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Full text of "Municipal register : containing rules and orders of the City Council, the city charter and recent ordinances, and a list of the officers of the City of Boston, for .."










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THE 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

FOR 1916. 




SEAL OF THE CITY. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/municipalregiste1916bost 




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THE 



MUNICIPAL REGISTEE 

FOR 1916, 



CONTAINING 



A REGISTER OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, 

RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL, 

AMENDED CITY CHARTER 

OF 1909, 

A SURVEY OF THE CITY DEPARTMENTS, 

■WITH 

LISTS OF EXECUTIVE AND OTHER PUBLIC OFFICERS; 

ALSO 

VARIOUS STATISTICS RELATING TO THE CITY. 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY THE STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 



[City Document No. 37.] 









^^ 1(8 SO. <^^^ 



CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1916. 

'^OSTol^ 
PUBLIC 




PA^Cl -^-u i. {^J ry ^ «iS''>i>2--;^t'^''/^^^^ 



STATISTICAL DEPAHTMEN 

WA!ri019i7 

BOSTON PUBLfC LIBRARY 



INTEODUCTION. 



The City has annually since 1821 issued a volume 
containing, until 1829, a register of the City Council 
and a list of the officers. In 1829 the City Charter, in 
1830 the Acts relating to Boston and the ordinances, 
and in 1832 an index, were added. The volume for 
1822 contains fifteen pages, and for 1840 eighty-five 
pages, and three pages of index. The volumes up to and 
including 1840 bear the title of The Rules and Orders 
of the Common Council and since that year the title 
of The Municipal Register. The Municipal Regis- 
ter for 1841 contains the Rules and Orders of the Com- 
mon Council, joint rules, ordinances of the City, statutes 
of the Commonwealth relating to the City, a list of the 
public schools, the City Government of 1841, the com- 
mittees and departments (consisting at that time of 
the treasury, law, police, health, public land and build- 
ings, lamps and bridges, fire, and public charitable 
institutions), and a list of the ward officers; from 1842 
to 1864 it also contains a list of the members of pre- 
ceding City Governments, a necrological record of those 
members, the latest ordinances and the special statutes 
relating to the City; in 1851 a list of the annual orators 
was added, and in 1853 a map of the City and the Rules 
of the Board of Aldermen were inserted; in 1876 sta- 
tistics of registration and voting were included, and, 
since 1879, in tabulated form; in 1883 portraits of the 
Mayor and presiding officers of the two branches of 
the City Council were included, and in 1888 a list of 
the members of the past City Governments of Roxbury 
and Charlestown was added and continued to 1890. 
From 1889 to 1896, inclusive. The Municipal Register 
contained a compilation of the Charter and Acts sub- 
sequently passed, in the place of which an index of the 
same appeared in 1897. The Amended Charter of 1909 
was added in 1910, while the alphabetical list of Alder- 
men and Councilmen since 1822 was dropped. 

By the direction of the Committee on Rules The 
Municipal Register of 1916 has been compiled by the 
Statistics Department. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



OEIGIN AND GEOWTH OF BOSTON. 



The Royal Patent incorporating the Governor and 
Company of Massachusetts Bay in New England passed 
the seals March *4, 1628-29. At a General Court, or 
Meeting of the Company, on August *29 of that year it 
was voted "that the Government and patent should be 
settled in New England." To that end Governor Win- 
throp led the Puritan Exodus in 1630. Soon after his 
arrival at Salem on June * 12, 1630, he proceeded with a 
large following to Charlestown, where a plantation had 
been established the summer before. The Assistants 
held three Courts at Charlestown in the interval, August 
*23 to September *28, inclusive. At their meeting 
on September *7, they "ordered that Trimountaine 
shalbe called Boston; Mattapan, Dorchester; and the 
towne upon Charles River, Waterton." Thus Shawmut 
of the Indians was named Boston, probably out of grati- 
tude to the Merchants of Boston in Lincolnshire, who 
had subscribed generously to the stock of the Company. 

In the course of the summer, Governor Winthrop 
with the patent chose Boston as his abiding place. 
The first ' ' Court " held in Boston was a ' ' General Court " 
on October *19, "for establishing of the government." 
On October *3, 1632, Boston was formally declared 
to be "the fittest place for pubhque meetings of any 
place in the Bay." 

Boston was the first town in Massachusetts to become 
a city. It was incorporated February 23, 1822, by 
St. 1821, c. 110, adopted March 4, 1822. This act was 
revised by St. 1854, c. 448, commonly called the City 
Charter, adopted November 13, 1854. 

The neck of land called Boston, still called Boston 
Proper, contained perhaps 700 acres of land, judging 
from the 783 acres shown by the official survey of 1794. 
In the interval 1630-37, Boston acquired jurisdiction 
over most of the territory now included in Chelsea, 
Winthrop, Revere, East Boston, Brookline, Quincy, 
Braintree, Randolph and Holbrook, besides certain 
islands in the harbor. From 1637 till May 13, 1640, 

* Old Style. 



ORIGIN AND GROWTH OF BOSTON. 7 

when ^' Mount WooUaston" was set off as Braintree, 
Boston exercised jurisdiction over a territory of at least 
40,000 acres. Within its present limits there are 30,295 
acres, including flats and water. 

Since 1640, grants of land have been made to Boston 
by the General Court as follows: (1) October * 16, 1660, 
1,000 acres ''for the use of a free schoole, layd out in 
the wildernesse or North of the Merimake River" (in 
Haverhill), in 1664. (2) June *27, 1735, in abatement 
of Province Tax, three townships, each six miles square, 
or 69,120 acres in all. These townships later became 
the Towns of Charlemont, Colrain, and Pittsfield. 
Boston sold its interest in them on June *30, 1737, for 
£3,660. (3) June 26, 1794, a township of land in 
Maine (23,040 acres) "to build a public hospital." This 
tract was sold by the City April 6, 1833, for $4,200. 

Muddy River was set off as the Town of Brookline 
on November *13, 1705, and R.umney Marsh was set 
off as the Town of Chelsea January *8, 1739. 

The principal annexations of territory included within 
the present limits of the City of Boston have been made 
as follows : . 

(1) Noddle's Island, by order of Court of Assistants, March 
*9, 1636-37. (2) South Boston set off from Dorchester March 
6, 1804, by St. 1803, c. 111. (3) Washington Village set off 
from Dorchester May 21, 1855, by St. 1855, c. 468. (4) Rox- 
bury January 6, 1868, by St. 1867, c. 359, accepted September 

9, 1867. Roxbury received its name by order of the Court of 
Assistants October * 8, 1630. It was incorporated a City March 
12, 1846, by St. 1846, c. 95, accepted March 25, 1846. (5) Dor- 
chester January 3, 1870, by St. 1869, c. 349, accepted June 22, 
1869. It received its name September *7, 1630, by order of 
the Court of Assistants. (6) Brighton January 5, 1874, by St. 
1873, c. 303, accepted October 7, 1873. Set off from Cambridge 
as the Town of Brighton February 24, 1807, by St. 1806, c. 65. 
(7) Charlestown January 5, 1874, by St. 1873, c. 286, accepted 
October 7, 1873. Settled July *4, 1629. It was incorporated 
a City February 22, 1847, by St. 1847, c. 29, accepted March 

10, 1847. (8) West Roxbury January 5, 1874, by St. 1873, c. 
314, accepted October 7, 1873. It was set off from Roxbury 
and incorporated a Town May 24, 1851, by St. 1851, c. 250. 
(9) Hyde Park January 1, 1912, by St. 1911, c. 469, and 583, 
accepted November 7, 1911. Incorporated a Town April 22, 
1868. 

* Old style. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 




THE CITY SEAL 



As it appeared prior to 1827. 



The City Seal was adopted by ''An Ordinance to 
Establish the City Seal," passed January 2, 1823, which 
provides ''That the design hereto annexed, as sketched 
by John R. Penniman, giving a view of the City, be the 
device of the City Seal; that the motto be as follows, 
to wit: 'Sicut patribus sit Deus nobis'; and that the 
inscription be as follows: — 'Bostonia condita, A.D. 
1630. Civitatis regimine donata, A.D. 1822.'" The 
motto is taken from 1 Kings, viii., 57. 

The seal as it then appeared is shown above. 

The seal as it was afterwards changed, and has ever 
since continued to be used, first appeared on page 221 
of the volume of laws and ordinances, commonly known 
as the "First Revision," published in 1827, and is con- 
tinued as the City Seal at the present time by Revised 
Ordinances of 1914, Chapter 1, Section 5, which provides 
that "The seal of the City shall be circular in form; 
shall bear a view of the City; the motto 'Sicut Patri- 
bus Sit Deus Nobis,' and the inscription, 'Bostonia 
Condita, A.D. 1630. Civitatis Regimine Donata, 
A.D. 1822,' as herewith set forth." 

The seal as changed in 1827, and as it has ever since 
appeared, is shown on the second page. 



u 



0' 

0' 

D\ 

I 

J. 



WALTER BALLANTYNE 



JOHN J. ATTRIDGE 



DANIEL J. IMcDONALD 



THOMAS J. KENNY 




Council. 
M 

Scale 

O 1 2 3 4 

! ! J 1 L 



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n entf 



Edward J. Learv 

City Messenger/ 




Reporters 

OF 
DAILV 

Papers 



GEORGE W. COLEMAN 



JOHN A. COULTHURST 



JAMES J. STORROW 



WALTER L. COLLINS 



Entrance 



CE I 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 
GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON, 

1916. 



JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor. 

Residence, 
Jamaicaway, Jamaica Plain. 



CITY COUNCIL. 

[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1914, Chap. 730.] 

Henry E. Hagan, President. 

TERM ENDS IN FEBRUARY, 1919. 

John J. Attridge . . . 552 Tremont Street. 
Walter L. Collins, 445 Washington Street, Dorchester. 
James J. Storrow . . . 417 Beacon Street. 

TERM ENDS IN FEBRUARY, 1918. 

Walter Ballantyne, 224 Dudley Street, Roxbury. 
* John A. Coulthurst, 807 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain. 
Henry E. Hagan . . 18 Victoria Street, Dorchester. 

TERM ENDS IN FEBRUARY, 1917. 

Daniel J. McDonald, 28 Marion Street, Charlestown. 
George W. Coleman . 177 West Brookline Street. 

Thomas J. Kenny, 296 West Fifth Street, South Boston. 

Salary, $1,500 each. 

* Councillor Coulthurst died June 30, 1916. 



10 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, §30; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266, §2; Stat. 1901, 

Chap. 332; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 11; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 8; 

Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 11.] 

Clerk, ex officio. 
James Donovan, 71 Emerald Street. 



Assistant Clerk, ex officio. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, 81 Wellington Hill Street, Dorchester. 

Regular meetings in Council Chamber, City Hah, fourth floor, 
Mondays at 3 P. M. 



OFFICIALS OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

CLERK OF COMAIITTEES. 

Office, City Hall, Room 56, fourth floor. 
John F. Dever. Salary, $2,500. 

The Clerk of Committees acts as the clerk of all committees of the City 
Council, keeps the records of their meetings, and has charge of the City 
Hall Reference Library. 

SECRETARY OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Frank X. Chisholm. Salary, $1,800. 

The Secretary of the City Council is also Assistant Clerk of Committees, 
and performs the duties of the Clerk in the latter 's absence or in case of 
vacancy of his position. 



CITY COUNCIL. 11 

CITY MESSENGER. 
Office, City Hall, Room 55, fourth floor. 

Edward J. Leary. Salary, $2,500. 

The City Messenger attends all meetings of the City Council and 
.committees thereof, and has the care and distribution of all documents 
printed for the use of the City Council, also the regular department reports. 
He has charge of the City flagstaffs, the display of flags in the public 
grounds, and the roping off of streets and squares on public occasions. 

OFFICIAL reporter OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Edward W. Harnden. Salary, $3,000. 



12 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL.* 



Day of Meeting. 
Rule 1. Unless otherwise ordered from time to time the regular 
meeting of the city council shall be held on every Monday at three o'clock 
p. m. Special meetings may be called by the president at his discretion, 
and by the city clerk for the purpose only of drawing jurors. 

President. 

Rule 2. The president of the council shall take the chair at the hour 
to which the council shall have adjourned and shall call the members to 
order, and, a quorum being present, shall proceed with the regular order 
of business. In the absence of the president the senior member by age 
present "shall preside as temporary president or until a presiding officer 
is chosen. 

Rule 3. The president shall preserve decorum and order, may speak 
to points of order ia preference to other members, and shall decide all 
questions of order, subject to an appeal. Any member may appeal 
from the decision of the chair, and, when properly seconded, no other 
business, except a motion to adjourn or to lay on the table, shall be in 
order until the question on appeal has been decided. The question shall 
be put as follows: 

"Shall the decision of the chair stand as the judgment of the council?" 
The vote shall be by a roll call, and it shall be decided in the affirmative 
unless a majority of the votes are to the contrary. 

Rule 4. The- president shall propound all motions in the order in 
which they are moved, unless the subsequent motion shall be previous 
in its nature, except that, in naming sums and fixing times, the largest 
sum and the longest time shall be put first. 

Rule 5. The president shall, at the request of any member, make a 
division of a question when the sense will admit. 

Rule 6. The president shall, without debate, decide all questions 
relating to priority of business to be acted upon. 

Rule 7. The president shall declare all votes; but if any member 
doubts a vote, the president shall cause a rising vote to be taken, and, 
when any member so requests, shall cause the vote to be taken or verified 
by yeas and nays. 

Rule 8. The president shall appoint all committees, fill all vacancies 
therein, and designate the rank of the members thereof. 

* At the first meeting of the City Council on February 7, 1916, the Rules of the City 
Council of 1915 were adopted without change. 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 13 

Rule 9. When the president of the council or the president pro tempore 
shall desire to vacate the chair he may call any member to it; but such 
substitution shall not continue beyond an adjournment. 



Motions. 

Rule 10. Every motion shall be reduced to writing if the president 
shall so direct. 

Rule 11. A motion to strike out and insert shall be deemed indivisible ; 
but a motion to strike out being lost shaU not preclude amendment, or 
a motion to strike out and insert. 

Rule 12. No motion or proposition of a subject different from that 
under consideration shall be admitted under color of amendment. 

Rule 13. When an order or resolution relates to a subject which 
may properly be examined and reported upon by an existing committee 
of the city council, such order or resolution shall, upon presentation, be 
referred to such committee. When a motion is made to refer any subject, 
and different committees are proposed, the motion shall be put in the 
following order : 

1 . To a standing committee of the council. 

2. To a special committee of the council. 

Any member offering a motion, order or resolution, which is referred 
to a committee, shall be given a hearing on the same by the committee 
before a report is made thereon, provided he so requests at the time of 
offering the order or before final action by the committee. 

Rule 14. After a motion has been put by the president it shall not be 
withdrawn except by unanimous consent. 

Rule 15. When a question is under debate the following motions 
only shall be entertained, and shall have precedence in the order in which 
they stand arranged: 

1. To adjourn. 

2. To lay on the table. 

3. The previous question. 

4. To close debate at a specified time. 

5. To postpone to a day certain. 

6. To commit. 

7. To amend. 

8. To postpone indefinitely. 

Rule 16. A motion to adjourn shall be in order at any time, except 
on an immediate repetition, or pending a verification of a vote; and that 
motion, the motion to lay on the table, the motion to take from the table, 
and the motion for the previous question, shall be decided without debate . 



14 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Readings. 

Rule 17. Every ordinance, order and resolution shall, unless rejected, 
have two several readings, both of which may take place at the same 
session, unless objection is made; provided, however, that all orders for the 
expenditure of money presented to, or reported upon by a committee of, 
the council, shall lie over for one week before final action thereon. When- 
ever the second reading immediately follows the first reading, the document 
may be read by its title onl}^; -provided, that all orders releasing rights 
or easements in or restrictions on land, all orders for the sale of land other 
than school lands, all appropriations for the purchase of land other than 
for school purposes, and all loans voted by the city council shall require 
a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the city council, and shall be 
passed only after two separate readings and by two separate votes, the 
second of said readings and votes to be had not less than fourteen days 
after the first. 

Reconsideration. 

Rule 18. When a vote has been passed, any member may move a 
reconsideration thereof at the same meeting, or he may give notice to the 
clerk, within twentj'-four hours of the adjournment of any meeting except 
the final meeting, of his intention to move a reconsideration at the next 
regular meeting; in which case the clerk shall retain possession of the 
papers until the next regular meeting. No member shall speak for more 
than ten minutes on a motion to reconsider. 

Rule 19. When a motion to reconsider has been decided, that deci- 
sion shall not be reconsidered, and no question shall be twice reconsidered 
unless it has been amended after the reconsideration; nor shall any recon- 
sideration be had upon the following motions: 

To adjourn. 

The previous question. 

To lay on the table. 

To take from the table. 

To close debate at a specified time. 

A motion to reconsider may be laid on the table or postponed indefi- 
nitely, and the effect of such action in either case shall be to defeat the 
motion to reconsider. 

Conduct of Members. 
Rule 20. Every member when about to speak shall rise, address the 
chair, and wait until he is recognized, and in speaking shall refrain from 
mentioning any other member by name, shall confine himself to the 
question and avoid personalities. Any member who, in debate or other- 
wise, indulges in personalities or makes charges reflecting upon the char- 
acter of another member shall make an apology in open session at the 
meeting when the offence is committed or at the next succeeding regular 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 15 

meeting, and, failing to do so, shall be named by the president, or held in 
contempt and suspended from further participation in debate until said 
apology is made. 

Rule 21. No member shall speak more than once on a question when 
another member who has not spoken claims the floor, and no member 
speaking shall, without his consent, be interrupted by another, except 
upon a point of order. 

Rule 22. No member shall be permitted to vote on any question, 
or serve on any committee, where his private right is immediately con- 
cerned, distinct from the public interest. 

Rule 23. Every member who shall be present when a question is put, 
where he is not excluded by interest, shall give his vote, unless the council 
for special reason shall excuse him. Application to be so excused on any 
question must be made before the council is divided, or before the calling 
of the yeas and naj^s ; and such application shall be accompanied by a brief 
statement of the reasons, and shall be decided without debate. 

Standing Committees. 

Rule 24. The following standing committees of the council, and 
all other committees, unless specially directed by the council, shall be 
appointed by the president: 

L A committee, to be known as the Executive Committee, to consist of 
all the members of the council. 

2. A committee on Appropriations, to consist of all the members of 
the council, to whom shall be referred such appropriation orders as may 
be submitted to the council from time to time. 

3. A committee on Branch Libraries, to consist of five members of the 
council. 

4. A committee on Claims, to consist of five members of the council, 
to whom shall be referred all claims against the city arising from the act 
or neglect of any of its departments. They shall report annually a list 
of the claims awarded or approved by them, and the amount of money 
awarded or paid in settlement thereof. 

5. A committee on County Accounts, to consist of five members of the 
council. 

6. A committee on Finance, to consist of all the members of the council, 
to whom shall be referred all applications for expenditure which involve 
a loan. 

7. A committee on Fire Hazard, to consist of five members of the 
council. 

8. A committee on Inspection of Prisons, to consist of five members of 
the council. 

9. A committee on Legislative Matters, to consist of five members of 
the council, who shall, unless otherwise ordered, appear before the com- 
mittees of the General Court and represent the interests of the city; pro- 
vided, said committee shall not appear unless authorized by vote of the 



16 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

city council, and shall not, unless directed so to do by the city council 
oppose any legislation petitioned for by the preceding city council. 

10. A committee on Ordinances, to consist of all the members of the 
council, to whom shall be referred all ordinances or orders concerning 
ordinances. 

11. A committee on Parhman Fund, to consist of five members of the 
council, to whom shall be referred all matters concerning the Parkman 
property or the expenditure of the income from the Parkman Fund. 

12. A committee on Printing, to consist of five members of the council, 
who shall have the charge of all printing, advertising or pubhshing 
ordered by the city council, as one of its contingent or incidental expenses, 
and the supply of all stationery or binding for the same purpose. The com- 
mittee shall -fix the number of copies to be printed of any document printed 
as above, the minimum, however, to be four hundred; and they shall 
have the right to make rules and regulations for the care, custody, and 
distribution of aU documents, books, pamphlets and maps by the city 
messenger. 

13. A committee on Public Lands, to consist of five members of the 
council, to whom shall be referred all matters relating to public lands. 

14. A committee on Soldiers' Relief, to consist of five members of the 
council, who shall determine the amount of aid to be allowed to soldiers 
and sailors and their families and submit a schedule of the same to the 
city council monthly. 

Order of Business. 
Rule 25. At every regular meeting of the council the order of business 
shall be as follows : 

1. Communications from his Honor the Mayor. 

2. Presentation of petitions, memorials and remonstrances. 

3. Reports of city officers, etc. 

4. Unfinished business of preceding meetings. 

5. Reports of committees. 

6. Motions, orders and resolutions. 

Spectators. 

Rule 26. No person, except a member of the council, shall be permit- 
ted to occupy the seat of any member while the council is in session. 

Rule 27. No person, excepting heads of departments, officials con- 
nected with the city council and reporters, shall be allowed in the ante- 
room or upon the floor of the council chamber while the council is in 
session. Spectators will be allowed in the gallery of the council chamber 
when the council is in session, and no one will be admitted to said gallery 
after the seats are occupied. The city messenger shall enforce this ride. 

Burial Grounds. 
Rule 28. No permission for the use of land for the purpose of burial 
shall be granted until a public hearing shall have been given by the city 
council, after due notice has been served upon abutters, on the applica- 
tion for such permission. 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 17 



Smoking in the Council Chamber. 

Rule 29. No smoking shall be allowed in the council chamber when 
the council is in session. 

Meetings. 

Rule 30. No meeting of any committee shall, without the consent 
of all the members thereof, be called upon less notice than twenty-four 
hours from the time the clerk shall have mailed the notices or despatched 
them by special messenger. No committee, unless authorized by an order 
of the city council, shall incur any expense. No committee meeting shall 
be called later than one hour immediately preceding the time set for any 
regular meeting of the city council, nor shall any committee remain in 
session later than the hour named for any such regular meeting. 

Form op Votes. 
Rule 31. In all votes the form of expression shall be "Ordered" 
for everything by way of command, and the form shall be "Resolved" 
for everything expressing opinions, principles, facts, or purposes. 

Transfers. 
Rule 32. Every application for an appropriation to be provided for 
by transfer shall be referred to the executive committee xmless otherwise 
ordered, and no such appropriation shall be made until the said committee 
have reported thereon. 

Consideration of Petitions. 
Rule 33. No petition, remonstrance, resolution or other communica- 
tion submitted by any improvement association, civic society, club or 
other unincorporated organization, or its officers, shall be considered by 
the city council or printed in its proceedings unless such organization 
shall have filed with the city clerk a statement, sworn to by one of its 
officers, specifying the number of members in good standing, the time and 
place of meeting and a list of the officers for the current year. 

Amendment and Suspension. 
Rule 34. The foregoing rules shall not be altered, amended, sus- 
pended or repealed at any time, except by the votes of two-thirds of the 
members of the city council present and voting thereon. 



18 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



COMMITTEES OF THE CiTY COUNCIL.* 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Executive Committee. — All the members, Councillor Coleman, 

Chairman. 
Appropriations. — All the members, Coimcillor Kenny, Chairman. 
Finance. — All the members, Councillor Coulthurst, Chairman. 
Ordinances. — All the members. Councillor Collins, Chairman. 
Branch Libraries. — Attridge, Storrow, Coleman, McDonald, BallantjTie. 
Claims. — Ballantjme, McDonald, Kenny, Coleman, Attridge. 
County Accounts. — Collins, Storrow, McDonald, Attridge, Coulthurst. 
Fire Hazard. — McDonald, Kenny, Ballantyne, Attridge, Coulthurst. 
Inspection of Prisons. — Coleman, Ballantyne, Kenny, Collins, Storrow. 
Legislative Matters. — Storrow, Collins, Coulthurst, McDonald, Kenny. 
Parkman Fund. — Storrow, Coulthurst, Coleman, Collins, Ballantyne. 
Printing. — McDonald, Attridge, Collins, Coulthurst, Kenny. 
Public Lands. — Attridge, McDonald, Kenny, Ballantyne, Coleman. 
Soldiers' Relief. — Ballantyne, McDonald, ColUns, Storrow, Coulthurst. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 
Rules. — Kenny, Attridge, Storrow'. 
Unclaimed Baggage. — McDonald, Coleman. 

* Appointed by President of City Council and announced at first meeting on February 7, 
1916. 

Note. — Of the above committees following the first four, the first named member 
as Chairman. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 19 

AMENDED CITY CHARTER OF 1909. 

[With footnotes as to Amendments in 1910 and 1914.1 



The Mayor and City Council. 
Section 1. The terms of office of the mayor and the members of both 
branches of the present city council of the city of Boston and of the 
street commissioner whose term would expire on the first Monday of 
January, nineteen hundred and ten, are hereby extended to ten o'clock 
A.M. on the first Monday of February, nineteen hundred and ten, and 
at that time the said city coimcil and both branches thereof and the 
positions of city messenger, clerk of the common council, clerk of com- 
mittees, assistant clerk of committees, and their subordinates shall be 
abolished. The officials whose terms of office are hereby extended shall, 
for the extended term, receive a compensation equal to one-twelfth of the 
annual salaries now paid to them respectively. The mayor and city 
council elected in accordance with the provisions of this act, and their 
successors, shall thereafter have aU the powers and privileges conferred, 
and be subject to all the duties and obligations imposed by law upon 
the city council or the board of aldermen, acting as such or as county 
commissioners or in any capacity, except as herein otherwise provided. 
Wherever in this act the phrase "mayor and city council" appears, it 
shall be understood as meaning the mayor and city council acting on and 
after the first Monday of February, nineteen hundred and ten, under the 
provisions of this and the three following sections. The city council may, 
subject to the approval of the mayor, from time to time establish such 
offices, other than that of city clerk, as it may deem necessary for the 
conduct of its affairs and at such salaries as it may determine, and abolish 
such offices or alter such salaries; and without such approval may fill 
the offices thus established and remove the incumbents at pleasure. 

Sect. 2. The mayor from time to time may make to the city council 
in the form of an ordinance or loan order filed with the city clerk such 
recommendations other than for school purposes as he may deem to be for 
the welfare of the city. The city council shall consider each ordinance or 
loan order presented by the mayor and shall either adopt or reject the 
same within sixty days after the date when it is filed as aforesaid. If the 
said ordinance or loan order is not rejected within said sixty days it shall 
be in force as if adopted by the city council unless previously withdrawn 
by the mayor. Nothing herein shall prevent the mayor from again 

Note. — The Amended City Charter is contained in Chap. 486, Acts of 1909, con- 
sisting of sixty-three sections. We have omitted §§ 35 to 44, inclusive, as these concern 
the alternative amendments which became inoperative on the adoption of Plan 2 by the 
voters at the State election, November 2, 1909. 



20 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

presenting an ordinance or loan order which has been rejected or with- 
drawn. The city council may originate an ordinance or loan order and 
may reduce or reject any item in any loan and, subject to the approval 
of the mayor, may amend an ordinance. AU sales of land other than 
school lands, all appropriations for the purchase of land other than for 
school purposes, and all loans voted by the city council shall require a 
vote of two thirds of all the members of the city council; and shall be 
passed only after two separate readings and by two separate votes, the 
second of said readings and votes to be had not less than fourteen days 
after the first. No amendment increasing the amount of land to be sold 
or the amount to be paid for the purchase of land, or the amount of loans, 
or altering the disposition of purchase money or of the proceeds of loans 
shall be made at the time of the second reading and vote. 

Sect. 3. All appropriations, other than for school purposes, to be 
met from taxes, revenue, or any source other than loans shall originate 
with the mayor, who within thirty days after the beginning of the 
fiscal year shall submit to the city council the annual budget of the current 
expenses of the city and county, and may submit thereafter supplemen- 
tary budgets until such time as the tax rate for the year shall have been 
fixed. The city council may reduce or reject any item, but without the 
approval of the mayor shall not increase any item in, nor the total of a 
budget, nor add any item thereto, nor shall it originate a budget. It 
shall be the duty of the city and county officials, when requested by the 
mayor, to submit forthwith in such detail as he may require estimates 
for the next fiscal year of the expenditures of the department or office 
under their charge, which estimates shall be transmitted to the city council. 

The city auditor may, with the approval in each instance of the mayor, 
at any time make transfers from the appropriation for current expenses 
of one division of a department to the appropriation for current expenses 
of any other division of the same department, and from the reserve fund 
to any appropriation for the current expenses of a department; and may 
also, with the approval of the mayor, at any time between December first 
and February first, make transfers from any appropriation to any other 
appropriation: -provided, however, that no money raised by loan shall be 
transferred to any appropriation from income or taxes. He may also 
with such approval apply any of the income and taxes not disposed of 
in closing the accounts for the financial year in such manner as he may 
determine. 

Sect. 4. Every appropriation, ordinance, order, resolution and vote 
of the city council, except votes relating to its own internal affairs, shall be 
presented to the mayor, who shall make or cause to be made a written 
record of the time and place of presentation, and it shall be in force if 
he approves the same within fifteen days after it shall have been presented 
to him, or if the same is not returned by him with his objections thereto 
in writing within said period of fifteen days. If within said period said 
appropriation, ordinance, order, resolution, or vote is returned by the 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 21 

mayor to the city council by filing the same with the city clerk with his 
objections thereto the same shall be void. If the same involves the expen- 
diture of money, the mayor may approve some of the items in whole or 
in part and disapprove other of the items in whole or in part; and such 
items or parts of items as he approves shall be in force, and such items or 
parts of items as he disapproves shall be void. 

Sect. 5. Except as otherwise provided in this act, the organization, 
powers, and duties of the executive departments of the city shall remain 
as constituted at the time when this section takes effect; but the mayor 
and city council at any time may by ordinance reorganize, consolidate, 
or abolish departments in whole or in part; transfer the duties, powers, 
and appropriations of one department to another in whole or in part; 
and establish new departments; and may increase, reduce, establish or 
abolish salaries of heads of departments, or members of boards. Nothing 
in this act shall authorize the abolition or the taking away of any of 
the powers or duties as established by law of the assessing department, 
building department, board of appeal, children's institutions department, 
election department, fire department, Franklin Foundation, hospital 
department, library department, overseers of the poor, schoolhouse 
department, school committee, or any department in charge of an official 
or officials appointed by the governor, nor the abolition of the health 
department. 

Sect. 6. No contract for lighting the public streets, parks, or alleys, 
or for the collection, removal, or disposal of refuse, extending over a 
period of more than one year from the date thereof, shall be valid without 
the approval of the mayor and the city council after a public hearing 
held by the city council, of which at least seven days' notice shall have 
been given in the City Record. 

Sect. 7. The city council at any time may request from the mayor 
specific information on any municipal matter within its jurisdiction, 
and may request his presence to answer written questions relating thereto 
at a meeting to be held not earlier than one week from the date of the 
receipt of said questions, in which case the mayor shall personally, ®r 
through a head of a department or a member of a board, attend such 
meeting and publicly answer all such questions. The person so attend- 
ing shall not be obliged to answer questions relating to any other matter. 
The mayor at any time may attend and address the city council in person 
or through the head of a department, or a member of a board, upon such 
subject as he may desire. 

Sect. 8. Neither the city council, nor any member or committee, 
officer, or employee thereof shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
act, directly or indirectly on behalf of the city or of the county of Suf- 
folk take part in the employment of labor, the making of contracts, 
the purchase of materials, supplies or real estate; nor in the construc- 
tion, alteration, or repair of any public works, buildings, or other prop- 
erty; nor in the care, custody, and management of the same; nor in the 



22 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

conduct of the executive or administrative business of the city or county; 
nor in the appointment or removal of any municipal or county employee; 
nor in the expenditure of public money except such as may be necessary 
for the contingent and incidental expenses of the city council. The pro- 
visions of this section shall not affect the powers or duties of the city coun- 
cil as the successor of the present board of aldermen relative to state 
or military aid and soldiers' reUef . 

It shall be unlawful for the mayor or for a member of the city coun- 
cil or for any officer or employee of the city or of the coimty of Suffolk 
or for a member of the finance commission directly or indirectly to make 
a contract with the city or with the county of Suffolk, or to receive any 
commission, discount, bonus, gift, contribution or reward from or any 
share in the profits of any person or coporation making or performing 
such contract, unless such mayor, member of the city council, officer, 
or employee or member of the finance commission immediately upon 
learning of the existence of such contract or that such contract is pro- 
posed, shaU notify in writing the mayor, city council, and finance com- 
mission of such contract and of the nature of his interest in such contract 
and shall abstain from doing any official act on behalf of the city in reference 
thereto. In case of such interest on the part of an officer whose duty it 
is to make such contract on behalf of the city, the contract may be made 
by any other officer of the city duly authorized thereto by the mayor, 
or if the mayor has such interest by the city clerk: 'provided, however, 
that when a contractor with the city or county is a corporation or voluntary 
association, the ownership of less than five per cent of the stock or shares 
actually issued shall not be considered as being an interest in the contract 
within the meaning of this act, and such ownership shall not affect the 
validity of the contract, unless the owner of such stock or shares is also 
an officer or agent of the corporation or association, or solicits or takes 
part in the making of the contract. 

A violation of any provision of this section shall render the contract 
in respect to which such violation occiu-s voidable at the option of the 
city or coimty. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall 
be pimished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or by 
imprisonment for not more than one year, or both. Chapter five himdred 
and twenty-two of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight is 
hereby repealed. 

The Executive Department. 
Sect. 9. All heads of departments and members of municipal boards, 
including the board of street commissioners, as their present terms of 
office expire (but excluding the school committee and those officials by 
law appointed by the governor), shall be appointed by the mayor with- 
out confirmation by the city council. They shall be recognized experts 
in such work as may devolve upon the incumbents of said offices, or 
persons specially fitted by education, training or experience to perform 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 23 

the same, and (except the election commissioners, who shall remain sub- 
ject to the provisions of existing laws) shall be appointed without regard 
to party affiliation or to residence at the time of appointment except a^ 
hereinafter provided. 

Sect. 19. In making such appointments the mayor shall sign a certifi- 
cate in the following form: 

CERTIFICATE OF APPOINTMENT. 
I appoint (Name of Appointee) to the position of (Name of Office) and I certify that 
in my opinion he is a recognized expert in the work which will devolve upon him, and 
that I make the appointment solely in the interest of the city. Mayor. 

Or in the following form, as the case may be: 

CERTIFICATE OF APPOINTMENT. 

I appoint (Name of Appointee) to the position of (Name of Office) and I certify that 
in my opinion he is a person specially fitted by education, training, or experience to perform 
the duties of said office, and that I make the appointment solely in the interest of the city • 

Mayor. 

The certificate shall be filed with the city clerk, who shall thereupon 
forward a certified copy to the civil service commission. The commis- 
sion shall immediately make a careful inquiry into the qualifications 
of the nominee under such rules as they may, with the consent of the 
governor and council, establish, and, if they conclude that he is a com- 
petent person with the requisite qualifications, they shall file with the 
city clerk a certificate signed by at least a majority of the commission 
that they have made a careful inquiry into the quahfications of the 
appointee, and that in their opinion he is a recognized expert, or that 
he is qualified by education, training or experience for said office, as 
the case may be, and that they approve the appointment. Upon the 
filing of this certfficate the appointment shall become opei;ative, subject 
however to all provisions of law or ordinance in regard to acceptance 
of office, oath of office, and the filing of bonds. If the commission does 
not within thirty days after the receipt of such notice file said certificate 
with the city clerk the appointment shall be void. 

Sect. 11. The civil service commission is authorized to incur in 
carrying out the foregoing provisions such reasonable expense as may be 
approved by the governor and council; the same to be paid by the 
commonwealth, which upon demand shaU be reimbursed by the city of 
Boston. 

Sect. 12. A vacancy in any office to which the provisions of section 
nine of this act apply, shall be filled by the mayor xmder the provisions 
of said section and pending a permanent appointment he shall designate 
some other head of a department or member of a board to discharge 
the duties of the office temporarily. 

Sect. 13. Members of boards shall be appointed for the terms estab- 
lished by law or by ordinance. Heads of departments shall be appointed 



24 MUNICIt»AL REGISTER. 

for terms of four years beginning with the first day of May of the year 
in which they are appointed and shall continue thereafter to hold office 
during the pleasure of the mayor. 

Sect. 14. The mayor may remove any .head of a department or 
member of a board (other than the election commissioners, who shall 
remain subject to the provisions of existing laws) by filing a written 
statement with the city clerk setting forth in detail the specific reasons 
for such removal, a copy of which shall be delivered or mailed to the 
person thus removed, who may make a reply in writing, which, if he 
desires, may be filed with the city clerk; but such reply shall not affect 
the action taken unless the mayor so determines. The provisions of this 
section shall not apply to the school committee or to any official by law 
appointed by the governor. 

Sect. 15. The positions of assistants and secretary authorized by 
section twenty of chapter four hundred and forty-nine of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five except those in the election depart- 
ment are hereby abolished, and except as aforesaid the said section is 
hereby repealed. 

The civil service laws shall not apply to the appointment of the mayor's 
secretaries, nor of the stenographers, clerks, telephone operators and 
messengers connected with his office, and the mayor may remove such 
appointees without a hearing and without making a statement of the 
cause for their removal. 

Sect. 16. No official of said city, except in case of extreme emer- 
gency involving the health or safety of the people or their property, shall 
expend intentionally in any fiscal year any sum in excess of the appro- 
priations duly made in accordance with law, nor involve the city in any 
contract for the future payment of money in excess of such appropria- 
tion, except as provided in section six of this act. Any official who shall 
violate the provisions of this section shall be punished by imprisonment 
for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one thousand 
dollars, or both. 

The Finance Commission. 
Sect. 17. Within sixty days after the passage of this act the governor 
with the advice and consent of the council shall appoint a finance com- 
mission to consist of five persons, inhabitants of and quahfied voters in 
the city of Boston, who shall have been such for at least three years 
prior to the date of their appointment, one for the term of five years, 
one for four years, one for three years, one for two years, and one for 
one year, and thereafter as the terms of office expire in each year one 
member for a term of five years. Vacancies in the commission shall be 
filled for the unexpired term by the governor with the advice and consent 
of the council. The members of said commission may be removed by 
the governor with the advice and consent of the council for such cause 
as he shall deem sufficient. The chairman shall be designated by the 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 25 

governor. His annual salary shall be five thousand dollars, which shall 
be paid in monthly instalments by the city of Boston. The other members 
shall serve without pay. 

Sect. 18. It shall be the duty of the finance commission from time 
to time to investigate any and all matters relating to appropriations, 
loans, expenditures, accounts, and methods of administration affecting 
the city of Boston or the county of Suffolk, or any department thereof, 
that may appear to the commission to require investigation, and 
to report thereon from time to time to the mayor, the city council, the 
governor, or the general court. The commission shall make an 
annual report in January of each year to the general court. 

Sect. 19. Whenever any pay roll, bill, or other claim against the 
city is presented to the mayor, city auditor, or the city treasurer, he shall, 
if the same seems to him to be of doubtful validity, excessive in amount, 
or otherwise contrary to the city's interest, refer it to the finance com- 
mission, which shall immediately investigate the facts and report thereon; 
and pending said report payment shall be -nathheld. 

Sect. 20. The said commission is authorized to employ such experts, 
counsel, and other assistants, and to incur such other expenses as it may 
deem necessary, and the same shall be paid by said city upon requisi- 
tion by the commission, not exceeding in the aggregate in any year the 
sum of twenty-five thousand dollars, or such additional sums as may be 
appropriated for the purpose by the city council, and approved by the 
mayor. A sum sufficient to cover the salary of the chairman of the com- 
mission and the further sum of at least twenty-five thousand dollars to 
meet the expenses as aforesaid shall be appropriated each year by said 
city. The commission shall have the same right to incur expenses in 
anticipation of its appropriation as if it were a regular department of 
said city. 

Sect. 21. For the purpose of enabling the said commission to perform 
the duties and carry out the objects herein contemplated, and to enable 
the mayor, the city council, the governor or the general court to receive 
the reports and findings of said commission as a basis for such laws, 
ordinances, or administrative orders as may be deemed meet, the com- 
mission shall have all the powers and duties enumerated in chapter five 
hundred and sixty-two of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight 
and therein conferred upon the commission designated in said act; but 
counsel for any witness at any public hearing may ask him any pertinent 
question and may offer pertinent evidence through other witnesses subject 
to cross-examination by the commission and its counsel. 

The City Clerk. 
Sect. 22. The present city clerk shall hold oflBce for the term for which 
he has been elected, and thereafter until his successor is chosen and quali- 
fied. In the year nineteen hundred and eleven, and every third year 
thereafter, a city clerk shall be elected by a majority of the members of 



26 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

the city council, to hold office until the first Monday in February in the 
third year following his election, and thereafter until his successor has been 
duly chosen and qualified, unless sooner removed by due process of law. 
The city clerk shall act as clerk of the city council established by this act. 

The City Atjditor. 

Sect. 23. All accounts rendered to or kept in the departments of the 
■city of Boston or county of Suffolk shall be subject to the inspection 
and revision of the city auditor, and shall be rendered and kept in such 
form as he shall prescribe. The auditor may require any person pre- 
senting for settlement an account or claim against the city or coimty 
to make oath before him in such form as he may prescribe as to the accuracy 
of such account or claim. The wilful making of a false oath shall be 
perjury and punishable as such. The auditor may disallow and refuse 
to pay, in whole or in part, any claim on the ground that it is fraudulent 
or imlawful and in that case he shall file a written statement of his reasons 
for the refusal. 

Sect. 24. Whenever, in response to an advertisement by any officer or 
board of the city or county, a bid for a contract to do work or fm-nish 
materials is sent or delivered to said officer or board, a duplicate of the 
same shall be furnished by the bidder to the auditor, to be kept by him 
and not opened until after the original bids are opened. After the original 
bids are opened, the auditor shall open and examine the bids submitted 
to him, and shall compare the same with the original bids. In case any 
of the bids submitted to the auditor differ from the corresponding original 
bids, those submitted to the auditor shall be treated as the original bids. 
The contract shall not be awarded imtil after both sets of bids are opened. 

Sect. 25. The auditor shall furnish monthly to each head of depart- 
ment a statement of the unexpended balance of the appropriation for that 
department, and he shall furnish to the mayor and city council a state- 
ment of the imexpended balances of all the departments. He shall 
fm-nish quarterly to the city council an itemized statement showing 
the amount of money expended by the mayor and the city council for 
contingent expenses. 

Miscellaneous Provisions. 

Sect. 26.* All loans issued by the city after the passage of this act 
shall be made payable in annual instalments in the manner authorized 
by section thirteen of chapter twenty-seven of the Revised Laws as 
amended by section one of chapter three hundred and forty-one of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight. No sinking fund shall be 
established for said loan. All bonds shall be offered for sale in such 
a manner that the effect of the premiums, if any, shall be to reduce 
the total amount of bonds issued. No city or county money shall be 
deposited in any bank or trust company of which any member of the board 
of sinking fund commissioners of said city is an officer, director, or agent. 

* Sect. 26 amended by Chap. 437, Acts of 1910, which exempts all loans issued for rapid 
transit construction from the prohibition as to sinking funds. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 27 

Sect. 27. Every officer and board in charge of a department of the 
city of Boston or county of Suffolk shall on or before the fifth day of 
May in each year prepare and furnish to the city auditor a list of the 
officials and employees under said officer or board and paid by the city 
or county on the thirtieth day of April preceding. Such lists shall give 
the names, residence by stre'et and ward, designation, compensation, 
and date of election or appointment of each of said officials and employees 
and the date when each first entered the employ of the city or county. 
It shall be the duty of the city auditor to verify said lists by the pay rolls; 
and when verified the said lists shall be printed by the superintendent 
of printing as a city docmnent. 

Sect. 28. The jurisdiction now exercised by the board of aldermen 
concerning the naming of streets, the planting and removal of trees in 
the public ways, the issue of permits or licenses for coasting, the storage 
of gasoline, oil, and other inflammable substances or explosive com- 
pounds and the use of the public waj^s for any permanent or temporary 
obstruction or projection in, under, or over the same, including the location 
of conduits, poles, and posts for telephone, telegraph, street railway, or 
illuminating purposes, is hereby vested in the board of street commis- 
sioners, to be exercised by said board with the approval in writing of the 
mayor; and the mayor and city council shaU have authority to fix by 
ordinance the terms by way of cash payment, rent, or otherwise, upon 
which permits or licenses for the storage of gasoline or oil, or other inflam- 
mable substances or explosive compounds, and the construction or use 
of coal holes, vaults, bay windows, and marquises, in, under, or over the 
public ways shall be issued. 

Sect. 29. Within ninety days after the passage of this act and there- 
after there shall be published at least once a week and distributed and 
sold imder the direction of the mayor and on terms to be fixed by the 
city council and approved by the mayor a paper to be known as the City 
Record. All advertising, whether required by law or not, with reference 
to the purchase or taking of land, contracts for work, materials, or supplies, 
the sale of bonds, or the sale of property for non-payment of taxes shall 
appear exclusively in said paper; a list of all contracts of one thousand 
dollars or more, as awarded, with the names of bidders, and the amount of 
the bids; appointments by the mayor; and changes in the number and 
compensation of employees in each department, shall be published in the 
City Record, The proceedings of the city council and school committee 
together with all commlmications from the mayor, shall be published in 
the City Record. 

Sect. 30. Every officer or board in charge of a department in said 
city, when authorized to erect a new building or to make structural 
changes in an existing building, shall make contracts therefor, not exceed- 
ing five, each contract to be subject to the approval of the mayor; and 
when about to do any work or to make any purchase, the estimated 
cost of which alone, or in conjunction with other similar work or pur- 
chase which might properly be included in the "same contract, amounts 



28 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

to or exceeds one thousand dollars, shall, unless the mayor gives written 
authority to do otherwise, invite proposals therefor by advertisement in 
the City Record. Such advertisement shall state the time and place for 
opening the proposals in answer to said advertisement, and shall reserve 
the right to the officer or board to reject any or all proposals. No authority 
to dispense with advertising shall be given by the mayor unless the said 
officer or board furnishes him with a signed statement which shall be 
published in the City Record giving in detail the reasons for not inviting 
bids by advertisement. 

Sect. 31. At the request of any department, and with the approval 
of the mayor the board of street commissioners, in the name of the city, 
may take in fee for any municipal purpose any land within the limits of 
the city, not already appropriated to public use. Whenever the price 
proposed to be paid for a lot of land for any municipal purpose is more 
than twenty-five per cent higher than its average assessed valuation dur- 
ing the previous three years, said land shall not be taken by purchase 
but shall be taken by right of eminent domain and paid for in the manner 
provided for the taking of and the payment of damages for land for high- 
ways in said city. No land shall be taken until an appropriation by loan 
or otherwise for the general purpose for which land is needed shall have 
been made by the mayor and city council by a two thirds vote of all its 
members; or in case of land for school purposes by the school committee 
and schoolhouse department in accordance with law; nor shall a price 
be paid in excess of the appropriation, unless a larger sum is awarded 
by a court of competent jurisdiction. All proceedings in the taking of 
land shall be under the advice of the law department, and a record thereof 
shall be kept by said department. 

Sect. 32.* The first municipal election under this act shall take 
place on the first Tuesday after the second Monday in January in the 
year nineteen hundred and ten, and thereafter the regular municipal 
elections in each year in said city shall be held on the first Tuesday after 
the second Monday in January. 

Sect. 33. The fiscal year in said city shall begin on February first 
and shall end on the thirty-first day of January next following; and the 
municipal year shall hereafter begin on the first Monday in February and 
shall continue until the first Monday of the February next following. 
The present terms of office of members of the school committee are hereby 
extended to the first Monday of February in the years in which their 
terms respectively expire, and hereafter the terms of office of members 
of the school committee shall begin with the first Monday of February 
following their election. The members of the school committee hereafter 
shall meet and organize annually on the first Monday of February. 

Sect. 34. In Boston beginning with the current year political com- 
mittees shall be elected at the state primaries instead of at the municipal 
primaries. 

* Sect. 32 amended by Chap. 730, § 1, Acts of 1914, fixing date of annual municipal 
election on the sixth Tuesday after the state election. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 29 



The Mayor. 

Sect. 45. The mayor of the city of Boston shall be elected at large 
to hold office for the term of four years from the first Monday in February 
following his election and until his successor is chosen and qualified, 
except as hereinafter provided. 

Sect. 46. The secretary of the commonwealth (imless notified as 
hereinafter provided) shall cause to be printed at the end of the official 
ballot to be used in the city of Boston at the state election in the second 
year of the mayor's term the following question: Shall there be an election 
for mayor at the next mimicipal election, with the words Yes and No at 
the right of the question and sufficient squares in which each voter may 
designate by a cross his answer to such question. If a majority of the 
qualified voters registered in said city for said state election shall vote 
in the affirmative on said question, there shall be an election for mayor 
in said city at the mimicipal election held in Januaryf next following said 
state election, and the same shall be conducted, and the result thereof 
declared in aU respects as are other city elections for mayor, except that 
the board of election commissioners shall place on the official ballot for said 
election without nomination the name of the person then holding the office 
of mayor (other than an acting mayor), unless in writing he shall request 
otherwise. The mayor then elected shall hold office for four years, sub- 
ject to recall at the end of two years as provided in this section. If said 
question is not answered in the affirmative by the vote aforesaid no elec- 
tion for mayor shall be held and the mayor shall continue to hold office 
for his unexpired term. If prior to October first in the said second year 
of his term the mayor shall ffie with the secretary of the commonwealth 
a written notice that he does not desire said question to appear upon the 
ballot at said state election it shall be omitted; his term of office shall 
expire on the first Monday of February following; and there shaU be an 
election for mayor in said city at the mimicipal election held in Januaryf 
next following said state election, and at such mimicipal election the 
mayor's name shall not be placed on the official baUot unless he is nomi- 
nated in the manner provided in section fifty-three of this act. 

Sect. 47. If a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor within two months 
prior to a regular municipal election other than an election for mayor, 
or within four months after any regular municipal election, the city council 
shall forthwith order a special election for a mayor to serve for the unex- 
pired term, subject if the vacancy occurs in the first or second year of the 
mayor's term to recall under the provisions of the preceding section. If 
such vacancy occurs at any other time there shaU be an election for mayor 
at the municipal election held in Januaryf next following, for the term 
of four years, subject to recall as aforesaid. In the case of the decease, 
inability,- absence or resignation of the mayor, and whenever there is a 

* * * Sections 35 to 44, inclusive, are omitted because now inoperative. See note 
on page 19. 

t January changed to December by Chap. 730, Acts of 1914, §§ 2 and 3. 



30 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

vacancy in the office from any cause, the president of the city council 
while said cause continues or until a mayor is elected shall perform the 
duties of mayor. If he is also absent or unable from any cause to perform 
such duties they shall be performed until the mayor or president of the 
city council returns or is able to attend to said duties by such member of 
the city council as that body may elect, and imtil such election by the city 
clerk. The person upon whom such duties shall devolve shall be called 
"acting mayor" and he shall possess the powers of mayor only in matters 
not admitting of delay, but shall have no power to make permanent 
appointments except on the decease of the mayor. 

The City Council. 

Sect. 48. There shall be elected at large in said city a city council 
consisting of nine members. At the first election imder this act there shall 
be elected nine members of said city coimcil. No voter shall vote for more 
than nine. The three candidates receiving the largest number of votes 
at said election shall hold office for three years, the three receiving the next 
largest number of votes shall hold office for two years, the three receiving 
the next largest number of votes shall hold office for one year. In case 
two or more persons elected should receive an equal number of votes those 
who are the seniors by age shall for the division into classes hereby required 
be classified as if they had received the larger number of votes in the order 
of ages. Thereafter at each aimual municipal election there shall be chosen 
at large three members of the city council to hold office for a term of three 
years. No voter shall vote for more than three. All said terms shall begin 
with the first Monday of February following the election. 

Sect. 49. Each member of the city council shall be paid an annual 
salary of fifteen hundred dollars; and no other sum shall be paid from the 
city treasury for or on account of any personal expenses directly or 
indirectly incurred by or in behalf of any member of said coimcil. 

Sect. 50. The city council shall be the judge of the election and 
qualifications of its members; shall elect from its members by vote of a 
majority of all the members a president who when present shall preside 
at the meetings thereof; shall from time to time establish rules for its 
proceedings, and shall, when a vacancy occurs in the office of any member, 
elect by vote of a majority of all the members a registered voter of said 
city to fill the vacancy for the remainder of the municipal year. The 
vacancy for the remainder of the unexpired term shall be filled at the next 
annual municipal election, unless the vacancy occurs within two months 
prior to such municipal election, in which event the city council shall 
forthwith order a special election to fill the vacancy for the unexpired 
term. The member eldest in years shall preside until the president is 
chosen, and in case of the absence of the president, until a presiding 
officer is chosen. 

Sect. 51. All elections by the city council under any provision of law 
shall be made by a viva voce vote, each member who is present answering 
to his name when it is called by the clerk or other proper officer, and stating 
the name of the person for whom he votes, or declining to vote as the case 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 



31 



may be; and the clerk or other proper officer shall record every such vote. 
No such election shall be valid unless it is made as aforesaid. 

Sect. 52. No primary election or caucus for municipal offices shall be 
held hereafter in the city of Boston, and all laws relating to primary elec- 
tions and caucuses for such offices in said city are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 53.* Any male qualified registered voter in said city may be 
nominated for any municipal elective office in said city, and his name as 
such candidate shall be printed on the official ballot to be used at the 
municipal election: 'provided, that at or before five o'clock p.m. of the 
twenty-fifth* day prior to such election nomination papers prepared and 
issued by the election commissioners, signed in person by at least five 
thousand registered voters in said city quaHfied to vote for such candi- 
date at. said election, shall be filed with said election commissioners, and 
the signatures on the same to the number required to make a nomination 
are subsequently certified by the election commissioners as hereinafter 
provided. Said nomination papers shall be in substantially the following 
form: 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
CITY OF BOSTON 
NOMINATION PAPER. 
The undersigned, registered voters of the City of Boston quaUfied to vote for a candidate 
for the office named below, in accordance with law, make the following nomination of 
candidates to be voted for at the election to be held in the City of Boston on January 
19 . 



NAME OF CANDIDATE. 
(Give first or middle name in full.) 



OFFICE FOR WHICH 
NOMINATED. 



RESIDENCE. 
Street and number, if any. 



SIGNATURES AND RESIDENCES OF NOMINATORS. 
We certify that we have not subscribed to more nominations of candidates for this 
office than there are persons to be elected thereto. In case of the death, withdrawal, 
or incapacity of any of the above nominees, after written acceptance filed with the board 
of election commissioners, we authorize (names of a committee of not less than five persons) 
or a majority thereof as our representatives to fill the vacancy in the manner prescribed 
by law 



SIGNATURES 

OF NOMINATORS. 

To be made in person. 



RESIDENCE MAY 1, 
or, as the case may be, April 1. 



WARD. 



PREC. 



PRESENT 
RESIDENCE. 



ACCEPTANCE OF NOMINATION. 
We accept the above nominations. 

(Signature of Nominees.) 



* Sect. 53 amended by Chap. 730, § 4, Acts of 1914 (accepted by the voters, November 3, 
1914), so as to require but 3,000 certified signatures for nomination of mayor and 2,000 for 
nomination of city council or school committee member. Also, the twenty-fifth day 
" prior to such election" changed to the twenty-first day. 



32 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Suffolk, ss. Boston, 19 

Then personally appeared who, I am satisfied, is one of the 

signers of the within nomination paper, and made oath that the statements therein con- 
tained are true to the best of his knowledge and belief and that his post office address is 

Before me, 

Justice of the Peace. 

Sect. 54.* If a candidate nominated as aforesaid dies before the day 
of election, or withdraws his name from nomination, or is found to be 
ineligible, the vacancy may be filled by a committee of not less than five 
persons, or a majority thereof, if such committee be named, and so author- 
ized in the nomiaation papers. Nomination papers shall not include 
candidates for more than one office except that not more than three or 
nine, as the case may be, candidates for city council may be included 
in one nomination paper, and not more than two candidates for school 
committee may be included in one nomination paper. Every voter may 
sign as many nomination papers for each office to be filled as there are 
persons to be elected thereto and no more. Nomination papers in each 
year shall be issued by the board of election commissioners on and after 
but not before the day next following the state election. 

Sect. 55. Women who are qualified to vote for a member of the school 
committee may be nominated as and sign nomination papers for candi- 
dates for that office in the manner and under the same provisions of law 
as men. 

Sect. 56. The names of candidates appearing on nomination papers 
shall when filed be a matter of public record; but the nomination papers 
shall not be open to public inspection until after certification. After 
such nomination papers have been filed, the election commissioners shall 
certify thereon the number of signatures which are the names of regis- 
tered voters in the city qualified to sign the same. They need not certify 
a greater number of names than are required to make a nomination, 
with one-fifth f of such number added thereto. All such papers found 
not to contain a number of names so certified equivalent to the number 
required to make a nomination shall be invaUd. The election commis- 
sioners shall complete such certification on or before five o'clock p.m. 
on. the sixteenth J day preceding the city election. Such certification 
shall not preclude any voter from filing objections as to the validity of 
the nomination. All withdrawals and objections to such nominations 
shall be filed with the election commissioners on or before five o'clock 
P.M. on the fourteenth § day preceding the city election. All substitutions 
to fill vacancies caused by withdrawal or ineligibility shall be filed with 
the election commissioners on or before five o'clock p.m. on the twelfth 
day preceding the city election. 

Sect. 57. The name of each person who is nominated in compliance 
with law, together with his residence and the title and term of the office 

* Sect. 54 amended by Chap. 730, § 5, Acts of 1914, so as to limit the number of nomi- 
nation papers issued to any candidate for mayor to 300, and to any candidate for city 
council or school committee to 200. 

t Changed to one-tenth by same act. % Changed to fifteenth. § Changed to thirteenth. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 33 

for which he is a candidate shall be printed on the official ballots at the 
municipal election, and the names of no other candidates shall be printed 
thereon. The names of candidates for the same office shall be printed 
upon the official ballot in the order in which they may be drawn by the 
board of election commissioners, whose duty it shall be to make such 
drawing and to give each candidate an opportunity to be present thereat 
personally or by one representative. 

Sect. 58. No ballots used at any annual or special municipal elec- 
tion shall have printed thereon any party or political designation or mark, 
and there shall not be appended to the name of any candidate any such 
party or political designation or mark, or anything showing how he was 
nominated or indicating his views or opinions. 

Sect. 59. On ballots to be used at annual or special municipal elec- 
tions blank spaces shall be left at the end of each list of candidates for 
the different offices, equal to the number to be elected thereto, in which 
the voter may insert the name of any person not printed on the ballot 
for whom he desires to vote for such office. 

Sect. 60. All laws not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, 
governing nomination papers and nominations for, and elections of munici- 
pal officers in the city of Boston, shall so far as they may be applicable, 
govern the nomination papers, nominations and elections provided for 
in this act. The board of election commissioners shall be subject to 
the same penalties and shall have the same powers and duties, where 
not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, in relation to nomination 
papers, preparing and printing ballots, preparing for and conducting 
elections and counting, tabulating and determining the votes cast under 
the provisions of this act, as they have now in relation to municipal elec- 
tions in said city. 

Sect. 61. The provisions of this act shall apply to any special munici- 
pal election held after the year nineteen hundred and nine in the city of 
Boston, except that nomination papers for offices to be filled at such 
elections shall be issued by the election commissioners on and after the 
day following the calling of said special election. Every special municipal 
election shall be held on a Tuesday not less than sixty days nor more 
than ninety days after the date of the order calling such special election. 

Sect. 62. All acts and parts of acts so far as inconsistent with this 
act are hereby repealed; all ordinances and parts of ordinances so far as 
inconsistent with this act are hereby annulled; and all acts and parts of 
acts affecting the city of Boston not inconsistent with the provisions 
of this act are continued in force: provided, however, that the provisions 
of chapter four hundred and forty of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and nine shall not apply to any election held hereunder prior to the first 
day of April in the year nineteen hundred and ten. 

[Approved June 11, 1909.] 

Note. — Section 63 (the final section) omitted, as it merely states when the different 
sections went into effect. It will be found in the Municipal Registee of 1911, on 
page 32. 



34 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

IN CHARGE OF 

THE CITY DEPARTMENTS. 



The following table shows the manner in which executive officers or heads of 
the City departments are appointed or elected, the time of appointment or election, 
the term of office as prescribed by statute, ordinance, or both, and the salary received 
by each. Heads of departments and members of municipal boards -appointed by the 
Mayor are subject to approval by the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission. (See , 
Acts of 1909, Chap. 486, Sects. 9-13.) 







Appointed 


OR Elected. 


Term. 




Officers. 


How 
Created. 










Salary. 


By Whom. 


When. 


Begins. 


Length of. 


Assessors (Seven) 


Statute.. . . 


Mayor 


Annually, 
one or two. 


May 1 


Three years. 


1 $4,000 




Ord 


" 


Quadren- 
nially 


" 1 


Four years. . 






6,000 


Building Commissioner . . . 


Statute 


" 


Quadren- 
nially 


" 1 


Four years. . 


5,000 


Cemetery Trustees (Five), 

Children's Institutions 
Trustees (Seven) 


" .... 


- 


Annually, 
one 

Annually, 
one or two. 


" 1 

" 1 


Five years . . 


None. 


City Clerk 


Ord 


City Council 
Mayor 


Triennially, 

Annually, 
one 


1st Monday 
in Feb 

May 1 


Three years. 
Five years . . 




City Planning Board 
(Five) 


$5,000 

None. 


Collector 

Consumptives' Hospital 
Trustees (Seven) 


Statute. . . . 
Ord 


« 


Quadren- 
nially 

Annually, 
one or two. 


« 1 


Four years. . 
Five years . . 


$5,000 

None. 


Corporation Counsel 

Election Commissioners 
(Four) 


Statute 


" 


Quadren- 
nially 

Annually, 
one 


" 1 

April 1 


Four years. . 


$9,000 
2 3,500 


Fire Commissioner 


" 


" 


Quadren- 
nially 


May 1 


« « .. 


5,000 


Health Commissioner 


Ord 


■ 


Quadren- 
nially 


" 1 


« " .. 


7,500 



1 Chairman, 

2 Chairman, 



$500 additional; Secretary, $200 additional. 
$500 additional. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 



35 



Officers. 



How 
Created. 



Appointed or Elected. 



By Whom. 



When. 



Term. 



Length of. 



Salary. 



Hospital Trustees (Five) . . 

Infirmary Trustees 

(Seven) 

Institutions Registrar 

Library Trustees (Five) . . . 

Markets, Superintendent 
of 

Overseers of the Poor 
(Twelve) 

Park and Recreation Com- 
missioners (Three) 

Penal Institutions Com- 
missioner 

Printing, Superintendent 
of 

Public Buildings, Superin- 
tendent of 

Public Works, Commis- 
sioner of 

Registrar, City 

Schoolhouse Commis- 
sioners (Three) 

Sinking Funds Commis- 
sioners (Six) 

Soldiers' Relief Commis- 
sioner 

Statistics Trustees (Five) . . 

Street Commissioners 
(Three) 

Supplies, Superintendent 
of 

Treasurer 

Vessels, Weighers of 

Weights and Measures, 
Sealer of 

Wire Commissioner 



Statute. 
Statute. 



Ord.... 

Statute. 



Mayor. 



Ord. 



Statute. . 



Ord 

Statute. . 

Ord 

Statute . . 



Annually, 
one 



Annually, 
one or two. 

Quadren- 
nially 



Annually, 
one 



Quadren- 
nially . . . 



Annually, 
four 



Annually, 



Quadren- 
nially . . . 



Quadren- 
nially. . 



Quadren- 
nially . . 



Quadren- 
nially . . . 



Quadren- 
nially. . 



Annually, 
one 



Annually, 
two 



Quadren- 
nially . . . 



Annually, 
one 



Annually, 
one 



Quadren- 
nially . . 

Quadren- 
nially . . 



Annually, 
two 



Quadren- 
nially. . 



Quadren- 
nially . . . 



May 1 . . . . 

" 1.... 

" 1.... 

" 1 

' 1.... 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

June 1 

May 1 

" 1 

" 1 

1st Monday 
in Feb 

May 1 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 



Five years. . 

Four years. . 
Five years . . 
Four years. . 
Three years, 

Four years. 



Three years, 

Four years. . 
Five years . . 
Three years, 
Four years. . 

One year . . . 
Four years. . 



None. 

$3,000 
None. 
$3,000 
None. 
1 

$5,000 
4,000 
3,600 
9,000 
4,000 

2 3,500 

None. 

$3,500 

None. 

2 $4,000 

3,000 

5,000 

Fees. 

$3,000 
5,000 



1 Chairman, $5,000; others, none. 

2 Chairman, $500 additional. 



36 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS.* 



DEPARTMENT OF THE MAYOR. 

Office, City Hall, Room 27, second floor. 
[Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 2; 
Stat. 1904, Chap. 450; Stat. 1905, Chap. 341; Stat. 1907, Chap. 274; 
C. C. Title II., Chap. 3; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1910, Chap. 373; 
Stat. 1912, Chap. 550; Stat. 1913, Chap. 280; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 274 
and 730; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 2.] 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor. 
Salary, $10,000. 
Charles O. Power, Assistant Secretary. Salary, $2,500. 
Edward J. Slattery, Assistant Secretary. Salary, $2,100. 
William J. J. O'Neil, Chief Clerk. Salary, $1,600. 
John M. Casey, Liceyise Clerk. • Salary, $2,100. 

THE CITY RECORD. 
City Hall, Room 27, second floor. 
[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, § 29.] 
Standish Willcox, Editor and Manager. Salary, $2,000. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 301 City Hall Annex, third floor. 
[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, §37; Stat. 1884, Chap. 123; Stat. 1903, Chap 
279; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 5; Ord. 1900, Chap. 5; Ord. 1901, Chap. 8 
C. C. Title IV., Chap. 12; Ord. 1910, Chap. 1; Stat. 1911, Chap. 89 
Stat. 1913, Chap. 484; Stat. 1914, Chap. 198; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 5 
Stat. 1915, Chap. 91 (Gen.).] 

officials. 
Edward B. Daily, Chairman. 
Charles E. Folsom, Secretary. 

assessors. 
Charles E. Folsom, Frederick H. Temple. Terms end in 1918. 
William A. Creney. Term ends in 1918. 

* All departments which are within the control of the Mayor. 

Note. — R. L. refers to the Revised Laws of iNIassachusetts, 1902. Stat., alone, to the 
annual Statutes or Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts; Rev. Ord. 1898, to the Revised 
Ordinances of 1898; Ord., alone, to annual Ordinances enacted; C. C, to City Charter in 
Statutes Relating to the City of Boston, 1908; Rev. Ord., 1914, to the Consolidation of all 
Ordinances and Amendments thereof to 1914, inclusive. 

The municipal year begins on the first Monday in February; the financial year, February 1. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 37 

William H. Cuddy. Term ends in 1917. 

Edward B. Daily, Fred E. Bolton, Philip O'Brien. Terms end 

in 1916. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chief Clerk. Salary, $3,500. 

One or more Assessors are appointed each year by the Mayor for a term 
of thi-ee years. The salary of the Chairman is $4,500, of the Secretary, 
$4,200, and of the five other Assessors, $4,000. 

The Assessors pubhshed annual tax lists from 1822 to 1866. Since 
1866 the records of the department are almost entirely in manuscript. 
Annual reports have been made since 1890. 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

IStat. 1885, Chap. 266, §2; Stat. 1894, Chap. 276; Stat. 1901, Chap. 400; 
Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 5, §1; Ord. 1901, Chap. 6; C. C, Title IV., 
Chap. 12, §2; Stat. 1913, Chap. 484. 

The First Assistant Assessors are appointed from the Civil Service list 
by the Board of Assessors for an indeterminate period, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor, one for each assessment district. The Assessors 
and First Assistants organize as the Board of Assessors and Assistant 
Assessors, of which body the Secretary of the Board of Assessors is at 
present the Secretary. The First Assistants receive a salary of $1,200 
annually. 

The Second Assistant Assessors are appointed annually by the Board 
of Assessors, subject to the approval of the Mayor, for a period of 40 days, 
one for each assessment district. Salary, $5 each per day. 

The 50 assessment districts, with First and Second Assistants assigned 
to each, are as follows : 

NEW ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS, 1916. 

DiST. 1. That part of Ward 1 (East Boston) bounded by the following- 
described line: Beginning at the intersection of Harbor Commissioner's 
line and the extension of Brook St.; thence running northwesterly to the 
Revere Beach & Lynn Raihoad ; thence through the middle line of Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad to Prescott St.; thence by the middle lines of 
Prescott, Princeton, Putnam, Lexington and Prescott Sts. to Trenton St.; 
thence through the middle line of Trenton St. to its intersection with Glendon 
St.; thence through the middle line of Glendon St. to the ward hne and 
thence by the ward line to the point of beginning. Thomas O. McEnaney, 
George E. Leet. 

DiST. 2. That part of Ward 1 (East Boston) beginning at the inter- 
section of Glendon St. with the ward line; thence running southerly 
through Glendon St. to Trenton St.; thence through the middle lines of 
Trenton, Prescott, Lexington and Putnam Sts. to Princeton St.; thence 
by the ward line to the point of beginning. Joseph H. King, Patrick J. 
Monahan. 



38 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

DisT. 3. The whole of Ward 2 (East Boston). Edward L. Hopkins, 
John J. Quinlan. 

DiST. 4. The whole of Ward 3 (Charlestown). Lucian J. Priest, 
Edward F. White. 

DiST. 5. The whole of Ward 4 (Charlestown). Michael J. Bropht, 
James V. Doherty. 

DisT. 6. That part of Ward 5 (North End) beginning at the inter- 
section of Cambridge St. extension and the ward hne; thence southerly- 
through Cambridge St. to Chambers St.; thence through the middle Hnes 
of Chambers, Green, Stamford, Causeway, Nashua, Minot, Lowell and 
Brighton Sts. to Leverett St. ; thence through the middle Une of Leverett 
St. extended to the ward hne and thence by the ward Une to the point of 
beginning. Jacob Rosenberg, John J. Dolan. 

DiST. 7. That part of Ward 5 (North End) within the following 
described lines : Beginning at the intersection of Cambridge and Chambers 
Sts.; thence through the middle hnes of Chambers, Green, Staniford 
Causeway, Nashua, Minot, Lowell, Brighton and Leverett Sts. to the 
ward hne; thence by the ward hne to the intersection of the extension of 
Prince St.; thence by middle hnes of Salem, Cooper and Washington Sts. 
to the intersection of Merrimac and Washington Sts.; thence by middle 
lines of Merrimac, Chardon, across Bowdoin Square to Cambridge St. 
and thence by Cambridge St. to the point of beginning. Thomas H. Bond, 
Simon Goldberg. 

DiST. 8. That part of Ward 5 (North End) starting at the intersection 
of Prince St. and the ward hne; thence through the middle hnes of Prince, 
Salem, Parmenter and Richmond Sts., Atlantic Ave. and Eastern Ave. 
to the ward Une, and thence by the ward Une to the point of beginning. 
Arthur C. Quincy, Ernest Martini. 

DiST. 9. That part of Ward 5 (Boston Proper) shown in the following 
described Unes: Beginning at the intersection of Tremont and Park Sts.; 
thence through middle Unes of Park, Beacon and Bowdoin Sts. to Cam- 
bridge St. and crossing Bowdoin Square to Chardon St.; thence by the 
middle Unes of Chardon and Merrimac Sts., crossing Haymarket Square 
to Blackstone St. ; thence through the middle Unes of Blackstone, Hanover, 
Washington and School Sts. to Tremont St. and by the latter to the point 
of beginning. Matthew Binney, Jr., James McNulty. 

DiST. 10. That part of Ward 5 (North End) shown in the foUowing 
described Une: Beginning at the intersection of Blackstone and Washing- 
ton Sts.; thence northerly by Washington to Cooper St.; thence through 
the middle lines of Cooper, Salem, Parmenter and Richmond Sts., Atlantic 
Ave. and Eastern Ave. to the ward line; thence by the ward Une to the 
extension of State St., Atlantic Ave. and South Market St.; thence through 
the middle Une of South Market St., through Faneuil Hall Square, Dock 
Square and Adams Square to Washington St.; thence through the middle 
Unes of Washington, Hanover and Blackstone Sts. to the point of be- 
ginning. Harry C. Byrne, Saverio R. Romano. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 39 

DisT. 11. That part of Ward 5 (Boston Proper) beginning at the inter- 
section of Milk and Washington Sts. ; thence northerly through Washington 
St. to Adams Square, crossing Dock Square and Faneuil Hall Square to 
South Market St.; thence through the middle hnes of South Market St., 
Atlantic Ave. and Central St. to McKinley Square; thence southerly to 
Milk St.; thence through Milk St. to the point of beginning. Edwin R. 
Spinney, John A. Badaracco. 

DiST. 12. That part of Ward 5 (Boston Proper) beginning at the inter- 
section of State St. extended and the ward hne; thence northwesterly 
by State St. extended to Atlantic Ave; thence by the middle hnes of 
Atlantic Ave. and Central St. to McKinley Square and southerly to Milk 
St.; thence through middle hnes of Milk and Congress Sts. to the ward 
line and thence by the ward line to the point of beginning. William F. 
Delehanty, Lawrence H. Newhall. 

DiST. 13. That part of Ward 5 (Boston Proper) starting at the inter- 
section of Beach and Kingston Sts; thence through middle hnes of King- 
ston and Otis Sts., crossing Frankhn and Devonshire Sts. to Milk; thence 
through the middle lines of Milk and Congress Sts. to Dorchester Ave., 
crossing Dewey Square to Atlantic Ave.; thence through the middle line 
of Atlantic Ave. to Beach St. and thence to the point of beginning. Wil- 
liam N. Goodwin, Charles P. Abbott. 

DisT. 14. That part of Ward 5 (Boston Proper) beginning at the 
intersection of Tremont and Eliot Sts.; thence through the middle lines 
of Tremont, School, Washington, Milk and Devonshire Sts. to Frankhn, 
crossing Frankhn St. to Otis; thence through the middle hnes of Otis, 
Kingston and Beach Sts. to Harrison Ave.; thence through the middle 
hnes of Harrison Ave., Kneeland and Ehot Sts. to the point of beginning* 
Alexander P. Brown, Grover C. Burkhardt. 

DisT. 15. That part of Ward 5 (Boston Proper) beginning at the 
intersection of Summer St. and the ward hne; thence by the middle hnes 
of Summer St., Atlantic Ave., Beach St., Harrison Ave., Kneeland and 
EUot Sts. to Tremont; thence by the middle line of Tremont St. to the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and Boston & Albany Rail- 
road; thence by said railroads and ward hne to the point of beginning- 
Henry J. Ireland, Charles E. Fullick. 

DiST. 16. That part of Ward 6 (South End) beginning at the inter- 
section of Waltham and Tremont Sts.; thence running northwesterly 
through the middle line of Tremont St. to the intersection of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford and Boston & Albany Railroads; thence 
by the middle hnes of said railroads to Broadway; thence by the middle 
hne of Broadway to the ward hne; thence by the Ward hne to W. Fourth 
St.; thence by the intersection of W. Fourth and Dover Sts.; thence by 
the middle line of Albany St. to Union Park St.; thence by Union Park 
St. to Washington St. ; thence northeasterly by Washington St. to Union 
Park St.; thence by Union Park St. to Shawmut Ave.; thence by the 



40 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

middle line of Shawmut Ave. to Waltham St.; thenc by the middle line 
of Waltham St. to the point of beginning. A. S. Paeker Weeks, Harry 
Cohen. 

DiST. 17. That part of Ward 6 (South End) beginning at the inter- 
section of West Springfield and Tremont Sts.; thence running northerly 
along Tremont to Waltham St.; thence by the middle hnes of Waltham 
St., Shawmut Ave. and Union Park St. to Washington; thence by the 
middle line of Washington St. to Union Park St.; thence by the middle 
line of the latter to Albany St. ; thence by the middle line of Albany St. 
to Dover St.; thence by Dover and West Fourth Sts. to the ward line; 
thence by the ward line to the point of beginning. David W. Creed, 
IsADOR W. Jacobs. 

DiST. 18. That part of Ward 7 (Back Bay, East) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Boylston and 
Dalton Sts.; thence running easterly through the middle line of Boylston 
St. to Arlington; thence by the middle lines of Arlington and Ferdinand 
Sts. to the Boston & Albany Railroad; thence by the middle line of said 
railroad to Tremont St.; thence by the middle Unes of Tremont and 
Pembroke Sts. and Warren Ave. to Columbus Ave.; thence by the middle 
line of Columbus Ave. to West Rutland Square, crossing the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Raihoad tracks; thence by the middle lines of 
Durham, St. Botolph and Cumberland Sts. to Huntington Ave.; thence 
by the middle hnes of West Newton, Falmouth, Belvidere and Dalton 
Sts. to the point of beginning. Joseph D. Dillworth, William A. 
Beade. 

DisT. 19. That part of Ward 7 (Back Bay, East) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad and Ruggles St.; thence by the middle 
line of Ruggles St. to the wardhne; thence by the ward line to Dalton 
St.; thence by Dalton, Belvidere, Falmouth and West Newton Sts. to 
Huntington Ave.; thence by the middle lines of Huntington Ave., Cum- 
berland, St. Botolph and Durham Sts., crossing the railroad to West 
Rutland Square; thence by the middle line of West Rutland Square to 
Columbus Ave.; thence by the middle lines of Columbus Ave., Warren 
Ave., Pembroke, Tremont and Camden Sts. to New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Raihoad, and thence by said raihoad to the point of beginning. 
James H. Phelan, Edward Lienemann. 

DisT. 20. That part of Ward 8 (West End to South End) within 
the following described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of 
Charles and Cambridge Sts.; thence by the middle lines of Cambridge, 
Bowdoin, Beacon, Park and Tremont Sts. to Shawmut Ave. and the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Raihoad; thence by the middle 
lines of said railroad and Tremont St. to its intersection with Ferdinand 
St.; thence by the middle lines of Ferdinand, Arhngton and Providence 
Sts. to Park Square and crossing Park Square to its intersection with 
Charles St.; thence by the middle hnes of Charles, Beacon, Joy, 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 41 

Pinckney and Charles Sts. to the point of beginning. Timothy W. 
MuRPHY; Jerome J. Crowley. 

DiST. 21. That part of Ward 8 (Back Bay and West End) within 
the following described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of 
Boylston St. and Massachusetts Ave. ; thence by the middle line of Massa- 
chusetts Ave. to Commonwealth Ave.; thence by the middle lines of 
Commonwealth Ave. and Exeter St. to the Charles River and the ward 
line; thence by the ward line to its intersection with Cambridge St. 
extended; thence by the middle lines of the latter, Charles, Pinckney, Joy 
and Beacon Sts. to Charles St. again and thence, crossing Park Square to 
the intersection of St. James Ave.; thence by the middle lines of St. 
James Ave., Arlington and Boylston Sts. and Massachusetts Ave. to the 
point of beginning. James I. Moore, James A. Stretch. 

DiST. 22. That part of Ward 8 (Back Bay) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of St. Mary's St. 
and Muddy River and the boundary line between Boston and Brookline; 
thence by the east side line of St. Mary's St. and the boundary line of 
Boston and Brookline to Commonwealth Ave.; thence westerly by Com- 
monwealth Ave. and the middle line of Ashby St. to the Charles River and 
the ward line; thence by the ward line to its intersection with Exeter 
St. extended; thence by the middle lines of the latter, Exeter St., Com- 
monwealth Ave., Massachusetts Ave., Boylston St. and the ward line 
to the point of beginning. William H. Allen, Daniel J. Goulding. 

DisT. 23. That part of Ward 9 (South Boston) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of East Broadway 
and Dorchester St.; thence by the middle lines of East and West Broad- 
way, F, West Eighth and D Sts. to Old Colony Ave.; thence to Dorchester 
Ave. and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Raih'oad; thence by 
the middle line of said railroad and the ward hne to Southampton St.; 
thence by Southampton St. and Massachusetts Ave. to the Roxbury 
Canal; thence by the latter and the ward line, crossing the South Bay 
to Dorchester Ave.; thence by the middle lines of Dorchester Ave., 
West First, F, West Second and Dorchester Sts. to the point of beginning. 
Arthur W. Smith, Joseph F. Ripp. 

DiST. 24. That part of Ward 9 (South Boston) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Broadway, East 
Broadway extended and the ward line; thence by the middle lines of 
East Broadway extended, East Broadway, Dorchester and West Second 
Sts. to F St. ; thence by F and West First Sts. to Dorchester Ave. ; thence 
to the ward line and by the latter to the point of beginning. John H. 
HouT, Jeremiah P. Murray. 

DisT. 25. The whole of Ward 10 (South Boston). John Marno, 
Cornelius M. Liston. 

DisT. 26. The whole of Ward 11 (Dorchester, North). ' John S. 
McDoNOUGH, James A. McElaney, Jr. 

DisT. 27. The whole of Ward 12 (Roxbury, East). Henry W. 
Reynaud, Thomas Grieve. 



42 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

DiST. 28. That part of Ward 13 (Roxbury, Center) within the follow- 
ing described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad and Ruggles St.; thence by said raihoad 
to Camden St.; thence by the middle lines of Camden, Tremont, West 
Springfield, Washington and Ruggles Sts. to the point of beginning. 
Frederick F. Smith, Frank Ciambelli. 

DiST. 29. That part of Ward 13 (Roxbury, Center) within the follow- 
ing described boundaries : Beginning at the intersection of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad and Ruggles St.; thence through the 
middle Unes of Ruggles, Washington and Warren Sts. to Walnut Ave.; 
thence through the middle hnesof Walnut Ave., Circuit, Regent, Hulbert, 
Washington and Cedar Sts. to Lambert Ave.; thence by the middle lines of 
Lambert Ave. and Bartlett St., crossing EUot Square to Roxbury St.; 
thence by the middle lines of Roxbury and Tremont Sts. westerly to the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence Division; thence 
by said railroad to the point of beginning. Alonzo F. Andrews, John S. 
Oilman. 

DisT. 30. That part of Ward 14 (Roxbury, West) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Raihoad, Providence Division and Cedar St.; 
thence by the middle hues of Cedar, Terrace, AUeghany, Parker and Hill- 
side Sts. to St. Alphonsus St.; thence by the middle lines of St. Alphonsus, 
Calumet, Oswald and Hillside Sts to Parker Hill Ave. ; thence by the middle 
lines of Parker HiU Ave. and Huntington Ave. southwesterly to the ward 
line; thence by the ward hne and Muddy river, Longwood entrance, 
Louis Prang and Ruggles Sts. and New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad to the point of beginning. James P. Fox, John F. Kinney. 

DiST. 31. That part of Ward 14 (Roxbury, West) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Perkins St., the 
Brookline hne and the ward line; thence by said ward line to Huntington 
Ave.; thence by Huntington and Parker HiU Aves., HiUside, Oswald, 
Calumet, St. Alphonsus, Hillside, Parker, Alleghany, Terrace and Cedar 
Sts. and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Raihoad, New Heath, 
Bickford, Minden, Gay Head, Centre and Perkins Sts., to the point of 
beginning. Charles H. Warren, Joseph H. Ryan. 

DiST. 32. That part of Ward 15 (Roxbm-y, South) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad and Roys St. extended; thence by the 
middle lines of Roys, Priesing, Mozart, Centre, Gay Head, Minden, 
Bickford and New Heath Sts. and New York, New liaven & Hartford 
Railroad to Tremont St.; thence by the middle hne of Tremont St. to 
Roxbury St., crossing John Ehot Square, Bartlett St., Lambert Ave., Cedar, 
Washington, Marcella and Ritchie Sts. and New York, New Haven & 
Hartford'Raihoad to the point of beginning. John J. Butler, Robert F. 
Waul. 

DiST. 33. That part of Ward 15 (Roxbury, South) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Walnut Ave. and 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 43 

Tfflp.y Road; thence by the middle lines of Iffley Road, Washington, 
Boylston and Centre Sts., crossing Hyde Square and Centre St. to Mozart 
St.; thence by the middle hnes of Mozart, Priesing and Roys Sts. to the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by the middle lines of 
Ritchie, Marcella, Washington and Ehnore Sts. and Walnut Ave. to the 
point of beginning. Fbederick F. O'Doherty, James E. McGrady. 

DisT. 34. The whole of Ward 16 (Roxbury, Southeast). Augustus D. 
McLennan, Ernest R. Buffinton. 

DisT. 35. The whole of Ward 17 (Dorchester, Blue HiU Ave. to Savin 
Hill). Charles A. Murphy, Frank A. Gafney. 

DiST. 36. The whole of Ward 18 (Dorchester, Grove Hall to Field's 
Corner). Daniel A. Downey, George O. Wood. 

DiST. 37. The whole of Ward 19 (Dorchester, FrankUn Park to Dor- 
chester Centre). Fred W. Burleigh, Louis Davis. 

DiST. 38. That part of Ward 20 (Dorchester, Ashmont to Neponset) 
within the following described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection 
of Dorchester Ave. and Ashmont St. ; thence by the middle hnes of Ashmont 
and Ocean Sts., WeUes Ave., Washington and Centre Sts. and the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said railroad to the 
extension of the middle hne of Greenwich St. and the ward hne; thence by 
said ward hne to its intersection with Neponset Ave., thence by the middle 
hnes of Neponset Ave., Ashmont, Adams, Mallet, Florida and Edwin Sts. 
and Dorchester Ave. to the point of beginning. John J. Dailey, William 
J. Henry. 

DiST. 39. That part of Ward 20 (Dorchester, Ashmont to Neponset) 
within the following described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection 
of Ashmont St. and Dorchester Ave. ; thence by the middle hnes of Dor- 
chester Ave., Edwin, Florida, Mallet, Adams and Ashmont Sts. and 
Neponset Ave. to the ward Une; thence by the ward line to the point 
of beginning. Timothy J. Murphy, Michael J. Murray. 

DiST. 40. That part of Ward 21 (Dorchester, FrankUn Park to Norfolk 
St.) within the following described boundaries: Beginning at the inter- 
section of Norfolk and Walk Hill Sts.; thence by the middle lines of Walk 
HiU and Canterbury Sts., Blue HiU and Talbot Aves., Washington, Torrey, 
Wentworth and Norfolk Sts. to the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad, Midland Division; thence by said railroad, Morton and Norfolk 
Sts. to the point of beginning. G. Fred Pierce, John J. Driscoll. 

DiST. 41. That part of Ward 21 (Dorchester, Norfolk St. to Lower 
MiUs) within the foUowing described boundaries: Beginning at the inter- 
section of Walk HiU and Norfolk Sts. ; thence by the middle Unes of Norfolk 
and Morton Sts. to the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, 
Midland Division; thence northerly by said railroad to Norfolk St.; 
thence by the middle Unes of Norfolk, Wentworth, Torrey and Washington 
Sts., WeUes Ave., Ocean and Ashmont Sts. to Dorchester Ave.; thence 
through the middle Une of Dorchester Ave. to the southerly line of Dor- 
chester Park; thence by said southerly Une and the middle line of MelUsh 
Road and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Milton Branch, 



44 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

to Granite Ave.; thence by the middle hne of Granite Ave. extended to the 
Neponset River and the ward hne; thence by the ward hne, Blue Hill Ave. 
and Walk Hill St. to the point of beginning. James F. Eagan, James J. 
Byrne. 

DisT. 42. That part of Ward 23 (Jamaica Plain and Forest Hills) 
within the following described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection 
of AUandale and Centre Sts; thence by the middle line of Allandale St. to 
the ward line; thence northerly by the ward line to Perkins St.; thence by 
the middle lines of Perkins, Centre and Boylston Sts. to the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad (Providence Division) ; thence by said 
railroad to its intersection with Percy St.; thence by the middle lines of 
Percy, Anson and South Sts., the Arborway, Centre and Allandale Sts. to 
the point of beginning. Frank S. Pratt, William F. Prindeville. 

DiST. 43. That part of Ward 22 (Jamaica Plain and Forest Hills) 
within the following described boundaries: Beginning at the inter- 
section of Allandale and Centre Sts.; thence by the middle lines of Centre 
St., the Arborway, South, Anson and Terrace (extended) Sts. to the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Raihoad (Providence Division); thence 
by said railroad, the middle lines of Boylston and Washington Sts., Iffley 
Road, Walnut Ave., Seaver St. and Blue Hill Ave., Canterbury, Walk Hill, 
Bourne, South Bourne and Florence Sts. to Stony Brook; thence by 
Stony Brook to Whipple Ave.; thence by the middle lines of Whipple Ave., 
Washington, South, Bussey, Walter and Centre Sts. to Allandale St. and 
the point of beginning. John M. Hayes, John H. Carr. 

DiST. 44. That part of Ward 23 (West Roxbury) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Centre St. and the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (West Roxbury Branch); 
thence by said raihoad to South St.; thence by the middle lines of South 
and Washington Sts. and Whipple Ave. to Stony Brook; thence by the 
middle line of Stony Brook to the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Raihoad (Providence Division); thence by said raihoad to the ward line; 
thence by the ward line to the westerly side of Stony Brook Reservation; 
thence by the westerly side of said reservation to Washington St.; thence 
by the middle lines of Washington, Grove and Centre Sts. to the point of 
beginning. Michael F. Dolan, Joseph T. McDonald. 

DisT. 45. That part of Ward 23 (West Roxbury) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the westerly side of Stony Brook 
Reservation and the ward line; thence by said ward line and the boundary 
line between Dedham and Boston, and the boundary line between Dedham 
and Newton, and the boundary Une between Dedham and Brookline to 
Allandale St.; thence by the middle hnes of Allandale, Centre, Walter, 
Bussey and South Sts. to the New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad 
(West Roxbury Branch); thence by said raihoad to Centre St.; thence 
by the middle hnes of Centre, Grove and Washington Sts. to the westerly 
boundary hne of Stony Brook Reservation; then by said westerW hne to 
the point of beginning. Warren F. Freeman, Alonzo A. Pulverman. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 45 

DiST. 46. That part of Ward 24 (Hyde Park (North) and Mattapan) 
within the following described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection 
of Neponset River and West St. extended; thence by the middle lines of 
West, River and Lincoln Sts. and Hyde Park Ave. to a proposed 40-foot 
street nearly opposite Webster St.; thence by the middle hne of proposed 
street to the Providence Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Raih'oad; thence by said railroad to West St. and the ward line; thence 
by the ward hne to the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence by said railroad, Stony Brook, Florence St., Southbourne Road, 
Bourne and Walk HiU Sts. to Blue Hill Ave. ; thence by the middle line of 
Blue Hill Ave. to the Neponset River and the boundary line between 
Milton and Boston; thence by said boundary hne in the Neponset River 
to the point of beginning. Edward E. McGrath, Clark Waters. 

DiST. 47. That part of Ward 24 (Hyde Park, South) within the fol- 
lowing described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of West St. 
extended and Neponset River; thence by the Neponset River to the 
boundary line between Boston and Milton; thence by said boundary hne 
and the Neponset River; thence by the boundary hne between Dedham 
and Boston; thence by said boundary hne to the ward hne dividing Wards 
23 and 24; thence by said ward hne to West St.; thence by the middle line 
of West St. to Providence Division of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad; thence by said raihoad to a proposed 40-foot street; 
thence by said proposed street to Hyde Park Ave. and Lincoln St. ; thence 
by the middle hues of Lincoln, River and West (extended) Sts. to the 
point of beginning. Joseph J. Houston, Edward F. Brennan. 

DiST. 48. That part of Ward 25 (Brighton, South) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Washington and 
Cambridge Sts.; thence by the middle hnes of Cambridge, Dustin, North 
Beacon and Everett Sts. to the middle line of the Boston & Albany 
Raihoad; thence by said railroad to the ward line; thence by said ward 
line and Smelt Brook to the Charles River; thence by Charles River and 
the boundary hne between Boston and Cambridge to Ashby St. extended; 
thence by the middle hne of Ashby to Commonwealth Ave.; thence by the 
southerly line of Commonwealth Ave. and the boundary hne between 
Boston and Brookhne; thence by said boundary line and the ward line 
to Washington St.; thence by Washington St. to the point of beginning. 
James F. Maguire, P. Frank Tracy. 

DiST. 49. That part of Ward 25 (Brighton, South) within the following 
described boundaries: Beginning at the intersection of Nonantum St. 
and the boundary hne between Boston and Newton; thence by the middle 
lines of Nonantum and Washington Sts. to the boundary line between 
Boston and Brookline; thence by said boundary line, the line between 
Boston and Newton and the ward hne to the point of beginning. Patrick 
F. Carley, John J. Casey. 

DisT. 50. The whole of Ward 26 (Brighton, North). Michael J. 
TouMEY, William P. Mulcahy. 



46 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hall, Room 20, first floor. 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 6; Ord. 1901, Chap. 10; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, 
§§ 3, 23, 24, 25; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 6.] 

J. Alfred Mitchell, City Auditor. Term ends in 1918. Salary, $6,000. 
JuLiEN C. Haynes, Assistant City Auditor. Salary, $3,600. 

The office of Auditor was estabhshed by ordinance on August 2, 1824. 
Regular annual reports of receipts and expenditures have been pubhshed 
by the Auditor since 1825. These reports show the annual receipts of the 
City and County, the debt, and the pubhc property. Similar, but less com- 
plete, reports were published by finance committees from 1811 to 1824, 
inclusive. Since June 1, 1867, the Auditor has pubhshed monthly exhibits 
of all City and County expenditures. 

The City Auditor is also Auditor of the County of Suffolk and Secretary 
of the Board of Commissioners of Sinking Funds. (R. L., Chap. 21, § 44; 
Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 3, § 5.) 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 901 City HaU Annex, ninth floor. 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 8, and Chap. 45, §§ 28-39; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 
13 and Chap. 36 (Part II); Stat. 1907, Chap. 550; Stat. 1908, Chap. 
221; Stat, 1909, Chap. 313; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 284, 631; Stat. 1911, 
Chaps, 76, 129, 342; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 369, 370, 713; Ord. 1912, 
Chaps. 3, 9; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 50, 680, 704, 714, 729; Ord. 1913, 
Chap. 4; Ord. 1914, Chap. 4; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 205, 248, 595, 782, 
791; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chaps. 8, 41; Stat. 1915, Chaps. 254, 352; Stat. 
1916, Chap. 118 (Gen.) and Chap. 248 (Spec.).] 

Patrick O'Hearn, Building Commissioner. Term ends in 1918. Salary, 

$5,000. 
Charles S. Damrell, Clerk of Department. Salary, $2,800. 
Edward W. Roemer, Supervisor Construction Division. Salary, $2,500. 
Edwin J. Turner, Supervisor Construction Division. Salary, $2,500. 
Carl Stuetzel, Jr., Chief Plan Division. Salary, $2,500. 
John H. Mahoney, Supervisor Egress Division. Salary, $2,500. 
William A. Wheater, Supervisor Plumbing Division. Salary, $2,000. 
James W. Flynn, Supervisor Gasfitting Division. Salary, $2,000. 
Patrick H. Costello, Supervisor Elevator Division. Salary, $2,000. 

It is the duty of the Building Commissioner to issue permits for and 
inspect the erection and alteration of buildings in the City, and the set- 
ting of boilers, engines and furnaces; to issue licenses to persons taking 
charge of constructing, altering, removing or tearing down buildings; to 
keep a register of the names of all persons carrying on the business of 
plumbing and gasfitting, and of aU persons working at the business of gas- 
fitting, and to issue Ucenses to master and journeymen gasfitters; to issue 
permits for and inspect the plumbing and gasfitting in buildings; to inspect 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 47 

elevators in buildings and report upon elevator accidents; to inspect at 
least monthly aU theaters and moving-picture houses, and semi-annually 
all halls or places for pubUc assembly; to inspect existing tenement houses; 
to report on aU fires in, and accidents in or to, buildings, and to approve 
plans of new buildings and alterations. 

BUILDING LIMITS. 

[Stat. 1907, Chap. 550, § 9; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 41, § 1; Stat. 1914, 

Chap. 782, § 1.] 
Among other restrictions imposed by statute on the erection of build- 
ings, it is provided that no wooden building shall be erected within such 
limits as shall from time to time be defined by ordinance. These limits 
at present are as described in the Revised Ordinances of 1914, Chap. 41, 
Sec. 1. 

Board of Examiners. 

[Ord. 1912, Chap. 9] 
Office, 1001 City Hall Annex, tenth floor. 

OFFICIALS. 

Thomas K. Reynolds, Chairman. 
William H. Besarick, Secretary. 
William A. Fish, Clerk of the Board. Salary, $1,200. 

THE BOARD. 

John F. Hicket. Term ends in 1919. 

William H. Besarick. Term ends in 1918. 

Thomas K. Reynolds. Term ends in 1917. 
By Chap. 9, Ordinances of 1912, the Board of Examiners was estab- 
lished as an adjunct of the Building Department, to consist of three mem- 
bers, appointed by the Mayor. The duties of these examiners are to 
determine the qualifications of persons taking charge or control of the 
construction, alteration, removal or tearing down of buildings; to register 
and classify those who are competent according to fitness and certify such 
to the Building Commissioner. Upon the payment of a fee of two dollars, 
each certified person is to receive a license. Each examiner is to receive 
ten doUars for every day or part thereof of actual service, but not more 
than $1,000 in any one year. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1001 City Hall Annex, tenth floor. 

[Stat. 1897, Chap. 375; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 9; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 

14; Stat. 1913, Chap. 117; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 9, 40, § 15.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Charles E. Phipps, Chairman. 
- John Frank Keating, Secretary. Salary, $2,000. 



48 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



TRUSTEES. 

Frederick E. Atteaux. Term ends in 1921. 
John J. Madden. Term ends in 1920. 
Albert W. Hersey. Term ends in 1919. 
Jacob R. Morse. Term ends in 1918. 
Charles E. Phipps. Term ends in 1917. 

Leonard W. Ross, Superintendent of Cemeteries. Salary, $3,000. 
Office of Superintendent at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Walk Hill street. 

By Chap. 375 of the Acts of 1897, the Mayor was authorized to appoint 
a board of five trustees, subject to confirmation by the Board of Aldermen, 
to have charge of Mount Hope Cemetery and all other burying grounds 
owned by or in charge of the City of Boston. 

Mount Hope Cemetery was bought by the City in 1857 for $35,000, and 
additional land has been purchased since. It is situated on Walk Hill 
street, Ward 23, West Roxbury. The Board of Trustees was first 
appointed under the ordinances of December 21, 1857, and annual reports 
have been published since 1859. 

All the burying grounds formerly under control of the Board of Health, 
but now under the jurisdiction of this department, are as follows, with area: 

Bennington street. East Boston, 157,500 square feet. 

Bunker Hill, Charlestown, 48,202 square feet. 

Central, Boston Common, 60,693 square feet. 

Copp's Hill, Charter and Hull streets, 89,015 square feet. 

Dorchester North, Upham's Corner, 142,587 square feet. 

Dorchester South, Dorchester avenue, 95,462 square feet. 

Eliot, Washington and Eustis streets, 34,830 square feet. 

Evergreen, Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, 604,520 square feet. 

Fairview, Hyde Park, 50 acres. 

Granary, Tremont street, opposite Bromfield street, 82,063 square feet. 

Hawes, Emerson street, near L street, 11,232 square feet. 

King's Chapel, Tremont street, near School street, 19,344 square feet. 

Market Street, Market street, Brighton, 18,072 square feet. 

Mount Hope, West Roxbury, 117 acres and 36,536 square feet. 

Phipps street, Charlestown, 76,740 square feet. 

Rainsford Island, 43,560 square feet. 

South End, Washington and East Concord streets, 64,570 square feet. 

Walter Street, Walter street, RosHndale, 35,100 square feet. 

Warren, Kearsarge avenue, Roxbury, 54,500 square feet. 

Westerly, Centre street. West Roxbury, 39,450 square feet. 

Total area of the 20 cemeteries, 206 acres. 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 49 

CHILDREN'S INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hall, Room 49, fourth floor. 
[Stat. 1897, Chap. 395; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 10; Stat. 1906, Chap. 150; 
C. C, Title IV., Chap. 15; Stat, 1911, Chap. 202; Stat. 1914, Chap. 
738; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 3, § 26, Chap. 10.] 

OFFICIALS. 

John O'Hare, Chairman. 

Miss Margaret T. Walsh, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES.* 

Louis A. Ginsburg. Term ends in 1920. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Needham, James P. Murphy. Terms end in 1919. 

John O'Hake. Term ends in 1918. 

Isaac G. Rosenberg. Term ends in 1917. 

Miss Margaret Foley, James J. Bacigalupo. Terms end in 1916. 

The Trustees of this department, which was estabUshed by statute in 
1897, have the supervision and care of neglected and dependent children 
committed to their charge by the courts. They maintain a placing-out 
system whereby most of their wards are boarded or indentured in country 
famihes in Massachusetts. 

The Trustees also have charge and control of the land and buildings on 
Rainsford Island used for the employment and reformation of juvenile 
offenders and known as the Suffolk School for Boys. The Parental School 
for truants, situated on Spring street, West Roxbury, and in charge of this 
department since 1897, was abohshed by Chap. 738, Acts of 1914, and 
the use of the buildings was later transferred to the City Hospital. Its 
inmates were placed in charge of the School Committee, whom the statute 
authorized to estabhsh disciphnary day schools for such children. 



CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City Hall, Room 31, second floor. 
[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, § 30; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266, § 2; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 11; R. L., Chap. 26, §§ 15, 16; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 8; Stat. 
1909, Chap. 486, § 22; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 11.] 
James Donovan, City Clerk. Term ends in 1917. Salary, $5,000. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Assistant City Clerk. Salary, $3,800. 

The City Clerk is elected by the City Council for the term of three 
years. He has the care and custody of the records of the City Council 
and of all city records, documents, maps, plans and papers, except those 
otherwise provided for. He also records chattel mortgages, assignments 
of wages, liens upon vessels, issues hcenses and badges to minors when so 
directed by the City Council, and performs other duties imposed by statute. 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



50 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The City Clerk and Assistant City Clerk are, ex officio, Clerk and Assistant 
Clerk, respectively, of the City Council. 

The Assistant City Clerk is appointed bj^ the City Clerk, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor, and discharges the duties of the City Clerk in 
his absence, or in case of a vacancy in that office [Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 11, 
§ 4]. By R. L., Chap. 26, § 16, the certificate or attestation of the Assistant 
City Clerk has equal effect with that of the City Clerk. 



CITY PLANNING BOARD. 

Office, City Hall, Room 47, third floor. 

[Stat. 1913, Chap. 494; Ord. 1913, Chap. 6; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 12; 

Ord. 1915, Chap. 2.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Ralph A. Crajsi, Chairman. 

Miss Elisabeth M. Herlihy, Secretary. Salary, $1,500. 

THE BOARD. 

Miss Emily G. Balch. Term ends in 1921. , 

Henry Abrahams. Term ends in 1920. 

William C. Ewing. Term ends in 1919. 

Ralph A. Cram. Term ends in 191S. 

John J. Walsh. Term ends in 1917. 
By Chapter 494, Acts of 1913, every city and town in the State having 
a population of more than 10,000 was authorized and directed to create a 
board to be known as the Planning Board, whose duty shall be to make 
careful studies of the resources, possibilities and needs of the city or town, 
particularly with respect to conditions which may be injurious to the 
public health, and to make plans for the development of the municipality 
with special reference to the proper housing of the people. In January, 
1914, an ordinance was passed establishing "The City Planning Board," 
consisting of five members, one of whom shall be a woman, all to serve 
without compensation. The Mayor then appointed the members as 
named above and they were subsequently confirmed by the Civil Service 
Commission. All future appointments will be for a term of five years. 



COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 201 City Hall Annex, second floor. 

[Stat. 1875, Chap. 176; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1888, Chap. 390; 

Stat. 1890, Chap. 418; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 14; Ord. 1908, Chap. 

1; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 10; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1913, 

Chap. 672; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 13; Ord. 1914, 2d Series, Chap. 2; 

Stat. 1916, Chap. 291.] 
John J. Curley, City Collector. Term ends in 1918. Salary, $5,000. 
John J. McCarthy, Cashier and Acting Collector in the absence of the 

Collector. Salary, $3,000. 



CONSUMPTIVES' HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 51 

The Collector collects and receives all taxes and other assessments, 
betterments, rates, dues and moneys payable on any account to the 
City of Boston or the County of Suffolk. He has the custod}^ of all leases 
from, and of all tax deeds of land held by, the City. The separate office 
of Collector was estabUshed by statute in 1875. Annual reports have been 
pubUshed since 1876. 



CONSUMPTIVES' HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

249 River street, Mattapan. 

City Office, 1001 City Hall Annex, tenth floor. 

[Stat. 1906, Chap. 189; Ord. 1906, Chap. 4; Stat. 1908, Chap. 225; Stat. 
1911, Chap. 167; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. -14.] 

OFFICIALS. 

John F. O'Brien, M. D., Chairman. 
Dr. Jaaies J. MiNOT, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES.* 

Eugene V. R. Thayer. Term ends in 1921. 

James J. Minot, M. D. Term ends in 1920. 

Mrs. Margaret G. O'Callaghan. Term ends in 1920. 

Miss Isabel F. Hyams. Term ends in 1918. 

John F. O'Brien, M. D. Term ends in 1918. 

John J. Barry. Term ends in 1917. 



The Trustees of this department, which was established in 1906, have 
had charge of the expenditure of $514,000, raised by loans, for the land, 
buildings and equipment of the Hospital for Consumptives. They pur- 
chased in 1906 the Conness estate of 55 acres fronting on River street, 
Mattapan, where various buildings have since been erected. Three Ward 
buildings accommodating 234, tlii'ee Cottage Wards, accommodating 
■103 and the Children's Ward, accommodating 65, are now in operation, 
also the Domestic Administration building, which was opened March 
1, 1912. The Out-Patient Department or dispensary is maintained at 
13 Dillaway street, where a chnic is held every Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday morning and every Monday evening. Patients are 
examined and treated by physicians at the dispensary, and visited by nurses 
in their homes. The Trustees were authorized by chapter 190, Acts of 1915, 
to hire one hundred beds in private hospitals for needy patients until July 
1, 1918. The care and management of the institution is entirely in charge 
of the Trustees, including the purchase of all supphes and the power to 
make aU necessary rules and regulations. 

* The Trustees serve -without compensation. 



52 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Admission to the hospital is confined to persons who are bona fide residents 
of Boston at the time of appUcation. 

HOSPITAL OFFICERS. 

Arthur J. White, M. D., Superintendent. Salary, $3,500. 
Edwin A. Locke, M. D., Chief of Staff. Salary, $2,500. 
Timothy J. Murphy, M. D., First Assistant. Salary, $1,750. 
Cleaveland Floyd, M. D., Second Assistant (Director of Out-Patient 

Department). Salary, $1,000. 
Robert E. S. Kelley, Resident Medical Officer. Salary, $1,500. 



ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 111 City Hall Annex, first floor. 
[Stat. 1907, Chap. 560, § 78; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 15; C. C, Title IV., 
Chap. 16; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 53-61; Stat. 1910, Chap. 520; 
Stat. 1911, Chaps. 304, 517, 550, 735; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 275, 471, 
483, 641; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 286, 835; Stat. 1914, Chap. 730; Rev. 
Ord. 1914, Chap. 15; Stat. 1915, Chap. 91.] 

officials. 
John M. Minton, Chairman. 
Melancthon W. Burlen, Secretary. 

commissioners. 
John B. Martin. Term ends in 1920. Salary, $3,500. 
Melancthon W. Burlen. Term ends in 1909. Salary, $3,500. 
John M. Minton. Term ends in 1918. Salary, $4,000. 
Frank Seiberli^h. Term ends in 1917. Salary, $3,500. 

One Election Commissioner is apointed by the Mayor each year, term 
beginning April 1. The Chairman of the Board is designated annually by 
the Mayor. 

The Board of Registrars of Voters was appointed in May, 1874, and 
was succeeded July 1, 1895, by the Board of Election Commissioners. 

This department exercises aU the powers and duties formerly conferred 
upon the Board of Registrars of Voters, including the preparation of the 
jury fist, together with all the powers and duties formerly conferred upon 
the Mayor, Board of Aldermen and City Clerk, relating to elections in the 
City of Boston, except the power and duty of giving notice of elections and 
fixing the days and hours for holding the same. 

The Board also exercises all the powers and duties formerly conferred 
upon the City Clerk and other officers by chapter 504 of the Acts of 1894, 
and acts in amendment thereof, relating to poHtical committees and 
primaries, and all laws relating to the registration of voters in the City 
of Boston. For information concerning the 223 voting precincts, see 
chapter on "New Voting Precincts." 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 53 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City Building, Bristol street. 
[Stat. 1850, Chap. 262; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, §§9-11; Rev. Ord. 
1898, Chap. 17; Stat. 1909, Chap. 308; Ord. 1912, Chaps. 4, 6; Ord. 
1913, Chap. 1; Stat. 1913, Chap. 800; Stat. 1914, Chap. 519; Rev. 
Ord. 1914, Chap. 16.] 
John Gradt, Fire Commissioner. Term ends in 1918. Salary, $5,000. 
Peter F. McDonough, Chief of Department. Salarj', $4,500. 
John O. Tabek, Senior Deputy Chief. Salary, $3,500. 
Daniel F. Sennott, Junior Deputy Chief. Salary, $3,500. 
George L. Fickett, Superintendent of Fire Alarm Branch. Salary, $3,000 ■ 
Eugene M. Byington, Superintendent of Repairs and Supervisor of 

Engines. Salary, $3,000. 
Benj. F. Underbill, Chief Clerk. Salary, $2,500. 

■ The Boston Fire Department was organized in 1837. It is in charge 
of one Commissioner, who has entire control of the department, consisting 
of the Chief, two deputy chiefs, and fifteen district chiefs in charge of the 
fifteen fire districts, 59 captains, 88 Heutenants and 795 engineers, hosemen 
and laddermen, 66 fire stations, a fire alarm branch with 46 employees, 
operating about 1,100 signal boxes, a repair shop with 58 employees, also 
a veterinary hospital. Annual reports have been published since 1838. 
Yearly salaries, as increased in May, 1915: District chiefs, $3,000; 
captains, $2,000; lieutenants, $1,800; engineers (first class), $1,700. The 
maximum salary of assistant engineers, hosemen and laddermen remains 
at $1,400. 

In calendar year 1915, fires in buildings numbered 2,968, with total loss 
of $2,998,187, all insured except $176,423. 

CHIEF AND DEPUTY CHIEFS. 

Chief, Peter F. McDonough. Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, 
Mason street. In charge of the fire protection for the whole of the 
City, which is divided into two main divisions, each in charge of a 
deputy chief. 

First Division. In charge of Senior Deputy Chief John O. Taber. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort HiU square. Districts 1 to 7, 
inclusive. AU that part of the City north and east of a hne extending 
from Charles river through Massachusetts avenue to Roxbury canal, 
thence to South Bay, Midland Division of New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad, Willow court, Mt. Vernon street and Columbia road 
to Old Harbor. 

Second Division. In charge of Junior Deputy Chief Daniel F. 
Sennott. Headquarters, Ladder House 4, Dudley street. Districts 8 
to 15, inclusive. AU that part of the City south and west of the above 
stated Kne. 



54 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

FIRST DIVISION — DISTRICTS, DISTRICT CHIEFS AND APPARATUS. 

District 1. John W. Godbold, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Ladder 
House 2, Paris street. AU that part of Boston locally known as 
East Boston. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 5, 9, 11, 40, 47 (fireboat); 
Ladders 2, 21; Chemical, 7. 

Dist. 2. Allan J. Macdonald, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Ladder 
House 9, Main street. AU that part of Boston locally known as Charles- 
town. Apparatus. — Engines, Nos. 27, 32, 36; Ladders, 9, 22; Chem- 
icals, 3, 9. 

Dist. 3. Stephen J. Ryder, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Ladder House 
18, Pittsburgh street. The territory included within a line beginning 
at the intersection of State and Devonshire streets, thence through 
State street to the water front, across the harbor to the extension of C 
street, South Boston, through C, Cypher, B and West First streets to 
Atlantic Avenue Bridge, through the latter and Atlantic avenue, 
Summer and Devonshire streets to the point of beginning. Apparatus — 
Engines, Nos. 25, 38, 39, 44 (fireboat); Ladders, 8, 18; Water Tower, 3. 

Dist. 4. Edward J. Shallow, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine House 4, 
Bulfinch street. The territory included within a line beginning at the 
intersection of State and Devonshire streets, thence through Devon- 
shire, Water, Washington, School and Beacon streets to Charles street, 
through Charles and Pinckney streets to the Cambridge boundary Mne, 
along said Une to its intersection with the tracks of the Eastern Division 
of the Boston & Maine Railroad, thence to the Warren Avenue Draw- 
bridge, to the Charlestown Drawbridge around the water front to the 
extension of State street, thence to the point of beginning. Apparatus — 
Engines, Nos. 4, 6, 8, 31 (fireboat); Ladders, 1, 24; Chemical, 1; Water 
Tower, 1. 

Dist. 5. William Coulter, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine House 
26-35, Mason street. The territory included within a fine beginning 
at the intersection of Devonshire and Water streets, thence through 
Water, Washington, School and Beacon to Charles street, through 
Charles and Pinckney streets to the Cambridge boundary fine, thence 
along said fine to the extension of Otter street, through Otter, Beacon, 
Arhngton, Boylston, Church and Providence streets to Columbus ave- 
nue, through said avenue. Church, Tremont and Pleasant streets and 
Broadway extension to Fort Point channel, thence to Atlantic Avenue 
Bridge, through the latter and Atlantic avenue, Summer and Devon- 
shire streets to the point of beginning. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 7, 
10, 26, 35; Ladder, 17; Chemical, 2. 

Dist. 6. Francis J. Jordan, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine 
House 1, Dorchester street. South Boston. The territory included 
within a line beginning at the intersection of Atlantic Avenue Bridge and 
Fort Point channel, thence to West First street, through West First, B, 
Cypher and C streets to the water front, thence to the extension of 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 55 

Columbia road, through Columbia road, Mt. Vernon street, Willow court 
and Massachusetts avenue to the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad tracks, along said tracks to the South Bay, to Fort Point channel 
and through the latter to the point of beginning. Apparatus — Engines, 
Nos. 1, 2, 15, 43; Ladders, 5, 10, 20; Chemical, 8. 
DiST. 7. Peter E. Walsh, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine House 22, 
Warren avenue. The territory included within a line beginning at the 
intersection of Beacon and Otter streets, thence through Beacon, Arling- 
ton, Boylston, Church and Providence streets to Columbus avenue, thence 
through the latter. Church, Tremont and Pleasant streets and Broad- 
way extension to Fort Point channel, through said channel to the Rox- 
bury canal, through the canal to Massachusetts avenue, to the Cambridge 
boundary line, and along said line to a point opposite the extension of 
Otter street, through Otter street to the point of beginning. Apparatus 
— Engines, Nos. 3, 22, 33; Ladders, 3, 13, 15; Chemical, 4; Water 
Tower, 2. 

SECOND DIVISION — DISTRICTS, DISTRICT CHIEFS AND APPARATUS. 

DiST. 8. William J. Gaffey, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Ladder House 
12, Tremont street. The territory included within a line beginning at 
the intersection of Massachusetts avenue and the Cambridge boundary 
line, thence through said avenue and Washington, Marcella, Centre and 
New Heath streets to Heath square, thence through Heath street, 
South Huntington and Huntington avenues, to the Brookline boundary 
line, along said line to Cottage Farm Bridge, thence through Essex street 
to the Cambridge boimdary line, and by said line to the point of beginning. 
Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 13, 14, 37; Ladders, 12, 26; Chemical, 12. 

Dist. 9. Joseph H. Kenney, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine House 
12, Dudley street. The territory included within a line beginning at 
the intersection of the extension of Columbia road and the Old Harbor, 
thence through Columbia road, Mt. Vernon street, WiUow court and 
Massachusetts avenue to the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road tracks, thence along said tracks to the South bay, along said bay 
to Roxbury canal, through the canal to Massachusetts avenue, thence 
through said avenue, Washington, Elmore, Munroe, Warren, Sunder- 
land and Stanwood streets to Columbia road, thence through Columbia 
road, Stoughton and Pleasant streets and Savin HiU avenue to Evandale 
terrace, thence through said terrace to the water front and along the 
water front to the point of beginning. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 12, 
21, 23, 24; Ladder, 4; Chemical, 10. 

Dist. 10. Walter M. McLean, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine 
House 18, Harvard street, Dorchester. The territory included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of the extension of Evandale terrace 
and Dorchester bay, thence through Evandale terrace, Savin Hill ave- 
nue. Pleasant and Stoughton streets to Columbia road, thence through 
Columbia road. Blue Hill avenue, Canterbury and Morton streets to 



56 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Blue Hill avenue, thence through said avenue, Lauriat avenue, Norfolk, 
Centre, Adams, Mill, Preston and Freeport streets to Dorchester bay, 
thence along the water front to the point of beginning. Apparatus 
— Engines, Nos. 17, 18; Ladders, 7, 29; Chemical, 11. 

DiST. 11. Henry A. Fox, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine House 41, 
Harvard avenue, Brighton. The territory included within the district 
known as Brighton, which is west of the Cottage Farm Bridge and 
Essex street. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 29, 34, 41; Ladders, 11, 31. 

Dist. 12. Michael J. Mulligan, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine 
House 28, Centre street, Jamaica Plain. The territory included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of Washington and Morton streets, 
thence through Morton and Canterbury steeets to Blue Hill avenue,thence 
to Columbia road, thence through Stanwood, Sunderland, Warren, Munroe 
and Ehnore streets to Washington street, thence through Washington, 
Marcella, Centre and New Heath streets to Heath square, thence 
through Heath square. Heath street. South Hxmtington and Huntington 
avenues to the Brookline boundary line, thence southeasterly along 
said boimdary line to Perkins street, thence through Perkins and Prince 
streets to the Arborway, thence through the Arborway to the point of 
beginnmg. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 28, 42; Ladders, 10, 23, 30; 
Chemical, 5. 

Dist. 13. Michael J. Kennedy, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine 
House 45, corner Washington and Poplar streets, Roslindale. The 
territory included within a line beginning at the intersection of Wash- 
ington and Morton streets, thence through Morton, Harvard and Ash- 
land streets to and across the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, thence southerly along said railroad to the boundary line of Ward 
26, thence southwesterly along the said boundary line to the Dedham 
boundary line, thence along the latter to the Newton boundary line, 
thence northeasterly along the latter to the Brookline boundary line, 
thence southeasterly and northerly along said line to Perkins street, 
thence to Prince street, thence to the Arborway, thence to the point 
of beginning. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 30, 45; Ladders, 16, 25; 
Chemical, 13. 

Dist. 14. Maurice Hbffernan, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine 
House 46, Peabody square, Dorchester. The territory included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of Dorchester bay and Freeport 
street (Commercial Point), thence through Freeport, Preston, Mill, 
Adams, Centre and Norfolk streets to Lauriat avenue, thence through 
Lauriat and Blue Hill avenues, Morton, Harvard, Oakland and Rex- 
ford streets to Blue HiU avenue, through said avenue and Fremont 
street to the Neponset river, thence along the Neponset river and 
Dorchester bay to the point of beginning. Apparatus — Engines, 
Nos. 16, 20, 46; Ladders, 6, 27. 
Dist. 15. Joseph A. Dolan, Dist. Chief. Headquarters, Engine 
House 48, corner Harvard avenue and Winthrop street, Hyde Park. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



57 



The territory included within a hne beginning at the intersection of 
the extension of Fremont street and the Milton boundary line, thence 
through Fremont street, Blue Hill avenue, Rexford, Oakland and Ash- 
land streets to the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks, 
thence along said tracks to the boundary hne of Ward 26 and along 
said line to the Dedham boundary line, thence along that hne to the 
Milton boundary line and along the latter to the point of beginning. 
Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 19, 48; Ladder, 28; Chemical, 14; Hose, 49. 

STEAM PIRE-ENGINES (INCLUDING HOSE WAGON FOR EACh). 



Number, Etc. 



Location. 



Officers. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 (With tractor and motor 
hose wagon.) 

11 (Motor combination) 

12 

13 

14 (Motor combination) 

15 

16 

17 (With tractor) 

18 

19 

20 

21 (With tractor) 

22 



Dorchester St., cor Fourth, 
South Boston 

Fourth St., cor. O, S. Boston, 

Harrison ave., cor. Bristol st 

Bulfinch street 

Marion street, E. Boston. . . 

Leverett street 

East street 

Salem street 

Paris street. East Boston. . . 

>Mt. Vernon St., cor. River. . 

/Cor. Saratoga and Byron 
\ streets. East Boston 

Dudley street, Roxbury . . . . 

Cabot street, Roxbury 

Centre street, Roxbury 

fCor. Broadway and Dorches- 
[ ter avenue 

River street, Dorchester. . . . 

Meeting House Hill, Dor. . . 

Harvard street, Dorchester. . 

Norfolk street, Dorchester. . . 

Walnut street, Dorchester . . 

Columbia road, Dorchester. . 

Warren avenue 



/^Michael J. Nolan, Capt. 
iC. J. Hickey, Lieut. 

fE. Connors, Capt. 
IE. J. Hartigan, Lieut, 
fjohn N. Lally, Capt. 
\William Peterson, Lieut. 
William E. Riley, Capt. 
G. E. Darragh, Lieut. 
iSIellen R. Jov, Capt. 
R. W. Clark, Lieut. 
F. A. Sweeney, Capt. 
M. L. Gahdn, Lieut. 
Philip A. Grant, Capt. 
J. H. Stout, Lieut. 
John F. Hines, Capt. 
Thos. W. Roose, Lieut. 
J. F. Gillen, Capt. 
T. J. Flynn, Lieut. 

fC. J. O'Brien, Capt. 
tW. C. Swan, Lieut. 

fC. H. Leary, Capt. 
I , Lieut. 

rw. H. McCorkle, Capt. 
\J. T. Gillen, Lieut. 
iThos. E. Conroy, Capt. 
I Thos. WylUe, Lieut. 
IC C. Springer, Capt. 
\Jacob Hyman, Lieut. 

fE. F. Richardson, Capt. 
\J. J. Burke, Lieut. 

[Michael Boyle, Capt. 
Id. W. Mahoney, Lieut. 
[Martin F. Mulligan, Capt. 
\john F. Curley, Lieut. 
/F. M. O'Lalor, Capt. 
' Wm. Hart, Lieut. 

F. J. Sheeran, Capt. 
Anthony J. Burns, Lieut. 
T. J. Muldoon, Capt. 

G. N. F. Getchell, Lieut. 
Michael Norton, Capt. 
F. J. Dermody, Lieut. 
T. H. Downey, Capt. 

IJ. E. Redman, Lieut. 



Note. — Wherever a street, channel or bridge is named, the center line of each is the 
boundary line. 

Inspections of these islands in Boston Harbor will be made under special orders of the 
Department Chief, viz.: Apple, Castle, Gallop's, George's, Governor's, Long, Lovell's, 
Rainsford, Deer, Thompson's and Spectacle. 



58 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



STEAM FIRE-ENGINES. — Concluded. 



Number, Etc. 



Location. 



Officers. 



23 

24 

25 (With tractor, motor hose 
wagon and chemical. 

26 and 35 

27 

28 

29.. 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

36 

37 (With tractor and motor 
hose wagon.) 

38 and 39 

40 

41 (Motor combination) 

42 

43 (With tractor, motor hose 
wagon and chemical.) 

44 

45 (Motor combination) 

46 (With tractor and motor 
hose wagon.) 

47 

48 



Northampton street 

Cor. Warren and Quincy sts., 

^Fort HUl square 

Mason street 

Elm street, Charlestown .... 

Centre st., Jamaica Plain. . . 

Chestnut Hill ave., Brighton 

Centre St., West Roxbury . . . 

Fireboat, 531 Commercial st. 

Bunker Hill st., Charlestown 

Boylston and Hereford sts. . 

Western avenue, Brighton. . 

Monument St., Charlestown 

fLongwood and Brookline 
1 avenues 



Congress St., South Boston. . 

Sumner st., East Boston. . . . 
Harvard avenue, Brighton. . 
Egleston square 



Andrew sq., South Boston. . 

Fireboat, Northern ave 

Poplar street, Roslindale . . . 

toorchester ave., Ashmont. . 

Fireboat, East Boston 



Harvard ave. and Winthrop 
street, Hyde Park 



•p. J. V. Kelley, Capt. 

John J. McCarthy, Lieut. 

M. J. Teehan, Capt. 
,M. N. Sibley, Lieut. 

J. F. Ryan, Capt. 

G. A. Carney, Lieut. 

A B. Howard, Capt. 

William Levis, Lieut. 

D. J. Hurley, Lieut. 
'B. F. Hayes, Capt. 

D. W. Towle, Lieut. 
W. F. Field, Capt. 

T. J. Fitzgerald, Lieut. 

E. F. Doody, Capt. 
D. L. Cadigan, Lieut. 

'T. M. McLaughlin, Capt. 
|B. J. Flaherty, Lieut. 

C. S. Moran, Capt. 

John Williams, Lieut. 

F. I. Adams, Capt. 
H. J. Kelley, Lieut. 
M. J. Lawler, Capt. 

G. W. Darling, Lieut. 
T. H. Ramsey, Capt. 
J. W. Shea, Lieut. 

J. P. Murray, Capt. 
,P. F. Goggin, Lieut. 

/Denis Driscoll, Capt. 
■ J. E. Corea, Lieut. 

J. J. Caine, Capt. 

W. B. Jennings, Lieut. 

J. H. Laughlin, Lieut. 

T. J. Lannery, Capt. 

P. P. Leahy, Lieut. 

Gustave H. Nichols, Capt. 

F. R. Brophy, Lieut. 

George H. Hutchings, Capt. 

, Lieut. 

fV. A. Richer, Capt. 
[J. A. Noonan, Lieut. 

fW. S. Eaton, Capt. 
IF. G. Avery, Lieut. 
ID. J. Dacey, Capt. 
[ , Lieut. 

fH. M. Hebard, Capt. 
[J. F. O'Connell, Lieut. 

fC. A. Winchester, Capt. 
[R. A. Nugent, Lieut. 

fF. W. Battis, Capt. 

[W. P. Whittemore, Lieut. 



Note. — The "Motor combination" is a gasolene pumping engine, chemical engine and 
hose reel combined in one automobile. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



59 



LADDER TRUCKS. 



Number, Etc. 



Location. 



1 

2 

3 

4 (Motor aerial truck) 

5 

6 

7 (With tractor) 

8 (Motor aerial truck) 

9 

10 (With tractor) 

11 

12 (Motor aerial truck) 

13 (With tractor) 

14 (With tractor) 

15 (With tractor) 

16 (With tractor) 

17 (With tractor) 

18 (With tractor) 

19 

20 (With tractor) 

21 (With tractor) 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 (Motor truck with chem- 
ical.) 

30 (Motor truck with chem- 
ical.) 

31 (Motor truck with chem- 
ical.) 



Friend street, Warren square 

Paris street. East Boston. . . 
Harrison ave., cor. Bristol st. 

Dudley st., cor Winslow, 
Rox 

Fourth St., near Dorchester 
st 

River St., cor Temple, Dor. . 

Meeting House Hill, Dor. . . 

Fort Hill square 

331 Main St., Charlestown. . 
659 Centre st., Jamaica PI., 
Chestnut Hill ave., Brighton, 

1046 Tremont St., Rox 

Warren avenue 

Harvard ave., Brighton. . . . 
Boylston St., cor. Hereford. . 

Poplar St., Roslindale 

157 Harrison ave 

Pittsburgh st 

E. Fourth St., near K, S. B., 
Andrew sq., S. Boston 



Officers. 



Saratoga and Byron sts., 
E. B. 

44 Monument st., Chas. . . . 



Grove Hall, Dor. 
North Grove st. . 



Centre st., near Bellevue, 

West Roxbury. 
Longwood and Brookline 

avenues. 
Walnut street, Dor 



Harvard ave. and Winthrop 

St., H. P. 
Callender and Lyons sts., 

Dor. 
Egleston square, Rox ... 

Oak square, Brighton ... 



J. F. McMahon, Capt. 

H. J. Power, Lieut. 

E. J. McKendrew, Capt. 

P. F. McLeavey, Lieut. 
/F. F. Leary, Capt. 
\J. McCann, Lieut. 

fC. T. Farren, Capt. 
1 John Hogan, Lieut. 
J E. D. Locke, Capt. 
\M. F. Conley, Lieut. 
McDarrah Flaherty, Lieut. 

J. J. Kelley, Lieut. 

/A. J. Caulfield, Capt. 
\D. W. Baker, Lieut. 
John E. Cassidy, Capt. 

C. R. Delano, Lieut. 

P. J. Laffey, Lieut. 

H. A. McClay, Lieut. 

C. A. Donohoe, Lieut. 

T. H. Andreoli, Lieut. 

fMelvin P. Mitchell, Capt. 
\Dennis J. Bailey, Lieut. 
M. J. Sullivan, Lieut. 

f J. F. Watson, Capt. 
^Henry Krake, Lieut. 
/DeWitt Lane, Capt. 
\D. J. O'Brien, Lieut. 

E. B. Chittick, Lieut. 
Michael J. Dacey, Lieut. 
J. J. Sullivan, Lieut. 
P. A. Tague, Lieut. 

D. M. Shaughnessy, Capt. 
T. J. Hines, Lieut. 
Hadwin Sawyer, Lieut. 
Charles H. Cosgrove, Lieut. 
C. E. Clougherty, Lieut. 
Florence Donahue, Lieut. 
L. D. Merrill, Capt. 

C. F. Driscoll, Lieut. 
T. E. Kiley, Lieut. 



60 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



CHEMICAL ENGINES. 



Number, Etc. 


Location. 


1 


Bulfinch street 


2 


25 Church street 


3 


Winthrop st., Charlestown. . 

398 Sha\\inut avenue 

Grove Hall, Dor 


4 


5 


7 


Saratoga St., cor. Prescott, 

E. B. 

B St., cor. Athens, S. B 

333 Main st., Charlestown. . 

Eustis St., Roxbury 

Callander and Lyons sts.. 

Dor. 
1046 Tremont St., Rox 

Walk Hill and Wenham sts., 

F. H. 

Harvard ave. and Winthrop 
St., H. P. 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 • 


13 (Motor) 


14 





Officers. 



C. A. Fernald, Lieut. 
W. F. Quigley, Lieut. 
T. F. Quigley, Lieut. 
J. P. Hanton, Lieut. 
J. J. Gavin, Lieut. 
John P. Walsh, Lieut. 
John INIcCarthy, Lieut. 
T. J. HeSron, Lieut. 
R. J. Carleton, Lieut. 
J. J. Lunny, Lieut. 
P. H. Kenney, Lieut. 
E. O. Haines, Lieut. 



WATER TOWERS. 



Number, Etc. 


Location. 


Ofiicers. 


1 (With tractor) 


Bulfinch street 


C. H. Long, Lieut. 


2 (With tractor) 


James Mahoney, Lieut. 


3 (With tractor) 


Pittsburgh street 


H. E. Richardson, Lieut. 







MISCELLANEOUS. 

Motor cars and runabouts, 25; 1-ton motor trucks, 3; horses, 290 (53 
less than in 1915); fuel wagons, 41; other wagons, 11; hose and other 
pungs, 40. Leading hose, 119,276 feet, and suction hose, 1,590 feet. 

BOSTON firemen's RELIEF FUND. 

By chapter 308, Acts of 1909, the Fire Commissioner and twelve mem- 
bers of the Fire Department, to be elected annually by the members of 
the department, are constituted a corporate body for the pm-pose of hold- 
ing and administering the Firemen's Rehef Fund. This incorporation 
supersedes that of 1880. 

On February 1, 1916, the fund amounted to $254,725. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Main ofl&ce, 1107, City Hall Annex, eleventh floor. 
[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, § 40; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, § 19; Rev. Ord. 
1898, Chap. 18; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 19; Stat. 1902, Chaps. 206, 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 61 

213; Stat. 1906, Chap. 225; Stat. 1907, Chaps, 386, 445, 480; Stat, 
1908, Chaps. 329, 411; Stat. 1909, Chap. 380; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 
269, 640; Stat. 1912, Chaps, 448, 486; Stat. 1913, Chap. 586; Stat. 
1914, Chaps. 627, 628; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chaps. 17, 40; Ord. 1914, 2d 
Series, Chap. 1; Ord. 1915, Chap. 1; Stat. 1915, Chap. 346 (Spec); 
Ord. 1915, Chaps. 3 and 4.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Fkancis X. Mahoney, M. D., Health Commissioner. Salary, $7,500. 
Frederick S. Davis, Secretary. Salary, $3,000. 

DEPUTY commissioners. 

Thomas B. Shea, M.D., Medical Division. Salary $5,000. 

Patrick H. Mullowney, M.D.V., Division of Food Inspection. Salary, 

$3,000. 
Thomas Jordan, Division of Sanitary Inspection. Salary, $3,000. 
Francis H. Slack, M.D., Laboratory Division. Salary, $3,000. 
William H. Davis, M.D., Vital Statistics Division. Salary, $2,500. 

The first Board of Health in Boston was estabhshed in 1799, under 
the special statute of February 13, 1799. The first collected edition of 
the statutes under which this Board acted was pubHshed in 1811, and 
contained also the regulations of the Board. That Board was aboUshed 
by the first City Charter. From 1822 to 1873 the functions of the Board 
were exercised through the City Council. The last Board of Health was 
estabhshed by an ordinance of December 2, 1872, and organized January 
15, 1873. It pubhshed annual reports, beginning with 1873. By Chap. 
1, Ord. 1914, 2d Series, the department was placed in charge of one 
executive, the Health Commissioner, the latter to appoint the deputy 
commissioners. Chap. 1, Ord. 1915, provided that the quarantine serv- 
ice should pass from the control of the Health Department on the date 
when the property was leased to the United States.* 

BACTERIAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Free examinations are made for physicians at the Laboratory of the 
Board of Health, 1101 City Hall Annex, in cases of tuberculosis, diph- 
theria, typoid fever, influenza and other bacterial diseases, and malaria. 
Blood specimens are received from patients on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday from 2 to 4 p. m. only, for examination by the 
Wassermann test for syphihs. 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

Ofiice at the Boston City Hospital, 818 Harrison avenue. 

[Stat. 1880, Chap. 174; Stat. 1893, Chap. 91; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. IS; 

C. C, Title IV., Chap. 20.] 

* Lease approved by City Council May 24, 1915, taking effect on June 1, 1915. 



62 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

OFFICIALS. 

A. Shuman, President. 
Joseph P. Manning, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES. * 

Joseph P. Manning. Term ends in 1921. 

A. Shuman. Term ends in 1920. 

Thomas A. Forsyth. Term ends in 1919. 

Conrad J. Rueter. Term ends in 1918. 

Francis J. Keany, M. D. Term ends in 1917. 
The Trustees have charge of the Boston City Hospital, on the south- 
east side of Harrison avenue, opposite Worcester square, occupying four 
city squares between East Concord street, Albany street, Northampton 
street and Harrison avenue. * The Hospital was begun September 9, 1861. 
It consists of many pavihons, connected wfth the central structure, and 
was estabhshed for the reception of those in need of temporary relief 
during illness or from injuries. The Trustees also have charge of the 
South Department for infectious diseases, the Convalescent Home, at 
2150 Dorchester avenue, Dorchester, the Haymarket Square Relief Station, 
the East Boston Relief Station, and the West Department, West Roxbury. 
The Trustees are incorporated by Chap. 174 of the Acts of 1880, and 
Chap. 91 of the Acts of 1893, as the Boston City Hospital, and are author- 
ized to receive and hold real and personal estate bequeathed or devised 
to said corporation to an amount not exceeding $1,000,000. 

hospital officers. 

John J. Dowling, M. D. — Superintendent and Medical Director. Resi- 
dence and office at the Hospital. Salary, $5,000. 

Edmund W. Wilson, M. D. — Assistant Superintendent. Salary, $3,000. 

James W. Manary, M. D. — First Executive Assistant. Salary, $2,000. 

Walter T. Garfield, M. D. — Second Executive Assistant. Salary, $1,500. 

John M. Thompson, M. D. — Third Executive Assistant. Salary, $1,200. 

WiUiam F. Dolan, M. D. — Resident Surgeon. Salary, $1,500. 

George E. Allen, M. D. — Night Executive Assistant. Salary, $1,000. 

F. B. Mallory, M. D.— Pathologist. Salary, $3,000. 

S. Burt Wolbach, M. D. — Assistant Pathologist. (Salary only when 
supplying for Dr. Mallory.) 

George S. Graham, M. D. — Second Assistant Pathologist. Salary, $3,000. 

Edgar M. Medlar, M. D. — Research Assistant in Pathology. Salary, 
$2,000. 

Leroy U. Gardner, M. D. — First Assistant in Pathology. Salary, $1,000. 

Ward H. Cook, M. D. — Second Assistant in Pathology. Salary, $500. 

Charles L. Overlander, M. D. — Assistant in Clinical Pathology. Salary, 
$500. 

Samuel W. Ellsworth, M. D.— Physician for X-Ray Service. Salary, $2,000. 

Paul F. Butler, M. D. — Assistant Physician for X-Ray Service. Salary, 

$1,200. ^ , 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 63 



MEDICAL AND SURGICAL STAFF. 

Consulting Physicians and Surgeons. — Edward H. Bradford, M.D., 
Vincent Y. Bowditch, M.D., Abner Post, M.D., Hayward W. Gushing, 
M.D., Francis S. Watson, M.D., Thomas A. DeBlois, M.D., E. M. 
Buckingham, M.D., George H. Monks, M.D., Morton Prince, M.D., 
Charles F. Withington, M.D., EUiott P. Joshn, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologist. — W. T. Councilman, M.D. 

Consultant in Tropical Diseases. — Richard P. Strong, M.D. 

Curator of the Hospital Museum. — Abner Post, M.D. 

Senior Physicians. — John G. Blake, M.D., George B. Shattuck, M.D., 
Francis H. Wilhams, M.D. 

Visiting Physicians. — Henry Jackson, M.D., George G. Sears, M.D., 
John L. Ames, M.D., Wilham H. Robey, Jr., M.D., Ralph C. Larrabee, 
M.D., Frankhn W. White, M.D. 

First Assistant Visiting Physicians. — Edwin A. Locke, M.D., Edward 
N. Libby, M.D., Francis W. Palfrey, M.D. 

Second Assistant Visiting Physicians. — Cadis Phipps, M.D., Cleaveland 
Floyd, M.D., Harold W. Dana, M.D., Thomas J. O'Brien, M.D., Albert A. 
Hornor, M.D., James P. O'Hare, M.D., Harold Bowditch, M.D., Martin J. 
English, M.D. 

Senior Surgeon. — George W. Gay, M.D. 

Surgeons-in-ChieJ . — Paul Thorndike, M.D., John Bapst Blake, M.D., 
Fred B. Lund, M.D., Edward H. Nichols, M.D., Howard A. Lothrop, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. — Frederic J. Cotton, M.D., WiUiam E. Faulkner, 
M.D., Joshua C. Hubbard, M.D., L. R. G. Crandon, M.D., David D. 
Scannell, M.D. 

First Assistant Visiting Surgeons. — Walter C. Howe, M.D., Horace 
Binney, M.D., J. H. Cunningham, Jr., M.D., Frank H. Lahey, M.D., Albert 
Ehrenfried, M.D. 

Out-Patient Surgeons. — Halsey B. Loder, M.D., Irving J. Walker, M.D., 
Arthm- R. Kimpton, M.D. 

Assistants to the Out-Patient Surgeons. — Robert C. Cochrane, M.D., 
Otto J. Hermann, M.D., Somers Eraser, M.D., Francis F. Henderson, M.D. 

Temporary Assistant to the Out-Patient Surgeons. — Harold G. Geddings, 
M.D. (appointed for six months ending June 4, 1916). 

Ancesthetists. — John E. Butler, M.D., Frank L. Richardson, M.D., 
Nathaniel N. Morse, M.D., Lincoln F. Sise, M.D. 

Dentists. — Joseph A. Ring, D.M.D., James E. Cox, D.M.D. 

Senior Surgeon for Diseases of Women. — Charles M. Green, M.D. 

Senior Visiting Surgeon for Diseases of Women. — Frankhn S. Newell, 
M.D. 

Junior Visiting Surgeon for Diseases of Women. — Ernest B. Young, 
M.D. 

First Assistant Visiting Surgeon for Diseases of Women. — Nathaniel R. 
Mason, M.D. 



64 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Second Assistant Visiting Surgeon for Diseases of Women. — Robert M . 
Green, M.D. 

Third Assistant Visiting Surgeons for Diseases of Women. — John T. 
Williams, M.D., Frederick L. Good, M.D. 

Fourth Assista7it Visiting Surgeon for Diseases of Women. — Leo V. 
Friedman, M.D. 

Visiting Ophthalmic Surgeon. — John C. Bossidy, M.D. 

Ophthalmic Surgeons. — Allen Greenwood, M.D., Edward R. WiUiams, 
M.D., Peter H. Thompson, M.D. 

Assistants to the Ophthalmic Surgeons. — William H. LoweU, M.D., 
Minot F. Davis, M.D., H. B. Stevens, M.D., Henry Hawkins, M.D. 

Temporary Assistants to the Ophthalmic Surgeons. — Frederick N. 
Stephens, M.D. (appointed for six months beginning March 17, 1916). 
Walter L. Chase, M.D. (appointed for six months beginning March 31, 
1916). 

Senior Surgeon for Diseases of Ear and Throat. — George A. Leland, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeon for Diseases of Ear and Throat. — Edgar M. Holmes, M.D. 

Surgeons for Diseases of Ear and Throat. — Rockwell A. Coffin, M.D., 
Charles R. C. Borden, M.D.,' George L. Vogel, M.D. 

Assistant Surgeons for Diseases of Ear and Throat. — Henry Tohnan, 
Jr., M.D., John H. Blodgett, M.D., Calvin B. Faunce, Jr., M.D., Louis M. 
Freedman, M.D., Robert J. Kissock, M.D. 

Visiting Physicians for Diseases of the Nervous System. — Phihp Coombs 
Knapp, M.D., John J. Thomas, M.D., Arthur W. Fakbanks, M.D. First 
Assistant Visiting Physicians for Diseases of the Nervous System. — Isador 
H. Coriat, M.D., W. J. Daly, M.D. Second Assistant Visiting Physicians 
for Diseases of the Nervous System. — LeRoy A. Luce, M.D., Hale Powers, 
M.D. 

Physician for Physical Therapeutics. — Frank B. Granger, M.D. 

Physician for Diseases of the Skin. — Francis J. Keany, M.D. 

Assistants to the Physician for Diseases of the Skin. — Arthur P. Perry, 
M.D., Townsend W. Thorndike, M.D., WiUiam P. Boardman, M.D., 
George P. Howe, M.D. 

Pathologist.— F. B. Mallory, M.D. 

Physician for Infectious Diseases. — Edwin H. Place, M.D. 

Physician for X-Ray Service. — Samuel W. Ellsworth, M.D. 

Assistant Physician for X-Ray Service. — Paul F. Butler, M.D. 

Consultant in Vaccine and Serum Therapy. — George P. Sanborn, M.D. 

SOUTH DEPAKTMENT. 

Medical Director. — John J. DowHng, M.D. 
Physician-in-Chief.— Edwin H. Place, M.D. Salary, $3,000. 
Assistant Physicians.— Robert B. Hunt, M.D. Salary, $1,200. Eli 
Friedman, M.D. Salary, $1,000. James A, Keenan, M.D. Salary, $1,000. 

HAYMAKKET SQUARE RELIEF STATION. 

Resident Surgeons.— William J. Brickley, M.D. Salary, $2,600. 
Somers Fraser, M.D. Salary, $1,500. 



INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT. 65 

EAST BOSTON RELIEF STATION. 

Resident Surgeons. — Joseph G. Hegarty, M.D. Salary, $1,300. John 
G. BresHn, M. D. Salary, $1,000. 

PHYSICIANS TO THE CONVALESCENT HOME. 

John P. Treanor, M.D. Robert M. Merrick, M.D. 

Henry F. R. Watts, M.D. 



INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT.* 

Office, City Hall, Room 51. 

[Stat. 1897, Chap. 395, § 4; Stat. 1908, Chap. 393; C. C, Title IV., 

Chap. 25; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 7.] 

OFFICIALS, t 

Thomas A. McQtjade, Chairman. 
Miss Mary A. Dierkes, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES. 

Mrs. Richard C. Kirby. Term ends in 1920. 

John J. Cusick. Term ends in 1919. 

Miss Mary A. Dierkes. Term ends in 1919. 

Thomas A. McQuade. Term ends in 1918. 

Thomas E. Masterson. Term ends in 1917. 

Frank L. Brier, Arthur Berenson. Terms end in 1916. 

The Trustees have had charge and control, since its erection in 1887, of 
the Boston Almshouse and Hospital on Long Island where 1,100 to 1,200 
inmates are cared for. In 1914 extensive additions to this institution 
were made, at a cost of $408,000. The old Charlestown Almshouse, erected 
in 1849, was sold in 1911 but not vacated until August, 1915, when those 
of its inmates remaining under the care of the department were transferred 
to Long Island. 

INSTITUTIONS REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hall, Room 5, Basement. 

[Stat. 1897, Chap. 395, § 6; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 21; C. C, Title IV., 

Chap. 22.] 
Charles F. Gaynor, Institutions Registrar. Term ends in 1919. Salary, 
$3,000. 

It is the duty of the Institutions Registrar to investigate all questions 
relating to the settlement of paupers, to the commitment of the insane, 
to the agency for discharged prisoners or to any rights, duties or liabilities 
connected therewith; to report the results of his investigations to the 

♦This name substituted for Pauper Institutions Department (Acts of 1908, Chapter 393). 
t The Trustees serve without compensation. 



66 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

department interested therein, and perform such services relating to the 
accounts and to the collection, registration and tabulation of statistics 
relating to the Children's Institutions Department, the Boston Infirmary- 
Department and the Penal Institutions Department, or any of them, as 
may be required of him by the Mayor, or by the ofiicer or trustees in charge 
of such departments, with the approval of the Mayor. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 730 Tremont Building. 

[Ord. 1904, Chap. 23; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 20.] 

John A. Sullivan, Corporation Counsel. Term ends in 1918. Salary, 

$9,000. 
Joseph P. Lyons, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $5,000. 
George A. Flynn, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $4,000. 
Karl Adams, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $3,800. 
Joseph A. Campbell, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $3,600. 
William P. Higgins, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $3,300. 
Walter J. O'Malley, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $2,500. 
Edward T. McGettrick, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $2,500. 
Daniel J. Kane, Assistant Corporation Counsel. Salary, $2,500. 
Charles F. Day, City Conveyancer. Salary, $4,000. 
Elizabeth M. Taylor, City Conveyancer. Salary, $3,000. 
Andrew A. Porter, Special Investigator. Salary, $2,000. 

The ofiice of "Attorney and Sohcitor for the City of Boston" was 
established by the ordinance of June 18, 1827; the office of Corporation 
Counsel and the office of City Sohcitor by the ordinance of March 30, 
1881. The office of City Sohcitor was abolished and the department 
placed under the sole charge of the Corporation Counsel by an ordinance 
which went into effect July 1, 1904. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Central Library Building, Copley square. 

[Stat. 1878, Chap. 114; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 24; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 23; 

Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 21.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Josiah H. Benton, President. 

William F. Kenney, Vice-President. 

Horace G. Wadlin, Librarian. Salary, $6,000. 

Otto Fleischner, Assistant Librarian. Salary, $3,250. 

trustees.* 
William F. Kenney. Term ends in 1921. 
Alexander Mann. Term ends in 1920. 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 67 

JosiAH H. Benton. Term ends in 1919. 
Samuel Carr. Term ends in 1918. 
Arthur T. Connolly. Term ends in 1917. 

The Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston, who are five 
in number, are appointed by the Mayor, one each year, for a term of five 
years. They were incorporated by an act of the General Court passed 
April 4, 1878, and were authorized to receive and hold real and personal 
estate which may be given, granted, bequeathed or devised to the said 
corporation, to an amount not exceeding $1,000,000. The first Trustees 
were appointed under an ordinance of October 14, 1852. The old Library 
Building on Boylston street was opened to the pubhc in September, 
1858, and closed finally in January, 1895. The Central Library Building on 
Copley square was first opened on March 11, 1895. The Library is 
maintained by an annual appropriation voted out of the general funds 
of the City by the City Council. About $45,884 of this appropriation was 
used in 1915 for the purchase of books and periodicals. The 35 Library 
trust funds in the custody of the City Treasurer amounted to $534,591 on 
February 1, 1916, the annual interest on these being used for the purchase 
of books. 

The annual reports, the first of which appeared in 1852, have been 
continued without interruption. 

Of the Quarterly Bulletins begun in 1867, fourteen volumes have been 
published. The series closed in 1896. 

A Quarterly Bulletin of a new series is now issued, and a weekly list 
of new books added to the Library. The Trustees have issued also general 
and special catalogues of the Central Library, and of its branches and 
special collections, as well as hand-books for readers, and other docu- 
ments. 

LIBRARY SYSTEM. 

The Library system consists of the Central Library in Copley square; 
fourteen branch libraries with independent collections of books; sixteen 
reading-room stations (minor branches), all of which contain deposits of 
books from the Central Library, reference books and periodicals. There 
were, on February 1, 1916, in the Central Library, branch libraries and 
reading-rooms, 568 employees, including 249 who are employed in the 
evening and on Sunday, some of whom also work during the week; and 
including also a certain number who work only a few hours or days in 
each week. 

Between the Central Library and these thirty stations, by hbrary 
wagons, there is a daily exchange of books and cards, whereby persons 
living in outlying districts can draw books from the Central Library without 
the necessity of coming in person. 

The dehvery or deposit of books is also undertaken in one hundred 
and sixty-seven pubhc and parochial schools, thirty-five institutions and 
sixty-one fire company houses. 

Cards allowing the use of two books without restriction as to class, 



68 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

for two weeks, are issued to all residents of Boston with no further attend- 
ant delay than is involved in identification. No guaranty is asked 
except in case of a sojourner. Such cards are also issued to non-resident 
pupils attending Boston schools who furnish guaranties. For reading 
and reference the Library is open to aU without formality. Special cards 
for more extended privileges are issued to clergymen oflBciating in the 
City, and to teachers giving instruction in Boston institutions of learn- 
ing; a special card is also issued in certain cases by the Trustees. On 
February 1, 1916, there were 112,199 card-holders having the right to draw 
books for home use. The total number of volumes was 1,121,747, and of 
different newspapers and periodicals currently received at the Central 
Library and branches about 2,200. Books issued in 1915, for home use 
and for use through schools and institutions, numbered 2,135,100. Of 
reference use, on account of the freedom with which books may be con- 
sulted, no adequate statistics are kept. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY, COPLEY SQUARE. 

Lending and reference, 843,567 volumes (including the Patent Library). 

Periodical reading-rooms, about 1,494 periodicals. 

Newspaper reading-room, 301 current newspapers. 

Patent Library, 13,361 volumes. 

Bates Hall for reading and reference. About 10,000 volumes are 
on open shelves. 

Other Activities. The Fine Arts Department has faciKties for copying 
and photographing, a collection of photographs of architecture, sculpture 
and painting, numbering 45,768 (including process pictures), besides 
illustrated books, portfohos, lantern sUdes, etc. Special assistance is 
offered to classes, travel clubs, etc. Free lectures, mostly on art topics, 
are giving during the winter season. The room for younger readers has 
about 10,000 volumes on open shelves for reading and circulation. A 
Teachers' Reference Room is maintained, with a pedagogical reference 
collection and files of current periodicals on educational subjects. Refer- 
ence books are reserved for use in connection with University Extension 
courses. Story teUing for children is regularly conducted under expert 
direction at the Central Library and principal branches. The Library 
is open from 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.; Sundays from 12 M. to 10 P.M.; 
closed at 9 P.M. from June 15 to September 15. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

The 14 branch libraries are open on week days from 9 A.M. to 9 P.M., 
with some variation of hours in summer: most of them are open on Sundays, 
from 2 to 9 P.M., November to April. 

Brighton Branch, 20,010 volumes. Reading-room, 52 periodicals. 
Holton Library Building, Academy Hill road. 

Charlestown Branch, 15,451 volumes. Reading-room, 57 periodi- 
cals. Monument square, corner Monument avenue. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 69 

CoDMAN Square Branch, 5,496 volumes. Reading-room, 38 periodi- 
cals. Washington, corner Norfolk street. 

Dorchester Branch, 20,560 volumes. Reading-room, 51 periodicals. 
Arcadia, corner Adams street. 

East Boston Branch, 16,547 volumes. Reading-room, 55 periodicals. 
276-282 Meridian street. 

Hyde Park Branch, 27,785 volumes. Reading-room, 72 periodicals. 
Harvard avenue, corner Winthrop street. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, 15,606 volumes. Reading-room, 49 periodi- 
cals. Sedgwick, corner South street. 

North End Branch, open from 2 to 9 P.M., 6,200 volumes. Reading- 
rooiji, 35 periodicals. 3A North Bennet street. 

RoxBURY Branch, 37,534 volumes. Reading-room, 82 periodicals. 
46 Milhnont street. 

South Boston Branch, 17,249 volumes. Reading-room, 57 periodicals. 
372 West Broadway. 

South End Branch, 16,948 volumes. Reading-room, 53 periodicals. 
397 Shawmut avenue. 

Upham's Corner Branch, 9,022 volumes. Reading-room, 55 peri- 
odicals. Columbia road, corner Bird street. 

West End Branch, 18,394 volumes. Reading-room, 56 periodicals. 
Cambridge street, corner Lynde street. 

West Roxbury Branch, 9,585 volumes. Reading-room, 44 periodi- 
cals. Centre, near Mt. Vernon street. 

delivery stations and reading-rooms. 

Station A. Lower Mills Reading-room. 3 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
900 volumes; 29 periodicals. Washington, corner Richmond street. 

Station B. Roslindale Reading-room. 2 to 9 P.M. 7,927 vol- 
umes; 39 periodicals. Washington, corner Ashland street. 

Station D. Mattapan Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
991 volumes; 27 periodicals. 727 Walk Hill street. 

Station E. Neponset Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 1,464 
volumes; 19 periodicals. 362 Neponset avenue. 

Station F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading-room. 2 to 9 P.M. 5,065 
volumes; 34 periodicals. Washington, corner Eldon street. 

Station G. Allston Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 2,160 
volumes; 33 periodicals. 6 Harvard avenue. 

Station N. Mt. Pleasant Reading-room. 2 to 9 P.M. 2,727 
volumes; 23 periodicals. Vine, corner Dudley street. 

Station P. Tyler Street Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
3,368 volumes; 22 periodicals. Tyler, corner Oak street. 

Station R. Warren Street Reading-room. 2 to 9 P.M. 2,501 
volumes; 27 periodicals. 392 Warren street. 

Station S. Roxbury Crossing Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 
P.M. 1,873 volumes ; 20 periodicals . 1154 Tremont street . 



70 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Station T. Boylston Station Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 
P.M. 2,119 volumes; 28 periodicals. The Lamartine, Depot square. 

Station Y. Andrew Square Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
2,229 volumes; 23 periodicals. 396 Dorchester street. 

Station Z. Orient Heights Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
2,089 volumes; 20 periodicals. 1030 Bennington street. 

Station 23. City Point Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
3,050 volumes; 26 periodicals. Broadway, near H street. 

Station 24. Parker Hill Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 
1,450 volumes; 19 periodicals. 1518 Tremont street. 

Station 25. Faneuil Reading-room. 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M. 1,886 
volumes; 22 periodicals. 100 Brooks street. 



MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office in Rotunda of Faneuil HaU Market. 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 1, § 4, tenth to twelfth; Chap. 25 and Chap. 47, 

§§ 60-65; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, § 26.] 
Patrick H. Graham, Superintendent of Markets. Salary, $3,000. Term 
ends in 1918. 

Faneuil Hall Market, proposed in Mayor Quincy's message of July 31, 
1823, and completed in 1826, was under the charge of a Clerk of the 
Market until an ordinance of September 9, 1852, estabUshed the office 
of Superintendent. According to the Revised Ordinances of 1898, Chap. 
1, § 4, tenth, Faneuil Hall Market includes the lower floor, porches and 
cellar of the buildings called respectively Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market. 
The Superintendent has charge and control of these two buildings. He 
may assign stands within their limits; and it is his duty, from time to 
time, to lease the stalls in the market for five years at rents not less than 
those estabhshed by the City Council. The market pohce are appointed 
by the PoUce Commissioner and under his control. 

As a municipal enterprise the Quincy Market has been steadily profitable, 
yielding a total net income in rentals, etc., of about $4,500,000 in the past 70 
years. Faneuil Hall Market yields $15,000 to $16,000 net yearly income, 
or about one-sixth that of Quincy Market. For a historical and financial 
article on "Public Markets in Boston" see Bulletin of Statistics Depart- 
ment for June, 1912. 



OVERSEEING OF THE POOR DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

[Stat. 1864, Chap. 128; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 27; C.C, Title IV., Chap. 

27; Stat. 1909, Chap. 538; Stat. 1913, Chap. 763.] 

OFFICIALS. 

William P. Fowler,* Chairman and Treasurer. 
William H. Hardy, Secretary. Salary, $3,000. 
* Serves without compensation. 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 71 

OVERSEERS.* 

Terms end in 1919. 
William P. Fowler. Thomas F. Lally. 

Thomas Sproules. Mrs. Margaret J. Gookin. 

Terms end in 1918. 
Miss Margaret Leahy. John H. Fitzpatrick. 

Vincent De Paul Reade. Matthew J. Mullen. 

Term^ end in 1917 . 
.Franklin P. Daly. Simon E. Hecht. 

H. Staples Potter. John R. McVey. 

The Overseers of the Poor in the Town of Boston, a corporation estab- 
lished in 1772 by act of the Legislature, were succeeded in 1864 by the 
corporation called "Overseers of the Poor in the City of Boston," consist- 
ing of twelve residents of Boston, four of whom are appointed annually 
to serve for the term of three years from the first day of May. The Board 
has issued annual reports since 1865. 

The Overseers of the Poor are also incorporated as a Board of Trus- 
tees of John Boylston's and other charitable funds, left for the assistance 
of persons of good character and advanced age, "who have been reduced 
by misfortime to indigence and want." 

In charge of the Overseers are the Wayfarers' Lodge on Hawkins street, 
opened in 1878, which gives free lodging to homeless men who are out of 
employment, but exacts work in its woody ard for meals furnished; and 
the Temporary Home on Chardon street for destitute women and children, 
opened in 1870. In the year ending January 31, 1916, the number of 
cases of aid given to men was 109,982; of women and children, 1,784. 
The families aided in their own homes by money, provisions, etc., num- 
bered 5,512, of which 1,335 were in the class provided for by Chapter 763, 
Acts of 1913, i. e., mothers with dependent children vmder fourteen years 
of age. Payments to this class amounted to $360,000, nearly one-third 
of which was reimbursed by the State. The total amount of the seven- 
teen permanent charity funds in the custody of the Overseers on February 
1, 1916, was $896,056. ^ 

PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 

Offices, 33 Beacon Street. 
[Stat. 1875, Chap. 185; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 28; C.C, Title IV., Chap. 
24; Ord. 1912, Chap. 10; Ord. 1913, Chap. 5; Ord. 1914, Chap. 3; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 24.] 

officials. 
John H. Dillon, Chairman. Salary, $5,000. 
James B. Shea, Deputy Commissioner. Salary, $3,500. 
Charles E. Putnam, Engineer. Salary, $2,500. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary and Chief Clerk. Salary, $2,500. 

* Serve without compensation. 



72 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



COMMISSIONERS. 

Term ends in 1918. 



Thomas F. Galvin.* Term ends in 1917. 
John H. Dillon. Term ends in 1916. 

Power to establish parks in Boston was granted by the Commonwealth 
on May 6, 1875, subject to acceptance by the people. This act was 
accepted by a vote of the citizens on June 9, 1875; yeas, 3,706, nays, 
2,311. The first Board of Park Commissioners was appointed on July 8, 
1875, and confirmed on July 15, 1875. The Board consisted of three 
members who served without compensation. As thus constituted, the 
department continued up to 1913, when, by the provisions of Chapter 10, 
, Ordinances of 1912, which went into effect in March, 1913, it was merged 
with the Public Grounds, Bath and Music Departments, under the name 
of Park and Recreation Department. The chairman of the new Board of 
Commissioners is a salaried ofiicial and is required to devote his entire 
time to the work, likewise the Deputy Commissioner. 

Parks and Parkways, with Locations and Areas, 
main park system. 

Acres. 

The Common, Tremont to Charles and Beacon to Boylston street, f 48 . 40 
Pubhc Garden, Charles to Ai-lington and Beacon to Boylston 

street 24.25 

Commonwealth avenue, Arlington street to Newton line . . 112.70 

Back Bay Fens, Beacon street to Brookline avenue . . . 116.99 

Riverway, Brookline avenue to Huntington avenue . . . 40 . 00 

Olmsted Park, Huntington avenue to Prince street . . . 180 . 00 

Arborway, Prince street to Franklin Park . . . . . 36 . 00 
X Arnold Arboretum and Bussey Park, South, Centre and Walter 

streets 223.00 

§ West Roxbury Parkway, from Centre and Walter streets, near 

Arboretum, to Weld street, near Church street . . . 77.88 
Franklin Park and Zoological Garden, Seaver to Morton street 

and Blue Hill avenue to Forest Hills street 527 . 00 



Total Acres, Main Park System 1,386.22 

MARINE PARK SYSTEM. 

Columbia road j ^^.^j^j^j^ -p^^^ ^^ Marine Park, City Point . 31 . 20 
Dorchester way ) ' -^ 

Strandway, Columbia road railroad bridge to City Point (land 

77.80; flats 187.50) 265.30 

* Two commissioners serve without compensation. 

t This area of the Common is exclusive of the old cemetery on Boylston street side 
containing 1.40 acres. 

t Of this park, only the roads and walks are maintained by the City. 

§ The control and care of that part of the parkway extending from Weld street to Wash- 
ington street was transferred to the Metropolitan Park Commission by Chap. 270, Acts of 
1915. The roadway has not yet been constructed. 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 73 

Marine Park and Aquarium, Farragut road, City Point (land Acres. 

52.50; flats 4.90) 57.40 

Castle Island, off City Point, bridge connecting (land 25.70; 

flats 78.30) 104.00 



Total Acres, Marine Park System 457.90 



MISCELLANEOUS PARKS. 

Charlesbank, Charles street, from Cambridge street to Leverett . 10 . 00 
Charlestown Heights, Bunker Hill and Medford streets (6.10), 

Dewey Beach (4.30) 10.40 

Chestnut Hill Park, Beacon street and Commonwealth avenue, 

Brighton 55.40 

Copp's Hni terraces. Commercial and Charter streets, North End, . 60 

Dorchester Park, Dorchester avenue and Richmond street . . 26 . 00 
Franklin Field, Blue Hill and Talbot avenues, Dorchester (park 

area. See under Playgrounds for larger area) . . . 17.00 
Freeport Street Wharf and grounds, Dorchester (land, 1.15: 

flats, 2.54) 3.69 

Governor's Island, * Boston Harbor, about one mile north of City 

.Point 73.00 

North End Beach, Commercial and Charter streets (land 3.70; 

flats 3) 6.70 

Rogers Park, Lake and Foster streets, Brighton . . . . 6 . 90 

Savin Hill Park, Grampian way, Dorchester 8 . 26 

Wood Island Park, East Boston, on eastern waterfront (land 

55.60; flats 155.40) . .211.00 

Total Acres, Miscellaneous Parks 428 . 95 



Playgrounds, with Locations and Areas 

Ashmont, Brent street, near Talbot avenue, Dorchester 
Bniings Field, La Grange and Bellevue streets. West Roxbury 
Carolina Avenue, near Lee street, Jamaica Plain . 

t Charlesbank, Charles street 

Charlestown, Main and Alford streets (land 14; flats 4) 
t Charlestown Heights, Bunker Hill and Medford streets 

t Chestnut Hill, Brighton 

Christopher Gibson, Dorchester and Geneva avenues . 

Columbus Avenue, at Camden street 

t Common, Charles street side 



2.20 
11.00 
3.10 
3.50 
18.00 
1.00 
4.00 
5.80 
5.00 
3.50 



* Governor's Island, the site of Fort Winthrop (now unoccupied) , is owned by United 
States, but in 1902 Congress authorized its use as a park by the City. Nothing was done 
until 1911, when the Park Department began making improvements there, for which 
$20,000 was appropriated. 

t Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 



74 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Commonwealth, C, D and Cypher streets, South Boston 
Cottage Street, near Maverick street, East Boston 

* Dorchester Park, Dorchester avenue and Richmond street 
t Dummy Field, Everett street, AUston . 

Factory Hill, Hyde Park 

I Fellows Street, at Hunneman street, Roxbury 

* Fens, Back Bay 

First Street, at M street. South Boston . 

Forest Hills, Washington street and Firth road 

Franklin Field, Blue Hill and Talbot avenues, Dorchester 

* Franklin Park 

I John Winthrop, Dacia and Danube streets, Dorchester 
Marcella Street, Highland and Ritchie streets, Roxbury 
t Massachusetts Avenue, near Edward Everett square, Dor 
Mystic, Chelsea street and Mystic river, Charlestown . 
Neponset, Neponset avenue, opposite Chickatawbut street 
Norfolk Street, opposite Evelyn street, Mattapan . 
North Brighton, Western avenue and North Harvard street 

* North End Beach, Commercial street .... 

* Olmsted Park, Jamaicaway 

Orient Heights, Saratoga and Boardman streets, East Boston 

(land, 5.24; flats, 3.07) 

J Paris Street, East Boston 

Parker Hill, Reservoir lot, top of Parker Hill, Roxbury 

t Parkinson, Forest Hills and Williams streets, Jamaica Plain 

Paul Gore Street, Jamaica Plain . . . . ■ . 

Portsmouth Street, Brighton 

t Prince Street, North Bennet and Prince streets, North End 
Randolph Street, Albany and Rp,ndolph streets, South End . 
Ripley, Trescott Place, near Harvard street, Dorchester 

* Rogers Park, Lake and Foster streets, Brighton . 
Ronan (formerly Mt. Ida), Bowdoin and Percival streets, Dor. 
Roslindale, South, Robert and South Walter streets 
Rutherford Avenue, at Austin street, Charlestown 

Savin Hill, Springdale and Denny streets (land, 8.35; flats, 24.35) 
Smith's Pond, Brainard street, Hyde Park .... 

* Strandway, Columbia road, opposite Old Harbor street 

Tenean Beach, Neponset 

Tyler Street, South End 

Ward 19, Phillips Street, near Tremont street, Roxbury 

t West Fifth Street, between D and E streets. South Boston 
t West Third Street, corner B street, South Boston 
William Eustis, Norfolk avenue and Proctor street, Roxbury 



Acres . 

8.07 
3.85 
l.OO 
6.40 
5.20 
0.85 
5.00 
4.60 
9.60 

60.00 

36.00 
1.57 
5.10 
2.76 
2.30 

18.00 
6.35 

14.00 
3.00 
3.00 

8.31 
1.27 
4.50 
4.50 
0.74 
4.29 
0.40 
2.80 
0.86 
4.00 
11.07 
3.80 
1.10 
32.70 
20.08 
23.50 
8.70 
0.26 
4.24 
0.41 
0.28 
4.88 



* Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks, 
t Leased grounds. J Children's playground. 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 75 

Acres. 

* Wood Island Park, East Boston 10.00 

Wood, near Hallet street, Neponset 3 . 10 

Total Area of the 54 Playgrounds (Acres) . . . 409 . 54 
Area of- 12 Playgrounds in Parks (Acres) . . . 97.50 

Area of the 42 Separate Playgrounds (Acres) . . 312 . 04 

The first playground acquired by the City was the Charlestown Play- 
ground, purchased in 1891 for $172,923. With that included, 54 play- 
grounds (42 separate and 12 located in parks) have been established, most 
of them equipped with first-class shelter and sanitary buildings containing 
lockers, also drinking fountains, shower baths, etc. 

The total outlay for land and construction of the playgrounds (not 
including those in parks) is $2,900,891. 

Public Grounds, Squares, Etc., with Locations and Areas, 
city proper. 

Square Feet. 

Berwick Park, between Columbus avenue and N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R ■ 3,800 

Blackstone Square, Washington street, between West Brookline 

and West Newton streets 105,100 

City HaU Grounds, School street 7,700 

Columbus Square, Columbus and Warren avenues . . . 2,250 
Concord Square, between Tremont street and Columbus avenue, 5,000 
Copley Square, between Huntington avenue, Boylston and Dart- 
mouth streets 28,399 

Fort Hill Square, OUver and High streets 29,480 

Franklin Square, Washington street, between East Brookhne and 

East Newton streets 105,205 

Massachusetts Avenue MaUs, four sections, between Albany 

street and Columbus avenue 106,500 

Park Square, Columbus avenue, Ehot and Pleasant streets . . 2,867 

Rutland Square, between Tremont street and Colmnbus avenue, 7,400 

St. Stephen Square, corner St. Stephen and Batavia streets . 100 
Trinity Triangle, between Huntington avenue, Trinity place and 

St. James avenue 5,380 

Union Park, between Tremont street and Shawmut avenue . 16,000 

Waltham Square, Harrison avenue, opposite Union Park street . 3,000 

Worcester Square, between Washington street and Harrison av., 16,000 

ROXBURY. 

Alvah Kittredge Park, Highland street and Highland avenue . 5,600 
Berners Square, Plymouth and Bellevue streets .... 57,200 

* Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 



76 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Square Feet. 
Brigham Circle, junction of Huntington avenue, Tremont and 

Francis street 1,662 

Bromley Park, Albert to Bickford street 20,975 

Cedar Square, Cedar street, between Juniper and Thornton sts., 26,163 
City Storage Grounds, Massachusetts avenue, adjoining iN". Y., 

N. H. &H. R. R 74,279 

Ehn Hill Park, off 550 Warren street 6,920 

Harold Square, Crawford, Abbotsford and Harold streets . . 966 

Heath Square, Old Heath, New Heath and Parker streets . . 2,419 

Highland Park, Fort avenue and Beech Glen street . . . 158,421 
Horatio Harris Park, Walnut avenue, from Munroe to To-misend 

street 116,000 

Linwood Park, Centre and Linwood streets 3,625 

Longwood Park, Park and Austin streets . . . . . 21,000 

Madison Park, Sterhng, Marble, Warwick and Westminster sts., 122,191 

Orchard Park, Chadwick, Orchard Park and Yeoman streets . 104,492 

Pubhc Ground, corner Blue Hill avenue and Seaver street . . 2,500 

Warren Square, Warren, St. James and Regent streets . . 1,380 

Square, Albany street, near Mail street 1,253 

Walnut Park, between Washington street and Walnut avenue . 5,736 

Washington Park, Dale and Bainbridge streets .... 396,125 



BRIGHTON. 

Brighton Square, Chestnut Hill ave. and Academy Hill rd. 
Fern Square, between Franklin and Fern streets 
Jackson Square, Chestnut HiU ave.. Union and Winship sts. 
Oak Square, Washington and Faneuil streets . . . , 
Pubhc Ground, Cambridge, Lincoln and Mansfield streets 



25,035 
1,900 
4,300 
9,796 

32,346 



Sparhawk Square, Cambridge, Murdock and Sparhawk streets, 7,449 

CHARLESTOWN. 

City Square, head of Bow and Main streets 8,739 

Essex Square, Essex and Lyndeboro' streets 930 

Hayes Square, Bunker HiU and Vine streets 4,484 

SuUivan Square, Main, Cambridge, Sever and Gardner streets . 56,428 

Winthrop Square, Winthrop, Common and Adams streets . . 38,450 

DORCHESTEE. 

Adams Square, Adams and Granite streets ..... 2,068 

Algonquin Square, Algonquin and Bradlee streets .... 1,728 
City Nursery Grounds and Greenhouses, Massachusetts avenue 

and East Cottage street , . 102,531 

Dorchester Square, Meeting House HiU 56,200 

Drohan Square, Edison green 10,241 

Eaton Square, Adams and Bowdoin streets 13,280 

Mt. Bowdoin Green, top of Mt. Bowdoin 25,170 

Peabody Square, Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue . . 1,963 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 



77 



Public Ground, junction of Adams and Codman streets 
Public Ground, Florida street, King to Ashmont streets 

Public Ground, Magnolia street 

Richardson Square, between Pond and Cottage streets 

Spaulding Square, junction of Freeport st. and Neponset ave. 

Tremlett Square, Tremlett street, between Hooper and Waldeck 

streets 



Square Feet. 

700 

. 24,193 

3,605 

. 45,982 
6,263 



7,107 



Wellesley Park, Wellesley Park street 28,971 



EAST BOSTON. 

Belmont Square, Webster, Sumner, Lamson and Seaver streets 
Central Square, Meridian and Border streets .... 
Maverick Square, Sumner and Maverick streets 
Prescott Square, Trenton, Eagle and Prescott streets . 
Putnam Square, Putnam, White and Trenton streets . 



30,000 
40,310 
4,396 
12,284 
11,628 



HYDE PARK. 

Camp Meigs, Readville 

Vose Square, Beacon street and MetropoMtan avenue 
Milton Square, Milton avenue and Highland street 
Wilhams Square, WiUiams avenue and Prospect street 
Greenwood Square, junction of Thatcher st. and Central ave. 
Webster Square, junction of Webster street and Central avenue, 
Wolcott Square, Hyde Park ave., Milton and Prescott streets 



124,500 
220 
220 

, 700 
220 
220 
220 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Independence Square, Broadway, Second, M and N streets , 279,218 
Lincoln Square, Emerson, Fourth and M streets .... 9,510 
Thomas Park, Telegraph Hill 190,000 

WEST ROXBURY. 

Carruth Square, South Conway, South Fairview and Robert sts., 750 

Centre Square, Centre and Perkins streets 3,200 

Oakview Terrace, off Centre street 5,287 

Soldiers' Monument Lot, South and Centre streets, Jamaica Plain, 5,870 
Total area of PubUc Grounds, etc., 2,821,283 square feet, or 64.77 acres. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Parks and Parkways: Acres. 

Main Park System 1,386.22 

Marine Park System 457.90 

Miscellaneous Parks 428 . 95 

Playgrounds (separate) 312.04 

Public Grounds, Squares, etc 64.77 

Grand total (Acres) 2,649.88 



78 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Bridges Located in Parks and Parkways. 

public garden. 
Foot-bridge, over pond. 

THE FENS. 

Agassiz, carrying Agassiz road over the Fens water. 

BoYLSTON, over outlet of the Fens. 

Charlesgate, over Boston & Albany Railroad and Ipswich street. 

Commonwealth avenue, over outlet of the Fens. 

Fens, over outlet of Muddy river. 

RIVERWAY. 

Audubon, over Newton circuit of Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Bellevue, over Muddy river from Bellevue street. 

Bridle Path, carrying the ride over Muddy river, near Audubon road. 

* Brookline avenue, over Muddy river. 

* Berners street foot-bridge, over Muddy river. 

* Huntington avenue, over outlet of Leverett pond. 

* LoNGWOOD, carrying Longwood avenue over Muddy river. 

OLMSTED PARK. 

Fooo^BRiDGES at Leverett pond and over outlets of Willow pond and 
Ward's pond. 

FRANKLIN PARK. 

Ellicott arch, carrying Circuit drive over walk at Elhcottdale. 

Forest Hills, carrying entrance to Frankhn Park over traffic road. 

Overlook arch, over entrance to Overlook Shelter. 

ScARBORo', carrying Circuit drive over Scarboro' pond. 

ScARBORo' POND FOOT-BRIDGE, Carrying the walk over Scarboro' pond. 

COLUMBIA ROAD. 

Columbia road, over Old Colony avenue and Plymouth division of New 

York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad. 
Columbia road, over Shoreham street. 

MARINE PARK. 

Castle Island, South Boston to Castle Island. 

WOOD island park. 
Neptune, carrying Neptune road over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

Railroad. 
Foot-bridge, from Prescott street over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

Railroad. 

* The Park and Recreation Department maintains such parts of these bridges as are 
located within the City limits. 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 



79 



Statues Belonging to City, Located in Parks and Public Grounds. 



Name. 


Location. 


Year 
Erected. 


Artist. 






1880 


Anne Whitney. 
Richard E. Brooks. 


Colonel Thomas Cass 


Public Garden 


1899 






1886 


Anne Whitney. 
Wilham W. Story. 


Edward Everett 


Edward Everett Square, 
Dorchester 


1867 


Admiral David G. Farragut, 


Marine Park, South Boston, 


1893 


Henry H. Kitson. 






1856 


Richard S. Greenough. 
Olin L. Warner. 


William Lloyd Garrison 


Commonwealth Avenue .... 


1886 


General John Glover 


Commonwealth Avenue .... 


1875 


Martin Milmore. 


Edward Everett Hale 




1913 
1865 
1915 


Bela L. Pratt 




Commonwealth Avenue .... 




Wendell Phillips 




Josiah Quincy 


City Hall Grounds 


1879 


Thomas Ball 


Charles Sumner 




1878 
1904 


Thomas Ball 


General Joseph Warren 


Warren Square, Roxbury. . . 


Paul W. Bartlett. 


George Washington * 


Public Garden 


1869 


Thomas Ball. 




Scollay Square (originally) ,t 


1880 


Richard S. Greenough. 





* Equestrian statue. 

t Location changed in 1903 to First Church Grounds, Marlborough street. 



Monuments and Memorials Belonging to 

Grounds. 



City, Located on Public 



N.^ME OB Designation. 


Location. 


Year 
Erected. 


Artist or Architect. 


Blackstone Memorial Tablet, 

Crispus Attucks and Other 
Patriots of 1770 


East corner of Common .... 


1914 

1888 
1903 

1908 

1902 
1S67 

1879 


R. Clipston Sturgis. 


William Ellery Channing 


Pubhc Garden 




Patrick A. Collins Memorial, 

Dorchester Heights (Revolu- 
tionary) 


Commonwealth Avenue .... 
TelegraphHill,SouthBoston, 


fHenrv H. Kitson. 
\T. Ahce Kitson. 

Peabody & Stearns. 
John Q. A. Ward. 

Thomas Ball 


Abraham Lincoln and Eman- 


Park Square 









80 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS BELONGING TO THE CITY. — Concluded. 



Name or Designation. 



Location. 



Year 
Erected. 



Artist or Architect. 



John Boyle O'Reilly 

Francis Parkman Memorial. . 

Colonel Robert Gould Shaw 
and 54th Massachusetts 
Regiment 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monu- 
ment 

Soldiers' Monument, Charles- 
town 

Soldiers' Monument, Dor- 
chester 

Soldiers' Monument, Jamaica 
Plain 



Back Bay Park 

Olmsted Park, Jamaica 
Plain 

Boston Common, facing 
State House 

Boston Common 

Winthrop Square 

Meeting House Hill 

Centre and South Street 



1896 

1906 

} 1897 

1877 
1872 
1867 
1871 



Daniel C. French. 

Daniel C. French. 

[Augustus Saint Gaudens. 
[McKim, Mead & White. 

Martin Milmore. 
Martin Milmore. 
B. F. Dwight. 
W. W. Lummis. 



Fountains Belonging to City, Located on Public Grounds. 
Brewer Foimtain, Boston Common; Coppenhagen Fountain, Edward 
Everett square; Johnson Memorial Fountain and Gateway, entrance 
to Back Bay Park, Westland Avenue; "Maid of the Mist" and three 
other fountains. Public Garden; one fountain each on Blackstone, 
Frankhn, Central, Independence and Sullivan Squares, Meeting House 
Hill, Thomas Park, Madison Park, Union Park and Massachusetts 
Avenue; Lyman fountain, Eaton Square. 

Since the City's park development began, in 1877, the total expenditure^ 
to the close of 1915, for parks, parkways and playgrounds (exclusive of 
the annual maintenance appropriation) is $20,899,225, or $9,272,329 
for the land and $11,626,896 for construction. 

The Arnold Arboretum (the "tree museum" of Harvard University), 
containing originally 122.6 acres, was added with other lands, in 1882, 
to the City's park system, under a special contract with Harvard Uni- 
versity, and in 1895 another tract of 75 acres (Peters' Hill), also belonging 
to the University, was included, the name Bussey Park being added to 
the title. All the land in these tracts not required for driveways and walks, 
a quarry reservation and traflSc road is used, under the trusts created by 
the wills of Benjamin Bussey and James Arnold, for Harvard's extensive 
collection of specimens of such trees and shrubs as wiU hve in this climate. 
The City maintains the roads and walks, also attends to pohcing the 
groimds. The arboretum is open to visitors daily from 7 A. M. until sunset. 

The new Frankhn Park Zoological Garden on the northern side of the park 
is designed to occupy sixty to eighty acres when completed. Up to Feb- 
ruary 1, 1916, the amount expended for construction, etc., was $300,173, 
and for animals $12,314. In the summer of 1912, the group of bear dens. 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. 81 

the aquatic flying cage, etc., were finished and put on exhibition, in 1913 
the bird house with other attractions, and in 1914 the elephant house, 
were added. The new Marine Park Aquarium, costing $144,530 for con- 
struction, etc., was opened to the pubUc on November 28, 1912. The 
entire outlay for both was appropriated from the George F. Parkman 
Fund income. 

GEORGE F. PARKMAN FUND. 

By the will of the late George F. Parkman, various real estate properties 
worth between $5,000,000 and $6,000,000 were left to the City, the income 
therefrom to be expended for the maintenance and improvement of the 
Common and such parks as were in existence January 12, 1887, and no 
part of it to be used for the purchase of additional land for park purposes . 
The bequest was accepted by the City Council, March 9, 1909, since which 
date most of the realty has been sold and the proceeds invested in munic- 
ipal and other bonds. On February 1, 1916, the principal of the fund in 
the custody of the City Treasurer amounted to $4,983,676. In the fiscal 
year, 1915-16, the income from the fund was $196,310, i. e., nearly four 
per cent. 

Public Baths and Gymnasia. 

main bath houses, open all the year. 

Cabot Street. — 203 Cabot street, Roxbury. Brick building, con- 
taining 45 shower baths, a swimming pool, 75 by 25 feet, and a gymnasium. 
Opened to the pubHc in September, 1905. Total cost of building, $108,690. 

Charlestown. — Corner Bunker HiU and Lexington streets. Brick 
building (old City building remodeled), containing 28 shower baths and 
a gymnasium. Opened to the pubHc in March, 1913. Total cost, $49,000, 
approximately. 

Dover Street. — • 249 Dover street. Brick building, containing 33 
shower baths for men and 17 for women, also tub baths. No gymnasium. 
It includes a laundry where all the towels and part of the bathing suits 
used in the department are laundered. Opened to the public in October, 
1898. Total cost (including $14,154 for land), $88,267. 

North Bennet Street. — North End. Brick building, containing 
65 shower baths, 400 lockers and a gymnasium. Opened to the public 
in April, 1909. Total cost (including $36,800 for land), $136,186. 

baths and gymnasia in other city buildings, open all the year. 

Charlesbank. — Charles street, West End, two houses (i. e., for men 
and women), 12 shower baths in each; outdoor gymnasium. 

East Boston Gymnasium.* — ■ 116 Paris street, 74 shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — Corner Columbia road and Bird street, 
Dorchester, 26 shower baths and a swimming pool. 

Municipal Building. — South street, near Sedgwick street, Jamaica 
Plain, 19 shower baths and a swimming pool, 75 by 24 feet. 

* On the site of the new East Boston Gymnasium was located the first indoor munic- 
ipal gymnasium in the United States, so far as known. It was opened to the public in 
1897. 



82 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

South Boston Gymnasium. — D street, 14 shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — Broadway, South Boston, 65 shower baths, 
i. e., 40 for men's section, 23 for women's, and two extension showers for 
boys. 

Municipal Building. — Tyler street. South End, 40 shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — Vine and Dudley streets, Roxbury, 28 shower 
baths for men's section, 28 for women's and 6 in gyxanasium. 

Ward 9 Gymnasium. — 642 Harrison avenue. South End, 13 shower 
baths. 

Under Construction, gymnasium and shower baths. Blossom street, 
West End. 

In the calendar year, 1915, the total number of baths taken in the 
thirteen indoor bathing places was 1,433,557, of which 75.8 per cent were 
by men and boys. 

beach baths. 

Dewey. — Medford street, Charlestown, three houses, for men, women 
and children. 

Freeport Street. — Dorchester, two houses, for men and women. 

K Street. — South Boston, for women. 

L Street.* — South Boston, for men and boys. 

McKenzie. — Columbia road, two houses, for men and women. 

North End Park. — Commercial street, two houses, for men and 
women. A laundry connected with these bath houses launders part of 
the bathing suits used in the department during the summer bathing 
season. 

Savin Hill. — Dorchester, two houses, for men and women. 

Tenean. — Neponset, two houses, for men and women. 

Wood Island Park. — East Boston, two houses, for men and women, 
and one house for boys. 

FLOATING BATHS. 

Border Street. — East Boston, two houses, for men and women. 
Charlesbank. — West End, two houses, for men and women. 
Dover Street Bridge. — South End, two houses, for men and women. 
Fort Point Channel. — South End, one house. 
Jeffries Point. — East Boston, one house, for men and women, at 
different hours. 

Mystic Bridge. — Charlestown, one house. 

Warren Bridge. — Charlestown, two houses, for men and women. 

outdoor swimming pools. 

Charles River. — Spring street. West Roxbury, two houses, for men 
and women, with open-air pool. 

Orchard Park. — Chadwick and Yeoman streets, Roxbury, two 
houses, for men and women, with concrete open-air pool, 80 by 30 feet. 

* The L street seaside bath, opened in 1866, was the first municipal bath established 
in the United States, so far as known. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 83 

PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 811 City Hall Annex, eighth floor. 
[Stat. 1857, Chap. 35; Stat. 1889, Chap. 245; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449; 
§§ 14-16; Stat. 1897, Chap. 395, § 5; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 30, 
C. C, Title IV., Chap. 26; Stat. 1910, Chap. 307; Stat. 1911, 
Chap. 673; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 25.] 

David B. Shaw, Penal Institutions Commissioner. Term ends in 1918. 

Salary, $5,000. 
Geoege H. Sheehan, Assistant Commissioner. Salary, $2,500. 
James H. Burke, Master, House of Correction. Salary, $2,500. 

From 1857 to 1885 the public institutions were in charge of a Board of 
Directors, twelve in number; from 1885 to 1889, in charge of a board 
consisting of nine members; from 1889 to 1895, in charge of the Board 
of Commissioners of Public Institutions, three in number. By Chapter 
449 of the Acts of 1895, the institutions were placed under the charge of 
one commissioner, known as the Institutions Commissioner. By Chapters 
395 and 451 of the Acts of 1897, the control of the institutions was divided; 
the Penal Institutions Commissioner to have the care of the Penal Insti- 
tutions Department and separate Boards of Trustees being appointed 
for the Children's Institutions, the Pauper Institutions and the Insane 
Hospital. In 1908 the name of the Pauper Institutions Department was 
changed to the Infirmary Department, and the State took over the Insane 
Hospital. 

The Penal Institutions Department is imder the control of a single 
commissioner, who has charge of the House of Correction at Deer Island. 
He purchases all supplies required for that institution, and has charge of 
the steamer "Monitor," which is used to transport passengers and freight 
to Deer, Long and Rainsford Islands. The average number of men 
prisoners in the House of Correction in 1915 was 1,014; of women, 120. 



PRINTING DEPAETMENT. 

Office, 251 Causeway street. 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 31; Ord. 1911, Chap. 2; Ord. 1914, Chap. 6; Rev. 
Ord. 1914, Chap. 26.] 

William J. Casey, Superintendent of Printing. Term ends in 1918. 
Salary, $4,000. 

The Superintendent of Printing has charge of all the printing and 
binding for the municipal departments, supplies them with postage 
stamps and attends to their requisitions for stationery. 

The municipal printing plant was established in 1897. It has received 
annually an appropriation for printing and binding the City Documents 
ordered by the City Coimcil, amounting in recent years to about $35,000. 
During the past five years its efficiency has been largely increased; it now 



84 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



handles practically all of the extensive printing business of the City and 
County departments, and ranks among the profitable public service 
enterprises. In 1914 the plant was valued at $52,767.83, the average 
number of employees was 98, and the output $178,550.08 in value. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 802 City Hall Annex, eighth floor. 

IStat. 1895, Chap. 449, § 22; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 32; Stat. 1913, 

Chap. 263; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 27.] 

Richard A. Lynch, Superintendent of Public Buildings. Salary, $3,600. 

Term ends in 1918. 
Frederick C. Ward, Chief Clerk. Salary, $2,500. 

The office of the Superintendent of Public Buildings was established 
by ordinance on July 1, 1850, and annual reports have been published 
by the Superintendent since 1851. He has the supervision of the care 
and repair of all buildings belonging to or hired by the City, also the 
furniture and fixtiu-es contained therein; attends to the hiring of such 
offices as are needed by departments which cannot be accommodated in 
City buildings; provides suitable wardrooms for public meetings of voters 
and purchases the necessary furniture, etc., for the public buildings. 



CITY BUILDINGS IN CHARGE OF THIS DEPARTMENT. 



Buildings, with Locations. 



Occupied by, etc. 



Ambulance Station, National st., South Boston. 
Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street 



Mtinioipal Building, City square, Charlestown . . . . 

City Building, Norfolk and Washington sts., Dor., 
City Building, Richmond and Washington sts., Dor. 
City Hall, School street 



City Hall Annex, Court street . 



On leased land. 

Overseemg of the Poor Department; 
part occupied by Associated Chari- 
ties (rent free). 

Charlestown Branch of Municipal 
Cpurt and Police Station, 15th 
Division. 

Public Library Branch and Ward 21 
(new) wardroom. 

Sub-police station and Public Library 
Branch. 

Mayor's office. City Council chamber 
and offices, also ten City depart- 
ments, etc.* 

Seventeen City departments, etc.f 



* Auditing, Treasury, Sinking Fund, City Clerk, City Planning Board, Children's 
Institutions, Infirmary, Institutions Registration, Soldiers' Relief, Statistics, and Permit 
Office of Street Commissioners. 

t Art, Assessing, Collecting, Election, Health, Building, Consumptives' Hospital, Ceme- 
tery, Penal Institutions, Public Buildings, Public Works, Registry, Schoolhouse, Street 
Laying-Out, Supply, Weights and Measures, Wire, also Business Agent and Schoolhouse 
Custodian belonging to Department of School Committee. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 



85 



City Buildings in Charge op this Department. — Concluded. 



Buildings, with Locations. 



Occupied by, etc. 



Cross street Schoolhouse (Old), Bunker Hill St., 
Charlestown. 

Curtis Hall (See Municipal Building, J. P.). 

East Boston Court House and Police Station, 
Meridian and Paris streets. 



Faneuil Hall, Faneuil Hall square 

Faneuil Hall Market House, N. and S. Market sts. 



Franklin Schoolhouse (Old), Washington street. 
Fuel House, Main street, Charlestown 



Jamaica Plain Library, South and Sedgwick sts. . . 
Municipal Building, Jamaica Plain, South street . . 
Municipal Building, Dorchester, Columbia road. .. 

Municipal Building, South Boston, E. Broadway. . 

Municipal Building, Ward 5 (new) , Oak and Tyler 

sta. 

Municipal Building, Ward 12 (new), Vine and 
Dudley sta. 

Old Armory Building, Maverick st., E. Boston. . . . 

Old Police Station, 6 Broadway, South Boston . . . . 

Old Police Station, 7 Meridian street. East Boston, 

Old Prov. State House, Washington and State sts., 

Old Winthrop Schoolhouse, Bunker Hill street, 
Charlestown. 

Repair Shop and Annex, Harrison avenue 

Smith Schoolhouse, Joy street 

Temporary Home for the Destitute, Chardon St. . . 

Thomas Street Schoolhouse, Thomas street 

Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street 

Westerly Hall, Centre street. West Roxbury 



Leased. 



District Court and Police Station, 
7th Division. 

Market stalls, etc., under hall. 

Quincy Hall and Produce Exchange, 
second floor. 

Ward 6 (new) wardroom ; part leased. 

First floor, fuel storage for Fire Dept.; 
second floor leased. 

Public Library Branch. 

Curtis Hall, baths and gymnasium. 

Public Library Branch, wardroom, 
baths and gymnasium. 

Municipal Court, Public Library 
Branch, hall and baths. 

Public Library Branch, baths, gym- 
nasium and wardroom. 

Public Library Branch, baths, gym- 
nasium and wardroom. 

Wardroom; upper part leased. 

Unoccupied. 

Unoccupied. 

Leased to Bostonian Society. 

Reconstructed, with gymnasium, 
baths and wardroom. 

Leased. 

Leased. 

Overseeing of the Poor Department. 

Leased. 

Overseeing of the Poor Department. 

PubHc Library Branch. 



County Buildings. 



Court House, Pemberton square 

Jail, Charles street (three buildings) . 

Roxbury Court House, Roxbury street 

Mortuary, Northern District, 18 North Grove st. 



County offices and court rooms. 



Municipal Court, Southern District; 
part leased to G. A. R. 



86 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



In charge of this department also are the following City scales: North 
scales, Haymarket square; South scales, City stables yard, Albany street; 
Roxbury scales, Eustis and MaU streets; Jamaica Plain scales. Centre 
street and Starr lane. 



WARDROOMS IN CITY BUILDINGS, ETC. (New Wards.) 


District and Ward. 


Name of Building. 


Location. 


East Boston, Ward 2 


Old Armory Building 


Maverick street. 


Charlestown, Ward 3 


Bunker Hill Schoolhouse. . 


Baldwin street. 


Ward 4 


Charlestown Gymnasium 
Building. 


Bunker Hill and Lexington sts. 


Boston Proper, Ward 5. . . . 
Ward 5 


Faneuil Hall 




New Municipal Building. . 


Oak and Tyler sts. 


Ward 6. . . . 


Old Franklin Schoolhouse, 


Washington street. 


Ward 7 


Rice Schoolhouse 


Appleton street. 


Ward 8. . . . 


Prince Schoolhouse 


Exeter street. 


South Boston, Ward 9 


MaynardHall* 


245 D street. 


Ward 10 ... . 


Municipal Building 


Broadway. 


Roxbury, Ward 12 






Ward 13 


Old pumping station 


Elmwood street. 


Dorchester, Ward 17 


Municipal Building 


Columbia road and Bird^street. 


Ward 18 


Wardroom Building 


Meeting House Hill. 


Ward 21 


City Building 


Washington and Norfolk'sts. 


Jamaica Plain, Ward 22. . . . 


Minton Hallf 


Forest Hills square. 


Brighton, Ward 26 


Old Town Hall 











* Hired for $300 per year. t Hired for $600 per year. 

The Public Buildings Department has charge of the "Grounds for Target 
Practice," viz., 53 acres in Woburn and 57 acres adjoining in Wilmington* 
Mass., purchased in 1902 for $25,000, as directed by a loan order of the 
City Council passed in 1901, for the use of mihtia companies' belonging 
in Boston. These grounds are not in use. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, 

General oflBces, 504-506 City HaU Annex, fifth floor. 

[Ord. 1910, Chap. 9; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 553 and 571; Ord. 1911, Chaps. 

1 and 10; Stat. 1912, Chap. 348; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 28.] 

Edward F. Mtjepht, Commissioner. Salary, $9,000. Term ends in 1919. 
Bernard C. Kelley, Chief Clerk. Salary, 13,000. 

By Chapter 9, Ordinances of 1910, approved by the Mayor November 
28, 1910, and taking effect February 1, 1911, the Department of Public 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 87 

Works was established, consisting of the Street, Water and Engineering 
Departments combined under a single executive head (viz., the Com- 
missioner of Public Works), the latter authorized to create the necessary- 
divisions of the department according to his judgment. The following 
three divisions were created by the Commissioner, viz.. Bridge and Ferry- 
Division, Highway Division and Sewer and Water Division, each in 
charge of a Division Engineer. 

The Commissioner of PubUc Works, who must be a civil engineer of 
recognized standing in his profession, has control over the construction 
of all streets and sewers, with discretionary power as to grades, materials 
and other particulars; over the construction, care and management of 
all bridges used as highways, of the ferries owned and operated by the 
City, and of the street lamps maintained by the City in highways, park- 
ways and pubUc grounds; over the cleaning, repairing and sprinkling of 
streets and the removal of house offal and refuse in the various districts 
of the City; over the maintenance and operation of all fixtures and appli- 
ances held by the City for purposes of water supply; and over the grant- 
ing of permits to open, occupy, obstruct and use portions of streets. 

By authority of Chapter 571, Acts of 1910, the Commissioner of Public 
Works now charges for permits issued, as per the following schedule: 

1. Openings in streets or sidewalks, 50 cents each. Limited to 100 linear feet on one 
permit. 

2. Emergency permits, Class A (for the above purpose), 50 cents each. 

3. Advertising by man wearing hat and coat lettered (annual permit), $5 (or $1 per 
month) . 

4. Cleaning snow from roofs (occupation of sidewalk and street while so doing), annual 
permit, $1 each. 

5. Driving cattle through the streets (annual permit to driver), $5. 

6. Dumping snow from private property into public alleys (annual permit), 50 cents. 

7. Erecting and repairing awnings (annual permit), 50 cents. 

8. Erecting, altering or repairing buildings (occupation of street or sidewalk) one cent 
per square foot per month up to 5,000 feet, and one-half cent per foot in excess of 5,000 feet; 
the minimum charge to be at one month rate. 

9. Painting or minor repairs, 50 cents each. 

10. Feeding horses on streets (annual permit), $1 each. 

11. Moving buUdings in streets, $5 per day; minimum charge, $10. 

12. Painting signs or notices on obstruction fences, $1 each. 

13. Placing and removing signs flat on buildings, 50 cents each. 

14. Projecting signs or lamps from buildings, SI each. 

15. Raising or lowering safes, machinery, etc., $1 each. 

16. Loading and unloading goods (annual permit), charges to be based on conditions 
at each location. Minimum, $1; maximum, $5. 

17. Emergency permits, Class B, $1 each. 

18. Special permits for other than above purposes, 25 cents each. 

19. Annual permits at rates other than those in the preceding classes when, in the 
opinion of the Commissioner, such permits are requisite to the proper conduct of the 
permit system. 

All extensions will be considered renewals and the charge collected as for a new permit. 



88 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Bridge and ferry Division. 

Ofl&ce, 602 City HaU Annex, sixth floor. 

John E. Cartt, Division Engineer. Salary, $5,000. 

S. E. TiNKHAM, Engineer of Construction. Salary, $3,000. 

L. B. Reilly, Designing Engineer. Salary, $1,920. 

Thomas H. Sexton, Supervisor of Bridges. Salary, $3,000. 

John F. Sullivan, General Foreman of Ferries. Salary, $2,400. 

The Division Engineer of this division has charge of the design, con- 
struction and maintenance of the highway bridges within the limits of 
the City, whether constructed over navigable waters or railroads, also 
of the care and management of the ferries operated by the City. Work 
pertaining to the aboUshment of grade crossings is attended to by this 
division, also special engineering work for other City departments. All 
drawtenders are appointed by and subject to the control of the Com- 
missioner of Public Works. The following named bridges are under the 
supervision of this division. 

1. — BRIDGES MAINTAINED WHOLLY BY THE CITY.^ 

[In the hst those marked with an asterisk (*) are over navigable waters, 
and are each provided with a draw.] 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad, at Cambridge street, Brighton. 

Ashland street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division, West Roxbury. 

Athens street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Mid- 
land Division. 

B Street (Footbridge), over Neponset river, Hyde Park. 

Baker street, at Brook Farm, West Roxbury. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Raihoad. 

Bennington street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berwick park (foot-bridge), over New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, Providence Division. . 

Blakemore Street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division. 

Bolton Street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Midland Division. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brooks street, Brighton. 

1 For other bridges, maintained wholly by the City, see "Park and Recreation Depart - 
ment." 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 89 

Byeon street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Charlesgate, over Ipswich street. 

* Charlestown, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Chelsea South, over South channel. Mystic river. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
CoLUMBiTs avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Commercial point, or Tenean, over Tenean creek, Dorchester. 

* Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 

Cottage farm, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Commonwealth avenue. 
Dana avenue, over Neponset river, Hyde Park. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Dorchester avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

* Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 
Fairmount avenue, over Neponset river, Hyde Park. 
Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Florence street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 
Gainsborough street (fqot-bridge), over New York, New Haven & 

Hartford Railroad, Providence Division. 
Glenwood avenue East (foot-bridge), over Neponset river, Hyde Park. 
Glenwood avenue West, over Mother brook, Hyde Park. 
Gold street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Huntington avenue, over Stony brook, Hyde Park. 
Hyde Park avenue, over Mother brook (at woolen mill), Hyde Park. 
Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 
Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook (near Clarendon Hills R. R. 

Station), Hyde Park. 
Ipswich street, over waterway. 
Irvington street (foot-bridge), over New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad, Providence Division. 

* L street, over reserved channel at junction of Summer and L streets. 

* Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Massachusetts avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, Providence Division. 

* Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Metropolitan avenue, at Clarendon Hills R. R. Station, Hyde Park. 
Newburn street, over Stony brook, Hyde Park. 

* Northern avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad and New York, 

New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence Division. 
Southampton street, over South Bay sluice. 
Summer street, over A street. South Boston. 
Summer street, over B street. South Boston. 
Summer street, over C street. South Boston. 

* Summer street, over Fort Point channel. 



90 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

ToLLGATE WAT (foot-bridge), ovei' N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Providence 
Division, from Washington st. to Hyde Park ave., Forest Hills. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Newton street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad^ 

Providence Division. 
West River street, over Mother brook, Hyde Park. 
West Rutland square (foot-bridge), over New York, New Haven & 

Hartford Railroad, Providence Division. 

II. BRIDGES OF WHICH BOSTON MAINTAINS THE PART WITHIN ITS LIMITS .. 

Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Chelsea North, from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 
Paul's bridge, over Neponset river, Hyde Park. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 
WiNTHROP, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

III. bridges whose COST OP maintenance is partly paid BY BOSTON.. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad (over freight tracks). 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over New York, New Havea 
& Hartford Railroad, Old Colony Division. 

Austin street, Charlestown, over Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Bennington street. East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Blue Hill avenue, Mattapan, over New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, Midland Division. 

Boston street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Old Colony Division. 

Brookline street, Brighton, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Cambridge street, Charlestown, over Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Chelsea, Charlestown, over Boston & Maine Railroad, 

Curtis street. East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Dana avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Mid- 
land Division, Hyde Park. 

Dorchester avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Old Colony Division. 

Everett street, Brighton, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Fairmount avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad, 
Midland Division and Station street, Hyde Park. 

Glenwood avenue West, over passageway connecting land of New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Hyde Park. 

* Granite avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

Harvard street, Dorchester, over New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, Midland Division. 

Hyde Park avenue, over proposed electric connection between Midland 
and Providence Divisions, New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, Hyde Park. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 91 

Mavekick street, East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Mystic avenue, Charlestown, over Boston & Maine and Boston & 

Albany Railroads. 
Norfolk street, Dorchester, over New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad, Midland Division, near Dorchester Station. 
Norfolk street, Mattapan, over New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad, Midland Division. 
Oakland street, Mattapan, over New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad, Midland Division. 
Pleasant street, over the subway. 

Porter street, East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Prescott street, East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Redfield street, Neponset, over New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad, Old Colony Division. 
Reservoir road, Brighton, over Boston & Albany R. R., Newton 

Branch. 
Saratoga street. East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Saratoga street. East Boston, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

Railroad. 
Southampton street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, Old Colony Division. 
Sprague street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 

Midland Division and branch of Providence Division, Hyde Park. 
Summer street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 

Midland Division. 
Sumner street. East Boston, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
West Fourth street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 

Old Colony Division. 

rv. — bridges maintained by railroad corporations. 
1. — By the Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Albany street (over passenger tracks). 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 
Webster street (foot-bridge), East Boston. 

2. — By the Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany Railroads. 
Main Street, Charlestown. 
Perkins street (foot-bridge), Charlestown. 

3. — By the Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 
Wauwatosa avenue, East Boston. 

4. — By the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. East Boston. 



92 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



5. — By the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland Division. 

Dorchester avenue, South Boston. 

East River street, at River Street Station, Hyde Park. 

Morton street, Dorchester. 

Silver street. South Boston. 

Washington street, Dorchester. 

West Broadway, South Boston. 

West Fifth street, South Boston. 

West Fourth street, South Boston. 

West Second street, South Boston. 

West Sixth street. South Boston. 

West Third street, South Boston. 

6. — By the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Old Colony Division. 

Adams street. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Medway street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7. — By the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence Division. 

Albany street. 

Baker street. West Roxbury. 

Beech street. West Roxbury. 

Bellevue street. West Roxbury. 

Berkeley street. 

Broadway. 

Canterbury street. West Roxbury. 

Castle square. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Columbus avenue. 

Dartmouth street. 

Gardner street, West Roxbury. 

Harrison avenue. 

Milton street, Hyde Park. 

New Allen street, Hyde Park. 

Park street, West Roxbury. 

Walworth street. West Roxbury. 

Washington street. 

West street, Hyde Park. 

West River street, Hyde Park. 

v. — bridges maintained by metropolitan park commission 

* Charles River Dam. 
Mattapan, from Mattapan to Milton. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 93 



RECAPITULATION OF BRIDGES. 

I. Number maintained wholly by Boston 63 

II. Number of which Boston maintains the part within its limits . 8 
III. Number of those whose cost of maintenance is partly paid 

by Boston 35 

IV. Number maintained by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany 6 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany .... 2 

3. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 1 

5. New York, New Haven & Hartford, Midland 

Division 11 

6. New York, New Haven & Hartford, Old Colony 

Division 4 

7. New York, New Haven & Hartford, Providence 

Division 20 

V. Number maintained by Metropolitan Park Commission . 3 

Total number 154 

Ferries Owned and Operated by the City, 
south ferry. 
Boston Proper side. — Head-house at termination of Eastern avenue. 
East Boston side. — Head-house at termination of Lewis street. 

NORTH FERRY. 

Boston Proper side. — Head-house at termination of Battery street. 
East Boston side. — Head-house at termination of Border street. 

The following seven steam ferryboats are in commission, aU being of 
wood construction, except the last built, which has steel hull: 

Name. When Built. Kind. Length. 

D. D. KeUy 1879 Side-wheel. 160 ft. 3 in. 

Hugh O'Brien 1883 " 175 " 6 " 

General Hancock 1887 " 160 " 3 " 

Governor RusseU 1898 PropeUer. 164 " 3 " 

Noddle Island 1899 " 164 « 3 " 

General Sumner * 1900 " ' 164 " 3 " 

John H. SuUivan 1912 « 172 " 3 " 

Highway Division. 
Main Office, 50l City HaU Annex, fifth floor. 
James H. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Salary, $5,000. 
Joshua Atwood, 3d, Chief Engineer, Paving Service. Salary, $3,000. 
Benjamin F. Bates, Assistant Engineer, Paving Service. Salary, $2,500. 

* Rebuilt in 1910, at cost of $39,500. 



94 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Joseph J. Noeton, Supervisor of Sanitary, also Street Cleaning and Oiling 

Service. Salary, $3,000. 
Thomas F. Bowes, Engineer in charge of Sewer Service. Salary, $3,500. 
Edgar S. Dorr, Office Engineer, Sewer Service. Salary, $2,500. 
William P. Willard, Engineer of Special Work, Sewer Service. Salary, 

$2,500. 
Christopher J. Carven, Engineer in charge of Water Service. Salary, 

$3,500. 
Robert W. Wilson, Superintendent, Income Branch, Water Service. 

Salary, $3,000. 
George H. Finneran, General Foreman, Water Service, Salary, 



The Division Engiaeer of this division has charge of the construction 
and maintenance of all pubUc streets, the placing of street signs and num- 
bering of buildings, and the issuing of permits to open, occupy and obstruct 
portions of streets; of the cleaning and sprinkling of streets, and the 
removal of house offal and refuse in the various districts of the City; and 
of the care and maintenance of the electric and gas lamps in the pubUc 
streets, alleys, parks and public groimds, also the setting up of all new 
lamps and the placiQg of glass street signs and numbers therein. 

In 1915 the Sewer and Water Division was merged with the Highway 
Division under the name of the latter, thus bringing the Sewer Service 
and the Water Service in charge of the Highway Division Engineer. 
Under his control are the preparation of plans for and the construction of 
new sewers, the repairing and cleaning of existing sewers and catch-basins, 
the granting of permits for making sewer connections, and the investiga- 
tion of complaints in regard to defective drainage; the care and main- 
tenance of all pipes and other j&xtures and apphances held by the City 
for the purposes of its water supply, including the laying and relaying of 
pipes, the installation and testing of meters and the placing of pubhc 
drinking fountains, also the assessing of water rates and issuing of the 
bills therefor. Assessments upon the estates benefited by new sewers 
are not levied by the Pubhc Works Department but by the Board of 
Street Commissioners (See Street Laying-Out Department). 

The total length of common and intercepting sewers in the City on 
February 1, 1916, was 923.65 mUes; of supply and distributing water 
mains, 852.3 miles; number of water meters in use, 53,958 (on January 1) 
or 5,619 more than in 1915 at same date; number of pubhc fire hydrants, 
9,358; number of pubhc drinking fountains, 159, of which 90 are fitted 
with hygienic bubble fixtures and 69 are for animals only. 

The first water document pubhshed by the City of Boston appeared 
in 1825. The pubhc introduction of wat^ from Lake Cochituate took 
place on October 25, 1848. The history of the Boston Water Works up 
to January 1, 1868, has been written by Nathaniel J. Bradlee; from 1868 
to 1876, by Desmond FitzGerald; of the "Additional Supply from Sud- 
bury River," by A. Fteley. In addition to the annual reports on the 
Cochituate supply, from 1850, and of the Mystic supply, from 1866, there 
are numerous special reports. By chapter 449, Acts of 1895, the Boston 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



95 



Water Board, the Water Income Department and the Water Registrar 
were aboUshed and the Water Department created, a single commissioner 
being entrusted with aU the powers previously exercised by the Boston 
Water Board and the Boston Water Registrar. 

By Chapter 488, Acts of 1895, the State provided for a metropolitan 
water supply, Boston being included among the municipahties thus to be 
supplied. A State commission, the Metropohtan Water Board, in accord- 
ance with said act, took possession, in 1898, of aU that part of the Boston 
water system lying westward of Chestnut Hill Reservoir, also the pumping 
station there, with adjacent lands. The sum paid to the City was 
$12,531,000. Payments to the State by the City for its supply of water 
have been regularly made since 1898. In the existing Metropolitan 
Water District are nine cities, besides Boston, and nine towns. Boston 
took 76.2 per cent of the entire water supply of the District in 1915. 

The total number of water rate payers (i. e., to the City) on January 1, 
1916, was about 102,000 and the daily average amount of water used in 
1915 was 77,651,800 gallons, or 104 gallons per capita. This daily average 
is 4,226,000 gallons less than that reported for 1914. 

MILES OF ACCEPTED STREETS, FEBRUARY 1, 1916, BY DISTRICTS . 



DiSTEICT. 


Asphalt. 


Bitulithic. 


Granite 
Block. 


Gravel. 


Macadam. 


All 
Other. 


Totals. 


City Proper 


15.46 
0.32 
0.11 
1.94 
3.15 
0.66 
1.45 
0.15 


5.47 


41.28 

11.88 

6.44 

18.76 

13.63 

1.73 

7.65 

0.64 

0.08 


0.02 
0.02 
1.47 
0.69 
2.44 
6.50 
8.04 
5.13 
15.73 


25.23 
10.90 
23.62 
20.99 
64.21 
86.75 
106.47 
39.48 
18.80 


7.21 
0.29 
0.24 
2.06 
4.11 
0.51 
4.35 
0.38 
0.54 


94.67 
23.41 


East Boston 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury. . . 

Dorchester 

Brighton 

Hyde Park 


0.03 
1.05 
2.41 
0.65 
1.80 
0.70 


31.91 
45.49 
89.95 
96.80 
129.76 
46.48 
35.15 










ToTAii Miles. . 


23.24 


12.11 


102.09 


40.04 


396.45 


19.69 


593.62 


Pek Cent .... 


3.91 


2.04 


17.20 


6.74 


66.79 


3.32 


100.00 


Change in 1915. . 
(Miles.) 


+ 1.59 


+1.06 


+0.94 


—0.73 


+4.09 


+2.11 


+9.06 


CSiange in last 5 
Years. (Miles.) 


+1.26 


+5.93 


+3.46 


+11.57 


+42.64 


+7.55 


+72.41* 



Note. — Total area of the 593.62 miles of accepted streets, 11,153,026 square yards, or 
•2,304.3 acres, which area is 8.38 per cent of City's entire land area. In addition to the above 
total, there are accepted footways with total length of 1.29 miles. The accepted improved 
streets, alleys, etc., number 2,357. Besides these, there are about 2,700 private streets and 
alleys. 

For alphabetical list of public and private streets, with location in new wards and 
precincts, see Street Commissioners' 1916 edition of "Boston's Streets." 



* Includes the streets in Hyde Park District (viz. 34.95 miles) added in 1912 when its 
annexation became effective. 



96 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



STREET LAMPS IN USE, JANUARY 1, 1916. 



Electric. 



Gas. 



Total. 



Magnetite arc . 
Flame arc 



f40c. p 

Tungsten incandescent { 60 c. p 

[80 c. p. and over. 



Single mantle 

Double mantle 

Open-flame (fire alarm) . 



5,0791 

23 J 

3,0961 
1,269 ^ 



9,6521 

70 

146 



5,102 



4,378 



9,868 



Totals. 



9,480 



9,868 



19,348 



HIGH PBESSURE FIRE SERVICE. 

By the provisions of Chapter 312, Acts of 1911, the Commissioner of 
Public Works was authorized to install an efficient system of high pressure 
fire service for the City, appropriations therefor, amounting to $1,000,000, 
to be voted by the City Council in sums of not less than $150,000 each 
year for six years. Up to February 1, 1916, the total of loans for this 
purpose was $835,000 and the total expenditure $591,898, about one-third 
of the pipe fines having been laid and connected with the fireboat service 
so as to be available through business district when needed. A pumping 
station is soon to be constructed adjacent to the river waU, opposite Fruit 
street, where eight centrifugal pumps wiU be instaUed, fresh water to be 
suppfied from Charles river. 

REMOVAL OF STORE REFUSE. 

As provided by Chapters 1 and 10 of the Ordinances of 1911, the removal 
of refuse from shops, stores and warehouses is attended to by the High- 
way Division, the charge for this service being seven cents a barrel or 
bundle (not larger than a flour barrel). No removals are made except 
on defivery of tickets obtainable at 504 City Hall Annex, or at the office 
of the Superintendent of Markets, Faneuil Hall Market. 



REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 103 City Hall Annex, first floor. 

[Stat. 1892, Chap. 314; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 34; C. C, Title IV., 

Chap. 28; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 29.] 
Edward W. McGlenen, City Registrar. Term ends in 1918. Salary, 

$4,000. 
John J. Browne, Assistant Registrar, Salary, $2,000. 
John M. Ludden, Assistant Registrar. Salary, $1,700. 



SCHOOLHOUSE DEPARTMENT. 97 

The City Registrar keeps the records of births, deaths and marriages,' 
and issues certificates of all intentions of marriage. Annual reports have 
been pubhshed since 1849, except in 1860 and 1861. 

By law, in the absence of the Registrar, the Assistant Registrars may 
perform his duties and give certificates of attestation. 

By Ordinance, approved Jvdy 12, 1892, the Department of Ancient 
Records and the office of Record Commissioners (established July 6, 
1875) were abohshed, and the duties of the Record Commissioners, includ- 
ing the pubhcation of documents relating to the early history of Boston, 
were transferred to the City Registrar. 



SCHOOLHOUSE DEPARTMENT. 

OflSice, 1007 City Hall Annex, tenth floor. 

[Stat. 1901, Chap. 473; Stat. 1904, Chap. 376; C. C, Title V., Chap. 33, 

§ 14; Stat. 1905, Chap. 392; Stat. 1906, Chap. 259; Stat. 1907, 

Chap. 450; Stat. 1908, Chap. 524; Stat. 1909, Chap. 446; Stat. 1911, 

Chap. 540; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 337, 363; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 331, 738.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Joseph P. Lomasney Chairman. 

William J. Hennessey, Secretary. 

J. George Herlihy, Chief Clerk. Salary, $2,500. 

commissioners. 
Joseph P. Lomasney. Term ends in 1919. Salary, $4,000. 
William J. Hennessey. Term ends in 1918. Salary, $3,500. 
Thomas D. O'Connor. Term ends in 1917. Salary, $3,500. 

This department, which was estabhshed by Chapter 473 of the Acts 
of 1901 (amended by Chapter 376 of the Acts of 1904), is in charge of a 
board of three commissioners, appointed by the Mayor. One com- 
missioner is appointed in each year for a term of three years, beginning 
with June 1 in the year of appointment. The salaries of the commis- 
sioners and the ordinary expenses of the department are met by appro- 
priations of the School Committee. 

The authority and duties of the Board are those formerly conferred 
and imposed upon the City Council and the School Committee in relation 
to selecting lands for school purposes and requesting the Street Com- 
missioners to take the same, providing temporary school accommodations, 
and making, altering and approving designs and plans for school purposes; 
erecting, completing, altering, repairing, furnishing, and preparing yards 
for, school buildings, and making contracts and selecting architects for 
doing said work. 

The Board is required to take measures to secure proper ventilation, 
proper sanitary conditions, and protection from fire, for existing school 
buildings. The Board is charged with the duty of making annual reports 
to the Mayor, to be published as pubHc documents. 



98 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City HaU, Room 20. 
IR. L., Chap. 27, § 14; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 35; C. C, Title IV., 
Chap. 9, § 5; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, § 26; Stat. 1910, Chap. 437; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 31.] 

Officials. 
James W. Dunphy, Chairman. 

J. Alfred Mitchell, Secretary. Salary, $700 per annum. 
Charles H. Slattery, Treasurer. Salary, $200 per annum. 

commissioners. * 
John J. Cassidy, Logan L. McLean. Terms end in 1919. 
Matthew Cummings, Donald J. Ferguson. Terms end in 1918. 
James W. Dunphy, Max E. Wyzanski. Terms end in 1917. 

The Board of Commissioners of Sinking Funds for the payment or 
redemption of the City debt was estabhshed by Ordinance on December 
24, 1870. This Board consists of six members, two of whom are appointed 
annually by the Mayor for a term of three years from May 1. The Board 
has published annual reports since 1871. The amended City Charter, 
Section 26, prohibits the further establishing of sinking funds, but an 
exception was afterwards made by the Legislature regarding loans for 
Rapid Transit purposes. It also prohibits the depositing of City or 
County money in any bank of which any member of the Board of Sinking 
Funds Commissioners is an officer, director or agent. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City Hall, fifth floor. 
[R. L., Chap. 79; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 36; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 29.] 
John E. Oilman, Soldiers' Relief Commissioner. Term ends in 1918. 
Salary, $3,500. 

The Soldiers' Relief Department was created as a department of the 
City of Boston by Chapter 441 of the Acts of 1897, and is under the charge 
of a commissioner, who is appointed by the Mayor. He exercises all 
powers and duties for the distribution of State and City aid to soldiers 
in the City of Boston, such as were formerly vested in the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen, by certain acts of the Legislature of previous years. 
The City Council determine the amount of rehef in individual cases. 



STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 73 City Hall, seventh floor. 
[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 37; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 33.] 

officials. 
John Koren, Chairman. 
Edward M. Hartwell, Secretary. Salary, $3,000. 

* The Commissioners serve without compensation. 



STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. 99 

TEUSTEES.* 

Frederic W. Rugg. Term ends in 1920. 
Robert J. Dts.irt. Term ends in 1919. 
John Keren. Term ends in 1918. 
William D. McKissick. Term ends in 1917. 
William D. C. Cuktis. Term ends in 1916. 

This department is in charge of a board of five members, whose duty 
it is to collect, compile and publish such statistics relating to the City 
of Boston and such statistics of other cities, for purposes of comparison, 
as they may deem of public importance, also to furnish statistical infor- 
mation to the city departments and to the public on request. Up to 1914, 
the department published two series of Special Publications, one on Extra- 
ordinary Receipts and Expenditures, the other on Ordinary, the latter issued 
annually with detail tables covering the last five fiscal years, also a Bulletin 
of municipal statistics, issued quarterly, with tables arranged by months, 
containing 40 to 48 quarto pages. A selection of such statistical material 
as has appeared hitherto in those publications will eventually be brought 
together in a municipal Year Book. The, Municipal Register is compiled 
annually by the department. 

STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. 
Main Ofiice, 401 City Hall Annex, fourth floor. 
[R. L., Chap. 48, §§88-90; Stat. 1870, Chap. 337; Stat. 1895, Chap. 
449, § 23; Stat. 1897, Chap. 426; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 39; Stat. 
1899, Chap. 450; Stat. 1906, Chap. 393; Stat. 1907, Chap. 584; Stat. 
1908, Chap. 447; C. C. Chap. 51; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 28, 31; 
Stat. 1911, Chaps. 415, 453, 591; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 339, 371, 558, 
661; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 263, 432, 536, 554, 577, 680, 799; Stat. 1914, 
Chaps. 119, 569, 641; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 34; Stat. 1915, Chap. 
176.] 

officials. 
John H. Dunn, Chairman. 
John J. O'Callaghan, Secretary. Salary, $3,600. 

BOARD OF street COMMISSIONERS. 

John H. Dunn. Term ends in 1918. Salary, S4,500. 
Frank J. Brennan, Term ends in 1917. Salary, $4,000. 
Frank A. Goodwin. Term ends in 1916. Salary, $4,000. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION. 

Frank O. Whitnet, Chief Engineer. Salary, $3,500. 
Irwin C. Cromack, Assistant Chief Engineer. Salary, $2,800. 

assessment division. 
Joseph F. Sullivan, Chief of Division. Salary, $2,500. 
A member of the Board of Street Commissioners is appointed each 
year by the Mayor to serve for three years from the first Monday in 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



100 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

February. The Board has power to lay out, relocate, alter or discontinue 
highways in the City, and to order specific repairs thereon, also to order, 
with the approval of the Mayor, the construction of sewers and to take 
for the City any lands, water courses and ways deemed necessary for 
such construction. It levies the betterment assessments on estates bene- 
fited by the construction of new sewers and new or improved highways 
(see Chapter 536, Acts of 1913), also awards damages for takings of land, 
and grants to landowners permission to open private streets. In 1895 
the duties of the Board of Survey were transferred to the Street Com- 
missioners; in 1907 they were charged with the licensing of street stands 
for the sale of merchandise, in 1908 with the regulation of street traffic, 
and in 1913 with the authority to grant or withhold permits for the erec- 
tion of automobile garages. 

By the Amended City Charter of 1909, the jiu-isdiction previously 
exercised by the Board of Aldermen is vested in the Street Commissioners, 
with the written approval of the Mayor, as to the naming of streets, as 
to trees in the streets, as to permits or Hcenses for special use of same, 
including the construction of coal holes, vaults, bay windows and mar- 
quees, in, under, or over the streets, also for the location of conduits, poles 
and posts and the storage of inflammables and explosives. 

The most extensive project of recent years for new street construction 
is now in charge of the Street Commissioners, as authorized by Chapter 661, 
Acts of 1912, and accepted by the voters of the City at the State election, 
November 5, 1912. The City Council designates the streets to be con- 
structed or improved; the total expenditiire is limited to $2,500,000, of 
which not more than $500,000 shall be expended in any single year, and 
not less than 60 per cent of each year's appropriation shall be appHed to 
streets in the suburban districts of the City. 

As authorized by Chapter 680, Acts of 1913, the Street Commissioners 
issued on April 9, 1914, their "Rules and Regulations Relating to Projec- 
tions on or over Public Highways." 

Fees for permits and each annual renewal thereof are fijsed as follows: 

Illuminated signs $1 00 

Two-foot projecting signs (not illuminated) 50 

Other projecting signs (not illuminated) 25 

Drum and sill signs 25 

Flat signs against buildings 25 

Lamps, unlettered 25 

Marquees, permanent, or movable awnings 1 00 

Hoisting devices 1 00 

Lettering in sidewalks 1 00 

Other structures 1 00 

Temporary signs on buildings for purposes of public interest No fee 

Traffic rules. 
As provided by Chapter 447, Acts of 1908, the Street Commissioners 
were authorized to make such regulations as they deemed needful to 
prevent the increasing congestion and delay of trafiic in the streets. New 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 101 

traflSc rules were promulgated in December, 1908, and went into effect 
January 1, 1909. They are enforced by the Pohce Commissioner, and the 
penalty for violation is a fine not exceeding twenty dollars for each offence. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 808 City Hall Annex, eighth floor. 
[Ord. 1908, Chap. 6; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 35.] 
D. Feank Doherty, Superintendent of Supplies. Term ends in 1917. 

Salary, $3,000. 
Francis P. Rock, Assistant Purchasing Agent. Salary, SI, 500. 

It is the duty of the Superintendent of Supplies to furnish all the material, 
apparatus and othe suppUes required for the special use of the Pubhc 
Works Department, and such material for other departments of the City 
as may be asked for by requisition signed by the head of such depart- 
ment, except furniture and stationery. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hall, Rooms 21 and 22, first fioor. 
[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 40; Ord. 1908, Chap. 4; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 9; 

Stat. 1913, Chap. 672; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 36.] 
Charles H. Slattery, City Treasurer. Salary, $5,000. Term ends in 

1918. 
Benjamin S. Turner, Cashier, and Acting Treasurer in the absence of 
the Treasurer. Salary, $4,000. 

The City Treasurer has the care and custody of the current funds of 
the City, of all moneys, properties . and securities placed in his charge 
by any statute or ordinance, or by any gift, devise, bequest, or deposit; 
he pays all drafts and all checks and other orders directed to him from 
the Auditing Department for the payment of bills and demands against 
the City; he pays aU executions against the City when duly certified as 
correct by an officer of the Law Department, even if the appropriation 
to which the execution is chargeable is not sufficient. He pays the prin- 
cipal and interest of the City debt, as the same becomes due, and has 
charge of the issue, transfer and registration of the City debt. He receives 
and invests all trust funds of the City, and holds the income thereof sub- 
ject to expenditure for the pm-poses designated in the gift. He disposes 
of the balance remaining at the end of each financial year as the City 
Council may direct. 

The City Treasm-er is also County Treasurer and Treasurer of the 
Sinking Funds Department. 

The Treasurer publishes reports yearly. Since 1882 he has published 
monthly statements. 



102 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

VESSELS AND BALLAST DEPARTMENT. 
OflBce, 157 Liverpool street, East Boston. 
[R. L., Chap. 66, §§ 8-16; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 41.] 
CoBNBLiTjs J. Donovan, Chief Weigher. Appointed annually. 
This department is under the charge of the Weighers of Vessels and 
BaUast, two in number, one of whom is designated by the Mayor as chief . 
They receive the fees, after payment of expenses, as compensation for 
their services. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DEPARTMENT. 
OflBce, 106 City HaU Annex, first floor. 
[R. L., Chap. 62, § 18; Stat. 1882, Chap. 42; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 43; 
Stat. 1909, Chap. 382; Stat. 1910, Chap. 209; Stat. 1913, Chap. 503; 
Stat. 1914, Chaps. 346, 379, 452; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 37.] 

Chaeles B. Woollet, Sealer. Salary, $3,000. 

John E. Ansell, Chief Clerk. Jeremiah J. Crowley, James A. Swee- 
ney, Charles E. Walsh, Frank L. Harney, Louis Hertgen, 
Benjamin P. Hutchinson, Julius Meyer, Charles O. Sikora, 
Fred A. Thissell, John J. Ryan, Deputy Sealers. Salaries, $1,600 
each per annum. 

This department is under the charge of the Sealer. The Sealer and 
Deputy Sealers are appointed also to seize illegal charcoal measures. 
(R. L., Chap. 57, § 93.) 

The standards in use are supphed by the Commonwealth and are deter- 
mined by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington, 
D. C. The ofl&ce was authorized by the statute of February 26, 1800. 
Annual reports have been pubhshed since 1868. By chapter 382, Acts 
of 1909, all principal and assistant sealers are included within the classified 
civil service. 



WIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Ofl&ce, 905 City HaU Annex, ninth floor. 

[Stat. 1890, Chap. 404; Stat. 1894, Chap. 454; Stat. 1895, Chap. 228; Stat. 

1898, Chaps. 249 and 268; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 44; Stat. 1908, 

Chaps. 339 and 347; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 31; Stat. 1911, Chap. 364; 

Stat. 1915, Chaps. 262 and 268; Stat. 1916, Chap. 196 (Spec.).] 
James E. Cole, Commissioner of Wires and Chief Electrician. Term ends 

in 1920. Salary, $5,000. 
Walter J. Burke, Chief Inspector, Interior Division. Salary, $2,200. 
Peter F. Dolan, Chief Inspector, Exterior Division. Salary, $2,200. 

The office of Commissioner of Wires was estabHshed in 1894, in accord- 
ance with Chapter 454 of the Acts of that year. 



WIRE DEPARTMENT. 103 

The department has issued annual reports, beginning February 1, 1895. 

Under the statute of 1894, it was made the duty of the Commissioner 
of Wires to have all unexempted electric wires, cables and conductors 
in the City north of Dover and Berkeley streets, and between the Charles 
river, the Harbor and Fort Point channel placed underground, and to 
remove all unexempted poles and structures in the streets within the said 
district before January 1, 1900. 

He was authorized to supervise and inspect both underground and 
overhead wires, cables and conductors; to regulate the direction of such 
wires, cables and conductors, and see that they were suflBciently insulated; 
to secure the removal of dead or abandoned wires, and the protection 
of all buildings by proper safety devices; to inspect all wires carrying 
electric hght, heating or power current within buildings, and to see that 
aU wires, posts, machinery and appliances are kept in good order and 
condition. 

Chapter 249 of the Acts of 1898 provided that in each of the years 
1900-1909, inclusive, the Commissioner of Wires should prescribe the limits 
of a district within which, for not more than two miles of streets, ave- 
nues, or highways, certain wires, cables and conductors were to be removed 
or placed imderground during the calendar year. 

By Chapter 347 of the Acts of 1908, the Commissioner was required to 
extend the same improvements to other streets, i. e., two miles each year 
to 1919, inclusive. Under Section 2 of the same Act, the Commissioner 
was authorized to grant such terminal pole locations as were in his judg- 
ment necessary, and under Section 3 he was authorized to make such rules 
and regulations relating to the insulation of overhead and underground 
wires, cables and conductors and apphances as were reasonably necessary 
for the purposes of safety The Commissioner is sole judge of what con- 
stitutes proper and safe insulation of electric conductors and appliances 
within buildings. 

According to Chapter 339, Acts of 1908, any person, firm or corpora- 
tion failing to notify the Commissioner of the instaUing of wiring or appa- 
ratus for electric hght, heat or power purposes shall be subject to a fine 
of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for each offence. 

Section 1 of Chapter 347, Acts of 1908, was repealed in 1911, as pro- 
vided by Chapter 364, and the Commissioner was therein required to 
prescribe not more than three miles (instead of two miles, as hitherto) 
of streets in 1912 and each year thereafter to 1916, inclusive, within which 
aU wires, etc., were to be removed (with the poles or other structures 
supporting them) and placed underground. 

By Chapter 196, Acts of 1916, the powers conferred and the duties 
imposed upon the Commissioner of Wires by legislation in 1911 and years 
prior thereto were extended from 1917 to 1921, inclusive. 



104 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VARIOUS CITY AND STATE OFFICERS. 



The following table shows the manner in which pubUc officers, other 
than the regular City department heads, are appointed or elected as pre- 
scribed by statute, ordinance, or regulation, the time of appointment or 
election, the term of office, and the salary, if any, of each officer. Appoint- 
ments by the Mayor marked with a * are subject to approval by the State 
Civil Service Commission; those marked with a f are confirmed by the 
City Council: 





How 
Created. 


Appointed or 
Elected. 


Teem. 


Salary. 


















By Whom. 


When. 


Begins. 


Length of. 




Art Commissioners * (five) 


Statute. . 


Mayor 


Annually 
one. 


May 1.. 


Five years. 


None. 


Board of Appeal * (five) 


" .. 





" .... 


Aug. 1. 


Five years . 


4 


Boston and Cambridge Bridges 
Commissioners (two). 


" 





May, 1898 




Indefinite. . 


None. 








Boston Transit Commissioners * 
(five). 


" 


Mayor and 
Governor.3 


July, 1894 . 


July 1. . 


Ends, 1917. 


$5,000 


Chattel Loan Company, one 
Director. 


" 


Mayor 


Annually 




One year . . 


None. 


County Officers ly^^i^^g See 
Court Officers. J PP" "2-118. 














Finance Commission (five) 


" . . 


Governor!. . 


Annually 
one. 




Five years . 


e 


Licensing Board (three) 


" . . 


" ! . . 


Biennially 
one. 




Six years . . 


$3,5002 


Loan Association, Working- 
men's, one Director. 


" . . 


Mayor ..... 


Annually 


3dThu. 
in Apr. 


One year . . 


None. 


Loan Company, Collateral, one 
Director. 


" . . 


" 


" .... 


3d Wed. 
in Dee. 


" 


" 




Statute. . 


Supreme 
Court. 








« 


(twelve) . 


cancies 
occur. 









1 With the advice and consent of the Executive Council. - Chairman, $500 additional 

' Three appointed by the Mayor, and two by the Governor, with the advice and consent of the. 
Executive Council. 

* Salary $10 per day, but not to exceed $1,000 per year. 
^ Chairman, $5,000; other members none. 



VARIOUS CITY AND STATE OFFICERS. 



105 



Opficebs. 



How 

Created 



Appointed or 
Elected. 



By Whom. When 



Term. 



Begins. Length of. 



Salary. 



Managers of Old South Asso- 
ciation (three) . 

Medical Examiners (two) 

Pilot Commissioners (two) 

Police, Commissioner of 

School Committee (five) 

Undertakers 

Officers Paid by Fees :t 

Beef, Weighers of 

Boilers, Weighers of, etc 

Coal, Weighers of 

Constables 

Fence Viewers^ 

Grain, Measurers of 

Hay and Straw, Inspectors of . 

Hay Scales, Superintendent of, 

Lime, Inspectors of 

Liquid Measures, Gauger of. . . 

Petroleum, etc.. Inspectors of , 

Upper Leather, Measurers of. 

Wood and Bark, Measurers of. 



Statute. 



City Coun- 
cil. 



Annually 



When 
elected. 



Governor! . 



Elected. 



Health De- 
partment. 

Mayor 



Trienni- 
ally. 



1916.... 



City elec- 
tion. 



Annually 



1st Mon- 
day in 
June. 

1st Mon- 
day in 
Feb'y 

May 1 . 



One year . . 

Seven yr's , 
Three yr's . 

Five years. 

Three yr's 

One year . . 



None. 



$4,000 

Fixed by 
Marine 
Society. 

$6,000 



None. 



None 



Fees. 



• With the advice and consent of the Executive Council. 

' Two inspectors in the Building Department are designated as the officers 



106 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

. VARIOUS CITY AND STATE OFFICERS, 
DEPARTMENTS, COMMISSIONS, 
COURTS AND MINOR OFFICERS. 



ART DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1001 City Hall Annex. 

[Stat. 1898, Chap. 410; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 4; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 11. 1 

OFFICIALS. 

Thomas Allen, Chairman. 
John T. Coolidge, Jr., Secretary. 

COMMISSIONERS . * 

Alexander Steinert, named by the Trustees of the Public Library. 
Term ends in 1921. 

Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, named by the Boston Society of 
Architects. Term ends in 1920. 

Charles D. Maginnis, named by the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. Term ends in 1919. 

Thomas Allen, named by Trustees of Museum of Fine Arts. Term 
ends in 1918 . 

John Templeman Coolidge, Jr., named by the Boston Art Club. Term 
ends in 1917. 

The Art Department was established by Chapter 410 of the Acts of 
the Legislature of 1898. It is in charge of five commissioners, who are 
appointed by the Mayor. Each of the following-named bodies, namely, 
the Trustees of the Museum of Fine Arts, the Trustees of the Boston 
PubUc Library, the Trustees of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, the Boston Art Club, and the Boston Society of Architects, sub- 
mits a Hst of three persons to the Mayor; and the Mayor appoints one 
person as Art Commissioner from each of the lists so submitted. When- 
ever the term of a member of the Board expires, the Mayor appoints his 
successor from a hst selected by the body which made the original selec- 
tion, as aforesaid. The Board may appoint a secretary outside of its own 
membership, who serves without compensation. 

No work of art can become the property of the City without the 
approval of the Art Department, which may also be requested by the 
Mayor or the City Council to pass upon the design of any municipal 
building, bridge, approach, lamp, ornamental gate or fence, or other 
structure to be erected upon land belonging to the City. Moreover, all 
contracts or orders for the execution of any painting, monument, statue, 

* The Commissioners serve without compensation. 



BOARD OF APPEAL. 107 

bust, bas-relief, or other sculpture for the City shall be made by said Board, 
acting by a majority of its members, subject to the approval of the Mayor. 



BOARD OF APPEAL. 
Office, 804 City Hall Amiex, eighth floor. 
[Stat. 1907, Chap. 550, §§ 6, 7; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 13, § 6; Stat. 

1910, Chap. 631.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Carl Gerstein, Chairman. 
Timothy Walsh, Secretary. 

THE BOARD. 

Charles S. Judkins. Term ends in 1920. 

John F. Stevens. Term ends in 1919. 

Timothy Walsh. Term ends in 1918. 

Carl Gerstein. Term ends in 1917. 

Walter S. Gerry. Term ends in 1916. 
The Board consists of five members appointed by the Mayor in the 
following manner: One member from two candidates, one to be nominated 
by the Real Estate Exchange and Auction Board, and one by the Massa- 
chusetts Real Estate Exchange; one member from two candidates, one 
to be nominated by the Boston Society of Architects and one by the 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers; one member from two candidates, one 
to be nominated by the Master Builders' Association and one by the 
Contractors' and Builders' Association; one member from two candidates 
to be nominated by the Building Trades Council of the Boston Central 
Labor Union; and one member selected by the Mayor. The term of 
office is five years. Each member is paid ten dollars per day for actual 
service, but not more than one thousand doUars in any one year. 

Any appHcant for a permit from the Building Commissioner whose 
apphcation has been refused may appeal therefrom within ninety days, 
and a person who has been ordered by the Commissioner to incur any 
expense may, within ten days after receiving such order, appeal to the 
Board of Appeal by giving notice in writing to the Commissioner. All 
cases of appeal are referred to this Board, which may, after a hearing, 
direct the Commissioner to issue his permit under such conditions, if any, 
as the Board may require, or to withhold the same. Any citizen of Boston 
may obtain the opinion of the Board as to the true construction of the 
language under which a decision of the Commissioner has been rendered. 
Permits to restore damage by fire can only be issued with the approval of 
the Board. 

The Board may vary the provisions of the statute of 1907 in specific 
cases which appear to them not to have been contemplated thereby, or 
in cases where manifest injustice is done, but such decisions, must be 
unanimous and not in conffict with the spirit of any provision of the 
statute. 



108 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Appeal may also be made to this Board from certain requirements of 
the Commissioner of Wires. (See Statutes 1907, Chap. 550, § 7.) 



BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 
Office, City Hall Annex, fifth floor. 
[Stat. 1870, Chaps. 300, 302; Stat. 1898, Chap. 467, § 14; Ord. 1908, 
Chap. 1; C. C, Chap. 35, §§ 2, 4, and 5; Stat. 1912, Chap. 92.] 
Edward F. Mvupby, Commissioner for Boston. 
Francis J. Smith, Commissioner for Cambridge. 

This Commission was estabUshed by statute in 1870, to have charge 
of the maintenance of the West Boston, Canal or Craigie's, and the 
Prison Point bridges. (Statutes of 1870, Chaps. 300, 302.) In 1892 the 
Harvard bridge was placed in their charge. (Statutes of 1882, Chap. 155.) 
The powers of the Commission were greatly enlarged by Statutes of 
1898, Chapter 467, Section 14. This Act places all bridges and draws 
between the two cities in their charge, to support, manage and keep in 
repair, and to authorize exclusively the placing of poles, wires and other 
structures upon, them. The expense of maintenance is borne equally 
by the City of Boston and the City of Cambridge. The two Commission- 
ers are appointed by the Mayors of Boston and Cambridge respectively. 
The Commissioner for Boston, who serves without pay, is the Commissioner 
of PubUc Works. 

BRIDGES IN CHARGE OF THE COMMISSIONERS.^ 

Anderson Bridge, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
3 Brookhne street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

2 Cambridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 

^ Cambridge street-River street, from Brighton to Cambridge . 
Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

3 Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 



BOSTON FINANCE COMMISSION. 
Office, 410-416 Tremont Building. 
[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 17-21.] 

OFFICIALS. 

John R. Mtjrphy, Chairman. Salary, $5,000. 

Gut C. Emerson, Consulting Engineer. Salary, $5,000. 

John C. L. Dowling, Junior Counsel and Acting Secretary . Salary, $3,200. 

1 For other bridges, see Park and Recreation Department and Bridge and Ferry Division 

of Public Works Department. 

2 Placed in charge of the Commission December 21, 1907. 

3 Placed in charge of the Commission July, 1898, under Chapter 467 of the Acts of 1898. 

All of the bridges named in this list are over navigable waters. 



BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION. 109 

COMMISSIONERS. 

John F. Moors. Term expires in 1921. 
James M. Morrison. Term expires in 1920. 
John R. Murphy. Term expu-es in 1919. 
James P. Magenis. Term expires in 1918. 
Charles L. Carr. Term expires in 1917. 

The Finance Commission is constituted under the Amended Charter. 
(Chapter 486, Acts of 1909.) It consists of five commissioners appointed 
by the Governor and confirmed by the Executive Council, the term of 
each being five years. The chairman of the Commission is named by 
the Governor. The members of the Commission, other than the chair- 
man, serve without pay. 

It is the duty of the Commission to investigate, at its discretion, all 
matters relating to appropriations, loans, expenditures, accounts and 
methods of administration affecting the City of Boston or the County 
of Suffolk, or any of their departments, and to report upon its investi- 
gations from time to time to the Mayor, the City Council, the Governor, 
or the General Court. 

The Commission is required to make an ammal report, in January, to 
the General Court. It is also the duty of the Commission to report to 
the Mayor, the City Auditor or the City Treasurer as to the validity or 
proper amoimt of any doubtful pay-roll, bill or claim referred to it by them. 

The Commission has aU the powers and duties conferred by Chapter 
562, Acts of 1908, upon the former Finance Commission, including the 
power to summon witnesses and secure papers. The term of the former 
Finance Commission, which expired by hmitation on December 31, 1908, 
was extended tiU February 1, 1909. The present Commission qualified 
on June 24, 1909. , 

BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION. 
Ofl&ce, 15 Beacon street, eighth floor. 
[Stat. 1894, Chap. 548; Stat. 1899, Chap. 375; Stat. 1902, Chap. 534; Stat. 
1906, Chap. 213; Stat. 1909, Chap. 455; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 623 and 
741; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 667, 775; Stat. 1915, Chaps. 87, 130, 376 
(Spec); Stat. 1916, Chap. 342 (Spec.).] 

OFFICIALS. 

George F. Swain, Chairman. 

B. Leighton Beal, Secretary. Salary, $3,500. 

Edmund S. Davis, Chief Engineer. Salary, $6,000. 

commissioners. 

Horace G. Allen, David A. Ellis. Appointed by the Governor. 

George F. Swain, Josiah Quincy, James B. Noyes. Appointed by 

the Mayor. Salary, $5,000 each. Terms expire July 1, 1917. 

The Commissioners were originally appointed for the term of five years 

from the first of July, 1894. By Stat. 1899, Chap. 375, the term was 



110 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

extended to July 1, 1902. By Stat. 1902, Chap. 634, accepted by the 
voters of Boston at the Municipal Election of 1902, the term of the Com - 
mission was fm-ther extended to July 1, 1906. By Stat. 1906, Chap. 213, 
the term of the Commission was further extended to July 1, 1909; by 
Stat. 1909, Chap. 455, to July 1, 1911; by Stat. 1911, Chap. 623, to July 
1, 1914, and by Stat. 1914, Chap. 644, to July 1, 1917. 

The Commission had charge of the construction of the Tremont street 
subway, opened September 1, 1897 (costing $4,416,000 including altera- 
tions), of the Charlestown bridge (costing $1,570,198), of the tunnel to 
East Boston, opened December 30, 1904 (costing about $3,300,000), and 
the Washington street tunnel. This two-track tunnel, which is used for 
elevated railway trains exclusively, was opened for traffic on November 
30, 1908. It is 1.16 miles long and cost $8,484,700, of which the land 
damages amounted to $2,850,000. 

The Commission began constructing in September, 1909, under the 
provisions of Chapter 520, Acts of 1906, a tunnel under Beacon HiU from 
the new Cambridge bridge to the Park street station of the Tremont 
street subway, as a connection with the Cambridge Main street subway 
built by the Boston Elevated Railway. This two-track subway for train 
service, called Cambridge Connection (length 2,486 feet), and costing 
$1,450,000 was opened for traffic March 23, 1912. 

By Chapter 741, Acts of 1911, the Commission was further charged 
with the construction of the East Boston Tunnel Extension (about 2,300 
feet in length), to connect Court street and ScoUay square with Bowdoin 
square and Cambridge street. This two-track subway for sm-face cars 
was opened for traffic on March 18, 1916, its cost being nearly $2,500,000. 
The same legislation provided for the Boylston street subway (about 1.9 
miles in length, substituted for the Riverbank subway), and the Dor- 
chester tunnel for train service (length about 2.27 miles), to connect with 
the Cambridge route at Park street station and extend under Winter and 
Summer streets to South station, thence to Andrew square, Dorchester. 
The Boylston street subway (for surface cars only), extending from Tre- 
mont street subway near Park square to Commonwealth avenue near 
Kenmore street, was opened for traffic October 3, 1914, and the total 
expenditxu-e therefor, to February 1, 1916, was $4,972,460. That part of 
the Dorchester tunnel between Park street station and Chauncy street 
was opened to pubhc use on April 14, 1915. The loans issued for 
Dorchester tunnel construction up to February 1, 1916, amounted to 
$6,900,000. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 

■County Commissioners for the County of Suffolk. — The Citt Council of 

Boston. 
County Auditor. — J. Alfred Mitchell. Salary, $800. 
County Treasurer. — Charles H. Slattery. Salary, $800. 



COUNTY OFFICIALS. HI 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Room 218, Court House. 

[R. L., Chap. 7, §§ 12, 13; Stat. 1910, Chap. 439.] 

District Attorney. — Joseph C. Pelletier. Salary, $7,000. Elected by the 

people, November 4, 1913, for term of three years ending 1917. 
Assistant. — Abraham C. Webber. Salary, $3,800. 
Assistant. — Daniel V. Mclsaac. Salary, $3,800. 
Assistant. — Daniel J. Gallagher. Salary, $3,800. 
Deputy Assistant. — Henry P. Fielding. Salary, $2,200. 
Deputy Assistant. — Ralph H. HaUett. Salary, $2,200. 

LAND COURT. 

Room 408, Court House. 

[R. L., Chap. 128; Chap. 448, Acts of 1904.] 

Judge. — Charles Thornton Davis. Salary, $8,000. Appointed by the 

Governor. ^ 

Associate Judge. — Joseph J. Corbett. Salary, $8,000. Appointed by the 

Governor. 
Recorder. — Clarence C. Smith. Salary, $4,500. Appointed by the 
Governor for a term of five years, expiring in 1918. 

" INDEX COMMISSIONERS. 

[R. L., Chap. 22, § 31; Chap. 422, Acts of 1902.] 
Commissioners. — Henry W. Bragg, term ends in 1919. Alfred Hemenway, 

term ends in 1918. Babson S. Ladd, term ends in 1917. 
Clerk. — Charles A. Drew. 

Appointed in March, one each year, by a majority of the Justices of 
the Superior Court for the County of Suffolk for a term of three years, 
beginning April 1, and serve without pay. 

REGISTER OF DEEDS. 

[R. L., Chap. 22; Stat. 1895, Chap. 493; Stat. 1904, Chap. 452.] 
Register of Deeds.— W. T. A. Fitzgerald. Salary, $5,000. Elected by 
the people in 1911 for five years, from January, 1912. The Register 
is ex officio Assistant Recorder of the Land Court. 
First Assistant Register. — Stephen A. Jennings. Salary, $3,000. Appointed 

by the Register. 
Second Assistant Register. — John W. Johnson. Salary, $2,400. Ap- 
pointed by the Register. 

SHERIFF AND DEPUTY SHERIFFS. 

[R. L., Chap. 23.] 
Sheriff. — John Quinn, Jr., elected by the people November 2, 1915. 
Term ends in 1919. Salary, $3,000; as Jailer he receives $1,000 
additional. 

Note. — The District Attorney appoints, and may remove at discretion, three assist- 
ants and two deputy assistants. All are paid by the State. 



112 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Special Sheriff. — John F. Kelly. 

Deputy Sheriffs for Service of Writs. — John F. Kelly, Jeremiah G. 

Fennessey, Joseph P. Silsby, Daniel A. Whelton, CorneUus A. Reardon. 
Deputy Sheriffs for Court Duty. — Wilham J. Leonard, Chief Deputy Sheriff. 

Salary, $2,000. 
Wilham Burns, William W. Campbell, Daniel A. Cronin,* Caleb D. 

Dunham, James A. Hussey, Wilham A. McDevitt, Thomas A. 

Mxirray, Francis H. Wall, Richard J. Murray, Robert Herterf, Peter 

McCann, Oscar L. Strout, Wilham J. Nawn, George F. Mitchell, 

Thomas P. Hurley, Andrew J. Crotty, Frank C. Pierce. Salary, 

$1,700 each. 
All debts and expenses of the County of Suffolk are borne by the City of 
Boston, unless otherwise specified. 



Court Officers and Assistants. 

Offices in Court House, Peniberton square, except as otherwise specified. 
SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT. 

Clerk for the Commonwealth. — Clarence H. Cooper. Salary, $3,000, paid 

by the Commonwealth. Appointed by the Court. 
Clerk for the County of Suffolk. — John F. Cronin. Salary, $5,000 from 

the County and $1,500 from the Commonwealth. Elected by the 

people in 1911, term ending in January, 1917. 
Assistant Clerk. — John H. Flynn. Salary, $3,000 from County and $500 

from the Commonwealth. 
Reporter of Decisions. — Henry W. Swift. Salary, $4,000. 
Messenger of Court. — Robert Herter.f 

SUPERIOR COUTIT FOR CIVIL BUSINESS. 

Clerk. — ■ Francis A. Campbell. Salary, $6,000. Elected by the people in 

1911 for five years, from January, 1912. 
Assistant Clerks. — Wilham Gilchrist,| George E. KimbaU,t Allen H. 

Bearse, Stephen Thacher, Guy H. Holhday, Flourence J. Mahoney, 

Charles J. Hart, Francis P. Ewing, H. R. W. Browne, Edmund S. 

Phinney, James F. McDermott. 
Assistant Clerk in Equity. — Henry E. Bellew. Salary, $4,500 from County 

and $500 from the Commonwealth. 
Stenographers. — Frank H. Burt, Fred W. Card, Florence Burbank, Alice 

E. Brett, Wilham N. Todd, Lucius W. Richardson Wells H. Johnson, 

John P. Foley, Nelhe M. Wood, M. Louise Jackson. Appointed by 

the Court, with a salary of $2,500 each. 
Messenger of Court. — Charles F. Dolan. Salary, $2,000. 

* Salary, $2,000. f Salary, $2,000 (S400 from State) ^ 

t Salary, $3,000 each; the others receive $2,500 each. 



COURT OFFICERS, ETC. 113 



SUPERIOR COURT FOR CRIMINAL, BUSINESS. 

[R. L., Chap. 11, § 318; Chap. 165, § 34.] 
Clerk. — John P. Manning. Salary, $6,000. Elected by the people in 

1911 for five years, from January, 1912. 
Assistant Clerks. — John R. Campbell. Salary, $3,000. JuUan Seriack. 

Salary, $3,000. 
Stenographer. — John H. Farley. Salary, $2,500. 

COURT OP PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY. 

[R. L., Chap. 11, § 319; Chap. 164, § 2; Stat. 1904, Chap. 455; Stat. 

1912, Chap. 585.] 
Judge. — Robert Grant. Salary, $7,000. 
Judge. — Ehjah George. Salary, $7,000. 
Register. — Arthm- W. Dolan. Salary, $5,000. 
First Assistant Register. — John R. Nichols. Salary. $3,000. 
Second Assistant Register. — Clara L. Power. Salary, $3,000. 

The Judges of Probate are appointed by the Governor. They are paid 
by the Commonwealth. The Register was elected by the people in 1913 
for five years, from January, 1914. 

MUNICIPAIi COURT OP BOSTON. 

[R. L., Chap. 160; Stat. 1912, Chap. 649; Stat. 1913, Chap. 430.] 

[The Judicial District comprises the territory bounded as follows, viz.: Beginning at 
the intersection of Massachusetts avenue with the Charles river; thence by said Massa- 
chusetts avenue, the Providence Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, Camden, "Washington, East Lenox, FeUows, Northampton and Albany streets, 
Massachusetts avenue, the Roxbury canal, East Brookline street extended, the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, the water line of South Boston, Bristol street 
extended and the water line of the City Proper, to the point of beginning. Jurisdiction 
within districts (Acts of 1876, Chap. 240), and throughout the City (Acts of 1877, Chap. 
187).] 

Chief Justice.— WMved Bolster. Salary, $5,500. 

Associate Justices. — John H. Burke, George L. Wentworth, James P. 

Parmenter, WiUiam SuUivan, Michael J. Murray, John Duff, Michael 

J, Creed, Thomas H . Dowd. Salary, $5,000 each. 

All judges appointed by the Governor, subject to confirmation by the 
Executive Council. 

[Stat. 1887, Chap. 163; Stat. 1899, Chap. 313; Stat. 1913, Chap.. 289.] 
Special Justices. — John A. Bennett, Abraham K. Cohen, John G. Brackett, 

Joseph A. Sheehan. Compensation $15 each per day for actual 

service. 

Terms of the Court. 

For Civil, Business. — Every Saturday at 9 A. M., for trial of civil 
causes not exceeding $2,000. ^ 

Clerk. — WiUiam F. Donovan. Salary, $4,000. Appointed by the 
Governor. 



M 



114 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Assistant Clerks. — Warren C. Travis. Salary, $2,700. Clesson S. Cur- 
tice,i George B. Stebbins,^ Volney D. CaldweU,^ Arthur W. Ash- 
enden,' Michael F. Hart,' Frederick A. Finigan.' 
For Criminal Business. — Every day in the week (Sundays and legal 

holidays excepted) at 9 A.M., for the trial of criminal causes. 

Clerk. — Frederic C. IngaUs. Salary, $4,000. Appointed by the Governor. 

Assistant Clerks. — Edward J. Lord. Salary $2,700. Sidney P. Brown,^ 
John F. Barry ,1 Harvey B. Hudson,^ Henry R. Blackmer,' Richard 
J. Lord,' Charles T. WiUock.' Appointed by the Clerk of the Court 
with the approval of the Justices. 

municipal court, BRIGHTON DISTRICT. 

Cambridge street, corner of Henshaw street. 

[Jurisdiction, Wards 25 and 26.] 

Justice.— Thomas H. Connelly. Salary, $2,000. 

Special Justices. — Robert W. Frost and Harry C. Fabyan. Compensa- 
tion, $6.56 each.* 
Clerk. — Daniel F. Cunningham. Salary, $1,200. Appointed by the 
Governor. The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business 
every week day, except hohdays, beginning at 9 A. M. 
For the return and entry of civil actions, every Saturday at 9 A. M. 
For trial of civil actions, every Wednesday at 9 A.M. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, CHARLESTOWN DISTRICT. 

New Municipal Building, City Square. 

[Jurisdiction, Wards 3 and 4.] 

Justice. — Charles S. SuUivan. Salary, $3,000. 

Special Justices. — Willis W. Stover and Joseph E. Donovan. Compen- 
sation, $9.84 each.'* 
€lerk. — Mark E. Smith. Salary, $1,800. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerk. — James J. MeUen, Jr. Salary, $1,200. 

The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every week day 
except hohdays, at 9 A.M. 

For the return and entry of civil actions, except ejectment cases, every 
Saturday from 9 A.M. until 12 M.; ejectment cases 9 A.M. until 10 A.M. 
on Saturdays. 

For the trial of civil actions, except ejectment and poor debtor cases, 
every Thursday at 9 A.M.; ejectment cases, Mondays at 9 A.M.; poor 
debtor cases, Wednesdays at 9 A.M. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, DORCHESTER DISTRICT. 

Adams street, corner of Arcadia street. 

IJurisdiction comprises the territory bounded as follows, viz.: Beginning at the inter- 
isection of the private way known as Carleton street with the harbor line; thence by said 

I Salary, $2,200; 2 Salary, $2,000; » Salary, $1,700; 
* Per diem for actual service. 



*t 



COURT OFFICERS, ETC. 115 

Carleton street, Mt. Vernon and Boston streets, Columbia road and Quincy street. Blue 
Hill avenue. Harvard street, Oakland street, Randolph road, Burmah street, the boun- 
dary lines between Boston and Milton and Quincy, and the harbor line to the point of 
beginning.] 

Justice. — Joseph R. Churchill. Salary, $3,500. 

Special Justices. — Michael H. SuUivan and William F. Merritt. Com- 
pensation, $11.48 each.* 
Clerk. — Frank J. Tuttle. Salary, $2,100. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerk. — Frederick E. Simmons. Salary, $1,400. 

The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every week day 
at 9 A.M. 

For civil business, Saturdays at 9.30 A.M., except dmring July and 
August. 

EAST BOSTON DISTRICT COUKT. 

Court House, corner of Meridian and Paris streets. East Boston. 

[Jurisdiction, Wards 1 and 2, Boston, and Town of Winthrop.] 

Justice. — Joseph H. Barnes. Salary, $3,000. 

Special Justices. — Charles J. Brown and Joseph J. Murley. Compensa- 
tion, $9.84 each.* 
Clerk. — WiUiam C. Maguire. Salary, $1,800. Appointed by the Gov- 
ernor. 
Assistant Clerk.— Henry P. Moltedo. Salary, $1,200. 

The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every week day, 
except legal hoUdays, commencing at 9 A.M. 

For the return and entry of civil actions, every Saturday at 9 A.M. 
(See Stat. 1886, Chap. 15.) 

MUNICIPAL COURT, ROXBURY DISTRICT. 

Court House, Roxbury street. 

[Jurisdiction comprises the territory bounded as follows, viz.: Beginning at the inter- 
section of Massachusetts avenue with the Charles river; thence by said Massachusetts 
avenue, the Providence Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Camden, Washington, East Lenox, Fellows, Northampton and Albany streets, Massachu- 
setts avenue, the Roxbury canal. East Brookline street extended, the Midland Division 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Willow court extended. Willow court, 
Boston street, Columbia road, Quincy street. Blue Hill avenue, Seaver street, Columbus 
avenue, Washington, Dimock, Amory, Centre and Perkins streets, that portion of Leverett 
park which was formerly Chestnut street, the boundary line between Boston and Brook- 
line, Ashby street and the Charles river, to the point of beginning.] 

Justice.— Albert F. Hayden. Salary, $4,000. 

Special Justices. — Joseph N. Palmer and Timothy J. Ahern. Compen- 
sation, $13.11 each.* 

Clerk. — Maurice J. O'ConneU. Salary, $2,400. Appointed by the Gov- 
ernor. 

First Assistant Clerk.— Fred E. Cruff. Salary, $1,600. 

Second Assistant Clerk. — Henry F. Ryder. Salary, $1,200. 

* Per diem for actual service. 



116 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every week day, 
except legal hohdays, commencing at 9 A.M. 
For the return and entry of civil actions, every Satiu-day at 10 A.M. 
For the trial of civil actions, every Tuesday at 9.30 A.M. 

' MUNICIPAL COURT, SOUTH BOSTON DISTRICT. 

New Municipal Building, East Broadway. 

[Jurisdiction comprises the territory bounded as follows, viz.: Beginning where the 
private way known as Carleton street intersects the water line in Boston harbor; thence 
by said Carleton street, Mt. Vernon street, Willow court. Willow court extended, the 
Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, the shore line of the 
South Bay, Fort Point channel and Boston harbor, to the point of beginning.] 

Justice. — Edward L. Logan. Salary, $2,750. 

Special Justices. — Josiah S. Dean, WiUiam J. Day. Compensation, $8.99 

each.* 
Clerk. — Adrian B. Smith. Salary, $1,650. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerk. — Harry W. Park. Salary, $1,100. 

The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every week day, 
except legal holidays, commencing at 9 A.M. 

For the return and entry of civil actions, every Saturday, from 9 A.M. 
until 12 M. 

For the trial of civil actions, every Tuesday at 10 A.M. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, WEST ROXBURY DISTRICT. 

Seaverns avenue, Jamaica Plain. 

[Jurisdiction comprises the territory bounded as follows, viz.: Beginning at the boun- 
dary line between Boston and Brookline at Leverett park, formerly known as Chestnut 
street; thence by said Leverett park, Perkins, Centre, Amory, Dimock and Washington 
streets, Columbus avenue, Seaver street. Blue Hill avenue, Harvard street, Oakland street, 
Randolph road, Burmah street and the boundary lines between Boston and Dedham, 
Needham, Newton and Brookline, to the point of beginning.] 

Justice. — John Perrins, Jr. Salary, $3,000. 

Special Justices. — Henry Austin and J. Albert Brackett. Compensation, 

$9.84 each.* 
Clerk. — Edward W. Brewer. Salary, $1,800. Appointed by the Gov- 
ernor. 

The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every week day, 
except legal hohdays, commencing at 9 A.M. 

For the return and entry of civil business, except ejectment, every 
Saturday, 9 A.M. imtil 12 M.; ejectment before 10 A.M. Satm-days. 

For the trial of civil actions, every Wednesday at 10 A.M. 

BOSTON JUVENILE COURT. 

Room 127, Court House. 
[Chap. 334, Acts of 1903; Chap. 489, Acts of 1906.] 
Justice.— Frederick P. Cabot. Salary, $3,000. 

Special Justices. — Frank Leveroni, Phihp Rubenstein. Compensation, 
$9.84 each.* 

* Per diem for actual service. 



COURT OFFICERS, ETC. 117 

CZerfc.— Charles W. M. WilHams. Salary, $1,500. 

Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1906, establishing a court to be known as 
the Boston Juvenile Court for the " Care, Custody and Discipline of Juvenile 
Offenders," provides for the transfer to said coiu:t of the jurisdictions, 
authority and powers hitherto vested in the Municipal Court of Boston, 
under Chapter 334 of the Acts of 1903. The act took effect September 1, 
1906. 

The Justice, Special Justices and Clerk of this Court are appointed by 
the Governor. The Justice of the court is empowered to appoint two 
probation officers, and so many deputy probation officers (without salary) 
as he may deem desirable. 

Probation Officers. 
[Stat. 1891, Chap. 356; Stat. 1892, Chaps. 242, 276; Stat. 1897, Chap. 266; 
Stat. 1910, Chap. 332; Stat. 1913, Chap. 612.] 
These officers are appointed by the judges of the respective criminal 
courts to ascertain aU facts relating to the offenders brought before the 
courts. In the performance of their official duties they have aU the powers 
of poHce officers. 

BOSTON MtnsnCIPAL COURT. 

Chief Probation Officer. — Albert J. Sargent. Salary, $3,500. 

Assistant Probation Officers. — Francis A. Dudley, "^ Albert J. Fowles, D. 
Joseph Linehan, Joseph A. McManus, Frank L. Warren, James F. 
Wilkinson, Frank E. Hawkes, James H. Knight, Eugene J. CaUanan, 
Victor V. Anderson, Edward F. Coughhn, Arthur A. WordeU, Charles 
H. Stearns, Robert E. McGuire, WiUiam J. Joyce, WiUiam A. Maloney . 
Salary, $2,000 each imless otherwise indicated. Also the following 
women: Mary A. Maynard,^ Mary L. Brinn,^ Ehzabeth A. Lee,^ 
Margaret H. Markham,^ Alfretta P. McClure,^ Theresa C. Dowhng,^ 
Ethel Wood,^ Annie M. Kennedy,^ Mary A. Thumith,^ Eleanor F. 
HoUand.'' 
JUVENILE COURT. — John B. O'Hare,^ John M. Kingman,* May A. Burke,^ 
Jane E. Stone.^ 

BRANCH MUNICIPAL COURTS AND EAST BOSTON DISTRICT COURT. 

Brighton. — Edward J. Drummond.^ Charlestown. — James D. Coady,' 
John P. Foley,'' Florence A. Smith ^ (for children). Dorchester. — Reginald 
H. Mair.6 East Boston. — Dennis J. KeHeher,* Frederick L. O'Brien.'^ 
Roxbury. — Joseph H. Keen,^ Ulysses G. Varney,^ Edward A. Fallon^ (for 
children), Mrs. Ceha S. Lappen.^ South Boston. — Clayton H. Parmelee,* 
EUen McGurty,^ James F. Gleason.^ West Roxbury. — Frank B. Skelton,^ 
Arthur R. Towle.^ 

SUPERIOR COURT. 

Richard Keefe,^ James F. Wise,^ Charles M. Warren,^ John J. Barter,' 
Ahce M. Power,3 Kate M. Reilly,^ Frances McCormick,* Mary A. 
Robinson.^" 

1 Salary, $2,200; 2 Salary, S2,100; 'Salary, »2,000; « Salary, $1,800; 5 Salary, $1,700; 
• Salary, $1,600; ? Salary, $1,500; s Salary, $1,300; 9 Salary, $1,200; w Salary, $750. 



118 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

DESIGNATED TO SOLEMNIZE MARRIAGES. 

[R. L., Chap. 151, § 31; Stat. 1899, Chap. 387.] 

By the above-stated Statute of 1899, the Governor has power to desig- 
nate persons as Justices of the Peace who may solemnize marriages in 
Massachusetts. The foUowing-named persons have been designated 
to act as such in the City of Boston and, according to the records of the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth, their commissions expire on the dates 
stated: 



Name and Residence (ok Office). 



Commission 
Expires. 



Anderson, J. Alfred, 209 Washington street 

Andrews, John E., 2343 Washington street 

Arzillo, Carlo F., 151 Richmond street 

Ballon, Henry A., 14 Park square 

Barrett, Alonzo H., 107 Warren avenue 

Bates, Benjamin G., 24 Worthington street, Roxbury. 

Belt, Herbert F., 15 Court square. Room 45 

Berg, Isaac, 40 Waumbeck street, Roxbury 

Binns, Walter H., 963 Tremont street 

Bloch, Nathan, 104 Humboldt avenue 

Borofsky, Samuel H., 201 Barristers' Hall 

Broadbent, Joel, 27 Hamburg street 

Brody, Marcus L., 382 Geneva avenue, Dorchester. . . 
Burns, James A., 1088 Saratoga street. East Boston. . 
Campbell, John A., 55 Monmouth street. East Boston 

Canavan, William J., 66 North Margin street 

Cangiano, Michael, 215 North street 

Card, Horatio S., 491 Massachusetts avenue 

Carleton, Willard F., 15 School street 

Carter, James T., 18 Tremont street 

Caverly, Harold, 18 Tremont street 

Connolly, Thomas G., 11 Pemberton sqviare 

Cook, Alonzo B., 294 Washington street 

Corey, Albert, 44 Cortes street , 

Corner, William, 14 Elm Hill park, Roxbury , 

Dakin, Archibald, 32 Kingsdale street, Dorchester . . . , 



Dec. 8, 1916. 
Jan. 25, 1918. 
Feb. 12, 1920. 
Dec. 20, 1918. 
Nov. 11, 1921. 
July 30, 1920. 
March 26, 1922. 
Jan. 29, 1920. 
Feb. 28, 1919. 
Aug. 15, 1918. 
Sept. 25, 1919. 
Dec. 20, 1918. 
Dec. 23, 1921. 
Jan. 17, 1919. 
Aug. 6, 1921. 
March 18, 1922. 
Jan. 31, 1919. 
Sept. 16, 1921. 
May 22, 1919. 
March 23, 1917. 
Dec. 8, 1922. 
Nov. 24, 1922. 
Jan. 12, 1918. 
Aug. 28, 1919. 
Oct. 14, 1921. 
Nov. 25, 1921. 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 



119 



Name and Residence (ob Office). 



Commission 
Expires. 



Douglas, George A., 6 Beacon street 

Dubinsky, Harry H., 12 Decatur street 

Elliot, Oliver C, 17 Davis street 

Emerson, Freeman O., Ill Pembroke street 

Farmer, Harry W., 339 Shawmut avenue 

Fernandez, "William L., 364 Park street, Dorchester 

Ferreira, Joseph E., 1 Pelham street 

Feyhl, Charles A., 449 Shawmut avenue 

Fletcher, H. T., 27 School street 

Forknall, Reuben, 6 Beacon street 

Franceschini, Augusto, 76 Devonshire street 

Eraser, James, 39 Court street 

Frederickson, Peter A., 1 Sterling street, Roxbury 

Frisbee, Ivory F., 727 Tremont street 

Fuller, Joseph R., 64 Mascot street, Dorchester 

George, Frank L., 1179 River street, Hyde Park 

Gifford, Adam, Salvation Army, 8 East Brookline street 

Green, George W., 43 Tremont street 

Grimes, Robert A., 24 Ticknor street 

Hale, Charles F., 107 Pemberton Building 

Hayler, Harry, 7 Richfield street, Dorchester 

Herter, Robert, 15 Catawba street, Roxbury 

Hill, Johnson W., 309 Columbus avenue 

Hirsh, William, 294 Washington street 

Hodgdon, Ernest F., 57 Myrtle street 

Hoffman, Frank N., 1841 Columbus avenue, Roxbury 

Hornig, Hugo, 60 Mozart street, Jamaica Pla.in 

Hourin, Christopher D. A., 1577 Columbus avenue, Roxbury. 

Jordan, Horace A., 95 Washington street, Brighton 

Kaufman, Charles, 126 State street 

Keegan, Stephen F., 39 Cambridge street . . . . 

King, Thomas H., 81 Roxbury street 

Latrobe, James F., 593 Tremont street 

Longarini, Antonio, 15 Court square. Room 59 

Maffei, Salvatore, 24 Chelsea street. East Boston 



June 5, 1919. 
March 6, 1920 
June 8, 1917. 
Oct. 1, 1920. 
March 22, 1923. 
Nov. 11, 1921. 
June 4, 1920. 
Jan. 25, 1918. 
Sept. 24, 1920. 
Oct. 13, 1917. 
June 5, 1919. 
Oct. 26, 1917. 
Nov. 30, 1917. 
Oct. 3, 1919. 
Dec. 17, 1920. 
Feb. 23, 1918. 
July 6, 1922. 
Aug. 2, 1918. 
July 29, 1921. 
April 30, 1920. 
Oct. 5, 1917. 
Jan. 21, 1921. 
Jan. 3, 1919. 
Nov. 8, 1918. 
May 22, 1919. 
Feb. 15, 1918. 
July 30, 1919. 
July 30, 1919. 
Jan. 4, 1918. 
March 22, 1923. 
June 10, 1921. 
Nov. 11, 1921. 
Sept. 22, 1916. 
Nov. 10, 1922. 
June 12, 1917. 



120 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Name and Residence (or Office). 



Commission 
Expires. 



Manks, Herbert M., 95 King street, Dorchester 

MacLellan, George P., 288 Roxbury street 

McCance, Alexander, 1328 Washington street 

McLeish, Robert M., 394 K street 

Moore, Charles H., 16 Temple street 

Mullen, Bernard M., 103 Bennington street, East Boston. . 

Newman, Max H., 24 Davis street 

Nicholson, Alexander, 7 Church place, Roxbury 

Noyes, John H. L., 171 Brooks street, East Boston 

Palladino, Hector, 1102 Bennington street. East Boston 

Parker, Leonard "W., 255B Shawmut avenue 

Patrick, Thomas "W., 699 Washington street 

Pennini, Lewis, 27 Broadway 

Peters, Matthew J., 215 L street. South Boston 

Powell, Benjamin F., 30 Pemberton square 

Propper, Albert H., 40Court street 

Ragozzino, Arthur, 294 Hanover street 

Read, Augustine H., 161 Devonshire street 

Reimer, Arthur E., 186 H street, South Boston 

Roberts, Frank L., 156 State street. Room 25 

Robinson, Nathaniel G., 21 Mt. Pleasant avenue, Roxbury 

Robinson, Robert, 15 Court square 

Romano, Saverio R., 247 Hanover street 

Rose, John W., 32 Woodville street, Roxbury 

Rosenband, Adolph, 15 Lyman street 

Rowley, Clarence W., 294 Washington street 

Saklitz, Rudolf, 95 Hillside street, Roxbury 

Saklad, Elias, 28 Fayston street, Roxbury 

Saklad, Joshua B., 28 Fayston street, Roxbury 

Schaub, Harry M., 25 Allen street 

Schriftgiesser, Emil S., 49 Mozart street, Jamaica Plain. . . . 

Schubert, Adolph L., 3 Adelaide terrace 

Shenberg, Hyman, 27 Greenock street, Dorchester 

Sheppard, Joseph, Salvation Army, 8 East Brookline street 
Sherman, John W., 60 Pemberton square 



Feb. 23, 1923. 
March 29, 1923. 
Feb. 23, 1917. 
March 19, 1920. 
April 30, 1920. 
April 24, 1919. 
March 16, 1917. 
July 6, 1922. 
Nov. 3, 1922. 
Nov. 3, 1922. 
Nov. 10, 1916. 
Nov. 11, 1921. 
Oct. 2, 1919. 
Aug. 17, 1917. 
Feb. 23, 1918. 
April 1, 1921. 
Jan. 21, 1921. 
Sept. 7, 1917. 
March 5, 1920. 
March 29, 1918. 
Feb. 15, 1918. 
Sept. 21, 1917. 
Jan. 20, 1922. 
Jan. 13, 1917. 
Oct. 14, 1921. 
Sept. 3, 1920. 
May 5, 1922. 
April 11, 1918. 
Jan. 20, 1922. 
Dec. 6, 1918. 
July 30, 1919. 
Oct. 27, 1919. 
AprU 12, 1918. 
Jan. 28, 1921. 
Jime 16, 1923. 



LICENSING BOARD. 



121 



Name and Resdience (ob Office). 



Silton, Morris I., 55 Devon street, Roxbury 

Silvano, Filippo, 218 Havre street, East Boston. . . 

Spitz, Henry B., 48 Summer street 

Susan, Abraham, 142 Trenton street, East Boston 
Tay, Herman S., 16 Fowler street, Dorchester. . . . 
Van Dam, Henry, 7 Lawrence park, Roxbury . . . . 
Vasil, Roman J., 11 Grenada avenue, Rosliadale. . 

Wilder, D. Edwin, 89 State street. Room 60 

Wright, Curtis J., 127 Dartmouth street 

Yennaco Frank, 32 Liverpool street. East Boston . 

Young, George M., 1098 Washington street 

Zottoli, Frank M., 240 Hanover street 



Commission 
Expires. 



Nov. 19, 1920. 
Oct. 13, 1922. 
Dec. 23, 1921. 
Oct. 16, 1919. 
April 5, 1922. 
Nov. 15, 1918. 
Oct. 20, 1922. 
May 18, 1917. 
March 15, 1918. 
Sept. 27, 1918. 
March 15, 1918. 
Sept. 17, 1920. 



LICENSING BOARD. 
OflBce, 1 Beacon Street, Eighth Floor. 
[Stat. 1906, Chap. 291; Stat, 1907, Chap. 214; Stat. 1909, Chap. 423; 
C. C. Chap. 55; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 383 and 476; Stat. 1911, Chap. 83; 
Stat. 1913, Chaps. 451, 715; Stat. 1915, Chap. 313.] 

OFFICIALS. 

, Fletcher Rannet, Chairman. 

Louis Epple, Secretary. Salary, $3,000. 

THE BOARD. 

William M. Prest. Term ends in 1922. Salary, $3,500. 
Fletcher Rannet. Term ends in 1920. Salary, $4,000. 
JosiAH S. Dean. Term ends in 1918. Salary, $3,500. 

The Licensing Board for the City of Boston was estabUshed by Chapter 
291 of the Acts of 1906. It consists of three members, appomted by 
the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council. The mem- 
bers must be citizens of Boston who have resided in the City for at least 
two years preceding the date of their appointment. The two principal 
pohtical parties must be represented and the term of the members is 
fixed at six years; after the first appointments, one member retiring every 
two years. The Board was created to exercise aU the powers and per- 
form aU the duties conferred or imposed upon the Board of PoUce of 
the City of Boston by Sections 10 to 90 (both inclusive) of Chapter 100 
of the Revised Laws and Amendments thereof, relative to intoxicating 
Hquors; and by Chapter 102 of the Revised Laws and Amendments 



122 . MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

thereof, relative to innholders and common victuallers. Chapter 423, Acts- 
of 1909, relates to Licensing the sale of ice cream, fruit, soda water and 
confectionery on Sunday. 

The Board also exercises aU the powers and performs aU the duties 
previously conferred or imposed by law on the Board of PoUce relative 
to the Ucensing of picnic groves, skating rinks, inteUigence offices, billiard 
tables and bowhng alleys. 



FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 
[Stat. 1905, Chap. 488; Stat. 1908, Chap. 569; C. C, Chap. 48, § 5.1 

MEMBEBS OF THE CORPORATION AND MANAGERS OF THE 
FRANKLIN FUND. 

Richard Olney, President. 
Nathan Matthews, Vice President. 
George F. Swain, Secretary. 
Henry L. Higginson, Treasurer. 

managers.* 
James M. Curley, Mayor of Boston, ex officio. 
Rev. C. E. Park, Pastor of First Church in Boston, ex officio. 
Rev. William H. Dewart, ex officio. 
Rev. Kenneth M. Munro, ex officio. 
Richard Olney, Henry L. Higginson, Nathan Matthews, Charles 

T. Gallagher, William Endicott, John A. Sullivan, George F. 

Swain, Henry Abrahams. Appointed by the Supreme Judicial 

Court. 

Franklin Union, corner Appleton and Berkeley streets. 
Walter B. Russell, Director. 

The Franklin Foundation is incorporated under Chapter 569 of the 
Acts of 1908, and has sole charge of the Frankhn Union, as well as the 
management of the Frankhn Fund . 

The Franklin Fund is the proceeds of a bequest of one thousand pounds 
to "the Inhabitants of the Town of Boston in Massachusetts" made by 
Benjamin Frankhn, in a codicil to his will dated June 23, 1789. The 
codicil provided that the fund "if accepted by the inhabitants of the 
Town of Boston" be managed "under the direction of the Selectmen, 
united with the Minister of the oldest Episcopahan, Congregational, and 
Presbyterian Churches in that Town," who were to make loans on certain 
conditions to "young married artificers under the age of twenty-five 
years." 

Dr. Frankhn, who died April 17, 1790, calculated that, in one hundred 
years, the thousand pounds would grow to £131,000, "of which," he says, 

*The Managers serve without compensation. 



FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 123 

"I would have the managers then lay out at their discretion £100,000 
in PubHc Works which may be judged of most general utility to the 
Inhabitants. The remaining £31,000, I would have continued to be let 
out on interest for another hundred years. At the end of this second 
term, if no unfortunate accident has prevented the operation, the sum 
will be £4,061,000, of which I leave £1,061,000 to the Town of Boston, 
and £3,000,000 to the disposition of the Government of the State, not 
presuming to carry my views farther." The Town accepted the donation 
at a Town Meeting held June 1, 1790. 

A futUe suit brought by the FrankUn heirs in 1891 prevented the division 
of the fund at the expiration of one hundred years; but on January 17, 
1894, by direction of the three ministers and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City, which board claimed to be the successors of the "Selectmen," 
$329,300.48 (iff of the fund) was paid to the City Treasurer, for "the 
purchase of land and the erection thereon of the Frankhn Trades School 
and for the equipment of the same." Owing to a series of comphcations 
the money remained in the custody of the Treasurer. Mayor Collins, 
in 1902, caused a petition of the City to be filed in the Supreme Court, 
praying for instructions as to the authority of the persons then acting as 
Managers of the fund. The Court rendered an opinion November 25, 
1903 (184 Mass. 373, page 43), to the effect that the three ministers were 
Managers of the fund under Franklin's will, but that the Aldermen did 
not succeed the "Selectmen" as Managers and had no powers with refer- 
ence to it. The Court, under its general power to care for pubHc chari- 
table funds, appointed, on March 16, 1904, the above Managers to take 
the place of the "Selectmen," and provided in the decree of the Court 
that the Mayor of Boston should be one, ex officio. On October 20, 1904, 
the City Treasurer, ex officio, was appointed by the Board of Managers as 
treasurer of the fund. 

On December 2, 1905, the City Treasurer received from Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie $408,396.48, said sum being equal to the amount of the Frankhn 
Fund in August, 1904, which Mr. Carnegie agreed to dupUcate. Only the 
annual income from this fund is used. 

On January 31, 1907, the amount of the "accumulated" fund available 
for expenditure by the Managers was $438,741.89, and in that year the 
Franklin Union Building was erected at the corner of Appleton and Ber- 
keley streets. It was opened for the use of the Franklin Trades School, 
or Frankhn Union as it is now called, in September, 1908, and is main- 
tained partly by the nominal registration fees, by rentals, and by the 
income {i. e., $22,500 yearly) from the above mentioned Frankhn Fund 
{i. e., the Andrew Carnegie Donation), amounting to $466,259.08 on 
January 31, 1916. The building contains 24 classrooms and 6 draughting 
rooms, where about 1,600 students receive instruction, the fees ranging 
from $4 to $15, according to length of course. There is also a technical 
and scientific Ubrary, and a large haU with a seating capacity of 1,000 for 
lectures, concerts, discussions and similar purposes. The building with 
equipment cost $402,718. The site was purchased in 1906 for $100,000. 



124 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The FranMia Accumulating Fund, wMch wiU become available in 1991, 
amounted, on January 31, 1916, to $246,424.41. 



MEDICAL EXAMINERS FOR SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
[R. L., Chap. 24; Stat. 1908, Chap. 424; Stat. 1909, Chap. 273.] 
The County is divided into two medical districts, Northern and South- 
ern, by a line beginning at the jimction of the BrookHne line with Hunt- 
ington avenue; thence through Huntington avenue and Fencourt; thence 
through middle of Fens, through Boylston, Berkeley and Providence 
streets. Park square, Boylston and Essex streets, Atlantic avenue and 
Summer street to Fort Point Channel; thence through said channel, 
Dover street, Dorchester avenue, Dorchester street, East Fourth and G 
streets to the harbor. [See Proceedings of City Coimcil, Jime 3, 1911.] 
Medical Examiners. — Northern District, George B. Magrath, M.D., 274 
Boylston street. Term ends in 1921. Southern District, Timothy 
Leary, M.D., City Hospital, 818 Harrison avenue. Term ends in 
1917. Salary of each, $4,000. 
Associate Medical Examiners. — William H. Watters, M.D., 80 East Con- 
cord street. Term ends in 1917. Oscar Richardson, M.D., 485 
Beacon street. Term ends in 1920. Salary of each, $666. 

All are appointed by the Governor for a term of seven years. 

The two mortuaries maintained by the County, in accordance with Acts 
of 1911, Chapter 252, are in charge of the Medical Examiners. Location 
of Northern District Mortuary, 18 North Grove street; Southern District, 
on City Hospital grounds. 



OFFICERS PAID BY FEES. 
Term May 1, 1916, to May 1, 1917. 
Appointed annually by Mayor, subject to confirmation by the City 
Council, for one year beginning with the first day of May. 
(Alphabetical Liats.) 

Beef, Weighers of.— [R. L., Chap. 57, §§ 1, 2.] Frederick T. Baker, Forrest 
O. Batchelder, James W. Blakeley, Lawrence A. Bragan, Patrick F. 
Brannan, Joseph O. Briggs, Thomas J. Callaghan, Patrick J. Callahan, 
Daniel G. Collins, Michael CoUins, James P. Conroy, Patrick J. Conroy, 
Charles S. Cotter, Fred A. Curtis, James H. Donovan, John F. Donovan, 
Grant Dunn, John Dunn, Clarence O. Dustin, Mark R. Eisenham, 
Lorenzo T. Farnum, Frank H. Feitel, Daniel T. Flynn, Patrick J. Foley, 
Patrick P. Ford, Robert Fulton, John Galloway, Thomas H. Gordon, 
WiUiam W. Gordon, Lawrence C HaUin, Charles Warren Hapgood, 
Fred G. Harms, Charles B. Harris, Florence J. Hartnett, Frank E. 
Hawkins, Benjamin Hay, Joseph M. Hefferan, Benjamin F. Hooten, 



OFFICERS PAID BY FEES. 125 

William S. Jewett, John W. Joy, George W. Keith, John W. Kelley, 
John F. Kelly, Thomas F. Kelly, John E. Keogh, Fred Kitson, Thomas C. 
Lamb, Michael J. McCann, Edward J. McCarthy, Eugene J. McCarthy, 
Jeremiah L. McCarthy, Eugene P. McDonald, Martin McGrath, 
Michael F. McLaughhn, James C. McMahon, John F. Mahoney, William 

F. Mahoney, WiUiam F. Mahoney, Jr., Mark M. Manning, Forrest O. 
Mitchell, Christian Moore, Arthur E. Morrison, John F. Nelson, Edward 
W. Noel, Denis O'SuUivan, Harold D. Page, Wilham A. Podolski, 
James F. Richard, Walter S. Riddell, Ellsworth G. Robbins, George F. 
Ryan, Harry N. Safford, WiUiam Seeley, Fred R. Segee, James E. Shea, 
John J. Sheehan, Eugene Sheridan, Alfred J. Sidwell, William E. Stewart, 
Jer6miah SuUivan, John C SuUivan, Timothy J. Sulhvan, Everett S. 
Vradenburgh, Alfred A. Waldron, Michael Wall, Albert M. Walles, 
Henry H. Walters, Moses R. Webster, George W. Whitney, Fred P. 
Wood, Charles H. Woods, Allen Wright, Benjamin W. Wright. 

Boilers and Heavy Machinery, Weighers of. — [R. L., Chap. 62, § 42.] 
Frederick T. Baker, Forrest O. Batchelder, Cecil E. Baum, Anton S. 
Beckert, James W. Blakeley, Lawrence A. Bragan, Patrick F. Brennan, 
Joseph C. Briggs, Thomas J. Callaghan, Patrick J. Callahan, Daniel 

G. Collins, Michael Collins, Patrick J. Conroy, Hugh F. Coyle, Andrew 
W. Crowther, Fred A. Curtis, James T. Donahue, James H. Donovan, 
John F. Donovan, Jeremiah F. Driscoll, James H. Duffy, Grant Dunn, 
John Dimn, Charles A. Dyer, Mark R. Eisenham, Lorenzo T. Farnum, 
Frank H. Feitel, Daniel T. Flynn, Patrick J. Foley, Robert Fulton, John 
Galloway, John E. GiUen, Thomas H. Gordon, WiUiam W. Gordon, 
Thomas A. Gorman, Lawrence C. Hallin, Fred G. Harms, Charles B. 
Harris, Florence J. Hartnett, Frank E. Hawkins, Benjamin Hay, James 
J. Hayes, Charles F. Hersey, Benjamui F. Hooten, Alfred Inch, Lemuel 
T. James, WiUiam S. Jewett, John W. Joy, George W. Keith, John W. 
KeUey, John F. Kelly, Thomas F. KeUy, Fred Kitson, Thomas C. 
Lamb, Walter M. Lowe, Michael J. McCann, Daniel McCarthy, Edward 
J. McCarthy, Eugene J. McCarthy, Jeremiah L. McCarthy, Eugene P- 
McDonald, James E. McGonigle, Jr., Martin McGrath, Michael F. 
McLaughlm, James C. McMahon, John F. Mahoney, WiUiam F. Maho- 
ney, WiUiam F. Mahoney, Jr., Mark M. Manning, Leshe H. Mason, 
Forrest O. MitcheU, Christian Moore, Edward P. Morrison, James H. 
Muldoon, John F. Nelson, Edward W. Noel, Thomas J. O'Keefe, Denis 
O'SuUivan, Harold D. Page, F. L. Pearl, WUham A. Podolski, Walter S. 
RiddeU, Fred B. Riggs, EUsworth G. Robbins, John T. Robinson, S. 
Walter Rowe, Harry N. Safford, WiUiam Seeley, Fred R. Segee, James 
E. Shea, Eugene Sheridan, Alfred J. SidweU, William E. Stewart, Jere- 
miah SuUivan, John C. SuUivan, Timothy J. SuUivan, John H. Toland, 
Everett S. Vradenburgh, Alfred A. Waldron, Michael WaU, Albert M. 
WaUes, Hemy H. Walters, Fred P. Wood, Charles H. Woods, Allen 
Wright, Sophie Zinger. 

Coal, Weighers of— [R. L., Chap. 57, §§ 83-93; amended by Stat. 1902, 
Chap. 453; Stat. 1907, Chap. 228; Stat. 1908, Chaps. 205 and 304.] 



126 MUNICIPAL EEGISTER. 

Morton Alden, Etta Alpert, Benjamin F. Appleby, Richard A. Atwood, 
William G. Bail, Albert W. Bailey, Chester A. Bailey, Frederick T, 
Baker, Arthur F. Barry, Forrest O. Batchelder, Cecil E. Baum, Anton 
S. Beckert, George P. Berkley, Charles E. Berry, James W. Blakeley, 
John F. Bowman, John J. Boyle, Lawrence A. Bragan, William M. 
Bragger, Patrick F. Brennan, Andrew S. Brewer, Joseph O. Briggs, 
James J. Brock, Algernon D. Brown, Joseph A. Browne, H. R. Brownson, 
James E. Buckley, Nicholas A. Burkhart, Thomas J. Callaghan, Gertrude 
Callahan, Jeremiah J. Callahan, Patrick J. Callahan, William A, 
Campbell, John F. Carroll, James Carter, Patrick C. Carter, John 

A. Caulfield, William C. Caverly, Harold H. Chapman, Isaac E. Clark, 
Sarah L. Cleary, Frederick E. Cleaves, Carleton M. Cobb, Paul G. 
Coblenzer, Frank H. Cole, Willis H. Cole, Daniel G. Collins, Michael 
Collins, Michael H. Condon, John Connors, Patrick J. Conroy, Eliot 
E. Copeland, John A. Cousens, Hugh F. Coyle, Patrick Coyle, FrankUn 
L; Cronin, Arthur R. Crooks, Arnold B. Crosby, Fred M. Crosby, 
Daniel J. Crowley, Daniel Joseph Crowley, Andrew W. Crowther, 
Arthur B. Cudworth, Wilbur Cullen, Daniel T. Cunningham, Fred A. 
Curtis, I. W. H. Curtis, Walter H. Cutter, George W. Dalton, James 

B. Dana, Francis W. Darling, Otto A. Datoro, Dennis J. Devine, Ray- 
mond C. Dinsmore, Daniel F. Doherty, Gerald M. Doherty, James H. 
Donovan, John F. Donovan, Patrick J. Donovan, Fred A. Downey, 
Thomas F. Downey, Winfred J. Doyle, Thomas A. Drew, Jeremiah F. 
DriscoU, H. T. DuffiU, James H. Duffy, Grant Dunn, John Dunn, 
Patrick R. Dunn, Charles A. Dyer, Mark R. Eisenham, J. H. ElUott, 
John A. Emery, Jr., George F. Enos, Lorenzo T. Farnum, Peter M. 
Farrell, Richard J. Fay, Frank H. Feitel, Clifton E. Flagg, Joseph 
Flores, Daniel T. Flynn, Patrick J. Foley, Edward J. Ford, Thomas Ford, 
Charles W. Friend, Henry A. Frost, Robert Fulton, John Galloway, 
Charles H. Gelpke, H. Ginsberg, Barnet E. Gordon, George K. Gordon, 
Thomas H. Gordon, WiUiam W. Gordon, Albert W. Grant, Charles T. 
Grant, Herbert C. Gray, Albert Greaves, Lawrence C. Hallin, Charles 
A. Hamann, Lewis F. Hamblen, Walter P. Hamblen, Charles A. Hardy, 
Fred E. Harmon, Fred G. Harms, Charles B. Harris, Benjamin Hay, 
Florence J. Hartnett, Joseph A. Hathaway, Frank E. Hawkins, James 
J. Hayes, Joseph M. Hefferan, Walter Henderson, George W. Herrick, 
Lewellyn S. Herrick, Sidney C. Higgins, Arthur W. Hill, John P. Hines, 
Roger S. Hodges, Benjamin F. Hooten, Fletcher Houghton, Thomas 
E. Hughes, Edward L. Hunter, John W. Hunter, Wilhs C. Hurd, Alfred 
Inch, Herbert E. Irving, Lemuel T. James, WiUiam S. Jewett, Harry W. 
Jones, John W. Joy, Charles R. Junkins, Samuel H. Kaercher, George 
Katz, John Bernard Keaney, Dennis F. Kearney, Dennis P. Keating, 
WiUiam W. Kee, Frank M. Keefe, Bradford J. Keith, George W. Keith, 
Lewis W. Keith, Michael M. Keleher, John W. KeUey, John F. Kelly, 
Thomas F. Kelly, Martin E. Kenna, James F. Kenney, John E. Keogh, 
John F. Kiernan, Leslie Kierstead, John F. Kiley, Joseph A. Kirchgasser, 
Arthiu- J. Kirley, Mary B. Kirley, Fred Kitson, Maurice H. Klous, 



OFFICERS PAID BY FEES. 127 

Edward A. Ladd, Thomas C. Lamb, HolLis A. Langley, Daniel F. 
Lauten, John J. Lavin, Clarence W. Lewis, F. E. Little, Alexander M. 
Lyall, James P. Lynch, Pearl B. Lyon, John J. Maguire, John F. Maho- 
ney, William F. Mahoney, William F. Mahoney, Jr., Horace J. Mair, 
Mark M. Manning, Arthur N. Mansfield, Charles S. Mansfield, Richard 
Marcy, Wesley T. Marr, Ella S. Marsh, Walter D. McAvoy, Michael J. 
McCann, Daniel McCarthy, Edward J. McCarthy, Eugene J. McCarthy, 
Frank E. McCarthy, Jeremiah L. McCarthy, WiUiam M. McCullagh, 
James S. McDaniel, Jr., Eugene P. McDonald, George V. McDougald, 
James E. McGonigle, Jr., Charles McGovern, Edward J. McGovern, 
Martin McGrath, Francis R. McGuire, Edward S. Mcllhatten, Roy C. 
Mclntyre, Horace E. McKeen, Edgar I. McKie, Michael F. McLaughlin, 
James C. McMahon, Herbert W. Merrow, James A. Mills, Forrest O. 
Mitchell, Richard J. Mitchell, Christian Moore, Richard J. Moore, 
John J. Morris, Edward P. Morrison, E. Eugene Morse, James H. 
Muldoon, Henry C. Murphy, John J. Murphy, Michael J. Miu-phy, 
Michael R. Murphy, Dennis F. Navien, John F. Nelson, Edward W. 
Noel, Alfred E. Nutter, Elizabeth J. O'Leary, John O'Neil, Charles E. 
Ordway, Fred L. Ortla, Denis O'SuUivan, George L. O'SuUivan, Lorraine 
K. O'SuUivan, Frank R. Oxley, Charlotte R. Packard, Harold D. Page, 
James E. Peacock, T. L. Pearson, Lovell O. Perkins, Ross A. Perry, 
Albert Peterson, Herbert W. Pike, Edward E. Piper, William A. Podolski, 
James T. Pond, Horace L. Porter, Harry J. Powers, Windsor W. Ray- 
mond, Charles T. Reardon, Jr., Herbert F. Reinhard, Bella Reitman, 
Frank B. Reynolds, Levering Reynolds, Walter S. Riddell, Fred B. 
Riggs, Ellsworth G. Robbins, Stuart E. Robson, Arthur Rock, Henry 
Rock, Edward Rodger, Patrick J. Rogers, Ralph W. Rogers, Russell 
M. Rose, S. Walter Rowe, Martin H. Ryan, Isaac Sacks, Harry N, 
Safford, Joseph W. Sawyer, William Seeley, Fred' R. Segee, Herbert 
Shattuck, James E. Shea, Eugene Sheridan, J. Irving Shultz, Alfred J. 
Sidwell, Edward A. Smith, Samuel Smith, W. A. Staples, William E. 
Stewart, Frank S. Stiles, Michael J. Stone, Louis G. Stowers, George 
B. Sullivan, Jeremiah Sulhvan, John C. Sulhvan, Timothy J. SuUivan, 
Frederick J. Swendeman, Henry H. Tag, Frederick W. Thielscher, 
George P. Thomas, Henry F. Thomas, Harry R. Thompson, Paul F. 
Tierney, Francis J. Tobin, Patrick F. Travers, Frank E. Trow, John E. 
Trull, Theodore H. Tufts, Charles J. Verrill, Joel F. Vinal, Everett S. 
Vradenburgh, Alfred A. Waldron, Michael Wall, Lucy E. Wallen, 
Albert M. Walles, Henry H. Walters, George C. Webb, George E. 
■ Wellington, B. F. C. Whitehouse, J. Clarence Whitney, Donald L. 
Whittemore, John A. Whittemore, John A. Whittemore, Jr., Theodore 
P. Whittemore, James M. Wilson, William C. Winsor, C. W.Hobart 
Wood, Fred P. Wood, Stuart P. Woodbury, Charles H. Woods, William 
J. H. Woods, John Wray, Allen Wright, Frederick R. Young, B. W. Yuill. 
Constables.— [St&t. 1802, Chap. 7, § 1; R. L., Chap. 25, §§ 87-94, Chap. 
26, § 14. The following give bond in $3,000, and are therefore author- 
ized to serve civil process: John E. Andrews, Joseph K. Barnes, David 



128 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Belson, Louis M. Bianco, George A. Borofski, Thomas F. Brett, George 
W. Brooker, Ernest R. Buffington, Sherman H. Calderwood, Raffaele 
Cameho, Daniel B. Carmody, Wilham K. Cobnrn, William S. Cosgrove, 
Joseph P. Donahoe, Robert J. Dooley, George G. Drew, William L. 
Drohan, John A. Duggan, Jr., Weldon A. Duley, Harold S. Eskin, Frank 
R. FarreU, Thomas Fee, William L. Fernandez, James Eraser, Harris 
Freidberg, Paul R. Gast, James W. Gihnore, Maurice J. Ghck, Samuel 
Goldkrand, Sears H. Grant, George W. Green, WiUiam C. Gregory, 
Charles M. Griffin, Joseph Guttentag, Charles F. Hale, George J. Hanley, 
John D. Harrington, Otis H. Hayes, Ehas Hirsch, Thomas F. Holden, 
Edward L. Hopkins, Walter Isidor, Parker N. Jenkins, Walter F. Keen, 
James P. KeUy, WiUiam H. Kelly, Clarence H. Knowlton, Joseph H. 
Knox, Morris F. Lewenberg, Antonio Longarini, Harland J. Lowe> 
WiUiam M. Macdonald, Salvatore Maffei, James G. McCann, WiUiam 
J. McDermott, WiUiam McCarthy, Daniel J. McGiUicuddy, Daniel 
McGonigle, Thomas E. McKenna, Joseph J. McWeeney, Edson T. 
Miner, William Mogha, Bernard M. Mullen, William H. Murphy, Arthur 
W. Nickerson, Wilham I. Paine, Hector Palladino, John J. Pendoley, 
Matthew J. Peters, Benjamin F. Powell, Robert Reid, Edward P. Rice, 
St. Clare H. Richardson, Samuel Rosenbaum, Louis Rosenthal, Raphael 
Rosnosky, James C. Ruhl, Filippo Silvano, Henry J. D. Small, Roscoe 
A. Smith, Anson Stern, Daniel P. SulUvan, John P. Sullivan, Abraham 
Susan, Wilham F. Swain, WiUiam H. Swift, Emil A. Thielsch, Fred G. 
Trask, Joseph J. TwitcheU, Jeremiah A. Twomey, Roman J. VasU, John 
J. Walsh, James H. Waugh, Harry A. Webber, John F. Welch, Martin 
Welch, Jonathan Wetherbee, Fred J. Weyand, John W. WUkinson, 
Frank Yennaco. 

Constables connected with official positions, and to serve vnthout bonds. — 
John M. Casey of the Mayor's office. Jacob Barber, Edward A. Burt, 
WiUiam W. K. CampbeU, John B. Cassidy, Lloyd H. Chase, John F. 
Coffey, Michael F. Cur ley, James F. Cm-ran, Thomas J. DonneUon, 
James F. English, John J. Fay, James Graham, Thomas Jordan, Law- 
rence J. KeUy, Michael B. Kenney, Edward J. Leary, Edward A. 
McGrath, John McLoughUn, James J. McMorrow, James E. Norton, 
Denis F. O'ConneU, James O'Connor, John A. O'Hearn, Thomas J. 
O'Keefe, Timothy F. Regan, John J. ReUly, Edward M. Richardson, 
Frank B. Skelton, John J. SuUivan, Lewis R. SuUivan, Arthur R. 
Towle. 

Constables connected vnih the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. — 
Harry L. AUen, Thomas Langlan, George W. Splaine, Edward S. Van 
Steenbergh. 

Constables connected with Animal Rescue League. — Julian Codman, Archi- 
bald McDonald, Huntington Smith, Frank J. SuUivan. 

Constables connected with Children's Aid Society. — Samuel C. Lawrence, 
Walter M. Stone. 

Constable connected with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. — John A. Elliott. 



OFFICERS PAID BY FEES. 129 

Grain, Measurers of. — [R. L., Chap. 57, §§ 25-31.] Frederick T. Baker, 
Forrest 0. Batchelder, James W. Blakeley, Lawrence A. Bragan, Patrick 
F. Brennan, Joseph O. Briggs, Thomas J. CaUaghan, Patrick J. Calla- 
han, Daniel G. Colhns, Michael CoUins, Patrick J. Conroy, Eliot E. 
Copeland, Fred A. Curtis, James H. Donovan, John F. Donovan, 
Alton F. Dow, Fred A. Downey, Thomas F. Downey, Grant Dunn, 
John Dunn, Patrick R. Dunn, Charles A. Dyer, Mark R. Eisenham, 
Lorenzo T. Farnum, Frank H. Feitel, Daniel T. Flynn, Patrick J. 
Foley, WiUiam M. Foley, Robert Fulton, John Galloway, G. Everett 
Giles, Thomas H. Gordon, William W. Gordon, Lawrence C. HaUin, 
John A. Hanly, Fred G. Harms, Charles B. Harris, Frank E. Hawkins, 
Benjamin Hay, James J. Hayes, Joseph M. Hefferan, Joseph G. Her- 
rick, Benjamin F. Hooten, Charles E. Howe, William S. Jewett, John W. 
Joy, George W. Keith, John W. KeUey, John F. Kelly, Thomas F. 
Kelly, Fred Kitson, Thomas C. Lamb, Joseph Landy, Thomas B. Lom- 
bard, Michael J. McCann, Edward J. McCarthy, Eugene J. McCarthy, 
Jeremiah L. McCarthy, Eugene P. McDonald, Martin McGrath, 
Michael F. McLaughlin, Timothy J. McLaughhn, William T. Mc- 
Laughhn, James C. McMahon, John F. Mahoney, William F. Mahoney, 
WiUiam F. Mahoney, Jr., Mark M. Manning, Forrest O. Mitchell, 
Edward P. Morrison, Christian Moore, John F. Nelson, Edward W. 
Noel, Denis O'SuUivan, Harold D. Page, Leshe A. Pike, Wilham A. 
Podolski, Herbert F. Reiuhard, Walter S. Riddell, Ellsworth G. Robbing, 
Harry N. Safford, William Seeley, Fred R. Segee, James E. Shea, Eugene 
Sheridan, Alfred J. Sidwell, William E. Stewart, Jeremiah Sullivan, 
John C. Sullivan, Timothy J. SuUivan, Everett S. Vradenburgh, Alfred 
A. Waldron, Michael Wall, Albert M. Walles, Henry H. Walters, 
Thomas F. White, George A. Wolff, Frederick P. Wood, Charles H. 
Woods, AUen Wright. 

Hay and Straw, Inspectors of Pressed or Bundled. — [R. L., Chap. 57, §§ 36- 
39.] Morton Alden, James W. Blakeley, Joseph O. Briggs, Daniel G. 
CoUins, James J. Colorusso, James P. Conroy, Thomas F. Culkeen, 
Fred A. Curtis, Patrick R. Dunn, Charles A. Dyer, Mark R. Eisenham, 
Frank H. Feitel, Patrick J. Foley, WiUiam M. Foley, G. Everett GUes, 
Thomas A. Gorman, John A. Hanly, Frank E. Hawkins, James J. 
Hayes, Alpheus R. Henderson, LeweUyn S. Herrick, Benjamin F. 
Hooten, Charles E. Howe, Amos S. Hubbard, John W. Joy, John W. 
KeUey, John F. Kelly, Thomas C. Lamb, Joseph Landy, Samuel Lom- 
bard, Jr., Eugene J. McCarthy, Martin McGrath, Michael F. Mc- 
Laughlin, Timothy J. McLaughUn, WiUiam T. McLaughhn, James C. 
McMahon, John F. Mahoney, Patrick H. Mahoney, Wilham F. Mahoney, 
WiUiam F. Mahoney, Jr., Mark M. Manning, Christian Moore, Richard 
J. Moore, Edward W. Noel, Denis O'SuUivan, LesUe A. Pike, Herbert F. 
Reinhard, Walter S. RiddeU, EUsworth G. Robbins, S. H. Robinson, 
George F. Ryan, Harry N. Safford, Charles H. Seeley, James E. Shea, 
John C. SuUivan, Alfred A. Waldron, Michael WaU, Albert M. WaUes, 
Henry H. Walters, Frederick P. Wood, John Wray. 



130 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Bay Scales, Superintendents of. — [R. L., Chap. 57, § 35; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 45, §§ 23-25.] Herbert C. Davis, North scales; John F. Martin, 
Roxbiu-y scales. 

Leather, Measurers of. — [R. L., Chap. 59.] Eugene BisseU, Karl B. Brooks, 
Henry A. Clafiin, George T. Corbett, Hanford Thomas Crosby, Jr., 
Joseph D. DriscoU, Thomas W. Edwards, SeweU B. Farnsworth, Edwin 
A. Fourett, John T. Hansen, Nathaniel C. Lyon, John A. MacDonald, 
Edward H. Mahoney, Edward R. MaxweU, James H. Reed, Jr., WiUiam 
S. Saunders, Frederick A. Schumann, WiUiam E. SuUivan, Roscoe D. 
Waterhouse, John E. Young. 

Liquid Measures, Gangers of. — [R. L., Chap. 62, § 18; Ord. 1912, 
Chap. 1.] Cecil E. Baum, Thomas Bond, Charles H. Gelpke, James A. 
Sweeney. 

Petroleum and its Products, Inspectors of. — [R. L., Chap. 102, §§ 109- 
112; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 45, § 6.] James H. Cleaves, Orrin E. 
Hodsdon, WUliam Park. 

Wood and Bark, Measurers of.— [R. L., Chap. 57, §§ 75-82; Rev. Ord. 
1898, Chap. 45, § 26.] Morton Alden, Benjamin F. Appleby, WiUiam 
G. Bail, Frederick T. Baker, Arthur F. Barry, Forrest O. Batchelder, 
James W. Blakeley, John J. Boyle, Lawrence A. Bragan, Patrick F. 
Brennan, Joseph O. Briggs, Thomas J. CaUaghan, Jeremiah J. CaUahan, 
Patrick J. CaUahan, Michael CoUins, Patrick J. Conroy, Arnold B. 
Crosby, Fred A. Curtis, Walter H. Cutter, James H. Donovan, John F. 
Donovan, Grant Dunn, John Dunn, Patrick R. Dunn, Charles A. Dyer, 
Mark R. Eisenham, John A. Emery, Jr., Lorenzo T. Farnum, Frank H. 
Feitel, Joseph A. Flores, Daniel T. Flynn, Patrick J. Foley, Robert 
Fulton, John GaUoway, Thomas H. Gordon, WiUiam W. Gordon, 
Herbert C. Gray, Lawrence C. HaUin, Charles A. Hardy, Fred G. Harms, 
Charles B. Harris, Frank E. Hawkins, Benjamin Hay, Joseph M. Hef- 
feran, Sidney C. Higgins, Benjamin F. Hooten, Fletcher Houghton, 
John W. Hunter, WilUam S. Jewett, John W. Joy, John B. Keaney, 
W. Wallace Kee, Frank M. Keefe, George W. Keith, John W. KeUey, 
John F. KeUy, Thomas F. Kelly, John F. Kiernan, Mary B. Kirley, Fred 
Kitson, Thomas C. Lamb, Michael J. McCann, Edward J. McCarthy, 
Eugene J. McCarthy, Jeremiah L. McCarthy, Eugene P. McDonald, 
Charles McGovern, E. J. McGovern, Martin McGrath, Edward S. 
Mcllhatten, Michael F. McLaughHn, James C. McMahon, John F. 
Mahoney, WiUiam F. Mahoney, William F. Mahoney, Jr., Mark M. 
Manning, Richard Marcy, Herbert W. Merrow, Forrest O. MitcheU, 
Christian Moore, John J. Morris, E. Eugene Morse, Edward P. Mor- 
rison, James H. Muldoon, Henry C. Murphy, Michael R. Murphy, John 
F. Nelson, Edward W. Noel, Denis O'SuUivan, Harold D. Page, James 
E. Peacock, LoveU O. Perkins, WiUiam A. Podolski, Horace L. Porter, 
Walter S. RiddeU, Fred B. Riggs, EUsworth G. Robbins, Harry N. Safford, 
WiUiam Seeley, Fred R. Segee, James E. Shea, Eugene Sheridan, Alfred 



PILOT COMMISSIONERS. 131 

J. Sidwell, Edward A. Smith, WiUiam E. Stewart, Jeremiah Sulhvan, 
John C. SuUivan, Timothy J. SuUivan, Paul F. Tierney, Frank E. Trow, 
Everett S. Vradenburgh, Alfred A. Waldron, Michael Wall, Albert M. 
WaUes, Henry H. Walters, B. F. C. Whitehouse, J. Clarence Whitney, 
John A. Whittemore, Fred P. Wood, Stuart P. Woodbury, Charles H. 
Woods, Allen Wright. 



OLD SOUTH ASSOCIATION IN BOSTON. 

[Stat. 1877, Chap. 222, §§ 1, 2.] 
The Mayor, ex officio, Councillors George W. Coleman and Walter 
Ballantyne, Managers on the part of the City of Boston. 

The association is managed by a Board of Managers, consisting of fifteen, 
of whom the Mayor of the City of Boston is one, ex officio, two are elected 
annually by the City Council for the municipal year, and the others are 
chosen as provided by Chapter 222 of the Acts of 1877. 



COLLATERAL LOAN COMPANY. 

[Stat. 1859, Chap. 173, § 6; Stat. 1865, Chap. 14; Stat. 1876, Chap. 11.] 

The Collateral Loan Company is managed by seven directors selected 
annually, five chosen by the corporators at the annual meeting in Decem- 
ber, one appointed by the Governor and one by the Mayor. 

Clarence W. Rowley, Director. Appointed by the Mayor. Term ends 
in December, 1916. 



WORKINGMEN'S LOAN ASSOCIATION. 

[Stat. 1888, Chap. 108, § 4.] 

The Workingmen's Loan Association is managed by sixteen directors, 
selected annually, fourteen chosen by corporators at the annual meeting 
on the third Thursday in April, one appointed by the Governor, and one 
appointed by the Mayor. 

Frederick M. J. Sheen an, Director. Appointed by the Mayor. Term 
ends in 1916. 



PILOT COMMISSIONERS. 

Office, 716 Chamber of Commerce. 

[R. L., Chap. 67, §§ 1-6.] 

commissioners. 
Frederick C. Bailey. Term ends in 1918. 
John H. Frost. Term ends in 1917. 
Richard Banfield, Secretary. 



132 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Two Commissioners of Pilots for the harbor of Boston, having the 
recommendation of the trustees of the Boston Marine Society, are ap- 
pointed by the Governor for the term of three years. They appoint a secre- 
tary. The Commissioners grant commissions as pilots for Boston Harbor 
to such persons, approved by the trustees of the Boston Marine Society, 
as they consider competent, and cause the laws of pilotage to be observed. 
The compensation of the Commissioners and their allowance for ofl&ce 
rent, clerk hire, etc., is fixed by the trustees of the Boston Marine Society, 
and is paid from the amounts received from pilotage returned by the 
pilots. Any surplus therefrom is paid to the Boston Marine Society. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 37 Pemberton square. 
[R. L., Chap. 31; Chap. 100, § 3; Stat. 1878, Chap. 244; Stat. 1885, 
Chap. 323; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, § 26; Stat. 1903, Chap. 279; Stat. 
1906, Chap. 291; Stat. 1907, Chap. 560; Stat. 1908, Chap. 480; C. C, 
Part III., Chaps. 53 and 54; Stat. 1909, Chap. 221 and Chap. 311, 
Stat. 1911, Chap. 287; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 263, 286, 592, 835, §§69-75; 
Stat. 1914, Chap. 611; Stat. 1915, Chap. 91.] 

Stephen O'Meara,* Police Commissioner. Salary, $6,000. 
John P. McNamara, Secretary. Salary, $3,000. 
Captain Thomas Ryan, Chief Clerk. Salary, $3,000. 

EXECUTIVE staff. 

Michael H. Ceowlet, Superintendent of Police. Salary, $5,000. 
Otis F. Kimball, Deputy Superintendent. Salary, $3,500. 
Captain George C. Garland, Special Service. Salary, $3,000. 
Captain Charles W. Searles, Property Clerk. Salary, $3,000. 
Captain Patrick F. King, Drill Master. Salary, $3,000. 
Captain Richard Fitzgerald, Special Service. Salary, $3,000. 
Lieutenant William J. Sheehan, Clerk in Superintendent's Office. Salary, 

$2,000. 
Lieutenant William L. Devitt, Inspector of Claims. Salary, $2,000. 
Lieutenant James McDevitt, Special Service. Salary, $2,000. 
Lieutenant George E. Saxton, Inspector of Carriages. Salary, $2,000. 
Sergeant Horatio J. Homer, Messenger. Salary, $1,750. 
John Weigel, Director of Signal Service. Salary, $2,500. 
Frank Richardson, Assistant Director. Salary, $2,000. 

BTJREATJ OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

John R. McGarr, Chief Inspector. Salary, $3,300. 
AiNSLEY C. Armstrong, Captain. Salary, $3,000. 
* Term ends in 1921. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 133 

Levi W. Burr, James D. Conboy, Edward T. Conway, Michael H. , 

Cronin, James A. Dennessy, Alfred N. Douglas, Gustaf Gustafsotst, 

Daniel W. Hart, Joseph F. Loughlin, Thomas H. Lynch, Francis 

J. McCauley, Michael J. Morrissey, Walter M. Murphy, George 

W. Patterson, William H. Pelton, Henry M. Pierce, William J. 

Rooney, Thomas A. Sheehan, Walker A. Smith, Silas F. Waite, 

Oliver J. Wise, Morris Wolf, Thomas F. Gleavy, George J. 

Farrell, John F. Linton, Inspectors. Salary, $2,000 each. 

The Board of Pohce for the City of Boston was estabhshed by Chapter 

323 of the Acts of 1885, and was composed of three citizens of Boston, 

appointed for five years from the two principal political parties by the 

Governor, Avith the advice and consent of the Executive Council. The 

Board assumed office on July 23, 1885. By Chapter 291 of the Acts of 

1906, the department was placed in charge of a single head, to be known 

as the Pohce Commissioner. 

The powers of the Board of Pohce, except those relating to the grant- 
ing of intelhgence office, bilhard and pool, skating rink, picnic grove, 
bowhng alley, common victualers' and liquor hcenses, which were trans- 
ferred to the newly created Licensing Board, devolve upon the Pohce 
Commissioner. The present Pohce Commissioner assumed ofiice June 4, 
1906, for a term of five years, was reappointed in 1911, and again in 1916. 
The City is divided into nineteen Pohce Districts, in each of which is a 
station-house, the headquarters of a captain and force of men. The 
Commissioner appoints a Harbor Master and assistants from the pohce 
force, and they receive pay in accordance with their rank in the force. 
The pohce steamer "Guardian" and the steam launches "Ferret," "Watch- 
man" and "Alert" are employed in this service. 

By Chapter 91, General Acts of 1915, the duties devolving upon the 
Pohce Commissioner as to the annual hsting of resident men, 20 years of 
age or over, also of women voters (as specified in Chapter 835, Acts of 
1913, sections 69 to 75) were transferred to the Board of Assessors. 

On December 1, 1915, the pohce force numbered 1,604 men, including 
24 captains, 25 inspectors, 39 heutenants, 102 sergeants, 1,330 patrolmen 
and 81 reservemen. There were 19 men in the signal service, whose 
director has charge of 487 signal boxes. In the calendar year 1915, the 
number of persons arrested was 89,225, of which 65 per cent were for 
drunkenness and 37.25 per cent were not residents of Boston. Foreign- 
born persons arrested, 38,176; women and girls, all ages, 8,419; boys under 
15 years of age, 2,291. In year ending November 30, 1915, persons 
imprisoned, 8,603; persons fined, 11,878, the fines amounting to $113,459; 
stolen property recovered, $291,289; hcenses granted, 21,212 (including 
9,844 for dogs and 6,691 for vehicles) for which $45,336 was received; 
prosecutions for violation of automobile laws, 4,172. 

Salaries: Captains, $3,000 per annum; inspectors and heutenants, 
$2,000 per annum; sergeants, $1,750 per annum; patrolmen, first year's 
service, $1,000; second year's, $1,100; third year's, $1,200; fourth year's 



134 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

$1,300; fifth and successive years', $1,400; reservemen, $2 per day, first 
year; $2.25 per day, second year; third year and after, $2.50 per day. 

POLICE STATIONS. 

First Division, Hanover street. Matthew J. Dailey, Captain. 

Second Division, Court square. James P. Sullivan, Captain. 

Third Division, Joy street. Irving A. H. Peabody, Captain. 

Fourth Division, La Grange street. James P. Canney, Captain. 

Fifth Division, East Dedham street. John E. DriscoU, Captain. 

Sixth Division, corner D and Athens streets, South Boston. Hugh J. 

Lee, Captain. 
Seventh Division, corner Emmons and Paris streets, East Boston. John 

A. Brickley, Captain. 
Eighth Division (including the islands in the harbor and the harbor 

service), corner Commercial and Battery streets. Ross A. Perry, Lieutenant 

and Harbor Master. Sergeants Ibri W. H. Curtis, Frederick J. Swende- 

man, Thomas H. Souther and Patrolmen Thomas Connor, John J. 

McCarthy, Herbert L. Cross, WiUiam H. Rymes, Assistant Harbor 

Masters. (See R. L., Chap. 66, §§ 17-28; Stat. 1882, Chap. 216; Stat. 

1889, Chap. 147.) 
Ninth Division, Mt. Pleasant avenue and Dudley street. Herbert W. 

Goodwin, Captain. 
Tenth Division, Tremont and Roxhury streets. Jeremiah F. GaUivan, 

Captain. 
Eleventh Division, corner Adams and Arcadia streets. Charles T. 

Reardon, Captain. 
Twelfth Division, East Fourth street, near K street, South Boston. Robert 

E. Grant, Captain. 
Thirteenth Division, Seaverns avenue, Jamaica Plain. Joseph Harri- 

man. Captain. Sub-station: Frankhn Park, Pierpont road. 
Fourteenth Division, Washington street, junction Cambridge street, 

Brighton. Forrest F. HaU, Captain. 
Fifteenth Division, New Municipal Building, City square, Charlestown. 

Michael J. Goff, Captain. 
Sixteenth Division, Boylston street, near Hereford street. Thomas F. 

Goode, Captain. 
Seventeenth Division, Centre street, corner Hastings street, West Roxbury. 

CMnton E. Bowley, Captain. 
Eighteenth Division, 1243 Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park. James F. 

DriscoU, Captain. 
Nineteenth Division, 870 Morton street, Dorchester. James J. Walkins 

Captain. 
House op Detention. [Stat. 1887, Chap. 234.] Basement of Court House, 

Pemberton square. Amelia B. White, Chief Matron. Salary, $1,200. 
City Prison. [R. L., Chap. 26, § 40.] Basement of Court House, Pemberton 

square. Captain Thomas C. Evans, Keeper of the Lock-up. Salary, 

$3,000. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 135 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Offices of the Committee, 14 Mason street, off West street. 
[Stat. 1875, Chap. 241; Stat. 1898, Chap. 400; Stat. 1900, Chap. 235; 
Stat. 1901, Chap. 448; Stat. 1903, Chap. 170; Stat. 1905, Chap. 349; 
C. C, Chaps. 33 and 48; Stat. 1906, Chaps. 205, 231, 259, 318, 505; 
Stat. 1907, Chaps. 295, 357, 450; Stat. 1908, Chap. 589; Stat. 1909, 
Chaps. 120, 388, 446, 537, 540; Stat. 1910, Chap. 617; Stat. 1911, 
Chap. 708; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 195, 569; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 337, 363, 
389, 615, 779; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 128, 331, 730, 738; Stat. 1915, Chaps. 
78, 81, 90, General and 189, 300, 304, 372 Special; Stat. 1916, Chaps. 86, 
88, 213, 267 Special] 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Frances G. Curtis. Term ends February, 1919. 
Joseph Lee. Term ends February, 1918. 
Frederick L. Bogan, M. D. Term ends February, 1918. 
Michael H. Corcoran. Term ends February, 1917. 
David D. Scannell, M. D. Term ends February, 1917. 

officials. 
David D. Scannell, M. D., Chairman. 
Thornton D. Apollonio, Secretary. Salary, S4,740. 
Franklin B. Dyer, Superintendent.* Salary, $10,000. 
George S. Burgess, Secretary to the Superintendent. Salary, $3,180. 
William T. Keough, Business Agent. Salary, $4,740. 
Mark B. Mulvey, Schoolhouse Custodian. Salary, $3,000. 

assistant superintendents. 
Jeremiah E. Burke. Augustine L. Rafter. 

Mrs. Ellor Carlisle Ripley. Frank V. Thompson. 

Mary C. Mellyn. 

Salary, $5,496 each. 

The School Committee consists of five members, elected by such per- 
sons as are qualified to vote for School Committee; but no person shall 
be ehgible for election to the Committee who is not an inhabitant of the 
City and has not been a resident thereof for at least three years continu- 
ously prior to the election. The members serve without compensation 
and their terms of office begin on the first Monday of February following 
their election. At each annual municipal election as many persons as 
may be necessary to fiU the places of the member or members of the Com- 
mittee whose term or terms are about to expire are elected for the term 
of three years. Vacancies are filled for the unexpired term at the next 
annual municipal election. 

* The term of Superintendent Dyer expires September 1, 1918. 



136 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The School Committee meets regularly on the first and third Monday 
evenings of each month, except in July and August. 

OFFICE HOURS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Frederick L. Bogan, M. D,, 514 Commonwealth avenue. Office hour 
at 514 Commonwealth avenue, Saturdays, 1 to 2 P.M. 

Michael H. Corcoran, 100 Chaimcy street. Office hour at School 
Committee Building, Mason street, Mondays, 3 to 4 P.M.; Saturdays, 
10 to 11 A.M. 

Frances G. Curtis, 28 Mt. Vernon street. Office hour at School Com- 
mittee Building, Mason street, Fridays, 4 to 5 P.M. 

Joseph Lee, Room 710, 101 Tremont street. Office hour at 101 Tremont 
street, Room 710, second and fourth Wednesdays, 4.30 to 5.30 P.M. 

David D. Scannell, M. D., 366 Commonwealth avenue. Office hour 
at School Committee Building, Mason street, Thursdays, 4 to 5 P.M. 

OFFICE HOURS OF SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS. 

Franklin B. Dyer, 38 Englewood avenue, Brighton. Office hours at 
School Committee Building, Mason street, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and 
Thursdays, 3 to 4 P. M.; Fridays, 3 to 5 P.M.; first and third 
Saturdays each month, 10.30 A.M. to 12 M. Office hours during 
school weeks only. 

OFFICE HOURS OF ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Jeremiah E. Burke, 60 Alban street, Dorchester. Office hours at School 

Committee Building, Mason street, Thursdays, 4 to 5 P.M.; Tuesdays, 

12 to 1 P.M. 
Mart C. Mellyn, 11 Mayfair street, Roxbury. Office hours at School 

Committee Building, Mason street, Mondays, 4 to 5 P.M.; Thursdays, 

12 to 1 P.M. 
Mrs. Ellor Carlisle Ripley, 1247 Commonwealth avenue, Allston. 

Office hours at School Committee Building, Mason street, Wednesdays, 

4 to 5 P.M.; Fridays, 12 to 1 P.M., and by appointment other afternoons 

after school. 
Augustine L. Rafter, 41 Bradlee street, Dorchester. Office hours at 

School Committee Building, Mason street, Fridays, 4 to 5 P.M.; 

Wednesdays, 12 to 1 P.M. 
Frank V. Thompson, 84 Brooks street, Brighton. Office hours at School 

Committee Building, Mason street, Mondays, 4 to 5 P.M.; Thursdays, 

12 to 1 P.M. 

Regular meetings of the Board of Superintendents on Fridays at 9 A.M. 

normal, latin and high schools (16). 
Normal School. 
Pubhc Latin (boys), Girls' Latin. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 137 

East Boston High, Charlesto^^oi High, English High (boys), Mechanic 
Arts High (boys). South Boston High, Girls' High, High School of 
Practical Arts (girls), Brighton High, High School of Commerce (boys), 
Roxbury High (girls), West Roxbury High, Dorchester High and Hyde 
Park High Schools. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICTS (70). 

East Boston. — Blackinton, Chapman, Emerson, John Cheverus, Samuel 
Adams, Theodore Lyman, Ulysses S. Grant. 

Charlestown. — ■ Bunker HiU, Frothingham, Harvard, Prescott, Warren, 

North and West Ends. — Bowdoin, Eliot, Hancock, Washington, Wells, 
WendeU PhiUips. 

City Proper. — Abraham Lincoln, Prince, Quincy. 

South End. — Dwight, Everett, FrankUn, Rice. 

South Boston. — Bigelow, Frederic W. Lincoln, Gaston, John A. Andrew, 
Lawrence, Norcross, Ohver Hazard Perry, Shurtleff, Thomas N. Hart. 

RoxBURT. — Comins, Dearborn, DiUaway, Dudley, George Putnam, 
Hugh O'Brien, Hyde, Lewis, Martin, Sherwin. 

Brighton. — Bennett, Thomas Gardner, Washington Allston. 

West Roxbury. — ■ Agassiz, Bowditch, Charles Sumner, Francis Park- 
man, Jefferson, Longfellow, Lowell, Robert G. Shaw. 

Dorchester. — Christopher Gibson, Edmund P. Tileston, Edward 
Everett, Gilbert Stuart, Henry L. Pierce, John Winthrop, Mary Hemen- 
way, Mather, Minot, OUver Wendell Holmes, Phillips Brooks, Roger 
Wolcott, William E. RusseU. 

Hyde Park. — Ehhu Greenwood, Henry Grew. 

industrial and special schools. 
Industrial Schools. — ■ Boston Industrial School for Boys (day) known 

as the Brimmer Branch of the Evening Industrial School in the evening . 

Trade School for Girls (day) known as the "Evening Trade School" 

in the evening. Continuation Schools (day), for employed boys and 

girls. 
Clerical School. — For special training in Stenography and Bookkeeping. 
Disciplinary Day School. — ■ For truants and other school offenders. 
School for the Deaf. — Horace Mann School. Connected with the 

school are classes for the semi-bhnd. 

A fuU hst of the schools and teachers will be found in the "Manual 
of the Pubhc Schools of the City of Boston, 1916." 

Special Departments, Etc. 
Educational Investigation and Measurement. Frank W, BaUou, 

Director. Salary, $3,780. 
Evening and Continuation Schools. W. Stanwood Field, Director. 

Salary, $3,780. 



138 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Extended Use of Pxjblic Schools {i. e., Evening Centers). Mrs. 

Eva W. White, Director. Salary, $3,420. 
Household Science and Akts. Josephine Morris, Director. Salary, 

$2,580. 
Kindergartens. Caroline D. Aborn, Director. Salary, $2,100. 
Licensed Minors. Timothy F. Regan, Supervisor. Salary, $1,620. 
Manual Arts. Theodore M. Dillaway, Director. Salary, $3,420. 
Medical Inspection. WiUiam H. Devine, M. D., Director. Salary, 

$1,500. 
Music. James M. McLaughlin, Director. Salary, $3,420. 

Practice and Training of Teachers. , Director. 

Salesmanship. Isabel C. Bacon, Acting Director. Salary, $1,800. 
Special Classes. Ada M. Fitts, Supervisor. Salary, $1,980. 

Administrative Offices. 

Secretary, Superintendent and Assistant Superintendents, 14 Mason 
street. 

Business Agent and SchooUiouse Custodian, Room 801, City HaU 
Annex. 

Supervisor of Licensed Minors, 218 Tremont street, where educational 
and employment certificates are issued daily, except Saturdays, from 8.30 
A.M. to 5 P.M. and on Saturdays to 1 P.M., but during July and August 
to 12 noon. 

Minors' licenses (i. e., minors under 14 years of age) to act as newsboys, 
etc., issued daily, except Saturdays, from 4 to 5 P. M., and on Saturdays, 
from 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., but during July and August to 12 noon. Licenses 
are not issued during school hours. 

Attendance Officers. 
[Stat. 1913, Chap. 779, §§ 12, 13.] 
These officers are appointed by the School Committee, and under their 
direction enforce the laws relating to absentees from school. They are 
also constables, serving without bonds, and the regular salary of the 
position is $1,512 per year. They may be found from 9 to 9.30 A.M., 
on the days that the schools are in session, at the first named schoolhouse 
following the residence of each, as below: 

William H. Marnell, Chief, 37 Mt. Everett street, Dorchester. 

Office, 218 Tremont street. Salary, $2,400. Office hour, school days, 

from 4 to 5 P. M. 
Francis P. Aieta, 66 Percival street, Dorchester. Eliot and Hancock 

Districts. 
George W. Bean, 42 Sagamore street, Dorchester. Mary Hemenway, 

Minot, Gilbert Stuart and Henry L. Pierce Districts. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 139 

James A. Bereill, 101 Walnut avenue, Roxbury. Martin and Prince 

Districts. Special work. 
Henry M. Blackwell, 107 Brook avenue, Dorchester. Dudley, Comins, 

and Dillaway Districts. 
James Bragdon, 75 Farragut road. South Boston. Oliver Hazard Perry, 

Frederic W. Lincohi and Gaston Districts. 
Constantino F. Ciampa, 53 Stanton street, Dorchester. Evening 

Schools. 
Maurice F. Corkery, 28 Longfellow street, Dorchester. John Winthrop, 

Hugh O'Brien and PhiUips Brooks Districts. 
Joseph W. Ferris, 10 Lyman terrace, Dorchester. John A. Andrew, 

Edward Everett, Thomas N. Hart and WiUiam E. Russell Districts. 
John T. Hathaway, 15 MerUn street, Roshndale. Bunker HiU, Frothing- 

ham, Prescott and Warren Districts. 
Joseph W. Hobbs, 429 Brookhne avenue. Evening schools. 
Timothy J. Kenny, 296 West Fifth street. South Boston. Mather, 

Christopher Gibson and Oliver Wendell Holmes Districts. 
David F. Long, 286 Bunker HiU street, Charlestown. Harvard, Wash- 
ington and Wells Districts. 
Michael J. McTiernan, 121 Glendower road, Roslindale. Charles 

Sumner, Francis Parkman, LongfeUow and Robert G. Shaw Districts. 
George H. Nee, 31 Greenock street, Dorchester Centre. Ulysses S. 

Grant, Samuel Adams and Theodore Lyman Districts. 
Richard F. Quirk, 564 East Broadway, South Boston. Shurtleff, 

Bigelow, Lawrence and Norcross Districts. 
George A. Sargent, 34 Hancock street. Chapman, Blackinton, Emerson 

and John Cheverus Districts. 
Amos Schaffer, 115 Hemenway street, Dorchester. Wendell Phillips 

Bowdoin and Rice Districts. 
William B. Shea, 119 Radcliife street, Dorchester Centre. Edmund 

P. Tileston, Ehhu Greenwood, Henry Grew and Roger Wolcott 

Districts. 
Warren J. Stokes, 1850 Centre street. West Roxbury. Lowell, Agassiz, 

Bowditch and Jefferson Districts. 

John J. Sullivan, 22 Alcott street, AUston. Dearborn, George Putnam 

and Lewis Districts. 
Richard W. Walsh, 5 Woodville street, Roxbury. Abraham Lincoln, 

Franklin and Quincy Districts. 
John H. Westfall, 24 Ashford street, Allston. Washington AUston, 

Bennett and Thomas Gardner Districts. 
Charles B. Wood, 619 Columbus avenue. Everett, Dwight, Hyde and 

Sherwin Districts. 



140 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



SUMMARY OF PUPILS IN ALL SCHOOLS. 
School Year Ending June 30, 1915. 





a 
.o 

u 
o 




i 

a 

< 


i 

"" 9 

O t^ 

r 


NuMBEK Enbolled June 30, 

1915, OF THE Following 

Ages. 


Schools. 


u 

0) 
T3 

a 


s 

in 


o 


o 
o 


1^ 

ID 




191 

17,182 

93,772 

8,498 


185 

15,714 

85,871 

6,598 


181 

14,755 

79,776 

5,298 


98 
94 
93 
80 










181 








2,853 

64,513 

13 


7,075 
6,940 


4,684 


Elementary (eight grades) 

Kindergarten 


134 
3,895 


13,268 
3,379 


709 






Totals 

Special Schools 


119,643 
1,203 


108,368 
855 


100,010 
768 


92 
90 


4,029 
2 


16,647 
14 


67,379 
125 


14,015 
352 


5,574 
254 






Totals, Day Schools 


120,846 


109,223 


100,778 


92 


4,031 


16,661 


67,504 


14,367 


5,828 


Evening High 

Evening Elementary 

Evening Industrial 


5,989 

12,182 

650 

147 


4,157 

7,025 

408 

97 


3,339 

5,895 

314 

74 


80 

84 
77 
76 




















Totals, Evening Schools 


18,968 


11,687 


9,622 


82 














4,047 


2,286 


2,001 


87 
















Totals, All Schools 


143,861 


123,196 


112,401 


91 

















SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 
June SO, 1915. 





Number 
of Schools. 


Number 
of Class 
Rooms. 


NuMBEB OP Teachers. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Day. 
Normal 


1 

15 

*254 

tl38 

tl2 


26 

475 

2,304 


4 
257 
164 


9 

272 

1,931 

244 
274 


13 
529 


Elementary (eight grades) 


2,095 

244 




42 


63 


337 








420 

9 

21 

4 

1 


2,847 

132 

347 

26 


488 


2,730 


3,218 


Evening. 


160 








379 








30 








9 












Totals, Evening Schools 


35 


505 






578 









* The separate schools, as shown by the number of schoolhouses and rented quarters 
belonginc; to the 70 elementary districts, not counting the portable houses annexed. 

t Includes nine afternoon kindergarten classes as follows: Bowdoin District (1); Eliot 
District (1); Hancock District (1); Phillips Brooks District (1); Quincy District (1); 
Samuel Adams District (2); Ulysses S. Grant District (1); Wells District (1). 

X Horace Mann, Tr ide School for Girls, Boston Industrial School for Boys, Continuation 
School, Boston Clerical School, Disciplinary Day School and six pre-vocational schools. 
The number of teachers given includes teachers of these special schools and aU general 
supervisors and directors. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 141 



TERMS, HOLIDAYS AND VACATIONS OF DAT SCHOOLS. 

The school year begins on the first day of September in each calendar 
year and closes on August 31 of the following calendar year. 

All day schools are in session from the second Wednesday in September 
up to and including the Wednesday of the second calendar week preceding 
the Fourth of July, except on Saturdays and Sundays and the following 
vacations and hohdays: Columbus Day (October 12); from 12 o'clock noon 
on the day before Thanksgiving Day until the following Monday; from 
12 o'clock noon on the second calendar day immediately preceding Christ- 
mas Day to and including the first day of the following January; the 
Twenty-second of February; Good Friday; the week beginning with the 
first Monday in April; the Nineteenth of April; Memorial Day and 
the Seventeenth of June. Whenever any of the aforesaid hohdays, 
except the first day of January, falls upon Sunday, the schools are not in 
session on the following Monday. Graduating exercises are held during 
the second calendar week preceding the Fourth of July. 

MEDICAL INSPECTORS AND NURSES. 

Regular medical inspection of the schools was maintained from 1894 to 
1915, under the supervision of the Health Department. Beginning 
September 1, 1915, the School Committee took charge of this service, 
appointing 41 physicians as named below. 

Chapter 357, Acts of 1907, provided for the appointment by the School 
Committee of one supervising female mu-se and as many district female 
nurses as are deemed necessary. Their duties are to assist the medical 
inspectors in carrying out the latter's directions, and to give such instruc- 
tion to the pupils as will promote their physical welfare. For the seventy 
elementary school districts there are now thirty-eight nurses in the service 
besides the supervising nurse. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS. 

Salary, $504 per year. 

Arthur C. Jelly, M. D. In charge. Salary, $2,004. 

Arnold N. Allen, M. D., 22 Conway st., Roslindale. West Roxbury 
High School; Agassiz, Bowditch and Francis Parkman Districts. 

Francis G. Barnum, M. D., 16 Maple st., Hyde Park. Hyde Park High 
School; Ehhu Greenwood and Henry Grew Districts. 

James E. Blake, M. D., 3 South Fairview st., Roshndale. Charles 
Sumner, Longfellow and Robert G. Shaw Districts. 

Ernest L. Booth, M. D., 2 Antrim st.. East Boston. Blackinton, Emerson 
and John Cheverus Districts. 

Roland W. Brayton, M. D., 693 Washington st., Dorchester. Dor- 
chester High School; Christopher Gibson District. 

Joseph A. Cogan, M. D., 419 Boylston st. Abraham Lincoln District; 
Horace Mann School. 



142 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Simon F. Ctjrran, M. D.,* 104 Norfolk st., Dorchester. Employment 

Certificate Ofiice; Boston Industrial School for Boys. 
Francis 7. Doherty, M. D., 12 Chestnut Hill ave., Brighton. Brighton 

High School; Bennett District. 
Martin J. English, M. D., 514 Commonwealth ave. Quincy District; 

Trade School for Girls. 
Theodore C. Erb., M. D., 38 Westland ave. Girls' High School; Everett 

District. 
Harry Fein, M. D., 55 Van Dyke st., Roxbury. Hancock District. 
Morris Frank, M. D., 106 Humboldt ave., Roxbury. DiUaway and 

Dudley Districts. 
Joseph E. Hallisey, M. D., 691 Columbia rd., Dorchester. Edward 

Everett and Hugh O'Brien Districts. 
David E. Hanlon, M. D., 1300 Hyde Park ave., Hyde Park. Mather 

District. 
David P. Hayes, M. D., 153 Dorchester st.. South Boston. John A. 

Andrew and William E. Russell Districts. 
Joseph H. H. Kelley, M. D., "The Peabody," Ashmont street, Dor- 
chester Centre. Gilbert Stuart and Henry L. Pierce Districts. 
Bradford Kent, M. D., 798 Blue HiU ave., Dorchester. John Winthrop 

and PhiUips Brooks Districts. 
Joseph B. Lyons, M. D., 1 Dexter row, Charlestown. Charlestown High 

School; Harvard and Warren Districts. 
Albert A. McCauley, M. D., 3 Mapleton st., Brighton. Thomas Gardner 

and Washington AUston Districts. 
John H. Moore, M. D., 419 Boylston st. Ehot District. 
Mary T. V. Moore, M. D., 419 Boylston st. WeUs District. 
Edward J. O'Brien, M. D., 8 Matchet st., Brighton. Mechanic Arts 

High School; Martin District. 
Harry Olin, M. D., 444 Warren st., Roxbury. Roxbury High and Boston 

Clerical Schools; Hyde District. 
Bernard W. Pond, M. D., 180 Huntington ave. Dwight, Franklin and 

Rice Districts. 
Carlisle Reed, M. D., 155 Massachusetts ave. Prince and Washington 

Districts. 
James A. Reilly, M. D., 1675 Dorchester ave., Dorchester. Mary 

Hemenway and Minot Districts. 
William H. Robinson, M. D., 430 Centre st., Jamaica Plain. Comins, 

Jefferson and Lowell Districts. 
Solomon H. Rubin, M. D., 484 Blue HiU ave., Roxbury. EngUsh High 

School and Annexes. 
Charles E. Shay, M. D., 136 Warren st., Roxbury. High School of 

Practical Arts; Dearborn District. 
Russell F. Sheldon, M. D., 30 Pinckney st. Bowdoin and Wendell 

PhilUps Districts. 

* The physician assigned to the Employment Certificate Office receives $900 per year 
because of extra duties 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 143 

Philip E. A. Sheridan, M. D., 580 Broadway, South Boston. South 

Boston High School; Frederic W. Lincoln and Shurtleff Districts. 
Francis P. Silva, M. D., 206 Main st., Charlestown. Bunker Hill, 

Frothingham and Prescott Districts. 
Mitchell Sisson, M. D., 26 Princeton st., East Boston. East Boston 

High School; Theodore Lyman and Ulysses S. Grant Districts. 
Irving Sobotky, M. D., 366 Commonwealth ave. Normal and Girls' 

Latin Schools; High School of Commerce. 
Charles F. Stack, M. D., 1315 River st., Hyde Park. Oliver Wendell 

Holmes District. 
Frederick W. Stetson, M. D., 504 Warren st., Roxbury. Dorchester 

High School Annex; George Putnam and Lewis Districts. 
John T. Sullivan, M. D., 520 Beacon st. Chapman and Samuel Adams 

Districts. 
William F. Temple, Jr., M. D., 499 Beacon st. Public Latin School; 

Sherwin District. 
Edward F. Timmins, M. D., 527 Broadway, South Boston. Gaston, 

OUver Hazard Perry and Thomas N. Hart Districts. 
Edward A. Tracy, M. D., 489 Broadway, South Boston. Bigelow, 

Lawrence and Norcross Districts. 
George E. Winslow, M. D., 1166 River st., Hyde Park. Edmund P. 

Tileston and Roger Wolcott Districts. 

physical training. 

By Chapter 295, Acts of 1907, the School Committee were authorized 
to organize and conduct physical training and exercises, athletics, sports 
and games and to provide therefor proper apparatus and faciUties in the 
buildings, yards and playgrounds under their control, also to make similar 
use of aU such facilities in charge of the Park and Recreation Commis- 
sioners as the latter, with the Mayor's approval, might deem suitable. 

The sum available for this branch of education is four cents on each 
$1,000 of the City's assessed valuation, which in the year 1915-16 was 
$60,430. Besides this, a special appropration of $29,049 was provided 
for playground activities. 

There are now a director, two assistant directors and one instructor of 
physical training, also 133 playground teachers, the latter having charge 
of games, gymnastics, etc., in the 29 schoolyard playgrounds and 50 park 
playgrounds in use. 

industrial schools partly maintained by state. 
By Chapter 471, Acts of 1911, and Chapter 106, Acts of 1912, the State 
especially encourages the establishing of Independent Industrial Schools, 
allowing financial aid for their maintenance proportionate to the amount 
raised by local taxation and expended for aU public schools. Under this 
arrangement, the School Committee is reimbursed by the State to the 
extent of one half the net maintenance cost of such industrial schools 



144 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

estabKshed in Boston thus far with the approval of the State Board of 
Education. By Chapter 805, Acts of 1913, Continuation Schools, for 
employed children between fourteen and sixteen years of age, were included 
under the same plan of State aid. The eight schools thus maintained are 
the Boston Industrial Day School for Boys, Evening Industrial School for 
Boys, Trade Day School for Girls, Evening Trade School for Girls, Evening 
Industrial School, Continuation School (Household Arts Class), Compul- 
sory Continuation School, also Training Class for Continuation School 
Teachers. In 1915-16 the amount received from the State for this purpose 
was $53,971. 

MANUAL TRAINING ROOMS. 

There are seven manual training rooms located in high schools, one in 
each of the following named districts : Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, 
East Boston, Hyde Park and West Roxbury. In addition to these there 
are sixty-nine manual training rooms located in elementary schools, viz.: 
Seven in East Boston, five in Charlestown, nine in Boston proper, ten in 
South Boston, eleven in Roxbury, three in Jamaica Plain, two in Roshn- 
dale, one in West Roxbury, fifteen in Dorchester, one in Mattapan, three 
in Brighton and two in Hyde Park. 

PRE-VOCATIONAIi CENTERS. 

I. Austin, Paris street. East Boston. Bookbinding, Machine Shop 
Practice and Printing. 

II. Abram E. Cutter, Medford street, Charlestown. Electrical Work 
and Woodworking. 

III. EHot, 39 North Bennet street. Printing and Woodworking. 

IV. Quincy, Tyler street, City Proper. Machine Shop Practice. 

V. Parkman, Broadway, South Boston. Electrical Work, Machine 
Shop Practice and Woodworking. 

VI. Lewis, Paulding street, Roxbury. Printing. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL KITCHENS. 

There are fifty-nine rooms fitted as kitchens and used for the purposes 
of instruction in cookery, of which six are in East Boston, four in Charles- 
town, twelve in Boston proper, five in South Boston, seven in Roxbury, 
four in Jamaica Plain, two in Allston, one in Brighton, two in RosUndale, 
one in West Roxbury, thirteen in Dorchester and two in Hyde Park. 

EVENING HIGH AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

The term of the evening schools begins on the last Monday in September 
and continues for twenty-four school weeks. Sessions are suspended on 
the evenings of legal hoHdays, the day preceding and day following 
Thanksgiving, and from the second Friday preceding Christmas Day to 
and including the first day of the following January; but when the first 
day of January falls later than Tuesday of any week, the sessions are 
suspended on the remaining days of that week. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 145 

There are ten evening High Schools, viz.: Central, for men and boys 
only (English High Schoolhouse), Girls', Charlestown, Dorchester, East 
Boston, Hyde Park, North (Washington Schoolhouse) and North Branch 
(Continuation School building, 25 La Grange st.), Roxbury and South 
Boston. These schools, whose sessions are on Monday, Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings, from 7.30 to 9.30, are held in the several high school- 
houses of the districts named. AU but the Central High are commercial 
schools. 

There are twenty-seven Elementary evening schools (including the 
branches) in session on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
evenings, held in the foUowing-named school buildings : 

Abraham Lincoln School, Ferdinand st.; Bigelow School, Fourth and 
E sts.. South Boston; Bowdoin School, Myrtle st. ; Brighton School, Cam- 
bridge and Warren sts., and Brighton Branch in Thomas Gardner School- 
house; Comins School, Terrace and Tremont sts., Roxbiu-y, and Comins 
Branch, Centre and Mozart sts., Jamaica Plain; Dearborn School, Orchard 
park and Chadwick st.; Eliot School, North Bennet st. and Ehot Branch, 
Tileston st.; Franklin School, Waltham st. and Franklin Branch, Warren 
ave. and Dartmouth st.; Frederic W. Lincoln School, Broadway, South 
Boston; Hancock School, Parmenter st. and Hancock Branch, Prince st.; 
Hyde Park School, Harvard ave. and Everett st.; Lewis School, Paulding 
St., Roxbury; Marshall School, WestviUe st., Dorchester; Phillips Brooks 
School, Perth st., Dorchester; Quincy School, Tyler st; Theodore Lyman 
School, Paris and Gove sts., East Boston; Ulysses S. Grant School, Paris 
St., East Boston, and Branch in John Cheverus Schoolhouse; Warren 
School, Pearl and Summer sts., Charlestown; Washington School, Nor- 
man and South Margin sts., North End; Wells School, Blossom st.; 
WendeU Phillips School, PhiUips st.. West End. 

EVENING INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 

The term of the Evening Industrial Schools begins on the last Monday 
in September, and continues for twenty-foiu" school weeks. The sessions 
are held on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings during the weeks 
that the other evening schools are in session. 

The central school is conducted in the Mechanic Arts High Schoolhouse, 
at the corner of Belvidere and Dalton streets, and the two branches are in 
the East Boston High Schoolhouse, Marion street, East Boston and Old 
Dearborn Schoolhouse, Dearborn place, Roxbury. At the Boston Indus- 
trial School for Boys and the Trade School for Girls, evening classes are 
also held. 

CONTINTTATION SCHOOLS. 

Classes are held at the main building, 25 La Grange street, at 48 Boylston 
street, at 52 Tileston street and in various stores and factories. 

All children 14 to 16 years of age employed under an employment cer- 
tificate are compelled by law (Chapter 805, Acts of 1913) to attend the 
school four hours per week. Sessions, 8 a. m. to 12 m. and 1 to 5 p. m., 



146 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

every week day except Saturday during the time the regular schools are 
at work. The courses of instruction include reading, writing and arith- 
metic, office procedure, business practice, salesmanship, prevocational and 
trade extension work, metalwork, woodwork, power machine, electricity, 
printing, dressmaking, millinery and household arts. Voluntary classes 
are conducted for pupUs over 16 years of age at 52 Tileston street, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. to 12 m. and 3 to 5 p. m. At 
48 Boylston street, Enghsh for non-EngUsh speaking people is taught on 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 8.30 to 10.30 
a. m. and from 2.30 to 5 p. m. 

SUMMER REVIEW SCHOOLS. 

These supplementary schools, one high and ten elementary, for pupils 
who have been retarded in their studies, were started on June 22, 1914. 
The term is forty days, morning sessions only, and the registration of pupils 
in 1915 was 5,985, or 5,470 in the elementary schools and 515 in the high 
school. 

USE OP SCHOOL PROPERTY FOR SOCIAL AND CIVIC PURPOSES. 

By the provisions of Chapter 195, Acts of 1912, the School Committee 
may allow the school property under their control to be used by associa- 
tions and individuals for social, recreative and civic purposes such as 
may be of benefit to the community, with the tmderstanding that such 
use shall nowise interfere with the regular school work, and that no admis- 
sion fee shall be charged. The School Committee may annually appro- 
priate for this purpose a sum equal to two cents on each $1,000 of the 
City's assessed valuation, which in the year 1915-16 amounted to $30,215. 
This plan was started by estabhshing four Evening Centers, each having 
a manager, in four high schooUiouses, viz.: Chariest own, East Boston, 
Roxbury and South Boston, beginning in October, 1912, and continuing 
five months. Two more were started in 1913, viz., the Washington Center, 
in Washington Schoolhouse and the Dorchester Center in the high school- 
house there. In 1914 the Abraham Lincoln Center on Ferdinand street 
was added, making seven. A variety of study clubs, lectures, concerts 
and other entertainments are included in these activities. The centers 
remain in session from the third Friday in October to Jime 30, on three 
evenings a week with some variation as to days. Their membership is 
limited to persons over 14 years of age who are not pupils in the regular 
day schools. Widening interest in the centers has extended their activities 
to one or more afternoons each week. Persons attending the various meet- 
ings and entertainments in 1915 numbered 210,530. The appeal of the 
School Center that "every plus talent of a community be used through it" 
for mutual benefit is meeting with response. The basements of 103 school- 
houses are used by the Election Department as polUng places. In the 
larger school halls municipal concerts are given, and their use for public 
meetings of citizens is usually permitted when requested. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



147 



PENSION AND RETIREMENT FUNDS FOR TEACHERS. 

As provided by Chapter 589, Acts of 1908, amended by Chapter 617, 
Acts of 1910, the School Committee, by a majority vote of all its members, 
may retire with a pension any member of the teaching or supervising staff 
of the pubhc day schools who has reached the age of sixty-five years, also 
such other members as are incapacitated for further efficient service. If 
the teacher retired has been employed in the public day schools for a period 
of thirty years or more, ten years of which has been in Boston, the pension 
paid amounts to one-thu'd of the annual salary received at time of retire- 
ment, but in no case is it less than $312 nor more than $600 annually. If 
the period of service is less than thirty years, the pension is proportionally 
less. The School Committee were authorized to provide for these pensions 
by appropriating annually an amount equal to five cents on each $1,000 
of the City's assessed valuation. This allowance was increased by Chap. 
304, Special Acts of 1915, to seven cents on each $1,000, and the appropria- 
tion was accordingly fixed at $105,753 for the year 1915-16. The Perma- 
nent School Pension Fund amounted to $225,215, February 1, 1916, and 
265 retu'ed teachers were receiving pensions therefrom. 

The Boston Teachers' Retirement Fund Association, started in 1900, 
is paying $120 per year to 273 annuitants, and the total amount of its fund 
on February 1, 1916, was $452,061. At that date 2,850 teachers were each 
contributing $18 per year to this fund. 



School Principals Retired (and Pensioned) with Honorary Title, Emeritus. 



Principal. 


School or District Served. 


Years of 
Service. 


Year 
Retired. 




English High School 


47 
35 
47 
44 
45 
46 
39 
41 
38 
43 
53 
47 


1915 


George C. Mann 

Augustus D. Small 


West Roxbury High School. . . 
South Boston High School. . . . 


1914 
1914 
1912 






1910 


Alfred Bunker 

Henry L. Clapp 


Quincy District 

George Putnam District 

Wells District 


1910 
1910 
1910 


John F. Dwight 


Thomas N. Hart District 


1914 
1910 




Horace Mann School 

Agassiz District 

Shurtleff District 


1910 


John T. Gibson 

Henry C. Hardon 


1912 
1910 


Edwin T. Horne 

Charles F. King 

Edward M. Lancaster 


William E. Russell District. . . 

Dearborn District 

Gilbert Stuart District 


48 
42 
41 
46 
49 
47 
50 
40 


1912 
1913 
1910 
1911 


Elias H. Marston 

Alonzo Meserve 


Wendell Phillips District 


1913 
1914 


Henry B. Miner 

Francis A. Morse 

James A. Page 


Edward Everett District 

Robert G. Shaw District 

Dwight District 


1914 
1913 
1910 


William E. C. Rich 

Ellen C. Sawteli.e 


Christopher Gibson District. . . 


38 
48 
49 


1913 
1912 






1914 


Edward Stickney 




1910 


Horace W. Warren 


Henry L. Pierce District 


40 
45 


1912 
1911 









148 



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154 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS AND EMPLOYEES (PAID) , 
ON APRIL 30, 1910 TO 1916, BY DEPARTMENTS. 



DEPARTSiENTS 

(Alphabetically) . 



1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 



1916. 



Art Department 

Assessing Department 

Auditing Department 

Bathi Departmentt 

Building Department 

Board of Appeal 

Cemetery Department 

Children's Institutions Dept. . 

City Clerk Department 

Citj' Council 

City Council Employees. . . . 

City Planning Board 

Collecting Department 

Consumptives' Hospital Dept., 

Election Department 

Engineering Department* . . . . 

Finance Commission 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Hospital Department 

Infirmary Department 

Institutions Registration Dept., 

Law Department 

Library Department 

Licensing Board 

Market Department 

Mayor, Department of 

Music Departmentt 

Overseeing of the Poor Dept. . 
Park and Recreation Dept.f. . 

Park Departmentt 

Police Department 

Printing Department 

Public Buildings Department.. 
Public Grounds Department.t 
Public Works Department:* 

Central Office 

Bridge and Ferry Division . . 

Highway Division 

Sewer and Water Division . . 

Registry Department 

School Committee, Dept. of... 

School-house Department 

Sinking Funds Department . . . 
Soldiers' Relief Department. . . 

Statistics Department 

Steamer "Monitor" 

Street Department:* 

Central Office 

Ferry Division 

Bridge Division 

Paving Division 

Lamp Di\'ision 

Sanitary Division 

Street Cleaning Division .... 

Street Watering Division. . . 

Sewer Division 

Street Laying-Out Dept 

Supply Department 

Treasiu-y Department 

Water Department* 

Weights and Measures Dept. . 
Wire Department 



County of Suffolk (including 
Penal Institutions Dept) . . . 



1 


1 


157 


157 


16 


16 


131 


165 


59 


64 


6 


6 


81 


82 


98 


105 


32 


28 


9 


9 


5 


7 


70 


70 


94 


114 


36 


36 


81 


— 


5 


10 


986 


1,009 


203 


221 


644 


648 


130 


142 


11 


12 


15 


15 


485 


521 


13 


14 


7 


7 


12 


14 


2 


2 


36 


36 


365 


408 


1,586 


1,592 


102 


107 


123 


119 


122 


168 





44 


— 


418 


— 


1,964 


— 


1,191 


27 


25 


3,558 


3,551 


49 


47 


3 


3 


11 


13 


4 


4 


14 


16 


10 





168 


— 


\ 1,024 


— 


9 


— 


1,093 


— 


660 


. 


73 


88 


5 


5 


17 


17 


570 


— . 


12 


12 


38 


41 


13,068 


13,344 


596 


644 


13,664 


13,988 



1 

169 

17 

212 

69 

6 

101 

84 

28 

9 

7 

73 

129 

36 

8 

1,074 

238 

694 

138 

11 

16 

549 

14 

8 

13 

2 

36 

413 

1,615 

99 

128 
178 

43 

413 

1,857 

1,141 

24 

3,754 

48 

3 

13 

4 

17 



1 
169 

17 

76 

6 

101 

92 

28 

9 

7 

74 

137 

36 

7 

1,081 

267 

734 

138 

11 

16 

564 

14 

9 

12 

40 
862 

1,679 

99 

136 



47 

414 

1,854 

1,088 

23 

3,715 

51 

3 

12 

4 

17 



13,665 
660 



14,325 



13,820 
696 



14,516 



1 

174 

17 



6 
105 

76 

26 
9 
7 
1 

77 
157 

36 



1,101 
273 
742 
149 

11 

16 
578 

13 
9 

13 

48 
798 

1,700 
101 
138 



46 

419 

1.854 

981 

22 

3,957 

55 

3 

12 

4 

17 



14,014 
735 



14,749 



1 

178 
18 

77 

6 

118 

42 

26 
9 
7 
2 

72 
158 

36 

]0 

1,090 

260 

828 

175 

11 

17 
601 

13 
9 

11 

72 
771 

1,729 
100 
171 



44 

417 

1,881 

899 

22 

4,138 

48 

3 

13 

4 

16 



103 
10 
18 

13 
43 



14,296 
760 



15,056 



1 
184 
21 

82 

6 

112 

48 

26 



3 

74 

185 

36 

10 

1,092 

177 

795 

153 

11 

17 
578 

13 
9 

14 

62 
763 

1,721 
100 

188 



46 

398 

1,789 

908 

22 

4,204 

49 

3 

13 

4 

19 



112 
10 
18 

13 

47 



14,141 
802 



14,943 



* Street, Engineering and Water Departments combined in Public Works Department, 1911. 
t Bath, Music, Park and Public Grounds Departments combined in Park and Recreation 
Department, 1913. 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1913-14. 155 



CITY ORDINANCES. 



Enacted in the Municipal Yeae, 1913-14. 



CHAPTER 1. 
Concerning Appointments in the Fire Department. 
Chapter four of the Ordinances of 1912 is hereby amended by adding 
at the end thereof the following words : 

"Provided, however, that this ordinance shall not apply to those persons 
who had passed the civil service examination for fire service in Boston 
prior to June 5, 1912, and who were eligible for appointment on that date." 

[Approved March 10, 1913. 



CHAPTER 2. 

Concerning Weighers of Goods. 
The mayor may appoint annually, subject to confirmation by the city 
council, one or more employees of any person, firm or corporation to be 
weighers of goods. Such weighers shall be sworn, and they shall have no 
other authority than to weigh, for the benefit of their employers, the goods 
or materials (except beef, boilers and heavy machinery, and coal) sold or 
purchased by said employers in the ordinary course of business. 

[Approved June 3, 1913. 

CHAPTER 3. 

Concerning Salary of Physician at Jail. 

Section 1 of chapter 4 of the Revised Regulations of 1898, as amended 
by chapter 4 of the Regulations of 1903, is hereby further amended by 
inserting after the words "eighteen hundred dollars," the words "the 
physician connected with the jail, appointed by the sheriff, shall be paid 
an annual salary not exceeding fifteen hundred dollars," so that said section 
shall read as follows : 

Section 1. The chief officer connected with the county jail shall be 
paid an annual salary of eighteen hundred dollars; the physician connected 
with the jail, appointed by the sheriff, shall be paid an annual salary not 
exceeding fifteen hundred dollars; the steward and the first inside officer 
and the clerk, each not exceeding thirteen hundred and fifty dollars; the 
second and third inside officers, each not exceeding twelve hundred and 
fifty dollars; the other regularly employed officers, each not exceeding 
twelve hundred dollars; the watchmen and other necessary assistants 
each not exceeding one thousand dollars. [Approved June 25, 1913. 



156 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

CHAPTER 4.* 
Concerning the Building Limits. 

Section 1. Section twenty-seven of chapter forty-five of the Revised 
Ordinances of 1898 is hereby amended by striking out said section and 
inserting in place thereof a new section, as follows : 

Section 27 . The building limits referred to in section nine of chapter 
five hundred and fifty of the acts of the year 1907 are hereby extended, 
defined and established as follows : 

All that portion of the city which is included within a line beginning at 
the intersection of the boundary lines between the City of Boston and the 
cities of Somerville and Everett; thence by the boundary fines between 
the City of Boston and the cities of Everett and Chelsea to the intersection 
with the centre line of Trumbull street extended northerly; thence by 
said centre line of Trumbull street extended, the centre line of Trumbull 
street and said centre line extended southerly to the Harbor line; thence 
by said Harbor line to its intersection with the easterly line of Pier No. 5 
belonging to the Boston and Albany Railroad Company; thence by a 
straight line across Boston Harbor to its intersection with the Harbor 
line at the easterly corner of Pier No. 1 in South Boston; thence by the 
Harbor line in the northerly, easterly and southerly portions of South 
Boston to an angle in said Harbor line nearly opposite the intersection of 
the centre line of Columbia road with the centre line of location of the 
Old Colony Railroad; thence by a straight line to the said intersection; 
and by the centre lines of Columbia road, Blue Hill avenue, Seaver street, 
Columbus avenue, Atherton and Mozart streets. Chestnut avenue, Sher- 
idan, Centre, and Perkins streets, South Huntington avenue, Castleton 
street and the centre fine of said Castleton street extended to the boundary 
line between the City of Boston and the town of Brookhne; thence by said 
boundary line to a point therein one hundred feet southwest of Washington 
street in the Brighton district; thence by a line parallel to and one hundred 
feet southwesterly from the centre line of Washington street to an angle 
formed by the intersection of said line with the extension of a line parallel to 
and one hundred feet northwesterly of the centre line of Market street; 
thence by said extension and said line parallel to and one hundred feet 
northwesterly of the centre line of Market street to a point one hundred feet 
south of the centre fine of Western avenue; thence by a fine parallel to and 
one hundred feet south of the centre fine of Western avenue and said fine 
extended to a point in the boundary fine between the City of Boston and 
the town of Watertown south of Watertown Bridge, so called; thence by 
said boundary fine and the boundary fine between the City of Boston and 
the cities of Cambridge and Somerville to the point of beginning. 

Also those portions of Ward 26 upon or within one hundred feet of the 
following-named streets and squares: Everett square, so called; Fair- 
mount avenue from River street to the Neponset river; River street from 
the location of the Boston & Providence Railroad to Winthrop street; 
Hyde Park avenue on the easterly side from the northerly side of Oak street 
to Everett street; Hyde Park avenue on the westerly side from the north- 

* See ameadments in 1914, Chapters 1 and 4. 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1913-14. 157 

erly side of Pine street extension, so called, to a point on said Hyde Park 
avenue opposite the southerly Une of Everett street; Harvard avenue 
from River street to Winthrop street; Maple street from River street to 
a point one hxmdred and eighty feet southerly therefrom; Central avenue 
from River street to Winthrop street; Davison street from Fairmount 
avenue to a point three hundred feet northeasterly therefrom; Grove 
street; Pierce street from Fairmount avenue to a point three hundred feet 
northeasterly therefrom; Knott street from Fairmoimt avenue to a point 
three hundred feet easterly therefrom; Railroad avenue from Fairmount 
avenue to a point three hundred feet northeasterly therefrom; Station 
street from the Neponset river to a point three hundred feet northeasterly 
from Fairmount avenue; Walnut street from Fairmount avenue to a 
point three hundred feet southwesterly therefrom; Maple street from 
Fairmoimt avenue to a point one hundred and twenty-five feet westerly 
therefrom. 

This ordinance shall become operative Mach 1, 1914. 

[Approved September 29, 1913. 



CHAPTER 5. 
Concerning Public Convenience Stations on Park Lands. 

Section 1. Section one of chapter eighteen of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1898, as amended by chapter eight of the Ordinances of 1908, is hereby 
further amended by striking out the whole of said section and inserting 
in place thereof the following : 

Section 1. The health department shall be under the charge of the 
board of health, consisting of three commissioners, who shall have and 
exercise all the powers relative to the pubUc health conferred by general 
or special acts upon the city council of the city of Boston or on boards of 
health, and shall include in their annual report a review of the sanitary 
condition of the city; shall have charge of all matters relating to quarantine, 
and to the quarantine grounds, consisting of Gallop's Island and that 
portion of the harbor between Long, Deer and Spectacle Islands known as 
the President Roads; shall have charge of the hospital for persons having 
infectious diseases, established by the city on Southampton street, and 
of the patients in said hospital; shall keep on hand, so far as practicable, 
a sufficient quantity of vaccine virus and anti-toxine, and supply the same 
free of charge to the physicians in the several departments and in the 
Boston Dispensary; shall authorize the occupancy or use of stables; shall 
have the care and custody of all urinals and pubhc convenience stations now 
or hereafter established by the city, except those located upon park lands or 
pubUc grounds; and shaU have the supervision of the burial of the dead. 

Sect. 2. Section six of chapter ten of the Ordinances of 1912 is hereby 
amended by adding at the end thereof a new sentence, as foUows: "Said 
board * shall have the care, custody and control of, and shall construct, 
aU urinals and pubhc convenience stations upon park lands and public 
groimds" — so as to read as follows: Section 6. Said board * shall construct, 
* "Said board" refers to the Park and Recreation Commissioners. 



158 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

improve, equip, supervise and regulate the use of, all gjrmnasia and all 
bath houses, now or hereafter provided by the city, and shall construct 
every such new bath house, gymnasium or means for pubUc recreation for 
which an appropriation may hereafter be made. Said board * shall have 
the care, custody and control of, and shall construct, all urinals and pubUc 
convenience stations upon park lands and pubhc grounds. 

[Approved December 23, 1913. 



CHAPTER 6. 
Establishing the City Planning Boabd. 

Section 1. The planning board of the city of Boston, to be established 
under the provisions of chapter 494 of the Acts of the year 1913, shall 
consist of five members, one of whom at least shall be a woman. Said 
members shall be appointed by the mayor in the manner provided by 
sections 9 and 10 of chapter 486 of the Acts of the year 1909. The first 
appointments shall be made, one for a term ending with the first day of 
May, 1914, one for a term ending with the first day of May, 1915, one for 
a term ending with the first day of May, 1916, one for a term ending with 
the first day of May, 1917, and one for a term ending with the first day of 
May, 1918; and beginning with the year 1914 one member shall be appointed 
annually for a term of five j^ears from the first day of May. Any vacancy 
that may occur shall be filled in like manner for the balance of the unex- 
pired term. 

Sect. 2. The board shall, as soon as practicable after the appointments 
of the members have become operative, meet and organize by the selection 
of a chairman, and shall appoint a secretary outside of its own membership 
who shall receive such compensation for his services as said board may fix 
and determine. 

Sect. 3. The planning board shall have the powers and authority, and 
perform the duties, set forth in said chapter 494 of the Acts of the year 
1913, relative to local planning boards. 

Sect. 4. The board shaU serve without pay, and may expend, for the 
salary of its secretary and for such other expenses as may be necessary in 
the performance of its duties, a sum not exceeding three thousand dollars 
per annum.f [Approved January 27, 1914- 



Enacted in the Municipal Year 1914-15. 



CHAPTER 1. 

Concerning the Building Limits. - 
Chapter four of the Ordinances of 1913 concerning the building limits 
is hereby amended by striking out the words "March 1, 1914," in the last 
line of said ordinance and inserting in place thereof the words "May 1, 
1914." • [Approved February 17, 1914- 

* "Said board " refers to the Park and Recreation. Commissioners. 

t Increased to $5,000 by Ordinances of 1915-16, Chapter 2, and, further, to $7,500 by 
Ordinances of 1916-17, Chapter 6. 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1914-15. 159 

CHAPTER 2. 

Concerning Sales of Land or Buildings. 

Section 1. Chapter thirty-five of the Revisted Ordinances of 1898 is 
hereby amended by adding to said chapter a new section, as follows: 

Section 5. The proceeds of all sales of land and buildings, other than 
school lands, shall be applied by said commissioners * to the reduction and 
cancellation of any part of any outstanding debt of the City for which there 
is a sinking fund. {A-pjiroVied April 16, 1914- 



CHAPTER 3. 

Concerning the Park and Recreation Department. 

Chapter ten of the Ordinances of 1912, establishing the Park and Recrea- 
tion Department, is hereby amended, as follows: 

In section one by striking out the words "seven thousand five hundred" 
and inserting in place thereof the words "five thousand." 

In section eleven by striking out the words "seventy-five hundred" and 
inserting in place thereof the words "five thousand." 

By striking out section nine of said ordinance and inserting in place 
thereof the following: 

Section 9. The board shall appoint a deputy commissioner who shall 
receive a salary of not more than four thousand two hundred dollars and 
who shall devote his whole time to the work, a secretary, engineers, physi- 
cians, subordinates and employees, and define their powers and duties 
and fix the amount of their compensation. [Approved April 16, 1914- 



CHAPTER 4. 

Concerning the Building Limits. 
Chapter four of the Ordinances of 1913, as amended by chapter one of 
the Ordinances of 1914, concerning the building limits, is hereby further 
amended by striking out the words "May 1, 1914," and inserting in place 
thereof the words "July 1, 1914." [Approved April 28, 1914. 



CHAPTER 5. 

Concerning Claims Against the City of Boston. 

Section 1. Every officer in charge of a department shall immediately 

make a report in writing to the law department whenever any transaction, 

act or negligence of the department in his charge occurs which results in 

or may occasion the bringing of, a claim against the city. Upon the 

* Refers to the Sinking Funds Commissioners. 



160 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

receipt of a claim against the city or any department thereof, it shall be 
referred to the committee of the city council on claims, and notice shall be 
given to the corporation counsel, who, by himself or his assistants, shall 
make an investigation of the claim, and for this purpose shall be furnished , 
on request, with all necessary departmental books, papers or records, 
and may require any oflBcial or employee of a department who may have 
information concerning such claim to attend any hearing thereon. Upon 
completion of the investigation the corporation counsel or his assistants 
shall present a report to the committee on claims recommending a settle- 
ment for an amount named in said report, or disapproving such claim. 
The committee on claims shall have authority to settle any such claim, 
subject to the approval of the mayor, for the amount recommended by the 
law department or for a less amount, or reject the proposed settlement. 
No such settlement shall be made for an amoimt exceeding five hundred 
dollars. Nothing herein contained shall affect the provisions of existing 
ordinances respecting the settlement of claims upon which suits have been 
entered. 

Sect. 2. Section seventeen of chapter three of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1898 is hereby repealed. [Approved May 27, 1914. 



CHAPTER 6. 
Concerning the Printing Department. 

Section 1. The printing department shall be under the charge of the 
superintendent of printing, who shall have charge of the printing plant and 
of all the printing of the city, shall supply all printing, binding, stationery 
and other office suppUes, except furniture, used by any board, commission 
or department for which the city of Boston is required by law to furnish 
such supplies, and shall, wherever practicable, standardize all such printing, 
binding, stationery and other office supplies. 

Sect. 2. Said superintendent shall number and print as city documents 
copies of the mayor's address, the department reports and such other 
matter as may be ordered to be printed in the form of a city document 
by the city council or by the mayor. The number of copies to be printed 
of each document shall, unless specified by the city coimcil, be determined 
by the mayor; provided, however, that the minimum shall be two hundred, 
of which nmnber one hundred copies shall be bound up in sets of volumes 
containing all such city documents with an alphabetical index. All city 
documents and sets of volumes shall be delivered to the city messenger 
and distributed in such manner as the city council may direct. Special 
pubhcations shall, from time to time, be printed upon order of the city 
council approved by the mayor, to which the provisions of this section, 
except as to distribution, shall not apply. 

Sect. 3. All printed matter done for the city of Boston shall, so far as 
it can legally do so, bear the imprint of the union label of the Allied Printing 
Trades Council of Boston, Mass. 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1914-15. 161 

Sect. 4. The term "printing" in this ordinance shall be construed to 
mean all engraving, stereotj^ing, electrotyping, lithographing, photo- 
graphing and other methods of work used in illustrating books, so far as the 
same are to be applied to any documents printed for or by the city govern- 
ment or any of its departments. The terms "binding" and "stationery" 
shall also be given the fullest meaning. 

Sect. 5. Said superintendent shall, in his annual report, include a 
statement of the cost of printing, binding, stationery and office supphes, 
supphed to each department. 

Sect. 6. Chapter thirty-one of the Revised Ordinances of 1898, as 
amended, is hereby repealed. [Approved June 24, 1914- 



CHAPTER 7. 
Concerning the Law Department. 

Chapter twenty-three of the Revised Ordinances of 1898, as amended by 
chapter two of the Ordinances of 1904, is hereby further amended in section 
one as printed on pages 180 ond 181 of the sixth edition of said Revised 
Ordinances, as follows: 

In lines 4 and 5 by striking out the words "the board of aldermen or 
the common council" and inserting in place thereof the words "or the city 
coimcn." 

In lines 8, 9 and 10 by striking out the words "or of either branch thereof, 
or by fom: members of the board of aldermen, or by ten members of the 
common coimcil," and inserting in place thereof the words "or by four 
members of the city council." 

In Knes 19, 20, 21 and 22 by striking out the words "and may, in the 
care of matters before the legislature, expend in any year a sum not exceed- 
ing two thousand dollars, to be charged to the appropriation for incidental 
expenses of the city council." 

In lines 25, 26, 27 and 28 by striking out the words "shall annually 
prepare and lay before the board of aldermen at the beginning of the year, 
a revision of the regulations of the board of aldermen, containing all 
regulations in force on the first day of the year." 

In Unes 46, 47 and 48 by striking out the words "the same to be charged 
to the appropriation for incidental expenses, or to such appropriation as 
he deems the proper one." [Approved June 26, 1914- 



CHAPTER 8. 
Concerning Vessels and Ballast. 
Chapter forty-one of the Revised Ordinances of 1898 is hereby amended 
by adding at the end thereof the following, to be nimibered section 11, viz.: 
Section 11. Whoever violates any of the provisions of sections six or 
seven of this chapter shaU be punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred 
dollars for each offence. [Approved August 27, 1914. 



162 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

REVISED ORDINANCES OF 1914. 



13th RimsiON. 

In pursuance of a vote of the City Council on August 24, 1914, the work 
of revising and consolidating the City Ordinances was undertaken by the 
Corporation Counsel and his associates of the Law Department, assisted 
by the Assistant City Clerk. On November 16, 1914, a draft of the 
completed revision up to date was submitted to the Committee on Ordi- 
nances, who arranged to have printed an appendix thereto showing the 
amendments and ehminations in the Ordinances of 1898 (12th Revision) 
and subsequent ordinances, also where the same have been repealed or 
rendered obsolete by statute. 

On December 21, 1914, the City Council, by unanimous vote, enacted 
the Revised Ordinances of 1914* consisting of 41 chapters with titles as 
follows : 

Chapter 1, General Provisions — • Ch. 2, the Mayor — Ch. 3, Officers 
and Boards — Ch. 4, Art Department — Ch. 5, Assessing Dept. — Ch. 
6, Auditing Dept. — Ch. 7, Boston Infirmary Dept. — Ch. 8, Building 
Dept., with sub-titles, viz. : Board of Appeal and Board of Examiners — 
Ch. 9, Cemetery Dept.— Ch. 10, Childrens' Institutions Dept.— Ch. 11, 
City Clerk Dept.— Ch. 12, City Planning Dept.— Ch. 13, CoUecting Dept. 
— Ch. 14, Consumptives' Hospital Dept. — Ch. 15, Election Dept. — Ch. 
16, Fire Dept.— Ch. 17, Health Dept.— Ch. 18, Hospital Dept.— Ch. 19, 
Institutions Registration Dept. — Ch. 20, Law Dept. — Ch. 21, Library 
Dept.— Ch. 22, Market Dept.— Ch. 23, Overseeing of the Poor Dept.— 
Ch. 24, Park and Recreation Dept. — Ch. 25, Penal Institutions Dept. — 
Ch. 26, Printing Dept.— Ch. 27, Public Buildings Dept.— Ch. 28, PubUc 
Works Dept.— Ch. 29, Registry Dept.— Ch. 30, Schoolhouse Dept.— Ch. 
31, Sinking Funds Dept.— Ch. 32, Soldiers' Relief Dept.— Ch. 33, Statistics 
Dept.— Ch. 34, Street Laying-Out Dept.— Ch. 35, Supply Dept.— Ch. 
36, Treasury Dept.— Ch. 37, Weights and Measures Dept.— Ch. 38, 
Wire Dept. — Ch. 39, Regulations Affecting Certain Trades — Ch. 40, 
Prohibitions and Penalties — Ch. 41, Miscellaneous Provisions. 



Enacted in the Year 1914-15, Second Series. 

CHAPTER 1. 

Concerning the Health Department. 
Section 1. The health department shall be under the charge and 
control of a health commlsioner, who shall be appointed by the mayor 
under the provisions of sections 9 and 10 of chapter 486 of the Acts of the 
year 1909, and who shall receive an annual salary of $7,500. 

* Copies may be obtained of the City Messenger, 55 City Hall, 50 cents each. 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1914-15. 163 

Sect. 2. The health commissioner shall exercise the powers and per- 
form the duties conferred or imposed by law upon the board of health of 
the city of Boston or upon the chairman thereof. 

Sect. 3. The health commissioner shall estabhsh the following division 
of the health department : medical division, child hygiene division, sanitary 
division, food inspection division, laboratory division, quarantine division, 
and division of vital statistics, records and accounts, the last division to be 
in charge of the officer entrusted with the duty of preparing vital statistics. 
Each division shall be in charge of a deputy commissioner, who shall be 
appointed by the health commissioner. Each deputy commissioner shall 
be a person of recognized standing in his profession or occupation and shall 
be an expert in the duties which may devolve upon him. In appointing a 
deputy commissioner the health commissioner shall certify under oath 
that he is a person of recognized standing in his profession or occupation, 
that in the commissioner's opinion he is an expert in the work which 
will devolve upon him, that he is a person specially fitted by education, 
training or experience to perform the duties of the office, and that the 
appointment is made solely in the interest of the city, such certificate to be 
ffied with the city clerk and to be open to public inspection. The salaries 
of the deputy commissioners shall be fixed by the health commissioner, 
subject to the approval of the mayor. 

Sect. 4. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith 
are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 5. The provisions of this ordinance relating to the appointment 
of the health commissioner shall take effect upon its passage, and all other 
provisions shall take effect when such appointment becomes operative. 

[Approved January 30, 1915. 



CHAPTER 2. 
Concerning the Collecting Department. 

Section five of chapter thirteen of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is 
hereby amended by adding at the end of said section the following words: 
"but no charge shall be made for information relating to taxes and assess- 
ments where a certificate is not requested or where a duplicate receipted 
tax bill is not furnished at the request of the person applying for informa- 
tion," so that the said section five, when so amended, shall read as follows: 

Section 5. The collector, upon the application of any person interested 
in any parcel of real estate and the payment of a fee of twenty-five cents 
shall certify in writing whether or not there are any claims of the city for 
taxes, assessments, or otherwise against said real estate, or any part thereof, 
in his office for collection, and if there are any such claims, shall certify 
the nature and amount thereof, but no charge shall be made for information 
relating to taxes and assessments where a certificate is not requested or 
where a duplicate receipted tax bill is not furnished at the request of the 
person applying for information. 

[Approved January 30, 1915. 



164 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Enacted in the Municipal Year 1915-16. 



CHAPTER 1. 
Concerning the Quarantine Service. 
All the powers and duties of the board of health, relative to the main- 
tenance of the quarantine service for the port of Boston, shall be abolished 
upon the date of the execution of a lease by the City of Boston to the 
United States of America of all property used in the said service. * 

[Approved March SO, 1915. 



CHAPTER 2. 

Concerning the City Planning Department. 

Chapter twelve of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is hereby amended 
in section four by striking out the word "three" and inserting in place 
thereof the word "five," so that said section, as amended, shall read as 
follows: 

Section 4- The board shall serve without pay, and may expend, for the 
salary of its secretary and for such other expenses as may be necessary 
in the performance of its duties, a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars 
per annima. [Approved April 10, 1915. 



CHAPTER 3. 
Concerning Hawkers and Peddlers. 

Chapter forty of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is hereby amended in 
section nineteen of said chapter by striking out the whole of said section, 
and inserting in place thereof the following: 

Section 19. No person shall hawk or peddle any fruits or vegetables 
or any of the articles enumerated in chapter 345 of the Acts of 1906 
and acts in amendment thereof or in addition thereto, untU he has been 
assigned a number by the health commissioner, and untU he has recorded 
with said commissioner his name and residence and, if he hawks or peddles 
articles which are sold by weight or measure, a certificate from the sealer 
of weights and measures that all weights, measures and balances to be 
used by him have been properly inspected and sealed. The presence of 
imseaJed weights or measures on the team, cart or person of such hawker 
or peddler shall terminate permission to hawk or peddle under such 
registration. 

* Lease approved by the City Council May 24, 1915, taking effect June 1, 1915. 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1915-16. 165 

No person shall hawk or peddle any fruits or vegetables until he has 
obtained a Ucense therefor from the health commissioner, unless he is 
engaged in the pursuit of agriculture or unless such articles are the product 
of his own labor or of the labor of his family. 

The health commissioner is hereby authorized to grant Ucenses to hawk 
or peddle fruits and vegetables to persons who have complied with the 
foregoing requirements, such Ucenses to be for the term of one year from 
the date of issue, and to charge therefor a Ucense fee of five dollars per 
annum. 

The foregoing provisions shall not apply to minors licensed by the mayor 
and city council, unless such minors hawk or peddle fruits or vegetables. 

[Approved October 20, 1915. 



CHAPTER 4. 

Concerning Hawkers and Peddlers. 

Chapter 40 of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is hereby amended in 
section 21 by striking out the whole of said section and inserting in place 
thereof the following: 

Section 21. No hawker or peddler shall carry or convey articles 
enumerated in chapter 345 of the Acts of 1906 and acts in amendment 
thereof or in addition thereto, in a manner tending to injure or distiirb the 
pubUc health or comfort, or except in vehicles or receptacles which are 
neat and clean and do not leak, and which have printed on them in letters 
and figures at least two inches in height the name of the person selling and 
the number given him by the health commissioner, and which are approved 
monthly by the health commissioner. 

[Approved November 15, 1915. 



CHAPTER 5. 

Concerning Salaries of First Assistant Assessors. 

Section five of chapter three of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is hereby 
amended in the clause estabUshing the salaries of assessors by striking out 
the words "The first assistant assessors, each ten doUars per day for street 
work, not to exceed forty days, and six hundred dollars for office work, 
including investigation of supplementary assessments in accordance with 
chapter 400, Acts of 1901," and inserting in place thereof the foUowing: 
"The first assistant assessors, each six hundred dollars for street work and 
preparation therefor, and six hundred dollars for services on dooming 
board and for work on abatements and investigations." 

This ordinance shall take effect April 1, 1916. 

[Approved February 6, 1916. 



166 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Enacted in the Municipal Year 1916-17. 



CHAPTER 1. 

Concerning the Use of Streets. 

Section 36 of chapter 40 of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is hereby 
amended by adding thereto the following words: "but nothing in this 
section shall be construed to curtail, abridge, or limit the right or oppor- 
tunity of any person to exercise the right of peaceful persuasion guaranteed 
by Statutes 1913, chapter 690, or to curtail, abridge, or limit the intend- 
ment of any statute of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts," so that said 
section shall read as follows : 

Section 36. No person shall, in a street, unreasonably obstruct the 
free passage of foot-travellers, or wilfully and unreasonably saunter or 
loiter for more than seven minutes after being directed by a police oflScer 
to move on, but nothing in this section shall be construed to curtail, 
abridge, or limit the right or opportunitj^ of any person to exercise the 
right of peaceful persuasion guaranteed by Statutes 1913, chapter 690, 
or to curtail, abridge, or limit the intendment of any statute of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. [Approved March 9, 1916. 



CHAPTER 2. 

Concerning Agent under Workmen's Compensation Act. 

The salary and expenses of the person designated to act as the agent 

for the payment of workmen's compensation under chapter 244 of the 

General Acts of 1915 shall be chargeable to the appropriation for the 

Reserve Fund. [Approved March 21, 1916. 



CHAPTER 3. 

Concerning Certain Items op City Income. 

Section six of chapter six of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 is hereby 
amended by striking out in the last three hnes of said section the words 
"and shall add such amount to the several appropriations for the divisions 
furnishing such materials, tools, or machinery," and inserting in place 
thereof the words "and shall credit such amount to the general revenue of 
the city, unless such materials, tools or machinery have been furnished 
by the water service, in which case the amount charged shall be credited 
to the water income." 

Section one of chapter twenty-eight of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 
is hereby amended by striking out in lines 33, 34 and 35 of said section the 
words "all moneys so received to be used in paying the expenses incurred 
by the department in such removal." 



CITY ORDINANCES OF 1916-17. 167 

Section nine of chapter twenty-eight of the Revised Ordinances of 1914 
is hereby amended by striking out of said section the last paragraph, 
which reads as follows: "All amounts paid to the city under the provisions 
of this section shall be credited to, and used as a part of, the appropriation 
for the public works department." [Approved March 28, 1916. 



CHAPTER 4. 

To Prevent Unnecessary Noise in the Vicinity of Hospitals. 

Section 1. The Commissioner of Pubhc Works shall, at the request 
of the hospital authorities, place and maintain a sign or signs displaying 
the words, "Warning! Hospital — -Make No Noise" at such points 
as he may determine on pubhc streets and places in the vicinity of hospitals 
accommodating more than fifty patients. No foot traveler, driver of 
a vehicle, motorman of a street car or operator of a motor vehicle shaU 
make any unnecessary noise in the vicinity of such hospitals so as to 
unreasonably disturb patients therein. 

Sect. 2. Any person violating the provisions of this ordinance shall 
be subject to a penalty not exceeding twenty dollars for each offence. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect on the first day of June, 
nineteen hundred and sixteen. [Approved April 22, 1916. 



CHAPTER 5. 
Concerning the City Planning Department. 

Chapter twelve of the Revised Ordinances of 1914, as amended by chap- 
ter two of the Ordinances of 1915, is hereby further amended in section four 
by striking out the words " five thousand" and inserting in place thereof the 
words "seven thousand five himdred, " so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows : 

Section 4- The board shall serve without pay, and may expend for the 
salary of its secretary and for such other expenses as may be necessary in 
the performance of its duties, a sum not exceeding seven thousand five 
hundred dollars per annum. Approved August 3, 1916. 



168 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Regulation of the Height of Buildings. 

[Stat. 1904, Chap. 333; Stat. 1905, Chap. 383; Stat. 1907, Chap. 416; 
Stat. 1912, Chap. 582; Stat. 1914, Chap. 786; Stat. 1915, Chap. 
333 (Special).] 

By Stat. 1904, Chap. 333, the Legislature provided that the City of 
Boston should be divided into two districts, designated as Districts A and 
B, and that if not repugnant to some other statute, buildings could be 
erected in District A to a height of 125 feet, but that except as to certain 
projections above the roof, no buildings could be erected in District B to a 
height greater than 80 feet. A conunission consisting of Nathan Matthews, 
Joseph A. Corny, and Henry Parkman was appointed by Mayor Collins, 
June 7, 1904, to determine the limits of these districts, and it made a pre- 
liminary order on July 5, 1904, which was revised December 3, 1904. Under 
Stat. 1905, Chap. 383, the Legislature made certain minor changes in the 
law, and also authorized the erection of buildings to a height not exceeding 
100 feet in such parts of District B, and on such conditions, as a commission 
should determine. The same commission was reappointed under this act 
and made a preliminary order July 21, 1905, which was revised November 
20, 1905. [See Document 133, 1905.1 

District A includes the waterfront regions extending around East Bos- 
ton, Charlestown, and the northerly and westerly sides of South Boston as 
far as East First and West First streets, Dorchester avenue, and Southamp- 
ton street, a narrow strip extending through Wards 12 and 9 east of Albany 
street to Broadway, thence the boundary Une extends northwesterly and 
westerly through Pleasant, Piedmont, and Ferdinand streets to Columbus 
avenue, thence across to the corner of Boylston and Arlington streets, along 
Boylston to Tremont, thence to Park, Beacon, Bowdoin, and Cambridge 
streets, thence through Cambridge, Staniford, Green, and Leverett streets 
to Charles River Dam. Of the City Proper, all of Ward 6, nearly all of 
Ward 7 and the northeastern haK of Ward 8 are within District A. 

District B comprises all other territory in the City. In this district 
buildings may in general be erected to a height of not more than 80 feet, but 
on streets exceeding 64 feet in width the height may be equal to one and a 
quarter times the width of the widest street upon which the building stands, 
said height to be measured from the mean grade of the curbs of aU streets 
upon which the building is situated and not to exceed in any event 100 feet 
above such point of measurement. On all streets or portions of streets 
upon which buildings may be erected on one side only, the buildings may 
be erected to a height of 100 feet. No building may be erected to a height 
greater than 80 feet imless its width on each and every pubKc street 
upon which it stands be at least one-half its height. Certain special 
exceptions to the general regulations affecting District B have been made 
as follows: 

1. No building can be erected to a height greater than 70 feet, measured 
on its principal front, in the territory bounded by Beacon street, Joy street, 
Myrtle street, Hancock street and Hancock avenue. 



REGULATION OF THE HEIGHT OF BUILDINGS. 169 

2. So long as the property owned by the City of Boston on Dalton, 
Belvidere and Scotia streets shall be used for a Mechanic Arts High School 
any building or buildings thereon may be erected to a height of 100 feet. 

3. Buildings may be erected to a height not exceeding 125 feet in that 
portion of District B which lies 50 feet westerly from the boundary line 
running from Columbus avenue to the centre of Boylston street separating 
District A from District B, provided that said portion of District B is 
owned by the same person or persons who own the adjoining premises in 
District A. 

4. No building can be erected on a parkway, boulevard or pubhc way 
on which a building line has been established by the Board of Park Com- 
missioners or by the Board of Street Commissioners acting under any 
general or special statute, to a greater height than that allowed by the order 
of said Boards. 

5. No building upon any land, any owner of which has received and 
retained compensation in damages for any hmitation of height, or who 
retains any claim for such damages, can be erected to a height greater than 
that fixed by the limitation for which such damages were received or 
claimed. 

No limitation of the height of buildings appUes to churches, steeples, 
towers, domes, cupolas, belfries or statuary not used for purposes of 
habitation, nor to chimneys, gas holders, coal or grain elevators, open 
balustrades, skyhghts, ventilators, flagstaffs, raihngs, weather vanes, soU 
pipes, steam exhausts, signs, roof houses not exceeding 12 feet square 
and 12 feet high, nor to other similar constructions such as are usually 
erected above the roof Une of buildings, nor to sugar refineries in District A. 

By Chapter 416, Acts of 1907, the width of Rutherford avenue in the 
Charlestown district, between Chapman street and the Mystic River 
tracks of the Boston & Main Railroad crossing the northerly part of 
said avenue, was considered as 80 feet in respect to the height of build- 
ings that might be erected on the southwesterly and westerly side of said 
avenue, between the points mentioned, so as to permit the erection of 
buildings to the height of 100 feet, as provided for buildings erected on 
streets of the width aforesaid in District B. 

By Chapter 582, Acts of 1912, the height of City Hall Annex was per- 
mitted to be 133 feet above the grade of Court street, i. e., 8 feet in excess 
of the limit originally legalized for District A. 

By Chapter 786, Acts of 1914, the parcel of land bounded by Washing- 
ton street, Lovering place, Harrison avenue and Asylum street was exempted 
from the laws relative to the height of buildings which might be erected 
thereon, except that the limit of 125 feet remained in force. 

By Chapter 333, Special Acts of 1915, a new commission, consisting of 
the Chairman of the City Planning Board, the Fire Commissioner and the 
Building Commissioner, was constituted to determine and revise the 
boundaries of Districts A and B. When the commission completes its 
revision, an order will be issued and recorded in the Registry of Deeds, to 
continue in effect for a period of ten years. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENTS RELATING TO BOSTON. 



Revised Ordinances of 1914. — Thirteenth Revision. 

The latest revision and consolidation of the City Ordinances, prepared 
by John A. Sullivan, Corporation Counsel, and published by order of the 
City Council. Contains 41 chapters, a table of changes since the 12th 
RcATsion, also a copious index. 1915, pp. 148, Printing Department. 
Price 50 cents, at office of City Messenger, 55 City Hall. 

New Boundaries of Wards and Precincts. 

Redi\'ision, by the City Council, of the territory of the City into 26 
Wards, as enacted on December 28, 1914. Doc. No. 121. 

See, also, this edition of Municipal Register, pages 171-183. 

Division of the 26 wards into 223 voting precincts, as enacted on June 
7, 1915, by the City Council. Doc. No. 68. See, also, this edition of 
Municipal Register, beginning on page 184. 

Amended City Charter of 1909. 

An Act Relating to the Administration of the City of Boston and to 
Amend the Charter of the said City. H. of R. Bill No. 1727, 1909, pp. 37. 
Acts and Resolves, 1909, chapter 486. 

See, also, this edition of Municipal Register, pages 19 to 33. 

Boston's Streets, Avenues, Courts, Places, Etc. 

Latest alphabetical list (1916), with new ward and precinct wherein 
located, showing the numbers and divisions of all which extend through 
more than one ward or precinct; to which is added the names and locations 
of hotels, apartment houses, fire-engine houses, schoolhouses, hospitals and 
other benevolent institutions. Issued by Board of Street Commissioners. 
Pp. 197, Printing Department, 1916. 

Record of Streets, Etc., in Boston. Second Edition. 

Revised list of all public and private ways, with brief historical records 
of the older and more important streets. Issued by Board of Street Com- 
missioners. Pp.,543. Printing Department, 1910. Price, $1. 

Consolidated Statutes. 

All Statutes Relating to the City of Boston, from 1821* to January, 
1908. Codified by Thomas M. Babson, Corporation Counsel. Pp. 631. 
Printing Department, 1908. 

Finance Commission Reports. 

Vol. I. Appointments, Organization, Communications to Mayor, 
etc., pp. 522. Appendices A to G, etc., 45 pp. additional. 

Vol. II. Reports and Communications to Mayor, etc., with Appendix 
Containing Draft of Proposed Amendments to the City Charter. Pp. 304. 
Printing Department, 1909. 

Vol. III. Reports of Metcalf & Eddy, Consulting Civil Engineers, 
upon the Water Department, the Sewer Division of the Street Depart- 
ment, and Miscellaneous Matters. Pp. 1226. Printing Department, 1909. 

Vol. IV. Report of Samuel Whinery, Consulting Civil Engineer, 
upon the Street Department. Pp. 333. Printing Department, 1909. 

Vol. v.. Part I. Report to the General Court. Part II. Official 
Communications to the City Government. Part III. Summary^ of 
Specific Recommendations Made by the Former Finance Commission, 
with a Record of Action Taken thereon. Pp. 143. Printing' Depart- 
ment, 1910. 

Vol. VI., Part I. Report to the General Court. Part II. Official 
Communications to the City Government. Pp. 252. Printing Depart- 
ment, 1911. 

Vols. VII. to XL of same series issued in years 1912 to 1916. 

Report to the Mayor on the Boston School System. Pp. 234. Printing 
Department, 1911. 

(170) 



NEW BOUNDARIES 

OF THE 

Twenty-Six Wards 

AND 

223 VOTING PRECINCTS, 

1916. 



172 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



THE WARDS OF BOSTON. 



Wards with definite boundaries by streets were first established in 1715. 
There were eight wards, three in the North End and five in the South 
End, from that year until 1735, when the number was increased to twelve. 
The ward lines then fixed remained substantially imchanged for seventy 
years until the division made by the Selectmen in 1805. In 1822, when 
the town became a city, there was a redivision on the basis of the U. S. 
Census of 1820, the number stUl remaining twelve. Subsequent changes 
of ward boimdaries were made in 1838, 1850, 1865, 1875, 1895 and lastly, 
that which was enacted December 28, 1914. In 1865 nine wards were 
added to provide for the annexed districts, in 1875 * and 1876 * the number 
was increased to 25 and in 1912 another annexation, viz.: Hyde Park, 
brought the total to 26. In 1885 an attempt was made by the City Coun- 
cil to make a new division of wards, and an ordinance to that effect was 
prepared by a special committee appointed for the ptu-pose, passed by 
the City CouncU and approved by the Mayor.^ Certain questions were 
raised, however, in the General Court of 1886, relative to establishing 
State, senatorial and representative districts, and as to whether such dis- 
tricts should be established according to the territorial boundaries of cities 
and towns and their wards as they existed on the first day of May, 1885, 
or whether new ward lines, as in the case of the City of Boston, should 
be foUowed. On May 21, 1886, the opinion of the Justices of the Supreme 
Judicial Court was asked by the Legislature on this matter, and they 
decided that the district divisions referred to must be made according to 
territorial and other boundaries existing on the first day of May, 1885, and 
that the new ward divisions were illegal. ^ On account of this opinion 
of the Justices of the Supreme Judicial Court, an act was passed by the 
Legislatme in June, 1886,^ which provided that the several wards, pre- 
cincts, and assessment districts of the several cities of the Commonwealth, 
existing May 1, 1885, should be established as the wards, precincts, and 
assessment districts of said cities, any acts or ordinances of the city coun- 
cils of said cities to the contrary notwithstanding. The new division of 
wards was thus set aside and the ward lines established in 1875 remained 
in effect imtil they were changed in 1895 and established imder the pro- 

* An ordinance providing for a new division of the City into wards passed Nov, 16, 
1875. An ordinance to make Breed's Island, so called, part of Ward 1 passed Dec. 4, 
1875. By Chap. 242 of the Acts of 1876 the City Council were directed to divide Ward 
Twenty-two into two wards, to be called Wards 22 and 25. The division was accord- 
ingly made by an ordinance passed May 27, 1876. 

'An ordinance making a new division of the city into wards passed Dec. 23, 1885. 
[Doc. 174 of 1885.] 

2 Mass. Reports, vol. 142, p. 601. 

^ An act to establish wards, precincts and assessment districts in the cities of the Com- 
monwealth, Chap. 283, Acts of 1886. 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. 173 

visions of Chapter 417 of the Acts of 1893. According to this act, a city 
may be redivided into wards in every tenth year after 1895, but this is 
not mandatory. In 1905 a new division of the City was attempted by 
the City Council, but neither of the plans submitted was adopted. 

Acting under the authority of Chapter 630, Acts of 1914,* the City 
Council redivided the territory of the City, establishing the boundaries 
of 26 wards as below. 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. 



Throughout the following descriptions the term "intersection" of 
streets, railroad locations, bridges, or the Uke, shall mean the intersection 
of middle lines imless otherwise clearly appearing; the phrase "through" 
or "to" a street, bridge, raihoad location, or the like, shall mean through 
or to middle lines imless otherwise clearly appearing; and where (if at aU) 
lines are mentioned as meeting or intersecting which do not technically 
meet or intersect, it shall be intended that such lines shall be extended for 
the purposes of these descriptions imtil they do so meet or intersect. 
The words "shore hne of the City of Boston" shall mean the line beyond 
which building or wharfing out may for the time being be legally for- 
bidden when such line has been or shall hereafter be established, and 
otherwise extreme low water mark. 

WARD ONE. 

(EAST BOSTON DISTRICT, NORTH.) 
Beginning at the intersection of the shore line of the City of Boston and 
the division line between the property now or late of Alonzo Crosby heirs 
and the property now or late of Richard F. Green (said division line being 
the same division line as established by the "Ordinance Making a New 
Division of the City into Wards," passed by the city government of Bos- 
ton in the year 1895); thence by said shore line to the boundary line 
between Boston and Chelsea; thence by the boundary line between 
Boston and Chelsea and the boimdary line between Boston and Revere 
and the boundary line between Boston and Winthrop to the southerly 
side of Winthrop bridge; thence by the line of the southerly side of Win- 
throp bridge to its intersection with the shore line of the City of Boston; 
thence by said shore line to its intersection with the line of Brooks stfeet 
extended; thence through the line of Brooks street extended, or Brooks 
street, to the location of the tracks of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad; thence through said track location to Prescott street or the line 
thereof extended; thence through Prescott street to Princeton street; 

* According to this act of 1914, the old ward divisions remained effective for the 1915 
tax assessments, also for all elections held in 1915. 

Note. — The locations of the new wards in their respective geographic districts, which 
appear in brackets, are not contained in the ofEicial version. They were added by 
permission. 



174 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

thence through Princeton street to Meridian street; thence through 
Meridian street to Lexington street; thence through Lexington street to 
Border street; thence through Border street to the division line between 
the property now or late of Alonzo Crosby heirs and the property now or 
late of Richard F. Green; thence by said line to the point of beginning. 

WARD TWO. 
(EAST BOSTON DISTRICT, SOUTH. ALSO THE ISLANDS.) 
Beginning at the intersection of the shore line of the City of Boston 
and the division line between the property now or late of Alonzo Crosby 
heirs and the property now or late of Richard F. Green (said division line 
being the same division line as established by the "Ordinance Making a 
New Division of the City into Wards," passed by the city government 
of Boston in the year 1895); thence by said division line to Border street; 
thence through Border street to Lexington street; thence through Lexing- 
ton street to Meridian street; thence through Meridian street to Princeton 
street; thence through Princeton street to Prescott street; thence through 
Prescott street or the line thereof extended to the location of the tracks 
of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad; thence through said 
track location to Brooks street or the Une thereof extended; thence through 
Brooks street or the line thereof extended to the shore line of the City of 
Boston; thence by said shore Line to the point of beginning. All portions 
of the City of Boston lying on the outside of the line beyond which build- 
ing or wharfing out is or may hereafter be legally forbidden or where such 
line does not exist, then all portions lying on the outside of extreme low 
water mark and including all islands in Boston harbor within the limits 
of the City of Boston are included in Ward Two. 

WARD THREE. 

(CHARLESTOWN DISTRICT, WEST.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Prison Point bridge and the boundary 
line between Boston and Cambridge; thence by said boundary line to 
the boimdary line between Boston and SomerviUe; thence by said bound- 
ary line to the boxmdary line between Boston and Everett; thence by said 
boundary line to the extension of the easterly line of a wharf now or for- 
merly known as Brooks wharf (said line being the same line as established 
between Wards Three and Four by the "Ordinance Making a New Divi- 
sion of the City into Wards," passed by the city government of Boston 
in the year 1895); thence by said line to Medford street; thence through 
Medford street to Everett street; thence through Everett street to Bunker 
Hill street; thence through Bunker HiU street to Trenton street; thence 
through Trenton street and through Cross street to High street; thence 
through High street to Cordis street; thence through Cordis street to 
Warren street; thence through Warren street and across Thompson 
square to Austin street; thence through Austin street and Prison Point 
bridge to the point of beginning. 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. 175 



WARD FOUR. 

(CHARLESTOWN DISTRICT, EAST.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Prison Point bridge and the boundary 
line between Boston and Cambridge; thence through Prison Point bridge 
and Austin street and across Thompson square to Warren street; thence 
through Warren street to Cordis street; thence through Cordis street to 
High street; thence through High street to Cross street; thence through 
Cross street and through Trenton street to Bunker Hill street; thence 
through Bunker HUl street to Everett street; thence through Everett 
street to Medford street; thence through Medford street to the easterly 
line of a wharf now or formerly known as Brooks wharf (said line being the 
same line as established between Wards Three and Four by the "Ordinance 
Making a New Division of the City into Wards," passed by the city govern- 
ment of Boston in the year 1895) ; thence by said line and said liae extended 
to the boundary line between Boston and Everett in the Mystic river; 
thence by said boundary line and the boundary line between Boston and 
Chelsea to the easterly side of Chelsea bridge; thence by the line of the 
easterly side of Chelsea bridge to its intersection with the shore line of the 
City of Boston; thence by said shore line to its intersection with the 
boundary line between Boston and Cambridge; thence by said boundary 
line to the point of beginning. 

WARD FIVE. 

(BOSTON PROPER, NORTH END AND EAST SIDE TO BROADWAY.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Cambridge bridge and the boundary line 
between Boston and Cambridge; thence through the Cambridge bridge 
and through Cambridge street to Bowdoin street; thence through Bowdoin 
street to Beacon street; thence through Beacon street to Park street; 
thence through Park street to Tremont street; thence through Tremont 
street to Shawmut avenue; thence through Shawmut avenue to the location 
of the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through said track location to Broad- 
way; thence through Broadway to the shore line of the City of Boston on 
the westerly side of Fort Point channel; thence by said shore line along the 
westerly side of Fort Point channel, around the North End of Boston and 
up the Charles river to the point where said shore line most nearly ap- 
proaches the east comer of the boundary line between Boston and Cam- 
bridge; thence in a straight line to said corner; thence by said boundary 
line to the point of beginning. 

WARD SIX. 

(BOSTON PROPER, SOUTH END TO TREMONT STREET.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Tremont street and the location of the 
tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad near Castle square; thence through Tremont street to 



176 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

West Springfield street; thence through West Springfield street and through 
East Springfield street to Harrison avenue; thence through Harrison 
avenue to Massachusetts avenue; thence through Massach\isetts avenue 
to the Roxbury canal, or the middle fine thereof extended; thence through 
the middle hne of the Roxbury canal to its intersection with the shore line 
of the City of Boston on the southerly side of the South bay; thence by 
said shore line along the southerly and easterly aides of South bay and 
along the easterly side of Fort Point charmel to Broadway; thence through 
Broadway to the location of the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad 
and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through 
said track location to the point of beginning. 

WARD SEVEN. 
(BOSTON PROPER, BACK BAY EAST.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Tremont street and the location of the 
tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad near Castle square; thence through Tremont street to 
Camden street; thence through Camden street to the location of the tracks 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through said 
track location to Ruggles street; thence through Ruggles street to the 
Tremont entrance to Back Bay Fens; thence in a straight line to the 
nearest point in the middle line of Muddy river; thence through Muddy 
river to Boylston road; thence through Boylston road to Boylston street; 
thence through Boylston street to Arlington street; thence through Arling- 
ton street and through Ferdinand street to the location of the tracks of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad; thence through said track location to the point of beginning. 

WARD EIGHT. 
(BOSTON PROPER, WEST END AND BACK BAY WEST.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Cambridge bridge and the boundary line 
between Boston and Cambridge; thence through the Cambridge bridge 
and through Cambridge street to Bowdoin street; thence through Bowdoin 
street to Beacon street; thence through Beacon street to Park street; 
thence through Park street to Tremont street; thence through Tremont 
street to Shawmut avenue; thence through Shawmut avenue to the loca- 
tion of the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through said track location to 
Ferdinand street; thence through Ferdinand street and through Arlington 
street to Boylston street; thence through Boylston street and through 
Boylston road to the middle line of Muddy river; thence through Muddy 
river to the easterly line of St. Mary's street extended; thence by said line 
extended and by the boimdary line between Brookline and Boston to its 
intersection with Ashby street or the line thereof extended; thence through 
Ashby street and the line thereof extended to its intersection with the 
boimdary hne between Boston and Cambridge in the Charles river; thence 
by said bovmdary Hne to the point of beginning. 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. 177 



WARD NINE. 
(SOUTH BOSTON DISTRICT, NORTH.) 
Beginning at the intersection of West Broadway and F street; thence 
through F street to West Eighth street; thence through West Eighth 
street to D street; thence through D street to Old Colony avenue; thence 
through Old Colony avenue to Dorchester avenue; thence northerly 
through Dorchester avenue to the location of the tracks of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through said track location and 
through the track location of the Midland Division of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad to Southampton street; thence through 
Southampton street to Massachusetts avenue; thence through Massa- 
chusetts avenue to the Roxbury canal or the middle Hne thereof extended; 
thence through the middle line of the Roxbury canal to its intersection 
with the shore line of the City of Boston on the southerly side of the South 
bay; thence by said shore hne along the southerly and easterly sides of the 
South bay and along the easterly side of the Fort Point channel and along 
the northeasterly side of South Boston and along the easterly side of South 
Boston to its intersection with the line of East Broadway extended; thence 
by said hne of East Broadway extended, and through East Broadway and 
through West Broadway to the point of beginning. 

WARD TEN. 

(SOUTH BOSTON DISTRICT, SOUTH.) 
Beginning at the intersection of West Broadway and F street; thence 
through West Broadway and through East Broadway, and by the line of 
East Broadway extended to the shore line of the City of Boston; thence by 
said shore line to the line of Old Harbor street extended; thence by the 
Une of Old Harbor street extended and through Old Harbor street to East • 
Eighth street; thence through East Eighth street and through West Eighth 
street to F street; thence through F street to the point of beginning. 

WARD ELEVEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, SOUTH BAY TO UPHAM'S CORNER.) 

Beginning at the intersection of Dudley street and the location of the 
tracks of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad; thence through Dudley street to Stoughton street; thence 
through Stoughton street to Thornley street; thence through Thornley 
street to Dorchester avenue; thence through Dorchester avenue to Bel- 
fort street; thence through Belfort street to Saxton street; thence through 
Saxton street to Romsey street; thence through Romsey street and by 
the line of Romsey street extended to high water mark; thence in a straight 
line running through a point lying midway between Fox Point at the 
extreme end of Savin HUl and the south corner of the Boston Consoli- 
dated Gas Company property at the Calf Pasture to the shore line of the 
City of Boston; thence by said shore line to the point of its intersection 



178 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

with the line of Old Harbor street extended; thence by the line of Old 
Harbor street extended and through Old Harbor street to East Eighth 
street; thence through East Eighth street and through West Eighth 
street to D street; thence through D street to Old Colony avenue; thence 
through Old Colony avenue to Dorchester avenue; thence northerly 
through Dorchester avenue to the location of the tracks of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through said track location 
and through the track location of the Midland Division of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad to the point of beginniag. 

WARD TWELVE. 
(ROXBURY DISTRICT, EAST.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Harrison avenue and East Springfield 
street; thence through East Springfield street to Washington street; 
thence through Washington street to Warren street; thence through 
Warren street to Moreland street; thence through Moreland street to 
Blue HiU avenue; thence through Blue Hill avenue to West Cottage 
street; thence through West Cottage street to Dudley street; thence 
through Dudley street to the track location of the Midland Division of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through said track 
location to Southampton street; thence through Southampton street to 
Massachusetts avenue; thence through Massachusetts avenue to Harri- 
son avenue; thence through Harrison avenue to the point of beginning. 

WARD THIRTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, CENTER.) 
Begiiming at the intersection of Tremont street and West Springfield 
street; thence thi-ough West Springfield street to Washington street; 
thence through Washington street to Warren street; thence through 
Warren street to Walnut avenue; thence through Walnut avenue to 
Circuit street; thence through Circuit street to Regent street; thence 
through Regent street to Hulbert street; thence through Hulbert street 
to Washington street; thence through Washington street to Cedar street; 
thence through Cedar street to Lambert avenue; thence through Lambert 
avenue to Bartlett street; thence through Bartlett street and across 
Eliot square to Roxbm-y street; thence through Roxbury street to Colum- 
bus avenue; thence through Columbus avenue to Tremont street; thence 
through Tremont street to the location of the tracks of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad at Roxbury Crossing; thence through 
said track location to Camden street; thence through Camden street to 
Tremont street; thence through Tremont street to the point of beginning. 

WARD FOURTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, WEST.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Ruggles street and the location of the 
tracks of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through 
Ruggles street to the Tremont entrance to Back Bay Fens; thence 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. ' 179 

in a straight line to the nearest point in the middle line of Muddy river; 
thence through Muddy river to the easterly line of St. Mary's street 
extended; thence by said line extended to the boundary line between 
Boston and Brookliue; thence by said boundary line in the park system 
to Chestnut street; thence through Chestnut street to Perkins street; 
thence through Perkins street and through Centre street to Gay Head 
street; thence through Gay Head street to Minden street; thence through 
Minden street to Bickford street; thence through Bickford street to 
Heath street; thence through Heath street and through New Heath 
street to the location of the tracks of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Raihoad; thence through said track location to the point of begin- 
ning. 

WARD FIFTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, ROXBURY STREET TO FRANKLIN PARK.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Washington street and Cedar street; 
thence through Cedar street to Lambert avenue; thence through Lambert 
avenue to Bartlett street; thence through Bartlett street and across Eliot 
square to Roxbm-y street; thence through Roxbury street to Columbus 
avenue; thence through Colmnbus avenue to Tremont street; thence 
through Tremont street to the location of the tracks of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Raihoad at Roxbury Crossing; thence through 
said track location to New Heath street; thence through New Heath 
street and through Heath street to Bickford street; thence through Bick- 
ford street to Minden street; thence through Minden street to Gay Head 
street; thence through Gay Head street to Centre street; thence through 
Centre street to Boylston street; thence through Boylston street to 
Washington street; thence through Washington street to Iffley road: 
thence through Iffley road to Walnut avenue; thence through Walnut 
avenue to Elmore street; thence through Ehnore street to Washington 
street; thence through Washington street to the point of beginning. 

WARD SIXTEEN. 
(ROXBURY DISTRICT. MORELAND STREET TO FRANKLIN PARK.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Warren street and Moreland street; 
thence through Moreland street to Blue Hill avenue; thence through 
Blue Hill avenue to Seaver street; thence through Seaver street to Walnut 
avenue; thence through Walnut avenue to Elmore street; thence through 
Ehnore street to Washington street; thence through Washington street 
to Hulbert street; thence through Hulbert street to Regent street; thence 
through Regent street to Circuit street; thence through Circuit street to 
Walnut avenue; thence through Walnut avenue to Warren street; thence 
through Warren street to the point of beginning. 

WARD SEVENTEEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, BLUE HILL AVENUE TO SAVIN HILL.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Blue Hill avenue and West Cottage 
street; thence through West Cottage street to Dudley street; thence 



180 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

through Dudley street to Stoughton street; thence through Stoughton 
street to Thomley street; thence through Thornley street to Dorchester 
avenue; thence through Dorchester avenue to Belfort street; thence 
through Belfort street to Saxton street; thence through Saxton street to 
Romsey street; thence through Romsey street and by the line of Romsey 
street extended to high water mark; thence in a straight line running 
through a point lying midway between Fox Point at the extreme end of 
Savin HiU and the south corner of the Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany property at the Calf Pasture to the shore line of the City of Boston; 
thence by said shore line to its intersection with the line of Greenwich 
street extended; thence by the line of Greenwich street extended to its 
intersection with the track location of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad; thence through said track location to Freeport street; 
thence through Freeport street and across Dorchester avenue to East 
street; thence through East street to Highland street; thence through 
Highland street and through Church street and across Eaton square to 
Quincy street; thence through Quincy street to Masco ma street; thence 
through Mascoma street to Fayston street; thence through Fayston 
street to Blue Hill avenue; thence through Blue HiU avenue to the point 
of beginning. 

WARD EIGHTEEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, GROVE HALL TO FIELD'S CORNER.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Blue Hill avenue and Fayston street; 
thence through Fayston street to Mascoma street; thence through Mas- 
coma street to Quincy street; thence through Quincy street and across 
Eaton square to Church street; thence through Church street and through 
Highland street to East street; thence through East street and across 
Dorchester avenue to Freeport street; thence through Freeport street 
to the location of the tracks of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad; thence through said track location to its intersection with the 
location of the tracks of the Shawmut Branch of said railroad near the 
Harrison Square Station; thence through the track location of the Shaw- 
mut Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to Geneva 
avenue; thence through Geneva avenue to Dakota street; thence through 
Dakota street to Clay bourne street; thence through Claybourne street 
to Bowdoin street; thence through Bowdoin street to Geneva avenue; 
thence through Geneva avenue to Blue Hill avenue; thence through 
. Blue Hill avenue to the point of begnmiag. 

WARD NINETEEN. 
(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, FRANKLIN PARK TO DORCHESTER CENTER.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Blue HiU avenue and Geneva avenue; 
thence through Geneva avenue to Bowdoin street; thence through Bow- 
doin street to Claybourne street; thence through Claybourne street to 
Dakota street; thence through Dakota street to Geneva avenue; thence 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. 181 

through Geneva avenue to the location of the tracks of the Shawmut 
Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence 
through said track location to Centre street; thence through Centre street 
and across Codman square to Talbot avenue; thence through Talbot 
avenue to Blue Hill avenue; thence through Blue HUl avenue to the 
point of beginning. 

WARD TWENTY. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, ASHMONT TO NEPONSET RIVER.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Centre street and Washington street 
at Codman square; thence through Washington street to Welles avenue; 
thence through WeUes avenue to Ocean street; thence through Ocean 
street to Ashmont street; thence through Aahmont street to Dorchester 
avenue; thence through Dorchester avenue to the southerly boundary 
of Dorchester Park; thence by the southerly boundary of Dorchester 
Park and across Adams street to MeUish road; thence through Mellish 
road and by the line thereof extended to the location of the tracks of the 
Milton Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence through said track location to Granite avenue; thence through 
Granite avenue and Granite bridge to the boundary line between Boston 
and Quincy in the Neponset river; thence by said boundary line to its 
intersection with the shore line of the City of Boston; thence by said 
shore line to its intersection with the line of Greenwich street extended; 
thence by the line of Greenwich street extended to its intersection with 
the track location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence by said track location to its iotersection with the location of the 
tracks of the Shawmut Branch of said railroad near the Harrison Square 
Station; thence through the track location of the Shawmut Branch of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Raihoad to Centre street; thence 
through Centre street to the point of beginning. 

WARD TWENTY-ONE. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, FRANKLIN PARK TO LOWER MILLS.) 

BeginniDg at the intersection of Blue Hill avenue and Canterbury street; 
thence through Canterbury street to Walk Hill street; thence through Walk. 
Hill street to Blue Hill avenue; thence through Blue Hill avenue and 
through Blue Hills Parkway to the boundary line between Boston and 
MUton in the Neponset river; thence by said boundary line and by the 
boundary line between Boston and Quincy to Granite bridge; thence 
through Granite bridge and through Granite avenue to the location of the 
tracks of the Milton Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad ; thence through said track location to MelUsh road; thence through 
Mellish road and across Adams street to the southerly boundary of Dor- 
chester Park; thence by the southerly boundary of Dorchester Park to 
Dorchester avenue; thence through Dorchester avenue to Ashmont street; 
thence through Ashmont street to Ocean street; thence through Ocean 
street to Welles avenue; thence through WeUes avenue to Washington 



182 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Btreet; thence through Washington street to Talbot avenue; thence 
through Talbot avenue to Blue Hill avenue; thence through Blue Hill 
avenue to the point of beginniag. 

WARD TWENTY-TWO. 

(JAMAICA PLAIN AND FOREST HILLS.) 

Beginning at the intersection of Centre street and Perkins street; thence 
through Perkins street to Chestnut street; thence through Chestnut street 
to the boundary line between Boston and Brookline; thence by said 
boimdary line to Allandale street; thence through Allandale street to 
Centre street; thence through Centre street to Walter street; thence 
through Walter street to Bussey street; thence through Bussey street 
to South street; thence through South street to Washington street; thence 
through Washington street to Whipple avenue; thence through Whipple 
avenue or the line thereof extended to the middle line of Stony Brook; 
thence by said Une of Stony Brook to Florence street East; thence through 
Florence street East to Southboume road; thence through Southbovu-ne 
road to Bourne street; thence through Bourne street to Walk Hill street; 
thence through Walk HUl street to Canterbury street; thence through 
Canterbury street to Blue HiU avenue; thence through Blue Hill avenue 
to Seaver street; thence through Seaver street to Walnut avenue; thence 
through Walnut avenue to Iffley road; thence through Iffley road to 
Washington street; thence through Washington street to Boylston street; 
thence through Boylston street to Centre street; thence through Centre 
street to the point of beginniag. 

WARD TWENTY-THREE. 

(WEST ROXBURY DISTRICT, INCLUDING ROSLINDALE.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Allandale street and the boundary line 
between Boston and BrookUne; thence through Allandale street to Centre 
street; thence through Centre street to Walter street; thence through 
Walter street to Bussey street; thence through Bussey street to South 
street; thence through South street to Washington street; thence through 
Washington street to Whipple avenue; thence through Whipple avenue 
or the line thereof extended to the middle line of Stony Brook; thence 
by said hne of Stony Brook to the track location of the Providence Divi- 
sion of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence through 
said track location to the boundary line formerly existing between Boston 
and Hyde Park; thence by the boimdary line formerly existing between 
Boston and Hyde Park to the boundary Line between Boston and Ded- 
ham; thence by the boimdary line between Boston and Dedham and by 
the boimdary line between Boston and Newton and by the boundary 
line between Boston and Brookline to the point of beginning. 

WARD TWENTY-FOUR. 

(HYDE PARK DISTRICT, ALSO MATTAPAN.) 

Beginning at the intersection of Walk Hill street and Blue HUl avenue; 
thence through Blue HiU avenue and through Blue HUls Parkway to the 



NEW WARD BOUNDARIES. 183 

boundary line between Boston and Milton in tlie Neponset river; thence 
by the boundary line between Boston and Milton and by the boundary 
line between Boston and Dedham to the boundary line formerly existing 
between Boston and Hyde Park; thence by the boundary line formerly 
existing between Boston and Hyde Park to the location of the tracks of 
the Providence Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road; thence northerly through said track location to the middle line of 
Stony Brook; thence by said line of Stony Brook to Florence street East; 
thence through Florence street East to Southbourne road; thence through 
Southboume road to Bourne street; thence through Bourne street to 
Walk Hill street; thence through Walk Hill street to the point of begin- 
ning. 

WARD TWENTY-FIVE. 
(BRIGHTON DISTRICT, SOUTH.) 
Beginning at the intersection of Ashby street extended and the bound- 
ary line between Boston and Cambridge; thence through Ashby street 
or the line thereof extended to its intersection with the boundary line 
between Boston and Brookline; thence by the boimdary line between 
Boston and Brookline and by the boundary line between Boston and 
Newton to Nonantum street; thence through Nonantum street to 
Washington street; thence through Washington street and Cambridge 
street to Dustin street; thence through Dustin street to North Beacon 
street; thence through North Beacon street to Everett street; thence 
through Everett street or the Une thereof extended to the location of the 
tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad; thence through said track loca- 
tion to the middle line of an old creek which formerly formed the boundary 
line between Brookline and Brighton; thence by the middle line of said 
creek to its intersection with the boundary line between Boston and 
Cambridge in the Charles river; thence by said bovmdary line to the 
point of beginning. 

WARD TWENTY-SIX. 

(BRIGHTON DISTRICT, NORTH.) 

Beginning at the intersection of Nonantum street and the boundary 
line between Boston and Newton; thence through Nonantum street to 
Washington street; thence through Washington street and through Cam- 
bridge street to Dustin street; thence through Dustin street to North 
Beacon street; thence through North Beacon street to Everett street; 
thence through Everett street or the line thereof extended to the location 
of the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad; thence through said track 
location to the middle line of an old creek which formerly formed the 
boundary line between Brookline and Brighton; thence by the middle 
line of said creek to its intersection with the boundary line between Bos- 
ton and Cambridge in the Charles river; thence by the boundary line 
between Boston and Cambridge and by the boundary hne between Bos- 
ton and Watertown and by the boundary line between Boston and Newton 
to the point of beginning. 



184 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



BOUNDARIES OF NEW VOTING 
PRECINCTS, 1916. 

(With Number of Voters in Each Precinct.) 



WARD ONE. 

(EAST BOSTON DISTRICT, NORTH.) 

8 Precincts — 3,948 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following de- 
scribed line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Austin 
avenue and Saratoga street; thence by the centre hne of Saratoga street 
to its intersection with the centre line of Breed street extended; thence 
by the centre line of said extension and the centre Une of Breed street 
to Ashley street; thence by the centre line of Ashley street and said centre 
line extended to its intersection with the boundary line between the city 
of Boston and the city of Chelsea (in Chelsea Creek); thence by said 
boundary line and by the boundary line between the city of Boston and 
the city of Revere, and between the city of Boston and the town of Win- 
throp (through Belle Isle Inlet) to the southerly line of Saratoga street 
bridge; thence by said southerly line to the shore hne; thence by said 
shore line to the centre line of Washburn avenue extended; thence by said 
centre line extended and the centre line of Bayswater street and Austin 
avenue to the point of beginning — 467 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Coleridge and 
Byron streets; thence by the centre line of Byron, Bennington, Words- 
worth, Saratoga, Byron and Chelsea streets to Chelsea street bridge; 
thence by the centre hne of Chelsea street bridge to the boundary line 
(in Chelsea Creek) between the city of Boston and the city of Chelsea; 
thence by said boundary line to its intersection with the centre line of 
Ashley street extended; thence by said centre line extended and the centre 
line of AsUey, Breed and Breed street extended to Saratoga street; thence 
by the centre line of Saratoga street, Austin avenue and Bayswater street 
to the centre line of Washbiu-n avenue; thence by the centre line of Wash- 
burn avenue extended to the shore line; thence by said shore line to the 
harbor line; thence by said harbor line to its intersection with a line 
drawn from the intersection of the centre lines of Coleridge and Rice 
streets to said harbor Une, and at right angles thereto; thence by said last 
described Une to the intersection of the centre Unes of Rice and Coleridge 
streets; thence by the centre Une of Coleridge street to the point of begin- 
ning — 478 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
Une : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Swift and Saratoga 
streets; thence by the centre hne of Saratoga, Curtis, Chelsea, Byron, 
Saratoga, Wordsworth, Bennington, Byron and Coleridge streets to the 
intersection of the centre lines of Coleridge and Rice streets; thence by a 
line drawn from said intersection to the harbor line, and at right angles 
thereto; thence by said harbor line to its intersection with a line drawn 
from the intersection of the centre lines of Shrimpton and Swift streets 
(at right angles to Shrimpton street) to said harbor line; thence by said 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 1. 185 

last described line to its intersection with the centre lines of Shrimpton 
and Swift streets; thence by the centre line of Swift street to the point of 
beginning — 445 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
lin e : Beginning at the intersection of the centre hne of location of the Bos- 
ton, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad and the ward line separating Ward 
One from Ward Two; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
Prescott street to its intersection with the centre line of Chelsea street; 
thence by the centre line of Chelsea street, Neptune road, Bremen street, 
Glendon place, Chelsea, Curtis, Saratoga and Swift streets to the inter- 
section of the centre lines of Swift street and Shrimpton street; thence 
by a hne drawn from said intersection (at right angles to Shrimpton street) 
to the harbor line; thence by said harbor line to its intersection with the 
line dividing Ward One from Ward Two; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Brooks street extended to its intersection with the centre 
line of location of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad; thence by 
said centre line of location to the point of beginning — 479 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Bennington and 
Prescott streets; thence by the centre line of Prescott, Princeton, Putnam, 
Lexington, Prescott and Trenton streets to the intersection with the 
centre line of Glendon street extended; thence by said extended centre line, 
the centre line of Glendon street and said centre line extended to the 
boundary line (in Chelsea Creek) between the city of Boston and the city 
of Chelsea; thence by said boundary line to its intersection with the 
centre line of Chelsea street bridge; thence by the centre line of Chelsea 
street bridge, Chelsea street, Glendon place, Bremen street, Neptune 
road and Chelsea street to the point of beginning — 501 voters. 

Prec. 6. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Brooks and 
Trenton streets; thence by the centre line of Brooks, Condor and Meridian 
streets and Meridian street bridge to the harbor Line; thence by the harbor 
line to the westerly hne of said bridge; thence by said westerly line to the 
boundary line between the city of Boston and the city of Chelsea (in 
Chelsea Creek) ; thence by said boundary line to its intersection with the 
centre line of Glendon street extended; thence by said extended centre 
line and the centre line of Glendon street and said centre line extended 
to the centre line of Trenton street; thence by the centre line of Trenton, 
Prescott, Lexington, Putnam and Trenton streets to the point of begin- 
ning — 469 voters. 

Prec. 7. — ■ AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Eutaw and Border 
streets; thence by the centre line of Border, Condor, Brooks and Eutaw 
streets to the point of beginning — 568 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Putnam street and 
the ward line separating Ward One from Ward Two; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of Princeton, Meridian, Lexington and Border 
streets, to a point in Border street opposite the line separating Ward One 
from Ward Two ; thence by said ward line by the division line between the 
property now or late of Alonzo Crosby Heirs and the property now or 
late of Richard F. Green; thence by said division line and the harbor 
Une to the centre line of Meridian street; thence by the centre line of 
Meridian, Condor, Border, Eutaw, Brooks, Trenton and Putnam streets 
to the point of beginning — 541 voters. 



186 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

WARD TWO. 

(EAST BOSTON DISTRICT SOUTH, ALSO THE ISLANDS.) 

8 Precincts — 4,052 Voters. 

Prec. I . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Porter and Bremen 
streets; thence by the centre line of Bremen, Putnam, Bennington and 
Brooks streets to the ward line separating Ward One from Ward Two; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Princeton and Prescott 
streets to the intersection of the centre line of location of the Boston, 
Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad; thence by said centre line of location 
and the centre line of Brooks street extended to the harbor line; thence 
by said harbor line to its intersection wdth the centre line of Porter Street 
extended; thence by said extended centre line and the centre line of Porter 
street to the point of beginning, including the islands in Boston Harbor, 
viz.: Apple, Castle, Deer, Gallop's, George's, Governor's, Long, Lovell's, 
Rainsford, Spectacle and Thompson's Islands — 509 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Bremen and 
Marion streets; thence by the centre line of Marion, Saratoga, Brooks, 
Bennington, Putnam and Bremen streets to the point of beginning — 490 
voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Havre and Meridian 
streets; thence by the centre line of Meridian street to a point in said 
centre line opposite the centre line of Meridian place; thence by a straight 
line across the southerly end of Central square to a point in the north- 
westerly line of Border street where the southwesterly line of Central 
square extended intersects it; thence by said point of intersection by the 
southwesterly line of Central square extended to the harbor line; thence 
by the harbor line to the ward line separating Ward One from Ward Two; 
thence by said ward line by the division line between the property now or 
late of Alonzo Crosby Heirs and the property now or late of Richard F. 
Green and the centre line of Border, Lexington, Meridian and Princeton 
streets to its intersection with the centre line of Brooks street; thence by 
the centre line of Brooks, Saratoga, Marion, London, Porter and Havre 
streets to the point of beginning — 493 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward l>dng within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Chelsea and 
Maverick streets; thence by the centre line of Maverick, Havre, Porter, 
London, Marion, Bremen, Porter and Chelsea streets to the point of 
beginning — 525 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Sumner and Lewis 
streets; thence by the centre line of Lewis street and Lewis street extended 
to the harbor line; thence by the harbor line to a point in same opposite 
the southwesterly hne of Central square extended; thence by a straight 
hne to a point in the northwesterly hne of Border street where it will 
intersect the southwesterly line of Central square extended; thence from 
said point of intersection in Border street by a straight hne drawn across 
the southerly end of Central square to its intersection with the centre line 
of Meridian street at a point opposite the centre line of Meridian place; 
thence by the centre line of Meridian, Havre, Maverick, Paris and Sumner 
streets to the point of beginning — 529 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Maverick and 
Cottage streets; thence by the centre line of Cottage, Sumner and Orleans 
streets and Orleans street extended to the harbor line; thence by said 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 3. 187 

harbor line to the centre hne of Lewis street extended; thence by said 
extended centre hne and the centre hne of Lewis, Sumner, Paris, Maverick, 
Chelsea and Porter streets and Porter street extended to the harbor line; 
thence by said harbor hne to its intersection with the centre line of Maverick 
street extended; thence by said extended centre line and the centre hne of 
Maverick street to the point of beginning — 544 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Marginal and 
Orleans streets; thence by the centre line of Orleans, Sumner, Cottage, 
Everett, Lamson, Ruth and Marginal streets to the point of beginning — 
466 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Begirming at the intersection of the centre lines of Marginal and 
Ruth streets; thence by the centre line of Ruth, Lamson, Everett, Cottage 
and Maverick streets and Maverick street extended to the harbor line; 
thence by said harbor line to its intersection with the centre line of Orleans 
street extended; thence by said extended centre line and the centre line 
of Marginal street to the point of beginning — ■ 496 voters. 

WARD THREE. 

(CHARLESTOWN DISTRICT, WEST.) 

7 Precincts — 3,449 Voters. 

Prec. I . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Baldwin street 
and Rutherford avenue; thence by the centre line of Rutherford avenue 
to the centre line of location of the Terminal Branch of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and the boundary 
line between the city of Boston and the city of Somerville, and the boundary 
Hne between the city of Boston and the city of Everett to the intersection 
of said boundary line with the line separating Ward Three from Ward 
Four (in Mystic River) ; thence by said ward line to its intersection with 
the centre line of Medford street; thence by the centre line of Medford, 
Baldwin, Bunker Hill, Charles, Main and Baldwin streets to the point of 
beginning — 528 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Rutherford 
avenue and Baldwin street; thence by the centre line of Baldwin, Main, 
Charles, Bunker Hill, Baldwin, Medford, St. Martin, Bunker Hill, Mead, 
Main and Middlesex streets and Rutherford avenue to the centre line of 
Tibbetts Town Way extended; thence by said extended centre line to the 
centre line of location of the Boston & Maine Railroad, Western Division; 
thence by said centre line of location to its intersection with the boundary 
line between the city of Boston and the city of Somerville; thence by said 
boundary hne to its intersection with the centre hne of location of the 
Terminal Branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad; thence by said centre 
hne of location and the centre hne of Rutherford avenue to the point of 
beginning — 465 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Lincoln street and 
Rutherford avenue; thence by the centre line of Rutherford avenue, 
Middlesex, Main, Mead, Bunker Hih, St. Martin, Medford, Belmont, 
Bunker Hill, Sullivan, Wall, Walker, Main and Lincoln streets to the 
point of beginning — 493 voters. 

Prec. 4. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Rutherford 
avenue and Lincoln street; thence by the centre line of Lincoln, Main, 
Walker, High, School and Main streets to the line separating Ward Three 



188 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

from Ward Four in Thompson square; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Austin street and the centre line of Prison Point bridge to 
the boundary line between the city of Boston and the city of Cambridge 
(in Millers River); thence by said boundary line and the boundary line 
between the city of Boston and the city of Somerville to its intersection 
with the centre line of location of the Boston & Maine Railroad, Western 
Division ; thence by said centre line of location to the centre line of Tibbetts 
Town Way extended; thence by said extended centre line and the centre 
line of Rutherford avenue to the point of beginning — 496 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Main and School 
streets; thence by the centre line of School, High, Walker, Wall, Sullivan, 
Bunker Hill, Elm, High, Green and Main streets to the point of beginning 
— 502 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Bunker HiU 
and Belmont streets; thence by the centre line of Belmont, Medford, Elm 
and Bunker Hill streets to the point of beginning — 473 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Main and Green 
streets; thence by the centre line of Green, High and Elm streets to the 
line separating Ward Three from Ward Four; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Medford, Everett, Bunker Hill, Trenton, Bartlett, 
Cross, High, Cordis and Warren streets, across Thompson square and by 
the centre line of Main street to the point of beginning — 492 voters. 

WARD FOUR. 

(CHARLESTOWN DISTRICT, EAST.) 

7 Precincts — 3,451 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the boundary line between the 
city of Boston and the city of Cambridge (in Millers River) and the line 
separating Ward Three from Ward Four; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Prison Point bridge and Austin street and Austin street 
extended to its intersection, in Thompson square, with the centre line of 
Warren street extended; thence by said extended centre line, by the 
centre line of Warren, Thompson, Main and Henley streets to the centre 
line of the southerly arm of Harvard square; thence by the centre line of 
said southerly arm and by the centre line of Harvard street and said, 
centre line extended across the southwesterly portion of City square to its 
intersection with the centre line of Warren avenue extended; thence by 
said extended centre line and by the centre line of Warren avenue and 
Warren bridge to the line separating Ward Four from Ward Five (in 
Charles River); thence by said ward line and the boundary line between 
the city of Boston and the city of Cambridge (in Millers River) to the 
point of beginning — 551 voters. 

Prec. 2. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Harvard street 
and the southerly arm of Harvard square; thence by the centre line of said 
southerly arm, Henley, Main, Winthrop, Warren and Soley streets, Monu- 
ment square, Winthrop and Adams streets and the centre line of Adams 
street extended to the centre line of Mt. Vernon street extended; thence 
by said last extended centre line to the southeasterly line of Chelsea 
street; thence by said southeasterly line and the southwesterly, north- 
westerly and southwesterly line of the Navy Yard to its intersection 
with the harbor line; thence by said harbor line and the northeasterly 
line of Washington Street North to the line separating Ward Four from 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 4. 189 

Ward Five; thence by said ward line, through Charles River, to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Warren bridge; thence by the centre line 
of Warren bridge, Warren avenue and the centre line of Warren avenue 
extended to its intersection with the centre line of Harvard street extended ; 
thence by said last extended centre line, across the southwesterly end of 
City square and by the centre line of Harvard street to the point of begin- 
ning — 510 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Begiiming at the intersection of the centre lines of Main and Thomp- 
son streets; thence by the centre line of Thompson and Warren streets 
to the line separating Ward Three from Ward Four; thence by said ward 
Une by the centre line of Cordis, High, Cross, Bartlett, Trenton and 
Bunker Hill streets to the centre line of Everett street; thence continuing 
by the centre line of Bunker Hill street to its intersection with the centre 
line of Concord street; thence by the centre line of Concord street. Monu- 
ment square (northeast side), Monument square (southeast side). Monu- 
ment square (southwest side), Soley, Warren, Winthrop and Main streets 
to the point of beginning — 469 voters. 

Prec, 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Monument 
square (southeast side) and Tremont street; thence by the centre Une of 
Tremont, Edgeworth and Ferrin streets and the centre line of Ferrin 
street extended to the harbor line; thence by said harbor line to the south- 
westerly line of the Navy Yard; thence by said southwesterly line and 
by the northwesterly and southwesterly line of said Navy Yard to a point 
in the southeasterly line of Chelsea street; thence by said southeasterly 
line of Chelsea street to its intersection with the centre Une of Mt. Vernon 
street extended; thence by said extended centre line to its intersection 
with the centre line of Adams street; thence by the centre Une of Adams 
street and Winthrop street and Monument square (southeast side) to the 
point of beginning — 501 voters. 

Prec. 5. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Monument 
square (northeast side) and Concord street; thence by the centre Une of 
Concord, Bunker Hill and Vine streets and Vine street extended to the 
harbor line; thence by said harbor Une to its intersection with the centre 
Une of Ferrin street extended; thence by said extended centre line and the 
centre line of Ferrin, Edgeworth and Tremont streets and Monument 
square (northeast side) to the point of beginning — 428 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Une of Bunker Hill street 
and the line separating Ward Three from Ward Four; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Everett and Medford streets to the easterly 
Une of a wharf now or formerly known as Brooks Wharf; thence by said 
last described Une to its intersection with the harbor line on the south- 
westerly side of Mystic River (south channel) extended; thence by said 
extended line and the harbor Une on the southwesterly side of Mystic 
River (south channel) to its intersection with the centre line of Tufts 
street extended; thence by said extended centre line and the centre Une 
of Tufts and Bunker Hill streets to the point of beginning — 494 voters. 

Prec. 7. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Bunker HiU and 
Tufts streets; thence by the centre line of Tufts street and said centre line 
extended to the harbor line on the southwesterly side of Mystic River (south 
channel); thence by said harbor line and said harbor line extended to 
the Une separating Ward Three from Ward Four; thence by said ward 
line by the easterly Une of a wharf now or formerly known as Brooks Wharf 
to its intersection with the boimdary line, in Mystic River, between the 



190 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

city of Boston and the city of Everett and the boundary line between the 
city of Boston and the city of Chelsea; thence by said boundary line 
between the city of Boston and the citj^ of Chelsea to the easterly side of 
Chelsea bridge; thence by said easterly side of Chelsea bridge to the harbor 
line; thence by said harbor Une to its intersection with the centre line of 
Vine street extended; thence by said extended centre line and the centre 
line of Vine and Bunker HiU streets to the point of beginning — 498 voters. 

WARD FIVE. 

(BOSTON PROPER, NORTH END AND EAST SIDE TO BROADWAY.) 

11 Precincts — 5,509 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — AH that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Hanover and North 
Bennet streets; thence by the centre Une of North Bermet, Salem, Sheaf e, 
Margaret, Prince and Commercial streets and Washington Street North to 
the intersection of the centre line of Washington Street North and the 
harbor line; thence by said harbor Une to its intersection with the centre 
line of Hanover street extended; thence by said extended centre line and by 
the centre line of Hanover street to the point of beginning — 530 voters. 

Prec. 2. — AH that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Atlantic avenue and 
CUnton street; thence by the centre Une of CUnton street. Merchants row, 
North, Blackstone, Hanover, Prince, Salem, North Bennet and Hanover 
streets and the centre line of Hanover street extended to the harbor line; 
thence by said harbor liae to the southerly line of Long Wharf; thence by 
said southerly line to its intersection with the centre line of Atlantic avenue; 
thence by the centre line of Atlantic avenue to the point of beginning — 
478 voters. 

Prec. 3. — AU that part of said ward Ijang with the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Hanover and Cross 
streets; thence by the centre line of Cross, Salem and Stillman streets and 
Haymarket square to the intersection of the centre Une of Haymarket 
square and the centre line of Canal street extended; thence by said extended 
centre Une and by the centre line of Canal, Causeway and Beverly streets 
and Warren bridge to the line separating Ward Pom- from Ward Five; 
thence by said ward line to the easterly side of Washington Street North; 
thence by said easterly side to the harbor line; thence by said harbor Une 
and by the centre line of Washington Street North, Commercial, Prince, 
Margaret, Sheafe, Salem, Priace and Hanover streets to the point of begin- 
ning — 534 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Causeway and 
Leverett streets; thence by the centre line of Leverett street and Charles 
River Dam to its intersection with the boundary Une, in Charles River, 
between the city of Boston and the city of Cambridge; thence by said 
boundary line to its intersection with the line separating Ward Four from 
Ward Five; thence by said ward line and by the centre line of Warren 
bridge, Beverly and Causeway streets to the point of beginning — 453 
voters. 

Prec. 5. — AU that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
Une : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Leverett and Green 
streets; thence by the centre Une of Green, Chambers, Poplar, Charles 
and Leverett streets to the point of beginning — 547 voters. 

Prec. 6. — AU that part of said ward lying within the foUowiag described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Chambers and 
Eaton streets; thence by the centre Une of Eaton, North RusseU, Parkman, 
Blossom, Fruit and Charles streets and Cambridge bridge to the boundary 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 5. 191 

line, in Charles River, between the city of Boston and the city of Cambridge; 
thence by said boundary Une to its intersection with the centre line of 
Charles River Dam; thence by said centre line and the centre hne of 
Leverett, Charles, Poplar and Chambers streets to the point of beginning — 
510 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Green and Lynde 
streets; thence by the centre line of Lynde street to its intersection with 
the line separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Cambridge street to its intersection with the centre 
line of Charles street; thence by the centre line of Charles, Fruit, Blossom, 
Parkman, North Russell, Eaton, Chambers and Green streets to the point 
of beginning — 523 voters. 

Prec, 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Sudbury and Court 
streets; thence by the centre Une of Court street, Bowdoin square and 
Cambridge street to the line separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; 
thence by said ward line by the continuation of the centre line of Cambridge 
street and by the centre line of Lynde, Leverett, Causeway and Canal 
streets and the centre line of Canal street extended to its intersection in 
Haymarket square with the centre line of Sudbury street extended; thence 
by said extended centre line and by the centre line of Sudbury street to 
the point of beginning — 501 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Atlantic avenue and 
Beach street; thence by the centre line of Beach, Washington and 
La Grange streets to the line separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Tremont, Park, Beacon and 
Bowdoin streets to its intersection with the centre hne of Cambridge street ; 
thence by the centre line of Cambridge street, Bowdoin square, Court and 
Sudbury streets and the centre line of Sudbury street extended to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Haymarket square; thence by the centre Une 
of Hajonarket square, Stillman, Salem, Cross, Hanover, Blackstone and 
North streets. Merchants row, Clinton street and Atlantic avenue to its 
intersection with the southerly line of Long Wharf extended; thence by 
said extended southerly Une and by the southerly line of Long Wharf to the 
harbor Une; thence by said harbor Une to its intersection with the centre 
line of Ejaeeland street extended; thence by said extended centre line and 
by the centre Une of Atlantic avenue to the point of beginning — 501 
voters. 

Prec. 10. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Albany and Oak 
streets; thence by the centre line of Oak, Ash, Bennet, Washington and 
HoUis streets to the Une separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; thence 
by said ward Une by the centre line of Tremont street to its intersection with 
the centre line of La Grange street ; thence by the centre line of La Grange, 
Washington and Beach streets, Atlantic avenue and the centre line of Knee- 
land street extended to the harbor Une; thence by said harbor line to its 
intersection with the line separating Ward Five from Ward Six; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of Broadway, to its intersection with the 
centre line of Albany street; thence by said centre line to the point of 
beginning — 493 voters. 

Prec. II . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beghming at the intersection of the centre line of Albany street with 
the line separating Ward Five from Ward Six; thence by said ward Une 
by the centre line of Broadway to the location of the tracks of the Boston 
& Albany RaUroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence by said track location to its intersection with the line separating 



192 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Ward Five from Ward Eight; thence by said ward line by the centre line 
of Shawmut avenue and Tremont street to its intersection with the centre 
line of Hollis street; thence by the centre line of HolUs, Washington, 
Bennet, Ash, Oak and Albany streets to the point of beginning — 439 
voters. 

WARD SIX. 

(BOSTON PROPER, SOUTH END TO TREMONT STREET.) 

9 Precincts — 4,537 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
Compton streets; thence by the centre line of Compton street, Shawmut 
avenue and Dover street to the line separating Ward Six from Ward Seven; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Tremont street and the loca- 
tion of the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with the centre line of 
Washington street; thence by the centre line of Washington street to the 
point of beginning — 541 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dover street and 
Shawmut avenue; thence by the centre line of Shawmut avenue, Compton 
and Washington streets to the line separating Ward Five from Ward Six; 
thence by said ward line by the location of the tracks of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
and by the centre line of Broadway to its intersection with the line sepa- 
rating Ward Six from Ward Nine; thence by said ward line by the easterly 
line of Fort Point Channel to its intersection with the centre line of West 
Fourth street; thence by the centre line of West Fourth street and Dover 
street to the point of beginning — 540 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Albany and Union 
Park streets; thence by the centre line of Union Park street, Shawmut 
avenue, Dover and West Fourth streets to the line separating Ward Six 
from Ward Nine; thence by said ward line by the easterly side of South 
Bay to its intersection with the centre line of Maiden street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line and the centre hne of Albany street to 
the point of beginning — 486 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Shawmut avenue 
and Waltham street; thence by the centre line of Waltham street to the 
line separating Ward Six from Ward Seven; thence by said ward line by 
the centre hne of Tremont street to its intersection with the centre line 
of Dover street; thence by the centre line of Dover street and Shawmut 
avenue to the point of beginning — 450 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
West Canton streets; thence by the centre line of West Canton street to 
its intersection with the line separating Ward Six from Ward Seven; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Tremont street to its intersection 
with the centre line of Waltham street; thence by the centre line of Wal- 
tham street, Shawmut avenue. Union Park street and Washington street 
to the point of beginning — 529 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of East Canton and 
Washington streets; thence by the centre line of Washington street, Union 
Park street and Albany street to its intersection with the centre line of 
Maiden street extended; thence by said extended centre line to the line 
separating Ward Six from Ward Nine; thence by said ward line by the 



VOTING PRECINCTS WARD 7. 193 

easterly and southerly line of South Bay to its intersection with the centre 
line of East Canton street extended; thence by said extended centre line 
and the centre line of East Canton street to the point of beginning — 480 
voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Albany and East 
Concord streets; thence by the centre line of East Concord, Washington 
and East Canton streets and the centre line of East Canton street extended 
to the line separating Ward Six from Ward Nine; thence by said ward line 
by the southerly line of South Bay to its intersection with the centre line 
of Roxbury Canal; thence by said centre line and the centre line of Massa- 
chusetts avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Albany street; 
thence by the centre line of Albany street to the point of beginning — 515 
voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Washington and 
West Concord streets; thence by the centre line of West Concord street 
to the hne separating Ward Six from Ward Seven; thence by said ward 
hne by the centre line of Tremont street to its intersection with the centre 
Une of West Canton street; thence by the centre line of West Canton and 
Washington streets to the point of beginning — 512 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Albany street and 
the Une separating Ward Six from Wards Twelve and Thirteen; thence by 
said ward Une by the centre line of Massachusetts and Harrison avenues 
and East and West Springfield streets to its intersection with the Une 
separating Ward Six from Ward Seven; thence by said line by the centre 
Une of Tremont street to its intersection with the centre line of West 
Concord street; thence by the centre Une of West and East Concord streets 
and Albany street to the point of beginning — ■ 484 voters. 



WARD SEVEN. 

(BOSTON PROPER, BACK BAY EAST.) 

9 Precincts — 4,722 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Columbus avenue 
and Yarmouth street; thence by the centre line of Yarmouth street, Irv- 
ington street foot-bridge, Irvington street, Huntington avenue. West 
Newton street, Falmouth, Belvidere and Dalton streets and the centre line 
of Dalton street extended across the location of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad to the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by 
said ward Une by the centre Une of Boylston, Arlington and Ferdinand 
streets to its intersection with the centre line of Isabella street; thence 
by said centre line and the centre Une of Columbus avenue to the point of 
begirming — 541 voters. 

Prec. 2. All that part of said ward lying within the following de- 
scribed line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Dartmouth 
street and Warren avenue; thence by the centre line of Warren avenue, 
Clarendon and Chandler streets and Columbus avenue and Isabella street 
to the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Five; thence by said ward 
Une by the centre line of Ferdinand street to the location of the tracks of 
the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad; thence by said location to the line separating Ward Seven 
from Ward Six; thence by said ward line by the centre Une of Tremont 
street to its intersection with the centre Une of Dartmouth street; thence 
by said centre line to the point of beginning — 549 voters. 



194 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Tremont and 
Pembroke streets; thence by the centre hne of Pembroke street and said 
centre line extended across the northeasterly end of Columbus square to 
a point in the centre line of Columbus avenue opposite the centre line of 
Berwick park; thence by the centre line of Columbus avenue, Chandler 
and Clarendon streets, Warren avenue and Dartmouth street to the line 
separating Ward Six from Ward Seven; thence by said ward line by the 
centre Une of Tremont street to the point of beginning — 491 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward l5ang within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Columbus ave- 
nue and West Rutland square; thence by the centre hne of West Rutland 
square foot-bridge, Durham, St. Botolph and Cumberland streets, Hunt- 
ington avenue and Irvington street, Irvington street foot-bridge, Yar- 
mouth street and Columbus avenue to a point in the centre hne of said 
Columbus avenue opposite the centre line of Berwick park; thence by the 
centre line of Berwick park extended across the northeasterly end of 
Columbus square to its intersection with the centre line of Warren ave- 
nue; thence by the centre line of Warren avenue extended across Colum- 
bus square to its intersection with the centre line of Columbus avenue; 
thence by said centre hne to the point of beginning — 553 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Pembroke street 
and the line separating Ward Seven from Wards Six and Thirteen; thence 
by -said ward line by the centre line of Tremont and Camden streets to 
its intersection with the centre line of Columbus avenue; thence by the 
centre hne of Columbus avenue to its intersection with the centre line of 
Warren avenue extended; thence by said extended centre Une across 
Columbus square, and the centre line of Pembroke street to the point of 
beginning — 547 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of West Rutland 
square and Columbus avenue; thence by the centre hne of Columbus 
avenue to its intersection with the hne separating Ward Seven from Ward 
Tlairteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Camden street 
and the centre line of Gainsborough street foot-bridge to the centre line 
of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence 
continuing by the centre line of Gainsborough street foot-bridge and 
by the centre line of Gainsborough, St. Botolph and Durham streets. 
West Rutland square foot-bridge and West Rutland square to the point 
of beginning — 509 voters. 

Prec. 7. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of St. Botolph street 
and Massachusetts avenue; thence by the centre line of Massachusetts 
avenue to the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by 
said ward line by the centre fine of Boylston street to its intersection with 
the centre line of Dalton street extended; thence by said extended centre 
line and by the centre hne of Dalton, Belvidere, Falmouth and West 
Newton streets, Huntington avenue, Cumberland and St. Botolph streets 
to the point of beginning — 564 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of St. Botolph and 
Gainsborough streets; thence by the centre line of Gainsborough, St. 
Stephen, Batavia and Hemenway streets, and by the centre hne of West- 
land Entrance and Agassiz road, in the Back Bay Fens, to the line, in 
Muddy River, separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by said 
ward fine through Muddy River to its intersection with the centre line of 
Boylston street; thence continuing by said ward line by the centre line of 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 8. 195 

Boylston street to its intersection with the centre Une of Massachusetts 
avenue; thence by the centre Une of Massachusetts avenue and St. Botolph 
street to the point of beginning — 480 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Gainsborough 
street and the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Thirteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of location of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with the line separating 
Ward Seven from Ward Fourteen; thence by said ward line by the centre 
Une of Ruggles street to the Tremont Entrance to the Back Bay Fens; 
thence by a straight line to the nearest point in the middle line of Muddy 
River; thence by the hne separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight through 
Muddy River to its intersection with the centre line of Agassiz road; 
thence by the centre line of Agassiz road and Westland Entrance, in the 
Back Bay Fens, and by the centre Une of Hemenway, Batavia, St. Stephen 
and Gainsborough streets to the point of beginning — 488 voters. 

WARD EIGHT. 

(BOSTON PROPER, WEST END AND BACK BAY WEST.) 

9 Precincts — 4,588 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Beacon and Joy 
streets; thence by the centre Une of Joy street to the line separating Ward 
Five from Ward Eight; thence by said ward Une by the centre Une of 
Cambridge, Bowdoin and Beacon streets to the point of beginning — 559 
voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Pinckney and 
Anderson streets; thence by the centre line of Anderson street to the line 
separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; thence by said ward Une by the 
centre line of Cambridge street to its intersection with the centre line of 
Joy street; thence by the centre Une of Joy and Pinckney streets to the 
point of beginning — 537 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Anderson and 
Pinckney streets; thence by the centre Une of Pinckney street and said 
centre line extended to the boundary Une, in Charles River, between the 
city of Boston and the city of Cambridge; thence by said boundary Une 
to its intersection with the line separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; 
thence by said ward Une by the centre line of Cambridge bridge, Cambridge 
and Anderson streets to the point of beginning — 533 voters. 

Prec. 4. — AU that part of said ward l3dng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Joy and Beacon 
streets; thence by the centre Une of Beacon and Otter streets and the 
centre line of Otter street extended to its intersection with the centre line 
of Pinckney street extended; thence by the centre line of Pinckney street 
extended and by the centre Une of Pinckney and Joy streets to the point 
of beginning — 538 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Arlington and 
Beacon streets; thence by the centre Une of Beacon street to the intersec- 
tion with the line separating Ward Five from Ward Eight; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Park street, Tremont street and Shawmut 
avenue to its intersection with the line separating Ward Six from Ward 
Eight; thence by said ward line by the location of the tracks of the Boston 
& Albany Railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 



196 MUNICIP.'^i REGISTER. 

to the line sepaxating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by said 
ward Une by the centre line of Ferdinand and Arlington streets to the 
point of beginning — 569 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Arlington street 
and the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Boylston street to its intersection with the 
centre line of Exeter street; thence by the centre hne of Exeter street and 
said centre line extended to the boundary line, in Charles River, between 
the city of Boston and the city of Cambridge; thence by said boundary 
line to its intersection with the centre line of Pinckney street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line to its intersection with the centre Une 
of Otter street extended; thence by said last extended centre line and by 
the centre line of Otter, Beacon and Arlington streets to the point of begin- 
ning — 502 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward Ijong within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Exeter street and 
the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by said ward 
Hne by the centre line of Bojdston street to its intersection with the centre 
line of Massachusetts avenue; thence by the centre line of Massachusetts 
avenue and Harvard bridge to its intersection with the bovmdary line 
between the citj^ of Boston and the city of Cambridge; thence by said 
boundary line, tlirough Charles River to its intersection with the centre 
line of Exeter street extended; thence by said extended centre line and 
the centre hne of Exeter street to the point of beginning — 503 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Massachusetts 
avenue and the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Eight; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of Boylston street and Muddy River to 
its intersection with the centre line of Jersey street extended; thence by 
said extended centre line and the centre hne of Jersey street and Brookline 
avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Deerfield street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line, the centre line of Deerfield street and 
said centre line extended to the bovmdary hne, in Charles River, between 
the city of Boston and the city of Cambridge; thence by said boimdary 
line to the centre line of Harvard bridge; thence by the centre hne of 
Harvard bridge and Massachusetts avenue to the point of beginning — 419 
voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Une of Jersey street 
extended and the line separating Ward Eight from Wards Seven and 
Fom-teen; thence by said ward line by the centre Une of Muddy River 
to its intersection with the boundary line between the city of Boston and 
the town of Brookline; thence by said boundary line, by the easterly line of 
St. Mary's street extended and St. Mary's street to the southerly Une of 
Commonwealth avenue; thence by said southerly Une to its intersection 
with the centre line of Ashby street extended; thence by said extended 
centre line, the centre line of Ashby street and said centre Une extended 
to the boundary line, in Charles River, between the city of Boston and 
the city of Cambridge; thence by said boundary line to its intersection 
with the centre line of Deerfield street extended; thence by said extended 
centre Une, the centre line of Deerfield street and said centre line extended 
to its intersection with the centre line of Brookline avenue; thence by 
the centre line of Brookline avenue, Jersey street and the centre line of 
Jersey street extended to the point of beginning — 428 voters. 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 9. 197 

WARD NINE. 

(SOUTH BOSTON DISTRICT, NORTH.) 

9 Precincts — 4,698 Voters. 

Prec. I . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of C and Silver 
streets; thence by the centre line of Silver street, Dorchester avenue and 
West Fourth street to the line separating Ward Six from Ward Nine; 
thence by said ward line by the easterly Une of Fort Point Channel to the 
northerly line of Broadway; thence continuing by the easterly line of 
Fort Point Channel and by the harbor line, in Boston Harbor, to its inter- 
section with the centre hne of F street extended; thence by said extended 
centre line to its intersection with the centre line of Summer street ; thence 
by the centre line of Summer and C streets to the point of beginning — 509 
voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Baxter and D 
streets; thence by the centre line of D street to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Nine from Ward Eleven; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of D street, Old Colony and Dorchester avenues to its 
intersection with the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and the centre 
line of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad to its intersection with the line separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Twelve; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Southampton 
street and Massachusetts avenue to its intersection with the line separating 
Ward Six from Ward Nine; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
Roxbury Canal to its intersection with the shore line on the southerly side 
of South Bay; thence by said shore line along the southerly and easterly 
sides of South Bay to its intersection with the centre line of West Fourth 
street; thence by the centre hne of West Fourth street, Dorchester avenue. 
Silver, C and Baxter streets to the point of beginning — 527 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Baxter and C 
streets; thence by the centre line of C and West Sixth streets to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by 
said ward hne by the centre line of F street to the line separating Ward 
Nine from Ward Eleven; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
West Eighth street to its intersection with the centre line of D street; 
thence by said centre line and the centre line of Baxter street to the point 
of beginning — 532 voters. 

Prec. 4. — • All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of West Sixth and C 
streets; thence by the centre hne of C and West Fourth streets to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by 
said ward hne by the centre hne of F street to its intersection with the 
centre line of West Sixth street; thence by said centre hne to the point 
of beginning — 515 voters. 

Prec. 5. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of West Fourth and 
C streets; thence by the centre line of C, West First, D, Bolton, E and 
West Fourth streets to the point of beginning — ■ 520 voters. 

Prec. 6. — AJl that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the hne separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Ten and the centre hne of West Fourth street; thence by the centre 
line of West Fourth, E, Bolton, D, West First, C and Summer streets to its 
intersection with the centre line of F street extended; thence by said 
extended centre hne and by the centre hne of F, West Second and Dor- 



198 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Chester streets to its intersection with the line separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Ten; thence by said ward line by the centre line of West Broadway 
and F street to the point of beginning — 534 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Ten and the centre Une of Dorchester street; thence by the centre 
line of Dorchester, West Second and F streets and the centre line of F street 
extended to the harbor Une, in Boston Harbor; thence by said harbor line 
to a point in said line where a line drawn from the intersection of the centre 
Unes of the Reserved Channel and O street extended would intersect said 
harbor line and at right angles thereto; thence by a straight line to the 
aforesaid intersection of the centre lines of Reserved Channel and O street 
extended; thence by the said Une of Reserved Channel to its intersection 
with the centre line of K street extended; thence by said extended centre 
Une and by the centre line of K, East Second and I streets to its intersection 
■wath the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by said ward 
line by the centre Une of East Broadway to the point of beginning — 526 
voters. 

Prec. 8. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Begiiming at the intersection of the line separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Ten and the centre line of I street; thence by the centre line of I, 
East Second and K streets and the centre line of K street extended to its 
intersection with the centre Une of Reserved Channel; thence by said 
centre line to its intersection with the centre line of O street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line and by the centre line of O street, East 
First, M , East Third and L streets to the line separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Ten ; thence by said ward Une by the centre line of East Broadway 
to the point of beginning — 502 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Nine from 
Ward Ten and the centre line of L street; thence by the centre line of L, 
East Third, M, East First and O streets and the centre Une of street 
extended to its intersection with the centre line of Reserved Channel; 
thence by a Une drawn from said last named intersection to the harbor Une, 
in Boston Harbor, and at right angles thereto; thence by the harbor Une 
on the northerly and easterly sides of the precinct now being described to its 
intersection with the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence 
by said line by the centre line of East Broadway extended and the centre 
line of East Broadway to the point of beginning — 533 voters. 

WARD TEN. 

(SOUTH BOSTON DISTRICT, SOUTH.) 

9 Precincts — 4,821 Voters, 

Prec. I . — All that part of said ward lying within the following de- 
scribed line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Une of Dorchester 
street and the line separating Ward Ten from Ward Eleven; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of West Eighth street to its intersection 
with the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by said ward 
Une by the centre Une of F street. West and East Broadway to its intersec- 
tion with the centre line of G street; thence by the centre line of G, East 
Fourth and Dorchester streets to the point of beginning — ■ 485 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following de- 
scribed line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Gates 
street and the line separating Ward Ten from Ward Eleven; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of East Eighth street to its intersection 
with the centre Une of Dorchester street; thence by the centre Une of 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 10. 199 

Dorchester, East Fourth and G streets, Thomas Park (south side), Tele- 
graph and Gates streets to the point of beginning — 568 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Ten from 
Ward Eleven and the centre line of Gates street; thence by the centre 
line of Gates and Telegraph streets, Thomas Park (south side), G, East 
Sixth and H streets and Columbia road to its intersection with the centre 
line of I street extended; thence by said extended centre line to its inter- 
section with the harbor line; thence by said harbor line to its intersection 
with the line separating Ward Ten from Ward Eleven; thence by said 
ward hne by the centre line of Old Harbor street extended and by the 
centre line of Old Harbor and East Eighth streets to the point of beginning 
— 559 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of East Sixth and G 
streets; thence by the centre line of G street to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by said ward line by 
the centre line of East Broadway to its intersection with the centre line 
of K street; thence by the centre line of K street. East Fourth, I and East 
Sixth streets to the point of beginning — 509 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of East Seventh and 
H streets; thence by the centre line of H, East Sixth, I, East Fourth and 
K streets to the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of East Broadway to its intersection with 
the centre line of L street; thence by the centre line of L, East Sixth, K 
and East Seventh streets to the point of beginning — 552 voters. 

Prec. 6. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Columbia road and 
H street; thence by the centre line of H, East Seventh and L streets. 
Marine road and the centre line of said road extended to its intersection 
with the centre line of N street extended; thence by the centre line of N 
street extended to its intersection with the harbor line; thence by said 
harbor line to its intersection with the centre line of I street extended; 
thence by the centre Une of I street extended and the centre line of Colum- 
bia road to the point of beginning — 560 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of East Eighth and L 
streets; thence by the centre line of L, East Seventh, K, East Sixth and L 
streets to its intersection with the line separating Ward Nine from Ward 
Ten; thence by said ward line by the centre hne of East Broadway to its 
intersection with the centre line of N street; thence by the centre line of 
N, East Fifth, M and East Eighth streets to the point of beginning — 523 
voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Marine road and 
L street; thence by the centre line of L, East Eighth, M, East Fifth and O 
streets and O street extended to the harbor line; thence by said harbor 
Hne to its intersection with the centre line of N street extended; thence 
by said extended centre Une to its intersection with the centre hne of 
Marine road extended; thence by the centre line of Marine road 
extended and the centre line of Marine road to the point of beginning — 
514 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hues of East Fifth and N 
streets; thence by the centre line of N street to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Nine from Ward Ten; thence by said ward line by 
the centre hne of East Broadway and said centre hne extended to the 



200 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

harbor line; thence by said harbor Une to its intersection with the centre 
line of O street extended; thence by said extended centre line and the 
centre line of O and East Fifth streets to the point of beginning — 551 
voters. 

WARD ELEVEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, SOUTH BAY TO UPHAM'S CORNER.) 

9 Precincts — 4,395 Voters. 
Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line (West Eighth street) sepa- 
rating Ward Eleven from Ward Nine at Dorchester street; thence by the 
centre line of Dorchester and Southampton streets to its intersection with 
the line separating Ward Nine from Ward Eleven; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of location of the Midland Division of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Raihoad and the centre line of location of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with 
the centre line of Dorchester avenue; thence by the centre Une of Dor- 
chester and Old Colony avenues, D and West Eighth streets to the line 
separating Ward Ten from Ward Eleven; thence by said ward line by 
the centre line of West Eighth street continued to the point of beginning 

— 576 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Preble and Ward 
streets; thence by the centre line of Ward and Dorchester streets to the 
line separating Ward Ten from Ward Eleven; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of East Eighth street and Old Harbor street and the 
centre line of Old Harbor street extended to its intersection with the 
harbor line; thence by a straight line drawn from said last described point 
to the intersection of the centre hnes of Old Colony avenue and Preble 
street; thence by the centre hne of Preble street to the point of beginning 

— 490 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dorchester avenue 
and Howell street; thence by the centre line of Howell, Boston and West 
Bellflower streets and the centre line of West Bellflower street extended 
to its intersection with the line separating Ward Eleven from Ward Twelve; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of location of the Midland 
Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and the 
centre line of Southampton, Dorchester, Ward and Preble streets to its 
intersection with the centre line of Old Colony avenue; thence by a hne 
drawn from said last described intersection to a point in the harbor line 
where the centre line of Old Harbor street extended would intersect said 
harbor line; thence southerly by said harbor Une to a corner in the same; 
thence by a line drawn from said corner to its intersection with the centre 
Une of Old Colony avenue at a point in said avenue where the centre line 
of Locust street extended would intersect same; thence by the centre 
line of Old Colony avenue to the northerly line of Columbia road; thence 
by said northerly line to its intersection with the centre line of location 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said 
centre line of location and by the centre Une of Dorchester avenue to the 
point of beginning — 451 voters. 

Prec. 4. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Crescent and Dor- 
chester avenues; thence by the centre line of Dorchester avenue and the 
centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
to the northerly line of Columbia road; thence by said northerly Une to its 
intersection with the centre line of Old Colony avenue; thence by said 
centre line to a point in said avenue where the centre Une of Locust street 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 12. 201 

extended would intersect it; thence by a line drawn from said point to 
the harbor line, at the southerly corner of same; thence by said harbor 
line to a point in same where the line separating Ward Eleven from Ward 
Seventeen would intersect it; thence by said ward line by a line drawn 
from said point northwesterly midway between Fox Point at the extreme 
end of Savin Hill and the south corner of the Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company property at the Calf Pasture to its intersection with the centre 
line of Romsey street extended; thence by said extended centre line to its 
intersection with the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad ; thence by said centre line of location and the centre 
line of Crescent avenue to the point of beginning — 410 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dorchester avenue 
and Roseclair street; thence by the centre line of Roseclair, May hew, 
Boston and Howell streets and Dorchester avenue to the point of begin- 
ning — 511 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of West BeUflower and 
Boston streets; thence by the centre line of Boston street and Columbia 
road to its intersection with the line separating Ward Eleven from Ward 
Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Dudley street to 
the Une separating Ward Eleven from Ward Twelve; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of location of the Midland Division of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with the 
centre line of West BeUflower street extended; thence by said extended 
centre line and by the centre line of West BeUflower street to the point 
of beginning — 530 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dorchester avenue 
and Howes street; thence by the centre line of Howes, Pleasant, Willis, 
Sumner and Annabel streets, Columbia road, Boston, Mayhew and 
Roseclair streets and Dorchester avenue to the point of beginning — 479 
voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Howes street and 
Dorchester avenue; thence by the centre line of Dorchester avenue to the 
line separating Ward Eleven from Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward 
line by continuing by the centre line of Dorchester avenue and by the 
centre line of Thornley, Pleasant and Stoughton streets, Columbia road, 
Annabel, Sumner, WiUis, Pleasant and Howes streets to the point of 
beginning — 505 voters. 

Prec 9. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Eleven from 
Ward Seventeen and the centre line of Dorchester avenue opposite the 
centre line of Belfort street; thence by the centre line of Dorchester and 
Crescent avenues and the centre hne of location of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad to the line separating Ward Eleven from 
Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Romsey 
street extended, Romsey, Saxton and Belfort streets to the point of begin- 
ning — 443 voters. 

WARD TWELVE. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, EAST.) 

9 Precincts — 4,648 Voters. 

Prec. 1 • — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 

line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Harrison avenue 

and Hunneman street; thence by the centre line of Hunneman street to 

the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen; thence by said 



202 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

ward line by the centre line of Washington street to the line separating 
Ward Six from Ward Twelve; thence by said ward line by the centre 
line of East Springfield street, Harrison avenue and Massachusetts avenue 
to its intersection with the centre line of Albany street; thence by the 
centre line of Albany, Northampton, Fellows and Randall streets and 
Harrison avenue to the point of beginning — 515 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Begirming at the intersection of the centre lines of Hunneman street 
and Harrison avenue; thence by the centre line of Harrison avenue, 
Randall, Fellows, Northampton and Albany streets to the line separating 
Ward Twelve from Wards Six and Nine; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Massachusetts avenue and Southampton street to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Eleven from Ward Twelve; thence 
by said ward Une by the centre line of location of the Midland Division 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection 
with the centre line of Norfolk avenue; thence by the centre line of Norfolk 
avenue, Yeoman and Himneman streets to the point of beginning — 492 
voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dearborn and 
Dudley streets; thence by the centre line of Dudley street to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Warren and Washington streets to 
its intersection with the centre line of Hunneman street; thence by the 
centre line of Hunneman, Fellows, Webber, Albany and Dearborn streets 
to the point of beginning — 525 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Hampden and 
Dudley streets; thence by the centre line of Dudley, Dearborn, Albany, 
Webber, Fellows, Hunneman, Yeoman and Hampden streets to the point 
of beginning — 478 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Mt. Pleasant 
avenue and Fairland street; thence by the centre line of Fairland street 
to its intersection with the line separating Ward Twelve from Wards 
Thirteen and Sixteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of More- 
land and Warren streets to its intersection with the centre line of Dudley 
street; thence by the centre line of Dudley and Vine streets and Mt. Pleas- 
ant avenue to the point of begirming — 538 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hues of Dudley street 
and Brook avenue; thence by the centre line of Brook avenue, Winthrop 
street and Blue Hall avenue to its intersection with the line separating 
Ward Twelve from Ward Sixteen ; thence by said ward line by the centre 
line of M or eland street to its intersection with the centre line of Fairland 
street; thence by the centre line of Fairland street, Mt. Pleasant avenue, 
Vine and Dudley streets to the point of beginning — 473 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward Isdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Shirley and 
Dudley streets; thence by the centre line of Dudley and Hampden streets, 
Norfolk avenue and Shirley street to the point of beginning — 527 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of East Cottage 
and Clifton streets; thence by the centre line of Clifton and Shirley streets 
and Norfolk avenue to its intersection with the line separating Ward 
Eleven from Ward Twelve; thence by said ward line by the centre line 
of location of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad to its intersection with the line separating Ward Twelve 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 13. 203 

from Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
Dudley street to its intersection with the centre line of East Cottage street; 
thence by the centre line of East Cottage street to the point of beginning — • 
532 voters. 

Prec, 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Clifton and 
East Cottage streets; thence by the centre line of East Cottage street to 
its intersection with the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Seven- 
teen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of West Cottage street to its 
intersection with the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Sixteen; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Moreland street; thence continuing by the 
centre line of Blue Hill avenue and by the centre line of Winthrop street, 
Brook avenue, Dudley, Shirley and Clifton streets to the point of beginning 
— 568 voters. 

WARD THIRTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, CENTRE.) 

9 Precincts — 4,508 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Tremont and 
Davenport streets; thence by the centre line of Davenport street, Columbus 
avenue and Walpole street to the line separating Ward Thirteen from Ward 
Seven; thence by said ward Hne by the centre line of location of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with the centre 
line of Camden street; thence by the centre line of Camden and Tremont 
streets to the line separating Ward Six from Ward Thirteen; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of West Springfield street to the line 
separating Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Washington street to its intersection with the centre 
line of Lenox street; thence by the centre line of Lenox and Tremont 
streets to the point of beginning — ■ 494 voters. 

te Prec. 2. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Lenox street 
and the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen in Washington 
street; thence by said ward line to its intersection with the centre line of 
Madison street; thence by the centre line of Madison street, Shawmut 
avenue, Hammond, Tremont and Coventry streets, Columbus avenue, 
Davenport, Tremont and Lenox streets to the point of beginning — 489 
voters. 

Prec. 3. — AU that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Twelve 
from Ward Thirteen in Washington street, and the centre line of Sterling 
street; thence by the centre line of Sterling, Tremont, Sarsfield, GrinneU 
and Walpole streets, Columbus avenue, Coventry, Tremont and Hammond 
streets, Shawmut avenue and Madison street to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen; thence by said ward 
line, by the centre line of Washington street to the point of beginning — 536 
voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Twelve 
from Ward Thirteen, in Washington street, and the centre line of Winthrop 
place; thence by the centre line of Winthrop place, Shawmut avenue and 
Ruggles street to its intersection with the line separating Ward Seven 
from Ward Thirteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of loca- 
tion of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad to its intersection 
with the centre line of Walpole street; thence by the centre line of Walpole, 



204 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Grinnell, Sarsfield, Tremont and Sterling streets to the line separating 
Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen; thence by said ward line by the centre 
line of Washington street to the point of beginning — 534 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Winthrop place 
and the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Thirteen, in Washington 
street; thence by said ward line by the centre Une of Washington and 
Warren streets to its intersection with the centre line of Dudley street; 
thence by the centre line of Dudley, Washington, Roxbury, St. Francis 
de Sales, Cabot and Ruggles streets, Shawmut avenue and Winthrop place 
to the point of beginning — 499 voters. 

Prec. 6. — Ail that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of St. Francis de 
Sales and Linden Park streets; thence by the centre line of Linden Park, 
Tremont and Prentiss streets to the line separating Ward Thirteen from 
Ward Fourteen; thence by said ward Une by the centre line of location 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with 
the centre line of Ruggles street; thence by the centre line of Ruggles, 
Cabot and St. Francis de Sales streets to the point of beginning — ■ 552 
voters. 

Prec. 7. — AH that part of said ward Ijang within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Washington and 
Bartlett streets; thence by the centre line of Bartlett street to the line 
separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward line 
by continuing by the centre line of Bartlett street across John Eliot square 
and by the centre Une of Roxbury street, Columbus avenue and Tremont 
street to its intersection with the line separating Ward Thirteen from 
Ward Fourteen; thence by said ward line by the centre Une of location of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and the centre line of 
Prentiss, Tremont, Linden Park, Roxbury and Washington streets to the 
point of beginning — 474 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Thirteen 
from Ward Sixteen, in Circuit street, and the centre line of Fountain 
street; thence by the centre line of Fountain, Regent, Alpine, St. James, 
Washington and Dudley streets to its intersection with the line separating 
Ward Twelve from Wards Thirteen and Sixteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre Une of Warren street. Walnut avenue and Circuit street 
to the point of beginning — 504 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Fountain street 
and the line separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Sixteen, in Circuit 
street; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Circuit, Regent and 
Hulbert streets to its intersection with the line separating Ward Thirteen 
from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Washing- 
ton and Cedar streets and Lambert avenue to its intersection with the 
centre Une of Bartlett street; thence by the centre Une of Bartlett, Wash- 
ington, St. James, Alpine, Regent and Fountain streets to the point of 
beginning — 426 voters. 

WARD FOURTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, WEST.) 

9 Precincts — 4,470 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — AU that part of said ward lying withing the foUowing described 

Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Kempton_ street 

and Huntington avenue; thence by the centre Une of Huntington 

avenue to its intersection with the boundary line between the city of Boston 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 14. 205 

and the town of BrookJine; thence by said boundary line, through Muddy 
River, to its intersection with the easterly line of St. Mary's street extended; 
thence continuing through Muddy River by the line separating Ward 
Fourteen from Wards Seven and Eight to a point in said line, where the 
shortest line, drawn from the intersection of the centre hnes of Ruggles 
street and the southeasterly part of Tremont Entrance, in Back Bay Fens, 
would intersect said line; thence by the last described hne to its inter- 
section with the centre lines of the southeasterly part of Tremont Entrance, 
in Back Bay Fens, and Ruggles street; thence by the centre line of Ruggles 
street to its intersection with the centre hne of Huntington avenue; thence 
by the centre hne of Huntington avenue, St. Alphonsus, Smith, Worthing- 
ton and Tremont streets, Huntington avenue, Fenwood road and Kempton 
street to the point of beginning — 536 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Hue: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Tremont and Par- 
ker streets; thence by the centre line of Parker, Conant, Oregon, Smith 
and St. Alphonsus streets and Huntington avenue to its intersection with 
the line separating Ward Seven from Ward Foiirteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre hne of Ruggles street to its intersection with the line 
separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Fourteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
RaUroad, and by the centre line of Tremont street to the point of beginning 
— 536 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward Ijdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of SewaU street and 
Delle avenue; thence by the centre hne of Delle avenue, Bumey, Tremont, 
Worthington, Smith, Oregon, Conant, Parker, Tremont and SewaU streets 
to the point of beginning — 504 voters. 

Prec. 4. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Parker and 
Hillside streets; thence by the centre line of Hillside, Calumet, St. 
Alphonsus, Tremont and Burney streets, DeUe avenue, SewaU and Tremont 
streets to the line separating Ward Fourteen from Ward Fifteen; thence 
by said ward hne by the centre line of location of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad and by the centre hne of Cedar, Terrace, 
AUeghany and Parker streets to the point of beginning — 515 voters. 

Prec. 5. — AU that part of said ward lying within the foUowing 
described line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Oswald 
and HiUside streets; thence by the centre line of Hillside street, Parker Hill 
and Huntington avenues, Kempton street and Fenwood road, Himtington 
avenue, Tremont, St. Alphonsus, Calmnet and Oswald streets to the point 
of beginning — 498 voters. 

Prec. 6. — AU that part of said ward Ijdng within the foUowing described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Heath and Lawn 
streets; thence by the centre line of Lawn and Bucknam streets, Fisher 
and Parker Hill avenues, Darhng, Hillside, Oswald, Calumet, HiUside, 
Parker, Alleghany, Terrace and Cedar streets to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Fourteen from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad and by the centre line of New Heath and Heath streets to its 
intersection with the centre Une of Bickford street; thence continuing by 
the centre line of Heath street to the point of beginning — 535 voters. 

Prec. 7. — AU that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Day street and 
Grotto Glen; thence by the centre line of Grotto Glen and Grotto Glen 
extended to its intersection with the centre line of Cranford street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line of Cranford street and by the centre 
line of Floyd street, South Himtington avenue and Craft street, Jamaica 



206 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

way, Huntington and Parker HiU avenues, HiUside and Darling streets, 
Parker HiU and Fisher avenues, Bucknam, Lawn, Heath and Day streets 
to the point of beginning — 460 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line separating Ward Fourteen 
from Ward Fifteen and the centre line of Suimyside street; thence by the 
centre line of Sunnyside, Creighton, Day and Heath streets to the line 
separating Ward Fourteen from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Bickford, Minden, Gay Head and Centre streets to the 
point of beginning — • 436 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Sunnyside street and 
the line separating Ward Fourteen from Wards Fifteen and Twenty-two; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Centre, Perkins and Chestnut 
streets to the boundary line between the city of Boston and the town of 
Brookline; thence by said boimdary line to its intersection with the centre 
Une of Huntington avenue; thence by the centre line of Huntington avenue, 
Jamaicawaj^ Craft street. South Huntington avenue, Floyd street and the 
centre line of Cranford street extended to its intersection with the centre 
line of Grotto Glen extended; thence by said extended centre line and by 
the centre line of Grotto Glen, Day, Creighton and Sunnyside streets to the 
point of beginning — 450 voters. 

WARD FIFTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, ROXBURY STREET TO FRANKLIN PARK.) 

9 Precincts — 4,497 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Highland and 
Cedar streets; thence by the centre line of Cedar street, Columbus avenue 
and New Heath street to its intersection with the line separating Ward 
Fourteen from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line 
of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Fifteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Columbus avenue, Roxbury street, 
across John Eliot square, Bartlett street and Lambert avenue to its inter- 
section with the centre hue of Millmont street; thence by the centre line of 
Millmont and Highland streets to the point of beginning — 492 voters. 

Prec. 2. — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
MarceUa streets; thence by the centre line of Marcella, Highland and 
Millmont streets to the line separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Fifteen; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Lambert avenue and Cedar 
street to the line separating Ward Fifteen from Ward Sixteen; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of Washington street to a point opposite 
the centre Une of Elmore street; thence continuing by the centre line of 
Washington street to the point of beginning — 514 voters. 

Prec. 3. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Ritchie street and 
the location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad; thence by 
said centre Une of location and the centre line of New Heath street, Colum- 
bus avenue. Cedar, Highland, MarceUa and Ritchie streets to the point 
of beginning — 577 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Priesiag and Mozart 
streets; thence by the centre line of Mozart and Centre streets to the line 
separatkig Ward Fourteen from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward line by 
the centre Une of Gay Head, Minden, Bickford, Heath and New Heath 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 15. 207 

streets to its intersection with the centre line of location of the NewYork 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad ; thence by said centre line of location to 
its intersection with the centre line of Roys street extended; thence by 
said extended centre line and the centre line of Roys and Priesing streets 
to the point of beginning — ■ 541 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of location of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad with the centre line of Paul Gore 
street extended; thence by said extended centre line and centre line of Paul 
Gore street, Chestnut avenue and Forbes street to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Fourteen from Ward Fifteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of Centre street to its intersection with the centre 
line of Mozart street; thence by the centre Une of Mozart, Priesing and 
Roys streets and the centre line of Roys street extended to its intersection 
■^vnth the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad; thence by said centre hne of location to the point of beginning — 
511 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward Ijang within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
Bradgon streets; thence by the centre line of Bragdon, Amory and Atherton 
streets to its intersection with the centre hne of location of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location 
and the centre line of Ritchie_, Marcella and Washington streets to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Fifteen from Ward Sixteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Elmore street and Walnut avenue 
to its intersection with the centre hne of Cobden street; thence by the 
centre Une of Cobden and Washington streets to the point of beginning — 
494 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of West Walnut park 
and Bancroft street; thence by the centre line of Bancroft street and said 
centre Une extended across Columbus avenue to its intersection with the 
centre line of Bragdon street; thence by the centre line of Bragdon, Wash- 
ington and Cobden streets to its intersection with the Une separating 
Ward Fifteen from Wards Sixteen and Twenty-two; thence by said ward 
Une by the centre Une of Walnut avenue, Iffley road and Washington 
street to its intersection with the centre line of Boylston street; thence 
continuing by the centre line of Washington street and by the centre Une 
of Columbus avenue and West Walnut park to the point of beginning 
— 436 voters. 

Prec. 8. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Columbus avenue 
and Washington street; thence by the centre line of Washington street 
to the line separating Ward Fifteen from Ward Twenty-two; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of Boylston street to its intersection with 
the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road ; thence by said centre line of location and by the centre line of Ather- 
ton, Amory, Bragdon, Bancroft, West Walnut park and Columbus avenue 
to the point of beginning — 414 voters. 

Prec. 9. — ■ AU that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Une of Paul Gore street 
extended and the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre Une of location to its inter- 
section with the line separating Ward Fifteen from Ward Twenty-two; 
thence by said ward Une by the centre line of Boylston and Centre streets 
to its intersection with the line separating Ward Fifteen from Wards 
Fourteen and Twenty-two; thence by said ward Une by the centre line of 
Centre street to its intersection with the centre line of Forbes street; thence 



208 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

by the centre line of Forbes street, Chestnut avenue and Paul Gore street 
and the centre line of Paul Gore street extended to the point of beginning 
• — 518 voters. 

WARD SIXTEEN. 

(ROXBURY DISTRICT, MORELAND STREET TO FRANKLIN PARK.) 

9 Precincts — 4,600 Voters. 

Prec. 1. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Clifford and Warren 
streets; thence by the centre hne of Warren street to the line, at Walnut 
avenue, separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Sixteen; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Warren street to its intersection with the 
line separating Ward Twelve from Ward Sixteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre hne of Moreland street and Blue Hill avenue to the line, 
opposite West Cottage street, separating Ward Sixteen from Ward Seven- 
teen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to 
its intersection with the centre line of Clifford street; thence by the centre 
hne of Clifford street to the point of beginning — 525 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Begiiming at the intersection of the centre lines of Catawba and 
Laurel streets; thence by the centre line of Laurel, Dale and Regent streets 
to the line separating Ward Thirteen from Ward Sixteen; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Regent and Circuit streets and Walnut 
avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Warren street; thence 
by said centre line of Warren street. Dale, Sherman and Catawba streets 
to the point of beginning — 517 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dale and Laurel 
streets; thence by the centre line of Laurel and Bower streets. Walnut 
avenue, Harold and Munroe streets to the line separating Ward Fifteen 
from Ward Sixteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Elmore 
street and Washington street to the hne separating Ward Thirteen from 
Ward Sixteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Hulbert 
street to its intersection with the centre line of Regent street; thence by 
the centre line of Regent and Dale streets to the point of beginning — 
515 voters. 

Prec. 4. — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Savin and Warren 
streets; thence by the centre line of Warren, Bower, Sherman, Dale and 
Clifford streets to the line separating Ward Sixteen from Ward Seyeriteen; 
thence by said ward hne by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Savin street; thence by the centre line of 
Savin street to the point of beginning — 532 voters. 

Prec. 5. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Warren and Mun- 
roe streets; thence by the centre line of Munroe street, Humboldt avenue 
and Harrishof street to the line separating Ward Fifteen from Ward_ Sixteen; 
thence by said ward Une by the centre line of Walnut avenue to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Munroe street; thence by the centre line of 
Munroe and Harold streets. Walnut avenue. Bower, Laurel, Catawba, 
Sherman, Bower and Warren streets to the point of beginning — 513 
voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Gaston and Warren 
streets; thence by the centre hne of Warren and Wyoming streets, Hum- 
boldt avenue, Munroe, Warren and Savin streets to the line separating 
Ward Sixteen from Wards Seventeen and Eighteen; thence by said ward 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 17. 209 

line by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to its intersection with the 
centre line of Otisfield street; thence by the centre line of Otisfield and 
Gaston streets to the point of beginning — 483 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Georgia street 
and Ekn Hill avenue; thence by the centre line of Elm Hill avenue, Craw- 
ford street, Humboldt avenue, Wyoming, Warren, Gaston and Otisfield 
streets to the line separating Ward Sixteen from Ward Eighteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Blue HiU avenue to its intersection 
with the centre line of Georgia street; thence by the centre line of Georgia 
street to the point of beginning — 528 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Homestead and 
Harold streets; thence by the centre line of Harold street to the line 
separating Ward Sixteen from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of Seaver street to the line separating Ward Fifteen 
from Ward Sixteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Walnut 
avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Harrishof street; thence 
by the centre liiie of Harrishof street, Humboldt avenue and Homestead 
street to the point of beginning — 492 voters. 

Prec. 9. — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Harold and 
Homestead streets; thence by the centre line of Homestead street, Hum- 
boldt avenue, Crawford street, Ehn Hill avenue and Georgia street to the 
line separating Ward Sixteen from Wards Eighteen and Nineteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to the hne separa- 
ting Ward Sixteen from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward line by 
the centre line of Seaver street to its intersection with the centre Une of 
Harold street; thence by the centre line of Harold street to the point of 
beginning — 495 voters. 

WARD SEVENTEEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, BLUE HILL AVENUE TO SAVIN HILL.) 

9 Precincts — 4,423 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward Isdng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Rand and Fair- 
bury streets; thence by the centre line of Fairbury street to the line separa- 
ting Ward Sixteen from Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Blue Hill avenue to the line separating Ward Twelve from 
Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of West 
Cottage and Dudley streets to its intersection with the centre line of 
Folsom street; thence by the centre line of Folsom and Woodward Park 
streets, Howard avenue, Julian, Judson, Brookford and Rand streets to 
the point of beginning — 436 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Fairbury and 
Rand streets; thence by the centre Une of Rand, Brookford, Judson and 
Julian streets, Howard avenue. Woodward Park street, Folsom, Robin 
Hood, Hartford and Wayland streets, Howard avenue and Dewey street 
to the line separating Ward Sixteen from Ward Seventeen; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to its intersection 
with the centre hne of Fairbiiry street; thence by the centre Une of Fair- 
bury street to the point of beginning — ■ 448 voters. 

Prec. 3. — • All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une : Beginning at the intersection of the centre fines of Dewey street and 
Howard avenue; thence by the centre line of Howard avenue, Wayland, 
Bird and Magnolia streets to the line separating Ward Seventeen from 



210 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward hne by the centre line of Quincy, 
Mascoma and Fayston streets to the line separating Ward Sixteen from 
Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Blue Hill 
avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Dewey street; thence by 
the centre line of Dewey street to the point of beginning — 421 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Magnoha and 
Bird streets; thence by the centre line of Bird, Wayland, Hartford, Robin 
Hood and Folsom streets to the line separating Ward Twelve from Ward 
Seventeen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Dudley street 
to its intersection •nith the centre line of location of the Midland Division 
of the New York, New Haven &.Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre 
line of location to the line separating Ward Seventeen from Ward Eighteen; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Quincy street to a point 
opposite Magnolia street; thence by the centre line of Magnolia street to 
the point of beginning — 422 voters. 

Prec. 5. — • All that part of said ward l5dng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Columbia road 
and Glendale street; thence by the centre line of Glgndale and Bird 
streets to its intersection with the centre line of location of the Midland 
Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by 
said centre line of location to the line separating Ward Eleven from Ward 
Seventeen ; thence by said ward Une by the centre line of Dudley, Stough- 
ton and Pleasant streets to a point in Pleasant street opposite the centre 
line of Thornley street; thence continuing by the centre line of Pleasant 
street and by the centre line of Sawyer avenue and Gushing avenue, 
Jerome and Bird streets and Columbia road to the point of beginning — 
567 voters. 

Prec. 6. — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Glendale street 
and Columbia road ; thence by the centre line of Columbia road. Bird and 
Jerome streets. Gushing avenue, Rowell, Hancock and Howe streets and 
the centre line of Howe street extended to its intersection with the centre 
line of Hendry street extended; thence by said extended centre line of 
Hendry street and the centre line of Hendry and Clarkson streets to the 
line separating Ward Seventeen from Ward Eighteen; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Quincy street to its intersection with the 
centre line of location of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and by the 
centre line of Bird and Glendale streets to the point of beginning — 530 
voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centra lines of Clarkson and 
Hendry streets; thence by the centre line of Hendry street and said centre 
line extended to its intersection with the centre line of Howe street extended; 
thence by the centre line of Howe street extended and by the centre line 
of Howe, Hancock and Rowell streets, Gushing avenue, Sawyer avenue 
and Pleasant street, Melvinside terrace and Dorchester avenue to the line 
separating Ward Seventeen from Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of East, Highland and Church streets, the centre 
line of Church street extended across Eaton square, and by the centre line 
of Bowdoin and Quincy streets to its intersection with the centre line of 
Clarkson street; thence by the centre line of Clarkson street to the point 
of beginning — 563 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward l5dng within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Savin Hill avenue 
and Pleasant street; thence by the centre line of Pleasant street to the 
line separating Ward Eleven from Ward Seventeen; thence by said ward 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 18. 211 

line by the centre line of Thornley street, Dorchester avenue, Belfort, 
Saxton and Romsey streets and the centre line of Romsey street extended 
to the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and by the centre hne of 
Savin Hill avenue to the point of beginning — 526 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Dorchester avenue 
and the centre line of Melvinside terrace; thence by the centre line of 
Melvinside terrace, Pleasant street and Savin HiU avenue to its inter- 
section with the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Romsey street extended; thence by said 
centre line extended to the high water mark; thence by a straight line 
drawn from said high water mark through a point lying midway between 
Fox Point at the extreme end of Savin Hill and the south corner of the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company property at the Calf Pastiu^e to the 
harbor line; thence by said harbor line to its intersection with the line 
separating Ward Seventeen from Ward Twenty; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad to the line separating Ward Seventeen from Ward Eighteen; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Freeport street to its inter- 
section with the centre Une of Dorchester avenue; thence by the centre 
line of Dorchester avenue to the point of beginning — 510 voters. 

WARD EIGHTEEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, GROVE HALL TO FIELD'S CORNER.) 

9 Precincts — 4,466 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Devon street and 
Columbia road; thence by the centre line of Columbia road and the 
centre hne of the roadway opposite the centre line of Columbia terrace 
to its intersection with the centre line of Richfield street; thence by the 
centre line of Richfield street, Richfield park and the centre line of Rich- 
field park extended to the centre line of Rock terrace; thence by the 
centre line of Rock terrace, Olney and Everton streets to the line sepa- 
rating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Geneva avenue to the line separating Ward Sixteen 
from Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward line by the centre hne of Blue 
HiU avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Devon street; thence 
by the centre line of Devon street to the point of begiiming — 481 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre fines of Columbia road 
and Devon street; thence by the centre line of Devon street to the line 
separating Ward Sixteen from Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to the line separating Ward Seven- 
teen from Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward line by the centre fine 
of Fayston, Mascoma and Quincy streets to its intersection with the 
centre line of location of the Midland Division of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location to the 
centre line of the roadway opposite the centre fine of Columbia terrace; 
thence by the centre line of said roadway to its intersection with the centre 
fine of Columbia road; thence by the centre line of Columbia road to the 
point of beginning — 540 voters. 

Prec. 3. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
fine: Begiiming at the intersection of the centre lines of Coleman and 
Hamilton streets; thence by the centre line of Hamilton, Clarkson, Barry 
and Richfield streets to a point in said Richfield street opposite the centre 



212 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

line of Columbia terrace; thence by the centre line of the roadway oppo- 
site Columbia terrace to its intersection mth the centre line of location of 
the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence by said centre line of location to the line separating Ward Seven- 
teen from Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
Quincy street to its intersection with the centre line of Coleman street; 
thence by the centre Une of Coleman street to the point of beginning — 
472 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Topliff street and 
Homes avenue; thence by the centre line of Homes and Geneva avenues 
to the line separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by 
said ward Une by the centre line of Geneva avenue to its intersection with 
'the centre line of Everton street; thence by the centre line of Everton 
and Olney streets and Rock terrace to its intersection with the centre line 
of Richfield park extended; thence by said extended centre line of Rich- 
field park, and the centre line of Richfield park, Richfield, Barry, Clark- 
son, Hamilton, Stonehurst and Topliff streets to the point of beginning — 
482 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Draper and 
Ridgewood streets; thence by the centre line of Ridgewood, Topliff, 
Stonehurst, Hamilton and Bowdoin streets and Mt. Ida road to the line 
of Ronan park; thence by said line of Ronan park to its intersection with 
the centre line of Homes avenue; thence by the centre line of Homes 
avenue and Draper street to the point of beginning — 481 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Leedsville and 
Adams streets; thence by the centre line of Adams street and Homes 
avenue to the line of Ronan park ; thence by said line of Ronan park to its 
intersection with the centre line of Percival street; thence by the centre 
line of Percival and Marie streets, Mt. Ida road, Bowdoin, Hamilton and 
Coleman streets to the line separating Ward Seventeen from Ward Eight- 
een; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Quincy and Bowdoin 
streets, across Eaton square, and by the cehtre line of Church, Highland, 
East and Freeport streets to its intersection with the centre line of Ellsworth 
street; thence by the centre line of Ellsworth street, Dorchester avenue 
and Leedsville street to the point of beginning — 508 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Adams and 
Leedsville streets; thence by the centre line of LeedsviUe street, Dorchester 
avenue and Ellsworth street to the line separating Ward Seventeen from 
Ward Eighteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Freeport 
street to the line separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Twenty; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad and the centre line of location of the Shawmut Branch 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to the line separating 
Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by said ward line by the centre 
line of Geneva avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Charles 
street; thence by the centre line of Charles street, Dorchester avenue 
and Adams street to the point of beginning — 515 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dorchester avenue 
and Charles street; thence by the centre line of Charles street to the line 
separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Geneva avenue to its intersection with the centre 
line of Dakota street; thence continuing by the centre line of Geneva 
avenue and by the centre line of Topliff, Ridgewood and Draper streets 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 19. 213 

and Homes avenue to the line of Ronan park; thence by said Hne of Ronan 
park to its intersection with the centre line of Mt. Ida road; thence by 
the centre line of Mt. Ida road, Marie and Percival streets to the line of 
Ronan park; thence by said line of Ronan park and by the centre line of 
Homes avenue, Adams street and Dorchester avenue to the point of 
beginning — 532 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Topliff street and 
Geneva avenue; thence by the centre line of Geneva avenue to the line 
separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Dakota, Claybourne and Bowdoin streets to its 
intersection with the centre line of Geneva avenue; thence by the centre 
line of Geneva avenue and Homes avenue and Topliff street to the point 
of beginning — 455 voters. 

WARD NINETEEN. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, FRANKLIN PARK TO DORCHESTER CENTRE.) 

9 Precincts — 4,322 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Erie and Wolcott 
streets; thence by the centre line of Wolcott street and Columbia road to 
the line separating Ward Nineteen from Wards Twenty-two and Sixteen; 
thence by said ward hne by the centre hne of Blue Hill avenue to the line 
separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of Geneva avenue to its intersection with the centre line 
of location of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and by the centre 
line of Erie street to the point of beginning — 518 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Harvard and 
Waterlow streets; thence by .the centre Hne of Waterlow, Shafter and Vas- 
sar streets and the centre line of Vassar street extended to its intersection 
with the centre line of location of the Midland Division of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location 
to the line separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of Geneva avenue and Bowdoin street 
to its intersection with the centre line of Claybourne street; thence con- 
tinuing by the centre line of Bowdoin street and by the centre line of 
Harvard street to the point of beginning — 477 voters. 

Prec. 3. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Harvard and Green- 
wood streets ; thence by the centre line of Greenwood, Maybrook, Glenway, 
Fowler and McLellan streets to the hne separating Ward Nineteen from 
Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward line by the centre Une of Blue 
Hill avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Columbia road; 
thence by the centre line of Columbia road, Wolcott and Erie streets to 
its intersection with the centre line of location of the Midland Division 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre 
line of location and by the centre hne of Harvard street to the point of 
beginning — 487 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Greenwood and 
Harvard streets; thence by the centre hne of Harvard street to the hne 
separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Twenty-two and Ward Twenty- 
one; thence by said ward line by the centre Une of Blue Hill avenue to its 
intersection with the centre line of McLellan street; thence by the centre 



214 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

line of McLellan, Fowler, Glenway, Maybrook and Greenwood streets 
to the point of beginning — 497 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Harvard street and 
the centre line of location of the Midland Division of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre hne of location to the 
Une separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Twenty-one; thence by said 
ward hne by the centre line of Talbot avenue to its intersection with the 
centre hne of Harvard street; thence by the centre line of Harvard street 
to the point of beginning — 521 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
School streets; thence by the centre line of School, Athelwold, Thane and 
Park streets and the centre line of location of the Midland Division of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with the 
centre line of Vassar street extended; thence by said extended centre line 
and by the centre Une of Vassar, Shafter, Waterlow, Harvard and Bowdoin 
streets to the line separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Eighteen; thence 
by said ward line by the centre hne of Claybourne street to its intersection 
with the centre line of Dakota street; thence by the centre line of Dakota 
street and Washington street to the point of beginning — 468 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
Rosedale streets; thence by the centre line of Rosedale and Whitfield 
streets to the line separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Twenty-one; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of Talbot avenue to its inter- 
section with the centre line of location of the Midland Division of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of 
location and by the centre line of Park, Thane, Athelwold, School and 
Washington streets to the point of beginning — 461 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Whitfield and 
Rosedale streets; thence by the centre line of Rosedale, Washington and 
Park streets to the line separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Twenty; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of location of the Shawmut 
Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad and by the 
centre line of Centre street to the line separating Ward Nineteen from 
Ward Twenty-one; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Talbot 
avenue to its intersection with the centre line of Whitfield street; thence 
by the centre line of Whitfield street to the point of beginning — 445 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Park and Wash- 
ington streets; thence by the centre line of Washington and Dakota streets 
to the line separating Ward Eighteen from Ward Nineteen; thence by said 
ward hne by continuing by the centre Une of Dakota street and by the 
centre line of Geneva avenue to the line separating Ward Nineteen from 
Ward Twenty; thence by said ward line by the centre line of the Shawmut 
Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Raihoad to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Park street; thence by the centre hne of 
Park street to the point of beginning — 448 voters. 

WARD TWENTY. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, ASHMONT TO NEPONSET RIVER.) 

9 Precincts — 4,359 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hues of Pope's Hill street 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 20. 215 

and Neponset avenue; thence by the centre line of Neponset avenue, King 
and Adam streets to the line separating Ward Twenty from Wards Seven- 
teen and Eighteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of location 
of the Shawmut Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad 
and by the centre line of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RaUroad 
location to its intersection with the centre line of Greenwich street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line to its intersection with the harbor line ; 
thence by said harbor hne to a point in same opposite the centre of the 
draw in Commercial Point bridge; thence by a line to the centre of the 
draw in said bridge and at right angles thereto; thence by the centre line 
of said bridge and the centre line of Freeport street (lower level) to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Pope's Hall street extended; thence by said 
extended centre line and the centre line of Pope's Hill street to the point 
of beginning — 524 voters. 

Prec. 2. — • All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Adams and Park- 
man streets; thence by the centre line of Parkman street, Dorchester and 
Melville avenues to the line separating Ward Twenty from Wards Nine- 
teen and Eighteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of location 
of the Shawmut Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
to its intersection with the centre line of Adams street; thence by the centre 
line of Adams street to the point of beginning — 446 voters. 

Prec. 3. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Adams and King 
streets; thence by the centre line of King street, Dorchester and Centre 
avenues and Centre street to the line separating Ward Nineteen from Ward 
Twenty; thence by said ward line to its intersection with the centre hne 
of Melville avenue; thence by the centre line of Melville and Dorchester 
avenues, Parkman and Adams streets to the point of beginning — 463 
voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Centre and Dor- 
chester avenues; thence by the centre line of Dorchester avenue to the line 
separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Ashmont and Ocean streets, WeUes avenue 
and Washington street to the line separating Ward Nineteen from Ward 
Twenty; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Centre street to 
the Shawmut Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence continuing by the centre line of Centre street and Centre avenue 
to the point of beginning — 459 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Ashmont and 
Adams streets; thence by the centre Une of Adams, Mallet, Florida and 
Edwin streets, Dorchester avenue, King street, Neponset avenue and Ash- 
mont street to the point of beginning — 497 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Neponset avenue 
and Pope's HiU street; thence by the centre hne of Pope's Hill street and 
said centre line extended to its intersection with the centre line of Freeport 
street (lower level) ; thence by said centre line of Freeport street to Com- 
mercial Point bridge; thence by the centre line of said bridge to the 
centre of the draw in said bridge; thence by a straight line drawn at 
right angles to said bridge to the harbor line; thence by said harbor hne to 
its intersection with the northeasterly line of location of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said northeasterly hne of 
location to its intersection with the boundary Une between the city of 
Boston and the city of Quincy; thence by said boundary line, through 
Neponset river to its intersection with the centre line of the draw in Nepon- 



216 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

set bridge; thence by the centre line of said bridge and by the centre Hne of 
Neponset avenue to the point of beginning — 439 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward hong within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Ashmont street 
and Neponset avenue; thence by the centre line of Neponset avenue and 
Neponset bridge to the centre of the draw in same; thence by the boundary 
line, through Neponset river, between the city of Boston and the city of 
Quincy to its intersection with the centre hne of Granite avenue bridge; 
thence by the centre line of said bridge and by the centre line of Granite 
avenue, Adams and Ashmont streets to the point of beginning — • 466 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Adams and Beau- 
mont streets ; thence by the centre line of Beaumont, Carruth and Rowena 
streets and the centre line of Rowena street extended across the location of 
the Shawmut Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
to the centre line of Fuller street; thence by the centre line of Fuller street 
to the line separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; thence by 
said ward hne by the centre hne of Dorchester avenue to its intersection 
with the centre line of Ashmont street; thence continuing by the centre 
line of Dorchester avenue and by the centre line of Edwin, Florida, MaUet 
and Adams streets to the point of beginning — 551 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Beaumont and 
Adams streets; thence by the centre line of Adams street and Granite 
avenue to the line separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; 
thence by said ward line by the centre line of location of the Milton Branch 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre 
line of location to its intersection with the centre line of Mellish road; 
thence by the centre line of Melhsh road to its intersection with the centre 
hne of Adams street; thence bj'^ the centre line of Adams street to a point 
in the same opposite the southerly boimdary of Dorchester park; thence 
by said southerly boxmdary to its intersection with the centre line of Dor- 
chester avenue; thence by the centre line of Dorchester avenue to its 
intersection with the centre hne of Full er street ; thence by the centre line 
of Fuller street and said centre hne extended across the location of the 
Shawmut Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to the 
centre hne of Rowena street ; thence by the centre line of Rowena, Carruth 
and Beaumont streets to the point of beginning — 514 voters. 

WARD TWENTY-ONE. 

(DORCHESTER DISTRICT, FRANKLIN PARK TO LOWER MILLS.) 

9 Precincts — ^4,123 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Lucerne and 
Morton streets; thence by the centre line of Morton street to the line 
separating Ward Twenty-one from Ward Twenty-two ; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of Canterbiu-y street to the line separating Ward 
Nineteen from Ward Twenty-one; thence by said ward line by the centre 
hne of Blue Hill avenue to a point in the same opposite the centre line of 
Talbot avenue; thence continuing by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to 
its intersection with the centre line of Stratton street ; thence by the centre 
line of Stratton and Lucerne streets to the point of beginning — 492 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Kne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Morton and Norfolk 
streets; thence by the centre line of Norfolk and Walk Hill streets to the 
line separating Ward Twenty-one from Ward Twenty-four; thence by said 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 21. 217 

ward line by the centre line of Walk Hill street to the line separating Ward 
Twenty-one from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward line by the 
centre Une of Canterbury street to its intersection with the centre line of 
Morton street; thence by the centre line of Morton street to the point of 
beginning — ■ 449 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of the Midland Divi- 
sion of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and Morton 
street; thence by the centre line of Morton, Lucerne, Stratton, Lyford, 
Callender and Boyden streets and Woodrow avenue to the centre line of 
location of the above mentioned railroad; thence by said centre line of 
location to the point of beginning — 455 voters. 

Prec, 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Wentworth and 
Norfolk streets; thence by the centre line of Norfolk street, Woodrow 
avenue, Boyden, Callender, Lyford and Stratton streets and Blue Hill 
avenue to the line separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Twenty-one; 
thence by said ward line by the centre Une of Talbot avenue to the line 
separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of Washington street to a point in the same opposite 
the centre Une of Welles avenue; thence continuing by the centre line of 
Washington street and by the centre line of Torrey and Wentworth streets 
to the point of beginning — 443 voters. 

Prec. 5. — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Milton avenue and 
Selden street; thence by the centre Une of Selden and Morton streets to 
its intersection with the centre line of location of the Midland Division of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line 
of location and by the centre line of Woodrow avenue, Norfolk and Edson 
streets and Milton avenue to the point of beginning — 508 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washington and 
Rockwell streets; thence by the centre line of Rockwell street, Milton 
avenue, Edson, Norfolk, Wentworth, Torrey and Washington streets to 
the line separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Welles avenue and Ocean street to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Burt street; thence by the centre line of 
Burt and Washington streets to the point of beginning — 471 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dorchester avenue 
and Richmond street ; thence by the centre line of Richmond, Washington 
and Codman streets to its intersection with the centre line of Milton 
avenue extended; thence by said extended centre line and by the centre 
line of Milton avenue, RockweU, Washington and Burt streets to the line 
separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; thence by said ward 
line by the centre line of Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue to a point 
in the same opposite the southerly boundary of Dorchester park; thence 
continuing by the centre line of Dorchester avenue to the point of begin- 
ning — 439 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of River and Idaho 
streets; thence by the centre Une of Idaho street and the centre Une of 
Manchester street extended to its intersection with the centre line of 
Groveland street; thence by the centre line of Groveland street and the 
centre Une of Board of Survey Street No. 511 to its intersection with the 
centre line of Morton street; thence by the centre line of Morton, Oak- 
ridge, Codman, Washington and Richmond streets and Dorchester avenue 
to the line separating Ward Twenty from Ward Twenty-one; thence by 



218 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

said ward line by the southerly boundary of Dorchester park to a point 
in the centre line of Adams street opposite the centre line of MeUish road; 
thence by the centre line of MeUish road to the intersection with the 
centre line of location of the Milton Branch of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Granite avenue bridge; thence by said 
centre line to the centre of the draw in said bridge ; thence by the boundary 
line, through Neponset River, between the city of Boston and the city of 
Quincy and the town of Milton to its intersection with the centre line of 
Groveland street extended; thence by said extended centre line and by the 
centre line of River street to the point of beginning — 441 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying Tvithin the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Idaho and River 
streets; thence by the centre line of River street to its intersection with 
the centre line of Groveland street extended; thence by said centre line 
extended to its intersection with the boundary line, in Neponset River, 
between the city of Boston and the town of Milton; thence by said boundary 
line, through Neponset River, to the line separating Ward Twenty-one 
from Ward Twenty-four; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
Blue Hills parkway and Blue Hill avenue to its intersection with the centre 
line of Walk Hill street; thence by the centre line of Walk Hill, Norfolk, 
Morton and Seldon streets and Milton avenue and said centre line extended 
to its intersection with the centre line of Codman street; thence by the 
centre line of Oakridge and Morton streets, Board of Survey street No. 511 
and Groveland street to its intersection with the centre line of Manchester 
street extended; thence by said extended centre line and by the centre 
line of Idaho street to the point of beginning — 427 voters. 



WARD TWENTY-TWO. 

(JAMAICA PLAIN AND FOREST HILLS.) 

9 Precincts — 4,416 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Chestnut avenue 
and Fessenden street; thence by the centre line of Fessenden street and 
the centre line of Fessenden street extended across Rockview street to 
its intersection with the centre line of Parley avenue; thence by the centre 
line of Parley avenue. Parley vale (northerly roadway). Parley avenue. 
Centre street, Lochstead avenue and Jamaicaway to the line separating 
Ward Fourteen from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Perkins street to the line separating Ward Fifteen from 
Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Centre 
and Boylston streets to its intersection with the centre line of location of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre 
line of location and by the centre line of Helena, Lamartine and Hubbard 
streets and Chestnut avenue to the point of beginning — 519 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Starr lane and 
Centre street; thence by the centre line of Centre and Pond streets, 
Jamaicaway, Lochstead avenue. Centre street. Parley avenue. Parley 
vale (northerly roadway). Parley avenue and said avenue extended across 
Rockview street to its intersection with the centre line of Fessenden 
street; thence by the centre line of Fessenden street, Chestnut avenue, 
Hubbard, Lamartine and Helena streets to its intersection with the centre 
line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
thence by said centre line of location to its intersection with the centre 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 22. 219 

line of Gordon street extended; thence by said extended centre line and 
by the centre line of Gordon street, Seaverns avenue and Starr lane to the 
point of beginning — 512 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Peter Parley road 
and Forest HiUs street; thence by the centre line of Forest Hills street, 
Sylvia, Washington and Ophir streets, Brookside avenue. Green street 
and the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad to the line separating Ward Twenty-two from Wards Fifteen and 
Sixteen; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Boylston and 
Washington streets, Iffley road. Walnut avenue, Seaver street to the line 
separating Ward Nineteen from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said 
ward line by the centre line of Blue Hill avenue to the line separating Ward 
Twenty-one from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward line by the 
centre line of Canterbury street and the entrance from Canterbury street 
to Circuit drive in Franklin Park; thence through Franklin Park by the 
centre line of Circuit drive and Pierpont road to a point in the centre 
line of Walnut avenue opposite the centre line of Peter Parley road; thence 
by the centre line of Peter Parley road to the point of beginning — 548 
voters. 

Prec. 4. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Forest Hills street 
and Brook road; thence by the centre line of Brook road, Lotus place, 
Washington street, Arborway, the centre line of location of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Green street, Brookside avenue, Ophir, 
Washington, Sylvia and Forest Hills streets, Peter Parley road to a point 
in Walnut avenue opposite said centre line of Peter Parley road; thence 
through Franklin Park, by the centre line of Pierpont road and Circuit 
drive to the entrance to said drive leading from Canterbury street; thence 
by said entrance to the hne separating Ward Twenty-one from Ward 
Twenty-two; thence by said ward hne by the centre line of Canterbury 
street to its intersection with the centre line of Morton street; thence by 
the centre line of Morton street to Scarboro entrance to Franklin Park; 
thence through said park by the centre line of Scarboro entrance. Cir- 
cuit drive and Forest HiUs entrance to its intersection with the centre 
Hne of Forest Hills street; thence by the centre hne of Forest Hills street 
to the point of beginning — 503 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Call and Child 
streets; thence by the centre hne of Child, South, Custer, Goldsmith and 
Centre streets, Starr lane, Seaverns avenue, Gordon street and the centre 
hne of Gordon street extended to its iQtersection with the centre line of 
location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by 
said centre line of location to its intersection with the centre line of Keyes 
street; thence by the centre line of Keyes and Call streets to the point 
of beginning — 508 voters. 

Prec. 6. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hnes of Anson and South 
streets; thence by the centre hne of South street, the centre line of the 
easterly drive of the Arborway, in Arnold Arboretum, to its intersection 
with the centre line of Centre street; thence by the centre line of Centre, 
Goldsmith, Custer, South, Child, Call and Keyes streets and the centre 
line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its 
intersection with the centre line of Percy street extended; thence by said 
extended centre line and by the centre hne of Percy and Anson streets to 
the point of beginning — 542 voters. 

Prec. 7.— All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Centre street and 



220 MUNICIPAL EEGISTER. 

the line separating Ward Twenty-two from Ward Twenty-three; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Allandale street to its intersection 
with the boundary Une between the city of Boston and the town of Brook- 
line; thence by said boundary line to the line separating Ward Fourteen 
from Ward Twenty-two; thence by said ward hne by the centre line of 
Chestnut and Perkins streets, Jamaicaway, Pond and Centre streets to 
the point of beginning — 435 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward l3^ing within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Mnes of Walk Hill and 
Wachusett streets; thence by the centre line of Wachusett and Weld Hill 
streets, Hyde Park avenue and Walk Hill street to its intersection with 
the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and by the centre line of 
location of the West Roxbury Branch of the above named railroad to the 
line separating Ward Twenty-two from Ward Twenty-three; thence by 
said ward Une by the centre Une of South, Bussey, Walter and Centre 
streets to a point in Centre street opposite the centre line of AUandale 
street; thence continuing by the centre Une of Centre street to its inter- 
section with the centre line of the easterly drive of the Arborway; thence 
by said easterly drive to its intersection with the centre Une of South 
street; thence by the centre Une of South, Anson and Percy streets and 
the centre line of Percy street extended to its intersection with the centre 
line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence 
by said centre line of location and by the centre line of Arborway, Wash- 
ington street, Lotus place, Brook road and Forest Hills street to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Forest Hills entrance to Franklin Park; 
thence through Franklin Park by said entrance and by the centre Une of 
Circuit drive and Scarboro entrance to its intersection with the centre 
line of Morton street; thence by the centre Une of Morton street to the 
line separating Ward Twenty-one from Ward Twenty-two; thence by 
said ward line by the centre Une of Canterbury street to the Une separating 
Ward Twenty-two from Ward Twenty-four; thence by said ward Une by 
the centre line of Walk Hill street to a point in the same opposite the 
centre line of Bourne street ; thence continuing by the centre Uiie of Walk 
HiU street to the point of beginning — 435 voters. 

Prec. 9. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Wachusett and 
Walk Hill streets ; thence by the centre Une of Walk HiU street to the Une 
separating Ward Twenty-two from Ward Twenty-four; thence by said 
ward line by the centre Une of Bourne street, Southbourne road, Florence 
street East and Stony Brook to its intersection with the Une separating 
Ward Twenty-two from Ward Twenty-three; thence by said ward Une 
by the centre Une of Whipple avenue, Washington and South streets to 
its intersection with the centre line of location of the West Roxbury Branch 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and by the centre 
Une of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its 
intersection with the centre line of Walk Hill street ; thence by the centre 
line of Walk HiU street, Hyde Park avenue. Weld HiU and Wachusett 
streets to the point of beginning — 414 voters. 

WARD TWENTY-THREE. 

(WEST ROXBURY DISTRICT, INCLUDING ROSLINDALE.) 

9 Precincts — 4,333 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 

line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Washmgton and 

Albano streets; thence by the centre line of Albano, Amherst, Haslet, 

Pinehurst and Penfield streets, Belgrade avenue and Robert street to its 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 23. 221 

intersection with the centre line of location of the West Roxbury Branch 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre 
line of location to the line separating Ward Twenty-two from Ward 
Twenty-three; thence by said ward line by the centre Line of South and 
Washington streets, Whipple avenue and Stony Brook to the line separating 
Ward Twenty-three from Ward Twenty-four; thence by said ward line 
by the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad to its intersection with the centre line of Ashland street; thence 
by the centre line of Ashland and Washington streets to the point of 
beginning — 513 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Metropolitan 
avenue and Washington street; thence by the centre line of Washington 
and Ashland streets to the line separating Ward Twenty-three from Ward 
Twenty-four; thence by said ward line by the centre line of location of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to the former boundary 
line between the city of Boston and the town of Hyde Park; thence by 
said former boundary line to its intersection with the centre line of Metro- 
politan avenue; thence by the centre line of Metropolitan avenue to the 
point of beginning — 493 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Metropolitan 
avenue with the former boundary Une between the city of Boston and the 
town of Hyde Park; thence by said former boundary line to its inter- 
section with the easterly boundary of Stony Brook Reservation; thence 
by said easterly boundary to its intersection with the centre line of Wash- 
ington street; thence by the centre line of Washington street to its inter- 
section with the centre line of West Roxbury parkway; thence by said 
centre line to its intersection with the centre line of Roslindale avenue 
extended; thence by said extended centre line and by the centre line of 
Roslindale and Dudley avenues, Pinehurst, Haslet, Amherst, Albano and 
Washington streets and MetropoUtan avenue to the point of beginning — 
422 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Dudley and 
Roslindale avenues; thence by the centre Une of Roslindale avenue and 
said centre line extended to its intersection with the centre line of West 
Roxbury parkway; thence by said centre line to its intersection with the 
centre line of Clement avenue extended; thence by said extended centre 
line and by the centre line of Clement and Anawan avenues and Beech 
street to its intersection with the centre Une of West Roxbury parkway; 
thence by said centre line of said parkway and by the centre line of loca- 
tion of the West Roxbury Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad to its intersection with the centre line of Walworth street; 
thence by the centre Une of Walworth street and Dudley avenue to the 
point of beginning — 470 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of location of the 
West Roxbury Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road with the centre line of the West Roxbury parkway; thence by the 
centre line of said parkway and the centre line of Weld street, Board of 
Survey street No. 1779, Fletcher, Centre, Farquhar and South streets 
and the centre line of location of the West Roxbury Branch of the above 
named railroad to its intersection with the centre Une of Robert street; 
thence by the centre line of Robert street, Belgrade avenue, Penfield and 
Pinehurst streets, Dudley avenue, Walworth street and the centre Une of 
location of the West Roxbury Branch of the above named railroad to the 
point of beginning — 487 voters. 



222 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of South and Farquhar 
streets ; thence by the centre line of Farquhar, Centre and Fletcher streets, 
Board of Survey street No. 1779, Weld and Church streets to the boundary 
line between the city of Boston and the town of Brookline; thence by 
said boundary line to its intersection with the line separating Ward Twenty- 
two from Ward Twenty-three; thence by said ward Une by the centre line 
of Allandale, Centre, Walter, Bussey and South streets to its intersection 
with the centre line of location of the West Roxbury Branch of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of 
location and by the centre line of South street to the point of beginning — 
499 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Centre and Spring 
streets; thence by the centre line of Spring street and the centre Une of 
location of the West Roxbury Branch of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad to its intersection wdth the centre Une of Dent street; 
thence by the centre line of Dent, Vermont, CarroU and Dent streets, 
Brook Farm road and Baker street to its intersection with the boundary 
line between the city of Boston and the city of Newton; thence bj^ said 
boundary line and by the boundary line between the city of Boston and 
the to\\Ti of Brookline to its intersection with the centre line of Church 
street; thence by the centre line of Church and Weld streets, the centre 
line of West Roxbury parkway and the centre line of Centre street to the 
point of beginning — 477 voters. 

Prec. 8. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hues of Washington and 
Grove streets; thence by the centre line of Grove street and Centre street 
to its intersection ^^dth the centre line of the West Roxbury parkway; 
thence by said centre line and the centre Une of Beech street, Anawan 
and Clement avenues, the centre Une of the West Roxbury parkway and 
the centre line of Washington street to its intersection with the easterly 
boundary of Stony Brook Reservation; thence by said easterly boundary 
to its intersection with the former boundary Une between the city of 
Boston and the town of Hyde Park; thence by said boundary line to its 
intersection with the westerly boundary of Stony Brook Reservation; 
thence by said westerly boundary line and by the centre Une of Washing- 
ton street to the point of beginning — 465 voters. 

Prec. 9. — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Une : Beginning at the intersection of the centre Unes of Spring and Centre 
streets; thence by the centre line of Centre, Grove and Washington streets 
to the westerly boundary of Stony Brook Reservation; thence by said 
westerly boundary to its intersection with the former boundary line between 
the city of Boston and the town of Hyde Park; thence by said former 
boundary line and by the boundary line between the city of Boston and 
the town of Dedham, in part through Charles river, by the boundary line 
between the city of Boston and the town of NeedUam, in Charles river, 
and by the boundary Une between the city of Boston and the city of 
Newton to its intersection with the centre Une of Baker street; thence by 
the centre line of Baker street, Brook Farm road. Dent, Carroll, Ver- 
mont, Dent and the centre Une of location of the West Roxbury Branch 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to its intersection with 
the centre Une of Spring street; thence by the centre Une of Spring street 
to the point of beginning — 507 voters. 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 24. 223 



WARD TWENTY-FOUR. 

(HYDE PARK DISTRICT, ALSO MATTAPAN, WEST.) 

8 Precincts — 3,789 Voters. 

Prec. 1. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Harvard and 
Ashland streets; thence by the centre Une of Ashland and Pleasant View 
streets to its intersection with the former boundary line between the 
city of Boston and the town of Hyde Park; thence by said former bound- 
ary line to its intersection with the line separating Ward Twenty-three 
from Ward Twenty-four; thence by said ward hne by the centre line of 
location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by 
said centre line of location to its intersection with the centre line of Stony 
Brook; thence by the centre line of said brook and by the centre hne of 
Florence street East, Southboiu-ne road, Bourne and Walk Hill streets to 
its intersection with the centre hne of Harvard street; thence by the centre 
Mne of Harvard street to the point of beginning — • 500 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of River street and 
Randolph road; thence by the centre hne of Randolph and Ridge roads, 
Oakland and Harvard streets to the line separating Ward Twenty-one 
from Ward Twenty-foiir; thence by said ward line by the centre line of 
Walk Hill street and Blue Hill avenue and Blue Hills Parkway to the 
boimdary line between the city of Boston and the town of Milton; thence 
by said boimdary hne through Neponset River to its intersection with the 
former boimdary line between the city of Boston and the town of Hyde 
Park; thence by said former boundary line and by the centre hne of 
River street to the point of beginning — 407 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Arlington street 
and Central avenue; thence by the centre line of Central and Metropoli- 
tan avenues and Thatcher street and the centre line of Thatcher street 
extended to its intersection with the centre line of Wood avenue; thence 
by the centre line of Wood avenue, Roanoke, Pleasant View, Ashland and 
Oakland streets. Ridge road and Randolph road and River street to its 
intersection with the former boundary hne between the city of Boston 
and the town of Hyde Park; thence by said boundary line to its intersec- 
tion with the boundary line between the city of Boston and town of Milton; 
thence by said boundary hne, through Neponset river, to a corner in the 
same; thence continuing through Neponset river to its intersection with 
the centre line of West street extended; thence by said extended centre 
line and the centre hne of a proposed street running through land of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to its intersection with the centre line 
of Arlington street; thence by the centre line of Arlington street to the 
point of beginning — 435 voters. 

Prec. 4.— All that part of said ward lymg within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of River and Lin- 
coln streets; thence by the centre hne of Lincoln street. Harvard and Hyde 
Park avenues to a forty-foot way leaving Hyde Park avenue nearly oppo- 
site Webster street, to Providence street; thence by the centre line of said 
forty-foot way to its intersection with the centre hne of location of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre hne 
of location and by the centre line of West street to the former boundary 
hne between the city of Boston and the town of Hyde Park; thence by 
said former boundary line to its uitersection with the centre hne of Pleas- 
ant View street; thence by the centre line of Pleasant View street and 
Roanoke street and Wood avenue to its intersection with the centre hne 
of Thatcher street extended; thence by said extended centre line and by 



224 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

the centre Line of Thatcher street, Metropohtan and Central avenues and 
Arhngton street to its intersection with the centre Hne of a proposed street 
running through land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; thence 
by the centre hne of said proposed street to its intersection with the 
centre line of West street; thence bj' the centre line of West and River 
streets to the point of beginniag — 492 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward hdng within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Glen wood ave- 
nue East and the centre line of location of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location to its intersec- 
tion wdth the centre line extended of a fortj'-foot way leading from Provi- 
dence street to Hyde Park avenue, nearly opposite Webster street; thence 
by said extended centre hne and by the centre hne of said forty-foot way, 
Hyde Park and Harvard avenues, Lincoln, River and West streets and 
the centre line of West street extended to its intersection with the centre 
hne of Neponset river; thence by the centre hne of said river and by the 
centre line of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad to its intersection with the centre hne of Glenwood avenue 
foot-bridge; thence by the centre line of said bridge and by the centre of 
Glenwood avenue East to the point of beginning — 509 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Neponset river 
(at the northerly corner of said precinct) with the boundary line between 
the city of Boston and the town of Milton; thence by said boundary line 
to its intersection with the centre line of Neponset river at the southwest- 
erly corner of said precinct; thence by the centre line of said river to its 
intersection with the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad; thence by said centre line of location and by the 
centre line of Neponset river to the point of beginning ■ — 583 voters. 

Prec. 7. — All that part of said ward lying within the foUowing described 
hne : Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Glenwood avenue 
foot bridge with the centre hne of Neponset river; thence by the centre 
line of said river to its intersection with the boundary line between the city 
of Boston and the towa of Milton; thence by said boundary hne, through 
Neponset river, to its intersection with the boundary hne between the 
city of Boston and the town of Dedham; thence by said boundary hne 
to its intersection with the northwesterly boimdary of Fairview Cemetery; 
thence by said northwesterly boundary and by the northeasterly boundary 
of said cemetery to its intersection with the centre line of Atherton avenue; 
thence by said centre line and by the centre hne of Fairview avenue, 
River and Knight streets to its intersection with the centre hne of Mother 
Brook; thence by said centre hne and by the centre hne of Glenwood 
avenue West, New Allen street, the centre hne of location of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and the centre hne of Glenwood 
avenue East, and Glenwood avenue foot-bridge to the point of beginning — 
393 voters. 

Prec. 8. — AH that part of said ward lying within the following described 
hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre hne of West street with 
the centre hne of location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road; thence by said centre line of location and the centre line of New 
Allen street, Glenwood avenue West, Mother Brook, Knight and River 
streets, Fairview and Atherton avenues to its intersection with the boundary 
of Fairview Cemetery; thence by the northeasterly and northwesterly 
boimdaries of said cemetery to its intersection with the boimdary hne 
between the city of Boston and the town of Dedham; thence by said 
boundary line to its intersection with the former boundary hne between 
the city of Boston and the town of Hyde Park; thence bj^ said former 
boundary hne and the centre hne of West street to the point of beginning — 
470 voters. 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 25. 225 

WARD TWENTY-FIVE. 

(BRIGHTON DISTRICT, SOUTH.) 

6 Precincts — 3,026 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — AU that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Brighton avenue 
and Mechanic street; thence by the centre hne of Mechanic, Cambridge, 
Hano and Braintree streets to its intersection with the line separating 
Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six; thence by said ward line by 
the centre line of Everett street (lower level) and by the centre line of 
location of the Boston & Albany Railroad to its intersection with the middle 
line of an old creek which formerly formed the boundary line between 
Brookline and Brighton; thence by said middle Hne to its intersection 
with the boundary line between the city of Boston and the city of Cam- 
bridge, in Charles River; thence by said boundary line through Charles 
River to its intersection with the centre Une of Ashby street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line and by the centre hne of Ashby street 
and said centre hne extended to the boundary Une between the city of 
Boston and the town of Brookline; thence by said boundary line, by the 
southerly Une of Commonwealth avenue to a point in said line between 
Winslow and Naples roads; thence by a Une drawn at right angles with 
said boundary Hne to the centre Une of Commonwealth avenue ; thence by 
the centre Hne of Commonwealth and Brighton avenues to the point of 
beginning — 503 voters. 

Prec. 2. — ■ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line : Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Glenville avenue 
and AUston square; thence by the centre line of Allston square and AUston 
street to a point in said street opposite the centre line of Glenville avenue; 
thence by the centre line of Glenville avenue extended to its intersection 
with the centre Hne of Allston Heights ; thence by the centre line of Allston 
Heights, Ridgemont, Eleanor and Cambridge streets to its intersection 
with the line separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six ; thence 
by said ward Hne by the centre line of Dustin street. North Beacon and 
Everett streets to its intersection with the centre line of Braintree street; 
thence by the centre Une of Braintree, Hano, Cambridge and Mechanic 
streets, Brighton, Quint and Glenville avenues to the point of beginning — 
533 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
Hne: Beginning at the intersection of the centre Hnes of Brainerd road 
and Idlewild street; thence by the centre line of Idlewild street. Common- 
wealth, Long and Glenville avenues, Allston street, Allston square, Glen- 
ville, Quint, Brighton and Commonwealth avenues to a point opposite the 
boundary line in the southerly Une of Commonwealth avenue between 
Naples and Winslow roads; thence by a line drawn from the last named 
point to the above named boundary Hne; thence by the boundary line 
between the city of Boston and the town of Brookline to its intersection 
with the centre Hne of Marshall terrace; thence by the centre line of Mar- 
shall terrace and Brainerd road to the point of beginning — 517 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Selkirk and 
Sutherland roads ; thence by the centre Hne of Sutherland road. Common- 
wealth avenue, Colonial road. Union, Shepard and Washington streets 
to the line separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six; thence 
by said ward line by the centre line of Cambridge street to the centre line 
of Dustin street; thence continuing by the centre Une of Cambridge street 
and by the centre Hne of Eleanor and Ridgemont streets and Allston Heights 
to its intersection with the centre line of GlenviUe avenue extended; 



226 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

thence by said extended centre line and by the centre hne of Glenville, 
Long and Commonwealth avenues, Idlewild street, Brainerd road and 
Marshall terrace to the boundary Une between the city of Boston and 
the town of Brookline; thence by said boundary line to its intersection 
with the centre line of KUsyth road; thence by the centre Une of Kilsyth 
and Selkirk roads to the point of beginning — 512 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Selkirk and 
Sutherland roads ; thence by the centre line of Sutherland road, Common- 
wealth avenue, Colonial road, Union, Shepard and Washington streets to 
the line separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six; thence by 
said ward hne by the centre line of Washington street to its intersection 
with the centre line of Winship street; thence by the centre hne of Winship 
street, Chestnut Hill avenue. South street and Commonwealth avenue 
to the boundary line between the city of Boston and the city of Newton 
and the city of JBoston and the town of Brookline; thence by said boundary 
line to its intersection with the centre Une of Kilsyth and Selkirk roads; 
thence by the centre line of Kilsyth and Selkirk roads to the point of 
beginning — 458 voters. 

Prec. 6.^ All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the line, in Washington street, 
separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six and the centre line 
of Winship street; thence by the centre line of Winship street. Chestnut 
Hill avenue. South street and Commonwealth avenue to the boimdary 
line between the city of Boston and the city of Newton; thence by said 
boundary line to its intersection with the line separating Ward Twenty- 
five from Ward Twenty-sLx; thence by said ward line by the centre line 
of Nonantum and Washington streets to the point of beginning — 503 
voters. 

WARD TWENTY-SIX. 

(BRIGHTON DISTRICT, NORTH.) 

6 Precincts — 3,016 Voters. 

Prec. 1 . — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Lincoln and 
Franklin streets; thence by the centre line of Franklin, Easton, Myrick, 
Bayard, Weitz, Franklin and North Harvard streets. North Harvard 
street bridge to the boimdary line between the city of Boston and the city 
of Cambridge in Charles River; thence by said boxmdary line, through 
Charles River to its intersection with the middle line of an old creek which 
formerly formed the boundary line between Brookline and Brighton; 
thence by said middle line to its intersection with the Line separating Ward 
Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six; thence by said ward line by the centre 
line of location of the Boston & Albany Railroad; thence by said centre 
line of location and by the centre line of Cambridge and Lincoln streets 
to the point of beginning — 502 voters. 

Prec. 2. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Lincoln and 
Antwerp streets; thence by the centre line of Antwerp street and Western 
avenue and Western avenue bridge to the boimdary line between the city 
of Boston and the town of Watertown and the city of Cambridge, in Charles 
River; thence by said boundary line, through Charles River, to the 
centre line of North Harvard street bridge; thence by the centre Mne of 
said bridge and by the centre line of North Harvard, Franklin, Weitz, 
Bayard, Myrick, Easton, Franklin, Lincoln and Cambridge streets to the 
line separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six; thence by 
said ward line by the centre line of location of the Boston & Albany Rail- 



VOTING PRECINCTS, WARD 26. 227 

road and by the centre line of Everett street (lower level) extended to its 
intersection with the centre line of Lincoln street; thence by said centre 
line to the point of beginning — 487 voters. 

Prec. 3. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Saybrook and 
Market streets; thence by the centre line of Market and North Beacon 
streets and North Beacon street bridge to the boundary line between the 
city of Boston and the town of Watertown in Charles River; thence by 
said boundary line, through Charles River to its intersection with the 
centre line of Western avenue bridge; thence by the centre line of said 
bridge and centre line of Western avenue, Antwerp and Lincoln streets to 
its intersection with the centre line (lower level) of Everett street extended; 
thence by said extended centre line to the line separating Ward Twenty- 
five from Ward Twenty-six; thence by said ward line by the centre line 
of Everett and North Beacon streets to its intersection with the centre 
line of Dustin street; thence continuing by the centre line of North Beacon 
street and by the centre line 'of Etna and Saybrook streets to the point of 
beginning — 519 voters. 

Prec. 4. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Parsons and 
Arlington streets ; thence by the centre line of Arlington, Market, Saybrook, 
Etna and North Beacon streets to its intersection with the line separating 
Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six; thence by said ward line by 
the centre line of Dustin, Cambridge and Washington streets to its inter- 
section with the centre line of Parsons street; thence by the centre Une 
of Parsons street to the point of beginning — 538 voters. 

Prec. 5. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre lines of Fairbanks and 
Faneuil streets; thence by the centre line of Faneuil, Brooks and Newton 
streets and the centre line of Newton street extended to the centre line of 
location of the Boston & Albany Railroad; thence by said centre line of 
location to the boundary line between the city of Boston and the city of 
Newton; thence by said boundary line and the boundary line, in Charles 
River, between the city of Boston and the town of Watertown to the 
centre line of North Beacon street bridge; thence by said centre line and 
by the centre line of North Beacon, Market, Arlington and Parsons 
streets to the line separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six ; 
thence by said ward fine by the centre line of Washington street and by 
the centre line of Fairbanks street to the point of beginning — 483 voters. 

Prec. 6. — All that part of said ward lying within the following described 
line: Beginning at the intersection of the centre line of Fairbanks street 
and the liae separating Ward Twenty-five from Ward Twenty-six, in 
Washington street ; thence by said ward line by the centre line of Wash- 
ington and Nonantum streets to the boundary line between the city of 
Boston and the city of Newton; thence by said boundary line to its inter- 
section with the centre line of location of the Boston & Albany Railroad; 
thence by said centre line of location to its intersection with the centre 
line of Newton street extended; thence by said extended center Une and 
the centre line of Newton, Brooks, Faneuil and Fairbanks streets to the 
point of beginning — 487 voters. 



228 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



THE NEW AND THE OLD WARDS 
COMPARED. 

On June 7, 1915, the City Council passed an order dividing the new 
wards, estabUshed on December 28, 1914, into "223 voting precincts con- 
taining as near 500 voters each as the natural configuration of the City will 
allow." The number of wards is 26, the same as before, while the precincts 
number two less than before. For description of the boundary of each new 
ward and precinct, see preceding pages, viz., 173 to 227. The comparison 
between the number of precincts and of voters in the new wards and the 
old is shown in the following table: 





IN NEW WARDS. 


IN OLD WARDS. 


Ward. 


Number. 

OF 

Precincts. 


Number 

OF 

Voters. 


Number 

of 

Precincts. 


Number 

OP 

Voters. 


1 


8 
8 
7 
7 
11 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
8 
6 
6 


3,948 
4,052 
3,449 
3,451 
5,509 
4,537 
4,722 
4,588 
4,698 
4,821 
4,395 
4,648 
4,508 
4,470 
4,497 
4,600 
4,423 
4,466 
4,322 
4,369 
4,123 
4,416 
4,333 
3,789 
3,026 
3,016 


9 
8 
6 
6 
6 
8 
6 
6 
7 
9 
9 
7 
8 
8 
8 
7 
9 
6 
9 
16 
12 
8 
14 
16 
10 
7 


5,163 


2 


2,837 


3 


2,712 


4 


2,043 


5 


2,145 


6 


1,986 


7 


1,301 


8 ■ 


3,053 


9 


2,929 


10 


3,649 


11 


3,502 


12 


3,370 


13 


2,553 


14 


4,202 


15 


3,606 


16 


4,602 


17 


4,042 


18 


3,035 


19 


4,966 


20 


12,609 


21 


6,355 


22 


5,695 


23 


7,349 


24 


8,558 


25 


6,042 


26 


2,862 






Totals 


223 


111,166 


225 


111,166 







As regards voting, the change from the old to the new wards and precincts 
goes into effect September 26, 1916, on the day of the State Primary. 



members of 
City Government, 



I909-I9I5, 



MAYORS AND CERTAIN OTHEE OFFICIALS SINCE 1822, 



ORATOES APPOINTED BY THE CITY SINCE 1771. 



MASSACHUSETTS MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 

AND 
BOSTON MEMBERS OF LEGISLATURE, 1916. 



230 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



I909, 



Jamea M. Curley, 
Daniel A. Whelton, 
Daniel J. Donnelly.^ 
George P. Anderson, 
Walter Ballantyne, 
Frederick J. Brand, 
W. Dudley Cotton, jr.. 



Ward 1 . 
Edward C. R. Bagley, 
Frank A. Goodwin, 
Joseph A. Hoey. 

Ward 2. 
Joseph H. Pendergast, 
Dennis A. O'Neil, 
Michael J. Brophy. 

Ward 3. 
James J. Brennan, 
Joseph A. Dart, 
William J. Murray. 

Ward 4. 
Francis M. Ducey, 
Patrick B. Carr, 
James I. Green. 

Ward B. 
John J. Buckley, 
William E. Carney, 
Edward A. Troy. 

Ward 6. 
Stephen Gardella, 
Francis D. O'Donnell, 
Alfred Scigliano. 

Ward 7. 
John L. Donovan 
John T. Kennedy, 
Dominick F. Spellman. 

Ward 8. 
James J. Ryan, 
James A. Bragan, 
Adolphus M. Burroughs. 

Ward 9. 
Isaac Gordon, 
Robert J. Howell, 
Thomas B. McKeagney. 



Mayor. 
GEORGE A. HIBBARD.i 

Aldermen. 
Frederick J. Brand, Chairman. 

James P. Timilty, 
J. Frank O'Hare, 
John J. Attridge, 
Charles L. Carr, 
Thomas J. Giblin, 
Matthew Hale. 



John T. Priestj City Clerk. 

COUNCILMBN. 

George C. McCabe, President 
Ward 10. 
J. Henderson Allston, 
Channing H. Cox, 
William S. Kinney. 



Ward 11. 
Courtenay Crocker, 
Theodore Hoague, 
Charles H. Moore. 

Ward 12. 
Seth Fenelon Arnold, 
Alfred G. Davis, 
Francis J. H. Jones. 

Ward 13. 
Leo F. McCullough,3 
Stephen A. Welch, 
Coleman E. Kelly. 

Ward 14. 
Cornelius J. Fitzgerald, 
Thomas J. Casey, 
Joseph L. Collins. 

Ward 15. 
John O'Hara, 
William T. Conway, 
Joseph A. O'Bryan. 

Ward 16. 
John D. McGivern, 
Hugh M. Garrity, 
William D. McCarthy. 

Ward 17. 
Thomas M. Joyce, 
Francis J. Brennan, 
John D. Connors. 
Joseph O'Kane, Clerk. 



Ward IS. 
Daniel F. Cronin, 
Michael F. O'Brien, 
George Kenney. 

Ward 19. 
Peter A. Hoban, 
William J. Kohler, 
John J. Donovan. 

Ward 20. 
Charles T. Harding, 
Harry R. Cimiming, 

William Smith, jr. 

Ward 21. 
William N. Hackett, 
John Ballantyne, 
Walter R. Meins. 

Ward 22. 
William H. Morgan. 
George Penshorn, 
Bernhard G. Krug. 

Ward 23. 
George W. Carruth, 
George W. Smith, 
Ward D. Prescott. 

Ward 24. 
Frank B. Crane, 
James A. Hart, 
Clifford C. Best. 

Ward 26. 
Edward C. Webster, 
George C. McCabe, 
Charles H. Warren. 



1 Elected for two years. ^ Died June 23, 1909. 

3 Resigned June 3, 1909. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



231 



I9IO. 

Mayob. 
JOHN F. FITZGERALD.* 



Term Ends in 1913. 
John J. Attridge, 
Matthew Hale, 
Walter L. CoUins. 



City Council. 
Walteb Ballanttne, President . 
Term Ends in 1912. 
James M. Curley, 
Walter Ballantyne, 
Thomas J. Kenny. 



Term Ends in 1911. 
Frederick J. Brand, 
Daniel J. McDonald, 
Timothy J. Buckley. 



Term Ends in 1914. 
Daniel J. McDonald, 
Timothy J. Buckley, 
Earnest E. Smith. 



1911. 

Mayor. 
JOHN F. FITZGERALD. 

City Council. 
Walter L. Collins, President 
Term Ends in 1913. 
John J. Attridge, 
Matthew Hale, 
Walter L. Collins. 



Term Ends in 1912. 
James M. Curley, 
Walter Ballantyne, 
Thomas J. Kenny. 



1912. 

Mayor. 
JOHN F. FITZGERALD. 



Term Ends in 1915. 
Walter Ballantyne, 
Thomas J. Kenny, 
John A. Coulthurst. 



City Council. 
John J. Attridge, President. 
Term Ends in 1914. 
Daniel J. McDonald, 
Timothy J. Buckley, 
Earnest E. Smith. 



Term Ends in 1913. 
John J. Attridge. 
Matthew Hale, 
Walter L. Colhns. 



1913. 

Mayor. 
JOHN F. FITZGERALD. 



Term Ends in 1916. 
John J. Attridge, 
Walter L. CoUins, 
James A. Watson. 



City Council. 
Thomas J. Kenny, President. 
Term Ends in 1915. 
Walter Ballantyne, 
Thomas J. Kenny, 
John A. Coulthurst, 



Term Ends in 1914. 
Daniel J. McDonald, 
Timothy J. Buckley, 
Earnest E. Smith. 



Note. — • The Board of Aldermen and Common Council were abolished by the amended 
City Charter of 1909 and the City Council was established, consisting of nine members 
See Section 1 of the Charter, page 19 of (his Municipal Register. 

* Elected for four years, subject to recall at end of two years. 



232 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Term Ends in 1917. 
Daniel J. McDonald, 
George W. Coleman, 
William H. Woods. 



1914. 

Mayor.' 
JAMES M. CURLEY.t 

City Council. 
Daniel J. McDonald, President 
Term Ends in 1916. 
John J. Attridge, 
Walter L. Collins, 
James A. Watson, 



Term Ends in 1915. 
Walter BaUantyne, 
Thomas J. Kenny, 
John A. Coulthurst. 



Term Ends in 1918. 
Walter BaUantyne, 
John A. Coulthurst, 
Henry E. Hagan. 



1915. 

Match. 
JAMES M. CURLEY. 

City Council. 
George W. Coleman, President. 



Term Ends in 1917. 
George W. Coleman, 
Daniel J. McDonald, 
William H. Woods.* 



Term Ends in 1916. 
John J. Attridge, 
Walter L. Collins, 
James A. Watson. 



* Councilor Woods died May 3, 1915, and was succeeded by James J. Storrow. 



Mayors of the City of Boston. 

From 1822 to the Present Time. 



Name.' 


Place and Date of Birth. 


Died. 


Years of 
Service. 


* John PJiillips 


Boston 

Boston 


.Nov. 26, 1770 
.Feb. 1, 1772 


May 29, 1823 
July 1, 1864 


1822.. .1 


* Josiah Quincy 


1823-28.. 6- 


* Harrison Gray Otis 


Boston 


.Oct. 8, 1765 


Oct. 28, 1848 


1829-31.. 3 


* Charles Wells 


Boston 

Boston 


.Dec. 30, 1786 
.Feb. 19, 1792 


June 3, 1866 
July 17, 1849 


1832-33.. 2 


* Theodore Lyman, jr . . . . 


1834-35.. 2 


* Samuel T. Armstrong. . . 


Dorchester. . . . 


.AprU29, 1784 


Mar. 26, 1850 


1836 1 


* Samuel A. Eliot 


Boston 


.Mar. 5,1798 


Jan. 29, 1862 


1837-39.. 3 


* Jonathan Chapman 


Boston 


.Jan. 23, 1807 


May 25, 1848 


1840-42. .3 


* Martin Brimmer 


Roxbury 


.June 8, 1793 


April 25, 1847 


1843-44.. 2 


* Thomas A . Davis 


Brookline 


.Dec. 11, 1798 


Nov. 22, 1845 


1845 1 


* Josiah Quincy, jr 


Boston 


.Jan. 17, 1802 


Nov. 2, 1882 


1846-48.. 3 


* John P. Bigelow 


Groton 


.Aug. 25, 1797 


July 4, 1872 


1849-51.. 3 


* Benjamin Seaver 


Roxbury 


.April 12, 1795 


Feb. 14, 1856 


1852-53.. 2 


* Jerome V. C. Smith 


Conway, N. H. 


.July 20, 1800 


Aug. 20, 1879 


1854-55.. 2 


* Alexander . Rice 


Newton 


.Aug. 30, 1818 


July 22, 1895 


1856-57.. 2 


* Frederic W. Lincoln, jr. . 


Boston 


.Feb. 27, 1817 


Sept. 13, 1898 


1858-60.. 3 


* Joseph M. Wightman. . . 


Boston 


.Oct. 19, 1812 


Jan. 25, 1885 


186 1-62.. 2 



* Deceased. 



t Elected for four years, subject to recall at end of two years. 



MAYORS OF BOSTON. 233 

MAYORS OF THE ciTT OP BOSTON. — Concluded. 



Name. 



Place and Date of Birth. 



Died. 



Years of 
Service. 



* Frederic W. Lincoln, jr . . 

* Otis Norcross 

* Nathaniel B. Shurtleff. . . 

* William Gaston 

* Henry L. Pierce 

§ Leonard R. Cutter 

* Samuel C. Cobb 

* Frederick O. Prince 

* Henry L. Pierce 

* Frederick O. Prince 

Samuel A. Green 

* Albert Palmer 

* Augustus P. Martin. . . . 

* Hugh O'Brien 

Thomas N. Hart 

Nathan Matthews, jr. . . 
Edwin U. Curtis 

t Josiah Quincy 

t Thomas N. Hart 

*t Patrick A. Collins 

§ Daniel A. Whelton 

t John F. Fitzgerald 

*t George A. Hibbard. . . . 

% John F. Fitzgerald 

IT James M. Curley. ...... 



(See above) 

Boston N V. 2, 1811 

Boston June 29, 1810 

Killingly, Conn.... Oct. 3, 1820 

Stou<?hton Aug. 23, 1825 

(See under Chairmen of Alder- 
men) 
Taunton May 22, 1826 

Boston Jan. 18, 1818 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Groton Mar. 16, 1830 

Candia, N. H...Jan. 17,1831 

Abbot, Me Nov. 23, 1835 

Ireland July 13, 1827 

North Reading. .Jan. 20, 1829 

Boston Mar. 28, 1854 

Roxbury Mar. 26, 1861 

Quincy Oct. 15, 1859 

(See above) 

Fermoy, Ireland, Mar. 12, 1844 

Boston Jan. 1, 1872 

Boston Feb. 11, 1863 

Boston Oct. 27, 1864 

(See above) 

Boston Nov. 20, 1874 



(See above) . . . 
Sept. 5, 1882 
Oct. 17, 1874 
Jan. 19, 1894 
Dec. 17, 1896 



Feb. 18, 1891 
June 6, 1899 
(See above) . . , 
(See above) . . . 



May 21, 1887 
Mar. 13, 1902 
Aug. 1, 1895 



Sept. 14, 1905 



May 29, 1910 



1863-66.. 4 

1867 1 

1868-70.. 3 
1871-72.. 2 
1873, lOmo. 
1873, 2 mo. 
1874-76.. 3 

1877 1 

1878 1 

1879-81.. 3 

1882 1 

1883 1 

1884 1 

1885-88.. 4 
1889-90.. 2 
189 1-94.. 4 

1895 1 

1896-99.. 4 
1900-01.. 2 
1902-05, 3i 
1905, 3i mo 
1906-07.. 2 
1908-09.. 2 
1910-13.. 4 
1914 



* Deceased. t Elected for two years (Stat. 1895, Chap. 449). 

t Twice elected for two years. § Acting Mayor. 

T[ Elected for four years, subject to recall at end of two years. 

Note. — From January 6, 1845, to February 27, 1845, or from the close of Mayor 
Brimmer's term of office tiU the election of his successor, Thomas A. Davis, William Parker, 
Chairman of the Board of Aldermen, ex officio performed the duties of Mayor. 

In the interim between the death of Mayor Davis, on November 22, 1845, and the 
election on December 11, 1845, of his successor, Josiah Quincy, jr., Benson Leavitt, Chair- 
man of the Board of Aldermen, acted as Mayor. 

There were three ballotings for the election of Mayor for 1854, between December 12, 
1853, and January 9, 1854. In the meantime the duties of Mayor were performed by 
Benjamin L. Allen, Chairman of the Board of Aldermen. 

^In 1873 Mayor Pierce resigned his office on November 29, on his election to the Congress 
of the United States. During the remainder of the municipal year Leonard R. Cutter, 
Chairman of the Board of Aldermen, served ex officio as Acting Mayor. 

Mayor Collins died on September 14, 1905. Daniel A. Whelton, Chairman of the 
Board of Aldermen, was Acting Mayor for the remainder of the municipal year, viz. 
September 15, 1905, to January 1, 1906. See R. L., Chap. 26, §§ 29, 30. 



234 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen. 



Name. 



Place and Date of Birth. 



Died. 



Years of 
Service. 



* William Washburn . . 

* Pelham Bonney 

* Joseph Milner Wightman 

* Silas Peirce 

*Otis Clapp 

* Silas Peirce 

* Thomas Phillips Rich . . . 

* Thomas CofBn Amory, jr. 

* Otis Norcross 

* George W. Messinger . . . 

* Charles Wesley Slack . . . 

* George W. Messinger . . . 

* Benjamin James 

* Newton Talbot 

* Charles Edward Jenkins, 

* Samuel Little 

* Leonard R. Cutter 

* John Taylor Clark 

* Solomon Bliss Stebbins. . 

* Hugh O'Brien 

* Solomon Bliss Stebbins. . 

* Hugh O'Brien 

* Charles Varney WTiitten 

* Charles Hastings Allen . . 

* Patrick John Donovan . . 

* Charles Hastings Allen . . 

* Homer Rogers 

William Power Wilson. . . 
Herbert Schaw Carruth.. 

John Henry Lee 

Alpheus Sanf ord 

John Henry Lee 

t Perlie Appleton Dyar . . . 



Lyme, N. H Oct. 7,1808 

Pembroke Feb. 21, 1802 

Boston Oct. 19, 1812 

Scituate Feb. 15, 1793 

Westhampton . . . Mar 3, 1806 

(See above) 

Lynn Mar. 31, 1803 

Boston Aug. 16, 1812 

Boston Nov. 2, 1811 

Boston Feb. 5,1813 

Boston Feb. 21, 1825 

(See above) 

Scituate Aug. 22, 1814 

Stoughton Mar 10, 1815 

Scituate July 29, 1817 

Hingham Aug. 15, 1827 

Jaffrey, N. H July 1, 1825 

Sanbornton, N. H. 

Sept. 19, 1825 
Warren Jan. 18, 1830 

Ireland July 13, 1827 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Vassalboro, Me.,. .May 10,1829 

Boston June 14, 1828 

Charlestown .... April 9,1848 

(See above) 

Sudbury Oct. 11, 1840 

Balthnore, Md. .Nov. 15, 1852 

Dorchester Feb. 15, 1855 

Boston April 26, 1846 

North Attleboro' . .July 5, 1856 

(See above) 

Lynn Mar. 26, 1857 



Oct. 30, 1890 


1855 


April 29, 1861 


1856-57 


Jan. 25, 1885 


1858 


Aug. 27, 1879 


1859 


Sept. 18, 1886 


1860 


(See above) . . . 


1861 


Dec. 11, 1875 


1862 


Oct. 10, 1899 


1863 


Sept. 5, 1882 


1864 


April 27, 1870 


1865-66 


April 11, 1885 


1867 


(See above) . . . 


1868 


April 13, 1901 


1869 


Feb. 3, 1904 


1870 


Aug. 1, 1882 


1871 


Dec. 21, 1906 


1872 


July 13, 1894 


1873 - 


Oct. 29, 1880 


1874-77 


June 8, 1910 


1878 


Aug. 1, 1895 


1879-81 


(See above) . . . 


1882 


(See above) . . . 


1883 


Mar. 18, 1891 


1884-85 


Mar. 31, 1907 


1886 


Sept. 18, 1912 


1887 


(See above) . . . 


1888 


Nov. 10, 1907 


1889 




1890 




1891 




1892-93 




1894-95 


(See above) . . . 


1896 




1897-98 






and October 1, 
1898. 


1898, to end 



* Deceased. 

fPerUe A. Dyar from January 25, 1898, to April 1, 1898, 
of year. Joseph A. Conry from April 1, 1898, to October 1, 



PRESIDENTS OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 235 

CHAIRMEN OP THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. Concluded. 



Name. 



Place and Date of Birth. 



Died. 



Years of 
Service. 



t Joseph Aloysius Conry . . 

* David Franklin Barry . . . 

* Michael Joseph O'Brien. 

James Henry Doyle 

Daniel A. Whelton 

% Charles Martin Draper. . 

% Edward L. Cauley 

"William Berwin 

* Louis M. Clark 

* Frederi ok J. Brand 



Brookline Sept. 12, 1868 

Boston Feb. 29, 1852 

Ireland Feb. 11, 1855 

Boston June 17, 1867 

Boston Jan. 1,1872 

Dedham Nov. 1, 1869 

Charlestown Aug. 8,1870 

New Orleans, La., Dec. 16,1858 

Dorchester Dec. 14, 1858 

Plainville, Conn.,Feb. 3,1861 



July 23, 1911 
April 5, 1903 



Mar. 15, 1914 
Mar. 16, 1912 



1898 

1899 

1900 

1901-04 

1905 

1906 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 



* Deceased. t See note on page 234. 

t Charles M. Draper from February 28, 1906, to September 10, 1906. Edward L. 
Cauley from September 10, 1906, to end of year. 

Note. — The Mayor was ex officio Chairman of the Board of Aldermen from the incor- 
poration of the city imtil 1855; the Board elected a permanent Chairman from 1855. 



Presidents of the Common Council. 



Name. 



Place and Date of Birth. 



Died. 



Years of 
Service. 



* William Prescott 

* John Welles 

* Francis Johonnot Oliver, 

* John Richardson Adan . . 

* Eliphalet Williams 

* Benj. Toppan Pickman. . 

* John Prescott Bigelow . . . 

* Josiah Quincy, jr 

* Philip Marett 

* Edward Blake 

* Peleg Whitman Chandler 

* George Stillman Hillard, 

* Benjamin Seaver 

* Francis Brinley 

* Henry Joseph Gardner. . 

* Deceased. 



Pepperell Aug. 19, 

Boston Oct. 14, 

Boston Oct. 10, 

Boston July 8, 

Taimton Mar. 7, 

Salem Sept. 17, 

Groton Aug. 25, 

Boston Jan. 17, 

Boston Sept. 25, 

Boston Sept. 28, 

New Gloucester, Me., 

April 12, 
Maohias, Me Sept. 22, 

Roxbiiry April 12, 

Boston Nov. 10, 

Dorchester June 14, 

1 To July 1. 



1762 
1764 
1777 
1793 
1778 
1790 
1797 
1802 
1792 
1805 

1816 
1808 

1795 

1800 

1818 



Dec. 8, 
Sept. 26, 
Aug. 21, 
July 4, 
Jime 12, 
Mar. 22, 
July 4, 
Nov. 2, 
Mar. 22, 
Sept. 4, 
May 28, 
Jan. 21, 
Feb. 14, 
June 14, 
July 19, 



1844 
1855 
1858 
1849 
1855 
1835 
1872 
1882 
1869 
1873 
1889 
1879 
1856 
1889 
1892 



1822 

1823 

1824-25 

1826-28 

1829 

1830-31 

1832-33 

1834-36 

1837-40 

1841-43 

1844-45 

1846-47 1 

1847 '-49 

1850-51 

1852-53 



2 From July 1. 



236 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. — Continued. 



Place and Date of Birth. 



Died. 



Years of 
Service. 



* Alex. Hamilton Rice . 

* Joseph Story 

* Oliver Stevens 



* Samuel Wallace Wald- 
ron, jr 



* Josiah Putnam Bradlee . . 

* Joseph HJildreth Bradley, 

* Joshua Dorsey Ball 

* George Silsbee Hale 

* Wm. Bentley Fowle, jr . . 

* Joseph Story 

* Weston Lewis 

* Charles Hastings Allen. . . 

* WiUiam Giles Harris .... 

* Melville Ezra Ingalls .... 

* Matthias Rich 



* Marquis Fayette Dickin- 
son, jr 



* Edward Olcott Shepard 

* Halsey Joseph Boardman 

John Quincy Adams 
Brackett 



* Benjamin Pope 

* William H. Whitmore . . . 
Harvey Newton Shepard. . 
Andrew Jackson Bailey. . . 

* Charles Edward Pratt . . . 

* James Joseph Flynn . . . . 

* Godfrey Morse 



John Henry Lee 

Edward John Jenkins .... 

* David Franklin Barry . . . 
Horace Gwynne Allen . . . . 

* David Franklin Barry. . .. 



Newton 


.Aug. 30, 


1818 


Marblehead. . . . 


.Nov. 11, 


1822 


Andoyer 


.June 22, 


1825 


Portsmouth, N. 
Boston 


H., 

Oct. 24, 
.June 10, 


1828 
1817 


Haverhill 


.Mar. 5, 


1822 


Baltimore, Md. 


.July 11, 


1828 


Keene, N. H... 


.Sept. 24, 


1825 


Boston 


.July 27, 


1826 


(See p. 235) . . . . 








.April 14 


1834 


Boston 


.June 14, 


1828 


Revere 


.May 15, 


1828 


Harrison, Me . . 


.Sept. 6, 


1842 


Truro 


.June 8, 


1820 


Amherst 


.Jan. 16, 


1840 


Hampton, N, H 


, Nov. 25, 


1835 


Norwich, Vt . . . 


.May 19, 


1834 


Bradford, N. H 


.June 8, 


1842 


Waterford, Ire . 


.Jan. 13, 


1829 


Dorchester. . . . 


.Sept. 6 


1836 


Boston 


.July 8 


1850 


Charlestown . . . 


.July 18, 


1840 


Vassalboro, Me. 


.Mar. 13, 


1845 



St. John, N. B 1835 

Wachenheim, Germany, 
May 17, 



Boston April 26, 

London, Eng Dec. 20, 

Boston Feb. 29, 

Jamaica Plain . . . July 27, 
(See above) 



1846 
1846 
1854 
1852 
1855 



July 22, 1895 
June 22, 1905 
Aug. 23, 1905 

Aug. 24, 1882 
Feb. 2, 1887 
Oct. 5, 1882 
Dec. 18, 1892 
July 27, 1897 
Jan. 21, 1902 
(Seep. 235)... 
April 6, 1893 
Mar. 31, 1907 
Oct. 29, 1897 
July 11, 1914 
Dec. 13, 1914 

Sept. 18, 1915 
April 27, 1903 
Jan. 15, 1900 



Sept. 24, 1879 
June 14, 1900 



Aug. 20, 1898 
Mar. 26, 1884 
June 20, 1911 



July 23, 1911 
(See above) . . 



1854 
1855 
1856-57 

1858 

1859-60 

1861 

1862 

1863-64 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873-74 

1875 

1876 
1877-78 
1879 
1880 
18811 
1881 2-82 
1883 3 
1883* 

1884 

1885-86 

1887-88 

1889-90 

1891-93 



* Deceased. 



3 To 



I To October 27. 2 From October 27. 

June 11. ^ From June 14. 



ORATORS OF BOSTON. 



237 



PRESIDENTS OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. — Concluded. 



Name. 



Place and Date of Birth. 



Died. 



Years of 
Service. 



* Christopher Francis 

O'Brien 

Joseph Aloysius Conry . . . . 

Timothy Lawrence Con- 
nolly 

Daniel Joseph Kiley 

Arthur Walter Dolan 

WiUiam John Barrett 

Leo F. McCullough 

George Cheney McCabe . . 



Boston Feb. 17, 1869 

Brookline Sept. 12, 1868 

Boston Oct. 5,1871 

Boston July 27, 1874 

Boston Sept. 22, 1876 

Boston June 24, 1872 

Boston July 1, 1882 

Carmel, N. Y. ..July 5,1873 

* Deceased. 



April 25, 1899 



1894-95 
1896-97 

1898 

1899-1901 

1902-05 

1906-07 

1908 

1909 



Presidents of the City Council. f 



Name. 


Place and Date of Birth. 


Died. 


Year of 
Service. 


Walter Ballantyne. 


Hawick, Scotland, 

Mar 17, 1855 

Boston April 7, 1878 

Boston Feb. 8,1878 

Boston Nov. 18, 1863 

Chelsea Aug. 14, 1873 

Boston June 16, 1867 

St. John, N. B. .Feb. 26, 1865 




1910 






1911 


John Joseph Attridge 

Thomas Joseph Kenny . . . 




1912 




1913 




1914 


George W. Coleman 




1915 




1916 









t Single chamber, established in 1910 (See Chap. 486, Acts of 1909, Sects. 48-51). 



Orators of Boston. 

APPOINTED BY THE PUBLIC AUTHORITIES. 

For the Anniversary of the Boston Massacre, March 5, 1770. 



1771 James Lovell. 

1772 Dr. Joseph Warren 

1773 Dr. Benjamin Church. 

1774 John Hancock. 

1775 Dr. Joseph Warren. 

1776 Rev. Peter Thacher. 

1777 Benjamin Hichborn. 



1778 Jonathan Williams Austin. 

1779 WilHam Tudor. 

1780 Jonathan Mason, jr. 

1781 Thomas Dawes, jr. 

1782 George Richards Minot. 

1783 Dr. Thomas Welsh. 



238 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



For the Anniversary of National Independence, July 4, 1776. 



1783 Dr. John Warren. 

1784 Benjamin Hichborn. 

1785 John Gardiner. 

1786 Jonathan L. Austin. 

1787 Thomas Dawes, jr. 

1788 Harrison Gray Otis. 

1789 Rev. Samuel Stillman. 

1790 Edward Gray. 

1791 Thomas Crafts, jr. 

1792 Joseph Blake, jr. 

1793 John Quincy Adams. 

1794 John PhilUps. 

1795 George Blake. 

1796 John Lathrop, jr. 

1797 John Callender. 

1798 Josiah Quincy. 

1799 John Lowell, jr. 

1800 Joseph Hall. 

1801 Charles Paine. 

1802 Rev. WiUiam Emerson. 

1803 WiUiam Sullivan. 

1804 Dr. Thomas Danforth. 

1805 Warren Dutton. 

1806 Francis Dana Channing. 

1807 Peter O. Thacher. 

1808 Andrew Ritchie, jr. 

1809 WiUiam Tudor, jr. 

1810 Alexander Townsend. 

1811 James Savage. 

1812 Benjamin Pollard. 

1813 Edward St. Loe Livermore. 

1814 Benjamin Whitwell. 

1815 Lemuel Shaw. 

1816 George SuUivan. 

1817 Edward T. Channing. 

1818 Francis C. Gray. 

1819 Frankhn Dexter. 

1820 Theodore Lyman, jr. 

1821 Charles G. Loring. 

1822 John C. Gray. 

1823 Charles Pelham Curtis. 

1824 Francis Bassett. 

1825 Charles Sprague. 

1826 Josiah Quincy, Mayor. 

1827 WiUiam PoweU Mason. 

1828 Bradford Sumner. 



1829 James T. Austin. 

1830 Alexander H. Everett. 

1831 Rev. John G. Palfrey. 

1832 Josiah Quincy, jr. 

1833 Edward G. Prescott. 

1834 Richard S. Fay. 

1835 George S. Hillard. 

1836 Henry W. Kinsman. 

1837 Jonathan Chapman. 

1838 Rev. Hubbard Winslow. 

1839 Ivers James Austin. 

1840 Thomas Power. 

1841 George Ticknor Curtis. 

1842 Horace Mann. 

1843 Charles Francis Adams. 

1844 Peleg W. Chandler. 

1845 Charles Sumner. 

1846 Fletcher Webster. 

1847 Thomas G. Carey. 

1848 Joel Giles. 

1849 WilUam W. Greenough. 

1850 Edwin P. Whipple. 

1851 Charles Theodore Russell. 

1852 Rev. Thomas Starr King. 

1853 Timothy Bigelow. 

1854 Rev. A. L. Stone. 

1855 Rev. A. A. Miner. 

1856 Edward Griffin Parker. 

1857 Rev. William R. Alger. . 

1858 John S. Hohnes. 

1859 George Simaner. 

1860 Edward Everett. 

1861 Theophilus Parsons. 

1862 George Ticknor Curtis. 

1863 Oliver WendeU Holmes. 

1864 Thomas RusseU. 

1865 Rev. Jacob M. Manning. 

1866 Rev. S. K. Lothrop. 

1867 Rev. George H. Hep worth. 

1868 Samuel Ehot. 

1869 EUis W. Morton. 

1870 WiUiam Everett. 

1871 Horace Binney Sargent. 

1872 Charles Francis Adams, jr. 

1873 Rev. John F. W. Ware. 

1874 Richard Frothingham. 



JUSTICES OF THE COURTS. 



239 



1875 Rev. James Freeman Clarke. 

1876 Robert C. Winthrop. 

1877 William Wirt Warren. 

1878 Joseph Healey. 

1879 Henry Cabot Lodge. 

1880 Robert Dickson Smith. 

1881 George Wasliington Warren. 

1882 John Davis Long. 

1883 Rev. H. Bernard Carpenter. 

1884 Harvey N. Shepard. 

1885 Thomas J. Gargan. 

1886 George Fred WiUiams. 

1887 John E. Fitzgerald. 

1888 WiUiam E. L. Dillaway. 

1889 John L. Swift. 

1890 Albert E. Pillsbury. 

1891 Josiah Quincy. 

1892 John R. Murphy. 

1893 Henry W. Putnam. 

1894 Joseph H. O'Neil. 

1895 Rev. Adolph Augustus Berle. 

Justices of the Police, Justices' and Municipal Courts. 

The Pohce Court of the City of Boston was estabHshed in 1822, and at 
the same time the Justices' Court for the County of Suffolk (civil business) 
was established. The duties of the Justices' Court were discharged by 
the Justices of the Police Coiu-t. The jurisdiction of the Justices' Court was 
transferred to the Pohce Court for civil business June 1, 1860. In 1866 
this court was succeeded by the Jfdunici-pal Court of the City of Boston. 
The names of the successive Justices and their terms of office are as follows : 

Justices of the Police Court, 

serving also as the 

Justices op the Justices' Court for the County of Suffolk. 

Abel Gushing, 1834 to 1858. 
Thomas Russell, 1852 to 1858. 
Sebeus C. Maine, 1858 to 1866. 



1896 John F. Fitzgerald. 

1897 Rev. Edward Everett Hale. 

1898 Rev. Denis O'Callaghan. 

1899 Nathan Matthews, jr. 

1900 Stephen O'Meara. 

1901 Curtis Gmld, jr. 

1902 Joseph A. Conry. 

1903 Edwin D. Mead. 

1904 John A. Sulhvan. 

1905 Le Baron B. Colt. 

1906 Timothy W. Coakley. 

1907 Rev. Edward A. Horton. 

1908 Arthur D. Hill. 

1909 Arthur L. Spring. 

1910 James H. Wolff. 

1911 Charles WiUiam Eliot. 

1912 Joseph C. Pelletier. 

1913 Grenville S. MacFarland. 

1914 Rev. James A. Supple. 

1915 Louis D. Brandeis. 



Benjamin Whitman, * 1822 to 1833. 
WiUiam Simmons, 1822 to 1843. 
Henry Orne, 1822 to 1830. 
John Gray Rogers, 1831 to 1866. 
James Gushing MerriU, 1834 to 1852 



George D. Wells, 1858 to 1864. 
Edwin Wright, 1864 to 1866. 



Justices op the Municipal Court. 



John W. Bacon, 

Chief Justice, 1866 to 1871. 
MeUen Chamberlain, 1866 to 1878. 

Chief Justice, 1871 to 1878. 
Francis W. Hurd, 1866 to 1870. 
Joseph M. ChurchiU, 1870 to 1886. 
WilUam E. Parmenter, 1871 to 1902. 

Chief Justice, 1883 to 1902. 
J. Wilder May, 

Chief Justice, 1878 to 1883. 
WiUiam J. Forsaith, 1882 to 1913. 
Matthew J. McCafferty, 1883 to 

1885. 
John H. Hardy, 1885 to 1896. 
Benjamin R. Curtis, 1886 to 1891. 



Frederick D. Ely, 1888. 
John H. Burke, 1891. 
John F. Brown, 1894. 

Chief Justice, 1902 to 1906.- 
George Z. Adams, 1896 to 1906. 
Henry S. Dewey, 1899 to 1902. 
George L. Wentworth, 1899. 
James P. Parmenter, 1902. 
WiUiam Sulhvan, 1902. 
Wilfred Bolster, 

Chief, Justice, 1906. 
Michael J. Murray, 1906. 
John Duff, 1911. 
Michael J. Creed, 1911. 
Thomas H. Dowd, 1914. 



* Senior Justice. 



240 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



MEMBERS OF THE STATE LEGISLATURE OF 1916 
FROM BOSTON. 



SENATORS. (9.) 

District 1 * — Ward 1 John E. Beck, R. 

2 **— Wards 2, 3, 4, 5 . . . . f James I. Green, D. 

3 **_ Wards 6, 7, 8 t Philip J. McGonagle, D. 

4 — Wards 9, 12, 17 Edward F. McLaughlin, D. 

5 — Wards 10, 11, 25 .... t Martin Hays, R. 

6 — Wards 13, 14, 15, 16 ... Daniel J. Chapman, D. 

7 — Wards 18, 19, 22 . . . . f James P. Timilty, D. 

8 — Wards 20, 21 W. Prentiss Parker R. 

9 — Wards 23, 24 f Sanford Bates, R. P. 



REPRESENTATIVES. (51.) 



WARD/t Thomas J. Giblin, D. 

1. \ Edward I. Kelley, D. 

Ward ft John J. Kearney, D. 

2. \ Manassah E. Bradley, D. 



Wakd 
3 

Wards f 
4 

AND 

5. 



Jt James J. Brennan, D. 
\ John J. Gillis, D. 

t John P. Mahoney, D. 
t Michael J. McNamee, D. 
Charles J. McNulty, D. 



Waed ft Felix A. Marcella, D. 
6. \ Vincent Brogna, D. 

'^^'^/t John L. Donovan, D. 

Ward f John I. Fitzgerald, D. 
8. \ David Mancovitz, D. 



Ward/ 
9. 1 



Thomas F. Donovan, D. 
Samuel Silverman, D. 



Ward ft Channing H. Cox, R. 

10. It Samuel Davis, R. 

WARD/t Fitz-Henry Smith, Jr., 

11. It Arthur E. Burr, R. 

Ward/ James W. Hayes, D. 

12. \ John W. Craig, D. 

WABD/t WilHam J. Foley, D. 

13. \t John N. Levins, D. 

WABD/t Daniel W. Casey, D. 

14. 1 Robert J. Ware, D. 



R. 



WARD/t John L. Monahan, D. 

15. It Edward G. Morris, D. 

WARD/t George J. Wall, D. 

16. \ Wilham J. Holland, D. 

WARD/t Joseph Oakhem, D. 

17. 1 Thomas M. Joyce, D. 

Ward ft Patrick E. Murray, Jr., D. 

18. It George E. Curran, D. 

Ward ft William H. Sullivan, D. 

19. \ James Mclnerney, D. 

Ward ft Joseph McGrath, D. 

20. ] John J. Cummings, D. 
[ Peter F. McCarty, D. 

WARD/t Addison P- Beardsley, R. 

21. \ Simon Swig, R. 

WAED/t Alfred J. Moore, R., D. 

22. \ John P. Englert, D. 

WARD/t James E. Phelan, D. 

23. \ George W. P. Babb, R. 

■^r.T>r^ft Joseph J. Benson, D. 
OA It Samuel H. Mildram, R. P. 
''*• 1 Charles S. Lawler, D. 

WARD/t Herbert A. Wilson, R. 
25. 1 Frederic E. Dowling, R. 

^^^[t Robert B. Martin, R. 



* Includes Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop. 
** Includes part of Cambridge, 
t Signifies re-election, 
t Ward 26 (Hyde Park) is not included in the 27 Suffolk Representative Districts, 
but remains in the Third Norfolk District. 

Note. — Senators, five Democrats, three Republicans, and one "Republican-Progres- 
sive." Representatives, thirty-nine Democrate, ten Republicans, one "Republican- 
Progressive" and one "Republican-Democrat." D. signifies Democrat, R. Republican, 
P. Progressive. 



MEMBERS OF CONGRESS AND DISTRICTS. 



241 



MEMBERS OF THE SIXTY-FOURTH CONGRESS 
FROM MASSACHUSETTS. 



SENATORS. 

Henkt Cabot Lodge,* R of Nahant. 

John Wingate Weeks, R of Newton. 



REPRESENTATIVES. 
District 1 — Allen T. Teeadway,* R. . 

2 — Frederick H. Gillett,* R. 

3 — Calvin D. Paige,* R. 

4 — Samuel E. Winslow,* R. . 

5 — John J. Rogers,* R. . 

6 — Augustus P. Gardner.* R. 

7 — Michael F. Phelan,* D. . 

8 — Frederick W. Dallinger, P. R. 

9 — Ernest W. Roberts,* R. . 

10 — Peter F. Tague, D. . 

11 — George Holden Tinkham, R. 

12 — James A. Gallivan,* D. . 

13 — William H. Carter, R. 

14 — Richard Olnet, 2d, D. 

15 — William S. Greene,* R. . 

16 — Joseph Walsh, R. 



of Stockbridge. 
of Springfield, 
of Southbridge. 
of Worcester, 
of Lowell, 
of Hamilton, 
of Lynn, 
of Cambridge, 
of Chelsea, 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Needham. 
of Dedham. 
of Fall River, 
of New Bedford. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

Since the new apportionment based upon the United States Census of 
1910, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has been divided into sixteen 
Congressional Districts. (See Chap. 674, Acts of 1912.) 

By Chapter 226, Acts of 1916, the five Congressional Districts, in which 
one or more of the new wards of Boston are situated, were redivided as 
follows : 

District 10.— Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

District 11.— Wards 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 22 and 23. 

District 12.— Wards 9, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21. 

District 13. — Wards 25 and 26 (Brighton), with Brookline and twelve 
other towns in Norfolk County; the three cities, Newton, Waltham and 
Marlborough, and eight towns in Middlesex County, and one in Worcester 
County. 

District 14. — Ward 24, with the city of Quincy and thirteen towns 
in Norfolk County; the city of Brockton and five towns in Plymouth 
County. 

♦ Signifies re-election. Note. — D. signifies Democrat, P., Progressive, R. Republican 



242 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



FOREIGN CONSULS IN BOSTON. 



Argentina — William McKissock, 92 State street, Vice-Consul. 

Austria-Hungary — Oswald Kunhardt, 70 State street, Consul. 

Belgium — E. Sumner Mansfield, 73 Tremont street, Consul. 

Bolivia — Arthur P. Cushing, 50 Congress street, Consul. 

Brazil — Jaime Mackay D'Almeida, 382 Hanover street, Vice-Consul; 

Pedro Mackay D'Almeida, Commercial Agent, 382 Hanover street. 
Chile — Horace N. Fisher, 256 Walnut street, Brookline, Consul. 
Colombia — Jorge Vargas, H., 1120 Boylston street. Consul; Francis R. 

Hart, 17 Court street, Vice-Consul. 
Costa Rica — Max Otto von Klock, 143 Federal street. Consul. 
Cuba — Rafael Cervino, 131 State street. Consul. 
Denmark — Gustaf Lundberg, 131 State street, Consul. 
Dominican Republic — J. H. Emslie, 1315 Commonwealth avenue, Acting 

Consul. 
Ecuador — Max Otto von Klock, 143 Federal street. Acting Consul. 
France — J. C. Joseph Flamand, 10 Post Office square, Consular Agent. 
Germany — Oswald Kunhardt, 70 State street, Consul. 
Great Britain — Frederick P. Leay, 247 Atlantic avenue, Consul-General; 

A. E. R. Browne, Vice-Consul; John B. Masson, 2d Vice-Consul. 
Greece — D. T. Timayenis, 62 Long wharf, Consul-General. 
Guatemala — Alfred C. Garsia, 85 Water street, Consul; William A. 

Mosman, Vice-Consul. 
Hayti — B. Preston Clark, 55 Kilby street. Consul. 
Hond\iras — J. H. Emslie, 1315 Commonwealth avenue, Consul. 
Italy — Gustavo di Rosa, 15 Exchange street, Consul; Camillo Santarelli, 

15 Exchange street, Vice-Consul. 
Netherlands — Charles C. Dasey, 8 Broad street. Consul. 
Norway — P. Justin Paasche, 161 Milk street, Vice-Consul. 
Panama — Arthur P. Cushing, 50 Congress street. Consul. 
Paraguay — Dr. Eben M. Flagg, 558 Washington street, WeUesley, Consul. 
Peru — Eugen C. Andres, 141 Milk street, Consul. 
Portugal — George S. Duarte, 92 State street. Consul; CamiUo Camara, 

92 State street, Vice-Consul. 
Russia — Joseph A. Conry, 1 Beacon street, Consul. 
Spain — Pedro Mackay D'Almeida, 382 Hanover street, Vice-Consul. 
Sweden — B. G. A. Rosentwist, 26 India square, Vice-Consul. 
Uruguay — WiUiam A. Mosman, 85 Water street. Consul. 



STATISTICS 

OF 

Population and Area. 



244 municipal register. 

Enumerated Population of Boston, 

APRIL 1, 1915, 

745,439. 



estimated population, JULY 1, 1916, 761,194. 

According to the State Bureau of Statistics, which had charge of the 
State Census of 1915 (as of April 1), the population of Boston on that 
date was 745,439 (i. e., 369,434 males and 376,005 females), an increase 
of 74,854, or 11.16 per cent, since April 15, 1910, when it was 670,585 
(Federal census); and of 25.2 per cent, over that of May 1, 1905, viz., 
595,380, enumerated also by the State Census. 

This State Census of 1915 having been taken according to the new ward 
and precinct boundaries, as established in 1914 and 1915, comparison 
with the census figures of earlier years cannot be made except by geo- 
graphical districts. 

Up to September 15, 1916, the only figures of the 1915 census available 
were the population by wards and by sex, shown on the next page. 

For other details pertaining to population, reference must be made to 
the Census of 1910 and prior censuses, as shown on pages 246 to 252. 
"It should be noted that these tables refer to the old wards. 

Since 1875 the only considerable amount of territory annexed to Boston 
is Hyde Park, whose population on April 15, 1910, was 15,507, and esti- 
mated to be, at date of annexation, January 1, 1912, 15,936. 

The following statement shows the population in each census year, with 
the absolute and relative increase, for 40 years, 1875-1915, by five-year 
periods: 

Per cent, of 
Increase, 
Population, Census Years. Period. Increase, 5-Yr. Period. 

1875 341,919 

1880 362,839 1875-1880 20,920 6.12 

1885 390,393 1880-1885 27,554 7.59 

1890 448,477 1885-1890 58,084 14.88 

1895 496,920 1890-1895 48,443 10.80 

1900 560,892 1895-1900 63,972 12.87 

1905 595,380 1900-1905 34,488 6.15 

1910 670,585 1905-1910 75,205 12.63 

1915 745,439 1910-1915 74,854 11.16 

Among American cities, Boston has ranked fifth in population since 1890. 
It is now a close rival of St. Louis for fourth in rank. 



POPULATION OF BOSTON, 1915. 



245 



POPULATION OF BOSTON BY THE NEW WARDS. 
State Census, April 1, 1915. 



Ward. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Per Cent 
Ward to 

City. 


Excess 

of 

Females. 


Excess 

of 
Males. 


Per Cents bt Sex. 


Males. 


Females. 


1 


11,691 
22,742 
11,053 
10,289 
43,622 
19,689 
17,057 
16,246 
17,739 
12,553 
12,857 
14,487 
15,013 
12,825 
12,600 
11,498 
12,136 
12,425 
10,325 
10,951 
12,629 
11,104 
10,049 
11,384 
7,379 
9,091 


12,085 
19,162 
9,963 
8,296 
33,951 
17,561 
18,027 
22,071 
16,257 
13,188 
13,377 
14,929 
15,520 
14,974 
13,625 
13,906 
13,717 
13,452 
12,423 
12,007 
13,870 
12,708 
11,393 
11,231 
9,022 
9,290 


23,776 
41,904 
21,016 
18,585 
77,573 
37,250 
35,084 
38,317 
33,996 
25,741 
26,234 
29,416 
30,533 
27,799 
26,225 
25,404 
25,853 
25,877 
22,748 
22,958 
26,499 
23,812 
21,442 
22,615 
16,401 
18,381 


3.19 
5.62 
2.82 
2.49 
10.40 
5.00 
4.71 
5.14 
4.56 
3.45 
3.52 
3.95 
4.10 
3.73 
3.52 
3.41 
3.47 
3.47 
3.05 
3.08 
3.55 
3.19 
2.88 
3.03 
2.20 
2.47 


394 




49.17 
54.27 
52.59 
55.36 
56.23 
52.86 
48.62 
42.40 
52.18 
48.77 
49.01 
49.25 
49.17 
46.13 
48.05 
45.26 
46.94 
48.02 
45.39 
47.70 
47.66 
46.63 
46.87 
50.34 
44.99 
49 46 


50.83 


2 


3,580 
1,090 
1,993 
9,671 
2,128 


45.73 


3 




47.41 


4 




44.64 


5 




43.77 


6 




47.14 


7 


970 
5,825 

635 

520 
442 
507 
2,149 
1,025 
2,408 
1,581 
1,027 
2,098 
1,056 
1,241 
1,604 
1,344 


51.38 


8 




57.60 


9 

10 


1,482 


47.82 
51.23 


11 




50.99 


12 




50.75 


13 




50.83 


14 




53.87 


15 




51.95 


16 




54.74 


17 




53.06 


18 




51.98 


19 




54.61 


20 




52.30 


21 




52.34 


22 




53.37 


23 




53.13 


24 


153 


49.68 


25 


1,643 
199 


55.01 


26 




50.54 








Totals, 


369,434 


376,005 


745,439 


100.00 


26,668 


20,097 


49.56 


50.44 



Note. — The excess of females in 1915 (i. e., 6,571) was 41.2 per cent less than in 1910. 



246 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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POPULATION OF BOSTON, 1905. 



249 









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250 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Population of Boston, 1900 and 1905, with Per Cent, in Each Ward to Total, 
and Increase or Decrease in Five Years. 



Population, 1900. 
(National Census.) 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


11,218 


11,614 


22,832 


12,159 


10,765 


22,924 


7,290 


7,274 


14.564 


6,651 


6,597 


13.248 


6,984 


5,856 


12,840 


17,000 


13,546 


30,546 


8,167 


6,615 


14,782 


15,714 


13,103 


28.817 


12,743 


11,840 


24.583 


10,108 


12,034 


22,142 


7,906 


11.369 


19,275 


10,457 


13,184 


23,641 


11.635 


11,200 


22,835 


10,859 


10,594 


21.453 


9,450 


10,250 


19.700 


9,545 


10,472 


20,017 


12,168 


12,870 


25,038 


11,078 


11,323 


22,401 


12,882 


14,296 


27,178 


14,839 


17.717 


32,556 


10,177 


13,691 


23.868 


12,125 


13,485 


25,610 


11,438 


12,199 


23.637 


12.917 


14.209 


27.126 


9,412 


9,867 


19,279 


274,922 


285,970 


560,892 



Per cent 

of 

Total. 



4.07 
4.09 
2.60 
2.36 
2.29 
5.45 
2.64 
5.14 
4.38 
3.95 
3.44 
4.21 
4.07 
3.82 
3.51 
3.57 
4.46 
3.99 
4.85 
5.80 
4.26 
4.57 
4.21 
4.83 
3.44 

100.00 



Population, 1905. 
(State Census.) 



Males. 


Females. 


12,553 


12,852 


14.076 


11,853 


7,441 


7,390 


6.313 


6,186 


6,911 


5.742 


16,563 


13.424 


8,996 


6,583 


16,820 


13,990 


11,428 


10,692 


10,734 


13,107 


8,444 


13,909 


9,598 


12,140 


11.193 


10,461 


10,990 


11,137 


9,815 


10,495 


10,349 


11,575 


11,730 


12,583 


10,854 


11,267 


13,784 


15,429 


19,043 


22,762 


11.533 


15,000 


13,075 


14,694 


12,664 


13,746 


14,978 


16,672 


10,424 


11,382 


290,309 


305,071 



Total. 



Per cent 

of 
Total. 



25,405 
25,929 
14,831 
12,499 
12,653 
29,987 
15,579 
30,810 
22,120 
23,841 
22,353 
21,738 
21,654 
22,127 
20,310 
21.924 
24.313 
22,121 
29,213 
41,805 
26.533 
27,769 
26,410 
31,650 
21,806 

595,380 



4.27 
4.35 
2.49 
2.10 
2.12 
5.04 
2.62 
5.17 
3.72 
4.00 
3.75 
3.65 
3.64 
3.72 
3.41 
3.68 
4.08 
3.72 
4.91 
7.02 
4.46 
4.66 
4.44 
5.32 
3.66 

100.00 



Increase (+) 

or 

Decrease ( — ) 

IN 5 Years. 



Absolute 
Numbers. 



+2,573 

+3,005 

+267 

—749 

—187 

—559 

+797 

+1,993 

—2,463 

+1,699 

+3,078 

—1,903 

—1.181 

+674 

+610 

+1,907 

—725 

—280 

+2.035 

+9,249 

+2,665 

+2,159 

+2,773 

+4,524 

+2,527 

+34.488 



Per cent. 



+11.27 

+13.11 

+1.83 

—5.65 

—1.46 

—1.83 

+5.39 

+6.92 

—10.02 

+7.67 

+15.97 

—8.05 

—5.17 

+3.14 

+3.10 

+9.53 

—2.90 

—1.25 

+7.49 

+28.41 

+11.17 

+8.43 

+11.73 

+16.68 

+13.11 

+6.15 



POPULATION, 1905, 1910. 



251 



Population of Boston, 1905 and 1910, with Per Cent, in Each Ward to Total, 
and Increase or Decrease in Five Years. 



Population, 1905. 
(State Census.) 



Males. 



Females. 



Total. 



Per cent. 

of 

Total. 



12,553 


12,852 


25,405 


14,076 


11,853 


25,929 


7,441 


7,390 


14,831 


6,313 


6,186 


12,499 


6,911 


5,742 


12,653 


16,563 


13,424 


29,987 


8,996 


6,583 


15,579 


16,820 


13,990 


30,810 


11,428 


10,692 


22,120 


10,734 


13,107 


23,841 


8,444 


13,909 


22,353 


9,598 


12,140 


21,738 


11,193 


10,461 


21,654 


10,990 


11,137 


22,127 


9,815 


10,495 


20,310 


10,349 


11,575 


21,924 


11,730 


12,583 


24,313 


10,854 


11,267 


22,121 


13,784 


15,429 


29,213 


19,043 


22,762 


41,805 


11,533 


15,000 


26,533 


13,075 


14,694 


27,769 


12,664 


13,746 


26,410 


14,978 


16,672 


31,650 


10,424 


11,382 


21,806 


290,309 


305.071 


595,380 



4.27 
4.35 
2.49 
2.10 
2.12 
5.04 
2.62 
5.17 
3.72 
4.00 
3.75 
3.65 
3.64 
3.72 
3.41 
3.68 
4.08 
3.72 
4.91 
7.02 
4.46 
4.66 
4.44 
5.32 
3.66 

100.00 



Population, 1910. 
(National Census.) 



Males. Females. 



Total. 



Per cent 

of 

Total. 



14,671 


15,005 


29,676 


15,715 


13,097 


28,812 


7,786 


7,553 


15,339 


6,743 


6,551 


13,294 


7,078 


5,733 


12,811 


20,835 


14,923 


35,758 


8,708. 


6,205 


14,913 


17,399 


15,031 


32,430 


14,058 


12,369 


26,427 


11,797 


13,523 


25,320 


10,450 


16,994 


27,444 


11,267 


13,027 


24,294 


11,323 


10,238 


21,561 


11,732 


11,852 


23,584 


10,249 


10,967 


21,216 


12,315 


13,318 


25,633 


12,903 


13,523 


26,426 


11,105 


11,630 


22,735 


14,888 


16,826 


31,714 


25,650 


30,070 


55,720 


13,420 


17,091 


30,511 


14,230 


15,745 


29,975 


14,605 


16,063 


30,668 


17,936 


19,813 


37,749 


12,840 


13,735 


26,575 


329,703 


340,882 


670,585 



4.43 
4.30 
2.29 
1.98 
1.91 
5.33 
2.22 
4.84 
3.94 
3.78 
4.09 
3.62 
3.22 
3.52 
3.16 
3.82 
3.94 
3.39 
4.73 
8.31 
4.55 
4.47 
4.57 
5.63 
3.96 

100.00 



Incbease (+) 

OR 

Decrease ( — ) 
in 5 Years. 



Absolute 
Numbers. 



+4,271 

+2,883 

+508 

+795 

+158 

+5,771 

—666 

+1,620 

+4,307 

+1,479 

+5,091 

+2,556 

—93 

+1,457 

+906 

+3,709 

+2,113 

+614 

+2,501 

+13,915 

+3,978 

+2,206 

+4,258 

+6,099 

+4,769 

+75,205 



Per cent. 



+16.81 

+11.12 

+ 3.43 

+6.36 

+1.25 

+19.25 

— 4.27 

+5.26 

+19.47 

+6.20 

+22 . 78 

+11.76 

—0.43 

+6.68 

+4.46 

+16.92 

+8.69 

+2.78 

+8.56 

+33.29 

+14.99 

+7.94 

+16.12 

+19.27 

+21.87 

+12.63 



252 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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254 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



AREA, PERSONS PER ACRE, ETC., 1915 AND 1910. 



1. 

2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



1915. 



New Wakds. 



ABBA. IN ACBES. 



Land. 



Flats. 



1.080 

480 

422 

403 

750 

316 

500 

782 

1,006 

328 

863 

440 

340 

689 

486 

474 

540 

485 

553 

1,342 

1,787 

2,467 

4,743 

3,668 

1,357 

1,383 



438 

208 

72 



363 

84 

332 



145 



129 



Water. 



134 



75 
80 
55 
67 
16 
226 
75 



Total. 



1,652 

688 

569 

483 

805 

383 

516 

1,008 

1,444 

412 

1,195 

440 

340 

701 

486 

474 

685 

485 

553 

1,515 

1,843 

2,535 

4,800 

3,730 

1,391 

1,465 



POPULATION. 



Per 
Ward. 



23,776 
41,904 
21,016 
18,585 
77,573 
37,250 
35,084 
38,317 
33,996 
25,741 
26,234 
29,416 
30,533 
27,799 
26,225 
25,404 
25,853 
25,877 
22,748 
22,958 
26,499 
23,812 
21,442 
22,615 
16,401 
18,381 



Per 
Acre of 
Land. 



22.0 
87.3 
49.8 
46.1 
103.4 
117.9 
70.2 
49.0 
33.8 
78.5 
30.4 
66.9 
89.8 
40.3 
54.0 
53.6 
47.9 
53.4 
41.1 
17.1 
14.8 
9.7 
4.5 
6.2 
12.1 
13.3 



1910. 



Old Wards. 



ABEA IN ACBES. 



Land. 



1,188 
357 
332 
301 
207 
293 
394 
171 
186 
394 
663 
235 
611 
405 
277 
564 
460 
220 
760 
1,716 
640 
760 
7,617 
3,252 
2,740 
2,869 



Total. 



1,510 
415 
388 
467 
222 
293 
412 
250 
287 
394 
908 
235 
713 
899 
350 
673 
460 
220 
760 
2,110 
640 
760 
7,662 
3,480 
2,856 
2,931 



POPULATION. 



Per 
Ward. 



29,676 
28,812 
15,339 
13,294 
12,811 
35,758 
14,913 
32,430 
26,427 
25,320 
27,444 
24,294 
21,561 
23,584 
21,216 
25,633 
26,426 
22,735 
31,714 
55,720 
30,511 
29,975 
30,668 
37,749 
26,575 
* 15,507 



Per 
Acre of 
Land. 



25.0 
80.7 
46.2 
44.2 
61.9 

122.0 
37.9 

189.6 

142.1 
64.3 
41.4 

103.4 
35.3 
58.2 
76.6 
45.4 
57.4 

103.3 

41.7 

32.5 

47.7 

39.4 

4.0 

11.6 

9.7 

5.4 



Totals . . 



27,684 



1,771 



1,143 



30,598 



745,439 



26.9 



27,612 



30,295 



686,092 



24.8 



* Hyde Park included in 1910 for purpose of comparison, though not annexed until 1912. 



AREA, POPULATION, ETC. 



255 



AREA, POPULATION, ETC., 1915 AND 1910 Percentages. 







Per Cent, op 


Each Ward to 


Whole City. 






1915. 


1910. 


Wabd. 


New Wards. 


Old Wards. 




AREA IN ACRES. 


Popu- 
lation. 


AREA IN ACRES. 


Popu- 




Land. 


Flats. 


Water. 


Total. 


Land. 


Total. 


lation. 


1 


3.90 
1.73 
1.52 
1.46 
2.71 
1.14 
1.81 
2.82 
3.63 
1.18 
3.12 
1.69 
1.23 
2.49 
1.76 
1.71 
1.95 
1.75 
2.00 
4.85 
6.46 
8.91 
17.13 
13.25 
4.90 
5.00 


24.73 

11.74 

4.07 

20.50 

4.74 
18.75 


11.72 

6.56 
7.00 
4.81 
5.86 
1.40 
19.77 
6.56 


5.40 
2.25 
1.86 
1.58 
2.63 
1.25 
1.69 
3.29 
4.72 
1.34 
3.90 
1.44 
1.11 
2.29 
1.59 
1.55 
2.24 
1.59 
1.81 
4.95 
6.02 
8.28 
15.69 
12.19 
4.55 
4.79 


3.19 

5.62 
2.82 
2.49 

10.41 
5.00 
4.71 
5.14 
4.56 
3.45 
3.52 
3.95 
4.10 
3.73 
3.52 
3.41 
3.47 
3.47 
3.05 
3.08 
3.55 
3.19 
2.88 
3.03 
2.20 

. 2.46 


4.30 
1.29 
1.20 
1.09 
0.75 
1.06 
1.43 
0.62 
0.67 
1.43 
2.40 
0.85 
2.21 
1.47 
1.00 
2.04 
1.66 
0.80 
2.75 
6.21 
2.32 
2.75 
27.59 
11.80 
9.92 
10.39 


4.98 
1.37 
1.28 
1.54 
0.73 
0.97 
1.36 
0.83 
0.95 
1.30 
3.00 
0.76 
2.35 
2.97 
1.16 
2.22 
1.52 
0.73 
2.51 
6.96 
2.11 
2.51 
25.29 
11.50 
9.43 
9.67 


4.33 


2 


4.20 


3 


2.24 


4 


1.94 


5 


1.87 


6 


5.21 


7 


2.17 


8 


4.73 


9 


3.85 


10 


3.69 


11 


4.00 


12 


3.54 


13 






3.14 


14 . . . . 




1.05 


3.44 


15 


3.09 


16 






3.75 


17 


8.19 




3.85 


18 . 


3.31 


19 






4.62 


20 


7.28 


3.85 
4.90 
5.95 
4.99 
5.42 
2.98 
7.18 


8.12 


21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 


4.45 
4.37 
4.47 
5.50 
3.87 
2.26 






The City. 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 



256 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



PRINCIPAL ISLANDS IN BOSTON HARBOR. 



Name. 


Area. 


Ownership. 


Occupied by, etc. 


* Governor's Island, 


72.0 acres 


United States 


Fort Winthrop. Now in charge 
of Boston Park and Recrea- 
tion Department. 


* Castle Island 


21.6 ' 




Fort Independence. Now in 
charge of Boston Park and 
Recreation Department. 


* Lovell's Island 


71.1 ' 





Fort Standish and Government 
Buoy Station. 


* George's Island 


39.7 " 


" " 


Fort Warren. 


* Rainsford Island . . 


17.4 « 


Citj' of Boston 


Suffolk School for Boys. Pur- 
chased in 1871 for $40,000. 


* Gallop's Island . . 


25.1 " 


United States 


Quarantine Station. Purchased 
in 1860 for $6,600. Leased to 
the United States in 1915. 
Purchased by United States 
in 1916. 




172.0 " 


City of Boston 


Almshouse and Hospital. In 
1885 the City of Boston pur- 
chased 182.5 acres for $164,- 
600. In 1900 10.5 acres were 


* Long Island 






conveyed to the United States 
Government for $18,540.80, 
leaving 172 acres owned by 
the city. 




43.5 " 


United States 


Fort Strong and Lighthouse 
on Long Island Head. The 
United States Government 
purchased 1.2 acres in 1819, 
31.8 acres in 1867 and 10.5 
acres in 1900. 




99.6 « 


City of Boston 


{ House of Correction. Con- 
veyed to the inhabitants of 
Boston, March 4, 1634-35. 
10.9 acres of this land were 






fCommonwealth of 


taken by the Commonwealth 


♦Deer Island 


7.7 ' 


\ for the Metropolitan Sewerage 








works, 7.7 acres in fee and 3.2 








acres in easement. 75 acres 








conveyed to the United States 




75.0 « 


United States 


for harbor defences in 1906. 


•Apple Island 


8.9 " 


City of Boston 


Purchased in 1867 for $3,750. 




55.1 « 


N. Ward & Co. 




• Spectacle Island . . • 


6.1 « 


City of Boston ... 1 


Purchased in 1914 for Refuse 
Destructor site. 




0.2 " 


United States 


Lighthouse. 


* Thompson's Island, 


146.5 " 


Boston Asylum and 
Farm School for 








Indigent Boys 


Farm School. Annexed to Bos- 
ton by Act of March 15, 1834. 


t Little Brewster. . . . 


3.6 " 


United States 


Boston Lighthouse. 


t Great Brewster 


23.1 ' 


City of Boston 


Purchased in 1848 for $4,000. 


t Outer Brewster 


17.5 " 


United States 


Purchased in 1913. 


t Middle Brewster. . . 


12.2 « 


Melvin O. Adams, 
Richard S. Whitney, 
Benj. P. Cheney. 




t Calf Island 


17.1 « 


Benj. P. Cheney. 




t Little Calf Island, 


1.1 « 


J. S.Weeks' Heirs. 




t Green Island 


1.8 « 


James Young and 
Melvin 0. Adams. 




X Moon Island 


30.0 " 


City of Boston 


Taken by right of eminent do- 
main in 1879. Point of dis- 
charge of main drainage system . 



Note. — Islards marked with an (*) are in the City limits; those with a (t) are in the 
town of Hull; the last, with a (t), is in the City of Quincy. 



STATISTICS 

OF 

valuation, taxes, appeopeiations, 

Expenditures, Debt, 

Etc. 



258 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



ASSESSED VALUATION AND TAXES, 1915. 



Assessed Valuation, 
April 1, 1915. 



Real 
Estate. 



Personal 

Estate. 



Total. 



Taxes at $18 per $1,000. 



Real 

Estate. 



Personal 
Estate. 



Polls. 



Total. 



$19,089,700 
22,304,600 
11,807,600 
14,102,.500 
12,253,600 

189,214,500 

318,246,000 
36,304,300 
24,704,700 
78,270,500 

134,536,000 
20.992,700 
35,551,300 
18,000,700 
9,477,100 
17,918,400 
20,411,900 
15,993,900 
24,761,600 
51,678,100 
27,977,200 
24,070,000 
35,009,800 
38,981,600 
45,261,600 
14,944,400 



$1,261,954,300 



$1,612,000 

1,204,600 

771,000 

808,600 

1,453,600 

35,278,900 

80,406,300 
3,394,500 
1,493,900 
6,641,400 

90,506,200 
3,013,800 

. 7,234,900 
1,263,600 
1,076,200 
1,605,000 
1,815,400 
851,700 
3,412,600 
7,292,600 
7,305,200 
6,481,200 
8,415,900 
4,479,300 
6,522,800 
2,453,600 



$286,794,800 
17,648,200 



$20,701,700 
23,599,200 
12,578,600 
14,911,100 
13,707,200 

224,493,400 

398,652,300 
39,698,800 
26,198,600 
84,911,900 

225,042,200 
24,006,500 
42,786,200 
19,264,300 
10,553,300 
19,523,400 
22,227,300 
16,845,600 
28,174,200 
58,970,700 
35,282,400 
30,551,200 
43,425,700 
43,460,900 
51,784,400 
17,398,000 



$343,614 60 
403,102 80 
212,536 80 
253,845 00 
220,564 80 
3,405,861 00 
5,728,428 00 
653,477 40 
444,684 60 
1,408,869 00 
2,421,648 00 
377,868 60 
639,923 40 
324,012 60 
170,587 80 
322,531 20 
367,414 20 
287,890 20 
445,708 80 
930,205 80 
503,589 60 
433,260 00 
630,176 40 
701,668 80 
814,708 80 
268,999 20 



$29,016 00 

21,682 80 

13,878 00 

14,554 80 

26,164 80 

635,020 20 

1,447,313 40 

61,101 00 

26,890 20 

119,545 20 

1,629,111 60 

54,248 40 

130,228 20 

22,744 80 

19,371 60 

28,890 00 

32,677 20 

15,330 60 

61,426 80 

131,266 80 

131,493 60 

116,661 60 

151,486 20 

80,627 40 

117,410 40 

44,164 80 



17,292 
14,612 
7,802 
7,494 
7,486 
23,270 
9,568 
17,038 
16,220 
18,012 
13,274 
16,524 
11,680 
13,298 
11,430 
16,074 
13,998 
12,640 
16,746 
39,038 
19,172 
17,894 
22,044 
27,110 
20,142 
10,008 



$1,548,749,100 
17,648,200 



$22,715,177 40 



$5,162,306 40 
317,667 60 



419,866 



$389,922 60 
439,397 60 
234,216 80 
275,893 80 
254,215 60 
4,064,151 20 
7,185,309 40 
731,616 40 
487,794 80 
1,546,426 20 
4,064,033 60 
448,641 00 
781,831 60 
360,055 40 
201,389 40 
367,495 20 
414,089 40 
315,860 80 
523,881 60 
1,100,510 60 
654,255 20 
567,815 60 
803,706 60 
809,406 20 
952,261 20 
323,172 00 



$28,297,349 80 
317,667 60 



Totals. . $1,261,954,300 $304,443,000 $1,566,397,300 $22,715,177 40 $5,479,974 00 419,866 $28,615,017 40 



Note. — The supplementary assessments of omitted estates increased the totals (for all wards) under Assessed 
Valuation as follows: Real Estate, $284,400, and Personal estate, $6,482,800, making the grand total of Assessed 
Valuation, $1,573,164,500, and under Taxes as follows: Polls, $300; Real Estate, $5,119, and Personal Estate, 
$116,690, making the grand total of Taxes $28,737,126.40. 

The total Assessed Valuation in 1915 exceeds that of 1914 by $23,117,891. 



VALUATION AND TAXES, 1915. 



259 



ASSESSED VALUATION AND TAXES, 1915 — PERCENTAGES. 



Old 
Wards 



10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



Per Cent, of Each Waed to Whole City. 



ASSESSED VALUATION. 



Real 

Estate. 



Personal 

Estate. 



1.51 
1.77 
0.94 
1.12 
0.97 
14.99 
25.22 
2.88 
1.96 
6.20 
10.66 
1.66 
2.82 
1.43 
0.75 
1.42 
1.62 
1.27 
1.96 
4.09 
2.22 
1.91 
2.77 
3.09 
3.59 
1.18 



0.56 
0.42 
0.27 
0.28 
0.51 
12.30 
28.04 
1.18 
0.52 
2.32 
31.56 
1.05 
2.52 
0.44 
0.38 
0.56 
0.63 
0.30 
1.19 
2.54 
2.55 
2.26 
2.93 
1.56 
2.27 
0.86 



The City... 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 



Total. 



1.34 
1.52 
0.81 
0.96 
0.89 
14.50 
25.74 
2.56 
1.69 
5.48 
14.53 
1.55 
2.76 
1.25 
0.68 
1.26 
1.44 
1.09 
1.82 
3.81 
2.28 
1.97 
2.80 
2.81 
3.34 
1.12 



TAXES. 



Real 

Estate. 



1.51 
1.77 
0.94 
1.12 
0.97 
14.99 
25.22 
2.88 
1.96 
6.20 
10.66 
1.66 
2.82 
1.43 
0.75 
1.42 
1.62 
1.27 
1.96 
4.09 
2.22 
1.91 
2.77 
3.09 
3.59 
1.18 



Personal 

Estate. 



0.56 
0.42 
0.27 
0.28 
0.51 
12.30 
28.04 
1.18 
0.52 
2.32 
31.56 
1.05 
2.52 
0.44 
0.38 
0.56 
0.63 
0.30 
1.19 
2.54 
2.55 
2.26 
2.93 
1.56 
2.27 
0.86 



Polls. 



4.12 
3.48 
1.86 
1.78 
1.78 
5.54 
2.28 
4.06 
3.86 
4.29 
3.16 
3.94 
2.78 
3.17 
2.72 
3.83 
3.33 
3.01 
3.99 
9.30 
4.57 
4.26 
5.25 
6.46 
4.80 
2.38 



Total. 



100.00 100.00 100.00 



1.38 
1.55 
0.83 
0.97 
0.90 
14.36 
25.39 
2.59 
1.72 
5.47 
14.36 
1.59 
2.76 
1.27 
0.71 
1.30 
1.46 
1.12 
1.85 
3.89 
2.31 
2.01 
2.84 
2.86 
3.37 
1.14 



Note. — Three wards (viz.: Wards 6, 7 and 11) contain 54.77 per cent, of all the taxed 
realty and personalty in the 26 wards of the City. 



260 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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EXPENDITURES, 1874-1915. 



265 



Annual Expenditures. 

(From the Annual Reports of the City Auditor.) 

The following table shows the City and County expenditures, by fiscal years, 
for all purposes except debt redemption and payments of temporary loans: 





Interest on 
Debt and 
Temporary- 
Loans. 


State Tax. 


Other City 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Total Actual Expbnditubes. 


Yeab. 


City. 


County. 


City and 
County. 


1874-75. . 


$2,671,496 12 


$802,120 00 


$11,542,694 17 


$15,016,310 29 


$372,321 99 


$15,388,632 28 


1875-76. . 


2,607,933 20 


802,120 00 


11,704,336 52 


15,114,389 72 


361,510 29 


15,475,900 01 


1876-77. . 


2,572,057 28 


742,932 00 


10,805,276 07 


14,120,265 35 


345,976 34 


14,466,241 69 


1877-78. . 


2,461,600 59 


619,110 00 


10,434,694 47 


13,515,405 06 


328,646 92 


13,844,051 98 


1878-79. . 


2,352,160 26 


412,740 00 


9,413,015 15 


12.177,915 41 


327,833 50 


12,505,748 91 


1879-80. . 


2,377,050 59 


206,370 00 


9,320,836 79 


11,904,257 38 


296,140 82 


12,200,398 20 


1880-81. . 


2,220,171 43 


619,110 00 


10,252,967 39 


13,092,248 82 


305,871 68 


13,398,120 50 


1881-82. . 


2,188,564 72 


619,110 00 


10,422,476 44 


13,230,151 16 


338,261 12 


13,568,412 28 


1882-83. . 


2,184,580 49 


825,480 00 


11,879,562 33 


14,889,622 82 


362,908 06 


15,252,530 88 


1883-84. . 


2,227,045 73 


578,055 00 


12,852,436 08 


15,657,536 81 


368,352 40 


16,025,889 21 


1884-85. . 


2,238,518 17 


770,740 00 


12,456,798 17 


15,466,056 34 


393,785 77 


15,859,842 11 


1885-86. . 


2,242,102 19 


578,055 00 


11,480,449 18 


14,300.606 37 


852,613 93 


15,153,220 30 


1886-87. . 


2,237,479 04 


555,870 00 


11,542,638 27 


14,335,987 31 


999,056 20 


15,335,043 51 


1887-88. . 


2,315,833 49 


833,805 00 


12,920,866 74 


16,070,505 23 


1,086,026 43 


17,156,531 66 


1888-89. . 


2,324,476 50 


833,805 00 


12,974,131 56 


16,132,413 06 


1,334,640 21 


17,467,053 27 


1889-90. . 


2,353,785 54 


738,020 00 


13,508,467 28 


16,600,272 82 


1,265,160 36 


17,865,433 18 


1890-91. . 


2,447,882 87 


645,767 50 


14,585,464 60 


17,679,114 97 


1,133,121 18 


18,812,236 15 


1891-92 
(9 months) 


1,785,671 04 


553,515 00 


13,855,842 03 


16,195,028 07 


777,496 32 


16,972,524 39 


1892-93. . 


2,522,587 58 


640,062 50 


16,954,626 31 


20,117,276 39 


1,183,388 65 


21,300,665 04 


1893-94. . 


2,476,430 95 


914,375 00 


17,287,020 68 


20,677,826 62 


1,019,172 73 


21,696,999 35 


1894-95. . 


2,341,623 81 


731,500 00 


19,026,419 75 


22,099,543 56 


985,044 21 


23,084.587 77 


1895-96. . 


2,580,208 65 


538,920 00 


20,474,494 46 


23,593,623 11 


941,184 68 


24,534,807 79 


1896-97. . 


2,820,480 64 


628,740 00 


21,421,186 40 


24,870,407 04 


967,083 25 


25,837,490 29 


1897-98. . 


3,107,953 19 


628,740 00 


24,105,749 58 


27,842,442 77 


1,183,478 06 


29,025,920 83 


1898-99. . 


3,326,127 78 


536,670 00 


22,794,478 50 


26,657,276 28 


1,223,241 21 


27,880,517 49 


1899-1900. 


3,258,486 87 


536,670 00 


24,246,070 07 


28,041,226 94 


1,284,496 76 


29,325,723 70 


1900-01. . 


3,372,266 00 


536,670 00 


23,559,659 53 


27,468,595 53 


1,286,450 67 


28,755,046 20 


1901-02. . 


3,131,100 88 


632,240 00 


25,279,578 54 


29,042,919 42 


1,470,276 08 


30,513,195 50 


1902-03. . 


3,077,050 88 


541,920 00 


26,327,770 22 


29,946,741 10 


1,700,850 15 


31,647,591 25 


1903-04. . 


3,173,911 88 


903,200 00 


28,071,752 70 


32,148,864 58 


1,501,586 44 


33,650,451 02 


1904-05. . 


3,320,144 38 


900,125 00 


28,417,736.09 


32,638,005 47 


1,451,986 08 


34,089,991 55 


1905-06. . 


3.504,103 13 


1,440,200 00 


28,270,333 05 


33,214,636 18 


1,377,704 33 


34,592,340 51 


1906-07. . 


3,671,778 94 


1,260,175 00 


27,817,757 83 


32,749,711 77 


1,395,900 07 


34,145,611 84 


1907-08. . 


3,769,830 58 


1,438,800 00 


27,397,912 24 


32,606,542 82 


1,500,090 41 


34,106,633 23 


1908-09. . 


3,894,965 35 


1,978,350 00 


26,402,196 14 


32,275,511 49 


1,505,615 76 


33,781,127 25 


1909-10. . 


3,965,443 80 


1,618,650 00 


26,600,060 27 


32,184,154 07 


1,603,152 00 


33,787,306 07 


1910-11. . 


4,086,250 65 


1,880,395 00 


26,784,297 11 


32,750,942 76 


1,537,506 98 


34,288,449 74 


1911-12. . 


4,143,157 09 


1,880,395 00 


27,317,977 23 


33,341,529 32 


1,636,168 09 


34,977,697 41 


1912-13. . 


4,212,457 98 


2,160,750 00 


31,983,793 94 


38,357,001 92 


1,706,653 40 


40,063,655 32 


1913-14. . 


4,378,886 96 


2,632,000 00 


36,656,694 61 


43,667,581 57 


1,733,420 82 


45,401,002 39 


1914-15. . 


4,533,015 .34 


2,878,750 00 


36,968,173 02 


44,379,938 36 


1,819,717 19 


46,199,655 55 


1915-16. . 


4,683,376 68 


3,207,750 00 


36,406,584 87 


44,297,711 55 


1,883,079 05 


46,180,790 60 



266 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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272 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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DEBT SUMMARY, 1878-1915. 



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STATISTICS 



OF 



City Election, 

DECEMBER 14, 1915. 



276 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



REGISTERED AND ACTUAL VOTERS, CITY ELECTION, 
December 14, 1915. 

[As Reported by Election Commissioners.] 











Men and Women Voters. 








Voting 
Precincts. 


* Men 
Listed 

by 
Police 
1915. 
















Ward. 


Registered 
Voters. 


Actual 
Voters, t 


Per Cent. 

Registered 

who 

Voted. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 




1 


9 


9,398 


5,363 


447 


5,810 


3,420 


261 


3,681 


63.36 


2 


. 8 


7,681 


2,739 


105 


2,844 


1,787 


46 


1,833 


64.45 


3 


6 


4.028 


2,664 


364 


3,028 


1,836 


160 


1,996 


65.92 


4 


6 


3,702 


2,029 


182 


2,211 


1,401 


71 


1,472 


66.58 


5 


6 


3,916 


2,109 


260 


2,369 


1,474 


119 


1,593 


67.24 


6 


8 


12,286 


2,075 


72 


2,147 


1,437 


32 


1,469 


68.42 


7 


6 


5,100 


1,213 


70 


1,283 


839 


25 


864 


67.34 


8 


6 


10,419 


3,120 


91 


3,211 


2,263 


46 


2,309 


71.91 


9 


7 


9,126 


2,956 


94 


3,050 


1,990 


44 


2,034 


66.69 


10 


9 


9,479 


3,734 


514 


4,248 


2,584 


378 


2,962 


69.73 


11 


9 


7,341 


3,607 


1,092 


4,699 


2,717 


811 


3,528 


75.08 


12 


7 


8,567 


3,490 


313 


3,803 


2,393 


203 


2,596 


68.26 


13 


8 


6,217 


2,427 


95 


2,522 


1,628 


48 


1,676 


66.46 


14 


8 


7,068 


4,245 


399 


4,644 


2,962 


196 


3,158 


68.00 


15 


8 


6,008 


3,509 


370 


3,879 


2,381 


167 


2,548 


65.69 


16 


7 


8,336 


4,797 


332 


5,129 


3,211 


172 


3,383 


65.96 


17 


9 


7,528 


4,069 


247 


4,316 


2,961 


142 


3,103 


71.90 


18 


6 


6,711 


3,140 


144 


3,284 


2,062 


59 


2,121 


64.59 


19 


9 


8,740 


5,064 


405 


5,469 


3,741 


174 


3,915 


71.59 


20 


16 


20,149 


13,189 


1,301 


14,490 


9,173 


758 


9,931 


68.54 


21 


12 


10,277 


6,649 


865 


7,514 


4,661 


516 


5,177 


68.90 


22 


8 


9,514 


5,867 


502 


6,369 


4,195 


320 


4,515 


70.89 


23..... 


14 


11,356 


7,818 


933 


8,751 


5,720 


600 


6,320 


72.22 


24 


16 


14,180 


9,237 


799 


10,036 


6,283 


454 


6,737 


67.13 


23 


10 


10,736 


6,517 


662 


7,179 


4,377 


390 


4,767 


66.40 


26 


7 


5,188 


2,942 


385 


3,327 


2,082 


241 


2,323 


69.82 


Totals, 


225 


222,951 


114,569 


11,043 


125,612 


79,578 


6,433 


86,011 


68.47 



* Men residents 20 years of age and over. 



t All the names cheeked on voting list. 



PER CENT. OF VOTERS IN EACH WARD. 



277 



REGISTERED AND ACTUAL VOTERS, CITY ELECTION, 
December 14, 1915. — Percentages. 







Per Cent, in Each Ward to 


Total. 




Ward. 


Men 
Listed 

by 
Police, 

1915. 


Registered 
Voters. 


Actual 
Voters. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


1 


4.21 
3.40 
1.81 
1.66 
1.76 
5.51 
2.29 
4.67 
4.09 
4.25 
3.29 
3.84 
2.79 
3.17 
2.69 
3.74 
3.38 
3.01 
3.92 
9.04 
4.61 
4.27 
5.09 
6.36 
4.82 
2.33 


4.68 
2.39 
2.33 
1.77 
1.84 
1.81 
1.06 
2.72 
2.58 
3.26 
3.15 
3.05 
2.12 
3.71 
3.06 
4.19 
3.55 
2.74 
4.42 
11.51 
5.80 
5.12 
6.82 
8.06 
5.69 
2.57 


4.05 
0.95 
3.30 
1.65 
2.35 
0.65 
0.63 
0.82 
0.85 
4.66 
9.89 
2.83 
0.86 
3.61 
3.35 
3.01 
2.24 
1.30 
3.67 
11.78 
7.83 
4.55 
8.45 
7.24 
5.99 
3.49 


4.62 
2.26 
2.41 
1.76 
1.89 
1.71 
1.02 
2.56 
2.43 
3.38 
3.74 
3.03 
2.01 
3.70 
3.09 
4.08 
3.44 
2.61 
4.35 
11.54 
5.98 
5.07 
6.97 
7.99 
5.71 
2.65 


4.30 
2.25 
2.31 
1.76 
1.85 
1.81 
1.05 
2.84 
2.50 
3.25 
3.41 
3.01 
2.05 
3.72 
2.99 
4.03 
3.72 
2.59 
4.70 
11.53 
5.86 
5.27 
7.19 
7.89 
5.50 
2.62 


4.06 
0.71 
2.49 
1.10 
1.85 
0.50 
0.39 
0.71 
0.68 
5.88 
12.61 
, 3.16 
0.75 
3.05 
2.59 
2.67 
2.21 
0.92 
2.70 
11.78 
8.02 
4.97 
9.33 
7.06 
6.06 
3.75 


4.28 


2 


2.14 


3 


2.33 


4. 


1.71 


5 


1.85 


6 


1.71 


7 


1.00 


8 


2.68 


9 


2.36 


10 


3.44 


11 


4.10 


12 


3.02 


13 


1.95 


14 


3.67 


15 


2.96 


16 


3.93 


17 


3.61 


18 


2.47 


19 


4.55 


20 


11.55 


21 


6.02 


22 


5.25 


23 


7.35 


24 . 


7.83 


25 


5.54 


26 


2.70 






Totals 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 



278 



MUNICIPAL EEGISTER. 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
By Precincts, December 14, 1915. 

[Compiled from Report of Election Commissioners.] 



Ward. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 



Precinct 
1. 



Listed 

by 
Police. 



623 

924 

620 

593 

761 

1,543 

416 

1,369 

1,775 

762 

1,080 

1,575 

898 

934 

628 

650 

826 

1,012 

1,431 

1,133 

890 

1,363 

799 

884 

870 

865 



Regis- 
tered. 



Voted. 



324 
311 
470 
404 
397 
122 
90 
371 
455 
220 
455 
570 
324 
469 
238 
396 
284 
506 
785 
696 
551 
967 
506 
498 
488 
505 



213 
193 
329 
281 
261 
82 
72 
276 
303 
151 
320 
379 
216 
320 
139 
239 
182 
347 
564 
493 
382 
734 
390 
351 
289 
314 



Precinct 

2. 



Listed 

by 
Police. 



653 

638 
665 
595 
825 

1,760 
913 

2,201 

1,352 
694 

1,220 

1,128 
700 
847 
889 

1,081 
581 

1,049 
644 

1,151 
727 

1,421 

1,070 
834 

1,030 
558 



Regis- 
tered. 



335 
239 
433 
320 
540 
275 
167 
597 
466 
284 
309 
428 
257 
458 
460 
667 
348 
395 
333 
788 
479 
706 
715 
488 
619 
415 



Voted. 



204 
167 
281 
204 
396 
170 
125 
418 
313 
205 
201 
296 
158 
328 
295 
451 
254 
253 
238 
538 
338 
521 
558 
358 
418 
290 



Precinct 
3. 



Listed 

by 
Police. 



937 

876 

651 

780 

546 

1,564 

1,191 

1,390 

1,367 

815 

1,078 

851 

769 

591 

759 

1,621 

746 

1,054 

830 

1,498 

832 

685 

1,241 

1,136 

896 

748 



Regis- 
tered. 



601 
377 
474 
436 
257 
274 
354 
671 
253 
267 
424 
332 
213 
403 
457 

1,039 
417 
460 
496 

1,081 
544 
449 
657 
726 
526 
478 



Voted. 



416 
269 
341 
308 
195 
200 
251 
414 
161 
189 
304 
217 
145 
269 
290 
712 
314 
274 
388 
779 
400 
320 
443 
487 
319 
346' 



REGISTRATION, VOTE, ETC., BY PRECINCTS. 279 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
By Precincts, December 14, 1915 — Continued, 



Ward. 



Precinct 

4. 



Listed 

by 
Police. 



Regis- 
tered. 



Voted. 



Precinct 

5. 



Listed 

by 
Police. 



Regis- 
tered. 



Voted. 



Precinct 

6. 



Listed 

by 
Police. 



Regis- 
tered. 



Voted. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 



897 

796 

681 

586 

415 

1,808 

1,112 

1,691 

1,250 

801 

720 

1,395 

806 

853 

611 

1,326 

1,125 

1,360 

875 

1,234 

776 

1,827 

1,075 

825 

1,162 

701 



562 
265 
432 
358 
222 
242 
225 
558 
517 
263 
413 
595 
319 
551 
372 
728 
701 
602 
499 
876 
523 
1,013 
713 
579 
506 
474 



351 
164 
299 
256 
143 
177 
141 
405 
339 
177 
329 
390 
224 
400 
259 
466 
507 
355 
358 
624 
364 
710 
546 
411 
326 
338 



1,018 
743 
788 
554 
749 

1,842 
823 

1,687 

1,346 
653 
432 

1,158 
843 
995 
627 

1,276 
642 
969 
763 

1,402 
877 

1,168 
818 

1,217 

1,203 
897 



568 
264 
489 
263 
382 
356 
234 
398 
430 
259 
288 
464 
349 
598 
439 
649 
371 
517 
386 
901 
572 
732 
543 
850 
745 
312 



355 
172 
343 
189 
276 
243 
153 
291 
283 
171 
247 
309 
253 
407 
325 
453 
249 
371 
276 
636 
384 
510 
391 
507 
503 
234 



1,159 


498 


664 


399 


623 


366 


594 


248 


620 


311 


839 


296 


645 


143 


2,081 


625 


1,232 


453 


990 


342 


281 


190 


1,442 


574 


784 


288 


826 


519 


728 


452 


1,018 


659 


624 


288 


1,267 


660 


1,031 


551 


1,266 


801 


857 


557 


953 


673 


435 


329 


716 


483 


1,588 


873 


602 


381 



302 
256 
243 
163 
203 
223 
97 
459 
325 
219 
155 
411 
196 
344 
310 
450 
204 
462 
417 
501 
403 
468 
216 
358 
659 
286 



280 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
By Precincts, December 14, 1915. — Continued. 





Precinct 

7. 


Precinct 

8. 


Precinct 
9. 


Wabd. 


Listed 

by 
Police. 


Regis- 
tered. 


Voted. 


Listed 

by 
Police. 


Regis- 
tered. 


Voted. 


Listed 

by 
PoUce. 


Regis- 
tered. 


Voted. 


1 


1,470 
1.865 


839 
508 


505 
340 


1,477 
1,075 


941 
376 


603 
226 


1,164 


695 


471 


2 




3 








4 




















5 




















6 


1,749 


313 


216 


1,181 


197 


126 








7 








s 




















g 


794 
1,228 

400 
1,018 

746 

848 
1,013 
1,364 

873 


382 
620 
258 
527 
350 
551 
649 
659 
474 


266 
457 
217 
391 
231 
400 
459 
440 
357 














10 


1,454 
412 


648 
313 


442 
254 


2,041 
1,718 


831 
957 


573 


11 


690 


12 




13 


671 

1,174 

753 


327 
696 
442 


205 

494 
304 








14 








15 








16 








17 


1,280 


654 


484 


831 


532 


410 


18 




19 


978 
1,178 
920 
855 
946 
422 
1,301 
817 


736 
915 
532 
569 
675 
330 
882 
377 


585 
658 
361 
411 
425 
219 
604 
274 


1.133 
1,104 
978 
1,242 
632 
988 
825 


715 
839 
685 
758 
487 
669 
588 


539 
619 
496 
521 
377 
526 
451 


1.055 

1,156 

767 


563 
722 
542 


376 


20 


506 


21 


378 


22 




23 


821 
720 
862 


541 
545 
633 


357 


24 


403 


25 


430 


26... 



















REGISTRATION, VOTE, ETC., BY PRECINCTS. 281 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
By Precincts, December 14, 1915. — Concluded. 







Peecinct 10. 

(In Five Wards Only.) 


Ward. 


Listed 

by 
Police. 


Regis- 
tered. 


Voted. 


Listed 

by 
PoKce. 


Regis- 
tered. 


Voted. 


20 








1,278 

864 
727 
733' 
999 


902 
534 
545 
534 
657 


627 


21 








371 


23 








410 


24 








360 


25 








478 













Ward. 


Precinct 11. 

(In Four Wards Only.) 


Precinct 12. 

(In Four Wards Only.) 


20 


1,233 

1,202 

687 

944 


675 
750 
567 
590 


455 
497 
445 
403 


1,200 

587 
584 
784 


811 
380 
465 
562 


558 


21 


287 


23 


360 


24 


388 



Ward. 


Precinct 13. 

(In Three Wards Only.) 


Precinct 14. 

(In Three Wards Only.) 


20 


1,218 

754 
967 


763 
552 

588 


513 
416 
343 


1,170 

767 

1.239 


859 
523 
668 


631 


23 


386 


24 


434 



Ward. 


Precinct 15. 

(In Two Wards Only.) 


Precinct 16. 

(In Two Wards Only.) 


20 


1,720 
1,003 


748 
650 


461 
421 


1,208 
768 


812 
477 


574 


24 


314 







Note . — At the time of the last City Election, December 14, 1915, only five of the wards 
had m ore than nine precincts, only four had more than ten precincts, etc., as shown above 



282 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



U 

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00 


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CD 

oq 







VOTE FOR SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



283 



VOTE FOR SCHOOL COMMITTEE, DECEMBER 14, 1915. 

[As Reported by Election Commissioners.] 



Ward. 



Frances 

G. 
Curtis. 

# 



Julia 
E. Duff. 



H. J. 

Keenan. 



All 
Others. 



Total 
Vote. 



Blanks. 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



1,528 

496 

322 

249 

296 

586 

324 

785 

807 

2,145 

2,997 

1,393 

236 

816 

647 

1,346 

948 

852 

1,019 

5,292 

3,218 

2,373 

3,839 

3,847 

2,600 

1,474 



827 
463 

1,152 
780 
928 
215 
231 
220 
426 
313 
185 
432 
361 
735 
635 
713 
601 
395 
953 

1,757 
752 
750 
908 

1,206 
706 
200 



1,167 

751 

456 

399 

309 

486 

258 

1,170 

667 

356 

248 

651 

1,008 

1,464 

1,157 

1,214 

1,425 

732 

1,790 

2,557 

1,012 

1,225 

1,360 

1,462 

1,320 

566 



3,525 
1,710 
1,930 
1,428 
1,533 
1,287 
813 
2,175 
1,900 
2,814 
3,430 
2,477 
1,606 
3,015 
2,439 
3,273 
2,974 
1,979 
3,762 
9,606 
4,984 
4,348 
6,107 
6,515 
^,626 
2,240 



156 
123 

66 

44 

60 
182 

51 
134 
134 
148 

98 
119 

70 
143 
109 
110 
129 
142 
153 
325 
193 
167 
213 
222 
141 

83 



Totals . 



40,435 16,844 



25,210 



82,496 3,515 



# Re-elected for term of three years. 
Note. — Total vote of women, 6,433, or 7.8 per cent, of all votes cast for School 
Committee. 



284 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VOTE ON QUESTION OF GRANTING LIQUOR LICENSES, 
DECEMBER 14, I9I5. 

[As Reported by Election Commissionera.] 



Wabd. 



Voted 
Yes. 



Voted 
No. 



Total 
Vo te. 



Majorities 

for 

License. 



Blanks. 



Per Cent of 
Total Who 
Voted Yes. 



9.. 
10. 
11., 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



2,026 
1,147 
1,022 

796 

837 
1,040 

524 
1,569 
1,223 
1,549 
1,795 
1,374 

950 
1,767 
1,390 
1,922 
1,820 
1,288 
2,379 
5,309 
2.787 
2,669 
2,843 
2,978 
2,271 

840 



1,332 

585 

772 

583 

605 

345 

294 

629 

717 

974 

844 

968 

650 

1,140 

937 

1,233 

1,082 

716 

1,298 

3,734 

1,788 

1,462 

2,782 

3,172 

2,034 

1,201 



3,358 
1,732 
1,794 
1,379 
1,442 
1,385 
818 
2,198 
1,940 
2,523 
2,639 
2,342 
1,600 
2,907 
2,327 
3,155 
2,902 
2,004 
3,677 
9,043 
4,575 
4,131 
5,625 
6,150 
4,305 
2,041 



694 
562 
250 
213 
232 
695 
230 
940 
506 
575 
951 
406 
300 
627 
453 
689 
738 
572 
1,081 
1,575 
999 
1,207 
61 

# 194 
237 

# 361 



62 


60.33 


55 


66.22 


i2 


56.97 


22 


57.72 


32 


68.04 


52 


75.09 


21 


64.06 


65 


71.38 


50 


63.04 


61 


61.40 


78 


68.02 


51 


58.67 


28 


59.37 


55 


60.78 


54 


59.73 


56 


60.92 


59 


62.72 


58 


64.27 


64 


64.70 


130 


58.71 


86 


60.92 


64 


64.61 


95 


50.54 


133 


48.42 


72 


52.75 


41 


41.16 



Totals. 



46,115 31,877 77,992 14,238 1,586 



59.13 



# Majority against license in "Wards 24 and 26. 



VOTES ON REFERENDA. 



285 



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286 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



POSSIBLE AND ACTUAL VOTE, DECEMBER 14, 1915. 



Ward. 


For 
City Council. 


For 
School Com- 
mittee. 


On 

License 

Question. 


Women. 
Voters. 




Possible 
Vote. 


Actual 
Vote. 


Possible 
Vote. 


Actual 
Vote. 


Possible 
Vote. 


Actual 
Vote. 


Possible 
Vote. 


Actual 
Vote. 


1 


21,452 

10,956 

10,656 

8,116 

8,436 

8,300 

4,852 

12,480 

11,824 

14,936 

14,428 

13,960 

9,708 

16,980 

14,036 

19,188 

16,276 

12,560 

20,256 

52,756 

26,596 

23,468 

■ 31,272 

36,948 

26,068 

11,768 


12,667 

6,399 

6,772 

5,239 

5,444 

4,990 

3,081 

8,437 

7,237 

9,700 

10,105 

8,942 

6,044 

11,1(17 

8,895 

12,143 

11,093 

7,402 

13,926 

34,691 

17,358 

15,649 

21,628 

23,813 

16,643 

7,841 


5,810 
2,844 
3,028 
2,211 
2,369 
2.147 
1,283 
3,211 
3,050 
4,248 
4,699 
3,803 
2,522 
4,644 
3,879. 
5,129 
4,316 
3,284 
5,469 

14,490 
7,514 
6,369 
8,751 

10,036 
7,179 
3,327 


3,525 
1,710 
1,930 
1,428 
1,533 
1,287 
813 
2,175 
1,900 
2,814 
3,430 
2,477 
1,606 
3,015 
2,439 
3,273 
2,974 
1,979 
3,762 
9,606 
4,984 
4,348 
6,107 
6,515 
4,626 
2,240 


5,363 
2,739 
2,664 
2,029 
2,109 
2,075 
1,213 
3,120 
2,956 
3,734 
3,607 
3,490 
2,427 
4,245 
3,509 
4,797 
4,069 
3,140 
5,064 
13,189 
6,649 
5,867 
7,818 
9,237 
6,517 
2,942 


3,358 
1,732 
1,794 
1,379 
1,442 
1,385 
818 
2.198. 
1,940 
2,523 
2,639 
2,342 
1,600 
2,907 
2,327 
3,155 
2,902 
2,004 
3,677 
9,043 
4,575 
4,131 
5,625 
6,150 
4,305 
2,041 


447 

105 

364 

182 

260 

72 

70 

91 

94 

514 

1,092 

313 

95 

399 

370 

332 

247 

144 

405 

1,301 

865 

502 

933 

799 

662 

385 


261 


2 


46 


3 


160 


4 


71 


5 


119 


6 


32 


7 


25 


8 


46 


9 


44 


10 


378 


11 


811 


12 


203 


13 


48 


14 


196 


15 


167 


16 


172 


17 


142 


18 


59 


19 


174 


20 


758 


21 


516 


22 


320 


23 


600 


24 


454 


25 


390 


26 


241 






Totals 


458,276 


297,246 


125,612 


82,496 


114,569 


77,992 


11,043 


6,433 



Note. — The "Possible Vote" for City Council is the number of registered voters multi- 
plied by four, which is the number of members elected in 1915, owing to a vacancy. 

The "Possible Vote" for School Committee equals the combined men and women regis- 
tered voters. 



PER CENT REGISTERED WHO VOTED. 



287 



POSSIBLE AND ACTUAL VOTE, DECEMBER 14, 1915. 



Ward. 



Per Cent op Actual to Possible Vote. 



For 
City Council. 



For 
School Com- 
mittee. 



On 

License 

Question. 



Women 
Voters. 



9.. 
10.. 
11*. 
12.. 
13.. 
14.. 
15.. 
16.. 
17.. 
18.. 
19.. 
20.. 
21.. 
22.. 
23*. 
24.. 
25.. 
26.. 



59.09 
58.41 
63.55 
64.55 
64.53 
60.12 
63.50 
67.60 
61.21 
64.94 
70.04 
64.05 
62.26 
65.41 
63.37 
63.28 
68.16 
58.93 
68.75 
65.76 
65.27 
66.68 
69.16 
64.45 
63.84 
66.63 



60.67 
60.13 
63.74 
64.59 
64.71 
59.94 
63.37 
67.74 
62.30 
66.24 
72.99 
65.13 
63.68 
64.92 
62.88 
63.81 
68.91 
60.26 
68.79 
66.29 
66.33 
68.27 
69.79 
64.92 
64.44 
67.33 



62.61 
63.23 
67.34 
67.96 
68.37 
66.74 
67.44 
70.45 
65.63 
67.57 
73.16 
67.11 
65.93 
68.48 
66.32 
65.77 
71.32 
63.82 
72.61 
68.56 
68.81 
70.41 
71.95 
66.58 
66.06 
69.37 



58.39 
43.81 
43.96 
39.01 

45.77 
44.44 
35.71 
50.55 
46.81 
73.54 
74.27 
64.86 
50.53 
49.12 
45.14 
51.81 
57.49 
40.97 
42.96 
58.26 
59.65 
63.75 
64.31 
56.82 
58.91 
62.60 



For the City. 



64.86 



65.68 



68.07 



58.25 



* Ward 11 shows the highest percentage of 
tared voters who voted (especially of women 



"Actual to Pos.sible Vote," i. e., of all regis- 
voters) and Ward 23 ranks next. 



288 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



SUMMARY OF LAST CITY ELECTION, DECEMBER 14, 1915. 
REGISTERED AND ACTUAL VOTERS. 





Number 

of Registered 

Voters. 


Number of 

Names ■ 

Checked. 


Per Cent, of 

Names Checked 

to Registered 

Voters. 




114,569 
11,043 


79,578 
6,433 


69.46 




58.25 






Totals 


125,612 


86,011 


68.47 







POSSIBLE AND ACTUAL VOTE, WITH PERCENTAGES. 



Candidates, Etc. 


Possible 
Vote. 


Actual 
Vote. 


Per Cent, of 

Interest, i. e., 

of Actual to 

Possible Vote. 


Per Cent, of 
Leading Vote 
to Total Vote. 


For City Cotincil: 

Ten candidates (four elected) 
in order of number of votes 
received, the "Possible Vote" 
being four times the number 
of registered voters; 

First '. . . 




43,346 
42,961 
38,441 
36,505 
32,566 
31,265 
30,939 
30,319 
5,515 
5,389 






Second 


54.25* 


Third 




Fourth 




Fifth 




Sixth 








Eighth 




Ninth 




Tenth 




Totals 


458,276 


297,246 

40,435 
25,210 
16,844 

7 


64.86 




Fob School Committee: 

Three candidates (one elected) : 
First 


49.01t 






Third 




All Others 








Totals 


125,612 

114,569 
343,707 


82,496 

77,992 
222,840 


65.68 

68.07 
64.83 




Referenda: 

On Liquor License Question 

On Taking Land from Boston 
Common. (Three Questions 


59.13 
63.17 







*The Per Cent, of the total Actual Vote of the four Councillors elected (i. e., 161,253) 
to the total vote for the ten candidates. 

t The Per Cent, of the Total Actual Vote of the member of the School Committee 
elected (i. e., 40,435) to the total vote for the three candidates. 



STATISTICS 



OF 



State Election, 

NOVEMBER 2, 1915, 



290 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



MEN LISTED AND REGISTERED, TOTAL VOTE, ETC., 
State Election, November 2, 1915. 

[Compiled from Annual Report of Election Commissioners for 1915.] 





Listed 

by 
Police. 

(1.) 


Regis- 
tered. 
(2.) 


Voted. 
(3.) 


Per 
Cent. 

of 
3 to 2. 


VOTE 


for: 


Ward. 


Gov- 
ernor. 


Lt.-Gov- 
ernor. 


1 


9,321 

7,473 

3,994 

3,668 

3,888 

12,175 

5,035 

10,287 

8,970 

9,338 

7,249 

8,398 

6,168 

7,006 

5,967 

8,290 

7,475 

6,641 

8,650 

20,018 

10,196 

9,438 

11,304 

14,106 

10,678 

5,150 


5,351 
2,720 
2,663 
2,025 
2,098 
2,054 
1,199 
3,081 
2,928 
3,700 
3,593 
3,436 
2,406 
4,234 
3,488 
4.780 
4,050 
3,116 
5,030 
13,126 
6,638 
5,843 
7,792 
9,207 
6,490 
2,931 


4,284 
2,103 
2,103 
1,587 
1,688 
1,688 
943 
2,579 
2,225 
3,017 
3,080 
2,774 
1,826 
3,370 

- 2,685 
3,809 
3,317 
2,401 
4,101 

10,776 
5,574 
4,785 
6,725 
7,572 
5,461 
2,513 


80.06 
77.32 
78.97 
78.37 
80.46 
81.21 
78.65 
83.71 
75.99 
81.54 
85.72 
80.73 
75.89 
79.59 
76.98 
79.69 
81.90 
77.05 
81.53 
82.10 
83.97 
81.89 
86.31 
82.24 
84.14 
85.74 


4,220 
2,049 
2,092 
1,572 
1,672 
1,600 
924 
2,536 
2,202 
2,991 
3,057 
2,743 
1,796 
3,348 
2,661 
3,789 
3,276 
2,354 
4,033 
10,714 
5,537 
4,723 
6,668 
7,504 
5,423 
2,498 


4,089 


2 


1,968 


3 


2,022 


4 


1,524 


5 


1,611 


6 


1,462 


7 


897 


8 


2,485 


9 


2,092 


10 


2,946 


11 


3,020 


12 


2,684 


13 


1,743 


14 


3,282 


15 


2,589 


16 


3,687 


17... 


3,204 


18 


2.304 


19 


3,913 


20 


10,437 


21 


5,366 


22 


4,630 


23 


6,537 


24 


7,351 


25 


5,303 


26 


2,453 






Totals 


220,883 


113,979 


92,966* 


81.56 


91,982 


89,599 



# Number of names checked on voting list. 
Note. — The highest percentage of voters registered who voted was in Ward 23; second, 
in Ward 26; third, in Ward 11. 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR. 



291 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR, BY CANDIDATES, 
State Election, November 2, 1915. 

[ As Reported by Election Commissioners.] 



Ward. 



Clark, 
Pr. 



Hutchins, 
S. 


McCaU, 
R. 

* 


40 


1,373 


25 


458 


4 


223 


4 


231 


14 


239 


13 


510 


12 


239 


129 


629 


49 


536 


37 


1,720 


68 


2,116 


41 


1,140 


17 


138 


48 


668 


41 


416 


30 


1,008 


18 


619 


20 


887 


55 


640 


129 


4,351 


91 


2,718 


104 


1,680 


93 


3,067 


92 


3,271 


23 


2,297 


32 


1,143 


1,229 


32,317 



O'Rourke, 
S. L. 



Shaw, 
P. 



Walsh, 
D. 



Total 
Vote. 



PliUBALITIES. 



Walsh, 
D. 



McCall, 
R. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



87 

11 

17 

12 

18 

16 

16 

29 

39 

124 

76 

94 

8 

46 

29 

57 

63 

39 

45 

282 

202 

149 

199 

328 

185 

152 



2,686 
1,536 
1,835 
1,315 
1,383 
1,033 

641 
1,707 
1,555 
1,065 

760 
1,425 
1,622 
2,559 
2,160 
2,660 
2,561 
1,384 
3,258 
5,822 
2,467 
2,734 
3,200 
3,702 
2,857 
1,130 



4,220 
2,049 
2,092 
1,572 
1,672 
1,600 
924 
2,536 
2,202 
2,991 
3,057 
2,743 
1,796 
3,348 
2,661 
3,789 
3,276 
2,354 
4,033 
10,714 
5,537 
4,723 
6,668 
7,504 
5,423 
2,498 



1,313 
1,078 
1,612 
1,084 
1,144 
523 
402 
1,078 
1,019 



285 
1,484 
1,891 
1,744 
1,652 
1,942 

497 
2,618 
1,471 



1,054 
133 
431 
560 



655 
1,356 



251 



13 



Totals. 



828 



238 



2,313 55,057 91,982 25,015 2,275 



# Elected for term of one year, plurality being 6,313 in the State. Walsh's plurality in Boston, 

22,740, or 2,273 less than in 1914. 
D. Signifies Democratic; P. Prohibition; Pr. Progressive; R. Republican; S. Socialist; 

S. L. Socialist Labor. 



292 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, BY CANDIDATES, 
November 2, 1915. 

[As Reported by Election Commissioners.] 



Wakd. 



Barry, 
D. 



Coolidge, 
R. 



Evans, 
P. 



Hayes, 
S.L. 



Law- 
rence, 

Pr. 
C.N.P. 



Leven- 
berg, 

S. 



Total 
Vote. 



Pltjbalities. 



Barry, 
D. 



Coolidge, 
R. 



9.. 
10.. 
11.. 
12.. 
13.. 
14. 
15 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



2,468 
1,447 
1,734 
1,245 
1,323 
942 
601 
1,626 
1,421 
889 
568 
1,298 
1,572 
2,402 
2,051 
2,464 
2,458 
1,226 
3,044 
5,120 
2,095 
2,461 
2,774 
3,271 
2,526 
1,027 



1,459 

453 

250 

248 

247 

467 

260 

628 

541 

1,882 

2,284 

1,241 

139 

765 

460 

1,109 

656 

988 

753 

4,831 

2,950 

1,889 

3,441 

3,685 

2,577 

1,271 



59 
19 
18 
14 
17 
11 
13 
30 
29 
72 
50 
62 
6 
26 
18 
43 
33 
34 
33 
165 
112 
94 
125 
179 
103 
80 



18 

10 

6 

7 

5 

12 

10 

31 

17 

18 

19 

24 

9 

27 

12 

15 

9 

9 

22 

58 

31 

42 

36 

33 

17 

15 



31 


54 


4,089 


3 


36 


1,968 


9 


5 


2,022 


5 


5 


1,524 


5 


14 


1,611 


10 


20 


1,462 


3 


10 


897 


16 


154 


2,485 


13 


71 


2,092 


36 


49 


2,946 


26 


73 


3,020 


19 


40 


2,684 


3 


14 


1,743 


15 


47 


3,282 


9 


39 


2,589 


21 


35 


3,687 


25 


23 


3,204 


16 


31 


2,304 


12 


49 


3,913 


95 


168 


10,437 


57 


121 


5,366 


34 


110 


4,630 


60 


101 


6,537 


84 


99 


7,351 


49 


31 


5,303 


25 


35 


2,453 



1,009 
994 

1,484 
997 

1,076 
475 
341 
998 
880 



57 
1,433 
1,637 
1,591 
1,355 
1,802 

238 
2,291 

289 



572 



993 
1,716 



855 



667 

414 

51 

244 



Totals.. 50,053 35,474 



1,445 



512 



681 1,434 89,599 19,519 



4,940 



#Elected for term of one year. Barry's plurality in Boston 14,579, or 3,958 less than in 1914. 
C. N. P. signifies Citizens' Nomination Paper; D. Democratic; P. Prohibition; Pr. Pro- 
gressive; R. Republican; S. Socialist; S. L. Socialist Labor. 



VOTE FOR SENATOR. 



293 



VOTE FOR STATE SENATOR. 
By Parties and Districts, November 2, 1915. 

[Compiled from Annual Report of Election Commissionera for 19 15.] 





District. 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Dem. 
and 
Prog. 


Total 
Vote. 


Plubalities. 


Ward. 


Dem. 


Rep. 


1 


Suffolk 
1st 

2nd 


2,351 
1,416 
1,692 
1,238 
1,291 


1,632 
397 
246 
225 
238 




3,983 
1,813 
1,938 
1,463 
1,529 


719 
1,019 
1,446 
1,013 
1,053 




2 




3 




4 




5 








Totals 

6 


2nd 

3rd 


5,637 

951 

597 

1,724 


1,106 

413 
247 
592 




6,743 

1,364 

844 

2,316 


4,531 

538 

350 

1,132 




7 




8 








Totals 

9 


3rd 

4tli 


3,272 

1,465 
1,354 
2,374 


1,252 

479 

1,214 

653 




4,524 

1,944 
2,568 
3,027 


2,020 

986 

140 

1,721 




12 




17 








Totals 

10 


4th 

5th 


5,193 


2,346 

1,739 
2,196 
2,915 


1,006 

633 

2,246 


7,539 

2,745 
2,829 
5,161 


2,847 


733 


11 






1,563 


25 


a 




669 










Totals 


5th 




6,850 

139 

714 

403 

1,036 


3,885 


10,735 

1,665 
3,125 

2,487 
3,548 


1,387 
1,697 
1,681 
1,476 


2,965 


13 


6th 


1,526 
2,411 
2,084 
2,512 




14 




15 




16 








Totals 

18 


6th 

7th 


8,533 

1,245 
2,872 
2,265 


2,292 

917 

861 

2,093 




10,825 

2,162 
3,733 
4,358 


6,241 

328 

2,011 

172 




19 




22 








Totals 

20 


7th 

8th 


6,382 

5,461 
2,091 


3,871 

4,69*3 
3,041 




10,253 

10,154 
5,132 


2,511 
768 




21 


950 






Totals 

23 


8th 

9th 


7,552 

2,919 
3,154 


7,734 

3,509 
3,985 




15,286 

6,428 
7,139 


768 


950 
590 


24 


831 






" Totals 

26 


9th 

Norfolk 
1st 


6,073 
955 


7,494 
1,375 




13,567 
2,330 




1,421 
420 






Totals, City.. . . 




45,948 


35,952 


3,885 


85,785 


19,637 


5,756 









Note. — Dem. signifies Democratic; Prog., Progressive; Rep., Republican. For name 
and party of Senators elected see page 240. 



294 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVE. 
By Parties and Districts, November 2, 1915. 

[Compiled from Annual Report of Election Commissioners for 1915.] 



District. 



The Vote for the Leading Candidate of Each Party. 



Dem. 



Prog. 



Rep. 



Rep. 

and 

Prog. 



AU 
Others. 



Total 
Vote. 



Plubaliiies. 



Dem. Rep 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 

26. 



Suffolk. 
1st 



2nd. 
3rd. 



4tli. 



6th 

7th ... . 
8th ... , 
9th ... . 

10th . . . , 

11th..., 

12th ... 

13th ... 

14th... 

15th . . . 

16th . . . 

17th... 

18th . . . 

19th . . . 

20th . . . 

21st.... 

22nd... 

23rd... 

24th... 

25th . . . 

Norfolk. 
3rd... 



1,941 
1,442 
1,665 
1,180 
1,257 
1,017 

656 
1,805 
1,483 

808 



1,243 
1,487 
2,355 
2,094 
2,391 
2,244 
1,166 
2,817 
5,193 
2,029 
2,495 
3,006 
3,592 
2,022 

1,012 



78 



112 



81 



239 



1,529 

269 

194 

197 

224 

357 

204 

600 

432 

1,874 

2,400 

1,078 



667 



1,000 

540 

951 

760 

4,698 

2,755 

2,243 

3,233 



2,928 



1,193 



3,295 



R. C. 86 



R. C. 159 
Ind. 121 



R. C. 280 



3,634 
1,711 
1,860 
1,377 
1,481 
1,374 
860 
2,405 
1,915 
2,794 
2,400 
2,480 
1,608 
3,022 
2,096 
3,391 
2,865 
2,117 
3,577 
9,892 
4,785 
4,738 
6,239 
6,887 
5,230 

2,444 



412 
1,173 
1,471 

983 
1,033 

660 

452 
1,205 
1,051 



165 
1,366 
1,688 
2,094 
1,391 
1,704 

215 
2,057 

495 



297 



1,066 
2,400 



726 



227 



906 



181 



Totals 48,400 



510 30,326 3,295 



651 83,182 20,164 5,506 



Note. — Dem. signifies Democrat; Ind., Industrialist; Prog., Progressive; Rep. Republican; 
Rep. and Prog, where those two parties united on one candidate; R. C, Republican Citizens. 

For name and party of each Representative elected, see page 240. 

Three Representatives each are elected in the 4th, 20th and 24th districts, one each in the 7th 
and Norfolk 3rd and two each in the other twenty districts. The above table shows the single vote 
for the single candidate, thus being comparable with the vote for Senator, etc. 



VOTE ON REFERENDUM. 



295 



REFERENDUM ON ENABLING WOMEN TO VOTE, 
November 2, 1915. 



Wabd. 



Question: "shall the proposed amendment to 

THE constitution, ENABLING "WOMEN TO VOTE, BE 
APPROVED AND RATIFIED? " 



Voted 
Yes. 



Voted 
No. 



Total 
Vote. 



Majorities 
Against 



Blanks. 



Per Cent of 
Total Who 
Voted No. 



1... 
2*. 
3... 
4... 
5... 
6*. 
7... 



9... 
10... 
11... 
12... 
13... 
14... 
15... 
16... 
17... 
18... 
19*. 
20... 
21... 
22... 
23... 
24... 
25... 
26... 



1,387 

522 

622 

457 

472 

331 

283 

837 

812 

1,158 

1,136 

1,019 

496 

1,112 

829 

1,242 

1,055 

693 

1,118 

3,915 

2,173 

1,657 

2,359 

2,933 

1,891 

920 



2,439 
1,234 
1,257 

959 
1,015 
1,074 

557 
1,481 
1,173 
1,671 
1,851 
1,481 
1,046 
1,995 
1,632 
2,270 
1,911 
1,347 
2,646 
6,245 
3,034 
2,763 
3,964 
4,061 
3,168 
1,380 



3,826 
1,756 
1,879 
1,416 
1,487 
1,405 
840 
2,318 
1,985 
2,829 
2,987 
2,500 
1,542 
3,107 
2,461 

- 3,512 
2,966 
2,040 
3,764 

10,160 
5,207 
4,420 
6,323 
6,994 
5,059 
2,300 



1,052 

712 

635 

502 

543 

743 

274 

644 

361 

513 

715 

462 

550 

883 

803 

1,028 

856 

654 

1,528 

2,330 

861 

1,106 

1,605 

1,128 

1,277 

460 



458 
347 
224 
171 
201 
263 
103 
261 
240 
188 
93 
274 
284 
263 
224 
297 
351 
361 
337 
616 
367 
365 
402 
578 
402 
213 



63.75 
70.27 
66.90 
67.73 
68.26 
76.44 
66.31 
63.89 
59.09 
59.07 
61.97 
59.24 
67.83 
64.21 
66.31 
64.64 
64.43 
66.03 
70.30 
61.47 
58.27 
62.51 
62:69 
58.06 
62.62 
60.00 



Totals. 



31,429 53,654 



85,083 



22,225 7,883 



63.06 



# Ward 6 shows the highest per cent, who voted No, and Wards 2 and 19 rank second 
and third. 



296 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



REFERENDUM ON RECALL OF MAYOR, 
November 2, 1915. 



Ward. 


Question: "shall there be an election 

AT the next municipal ELECTION?" 


OF MAYOR 




Voted 
Yea. 


Voted 
No. 


Total 
Vote. 


Majorities 
For. 


Majorities 
Against. 


Per Cent, of 
Total Who 
Voted Yes. 


1 


2,191 

926 

846 

644 

680 

759 

465 

927 

1,189 

1,876 

2,012 

1,463 

664 

1,481 

1,226 

1.880 

1,060 

1,277 

1,737 

5,973 

3,223 

2,543 

3,751 

4,318 

2,850 

1,435 


1,557 

810 

1,022 

751 

803 

648 

352 

1,440 

751 

816 

759 

984 

920 

1,566 

1,181 

1,595 

1,983 

822 

1,986 

3,884 

1,796 

1,719 

2,388 

2,474 

2,042 

735 


3,748 
1,736 
1,868 
1,395 
1,483 
1,407 
817 
2,367 
1,940 
2,692 
2,771 
2,447 
1,584 
3,047 
2,407 
3,475 
3,043 
2,099 
3,723 
9,857 
5,019 
4.262 
6,139 
6,792 
4,892 
2,170 


634 
116 




58 46 


2 




53.34 


3 


176 
107 
123 


45.29 


4 i 




46 16 


5 




45 85 


6 


111 
113 


53.94 


7 




56.92 


8 


513 


39 16 


9 


438 
1,060 
1,253 

479 


61.29 


10 # 




69.69 


11 # 




72 61 


12 




59 79 


13 


256 
85 


41.92 


14 




48 61 


15 


45 

285 


50 93 


16 




54 10 


17 


923 


34.83 


18 


455 


60 84 


19 


249 


46 66 


20 


2,089 

1,427 

824 

1,363 

1,844 

808 

700 


60 60 


21 




64 22 


22 




59.67 


23 




61 10 


24 




63 57 


25 




58 26 


26 # 




66 13 








Totals 


47,396 


35,784 


83,180 


14,044 


2,432 


56 98 







# Ward 11 shows the highest per cent, who voted Yes, and Wards 10 and 26 rank second 
and third. 



VOTE ON REFERENDUM. 



297 



REFERENDUM ON TAXATION OF INCOMES, ETC. 
November 2, I9I5. 



Ward. 



Question: "shall the proposed amendment to 
the constitution, relative to the taxation of 
incomes and the granting of reasonable ex- 
emptions, be approved and ratified?" 



^ 


Voted 
Yes. 


Voted 
No. 


Total 
Vote. 


Majorities 
For. 


Blanks. 


Per Cent, of 
Total Wio 
Voted Yes. 


1 


2,077 

925 

1,109 

835 

821 

581 

539 

1,195 

1,209 

1,940 

2,096 

1,625 

833 

1,926 

1,435 

2,249 

1,789 

1,273 

2,311 

6,582 

3,200 

2,834 

4,166 

4,466 

3,358 

1,404 


896 
435 
393 
261 
298 
466 
163 
717 
333 
474 
546 
441 
367 
565 
451 
581, 
575 
385 
749 
1,842 
1,048 
859 
1,238 
1,308 
941 
461 


2,973 
1,360 
1,502 
1,096 
1,119 
1,047 
702 
1,912 
1,542 
2,414 
2,642 
2,066 
1,200 
2,491 
1,886 
2,830 
2,364 
1,658 
3,060 
8,424 
4,248 
3,693 
5,404 
5,774 
4,299 
1,865 


1,181 

490 

716 

574 

523 

115 

376 

478 

876 

1,466 

1,550 

1,184 

466 

1,361 

984 

1,668 

1,214 

888 

1,562 

4,740 

2,152 

1,975 

2,928 

3,158 

2,417 

943 


1,311 

743 

601 

491 

569 

621 

241 

667 

683 

603 

438 

708 

626 

879 

799 

979 

953 

743 

1,041 

2,352 

1,326 

1,092 

1,321 

1,798 

1,162 

648 


69.86 


2 


68.01 


3 


73.83 


4 


76.19 


5 


73.37 


6 


55.49 


7 


76.78 


8 


62.50 


9 


78.40 


10* 


80.36 


11* 


79.33 


12 


78.65 


13 


69.42 


14 


77.32 


15 

16* 


76.09 
79.47 


17 


75.68 


18 


76.78 




75.52 


20 


78.13 


21 


75.33 


22 


76.74 


23 


77.09 


24 


77.35 




78.11 


26 


75.28 






Totals 


52,778 


16,793 


69,571 


35,985 


23,395 


75.86 







*Ward 10 shows the highest per cent, who voted Yes, and Wards 16 and 11 rank 
second and third. 



298 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



POSSIBLE AND ACTUAL VOTE. 
November 2, 1915. 



Ward. 



Possible 
Vote. 



Actual Vote. 



For 
Governor. 



For 

Lieut. 

Governor. 



For 
Senator. 



For 
Repre- 
sentative. 



Referenda. 



As To 

"Women's 

Voting. 



As To 

Recall 

of Mayor. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

Totals 



5,351 
2,720 
2,663 
2,025 
2,098 
2,054 
1,199 
3,081 
2.928 
3,700 
3,593 
3,436 
2,406 
4,234 
3,488 
4,780 
4,050 
3,116 
5,030 
13,126 
6,638 
5,843 
7,792 
9,207 
6,490 
2,931 



4,220 
2,049 
2,092 
1,572 
1,672 
1,600 
924 
2,536 
2,202 
2,991 
3,057 
2,743 
1,796 
3,348 
2,661 
3,789 
3,276 
2,354 
4,033 
10,714 
5,537 
4,723 
6,668 
7,504 
5,423 
2,498 



4,089 
1,968 
2,022 
1,524 
1,611 
1,462 
897 
2,485 
2,092 
2,946 
3,020 
2,684 
1,743 
3,282 
2,589 
3,687^ 
3,204 
2,304 
3,913 
10,437 
5,366 
4,630 
6,537 
7,351 
5,303 
2,453 



3,983 
1,813 
1,938 
1,463 
1,529 
1,364 
844 
2,316 
1,944 
2,745 
2,829 
2,568 
1,665 
3,125 
2,487 
3,548 
3,027 
2,162 
3,733 
10,154 
5,132 
4,358 
6,428 
7,139 
5,161 
2,330 



3,634 
1,711 
1,860 
1,377 
1,481 
1,374 
860 
2,405 
1,915 
2,794 
2,400 
2,480 
1,608 
3,022 
2,096 
3,391 
2,865 
2,117 
3,577 
9,892 
4,785 
4,738 
6,239 
6,887 
5,230 
2,444 



3,826 
1,756 
1,879 
1,416 
1,487 
1,405 
840 
2,318 
1,985 
2,829 
2,987 
2,500 
1,542 
3,107 
2,461 
3,512 
2,966 
2,040 
3,764 
10,160 
5,207 
4,420 
6,323 
6,994 
5,059 
2,300 



3,748 
1,736 
1,868 
1,395 
1,483 
1,407 
817 
2,367 
1,940 
2,692 
2,771 
2,447 
1,584 
3,047 
2,407 
3,475 
3,043 
2,099 
3,723 
9,857 
5,019 
4,262 
6,139 
6,792 
4,892 
2,170 



113,979 



91,982 



89,599 



85,785 



83,182 



85,083 



83,180 



* The "Possible Vote " in the total number of Registered Voters. 



PER CENT. OF ACTUAL TO POSSIBLE VOTE. 



299 



POSSIBLE AND ACTUAL VOTE.— PERCENTAGES. 
November 2, 1915. 





Per Cent. 


OF Actual to Possible Vote. 


Wahd. 


For 
Governor. 


For 
Lieut- 
Governor. 


For 
Senator. 


For 
Repre- 
sentative. 


Referenda. 




As to 
Women's 
Voting. 


As to 

Recall 

of Mayor. 


1 

2 


78.86 

75.30 

78.56 

77.63 

79.69 

77.90 

77.07 

82.31 

75.24 

80.84 

85.08 

79.83 

74.65 

79.07 

76.29 

79.27 

80.89 

75.55 

80.18 

81.62 

83.41 

80.83 ' 

85.67 

81.50 

83.56 

85.23 


76.42 
72.33 
75.93 
75.26 
76.79 
71.18 
74.81 
80.66 
71.45 
79.62 
84.05 
78.11 
72.44 
77.62 
74.23 
77.13 
79.11 
73.94 
77.79 
79.51 
80.84 
79.24 
83.89 
79.84 
81.71 
83.69 


74.43 
66.63 
72.77 
72.26 
72.88 
66.41 
70.39 
75.17 
66.39 
74.19 
78.74 
74.74 
69.20 
73.81 
71.30 
74.23 
74.74 
69.38 
74.21 
77.36 
77.31 
74.58 
82.49 
77.64 
79.52 
79.50 


67.91 
62.88 
69.85 
68.00 
70.59 
66.89 
71.73 
78.06 
65.40 
75.61 
66.80 
72.18 
66.83 
71.37 
60.09 
70.94 
70.74 
67.94 
71.11 
75.36 
72.08 
81.09 
80.07 
74.80 
80.59 
83.38 


71.50 
64.54 
70.66 
69.93 
70.88 
68.40 
70.06 
75.24 
67.79 
76.46 
83.13 
72.76 
64.09 
73.38 
70.56 
73.47 
73.23 
65.47 
74.83 
77.40 
78.44 
75.65 
81.16 
75.96 
77.96 
78.47 


70.04 
63.80 


3 

4 


70.14 
68.89 


5 


70.69 


6 


68.50 


7 


68.14 


8 


76.83 


9 


66.26 


10 


72.76 


11 


77.12 


12 


71.22 


13 


65.84 


14 


71.97 


15 


69.01 


16 


72.70 


17 


75.14 


18 


67.36 


19 


74.02 


20 


75.10 


21 


75.61 


22 


72.94 


23 


78.79 


24 :. 


73.77 


25 


76.38 


26 


74.04 






Totals 


80.70 


78.61 


75.26 


72.98 


74.65 


72.98 



300 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



SUMMARY OF BOSTON VOTE, 

State Election, November 2, 1915. 



Candidates for: 


Possible 
Vote (i. e., 
Registered 

Voters) . 


Actual Vote. 


Per Cent, of 
Interest (t. e., 

of Actual to 
Possible Vote) . 


Per Cent, of 
Leading Vote 
to Total Vote. 




113,979 
113,979 
455,916 
113,979 
113,979 
113,979 

113,979 
113,979 

113,979 
113,979 


91,982 
89,599 
347,671 
85,785 
83,182 
80,295 

85,083 
83,180 

73,165 
69,571 


80.70 
78.61 
76.26 
75.26 
72.98 
70.45 

74.65 
72.98 

64.19 
61.04 


59.86 




55.86 


Other State Officers (four) 

Senator 


55.78 
53.56 


Representative 


58.19 




54.68 


Referenda. 

Question as to Women's Voting . . 

Question as to Recall of Mayor . . 

Question as to Taking of Land to 
Relieve Congestion of Popula- 
tion 


63.06 
56.98 

80.69 


Question as to Taxation of 
Incomes 


75.86 







Note. — At this State Election 92,966 names were checked, or 81.56 per cent, of the number of 
registered voters, which is 7.51 per cent, more than in the election of 1914. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICS 

OP 



ELECTIONS, FOR FIVE YEARS 



1911-1914. 



302 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
City and State Elections, 1911. 

[Compiled from Reports of Election Commissioners.! 



Wabd. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 



CiTT Election, 

JANTJAKY 10, 1911. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



4,992 
3,267 
2,975 
2,305 
2,423 
2,480 
1,772 
3,547 
3,403 
4,024 
3,872 
3,866 
2,953 
4,463 
3,917 
4,827 
4,393 
3,616 
5,171 
11,593 
6,095 
5,607 
6,180 
7,525 
4,957 



Names 
Checked. 



2,727 
1,791 
1,845 
1,325 
1,577 
1,395 
959 
2,110 
1,615 
1,880 
2,228 
1,752 
1,671 
2,500 
2,068 
2,303 
2,400 
1,714 
2,926 
5,596 
3,041 
2,995 
3,501 
3,639 
2,213 



Vote 

for 

City 

ComicU. 



6,631 
4,505 
4,599 
3,463 
3,812 
3,715 
2,598 
5,916 
4,308 
5,193 
6,267 
4,781 
4,215 
6,542 
5,479 
6,313 
6,652 
4,363 
7,731 
15,529 
8,413 
8,066 
9,584 
9,960 
6,132 



Per 
Cent. 
Voted. 



55 
55 
62 
57 
65 
56 
54 
59 
47 
47 
58 
45 
57 
56 
53 
48 
55 
47 
57 
48 
50 
53 
57 
48 
45 



Men 
Listed 

by 
Police 

1911. 



8,664 
7,386 
4,149 
3,930 
4,228 

13,310 
6,436 

10,386 
9,419 
9,386 
7,238 
8,793 
6,516 
6,976 
5,881 
7,653 
7,701 
7,071 
8,561 

17,183 
9,307 
8,471 
9,264 

11,484 
8,193 



State Election, 
november 7, 1911. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



5,082 
3,086 
2,840 
2,192 
2,282 
2,309 
1,647 
3,468 
3,206 
3,850 
3,697 
3,837 
2,778 
4,371 
3,838 
4,722 
4,335 
3,446 
5,127 
11,797 
6,078 
5,431 
6,375 
7,601 
4,991 



Names 
Checked. 



4,021 
2,267 
2,177 
1,528 
1,685 
1,821 
1,344 
2,813 
2,313 
2,879 
3,057 
2,881 
2,021 
3,353 
2,756 
3,357 
3,348 
2,398 
4,013 
8,990 
4,666 
4,176 
5,141 
5,711 
3,892 



Vote 
for 
Gover- 
nor. 



3,968 
2,222 
2,141 
1,511 
1,665 
1,707 
1,299 
2,780 
2,275 
2,841 
3,019 
2,849 
1,986 
3,316 
2,713 
3,328 
3,305 
2,359 
3,935 
8,922 
4,628 
4,128 
5,092 
5,673 
3,857 



Per 

Cent. 

Voted. 

* 



79 
73 

77 
70 
74 
79 
82 
81 
72 
75 
83 
75 
73 
77 
72 
71 
77 
70 
78 
76 
77 
77 
81 
75 
78 



Totals... 110,223 57,771 154,767t 52 207,586 108,386 82,608 81,519 



76 



* Per cent of "Names Checked" to "Men Registered." 

t Three members of the City Council elected annually, hence the large total. 



CITY ELECTION, 1911. 



303 



Vote For City Council, 1911. 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 









City Election, 


January 10, 1911. . 






Waed. 


J. F. 
O'Hare. 


J. A. 

Shee- 
han. 


F. A. 

Go9d- 

win. 


T.J. 
Buck- 
ley. 
# 


T. F. 

Mans- 
field. 


J.J. 

Butler. 


T. J. 
Collins. 


D.J. 
McDon- 
ald. 


E. E. 
Smith. 

* 


E.J. 
O'Con- 
nor. 


1 


336 


351 


2,041 


606 


1,618 


273 


170 


662 


660 


14 


2 


247 


235 


1,224 


602 


1,147 


249 


176 


424 


292 


9 


3 


309 


284 


386 


1,350 


352 


420 


223 


986 


286 


3 


4 


257 


268 


295 


1,034 


190 


306 


211 


639 


261 


2 


5 


263 


256 


312 


1,289 


236 


372 


210 


584 


285 


5 


6 


184 


303 


246 


816 


718 


671 


133 


335 


309 




7 


340 


342 


239 


413 


166 


287 


240 


314 


266 


1 


8 


186 


377 


256 


1,452 


1,342 


1,327 


177 


350 


447 


2 


9 


442 


955 


370 


486 


225 


281 


242 


738 


567 


3 


10 


268 


1,138 


588 


389 


268 


301 


186 


830 


1,222 


3 


11 


186 


1,568 


325 


279 


167 


222 


151 


1,536 


1,830 




12 


353 


858 


561 


647 


241 


408 


351 


726 


736 




13 


913 


199 


380 


573 


121 


430 


1,198 


229 


169 


3 


14 


1,631 


492 


645 


684 


341 


437 


1,209 


561 


626 


26 


15 


1,326 


400 


554 


700 


158 


400 


1,144 


417 


376 


4 


16 


705 


798 


676 


890 


372 


603 


632 


802 


827 


8 


17 


479 


640 


616 


1,372 


297 


1,151 


1,085 


611 


488 


13 


18 


335 


427 


399 


616 


226 


1,067 


411 


406 


472 


4 


19 


781 


780 


679 


1,184 


441 


1,775 


628 


736 


723 


4 


20 


1,207 


2,468 


1,917 


1,972 


812 


1,266 


997 


2,304 


2,572 


14 


21 


536 


1,350 


968 


860 


469 


864 


404 


1,347 


1,687 


28 


22 


555 


1,212 


774 


874 


437 


1,116 


470 


1,181 


1,433 


14 


23 


494 


1,527 


1,186 


1,085 


445 


936 


526 


1,566 


1,824 


5 


24 


731 


1,453 


1,371 


f,124 


680 


760 


716 


1.465 


1,770 


1 


25 


418 


975 


701 


811 


331 


469 


391 


1,006 


1,032 


9- 


Totals. . . 


13,482 


19,656 


17,609 


21,806 


11,700 


16,380 


12,279 


20,724 


20,950 


175 



# Elected for three years. 
Note. — Candidates' nam.e3 are in same order as on official ballot. The total vote for 10 candidates 
was 154,767; for "All Others" 6; while the total number of "Blanks" was 18,546. 



304 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Vote for Governor, by Candidates, 1911, 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 









State Election, 


November 7, 1911. 


Wakd. 


Carey, 

S. 


Foss, 
D. 


Foss, 
D. P. 


Foss 
(N. D.) 


Total 

for 

Foss. 

* 


Froth- 
ingham. 


McGoff, 
S. L. 


Rand, 
P. 


AU 
Others. 


Total 
Vote. 


1 


79 

58 

20 

28 

28 

34 

33 

141 

92 

56 

57 

60 

52 

129 

76 

66 

52 

41 

99 

138 

79 

173 

125 

124 

46 


1,903 
1,291 
1,177 
976 
1,064 
914 
801 
1,830 
1,344 
873 
656 
1,233 
1,434 
1,890 
1,695 
1,827 
2,033 
1,244 
2,605 
3,960 
1,877 
1,960 
2,207 
2,239 
1,624 


433 
362 
247 
200 
215 
186 
162 
234 
207 
177 
146 
290 
236 
381 
341 
330 
483 
245 
477 
786 
327 
394 
479 
515 
344 


63 
53 
45 
24 
32 
48 
42 
68 
32 
30 
25 
87 
40 
49 
56 
47 
83 
60 
93 
61 
38 
68 
91 
62 
44 


2,399 
1,706 
1,769 
1,200 
1,311 
1,148 
1,005 
2,132 
1,583 
1,080 
827 
1,610 
1,710 
2,320 
2,092 
2,204 
2,599 
1,549 
3,175 
4,807 
2,242 
2,422 
2,777 
2,816 
2,012 


1,464 

451 

349 

281 

323, 

519 

256 

495 

585 

1,694 

2,113 

1,162 

218 

853 

532 

1,045 

647 

759 

650 

3,949 

2,269 

1,504 

2,156 

2,699 

1,778 


12 

5 

3 

1 

1 

3 

2 

11 

9 

1 

5 

5 

2 

11 

11 

7 

3 

7 

9 

11 

6 

17 

15 

11 

3 


14 
2 




3,968 


2 


2,222 


3 


2,141 


4 


1 
2 
3 
3 

1 

6 

10 

17 

11 

4 

3 

2 

6 

4 

3 

1 

17 

30 

12 

19 

22 

17 


1 


1 
2 

1 
1 


1,511 


5 


1,665 


6 


1,707 


7 


1,299 


8 


2,780 


9 


2,275 


10 


2,841 


11 


3,019 


12 


2,849 


13 


1,986 


14 


3,316 


15 


2,713 


16 


3,328 


17 


3,305 


18 


2,359 


19 


3,935 


20 


8,922 


21 


4,628 


22 


4,128 


23 


5,092 


24 


5,673 


25 


3,857 






Totals... 


1,886 


40,957 


8,197 


1,341 


50,495 


28,751 


171 


210 


6 


81,519 



# Elected for one year, with plurality of 21,744. 
D. signifies Democratic; D. P. Democratic Progressive; N. D. No Designation; P. Progressive; 
R. Republican; S. Socialist; S. L. Socialist Labor. 



CITY AND STATE ELECTIONS, 1912. 



305 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
City and State Elections, 1912. 

[Compiled from Reports of the Election Commissioners.] 



Wabd. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



City Election, 
JANUARY 9, 1912. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



5,081 
3,084 
2,825 
2,189 
2,278 
2,317 
1,647 
3,498 
3,206 
3,843 
3,693 
3,819 
2,772 
4,369 
3,830 
4,724 
4,327 
3,437 
5,119 
11,803 
6,057 
5,424 
6,365 
7,586 
5,006 
3,053 



Names 
Checked. 



2,335 
1,450 
1,278 

878 
1,104 
1,202 

718 
1,942 
1,369 
1,591 
2,008 
1,544 
1,237 
1,997 
1,842 
1,929 
2,101 
1,357 
2,419 
5,008 
2,613 
2,633 
3,341 
3,068 
2,230 
1,446 



Vote 

for 

City 

Council. 



5,818 
3,749 
3,560 
2,474 
3,126 
3,282 
1,940 
5,628 
3,788 
4,509 
5,804 
4,408 
3,359 
5,561 
4,892 
5,411 
5,949 
3,765 
6,783 
14,341 
7,487 
7,332 
9,513 
8,791 
6,341 
4,123 



Per 
Cent. 
Voted. 

* 



Men 
Listed 

by 
Police, 

1912. 



8,645 
7,422 
4,104 
3,944 
4,114 

12,642 
6,417 

10,613 
9,386 
9,784 
7,466 
8,902 
6,603 
6,893 
5,968 
7,787 
7,606 
6,992 
8,656 

18,091 
9,514 
8,895 
9,592 

12,098 
8,713 
4,961 



State Election, 
november 5, 1912. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



Names 
Checked. 



5,093 
3,011 
2,761 
2,163 
2,209 
2,213 
1,547 
3,491 
3,298 
3,857 
3,923 
3,767 
2,737 
4,246 
3,732 
4,664 
4,252 
3,375 
5,110 
12,243 
6,206 
5,459 
6,705 
8,102 
5,394 
2,695 



4,220 
2,416 
2,180 
1,615 
1,745 

. 1,883 
1,222 
2,855 
2,507 
3,169 
3,412 
3,030 
2,054 
3,353 
2,847 
3,719 
3,397 
2,486 
4,052 

10,082 
5,181 
4,460 
5,808 
6,842 
4,66<i 
2,537 



Vote 

for 

Gover- 



3,961 
2,187 
2,049 
1,508 
1,639 
1,614 
1,134 
2,684 
2,306 
3,042 
3,285 
2,856 
1,921 
3,188 
2,707 
3,571 
3,192 
2,211 
3,866 
9,747 
4,979 
4,266 
5,601 
6,606 
4,467 
2,458 



Per 
Cent. 
Voted. 



83 
80 
79 
75 
79 
85 
79 
82 
76 
82 
87 
80 
75 
79 
76 
80 
80 
74 
79 
82 
83 
82 
87 
84 
86 



Totals. . . 111,352 50,640 141,734t 



45 215,: 



112,2SB 91,738 87,045 



82 



# Per cent, of "Names Checked" to "Men Registered." 

t Three members of the City Council elected annually, hence the large total. 



306 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Vote for City Council, 1912. 

[As reported by the Election Commissioners.] 



Ward. 



1 

2 

3... ... 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

Totals 



City Election, January 9, 1912. 



w. 

Ballan- 

tyne. 

* 



890 

394 

317 

270 

329 

414 

259 

458 

703 

1,141 

1,679 

861 

213 

651 

501 

856 

746 

566 

764 

2,886 

1,741 

1,346 

1,958 

1,834 

1,274 

906 



J. A. 
Coul- 

thurst. 
* 



751 

359 

317 

275 

306 

386 

260 

462 

714 

1,068 

1,608 

819 

213 

587 

471 

846 

604 

502 

736 

2,808 

1,637 

1,396 

2,189 

1,843 

1,210 

969 



0. A. 

Cunning- 
ham. 



732 
548 
713 
463 
598 
659 
273 

1,378 
483 
403 
320 
560 
585 
864 
680 
778 

1,168 
625 

1,203 

1,935 
721 
854 
970 

1,077 
789 
436 



E. D. 

Collins. 



699 

660 

766 

487 

668 

658 

380 

1,365 

527 

347 

246 

563 

936 

1,178 

1,213 

911 

1,220 

624 

1,304 

1,589 

689 

861 

911 

923 

704 

415 



F. A. 
Good- 



1,490 
817 
280 
203 
205 
205 
168 
218 
223 
295 
209 
324 
191 
370 
299 
353 
321 
289 
484 
904 
456 
398 
598 
592 
489 
143 



T.J. 

Kenny. 

# 



593 

365 

391 

285 

341 

323 

256 

393 

678 

954 

1,519 

763 

514 

1,063 

1,018 

912 

688 

488 

831 

2,725 

1,525 

1,185 

1,688 

1,649 

1,173 

833 



C. J. F. 
O'Brien. 



663 

606 

776 

491 

679 

637 

344 

1,354 

460 

301 

223 

518 

707 

848 

710 

755 

1,202 

671 

1,461 

1,494 

718 

1,292 

1,199 

873 

702 

421 



Total 
Vote. 



5,818 
3,749 
3,560 
2,474 
3,126 
3,282 
1,940 
5,628 
3,788 
4,509 
6,804 
4,408 
3,359 
5,561 
4,892 
5,411 
5,949 
3,765 
6,783 
14,341 
7,487 
7,332 
9,513 
8,791 
6,341 
4,123 



23,957 



23,336 



19,815 



20,844 



10,524 



23,153 



20,105 



141,734 



# Elected for term of three years. 
Note. — Candidates' names are in same order as on official ballot. Vote for "All 
others," 9; total number of "Blanks," 10,177. 



STATE ELECTION, 1912. 



307 



Vote for Governor, by Candidates, 1912, 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 





State Election, November 5, 1912. 


Wahd. 


Bird, 
Pr. 


Foss, 
D. 
# 


Mulli- 
gan, 
S. L. 


Rand, 
P. 


Sawyer, 

S. 


Walker, 
R. 


Total 
Vote. 


1 


853 
335 
295 
213 
231 
241 
180 
353 
426 
847 
694 
706 
199 
514 
417 
738 
460 
436 
561 
2,719 
1,140 
918 
1,532 
2,063 
1,003 
846 


2,258 
1,590 
1,585 
1,117 
1,237 
1,077 

793 
1,954 
1,488 
1,053 

854 
1,469 
1,601 
2,167 
1,946 
2,153 
2,320 
1,378 
2,868 
4,605 
2,217 
2,328 
2,626 
2,883 
2,118 

999 


31 
11 

6 

3 

2 
18 

5 
15 
20 

9 
10 
10 

8 
19 
10 

9 
10 

7 
17 
23 
20 
25 
15 
24 

8 

6 


13 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
4 
6 

11 
4 
9 
8 
4 
3 

8 

4 

5 

5 

9 

11 

20 

12 

21 

11 

9 


66 
51 
14 
13 
16 
22 
17 

122 
88 
54 
68 
49 
30 
73 
65 
55 
41 
34 
68 

128 
84 

138 

103 
91 
34 
67 


740 

197 

146 

159 

151 

253 

135 

234 

273 

1.075 

1,650 

614 

79 

412 

269 

608 

357 

351 

347 

2,263 

1,507 

837 

1,313 

1,524 

1,293 

531 


3,961 


2 


2,187 


3 


2,049 


4 


1,508 


5 


1,639 


6 


1,614 


7 


1,134 


8 


2,684 


9 


2,306 


10 


3,042 


11 


3,285 


12 . . 


2,856 


13 


1,921 


14 


3,188 


15 


2,707 


16 


3,571 


17 


3,192 


18 


2,211 


19 


3,866 


20 


9,747 


21 


4,979 


22 


4,266 


23 

24 


5,601 
6,606 


25 


4,467 


26 : 


2,458 






Totals 


18,920 


48,684 


341 


191 


1,591 


17,318 


87,045 







# Elected for term of one year, with pliirality of 29,764. 
D. Signifies Democratic; P. Prohibition; Pr. Progressive; R. Republican; S. Socialist; 
. L. Socialist Labor. 



308 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Vote for President, by Candidates, 1912. 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 



Wakd. 



State Election, November 6, 1912. 



Chafin, 
P. 



Debs, 

S. 



Reimer, 
S. L. 



Roose- 
velt, 
Pr. 



Taft, 
R. 



WUson, 
D. 

* 



Total 
Vote. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



18 

4 

4 

7 

2 

1 

5 

8 

11 

7 

11 

10 

2 

4 

6 

11 

7 

14 

11 

14 

13 

24 

20 

17 

14 

12 



66 

47 

16 

12 

17 

8 

21 

145 

102 

60 

71 

55 

20 

72 

66 

65 

49 

49 

92 

164 

85 

172 

133 

119 

42 

80 



5 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 

11 
3 
7 
3 

20 

11 
4 
1 
2 
4 

14 
8 

22 
9 

18 
3 
3 



1,101 

480 

355 

218 

247 

657 

228 

628 

544 

1,007 

759 

747 

148 

501 

390 

722 

439 

566 

535 

2,951 

1,425 

1,059 

1,639 

2,133 

1,231 

823 



380 

255 

284 

260 

355 

245 

372 

461 

1,056 

1,512 

754 

299 

784 

495 

925 

536 

561 

683 

2,557 

1,579 

987 

1,415 

1,707 

1,321 

676 



1,859 
1,344 
1,464 
1,011 
1,138 
701 
670 
1,599 
1,282 
953 
973 
1,284 
1,427 
1,848 
1,761 
1,880 
2,178 
1,148 
2,535 
4,192 
1,937 
2,053 
2,382 
2,688 
1,904 
853 



4,017 
2,258 
2,097 
1,535 
1,665 
1,723 
1,171 
2,753 
2,404 
3,094 
3,329 
2,857 
1,899 
3,229 
2,729 
3,597 
3,210 
2,340 
3,860 
9,892 
5,047 
4,317 
5,598 
6,682 
4,517 
2,442 



Totals. 



257 1,818 



166 



21,533 21,427 43,064 88,265 



# Wilson's plurality, 21,531. 

D. signifies Democratic; P. Prohibition; Pr. Progressive; R. Republican; S. Socialist; 
S. L. Socialist Labor. 

Note. — As compared with the vote for President in the two previous elections, counting 
only the 25 Wards previously existing, the vote in 1912 was 1,627 less than in 1908 and 
4,774 less than in 1904. 



CITY AND STATE ELECTIONS, 1913. 



309 



MEN LISTED, REGISTRATION AND VOTE, 
City and State Elections, 1913. 

[Compiled from Reports of Election Commissionera.]' 



City Election, 
Jajstuakt 14, 1913. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



Names 
Checked. 



Vote 

for 

City 

Council, 



Per 
Cent 
Voted. 



Men 
Listed 

by 
Police, 

1913. 



State Election, 
November 4, 1913. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



Names 
Checked. 



Vote 
for 
Gover- 
nor. 



Per 
Cent 
Voted. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



5,092 
3,004 
2,747 
2,162 
2,201 
2,233 
1,547 
3,495 
3,289 
3,844 
3,916 
3,752 
2,733 
4,238 
3,724 
4,667 
4,245 
3,377 
5,095 
12,244 
6,200 
5,451 
6,702 
8,082 
5,379 
2,707 



1,789 
1,213 
1,210 
815 
985 
1,012 
611 
1,779 
1,491 
1,442 
1,836 
1,314 
1,065 
1,644 
1,444 
1,815 
1,906 
1,441 
2,471 
4,974 
2,675 
2,375 
3,174 
3,248 
1,994 
1,120 



4,399 
2,857 
2,788 
1,977 
2,332 
2,403 
1,605 
4,547 
3,658 
3,844 
5,073 
3,334 
2,399 
4,022 
3,454 
4,428 
4,369 
2,736 
5,069 
12,891 
6,539 
5,739 
8,168 
8,631 
5,200 
2,966 



35 

40 
44 
38 
45 
45 
39 
51 
45 
38 
47 
35 
39 
39 
39 
39 
45 
43 
49 
41 
43 
44 
47 
40 
37 
41 



9,001 
7,643 
3,974 
3,819 
3,928 

12,134 
5,818 

10,350 
9,272 
9,507 
7,716 
8,900 
6,490 
7,034 
5,885 
7,831 
7,533 
6,814 
8,515 

18,922 
9,760 
9,099 

10,200 

12,524 
9,278 
5,155 



5,035 
2,824 
2,624 
2,073 
2,182 
1,974 
1,345 
3,081 
3,206 
3,542 
3,642 
3,589 
2,536 
4,117 
3,654 
4,507 
4,109 
3,084 
4,864 
12,278 
6,116 
5,540 
6,821 
8,105 
5,597 
2,814 



3,933 
2,091 
2,032 
1,513 
1,688 
1,556 
1,022 
2,500 
2,296 
2,678 
2,885 
2,646 
1,939 
3,297 
2,722 
3,262 
3,146 
2,148 
3,834 
9,255 
4,752 
4,313 
5,531 
6,339 
4,452 
2,378 



3,892 
2,062 
2,007 
1,505 
1,673 
1,505 
1,008 
2,463 
2,278 
2,647 
2,874 
2,622 
1,921 
3,265 
2,702 
3,246 
3,114 
2,114 
3,805 
9,220 
4,712 
4,271 
5,498 
6,311 
4,422 
2,357 



78 
74 
77 
73 
77 
79 
76 
81 
72 
76 
79 
74 
76 
80 
74 
72 
76 
70 
79 
75 
78 
78 
81 
78 
79 
84 



Totals.. 112,126 46,843 115,328t 42 217,102 109,259 84,208 83,494 



77 



#Per Cent, of "Names Checked" to "Men Registered." 
t Three members of City Council elected annually, hence the large total. 
Note. — The total vote in the City election of January 14, 1913, viz. 46,843, shows the lowest 
per cent of interest ( i. e. 42) recorded in many years. 



310 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Vote for City Council, 1913. 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 







City Election, Januaey 14, 


1913. 




Ward. 


J. J. 

Attridge. 
# 


L.J. 
Hewitt. 


W. L. 

Collins. 
# 


J. A. 

Watson. 
# 


AU 
Others. 


Total 
Vote. 


Blanks. 


1 


1,301 

826 

774 

548 

638 

678 

476 

1,369 

1,250 

1,231 

1,621 

1,041 

656 

1,169 

1,005 

1,297 

1,193 

646 

1,273 

3,918 

1,922 

1,653 

2,447 

2,611 

1,505 

926 


894 

505 

396 

317 

359 

532 

278 

848 

776 

1,023 

1,512 

692 

315 

655 

523 

808 

623 

383 

656 

2,846 

1,530 

1,242 

1,922 

1,926 

1,527 

757 


1,254 

829 

801 

597 

694 

621 

446 

1,060 

1,028 

1,095 

1,567 

919 

686 

1,163 

1,018 

1,315 

1,196 

569 

1,231 

4,030 

1,784 

1,570 

2,337 

2,665 

1,449 

866 


950 

697 

817 

514 

636 

572 

305 

1,270 

603 

495 

371 

'682 

742 

1,034 

906 

1,008 

1,357 

1,138 

1,907 

2,092 

1,302 

1,274 

1,462 

1,425 

717 

417 


1 
5 

1 
2 

1 
2 

2 
5 
1 

4 
2 


4,399 
2,857 
2,788 
1,977 
2,332 
2,403 
1,505 
4,547 
3,658 
3,844 
5,073 
3,334 
2,399 
4.022 
3,454 
4,428 
4,369 
2,736 
5,069 
12,891 
6,539 
5,739 
8,168 
8,631 
5,200 
2,966 


968 


2 


782 


3 


842 


4. 


468 


5 


623 


6 


633 


7 


328 


8 


790 


9 


815 


10 


482 


H 


435 


12 


608 


13 


796 


14 


910 


15 


878 


16 


1,017 


17 


1,349 


18 


1,587 


19 


2,344 


20 


2,031 


21 


1,486 


22 


1,386 


23 


1,354 


24 


1,113 


25 


782 


26 


394 






Totals 


33,974 


23,845 


32,790 


24,693 


26 


115,328 


25,201t 







# Elected for term of three years. 
tOf the total possible votes for three members of the City Council, viz., 140,529 (i. e. 
three times the number of "Names Checked"): the "Blanks" (i. e. failures to vote) 
amounted to 18 per cent., showing unprecedented indifference, in addition to the small 
proportion (». e. 42 per cent.) of men registered whose names were checked. 



STATE ELECTION, 1913. 



311 



Vote for Governor, by Candidates, 1913. 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 





State Election. November 4, 1913. 


Waed. 


Bird, 
Pr. 


Evans, 
P. 


Foss, 
I. 


Gard- 
ner, 
R. 


Reimer, 
S. L. 


Walsh, 
D. 

* 


Wrenn, 

S. 


Total 
Vote. 


1 


922 
342 
183 
140 
186 
317 
170 
600 
468 
766 
614 
620 
114 
509 
330 
617 
393 
483 
503 
2,676 
1,387 
968 
1,655 
1,998 
1,052 
814 


9 
4 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
2 
3 
4 
3 
5 
3 
5 

5 

7 

1 

2 

13 

26 

12 

13 

8 

9 

2 


99 

46 

25 

39 

32 

42 

31 

47 

78 

155 

235 

116 

32 

69 

45 

120 

76 

77 

74 

419 

242 

222 

296 

243 

223 

114 


610 

141 

124 

114 

121 

166 

94 

150 

201 

892 

1,375 

538 

74 

297 

201 

394 

232 

312 

244 

1,547 

1,028 

743 

1,020 

1,184 

936 

431 


11 

12 

2 

2 

4 

4 

4 

16 

6 

8 

13 

10 

9 

15 

18 

11 

4 

4 

8 

16 

19 

32 

14 

17 

7 

12 


2,180 
1,487 
1,664 
1,197 
1,318 
954 
694 
1,541 
1,445 
775 
580 
1,290 
1,670 
2,316 
2,055 
2,060 
2,375 
1,213 
2,914 
4,434 
1,945 
2,183 
2,404 
2,776 
2,172 
924 


61 
30 
8 
11 
11 
18 
13 

107 
77 
47 
64 
43 
19 
54 
52 
39 
27 
24 
60 

115 
65 

111 
96 
85 
23 
60 


3,892 


2 


2,062 


3 


2,007 


4 

5 


1,505 
1,673 


6 


1,505 


7 


1,008 


8 


2,463 


9 


2,278 


10 


2,647 


11 


2,874 


12 


2,622 


13 


1,921 


14 


3,265 


15 . 


2,701 


16 


3,246 


17 


3,114 


18 


2,114 


19 


3,805 


20 


9,220 


21 


4,712 


22 


4,271 


23 


5,498 


24 


6,311 


25 


4,422 


26 


2,357 






Totals... 


18,827 


146 


3,197 


13,169 


278 


46,566 


1,310 


83,493 



# Elected for term of one year, with plurality of 27,739. 

D. Signifies Democratic; P. Prohibition; Pr. Progressive; R. Republican; S. Socialist; 
S. L. Socialist Labor. 

Note. — Besides the figures above shown, there were 714 "Blanks" and one vote iinder 
"AU others." 



312 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Men Listed, Registration and Vote, 

City and State Elections, 1914. 

[Compiled from Reports of Election Commissioners.] 



Waed. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



City Election, 
January 13, 1914. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



5,092 
2,865 
2,636 
2,086 
2,202 
2,039 
1,382 
3,203 
3,265 
3,633 
3,688 
3,649 
2,555 
4,184 
3,693 
4,580 
4,201 
3,136 
4,913 
12,491 
6,192 
5,580 
6,955 
8,225 
5,679 
2,822 



Names 
Checked. 



3,515 
2,078 
1,973 
1,501 
1,630 
1,501 
975 
2,469 
2,390 
2,416 
2,683 
2,523 
1,993 
3,229 
2,835 
3,410 
3,492 
2,167 
3,870 
9,131 
4,551 
4,033 
5,319 
5,914 
3,853 
2,108 



Vote 

for 

Mayor. 



3,480 
2,054 
1,956 
1,489 
1,615 
1,465 
960 
2.437 
2,374 
2,381 
2,656 
2,487 
1,973 
3,206 
2,812 
3,392 
3,469 
2,142 
3,848 
9,055 
4,523 
3,991 
5,265 
5,876 
3,826 
2,091 



Per 

Cent. 
Voted. 



Men 
Listed 

by 
Police, 

1914. 



9,241 

7,835 

4,031 

3,771 

3,913 

12,701 

5,334 

10,464 

9,212 

9,712 

7,488 

8,780 

6,399 

7,157 

6,009 

7,936 

7,605 

6,760 

8,664 

19,421 

10,173 

9,274 

10,857 

13,302 

9,941 

5,246 



State Election, 
November 3, 1914. 



Men 
Regis- 
tered. 



5,163 
2,837 
2,712 
2,043 
2,145 
1,986 
1,301 
3,053 
2,929 
3,649 
3,502 
3,370 
2,553 
4,202 
3,606 
4,602 
4,042 
3,035 
4,966 
12,609 
6,355 
5,695 
7,349 
8,558 
6,042 
2,862 



Names 
Checked. 


Vote 

for 

Gover- 




nor. 


3,871 


3,810 


1,879 


1,840 


1,970 


1,950 


1,418 


1,399 


1,561 


1,544 


1,650 


1,492 


954 


937 


2,392 


2,352 


1,899 


1,879 


2,680 


2,635 


2,783 


2,742 


2,432 


2,393 


2,012 


1,946 


2,877 


2,834 


2,455 


2,420 


3,071 


3,051 


2,873 


2,834 


2,086 


2,039 


3,825 


3,698 


9,194 


9,113 


4,745 


4,694 


4,340 


4,295 


5,795 


5,754 


6,355 


6,314 


4,787 


4,737 


2,417 


2,391 


82,321 


81,093 



Per 

Cent 

Voted. 

* 



75 
66 
73 
69 
73 
83 
73 
78 
65 
73 
79 
72 
79 



67 
71 
69 
77 
73 
75 
76 
79 
74 
79 
84 



Totals... 



110,946 



81,559 



80,823 



74 



221,226 



111,166 



74 



# Per Cent, of "Names Checked" to "Men Registered." 
Note. — On account of the change of date for the City Election from January back to Decem- 
ber (See Chap. 730, Acts of 1914) there were two such elections in 1914. The first was held on 
January 13, for which the statistics are shown in the above table. The second occurred on December 
15. (See pages 315, 316.) 



FIRST CITY ELECTION IN 1914. 



313 



Vote for Mayor, by Candidates, 1914. 

[Compiled from Report of Election. Commissioners.] 







City Election, January 


13, 1914. 




"Wakd. 


J. M. 

Curley. 

* 


T. J. 

Kenny. 


AU 
Others. 


Total 
Vote. 


MAJORITIES. 


Per 
Cent 
Voted. 






For 
Cm-ley. 


For 
Kenny. 


Blanks. 


1 


1,889 
1,276 
1,426 
1,042 
1,196 
956 
610 
1,838 
1,302 
722 
506 
1,099 
1,272 
1,662 
1,331 
2,086 
2,832 
1,294 
2,831 
4,402 
2,077 
2,110 
2,272 
2,642 
1,700 
889 


1,589 

777 

530 

447 

418 

509 

350 

597 

1,070 

1,651 

2,149 

1,387 

700 

1,543 

1,479 

1,305 

637 

847 

1,014 

4,651 

2,445 

1,880 

2,993 

3,232 

2,122 

1,200 


2 
1 

1 

2 
2 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

1 
3 
2 
1 
1 

2 
4 
2 


3,480 
2,054 
1,956 
1,489 
1,615 
1,465 
960 
2,437 
2,374 
2,381 
2,656 
2,487 
1,973 
3,206 
2,812 
3,392 
3,469 
2,142 
3,848 
9,055 
4,523 
3,991 
5,265 
5,876 
3,826 
2,091 


298 
498 
896 
595 
777 
447 
260 
1,239 
230 

671 
118 

780 
2,195 

446 
1,814 

229 


921 
1,642 

287 

146 

247 
367 

721 
588 
418 
309 


68.34 
71.69 
74.20 
71.38 
73.34 
71.85 
69.46 
76.08 
72.71 
65.54 
72^02 
68.16 
77.22 
76.63 
76.14 
74.06 
82.58 
68.30 
78.32 
72.49 
73.05 
71.62 
75.70 
71.44 
67.37 
74.10 


36 


2 


24 


3 


17 


4 


12 


5 


16 


6 


36 


7 


15 


8 


32 


9 


16 

lO 


10 


35 


11 


27 


12 


36 


13 


20 


14 


23 


15 


23 


16 


18 


17 


23 


18 


25 


19 


22 


20 

21 


76 
28 


22 


42 


23 


54 


24 


38 


25 


27 


26 


17 






Totals.... 


43,262 


37,522 


39 


80,823 


11,393 


5,646 


72.86 


736 



# Elected for four years (subject to recall at end of two years). 
Note.— Average vote per precinct, 359; mimm.iun vote, 83, in Precinct 1, Ward 7; 
maximmn vote 699, in Precinct 1, Ward 22. 



314 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR CITY COUNCIL, 1914. 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 



Ward. 



City Election, January 13, 1914. 



D. J. 

McDonald. 

# 



W. H. 

Woods. 
# 



G. W. 
Coleman. 



F. J. 
Kneeland. 



P. A. 
Kearns. 


H. E. 
Hagan. 


Total 
Vote. 


1,092 


1,483 


. 9,106 


672 


942 


5,169 


839 


677 


4,936 


667 


583 


3,968 


717 


584 


4,164 


446 


453 


3,458 


369 


360 


2,521 


866 


1,369 


6,479 


786 


848 


6,069 


529 


1,097 


6,422 


379 


1,618 


7,194 


804 


1,033 


6,622 


920 


610 


5,011 


1,287 


1,156 


8,316 


1,212 


1,166 


7,454 


1,767 


1,357 


8,858 


2,041 


1,010 


9,077 


932 


690 


5,513 


2,018 


1,205 


10,091 


3,659 


4,468 


24,280 


1,764 


1,893 


11,747 


1,484 


1,633 


10,636 


1,464 


2,419 


14,297 


2,162 


2,720 


15,806 


1,122 


1,547 


9,985 


637 


981 


5,495 


30,635 


33,902 


212,674 



Blanks. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

Totals 



2,471 
1,409 
1,408 
1,079 
1,158 
963 
607 
1,772 
1,403 
1,621 
1,962 
1,505 
1,066 
1,977 
1,703 
1,798 
1,636 
1,108 
1,848 
5,481 
2,588 
2,338 
3,247 
3,550 
2,277 
1,180 



1,379 

724 

820 

680 

700 

611 

402 

612 

940 

936 

729 

917 

1,068 

1,578 

1,291 

1,426 

1,683 

1,099 

2,105 

3,554 

1,764 

1,636 

2,011 

2,522 

2,234 

820 



1,479 

690 

536 

448 

491 

597 

457 

959 

1,213 

1,618 

2,039 

1,560 

566 

1,213 

1,081 

1,237 

1,081 

839 

1,193 

4,475 

2,332 

1,871 

2,757 

2,989 

1,849 

1,205 



1,202 

732 

656 

511 

514 

388 

326 

901 

879 

621 

467 

803 

781 

1,105 

1,001 

1,273 

1,626 

845 

1,722 

2,643 

1,406 

1,674 

2,399 

1,863 

956 

672 



1,439 

1,065 

982 

535 

726 

1,045 

404 

928 

1,099 

825 

855 

947 

968 

1,371 

1,050 

1,372 

1,399 

988 

1,518 

3,113 

1,906 

1,463 

1,660 

1,935 

1,574 

829 



49,155 



34,241 



36,775 



27,966 



31,996 



# Elected for term of three years. 
Note. — Candidates' names are in same, order as on official ballot. Vote for "All Others," 7. 



SECOND CITY ELECTION IN 1914. 



315 



Men Listed, Registration and Vote. 

City Election, December 15, 1914. 

[Compiled from Report of Election Commissioners.] 



Voting 
Precincts. 


* Men 
Listed 

by 
Police 
1914. 


9 


9,241 


8 


7,835 


6 


4,031 


6 


3,771 


6 


3,913 


8 


12,701 


6 


5,334 


6 


10,464 


7 


9,212 


9 


9,712 


9 


7,488 


7 


8,780 


8 


6,399 


8 


7,157 


8 


6,009 


7 


7,936 


9 


7,605 


6 


6,760 


9 


8,664 


16 


19,421 


12 


10,173 


8 


9,274 


14 


10,857 


16 


13,302 


10 


9,941 


7 


5,246 


225 


221,226* 



Men and Women Voters. 



Registered 
Voters. 



Men. Women. Total 



5,174 
2,847 
2,712 
2,039 
2,154 
1,991 
1,313 
3,086 
2,941 
3,669 
3,526 
3,394 
2,560 
4,206 
3,626 
4,622 
4,050 
3,066 
4,979 
12,650 
6,368 
5,722 
7,358 
8,578 
6,038 
2,864 



320 

94 

329 

172 

204 

59 

74 

83 

83 

364 

905 

244 

78 

349 

350 

324 

225 

175 

363 

1,172 

811 

465 

691 

675 

559 

245 



5,494 
2,941 
3,041 
2,211 
2,358 
2,050 
1,387 
3,169 
3,024 
4,033 
4,431 
3,638 
2,638 
4,555 
3,976 
4,946 
4,275 
3,241 
5,342 
13,822 
7,179 
6,187 
8,049 
9,253 
6,597 
3,109 



Actual 
Voters, f 



Men. Women. Total 



2,493 
1,367 
1,331 
1,018 
1,192 
993 
610 
1,684 
1,255 
1,433 
1,781 
1,302 
1,195 
2,120 
1,727 
1,951 
1,946 
1,208 
2,363 
5,653 
2,893 
2,604 
3,746 
3,465 
2,346 
1,319 



119 

27 

81 

37 

36 

19 

28 

39 

31 

201 

593 

118 

31 

133 

120 

124 

87 

60 

97 

488 

364 

230 

306 

244 

272 

64 



2,612 
1,394 
1,412 
1,055 
1,228 
1,012 
638 
1,723 
1,286 
1,634 
2,374 
1,420 
1,226 
2,253 
1,847 
2,075 
2,033 
1,268 
2,460 
6,141 
3,257 
2,834 
4,052 
3,709 
2,618 
1,383 



Per Cent. 

Registered 

who 

Voted. 



47.54 

47.40 

46.43 

47.72 

62.08 

49.37 

46.00" 

54.37 

42.53 

40.52 

53.58 

39.03 

46.47 

49.46 

46.45 

41.95 

47.56 

39.12 

46.05 

44.43 

45.37 

45.81 

50.34 

40.08 

39.68 

44.48 



111,533 



9,413 



120,946 



50,995 



54,944 



45.43 



* Men residents 20 years of age and over. 



t All the names checked on voting list. 



316 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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STATE ELECTION, 1914. 



317 



Vote for Governor, by Candidates, 1914. 

[As Reported by the Election Commissioners.] 



Ward. 



State Election, November 3, 1914. 



Evans, 
P. 



MeCaU, 
R. 



Reimer, 
S. L. 



Roberts, 

S. 



Walker, 
Pr. 



Walsh, 
D. 
* 



Plxtbalities. 



Total 
Vote. 



Walsh, 
D. 



McCaU, 
R. 



10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



29 
10 
11 

5 

1 
16 

6 
29 
18 
16 
10 

8 
12 
10 

7 

7 
16 
16 

9 
32 
26 
22 
21 
24 
19 
13 



1,032 

246 

172 

171 

197 

244 

184 

379 

353 

1,417 

1,850 

907 

102 

506 

338 

750 

461 

655 

486 

3,312 

2,028 

1,412 

2,435 

2,590 

1,932 

1,123 



2 

2 
14 

4 
19 
13 

4 
10 
10 

4 
11 
21 
10 

7 

4 
13 
25 
18 
37 
22 
21 
6 
4 



53 

30 

6 

9 

9 

12 

14 

109 

67 

38 

60 

34 

17 

46 

38 

35 

20 

24 

59 

120 

73 

100 

99 

80 

19 

44 



147 

64 

43 

32 

20 

65 

37 

95 

77 

238 

119 

130 

23 

60 

52 

93 

72 

84 

100 

508 

257 

162 

360 

412 

216 

147 



2,540 
1,485 
1,718 
1,180 
1,315 
1,141 
692 
1,721 
1,351 
922 
693 
1,304 
1,788 
2,201 
1,964 
2,156 
2,258 
1,256 
3,031 
5,116 
2,292 
2,562 
2,817 
3,187 
2,545 
1,060 



3,810 
1,840 
1,950 
1,399 
1,544 
1,492 
937 
2,352 
1,879 
2,635 
2,742 
2,393 
1,946 
2,834 
2,420 
3,051 
2,834 
2,039 
3,698 
9,113 
4,694 
4,295 
5,754 
6,314 
4,737 
2,931 



1,508 

1,239 

1,546' 

1,009 

1,118 

897 

508 

1,342 

998 



397 

1,686 

1,695 

1,626 

1,406 

1,797 

601 

2,545 

1,804 

264 

1,150 

382 

597 

613 



495 
1,157 



63 



Totals . 



393 



25,282 



295 



1,215 



3,613 



50,295 81,093 



26,728 



1,715 



# Elected for term of one year, plurality being 25,013 and majority over all 19,497. 
D. Signifies Democratic; P. Prohibition; Pr. Progressive; R. Republican; S. Socialist; 
S. L. SociaUst Labor. 



318 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMAN, 
By Parties and Districts, November 3, 1914. 

[Compiled from Annual Report of Election Commissioners for 1914.] 









Dem. 


Prog. 


Rep. 


All 
Others. 


Total 
Vote. 


Plubalities. 






Dem. 


Rep. 


1 


10th 


2,378 

1,367 

1,580 

1,123 

1,216 

953 

658 

1,682 

1,250 

202 


225 
140 
185 

98 
103 
144 

64 
186 
183 

79 


1,078 
242 
133 
148 
156 
243 
160 
320 
315 
223 


1 


3,681 
1,749 
1,898 
1,369 
1,475 
1,340 

882 
2,188 
1,749 

504 


1,300 
1,125 
1,395 

975 
1,060 

710 

498 
1,362 

935 





2 




' '.'.'.'. 




3 




4 




5 




6 




7 




8 




9 


" .... 




11 (Prec. 1, 2) ... . 


21 


' Totals 

10 


10th.... 
11th.... 


12,409 

724 
368 
1,066 
920 
2,641 
1,792 
1,951 
2,401 


1,407 

268 
113 

138 
97 
146 
361 
257 
385 


3,018 

1,601 
1,643 

1,148 
934 
928 
2,411 
1,972 
2,873 


1 

1 


16,835 

2,593 
2,125 
2,352 
1,951 
3,715 
4,564 
4,180 
5,659 


9,360 
1,713 


21 

877 


11 (Prec. 3-9) 

12 


1,275 
82 


18 


14 


19 




21 


619 


22 


21 


23 


472 






Totals 

13 


11th 

12th 


11,863 

1,752 
2,165 
1,959 
2,116 
2,132 
5,068 
3,123 


1,765 

49 
109 

89 
122 
142 
641 
526 


13,510 

107 
505 
307 
722 
419 
3,123 
2,490 


1 
1 


27,139 

1,908 
2,779 
2,355 
2,960 
2,693 
8,833 
6,139 


1,713 

1,645 
1,660 
1,652 
1,394 
1,713 
1,945 
633 


3.360 


14 




15 




16 




17 




20 




24 








Totals 

25 


12th.... 

13th. ... 
14th. ... 


18,315 

2,584 
998 


1,678 

168 
322 


7,673 

1,930 
959 


1 

1 
66 


27,667 

4,683 
2,345 


10,642 

654 
39 




26 








Totals, City. . 




46,169 


5,340 


27,090 


70 


78,669 


22,408 


3,381 









Dem. signifies Democratic; Prog., Progressive; Rep., Republican. 

Note. — Congressmen elected: 10th Dist., Peter F. Tague (Dem.); 11th Dist., George 
Holden Tinkham (Rep.); 12th Dist., James A. Gallivan (Dem.); 13th Dist., "William H. 
Carter (Rep.); 14th Dist., Richard Olney, 2nd (Dem.). 



VOTE ON REFERENDUM. 



319 



VOTE ON ABOLISHING PARTY ENROLMENT. 
State Election, November 3, 1914. 



Waed. 



Question: "shall the act passed by the general 
court in the year 1914, providing for the aboli- 
tion of party enrolment at primary elections, 
be accepted." 



Voted 
Yes. 



Voted 
No. 



Total 
Vote. 



Majorities 
For. 



Blanks. 



Per Cent, of 
Total Who 
Voted Yes. 



1... 

2*. 

3 *. 

4... 

5... 

6... 

7... 

8*. 

9... 
10... 
11... 
12... 
13... 
14... 
15... 
16... 
17... 
18... 
19... 
20... 
21... 
22... 
23... 
24... 
25... 
26... 



2,388 
1,126 
1,289 
879 
940 
844 
579 
1,694 
1,120 
1,397 
1,193 
1,366 
1,099 
1,790 
1,522 
1,966 
1,744 
1,190 
2,394 
5,780 
2,786 
2,668 
3,513 
3,873 
2,852 
1,420 



636 

274 

319 

242 

297 

235 

147 

270 

372 

737 

1,037 

536 

287 

533 

423 

575 

572 

381 

729 

1,804 

1,082 

922 

1,401 

1,349 

1,064 

496 



3,024 
1,400 
1,608 
1,121 
1,237 
1,079 
726 
1,964 
1,492 
2,134 
2,230 
1,902 
1,386 
2,323 
1,945 
2,541 
2,316 
1,571 
3,123 
7,584 
3,868 
3,590 
4,914 
5,222 
3,916 
1,916 



1,752 

852 

970 

637 

643 

609 

432 

1,424 

748 

. 660 

156 

830 

812 

1,257 

1,099 

1,391 

1,172 

809 

1,665 

3,976 

1,704 

1,746 

2,112 

2,524 

1,788 

924 



847 
479 
362 
297 
324 
571 
228 
428 
407 
546 
553 
530 
626 
554 
510 
530 
557 
515 
702 

1,610 
877 
750 
881 

1,133 
871 
501 



78.97 
#80.43 
#80.16 
78.41 
75.99 
78.22 
79.75 
#86.25 
75.07 
65.46 
53.50 
71.82 
79.29 
77.06 
78.25 
77.37 
75.30 
75.75 
76.66 
76.21 
72.03 
74.32 
71.49 
74.17 
72.83 
74.11 



Totals . 



49,412 



16,720 



66,132 



32,692 



16,189 



74.72 



# Ward 8 shows the highest per cent who voted Yes, and Wards 2 and 3 rank second 
and third. No ward showed a majority against abolition, bijt in Ward 11 the majority 
for it was much less than in any other ward. 



320 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



MEN LISTED (BY POLICE) AND POLLS ASSESSED, 1911=1915. 





1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 




Men 
Listed. 


Polls 
Assessed. 


Men 
Listed. 


PoUs 
Assessed. 


Men 
Listed. 


Polls 

Assessed. 


Men 
Listed. 


PoUs 
Assessed. 


Men 
Listed. 


PoUs 
Assessed. 


1 


8,664 


8,389 


8,645 


8,342 


9.001 


8.633 


9,241 


8.770 


9,398 


8.646 


2 


7,386 


6,783 


7.422 


6,983 


7.643 


7.098 


7,835 


7,008 


7,581 


7.306 


3 


4,149 


4.086 


4,104 


4,044 


3.974 


3,877 


4,031 


3,903 


4,028 


3.901 


4 


3,930 


4,089 


3,944 


4,049 


3.819 


3.621 


3,771 


3,582 


3,702 


3,747 


5 


4,228 


4,018 


4,114 


3,978 


3,928 


3,985 


3.913 


3,873 


3,916 


3,743 


6 


13,310 


10,613 


12,642 


10,353 


12,134 


10,387 


12,701 


10,886 


12,286 


11,635 


7 


6,436 


5,523 


6,417 


5,052 


5,818 


5,298 


5.334 


4.930 


5,100 


4,784 


8 


10,386 


9,468 


10,613 


9,168 


10,350 


9,008 


10.464 


8.344 


10,419 


8,519 


9 


9,419 


8,679 


9,386 


8.612 


9,272 


8,591 


9,212 


8,323 


9,126 


8.110 


10 


9,386 


8,787 


9,784 


8.910 


9.507 


8,879 


9.712 


8,950 


9,479 


9.006 


11 


7,238 


6,534 


7,466 


6.569 


7,716 


7,149 


7.488 


6,953 


7,341 


6.637 


12 


8,793 


8,276 


8,902 


8,323 


8,900 


8,465 


8,780 


8,424 


8,567 


8.262 


13 


6,516 


6,617 


6,603 


6,561 


6,490 


6.343 


6.399 


5,978 


6,217 


5.840 1 


14 


6,976 


6,481 


6,893 


6,569 


7,034 


6.548 


7.157 


6.559 


7,068 


6,649 1 


15 


5,881 


5,908 


5,968 


5,931 


5,885 


5,825 


6,009 


5,772 


6,008 


5,715 1 


16 


7,653 


7,403 


7,787 


7,596 


7,831 


7.708 


7,936 


7.727 


8,336 


8,037 


17 


7,701 


6,912 


7,606 


6,839 


7.533 


6,997 


7,605 


6.882 


7,528 


6,999 


18 


7,071 


6,530 


6,992 


6,912 


6,814 


6,624 


6,760 


6,682 


6,711 


6,320 


19 


8,561 


8,468 


8,656 


8,592 


8,515 • 


8,833 


8,664 


8,503 


8,740 


8,373 


20 


17,183 


16,888 


18,091 


17,508 


18,922 


18.370 


19,421 


18,860 


20,149 


19.519 


21 


9,307 


8,862 


9,514 


9,160 


9,760 


9,115 


10,173 


9,316 


10,277 


9.586 


22 


8,471 


8,466 


8,895 


8,515 


9,099 


8,695 


9.274 


8.801 


9.514 


8,947 


23 


9,264 


8,813 


9,592 


9,262 


10,200 


10,005 


10,857 


10,474 


11.356 


11,022 


24 


11,484 


11,056 


12,098 


11,643 


12,524 


12,161 


13,302 


12,892 


14,180 


13,555 


25 


8,193 


7,884 


8,713 


8,170 


9,278 


8,565 


9,941 


9,145 


10,736 


10,071 


26 






4,961 


4,781 


5.155 


5,203 


5,246 


5,278 


5,188 


5,004 J 








Totals, 


207,586 


195,533 


215,808 


202.422 


217,102 


205,983 


221.226 


206,815 


222,951 


209.933 1 



Note. — In accordance with chapter 279, Acts of 1903, amended by chapter 291, Acts of 1906, all male 
residents 20 years of age or more have been listed by the police annually on May 1. This date was changed 
to April 1 by chapter 440, Acts of 1909. In Boston only was the voting list prepared from a police canvaiss 
in the years 1903 to 1915, inclusive. Elsewhere in the state the Assessors' hst of polls has been the basis of 
the voting hst, as it now is in Boston, the change having been ordered by Chapter 91, General Acts of 1915. 



VOTES OF WOMEN, 1911-1914. 



321 



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IS 

f< a) 



322 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 







1 _^-d . 










































iO 


Per 
Cen 
Vote 
Yes 






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t^ O 


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IN 


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1— ( 








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a 








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CO 


CO 


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CD 


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in CD 


CD 


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r^ 
















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IN 


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^ 


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m 




















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Yes 


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1— I 


^ (N OS IN 


OS ■* 


OS 


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CD 


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OS 


CO 


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IN 


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a 

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CD 


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CD 


CD 


CD 


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CD 


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CO 


in 


1^ 


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rfi lO 


on 


t- en 


■* 


04 




00 


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on 


(/) 
















^^ 








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CO 


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CD 


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00 


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OS 


in 


OS 


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in OS i> 


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05 ■* 


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CD 00 


IN 


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m 


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m 


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CO 








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t~ CD 


CD 


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in 


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■ 




























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Yes 


p J? 


IN 


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CO Tj< 


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OS 


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rH 


o 


















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1-5 






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1— t 


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in 


CD 


cq 


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2g 
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in 1-1 




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in 


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CD 


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CO o 


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CO 




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rt 1-1 




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Per 
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Yes 


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cq rf 


OS 


IN CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


r^ 


r^ 


CO 




CO in 


(-1 












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1-^ 






CO t^ 00 t- 


00 b- 


CO 


t> CO 


CO 


CD 


I> 


CO 


CO 


CO 


p. 


in CO 


t- 


TjH in CD 
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* 


CD 
















































. 




t~ 05 


t^ 


■* T* IN 00 
IQ 00 O f~ 


O CO 


o 


(N IN 


•^ 


in 


OS 


^ 


o 


OS 


^ 




[^ 




CO 


CO 






22 










in 


IN 00 


ai 


CO 






in 


cq 


1-1 


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ro 




CO 


CO 














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CO 


CO 


in 


m 


CO 


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CD 


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t> 


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tH t-^ 


i> 


in 

co" 
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CO T)( 


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1^ 


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CO 


t^ 


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in 




r^ 


in 














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CO 








cq 


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no 


o 








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<N 




CO 


on 


CO 


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r^ 


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00 






o 


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1-1 










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rH 1-H rH 




o 

CO 








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o 

d 

1-5 


Per 

Cen 
Vote 
Yes 


05 CO 


1—1 


O IN CO CO 


CO IN 


™ 


■* CO 


O 


on 


<N 


CO 


oo 


CO 






















i> t^ 00 i> 


00 t^ 


CD 


(> i> 


I> 


CO 


1> 


CO 


CD 


CO 


t> 


in CO 


t- 


■* in CD 
* 




CO 








CO r^ 


Oi 


O IN t> T)< 


CO 1-1 


CO 


OS ^ 


h~ 


o 


in 


OS 


cq 


ro 


^ 


in o 


CO 


tH CO CO 










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t^ CO 1-1 tH 


CO IN 


in 


CO tH 


CO 


CIS 


CO 


^ 


00 


Ml 


ro 




in 


















CO ■* 




lO rjl 


X|H 


i> 


in 


t> 


l> 




I> 


CO OS 


t> 


l> 1> I> 




cq 






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cq 




rH rH 




00 






w 


T) . 


CO o 


1-1 


CO t> r^ 00 


CO CO 


CD 


CO ■* 


>n 


^_, 


IN 


CO 


m 


m 






in 
























in 00 


OS 


o 


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in 
























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CD ^ 


IN 


m 1-1 


o 


CO 


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Tf 


in 


o 


O 


O 05 


o 


CO 1> CO 




CD 






o 


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1-t 1—1 


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1-1 1-1 


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1-1 1-1 


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cq 


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CO 
CO 












































m 








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rt IN 


CO 


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in 


CD 


i> 


OS 


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cq cq 


cq 
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CO 

cq 







SUMMARY OF ELECTIONS. 



323 



OS 
II 



C/3 

z 

o 

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a 

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> 
6 

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loocit: 






H 






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15 




P-l 












lOOCOCO 








'Per 
Cent. 

of 
2 to 1 


ooaiOi> 




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CO 


t> CO CD CO 
















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Per 
Cent. 

of 
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rHOO! 








CO-* CO 


















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324 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



REFERENDA RELATING TO BOSTON. 



Votes on Acts and Questions Submitted to the People. 

Chapter 110, Acts of 1821.— "An Act to Establish the City of Boston." 
Adopted March 4, 1822. Yes, 2,797; no, 1,881. 

Resolve of the Common Council of November 26, 1844. — Fom* propo- 
sitions were submitted to the people December 9, 1844: 

1. Whether the people were in favor of procuring a supply of water, 
at the expense of the City, from Long Pond in Natick and Framingham 
or from any of the sources adjacent thereto. Adopted. Yes, 6,260; 
no, 2,204. 

2. Whether the people would instruct the City Council to apply to 
the Legislature for suitable legislation to carry the first proposition into 
effect. Adopted. Yes, 6,252; no, 2,207. 

3. Whether the people were in favor of procm-ing a supply of water, 
at the expense of the City, from any other source which might be there- 
after decided upon by the City Council. Defeated. Yes, 1,206; no, 7,081. 

4. Whether the people would instruct the City Council to apply to 
the Legislature for suitable legislation to carry the third proposition into 
effect. Defeated. Yes, 1,194; no, 7,144. 

Chapter 167, Acts of 1846. — "An Act for Supplying the City of Boston 
with Pure Water." Adopted April 13, 1846. Yes, 4,637; no, 348. 

Chapter 448, Acts of 1854. — "An Act to Revise the Charter of the City 
of Boston." Adopted November 13, 1854. Yes, 9,166; no, 990. 

Chapter 185, Acts of 1875. — "An Act for the Laying Out of Pubhc 
Parks in or near the City of Boston." Adopted Jxme 9, 1875. Yes, 3,706; 
no, 2,311. 

* Chapter 41, Resolves of 1889. — Proposed Article of Amendment to the 
Constitution "Forbidding the Manufacture and Sale of Intoxicating 
Liquors to be used as a Beverage." Defeated April 22, 1889. Yes, 
10,669; no, 31,699. 

* Chapter 102, Resolves of 1891.— Proposed Article XXXIII. of Amend- 
ments of the Constitution providing that a majority of the members of 
each branch of the General Court shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. Ratified November 3, 1891. Yes, 33,398; no, 4,702. 

* Chapter 58, Resolves of 1891.— Proposed Article XXXII. of Amend- 
ments of the Constitution, annuUing the provision of the Constitution 
which made the payment of a state or county tax a necessary quahfica- 
tion for voters for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Senators and Repre- 
sentatives. Ratified November 3, 1891. Yes, 33,490; no, 7,170. 

* state Referenda. 



VOTES ON REFERENDA. 325 

Chapter 473, Acts of 1893. — "An Act relating to the Election of Members 
of the Board of Aldermen." Adopted November 7, 1893. Yes, 26,955; 
no, 19,622. 

Chapter 481, Acts of 1893. — "An Act to Provide for Rapid Transit in 
Boston and Vicinity." Defeated November 7, 1893. Yes, 24,012; no, 
27,588. 

Chapter 548, Acts of 1894- — "An Act to Incorporate the Boston Ele- 
vated Railway Company and to Promote Rapid Transit in the City of 
Boston and Vicinity." Adopted July 24, 1894. Yes, 15,542; no,. 14,162. 

Chapter 436, Acts of 1895. — "Is it Expedient that Municipal Suffrage 
be Granted to Women?" Defeated November 5, 1895. Totals: Yes, 
22,401; no, 42,502. Men: Yes, 15,860; no, 42,224. Women: Yes, 6,541, 
no, 278. 

Chapter 410, Acts of 1896. — "An Act Providing a Salary for the Members 
of the Common Council of the City of Boston." Adopted December 15, 
1896. Yes, 35,152; no, 26,517. 

Chapter 361, Acts of 1897.— "Act to Consolidate the Board of Alder- 
men and the Common Council and to reorganize the City Government 
of the City of Boston." Defeated November 2, 1897. Yes, 24,906; no, 
31,105. 

Chapter 344, Acts of 1899.— "An Act to Make Eight Hours a Day's 
Work for City and Town Employees." Adopted December 12, 1899. 
Yes, 60,836; no, 14,483. 

Chapter 398, Acts of 1899. — "An Act to Authorize the Replacing of 
Street Car Tracks on Boylston and Tremont Streets in the City of Boston." 
Defeated December 12, 1899. Yes, 26,166; no, 51,643. 

Chapter 332, Acts of 1901.— "An Act Relative to the Terms of Office 
of City Clerks." Adopted December 10, 1901. Yes, 29,186; no, 17,485. 

Chapter 485, _ Acts of 1902. — "An Act to Extend to the Several Dis- 
tricts of the City of Boston the Right of Local Option as to the Granting 
of Licenses for the Sale of Intoxicating Liquors." Defeated November 4, 
1902. Yes, 35,810; no, 45,914. 

Chapter 534, ^cts of 1902. — "An Act to Provide for the Construction 
of Additional Timnels and Subways in the City of Boston." Adopted 
December 9, 1902. Yes, 42,234; no, 16,199. 

Chapter 395, Acts of 1906.— "An Act to Extend the Time in which 
Intoxicating Liquors may be Sold by Innholders in the City of Boston." 
Adopted December 11, 1906. Yes, 39,592; no, 21,179. 

Chapter 486, Acts of 1909. — "An Act Relating to the Administration 
of the City of Boston and to Amend the Charter of the Said City." Sec- 
tion 35, relating to Plan 1 and Plan 2, the only part of the act submitted 
to the voters. Plan 2 adopted November 2, 1909. Vote for Plan 1, 
35,276; for Plan 2, 39,170. 



326 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Chapter Ji86, Acts of 1909, Sect. 4^.— "Shall there be an Election for 
Mayor at the Next Municipal Election?" (Question submitted at State 
election in the second year of the Mayor's term.) Defeated Novem- 
ber 7, 1911. Yes, 37,682; no, 32,142, the vote required for adoption 
being a majority of all the registered voters {i. e., 54,194) instead of a majority 
of the actual voters. 

Chapter 469, Acts of 1911. — "An Act to Annex the Town of Hyde 
Park to the City of Boston." Adopted by Boston November 7, 1911. 
Yes, 51,242; no, 14,281. Adopted by Hyde Park at same date. Yes, 
1,434; no, 1,247. 

Chapter 661, Acts of 1912. — "An Act to Provide for the Widening and 
Laying Out of Certain Streets or Thoroughfares in the City of Boston." 
Adopted November 5, 1912. Yes, 37,313; no, 19,849. 

Chapter 667, Acts of 1913. — "An Act to Authorize the City of Boston 
to Appropriate Money to be Added to the Rental of East Boston Tunnel." 
Adopted January 13, 1914. Yes, 35,121; no, 26,588. 

Chapter 646, Acts of 1914- — "Shall the Act . . . providing for the 
election of a City Coimcil of seventeen members, by districts, be accepted?" 
Defeated November 3, 1914. Yes, 26,229; no, 47,355. 

Chapter 486, Acts of 1909, Sect. 46. — "Shall there be an Election for 
Mayor at the Next Municipal Election?" (Question submitted (second 
instance) at State election in the second year of the Mayor's term.) De- 
feated November 2, 1915. Yes, 47,396; no, 35,784, the vote required for 
adoption being a majority of all the registered voters (i. e., 56,990) instead 
of a majority of the actual voters. 

Order of the City Council, November 29, 1915. — "Shall the consent of the 
inhabitants of Boston be given to the widening of Boylston street by the 
taking of a portion of Boston Common for said pm-pose?" The same 
question submitted as to Park street and as to Tremont street, making 
three separate questions. Defeated at City election, December 14, 1915. 
Vote on Boylston street — yes, 27,771; no, 47,041. On Park street — 
yes, 27,698; no, 46,539. On Tremont street — yes, 26,599; no, 47,192. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 327 



Additions and Coeeections. 



ADDITIONS. 

ASSESSED VALUATION AND TAX RATE, 1916. 

Total assessed valuation as of April 1, 1916, $1,608,701,300, or 
$1,279,775,700 real estate and $328,925,600 personal, exceeding the total 
valuation of 1915 by $42,304,000. Total tax rate, $17.80 per $1,000 of 
valuation, or 20 cents less than in 1915, divided thus: City tax, $14.11; 
County tax, $1.21; State tax, $2.48, the latter reduced 48 cents from the 
1915 rate. Total tax levy, $28,634,883.14 on property and $421,844 on 
polls, subject to additions of supplementary assessments later in the year. 

In the 10 years, 1906 to 1916, the assessed valuation increased 25 per 
cent, the population 26 per cent and the tax rate 12 per cent. 

APPROPRIATIONS, ETC., FOR FINANCIAL YEAR, 1916-17. 

All departments except School Departments (Maintenance) $16,496,- 
599.05 (including $193,976.77 for Reserve Fund); City and County Debt 
Requirements, $5,524,955.66; School Departments, $6,189,000 (regular) 
and $922,812 (special); other special appropriations, $539,123,35; State 
tax, $2,548,240; Metropolitan assessments (excluding Water assessment 
paid by water income), $1,199,298.19 (including Charles River Basin); 
other State assessments, $116,007.15. Total of all appropriations, etc., 
from Tax Levy and General Income, $33,536,035.42, which is $581,359.96 
more than the total for 1915-16. 

The notable items of increase over the appropriations for 1915-16 are: 
School Departments, $709,446; Street improvements, $327,813; Over- 
seemg of Poor Department, $118,469; County of Suffolk, $96,035; City 
Hospital, $71,327; PoUce Department, $63,752; Health Department, 
$29,850; Fire Department, $27,363; Assessing Department, $26,988. 

Items of decrease are: State Tax, $659,510; Debt Requirements, 
$225,929; Pubhc Works Department, $9,579. 

The appropriations for 1916-17 are the first to be worked out accord- 
ing to the new Segregated Budget method recommended by the Budget 
Commission of 1915. For details of 1916 appropriations with per cent 
of each department's allowance to the whole budget, see pages 262 and 263 
of this Municipal Register. 

BOSTON'S FUNDED DEBT, 1916. 
Gross funded debt, February 1, 1916, $127,405,697.68 (including 
$462,666.68 issued by State for enlargement of Court House); sinking 



328 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

funds, $41,773,295.36; other redemption means, $1,209,923.69; net debt 
$84,422,478.63, of which $28,127,713.83 (or 33.3 per cent) is for rapid 
transit (self -paying) ; net debt per capita (estimated population, 755,905), 
$111.70; net debt exclusive of rapid transit debt, $56,294,764.80, or 
$74.47 per capita. In the fiscal year 1915-16 the net City debt was 
reduced by $1,357,501.65; the net County debt was reduced by $138,257.67 
and the net Water debt by $47,335.11. The net increase of Rapid Transit 
debt, i. e., for new subways, was $3,990,996.11. Total debt contracted in 
1915-16 was $7,205,200; total debt paid and cancelled, $4,616,017; total 
increase of gross debt, $2,589,183; of net debt, $2,447,902. 

Total amount of debt incurred by the City since its incorporation (in 
1822), $243,796,487, of which 52.5 per cent belongs to the last 20 years. 

MEN IN BOSTON, AS LISTED IN 1916, BY ASSESSORS. 
Total, 20 years of age and over, 210,922. This includes only bona fide 
residents subject to poU tax. By Chapter 91, General Acts of 1915, the 
annual listing of male residents by the Police Department was discon- 
tinued, after being in vogue since 1903. In the 1916 list, taken accord- 
ing to the new wards, the maximum ward total is 21,130 (Ward 5); next 
largest, 11,259 (Ward 7); third, 11,226 (Ward 6); fourth, 9,870 (Ward 9); 
fifth, 9,554 (Ward 8); sixth, 9,464 (Ward 2); 7,000 to 9,000, Wards 10, 
11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 22; 5,000 to 7,000, Wards 1, 3, 4, 19, 20, 
23, 24, 25, 26. 

MEN LIABLE TO MILITIA ENROLMENT 
On June 22, 1916, the Board of Assessors certified to the City Clerk that 
the number of men in the City liable to enrolment in the State militia 
is. 125,692, i. e., men eighteen to forty-five years of age, subject to certain 
exemptions, such as clergymen, physicians, judges, firemen, etc. This 
action is in accordance with Chapter 604, Acts of 1908, section 8. 

CITY TREASURER'S TRANSACTIONS FOR YEAR, 1915-16. 
Balance, February 1, 1915, $5,986,155. Receipts.— from City Col- 
lector, $39,695,128; temporary loans, $8,250,000; debt issued, $7,205,200; 
from sinking funds for debt due, $3,539,350; trust funds, $335,948; interest 
on bank deposits, $123,684; premium on loans negotiated, $126,422; other 
receipts, $64,082. Total receipts for year, $59,339,814. 

Payments. — Pay roll drafts, $16,244,406 (not including County); 
general drafts (excluding debt and temporary loans), $5,481,170; tem- 
porary loans, $8,250,000; payments to the State, $7,340,866; special drafts 
(excluding interest on debts), $9,614,137; interest on all debts, $4,819,383; 
debt redemption, $4,616,017 (including $1,076,667 serial debt); trust 
fund investments, etc., $82,980; County payments (excluding debt, ' 
interest and State assessment), $1,671,427; payments to Sinking Fund 
Commissioners, $751,365; other payments, $22,217. Total for the year, 
$58,893,968. Balance January 31, 1916, $6,432,000. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 329 

ASSESSED VALUATION PER CAPITA IN SIX LEADING CITIES, 

1914 (By Rank). 
Boston, $2,109.63; New York, $1,715.30; Pittsburgh, $1,364.94; 
Cleveland, $1,364.32; Philadelphia, $1,351.75; Baltimore, $1,348.70; 
assessment basis 100 per cent of value. (See U. S. Census Bureau's Finan- 
cial Statistics of Cities, 1915, pages 318 + ). Other large cities not com- 
parable, as assessment basis varies from 25 per cent to 85 per cent of 
value. The per capita figures above stated are approximate. 

TOTAL ASSETS AND PROPERTIES OF TWELVE LEADING 
CITIES, 1915 (By Rank). 
New York, $2,067,753,951; Philadelphia, $297,584,861; Chicago, 
$269,283,504; Boston, $236,620,719; Pittsburgh, $122,994,056; Cleve- 
land, $103,183,617; St. Louis, $102,497,191; Los Angeles, $89,677,283; 
Baltimore, $87,589,943; Detroit, $81,566,992; San Francisco, $73,652,421; 
Buffalo, $55,953,680. (See U. S. Census Bureau's Financial Statistics of 
Cities, 1915, page 284.) 

BOSTON'S ASSETS AND PROPERTIES IN DETAIL, 1915. 

Assets in Sinking Funds, $41,217,083; Trust Fimds, $9,238,557; value 
of Parks, PubHc Grounds, Bathhouses, etc., $67,995,800; Rapid Transit 
Subways and Tunnels, $24,025,664; Schools, $23,269,900; Water Supply 
System, $19,585,432; Hospitals and other Institutions, $9,191,900; General 
Government, $9,101,300; Cemeteries, $7,041,100; Pubhc Library, 
$5,918,400; Fire Department, $3,357,098; Public Markets, etc., $2,781,200; 
Pubhc Works Department, $2,534,894; Pohce Department, $1,225,500; 
General Cash on hand, $4,213,155; all other, $5,923,736. Total, 
$236,620,719. (See U. S. Census Bureau's Financial Statistics of Cities, 
1915, pages 284, 285, 290, 291.) 

TOTAL YEARLY MUNICIPAL COST PER CAPITA IN TWELVE 
LEADING CITIES, 1914. 
New York, $45.85; Chicago, $33.97; Philadelphia, $28.67; Boston, 
$49.29; St. Louis, $31.32; Cleveland, $41.20; Baltimore, $39.83; Pitts- 
burgh, $39.87; Detroit, $38.44; Buffalo, $38.61; San Francisco, $53.88; 
Los Angeles, $56.42. (See U. S. Census Bureau's Financial Statistics of 
Cities, 1915, page 160.) 

NET DEBT PER CAPITA IN TWELVE LEADING CITIES, 1915. 

New York, $172.82; Chicago, $27.49; Philadelphia, $61.44; Boston, 
$113.10; St. Louis, $29.72; Cleveland, $89.26; Baltimore, $102.86; 
Pittsburgh, $91.93; Detroit, $33.65; Buffalo, $71.54; San Francisco, 
$94.27; Los Angeles, $94.38. (See U. S. Census Bureau's Financial Statis- 
tics of Cities, 1915, page 297.) 

These Per Capita figures are approximate, as the Population totals all 
had to be estimated as of 1914. 



330 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

PER CENT INCREASE OF NET DEBT IN FIVE YEARS, 1910 to 
1915, FOR NINE LEADING CITIES. 
New York, 40.45; Philadelphia, 18.36; Boston, 12.12; Cleveland, 53.36; 
Baltimore, 49.00; Pittsburgh, 19.59; Detroit, 96.05; Buffalo, 49.67; 
Los Angeles, 111.15. 

PER CENT OF NET DEBT TO VALUATION IN TEN LEADING 

CITIES, 1915. 
New York, 10.08; Philadelphia, 4.55; Boston, 5.30; St. Louis, 2.10, 
Cleveland, 6.54; Baltimore, 7.63; Pittsburgh, 6.40; Detroit, 2.62; Buffalo, 
5.95; Los Angeles, 4.49. 

BOSTON'S SHARE OF METROPOLITAN NET DEBT, 1915. 

Boston's hability for the State's Contingent Debt, i. e., the debt incurred 
for MetropoUtan parks, sewers, water, etc., was $35,073,577 on July 1, 
1915, or S598,735 less than in 1914. It is divided thus: Water debt, 
$23,466,764; park debt, $5,058,117; sewer debt, $4,175,763; Charles 
River Basin debt, $2,372,933. The percentages paid by Boston are 
76.929+ on water debt; 60.174 on most of the park debt; 43.70 on most 
of the sewer debt, and 60.60 on Charles River Basin debt. 

MetropoUtan assessments paid by Boston in 1915 amounted to 
$2,865,973, of which 69.14 per cent was for debt requirements and 30.86 
per cent for maintenance. 

VITAL STATISTICS OF BOSTON. 

In the calendar year 1915, total nmnber of deaths, 12,022, or 191 more 
then in 1914. Death rate for 1915, 16.07, or if deaths of non-residents 
{i. e., 1,610) are deducted, 13.9. Deaths of children imder 1 year of age, 
2,044; same in 1914, 2,007; in 1913, 2,111. Number of births in 1915, 
19,871; birth rate per 1,000 of popiilation in 1915, 26.5. Ratio of births 
to deaths (excluding non-residents) 191 to 100. 

Corrected death rates {i. e., excluding deaths of non-residents) for eight 
years: 16.9 in 1906, 16.7 in 1907, 16.4 in 1908, 14.8 in 1909, 15.3 in 1910, 
15.2 in 1911, 14.3 in 1912, 14.2 in 1913, 14.4 in 1914. 

RETIREMENT LAWS AND PENSIONS.* 
By Chapter 619, Acts of 1910, amended by Chapter 338, Acts of 1911, 
cities and towns are authorized to establish the retirement and contributory 
pension system therein set forth and applying to all municipal employees 
alike. The system has not become law in Boston because the City Coun- 
cil rejected it as impracticable. The classes of retired employees now 
receiving pensions are the police (since 1878), firemen (since 1880), school 
teachers (since 1908), judges, prison officers, Civil War veterans (since 
1911) and laborers, skilled and unskilled. The largest class, i. e., the 
laborers, were provided for by Chapter 413, Acts of 1911, accepted by 

* Regarding pensions paid to school teachers, see page 147. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 331 

the City Council on October 26, 1911. Any laborer sixty years of age 
or over, who has served the City for twenty-five years and is physically 
incapacitated shall, at his request, be retired from service, receiving for 
the remainder of his Ufe an annual pension equal to one-half of his pay 
for his final year's service. All retirements are subject to the approval 
of the Retirement Board, viz., the Mayor, City Auditor and City Treas- 
urer, who serve without compensation. Retirement is compulsory when 
any laborer reaches the age of seventy. 

Chapter 367, Acts of 1913, specifies that the amount of the annual 
pension payable to such retired laborers, skilled laborers, mechanics, etc., 
is not to exceed $360. 

Chapter 765, Acts of 1914, provides that the Retirement Board, upon 
request of the Mayor and City Council, may retire any laborer employed 
by the City who, owing to injury, physical incompetency, old age or 
infirmity may be incapable of further performance of his work. 

Veterans of the Civil War in City service, if incapacitated for active 
duty, are retired, with the consent of the Mayor, at one-haK pay, provided 
they have been in the City's service for at least ten years. This is in 
accordance with Chapter 113, Acts of 1911, which went into effect March 
8, 1911, the date of its approval. 

As provided by Chapter 459, Acts of 1910, veterans of the Civil War in 
the service of any county if incapacitated for active duty, may be retired 
by the County Commissioners, with the consent of the Governor, on half 
pay, when they have been ten years in the county service, and have 
reached the age of sixty-five. When necessary for the good of the service 
a veteran may be retired before reaching that age. 

On August 1, 1916, the total niunber of pensioners was 1,220, divided as 
follows: Laborers, 317; teachers, 265; firemen, 254; police, 228; veterans, 
136; various others, 20. Of the laborers, 278 were from the Public Works 
Department. 

The total of City and County pension payments in the fiscal year 
1915-16 was $580,790 {i. e., $65,265 more than in 1914r-15), divided as 
follows: Pohce Department, $157,374; Fire Department, $140,989; 
Public Works Department, $138,345; Department of School Committee, 
$97,393; Suffolk Coimty, $17,968; Park and Recreation Department, 
$14,241; other departments, $14,480. 

METROPOLITAN DISTRICT, OR "GREATER BOSTON." 
This consists, in the most inclusive sense, of 39 municipalities, including 
Boston, or 14 cities and 25 towns, all within 15 miles of the State House. 
The 7 cities in the first zone, i. e., contiguous to Boston, are these, viz.: 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Newton, Quincy, Revere and SomerviUe; the 
6 cities in the second zone, not contiguous, are, Lynn, Maiden, Medford, 
Melrose, Waltham and Woburn. The 7 contiguous towns are : Brookline, 
Dedham, Milton, Needham, Watertown and Winthrop; the 19 other 
towns are: Arlington, Belmont, Braintree, Canton, Cohasset, Dover, 
Hingham, Hull, Lexington, Nahant, Saugus, Stoneham, Swampscott, 



332 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Wakefield, Wellesley, Weston, Westwood, Weymouth and Winchester. 
Area of district, 412 square miles; population by census of 1915, 1,587,093, 
or 163,664 larger than in 1910. Of said total, 47 per cent, was in Boston, 
and 53 per cent, outside. Of the State's total population, "Greater 
Boston" has 43 per cent. Total valuation of taxable property in district 
on April 1, 1915, $2,643,038,257, an increase of $59,163,175 over valuation 
in 1914. Of said total, 59.27 per cent, was in Boston and 40.73 per cent, 
outside. To "Greater Boston" belongs 55.4 per cent, of the entire valua- 
tion of Massachusetts. The four organized Metropolitan Districts 
existing for the purpose of constructing and maintaining certain extensive 
systems of public works under State control are as follows: Metropolitan 
Park District, established by chapter 407, Acts of 1893, including all the 
cities and towns except Lexington and managed by a State Board of five 
commissioners; Metropolitan Water District, established by chapter 488, 
Acts of 1895, including 10 cities and 9 towns and covering an area of 170 
square miles; Metropolitan Sewerage District, established by chapter 439, 
Acts of 1889, consisting of the North System and South System, including 
17 cities and towns in the former system and 8 in the latter, covering an 
area of 216 square miles; the last two districts managed by a single State 
board of three commissioners; Charles River Basin District, established 
by chapter 465, Acts of 1903, including all the cities and towns except 
Cohasset and Lexington and in charge of the Metropohtan Park Com- 
mission. The total gross Metropolitan debt for water, parks, sewers and 
Charles River Basin improvements on July 1, 1915, was $75,467,974; 
sinking funds, $19,550,862; net debt, $55,917,112, or $795,999 less than 
in 1914. The division of this net debt was: Water supply, $30,504,276; 
sewers, $12,908,507; parks, $8,835,853; Charles River Basin, $3,668,476. 
Of 1915 tax rates the highest among the towns was that of Wakefield 
($25.20), the lowest was Dover's ($5.50). No city had as low a tax rate as 
Boston's ($18), the next in rank being Newton's ($18.50). The highest 
among the cities was Woburn's ($24.50). Mean tax rate of the 13 cities 
in the district outside Boston, $22.32. There were in the district, in 1913, 
3,584 manufacturing establishments (newspaper and periodical concerns, 
etc., omitted), with 172,594 employees; value of product, $560,390,104;. 
capital invested, $362,458,828; total wages paid, $107,031,822. If the 
newspaper and periodical establishments were included, the total output 
of manufactures during 1913 would approximate $585,000,000, Boston's 
share being about 46 per cent. 

GENERAL AND SPECIAL ACTS OF 1916 RELATING TO BOSTON. 

Of the 13 General Acts and 45 Special Acts pertaining to the City which 
the Legislature. of 1916 passed, 5 of the former and 12 of the latter are per- 
sonal, leaving 41 Acts which are of particular local concern. Those of 
chief importance are: 

Chapter 288 (General) abolishing the Directors of the Port of Boston, 
also the Harbor and Land Commission, and establishing instead the 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 333 

Waterways and Public Lands Commission, consisting of three members; 
Chapter 342 (Special) providing for the construction of Arlington-street 
station in the Boylston-street subway; Chapter 291 (Special) authorizing 
the City to cancel uncollectible bills, debts, assessments or taxes which were 
due prior to January 1, 1910, except such as are a hen on real estate; 
Chapter 175 (Special) authorizing the construction of a high-pressure 
fire pumping-station in the Charles River Basin between Cambridge bridge 
and Charles River dam; Chapter 274 (Special) authorizing the City to 
improve the foreshore, flats and channels of that part of Dorchester bay 
known as Old Harbor; Chapter 267 (Special) fixing the proportion of the 
total annual appropriation for the schools, from February 1, 1916, at $4.35 
on each $1,000 of City's valuation, in addition to the 15 cents, remaining 
unchanged, for pensions and other purposes. By the same act, the tax 
limit for City purposes was raised to $11.02; Chapter 40 (Resolves) direct- 
ing the Transit Commission to investigate as to the construction of a sub- 
way from Andrew square to Upham's Corner, Dorchester district, and to 
report as to the most feasible route and the cost involved on or before the 
first Monday of January, 1917; Chapter 158 (Resolves) providing for a 
special commission to consider the financial condition of the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, with the purpose of ascertaining what legisla- 
tion is needed to bring about a more efficient service and the improvement 
of said company's credit and resources; the commission to report not later 
than January 15, 1917; Chapter 46 (Resolves) directing the State Board 
of Charity to investigate and determine as to expediency of State care and 
control of all juvenile offenders, and particularly as to whether the State 
should acqu^e the Suffolk School for Boys and maintain it. 



NEW SENATORIAL, REPRESENTATIVE AND COUNCILLOR 
DISTRICTS IN BOSTON. 
The decennial apportionment, based upon the 1915 census of legal 
voters, estabhshed new pohtical districts as stated in Chapter 270, General 
Acts of 1916. Those including one or more of the new wards of Boston 
are as follows : 

Senatorial Districts. 

First Suffolk, Ward 1, with Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop. — Second 
Suffolk, Wards 3, 4 and 5, with first two wards of Cambridge. — Third 
Suffolk, Wards 9, 10 and 11.— Fourth Suffolk, Wards 2, 6 and 12.— 
Fifth Sufiolk, Wards 7 and 8.— Sixth Suffolk, Wards 13, 14 and 15.— 
Seventh Suffolk, Wards 17, 18 and 20.— Eighth Suffolk, Wards 16, 22 
and 23.— Nmth Suffolk, Wards 19, 21 and 24. The Brighton wards, 
25 and 26, are in the Norfolk and Suffolk District, with BrooMine and 
Watertown. Total Senatorial Districts, 10, instead of 9, as formerly. 

Representative Districts. 
Suffolk County's quota is now 54 Representatives instead of 50, as 
formerly. The plans decided upon by the Board of Commissioners 

Note. — For the new Congressional Districts, see page 241. 



334 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

elected in November, 1915, to redivide the County into Representative 
Districts were declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court (see 
Article XXI. of Amendments to the Constitution) on account of unequal 
apportionment in some of the districts. Up to October 15 the differences 
had not been adjusted. 

Councillor Districts. 
The Second, Third and Fourth Councillor Districts of the State are 
constituted as follows from the Suffolk Senatorial Districts: Second, 
8th and 9th Suffolk, with the Norfolk and Suffolk District and two dis- 
tricts outside.— Third, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th and 7th Suffolk.— Fourth, 
1st and 5th Suffolk with three districts outside. 



CORRECTIONS. 
CHANGES IN DEPARTMENTS. 

Fire Department (See page 53). — Charles E. Stewart appointed to 
permanent position of Supervisor of Motor Apparatus at annual salary 
of $3,500; Captain Charles A. Winchester, Engine Company 47 
(Fireboat, East Boston) retired with pension, after 22 years of service; 
Lieutenant Charles H. Long of Water Tower Company No. 1,. pro- 
moted to be Captain. 

Health Department (See page 61). — William H. Davis, M. D., Deputy 
Commissioner, Vital Statistics Division, resigned to accept position 
of Chief Statistician for Vital Statistics, United States Census Bureau, 
Washington, D. C. 

Police Department (See page 132). — Lieutenant George E. Saxton, 
Inspector of Carriages, retired at hah pay, after 38 years of faithful 
service in the department. Sergeant Michael C. Bresnahan promoted 
to the vacated position. 

School Committee, Department of. — Walter S. Parker, School 
Supervisor from 1894 to 1906 and member of the Board of Assistant 
Superintendents since 1906, retired August 31, 1916, after 44 years of 
faithful and conspicuously able service for the " good of the child " 
at school. 

Hiram M. George, Principal of Roger Wolcott District, retired with 
pension, September 1, 1916, and honorary title of Master Emeritus in 
consideration of his many years of faithful and efficient service. (See 
page 152.) 

Transfers of principals in effect September 1, 1916, as follows: 
William E. Perry, from Frederic W. Lincoln District to Henry Grew 
District; Charles N. Bentlet, from Oliver Hazard Perry District to 
Roger Wolcott District; John W. Lillis, from Henry Grew District to 
Ohver Hazard Perry and Frederic W. Lincoln Districts, these two 
districts in charge of one principal. (See pages 150, 151.) 

John A. O'Shea promoted to be Director of Music in place of James 
M. McLaughlin, whose rank is changed to Assistant Director, at his 
request. (See page 138.) 



CITY OFFICIALS DECEASED IN 1916. 335 



CITY OFFICIALS DECEASED IN 1916. 
John A. Coulthtirst, Member of City Council, elected in 1914 for second 
term. Candidate for Mayor in 1907, receiving 15,811 votes. Member 
of State House of Representatives from Ward 23 in 1902, 1903 and 1904. 
Died June 30. 

John J. Hanley, Police Captain, 10th Division (Roxbury), 1900 to 1915. 
Retired in 1915 after 37 years of service in the Police Department. 
Died August 17. 

EiJAS H. Marston, Master Emeritus, Wendell Phillips School District, 
retired in 1913 after 49 years of service in the schools . Died September 24 . 

Frank H. Holt, M. D., Assistant Superintendent of City Hospital for 10 
years, ending 1914. Died in Chicago, August 10. 



INDEX. 



337 



Oedee of Contents. 



Page 

Introduction 5 

Origin and Growth of Boston. ... 6, 7 

The City Seal 8 

The City Government, 1916 9 

Officials of the City Council 10, 11 

Rules of the City Council 12-17 

Committees of the City Council. . 18 

Amended City Charter of 1909 . . . 19-33 
Executive officers in charge of 

"' departments 34, 35 

A survey of the regular City 
departments, with the 
officials and their salaries, 36-103 
Various City and State officers. . . 104, 105 
Various departments, commis- 
sions, courts, etc. 106-153 

City and County paid officials and 
employees, number of, by 
departments, 1910-1916, 154 

City Ordinances, 1913-1916 155-167 

Regulation of the height of build- 
ings 168, 169 

Recent Public Documents relating 

to Boston 170 

New boundaries of wards and pre- 
cincts, 1916 171-227 

New wards compared with the 

old 228 

Members of the City Govern- 
ment, 1909-1915, by 

years 229-232 

Mayors of the City from 1822 to 

1914 232,233 

Chairmen of the Board of Alder- 
men from 1855 to 1909, 234, 235 



Page 

Presidents of the Common Coun- 
cil from 1822 to 1909. . . 235-237 

Presidents of the City Council 

from 1910 to 1916 237 

Orators of Boston, annually 

appointed, 1771 to 1915, 237, 239 

Justices of the Police, Justices' 
and Municipal Courts, 
1822 to 1914 239 

Boston members of 1916 State 

Legislature 240 

Members of Sixty-fourth Con- 
gress from Massachu- 
setts, with Boston's 
Congressional districts. . 241 

Foreign Consuls in Boston 242 

Statistics of population and 

area 243-255 

Principal Islands in Boston 

Harbor, with area, etc., 256 

Statistics of valuation, taxes 
appropriations, expendi- 
tures, debt, etc 257-273 

Boston Port Statistics, 1900-1914, 274 

Statistics of City Election, Dec. 

14, 1915 275-288 

Statistics of State Election, 1915, 289-300 

Comparative statistics of elec- 
tions, 1911-1914 301-323 

Votes on referenda relating to 

Boston 324-326 

Additions and Corrections 327-335 

City Officials deceased in 1916. . . 335 

Index 337-346 

Map of the City of Boston. 



Index to Contents. 



A 

Page 
Acts of 1916, relating to Boston, 332, 333 

Additions and Corrections 327-335 

Aldermen, Board of: 

Chairmen of, since 1855 234, 235 

Members of, 1909 230 



Page 
Amended City Charter of 1909 . . 19-33 

Annexations 7 

Appeal, Board of 107 

Appropriations : 

By departments, 1911-1916, 

with increase in 5 years, 262, 263 



338 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Page 

Appropriations. — Concluded. 

For Financial Year, 1916-17, 328 
For Financial Year, 1916-17, 
by,departments, vnt'h per 
cent of each to Total 

Budget 262, 263 

Summary of, by years, 1885- 

1916 264 

Committee on 18 

Area: 

Boston, by new wards and by 

old 254,255 

Islands in Boston Harbor. . . 256 

Parks, Playgrounds, etc 72-77 

Art Department 106 

Assessed Polls and Police List, 

1911-1915 320 

Assessed valuation, tax rate, etc., 

1916 327 

Assessed valuation and taxes, 

1915, by wards 258, 259 

Assessed valuation and taxes, 

1888-1915 260 

Assessed valuation of exempt 

real estate, 1914 261 

Assessed valuation per capita in 
six leading cities, by 
rank, 1914 329 

Assessing Department 36-45 

Assistant Assessors of 37-45 

Assessment districts, new, 1916.. 37-45 

Assessments, 1915, supplement- 
ary 258 

Assessors' listing of men, 1916. . . 328 

Assessors' statistics 258-261 

Assets and Properties of Twelve 
leading Cities in 1915, by 
rank 329 

Assets, etc., of Boston, by items, 

1915 329 

Attendance Officers for Public 

Schools 138,139 

Auditing Department 46 

B 
Back Bay assessment districts. . . 40, 41 

Bacteriological Laboratory 61 

Bank stock, valuation of and tax 

on, 1915 258 

Bark and Wood, Measurers of . . . 130 

Bath-houses, Ust of 81, 82 

Beef, Weighers of 124, 125 

Births, Begistrar of 96 

Births, Number of, in 1915 and 

1914 330 

Board of Aldermen. See Alder- 
men, Board of. 



Page 
Boards and Commissions serving 
without pay: 

Art Commission 106 

Boston and Cambridge 

Bridge Commission 108 

Cemetery Trustees 48 

Children's Institutions 

Trustees 49 

City Hospital Trustees 62 

City Planning Board 50 

Consumptives' Hospital 

Trustees 51 

Finance Commission (the four 
members other than 

Chairman) 109 

Franklin Foundation Man- 
agers 122 

Infirmary Trustees 6S 

Library Trustees 66 

Overseers of the Poor 71 

Park and Recreation Com- 
missioners (the two 
members other than 

Chairman) 72 

School Committee 135 

Sinking Funds Commission. . 98 

Statistics Trustees 99 

Boilers, etc.. Weighers of 125 

Boston and Cambridge Bridge 

Commission 108 

Boston Common, votes on ques- 
tions of taking land from, 
for street widening, 1915, 285 

Boston Proper, population of, 
every 5 years, 1840 to 

1910 252 

Boundaries of New Wards and 

Precincts 173-227 

Bridge and Ferry Division, Public 

Works Department 88-93 

Bridges 78, 88-93, 108 

Brighton: 

Annexation of 7 

Municipal Court 114 

Origin of 7 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1850 to 1910 252 

Building Department 46 

Building hmits 47, 156, 158, 159 

Buildings in charge of Public 

Buildings Department . . 84, 85 
Buildings, regulation of height of, 168, 169 

C 

Cambridge and Boston Bridges 

Commission 108 

Carriages, Inspector of 132 



INDEX. 



339 



Page 

Cemetery Department 47, 48 

Cemeteries under jurisdiction of 

City, with area 48 

Census, 1638 to 1910, by districts, 252 

School, 1915 253 

1915 (State) by New "Wards. . 244, 245 
Charlestown: 

Annexation of 7 

Assessment districts 38 

Mvmiciapl Court • 114 

Origin of 7 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1850 to 1910 252 

Children's Institutions Depart- 
ment 49 

City and County Buildings in 
charge of Public Build- 
ings Department 84, 85 

City and County officials and 
employees, paid, sum- 
mary of, 1910-1916 154 

City Charter, Amended, 1909 19-33 

City Clerk Department 49 

City CouncU of 1916 9-11 

Committees of 18 

Officials of 10 

Rules of 12-17 

Special Committees of 18 

Vote for, by candidates 1915, 282 
Vote for, by candidates, 1911- 

1914 303, 306, 310, 314, 316 

City Coimcil, Members of, by 

years, 1909-1915 230, 232 

City debt, 1878-1915 268, 269 

City departments. See Depart- 
ments of the City. 
City Election (last)Statistics,1915, 275-288 

City Government, 1916 9 

City Governments, 1909-1915 . . . 230, 232 

City Hospital 61-65 

City Messenger 10 

City Officials deceased in 1916.. . . 335 
City Ordinances, 1913 to 1916. . . 155-167 

City Planning Board 50 

City Prison 134 

City Record 36 

City Seal, Origin of the 8 

City SoHcitor, Office of, abolished, 66 
City Treasurer's Transactions, 

fiscal year 1915-1916. . . 329 
Claims: 

Committee on 18 

Inspector of, Pohce Depart- 
ment 132 

Claims against the City, Ordinance 

as to, 1914 159 

Clerk of Committees 10 



Page 

Coal, Weighers of 125-127 

Coastwise arrivals, 1900-1915. . . . 274 
Cochituate water debt. See 
Water debt. 

Collateral Loan Company 131 

Collecting Department 50 

Ordinance concerning, 1914. . 163 
Commissions. See Departments 

of the City. 
Commissioner : 

Building 46 

Fire 53 

Health 61 

Penal Institutions 83 

Police 132 

Pubhc Works 86 

Soldiers' Relief 98 

Wire 102 

Commissioners : 

Art 106 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 108 

Boston Finance 108 

Bos.ton Transit 109 

Election 52 

Park and Recreation 72 

PUot 131 

Schoolhouse ' 97 

Sinking Funds 98 

Street 99 

Committees: 

City Council (special) 18 

City Council (standing) 18 

Common Council: 

Members of, 1909 (last year), 230 

Presidents of, since 1822 235-237 

Congress: 

Members from Massachusetts, 241 
Vote for Boston candidates, 
by parties and districts, 

1914 318 

Congressional Districts in Boston, 241 

Constables 127, 128 

Consuls in Boston 242 

Consumptives' Hospital Depart- 
ment 51 

Convalescent Home 62, 65 

Conveyancers, City 66 

Corporation Counsel 66 

Cost per capita, municipal, in 
Twelve Leading Cities,, 

1914 329 

Councillor (State), vote for, 1915, 

su mm ary 300 

Councillor Districts, new 334 

County accounts. Committee on. . 18 

County debt, 1885-1915 271 

County of Suffolk, Auditor of . . . . 110 



340 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Page 
County of Suffolk. — Concluded. 

Commissioners of 110 

District Attorney of Ill 

Employees, paid, number of, 

1910-1916 154 

Index Commissioners of Ill 

Land Covu-t of Ill 

Register of Deeds of Ill 

Sheriff of Ill 

Treasurer of 110 

Courts and Officers of: 

Juvenile Court 116, 117 

Municipal Court: 

Boston proper 113 

Brighton 114 

Charlestown 114 

Dorchester 114, 115 

East Boston 115 

Roxbury 115 

South Boston 116 

"West Roxbury 116 

Probate and Insolvency: 

Judges of 113 

Register of 113 

Probation officers 117 

Superior Court, ci\'il business: 
Clerks and stenographers 

of 112 

Superior Court, criminal busi- 
ness: 

Clerks and stenographer of, 113 
Supreme Judicial Court: 

Clerks of 112 

Reporter of Decisions 112 

Justices of Municipal Court 

since established in 1866, 239 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of, 132 

D 

Deaths, Registrar of 96 

Deaths, number of, in 1915 329 

Death rates, 1906-1914 330 

Debt: 

City, 1878-1915 268, 269 

County, 1885-1915 271 

Gross Funded, by Objects, 

1911-1916 266,267 

Limit of, and amounts Out- 
side and Inside 267 

Metropolitan (Boston's share), 329 

Net, Per Capita, etc., 1916. . 328 
Same for 12 leading cities, 

1915 329 

Per cent increase of net debt 
1910 to 1915, for 9 lead- 
ing cities 330 

Rapid Transit, 1894-1916. . . 270 



De bt. — Concluded. 

Per cent of net debt to valua- 
tion, 1915, in 10 leading 
cities 

Summary, all Debts, 1878- 
1915 

Water, 1880-1915 

Deeds, Register of 

Department Changes, 1916 

Departments and Commissions of 
the City: 

Art 

Assessing 

Auditing 

Boston and Cambridge 
bridges 

Building 

Appeal, Board of 

Examiners, Board of . . . . 

Cemetery 

Children's Institutions 

City Clerk 

City Planning Board 

Collecting 

Consumptives' Hospital 

Election 

Finance Commission 

Fire 

Franklin Foundation 

Health 

Hospital 

Infirmary 

Institutions Registration .... 

Law 

Library 

Licensing Board 

Market 

Mayor 

Park and Recreation 

Penal Institutions 

Police 

Poor, Overseeing of 

Printing 

PubKc Buildings 

Pubhc Works 

Registry 

School Committee 

Schoolhouse 

Sinking Funds 

Soldiers' Relief 

Statistics 

Street Laying-out 

Supply. 

Transit Commission 

Treasury 

Vessels and Ballast 

Weights and Measures 

Wire 



Page 



330 

273 
272 
111 
334 



106 
36 
46 

108 

46 

107 

47 

47 

49 

49 

50 

50 

51 

52 

108 

53 

122 

60 

61 

65 

65 

66 

66 

121 

70 

36 

71 

83 

132 

70 

83 

84 

86 

96 

135 

97 

98 

98 

98 

99 

101 

109 

101 

102 

102 

102 



INDEX. 



341 



Page 

Detention, House of 134 

District Attorney Ill 

Dorchester: 

Annexation of 7 

Assessment districts 41, 43 

Municipal Court 114 

Origin of 7 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1850 to 1910 252 

E 

East Boston: 

Assessment districts 37, 38 

District Court 115 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1850 to 1910 252 

Relief Station 62, 65 

Election Department 52 

Election, 1915, City, statistics 

of 276-288 

Election, 1915, State, statistics 

of 290-300 

Elections, Comparative statistics 

of, lSll-1914 302-323 

Employees of the City, paid, sum- 
mary of, 1910-1916 154 

Engineers, Public Works Depart- 
ment 88, 93, 94 

Evening Schools 140, 144, 145 

Examiners, Board of. See Build- 
ing Departm.ent. 

Executive Committee of City 

Council 18 

Executive departments of Boston, 36-103 

Executive Officers, salary, term 

of office, etc 34, 35 

Expenditures of Boston, Summary 

of, by years, 1874-1915, 265 

Exports and imports, 1900-1915, 274 

Exported in 1915, value of com- 
modities 274 

F 
Fees Payable to City for Permits: 

Public Works Department 87 

Street Commissioners 100 

Ferry. See Bridge and Ferry 
Division, Public Works 
Department. 
Ferries (North and South) owned 

by City 93 

Finance Commission 108 

Reports, list of 170 

Finance, Committee on 18 

Financial statistics 258-273 

Fire apparatus 57-60 

Fire apparatus, district assign- 
ments 54-57 



Page 

Fire Department 53-60 

Fire districts and chiefs .• . . 54-57 

Firemen's Relief Fund 60 

Fires and losses in 1915, totals. . . 53 
Foreign-born popvilation, 1910, 

with country of birth . . . 247 

Foreign Consuls in Boston 242 

Foreign trade, vessels entered 

and cleared, 1900-1915, 274 
Fountains, monuments and stat- 
ues 79, 80 

Fourth of July, Orators appointed 

by City 237-239 

Franklin Foundation 122 

Frankhn Fund, Managers of 122 

Franklin Union 122 

Funded Debt, gross, by objects, 

1911-1916 266,267 

G 

Gallop's Island, purchased by 

United States 256 

Gaiigers of Liquid Measures 130 

Government of Boston, 1916 9 

Members of, 1909-1915 230-232 

Governor: 

Vote for, by candidates, 1915, 291 
Men Hsted, registration and 

vote for 1911-1914 302-312 

Vote for, by candidates, 

1911-1914 304,307,311, 317 

Grain, Measurers of 129 

"Greater Boston," or Metropoli- 
tan District 331, 332 

Gymnasia of the City, list of ... . 81 

H 

Harbor, Boston: 

Islands in 256 

Pilot Commissioners of 131 

Harbor Master 134 

Hay and Straw, Inspectors of . . . . 129 

Hay Scales, Superintendents of .. . 130 

Haymarket-square Relief Station, 62,64 

Health Department 60,61 

Bacteriological Laboratory .... 61 
Commissioner and Deputy 

Commissioners 61 

Ordinance concerning (reorgani- 
zation) 1914 162 

High Pressure Fire Service 96 

Highway Division of Public 

Works Department 93 

Holidays, Vacations and Terms 

of Schools 141 

Hospital Department 61-65 

Convalescent Homie, physi- 
cians to 65 



342 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Page 

Hospital Department. — Concluded. 

Relief Stations 64, 65 

South Department 64 

House of Detention 134 

Hyde Park: 

Annexation of 244 

Assessment districts . . i 45 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1870 to 1910 252 



Imports and exports, 1900-1915 . . 274 
Imported in 1915, value of com- 
modities 274 

Incomes, taxing of, vote on refer- 
endum, 1915 297 

Index Commissioners Ill 

Infirmary Department 65 

Insolvency and Probate, Court of: 

Judges of 113 

Register of 113 

Inspectors: 

Health 61 

of Hay and Straw 129 

of Petroleum and its Prod- 
ucts 130 

Police Department 132 

Institutions Registration Depart- 
ment 65 

Interest and sinking funds 268-273 

Introduction 5 

Islands in Boston Harbor 256 

J 

JaUer and Sheriff Ill 

July Fourth, Orators Appointed 

by City 237-239 

Justices of Municipal Courts 113-116 

Justices of Mimicipal Court since 

1866 239 

Justices of the Peace: 

Solemnize marriages, author- 
ized to 118-121 

Juvenile Court 116 

L 

Lamps, number and kinds of 95 

Land Court Ill 

Law Department 66 

Leather, Measiu-ers of 130 

Legislative Matters, Committee 

on 18 

Legislature of 1916, Boston Mem- 
bers of 240 

Library Department. 66-70 

Branches of. 68 

Delivery Stations of 69 



Page 
License, Liquor, vote on 1915, by 

wards 284 

Vote on, 1911-1914, by wards, 322 

Licensing Board 121 

Lieutenant-Governor, vote for, 

1915 . 292 

Loan Association, Workingmen's, 131 

Loan Company, Collateral 131 

M 

Male Residents, 20 years of age 
and over, number of in 

1916 328 

Market Department 70 

Marriages: 

Justices of the Peace author- 
ized to solemnize 118-121 

Registrar of 96 

Massachusetts, Members of 64th 

Congress from 241 

Massachusetts Customs District, 274 
Mayor: 

Men listed, registration and 

vote for, 1914 312 

Vote for, by candidates, 1914, 313 

Department of 36 

Recall of, vote on referendum, 296, 326 

Mayors of Boston since 1822 232, 233 

Measurers of Grain 129 

Measurers of Leather 130 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. . . . 130 
Medical Examiners, Suffolk 

Coimty 124 

Men in Boston 20 years of age and 

over, as listed in 1916 328 

Metropolitan Assessments 263, 330 

Metropolitan District, statistics 

for 1915.... 331,332 

Metropolitan District Debt, Bos- 
ton's share of 330 

Militia enrollment, number of men 

liable to 328 

Monuments, statues and foun- 
tains 79,80 

Mortuaries, Suffolk County 124 

Municipal cost per capita in 

twelve leading cities, 1914. . . 329 
Municipal Court: 

Boston proper 113 

Brighton 114 

Charlestown 114 

Dorchester 114 

East Boston (District Court), 115 

Justices of, since 1866 239 

Probation officers of 117 

Roxbury 115 

South Boston 116 

West Roxbury 116 



INDEX. 



343 



O Page 

Officers Paid by Fees 124-131 

Officials and employees of the 
City, paid, summary of, 

1910-1916 154 

Old South Association 131 

Orators of Boston 237, 239 

Ordinances enacted, 1913-1916. . . 155-167 

Committee on 18 

Revised (13th Revision), 1914, 162 

Origin and Growth of Boston. ... 6 

Overseeing of Poor Department. . 70 

P 

Park and Recreation Department, 71-82 

Ordinance concerning, 1914, 159 

Parkman Fund, Committee on. . 18 

Parkman, George F., Bequest of, 81 

Parks, playgrounds, etc 72-77 

Party enrolment, abolishing, vote 

on, 1914 319 

Payments of State tax and as- 
sessments, 1911-1916. . . 263 
Peddlers and Hawkers, ordinance 

concerning, 1915 165 

Penal Institutions Department ... 83 
Pensioners, number of, by depart- 

mentr, 1916 331 

Pensions, Retirement Laws, etc. . 330, 331 

Total payments in 1915 331 

Permanent Public Schoolhouses, 
etc., 1916, alphabetical 

list of 148-153 

Permits, Fees for: 

Public Works Department . . 87 

Street Commissioners 100 

Persons per Acre of Land in Bos- 
ton, by new wards and 

old 254 

Petroleima, Inspectors of 130 

Pilot Commissioners 131 

Planning Board, City 50 

Playgrounds, parks, etc 72-77 

Pliu-alities, by wards. State Elec- 
tion, 1915 291-294 

Police Department 132-134 

Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion 132 

Executive Staff 132 

Stations 134 

Police listing of men discontinued, 328 
Polls assessed, 1911-1915, by 

wards, with Police lists . . 320 

Poor Department, Overseeing of. . 70 
Population: 

Boston, State Census of 19 15, 

by sex and wards 245 

Boston, July 1, 1916, esti- 
mated 244 



Page 
Population. — Concluded. 

Boston, by districts, since 
1638 ; every 5 years from 

1820 to 1910 252 

Boston, 1900, 1905 and 1910, 
according to sex, by 

wards 246, 248, 249 

Boston, 1900 to 1910, ac- 
cording to sex, by wards, 
with changes in 5 years, 250, 251 
Boston, 1910, native white, 
foreign-born white and 
negro, with percentages, 

by wards 246 

Boston, 1910, foreign-born 
white, by country of 

birth, by wards 247 

Boston, 1915 and 1910, per 
acre, by new wards and 

by old 254 

Foreign-bom and native-bom, 

1900, 1905, by wards. . . 248, 249 
School Census, September 1, 
1915, including all chil- 
dren 5 to 15 years of age 
(inclusive), by age, by 

sex and by wards 253 

Port of Boston, Directors of, 

abolished 332 

Port Statistics, 1900-1915 274 

Precinct boundaries, new 184-227 

Precinct election statistics, 1915. . 278-281 
Precincts (new), voters in, 1915, 184-227 
President, Vote for, by candidates, 

1912 308 

Printing, Committee on 18 

Printing Department 83 

Ordinance concerning, 1914. . 160 

Prison, City 134 

Prisons, inspection of, Committee 

on 18 

Probate and Insolvency, Court of: 

Judges of 113 

Register of 113 

Probation officers 117 

Public Buildings Department .... 84 

Public Documents relating to 

Boston 170 

Public Lands, Committee on ... . 18 

Public Library 66-70 

Public officers, list of, salary, 

term of office, etc., 34, 35, 104, 105 
Public Streets, miles of paved, by 

districts 95 

Public Works, Commissioner of . . 86 

Public Works Department 86-96 

Bridge and Ferry Division . . . 88-93 
Highway Division 93-96 



344 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Q Page 

Quarantine service, transfer to 

United States, ordinance, 1915, 164 

R 

Reading-rooms, Library Depart- 
ment 68-70 

Real Estate Exempt from Taxa- 
tion, value of, in 1914. . 261 
Reappoitionment of political dis- 
tricts 333 

Recall of Mayor, vote on referen- 
dum 296,326 

Referenda at City Election, 1915, 

vote on, by wards 285-288 

Referenda at State election, 1915, 

vote on, by wards 295-300 

Referenda, Votes on, 1821-1915. . 324-326 

Register of Deeds Ill 

Registered voters. See Statistical 
Tables. 

Registry Department 96 

Relief Station, Haymarket square, 64 

Relief Station, East Boston 65 

Representative, vote for, 1915. . . 294 

Representative Districts, new .... 333 

Retirement Laws and Pensions. . . 331 

Roxbury: 

Anftexation of 7 

Assessment Districts 41, 42 

Municipal Court 115 

Origin of 7 

. Population of, every 5 years, 

1850 to 1910 252 

Rules of the City Council 12-17 

Committee on 18 

S 

Salaries of City officials 34, 35, 104, 105 

Sanitary Service, Highway Divi- 
sion of Public Works 

Department 94 

School Census of persons 5 to 15, 

inclusive, 1915, by wards, 253 

School Committee 135 

Department of 135-153 

Officials of 135 

Vote for, 1915 283, 286, 287, 288 

Women registered and voting, 

1915, by wards 276, 277 

Women voting for, 1911-1914, 321 

Schoolhouse Department 97 

Schoolhouses, list of permanent 
buildings, with location, 
school district, year built, 
grades, masters, etc. . . . 148-153 
Schools: 

Administrative Offices 138 

Attendance Officers 138, 139 



Page 
Schools. — Concluded. 

Cookery (School Kitchens) . . 144 

Elementary Districts 137 

Evening Centers, Social 146 

Evening, list of 144, 145 

Industrial and Special . . . 137, 143, 145 

Manual Training 144 

Masters, list of 148-153 

Normal, Latin and High. . . . 136, 137 
Nurses, Elementary Schools.. 141 

Pension Funds for Teachers, 147 

Pre-vocational Centers 144 

Principals (Emeritus) retired, 147 

School Physicians 141-143 

Special Departments, with 

Directors 137, 138 

Statistics of 140 

Superintendent of 135, 136 

Superintendents, Assistant. . 135, 136 
Terms, vacations and holi- 
days 141 

Seal of the City of Boston, origin 

of 8 

Senator, vote for, 1915 293 

Senatorial Districts, new 333 

Serial debt, total amount of, 1916 

(see footnote) 267 

Sewers, length of, in miles 94 

Sheriff of Suffolk County ........ Ill 

Sinking funds and interest 268-273 

Sinking Funds Department 98 

Soldiers' Relief, Committee on. . . 18 

Soldiers' Relief Department 98 

South Boston: 

Assessment Districts 41 

Municipal Court 116 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1850 to 1910 252 

State Election of 1915, statistics of, 290-300 
State Tax and Assessments, 1911- 

1916 263 

Statistical Tables: 

Appropriations of Boston, 

1885-1916 264 

Appropriations, by depart- 
ments, 1911-1916, with 

increase in 5 years 262, 263 

Area of Boston, by new and 

by old wards 254, 255 

Assessed Valuation, taxe.s, 

etc 258,260 

City Debt, 1878-1915 268, 269 

City Election, 1915 276-288 

City Council, vote for, 

1915, by wards 282 

City Council, possible and 
actual vote for, 1915, 
summary by wards 286, 287 



INDEX. 



345 



Page 
Statistical Tables — Continved. 

Liquor License, vote on, 

1915, by wards 284 

Men Listed, registration 
and vote, by precincts, 

1915 278-281 

Possible and actual vote, 

with percentages, 1915. . 286, 287 
Registered and actual 
voters, men and women, 

by wards, 1915 276, 277 

School Committee, vote 

for, 1915, by wards 283 

City Elections, 1911-1914. . . 302-323 
City Council, vote for, by 
candidates, 1911-1914. . 

303, 306, 310, 314, 316 
Liquor Licenses, vote on, 

1911-1914 322 

Mayor, vote for, by candi- 
dates, 1914 313 

Women voters, 1911-1914... 321 

County Debt, 1885-1915. . . . 271 

Debt, Simimary (all debts), 

1878-1915 273 

Elections, comparative statis- 
tics of, 1910-1914 302-323 

Expenditures, 1874-1915 265 

Exports and Imports, 1900- 

1915 274 

Funded Gross Debt, by Ob- 
jects, 1911-1916 266,267 

Imports and Exports, 1900- 

1914 274 

Interest and sinking funds .. . 268-273 
Islands in Boston Harbor . . . 256 

Lamps, number and kinds of, ^ 95 
Monuments, statues, etc .... 79, 80 

Parks, etc., area of 72-77 

Police List and Assessed Polls, 

1911-1915 320 

Police List of Men, 1915, by 

precincts 278-281 

Same, by wards, 1915 276 

Population: 

Boston, by geographical 

divisions, since 1638. . . . 252 

Boston, 1900, 1905 and 
1910, according to sex, 

by wards 246, 248, 249 

Boston, 1900 to 1910, ac- 
cording to sex, by wards, 
with changes every 5 

years 250, 251 

Boston, 1915 and 1910, per 
acre, by wards, new and 

old 254 

Port statistics, 1900-1915 ... 274 



Page 
Statistical Tables.- — Co7icluded. 
Public grounds, etc., area 

of 75-77 

Rapid Transit debt, 1894- 

1915 270 

Referenda, votes on, 1915. . . 285 

295-300 
School Census, 1915, by 

wards 253 

Schools, teachers and pupils, 

number of 140 

State Election, 1915 292-302 

Congressman, vote for 

1914 318 

Governor, vote for, 1915. . 291 

Lieutenant-Governor, vote 

for, 1915 292 

Referendum on question of 
enabling women to vote, 

vote on 295 

Referendum on recall of 

Mayor, vote on 296 

Referendum on taxation 

of incomes, vote on 297 ' 

Registered voters, 1915. . . 290 

Representative, vote for, 

1915 294 

Senator, vote for, 1915 293 

Summary of results, 1915. . 300 

State Elections, 1910-1914: 
Governor, registration and 

vote for, 1911-1914 302, 305 

309,312 
Governor, vote for, by 

candidates, 1911-1914. . 304, 307 
311, 317 
Men listed by police, 1911- 

1915, by wards 320 

President, vote for, by can- 
didates, 1912 308 

Registered voters, 1911- 

1914 302, 305, 309, 312 

Taxes and valuation 258-260 

Valuation and taxes 258-260 

Valuation of exempt real 

estate, 1914 261 

Water debt, 1880-1915 272 

Statistics Department 98 

Statues, monuments and foun- 
tains 79, 80 

Store Refuse, removal of 96 

Straw and Hay, Inspectors of . . . . 129 

Street Commissioners 99 

Street Lamps, number and 

kinds 96 

Street Laying-Out Department. . 99 

Streets, Public, rmles of paved, by 

districts , 95 



346 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Page 
Suffolk County. See County, 

Suffolk. 
Superintendent of: 

Cemeteries 48 

City Hospital 62 

Consumptives' Hospital 52 

Fire Alarm Branch, Fire 

Department 53 

Police 132 

Printing 83 

Public Buildings 84 

Schools 135 

Supplies 101 

Superior Court: 

Civil business 112 

Criminal business 113 

Super\'isor of: 

Bridges, Public Works De- 
partment 88 

Sanitary Service 94 

Street Cleaning and Oiling 

Service 94 

Licensed Minors 138 

Supply Department 101 

Supreme Judicial Court: 

Clerks-of 112 

Reporter of Decisions of . . . . 112 

T 

Tax Levy: 

Appropriations from, for fis- 
cal years 1911-1916 262, 263 

For current year, 1916 327 

For fiscal year, 1915-1916 by 

wards 258 

Payments from, to Sinking 
Funds and for Serial 

Debt, 1878-1915 268-273 

Payments from, for Interest, 

1878-1915 268-273 

Tax limit for City purposes, 

raised in 1916 333 

Tax rate, 1916 327 

Per cent increase, 1906-1916, 327 

Tax levy, 1916 327 

Tax rates, 1888-1915 260 

Taxes and valuation 258-261 

Transit Commission 109 

Treasury Department 101 

Trustees : 

Cemetery 48 

Children's Institutions 49 

City Hospital 62 

Consumptives' Hospital 51 

Infirmary 65 

Library 66 

Statistics 99 



V Page 

Vacations, Terms and Holidays 

of Day Schools 141 

Valuation, per cent increase, 1906- 

1916 327 

Valuation, tax rate, etc., 1916. . . . 327 

Valuation and taxes 258-261 

Valuation of real estate exempt 

from taxation, 1914 261 

Vessels and Ballast Department . . 102 

Vital statistics, summary, 1915. . . 330 

Vote, per cent of actual to possible, 

1915 287, 288, 299, 300 

Voters, Registered, 1915, by wards, 276, 290 

1915, by precincts. 278-281 

Voting Precincts, new 184-227 

W 

Wards, new and old compared. . . 228 

Ward areas, new and old 254, 255 

Ward boundaries, new 173-183 

Ward pluralities, State Election, 

1915 291-294 

Ward population: 

1915, Last Census 245 

1900, 1905 and 1910, by sex, 
with changes every 5 

years 250,251 

1900, 1905 and 1910, by sex, 
also foreign-born and 

native-born 246, 248, 249 

Ward-rooms, list of 86 

Water debt 272 

Water Service 94, 95 

Water used in 1915, average 

gallons daily 95 

Weighers of Beef 124 

Weighers of Boilers and Heavy 

Machinery 125 

Weighers of Coal 125-127 

Weighers of Goods, ordinance 

concerning 155 

Weights and Measures Depart- 
ment 102 

West Roxbury: 

Annexation of 7 

Assessment districts 44 

Municipal Court 116 

Origin of 7 

Population of, every 5 years, 

1850-1910 252 

Wire Department 102, 103 

Women, question as to enabling to 

vote, referendum, 1916. . 295 

Women voters: 

1915, by wards 276 

1911-1914, by wards 321 

Wood and Bark, Measurers of . . . . 130 

Workingmen's Loan Association . . 131 





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