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Full text of "Municipal register : containing rules and orders of the City Council, the city charter and recent ordinances, and a list of the officers of the City of Boston, for .."

Boston 

MUIICIPAL EEGISTER 

Foe 1926. 




THE CITY SEAL 



As it appeared prior to 1827. 



The City Seal was adopted by ''An Ordinance to 
Establish the City Seal," passed January 2, 1823, which 
provides ''That the design hereto annexed, as sketched 
by John R. Penniman, giving a view of the City, be the 
device of the City Seal; that the motto be as follows, 
to wit: 'Sicut patribus sit Deus nobis'; and that the 
inscription be as follows: — 'Bostonia condita, A.D. 
1630. Civitatis regimine donata, A.D. 1822.'" The 
motto is taken from 1 Kings, viii., 57: "God be with 
us as He was with our fathers." 

The seal as it first appeared is shown above. 

The seal as it was afterwards changed, and has ever 
since continued to be used, was first shown on page 221 
of the volume of laws and ordinances, commonly known 
as the "First Revision," published in 1827, and is 
established as the City Seal at the present time by 
Revised Ordinances of 1914, Chapter 1, Section 5, 
which provides that "The seal of the City shall be 
circular in form; shall bear a view of the City; the 
motto 'SicuT Patribus Sit Deus Nobis,' and the 
inscription, 'Bostonia Condita, A.D. 1630. Civitatis 
Regimine Donata, A.D. 1822,' as herewith set forth." 

The seal as changed in 1827 is shown on the opposite 
page. 




SEAL OF THE CITY 

OF 

BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON 
IN CITY COUNCIL 

June 21, 1926. 
ORDERED: That the Statistics Depaetment be authorized, 

UNDER the direction OP THE COMMITTEE ON RULES, TO PREPARE AND 
HAVE PRINTED THE MUNICIPAL REGISTER FOR 1926, AND THAT THE ClERK 

OP Committees be authorized to. prepare and have printed a 
pocket edition of the organization of the city government and 
heads op departments; the expense thus incurred to be charged 
to the appropriation for city documents. 

, Passed. Approved by the Mayor, June 22, 1926. 

Attest: 

W. J. DOYLE, 

Assistant CUy Clerk. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/municipalregiste1926bost 




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1KIA.Y03?1 OF BOSTON 



I 



[Document 36 — 1926.] 

CITY OF BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTEE 
FOE 1926 



CONTAINING 



A REGISTER OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, 

RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL, 

AMENDED CITY CHARTER OF 1909, 

WITH CHANGES SINCE, 

INCLUDING THE 

IMPORTANT AMENDMENTS OF 1924, 
NOTES ON THE CITY DEPARTMENTS, 

WITH 

LISTS OF EXECUTIVE AND OTHER PUBLIC OFFICERS, 

ALSO 

THE NEW WARD BOUNDARIES, 

AND 

MEMBERSHIP OF FORMER CITY GOVERNMENTS. 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY THE STATISTICS 
DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1926 



./rr. ^ 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Contents. 



Paob 
Introduction 7, 8 

The City Governmeni, 192(5 9 

Officials of the City Council 10, 11 

Committees of the City Council 12 

Rules of the City Council 13-18 

Amended City Charter of 1909 (with changes to 1922) . 19-33 

Amendments of City Charter in 1924 34-43 

Officers in charge of executive departments, with term, salary, etc., 44-46 
Notes on the executive departments, lists of their officials, with 

term of each 47-114 

Various City, County and State officers, with term, etc. . . 116, 117 
Various departments, commissions, courts, etc., with officials and 

assistants 118-140, 145, 146 

City Ordinances, 1925-1926 141, 142 

Regulation of Building Heights 143-145 

Valuation of Boston 147 

Gain and Loss 148 

Boundaries of the 22 wards (.new) 150-163 

Members of City Government by years, 1909-1925 . . 166-169 

Mayors of Boston, 1822 to 1926 170 

Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen, 1855 to 1909 . 171, 172 

Presidents of the Common Council, 1822 to 1909 .... 172, 173 

Presidents of the City Council, 1909 to 1926 174 

Orators of Boston, annually appointed, 1771 to 1926 . 174, 175 

Boston members of 1926-27 State Legislature .... 176 

Members of 69th Congress from Massachusetts, with Boston's 

Congressional districts 177, 178 

Foreign Consuls in Boston 179, 180 



INTRODUCTION. 



INTRODUCTION. 



As a public document The Municipal Register is 
as old as the City of Boston itself, the first volume 
having been published in 1821, a year before the govern- 
ment of Boston changed from Town to City. Up to 
1840 the title of the volume was: The Rules and Orders 
of the Common Council. From 1821 to 1829 the 
document contained merely a register of the City 
Council and a list of the dfficers. 

In 1829 the City Charter was published as a part of 
the volume, and in 1830 the Acts relating to Boston, 
also the ordinances were added. In 1832 the size of 
the volume was increased by the addition of an index 
to the contents. The volume published in 1822 con- 
tained fifteen pages and for the year 1840 there were 
eighty-eight pages, including three pages of index. 

The title Municipal Register was adopted in 1841 
when the publication became more ambitious, incor- 
porating in its pages, the Rules and Orders of the Com- 
mon Council, joint rules, ordinances of the City, statutes 
of the Commonwealth relating to the City, a list of the 
public schools, the City Government of 1841, the com- 
mittees and departments (consisting at that time of 
the treasury, law, police, health, public land and build- 
ings, lamps and bridges, fire, and public charitable 
institutions), and a list of the ward oflacers. 

From 1842 to 1864 it also contained a list of the 
members of preceding City Governments, a necrological 
record of those members, the latest ordinances and the 
special statutes relating to the City. In 1851 a list of 
the annual orators was added, and in 1853 a map of 



8 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

the City and the Rules of the Board of Aldermen. In 
1876 statistics of registration and voting were included, 
carried from 1879 to 1924 in tabulated form. 

From 1889 to 1896, inclusive. The Municipal 
Register also contained a compilation of the Charter 
with the revision of 1854 and the amendments of 1885 
and thereafter. The Amended Charter of 1909 (15 
pages) was added in 1910, and the various changes in 
same since that year have been stated in footnotes. 

In 1924 the important amendments to the Charter 
enacted in that year (10 pages) were included. 

The 1925 volume contained, as the latest addition, 
descriptions of the ward boundaries as fixed for the 22 
new wards (formerly 26) in December, 1924. 

Beginning in 1924, The Boston Year Book, the most 
comprehensive municipal publication yet undertaken, 
was issued. It treats extensively of municipal activi- 
ties as well as community conditions and interests, 
containing illustrations and diagrapas. This publica- 
tion, covering a different and much broader field than 
The Municipal Register, now 84 years old and hav- 
ing a reputation to live up to, is not intended to absorb 
that annual document, but the statistical tables (52 
pages) heretofore contained in the latter will be con- 
tinued in the Year Book, thus permitting for The 
Municipal Register a desirable reduction in size and 
an earlier issuance. 









3-m£E:T l^y/NG Out Dept- £na, Df\^. 



Entrance: 



Boston City Council Chamber, 1926 




PRESIDENT BOSTON CITV COUNCIL 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 
GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTOTn^, 
1926. 



MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, Mayor. 

Residence, 
796 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain. 



BOSTON CITY COUNCIL, 1926. 

[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1912, Chap. 574: Stat. 1914, Chaps. 630, 730; 

Spec. Stat. 1916, Chap. 269; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chap. 196; Stat. 1924, 

Chaps. 328 and 479.] 

CHARLES G. KEENE, President. 
Ward 1. Timothy F. Donovan, 148 Lexington street. 
Ward 2. Thomas H. Green, 117 Baldwin street. 
Ward 3. John I. Fitzgerald, 7 Allen street. 
Ward 4. Seth F. Arnold, 92 Huntington avenue. 
Ward 5. Henry Parkman, Jr., 182 Beacon street. 
Ward 6*. Michael J. Mahoney, 289 West Third 

street. 
Ward 7. William G. Lynch, 670 Columbia road. 
Ward 8. John F. Dowd, 24 Clarence street. 
Ward 9. Michael J. Ward, 20 A Auburn street. 
Ward 10. Walter J. Freeley, 65 Hillside street. 

* Elected at special election March 9, 1926, to succeed John L. Carr 
who died. 

Note. — By Chap. 479, Acts of 1924, the terms of all members of the 
City Council expire on the first Monday in January, 1926. On the same 
date a new City Council of 22 members (one from each ward) assumed 
office. 



10 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Ward 11. Edward L. Englert, 86 Montebello road, 
Jamaica Plain. 

Ward 12. Herman L. Bush, 64 Seaver street. 

Ward 13. Joseph McGrath, 3 Castle Rock street. 

Ward 14. Israel Ruby, 102 Talbot avenue. 

Ward 15. Thomas W. McMahon, 164 Westville street. 

Ward 16. George F. Gilbody, 43 Rosemont road S. W. 

Ward 17. Robert' Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 44 Ken- 
wood street. 

Ward 18. Walter E. Wragg, 15 Mattakeeset street. 

Ward 19. Horace Guild, 40 Southbourne road. 

Ward 20. Charles G. Keene, 156 Bellevue street. 
West Roxbury. 

Ward 21. Frederic E. Dowling, 4 Imrie road. 

Ward 22. John J. Heffernan, 6 Mapleton street. 

|Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, §30; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266, §2; Stat. 1901, 

Chap. 332; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 11; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 8; 

Stat. 1909, aiap. 486; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 11.] 

Clerk, ex officio. 
James Donovan, 71 Emerald Street. 

Assistant Clerk, ex officio. 

Wilfred J. Doyle, 81 Wellington Hill Street, 

Dorchester. 

Regular meetings in Council Chamber, City Hall, fourth floor, 
Mondays at 2 P. M. 



OFFICIALS OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

Office, City Hall, Room 55, fourth floor. 

Edward J. Leary. 

The City Messenger attends all meetings of the City Council and 
committees thereof, and has the care and distribution of all documents 
printed for the use of the City Council, also the regular department reports. 
He has charge of the City flagstaflfs, the display of flags in the public 
grounds, and the roping off of streets and squares on public occasions. 



CITY COUNCIL. 11 

Office, City Hall, Room 56, fourth floor. 

John E. Baldwin. 

The Clerk of Committees acts as the clerk of all committees of the City 
Council, keeps the records of their meetings, and has charge of the City 
Hall Reference Library. 

ASSISTANT CLERK OP COMMITTEES, 

Chester M. Macomber. 

SECRETARY OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

William J. J. O'Neil. 

The Secretary of the City Council is also Assistant Clerk of Committees 
and performs the duties of the Clerk in the latter's absence or in case of 
vacancy of his position. 

ASSISTANT CITY MESSENGERS. 

City Hall, Room 55, 

Frederick J. Glenn. 
William J. Walsh. 

The Assistant City Messengers perform the duties of the City Messenger 
in the latter's absence or in case of vacancy of his position. 

OFFICIAL REPORTER OF PROCEEDINGS. 

Edward W. Harnden. 



12 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY 
COUNCIL. 

19 36. 



STANDING COMMITTEE. 
Executive. — All the members, Councillor Bowling, Chairman. 



On the following committees the first-named member is Chairman. 
Appropriations. — Coun. Wilson, Fitzgerald, Dowhng, Donovan, Park- 
man, Lynch, Englert. 

Branch Libraries. — Coun. Bush, Heffernan, McMahon, Wragg, 

Fitzgerald. 
Claims. — Coun. Parkman, Ward, Guild, Freeley, Englert. 
County Accounts. — Coun. Fitzgerald, Arnold, Green, Wilson, Donovan. 
Finance. — Coun. Green, Arnold, Heffernan, Gilbody, Guild, Bush, Dowd. 
Greater Boston. — Coun. Bush, Donovan, Fitzgerald, Gilbody, 

Mahoney, Parkman, W^ard. 
Inspection of Prisons. — Coun. Lynch, Dowling, McGrath, Parkman, 

Ruby. 
Legislative Matters. — Coun. Heffernan, Arnold, Bush, Donovan, 

McGrath. 
Ordinanchs. — Coun. Ruby, Gilbody, Wragg, Fitzgerald, Dowling, 

McMahon, Dowd. 
Parkman Fund. — Coun. Guild, Gilbody, Ruby, Dowd, Ward. 
Parks and Playgrounds. — Coun. McMahon, Mahoney', Englert, 

Green, Ruby. 
Port of Boston. — Coun. Donovan, Fitzgerald, Mahoney, Ruby, 

Parkman. 
Printing. — Coim. Ward, Green, Lynch, Donovan, Dowd. 
Public Lands. — Coun. McGrath, Wilson, Englert, Guild, Freeley. 
Rules. — Coun. Arnold, Green, McMahon, McGrath, Parkman. 
Soldiers' Relief. — Coun. Gilbody, Bush, Lynch, Ward, Englert. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 
Jitney Licenses. — Coun. Wragg, McMahon, Wilson, Ruby, Freeley. 
Unclaimed Baggage. — Coun. Freeley, Heffernan, Wragg. 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 13 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 



Day of Meeting. 
Rule 1. Unless otherwise ordered from time to time the regular 
meeting of the city council shall be held on every Monday at two o'clock 
p. m. Special meetings may be called by the president at his discretion, 
and by the city clerk for the purpose only of drawing jurors. 

President. 

Rule 2. The president of the council shall take the chair at the hour 
to which the council shall have adjourned and shall call the members to 
order, and a quorum being present, shall proceed with the regular order 
of business. In the absence of the president the senior member by age 
present shall preside as temporary president or until a presiding officer is 
chosen. 

Rule 3. The president shall preserve decorum and order, may speak 
to points of order in preference to other members and shall decide all 
questions of order, subject to an appeal. Any member may appeal from 
the decision of the chair, and, when properly seconded, no other business, 
except a motion to adjourn or to lay on the table, shall be in order until the 
question on appeal has been decided. The question shall be put as follows : 

"Shall the decision of the chair stand as the judgment of the council?" The 
vote shall be by a roll call, and it shall be decided in the affirmative unless 
a majority of the votes are to the contrary. 

Rule 4. The president shall propound all motions in the order in 
which they are moved, unless the subsequent motion shall be previous in 
its nature, except that, in naming sums and fixing times, the largest sum 
and the longest time shall be put first. 

Rule 5. The president shall, at the request of any member, make a 
division of a question when the sense will admit of it. 

Rule 6. The president shall, without debate, decide all questions 
relating to priority of business to be acted upon. 

RxTLE 7. The president shall declare all votes; but if any member 
doubts a vote, the president shall cause a rising vote to be taken, and 
when any member so requests, shall cause the vote to be taken or verified 
by yeas and nays. 

Rule 8. The president shall appoint all committees, fill all vacancies 
therein, and designate the rank of the members thereof. 

Rule 9. When the president of the council or the president pro tempoie 
shall desire to vacate the chair he may call any member to it; but such 
substitution shall not continue beyond an adjournment. 



14 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

. Motions. 

Rule 10. Every motion shall be reduced to writing if the president 
shall so direct. 

Rule 11. Amotion to strike out and insert shall be deemed indivisible; 
but a motion to strike out being lost shall not preclude amendment, or a 
motion to strike out and insert. 

Rule 12. No motion or proposition of a subject different from that 
under consideration shall be admitted imder color of amendment. 

Rule 13. ^Vhen an order or resolution relates to a subject which may 
properly be examined and reported upon by an existing committee of the 
city council, such order or resolution shall, upon presentation, be referred 
to such committee. When a motion is made to refer any subject, and 
different committees are proposed, the motions shall be put in the following 
order: 

1. To a standing committee of the council. 

2. To a special committee of the council. 

Any member offering a motion, order or resolution, which is referred 
to a committee, shall be given a hearing on the same by the conamittee, 
before a report is made thereon, provided he so requests at the time of 
offering the order or before final action by the committee. 

Rule 14. After a motion has been put by the president it shall not 
be withdrawn except by unanimous consent. 

Rule 15. When a question is under debate the following motions 
only shall be entertained, and shall have precedence in the order in which 
they stand arranged. 

1. To adjourn. 

2. To lay on the table. 

3. The previous question. 

4. To close debate at a specified time. 

5. To postpone to a day certain. 

6. To commit. 

7. To amend. 

8. To postpone indefinitely. 

Rule 16. A motion to adjourn shall be in order at any time, except 
on an immediate repetition, or pending a verification of a vote; and that 
motion, the motion to lay on the table, the motion to take from the table, 
and the motion for the previous questions, shall be decided without debate. 

Readings. 
Rule 17. Every ordinance, order and resolution shall, unless rejected) 
have two several readings, both of which may take place at the same 
session unless objection is made, provided, however, that all orders for the 
expenditure of moneys, unless reported upon by a comnaittee of the coun- 
cil, shall lie over for one week before final action thereon. A\Tienever 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 15 

the second reading immediately follows the first reading, the dociunent 
may be read by its title only; provided, that all orders releasing rights or 
easements in or restrictions on land, all orders for the sale of land other 
than school lands, all appropriations for the purchase of land other than 
for school purposes, and all loans voted by the city council shall require 
a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the city council, and shall be 
passed only after two separate readings and by two separate votes, the 
second of said readings and votes to be had not less than fourteen days 
after the first. 

Reconsideration. 

Rule 18. When a vote has been passed any member may move a 
reconsideration thereof at the same meeting, or he may give notice in 
WTiting to the clerk, wthin twenty-four hours of the adjournment of any 
meeting except the final meeting, of his intention to move a reconsidera- 
tion at the next regular meeting; in which case the clerk shall retain 
possession of the papers until the next regular meeting. No member shall 
speak for more than ten minutes on a motion to reconsider. 

Rule 19. Wlien a motion to reconsider has been decided, that decision 
shall not be reconsidered, and no question shall be twice reconsidered 
unless it has been amended after the reconsideration; nor shall any recon- 
sideration be had upon the follo-on'ng motions: 

To adjourn. 

The previous question. 

To lay on the table. 

To take from the table. 

To close debate at a specified time. 

A motion to reconsider may be laid on the table or postponed indefinitely 
and the effect of such action in either case shall be to defeat the motion 
to reconsider. 

Conduct of Members. 

Rule 20. Every member when about to speak shall rise, address the 
chair, and wait until he is recognized, and, in speaking, shall refrain from 
mentioning any other member by name, shall confine himself to the 
question and avoid personalities. Any member who, in debate or other- 
wise, indulges in personalities or makes charges reflecting upon the char- 
acter of another member, shall make an apology in open session at the 
meeting at which the offence is committed or at the next succeeding 
regular meeting, and, failing to do so, shall be named by the president 
or held in contempt and suspended from further participation in debate 
until said apology is made. 

Rule 21. No member shall speak more. than once on a question 
when another member who has not spoken claiins the floor, and no mem- 
Ijer speaking shall, without his consent, be interrupted by another, except 
upon a point of order. 



16 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Rule 22. No member shall be permitted to vote on any question, 
or to serve on any committee, where his private right is immediately 
concerned, distinct from the public interest. 

Rule 23. Every member who shall be present when a question is 
put, unless he is excluded by interest, shall give his vote, unless the coun- 
cil for special reason shall excuse him. Application to be so excused on 
any question must be made before the council is divided, or before the 
calling of the yeas and nays; and such application shall be accompanied 
by a brief statement of the reasons, and shall be decided without debate. 

Standing Committees. 
Rule 24. The following standing committees of the council, and 
all other committees, unless specially directed by the council, shall be 
appointed by the president: 

1. A committee, to be known as the Executive Committee, to consist 
of all the members of the council. 

2. A committee on Appropriations, to consist of seven members of 
the council, to whom shall be referred such appropriation orders as may 
be submitted to the council from time to time. 

3. A committee on Branch Libraries, to consist of five members of the 
council. 

4. A committee on Claims, to consist of five members of the council) 
to whom shall be referred all claims against the city arising from the 
act or neglect of any of its departments. They shall report annually 
an account of the claims awarded or approved by them, and the amount 
of money awarded or paid in settlement thereof. 

5. A committee on County Accounts, to consist of five members of the 
council. 

6. A committee on Finance, to consist of seven members of the council, 
to whom shall be referred all applications for expenditure which involve 
a loan. 

7. A committee on Inspection of Prisons, to consist of five members of 
the council. 

8. A committee on Legislative Matters, to consist of five members 
of the council, who shall, unless otherwise ordered, appear before the 
committees of the General Court and represent the interest of the city; 
provided, said committee shall not appear unless authorized by vote of 
the city council, and shall not, unless directed so to do by the city council, 
oppose any legislation petitioned for by the preceding city council. 

9. A committee on Ordinances, to consist of seven members of the 
council, to whom shall be referred all ordinances or orders concerning 
ordinances. 

10. A committee on Parkman Fund, to consist of five members of the 
council, to whom shall be referred all matters concerning the Parkman 
property, or the expenditure of the income from the Parkman Fund. 



RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 17 

11. A committee on Printing, to consist of five members of the council 
who shall have the charge of all printing, advertising or publishing ordered 
by the city council as one of its contingent or incidental expenses, and 
the supply of all stationery or binding for the same purpose. The commit- 
tee shall fix the number of copies to be printed of any document printed 
as above, the minimum, however, to be four hundred; and they shall 
have the right to make rules and regulations for the care, custody and 
distribution of all documents, books, pamphlets and maps by the city 
messenger. 

12. A committee on Public Lands, to consist of five members of the 
council, to whom shall be referred all matters relating to public lands. 

13. A committee on Rules, to consist of five members of the council, 
to consider all matters concerning the rules. 

14. A committee on Soldiers' Relief, to consist of five members of the 
council, who shall determine the amount of aid to be allowed to soldiers 
and sailors and their families and submit a schedule of the same to the 
city council monthly. 

Order of Business. 
Rule 25. At every regular meeting of the council the order of busi- 
ness shall be as follows: 

1. Communications from his Honor the Mayor. 

2. Presentation of petitions, memorials and remonstrances. 

3. Reports of city officers, etc. 

4. Unfinished business of preceding meetings. 

5. Reports of committees. 

6. Motions, orders and resolutions. 



Spectators. 

Rule 26. No person, except a member of the council, shall be permitted 
to occupy the seat of any member while the council is in session. 

Rule 27. No person, excepting heads of departments, officials con- 
nected with the city council, and reporters, shall be allowed in the ante- 
rooms or upon the floor of the council chamber while the council is in 
session. Spectators wll be allowed in the gallery of the council chamber 
when the council is in session, and no one will be admitted to said gallery 
after the seats are occupied. The city messenger shall enforce this rule. 

Burial Grounds. 
Rule 28. No permission for the use of land for the purpose of burial 
shall be granted until a public hearing shall have been given by the execu- 
tive committee of the city council on the application for such permission, 
after due notice has been served upon abuttors. 



18 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Smoking in the Council Chamber. 
Rule 29. No smoking shall be allowed in the council chamber when 
the council is in session. 

Committee Meetings. 
Rule 30. No meeting of any committee shall, without the consent of 
all the members thereof, be called upon less notice than twenty-four hours 
from the time the clerk shall have mailed the notices or dispatched them 
by special messenger, provided, however, that meetings of the executive 
committee may be held in the recess period of any meeting of the council 
without such consent or notice. No committee, unless authorized by an 
order of the city council, shall incur any expense. No committee meetings 
shall be called later than one hour immediately preceding the time set for 
any regular meeting of the city council, nor shall any committee remain in 
session later than the hour named for any such regular meeting. 

Form of Votes. 
Rule 31. In all votes the form of expression shall be "Ordered" for 
everything by way of command, and the form shall be "Resolved" for 
everything expressing opinions, principles, facts or purposes. 

Transfers. 
Rule 32. Every application for an appropriation to be provided for by 
transfer shall be referred to the executive committee unless otherwise 
ordered, and no such appropriation shall be made until the said committee 
has reported thereon. 

Amendment and Suspension. 
Rule 33. The foregoing rules shall not be altered, amended, suspended 
or repealed at any time, except by the votes of two-thirds of the members 
of the city council present and voting thereon. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 19 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER OF 1909. 

[With footnotes as to Amendments in 1910, 1912, 1914, 1918, 1919, 1921 

and 1922.1 



The Mayor and City Council. 

Section 1. The terms of office of the mayor and the members of both 
branches of the present city comicil of the city of Boston and of the 
street commissioner whose term would expire on the first Monday of 
January, nineteen hundred and ten, are hereby extended to ten o'clock 
A.M. on the first Monday of February, nineteen hundred and ten, and 
at that time the said city council and both branches thereof and the 
positions of city messenger, clerk of the common council, clerk of com- 
mittees, assistant clerk of committees, and their subordinates shall be 
abolished. The officials whose terms of office are hereby extended shall, 
for the extended term, receive a compensation equal to one-twelfth of the 
annual salaries now paid to them respectively. The mayor and city 
council elected in accordance with the provisions of this act, and their 
successors, shall thereafter have all the powers and privileges conferred, 
and be subject to all the duties and obligations imposed by law upon 
the city coimcil or the board of aldermen, acting as such or as county 
commissioners or in any capacity, except as herein otherwise provided. 
Wherever in this act the phrase "mayor and city council" appears, it 
shall be understood as meaning the mayor and city council acting on and 
after the first Monday of February, nineteen hundred and ten, under the 
provisions of this and the three following sections. The city council may, 
subject to the approval of the mayor, from time to time establish such 
offices, other than that of city clerk, as it may deem necessary for the 
conduct of its affairs and at such salaries as it may determine, and abolish 
such offices or alter such salaries; and without such approval may fill 
the offices thus established and remove the incumbents at pleasure. 

Sect. 2. The mayor from time to time may make to the city council 
in the form of an ordinance or loan order filed with the city clerk such 
recommendations other than for school purposes as he may deem to be for 
the welfare of the city. The city council shall consider each ordinance or 
loan order presented by the mayor and shall either adopt or reject the 
same within sixty days after the date when it is filed as aforesaid. If the 
said ordinance or loan order is not rejected within said sixty days it shall 

Note. — The Amended City Charter is contained in Chap. 486, Acts of 
1909, consisting of 63 sections. Sees. 35 to 44, inclusive, are omitted, 
as these concern the alternative amendments which became inoperative 
on the adoption of Plan 2 by the voters in the State election, November 2, 
1909. 



20 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

be in force as if adopted by the city council unless previously withdrawn 
by the mayor. Nothing herein shall prevent the mayor from again 
presenting an ordinance or loan order which has been rejected or with- 
drawn. The city council may originate an ordinance or loan order and 
may reduce or reject any item in any loan and, subject to the approval 
of the mayor, may amend an ordinance. All sales of land other than 
school lands, all appropriations for the purchase of land other than for 
school purposes, and all loans voted by the city council shall require a 
vote of two thirds of all the members of the city council; and shall be 
passed only after two separate readings and by two separate votes, the 
second of said readings and votes to be had not less than fourteen days 
after the first. No amendment increasing the amoimt of land to be sold 
or the amount to be paid for the purchase of land, or the amount of loans, 
or altering the disposition of purchase money or of the proceeds of loans 
shall be made at the time of the second reading and vote. 

Sect. 3. All appropriations, other than for school purposes, to be 
met from taxes, revenue, or any source other than loans shall originate 
with the mayor, who within thirty days after the beginning of the 
fiscal year shall submit to the city council the annual budget of the current 
expenses of the city and coimty, and may submit thereafter supplemen- 
tary budgets until such time as the tax rate for the year shall have been 
fixed. The city council may reduce or reject any item, but without the 
approval of the mayor shall not increase any item in, nor the total of a 
budget, nor add any item thereto, nor shall it originate a budget. It 
shall be the duty of the city and county officials, when requested by the 
mayor, to submit forthwith in such detail as he may require estimates 
for the next fiscal year of the expenditures of the department or office 
under their charge, which estimates shall be transmitted to the city council. 

The city auditor may, with the approval in each instance of the mayor, 
at any time make transfers from the appropriation for current expenses 
of one division of a department to the appropriation for current expenses 
of any other division of the same department, and from the reserve fund 
to any appropriation for the current expenses of a department; and may 
also, with the approval of the mayor, at any time between December first 
and February first, make transfers from any appropriation to any other 
appropriation: provided, however, that no money raised by loan shall be 
transferred to any appropriation from income or taxes. He may also 
with such approval apply any of the income and taxes not disposed of 
in closing the accoimts for the financial year in such manner as he may 
determine. 

Sect. 4. Every appropriation, ordinance, order, resolution and vote 
of the city council, except votes relating to its own internal affairs, shall be 
presented to the mayor, who shall make or cause to be made a written 
record of the time and place of presentation, and it shall be in force if 
he approves the same within fifteen days after it shall have been presented 
to him, or if the same is not returned by him with his objections thereto 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 21 

in writing within said period of fifteen days. If within said period said 
appropriation, ordinance, order, resolution, or vote is returned by the 
mayor to the city council by filing the same with the city clerk with his 
objections thereto the same shall be void. If the same involves the expen- 
diture of money, the mayor may approve some of the items in whole or 
in part and disapprove other of the items in whole or in part; and such 
items or parts of items as he approves shall be in force, and such items or 
parts of items as he disapproves shall be void. 

Sect. 5. Except as otherwise provided in this act, the organization, 
powers, and duties of the executive departments of the city shall remain 
as constituted at the time when this section takes effect; but the mayor 
and city council at any time may by ordinance reorganize, consolidate, 
or abolish departments in whole or in part; transfer the duties, powers, 
and appropriations of one department to another in whole or in part; 
and establish new departments; and may increase, reduce, establish or 
abolish salaries of heads of departments, or members of boards. Nothing 
in this act shall authorize the abolition or the taking away of any of 
the powers or duties as established by law of the assessing department, 
building department, board of appeal, children's institutions department, 
election department, fire department, Franklin Foundation, hospital 
department, library department, overseers of the poor, schoolhouse 
department, school committee, or any department in charge of an official 
or officials appointed by the governor, nor the abolition of the health 
department. 

Sect. 6. No contract for lighting the public streets, parks, or alleys, 
or for the collection, removal, or disposal of refuse, extending over a 
period of more than one year from the date thereof, shall be valid without 
the approval of the mayor and the city council after a public hearing 
held by the city coimcil, of which at least seven days' notice shall have 
been given in the City Record. 

Sect. 7. The city council at any time may request from the mayor 
specific information on any municipal matter within its jurisdiction, 
and may request his presence to answer written questions relating thereto 
at a meeting to be held not earlier than one week from the date of the 
receipt of said questions, in which case the mayor shall personally, or 
through a head of a department or a member of a board, attend such 
meeting and publicly answer all such questions. The person so attend- 
ing shall not be obliged to answer questions relating to any other matter. 
The mayor at any time may attend and address the city council in person 
or through the head of a department, or a member of a board, upon such 
subject as he may desire. 

Sect. 8. Neither the city coimcil, nor any member or committee, 
ofiicer, or employee thereof shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
act, directly or indirectly on behalf of the city or of the county of Suf- 
folk take part in the emplo3Tnent of labor, the making of contracts, 
the purchase of materials, supplies or real estate; nor in the construe- 



22 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

tion, alteration, or repair of any public works, buildings, or other prop- 
erty; nor in the care, cijstody, and management of the same; nor in the 
conduct of the executive or administrative business of the city or county ; 
nor in the appointment or removal of any municipal or county employee; 
nor in the expenditure of public money except such as may be necessary 
for the contingent and incidental expenses of the city council. The pro- 
visions of this section shall not affect the powers or duties of the city coun- 
cil as the successor of the present board of aldermen relative to state 
or miUtary aid and soldiers' relief. 

It shall be unlawful for the mayor or for a member of the city coun- 
cil or for any officer or employee of the city or of the county of Suffolk 
or for a member of the finance commission directly or indirectly to make 
a contract with the city or with the county of Suffolk, or to receive any 
commission, discount, bonus, gift, contribution or reward from or any 
share in the profits of any person or corporation making or performing 
such contract, unless such mayor, member of the city council, officer, 
or employee or member of the finance commission immediately upon 
learning of the existence of such contract or that such contract is pro- 
posed, shall notify in writing the mayor, city council, and finance com- 
mission of such contract and of the nature of his interest in such contract 
and shall abstain from doing any official act on behalf of the city in reference 
thereto. In case of such interest on the part of an officer whose duty it 
is to make such contract on behalf of the city, the contract may be made 
by any other officer of the city duly authorized thereto by the mayor, 
or if the mayor has such interest by the city clerk: provided, however, 
that when a contractor with the city or coimty is a corporation or voluntary 
association, the ownership of less than five per cent of the stock or shares 
actually issued shall not be considered as being an interest in the contract 
within the meaning of this act, and such ownership shall not affect the 
validity of the contract, miless the owner of such stock or shares is also 
an officer or agent of the corporation or association, or solicits or takes 
part in the making of the contract. 

A violation of any provision of this section shall render the contract 
in respect to which such violation occurs voidable at the option of the 
city or county. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall 
be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or by 
imprisonment for not more than one year, or both. Chapter five hundred 
and twenty-two of the acts of the year nineteen himdred and eight is 
hereby repealed. 

The Executive Department. 
Sect. 9. All heads of departments and members of municipal boards, 
including the board of street commissioners, as their present terms of 
office expire (but excluding the school committee and those officials by 
law appointed by the governor), shall be appointed by the mayor with- 
out confirmation by the city council. They shall be recognized experts 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 23 

in such work as may devolve upon the incumbents of said offices, or 
persons specially fitted by education, training or experience to perform 
the same, and (except the election commissioners, who shall remain sub- 
ject to the provisions of existing laws) shall be appointed without regard 
to party affiliation or to residence at the time of appointment except as 
hereinafter provided. 

Sect. 10.* In making such appointments the mayor shall sign a 
certificate in the following form: 

CERTIFICATE OF APPOINTMENT. 
I appoint (Name of Appointee) to the position of (Name of Office) and I certify ttiat 
in my opinion he is a recognized expert in the work which will devolve upon him, and 
that I make the appointment solely in the interest of the city. Mayor. 

Or in the following form, as the case may be: 

CERTIFICATE OF APPOINTMENT. 
I appoint (Name of Appointee) to the position of (Name of Office) and I certify that 
in my opinion he is a person specially fitted by education, training, or experience to perform 
the duties of said office, and that I make the appointment solely in the interest of the city. 

Mayor. 

The certificate shall be filed with the city clerk, who shall thereupon 
forward a certified copy to the civil service commission. The commis- 
sion shall immediately make a careful inquiry into the qualifications 
of the nominee under such rules as they may, with the consent of the 
governor and councU, estabUsh, and, if they conclude that he is a com- 
petent person with the requisite qualifications, they shall file with the 
city clerk a certificate signed by at least a majority of the commission 
that they have made a careful inquiry into the qualifications of the 
appointee, and that in their opinion he is a recognized expert, or that 
he is qualified by education, training or experience for said office, as 
the case may be, and that they approve the appointment. Upon the 
fihng of this certificate the appointment shall become operative, subject 
however to all provisions of law or ordinance in regard to acceptance 
of office, oath of office, and the fiUng of bonds. If the commission does 
not within thirty days after the receipt of such notice file said certificate 
with the city clerk the appointment shall be void. 

Sect. 11. The civil service commission is authorized to incur in 
carrying out the foregoing provisions such reasonable expense as may be 
approved by the governor and council; the same to be paid by the 
commonwealth, which upon demand shall be reimbursed by the city of 
Boston. 

Sect. 12. A vacancy in any office to which the provisions of section 
nine of this act apply, shall be filled by the mayor under the provisions 

* Sect. 10, amended by Chap. 550, Acts of 1912, now provides that if 
an appointee is accused of a crime, misdemeanor or act of dishonesty, he 
has a right to a hearing, where full opportunity shall be given to explain 
or refute the charge. 



24 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

of said section and pending a permanent appointment he shall designate 
some other head of a department or member of a board to discharge 
the duties of the ofEce temporarily. 

Sect. 13. Members of boards shall be appointed for the terms estab- 
lished by law or by ordinance. Heads of departments shall be appointed 
for terms of four years beginning with the first day of May of the year 
in which they are appointed and shall continue thereafter to hold office 
during the pleasure of the mayor. 

Sect. 14. The mayor may remove any head of a department or 
member of a board (other than the election commissioners, who shall 
remain subject to the provisions of existing laws) by filing a written 
statement with the city clerk setting forth in detail the specific reasons 
for such removal, a copy of which shall be delivered or mailed to the 
person thus removed, who may make a reply in writing, which, if he 
desires, may be filed with the city clerk; but such reply shall not affect 
the action taken unless the mayor so determines. The provisions of this 
section shall not apply to the school committee or to any official by law 
appointed by the governor. 

Sect. 15. The positions of assistants and secretary authorized by 
section twenty of chapter four hundred and forty-nine of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five except those in the election depart- 
ment are hereby abolished, and except as aforesaid the said section is 
hereby repealed. 

The civil service laws shall not apply to the appointment of the mayor's 
secretaries, nor of the stenographers, clerks, telephone operators and 
messengers connected with his office, and the mayor may remove such 
appointees without a hearing and without making a statement of the 
cause for their removal. 

Sect. 16. No official of said city, except in case of extreme emer- 
gency involving the health or safety of the people or their property, shall 
expend intentionally in any fiscal year any sum in excess of the appro- 
priations duly made in accordance with law, nor involve the city in any 
contract for the future pa3Tiient of money in excess of such appropria- 
tion, except as provided in section six of this act. Any official who shall 
violate the provisions of this section shall be punished by imprisonment 
for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one thousand 
dollars, or both. 

The Finance Commission. 

Sect. 17. Within sixty days after the passage of this act the governor 
with the advice and consent of the council shall appoint a finance com- 
mission to consist of five persons, inhabitants of and quaHfied voters in 
the city of Boston, who shall have been such for at least three years 
prior to the date of their appointment, one for the term of five years, 
one for four years, one for three years, one for two years, and one for 
one year, and thereafter as the terms of office expire in each year one 
member for a term of five years. Vacancies in the commission shall be 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 25 

filled for the unexpired term by the governor with the advice and consent 
of the council. The members of said commission may be removed by 
the governor with the advice and consent of the council for such cause 
as he shall deem sufficient. The chairman shall be designated by the 
governor. His annual salary shall be five thousand dollars, which shall 
be paid in monthly installments by the city of Boston. The other members 
shall serve without pay. 

Sect. 18. It shall be the duty of the finance commission from time 
to time to investigate any and all matters relating to appropriations, 
loans, expenditures, accounts, and methods of administration affecting 
the city of Boston or the county of Suffolk, or any department thereof, 
that may appear to the commission to require investigation, and 
to report thereon from time to time to the mayor, the city council, the 
governor, or the general court. The commission shall make an 
annual report in January of each year to the general court. 

Sect. 19. Whenever any pay roll, bill, or other claim against the 
city is presented to the mayor, city auditor, or the city treasurer, he shall, 
if the same seems to him to be of doubtful validity, excessive in amount, 
or otherwise contrary to the city's interest, refer it to the finance com- 
mission, which shall immediately investigate the facts and report thereon ; 
and pending said report payment shall be withheld. 

Sect. 20.* The said commission is authorized to employ such experts, 
counsel, and other assistants, and to incur such other expenses as it may 
deem necessary, and the same shall be paid by said city upon requisi- 
tion by the commission, not exceeding in the aggregate in any year the 
sum of twenty-five thousand dollars, or such additional sums as may be 
appropriated for the purpose by the city council, and approved by the 
mayor. A sum sufficient to cover the salary of the chairman of the com- 
mission and the further sum of at least twenty-five thousand dollars to 
meet the expenses as aforesaid shall be appropriated each year by said 
city. The commission shall have the same right to incur expenses in 
anticipation of its appropriation as if it were a regular department of 
said city. 

Sect. 21. For the purpose of enabling the said commission to perform 
the duties and carry out the objects herein contemplated, and to enable 
the mayor, the city council, the governor or the general com-t to receive 
the reports and findings of said commission as a basis for such laws, 
ordinances, or administrative orders as may be deemed meet, the com- 
mission shall have all the powers and duties enumerated in chapter five 
hundred and sixty-two of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight 
and therein conferred upon the commission designated in said act; but 
counsel for any witness at any public hearing may ask him any pertinent 
question and may offer pertinent evidence through other witnesses subject 
to cross-examination by the commission and its counsel. 

* Sect. 20, amended by Chap. 81, Acts of 1921, now allows for Finance 
Commission's annual expenses $35,000 instead of $25,000. 



26 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The City Clerk. 
Sect. 22. The present city clerk shall hold office for the term for which 
he has been elected, and thereafter until his successor is chosen and quali- 
fied. In the year nineteen hundred and eleven, and every third year 
thereafter, a city clerk shaU be elected by a majority of the members of 
the city council, to hold office until the first Monday in February in the 
third year following his election, and thereafter until his successor has been 
duly chosen and qualified, unless sooner removed b}^ due process of law. 
The city clerk shall act as clerk of the city council established by this act. 

The City Auditor. 

Sect. 23. All accounts rendered to or kept in the departments of the 
city of Boston or county of Suffolk shall be subject to the inspection 
and revision of the city auditor, and shall be rendered and kept in such 
form as he shall prescribe. The auditor may require any person pre- 
senting for settlement an account or claim against the city or county 
to make oath before him in such form as he may prescribe as to the accuracy 
of such accoimt or claim. The wilful making of a false oath shall be 
perjury and punishable as such. The auditor may disallow and refuse 
to pay, in whole or in part, any claim on the ground that it is fraudulent 
or unlawful and in that case he shall file a written statement of his reasons 
for the refusal. 

Sect. 24. Whenever, in response to an advertisement by any officer or 
board of the city or county, a bid for a contract to do work or furnish 
materials is sent or delivered to said officer or board, a duplicate of the 
same shall be furnished by the bidder to the auditor, to be kept by him 
and not opened until after the original bids are opened. After the original 
bids are opened, the auditor shall open and examine the bids submitted 
to him, and shall compare the same with the original bids. In case any 
of the bids submitted to the auditor differ from the corresponding original 
bids, those submitted to the auditor shall be treated as the original bids. 
The contract shall not be awarded until after both sets of bids are opened. 

Sect. 25. The auditor shall furnish monthly to each head of depart- 
ment a statement of the unexpended balance of the appropriation for that 
department, and he shall furnish to the mayor and city council a state- 
ment of the unexpended balances of all the departments. He shall 
furnish quarterly to the city council an itemized statement showing 
the amount of money expended by the mayor and the city council for 
contingent expenses. 

Miscellaneous Provisions. 

Sect. 26.* All loans issued by the city after the passage of this act 
shall be made payable in annual instalments in the manner authorized 
by section thirteen of chapter twenty-seven of the Revised Laws as 

* Sect. 26 amended by Chap. 437, Acts of 1910, which exempts all loans 
issued for rapid transit construction from the prohibition as to sinking 
funds. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 27 

amended by section one of chapter three hundred and forty-one of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight. No sinking fund shall be 
established for said loan. All bonds shall be offered for sale in such 
a manner that the effect of the premiums, if any, shall be to reduce 
the total amoimt of bonds issued. No city or county money shall be 
deposited in any bank or trust company of which any member of the board 
of sinking fund commissioners of said city is an officer, director, or agent. 

Sect. 27.* Every officer and board in charge of a department of the 
city of Boston or county of Suffolk shall on or before the fifth day of 
May in each year prepare and fvu-nish to the city auditor a list of the 
officials and employees imder said officer or board and paid by the city 
or county on the thirtieth day of April preceding. Such lists shall give 
the names, residence by street and ward, designation, compensation, 
and date of election or appointment of each of said officials and employees 
and the date when each first entered the employ of the city or county. 
It shall be the duty of the city auditor to verify said lists by the pay rolls; 
and whai verified the said lists shall be printed by the superintendent 
of printing as a city document. 

Sect. 28. The jurisdiction now exercised by the board of aldermen 
concerning the naming of streets, the planting and removal of trees in 
the public ways, the issue of permits or licenses for coasting, the storage 
of gasoline, oil, and other inflammable substances or explosive com- 
pounds and the use of the public wa5^s for any permanent or temporary 
obstruction or projection in, under, or over the same, including the location 
of conduits, poles, and posts for telephone, telegraph, street railway, or 
illuminating purposes, is hereby vested in the board of street commis- 
sioners, to be exercised by said board with the approval in writing of the 
mayor; and the mayor and city council shall have authority to fix by 
ordinance the terms by way of cash payment, rent, or otherwise, upon 
which permits or licenses for the storage of gasoline or oil, or other inflam- 
mable substances or explosive compounds, and the construction or use 
of coal holes, vaults, bay windows, and marquises, in, under, or over the 
public ways shall be issued. 

Sect. 29. Within ninety daj's after the passage of this act and there- 
after there shall be published at least once a week and distributed and 
sold under the direction of the mayor and on terms to be fixed by the 
city council and approved by the mayor a paper to be known as the City 
Record. All advertising, whether required by law or not, with reference 
to the purchase or taking of land, contracts for work, materials, or supplies, 
the sale of bonds, or the sale of property for non-payment of taxes shall 
appear exclusively in said paper; a list of all contracts of one thousand 
dollars or more, as awarded, with the names of bidders, and the amount of 

*Sect. 27 amended by Chap. 168, Spec. Acts of 1919, changing the 
date from April 30 to June 1 for the annual listing of officials and employees, 
also by Chap. 133, Acts of 1922, directing the City auditor to keep a copy 
of said list open for pubhc inspection, and that it be printed as a public 
document in 1923 and every two years thereafter. 



28 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

the bids; appointments bj^ the mayor; and changes in the number and 
compensation of emploj^ees in each department, shall be published in the 
City Record. The proceedings of the city council and school committee 
together with all communications from the mayor, shall be published in 
the City Record. 

Sect. 30. Every officer or board in charge of a department in said 
city, when authorized to erect a new building or to maffe structural 
changes in an existing building, shall make contracts therefor, not exceed- 
ing five, each contract to be subject to the approval of the mayor; and 
when about to do any work or to make any purchase, the estimated 
cost of which alone, or in conjunction with other similar work or pur- 
chase which might properly be included in the same contract, amounts 
to or exceeds one thousand dollars, shall, unless the mayor gives written 
authority to do otherwise, invite proposals therefor by advertisement in 
the City Record. Such advertisement shall state the time and place for 
opening the proposals in answer to said advertisement, and shall reserve 
the right to the officer or board to reject any or all proposals. No authority 
to dispense with advertising shall be given by the mayor unless the said 
officer or board furnishes him with a signed statement which shall be 
published in the City Record giving in detail the reasons for not inviting 
bids by advertisement. 

Sect. 31. At the request of any department, and with the approval 
of the mayor the board of street commissioners, in the name of the city, 
may take in fee for any municipal purpose any land within the limits of 
the city, not already appropriated to public use. Whenever the price 
proposed to be paid for a lot of land for any municipal purpose is more 
than twenty-five per cent higher than its average assessed valuation dur- 
ing the previous three years, said land shall not be taken by purchase 
but shall be taken by right of eminent domain and paid for in the manner 
provided for the taking of and the payment of damages for land for high- 
ways in said city. No land shall be taken until an appropriation by loan 
or otherwise for the general purpose for which land is needed shall have 
been made by the mayor and city council by a two thirds vote of all its 
members; or in case of land for school purposes by the school committee 
and schoolhouse department in accordance with law; nor shall a price 
be paid in excess of the appropriation, unless a larger sum is awarded 
by a court of competent jurisdiction. All proceedings in the taking of 
land shall be under the advice of the law department, and a record thereof 
shall be kept by said department. 

Sect. 32.* The first municipal election under this act shall take 
place on the first Tuesday after the second Monday in January in the 
year nineteen himdred and ten, and thereafter the regular municipal 

* Sect. 32 amended by Chap. 730, § 1, Acts of 1914, fixing date of annual 
municipal election on the sixth Tuesday after the state election. Sect. 32 
again amended (by Chap. 288, Acts of 1921) fixing date of municipal 
election on the first Tuesday after the second Monday in December. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 29 

elections in each year in said city shall be held on the first Tuesday after 
the second Monday in January. 

Sect. 33. The fiscal year in said city shall begin on February first 
and shall end on the thirty-first day of January next following; and the 
municipal year shall hereafter begin on the first Monday in February and 
shall continue until the first Monday of the February next following. 
The present terms of ofiice of members of the school committee are hereby 
extended to the first Monday of February in the years in which their 
terms respectively expire, and hereafter the terms of oflice of members 
of the school committee shall begin with the first Monday of February 
following their election. The members of the school committee hereafter 
shall meet and organize annually on the first Monday of February. 

Sect. 34, In Boston beginning with the current year political committees 
shall be elected at the state primaries instead of at the municipal primaries. 



The Mayor. 

Sect. 45.* The mayor of the city of Boston shall be elected at large 
to hold office for the term of four years from the first Monday in February 
following his election and until his successor is chosen and qualified, 
except as hereinafter provided. 

Sect. 46. (Repealed by Chap. 94, Special Acts of 1918. This section 
provided for the recall of the Mayor.) 

Sect. 47. If a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor within two months 
prior to a regular municipal election other than an election for mayor, 
or within four months after any regular municipal election, the city council 
shall forthwith order a special election for a mayor to serve for the unex- 
pired term, subject if the vacancy occurs in the first or second year of the 
mayor's term to recall under the provisions of the preceding section. If 
such vacancy occurs at any other time there shall be an election for mayor 
at the municipal election held in January t next following, for the term 
of four years, subject to recall as aforesaid. In the case of the decease, 
inability, absence or resignation of the mayor, and whenever there is a 
vacancy in the office from any cause, the president of the city council 
while said cause continues or until a mayor is elected shall perform the 
duties of mayor. If he is also absent or unable from any cause to perform 
such duties they shall be performed until the mayor or president of the 
city council retiirns or is able to attend to said duties by such member of 
the city council as that body may elect, and until such election by the city 
clerk. The person upon whom such duties shall devolve shall be called 
"acting mayor" and he shall possess the powers of mayor only in matters 

* * * Sections 35 to 44, inclusive, are omitted because now in- 
operative. 

* Sect. 45 amended by Chap. 94, Special Acts of 1918, providing that 
the mayor shall not be eligible for election for the succeeding term. 

t January changed to December by Chap. 730, Acts of 1914, §§2 and 3. 



30 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

aot admitting of delay, but shall have no power to make permanent 
appointments except on the decease of the mayor. 

The City Council. 

Sect. 48. There shall be elected at large in said city a city council 
consisting of nine members. At the first election under this act there shall 
be elected nine members of said city council. No voter shall vote for more 
than nine. The three candidates receiving the largest number of votes 
at said election shall hold office for three years, the three receiving the next 
largest number of votes shall hold office for two years, the three receiving 
the next largest number of votes shall hold office for one year. In case 
two or more persons elected should receive an equal number of votes those 
who are the seniors by age shall for the division into classes hereby required 
be classified as if they had received the larger number of votes in the order 
of ages. Thereafter at each annual municipal election there shall be chosen 
at large three members of the city council to hold office for a term of three 
years. No voter shall vote for more than three. All said terms shall begin 
with the first Monday of February following the election. 

Sect. 49. Each member of the city council shall be paid an annual 
salary of fifteen hundred dollars; and no other sum shall be paid from the 
city treasury for or on account of any personal expenses directly or 
indirectly incurred by or in behalf of any member of said council. 

Sect. 50. The city council shall be the judge of the election and 
qualifications of its members; shall elect from its members by vote of a 
majority of all the members a president who when present shall preside 
at the meetings thereof; shall from time to time establish rules for its 
proceedings, and shall, when a vacancy occurs in the office of any member, 
elect by vote of a majority of all the members a registered voter of said 
city to fill the vacancy for the remainder of the municipal year. The 
vacancy for the remainder of the unexpired term shall be filled at the next 
annual municipal election, unless the vacancy occurs within two months 
prior to such municipal election, in which event the city council shall 
forthwith order a special election to fill the vacancy for the unexpired 
term. The member eldest in years shall preside until the president is 
chosen, and in case of the absence of the president, imtil a presiding 
officer is chosen. 

Sect. 51. All elections by the city council under any provision of law 
shall be made by a viva voce vote, each member who is present answering 
to his name when it is called by the clerk or other proper officer, and stating 
the name of the person for whom he votes, or declining to vote as the case 
may be; and the clerk or other proper officer shall record every such vote. 
No such election shall be valid unless it is made as aforesaid. 

Sect. 52. No primary election or caucus for municipal offices shall be 
held hereafter in the city of Boston, and all laws relating to primary elec- 
tions and caucuses for such oflBces in said city are hereby repealed. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 



31 



Sect. 53.* Any male qualified registered voter in said city may be 
nominated for any municipal elective office in said city, and his name as 
such candidate shall be printed on the official ballot to be used at the 
mimicipal election: -provided, that at or before five o'clock p.m. of the 
twenty-fifth* day prior to such election nomination papers prepared and 
issued by the election commissioners, signed in person by at least five 
thousand registered voters in said city qualified to vote for such candi- 
date at said election, shall be filed with said election commissioners, and 
the signatures on the same to the number required to make a nomination 
are subsequently certified by the election commissioners as hereinafter 
provided. Said nomination papers shall be in substantially the following 

form: 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
CITY OF BOSTON 
NOMINATION PAPER. 
The undersigned, registered voters of the City of Boston qualified to vote for a candidate 
for the office named below, in accordance with law, make the following nomination of 
candidates to be voted for at the election to be held in the City of Boston on December 
19 . 



NAME OF CANDIDATE. 
(Give first or middle name in full.) 



OFFICE FOR WHICH 
NOMINATED. 



RESIDENCE. 
Street and number, if any. 



SIGNATURES AND RESIDENCES OF NOMINATORS. 
We certify that we have not subscribed to more nominations of candidates for this 
office than there are persons to be elected thereto. In case of the death, withdrawal, 
or incapacity of any of the above nominees, after written acceptance filed with the board 
of election commissioners, we authorize (names of a committee of not less than five persons) 
or a majority thereof as our representatives to fill the vacancy in the manner prescribed 
by law. 



SIGNATURES 

OF NOMINATORS. 

To be made in person. 



RESIDENCE MAY 1, 
or, as the case may be, April 1. 



WARD. 



PREC. 



PRESENT 
RESIDENCE. 



ACCEPTANCE OF NOMINATION. 
We accept the above nominations. 

(Signature of Nominees.) 

* Sect. 53 amended by Chap. 730, § 4, Acts of 1914 (accepted by the 
voters, November 3, 1914), so as to require but 3,000 certified signatures 
for nomination of mayor and 2,000 for nomination of city council or school 
committee member. Also, the twenty-fifth day "prior to such election" 
changed to the twenty-first day. 

Note. — The last clause of Sect. 53, containing the jurat, annulled in 
1918 by Chap. 37, Special Acts. 



32 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Sect. 54.* If a candidate nominated as aforesaid dies before the day 
of election, or withdraws his name from nomination, or is found to be 
inehgible, the vacancy may be filled by a committee of not less than five 
persons, or a majority thereof, if such committee be named, and so author- 
ized in the nomination papers. Nomination papers shall not include 
candidates for more than one office except that not more than three or 
nine, as the case may be, candidates for city council may be included 
in one nomination paper, and not more than two candidates for school 
committee may be included in one nomination paper. Every voter may 
sign as many nomination papers for each office to be filled as there are 
persons to be elected thereto and no more. Nomination papers in each 
year shall be issued by the board of election commissioners on and after 
but not before the day next following the state election. 

Sect. 55.** Women who are qualified to vote for a member of the 
school committee may be nominated as and sign nomination papers for 
candidatea for that office in the manner and under the same provisions of 
law as men. 

Sect. 56. The names of candidates appearing on nomination papers 
shall when filed be a matter of public record; but the nomination papers 
shall not be open to public inspection until after certification. After 
such nomination papers have been filed, the election commissioners shall 
certify thereon the number of signatures which are the names of regis- 
tered voters in the city qualified to sign the same. They need not certify 
a greater number of names than are required to make a nomination, 
with one-fifth f of such number added thereto. All such papers foimd 
not to contain a number of names so certified equivalent to the number 
required to make a nomination shall be invahd. The election commis- 
sioners shall complete such certification on or before five o'clock p.m. 
on the sixteenth f day preceding the city election. Such certification 
shall not preclude any voter from filing objections as to the validity of 
the nomination. All withdrawals and objections to such nominations 
shall be filed with the election commissioners on or before five o'clock 
P.M. on the fourteenth § day preceding the city election. All substitutions 
to fill vacancies caused by withdrawal or ineligibility shall be filed with 
the election commissioners on or before five o'clock p.m. on the twelfth 
day preceding the city election. 

Sect. 57. The name of each person who is nominated in compliance 
with law, together with his residence and the title and term of the office 

* Sect. 54 amended by Chap. 730, § 5, Acts of 1914, so as to limit the 
number of nomination papers issued to any candidate for mayor to 300, 
and to any candidate for city council or school committee to 200. 

t Changed to one-tenth by Chap. 730. 

t Changed to fifteenth. § Changed to thirteenth. 

Sect. 54 again amended (by Chap. 340, Acts of 1921) so as to fix the 
time for issuing municipal nomination papers on and after the Wednesday 
following the first Monday m November. 

** Sect. 55, amended by Chap. 65, Acts of 1921, leaving women voters 
as unrestricted as men voters. 



AMENDED CITY CHARTER. 33 

for which he is a candidate shall be printed on the oflficial ballots at the 
municipal election, and the names of no other candidates shall be printed 
thereon. The names of candidates for the same office shall be printed 
upon the official ballot in the order in which they may be drawn by the 
board of election commissioners, whose duty it shall be to make such 
drawing and to give each candidate an opportunity to be present thereat 
personally or by one representative. 

Sect. 58. No ballots used at any annual or special municipal elec- 
tion shall have printed thereon any party or pohtical designation or mark, 
and there shall not be appended to the name of any candidate any such 
party or political designation or mark, or anything showing how he was 
nominated or indicating his views or opinions. 

Sect. 59. On ballots to be used at annual or special municipal elec- 
tions blank spaces shall be left at the end of each Hst of candidates for 
the different offices, equal to the number to be elected thereto, in which 
the voter may insert the name of any person not printed on the ballot 
for whom he desires to vote for such office. 

Sect. 60. All laws not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, 
governing nomination papers and nominations for, and elections of munici- 
pal officers in the city of Boston, shall so far as they may be applicable, 
govern the nomination papers, nominations and elections provided for 
in this act. The board of election commissioners shaU be subject to 
the same penalties and shall have the same powers and duties, where 
not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, in relation to nomination 
papers, preparing and printing ballots, preparing for and conducting 
elections and counting, tabulating and determining the votes cast under 
the provisions of this act, as they have now in relation to municipal elec- 
tions in said city. 

Sect. 61. The provisions of this act shall apply to any special mimici- 
pal election held after the year nineteen hundred and nine in the city of 
Boston, except that nomination papers for offices to be filled at such 
elections shall be issued by the election commissioners on and after the 
day following the calUng of said special election. Every special municipal 
election shall be held on a Tuesday not less than sixty days nor more 
than ninety days after the date of the order calUng such special election. 

Sect. 62. All acts and parts of acts so far as inconsistent with this 
act are hereby repealed; all ordinances and parts of ordinances so far as 
inconsistent with this act are hereby annulled; and all acts and parts of 
acts affecting the city of Boston not inconsistent with the provisions 
of this act are continued in force: provided, however, that the provisions 
of chapter four hundred and forty of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and nine shall not apply to any election held hereimder prior to the first 

day of April in the year nineteen himdred and ten. 

************ » 

[Approved June 11, 1909.] 

Note. — Section 63 (the final section) omitted, as it merely states when 
the different sections went into effect. 



34 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



AMENDMENTS OF CITY CHARTER IN 1924. 



[Acts of 1924, Chapter 479.] 
Providing for biennial elections in the city of boston and foe 

BOROUGH or ward REPRESENTATION IN THE CITY COUNCIL THEREOF, 
AND MAKING CERTAIN OTHER CHANGES IN AND ADDITIONS TO THE CHARTER 
OF SAID CITY. 

Section 1. The terms of office of the mayor of the city of Boston, 
of members of the city council and school committee of said city which 
would expire under existing law on the first Monday of February, nine- 
teen hundred and twenty-six, and of members of the city council and 
school committee of said citj'' which would expire under existing law on 
the first Monday of February, nineteen hundred and twenty-seven, shall 
terminate at ten o'clock in the forenoon on the first Monday of January, 
nineteen hundred and twenty-six. There shall be no municipal election 
in said city in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-four, and the terms 
of office of members of the city council and school committee of said city 
which would expire imder existing law on the first Monday of February, 
nineteen hundred and twenty-five, are hereby extended to ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on the first Monday of January, nineteen hundred and 
twenty-six. The salary of any official whose term of office is terminated 
as aforesaid shall cease at the time of such termination and the salary 
of any official whose term of office is extended as aforesaid shall continue 
at the same rate as theretofore so long as he continues to serve during 
the period of such extension. 

Section 2. Section three of chapter four hundred and eighty-six 
of the acts of nineteen hundred and nine is hereby amended by striking 
out, in the twenty-fifth Une, the words "December first" and inserting 
in place thereof the words: — November fifteenth, — and by striking out, 
in the twenty-sixth line, the word "February" and inserting in place 
thereof the word: — Januaiy, — so that the second paragraph will read 
as follows: — ^ The city auditor may, with the approval in each instance 
of the mayor, at any time make transfers from the appropriation for 
current expenses of one division of a department to the appropriation 
for current expenses of any other division of the same department, and 
from the reserve fund to any appropriation for the current expenses of 
a department; and may also, with the approval of the mayor, at any 
time between November fifteenth and January first, make transfers from 
any appropriation to any other appropriation : proz^ided, however, that no 
money raised by loan shall be transferred to any appropriation from in- 
come or taxes. He may also with such approval apply any of the income 
and taxes not disposed of in closing the accounts for the financial year 
in such manner as he may determine. 



ClTi' CHARTER AMENDMENTS IN 1924. 35 

Section 3. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six is hereby fur- 
ther amended by inserting after section four the following new section:— 
Section 4 A. The mayor may designate one clerical assistant for whose 
acts he shall be responsible to sign his name in approval of all vouchers 
of less than five hundred dollars each. 

Section 4. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six, as amended in 
section thirty-two by section one of chapter seven hundred and thirty 
of the acts of nineteen himdi-ed and fourteen and by section one of chapter 
two himdred and eighty-eight of the acts of nineteen hundred and twenty- 
one, is hereby fm'ther amended by striking out said section thirty-two 
and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section 32. Beginning in 
the year nineteen hundred and twenty-five, the municipal election in 
said city shall take place biennially in every odd numbered year on the 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November. 

Section 5. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six is hereby fur- 
ther amended by striking out section thirty-three and inserting in place 
thereof the following: — Section S3, The fiscal year in said city shall 
l^egin on January first and shall end on December thirty-first next follow- 
ing; and the municipal year shall begin on the first Monday in January 
and shall continue until the first Monday of the January next following. 
At the biennial municipal election in the year nineteen hundred and 
twenty-five, the five members of the school committee shall be elected. 
The two candidates receiving the largest number of votes at said election 
shall hold office for four years, and the three receiving the next largest 
number of votes at said election, for two years. At every biennial munici- 
pal election thereafter, all members of the school committee to be elected 
shall be chosen for terms of four years each. The terms of all members 
of the school committee shall begin with the first Mondaj^ of January 
following their election and continue until their successors are chosen and 
qualified. The members of the school committee shall meet and organize 
on the first Monday of January following their election. 

Section 6. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six, as amended in 
section forty-five by section one of chapter ninety-four of the Special 
Acts of nineteen hundred and eighteen, is hereby further amended by 
striking out said section forty-five and inserting in place thereof the 
following: — Section 45. Beginning with the biennial municipal election 
in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-five, the mayor of the city of 
Boston shall be elected at large to hold office for the term of four years 
from the first Monday in January following his election and until his 
successor is chosen and qualified and shall not be eligible for election for 
the succeeding term. 

Section 7. Section forty-seven of said chapter fom- hundred and 
eighty-six, as amended by section three of chapter seven hundred and 
thirty of the acts of nineteen himdred and fourteen, is hereby fiuther 
amended by striking out the first two sentences and inserting in place 
thereof the following: — If a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor, with- 
in two months prior to a regular municipal election other than an election 



36 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

for mayor, or within sixteen months after any regular mmiicipal election 
the city comicil shall forthwith order a special election of mayor to serve 
for the unexpired term, and if such vacancy occurs at any other time there 
shall be an election for mayor at the next regular municipal election for 
the term of four years; provided, that the foregoing provisions shall not 
apply if such vacancy occurs between the date of an election at which a 
new mayor is elected and the date he takes office, — so as to read as fol- 
lows: — Section 1^7. If a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor within 
two months prior to a regular mimicipal election other than an election 
for mayor, or within sixteen months after any regular mimicipal election, 
the city coimcil shall forthwith order a special election of mayor to serve 
for the xmexpii'ed term, and if such vacancy occurs at any other time 
there shall be an election for mayor at the next regular mimicipal election 
for the term of four years; provided, that the foregoing provisions shall 
not apply if such vacancy occurs between the date of an election at which 
a new mayor is elected and the date he takes office. In the case of the 
decease, inability, absence or resignation of the mayor, and whenever 
there is a vacancy in the office from any cause, the president of the 
city council while said cause continues or until a mayor is elected shall 
perform the duties of mayor. If he is also absent or unable from any 
cause to perform such duties they shall be performed until the mayor or 
president of the city coimcil returns or is able to attend to said duties 
by such member of the city council as that body may elect, and until 
such election by the city clerk. The person upon whom such duties 
shall devolve shall be called "acting mayor" and he shall possess the 
powers of mayor only in matters not admitting of delay, but shall have 
no power to make permanent appointments except on the decease of the 
mayor. 

Section 8. At the biennial state election in nineteen hundred and 
twenty-four, the registered voters of the city of Boston shall be entitled 
to vote upon the following plans of city council, which shall be printed 
upon the official ballot in the following form. Each voter shall make a 
cross in the space at the right of the plan which he desires to have adopted. 
No ballot shall be counted upon which the voter has made a cross in each 
such space. 

Plan No. 1. A city council of fifteen members to consist of three 
members to be elected for two-year terms by and from the voters of each 
of five boroughs (each comprising certain specified wards), at 
a salary of fifteen hundred dollars each, nominated as here- 
tofore, except that the names of five hundred voters only shall 
be requu-ed to nominate each member 



Plan No. 2. A city council to consist of one member to be elected 
for a two-year term by and from the voters of each ward at a salary of 
fifteen hundred dollars each, nominated as heretofore, except 
that the names of one hundred voters only shall be required 
to nominate each member. 



CITY CHARTER AMENDMENTS IN 1924. 37 

Section 9. If a majority of the votes cast under the pro- 
visions of the preceding section are in favor of the first plan, then sections 
ten to twelve, inclusive, shall take effect subject to section twenty-one, and 
sections fourteen to sixteen, inclusive, shall be inoperative. 

Section 10. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six is hereby 
further amended by striking out section forty-eight and inserting in place 
thereof the following : — • Section 48- For the purpose of electing city 
councillors, the city of Boston is hereby divided into the five following 
boroughs, each comprising the territory within the wards as constituted 
on January first, nineteen hundred and twenty-four, which are hereinafter 
assigned to it: 

First borough. Wards one, two, three, four, five, nine and ten. 

Second borough. Wards six, seven, eight, twenty-five and twenty-six. 

Third borough. Wards eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen and seventeen. 

Fourth borough, Wards eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one and 
twenty-four. 

Fifth borough. Wards fifteen, sixteen, twenty-two and twenty-three. 

Beginning with the biennial municipal election in the year nineteen 
hundred and twenty-five, there shall be elected at each regular municipal 
election by and from the registered voters of each borough three councillors 
to serve for two years from the first Monday in January following their 
election and until their successors are elected and qualified. 

Section 11. Section fifty of said chapter four hundred and eighty-six 
is hereby amended by striking out all after the word "member" in the 
seventh line down to and including the word "term" in the fourteenth 
line, and inserting in place thereof the following : — during the first eighteen 
months of his term, order a special election in his borough to fill such 
vacancy for the unexpired term, — so as to read as follows: — ■ Section 50. 
The city council shall be the judge of the election and qualifications of 
its members; shall elect from its members by a vote of a majority of all 
the members a president who when present shall preside at the meetings 
thereof; shall from time to time establish rules for its proceedings, and 
shall, when a vacancy occurs in the office of any member during the first 
eighteen months of his term, order a special election in his borough to fill 
such vacancy for the unexpired term. The member eldest in years shall 
preside until the president is chosen, and in case of the absence of the 
president, until a presiding officer is chosen. 

Section 12. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six, as amended 
in section fifty-three by section four of chapter seven hundred and thirty 
of the acts of nineteen hundred and fourteen and by chapter thirty-seven 
of the Special Acts of nineteen hundred and eighteen, is hereby further 
amended by striking out said section fifty-three and inserting in place 
thereof the following : — Section 53. Any registered voter who is qualified 
to vote for a candidate for any municipal elective office in such city may 
be a candidate for nomination thereto, and his name as such candidate 
shall be printed on the official ballot to be used at the municipal election; 



38 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



provided, that at or before five o'clock p.m. of the twenty-first day prior to 
such election nomination papers prepared and issued by the election 
commissioners, signed in person for the nomination for mayor by at least 
three thousand registered voters in said city qualified to vote for such 
candidate at said election, signed in person for the nomination for school 
committee by at least two thousand registered voters in said city qualified 
to vote for such candidate at said election and signed in person for the 
nomination for city councillor by at least five hundred registered voters 
in the borough, for which said nomination is sought, qualified to vote for 
such candidate at said election shall be filed with said election commissioners 
and the signatures on the same to the number required to make the nomina- 
tion subsequently certified by the election commissioners as hereinafter 
provided. Said nomination papers shall be in substantially the following 
form: 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 

NOMINATION PAPER. 

The undersigned, registered voters of the City of Boston, qualified to 
vote for a candidate for the office named below, in accordance with law, 
make the following nomination of a candidate to be voted for at the election 
to be held in the City of Boston on November 1 9 



Name of Candidate. 
(Give first or middle name in full.) 



Office for which 
nominated. 



Residence. 
Street and number if any. 



SIGNATURES AND RESIDENCE OF NOMINATORS. 

We certify that we have not subscribed to more nominations of candi- 
dates for this office than there are persons to be elected thereto. In case 
of the death, withdrawal or incapacity of the above nominee, after written 
acceptance filed with the board of election commissioners, we authorize 
(names of a committee of not less than five persons) or a majority thereof 
as our representatives to fill the vacancy in the manner prescribed by law. 



Signatures of 
Nominators 
'To he made in Prr.son.') 



Residence, 
April 1. 



Borough. 



Ward. 



Precinct. 



Present 
Residence. 



CITY CHARTER AMENDMENTS IN 1924. 39 

ACCEPTANCE OF NOMINATION. 

I accept the above nomination. 

Signature of Nominee. 

I (the candidate named in this paper, an officer of his political committee 
or the person who circulated this paper, as the case may be) do hereby 
make oath that the persons whose names appear on this paper as nomi- 
nators signed the same in person. 



(Voter's Residence.) 

commonwealth of massachusetts. 
Suffolk, ss. Boston, 19 . 

Then personally appeared who, I am satisfied, is (the 

candidate named in this paper, an officer of his political committee, or 
the person who circulated this paper, as the case may be) and made oath 
that the foregoing statement by him subscribed is true, and that his voting 
residence is 

Before me, 



Notary Public or Justice of the Peace. 



The affidavit above set forth shall be sworn to before any officer 
qualified to administer oaths. 

Section 13. If a majority of the votes cast under the provisions of 
section eight are in favor of the second or alternative plan, then sections 
fourteen to sixteen, inclusive, shall take effect subject to section twenty-one 
and sections ten to twelve, inclusive, shall be inoperative. 

Section 14. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-sLx is hereby further 
amended by striking out section forty-eight and inserting in place thereof 
the following: — Section 48. Beginning with the biennial municipal elec- 
tion in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-five, there shall be elected 
at each regular municipal election by and from the registered voters of 
each ward one councillor to serve for two years from the first Monday in 
January following his election and until his successor is elected and quaUfied. 

Section 15. Section fifty of said chapter four hundred and eighty-six 
is hereby amended by strildng out all after the word "member" in the 
seventh line down to and including the word "term" in the fourteenth 
line and inserting in place thereof the following: — during the first eighteen 
months of his term, order a special election in his ward to fill such vacancy 
for the unexpired term,— so as to read as follows: — Section 50. The city 
council shall be the judge of the election and qualifications of its members ; 
shall elect from its members by a vote of a majority of all the members a 
president who when present shall preside at the meetings thereof; shall 



40 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



from time to time establish rules for its proceedings, and shall, when a 
vacancyoccursintheofficeof any member during the first eighteen months 
of his term, order a special election in his ward to fill such vacancy for the 
unexpired term. The member eldest in years shall preside until the 
president is chosen, and in case of the absence of the president, until a 
presiding officer is chosen. 

Section 16. Said chapter four hundred and eighty-six, as amended in 
section fifty-three by section four of chapter seven hundred and thirty of 
the acts of nineteen hundred and fourteen and by chapter thirty-seven of 
the Special Acts of nineteen hundred and eighteen, is hereby further 
amended by striking out said section fifty-three and inserting in place 
thereof the following : — ■ Section 53. Any registered voter who is qualified 
to vote for a candidate for any municipal elective office in such city may 
be a candidate for nomination thereto, and his name as such candidate 
shall be printed on the official ballot to be used at the municipal election ; 
provided, that at or before five o'clock p.m. of the twenty-first day prior 
to such election nomination papers prepared and issued by the election 
commissioners, signed in person for the nomination for mayor by at least 
three thousand registered voters in said city qualified to vote for such 
candidate at said election, signed in person for the nomination for school 
committee by at least two thousand registered voters in said city qualified 
to ,vote for such candidate at said election and signed in person for the 
nomination for city councillor by at least one hundred registered voters 
in the ward, for which said nomination is sought, qualified to vote for such 
candidate at said election shall be filed with said election commissioners 
and the signatures on the same to the number required to make the nomi- 
nation subsequently certified by the election commissioners as hereinafter 
provided. Said nomination papers shall be in substantially the following 
form: 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CITY OF BOSTON 
NOMINATION PAPER. 

The undersigned, registered voters of the City of Boston, qualified to 
vote for a candidate for the office named below, in accordance with law, 
make the following nomination of a candidate to be voted for at the 
election to be held in the City of Boston on November 19 . 



Name op Candidate. 
(Give first or middle name in full.) 



Office for which 
nominated. 



Residence. 

Street and Number 

if any. 



CITY CHARTER AMENDMENTS IN 1924. 



41 



SIGNATURES AND RESIDENCES OF NOMINATORS. 

We certify that we have not subscribed to more nominations of candidates 
for this office than there are persons to be elected thereto. In case of the 
death, withdrawal or incapacity of the above nominee, after written 
acceptance filed with the board of election commissioners, we authorize 
(names of a committee of not less than five persons) or a majority thereof 
as our representatives to fill the vacancy in the manner prescribed by law. 



SIGNATURES OP NOM- 
INATORS. 

To be made in person. 



Residence 
April 1. 



Ward. 



Precinct. 



Present Residence. 



ACCEPTANCE OF NOMINATION. 

I accept the above nomination. 



Signature of Nominee. 
I (the candidate named in this paper, an officer of his political committee 
or the person who circulated this paper, as the case may be) do hereby 
make oath that the persons whose names appear on this paper as nomi- 
nators signed the same in person. 



(Voter's Residence.) 

commonwealth of massachusetts. 
Suffolk, ss. Boston, 19 . 

Then personally appeared who, I am satisfied, is (the 

candidate named in this paper, an officer of his political committee, or the 
person who circulated this paper, as the case may be) and made oath that 
the foregoing statement by him subscribed is true, and that his voting 
residence is 

Before me, 



Notary Public or Justice oj the Peace. 



The affidavit above set forth shall be sworn to before any officer qualified 
to administer oaths. 

Section 17. Section fifty-four of said chapter four hundred and eighty- 
six, as amended by section five of chapter seven hundred and thirty of the 
acts of nineteen hundred and fourteen and by chapter three hundred and 
forty of the acts of nineteen hundred and twenty-one, is hereby further 
amended by striking out, in the tenth and eleventh fines, the words "in 



42 ^MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

each yciir," by strildng out, in the twelfth and thirteenth lines, the words 
"Wednesday after the first Monday in November," and inserting in place 
thereof the words: — -fifth Wednesday- preceding the regular municipal 
election, — by striking out, in the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth lines, 
the words "for the city council or," and by inserting after the word "com- 
mittee" in the twenty-fifth line the following: — and to any candidate for 
the city council there shall be issued not more than ten such nomination 
papers for a ward or not more than sixty such nomination papers for a 
borough, — so as to read as follows: — Section 54- If a candidate nomi- 
nated as aforesaid dies before the day of election, or withdraws his name 
from nomination, or is found to be ineligible, the vacancy may be filled by 
a committee of not less than five persons, or a majority thereof, if such 
committee be named, and so authorized in the nomination papers. Nomi- 
nation papers shall not include candidates for more than one office. Every 
voter may sign as many nomination papers for each office to be fiUed as 
there are persons to be elected thereto and no more. Nomination papers 
shall be issued by the board of election commissioners on and after but not 
before the fifth Wednesday preceding the regular municipal election. 
Such papers shall be issued only to candidates who shall file with the 
election commissioners requests therefor in writing, containing their names 
with the first or middle name in full, the offices for which they are candi- 
dates, and their residences, with street and number, if any. Forth- 
with the election commissioners shall print or insert on such nomination 
papers the names of the candidates, the offices for which they are nomi- 
nated and their residences, with street and number, if any. Not more than 
three hundred such nomination papers shall be issued to any candidate 
for mayor, and not more than two hundred such nomination papers shall 
be issued to any candidate for the school committee and to any candidate 
for the city council there shall be issued not more than ten such nomination 
papers for a ward or not more than sixty such nomination papers for a 
borough. No nomination papers except those issued in accordance with 
the provisions of this section shall be received or be valid. 

Section 18. Section fifty-eight of said chapter four hundred and 
eighty-six is hereby amended by striking out, in the first line, the word 
"annual" and inserting in place thereof the word: — biennial, — so as to 
read as follows: — Section 58. No ballot used at any biennial or special 
municipal election shall have printed thereon any party or political designa- 
tion or mark, and there shall not be appended to the name of any candidate 
any such party or political designation or mark, or anything showing how 
he was nominated or indicating his views or opinions. 

Section 19. Section fifty-nine of said chapter four hundred and eighty- 
six is hereby amended by striking out, in the first line, the word "annual" 
and inserting in place thereof the word : — biennial, — so as to read as 
follows : — Section 59. On ballots to be used at biennial or special municipal 
elections blank spaces shall be left at the end of each list of candidates for 
the different offices, equal to the number to be elected thereto, in which the 



CITY CHARTER AMENDMENTS IN 1924. 43 

voter may insert the name of any person not printed on the ballot for whom 
he desires to vote for such oflBce. 

Section 20. All acts and parts of acts, so far as inconsistent with this 
act, are hereby repealed; and all ordinances and parts of ordinances, so far 
as inconsistent with this act, are hereby annulled. All acts and parts of 
acts affecting the city of Boston, not inconsistent with the provisions of 
this act, are hereby continued in force. 

Section 21. The provisions of section five relative to the fiscal year 
shall take effect on January first, nineteen hundred and twenty-six. The 
provisions of section one abolishing the municipal election in said city in 
the year nineteen hundred and twenty-four and extending the terms of 
office of members of the city council and school committee of said city 
which would expire under existing law on the first Monday of February, 
nineteen hundred and twenty-five, shall take effect after the Tuesday 
following the first Monday in November, nineteen hundred and twenty- 
four. The provisions of this act relative to changes in the date of the 
regular municipal election in said city in the year nineteen hundred and 
twenty-five, in the terms of office for which elective municipal officers are 
to be elected and in the manner of nominating and electing members of the 
city council shall, except as herein otherwise provided, take effect in season 
to be availed of at the regular municipal election of said city in the year 
nineteen hundred and twenty-five. Except as otherwise provided in this 
act, all other provisions thereof shall take effect on the first Monday of 
January, nineteen hundred and twenty-six. 

[Approved by Governor June 4, 1924. 



44 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Officers 

IN CHARGE OF THE 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 



The following table shows the manner in which the administrative heads of the 
Executive departments are appointed or elected, the time of appointment or election, 
the term of office as prescribed by statute, ordinance, or both, and the salary received 
by each. Heads of departments and members of municipal boards appointed by the 
Mayor are subject to approval by the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission. (See 
Acts of 1909, Chap. 486, Sects. 9-13; Acts of 1912, Chap. 550.) As of May 1, 1926. 







Appointed or Elected. 


Term. 






How 
Created. 






Salary. 


Officers. 


By Whom. 


When. 


Begins. 


Length. 


Art Commission 


Statue. . . . 


Mayor. . 


Annually, 
one 


May 1 . . 


5 yrs. 


None 


Assessors (Three) 


« 


u 


Annually, 
one 


April 1 . . 


3 " 


* $4,500 


Auditor 


Ord 


a 


Quadren- 
nially 


May 1 . . 


4 « 






t 7,000 


Boston Sanatorium 
Trustees (Seven) 


u 


a 


Annually, 
one or two, 


" 1.. 


5 " 


None 


Budget Commissioner, 


u 


u 


Quadren- 
nially 


« 1.. 


4 " 


6,000 


Building Commissioner, 


Statute . . . 


u 


Quadren- 
nially 


« 1.. 


4 « 


7,000 


City Clerk 


Ord 


City 
Council. 

Mayor... 


Triennially, 

Annually, 
one 


1st Mon. 
in Jan. . 

May 1 . . 


3 « 
5 « 




City Planning Board 
(Five) 


6,000 




None 


Collector 


Statute . . . 


« 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


" 1.. 


4 « 






7,500 



* Chairman, $6,000. 

t County Auditor, $880; Secretary of Sinking Funds Commission, $700. 



CHIEF OFFICERS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 45 







Appointed 


OR Elected. 


Term. 






How 
Created 










Salary. 
















By Whom. 


When. 


Begins. 


Length. 




Corporation Counsel. . . 


Ord 


Mayor. .. 


Quadren- 
nially 


May 1 . . 


4 yrs. 


$9,000 


Election Commissioners 
(Four) 


Statute . . . 


a 


Annually, 
one 


April 1 . . 


4 " 






* 5,000 


Fire Commissioner .... 


u 


u 


Quadren- . 
nially 


May 1 . . 


4 " 


7,500 


Health Commissioner . . 


Ord. ..... 


u 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


" 1.. 


4 « 


7,500 


Hospital Trustees 
(Five) 


Statute . . . 


11 


AnnuaUy, 
one 


" 1.. 


5 " 






None 


Institutions Commis- 
sioner 


Ord 


u 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


« 1.. 


4 " 






7,500 


Library Trustees (Five) 


u 


tl 


Annually, 
one 


« 1.. 


5 " 


None 


Markets, Superintend- 
ent of 


li 


u 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


" 1.. 


4 " 






4,000 


Overseers of the Pub- 
lic Welfare (Twelve), 


Statute . . . 


It 


Annually, 
four 


" 1.. 


3 " 


None 


Park Commissioners 
(Three) 


u 


« ... 


Annually, 
one 


" 1.. 


3 " 






t 


Penal Commissioner 
(One) 


Ord 


ti 


Annually, 
one 


« 1.. 


3 " 


5,000 


Printing, Superintend- 
ent of 


a 


<i 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


« 1.. 


4 " 






6,000 


Pubhc Buildings, Su- 
perintendent of 


u 


u 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


" 1.. 


4 " 


4,500 


Pubhc Works Com- 
missioner of 


u 


u 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


« 1.. 


4 « 


9,000 



* Chairman, $6,000. 



t Chairman, $7,000; others none. 



46 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Officebs. 


How 


Appointed or Elected. 


Term. 


Salary. 


Created. 


By Whom. When. 


Begins. 


Length. 


Registrar, City 


Statute . . . 


Mayor . . . 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


May 1 . . 


4 yrs. 


$5,000 


Schoolhouse Commis- 
sioners (Three) 


(( 


a 


Annually, 
one 


June 1 . . 


3 " 


* 4,000 


Sinking Funds Com- 
missioners (Six) 


(i 


11 


Annually, 
two 


May 1 . . 


3 " 


None 


Soldiers' Relief Com- 
missioner 


(1 


u 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


'■ 1 . . 


4 " 






6,000 


Statistics Trustees 
(Five) 


Ord 


" 


Annually, 
one 


« 1.. 


5 " 






t 


Street Commissioners 
(Three) 


Statute . . . 


u 


Annually, 
one 


1st Mon. 
in Feb . . 


3 " 






X 6,000 


SuppUes, Superintend- 
ent of 


Ord 


tl 


Quadren- 
nially 


May 1 . . 


4 " 






6,000 


Transit Commissioners 
(Three) 


u 


u 


Annually. . . 

Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


" 1 


1 " 


§ 


Treasurer 


Statute . . . 


u 


" 1.. 


4 " 




li 6,000 


Vessels, Weighers of . . . 


« 


it 


Annually, 
two 


« 1.. 


1 « 


Fees 


Weights and Measures, 
Sealer of 


« 


tt 


Quadren- 
nially. . . . 


« 1.. 


4 « 






4,500 



* Chairman, $5,000. f Chairman, $3,500; others none. % Chairman, $6,000. 

§ Chairman, $7,500; others $5,000. 

II County Treasurer, $880; Treasurer of Sinking Funds Commission, $700; Custodian 
of Teachers' Retirement Fund, $1,500. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE MAYOR. 47 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE MAYOR. 

Office, 27 City Hall, second floor. 
[Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 2; 
Stat. 1904, Chap. 450; Stat. 1905, Chap. 341; Stat. 1906, Chap. 259; 
Stat. 1907, Chaps. 274, 463; C. C. Title II., Chap. 3; Stat. 1908, 
Chaps. 292, 494; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1910, Chap. 373; 
Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1912, Chap. 550; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 
280, 367, 788; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 274 and 730; Rev. Ord. 1914, 
Chap. 2; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 184, 348; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 94; 
Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 75; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 6, 312, 613; Stat. 1921, 
Chaps. 169, 407, 497; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 35, 399, 521; Stat. 1924, 
Chaps. 453 and 479.] 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, Mayor. 
Edward F. Condon, Secretary. 
William A. Fisher, Assistant Secretary. 
Benjamin Freedman, Assistant Secretary. 
Stephen C. Sullivan, Assistant Secretary. 
George T. Reid, Assistant Secretary. 
Ida Hibbard, Assistant Secretary. 
Henry L. Hamilton, Chief Clerk. 
John M. Casey, Chief Licensing Division. 
Joseph Mikolajewski, Assistant. 

THE CITY RECORD. 
Office, 73 City Hall. 

Frank H. Cushman, Editor. 

Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 

Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 
MUNICIPAL BUILDING. 

(Men.) 

Oak and Tyler Streets. 

Augustus Seaver, Assistant Secretary. 

(Women.) 
Room 109, City Hall Annex. 
Augustus Seaver, Assistant Secretary. 



48 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1001 City Hall Annex. 

[Stat. 1898, Chap. 410; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 4; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 11 ; 
Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 87.] 

OFFICIALS. 

John Haeleston Parker, Chairman. 
Henry Forbes Bigelow, Secretary. 

COMMISSIONERS. * 

George H. Edgell, named by the Boston Society of Architects. Term 
ends in 1930. 

Charles D. Maginnis, named by the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. Term ends in 1929. 

Philip S. Sears, named by Trustees of Museum of Fine Arts. Term 
ends in 1928. 

Henry Forbes Bigelow, named by the Boston Art Club. Term ends in 
1927. 

John Harleston Parker, named by the Trustees of the Public Library. 
Term ends in 1926. 

The Art Department, established in 1898, is in charge of five commis- 
sioners, who are appointed by the Mayor. Each of the following-named 
bodies, namely, the Trustees of the Museum of Fine Arts, the Trustees of 
the Boston Public Library, the Trustees of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, the Boston Art Club, and the Boston Society of Architects, 
submits a list of three persons to the Mayor; and the Mayor appoints 
one person as Art Commissioner from each of the lists so submitted. 
Whenever the term of a member of the Board expires, the Mayor appoints 
his successor from a Ust selected by the body which made the original 
selection, as aforesaid. 

No work of art can become the property of the City of Boston without 
the approval of the Art Department, which may also be requested by the 
Mayor or the City Council to pass upon the design of any municipal 
building, bridge, approach, lamp, ornamental gate or fence, or other 
structure to be erected upon land belonging to the City. No work of art, 
the property of the City of Boston, shall be removed without the assent of 
the Art Commissioners. Moreover, all contracts or orders for the execu- 
tion of any painting, monument, statue, bust, bas-rehef, or other sculpture 
for the City shall be made by said Board, acting by a majority of its mem- 
bers, subject to the approval of the Mayor. By Chap. 87, Special Actt; 
of 1919, all works of art owned by the City were placed under the exclusive 
control of the Art Commissioners. 

* The Commissioners serve without compensation. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 49 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 301 City HaU Annex, third floor. 
[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, § 37; Stat. 1884, Chap. 123; Stat. 1903, Chap. 
279; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 5; Ord. 1900, Chap. 5; Ord. 1901, Chap. 8; 
C. C. Title IV., Chap. 12; Ord. 1910, Chap. 1; Stat. 1911, Chap. 89; 
Stat. 1913, Chaps. 155, 484; Stat. 1914, Chap. 198; Rev. Ord. 1914, 
Chap. 5; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 91; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chaps. 87, 
173, 294; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 93; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 93, 96, 183, 
552; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 283, 399; Stat. 1922, Chap. 6; Stat. 1924, 
Chap. 410.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Neal J. Holland, Secretary. 

ASSESSORS. 

Edward T. Kelly. Term ends April 1, 1927. 
Neal J. Holland. Term ends April 1, 1928. 
Horace B. Mann. Term ends June 15, 1929. 

deputy assessors. 
Fred E. Bolton. William H. Cuddy. 

James H. Phelan. John M. Hayes. 

Christopher I. Fitzgerald. 



Daniel F. Ryan, Chief Clerk. 

One Assessor is appointed each year by the Mayor for a term of three 
years, from April 1, the Chairman of the Board of three members being 
designated by the Mayor. 

The Assessors published annual tax Usts from 1822 to 1866. Since 
1866 the records of the department are almost entirely in manuscript. 
Annual reports have been made since 1890. 

assistant assessors. 
[Stat. 1885, Chap. 266, § 2; Stat. 1894, Chap. 276; Stat. 1901, Chap. 400; 
Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 5, § 1; Ord. 1901, Chap. 6; C. C, Title IV., 
Chap. 12, §2; Stat. 1913, Chap. 484; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 93; 
Stat 1920, Chap. 96; Ord. 1920, Chap. 1; Ord. 1923, Chap. 7; Ord. 
1925, Chap. 3; Stat. 1925, Chap. 39.] 

The Assistant Assessors are appointed from the Civil Service hst by the 
Board of Assessors for an indeterminate period, subject to the approval 
of the Mayor, one for each assessment district or two when required. 
The redivision of the City into 22 wards (see Chap. 410, Acts of 1924) by 



50 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

a special legislative commission in December, 1924, made new assessment, 
districts necessary. By the original Act the change was not ordered to 
go into effect in 1925, but an amendment was made later whereby the new 
districts first applied to the 1925 assessments. 

The 47 assessment districts, with First Assistant Assessors assigned to 
same for year 1926, are as follows: 

DiST. 1. That part of Ward 1 (East Boston, North) extending from 
junction of the shore hne and the division line between the property now 
or late of Alonzo Crosby heirs and the property now or late of Richard F. 
Green (said division .Line being the same as that established by the Ordi- 
nances of 1S95) to the boundary line between Boston and Chelsea; thence 
by said line and the boundary lines between Boston and Revere and Boston 
and Winthrop to the southerly side of Winthrop bridge; thence by the 
latter to its junction with the shore line of the City and by said line to 
its junction with the line of Brooks Street extended; thence through latter 
and Brooks Street to the location of Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn R. R. 
and to Prescott St. or the line thereof extended; thence through Prescott, 
Princeton, Meridian, Lexington and Border Sts. to the division line be- 
tween the property now or late of Alonzo Crosby heirs and the property 
now or late of Richard F. Green and by said line to the beginning. Michael 

.J. TOUMEY. 

DiST. 2. That part of Ward 1 (East Boston, South, including the 
Islands) extending from junction of City shore line and the division line 
between the property now or late of Alonzo Crosby heirs and the property 
now or late of Richard F. Green (said division line being the same as that 
established by the Ordinances of 1895) to Border St.; thence through 
Border, Lexington, Meridian, Princeton and Prescott Sts. (also Prescott 
St. extended) to the location of Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. and 
through same to Brooks St. or the line thereof extended; thence through 
latter to the shore line and by said line to the beginning. All portions 
of the City lying on the outside of the line beyond which building or 
wharfing out is or may hereafter be legally forbidden or where such line 
does not exist, then all portions lying on the outside of extreme low water 
mark and including all islands in Boston harbor within city limits are 
included in District 2 except Castle Island. Lucian J. Priest. 

DisT. 3. That part of Ward 2 (Charlestown, West) extending from 
Prison Point bridge and the boundary line between Boston and Cambridge 
to the boundary line between Boston and Somerville; thence by said line 
to the boundary line between Boston and Everett and by latter to the 
extension of the easterly line of a wharf now or formerly known as Brooks 
wharf (said line being the same as that established between Wards Three 
and Four by the Ordinances of 1895); thence by said line through Medford, 
Everett, Bunker Hill and Trenton Sts.; thence through Cross, High, 
Cordis and Warren Sts. across Thompson Square to Austin St. and through 
latter and Prison Point bridge to the beginning. Francis J. Ryan. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 51 

DiST. 4. That part of Ward 2 (Charlestown, East) extending from 
junction of Prison Point bridge and the boundary line between Boston 
and Cambridge through said bridge and Austin St., across Thompson 
Square to Warren St.; thence through Warren, Cordis, High, Cross and 
Trenton Sts. to Bunker Hill St. ; thence through latter, Everett and Med- 
ford Sts. to the easterly hne of a wharf now or formerly known as Brooks 
wharf (said line being the same as that established between Wards Three 
and Four by the Ordinances of 1895); thence by said line and same ex- 
tended to the boundary line between Boston and Everett in the Mystic 
river; thence by latter and the boundary line between Boston and Chelsea 
to the easterly side of Chelsea bridge; thence by same to its junction 
with the shore line of the City and by said line to its junction with the 
boundary line between Boston and Cambridge; thence by said boundary 
line to the beginning. John F. Fitzpatrick . 

DiST. 5. That part of Ward 3 (North End) extending from junction 
of Cambridge St. (extended) and Charles River; thence by the latter to 
Charles River Dam; thence through Leverett, Brighton, Lowell, Minot 
and Nashua Sts. to Causeway St. crossing John F. Lindsay Square to 
Staniford St.; thence through Staniford, Green, Chambers and Cambridge 
Sts. to Bowdoin St.; thence through latter and Derne St., crossing Han- 
cock St. to Myrtle and through same, then Irving and Cambridge Sts. 
to the beginning. Daniel A. Downey. 

DiST. 6. That part of Ward 3 (North End) extending from junction 
of Cambridge and Chambers Sts. through Chambers, Green, Staniford, 
Causeway, Nashua, Minot, Lowell, Brighton and Leverett Sts. to Charles 
River; thence to Warren Bridge and through Beverly and Causeway Sts., 
Keany Sq. and Commercial, Hanover and Blackstone Sts., crossing 
Haymarket Sq. to Merrimac St.; thence through latter, Chardon St., 
Bowdoin Sq. and Cambridge St. to the beginning. Jacob Rosenberg. 

DiST. 7. That part of Ward 3 (North End) extending from junction 
of Beacon and Bowdoin Sts.; thence through Bowdoin and Cambridge 
Sts.; crossing Bowdoin Square to Chardon St.; thence through Chardon 
and Merrimac Sts. to Haymarket Square and crossing same to Blackstone 
St. ; thence through Blackstone, Hanover, Washington, School and Beacon 
Sts. to the beginning. Matthew Binney. 

DisT. 8. That part of Ward 3 (North End) extending from junction 
of Beverly St. (extended) and Charles River; thence by the latter and 
Harbor Commissioners' hne to Congress , St. ; thence through latter, 
Atlantic Ave. and South Market St. to Merchants' Row; thence by south- 
erly and westerly sides of Faneuil Hall Square to Dock Square and Wash- 
ington St.; thence through Washington, Hanover and Commercial Sts., 
Keany Sq., Causewaj' and Beverly Sts. to the beginning. Harry C. 
Bybne. 

DiST. 9. That part of Ward 3 (Boston Proper) extending from junc- 
tion of Washington and Milk Sts., thence northerly through Washington 



52 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

St. and Adams, Dock and Fanenil Hall Squares (westerly side) to South 
Market St.; thence through South Market St., Atlantic Ave. and Central 
St. to McKinley Square and Milk St. to the beginning. Edwin R. 
Spinney. 

DiST. 10. That part of Ward 3 (Boston Proper) extending from junc- 
tion of Congress and Milk Sts.; thence through Milk St., McKinley 
Square, Central St., Atlantic Ave., Congress and Milk Sts. to the begin- 
ning. Michael J. Brophy. 

DiST. 11. That part of Ward 3 (Boston Proper) extending from junc- 
tion of Franklin and Devonshire Sts.; thence through Franklin and Con- 
gress Sts., Dorchester Ave., Summer St., Atlantic Ave., Beach, Kingston 
and Bedford Sts. to Church Green; thence crossing latter and Summer St. 
to Devonshire, thence to Frankhn St. and the beginning. Arthur L. 
Ctjrry. 

DiST. 12. That part of Ward 3 (Boston Proper) extending from junc- 
tion of Washington and Milk Sts.; thence through Milk, Congress, Frank- 
lin, Devonshire and Summer Sts., Church Green, Bedford, Kingston, 
Essex and Washington Sts. to the beginning. Fred W. Burleigh. 

DisT. 13. That part of Ward 3 (Boston Proper) extending from junc- 
tion of Park and Beacon Sts.; thence through Beacon, School, Washington 
and Essex Sts. to Harrison Ave.; thence by the latter, Kneeland, Wash- 
ington, Stuart, Tremont and Park Sts. to the beginning. Alexander P. 
Brown. 

DisT. 14. That part of Ward 3 (South End) extending from junction 
of Tremont and Stuart Sts.: thence through Stuart and Kneeland Sts.; 
Harrison Ave., Essex, Kingston and Beach Sts., Atlantic Ave., Summer 
St., Dorchester Ave. and Broadway to New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad and Boston & Albany Railroad; thence by said railroads to 
Shawmut Ave. and through same, Tremont and Stuart Sts. to the beginning. 
Henry J. Ireland. 

DiST. 15. That part of Ward 3 (South End) extending from the junction 
of Shawmut Ave. and the location of the Boston & Albany and the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroads, through the location of the said 
railroads to Broadway; thence through Broadway to Lehigh st.; thence 
through Lehigh St. to Albany St.; thence through Albany St. to Union 
Park St.; thence through Union Park St. to Washington St.; thence 
through Washington St. to Pelham St.; thence through Pelham St. to 
Shawmut Ave.; thence crossing Shawmut Ave. to Upton St.; thence 
through Upton St. to Tremont St. ; thence through Tremont St. to Dover 
St.; thence through Dover St. to Shawmut Ave.; thence through Shawmut 
Ave. to the location of the Boston & Albany and New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroads to the point of beginning. Warren F. Freeman, Jr. 

DiST. 16. That part of Ward 4 (Back Bay, East) extending from 
junction of Dalton St. (extended) and Boylston St. through latter and 
Berkeley St. to Columbus Ave.; thence through same also Clarendon, 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 53 

Tremont and Pembroke Sts. to Warren Ave.; thence through same and 
Columbus Ave. to West Rutland Square, crossing the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford R. R. to Durham St.; thence through Durham, St. 
Botolph and Cumberland Sts. to Huntington Ave. ; thence through latter, 
West Newton, Belvidere and Dalton Sts. also Dalton St. (extended) to 
the beginning. Edward L. Hopkins. 

DiST. 17. That part of Ward 4 (Back Bay, South) extending from 
junction of Pembroke and Tremont Sts. through latter, West Springfield 
and WeUington Sts. to the New York, New Haven and Hartford R. R. , 
Providence division; thence by said location to its intersection with Ward 
St. and through same, Huntington Ave., Francis St. and BrookJine Ave. 
southerly to Muddy River and the boundary hne between Boston and 
Brookline; thence by said line to its jimction with the northeasterly side 
of St. Mary's St. (extended) ; thence by the middle hne of Muddy River 
and crossing Brookhne Ave. near the end of Boylston St. through Back Bay 
Fens to Boylston St. near Charlesgate East also Charlesgate West to 
Boylston St.; thence through latter, Dalton, Belvidere and West Newton 
Sts. to Huntington Ave.; thence through same, Cimaberland, St. Botolph 
and Durham Sts., crossing the railroad to West Rutland Square to Colum- 
bus and Warren Aves. and Pembroke St. to Tremont St. and the beginning. 
Charles A. Murphy. 

DisT. 18. That part of Ward 5 (West End to South End) extending 
from junction of Charles and Cambridge Sts. through latter also Irving 
and Myrtle Sts., crossing Hancock to Derne St.; thence through Derne, 
Bowdoin, Beacon and Park Sts. to Tremont St.; thence through latter to 
Shawmut Ave.; and through same, Dover, Tremont and Clarendon Sts. 
to Columbus Ave.; thence through latter, Berkeley, Boylston, Charles, 
Beacon, Joy, Mt. Vernon and Charles again to Cambridge St. and the 
beginning. Augustus D. McLennan. 

DisT. 19. That part of Ward 5 (Back Bay and West End) extending 
from jimction of Boylston St. and Massachusetts Ave. to Common- 
wealth Ave.; thence through latter and Exeter St. to Charles River and 
ward line; thence by said line to Cambridge St. (extended) and through 
same to Charles St.; thence through Charles, Mt. Vernon, Joy, Beacon 
and Charles again to Boylston St.; thence through latter to Massachu- 
setts Ave. and the beginning. James I. Moore. 

DisT. 20. That part of Ward 5 (Back Bay, West) extending from 
junction of Granby St. and Charles River; through said street to Common- 
wealth Ave.; thence through latter and Blandford St. to the Boston and 
Albany R. R.; thence along said railroad, Brookline Ave., Kilmarnock 
St. and Kilmarnock Street (extended) crossing the Fens to Muddy River- 
thence through same, also Boylston Road, Boylston St., Massachusetts 
Ave., Commonwealth Ave., Exeter St. and Exeter St. (extended); thence 
through said location to Charles River and by the middle line of Charles 
River to the beginning. Edmund G. White. 



54 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

DiST. 21. That part of Ward 6 (South Boston, North) extending from 
Fort Point Channel and Dorchester Ave., thence through Dorchester Ave.; 
thence through same and West First, F, West Second and Dorchester Sts., 
East Broadway, M and East Seventh Sts.; thence through East Seventh 
St. (extended) to its intersection with Farragut Road (extended); thence 
through Farragut Road (extended) to its intersection with the shore hne; 
thence by said shore hne and Fort Point Channel to Dorchester Ave. to 
the point of beginning. Matthew H. Doyle. 

DiST. 22. That part of Ward 6 (South Boston, North) extending from 
Fort Point Channel and Dorchester Ave. through Dorchester Ave., West 
First, F, West Second and Dorchester Sts., East Broadway, M, East 
Seventh, L, East Sixth, H, East Fourth, West Fourth, F, West Eighth and 
D Sts., Old Colony and Dorchester Aves. to the location of the Midland 
Division of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad; thence 
through said location to the easterly side of South Bay; thence through 
South Bay and Fort Point Channel to Dorchester Ave. to the point of 
beginning. Arthur W. Smith. 

DiST. 23. The whole of Ward 7 (South Boston, South). Maurice J. 
Power. 

DiST. 24. The whole of Ward 8 (Roxbury, North). William F. 
Morrissey. 

DiST. 25. The whole of Ward 9 (Roxbury, Centre). Frederick F. 

The whole of Ward 10 (Roxbury, West). Philip E. Conroy. 
The whole of Ward 11 (Roxbury, South — Jamaica Plain, 
S. Parker Weeks. 
That part of Ward 12 (Roxbury, East) extending from 
Washington and Dudley Sts. through latter, Greenville, 
Winthrop, Fairland and Moreland Sts. to Blue Hill Ave.; thence through 
same. Savin and Munroe Sts. crossing Walnut Ave. to Elmore St.; thence 
through Elmore, Kensington, Kingsbury, Bainbridge and Dale Sts. to 
Regent St.; thence through latter, Circuit and Washington Sts. to junc- 
tion with Dudley St., the beginning. William A. Creney. 

DisT. 29. That part of Ward 12 (Roxbury, East) extending from 
junction of Blue Hill Ave. and Savin St. through said avenue, Canterbury 
and Morton Sts. to Morton Road; thence through same and Forest Hills 
St. to its first junction with the boundary line of Frankhn Park (extended) 
running nearly east and west about midway between Wilhams St. and 
Glen Road; thence by said boundary line of Franklin Park by several 
courses in a general northeasterly direction and crossing Glen Road to its 
junction with Sigourney St.; thence through latter. Walnut Ave., Munroe, 
Warren and Savin Sts. to junction with Blue Hill Ave., the beginning. 
Arthur C. Quincy. 

DiST. 30. The whole of Ward 13 (Dorchester, North). Edward E. 
McGrath. 



Smith. 




DiST. 


26. 


DiST. 


27. 


South). 


A. 


DiST. 


28. 


junction 


of 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 55 

DiST. 31. That part of Ward 14 (Dorchester, West) extending from 
junction of Blue Hill Ave. and Fayston St. through latter, Mascoma and 
Quincy Sts. to the location of the Midland Division, New York, New- 
Haven and Hartford R. R.; thence through same, Wales Place, Rock 
Terrace and Olney St. to Geneva Ave.; thence through latter, and Bow- 
doin St., across Washington to Harvard St.; thence through same to its 
junction with the location of Midland Division, New York, New Haven 
and Hartford R. R. and through latter to Talbot Ave. thence through 
same to Blue Hill Ave. and Fayston St., the beginning. Joseph P. 
Dempsey. 

DiST. 32. That part of Ward 14 (Dorchester, West) extending from 
junction of Blue Hill Ave. and Canterbury St. through said avenue and 
Talbot Ave. to location of Midland Division, New York, New Haven and 
Hartford R. R.; thence through same, Elizabeth St. (extended) and 
EHzabeth St. also Norfolk and Eveljm Sts. to Blue HiU Ave.; thence 
through latter. Walk Hill and Canterbury Sts. to Blue Hill Ave. and the 
beginning. G. Feed Pierce. 

DiST. 33. The whole of Ward 15 (Dorchester, North Central). Henry 
T. Hartmere. 

DiST. 34. That part of Ward 1 6 (Dorchester - Neponset) extending 
from junction of Freeport St. and the location of Plymouth Division, New 
York, New Haven and Hartford R. R. along said location and the line of 
• Shawmut Branch of same Railroad to Park St.; thence through latter, 
Upland Ave., Centervale Park, Bourneside St. and Melville Ave. to 
Penhallow St. ; thence through same, Mather, Nixon, Centre, Wainwright 
and Lithgow Sts. to Talbot Ave.; thence through said avenue, Dorchester 
Ave., Edwin, Florida, Mallet, Adams and Ashmont Sts. to Neponset Ave.; 
thence through same and Neponset Ave. (extended) to middle hne of 
Neponset River and the Harbor line to a point in Dorchester Bay opposite 
Greenwich St. (exi;ended); thence through latter to location of Midland 
Division, New York, New Haven and Hartford R. R. and through same 
to the beginning. John J. Dailey. 

DisT. 35. That part of Ward 16 (Dorchester - Neponset) extending 
from junction of Dorchester Ave. and Edwin St. through latter, Florida, 
Mallet, Adams and Ashmont Sts. to Neponset Ave. ; thence through same 
and Neponset Ave. (extended) to the boimdary line between Quincy and 
Boston in Neponset River; thence bj' said line to its junction with Granite 
Bridge and through latter to its junction with the location of Plymouth 
Division, New York, New^ Haven and Hartford R. R.; thence through 
same to its junction with Mellish Road (extended) also through MeUish 
Road and Adams St. to its junction with the southern line of Dorchester 
Park (extended), said hne running north, northwesterly and southeast; 
thence by latter in several courses as the same is legally established, 
rxmning in a general westerly direction to its junction with Dorchester 
Ave. and through said avenue and Edwin St. to the beginning. Charles 
H. Warren. 



56 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

DisT. 36. The whole of Ward 17 (Dorchester, Centre). Albert F. 
Hennessey. 

DiST. 37. That part of Ward 18 (Hyde Park- Mattapan) extending 
from junction of Eagle Mill Place (extended) with the Boston and Milton 
boundary line in the Neponset River along said boundary line to its junc- 
tion with West St. (extended); thence through latter, River, and Woods 
St. to Wood Ave.; thence through same, Harvard and Walk Hill Sts. to 
Blue Hill Ave.; thence through latter, Evelyn, Norfolk and Ehzabeth 
Sts. to location of Midland Division, New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford R. R. ; thence through same, Morton, Groveland St. (extended), 
Groveland and River Sts. to Eagle Mill Place and the beginning. Fred- 
erick A. Robinson. 

DiST. 38. That part of Ward 18 (Hyde Park - Mattapan) extending 
from junction of Washington and Poplar Sts., through latter and Canter- 
bury St. to location of Providence Division, New York, New Haven and 
Hartford R. R.; thence through same, Blakemore St., Hyde Park and 
Neponset Aves. also Canterbury St. to Walk Hill St.; thence through 
latter, Harvard St., Wood Ave., Wood St., River and West Sts. to the 
former boundary hne between Boston and Hyde Park; thence along 
said line, through Turtle Pond Road, Washington and Poplar Sts. to the 
beginning. Alonzo F. Andrews. 

DisT. 39. That part of Ward 18 (Hyde Park- Mattapan) extending 
from junction of former boundary line between Boston and Hyde Park 
and Turtle Pond Road in the Stony Brook Reservation along said bound- 
ary line to West St.; thence through latter and West Street (extended) 
to its junction with the center line of Neponset River; thence through same 
to its junction with the boundary line between Boston and Milton and 
along said line to its junction with the boundary line between Boston and 
Dedham; thence along latter to its junction with the former boundary 
line between Boston and Hyde Park and by said line to the beginning. 
Ward A. Marsh. 

DiST. 40. That part of Ward 19 (Jamaica Plain - Roslindale, East) 
extending from junction of Centre and Perkins Sts. through latter and 
Chestnut St. to boundary line between Boston and Brookline; thence 
along said line and through AUandale, Centre and Walter Sts. to the 
southwesterly boundary hne of Arnold Arboretum; thence by latter on 
several courses as the same is legally established, and by said line ex- 
tended to its junction with the location of West Roxbury Branch, New 
York, New Haven and Hartford R. R.j thence through same and Lee 
HiU Road (extended) also Lee Hill Road, Washington St., and Whipple 
Ave. to Stony Brook; thence along latter, through Florence St., South- 
bourne Road, Bourne, Walk Hill, Canterbury and Morton Sts. to Forest 
Hills Ave. in Forest Hills Cemetery; thence through same and Union 
Terrace to its junction with the northwesterly boundary line of said 
cemetery and by the latter on several courses as same is legally estab- 
lished to Weld Hill St.; thence through same, Hyde Park Ave., Washing- 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 57 

ton St., Asticou Road and St. Ann St. across South St. to the Arborway; 
thence through latter, Custer and South Sts., CaroUna Ave. and WiUiams 
St. to its junction with the location of Providence Division, New York, 
New Haven and Hartford R. R.; thence through same, Atherton, Lamar- 
tine and Mozart Sts., Chestnut Ave., Forbes and Centre Sts. to the be- 
ginning. William N. Goodwin. 

DisT. 41. That part of Ward 19 (Jamaica Plain - Roslindale, East) 
extending from junction of Walk Hill and Bourne Sts. through latter 
Southbourne Road and Florence St. to Stony Brook; thence through 
same, Whipple Ave., Washington, Poplar and Canterbury Sts. to the 
location of Providence Division, New York, New Haven and Hartford 
R. R.; thence through latter, Blakemore St., Hyde Park Ave., Neponset 
Ave. and Walk Hill St. to the beginning. John J. Butler. 

DiST. 42. That part of Ward 20 (West Roxbury - Roshndale, West) 
extending from junction of Lee Hill Road and Washington St. through 
latter. Grove and Center Sts. to the location of West Roxbury Branch, 
New York, New Haven and Hartford R. R. ; thence through said location 
and Lee Hill Road to the beginning. Francis J. Turcotte. 

DisT. 43. That part of Ward 20 (West Roxbury - Roshndale, West) 
extending from junction of Allandale St. and Brookhne boundary line 
through Allandale, Center and Walter Sts. to the southwesterly line of 
Arnold Arboretum; thence by same to location of West Roxbury Branch, 
New York, New Haven and Hartford R. R. and through latter south- 
westerly to La Grange St., thence through same to the boundary hne 
between Boston and Newton and along said line to the boundary line 
between Boston and Brookline, continuing thereon to the beginning. 
Adolph H. Brauneis. 

DisT. 44. That part of Ward 20 (West Roxbury - Roslindale, West) 
extending from junction of Washington St. and Turtle Pond Road in the 
Stony Brook Reservation through said park road to its junction with the 
former boundary line between Boston and Hyde Park; thence along same 
to its junction with the boundary line between Boston and Dedham and 
along the latter and the boundary line between Boston and Needham to 
the Charles River and its junction with the boundary line between Boston 
and Newton; thence along said line to La Grange St., and through same 
southeasterly to the location of West Roxbury Branch, New York, New 
Haven and Hartford R. R.; thence through latter to Center St. and 
southerly through same, then along Grove St. to Washington and through 
latter northerly to the beginning. Timothy W. Mitrphy. 

DiST. 45. That part of Ward 21 (Brighton, South) extending from 
junction of Granby St. and Commonwealth Ave. through latter and 
Blandford St. also Blandford St. (extended) to location of Boston and 
Albany R. R.; thence through same, Brookline Ave., Kilmarnock St. and 
Kilmarnock St. (extended) to its junction with the middle line of Muddy 
River in Back Bay Fens; thence by the latter hne and the River way to its 



58 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

junction with the boundary line between Boston and Brookline in the 
northeasterly line of St. Mary's St. (extended); thence by said Hne to 
Commonwealth Ave. and along its southerly side, continuing in various 
courses as said boundary Hne is legally established to its junction with 
Warren St.; thence through Warren, Cambridge, Dustin and North 
Beacon Sts. to the latter's junction with Cambridge St. in Union Square; 
thence through Cambridge St. to its junction with the location of the 
Boston and Albany R. R.; thence through said location to its junction 
with the middle line of Smelt Brook; thence by the same line extended to 
its junction with the boimdary line between Boston and Cambridge in the 
Charles River; thence by said line to its junction with Granby St.; and 
through latter to Commonwealth Ave. and the beginning. John J. 
O'Connor. 

DisT. 46. That part of Ward 21 (Brighton - South) extending from 
junction of Cambridge and Warren Sts. through latter to the boundary 
line between Boston and Brookline; thence along said line to its jxmction 
with the boundary line between Boston and Newton and along same, 
also Commonwealth Ave. to South Street; thence through latter, Chestnut 
Hill Ave., WilUam Jackson Ave., Academy Hill Road, and again Chestnut 
Hill Ave. to Union St.; thence through same, Nantasket Ave., Washington, 
Cambridge and Warren Sts. to the beginning. John H. Hout. 

DisT. 47. The whole of Ward 22 (Brighton, North). Leopold F. 
QuiNN. 

second assistant assessors. 

Phihp J. Camerlengo, Raymond W. Connaughton, Ohver F. Davenport, 
Albert J. A. Gleasoh, Simon Goldberg, Otto Kramer, Joseph B. McClellan, 
Juha F. MuUen, John A. Reagan, Albert Soosman, Charles H. Stevens, 
Charles L. Werner, George O. Wood, Ehzabeth R. White. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 20 City Hall, first floor. 
[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 6; Ord. 1901, Chap. 10; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, 
§§3, 23, 24, 25; Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 367, 788; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 6; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chap. Ill; Spec. Stat. 
1919, Chap. 168; Ord. 1921, Chap. 1; Stat. 1922, Chap. 183: Stat. 
1924, Chap. 479.] 

Rupert S. Carven, City Auditor. Term ends 1930. 

Henry E. Keenan, Asfdstant City Auditor. 
The office of Auditor was established by ordinance on August 2, 1824. 
Regular annual reports of receipts and expenditures have been published 
by the Auditor since 1825. These reports now contain in addition various 
financial tables relating to appropriations, debt, etc., and a full account of 
the trust funds, also lists of City property, by departments. Less com- 



BOSTON SANATORIUM. 59 

plete reports were published by finance committees from 1811 to 1824, 
inclusive. Since Jime 1, 1867, the Auditor has published monthly exhibits 
of all City and County expenditures. 

The City Auditor is also Auditor of the County of Suffolk and Secretary 
of the Board of Commissioners of Sinldng Funds. (Rev. Ord. 1914, 
Chap. 6.) 

BOSTON SANATORIUM. 

[Formerly Consumptives' Hospital Department.] 
Main Hospital, 249 River street, Mattapan. 
Out-Patient Department, Corner of Harrison avenue and East Concord 
Street, South End. 

Trustees' Office, 1001 City Hall Annex, tenth floor. 

[Stat. 1906, Chap. 189; Ord. 1906, Chap. 4; Stat. 1907, Chap. 248; Stat. 
1908, Chap. 225; Stat. 1911, Chap. 167; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 14; 
Spec. Stat. 1915, Chap. 190; Ord. 1921, Chap. 8.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Francis X. Mahoney, M. D., Chairman. 
James J. Minot, M. D., Secretary. 

TRUSTEES.* 

.Iames J. Minot, M. D. Term ends in 1930. 

Miss Isabel F. Hyams. Term ends in 1929. 

Abraham Pearlstein. Term ends in 1928. 

Thomas M. Green. Term ends in 1927. 

Francis X. Mahoney. Term ends in 1928. 

. Appointment pending. 

. Appointment pending. 

The Trustees of this Department, which was established in 1906, pur- 
chased that year the Conness estate of 50.951 acres fronting on River 
Street, Mattapan, where various buildings have since been erected. There 
are now three Ward buildings accommodating 233 patients, four Cottage 
Wards, accommodating 101 adults and 10 children, and the Children's 
Building, accommodating 41 patients, also the Domestic-Administration 
building. At the Out-Patient Department or dispensary. East Concord 
street, corner Harrison avenue, a clinic is held every Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday morning and every Monday evening. Patients 
are examined and treated by physicians at the dispensary, and visited 
by nurses in their homes. 

Admission to the hospital is confined to persons who are bona fide resi- 
dents of Boston at the time of apphcation. 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



60 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

HOSPITAL OFFICERS. 

Arthur J. White, M. D., Superintendent. 
Frank H. Hunt, M. D., Resident Medical Officer. 
Edwin A. Locke, M. D., Chief of Staff. 
Timothy J. Murphy, M. D., First Assistant. 

Cleaa'eland Floyd, M. D., Second Assistant (Director of Clinic, Out- 
Patient Department). 



BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 47 City Hall, third floor. 

[Ord. 1917, Chap. 3; Ord. 1921, Chap. 4.] 

Charles J. Fox, Budget Commissioner. Term ends in 1930. 

William D. Kjinney, Secretary. 

John B. Hynes, Clerk. 
The adoption in 1916 of a segregated budget recommended by the 
Budget Commission of 1915 was followed by the establishing of an inde- 
pendent department in 1917, to have the supervision of aU details of 
method pertaining to the preparation of the annual appropriation 
schedules of the departments. These are submitted at the beginning of 
the financial year to the Mayor, who, after 30 days' consideration, submits 
them to the City Council with his recommendations. The Commissioner 
of the Budget Department also prepares the form of departmental monthly 
reports of expenditures of all appropriations by items. 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 901 City Hall Annex, ninth floor. 
(Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 8, and Chap. 45, §§ 28-39; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 
13 and Chap. 36 (Part II); Stat. 1907, Chap. 550 {i. e. Boston Build- 
ing Law); Stat. 1908, Chap. 221; Stat. 1909, Chap. 313; Stat. 1910, 
Chaps. 284, 631; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 76, 129, 342; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 
369, 370, 713; Ord. 1912, Chaps. 3, 9; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 50, 680, 
704, 714, 729; Ord. 1913, Chap. 4; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 8 and 
Chap. 41, § 1; Ord. 1914, Chap. 4; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 205, 248, 
595, 782, 791; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chaps. 8, 41; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 
254, 352; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chap. 118 and Spec. Stat. Chaps. 248, 
277; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chap. 221; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chaps. 104, 179 
(i. e. Building Law amended and codified); Spec. Stat. 1919, Chaps. 
32, 155, 156, 163; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 91, 266, 440; Ord. 1920, Chap. 
10; Ord. 1921, Chaps. 1, 5; Stat. 1921, Chaps, 60, 280, 476; Stat. 1922, 
Chaps. 126, 174; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 108, 278, 462; Stat. 1924, Chaps. 
332, 335, 412 and 488; Stat. 1925, Chap. 219.] 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 61 

Louis K. Rourke, Building Commissioner. Term ends in 1930. 

Charles S. Damrell, Clerk of Department and Executive Secretary. 

Edward W. Roemer, Supervisor of Construction. 

John J. Dunigan, Supervisor of Zoning Division. 

Edwin H. Oliver, Chief of Egress Division. 

Wilfred H. Smith, Chief, Plan Division A. 

Joseph E. Cahill, Chief, Plan Division B. 

Timothy J. Fareell, Supervisor of Elevators. 

William A. Wheater, Supervisor of Plumbing. 

James W. Flynn, Supervisor of Gasjiiting. 

It is the duty of the Building Commissioner to issue permits for and 
inspect the erection and alteration of buildings in the City, and the set- 
ting of boilers, engines and furnaces; to issue licenses to persons taking 
charge of constructing, altering, removing or tearing down buildings; to 
keep a register of the names of all persons carrying on the business of 
plumbing and gasfitting, and of all persons working at the business of gas- 
fitting, and to issue hcenses to master and journeymen gasfitters; to issue 
permits for and inspect the plumbing and gasfitting in buildings; to inspect 
elevators in buildings and report upon elevator accidents; to inspect at 
least monthly all theaters and moving-picture houses, and semi-annually 
all halls or places for public assembly; to inspect existing tenement houses; 
to report on all fires in, and accidents in or to, buildings, and to approve 
plans of new buildings and alterations. 

The Board of Appeal {i. e., appeal from the decisions of the Bmlding 
Commissioner) although appointed by the Mayor, is nominated by the 
leading real estate and builders' organizations. 

building limits. 
Stat. 1907, Chap. 550, § 9; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 41, § 1; Stat. 1914, 
Chap. 782, § 1; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chap. 352; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chap. 
221; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 179.] 

Board of Examiners. 

[Ord. 1912, Chap. 9; Ord. 1920, Chap. 10; Ord. 1925, Chap. 5.] 

Office, 907 City Hall Annex, ninth floor. 

OFFICIALS. 

John F. Hickey, Chairman. 

Mary C. Dowd, Permanent Secretary. 

THE BOARD. 

John F. Hickey. Term ends in 1928. 

Thomas K. Reynolds. 

. Appointment pending. 



62 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The Boaixl of Examiners was established in 1912 as an adjunct of the 
Building Department, to consist of three members, appointed by the 
Mayor. The duties of these examiners are to determine the qualifica- 
tions of persons taking charge or control of the construction, alteration, 
removal or tearing down of buildings; to register and classify those who 
are competent according to fitness and certify such to the Building Com- 
missioner. Each examiner is to receive ten dollars for every day or part 
thereof of actual service, but not more than $1,000 in any one year. 

The fees to be paid to the Board are: for new license, S5.00, and each 
annual renewal, $2.00; special license, $1.00. 



BOARD OF APPEAL. 
Office, 907 City Hall Annex, ninth floor. 
[Stat. 1907, Chap. 550, §§ 6, 7; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 13, § 6; Stat. 1910, 
Chap. 631; Stat. 1920, Chap. 440; Stat. 1924, Chap. 488; Stat. 
1925, Chap. 219.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Walter S. Gerry, Chairman. 
Hubert G. Ripley, Secretary. 

THE board. 
George S. Parker. Term ends in 1930. 
James H. Fitzpatrick. Term ends in 1929. 
Hubert G. Ripley. Term ends in 1928. 
John D. Marks. Term ends in 1927. 
Walter S. Gerry. Term ends in 1931. 

The Board consists of five members, one appointed each year by the 
Mayor from two candidates nominated in successive years by the follow- 
ing organizations respectively: Real Estate Exchange and Auction Board, 
Massachusetts Real Estate Exchange, Boston Society of Architects, 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers, Master Builders' Association, Con- 
tractors' and Builders' Association, and Building Trades Council of the 
Boston Central Labor Union; also one member of the Mayor's own selec- 
tion. The term of office is five years. Each member is paid $10 per 
day for actual service, but not more than $1,000 in any one year. 

Any applicant for a permit from the Building Commissioner whose 
application has been refused in re building law or in re zoning law, may 
api)eal therefrom within ninety days, and a person who has been ordered 
by the Commissioner to incur any expense may, within thirty days after 
receiving such order, appeal to the Board of Appeal by giving notice in 
writing to the Commissioner. All cases of appeal are settled by this 
Board, after a hearing. Permits to restore damage by fire can only be 
issued with the approval of the Board. 

Appeal may also be made to this Board from certain requirements of 
the Commissioner of Wires. 



BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 



63 



BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 

[Chap. 488, Acts 1924, Section 20, amended by Chap. 219, Acts of 1925, 
and Chap. 350, Acts of 1926.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
Leo Schwartz, Secretary. 





Members. 
Nominated by 


Term ends in 


Frederic H. Fay, Chairvmn . . . 
William H. Sayward 


City Planning Board 

Master Builders' Association 


Ex-officio. 
1931 


Eliot N. Jones . . 


Boston Chamber of Commerce 


1931 


Dana Somes 


Boston Society of Architects and Boston 
Society of Landscape Architects. 

Massachusetts Real Estate Exchange .... 

Boston Central Labor Union 


1930 


W. Franklin Burnham 

Patrick H. Jennings 

Frank 0. Whitney 

George F Stebbins 


1930 
1929 


Boston Society of Civil Engineers 

Team Owners' Association 


1929 
1928 


Frank W. Merrick 

Gharies R. Gow 


United Improvement Association 

Associated Industries of Massachusetts. . 
Boston Real Estate Exchange 


1928 
1927 




1927 


IjCo Schwartz . ■ ■ 


Appointed by the Mayor. 









The board consists of twelve members appointed by the Mayor in 
the following manner; one member from two candidates to be nominated 
by each of the following organizations; Associated Industries of Massa- 
chusetts, Boston Central Labor Union, Boston Chamber of Commerce, 
Boston Real Estate Exchange, Massachusetts Real Estate Exchange, 
Boston Society of Architects and the Boston Society of Landscape Archi- 
tects, Boston Society of Civil Engineers, Master Builders' Association, 
Team Owners' Association, United Improvement Association and one 
member to be selected by the Mayor. All appointive members shall be 
residents of or engaged in business in Boston. The term of office is five 
years. 



64 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Either upon petition or otherwise, the board may, by a decision of not 
less than four-fifths of its members, rendered after a public hearing and 
due notice to the owners of all property affected, change the boundaries 
of districts by changing the zoning map on file at the state secretary's 
office to meet altered needs of a locality, to avoid undue concentration of 
population, to provide adequate light and air, to lessen congestion in streets, 
to secure safety from fire, panic and other dangers, to facilitate the ade- 
quate provision of transportation, water, sewerage and other public require- 
ments and to promote the health, safety, convenience and welfare of the 
inhabitants of the city of Boston. 

No decision of the Board of Appeal permitting the erection or altera- 
tion of a building to an extreme height greater than that otherwise author- 
ized under the provisions of the zoning law for the lot or building in ques- 
tion is effective until and unless confirmed by the decision of not less than 
two-thirds of the members of the Board of Zoning Adjustment. 

If a change in the boundaries of districts is favorably decided upon or if 
a decision of the Board of Appeal is confirmed, any person aggrieved or 
any municipal officer or Board, may within fifteen days after the entry 
of such decision, bring a petition in the Supreme Judicial Court for the 
County of Suffolk for a writ of certiorari setting forth that such decision 
is in whole or part not in accordance with the duties and powers of the 
board. 



CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Oflace, 31 City Hall, second floor. 
[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, § 30; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266, § 2; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 11; R. L., Chap. 26, §§ 15, 16; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 8; Stat. 
1909, Chap. 486, § 22; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 11; Ord. 1917, Chap. 6; 
Ord. 1920, Chap. 11. J 

.Tames Donovan, City Clerk. Term ends in 1929. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Assistant City Clerk. 

The City Clerk is elected by the City Council for the term of three 
years. He has the care and custody of the records of the City Council 
and of all city records, documents, maps, plans and papers, except those 
otherwise provided for. He also records chattel mortgages, assignments 
of wages, hens upon vessels, issues Mcenses and badges to minors when so 
directed by the City Council, and performs other duties imposed by statute. 

The City Clerk and Assistant City Clerk are, ex officio, Clerk and Assistant 
Clerk, respectively, of the City Council. 

The Assistant City Clerk is appointed by the City Clerk, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor. By Gen. Laws, Chap. 41, §18, the certificate or 
attestation of the Assistant City Clerk has equal effect with that of the 
City Clerk. 



ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 65 

CITY PLANNING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 30 City Hall, second floor. 

[Stat. 1913, Chap. 494; Ord. 1913, Chap. 6; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 12; 
Ord. 1915, Chap. 2; Ord. 1923, Chap. 5; Stat. 1924, Chap. 488; Stat. 
1925, Chap. 333.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 

Miss Elisabeth M. Hbrliht, Secretary. 

THE BOARD. 

Frederic H. Fay. Term ends in 1929. 
Ernest A. Johnson. Term ends in 1930. 
William Stanley Parker. Term ends in 1928. 
John J. Walsh. Term ends in 1927. 
Mary A. Barr. 

Every city and town in the State having a population of more than 
10,000 is authorized and directed to create a board to be known as the 
Planning Board, whose duty shall be to make careful studies of the re- 
sources, possibilities and needs of the city or town, and to make plans for 
the development of the municipality with special reference to the proper 
housing of the people. In January, 1914, an ordinance was passed estab- 
lishing "The City Planning Board," consisting of five members, one of 
whom shall be a woman, all to serve without compensation for a term of 
five years. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 201 City Hall Annex, second floor. 

[Stat. 1875, Chap. 176; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1888, Chap. 390; 
Stat. 1890, Chap. 418; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 14; Ord. 1908, Chap. 
1; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 10; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1913, 
Chap. 672; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 13; Ord. 1914, 2d Series, Chap. 2; 
Spec. Stat. 1916, Chap. 291; Ord. 1921, Chap. 1; Stat. 1922, Chap. 
390; Ord. 1925, Chap. 1.] 

George H. Johnson, City Collector. Term ends in 1930. 

The Collector collects and receives all taxes and other assessments, 
betterments, rates, dues and moneys payable on any account to the 
City of Boston or the County of Suffolk. He has the custody of all leases 
from, and of all tax deeds of land held by, the City. Annual reports 
have been published since 1876. 



ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex, first floor. 
[Stat. 1906, Chap. 311; Stat. 1907, Chap. 560, §78; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 15; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 16; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§53-61; 



66 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Stat. 1910, Chap. 520; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 304, 469, 517, 550, 735; 
Stat. 1912, Chaps. 275, 471, 483, 641; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 286, 835; 
Stat. 1914, Chap. 730; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 15; Gen. Stat. 1915, 
Chaps. 48, 91; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chaps. 16, 43, 81, 87, 179; Gen. 
Stat. 1917, Chap. 29; Gen. Stat. 1918, Chap. 74; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 
129, 142; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 65, 93, 114, 209, 288, 340, 387; Ord. 1921, 
Chap. 7: Stat. 1924, Chaps. 410, 453, 479; Stat. 1925, Chap.=. 39, 
136.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Frank Seiberlich, Chairman. 
Patrick H. O'Connor, Secretary. 

COMMISSIONERS. 

Frank Seiberlich. Term ends in 1929. 
Patrick H. O'Connor. Term ends in 1930. 
James F. Eagan. Term ends in 1928. 
Nina M. Gevalt. Term ends in 1927. 

One Election Commissioner is appointed by the Mayor each year, term 
beginning April 1. The two leading poHtical parties mxist be equally 
represented on the Board and the Chairman is designated annually by the 
Mayor. 

The Board of Registrars of Voters was appointed in May, 1874, and 
was succeeded July 1, 1895, by the Board of Election Commissioners. 

This department exercises aU the powers and duties formerly conferred 
upon the Board of Registrars of Voters (including the preparation of the 
jury list), except the power and duty of giving notice of elections and 
fixing the days and hours for holding the same. 

The Board also exercises all the powers and duties formerly conferred 
upon the City Clerk and other officers by chapter 504 of the Acts of 1894. 
The voting precincts in the 22 new wards now number 339 instead of 254- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Building, Bristol street. 

(Stat. 1850, Chap. 262; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, §§ 9-11; Rev. Ord. 
1898, Chap. 17; Stat. 1909, Chap. 308; Stat. 1912, Chap. 574; Ord. 
1912, Chaps. 4, 6; Ord. 1913, Chap. 1; Stat. 1913, Chap. 800; Stat. 
1914, Chaps. 519, 795; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 16; Ord. 1917, Chap. 4; 
Ord. 1919, Chap. 2; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 60, 68; Stat. 1921, Chap. 196; 
Stat. 1923, Chap. 309.] 

Eugene C. Hultman, Fire Commissioner. 

Herbert J. Hickey, Executive Secretary of the Department. 

Daniel F. Sennott, Chief of Department. 

Henry A. Fox, Assistant Chief. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 67 

Walter M. McLean, Deputy Chief. 

Edward J. Shallow, Deputy Chief. 

Albert J. Caulfield, Deputy Chief 

Joseph A. Dolan, Deputy Chief. 

Frank A. Sweeney, Deputy Chief. 

Henrt J. Power, Deputy Chief. 

George L. Fickett, Superintendent, Fire Alarm Branch. 

Walter J. Burke, Superintendent, Wire Division. 

Edward E. Williamson, Superintendent of Maintenance Division. 

James P. Malonet, Chief Clerk. 

The Boston Fire Department was organized in 1837. It is in charge of 
1 Commissioner, 1 Chief of Department, 1 Assistant Chief of Department, 
6 Deputy Chiefs, 30 District Chiefs, 1 Superintendent of Fire Alarm, 1 
Superintendent of Fire Prevention, 1 Superintendent of Maintenance, 
1 Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarm, 1 Engineer and Architect, 
1 Medical Examiner, 1 Executive Secretary, 1 Superintendent of High 
Pressure, Steam and Marine Service, 1 Chief of License Division, Bureau of 
Fire Prevention, 1 Motor Apparatus Engineer, 76 Captains, 112 Lieuten- 
ants, 83 Engineers, 1,161 Hoseman, Laddermen, Aides, Assistant Engineers, 
Masters, 18 Clerks, 19 Fire Alarm Operators, 121 mechanics, painters, 
carpenters, linemen, repairers, electricians and workmen. 

Total officers, engineers and privates, 1,683 men. 

There are 62 fire stations, a fire alarm branch with 57 employees, 
operating 1,328 signal boxes, and a repair shop with 117 employees. 
Annual reports have been published since 1838. 

Yearly salaries of district chiefs, $3,500; captains, $2,500; lieutenants, 
$2,300; engineers, $2,100; ass't engineers, $2,000; first year privates, 
$1,600, with annual increase of $100 until the maximum of $2,000 is 
reached. 

In 1919 the Wire Department became the Wire Division of the Fire Dept. 
It was estabhshed in 1894 for the purpose of supervising and inspecting 
all electrical wires, cables and conductors and substituting underground 
for overhead transmission. The Wire Division is in charge of 1 Super- 
intendent, 1 Chief Inspector, 1 Chief Clerk, 7 Clerks, 1 Engineer, 34 
Inspectors, 1 Telephine Operator, 1 Stenciller, 1 Chauffeur. 

A total of 48 men. 

CHIEF, assistant CHIEF AND DEPUTY CHIEFS. 

Chief, Daniel F. Sennott. Headquarters, Bristol Street. 

Assistant Chief, Henry A. Fox. Headquarters, Ladder 4, Dudley Street. 

First Division. In charge of Deputy Chiefs Edward J. Shallow and 
Henry J. Power. Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort HiU sq. 
Districts 1 to 5 inch 

Second Division. In charge of Deputy Chiefs Albert J. Caulfield and 
Frank A, Sweeney. Headquarters, Engine 22, Warren ave. Dis- 
tricts 6, 7, 8, 11. 



68 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Third Division. In charge of Deputy Chiefs Walter M. McLean and 
Joseph A. Dolan. Headquarters, Ladder . House 23, Grove Hall. 
Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 

Maintenance Division. Edward E. Williamson. 

FIRST DIVISION DISTRICTS, DISTRICT CHIEFS AND APPARATUS. 

District 1 (East Boston). Henry Krake and Thomas E. Conrot, 
Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris st. Apparatus — 
Engines, Nos. 5, 9, 11, 40, 47 (fireboat); Ladders, 2, 21; Chemical, 7. 

Dist. 2 (Charlestown). Philip A. Tague and Hamilton A. McClay, 
Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop st. Appara- 
tus—Engines, Nos. 27, 32, 36, 50; Ladders, 9, 22. 

Dist. 3 (Boston Proper and South Boston). Cornelius J. O'Brien and 
James Mahoney, Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Ladder House 18, 
Pittsburgh st. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 25, 38, 39, 44 (fireboat); 
Ladders, 8, 18; Water Tower, 3. 

Dist. 4 (North End). Aaiiry B. Howard and John F. Watson, Dist. 
Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 4 Bulfinch st. Apparatus 

— Engines, Nos. 4, 6, 8; fireboat, 31; Ladders, 1, 24; Water Tower, 1. 
Dist. 5 (Boston Proper). Louis C. Stickel and Victor H. Richer, 

Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 7, East st. Appara- 
tus — Engines, Nos. 7, 10, 26, 35; Ladder, 17; Rescue 1. 

SECOND DIVISION — DISTRICTS, DISTRICT CHIEFS AND APPARATUS. 
DiST. 6 (South Boston). H. M. Hebard and Michael J. Teehan, 

Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester st. Appara- 
tus — Engines, Nos. 1, 2, 15, 43; Ladders, 5, 19, 20. 
Dist. 7 (Back Bay and South End). Thos. H. Downey and John J. 

Kelley, Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren ave. 

Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 3, 22, 33; Ladders, 3, 13, 15; Water Tower, 2. 
Dist. 8 (Roxbury). Frank J. Sheeran and Dennis Driscoll, Dist. 

Chiefs. Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont st. Apparatus — 

Engines, Nos. 13, 14, 37; Ladders, 12, 26. 
Dist. 11 (Brighton). James F. McMahon and Thomas H. Andreoli, 

Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard ave. Apparatus 

— Engines, Nos. 29, 34, 41, 51; Ladders, 11, 14. 

THIRD DIVISION — DISTRICTS, DISTRICT CHIEFS .\ND APPARATUS. 

Dist. 9 (Dorchester North and Roxbury East). Joseph H. Kenney 
and Patrick J. V. Kelley, Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 
12, Dudley st. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 12, 21, 23, 24; Ladder, 4; 
Rescue, 3. 

Dist. 10 (Dorchester Centre). Francis J. Jordan and Chas. H. Long, 
Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 18, Harvard st. Apparatus 

— Engines, Nos. 17, 18, 52; Ladders, 7, 29. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



69 



DisT. 12 (Jamaica Plain). John N. Lally and William F. Quigley, 
Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre st. Apparatus 
— Engines, Nos. 28, 42; Ladders, 10, 23, 30. 

Dist. 13 (Roslindale and West Roxbury). Michael J. Kennedy and 
Charles A. Donahoe, Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 45, 
corner Washington and Poplar sts., Roslindale. Apparatus — Engines, 
Nos. 30, 45, 53; Ladders, 16, 25. 

Dist. 14 (Ashmont, Neponset and Lower Mills). Allan J. Macdonald 
and James F. Ryan, Dist. Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 46, 
Peabody sq. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 16, 20, 46; Ladders, 6, 27. 

Dist. 15 (Hyde Park). John P. Murray and Michael F. Silva, Dist. 
Chiefs. Headquarters, Engine House 48; corner Harvard ave. and 
Winthrop st., Hyde Park. Apparatus — Engines, Nos. 19, 48, 49; 
Ladder, 28. 

FIRE-ENGINES. 



Number, Etc. 


Location. 


Chief Officer. 


1 (Auto combination) 

2 (Auto combination) 


Dorchester st., cor. Fourth, 

South Boston. 
Fourth St., cor. 0, S. Boston, 


Wm. F. Field, Capt. 
E. Conners, Capt. 


3 (Auto combination) 


Harrison ave., cor. Bristol 

St. 


Daniel Martell, Capt. 


4 (Auto combination) 

5 (Auto combination) 




Marion street, E. Boston. . . 


Thomas F. Ryan, Capt. 


6 (Auto combination) 

7 (Auto combination) 

8 (Auto combination) 

9 (Auto combination) 




John F. Murphy, Capt. 






Napeen Boutilier, Capt. 
T. J. Flynn, Capt. 


Paris street, East Boston. . . 


10 (Auto combination) 


Mt. Vernon st., cor. River. . 


D. J. O'Brien, Capt. 


11 (Auto combination) 

12 (Auto combination) 


Cor. Saratoga and Byron 

streets. East Boston. 
Dudley street, Roxbury 


J. W. Dwyer, Capt. 
Wm. B. Jennings, Capt. 


13 (Auto combination) 


Cabot street, Roxbury 


Dennis J. Bailey, Capt. 


14 (Auto combination) 


Centre street, Roxbury 


George A. Carney, Capt. 


15 (Auto combination) 

16 (Auto combination) 


Cor. Broadway and Dor- 
chester avenue. 
River street, Dorchester. . . . 


Michael D. Sullivan, Capt. 
James F. O'Connell, Capt. 


17 (Auto combination) 


Meeting House Hill, Dor. . . 


Martin F. Mulligan, Capt. 


18 (Auto combination) 


Harvard street, Dorchester. 


Wm. Levis, Capt. 


19 (Auto combination) 


Norfolk street, Dorchester. . 


J. J. Gavin, Capt. 


20 (Auto combination) 


Walnut street, Dorchester. . 


F. I. Adams, Capt. 


21 (Auto combination) 


Columbia road, Dorchester, 


F. G. Avery, Capt. 


22 (Auto combination) 




Charles A. Wolfe, Capt. 







Note. — The "Auto combination" is a gasolene pumping engine, and 
hose reel combined in one automobile. Five engines include a chemical 
tank, making a triple combination. 



70 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 
FIRE ENGINES. — Concluded. 



Number, Etc. 

23 (Auto combination) 

24 (Auto combination) 

25 (Auto combination) 

26 (Auto combination) 

27 (Auto combination) 

28 (Auto combination) 

29 (Auto combination) 

30 (Auto combination) 

31 (Fireboat) 

32 (Auto combination) 

33 (Auto combination) 

34 (Auto combination) 

35 (Auto combination) 

36 (Auto combination) 

37 (Auto combination) 

38 and 39 (Auto combina 

tion). 

40 (Auto combination) , 

41 (Auto combination) 

42 (Auto combination) 

43 (Auto combination) 

44 (Fireboat) 

45 (Auto combination) 

46 (Auto combination) 

47 (Fireboat) 

48 (Auto combination) 

49 (Auto combination) 

50 (Auto combination) 

51 (Auto combination) 

62 (Auto combination) 

53 (Auto combination) 



Location. 



Chief Officer. 



Northampton street 

Cor. Warren and Quincy sts. 

Fort Hill square 

Bulfinch St. (Temp.) 

Elm street, Charlestown 

Centre st., Jamaica Plain. . 

Chestnut EDll ave., Brighton, 

Centre st.. West Roxbury. . 

521 Commercial st 

Bunker Hill st., Charlestown, 

Boyleton and Hereford sts.. 

Western avenue, Brighton . . 

Church st. (Temp.) 

Monument St., Charlestown, 

Longwood and Brookline 

avenues. 
Congress st., South Boston.. 

Sumner st., East Boston. . . 

Harvard avenue, Brighton. . 

Egleston square 

Andrew sq.. South Boston, 

Northern ave 

Poplar street, Roslindale . . . 

Dorchester ave , Ashmont. . 

East Boston 

Harvard ave. and Winthrop 

street, Hyde Park. 
Milton and Hamilton streets, 

Readville. 
Winthrop St., Charlestown, 

Oak square, Brighton 

Callender and Lyons sts., 

Dorchester. 
Walk Hill and Wenham sts., 

Forest Hills. 



John M. Donovan, Capt. 
Chas. A. Thompson, Capt . 
T. E. Flanagan, Capt. 
Edward J. Locke, Capt. 
John H. Laughlin, Capt. 

F. J. Sullivan, Capt. 
E. F. Doody, Capt. 
Samuel A. Dwight, Capt. 
Walter S. Eaton, Capt 
E. F. Richardson, Capt. 
J. P. Hanton, Capt. 

J. M. Ferreira, Capt. 
(See Eng. 26 above.) 

G. E. Darragh, Capt. 

D. F. Crowley, Capt. 

E. B. Chittick, Capt. 
T. J. Lannary, Capt. 
J. W. Shea, Capt. 

M. F. Minehan, Capt. 
John McCarthy, Capt. 
John Williams, Capt. 

E. O. Haines, Capt. 
Wm. Hart, Capt. 
J. P. Walsh, Capt. 
C. A. Fernald, Capt. 

F. Donohue, Capt. 
T. F. Roach, Capt. 
J. E. Redman, Capt. 
L. D. Merrill, Capt. 
A. J. Burns, Capt. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



71 



LADDER TRUCKS. 



Number, Etc. 

1 (Aerial, with tractor) . . . . 

2 (Aerial, with tractor) .... 

3 (Motor truck with trac- 

tor.) 

4 (Aerial) 

5 (Motor aerial truck) 

6 (Motor truck) 

7 (Motor truck) 

8 (Aerial, with tractor) . . . . 

9 (Aerial, with tractor) . . . . 

10 (Motor truck) 

11 (Motor truck) 

12 (Motor aerial truck) 

13 (Motor aerial truck) 

14 (Motor aerial truck) 

15 (Motor aerial truck) 

16 (Motor truck) 

17 (Aerial, with tractor) 

18 (Aerial, with tractor) .... 

19 (Motor truck) 

20 (Motor truck) 

21 (Motor truck) 

22 (Motor truck) 

23 (Motor truck) 

24 (Motor truck) 

25 (Motor truck) 

26 (With tractor) 

27 (Motor truck) 

28 (Motor truck) 

29 (Motor truck with chem- 

ical.) 

.30 (Motor truck with chem- 
ical.) 

31 (Aerial with motor truck), 



Location. 



Friend St., Warren square, 
Paris street, East Boston . . . 
Harrison ave., cor. Bristol 

St. 

Dudley st., cor. Winslow, 

Rox. 
Fourtn st., near Dorchester 

St. 

River St., cor. Temple, Dor., 
Meeting House Hill, Dor. . . 

Fort Hill square 

331 Main St., Charlestown . . 
659 Centre st., Jamaica PI., 
Chestnut Hill ave., Brighton, 

1046 Tremont st,, Rox 

"Warren avenue 

Harvard ave., AUston 

Boylston st., cor. Hereford. . 

Poplar St., Roslindale 

157 Harrison ave 

Pittsbiirgh st 

E. Fourtn st., near K, S. B., 
Andrew sq., S. Boston 

Saratoga and Byron sts., 
E. B. 

44 Monument st., Charles- 
town. 

Grove Hall, Dor 

North Grove st 

Centre St., near Bellevue, 

West Roxbury. 
Longwood and Brookline 

avenues. 
Walnut street. Dor 

Harvard ave. and Winthrop 

St., H. P. 
Callender and Lyons sts., 

Dor. 
Egleston square, Rox 

Saratoga st., cor. Prescott 
St., East Boston. 



Chief Officer. 



P. J. LafFey, Capt. 
P. J. Ryan, Capt 
F. F. Leary, Capt. 

C. T. Farren, Capt. 

J. .J. Lunny, Capt. 

McDarrah Flaherty, Lieut 

L. P. Mahoney, Lieut. 

J. M. Cook, Lieut. 

J. J. Devine, lieut. 

J. F. McDonough, Capt, 

M. J. Galvin, Capt. 

William F. Donovan. Lieut. 
Wm. F. Thompson, Lieut, 
T. P. Lohan, Lieut. 
John L. Crimlisk, Lieut, 
J. H. Leary, Capt. 

Wm. J. Shepard, Capt, 

F. R. Brophy. Capt, 

G. F. Doyle, Capt. 
W. F. Heldt, Capt. 
T. F. Donovan, Capt. 
M. J. Prendergast, Capt. 

E. T. Cunniff, Lieut. 
James Gavagan, Lieut. 
M. F. Conley, Capt. 

P. F. McLeavey, Lieut. 

Chas. IngersoU, Capt. 

D. M. Shaughnessy, Capt. 
Wm. Peterson, Capt. 

F. W. Battis, Cant. 

P. H. Kenney, Lieut. 
C. J. Greely, Lieut. 
James H. Stout, Capt. 

John Hogan, Lieut. 
Edward McNamara, Lieut. 
T. F. McGowan, Lieut. 
Richard A. Dinin, Lieut. 
W. A. J. Drinan, Capt. 

John J. Blakeley, Lieut. 
Walter C. Glynn, Lieut. 



72 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



WATER TOWERS. 



Number, Etc. 


Location. 


Chief Officer. 


WATER TOWERS, ETC. 

1 (With tractor) 


Bulfinch street 


Patrick J. Cray, Lieut. 




Charles H. MoDonneU. 




Pittsburgh street 


George L. Evanson, Lieut. 


1 Motor Rescue Car 

2 Motor Rescue Car 




Michael J. Aylward, Lieut. 
D. J. Hurley, Capt. 

William L Nolan, Lieut 









TOTAL EQUIPMENT IN USE AND IN RESERVE. 

In Use: Auto combination gasoline engines, 45; triple combination 
gasoline engines, 5; marine pumpers or fireboats, 3; total engines, 53; 
combination chemical and hose cars, 41; auto ladder trucks, 31 (16 aerial) ; 
auto water towers, 3; officers' cars, 31; auto delivery trucks, 17; two 
rescue companies with pulmotors, etc., one auto wrecker; total automo- 
biles, 179, of which 129 are apparatus; salt wagons, 14, hose and other 
pungs, 65. Leading hose 149,309 feet and suction hose 2,505 feet. 

In Reserve: Auto gasoline engines, 8; tractor drawn steamers, 3; 
auto chemical and hose cars, 7; auto ladder trucks, 10 (3 aerial); one 
auto water tower, 9 officers' cars. 

BOSTON firemen's RELIEF FUND. 

By Chapter 308, Acts of 1909, amended by Chapter 134, Acts of 1911, 
the Fire Commissioner and 12 members of the Fire Department, to be 
elected annually by all the members, are constituted a corporate body for 
the purpose of holding and administering the Firemen's Relief Fund. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
Main office, 1108, City Hall Annex, eleventh floor. 
IStat. 1854, Chap. 448, § 40; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, § 19; Rev. Ord. 
1898. Chap. 18; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 19; Stat. 1902, Chaps. 206, 
213; Stat. 1906, Chap. 225; Stat. 1907, Chaps, 386, 445, 480; Stat. 
1908, Chaps. 329, 411; Stat. 1909, Chap. 380; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 
269, 640; Stat. 1911, Chap. 287; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 448, 486; Stat. 
1913, Chap. 586; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 627, 628; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chaps. 
17, 40; Ord. 1914, 2d Series, Chap. 1; Ord. 1915, Chap. 1; Spec. Stat. 
1915, Chap. 346; Ord. 1915, Chaps. 3 and 4; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 
163; Stat. 1920, Chap, 100; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 94, 111; Stat. 1922, 
Chap. 61.] 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 73 

OFFICIALS. 

Francis X. Mahoney, M.D., Health Commissioner. 

Term ends in 1930. 
Stephen L. Maloney, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 

DEPUTY COMMISSIONERS. 

M. Victor Safford, M.D., Medical Division. 

Frederick J. Bailey, M.D., in charge of Communicable Diseases. 

Karl E. Bailey, M.D., Laboratory Division. 

P. H. MuLLOWNEY, M.D.V., Division of Food Inspection. 

Thomas J. Donnellon, Division of Sanitary Inspection. 

Frederick S. Davis, Division of Vital Statistics, Records and Accounts. 

Charles F. Willinsky, M.D., Child Hygiene and Director Health Units. 

chief division assistants. 
Alexander Burr, M.D.V., Veterinarian in charge of Abattoir Inspection. 
Robert E. Dyer, D.V.S., Veterinarian in charge of Dairy Inspection. 
James O. Jordan, Inspector of Milk. 

The first Board of Health in Boston was established in 1799, under 
the special statute of February 13, 1799. It was abolished by the first 
City Charter, and from 1822 to 1873 its functions were exercised through 
the City Council. The last Board of Health was established by an ordi- 
nance of December 2, 1872. It published annual reports, beginning 
with 1873. By Chap. 1, Ord. 1914, 2d Series, the department was placed 
in charge of one executive, the Health Commissioner, who appoints 
the deputy commissioners. Chap. 1, Ord. 1915, provided that the quar- 
antine service should pass from the control of the Health Dept. when the 
property was leased to the United States, in effect June 1, 1915. 



CONSERVATION BUREAU. 
Office, 1107 City Hall Annex. 
Dr. Francis X. Mahoney, Chairman. 
The Boston Conservation Bureau was established by the City Council 
in 1922. The Chairman is designated by the Mayor. 

The Bureau is required to make from time to time such recommenda- 
tions to the Mayor as will be conducive to the conservation of human 
life and the promotion of public health. 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

Office at the Boston City Hospital, 818 Harrison avenue. 

IStat. 1880, Chap. 174; Stat. 1893, Chap. 91; Rev. Ord. 1914, chap. 18; 

C. C, Title IV., Chap. 20; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chap. 34; Stat. 1922, 

Chap. 521, SS. 18, 19; Stat. 1924, Chap. 70.] 



74 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

OFFICIALS. 

Joseph P. Manning, President. 
Thomas A. Forsyth, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES.* 

Joseph P. Manning, Terai ends in 1931. 
Carl Dreyfus, Term ends in 1930. 
Thomas A. Forsyth, Term ends in 1929. 
George G. Sears, M.D., Term ends in 1928. 
Henry S. Rowen, M.D., Term ends in 1927. 

The Boston City Hospital was opened on June 1, 1864. Besides the 
Main Hospital, the Trustees have charge of the South Department for 
contagious diseases, the Convalescent Home at 2150 Dorchester avenue, 
Dorchester, the Haymarket Square Relief Station, the East Boston 
Relief Station, and the West Department, West Roxbury (at present 
leased and occupied by United States Government). 

The Trustees are incorporated and authorized to receive and hold 
real and personal estate bequeathed or devised to said hospital corpora- 
tion to an amount not exceeding $1,000,000. 

hospital officers. 
John J. Dowling, M.D. — Superintendent and Medical Director. Residence 

and office at the Hospital. 
Edmund W. Wilson, M.D. — Assistant Superintendent. 
James W. Manary, M.D. — First Executive Assistant and Director of 

Out-Patient Departments. 
Francis S. Broderick, M.D. — Second Executive Assistant. 
M. WiNTHROP O'Connell, M.D. — Third Executive Assistant. 
Donald S. McKinnon, M.D. — Fourth Executive Assistant. 
Robert M. Coleman, M.D. — Night Executive Assistant. 
Allan L. Davis, M.D. — Resident Surgeon. 
Harry L. Denoon, M.D. — Resident Anesthetist. 
F. B. Mallory, M.D.— Pathologist. 

Francis W. Peabody, M.D. — Director of Thorndike Laboratory. 
P. F. Butler, M.D, — ■ Roentgenologist-in-Chief. 

medical and surgical staff. 
Consulting Physicians and Surgeons.- — Vincent Y. Bowditch, M.D., 
Abner Post, M.D., Hayward W. Gushing, M.D., Francis S. Watson, M.D., 
George H. Monks, M.D., Morton Prince, M.D., Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., 
Henry Jackson, M.D., George G. Sears, M.D., John Bapst Blake, M.D., 
Paul Thorndike, M.D. 

The Trustees serve without compensation. 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 75 

Consulting Physician in Neurology. — Arthur W. Fairbanks, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologist. — -William T. Councilman, M.D. 

Consultant in Tropical Diseases. — Richard P. Strong, M.D. 

Consultant in Ophthalmology. — Allen Greenwood, M.D. 

Consulting Aural Surgeon. — Rockwell A. Coffin, M.D. 

Curator of the Hospital Museum. — Townsend W. Thorndike, M.D. 

Senior Physician. — Francis H. Williams, M.D. 

Visiting Physicians. — William H. Robey, M.D., Ralph C. Larrabee, 
M.D., Franklin W. White, M.D., Edwin A. Locke, M.D., Edward N. 
Libby, M.D., Francis W. Peabody, M.D., Francis W. Palfrey, M.D., 
Cadis Phipps, M.D., 

Assistant Visiting Physicians. — Harold W. Dana, M.D., Thomas J. 
O'Brien, M.D., Albert A. Hornor, M.D., William R. Ohler, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Physicians. — Edmund F. Walsh, M.D., Burton E. 
Hamilton, M.D., Harry A. Nissen, M.D., Joseph M. Lynch, M.D., Joseph 
E. Hallisey, M.D., John A. Foley, M.D., George C. Shattuck, M.D., 
Louis J. UlHan, M.D., Dwight O'Hara, M.D., Henry Jackson, Jr., M.D., 
Frank S. Cruickshank, M.D., Daniel J. Hogan, M.D., Louis F. Curran, 
M.D., Joseph T. Wearn, M.D., Maurice Fremont Smith, M.D., Percy 
B. Davidson, M.D. 

Senior Surgeon. — George W, Gay, M.D. 

Surgeons-in-Chief.- — Howard A. Lopthrop, M.D., Frederic J. Cotton, 
M.D., Joshua C. Hubbard, M.D., David D. Scannell, M.D., Horace 
Binney, M.D., 

Visiting Surgeons. — Arthiu" R. Kimpton, M.D., Robert C. Coch- 
rane, M.D., Halsey B. Loder, M.D., Irving J. Walker, M.D., Otto J. 
Hermann. M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons. — Somers Fraser, M.D., Francis F. Hen- 
derson, M.D., Herbert H. Howard, M.D., James J. Hepburn, M.D., 
Donald Munro, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Surgeons. — Edward Harding, M.D., Joseph H. Short- 
tell, M.D., Augustus Riley, M.D., William R. Morrison, M.D., Thomas 
K. Richards, M.D. 

Assistants to Visiting Surgeons. — Thomas W. Wickham, M.D., George 
W. Paper, M.D., Charles C. Lund, M.D., Joseph H. Burnett, M.D., 
E. Everett O'Neil, M.D., William F. Cotting, M.D., John J. Lucy, M.D., 
Howard A. Bouve, M.D., Gerald L. Doherty, M.D., John A. Seth, M.D. 

Senior Surgeon for Gynecology and Obstetrics. — Charles M. Green, M.D. 

Surgeon-in-Chief for Gynecology and Obstetrics. — Nathaniel R. 
Mason, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeon for Gynecology and Obstetrics. — Robert M. Green, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons for Gynecology and Obstetrics. — John T. 
Williams, M.D., Frederick L. Good, M.D., Joseph P. Cohen, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Surgeons for Gynecology and Obstetrics. — Harold V. 
Hyde, M.D., Fiederick J. Lynch, M.D. 

Assistant to Visiting Surgeons for Gynecology and Obstetrics. — Reginald 
D. Margeson, M.D. 



76 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Ophthalmic Surgeon-in-Chief. — Jeremiah J. Corbett, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Ophthalmic Surgeons, — L. Colby Rood, M.D., Leon 
W. Jessaman, M.D., Samuel H. Wilkins, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Ophthalmic Surgeons. — Joseph J. Skirball, M.D., 
Harry Schwartman, M.D., Thomas J. Hagan, M.D., Paul G. Haire, M.D. 

Surgeon-in-Chief for Diseases of Ear and Throat. — Harry P. Chaill, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeon for Diseases for Ear and Throat. — Louis M. Freed- 
man, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeon for Oral and Plastic Surgery. — Varaztad H. Kazan- 
jian, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons for Diseases of Ear and Throat.— WUliam T. 
Haley, M.D., Edward J. Monahan, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Surgeons for Diseases of Ear and Throat. — Philip E. A. 
Sheridan, M.D., WiUiam F. Regan, M.D., Edmund J. Butler, M.D., 
Philip R. Dwyer, M.D., Chester R. Mills, M.D., Francis G. Miniter, M.D. 

Oral Surgeon-in-Chief. ~ Stepen P. Mallett, D.M.D. 

Visiting Oral Surgeons. — •WiUiam H. Canavan, D.M.D. , Thomas 
Hennessey, D.M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Oral Surgeons.— Douglass M. Baker, D.M.D., George 
F. Winchester, D.M.D., Austin T. Wilhams, D.M.D. 

Visiting Anesthetists. — •Frank L. Richardson, M.D., Nathaniel N. 
Morse, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Anesthetist. — Lincoln F. Sise, M.D. 

Visiting Physician for Neurology. — Stanley Cobb, M.D., Abraham 
Myerson, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician for Neurology. — Miner H. A. Evans, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Physician for Neurology. — Percy L. Dodge, M.D., 
Maxwell E. MacDonald, M.D, 

Physician-in-Chief for Physical Therapeutics. — Frank P. Granger, M.D. 

Visiting Physician for Physical Therapeutics. — Robert Bonney, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician for Physical Therapeutics. — Joseph Res- 
nik, M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief for Diseases of the Skin. — Townsend W. Thorn- 
dike, M.D. 

Visiting Physician for Diseases of the Skin. — WilUam P. Board- 
man, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician for Diseases of the Skin. — ■ Walter T. Gar- 
field, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Physicians for Diseases of the Skin.' — John G. Downing, 
M.D., Bernard Appel, M.D. 

Pathologist-in-Chief.— Frank B. Mallory, M.D. 

Physician for Contagious Diseases. — Edwin H. Place, M.D. 

Roentgenologist-in-Chief. — P. F. Butler, M.D. 

Visiting Roentgenologists. — Max Rit\o, M.D., Frederick W. 
O'Brien, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Roentgenologist. — • Isaac Gerber, M.D. 

Physidaririn-Chief for Immunology. — George P. Sanborn, M.D. 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 77 

Assistant Visiting Physicians for Im7nunology. — • Edmund F. Walsh, 
M.D., LeRoy A. Luce, M.D. 

Pediatrician-in-Chief. — ■ Martin J. English, M.D. 

Visiting Pediatricians. — Augustine W. McGarry, M.D., Eli Fried- 
man, M.D. 

Junior Visiting Pediatricians. — Edward S. O'Keefe, M.D., John J. 
Dunphy, M.D., George Kahn, M.D., John P. Treanor, Jr., M.D. 

SOUTH DEPARTMENT. 

Medical Director. — John J. Dowling, M.D. 
Physician-in-Chief. — • Edwin H. Place, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians. — Wen S. Fu, M.D., Maurice Prizer, M.D., Fred 
HeimUch, M.D. 

HAYMAEKET SQUARE RELIEF STATION. 

Resident Surgeons. — ■ John G. Breslin, M.D., Bernard F. Devine, M.D. 

EAST BOSTON RELIEF STATION. 

Resident Surgeons. — Arthur G. Holland, M.D., Edward Reynolds, M.D. 

PHYSICIANS TO THE CONVALESCENT HOME. 

John P. Treanor, M.D. Henry F. R. Watts, M.D. 

Bradford Kent, M.D. 

Out-Patient Department. 
The new Out-Patient Building was opened to patients in October, 
1924. It contains 300 rooms and is equipped with every known device for 
the treatment of patients, also a centralized system of records. About 
seventy members of the Visiting Staff are here engaged in the treatment of 
patients and the teaching of Medical Students. There are also twenty 
nurses and six attendants, eight social workers, many clerks and tech- 
nicians. The out-patients treated in this building, together with those at 
the ReUef Stations, number more than 85,000 annually, with over 300,000 
visits of out-patients. 

The Thorndike Memorial. 
The Thorndike Memorial was opened on November 15, 1923, as the 
research department of the Hospital. The two upper floors of this building 
consists of laboratories devoted to special investigation. One floor con- 
tains nineteen beds for cases to be studied intensely. The first floor 
and basement house the X-Ray Department. All equipment is of the 
latest and best known to medical science. The Staff of the Thorndike 
Laboratory research service consists of Dr. Francis W. Peabody, Director, 
seven Assistant Physicians, four Resident Physicians and four Volunteer 
Assistants. 



78 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 808-811 City Hall Annex. 

[Special Stat. 1919, Chap. 222; Ord. 1920, Chap. 7; Stat. 1921, Chap. 173; 
Stat. 1922, Chap. 231; Ord. 1924, Chaps. 9, 10.| 

William S. Kinney, Commissioner. Term ends in 1930. 
Mary A. Cotter, Deputy Commissioner. 
John J. Ryan, Swpt. of Long Island Hospital. 

By Chap. 9, Ordinances of 1924, the Penal Division of this Department 
was separated therefrom and established as the Penal Institutions De . 
partment, to be in charge of one commissioner. This official has the 
control and active management of the House of Correction and Deer 
Island. 

The above-mentioned ordinance supersedes Chap. 7, Ord. of 1920 only 
so far as concerns the fourth or Penal Division of the Institutions Dept. 
The Infirmary and Child Welfare management remain in charge of the 
Institutions Commissioner. 

The Long Island Hospital was established on Long Island in 1887 and 
today its extensive plant consists of 9 large and 6 small buildings valued 
with land at $1,963,200. In 1926 the number of inmates cared for was 
1,520 males, 602 females, or total of 2,122 persons. The two schools 
formerly in charge of the Children's Inst. Trustees having been discon- 
tinued, the Parental School in 1914 and the Suffolk School for Boys in 
1920, the child welfare activities are now confined to a placing-out system 
whereby neglected and dependent children committed by the courts 
are boarded or indentured in country families in Massachusetts. Dis- 
ciplinary day schools are maintained by the School Committee to take 
care of such juvenile offenders as were formerly committed to the said 
training schools. 

The children placed out, such as require hospital treatment, are sent 
to the Long Island Hospital untU restored to health when they are replaced 
in families, so that there is an average daily number of 95 in the Hospital. 

The institution steamboat, "George A. Hibbard," is maintained for 
Long Island transportation service and power launch "James J. Minot." 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 11 Beacon Street. 
[Ord. 1904, Chap. 23; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 20., 
Frank S. Deland, Corporation Counsel. 
Joseph P. Lyons, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Joseph A. Campbell, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 79 

Samuel Silverman, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Andrew J. Casey, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
H. Murray Pakuxski, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Leo Schwartz, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Hale Power, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
ViTTORio Orlandini, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Edwin D. Gallagher, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Sadie Lipner Shulman, Assistant Corporation Counsel. 
Walter J. O'Malley, City Conveyancer. 
Ernest D. Cooke, City Conveyancer. 
Daniel B. Carmody, Messenger and Docket Clerk. 
Joseph J. Sarjeant, Special Investigator. 

The office of "Attorney and Solicitor" was established in 1827; the 
office of Corporation Counsel and that of City Solicitor in 1881. The 
office of City Solicitor was aboUshed and the department placed under the 
sole charge of the Corporation Counsel in 1904. 

As now organized the Law Department consists of a Corporation Counsel 
and twelve assistants, two of whom are detailed to do the conveyancing 
work of the department. One member of the department acts as advisor 
to the Transit Department and one member as advisor to the Building 
Department. The department, in addition to prosecuting and defending 
all law suits and causes for and against the City and County, does all the 
conveyancing work for the various municipal departments. 

Legal opinions are furnished to the various department heads and city 
officials, including the School Committee, on matters relating to the dis- 
charge of their official duties. This department appears and represents 
the City and County before the various committees of the Legislature and 
other public boards and commissions. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 
Office, Central Library Building, Copley square. 
[Stat. 1878, Chap. 114; Rev.Ord. 1898, Chap. 24; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 23; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 21; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 116.] 

officials. 
Guy W. Currier, President. 
Rt. Rev. Arthur T. Connolly, Vice President. 
Charles F. D. Belden, Director. 
Frank H. Chase, Reference Librarian. 

trustees.* 
William A. Gaston. Term ends in 1930. 
Louis E. Kirstein. Term ends in 1929. 
Guy W. Currier. Term ends in 1928. 
Arthur T. Connolly. Term ends in 1927. 
Gordon Abbott. Term ends in 1931. 

* The Trustees serve without compensation. 



80 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The Trustees of the PubUc Library of the City of Boston.five in number, 
are appointed by the Mayor, one each year, for a term of five years. They 
were incorporated in 1878, and authorized to receive and hold real and 
personal estate to an amount not exceeding $1,000,000. This amount 
was changed to $10,000,000 in 1919. The first Trustees were appointed 
under an ordinance of October 14, 1852. The old Library Building on 
Boylston street was opened to the public in September, 1858, and closed 
finally in January, 1895. The Central Library Building on Copley square, 
costing $2,756,384, was first opened on March 11, 1895. The Library 
is maintained by an annual appropriation included in the regular budget 
of the City Government. Of this appropriation ($1,000,981 in 1926) 
$125,000 was used for the purchase of books and periodicals. The Library 
trust funds in the custody of the City Treasurer amounted to $737,649.80 
on January 1, 1927. 

The annual reports, the first of which appeared in 1852, have been 
continued without interruption. 

LIBRARY SYSTEM. 

The Library system consists of the Central Library in Copley square; 
seventeen major branch libraries with independent collections of books 
and fourteen minor branches. There were, on January 1, 1927, in the 
Central Library (including mechanical departments), and branch hbraries, 
about 600 employees. 

Besides the daily delivery of books called for at the various branches, 
212 public and parochial schools, 38 institutions and 56 fire-company 
houses are regularly supplied. 

For reading and reference the Library is open to all without formality. 
On January 1, 1927, there were 135,445 cardholders having the right to 
draw books for home use. The total iiimciber of volumes was 1,388,439, 
including newspapers and periodicals. Books issued in 1926, for home 
use and for use through schools and institutions, nxunbered 3,499,137. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY, COPLEY SQUARE. 

Lending and reference, 1,011,130 volumes. 

Periodical reading-rooms, 1,532 periodicals. 

Newspaper reading-room, 274 current newspapers. 

Patent Library, 19,211 volumes. 

Bates Hall for reading and reference. About 10,000 volumes are 
on open shelves. 

Other Activities. The Fine Arts Department has facilities for copying 
and photographing, a collection of photographs of architecture, sculpture 
and painting, numbering 71,880 (including process pictures), besides 
illustrated books, portfolios, etc., and 11,533 lantern slides. Special assist- 
ance is offered to classes, travel clubs, etc. Free lectures mostly on art and 
travel topics, and concerts, are given during the winter season. The room 
for younger readers has about 10,000 volumes on open shelves for reading 
and circulation. A Teachers' Reference Room is maintained, and reference 
books are reserved for use in connection with University Extension courses. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 81 

Story telling for children is regularly conducted under expert direction at 
the Central Library and principal branches. On the ground floor of the 
Central Library near the main entrance are three rooms, wherein is pro- 
vided a community and general information service. In one room is 
maintained a classified collection of some 3,000 cm-rent Federal documents, 
including congressional, departmental and miscellaneous publications. 
Current Massachusetts documents are also to be found in this room. 
Another room contains on open shelves a classified collection of general 
literature for circulation, consisting of about 2,500 volumes. The Library 
is open from 9 A. M. to 10 P. M.; Sundays from 12 M. to 10 P. M.; 
closed at 9 P.M. from June 15 to September 15. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

The 17 major branch libraries are open on week days from 9 A. M. to 
9 P. M., with some variation of hours in summer. Most of them are open 
on Sundays, from 2 to 9 P. M., November to April. 

Brighton Branch, 19,358 volumes. Reading-room, 53 periodicals. 
Holton Library Building, Academy Hill road. 

Charlesto-R'n Branch, 15,533 volumes. Reading-room, 48 periodi- 
cals. Monument square, corner Monument avenue. 

Codman Square Branch, 11,502 volumes. Reading-room. 59 periodi- 
cals. Washington, corner Norfolk street. 

Dorchester Branch, 14,271 volumes. Reading-room, 59 periodicals. 
Arcadia, corner Adams street. 

East Boston Branch, 20,851 volumes. Reading-room, 65 periodicals. 
276-2S2 Meridian street. 

Fellowes Athen^um Branch, 36,943 volumes. Reading-room, 56 
periodicals. 46 Millmont street. 

Hyde Park Branch, 35,020 volumes. Reading-room, 51 periodicals. 
Harvard avenue, corner Winthrop street. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, 16,973 volumes. Reading-room, 50 periodi- 
cals. Sedgwick, corner South street. 

Memorial Branch, 11,115 volumes; 56 periodicals. Corner Warren 
and Townsend streets. 

Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 9,598 volumes, 42 periodicals. Washington, 
corner Eldon street. 

North End Branch, 11,274 volumes. Reading-room, 40 periodicals. 
3A North Bennet street. 

RosLiNDALE Branch, 11,563 volumes; 55 periodicals. Washington, 
near Ashland street. 

South Boston Br.\nch, 19,921 volumes. Reading-room, 61 periodicals. 
372 West Broadway. 

South End Branch, 14,403 volumes. Reading-room, 47 periodicals. 
West Brookline street, corner Shawmut avenue. 

Upham's Corner Br.\nch, 11,758 volumes. Reading-room, 49 peri- 
odicals. Columbia road, corner Bird street. 

West End Branch, 22,332 volumes. Reading-room, 67 periodicals. 
Cambridge street, corner Lynde street. 



82 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

West Roxburt Branch, 16,849 volumes. Reading-room, 54 periodi- 
cals. Centre, near Mt. Vernon street. 

The 14 minor branches, mostly located in the outlying districts, are 
open on week days from 1 to 9 P. M. Some of them are open on Sundays 
for the same hours from November to April. They contain from 2,200 
to 7,200 volumes and 23 to 38 periodicals. 



MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

OflBce in Rotunda of Faneuil Hall Market. 

[Rev. Ord. 1898 (now Rev. Ord. 1914), Chap. 1, § 4, tenth to twelfth; Rev. 
Ord. 1914, Chap. 22 and Chap. 40, §§ 29-34; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, 
§ 26; Ord. 1923, Chap. 6.] 

Daniel H. Rose, Superintendent of Markets. Term ends in 1930. 
Peter J. Connolly, Clerk and Depniy Superintendent. 

Faneuil Hall Market, proposed by Mayor Quincy and completed during 
his administration in 1826, was under the charge of a Clerk of the Market, 
until an ordinance of September 9, 1852, estabHshed the office of Super- 
intendent. Faneuil Hall Market includes the lower floor, porches and 
cellar of the buildings called respectively Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market. 
The Superintendent of Markets may assign stands within their limits; 
and it is his duty, from time to time, to lease the stalls in the markets at 
rents not less than those estabHshed by the City Council. The market 
police are appointed by the Pohce Commissioner and under his control. 

As a municipal enterprise both Faneuil Hall and Quincy markets have 
been steadily profitable, the latter yielding a total of $117,529.64, during 
the year 1926. 

The income from Faneuil Hall Market was $29,929.20, during the year 
1926. 

PubUc markets, outside stands, and coin locks yielded an additional 
revenue of $2,649.66, making a total income from the Market Department 
of $150,108.50, for the year 1926. 

Faneuil Hall Market, proposed by Mayor Quincy and completed during 
his administration in 1826, was under the charge of a Clerk of the Market 
until an ordinance of September 9, 1852, established the office of Super- 
intendent. Faneuil Hall Market includes the lower floor, porches and 
cellar of the buildings called respectively Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market. 
The Superintendent may assign stands within their limits; and it is his 
duty, from time to time, to lease the stalls in the market at rents not less 
than those established by the City Council. The market police are 
appointed by the Police Commissioner and under his control. 

As a municipal enterprise the Quincy Market has been steadily profitable, 
yielding a total net income in rentals, etc., of about $4,500,000 in the past 70 
years. Faneuil Hall Market yields $15,000 to $16,000 net yearly income, 
or about one-sixth that of Quincy Market. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 83 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE. 

[Formerly 0\':erseee8 of the Poor.] 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

[Stat. 1864, Chap. 128; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 27; C.C, TitlelV., Chap. 

27; Stat. 1909, Chap. 538; Stat. 1913, Chap. 763; Rev. Ord. 1914, 

Chap. 23; Stat. 1921, Chap. 146.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Nathan A. Heller, Chairman. 
Walter V. McCarthy, Secretary. 
Franklin P. Daly, Treasurer. 

overseers.* 
Nathan A. Heller. Edward H. Willey. 

Mrs. Jeremiah J. Hurley. Mrs. Margaret J. Gookin. 

Morris Bronstein. Mrs. Eva W. White. 

Franklin P. Daly. Sophie M. Friedman. 

The Overseers of the Poor in the Town of Boston, a corporation estab- 
lished in 1772 by act of the Legislature, were succeeded in 1864 by the 
corporation called "Overseers of the Poor in the City of Boston," consist- 
ing of twelve residents of Boston, four of whom are appointed annually 
to serve for the term of three years from the first day of May. The Board 
has issued annual reports since 1865. 

The Overseers of the Poor are also incorporated as a Board of Trus- 
tees of John Boylston's and other charitable funds. 

In charge of the Overseers are the Wayfarers' Lodge on Hawkins street, 
opened in 1878, which gives free lodging to homeless men who are out of 
employment, but exacts work in its woodyard for meals furnished; and 
the Temporary Home onChardon street for destitute women and children, 
opened in 1870. The total amount of the 17 permanent charity funds in 
the custody of the Overseers on Feb. 1, 1925, was $1,015,063, the annual 
income from which (about $37,000) is distributed to pensioners according 
to the intentions of the donors of the funds. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 

Offices, 33 Beacon Street. 

(Stat. 1875, Chap. 185; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 28; C.C, Title IV., Chap. 

24; Stat. 1911, Chap. 435, 540; Ord. 1912, Chap. 10; Ord. 1913, 

Chap. 5; Ord. 1914, Chap. 3; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 24; Ord. 1920, 

Chap. 13; Ord. 1922, Chaps. 5, 7; St.it. 1923, Chap. 309; Ord. 1923, 

Chaps. 8, 12J 

* The Overseers serve without compensation. 



84 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



COMMISSIONERS. 

William P. Long. TeiTQ ends in 1928. 
Myron P. Lewis* Term ends in 1927. 
Charles P. Norton.* Acting. 

OFFICIALS. 

William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Charles A. Hogan, Superintendent of Parks. 
John J. Murphy, Engineer. 

The first Board of Park Commissioners was appointed on July 8, 1875. 
The Board consisted of three members who served without compensation. 
As thus constituted, the department continued up to 1913, when, by the 
provisions of Chapter 10, Ordinances of 1912, it was merged with the 
Public Grounds, Bath and Music Departments, under the name of Park 
and Recreation Department. In 1920 the Cemetery Department was 
merged with the Part Department, the latter title being substituted for 
Park and Recreation Dept. 

Parks, Etc., with Location, Area and Year Acquired. 

main park system. Acres. 

Arborway, Prince St. to Franklin Park, 1892 36.00 

t Arnold Arboretum and Bussey Park, South, Centre and Walter 

sts., 1882, 1895 223.00 

Back Bay Fens, Beacon st. to Brookline ave., 1877 . . . 116.99 

Common, Tremont to Charles and Beacon to Boylston st., 1634. f 48.40 

Commonwealth ave., ArUngton st. to Newton line, 1894-1905 . 112 .70 
Frankhn Park (1883-84) and Zoological Garden (1912), Seaverto 

Morton St. and Blue Hill ave. to Forest Hills St. . . . 527.00 

Olmsted Park, Huntington ave. to Prince St., 1890 . . . 180.00 

** Avenue Louis Pasteur, Longwood ave. to the Fenway, 1922, 3.19 
Public Garden, Charles to ArUngton and Beacon to Boylston 

St., 1823 24.25 

Riverway, Brookline ave. to Huntington ave., 1890 . . . 40.00 
§ West Roxbury Parkway, from Centre and Walter sts., near 

Arboretum, to Washington St., Bellevue hill, 1894 . . 77.87 



Total Acres, Main Park System 1,389.40 

* Two commissioners serve without compensation. 
** Acquired by Ordinance, Chap. 7 of 1922. 

t This area of the Common is exclusive of the old cemetery on Boylston 
St. side, containing 1.40 acres. 

t Of this park, only the roads and walks are maintained by the City. 

§ The construction and care of that part of the parkway extending from 
Weld st. to Washington st. was transferred to the Metropolitan Park 
Commission by Chap. 270, Acts of 1915. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 85 



Acres. 



MARINE PARK SYSTEM. 

Castle Island (formerly), now joined to mainland and a part of 

Marine Park (land 25.70; flats 78.30), 1890 .... 104.00 
Columbia road ; Franklin Park to Marine Park, City Point, ) 

Dorchester way ) 1892,1899 ) 

Marine Park and Aquarium, Farragut road, City Point (land 

52.50; flats 4.90), 1883. (Aquarium, 1912.) . . . 57.40 

Strandway and Columbus Park, Columbia road railroad bridge 

to City Point (land 133.80; flats 131.50), 1890-1901 . . 265.30 



Total Acres, Marine Park Systena 457.90 

MISCELLANEOUS PARKS. 

* Irving W. Adams Park, Junction of Washington and South sts,, 

Roslindale, 1919 0.78 

Berners Sq., Longwood ave., Bellevue and Plymouth sts., Rox- 

bury, 1901 1.31 

Charlesbank, Charles st., from Cambridge st. to Leverett, 1883 . 10.00 
Charlestown Heights, Bunker Hill and Medford sts. (6.10), Dewey 

Beach (4.30), 1891 . 10.40 

Chestnut Hill Park, Beacon st. and Commonwealth ave., Brighton, 

1898-1902 55.40 

Copp's Hill terraces. Commercial and Charter sts.. North 

End, 1893 0.60 

* William B. Corbett Park, between Washington and Clayboume 

sts., Dorchester, 1917 0.94 

Dorchester Park, Dorchester ave. and Richmond St., 1891 . . 30.40 
FrankUn Field, Blue Hill and Talbot aves., Dorchester (park 

area), 1892. (See under Playgrounds for larger area) . . 17.00 
Freeport St. (Malloch's) Wharf and grounds, Dorchester (land 

1.15; flats, 2.54), 1912 3.69 

North End Beach, Commercial and Charter sts. (land 3.70; 

flats 3), 1893 6.70 

* Stanley A. Ringer Park, Allston st. and Griggs place, 1916 . 12. 12 
Rogers Park, Lake and Foster sts., Brighton, 1899 . . . 6.90 
Savin Hill Park, Grampian way, Dorchester, 1909 , . . 8.26 
Park, East Cottage, Pleasant and Pond sts., Dorchester, 1921 . 0.22 
Statler Park, Columbus ave., Stuart and Church sts., 1925 . 0.25 
Trinity Triangle, Huntington and St. James aves., 1885 . . 0.12 
World War Memorial Park, (formerly Wood Island), East Boston, 

on eastern waterfront (land 55.60; flats 155.40), 1882, 1891 . 211.00 



Total Acres, Miscellaneous Parks 376.09 

* Named for soldier killed in World War. 



86 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Playgrounds, with Location, Area and Year Acquirbd. 
(Alphabetically. ) 

Almont St., Mattapan, 1924 

William J. Barry, Chelsea st. and Mystic River, Cha'st'wn, 1897 
A J Bennett, Charles St. place, Charlestown, 1920 . 
Billings Field, La Grange and Bellevue sts., W. Roxbury, 1896 
Rev. Fr. Buckley, Bolton and West Third sts., South Boston 

1925 ' . . . . 

Brookside ave. and Cornwall st., Jaraaica Plain, 1925 
CarroU Pond, Carroll st., W. Roxbury, 1921 . 
t William E. Carter, Columbus ave. at Camden st., 1899 
Ceylon and Intervale sts., Dorchester, 1923 . 

*Charlesbank, Charles St., 1883 

Charlestown, Main and Alford sts. (land 14; flats 3.7), 1891 

* Charlestown Heights, Bunker Hill and Medford sts., 1891 

* Chestnut Hill, Brighton, 1898 

* Columbus Park, Strandway (15 acres improved) . 

* Common, Charles st. side 

American Legion, Condor and Glendon sts.. East Boston, 1924 
t John J. ConnoUy, Marcella and Highland sts., Roxbury, 1903 
t James L. Cronin, Brent st., near Talbot ave., Dorchester, 1899 
t Vincent Cutillo, Morton and Stillman sts.. North End, 1917 

* Dorchester Park, Dorchester ave. and Richmond st., 1891 . 
t John A. Doherty, Dorchester and Geneva aves., 1897 
t Frederick D. Emmons, Rutherford ave., Charlestown, 1912 
William Eustis, Norfolk ave. and Proctor st., Roxbury, 1909 . 

FactoryHill, Town St., Hyde Park, 1912 

t Fallon Field, South and Robert sts., Roslindale, 1899 . 

* Fens, Back Bay, 1877 

Franklin Field, Blue Hill and Talbot aves., Dorchester, 1892 

* Franklin Park, 1883-84 

t William H. Garvey, Neponset ave., opposite Chickatawbut st 

Dorchester, 1896 

Christopher Gibson, Dorchester and Geneva aves., 1897. 

Paul Gore st., Jamaica Plain, 1913 

Gove, Geneva, Porter and Wellington sts., E. B., 1925 . 

t James F. Healy, Washington st. and Firth road, Ros., 1902 

Heath, Cranford and Floyd sts., Roxbury, 1924 

Mary Hemenway, Adams and Gustine sts., Dorchester, 1919 

t John F. Holland, Mozart and Bolster sts., Roxbury, 1917 

Christopher J. Lee, First st. at M st., South Boston, 1897 

t McConnell Park (formerly Savin Hill), Springdale and Denny 

sts. (land, 9.78; flats, 50.55) 



Acres. 

17.81 
5.27 
0.11 

10.83 

0.65 
1.32 
0.47 
5.02 
4.03 
3.50 

17.73 
1.00 
4.00 

79.00 
3.50 
3.38 
5.10 
2.24 
0.48 
5.40 
1.47 
1.07 
7.60 
5.20 
3.87 
5.00 

60.00 

36.00 

16.68 
4.34 
0.74 
4.06 
9.63 
7.51 
4.41 
1.07 
5.20 

60.33 



* Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 

t Named for soldier killed in World War. 

A Acquired by gift. t Children's playground. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 



87 



t Arthur F. McLean, Saratoga and Bennington sts., E. B., 1917 
Mission Hill, Tremont and Smith sts., Roxbury, 1913 and 1915 
t John W. Murphy, Carohna ave., Jamaica Plain, 1912 . 

* North End Beach, Commercial st., 1893 .... 

* Olmsted Park, Jamaicaway, 1890 

John H. L. Noyes, Saratoga and Boardman sts.. East Boston 

(land 5.24; flats 3.07), 1909 ... 

t Paris St., East Boston, 1912 

Francis Parkman, Wachusett st., Forest Hills, 1924 

Portsmouth st., Brighton, 1912 

t Prince st., North Bennet and Prince sts., North End, 1897 . 
Readville, Bullard, Milton and Regent sts., Hyde Park, 1924 
t * Stanley A. Ringer, Allston st. and Griggs place, Brighton, 1916 
A Ripley, Ripley road, near Harvard st., Dorchester, 1913 

* Rogers Park, Lake and Foster sts., Brighton, 1899 
Ronan (formerly Mt. Ida), Bowdoin and Percival sts., Dor., 1912 
t Lester J, Rotch, Albany and Randolph sts., South End, 1903 
Shawmut ave. and Cherry st., South End, 1922 
Smith's Pond, Brainard st., Hyde Park, 1914 .... 
t William F. Smith, Western ave. and N, Harvard st., Bri., 1894 
1 1 J- M. and J. J. Sullivan, Fellows and Hunneman sts., Rox., 1897 
1 1 Matthew J. Sweeney, West Fifth st.. South Boston, 1909 

Tenean Beach, Neponset, 1915 

X Tyler St., South End, 1912 

t George H. Walker, Norfolk st., opp. Evelyn, Mattapan, 
t West Third st., comer B st., South Boston, 1909 . 
t John Winthrop, Dacia and Danube sts., Dorchester, 1911 
Webster ave., North End 1925 

* World War Memorial Park, East Boston, 1891 . 

Total area of the 66 Playgrounds (Acres) 
Area of 13 Playgrounds in Parks (Acres) 

Area of the 53 Separate Playgrounds (Acres) 

The first separate playground acquired by the City was the Charlestown 
Playground, purchased in 1891 for $172,923 . With that included, 63 play- 
grounds (50 separate and 13 located in parks) have been established, most 
of them equipped with first-class shelter and sanitary buildings containing 
lockers, also drinking fountains, shower baths, etc. 

The total outlay for land and construction of the playgrounds (not 
including those in parks) is $5,236,257. 

* Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 

t Named for soldier killed in World War. 

A Acquired by gift. t Children's playground. 



1912 



Acres. 

0.43 
4.24 
4.17 
3.00 
3.00 

8.31 
1.27 
2.06 
4.29 
0.40 
5.01 
2.00 
0.86 
4.00 

11.65 
2.80 
0.55 

14.51 

14.00 
0.85 
0.41 
8.70 
0.25 
6.21 
0.28 
1.57 
0.30 

10.00 



514.46 
159.40 

355.06 



88 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Public Grounds, Squares, Etc., with Locations and Areas. 
city proper. 

Square Feet. 

Berwick Park, between Columbus ave. and N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. 3,800 
Blackstone Square, Washington st., between West Brookline and 

West Newton sts 105,100 

City Hall Grounds, School st 7,700 

Columbus Square, Columbus and Warren aves 2,250 

Concord Square, between Tremont st. and Columbus ave. . . 5,000 
Copley Square, between Huntington ave., Boylston and Dart- 
mouth sts 28,399 

Fort Hill Square, OHver and High sts 29,480 

Franklin Square, Washington st., between East Brookline and 

East Newton sts 105,205 

Abraham Lincoln Square (formerly Park Square), Columbus 

ave., Eliot st. and Broadway 2,867 

Massachusetts Ave. Malls, four sections, between Albany st. and 

Columbus ave 106,500 

Rutland Square, between Tremont st. and Columbus ave. . . 7,400 

St. Stephen Square, corner St. Stephen and Batavia sts. . . 100 

Union Park, between Tremont st. and Shawmut ave. . . . 16,000 

Waltham Square, Harrison ave., opposite Union Park st. . . 3,000 

Worcester Square, between Washington st. and Harrison ave. . 16,000 



ROXBURY. 

Bromley Park, Albert to Bickford sts. 



Cedar Square, Cedar st., between Juniper and Thornton sts. 
Elm Hill Ave., between Seaver and Schuyler sts. (Tree Area) 
Elm Hill Park, off 550 Warren st 

* Francis G. Hanlon Square, junction of Huntington ave., Tre 

mont and Francis sts 

General Heath Square, Old Heath, New Heath '^nd Parker sts 
Highland Park, Fort ave. and Beech Glen st. .... 
Horatio Harris Park, Walnut ave., from Munroe to Townsend st 
Alvah Kittredge Park, Highland st. and Highland ave. 

Linwood Park, Centre and Linwood sts 

Longwood Park, Park and Austin sts 

Madison Park, SterHng, Marble, Warwick and ^\estminster sts., 
Orchard Park, Chad wick. Orchard Park and Yeoman st. 
Public Ground, corner Blue Hill ave. and Seaver st. 
Warren Square, Warren, St. James and Regent sts. 
Walnut Park, between Washington st. and Walnut ave. 
Washington Park, Dale and Bainbridge sts 

* Herbert J. Wolf Square, Crawford, Abbotsford and Harold sts. 



20,975 

26,163 

2,650 

6,920 

1,662 

2,419 

158,421 

110,040 

5,600 

3,625 

21,000 

122,191 

104,492 

2,500 

1,380 

5,736 

396,125 

966 



Named for soldier killed in World War. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 



89 



BRIGHTON 



Brighton Square, Chestnut Hill ave. and Academy Hill rd. 

* Edward M. Cunningham Square, Cambridge, Murdock and 

Sparhawk sts 

Fern Square,* between Franklin and Fern sts 

Jackson Square, Chestnut Hill ave., Union and Winship sts. 

Oak Square, Washington and Faneuil sts 

Public Ground, Cambridge and Henshaw sts. 

CHARLESTOWN. 

City Square, junction of Main and Park sts 

Essex Square, Essex and Lyndeboro' sts 

Hayes Square, Bunker Hill and Vine sts. .... 

Sullivan Square, Main, Cambridge, Sever and Gardner sts. 
Winthrop Square, Winthrop, Common and Adams sts. 

DORCHESTER. 

* Andrew Henry Square, Adams and Granite sts. 
Algonquin Square, Algonquin and Bradlee sts 
Centervale Park, Upland ave. and Bourneside st 

* John F. Donovan Park, Meeting House Hill 
Drohan Square, Edison Green .... 
Eaton Square, Adams and Bowdoin sts. . 

* Francis G. Kane Square, Bowdoin, Winter and Hancock sts 
Mt. Bowdoin Green, summit of Mt. Bowdoin 
Peabody Square, Ashmont st. and Dorchester ave. 
*Fred C, W. Olson Square, junction of Adams and Codmansts 
Public Ground, Florida st.. King to Ashmont (7 sections) 

* Gordon E. Denton Square, Magnolia st 

Public Ground, between Victory Road and Park st. 
Richardson Square, between Pond and Cottage sts. 
Spaulding Square, junction of Freeport st. and Neponset ave 
Tremlett Square, Tremlett st., between Hooper and Waldeck sts 
Wellesley Park, Wellesley Park st. . 



Square Feet. 

25,035 




EAST BOSTON. 

Belmont Square, Webster, Sumner, Lamson and Seaver sts. 

Central Square, Meridian and Border sts 

Maverick Square, Sumner and Maverick sts 

Prescott Square, Trenton, Eagle and Prescott sts. 
Putnam Square, Putnam, White and Trenton sts. 

HYDE PARK. 

Camp Meigs, Readville 

* Horace Campbell Woodworth Square, Beacon st. and Metro- 

politan ave 

♦ Lieut. Parker B. Jones Square, Milton ave. and Highland st. . 
Williams Square, Williams ave. and Prospect st 



7,449 
1,900 
4,300 
9,796 

1,434 

8,739 
930 

4,484 
56,428 
38,450 

2,068 
1,728 
9,740 

56,200 

10,241 

13,280 
1,600 

25,170 

1,963 

700 

24,193 

3,605 

450,846 

46,035 
6,263 
7,107 

28,971 

30,000 
40,310 
4,396 
12,284 
11,628 

124,500 

220 
220 
700 



* Named for soldier killed in World War. 



90 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Square Feet. 
Greenwood Squaxe, junction of Greenwood st. and Central ave. 220 

Webster Square, junction of Webster st. and Central ave. . 220 

Wolcott Square, Hyde Park ave., Milton and Prescott sts. . 220 

SOXITH BOSTON. 

Independence Square, Broadway, Second, M and N sts. 

Lincoln Square, Emerson, Fourth and M sts 

Public Ground, East Ninth st 

Thomas Park, Telegraph Hill 



WEST ROXBURY. 

* Gustav Emmet Square, S. Conway, S. Fairview and Robert sts. 

* Cornelius J. Mahoney Square, Centre and Perkins sts. 

Oakview Terrace, off Centre st. 

Soldiers' Monument Lot, South and Centre sts., Jamaica Plain . 



279,218 
9,510 
6,671 

190,000 

750 
3,200 
5,287 
5,870 



Total area of Public Grounds, etc., 3,005,745 square feet, or 69 acres. 



Acres. 

1,389.40 

457.90 

376.09 

355.06 

69.00 



RECAPITULATION . 

Parks and Parkways: 

Main Park System . 

Marine Park System 

Miscellaneous Parks 
Playgrounds (separate) 
Public Grounds, Squares, etc. 

Grand total (Acres) .2,647.4.5 

Bridges Located in Parks and Parkways. 

public garden. 
Foot-bridge, over pond. 

the fens. 

Agassiz, carrying Agassiz road over the Fens water. 

BoYLSTON, over outlet of the Fens. 

Charlesgate, over Boston & Albany Railroad and Ipswich street 

Commonwealth avenue, over outlet of the Fens. 

Fens, over outlet of Muddy river. 

commonwealth avenue. 
Cottage Farm, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

RIVERWAY. 

Audubon, over Newton circuit of Boston & Albany Railroad. 

t Bellbvue, over Muddy river from Bellevue street. 

Bridle Path, carrying the ride over Muddy river, near Audubon road. 

t Brookline avenue, over Muddy river. 

t Berners street foot-bridge, over Muddy river. 

t Huntington avenue, over outlet of Leverett pond. 

t Longwood, carrying Longwood avenue over Muddy river. 

* Named for soldier killed in World War. 
t The Park Dept. maintains such parts of these bridges as are within City 
limits. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 



91 



OLUSTED FARE. 

Foot-bridges at Leverett pond and over outlets of Willow pond and 
Ward's pond. 

FRANKLIN PARK. 

Ellicott arch, carrying Circuit drive over walk at Ellicottdale. 

Forest Hills, carrying entrance to Franklin Park over traffic road. 

Overlook arch, over entrance to Overlook Shelter. 

ScARBORo', carrying Circuit drive over Scarboro' pond. 

Scarboro' pond foot-bridge, carrying the walk over Scarboro' pond. 

COLXTMBIA road. 

Columbia road, over Old Colony avenue and Plymouth division of New 

York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 
Columbia road, over Shoreham street. 

WORLD war memorial PARK. 

Neptune, carrying Neptune rd. over Boston, Revere B. & Lynn R.R. 
Foot-bridge, from Prescott st. over Boston, Revere B. & Lynn R.R. 



Statues Belonging to City, Located in Parks and Public Grounds. 



Name. 


Location. 


Year 
Erected. 


Artist. 


Samuel Adams 


Adams Square 


1880 


Anne Whitney. 
Henry H. Kitson. 
Richard E. Brooks. 


Robert Bums 


Back Bay Fens 


1919 


Colonel Thomas Cass .... 


Public Garden 


1899 


Leif Ericsson 


Commonwealth Ave . . 


1886 


Anne Whitney. 


Edward Everett 


Edward Everett Sq., 
Dorchester 


1867 




William W. Story. 


Admiral David G. Farra- 
gut. 


Marine Park, S. Bos- 
ton. 


1893 


Henry H. Kitson. 


Benjamin Franklin 


City Hall Grounds. . . . 


1856 


Richard S. Greenough. 


William Lloyd Garrison . . 


Commonwealth Ave . . 


1886 


Olin L. Warner. 


General John Glover 


Commonwealth Ave. . 


1875 


Martin Milmore. 


Edward Everett Hale 


Public Garden 


1913 


Bela L. Pratt. 


Alexander Hamilton 


Commonwealth Ave . . 


1865 


William Rimmer. 


Wendell Phillips 


Public Garden 


1915 


Daniel C. French. 







92 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



STATUES BELONGING TO CITT, LOCATED IN PARKS AND PUBLIC GROUNDS. — Concluded 



Name. 


Location. 


Year 
Erected. 


Artist. 


Josiah Quincy 


City Hall Grounds 

Public Garden 

Warren Sq., Roxbury, 

Public Garden 

First Church Grounds, 


1879 
1878 
1904 
1869 
1880 


Thomas Ball. 


Charles Sumner 


Thomas Ball. 


General Joseph Warren. . 
George Washington * . . . . 
John Winthrop 


Paul W. Bartlett. 
Thomas Ball. 
Richard S. Greenough. 







Monuments and Memorials Belonging to City, Located on Public Grounds. 



Name or Designation. 



Location. 



Year 
Erected. 



Artist or Architect. 



Blackstone 
Tablet. . . 



Memorial 



Crispus Attucks and Other 
Patriots of 1770 



William EUery Channing, 

Patrick A. Collins Me- 
morial 



Declaration of Independ- 
ence Tablet 



Dorchester Heights (Rev- 
olutionary) 



Ether Memorial . 



Curtis Guild Memorial 
Entrance 



Abraham Lincoln and 
Emancipation 

John Boyle O'Reilly 



Francis Parkman Me- 
morial 



Boston Common. 

Boston Common . 
Public Garden . . . 



Commonwealth Ave. 



Boston Common. 



Telegraph Hill, 

South Boston . . . 

Public Garden 

Boston Common 



Abraham Lincoln Sq. , 
Back Bay Park , 



Olmsted Park, J. P. 



1914 



1903 
1908 
1925 

1902 

1867 

1917 

1879 
1896 

1906 



R. Clipston Sturgis. 

Robert Kraus. 
Herbert Adams. 



Henry H. Kitson. 
T. Alice Kitson. 



John F. Paramino. 

Peabody & Steams. 
John Q. A. Ward. 

Cram & Ferguson. 

Thomas Ball. 
Daniel C. French. 

Daniel C. French. 



Equestrian statue. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 93 

MONUMENTS AND MEMOEIALS BELONGING TO THE CITY. — Concluded. 



Name or Designation. 



Location. 



Year 
Erected. 



Artist or Architect. 



George F. Parkman Me- 
morial Bandstand. 

Football Tablet 

Colonel Robert Gould 
Shaw and 54th Mass. 
Reg. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Monument 

Soldiers' Monument, 
Charlestown 

Soldiers' Monument, 
Dorchester 

Soldiers' Monument, 
Jamaica Plain 

George Robert White Me- 
morial 



Boston Common . 
Boston Common. 



> Boston Common . . . 



Boston Common 

Winthrop Siquare 

Meeting House Hill. . . 
Centre and South sts.. . 
Public Garden 



1912 
1925 

1897 

1877 
1872 
1867 
1871 
1924 



Robinson & Shepard. 



Augustus Saint Gaudens. 
McKim, Mead & White. 



Martin Milmore. 
Martin Milmore. 
B. F. Dwight. 
W. W. Lummis. 
Daniel C. French. 



Fountains Belonging to City, Located on Public Grounds. 
Brewer Fountain, Boston Common; Coppenhagen Memorial Fountain, 
Edward Everett Square; Johnson Memorial Fountain and Gateway, 
entrance to Back Bay Park, Westland Avenue; "Maid of the Mist" 
and three other fountains, PubHc Garden; one fountain each on 
Blackstone, Franklin, Central, Independence and Sullivan Squares, 
Meeting House HiU, Thomas Park, Madison Park, Union Park and 
Massachusetts Avenue; Lyman Fountain, Eaton Square; Taft 
Memorial Fountain, Chestnut Hill Park. 

Since the City's park development began, in 1877, the total expenditure, 
to the close of 1925, for parks, parkways and playgrounds (exclusive of 
the annual maintenance appropriation) is $26,827,727.38 or $10,668,- 
224.29 for the land and $16,159,503.09 for construction. 

The ArBold Arboretum (the "tree museum" of Harvard University), 
containing originally 122.6 acres, was added with other lands, in 1882, 
to the City's park system, under a special contract with Harvard Uni- 
versity, and in 1895 another tract of 75 acres (Peter's HilD, also belonging 
to the University, was included, the name Bussey Park being added to 
the title. All the land in these tracts not required for driveways and walks, 
a quarry reservation and traffic road is used, under the trusts created by 



94 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

the wills of Benjamin Bussey and James Arnold, for Harvard's extensive 
collection of specimens of such trees and shrubs as will live in this climate. 
The City maintains the roads and walks, also attends to policing the 
grounds. The Arboretum is open to visitors daily from 7 A. M. until 
sunset. 

The Franklin Park Zoological Garden on the northern side of the park, 
begun in 1911, now occupies about eighty acres. Up to December 31, 1925, 
the amount expended for construction, etc., was S571, 128.79. In the sum- 
mer of 1912, the group of bear dens, the aquatic flying cage, etc., were 
finished and put on exhibition, in 1913 the bird house with other attrac- 
tions, in 1914 the elephant house and in 1920 the lion house, were added. 
One of the latest improvements is the "Greeting" or main entrance and 
concourse leading from Blue Hill avenue, with massive stone gateway, 
ornamental fence, etc., completing the original artistic design. 

The Marine Park Aquarium, costing $144,530, was opened to the public 
on November 28, 1912. The entire outlay for both was appropriated 
from the George F. Parkman Fund income. 

GEORGE F. PARKMAN FUND. 

By the wiU of the late George F. Parkman, various real estate properties 
worth between $5,000,000 and $6,000,000 were left to the City, the income 
therefrom to be expended for the maintenance and improvement of the 
Common and such parks as were in existence January 12, 1887, and no 
part of it to be used for the purchase of additional land for park purposes. 
The bequest was accepted by the City Council, March 9, 1909, since which 
date most of the realty has been sold and the proceeds invested in bonds. 
On December 31, 1926, the principal of the fund in the custody of the City 
Treasurer, amounted to $5,237,934.96. In the fiscal year 1926, the income 
from the fund was $218,343.03. 

Public Baths and Gymnasia. 

MAIN bath houses, OPEN ALL THE TEAR. 

Cabot Street. — 203 Cabot street, Roxbury. Brick building, con- 
taining 45 shower baths, a swimming pool, 75 by 25 feet, and a gjrmnasium. 
Opened to the public in September, 1905. Total cost of building, $108,690. 

Charlestown. — Corner Bunker Hill and Lexington streets. Brick 
building (old City building remodeled), containing 28 shower baths and 
a gymnasium. Opened to the public in March, 1913. Total cost, $49,000, 
approximately. 

Dover Street. — 249 Dover street. Brick building, containing 30 
shower baths for men and 11 for women, also tub baths. No gymnasium. 
It includes a laundry where all the towels and part of the bathing suits 
used in the department are laundered. Opened to the pubUc in October* 
1898. Total cost (including $14,154 for land), $88,267. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 95 

North Bennet Street. — North End, Brick building, containing 
65 shower baths, 400 lockers and a gymnasium. Opened to the pubUc 
in April, 1909. Total cost (including $36,800 for land), $136,186. 

BATHS AND GYMNASIA IN OTHER CITY BUILDINGS, OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

Charlesbank. — -Charies street, West End, two houses (i. e., for men 
and women), 12 shower baths in each; outdoor gymnasium. 

Copley School. — Bartlett street, Charlestown, 12 showers for men, 10 
showers for women. 

East Boston Gymnasium.*— 116 Paris street, 74 shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — Corner Columbia road and Bird street, 
Dorchester, 26 shower baths and a swimming pool. 

Municipal Building. — • South street, near Sedgwick street, Jamaica 
Plain, 19 shower baths and a swimming pool, 75 by 24 feet. 

Municipal Building. — ■ Broadway, South Boston, 65 shower baths, 
i. e., 40 for men's section, 23 for women's, and two extension showers for 
boys. 

Municipal Building. — ■ Tyler street, South End, 40 shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — Vine and Dudley streets, Roxbury, 28 shower 
baths for men's section, 28 for women's and 6 in gymnasium. 

Municipal Building. — Shawmut avenue and W. Brookline street. 
South End, 115 shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — Washington street, near Ashland, Roshndale, 
1 S shower baths. 

Municipal Building. — ■ River street, Hyde Park, 25 shower baths. 

beach baths. 

Columbus Park. — South Boston, single house, for men, women and 
children. 

Dewey. — Medford street, Charlestown, single house, for men, women 
and children. 

Freeport Street. — ■ Dorchester, one-house, for men and women. 

K Street. — South Boston, for women. 

L Street.! — South Boston, for men and boys. 

Marine Park. — Dressing closets, lockers and showers, for men and 
women. 

* On the site of the new East Boston Gjmanasium was located the first 
indoor municipal gymnasium in the United States, so far as known. It 
was opened to the pubUc in 1897. 

t The L street seaside bath, opened in 1866, was the first municipal bath 
established in the United States, so far as known. 



96 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

North End Park. — Commercial street, two houses, for men and 
women. A laundry connected with these bath houses launders part of 
the bathing suits used in the department during the summer bathing 
season. 

Savin Hill. — Dorchester, single house, for men, women and children. 

Tenean. — Neponset, single house, for men, women and children. 

World War Memorial Park. — East Boston, two houses, for men and 
wcjmen, and one house for boys. 

Cemetery Division. 
When in November, 1920, the Cemetery Department was consolidated 
with the Park Department, the five trustees of the former were superseded 
by the Park Commissioners, who reorganized it as the Cemetery Division 
of the Park Department, thereupon taking charge of Mount Hope 
Cemetery and all the burying grounds owned by the City. Mount Hope 
Cemetery (the largest of all) was bought by the City in 1857 for $35,000 
and additional land has been purchased since. It is bounded by Walk Hill, 
Harvard, Canterbury and Paine streets, Ward 18. The Board of Cemetery 
Trustees was first appointed under the ordinances of December 21, 1857, 
and annual reports have been published since 1859. 

All the cemeteries formerly under control of the said Board but now in 
charge of the Park Department, are as follows, with area: 

Bennington street, East Boston, 157,500 square feet. 
Bunker Hill, Charlestown, 48,202 square feet. 
Central, Boston Common, 60,693 square feet. 
Copp's Hill, Charter and Hull streets, 89,015 square feet. 
Dorchester North, Upham's Corner, 142,587 square feet. 
Dorchester South, Dorchester avenue, 95,462 square feet. 
Eliot, Washington and Eustis streets, 34,830 square feet. 
Evergreen, Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, 604,520 square feet. 
Fairview, Hyde Park, 50 acres. 

Granary, Tremont street, opposite Bromfield street, 82,063 square feet. 
Hawes, Emerson street, near L street, 11,232 square feet. 
King's Chapel, Tremont street, near School street, 19,344 square feet. 
Market Street, Market street, Brighton, 1,872 square feet. 
Mount Hope, Walk Hill street, 117 acres and 36,536 square feet. 
Phipps street, Charlestown, 76,740 square feet. 
Rainsford Island, 43,560 square feet. 

South End, Washington and East Concord streets, 64,570 square feet 
Walter Street, Walter street, Roslindale, 35,100 square feet. 
Warren, Kearsarge avenue, Roxbury, 54,500 square feet. 
Westerly, Centre street, West Roxbury, 39,450 square feet. 
Total area of the 20 cemeteries, 206 acres. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 97 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Office 804, 805, 806 City Hall Annex. 

[Ord. 1924, Chap. 9.] 
Philip A. Chapman, Commissioner. 
By Chap. 9, Ordinances of 1924, the control and management of the 
House of Correction and Deer Island was transferred from the Institu- 
tions Commissioner to a new official, viz., the Penal Institutions Com- 
missioner. This executive and administrative head of the newly estab- 
lished Penal Institutions Department was empowered to organize it 
according as deemed necessary for its proper conduct. 

CHIEF PENAL OFFICER. 

George F. A. Mulcahy, Master of House of Correction, Deer Island. 

This institution dates from 1902 and now includes a group of buildings 
valued at $1,467,600, the value of the land has been appraised at $605,900, 
a total of $2,073,500. The persons confined there in 1926, numbered 
3,555, all men, who were kept busy at farming or in making shoes, clothes, 
and granite edgestones. Number discharged in year 3,646; average 
daily population, 653, in month of December, 1926. 

The Department Steamboat "Michael J. Perkins" is maintained for 
Deer Island transportation service. 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office and Printing Plant, 286 Congress street. 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 31; Ord. 1911, Chap. 2; Ord. 1914, Chap. 6; Rev. 

Ord. 1914, Chap. 26; Ord. 1920, Chap. 9; Rev. Ord. 1925, Chap. 24.] 
William J. Casey, Superintendent of Printing. Term ends April, 1930. 
Salary, $6,000. 

The Superintendent of Printing has charge of all the printing, binding 
and stationery for the city departments. He also purchases the postage 
used by the city. 

The printing plant was estabhshed in March, 1897, for the express 
purpose of executing the printing required by all city and county depart- 
ments. It was originally operated and maintained partly from an appro- 
priation and partly from revenue. Since 1910 it has been entirely self- 
supporting, and no appropriation of any kind has been made. The entire 
expense of maintenance, including pay roll, has been met from the revenue. 

The plant is organized and equipped especially for the city's printing 
requirements and consists of modern type-setting machinery, presses and 
material, and is appraised at approximately $200,000. 



98 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 802 City Hall Annex, eighth floor. 

[Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, § 22; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 32; Stat. 1913, 

Chap. 263; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 27; Ord. 1921, Chap. 1.] 

John P. Englert, Superintendent of Public Buildings. 
Frederick C. Ward, Chief Clerk. 

The office of the Superintendent of PubHc Buildings was established 
by ordinance on July 1, 1850, and annual reports have been published 
by the Superintendent since 1851. He has the supervision of the care, 
repair and furnishing of all buildings belonging to or hired by the City. 

CITY BUILDINGS IN CHARGE OF THIS DEPARTMENT. 



Building and Location. 



Occupied bt, etc. 



Ambulance Station, National st., So. 
Boston. 

Municipal Building, City sq., Charles- 
town. 

City Building, Norfolk and Washing- 
ton sts., Dor. 

City Building, Richmond and Washing- 
ton sts.. Dor. 

City Hall, School st 



On leased land. 



Charlestown Municipal Court 
and Police Sta., 15th Div. 

Public Library Br. and Wd. 17 
wardroom. 

Public Librarj' Br., veterans' 
headquarters. 

Mayor's office, City Council 
chamber and City depart- 
ments or divisions of same. 



City Hall Annex, Court st j City Departments. 



East Boston Court House and PoUce 
Station, Meridian and Paris sts. 

Faneuil Hall, Faneuil Hall square 



Faneuil Hall Market House, N. and S. 
Market sts. 

Jamaica Plain Library, South and Sedg- 
wick sts. 

Municipal Building, Jamaica Plain, 
South st. 



Dist. Court and Police Sta., 7th 
Div. 

Faneuil Hall, Armory of Ancient 
and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany, market stalls, under hall . 

Quincy Hall and Produce Exch. 



Public Library Br. 



Curtis Hall, baby clinic, baths 
and gymnasium. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 99 

City Botldings in Charge op this Department. — Concluded. 



Building and Location. 



Municipal Building, Dorchester, Colum- 
bia rd. 



Municipal Building, River st., Hyde 
Park. 

Municipal Building, Roslindale, Wash- 
ington St., opposite South. 



Municipal Building, So. Boston, E. 
Broadway. 

Municipal Building, Wd. 3, Oak and 
Tyler sts. 



Municipal Building, Wd. 9, Shawmut 
ave. and W. Brookline st. 



^Municipal Building, Wd. 8, Vine and 
Dudley sts. 



Old Chemical Engine House, Eustis St., 
Roxburj'. 

Old Ladder House No. 5, Fourth st., 
So. Boston. 

Old Pohce Sta. 7, Meridian street, E. 
Boston. 

Old Provincial State House, Washington 
and State sts. 

Old Franklin Schoolhouse, 1151 Wash- 
ington St. 

Old Cross St. Schoolhouse, Cross st.. 
Charlestown. 

Old Winthrop Schoolhouse, Bunker Hill 
St.. CharlestcuTi. 



Smith Schoolhouse, Joy st. 



Occupied by, etc. 



Pub. Library Br., wardroom, 
baths and gymasium, veteran 
organiziation headquarters. 

Auditorium, wardroom, gym- 
nasium, baby clinic and baths. 

Auditorium, Pub. Library Br., 
wardroom, baby clinic, gym- 
nasium and baths. 

Municipal Court, Pub. Library 
Br., auditorium and baths. 

Pub. Library Br., baths, baby 
clinic, municipal employment 
bureau, gymnasium and 
wardroom. 

Auditorium, Pub. Library Br., 
gymnasium, baby clinic and 
baths. 

Pub. Library Br., baths, gym- 
nasium, baby clinic and ward- 
room. 

Leased. 



Upper part, Post 32, G. A. R. 
Leased to L. S. W. V. 
Leased to Bostonian Soc. 
Leased as veteran headquarters. 



Leased to Col. F. B. Bogan 
Camp, No. 14, L. S. W. V. 

Reconstructed, with gymna- 
sium, baths, baby clinic and 
wardroom. 

Leased to Post 134, G. A. R. 



100 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

County Buildings. 



Building and Location. 



Occupied bt, etc. 



Court House, Pemberton sq . 



Mortuary, Northern Dist., 18 N, Grove 

St. 

Municipal Court, Brighton. 

Roxbury Court House, Roxbury st 



Municipal Court, Dor., Adams and 
Arcadia sts. 



Municipal Court, W. Rox., Morton St., 
Forest Hills. 



County offices and court rooms 



Municipal Court, South'n Dist., 
veteran organizations. 

Part occupied by PoUce Sta., 
11th Div., Public Library 
Br. 

Municipal Court, W. Rox. and 
Hyde Park. 



WARDROOMS IN CITY BUILDINGS, ETC. 



District. 


New 
Wds. 


BuiLDINa. 


Location. 


East Boston 


1 


Old Armory Building 


Maverick st. 


Charlestown 


2 


Charlestown Gymnasium 
Building. 


Bunker Hill and Lex- 
ington sts. 


Boston Proper. . . 


3 


Municipal Building 


Oak and Tyler sts. 


South Boston 


6 


Municipal Building 


Broadway. 


Roxbury 


« 


Municipal Building 


Vine and Dudley sts , 


Dorchester 


13 


Municipal Building 


Columbia road and 
Bird St. 




17 


City Building 


Washington and Nor- 






folk sts. 


Jamaica Plain. . . . 


11 
19 


Minton Hall * 


Forest Hills sq. 


Roslindale 


Municipal Building 


Washington st. oppo- 
site South. 


Hyde Park 


18 


Municipal Building 


River st., and Cen- 
tral ave. 


Brighton 


22 


Old Town Hall 


Washington st. 



* Hired for $600 per year. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 101 

The two buildings used as armories are Engine House No. 4, Bulfineh 
St., belonging to the City, and No. 130 Columbus ave., the latter occupied 
by four companies of Cadets, annual rent paid, $4,800. At 11 Beacon 
St., 10th floor, hu-ed for Law Department at annual rent of $12,840, and 
at 274 Boylston st., three rooms for Medical Examiner of Northern Dis- 
trict at $1,800 per year. 

In charge of this department also are the following City scales: North 
scales, Haymarket square. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 
General offices, entire fifth, sixth and seventh floors, City Hall Annex. 

[Ord. 1910, Chap. 9; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 553 and 571; Stat. 1911, Chap. 
312; Ord. 1911, Chaps. 1 and 10; Stat. 1912, Chap. 348; Rev. Ord. 
1914, Chap. 28; Stat. 1914, Chap. 324; Ord. 1916, Chap. 3; Ord. 1917, 
Chap. 2; Ord. 1921, Chap. 3.] 

James H. Sullivan, Commissioner. Term ends in 1930. 
Bernard C. Kbllbt, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 

The Department of Public Works was established in 1911, consisting of 
the Street, Water and Engineering Departments combined under a single 
executive head, the Commissioner of Pubhc Works, the latter authorized 
to create the necessary divisions of the department according to his judg- 
ment. The following four divisions have been created, viz.. Bridge and 
Ferry, Highway, Sewer and Sanitary, Water, each in charge of a Division 
Engineer. 

The Commissioner of Pubhc Works, who must be a civil engineer of 
recognized standing in his profession, has control over the construction 
of all streets and sewers; the care and management of all bridges used as 
highways; of the ferries owned and operated by the City, and of the street 
lamps maintained by the City; the cleaning, repairing and sprinkling of 
streets and the removal of house offal and refuse; the maintenance and 
operation of all fixtures and appliances held by the City for purposes of 
water supply; and over the granting of permits to open, occupy, obstruct 
and use portions of streets. 

By authority of Chapter 571, Acts of 1910, the Commissioner of Public 
Works charges for permits issued, as per the following revised schedule in 
effect from April 1, 1920: 

1. Openings in streets or sidewalks, 50 cents each. Limited to 100 linear feet on one 
permit. 

2. Emergency permits, Class A (for the above purpose), 50 cents each. 

3. Advertising by man wearing hat and coat lettered (annual permit), $5 (or SI pet 
month). 

4. Cleaning snow from roofs (occupation of sidewalk and street while eo doing), annual 
permit, $1 each. 



102 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

5. Driving cattle through the streets (annual permit to driver), So. 

6. Erecting and repairing awnings (annual permit) , $1 each. 

7. Moving buildings in streets, $5 per day; minimum charge, $10. 

8. Erecting, altering or repairing buildings (occupation of street or sidewaik), 5 cents 
per square foot per month in the City Proper, bounded on the south by and includingBerke- 
ley and Dover streets; 3 cents per square foot per month in that part of the City south 
of limits above stated to and including Massachusetts ave.; and 2 cents per square foot 
per month in all other localities. 

9. Painting or minor repairs, $1 each. 

10. Feeding horses on streets (annual permit) , $1 each. 

11. Placing and removing signs flat on buildings, $1 each. 

12. Projecting signs or lamps from buildings, $1 each. 

13. Raising or lowering safes, machinery, etc., $1 each. 

14. Emergency permits, Class B, $1 each. 

15. Special permits for periods and rates other than those in the preceding classes 
according to the discretion of the Commissioner. 

Bridge and ferry Division. 
Office, 602 City Hall Annex, sixth floor. 
John E. Carty, Division Engineer. 
L. B. Reilly, Engineer of Construction. 
R. D. Gardner, Designing Engineer. 
Thomas H. Sexton, Supervisor of Bridges. 
John F. Sullivan, General Foreman of Ferries. 

The Division Engineer has charge of the design, construction and main- 
tenance of the highway bridges within the limits of the City, the care and 
management of the municipal ferries, the abolishment of grade crossings, 
also the special engineering work for other City departments. AU draw- 
tenders are appointed by and subject to the control of the Commissioner 
of Public Works. 

SUMMARY OF HIGHWAY BRIDGES, ETC. 

I. Number maintained wholly by Boston 67 

II. Number of which Boston maintains the part within its limits . 6 
III. Number of those whose cost of maintenance is partly paid 

by Boston 50 

IV. Number maintained by railroad corporation.s : 

1. Boston & Albany 4 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany . 1 

3. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 1 

.5. New York, N. H. & H., Midland Div 13 

6. New York, N. H. & H., Old Colony Div. 4 

7. New York, N. H. & H., Providence Div. ... 16 
V. Number maintained by Metropohtan District Commission, 9 

VI. Number maintained by U. S. Government 1 

Total number 173 

Note.— For bridges in parks see Park Department. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. ' 103 

Municipal Feeries. 
South | ^"^'^^ Proper.— Head-house, end of Eastern ave. 
I East Boston. — Head-house, end of Lewis st. 

Nor I ■S^'ston Proper.— Head-house, end of Battery st. 
( East Boston. — Head-house, end of Border st. 

The following steam ferryboats are in commission: 

Name. When Built. Type. Length. Gross 

Tonnage. 

Hugh O'Brien 1883 Side-wheel. 175 ft. 3 in. 645 

Governor Russell 1898 Propeller. 164 " 3 " 713 

General Sumner 1900 ' 164 " 3 " 450 

John H, Sullivan 1912 " 172 " 3 " 527 

Lieut. Flaherty 1921 " 174 " 727 

Ralph J. Palumbo 1921 * « 174 " 755 

Noddle Island (rebuilt) 1921 " 174 " 5 in. .564 

HIGHWAY DIVISION. 
Main Office, 501 City Hall Annex, fifth floor. 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. 
Benjamin F. Bates, Chief Engineer, Paving Service. 

The Division Engineer has charge of the construction and maintenance 
of all pubhc streets, the issuing of permits to open, occupy and obstruct 
portions of streets, the care and upkeep of the electric and gas lamps in the 
public streets, alleys, parks and pubhc grounds, and the placing of glass 
street signs and numbers therein, the numbering of buildings and the 
placing of all street signs. 

STREET LAMPS IN USE JANUARY 1, 1926. 



Electeic. 



Gas. 



Total. 



Magnetite arc 

Tungsten incandescent. 

Single mantle 

Open-flame (fire alarm). 

Totals 



5,873 
5,009 



10,872 



9,750 
145 

9,895 



5,863 

5,009 

9,750 

145 

20,767 



104 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



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PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, 105 



SEWER AND SANITARY DIVISION. 

Main Office, 510 City Hall Annex. 
Edward F. Murphy, Division Engineer. 
Thomas F. Bowes, Engineer in Charge of Sewer Service. 
John M. Shea, Construction Engineer, Sewer Service. 
William V. P. Hoar, Office Engineer, Seiver Service. 

Daniel H. Gillespie, Supervisor of Sanitary, Street Cleaning and Oiling 
Service. 

The Commissioner of Public Works in 1918 merged the Sewer Service, 
Sanitary Service and Street Cleaning and Oiling Service, designating these 
three former branches of the Highway Division as the Sewer and Sanitary 
Division. 

The Division Engineer has charge of all sewer work; of the cleaning 
and oiling of streets, also the removal of house offal and refuse in the 
various districts of the City. 

The total length of common and intercepting sewers is computed as 
1,027.55 miles; total number of catch-basins in charge of Sewer Service 
17,166. 

Assessments upon the estates benefited by new sewers are not levied by 
the Public Works Department but by the Board of Street Commissioners 
who also award damages to real estate owners having approved claims for 
such. The assessment upon an estate for a new sewer is limited to $4.00 
per Unear foot and it is a lien upon the property until paid, the law allow- 
ing payment in annual instalments of 10 per cent of total assessment 
with interest. 

In 1889 as provided by Chap. 439 of the Acts, the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Commission of three members undertook the construction of the 
North Metropolitan and South Metropolitan systems of trunk and inter- 
cepting sewers, the former to discharge into the sea at Deer Island and the 
latter at Moon Island. The City of Boston had already constructed, at 
a cost of $4,250,000, pumping works and a trunk sewer from Huntington 
avenue and Gainsborough street to Moon Island. The South system was 
completed and put into operation in 1892, the State paying the City for 
pumping and discharging the sewage received from the territory west of 
Huntington avenue. The North Metropolitan system, with four pump- 
ing plants and 41 miles of sewers, went into operation in 1896, costing 
$5,116,696. A third S3'stem, the Neponset Valley, with a total length 
of 11.3 miles, was completed in 1898. In 1906 the High-level sewer was 
completed and into its 17 miles of tunnel, extending from Roxbury to 
Quincy, thence to outlets off Nut Island, nearly all the sewage of the South 
District was diverted. There were 68.51 miles of Metropolitan sewer 
in the North District, of which 10.4 miles were in Boston, and 51.85 
miles in the South District, 23 . 98 miles being in Boston. Tributary to 
the two Metropohtan systems there were 1,581 miles of local sewers 
in the 28 cities and towns belonging. 



106 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

REMOVAL OF STORE REFUSE. 

The removal of refuse from shops, stores and warehouses, involving 
much extra labor, is attended to by the Sanitary Service and charged for 
at 15 cents a barrel or bundle (not larger than a flour barrel). No removals 
are made except on delivery of tickets obtainable at 504 City Hall Annex. 

WATER DIVISION. 
Main Office, 606 City Hall Annex. 

Christopher J. Carven, Division Engineer. 

James A. McMurky, Engineer in Charge, Income and Meter Branch. 

George H. Finneran, Superintendent, Distribution Branch. 

Under the control of the Division Engineer are the care and mainte- 
nance of all pipes and other fixtures and appliances for the purposes of the 
City's water supph^ also the assessing of water rates and issuing of the 
bills therefor. 

The total length of supply and distributing water main on January 1, 
1926, was 914.03 miles; number of services actually in use, 88,788, were 
metered; number of public fire hydrants, 10,680. 

The first water document published by the City of Boston appeared 
in 1825. In addition to the annual reports on the Cochituate supply, 
from 1850, and of the Mystic supply, from 1866, there are numerous special 
reports. By chapter 449, Acts of 1895, the Boston Water Board, the 
Water Income Department and the Water Registrar were abolished and 
the Water Department created, a single commissioner being entrusted 
with all the powers previously exercised by the Boston Water Board and 
the Boston Water Registrar. 

A State commission, the Metro pohtan Water Board, took possession. 
in 1898, of all that part of the Boston water system lying westward of 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, also the pumping station there, with adjacent 
lands. The sum paid to the City was $12,531,000. Payments to the 
State by the City for its supply of water have been regularly made since 
1898. Total quantity of water in the ten storage reservoirs of the Metro- 
politan system on January 1, 1925, 60,384,300,000 gallons, of which 76. 6 
per cent was in the Wachusett Reservoir in Clinton, 32 miles west of Boston, 
an artificial lake 4,135 acres in surface area and added to the system in 
1905. There are also twelve distribution reservoirs with capacity of 
2,400,680,000 gallons, five pumping-stations being connected with these, 
in which stations 34,439,629,000 gallons of water were pumped during 
the year 1924. In the existing Metropolitan Water District are nine 
cities, besides Boston, and nine towns. Boston takes about 75 per cent of 
the entire water supply of the District. 

The daily average amount of water used in Boston in 192() waa 89,724, TOO 
gallons, or 115 gallons per capita. 



RETIREMENT BOARD. 107 

HIGH PRESSURE FIRE SERVICE. 

By the provisions of Chapter 312, Acts of 1911, the Commissioner of 
Public Works was authorized to install an efficient system of high pressure 
fire service for the business center of the City. The work completed, 
including the old salt-water fireboat line installed in 1898, comprises 
16.8 miles of pipe with 451 hydrants. Total expenditure for installation 
of system to Dec. 31, 1925, was $2,126,938.01. Total mileage of system 
to be about 17.00. Two pumping stations are now in use. 



REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 103 City Hall Annex, first floor. 

[Stat. 1892, Chap. 314; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 34; C. C, Title IV., 
Chap. 28; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 29; Ord. 1924, Chap. 1; Ord. 1924, 
Chap. 1.] 

Edward W. McGlenen, City Registrar. Term ends in 1930. 
Jeremiah J. Leary, Assistant Registrar. 
Margaret M. Foley, Assistant Registrar. 

The City Registrar keeps the records of births, deaths and marriages, 
and issues certificates of all intentions of marriage. Annual reports have 
been published since 1849, except in 1860 and 1861. 

By Ordinance, approved July 12, 1892, the Department of Ancient 
Records and the office of Record Commissioners (estabUshed July 6, 
1875) were abolished, and the duties of the Record Commissioners, includ- 
ing the publication of documents relating to the early history of BoBton, 
were transferred to the Cit}'' Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 
Office, 22 City Hall. 
[Stat. 1922, Chap. 521; Stat. 1923, Chap. 381; Stat. 1924, Chaps. 249, 
250, 251; Stat. 1925, Chaps. 18, 90, 152.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William F. Reagan, Executive Officer. 

THE BOARD. 

Wilfred J. Doyle. Term ends Sept. 1, 1928. 

Frank L. Brier (ex officio). 

J. George Herlihy. Term ends Sept. 1, 1929. 
The Boston Retirement System was established on Feb. 1, 1923, as 
provided by Chap.'521 enacted in Jime, 1922, and accepted by Mayor and 
City Council in August, 1922. It is administered by a board of three mem- 
bers, or the City Treasurer, ex officio, one person appointed by the Mayor, 



108 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

and the third member chosen by the other two. The compensation of the 
members is $10 each for every meeting attended, but not over $500 in any 
one year. After the original appointments, the term of each appointive 
member is four years. 

SCHOOLHOUSE DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1007 City Hall Annex, tenth floor. 
[Stat. 1901, Chap. 473; Stat. 1904, Chap. 376; C. C, Title V., Chap. 33, 
§ 14; Stat. 1905, Chap. 392; Stat. 1906, Chap. 259; Stat. 1907, 
Chap. 450; Stat. 1908, Chap. 524; Stat. 1909, Chap. 446; Stat. 1911, 
Chap. 540; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 337, 363; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 331, 738; 
Spec. Stat. 1916, Chap. 267; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 132; Spec. Stat. 
1919, Chaps. 199, 206; Stat. 1920, Chap. 524; Stat. 1921, Chap. 169; 
Stat. 1924, Chap. 380.] 

OFFICIALS. 

Francis E. Slattery, Chairman. 
Charles P. Norton, Secretary. 
Henry Curry, Chief Clerk. 

commissioners. 
Francis E. Slattery. Term ends in 1928. 
Charles P. Norton. Term ends in 1927. 
James W. H. Myrick. Term ends in 1929. 
This department is in charge of a board of three commissioners, ap- 
pointed by the Mayor. One commissioner is appointed in each year for a 
term of three years, beginning with June 1. The salaries of the commis- 
sioners and the ordinary expenses of the department are met by appro- 
priations of the School Committee. 

The authority and duties of the Board are those formerly conferred and 
imposed upon the City Council and the School Committee in relation to 
selecting lands for school purposes, providing temporary school accommo- 
dations, making, altering and approving designs and plans for school pur- 
poses; erecting, completing, altering, repairing, furnishing, and preparing 
yards for school buildings, and making contracts and selecting architects. 
Annual reports to the Mayor have been made since 1901, an interesting 
feature of which is the "Descriptive Schedule of Permanent School Build> 
ings," a large tabular insert showing, under 14 headings, building statistics 
of 270 or more schoolhouses. 



SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 20 City HaU. 
[R. L., Chap. 27, § 14; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 35; C. C, Title IV., 
Chap. 9, § 5; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, § 26; Stat. 1910, Chap. 437; 
Stat. 1911, Chap. 165; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 31; Stat. 1914, Chap. 
324; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chap. 184; Ord. 1916, Chap. 7; Ord. 1925, 
Chap. 2.1 



STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 109 

Officials. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 
Rupert S. Carven, Secretary. 
Frank L. Brier, Treasurer. 

COMMISSIONERS.* 

Eliot Wadsworth, Abraham E. Pinansky. Terms end in 1929. 
Clarence W. Barron, Frederick J. Crosby. Teiins end in 1928. 
William H. Slocum, Randolph C. Grew. Terms end in 1927. 

The Board of Commissioners of Sinking Funds for the payment or 
redemption of the City debt consists of six members, two of whom are 
appointed annually by the Mayor for a term of three years from May 1. 
The Board has published annual reports since 1871. The amended City 
Charter, Section 26, prohibits the further establishing of sinking funds, 
but an exception was afterwards made by the Legislature regarding loans 
for Rapid Transit purposes. It also prohibits the depositing of City or 
County money in any bank of which any member of the Board of Sinking 
Funds Commissioners is an officer, director or agent. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 65 City Hall, fifth floor. 
[Gen. Laws, Chap. 115; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 36; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 29; 
Stat. 1904, Chap. 381; Stat. 1909, Chap. 468; Stat. 1914, Chap. 587; 
Gen. Stat. 1916, Chap. 116; Gen. Stat. 1917, Chap. 179; Gen. Stat. 
1918, Chaps. 108, 183; Ord. 1920, Chap. 8; Ord. 1922, Chap. 8; 
Ord. 1925, Chap. 4.] 

John Joseph Murphy, Soldiers' Relief Commissioner. Term ends in 

1929. 
Frederick W. Watkeys, M.D., Deputy Commissioner. 
Timothy W. Kelly, Deputy Commissioner. 

The Soldiers' Relief Department was created as a department of the 
City of Boston by Chapter 441 of the Acts of 1897, and is imder the charge 
of a commissioner appointed by the Mayor. He exercises all powers and 
duties for the distribution of State and City aid to soldiers in the City 
of Boston, such as were formerly vested ui the Mayor and Board of 
Aldermen. 



STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 73 City Hall, seventh floor. 
[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 37; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 33; Ord. 1922, Chaps. 
and 9; Ord. 1923, Chap. 11.] 

* The Commissioners serve without compensation. 



no MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

OFFICIALS. 

James P. Balfe, Chairman. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES.* 

Frederic W. Rugg. Term ends in 1930. 

Robert Dtsart. Term ends in 1929. 

Daniel F. O'Connell. Term ends in 1928. 

James P. Balfe. Term ends in 1930. 

Edward G. Graves. Term ends in 1927. 
This department is in charge of a board of five members, whose duty 
it is to collect, compile and publish such statistics relating to the City 
of Boston and such statistics of other cities, for purposes of comparison, 
as they may deem of public importance, also to furnish statistical informa- 
tion to the City departments and to the public on request. 

The Municipal Register has been compiled and edited annually by 
the department since 1898. The new and more comprehensive work, 
Boston Yearbook, was issued for the first time in 1924. For the past 
fourteen years the annual City Council manual, "Organization of the 
City Government," has contained a large collection of the latest statistics 
contributed by the department. The same collection has also been 
separately issued in a more elaborate form with title "Boston Statistics" 

and distributed widely. 

City Record. 

[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 29, 30; Ord. 1922, Chap. 9.] 
In accordance with the amended City Charter of 1909, the official weekly 
publication of the City, with the title, Boston City Record, was re-estab- 
lished in that year, the size of the page, typography, etc., being similar to 
the form adopted by the Statistics Department, under whose manage- 
ment the first City Record was issued during the years 1898, 1899 and 
to May 8, 1900, at which time it was discontinued. 

The paper is now issued under the direction of the Mayor, who appoints 
the editor, while the business details are in charge of the Secretary of the 
Statistics Department who is Business Agent. 



STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Main Office, 401 City Hall Annex, fourth floor. 
fGen. Laws, Chaps. 82, 83; Stat. 1870, Chap. 337; Stat. 1895, Chap. 
449, § 23; Stat. 1897, Chap. 426; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 39; Stat. 
1899, Chap. 450; Stat. 1906, Chaps. 258, 393; Stat. 1907, Chaps. 
403, 584; Stat. 1908, Chaps. 447, 519; C. C. Chap. 51; Stat. 1909; 
Chaps. 209, 486, §§ 28, 31; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 169, 415, 453, 591, 
Stat. 1912, Chaps. 338, 339, 371, 558, 661; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 263, 
432, 536, 554, 577, 680, 799; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 119, 128, 569, 641; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 34; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 176 and Spec. 
Stat., Chap. 91; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 318, 329; Spec. Stat. 1918, 
Chap. 155; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 224; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 74, 312, 
465; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 191, 407; Stat. 1922, Chap. 316; Stat. 1923, 
Chap. 489; Ord. 1924, Chap. 7; Stat. 1925, Chaps. 323, 325, 333.] 

* The Trustees other than the chairman serve without compensation. 



STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. HI 



OFFICIALS. 

Thomas J. Hurley, Chairman. 
Joseph F. Sullivan, Secretary. 

BOARD OF STREET COMMISSIONERS. 

Thomas J. Hurley. Term ends in 1930. 
Charles T. Harding. Term ends in 1929. 
John J. O'Callaghan. Term ends in 1928. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION. 

William J. Sullivan, Chief Engineer. 
Arthur N. Colman, Assistant Chief Engineer. 

assessment DIVISION. 

Charles F. Bogan, Chief. 

PERMIT DIVISION. 

44 City Hall. 

James Celeste, Acting Chief. 

A member of the Board of Street Commissioners is appointed each 
year by the Mayor to serve for three years from the first Monday in 
January. The Board has power to lay out, relocate, alter or discontinue 
highways in the Cit}^, to order specific repairs, also, with the approval of 
the Mayor, the construction of sewers and to take for the City any lands, 
water courses and waj's deemed necessary for such construction. It 
levies the betterment assessments on estates benefited by the construction 
of new sewers and new or improved highways, also awards damages for 
takings of land, and grants to landowners permission to open private 
streets. In 1895 the duties of the Board of Survey were transferred to the 
Street Commissioners; in 1907 they were charged with the licensing of 
street stands for the sale of merchandise, in 1908 with the regulation of 
street traffic, and in 1913 with the authority to grant or withhold permits 
for the erection of automobile garages. The fees for these permits are: 
For erecting a public garage, $100 ; for a business garage for trucks, $100; 
repair shop, isolated, $5.00 ; unit group, $1.00 each unit ; private garage 
for one or two cars, $1.00, and if in excess of two cars, $1.00 more for 
each such excess. There is no annual garage fee. 

By the Amended City Charter of 1909 the jurisdiction previously 
exercised by the Board of Aldermen is vested in the Street Commissioners, 
with the written approval of the Mayor, as to the naming of streets, as 
to trees in the streets, as to permits or hcenses for special use of same, 
including the construction of coal holes, vaults, bay windows and mar- 
quees, in, under, or over the streets, also for the location of conduits, poles 
and posts and the storage of inflammables and explosives. They collect 
the annual license of $1.00 for selling and keeping gasoline. 



112 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

As authorized by Chapter 680, Acts of 1913, the Street Commissioners 
issued on April 9, 1914, their "Rules and Regulations Relating to Projec- 
tions on or over Public Highways." These rules were amended in 1915, 
as authorized by Chapter 176, General Acts of that year, the changes 
taking effect July 20. The penalty for disregard of said rules is a fine not 
exceeding five dollars for each day of negUgence after five days' notice. 

Fees for permits and each annual renewal thereof are fixed as follows: 

Illuminated signs SI 00 

Two-foot projecting signs (not illuminated) 50 

Other projecting signs (not illuminated) 25 

Lettering on awnings 25 

Lamps, unlettered 25 

Marquees, or awnings 1 00 

Lettering or signs on marquees 1 00 

Hoisting devices 1 00 

Clocks 1 00 

Lettering in sidewalks 1 00 

Other structures 1 00 

Temporary signs on buildings for purposes of public interest No fee 

Awnings above the first story, not used for advertising No fee 

Traffic Rules. 
As provided by Chapter 447, Acts of 1908, the Street Commissioners 
were authorized to make traffic rules. The latest revision of same to 
December 1, 1926, shows 110 one-way streets. The rules are enforced bA- 
the Police Commissioner, having in charge a traffic squad of 290 men. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 808 City Hall Annex, eighth floor. 

[Ord. 1908, Chap. 6; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 35; Ord. 1919, Chap. 6.] 

Herbert S. Frost, Superintendent. Term ends in 1930. 
Charles E. Thornton, Chief Clerk. 

The Superintendent of Supplies furnishes all the material, apparatus 
and other supphes required for the special use of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, and such material for other departments of the City as may be 
asked for by requisition signed by the head of such department, except 
furniture and stationery. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1 Beacon street, sixth floor. 
[Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 185; Ord. 1918, Chap. 3; Ord. 1922, Chap. 1; 
Stat. 1923, Chaps. 399, 405, 480: Stat. 1924, Chaps. 120, 403, 444; 
Stat. 1925, Chaps. .52, 193, 341.] 



VESSELS AND BALLAST DEPARTMENT. 113 

commissionebs. 
Thomas F. Sullivan. 
James B. Notes. 
Nathan A. Heller. 
Terms of all end in 1930. 

OFFICIALS. 

Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

Andrew Adair, Secretary. 

Ernest R. Springer, Chief Engineer. 

This department was established to exercise the powers and perform 
the duties formerly in charge of the Boston Transit Commission, whose 
oflacial existence terminated July 1, 191S. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hall, Rooms 21 and 22, first floor. 
[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 40; Stat. 1908, Chap. 210; Ord. 1908, Chap. 4; 
C. C. Title IV., Chap. 9; Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 
367, 672, 788; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 36; Stat. 1920, Chap. 140; Ord. 
1920, Chap. 12; Ord. 1921, Chaps. 1 and 2; Stat. 1922, Chap. 521; 
Ord. 1925, Chap. 2.] 

Frank L. Brier, City Treasurer. Term ends in 1930. 
Edward F. McAdams, Cashier and Acting Treasurer in the absence of the 
Treasurer. 

The City Treasurer has the care and custody of the current funds of 
the City, of all monej's, properties and securities placed in his charge 
by any statute or ordinance, or by any gift, devise, bequest, or deposit, 
and pays all bills and demands against the City. 

The City Treasurer is also County Treasurer and Treasurer of the 
Sinking Funds Dept. He publishes reports yearly, also monthly statements. 



VESSELS AND BALLAST DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 173 Sumner street. East Boston. 

IGen. Laws, Chap. 102, §§ 6-13; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 41; Rev. Ord. 

1914, Chap. 39.] 

Cornelius J. Donovan, Chiej Weigher. Appointed annually. 
This department is under the charge of the Weighers of Vessels and 
Ballast, two in number, one of whom is designated by the Mayor as chief. 
They receive the fees, after payment of expenses, as compensation for 
their Bervices. 



114 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 106 City Hall Annex, first floor. 
[Gen. Laws, Chap. 98, §§ 34-55; Stat. 1882, Chap. 42; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 43; Stat. 1909, Chap. 382; Stat. 1910, Chap. 209; Stat. 1913, 
Chap. 503; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 346, 379, 452; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 37; 
Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 253; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chap. 120; Gen. Stat. 
1919, Chaps. 91, 128; Ord. 1919, Chap. 1; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 259, 369, 
Ord. 1923, Chap. 4.] 

James A. Sweeixey, Sealer. 

Walter L. Finigan, Chief Clerk. 

Deputy Sealers. — Charles E. Walsh, Louis Hertgen, Benjamin 
Lebowitz, Thomas A. Kelley, Fred A. Thissell, John A. Gargan, 
Chief Deputy, John J. Martin, William D. Fat, Martin J. Travers, 
Edward J. McManus, Francis A. Traters and Lawrence J. 
Lewis. Philip F. Leonard, Mechanician. Robert E. Sexton, 
Coal Inspector. 

This department is in charge of the Sealer. 

The standards in use are suppUed by the Commonwealth and a stand- 
ardization is made every five years by the Division of Standards, Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. The office was authorized by ordinance 
in 1890. Ways and means were devised for service of this character to the 
Town of Boston as early as 1800. Annual reports have been published 
beginning in 1864. By Chapter 382, Acts of 1909, all principal and 
assistant sealers are included within the classified civil service. 



Nonexecutive DepartmenTvS. 



116 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VARIOUS CITY, COUNTY AND STATE 
OFFICERS. 



The following table shows the manner in which public officers, other 
than the regular City department heads, are appointed or elected as pre- 
scribed by statute, ordinance, or regulation, the time of appointment or 
election, the term of office, and the salary, if any, of each officer. Appoint- 
ments by the Mayor marked with a * are subject to approval by the State 
Civil Service Commission; those marked with a t are confirmed by the 
City Council: 



A With the advice and consent of the Exec. Council. 
B Chairman, $5,000; other members none, 
c Chairman, $500 additional. 
D As vacancies occur. 





How- 
Created. 


Appointed or 
Elected. 


Teem. 


Salart 














1 




By Whom. 


When. 


Begins. 


Length. 




Boston and Cambridge 
Bridges Commiss'n (two) . 


Statute 


Mayor. . . . 








None. 














Finance Commission (five). 


" 


Governor a 


Annually 
one. 




5 yrs. . 


b 


Franklin Foundation 
(twelve Managers). 


" 


Supreme 
Court. 


D 






None. 








Licensing Board (three) . . . 


(.• 


Governor a 


Biennially 
one. 




6 " . 


$3,500 c 


Loan Assoc'n, Working- 


11 


Mayor. .». . 


Annuallv. . 


3d Thu. 


lyr... 


None. 


men's, one Director. 








in Apr. 






Loan Comp'}', Chattel, 
one Director. 


li 


" 


u 




1 " .. 


u 








Loan Conip'}', Collateral, 
one Director. 


" 


" 


u 


3d Wed. 
in Dec. 


1 " .. 


u 


Did South Assoc'n (three 
Managers). 


(( 


City Coun- 
cil. 


u 


When 
elected. 


1 " .. 





VARIOUS OFFICERS. 



117 



Officers. 


How 
Created. 


Appointed or 
Elected. 


Term. 


S.4.LART. 




By Whom. 


When. 


Begins. 


Length. 




Medical Examiners (two).. 


Statute 


Governor * 
« 






7 yrs.. 
5 " . 


$5,000 
8,000 


Police Commissioner 




1st Mon. 
in June 








School Committee (five) . . 


11 


Elected.... 


City elec- 
tion 


1st Mon. 
in Jan'y 


4 " . 


None. 


Undertakers 


(I 


Health 


Annually 

u 


May 1 . . 

" 1 


lyr.. 

1 " 


u 


OflBcers Paid by Fees :t 
Constables 


u 


Dept. 
Mayor. . . . 

u 


Fppi? 


Fence- viewers J 


u 


li 


" 1.. 


1 " .. 


(1 


Inspectors of hay and 
straw, lime, petroleum, 
etc. 


u 


u 


u 


" 1.. 


] " .. 


u 


Gangers of liquid meas- 
ures. 


li 


a 


(1 


" 1.. 


1 " .. 


u 


Measurers of grain, up- 
aer leather, wood and 
)ark. 


u 


a 


u 


" 1.. 


1 " .. 


u 


Superintendents of hay 
scales. 


« 


u 


u 


" 1.. 


1" .. 


u 


Weighers of boilers and 
heavy machinery, coal. 


(I 


u 


" 


« 1.. 


1 « .. 


11 



* With the advice and consent of the Executive Council. 

t Confirmed by City Council. 

t Two inspectors in the Building Dept. act as Fence-viewers. 



^ 



118 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VARIOUS CITY, COUNTY AND STATE 
OFFICERS, DEPARTMENTS, COMMIS- 
SIONS, COURTS, ETC. 

BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES COMMISSION. 

Office, 506 City Hall Annex, fifth floor. 

[Stat. 1870, Chaps. 300, 302; Stat. 1898, Chap. 467, § 14; Ord. 1906, 
Chap. 1; C. C, Chap. 35, §§ 2, 4, and 5; Stat. 1912, Chap. 92.] 

James H. Sullivan, Commissioner for Boston. 
Fkancis J. Smith, Commissioner for Cambridge. 
John J. O'Neil, Secretary. 

This Commission was established in 1870, to have charge of the mainte- 
nance of the West Boston, Canal or Craigie's, and the Prison Point bridges. 
In 1892 the Harvard bridge was placed in their charge. The powers of 
the Commission were greatly enlarged in 1898 when all bridges and draws 
between the two cities were placed in their charge. The expense of 
maintenance is borne equally by the City of Boston and the City of Cam- 
bridge. The two Commissioners are appointed by the Mayors of Boston 
and Cambridge respectively. The Commissioner for Boston, who serves 
without pay, is the Commissioner of Public Works. 

bridges in charge of the commissioners.* 
Anderson Bridge, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Brookline street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Cambridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Cambridge street-River street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 
Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 



BOSTON FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 11 Beacon Street. 

[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 17-21; Stat. 1921, Chap. 81; Stat. 1924, 

Chap. 369; Stat. 1925, Chap. 333.] 

* All of the bridges named in this Uet are over navigable waters. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 119 

OFFICIALS. 

Charles L. Care, Chairman. 

Guy C. Emerson, Consulting Engineer. 

John C. L. Dowling, Counsel and Acting Secretary. 

COMMISSIONERS. 

Charles L. Carr. Term ends in 1930. 
William J. Drew. Term ends in 1929. 
Joseph A. Sheehan. Term ends in 1928. 
Courtenay Guild. Term ends in 1927. 
John F. Moors. Term ends in 1931. 

The Finance Commission is constituted under the Amended Charter of 
1909. It consists of five commissioners appointed by the Governor and 
confirmed by the Executive Council, the term of each being five years. 
The chairman of the Commission is named by the Governor. The members 
of the Commission, other than the chairman, serve without pay. 

It is the duty of the Commission to investigate, at its discretion, all 
matters relating to appropriations, loans, expenditures, accoimts and 
methods of administration affecting the City of Boston or the CouBty 
of Suffolk, or any of their departments, and to report upon its investi- 
gations from time to time to the Mayor, the City Council, the Governor 
or the General Court. 

The Commission is required to make an annual report, in January, to 
the General Court. It is also the duty of the Commission to report to 
the Mayor, the City Auditor or the City Treasurer as to the validity or 
proper amount of any doubtful pay-roll, biU or claim referred to it by them. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 
County Commissioners for the County of Suffolk. — The City Council of 
Boston. 

County Auditor. — Rupert S. Cara^en. 
County Treasurer. — Frank L. Brier. 

district attorney. 

Room 218, Court House. 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 12, sec. 12, etc.; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 373, 439; Stat. 

1912, Chap. 576; Stat. 1913, Chap. 602; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 269; 

Stat. 1920, Chap. 451; Stat. 1922. Chap. 277; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 398, 

485.] 
District Attorney. — Williaji J. Foley. Elected by the people in 1926 

for term of four years ending January. 1931. 
Assistant. — William H. McDonnell. 
Assistant. — Frederick M. J. Sheenan. 



120 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Assistant. — Daniel J. Lyne. 
Assistant. — Robert E. McGuire. 
Assistant. — Daniel J. Gillen. 
Assistant. — • Frederick T. Doyle. 
Assistant. — William J. McDonough. 
Assistant. — Joseph A. Scolponeti. 
Assistant. — William J. Sullivan. 

LAND COURT. 

Room 408, Court House. 
Judge. — Charles Thornton Davis. Appointed by the Governor. 
Associate Judge.— Joseph J. Corbett. Appomted by the Governor. 
Associate Judge. — Clarence C. Smith. Appointed by the Governor. 
Recorder. — Charles A. Southworth. Appointed by the Governor for 
term of five years ending in 1928. 

INDEX COMMISSIONERS. 

Commissioners. — Samuel T. Harris, term ends in 1929. Ralph W. E. 
Hopper, term ends in 1927. Edward W. Bancroft, term ends in 1928. 

CZerfc.— William J. Kurth. , 

Appointed in March, one each year, by a majority of the Justices of 
the Superior Court for the County of Suffolk for a term of three years, 
beginning April 1, and serve without pay. 

REGISTER OF DEEDS. 

IGen. Laws, Chap. 36; Stat. 1895, Chap. 493; Stat. 1904, Chap. 452; Stat. 
1910, Chap. 373; Stat. 1913, Chap. 737; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 269; 
Stat. 1920, Chap. 495.] 

Register of Deeds.-^ W. T. A. Fitzgerald. Elected by the people in 1922. 

Term ends in January, 1929. The Register is ex officio Assistant 

Recorder of the Land Court. 
First Assistant Register. — John J. Attridge. Appointed by the Register. 
Second Assistant Register. — John W. Johnson. Appointed by the Register. 

SHERIFF AND DEPUTY SHERIFFS. 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 37; Stat. 1910, Chap. 373; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 269; 
Stat. 1922, Chap. 525.] 

Sheriff. — John A. Keliher. Elected by the people, November 9, 1926. 
Term ends in January, 1933. As Jailer he receives additional com- 
pensation. 

Deputy Sheriffs for Service of Writs. — Daniel A. Whelton, Henry G. 
Gallagher, Richard F. Sweeney, Edmund P. Kelly, John J. Casey, 
James P. Keliher, Thomas J. Wilson, Thomas F. Donovan. Paid by 
fees. 



COURT OFFICERS, ETC. 121 

Deputy Sheriffs for Court Duty. — William J. Leonard, Chief Deputy Sheriff. 
Peter McCann, William A. McDevitt, Richard J. Murray, Oscar L. 
Strout, Willard W. Hibbard, Andrew J. Grotty, Frank C. Pierce, Jere- 
miah J. McCarthy, John A. Finley, John F. Glynn, Thomas F. Lally. 

All debts and expenses of the County of Suffolk are borne by the City of 
Boston, unless otherwise specified. 

COURT OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Offioes in Court House, Pemberton square, except as otherwise specified. 
SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT. 

Clerk for the Commonwealth. — Walter F. Frederick. Appointed by the 

Court. 
Clerk for the County of Suffolk. — John F. Cronin. Elected by the people 

in 1922. Term ends in January, 1929. 
Assistant Clerks. — John H. Fljoin, Joseph Riley. 
Reporter of Decisions. — Ethelbert V. GrabiU. Appointed by Governor. 

SUPERIOR COURT FOR CIVIL BUSINESS. 

Clerk. — Francis A. Campbell. Elected by the people in 1922. Term 
ends in January, 1929. 

Assistant Clerk in Equity. — James F. McDermott. 

Assistant Clerks. — John L. MacCubbin, First Assistant, George E. Kimball, 
Flourence J. Mahoney, Charles J. Hart, Francis P. Ewing, Frank 
H. Hallett, Michael E. Leen, Albert E. MacDonald, D. Pulsifer, 
Colville, George A. Scheele, Francis P. Murphy, Clesson S. Curtice, 
Michael F. Hart. 

SUPERIOR COURT FOR CRIMINAL BUSINESS. 

Clerk. — John P. Manning. Elected by the people in 1922. Term ends 

in January, 1929. 
Assistant Clerks. — John R. Campbell, JuUan Seriack, John P. Manning, 

Jr., and Walter A. Murray. 

COURT OP PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY. 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 217; Stat. 1904, Chap. 455; Stat. 1910, Chap. 374; 
Stat. 1912, Chap. 585; Stat. 1913, Chap. 791; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 
269; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 486, 487; Stat. 1922, Chap. 532.] 

Judge. — Arthur W. Dolan. 

Judge.— WiUiam M. Prest. 

Register. — Arthur W. Sullivan. 

First Assistant Register. — John R. Nichols. 

Second Assistant Register. — Clara L. Power. 

The Judges of Probate are appointed by the Governor. They and the 
three other officials of this Court are paid by the State. 



122 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

MUNICIPAL COURT OP BOSTON. 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 218; Stat. 1907, Chap. 179; Stat. 1908, Chap. 191; Stat. 

1909, Chaps. 386, 434; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 231, 469, § 5; Stat. 1912, 

Chaps. 648, 649, 660, 672; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 289, 430, 612, 716, 748; 

Stat. 1914, Chaps. 35, 409; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 166; Gen. Stat. 1916, 

Chaps. 69, 71, 109, 195, 261, 263; Gen. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 262, 330; 

Gen. Stat. 1918, Chap. 250; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 553, 614; Stat. 1921, 

Chap. 284; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 309, 399, 532.] 
Chief Justice. — Wilfred Bolster. 
Associaie Justices. — James P. Parmenter, William Sullivan, Michael J. 

Murray, John Duff, Michael J. Creed, Thomas H. Dowd, Joseph T. 

Zottoli, James H. Devlin. 

AU judges appointed by the Governor, subject to confirmation by the 
Executive Council. 

Special Justices. — John A. Bennett, Abraham K. Cohen, John G. Brackett, 
Joseph A. Sheehan. 

Terms of the Court. 
For Civil Business. — Every Saturday at 9 A. M., for trial of civil 
causes not exceeding $2,000. 
Clerk. — William F. Donovan. Appointed by the Governor. 

Assistant Clerks. — Warren C. Travis, Volney D. Caldwell, Arthur W. 

Ashenden, James T. Tobin, Louis B. Torrey, Frederick J. Dillon, 

Joseph L. Pierce, George F. Devine. 
For Criminal Business. — Every day in the week (Sundays and legal 

holidays excepted) at 9 A. M., for the trial of criminal causes. 
Clerk. — Edward J. Lord. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerks. — Harvey B. Hudson, Charles T. Willock, James G. 

Milward, George A. Savage, Paul W. Carey, James F. Hardy, Edward 

A. Chalmers, George W. Herman. Appointed by the Clerk of the 

Court with the approval of the Justices. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, BRIGHTON DISTRICT. 

Cambridge street, corner of Henshaw street. 
Justice. — Thomas H. Connelly. 

Special Justices. — Robert W. Frost and Harry C. Fabyan. 
Clerk. — Daniel F. Cunningham. Appointed by the Governor. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, CHARLESTOWN DISTRICT. 

New Municipal Building, City square. 
Justice. — Charles S. Sullivan. 

Special Justices.— Willis W. Stover and Joseph E. Donovan. 
Clerk. — Mark E. Smith. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerk. — James J. Mullen, Jr. 
Second Assistant Clerk. — George E. Irving. 



COURT OFFICERS, ETC. 123 

MUNICIPAL COURT, DOKCHBSTEK DISTRICT. 

Adams street, corner of Arcadia street. 
Justice. — Joseph R. Churchill. 

Special Justices. — Michael H. Sullivan and WiUiam F. Merritt. 
Clerk. — Alpheus Sanford. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerk. — Frederick E. Simmons. 

EAST BOSTON DISTRICT COURT. 

Court House, corner of Meridian and Paris streets, East Boston. 

Justice. — Joseph H. Barnes. 

Special Jxistices. — Charles J. Brown and Patrick J. Lane. 

Clerk. — John S. C. Nicholls. Appointed by the Governor 

Assista7it Clerk. — Emanuel Olsen. 

Second Assistant Clerk. — Grace M. Dalton. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, ROXBURT DISTRICT. 

Court House, Roxbury street. 
Justice. — Albert F. Hayden. 

Special Justices. — Joseph N. Palmer and Timothy J. Ahem. 
Clerk. — Maurice J. O'Connell. Appointed by the Governor. 
First Assistant Clerk. — Fred E. Cruff. 
Second Assistant Clerk. — Henry F. Ryder. 
Third Assistant Clerk. — Charles A. Moore. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, SOUTH BOSTON DISTRICT. 

New Municipal Building, East Broadway. 

Justice. — Edward L. Logan. 

Special Justices. — Josiah S. Dean, WiUiam J. Day. 
Clerk. — Adrian B. Smith. Appointed by the Governor. 
Assistant Clerk. — Harry W. Park. 

MUNICIPAL COURT, WEST ROXBURY DISTRICT, INCL. HYDE PARK. 

Court House (new), Morton street, Forest Hills. 

Justice. — John Perrins. 

Special Justices. — J. Albert Brackett, Bert E. Holland. 

Clerk. — George B. Stebbins. Appointed by the Governor. 

Assistant Clerk. — Sidney T. Knott. 

Second Assistant Clerk. — Caroline M. Adams. 

BOSTON JUVENILE COURT. 

Room 127, Court House. 

[Chap. 334, Acts of 1903; Chap. 489, Acts of 1906; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 
255; Stat. 1922, Chap. 399.] 



124 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. . 

Justice. — Frederick P. Cabot. 

Special Justices. — Frank Leveroni, Philip Rubenstein. 

Clerk.— Charles W. M. Williams. 

Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1906, establishing a court to be known as 
the Boston Juvenile Court for the " Care, Custody and Discipline of Juvenile 
Offenders," provides for the transfer to said court of the jurisdictions, 
authority and powers hitherto vested in the Municipal Court of Boston, 
under Chapter 334 of the Acts of 1903. The act took effect September 1, 
1906. 

The Justice, Special Justices and Clerk of this Court are appointed by 

the Governor. The Justice of the court is empowered to appoint two 

probation oflBcers, and so many assistant probation officers as he may deem 

necessary. 

Probation Officers. 

[Stat. 1891, Chap. 356; Stat. 1892, Chaps. 242, 276; Stat. 1897, Chap. 266; 

Stat. 1910, Chap. 332; Stat. 1913, Chap. 612; Stat. 1914, Chap. 491; 

Gen. Stat. 1917, Chap. 135.] 
These officers are appointed by the judges of the respective criminal 
courts to ascertain all facts relating to the offenders brought before the 
courts. In the performance of their oflficial duties they have all the powers 
of police officers. 

BOSTON MUNICIPAL COtJRT. 

Chief Probation Officer. — Albert J. Sargent. 

Medical Director. — C. Edouard Sandoz, M. D. 

Assistant Medical Director. — Margaret C. Welsh, M. D. 

Probation Officers. — Francis A. Dudley, Albert J. Fowle, Francis A. 
McCarthy, Frank E. Hawkes, James H. Knight, Eugene J. Callanan, 
Edward F. Coughlin, Frank L. Warren, William J. Joyce, Edward J. 
Bromberg, John P. Bogan, Jr., George J. McDonnell, Thomas G. 
Davis, Thomas F. Teehan, Oswald J. McCourt, Mary L. Brinn, 
Elizabeth A. Lee, Margaret H. Markham, Alfretta P. McClure, 
Theresa C. Dowling, Ethel Wood, Annie M. Kennedy, AHce D. 
Keating, Eleanor F. Holland, Bessie G. Kaufman, John F. Mulvey, 
Joseph W. Crockwell. 

Juvenile Court. — John B. O'Hare, Walter C. Bell, Edward J. O'Mara, 
May A. Burke. 

BRANCH MUNICIPAL COURTS AND EAST BOSTON DISTRICT COURT. 

Brighton. — Edward J. Drummond. Charlestown. — James D. Coady, 
Mrs. Ellena M. Foley, William E. Carney. Dorchester. — Reginald H. 
Mair, Scott H. Rose. East Boston. — Dennis J. Kelleher, Frederick L. 
O'Brien. Roxbury. — Joseph H. Keen, Ulysses G. Varney, Edward A. 
Fallon (for children), Matthew M. Leary, John L. Letzing, Thomas Grieve, 
Kathryn Q. Quealey. South Boston. — Clayton H. Parmelee, Ellen 
McGurty, James F. Gleason. West Roxbury. — Frank B. Skelton, Thomas 
H. Staples (for children). 



FRANKLIN FOUNDATION; 125 

SUPERIOR COURT. 

Chief Probation Officer. — Henry C. McKenna. 

John J. Barter, Joseph A. McManus, Arthur R. Towle, William A. 
Maloney, Edward A. Griffin, James E. Donovan, Harry Keenan, Alice 
M. Power, Ellen L. Cunniff, Mary A. Robinson, Mary F. McManus, 
Ralph L. Countie, Alice P. Meyers. 



MEDICAL EXAMINERS FOR SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 38; Stat. 1908, Chap. 424; Stat. 1909, Chap. 273; Stat. 
1911, Chaps. 252, 274; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 466, 631; Gen. Stat. 1916, 
Chap. 114; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 216; Stat. 1920, Chap. 188.] 

The County is divided into two medical districts. Northern and South- 
ern, by a line beginning at the junction of the Brookline line with Hunt- 
ington avenue; thence through Himtington avenue and Fencourt; thence 
through middle of Fens, through Boylston, Berkeley and Providence 
streets, Park square, Boylston and Essex streets, Atlantic avenue and 
Summer street to Fort Point Channel; thence through said channel, 
Dover street, Dorchester avenue, Dorchester street, East Fourth and G 
streets to the harbor. 

Medical Examiners. — Northern District, George B. Magrath, M. D., 274 
Boylston street. Term ends in 1929. Southern District, Timothy 
Leary, M. D., 44 Burroughs street, Jamaica Plain. Term ends in 
1931. 

Associate Medical Examiners. — WiUiam H. Watters, M. D., 109 Mt. 
Vernon street, for Southern District. Term ends in 1931. William 
J. Brickley, M. D., 496 Commonwealth avenue, for Northern Dis- 
trict. Term ends in 1927. 

All are appointed by the Governor for a term of seven years. 
Location of Northern District Mortuary, 18 North Grove street; 
Southern District, on City Hospital grounds. 



FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 
[Stat. 1905, Chap. 488; Stat. 1908, Chap. 569; C. C, Chap. 48, § 5.] 

MEMBERS OP THE CORPORATION AND MANAGERS OF THE 
FRANKLIN FUND. 

Nathan Matthews, President. 
John A. Sullivan, Vice President. 
Rev. C. E. Park, Secretary. 
Everett Morss, Treasurer. 



126 ■ MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

MANAGERS.* 

Malcolm E. Nichols. Mayor of Boston, ex ufficiu.' 
Rev. Chakles E. Park (Congregational minister) ex officio. 
Rev. William H. Dewart (Episcopalian minister), ex officio. 
Rev. Donald C. MacGuire (Presbyterian minister), ex officio. 
Nathan Matthews, John A. Sullivan, David A. Ellis, Louis K. 

RouRKE, Charles R. Gow, Everett Morss, .J. Frank O'Hare. 

Appointed by the Supreme Judicial Court, 

Franklix Union, corner Appleton and Berkeley streets. 
Walter B. Russell, Director. 

The Franklin Foundation is incorporated under Chapter 569 of the 
Acts of 1908, a board of twelve citizens being named therein as Managers 
of the Frankhn Fund and having the standing ot a City department with 
the object of maintaining the Franklin Union as an independent industrial 
school for adults. 

The Franklin Fund is the proceeds of a bequest of one thousand pounds 
to "the Inhabitants of the Town of Boston in Massachusetts" made by 
Benjamin Franklin, in a codicil to his will dated June 23, 1789. The 
codicil provided that the fund "if accepted by the inhabitants of the 
Town of Boston" be managed "under the direction of the Selectmen, 
united with the Minister of the oldest Episcopalian, Congregational, and 
Presbyterian Churches in that Town," who were to make loans on certain 
conditions to "young married artificers under the age of twenty-five 
years." 

Dr. Franklin, who died April 17, 1790, calculated that, in one himdred 
years, the thousand pounds would grow to £131,000, "of which," he says, 
"I would have the managers then lay out at their discretion £100,000 
in Public Works which may be judged of most general utility to the 
Inhabitants. The remaining £31,000, I would have continued to be let 
out on interest for another hundred years. At the end of this second 
term, if no unfortunate accident has prevented the operation, the sum 
will be £4,061,000, of which I leave £1,061,000 to the Town of Boston, 
and £3,000,000 to the disposition of the Government of the State, not 
presuming to carry my views farther." The Town accepted the donation 
at a Town Meeting held June 1, 1790. 

A futile suit brought by the Franklin heirs in 1891 prevented the division 
of the fund at the expiration of one hundred years; but on January 17, 
1894, by direction of the three ministers and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City, which board claimed to be the successors of the "Selectmen," 
$329,300.48 (if? of the fund) was paid to the City Treasurer, for "the 
purchase of land and the erection thereon of the Franklin Trades School 
and for the equipment of the same." Owing to a series of complications 
the money remained in the custody of the Treasurer. Mayor Collins, 
in 1902, caused a petition of the City to be filed in the Supreme Court, 
praying for instructions as to the authority of the persons then acting as 

* The Managers serve without compensation. 



LICENSING BOARD. 127 

Managers of the fund. The Court rendered an opinion November 25, 
1903 (184 Mass. 373, page 43), to the effect that the three ministers were 
Managers of the fund under Franklin's will, but that the Aldermen did 
not succeed the "Selectmen" as Managers and had no powers with refer- 
ence to it. The Court, under its general power to care for public chari- 
table funds, appointed, on March 16, 1904, a Board of Managers to take 
the place of the "Selectmen," and provided in the decree of the Court, 
that the Mayor of Boston should be one, ex officio. 

On December 2, 1905, the City Treasurer received from Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie $408,396.48, said sum being equal to the amount of the Franklin 
Fund in August, 1904, which Mr. Carnegie agreed to duplicate. Only the 
annual income from this fund is used. 

On January 31, 1907, the amount of the "accumulated" fund available 
for expenditure by the Managers was $438,741.89, and in that year the 
Franklin Union Building was erected at the corner of Appleton and Berk- 
eley streets. It was opened for the use of the Franklin Trades School, 
or Franklin Union as it is now called, in September, 1908. This is main- 
tained partly by tuition fees, rents, etc., $118,353 total in year 1924, 
including the income from the above mentioned Franklin Fund {i. e., the 
Andrew Carnegie Donation), which fund amounted to $462,396 on January 
31, 1925. The building contains 24 classrooms and 6 draughting rooms, 
where 1,833 adult students received instruction at evening sessions during 
the year 1924, the fees ranging from $4 to $15. There is also a technical 
and scientific library, and a large hall with a seating capacity of 1,000. 
The building with equipment cost $402,718. , The site, containing about 
16,000 square feet, was purchased in 1906 for $100,000, a 20-year loan 
being issued to cover same. 

The Franklin Fund will become available in 1991. 



LICENSING BOARD. 
Office, 1 Beacon Street, Eighth Floor. 
[Stat. 1906, Chaps. 291, 395; Stat. 1907, Chap. 214; Stat. 1909, Chaps, 
387, 423; C. C. Chap. 55; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 383 and 476; Stat. 1911, 
Chap. 83; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 451, 715; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chap. 313; 
Spec. Stat. 1917, Chap. 145; Gen. Stat. 1918, Chaps. 64, 259; Gen. 
Stat. 1919, Chaps. 10, 99; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 47, 191, 216; Stat. 1922, 
Chaps. 285, 392, 427, 485.] 

OFFICIALS. 

David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

THE BOARD. 

David T. Montague. Term ends in 1932. 
Mary E. Driscoll. Term ends in 1930. 
Arthur J. Selfridge. Term ends in 1928. 



128 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The Licensing Board for the City of Boston, estabhshed in 1906, con- 
sists of three members, appointed by the Governor, with the advice and 
consent of the Council. The members must be citizens of Boston who 
have resided in the City for at least two years preceding the date of their 
appointment. The two principal poUtical parties must be represented 
and the term of the members is fixed at six years; after the first appoint- 
ments, one member retiring every two years. The Board was created to 
exercise all the powers and perform all the duties conferred upon the Board 
of Police of the City of Boston relative to intoxicating liquors, also as to 
innholders and common victuallers. In 1909 they took charge of hcensing 
the sale of ice cream, fruit, soda water and confectionery on Sunday. 

Licenses for the selling, renting or leasing of firearms are now issued by 
this board instead of by the City Clerk. The annual fee established for 
such licenses is $5.00. It also has charge of the licensing of picnic groves, 
skating rinks, intelUgence offices, bilUard tables and bowling alleys, 
formerly attended to by the Police Dept. 



CONSTABLES. 

As OF May 1, 1926. 

Appointed annually by Mayor, subject to confirmation by the City 

Council, for one year beginning with the first day of May, and paid by fees 

fixed by law. 

(Alphabetical Lists.) 

Constables Connected with Official Positions, and to Serve With- 
out Bonds. — John A. Anderson, Philip J. Brennan, William W. K. 
Campbell, John M. Casey, John B. Cassidy, Martin F. Cavanagh, 
Llojfd H. Chase, John F. Coffey, Thomas Farrell, John C. Fitzgerald, 
Joseph Fucillo, John F. Gillespie, Joseph W. Hobbs, William A. Kelley, 
Lawrence J. Kelly, Edward J. Leary, Edward A. McGrath, John 
McLoughlin, Emery D. Morgan, Vincenzo Musto, James E. Norton. 
Timothy F. Regan, Charles H. Reinhart, Edward M. Richardson. 
Henry Santosuosso, Frank B. Skelton, Thomas H. Staples, John J. 
SulUvan, Rudolph F. Watson, Ernest C. Nickerson, Daniel F. Hines, 
Andrew B. DeCourcy. 

Constables Connected with Animal Rescue League. — Julian Cod- 
man, Archibald McDonald, Henry C. Merwin, Frank J. Sullivan. 

Constables Connected with Massachusetts S. P. C. T. A. — Harry L. 
Allen. 

Constables Authorized to Serve Civil Process upon Filing Bonds. — 
Francis J. Ahearn, Charles E. Ahern, Frank C. Andano, Carleton N. 
Baker, John J. Bavis, David Belson, Joseph W. Bennett, Carl Birger 
Berg, Morris Berkman, Jacob Berman, George W. Bloomberg, George 
A. Borofski, John H. Brady, Thomas A. Brannelly, Thomas F. Brett, 



CONSTABLES. 129 

Charles B. Broad, Daniel E. Brogie, George W. Brooker, Warren A. 
Brown, John J. Buckley, Louis Budd, Henry P. Burns, Sherman H. 
Calderwood, Atlante Campagna, Herbert S. Campbell, Eugene F. 
Canney, Thomas Cannizzaro, James A. Canton, Daniel B. Carmody, 
Thomas C. Carr, Matthew W. Chait, Morris Chalfin, Hyman Charney, 
Thomas E. Cimeno, William K. Coburn, Thomas F. Coffey, Jr., William 
F. Cogan, Benjamin Cohen, William A. CoUupy, James B. Cushing, 
Walter D. Cushing, Joseph P. Cutter, William Davis, Barney Delucca, 
Crescenzo Desimone, William R. Desmond, Paul V. Dicicco, Saverio 
Didonato, Charles F. Dolson, Thomas J. Donnelon, George G. Drew, 
Arthur W. Duffy, Louis Ebb, Frank R. Farrell, Thomas Fee, Edward J. 
Feeley, Levi P. Fernald, Achille L. Fiorine, Thomas Freedman, Harris 
Friedberg, William L. Frost, Gerald W. Garten, Paul R. Gast, George 
L. Gilbert, James W. Gilmore, John T. Gleason, Maurice J. Glick, 
Reny Goduti, Louis Goldberg, Samuel Goldkrand, Samuel Goldmeer, 
Samuel Goldsmith, Joseph M. Goode, Edmund C. Grady, Joseph Gran- 
ara. Sears H. Grant, Salvatore Grassa, George W. Green, Mark Green, 
Harry Greenbaum, William C. Gregory, Joseph Guttentag, Charles F. 
Hale, St. Clair E. Hale, John F. Halligan, John D. Hayes, Daniel F. 
Hines, John H. Howard, Jacob Isgur, Walter Isidor, Charles H. Jackson, 
David Kaplan, Mark F. Kelleher, David Keller, Francis E. Kelley, 
Joseph F. Kelly, William H. Kenney, Hugh F. Kiernan, William H. 
Kivlan, Clarence H. Knowlton, Bronis Kontrim, Nathan Kopelman, 
Abraham Krinsky, William J. Lally, William J. Lally, John M. Lenane, 
Leopold Lepore, Barnet Levenbaum, John J. Levy, Julius London, 
Joseph G. Luke, William J. Macdonald, Salvatore Maffei, Bernard H, 
Magee, Samuel Mandelstam, Augustus L. Marks, John C. McCluskey, 
Edward J. L. McGowan, Murdock McLellan, Edward J. McTiernan, 
Willam L. Meegan, John B. Mikalauskas, John J. Miller, John J. 
Moriarty, Andrew W. Murphy, Daniel C. Murphy, Eugene V. Murphy, 
Frederick J. Murphy, George W. Murphy, Joseph M. Murphy, John F. 
Nevins, Florence A. Nolan, Michael W. Ober, Daniel W. O'Brien, 
Joseph P. O'Brien, Michael B. O'Donnell, Gay A. Osborne, William I. 
Paine, Corrado Palladino, John J. Pearlman, Frank J. Penney, Phillip 
S. Phillips, George M. Potter, Benjamin F. Powell, James A. Quinn, 
George Ramacorti, Robert Reid, Davis Reinherz, St. Clare H. Richard- 
son, Bartholomew F. Roach, James F. Rosenfield, William Rozman, 
William B. Santosuosso, Barnet Serkin, Samuel Shain, Frank Shaw, 
Joseph P. Silsby, Abraham S. Singer, Henry J. D. Small, George C. 
Souther, Jerome Suvalle, Benjamin J. Tackeff, Joseph H. Tirrell, Francis 
J. Tobin, Joseph Todisco, Joseph M. Torr, Fred G. Trask, Jeremiah A. 
Twomey, Roman J. Vasil, Adolph Vogel, John J. Walsh, Harry A. 
Webber, Charles F. Weinberg, John F. Welch, Albert G. Wenners, 
Richard W. Whipple, Edward J. White, Charfes D. Wilhelm, Hugh 
Wyllie, Frank Yennaco, Maurice Zeeman. 



130 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



OLD SOUTH ASSOCIATION IN BOSTON. 
[Stat. 1877, Chap. 222, §§ 1, 2.] 
The Mayor, ex officio, Councilors Henry Parkman, Jr., and Michael 
J. Mahoney, Managers on the part of the City of Boston. 

The association is managed by a Board of Managers, consisting of fifteen, 
of whom the Mayor of the City of Boston is one, ex officio, two are elected 
annually by the City Council for the municipal year, and the others are 
chosen as provided by statute. 



CHATTEL LOAN COMPANY. 
[Stat. 1907, Chap. 415; Stat. 1908, Chap. 236.) 
The board of directors of the Chattel Loan Company must include one 
member who is appointed by the Governor and one by the Mayor. 
Samuel Bloom, Director. Appointed by the Mayor. 



COLLATERAL LOAN COMPANY. 

[Stat. 1859, Chap. 173, § 6; Stat. 1865, Chap. 14; Stat. 1876, Chap. 11.] 
The Collateral Loan Company is managed by seven directors selected 
annually, five chosen by the corporators at the annual meeting in Decem- 
ber, one appointed by the Governor and one by the Mayor. 

Peter A. Donovan, Director. Appointed by the Mayor. 



WORKINGMEN'S LOAN ASSOCIATION. 

[Stat. 1888, Chap. 108, § 4]. 
The Workingmen's Loan Association is managed by sixteen directors 
selected annually, fourteen chosen by corporators at the annual meeting 
on the third Thursday in April, one appointed by the Governor and one 
appointed by the Mayor. 

Frederick M. J. Sheenan, Director. Appointed by the Mayor. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

OflBce, 37 Pemberton square. 
[Stat. 1878, Chap. 244; Stat. 1885, Chap. 323; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, 
§ 26; Stat. 1903, Chap. 279; Stat. 1906, Chap. 291; Stat. 1907, Chaps. 
387, 513, 560; Stat. 1908, Chaps. 480, 519; C. C, Part III., Chaps. 
53 and 54; Stat. 1909, Chaps. 221, 311, 538; Stat. 1911, Chap. 287; 
Stat. 1913, Chaps. 236, 263, 286, 592, 835, §§ 69-75; Stat. 1914, Chap. 
611; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 91; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chap. 87; Gen Stat. 
1917, Chap. 29, and Spec. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 145, 307; Gen. Stat. 1919, 
Chap. 259; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chaps. 23, 93, 188; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 
6, 7, 8, 13, 68, 211; Stat. 1921, Chap. 114; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 485 
and 521, § 31; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 242, 289; Stat. 1924, Chap. 410.] 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 131 

Herbert A. Wilson, Police Commissioner. 

John H. Merrick, Secretary. 

Captain Joseph Harriman, Chief Clerk. 

EXECUTIVE STAFF. 

Michael H. Crowley, Superintendent of Police. 

Thomas C. Evans, Deputy Superintendent. 

Forrest F. Hall, Deputy Superintendent. 

Thomas F. Goode, Deputy Superintendent. 

Captain George C. Garland, Special Service. 

Captain Charles W. Searles, Property Clerk. 

Captain George W. Patterson, Vice Squad. 

Sergeant Robert Caverly, Narcotic Squad. 

Captain John F. Ahearn, Inspector of Claims. 

Captain John W. Pyne, Superintendent's Clerk. 

Captain Louis E. Lutz, Drill Master. 

Lieutenant Michael C. Bresnehan, Inspector of Carriages. 

Sergeant Thomas S. J. Kavanagh, Assistant Drill Master. 

Frank A. Richardson, Director of Signal Service. 

BUREAU OF criminal INVESTIGATION. 

Ainsley C. Armstrong, Chief Inspector. 

Gustap Gustafson, Captain. 

William J. Rooney, Lieutenant-Inspector. 

James F. Concannon, Edward T. Conway, William F. Crawford, 
James A. Dennessy, Timothy F. Donovan, John A. Dorsey, George 
J. Farrell, Stephen J. Flaherty, Thomas F. Gleavy, Francis P. 
Haggerty, Daniel W. Hart, John W. Kilday, Joseph F. Loughlin, 
John F. McCarthy, Michael J. Morrissey, Thomas F. Mulrey, 
Henry M. Pierce, Thomas A. Sheehan, John F. Mitchell, 
Patrick J. O'Neil, James R. Claflev, Michael J. Burke, James 
H. Egan, Thomas M. Towle, Joseph L. A. Cavagnaro, Lieutenant- 
Inspectors. Detective Sergeants. Owen Farley, William A. Sayward, 
Timothy J. Sheehan, Elkanah W. D. Le Blanc, William R. 
Connolly, Michael A. Kelley. 

police department. 

The Board of Police for the City of Boston, estabhshed in 1885, was 
superseded in 1906 by a single executive, the Police Commissioner. 

The City is divided into twenty-one Police Districts, in each of which is a 
station-house, the headquarters of a captain and force of men. There are 
also two traflSc divisions; a northern and a southern. The Commissioner 
appoints a Harbor Master and assistants from the police force, and they 
receive pay in accordance with their rank in the force. The police steamer 
"Guardian," the steam laimch "Watchman" and the gasolene boats 
"E. U. Curtis" and "Argus," are employed in this service. 



132 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

By Chapter 114, Acts of 1921, the annual listing of voters, now includes 
all women 20 years of age and over, in addition to the men. 

On December 1, 1926, the police force numbered 2,319 members, includ- 
ing 30 captains, 27 lieutenant-inspectors, 43 lieutenants, 166 sergeants. 
2,032 patrolmen and 5 patrolwomen, of which 267 detailed for traffic 
control. There were 18 men in the signal service, whose director has 
charge of 515 signal boxes. 

Salaries: Captains, $3,500 per annum; lieut.-inspectors and lieutenants, 
S2,500; sergeants, $2,300; patrolmen, $1,600 1st year and $100 increase 
each year until $2,000 (maximum) is reached. Uniform and equipment 
are free. 

POLICE STATIONS. 

First Division, Hanover street. Arthur B. McConnell, Captain. 

Second Division, 229 Milk street. Perley S. Skillings, Captain. 

Thied Division, Joy street. James McDevitt, Captain. 

Fourth Division, La Grange street. Herbert W. Goodwin, Captain. 

Fifth Division, East Dedham street. John E. Driscoll, Captain. 

Sixth Division, corner D and Athens streets, South Boston. Daniel G. 
Murphy, Captain. 

Seventh Division, corner Emmons and Paris streets, East Boston. Archi- 
bald F. Campbell, Captain. 

Eighth Division (including the islands in the harbor and the harbor 
service), 521 Commercial street. Ross A. Perry, Captain and Harbor 
Master. Lieutenant Frederic J. Swendeman, Sergeants Ibri W. H. 
Curtis, James J. Crotty, WUliam H. Rymes, Lawrence H. Dunn, Hugh 
F. Marston, Charles Carlson, and Timothy F. Kellard, Assisfmit Harbor 
Masters. 

Ninth Division, Mt, Pleasant avenue and Dudley street. Richard Fitz- 
gerald, Captain. 

Tenth Division, Tremont and Roxbury streets. Jeremiah F. Gallivan, 
Captain. 

Eleventh Division, corner Adams and Arcadia streets. Matthew J. 
Dailey, Captain. 

Twelfth Division, East Fourth street, near K street, South Boston. John 
J. Rooney, Captain. 

Thirteenth Division, Seaverns avenue, Jamaica Plain. Bradley C. 
Mason, Captain. Sub-station, Franklin Park, Pierpont road. 

Fourteenth Division, Washington street, junction Cambridge street, 
Brighton. John M. Anderson, Captain. 

Fifteenth Division, New Municipal Building, City square, Charlestown. 
Michael J. Goff, Captain. 

Sixteenth Division, Boylston street, near Hereford street. Perley C. 
Kneeland, Captain. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 133 

Seventeenth Division, Centre street, corner Hastings street, West Roxbury. 
James P. Smith, Captain. 

Eighteenth Division, 1249 Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park. Robert E. 
Grant, Captain. 

Nineteenth Division, 870 Morton street, Dorchester. James J. Walkins, 
Captain. 

Twentieth Division (Traffic), SS9 Milk street. Bernard J. Hoppe, 

Captain. 

Twenty-first Division (Traffic), Boston Arena Building, 262 St. 
Botolph street. James Laffey, Captain. 

House of Detention. [Stat. 1887, Chap. 234.] First floor of Court 
House, Somerset street. Mary E. Smith, Chief Matron. Mary Kenney, 
Assistant Chief Matron. 

City Prison. First floor of Court House, Somerset street. Lieutenant 
Edward H. Mullen, Keeper of the Lock-up. James J. Hoy, Assistant 
Keeper. Sergeants Charles F. Bannister, Denis J. Casey, Dennis F. 
Desmond, Assistant Keepers. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Administration Building, 15 Beacon street. 

[Stat. 1875, Chap. 241; Stat. 1898, Chap. 400; Stat. 1900, Chap. 235; 
Stat 1901, Chap. 448; Stat. 1903, Chap. 170; Stat. 1905, Chap. 349; 
C. C, Chaps. 33 and 48; Stat. 1906, Chaps. 205, 231, 259, 318, 505; 
Stat. 1907, Chaps. 295, 357, 450; Stat. 1908, Chap. 589; Stat. 1909, 
Chaps. 120, 388, 446, 537, 540; Stat. 1910, Chap. 617; Stat. 1911, 
Chaps. 540, 708; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 195, 569, 711; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 
337, 363, 389, 615, 779; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 128, 331, 489, 730, 738; 
Gen. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 78, 81, 90, and Spec. Stat. Chaps. 189, 300, 304, 
372; Spec. Stat. 1916, Chaps. 86, 88, 213, 267, 289 and Gen. Stat. Chap. 
102; Gen. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 84, 169 and Spec. Stat. Chap. 146; Spec. 
Stat. 1918, Chap. 132; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chaps. 132, 199, 206; Stat. 
1920, Chaps. 140, 524; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 169, 351; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 
273, 286; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 284, 381, 460, 488; Stat. 1924, Chaps. 380, 
479; Stat. 1925, Chaps. 309, 327.] 

school committee. 
Edward M. Sullivan. Term ends January, 1930. 
Jennie Loitman Barron. Term ends January, 1930. 
Frederick L. Bogan, M. D. Term ends January, 1928. 
William G. O'Hare. Term ends January, 1928. 
Francis C. Gray. Term ends January, 1928. 



134 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

OFFICIALS. 

Frederick L. Bogan, M. D., Chairman. 
William G. O'Hare, Treasurer. 
Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 
Jeremiah E. Bttrke, Superintendent. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 
Mark B, Mulvey, Schoolhouse Custodian. 

BOARD OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Superintendent Burke, Chairman ex-officio. 

assistant superintendents. 
Augustine L. Rafter. John C. Brodhead. 

Mart C. Mellyn. Arthur L. Gould. 

William B. Snow. Michael J. Downey. 

The School Committee consists of five members. No person shall be 
eligible for election to the Committee who is not an inhabitant of the City 
and has not been a resident thereof for at least three years continuously 
prior to the election. The members serve without compensation and 
their terms of ofl&ce begin on the first Monday of January following their 
election. At each biennial municipal election as many persons as may 
be necessary to fill the places of the member or members of the Committee 
whose term or terms are about to expire are elected for the term of four 
years. Vacancies are filled for the unexpired term at the next municipal 
election. 

The School Committee meets regularly on the first and third Mondays 
of each month, except during July and August and the first week in 
September. 

office hours of SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Frederick L. Bogan, M. D. Office hour at Administration Building, 
15 Beacon Street, by appointment. 

Jennie Loitman Barron. Office hom- at Administration Building, 15 Bea- 
con Street, Mondays, 3.30 to 4.30 P. M. 

William G. O'Hare. Office hour at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 
Street, Thursdays, 4.30 to 5.30 P. M. 

Francis C. Gray. Office hour at 320 Commonwealth Avenue, or Admin- 
istration Building, 15 Beacon Street, Mondays, 3.30 to 4.30 P. M. 

Edward M. Sullivan. Office hour at Administration Building, 15 Bea- 
con Street, Fridays, 4 to 5 P. M. 

office hours of SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Jeremiah E. Burke. Office hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 
Street, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 3 to 5 P. M. ; also 
on 1st and 3rd Saturday of each month from 11.30 A. M. to 1 P. M. in 
weeks when the schools are in session. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 135 

OFFICE HOURS OF ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS. 

A.UGU8TINE L. Rafter. OflBce hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 

Street, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4 to 5 P. M. 
Mart C. Mellyn. Office hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 

Street, Mondays and Thursdays, 4 to 5 P. M. 
John C. Brodhead. Office hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 

Street, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4 to 5 P. M. 
Arthur L. Gould. Office hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 

Street, Mondays and Wednesdays, 4 to 5 P. M. 
William B. Snow. Office hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 

Street, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4 to 5 P. M, 
Michael J. Downey. Office hours at Administration Building, 15 Beacon 

Street, Mondays and Wednesdays, 4 to 5 P. M. 

NORMAL, LATIN AND DAY HIGH SCHOOLS (16). 

Teachers College (formerly Normal School). 

Boys' Latin (or Public Latin) and Girls' Latin. 

East Boston High, Charlestown High, EngUsh High (boys). Mechanic 
Arts High (boys), South Boston High, Girls' High, High School of 
Practical Arts (girls), Brighton High, High School of Commerce (boys). 
Memorial High (girls), Jamaica Plain High, Dorchester High (boys), 
Dorchester High (girls), and Hyde Park High Schools. 

THE TEACHERS COLLEGE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON, LATIN AND DAY HIGH 

SCHOOLS (17). 

Teachers College, Public Latin, Gii'ls' Latin, Brighton High, Charlestown 
High, Dorchester High (girls), Dorchester High (boys). East Boston 
High, English High, Girls' High, High School of Commerce, High 
School of Practical Arts, Hyde Park High, Jamaica Plain High, Memo- 
rial High (girls), Roxbury High, South Boston High. 

Clerical School. — Boston Clerical School. 

Trade Schools. — Boston Trade School, Trade School for Girls. 

continuation school, day intermediate school districts, school 
districts with intermediate classes, and day elementary 
school districts (80). 
East Boston. — Chapman,! Donald McKay Intermediate,* Emerson,* 
Blackinton-John Cheverus,t Joseph H. Barnes Intermediate,* Samuel 
Adams,t Theodore Lyman,t Ulysses S. Grant.* 
Charlestown. — Harvard-Frothingham,t Prescott,t Warren-Bunker Hill.f 
North and West Ends. — Bowdoin, Eliot,* Hancock,* Michelangelo 
Intermediate,* Washington Intermediate,* Wells, Wendell Phillips. 

* Intermediate Schools. t Intermediate Classes. 



136 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

City Proper. — Abraham Lincoln,* Horace Mann, Prince,t Quincy.f 

South End. — D wight, t Everett,! Franklin,! Rice.f 

South Boston. — Bigelow,* Frederic W. Lincoln,! Gaston,* John A. 
Andrew,! Lawrence,! Norcross,* Oliver Hazard Perry,! Shurtleflf,* 
Thomas N. Hart.! 

RoxBURY. — Dearborn,! Dillaway,! Dudley,! Henry L. Higginson, Hugh 
O'Brien,! Hyde,! Jefferson-Comins, Julia Ward Howe, Lewis Inter- 
mediate,* Martin,! Sherwin,! Theodore Roosevelt Intermediate,* 
William Lloyd Garrison. 

Brighton. — Bennett,* Thomas Gardner,! Washington Allston.* 

Jamaica Plain. — Agassiz,! Bowditch,! Francis Parkman,! Lowell.! 

RosLiNDALE. — Charles Sumner, Longfellow, Washington Irving.* 

West Roxbury. — ■ Robert Gould Shaw.* 

Dorchester. — Christopher Gibson,! Edmund P. Tileston,! Edward 
Everett,! Emily A. Fifield, Frank V. Thompson Intermediate,* Gilbert 
Stuart,! Grover Cleveland Intermediate,* Henry L. Pierce,* John 
Marshall, John Winthrop,* Mary Hemenway,* Mather,! Minot,! 
Oliver Wendell Holmes Intermediate,* Phillips Brooks,! Robert Treat 
Paine, Roger Wolcott, William E. Endicott, William E. Russell! 

Hyde Park. — Elihu Greenwood,! Henry Grew.! 

INDUSTRIAL AND SPECIAL SCHOOLS. 

Industrial Schools. — Boston Trade School (day) with evening classes 
also; Trade School for Girls (day), with extension classes also; Con- 
tinuation Schools (day) for employed boys and girls. 

Clerical School. — For special training in Stenography, Bookkeeping, 
Typewriting, English, office practice and penmanship. 

Disciplinary Day School. — For truants and other school offenders. 

School for the Deaf. — Horace Mann School. 

Day Schools for Immigrants. — For instruction in English language. 

special departments. 
^Educational Investigation and Measurement. Arthur W. Kallom, 

Assistant Director. 
Evening Schools. Joseph F. Gould, Director. 
Examinations. Joel Hatheway, Chief Examiner. 
Extended Use of Public Schools (i. e., School Centers). James T. 

Mulroy, Director. 
Household Science and Arts. Josephine Morris, Director. 
Kindergartens. Caroline D. Aborn, Director. 
Licensed Minors. Timothy F. Regan, Supervisor. 

* Intermediate Schools. t Intermediate Classes. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 137 

Manual Arts. C. Edward Newell, Director. Edward C. Emerson, 
Associate Director. 

Modern Foreign Languages. Marie A. Solano, Director. 
Music. John A. O'Shea, Director. 
Penmanship. Bertha A. Connor, Director. 

Physical Education. Nathaniel J. Young, Director. Frederick J. 
O'Brien, Associate Director. 

Practice and Training of Teachers. Katherine L. King, Director. 
Salesmanship. Edward J. Rowse, Commercial Co-ordinator. 
School Hygiene. John A. Ceconi, M. D., Director. 
Special Schools and Classes. Ada M. Fitts, Director. 
Vocational Guidance. Susan J. Ginn, Director. 
Chief Attendance Officer. Joseph W. Hobbs. 

Administrative Offices. 

Administration Building, 15 Beacon St. Headquarters of all officials. 

At Continuation School, Common St., educational and employment 
certificates are issued daily (except Saturdays), from 8.30 A. M. to3 P M., 
and on Saturdays from 9 A. M. to 1 P. M., but during July and August 
to 12 noon. Physical examination of appUcants for employment certifi- 
cates daily from 9 to 10.30 A. M. 

Minors' licenses (i. e., minors under 16 years of age) to act as newsboys, 
etc., issued daily, except Saturdays, from 4 to 5 P. M., and on Saturdays 
from 9 A. M. to 1 P. M., but during July and August to 12 noon. Licenses 
are not issued during school hours. 

attendance officers. 
[Stat. 1913, Chap. 779, § § 12, 13.] 
These officers are appointed by the School Committee, and under their 
direction enforce the laws relating to absentees from school. They are 
also constables, serving without bonds. There are 29 officers besides the 
chief and they may be seen from 9 to 9.30 A. M., on the days that the 
schools are in session at the principal schoolhouse in the district served. 

school physicians and school nurses. 

Regular medical inspection of the schools was maintained from 1894 to 
1915, under the supervision of the Health Department. Beginning 
September 1, 1915, the School Committee took charge of this service. 
For all schools and districts there is one Director of School Hygiene in 
charge of six supervising school physicians and fifty-two school physicians. 

Chapter 357, Acts of 1907, provided for the appointment by the School 
Committee of one supervising female nurse and as many district female 
nurses as are deemed necessary. For the eighty elementary and inter- 
mediate school districts there is one supervising nurse in charge of three 
assistant supervising nurses and fifty-five school nurses. 



138 MUNICIPAL REGISTER, 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Ill 1907 the School Committee were authorized to provide for the 
extension of physical education and recreation of pupils, including proper 
apparatus and facilities in the buildings, yards and playgrounds under their 
control. 

The sum available for this branch of education is 15 cents on each 
$1,000 of the City's assessed valuation, the appropriation for 1926 being 
$267,141.81. 

There are now a director, an associate director, an assistant director and 
30 instructors of physical education, 8 instructors in military drill, 2 
armorers, 1 supervisor-in-charge of playgrounds, 6 playground supervisors, 
also 250 playground teachers, the latter having charge of games, gymnas- 
tics, etc.. in the 45 schoolyard playgrounds and 65 park playgrounds in use. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS PARTLY MAINTAINED BY STATE. 

By Chapter 471, Acts of 1911, and Chapter 106, Acts of 1912, the State 
especially encourages the establishing of Independent Industrial Schools, 
allowing financial aid for their maintenance proportionate to the amount 
raised by local taxation and expended for all public schools. Under this 
arrangement the School Committee is reimbursed by the State to the 
extent of one haK the net maintenance cost of such industrial schools 
established in Boston thus far with the approval of the State Board of 
Education. By Chapter 805, Acts of 1913, Continuation Schools, for 
employed children between fourteen and sixteen years of age, were included 
under the same plan of State aid. The schools thus maintained are the 
Boston Trade School (for Boys), day and evening classes. Trade School 
for Girls, day and extension classes. Compulsory Continuation School, 
High School of Practical Arts, also co-operative courses in the Charlestown, 
Dorchester and Hyde Park High and practical arts courses in the evening 
elementary schools. 

MANUAL ARTS. 

The Training School for Teachers of Mechanic Arts, located in the 
Parkman Schoolhouse, Broadway, South Boston, is conducted under the 
direction of the Department of Manual Arts. 

There are seven co-operative courses in high schools, as follows: Brighton 
(auto mechanics), Charlestown (electricity), Dorchester (woodwork). 
East Boston (machine shop practice), Hyde Park (machine shop practice), 
Jamaica Plain (agriculture), and South Boston (sheet metal). 

There are 143 shops in elementary and intermediate schools, in which 
the following-named subjects are taught: Auto mechanics, bookbinding, 
electricity, interior decoration, machine shop practice, mechanical drawing 
(temporary), printing, sheet metal, woodwork, and diversified subjects. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND ARTS. 

There are ten high schools offering courses in household science and 
arts, Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, East Boston, Hyde Park, Girls' 
High, .Jamaica Plain. Memorial also South Boston and High School of 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 139 

Practical Arts, and 69 rooms in elementary and intermediate schools 
equipped for instruction in cookery, 65 sewing rooms, 7 millinery rooms 
and 11 home suites. 

A director, two assistant directors, 69 teachers of cookery and 117 
teachers of sewing also 9 teachers of millinery are assigned to the Depart- 
ment of Household Science and Arts. 

EVENING HIGH, ELEMENTARY AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 

There are nine evening high schools, Central (English High Schoolhouse) , 
Girls', Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, East Boston, Roxbury, South 
Boston and Hyde Park. These schools, whose sessions are on Monday, 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings, from 7.30 to 9.30, are held in the several 
high schoolhouses of the districts named. All but the Central High are 
commercial schools. 

There are twenty-two elementary evening schools, including six branch 
schools of same in session on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings. 

Evening industrial classes are conducted in the Boston Trade School 
and three branch schools held in the Brighton, East Boston and Hyde 
Park High schoolhouses, and in Mechanic Arts High Schoolhouse. 

CONTINUATION SCHOOL (dAY). 

Classes for Boys' Division, with 27 instructors, are held in the Brimmer 
School on Common St.; for Girls' Division, with 22 instructors, at 868 
Washington street. 

All children 14 to 16 years of age employed under an employment cer- 
tificate are compelled by law to attend the school four hours per week. 

DAY SCHOOL FOR IMMIGRANTS. 

There are thirty schools for immigrants where instruction in the Eng- 
lish language is provided, classes being conducted daily (except Saturday) 
for two hours in the forenoon and the same in the afternoon. 

SUMMER REVIEW AND VACATION SCHOOLS, 

These supplementary schools, one high and eleven elementary, for pupils 
who have been retarded in their studies, were started in 1914. The term 
is forty days, and the number of pupils in 1926 was 7,025. There are also 
five vacation schools. The term is forty days, and the number of pupils in 
1926 was 6,983. 

USE OF SCHOOLHOUSES FOR SOCIAL AND CIVIC PURPOSES. 

In 1912 the School Committee were authorized by statute to allow the 
use of buildings under their control by associations and individuals (other 
than school pupils) for social, recreative and civic purposes at times when 
the schools were not in session. Under this arrangement there are now 
eleven School Centers, each having a manager and largely attended on 
three evenings and one or two afternoons a week. More than 50 school 
buildings are also used by Non-School Center groups. 



140 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

The School Committee may annually appropriate for this purpose a 
sum equal to four cents on each $1,000 of the City's assessed valuation, 
which in 1926 will amount to $71,237.82. In addition, the income from 
rents of school buildings is available. Besides the renting of school 
halls for club meetings, entertainments, etc., basements and other accom- 
modations in schoolhouses are used by the Election Department as poll- 
ing places, lighting and janitor service being paid for. 

PENSION AND RETIREMENT FUND FOR TEACHERS. 

The School Committee, by a majority vote of aU its members, may retire 
with a pension any member of the teaching or supervising staff of the 
public day schools who has reached the age of sixty-five years, also such 
other members as are incapacitated for further efficient service. If the 
teacher retired has been employed in the public day schools for a period 
of thirty years or more, ten years of which has been in Boston, the pension 
paid amounts to one-third of the annual salary received at time of retire- 
ment, but in no case is it less than $312 nor more than $600 annually. If 
the period of service is less than thirty years, the pension is proportionally 
less. The School Committee are authorized to provide for these pensions 
by appropriating annually an amoimt equal to seven cents on each $1,000 
of the City's assessed valuation. The Permanent School Pension Fund 
amounted to $657,838.92 on January 1, 1926, and 309 retired teachers 
were receiving pensions therefrom. 

The Boston Teachers' Retirement Fund Association, started in 1900, 
is paying $120 per year to 301 annuitants, the total amount of its fund 
on October 1, 1926, being $929,670.23. At that date 3,699 teachers 
were each contributing $18 per year to this fund. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 141 



ORDINANCES ENACTED BY THE 
CITY COUNCIL. 



REVISED ORDINANCES OF 1925. 



14th Revision (Latest). 

In pursuance of a vote of the City Council on Julj^ 27, 1925, the work 
of revising and consolidating the City Ordinances was undertaken by the 
Assistant City Clerk. On December 21, 1925, a draft of the completed 
revision up to date was submitted to the Committee on Ordinances, who 
arranged to have printed an appendix thereto showing the disposition of 
the Revised Ordinances of 1924 and subsequent ordinances, also where the 
same have been repealed or rendered obsolete by statute. 

On December 28, 1925, the City Council, by unanimous vote, enacted 
the Revised Ordinances of 1926, * consisting of 40 chapters. 

Since the adoption of the Revised Ordinances of 1925 up to the time of 

issuing this volume, the folloAving ordinances have been enacted by the 

City Council: 

ORDINANCES OF 1926. 



CHAPTER 1. 

Concerning Bonds of the City Collector and the City Treasurer. 
Chapter three of the Revised Ordinances of 1925 is hereby amended in 
section three, by striking out in the clause establishing the bond of the city 
collector the words ?' seventy-five thousand dollars" and inserting in place 
thereof the words "one hundred and fifty thousand dollars"; and by 
striking out in the clause establishing the bond of the city treasurer the 
words "one hundred and fifty thousand dollars" and inserting in place 
thereof the words "three hundred thousand dollars." 

[Approved October IS, 1926. 



CHAPTER 2. 

Concerning Meal Periods of Members of the Fire Department. 

Section three of chapter fifteen of the Revised Ordinances of nineteen 
hundred and twenty-five is hereby amended by adding at the end of said 
section the following: — and provided further that each member of the 

* Copies may be obtained at ofl&ce of City Messenger, 55 City Hall, 50 
cents each. 



142 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

fire department while on a twenty-four hour tour of duty may be allowed 
one meal period of one and one quarter hours while on such tour of duty^ — 
so that section three as amended shall read: 

Section 3. The hours of duty of the day force shall be from eight 
o'clock ante meridian to six o'clock post meridian, and the hours of duty 
of the night force shall be from six o'clock post meridian to eight o'clock 
ante meridian; provided, that on every third day, for the purpose of alter- 
nating the day force with the night force and vice versa, the number of 
hours of duty herein stated may be exceeded, but one force shall be at 
liberty at all times, except as otherwise provided in section four of this 
ordinance, and provided further that each member of the fire department 
while on a twenty-four hour tour of duty may be allowed one meal period 
of one and one quarter hours while on such tour of duty. 

[Approved October 13, 1926. 



CHAPTER 3. 
Concerning the Conservation Bureau. 

Section 1. The conservation bureau created pursuant to section five, 
chapter eighteen, of the revised ordinances of nineteen hundred and 
twenty-five is hereby abolished. 

Sect. 2. The health commissioner shall establish in addition to the 
other divisions of the health department a conservation division for the 
purpose of conserving life and promoting public health. The scope and 
character of the work to be done by the conservation division shall be the 
study of conditions and problems of cancer and contagious diseases. 
Temporary and permanent employees necessary to carry on the work of 
the conservation division shall be appointed and their compensation 
fixed in the same manner as other employees of the health department 
and their compensation and other expenses of the conservation division 
paid from appropriations available for the purpose in the same manner as 
other expenses of the health department. 

[Approved October 26, 1926. 



CHAPTER 4. 
Concerning the TreasiTry Department. 
The treasurer may appoint an assistant cashier who shall furnish a 
bond in the penal sum of ten thousand dollars to the ti'easurer as obligee, 
with sureties satisfactory to the mayor, for the faithful performance of his 
duties and for the safe custody of money and other property entrusted 
to him. The assistant cashier may in addition to such other duties as 
the treasurer may require him to perfonn sign, in the name and behalf 
of the treasurer, if countersigned by said assistant cashier, all checks 
which may be required for the payment of the pay rolls of the school 

committee. 

[Api)roved October 26, 1926. 



REGULATION OF BUILDING HEIGHTS. 143 



REGULATION OF BUILDING HEIGHTS. 
[Stat. 1904, Chap. 333; Stat. 1905, Chap. 383; Stat. 1907, Chap. 416; 
Stat. 1912, Chap. 582; Stat. 1914, Chap. 786; Spec. Stat. 1915, 
Chap. 333; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 156; Stat. 1920, Chap. 455; 
Stat. 1922, Chap. 174.] 

In 1904 the Legislature provided that the City of Boston should be 
divided into two districts, designated as Districts A and B, and that if 
not repugnant to some other statute, buildings could be erected in Dis- 
trict A to a height of 125 feet, but that except as to certain projections 
above the roof, no buildings could be erected in District B to a height 
greater than 80 feet. A commission fixed the boundaries of these dis- 
tricts and they were intended to remain- in effect until 1919. 

In 1915 a new commission was appointed, consisting of the Chairman 
of the City Planning Board, the Fire Commissioner and the Building 
Commissioner, who filed their order in the Registry of Deeds on Novem- 
ber 2, 1916, to remain in force for ten years, and superseding the order 
of 1904 as to the boundaries of Districts A and B. 

District A. The boundaries established begin at the intersection of 
Wauwatosa st. and Chelsea creek (Ward 1, East Boston), thence extend 
easterly through Wauwatosa and Boardman sts. to Saratoga st., thence 
southwesterly and westerly through Saratoga and Addison sts. to the 
B. & M. R.R., thence along said railroad to Saratoga st., thence through 
Saratoga st. to Neptune rd.. Eagle sq.. Eagle, Glendon and Condor sts. 
to Meridian st., thence southerly through Meridian, Gove, Orleans and 
Marginal sts. to Jeffries st. thence northeasterly to Maverick st. and 
through same to the B., R. B. & L. R.R., thence along latter to the center 
of Porter st. extended, thence through Porter, Bremen and Prescott 
sts. to the B., R. B. & L. R.R., thence along said railroad to the northern 
boundary of Wood Island (now World War Memorial) Park (Ward 1), 
thence easterly along same to the harbor line, thence along said line 
of Boston Harbor and Chelsea creek to the point of beginning. These 
are the East Boston boundaries of District A. 

The boundaries in Charlestown begin at the Maiden Bridge (Ward 2), 
thence extend southerly through Alford st. to Sullivan sq., thence 
southeasterly through Bunker Hill and Medford sts. to Chelsea st. 
thence southerly through latter to Henley st., thence westerly through 
same, Harvard sq. and Harvard st. to Washington st., thence through 
latter and Rutherford ave. northwesterly to Sullivan sq., thence through 
Cambridge st. to the City line, thence along said line and the Charles 
river to Charlestown Bridge, thence along the harbor line and the Mystic 
river to the point of beginning. 

In the City proper the boundaries begin at the intersection of the City 
line with the Charles river dam (Ward 3), thence extend along said dam 
and Leverett st. to Green st., thence through Green, Staniford and Cam- 
bridge sts. to Bowdoin st., thence southerly through same, Beacon, Park 
and Tremont sts. to Boylston st., thence through latter, Massachusetts 



144 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

ave. and the line of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. (Providence Div.) to 
Tremont st. at Roxbury Crossing, thence through Columbus ave., Rox- 
bury St., Guild row and Dudley st. to Columbia rd. (Upham's Corner), 
thence through same to Dorchester ave., thence southerly to Park st. 
(Ward 16), and through latter and Adams st. to Neponset ave., thence 
through said avenue to the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. (Milton Branch), 
thence along said railroad and through Granite ave. to the Neponset 
river, thence easterly and northerly along the shore of said river and the 
harbor lines of Dorchester bay and Old Harbor to the intersection of 
Old Colony ave. and Columbia rd., thence northerly along Old Colony 
ave. to E st. (South Boston), thence through latter, Broadway, Dorches- 
ter and East Second sts. to I st., thence northerly through I to East First 
St. and easterly through latter to Farragut rd., thence northerly through 
same and Farragut rd. extended across the reserved channel, thence along 
the harbor line of South Boston to Northern Avenue Bridge, thence west- 
erly along said bridge to the harbor line of Boston Proper, thence northerly 
and westerly along said harbor line and Charles river to the point of 
beginning. 

Wherever a boundary line of District A is described as following a cer- 
tain street, the same is intended to include all property on that side of the 
street which lies within the described area, and also that portion of all 
lots on the opposite side of the street, abutting on the street, but extending 
to a depth of not more than 1.50 feet. 

District B comprises all territory in the City outside the boundaries 
above described. In this district buildings may in general be erected to 
a height of not more than 80 feet, but on streets exceeding 64 feet in width 
the height may be equal to one and a quarter times the width of the widest 
street upon which the building stands, said height to be measured from 
the mean grade of the curbs of all streets upon which the building is 
situated and not to exceed in any event 100 feet above such point of 
measurement. On all streets or portions of streets upon which buildings 
may be erected on one side only, the buildings may be erected to a height 
of 100 feet. No building may be erected to a height greater than 80 feet 
unless its width on each and every public street upon which it stands be 
at least one half its height. Certain special exceptions to the general 
regulations affecting District B have been made as follows: 

No building can be erected on a parkwaj^, boulevard or public way 
on which a building line has been established by the Board of Park Com- 
missioners or by the Board of Street Commissioners acting under any 
general or special statute, to a greater height than that allowed by the 
order of said Boards. 

No building upon any land, any owner of which has received and retained 
compensation in damages for any limitation of height, or who retains 
any claim for such damages, can be erected to a height greater than 
that fixed by the limitation for which such damages were received or 
claimed. 



COMMITTEE FOR AMERICANISM. 145 

No limitation of the height of buildings applies to churches, steeples, 
towers, domes, cupolas, belfries or statuary not used for purposes of 
habitation, nor to chimneys, gas holders, coal or grain elevators, open 
balustrades, skylights, ventilators, flagstaffs, railings, weather vanes, soil 
pipes, steam exhausts, signs, roof-houses, nor to sugar refineries in 
District A. 

By Chap. 156, Special Acts of 1919, section four of Chap. 383, Acts of 
1905, was amended so as to allow roof-houses, skylights, etc., above the 
roof line, used to enclose elevator shafts, an additional space of four feet 
on all sides (or 16 feet square in all), but not to exceed 12 feet in height. 
All such roof structures of first-class buildings may be constructed of 
angle iron and four -inch blocks, plastered inside and outside, or covered 
on both sides with metal or angle iron, and two-inch solid metal lath and 
plaster walls may be used, the door to be of metal frame and covered 
with metal. 

The limitation as to size of roof-houses was revoked by Chap. 174, Acts 
of 1922, and the requirements concerning such were left to the discretion 
of the Building Commissioner. 

In 1923, by Chap. 462, sec. 11, a maximum building height of 155 
feet (instead of 125 feet as before) was permitted for buildings in District A. 



PUBLIC CELEBRATIONS BUREAU. 

George H. Johnson, Director of Public Celebrations. 
Office, 25 City Hall. 
The Bureau of Public Celebrations was organized in 1912, for the pur- 
pose of observing, under the diiection of his Honor the Mayor, the cele- 
bration of historical events, the observance of patriotic holidays and other 
public occasions, in a manner calculated to produce constructive results, 
as well as to provide for the enjojrment of men, women and children of 
the community. 



COMMITTEE FOR AMERICANISM. 

Herbert E. Ellis, Secretary. 
Office, 305 City Hall Annex. 

The Bureau of the Committee for Americanism was created to incul- 
cate the spirit of active and alert Americanism throughout the City of 
Boston and combat the circulation of malicious propaganda. 

The service of the Bureau has aided in the construction of a well at- 
tended policy of American ideals and for fostering better community 
conditions. 

Since the formation of the Bureau for Americanism, a vast number of 
aliens have received instruction in matters of naturalization and future 
citizenship and literature of an informative nature has been widely dis- 
tributed. 



146 MUNICIPAL REGISTER, 



RENT AND HOUSING COMMITTEE. 

Herbert E. Ellis, Secretary. 

Office, 305 City Hall Annex. 

The Rent and Housing Committee was appointed by his Honor the 

Mayor, March 25, 1920. The purpose of the Committee has been to 

carefully study the difficulties arising between tenants and landlords and 

to endeavor to effect settlements of the most deHcate social and economic 

problems provided in hundreds of rented homes. 



GEORGE ROBERT WHITE FUND. 

George E. Phelan, Director. 
Office, 45 City Hall. 

The late George Robert White, who died in Boston, January 27, 1922, 
left the residue of his estate to the City of Boston to be held as a per- 
manent charitable trust fund for creating works of public utility and for 
the use and enjoyment of the inhabitants of the City of Boston. 

The control and management of the fund is in the hands of a board of 
five trustees, consisting of the Mayor as Chairman, the President of the 
City Council, the City Auditor, the President of the Boston Chamber of 
Commerce, and the President of the Bar Association of the City of Boston. 

Health Units have been provided at Baldmn Place and North Margin 
Street in the North End, and at Paris and Emmons Streets, East Boston, 
to provide medical, surgical and dental service for the well-being of m.en, 
women and children. 

A similar health unit is now in process of construction in South Boston. 



COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL AND PUBLICITY BUREAU. 
George H. Johnson, Director. 
Office, 25 City Hall. 
The Commercial, Industrial and Publicity Bureau was organized by the 
Mayor early in 1921. The purpose of the Bureau is to foster and stimu- 
late the creation of new industries in Boston, under the direction of 
the Mayor, to co-operate with commercial and trade organizations for 
this purpose, and to provide for suitable pubhc statements relative to 
successful business accomplishments in Boston from time to time. 



VALUATION OF BOSTON. 



147 



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INDEX — S-T. 191 

Page 
South Boston (Wards 6 and 7). — ■ Concluded. 

Streets paved in, miles of 104 

Wards in, boundaries of . . . . 153, 154 

Statistics Department 109 

Boston Statistics 110 

Boston Year Book 110 

City Record 110 

Statues, monuments, etc., belonging to City 90, 93 

Store refuse, removal of 106 

Street Cleaning and Oiling Service (Public Works Dept.) . . 105 

Street Commissioners (Street Laying-Out Dept.) . . . . 110 

Street lamps, number and varieties of 103 

Street Laying-Out Department 110 

Traffic rules - 112 

Streets, public, miles of paved, by districts, 1926 .... 104 
Suffolk County, See County of Suffolk. 
Superintendent of: 

Almshouse and Hospital . 78 Police 131 

Boston Sanatorium . . 59 Printing .... 97 

City Hospital ... 74 Public Buildings . 98 

Fire Alarm Branch . . 67 Schools .... 134 

Maintenance (Fire Dept.) 67 SuppHes .... 112 

Markets .... 82 Wire Div., Fire Dept. . 67 

Parks 84 

Supervisor of: 

Bridges, Public Works Dept 102 

Construction, Building Dept 61 

Elevators, Building Dept 61 

Gasfitting, Building Dept 61 

Plumbing, Building Dept 61 

Sanitary and Street Cleaning and Oiling Service . . 105 

Licensed Minors (School Dept.) 136 

Supply Department .^ . . 112 

Supreme Judicial Court, clerks of 121 

Superior Court, clerks of 121 

T. 

Transit Department . 112 

Treasury Department 113 

Assistant Cashier (Ordinances, 1926) 142 

Treasurer's bonds increased 141 

Trustees of: 

Boston Sanatorium 59 

Hospital Dept 74 

Library Dept 79 

Statistics Dept 1 10 



192 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

V. 

Page 

Valuation of Boston 147 

Various City, County and State Officers 116,117 

Vessels and Ballast Department . 1 13 

W. 

Wachusett Reservoir 106 

Ward boundaries (new) as fixed in 1924 150-163 

Ward-rooms, list of (Public Buildings Dept.) 100, 101 

Water Division (Public Works Dept.) 106, 107 

Water used in 1926, average gallons daily 106 

Water mains, miles of, 1926 106 

Weights and Measures Department 114 

West Roxbury (Wards 19 and 20) : 

Assessment districts in 56, 57 

Municipal Buildings (Jamaica Plain and Roslindale) . . 98, 100 

Municipal Court of 123 

Parks, playgrounds, etc., in 84-87, 90 

Public Library Branches in Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, and 

West Roxbury Center 81, S2 

Pubhc Schools in 135, 136 

Representatives of, in Legislature, 1926-27 .... 176 

Streets paved in, miles of 104 

Wards in, boundaries of . . . . . . . 161, 162 

White Fund, George Robert 146 

Workingmen's Loan Association 1 30 

Z. 

Zoning Adjustment, Board of 63, 64 

Members of 63 

Zoological Garden, Franklin^Park 94