
Grand .'Xrmy of the Republic in 1918, and has long been 
a very active member of .■\llen Post, of Manchester, 
which now (1922) has only si.x members left. He is 
chairman of the State Memorial Commission, and is a 
member of the Memorial Town Hall Committee. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Stanley is connected with the Masonic 
lodges of both Manchester and Beverly. He is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of 
the Improved Order of Red Men. His religious con- 
victions place his membership with the Congregational 
church. Mr. Stanley is fond of painting, and in his 
spare moments, from time to time, he has painted sev- 
eral beautiful pictures of historic places of interest in 
and around Manchester. 

Mr. Stanley married, in 1870, Rachael J. Hobbs, of 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, and they have one daughter, 
Mary A. (Mrs. Thomas Baker), of Manchester. 



AUSTIN J. RILEY— Until his death in 1912. at the 
age of fifty-five. James F. Riley, of Fall River, Massa- 
chusetts, was there engaged as a textile worker. He 
married Catherine McDermott, of Fall River, and they 
were the parents of Austin J. Riley, owner and manager 
of the North Shore Utility Company of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Austin J. Riley was born at Fall River, Massachu- 
setts, and there educated in the public schools. After 
leaving school he spent three years as a worker in the 
Mechanic Mill at Fall River, then entered the employ of 
the National Window Company, of Boston, and re- 
mained with that company for nine years. At the end 
of that period he located in Lynn, Massachusetts, and 
entered the same business for himself, under the name 
of the North Shore Utility Company of Lynn. He 
continued in the window cleaning business in Lynn until 
1918, then removed to Salem, Massachusetts, where he 
continues in the same business under the same name. 

Mr. Riley married, in 1907, Rose S. Gendron, of Lynn, 
daughter of Joseph and Rose S. Gendron, her father 
a wood carver of Cambridge, Massachusetts, her 
mother of Quebec, Canada. 



FREDERICK A. BRYDEN was born at Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, on February 16, 1872, and is a son of 
Alexander and Frances (Sinclair) Bryden. His father, 
who was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, was engaged in 
the steel industry until his death. His mother, who was 
also born in Edinburgh. Scotland, is still living there. 

Mr. Bryden received his early education in the public 
schools of England. After having completed his stud- 
ies, he obtained employment in the steel industry with 
which his father was connected, and spent four years 
working in that industry. In 1886 he decided to leave 
home and seek his fortune in a new country. Accord- 
ingly, he gave up his connection with the steel industry 
and came to the United States. He went to North 

Essex — 2 — 28 



Adams, Massachusetts, and obtained employment with 
the Arnold Print Works of that city. He worked as an 
assistant finisher at the Arnold Print Works, spending 
four years there. At the end of that period, in 1900, 
he moved to Rhode Island and obtained employment at 
the Phillipsdale branch of the Sayles Bleachery, where 
he worked as a finisher. He remained at the Sayles 
Bleachery for thirteen years, at the end of which time 
he was offered a position as superintendent of the fin- 
ishing department of the Pacific Print Works at Law- 
rence, Massachusetts. He accepted this position and 
moved to Lawrence in 1913. He still holds the position 
of superintendent of the finishing department, and is 
well known throughout the city, both in the business and 
social worlds. 

Mr. Bryden is a member of St. Paul's Protestant 
Episcopal Church of North Andover, of which he is a 
vestryman. In politics he is a Republican. He is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge at North Andover, and 
the North Andover Club. 

Mr. Bryden has twice been married. He has one son, 
Frederick E., by his first marriage. He married (sec- 
ond) Lillian Cryer, of Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1904, 
and they are the parents of three children : Florence 
Annie, Dorothy Lillian, and William Bryden. 



LYMAN EARL WINN, a native son of H.iverhill, 
Massachusetts, v^ born May 22, 1888, son of Henry 
C. Winn, whose iJiography is found in detail elsewhere 
in this work. 

Lyman E. Winn was educated in the public and high 
schools of that city. He attended the Lowell Textile 
College and subsequently the Young Men's Christian 
Association Automobile School of Boston, graduating in 
1909. Thus equipped for his business career, Mr. Winn 
entered the employ of the Hilliard & Cass Company, of 
Haverhill, repairers of automobiles, and after four 
years' experience there, became a private driver for 
Moses S. Dow, where he remained for six years. Then 
he entered the employ of the Atlantic Corporation, of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and after a year there, 
returned to Haverhill to become associated with his 
father in the garage and accessory business, which the 
former had founded some time before. Mr. Winn is 
now foreman of the business conducted under the name 
of the Kenoza Garage, and is one of the leading citi- 
zens of Haverhill. 

Mr. Winn married, in 1909, Mildred C. Chase, daugh- 
ter of Abram and Edith Chase, of Haverhill, and their 
daughter, Olive Frances Winn, was born December 10, 
1917. The family attends the Congregational church. 



CHARLES EMERY HOYT, one of the substantial 
citizens of Merrimac, Massachusetts, who has materially 
aided in the upbuilding of that community for many 
years, was born at West Newbury, same State, August 
3, 1872, son of George W. Hoyt, also born there, April 
10, 1833, and who died July 17, 1917. The latter mar- 
ried (first) Mary Erwin, of Vermont, and a few years 
after her death he married (second) Jane K. Noyes, 
daughter of Stephen Emery Noyes, of West Newbury, 
the latter born in Newbury, afterwards West Newbury, 
June 21, 1810, and died February 14, 1893. 



434 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Charles E. Hoyt was educated in the public schools of 
Merrimac, and soon afterwards engaged in agricultural 
pursuits in that town, which occupation he has fol- 
lowed to the present time. He is one of the most pro- 
gressive farmers of Essex county and his large pros- 
perous farm is proof of his industry and excellent 
management. 

In politics, Mr. Hoyt is a Republican and he is a 
member of several fraternal organizations, among them 
being the following : Riverside Lodge, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows; the Rebekahs; and Merrimac 
Grange. Mr. Hoyt has passed through all the chairs in 
both the Odd Fellows and the Grange. With his fam- 
ily he attends the Pilgrim Congregational Church of 
Merrimac. 

On November 26, 1908, Mr. Hoyt married Annie A. 
Wells, born July 11, 1878, at Wells, Maine, daughter of 
Benjamin Franklin Wells, born August 18, 1846, and his 
wife, Cynthia Flagg (Littlefield) Wells, born April 27, 
1848, at Wells, Maine. Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt are the par- 
ents of two sons: George R., born July 15, 1911; and 
Arthur W., born February 11, 1915. 



EDWARD A. O'MAHONEY, who saw service with 
the Twenty-eighth Engineers in France during the 
World War, and was wounded in Argonne Forest, comes 
of a family very well known in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts. His father had part in civic affairs there, and at 
one time was one of the largest public works' con- 
tractors in New England. 

Edward A. O'Mahoney was born in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, on June 19, 1885, the son of Michael and 
Ellen G. (Donovan) O'Mahoney. The mother, who is 
a native of Lawrence, is still living, but the father, 
Michael O'Mahoney, was born in County Cork, Ireland, 
and died in 1910, within a few months of being sixty- 
two years of age. In his early association with Law- 
rence affairs, he was the superintendent of streets. He 
is best remembered, however, as a contractor, and in 
that trade was responsible for some of the very large 
public works' contracts of New England. As a con- 
tractor, he was in partnership with Jesse Moulton, of 
Boston, and they were responsible for the construction 
of the Clinton Dam, the Spot Pond Reservoir, Fields 
Point, Rhode Island, sewer, and Stony Brook sewers, of 
Boston, Brookline Park, and the first filter gatherer in 
Lawrence, which is the second largest in the country. 
Among the many other large contracts they carried 
through may be mentioned the Duck Bridge in Law- 
rence. 

Edward A. O'Mahoney, who is now continuing the 
contracting coal and builders' supply business estab- 
lished by his father in 1873, was not born until twelve 
years after that time. He attended the Lawrence public 
schools, graduating from the high school in the class 
of 1904. From the high school he proceeded to the 
Phillips Academy at Andover. His academic education 
ended there, snd he entered the employ of a public 
works' contractor. From that time until 1914 he was 
employed successively on the following jobs; Extension 
of New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad between 
West Roxbury and Needham ; the Washington street 
tunnel and Cove street bridge, and the State street 
tunnel — all in Boston; East river tunnel. New York 



City, and Pennsylvania station there ; paved Main street, 
in Norfolk, \'irginia; and the Lachine aqueduct, from 
Cote Saint Paul to Montreal. He then returned to the 
United States and worked on the Ayer and Wood mills 
in Lawrence, but later entered the employ of the M. 
O'Mahoney estate (his father having died), and suc- 
cessfully completed the Bloody Brook sewer in Law- 
rence; built part of Lowell boulevard and paved many 
streets in Lawrence ; also worked on the Boston & 
Maine railroad's Mystic wharf in Boston; built part of 
the boulevard between Lynn and Salem, and the foun- 
dation for the Grossman building in Lynn. Since then 
he has confined his operations to Lawrence and vicinity. 
The original business headquarters were on Winter 
street. Concord street being a later address. However, 
the address since 1891 has been at No. 8 West street, 
Lawrence. 

When the World War came, in 1917, it seriously 
affected Edward A. O'Mahoney, even though he was 
above the age of the selective draft. He could not 
resist the inclination to enlist, and eventually went to 
France, with the Twenty-eighth Engineers. He saw a 
good deal of hard work there, under exciting condi- 
tions, and during the battle of the Argonne was 
severely wounded in the legs. He was sent to Base 
Hospital No. 3. and there stayed for fourteen weeks. 
After returning to this country he was at Camp Upton 
for a little while, and was finally honorably discharged, 
in 1919, having reached the grade of master engineer, the 
highest paid non-commissioned rank in the United 
States army. After discharge, he returned to his 
native place and to civil occupations. He is a member 
of the American Legion; the local body of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, and also of the 
associated Catholic societies. He is a member of the 
Catholic church, and is unmarried. 



THOMAS P. FLYNN was born in Danvers, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1872, and is a son of John and Mary A. 
(Lynn) Flynn, both natives of Ireland. 

Mr. Flynn received his early education in the public 
schools of Danvers. He began his business career at an 
early age by working in a shoe factory. After a year 
of practical experience in this position, he worked in a 
leather factory for six months. Mr. Flynn then decided 
that an open air occupation would suit him better than 
indoor employment and he became a market driver. 
He made regular trips between Danvers and Boston for 
two years, at the end of which time he worked for 
three years for the Naumkeag Street Railway Company. 
After three years of street railroad work, Mr. Flynn 
embarked upon various enterprises. In 1903 he installed 
the sewerage system of the Danvers State Hospital. 
He later accepted a position with the Boston & Maine 
railroad, and in 1913 became connected with the lighting 
department of the city of Danvers, with which he was 
identified in 1919. In July, 1920, he received a contract 
to carry the United States mail. In addition to his 
numerous other activities, he has for the past nine 
years sold fire insurance. 

Mr. Flynn is a Catholic, and a member of the Knights 
of Columbus. He has belonged to the Catholic Tem- 
perance Association since 1887, and for twenty years 
was the treasurer of the Catholic Temperance Associa- 



THE NEW YORK *' 
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AS-IOK, LENOX 
TILDEM FOUNDATIONS 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



435 



tion Union, of which he is also president at the present 
time. He is a member of the Board of Registrars of the 
city of Danvers, and has been a member of the Danvers 
Police Department since 1900. 

Mr. Flynn married, in 1902, Bridget M. Allen, of 
Salem. They have two children : Catherine A., who was 
born in 1903; and William J., who was born in 1908. 
Mr. Flynn, with his family, resides at No. 26 Purchase 
street, Danvers, Massachusetts. 



RAPHAEL A. A. COMPARONE— Among the 
younger professional men of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
Raphael A. A. Comparone is taking a leading position. 
Mr. Comparone was born in Marzano Appio, Italy, June 
12, 1890. and is a son of Francesco and Mary Compar- 
one. This was one of the first families to come from 
Italy to Lawrence, and they located here in 1893. Fran- 
cesco Comparone has since been an operative in the 
woolen mills. His wife died December 5, 1920. 

Receiving his early education at St. Mary's Parochial 
School, Raphael A. A. Comparone entered the Lawrence 
High School, and had the distinction of being the first 
Italian student to be graduated from that institution ; 
this was in 1909. Thereafter he entered the Boston 
University Law School, from which he was graduated 
in 1912. with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and was 
admitted to the bar at Boston, Massachusetts, in the 
same year. Shortly afterward he opened an office in 
Lawrence, and began the general practice of law, thus 
winning the further distinction of being the first Law- 
rence resident of Italian birth to become a professional 
man. His success has been definite thus far, and is 
assured for the future. He is a thember of the Law- 
rence Bar .\ssociation. With his wife he is a member 
of the Home Club. 

In connection with his legal business, Mr. Comparone 
is also interested in a thriving local industry, being 
president of the Magnano Corporation. This company 
manufactures a variety of textile machinery, and also a 
warp wire-dropping machine, for which they hold a 
patent. 

During his course at Boston University Mr. Compar- 
one won three scholarships. He served in the first year 
as assistant postmaster of the Law School, the second 
year as postmaster, and the third year as clerk of the 
school legislature. In public events of every nature Mr. 
Comparone is broadly interested, and served in an ad- 
visory capacity on the Draft Board during the World 
War. 

Mr. Comparone married Teresa Bacigalupo, daughter 
of Joseph Bacigalupo, of Lawrence ; he was born in 
Boston. Mr. and Mrs. Comparone have two children: 
Joseph R., and Camille T. The family are members of 
the Church of the Holy Rosary, and reside at No. 34 
Coolidge street. 



ARTHUR IGINIO TEUTONICO, D. M. D.— 

Among the younger generation of practicing dentists in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he has been active 
since 1909, is Dr. Teutonico, who is a native of Treant, 
Italy, his birth having occurred March 10, 1891. He is 
a son of John and Mary (Damarco) Teutonico, like 
himself natives of Italy. John Teutonico was an agent 
for the North American Civic League at Lawrence, 



where he had resided since coming to this country in 
KXX); he died F'ebruary 18, 1922. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Teutonico were born three children : Emil L. ; Anthony, 
who served during the World War in the Quarter- 
master's Department, and was overseas for twenty- 
seven months ; and Arthur I., of further mention. 

The childhood of Dr. Teutonico was passed in his 
native place until he was nine years of age, when he 
was brought by his parents to this country. Upon land- 
ing in New York City they came immediately to Law- 
rence, which has been their home ever since, and here 
the boy, Arthur I., attended the public schools, subse- 
quently working as a clerk in a clothing store for five 
years and then entered Phillips .\ndover Academy, 
where he prepared for college. After graduating he 
entered the dental department of Tufts College, having 
decided to make that profession his career. He took 
the usual dental course and was graduated with the 
class of 1918, taking the degree of Doctor of Dental 
Medicine. On December 4, 191 7, Dr. Teutonico enlisted 
as a private in the medical corps of the LTnited States 
army and was ordered to Fort Warren, Boston, after 
which he was sent to Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, where 
he devoted most of his time to dental surgery, and was 
promoted to a corporal and later to a sergeant. He 
received his honorable discharge, December 16, 1918, 
and received the commission of first lieutenant in Janu- 
ary, 1919, after which he opened his office at No. 77 
Essex street, since which time he has made his head- 
quarters at this place and has developed a high class 
practice. He is a member of the dental staff of the 
Boston dispensary, and devotes one day each week to 
the practice of dental surgery in this institution. He is 
a member of the various professional organizations, in- 
cluding the National Dental Association, the Massachu- 
setts Dental Association, and the Northeastern Dental 
Society. He has been instructor of Clinical Dentistry 
(Boston Dispensary) Tufts College. He affiliates with 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Knights of Columbus, the Sons of Italy, and with the 
Psi Omega fraternity. In religion he is a Roman Cath- 
olic and attends Holy Rosary Church of that denomi- 
nation. 

Dr. Teutonico married. August 3, 1921, Ellen Lor- 
aine Gavin, and they reside at No. 38 Newton street, 
Lawrence. 



JOHN F. HOWARD was born at Stowe, Maine, 
on January 8, 1855, and is a son of Smith and Hannah 
Elizabeth (Mores) Howard, of New Hampshire. Mr. 
Howard's father, who was a farmer and dealer in 
horses, died in 1863. As the name Howard implies, 
Mr. Howard is a descendant of the ancient and noble 
house of Howard, which has always been considered 
one of the first families of England. 

Mr. Howard received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Rochester, New Hampshire, and after 
leaving school became connected with a racing stable 
as track boy. His great skill and ability in the man- 
agement of horses won quick recognition among owners 
and he was presently employed as a driver of the finest 
racers. Before he was twenty-one years old he had 
crossed the Continent three times and had establisRed 
a splendid reputation as a horseman. He gave up rac- 



436 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ing after having spent ten years on the Grand Circuit, 
and decided to embark on a business career. He settled 
at Haverhill in 1880, and became a contractor in the 
shoe manufacturing industry. He was the first manu- 
facturer who ever made use of modern machinery in 
the production of "turns" at Haverhill. After a time 
his energetic disposition led him into the hotel busi- 
ness, and while he was engaged therein, he originated 
the prepared Welsh Rarebit for table service and began 
to experiment witli prepared salad dressings. He was 
so successful in these efforts that he decided to devote 
all his time to the manufacture of salad dressing. Be- 
ginning in a small way in 1895, he has developed his 
business until he now has the largest establishment of 
its kind in the world, employing a number of people, 
and occupying three floors at No. 21 Kingsbury avenue, 
Bradford. 

Mr. Howard is a Mason, and belongs to the various 
Masonic bodies, including the Knights Templar, York 
Rite, and the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. He is 
also a member of the Royal Order of Scotland, and the 
Knights of Pythias. He belongs to the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Order of Artillery of Boston, Massachusetts, and 
he is a member of the Island Golf Club. 

Mr. Howard married Margaret Cochran, of Liverpool, 
England, in 1893, and has two children : John C, and 
Albert F. Mrs. Howard is a daughter of Smith and 
Mary (Taylor) Cochran, who were both English by 
birth. Her father was a coach painter by trade. 



dren : Thomas and Theresa. The family home is at No. 
58 Camden street, Methuen, Massachusetts. 



THOMAS J. HANLEY, when but a lad of thirteen 
years, began his career as an electrician, and through the 
years that have intervened he has overcome many 
obstacles, achieving his present success by an abiding 
confidence in his own ability to overcome whatever 
might befall. That this confidence was not misplaced 
is shown by the records of things accomplished. 

Thomas J. Hanley was born at Providence, Rhode 
Island, March 24, 1888, the son of James and Bridget 
(McCauley) Hanley. At the age of five he was 
brought by his parents to Lawrence, where he attended 
the parochial schools and the local high school until he 
was thirteen years of age, when the business of life 
commenced for the boy. His first employment was with 
the Lawrence Electric Supply and Construction Com- 
pany, after which he took an extensive course at the 
State University. In 1919, thoroughly equipped with 
both theoretical and practical knowledge of the busi- 
ness, he founded the Hanley Electrical Company, which 
was located at No. 46 Lawrence street. The venture 
proved successful, for his enterprise rapidly and con- 
sistently developed. In 1921 he moved to his present 
location, at No. 84 Esse.x street, where he has a modern 
showroom and shop, dealing in electrical fixtures of all 
kinds. 

Mr. Hanley is a member of the Electrical Contrac- 
tor's Association and the Master Builders' .Association. 
He affiliates with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and the Knights of Columbus, and attends St. 
Monica's Roman Catholic Church at Methuen, Massa- 
chusetts. 

At Salmon Falls. New Hampshire, in 1915, Thomas 
J. Hanley was united in marriage with Alvina Nolette, 
who died July 17, 1919, after having borne him two chil- 



BENJAMIN B. HALL, of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, is a native of New Hampshire, born in Hudson, 
January 28, 1877, son of Isaac W. Hall, who was born 
in Methuen, Massachusetts, and died in igoj. By occu- 
pation he was a carpenter, and was a veteran of the 
Civil War. He married Jennie M. Call, of Lawrence, 
and her death occurred in 1914. 

Benjamin B. Hall was educated in the public schools 
and subsequently was employed by R. J. O'Connell, a 
teaming contractor, remaining with him for five years. 
For the following four years Mr. Hall worked at a 
similar occupation for John Chase, of Nassau, New 
Hampshire, and then for two years was with the Haver- 
hill Ice Company. The greater part of the next decade 
was spent in textile lines, and in 1915 Mr. Hall was in 
a position to carry out a long cherished plan to engage 
in the contract trucking business on his own account. 
He has met with well deserved success, and is prom- 
inent among those engaged in his line of work in Law- 
rence. In politics Mr. Hall is a Republican. 

Mr. Hall married, in 1901, Helen Schurbert, born 
January 15, 1876, in Germany, and they are the parents 
of two sons : Fred W., and Harry B. Hall. With his 
wife and children Mr. Hall is a member of the Second 
Baptist Church of Lawrence. 



CONSTANT CALITRI, M. D.— A resident of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, since 1907, and an honored 
member of the medical profession. Dr. Calitri has proved 
by his work the valued service which has been rendered 
this country by her foreign-born sons. 

Constant Calitri was born in Panni, the Province of 
Fogga, Italy, March 26, 1887, the son of Joseph and 
Caroline (Del Vicario) Calitri. Joseph Calitri was for 
many years a wine and lumber merchant in his native 
country, but since coming to this country has retired 
from active business life. To Mr. and Mrs. Calitri 
have been born four children : Antonio, a school teacher 
in New York City and editor of two Italian newspapers; 
Favilla ; La Difesa; and Constant, of further mention. 

The elementary education of Dr. Calitri was obtained 
in the schools of his native place, and after exhausting 
their advantages he set sail for the United States, arriv- 
ing here in 1901. Upon landing in New York City he 
entered a night school for the purpose of gaining a 
knowledge of the English language, after which he 
devoted one year to the making of artificial flowers. 
He had in the meantime decided to pursue the study of 
medicine, so, accordingly, with this end in view, he 
matriculated at Baltimore Medical College, from which 
he was graduated in 1907, with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. Immediately after graduating, he went to 
Boston, Massachusetts, passed the Massachusetts State 
Board examinations, and opened an office, where he 
established himself in the practice of his profession, 
remaining there until August, 1908, when he came to 
Lawrence and located at No. 100 Jackson street, and 
this has since been his headquarters. He is well estab- 
lished in general practice, and is one of the well known, 
highly regarded physicians of the city. 

Dr. Calitri is a member of the American Medical 



THE ?<i-w YORK^ 
PUP.iJr LIBRARY \ 

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ASTOR, LBNOX I 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS | 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



437 



Association, the Massachusetts Medical Association, and 
the Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity. He is also a member 
of the Sons of Italy, Christopher Columbus Society, 
Victor Emanuel Society, and the Holy Rosary Society. 
His religion is that of a Roman Catholic, and he attends 
the Holy Rosary Church of that denomination. Al- 
though Dr. Calitri maintains a deep interest in public 
issues, he keeps strictly aloof from political circles, and 
is independent of party restriction in casting his vote. 

On No\-ember 19, 1917, Dr. Calitri was united in 
marriage with Angelina McDonnough, of Lawrence, 
Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Calitri are the parents of 
two children: Joseph, born in Lawrence; and Angeline, 
also born there. Mrs. Calitri died February 16, 1921. 



ALBERT SICARD, one of tlie younger business 
men of Bradford, Massachusetts, who have attamed 
success, was born September 5, 1886, in the Province of 
Quebec, Canada, son of Louis and Celina Sicard. His 
father was a native of Canada, and his mother of 
Nashua, New Hampshire. The parochial schools of 
his native home afforded him his early education, and 
afterwards young Sicard learned the machinist's trade 
under his father, following this occupation for eight 
years. 

In 1907 he came to Haverhill, Massachusetts, and 
entered the employ of the Hamel Shoe Company, 
remaining for four years, and for seven years was with 
another shoe manufacturer. Mr. Sicard had long been 
making a study of machinery for use in making wood 
heels for shoes, and he established the Ideal Machine 
Company on Washington street, Bradford, for the mak- 
ing of the machinery along the lines of his ideas. In 
this venture he has been very successful, and is also 
part owner of the Haverhill Gear Works. Mr. Sicard 
is a member of the Franco-.^merican Order of Forest- 
ers, and of several other fraternal orders. 

Mr. Sicard married, in 1907, at Haverhill, Lea Pay- 
ette, daughter of Joseph and Rosanna Payette, of 
Holyoke. Their children are: Leo G., Cecille A. and 
Paul C. Mr. Sicard and his family attend St. Joseph's 
Church. 



HENRY ACHIANCE DINSMORE, who for many 
years has owned a good mercantile business in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, and also recently became part owner 
of the Haverhill Ignition Company, was born in Haver- 
hill, January 26, 1885, son of Adrian S. and Mary L. 
(Barrett) Dinsmore, both of Haverhill. His father, 
who died in 1920, was for the greater part of his life 
engaged in the wholesale and retail liquor business in 
Haverhill, and was widely known. 

Henry A. Dinsmore received the whole of his school- 
ing in Haverhill, attending the public grammar and 
high schools, and afterwards taking the course at the 
Haverhill Business College. After graduating from the 
last named he entered the employ of the Langley Burr 
Company, of Boston, wholesale dry goods merchants. 
In their employ he remained for two years, leaving 
them to work for the Teft, Wellor Company, of New 
York. Two years later he returned to Haverhill, and 
became manager of the Haverhill Motor Mart. That 
was his connection and line of business for the next 
seven years. At the end of that time, however, he went 



into business for himself, in groceries and provisions, 
and that has since been his main business. In April, 
1921, however, he formed a partnership with Leslie L. 
Whitcomb, and they established the Haverhill Ignition 
Company, a description of which business will be found 
elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. Dinsmore is progressing satisfactorily in busi- 
ness, and has many friends in Haverhill. He is a mem- 
ber of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, and fra- 
ternally belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, a member of the local lodge. He is a Con- 
gregationalist, and attends the Haverhill church. 

Mr. Dinsmore married, in 1906, Pauline Hennessey, 
of Haverhill, and they have one child, a daughter, Mary 
Elizabeth. 



JOSEPH F. TOBIN— .\mong the prominent citi- 
zens of Lawrence, Massachusetts, whose activities have 
placed them among the leading men of their city, Joseph 
F. Tobin is deserving of mention. Mr. Tobin was born 
at Lowell, Massachusetts, December 3, 1S72, son of John 
Tobin. The latter was a native of County Cork, Ire- 
land, born March 10, 1853, and died January 26, 1917. 
He came to the United States at the age of three months, 
and lived in Lowell, removing later to Tewksbury, 
Massachusetts. In i860 he came to Lawrence, and for 
a time attended school there. At an early age he went 
to work in the Pacific Mills, and later was employed in 
a hat factory at Ballardville. In 1865 Mr. Tobin 
returned again to Lawrence, and worked among the 
farmers in the vicinity; in the summer time he was 
occupied with these tasks and took advantage of the 
opportunity to attend school in the winter season. After 
four years he went to work in a grocery store as a 
clerk, and then entered the Everett Mills in the city of 
Lawrence. 

In 1871 Mr. Tobin apprenticed himself to learn the 
trade of plasterer with Rufus Page, and completed his 
t -aining with D. M. Prescott, of Lowell. For several 
years Mr. Tobin followed this occupation as a jour- 
I7eyman, and in 1876 engaged in business on his own 
a ccount in Lawrence, dealing in paints, oils, wall-paper 
and similar products. 

The increase in his business was a very satisfactory 
one, and in a short time it was necessary to remove to 
larger quarters. Mr. Tobin became the largest con- 
tractor in his line in Lawrence and employed on an 
average between twenty and thirty men. 

In politics, Mr. Tobin was a Democrat, and he served 
a term as alderman. He was a member of Lawrence 
Lodge, No. 65, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; Fraternal Order of Eagles, Aerie No. 216. of 
which he was for many years treasurer ; member of the 
Knights of Columbus ; and the Lawrence Board of 
Trade. Mr. Tobin was a regular attendant of St. 
Mary's Church of Lawrence, and was a member of the 
Holy Name Society of this church. 

John Tobin married, in August, 1871, Ann Maria 
Bush, born November 29, 1850, daughter of Francis 
Joseph and Ellen (McCarthy) Bush; she died January 
5, 1910. Francis J. Bush, her father, was a native of 
Baltimore, Maryland, and died in 1873; in his early life 
he removed to Salem, and followed the sea. During the 



438 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Civil War, he was a gunner in the fleet of Admiral 
Farragut. 

Joseph F. Tobin attended the public schools o{ Law- 
rence and for a time worked with his father. He was 
appointed to the police force of Lawrence, September 
14, 1903, by Mayor Grant, and on grounds of economy 
was dismissed the following year. On April 31, 1906, 
he was appointed to the regular force, and was promoted 
to sergeant January i, 1911. On April i, 1914, he was 
appointed inspector by Commissioner James W. Cado- 
gan, and served four years, at the end of which time 
he was granted a leave of absence. At the termination 
of this leave, Mr. Tobin resigned from the service, as 
the business established by his father to which he had 
succeeded demanded his entire attention. 

Mr. Tobin is a member of the Lawrence Chamber of 
Commerce; the Merrimack Valley Association of 
Painters and Decorators, of which he is a past presi- 
dent; member of the State Association of Master 
House Painters and Decorators ; and member of the 
Lawrence Master Builders' Association. His fraternal 
affiliations are: Member of the Lawrence Police Relief 
Association ; past president of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, Aerie No. 216; fourth degree member of the 
Knights of Columbus, Lawrence Council, No. 67 ; first 
vice-president of St. Mary's Catholic Association; mem- 
ber of St. Mary's Holy Name Society; member of Law- 
rence Lodge, No. 65, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

Mr. Tobin married Ellen T. Maguire, daughter of 
Patrick and Elizabeth (Coyne) Maguire, both born in 
Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Tobin are the parents of a 
daughter, Marion, born September 19, 1900, now asso- 
ciated with her father in business; and a son, Walter 
John, a sketch of whom follows. 



WALTER JOHN TOBIN, manager of the John 
Tobin Company, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born 
July 4, 1897, in that city, son of Joseph F. Tobin. an 
extended account of whose career appears in preceding 
sketch. The son was educated in the public and high 
schools, and his first experience in business was in the 
automobile line, as an employee of the Back Bay Garage 
Company, remaining there for a year. 

The business of which he is now manager was estab- 
lished by his grandfather, John Tobin, who was a mate- 
rial factor in the early success of this firm. After the 
death of the latter the responsibility was assumed by 
the son, Joseph F. Tobin, and the grandson, Walter J. 
Tobin, was made manager in 1920, continuing to hold 
this position to the present time. 

Among the younger business men of Lawrence he is 
held in high esteem, and is prominent in the civic and 
business activities there. 

Mr. Tobin married (first), in 1918, Josephine Mc- 
Grath, of Lawrence, and they were the parents of a 
daughter, Marie. Mrs. Tobin died in 1919, and he 
married (second) Mary Keefe, of Lawrence, daughter 
of William Keefe, for many years engaged in the 
plumbing business. 

Mr. Tobin is a member of the Democratic party and 
takes a very active interest in its work. He also is a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce of Lawrence. 



OBED H. SMITH— Long a resident of Marblehead, 
and for the past fifteen years prominent as a builder, 
Obed H, Smith bears the part of the progressive citizen 
in the business and social life of the town. 

Mr. Smith was born in Shelbourne, Nova Scotia, 
November 3, 1873, a son of David G. and Amelia M. 
(McKay) Smith. David G. Smith was a native of 
Nova Scotia, and was engaged in the contracting busi- 
ness there. The mother was also born in Nova Scotia, 
and died there February 22, lOio. 

Obed H. Smith attended the schools of his native 
town, and upon his removal to Marblehead, completed 
his education in the schools there, then entered the 
world of industry and engaged in the building business. 
He filled the position of foreman in this connection for 
a period of seven years. In igo6 Mr. Smith started in 
business for himself, as a builder, and has since con- 
tinued in this line of work. Prosperous from the 
beginning, Mr. Smith has developed a large interest and 
carries on the business under the name of Obed H. 
Smith. Mr. Smith is interested in all progress, but has 
little time for outside interests. He is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious 
convictions place his membership with the Baptist church. 

In 1896 Mr. Smith married (first) Susie C. Pryor, 
of Marblehead, Massachusetts. They were the parents 
of one son, Raymond H., born August 21, 1898; he was 
a member of the Naval Reserves of Marblehead, during 
the World War, and served from 1918 to 1919. He is 
now associated with his father in business. Susie C. 
(Pryor) Smith died August 11, 1915. Mr. Smith mar- 
ried (second), December 27, 1916, Mabel K. Chisholm, 
of Medford, Massachusetts, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Betty W., born November 23, 1918. 



LOUIS C. LAWTON, civil engineer, graduate of 
Vale University, class of 1893, and since 1912 city engi- 
neer of Haverhill, was born in Hartland, Connecticut, 
April 23, 1868, the son of Giles N. and Sarah (Hay- 
den) Lawton. On both sides he is descended from old 
Connecticut families, his father, who died in 1871, having 
been a Connecticut farmer, and the maternal line, the 
Haydens, being of Winsor, that State. 

Louis C. Lawton in boyhood attended Connecticut 
public schools, and eventually passed from Phillips 
Exeter Academy into Yale University, from which he 
was graduated in 1893. His first work after leaving col- 
lege was for the city of Middletown, Connecticut, but 
in 1894 he was in the employ of the United States Gov- 
ernment, in topographical survey work. Then followed 
a period with the Berlin Iron Bridge Company, and 
another brief period in the employ of French & Bryant, 
of Boston, but in 1896 he joined the constructional engi- 
neering staff of the Boston & Maine Railroad Company. 
He was engineer for that railroad company for sixteen 
years, until 1912, when he was appointed city engineer 
of Haverhill. While in railroad work, Mr. Lawton had 
entire charge of construction work, and under his direc- 
tion the grade crossings of Lynn, Ipswich, Everett, 
Rowley and Somerville were constructed. He has 
proved himself to be a capable engineer, and a consci- 
entious public servant. He is a member of the Haver- 
hill Rotary Club, and the American Association of Engi- 




y^^:z^^e^T' ^y^!'~^-^^^ ^a^^j-^f^t^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



439 



neers. Religiously, he is a Congregationalist, member of 
the Haverhill church of that denomination. 

Mr. Lawton married, in 1896, Hattie E. Breckinridge, 
daughter of Warren and Jane (Brigham) Breckin- 
ridge, both of Connecticut, the Breckinridges of Mid- 
dletown, and the Brigham family of New Britain. They 
have two children: Harold H., born i8gS, a student in 
the Army Training Corps, and was at Plattsburg dur- 
ing the World War; Ralph B., born in 1900. 

GEORGE D. CURRIER, who has spent the greater 
part of his life in the Haverhill-Bradford district, and 
now is the head of the firm of George D. Currier & 
Company, tanners, sheep skins, and shoe trimmings, was 
born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, December 23, 
1879, the son of George W. and Louisa M. (Johnson) 
Currier. His father, who died in 1910, was a native of 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, and a carriage maker by 
trade; his mother was of a Newburyport family. 

George D. Currier attended the public schools in his 
boyhood, and afterwards took the course in the Haver- 
hill Business College, after graduating from which he 
began his business career in the shoe shop of T. S. 
Ruddock & Son, on Granite street. Three years later he 
entered the employ of Thayer, McGuire & Fields, which 
firm he served for seven years. Then followed a period 
of service to D. C. Peabody, but in 1912 Mr. Currier 
decided to open a business for himself. He traded as 
George D. Currier & Company, tanners, his specialties 
being sheep skins and shoe trimmings. The plant is 
now located on Railroad avenue, Bradford ; it is a busi- 
ness of satisfactory dimensions. 

Mr. Currier is well known in Haverhill ; he is a 
Mason, up to and including the Scottish Rite degree, 
and socially is a member of the Agawam Club. By 
religious faith he is a Congregationalist, and he holds 
membership in the local church of that sect 

Mr. Currier married, in 1905, Lillian Ross, daughter 
of George J. and Olive M. (Stanley) Ross, of West 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, the former a police officer 
of that place. 



HENRY LA ROSA— An instance of the rapidity 
with which the better type of immigrants succeed after 
they reach America is seen in the advancement that has 
come to Henry La Rosa, of Lawrence. He is only 
thirty years old, but he owns and successfully operates 
two good stores in Lawrence, Massachusetts, handling 
automobile tires, accessories, and supplies. 

Henry La Rosa was born in Italy on Christmas Day 
of 1891, and is the fourth-born of live children. His 
father, Biaggio La Rosa, conducted a grocery store for 
thirty years in Italy; he died in 1918. When old enough, 
Henry La Rosa began to study in the public schools of 
his native land. He was sixteen years old when he 
came to this country in 1907, and his first work in 
America was obtained in the Wood Mills in Lawrence. 
There he worked for five years, then for another year 
was employed in the Washington Mills. For five years 
after that he was with the Tire and Rubber Company, at 
Andover, Massachusetts. There he learned the auto- 
mobile supply business, and after five years of service 
in Andover, he returned to Lawrence, with enough 



money to open in business for himself. This he did, his 
first store being at No. 52 Essex street, where he traded 
under the name of the Quality Tire and Accessory 
Shop. Later he removed to larger quarters on Jackson 
street, where he still is. He also operates another store 
under the same name, and from a humble beginning it 
has developed into quite a good well paying business. 
This he has done by the assimilation of good American 
characteristics, and he has undoubtedly conducted his 
business in an alert, enterprising and efficient manner. 

Mr. La Rosa is a member of the Sons of Italy, and of 
the Holy Rosary Church of Lawrence. 

Henry La Rosa married, in 1912, Marie Misenti, who 
was of Italian birth. They have one child, a daughter, 
Eleanor, who was born in 1920. 



WILLIAM L. JENNINGS, partner with Edward 
Mitchell in the Household Furniture Company of Ha- 
verhill, Massachusetts, was born on the rock of Gibraltar, 
the British fortress in Spain, at the entrance to the 
Mediterranean Sea. His parents were William Thomp- 
son and Ida Clarence (Basden) Jennings. The former 
was born in England, and was a soldier in the garrison 
of Gibraltar at the time of the birth of William L., June 
8, 1880, and later ser\ed in the Egyptian War. He was 
wounded in the unsuccessful attempt by General Wolse- 
ley to relieve General Gordon, besieged in Khartoum. 
He was taken to Watalie Hospital, but eventually inval- 
ided. The family then went to live in Bermuda, where 
Mrs. Jennings was born. On that island their son, Wil- 
liam L. Jennings, spent the greater part of his boy- 
hood. After leaving school he worked for two years 
at the Hamilton Hotel, Bermuda, but while the United 
States was at war with Spain he resolved to come to this 
country. He enlisted in the United States army in 1898, 
his father having died in that year, which perhaps 
explains why he did not return to Bermuda at the end 
of his military service. When discharged from the 
army, he took up his abode in Dover, New Hampshire, 
where for nine years he worked for Mooney & Ewer, 
after which period he removed to Haverhill. In 1915 
he became connected with the Atherton Furniture Com- 
pany, but three years later went into independent busi- 
ness, in partnership with Edward Mitchell. They estab- 
lished the Household Furniture Company, and since 
1918 have experienced a promising growth of their 
enterprise. Their store is situated at No. 50 Emerson 
street, Haverhill, and covers all domestic lines of 
furniture. 

Mr. Jennings' army service began on June 6, 1898, 
when he enlisted for active service in the occupation 
of Porto Rico. At the end of the war emergency, he 
reenlisted, and his final discharge came in December, 
1903. 

Mr. Jennings has entered actively into community life 
in Haverhill ; he is a member of the Methodist church, 
belongs to the Knights of Pjthias, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, organizations in Haverhill. 

After he came out of the army, in December, 1903, 
Mr. Jennings married Blanche J. Gage, daughter of 
Thomas F. and Fannie (Brownell) Gage, of Dover, 
New Hampshire. The former was a carpenter by trade, 



440 



ESSEX COUNTY 



and died in igip. To Mr. and Mrs. Jennings have been 
born five children: Lendon R., born in 1904; Ruth J., 
born in 1906; Muriel, born in 1908; Earl, bom in 191 1; 
and William L., Jr., born in 1915. 



LESLIE LUDWIG WHITCOMB, World War 
veteran, a Naval Aviation Corps man, is part owner of 
the Haverhill Ignition Company, electrical contractors, 
dealers, and agents. He was born in Arlington, 
Nebraska, November 24, 1893, son of Edward L. and 
Matilda (Ludwig) Whitcomb, the former a farmer for 
the greater part of his life, and latterly of Simla, Colo- 
rado. Matilda (Ludwig) Whitcomb, mother of Leslie 
L., was of Quincy, Illinois; she died in 1918. 

Leslie L. Whitcomb was educated in the public schools 
of Freemont, Nebraska, and after leaving school went 
into the automobile repair business. He became expert 
in that trade, and worked at it in various cities for 
fourteen years, until 1917, when the entry of America 
into the World War made it necessary that call be 
made upon all its young manhood. Mr. Whitcomb 
joined the naval branch, and was assigned to the Naval 
Aviation Corps, serving through the war, reaching 
the grade of chief petty officer before being honorably 
discharged at the termination of the emergency. His 
service was from January 18, 1918, to January 21, 1919. 
Entering civil life again, he took up residence in Haver- 
hill, and entered into business partnership with H. A. 
Dinsmore in 1921, the two forming the Haverhill Igni- 
tion Company, at No. "j^ Kenoza avenue, where they 
have an area of one thousand square feet of floor space 
for workshops and sales rooms. They do general repair 
work in batteries and magnetos, and carry a full line 
of electrical accessories for all makes of machines, spec- 
ializing in Deico and Remo products. They are also 
distributors in Haverhill and vicinity for the Gould 
battery. Altogether, they have an automobile supply 
business of great promise. Mr. Whitcomb is a member 
of the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, and is an 
active business man. He belongs to the Congregational 
church of Haverhill. 

Mr. Whitcomb married, in 1917, Beatrice Rogers, of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. 



CHARLES W. MORRISON, sales manager of the 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, plant of Robert Gair Com- 
pany, box board manufacturers, was born at Frankfort 
Springs, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1869, the son of 
Alexander and Mary J. (Withrow) Morrison, both of 
Pennsylvania families. Alexander Morrison died in 
1906; in early life he taught school, later became a 
dentist, then took over his father's mercantile business 
and was a merchant in Pennsylvania, becoming some- 
what prominent in Pittsburgh, that State. He was at 
one time elected county treasurer of Beaver county, and 
also served in the registry department of the Pittsburgh 
post office. He was a veteran of the Civil War. 

Charles W. Morrison was educated in the public 
schools of his native place and those of Beaver Falls, 
Pennsylvania. After leaving school he entered com- 
mercial business, for eight years being in the employ of 
C. C. Ray, shoe merchant, of Beaver Falls. Then fol- 
lowed a period of independent business enterprise, Mr. 



Morrison opening a store on Seventh avenue, Beaver 
Falls, and conducting the business with moderate suc- 
cess for five or six years, 1890-95. In 1896 he went to 
Indiana, for eight years thereafter being manager for 
the Central Glass Company, at Summitville, that State, 
and later, for some time, was in the steel business. In 
1004 he came to Haverhill and joined the sales force of 
the Haverhill Box Board Company. Eventually the 
company was absorbed by the Robert Gair Company, 
since which change Mr. Morrison has been sales manager 
of the Haverhill branch of the corporation. 

Mr. Morrison takes a keen interest in all civic sub- 
jects, but he does not enter into public affairs, having 
little time to spare from his business responsibilities, 
but fraternally he is identified with local lodges of the 
Royal Arcanum and Modern Woodmen orders. Relig- 
iously he belongs to the Congregational denomination, 
and is a member of the First Church of Christ (Scien- 
tist), of Bradford, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Morrison married, in 1894, Jennie Crane, daugh- 
ter of John T. and Mary E. (Little) Crane, a New Jer- 
sey family, and to them have been born two children : 
Theodore C, and William C. Theodore C. is a veteran 
of the World War; he enlisted November 26, 1917, in 
the Quartermaster's Department, and was sent to Camp 
Johnson, Jacksonville, Florida. Eventually he was 
transferred to Camp Humphrey, Accotink, Virginia, and 
from there went to France, serving six months there. 
He returned as a casual, and was sent to the Walter 
Reed Hospital on February 2, 1919. He was discharged 
from the hospital on April 7th, and three days later 
honorably discharged from the United States army. 



JAMES M. QUIMBY— Identified with the great 
shoe industry through the manufacture of shoe findings 
of every description, James M. Quimby is conducting a 
large and prosperous business in this branch of manu- 
facture. 

Mr. Quimby is a son of James Fred Quimby, who 
was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, and was one of 
the early settlers of Lawrence. He was for 9 consid- 
erable length of time employed by M. J. Mahoney, a 
prominent undertaker of that day. He married Cora 
Levine, a member of one of the oldest families in 
Lawrence. 

James M. Quimby was born in Lawrence on Febru- 
ary 25, 1891, and received his education in the public 
schools of the city. After completing his studies he was 
engaged in the coal business with his father for about 
four years. In 1916 he went into the shoe business, and 
in 1920 established the present industry, disposing of 
his product both at wholesale and retail. The business 
has made a most promising beginning, and is already 
flourishing and rapidly growing. 

Mr. Quimby is a member of the New England Shoe 
Finding Association, and of the Greater Boston Shoe 
Finding Association. Fraternally he is prominent as a 
member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal 
Order of Moose, both of Haverhill. 

On June 21, 1916, Mr. Quimby married, in Lawrence, 
May Humphrey, of this city, and they have two sons : 
James Monroe; and Francis Joseph. The family reside 
in Lawrence. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



441 



WILLIAM F. BLEYER, president and treasurer of 
the Seventh Avenue Garage, Inc., of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, is a man of wide knowledge of mechanics and 
electrical appliances, having been for many years con- 
nected with the leading American manufacturers in that 
line. He was born in Germany, on December 13, 1886, 
son of Theo. and Sophie (Whitfield) Bleyer, both of 
German birth, where the 'former died in 1916. 

The academic education of William F. Bleyer was 
obtained in institutions of Germany. Coming to Amer- 
ica in 1900, he took a course in a technical college, and 
afterwards entered the employ of the Edison Company, 
of East Orange, New Jersey, with which well known 
company he remained for two years, next becoming 
connected with the Westinghouse Company, and work- 
ing at their Newark. New Jersey, plant. Later he was 
with the Westinghouse Air Spring Company, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, and was sent by the Westinghouse 
Company to open a branch plant in Boston. This was 
in 1913, and Mr. Bleyer was appointed superintendent 
of equipment there. Here he remained until 1918, when 
he came to Haverhill, and established the Seventh Ave- 
nue Garage, Inc., of which he is now principal owner. 
His business address is No. 9 Seventh avenue, and 
there Mr. Bleyer has, during the period since 1918, 
developed an appreciable business. 

Mr. Bleyer is among the active business men of 
Haverhill, is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce ; and is identified with the local body of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Bleyer married, in 1909, Anne Spreen, of New 
York City, daughter of Fred and Katharine (Katthn- 
horn) Spreen, both of German birth, the former a 
wagon manufacturer by trade. Mr. and Mrs. Bleyer 
have two children: Elsie Louise, born in 1914; and 
Dorothy Anne, born in 1919. 



HOWARD J. CASHMAN, a native of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, and now in successful business there, 
was born on May 2, 1894, son of John and Margaret 
Cashman, well known residents. He was educated in 
the public schools of Haverhill, and took the higher 
course at the Iberville Preparatory School. That ended 
his schooling, and he entered actively into business 
affairs. For five years he worked for Lewis Kelleam, 
a contractor of Haverhill, leaving his employ at the end 
01 that time so that he might enter into a like business 
for himself. From that time until 1917 Mr. Cashman 
traded as the Howard J. Cashman Company, in a team- 
ing and contracting business. In 191 7 he became the 
distributor of the Exide battery in Haverhill and vici- 
nity, and since, has found the demands of that business 
and certain real estate endeavors have taken all his 
time. He is a man of distinctive energy, and is making 
good. He has many friends in Haverhill. 

Mr, Cashman is a member of the Haverhill Chamber 
of Commerce, belongs to the Agawam Club, and is 
affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, local branch. 
He is a devout Catholic, a member of St. James' Cath- 
olic Church of Haverhill. 

Mr. Cashman married, in 1916, Alice Bouchard, of 
Haverhill, and to them one child has been born, a son, 
Howard J., Jr., who was born on March 30, 1918. 



RALPH EVERETT DANIELS, owner of the In- 
dividual Family Laundry, which it is stated is the 
largest business of its kind in the Bradford-Haverhill 
district, is a native of Haverhill, Massachusetts, born in 
the city on February 7, 1890, son of George H. and 
Susan A. (Billings) Daniels, the latter originally of 
Saco, Maine, and the father of West Newbury. The 
family has lived for several decades in Haverhill. 

Ralph E. Daniels, in due course, attended the Haver- 
hill public schools, and after closing his schooling, began 
business life by working for G. H. Thurston, who was 
his employer for three years, after which young Daniels 
took up railroading, becoming a fireman on the Boston 
& Maine railroad, .'\fter ten years at such work, in 
April, 1919, he joined Mrs. Smith in purchasing the 
laundry business of Laing & Westcott, of Bradford, 
Massachusetts. The reorganization brought a change 
of trading name, and since April. 1919, the business has 
been known as the Individual Family Laundry. It is 
the largest in the Haverhill-Bradford district, as may 
be imagined when it is known that twenty-five to thirty 
persons find constant employment in the laundry, which 
is located at No. 38 Middlesex avenue, Bradford, Mas- 
sachusetts. The plant uses about 10.000 square feet of 
floor space, and its business covers Haverhill and Brad- 
ford and tributary territory. Mr. Daniels belongs to the 
Masonic order, and also to the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers and Firemen. 

Mr. Daniels married, in 191 1, Elma L. Deacon, of 
Rockwell, Connecticut, and they have two children : 
Ralph E., Jr., born in 1913; and Norman K., born in 
1 91 6. 



LOUIS D. SAVAGE was born at Boxford, Massa- 
chusetts, on July 17, 1859, and is a son of William J. 
and Elizabeth D. (Pingree) Savage. William J. Sav- 
age was a farmer, born at Boxford, Massachusetts ; he 
died in 1915. His mother, Elizabeth D. (Pingree) 
Savage, was a descendant of the well-known Pingree 
family of Massachusetts ; she was born at Haverhill, 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. Savage received his early education in the public 
schools of Newburyport. After his graduation from 
school, Mr. Savage decided to follow in his father's 
footsteps and become a farmer. He w^orked as a farmer 
in Massachusetts for some years, and then decided to go 
out West. He traveled through many Western States, 
working as a rancher at various places. He spent five 
years in this manner and then, his desire to see his 
native country being satisfied, he returned to Massachu- 
setts and became connected with the Danvers Hospital. 
Later he obtained a government position at the Ipswich 
House of Correction. In 1887 he came to Haverhill as 
superintendent of the City Farm, a position which he 
still holds. 

Mr. Savage married Margaret A. Pearson, of Prince 
Edward Island, in 1882, a daughter of Henry Pearson, 
a farmer, of Prince Edward Island, and his wife. Lucy 
(Morrison) Pearson. Henry Pearson died in 1919. 
Like her husband. Mrs. Pearson was a native of Prince 
Edward Island. Mr. and Mrs. Savage have two chil- 
dren. Their son, William W. Savage, was born in 
1887, and is now an engineer on the Boston & Maine 



442 



ESSEX COUNTY 



railroad. Their daughter, Helen Dodge Savage, is now 
the wife of Harold Larkin, of Andover, Massachusetts, 
who is now manager of the Essex Mercantile Agency, 
of Lowell, Lawrence, Andover and Haverhill. 



RAOUL C. LEGAULT was born at Hamilton, On- 
tario, on May 12, 1888, and is a son of James and 
Georgianiia (Therian) Legault. His father, who was a 
Canadian by birth, followed the trade of a carpenter, but 
died when Mr. Legault was only three years old. Mr. 
Legault's mother was born at Milford, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Legault received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools. After completing the second year of the 
high school course, he decided to leave school and 
become a wage earner. He found employment suited to 
his years in various places and, in 1908, when he was 
twenty years old, entered into the service of the Bus- 
field Machinery Company. After four years spent in 
their employment, he left the Busfield Machinery Com- 
pany, and obtaining a position with Witherell & Dob- 
bins, spent three years in the service of that firm. He 
next formed a connection with the Collins Machinery 
Company. After a year spent with them, he associated 
himself with the Singer Machinery Company and worked 
for them until, at the end of a year, he found a better 
opportunity elsewhere. Two years after he left the 
Singer Machinery Company, Mr. Legault established 
himself in business, forming a partnership with Lyman 
Cole and Harry Merrill. Under the firm name of the 
Legault Machinery Company, the partners conduct the 
business of manufacturing machinery. Their factory is 
at No. 221 Esse.x street, Haverhill, Massachusetts. They 
specialize in making machinery for the manufacture of 
wooden heels, and also do acetylene welding. Mr. 
Legault is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

Mr. Legault married Mary E. Flanagan, of Ames- 
btu-y, Massachusetts, in 1915. Mrs. Legault is a daugh- 
ter of John and Mary (Hanley) Flanagan, who were 
both Irish by birth. Her father, John Flanagan, who 
was a carriage painter by trade, died in 1901. Mr. and 
Mrs. Legault have no children. 



JOSEPH DUBfi— The story of the career of Joseph 
Dube is the story of obstacles overcome and fine ambi- 
tions achieved through sheer dint of that wonderful 
pluck which one often reads about in the pages of fiction, 
but rarely encounters in real life. That he has won his 
way to the front ranks in the community in Salem is due 
to the innate force of character of the man who takes 
the difficulties in his way with a certain zest in the effort 
and with an abiding confidence in his own ability to 
overcome whatever might befall. That this confidence 
was not misplaced is shown by the records of things 
done. 

Joseph Dube was born January 11, 1867, at St. Louis, 
Kamowasha, Province of Quebec, Canada, the son of 
Alphonse and Eliza (Pardise) Dube. Here he went to 
school until he was nine years of age, then business life 
began for the boy and he went to work on a farm in 
that region, remaining there until 1881, when he came 
with his father and mother to this country and settled 
in Salem. Massachusetts, later removing to Fall River, 
where the father died in 1883. Three years later Joseph 
Dube began an apprenticeship to the baker's trade at 



Fall River, and subsequently removed to Salem, where 
he became employed by Mr. Bodry, who was the oldest 
French baker in Salem at that time. On February 12, 
1894, Mr. Dube established himself in the bakery busi- 
ness in a small way, and was on the road to success, 
when the great fire in Salem, in 1914, destroyed his 
store, and he was obliged to rebuild and start over 
again. He has enlarged his interests and to-day has 
one of the largest bakeries in tlie State, which is the last 
word in modern improvements. He employs thirty men, 
and has fifteen automobile delivery cars which carry his 
goods to all parts of Essex county. 

In politics Mr. Dube is a Republican, but is no office 
seeker. He affiliates with the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, the Artisans Catholic Order of 
Foresters, and holds membership in the Salem Club. 
In religion he is a Roman Catholic and attends St. 
Joseph's Church of that denomination. 

On June 5, 1893, Mr. Dube married (first) Dorilda 
Devost, of Quebec, who died .August 25, 1912. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Dube were born ten children: Joseph and 
two others, deceased ; Leon, who was sergeant in the 
Quartermaster's Department of the United States army 
during the World War, and is now associated with his 
father in business; Alice; Estelle; Wilfred, who served 
in the United States army during the World War and 
is now associated with his father in business; Ernest- 
ine; Armand; and Alvine. He married (second), Octo- 
ber 22, 1917, Laura E. Dione. 



HUGH TED McGOVERN, owner of one of the 
largest sign painting businesses in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, is a native of Lowell, born there January 25, 
1881, son of Hugh McGovern, of Harwick, Scotland, 
now engaged in the textile industry in Lawrence. His 
mother was Ellen (Langton) McGovern, of Dumfries, 
Scotland, and her death occurred in 1898. The educa- 
tion of Mr. McGovern was obtained in the public schools 
of Lowell, and he subsequently started on his business 
career in one of the textile industries of that city. He 
was employed at this occupation for twelve years, remov- 
ing at the end of this period to Lawrence, and there he 
engaged in the business of sign painting. Mr. McGov- 
ern is now the owner of his own business, employing five 
men, and under the name of The Mack Service, con- 
tracts to paint signs of any description. He has been 
singularly successful in this undertaking, and his busi- 
ness is steadily growing. 

Mr. McGovern married Anna Midgley, born in 1880, 
of Lawrence, and they are the parents of the following 
children: Margaret; Leonard; Helen; Jessie; and Hugh 
McGovern. 



EMILE MERCIER— For thirty-two years a resi- 
dent of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and active in the 
world of industry, Emile Mercier has for the past seven 
years been engaged in the real estate business in this 
city. 

Mr. Mercier was born in Ishpeming, Michigan, on 
February 14, 1873, and is a son of Jean and Alice 
Mercier, both of whom are now deceased. The family 
removing to Gentilly, he there attended the rural schools, 
acquiring an education, which he has made the founda- 
tion of success. Coming to Lawrence in 1889, Mr. 





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BIOGRAPHICAL 



443 



]\Iercicr was employed by various grocers of this city, 
and gained a practical working knowledge of this busi- 
ness. In 1898, becoming associated with his brother, 
Jean B. Mercier, in partnership, they established a 
grocery business, which proved successful, and thrived 
for a number of years. In 1914, however, Emile Mercier 
withdrew from the partnership to take up another busi- 
ness. Entering the real estate field, and taking up, 
also, insurance in its various branches, Mr. Mercier has 
built up a broadly comprehensive business in all kinds 
of real estate and the many forms of insurance wliich 
are to-day a part of business economics. His offices are 
located at No. 172 Broadway, in Lawrence. 

Mr. Mercier is a member of the Lawrence Chamber of 
Commerce, and is interested in all the progress of the 
day. Fraternally he is prominent, being a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge 
No. 65; the Knights of Columbus: the Catholic Order 
of Foresters : ajid also several other Catholic societies 
of French origin and membership. He is a member of 
the Church of the Sacred Heart. 

On August 14, 1900, Mr. Mercier married Lucy Caron, 
of Lawrence, and they reside at No. 4 Winthrop ave- 
nue. Mr. Mercier has two brothers and one sister, also 
residing in Lawrence : Jean B., Achille, and Antoinette. 



JAMES C. FINNEGAN— With broad experience in 
various interests, and now rapidly going forward to a 
leading position as an undertaker, James C. Finnegan, 
of the firm of Finnegan Brothers, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, is making a place for himself in the business 
world of the city. 

Mr. Finnegan was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
on May 10, 1882, and is a son of Michael and Mary 
(McDonough) Finnegan. Michael Finnegan was born 
in County Monaghan, and came to America as a young 
man. He accepted a position as coachman for General 
Sutton, of North Andover, but later went into the 
butcher business in Lawrence, being one of the first 
Irish butchers there. He has been retired some years. 
In politics he is a Democrat; he was overseer of the 
poor for twelve consecutive years. 

James C. Finnegan received his education in the 
parochial and public schools of Lawrence, then, at the 
age of nineteen years, entered the United States army. 
He was stationed at various forts throughout the coun- 
try, starting as trumpeter, and later becoming drum 
major, also serving for several years in the Philippines, 
his period of service covering, altogether, nine years. 
He received an honorable discharge September 26, 1910, 
at .\ngel Island, California. 

In 1910 Mr. Finnegan returned to Lawrence and en- 
tered the employ of an uncle who was engaged in the 
meat business. He did not, however, wish to continue 
in this line permanently and May i, 1920, purchased the 
present business, in association with his brother John. 
The Messrs. Finnegan are licensed embalmers, and are 
conducting a prosperous business as funeral directors 
and undertakers, Mr. Finnegan having received his 
training at the Massachusetts College of Embalming. 
They have a handsome place, equipped in the most 
modern manner, and with complete motor equipment. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Finnegan is prominent. He 
is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 



Elks, Lawrence Lodge, No. 65 ; of the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, Aerie No. 216; of the Knights of Columbus, 
Council No. 67; of Division No. 15, Ancient Order of 
Hibernians; and Friends of Irish Freedom. He is a 
member of the Church of the Immaculate Conception. 
On November 17, 1912, Mr. Finnegan married Cath- 
erine Maguire, daughter of Patrick Maguire, of Law- 
rence, and they have one child, Agnes Louise. They 
reside at No. 103 Trenton street. 



MICHAEL CARROLL— For many years a resi- 
dent of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and for the past four- 
teen years identified with the business world of this 
city as a broker in real estate, insurance, loans and 
mortgages, Michael Carroll has borne a constructive 
part in its progress. 

Mr. Carroll was born in Ontario, Canada, on April 
12, 1855, and attended the public schools of Ontario, 
and also the parochial schools, later removing with his 
parents to Ypsilanti, Michigan, and completing his 
studies in the schools of that city. He entered the 
industrial world in the paper mills, and spent thirty 
years in the manufacture of paper, coming to Lawrence 
in 1875. 

Since 1907 Mr. Carroll has been actively engaged in 
his present business here in Lawrence, under the name 
of M. Carroll & Son. His business is not confined to 
the city alone, but reaches out into many of the sur- 
rounding towns, covering a wide territory. Mr. Car- 
roll is a power in this field, and his business is con- 
stantly increasing. 

In 1880 Mr. Carroll married Mary J. McCauley, of 
Ypsilanti, Michigan, and they are the parents of six 
children: John Francis, who died in 1917; Elizabeth 
M.: Edith E. ; Joseph E., who served in the World 
War, and was a sergeant in the loist Division, Amer- 
ican E.xpeditionary Forces ; William P., who was ser- 
geant major with the 38th Infantry, "The Rock of the 
Marne Regiment ;" and Charles M., who served in the 
United States navy. The family residence is at No. 38 
Custer street, and they attend St. Lawrence Roman 
Catholic Church. 



CHARLES ALBERT RICHARDSON, of the elec- 
trical supply firm of Johnson & Richardson, Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, was born in Methuen, same State, June 
30, 1865, son of Henry C. and Mary P. (Frye) Rich- 
ardson, the former originally of Manchester, New 
Hampshire, and the latter of a Bradford, Massachusetts, 
family; she died in 1901, but her husband lived until 
1918, reaching the venerable age of seventy-seven years. 
He was a veteran of the Civil War, serving first with 
the First Heavy Artillery of Massachusetts, and an- 
other war enlistment in the Massachusetts Infantry. 
He was honorably discharged in the grade of sergeant. 
Later in life he was affiliated with the Grand Army of 
the Republic, a member of the Colonel W. B. Green 
Post, No. 100, of Methuen. Massachusetts. He entered 
actively into business, and was identified with the felt 
and rubber business almost to the year of his death. 

Charles A. Richardson, son of Henry C. Richardson, 
received elementary education in the public schools of 
Methuen, Massachusetts, and later at Haverhill, .\fter 
leaving school he was for about a year in the employ of 



444 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the Methuen Woolen Company. His subsequent busi- 
ness career was destined to be a varied one. For tive 
years after leaving his first employers he worked in a 
shoe factory; ne.xt, for a similar period, he was in the 
felt-boot business, after which for five years he was 
in the carriage and harness trade. Then followed more 
than a generation of service to railway companies ; for 
seven years he was in the employ of the Haverhill and 
Amesbury Railroad Company, and for nineteen years 
he served the Bay State Railroad Company, leaving that 
company in order to enter into business for himself, or 
rather in association with another, Lloyd Johnson 
(q. v.), of Haverhill. They have a good ignition and 
battery business on White street, and have good 
prospects. 

Mr. Richardson is a member of the Masonic order, 
and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Haverhill. He is a Congregationalist, a member of the 
Haverliill church of that denomination. 

Mr. Richardson married, in 1907, Mabel Croome, of 
Brantford, Canada. Their home is at No. 19 Concord 
street, Haverhill. 



AMOS MARSTON SPURR— Conducting a large 
and constantly widening business on the factory-to-con- 
sumer plan, the Shu-Fix Shop, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, of which Amos Marston Spurr is one of the 
active managers, produces men's shoes for their own 
retail trade, exclusively. 

Mr. Spurr comes of a family of shoe workers. He is 
a son of John M. Spurr, who was born in Nova Scotia, 
and came to Methuen, Massachusetts, about 1832. John 
M. Spurr followed shoemaking throughout his lifetime, 
having learned the trade from his father. He remained 
in Essex county, and married Sarah Jane Lowell. 

Amos Marston Spurr was born in Methuen, June 4, 
1855. He received a limited but practical education in 
the public schools of that town, then when only twelve 
years of age began to learn the shoemaker's trade from 
his grandfather. When fifteen years of age he entered 
one of the shoe factories of Lawrence, and from that 
time on was identified with the larger factories, rising 
from one position to another of greater responsibility, 
until he became superintendent of the Alfred Kimball 
Shoe Company's plant, which office he ably filled for a 
period of twenty-nine years. In 1908, in association 
with R. J. Fleming, of Lawrence, Mr. Spurr took up 
the active management of the Shu-Fix Shop, located at 
No. 150 Broadway, under the firm name of Fleming 
& Spurr. This business was established in igo6 by Mr. 
Fleming, the shop then being equipped with modern ma- 
chinery for repair work. Upon Mr. Spurr's coming into 
the firm the scope of the plant was greatly broadened, 
and since that time the company has manufactured 
shoes to be sold at retail on the premises, confining their 
product to shoes for men. They have a very complete 
and entirely modern equipment, and employ fourteen 
skilled men in the manufacturing and repair depart- 
ments. Mr. Spurr is a member of William B. Gale 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of Lawrence, and attends 
the Wood Memorial Church. 

Mr. Spurr married, in 1878, in Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, Esther M. Ayer, of Salem, New Hampshire, and 



tliey have one son living, Elbert A., who is associated 
with his father in business as assistant manager of the 
Shu-Fix Shop; he married Mabel Searls, and they have 
three children : Clarence, Gwendolin, and Marston. 
F.lbert A. Spurr and his family attend the Universalist 
church of Haverhill, and reside at No. 43 Brockton 
avenue. Another son, Clarence M., was drowned at the 
age of fourteen years, in the Merrimack river. The 
family home of Amos M. Spurr is at No. 521 Andover 
street, Lawrence. 



ARTHUR BEAUCAGE, for many years identified 
v.'ith the business and political world, has long been a 
resident of Essex county, Massachusetts, and active in 
Its progress. 

Mr. Beaucage was born in Sorel, Province of Que- 
bec, Canada, on October 22, 1871. Receiving his early 
education in the schools of his native town, he took a 
four years' course in pharmacy at the Montreal College 
of Pharmacy, after which he came to Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts. Here he was employed by a drug concern for 
a period of five years. In 1900 he entered the insur- 
ance business in Lowell, as agent for the John Hancock 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, and was thus engaged 
for five years. He then became associated with the Bos- 
ton Mutual Life Insurance Company, as assistant super- 
intendent at their Lowell office, then later as general 
manager at Webster and Southbridge, Massachusetts. 

Following these activities Mr. Beaucage became inter- 
ested in journalism, first as city editor, and later as 
editor of "L'Etoile," the well-known French daily pub- 
lished in Lowell. Thereafter he went to Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, as editor-in-chief of "Le Courrier," a daily 
newspaper published simultaneously in Lawrence, Salem 
and Lynn. He is also interested in "Le Courrier de 
Lawrence," of which Herigault Pelletier is editor, as 
manager of the subscription department. 

Mr. Beaucage is a member of the Lawrence Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and is a member of numerous fra- 
ternal and social organizations, including the Union St. 
Jean de Baptiste of America, the Artisans Canadiens 
Francais, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic 
Fraternal League, of Boston, and the Franco-American 
Order. He is also a member of the Franco-American 
Republican Club, of Boston. By political affiliation a 
Republican, Mr. Beaucage is broadly interested in civic, 
social and political affairs, and in the interests of public 
welfare and reform along all these lines he has made 
many public addresses throughout New England in the 
past twenty-five years. 

Mr. Beaucage married, July 29, 1903, in Lowell, Eleo- 
nore Coutu, of that city, and they have six children. 



HARRY W. TWOMBLY was born at Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, on December 3, 1885, and is a son of 
Charles A. and Alice G. (Lear) Twombly. His mother 
and father were born at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 
His father, who was a funeral director, died in 1913. 

Mr. Twombly received his early education in the 
public schools of Haverhill, and was a member of the 
class of 1905 in the high school. After his school days 
were over, Mr. Twombly enlisted in the Medical and 
Hospital Corps of the United States army, in which he 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



445 



served during the years 1901 to 1904. He was on 
board the U. S. S. "Hartford" during her cruise of the 
Mediterranean. 

Mr. Twombly began his business career by accepting 
a position with the National Casket Company of Boston. 
This connection lasted for a year, at the end of which 
Mr. Twombly associated himself with C. J. Rhode- 
strand, of Springfield, Massachusetts. Still later, he 
became connected with John Corbin, of Burlington, 
Vermont. When his connection with Mr. Corbin came 
to an end, Mr. Twombly spent two years in study at the 
State Hospital. More fully equipped than ever for 
work of a professional nature, Mr. Twombly became a 
private nurse. He is a graduate of the Volke, Reed 
Hospital of Washington, D. C. In September, 1919, in 
partnership with Mr. Boland, he established the firm of 
Twombly & Boland, funeral directors, with offices at 
No. 89 Main street, Bradford, Massachusetts, where he 
still remains. Mr. Twombly is a Catholic, and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus. 

Mr. Twombly married ISIary B. Reynolds, of Ded- 
ham, Massachusetts, in 1913. Mrs. Twombly is a 
daughter of Owen J. and Alice (Powderley) Reynolds. 
Her father, who is a public official of Dedham, Massa- 
chusetts, was born in Ireland; her mother was born at 
South Acton, Massachusetts. 



member of St. James' Church, and of the American 
Legion, being a veteran of the World War. 

Mr. Wills married Ruth Sprague, of Providence, 
Rhode Island, in 1920. Mrs. Wills is a daughter of 
Arthur and Annie Little, of Vermont, her father the 
overseer of the Oswoco Mill. 



BERTRAM R. WILLS was born at Somerville, 
Massachusetts, on July 8, 1896, and is a son of Albert 
James and Katherine (Burns) Wills. His father, who 
was born at Lewiston, Maine, is the president of the 
Wills Motor Company, of Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Wills' mother was born at Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Mr. Wills received his early education in the public 
schools of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and later completed 
a full course of study at Cann's Commercial College. 
After leaving school he spent a year working at the 
Common Street Garage, at Lawrence, and then went to 
Detroit, Michigan, where he spent a year in the Hudson 
factory and acquired a great deal of practical experi- 
ence in regard to manufacturing methods in the auto- 
mobile industry. At the end of this period he returned 
to Massachusetts and entered the service of the Wills 
Motor Car Company, of which his father is president. 
He remained at Lawrence until the LTnited States entered 
the World War, when he enlisted in the United States 
navy, on April 15, 191 7. 

After his enlistment in the United States navy, Mr. 
Wills was sent, first, to Newport, Rhode Island, and 
thence to the Boston Receiving Station. From Boston 
he was transferred to Norfolk, Virginia, and later 
assigned to the U. S. S. "Michigan." From the "Mich- 
igan" he was transferred to Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire, next serving on the U. S. S. "Lake Gasper," pro- 
ceeding to Cardiff, Wales, and later, to Brest, France. 
He was then transferred to the U. S. S. "Imperator," 
and discharged at Hingham, Massachusetts, on October 
I, 1919, with the rank of fireman. 

After receiving his discharge from the United States 
navy, Mr. Wills entered the firm of which his father 
IS president, becoming vice-president This firm, the 
Wills Motor Car Company, has its offices at No. 513 
River street, Haverhill, Massachusetts. Mr. Wills is a 



CORNELIUS A. DONOVAN, of the firm of Foley, 
Donovan & Chadwick Company, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, is one of the leading business men of that city, 
and was born there January 9, 1887, son of John J. 
Donovan, also of Lawrence, who died there in iSgi, 
and Sarah G. (Blake) Donovan, a native of Boston, now 
residing in Lawrence. Mr. Donovan was educated in 
the public schools of Lawrence, and after leaving the 
high school, went to work in the Arlington Mills, and 
after a year there, resigned to work for the Sullivan 
Furniture Company of Lawrence. Mr. Donovan spent 
seven years in the employ of this firm and during these 
years diligently applied himself to the mastering of the 
business in all its details with the result that he was in 
a position to engage in a similar line of business on his 
own account as a member of the firm above mentioned. 
This firm is now one of the established business houses 
of Lawrence, and the members of the firm are among 
the foremost citizens there. Mr. Donovan is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and although not a seeker for public 
office of any kind, does take a keen interest in matters 
of public welfare, as is natural with every good citizen. 
He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and attends St. Patrick's Roman Cath- 
olic Church of Lawrence. 



JOSEPH O'DONNELL, undertaker and livery 
owner, and now a selectman of Amesbury, Massachu- 
setts, has been connected with that town for almost 
thirty years. He was born on Prince Edward Island, 
Canada, on May 10, 1871, son of Anthony and Ann 
(O'Keefe) O'Donnell, the former of Irish birth, and 
the latter born in Newfoundland, of Irish parents. In 
America, Anthony O'Donnell engaged in farming until 
his death. 

Joseph O'Donnell attended the schools of Prince 
Edward Island, and until he was nineteen years old 
stayed at home, assisting his father in farming work. 
He then came to Amesbury, Massachusetts, and there 
found employment with the Riddle & Smart Company, 
which firm he served for about two years. Several 
more years passed in the service of various firms in 
Amesbury, and for a couple of years he was in Boston, 
working in that city for D. P. Nichols, carriage builder. 
However, he returned to Amesbury, and there, in 1900, 
became associated with his brother, D. P. O'Donnell, 
who owned a livery and undertaking business, the for- 
mer known as the American House Stable Company. 
The brothers were in partnership only a year before 
the death of D. P., and Joseph then took over the 
whole business, which he has successfully conducted 
ever since. In 1901, in order to give expert service in 
undertaking, Joseph O'Donnell attended the Massachu- 
setts College of Embalming, and was graduated eventu- 
ally therefrom. 

Mr. O'Donnell is a public-spirited citizen. He is a 
member and director of the Amesbury Chamber of 



446 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Commerce ; was a member of the Volunteer Fire 
Department; in 1915 was elected to the Board of Health 
of Amesbury, serving four years, and is now in his 
second term ; was elected selectman of the town of 
Amesbury in 1921-22, and reelected in 1921 ; and in 
many other ways has given clear indication that he 
does not shirk public work. He belongs to many fra- 
ternal organizations, including the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
the xAmesbury Council of the Knights of Columbus, the 
Amesbury Aerie of Eagles, and the Amesbury Veteran 
Firemen's Association. Politically he is a Democrat. 
He is a devout Catholic, member of St. Joseph's Cath- 
olic Church, of Amesbury. He is also superintendent of 
St. Joseph's Catholic Cemetery. 

Mr. O'Donnell married, in 1904, Julia T. Rooney, who 
was born in Amesbury, Massachusetts, on October 21, 
1873. They have two children : Francis A., born July 
?9, 190S ; and Joseph P., born April 29, 1907. 



JOSEPH CAMIRE, as head of the Camire Welding 
Company, of Lawrence. Massachusetts, is building suc- 
cess from one of the necessary branches of industry, 
making it his specialty. 

Mr. Camire was born in Canada, on February 2, 1892, 
but came to the United States with his parents when 
three years of age, locating in Maine, where he became 
a loyal citizen of the United States; he was educated 
in the parochial schools of San ford, Maine. Always 
interested in machinery, when he came to an age to go 
out into the world for himself, he followed this natural 
bent. He learned acetylene welding, and for the past 
twelve years has followed that line of work exclusively, 
for eight years in New York City, for one year in Port- 
land, Maine, and thereafter in Lawrence, where he is 
now well established in an independent business. Mr. 
Camire came to Lawrence in 1918, and was first employed 
here by John P. Ryan, Jr., whose business he purchased 
on June 27, 1919. He now has a complete welding room 
and machine shop, well equipped with the most modern 
facilities, and employs from three to seven men at dif- 
ferent times. His business location is an excellent one, 
on the corner of Lawrence and Canal streets. 

In 1918 Mr. Camire enlisted for service in the World 
War. He was stationed at Fort Hamilton, New York, 
in the Coast Artillery, but was discharged before the 
end of the year on account of disability. Mr. Camire 
is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 

Mr. Camire married, on August 25, 1920, Merilda 
Dube, of Lawrence. They reside at No. 191 Park 
street, and attend St. Ann's Roman Catholic Church. 
They have two children: Rita and Hubert. 



WILLIAM H. CALLAHAN, inspector of build- 
ings and superintendent of public property in Law- 
rence. Massachusetts, was born in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, on April 9, 1872, son of William and Bridget 
(Gair) Callahan. His parents were of County Cork, 
Ireland, and his father, who was a mason, died in 1872. 
His mother lived a widowhood of forty-four years, 
her death not occurring until 1916. They had four 
children, William H. being the third-born. Much of 
his boyhood can not have been spent in Boston, for the 



whole of his schooling was obtained in Lawrence 
schools. After leaving school he found employment 
with E. A. Peabody & Sons, masons, and was con- 
nected with them for fifteen years thereafter. Then 
followed three years spent in New York City, where he 
worked as a mason, but he returned to Lawrence then, 
and since has been in business for himself as a mason 
contractor. Among the notable structures built by Mr. 
Callahan in the Lawrence district are the John Breen 
School, the County Training School, the Jersey Ice 
Cream building, the E. W. Dillon building, and St. 
Joseph's School; also the comfort station on Lawrence 
Common. Mr. Callahan was superintendent for W. N. 
Pike & Sons, and superintendent of the municipal garage 
construction. In 192 1 he was appointed to civic office, 
being made inspector of buildings and superintendent of 
public property. 

Mr. Callahan is a veteran of the Spanish-.^merican 
War. He saw service in Cuba with the Eighth Massa- 
chusetts Regiment, being a member of Company L. He 
now belongs to the Spanish War Veterans, to the 
Masons' Union, and to the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 
He also is past president and treasurer of Bricklayers' 
Union No. 10, of Lawrence. 

During his long connection with the city of Lawrence, 
he has at times shown a very active interest in civic 
affairs. For two years he was an alderman (1910-11) ; 
has served on several civic committees; and is an over- 
seer of the poor. He is a member of the St. Laurence 
Catholic Church, and of the Knights of Columbus. Mr. 
Callahan is very fond of sports; he was champion light- 
weight wrestler of New England, and also held swim- 
ming championships. 

Mr. Callahan married, in 1894, Margaret Hoye, of 
Lawrence, daughter of Laurence Hoye, a carpenter, 
who died in 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Callahan have three 
children: William, Jr., born in 1895; Esther, born in 
1901 ; and Joseph, born in 1913. 



CHARLES A. O'CONNOR, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, was born in that city, March 3, 1881, son of 
Patrick O'Connor, born in 1847, in County Waterford, 
Ireland. He was a thorough horseman, which occupa- 
tion he followed in America until a few years before his 
death in December, 1920. Patrick O'Connor married 
Bridget Duffy, a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, and 
she died in 1907. Their son was educated in the paro- 
chial school and St. Mary's High School, at Lawrence, 
and soon afterwards started to work for William H. 
Abbott, owner of one of the oldest sign painting busi- 
nesses in Lawrence, being founded by Mr. Abbott at 
the close of the Civil War in 1867. In 1907 Mr. O'Con- 
nor purchased a half-interest in Mr. Abbott's business, 
and this partnership was carried on for five years, 
terminating with the death of Mr. Abbott. At this time 
Mr. O'Connor purchased the remaining interest, and at 
the same time changed the firm name to Charles A. 
O'Connor, Signs, continuing to the present time. He 
makes a specialty of painting commercial signs, and 
employs on an average of four men. 

Mr. O'Connor is a member of the local Painters' 
Union, and fraternally he affiliates with the Knights of 
Columbus. 

Mr. O'Connor married, June 20, 1906, Jennie Calnan, 




MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH CAMIRE 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



447 



of Lawrence, and she died in 1914. Their children 
are: Joseph, Charles, and John. The family attend 
St. Augustine's Catholic Church of Lawrence. 



ALEX H. CARLSON— A progressive business man 
and leading citizen of Methuen, Massachusetts, Alex H. 
Carlson is a native of Stockholm, Sweden, where he 
was born December 9, 1872, and attended school. He 
was a young man of twenty years when he came to 
.America, first settling at Lowell, Massachusetts, and 
there served his apprenticeship in stone cutting and 
monument work, which occupation he followed as a 
journeyman for several years. 

In 1898 he removed to Lawrence, and there was 
employed in the granite and monumental works of W. 
Jones, continuing until igog, in which year he pur- 
chased the business known as the Oakland Granite Com- 
pany, in partnership with Lawrence Collins. This ar- 
rangement, carried on for ten successful years, termi- 
nated in 1919 by the death of Mr. Collins, and in the 
same year Mr. Carlson purchased the former's interests 
and has since continued in business alone. 

Mr. Carlson engages in both monumental and build- 
ing construction, and is skilled in these lines. Many 
of the important building contracts in Lawrence have 
been awarded him in the past years, and in the making 
of monuments he has acquired a high skill of work- 
manship, carrying satisfaction to those whose orders 
he executes. He is a member of Kearsarge Lodge, No. 
129. Knights of Pythias; and of the Congregational 
church of Methuen. 

Mr. Carlson married, in 1900, at Lawrence, Cecelia 
Hanson, and they are the parents of a son, Arthur 
Lawrence Carlson, born April 8, 1901. The family 
reside at No. 12 Union street, Methuen. 



GEORGE E. MORE'y, a successful merchant of 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, was born there June 17, 
1883, son of Captain Christopher Morey. His father 
was a mariner and successfully followed this occupa- 
tion for many years. 

George E. Morey was educated in the public schools 
of his native town, and at the age of fourteen years 
began to learn the butcher's trade, and for several years 
was engaged in this work. He then became a clerk for 
E. P. Stickney, and subsequently was in the employ of 
P. B. Curtis and W. J. Clancy, respectively. After 
eleven years in the service of Mr. Clancy, Mr. Morey 
purchased the business which he conducts at the pres- 
ent time. 

Mr. Morey married, July 6, 1907, Matilda May Fran- 
coner. Fraternally he is a Mason, and a member of the 
Mystic Shrine. 



LOUIS S. ADAMS, owner of the Louis S. Adams 
Sale Stable, of Georgetown, Massachusetts, is well 
known in that vicinity, having lived there for the 
greater part of his life. He was born in Georgetown, 
Marlboro District, Massachusetts, May 22, 1866. the 
son of Jophanis and Laura (Brucklebank) Adams, both 
originally of Maine. But the family removed to 
Georgetown when Louis S. was still in his infancy, and 
the whole of his schooling was obtained in George- 
town public schools. His father opened a sales and 



livery stable in Georgetown, and after his schooldays 
were finally over, Louis S. became associated with his 
father in the conduct of that business. The father's 
death did not occur until July 5, 1914, but Louis S. 
relieved his father of business cares in 1909, when he 
bought the business, thus permitting his father to retire. 
Since that year the establishment has been known as 
the Louis S. Adams Sale Stable, and is continuing to 
bring in satisfactory revenue. 

There are few men better known in Georgetown than 
Mr. Adams. He is an active member of the local 
Grange, and religiously he is a Baptist, attending the 
Georgetown church of that denomination. 

Mr. Adams was married in 1888 to Carrie E. Cook, 
daughter of John and Louisa (Harding) Cook. The 
former, now deceased, was a farmer and butcher of 
Newburyport and Groveland ; his wife, Louisa (Hard- 
ing) Cook, was originally of Bradford, Massachusetts. 



MEYER SEDERSKY, ex-serviceman and a suc- 
cessful young business man of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
was born in Lowell, same State, November ", 1894, son 
of Harris Sedersky, who is the owner of the garage 
operated by the family. The Sedersky family was 
originally from Russia, but has had several decades of 
American residence. 

Meyer Sedersky was educated in the public schools of 
Boston, Massachusetts, and also the high school, grad- 
uating with the English class of 1913. For some time 
after leaving school Mr. Sedersky seems to have 
intended to follow journalism. He was in newspaper 
work for two years, and at the end of that time went 
into horticultural business. Later, for eighteen months, 
he was with the Auto Tire Exchange Company, of 
Lynn. In 191 7, however, he set aside his personal 
affairs and enlisted in the United States army for serv- 
ice during the World War. He was assigned to New- 
port News, Virginia, and in that busy embarkation 
point, served throughout the war, reaching the rank of 
quartermaster. He was honorably discharged in 
December, 1918, and soon thereafter joined his brother, 
Hyman E., in a business enterprise in Lynn. They 
established the City Hall Tire Company, and opened a 
store at No. 155 Central avenue, Lynn, where from a 
very small line the brothers have developed one of the 
best tire, tube, and accessories businesses in Lynn. The 
company has specialized in vulcanizing, and by close 
attention to business and good workmanship they have 
reached commendable standing in Lynn. 

Meyer Sedersky is a member of the local body of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is becoming 
well known in the business world of Lynn. He is 
unmarried. 



JOHN O'DONNELL. merchant, of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, was born March 12, 1887, in Ireland, 
son of Hugh and Sarah O'Donnell. His education was 
obtained in the public schools of his native home, and 
in 1906 he came to America and followed the trade of 
moulder. Soon after, he located at Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, whence, in 1910, he removed to Newburyport 
and became manager of the O'Keefe Grocery Store, 
continuing in this position for two years. Then two 
years were spent in the livery business, and at the end 



448 



ESSEX COUNTY 



of this time Mr. O'Doniiell purchased the Tarpon Fish 
Market, which he is still the owner of. With true 
progressiveness, Mr. O'Donnell foresaw the possibilities 
of a restaurant of the better kind, where tlie best of 
ocean food could be served fresh, and opened the 
Ocean Grill, one of the finest restaurants in Newbury- 
port. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks ; the Knights of Columbus ; Foresters 
of America; and the Loval Order of Moose. 



JOHN F. NICKET, a native of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, and well known in South Groveland and 
Flaverhill, was born April 2, 1888, the son of John and 
Jane M. (Dudley) Nicket. His mother was born in 
Liverpool, England, but his paternal descent is French- 
Canadian, his father having been born at Three Rivers, 
which was one of the French-Canadian outposts in the 
time of the viceregal French governors. Frontenac and 
Denonville, during the reign of King Louis the 
Magnificent. 

John Nicket. father of John F. Nicket, was a grocer 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts, for many years prior to 
his death in 1902. John F.. as a boy, attended the 
Haverhill public schools, and also for some years went 
to the parochial school. For more than fifteen years 
after leaving school he was in the employ of Chesley & 
Rugg, shoe manufacturers of Haverhill, leaving their 
employ in 1918 to enter the United States army for 
service during the World War. Upon his return to 
civil life he opened a garage for himself in Groveland, 
and later opened a garage, service station, and repair 
shop at No. 2S8 Groveland street, Haverhill ; and not- 
withstanding that his business is only of comparatively 
recent establishment, there is not much doubt that it is 
well established and lucrative. He is enterprising and 
attentive, desirous of giving good service, and he has no 
reason to regret that he went into independent business. 

Mr. Nicket belongs to several fraternal orders, in- 
cluding the Knights of Columbus, the New England 
Order of Protection, and the Loyal Order of Moose. 
He enlisted in the United States army, on September 5, 
1918, with the Motor Transport Corps, and was assigned 
to Holabird, Maryland. He was discharged at Camp 
Holabird, Maryland, on March 5, 1919, receiving a cer- 
tificate of honorable discharge. 

Mr. Nicket was married only a few days before he 
left camp, the marriage being solemnized on September 
2, 1918. His wife was .\gnes J. McCauley, of South 
Groveland, Massachusetts, daughter of Alexander and 
Jennie (Sadler) McCauley, the former of Irish and 
the latter of Scotch birth. Alexander McCauley, who 
is still living, is a mill worker. 



WILLIAM J. HONOHAN, an electrical contractor 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was born there August 3, 
1881, son of John and Bridget (Hall) Honohan. His 
parents were natives of Ireland, the father coming from 
County Cork, and the mother from County Donegal. 
John Honohan came to Lawrence in 1859, where he was 
employed as a stationary engineer. He died in 1896. 

The education of William J. Honohan was obtained 
in the public schools, and subsequently he worked for 
various electrical contractors, with the idea in mind of 



learning the business. By attention to detail and natural 
business acumen, Mr. Honohan was in a position in 
1909 to engage in business for himself. Since that time 
he has had steady progress, and in addition to his con- 
tracts is a retail dealer in all kinds of electrical appli- 
ances. He is a member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. 

Mr. Honohan married, November 23, 1910, Ellen 
McGrath, and they are the parents of a son, Thomas 
Francis, and a daughter, Ellen. Mr. Honohan and his 
family attend St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. 



CHARLES A. JONES— An active business man, 
identified with two 'successful corporations in New- 
buryport, Massachusetts, Mr. Jones is known to very 
many of the business people of that place. He was 
born in Rochester, New Hampshire, June 6, 1S80, son of 
Warren C. and Clara A. (Abbott) Jones. Both parents 
are still living, and his father is still comparatively 
active as a merchant. He was of Lebanon, Maine, but 
his wife was of Rochester, New Hampshire, where 
their son, Charles A., was born. 

Charles A. Jones was educated in the public schools 
of Rochester, and graduated from the high school in 
the class of 1898. Entering business life, he found 
employment with the Rochester Lumber Company, with 
which company he remained for three years. For five 
years, thereafter, he was with L. M. Dyer, of Boston, 
in the wholesale beef business, then, for a while, until 
1913, he was in the retail business. In that year, how- 
ever, he became a restaurant owner in Newburyport, 
and continued to operate that enterprise for two and a 
half years. In 1915, after giving up his restaurant, Mr. 
Jones became manager of the Newburyport Garage 
Company, in Newburyport. He is still connected with 
that business, although it was known as Ingalls' Garage 
in earlier days. The business was established in 1904, 
and in 1905 a company was formed and received a 
charter as the Newburyport Garage Company, Inc. Mr. 
Jones is vice-president of that company, and still takes 
an active part in the business. Mr. Jones formed, in 
1919, in association with Harry Barth and J. Everett 
Frost, an ice company, and it is stated that they are 
the largest ice dealers in the Newburyport district, not- 
withstanding that they have barely been in business two 
years. 

Mr. Jones is a member of the Masonic order, iden- 
tified with all lodges to the Shrine, and he is also a 
member of the Dalton Club. He is a most popular man, 
is progressive and energetic, and in both ice and garage 
enterprises, has given indication that his business suc- 
cess comes by efficient service. Since he has been 
connected with it the garage has been maintained at a 
standard which will compare with the best and most 
modern in the district. 

In 1909 Mr. Jones married Bertha R. Busch, of 
Methuen, Massachusetts, daughter of John A. and Effie 
M. (Patch) Busch, of Rochester, New Hampshire. Mrs. 
Jones' father is a woolen mill's superintendent, and her 
mother was of a Shapley, Maine, family. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jones have no children, but Mr. Jones has two sisters 
and a brotlier, all younger. , 





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/X 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



449 



THOMAS SOMERVILLE, a native of Lanca- 
shire, England, became a resident of North Andover, 
Massachusetts, at an early age, coming here with his 
parents, both natives of England. His father, John 
Somcrville, was also born in Lancashire, as was his 
mother, Rachel (Hardy) Somerville. The former was 
long engaged in business as a blacksmith, and died in 
1907. having survived his v^ife just one year. 

Mr. Somerville attended school in North Andover, 
and then entered the employ of the Dans & Thurber 
Machine Company of that town, where he learned the 
trade of machinist, serving an apprenticeship of three 
years. After leaving this firm he entered the employ of 
the Lawrence Machine Company, remaining for three 
years, then returned to his original employers. After a 
>ear he resigned to enter the employ of the Naumkeag 
Mills at Salem, Massachusetts, and thence he returned 
tc Lawrence, and to the employ of the Washington Mills 
there, remaining from May, 188;. to March, 1906, and at 
the time of leaving he held the position of foreman. In 
the latter year Mr. Somerville accepted a position with 
the Wood Mill Company, as master mechanic, a posi- 
tion he is well fitted for by virtue of his many years of 
experience and his mechanical ingenuity. 

Mr. Somerville is a Republican, and one of the 
leading citizens of Lawrence. He served for three 
years as a member of the Massachusetts State Militia, 
from 1880 to 1883, and was discharged with the rank of 
sergeant. His fraternal afifiliations are with the Ma- 
sonic order; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
lodge and encampment ; the Eastern Star ; Benevolent 
?nd Protective Order of Elks; and the Veterans' Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Somerville married, in 1885, Eliza A. Briggs, a 
native of Lockwood, England, and they are the parents 
of a son, Fred Somerville, born June 2, 1886. The latter 
married Alice Phelan of Lawrence. Mr. Somerville 
uud his wife attend Grace Episcopal Church of 
Lawrence. 



FREDERICK L. WATSON— Following one of 
the branches of production most vital to the public wel- 
fare, Frederick L. Watson, of Essex, Massachusetts, is 
achieving success along agricultural lines. Air. Watson 
was born on Hog Island, Massachusetts, September 15, 
1SS6, and is a son of Frank E. and Clara E. (Low) 
Watson. As a boy Mr. Watson attended the public 
schools of Essex, and laid a practical foundation for 
the future. After l