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Full text of "Municipal and official handbook of the City of Auckland, New Zealand"






■iiii©li«£)K 




V 




THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



GIFT OF 

Charles K. Adams 




ARMORIAL BEARINGS OF THE CITY OF AUCKLAND. 



Description — Arms: Argent, upon Waves ot the Sea a two- 
masted Ship in full Sail proper flagKed Gules, on a chief per 
pale Azure and Gules to the dexter a Cornucopia Or, to the sinis- 
ter a Shovel surmounted by a Pick, in saltire proper. Crest: 
Issuant out of a Mural Crown Or a representation of the Phor- 
mium Tenax flowered proper. Supporters: On either side An 
Apteryx (or Kiwi) proper. 



MUNICIPAL AND OFFICIAL 
HANDBOOK 



01- TUB 



CITY OF AUCKLAND 

NEW ZEALAND. 



Edited by 

JOHN B A R 11 

Ckii'f I.ibruriaii. 



Prepared by Direction oj the 
Auckland Citv Council. 



AL'CKLAND, N.Z.; 
Wilbon & Horton. Printers, Queen anil Wyndham Streets. 

1922. 



DO 



FOREWORD. 

The civic adiniiiistration of Aucklaiul has now made 
70 years of history. They have been years of wonderful 
expansion and i)rogress. The facts and records call 
for wider and more effective publicity than any yet 
given to them. Resident citizens and visitoi's from 
abroad ask for information that has hitherto not been 
available in any convenient form. This Handbook, 
comiiiled by the Chief Librarian under the direction 
of the Council, is intended to meet the need so widely 
felt and expressed. The book will be found to cover 
nearly all the activities and interests of the Coi'poration 
and of other local bodies whose work is connected with 
the City. 

The views of early Auckland i)laced in contrast 
with corresponding ones of recent date are especially 
impressive. They show at a glance how the pioneer 
town has become a modern citj'. 

The compiler's work is ably done ; and it is 
confidently predicted that the book will command wide 
interest and ap{)reciation. 



J. H. GUXSON, 

Mayor. 



Town Hall, Auckland, N.Z. 
May, 1922. 



i G.?4564 



CONTENTS. 

GfMifi'ul Dill a 

Auckland City Cuuin'il . . 

The City Council 

<illior linpni'tant Local Bodies 

liili-iMlui'tni'v : 'J'hc Cily (d' .\U(d<land 

Town Hall 

Town Mall: Tlir (ii'iiaii 

Public Lilu'ai'v. Ai'l (".allcry, and Old 

.Museum 
Parks and Recreation Reserves . . 
Cily Engineer's Department 
\\'alei' Supply 
Elecli'icity 
Tramways 

Electoral Department 
Valuer's Department 
Traffic Department 
Stores Purchasing Department 
Sanitation and Puhlic Health 
Abattoir 
Fish Market 
Finance 

Harbour Board 
Drainage Board 
Fire Board 
Appendices:- — 

A. — Table of Population 

B. — Imports and Exports 

C. — Shipping of the Port 

D. — Shipping Companies and Agents 

E. — Consuls Resident in Auckland 

F. — City Banks 

G. — Chief Trades 

H. — List of Religious Denominations 

I. — Principal Benefactors of the City 
Index 



Colonists' 



Page, 
ix. 
xi. 
xii. 
xiv. 
1 
23 

:u\ 

41 
<VS 
87 
121 
133 
139 
159 
1G3 

no 

175 

177 
187 
193 
19G 
201 
211 
223 

229 
229 
230 
230 
233 
234 
234 
23 G 
238 
2il 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



flcial nf Anns . . 

'J'lic Cily ( iiMiiicil 

llciuis nf Dcpjd'lmi'nls . . 

Aucklancl, IS'iO 

Auckland's Harl)oui- Frontage, 1!>22 

Queen Street in 18 i. "5 . . 

Queen Street in l92-> . . 

Mayors of the City 

Pliotograpli "f Auekl.ind from a Sfai'lJi'i'' ■ ■ 

Town Hall 

The Couneil Cliainiicr: Council in Session . . 

Mayiir's Room; Mayoress's Room 

Town Hall: Reception of H.R.H. the Prince of Wale 

l!>-iO 
Public Lil)i'ary, 1880; Pui)lic Library, to-day 
Central Library: The Reference Department 
Central Library: The Grey and Shaw Collections 
Central Liln'ary: Upper Landing 
Ci'iitral Lilirary: Ctiildren's Room 
Til.' L.'vs Institute 
Hi'.incli Liiu'aries 
Till' New C.albM-y 
'I'Ih' Art CaJli'i'y: General Mew 
Ali)ert Park: General \'ii'w 
Alitert Park 

Albert Park : The Princes Street Border 
Bowen Avenue 
Domain : Cricket Ground 
Domain : Main Drive 
Domain: Ttic Botanic Gardens .. 
Victoria Park 

Myers Pai-k and Kindergarten . . 
Point f^rin Park 
Parnell Park 
City Reserves 
Anzac Avenue; Befnre and After Conipletiou nf Im 

l>rnvenients 



Page. 

Front. 

xiii. 

XV. 



89 



Gillies Avi-nii"- 

Customs Sli t W.sl 

O'Connell Street: t^efuiv uml AftiT Wiii'iiini: 

Grafton Bridiie 

Wailalvere l^cservoir 

.Nitiotupu ;Main) Kaiii 

Niliotupu (Main) I (am 

City Marlvots 

Sticily Beacli and I^irncll Baths . . 

Workers" (^ottagres, Gr<-y l,\iin . . 

Munieipiil Depot 

Aueklands First Water Supply . . 

Western Springs Pumping- Station 

Ponsonl^y Reservoir 

Tlie Waterworks Sliop 

" Venturi " Meter ;uid \alvis 

Service Reservoirs: old and New Typi-s .. 

Pumpinf? Stations: Western Springs and Kliyber 

Electric Power Station: Generatoi's 

Electric Power Station: Switctd)oard .uid Hnj 

Tramway Powei' Statiun: Builcr Hnuse and K 

Room 
Tramway Wnrkslmiis . . 
Tramway Worksimiis: Tln' Macliine Simp and Gi-nei 

Store 
Epsom Tiaiii I )i'|Mi| 
Type of Tiam 
Abattoir: General \ii'w 
Abattoir: Ext'Tini- and Iiiti'i-inr . . 
Fish Curing . . 
A Catch on a Trawler . . 
Plan of Auckland WaliTfn.id 
Auckland. Looking Eastward 
Auckland, from llie Nni-lh Slini'c 
Chairmen of IIm' Au<'kland llarlimii' Bnai'd . . 
Ok.diu Bay 

Builiiing cniitaiiiiti;; Sn nitit--^ Plant . . 

Mechanical Screens 
City Fii'e Station 

Map (if tlo' City nf Aurkhmd . . . . Al Kiid 

\- i i i . 



Pa 






Page. 
91 
91 
9 4 

;>(■, 

99 
100 
102 
10 i 

lOC, 
110 

lie. 
120 
123 
12C. 
127 
127 
129 
i:50 

i:n 
I i;{(; 

1 i i 
140 

li8 
l.-)2 
loi 
180 
189 
194 
194 
202 
204 
204 
200 
212 
219 
221 
22 4 



GENERAL DATA. 

Date of foundation, City of 

Auckland ... ... ... IHth .September, 1840 

Situation : 

Longitude... ... ... East 174^ 4-")' 

Latitude ... ... ... South .36' .")!' 

Climate : 

]\Iean annua! temiieratuio ... 58 degrees Fahr. 
Rainfall (average)... ... 4.3 inches 

Areas : 

City (Municipal boundaries) 7,844 acres 
Greater Auckland... ... 92.. 55 square miles 

Population (1921 census): 

City ... ... ... 81,712 

City and suburbs ... ... 157,757 

Province ... ... ... 369,618 

Commeice : 

Shipping, 1921— Inwards ... 1,800,193 tons 
Outwards... 1,750,844 ,, 

Trade, 1920: 

Exports ... ... ... £9,383,603 

Imports ... ... ... £18,732,032 

Harbour : 

Area ... ... ... 73 square miles 

Water frontage ... ... 194 miles 

Berthing accommodation ... 14,925 feet 

Mileage of City streets ... 184 

Tramways : 

Route miles ... ... 27 



Parks : 

Xuinber of parks within City Boiiiularies... 14 

Acreage of parks within City bi>undaiies ... 522 

Number of parks and reserves beyond 
City boundaries owned by (tr vested in 
the City Corporation ... ... 5 

Acreage of |)arks and reserves beyond 
City boundaries owned by or vested in 
the City Corporation ... ... 7,574 

Haths : 

Nmnber (»f swinniiinii baths ... ... 3 

Libraries : 

Number (if libraiies ... ... ... 6 

Number of volumes in liliraiies ... ... 105,486 

City Fimmces : 

Arwiual revenue, 1920-21 ... ... ... £1,075,840 

Annual ratable value, 1922-23 ... ... £1,591,526 

Vital Statistics. 19-_>i : 

Birth rate per 1.000 ... ... .. 19.41 

Death ,, ,. ,, ... ... ... 10.50 



AUCKLAND CITY COUNCIL. 

The Auckland City Council is the adniinistiative 
executive of the Corporation of the Mayor, Councillors 
and Citizens of the City of Auckland. It was origin- 
ally constituted a Borough in 1851 and was governed 
by various Acts from that date until April 24th, 1871, 
when the City was constituted by a Proclamation of the 
Governor under the " Municipal Corporations Act, 
1867." At the present time it is governed by the 
" Municipal Corporations Act, 1920." The Council 
consists of the Mayor and 21 Councillors, all of whom 
are elected for a period of two years by the electors 
of the City of Auckland. It is the body having the 
control of streets, water supply, drainage and sanita- 
tion, tramways, Hbraries, art gallery, etc., domains, 
parks and reserves, public baths, cemeteries, abattoir 
and markets. 



AUCKLAND CITY COUNCIL. 

MARCH. 1922. 

MAYOR: J. H. GUNSON, ESQ., C.M.G., C.B.E. 

COUNCILLORS: J. A. C. Alluin, H. N. Hatinall, 
(;. Haildon, M. J. Bennett, T. H. Hloodworth, 
F. W . Hiinsden, K. H. Davis, G. Davis, J. Denipsey, 
J. \V. Hardley, 11. 1 ). Heather, W. J. Holdsworth, 
Major (i. R. Hutchinson, O.B.E. : G. Knight, P. M. 
Mackay, E. H. Maguire, E. Melville, J. B. Paterson, 
.1. Kolicrtsoii, M. J. Savage, and J. A. Wariioek. 

COMMITTEES: 

Finance and Legal. 

THE MAYOR and Councillors Alluni, Bennett, H. D. 
Heather (f 7iairma/i), Melville, Robertson, .Savage. 

Works. 

'I'll!-: .MAYOR and Councillors BagnalK Baildon (C/unr- 
nidii), liloodwoith, l^i-insden, Dempsey, Ci. Davis. 

Parks. 

THK MAYOR and Councillors Rrinsden, E. H. Davis, 
Knight, P. M. Mackay, Maguire, ^Val•nock 
C ' lia I riiiti ii). 

Electricity and Tramways. 

THK .MAYOR aii<l ((Kincillois Allum, Bloodworth, 
Dcinp.sty, K. il. Davis, Holdsworth {Chairman), 
Hutchinson. 

Markets. 

Tin: M.\YOH and Councillors Bagnall, Hardley, Knight, 
Pali-rsDii (< ' l,,i i riiiaii), Robertson, Savage. 

xii. 




>,'E 5 Q 






CL — .- 



3 ^^:i-.< 






:: 1- .^ ■ 

•£.2f 
I i- .= 



-Z-.^c 






stores. 

THE MAYOR and Councillors Baildon, Haidloy. 

Hutchinson {ChdiriiKtu), Paterson, Robertson. 

Library. 

THE MAYOR and Councillors Bennett, E. H. Davis, 
}1. 1). Heather, Maguire, Melville {Chairiroi/ian), 
Dr. T. W. Leys, Prof. Segar, Messrs. A. J. Entri- 
can, J. Kenderdine, 0. H. Wilson, H. Shaw. 

Leys Institute. 

Council representatives on Leys Listitute Com- 
mittee are : — 
THE MAYOR and Councillors Bagnall, Bennett, 

Savage, and Mr. J. Trevethick. 



Other Important Local Bodies whose Administrative 
Work is in the City are : — 

Auckland Harbour Board : 
Mr. H. R. Mackenzie, Chairman. 

Auckland Electric Power Board : 
.Mr. W. .7. Holdswoi'th. Chaiiinan. 

Auckland and Suburban Di'ainage Board : 

His Worship the :NLiyor of Auckland, Chairman. 

Auckland Hospital and Charitable Aid Board : 

Mr. William Wallace, Chaiiniaii. 

Auckland Fire Boaid : 

Mr. .T. J. Kingston, Chairman. 

xiv. 










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c - Ji M F S — 

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A ('( 'KLAM) M/'XICI/'AL llASJJJiOOK. 



THE CITY OF AUCKLAND, N.Z. 

FOUNDATION AND SETTLEMENT. 

A little mure than eighty years ago the site of 
the City of Auckland was covered with ti-tree, 
fern and bush. In the year 1840 Captain William 
Hobson, Lieutenant-Governor, selected a site on 
the shores of the Waitemata Harbour as the 
capital of the young colony, and on the 18th 
September of that year a flagstaff was erected 
on Point Britomai't (since demolished) and the 
Union Jack unfurled. This was Auckland's official 
birthday. The seat of govei"nment remained here until 
1865, when it was removed to Wellington. Auckland's 
appearance at that time "was tersely described by the 
late Sir John Logan Campbell, one of Auckland's 
great pioneers. "The capital!" he wrote, "a 
few boats and canoes on the beach, a few tents 
and break-wind huts along the margin of the bay, 
and then — a sea of fern stretching away as far as the 
eye could reach." 

What a transformation has taken place in this 
short period of little more than the normal si)an of 
a man's life. The ti-tree and the fern have given place 
to a city with a population (1921 census) of 81,712 
inhabitants, or, if the suburbs are included, of 157,757. 

The young city did not grow without e.xixMiencing 
difficulties. In the fii'st two decades the Maoris caused 
H 1 



A C ■KLAM) Miyji 'll'AL HAS D BOOK. 

the colonists some concern, and Hone Heke's Rebellion 
in the North (ls4:3-46) and the threatened invasion of 
Auckland by discontented natives, in 185], nuist have 
occasioned no little anxiety to the settlers. The most 
serious ti-ouble with the natives occuri'cd tluiing the 
Maori Wars of the 'sixties, when the City was 
surrounded by hostile natives, and fears were enter- 
tained for its safety. Block houses were erected at 
various points of vantage, and the entire male popula- 
tion was conscripted. Fortunately the tide of war 
swept past the City without doing any damage to life 
or property and without seriously arresting the work 
of the pioneers, who during the first two or three 
decades laid the foundation of the prosperity wh'wh 
the City has since exiierienced. 

GROWTH OF POPULATION. 

In l>i41 the population was estimated to be 1,500 
persons, but by 185b it had reached 6,283, and in 1864 
the inhabitants numbered 12,423. This was rapid 
pi-ogress for so young a city, and was due in a measure 
to the discovery of gold at Coromandel in 1852, which 
brought many colonists to the City. The wai', how- 
ever, seriously affected the City's prosperity, and for 
the next ten years the population remained practically 
stationai-y, the census retui-ns foi- 1874 showing the 
residents to number 12,775. 

The follcjwing decade found the City making rapid 
strides, and by 1886 the population had increased to 
.33,161, due in part to direct immigratimi. but also to the 

4 



ACCKLAM) Mrynil'AI. II A.\ l)li<>(H\. 

HiniiliiiUiiation of adjacent districts. But the profiress 
had been too f2;reat. The advance, wliich liad been 
steady at first, led to specuLation causing a boom, and 
resulted in a slump in the 'nineties, bringing much 
hardship to many. A slow recoveiy followed, and by 
1896 th(> population, which had dropped to 28,613 in 
1891, had increased to 31,424, and by 1900 had reached 
the 1886 figures. From the opening of the Twentieth 
Century, the progress made by the City has been 
marked. In 1901 the population numbered 34,213 ; ten 
years later it was 40,536, and at the last census the 
inhabitants of the City alone totalled 81,712, an 
increase in ten years of more than 100 per cent. The 
very large increase in the City's inhabitants in the 
last decade was again partly attributable to the 
amalgamation of contiguous districts, partly to the 
movement of population from other districts, and in 
a measure to direct immigration. 

COMMERCIAL PROGRESS. 

On the commercial side, the progress is also 
remarkable. In 1853 the exports from the Port of 
Auckland were valued at £148,724, and the imi)orts 
£253,920. In 1861 the exports had shrunk to £57,673, 
while the impoils had inci'eased to £591,168. These 
abnormal figures were due to the wars with the Maoris. 
Ten years later the exports reached beyond the 
million mark, being £1,601,763, as against £937,655 
of imports. The following figures, given in ten-year 



AiCKLAMJ MI'MCIl'AL llASUBOOK. 

iJtM-iods, indicate the development which the commerce 

of the City has undergone : — 

Exports. Imports. 

1881 ... ... £813,113 £1,490,124 

1891 ... ... 1,218,321 1,595,036 

l!i!)l ... ... 1,922,792 3,023,566 

lUil ... ... 3,280,878 5,650,734 

1920 ... ... 9,383,603 18,732,032 

These figures, especially the expoi'ts, show a 
remarkable progress for such a young city. The 
excess of imports over exports is due to the fact that 
New Zealand is pi-imai-ily an agricultuial country and 
is dependent upon the overseas manufacturer for the 
supply of manufactuied goods. 

Auckland's commei-cial position is based ujx)!! its 
natuial advantages by land and sea. It is the centre 
of a large agricultuial district. The primaiy products, 
princii)ally butter, cheese and wool, are shii)ped to the 
woild's maikets ; and its ])oit, which can accommodate 
the largest \essels aHoat, attracts ships from all parts 
of the world. Its situation on the direct line of com- 
munication between the Commonwealth of Australia and 
the Continent of Ani'Mica is excolleni from the mercan- 
tile standpoint. 

THE PORT OF AUCKLAND. 

The INirt's facilities, including elect lie ciancs for 
the speedy discharge of vessels and for tlie liaiidling 
of cargoes, are thoroughly modern. A comprehensive 

■s 



ArCKLAXl) MrXK'lPAL HANDBOOK. 

scheme of Port (levelopiiietit and of concrete whai'ves 
was adopted in Ii)(i4. The scheme is being steadily 
developed, and will cost ove)' .£2,000,000 stei'ling. 

As an indication of the shipping of the Poi't, the 
figures for the year 1021 are given. In that year the 
total number of vessels (overseas and coastal) which 
entered the Port was 5,367, totalling 1,800,193 tons. 
The outward shipping numbered 5,301 vessels, aggregat- 
ing 1,750,844 tons. 

The pi-incijial ovei'seas shipping companies trading 
regularly to the Port are the Union S.S. Company of 
X.Z., the New Zealand Shipping Co., the Commonwealth 
and Dominion Line, the Shaw, Savill and Albion Co., 
the Federal and Shire Line, and the Canadian Govern- 
ment Line. 

The coastal trade is maintained by the Northern 
Steamship Co., whose vessels conduct an extensive trade 
on both the east and west coasts of the North 
Island. 

A TOURIST'S CENTRE. 

The City is also the natural centre for the increasing 
number of world tourists who are attracted to New 
Zealand by its climate and scenery, which I'ange fioin 
the sub-tropical to the sub-antarctic. North of Auck- 
land some of the few remaining kauri forests are to 
be found, and to the south are the weird and wonderful 
Thermal District, with Rotorua as its centre, the 



AUCKLAXD Ml.WIClFAL HAyjJliOOK. 

beautiful scenery of the Waiigaiiui Kiver, the Alpine 
pleasures of the Tongaiiro National Park, and the 
beauties of Mt. Egmont. Connection with the South 
Island, where the fiords and cold lakes attract the 
visitor, is easily made. 

MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT. 

The municipal advancement of the City is also 
interesting. Auckland has the distinction of being the 
first ^lunicipal Coi'poration established in New Zealand 
under the immediate sanction of the Royal Authority. 
The first meeting of the Council was held in November, 
1851, Mr. Archibald Clark being the first Mayor. The 
Borough Council, as the Corporation was then called, 
did not last long, the disallowance in England of the 
" Land Fund Appropriation Act," from which the 
Council had expected to derive its principal revenue, 
causing its termination. The boundaries of the Borough 
were larger than the City's boundaries to-day, and 
covered the whole isthmus from the Waitemata to the 
Manukau, and from the Whau (Cox's) Creek to the 
Tamaki, an area of about 58,000 acres. 

The City's municipal history during the remainder 
of the 'fifties and the 'sixties is not of much importance. 
" An Act to Provide for the Municipal Government of 
the City of Auckland "' was passed by the Provincial 
Council in 1854, but was repealed two years latci-, and 
the powei's contained therein wei'e transfencd to the 
8u{»('iiiitrii(lciit of the Province. Another attempt at 

10 




MAYORS OF THE CITY OF AUCKLAND. 

FiKST Row;— Arch. Clark (1S51-S2); P. A. Philips (1872-74); II. II. I.saacs (187-n: 

F. L. Prime (IS74-75): B. Tonks (1875-7h). 
Second Row:— W. J. Hurst (1876-77): H. Brett (1877-78): T. Peacock (1878-80): 

J. .\1. C;iark (1880-83); W. R. Waddel (1883-86). 
Third Row:— A. E. T. Devore (1886-89); I. II. Lpton (1889-91); J. II. Giinson, 

C..M.G., C.B.E. (1915—); W. Crowther (1891-93); I. I. Holland (1893-96). 
Fourth Row:— A. Boardman (1896-97); P. Dignan (1897-98); D. Goldie 

(1898-1901); Sir J. l.ojian Campbell (loni); Alf. Kidd (I901-0n. 
Fifth Row;— Hon. (afterwards Sir) F. .Mit.hclson (1903-05); Hon. A. .\1. .Mvers 
(1905-09); C. D. Grey (1909-10): I. 1. Bagnall (1910-11); Hon. C. [. Parr 

(1911-15)^ 



KLASh MCyirirAL HAyUBOOK. 

local governnu'Ut was luadf in lbG2, when the Provincial 
(joverninent passed the " Town Boards Act " ; it was 
repealed in the following year, and its place taken 
by the • C"ity Boards Act." 1863. On April 24th, 1871, 
the City was constituted by a Proclamation of the 
(Jovernor under the "' Municipal Corporations Act, 
1867," and it has continued to be governed by that 
Act and its amendments up to the present time. 
The first meeting of the City Council under this 
constitution took place on May 22nd, 1871, Mi-. P. A. 
Philips, who had been Chairman of the City Board of 
('(itinnissioners, being elected Mayor, while Mr. Fiank 
Bn>die was appointed Town Cleik. 

The City of this date was small, occupying 623 
acres, within the following boundaries, viz., Stanley 
Street, Symonds Street, Karangahape Road, and 
Franklin Road. From this small area it has grown 
by the amalgamation of adjoining districts, the High- 
way Districts of Ponsonby (755 acres), Karangahape 
(139 acres), and (irafton (88 acres), becoming part of 
the City in 1882. With these additions, the City con- 
tinued without enlarging its area until 1913, but since 
that year a number of other districts have amalgamated 
with the City, as follows :—Parnell, 15th February, 
15M3 (4!«) acres); Arch Hill, 1st April, 1913 (154 acres); 
Orey Lynn, Ist July, 1914 (900 acres): Remuera, 1st 
■|. 1915 (2,520 acres); Eden Terrace, 1st October, 
• acres): Kpsom, 1st February, 1917 (860 acres); 
• -int Chevalier. 1st A|.ril, 1921 (1,220 acres). The 
< M_\ HOW extends «»ver 7.hi4 acres. 



ACCKLAM) .yrSICIFAL HAyUBOOK. 

At the present day, Auckland uccupics a hii;li 
jiosition among the nuuiicii)alities of the Dominion. 
Its civil engineering woi'ks are large, and include at 
the present time the erection of two dams, one designed 
to contain 69,0(H),OU0 gallons of water and the other 
540,000,000 gallons. The smaller dam is practically 
finished, and the larger will be completed in 1923. The 
Council owns and operates an electric tramway system 
which covers 27 route miles. The revenue last year 
was £502,000. The Corporation has just sold its 
electricity business to the Auckland Electric Power 
Board, which will supply the City and disti'ict 
with electric energy. Gas is provided by a 

private company. Water, as ah'eady indicated, is 
under Corporation ownership. The drainage and 
sewerage work of the City and suburbs is thoroughly 
modern, and is administered by a Board, upon which 
the City has representation. The Fire Brigade is 
similarly controlled by a Board. The health and 
sanitation of the community is another of the Council's 
responsibilities. It owns a modern abattoir and a 
fish market, employing for the latter two steam 
trawlers, and the fish caught is sold at its own i-etail 
department. On the aesthetic side, the Council pro- 
vides its citizens with Organ and Choral Concerts and 
subsidizes band performances in the public parks ; the 
Art Gallei-y caters for the artistic requirements, while 
the Public Library satisfies the intellectual demands 
of the community. The public ])arks and i-eserves, both 
within and beyond the City's boundaries, i)i-ovide for 

13 



All KLAM) MI'XK'IIWL HAM)B()OK. 

many forms of I'ecreatioii. The Council's annual 
revenue and the annual valuation of the City 
will summarize the various activities. In 1920-21 
the former was £l, 075,840, while the latter for 
the same i)eriocI was £1,497,095. The progress of 
the City in the last twenty years may be estimated by 
a comparison of the figures for 1901. In that year the 
afinual revenue was £82,657 and the annual valuation 
£349.765. All of the Citj' Council's undertakings are 
fully dealt with in the following pages. 

THE HARBOUR BOARD. 

The Auckland Harbour Board, to which the 
administration of the Port was delegated under "The 
Harbour Hoards Act, 1870," came into being in the 
same year as the City Council. These two bodies are 
the principal coiporations of the City, and are largely 
responsible for the great impiovements which have 
taken jilace. 

SITUATION AND CLIMATE. 

Auckland is situated in longitude 174" Ah" E. and 
latitude 36" 51" .S. on the Waiteniata Haibour, a 
branch f)f the great Hauraki (iulf. The position is 
ideal alike from th<- commercial and sporting aspects. 
Its waters are deep enough for the laigest ships afloat. 
When the great battle cruiser 7?fiioir/i, of 28,000 tons, 
visited Auckland, in 1920, with the Prince of Wales 
«»n board, she wa^ abl<- to come right alongside the 

14 




PHOTOGRAPH OF AUCKLAND TAKEN FROM A SEA PLANE, SHOWU 

WAITEMATA IN THE FRONT AND Ti 




THE CITYS POSITION BETWEEN THE TWO HARBOURS. THE 
MANUKAU IN THE BACKGROUND. 



W. A. Water.-. I'lioto. 



AUCKJ.AM) MryiCll'AL HANDBOOK 



City's main street and to be mooi-ed at the wharf 
there. On its waters the smallest and lightest 
craft may cruise among the myriad islands or explore 
the smaller gulfs and bays which abound. The waters 
of the gulf attract both yachtsmen and fishermen, for 
scenery and sport are to be found in abundance. 
Auckland's beaches, which are easily accessible, are 
famed for their safety, and to the jaded city dweller 
they are a source of physical refreshment and enjoy- 
ment. In the summer time they are the pleasure 
grounds of thousands. 

Nature has dealt bountifully with Auckland. Sun- 
shine and rain she has given with equal generosity. 
The mean annual temperature is about 58" ; the coldest 
month (July) has an average of 51°, and the hottest 
month (December) an average of 65". The average 
rainfall is about 43 inches. Frosts are rare, and a 
serious drought practically unknown. 

The City itself is beautifully situated between 
the Waitemata and the Manukau Harbours. Leav- 
ing Auckland City by electric tram, one may 
travel across the narrow isthmus to the Borough of 
Onehunga, on the Manukau Harbour, in less than 
forty-five minutes, the distance being about seven miles. 
At the narrowest point the distance is less than a 
mile. For many years proposals that these two har- 
bours should be connected by a canal have been 
discussed; such a canal would add enonnously to the 
City's commercial facilities. The Xoilliciii Boroughs, 

15 



AI-CKLAM) MIMCirAL HAMJBOOK. 

which are grt)\vin^ rapidly, will no doubt, in duo time, 
be brought nearer to the City by means of a bridge 
across the Harbour. 

Between these two harbours Auckland City stands, 
its northei-n and eastern boundaries mingling with the 
waters of the Waitemata. To the south and west its 
frontiers jnish aci-oss the isthmus. Salient features of 
the City's topography are the ridges and gullies which 
dissect it, and the many stretches of undulating land 
between. Another striking feature of the locality is 
the large number of hills, which are locally known 
as mounts, although the largest of them does not 
exceed 650 feet in height. They are, almost without 
exception, of volcanic origin, for many generations 
extinct. From sea level these mounts and ridges lend 
a pleasing and vai'ied feature to the scene, and from 
their summit exceptionally beautiful views of land 
and sea can be obtained. Travellers of woi-ld-wide 
experience have expressed their pleasure and surprise 
at the view^s obtained from Maungawhau (Mt. Eden) 
and Maungakiekie (One Tire Hill). It is a pleasure 
to state that nearly all these vantage points have been 
reserved as domains and will belong for ever to the 
people. 

The City is jjleasingly laid out, altliough it might 
not call forth the encomiums of a modern expert in 
town planning. The early colonists seem to have 
followed the natural method of laying down streets, 
following the easiest routes. The main streets are 



.1 1:( KLA y I) M UNU ' I PA L II A S J) BOOK 



brojul ;ui(l \v('ll iiuule, but some of the oldei' streets 
in tlie heart of llie City are narrow. This was an 
eri'or in the original plan which is only being overcome 
at great expense. For many years Auckland roads 
were not good. Concrete paving is now being used, 
however, and a vigorous reading policy having been 
adopted, the City is making rapid progress in roading 
imi)r()veraents, and will soon have the reputation of 
being the best roaded city in Australasia. 

BUILDINGS. 

Auckland's buildings are a quaint mixture of past 
and present. In the main streets large buildings of 
modern design stand side by side with one, two, or 
three storey structures which have passed their prime 
in terms of years. This contrast is not to be deplored 
from an artistic point of view, for what it lacks in 
symmetry is moi'e than compensated by the effect of 
a broken sky-line. The sky-scraper happily does not 
exist — an eight-stoi'ey building being the tallest in the 
City. Amongst notable buildings may be mentioned 
the Post Office, Ferry Buildings, the New Zealand 
Insurance Buildings, some of the banks, including 
the Auckland Savings Bank and the Bank of 
New Zealand, which is the gem of Auckland's 
commercial buildings, the Public Library and Art 
Gallery, the Town Hall, the Supreme Court, the 
Magistrate's Court and the city churches, noticeably 
St. Paul's, St. Matthew's, St. Andrew's and the 
Tabernacle. 

(• 17 



Arch'LAyi) MrXKlPAL IIAXDIiOOK. 



A GARDEN CITY. 

If Auckland cannot be desci-ibcd as an ideal exaniiile 
of city planning, according to the town planner's 
standards, it can fairly be described as a garden city. 
One cannot walk any distance in the City — except, of 
course, the purely business part — without linding a 
garden. The public parks and reserves, which are 
fully described in the succeeding pages, are tastefully 
laid out, and every house, be it large or small, has a 
garden or trim lawn. In a climate where extremes 
do not exist, with a good average lainfall and abundant 
sunshine all the year round, the cultivation of Howers, 
fruit and vegetables is an easy matter, and the universal 
garden is the result. 

The domestic aichitecture of Auckland and suburbs 
helps to accentuate this feature. Tenements are prac- 
tically unknown. The type of building used for 
dwellings is either the cottage oi' the bungalow, and 
occasionally a more formal house of two storeys. Nearly 
every household is self-contained, or at worst occupies 
a semi-detached dwelling. Seldom are two houses 
together of the same design. The I'ows of dwellings 
of a uniform pattern, so connnon in English towns, 
do not obtain here, and this adds to the variety and 
charm of the Auckland home. 

EDUCATION. 

The educational interests of the City are represented 
by thf T^in'vfMsity C'ollege (which is about to commence 

l.s 



Arc K LAM) MCXK'/J'AL II AS DBOOK . 

the erection of ;i l;ii-ge modern building), the (Jiaiumar 
Schools for boys and girls, and a number of private 
secondaiy schools, the Seddon Memorial Technical 
School, and the State primary schools. Of the latter 
there are eighteen within the City boundaries alone. 
There is also a School of Art, and, attached to the 
ITniversity, a school of music. The Auckland Museum 
is another educative institution, notable especially on 
account of its Maori collection, which is reputed to be 
the largest and best in existence. 

BUSINESS. 

The business activity of the City is exemplified in 
the large banking concerns cari'ied on in it, which now 
number six different companies, including the progres- 
sive, locally promoted Bank of New Zealand. This 
bank has now branches throughout New Zealand, tlie 
Commonwealth of Australia, Fiji and Samoa. There 
are also a number of insui-ance companies, including 
two large companies of native origin, viz., the New 
Zealand Coy. and the South British Coy. Both have 
made good their positions among similar concerns 
throughout the world. 

AMUSEMENTS. 

The amusements which the City affords are limited 
naturally by the mimbers of the i)()pulation. A city 
of Auckland's size cannot expect to be catered for to 
the same extent as London. Yet, despite this limitation. 
the City has been fortunate in receiving visits from 

19 



AC CK LAX J) MiyiCirAL HAM) BOOK. 

world renowned artistes. Generally speaking, however, 
the City has to depend for its enteitaininents upon the 
talent contained within the Dominion and peiiodical 
visits by Australian coinjianies. This dependence upon 
its own resources has led to the development of the 
local musical and dramatic talent, and has resulted in 
the fostering of a luimber of organisations which jjrovide 
entertainment of a good standard. Entertainments of a 
more solid character than those already indicated are 
provided by courses of lectures arranged by the Auck- 
land Institute, the Leys Institute and other libraiies 
and organisations. 

SPORTS. 

in the sporting woild the City is foilunate. 
The genial climate and the natural facilities for outdoor 
sports richly endow Auckland. At football the Dominion 
has proved its prowess against all comers. Roth the 
Rugby and th<' League codes have large follnwings; 
Association is also played : and hockey is jjopular. 
The " sport of kings " has a democratic following. The 
Auckland Racing Club's coui'se at Ellerslie will stand 
comparison with any course in the world, and its exten- 
sive grounds are most exquisitely laid out in lawns 
and gardens. Yachting and aquatic sportsmen have one 
of tlie finest waterways in the world to exercise on, and 
the Hauraki (Julf attracts thousands of devotees. 
Throughout tlie season regular races are held, and the 
annual regatta, which takes place on Anniversary Day 
(.Tamiaiv 2iiilii. is r.nr- nf the sporting fxfnts of the 

•J(i 



AI'CKLAXI) MrXK'lI'M. HAXDJiOOK. 

year. Cricket, lawn tennis and bowls attract many, and 
golf is rapidly coming into favour. Athletic sports also 
claim a luimbei' of adherents. 

A FORTUNATE CITY. 

Auckland has been fortunate in many ways, but 
especially in respect of its benefactoi's. To the 
visitor, the number of endowments which the 
City manifests is a source of constant i-emai-k and 
not a little justifiable envy. Beginning in the 
'eighties with the gift of Sir George Grey to the citizens 
of his collection of valuable books, pictures and curios, 
the Roll of Benefactors has increased, until to-day it 
is one that any city would be proud to possess. A 
list of the most important benefactions is included in 
an appendix. 

This brief survey of the City's foundation and 
progress is intended to serve as a background to the 
more fully detailed sections which follow. Other 
information of a general and statistical character will 
be found in the appendices. 

JOHN BARR, 

Chief Librarian. 



ArcKLAyi) MrXK'll'AL IIASJJBOOK 



TOWN HALL 

Although Auckland's municipal historj' goes back 
to 1851, eleven years after the foundation of the city 
itself, it was not until sixty years later that the first 
building devoted entirely to the purposes of a town 
hall was opened. Prior to the Proclamation of April 
24, 1871, by which the Auckland City Council was con- 
stituted under " The Municipal Corporations Act, 1867," 
local government was a thing of little importance, but 
from 1871 onwards the municipality began to make 
headway. At the commencement of this period, only a 
small office, owned by Messrs. Ujiton & Co., Booksellers, 
Queen Street, and located over their shop, was occupied 
as the first municipal chambers of Auckland. As the 
Council's affairs prospered, this humble office was 
found inadequate, and larger accommodation was sought 
in the old Magistrate's Court, at the corner of High 
and Chancery Streets. Soon after the opening of the 
Public Library in the new building, ^Yellesley Street, 
in 1887, the Council decided to utilize, temporarily, 
some of the rooms in this building as Municipal 
Chambers— that which had been planned for a lecture 
hall becoming the Council Chamber, and rooms 
designed for more [esthetic purjioses being converted 
into departmental offices. For nearly a quarter of a 
century (until the Town Hall was ready for occupation) 
the Corporation can-ied on its work here. 

The first practical step in conn. 'ct ion with the 
provision of a Town Hall for Auckland goes back to 

■2;{ 



jrCKLAX/J MrXK'IPAL HAXDBOOK 



1880, in which year the question of a site received the 
consideration of the City Council, and it was then 
resolved to seek legislative authority to occupy the 
reserve at the junction of Grey and Queen Streets 
for the erection of a Town Hall. 

This was carried into effect, and by " The Auckland 
Reserves Exchange and Change of Trust Act, 1881," 
Clause 5, the Council was authorised to erect a Town 
Hall and such other buildings for nninicii)al purposes 
as to the Council should seem fit upon such leserve, 
being Lot 57, Section 29, City of Auckland, containing 
30 poles, which previously, by " The Auckland City 
Endowments and Reserves Act, 1875," had been vested 
in fee simple in the Mayor, Councillors, and Citizens 
of the City of Auckland and their successors as an en- 
dowment for the improvement of the City of Auckland. 

The area of tlie reserve was manifestly too small 
for the purpose, and, as an addition thereto, the Coun- 
cil purchased, in 1883, Mr. Lally's property in Grey 
Street for £ 1,350, and Mr. S. Jagger's property front- 
ing Queen Street, on which was erected the Army and 
Navy Hotel, for £3,800. 

Ill 1001 proposals were submitted by the Council to 
the ratei)ayers to erect a Town Hall at a cost of 
£26,000, and to i)urchase two areas of land between 
Coburg and Lome Streets, known as Philson's Square 
and (iraham's property, containing about one acre, at 
the price of £l4,000. Although these proposals were 
not officially connected, still, in the minds of the i-ate- 

24 



AUVKLAXI) MrXK'IIWL HAM) BOOK. 

payers, they formed one joint jjroposal, and they were 
rejected at the poll. 

In 1905 the Council resolved that the time had 
arrived for pioviding a Town Hall for the City of 
Auckland, and that such Hall be erected on the site 
already acquired for the purpose at the corner of 
Queen and Grey Streets, subject to the Council being 
enabled to acquire the additional land necessary, and 
being satisfied that no architectural difficulties existed 
to prevent the erection of a suitable building. 

Negotiations were entered into for the purchase of 
the necessarj- additional land, resulting in the acquisi- 
tion of Lots 2 to 7, 9 to 13, of Allotments 1, 2 and 3, 
of Section 29, of the City of Auckland, at the price of 
£13,201. 

This additional land having been acquired, competi- 
tive designs were invited for the Town Hall, the 
pi-emiums offered being: — 

1st ... ... £400 

2nd ... ... £200 

3rd .. ... £100 

Forty-six sets of designs were submitted, and these 
were placed by the Council before a special Board of 
Experts, consisting of Messrs. W. E. Bush, A.M.I.C.E., 
City Engineer; H. C. Kent, F.R.I. B.A., of Melbourne: 
P. Oakden, F.R.V.I.A., of Melbourne : T. Mahoney ami 
R. M. Watt, Architects, of Auckland. 

These gentlemen, after spending seven or eight days 
in exhaustively studying the designs, recommended the 

25 



A/'CKLAJ/J MfjyiCJPAL IIAXDBOOK. 



Council to select as the three best those submitted by 

1. Messrs. J. J. k E. J. Clark, Architects, of ]\Iel- 

bourne 

2. Messrs. V\". iV H. Black. Arcliitects, of Camber- 

well, Melbourne. 

3. Messrs. Clegg A: Miller, Architects, of liallarat, 

Victoria. 

Tenders were called as soon as ])()ssible thereafter, 
and in August, 1908, the tender of Messrs. Ferguson 
e\: ^lalcolm, at the price of £87,565 19s was accepted, 
subject to such modificatiojis thereof as might be mutu- 
ally agi'eed ii))()n between the Council and the con- 
tractors. 

Subsequent modifications and inii)rovements, in- 
cluding the substitution of a stone front for stucco 
work, the purchase of additional land and the furnish- 
ing, togethei- with the charges incidental to the raising 
of loans, brought up the cost of the building to ajjjjroxi- 
mately £125.000. 

The foundation stone was laid by His Worshij) the 
Mayor (Mr.— afterwards the Hon. — Arthur M. Myers) 
on the 24th February, 1909, and tlir l)iiildiiig was 
opened by the fiovernor, Hai-(jn Islington, on 1 Itli De- 
cember. 1911, Mr. (afterwards the Hon.) C. J. I'arr, 
C.M.Ci., Mayor, presiding at the ceremony which took 
place in the Large Hall. The festivities connected with 
the opening continm d for a wick, cnnccrts, organ re- 
citals, oratorios, and the Annual liiMinion of lli.- Old 
Coloidsfv" Association being held in (he new Hall. 

•2<i 




COUNC 
Flashlight Photograph, tak 




CHAMBER. 

while Council was in session. 



AI'CKLAM) MIWK'IJ'AL II AX DUOOK . 



At the oi)enijig ceremony the Mayor loriiuilly 
acknowledged two splendid gifts which had been made 
to the citizens and erected in the Town Hall. The first 
was the pipe organ, the gift of Mw Henry Brett, a 
former Mayor of the City : the other was the clock, 
presented by Mr. A. ^I. Myers, who had just retired 
fi'om the Mayoralty. 

The architectural style of the building is a free 
treatment of the Classic, and the material used for the 
facades is Oamaru limestone with a base in Melbourne 
bluestone. For the main Queen and Grey Street fronts 
a columnar method of design has been adopted, termin- 
ating at the apex formed by the junction of the tw(; 
streets in a segmental colonnade, surmounted by a tower 
18 feet square and 130 feet high, in which is fixed the 
clock with four dials of S\ feet diameter, i)resented 
by Mr. A. M. Myers. In front of this colonnade is a 
terrace enclosed by a stone balustrade, with provision 
for a statue at the extreme angle. A feature of the 
structure of the building is the arrangement of the 
foundations, which necessitated special treatment on 
account of the depth at which rock was found. Con- 
crete piers have been carried down at intervals to the 
rock and the spaces between spanned by concrete beams 
carrying the walls, the beams being reinforcfnl with 
Kahn steel bars. 

The principal entiance is fium Queen Street, and 
the building is divided into two portions, the first being 
a four-storey building containing the Municipal Offices, 
and the other containing the Large Hall, Concert 
Chambei', and Supper Eoom. 



ACrKLAM) MIMCIJ'AL HAyUBOOK 



These portions are separated from each other by the 
main entrance hall, giving access to the Large Hall, 
Concert Chamber, Siii)per Room, etc. The main en- 
trance to the Large Hall and Conceit Chamber is in 
Queen Street. 

From the entrance hall a staircase, 12 feet wide, 
leads down to the ground floor of the Large Hall and 
to the Supper Room, which are on the basement of 
Grey Street level. 

The principal office entrance is also situated on 
Queen Street, immediately under the tower, and leads 
by a short staircase to the ground floor of the office 
block. There is also a commodious entrance on Grey 
Street with a courtyard entrance adjoining, and there 
are separate entrances to the di'essing rooms for both 
the Large Hall and Concert Chamber. 

The office portion of the building provides the fol- 
lowing accommodation : — On the basement floor, offices 
for the City Valuer and Registrar of Electors, Traffic 
Inspector, Stores Puichasing Department, Strong and 
Store Rooms, and cDininodious cloak-rooms for gentle- 
mf'ii. 

Oil the groiiiid lloor is the Council ('haml)er. This 
is a handsome room, semi-circular in ]ilan, 47 feet by 
42 feet, and is i)anelled in kauri, with i)laster walls and 
ceilings and lead glazed windows. The Mayor and 
Tfjwn Clerk's tables are fixed on a raised dais, which 
occupies a recess in the chamber. The Councillois' 
desks are arranged in a semi-circle, and tables are pro- 
vided for other officials and foi- the Press, while a 

•_N 




MAYOR'S ROOM. 




MAYORESS'S ROOM. 



Arc K I.AM) Mr MCI J- A I. II AXDJiOOK. 

small gallery for the accommodation of the public, with 
separate entiance, is also provided. The Chamber is 
approached by doors leading fioin the flavor's suite 
and the Councillors' suite respectively. 

The Mayor's suite consists of Waiting Room, Public 
Office, and Private Room, and separate lavatory accom- 
modation. 

The Town Clerk's Private Office adjoins the Wait- 
ing Room, with his general office adjacetit. 

On the (irey Street side a suite of rooms for Coun- 
cillors is pi'ovided, consisting of Councillors" Room, 
Committee I\oom, Libraiy, and Cloak Room. A kitchen 
adjoins the Councillors" Room. 

Oil the first floor are situated offices for the City 
Euiiineer, Waterwoi'ks Engineer, and Chief Sanitary 
Inspector. 

The second floor is occupied l)v the City Treasurer's 
Department and the Auckland City Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners. On this floor also are provided Caretaker's 
(puirters. 

On each floor there is ample lavatory accommo- 
dation for the staff. 

The main feature of the liall poition of the l)ui](ling 
is, of coui'se, the Lai'ge Hall, which has an average 
length of 168 feet b^' a width of 75 feet, and an actual 
floor area for dancing of 122 feet by 75 feet, the height 
from floor to ceiling being 50 feet. Ample space 
has been provided for the fine organ, and in front 
thereof is placed a chorus gallery and orchestral plat- 

80 




RECEPTION OF H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF V. 




ES AT THE TOWN HALL. APRIL 24th. 1920. 



ArrKLAM) MryiCII'AL IIA.XDIiOOK. 

form capable ol:" accommodating 350 performers. The 
ground floor is capable of seating 1,660 pei'sons, exclu- 
sive of the chorus gallery and platform, while a further 
740 can be accommodated in the capacious balcony, 
situated on two sides and at the end of the Large Hall, 
and an additional 300 can be provided for in the uppei' 
gallery, giving a total seating capacity of 2,700, exclu- 
sive of performers. 

The orchestral platform is so arranged that it can 
be run back on the occasion of dances or big public 
meetings, when an extra large floor area is required. 

Dressing-room and lavatory accomnnjdation is pi'O- 
vided at the rear of the Large Hall for the use of 
artistes and performers, and underneath the organ loft 
there is a commodious Green Room, and ample Cloak- 
rooms and lavatories for ladies and gentlemen. Ticket 
offices are provided for both halls. 

The Concert Chamber is, overall, 93 feet long by 
47 feet wide and 31 feet high, and is capable of seating 
880 persons. It has a stage platform and amjjle dress- 
ing-rooms. Communication with the Large Hall is 
obtained by a bridge across the triangular light area 
between the two halls. 

Both halls are amply provided with exits, the doors 
of which are fitted with i)atent jianic bolts. 

Underneath the Concert Chambei- is the Sui")per 
lioom, which communicates directly by two bridges 
with the Large Hall, and in connection therewith there 
is a kitchen and large servery, ajiproached by a sepa- 
rate staircase from Queen Street. 

31 



ArcKLAXJ) MrXlcil'AL HASJJnOOK. 

A large chair store has been made undor the Large 
Hall, and chair lift and hatchway provided. 

J5()th the Large Hall and Concert Chamber are ex- 
ceedingly handsome auditoiiums, the decorations being 
carried out in Carrai-a plaster work of chaste design, 
while the windows are stained lead lights. 

The thi-ee i)ub]ic staircases are constructed of rein- 
forced concrete, iinished in gi-anolithic, the landings 
being finished with tiled floors and dadoes, a similar 
treatment being adopted for all lavatories. The balus- 
ters are of m-iiainental cast-iron, with cedar handrail. 

The whole (if the walls are lendered in cement and 
finished with Keenes, while all ceilings are jjlastered 
with finish. 

Lead lights have been used in the Large Hall, 
Concert Chamber, Entrance Hall, and Colonnade, at 
ai)ex. with good effect. 

Xew Zealand kauri and Australian jari-ah are the 
principal timbers employed, the Large Hall roof trusses, 
balcony and galleiy cantilevei's aiid piincipal floor gir- 
ders being of steel. 

All walls other than the stone facings are of brick 
or cement concrete, and slate and galvanised iron are 
used for roofing. Internal partitions are of timber 
studding, lathed with steel and plastered. 

Tlic whole of the building is lighted and heated by 
electricity, the electioliers being of handsome design, 
and an electric passenger lift has also l)een installed, 
giving access to every floor. 

32 



Ar('KI..\.\l) MiSli'lI'M. II .\.\ DliOOK. 

V'wv hydrants have been provided, and exhaust 
mains for a stationary vacuum cleaning plant fixed over 
the whole building. 

The Town Hall, being the most commodious hall in 
the city, is used for all the lai'ge gathei'ings, both public 
and private, of the city. All the important civic recep- 
tions take place here also; it was in this Hall that 
PI.R.H. the Prince of Wales was oflicially welcomed by 
the Mayor, councillors and citizens on his arii\al in 
Auckland on April 24th, 1920. 

The City's progress in the decennial period since 
the opening of the Town Hall has been so great that 
already the accommodation provided for the municipal 
staff is inadequate, a number of departments being 
housed in offices outside the Town Hall. The Council 
has under consideration proposals for the erection of 
Municipal Chambers on the old Markets site, in order 
that the Coi'poration's Staff may be congregated in one 
building. 

J. R, RI^IGHAM. 

Town Clerk. 



x\ 



Ari'KLAM) MIX ICI I'M. IIAXDHOOK 



Concert 


Large 




Cham 


ber. 




Hall. 




£ s. 


(1. 


f 


^ 


(1. 


1 in 


n 


.\ 


(1 





3 


(1 


S 


8 





■'i i 


(t 


10 


10 


(1 


r. 





IS 





n 


r. 1 





■-'I 





(1 



Schedule of charges for hire of Town Hall, 
Concert Chamber and Organ. 



1. Davlig-ht, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

•2. Daylig-ht, 2 p.m. to 1.30 p.m. 

3. Matinee for Celehritles 

i. Evening- (Electric Light incUuled). 
Monday.s to Friclay.s (and Public 
Holidays wlien trams not run- 
ning-), 7.30 p.m. to 11 p.m. .. 

."). Saturdays. 7.30 to 11 p.m. 

C. i>ul)lic Holidays, 7.30 to I i p.m. 
when trams running 

7. Rehearsals (('veningi in (■(luneclKin 

with engagements only, sul)ject 
to Hall not being otherwise i-e- 
cpiired. Partial lighting 3 J 
houis 

8. Daylight Pehearsals (morning or 

afternoon) 
0. When no i-harge lor admission 
made, nor collection taken up 
(including Sundays), evening 

10. When no charge for admission 
made, but collection taken up 
(including Sundays), evening.. 

1 I . Receptions, .\t Homes, by day- 
light, no admission charge, no 
electric lighting 
If electric light recpHred (e.xtra) 

1-2. Local .\i-tistes and Musical Societies 
(onl.\ i allowed I ."i pet- cent, re- 
du(-tJon from above chaigi's. 

SPECIAL PROVISIONS. 

13. Stri(-tly Charity Concnis. .Ml per- 
sonal services bcnig without fee, 
and whole proceeds, if any. 
being devoted to Chaiitable 
ob.ject, 7.30 p.m. to 1 1 i).m. . . 
When personal sei-vices are paid 
foi-, and baJance of pi-oceeds 
devr)ted to Charity . . 

li. Mazaais, Exhibitions, Flowei- 

Shows, or other- similar en- 
gagenu'uts, necessitating the use 
of the Town Hall during the 
whole day and evening, until 
not lati-r than I I p.m., includ- 
ing i hours lighting . . 
Hall tinist be vacated not later 
than noon the da.v following 
the closing of engagement, oi- 
hair usual charge additional paid. 

U 



■y.\ II 

.'> 

•2 

1(1 10 

1 2 1 2 



8 S 
1 1 



Id III 
I 2 I 2 



1 r, 



ArCKI.AM) MFXirWAL II A X I) lUX H< . 



Concert Large 

Chamber. Hall. 

Si S. (1. t -. ll. 

I.''). Uso of kitchtMi and store rooms 

('own fiiol to be provided) . . I (i n 

Deposit (to l)e returned after 
eleaning- kiti'hen not later tJian 
noon on day after vise) . . 2 

BALLS. 

10. From 7.30 p.m. till midni?ht .. .". o e I '.> o 

IT. From 7.:iO p.m. till midiiig-lit (in- 

eludiUK use of supper mom and 

kitchen) .. .. .. 7 d o •.> I o o 

18. From 7.30 p.m. to 3 a.m. >'■ o n -'o e n 

19. From 7.30 p.m. to 3 a.m. (includ- 

ing- use of supper room and 

kitchen) .. . . f< n n -.'-j 

20. When Balls are in aid of Local 

Charities, \i> per cent, reduction. 
When the Small Hall is engaged 
as a Supper Room or Refresh- 
ment Room, in connection with 
the use of the Large Hall for 
Balls, one-third of the above 
rates for the Small Hall to be 
paid for same. 

USE OF ORGAN. 

•> \ . For accumiiaiilmiMits only, by 
approved Organists 

22. For accompaniments only, by ap- 

proved Organists, for Charitable 
purposes 

23. For Public Recitals 
2i. For Public Recitals for Charitable 

purposes 
2,5. Practice (ai)proved Organists only) 

by daylight, per hour 
2G. Practice in evening. Hall not 

otherwise engaged, two small 

lights allowed, per hour 






10 





I 

3 


Id 
10 









10 








.5 






35 



AI-CKI.AM) MryiCll'AL HAM) BOOK 



THE ORGAN. 

The iiiic Organ in the Town H;ill was i)resented to 
the City by Henry Biett, Esq., who was Mayor of 
Auckland in 1877-78, and who for many years past 
has taken a keen interest in the musical welfare 
of the coniiiitinity. The specification of the organ w^as 
drawn ui) by .Mr. Edwin Lemare, the noted English 
organist, and the instrument was built hy Messrs. 
Xorman and Beard, of Norwich and London. It was 
erected in the Town Hall under the supervision of Mr. 
H. A. Tustin, the Xew Zealand manager of the builders, 
and was opened on December 14, 1911, by Mr. Maughan 
Barnett, at that time City Organist at Wellington. In 
1914 a set of carillons, also the gift of Mr. Henry Brett, 
was added to the Organ. 

The Organ is the largest in Xew Zealand, and the 
most modern in Australasia. It is situated at the level 
of the uppermost tier of the choii- i)latform, and is set 
in a special charnbei-, 18ft. by 22ft., provided for its 
reception. 

Specification. 



rF:n.\i, oroa.n i<:(impa<s cc.v. 

1 ruiiililc Open luapason 

2 I)()ijl)lf' Opori iJiapason 

3 Open Itiapasfiii 
i op<'ii [liaiiason 
."> Vidldiic 
'■i Moiirddii 

7 F.clH) Mass 

8 Octave Dlapa.son 
'.) I'rinrlpal 

10 Mass riiitr- 

1 1 Contra I'osauiK- 
1-j. TromhoiK' 
1 3 Trumpet 

3 



) O. 3-2 Notes K 
32rt. 

:i-jrt. 

I nit.. Wood 

I (lit.. Metal 

I Git., Wood 

liilt.. Wood 

I int.. Wood 

8 ft., Wood 

8 ft.. Metal 

srt., Wood 

3art., Metal 

I Oft., Metal 

srt.. Metal 



ArcKLAM) MIM( ll'AI. II A .\ I) liOd K . 



CHOIR OHGAIV (Compass CC to C. CI I'ipr 



1 i 
1 :. 
ic. 
17 
IS 
H) 
I'O 
21 
22 
23 



27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
3 3 
34 
3 5 
36 
37 
38 



39 
iO 
41 
4 2 
43 
4 4 
4 5 
46 
47 
4 8 

4 9 
50 

5 1 

53 



56 
57 
58 



I.icblicli Codcckt . . sir.. 

Kchi) iMilclana . . . . . . Hit., 

Kolce . . . . . . ^x\.. 

Viol (rOrchcstrc . . srt., 

Volx Celeste ( ..' ranks) .. .. srt., 

Uiuia Maris . . . . . . sft., 

Flaiito Tiaveiso . . . . 4ft., 

Harniiiiiic Piccolo . . . . 2rt., 

Schaliiiei . . . . . . 1 6ft.. 

Orchestral Clarinet . . 8ft.. 

Orchestral Oboe . . . . 8rt., 

Tremulant 

(IHKAT OHG.\>" (Compass CC to C, 61 ^ote 

liouble Open liiapason .. icft 



Wood and .Metal 

.Metal 

Wood and Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Wo<(d 

Wood 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 



Open liiapason ( large > 

Open Diapason (medium 

Open Hiapasou (small) 

Claribel Flute (wood) 

Corno Flute (metal) 

Principal 

Harmonic Flute 

Twelfth 

Fifteenth 

Mixture 

Trombone 

Tromba 

Harmonic Clarion 



8ft., 
8ft., 
8ft., 
8rt., 
8ft., 
4ft., 
4ft.. 
2i^ft., 

2rt., 

ranks 
16ft., 

8rt., 
ift.. 



Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Wood 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 



SWKLL ORGAIV (Compass CC to c. 6i .\oies 

Bourdon . . . . 1 Oft. 

Diaphonic liiapason . . 8ft., 

Geigen Principal . . . . Sft. 

Lieblich (iedeckt . . . . 8ft., 

Salicional . . . . . . 8ft. 

Vox Angelica . . . . . . 8ft. 

Principal . . . . . . 4ft. 

Lieblich Flute . . . 4ft. 

Fifteenth . . . . . . 2ft. 

Mixture (3 ranks) 

Contra Posaune .. .. 16ft. 

Horn . . 8ft. 

Oboe . . . . srt. 

Vox Humana 8ft. 

Harmonic Posaune .. .. 4 ft. 

Tremulant. 



Wood 

Metal and Wood 

Metal 

Wood and .Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 

Metal 



SOLO (M{(iA.\ (Compass CC to C. 6| 



Hai'nionic Claribel 
Concert Flute 
Orchestral Trumpet 
Bombarde . . 

Tuba .Mirabilis 
Tuba Clarion 
Tremulant. 
Carillons. 



sit.. 

III.. 

sft.. 

left., 

8ft.. 
4ft.. 



tes 



\\M(,d 

.Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 
Metal 



Hid Metal 



37 



ArcKL.\.\/j MIXiril'M, HAXDIiOOK 



COUPLF.RS. 

Swell Octavo Sulo to Great 

Swell Sub Octave Solo to Choir 

Swell Unison Oil' Solo Octave 

Swell to Great Choir to Pedal 

Swell to Choir (ireat to I'edal 

(>hoir Octave Swell to Pedal 

Choir Suh Octave Solo to Pedal 

Choir Unison OfT Great Pistons to Pedal Composi- 

Clioir to ijreat tion 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

The installation of the Organ in the Town Hall was 
followed in due course by the a])pointment of a City 
Organist. Mr. Maughan Barnett, to whom the position 
was offered, gave the first of the regular Saturday 
evening Recitals on April 5th, 1913. 

The scope of the recital scheme has been gradually 
enlarged by the City Council. 

A series of free afternoon Recitals for school 
children was established towards the end of 1913, and, 
later on, an Essay scheme was connected with these 
Recitals. Prizes for the best papers are given by 
Messrs. Henry Brett and S. Adams. 

In 1917 it was decided to engage vocalists for the 
Recitals, and in 1920 a :\Iunici))al Choir was formed. 

The attendance at the Satuitlay evening Recitals 
has steadily increased year after year. The average 
attendance is riow more than double that of the first 
year. The audience at the Recitals for school children 
frequently numbers over 2000. 

The Saturday evening Recitals conunence in Aijril 
and contirnie till the end of November. A Carol Concert 

•AS 



Arc K LAM) Ml MCII'AL II A S I ) li( K > K . 

is given in December and a special rceital is aiiaiijzicd 
for Christmas night. 

A charge of sixi^ence is made foi- aiiiiiissioii to 
the evening Recitals, but a short sei'ies of free 
afternoon llecitals is given dui-ing the wintei' months. 
The Organ is also nsed at all civic functions which 
take place in the large Town Hall. 

Three hundred and thirty-one public lejitals liave 
been given by the City Organist up to tlic end of 1921, 
at which 600 different compositions have been played. 

MUNICIPAL CHOIR. 

The Municipal Choir, the lirst to be established in 
New Zealand, gave its first y)ublic i)erf()rmance (Ui 
June 19th, 1920. The Choir consists of about 90 voices, 
and specialises in unaccompanied choral music. Its 
repertoire includes early English madrigals, motets for 
double chorus by Mendelssohn, and a numbei' of woi-ks 
by modern British composers. 

The Choir appears at eight or nine of the Satuiday 
evening Recitals each year, and takes a pait in tlie 
programmes arranged for nnjiortant civic functions. 
The Choir is under the direction of the City Organist. 

MUSIC IN THE PARKS. 

Band perfoi'mances are given in the \arious parks 
on Sundays during six months of the year, from \ovem- 
ber onwards. The local bands selected for this purjtose 
receive a grant fi'om the City Council. 

J. MAUGHAX HARNETT. 

City Organist. 
39 




-s>^^.-^^ 



AUCKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, 1880. 
Formerly the Mechanics' Institute and Library, established 1842. 








— r 

■ ■■ 1 







PUBLIC LIBRARY. ART GALLERY, AND OLD COLONISTS' 

MUSEUM, TO-DAY. 
The progress illustrated in these pictures may be taken as 
typical of the growth of the City's institutions in general. 



AUCKLAXI) .\/rX/('/I'AL HAM)I',()(>K 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. ART GALLERY AND 
OLD COLONISTS' MUSEUM. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The Auckland Public Library was founded in 1S80, 
commencing its career in the Mechanics' Institute. This 
Institute, which was established in 1842, had filled an 
important function during the thirty-eight years of its 
existence, supplying literary recreation for its members, 
lectures and classes of instruction for the oomunii.it}', 
when such were not easily obtained, and providing a 
hall for meetings when no other existed in the City. 
In it many of the flourishing societies of to-day were 
born. 

Toward the end of the 'seventies tlic Institute fell 
upon evil days, and the City Council acqiiii-ej the pre- 
mises, which were situated in Chancery Street (now 
Court House Lane), along with the stock and freehold, 
and re-named it the Free Public Library. At the same 
time the Council acquired the library of the Aucklaiui 
Provincial Council, which contained a well-selected 
stock, including a valuable set of official papers relating 
to New Zealand. At the opening of the Public Library 
the stock numbered about 6,000 volumes. 

The premises of the Mechanics' Institute, which were 
then some thirty-eight years old, wrre ru)t in good 
condition, and they were also inatleciuate for the pur- 
poses of an up-to-date library. Two years after the 

41 



M'(l\l..\.\l) Ml'.\ ICI I'M. II A.\ niiOOK. 

establishment of the Library, Sir George Grey offered 
to present his collection of books, pictures and curios 
to the City, and this generous action influenced the 
City Council in its decision to erect a building which 
would suitably house this and other collections. 

In 1883 the site of the new Iniilding was selected, 
and designs invited foi' a Public Libi'ary and Art Gallery 
building, and the plans of Messrs. Graingo]- and D'Ebro, 
ai-chitects, of Melbourne, having been accepted, the 
foundation stone was laid, on ttli June, 1885, by the 
Mayor (Mr. William Richard Waddel) with much pomp 
and circumstance, addresses being delivered by Sir 
George Grey, Sir Geoige Maurice O'Koike and Sir 
Frederick Whitaker. The contract for the building 
was let to Messrs. Malcolm k Price for £21,851. 

The official opening of the Library took place on 
26th March, 1887, and was again the occasion of an 
interesting ceremony, in which the citizens took an 
active interest. The Mayor (Mr. A. L. T. Devore) pre- 
sided over the gathei-ing which filled the building, and 
he was supported by representative citizens, including 
Sir George Grey, who occupied the seat of honour. 
Addresses were delivered by th:' Mayor, by Sir (ieorge 
Grey, Sir G. Maurice OTJorke, and ex-Mayors Peacock, 
Clark and Waddei, while vocal selections were ren- 
(I'Mcil V)y tl:c ('hinal Society. 

At the date of the opening of the new building, the 
stock comprised 15,000 volumes, the increase being 
mainlj' attributable to the acquisition of Sir George 

\1 



ArcKI.AXI) Mr.MCII'M. II A .\ I) liOO l< . 

Grey's library. From 1887 to 1898 Sir George continued 
to add to his collection, enriching it with such treasures 
that the Auckland Public Library has attained what is 
perhaps a unique position among municipal libraries 
throughout the world. The manuscripts in the collection 
represent specimens of illuniiiuition of various schools 
and books written in Greek, Latin, Coptic, Arabic, 
Ethiupic and Persian, Italian, French, (Jornian, English 
and Bohemian, and the languages of the Polynesians, 
including Maori, and of the Aboriginals of Australia. 
Worthy of special mention are : LerfioiKiriim GraecMtn 
(Lessons from the Gospels), a Greek MS. of the 10th 
or 11th Century (the oldest book in the Library); the 
Codex Evangelarium (The Four Gospels), bearing the 
date 1128, also a Greek MS. ; the Bihlia Saci'a Lntina, 
belonging to the 12th Centui'v, considered to be 
the earliest copy of the Scriptures in Australasia. 
The finest specimen of caligraphy contained in the col- 
lection, and perhaps the finest example of manuscrijit 
work in these parts, is the Jiihiid Sf/mi Lnfiiia Viil- 
(jat'i, 15th Century. The finest illuminated manuscript 
is the Miiisah' Rnwnniw. Alike for the perfect forma- 
tion of the letters and capitals, the regularity of the 
lines, the quality and richness of the red and black 
inks, the colouring and design of the miniatures and 
borders, and the brilliant gilding, it justifies the claim. 
Of original documents, the Treaty signed In- Richard 
Cromwell confii-ming the Treaty entei-ed into b(>tween 
Oliver Cromwell and the Protestant Powers, and the 
Letters and Papers relating to Captain Cook and Sir 

43 




CENTRAL LIBRARY: REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 




CENTRAL LIBRARY : 
Room containing the Grey and Shaw Collections. 



A UCKLA J/J M I WK ' 1 1> A L II A J I) BOOK. 



Joseph Banks, foiiiierly in the Hiahouiiic ( Ollcct ion, are 
documents of historical inii)Oi'tance and interest. 

The collection of Incunabula and early printed 
books contains some interesting examples, especially 
noteworthy being the three Caxtons, viz , Higden's 
I'ol Hclir())ucoii , r. 14S;5; The Golden Leyend^ c. 1484; and 
7'lie Bole of EneydoK, 1490; and two books printed 1)V 
Richard Pynson — The ('<niferhiinj TaJesi of Chaucer, 
c 1493, and Xora Sfofua Anno I. — A//. Ilinrici VII.. 
1497. 

Besides Incunabula the Grey Collection is rich in 
literary rarities, conspicuous among which are Tin 
Faerie Queen of Spenser, 1590, 2 parts; the First, 
Second, and Fourth Folios of Shakespeare, and Shake- 
speare'a Poems, 1640. 

The autograph letters, which fonii part of the col- 
lection, are also of imi)ortance. 

Among other donors to the Library whose gifts 
entitle them to be mentioned aie the late J. T. Mac- 
kelvie, who bequeathed a collection of Ix'oks whieh c<.n 
tains a large number of choice and rare art works ; the 
late Mr. E. A. AIcKechnie, whose gifts include a mimber 
of useful books in general literature; and Mr. Kn-<i. 
Shaw, the donor of a large collection of books, particu- 
larly strong in dramatic literature. The most important 
of recent donations is und()u])tcdly that of -Mr. Ilmry 
Shaw, who, in 1912, presented his collection, the li.ibby 
of a life time, to tlie citizens. 

4.1 



Arci\LA.\h MrMCII-M. II .\.\ l)Ji()(H<. 

The H. Shaw collection partakes of the character 
of the Sir George Grey collection, containing as it does 
a number of manuscripts, early printed books and a 
splendid collection of works in general literature in 
best copies. It is especially strong in specimens 
of Oriental illuminated work, in which the Grey 
collection is deficient ; also in Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth Century printed books, of which Augustine's Dc 
Civitate Dei, 1467, printed by Johann Mentelin, of 
Strassburg, is notable, among other reasons as being 
the earliest printed book contained in the Libraiy. From 
many others with outstanding claims we select for 
special mention the Biblia Lat ina, 1479, the production 
of Adolf Rusch, of Strassburg, on account of its perfec- 
tion of workmanship. Of the modern books, typical is 
the magnificent copy of The TJoJij hand and Egypt and 
Nnhia, 6 volumes, by David Roberts, R.A., which has 
lithographs coloured by hand in imitation of the original 
drawings. The section of the Shaw collection devoted 
to art and art crafts is also worthy of special mention. 
Still another feature of Mr. Shaw's work as a collector 
is the grangerized books, the Edinhurqh Folio Sh'ike- 
upeare, which has over .'?,000 illustrations added to it, 
being the most important, but by no means an isolated 
example of this form of book-making. 

Of monetary bequests the gift of £12,150 made by 
the will of the late Edward Costley, who died on April 
IS, 1883, is the most outstanding. 

The growth of the Public Libraiy has been interest- 
ing and in recent years most marked. Commencing in 

46 




CENTRAL LIBRARY: UPPER LANDING. 




CENTRAL LIBRARY: CHILDREN'S ROOM 



.|/'."A/..LV/> Ml' .\ l('l I'M. II AS nilooK 



1880 with about 6,000 volumes, it had increased by 1887 
to 15,000 volumes, due largely to the acquisition of Sir 
George Grey's Libi'ary. In 1889 a Lending Department, 
which has steadily increased in popularity, was inaugu- 
rated. In 1913 a fireproof room was opened by the 
Mayor (Mr. C. J. Parr) for the purpose of suitably 
exhibiting the Grey and Shaw collections. 

Library work with children was undertaken in 1917, 
v.hen a system of school class-room libraries, organised 
and provided by the Library, was commenced ; and in 
the following year, upon the removal of the Grey and 
Shaw collections to another room in tlie l)uilding, a 
Children's Department (reading room and home-reading 
section combined) was instituted, and was opened by 
the Mayor (Mr. J. H. (iunson) on October 16th, 1918. 
In 1920 a commercial section, which has ali-eady proved 
its usefulness, was inaugurated. 

The extension of the City's boundaries rendered 
the establishment of district libraries a necessity. 
The first librai-y of this class to be inaugurated 
was the Leyj, Institute, which, while forming part 
of the City's library system, is munagiHl by a 
separate committee, consisting of nine members, of 
whom two aie trustees of the late Win. Leys, threfe 
elected by members of the Institute, and fciur nominated 
by the City Council. ' 

THE LEYS INSTITUTE. 
The Leys Institute was founded under the will of the 
late William Leys, who died on h\\\ October. 1*^99. The 
funds available being inadequate for the early realisa- 

48 



Al'<hl.Ayi) MIM< ll'AL H.\.\l)li()()K. 

tion of the testator's benevolent purpose, Mr. T. \\. 
Lej's, a brother of the deceased, and one of the trustees, 
•offered to defray one-half of the entire cost of erecting 
and equipping a building and to furnish it with a 
library, on condition that the Corporation piovided a 
suitable site. This pioviso was readily agreed to hy the 
Citj- Council, and on .March 29th, 1905, the Leys Insti- 
tute was officially opened by the Mayor (Hon. E. Mit- 
chelson). The building and equipment, exclusive of 
books, cost £3,234. In 1906 the gymnasium was erected 
at a cost of £1,524, exclusive of equipment, and in 1908 
a new Lending Libraiy building, the gift of Mr. T. W. 
Leys, was added. The gymnasium was subsequently 
altered into a hall specially adapted foi- a Boys' Read- 
ing and Recreation Room and (iymnasium. The total 
expendituie on buildings and equipment has been 
£6,604. An addition to the Lending Library building 
is now being made by the Tiustees at a cost of about 
£1,200. Of the 23,290 books in the Refeience and Lend- 
ing Libraiies, 16,817 have been presented by ^Ii'. T. W. 
Leys, LL.I). These include 1,404 volumes on the Fine 
Arts and 2,()72 on the T'seful Aits and Trades, which 
form a sepaiate division of the Reference Libiaiy. The 
total expenditure on the Institute and maintenance to 
the 3Ist Maich. 1022, is estimated at £15,632. The 
endowment created by the late ^Ii-. Wm. Leys, which 
is now subject to the lights of certain beneficiaries 
under his will, is \alucd at £18,500. 

The Boys' Reading and Recreation Room is ojien 
free from 7 to 9 on every night except Saturday. The 

50 



ArCKLAJ/J MISU'irAL JlAMJJiOOK. 

muiilxM' of boys on tlic loll is :iss, iiiclinlin^i; (>(> 
\m)\ Scouts. The iittt'iitlaiu'c uvci'am'S ahoiil Im. 
This is probably the largest Ijoys' institute in the Do- 
minion. Mr. T. W. Leys, LL.l)., has been ))resi(l('n( of 
the Institute since its inception, and the success which 
it has attained has been due in great measure to his 
personal interest in and benefactions to it. 

Cricket, football, aiul .swiiinninu' clubs aic afliliatrd 
to the Institute. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

Other branch libi'aries were established in (irafton 
al Mount Eden Road (191.3): in Pavnell, Manukau and 
St. (ieorge's Bay Roads (ir)i:i); in Ivcniuera, near Vic- 
toria Avenue (1!)15): and in Ki)S()ni (l!)ls), the fine 
premises formei'ly belonging to the Manukau Water 
Supply Board being acquired for the purpose. Each 
of these hbraries consists of a Reading Room, Lending 
Department, and Childi'en's Section, Epsom and 
Remuera having a separate room for boys and giils. 

A feature of the work of the libi'aries is the course 
of lectures and entertainments arranged each winter 
at the Leys Institute, Grafton, and Ejisom libraries, 
each of which has a hall attached, with a seating capa- 
city for over 3(iO ])ersons. 

Mr. Edward Shillington was the tii'st libiarian, an.l 
he occupied the position until li»i:'., wIkmi tin- present 
Chief Librarian was ajipointed. 

The folloAving statistics give in tabiilai- f.iiin iIh- 
principal facts of the jiresent jjosition and activities of 
the libraries : — 



0\1 

0^ 



X 
U 

< 



en 
O 

z 

Q 
Z 

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>^ 

n: 

a: 
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lo lo o 

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THE NEW GALLERY. 




THE ART GALLERY. 

Showing portions of the City Gallery, the Mackelvie 

Gallery, and the New Gallery. 



ArCKLAM) MIMC'IPAL IIASDHOOK. 



ART GALLERY. 

'I'lu' AucklaiHl All (ialli'vy — tlu- iii>l pciiiiaiiciil Ail 
Gallciy crects'd in tliv I )iiiiiiiiii;ii — was ojicnrd nn |-'.l, 
niary 17th, 1888, by tlio (^iovcM'iioi', Sii- W. 1'". I). .Icrxnis, 
befoi'e a large attendance of citizens, .Mr. .\. K. T. 
Devore, Mayor, presiding-. At tlie dat:" (if opcnin.i; (he 
contents of the gallery wei'e small, consisting of the 
(irey Collection, a few pictures by local ai'tists, and 
others presented by the late J. McCosh Clark, Alljin 
Mai tin, and the Auckland Society of Arts. 

From this small beginning the (iallery has steadily 
grown until to-day it contains a collection of pictures 
and works of art, which will compare more than favour- 
al)ly with the gallei'ies of liritish, American, or Aus- 
tralian cities of the same population, and even with 
those of greater size. This happy condition is due to 
the public spirit of many Auckland citizens, who have 
at various times made presentations to the collections. 

The outstanding position occujjied by the Art Gal- 
lery is due, most of all, to the bequest of the late James 
Tannock Mackelvie, at one time a I'esident of Auckland. 
]\Ir. ^Mackelvie died in 1885, and \^\ his will licqiieathed 
his art collection and a large sum of money, in trust, 
to establish a Museum of Fine Arts for the people of 
Auckland. Mi-. ]\Iackelvie's will instructed his ti'ustees 
to erect a separate gallery, but the funds at theii- dis- 
posal at the time being insufficient, Mr. ,1. II. I'pton, 
then Mayoi', suggested to the Ti-ustees that the Cor- 
jioration would erect an addition to the .Auckland .Art 

K ")7 



ArcKLAXJ) MrXKII'AL nAXDBOOK. 

(ialleiy I'of the puri)oso of housing the .Maekclvic col- 
lection. This ])i()i)osal was accepted by the Ti'ustees, 
and an agreement was thei-eupon entei'cd into between 
the Trustees and the Corporation, which being ratified 
by the Supreme Court, the Council carried out its under- 
taking, the gallciy known as the Mackelvic Gallery 
being completed and opened in l!^93. 

So i'a|)id]y did the City and Mackelvie collections 
grow that in less than two decades the accommodation 
became insufficient, Ijiit with the ti-ansfer, in 1911, of 
the .Municipal Offices, which had uj) to this time occu- 
pied rooms in the Library and Art Gallery building, 
to the new Town Hall, further accommodation was 
obtained for the collections. Alterations were under- 
taken with this object in view, and were duly com- 
pleted, the re-opening of the (ialleiics taking })lace on 
January 28th, 1913, Mr. C. J. T'arr, :\Iayor. presiding, 
and Mr. J)evore and Mr. Upton, ex-Mayors, who had 
been associated with the previous functions connected 
with the Librar.N and .\rt (iallery, taking i)art in the 
ceremony. Mr. rpt(jn was n<>u cliaiiiiian of the Mac- 
kelvie Tiiist. 

Still the space was insuflicieiil , and in 19! 4 the rate- 
payers approved the raising of a loan of €4. 000 to erect 
an additional galleiy, which was opened liy Mi-. .1 II. 
Gunson. Mayoi-. on iL'tli DeccMnbei-, lltKi. .Mi'. .1. Jl. 
rpton deli\eicd an address on this occasion. 

The record of expansion still continues. .\t the 
present time the galleries are more congested than ever. 



ACCKLAM) MrXK'll'AI, IIAM)H()()k 



jiiul the (lucstion of cxlru iiccoiriinodat ion is a^iiiti <ti 
jiiigiiiii the attciilioii of tlic ('ouiicil. 

A wold on the artistic \alur of tlir collcftions. The 
Grey eolieetion contains nian.\- old caux asses, some of 
w.hich are rejjnled to be, and nndoubtedl.v are, p;enuiiie 
old masters ; others may l)c icplicas or copies of th(^ 
originals. The City colhu'tioii eontains a ninnher of 
interesting British and Continental paintings, including 
examples of Alfi-ed Pai'sons, Brangwyn, T. McKwati, .1. 
R. Reid, Terrick Williams, R. Anning Bell, J. I.. Bicker 
ing, Stanhope Foibes, A. Hacker, Biiton Riviere, Harold 
Knight, Watson (ioi'don, T. H. Kcnnington, T. I!. 
Hardy, W. Duffield, Sir E. A. Waterlow, (i. Chambers, 
J. J. Tissot, and A. J. Hanson. The section devoted to 
New Zealand artists contains paintings by Miss liich- 
mond, L. J. Steele, P. Van der Velden, C. F. Coldie, F. 
and W. Wright, C. Blomfield, J. Gibb. T. B. Di'ununond, 
R. Proctor, K. Watkins, Albin Martin, C. \V. Foster. 
G. E. Butler, E. Spenser Macky, W. Menzies (Jibl). 
C. N. Worsley, John (iully, .1. C. Hoyte and others. 

The Mackelvic collection ct)nsists of two broad divi- 
sions, paintings and ohjtfx d'art. The latter, collectetl 
by Mr. Mackelvic himself, c()nii)rises what is perhaps the 
most valuable aggi'egation of its kind among Austral 
asian collections. In it aic to be found beautiful 
examples of caivings in metal, wood and ivory, porce- 
lain, crystal ware, mosaics, teira-cotta, enamelled ware, 
miniatures, antique clocks, watches, siniff-boxes, bon 

59 



ArCKLASJJ MCMCIl'AL nASDBOOK 



bDiiiiifrcs ami t'uiiiituic. The picture collection wliich, 
in addition to Mr. ]\Iackelvie's own selection, has been 
made largely iiiion the advice of Sir (ieoi-ge Ixeid, 
P.R.S.A., and the late Mai'cus Stone, E.A., covers a wide 
field of Modern British Ait. The latest purchases were 
made by Dr. T. W. Leys, one of the ^lackelvie Trustees, 
while on a i-ecent visit to England and th.e Continent, 
his toui- on the lattei' rcsiiltinii in the jjurchase of some 
Jun-oi)(>an artists' work. Among the oil i)aintings are 
works by (Jilbert, Gow, Logsdail, Jidius Olsson, Arnesby 
Brown, Bramley, Llewellyn, Alma-Tadema, Waterlow, 
Moore, Blair Leighton, D. Fai'(iuharson, S. >L Fisher, 
Somei-scales, (loodall, T^ tighes Stant on, Mniray, Clau- 
sen, ha Thangue, Hall, East, Brangwyn, Padday, 
Tuinci', and Roche. Of the water-colours, special men- 
tion should be made of three e.xtiiiisite Biiket Foster's. 
Recent acquisitions include examples of Macwhiiler, 
Graham, Herkomer, Bundy, Long, Collier, ]\Iunnings, 
Laui'a Knight, Spenlove, Roll, T.,ynch, Dupuy, Dinet, 
Xicot, Masriera, and (Jomez (iil, the last se\cn l)eing 
Continental artists. 

The oi'iginal Mackeb ie Trustees weie Messrs. David 
S. Murdoch, J. Logan Campbell, Thomas Russell, ami 
Albin Martin. The present Trustees are ^lessi's. J. 11. 
Ipton (Chairman), A. S. Bankart, A. Clark, T. W. Leys, 
and the .Mayoi' of .AnckluMd. e.x-officio. 

in aiidition to the foregoing, the Gallery also con- 
tains the collection of Maoii studies painted by Herr G. 
Lindauer, which are a unioiir representation of Maori 
life ami customs. The \alue of these itaintings, from an 

(>ii 



A/l.'KLAJ/J Mr.\ ICIl'AL llAMJjiOOK. 



etliiiological point of \ii-\\, is iiicst iiii;il)lr. '|'1m. collec- 
tion was presented to tlic City, in llM."), hy Mi. II. Iv 
Pai'tridse, who was the pati'on of the aiiist. 

The Russi'll Collection of Casts is also lioused in the 
(iaIN'iy. They \\(M<' ))i'esented to the Auckland MMseuiii 
in 1878 by the hite Thomas Kussell, C.M.C. I'.y an 
arrangement with the Council of the Museum and the 
City Council, the statuaiy has I)een deposited in the 
Art Gallery in exchange foi' the Sir Geoi'ge (irey collec- 
tion of Maori curios, which has been ti'ansfen-ed to the 
]\fuseum. Neither body has relituiuished the ownership 
of its collection. 

The populai' esteem in which the Art (JalU'ry is 
held may be gauged by the attendance of visitors, 
which for the year ending ."Jist iMarch, ]!)21, totalled 
148,579 persons. 

OLD COLONISTS' MUSEUM. 

This museum, which occupies two large rooms on 
the top floor of the Library and Art (Jallery l)uilding, 
was opened by Mr. J. H. (iunson, ^hiyoi', on -2-2ik1 
March, 1916. It contains a collection of pictures, maps, 
prints, documents (printed and manuscript), and objects 
illustrating the history and development of New Zea- 
land, especially the Auckland Province and City. The 
airangement of the {)ictures is chi-onological. beginning 
with the discovery of New Zealand l)y Tasman in Hi 12, 
its re-discovery by Cai)tain Cook, and the subsec|uent 
stages it passed thi'ough from the days of the mission 

III 



ArCKLASU MI'MCirAI. II AM) BOOK 



aries, whalers, and IradtT.s until the advent of British 
sovereignty. The stirring days of conflict with the 
Maoris, which passed away in the 'sixties, are also well 
represented. The City's history may be followed in 
the same way fi'oin 1840-70. 

The Museum owes its origin chieHy to the suggestion 
of Messrs. Leys and Shaw, who were impressed with 
the Early Settlers' Musi'imi, Diincdin. From the time 
the scheme was launched, during Mr. Pan's Mayoralty, 
the citizens are greatly indebted to the numei'ous 
donors who have presented items to the collection, and 
especially to Sir Edwin Mitchelson, M.L.C, .Mi'. T. \V. 
Leys, LL.D., and Mi-. Henry Brett, for the time, thought, 
nnd money which they have spent upon it. 

The items contained in the .Museum now total 750. 
The only regret in connection with the Museum is the 
inadequacy of the accommodation wherein to exhibit 
satisfactorily the oVjjects of interest which it contains. 

JOHX BARR, 

Chief Librarian and Dii-ector. 



62 



Arc K LAS J) MIWK'IPAL llAMJliOOK. 



PARKS AND RECREATION RESERVES. 

Piiui- to 1900 the City pusscsscci mily three areas 
devoted to Park puri)oises, viz., Alherl Park, acquired 
in isTI, Western Pai'k, which Ix'canie t'ity property 
four years hiter, and the honiain, which was not vested 
in the City Council until 1 s03 : but litth> was done in 
developing these areas until recent years. A pei'iod 
of activity in the acquisition of Park grounds com- 
menced with the opening, in 1911, of Point Erin Pai'k, 
and since that date many othei- grounds have been 
added either by purchase, gift, or lease, both within the 
City boundaries and beyond. At the present time the 
Council controls over 8,000 acres of Park and Reserve 
land. Development of these areas has also been stimu- 
lated, and in the last twelve years much progress in 
this dii-ection has taken jilace. 

ALBERT PARK (II Acres). 
Alberl Park, which occupies pai't of the site of the 
old Albeit Barracks, is situated in the heait of 
the City, a few yards away fidin Aucklaiids main 
thoroughfare, Queen Street, and, being on elevated 
ground, provides excellent views of the Harbour and 
City. The inoperty was handed over as Park grounds 
to the Council on A))iil islh, isTI. Traces of the old 
Barracks wall can still be seen in the Park and in 
Princes Street. On the lattei-, di\iding the Metropoli- 
tan (Grounds from (iovcrnment House f^rounds, a small 




ALBERT PARK. 




ALI3ERT PARK. 
The Princes Street Border. 



AUCKLAND ML'NlCirAL HANDBOOK. 

niarl)lr tablet, healing the t'nildu ing insciipt ion, has 
been placed : — 

TO COMMEMORATE THE UNION AND COMRADE- 
SHIP OF PAKEHA AND MAORI DURING THE GREAT 
EUROPEAN WAR. THIS TABLET WAS FIXED BY THE 
AUCKLAND CIVIC LEAGUE. SEPTEMBER. 1915. ON THE 
REMNANT OF THE BARRACK WALL. BUILT BY 
FRIENDLY MAORIS. IN 1848, AFTER THE BURNING 
OF KORORAREKA. 

The Park grounds are well laid out in flower beds 
and borders. The Princes Street border, running 
parallel with the street of that name, is about 600 feet 
long, and is continuously kept gay with a fine display 
of the gardener's art. 

The lesser borders of the Park include the Rcjyd 
border and small beds, in which aie fine displays of 
giant hydrangeas, as well as suitable fiowei'ing slnubs 
and plants. 

The smaller beds ai'e laid out during the year with 
spring flowering bulbs, and several are furnished during 
the summer and autumn with carpet bedding to design. 

Roses, of which there are now nearly 300 varieties, 
occupy a promiiuMit position. Fine specimens of 
Canary Island palms (Phoenix Canariensis), as well as 
many other exotic trees, such as Cedrus Deodara, 
Cedrus Atlantica. and many fine types of English aiul 
American oaks, English elms, birches, etc., have beiMi 
introduced. 

A feature of this Park is the area known as l^oweii 
Avenue, which, a few years ago, was a refuse tip, but 

r: (i5 



ACChLAJ/J M(\YI('U'AL HANDBOOK. 

has since been planted out in eucalyjiti and palms, and 
niaigincHi off in I'ock woi'k, containing suitable plants 
foi' this class of gaiclening. 

A fountain occupies the centre of the grounds, 
around which, artistically laid out, are foui' large 
})anel beds with Spring, Sunniier, and Autumn bedding 
plants of gorgeous colouring. Inside the fountain 
basin, water lilies (Nynipheae) have been planted. 

Near the fountain the Park Observatory is situ- 
ated, where records of the meteorological conditions 
are taken daily by Mr. Burnett. 

The Park is adorned with a number of statues, 
the chief one being that of Queen Victoria, which 
was unveiled on 24th May, 1899, by the Governor, th" 
Earl of Ranfurly. This statue, which was designed 
by Ml'. Williamson, was the fii'st statue of the Queen 
erected in New Zealand. 

A flag staff is elected on the apex of the slo])!', 
and here are located a collection of field guns, fiMui 
the Crimean and Snuth African Wars, as well as a 
number of trophies from Gallipoli and the battlefields 
of France, the latter having been jnesented to the City 
by the Defence Department. 

On the western side of the Park, facing Wellesley 
Street, are situated the Public Library, Art Gallery, 
and Old Colonists' Museum, which add additional 
pleasure to the visitors to the Park grouiuls. 

U7 



Ad'KLAXD MUNICIPAL II AM) HOOK. 

WESTERN PARK (6 Acres). 

This Park is situated between Ponsonby Road and 
Beresford Street, and is tiuly a scenic Park, possessing 
some good specimens of native and exotic trees. It 
was vested in the City Council in 1875. 

The main path leads from Ponsonby Road to 
Beresford Street, other entrances being placed in 
Howe Street and Totara Street. Seats are provided, 
and on a warm day the Park is an ideal place of rest 
and lefreshment. 

DOMAIN (194 Acres). 

The Auckland Domain, the oldest Park in the City, 
was vested in the City Council by an Act of Parliament 
of 1893. Prior to this date the area belonged to the 
Government, and was officially designated the (Govern- 
ment Domain or Auckland Paik. 

The Domain consists of a large cricket ground, 
children's playing ground, a botanic garden, native bush 

plantations, tennis lawns, etc. 

The Cricket Ground, which has entiances from 
Park Road, Domain Drive and Carlton Gore lioad, 
is the principal syjorts area of the City. Its dimensions 
may be judged by the fact that six games of fcotball 
can be carried on simultaneously. This ground is also 
used for large outdoor gatherings ; it was liere that 
the Prince of Wales, in 1920, witnessed a military 
review- and met the school children of the distiict. The 

69 




DOMAIN: VIEW OF MAIN DRIVE 



^'f .,;^^ 




^^^ 


1 






^^■Plppi^^"''-' 


^ / ' ^ 






IP-W*- "'y|^ 




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^"^W 



DOMAIN: THE BOTANIC GARDENS. 



A CCK L A y D M I 'J / ( 'IP A L 11 A S I) BOOK . 

iiiiul of the international tennis matches foi' the Davis 
Cup between Australasia and the United States was 
contested on this ground in December, 1920, special 
courts being laid down for the event. 

Prior to the formation of the Cricket (Jround, the 
area was a marsh. The di'ainage system, which was 
laid down, has transformed it into the splendid sports 
giound of to-day. It is also interesting to record that 
the site is reputed to have been a resort of the old- 
time Maoris as a place to procure eels for consumption. 

The Auckland Exhibition of 1913-14 was held in the 
Domain, and this event has resulted in great improve- 
ments to this Park. A feature of the Exhibition was 
the manner in which the grounds approaching the 
buildings were laid out in walks and Howe)- beds. 
These have been preserved and maintained, adding to 
the amenity of the Park. While the purpose of the 
Exhibition was primarily commercial, the executive 
decided that in the event of a surplus accruing from 
the undertaking it would be used in beautifying the 
area used for the Exhibition. The surplus available 
amounted to over £20,000, which has been expended in 
improving and beautifying the part of the Domain now 
officially named the Children's Playing Ground, but 
better known as the Outer Domain, on which a sports 
ground, of an area large enough to allow five football 
matches to be played at one tinu^ has been formed, 
and new drives and paths made. A Winter Garden 
has also been erected out of the Exhibition funds, and 

71 



AfcKLAM) MfMril'M. II AX DI'J )()l< . 

is used for the display of palms and pot plants of 
various kinds. The Winter dardens were officially pre- 
sented to the Citizens by Mr. Geo. Elliot (President of 
the Auckland Exhibition, 1913-1 J), on behalf of the 
Executive, on October 12th, 1S21. The Mayor of Auck- 
land, Mr. J. H. Gunson, C.B.E., presided, and, on be- 
half of the Citizens, accejjted the caie of the new build- 
ing. The Tea Kiosk and the Band Rotunda, the latter the 
gift of Mr. J. M. Mennie, are other survivals of the Ex- 
hibition. The same citizen presented, at a later date, a 
statue of Robeit Burns, in bi-onze, which has been 
erected close to the Bandstand. The figure, which is 
of heroic size, was the work of Mr. F. W. Pomeroy, 
ii.A., and stands on a granite pedestal, the height 
overall being 27 feet. It was unveiled by the Prime 
Minister, the Rt. Hon. W. E. Massey, P.C., on 
November .oth, 1921. 

The Botanic Gardens (X'eui)y an enclosed area, 
neatly laid out in lawns and flower beds, on the north 
side of the Main Drive. The greenhouses, of which 
there are nine, are open daily, Sundays excepted, for 
public inspection, and are of interest and value to both 
the amateur and professional hoiticulturihl. Plants for 
the City gardens and reserves are projjagated here. 

A commanding site in the Domain has been granted 
by the Corporation to the Council of the Auckland 
Instil lite and Museum, and in the near future Auckland's 
Way .Mt'iiH.iial and Museum will be erected here. 



A UCKLA y I) MiWWU'A L II A S I) HOOK. 

The Domain may be reached from the Cily l)y 
.Symonds Street and across the CJrafton Bridge oi' t'lom 
Manukau Road. Painell. 

VICTORIA PARK (18 Acres). 
On completion of the Fieeman's Bay rechunatic^n, 
an area fronting Patteson Street, belonging to the 
Harbour Board, was leased to the City Council at a 
small annual rental on March 11, 1901. This the Coun- 
cil formed into a reserve suitable for sports and large 
enough to permit five games of football to be played 
simultaneously. Courts for tennis, bowls, and croquet 
have also been made. Part of the area has been sur- 
rounded by a rock garden, and the tout t /^(inhh is 
both effective and pleasing. Children have also been 
catered for, a complete outfit of rockabyes, ladders, 
Roman rings, swings for babies, giant strides, etc., 
having been presented by Mr. J. Court, a worthy 
citizen and ex-Councillor. A lady supervisor of games 
and an assistant have charge of this section. 

BAYFIELD PARK (6 Acres). 
Bayfield Park is situated near the Heme Bay tram 
terminus, and is held in abeyance for further develop- 
ment. It was purchased by the City Council on 29th 
September, 1906. Part of the gi-ound is used by the 
Y.M.C.A. for tennis. 

GREY LYNN PARK {Appro,: :50 Acres). 
This Park, which was jiiesented to the Borough of 
Grey Lynn, in 1909, by the Bank of New Zealand, was 

73 




VICTORIA PARK. 
Showing the Children's Playground. 




MYERS PARK. 
Showing (in centre) the Myers' Kindergarten. 



Arc K LAM) MI'XICIJ'AL HAM) BOOK. 

added to the City's l)iTatliiiiji; sT)ac.'s at tli<' aiiialKaiiia- 
tion of Gi'ey Lynn with th(' City, in l!)l 1. It is situated in 
what is locally known as the Grey Lynn (jiilly. The 
area has been made into a recreation ground for young 
people. 

COX'S CREEK RESERVE (32 Acres). 

This Park, which is situated in the I'oiisonliy 
Borough, in 1909, and transferred to the City at the 
amalgamation of that district with the City. It re- 
inains undeveloped. 

POINT ERIN PARK (12 Acres). 

This Park, which is situated in the Ponsonby 
district, was purchased on August 8th, 1911, and 
opened by Mr. C. J. Parr, Mayor of Auck- 
land, on December 16th of the same year. It has 
an ideal beach frontage to the Waitemata Harbour, 
and is adjacent to Shelly Beach, where safe bathing is 
to be had for old and young. A concrete swimming 
|)ond (150ft. by 60ft.) was opened on this beacli in 1912. 

MYERS PARK (G Acres). 

Myers Park, which is named after the donoi-, is 
situated in a gully between Queen and Grey Streets, 
with entrances from each, and lies just behind the Town 
Hall. It was pi'esented, in 1913, by Mr. (afterwai'ds the 
Hon.) A. M. Myers, M.P., who was Mayor of Auckland 
from 1905 to 1909. The site when purchased by Mr. 
Myers was an unsightly gully, overgrown willi weeds; 



A UCKLAJD M CX/riFA L II A X J) BOOK. 

it has now been trausfoniied into a deli^litful icsei-vc, 
laid out in lawns and fiowor beds and planted with 
trees, palms and sin'ubs (native and exotic). 

An additional attraction was provided to the Park 
grounds in the form of a children's playing area, where 
swings, rockabyes, l^omaii lings, ladders, sand pit and 
wading pool were i)laced for the enjoyment and pU^asure 
of young boys and girls. 

The Park was opened on January 2sth, lit 15. by 
Mr. C. J. Parr, C.M.G., Mayor. 

Mr. Myers further displayed his interest in the 
children of the City by erecting at his own cost an ideal 
Kindergarten, which was foimally opened by the 
Governor, Lord Liverpool, on November ]5th, 1916. 

PARNELL DOMAIN (11 Acres). 

This area is situated on the western side of Glad- 
stone Road. It was vested in the City Council in 1914, 
but has not yet been developed as a Park area. 

MOUNT HOBSON DOMAIN (9 Acres). 

The Mount Hobson Domain is one of the numerous 
extinct volcanic cones which abound on the isthiiuis : 
from it splendid views of the haibour can be obtained. 
It was vested in the City Council, in liU."), subsequent 
to the amalgamation of Remuera with Auckland. In 
1921, 13 acres adjoining this Reserve were transferred 
to the Corporation by agreement with the Dilworth 
Trustees. 

77 



A rCKLAM) Mr Sir II' AL IIAyj)]i(J()K. 

In pre-l<]ui(){)eaii chiys Mount Iloltson was a poiiii 
of strategic iiiiportaiue in Maoi'i vvarfaro, as it com- 
manded the a])))i'oach from the Haiiraki Oilf. |{emains 
of fighting trenches can still be seen on the slopes of 
the Mount. Large deposits of shell, several feet deep. 
commoiil3' kiu>\vii as Maori Middens, are also found 
on the hill. 

PAR NELL PARK (9 Acres). 
Another Paik, with a frontage to the harl)(uii-, was 
acquired in the Parnell district soon aftei' the amalga- 
mation of that Borough with the City, and was opened 
in 1915. The first section of the Park to be obtained 
was the Gillies Estate, which was purchased under the 
Public Works Act. Adjoining this property was 
■' Kilbryde," which for many years had been the home 
of Sir John Logan Campbell, familiarly known as the 
" Father of Auckland." This was acquired from the 
Harbour Board, on January 21st, 1915, and the two 
properties combined were named Parnell Park, which 
was opened to the citizens on January 2Sth, l!)l."). 

Very little required to be done to either of the 
grounds, and to-day the park forms an ideal and pic- 
turesque spot for spending a holiday, being in close 
proximity to Judge's Bay, on which stands the remains 
of the old cottage formerly tenanted by Judge Swain- 
son. Delightful views of the harbour are obtainable 
from the grounds, and bathing may be indulged in on 
the beach. One of the residences in the Park has been 
utilised as a tea room. 

71) 



AI'rKLAM) Ml' Sin J' A I. II AS DHOOK. 

EPSOM DOMAIN (19 Acres). 

On the aiiialgaiuHLioii ot the Epsom Road Board 
with the City, in 1917, the Epsom Domain was 
acquired. Up to the present nothing in the way of 
iniprdvement has been done to it. 

WAIATARUA PARK (156 Acres). 

This area of ground was acquired by the City 
Council in 1918, under an arrangement with Mr. R. H. 
Abbott, who presented 100 acres of the area to the 
citizens, and is held in abeyance for Park grounds at 
a future date. Situated within the property is a large 
fresh water lake. The grounds at the present time are 
let for grazing purposes. 

CITY RESERVES. 

.Small Reserves, formed at the junction of wide 
City streets, or situated at vacant corners of streets, 
have become a feature of the City's thoroughfares. 
Some are merely grass plots, which are kept neat, 
while others are large enough to be described as minia- 
ture parks, being replete with flower beds, paths and 
lawns, where seats are provided. 

EMILY PLACE RESERVE. 

This Reserve is at the top of Shortland .Street, and 
is kept in neat lawns and flower-beds. St. Paul's 
Church, the fir.st church erected in Auckland, oi'iginally 
occupied this site. The monument to the Rev. J. F. 
Churton marks the position which the church occupied. 

.S(» 



AICIkLAM) MCMilJ-M. II AS DHOOK. 

ALTEN ROAD RESERVE. 

This is a large i\esL'i\e, siliiated near Government 
House and Supreme Court, planted with shelter trees 
and laid (jut in well-kept lawns. 

SYMONDS STREET AND KARANGAHAPE ROAD 

RESERVE AND ROCKERIES. 

Both the above Reserves ai'e well laid out in rock- 
work and flower holders. Kaiangahape Road Reserve, 
which is situated close to (h-afton Bridge, is very 
populai-, and is in contiinial use as a lesting place bj' 
City residents and country visitors. 

WAKEFIELD STREET RESERVE 

This Reserve contains a fine monument made of New 
Zealand maible, at the base of which is a bronze figure, 
erected by the Auckland Branch of the Victoria League 
to the memory of the men of the Imperial Forces, Colo- 
nial Foi'ces, and Friendly Maoris who laid down their 
lives in the New Zealand Wars. It was unveiled \^\ the 
Mayor, Mr. .J. H. Cunson, C.B.E.. on August 18th. 1920. 

OTHER RESERVES ARE: 

Marivare Reserve, Maiiukau Huad and Ranfurly 
Road, Epsom, which contains sonu' of the finest 
specimens of Portuguese oak ((Jiumts Lusi= 
taincd) in the district. 

iirooks Squai'e Reserve, Ponsonby. 

St. James' Square Reserve. 
82 



AI'CKLAM) MI'XK'II'AL ILAX DHOOK . 

Grafton Road Enibaiikinciit. 
Patteson Street Reseive. 
Customs Street West Reserve. 

The following Parks belonging to the City are situ- 
ated beyond the City Itouiidaiies. 

CORNWALLIS PARK (1,927 Acres). 

Cornwallis Park, Auckland's largest beach doinain, 
was presented, in 1!)11, to the Citizens by the Execu- 
tors of the will of the late J. Mitchell McLachlan. It 
is situated on the shcn-es of the Manukau Harbour, and 
extends from Xihotupu Park to Puponga Poiiit. The 
area, from which extensive views of the Manukau Har- 
bour and the Waikato country are obtainable, has been 
preserved in its natui'al condition, and contains tine 
groups of native bush. A monument, in memory of the 
donor's mother, was erected on Puponga Point by the 
City Council. To gain access to this domain, take train 
to New Lynn, thence by motoi-, rln Titirangi. 

TITIRANGI PARK AND SCENIC RESERVE 

(30 Acres). 
This Reserve was gifted to the City of Auckland by 
the late Henry Atkinson, on February 17th, HM.'J. From 
the highest i)i>int of this Reserve. Mount Atkinson, 
which reaches a height of 654 feet above sea lev«'l, 
commanding views of the whole Isthmus and surround 
ing country can be obtained. A motm' drive on a 

83 



A/''A'/.jy/J MI'M'tl'M. II A.X hliOOK. 

moderate gradient has been formed up Mount Atkin- 
son, and motor-cars can easily ascend to the top of 
the hill. On the lower portion of the Reserve, i)ath- 
ways have been formed through the steep bush, to 
Titirangi Beach, an ideal si)ot for picnic i)arties, 
where bathing may be indulged in, thousands of people 
availing themselves of the oppoitunity thus affoi'ded 
during the summer months. Motor-cais can bo driven 
down to the beach in dry weather. 

A motor road, named the Exhibition Drive, was 
constiiicted, at a cost of £l,00(), thi'ough the joint effoi't 
of the City Council and the Auckland Automobile 
Association, and was opened on January 25th, 1914. 
The road follows the pipe line of the water supply from 
Xihotupu, and joins the West Coast Road from Waiku- 
mete. The drive aboiuids in native bush, Kami and 
Xikau palms being most prominent. A fine specimen 
of the former ( A(j(tthii< AiiAtralii^) may be seen on Mr. 
-\. Clark's property, situated a little beyond the 
settling tanks of the City Council. 

PIHA DOMAIN (146 Acres). 
Piha Domain, situated on the West Coast, is an- 
othci- asset of the citizens which was placed in the 
care of the Coijioiation in 1916. 

KAITARAKIHE PARK (761 Acres). 
This Park, also situated on the Manukau Harbour, 
which like the other Parks in this area is covered with 
native bush, was presented to the City in 1918, by Mr 

S4 



Arc ALA J /J .\//\\J(//'AL IIAXDHOOK 



Wesley Spi'a.n.u, who eveeted in tlie ;j:i(>iiiu1s a liaiid 
some granite obelisk to the ineinory of his son, Lieu- 
tenant Xeil Spragg, and of the nien who fell dniing 
the great war. Tiie Park was opened and the memorial 
unveiled by His Woishij) the Mayor, Mr. J. H. (iunsoii, 
or. 17th March. liiiiO. To gain access to tliis Park, take 
the same route as to Cornwallis Park. 

NIHOTUPU DOMAIN (1710 Acres). 

The watershed in the \icinity of Nihotupu has been 
vested in the Council in connection \vith the water 
supply of the City. 

CORNWALL PARK (230 Acres). 

This Pai-k, which is situated just beyond the City's 
bcundai'ies, does not belong to the Council, but is vested 
in a Domain Board. It is nevertheless one of .Auck- 
land's principal reserves. 

The grounds have been maintained as a scenic 
])aik, there being only a few flowei' beds laid down. 
A portion of it has been kept for sports, and the 
Maungakiekie Golf Club has a numbei' of gi'eens 
within the Park ai'ea. Picnic parties find it a favourite 
resort. 

Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill) is the highest point 
within this Domain, and from it magnificent views of 
th( Hauraki (lulf. the ]\raiiiiki;i ITai-bour, and the 
countrv surroumliim' .Auckland can be h.ad. 



M'CI\l.A.\l) MI'Mi'l I'M. II AX DliOOK. 

The Park was the gift, in 1001, of one of Aucklands 
most venerable jiioneeis, Di'. (afterwards Sii-) John 
Logan Campbell, who an-ived in New Zealand in 18.39, 
and took up residence in the City after its foundation. 
From then until his death, in 1912, he was continuously 
associated with the City. His remains repose on the 
summit of One Tree Hill. The Park was named m 
commemoration of the visit of the Duke and Duchess 
of Cornwall and York, in 1901. 

At the northern entrance to the Park stands a 
statue of Sir John Logan Campbell, which possesses 
striking features of style and workmanship, and worthily 
commemorates the " Father of Auckland." 

T. E. PEARSON. 

Superintendent of Parks. 



86 



ArcKI.AM) MIMCII'M. II .\ S I) lU )( )K . 

CITY ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 

STREETS. 

The inipdi'taiil positimi th;U roadiiiakini^ now 
occupies in the C'ily C'ouncirs policy is icflccird in the 
progress made in the past decade. Prior to liJll the 
City possessed one paved street, viz., Queen Street, 
which, in 1902, was paved with Xeuchatel Asphalt, co- 
incident with the construction and opening of the 
Electric Tramway system. At the present time there 
are 10 streets paved w^th Neuchatel Asphalt on a con- 
crete foundation, of a total length of 2.5 miles and 
an area of 61,312 sq. yards : 6 paved with wood blocks 
on a concrete foundation, of a total length of 1.1 mih's 
and an area of 32,336 sq. yards ; and 17 j)a\ed w ith 
cement concrete of a total length of 5.6 miles and an 
area of 118,074 square yards. There are also 2 shoit 
lengths of stone sett paving, of 2663 square yards. 
Concrete paving has been used more extensively in 
Auckland than in any othei- city in New Zealand or 
Australia, and it has been laid in streets carrying the 
heaviest traffic. 

The City has been equally progressive in other 
directions. Out of a total of 184 miles of streets, 
comprising 756 in all, 367 streets, of a total length of 
83 miles, have been fully keihed and ('hannellcd. 
and 93 streets have been kerbed and channelled for 
a portion of their length, adding a furthei- 19 mih's of 
kerbed streets, and making a total of 102 miles. 

87 



ArCKLAXD MCXICIPAL HAXDBOOK. 

In the matter of siiifaciii« macadamised streets, 
the policy of tarring and dressing has been largely 
adopted, and at the present time 22 miles of carriage- 
way have been so treated. 

For the surfacing of footpaths the laying of tar toi)- 
ping on the moi-e important streets, and of tar dressing 
on others, has been adopted, and in all 1,261,700 square 
yards, or approximately 260 acres, are treated in tliis 
way. 

Where private cart or cariiage entrances cioss the 
footpaths, stone sett, concrete, asphalt, wood-blocks, or 
tar macadam paved surfaces are provided at tlic cost 
of the owners, so that a good surface for pedestrians 
is assured on all properly-formed footpaths. 

IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENT SCHEMES. 

Apart from paving operations, the Council has of 
late years cairied out many very important schemes, 
having for their object the iiniJrdvciiKMit of the j)i'inci- 
pal traffic routes in the City. The most notable of 
these is the scheme known as the Eastern Outlet, 
which was started in H»1.5 and completed in H)2(). The 
trams connnenced to niii on this route in I'cliiuary, 
1921. 

The work conijjrised tlu' widening of Beach Koad 
from 66 feet t<j an ultimate width of 110 feet. An agree- 
ment was made with the Uailway Department, under 
which it contributed a 30-foot strip of land along the 

88 




JERMYN STREET (now Anzac Avenue). 
before commencement of improvements. 




ANZAC AVENUE, 
after completion of improvements. 



Arc K LAM) MryiCll'AL II AyjJBOOK. 

greater part of this load. The leniaiiuler of the land 
required was obtained by the Council acquiiinji the 
whole of the properties between Beach Road and the 
narrow street known as Jei-myn Street, together with 
the land and pioperties on the western side of 
Jerniyn .Street. The latter street was only '.V.i feet 
wide, and was most awkwardly graded, having 
two or three hollows in its length and some 
very steep grades. The Council having obtained the 
power to acquire the whole of the properties, proceeded 
to construct what is virtually a new street, 84 feet wide, 
since named Anzac Avenue, which, for a ])ortion of its 
length, follows the line of Jerniyn Stieet, and joins 
at its lower end, with bold curves. Beach Road ; and 
at its ui)i)er end. Syiiionds Street, after passing over 
the site of the old University College, fornieily the 
first Parliament building of New Zealand. 

A])ail from the acquisition of jjroperty, which has 
cost in all £234,000, the Council has spent the sum of 
£43, .500 in excavating the pi'oj)erty to new levels, involv- 
ing in the course of constructing the new road (Anzac 
Avenue) and levelling the sections abutting thereon, 
the removal of ai)i)roximately 70,000 cubic yards of 
spoil, and a similar quantity in excavating the sections 
abutting on Beach Road, and forming, kerbing, and 
paving Anzac Avenue from the Junction of Beach Road 
to Symonds Street, while a further sum of £16,200 has 
been spent in kerbing and pa\iii,ir Beach Jioad. 




GILLIES AVENUE, 
Example of Suburban High'vay. 




CUSTOMS STREET WEST. Baths. 

Showing Retaining Walls and Hobson Street Baths. 



AI'CKLAyi) MI'Mil I'M. II AS DHOOK. 

At the time of embarking upon the scheme, it was 
anticipated that the sale of properties, after the im- 
provements had been completed, would practically re- 
imburse the cost of acquiring the property and carry- 
ing out the improvements. But owing to the long dura- 
tion of the war, and the unsettled conditions which 
have succeeded it, it was found tliat the interest 
charges on the large amount of capital sunk in the 
undertaking would prevent this expectation being real- 
ised, and £100. (X)() of Loan nioiicy has been raised. 

The improvements are, however, of so important a 
character that the work is fully justified, and it is 
pi'obable that the increased ratable value of the pro- 
jierties will enable the Council to meet the aiimia! capi- 
tal charges in connection witli the scheme. 

Important improvements, with the co-oj)eration of 
the Auckland Harbour Board, have also been effected 
on the water-front, the principal one being the widen- 
ing of Customs Street West and its continuation (Fan- 
shawe Street) to and i)ast the north of Victoria Park, 
as a 100-foot wide street. 

The works cai-ried out include the erection of three 
reinforced concrete retaining walls, aggregating a total 
length of 1,775 feet, the construction of a liigh and a 
low level road, each 80 feet wide, between Albert and 
Nelson Streets, and an inclined roadway, 20 feet wide, 
connecting them at the Hobson Street intersection. 

Lower Hobson Street, from the low level road to 
the wharf, was also widened to 100 feet, and a graded 

;t-2 



AUCKLA.M) MIMCH'AL IIASDHOOK. 



I'uad, leading fioiii the high level I'natl ronnefting with 
Nelson Street, formed. 

Fanshawe Sti'eet, from its intersection at kelson 
Street to Victoria Park, was increased in width to l()(i 
feet, and from that point northward an extension of 
Fanshawe Sti'eet was constructed as far as Beaumont 
Stieet. The total cost of carrying out these imi)i-ove- 
ments was £46,646. 

In connection with this series of undertakings the 
Harbour Board was able to assist, hy arranging for the 
transfer of lessees' interests from property required for 
street pui-poses to other portions of the Board's pro- 
perty. 

The waterfront on the eastern side of Queen Street 
has also been imjiroved. The improvements were made 
possible in the first place by the reclamations cairied 
out by the Harbour Board and secondly by the co- 
operation of the Board and the Kailway Department 
with the City Council. Prior to the alterations lieing 
undertaken, Quay Street practically finished at liieak- 
water Road. A new road, named King's Drive, 100 feet 
wide, now continues Quay Street in a straight line to 
the cliff at Campbell's Point. Tn the course of the 
work connected with this scheme, the old locomotive 
sheds were removed to an adjacent locality. 

Another improvement was carried out in conjunc- 
tion with the Railway Department ; Mechanic's Road, a 
nai'i'ow tortuous street, being convei-ted into a bold 
curved roadway, 100 feet wide, and renamed the Strand. 



AUCKLAM) MIWlCli'AL HANDBOOK. 

Sti-eet-wicleiiiiig operations have been carried out 
in other districts, a portion of Symonds Street, opposite 
Khyber Pass Koad, and a ship of Monnt Eden Road, 
adjacent to the Giafton Library, being increased from 
66 feet to 76 feet. Another section of Symonds .Street, 
south of St. Paul's Church, was w i(hMie(l lo 90 feet by 
the ei'ection of a reiiifoi'ced concrete retaininsi wall on 
what was originally intended to be the line of 
street, but which evidently had })een abandoned on 
account of the steep nature of the countiy abutting 
the road. 

O'Connell Street, one of the City's oldest thorough- 
fares, which was originally 18 feet wide, has been in- 
creased to 33 feet, the work being carried out with 
the co-operation of the property owners on the eastern 
side of the thoroughfare. The alterations necessitated 
the removal of Auckland's first wooden house, erected 
by the late Sir John Logan Cami)bell, to a new site in 
Cornwall Park. 

High Street has also been increased in width finrn 
20 feet to 33 feet on a portion of its length. 

The most recent operation of this class was the 
widening of Remuera Road at the base of Mount Hobson, 
where, although the maximum increase of the roadway 
did not exceed nine feet, the impi'ovenn.'nt is con- 
siderable. 

LIGHTING OF STREETS. 

The principal business .streets and tramway routes 
of the City are lighted by electric lamits. four of which 



.1 UCKLA ND M ( WK 11' A L II A .V I) HOOK. 

ai'O of 2,000 C'UiuUc power, 32 ot" 1,00U c;iiidl(> powci", 65 
of 1 00 candle ])o\v('r, and 26 of 32 candle powei'. 

(ias lif^hts, of which I here are 920, each 50 carnlle 
power (nominal), are used foi' the illumination of resi- 
dential and suburban streets. 

BRIDGES. 

The only bridge of any importance in the City, w ith 
the exception of one or two bridges belonging to the 
Railway Department, is the Grafton Bridge, the others 
being wooden structures over creeks, etc. 

Grafton Bridge is notable as ha\ iiig the longest 
three-hinged arch in the woild, and was, at the time 
of its construction, the longest single-span arch con- 
structed in reinforced concrete. 

The Bridge, which is 973 feet in length, consists of 
11 girder spans, besides the central arch span, made 
up as follows : — 

One sjian of 35 feet. 
One span of 37.5 feet. 
Three spans of 75.5 feet each. 
One span of 81 feet. 
Two main piers, 13 feet each. 
Centre span, 320 feet. 
One straight girder, 83.5 feet. 
One straight girder, 80.5 feet. 
One straight girder, 41 feet. 
The balance is nuide up by filled ii|i .ipproaches of 
20 and 22 feet respectively at each end. 
.. 07 



ArcKLAMJ .yrX/C/J'AL HAy/JliOOK. 



Till- Bridge was designed and built by the Ferro- 
I'unciete Company of Australasia, Ltd., under the 
supervision of the City Engineer, the contract price 
being £31,918. The total completed price was £35,441, 
while a further £5,000 was spent in acquisition of land 
and in legal and other expenses. 

The main ai'ch consists of two ribs, 6 feet by 4 feet 
7 inches at the abutments, 10 feet by 4 feet 3h inches 
at the quarters, and 5 feet 6 inches by 4 feet at the 
centre hinge. The abutment hinges are of cast steel, 
and are carried on steel jiiidei- grids. The total length 
between the abutment hinges is 315 feet, the rise 
from the bottom hinge to the central hinge is 84 feet, 
and the greatest height above the creek 147 feet. Six 
of the straight girders are of the open type and the 
remainder solid. There are three girders to the width 
of the bridge, the two outer being under the kerb line. 
The footpaths are carried out from the outer girder on 
cantilevers. The width of the bridge between j)arapets 
is 36 feet, of whicli 21 feet is carriage way, and the 
remainder, two footpaths of 6 feet each. 

It is interesting to note that the total amount of 
Bteel used was over 337 tons, and of concrete 5,504 
cubic yards. 

The Bridge was commenced in l!i07, and coinijleted 
in March, 1910. It was oiiencd foi' traffic in April of 
the same year. 

CJn each side of the Symonds Street approach to 
tlic Bridge, bronze tablets, with raised lettei'ing, have 



'.ts 



Arc K LAM) MIWICirAL 11 AM)li()OK 



been Hxed ; the one on the iioitli side being i-elative 
to the .structure itself, the otlier designed to commem- 
orate the pioneers whose mortal remains are deposited 
ia the cemetery spanned by the bridge. 

RESERVOIRS. 

THK WAITAKKKI-: KESKKVOIH is situated on 
the Waitakere Stream, about 14 miles from .\uekland. 
This, the first impounding reservoir constructed by the 
Council in connection with its gravitation scheme, has 
a storage capacity of 220 million gallons, and has 
yielded, with the diy weather flow of the stream, 3 
million gallons as its minimum daily supply. The water 
area of the Reservoir is 64 acres, and tlic catchment 
area 2,200 acres. The overflow weir, which is lOO feet 
long, is situated 580 feet above sea-level and 50 feet 
above the bed of the stream. The dam is 540 feet in 
length, and is curved to a radius of 382 feet, measured 
to the upstream face. The width on the bottom is 231 
feet, and at the toj) it is 3 feet (5 inches. It was com- 
pleted in 1906, and the cost of construction was £29.600. 
The Engineer for the work was Mr. II. ^runio "Wilson, 
C.E., and the Contractor, Mr. Billington. 

The watei- is brought to the Cit.y l).v a -iT-inch dia- 
meter steel locking-bar main. 

XIIIOTl'Pr RKSKKVOIR. — On the Nihotupu 
Stream there are two reservoirs, the upper one holding 
69 million gallons, and having a water area of 10 acies 
and a gatho'ing ground of ].310 acres. The \\ater is 

100 







^l. 



si I 





















NIHOTUPU (MAINl DAM, IN C 








M 




^-i; 



RSE OF CONSTRUCTION. 



M'CKI.AXI) MI.\l<il>.\L ll.Wnnooh 



impounded by a reiiifuiccd ((iiicrctc slab and ])ii( tress 
dam, 3S feet above sticain level. Its construct ion was 
undertaken as an emei'u,'en(y mensui'c, to aii.nniciit tin- 
storatic at A\'aitakere, jjendinu; the compli't inn ot' the 
]\Iain l)am at Xihotufju, Vint it will form a peinianent 
poitidii lit' the stoi'ai^e system. 

The Main I )am is situated (Acr \\ miles down the 
sti«>am, at the toii of the main falls, where the sides 
of the liver contract, but on account of the compara- 
tive steepness of the sides of the valley above, it has 
had to be constructed to a hei<;ht of 146 feet from river 
bed to weir level. The dam, which is designed as a 
gravitation dam. is curved on i)lan, the radius being 
450 feet, and the maximum length will be, approxi- 
mately, 540 feet, while the maximum thickness is 104 
feet, diminishin.ii' at the toii to 1-2 feet. The total «|uan- 
tity of water impounded will be ")1() million gallons. 
Tlie water area of the Reseivoir, when full, will be 36 
acres, while the total aiea of the ^atheiing ^I'ouml is 
2,400 acres. 

It is expected that the Dam will be completed in 
the fiist half of 1923. 

It is being constructed of mass concrete, with blue- 
stone plums or sinkers embedded, and will contain, 
when finished, ujnvards of 70.000 cubic yaids of con 
Crete. 

The Xihotupu Stream, with the two reservoirs 
above described, is exiiected to yield a daily supply of 
5 million gallons of water. 

101 




NIHOTUPU (MAINi DAM. SHOWING WORK IN PROGRESS. 



Arc Id. AX I) MISU'U'Al. IIASJJJiOOK. 



Tlic coiisl iiu'tiiMi (if the sci'vicc rcscivuirs has 

varied accord iii,<>' to llie time of their consli-uct i l)iil 

those miii-e recently creeled !i;i\i' heeii luiiH of reiii- 
f-orced concret(\ with \-eilical walls and I'einfoiced con- 
crete I'oofs. The s(M-\ ice IJescMVoirs situated at Arch 
Hill and Khybi'i- Pass have each a cai);icity of three 
million jiallons, with a dei)th of ±1 feet 6 inches, while 
a third on Monid Kden has a depth of 15 feet and a 
capacity of one and a half million gallons. 

CITY MARKETS. 

Auckland's first Municipal Markets were situated 
between Wellesley Street and Cook Sti'eet, and were 
opened in 1873. They wei'e used until l!HT, when the 
first of the two new buildings, situated in Customs 
Street West, was o])en(Ml. The old Markets were 
demolished in 1921. 

The present buildinj^s wei'e erected from the de- 
signs of the City Engineer, foi' the purpose of pro\-i(lin.>i 
accommodation for firms cariyin.n on business as whole 
sale fruit atul luodnce auctioneers and merchants. 

Building Xo. 1 is of reiid'oi-ced concrete fi'ame con- 
struction, with brick cavity walls, 11 inches thick in 
panels. The fioors are of leinforced concrete, and the 
roof is of 24-gauge galvanised corrugated iion. The 
co»t of this building complete was £1:3, OOO, the actual 
floor area provided being 38,623 square feet. The main 
part of the building consists of a basement, ground 
flooi' (three feet above street level), first and second 

103 



AfCKLAXI) MrXK'/l'AL JIAyDliOOK 



floors ; the other portion is an Auction Mart, of one 
storey. 

Buildin.f? No. 2 is of similar construc-tion, w ith divid- 
ing walls 9 inches thick. The first floor and the middle 
portion of the ground floor, 70 feet wide, are formed 
with wooden joists covered with l^ inch T. k G. floor- 
ing, the I'emaining 56 feet being of reinforced concrete ; 
the loof is covered with 26-gauge galvanised corrugated 
iron, the principals being of steel, and the purlins of 
wood. The cost of this building was £36,100, and in- 
cludes a proportionate cost of back roads, jjaved with 
concrete, draughting charges and Clerk of \\ orks' 
wages. The building, with the exception of " A" i)or- 
tion (which is of three-storey construction) has a gi-ound 
floor, 3 feet above- street level, 14 feet high, and a first 
floor, 9 feet high to the undei'side of the lieams, the 
total floor area being 11(),0U) square feel. In the "A" 
portion, a cold store was provided at the expense of 
the firm leasing that portion, but the cost is not in- 
cluded in the above-mentioned figures. It is interesting 
to note that the Council aci|uii-ed this sit(> on account 
of its proximity to the waterfiont, and subsequentl.v 
erected buildings to accommodate, amongst others, 
those who had been its tenants in the old Maikcl build- 
ings, situated near the Town Hall. By this cours(>, the 
l)rotluce business has been more or less confined to one 
part of the City, thus I'educing cartage to a iiiininnnu 
and preventing trafiic of produce to and from the 

Hit 




CITY M 




KETS. 



rchl.AXI) MrMcil'AL IIAyDBOOK. 



markets having to pass thi'ough the principal shopiiinfi 
centre, Queen Street, as was formerly the case. 

The Contractoi's t'oi- both buiklings were Messrs. 
Fletcher Bros., Ltd. 

BATHS AND BATHING FACILITIES. 

Tlie City Council maintains three large swimming 
Baths at Ponsonby, Parnell and Hobson Street West, 
also small bathing sheds on the beaches at the foot of 
Sentinel Road, Ponsonby, and Victoria Avenue, 
Remuera. 

The use of two Baths, formerly located at Albert 
Street and Customs Street West, was dispensed with, 
owing, in the former case to the lack of pati'onage and 
in the latter to make room for City improvements. 

The following is a brief description of the three 
•swimming Baths, which were designed by the City 
Engineer and erected under his supervision. 

SHELLY BEACH SALT WATER BATH, I'OX- 
SONBY, which is situated on the beach frontage of 
Point Erin Park, was erected at a cost of £6,500. and 
was opened on the 23rd November, 1912. 

The swinnniiig pool is 15()ft. by Boft., and is sur- 
i'oiindcd l)y heavy concrete i-etaining walls, the ilooi', 
Avhich is sloped to foi-in a deep and shallow end, l)eing 
also of concrete. The water is brought directly from 
the sea through a valve in the wall. 

10.-) 




SHELLY BEACH BATH. 




PARNELL SALT-WATER SWIMMING BATH. 



AIJCKLAM) MIMCWAL IIA.\l)IUKfl\ 



On the Park side of the liatli, a l)iiil(liii,ii, coiitain 
ing 56 dressing boxes, Caretaker's Quarters and Oflicc, 
and a eoinmodious grand stand, lias been built on a 
foundation of leinforced concrete piles and beams. 

PARNEIJ. SALT WATKI^ JlATll was erected on 
the beach at Point Resolution, and was oflicially 
opened on 7th March, 1914. Access is obtained liy 111 
steps, which zig-zag down the face of the cliff. 

The swinnning jjool is 194 feet long, with a niaxi- 
nuun width cf 149 feet, and is enclosed by massive 
conciete walls. The natural sea bed forms the bottom 
of the bath, providing an average depth of water 
at ordinary tides of -1 feet to 7 feet. Water is 
obtained from the sea through sluices in the north 
wall. A hardwood fence has been consti ucled on tin' 
two seaward walls, to ensure the safety of bathers. 
Commodious dressing sheds, each equipped with showei- 
baths, for women, men, girls, and boys, are placed on 
the west, east, and south sides of the jjond. Mixed 
bathing, under sti'ict luh'S, is pei'mitted. The situation 
of this Bath renders it suitable for sun bathing. 

HOHSON STREET BATHS are situated at the 
junction of Customs Sticet and Stuidee Street, and 
were (u-ected, uiuler contract, by Messrs. J. T. Julian 
k Sons, at a cost of £10,673, and were ojx'iied on the 
17th Decembei', I!)I4. (See illustration opposite page !Hi). 

The site was foiineily a jxirlion of the haibour, 
and the whole of th(> bnildin- had to be i-arried on 



ircK/.A.XJj Mf.XJC/rJL HAyjJJiOOK. 



reinforced concrete piles, driven an average d(i>th of 
24 feet. 

The liuildin^ is constvncted of icinfoi'oed con- 
crete, with iiaiK'l walls of brick, the i)Ools ])ein.a: en- 
tirely of reinfoi'ced concrete. The accommodation 
comprises a swinmiing bath for men, 100 feet long by 
50 feet wide, in a hall 122 feet by 72 feet, with 65 
dressing rooms, on top of which is an extensive gallery^ 
capable of seating 450 person.s. The women's swim- 
ming bath, 60 feet by 30 feet, is in a hall. 82 feet by 
57 feet, with 55 diessing rooms. Both pools are lined 
with white tiles and have sloping floors. 

Ill addition to the swinmiing baths, there are 9 
slipper baths, a caretaker's residence, and a laundry^ 
equipped with washers and driers. 

Tlic Baths are provided with tepid salt water, 
obtained liy utilising the letuni flow from the con- 
densers of the Tramway I )epart mi'iit s Powei' Station, 
Hobson Street, and the inlets and outlets have lieen 
arranged to ensure a cinitimious passage of water 
tlnough the baths at all times. About one-third of the 
roof area over each lialh is left ojjen, and {n-ovides 
ample ventilation, (did water spiays have been fi.xed 
on the roof of the mens bath, while shower baths and 
other conveniences are also avaihible. The slijjjx'r 
baths are |»r<tvided with hot and cold water (salt an(i 
fresh). 



A CCA LA J/J M f/NICIFA L UANDJUJOK. 

MUNICIPAL HOUSING. 

The question of providiiiy houses for woiknieu has 
at various times received the consideration of Council, 
but it was not until 1915 that it was resolved to erect 
six woikei's' cottati;es on land bchiiiiijin.n: to the Council 
in C'lai'ence Street, Ponsonby. Four of these are de- 
signed as semi-detached and two as detached cottages. 
Competitive designs were invited, and the jjlans of Mr. 
T. G. Price were accepted. The accommodation pro- 
vided for each house consists of 5 rooms, bathroom, 
wash-house, etc. The total cost, exclusive of land, 
was £2,264. These houses are let on weekly tenancies, 
the present rents being £l. 

The matter was again under consideration in Sep- 
tember and Xovember of 1918, wIhmi a scheme was 
submitted, providing for the erection of 224 houses ujion 
three City sites, at a total cost of £165,855, which 
included roading in each case- and the purchase of 
the necessary land. On two of the sites there was 
already property belonging to the Council. 

After cai'eful deliberation, the larger scheme was 
deferred, but the Council resolved to take steps to 
erect, on the site foi-merlj- occupied by the Abattoir, 
in Grey Lynn, 79 dwellings, and, with this end in view, 
applied to the Government for an advance of £50.000 
to carry out the proposal. It was ultimatel.v found, 
howevei', that £10,000 was the maxinuun that ccuild lie 
advanced in an.y one year. This sum was accordingly 
borrowed from the State Advances Office, .\fter con- 

10!) 



.1 ( -CKLA y I) M I NlCirA L 11 A SI) HOOK. 

sideratiori of tlic \;ii-ii)UK types of cottages, the City 
Engineer was instructed to erect 10 detached cottages, 
of five rooms each, on allotments having a frontage 
on Old Mill J^)a(l of 10 feet each and ;i dcptli of lid 
feet. The houses were designed by the City KnginctT. 

The erection of these houses was undertaken when 
the price of labour and materials was at its highest, 
but, notwithstanding, the Council considered it advis- 
able to construct the houses of permanent material, 
and for the most part earthenware hollow blocks, is 
inches by 9 inches by 6 inches, wei'e adopted for the 
outer walls and concrete or brick for the internal walls. 
The cottages were plastered internally and rough- 
casted externally. The ten houses were conii)leted at 
an average cost of £l,IOO, or, with the land, £l,250, 
and were sold, with the land, on a rent purchase agiee- 
ment, £50 deposit being paid, the balance to be paid in 
half-yearly instalments of £44 Is, extending over a 
period of 25.\ years. 

DRAINAGE AND SEWERAGE. 

The natural configuration of the oldei' i)oi-tions of 
the City made drainage a fairly easy matter, tlie 
gullies forming natural water-courses into which drain- 
age could easily be led, and in coui'se of time pipes 
and culverts were used to carry th<' diainagc to the 
level of high or low tide. 

With the increase of population, the pollution of 
the foreshore became such as to render some more 



Arc K LAS D ML'MCll'AL UASUBOOK. 



.suitable nietliod df dealing w itli the sewage necessary, 
.md, as a result, a comprehensive scheme for the 
interception of these gully seweis was undeitaken and 
carried to a successful conclusion. 

Following this work, the connection of the various 
City sew'ei's with the main system has proceeded, and 
the only work remaining to be done is the construction 
of certain separate sewers on the low levels of the 
City, the sewage fiom which will liave to be pumi)ed 
into tlic l)raiiiage Board's System. 

In the older portions of the City, the sewers were 
made large enough to carry both sewage and storm- 
water, but in most of the suburban districts, the reticu- 
lation of which w'as carried out prior to their amalga- 
mation with the City, the provision is not sufficient, 
and vai'ious means have to be adopted for dealing with 
the stormwater. In many cases this is still carried off 
by the natural water-courses, in < it hois tlie storm- 
water is led into caves and vaults in the lava rock, 
where it ultimately finds an exit into the old water 
course. 

In the City's reticulation system, no less than 191 
miles of sewers, varying from 6 inches to 9 feet in 
diameter, have been laid. 

In many of the principal streets the reticulation 
sewers are laid on both footpaths, to obviate the con- 
stant disturbance of the roadway surface, while, owing 
to the liill.v nature of the City, others necessaril\ have 

112 



AUCKLAXI) MrMCirAL IIAMJJiOOh. 

to be hiiu in jii-ivalo property at tlie back of llii' houses, 
instead of under the street. 

COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. 

The refuse of the City is collected by the^ Council's 
own staff, and conveyed in its own plant to the 
Destructor or to tips. 

In the business portion of the City, the collection 
is made three times per week ; in the inner residential 
districts twice weekly, and in the outer suburbs once 
weekly. 

The refuse from the outer districts is deposited on 
tips, and that from the business portion and near resi- 
dential districts is taken to the Refuse Destructor, which 
is situated between Patteson Street and Drake Street, 
and there burned. Drake Street being at a level 25 
feet above Patteson Street, the refuse is tipped into 
bins and thence into a four-grate Meldrum Patent 
Simplex Regenerator Destructor. 

The Destructor is able to burn, at a maxinnim 
capacity, 40 tons of refuse per day of 24 hours, the 
normal quantity destroyed being approximately 20<) 
tons per week. 

The hot gases from the Destructor, before reach- 
ing the main flue and chimney, pass through a com- 
bustion chamber, and thence to a Babcock and Wilcox 
Boiler, having 1,966 square feet of luxating surface. 
The steam from this source is utilised in connection 



ArcKLAM) MiyinrAL handbook. 



with the forced diaiiglit tu tlu' ruinaces, also in con- 
nection with the feed pnnips to boilers, and in driving 
a vertical steam engine used for power in the adjoining 
corporation workshops. It was formerly more fully 
utilised as a complement to the boiler power at the 
Electricity Power Station before the latter was removed 
to its present site. 

QUARRY. 

For a great number of years the City's supply of 
stone for the making and repair of macadamised 
loads has been principally derived from the Council's 
Quarry ((jf acres), which is leased from the Govern- 
ment Prisons Department, Mount Eden. 

The machineiy installed consists of : 

1 Babcock and Wilcox boiler, of 75 h.p. 

1 Tangye single cylinder steam engine, 14| 

inches diameter by 2S inches stroke. 

2 Baxtei' jaw stone breakei's, 20 inches by 16 

inches. 
1 Set of Baxter granulating rolls, together with 

the necessary screen conveyors, etc. 
1 Air compressor, 11 inches by 12 inches, which 

sujjplies the air for the pneumatic diills. 

Owing to the uncertain temire of the lease, the 
disposition and arrangement of the plant is not as 
satisfactory as the Council would desire. 

Attached to the stone-breaking plant is a large 
shed, in which are installed a r(>vnlving cylinder for 

I I I 



AUCKLAND MUNICIPAL HANDBOOK. 

licalaiijj stone, tar lioilcrs and tai' inacadaniiscis, wlieie 
tan-od macadam, tarred toppings and tarred chips ai-e 
l)re})ared for Council's street works. All th(; latter 
j)lant is of local manufacture. 

Tlie norma! output of the Quarry is abinit 20,000 
cubic yai'ds per annum, but it has reached ovei- 30,000 
during busy periods. 

STABLES. 

For the cai'ryiiig out of the maintenance services, 
and numerous public works executed by direct labour, 
tile Council keeps, in addition to motors, a consider- 
able number of horses. The horses are stabled at 
vaiious depots, the principal one being situated on the 
Council's pro))erty, Patteson Street, where a commodi- 
ous ):)uil(ling, containing two stoi'eys of stalls, with 
lofts, has been erected, giving accommodation for 93 
horses, while six loose boxes are provided for horses 
that are sick oi' needing special attention. This two- 
storey stable is the only one of its kind in New Zea- 
land, although this form of stable is common in Great 
Britain. 

Other stables are situated at Parnell, Remuera and 
Grey Lynn Depots of the Council, 102 horses being 
housed in the central and branch stables. The remain- 
ing animals, including those turned u\i{ to grass on 
account of sickness or injury, are distril)ut('d in tlu' 
public parks, at Nihotupu Ham Construction Works and 
the Council's farm at Harkin's IN. int. The total num- 
ber of horses fed is 115. 

II.") 



Ai'CKLAJ/J MIWnirAL IIAMJliOUk. 

The Council's farm at Jlarkin's Point, sonic 12 
iiiilos up tlic llai'bour, consists of 478 acres, of wliich 
all but TOO acres are improved. It was acquired in the 
first place for the disposal of ni.i-litsoil, but that system 
having been superseded it is now used for grazing and 
for raising of stock. The avei-age number of stock 
grazed is from ino to I3(). 

CORPORATION DEPOT. 

The Council's Main Depot, Patteson Street, con- 
tains the Main Stores of the City Engineer's Depart- 
ment, workshops for blacksmiths, carpenters, wheel- 
wrights, painters, plumbers, stonemasons' sheds, and 
offices for overseers, foremen and sewer inspectors, 
while immediately adjoining are situated the Refuse 
Destructor and a Dog Pound. 

PUBLIC CONVENIENCES. 

The Council has erected and nuiintains twenty- 
seven conveniences, or comfort stations, five of which 
are placed underground in different parts of the City, 
the largest being in Customs Street West, outside the 
Government Buildings. Thirteen stations are located 
in the parks 

CORONER'S COURT AND MORGUE. 

The building serving these purposes was erected 
within the Hospital grounds in 1912-13, from the de- 
signs of the City Engineer, at a cost of £1,616. 

117 



J / V • A' A.I XD .1/ / WK -/J' A L HA XDBOOK. 

The accoaimodation provided consists of a Court- 
room, 21 feet bj' 15 feet, Coroner's Office, Public Wait- 
ing-room, and separate mortuaries and post-mortem 
rooms for general and Hospital purposes. 

CEMETERIES. 

The Council controls two Cemeteries, one of which 
is situated in Symonds Street, but, except for the in- 
terment of certain blood relatives of those whose 
remains ai'e buiied theie, is closed. 

This Cemetery contains the mortal remains of Cap- 
tain William Hobson, R.X., the first Goveriu)r of New 
Zealand, and of many other early pioneers. On its 
lower slopes still Hiuirish a profusion of tree ferns and 
other native flora. 

The principal Cemeteiy, familiarly known as Waiku- 
mete Cemetery, is situated at Glen i-lden, 9 miles from 
the City by road and 11 miles by rail. It occupies 307 
acres, of which some 98 acres have been liiought into 
use, the i-emainder being put down in grass and 
planted with trees. 

The north-western portion of the Cemetery has 
been set aside exclusively foi' the burial of returned 
soldiers, and at the entrance thereto the Returned 
.Soldiers' Association has erected a fine obelisk of 
Nelson marble, with Sicilian marble panels, in memory 
of those who lost their li\cs in the Great War. 

118 



AUCKLAyiJ MUXICIPAL UAyj)Ji(K)h 



BY-LAW ADMINISTRATION. 

The liy-laws relating to the erection and alteration 
of buildinfz;s, the conti'ol of hoardings, the laying of 
drains, and othei' plumbing woi'k, arc administered by 
the City Engineei-. The staff consists of the Chief 
Building Inspectoi", two Building Inspectoi-s, two 
Plumbing and Drainage Inspectors, and two Office 
Assistants, who attend to the issuing of pei'inits, etc., 
and to other routine business connected with the City 
Engineer's Department. 

The number of permits issued varies considerably, 
depending largely upon the financial barometer, but 
is influenced by other causes. The following are the 
figures for the year ended 31st March, 1921 — 

No. of permits for the year ... ... 2,046 

Building value ... ... .... £895,623 

As illustrating the progress which has been made, 
the figures for the year ending 31st March, 1913, are 
of comparative interest. In that year, 899 permits, for 
buildings, valued at £399,258, were issued. 

The position of City Engineer has been occupied 
by the following :— Mr. William Anderson, 1871-1899, and 
Mr. A. A. Wrigg, 1899-1906. The present holder of 
the office was api)ointed in the lattei- yeai'. 

WE. BUSH, M. Inst. C.E.. 

Citv Engineer. 



119 



AUCKLASD M(Mi/J'AL IIAMJliOOK. 



WATER SUPPLY. 

Ill the eai'ly days of the City, the water supply was 
obtained from storage of rain water, springs, and wells 
(public and private). The public wells, with pumps at- 
tached, \vere situated as follows. Two were in Queen 
Street, one nearly opposite Mr. J. H. Dalton, tailor, and 
the other opposite Hardie's Buildings ; one in Albert 
Street, opposite Masefield's Buildings ; and one in 
Kitchener Street, nearly opposite the Magistrate's 
Court. There was also a spring in Wellesley Street 
East, outside the old barrack wall. It is interesting 
to note that when the asphalting of Queen Street 
necessitated the removal of water mains from road to 
footpath, two of the old wells w^ere unearthed. The 
new water mains now pass through them. 

In those days people had to carry their supplies 
in buckets from the wells to their homes. The journey 
to the wells began at 5 a.m., and so great was the 
demand that queues were formed so that everyone 
got to the well in turn. 

In 1864, an agitation was raised about the 
difficulty of obtaining water, with the result that 
the Government instructed the late Mr. Henry 
Wrigg, C.E., to report on a water supply for the 
City. Mr. Wrigg recommended a giavitation scheme 
from Nihotupu, the head woi-ks suggested by him 
being close to the site of the recently constructed 
auxiliary dam. Nothing was done in connection 
with the report, and the old state of things 

li'l 



AlJCKLAyiJ MCMCU'AL HAyDBOOK. 

continued until 1S69, when the Government laid a 
6-inch main from the small lake in the Domain to the 
City, rill Domain Street, Abercrombie Street and 
Wakefield Street ; stand pipes being erected at various 
points (11 route. Still the supply was inadequate, and in 
Januaiy, 1872, owing to a drought, water was sold in 
the streets by hawkers, and resulted in the Citj' Coun- 
cil augmenting the Domain supply by pumping 30,000 
gallons per day fiom Seccombe's Well, Khyber Pass 
Road. Even with this addition, the supply was still 
meagre, and only fulfilled the mere necessities of 
living. There was no surplus for public or private 
baths, for garden or street watering, and. worse still, 
for fire-fighting — all of which are to-day regarded as 
essentials. 

In 1^74 the Coijioration secuied the services of Mr. 
E. O. Moriarty, C.E., to report on a water supply. After 
inspecting the Onehunga Springs, Xihotupu, Lake St. 
John and Western Springs, he finally recommended, 
without hesitation, the latter, expressing his opinion 
in the following terms: — "Taking the present popula- 
tion of the City, and those parts of the suburbs likely 
to be dependent on the City for water at 20,000 persons, 
one million gallons per day would be a liberal allow- 
ance at 50 gallons pei- head jxm- day, but if manufac- 
tories are to be established and .s}iii)ping to be supi)lied 
then 7.5 gallons per head would bo a safer estimate, and 
looking at the peculiarly favourable position of Auck- 
land and to the j)rol)ability of its becoming a great 

1-22 



All- K I. AX I) MlMi-irAL HA2sDB00K. 



centre of commerce, there seems every reason to anti- 
cipate that within the next ten to fifteen years the 
poiuihition will be doubled, and the demand for water 
proportionally increased."' 

Mr. Moriarty's opinion of the future of Auckland, 
both as regards population and commerce, has been 
fully proved. His report on the Western Springs was 
adopted by Council, which purchased Motion's property 
foi £20,000, and work was commenced in 1875, Messrs. 
T. ct S. Morrin being the successful tenderers for the 
supply of pipes, machinery, and the whole of the work 
of reticulation. The undertaking, which was supervised 
by Mr. \V. Errington, C.E., was completed in July, 
1877, when the wate)' was turned into the City reser- 
voirs. 

.Mr. Mfjriarty's estimate that the Western Springs 
supply would serve the City for 2.5 years from the date 
of his report, was also shown to be correct, as in 1899 
it became evident that an auxiliary supply must be 
f btained for summer consumption, to meet the rcquiie- 
ments of the rapidly growing city. At this time, Mr. 
H. Munro Wilson, C.E., and the late H. W. Atkinson, 
suggested the possibility of obtaining an au.xiliary 
supply from Xihotupu (running water only), carried 
along the southern side of the dividing range. This 
scheme was approved by the Council, and in May. 1900, 
an additional supply of one million gallons per day was 
turned into the City reservoirs. For two months be- 
fore the new supply became available the citizens had 

I -'4 



AUCKLAMJ Mf NIC! PAL HANDBiJOK. 

been placed on short rations, the walci- liriiiu liinifd 
off nightly at ti i).iii. and not tuincd cm unlil fi a.m. the 
following nioining. 

'J'his auxiliary sui)ply, with cxtensidiis, was sul)se- 
quently adopted as the second part of a threefold 
scheme of water supply from the Waitakere Ranges. 
In 1902, acting under instructions from the Council, 
Messrs. H. Munro Wilson, C'.E., and J. Cai-law (Water- 
works Engineer) reported on a scheme of walei' sujjjjly 
from the Waitakere River, which made provision, 
by the erection of a dam, for the impounding of 220 
million gallons of water, and two years later the 
Council engaged the services of Mr. Mestayer, C.E., 
of Wellington, to report on Messis. Wilson and Car- 
law's scheme and the question of further extension. 
He endorsed the report of the latter and, in addition, 
recommended the erection of a dam on the Xihotupu 
River, now under construction, and, when necessary, 
a fuither extension to the Huia. The water from Wai- 
takere was turned into the City mains in 1906, and this, 
together with the running water from Xihotujju. is 
now supplying 107,000 people with 56 gallons per head 
per day. When the dam on the Nihotupu River is com- 
pleted the available storage will be 840 million gallons. 
In order to preserve the purity of the water, the City 
Council controls ovei- 10,000 acres of land in the 
ranges, embracing the watersheds of Waitakere. Xiho- 
tupu, and Huia. A portion of this laiul was purchased, 
but the greater iiart was obtained from the C^ivcrn- 
ment, which vested it as a domain in the City Council. 

12.-) 



PTJ .1;*! J JJ J,X^ 
I.U1._J^ IJ.I-JJJ 

J J J VI J li 





A CORNER OF THE WATERWORKS SHOP. 




VENTURI " METER AND VALVES. 



AUCKLAM) MiSlClPAL IIAyjJBOOK. 



The whole of the water is gravitated from Nihotupu 
and Waitakere into service reservoirs at Khyber Pass, 
Arch Hill and Ponsonby. The water for the higher 
levels is raised by means of electric motors frojn Khyber 
Pass to Mount Eden Reservoir, and from tliei'e i)art of 
the supply is gravitated to Mount Hobson Reservoir, 
which serves Remuera and Tamaki West districts. 

The inci-ease of the persons supplied with water has 
been fairly regulai' during the past twenty years, as 
shown hereunder : - 

Date. Popidation supplied Increase, 
with water. 

1900 52,000 

1905 62,000 10,000 

1910 75,000 1.3,000 

1915 94,000 19,000 

1920 107,000 13,000 

Total increase, 55,000 or over 100% 
in 20 years. 

In addition to the natural growth in population of 
the City propei- during the last twenty years. Arch Hil! 
and Parnell, with a uiiitrd population of 7,969, amalga- 
mated with the City, in 19 13; Grey Lynn, with 8,000, in 
1914; Eden Terrace and Remuera, with 7.877. in 1915; 
and Epsom, with 3,000, in 1917, being a total addition 
of 26,848. All the districts named, with the exception 
of Epsom, were su{)plied with water finiii the City 
mains at the time of amalgamation. 

128 




INTERIOR OF OLD TYPE OF SERVICE RESERVOIR. 




INTERIOR OF NEW TYPE OF SERVICE RESERVOIR. 




PUMPING STATION. WESTERN SPRINGS. 




PUMPING STATION. KHYBER PASS. 



AL't'KLAM) MUNICIPAL II AS JJliOOK. 

The servit'c reservoirs, seven in iiuiiil)er, are situ- 
ated at Arch Hill, 232 feet above H.W.M. ; Ponsoiihy, 
232 feet above H.W.M. ; Khyber Pass (two reservoirs), 
310 feet above H.W.M. ; Mount Eden (two i-eservoirs), 
498 feet above H.W.M. ; and .Moiml llohson, 4M feet 
above H.W.M., having a total capacity of 15 million 
gallons. The giavitalion mains ai'e 2") miles in length, 
and consist of 7 miles of 27 inclics diametei', 1)[ miies 
of 24 inches, 2.1 miles of 21 inches, 3 miles of 2() inches 
and 3 miles of IS inches. The reticulation mains covei- 
158 miles and vary in diameter fiom 12 Indies to 
4 inches. 

The ca])ital in\csted in the undertaking is £715.211 
12s 7d, and the gross revenue £73,534 Is 3d. The aver- 
age ratio of management expenses to revenue is 16%. 
The capita consumption is 56 gallons, which compares 
very favourably with any city iri Austialasia. 

CHARGES. 

Ordinary domestic supply, up to £ I no 

rental valiu' . . . . -' .o 

Thereafter • • "% 

On non-resiclcntial properties • . l?u 

Non-consumers rate . . ■ ■ • • V\> 

W.C.'S.— In private house for the first two 15 - por annum 
Fot each additional closet after first 

two . . . . 7 fl per annum 

Hotels or lod^'in■r houses .. .-^O - to CO - per annum 

Eatlis. in private houses Free 
,, in hotels, lodging houses, and 

boarding houses ■• 15/- to 50/- per Rnnum 

Lavatories 1o/-t..'2ii - .. 

LSI 



AUCKLAyjJ Mi'XlClPAL HANDBOOK. 



Water by Meter, ordinary . . . . lOd per 1000 gallons 

in bulk to outside dis- 
tricts .. .. 1/- ., 
to individuiil supplies 
outside City and to 
Government buildings 1/6 
Harbour Board (ship- 
ping) .. 2/5 . 
Primary scliools, up to 
500 gallons per child 
per annum . . B^ree 
in excess of that quantity lOd per 1000 gallons 
for concrete, 3d per cubic 

yard or . . . . 1/6 

for bricks, Gd per 1000 or 1/6 
Garden Hose, for an area under k acre .. £\ per annum 

over \ acre and under h acre £1/10/- per annum 
over i acre .. .. £21-:-. or by meter, 

lOd per 1000 gallons 

The oflSce of Waterworks Engineer was created in 
1899, when the present Engineei- was appointed. Piior 
to tliis date consulting engineei's were enii)I(.yr(l by 
the Council. Mr. W. Errington, C.E., was engaged in 
this capacity fiom 1875 to December, 1888, and W. 
Anderson, City Engineei-, fi'om 188(( until IS99. 

J. CARLAW, 

AV;i<erwoiks Engineer. 



\:\-i 



MiKLAM) MLMilL'AL ILASliHOOK. 



ELECTRICITY. 

The City Council iiisl suiict ioiicd an elect lic siipiiiy 
in the year 190(i, in aceoidanee with a icpdil presentt-d 
by Mr. W. G. T. (ioodman. 

It was (leeided to establish the works at Fi-eeman's 
Bay, in order to take advantage of a certain amount 
of steam supplied hy the Destruetoi'. 

The fii'st pro))()sal invohcd an expenditui'e of 
£21,0110, and the Council applied foi' a loan of £25,0(10. 

In 1907, Ml'. A. Wyllie was appointed Electrical 
Engineei', and in February, IftOS, the first supply was 
given from Freeman's Bay. 

It was soon manifest that the demand would 
exceed the lirst expectations, and it became necessary 
to i-aise a fui'ther loan of £50,000, in oi'der to increase 
the area of I'eticulation and the capacity uf the Power 
Station. It was also evident that the Destructor site 
was unsuitable foi- meeting; the demand of the future, 
and that the Power Station at Freeman's Hay was 
altogether inadequate. 

In 1909, Wv. Wyllie presented a I'epoi-t recomiiu'iiding 
the buildinjj, of a new and nuich larger I'ower Station 
at King's Wharf. This scheme inxohrd an ex|ientlit ure 
of £225,000, and after careful consideration was 
adopted by the Council. 

133 



AUCKLAND MCMCH'M. II AS JjJiUUh 



A water I'roiit site nt' nearly t'oiii' .-lei-os al King's 
Whaif was acquired at a cost of £33,000. Tliis was 
suitably situated for obtainiu.a: su{)itlies of coal by rail 
and sea, and furnished an abundant suj)])Iy of circu- 
lating watei'. 

The l^ower Station at King's Wharf was put into 
oi)eration in Febi'uary, liH3. and I lie Freein.-Mi's Ray 
works were closed d!>wn. 

The system of sui)ply rt'coinnieiuled by Mr. (jood- 
man was three-wire direct current, with 46() volts 
between the outer wires. This was I'etained at the 
King's Whai-f Station, to deal with tlu' cential City 
area, and provision was made for adding a high tension 
three-phase alternating current supply at (),6I)() vclts 
to deal with tlie outer areas. The capacity of the 
first installation at King's Wharf was 3.000 kilowatts. 

In 1914, contracts were ente)-ed into for adding 
2,200 kilowatts of direct current and 1,500 kilowatts of 
alternating curient supi)ly. Owing to the outbreak of 
war, these contracts wei'e not finally cnmpleted until 
1920. 

Fiom the beginning, the Council has steadily 
increased its area of ojjeration. 

In the yeai- 1920, on the recommendation of .Mr. 
Wyllie. it was decided to furthei' inci-i'ase the capacity 
of the King's Wharf Power Station by l3,ii()o kilowatts 
of alternating machinery, in order to iirovide sufficient 
power to combine the whole of the electric supply of 

l.T") 




ELECTRIC POWER STATION: SWITCHBOARD. 




ELECTRIC POWER STATION: BOILER ROOM. 
Showing Automatic Stokers. 



Ar(;KLAM) MIMCU'AL JIAMJiiUOK. 



Auckliiiid, inclii(liii!i: the siiijply to tlic 1 i-;iiiiuays, in a 
single Power Station. The tramways had, in the 
previous yeai', beeonie the jjroperty of the Couneil, 
and it was considered more efficient to have a single 
Powei' Station tlian to continue supplying the Tram- 
ways l)e]iartm(Mit separately from its own I'ower 
Station in Hobsoii Street. 

The 'I'ramways I )ei)artmeiit I'owci- Station, llol)son 
Street, was, in certain respects, out of date, and was 
unfavourably situated for extension. It was already 
overtaxed, and for onci- six years had been receiving 
help from the City Council Power Station at King's 
Wharf. 

It was decided to conxcit tlie iiol)son Street Power 
Station into a sub-station and establish a further 
tramway sub-station at Kingsland. These extensions 
involved a capital expenditure of £500,000. 

The capital ex])enditure on the King's W'haif 
Powder Station, and on i-cliculation. up to :5ist March, 
1921. was £506,000. 

Two sub-stations are supjjlied fiom Kind's Wharf — 
■one in Eijsoni, which was started in 1!M:), and one at 
(jiiey Lynn, started in li>2n. 

About ten miles of streets are now lit by electricity, 
.and the Council contemplates considerable extensions 
•of its sti'eet lighting system. 

The total inuuber of units sold for the year ended 
:31st March, 1921. was l(),lt»O.Ot)0. Of this, :3.552,3:J3 

137 



A/'CALAy/J MrXIC/rAL llAXDBOOK. 



units were siipplieil for lighting and the balance for 
power. 

The total revenue for the same year was £108,734, 
the working expenses £67,932, and tlie profit for the 
year's operation £17,080. 

A Powei' Hoai'd has been forined under legislation 
of 1921 to control the electric sui)])ly of the whole Auck- 
land isthmus. 'J'he City Council and the representa- 
tives of all the otlu'i- authorities concerned signed an 
agreement, by which the Cit}^ sold the whole of its 
electi'ical undei-taking to the Hoaid, ami this was 
validated by Pai-liament. 

The tirst Am-klaiid Klcctric Powei- Pnard elec- 
tions were held on February 28, 1922, and the first 
meeting of the Board took place in the .Auckland City 
Council Chamber on March 16th. wIkmi ^Ir. W. J. 
Holdswoi-th was elected chairman. 

ALEX. WYLLIE, 
Electi-ical Engineer to Power Board, 

(Formerly City Electrical Engineer). 



138 



AICKLAM) MCMi ll'AL IIAMJliOOK 



TRAMWAYS. 

Auckland's fii-st tramways wcic (•oiiducted by the 
St. Heliers and Northcote T.aiul ('(Hiipany, Ltd., which 
entei'ed into an agreement with the City Council for 
this purpose on Januaiy Nth, iss.i. \\\ an Ordei--in- 
Council, dated 9th October, Ls,^3, under the " Ti-amways 
Act, 1872," the construction of tramways in .Xnckland, 
Parnel] and Newmarket was authorised. The fiist tram- 
way to be completed was the line from the Waiteniata 
Hotel, by Queen Street, to tlu; Poiisonby Kcscrvoir, and 
the trams, which were horse drawn, commenced runnintc 
on August 11th, 1884; the fare being thi-eei)enc!'. 

In 1886, the St. Heliers and Xorthcote Land Com- 
pany, Limited, changed its name to the City of Auckland 
Tramways and Suburban Land Company, Limited, and 
the latter, as promoters of the Aucklaiul City and 
Subui'ban Tramways, obtained fnitlicr Orders in ('ouiicil 
for certain extensions of the existing tramways. The 
Auckland City and Subuiban Tramways Company, 
Limited, did not prosper, ami owing to liiiancial (lilhcid- 
ties its assets passinl to t!ic liank of New Zealand. 
Further transfei'S of the intei-est in tlie .Auckland 
Ti-amways took place from time to time nntil it rested 
in the Auckland Electric Tramways Company, Limited, 
which was registered in London on the 2-2nd March, 
1899. 

The capital of the Auckland Klectric Tramways 
Company, Limited, at its inception was i;i.-5(i,n(Mi, divided 

I.S'.t 



Ai< klamj Mryini'AL iiAy dbook. 

into 15,000 shares of £10 each, am], in 1907, each 
existing ordinaiy shaic of £ll) was split into In shares of 
£l each. From time to time the capital was increased 
until it eventually stood at £600,000, divided into 150,000 
6 per cent, ciunulative preference shares and 450,00tt 
ordinary shares, all of £l each. In addition first mort- 
gage 5 per cent, debenture stock was issued to a total 
of £435,100. 

Ill due couisc the Auckland Electi'ic Tiannvays. 
Company, Limited, made agreements with the Auckland 
City Council, the lioioughs of Parnell, (irey Lynn, New- 
market, Onehunga and Mount Eden, and the Road 
Districts of liemuera. Mount Roskill, Ejjsom, One Tree 
Hill, Eden Teirace aiul Mount Albert for the construc- 
tion of electric tiamways in theii' I'espective districts. 
The " Tramways Act, 1908," provides that an order 
authorising th(> eonsti'uction of ti'amways in any district 
can only be olUained by the Local Autluuity thereof on 
application to the (iovernor-in-Council, consequently alF 
Orders-in-Council having reference to the tramways in 
Auckland C'ity and suijurljs aic vested in the Local 
Authorities. The Act also provides for a Local Authority 
to grant a lease of a tramway consti-ucted, or ordeied 
to be constructed under the Act, and consequently 
during the regime of the Auckland Electric Tramways 
Company, Limited, that Conq)any"s i^owers regarding 
the tramways in Auckland were defined by ceitain deeds, 
executed })y the Local .\utlioiily which delegated to the 
Conijiany certain rights, ])i-ivileges, etc., contained iiD 

14(1 



AUCKLAyj) MUNICIPAL HAMjIUK)K. 

Orders-in-('()uiicil pit'viously ohlaiiu'd hy tlic Ldcal 
Authority. 

The first breaking of the ginuiul in cdnncct ion uitli 
the hiyiiig of the permanent way took place on 1st 
August, 1901, and on the 17th Novembei' of the following 
year the eleetrie trams were formally inaugurated. Tlie 
opening proceedings commenced at 12. .'50 j).m. at the 
Power House, where a large mimbei- of rejjresentative 
citizens assembled as guests of the Auckland j-.lect ric 
Tramways Company, Limited. After an insi)ectioii of 
the machinery contained in the building, the Mayor of 
Auckland (Mi-. Alfied Kidd), accompanied by Sii' John 
Logan Cami)bell, the Town Clerk (Mr. IL \V. Wilson), 
and others, ascended the switch board ))lat foiin. and at 
the request of the Company's aftonu'V, the Maxoi- of 
Auckland switched on the electric i)owei-. On leaving the 
Powei- House the guests yjioceeded to Lowei- Queen 
Street, where six electric tramcai's waited in readiness 
to convey them to a luncheon in the Choral Hall. Sir 
John Logan Campbell started the first car, aftei- receiv- 
ing fiom the Town Clei-k a handsomely bound motor- 
man's license. 

It was intended to start the public service tlie fol 
lowing day, the 18th Novembei', in02. but owing to the 
wreck of the S.S. HI i iKjainili , in which some niotoinien, 
who were being brought from Sydney, were ihowneil, 
the opening was delayed until the 21th November, liKt2. 
when the route from the City to the Threr Lamps, 
PonsfUiby, ria Karangaliai)c 1\on<l, was opi^ned for 

141 



A UCKL A XD MVyiClPA L HA J D BOOK . 

jniblic traffic The other sections of the tiaiiiways were 
opened at intervals. 

The Kl(M-tric Ti-aniways CV)in])aiiy, J^iniited, was a 
successful undei'takiiitf, and paid its first dividend of 4^ 
per cent, for 1903, followed by (i per cent, for 1904, 
7 per cent, for 1905 and 1906, 6 pei' cent, for 1907, 1908, 
1909 and 19l(i, 7 per cent, for 1911, 7.1 per cent, for 1912, 
1913, 1914, 1915, 1910, 1917 and 191S, arid 5 per cent, for 
1919. 

Xej^otiations for the i)urchase of the electric tram- 
ways by the Auckland City Council commenced in 
February, 1919, Ijut as the Company's tenuie of the City 
lines did not e.xi)ii-e until the 1st June, 1932, the City 
could not take advantage of the clause providing for 
purchase in the Deeds of Delegation. This clause made 
provision for the Local Authority to i)urchase the Ti-am- 
way system at the exjiiry of the term of concession on 
the basis of its value as a going concnii, l)iit not includ- 
ing any sum foi- goodwill. In the case of a dispute as 
to the price to be paid, the (|uestion was to be submitted 
to the arbitration of three indiffei'ent pcisons, one to 
})(' chosen by each of the i)arties, and tln^ third to be 
nanii-d 1)\ the two persons first chosen, tlie arbitration 
to l)e conducted in .\uckland coid'oiinabiy to the provi- 
sions of the " Ai-bitiation Act, l^*9it."" Provision was 
also made for the Local Authoi-ity to |)uichase before 
the expiry of the teiin of concession. l)ut no terms could 
be laid down as in such case the ('oniiiany could not 

142 



AUCKLAND MUMCn'AL 11 AN JJJiUUK. 

be irc|uirr(l ti) sell cxi'i'iit (Hi such cDiidit inns as iiii^lit 
be iiuitually agii'i'd upon Ix'twccn (lie paitics. 

The ncfiotiations for purchase had t hcn-foi-e to 
proceed on the lines of mutual agreement. In continu 
ance of thi' negotiations foi' pufchase a valuation I'cpoit 
of the tianiways was obtained from Mr. William 
Ferguson, M.I.C.K., M.I.M.E., and under date of the 
2nd A])ril, 1919, an option-of-puicliasc was entei'ed into 
between the Company and tlie Council, jiossessioii to 
be given on the 1st July, 1919, in the event of the 
Council exei'cisinti the option. Th(> option-of-pui-chase 
was eventually exeicised, and tlie ('ity entered into 
possession on the date mentioned. The i)ui-chase i)rice 
was £1,227,201 8s 7d. The amount was paid in 
Debentures of the Corpoiation, having a currency of 21 
years from 1st July, 1919, £392,890 bearing interest at 
5 per cent., and the balance at b\ per cent. By the 
pui'chase the Corporation secured the whole of the 
electric tramways in the City and suburbs of Aucklaml. 
together with all the lands, buildings, works, machiiu-ry. 
material and i)lant of the Company used ))y it for the 
pui'pose of its tramway uiulertaking, oi' in transit to 
it, at the date of i)OSsession, and furthci' all assets, 
contracts and engagements in connection therewiih, 

POWER STATION. 

This is situated in Hobson Street, tin- area of tin- 
property being 3.375 loods. TIk' original jilant consisted 
of three horizontal compound engines, each <lircct 

li:; 




TRAMWAY POWER STATION: BOILER HOUSE. 




TRAMWAY POWER STATION: ENGINE ROOM. 



A I '( 'KLAX/J MIWK 'IP A L II AS 1) HOOK. 

couplccl to ;i ;50() K.W. (liccct (•iincnt ,>r('iifr;it(»i\ slcaiii 
b('iIl^■ supplied l)y foui' Halx-ock and Wilcox water tulie 
boilers. From time to time additi(jiis have Ix'eii made, 
comi)risiiig eight boilers and the following general iim 
plant: — Two 600 K.W. dii-eet cui'i'e?it sets, one (loo K.W. 
and three 1,000 K.W. alternating curi-ent sets, together 
with the requisite auxiliary plant and standard switch 
gear. 

The boilers are fitted with automatic chain grate 
stokers and superheaters, and the gases fi'om them pass 
through two Green's Economisers to two steel chimneys 
I25ft. high, lined with concrete aiul brick. 

Coal is handled by means of a conveyor driven by 
electricity. 

The engines exhaust into sui-faee condensers, the 
circulating water for which is dra\\ii from ihe harbour 
at Hobson Street Wharf by four motor-driven pumjis, 
installed in a building opposite the Hobson Street Haths. 
The water after passing through the condensers and 
becomnig heated is used in the baths befor(> its return 
to the sea. 

The total capacitj' of the powei- station is now just 
under 6,000 K.W. 

The number of units generated foi- the yeai' ended 
31st March, 1921, amounted to over thirteen million. 

A sub-station has been ei'ected at (ireen l.ane, off 
Manukau Road, to which jiowei- is transmitteil at a 
voltage of 5,500 and distributed, at the ordinary voltau'e 

M 1 4.") 



Af'Ch/.A.X/) MUNIC/J'AL // A.\ /)/{()()/( . 



of 550, to the ti'aiuway routes in tlic adjacent area. Tin- 
plant ccnsists of four 500 K.W. inotoi- generators, 
together with a staiter set, two negative boosters and 
standard alternating and direct current switch-gear. 

WORKSHOPS. 

The Department's workshojj.s, which were com- 
pleted in 1914, are situated in .Manukau Koad, near 
Royal Oak, and cover an area of two acres in 
a property six acres in extent, there being a 
wide margin for extensions. The buildings are 
constructed of galvanised iron, the supporting columns 
and roof trusses being of steel, and the foundation of 
concrete. They are lofty, well ventilated and lighted, 
both naturally and artificially, and are piactieally fire- 
proof. The ground not used foi' buildings has been 
tastefully laid out in lawns, with Hower beds and orna- 
mental shrubs and trees. 

The work carried on here ineludcs the cDUipicte 
overhaul and repair of cars, rebuilding, renewal, paint- 
ing, and the manufacture of i)arts icquireil by the 
Department. 

The lay-out is compact, and has been rendfiiMJ jios- 
sible by the use of an electrically driven traverser, which 
allows of a car being transported from the W(.rkshoi)s 
siding to any one of the 24 tracks in tin' r.-pair. wood- 
working and paint shops. In addition to the shops 
just mentioned there are the inaehine, electrical an<l 

147 




TRAMWAY WORKSHOPS: THE MACHINE SHOP 




TRAMWAY WORKSHOPS: GENERAL STORE. 



MCKLaMj MlSU'll'AL llAShliOOK. 

hlac-ksinitli sliops. The following is ;i hiict' dcsciijitioii 
of the work c;inio(l out in them. 

Repair Shop. 

Here the car body is lifted from the trucks by means 
of chain blocks on an overhead ruinvay. The ti'ucks are 
then lun out from uiidei- the c-ai' to tlie tracks sparnicd 
by an electiic crane, which does all the necessary liftinj^ 
and transporting of the parts preparatory to repair and 
overhaul. 

Machine Shop. 

In this shop is installed a complete and up-to-date 
equipment of machines foi' cairyin^ out ie))airs 
and renewals to the cars and jtlant cenei-ally, also 
machines for the making of new parts and the turning 
of car wheel tyres. 

Wood-working Shop. 

In this shop cars are rebuilt, wIkiIIv, or, in part, as 
required, and all necessary repairs are effected. 

Paint Shop. 

This is where cars are repainted and vainished. 

Electrical Shop. 

The different parts of the car nn.tors are here 
repaired and rewound. 

Blacksmiths' Shop. 
In this is installed a complete plant for dealing with 
the various classes of forging work reipiired in tramway 

14!t 



AfCKLAJU MVyiClPAL HAyjJBOOK. 

working. A number of ingenious machines for making 
use of old material and saving manual labour have been 
installed and found to be of great service. 

Stores. 

In close proximity to the I'epair shops are the 
stores where over 5,000 different material items used in 
the upkeep and running of the tramways are stocked. 
Oil is kept in a small building isolated from all the 
others. Tram rails are stacked in the open. Wood, 
bitumen, and other stores are kept underneath the paint 
and wood-working shops. 

OVERHEAD CONSTRUCTION. 

Theie aix- thi'ee types of construction : — Centre pole, 
side pole, and span. The poles are made of steel or 
of wood (totai-a and Australian iion bark). The trolley 
wires are mostly 3/0 8.W.G. hard drawn copper, but 
experiments have I'ecently been cai'iied out with 
Phono electric wire. 

FEEDERS. 

The trolley wire is divided into a munber of sections, 
each of which is fed from the Power Station or Rub- 
station. The feedei-s comprise \ulcanise(l l)ilumcn and 
lead-covered cables, some laid solid in bitumen-tilled 
earthenware troughs, and othei's diawn into conduits, 
and also of 4/(t H and 8 bare copper wires fixed on the 
poles which support the trolley wires. 

1 .-)() 



AUCKLAyiJ Mr MCI I'M, II.\MjI>()(JK. 

The lii,t;h tension cjiljlcs wliicli siipjilv IIk- siih-statinii 
;ir(> lead covered and armoured. They are partly drawn 
into conduits and partly laid solid in i)itumen-filled 
earthenware ti-ou^hs. 

CONTROL AT JUNCTIONS. 

At the corner of Queen ;ind W'ellesley Streets a 
signal tower was erected, in 1!)16, fioni which all track 
points and semaphores at this 4-\vay junction are electri- 
cally controlled. At all other junctions, eleven in all, 
the track points are electrically operated by means of 
contactors on the trolley wires, and to enable ti-olley 
wheels to follow the right course, boom fiogs, operated 
by the car trolley poles, are installed in the overhead 
wires. 

TOWER WAGGONS. 

Thiee motor tower waggons are in daily use for the 
examination, repair and renewal of the overhead wires 
and fittings. The Depot in connection with this d(>i)art- 
ment is situated at Xewton Road, near the top of 
Symonds Street. An emergency man is always on duty 
here, and, on account of the central position, he can 
reach the scene of a breakdown in the shortest of time. 

CAR SHEDS. 

There are two sheds for the deputing of cars, one 
situated at Jervois Road, Hernc Hay, antl the other at 
Manukau Road, Epsom. The tiacks in the car sheds 



A/fA/.AA/j MfMCIJ'AL II A.\ JJJ.OOK 



are pi-ovidcd with i)its to {'iiahlc the triii-ks and luidrr 
gear to be exainined. All iiiiiniiii; repairs and cleaning 
a^re effected in those two cai' sheds, most of the work of 
necessity being carried out at night. A few machine 
tools are installed at each car shed fni- the carrying out 
of small repair work. 

ROLLING STOCK. 

The number of passenger cars at the present time 
is 169. Of these 24 ai'e of the four-wheeled tyj^e, 
coupled in i)aii's, each with a seating capacity for 56 
passengers ; 108 cars, with seating foi- 52 i)assengers, are 
of the vestibule composite type, equijiped with bogie 
trucks, and the majority with two .50 h.p. motors. The 
remaining 37 are of various tj'pes, including si.x double- 
decked cars. All the cars ai'e fitted with glass fi'onts, 
to afford protection from the weather, and with three 
types of brake.s — an air and a hand brake to operate on 
the wheels, and a slipper brake to operate on the rails. 
The construction of ten new passenger cars has been 
authorised. 

In addition to the passenger cars there are two 
freight cars used for the carriage of material between 
the stores and dei)6ts. 

PERMANENT WAY. 

The total length of line measured as single track is 
51.65 miles, made up of :3.:?7 miles of single track and 
24.14 miles of double track. The gauge of th-- trark is 

l.-).S 



A UCKLAy I) MUNICH' A L J I ANDBOOK. 

4ft. S.jin. Ill the original ('(list ruct ion tlic I'uils wi-re 
carried on longitudinal concrete stringers, hut in 1904 
this method was changed to hardwood cross sleepers, 
8ft. X 9in. X 4Tjin., 2,640 being used to the mile of track. 

The first tracks were laid with 92lb. girder rails, but 
owing to these being found too light for a heaviei- type 
of car subsequently used, girder rails weighing liolbs. 
per yard (116lbs. on curves) were .sul)stituteil, in l!»i:'>, for 
all renewal and extension work. 

Owing to the unstable natuic of the grouiul in Queen 
Street, recurring trouble was experienced up to the year 
1913, when a complete reconstruction was carried out 
and the tracks relaid on a pile foundation. Track to the 
extent of 5,541 square yards is paved with Neuchatel 
asphalt, 43,308 squai-e yards with bituminous macadam, 
and the balance with water bound macadam. 

The steepest grade is one in 8.77, and tin- sharpest 
curve has a radius of 53ft. 

STAFF. 

In March, 1922, the tramways staff iiunil)ered 895, 
viz : — 

Traffic 458 

Permanent Way ... 129 

Overhead . li' 

Power Station 1-' 

Car Repairing I'^'j 

Management and Clerical 51 

895 
155 



ACrKLAXD MVMCIPAL IIAMJBOOK. 

Ml'. P. M. llanseni was the first manager and later 
managing directoi' of the Company. He was succeeded, 
in 19(17, by ^Ir. J. J. ^Vallvlate, who was appointed 
geneial managei- and held the position under the Com- 
pany's control and afterwards under the Corporation's 
ownershiji until his death in 1922. 

SICK AND ACCIDENT BENEFIT SOCIETY. 

This Society, which has about 500 uu-mbers, was 
established in 1904 to provide payment to members who 
are unable to follow their occupation through illness. 
The contribution is 6d per week for sick and funeral 
benefit ; 9d per week for medical and dispensary benefit ; 
and 1/6 per quarter for hospital licnefit. The weekly 
aliment to members is £l. 

RECREATION CLUB. 

This body was established to promote social inter- 
course among the tramways staff. The club's activities 
include the holding of water excursions and evening 
socials ; the promotion of football, cricket, and shooting, 
in which connection a miniature rifle range has been 
fitted iij). The clul) has also a library. The membership 
is about 480, and the weekly contribution is :5d. 

ACCIDENT FUND. 

The third party and employers' liability settlements 
for the year amounted to £l,745 4s 2d, which was 

l.W 



.4 UCK L A y/J M/MCJJ'A L II A MJliOOK. 

v\\i\v\i,od against the £3,000 — allocated tOi' tlir piirpoH*' 
from the 1920 accounts. "With the £3,0(10 allocated fn.iii 
the 1921 accounts the fund is in credit £4,254 15s lod as 
at the 31st March, 1921. 

A statistical table, containinjj, di'tailcd information 
relative to the progress of the Tramways undertaking, 
will be found on the next paji;e. 

W. St. J. CLARKE, 

Acting General Manager. 



157 



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ACCKLAM) Ml SIC II' A L II AS DliOOK. 

ELECTORAL DEPARTMENT. 

ELECTORS' ROLL. 

The Electoi's' JloU is compiled Ijiciniiaily piioi- to 
the election of the Mayor and Councillors. 

The franchise embraces not oidy " Ratepayers," but 
also " Freeholders " and " Kesidentials." 

The qualifications are as follows :— 

RATEPAYER — Is a person whose name 
appears in the " Occupiers " column of the Valua- 
tion Roll. (The meaning of the word " Occupiei- " 
in this' case is, either the ow-nei- of the property or 
the lessee, irrespective of who actually pays the 
rates.) 

FREEHOLDER— Is a person who signs a claim 
of enrolment, declaring that he, or she, is the actual 
registered beneficial owner of a freehold estate in 
land of tlie capital value of not less than £25. 

This qualification is used when the dwiier of 
land has leased his or her ])roperty to .some other 
person, and is not primarily res])i>nsilile for the 
rates. 

RESIDENTIAL Is a person who either actu- 
ally resides within the city, or wIk.. not l>.'ing a 
resident, pays a rent within the city. 



ACCKLAM) Mi'MrWAL llAMJBOOK. 



The latter qualiticatioii peiiiiits the eniohnent of 
persons who lent offices, etc., in the city, but who 
reside outside the city limits. 

Each individual seeking the franchise must be 21 
years of age, and must be a British subject by birth 
or by naturalisation. 

In the case of husband and wife, any qualification 
possessed by one of them is deemed to be jjossessed 
by each. 

No person enrolled has nioie than one vote, and 
no person enrolled as a " Residential'" is permitted to 
vote on any proposal relating to loans or rates. 

Persons enrolled as " Residentials" who fail to 
vote at (ieneral Elections are omitted when the 
next Roll is compiled, notwithstanding the fact that 
persons may have voted at a subsequent by-election. 
In cases of this sort it is necessai'y for new enrolment 
claims to be made. 

ELECTIONS. 

The municipal elections embrace not only the elec- 
tion of the Mayor and 21 C'ouncilloi-s, but also the 
election of members foi- th(> Auckland Harbour Board 
and Aucl<l,iiid TTospital Hoai'd. 

The last election was held on April 27th, 1921. and 
out of 31,fi4] names on the Electors' Roll, 20,420 persons 
voted, or 64%. This is a record vote for the City of 
Auckland. 

160 



AUCKLAM) Mi'MClJ'AL IIASDHOOK. 

The mayoralty was uncontested, hut for tlit- elec- 
tion of City Couneillois and members of the Auekland 
Harbour Board and Auckland Hospiial lioard. tlir f,.l- 
lowiug are the figures : — 

Votes recorded. 
50 Candidates tioininated for 21 seats on 

Council ... ... ... 277,141 

6 Candidates nomijuited for 3 seats on 

Harbour Board ... ... 42,939 

13 Candidates nominated for 5 seats on 

Hospital Board ... ... 73,2)1 



A total of ... ... ... 393,371 votes 

To issue the ballot papers and count this large 
number of votes, 32 booths were engaged, and the 
following officers enii)loyed : — 114 deputy leturning 
officei-s, 114 poll clei'ks, and 27 assistant emimeiators 
(after 7 p.m.). 

The hours for jjolling were fi-om i) a.m. until 7 [i.m. 
It was 4 o'clock the following morning liefore the re- 
sults could be handed to the press for publication. 

At the official count, which took three days to com- 
plete, there were 56 clerks engaged. 

Other issues determined by the votes of the peojile 
are : — 

1. The statutory half-holiday, which is decided by the 
voters entitled to vote at the municipal elecfion^. 
N Itil 



AL'CKLASD MCMCIFAL HASDBOOK. 

2. The system of rating (capital value, unimproved 
value, oi- annual value) determined by vote of 
ratepayers only. 

A new hotly, the Auckland Electric Power Board, 
came into being subsequent to the passing of the 
Auckland Electiic Power Board Act, 1921. The 
electoral district embraces the Citj- of Auckland. 
the boroughs of Onehunga, Otahuhu, Mount Albert, 
Mount Eden and Newmarket ; the road districts 
of One Tree Hill and Mount Roskill : the town 
districts of Ellerslie, Papakura, Papatoetoe and Manu- 
re wa ; and the County of Manukau. 

The first election of members of the Board took 
place on February 28th, 1922. There were 21 candidates 
for 12 seats. The franchise permitted only ratepayers 
to vote ; the term ratepayer, in this case, meaning 
the names of peisons appearing in the 'Occupiers" 
column of the Valuation Roll. The number of 
electors entitled to vote at this election was about 
27,800, the City propoition of same being 13,16S, or 
47%. 

P. F. XOTLEY, 

Returning Officer. 



I(i2 



A UCKLA y D M i WK'/J'J A // J .\ JjJioOK . 



VALUER'S DEPARTMENT. 

VALUATION OF PROPERTY FOR RATIN3 
PURPOSES. 

The Valuation Department provides the figures 
upon which the major portion of the revenue of the 
local body is obtained. It is a matter that very few 
take an interest in until after the I\<ii< l)( iiunul has 
been sent out by the Rate Collector, when, of course, 
it is too late for redress should there be any just griev- 
ance. 

An attempt has been made to extiact the main 
features of the Rating Act, as pertaining to the valua- 
tions for the City of Auckland, with the folldwing 
results : — 

The local authority of any district (other than a 
district wheiein the system of rating on the unim- 
proved value is in force) may at any time, by resolu- 
tion, determine whether the system of rating on the 
annual value or the capital value shall in future be in 
force in the district, and any such resolution may, 
after three years, be rescinded and a new resolution 
passed. 

Where the system of rating on the cajiital value 
OJ- on the unimproved value is in force, the valuation 
used is that supplied by the Valuer-General under th- 
Valuation of Land Act, prepared l)y valuers employed 
as permanent (lovenuneiit officei-s. The valuation roils 

1(53 



AUCKLAND MUyiCIFAL HANDBOOK. 

are revised from time to time as required, but there 
is no fixed period between one revision and another. 

Where the system of rating on the annual value is 
in force the local authority appoints and pays its own 
valuer, and the valuation may be made annually or 
triennially. 

The unuu<il I'aJuc is deemed to be the letting-value 
less 20 per cent, in case of houses, buildings, and other 
perishable property, and less 10 per cent, in cases of 
land ; but in no case less than 5 per cent, of the value 
of the fee-simple. The capital I'^ihie is deemed to be 
the selling value of the land, including improvements, 
at the time of \aluation. The \iniin pravecl rahu is 
deemed to be the selling value of the land at the time 
of valuation, excluding the value of any existing 
improvements. 

The system of lating adopted for the City of Auck- 
land is that of annual value. The following examples 
illustrate the huxIiik a/x rtnid I : — 
A dwelling let at £l per week (worth 

£700), equals ... ... ... £52 pei- annum 

Less 20% ... ... ... 10 

The annual value is ... ... £42 

but if a dwelling is worth £900 and lets only at £] per 
week, then the value would be £45. (57,', of the £900.) 

All properties are dealt with as being freehold. 

In the case of vacant land, the freehold value is 
arrived at, and 5% of that is the annual value, so that 
idle land does not escajjc local rates. 

Iti4 



AUCKLASJJ MO SIC J PAL I/ASDJiOOK. 



In certain casi's where during the laling jierind ;i 
building lia.s been untenanted for six niontlis, the owner 
may, on ajjplication, obtain a ict'und <il' half rates. 

The vahiation list for the City of Auckland is coin 
piled by the City Valuer, and deposited with (In- Toun 
Clerk on January 15th each yeai'. It is then adver- 
tised as open foi- inspection until February 15th, and 
objections to any matter contained therein may be 
lodged during that period. 

After the objections are lodged, an Assessment 
Court is held, and is presided over by the District 
Magistrate, who becomes the Judge of the Assessment 
Court. On the day of the sitting of the Court, which 
is fixed by the judge, the objections are heai'd and 
dealt Avith. The valuation list is signed by the judge, 
and it then becomes the Valuation Koll. Aftei' this, 
the total ratable value is submitted to the Mayoi- and 
Council, and a I'ate in the £, which will l)ring tin- 
necessary I'evenue for the City's exjienditure, is duly 
struck. 

The total numlx'r of assessments on the lf)22-23 
valuation list, which was submit(/ed by the Valuer on 
Januaiy 15th, 1922, consisted of 21,179. 
The total ratable \alue for the City of 

Auckland, submitted on January 15th, 

1922, was ... ... ... ••• l'l.5iM;,.'<i.>.J 

Less reductions made by the Assessment 

Court ... ... ... 4,Tab 



Net total ratable value .Cl..'jni.526 

Km 



ArcKLAM) Mryi'll'AI. II A.\ J)Ji()< >K 



As an indication of the real estate market during 
the last twelve months (Xoveniber 1st, 1920, until Octo- 
ber 31st, 1921) no less than 2,927 letters were received 
from solicitors and (jtheis notifying sales of jjrojierties. 

Appended is a table showing, for the last de- 
cade, the increase in the valuations for the City of 
Auckland. A poition of the increase is accounted for 
by the merging of outside districts. 

The ratable value per acre, in 1913, prior to the era 
of amalgamation, wuis, for the City of Auckland, £389. 
This has gradually been reduced by the amalgamation 
of various suburban districts, and at the present time 
the ratable value pei' acre is £l5-l ; but as building 
operations progress this will rise in pi'oportion. At the 
present date, the ratable value of the City, omitting 
the amalgamated areas, is £553 per acre. 

In 1913 the following comparison was made, viz : — 

Katablo value per 
acre. 

The City of Auckland (1,878 acres) ... £389 
Pai'nell Borough (470 acres) ... £l25 

Arch Hill District (125 acres) ... £94 

Another interesting fact is that practically 16% of 
the ratable value pertains to Queen Street alone. 

P F. NOTLEY, 

Citv Valuer. 



ca 

a 


f Auckland at this 
uded Ponsonby, 
. iVewton districts 


of Auckland was 
the amalgamation 
ell Borough (470 
/1913, and Arch 
ct (15'2 acres). 


e reduction was the 
appeal by tlie Gas 

nn Borough (900 

gamated with the 

conditionally on 

on the uuinii'rovetl 
upplied by the Go- 
Valuation Depart- 

years). 


jf Auckland was 
the aniaI>.':iniat)on 
Road District 
1/3/15. 




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1 



ACCKLAND MrXlClFAL HAJ/JBOOK. 



TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 

The Traffic Department has been established 
primarily for the due performance and efficient control 
of the duties entailed by the provisions contained in 
the City By-laws, " The Motor Regulation Act, 1908," 
'• The Municipal Corporations Act, 1920," " The Dogs 
Registration Act, 1908," and " Light on Vehicles Act, 
1915." 

While the organisation of the Department dates 
from about 1894, its inception may be said to date 
from 1878. In this year it was controlled by the 
Sanitary Inspector, who embraced it as a part of his 
Department. In 1894, Council realised the necessity 
of creating a Ti'affic I)ei)artment to deal with the 
control of traffic and the issuing of licenses. A Chief 
Inspector was appointed and a sepaj'ate Department 
established. Since that time the imi)ortance of the 
Department has greatly increased, owing to the advent 
of motor transit, which is large for a city of the 
population and size of Auckland, aiul to the extension 
of the V)ouiidaii('s of the City. 

The Department's ramifications include the general 
control of traffic, legistration of motor vehicles, 
bicycles and dogs, and the issuing and control of the 
following licenses : — Taxi and omnibus, heavy tiaffic 
(motor and horse vehicles), hoise carriages, drivers 
(motor atj(l horse), conductors, street stalls, hawkers, 

ITU 



AUCKLASD MCMt'll'AL llASDliOOK. 

bootblacks, newsvendors, street rmisicians, poricr.s, 
and the issuing of certificates of competency to drivers 
of private nictoi- cars and cycles. The Department is 
also responsible foi' the control of theatres and jilaces 
of amusement, ami the impounding of stray cattle. 

The system of registration of motor vehicles is Ijy 
personal application and the issuing of numci-als to 
be attached to the car foi' identification purposes. 
Every person driving a motor car must hold a certificate 
to prove that he is competent to drive and control a 
car. The minimum age is fixed at 17 j-ears. The 
certificate is granted after the Traffic Inspector of the 
Council is satisfied as to competency. 

Applicants for licenses, under all heads, obtain an 
application form from the Department, which, when 
details are filled in, is handed by applicant to the 
Police De]iartment, which investigates and reports direct 
to Council, and in the event of the report proving 
satisfactoi-y. Council forthwith authoi'ises the Depart- 
ment to issue the license. Council exercises a close 
scrutiny of all licenses, and any delinquents are 
promptly dealt with. 

Licensed motor car fares are arranged under two 
headings— (a) by distance, and (b) by time. Such is 
optional with the hirer : — 

A.— By Distance. , 

' s. d. 

Mininuim fare for 1 mile for I or 2 passengers ... 2 6 
For every additional passenger beyond 2 ... 1 " 

171 



ACCKLAM) MI'MCIPAL IIAXDBOOK. 

s. d. 
For every additional mile or fraction thereof for 

1 to -1 passengers ... ... ... ... 1 3 

For every additional joassenger above 4, per mile 3 

The charge by distance shall not include the 
return of the car to the stand. 

B. — By Time. g j 

For up to 4 passengers at per hour, including 

return to stand ... ... ... ... 15 

For each additional passenger, per hour ... ... 2 6 

Detention for every 5 minutes or fraction thereof 6 

From midnight to 6 o'clock a.m., a 50 per cent, 
increase on the foregoing amounts. 

The time of departure of omnibuses fiom their 
respective stands to places on their respective routes 
is regulated by time-tables ajjproved and controlled by 
this Department. The scale of fares is 3d per mile 
or fraction thereof for each passenger. 

Vehicles that ply for hire and are used for com- 
mercial purposes come unde}- the category of " Heavy 
Traffic," for which an animal license is issued on appli- 
cation. 

Motor and horse-drawn vans used comiinMrially 
operate under the following schedule df rates: — 

Fares by Distance. £ g j 

For any (piantity of goods or portable package 
not exceeding 8cwt., the distance being 
a mile oi' under on the level — 

(a) Hy horse-drawn van ... ... 3 6 

(b) Hy motor van ... ... ... 3 6 



.{/'( 'KLAXD mi: ML' 1 1' A L H ASDliOOK. 



For any t]uantity of miods cxcfcdiug 8(;\vt. 
aiul not exceeding; 1 ton, the distance 
being a mile or under on the level — 

(a) By horse-drawn \ an ... ... (i 

(b) By motor van ... ... ... 

For any further or other distance than one 

mile on the level, the fare to be charged 
by time. 

For ] horse van, at per hour ... 

9 

11 '^ 11 11 11 11 ••• 

,, 2 ,, furniture van ,, 

,, each additional horse, at per hour o 
For motor vans, at per hour — 
Up to half-ton carrying capacity 
Over 7\-ton, but not exceeding 1 ton 
„ 1 „ „ „ 2 ,, 

?' ^ 7) )) 11 "^ >1 

,, 3 ,, 






5 6 





8 





9 



... II H' 





... ]-2 


() 


... 15 





... 1 n 


I) 


... 1 2 


6 



The employer shall have the option of hiring In- 
time or distance, except for removal of furniture, which 
shall always be paid for by time, the carter being bound 
to use all reasonable expedition, and in all other cases 
the hiring to be by time, unless at the time of hiring 
the hirer exercises his option and hires by distance. 

The rapid growth of motor transport in the City 
during recent years is shown by the fact that the 
registration numbers are now well on the 10,000 mark, 
and the Government has recently increased the numerals 
from 1 to 12,000. It is estimated tliat tliere are (i.O*^ 



17.S 



AirKLAM) MiyicWAL II AM)Ji()(>K. 

motor vehicles of all classes on the City streets daily. 
In order to meet the requirements and convenience of 
owners of private motor cars, the City Council has set 
aside a number of streets in which private cars may 
be " parked." These cars are permitted to stand 
unattended iu tliese " i:)arkin<i " ai'eas day or niuht, 
but no responsibility is acce|)ted by the Corporation 
in case of damage. 

The City Council has established a system of 
" safety zones " foi' tram passengers, which has 
proved of public benefit. By-laws protecting these 
zones from the encioachment of horse, vehicular and 
motor traffic have been passed. 

GEO. R. HOGAN, 

Chief Ti'affic Inspector. 



174 



At'CKLAX/J MUMUJrAL JJ A.X JJjiOOK 



STORES PURCHASING DEPARTMENT. 

This Depailineiit came into opd'ation on .July 1st, 
1921, and was established for the purpose of securing 
economy in purchasing Coiporation supplies. Piior to 
this each department had been responsible for the 
I)urchasing of its own supplies. 

For the purpose of ascertaining the requirements of 
each department the Officer in Charge of the Stores 
Department submits schedules of the goods purchased 
and used, over a given period, to the heads of depart- 
ments, who in return are required to fill in the esti- 
mated requirements for a year ahead. These schedules 
are collated by the Stores Officei-, who is then in a 
position to obtain prices for the total amounts of any 
particular item required by the whole of the Corpora- 
tion Departments. 

The prices so obtained are, after consultation 
between the Stores Officer and the heads of ilejtart- 
ments, recommended to the Stores Conmiittee for 
acceptance or othei'wise. 

TENDERS AND QUOTATIONS. 

For the suj>ply of goods of an expensive characttT. 
specifications are prepared and tenders invited by 
advertisement. For smallei' lines prices are obtained 
on special quotation sh(H>ts, which are posted t<» the 
films on the list for the particular class of supplies 
required. 

I7."> 



ACCKLAM) MI'MCIPAL HASDBOOK. 

ORDERS. 

When the lowest satisfactory tenders are ascer- 
tained, orders on the triplicate official (jider form are 
placed for items selected from each tender. The 
original copj^ is sent to the supplier, the duplicate coytx 
is retained m the Purchasing Department, and the 
triplicate copy forwarded to the department for which 
the goods are ordered. 

DELIVERIES. 

The supplies are delivered to the department 
ordering them, and theii' receijit vouched for in the 
space ])rovided on the back of the pink coi)y of the 
order form, which is returned to the Purchasing Depart- 
ment. 

INVOICES. 

All invoices for goods supplied ai'e first delivered to 
the Purchasmg Department, where they are checked 
with the deliveries and prices on the (pink) copy of the 
order returned from the department, after which they 
are forwarded to the department concerned for the 
purjiose of accounting. 

STORING OF MATERIALS. 

The bulk of the material used by tlie Corporation 
is stored at Mount Roskill Tramway Depot, and from 
there the various departments are supplied weekly. 

S. M. FARRELLY, 

Officer in Charge. 

ITf) 



AUCk'LAM) ML'MCirAL llAyDliUOK, 



SANITATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 

HISTORICAL. 

The formation of the Sanitary I)ei)artriieiit praetic- 
ally dates from 1902, when the Council decided to sejja- 
rate the duties of Inspector of Nuisances from the 
Traffic Insj)ectc)r's Office, and to establisli a dejjart 
nient responsiVjle only for the health and sanitation 
of the City. This step was the outcome of tlic new 
health legislation, which brought matters affecting the 
health and welfare of the community into prominence, 
and necessitated increased activity on the pait of lt>cai 
bodies. 

Previous to this, the statutory duties of preventing 
and suppressing nuisances, and i)rotecting the people 
against any outl)reak of infectious diseases, had been 
carried out in a manner conformable with the opinions 
then prevalent lespecting such matters. The In- 
spectoi' s powers were extremely limitpd. Ilr icpoiictl 
to the Council upon the cleanliness of all streets, i)ublii' 
places, and drains, and as to any miisances : visited 
and insjiected back yards and premises, rubbish recep 
tacles, and " all buildings in which any manufactory, 
trade, or business is carried on which, from its natuic, 
may become offensive to the inhabitants of the borough 
or injurious to health," but, for some reason ilifficult 
to compiehend, " the decision of the Council as to 
what building" should be itispected hereutider was 
" final." 



Ai'CKLAM) Ml' Mr IP AL 11 AM) HOOK. 

Coiiimenciiif? with a staff of two, the J)opartnient's 
career has been one of continuous, if somewhat iiregu- 
hir, devoloi)Mi(nt, the officers to-thiy numbering nineteen. 
This expansion is not alone due to the fact that the 
jtopulation has considerably more than doubled, or 
that the area of the City, by the inclusion of subuibaii 
•districts, has increased over five-fold, but to the greater 
vigilance and efficiency that is now needed to meet the 
•demands of a continuously lising standaid of civic 
hygiene, and in particular to the necessity of having a 
sufficient and well-equipped staff to provide against 
•the introduction of epidemic disease, to which Auck- 
land, as an imixntant shipi)ing centre, is normally 
exposed. 

l)ur-ing the time the Sanitary Department has been 
in existence, concejjtions of health, public and private, 
have undergone the most ladical changes. Sanitation, 
with its many and complex problems, has now become 
one of the foiemost of municipal undertakings. Health 
is conceived as something more than the mere absence 
<»f disease, and to a great exteiit as being puichasable. 
The keynote of modern health princijiles aiul practice 
is jirevention. 

For several years supervision was exercised over 
the sanitary and lefuse removal sei'vices, then carried 
out by contiact. This .system was, needless to say, an 
almost constant source of dissatisfaction to the public 
and an anxiety to the Council. Ultimately, the con- 
tracts had to be teiiniruited and the work undertaken 

ITS 



AUCKLAND MrXlCWAL HANDBOOK. 

by thr City luigineer. Until a year a^o all pliinihiiiL; 
and (liainage was done* undci' tho 1 )('i)ait nicnt's dii-ec- 
tion ; its inception necessitating the preparation of by- 
laws, the teaching, examining, and licensing of i)lura- 
bers and di'ainers. I'ract ica lly all piciiiises in the City 
were re-drained in accordance with the requirements 
of the by-laws, and the owners of some 8,0()0 j^lacos 
dependent on the conservancy sj-stein wei'e compelh'd 
to connect with the sewers. 

LEGISLATION. 

The work of the Sanitaiy Depai-tment is lai-gely 
based upon and governed by the following Acts of 
Parliament, namely, the ' M iinicipal Corporations 
Act," the " I'ublic Health Act, 1!K)0," and " Health 
Act, 1920." An epitome of these follows: - 

"MrXlClI'.\L C()|{l'()i!.\Tl()XS ACT." 

This Act it'(|uii'('s first considciat inn. not only as 
the foundation of municipal administration, l)ut as the 
main sujiporf of the activities of the Sanitaiy |)epart 
mei]t since its iuaugui'ation. In its picseiit foini, as 
consolidated in ]!)20, it is the i)rinci|ial souice of 
authority foi' by-laws relating to sanitation in its 
widest meaning. 

Cnder this Act, "the Council may do all tilings 
necessaiy from time to time for the preservation of 
the public health and convenience, and for carrying 
into effect the provisions of fh.- ' llraltli Act. l!t2o,' 
so far as tliey aiipl>' *<» bi)roughs.'' 

170 



AUCKLAXD MUNICIPAL HANDBOOK. 

Although the adoption of these powers was optional 
until recently, the Council had availed itself of them 
to the fullest extent, and the sanitary by laws made 
thei-eundei- leave little to be desii'ed, even with the 
amplified meanings given to nuisances, and the addi- 
tional means i)rovided in the Health Act for dealing 
with uidicalthy and ((tliei- conditions. 

■•TIIK 1M151.1C HEALTH ACT, moo."' 

In many icspects this Act was of striking import- 
ance. H eliminated the Central Board of Health, took 
away the powers vested in local authorities as Local 
Boards of Health, and substituted a ^linistry of 
Health, the safeguai'ding (if the health of the jieople 
becoming a mattei' for the State. The counti'y was 
divided into a number of health districts, with district 
health officers in the principal cities, thus rend(M-ing 
the local Medical Officers of Health unnecessaiy. 

The transfei-ence of other health powers hitheilo 
of local control followed, foi' in inOT. by the " Sale of 
Food and Drugs Act," the supervision (,f foodstuffs 
and the taking of samples by tln' Cduncirs officers for 
analysis under the "Adulteration I'levention Act, 

ISSO," became the duty of the I )cj)artment of Health. 

In 1910. 1)\ an .\mcndment of the definition of " Local 
Authority" iu the " Public Health Act," Hospital and 
Charitable Aid Hoards became responsible for every- 
thing relating to infectious diseases, including the in- 
Sljection and disinfection of in-eniises. 

ISO 



AUCKLAND MLXICIPAL JlAM)Ji(JOK. 



Hy an anaiiuciiicnt wilh tln' Health Depart incnl, 
and the Hosi)ital aiul Chaiitable Aid lioard, Auckland 
retained control over infectious diseases, and alth(in;:h 
it was the only city to do so, its action was fully 
justified, when the Hi-altli Authoiities ten yeai's latei-, 
as a lesult of theii- e.\i»erience here and elsewhere,. 
restoi-(Ml the i-esponsibility to the municipal authorities. 

" The Public Health Act, 1900," as amended fiom 
time to time, was consolidated in 1908, and with further 
occasional amendments up to lf)19, it became gradually 
more complicated, uncertain in meaning, and unneces- 
sarily costly in administration. The i)owers given to 
local authorities were numei'ous ami vaiied, l)ut must, 
if not all of them, as well as the funds and machinery 
of the local authorities to a considerable extent, were 
at the disposal of the Chief or District Health Ofhcer 
or the Minister, and could be controlled by the Health 
Department " both legally ami practically to an almost 
unlimited extent." 

"THK 11 KALTH ACT, lo-io." 

Included in the many impiox-ements this Act 
possesses over its i)i'edecess()i-, the following are worthy 
of mention: — It defiiu^s the iclatisc i-esjiotisibilities of 
the (State and local authorities for safeguarch'ng ihti 
health of the peo|)le, eliminates some overlapping of 
sanitary control that previously existed, gives ext«'nded 
powers for dealing with utdiealthy conditions, s«'ts a 
much higher standard of sanitation, and delegates to 



AliKLAM) MlXiriPAL llAyOBOOK. 

local authorities certain powers for the i)voiiintion and 
conservation of health in theii- districts. 

BY-LAWS RELATING TO SANITATION. 

Til keep abreast uf the I'equii'enit'iits oJ' the City 
and to maintain an efficient sanitarj^ administi-ation, the 
Council has exercised its powers to the utmost in the 
making of by-laws. 

In addition to tlie adojjtion of Section 26 of "The 
Health Act "" dcfinin-^ iniisances, wliidi in itself almost 
constitutes a sanitary code, by-laws aie ]3rovide(l fully 
covering ])ublic h(»ahh and sanitary interests. 

DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES. 

As pi-actically e\ iMvthiiiii i<-(|uii-ed for dealin<i with 
matters affecting the health of the public and the 
sanitation of the City is piovided in the By-laws and 
Kegulations under the Health Act, their application in 
detail comprises the duties of the Deitaitnient . 

Tlie relati\(> importance attached to the different 
branches of the woik varies fiom time to time, but 
the vulnerability of the waterfiont district, and the 
po.ssibility of the introduction of disease fiom overseas 
are always kept in view, and tlie work in many respects 
organised to meet such a cont in<iency. 

The City is ins|)ected systematically, house to 
house, averaginti under normal comlifions from two 
to three inspections per year, Imt certain localiti<'s and 

1S2 



AUCKLAM) MLWICU'AL IIANUJUJOK. 



piiMiiiscs i('fei\(" more I'lciiurnt \i.sils, while (.tlicis in 
subui-baii districts i-cciuire less t'ic(|iiriit attciil iuii. 
►Special inspections are made <if ))laees wheic t'ni.d is 
stored or handhnl, stables, and jiicniises occupied by 
Asiatics and othei-s. 

Special inspc-ctois iindei'take llie inspection and 
licensing of places used in connection with the prepara- 
tion, storage, or sale of food, the iincstigation of cases 
of infectious disease and the disinfection of premises, also 
the supei-vision of stoi'es and depots whei'e dangei-ous 
goods are kept. A woman sanitary inspectoi- is emijjoyed 
visiting the homes of peoi)le requii-ing her advice and 
attention. Her work is really an extension and round- 
ing-off of sanitary inspectois' work, moi'e reliance being 
placed on pei'suasion to secure th(> inii)i()vemenls 
sought. She also serves as a connecting link between 
the various social workei's and the 1 )epartnu'nt, bi'ing- 
ing together the sujiplj^ and demand of social service. 

The figures given in the following sunnnaiy of woik 
will indicate to some extent the effoi-ts made during the 
past year to keep the City clean ami healthy: — 

SUMMARY OF WORK 
For the Year Ending 31st March, 1922. 

Number of insjx'ctions made ... ... ... 41.7^7 

Number of complaints received and investigated !<S2 

Notifiable infectious diseases dealt with ... r)7l 

Number of rats caught ... ... ... ... «,2W 

Lettei-s, etc., recci\'ed and despatched ... ... l.o25 

IS.S 



ArcKLAM) MrMcil'AI. HAXDIiOOK 



Departmental i-epoits and rcpoits to ^VTedical 

Officer of Health ... 
Licenses issued 

Notices issued under TTcalth Act and irv-laws 
Premises disinfected 
l>uildiiigs reconui)('ii(l(>{l for deniolitioi 
Prosecutions for non-coni])liance with liy-laws 



],U1G 
1,283 
3,555 

397 
5 

138 



Vital statistics covering the last twenty years are 
given in tabular foi-m on the following page. 

C. T. HAYNKS, MM. San. I., 

Chief (Sanitary Inspector. 



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S S c; 2 ^* 



AUCKLAND MUSIVWAL IIAMJliOOK. 



ABATTOIR. 

Prior to the passing of " The Slauglitering and 
Inspection Act, 1908," it was customary for tlie 
butchei's to do their own slaughtei'ing, the slaughter- 
house, Richmond, being largely used for this pui-jjose, 
although some did their work undei- most insanitaiy 
conditions, in backyards, stables, etc. In l!)(»7 thr 
City Council decided that the premises at Richmond 
were totally unsuitable and inadequate, and that a new 
and up-to-date abattoir was essential. 

A new site, of about 27 acres, was acquiied at 
Westfield, near Otahuhu, on the Main Ti'unk Railway, 
about 8 miles f)om the centre of the city. This jn-oix-rty 
is favourably situated for an abattoir, l)t'ing a very 
naiiow strip of land lying between the Waitenuita and 
Manukau Harbours. The situation, exposed as it is 
to the prevailing westerlj' wind, ensures a cool hiee/.e 
on the wai'mest day in summer, which is very beneficial 
to the meat; fresh, cool aii' Ijfing a well known 
presei'vative. 

A loan of £26,000 was i-aised for the pui-ehase of 
the land and the election of the necessary buildings. 
Building operations wei'e commenced in IttoT, and in 
1908, the loan pioviiig insufficient, a further .t't.oou 
was obtained. The building was compli-l cd and opened 
to the maste)' butchers for killing in the early part 
of 1909. 

1S7 



MrKl.AXl) MiyifWAI. 11 AS DliOOK. 

The buildings erected at that time consisted of the 
main slaughter hall and hanging room. .Substantially 
built (if brick, 2 feet thick, and concrete covered, this 
hall has sufficient space foi' 20 slaughtermen to work, 
and the following stock can be convenient!}^ hung after 
slaughtei-, i)ending i-emoval to town — viz., ]20 beef, 100 
veal, liMi polk. Slid niutto?i and lainlx At both ends 
of this hall are large rooms used for the handling of 
bv-products. The office block, almost as substantially 
built as the slaughter hall, is conveniently situated to 
the noith-west of the main building, and consists of 
the manager's office, the general office, and a small 
laboratory, wheicin fust aid can be lendeied to the 
injured. .\t tlic snulhcin end, across the road that 
encircles the abattoir, is situated the wooden block, 
where the (Joveiriment meat inspectors and contract 
.slaughteiiiicii have their offices, and the woikincn their 
luncheon looni. Change and bath I'ooms, clothes drying 
loom, and the usual offices are under the same roof 
as the slaughter hall. Immediately behind the main 
building ai-e the sheep and cattle drafting yaids and 
shekel- sheds. Fat stock sales are held on Wednesday 
of each week at the saleyards, whicli piactically adjoin 
the abattoir grounds, and stock bought by the butchers 
are held and fed by the founcil, pending slaught<'r. 
Cottages for the stockman, foicman contractor, and a 
two storeyed house fur the .Manager of the Abattoir 
c( mpris" the remainini: l)uil(lings on the abattoir 
gi-dund. The rcniaiiidcr of tlie land is in natural grass. 

ISS 




ABATTOIR: EXTERIOR. 




ABATTOIR: INTERIOR. 



Ar<Kf,AM) Miyiril'AL lfAM)n(K)K. 

and plantation, ajul is used oxclusively for grazing 
stock. 

Stock killed at the Auckland ^ruiiicii)al Abattoir 
for the year ending 31st Maich, 1921, comprised 20,650 
cattle, 8,290 calves, 11,516 pigs, 98,498 sheep, and 16,528 
lambs. The revenue derived fioni the slaughter of 
this stock was £18,949 4s 9d, which does not include 
fees paid bj' firms killing for local consumi)tion at their 
own slaughterhouse, or for meat sui)i)lietl locallj- by 
either of the freezing works. Charges foi- killing, etc., 
are regulated by by-laws. 

Up to September, 1921, the Council employed its 
own slaughtei-men, etc., but since that date the 
slaughtering has been done by contractors, who are 
also responsible to the Council for the delivery of the 
meat killed to the correct ownois. The present general 
system is to load meat killed on a ceitain day in the 
early hours of the following morning. The T\ailway 
Department supplies a sufficient number of ventilated 
meat wagons for this puipose, but many of the butchers 
prefer to have then- meat carried into town by motor 
wagon. With the advent of Ixttci- roads, it is 
anticipated that the latter melliod will Ix'come genei-al, 
ensuring, as it does, more speedy deliveiy to the shops 
and avoiding the repeated handling which caniage by 
rail necessitates. 

The by-products are sold ])y the Council on hdialf 
of the butchers, and are disposed of by contiact, the 
contractors paying the Council, and ihe Council credit- 
ing the butcheis monthly. 



AUCKLAND MIMdl'AL II A S hIiooK . 

The Abattoir is subject to insiioction by tin- 
Department of Agriculture, whicli supplies (|u;ilitic(l 
inspectors to exauiiiu> all stock killed. Stock ins|>cctor's 
also make a I'egular ante-mortem inspection of stock 
offei-ed at the fat stock sales, and condemn all stock, 
before slaughter, whose condition warrants it. Stock 
condemned at the Abattoii- does not become a total 
loss to the owner, a small amount, in most cases, being 
paid as comi)ensation by the (Jovennnent, the balance, 
over and above the small sum obtained from the sale 
of the diseased meat, being met by the Condemned 
Stock Jnsui'ance Fund, to which tlir inajoiity of tlic 
butchers contribute. 

The drainage of the Abattoir is easily dealt with, on 
account of its position on the forcshoic of the .Mamikan 
Harbour. Having nothing inoic olYensixc to deal willi 
than the effluent from th<' septic tanks and the water 
from washing down the Abattoir, a holding tank which 
debouches its contents daily on the ehh tide is tlie 
extremely simj)le and effective method of dealing with 
this most impoi'tant matter. 

The chief factor in the cleaidiness of an 
Abattoir and the health of stock is water. When the 
Abattoir was first started, a su|)ply of water was 
obtained fiom a well in close i^roximity, but this supply 
was found to be nn)st unsatisfactory, being strongly 
impregnated with oxide, which left a reil deposit 
wherever used, and was full of vegetable poison, which 
soon caused heavy nu)rtality amongst the stock. 



AICKLAM) MI'M'U'M. II AM)IiOOK. 

Arrangements were cjuickly made to bring a supply of 
pure water from Onehunga, a distance of nearly 4 
miles. 

At tlu' pi'esent time, plans are being prepared by the 
City Engineer for the remodelling of the Abattoir, which 
will conveit it into the largest and most up-to-date 
slaughter house in the Dominion. Provision is being 
made for twice as nuich hanging space as now exists, 
additional killing space, and a chilling room. The 
lack of a chiller has long been a stumbling block to 
the more rai)id expansion of this branch of nuuiicipal 
enterprise. 

R. W. RUGG, 

Works Manager. 



I '.t_' 



Al'CKLAMJ MCMUH'AL llAMJJiUOK. 



MUNICIPAL FISH MARKET. 

The Market is iiiulcr the control of a .Maikcls 
Committee, and is supervised by a manager. The 
premises, consisting of offices, smoke houses, chilling 
plant, storage trenches, net shed, carpenter's shop, 
cleaning shed, and general equipment, ai'e situated 
off Customs Street West, attached to which is a wharf 
for trawlei's and fishing boats to discharge their catches. 

The Council has two steam trawlers, the Sii/i/i/uii 
and the ('owni. The Si/nphjii, which was for- 
mei'l}' a North Sea trawler, is a steel vessel 
of 184 gi'oss tonnage. She is 1U9 feet long, and 
can-ies a crew of eleven hands. During the 
war period she did useful work mine-sweeping on 
the New Zealand coast, and has proved to be the right 
size for ti-awling in these waters, going as far afield 
as the North Cape and the west coast. The ('tin-in 
is built of iionbaik, and has been converted into a 
trawler, her gross tonnage being 67 tons ; length S:3 feet. 
She carries a crew of 7 hands, and although of nuicli 
smaller dimensions than the Siiuiihni. her fishing i-eports 
compare more than favourably with any trawler in 
New Zealand. 

In addition to the two trawlers, tin- 1 )ci.;irtnifnt 
buys from liiu> and net men. and duiing Ia.st winter 
employed b(>tween 30 and 4(> small boats to augment 
the supply of (he trawlers. The demand for fish i.s 
steadily growing, l)ut th(> opiM'ations ii (lie City Council 
,. I'.i:! 




FISH-CURING. 




A CATCH ON A TRAWLER. 



Ai'CKLAM) MIXirH'AL ll.\M)li()(jK. 



in its Fish Market Department have had the effect 
of keeping it at a reasonable price. In spite of the 
high cost of working material, etc., cuiiscd l)y the wai", 
fish is cheaper in Auckland than in any other |)art 
of Australia or New Zealand. 

The Market is open fi-om 6 a.m. on Monday to 
12 noon on Saturday, and is worked by a day shift 
and a night shift. Business is transacted in the office 
between the hours of 5.30 a.m. and 5.30 j).in. Hawkers, 
hotels, restaurants, hospitals, dealers, and the trade 
in general aie supplied between these hours. Fish 
is received for cleaning and smoking at any houi- of 
the day or night, and an average of 45 hands i.s 
employed. Two motor vehicles deliver to city and 
suburbs. The Department also sells fish direct to the 
public through its own shop, situated in Queen Street. 
So far the Council's operations have been chiefly of an 
experimental nature, and given j)id|)cr facilities, there 
is no I'eason why the venture shouhl nut prove a success, 
as the expei'ience gained has Ix'cn inxaliiablc. 

During the year ending March. 31st, 1!>21, the 
total weight of fish received from all sources was l,(i40 
tons, and returns fi-oni sales amounted to the snrn of 
£49,758 

■J. 11. i)i:i(;nTOX, 

Manager. 



ArrKLAM) M/W/c/J'AL IIAXDHOOK. 



FINANCE. 

As the truest indication of the progress or otherwise 
of any institution or corporate body is recorded by its 
financial opeiations, it is of interest therefore to note 
that the first avaihible balance sheet of the City of 
Auckland, namely, the area bounded by Stanley Street, 
Symonds Street, Karangahape Road and Fianklin 
Koad, was presented, under the City Board Act, 1S63," 
by the City Board of Commissioners for the period 
1st June, 186.'3, to 30th June, 1864, and is given below 
in detail : — 

KECEIPTS. 
June 30. 1SG4— £ .,. d. £ g. j. 

From Provincial Government, on 

account of votes for City main sewer 3,049 3 5 
From ditto, on account of votes for 

City purposes ... ... ... 1.007 8 3 

Ditto, on account of vote loan of £20,000 5.000 
Ditto, on account of votes for water 

supply ... .. ... ... 700 U 

Ditto, contribution towards expense of 

cutting and forming Albert Street 500 
Ditto, one-half of expense of erecting 

urinal, etc.. at wharf ... ... 13 14 G 

Ditto, expense of lighting wharf lamps ,30 1 



From rents of ground in Customs 

House Street ... ... ... 17G 10 

From City rates ... ... ... 4.803 14 10 

From carters' licenses ... ... 182 10 

From lodging house licenses ... ... 21 '0 

From insurance companies, proportion 
of expense of fc rming water tanks 

for fire engines ... ... ... 004 

From miscellaneous income ... ... 50 8 G 



10,900 



5,441 3 4 
±•16,341 11 I 



^rcKI.AM) MrxiciI'M. IIWDIiooK 



PAYMENTS. 

£ 8. d. 

For constructinf; City main sewer ... 2,773 13 11 

Repairing and cleansing streets ... 6.904 11 6 

Lighting streets, repairing lamps, etc. 185 8 8 

Repairing and working fire engines, 

forming water tanks, etc. ... 412 G 4 

Salaries of officers and servants 

of the Board ... ... ... 859 (i 

Office furniture, printing, stationery, 

advertisi7ig, etc. ... ... ... 373 11 

Water supply, forming wells, erecting 

pumps, etc. ... ... ... 718 15 9 

Services of assistants to Engineer at 

City levels ... ... ... ... 54 17 10 

,, Price of stone breaking machine. 

Expenses towards erecting and 

working same ... ... ... 885 5 G 

Valuation of City property — sum paid 

to Messrs. Aitken & Reid ... 250 

Subscription to repair of Mount Eden 

Road 30 

., Erecting urinal and water closet on 

the wharf 27 9 

Law expenses ... ... ... 73 4 

Miscellaneous expenditure ... 84 11 4 



Balance in hand — main sewer ... ... 301 9 G 

Balance in hand — general purposes ... 2.107 IG 4 



13.C32 5 3 
2,709 5 10 



flG.341 11 1 
(Sgd.) D. C.RAHAM, 
Auckland, 12th July. 1864. Chairman. 

The Assets and Liabilities for tlic period wen- as 
follows : — 

ASSETS. LIABILITIES. 

£ s. d. -t' *•■ ''• 

Money due to Board 6.517 4 10 A ni o u n t borrowed 

from Provincial 
Government ... 5,000 

Sundry creditors ... 1,237 5 8 



£G.237 5 8 
Contingent liabilities 

under existing con- _ 

tracts 4.G20 19 , 



£6.517 4 10 £10.857 5 3 

HIT 



M'KLAM) MI'MCI I'M. II A X DJiOO l< . 

It will be noticed that in the Receipts there are a 
number of items such as loan receipts, contributions and 
reimbursements of expenditures, whicli, if excluded, 
reduce the amount of actual revenue receipts to 
£5,237 3s 4d, mainlj- accounted for by City rates, 
£4,803 14s lOd. 

Similarly on the Payments side most of the items 
are for new works, which, in later years, would be shewn 
in separate accounts uiulei- Loan headings. 

The next available statement of Accounts is that of 
the City Council from 21st November, 1871, to 15th 
November, 1872, in which the distinction befoi'e refened 
to is made. 



REVENUE RECEIPTS. 

£ s. d. 

Ordinary revenue 5,132 7 1 

Special rate ... 1,208 2 3 

Endowment rents 1,378 5 



f 7,718 14 4 



ASSETS. 



€ 



.Money, plant and 

debtors ... 23.934 9 11 

Accrued Sinking 

•^""'J 8,8G5 



£32.799 9 II 



PAYMENTS FROM REVENUE 
£ s. d. 

Xew work ... 758 16 10 

Repairs and main- 
tenance of streets 
and sewers ... G,215 G 7 

Salaries, office ex- 
penses and sun- 
dries 2,429 5 4 

Interest on deben- 
tures . ... 1.805 14 10 



Loan debt 
Mortgage 
Creditors . 



i. 1 1 .209 3 7 

LIA HI IJ'I'IKS. 

£ R. d. 

... 35.000 

1,400 

... 3,445 G 9 



£39,845 G 9 



Ills 



AUCKLAM) Mryicil'AI. II A .\ I) li( k > h 



Comparative figni-o.s avo o-ivon, in (Iccciinial pcrioil 
from that date : 



Year. 


Revenue Receipts. 


I'avnients iroiii 
Revenue. 

£ s. d. 








£ s. d. 


:U 


<t March. 


188'2 


23.8G4 1 7 


28.58C 17 9 






1892 


(;5.;U5 8 2 


57. no** 17 1 






1902 


Sl.(i49 9 


91,009 8 






1912 


2I4.9(V2 11 7 


22G.991 13 3 






1921 


1.075.840 18 11 


1.1(U.417 14 9 



Year. 


Assets, including 

Sinkins Fund 

Accrued. 


Liul'ililies. 

iucludiiis 

Loan Debts. 




£ s. d. 1 


£ s. d. 


31st March. 1882 


275.940 7 9 


252.859 


1892 


573,290 11 


4Ci5.294 Ifi 3 


1902 


787, 8G0 4 


5(50.750 3 


1912 


1.895.023 17 10 


1.284.007 5 


1921 


5,230.>^27 8 2 


!. 113. 092 n 7 

1 





Accrued 




Loan Debt. 


Sinking Fund. 


Xett 


£ 


£ 


£ 


5.000 


-- 


— 


35.000 


8.805 


26.135 


250.000 


5,358 


244.642 


449.900 


20,867 


423.033 


554.900 


72.117 


482.783 


1.178.200 


108.299 


1.009.901 


3.918,924 


499.827 


3.419.097 



1864 
1872 
1882 
1892 
1902 
1912 
1921 



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M'CKI..\.\I) Ml .\ II I I'M. II .\.\ ulidOK. 



AUCKLAND HARBOUR BOARD. 

The Port of Auckland is situated in the lower 
leaches of the Waiteinata Estuary, at the head of the 
ii.uiiaki (iulf. The e.stuaiy has a total area of I'.'j 
square miles and a water frontage of J 94 miles. It is 
completely sheltered by an outlying chain of islands 
and by the peninsula at the northern enti-anc<'. Its 
geographical position (obsei'vation spot) is latitude 
38deg. 49mins. 56secs. S. and longitude 174deg. 47mins. 
57secs. E. In the inner hai'bour the anchorage is of 
the very best desci'iption, with watei' fiom 5 to 12 
fathoms, and good holding ground. The tide i-ises and 
falls from 5ft. 6in. to 12ft. The whole of the harbour 
and approaches are well lighted, and the channels, 
shoals, etc., are clearlj' maiked by buoys and beacons, 
so that at any hour the poit may l)e entered with 
perfect safety. 

The Auckland Harbour Board was constituted unilei' 
" The Harbour Boards Act, 1870," and held ils first 
meeting on June 1st, 187i, the Mayoi- of Auckland (Mr.. 
P. A. Philips) presiding. At a subsecjuent meeting 
Captain W. C. Daldy was elected chaiiinan. a jxisition 
he occupied for six years, and .Mi-. Jchn Ogilvie was 
a]ipointed to the office of secretary and treasure)-. 

Prior to the constitution of the Harbour Boartl, the 
Port was undei- the control of the Provincial Council. 
Some reclamation had been carried out l)y that tudy. 

201 



M'CKI.AM) MISIilI'M. ll.\.\l)li()()K 



for at the time of the transference of the control from 
the Provincial Council to the Board considcialjle 
alteration had taken place on \hv foreslioics. in the 
'forties, Commei-cial iiay swept round from lii-it(jmart 
Point, along a beach, which subsecjuently became Foit 
Sti-eet, to a headland known successively as Stanley 
Point and Smales Point. This promontory stood in 
the vicinity of Alix'i't Street and Customs Street West. 
By 1870 the foi-eshore had been reclaimed, and Customs 
Street East added to the City's highways. At that date 
Customs Street ended at the foot of a cliff, and a 
long flight of steps, known as '' Jacob's Ladder," led 
up to Emily Place. On the western side of Queen 
Street, Customs Sti-eet ended at the waterfi-ont 
opposite Albert Street. 

The wharf acconnnodation in 1870 was very small 
indeed. The first Auckland wharf was the Wynyaril 
Pier, which was built in the 'forties, and was situated 
in Official liay, in a dii-ect Vine ivom Shoit Street. 
Commeicial Bay had from the first been selected as 
the shipping centre of Auckland, and by 1852 consider- 
able work had been exjoended upon the imj)i-ovement 
of the facilities for loading and urdoading vessels. The 
Queen Street Wharf has always been the piiru-ipal 
wharf, but in 1852 there was a small pier leatling fi-o:ii 
the lane which ran from the Victoria Hotel to Short land 
Street, and east of (Jraham's IJoinl (a stone building 
which still stands in I'oit Sti'eet, but at that time was 
right on the waterfiont ) there was a laiuh'ng stage. 
Between 1852 and 1870 a new woodm wharf replaced 

•Jd.S 



Airiu.AM) Ml MCII'M. II AXDliOOK. 

the Queen Street cne ; another was erected opposite 
Gore Street, and a breakwater had been built from 
Hiitoniart Point. 

This was the state of the waterfront when the 
Harbour Hoard undertook the inanai!;ement of the 
Port. 

The Hoaid iiiuuediately iiioceeded with a scheme 
cf harbour impi-ovements. In 1874 authoi'ity was 
obtained to boi-row the sum of £150,000 for the purpose 
of buildinii Auckland Dock (now demolished), con- 
structing the Railway AVharf and Breastwork, and 
making certain leclamations fronting the City. Latei', 
Queen's Wharf (then a wooden structure) was wiilcned 
and lengthened, and the reclamation of Freeman's Bay 
was undertaken. 

In 1882 authcirity was obtained to Ijoii-ow a furthci' 
sum of £150,000, and the consti'uction of Calliope Dock 
was begun. The dock was opened ciii IGth February, 
1888, when II. .M. ships ('alliopi and iJuninnul were 
docked together. The same year a largei- scheme of 
harbour works was authorised, the sum of £500,000 
being bcn-owed for the pui'pose of paying off existing 
loans, constructiiiii additional \\liai\cs and sheds, pur 
chasing a bucket di'c dger and niakinu fui'the?- reclama- 
tions. 

I:i \'^u\\ an agi-eement was comjdcted between 
the Admiralty and llie Boaid, whei-eby the latter 
agreetl. in return for an annual subsidy, to jii-ovide 
workshops and niacliineiy, togethei- with a dee]i water 

204 







AUCKLAND, LOOKING EASTWAI 
Showing the wharves, Quay Street, and King's Drive (reci 




AUCKLAND. VIEW FII 



Al 








'= .'■.■-■., ■«,-<S5S, 



K t 



Vk' i'Sli 



FROM THE FERRY BUILDING 
y reclaimed), Devonport and Rangitoto Island on the left. 








THE NORTH SHORE. 



ArcKLAM) MrMCIl'AL UAMJJiOOK. 

jetty and 80-ton sheevlegs, so that Calliope Duck iiii^ht 
be made efficient for the docking and repair of shijis 
of the Royal Navy. Four years later this agreement 
was extended and the subsidy increased to cover the 
cost of additional works. This arrangement made 
Auckland the naval base for the 1 )()niini()ii. 

The growing trade of the Port and the pressing 
need of accommodation for oversea vessels caused the 
Board to decide, in 1903, that the time had conic to 
adopt a comprehensive scheme of harbour iinin-ove- 
ments. In July, U304, the Engineer submitted a 
scheme of works, which, after consideration extend- 
ing over some months, was adopted. A Bill was 
promoted and passed through Parliament, in 1905, 
authorising the boi'rowing of £400,00(1, in oitler to 
enable the Board to proceed with the first portion 
of the scheme. Contracts were let for the con- 
struction of the Kailway Wharf in ferroconcrete : the 
reclamation at Fi-eeman's Bay was undertaken : the 
deepening of the berths to take the largest vessels 
coming to New Zealand was betiun ; and landing stages 
for the vehicular cargo vessels were built. The same 
year a contract was let for the construction in reinforced 
concrete of the first j)ortion of tlic new Queen's Wharf. 

In 1907 the Bailway Whaif was completed and 
brought into commission, and a contract was let for 
the construction upon it of five single-storey steel 
sheds The Ferry Jetty was finished and brought into 
use, and the work of deepening; the berths was 
advanced. 

•20.-. 




CHAIRMEN OF THE AUCKLAND HARBOUR BOARD. 
I IKST Row- W. C. DaMy (1871-77): J T. B„vl.,n (1.S77-7.S) : IX II. .McKcnzic 
M 879-80). 
'COND R(,w:— 1-". 0. Compton (1881-82): G. Aickin (1882 and 188-1); C. B. Stone 

(1883): C. W. Owen (1885). 
liiIRD Row:— W. R. Waddi-I (1886-88): M. Niccol (1888-91. 1895 and 1898); 

C. C. McMillan (1892); W. Oowther (189^); A. Porter (1894) 
Fourth Row:— A. II. Nathan (1894 and 1902); \V. J. Napier (1897 and 1899)- 

A. Kidd (1901); \V. Gunson (1902): J. T. Julian (1903-04). 
1 iFTH Row:— lion, (afterwards Sir) f^. Mitchelson (1905-09)- A | tntrican 
^. f i l^'K^^- ••• "• ^'""='"" (1911-15): H. D. Heather (1915-1922) 
Mr. G. S. Kissling and .Mr. J. W. W'itheford occupied the chair in 1896 and I9D9, 
but no photographs of them are available.) 



ACCKLAM) MI.MCII'M. II.WDIiooh. 

Til 1908 the Board decided to obtain aulliority tu 
bonow a further £1,000,000, and :vii empowering Hill was 
l)i'oinoted and successfully passed thioiiuli Parliament. 

The following years were busy ones tdr llic Hoard. 
Construction work was continued, bul trade antl 
shipping increased at a greater rate than jiro- 
vision could be made for them. Northern \\'harf. 
for the accommodation of tlie lleet of coastal 
steamers, was completed : the I'eclamation of Fi'ee- 
man's Bay (67 acres) was finished : ari-angements 
were made with the Auckland City Council for 
widening and impi'oving the streets on the water- 
front ; and the i-eclamation of ]\fechanics Bay, to 
provide railway yards, was begun. The main harbour 
and its approaches were re-surveyed by arrangement 
with the Admiialty, and everj' effort was made to make 
the Harbour safe at all times by the piovision of lights, 
buoys and beacons. The old wooden Queen's Wharf 
was leplaced with a longer and wider structure of feri'o- 
concrete, equipped with large transit sheds (three of 
them of two stories), electric cianes and capstans, railway 
sidings on the quay sides, and a centi'e I'oadway (Jo feet 
wide. Central Wharf, similarly equipped, followed : 
the Western Breakwater and the first 1000 feet of 
Western Wharf, off the Freeman's Bay Reclamation, 
were completed. At the same time a slipway, or marine 
railway, capable of taking up vessels of tjoo tons dis- 
placement, was built and commissioned, and other 
reclamations to the eastward of King's Mharf were 
uiulertaken. 

■-'nT 



AICKLASD MI'MilVAL II A^ DBOOK. 

In 1913 the Board took over from the Marine 
Department the control and management of Manukau 
Harbour. A scheme for a new ferro-concrete wharf, to 
replace the old wooden railway wharf, was approved, 
but could not be carried out owing to iiiiaiu-ial dis- 
organisation consequent upon the Great War. How- 
ever, the bai- was re-surve\'ed, and new beacons and 
automatic lights were piovided. 

In 1919 Parliamentarj^ authority was obtained for 
the bcrrowing of another million ])ounds for further 
harbour works. The work of iei)lacing the old 
wooden Hobson M'luuf with a new reinfoiced con- 
crete structure, e(iuipped with two-storey sheds 
and appliances foi- the rai)id handling of cargo, 
was begun in 1921. The Eastei'n Tide Deflector 
v.as put in hand, and further reclamation work 
was undertaken. Meantime the Harbour had been 
deepened around the berths and in the approaches to 
the various wharves, giving a depth at the main 
wharves of 3.5 feet of water at low water spring tides. 
Quarries were opened at Rangitoto, from wliich the 
Board obtains the stone for its own works, and a 
sawmill was erected on the coast to iJiovide tind)ei-. 

As these improvements proceeded, trad(> and 
.shipping increased. In 1871 the Board's net receipts 
were £6,523, whilst in 1921 (its jubilee year) they 
amounted to £283,782. 

Thr arrivjils cf .shipping at the Poit ..f .Vncklaiid 
have increased in that time from 20.5 vessels, totalling 

2t),S 



ACCA'LAX/J MrMCIl'AL HANDIiOOK. 



88,567 tons register, to 5,:567 vessels, totiilliii-i l,s.00,lf)3 
tons in li)21. 

The berthing accommodation at the present time 
amounts to 14,925 feet, of which 8,208 feet is avaihihh; 
for overseas shipping and 6,717 feet for coastal xcssels. 

From time to time the Hoard's constitution has 
been altered, until it now consists of 14 uuMubers, 
three of whom ai'e elected by the electoi-s of the City 
of Auckland, seven by the electors of the suburban 
distiicts and the ratepayers of the adjoining counties, 
three by the payers of dues, and one nominated by the 
Governor-in-Council. The Hoard has been fortunate in 
the men who, from time to time, have occupied the 
C'haii'. Mr. H. R. Mackenzie is the present Chai)-man. 

The Hoaid fully recognizes that its future is bouiul 
up with that of the City and Province, and that the 
Harbouj' must keep pace with their piogiess. This 
year (1922) it is estimated that over £4()0,0U0 will be 
spent on works foi' the improvement of the Harbour. 

The following pi-ogress statement of receipts, com- 
mencing with 1872, will indicnte the llnancial advance- 
ment made by the Board : — 

Year. £ s. d. 

1872 .. ... ... •■• 12.498 2 11 



1881 
1891 
1901 
1911 
1921 



25,525 17 

3:i,s>i4 1 

54,2H6 1(1 

125,294 s 

283.782 9 



209 



Al'CKLAMJ MIWirirAL HANDBOOK. 

In A|»i)riulix C will Ix- found a statement of the 
shipping of the Poit from 1871 to 1921, in decennial 
periods. 

Mr. J. M. Brigham succeeded Mr. Ogilvie as 
Secretary in is72, and occui)ied that office until his 
■decease in liilO. He was followed l)y the {nesent holder 
■of the position. 

H. W. BURNETT, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



AUCKLASJ) MIMcirAL UAMJBOOK 



AUCKLAND AND SUBURBAN 
DRAINAGE BOARD. 

When the necessity for di'ainage facilities first pre- 
sented itself to the inhabitants of Auckland and the 
suburban areas, it was, of couise, iini)racticable to 
proceed with extensive works. Tlic authorities con- 
cerned therefore adopted the siiujilc nu-thod of con- 
structing sewers alongside the iiatuial watercourses 
with the outlets discharging into the harbour. The.se 
sewer outlets were increased in number from time to 
time with the growth of th(> City aiul expansion of 
its suburbs, until it became apparent that some im- 
proved method of sewage disi)osal should be adojited. 

As early as 1878, Mr. W. Clark, ^V. Inst. C.K., '.f 
London, visited Auckland foi' the purpose of reporting 
on the main drainage of the City and certain suburbs. 
In his leport to the City Council he rcconnncndfd the 
construction of intercepting sewcis. luiniping stations, 
septic tanks and filters with an outfall in St. (ieorge's 
Bay and provision for an extension to Hobson Hay if 
occasion should recpiii-e. Xo action was taken liowc\.>r 
with i-egard to these reconnnendations. 

in 1902 Mr. A. A. Wrigg, City j-jiginrcr. was 
instructed by the City Council to icport on tin- drain.mf 
of the City. He advised that the nuMhod, tln-n exist inu. 
of discharging sewage from the many outlets into the 
harbour could be rnidcrcd ipiitr sanitary by th.' ••\t<'n- 
sion of the sewei's to low water mark. 

•J I I 



ACCKLAMJ MIMCII'AL ilAMiliOOK 



The iiiattci- was aK-n'ii cunsidiM-cil l).y the Cily ('(nimil 
ill l!»0:i, the Aiu-kland Harlxmi- lioard lia\in^ llim 
decided that the dis(•hal■,^■<■ (if cnide .sewajic iiitu tl,.' 
harboiii- must be disconlininMl. In this year Mr. II. L 
Mestayer, M. Inst. Civ, of \\'ellin-toii, visited Aiickland 
and enciuivcd into the diainajie of the City. He after- 
wards reported to the City ("ouneil and I'ecomtnended 
that the City be re-sewered on the separate system, 
and that a main intcieeptin^ sewer be const met imI, with 
se])tic tanks and outlet at Cox's Creek. 

After having considered Mr. Mestayer's report the 
City Council, under the Mayoralty of the Hon. K. 
Mitchelson, refencd the whole (|iiestion to .Mr. (J. 
Midgley Taylor, M. Inst. C.K., of T^ondon. In hin.i 
Mr. Taylor submitted his reiiort, in which lu- recom- 
mended the utilization of tlie existing sewers as far 
as practicable and the const nict ion of a main intercept- 
ing sewer with an outfall at ()kaliu Point. 

In 1906 Mr. \\'. K. Mush, .M. Inst. C.K.. City 
Engineer, was instructed to report r.w the schemes |)ro- 
posed by Mr. li. L. Mestayer and .Mr. (i. .Midgley 
Taylor. In his report to the Council .Mr. liiisli concurird 
with the proposals of .Mr. 'i\iyl<ii\ Wiit rccommriidrd the 
adoption of a scheme which wnuld pro\ idc for tin- 
drainage, not only of the City, but also of those 
suburban districts whose natural drainage was towards 
the Waitemata Harlxiui' between Okahu I'oiiit and 
Motion's Creek. 

21.S 



ACCKLASD MUSICirAL ILAyUBOOK. 

This lepoit was afterwards considered at several 
conferences of the authorities interested in the pro- 
posals contained theiein. Mr. Bush was eventually 
instructed to piepare a scheme for the main diainage 
of Auckland and subu)i)s, the Auckland Harhniir Hoard 
being at the same time i-equested to allow of the 
dischaige of sewage at Okahu Point. 

Subseiiuently Mr. ({. Midgley Ta\ loi' was, b\ nuitual 
agreement between the City Council and the Harbour 
Board, commissioned to pi-oceed to Auckland and sub- 
mit a further repoi-t. He visited Auckland in 1!)08 for 
this purpose, ami his leport on that occasion contained 
the following important recommendations, which became 
embodied in the scheme ultimately decided ujion and 
authorised l)y Act of I'ailiament : — 

(a) Adoption of a joint scheme i^^r Aucklarul City 
and suburbs 

(b) Drainage on the cond)ined system. 

(c) Direct dischaige of the sewage, after screen- 

ing, into the sea at Okahu Point. 

(d) Adoption of the line of the main intciccpting 
sewer recommended l)y the lioaiiTs Kn^ineer, 
Mr. W. E. J^ush. 

.\t iliis juncture it was fully I'ccognized that th(> 
sclieme, if adopted, should be jn'oceeded with under 
the control of a single authoiily. Pioposals were 
therefore projected, and considered at some length, for 
the incorporation of a (iieater Auckland Municipality 
to comprise at least those authoi'ities concern.M] in the 

•J 1 4 



ArCKI.AM) MIMCWAL IIASDUOOK. 

mjiiii di-;iinai;e schtMiie. This was not cl'tcctrd, Imw cn cr. 
and Hs an alternative the scheme was authoi-ised l)v 
■'The Auckland and Suhni})aii l)iainai;e Act, I!i(ih," 
and the Auckland and Snl)uil)an I'laina^e iJoard was 
constituted thereby as fioni October lOth, H)OH. 

The Boai'd consists of the Mayor and C'fnincilhtrs 
of the City of Auckland, and the respective Mayors and 
Chairmen of tlie other contributing authorities : the 
Mayor of the ('ity of Auckland beint; chairman r>f the 
Board, ex-officio. 

The first meeting of tlu' Hoard was held on 
November 20th, 1908, and was jjresided over by .Mr. 
(aftei-wards the lion.) /Vithur M. .Myei'S. 

On October 25th, 1909, the works in the scheme were 
formally inauguiated by Mi'. ('. D. Cirey, then Chairman 
of the Hoard. I'pon completion of the outfall works at 
Orakei the scheme was bi-ouuht into operation, the 
ofKcial opening ceremony Ix'ing performed at the works 
on March 25th, I'.Hl, l)y .Mi', (afterwards the lion.) 
C. J Parr, C..M.(i., then Chaiinian of the Hoard. 

The function of the Hoard is to piovide all neces- 
sary facilities for the reception of sewage from the 
several districts incorixirated within the hiainage I'is- 
trict, and to make pioxision for the pi(>|ier disi'harge of 
such sewage into the harbour at Okahu Point. 
Reticulation sewers are provided b\ the several local 
authorities, by-laws of the I'.oaid regulating their design 
and construction. 



Arc K LAM) Ml'MClPAL II AM) BOOK . 

The scheme has been designed for an aiea of 18,900 
acres with an estimated ultimate population of 280,000 
persons on a basis of 210 gallons per capita per diem, or 
six times a dry-weathei- How of 35 gallons. 

At the inception of the lioaid twelve sepai-ate 
distiicts were incorporated in the Drainage District 
with a total area of 12,915 acres. Portion of another 
district, comprising 2,240 acres, was incorporated in 
1915, making a total area of 15,155 acres. Seven of the 
original districts have since been amalgamated with 
Auckland City, anil have consequently ceased to exist 
as separate districts under the jurisdiction of the Board. 
The areas of the sevcMal disti-icts incorporated in the 
Drainage District as at March 3 1st, 1921, are as 
follows : — 

District. AcreS. 

Auckland Citv (iiicludiim Domain) ... ... ... 1.878 

Parnell. amalgamated Auckland City, Feb. 15. 19I.S... (■)84 

Arch Hill, amalgamated .\uckland City. April 1. 19l:i 154 

Grey Lynn, amalgamated Auckland City, .Tulv 1, 11)1 1 900 

Reninera. amalgamated Auckland City. March I. 1915 2. 520 

hiden Terrace, amalgamated Auck. Citv. Oct. 1, 1915 95 

f'P«"'"- ainalfian'ated Auckland Citv, Feb. 1. 1917 ... SCO 

J^ t. thevaher, amalgamated Auck. City, Mar. 1. 1921 1.200 

Total area Auckland Citv .. 8,291 

Mount Eden - l_40o 

Mount Albert 2,450 

.Newmarket ... ... ing 

One Tree Hill (portion) .". ['_', \\ '" gos 

Avondale (portion), incorporated Nov. 4, 1915 ... 2,240 

Total area Drainage Di.strict ... ... ... 15,155 

The further area of 3,745 acies piovidcd for 

eompri.ses an additional area of the One Tic- Hill 

Road Di.strict. the- Orakei Koad Distiict, and a i)ortioi. 

of the Mount i;.)skill I;,, a, I District. Negotiations have 

been coimnenccd Ur th,- ineliision ..f the first nn-ntioncd 

21(i 



I'omi 


liitioii. 


1911. 


1921. 


0".8:}-2' 


81.712 


9.381 


14.635 


(i.7(K) 


11.345 


2.780 


3.083 


2.000 


5.197 


+ 


3.229 



ArCKLAXI) MryiCII'AL IIASDliOOK. 

area, but no i)r()|)().sals ha\c yet bt-t'ii made witli 
respect to the othei' two areas. 

In the census returns for 1!>II and 1921 the ]ioim- 
hition of each of th<> several dislricts is fiiven as 
follows : — 

District. 

Aueklaiul City (incliuliiiK Domain i 

Mount Eden 

Mount Albert 

Xewinarket 

One Tree Hill (portion) ... 

.\vonflale (portion) 

88.093 119.201 

* These figures include districts since ainalganiated with City. 
+ Not incoriKirated in Drainage District at this date. 

The Hoard is empowered to l)orrow a total sum nut 
exceeding £.5(J0,0UU for expendituic on th<> works 
authoi-ised. At March 31st, 1921, five si'parale loan- 
had l)een effected amounting in all to £450,000. Two 
loans, amounting to £5,500, raised by the late Hobson 
Bay Wateished Sewage Board, are also liabilities of 
the Board, the ])ublic del)t of whicli is therefore 
£4.55,.^0(). 

Repayment of loans is provided for 1).\ a sinking; 
furnl administered by the Auckland and Sulairban 
Drainage Loan ( 'oiiuiiissioners. The accuimilated 
amount in the fund at March Hist, \wl\ . was f-2."i,4:{() l.'is. 

The ordinary income and re\cnur nf ttir board is 
deiived by assessments le\ied aniniall\ npon the con- 
ti-ibuting authorities. The fund thus cicated provides 
foi' the paynuMit of interest and sinkiim fluids on loans 



AiCKLAJD MryiCll'AL IIAXDBOOK. 

ami foi- expenses inclined in general nuiintenance of 
eonipletecl wuiks. An annual estimate of the amount 
retiuiied for these purposes is prepared, and each local 
authoiity is assessed for its propoi'tion of this amount 
as the capital value of all the ratable property in its 
district bears to the total capital value of the Drainage 
District, these values being furnished by the Valuer- 
General. The following table shows particulars of 
these operations for the year ending March 31st, 1921 : — 

District. Capital Value* Amount Assessed. 

& £, a. d. 

Auckland City ... ... 21,868,377 22,081 2 4 

Mount Eden ... ... ... 2.302.815 2.325 4 3 

Mount Albert ... ... ... 1,6.35.418 1,051 6 

Newmarket ... ... ... GG1,404 007 10 9 

One Tree Hill (portion) ... r.C3.457+ 069 18 2 

Avondale (portion) ... ... 387,404+ 391 4 8 

:Point Chevalier ... ... 242.150 244 10 1 



£27.701.085 £28.031 2 9 

• As at March 31st.. 1919. 

+ For portion included in Drainage District. 

'. Amalaainated with Auckland City March 1. 1921. 

The following princi|)al works in the scheme were 
completed at Maich :51st, 1921 : — 

(a) Outfall works at Orakei, com]jrising outfall 
sewer, storage tanks, buildings and plant. 

(b) 7 sections of the main sewer of a total 

length of 8 miles lO.T) chains. 

(c) 13 branch sewers of a total length of 12 miles 
73.2 chains. 

(d) 4 pumping stations. 

The m.aiii outfall sewer is \,-l\:'A{. long, with its point 
<.f discharge 87.5fl. north-east of the Orakei Jetty. For 
a li-imth of 732ft. from the seaward end it consists of 

•Jis 



AirKLAMJ MIML'U'AL HANDBOOK. 

two 4hiii. diaiiK'tcr cast-iron pipes on cast-iron cradles, 
the next length of 324ft. consists of two similar 
Ijipes set in concrete, and the I'emaining poition is a 
conci'ete culveit 22.5 stiuare feet in sectional aiea lead- 
ing into the outfall chamber of the stoi'age tanks. The 
invert of the ontfall sewer at its i)oint of discharge is 
26.2ft. below high-water level. 

The stoi-age tanks are compiised in one block 
l,2!J6ft. 6in. in length and l()6ft. wide, with a total 
capacity of 7,80U,U0U gallons. They are constructed of 
conci-ete, plain and reinfoix-ed, the roof having been 
designed to form a jjoition of Ihe suggested esplanade 
for the foreslxnc of the liailjour. 

At the inlet end of the tanks a hrick building is 
erected in which is installed the screening and detritus- 
removal plant, compi-ising coarse sci-eens, mechanically 
ojjerated fine screens, and a bucket di'edge. This plant 
is driven by a 10 b.h.p. vertical steam engine, with an 
oil engine as a stand-by. A \alve chamber is built at 
the outlet end of the tanks, in wliieli the \alves con- 
trolling the discharge of sewage aie opei-ated. 

Tin- main intercejiting sewei-. which has a luling 
«radi<-nl <.f I in .■{,()()(), is of the standaid ox iform, or egg- 
shaped section, ranging from 8ft. 6in. by 5ft. Sin. to 3ft. 
«in. by 2ft. -tin. It is constructed of concrete, iilain and 
reinforced, and is laid princii)all\ in tunnel with the 
exception of a length <if 100 chains in Hobson Bay, 
which is constructed on i-einforced concrete piles. 
The l)ranch sewers are of various sections and grades, 
and are ei.nst riicted of concrete and earthenware pipes. 

•22(1 



t 'i II p 



MECHANICAL SCREENS: FRONT. 




MECHANICAL SCREENS: BACK. 



ACCKLASJ) MiWlClPAL HAJDBOOK. 

Koiir i)Uiii|)iiii; stations have been piuvided for the 
low-level areas and reclaimed lands on the foreshore of 
the City. The plant necessary foi- the total output at 
each station is installed in duplicate, each unit con- 
sisting of a stei-eo])hagus eenliifugal imiiip, electric 
iiiotoi-, patent auton)atic coiiti-ollei' and Hoat apparatus. 

During the year ending March 31st, 1921, an avei-age 
daily dry-weathei' flow of 6| million gallons was recorded 
at the Orakci works. The gi-eatest quantity dischai-ged 
in any one day was ."^7.1 million gallons, recorded on 
November 22nd, 1015. 

The Board meets quartei'ly in the Council Chamber, 
To\\ri Hall, Auckland. The successive ('hairmen of the 
Board have been Mr. (afterwards the Hon.) A. M. 
Myers, 1908-1909: Mr. C. I). Grey, 1909-1910: Mr. L. .1. 
P.agnall, lOKi-IOIl : aiul Mi', (aftei'wards the Hon.) C. J. 
Pair, C.-M.C, 1911-1915: the lucsent Chairman being 
•Mr. 1. 11. Cunson, CM. (J., who has held that office 
since Apiil, 1915. 

The office of the Boaid is in Cleave's Buildings, 
High Street, Auckland. Mr. W. K. Bush, .M. Inst. C.E., 
City I'^ngineer, who designed the scheme, was Engineer 
to the Board until Sejjtembei', 1915, and Mi-. H. H. Iiwin 
was Secretary to the Board until A|)ril. 1911. These 
officers were succeeded by the present holder of the 
joint position of Engineer and Secretary. 

H. II. WATKIXS. M.H. San. 1.. 

|-">ngine(M- and Secretary. 
■}•>■> 



Arc l< I. AM) MIMCII'AL II AM)JiOOJ< 



AUCKLAND FIRE BOARD. 

Auckhiiid's early fire brigades were volunteer organi- 
sations. In the seventies, soon aftci- the foi'matioii of 
the Auckland City Council, iindci the Municipal 
Corporations Act, the Fire Brigade became a dejiart- 
niciit of the Corporation, and continuod under the 
Council's control until 1907, when the Auckland l-'ir.- 
Boai'd took ovei' the brigade under the provisions of 
"The File Brigades Act, liKXi." The Boaid, which 
consists of seven niend^ers, one ajjpointed by the 
Governoi-, three elected by insurance companies, and 
three appointed by th(^ Ci(.\ Council, held its first nu'ct- 
ing on July 1st, 19(i7. 

The plant at the time of the change of the coritr<il 
consisted of one small motor tender and four pair of 
hoi'se machines. Th(^ Board decided to re|ilace this 
out-of-date ai)paratus with modern fire fighting appli- 
ances, and innnediately actpiircd a large Thornecroft 
motor temler, with a speed of forty miles jjei' hour, an.i 
capable of cariying twelve nieii and the necessary first 
aid equipment. In 1909 a large 120-horse power Dennis 
(Jwynne motoi' turbine pum]), callable of throwing sOO 
gallons of water per minute, at liiolbs. pressure, wjis 
obtained. This was the largest motoi pump in existence 
at that peiiod for fire fighting purposes, and has iM)t 
yet been superseded. 

In 1912 the equipment of the Biinaile was inciea^ed 
by a secoml Thornecroft tender and an electric tuintalile 



AIJCKLAXD MLW/C/rAL HANDBOOK. 



extensiun laihler, capuljlc ot' cxtfiiiliiig sTft. without 
i-estiiig on any stiueturp at the top. This nn ant with- 
drawing fi-oin .service three pair of hoises, only one 
pair being retained to draw ttie Shand Mason I'lm. 
escape. 

The new Hoard also incicased the statY, wliich neces- 
sitated an enlargeiiu'nt of the Central Station, and a tin<' 
two storey brick building, with reinforced coneiete Hoois 
was erected in Beresford Street, containing twelve 
rooms for single men on the groum' floor and qnarters 
for three married men on the first floor, and a flat roof 
for yard acconunodation. The cost of this addition was 
about £6,000. 

In 19i:} began the lii'st of a series of amalgamations 
with suburban distiicts, Aich Hill and Parnell joining 
the City. To meet the reijuirements of Parnell a new 
.station, provided with a Kissel motor tender and a staff 
of three men, was oijcned in Manukau Koad, near St. 
Stephen's Avenue. Electric fire alarms wei-e instalh-d, 
and to i)rovide a sufficient watei- suppl.x the distiict was 
reticulated with new mains, bringing it up to the City 
standard. At Arch Hill electric tire alarms were 
installed, and i-eticulat ion of water undertaken. 

In the following year (101 1) (Irey Lynn .iinalgamated 
with the City, and additions were made to the existing 
station, a 38 h.p. Daimler motor was i)rovidetl, and th«» 
staff increased to five. Klectric alarms were als'> 
installed. 
R '22r) 



ArcKLAM) MryinpAL hamjuook. 

Hrimicra joined the City in 1915, and a new station 
was erected on Henuieia Road, close to Victoria Avenue. 
The staff consists of six peiinanent men. The motor 
tender is a 40 h.p. Kissel. Electric alarms were also 
installe<l. 

Kdcn Terrace also joined the City in this yeai-, but 
owing to its pro.ximity to the City station it was only 
necessary to instal electric fire alarms. 

Epsom Ijecaiiie part of the City in lit 1 7, hut as the 
stations at Parnell and Kenuiera wei-e consideied suffi- 
cient to deal with outbreaks of fii'e in these disti'icts, 
all that was rf'tiuiicd to Ining the district up-to-date 
was the installation of electric fii'e alarms. 

I'oint Chevalier is the latest district to amalgamate 
with the City, and to meet the demands of residents in 
this locality the lioard immediately acciuiicd a site on 
which a station will be elected shortly-. 

A site has also been secui-ed in I'onsnnby Hoad, on 
which it is in-opcjsed to erect a station, to he known as 
the Westeiii Station. 

When the Fire lioard fiist took over control of tlic 
P.rigade it consisted of a central station, a station in 
I'onsoriby, the Heach Koad station, and a total staff of 
twenty-two permanent men and twenty-one auxiliary 
firemen under the command of Superintendent C. A. 
\Vo(,lley. Sui)erintendent W. L. Wilson, who succeeded 
the late .Mr. Woolley, now contiols five stations and 
a staff ot forty-two permanent men and twenty 
auxiliaries. 

22(5 



AUCKLAM) Mr MCI I' A L llAMHUHth. 



Tfic fire ;il;iiMi s\ stein lias l)ccii t Imi i)iiL(lily iciii-\s cd 
iiiulcr the pi-oseiit Supciiiilcndriil hy llic iiistallal ion (if 
the l)ui)lex iii-e ahiriii system, whicli is practically the 
last woi-d in fire alaiin installations. With its hi^^lily- 
trained staff and tirstclass appliances, Anckland can 
safely consider itself to be one of the best pmtected 
cities fiom the lavages of the fire fiend. 

The annual cost of the Hiigade in the year liMM! was 
£3,000, and for the year endinj; :!()th .Inne, lifJI, it 
reached the sum of £ 17,000. 

Mr. David (Joldie was Chairman of the Hoard fiom 
its formation until Ii)l7. He is still a member of the 
Board and one of the most regular attenders. .Mr. 
H. P. Kissling succeeded Mr. (joldie, but resigned <iri 
being appointed (ieneral Manager of his Company. }!•• 
was succeeded by the present occupier of thr position, 
Mr. J. J. Kingston. 

The following gentlemen constitute the pro'-nt 
Board: — Messrs. David (Joldie, appointed by the 
Governor: (i. R. Hutchinson, .). \\ . llardle\, I'.. Mavis, 
apiJointed by the Auckland City Council ; .1. 1. Kingston. 
W. W. Saundei-s, W. Pavitt, elected l)y the insuranoe 
compfinies. 

Mr. Percy liutler was the oiiginal St>cre(ary, and 
the Boai'd is foitunate in still ha\ ing his services. 

\\ . L. WILSON. 

Superintendent. 



ArCKLAXD Mr MCI PAL IlAXDlutni, 



APPENDICES. 



A. 



TABLE SHOWING, IN DECENNIAL PERIODS, 
THE GROWTH OF THE CITY'S POPULATIOn! 





Year. 








PoiMilal idii. 






18 U 






1.500 v<>.s|il|i;,(, 


'.h 




18(Ji 








7.080 






1871 








. 12.937 






1881 








1(5.66 4 






ISltl 








28.613 






h)iM 








3 4,213 






1 !» 1 1 








'i 0.536 






lilJI 








SI.7I-.' 




IC 


popiila 


lion (if II 1 ( > 


Cily and Siildirb.s m 1 


02! 








wa s 


157 


.757. 





B. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS AT THE PORT OF 
AUCKLAND. 



JApoi'l >. 



Your. 


llll|»(l|'ls. 






f 


^. .1. 


J8.i;{ 


253.026 1 


-' s 


18()l 


501.i()8 ( 


1 II 


1871 


037.655 ( 


I 


1881 


l.iOO.lL'i ( 


) II 


1801 


l.505.()3(; ( 


1 II 


1001 


3,023.56(; ( 


) 


10 11 


5.650.7;{'i ( 


) 


1020 


18.732.082 ( 


1 



1 iS 


72 i I'.l 


I.TiOl 


7 1".;; 11 


si;; 


li;.' II 


I.J IS 

1 ()■>-> 


.iji II 


!.28ll. 


/ ; 1 J II 
878 (1 



o.;is;!.i;i):; o 



Af'CKLAJ/J MUMCIFAL HAXDBOOK. 

C. 

SHIPPING OF THE PORT OF AUCKLAND. 

I.\\\ Alt!). 
Yf'Uf. .\(.. (if N'csscls. ■I'diiiia^;!' Xcl. 

l-'^TI .. L'or. .SH.oGT (Ov(M-si"as only) 

I^^NI .. -J 1 8 lL'7.7()7 

18*tl .. /i.fj.'iH r)()i.73i vOvcrscas ^: 

Coaslal; 

t'."M . . ().;i:-"i i.i:jr),'.»".t,s 

I'-'i I . . 7.7();; i.«:j«.r)-ji 

1 '.':.' I . . r).:;()7 i.800.i<);{ 

or 1\\ AMD. 

Vcar. .\n. (if Vessels. roniiaKe Xel. 

187 I 

188 1 
1 89 I 



1*101 
I HI I 
lllL'l 



D. 

SHIPPING COMPANIES AND AGENTS. 

Willi nilicrs ill Ihc Citx. 

Aberdeen Line— Amvnis : Messes. Imip'ty ,V; Co.. imd L. n. 
.N:illi;iii vV: (U\. 

American and Australian Steamship Line— .\.y.iils : Xew 

/■mI.mhI Slii|i|Hiii: Cniiip.iiiy. I.M. 
Anchor Shipping and Foundry Co., Ltd., Nelson X^Miits- 

Blackball Coal Co., Ltd.— I. (,,•;, I .\|;in,i.i:ri' : 'r. .\. Orang-e. 



L'lJ 


'.Mt. 1 .")<» 


( ) 


\erseas (iii 


,'M'.) 


1 1 1 . 1 1 11 






i.lC.f) 


5i;i.-j-jc. 





\'erseas & 
Coaslal) 


('..:;oi 


1.097.729 






7.8l'C) 


i.8;ir).93() 






5.:joi 


1.750.8/1/1 







AUCKLAM) Mryii'll'AL II AM) HOOK. 



British Imperial Oil Co. — Aynls: .M«ssis. r.ullin ,v Co. 

British India Steam Navigation Co. A^'^.iils: rninii S.S. Co. 
;ni(l N./. Slii|i|iiiiK <-ii. 

Burns, Philp Line. 

Canadian and Australian R.IV?. Line \i:<'nts: riiinii S.P. Co. 

Canadian Government Merchant Marine. 

Commonwealth and Dominion Line — Agenis: Messrs. 
llfHllier. Hdltfititn. I.lil.. .im! FariinTs' Cn-npi-nilivo 
Auctionpering Co.. I-M. 

Compagnie Francais des Phosphates De L'Oceanie — 

.Vjiciils: .Messrs. HeiKlcisiin iV .Ma<'t';irl;uie. 

Craig Line of Steamers — .\i;tnts: Messrs. .1. .1. liraij;. Ldl. 

Cunard Line Australasian Service) — Agents: Messrs. 
Hertthei-, Rol)erlon, Lid., aiiil Kai'iners' (;ii-fiperalivo 
.Xuclioneei'ing Co., Lid. 

East Coast Shipping Company — Agenls; Messis. Wjlkiii ,t 
W.illis. 

Eastern and Australian Line — Ai:enls: .\le>>rs. Uiissell .sL 

Sdlllers. 

Federal Steam Navigation Company — .\yeiiis: X./. Siii|(iiing 

Cn. 

General Steamship Corporation of San Francisco \L:>nls: 

Messrs. S]M'ddiii,i:', Liiiiiled. 

Holt's Blue Funnel Line — Amuls: .\iessis. Ijeiidcixui .t 

.Maef.ii'hine. 

Huddart-Parl<er Line. 

Kaipara Steamship Company — Agenls: .\..rl li'iii Sle;iiiislii|) 

(;n||||i;ill\ . 

Messageries Maritlmes- Af.;eiils: .Messr's. JleiiderMiii A M,u5- 

fai'lalie. 

New Zealand Shipping Company. 

N.Y.K. Nippon Yusen Kaisha .\i;eiils: .M.ssrs. Uiinis. 

IMiilp and Cu, 
Northern Steamship Company. 
Oceanic Steamship Company A^enis; .Messrs. Uiissell .<i 

Somers. 

■1-A \ 



ArcKLAMJ M/WIC/J'AL II AX I) BOOK. 



Orient Company- A^j^'iils : I'ninn S.S. f^o. 

P. and O. Branch Service -Aiifiils : .Mi'ssrs. IIi'iidiTSdn vt 

\l,M-r.M-|;.t|. . 

p. and O. Steam Navigation Company — Aa<iits: .Messrs. 

Piako Steamship Company — Amiils: .Messrs. WalUin & 

W.illi-. 

Richardson Steamship Company — Aui'iiis: Missis. \\'atkin 
A W.HIi-. 

Riverhead Steamship Company — A^ciils: .Messrs. Bi'adix'y 

A I i i 1 1 1 1 > . 

Royal Dutch Packet Line- -Ai^vuls : Messrs. HiissrII »t 

Su|||iT>. 

Shaw, Savill and Albion Co., Ltd. — A.miils: .Mcssis. [.. 1). 
-Natluin vV Co., I. Id.. A. S. I'alersdii .V Cn.. I.td, and 
ilal.ii-ly \ Co. j.ld. 

Union Steamship Company. 

United States and Australasian Line — Ai;.'iils: Messrs 

Vacuum Oil Co. Proprietary, Ltd. 

Waikato Shipping Company. 

White Star Line — Afr''nls: .Mi'ssi-s. L. I». Naliiaii i\c Co.. and 
ltal,L:.'ly ,V Cn. 

Yamasldta KIsen Kaisha — Ai^vnls- .Messrs. Headier 

l'.n|ie|-|,,ii, |J,|. 
•Messrs. ']||n|i|;,s C.nik .^ SnUS ll.lVe (, Hires ill AucivlaiKl, 

and .ire Ayvnis U\v all P.issenjier l.iii.'s. 



■i:vi 



-1 i'CKLAMj iMUMi •wm // . , v /y/;oo A 



E. 

CONSULS AND CONSULAR AGENTS IN 

AUCKLAND. 

Belgium. A. .M. F,.,-usnn. (:.,„>!, I, ,■ o .M..s>r.s .l,.l,n 

Hums .V: Cn., 1,1,1., Cllslniiis Shv,.f K;,sl. 

Canada.— \V. A. H,.,| Tnnlr CMMunissiMnrT. Inion niiil-l- 

inii-s, Ciisldiiis Sti-eot East. 
Chile. — v.. A. Cr.iiy. Consul. r>.T. Oiiop.n Ptr-not. 

Denmark.— R. .Mill:,r. \rlin.:- Vir. -Consul. |s. <:„M.m.MTr. 

Stroi'l. 

France. -K. T. dr Bcauiv^;,,.,!, c,,riMil r,,r \/ \/ i„sur- 
iinci' Buildiiii^s. 

Italy.— .1. II. P.i^ni, Mny.ij c,,ii>ul;ir A-.^il -'0 <!rui.l 

.\l'(M(|r. (Jucrli Shv,.|. 

Japan.— A. H. Mnhrrlnu. Cnnsul. ,• ,, M,^^,.. n,..,(|„.,. 
linh'TJon. Fort Sti I. 

Mexico.^ -.1. W. Hall. Consul. I'alnprsh.u Huil-iiirirs. Oi X\\ 

Norway. M. \lill,,r. \-Mv-Consul. Cn„im, .,•,•.■ Stivl. 
Peru. ('.. li. li.ik.r. c,,,isul. 17. Coiiirri. ■,■,•.' Sliv..|. 
Portugal. h. I.. .Xathan. diisul. c ,i Mrssi-, | |i .\,||iin 

A Cn., |J,|.. Shnl-ll.ni.l Slivrl. 

Russia. \acaiil. 

Sweden. Cliail,.> |. Xalli.i.-i. c/o .Messrs. A. 11. Nailiati I M 

Ciisloins Sliv.'l Kast. 
Switzerland, \aiaiil. 

The Netherlands.— M. Copd.Mi.l. \ic. -Consul. -J.". <|r.,ii<l 
Ai-caiji'. nui'cn SIrcrl. 

United States of America. K. i|<' (i. .M;o\il|y. Consul: 
I.. A. HaclM'|,i,.|'. II, Ml. \ic,'-C,insul. K..rl .<fV.M'f. 



-rx?, 



M'l'l^iAM) MIWIcirAL II AS I) IU)(> K . 



CITY BANKS. 

Auckland Savings Bank.- .1. Miiir H^irr. Manager. 

Bank of Australasia. — V. W. K. Hush, Manager. 

Bank of New South Wales. — W. II. L. Gaiwcy, Manager. 

Bank of New Zealand. A. H. \V. P. Gri-en, Managm". 

Commercial Bank of Australia, Ltd. — (>. K. Can-, Manager. 

National Bank of New Zealand, Ltd. II. W. LaNvson, 

.M:ui;ii^.T. 

Union Bank of Australia, Ltd. — I'l'aiik HtMluTt, Manager. 



G. 

CHIEF TRADES CARRIED ON IN THE 
AUCKLAND DISTRICT. 

Agricultural Impiciin'iil l!(i.\ Makiuji'. 

Mauuracluriug. P)rass Fouiiijoi-s ami ('.n|)- 
Arlififial Manure Mann- jum- Wdi'kin^. 

facluriug. iJiick. I'ili'. anil Di'aiii 
Bakci-y and ConfectioiitM-y. I'lpi' Making". 

Baking PrtwdtM- ManuTac- Itnildin;^. 

lunn;:. liulliT juiij Ctit'c-c .Mak- 
Bf'd ami Bcdslcad Mann- ing. 

fac'luring. (".aliin<'l .Making. 

Bicycle Making. Candli- .Making. 

]iiscviil Manul'acI nrinu. Casein .Making. 

Jiook Bindin;:. ( lai'iienl i-y anil .Ininciy. 

Bf.tol Poli.sii .Mannraclnr- Clieniical Mann I'ael ui'ing. 

ing. C-iNii I'.n^: ineei'ing. 

Bool and Slme Manurac- Cnarli ami (laiTia^c 

luring. iJnildin.L:. 

•234 



AI('KLAM) MIMCWAL HANDBOOK. 



Coal iMiiiiiiK- <*il Ijipinrrriti':. 

Cordial ami Arrad-il ((jilical Lciisr .Maiinrac- 

Water MamiracI iii'iiifi. luriiiy. 

Drug ManufacliiriiiL;. I'.niil ing-. 

Elecfi'ic T>iglil and I'nwrr Picklr ami (i<tmliriii'rit 

Dislribulidii. Ma n niacin i' ing. 

Electrical EnginciM-iii^:. Paper Mannfael nrinp. 

Fellmongering. Plastering. 

Flour Milling. Plumbing. 

Foundry \\'()i'king. Pi'inting. 

Fruit Bdllliiig. J{(i|m'. 'Twini'. ainl Sark 
Galvanised Iron \\'orking. Manuraclurin;;. 

(ias Lighting and Manu- Saddlery. 

facturing. Saw .Milling. 

Glue Manufacturing. Sliii) JJuilding. 

Gold Mining. Smithing. 

Jam Making. Soap Making. 

Leadlight Working. Slone Masonry. 

Mechanical EngiiKMM'ing. Stove Making. 

Monumental Masonry. 'Tanning. 

Motor Gai- J^ngiiiccring. Tindici' .Milling-. 

Munition Manul'aclui'iiig. Wouljfn .Mannfaelnring. 



23^ 



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AlCh'LAM) .yryiCWAL llAyjJBOOK 



I. 

LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL BENEFACTORS OF 
THE CITY. 

1. Sir George (iroy, wIki |)I'i's(miI cd Id I lie Cify. in 
Augusf, 1882. liis (■(illcclidii of liooks. wui'ks 
of arf, and onrios. 

2. iMlwanl CdsMcy. wiin ilicij ^^\\ A|iim1 iHlli, 188.'!, 
iK'iIiirallird ihc sum of .t:8i.7O0 in equal 
>liai'es 111 llic t'djldwing' insi itut ions : — -In- 
>^lilnle and Mnseuin. Public Library, ilos- 
pilal. Oi-piian li(nne. Homo for the Aged 
Po(»r, Saib>r.s' Iforne. and [Joys' Institute. 

.3. .lames 'I'annoeic Mackelxie. wbn died ilii .June?, 
I88."j. bequealiied liis xalnablc arl eidleclion 
and a sum (d' MKincy. in Irnsl. hi establish 
and mainlain a Museum (d" Kinr Ai-t. He 
also presenfed a C(jIlecfion n{ art JMM.ks to 
(be Piildic l.iiirarx-. 

\. Dr. .]. i:. i;iam. wbu bequealiied a sum n\ fC).."jOO 
In .'slaidisb a Sebool of Ai-f. 

T). .lamr^ hilwui'lh. win. died (ui 23r(l Drccndiei', 
•''^'••i. I'dl olalc \alued al flOO.OlMl. id 1h; 
■'I'plied Id I hi' mainlcMancr and rdural idu of 
•"■jdians di- (d' (diildnui (d' iMU'smis of good 
ebaraelci- in sirailenrd eircunis! anecs. 

'■'. William Lrys. win. dh'd ."»lli ()(didMM'. I.S'.»9, 
I'Mind.'d and iMiddWi'd (he Ij.ys Inslilule as 
■' •■'i'''' I'uidic l.ibiary and Inslilulr. Tlu' 
building: wa- nrclrd and Junii-lird willi 
funds derived, in .Miiial pari-. Ji'iun Ihc en- 
ddwmenl and a ddnalicm by .Mr. rihuii-dii W. 
2.S.S 



ArCKLAM) MIWnil'M. ll.\M,li(K)h 



1(1. 



1 I. 



Li'vs. wild also piv'siMilcd the In>(iliifr wnii 
" iiln-ai'\-. and siiIixniiicii I ly nccli'il a iirw 
I'liildin.L; lui' llir LciidinL: I )r|ia li iiini I . 'lii,. 

gifts (d- .Ml'. I'. \\ . |.,.y^. 1. 1,. I).. (,, III,. |„_ 

>*liluli' rcprcscid ^w^'v I'.s.oiiii. 

Mi's. I'ldiiiiiiid A. .Mackc(diiii.-. win. died <.ii 
^ovciuImt ;|||. |'.)(IJ. lM'(|iirallird. \^y diivr- 
''<»" "I' li''i' dcorascd liiisliaiid. a siiiri uf 
£5.0011. ,,r whirh t'2..^)00 wa^ lu W us.^d in 
"i'' •'iTclKiii id' a i.:all<My foi- (lie Socjidy (.f 

Ai'Is. I':'. ()()() foi' II ihlnwin.Md nT ;i Ii|.rai-y 

f"i' lh(> Auckland Inslihil,. and Mn-cnni. anil 
t'.")0() idi' I he |)nr(diasc ni" cases ^A aniinais 
I'm- Ihc laMcr. 

\Vil'i'iiii Arrowsinilli. wlm djrd in lOirj. l.r- 
(jiicalhcd ahnul i':'.;.(i(i(i. |<, |,r di\idi'd. in 
'''|ii"l p.nl-. hctwcrn Ihr Orphan li<nin> and 
.Mi's, (jiwic'- Wnnicii- Ihinh'. 

William .Ma>nii. wlm dicil (ui Scpfpnihcr JTlli. 
1905. iMMim'alhcd a -iim nl fhi.ddd Pi n,,. 
IiisMlidc liir llic niind. Cl.tKm In |hf l,cy.s 
lii-^l il iilc. and sinallci- -uni- In ullin- |..ca| 
(M'^an isal inns. 

Auckland Sa\infis Tlank cud rilnitcd. in lim."). 
i'iO.OOO h.wai-ds Ihr huiidin^ I'lind of the 
'reehnical Ctdicfic. and rcccidly i:j.'..(i(Ht p. 
War Mcnioi-ial Musoum. 

Ml', anil .Mr>. W. II. Sniilli. wlm pi-.-senlrd to the 
llos|)ilal l;oaid. m .Maicdi. lOo;, a itropcrly 
situated \\\ I'.llerslie. containinj; ovei- Miroo 
acres and a Iwm-slorey dwelling, for (ho 
purpose of ioundin;^ a Conxalescenl Koine 
foi- wdineii and idiildren. 



M'il^l,A\l, Mr MCI I'M, II .\y DliOOK 



\'l. Ellen Knox, wild dicil uii Orlubcr I '.Mil, 1908, 
licqiK'aflicd t'7(i.(H)ii In cliaril irs. inoludiiiii- 

f-'O.OOO for li iTctioii nl' a liiiil.liiiK I'nr 

Ihc ti'catmt'iil nf poitr pettple sulVcriiig' rroiii 
iiH'iiraMc diseases. 

I."!. .Tolm .Milclicll McLachlaii. who died in lull. 
1m'(|ii. ■allied ('ornwallis Pai-k (lU-'T aci'cs lo 
llir cily. 

11. -Ml'. Ifi'iii-y IJrcll. i",\-.Ma\()i-. in'csciilrd Hk' 
PilM- (M-fiaii installed in lhe 'I'dwii Hall. 
He lias Inr niany years been a |ialr(ui (d' 
iiiiisic, and has jire-enleil (iriian- hi ilie 
lilind Insliliile. (de. 

15. iloii. A. .M. Myers, an e\-.Ma\nr of lhe Cily. 
jiresenled. in 1 '.) I I . liie (dock whi(di was 
eriMded in lhe lower (d' lhe Town Hall. In 
I'.H.") he ddiialed .Myers Park d acre- . and 
erecded al his nwn ensl a l\ i ndecLia rl en 
wliieli hear> his nanie. 

It). Sir .J(din l.oLiaii ( '.aniplnd I. wlm filed on .lime 
"J-iid. I'.Ml'. made ^|.\eral pi'esenl a I ion s. in- 
eliidiiii: Cfn-nwall Park J.'iO acres . and lhe 
K'inderjiarleii. the Cr.Mdie. and .\iirsery wliifdi 
liear his name. In hi- will he iMMiiieathed 
i'Td.iino In piildic insMiiil ion-. 

17. -Mr. Henry Shaw, an e\-(:il\- ( '.on ludlhn'. pre- 
senled lo lhe Public Lihrar\-. in I'.MJ. a \ahi- 
alile colleclion (d' hooks and ma nnscripl s. 
'" Hie Arl (iailery a nnniher (d' jii(diii-e>. and 
lo llie .ViicUlaiid Museum a colleclion of 
Japanese arl oli.jerls. 

18- Ml-. II. v.. Parlrid^:e presenled lo lhe Art 
(lallei-y. in I'M.'), the I.indaner Colleclion of 
Maori painlinj:.-. 

•_'4(l 



Arc K LAM) .\//\\ /(•//' A L II AX I) HOOK. 



INDEX. 



p 


aiTi'. 




l»aL'.'. 


Ahull. lii' 


18-; 


V\vr l!,,,ir,| . . 


ir.\ 


Accounts 


l!»C, 


I''isli Maik.-I 


I'l.t 


Aiiialgfuiinlidii 111' 1 »is- 




l-"uini(l,il JMii iif AiirK- 




t riots 


\-> 


laiHl 


1 


AmusiMiit^nls 


i;i 


{".iMl'l.m lii'jil^v 


I.I 1 


Arl (Jallrry 


r)7 


llai'l 1' linanl 1 


i. -Jill 


Uaths and Balliins-. . 


Id.-. 


II.mIIIi 


i:t 


Bf^nef'actions 


•i\ 


lli>l.ii-i(Ml ImIi'.hIiic- 




Hfl.li:rs 


;•; 


11. .n 


1 


Unililiiitis 


IT 


1 lnu^int: 


111'.' 


Hiisiiirss 


i;t 


1 IJI |l [• II \ !• Ill 1' II 1 




i{\-l;i\v Ailinitiislralidii 


ll'.» 


Sell. 'III. ■> 


S > 


( j'liii'ti'i-ics . . 


11.^ 


{..•ys Iii>litMl.' 


i!* 


Oil.V lllll>!'n\ cilli'llt!^ 

Conifui'l Slations . . 
ConinuM'ci> . . ."), 
(jiini'iii.Tici's 

( jii'iiiii'r's Ciiiirl 
1 ii'iiiil 


88 
117 
•201 

1 n 
1 1 : 
1 1 ". 


IJIii-arii's 

M.iihtinAi uf Sti In ;• 

.Mack.-ivl.' Caiii'i-y . . 

MaiiM'ls 

MimI 

M.iriiii.' 


• 1 

■.. 1.:; 

."> 7 

lii.t 

is: 
1 1 : 


Di'slfiictdi-. Biliis.' 
Di'ainaffi' . . 111. 


1 i:; 

■l\ i 


\\ iiiii.'i|i.il 1 ilmii' . . 
Miinii-ipa! |ii'\r|ii|i- 

IIH'lll 


:i'.» 


i>i'ainag-i' Hnar-il . . 


■>\ 1 


.Miiiiiri|Ml 1" 1 > h 




Kasti'fii 1 lull''! 


S S 


Mi.rki'l .. 


i'.t;( 


I'llrcliii-al hi'|F.irliiii'i:l 


I.")'.' 


MiMIJri|Ml llollNJlii: 


iii'.i 


KIcclrIc l>M\viT H,,;ii-il 


i:!s 


Miniiri|i;il 'riMiliiitr 


•.'(Ml 


l-;i<'clilc 'rraiiiwas s 


l.!!t 


.Mll>ir 


:ir. 


Kli'cli-lcily .. 


l.{;! 


n|,l (:n|i,iii>l>- MiiM'iii 


1 •-.i 


Knginct'i'iiiy. ( :i\ II . . 


s ■ 


• trfraii 


.{7 


Kducatinn 


is 


Pai-k.s 


<■.;< 


l'"illalici' 


I'.h; 


1 '. i|>n I.I 1 !■ '11 
241 


i 



J I ■( KJ. A y/J MUNjriPA L HANDBOOK. 



Pag-e. 






Page. 


Port of Anckljind . . 


2(11 


stores. Piirchas 


■ of 


175 


Public Cnnvi'iiii'iio's 


117 


Stri'cl Ligliljng 


i 


5. 137 


Public Health 


177 


SI I t Wid.'nin.a 




88 


Public Library 


U 


Streets 




87 


Purchasing of Stores 


i:.-) 


T.iwn Hall . . 




23 


Quarry 


11 1 


Town Hall : 1 »i-g 


in . . 


30 


Ratable Value 


If, 7 


Town Hall: Sell 


■(iub 




Rates 


ir,;5 


of Chai'ii-i'S 




34 


Recreation Reserves 


r.;{ 


Trailing. Munie 


pal 


200 


Refuse Disposal 


113 


Traflie 




170 


Reserves 


<•,:{ 


Tramways . . 




139 


Reservoirs . . 


100 


\'aliiation 




103 


Reservoii's, Service 


1:{1 


\-|'liic|rs 




170 


Sanitation . . 


177 


N'ifal Statistics 




185 


Sewage and Sewer- 




Wal.M' Charir.'s 




131 


age . . Ill 


•2 1 1 


W'.itiT Sujiiily 


100, 121 


Shipping . . 8 


201 


Waterfroiil Iniji 


•ove- 




Sports 


20 


ments 




92 


Stables 


iir. 


Wharves 




201 



'242 



(/^ WILSON A HOTHON ^s. I 
K HefiOlO PRINTtN6 WORKS >J 
L_S- AUCKLANQ ^ \ 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 

Los Angeles 

This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 



UKlUn 



L APfiO3'90 
" 12 199^ 



M 



Form L9-50m-9,'60(B361084)444 




# 



L 006 009 764 9 



DU 
430 
ASA 5 
1922 




AA 000 8U8 164