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Full text of "Municipal register : containing rules and orders of the City Council, the city charter and recent ordinances, and a list of the officers of the City of Boston, for .."

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 9999 06583 133 9 



IIBR/^ 



[Document 50 - 1979] 



CITY OF BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
FOR 1978-1979 



CONTAINING 

A REGISTER OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, EXCERPTS 
FROM STATUTE 1909, CHAPTER 486, AS AMENDED 
BY STATUTE 1948, CHAPTER 452, AND STATUTE 
1951, CHAPTER 376, INCLUDING SUBSEQUENT 
CHANGES, 

WITH 

LISTS OF PUBLIC OFFICERS, 

AND 

MEMBERSHIP OF FORMER CITY GOVERNMENTS. 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY THE CITY CLERK 

UNDER THE DIRECTION 

OF 

THE COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE 
(FORMERL Y THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE) 

OF 

THE CITY COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING SECTION 




BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

FOR 1978-1979 




SEAL OF THE CITY 

OF 

BOSTON 






^BOStONlA'l, 

^"^^ CONDITA A.D. ^J 






THE CITY SEAL 

As it appeared prior to 1827 

The City Seal was adopted by "An Ordinance to Estab- 
lish the City Seal," passed January 2, 1823, which pro- 
vides "That the design hereto annexed, as sketched by 
John R. Penniman, giving a view of the City, be the device 
of the City Seal; that the motto be as follows, to wit: 'Sicut 
patribus sit Deus nobis'; and that the inscription be as 
follows:— 'Bostonia condita, A.D. 1630. Civitatis regimine 
donata, A.D. 1822.' " The motto is taken from 1 Kings, 
viii, 57: "God be with us as He was with our fathers." 

The seal as it first appeared is shown above. 

The seal as it was afterwards changed, and has ever since 
continued to be used, was first shown on page 221 of the 
volume of laws and ordinances, commonly known as the 
"First Revision," published in 1827, and is established as 
the City Seal at the present time by Revised Ordinances of 
1914, Chapter 1, Section 5, which provides that "The seal 
of the City shall be circular in form; shall bear a view of the 
City; the motto 'SicuT Patribus Sit Deus Nobis,' and 
the inscription, 'BoSTONiA CONDITA, A.D. 1630. 
Civitatis Regimine Donata A.D. 1822,' as herewith 
shown." 

The seal as changed in 1827 is shown on the opposite 
page. 



4 
ORIGIN AND GROWTH OF BOSTON 



The Royal Patent incorporating the Governor and Com- 
pany of Massachusetts Bay in New England passed the 
seals March * 4, 1628-29. At a General Court or, Meeting 
of the Company, on August * 29 of that year it was voted 
*'that the Government and patent should be settled in New 
England." To that end Governor Winthrop led the 
Puritan Exodus in 1630. soon after his arrival at Salem on 
June * 12, 1630, he proceeded with a large following to 
Charlestown, where a plantation had been established the 
summer before. The Assistants held three Courts at 
Charlestown in the interval, August * 23 to September * 
28, inclusive. At their meeting on September * 7, they 
"ordered that Trimountaine shall be called Boston; Mat- 
tapan, Dorchester; and the towne upon Charles River, 
Waterton." Thus Shawmut of the Indians was named Bos- 
ton, probably out of gratitude to the Merchants of Boston 
in Lincolnshire, who had subscribed generously to the 
stock of the Company. 

In the latter part of August, Governor Winthrop with 
the patent chose Boston as his abiding place. The first 
"Court" held in Boston was a "General Court" on Oc- 
tober * 19, "for establishing of the government." On 
October * 3, 1632, Boston was formally declared to be 
"the fittest place for pubhque meetings of any place in the 
Bay." 

Boston was the first town in Massachusetts to become a 
city. It was incorporated February 23, 1822, by St. 1821, c. 
110, adopted by the voters March 4, 1822. This act was 
revised by St. 1854, c. 448; amended by St. 1885, c. 266, 
again by St. 1909, c. 486, and again by St. 1948, c. 452 as 
amended by St. 1951, c. 376. 

The neck of land called Boston, still called Boston 
Proper, contained perhaps 700 acres of land, judging from 
the 783 acres shown by the official survey of 1794. (In the 
interval 1630-37, Boston acquired jurisdiction over most of 
the territory now included in Chelsea, Winthrop, Revere, 
East Boston, Brookline, Quincy, Braintreee, Randolph 
and Holbrook, besides certain islands in the harbor.) From 
1637 till May 13, 1640, when "Mount Woolaston" was set 
off as Braintree, Boston exercised jurisdiction over a 

* Old Style. 



territory of at least 40,000 acres. Within its present limits 
there are 30,598 acres, including flats and water. 

Since 1640, grants of land have been made to Boston by 
the General Court as follows: (1) October * 16, 1660, 1,000 
acres "for the use of a free schoole, layd out in the 
wildernesse or North of the Merimake River" (in 
Haverhill), in 1664. (2) June * 27, 1735, in abatement of 
Province Tax, three townships, each six miles square, or 
69,120 acres in all. These townships later became the 
Towns of Charlemont, Colrain, and Pittsfield. Boston 
sold its interest in them on June * 30, 1737, for L3,660. (3) 
June 26, 1794, a township of land in Maine (23,040 acres) 
"to build a public hospital." This tract was sold by the 
City April 6, 1833, for $4,200. 

Muddy river was set off as the Town of Brookline on 
November * 13, 1705, and Rumney Marsh was set off as 
the Town of Chelsea January * 8, 1739. 

The principal annexations of territory included within 
the present limits of the City of Boston have been made as 
follows: 

(1) Noddle's Island by order of Court of Assistants, 
March * 9, 1636-37. (2) South Boston set off from Dor- 
chester March 6, 1804, by St. 1803 c. 111. (3) Washington 
Village set off from Dorchester May 21, 1855, by St. 1855, 
c. 468. (4) Roxbury January 6, 1868, by St. 1867, c. 359, 
accepted September 9, 1 867. Roxbury received its name by 
order of the Court of Assistants October * 8, 1630. It was 
incorporated as a city March 12, 1846, by St. 1846, c. 95, 
accepted March 25, 1846. (5) Dorchester January 3, 1870, 
by St. 1869, c. 349, accepted June 22, 1869. It received its 
name September * 7, 1630, by order of the Court of 
Assistants. (6) Brighton January 5, 1874, by St. 1873, c. 
303, accepted October 7, 1873. Set off from Cambridge as 
the Town of Brighton February 24, 1807, by St. 1806, c. 
65. (7) Charlestown January 5, 1874, by St. 1873, c. 286, 
accepted October 7, 1873. Settled July * 4, 1629. It was in- 
corporated a City February 22, 1847, by St. 1847, c. 29, ac- 
cepted March 10, 1847. (8) West Roxbury January 5, 1874, 
by St. 1873, c. 314, accepted October 7, 1873. It was set off 
from Roxbury and incorporated a Town May 24, 1851, by 
St. 1851, c. 250. (9) Hyde Park January 1, 1912, by St. 
1911, c. 469, and 583, accepted November 7, 1911. Incor- 
porated a Town April 22, 1868. 

* Old Style. 



CITY OF BOSTON 
IN CITY COUNCIL 



Ordered,— That the City Clerk be authorized, under the 
direction of the Executive Committee, to prepare and have 
printed the Municipal Register for the biennium 
1978-1979, the expense of said register to be charged to the 
appropriation for City Documents. 

In City Council April 5, 1978. Passed. 

Attest: 

Frederic J. O'Donnell, 
City Clerk. 







\ 






.^ ^i^,: 



Kevin H. White 

Mayor of Boston 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/municipalregiste19789bost 




Lawrence S. DiCara 
President, Boston City Council, 1978 




Joseph M. Tierney 
President, Boston City Council, 1979 



Document 50 — 1979 



CITY OF BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
FOR 1978-1979 

CONTAINING 

A REGISTER OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, EXCERPTS 
FROM STATUTE 1909, CHAPTER 486, AS AMENDED 
BY STATUTE 1948, CHAPTER 452, AND STATUTE 
1951, CHAPTER 376, INCLUDING SUBSEQUENT 
CHANGES, 

WITH 

LISTS OF PUBLIC OFFICERS, 

AND 

MEMBERSHIP OF FORMER CITY GOVERNMENTS 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY THE CITY CLERK 

UNDER THE DIRECTION 

OF 

THE COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE 
(FORMERLY THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE) 

OF 

THE CITY COUNCIL 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction 9, 10 

The City Government, 1978-1979 11 

Of ficers of the City Council 12 

Committees of the City Council 13-16 

Excerpts from the City Charter 17 

Amended City Charter of 1909 (with Plan A charter) . . 19-43 

Public Officials 45-48 

Notes of executive departments, lists of officials, term, 

etc 49-151 

Various City, County and State officials, term, etc. . . .154-164 

Members of City Government, 1909-present .... 167-183 

Mayorsof Boston, 1822-present . ." 184 

Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen, 1855-1909 .... 185 

Presidents ofthe Common Council, 1822-1909 . . . .186,187 

Presidents of the City Council, 1910-present 188 

Orators of Boston, 1771-1979 189,190 

Index 191-199 



9 
INTRODUCTION 



As a public document The Municipal Register is as 
old as the City of Boston itself, the first volume having 
been published in 1821, a year before the government of 
Boston changed from Town to City. Up to 1940 the title of 
the volume was: The Rules and Orders of the Common 
Council. From 1821 to 1829 the document contained 
merely a register of the City Council and a list of the of- 
ficers. 

In 1929 the City Charter was pubUshed as a part of the 
volume, and in 1830 the Acts relating to Boston, also the 
ordinances, were added. In 1832 the size of the volume was 
increased by the addition of an index to the contents. The 
volume published in 1822 contained fifteen pages and for 
the year 1840 there were eighty-eight pages, including three 
pages of index. 

The title The Municipal Register was adopted in 
1841 when the pubHcation became more ambitious, incor- 
porating in its pages the Rules and Orders of the Common 
Council, joint rules, ordinances of the City, statutes of the 
Commonwealth relating to the City, a hst of the public 
schools, the City Government of 1841, the committees and 
departments (consisting at that time of the treasury, law, 
police, health, public land and buildings, lamps and 
bridges, fire, and public charitable institutions), and a list 
of the ward officers. 

From 1842 to 1864 it also contained a list of the members 
of preceding City Governments, a necrological record of 
those members, the latest ordinances and the special 
statutes relating to the City. In 1851 a list of the annual 
orators was added, and in 1853 a map of the City and the 
Rules of the Board of Aldermen. In 1876, statistics of 
registration and voting were included, carried from 1879 to 
1824 in tabulated form. 

From 1889 to 1896, inclusive, THE Municipal Reg- 
ister also continued a compilation of the Charter with the 
revision of 1854 and the amendments of 1885 and there- 
after. The Amended Charter of 1909 (15 pages) was added 



10 

in 1910, and the various changes since that year have been 
indicated by footnotes. 

In 1924 the important amendments to the Charter 
enacted in that year (10 pages) were included. 

The 1925 volume contained, as the latest addition, 
descriptions of the ward boundaries as fixed for the 22 new 
wards (formerly 26) in December, 1924. 

This volume contains the City Charter as amended by 
Stat. 1948, Chap. 452, and Stat. 1951, Chap. 376, com- 
monly known as Plan A, including subsequent changes. 










James M. Connolly* 



Lawrence S. DiCara 



Raymond L. Flynn 





CITY COUNCIL 





Louise Day Hicks t Christopiier A. lannella Frederick C. Langone Patrick F. McDonough 






Albert L. O'Neil 

*Resigned January 3, 1979 

tElected to fill vacancy January 10, 1979 



Rosemane E. Sansone 



Joseph M. Tierney 



PUBLIC 
GALLERY 



u 



ENTRANCE 



Q O <0 

LAWRENCE S DiCARA 

PRESIDENT 

I I 



JOHN P CAMPBELL 
ASS'T CITY CLERK 



EDWARD T. KELLEY 
ASSISTANT CLERK 
OF COMMITTEES 



JOSEPH M TIERNEY 



ROSEMARIE E, SANSONE 



o a 



BARRY T HYNES 
CITY CLERK 



a 



MARYE. FORD 

OFFICIAL 
STENOGRAPHER 



NICHOLAS DiMELLA 
CLERK OF COMMITTEES 



JAMES M. CONNOLLY 



LJ 



PUBLIC 
GALLERY 



ALBERT L, O'NEIL 



'patrick f 
Mcdonough 



FREDERICK C 
LANGONE 



RAYMOND L FLYNN 



CHRISTOPHER A, 
lANNELLA 



ENTRANCE 

COUNCIL 

GALLERY 



PUBLIC 
GALLERY 



BOSTON CITY COUNCIL CHAMBER 1978 



ORGANIZATION OF BOSTON'S CITY GOVERNMENT 



GOVERNOR 



FINANCE 
COUUISSION 









CITY 
COUNCIL 












c":l 





ADMINISTRATIVE 



L 



BOSTON 
HOUSING 
AUTHORITY 



BOSTON 

REDEVELOPMENT 

AUTHORITY 



ESTATE 1 



HEALTH 
HOSPITALS 



ELECTORATE 



SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
SERVICES 



1 




L 


"^ 








COMM 


ISSION- 


SINKIN 


G FL 


NDS 


\b 




/ 



DEPARTMENTS 



t . 



TRAFF 
PARKI1 



DEFENSE FACI 



DEPARTMENTS 



Tz;. 



RECREATION 



= Full Control 
^ Partiai Control 
= Board or Coi 



jn: 



re 



COMMISSION 



attached for Administrative 



CHART DESIGNED AND LITHOGRAPHED BY THE 
CITY OF BOSTON "'^^< PRINTING SECTION 



11 

GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1978 



KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 

Residence, 

158 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston 



BOSTON CITY COUNCIL, 1978 

Stat. 1948, Chap. 452; Stat. 1951, Chap. 376; Stat. 1952, Chap. 190. 

Lawrence S. DiCara, President, 
86 Codman Hill Avenue, Dorchester 

James Michael Connolly 
177 Hackensack Road, West Roxbury 

Raymond L. Flynn 
1 Flint Place, South Boston 

Christopher A. Iannella 
14 Jaeger Terrace, Jamaica Plain 

Frederick C. Langone 
118 Richmond Street, Boston 

Patrick F. McDonough 
1 1 Barrington Road, Dorchester 

Albert L. O'Neil 
4354 Washington Street, RosUndale 

Rosemarie E. Sansone 
243 North Street, Boston 

Joseph M. Tierney 
38 Milton Avenue, Hyde Park 

Regular meetings in Council Chamber, City Hall, 
fifth floor, Wednesdays, at 2 p.m. 



12 

GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1979 



KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 

Residence, 

158 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston 



BOSTON CITY COUNCIL, 1979 

Stat. 1948, Chap. 452; Stat. 1951, Chap. 376; Stat. 1952, Chap. 190. 

JOSEPH M. TiERNEY, President 
38 Milton Avenue, Hyde Park 

James Michael Connolly* 
177 Hackensack Road, West Roxbury 

Lawrence S. DiCara 
86 Codman Hill Avenue, Dorchester 

Raymond L. Flynn 
1 Flint Place, South Boston 

Louise Day HiCKSt 
1780 Columbia Road, South Boston 

Christopher A. Iannella 
14 Jaeger Terrace, Jamaica Plain 

Frederick C. Langone 
118 Richmond Street, Boston 

Patrick F. McDonough 
1 1 Barrington Road, Dorchester 

Albert L. O'Neil 
4354 Washington Street, RosHndale 

Rosemarie E. Sansone 
243 North Street, Boston 

Regular meetings in Council Chamber, City Hall, 
fifth floor, Wednesdays, at 1 p.m. 

♦Resigned January 3, 1979 

tElected to fill vacancy January 10, 1979. 



13 

1978 
OFFICERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL 

Clerk 

Frederic J. O'Donnell* 
Barry T. Hynesi 

Assistant Clerk 

Barry T. Hynes 
John P. Campbellj 

Staff Director 

James M. Coyle 

The Staff Director keeps the accounts of the expen- 
ditures from the city council appropriations, and has the 
care and distribution of all documents printed for the use 
of the City Council, also the regular department reports, 
and has charge of the City Hall Reference Library. 

Clerk of Committees 

Nicholas J. DiMella 
The Clerk of Committees acts as the clerk of all commit- 
tees of the City Council, and keeps the records of their 
meetings. 

Assistant Clerk of Committees 

Edward T. Kelley 

The Assistant Clerk of Committee assists the Clerk of 

Committees in the performance of his duties. 

Chief of Research 

Robert F. Hannan 

City Messenger 

Robert McDonald 

Chaplain 

Rt. Rev. Christopher P. Griffin 

Chief of Administrative Services 

Francis X. Joyce 

Librarian 

Catharian MacKay-Smith 

Receptionist 

Bridget McMullen 

Official Reporter of Proceedings 

Mary E. Ford 

♦Deceased, July 21, 1978 
tElected, August 9. 1978 
JElected, September 6, 1978 



14 

1979 
OFFICERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL 

Clerk 

Barry T. Hynes 

Assistant Clerk 

JOHN P. Campbell 

Staff Director 

James M. Coyle 

The Staff Director keeps the acounts of the expenditures 
from the city council appropriations, and has the care and 
distribution of all documents printed for the use of the 
City Council, also the regular department reports, and has 
charge of the City Hall Reference Library. 

Clerk of Committees 

Nicholas J. DiMella 

The Clerk of Committees acts as the clerk of all commit- 
tees of the City Council, and keeps the records of their 
meetings. 

Assistant Clerk of Committees 
Edward T. Kelley 

The Assistant Clerk of Committees assists the Clerk of 
Committees in the performance of his duties. 

Chief of Research 

Robert F. Hannan 

City Messenger 

Robert McDonald 

Chaplain 

Rt. Rev.Christopher p. Griffin 

Chief of Administrative Services 
Francis X. Joyce 

Librarian 



Receptionist 

Bridget McMullen 

Official Reporter of Proceedings 

Mary E. Ford 



15 
STANDING COMMITTEES OF CITY COUNCIL— 1978 

EXECUTIVE 

All Members: Councillor Iannella, Chairman 

Councillor McDONOUGH, Vice-Chairman 
On the following committees the first-named member is 
Chairman; the second-named member is Vice-Chairman. 

ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS 
Councillors O'Neil, Tierney, DiCara 

HEALTH AND HOSPITALS 

Councillors Sansone, McDonough, Tierney 

HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT 

Councillors Flynn, Langone, Sansone 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Councillors Langone, Connolly, Flynn 

LAWS AND ORDINANCES 
Councillors McDoNOUGH, DiCara, Hicks 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Councillors Tierney, Flynn, O'Neil 

TRANSPORTATION AND LICENSES 
Councillors Iannella, O'Neil, Kerrigan 

WAYS AND MEANS 
Councillors Connolly, Langone, Sansone 



16 
STANDING COMMITTEES OF CITY COUNCIL— 1979 

COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE 

All members: Councillor Tierney, Chairman 

Councillor DiCara, Vice- Chairman 
On the following committees the first-named member is 
Chairman; the second-named member is Vice-Chairman. 

ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS 

Councillors Flynn, O'Neil, McDonough 

HEALTH AND HOSPITALS 
Councillors Sansone, O'Neil, Iannella 

HOUSING AND HUMAN SERVICES 
Councillors HiCKS, Sansone, O'Neil 

LAWS AND ORDINANCES 
Councillors McDoNOUGH, DiCara, Hicks 

NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT 
Councillors DiCara, Hicks, Sansone 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Councillors O'Neil, DiCara, Flynn 

TRANSPORTATION AND LICENSES 

Councillors Iannella, McDonough, Flynn 

WAYS AND MEANS 
Councillors Langone, O'Neil, DiCara, Flynn, Hicks, 
Iannella, Sansone 



OFFICERS 

of the 

CITY COUNCIL 




Barry T. Hynes 
City Clerk 





James M. Coyle 
Staff Director 



17 

EXCERPTS FROM THE CITY CHARTER 

Portions of the City Charter concerning the form of 
government, the election of the Mayor, the School Com- 
mittee, and the City Council, and the general powers and 
duties of those officers, together with certain miscellane- 
ous sections relative to the powers and duties of certain 
boards and officers. 

Users of the following material should bear in mind that 
these are only excerpts from the hundreds of Special Laws 
Relating to the City of Boston, all of which together com- 
prise the "City Charter." A codification thereof can be 
purchased from the Law Department. The voters of 
Boston adopted a "Plan A" form of city government on 
November 8, 1949. See G. L. c. 43. 



19 



SECTION NUMBERS REFER TO 
CHAPTER 452 OF THE ACTS OF 1948 

AS AMENDED BY 

CHAPTER 376 OF THE ACTS OF 1951, 

INCLUDING CERTAIN SUBSEQUENT CHANGES 

General Provisions 

Section 1 . The following words as used in this act shall, unless the 
context otherwise requires, have the following meanings: 

"City", the city of Boston. 

"Board of election commissioners", the board of election commis- 
sioners of the city of Boston. 

"Regular municipal election", the biennial election held for electing 
officers of the city as provided in this act. 

"PreUminary election", the election held for the purpose of 
nominating candidates whose names shall appear on the official ballot 
at a municipal election. 



Sect. 8. Whenever one of the plans provided in this act shall be 
adopted the terms of office of all elective officers in office, and the posi- 
tion of the city manager if there be one, shall terminate at ten o'clock in 
the forenoon on the first Monday of January following the first 
municipal election held in accordance with the provisions of the plan so 
adopted. 

Sect. 9. Whenever one of the plans provided in this act shall be 
adopted, the fiscal year of the city shall begin on January first and shall 
end on December thirty-first next following;* and the municipal year 
thereof shall begin on the first Monday in January and shall continue 
until the first Monday of the January next following. 

Plan A. Government by Mayor, City Council, and School Committee, 
Elected at Large with Preliminary Elections 
(Plan A was adopted by the voters of the City of Boston at the 
Municipal Election held November 8. 1949, Yes, 146,162, No, 73,882.) 

Sect. 1 1 . There shall be in the city a mayor who shall be the chief ex- 
ecutive officer of the city, a city council of nine members which shall be 
the legislative body of the city, and a school committee of five members 
which shall have the powers and duties conferred and imposed by law. 

Sect. 11 A. Every person elected mayor and every person elected or 
chosen city councillor or school committeeman shall, before entering 
upon the duties of his office, take, and subscribe in a book to be kept by 
the city clerk for the purpose, the oath of allegiance and oath of office 
prescribed in the constitution of this commonwealth and an oath to 

*By St. 1969, c. 849, as amended, changed the fiscal year of all cities 
and towns in the Commonwealth to begin on July 1, and end on June 30. 



20 

support the constitution of the United States. Such oaths shall be ad- 
ministered, to a person elected mayor, by a justice of the supreme 
judicial court, a judge of a court of record commissioned to hold such 
court within the city or a justice of the peace, and to a person elected or 
chosen city councillor or school committeeman, by the mayor or any of 
the persons authorized to administer said oaths to a person elected 
mayor. 

Sect. 11 B. Whenever the mayor is absent from the city or unable 
from any cause to perform his duties, and whenever there is a vacancy in 
the office of mayor from any cause, the president of the city council, 
while such absence, inability or vacancy continues, shall perform the 
duties of mayor. If there is no president of the city council or if he also is 
absent from the city or unable from any cause to perform such duties, 
they shall be performed, until there is a mayor or president of the city 
council or the mayor or president of the city council returns or is able to 
attend to said duties, by such member of the city council as that body by 
a vote which, for the purposes of section seventeen D, shall be deemed 
to be a vote electing an official, may elect, and until such elections by 
the city clerk. The person upon whom such duties shall devolve shall be 
called "acting mayor" and he shall possess the powers of mayor only in 
matters not admitting of delay, but shall have no power to make perma- 
nent appointments. 

Sect. 12. At the next regular municipal election following the adop- 
tion of Plan A and at every second regular municipal election after a 
regular municipal election at which a mayor is elected, a mayor shall be 
elected at large to hold office for the four municipal years following the 
municipal year in which he is elected and thereafter until his successor is 
elected and qualified. 

Sect. 13. If a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor within sixteen 
weeks prior to a regular municipal election other than a regular 
municipal election at which a mayor is elected, or within sixteen months 
after a regular municipal election, or if there is a failure to elect a mayor 
or a person elected mayor resigns or dies before taking office, the city 
council shall forthwith adopt an order calling a special municipal elec- 
tion for the purpose of electing at large a mayor for the unexpired term, 
which election shall be held on such Tuesday, not less than one hundred 
and twenty days nor more than one hundred and forty days after the 
adoption of such order, as the city council shall in such order fix. If a 
vacancy occurs in the office of the mayor at any other time, a mayor 
shall be elected at large at the next regular municipal election to hold of- 
fice for a term expiring at ten o'clock in the forenoon on the first Mon- 
day of the fourth January following his election. A person elected 
mayor under either of the foregoing provisions shall take and subscribe 
the oaths required by section eleven A as soon as conveniently may be 
after the issuance to him of his certificate of election. Such person shall 
hold office from the time of taking and subscribing such oaths until the 
expiration of his term and thereafter until his successor is elected and 
quahfied. The provisions of this section shall not apply if a vacancy oc- 
curs in the office of mayor in the period beginning on the date of a 
regular municipal election at which a new mayor is elected and ending at 
the time he takes office. 



21 

Sect. 13A.* The mayor shall be paid an annual salary of twenty 
thousand dollars or such other sum as may from time to time be fixed by 
ordinance. The mayor shall not receive for his services any other com- 
pensation or emolument whatever; nor shall he hold any other office of 
emolument under the city government. 

Sect. 14. At the next regular municipal election following the adop- 
tion of Plan A and at every regular municipal election thereafter, there 
shall be elected at large nine city councillors, each to hold office for the 
two municipal years following the municipal year in which he is elected. 

Sect. IS.f If at any time a vacancy occurs in the city council from 
any cause, the city clerk shall forthwith notify the city council thereof; 
and within fifteen days after such notification, the remaining city coun- 
cillors shall choose, as city councillor for the unexpired term, whichever 
of the defeated candidates for the office of city councillor at the regular 
municipal election at which city councillors were elected for the term in 
which the vacancy occurs, who are eligible and willing to serve, received 
the highest number of votes at such election, or, if there is no such 
defeated candidate eligible and willing to serve, a registered voter of the 
city duly quaHfied to vote for a candidate for the office of city coun- 
cillor. If at a regular municipal election there is a failure to elect a city 
councillor or if a person elected city councillor at such an election 
resigns or dies before taking office, the city clerk shall, as soon as conve- 
niently may be after the remaining city councillors-elect take office, 
notify the city council of such failure to elect, resignation or death; and 
within fifteen days after such notification, the members thereof shall 
choose, as city councillor for the unexpired term, whichever of the 
defeated candidates for the office of city councillor at such election, 
who are eligible and willing to serve, received the highest number of 
votes at such election, or, if there is no such defeated candidate eligible 
and willing to serve, a registered voter of the city duly qualified to vote 
for a candidate for the office of city councillor. If in any of the aforesaid 
events a choice is not made as hereinbefore provided within fifteen days 
after the notification of the city council by the city clerk, the choice shall 
be made by the mayor, or, if there is no mayor, by the city councillor 
senior in length of service, or, if there be more than one such, by the city 
councillor senior both in age and length of service. For the purposes of 
section seventeen D, votes of the city council under this section shall be 
deemed to be votes electing officials. 

Sect. 16. J Every city councillor shall be paid an annual salary of five 
thousand dollars; and no other sum shall be paid from the city treasury 
for or on account of any personal expenses directly or indirectly in- 
curred by or in behalf of any city councillor. 

Sect. 17. The city council shall be the judge of the election and 
qualification of its members; shall elect from its members by vote of a 



*At present forty thousand dollars, under Rev. Ord. 1961, c. 2, s. 9A. 
tSect. 15 as amended by St. 1952, c. 190. 

JAt present, president twenty-two thousand dollars, other councillors 
twenty thousand dollars, under Rev. Ord. 1961, c. 2A, s. 1. 
Passed pursuant to G. L., c. 39, s. 6A. 



22 

majority of all the members a president who when present shall preside 
at the meetings thereof; and shall from time to time establish rules for its 
proceedings. The memljer eldest in years shall preside until the president 
is chosen, and in case of the absence of the president, until a presiding 
officer is chosen. 

Sect. 17A. The mayor may, whenever in his judgment the good of 
the city requires it, summon a meeting or meetings. of the city council 
although said council stands adjourned to a more distant day, and shall 
cause suitable written notice of such meeting or meetings to be given to 
the city councillors. 

Sect. 17B. The city council may, subject to the approval of the 
mayor, from time to time establish such ofices, other than that of clerk, 
as it may deem necessary for the conduct of its affairs and at such 
salaries as it may determine, and abolish such offices or alter such 
salaries; and without such approval may fill the offices thus established 
and remove the incumbents at pleasure. The city clerk shall act as clerk 
of the city council. 

Sect. 17C. All elections by the city council under any provision of 
law, including the choosing of a city councillor under section fifteen, 
shall be made by a viva voce vote, each member who is present answer- 
ing to his name when it is called by the clerk or other proper officer, ana 
stating the name of the person for whom he votes, or declining to vote, 
as the case may be; and the clerk or other proper officer shall record 
every such vote. No such election shall be valid unless it is made as 
aforesaid. 

Sect. 17D. Every order, ordinance, resolution and vote of the city 
council (except special municipal election orders adopted under section 
thirteen, votes relating to the internal affairs of said council, resolutions 
not affecting legal rights, votes electing officials, and votes confirming 
appointments by the mayor) shall be presented to the mayor for his ap- 
proval. If he approves it, he shall sign it; and thereupon it shall be in 
force. If he disapproves it, he shall, by filing it with the city clerk with 
his objections thereto in writing, return it to the city council which shall 
enter the objections at large on its records. Every order, ordinance, 
resolution and vote authorizing a loan or appropriating money or 
accepting a statute involving the expenditure of money, which is so 
returned to the city council, shall be void, and no further action shall be 
taken thereon; but the city council shall proceed forthwith to reconsider 
every other order, ordinance, resolution and vote so returned, and if, 
after such reconsideration, two thirds of all the city councillors vote to 
pass it notwithstanding the disapproval of the mayor, it shall then be in 
force; but no such vote shall be taken before the seventh day after the 
city council has entered the objections at large on its records. Every 
order, ordinance, resolution or vote required by this section to be 
presented to the mayor which, within fifteen days after such presenta- 
tion, is neither signed by him nor filed with his written objections as 
hereinbefore provided, shall be in force on and after the sixteenth day 
following such presentation. 

Every order, ordinance, resolution or vote required by this section to 
be presented to the mayor shall be approved as a whole or disapproved 



23 

as a whole; except that, if the same authorizes a loan or appropriates 
money, the mayor may approve some of the items in whole or in part 
and disappove other of the items in whole or in part; and such items or 
parts of items as he approves shall, upon his signing the same, be in 
force and such items or parts of items as he disapproves by filing with 
the city clerk his written objections thereto shall be void, and such items 
or parts of items as he neither signs nor so disapproves within fifteen 
days after the order, ordinance, resolution or vote shall have been 
presented to him shall be in force on and after the sixteenth day follow- 
ing such presentation. 

Sect. 17E.* The mayor from time to time may make to the city 
council in the form of an ordinance or loan order filed with the city 
clerk such recommendations as he may deem to be for the welfare of the 
city. The city council shall consider each ordinance or loan order so 
presented and shall either adopt or reject the same within sixty days 
after the date when it is filed as aforesaid. If such ordinance or loan 
order is not rejected within said sixty days, it shall be in force as if 
adopted by the city council unless previously withdrawn by the mayor. 
Nothing herein shall prevent the mayor from again presenting an or- 
dinance or loan order which has been rejected or withdrawn. The city 
council may originate an ordinance or loan order and may reduce or re- 
ject any item in any loan and, subject to the approval of the mayor, may 
amend an ordinance. All sales of land other than school lands, all ap- 
propriations for the purchase of land, and all loans voted by the city 
council shall require a vote of two thirds of all the city councillors and 
shall be passed only after two separate readings and by two separate 
votes, the second of said readings and votes to be had not less than four- 
teen days after the first, except that in the case of loan orders for tem- 
porary loans in anticipation of taxes the second of said readings and 
votes may be had not less than twenty-four hours after the first. No 
amendment increasing the amount to be paid for the purchase of land, 
or the amount of loans, or altering the disposition of purchase money or 
of the proceeds of loans shall be made at the time of the second reading 
and vote. If a petition signed by three city councillors requesting that ac- 
tion be taken forthwith upon a loan order presented by the mayor is fil- 
ed in the office of the city clerk not earlier than fourteen days after the 
presentation of such loan order, action shall be taken by the yeas and 
nays on the question of the adoption of such loan order at the next 
meeting of the council, or, if one vote has already been taken thereon, at 
the next meeting after the expiration of the required interval after such 
vote; provided, that such action thereon has not sooner been taken or 
such loan order has not been withdrawn by the mayor. 

Sect. 17F. The city council at any time may request from the mayor 
specific information on any municipal matter within its jurisdiction, and 
may request his presence to answer written questions relating thereto at 
a meeting to be held not earlier than one week from the date of the 
receipt of said questions, in which case the mayor shall personally, or 
through a head of a department or a member of a board, attend such 
meeting and publicly answer all such questions. The person so attending 

*Sect. I7E, as amended by St. 1966, c. 642, s. 14. 



24 



shall not be obliged to answer questions relating to any other matter. 
The mayor at any time may attend and address the city council in person 
or through the head of a department, or a member of a board, upon 
such subject as he may desire. 

Sect. 17G. Except as otherwise provided in chapter four hundred 
and eighty-six of the acts of nineteen hundred and nine, neither the city 
council nor any member, committee, officer or employee thereof shall 
directly or indirectly on behalf of the city or of the county of Suffolk 
take part in the employment of labor, the making of contracts, or the 
purchase of materials, suppUes or real estate; nor in the construction, 
alteration, or repair of any public works, buildings, or other property; 
nor in the care, custody, or management of the same; nor in the conduct 
of the executive or administrative business of the city or county; nor in 
the appointment or removal of any city or county employee; nor in the 
expenditure of public money except such as may be necessary for the 
contingent and incidental expenses of the city council. Any person 
violating any provision of this section shall be punished by imprison- 
ment for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one 
thousand dollars, or both. 

Sect. 17H. No city councillor nor any person elected city councillor 
shall during the term for which he is elected or chosen, be appointed to, 
or hold, any office or position which is under the city government or the 
salary of which is payable out of the city treasury except the office of 
city councillor and any ofice held ex officio by virtue of being a member, 
or president, of the city council; provided, however, that nothing herein 
contained shall prevent a city councillor or any person elected city coun- 
cillor from, during the term for which he is elected or chosen, being ap- 
pointed by the governor, with or without the advice and consent of the 
council, to, and holding, any such office or position if before entering 
upon the duties of such office or position he resigns as city councillor or 
city councillor-elect. 

Sect. 18. At the next regular municipal election following the adop- 
tion of Plan A and at every regular municipal election thereafter, there 
shall be elected at large five school committeemen, each to hold office 
for the two municipal years following the municipal year in which he is 
elected. 

Sect. 19.* If at any time a vacancy occurs in the school committee 
from any cause, the mayor, the president of the city council and the re- 
maining school committeemen, meeting in joint convention, shall, 
within fifteen days after the vacancy arises, choose, as school commit- 
teeman for the unexpired term, whichever of the defeated candidates for 
the office of school committeeman at the regular municipal election at 
which school committeemen were elected for the term in which the 
vacancy occurs, who are eligible and wiUing to serve, received the 
highest number of votes at such election, or, if there is no such defeated 
candidate eligible and willing to serve, a registered voter of the city duly 
qualified to vote for a candidate for the office of school committeeman. 
If at a regular municipal election there is a failure to elect a school com- 

•Sect. 19 as amended by St. 1952, c. 190. 



25 

mitteeman or if a person elected school committeeman at such an elec- 
tion resigns or dies before taking office, within fifteen days after the re- 
maining school committeemen-elect take office, such school commit- 
teemen and the then mayor and the then president of the city council 
shall meet in joint convention, and choose, as school committeeman for 
the unexpired term, whichever of the defeated candidates for the office 
of school committeeman at such election, who are eligible and willing to 
serve, received the highest number of votes at such election, or, if there 
is no such defeated candidate eligible and willing to serve, a registered 
voter of the city duly qualified to vote for a candidate for the office of 
school committeeman. 

Sect. 20. The members of the school committee shall meet and 
organize on the first Monday of January following their election. The 
school committee shall be the judge of the election and qualifications of 
its members. The members of the school committee shall serve without 
compensation. 

Sect. 53. Every municipal officer required by sections twelve, thir- 
teen, fourteen and eighteen to be elected at large shall be elected at a 
biennial municipal election, or, in the case of a mayor for an unexpired 
term, at a special municipal election, after, in either case, nomination at 
a preliminary municipal election, except as otherwise provided in section 
fifty-seven C. In sections fifty-three to sixty-five, inclusive, the term 
"regular election" shall be construed to refer to the biennial municipal 
election or the special municipal election, as the case may be, and the 
term "preliminary election" to the preliminary municipal election held 
for the purpose of nominating candidates for election at such regular 
election. Every preliminary election shall, unless dispensed with under 
said section fifty-seven C, be held on the sixth Tuesday preceding the 
regular election. 

Sect. 54. Any person who is a registered voter of the city duly 
qualified to vote for a candidate for an elective municipal office therein 
may be a candidate for nomination to such office; provided, that a peti- 
tion for the nomination of such person is obtained, signed and filed as 
provided in sections fifty-five, fifty-five A, and fifty-six, and signatures 
of petitioners thereon, to the number required by section fifty-six, cer- 
tified as provided in section fifty-seven by the board of election commis- 
sioners, in sections fifty- five to sixty- five, inclusive, called the election 
commission. 

Sect. 55. A nomination petition shall be issued only to a person 
subscribing after the sixteenth Tuesday, and before the eleventh Tuesday 
preceding the preliminary election, in a book kept for that purpose by 
the election commission, a statement of candidacy in substantially the 
following form: — 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CITY OF BOSTON 

Statement of Candidacy 
I (name with first or middle name in full), under the pains and 
penalties of perjury declare that I reside at (street and number, if any) in 
Ward (number) of the City of Boston; that I am a registered voter of 



26 



said City duly qualified to vote for a candidate for the office hereinafter 
mentioned; that I am a candidate for nomination for the office of 
(Mayor or City Councillor or School Committeeman); that I request 
that my name be printed as such candidate on the offical ballot to be 
used at the preliminary municipal election to be held on Tuesday, ,19 , 
for the purpose of nominating candidates for election to such office; 
and that I also request that my nomination petition contain the follow- 
ing statement (not exceeding eight words) concerning the elective public 
offices now or formerly held by me: — 



Signature of Candidate 



Sect. 55A. A nomination petition shall be issued by the election 
commission not later than twelve o'clock noon on the second day 
(Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays excluded) after the subscription 
of a statement of candidacy, except that no such petition shall be issued 
before the fourteenth Tuesday preceding the preliminary election. A 
nomination petition shall not relate to more than one candidate nor to 
more than one office. A nomination petition may state the elective 
public offices which the candidate holds or has held under the govern- 
ment of the commonwealth, the county of Suffolk or the city of Boston 
or in the congress as a representative or senator from the com- 
monwealth; provided, that such statement shall not exceed eight words 
and shall, with respect to each such office, consist solely of the title, as 
hereinafter given, of such office, preceded, if the candidate is the then 
incumbent thereof, by the word "Present", otherwise, by the word 
"Former", and followed, if, but only if, the office is that of city coun- 
cillor, by the words "at Large" or "for Ward (here insert ward number 
in numerals, which shall be counted as one word)", as the case may be. 
For the purposes of such statement, the titles of the elective public of- 
fices which may be stated shall be deemed to be as follows: — city coun- 
cillor, school committeeman, mayor, district attorney, sheriff, register 
of deeds, register of probate, county clerk of superior (criminal) court, 
county clerk of superior (civil) court, county clerk of supreme judicial 
court, state representative, state senator, governor's councillor, attorney 
general, state auditor, state treasurer, state secretary, lieutenant gover- 
nor, governor, congressman, and United States senator. 

If the candidate is a veteran as defined in section twenty-one of 
chapter thirty-one of the General Laws, his nomination petition may 
contain the word "Veteran", which, in the case of a candidate holding 
or having held elective public office as aforesaid, shall, for the purposes 
of this section and sections fifty-five, fifty-eight and sixty-two, be 
counted as a part of the statement concerning the elective public offices 
held by him, and, in the case of a candidate who does not hold and has 



27 



never held elective public office as aforesaid, shall, for the purposes of 
said sections, be deemed to be a statement concerning the elective public 
offices held by him. 

A nomination petition may consist of one or more sheets; but each 
sheet shall be in substantially the following form: — 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CITY OF BOSTON 



Nomination Petition 

Whereas {name of candidate) residing at (street and number, if any) in 
Ward (number) of the City of Boston, (here insert any lawfully re- 
quested statement concerning the elective public offices held by can- 
didate) is a candidate for nomination for the office of (Mayor or City 
Councillor or School Committeeman), the undersigned, registered 
voters of the City of Boston, duly qualified to vote for a candidate for 
said office, do hereby request that the name of said (name of candidate) 
as a candidate for nomination for said office be printed on the official 
ballot to be used at the preliminary municipal election to be held on 
Tuesday, ,19 . 

Each of the undersigned does hereby certify that he or she has not 
subscribed (if the petition relates to the office of mayor, here insert: — 
any other nomination petition for said office; if the petition relates to 
the office of city councillor, here insert: — more than eight other 
nomination petitions for said office; and if the petition relates to the of- 
fice of school committeeman, here insert: — more than four other 
nomination petitions for said office). 

In case the above-named candidate withdraws his name from nomi- 
nation or is found to be inehgible or dies, we authorize (names and 
residences of a committee of not less than five persons) or a majority 
thereof as our representatives to fill the vacancy in the manner prescrib- 
ed by law. 



Signatures of 
Nominators 

(To be signed in person 
with name as regis- 
tered) 



Residence 
January 1, 19 

(If registered after above 
date, residence when 
registered) 



Pre- 
cinct 



Present Residence 



28 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Suffolk, ss. Boston, 19 . 

The undersigned, being the circulator or circulators of this sheet, 
severally certify, under the pains and penalties of perjury, that the per- 
sons whose names are written upon the lines the numbers of which ap- 
pear opposite our signatures below, signed the same in person. 



NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF PERSONS 
CIRCULATING THIS SHEET 


Numbers of Lines Upon Which 
Appear Signatures as to Which 


Name 


Address 


Certification is Made Hereby 









{Add here or at some other convenient place on the nomination peti- 
tion sheet the following.) 

I hereby accept the nomination. 



Signature of Candidate 



This nomination petition sheet filed by 



Signature of Filer 



Number Street City 



Every nomination petition sheet shall, before issuance, be prepared 
by the election commission by printing or inserting thereon the matter 
required by the first two paragraphs of the foregoing form. Not more 
than three hundred nomination petition sheets shall be issued to any 
candidate for nomination to the office of mayor under Plan A; not 
more than one hundred and fifty such sheets shall be issued to any can- 
didate for nomination to the office of city councillor under Plan A or D; 
and not more than two hundred such sheets shall be issued to any can- 
didate for nomination to the office of school committeeman under Plan 
A or D. No nomination petition sheets shall be received or be valid 
unless prepared and issued by the election commission; nor shall any 
such sheet be received or be valid unless the written acceptance of the 
candidate thereby nominated is endorsed thereon, anything in section 
three A of chapter fifty of the General Laws to the contary notwith- 
standing. 

Sect. 56. The nomination petition shall be signed, in the case of a 
candidate for mayor, by at least three thousand registered voters of the 
city qualified to vote for such candidate at the preliminary election, in 
the case of a candidate for city councillor, by at least fifteen hundred 
registered voters of the city qualified to vote for such candidate at such 



29 



election, in the case of a candidate for school committeeman, by at least 
two thousand registered voters if the city qualified to vote for such can- 
didate at such election. 

Every voter signing a nomination petition shall sign in person, with 
his name as registered, and shall state his residence on January first 
preceding, or his residence when registered if subsequent thereto, and 
the place where he is then living, with the street and number, if any; but 
any voter who is prevented by physical disability from writing may 
authorize some person to write his name and residence in his presence. 
No voter may sign as petitioner more than one nomination petition for 
the office of mayor, nor more than nine nomination petitions for the of- 
fice of city councillor, nor more than five nomination petitions for the 
office of school committeeman. If the name of any voter appears as 
petitioner on more nomination petitions for an office than prescribed in 
this section, his name shall, in determining the number of petitioners, be 
counted, in the case of the office of mayor, only on the nomination peti- 
tion sheet bearing his name first filed with the election commission, in 
the case of the office of city councillor, only on the nine nomination 
petition sheets bearing his name first filed with said commission, and, in 
the case of the office of school committeeman, only on the five nomina- 
tion petition sheets bearing his name first filed with said commission. If 
the name of any voter appears as petitioner on the same nomination 
petition more than once, it shall be deemed to appear but once. The 
signature of any petitioner which is not certified by the circulator of the 
sheet as provided in the form set forth in section fifty-five A shall not be 
counted in determining the number of petitioners. 

The separate sheets of a nomination petition may be filed all at one 
time or in lots of one or more from time to time, but shall all be filed 
with the election commission at or before five o'clock in the afternoon 
on the eleventh Tuesday preceding the preliminary election. Every 
nomination petition sheet shall be filed by a responsible person, who 
shall sign such sheet and, if he is other than candidate, add to his 
signature his place of residence, giving street and number, if any; and 
the election commission shall require satisfactory identification of such 
person. 

The names of candidates appearing on nomination petitions shall, 
when filed, be a matter of public record; but no nomination petition 
shall be open to public inspection until the signatures on all nomination 
petitions for the same office have been certified. 

Sect. 57. Upon the filing of each nomination petition sheet the elec- 
tion commission shall check each name to be certified by it on such sheet 
and shall certify thereon the number of signatures so checked which are 
the names of registered voters of the city qualified to sign the same; pro- 
vided, however, that said commission shall not certify, in connection 
with a single nomination petition, a greater number of names than re- 
quired by section fifty-six with one tenth of such number added thereto. 
Names not certified in the first instance shall not thereafter be certified 
on the same nomination petition. All nomination petitions not contain- 
ing names certified pursuant to this section, to the number required by 
said section fifty-six, shall be invalid. The election commission shall 



30 



complete the certification required by this section at or before five 
o'clock in the afternoon on the fifty-fifth day preceding the preUminary 
election. 

Sect. 57A. A nomination petition which has been filed and is in ap- 
parent conformity with law shall be valid unless written objection 
thereto is made by a registered voter of the city. Such objection shall be 
filed with the election commission at or before five o'clock in the after- 
noon on the forty-ninth day preceding the preliminary election. Objec- 
tions filed with the election commission shall forthwith be transmitted 
by it to the Boston ballot law commission. Certification pursuant to sec- 
tion fifty-seven shall not preclude a voter from filing objections to the 
validity of a nomination petition. 

Sect. 57B.* Any candidate may withdraw his name from nomina- 
tion by a request signed and duly acknowledged by him; provided, 
however, that all withdrawals shall be filed with the election commission 
at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the forty-ninth day 
preceding the preliminary election. If a candidate so withdraws his name 
from nomination before five o'clock in the afternoon of the fiftieth day 
preceding the preliminary election, or is found to be ineligible or dies, 
the vacancy may be filled by a committee of not less than five persons or 
a majority thereof, if such committee be named and so authorized in the 
nomination petition; provided, however, that all certificates of substitu- 
tion, except any certificate of substitution for a deceased candidate for 
mayor under Plan A, shall be filed with the election commission at or 
before five o'clock in the afternoon on said fiftieth day. 

The certificate of substitution for a deceased candidate for mayor 
under Plan A shall be filed with the election commission (a) at or before 
five o'clock in the afternoon on the first Tuesday preceding the 
preliminary election if he dies on or before the second Friday preceding 
such election (b) at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the first 
Friday following the preliminary election if he dies after the second Fri- 
day preceding such election and before the closing of the polls at such 
election, (c) at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the Tuesday 
preceding the regular election if he dies after the closing of the polls at 
the preUminary election and on or before the second Friday preceding 
the regular election, and (d) at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on 
the first Friday following the regular election if he dies after the second 
Friday preceding such election and before the closing of the polls at such 
election; provided, however, that no certificate of substitution for such 
a deceased candidate shall be filed after the closing of the polls at the 
preliminary election unless such candidate, if living, would be deemed 
under either section fifty-seven C or sixty-one to have been nominated 
for the office of mayor under Plan A. 

If a certificate of substitution for a deceased candidate for mayor 
under Plan A is filed at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the 
first Tuesday preceding the preliminary election, the ballots for use at 
such election shall be printed with the name, residence and ward of the 



*Sect. 57B as amended by St. 1958, c. 257. 



31 



substitute in the place of the name, residence and ward of the deceased; 
and the voting machine ballot labels for use at such election, if not 
previously printed, shall be printed with the name, residence and ward 
of the substitute in the place of the name, residence and ward of the 
deceased, and, if previously printed shall have a slip containing the 
name, residence and ward of the substitute pasted over the name, 
residence and ward of the deceased. If such a certificate is filed after five 
o'clock in the afternoon on the first Tuesday preceding the preliminary 
election, all ballots and voting machine ballot labels for use at such elec- 
tion shall bear the name, residence and ward of the deceased but shall be 
deemed as a matter of law to bear the name, residence and ward of the 
substitute in the place of the name, residence and ward of the deceased, 
and a vote for the deceased at such election shall be counted as a vote 
for the substitute. If such a certificate is filed at or before five o'clock in 
the afternoon on the first Tuesday preceding the regular election, the 
ballots for use at such election other than absent voting ballots shall be 
printed with the name, residence and ward of the substitute in the place 
of the name, residence and ward of the deceased; and the absent voting 
ballots for use at such election, if not previously printed, shall be printed 
with the name, residence and ward of the substitute in the place of the 
name, residence and ward of the deceased and, if previously printed, 
shall be deemed as a matter of law to bear the name, residence and ward 
of the substitute in the place of the name, residence and ward of the 
deceased so that a vote thereon for the deceased shall be counted as a 
vote for the substitute; and the voting machine ballot labels for use at 
such election, if not previously printed, shall be printed with the name, 
residence and ward of the substitute in the place of the name, residence 
and ward of the deceased, and, if previously printed, shall have a slip 
containing the name, residence and ward of the substitute pasted over 
the name, residence and ward of the deceased. If a candidate for mayor 
under Plan A in whose nomination petition a committee of not less than 
five persons or a majority thereof is authorized to fill a vacancy dies 
after the second Friday preceding the regular election and a certificate of 
substitution is not filed at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the 
first Tuesday preceding such election, so far, but only so far, as it is for 
the purpose of electing a person for the office of mayor, shall be 
postponed for four weeks and no vote cast for any candidate for mayor 
at the originally scheduled election shall be counted. 

Every certificate of substitution shall state: — (1) the name of the 
substitute, (2) his residence, with street and number, if any, and ward, 
(3) the office for which he is to be a candidate, (4) the name of the 
original candidate, (5) the fact of his death, withdrawal or ineligibility, 
and (6) the proceedings had for making the substitution. The chairman 
and secretary of the committee shall sign and make oath to the truth of 
the certificate; and it shall be accompanied by the written acceptance of 
the candidate substituted. A certificate of substitution shall be open to 
objection in the same manner, so far as practicable, as a nomination 
petition. 

Sect. 57C. On the first day, other than a legal holiday or Saturday 
or Sunday, following the expiration of the time for filing withdrawals 



32 



and the final disposition of any objections filed, the election commis- 
sion shall post in a conspicuous place in the city hall the names, 
residences and wards of the candidates for nomination for mayor under 
Plan A and for city councillor and school committeeman under Plans A 
and D who have duly qualified as such canditates, as they are to appear 
on the official ballots to be used at the preUminary election, except at to 
the order of the names. If there are so posted the names of not more 
than two candidates for the office of mayor under Plan A, the can- 
didates whose names are so posted shall be deemed to have been 
nominated for said office, and the preliminary election for the purpose 
of nominating candidates therefor shall be dispensed with; if there are 
so posted the names of not more than eighteen candidates for the office 
of city councillor under Plan A or D, the candidates whose names are so 
posted shall be deemed to have been nominated for said office, and the 
preliminary election for the purpose of nominating candidates therefor 
shall be dispensed with; and if there are so posted the names of not more 
than ten candidates for the office of school committeeman under Plan 
A or D, the candidates whose names are so posted shall be deemed to 
have been nominated for said office, and the preliminary election for 
the purpose of nominating candidates therefor shall be dispensed with. 

Sect. 58. On the day of the posting provided for by section fifty- 
seven C, or as soon thereafter as conveniently may be, the election com- 
mission shall draw by lot the position of the candidates on the ballot. 
Each candidate shall have an opportunity to be present at such drawing 
in person or by one representative. As soon as conveniently may be after 
such drawing, the election commission shall cause the ballots to be 
printed. Said ballots shall, in addition to the directions and numbers 
provided for by section fifty-nine, contain, in the order drawn by the 
election commission, the names posted as aforesaid (except those of 
candidates deemed under section fifty-seven C to have been nominated), 
and no others, with a designation of residence and ward and the title 
and term of the office for which the person named is a candidate, and 
the statement, if any, contained in his nomination petition concerning 
the elective public offices held by him. Said ballots shall be official and 
no others shall be used at the preliminary election. Said ballots shall be 
headed as follows: 



OFFICIAL PRELIMINARY MUNICIPAL 
ELECTION BALLOT 

Candidates for nomination for the offices of in the 

City of Boston at the preUminary municipal election to be held on Tues- 
day. , 19 . 

The heading of said balots shall be varied in accordance with the offices 
for which nominations are to be made. 

Sect. 59. At every preliminary election, and every regular election, 
under Plan A, each voter shall be entitled to vote for not more than one 
candidate for the office of mayor, not more than nine candidates for the 



33 



office of city councillor, and not more than five candidates for the of- 
fice of school committeeman. On the ballots and voting machine ballot 
labels for use at each of said elections, there shall, as a direction to the 
voter, be printed in capital letters, near the title of each office to be 
voted for, the words "vote for (here insert in words the number of can- 
didates specif ied in this section with respect to such office). The election 
commission, when drawing under section fifty-eight the position on the 
ballot of the candidates for nomination at every preliminary election, 
shall draw the positions of all candidates for mayor, if any are to be 
drawn, before drawing the position of any candidate for city councillor 
or school committeeman and shall draw the positions of all candidates 
for city councillor, if any are to be drawn, before drawing the position 
of any candidate for school committeeman. The election commission 
shall number consecutively, regardless of office, all candidates 
drawn, — the candidate first drawn being assigned the number 1 and 
the candidate last drawn being assigned the last number assigned. No 
position shall be drawn for, nor shall any number be assigned to, any 
candidate deemed under section fifty-seven C to have been nominated; 
nor shall any number be assigned to any blank space provided under 
section sixty-four or to any sticker candidate, so called; and no vote by 
sticker, which term shall not be construed to include the slip provided 
for by section fifty-seven B, shall be counted if any candidate number 
appears thereon. The numbers assigned under this paragraph shall be 
separate and distinct from the alphabetical or numerical code of any 
voting machine. On the ballots and voting machine ballot labels for use 
at every preliminary election, there shall, as an aid to the voter, be 
printed in numerals, before the name of each candidate and with type 
the same size as the name, the number assigned to the candidate by the 
election commission under this paragraph. 

Sect. 60. The election officers shall, immediately upon the closing 
of the polls at preliminary elections, count the ballots and ascertain the 
number of votes cast in the several voting places for each candidate, and 
forthwith make return thereof upon the total vote sheets or, if voting 
machines are used, the general or precinct record sheets, as the case may 
be, to the election commission which shall forthwith canvass said 
returns and, subject to the provisions of the first sentence of section one 
hundred and thirty-seven of chapter fifty-four of the General Laws, 
determine and declare the result thereof, publish said result in one or 
more newspapers in the city, and post the same in a conspicuous place in 
the city hall. 

Sect. 61 . The two persons receiving at a preliminary election under 
Plan A the highest number of votes for nomination for the office of 
mayor shall be deemed to have been nominated for said office; and the 
eighteen persons receiving at such an election under Plan A or D the 
highest number of votes for nomination for the office of city councillor 
shall be deemed to have been nominated for said office; and the ten per- 
sons receiving at such an election under Plan A or D the highest number 
of votes for nomination for the office of school committeeman shall be 
deemed to have been nominated for said office. If a preliminary election 



34 



under Plan A or D results in a tie vote among candidates for nomination 
receiving the lowest number of votes, which, but for said tie vote, would 
entitle a person receiving the same to be deemed to have been 
nominated, all persons participating in said tie vote shall be deemed to 
have been nominated, although in consequence there be printed on the 
official ballot to be used at the regular election names to a number ex- 
ceeding twice the number to be elected. 

Sect. 62. The name of every person deemed under section fifty- 
seven C or section sixty-one to have been nominated, together with his 
residence and ward and the title and term of the office for which he is a 
candidate, and the statement, if any, contained in his nomination peti- 
tion concerning the elective public offices held by him, shall, in addition 
to the directions provided for by section fifty-nine, be printed on the of- 
ficial ballots to be used at the regular elections; and said persons shall be 
the sole candidates whose names may be printed on such ballots. As 
soon as conveniently may be after the sixth Tuesday preceding every 
regular election, the election commission shall draw by lot the position 
of said names on said ballots; and said names shall be printed on such 
ballots in the order so drawn. Each candidate shall have an opportunity 
to be present at such drawing in person or by one representative. 

Sect. 63. No ballot used at any preliminary or regular election shall 
have printed thereon any party or political designation or mark, and 
there shall not be appended to the name of any candidate any such party 
or political designation or mark or anything showing how he was 
nominated or indicating his views or opinions. 

Sect. 64. On every ballot to be used at a preliminary or regular elec- 
tion, there shall be left, at the end of the list of candidates for each of- 
fice, blank spaces equal to the number for which a voter may vote for 
such office, in which blank spaces the voter may insert the name of any 
person not printed on the ballot for whom he desires to vote for such 
office. 

Sect. 65. At every preliminary election, and every regular election 
under Plan D, each voter shall be entitled to vote for not more than six 
candidates for the office of city councillor and not more than three can- 
didates for the office of school committeeman. On the ballots for use at 
both of said elections, there shall be printed directions to the voters that 
each voter shall not vote for more than the number of candidates 
specified in this section. 



35 



SECTION NUMBERS REFER TO 

CHAPTER 486 OF THE ACTS OF 1909 

AS AMENDED 



The Mayor and City Council 



Sect. 3.* All appropriations, other than for school purposes, to be 
met from taxes, revenue or any source other than loans, shall originate 
with the mayor, who, not later than the first Monday in February of 
each year, shall submit to the city council the annual budget of the cur- 
rent expenses of the city and county for the current fiscal year, and may 
submit thereafter such supplementary appropriation orders as he may 
deem necessary. The city council may reduce or reject any item, but, ex- 
cept upon the recommendation of the mayor, shall not increase any item 
in, nor the total of, a budget, nor add any item thereto, nor shall it origi- 
nate a budget. Not later than the first Monday in April the city council 
shall take definite action on the annual budget by adopting, reducing or 
rejecting it, and in the event of their failure so to do the items and the 
appropriation orders in the budget as recommended by the mayor shall 
be in effect as if formally adopted by the city council and approved by 
the mayor. The city council shall take definite action on any supplemen- 
tary appropriation order for the public facilities department by adopt- 
ing, reducing or rejecting it within sixty days after it is filed with the city 
clerk; and in the event of their failure so to do, such supplementary ap- 
propriation order as submitted by the mayor shall be in effect as if for- 
mally adopted by the city council and approved by the mayor. It shall be 
the duty of the city and county officials, when requested by the mayor, 
to submit forthwith in such detail as he may require estimates for the 
next fiscal year of the expenditures of the department or office under 
their charge, which estimates shall be transmitted to the city council. 

Sect. 3A.t In the period after the expiration of any fiscal year, and 
before the regular appropriations have been made by the city council 
and the school committee, city and county officers who are authorized 
to make expenditures, and the school committee, may incur liabilities in 
carrying on the work of the several departments and offices entrusted to 
them, and payments therefor shall be made from the treasury from any 
available funds therein and charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion, or special appropriation, if any is made; provided, that the liabilities 

♦Sect. 3 as amended by St. 1924, c. 479, Sect. 2, St. 1941, c. 604, Sect. 
1, and St. 1966, c. 642, Sect. 10. 

1Sect. 3A as inserted by St. 1941, c. 604, Sect. 1, and as amended by 
St. 1947, c. 120. 



36 



incurred during such interval for regular employees do no exceed in any 
one month the average monthly expenditure of the last three months of 
the preceding fiscal year, and that the total liabilities incurred during 
said interval do no exceed in any on month the sums spent for similar 
purposes during any one month of the preceding fiscal year; and pro- 
vided, further, that said officers who are authorized to make expendi- 
tures may expend in any one month for any new officer or board law- 
fully created an amount not exceeding one twelfth of the estimated cost 
for the current fiscal year; and provided, further, that until a regular or 
special appropriation has been made for snow removal, expenditures 
may be made for that purpose to an amount not exceeding the average 
of the annual expenditures for snow removal in the five preceding fiscal 
years. Notwithstanding the foregoing limitations upon the authority of 
city officers to incur liabilities during said interval, such officers may in- 
cur liabilities to such extent as may be necessary for the purpose of com- 
pensating first assistant assessors for their regular duties. 

Sect. 3B.* After an appropriation of money has been duly made by 
city of Boston for any specific purpose, or for the needs and expendi- 
tures of any city department or county office, no transfer of any part of 
the money thus appropriated shall be made except in accordance with 
and after the written recommendation of the mayor to the city council, 
approved by a yea and nay vote of two thirds of all the members of the 
city council; provided, that the city auditor, with the approval in each 
instance of the mayor, may make transfers, other than for personal ser- 
vice, from any item to any other item within the appropriations for a de- 
partment, division of a department or county office. After December 
tenth in each year the city auditor may, with the approval of the mayor 
in each instance, apply any income and taxes not disposed of and make 
transfers from any appropriation to any other appropriation for the 
purpose only of closing the accounts of the fiscal year. 

(See Stat. 1942, Chap. 4, Sect. 3, reading as follows: 
"During the continuance of the existing state of war between the 
United States and any foreign country, notwithstanding the provisions 
of section three B of chapter four hundred and eighty-six of the acts of 
nineteen hundred and nine, inserted in said chapter by section one of 
chapter six hundred and four of the acts of nineteen hundred and forty- 
one, the vote required for approval by the city council of the city of 
Boston of any transfer of appropriation, other than a loan appropria- 
tion, shall be a yea and nay vote of a majority of all the members of the 
city council. ") 



Sect. 4At The mayor may designate one clerical assistant for whose 
acts he shall be responsible to sign his name in approval of all vouchers 
of less than five hundred dollars each. 

♦Sect. 3B as inserted by St. 1941, c. 604, Sect. 1, and as amended by 
St. 1954, c. 24. 
1Sect. 4A inserted by St. 1924, c. 479, Sect. 3. 



37 



Sect. 5* The city council with the approval of the mayor may from 
time to time make by-laws or ordinances for any or all of the following 
purposes: — (g) to create a new department or agency; (b) to aboHsh, in 
whole or in part, any department or agency; (c) to reorganize, in whole 
or in part, any department or department head or any agency or agency 
head; (d) to confer or impose on any department or agency any power 
or duty of the city not appertaining at the time of the making of the by- 
law or ordinance to any department or agency; (e) to transfer any or all 
of the powers, duties and appropriations of any division of any depart- 
ment or agency to another division of the same department or agency; 
(/) to transfer any or all of the powers, duties and appropriations of any 
department or division thereof or of any agency or division thereof 
either to another department or division thereof or to another agency or 
division thereof; and {g) to increase, reduce, establish or abolish the 
salary of any department or agency head. Every department or agency 
head created by, or resulting from a reorganization effected by, a by-law 
or ordinance made under this section shall, unless ex-officio, be ap- 
pointed by the mayor without confirmation by the city council for a 
term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next 
biennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected or, in the case of 
a person serving without compensation or of a person serving on the 
board of appeal, the board of examiners, the board of examiners of 
gasfitters or other Hke board, for such other term as the by-law or or- 
dinance may prescribe. Every person holding an office or position sub- 
ject to the civil service law and rules shall, if the office or position is 
abolished by a by-law or ordinance made under this section and the by- 
law or ordinances so provides, be reappointed without civil service ex- 
amination or registration to a similar office or position with similar 
status in any new department or agency, or division of either, thereby 
created or in any department or agency, or division of either, not 
thereby abolished; and every such person shall upon such reappoint- 
ment, retain all rights to retirement with pension that shall have accrued 
or would thereafter accrue to him; and his services shall be deemed to 
have been continuous to the same extent as if such abolition had not 
taken place. As used in this section, the term "agency" shall be con- 
strued to mean any office in charge of a board or officer not subject to 
the direction of a department head. Nothing in this section shall 
authorize any action in conflict with the civil service laws or rules except 
as expressly provided herein; nor shall any by-law or ordinance made 
under this section affect in any way the school committee or any board 
or officer of the school committee or school department, or the board 
of commissioners of school buildings or the superintendent of construc- 
tion, or the board of trustees of the teachers' retirement fund or the 
board of trustees of the permanent school pension fund, or the Boston 
retirement board, or the city clerk, or the board of election commission- 
ers, or the Boston traffic commission, or any board or officer appointed 
by the governor. 

* Sect. 5 as amended by Stat. 1953, Chap. 473. 



38 



Sect. 6. No contract for lighting the public streets, parks, or alleys, 
or for the collection, removal, or disposal of reftise, extending over a 
period of more than one year from the date thereof, shall be valid 
without the approval of the mayor and the city council after a public 
hearing held by the city council of which at least seven days' notice shall 
have been given in the City Record. 



Sect. 8. Neither the city council, nor any member or committee, of- 
ficer, or employees thereof shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
act, directly or indirectly on behalf of the city or the county of Suffolk 
take part in the employment of labor, the making of contracts, the pur- 
chase of materials, supplies or real estate; nor in the construction, alter- 
ation, or repair of any public works, buildings, or other property; nor in 
the care, custody, and management of the same; nor in the conduct of 
the executive or administrative business of the city or county; nor in the 
appointment or removal of any municipal or county employee; nor in' 
the expenditure of public money except such as may be necessary for the 
contingent and incidental expenses of the city council. . . . 

It shall be unlawful for the mayor or for a member of the city council 
or for any officer or employee of the city or of the county of Suffolk or 
for a member of the finance commission directly or indirectly to make a 
contract with the city or with the county of Suffolk, or to receive any 
commission, discount, bonus, gift, contribution or reward from or any 
share in the profits of any person or corporation making or performing 
such contract, unless such mayor, member of the city council, officer, 
or employee or member of the finance commission immediately upon 
learning of the existence of such contract or that such contract is pro- 
posed, shall notify in writing the mayor, city council, and finance com- 
mission of such contract and of the nature of his interest in such con- 
tract and shall abstain from doing any official act on behalf of the city 
in reference thereto. In case of such interest on the part of an officer 
whose duty it is to make such contract on behalf of the city, the contract 
may be made by any other officer of the city duly authorized thereto by 
the mayor, or if the mayor has such interest by the city clerk; provided, 
however, that when a contractor with the city or county is a corporation 
or voluntary association, the ownership of less than five percent of the 
stock or shares actually issued shall not be considered as being an in- 
terest in the contract within the meaning of this act, and such ownership 
shall not affect the validity of the contract, unless the owner of such 
stock or shares is also an officer or agent of the corporation or associa- 
tion, or solicits or takes part in the making of the contract. 

A violation of any provision of this section shall render the contract in 
respect to which such violation occurs voidable at the option of the city 
or county. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or by im- 
prisonment for not more than one year, or both. . . . 



39 



The Executive Department 

Sect. 9. All heads of departments and members of municipal 
boards, including the board of street commissioners, as their present 
terms of office expire (but excluding the school committee and those of- 
ficials by law appointed by the governor), shall be appointed by the 
mayor without confirmation by the city council. They shall be recog- 
nized experts in such work as may devolve upon the incumbents of said 
offices, or persons specially fitted by education, training or experience 
to perform the same, and (except the election commissioners, who shall 
remain subject to the provisions of existing laws) shall be appointed 
without regard to party affiliation or to residence at the time of appoint- 
ment except as hereinafter provided. 



Sect. 12. A vacancy in any office to which the provisions of section 
nine of this act apply, shall be filled by the mayor under the provisions 
of said section and pending a permanent appointment he shall designate 
some other head of a department or member of a board to discharge the 
duties of the office temporarily. 

Sect. 13.* Members of boards shall be appointed for the terms 
established by law or by ordinance. Heads of departments shall be ap- 
pointed for terms of four years beginning with the first of May of the 
year in which they are appointed and shall continue thereafter to hold 
office during the pleasure of the mayor. 

Sect. 14. t The mayor may remove any head of a department or 
member of a board (other than the election commissioners, who shall 
remain subject to the provisions of existing law) by filing a written state- 
ment with the city clerk setting forth in detail the specific reasons for 
such removal, a copy of which shall be delivered or mailed to the person 
thus removed, who may make a reply in writing, which, if he desires, 
may be filed with the city clerk, but such reply shall not affect the action 
taken unless the mayor so determines. The provisions of this section 
shall not apply to the school committee, the public facilities commis- 
sion, or any official by law appointed by the governor. 

Sect. 1 5 . The positions of assistants and secretary authorized by sec- 
tion twenty of chapter four hundred and forty-nine of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five except those in the election 
department are hereby abolished, and except as aforesaid the said sec- 
tion is hereby repealed. 

The civil service laws shall not apply to the appointment of the 
mayor's secretaries, nor of the stenographers, clerks, telephone 
operators and messengers connected with his office, and the mayor may 
remove such appointees without a hearing and without making a state- 
ment of the cause of their removal. 

* Sect. 13. Affected by St. 1953, c. 473. 

t Sect. 14 as amended by St. 1966, c. 642, s. 11. 



40 



Sect. 16. No official of said city, except in case of extreme emer- 
gency involving the health or safety of the people or their property, shall 
expend intentionally in any fiscal year any sum in excess of the appropri- 
ations duly made in accordance with law, nor involve the city in any 
contract for the future payment of money in excess of such appropria- 
tion, except as provided in section six of this act. Any official who shall 
violate the provisions of this section shall be punished by imprisonment 
for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one thousand 
dollars, or both. 

Sect. 16A.* Anything in section three A or section sixteen to the 
contrary notwithstanding, city and county officers who are authorized 
to make expenditures, and the school committee, may, during any fiscal 
year, at the time of, or after, contracting for the performance of deliv- 
ery during the remainder of such year of any work, services or supplies 
of a constantly recurrent nature, contract, without an appropriation, 
upon like or more favorable terms and conditions, for the performance 
or dehvery of such work, services or supplies for the whole or any part 
of the first three months of the next fiscal year; provided, that in no 
event shall the average monthly liability incurred with respect to the next 
fiscal year exceed the average monthly liability for such work, services 
or suppUes during the last nine months of the then current fiscal year. 



Miscellaneous Provisions 

Sect. 26. t AH loans issued by the city after the passage of this act 
shall be made payable in annual instalments in the manner authorized 
by section thirteen of chapter twenty-seven of the Revised Laws as 
amended by section one of chapter three hundred and forty-one of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and eight. No sinking fund shall be 
established for said loan. All bonds shall be offered for sale in such a 
manner that the premiums, if any are received, shall be applied in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of chapter three hundred and seventy-nine 
of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and ten. No city or county 
money shall be deposited in any bank or trust company of which any 
member of the board of sinking fund commissioners of said city is an 
officer, director, or agent. Nothing herein shall apply to transit bonds of 
the city of Boston issued under the provisions of the several acts 
authorizing the construction of tunnels and subways in said city by the 
Boston Transit Commission, and said bonds may be issued as 
heretofore and secured by sinking fund. 

Sect. 27. t Every officer and board in charge of a department of the 
city of Boston or county of Suffolk shall, on or before the sixth day of 
February in each year, prepare and furnish to the city auditor a list of 

* Sect. 16A. Inserted by St. 1951, c. 182. 

t Sect. 26 as amended by St. 1910, c. 437, Sect. 1, and St. 1911, c. 165, 
Sect. 1. 

t Sect. 27 as amended by Special St. 1919, c. 168, Sect. 1, St. 1922, c. 
133, Sect. 1, St. 1938, c. 263, Sect. 1, and St. 1951, c. 111. 



41 



the officials and employees under said officer or board and paid by the 
city or county on the first of such February. Such list shall give the 
name, residence by street and ward, designation, compensation, and 
date of election or appointment of each of said officials and employees 
and the date when each first entered the employ of the city or county. It 
shall be the duty of the city auditor to verify said lists by the pay rolls 
and to keep a copy of said lists open for public inspection, and to 
prepare and publish in the City Record on or before the tenth day of 
April in each year a comparative table containing the number of such 
officials and employees holding office or employed in each such depart- 
ment or board and paid by the city or county on the compilation date in 
each of the ten years next preceding such publication. The term "com- 
pilation date," as herein used, shall be construed to mean, with respect 
to the year nineteen hundred and fifty-one or any prior year, the first 
day of January, and with respect to the year nineteen hundred and fifty- 
two or any subsequent year, the first of February. 

Sect. 28. The jurisdiction now exercised by the board of aldermen 
concerning the naming of streets, the planting and removal of trees in 
the pubhc ways, the issue of permits or licenses for coasting, the storage 
of gasoline, oil, and other inflammable substances or explosive com- 
pounds and the use of the public ways for any permanent or temporary 
obstruction or projection in, under, or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles, and posts for telephone, telegraph, street 
railway, or illuminating purposes, is hereby vested in the board of street 
commissioners, to be exercised by said board with the approval in 
writing of the mayor; and the mayor and city council shall have author- 
ity to fix by ordinance the terms by way of cash payment, rent, or other- 
wise, upon which permits or licenses for the storage of gasoline or oil, or 
other inflammable substances or explosive compounds, and the con- 
struction or use of coal holes, vaults, bay windows, and marquises, in, 
under, or over the public ways shall be issued. 

Sect. 29.* Within ninety days after the passage of this act and there- 
after there shall be published at least once a week and distributed and 
sold under the direction of the mayor and on terms to be fixed by the 
city council and approved by the mayor a paper to be know as the "City 
Record." All advertising with reference to the sale of property for non- 
payment of taxes shall appear exclusively in the City Record. All other 
advertising, whether required by law or not, with reference to the pur- 
chase or taking of land, contracts for work, materials or supplies, and 
the sale of bonds, shall appear in said paper, and in such newspaper or 
newspapers as the mayor, in his discretion, may order; a list of ail con- 
tracts of one thousand dollars or more, as awarded, with the names of 
bidders, and the amount of the bids; appointments by the mayor; and 
changes in the number and compensation of employees in each depart- 
ment, shall be pubhshed in the City Record. Failure to pubUsh in such 
newspaper or newspapers as the mayor may order shall not invalidate 
any purchase, contract or sale made or action taken by the city. The pro- 

* Sect. 29 as amended by St. 1934, c. 185, Sect. 1, and St. 1947, c. 
447, Sect. 1. 



42 



ceedings of the city council and school committee together with all com- 
munications from the mayor, shall be published in the City Record; pro- 
vided, that the substance of debates by and among the members of the 
city council shall not be so published or published elsewhere at the ex- 
pense of said city. 

Sect. 30.* Every officer or board in charge of a department in said 
city and every officer, board or official of the county of Suffolk having 
power to incur obUgations on behalf of said county in cases where said 
obligations are to be paid for wholly from the treasury of said city, when 
authorized to erect a new building or to make structural changes in an 
existing building, shall make contracts therefor, not exceeding five, each 
contract to be subject to the approval of the mayor; and when about to 
do any work or to make any purchase, the estimated cost of which 
alone, or in conjunction with other similar work or purchase which 
might properly be included in the same contract, amounts to or exceeds 
two thousand dollars, shall, unless the mayor gives written authority to 
do otherwise, invite proposals therefor by advertisement in the City 
Record. Such advertisements shall state the time and place for opening 
the proposals in answer to said advertisement, and shall reserve the right 
to the officer, board or official to reject any or all proposals. No 
authority to dispense with advertising shall be given by the mayor unless 
the said officer, board or official furnishes him with a signed statement 
which shall be published in the City Record giving in detail the reasons 
for not inviting bids by advertisement. 

Sect. 31.t Without obtaining the consent of any other board or of- 
ficer or further authority than that contained in this act, the public 
facilities commission, in the name of the city, may acquire by purchase, 
lease, gift, devise or otherwise for any municipal purpose a fee simple 
absolute or any lesser interest in any land, public or private, within the 
limits of the city, including air rights and riparian rights, and may take 
by eminent domain under chapter seventy-nine or chapter eighty A of 
the General Laws any such fee or interest except in parks and 
playgrounds and except also, unless there be express consent, in lands 
belonging to or covered by contract with the United States, the com- 
monwealth, the Boston Housing Authority or the Boston Redevelop- 
ment Authority. Whenever the price proposed to be paid for any land to 
be acquired for any municipal purpose is more than twenty- five percent 
higher than its average assessed valuation during the previous three 
years, such land shall not be acquired by purchase but shall be taken by 
eminent domain. No land shall be taken until an appropriation by loan 
or otherwise for the generaal purpose for which land is needed shall 
have been made by the mayor and city council by a two thirds vote of all 
its members; nor shall a price be paid in excess of the appropriation, 
unless a larger sum is awarded by a court of competent jurisdiction. 
Nothing in this section shall effect in any way the powers and duties of 
the real property board under chapter four hundred and seventy-four of 



* Sect. 30 as amended by St. 1939, c. 156, Sect. 1, and St. 1955, c. 60, 
Sect. 2. 
t Sect. 31 as amended by St. 1966, c. 642, s. 12. 



43 



the acts of nineteen hundred and forty-six as now or hereafter amended, 
or of the pubHc improvement commission as successor in function to the 
board of street commissioners under chapter four hundred and thirty- 
seven of the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety-three or chapter four 
hundred and twenty-six of the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven or chapter three hundred and ninety-three of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and six, as severally now or hereafter amended, or acts in addi- 
tion thereto. 

Sect. 31 A. Without obtaining the consent of any board or officer 
other than the mayor, and without interdepartmental payment, the 
public facilities commission, without further authority, may transfer 
any land now or hereafter belonging to the city, except parks and 
playgrounds, but including school lands and land acquired by fore- 
closure of tax title, from the municipal purpose, if any, to which it is 
devoted at the time of such transfer to any other specific municipal pur- 
pose, and may also transfer the care, custody, management and control 
of any such land, except parks and playgrounds, but including school 
land and land acquired by foreclosure of tax title, from such board or 
officer, including itself, as at the time of such transfer may have the 
same to such other board or officer, including itself, as it may deter- 



Sect. 3 IB. Without obtaining the consent of any board or officer 
other than the mayor, the public facilities commission, without further 
authority, may, for such rent or price and upon such terms as said com- 
mission may deem appropriate, lease or sublease or sell, grant and con- 
vey any surplus land, as hereinafter defined, to the federal government 
or any agency thereof, the commonwealth or any political subdivision 
or authority thereof or, if notice of intent to lease or sell such land or 
buildings together with a statement of when and where written details of 
such proposed lease or sale may be examined shall first have been 
pubUcly advertised in the City Record once a week for two successive 
weeks, to any person, firm, corporation or trust. "Surplus land", as 
used in this section, shall be deemed to mean land, buildings and real 
estate now or hereafter belonging to the city and in the care, custody, 
management and control of said commission (except parks and 
playgrounds) which at the time of such lease or sale are or have been 
used for school purposes, or which have been acquired by foreclosure of 
tax titles or acquired under section eighty of chapter sixty of the General 
Laws, or which, irrespective of the manner or time of acquisition, are 
not held by the city for a specific purpose, or which have been trans- 
ferred to the commission by the city council. 

Sect. 32.* Beginning in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-five, 
the municipal election in said city shall take place biennially in every odd 
numbered year on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. 

* Sect. 32 as amended by St. 1914, c. 730, Sect. 1, St. 1921, c. 288, 
Sect. 1, and St. 1924, c. 479, Sect. 4. 



45 
PUBLIC OFFICIALS 

The following table shows the manner in which public of- 
ficials are appointed or elected, the time of appointment or elec- 
tion and the term of office as prescribed by statute, ordinance, 
or equlation. (Stat. 1953, Chap. 473; Ord. 1953, Chap. 8; Ord. 
1954, Chaps. 2 and 3; Ord. 1956, Chaps. 1 and 3; Ord. 1957, 
Chap. 2; Ord. 1958, Chap. 4 and Ord. 1961, Chap. 1.) 





How 

Created 


Appointed or Elected 


Term 


Officials 


By Whom 


When 


Begins 


Length 


Administrative Services, 
Director of 


Ord. 


Mayor 


* 


* 


* 


Appeal, Board of (Five) 


Statute 
and Ord. 




Annually, 
one 


May 1 


5 yrs. 


Art Commission (five) 


Statute 
and Ord. 




Annually, 
one 


May 1 


5 yrs. 


Assessing, Commissioner 
of 


Statute 
and Ord. 

Statute 
and Ord. 




* 
* 


* 
* 


* 


Assessing, Associate Com- 
missioner of (Two) 


* 


Auditor 


Ord. 
Ord. 




t 

Annually 
one 


t 
May 1 


t 


Auditorium Commission 
(five) 


5 yrs. 


Beacon Hill Architectural 
Commission (Five) 


Statute 




Annually, 
one 


May 1 


5 yrs. 


Boston Employees Credit 
Union, City of 

Boston Finance Commis- 
sion (five) 


Statute 












Governor 


Annually 
one 




5 yrs. 


Boston Housing Authority 
(five) . 




** 




Jan. 8 


5 yrs. 


Boston Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission (five) . . 


4, 


Governor 
and 
Mayor 


Biennially 


Oct. 24 


2 yrs. 


Boston Redevelopment 
Authority (five) 

Budgets, Supervisor of 


.. 


** 




Sept. 17 


5 yrs. 


Ord. 


Mayor 


* 


* 


* 


Building Commissioner. . . . 


Statute 




Quinqen- 
nially 


May 15 


5 yrs. 



• For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at which a 
mayor is elected. 

•• Four members appointed by the Mayor and City Council and one appointed by the Massachusetts State 
Housing Board. 



46 



Officials 



How 
Created 



Appointed or Elected 



By Whom 



When 



Term 



Begins 



Length 



Charitable Donations for 
Inhabitants of Boston, 
Trustees of 



City Clerk 

Civil Defense Director . . 

Collector-Treasurer 

Corporation Counsel . . . 

Election Commissioners 
(Four) 



Examiners, Board of 
(Three) 



Fire Commissioner 



Franklin Foundation 
(twelve Managers) . 



Freedom Trail Commission 

Hospital Members 
(Nine) 



Statute 



Statute 
and Ord. 

Statute 
and Ord. 



Mayor 

City 
Council 



Mayor 



Annually 
four 

Trien- 
nially 



Ord. 



Statute 

Statute 
and Ord. 

Statute 



Housing Inspection, Com- 
missioner 

Library Trustees (Five) . . . 



Licensing Board (three) . 

Old South Association iq 
Boston (two Managers) . . 

Parks and Recreation, 
Commissioner of 



Parks and Recreation, 
Associate Commissioners 
of (Four) 



Statute 

Ord. 
Ord. 

Statute 



Statute 
and Ord. 



Statute 
and Ord. 



Mayor 



Supreme 
Court 

Mayor 



Governor 

City Coun 
cil 



Mayor 



Quadren- 
nially 

Annually, 
one 

Annually, 
one 

Quadren- 
nially 



Annually, 
one 



Annually, 
one 

Biennially 
one 



Annually 



Annually, 
one 



May I 

1st Mon. 
in Feb 



May 1 

April 1 
May 1 
May 1 



May 1 



May 1 



3 yrs. 

3 yrs. 

t 
* 

4 yrs. 
4 yrs. 

3 yrs. 

4 yrs. 



When 
elected 



May 1 



3 yrs. 

5 yrs. 

6 yrs. 
1 yr. 

4 yrs. 



• For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at which a 
mayor is elected. 

t Determined by St. 1953, c. 491. 
A As vacancies occur. 



47 





How 

Created 


Appointed or Elected 


Term 


Officials 


By Whom 


When 


Begins 


Length 


Penal Institutions Commis- 
sioner 


Ord. 




Quadren- 
nially 


May 1 


4 yrs. 

t 


Personnel, Supervisor of . . 


Ord. 




t 


t 


Police Commissioner 


Statute 




Quinquen- 
nially 


May 1 


5 yrs. 


Public Facilities Commis- 
sioners (Three) 


Statute 




* 


* 


* 


Public Works, Commis- 
sioner of 


Ord. 




* 


* 


* 


Purchasing Agent 


Ord. 




* 


* 


>K 


Real Estate, Committee on 
Foreclosed (Three) 


Ord. 




§ 


§ 


§ 


Real Property, Commis- 
sioner of 


Ord. 
Ord. 




* 

* 


* 

* 


* 


Real Property, Assistant 
Commissioner of 


* 


Real Property, Associate 
Commissioners of 
(Three) 


Ord. 




Annually, 
one 


May 1 


3 yrs. 


Retirement Board (Three) . 


Statute 




Triennially, 
one 


Oct. 1 


3 yrs. 


Review, Board of (Three) . . 


Statute 
and Ord. 




See 
footnote 


See 
footnote 


See 
footnote 


School Committee (five) . . . 


Statute 


Elected 


City elec- 
tion 


1st Mon. 
in Jan'y 


2 yrs. 


Sinking Funds Commis- 
sioners (Six) 


Statute 
and Ord. 


Mayor 


Annually, 
two 


May 1 


3 yrs. 


Traffic and Parking Com- 
missioner 


Statute 


* 


* 


* 


Veterans' Benefits and 
Services Commissioner . . 


Statute 
and Ord. 


" 


* 


* 


* 



• For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at which a 
mayor is elected. 

tPosition placed under Civil Service by St. 1959, c. 603. 

§ The Chairman and two other members of the Real Property Board are appointed by the Mayor from the Real 
Property Board. 



48 





How 
Created 


Appointed or Elected 


Term 


Officials 


By Whom 


When 


Begins 


Length 


Veterans' Graves and 
Registration, Supervisor 
of 

Weights and Measures, 
Sealer of 


Statute 
and Ord. 

Statute 
and Ord. 

Bequest 

Statute 

Statute 
and Ord. 


t 
Mayor 


• 
t 


* 
t 

May 1 

May 1 


• 
t 


White Fund, George 
Robert (five Trustees) . . . 




Youth Activities Commis- 
sion 

Zoning Commission 
(Eleven 


Annually 
one 

Annually, 
four 


5 yrs. 
3 yrs. 



• Position placed under Civil Service by St. 1949, c. 245. 

t Position placed under Civil Service by St. 1909, c. 382. 

t Appointing power shared by the Mayor, Superintendent of Schools and Chairman of the Youth Service Board of 
the Commonwealth. (See Stat. 1963, Chap. 391.) 

NOTE:— The Mayor appoints three persons to this Board as follows:— (1) such person in the service of the real 
estate appraisal division of the assessing department as the mayor, by a writing filed with the city clerk after the com- 
mencement of a municipal year, shall designate to serve ex officio on said board at his pleasure during such year, 
who, while so serving, shall be chairman of said board, (2) such person in the service of the statistical research divi- 
sion of the assessing department as the mayor in like manner shall designate to serve ex offico on said board at his 
pleasure during such year, and (3) such person as the mayor shall appoint from the public at large to serve on said 
board for a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at which 
a mayor is elected. 



SUFFOLK 



COUNTY 



ORGANIZATION 



GOVERNORS 
COUNCIL 



LAND 
COURT 



CLERK 
SUPREME 
JUDICIAL 

COURT 



SUPERIOR COURT 



REGISTER 

OF 

PROBATE 



CITY 
COUNCIL 



DISTRICT 
ATTORNtlt 



-| 



— • JUSTICES 



-• JUSTICES 



-• JUSTICES 



COURT 
OFFICERS 



-' JUSTICES 



PROBATION 
OFFICERS 



COURT 
OFFICERS 



I 



L 



i 1 




SUFFOLK COUNTY 

COURT HOUSE 

COMMISSION 



MUNICIPAL - 



JUSTICES ond 
CLERK OF 
MUNICIPAL 
COURT FOR 
CRIMINAL 
BUSINESS 



PROBATION 
OFFICERS 



LEGEND 



~Fu// Control 
— Portial Control 
■ -'Appointivo Authority 



COURTS 
CHELSEA 
8RI0HT0N 
CHARLESTOWN 
DORCHESTER 
EAST BOSTON 

ROXBURV 
SOUTH BOSTON 
WEST ROXBURY 



COURT 
OFFICERS 



JUSTICES ond 

CLERK 

BOSTON 

JUVENILE 

COUflT 






PROBATION 
OFFICERS 



COUNTY 
COMMISSIONER! 



PENAL 
INSTITUTIONS 



COUNTY 
PAYMASTER 



COURT 
OFFICER 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT 

Aug. I, I9S4 



49 

MUNICIPAL DEPARTMENTS 
BOARDS AND AGENCIES 



The departments and boards of the city were reorga- 
nized and consohdated by chapter 8 of the Ordinances of 
1953, which took effect on January 1, 1954, chapter 2 of 
the Ordinances of 1954, which took effect on May 1, 1954, 
and chapter 3 of the Ordinances of 1954, which took effect 
on June 30, 1954. 

For convenient reference the following departments are 
arranged alphabetically according to the principal word of 
their title. The departments are distinguished by titles in 
capital letters and the boards and commissions are in 
itahcs. 



50 
DEPARTMENT OF THE MAYOR 

Office, 511 City Hall 

[Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449; Stat. 1904, Chap. 450; Stat. 1905, 
Chap. 341; Stat. 1906, Chap. 259; Stat. 1907, Chaps. 274, 463; C. C, Title 
II., Chap. 3; Stat. 1908, Chaps. 292, 494; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1910, 
Chap. 373; Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1912, Chap. 550; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 
280, 367, 788; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 274, 730; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 184, 
348; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 94; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 75; Stat. 1920, 
Chaps. 6, 312, 613; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 169, 407, 497; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 35, 
399, 521; Stat. 1924, Chaps. 453, 479; Stat. 1930, Chap. 167; Stat. 1938, 
Chap. 300; Stat. 1945, Chaps. 4, 8; Rev. Ord. 1947, Chap. 2; Stat. 1948, 
Chap. 452; Stat. 1951, Chap. 376.] 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 

MiCHO F. Spring, Administrative Assistant 

Lawrence Quealey, Executive Assistant 

Patricia H. Foley, Appointment Secretary 

Cathleen McDonnell, Clerk 

Richard J. Sinnott, Chief of Licensing Division 

the city record 

Office, 721 City Hall 

Joseph J. Fahey, EdUor 



51 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

Office, 608 City Hall 

[Rev. Ord. 1961, Chaps. 3 and 4; Ord. 1968, Chap. 2; Ord. 1969, Chap. 4, 
Sees. 1 and 2A; Ord. 1974, Chap. 486, Sec. 5, Acts of 1909, as amended 
by Sec. 1, Chap. 473, Acts of 1953.] 

Administrative Services Board 

Edward T. Sullivan, Director of Administrative Services, Chairman* 

, Deputy Director for Fiscal Affairs 

William P. McNeill, Supervisor of Budgets* 

John E. Murphy, Jr., Supervisor of Personneit 

Frank F. Chin, Purchasing Agent* 

Walter W. Merrill, City Auditor, ex officio 

Lowell L. Richards III, Collector-Treasurer, ex officio 

Barbara G. Cameron, Commissioner of Assessing, ex officio 

Richard F. Meyer, Supervisor of Labor Relations* 

Robert A. Freeley, Executive Secretary 

The Administrative Services Department represents a consolidation of the ac- 
tivities formerly conducted by the Budget, Printing, and Supply Departments, 
and the acquisition of 6 new activities — general administrative; the repair and 
maintenance of office machines; surplus property control; data processing; the 
administration of a life-health insurance program for City and County 
employees; and a labor relations unit. 

The Department is under the charge of a board known as the Administrative 
Services Board, consisting of the Director of Administrative Services as Chair- 
man, the Deputy Director for Fiscal Affairs, the Supervisor of Budgets, the 
Supervisor of Personnel, the Purchasing Agent, the Supervisor of Labor Rela- 
tions, the City Auditor, the Collector-Treasurer, and the Commissioner of 
Assessing, ex officiis. It is the duty of this board, and more especially of the 
Director of Administrative Services, to make, under the Mayor, studies and 
recommendations with respect to the organization, activities, policies, and pro- 
cedures of all departments, boards, and officers so that the administration 
thereof shall be economical and efficient. 

The Deputy Director of Administrative Services for Fiscal Affairs shall, under 
the direction of the Mayor, and in consultation with the Director of Ad- 
ministrative Services review all aspects of the fiscal affairs of the city and make 
recommendations for continual modernization and improvement in the basic 
fiscal policies and procedures of the city, including, but not limited to, the means 
by which the budget can be used to effectuate policy decision. 

* For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next 
biennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected. 

t Stat. 1959, Chapter 603 placing the office of Supervisor of Personnel under 
Civil Service was accepted by the City Council on October 19, 1959, and ap- 
proved by the Mayor on October 20, 1959. 



52 



The regular activities of the department, for payroll purposes, are divided into 
six divisions — administrative, budget, data processing, personnel, printing, and 
purchasing, the operations and functions of all divisions being under the overall 
supervision of the Director. 

The Administrative Division which handles all types of administrative matters 
concerning City and County operations, is under the supervision of the Ex- 
ecutive Secretary to the Board. 

The Supervisor of Budgets is the budget officer of the City and County and 
under the direction of the Mayor and in consultation with the Director is respon- 
sible for the preparation of the annual and all supplementary budgets as well as 
all subsequent revisions of the items in any budget. 

The Supervisor of Personnel is in charge of all personnel records as well as the 
administration of all compensation plans established for City and County 
employees. He makes a continuing study of personnel problems, employment 
conditions, and economic changes affecting all departments and recommends to 
the Mayor and department officials programs and administrative policies de- 
signed to improve and co-ordinate the handling of personnel matters. 

The Office of Labor Relations was established in 1971 by his Honor the 
Mayor and the Board and by Ordinances in 1974 as a new unit within the Person- 
nel Division. The office represents the Mayor in collective bargaining and is 
responsible for the administration of collective bargaining agreements and all 
other labor relations matters. 

The Purchasing Agent is responsible for the furnishing of all materials or sup- 
plies requisitioned by the several departments. He has charge of the Printing 
Plant and supplies the printing or binding requisitioned by departments to whom 
the City is required by law to furnish the same. He is the custodian of all surplus 
personal property of the City and may reallocate any such items among the 
several departments or, with the required approvals, sell or otherwise dispose of 
the same. He is also responsible for the operations of the Office Machine Repair 
Unit. 

The department also contains a board of five commissioners known as the Art 
Commission, which has the custody and care of all works or art owned by the 
City. White not subject to the direct supervision or control of the Administrative 
Services Board, this commission shall not communicate with the Mayor or make 
any annual or other report except through the board. 

Art Commission 

Office, Faneuil Hall 

[Stat. 1898, Chap. 410; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 4; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 11; 

Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 87; Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 4, Sec. 8.] 

OFFICIALS 

Marvin Goody, Chairman 
, Secretary 



53 



COMMISSIONERS* 

William B. Osgood, nominated by the Trustee of the Public Library of the 

City of Boston. Term expiring May 1, 1971. 
Stephen D. Paine, nominated by the Museum of Fine Arts. Term expiring 

May 1, 1973. 
Carol Bratley, nominated by the Massachusetts Insitute of Technology. 

Term expiring May 1, 1979. 
Marvin Goody, nominated by the Boston Society of Architects. Term expiring 

May 1, 1970. 

The Art Commission, formerly the Art Department, established in 1898, is 
composed of give commissioners, appointed by the Mayor. Each year one of the 
following-named bodies, namely, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Trustees of the 
Pubhc Library of the City of Boston, the Masssachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, the Boston Society of Architects, and the Copley Society of Boston, submits 
a list of three persons to the Mayor; and the Mayor appoints one person as Art 
Commissioner from the list so submitted, to serve for five years. Whenever the 
terms of a member of the commission expires, the Mayor appoints his successor 
from a list selected by the body which made the original selection, as aforesaid. 

No work of art can become the property of the City of Boston without the ap- 
proval of the Art Commission, which may also be requested by the Mayor or the 
City Council to pass upon the design of any municipal building, bridge, ap- 
proach, lamp, ornamental gate or fence, or other structure to be erected upon 
land belonging to the City. No work of art, the property of the City of Boston, 
shall be removed except by order of the Art Commissioners and with the ap- 
proval of the Mayor. Moreover, all contracts or orders for the execution of any 
painting, monument, statue, bust, bas-relief, or other sculpture for the City shall 
be made by said Commission acting by a majority of its members, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor. By Chap. 87, Special Acts of 1919, all works of art 
owned by the City were placed in the custody and care of the Art Commis- 
sioners. 



The Commissiorters serve without compensation. 



54 



Public Safety Commission 
Office, 608 City Hall 
[Stat. 1959, Chap. 203; Stat. 1961, Chap. 194; Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 4, Sec. 9.] 
Edward T. Sullivan, Director of Administrative Services, ex officio, Chairman 
David Rosenbloom, Commissioner of Health and Hospitals 
Francis W. Gens, Building Commissioner, ex officio 
George H. Paul, Fire Commissioner, ex officio 
Joseph F. Casazza, Public Works Commissioner, ex officio 
Emily Lloyd, Traffic and Parking Commissioner, ex officio 
Robert C. Wood, Superintendent of Schools, ex officio 
Joseph M. Jordan, Police Commissioner, ex officio 

Robert R. Kiley, General Manager, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Au- 
thority, ex officio 

Robert A. Freeley, Executive Secretary 

It is the duty of this Commission to co-ordinate the work of all departments of 
the City concerned with public safety to the end that there may be efficient and 
concerted action by said departments, particularly in times of emergency or 
disaster. The Commission shall meet at least once each month, at the call of the 
Director of Administrative Services, for the purpose of discharging said duty. 



55 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL COMMISSION 

182 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02111 

[Rev. Ord. of 1961, Chap. 15, Sec. 2, as inserted by Sec. 5, Chap. 14, of 
Ordinances of 1968, and amended by Sec. 1, Chap. 3, Ordinances 
of 1970 and Chap. 3, Ordinances of 1977] 

Commissioners 

Emily Lloyd, Chairman, Commissioner of Traffic and Parking Depart- 
ment, ex officio 

David Rosenbloom, Commissioner of Health and Hospitals Depart- 
ment, ex officio 

Susan D. Straight 

Clark Frazier 



Eugenie Beal, Acting Executive Director 

The Air Pollution Control Commission was established December 12, 
1968. The Commission consists of five members who serve without 
compensation, the executive director, and staff. It is empowered to 
regulate and control atmospheric pollution as provided in Section 31C, 
Chapter 111, of the General Laws. On April 2, 1970, the Commission 
was given jurisdiction to investigate, control, and abate noise within the 
city, to estabUsh standards, and to issue permits and establish fees 
therefor. The Commission also has power to require the production of 
records and documents relevant to its work and to compel the atten- 
dance and testimony of witnesses before it. The Commission is the issu- 
ing department for abrasive blasting permits, and is the issuing and con- 
troling Commission for Parking Freeze Permits, regulating any new or 
modified parking facihty in "Boston Proper." 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

Office, 301 City Hall Annex, third floor 

[Stat. 1854, Chap. 448 §37; Stat. 1884, Chap. 123; Stat. 1903, Chap. 
279; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 5; Ord. 1900, Chap. 5; Ord. 1901, 
Chap. 8; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 12; Ord. 1910, Chap. 1; Stat. 
1911, Chap. 89; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 155, 484; Stat. 1914, Chap. 198; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 5; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 91; Gen. Stat. 
1916, Chaps. 87, 173, 294; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 93; Stat. 1920, 
Chaps. 93, 96, 183, 552; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 283, 399; Stat. 1922, 
Chap. 6; Stat. 1924, Chap. 410; Stat. 1938, Chap. 257; Stat. 1945, 
Chap. 263; Stat. 1949, Chap. 313; Stat. 1951, Chap. 601; Ord. 
1954, Chap. 3; Ord. 1958, Chap. 4; Ord. 1961, Chap. 1; Acts 
1963, Chap. 160.] 



56 



BOARD 

Barbara G. Cameron, Commissioner of Assessing* 
Matthew F. Hanley, Jr., Associate Commissioner of Assessing* 
Jack Kardon, Associate Commissioner of Assessing* 
Bryan J. Reynolds, Executive Secretary 

BOARD OF review 

Harold L. Vaughn, ex. officio, Chairman 
Helen M. Sullivan, ex officiot 
Edward W. Jay, Jr. 



The Assessing Department is under the charge of a board consisting 
of an officer, known as the Commissioner of Assessing, and two other 
officers, known as Associate Commissioners of Assessing. The mayor 
shall from time to time by a writing filed with the city clerk designate 
one of the associate commissioners of assessing as the associate com- 
missioner of assessing for motor vehicle excises. 

Said board shall divide the assessing department from time to time 
into a real estate appraisal division, a statistical research division, and 
such other divisions as said board shall adjudge necessary for the proper 
conduct of the department. 

The commissioner of assessing shall, for the assessing department 
including the board of review, exclusively have the power, and perform, 
the duties, conferred or imposed by law on the assessor in existence im- 
mediately prior to April 26, 1961, with respect to the acquisition and 
disposal of property, the making of contracts, and the appointments, 
suspension, discharge, compensation and indemnification of subordinates. 
The commissioner of assessing shall also have the powers and perform 
the duties conferred or imposed by law on the assessor and the board 
of review in the assessing department in existence immediately prior to 
April 26, 1961, with respect to taxes other than poll and motor vehicle 
excise taxes, and shall further have the powers and perform the duties 
from time to time conferred or imposed on assessors of cities in Massa- 
chusetts by general laws applicable to Boston with respect to taxes other 
than motor vehicle excise taxes. 

The associate commissioners of assessing shall have the powers and 
perform the duties conferred or imposed by law on the assessor in existence 
immediately prior to April 26, 1961, with respect, in the case of the asso- 
ciate commissioner of assessing for motor vehicle excises, to motor vehicle 
excise taxes, and shall also have the powers and perform the duties 
from time to time conferred or imposed on assessors of cities in 

♦For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the 
next biennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected. 

1Such person in the service of the statistical research division of the 
assessing department as the mayor, by a writing filed with the city clerk 
after the commencement of a municipal year, shall designate to serve 
ex officio on said board at his pleasure during such year. (See Ord. 1961, 
Chap. 1, Sect. 4.) 



57 



Massachusetts by general laws applicable to Boston with respect, in the 
case of the associate commissioner of assessing for motor vehicle excises, 
to motor vehicle excise taxes. In addition, each associate commissioner 
of assessing may, at such time as he shall have been so authorized by 
written designation signed by the commissioner of assessing, approved 
by the mayor and filed with the city clerk and such authorization shall not 
have been revoked in like manner, exercise the powers and perform the 
duties of commissioner of assessing in relation to such matters as may be 
specified in such designation. In the event of the absence, disability or 
vacancy in office of an associate commissioner of assessing, the powers and 
duties conferred or imposed upon him by or under this section shall be 
exercised and performed by the other associate commissioner of assessmg. 

The Board of Review, consists of (1) such person in the service of 
the real estate appraisal division of the assessing department as the 
mayor, by a writing filed with the city clerk after the commencement of 
a municipal year, shall designate to serve ex officio on said board at his 
pleasure during such year, who, while so serving, shall be chairman of 
said board, (2) such person in the service of the statistical research division 
of the assessing department as the mayor in like manner shall designate 
to serve ex officio on said board at his pleasure during such year, and (3) 
such person as the mayor shall appoint from the public at large. 

It shall be the duty of the board of review to review every application 
for the abatement of a real estate or personal property tax and report 
to the conmiissioner of assessing its findings and recommendations with 
respect thereto, including such suggestion for settlement, if any, as, after 
discussion with the applicant, the board may think proper. 

Every application for abatement filed v^dth the assessing department 
shall be deemed to be filed with, and shall be forthwith transmitted to, 
in the case of an application for the abatement of a real estate or personal 
property tax, the commissioner of assessing, in the case of an application 
for the abatement of a motor vehicle excise tax, the associate commissioner 
of assessing for motor vehicle excises. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT 

Office, M4 City Hall 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 6; Ord. 1901, Chap. 10; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, 
§§3, 23, 24, 25; Stat. 1911, Chap. 413,' Chaps. 367, 788; 
Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 6; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chap. HI; Spec. Stat. 
1919, Chap. 168; Ord. 1921, Chap. 1; Stat. 1922, Chap. 133; Stat. 
1924, Chap. 479; Ord. 1925, Chap. 6; Ord. 1934, Chap. 5; Ord. 1949, 
Chap. 9.] 

Walter W. Merrill, City Auditor 

The office of Auditor was established by ordiance on August 2, 1824. 
Under provisions of Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1941, the office of City 
Auditor was placed under Civil Service on November 2, 1943, by a refer- 
endum vote of 60,139 to 12,409. 



58 



The office of Deputy City Auditor was established by ordinance on July 
11, 1934. 

Regular annual reports of receipts and expenditures have been pub- 
lished by the Auditor since 1825. Less complete reports were published 
by finance committees from 1811 to 1824, inclusive. Since June 1, 1867, 
the Auditor has published monthly exhibits of all City, School, and 
County expenditures. 

The City Auditor is also Auditor of the County of Suffolk, Secretary of 
the Board of Commissioners of Sinking Funds, a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the George Robert White Fund, a member of the Boston 
Retirement Board and a member of the Administrative Services Board, 
(Rev. Ord. 1961, Chaps. 3, 6.) 



59 



AUDITORIUM COMMISSION 

900 Boylston Street 
[Stat. 1954, Chap. 164; Ord. 1957, Chap. 2. 

OFFICIALS 

Robert C. Linnell, Chairman 
Joseph R.Hynes, Executive Secretary 

THE BOARD 



Members Nominated by Term Ending 



Leonard S. Green Greater Boston Real Estate Board May 1 

Bertram A. Druker Greater Boston Hotel and Motor Inn Assoc May 1 

Robert C. Linnell Chamber of Commerce May 1 

George Leary Mayor's Selection May 1 

Mario Umana Mayor's Selection May 1 



1981 
1977 
1980 
1979 
1978 



The board is known as the Auditorium Commission and consists of 
five officers known as Auditorium Commissioners, who shall be 
residents of the City of Boston and appointed by the Mayor as follows: 
One commissioner from three candidates nominated by the Greater 
Boston Hotel and Motor Inn Association, one commissioner from three 
candidates nominated by the Boston Real Estate Board, one commis- 
sioner from three candidates nominated by the Greater Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, and two commissioners selected at large by the 
Mayor. As the term of any commissioner expires, his successor shall be 
appointed in like manner as such commissioner for a term of five years. 
Vacancies in the board shall be filled in the same manner for the unex- 
pired term. The commissioners serve without compensation but are to 
be reimbursed for their traveling and other necessary expenses incurred 
in the performance of their duties. 

The commission constructed the municipal auditorium authorized by 
chapter 164 of the Acts of 1954, with an exhibition hall, assembly hall 
and accessory rooms suitable for exhibitions, conventions and other 
shows and gatherings in the city; contracts for the care and management 
thereof; and for such purposes may, subject to the approval of the 
mayor, make such contracts and employ such experts, assistants and 
employees as they think necessary or expedient. 



60 



BACK BAY ARCHITECTURAL COMMISSION 

[Chap. 625— Acts of 1966, as amended by Chap. 463— Acts of 1974] 

COMMISSIONERS 

Donald F. Winter, Chairman, Neighborhood Association of Back Bay, 

Dec. 31, 1973 
Clifford deBaun, K/ce-C/2a/>wc/2, Back Bay Association, Dec. 31, 1971 
Stephen T. Kunian, Mayor's Representative, Dec. 31, 1977 
Roger P. Lang, Boston Society of Architects, Dec. 31, 1974 
Donald L. Saunders, Greater Boston Real Estate Board, Dec. 31, 1974 

alternatives 
LynneC. Fife, Dec. 31, 1973 
A. Anthony Tappe, Dec. 31, 1976 
Stephen W. Wolfe, Dec. 31, 1977 
Jean-Paul Carlhian, Dec. 31, 1974 | 

MauriceE. Frye, Dec. 31, 1974 

executive secretary 
Mace Wenniger — Boston Redevelopment Authority 

The Back Bay Architectural District was established by special acts of 
the Legislature for these purposes: 

(a) to promote the economic, cultural, educational, and general 
welfare of the pubHc through the encouragement of high design stan- 
dards for that portion of the Back Bay area in the city of Boston 
described below: 

(b) to safeguard the heritage of the City of Boston by preventing the 
despoliation of a district in that city which reflects important elements 
of its cultural, economic, and political history; 

(c) to stabilize and strengthen residential property values in such 
areas; 

(d) to foster civic beauty; and 

(e) to strengthen the economy of the Commonwealth and the City of 
Boston. 

The District includes generally both sides of Beacon Street, 
Marlborough Street and Commonwealth Avenue, from the Public 
Garden at Arlington Street beyond Massachusetts Avenue to 
Charlesgate East, and Newbury Street and Boylston Street from Dart- 
mouth Street to Massachusetts Avenue. The boundaries are defined in 
the Act as follows: 

starting at the intersection of the center line of Newbury Street 
and the center line of Charlesgate east; thence running northerly 
by the center line of Charlesgate East to the center line of Back 
Street; thence running easterly by the center line of Back Street to 
the center Hne of Embankment Road; thence running southerly 
by the center line of Embankment Road to the center line of 
Beacon Street; thence running easterly along the center line of 
Beacon Street to the center line of Arlington Street; thence runn- 
ing southerly along the center line of Arlington Street to the 
center line of the public alley between Newbury Street and Com- 
monwealth Avenue; thence running westerly along the center line 
of the public alley between Newbury Street and Commonwealth 



61 



Avenue to the center line of Dartmouth Street; thence running 
southerly along the center Hne of Dartmouth Street to the center 
line of Boylston Street; thence running westerly along the center 
Une of Boylston Street to the center line of Massachusetts Avenue; 
thence running northerly along the center line of Massachusetts 
Avenue to the center Une of Newbury Street; thence running west- 
erly along the center line of Newbury Street to the point of 
beginning. 
In general, no building permit can be issued by the Building Commis- 
sioner in the District for construction, reconstruction, alteration or 
demolition unless: 

(1) the Secretary certifies on the building permit appUcation that no 
exterior architectural feature is involved, or 

(2) the appUcation for a building permit is accompanied by a cer- 
tificate of design approval issued by the Secretary. 

No permit can be issued by the PubUc Improvement Commission to 
erect a sign, marquee, awning, or other architecural feature protruding 
from any structure unless the appUcation for such permit is accom- 
panied by a certificate of design approval issued by the Secretary. This 
Act shaU not affect a building permit issued prior to December 6, 1966, 
in the case of a property facing on Beacon Street, Marlborough Street, 
or Commonwealth Avenue, or issued prior to August 3, 1974, in the 
case of a property facing on Newbury Street or Boylston Street. 

This Act shaU not prevent construction or alteration of an architec- 
tural feature if such work is certified as necessary by the Building Com- 
missioner to remedy an unsafe or dangerous condition. 

The commission shall pass only upon the exterior architectural 
features of a structure and shaU not consider interior arrangements nor 
the use to be made of the structure. 

It is the intent of this act that the commission be strict in its judgment 
of plans involving substantial new construction or for structures deemed 
to be valuable according to studies performed on behalf of the city, the 
board or the commission for said area to determine which structures are 
of architectural value. It is also the intent of this act that the commission 
shall be lenient in its judgment of plans for structures of little architec- 
tural value except where such plans would seriously impair the architec- 
tural value of surrounding structures or the surrounding area. It is also 
the intent of this act that the commission deal more leniently with pro- 
posals respecting structures zoned for business to the end that conver- 
sions to business uses will not be prevented. 

Owing to conditions especiaUy affecting the structure involved, but 
not affecting the District generally, the commission may issue a cer- 
tificate of design approval to avoid substantial hardship to an applicant, 
where this can be done without substantial detriment or derogation to 
the purposes of the Act. 

Exterior color may be changed, without applying for a certificate of 
design approval, to any color or combination of colors which the Com- 
mission has determined may be used. 

"Exterior architectural feature" is the architectural style and general 
arrangement of such portion of the exterior of a structure as is designed 



62 



to be open to view from a public street or way, but not such portions as 
are designed to be open to view only from a public alley, including, but 
not limited to, kind, color, and texture of the building material of such 
portion, type and design of all windows, doors, lights, signs, and other 
fixtures appurtenant to such portion, the location and adequacy of 
vehicular access, if any, and the location and treatment of any parking 
space for motor vehicles open to view from such pubHc street or way. 
The applicant must submit plans to aid the commission in consider- 
ing: 

(a) the architectural value and significance of the structure and its 
relationship to the surrounding area. 

(b) the relationship of the exterior architectural features of such pro- 
posed structure to the rest of the structure and to the surrounding area. 

(c) the general compatibility of exterior design, arrangement, texture, 
and materials to be used. 

(d) any landscape features proposed by the applicant. 

(e) any aesthetic or other factor which it deems to be pertinent. 

The Commission has nine commissioners and five alternates, ap- 
pointed by the Mayor as follows: two commissioners and one alternate 
from nominations by each of the following organizations: the 
Neighborhood Association of the Back Bay, the Back Bay Association, 
the Boston Society of Architects; one commissioner and one alternate 
from nominations by the Greater Boston Real Estate Board; two com- 
missioners and one alternate selected at large by the Mayor. Commis- 
sioners serve without compensation. 

EDWARD INGERSOLL BROWNE COMMISSION 

Room M5, City Hall Plaza, Boston, MA 02201 
[City of Boston Code, Ordinances, Title 16, Section 300 - 304] 

Commissioners 

Honorable Kevin H. White, Mayor of Boston, Chairman 
Christopher A. Iannella, City Councillor 
Lowell L. Richards III, Collector-Treasurer 

The Edward IngersoU Browne Commission was established on June 
26, 1975, in order to facilitate the achievement of the testamentary goals 
of Edward IngersoU Browne, who died at his residence in Hyde Park on 
September 15, 1901. A lawyer by profession, Mr. Browne's life was 
devoted chiefly to the care of trusts. During his Hfetime he always, 
quietly, extended aid to those in need. By his will, proved on October 3, 
1901, Mr. Browne bequeathed one-third of the remainder of his estate 
to the City of Boston to be invested as a special fund, the annual income 
to be applied to: 

"the adornment and benefit of said City by erection of statues, 
monuments, fountains for men and beasts and for the ornament 
of its streets, ways, squares and parks in such manner as will pro- 
mote the pleasure, comfort, education, patriotism and good taste 
of its citizens, and hkewise for the maintenance and repair of any 
statues or other structures as aforesaid erected by money supplied 
from this bequest." 



63 



The Commissioners, consisting of the Mayor, that member of the 
City Council for the time being the senior member in time of service, or, 
in the event that two or more members have equal service, the senior of 
those in age, and the Collector-Treasurer, shall serve without compensa- 
tion. The Mayor shall be Chairman. 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Office, 807 City Hall 

[Stat. 1945, Ch. 626; Ord. 1945, Ch. 6; Rev. Ord. 1947, Ch. 41: Ord. 
1949, Ch. 8; Ord. 1950, Ch. 6; Stat. 1952, Ch. 212; Ord. 1953, Ch. 7; 
Ord. 1954, Ch. 7; Stat. 1955, Ch. 4; Ord. 1955, Ch. 1, Ch. 2; Ord. 
1957, Ch. 11; Stat. 1958, Ch. 234; Stat. 1959, Ch. 227; Ord. 1962, Ch. 
10; Ord. 1963, Ch. 6, Ch. 8; Ord. 1964, Ch. 6; Ord. 1965, Ch. 7; 
Ord. 1967, Ch. 10.] 

Francis W. Gens, Building Commissioner. 
Leo F. Martin, Deputy Building Commissioner 
Richard L. Granara, Jr., Assistant Commissioner, Administration 
James T. Reid, Assistant Commissioner, Inspections 
Daniel F. Kent, Supervisor of Construction and Safety Inspections 
JohnL. O'Leary, Supervisor of Mechanical Inspections 
Alec F. Bonda, Supervisor of Electrical Inspections 

The duty of the Building Commissioner, under the provisions of 
Chapter 802 of the Acts of 1972, as amended (the Massachusetts State 
Building Code), is to inspect all buildings and structures in the City of 
Boston except bridges, quays or wharves, buildings owned and occupied 
by the United States or the Commonwealth, railroad station and struc- 
tures used primarily for railway purposes, voting booths, tanks of cer- 
tain specified capacities, tunnels constructed and maintained by the 
public authority, tents covering an area of less than one hundred square 
feet, fences less than six feet in height, signs or billboards upon the 
ground and signs less than one square foot in area, and flagpoles less 
than twenty feet in length. 

The Code authorizes the Commissioner to issue permits to erect, 
enlarge, alter, substantially repair, move, demolish or change the oc- 
cupancy of any building or structure; or to install, alter, or substantially 
repair plumbing, gas fitting, fire extinguishing apparatus and elevators; 
or to install steam boilers, furnaces, heaters or other heat producing ap- 
paratus the installation of which is regulated by the Code; or to install 
engines or dynamos. 

Pursuant to Chapter 665, Acts of 1965, a new zoning code has been 
prepared and approved and became effective Dec. 31, 1964. Many im- 
portant revisions of previous regulations are made in the new code, but 
it continues, in effect, under new use districts and administrative regula- 
tions, the general purposes of the superseded zoning act. With minor ex- 
ceptions, no buildings shall be erected or altered, nor shall any building 



64 



or premises be used, for any purpose other than the use permitted in the 
district in which such building or premises is located. 

In addition, Chapter 143 of the General Laws, insofar as applicable to 
Boston, is administered by the Building Commissioner under delegated 
authority from the State Commissioner of Public Safety. 

The primary purpose of the public safety regulations promulgated 
under this chapter is to establish a minimum code of safety for the entire 
state. Cities and towns may make further exactions in accordance with 
local building ordinances and not inconsistent with law, but in no case 
may the provisions of state law be avoided or minimized. 

The law falls with particular force on all places of as- 
sembly — restaurants, taverns, dance halls, meeting halls and all places 
of similar occupancy in which fifty or more persons may be accom- 
modated. Lodging houses and apartment houses in which' there are eight 
or more rooms above the second floor, or in which ten or more persons 
are accommodated above the second floor come also within the provi- 
sions of this Act. All such buildings must be certified by the Building 
Commissioner as to compliance with these particular regulations in ad- 
dition to the Boston Code requirements. 

On May 1, 1954, in accordance with Ordinances of 1954, Chapter 2, 
Section 30, the powers, duties, appropriations and personnel of the 
Electrical Inspection Division of the Fire Department were transferred 
to the Building Department. 

By Chapter 2 of the Ordinances of 1954 the Board of Appeal, the 
Board of Examiners, and the Committee on Licenses were placed in the 
Building Department and the Board of Zoning Adjustment and the 
Zoning Commission were placed in the said Department by Revised Or- 
dinances of 1961, Chapter 9, Section 9 and 10, but none of said Boards, 
Commission or Committee is subject to the supervision or control of the 
Building Commissioner, but unless otherwise ordered by the Mayor 
none of said Boards, Commission or Committee shall communicate 
with the Mayor or make any annual or other report, except through the 
Building Commissioner. 

Licenses for gas fitters are now issued by the Gas Regulatory Board 
(Ch. 623, Acts 1962). 

Ch. 254, Acts 1965, became effective May 5, 1965. Under its provi- 
sions the Electrical Code of the City of Boston was repealed and the 
Massachusetts Electrical Code (G. L., Ch. 143, S. 3L) was substituted 
therefor. 



65 



Board of Appeal 
Office, 803 City Hall 
(Building Code: Statute 1972, Chapter 802, as amended, and the Bos- 
ton Zoning Code: Statute 1956, Chapter 665, Section 8, as amended.) 

OFFICIALS 

JohnW. Priestley, Jr., Chairman 
Charles F. Spillane, Secretary 
Anne Hagbrty, Executive Secretary 

THE BOARD 



Members 



Nominated by 



Term ending 



Boston Society of Architects 

John W. Priestley, Jr. . . Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 



May 1, 1973 



Building and Construction Trades Council of the 
Charles F. Spillane ^^^ Metropolitan District May 1 , 1974 



Alfred Gross. 



Master Builders Association 

Building Trades Employer's Association May 1 , 1976 

Associated General contractors of Massachusetts, 
Inc 



Patrick Farrell Mayor's selection. 



May 1, 1977 



The Board consists of five members appointed by the Mayor in the 
following manner: One member from two candidates, one to be 
nominated by the Greater Boston Real Estate Board and one by the 
Massachusetts Association of Real Estate Board; one member from two 
candidates, one nominated by the Boston Society of Architects and one 
by the Boston Society of Civil Engineers; one member from three can- 
didates, one to be nominated by the Master Builders' Association, one 
by the Building Trades Employers' Association, and one by the 
Associated General Contractors of Massachusetts, Inc.; one member 
from two candidates nominated by the Building and Construction 
Trades Council of the Metropolitan District; and one member selected 
by the Mayor. The term of office is five years. Each member is paid $75 
per diem for actual service, but not more than $9,000 in any one year for 
the aggregate services rendered by him under building code and zoning 
law. 



66 



Any applicant for a permit from the Building Commissioner whose 
application has been refused in re Building Law may appeal therefrom 
within 90 days, and any applicant whose application has been refused in 
re Zoning Code may appeal therefrom within 45 days, and a person who 
has been ordered to incur expense may within thirty days after receiving 
such order (or in the case of its being a hazardous condition in the opi- 
nion of the Building Commissioner within a shorter period as the 
Building Commissioner designates) appeal to the Board of Appeal by 
giving notice in writing to the commissioner. All cases of appeal are set- 
tled by the Board after a hearing, and a decision rendered on same open 
for public inspeciton. 



Board of Examiners 
Office, 804 City Hall 
[Stat 1912, Chap. 713; Ord. 1912, Chap. 9; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap 8; 
Ord 1920, Chap. 10; Ord. 1952, Chap. 5; Stat. 1938, Chap. 479 as 
amended by Ord. 1943; Stat. 1945, Chap. 626; Stat. 1952, Chap. 212; 
Ord. 1952, Chap. 6; Ord. 1954, Chap. 2,§ 22.] 



OFFICIALS 

Michael P. Veneto, Chairman 
Geraldine Antonelli, Executive Secretary 



THE BOARD 

MichaelP. Veneto Term expiring May 1, 1970 

ThomasM. Simmons Term expiring May 1, 1971 



The Board of Examiners, as an adjunct of the Building Department, 
was estabUshed in 1912. It consists of three members appomted by the 
Mayor, the duty of said members being to act upon the qualifications of 
persons desiring to be registered as construction superintendents in the 
City of Boston. Under the law the personnel of the Board includes an 
architect or engineer, a contractor, and a lawyer. Compensation for ser- 
vice by said members is established at twenty-five dollars a day, the 
yearly salary not to exceed twenty-five hundred dollars. 

(47) Builder's or Mechanic's License. The fee for a license granted 
by the board of examiners under section 120 of the Boston Building 
Code and classified by said board under paragraph (c) of said section as 
an ABC Ucense shall be $40; provided, that the fee for a renewal of such 
a Ucense shaU be, if paid on or before, or within thirty days after, the ex- 
piry date of the license renewed, $25, otherwise, $30. The fee for any 
other Ucense granted by the board of examiners under said section 120 
shaU be $30; provided, that the fee for a renewal of such a hcense tor 
which the fee is paid on or before, or within thirty days after, the expiry 
date of the Ucense renewed shall be $10. 



67 



Committee on Licenses 

Office, 807 City Hall 

[Ord. 1954, Chap. 2, § 25; Stat. 1959, Chap. 203, § 2; Ord. 1961, 

Chap. 9. § 11.] 



COMMITTEE 

Francis W. Gens. Building Commissioner, ex officio 

Emily C. Lloyd, Traffic and Parking Commissioner, ex officio 

George H. Paul, Fire Commissioner, ex officio 

Edward J. Whelan, Secretary 

The Committee on Licenses is in the Building Department. This com- 
mittee shall have the powers and perform the duties conferred or im- 
posed on the board of street commissioners by Chapter 148 of the 
General Laws, as amended, by Chapter 577 of the Acts of 1918, as 
amended, by Chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, as amended, and by 
Chapter 349 of the Acts of 1953, as amended. 



Beacon Hill Architectural Commission 

Office, 807 City Hall 

[State. 1955, Chap. 616; Stat, 1958, Chaps. 314, 315; Stat. 1963, Chap. 

622; Stat. 1965, Chap. 429.] 

officl\ls 
JohnW. Priestley, Chairman 
Carmen DiStefano, Vice Chairman 
, Secretary 



68 



THE COMMISSION 



Members Nominated by Term ending 



Jesse R. Fillman Beacon Hill Civic Association, Inc May 1, 1976 

John Codman Greater Boston Real Estate Board May 1, 1972 

John P. Bennett Boston Society of Architects May 1, 1973 

James D. McNeely . . Society for the Preservation of New England 

Antiquities May 1 , 1974 

Joseph L. Eldredge . . Mayor's Selection May 1, 1970 



Alternate Members* Nominated by Term ending 



George M. Notter, Jr. Boston Society of Architects May 1, 1973 

Harriet Ropes Cabot Society for the Preservation of New England 

Antiquities, Inc May 1, 1974 

Benjamin A. Cook . . Mayor's Selection May 1, 1970 

Alex Mclntyre Beacon Hill Civic Association, Inc May 1, 1976 

Frederic W. Lord . . . Greater Boston Real Estate Board May 1, 1972 



♦Alternate members as provided in Chap. 429, Acts of 1965. 

The Beacon Hill Architectural Commission was formed for the pur- 
pose of promoting the "educational, cultural, economic and general 
welfare of the public through the preservation of the historic Beacon 
Hill District and to maintain said district as a landmark in the history of 
architecture and as a tangible reminder of Old Boston as it existed in the 
early days of the Commonwealth." 

The District, as defined in the Act comprises the area bounded as 
follows: — southerly by the northerly side line of Beacon street; westerly 
by a line parallel with, and one hundred and fifty feet distant westerly 
from, the westerly side line of Beaver street; northerly by Beaver place; 
easterly by Brimmer street; northerly again by Byron street; westerly 
again by a line parallel with, and eighty feet distant westerly from, the 
westerly side line of Charles street; northerly again by the southerly side 
line of Revere street; easterly again by the westerly side line of Myrtle 
street; northerly again by the southerly side line of Myrtle street; and 
easterly again by the westerly side line of Hancock street and said side 
line extended southerly to Beacon street; excluding, however, from said 
area land of the commonwealth and the estates numbered twenty-six to 
eighty-eight, inclusive, and ninety-eight to one hundred and thirty-six, 
inclusive, on Myrtle street. 

Under the provisions of Stat. 1958, Chap. 315, the following addition 
was made to the Historic District. The area bounded as follows: 
southerly by Byron street; westerly by Brimmer street; southerly again 
by Beaver place; westerly again by Embankment road; northerly by 



69 



Pinckney street; and easterly by a line parallel with, and eighty feet dis- 
tant westerly from, the westerly line of Charles street. 

Under Stat. 1963, Chap. 622, the Historic Beacon Hill District as 
defined in the two previous paragraphs was further enlarged and ex- 
tended in area as follows: 

Section IB. The Historic Beacon Hill District, created by section one 
and enlarged and extended by section one A, is hereby futher enlarged 
and extended to include an area contiguous thereto bounded as follows: 
— southerly by Myrtle street, including, however, the estates numbered 
twenty-six to eighty-eight, inclusive, and ninety-eight to one hundred 
and thirty-six, inclusive, on Myrtle street; westerly by Myrtle street; 
southerly by Revere street; westerly by the alley located to the rear of the 
estates numbered one hundred and thirty to one hundred and forty 
Charles street; northerly by the northerly boundary line of the estate 
numbered one hundred and forty Charles street, and by said boundary 
line extended diagonally in an easterly direction across Charles street to 
Putnam avenue; northerly by Putnam avenue; westerly by West Cedar 
street; northerly by PhilHps street; easterly by the rear property lines of 
the estates numbered seventy-nine to sixty-one West Cedar street; nor- 
therly and westerly by the northerly property lines of the estates located 
at the northerly ends of Bellingham place. Sentry Hill place and Good- 
win place, and the northerly sideline of the estate numbered thirty-seven 
Grove street, easterly by Grove street; northerly by Revere street; east- 
erly by Irving street; but including the estates located on Rollins place. 

Section IC. The Historic Beacon Hill District, created by section one 
and enlarged and extended by sections one A and one B, is hereby fur- 
ther enlarged and extended to include an area contiguous thereto 
bounded as follows: — northerly by a line parallel to and forty feet dis- 
tant southerly from the southerly sideline of Cambridge street; easterly 
by Bowdoin street; southerly by Derne and Myrtle street; westerly by Ir- 
ving street; generally southerly by the northerly, easterly and westerly 
boundaries of the area defined in section one B; southerly by Revere 
street; westerly and northerly by Embankment road; and northerly by 
Charles street circle; and including the estates located at 131 and 141 
Cambridge street and 2-16 Lynde street. 

Nothing contained in this act shall apply to the construction, repair, 
alteration, demolition or reconstruction of any building by Suffolk 
University on Hancock, Derne or Temple streets. 

Section 7A. Signs — No permit to erect a sign, marquee, awning or 
other exterior architectural feature protruding from any structure in the 
Historic Beacon Hill District shall be issued by the public improvement 
commission of the city of Boston, or by any other agency now or here- 
after authorized to issue such permits, unless the application for such 
permit shall be accompanied by a certificate of appropriateness issued 
under section seven. 

It is the function of the Commission to regulate and control all con- 
struction, reconstruction and alteration to buildings and structures 
within the District in which exterior architectural features are involved. 
Under the terms of the Act, an "Exterior Architectural Feature" is the 
"architectural style and general arragement of such portion of the ex- 



70 



tenor of a structure as is designed to be open to view from a public way, 
including kind, color and texture of the building materials of such por- 
tion and type of all windows, doors, lights, signs and other fixtures ap- 
purtenant to such portion." 

The members of the Commission are appointed by the Mayor as 
follows: one commissioner from two candidates, and one alternate from 
two other candidates, nominated by the Beacon Hill Civic Association, 
Inc., one commissioner from two candidates, and one alternate from 
two other candidates, nominated by the Greater Boston Real Estate 
Board, one commissioner from two candidates, and one alternate from 
two other candidates, nominated by The Boston Society of Architects, 
one commissioner from two candidates, and one alternate from two other 
candidates, nominated by the Society for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities, and one commissioner, and one alternate, selected 
at large by the mayor. As the term of any commissioner expires, his suc- 
cessor shall be appointed in like manner as such commissioner for a 
term of five years. Any vacancy in the office of a commissioner shall be 
filled in like manner for the unexpired term. As the term of any alternate 
expires, his successor shall be appointed in like manner as such alter- 
nate. Any vacancy in the office of an alternate shall be filled in Uke 
manner. Every person appointed an alternate shall be so appointed that 
his term will expire at the same time as the term of the incumbent com- 
missioner appointed in the same manner as such alternate. Every com- 
missioner and every alternate shall continue in office after the expiration 
of his term until his successor is duly appointed and quaUfied. Any com- 
missioner or alternate may be removed by the mayor as provided in sec- 
tion fourteen of chapter four hundred and eight-six of the acts of nine- 
teen hundred and nine. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of a 
commissioner, or whenever a commissioner is absent or unable for any 
cause to perform his duties, the alternate appointed in the same manner 
as such commissioner shall exercise the power and perform the duties of 
such commissioner; but an alternate shall not otherwise be deemed to 
be, or act as, a member of the board. 

[The above paragraph was inserted by Section 1 of Chapter 429 of the 
Acts of 1965, approved May 5, 1965, effective June 4, 1965.] 



Zoning Commission 

Section 907 City Hall, Boston 

[Stat. 1956, Chap. 665; Stat. 1957, Chap. 408; Stat. 1958, Chap. 77; 

Stat. 1960, Chap. 652; Rev. Ords. 1961, Chap. 9, § 10: Stat. 1964, 

Chap. 244; Stat. 1966, Chap. 193; Stat. 1972, Chap. 802, § 66.] 

Boston Zoning Code, Adopted March 29, 1963; Filed with Clerk of 

Senate April 1, 1963; Effective December 31, 1964 

OFFICIALS 

Richard B. Fowler, Chairman 
Richard Battles, Vice-Chairman 
Mace Wennioer, Advisor 
Marguerite Hildebrand, Secretary 



71 



Members Nominated by Term ending 



Richard F. Battles . . . Boston Society of Civil Engineers May 1 

Raymond T. Coleman Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce May 1 

Greater Boston Real Estate Board May 1 

Boston Society of Architects May 1 

Mayor's Selection May 1 

Greater Boston Massachusetts Labor Council May 1 

Mayor's Selection May 1 

Mayor's Selection May 1 

Master Builders Association of Boston May 1 

Massachusetts Motor Truck Association, Inc. May 1 



Richard B. Fowler. 
Thomas G. Green 

Ann Gulo 

Joseph W. Joyce . 
Louis P. Leonard 
Anthony Macolini 
Robert L. Marr . . 
Theodore W. Paul 



Marvin E. Rosenberg Associated Industries of Massachusetts May 1 



1972 
1975 
1976 
1975 
1980 
1980 
1977 
1976 
1977 
1971 
1979 



The Commission consists of eleven commissioners appointed by the 
Mayor subject to confirmation by the City Council as follows: one com- 
missioner from two candidates nominated by the Associated Industries 
of Massachusetts, one commissioner from two candidates nominated by 
the Greater Boston Massachusetts Labor Council, AFL-CIO, one com- 
missioner from two candidates nominated by the Greater Boston Real 
Estate Board, one commissioner from two candidates nominated, one 
by The Boston Society of Architects and one by the Boston Society of 
Landscape Architects, one commissioner from two candidates 
nominated by the Boston Society of Civil Engineers, one commissioner 
from two candidates nominated by the Greater Boston Chamber of 
Commerce, one commissioner from two candidates nominated by the 
Massachusetts Motor Truck Association, Inc., one commissioner from 
two candidates nominated by the Master Builders Association of 
Boston, and three commissioners selected at large by the Mayor, one of 
whom shall own alone or with one or more other persons, and shall oc- 
cupy in whole or in part as his place of residence, a dwelling house 

having not more than three dwelling units. All zoning commissioners 
shall be residents of Boston. The term of office is for three years and the 
commissioners serve without compensation. 

The commissioners may adopt a zoning regulation and from time to 
time amend it upon petition or otherwise, by the concurrent vote of not 
less than seven of its members, after a public hearing following adver- 
tisement. 

A zoning regulation shall be designed among other purposes to lessen 
congestion in the streets; to conserve health; to secure safety from fire, 
panic and other dangers; to provide adequate light and air; to prevent 
overcrowding of land; to avoid undue concentration of population; to 
faciliate the adequate provision of transportation, water, sewerage, 
schools, parks and other public requirements; to conserve the value of 
land and buildings; to encourage the most appropriate use of land 
throughout the city; and to preserve and increase its amenities. 



72 



Votes of the Zoning Commission adopting a zoning regulation or 
amendment thereof shall be subject to the same provisions of law in 
respect to approval by the Mayor as orders or votes of the City Council 
of the city, except that the concurrent vote of not less than nine 
members of the Zoning Commission shall be necessary to pass such a 
regulation or anxendment over the veto of the Mayor. 



TRUSTEES OF CHARITABLE DONATIONS 
FOR INHABITANTS OF BOSTON 

[Chap. 368, Acts of 1970] 



Term Ending May 1, 1974 

Melnea Cass 

Terms Ending May 1, 1975 

Rev. Michael E . Haynes Clarence J . Jones 

Terms Ending May 1, 1976 

Robert Ryan John Kelly 

Term Ending May 1, 1977 

Kevin O'Malley 
Term Ending May 1, 1978 

Maureen Schaffner 
Term Ending May 1, 1979 
Robert McCoy 
The Overseers of the Poor in the Town of Boston, a corporation 
established in 1722 by act of the Legislature, were succeeded in 1864 by 
the corporation called "Overseers of the Poor in the City of Boston," 
consisting of twelve residents of Boston, four of whom are appointed 
annually to serve for the term of three years from the first day of May. 
In 1921 the name of the corporation was changed to Overseers of the 
Public Welfare. The members of the corporation also constitute the 
Trustees of John Boylston's Charitable Donations. The total book 
value of the 18 permanent charity funds in the custody of the corpora- 
tion on June 30, 1978 was $998,487.32, the annual income from which 
($58,572.93 in 1977) is distributed in accordance with the terms of the 
donations. 



73 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT 

Office, 601 City Hall 

[Stat. 1821, Chap. 110, §10; Stat. 1854, Chap. 448, §30; Stat. 1885, 

Chap. 266, §2; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 11; G.L., Chap. 41, §§ 12-19; 

C. C. Title IV., Chap. 8; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §22; Rev. Ord. 

1947, Chap. 10; Stat. 1951, Chap. 376, § 17B; CBC Ord. 2 §553.] 

Barry T. Hynes, City Clerk 

John P. Campbell, Assistant City Clerk 



The City Clerk is elected by the City Council for the term of three 
years. He has the care and custody of the records of the City Council 
and of all city records, documents, maps, plans and papers, except those 
otherwise provided for. He also records financing statements, 
assignments of wages, and other instruments, issues licenses and badges 
to minors when so directed by the City Council, and performs other 
duties imposed by statute. 

The City Clerk and Assistant City Clerk are, respectively. Clerk and 
Assistant Clerk of the City Council. 

The Assistant City Clerk is elected by the City Council, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor. By Gen. Laws, Chap. 41, § 18, the certificate or 
attestation of the Assistant City Clerk has equal effect with that of the 
City Clerk. 

Registry Division 

Room 213, City Hall 

[Stat. 1892, Chap. 314; Stat. 1898, Chap. 398; Gen. Laws, Chap. 46; 
Rev. Ord. 1925, Chap. 28; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 28; Ord. 1954, 
.Chap. 2, §31; Stat. 1965, Chap 656.] 

William J. Kane, City Registrar 

Helen Bowen, First Assistant City Registrar 

Marguerite Irwin, Assistant City Registrar 

William McOsker, Assistant City Registrar 
The City Registrar keeps the records of births, deaths and marriages, 
issues certificates of the same and marriage licenses, receives and 
records affidavits of, additions to, and amendments and corrections of 
said records, and forwards copies of all records to the office of the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth and to outside cities and towns when 
nonresidents are involved. Annual reports have been published since 
1849, except in 1860 and 1861. 

By ordinance, approved July 12, 1892, the Department of Ancient 
Records and the office of Record Commissioners (established July 6, 
1875) were abolished, and the duties of the Record Commissioners, in- 
cluding the publication of documents relating to the early history of 
Boston, were transferred to the City Registrar. 



74 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

[Established by Ordinances of 1970, Chapter 10] 

Alan Austin, ex officio 

Lorraine M . Downey Term ends in 1 97 1 

William Smith Term ends in 1980 

Augusta Bailey Term ends in 1972 

Edith G. DeAngelis Term ends in 1976 

John Lewis Term ends in 1973 

Robert E. Holland Term ends in 1975 
Lorraine M. Downey, Executive Secretary 

The Boston Conservation Commission, estabhshed in June, 1970, is 
composed of six Commissioners appointed by the Mayor for three-year 
terms. The Mayor appoints the chairman and vice-chairman. The Com- 
missioner of Parks and Recreation will serve as an ex-officio member. 
All of the Commissioners are residents of Boston. Two Commissioners 
are appointed from a list of ten candidates nominated by the following 
organizations — Massachusetts Audubon Society, Massachusetts 
Forest and Park Association, Massachusetts Roadside Council, 
Trustees of Reservations, Eastern Massachusetts Division of the Sierra 
Club. 

The Conservation Commission is established under Chapter 40, Sec- 
tion 8c, of the General Laws for the promotion and development of 
natural resources and for the protection of the watershed resources of 
Boston. The Commission shall conduct research, seek to coordinate the 
activities of unofficial conservation bodies, hold pubUc hearings, may 
prepare, print, and distribute books, maps, plans, and pamphlets. 
Among such plans may be a conservation and passive outdoor recrea- 
tion plan. The Commission shall publish an annual report. The Com- 
mission may receive gifts, bequests, or interests in real property of the 
kinds mentioned below in the name of the city. It may purchase interests 
in such land with sums available to it, or it may lease, acquire conserva- 
tion restrictions, easements, or other contractual rights, and it shall 
manage and control the same. 

The Conservation Commission can apply for funds under the Self 
Help Act (G.L. Ch. 132A, Section 11) for acquiring land. The City may 
be reimbursed up to fifty percent of the non-federal cost of such a pro- 
ject. 

Under the provisions of the Wetlands Protection Act (G.L. Ch. 131, 
s. 40) the Conservation Commission Commission regulates the filling, 
dredging, or altering of coastal and inland wetlands, and lands border- 
ing water bodies. 



75 



BOSTON CONSUMERS' COUNCIL 

182 Tremont St., Boston 
[Ordinances of 1968, Chapter 15] 

The Boston Consumers' Council is a board consisting of seven mem- 
bers serving coterminously with the Mayor. The Consumers' Council 
conducts studies, investigations, and research in matters affecting con- 
sumer interests; keeps consumers informed on matters affecting their in- 
terests; and pursues a course of action to insure to the fullest possible 
extent that all laws enacted for the benefit of consumers are duly 
enforced. 
Dr. Ira A. Korff 

Richard G. Huber, Law Department 
Edwin F. Lownie, Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Donald Kerr, Health and Hospitals Department 
Michael Tarallo, Laborers Union 
Rev. Nellie Yarborough 
Jose Matos 
Arnold L Epstein, Executive Director 



COORDINATING COUNCIL ON DRUG ABUSE 

[ordinances of 1969, chapter 17] 

The Coordinating Council on Drug Abuse is a 21 -member Board ap- 
pointed by the Mayor for terms conterminous with the Mayor. Its duties 
are "to coordinate to the fullest possible extent the work of all pubUc 
and private agencies dealing with drug abuse, to effect an ongoing dia- 
logue and exchange of views between such agencies; to conduct, either 
independently or in conjunction with the school committee of the city, 
such drug education programs as said council deems advisable; to con- 
duct studies, investigations, and research into the source and use of 
harmful drugs and narcotic drugs; to pursue a course of action that all 
laws governing the sale, possession, and use of both harmful and nar- 
cotic drugs are duly enforced; and by the use of such media of 
communication as said council shall from time to time deem appropri- 
ate, keep the inhabitants of the city informed respecting the use of both 
harmful and narcotic drugs." The meetings of the Council are open to 
the public. 

Dr. David C. Lewis, Chairman 

Paul E. Robinson, Executive Secretary 

John Bartholomew 

Marjorie Eltzroth 

Carol Nesson, Designee of Corporation Counsel 

John E. Barry, Jr, Designee of Police Commissioner 

James Roberts, Designee of Penal Commissioner 



76 



Henry Previtt, Designee of Y.A.C. Chairman 

, Designee of Commissioner of Health and Hospitals 

Dr. John Renner, Chairman, Treatment Committee 
Rev. C. Melvin Surette, Chairman, Education and Prevention Com- 
mittee 
Nathaniel Hakim Askia 
James Wells 
Marsha Semuels 

Scott Harshbarger, Esq., Chairman, Administration of Justice Committee 
Ann Foley 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

[CBC, Ord. 8] 

The Commission consists of fifteen Commissioners appointed by the 
Mayor. 

The Development and Industrial Commission conducts research into 
industrial conditions, investigates and assists in the establishment of 
educational, commercial, and industrial projects, including projects in- 
volving private enterprise, for the purpose of expanding or strengthen- 
ing the local economy, and seeks to coordinate the activation of unoffi- 
cial bodies organized for said purposes, and may advertise, prepare, 
print, and distribute books, maps, charts, and pamphlets to further the 
purposes for which it is established. 

George Seybolt, Chairman Term ends in 1977 

Thomas E. Leggat, Vice-Chairman Term ends in 1977 

Matthew McGrath Term ends in 1978 

Gabriel Piemonte Term ends in 1983 

Warren Berg Term ends in 1979 

Bertram Lee Term ends in 1980 

Frank Bronstein Term enB^ in 1977 

Neil St. John Raymond Term ends in 1983 

Gerry Dunfey Term ends in 1981 

Barbara Salow Term ends in 1981 

George P. Skelly Term ends in 1980 



77 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL 
CORPORATION OF BOSTON 

[Established by Chapter 1097 of the Acts of 1971] 

Members 

Thomas E. Leggat Term ends June 30, 1980 

Frank Bronstein Term ends June 30, 1980 

Edward T. Sullivan Term ends June 30, 1981 

Edwardo DaSilva Term ends June 30, 1981 

Mark C. Wheeler Term ends June 30, 1981 

Matthew L. McGrath Term ends June 30, 1979 

George C. Seybolt Term ends June 30, 1979 



COMMISSION ON AFFAIRS OF THE ELDERLY 

[Established by Ordinances of 1970, Chapter 4] 
Elaine F. Guiney, Commissioner 

ASSOCIATE commissioners 

Term Ending 

Enrique Velasco May 1, 1979 

RuthTinsley May 1, 1979 

Grace LeBeau May 1 , 1 979 

Sa VERIO Messina May 1 , 1980 

John J. Hannigan, Chairperson May 1, 1980 

JeanGallo May 1,1980 

David McSweeney May 1, 1981 

Nellie Sullivan May 1, 1981 

Dr . Melnea Cass May 1 , 1 982 

Mary S. Colbert May 1 , 1982 

The Commission on Affairs of the Elderly shall be cognizant of 
federal and state legislation concerning financial assistance, information 
exchange, and planning for better community programming for the 
elderly, and shall co-ordinate or carry out programs designed to meet 
the problems of the aging in co-ordination with programs of the Com- 
mission on Aging estabUshed under Chapter 6 of the General Laws. The 
Commission on Affairs of the Elderly shall send to said Commission on 
Aging a copy of the annual report transmitted by it to the Mayor under 
Section 25 of Chapter 3 of these ordinances. 



78 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT 

Office, 241 City HaU 

[Stat. 1906, Chap. 311; Stat. 1907, Chap. 560; §78; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 15; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 16; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 
53-61; Stat. 1910, Chap. 520; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 304, 469, 517, 550, 
735; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 275, 471, 483, 641; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 286, 
835; Stat. 1914, Chap. 730; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 15; Gen. Stat. 
1915, Chaps. 48, 91; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chaps. 16, 43, 81, 87, 179; 
Gen. Stat, 1917, Chap. 29; Gen. Stat. 1918, Chap. 74; Stat. 1920, 
Chaps. 129, 142; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 65, 93, 114, 209, 288, 340, 387; 
Ord. 1921, Chap. 7; Stat. 1942, Chaps. 311, 410, 453, 479; Stat. 
1925, Chaps. 39, 136; Stat. 1926, Chap. 105; Ord. 1938; Stat. 1938, 
Chap. 287; Stat. 1939, Chap. 450; Stat. 1941, Chap. 472; Stat. 
1945, Chap. 139; Stat. 1947, Chaps. 227, 446; Stat. 1948, Chap. 
452; Stat. 1949, Chap. 347; Stat. 1951, Chap. 376.] 

OFFICIALS 

John M. Robinson, Chairman 
William A. McDermott, Jr., Secretary* 

COMMISSIONERS 

Joseph W . Fitzgerald Term ending April 1 , 1 97 1 

William A. McDermott, Jr. Term ending April 1 , 1980 

John M. Robinson Term ending April 1, 1977 

Michael Joyce Term ending April 1 , 1 982 

One Election Commissioner is appointed by the Mayor each year, 
term beginning April 1 . The two leading political parties must be equally 
represented on the Board and the Chairman is designated annually by 
the Mayor. 

The Board of Registrars of Voters was appointed in May, 1874, and 
was succeeded July 1, 1895, by the Board of Election Commissioners. 

This department exercises all the powers and duties formerly confer- 
red upon the Board of Registrars of Voters (including the preparation of 
the jury list), except the power and duty of giving notice of elections and 
fixing the days and hours for holding the same. 
The Board also exercises all the powers and duties formerly conferred 
upon the City Clerk and other officers by chapter 504 of the Acts of 
1894. The voting precincts in the 22 wards number 252. 

police listing board 
Chapter 287 of the Acts of 1938 provides: "In Boston there shall be a 
listing board composed of the police commissioner of the city and the 
board of election commissioners. In case of disagreement between the 
members of the listing board, the chief justice of the municipal court of 
the city of Boston, or, in case of his disability, the senior justice of said 
court who is not disabled, shall, for the purpose of settling such 
disagreement, be a member of said listing board and shall preside and 
cast the deciding vote in case of a tie." 

'Resigned May 18, 1979 



79 

The duties of said board are further provided for in sections 8, 10, 1 1, 
12, 13, 14, 15, 16 of Chapter 29 of the Acts of 1917; and all other acts in 
amendment and addition thereto. 



CITY OF BOSTON EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION 

Room 34, City Hall 
[Gen. Laws, Chap. 171.] 

Officers 

William P. McHm\x, President 

Anne M, Tierney, First Vice-President 

Thomas E. Newcomb, Secowcf Vice-President 

Peter J. DeRosa, Treasurer 

Harold T. Kenney, Assistant Treasurer 

Joseph V. McBrine, Security Officer 

Gene J. DiBenedetto, Clerk 

Directors 

William Brown James J. Hyde 

Marguerite H. Connaughton James F. Johnson 

Charles D. Costello PaulK. Leary 

RoyE. Covell Joseph p. Sances 

PaulF. Fitzgerald Albert G. Sullivan 

Thomas W. Gately Margaret Waldron 

JohnP. Hardiman Francis J. Wilson 

This organization was incorporated under the laws of Massachusetts 
on October 25, 1915. 

The incorporators were twenty-one in number and included, besides 
the Mayor, the Corporation Counsel, the City Auditor, City Treasurer, 
Park Commissioner, the Principal Assessor and fifteen other 
city employees occupying responsible positions. 

Since its incorporation the Credit Union has been functioning for the 
•benefit of the city employee by the promotion of thrift among its 
members and the loaning of money to members in need of financial 
assistance. These loans are made at a low rate of interest, saving the bor- 
rower from the exorbitant rate charged by loan agencies. Approximately 
95 percent of the borrowers have their weekly loan payment deducted 
from their salary by means of the payroll deduction plan. 

The Credit Union at the present time has assets of $28,322,726.76 and 
reserves of $886,576.12, with 15,769 members, 9,261 of whom are bor- 
rowers. 

Most departments of the city or county government are respresented 
on the Board of Directors which consist of twenty-one members. Seven 
of these directors are elected each year for a three-year term. 



80 



FINANCE COMMISSION, BOSTON 

Office, 65 Franklin Street 
[Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, ss 17-21; Stat. 1921, Chap. 81; Stat. 1923, Chap. 
489; Stat. 1924, Chap. 369; Stat. 1948, Chap. 175; Stat. 1961, 
Chap. 40; Stat. 1965, Chap. 894.] 

OFFICIALS 

Jeffrey S. Lambert, Chairman 
Peter HwM.Confidential Secretary 

COMMISSIONERS 

Frederick R. H. Witherby Term ends in 1979 

Barbara Cheney Term ends in 1 980 

William P . McDonough Term ends in 1 98 1 

Jeffrey F. Lambert Term ends in 1982 

George Huggins Term ends in 1 983 

The Finance Commission is constituted under the Amended Charter 
of 1909. It consists of five commissioners appointed by the Governor 
and confirmed by the Executive Council, the term of each being five 
years. The Chairman of the Commission is named by the Governor. The 
members of the Commission, other than the chairman, serve without 
pay. 

It is the duty of the Commission to investigate, at its discretion, all 
matters relating to appropriations, loans, expenditures, accounts and 
methods of administration affecting the City of Boston or the County 
of Suffolk, or any of their departments, and to report upon its in- 
vestigations from time to time to the Mayor, the City Council, the 
Governor or the General Court. 

The Commission is required to make an annual report, in January, to 
the General Court. It is also the duty of the Commission to report to the 
Mayor, the City Auditor or the City Treasurer as to the validity or pro- 
per amount of any doubtful payroll, bill or claim referred to it by them. 



81 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Office, 115 Southampton Street 

[Stat. 1850, Chap. 262; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, §§9-11; Rev. Ord. 1898, 
Chap. 17; Stat. 1909, Chap. 308; Stat. 1912, Chap. 574; Ord. 1912, 
Chaps. 4, 6; Ord. 1913, Chap. 1; Stat. 1913, Chap. 800; Stat. 1914, 
Chaps. 519, 795; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 16; Ord. 1917, Chap. 4; 
Ord. 1919, Chap. 2; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 60, 68; Stat. 1921, Chap. 
196; Stat. 1923, Chap. 309; Stat. 1939, Chap. 237; Ord. 1944, 
Chap. 10; Stat. 1945, Chap. 413; Ord. 1959, Chap. 3.] 

George H. Paul, Fire Commissioner/Chief of Department 

Joseph M. Clasby, Deputy Fire Chief, Executive Assistant to Fire 
Commissioner 

Richard F. Finnegan, Executive Secretary 

Joseph L. Dolan, Deputy Fire Chief, Fire Marshal 

Gerald P. Hart, Deputy Fire Chief, Training and Research Division 

John E. Clougherty. Jr., Deputy Fire Chief, Personnel Division 

John J. McCarthy, Deputy Fire Chief, Planning and Logistics Division 

James M. Finn, Deputy Fire Chief 

Robert J. Hamilton, Deputy Fire Chief 

John R. Harrison, Deputy Fire Chief 

John C. Kilroy, Deputy Fire Chief 

Leslie W. Magoon, Deputy Fire Chief 

John J. O'Mara, Deputy Fire Chief 

Leo D. Stapleton, Deputy Fire Chief 

George Thompson, Deputy Fire Chief 

John M. Murphy, Superintendent, Fire Alarm Division 

John E. Fagan, Superintendent, Maintenance Division 

The Boston Fire Department was organized in 1837. It is in charge of 
1 Commissioner, 1 Executive Secretary, 1 Chief of Department, 13 
Deputy Fire Chiefs, 59 District Fire Chiefs, 3 Chaplains, 1 Superinten- 
dent of Fire Alarm, 1 Superintendent of Maintenance, 1 Medical Ex- 
aminer, 88 Fire Captains, 272 Fire Lieutenants, 1550 Fire Fighters, 35 
Clerks, 29 Fire Alarm Operators and 63 Mechanics, Painters, Linemen, 
Repairers, Electricians, Workmen, and other employees. 

There are 41 Fire Stations, a Fire Alarm Branch with 73 employees, 
operating 2,448 signal boxes. Annual reports have been published since 
1838. 

boston FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

By Chapter 308, Acts of 1909, amended by Chapter 134, Acts ofl911, 
and Chapter 186, Acts of 1949, the Fire Commissioner and 12 members 
of the Fire Department, to be elected annually by all the members are 
constituted a corporate body for the purpose of holding and administer- 
in the Firemen's Relief Fund. 



82 



THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION 

[Stat. 1905, Chap. 448; Stat. 1908, Chap. 569; Stat. 1927, Chap. 40; 
Stat. 1941, Chap. 212; Stat. 1953, Chap. 77; Stat. 1957, Chap. 119; 
C. C. Chap. 48, §5.] 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION OF THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION 

John P. Kendall, President 

C. William Anderson, Vice-President and Secretary 
Georges F. Doriot, Vice-President 
Noel Morss, Vice-President 
Paul F. Hellmuth, Treasurer 
Kevin H. White, Mayor of Boston {ex officio) 
Rev. Rhys Williams, Congregational Minister {ex officio) 
Rev. Robert W. Golledge, Episcopalian Minister {ex officio) 
Rev. Joseph C. Williamson, Presbyterian Minister {ex officio) 
C. William Anderson, Georges F., Doriot, Paul F. Hellmuth, John 
P. Kendall, John Lowell, Noel Morss, Lee J. Nash, Ralph H. 
Young, Appointed by the Supreme Judicial Court. 

Franklin Institute of Boston, 41 Berkeley Street 

Michael C. Mazzola, Director 

The Franklin Institute is incorporated under Chapter 569 of the Acts 
of 1908, a board of citizens being named therein to act for the City in 
the control of the Franklin Fund and in maintaining the Franklin Insti- 
tute of Boston as an independent technical college for adults. 

The Franklin Fund is the proceeds of a bequest of one thousand 
pounds to "the Inhabitants of the Town of Boston in Massachusetts" 
made by Benjamin Franklin, in a codicil to his will dated June 23, 1789. 
The codicil provided that the fund "if accepted by the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Boston" be managed "under the direction of the Select Men, 
united with the Ministers of the oldest Episcopalian, Congregational 
and Presbyterian Churches in that Town," who were to make loans on 
certain conditions to "young married artificers, under the Age of 
twenty-five years." 

Dr. Franklin, who died April 17, 1790, calculated that, in one hun- 
dred years, the thousand pounds would grow to one hundred and thirty- 
one thousand pounds "of which," he says, "I would have the Managers 
then lay out at their discretion one hundred thousand Pounds in Public 
Works which may be judged of most general utility to the Inhabit- 
ants . . . The remaining thirty-one thousand Pounds I would have con- 
tinued to be let out on interest in the manner above directed for another 
hundred years ... At the end of this second Term, if no unfortunate 
accident has prevented the operation the sum will be Four millions and 
Sixty-one thousand Pounds Sterling, of which I leave one Million sixty- 
one Thousands Pounds to the Disposition of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Boston, and Three Million to the disposition of the Govern- 
ment of the state, not presuming to carry my views farther." The Town 
accepted the donation at a Town Meeting held June 1, 1790. 



83 

A futile suit brought by the Franklin Heirs in 1891 prevented the divi- 
sion of the fund at the expiration of one hundred years; but on January 
17, 1894, by direction of the three ministers and the Board of Aldermen 
of the City, which board claimed to be the successors of the 
"Selectmen", $329,300.48 (jf^of the fund) was paid to the City Treas- 
urer, for "the purchase of land and the erection thereon of the Franklin 
Institute of Boston and for the equipment of the same." Owing to a 
series of complications the money remained in the custody of the 
Treasurer. Mayor CoUins, in 1902, caused a petition of the City to be 
filed in the Supreme Judicial Court, praying for instruction as to the au- 
thority of the persons then acting as Managers of the fund. The Court 
rendered an opinion November 25, 1903 (184 Mass. 373) to the effect 
that the three ministers were Managers of the fund under Franklin's 
will, but that the Aldermen did not succeed the "Selectmen" as 
Managers and had no powers with reference to it. The Court, under its 
general power to care for pubUc charitable funds, appointed, on March 
16, 1904, nine Managers to take the place of the "Selectmen" and pro- 
vided in the decree of the Court, that the Mayor of Boston should be 
one, ex officio. Successors to the other eight are appointed by the 
Court. In 1908 the Franklin Fund Managers were incorporated as The 
Franklin Foundation by the special act already referred to which was 
clarified by amendments in 1927 and 1953. In 1931 the Court held the 
incorporation to be constitutional, since it did not change the composi- 
tion or duties with respect to the FrankUn Fund of the Board of 
Managers, and answered various questions which had been raised (276 
Mass. 549). 

On December 2, 1905, the City Treasurer received from Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie $408,396.48, said sum being equal to the amount of the ex- 
pendable portion of the Frankhn Fund in August, 1924, which Mr. 
Carnegie agreed to dupUcate. 

On November 17, 1927, $100,000 was received by the Foundation 
from the estate of the late James J. Storrow, the income to be used for 
maintenance of Franklin Institute of Boston. 

In 1906 the City appropriated $100,000, raised by a 20-year loan, to 
purchase a building site of about 16,000 square feet at the corner of Ap- 
pleton and Berkeley Streets. On January 31, 1907, the amount available 
to be "laid out" by the Managers was $438,741.98 and in that year the 
Franklin Union Building was erected and equipped at a cost of 
$438,528.80. It was opened in September, 1908, as a Technical Institute 
to train young men and women for positions of supervision in industry. 
In 1941 the name was legally changed to Franklin Technical Institute. In 
1957, the Board of Collegiate Authority of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts voted to confirm the action of the Members of the Franklin 
Foundation to confer the Degree of Associate in Engineering upon 
qualified graduates of the Institute. 

In 1961, the name of the school was again changed to Franklin Insti- 
tute of Boston. It is maintained partly by tuition fees ($616,176 for the 
fiscal year 1977), and income from the previously mentioned funds (i.e. , 
the Andrew Cameagie donation and the Storrow bequest. The Franklin 



84 



Union Building contains eleven classrooms, two drafting rooms, one 
shop, fourteen laboratories, library, and offices. There is also an 
auditorium with a seating capacity of 927. 

A second building, acquired in 1960 at 4 Appleton Street, contains 
four classrooms, two laboratories, one shop, and two offices. A third 
building, acquired in 1965 at 439-441 Tremont Street, contains three 
classrooms, five laboratories, one shop, and three offices. Four hundred 
adult students received instruction at evening sessions and five hundred 
in day courses during the school year of 1973. 

The Frankhn Fund (Second Part) will become available in 1991. 



FREEDOM TRAIL COMMISSION 

[Stat. 1965, Chap. 625.] 

OFFICIALS 

Richard A. Berenson, Chairman 

Joseph F. Casazza, Vice Chairman 

Robert P. Mehegan, Secretary 



Members Nominated by Term ending 



Richard A. Berenson Freedom Trail Foundation, Inc Jan. 7, 1980 

Joseph F. Casazza Mayor's Selection Jan. 7, 1980 

Alan Austin Mayor's Selection Jan. 7, 1980 

Emily Lloyd Mayor's Selection Jan. 7, 1980 

Robert Cumings Freedom Trail Foundation, Inc Jan. 7, 1980 



A board in the Public Works department consisting of five commis- 
sioners appointed by the Mayor, two of whom shall be appointed from 
a list of seven candidates from the Freedom Trail Foundation, Inc. The 
Freedom Trail Commission shall from time to time designate a route in 
said city not over three miles in length, along which the public may walk 
and pass not less than twelve historic places. 



85 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HOSPITALS 

Main Office, 818 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 

BOARD 

William p. Morrissey, Chairman Term ending May 1 , 1978 

Shirley D. Campbell, Secretary Term ending May 1 , 1 977 

George P . Munoz Term ending May 1 , 1 97 1 

Joseph M. Smith Term ending May 1 , 1 976 

Bessie Washington Term ending May 1 , 1 976 

EvERETTE T. Sheppard Term ending May 1 , 1978 

David L. Rosenbloom, Ph.D. Term ending May 1, 1977 

Nancy Coolidge Term ending May 1 , 1 980 

commissioner 

David L. Rosenbloom, ph.d. Term ending June 30, 1979 

deputy commissioners 

Lewis Pollack, Community Health Services 

Thomas Lyons, Hospital and Health Facilities 

Timothy Walsh, Chief Financial Officer 

Paul Foster, Personnel 

A Board of Health was first established in 1799 under a special statute 
of February 13, 1799. it was abolished by the first City Charter and from 
1822 to 1872 its functions were exercised through the City Council. 

A Board of Health was re-established by an ordinance of December 2, 
1872. It pubUshed annual reports beginning with 1873. 

By Chap. 1, Ord. 1914, 2d Series, the board was replaced by a Health 
Commissioner. Chap. 1, Ord. 1915, provided that the quarantine ser- 
vice should pass from the control of the Health Department when cer- 
tain property was leased to the United States, in effect June 1, 1915. 

Ord. 1927, Chap. 1 abolished the Boston Sanatorium Department 
and placed the Tuberculosis Sanatorium at Mattapan under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Boston City Hospital Trustees and transferred all other 
powers and duties as well as the Out-Patient Department to the Health 
Commissioner. 

The Boston City Hospital was opened on June 1, 1864. 

The Relief Stations were closed to patients on March 15, 1938, but on 
October 15, 1945 the East Boston Relief Station was bpened on a 
24-hour basis. 

The Convalescent Home in Dorchester was closed in March, 1932. 

By Ord. 1954 the Institutions Department was abolished; and the 
powers and duties and appropriations of said department in relation to 
the commitment of the insane to Long Island and the institutions 
thereon were transferred to the Hospital Department. 

Chapter 656 of the Acts of 1965, accepted January 6, 1966, created 
the Department of Health and Hospitals — merging the former Health 
Department and former Hospital Department. The Board of Health 
and Hospitals by this same statute was incorporated as the Trustees of 
Health and Hospitals of the City of Boston and authorized to hold real 
and personal estate to an amount not exceeding $10,000,000. 



86 

HOUSING AUTHORITY, BOSTON 

Office, 53 State State 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 121B, Sees. 1 to 59] 

MEMBERS OF THE BOSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 

APPOINTED BY THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL 

Barbara Carpenter, Chairwoman Term ends in 1982 

John Battos, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer Term ends in 1981 

Otto P. Snowden, Member Term ends in 1980 



Appointed by Secretary, Executive Office of Communities 
AND Development 

Patrick B. Moscaritolo, Secretary Term ends 1983 



Bradley Biggs, Assistant Treasurer 
Assistant Secretary 
Administrator 

The Boston Housing Authority was established by the Mayor and the 
City Council, in October of 1935, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, chapter 121, sees. 26 I et seq. 

The members of the Authority, each appointed for a term of five 
years, guide and act on local agency policy. 

Four of these members are appointed by the Mayor with the approval 
of the City Council. The Secretary, Executive Office of Communities 
and Development, appoints one member. As the terms of the members 
expire, successors are appointed by the same appointive powers for 
terms of five years. 

The objective of the public housing program administered by the 
Boston Housing Authority is to provide low-rent housing for low- 
income families and for elderly people of limited income. 

To insure this purpose, the Authority has established specific policies 
governing eligibiUty both for admission to and continued occupancy of 
all its public housing developments. 

Housing developments are built and operated either with federal or 
state financial assistance. The federal program dates back to the initial 
occupancy of the Mary Ellen McCormack Houses in May of 1938. State 
legislation, in 1948, initiated the state-aided program. 

The Boston Housing Authority has, under management, 19 federally 
aided and 10 state-aided developments for low-income families. 

Also under management, in its program of specialized housing for the 
elderly, are 32 federally aided and 2 state-aided developments. 

The location and number of dwelling units of these housing programs 
are noted in the following tables. 



87 



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90 



HOUSING AUTHORITY, BOSTON 
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 

State 

Under Construction 

667-3a L Street, South Boston (Elderly) 68 

667-4 Pine Street Inn (Residents) 350 

Total State Under Construction 4 1 8 

State 
Under Planning and Development 
667-3b Community Residence (Residents) 20 

667-5 Summer Street, Hyde Park (Elderly) 120 
705-1 Roxbury Action Program, Roxbury (Family) 30 

705-2 Dorchester Area Planning Action Council, Dor- 
chester (Family) 30 



Total State Urban Planning and Development 6 1 8 



HOUSING INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

703 City Hall 
[G. L. Chap. 83, Sec. 12; G. L. Chap. Ill, Sees. 5, 122, 123, 124, 125; 
Stat. 1885, Chap. 382, Sees. 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22; Stat. 1887, 
Chap. 185, Chap. 219; Stat. 1907, Chap. 550, Sec. 128; Sec. 116 of 
Boston Building Code; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, Sec. 5; Stat. 1953, 
Chap. 473, Sec. 1; Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 3, Sec. 5, Chap. 2, Sec. 
2, Rev. Ord. 1961.] 

John A. Vitagliano, Commissioner 
Constantino Buttiglieri, Assistant Commissioner 
Frank P. Henry, Director 

This Department enforces the State Sanitary Code as it pertains to all 
residential dweUings, both public and private. The Department also en- 
forces various City ordinances that Hkewise pertain to residential dwell- 
ings and their environs. 

In essence, the Department functions as the board of health for all 
residential property in the City. It is organized as follows: 

The Commissioner of Housing Inspection shall have the powers and 
perform the duties from time to time conferred or imposed on a board 
of health by Section 12 of Chapter 83, and Section 127 of Chapter 111, 
of the General Laws, by Sections 122, 123, 124 and 125 of said Chapter 
111 insofar as said Sections 122, 123, 123 and 125 apply to places of hu- 
man habitation, and by Section 5 of said Chapter 1 1 1 insofar, but only 
insofar, as said Section 5 relates (a) to enforcing so much of the state 
sanitary code as concerns standards of fitness for places of human habi- 
tation, housing and sanitation standards for farm labor camps, 



91 



unsewered areas, and (b) to adopting such public health regulations, not 
inconsistent with the state sanitary code or other provisions of law, as in 
the opinion of the commissioner of housing inspection may be necessary 
to make and keep all places of human habitation fit for such habitation. 
The commissioner of housing inspection shall also have the powers and 
perform the duties conferred or imposed upon the board of health of 
the city, or the health commissioner of the city, by Sections 13, 14, 19, 
20, 21, and 22 of Chapter 383 of the Acts of 1885, as amended, by 
Chapter 185 of the Acts of 1897, by Chapter 219 of the Acts of 1897, as 
amended, by Section 128 of Chapter 550 of the Acts of 1907, as 
amended, and by Section 116 or any other provision of the Boston 
Building Code. It shall further be the duty of the commissioner of hous- 
ing inspection: (1) to receive all complaints of violations, in or about 
places of human habitation, of any and all statutes, ordinances, rules 
and regulations enacted for the preservation of health or safety in or 
about places of human habitation; (2) to refer in writing to the building 
commissioner or the fire commissioner, as the case may be, for in- 
vestigation and prosecution all complaints of violations of the Boston 
Building Code and the Boston Fire Prevention Code and to maintain 
written contact with said commissioners with respect thereto; and (3) to 
inspect place of human habitation and enforce therein the provisions of 
law specified in the preceding sentences of this section and all other 
statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations enacted for the preservation 
of health in or about such places. It shall remain the duty and respon- 
sibiHty of the building and fire commissioners, respectively, to enforce 
compliance with the Boston Building Code and the Boston Fire Preven- 
tion Code. To aid them in discharging such duty but without any lessen- 
ing of their respective responsibilities, the enforcement division of the 
housing inspection department may offer them, and they may accept 
assistance designed to unify action upon complaints received by the 
commissioner of housing inspection. 



Weights and Measures Division 

204 City Hall 

[Ord. 1954, Chap. 2, § 31; Chap. 656, Acts of 1965.] 

William R. Bradley, Sealer 

, Chief Deputy Sealer 

Marie Forsyth, Principal Clerk 

The duties of the division are set forth in the General Laws, Chapters 
94 through 98, 101 and 885, with amendments and additions thereto. 

The Sealer is required to give public notice annually by advertisement 
to all persons having places of business in the city and using weighing 
and measuring devises for the purpose of buying or seUing goods, wares 
or merchandise, for pubUc weighing or for hire or reward, to bring them 
into his office to be tested and sealed. After giving the said notice, he 
shall visit the places of business not complying and shall test, adjust, 
seal, or condemn in accordance with the results of the tests made on the 
weighing and measuring devices of said person. In addition the division 



92 



is charged with the enforcement of all laws relative to the licensing of 
hawkers, peddlers, and transient vendors; the giving of false or insuffi- 
cient weight or measure; the reweighing of coal and road-building 
materials; the reweighing or remeasuring of merchandise packaged in 
advance of sale and the inspection of standard containers as to the size, 
shape, dimensions, and capacity. The division also enforces the Unit 
Pricing Law. The division makes investigations of all complaints 
registered with the division relative to the above duties and when the 
evidence warrants, shall prosecute the violators. 



BOSTON INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCING AUTHORITY 

[General Laws Chapter 40D, Section 3] 
The Industrial Development Financing Authority is designed to at- 
tract new industry to Boston or substantially expand industry existing in 
the city through industrial development projects financed through the 
Boston Industrial Development Financing Authority. 

David W. Davis Term ends in 1976 

William H. O'Leary Term ends in 1975 

Matthew L. McGrath Term ends in 1974 

Lawrence A. Bianchi Term ends in 1973 



LAW DEPARTMENT 

Office, 615 City Hall 
[Ord. 1904, Chap. 23; Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 17.] 
Joseph D. ALviAm, Acting Corporation Counsel 
Dennis G. Avstw, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Michael Betcher, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Jonathan D. CAt^TER. Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Robert E. Brooks, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Lisa Daniel. Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Suzanne DelVecchio, Assistant Corporation Counsel 



93 



Kelam Derderian, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
John R. Devereaux, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Paul F. Edgar. Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Joseph W. Glannon, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Kenneth Glidden, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Edmund C. Grant. Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Mary Jo Hollender, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Dana Hanson, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Richard W. Hynes, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Jay F. Jason, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
JohnL. Keefe, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Kevin F. Moloney, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Carol E. Nesson, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Richard S. Ong, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
DarrellL. Ovjlav^, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Marcia D. Seeler, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
AshelenP. Senopovlos, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
John J. Slater, Jr., Assistant Corporation Counsel 
William J. Smith, ^55/5/oa7/ Corporation Counsel 
Thedore R. Stanley, Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Walter F. Maguire, Senior Legal Assistant 
Eleanor Merrigan, Legal Assistant 
Earl Franklin, Workmen 's Compensation Counsel 

The office of Attorney and Solicitor was established in 1827, which 
was superseded by the office of City Solicitor in 1866. A further office 
of Corporation Counsel was created in 1881. The office of City Solicitor 
was abolished and the department placed under the sole charge of the 
Corporation Counsel. 

The Law Department consists of a Corporation Counsel, twenty- 
seven assistant corporation counsel, a workmen's compensation agent, 
and twenty-nine other employees, including the staff of the Ad- 
ministrative, Counseling and Miscellaneous Litigation, General Trial, 
Collection and Workmen's Compensation Divisions of the Law Depart- 
ment. 

The Law Department has general charge of the legal work of the city, 
represents the city in all litigation to which it is a party, prosecutes cer- 
tain criminal proceedings, does the conveyancing work for the various 
municipal departments, provides the legal staff for the Office of Labor 
Relations performs the legal work incidental to tax title foreclosures, 
prepares and approves all municipal contracts and bonds, furnishes 
legal opinions to the Mayor and the City Council and to the various 
department heads and city officials, including the School Committee, 
on matters relating to the discharge of their official duties, prepares 
petitions for and drafts of legislation in which the city has an interest 
and appears and represents the city before the various committees of the 
legislature, and before state and federal boards, commissions and ad- 
ministrative agencies. 



94 



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION 

City Hall, Boston, MA 02201 
[Established under Chapter 772 of the Acts of 1975.] 

OFFICIALS 

Pauline Chase Harrell, Chairman 
Marcia L. Myers, Executive Director 

commissioners 
Name Nominated by 

Term Ends June 30, 1976 
Martha Rothman Boston Society of Architects 
LiBBY Blank American Institute of Planners 
Mayor (at large) 

Term Ends June 30, 1977 
Henry A. Wood Boston Society of Architects 

Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce 

Lawrence A. Bianchi Greater Boston Real Estate Board 

Term Ends June 30, 1978 

Boston Society of Landscape Architects 

Pauline Chase Harrell Society for the Preservation of New 

England Antiquities 
Luix Overbea Mayor (at large) 



Margarets. Smith 

Virginia Aldrich 
JohnF. Cooke 

Joan Goody 
Susan S. Davis 

Carl Zellner 
Roger P. Lang 



Romas Brickus 



alternates 
Society for the Preservation of New 

England Antiquities 
Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce 
Mayor (at large) 
Term Ends June 30, 1977 

Boston Society of Architects 
Boston Society of Landscape 

Architects 
American Institute of Planners 
Term Ends June 30, 1978 

Boston Society of Architects 
Greater Boston Real Estate Board 
Mayor (at large) 



Established by home rule petition, Chapter 772 of the Acts of 1975, 
the Boston Landmarks Commission is a statutory commission that pro- 
vides a continuing comprehensive preservation program for Boston; 



95 



coordinates preservation related activities currently undertaken by 
private organizations and other city departments; and develops addi- 
tional functions necessary for a serious local preservation program. 

The Commission consists of nine members and nine alternates ap- 
pointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council. Seven of the 
members and seven of the alternates must be appointed from nomina- 
tions by six organizations: two members and two alternates must be 
nominated by the Boston Society of Architects, and one member and 
one alternate from each of the Boston Society of Landscape Architects, 
the American Institute of Planners, the Society for the Preservation of 
New England Antiquities, the Greater Boston Real Estate Board, and 
the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce. The Mayor appoints two 
members and two alternates on an at-large basis. All members and alter- 
nates must be residents of Boston. They are not compensated, except 
for expenses incurred in performance of their duties. 

The Commission is placed administratively under the Boston 
Redevelopment Authority, which agency provides staff to the Commis- 
sion. 

The Commission has the power to designate, for architectural regula- 
tion, those areas, sites, and structures that are of historical, social, 
cultural architectural, or aestheic value located in the City of Boston. 
Four categories of designation may be given; Landmark, Landmark 
District, Architectural Conservation District, and Protection Area. 

The Commission is empowered to review and approve or disapprove 
proposed changes to the physical environment of designated sites and 
districts. Depending on the type of designation, changes to be reviewed 
by the Commission could include: new construction, restoration, 
demolition, aheration of exterior architectural features, and in the case 
of certain landmarks, changes to distinguished interior features. No 
building permit or sign permit shall be issued for changes to designated 
properties unless the application for permit is accompanied by either a 
Certificate of Design Approval or a Certificate of Exemption from the 
Commission. 

The Mayor may veto any designation voted by the Commission within 
fifteen days of the vote; the City Council may override a Mayoral ap- 
proval of a designation by two-thirds majority within thirty days of such 
approval. 

The Commission also assumes the responsibilities of a historical com- 
mission for the City, pursuant to Chapter 40C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws. It provides advice and technical assistance to other agen- 
cies and departments of the City; surveys and collects data concerning 
properties of architectural or historical interest; prepares reports of its 
findings; and sponsors educational activities. In addition, the Commis- 
sion may, with appropriate funds and with the approval of the Mayor 
and City Council, buy, receive, manage, and dispose of properties of ar- 
chitectural and historical value. 



96 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Office, Central Library Building, Copley Square 
[Stat. 1878, Chap. 114; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 24; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 
23; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 21; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 116; Spec. 
Stat. 1931, Chap. 50; Spec. Stat. 1943, Chap. 218; Spec. Stat. 1953, 
Chap. 167.] 

OFFICIALS 

Frank R.Maher, President 

Sidney R. Rabb, Vice-President 

Philip J. McNiff, Director, and Librarian 

TRUSTEES* 

Edward G. Murray Term ending May 1, 1972 

Sidney R. Rabb Term ending May 1, 1974 

AuGUSTiN H. Parker, Jr. Term ending May 1 , 1970 

Patricia Hagan White Term ending May 1 , 1976 

Frank B. Maher Term ending May 1 , 1978 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, five in num- 
ber, are appointed by the Mayor, one each year, for a term of five years. 
They were incorporated in 1878, and authorized to receive and hold real 
and personal estate to an amount not exceeding $1,000,000. This amount 
was changed to $10,000,000 in 1919, to $20,000,000 in 1931, and to 
$50,000,000 in 1953. The first Trustees were appointed under an ordi- 
nance of October 14, 1852. 

The old library building on Boylston street was opened to the public 
in September, 1858, and closed finally in January, 1895. The Central 
Library Building in Copley square was first opened on March 11, 1895. 
A 500,000 square foot addition to the Central Library Building was 
opened on December 12 of 1972. 

The Library is maintained by an annual appropriation made to the 
Trustees by the City Government. 

The annual reports, the first of which appeared in 1852, have been 
continued without interruption. 

the library SYSTEM 

The Hbrary system consists of the Central Library in Copley square, 
The Kirstein Business Branch in the Edward Kirstein Memorial Library 
Building at 20 City Hall avenue, twenty-six Branch Libraries, 
Bookmobile Services, Homesmobile Services to nursing homes and 
Hospital Library Service at Boston City Hospital. 
The component parts of the hbrary system are the following: 

General Administrative Offices 

General Library Services 

Research Library Services. 

Resources and Processing Services 

*The Trustees serve without compensation. 



97 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 

The general administration of the library system as a whole is centered 
in the Director's Office. There is also administered from the Director's 
Office the work of the Personnel Office, the Information and Publica- 
tion Office, the work of resources development, as well as the Business 
Operations including: 

Accounting 

Bindery 

Buildings 

Business 

Duplicatmg Systems and Data Processing 



GENERAL LIBRARY SERVICES 

These services are administered from the Central Library in Copley 
Square, which houses a 750,000-volume, open-shelf, circulating collec- 
tion, an Audio-Visual Center, and Adults', Young Adults', and 
Children's Sections. City- wide services are also provided by the twenty- 
six Branch Libraries, a Multilingual Library, one Bookmobile, two 
Homesmobiles, and the Hospital Library Services at Boston City 
Hospital. 

The Branch Libraries, Bookmobile, and two Homesmobiles are 
distributed throughout the city as follows: 

City Proper: 
Homesmobile Service 

Bookmobile Services, 380 Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown 
Hospital Library Service, Boston City Hospital 
Kirstein Business Branch, 20 City Hall Avenue 
Multilingual Library, 498 Tremont Street 
North End, 25 Parmenter Street 
South End, 685 Tremont Street 
West End, 151 Cambridge Street 

BRIGHTON: 

AUston, 161 Harvard Avenue 
Brighton, 40 Academy Hill Road 
Faneuil, 419 Faneuil Street 

CHARLESTOWN: 

Charlestown, 179 Main Street 

DORCHESTER: 

Adams Street, 690 Adams Street 
Codman Square, 690 Washington Street 
Fields Corner, 1520 Dorchester Avenue 

Lower Mills, 1110 Washington Street, corner of Richmond Street 
Mattapan, 10 Hazleton Street 

Uphams Corner, 500 Columbia Road, corner of Bird Street 
East Boston: 
East Boston, 276 Meridian Street 
Orient Heights, 18 Barnes Avenue 



98 



Hyde Park: 

Hyde Park, 35 Harvard Avenue, corner of Winthrop Street 

Jamaica Plain: 
Connolly, 433 Centre Street 
Jamaica Plain, 12 Sedgwick Street, corner of South Street 

RoxBURY-Dudley, 65 Warren Street 

Egleston Square, 2044 Columbus Avenue 
Grove Hall, 5 Crawford Street 
Parker Hill, 1497 Tremont Street 

South Boston: 
South Boston, 646 East Broadway 
Washington Village, 290 Old Colony Avenue 

West Roxbury: 
RosUndale, 4238 Washington Street 
West Roxbury, 1961 Centre Street 



RESEARCH LIBRARY SERVICES 

The more important part of the reference work of the library system 
as a whole is carried on in the Central Library. The Researcn and 
Reference activities of the Central Library are therefore considered as a 
unit which is designated as the Research Library Services. The public 
service areas are: 
Humanities 
Literature and Languages 

Religion Philosophy, and Psychology 
Social Sciences 
Economics 
Education 
History 

Maps and Geography 
Kirstein Business Branch 
Science 
Technology 
Patents 
Government Documents 
Periodicals and Newspapers 
Music 
Fine Arts 
Prints 
Rare Books and Manuscripts 



resources and processing services 
This division is responsible for the acquisition and processing of all 
library materials and for their integration into the collections of the 
Library. The division is made up of two units: 
Processing 
Resources and Acquisitions 



99 



SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 

Lectures, concerts, films, and special programs are among the full 
schedule of events held in the Central Library Lecture Hall. Several an- 
nual lecture series and the week-long Children's Books International 
bring distinguished scholars and librarians to the Boston PubUc Library 
each year. Exhibits in the Main Lobby, the Cheverus Room, the Cush- 
man Room, and in the Puvis de Chavannes, Sargent, and Wiggin 
Galleries in the Central Library building afford opportunities for em- 
phasizing the Library's valuable resources. 

The BPL Calendar of Events listing all activities in the Central Li- 
brary and Branches is distributed free throughout the system each 
month. 

STATISTICAL DATA 

City appropriation for support of the Library, 1978 $8,917,102 

For purchase of books and library materials, 1978 1,455,375 

Books lent to borrowers, 1978 1,921,463 

Employees (in full time equivalents) 550 

Number of volumes 4,472,684 

Trust Funds, approximate value 5,374,218 



CENTRAL LIBRARY 



Copley Square, 536-5400 
Print Department, Ext. 311 
Rare Books and Manuscripts 
Department, Ext. 318 



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BRANCH LIBRARIES 

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Bookmobile, 536-5400, Ext. 238 
Homesmobile 
Hospital Library Service, Boston 

City Hospital, 424-4578 
Kirstein Business Branch, 20 City 

Hall Ave., 523-0860 
MultiHngual Library, 498 Tremont 
St. 426-0963 
North End, 25 Parmenter St., 

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West End, 151 Cambridge St., 
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BRANCH LIBRARIES 

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Brighton 

AUston, 161 Harvard Ave., 782-3332 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 

Brighton, 40 Academy Hill Road, 

782-6032 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Faneuil, 419 Faneuil St., 782-6705 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 
Charlestown 

Charlestown, 179 Main St., 242-1248 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Dorchester 
Adams Street, 690Adams St., 436-6900 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 
Codman Square, 690 Washington St., 

436-8214 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Fields Corner, 1520 Dorchester Ave., 

436-2155 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Lower Mills, 1100 Washington St., 

cor. Richmond St., 298-7841 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 

Mattapan, 10 Hazelton St., 298-9218 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 
Uphams Corner, 500 Columbia Rd., 

cor. Bird St., 265-0139 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 

East Boston 
East Boston, 276 Meridian St., 

569-0271 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Orient Heights, 18 Barnes Ave., 

567-2516 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 

Hyde Park 
Hyde Park, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. 

Winthrop St., 361-2524 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Jamaica Plain 

Connolly, 433 Centre St., 522-1960 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 

Jamaica Plain, 12 Sedgwick St., cor. 

South St., 524-2053 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

ROXBURY 

Dudley, 65 Warren St., 442-6186 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

Egleston Square, 2044 Columbus 

Ave., 445-4340 10-6 10-6 10-6 10-6 9-5 cl. cl. 

GroveHall, 5 Crawford St., 427-3337 12-8 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 
Parker Hill, 1497 Tremont St., 

427-3820 10-6 10-6 10-6 12-8 9-5 cl. cl. 

South Boston 
South Boston, 636 East Broadway, 
268-0180 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

West Roxbury 

Roslindale, 4238 Washington St., 

323-2343 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

West Roxbury, 1961 Centre St., 

325-3147 12-8 10-8 10-8 12-8 9-5 9-5 cl. 

CLOSED ON HOLIDAYS 



101 



LICENSING BOARD 

Office, Room 240, City Hall 
[Sta. 1906, Chap. 291; Stat. 1909, Chap. 423; Stat. 1918, Chap. 259, 
Stat. 1921, Chap. 59; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 392, and 485; Stat. 1926 
Chap. 299; Stat. 1933, Chaps. 97, 284 and 376 (Chap. 376 is now 
the new Chap. 138 of the General Laws); General Laws, Chap. 140, 
§§2 and 202.] 

OFFICIALS 

Andrea W. Gargiulo, Chairwoman 

Gerald T. Vento, Secretary 

THE board 

Andrea W. Gargiulo Term ends in 1984 

Richard L . Arrington Term ends in 1 980 

Jon C. Straight Term ends in 1982 

The Licensing Board for the City of Boston was established by 
Statutes of 1906, Chapter. 291. It consists of three members appointed 
by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Council. They must 
be citizens of Boston who have resided in Boston for at least two years 
preceding the date of their appointment. The two principal political par- 
ties must be represented on the Board and the term of the members is 
fixed at six years after the first appointment, which was for six, four, 
and two years. The Board was created to exercise all the powers and per- 
form all the duties conferred upon the Board of PoHce of the City of 
Boston relative to intoxicating liquors (now called alcoholic beverages), 
innholders, common victuallers, billiard and pool tables, sippio tables, 
bowling alleys, intelligence offices and picnic groves. 

By Statute of 1909, Chapter 423, the Board was given the right to 
issue licenses to "Sunday dealers in ice cream, or confectionary, or soda 
water or fruit." (Repealed see c. 616 Acts of 1962.) 

By Statutes of 1918, Chapter 259, the Board was granted the right to 
issue Hcenses to lodging houses. 

By Statutes of 1922, Chapter 392, the Board was given the right to 
license "retail vendors of soft drinks." 

By Statutes of 1926, Chapter 299, the Board was given the right to 
grant entertainment license in places where such entertainment was car- 
ried on in conjunction with sale for cash of food or drink six days of 
week but not on Sundays. 

By Chapter 284 of the Acts of 1933, the Board was given authority to 
grant victuallers licenses to clubs, societies, associations or other 
organizations which dispense food and beverages on their premises, to 
their stockholders or members and their guests and to no others. 

By Chapter 376 of the Acts of 1933, now Chapter 138 of the General 
Laws, the Board was given the authority to issue alcohoHc beverage 
licenses to common victuallers, innholders, taverns, clubs, and retail 
druggist and package stores, and to suspend or revoke the same after a 
hearing. 



102 



By Statutes of 1949, Chapter 361, the Board was given the right to 
hcense mechanical amusement devices and regulate the operation 
thereof. 

By Statutes of 1953, Chapter 622, in addition to the notice which the 
Licensing Board for the City of Boston is required by law to give to the 
public concerning applications for new licenses, under Sections 12, 15 or 
30A of Chapter 138 of the General Laws, and appUcations for transfer 
of location of said hcenses, it shall also give notice of such applications 
to the state representatives of each representative district affected by the 
application, and also to such persons, groups, and organizations as have 
formally requested in writing that such notice be given them for license 
applications in a designated representative district. 

By Statutes of 1966, Chapter 729, the authority to grant employment 
office hcenses, with the exception of "not for profit class' of employ- 
ment agency, was transferred to the Department of Labor and In- 
dustries of the Commonwealth. 

By Statutes of 1969, Chapter 59, Sections 41 to 46, inclusive of 
Chapter 140 of the General Laws was repealed; and in Section 202 of 
said Chapter 140, the words "keepers of intelligence offices" to be 
stricken out. 

By Statutes of 1971, Chapter 486, the Licensing Board for the City of 
Boston was designated as the "Local Licensing Authority" under the 
provisions of said chapter (beano bill). 

[Note: Roller skating rinks, merry-go-rounds, etc., were transferred to 
the Mayor's Office by Chap. 169 of the Acts of 1936. The licensing 
of the sale of denatured alcohol for mechanical, manufacturing, 
and chemical purposes, under Section 76 of Chap. 138 of the 
General Laws, was eliminated by Section 43 of Chap. 440 of 
the Acts of 1935.] 



103 



COMMISSION ON MENTAL RETARDATION 

[Ordinances of 1970, Chapter 1] 

The Commission on Mental Retardation shall coordinate the work 
of public and private agencies dealing with the problems of children 
who are mentally retarded, and assist retarded children in any manner. 

Sophie M. Gallagher§ 

Pauline M. Sprague§ 

DOMENICK S. PASCIUCC0§ 

Lorraine Sullivan§ 
Robert Briggs§ 
Daphna Krouk§ 

Daniel E. Needam, designee of Parks and Recreation Commis- 
sioner. 

§For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the 
next biennial election at which a mayor is elected. 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT, BOSTON 

73 Tremont Street 
[Stat. 1929, Chap. 383.] 

Trustees Appointed by the Governor 
John A. Perkins, Chairman, Boston, 1975 
Robert B. Almy, Jr.. Clerk, Dedham, 1977 
Joseph Lockett, Treasurer, Wellesley, 1977 
George Larson, Reading, 1974 

Trustee Appointed by Mayor of Boston 
Vacant 



OLD SOUTH ASSOCIATION IN BOSTON 

[Stat. 1877, Chap. 222, §§ 1, 2.] 

The Mayor, ex officio. Councillors Raymond Flynn and Rosemarie 
Sansone, Managers on the part of the City of Boston. 

The association is managed by a Board of Managers, consisting of 
twenty-nine, of whom the Mayor of the City of Boston is one, ex of- 
ficio, two are elected annually by the City Council for the municipal 
year, and the others are chosen as provided by statute. 

The business of the Association is the operation of the Old South 
Meeting House on Washington Street as a historical monument. 



104 



PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Office, 802 City Hall 
[Stat. 1875, Chap. 185; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 28; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 
24; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 435, 540; Ord. 1912, Chap. 10; Ord. 1913, 
Chap. 5; Ord. 1914, Chap. 3; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 24; Ord. 1920, 
Chap. 13; Ord. 1922, Chaps. 5, 7; Stat. 1923, Chap. 309; Ord. 1923, 
Chaps. 8, 12; Ord. 1954, Chap. 2, § 37.] 



Parks and Recreation Commission 
AlanM. Austin, Commissioner of Parks and Recreation, Chairman. 
Robert McCoy,* Assistant Commissioner of Recreation 
Gerard J. Morgan,* Assistant Commissioner of Administration 
J. Leo McCarthy, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recreation. 

Term ending May 1, 1974. 
John F. Kelly, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recreation. Term 

ending May, 1979. 
James A. Smith, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recreation. Term 

ending May 1, 1976. 
Norris Strawbridge, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recreation. 

Term ending May 1, 1977. 



officials 
Alan M. Austin, Commissioner 
John F. Ruck, Executive Secretary 
Frank Clark, Chief Engineer 
Dorothy Curran, Director of Recreation 
Robert McCoy, Assistant Commissioner of Recreation 
Gerard J. Morgan, Assistant Commissioner of Administration 



The first Board of Park Commissioners was appointed on July 8, 1875. 
The Board consisted of three members who served without compensation. 
As thus constituted, the department continued up to 1913, when, by the 
provisions of Chapter 10, Ordinances of 1912, it was merged with the 
Public Grounds, Bath and Music Departments, under the name of Park 
amd Recreation Department. In 1920, the Cemetery Department was 
merged with the Park Department, the latter title being substituted for 
Park and Recreation Department. On May 1, 1954, the department be- 
came the Parks and Recreation Department. The four Associate Com- 
missioners serve with out compensation. 



* For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the 
next biennial municipal election at which a Mayor is elected. 



105 



Parks and Parkways with Location, Area and Year Acquired. 

MAIN park system 

Acres 

zArborway, Prince street to Franklin Park, 1892 17.38 

t Arnold Arboretum and Bussey Park, South, Centre and 

Walter Streets, 1882, 1895 223.00 

zBack Bay Fens, Beacon street to Brookline avenue, 1877 113.19 

t Boston Common, Tremont to Park street, Beacon, Charles 

and Boylston streets, 1634 48.40 

Commonwealth avenue, Arlington street to Kenmore street, 

1894-1905 32.00 

Franklin Park (1833-84) Blue Hill avenue, American Legion 

Highway, Forest Hills street. Walnut avenue, Columbus 

avenue and Seaver street 429.00 

zOlmsted Park, Huntington avenue to Prince street, 1890 180.00 

Public Garden, Charles to Arlington and Beacon to Boylston 

streets, 1823 24.25 

zRiverway, Brookline avenue to Huntington avenue, 1890 28.22 

West Roxbury Parkway, from Centre street, near Arboretum, 

to the Metropolitan District Commission Parkway, 1894. 

Roadway area taken by M.D.C 59.18 

Total Acres, Main Park System 1,154.62 



MARINE PARK SYSTEM 

Columbus Park 57.00 

L Street Beach 30.00 

Total Acres, Marine Park System 87.00 



MISCELLANEOUS PARKS 

*Adams, Irving W. Park, Junction of Washington and South 

streets, Roslindale, 1919 0.78 

Chestnut Hill Park, Beacon street and Commonwealth, avenue, 

Brighton, 1898-1902 33.50 

Chiswick road, Conmionwealth avenue, Sidlaw road, Brighton, 

1949 0.60 

§ Copp's Hill terraces, Commercial and Charter streets, North 

End, 1893 0.60 



t Of this park, only the roads and walks are maintained by the City. 

t This area of the Common is exclusive of the old cemetery on Boylston 
Street side containing 1.40 acres. 

zThe roadway portions of these areas have been transferred to the 
Metropolitan District Commission on October 30, 1956 under Stat. 1956, 
Chap. 581. 

*Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 

§ Children's Playground. 



106 

Acres 

*Corbett, William B. Park, between Washington and Clay- 
bourne streets streets, Dorchester, 1917 0.94 

Cummings Memorial Park, located partially in Woburn and 

Burlington, Mass., 1930 212.16 

xDoherty, Ensign, John J., Jr., Bunker Hill and Medford 

streets (4.30), 1891 4.30 

Dorchester Park, Dorchester avenue and Richmond street, 

1891-1925 27.27 

Freeport Street (Malloch's) Wharf anr ;rounds, Dorchester 

flats (1.40), 1912 1.42 

North End Beach, Commercial and Charter street (land and 

flats), 1893 6.70 

♦Ringer, Stanley A. Park, AUston street and Griggs place, 
Allston, 1916 (playground area 2.32) 10.54 

Rogers Park, Lake and Foster streets, Brighton, 1899 (play- 
ground 6.00 acres) 8.20 

Savin Hill Park, Grampian Way, Dorchester, 1909 8.26 

Statler Park, Columbus avenue, Stuart and Church streets, 

1925 0.25 

William A. Meaney Pack, Pleasant and Pond streets, Dor- 
chester, 1921 0.22 

Washington street and Monsignor Reynolds Way, South End, 

1945 0.32 

Total Area, Miscellaneous Parks 316.06 



Playgrounds and Play Areas, with Location, Area, and Year Acquired 

Almont Street Playground, Mattapan, 1924 17.81 

Alsen, Carl Henry Playground, Victory road at Park street, 

Dorchester, 1916-1943 4.27 

Amatucci, Priv. Joseph Playground, East Glenwood and Hyde 

Park avenues, Hyde Park, 1958 0.47 

American Legion Playground, Condor and Glendon streets. 

East Boston, 1924 3.38 

♦Barry, William J. Playground, Chelsea street and Mystic 

river, Charlestown, 1897 5.72 

Beecher Street Play Area, Jamaica Plain, 1942 (undeveloped) 0.18 
Billings Field, La Grange and Bellevue streets. West Roxbury, 

1896 10.83 

Boston Common, Charles Street side 3.50 

Bradford Street Play Area, South End, 1954 0.04 

Bruce Street, West Roxbury, 1945 (undeveloped) 0.80 

t Brookside Avenue Playground at Cornwall street, Jamaica 

Plain, 1925 1 .32 

♦Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1 
xNamed for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 2. 
t Children's playground. 



107 

Acres 
t Buckley, Rev. Fr. Playground, West Third and Bolton 

street. South Boston, 1952 0.65 

xByrne, Joseph M. Playground, Everett and Elm streets, Dor- 
chester, 1939 1.16 

Carleton and Canton streets. South End, 1945 0.05 

Carroll Pond, Carrolton Rd., West Roxbury (undeveloped), 

1921 0.47 

Carson street, Dorchester, 1945 0.47 

♦Carter, William E. Playground, Columbus avenue at Camden 

street, 1899 4.95 

fxCassidy, Walter F. (Chestnut Hill) Playground, Beacon 

streets, Brighton, 1898 9.44 

Ceylon Street Playground, Ceylon and Intervale streets, Dor- 
chester, 1923 4.03 

t Charter Street Playground, Charter street and Greenough 

Lane, North End, 1940 0.25 

Clifford, Edv^ard P. Playground, Norfolk avenue and Proctor 

street, Roxbury, 1909 7.60 

Columbus Point Playground, at Columbia Point Housing 

Project, 1970 33.29 

t Columbus Park, South Boston 57.00 

♦Connolly, John J. Playground, Marcella and Highland 

streets, Roxbury, 1903 5. 10 

Crawford Street Playground, Crawford street and Walnut 

avenue, Roxbury, 1965-1966 2.64 

♦Cronin, James L. Playground, Brent street, at Wainwright 

street, Dorchester, 1899 2.24 

Cumston Street Play Area, South End, 1952 0.02 

*t Cutillo. Vincent Playground, Morton and Stillman streets. 

North End, 1917 0.29 

♦JDeFilippo, Private John Playground (Snow Hill street). 

North End, 1937 1.13 

♦Doherty, John A. Playground, Dorchester and Geneva ave- 
nues, 1897 1.47 

t xDoherty, Ensign John J., Jr. Playground, Bunker Hill and 

Medford streets, Charlestown Heights, 1891 4.30 

t Dorchester Park, Dorchester avenue and Richmond street, 

1891 5.40 

Douglass Court Play Area, North End, 1952 0.01 

Dover Street Extension— Bath— Land, 1952 0.06 

Downer Avenue Playground, Downer avenue and Hancock 

street, Dorchester, 1972 0.78 

Draper, Mary Playground, Washington and Stimson streets. 

West Roxbury, 1932 5.76 

* Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 

t Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 

X Children's playground. 

X Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 2. 



108 

Acres 
East Boston Memorial Stadium, Porter street, East Boston, 

1954 17.67 

Edwards Playground, Mead, Main, and Eden streets, Charles- 
town 1 .26 

Erie-Ellington Street Playground, Erie and Ellington streets, 

Roxbury 0.12 

Eustis Street Play Area, Eustis street, Roxbury 0.23 

Factory Hill Playground, Town and Sunnyside streets, Hyde 

Park, 1912 5.20 

♦Fallon Field, South and Robert streets, Roslindale, 1899 and 

1931 7.57 

t Foster Street Playground, Foster street, place and court, 

North End, 1930 0.10 

Franklin Field, Blue Hill and Talbot avenues, Dorchester, 1892 . . 45.59 

t Franklin Park, 1883-1884 (Playstead) 22.00 

Gallagher, Alice E. Memorial Park, Brighton, 1937-1943-1948 16.51 
*Garvey, William H. Playground, Neponset avenue, opposite 

Chickatawbut street, Dorchester, 1896 5.33 

Gibson, Christopher, Playground, Dorchester and Geneva 

avenues, 1897 4.34 

Hannon, Mary Playground, Howard avenue and Folsom 

street, Dorchester, 1940-1945 1.69 

Hanson Street Play Area, Hanson street, South End, 1957 .... 0.07 

Harrison avenue, 624-634, South End Play Area (1950) 0. 12 

Harvard, John Mall, Main street, near City Square, Charles- 
town, 1943 0.85 

*Healy, James F. Playground, Washington street and Firth 

road, Roslindale, 1902 9.63 

Hemenway, Mary Playground, Adams street, Dorchester, 1919 . . 4.41 

Hill and Cook Streets Play Area, Charlestown, 1942 0. 10 

Hobart Street Play Area, Hobart and Ranelegh roads, Brighton, 

1970 0.60 

Holyoke Street Play Area, South end, 1951 0.04 

Howes, Gertrude Playground, Winthrop, Fairland and More- 
land streets, Roxbury, 1930 1.88 

Hynes, Thomas J. Playground, V. F. W. Parkway at Brucewood 

street, West Roxbury, 1950 6.42 

Jefferson Playground, Heath, Crawford and Floyd streets, 

Roxbury, 1924 4.38 

Joyce, William F. Playground, Union street, Brighton, 1949 .... 1.31 

King Street Play Area, Roxbury, 1943 0.32 

Lambert Avenue Playground, Lambert avenue, Millmont and 

Dorr streets, Roxbury 0.68 

Lasell street at Addington road. West Roxbury, vacant land, 

1958 0.09 



* Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 

t Children's playground. 

t Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 



109 

Acres 
pLee, Major Christopher J. Playground, First street at M street, 

South Boston, 1897 5.20 

J Lee, Joseph Playground, the Fens, Back Bay, 1877 5.00 

Little Scobie Playground, Dunreath and Copeland street, 

Roxbury 0.79 

London and Decatur streets Play Area, East Boston, 1941 0. 13 

Mason School Site, Roxbury, 1970 0.44 

*c|4 McConnell Park (including Comerford Field), Springdale 

and Denny streets (land and flats), 1899, 1914, including 

beach 57.40 

McKinney Playground, Faneuil street, Brighton, 1930 5.94 

FxMcLaughlin, Joseph D. Playground, Parker Hill and Fisher 

avenues, Roxbury, 1912 1 1 .54 

*t McLean, Arthur F. Playground, Saratoga and Bennington 

streets, near Moore street. East Boston, 1917 0.43 

Mission Hill Playground, Tremont and Smith streets, Roxbury, 

1913-1915-1947 2.75 

Mt. Pleasant Avenue Play Area, Mt. Pleasant avenue, Roxbury . 0.26 
Mozart Street Play Area, Centre and Mozart streets, Roxbury, 

1959 0.81 

*Murphy, John W. Playground, Carolina avenue, Jamaica Plain, 

1912 4.17 

Myrtle Street Play Area, WestEnd, 1949 0.17 

t North End Beach and Playground, Commercial street, 1893 .. . 3.00 
Noyes, John H. L. Playground, Saratoga and Boardman streets. 

East Boston (land and flats), 1909 8.31 

Oak Square Playground, Brighton, 1948 1.48 

O'Day, Thomas F. Playground, Pembroke street, near Tremont 

street, 1960 0.87 

t Ohnsted Park, Jamaicaway, 1890 3.00 

t Paris Street Playground, East Boston, 1912 1 .27 

t Parkman, Francis Playground, Wachusett street. Forest Hills, 

1924 2.06 

Paul Gore street, Jamaica Plain, 1913 (undeveloped) 0.74 

Penniman and Hano streets, Brighton, 1945 0.94 

t Phillips Street Play Area, West End, 1941 0.13 

i Pitts and Hale Streets Play Area, West End, 1942 0. 10 

APlympton Street Play Area, South End, 1926 0.09 

Polcari, Capt. Louis Playground, North Bennett and Prince 

streets. North End, 1897 0.40 

Poplar and Hillside Streets, Roslindale, 1951 0.44 

A Acquired by gift. 

* Named for U. S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 

X Named for U. S. serviceman killed in World War No. 2. 

t Children's playground. 

t Playgrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 

|4 The beach section of this area was turned over to the M.D.C. of the 
Commonwealth under Chap. 92, Sec. 87, G. L. Final transfer not com- 
pleted. 

c The playground area named Comerford Field, July 1960. 

F Little League area named Sp4 Martin F. Killilea Field. 



110 



Acres 

Portsmouth Street Playground, Brighton, 1912 4.29 

Quincy Street Play Area, 61-71 Quincy Street, Roxbury 0.54 

Quincy and Stanley Streets, Dorchester, 1955 0.38 

Readville Playground, Milton and Readville streets, Hyde 

Park, 1924 5.03 

Revere, Paul Mall, Hanover and Unity streets. North End, 

1925 0.76 

tRinger, Stanley A. Playground, Allston street and Griggs 

place, Brighton, 1916 2.32 

Ringgold Street Play Area, Ringgold, Waltham and Hanson 

streets, Boston, 1965 0.38 

ARipley Playground, Ripley road, near Harvard street, Dor- 
chester, 1913 0.86 

Roberts, Thomas J. Playground, Dunbar avenue, Dorchester, 

1930 10.20 

tRogers Park, Lake and Foster streets, Brighton, 1899-1931 . . 6.60 
Ronan Park, (formerly Mt. Ida), Adams street and Mt. Ida 

road, Dorchester, 1912 11.65 

xRoss, Wesley G. Playground, Westminister street, near 

Wood avenue, Hyde Park, 1936 13.03 

*Rotch, Lester J. Playground, Albany and Randolph streets, 

South End, 1903 2.80 

Rutherford Avenue and Union Streets, Charlestown, 1951 .. . 0.21 
xRyan, John J., Jr. Playground, Main and Alford streets, 

Charlestown, (land and flats), 1891 12.38 

Ryan, Robert F. , Play Area, Harbor View street at Dorchester 

avenue, Dorchester, 1960 0.64 

St. James Street Park, Roxbury, 1966 0.40 

Saratoga Street, undeveloped, Saratoga and Byron streets. 

East Boston, 1969 0.23 

Smith's Pond Playground, Brainard near Cleveland street, 

Hyde park, 1914 12.91 

*Smith, William F. Playground, Western avenue and North 

Harvard street, Brighton, 1894 14.00 

Sorrento, Hooker and Goddard streets, Brighton, 1951 1.00 

Sumner and Lamson Streets, East Boston, 1955 0.48 

*JSweeney, Matthew J. Playground, West Fifth street, South 

Boston, 1909 0.47 

Thetford Avenue and Evans Street, Dorchester, 1955 (unde- 
veloped) 0.66 

Thornton Street, Roxbury — no. 134 (undeveloped), 1941 0.06 

Townsend Street Plaza, at Humboldt avenue, Roxbury, 1966. 0.62 
Vernon Street, Roxbury, between Cabot and Lamont streets 

(undeveloped), 1941 0.40 

A Acquired by gift. 

*Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 

^Children's playground. 

xNamed for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 2. 

tPlaygrounds located in parks, and included in areas of parks. 



Ill 

Acres 
♦Walker, George H. Playground, Norfolk street, opposite 

Evelyn street, Mattapan, 1912 6.12 

Walnut Park Play Area, Walnut Park at Walnut avenue, Rox- 

bury, 1965 0.32 

xxWalsh, William Gary Playground, Gallivan Boulevard, 

corner Washington street, Dorchester, 1946 6.97 

Washington and Stimson streets. West Roxbury, 1938 0.30 

West Rutland Square Play Area, South End, 1953 0.13 

tWest Third Street Playground at B street. South Boston, 

1909 0.23 

Wilkes Street Play Area, South End, 1954 0.06 

Winthrop, John Playground, Dacia and Danube streets, Dor- 
chester, 1911 1.57 

WoodcHff Street Play Area, at Howard avenue, Dorchester, 

1965 0.09 

Wright, George Golf Course, West street, Hyde Park, 1930- 

1931 158.48 

Total area of the 118 Playgrounds and Play Areas (Acres) 750.36 

Area of 10 Playgrounds in Parks (Acres) 63.96 

Area of the 108 Separate Playgrounds (Acres) 686.40 

The first separate playground acquired by the City was the 
Charlestown Playground, purchased in 1891 for $172,923. With that in- 
cluded, 121 playgrounds (111 separate and 10 located in parks) have 
been established, most of them equipped with first-class shelter and 
sanitary buildings containing lockers, also drinking fountains, shower 
baths, etc. 

Recreation Centers, Beaches, Pools and Public Baths 
Recreation Centers 

Brighton Municipal Building 

Cabot Street, Roxbury 

Columbia Road, Dorchester 

Curtis Hall, Jamaica Plain 

Hyde Park, Municipal Building 

J.J. WilHams Building, South End 

Lexington Street, Charlestown 

North Bennett Street, North End 

Paris Street, East Boston 

Roslindale Municipal Building 

South Boston Municipal Building 

Vine Street, Roxbury 

Tobin Memorial Building, Roxbury 
Beaches and Swimming Pools 

Curtis Hall Pool, indoor 

Charlestown Pool, outdoor 

xxNamed for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 2. Congres- 
sional medal of honor. 
X Children's playground 
*Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 



112 

North End Pool, outdoor 
L Street beach (3 beaches — men, women, boys) 
L Street Solarium (men, women) 
Public Baths 

Brighton Municipal Building 
Cabot Street, Roxbury 
Columbia Road, Dorchester 
Copley School, Charlestown 
Curtis Hall, Jamaica Plain 
Dover Street, South End 
Hyde Park Municipal Building 
Lexington Street, Charlestown 
North Bennett Street, North End 
Paris Street, East Boston 
Roslindale Municipal Building 
South Boston Municipal Building 
Tobin, Maurice J. Memorial Building 
Vine Street, Roxbury 
Williams, John J. Building, South End 

Public Grounds, Squares, etc., with Locations and Areas 

CITY proper Square 

Feet 
Blackstone Square, Washington street, between West Brook- 
line and West Newton streets 105,100 

Braddock Park, between Columbus avenue and N.Y., N.H. 

& H.R.R 3,800 

City Hall Grounds, School street 7,700 

Harriet Tubman Square, Columbus and Warren avenues 2,200 

Concord Square, between Tremont street and Columbus 

avenue 5,005 

Copley Square, between Huntington avenue, Bolyston and 

Dartmouth streets 28,399 

Dock and Faneuil squares 707 

Franklin Square, Washington street, between East Brookline 

and East Newton streets 105,205 

Abraham Lincoln Square (formerly Park Square), Columbus 

avenue, Ehot street and Broadway 2,867 

Massachusetts Avenue Malls, four sections, between Albany 

street and Columbus avenue 106,500 

Angell Memorial Square 6,747 

Rachael Revere Square, North End, 1945 3,509 

Rutland Square, between Tremont street and Columbus 

avenue 7,400 

St. Stephen Square, corner St. Stephen street and Symphony 

road 100 

Trinity Triangle, Huntington and St. James avenues, 1885 7,841 

Union Park, between Tremont street and Shawmut avenue. . . 16,(XX) 
Waltham Square, Harrison avenue, opposite Union Park 

street 3,000 

Worcester Square, between Washington street and Harrison 

avenue 16,000 

Total 428,125 



113 

BRIGHTON Square 

Brighton Square, Chestnut Hill avenue and Academy Hill Feet 

road 25,035 

♦Cunningham, Edward M., Square, Cambridge, Murdock 

and Sparhawk streets 7,449 

Fern Square, between Franklin and Fern streets 1 ,900 

Jackson Square, Chestnut Hill avenue, Union and Winship 

streets 4,300 

P.F.C. Kevin Barry Hardiman Square, Washington and 

Faneuil streets 9,796 

Public Ground, Cambridge and Henshaw streets 1 ,434 

II William Boyden Park, Commonwealth avenue at Lake 

Street Extension — 

Total 49,914 

CHARLESTOWN 

City Square, junction of Main and Park streets 8,739 

Essex Square, Essex and Lyndeboro streets 930 

Hayes Square, Bunker Hill and Vine streets 4,848 

Sullivan Square, Main, Cambridge, Sever and Gardner streets 14,542 

Winthrop Square, Winthrop, Common and Adams streets. . . 38,450 

Total 67,145 

DORCHESTER 

Algonquin Square, Algonquin and Bradlee streets 1,728 

* Andrew, Henry, Square, Adams and Granite streets 2,068 

Centervale Park, Upland avenue and Bourneside street 9,740 

Coppens, Reverend Francis X., Square, Adams and Bowdoin 

streets (Formerly Eaton Square) 13,280 

*Denton, Gordon E., Square, Magnolia street 3,605 

♦Donovan, John F., Park, Meeting House Hill 56,200 

Drohan Square, Edison Green 10,241 

Florida Street Reservation, King to Ashmont streets 

(7 sections) 24,193 

*Kane, Francis G., Square, Bowdoin, Winter and Hancock 

streets 1,600 

Mt. Bowdoin Green, summit of Mt. Bowdoin 25,170 

*01son, Fred C. W., Square, junction of Adams street and 

Gallivan Boulevard 700 

Peabody Square, Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue 1,963 

Richardson Square, between Pond and Cottage streets 46,035 

Monsignor O'Donnell Square, junction of Freeport street and 

Neponset avenue 6,263 

(Town meeting Park) see "Miscellaneous Parks" 
Tremlett Square, Tremlett street, between Hooper and Wal- 

deck streets 7,107 

Wellesley Park, Wellesley park 28,971 

Total 238,864 

♦Named for U.S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 
1 1 Part of Chestnut Hill Park. 



114 



EAST BOSTON Square Feet 

Brophy, Michael J., Park, Webster, Sumner, Lamson and 

Seaver streets 30.000 

Central Square, Meridian and Border streets 40,310 

Maverick Square, Sumner and Maverick streets 4,396 

Prescott Square, Trenton, Eagle and Prescott streets 12,284 

Putnam Square, Putnam, White and Trenton streets 1 1,628 

Total 98,618 



HYDE PARK 

Lt. Robert M. Foley Square, junction of Greenwood street 

and Central avenue 220 

* Jones, Lieut. Parker B., Square, Milton avenue and High- 
land street 220 

Webster Square, junction of Webster street and Central avenue . . 220 

Williams Square, Williams avenue and Prospect street 700 

Wolcott Square, Hyde Park avenue, Milton and Prescott streets . 220 
♦Woodworth, Horace Campbell, Square, Beacon street and 

Metropolitan avenue 220 

Total 1,800 



ROXBURY 

Cedar Square, Cedar street, between Juniper and Thornton streets . 26 , 1 63 
Elm Hill Avenue Tree Reservation, between Seaver and Schuyler 

streets 2,650 

Elm Hill Park, off 550 Warren street 6,920 

*Hanlon, Francis G., Square, junction of Huntington avenue, 

Tremont and Francis streets 1 ,662 

Harris, Horatio, Walnut avenue, Munroe, Townsend and 

Harold streets 1 10,040 

Heath, General, Square, Old Heath, New Heath and Parker 

streets 2,416 

Highland Park, Fort avenue and Beech Glen street 158,421 

Joslin Park, Deaconess road and Brookline avenue 13,500 

Kittredge, Alvah Park, Highland street and Highland avenue . 5,600 

Linwood Park, Centre and Linwood streets 3,625 

Orchard Park, Chadwick, Orchard Park and Yeoman streets . 108,545 

Public Ground, corner Blue Hill avenue and Seaver street .... 2,500 

Walnut Park, between Washington street and Walnut avenue . 5,736 

Warren Square, Warren, St. James and Regent streets 1,380 

Washington Park, Dale and Bainbridge streets 396,125 

♦Wolf, Herbert J., Square, Crawford, Abbotsford and Harold 

streets 966 

Total 846,249 

♦Named for U. S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 



115 

SOUTH BOSTON Square Feet 

Independence Square, Broadway, Second, M and N streets . . . 279,218 

Lincoln Square, Emerson, Fourth and M streets 9,510 

Thomas Park, Telegraph Hill (Dorchester Heights) 190,000 

Total 478,728 



WEST ROXBURY 

Duffie, Arthur, Square, Clement avenue, West Roxbury 2,200 

*Gustav Emmet Square, S. Conway, S. Fairview and Robert 

streets 750 

♦Mahoney, Cornelius J., Square, Centre and Perkins streets . . 3,200 

Oakview Terrace, off Centre street 5,287 

Soldiers' Monument Lot, South and Centre streets, Jamaica 

Plain 5,870 

Total 17,307 

Total area of PubHc Grounds, etc., 2,222,697 Square 
Feet, or 51.03 Acres. 



RECAPITULATION 

Acres 
Parks and Parkways: 

Main Park System 1,154.62 

Marine Park System 87.00 

Miscellaneous Parks 316.06 

Playgrounds (separate) 686.40 

Public Grounds, Squares, etc 51.03 

Grand total (acres) 2,295. 1 1 



Monuments and Memorials Belonging to City, Located on 
Public Grounds 

Year 
Name or Designation and Location Erected Artist or Architect 

Blackstone Memorial Tablet, Boston 

Common 1914 R. Clipston Sturgis 

Crispus Attucks and Other Patriots 

of 1770, Boston Common (Boston 

Massacre) 1 888 Robert Kraus 

William Ellery Channing, Public Garden . 1903 Herbert Adams 
Patrick A. Collins Memorial, Common- Henry H. Kitson 

wealth Ave 1908 T. Alice Kitson 

Declaration of Independence Tablet, 

Boston Common 1925 John F. Paramino 

Dorchester Heights (Revolutionary), 

Telegraph Hill, South Boston 1902 Peabody and Stearns 

Ether Memorial, Public Garden 1867 John Q. A. Ward 

Football Tablet, Boston Common 1925 

*Named for U. S. serviceman killed in World War No. 1. 



116 



Curtis Guild Memorial Entrance, Boston 

Common 1917 

John Harvard Tablet, John Harvard 

Mall, Charlestown 

Kosciuszko Tablet, Public Garden 1927 

Lafayette Tablet, Boston Common .... 1924 
Abraham Lincoln and Emancipation, 

Abraham Lincoln Sq 1879 

Donald MacKay, Castle Island 

John Boyle O'Reilly, Back Bay Park ... 1896 
Francis Parkman Memorial, Olmsted 

Park, Jamaica Plain 1906 

George F. Parkman Memorial Band- 
stand, Boston Common 1912 

Paul Revere, Paul Revere Mall, Boston . 1940 
Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and 54th 

Mass. Regiment, Boston Commonl897 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 

Boston Common 1877 

Soldiers' Monument, Charlestown, Win- 

thropSq 1872 

Soldiers' Monument, Dorchester, Meeting 

House Hill 1867 

Soldiers' Monument, Jamaica Plain, 

Centre and South Sts., Jamaica Plain 1871 
George Robert White Memorial, PubUc 

Garden 1924 

Founding of Boston Memorial Tablet, 

Boston Common 1930 



Cram and Ferguson 

Mrs. T. A. R. Kitson 
John F. Paramino 

Thomas Ball 
W. T. Aldrich 
Daniel C. French 

Daniel C. French 

Robinson and Shepard 
Cyrus E. DaUin 
Augustus Saint Gaudens 
McKim, Mead & White 

Martin Milmore 

Martin Milmore 

D. F. D wight 

W. W. Lummis 

Daniel C. French 

John F. Paramino 



Statues Belonging to City, Located in Parks and Public Grounds 

Year 
Name Location Erected Artist 

Samuel Adams, Adams Sq 1880 Anne Whitney 

Robert Bums, Back Bay Fens 1919 Henry H. Kitson 

Colonel Thomas Cass, Public Garden 1899 Richard E. Brooks 
John Endicott, Back Bay Fens (at Forsyth 

Way) 1937 Jennewien 

Leif Ericsson, Commonwealth Ave 1886 Aime Whitney 

Edward Everett, Richardson Pk 1867 William W. Story 

Admiral David G. Farragut, Marine Park, 

South Boston 1895 Henry H. Kitson 

Benjamin Franklin, City Hall Grounds ... 1856 Richard S. Greenough 
William Lloyd Garrison, Commonwealth 

Ave 1886 Olin L, Warner 

General John Glover, Commonwealth Ave. 1 875 Martin Milmore 

Edward Everett Hale, Public Garden ... 1913 Bela L. Pratt 

Alexander Hamilton, Commonwealth Ave. 1865 William Rimmer 

Wendell Phillips, Public Garden 1915 Daniel C. French 



117 



Josiah Quincy, City Hall Grounds 1879 Thomas Ball 

Charles Sumner, Public Garden 1878 Thomas Ball 

General Joseph Warren, Warren Sq., Rox- 

bury 1904 Paul W. Bartlett 

George Washington,* Garden 1869 Thomas Ball 

John Winthrop, Marlborough St. at Berkeley 

St., First Church Grounds 1880 Richard S. Greenough 

Labor Group,** Franklin Park 1930 Daniel G. French 

Science Group,** Frankhn Park 1930 Daniel G. French 

(West Street Plaza Group), Boston Com- 
mon 1961 Cassieri & DiBiccari 

*Equestrian Statue. 

♦♦Removed from Old Post Office Building in Boston to the Zoologi- 
cal Garden. 



Fountains Belonging to City, Located on Public Grounds 

Brewer Fountain, Boston Common. 

Coppenhagen Memorial Fountain, Richardson square. 

Johnson Memorial Fountain and Gateway, entrance to Back Bay 
Park, Westland avenue. 

"Maid of the Mist" and three other fountains, PubHc Garden. 

West Street, Parkman Plaza, at Boston Common. 
One fountain on each of the following locations: — 

Blackstone, Franklin, and Reverend Franxis X. Coppens squares and 
Rayman Fountain and Union Park. 



Bridges Located in Parks and Parkways 
Public Garden 
Foot Bridge, over Pond. 

The Fens 
Boylston, over outlet of the Fens. 
Fens, over outlet of Muddy River. 

River way 
Bellevue, over Muddy River from Francis street. 
Brookline avenue, over Muddy River. 
Berners street Foot Bridge, over Muddy River. 
Berners street Foot Bridge, over Bridle Path. 

Olmsted Park 
Foot Bridges at Leverett Pond and over outlets of Willow Pond and 
Ward's Pond. 

Franklin Park 
EUicott Arch, carrying Circuit Drive over walk at EUicottdale. 



118 

Forest Hills, carrying entrance to Franklin Park over traffic road. 

Scarboro, carrying Circuit Drive over Scarboro Pond. 

Scarboro Pond Foot Bridge, carrying the walk over Scarboro Pond. 

George H. Walker Playground 

Foot Bridge over Midland Division of New York, New Haven &. Hart- 
ford Railroad. 



CEMETERY DIVISION 

The burying grounds, cemeteries and tombs which are owned by and 
in charge of the City of Boston are as follows, with a total area of about 
7,000,000 square feet: 

Square Estab- 
Feet lished 

Bennington Street, East Boston 157,500 1838 

Bunker Hill, Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 48,202 1807 

Central, Boston Common, City 60,693 1756 

Copp'sHill, Hull street, City 89,015 1659 

Dorchester North, Uphams Corner, Dorchester 142,587 1633 

Dorchester South, Dorchester avenue, near Gallivan 

Boulevard, Dorchester 95,462 1814 

Eliot, Eustis street, Roxbury 34,830 1630 

Evergreen, Commonwealth avenue, near Wade street, 

Brighton 604,520 1848 

Fairview, Fairview avenue, Hyde Park, about 50 acres . . 1892 

Granary, Tremont street, City 82,063 1660 

Hawes, Emerson street. South Boston 11,232 1816 

King's Chapel, Tremont street, City 19,344 1630 

Market Street, Brighton 18,072 1764 

Mount Hope, Walk Hill, Paine and Canterbury streets, 

125 acres and 14,330 square feet 1851 

Phipps Street, Charlestown 76,740 1630 

South End South, Washington street, near East Newton 

street, City 64,670 1810 

Union, East Fifth street. South Boston 5,470 1841 

Walter Street, West Roxbury 35,100 171 1 

Westerly, Centre street. West Roxbury 39,450 1683 



CITY TOMBS 

Twenty-five in the South Ground, six in Phipps Street Ground, 
Charlestown; one tomb for infants in South Ground; one tomb for in- 
fants and one for adults in Copp's Hill Ground; one for adults and one 
for infants in the Granary Ground; one for infants in King's Chapel 
Ground; one for infants in the Central Ground; two receiving tombs in 
East Boston; one receiving tomb in Dorchester North; one receiving 
tomb in Dorchester South; one receiving tomb in Evergreen Cemetery, 
Brighton; one receiving tomb in Mount Hope Cemetery, and one receiv- 
ing tomb in Fairview Cemetery, Hyde Park. 



119 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT 

Office, 276 City Hall 
[Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, Sec. 14; Stat. 1896, Chap. 536, Sec. 9; Stat. 
1897. Chap. 395, Sec. 5; Stat. 1928, Chap. 389; Ord. 1924, Chap. 9; 
Rev, Ord. 1961, Chap. 20.] 

William R. Celester, Commissioner 

The Penal Institutions Department is under the direction of the Penal 
Institutions Commissioner who is the executive and administrative head 
of the department and exercises the power and performs the duties pro- 
vided by statute. The Suffolk County House of Correction at Deer 
Island is under his control and he is also charged with paroling power 
for inmates, serving sentences of less than twelve months at the House 
of Correction and the Suffolk County Jail. 

House of Correction 
John Seay, Superintendent 

The Suffolk County House of Correction is located at Deer Island, 
which is part of Boston, adjacent to the Town of Winthrop, and covers 
about 67.5 acres. The institution dates from 1895 and now includes land 
and buildings valued at $2,221,600; land appraised at $448,900, and 
buildings at $1,722,700. 



COMMISSION ON THE 
PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED 

[ORDINANCES OF 1971, CHAPTER 3] 

The Commission on the Physically Handicapped shall coordinate the 
work of all pubHc and private agencies deahng with the needs and prob- 
lems of the physically handicapped. 

Dr. Murray M. Freed, Chairman 

Joseph Marrone 

Harold S. Remmes 

Doris Sarkisian 

Robert J. Scott 

Edward T. Sullivan, ex officio 

ViviENNE S. Thomson 

Robert Williams 



120 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley Street 

[Stat. 1878, Chap. 244; Stat. 1885, Chap. 323; Stat. 1906, Chap. 291; 
Stat. 1938, Chap. 377; Stat. 1962, Chap. 322; Stat. 1964, 
Chap. 739] 

Joseph M. Jordan, Police Commissioner 

Daniel J. MacDonald, Superintendent-in-Chief 

Bureau Chiefs 

Superintendent, JohnF. Kreckler 

Superintendent, John Doyle 
Superintendent, Paul J. Russell 
The Police Department is responsible for the prevention of crime, the 
investigation of crime, the apprehension of criminals, the maintenance 
of order, the enforcement of laws and statutes, the enhancement of the 
public safety, and the public safety, and the provision of other police 
and emergency services. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The department is organized into four major entities: the Office of 
the Commissioner, the Bureau of Field Services, the Bureau of In- 
vestigative Services, and the Bureau of Administrative Services. 

Definitions: For the purpose of this order, the terms that follow are 
defined as noted: 

Department: The Boston Police Department. 

Bureau: The first level of command under the PoUce Commis- 
sioner, responsible for coordinating and directing a major grouping of 
like activities in the department. 

Division: The second level of command responsible for a broad type 
of police activity and/or a large geographical area of the city. 

District: A geographical area of the city to which field personnel 
and other resources are assigned in sufficient quantity to provide general 
police services on a twenty- four basis. 

Section: A part of the division, district, or office with ongoing 
responsibility for a particular function. 

Unit: A group of personnel and resources organized to perform a 
special task. 

Platoon: A group of officers composing the work force of a district 
for a particular period of the day and containing its own supervisory 
and command officers. 

Squad: A group of officers under the command of a sergeant for an 
operational task. 

Sector: A geographical area of variable size within a district to 
which is assigned one or more radio cars. 

Beat: A geographical area of variable size within a district to which 
is assigned one or more officers for patrol purposes. 



121 



OFFICE OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 

The office of the Commissioner consists of the Commissioner and the 
following sections: 

1. Staff Section: 

(A) Administrative Unit is responsible for managing and coor- 
dinating the activities of the Police Commissioner's Office, coor- 
dinating correspondence to and from the Department, managing ap- 
pointments for the Commissioner, and providing an effective working 
relationship with the Bureau of Administrative Service and the Bureau 
of Investigative Service. The Unit has the general responsibility to assist 
the Commissioner in developing programs to improve the quaUty of 
police service and in reviewing and evaluating recommendations made 
by other units as to their feasibility and completeness. 

(B) Informational Services Unit is responsible for keeping members 
of the department and the pubUc informed of police activities by 
pubHshing an employee newsletter and by maintaining liaison with the 
news media by preparing and disseminating news releases, coordinating 
news conferences and requests for interviews and coverage. It prepares 
slide shows, movies, brochures, displays and booklets and coordinates a 
Speaker's Bureau and tours of police facilities. A Crime Prevention Sec- 
tion provides advice to citizens on personal and property protection. 

(C) Operations Unit is responsible for coordinating management of 
the department's field services through the Bureau of Field Services and 
for evaluating and assisting in the development of programs to improve 
the quality of enforcement activities and service delivery. 

2. Labor Relations Section represents the Commissioner at 
employee collective bargaining negotiations, conferences, and grievance 
discussions and assists in the development of policies regarding labor 
relations and negotiations. It advises command officers to ensure their 
compliance with the provisions of the various collective bargaining 
agreements and works to resolve grievances at the unit or district level 
when possible. 

3. Legal Affairs Section maintains liaison with the city Law Depart- 
ment, other criminal justice agencies and local bar associations, en- 
couraging their participation in the development of responses to the 
legal problems of the police. It formulates legislative programs and par- 
ticipates in the legislative process. It prepares and revi-^ws contracts and 
agreements, produces or formulates legal opinions and provides the 
Commissioner with a legal perspective on policy matters. Legal Affairs 
personnel assist in the development of law-related training programs 
and bulletins and provide legal advice to sworn members concerning ar- 
rests, warrants, searches and case presentations. The Legal Advisor 
represents the department in selected civil litigation. 

4. Special Investigations Unit is responsible for providing the Com- 
missioner with complete and accurate information on the maintenance 
of integrity in the department. It seeks out information regarding cor- 
ruption in the department, investigates throughly and aggressively all in- 
stances in which a member is reported or suspected of having accepted a 
bribe or of other involvement in criminal activity, and reports its 
findings to the Commissioner. It also monitors the efforts and effec- 



122 



tiveness of all police commanders to combat corruption, looks for 
weaknesses in the department that may encourage its existence, and 
make appropriate recommendations to the Commissioner. 

5. Management and Budget Section is responsible for budgeting, 
auditing and analysis of all department programs. It also operates data 
processing systems, prepares statistical reports, seeks to ensure accuracy 
of official reports and records and works to develop improved manage- 
ment systems. This section is divided into four subsections each having a 
specific responsibility. 

A. Auditing and Finance Section Prepares the department budget, 
monitors expenditures, audits all vouchers paid by the department, en- 
cumbers all accounts and appropriations, initiates and processes orders 
for payment. 

B. Purchasing and Inventory Section coordinates the acquisition in- 
ventory, and disposition of department property. 

C. Systems Analysis and Programming Section is responsible for 
analysis, design, programming and implementation of all computer 
systems. 

D. Data Processing Section maintains computer systems to provide 
management information and controls. 

1. Computer Operations Unit uses computers to maintain files 
and produce reports responsive to the information needs of the de- 
partment. It is a twenty-four, seven-day operation and is available to 
street officers via on-line terminals in the Operations Section. 

2. The Field Reports Unit reviews, codes, routes, and prepares 
data received from other units for the Data Collection Unit. 

3. The Data Collection Unit keypunches and verifies all docu- 
ments necessary for maintaining computer files and delivers its output 
to the computer facility. 

4. Data Control Unit disseminates computer-produced reports 
for internal use in or from crime reporting and other governmental 
agencies. It is also responsible for all computer library maintenance, 
computer-run preparation, scheduling and error correction, geo- 
graphic base-file maintenance, and historical crime statistics. 

6. Community Disorders Unit is responsible for providing the Com- 
missioner with complete and accurate information concerning disorders 
in the community. It monitors the department's response to community 
disorders, analyzes reports, and maps incidents. It also develops 
strategies to effectively deal with ongoing disorders. Members of the 
unit will assist districts in investigating incidents that are complex or of a 
violent nature. 

BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 

The Bureau of Field Services has primary responsibility for delivery 
of effective and efficient police services to the community. 

This bureau is responsible for providing general police services 
throughout the city, and is divided into eight divisions. 

Division A — Area Command: Districts 7 and 15 

Division B — Area Command: District 1 



123 



Division C — Area Command: Districts 4 and 14 
Division D — Area Command: Districts 2 and 3 
Division E — Area Command: Districts 6 and 11 
Division F — Area Command: Districts 5 and 13 
Division G — 

(A) The Tactical Patrol Force which comprises two specialized units: 

(1) The Anti-Crime Unit functions as a selective enforcement 
group concentrating on the reduction of street crimes and rob- 
beries throughout the city. The unit supplements regular 
patrol, plainclothes and anti-crime forces in selected areas, has 
canine capability, and is specially equipped and trained for 
emergencies. 

(2) The Emergency Service Unit responds to all incidents likely to 
require the use of special tools and equipment. It also responds 
to sniper and hostage incidents and is responsible for bomb 
search and disposal. 

(B) The Mobile Operations Patrol is the department's motorcycle 
unit which is used for traffic enforcement, patrol and selective 
tactical operations. 

(C) The House of Detention is responsible for the care and custody of 
all women prisoners until the court has disposed of their cases or 
until they have been otherwise released in accordance with law. 

(D) The Mounted Patrol Unit patrols areas of the city on horseback 
and is used for preventive patrol and traffic control as the need 
for and propriety of such service is determined. 

Division H — The Operations Division is responsible for receiving 
citizen's calls for assistance through the 91 1 emergency telephone system 
and for assigning police resources to handle these calls. An Operations 
Center receives and records telephone calls for police service and dis- 
patches units in accordance with department directives and plans devel- 
oped by the Bureau of Field Services. The division maintains current 
knowledge of conditions throughout the city and assigns police response 
units to meet changing requirements for service. The operations duty 
supervisor has final responsibility for the movement of field units to 
provide the most effective poUce service possible. The Message Center 
of the Operations Division contains the department Stolen Car Unit as 
well as communications facilities with LEAPS and NCIC computers. 
The Stolen Car Unit is responsible for recording and maintaining de- 
partment files on stolen cars and recoveries. They also maintain listings 
of all vehicles towed within the city for parking violations. 

The Towing Enforcement Unit tows and safely stores records con- 
cerning all tows and collection of towing and storage fees. 

The Field Inspections Unit insures prompt and efficient poHce 
response to calls to the department's emergency number 911 and insures 
the effectiveness of police enforcement activities. 

Each Field Services division commander provides complete ad- 
ministrative and field supervision in the division under his control and is 
responsible for meeting the needs of citizens in the area and for the ac- 
curate interpretation and implementation of department rules and 
policies in the districts and units for which he is responsible. Each 



124 



district is responsible for all police services within the district boundaries 
except those that are specifically assigned to other units in the depart- 
ment. District personnel are responsible for providing the best possible 
police service to their communities; and they cooperate fully with spe- 
cialized units in seeking ways to improve the overall effectiveness of 
police operations in the district. Each district maintains a patrol force 
sufficient in size to provide around-the-clock coverage, and each con- 
tains its own administrative, supervisory, and command personnel. 

Bureau of Investigative Services 
The Bureau of Investigative Services evaluates police performance 
and investigates complaints against department personnel. A legal sec- 
tion supplies advice on possible violations of the department Rules and 
Regulations. External inquiries are provided by the bureau in the form 
of specialized criminal investigations. The bureau also provides manage- 
ment studies and information through a Planning and Research Divi- 
sion. 

1. Internal Affairs Division is responsible for supervising the 
disciplinary processes of the department to ensure that they are 
both fair and constructive in nature. It thoroughly investigates or 
causes to be investigated all reports or allegations of police mis- 
conduct and makes appropriate recommendations to the Com- 
missioner. The division also reviews complaint data as to type and 
source and recommends training programs or changes in pro- 
cedure to reduce the causes and frequency of complaints. 

2. Criminal Investigative Division is responsible for developing in- 
formation on, as well as investigation of, criminal activity in the 
city. The division is divided into four sections, each with specific 
responsibilities. 

A. Intelligence Section keeps the Commissioner informed of all 
the operational responses to the department to planned 
criminal occurrences. 

B. The Vice Control Section provides specialized assistance to 
area and district commanders for control of illegal gaming, U- 
quor law violations, prostitution, and related crimes. It also in- 
vestigates and reports attempts by criminal organizations to 
gain control of licensed establishments or businesses. 

C. Organized Crime Section conducts investigations of organized 
criminal activity for the purpose of court prosecutions when 
warranted. In furtherance of its investigative responsibilities, it 
maintains liaison with other governmental agencies and main- 
tains its own confidential records and files. 

D. Central Investigative Section. This section comprises four 
units which handle specialized criminal investigations. They 
are: 

(1) The Drug Control Unit is responsible for city-wide en- 
forcement of the Massachusetts Controlled Substance Act 
(Chapter 94C), development and implementation of drug- 
related public education programs, and liaison with pub- 
lic and private organizations involved in prevention and 
control of drug abuse. 



125 



(2) The Homicide Unit investigates and prepares the case for 
Grand Jury presentation on all homicides, suspicious 
deaths, serious assaults and battered child cases in which 
the victim is in danger of death, is also responsible for the 
investigation of the sudden death of infants or those ap- 
parently stillborn. 

(3) General Investigative Unit is responsible for city- wide in- 
vestigations of crime against persons and property such as 
robbery, crimes against banking institutions and retail 
stores, fraudulent and larcenous schemes, consumer 
fraud, automobile theft and other crimes. The unit will 
supplement other C.I.S. units, when required, by con- 
ducting surveillances, investigations and related duties. 

(4) The Rape Investigation Unit is responsible for the coor- 
dinations and supervision of all Department investiga- 
tions concerning rape and sex crimes, techniques, stand- 
ardized reporting and crime analysis, and investigates 
methods of operating of rapists. They shall also maintain 
a continuing liaison with agencies involved in medical and 
psychological aid to victims and other agencies necessary. 

Staff Inspection Division is responsible for evaluating the level of 
performance of units, districts, and divisions in the department, 
with particular attention to their efforts to attain departmental 
goals and assist in the development of performance standards. It 
also reviews rules and orders as to their adequacy and to which 
they are complied with throughout the department. 
Planning and Research Division is responsible for researching 
operational and administrative problems in the department and 
assisting affected units in developing effective response to those 
problems. It works closely with other units in preparing long- 
range and contingency plans and is responsible for forms control. 
This division is composed of five units, each with certain respon- 
sibilities. 

A. Written Directives Section is responsible for preparing Rules 
and Regulations, Special Orders, Commissioner's Memo- 
randa, and Circulars as directed by the Police Commissioner. 

B. Administrative Analysis Section researches problems that arise 
pertaining to the administration of the department and 
develops through objective reports detailing the findings of 
such studies. 

C. Crime Patterns and Trends Section gathers and analyzes data 
relating to specific target crimes, identifies patterns and trends 
of use to field officers and commanders, and disseminates 
such information to concerned units throughout the depart- 
ment. 

D. Graphic Arts Section prepares illustrations, graphic layouts, 
crime scene sketches and other art work as required by the 
various units and divisions of the department. 

E. Grants Management Section establishes and maintains liaison 
with potential and actual funding sources, and supervises 
development and implementation of grant proposals. 



126 



Bureau of Administrative Services 
The Bureau of Adminstrative Services is responsible for providing 
services to support the field activities of the department. Divisions and 
sections of a supportive nature are organized under this bureau with a 
general mandate to arrange the availability of their resources to meet the 
needs of the department and the public in the most effective manner 
possible. 

1 . Services Division prepares the department budget and administers 
the office of the chief clerk which is responsible for receiving, 
recording, and transmitting to the City Treasurer all license fees 
collected by the department. The division is divided into seven 
sections, each providing specific services to other units in the 
department and/or to the public. 



A. Maintenance Section is comprised of four units: 

(1) The Communications Maintenance Unit installs, repairs 
and maintains all department communications equip- 
ment. An Engineering Unit is responsible for keeping 
abreast of technological innovations in communicating 
systems and equipment, maintaining the Operations 
Center and related transmitting and receiving equipment. 

(2) Signal Services Unit handles installation, maintenance, 
repair and alteration of all electrical appliances, equip- 
ment, lines, and related accessories in the department 
buildings. 

(3) The Automotive Maintenance Unit is responsible for the 
maintenance and repair of police vehicles. 

(4) The Building Maintenance Unit is responsible for the 
maintenance and repair of all police buildings. 

B. The Central License Section investigates, processes, and 
records all applications for licenses and bicycle registrations. 
When appropriate, it also investigates and reports upon ap- 
plications for licenses and permits issued by other city and 
state agencies. 

C. The Warrants Section, serves as a clearinghouse for all war- 
rants issued by the courts. 

D. The Private Detail Service Section is responsible for coordinat- 
ing all off-duty police services rendered by members of the de- 
partment to private employees. The section keeps accurate 
records of all private detail activity and is responsible for bill- 
ing and processing payments received; also administers cen- 
tralized paid details for superior officers. 

E. Payroll Section prepares payrolls and maintains accurate 
records and files of all payroll-related activities. 

F. Technical Services Section is responsible for obtaining, pre- 
serving and analyzing physical evidence for eventual court 
presentation and for assisting in the development of tech- 



127 



niques and procedures for effective crime scene search. It in- 
cludes: 

1 . The Crime Laboratory Unit 

2. The Identification and Photography Unit 

3. The Ballistics Unit 

G. Printing Section prints and prepares for distribution all forms, 
directives, bulletins, and other official documents necessary 
for the efficient administration of the department. 

2. Personnel Division is responsible for the administration of the de- 
partment's personnel system. It develops standards and policies 
for all personnel actions, including establishment of job specifica- 
tions, recruitment, selection and promotion, transfer, discipUne, 
leaves and retirement, and monitors all personnel activities. The 
division coordinates processing of all new personnel, conducts 
background investigations, processes all personnel actions affect- 
ing existing personnel, and maintains central personnel files. It 
supervises the medical program of the department, the Stress Pro- 
gram, and related personnel service activities. It provides liaison 
with city personnel services and the Massachusetts Division of 
Personnel Administration. The division includes: 

A. The Personnel Records Section maintains personnel files and 
related records for all Department employees. 

B. The Medically Incapacitated Section includes all sworn and 
civilian employees who have been absent on sick or injured 
leave for more than thirty calendar days. 

C. The Suspended and Extended Leave Section includes all sworn 
and civilian personnel on suspension or extended leave for 
more than thirty calendar days. 

D. Personnel Processing Section processes all appointments, 
transfers and promotions. 

3. Training and Education Division is responsible for the develop- 
ment of department training standards and administration of all 
training and education programs. It is organized into four sec- 
tions, each with specific responsibilities. 

A. Program Development Section is responsible for initiating and 
developing new training programs. It prepares course pro- 
specti, selects instructors, gathers teaching materials and co- 
ordinates course development with affected units in the de- 
partment. 

B. Program Coordination Section is in charge of ongoing, in- 
service training programs and includes the registrar who is 
responsible for scheduling, attendance, and testing. 

C. Technical Training Section operates the police range, develops 
firearms standards, and coordinates a firearms qualification 
program. 

D. Recruit Training Section is responsible for implementing and 
coordinating all recruit training programs and for supervising 
recruits throughout the recruit training year. 



128 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, BOSTON 

Office, City Hall, Room 900 
[Gen. Laws, Chap. 121B, as amended] 
Appointed by Mayor with Approval of City Council 
Robert L. Farrell, Chairman Term ends in 1979 

Joseph J. Walsh, Vice-Chairman Term ends in 1981 

James G. Colbert, Treasurer Term ends in 1982 

James K. Flaherty, Assistant Treasurer Term ends in 1983 

Appointed by Massachusetts Department of Community Affairs 

James E. Cofield, Jr. Term ends in 1980 

Robert J. Ryan, Director 

Kane Simonian, Secretary and Executive Director 

The Boston Redevelopment Authority, established in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 121B, has the sole responsibUty for urban 
renewal activities in the City of Boston. 

The Authority was organized in September, 1957 and received its cer- 
tificate of organization from the Secretary of the Commonwealth on 
October 4, 1957. 

Under the provisions of the Housing Act of 1949, as amended, the 
Federal Housing and Urban Development Department is authorized to 
enter into contracts with local redevelopment authorities to finance 
slum clearance, urban renewal projects and open space, urban beautifi- 
cation and other programs designed to prevent the spread of urban 
blight through rehabilitation and conservation measures and to improve 
the quality of the urban environment. The most common form of urban 
renewal financing is one in which the local government provides one- 
third of the net cost of undertaking a project and the federal govern- 
ment provides the other two-thirds. 

Chapter 121 B of the General Laws provides authority for local com- 
munities to carry out urban renewal without federal aid. 

Under Chapter 652, Acts of 1960 (Mass. Gen. Laws, Chapter 121A), 
the City Planning Board was abolished and all its staff transferred to the 
Authority. The functions, duties, and responsibilities for general city 
planning and development was merged into one agency, the Boston 
Redevelopment Authority. 

A brief description of major projects approved by the Authority as of 
December 31, 1971, and a summary of planning activities follow. 
Bedford-West, Mass. R-182. The 2.3-acre Bedford- West Project, 
located in the retail core of the Central Business District, received 
federal approval in March, 1975. The project is part of the $220-miUion, 
Jordan Marsh/Lafayette Place development, which includes a con- 
solidated Jordan Marsh retail facility, a major retail, hotel and office 
complex, a new city parking garage, and other street and pedestrian im- 
provements. 

Brunswick-King, Mass. R-168. Located in the Model Cities area, the 
33.5-acre Brunswick-King Project was approved by the federal govern- 
ment in January, 1974. Included in the project are some 140 new hous- 



129 



'.lig units, plus improvement and expansion of parks and recreation 
space within the area. 

Campus High School, Mass. R-129. The 129-acre Campus High 
School Project, located in Roxbury, received federal approval in June, 
1972. The project is the site for a 2,500-student, city-wide Secondary 
Education Complex being built on thirty-five acres of the project area, 
along with a 2,500-student Occupational Resource Center, a public con- 
course, parking, and a community service center. The Lower Roxbury 
community corporation has built 380 units of low-and moderate-income 
housing. Another 150 units are planned. 

Central Business District Project. The original Central Business Dis- 
trict Project, encompassing 245 acres, received early land acquisition 
approval from the federal government in August, 1966, but did not 
receive final approval and funding. Three smaller projects, however, in- 
cluding land that had been acquired through early land acquisition, 
have been designated renewal areas: 

1. In School-Franklin (Mass. R-82A), a nine-acre project, construc- 
tion was completed in 1970 of the new Woolworth's department store 
with adjoining 900-car parking garage, the Boston Company Building, 
and the Sack Pi-AUey Theater-Coffman parking garage complex. The 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank and the renovation of Old City Hall for 
office and commercial use were completed in 1972. In addition. School 
Street has been aligned with Milk Street, creating a triangular piece of 
land that has been converted to a small park. Franklin Street has been 
relocated, a new entrance to the Washington Street MBTA built, and 
Filene's has built a major addition at Franklin and Washington Streets, 
adjacent to the project area. A new Shoppers Park was developed be- 
tween Filene's and the relocated end of FrankHn Street when the depart- 
ment store's new building was completed in 1973. 

2. Another renewal parcel in the Central Business Distict, the 
Bedford- West site, is part of the mixed-use development known as Jor- 
dan Marsh/Lafayette Place. The first phase of that project consisted of 
the Jordan March Company carrying out an extensive reconstruction of 
their downtown store. The second phase, or Lafayette Place, calls for 
the development of a retail-hotel complex. The City of Boston, through 
its Real Property Board, will construct a 900-car parking garage, an 
underground parking garage accommodating 900 cars on a site bounded 
by Washington Street, Exeter Place, Bedford Street and Chauncy 
Street. The developers of the project, Sefrius, Inc. and Mondev, will 
then construct on air rights above the garage a retail complex of 200,000 
square feet. A 500-room hotel will also be built as part of the platform 
above the garage. Additional parking spaces for 600 cars will be built by 
the developers. 

3. Boylston-Essex (UR Mass. R-82B), primarily a street realignment 
project (six- tenths of an acre), includes a new Essex MBTA station, 
alignment of Boylston Street to meet Essex, and Liberty Tree Park 
which has been built on the newly created land at that corner. 

4. South Station (Mass. R-82C) will be the site for a new Transpor- 
tation Center for rail, intercity and commuter bus, rapid transit, and 
automobile parking facilities. The historic 1899 Headhouse will be in- 



130 



tegrated into the new development. Also in the project area, Stone and 
Webster Engineering Company completed their office building, and 175 
Federal Street (the Fiduciary Trust Building) is under construction. Ma- 
jor public improvements are scheduled for the project area as well. The 
82-acre project received federal approval in June, 1971. The BRA has 
designated the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority as 
developer of the Transportation Center and the BRA is in the process of 
seUing the South Station to the MBTA for a sum of $6 miUion. 

5. Park Plaza. Lack of federal funds for downtown renewal and an 
awareness that private development was imminent led to the creation in 
1971 of the nonfederally funded Park Plaza Project in the Park Square 
area of the central business district. The 35-acre project will include 
residential, hotel, commercial, entertainment, office, and parking uses. 
The Boston City Council approved Park Plaza in December, 1971, and 
the state approved it in March, 1974. The Park Plaza plan has been 
modified considerably since its initial introduction, with density reduced 
from 6 million square feet to approximately 2.8 million square feet, the 
number of tower elements reduced from five to two, and the maximum 
tower heights reduced from 550 feet to 350 and 300 feet. The first com- 
ponent of the project, a new State Transportation Building, is now 
under construction. This $50 million project will consolidate all 
transportation agencies of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in a 
600,000-square-foot building that will extend from Charles Street to 
Tremont Street. A London-based firm. Lex Hotels, has been designated 
to develop a 12-story, 400-room luxury hotel for a parcel which runs 
from Hadassah Way to Charles Street and fronts on the Public Garden. 

Charlestown. UR Mass. R55. The 520-acre Charlestown project was 
approved by the federal government in 1965. Its main emphasis has been 
rehabilitation of existing structures and improvement of public facilities 
to strengthen the residential character of this historic section of Boston. 
Nearly 1,750 housing units have been rehabilitated, with another 450 
under way or planned. Charles-New-Town, 262 units of low-and 
moderate-income housing located between Medford Street and the Lit- 
tle Mystic Channel, was completed in 1971, and Mishawum Park, 337 
units, has been built between Main Street and New Rutherford Avenue. 
Ninety-six units of housing for the elderly were built through the federal 
Turnkey Program, and the Thompson Triangle has been rehabilitated 
through a federal rehabilitation loan. Forty single-, two- and three- 
family homes are completed or under way, with another 3 planned. The 
Charlestown branch library and Sullivan Square fire station have been 
completed, as well as the Kent Elementary School and Stage I of Bunker 
Hill Community College (in the vicinity of the former State Prison). In 
1978, the Bunker Hill Mall, a shopping center opened at Thompson 
Square. The new MBTA Orange Line beneath Interstate 93 went into 
operation in late 1974, making possible the demolition in 1975, of the 
elevated structure on Main Street. Also included in the Charlestown Ur- 
ban Renewal Project is the BRA's development program for the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. The Navy Yard was deactivated by the U.S. 
Navy in 1974. Since that time the BRA has proposed a $100 million 
development program which will result in the creation of a new residen- 
tial community. The federal government has transferred, at no charge, 



131 



46 acres of the Navy Yard to the BRA. Sixteen acres of that land is now 
under development as a $2.5 million waterfront park, adjacent to Dry 
Dock 1 . The remaining 30 acres will consist of an area where historic 
buildings will be recycled for new uses. The other 50 acres of the Navy 
Yard will be sold to a Montreal-based development firm, Immobiliare 
Canada Limited, which will construct 1,100 units of housing, half of 
which will be produced by the conversion of warehouse and manufac- 
turing buildings to apartments. 

Downtown Waterfront-Faneuil Hall, UR Mass. R-77. Approved in 
August, 1964, the 104-acre Waterfront Project is intended to provide 
housing and recreational activities, to preserve historic structures, and 
to open the city to the sea once again. The New England Aquarium on 
Central Wharf, opened in 1968, enjoys wide popularity and has been 
cited for its innovative design. Harbor Towers, with 624 luxury apart- 
ments, was opened for occupancy in 1971. Rehabilitation and conver- 
sion of more than 600 apartments is under way or complete in struc- 
tures, including the Custom House Block on Long Wharf, Commercial 
Wharf South Lewis Wharf, the Mercantile Wharf Building, the Prince 
Building, and former commercial structures on Fulton and Commerical 
Streets. A 385 room motel is planned for Long Wharf, and two elderly 
housing developments totaling 260 units, have been completed. The 
4.5-acre Waterfront Park, between Long and Commercial Wharves and 
New Atlantic Avenue, was completed in mid 1976. Extensively land- 
scaped, the park provides an opportunity to enjoy the seaside environ- 
ment and also has a children's tot lot. A major development in the 
Waterfront is the Faneuil Hall Markets Restoration Project, which 
opened some of its space in August, 1976 and was completed in August, 
1978. The project is creating a vital and exciting area of retail, entertain- 
ment, restaurant, and office activity along North and South Market 
Streets. The construction of a 600-car parking garage adjacent to the 
markets will start in late 1978. The neighboring Blackstone Block and 
Merchants Row buildings are also undergoing rehabilitation as office 
and commercial space. 

Fenway, UR Mass. R-115. The 507-acre Fenway Project, approved in 
March, 1967, contains residential, institutional, and recreational uses 
and has a high concentration of both elderly and student residents. The 
Christian Science Church has completed its 31 -acre Church Center on 
Huntington Avenue, which includes an administration tower, Sunday 
School, underground parking garage, and reflecting pool and plaza. 
The 508-unit Church Park mixed-income housing development on Mas- 
sachusetts Avenue has been completed, as has the Colonnade Hotel on 
Huntington Avenue. Housing for the elderly is of major concern in the 
Fenway, and the Episcopal City Mission "Morville House," which con- 
tains 147 apartments for elderly persons was constructed. Additional 
housing for senior citizens is underway on sites on two corners of the in- 
tersection of Massachusetts and Huntington Avenue. Three-hundred 
units of middle-income housing are planned across from the Christian 
Science Administration Building on Huntington Avenue. Residential 
rehabilitation has also been stressed, and more than 1,400 apartments 
have been rehabilitated. Two tot lots in the Fens Parkland were com- 
pleted several years ago as well, and a neigborhood park on Edgerly 



132 



Road was built in 1975. Institutional development by universities, 
hospitals, and cultural institutions in the Fenway has helped the city 
financially; the Fenway financing plan provides for a pooling credit of 
$12.7 million form institutuonal expeditures under Section 112 of the 
National Housing Act, which allows the application of these credits to 
the city's share of the financing of other renewal projects. 

Government Center, UR Mass. R-35. The plan for the 60-acre Gov- 
vernment Center, approved in July, 1964, has received wide acclaim for 
its high level of design. Now more than 90 percent complete, it 
represents nearly $300 million in public and private investment. The 
award-winning New City Hall, the focal point of the project, was com- 
pleted in 1963, and the seven-acre City Hall Plaza surrounding it was 
completed in 1976. The Government Center MBTA station was com- 
pleted in late 1971, and new stations have also been built at Bowdoin 
and Haymarket. Pemberton Square, next to the Suffolk County Court 
House, has also been redesigned as a pedestrian area. Numerous govern- 
ment and private office facilities have been constructed, including the 
John F. Kennedy Federal Office Building, the Center Plaza Office 
Building, and the New England Merchants National Bank. The Govern- 
ment Center parking garage and bus terminal between Sudbury and 
New Chardon Streets, accommodates 1,865 cars. Adjacent on Sudbury 
Street is the new District One Police Station, and on the site of the 
Mayhew School the Capitol Bank has built a five-story structure to 
house office and commercial space. Near Bowdoin Square, a new post- 
office building, headquarters for RKO-General, the Jewish Family and 
Children's Service Center, and the Bulfinch Place Office Building are 
complete, as are two of the three sections of the State Service Center — 
the Division of Employment Security and the Mental Health Center. 
The third section, the Health, Education, and Welfare tower, is awaiting 
state approval of construction funds. The New England Telephone 
Company has built an addition to its facility, and Cardinal Gushing 
Park was completed in 1976. In the neighborhood of City Hall, the 
Sears Block and Crescent have been rehabilitated, the City Bank and 
Trust Company has built a new building, and One Washington Mall is 
also complete. Construction of Sixty State Street, a 38-story office 
tower at State and Congress Streets was completed in late 1977, and 
development of a 350-room motel on Parcel 7, along New Congress 
Street, is also planned. 

Kittredge Square, UR Mass. R-167. The 27-acre Kittredge Square 
project in the Model cities area was approved by the federal government 
in January, 1974. Some 75 new housing units are proposed for construc- 
tion in the project, as well as rehabilitation of existing housing in the 
area. 

New York Streets Project, UR Mass. 2—1. Boston's first urban 
renewal project under Title I of the Housing Act of 1949 was officially 
completed and closed out in 1964 upon receipt of the final portion of the 
federal grant. This 23-acre tract of land had been one of Boston's most 
decayed residential areas for many years prior to 1955 when the land 
was acquired, the residents relocated, and the buildings demolished. 
With the construction of a new street system ten new commercial 
buildings have been erected at a cost of $10,300,000. 



133 



North Harvard Street, UR Mass. R-54. The 6.6 acre North Harvard 
Street Project in Allston, approved by the federal government in 1966, 
was completed and occupied in 1971. It is the location of the 212-unit 
Charlesview Apartments development for low- and moderate-income 
famihes, which includes parking, a day care center, health clinic, and 
commercial space. It is the end result of the efforts of the Committee for 
North Harvard, Inc., a group of concerned residents in the AUston- 
Brighton neighborhood who joined together to form a limited dividend 
corporation, under Chapter 121 A of the General Laws, to develop the 
area cleared by the Authority in 1969. 

St. Botolph Street, UR Mass. R-148. This 1 . 1 acre single-purpose pro- 
ject was approved by the federal government in May, 1971, as the loca- 
tion for 134 units of housing for the elderly, built by the Boston Hous- 
ing Authority under the federal Turnkey Program. Construction was 
completed in 1973. 

South Cove, UR Mass. R-92. The 96-acre South Cove Project con- 
tains a variety of uses: residential, institutional, commercial, and enter- 
tainment. Its renewal plan was approved by the federal government in 
April, 1966. The Tai Tung Village and Mass. Pike towers, totahng 414 
units of housing for low- and moderate-income families, have been built 
and 162 units of mixed-income housing for the elderly have been built 
adjacent to the new Quincy Community School. Residential rehabilita- 
tion has affected some 243 housing units, and a small retail and apart- 
ment complex has been constructed in the Bay Village section. In addi- 
tion, extensive street relocation, sewer and water improvements, street 
hghting, and tree planting have been accomplished. Extension of the 
MBTA tunnel for the Forest Hills-Everett line to a point south of the 
Turnpike Extension has also been completed. South Cove has a new fire 
station, dedicated in 1971, and a temporary YMCA recreation facihty 
has helped alleviate the area's lack of space. The 57 Carver Street hotel- 
garage-retail-theater complex was completed in 1971, and several other 
retail and parking facilities are being discussed. The Morgan Memorial 
Church of All Nations was completed in 1976 and the Chinese 
Evangelical Church will be completed this year. The Elliot Norton Park 
was dedicated in 1977. Tufts-New England Medical Center has built its 
Health Services Building, Dental Health Services Building and a parking 
garage, and Don Bosco Technical High School has completed its first 
stage of expansion. South Cove institutional expenditures have pro- 
vided the city with $4 million in Section 112 credits. 

South End, UR Mass. R-56. The 606-acre South End Project, ap- 
proved by the federal government in November, 1965, is the largest 
residential renewal project in the nation. Both rehabilitation and new 
construction have taken place, as well as an upgrading of public 
facilities. More than 2,500 new housing units for low- and moderate- 
income families and the elderly are complete, and another 200 are plan- 
ned. In addition, more than 3,500 apartments have been rehabilitated, 
including several tenant-developed projects, and over 560 are under way 
or planned. The South End Branch Library is complete, and 
playgrounds and parks completed include Carter Playground, James 
Hayes Park, Eight Streets Playground, Peters Park, Derby Park, Titus 
Sparrow Park, and Watson Park. The Boston Center for the Arts is 



134 



operating in the Cyclorama building and other neighboring structures 
vacated by the wholesale flower market, which has moved to new 
facilities on Harrison Avenue, also in the project area. City Hospital 
and Boston University Medical Center are rehabilitating and expanding 
their facilities, and United South End Settlements has built a new com- 
munity facility. Elementary schools are planned, plus an intermediate 
school library. 

Sumner Street Neighborhood Development Program, UR Mass. A-3. 
The 9.6-acre Sumner Street NDP in East Boston is the site of Heritage 
Apartments, 300 units of Turnkey public housing: 280 spartments for 
the elderly, and 20 for families. Located near Maverick Square, the pro- 
ject was formulated with extensive community participation in the plan- 
ning and design of the housing. The project was approved by the federal 
government in March, 1972, and completed in late 1975. 

Washington Park, UR Mass. R-24. Renewal activities in the 502-acre 
Washington Park Project are nearing completion. The renewal plan, ap- 
proved in April, 1963, places major emphasis on housing, both 
rehabiUtation and new construction. More than 4,600 dwelling units 
have been rehabilitated, and construction of nearly 1,800 new units is 
complete. Numerous community facilities have been built, including a 
new YMAC and addition, the Roxbury Chapter of the Boys' Clubs of 
Boston, a neighborhood shopping center, Washington Park Community 
Park (with MDC skating rink and swimming pool, outdoor playing 
fields and recreational areas, and an indoor recreation and community 
center), five parks and playgrounds, the Trotter elementary School, 
Grove Hall branch library, Roxbury Civic Center Court House, Pohce 
Station and library, and several churches. Also completed are the Rox- 
bury Ecumenical Center and a Comprehensive Community Health 
Center. More than $12 miUion is being spent to complete the program of 
providing new streets, sidewalks, sewer and storm drains, street lighting, 
parks, playgrounds, and water lines. 

West End, UR Mass. 2-4. The 47-acre West End Project received 
federal approval in January, 1958. Charles River Park, Inc., the prin- 
cipal developers of the project, received approval in 1971 of their final 
plans for the last phase of new construction in the project area, which 
consists of two 35-story apartment towers with 710 dwelling units, an 
eleven-story building to provide 150 apartments for the elderly, a 
10-story office building, and an underground garage for 1,200 cars. 
Construction began in 1972 and was completed in 1976. Six luxury 
apartment towers containing 1,426 units have been built in the West 
End, plus a shopping center with parking garage on Charles Street, a 
300-room motel, parking garages for 1,500 cars, a ten-story office 
building, the West End branch library, a nursery school, the Shriners 
Hospital Burns Institute, the Retina Foundation Research Center, the 
Regina Cleri home for retired CathoUc priests, and Temple Beth 
Amedrish Agudal Beth Jacob. 

Whitney Street. In 1966 the Authority approved the application of 
Back Bay Manor Apartments, Inc., to develop the third and last two- 
acre parcel in the city-financed Whitney Street Project area, construc- 
tion was completed in 1969 on a twenty-story building containing 288 
apartments and a three-level, 267-car parking facility. 



135 



Limited Dividend Projects — M.G.L., Chapter 121 A. With the 
enactment of Chapter 652 of the Acts of 1960 the Authority was given 
the power to approve apphcations for the formation of limited dividend 
corporations and the development of projects pursuant to General 
Laws, Chapter 121 A, legislation written initially to insure stable taxes 
for the Prudential Center development. Since that time nearly seventy 
such corporations have been approved by the Authority and the Mayor 
following a public hearing for each application. These corporations 
have in the past fifteen years undertaken more than $650 million of new 
construction and rehabilitation, both within and outside federally fund- 
ed renewal projects, including, in addition to the Prudential, nearly 
10,000 housing units. One Beacon Street, the Christian Science Center, 
and the South Bay Food Market for meat and poultry dealers. 

The BRA as the city's planning agency is responsible for city-wide 
comprehensive planning, urban renewal and special planning studies, 
transportation planning, historic preservation, and zoning. Planning ac- 
tivities in most urban renewal projects have been completed, but the 
planning staff provides necessary assistance to other staff and com- 
munity groups as required. The district Planning Program, initiated in 
1968, is designed to improve planning services to all of the city's 
neighorhoods by developing, with extensive community participation, a 
comprehensive planning program for each of the planning districts. AH 
sections of the city have received assistance from the District Planning 
Program. District Planning staff have also worked on approaches to the 
utilization of federal community development revenue-sharing funds. 
City-wide studies of housing, open space and recreation, industrial 
development, institutional expansion, and transportation policy have 
also been undertaken by Planning staff. The Transportation Planning 
Section carries out planning studies pertaining to traffic, parking, public 
transportation, and intercity transportation issues. Staff activities in- 
clude formulation of state and federally funded TOPICS programs, and 
work with the MBTA to improve the quality of pubHc transportation in 
the city. Under a HUD grant the Historic Preservation staff is develop- 
ing a comprehensive program for the preservation of historic buildings 
and landmarks in the city, and also serve as staff to the Boston Land- 
marks Commissions, estabhshed in 1975 under state law. The primary 
function of the Zoning Staff is to review and make recommendations on 
petitions for conditional use permits, variances, and exceptions that 
come before the Board of Appeal, and amendments to the Zoning Code 
and Zoning Maps that come before the Zoning Commission. 

A major adjunct to the Authority's planning capabilities is the 
Research Department, established several years ago to evaluate the 
economic impact of urban renewal on the city and formulate programs 
of action for the future. The early focus centered on information useful 
for planning, including studies of population and income, the city's ex- 
panding economy, and property values before and after renewal in 
several renewal projects, plus analyses of data from the 1970 Federal 
Census of Population and Housing. Information management systems 
have been established for the development and rehabilitation activities 
of the BRA. Strategies are now being formulated for fiscal planning, 
housing and community, development, economic and manpower 
development, and population and income goals for the city. 



136 

PUBLIC FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

Office, 816 City Hall 
[Stat. 1966, Chap. 642] 

OFFICIALS 

Edward T. Sullivan, Chairman 

Barbara G. Cameron, Vice Chairman 

Robert F. Walsh, Commissioner 

Patricia A. Vandenberg, Secretary 

Donald B. Manson, Director 

Chapter 642 of the Acts of 1966 establishes in the City of Boston a 
Public Facilities Department, aboUshes the Department of School 
Buildings and transfers its function in part to the Public Facilities 
Department and in part to the School Committee of said City for the 
more efficient and economical construction and alterations of municipal 
buildings. The Public Facilities Department shall be under the charge of 
a board known as the Public Facilities Commission consisting of three 
members known as PubUc Facilities Commissioners appointed by the 
Mayor for a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following 
the next biennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

714 City Hall 

Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner* 

The Public Works Department was created in 1911 under the provi- 
sions of Chapter 486, Acts of 1909, through the consolidation of the ex- 
isting street, water, and engineering departments. The department was 
placed in the charge of a commissioner who was required by ordinances 
to be a civil engineer of recognized standing. The department now 
operates through its Central Office and three (3) major divisions, each 
in the charge of a division engineer. These divisions carry out the major 
programs of the department; namely, the maintenance and construction 
of highways, bridges, street lighting, snow removal, sanitation, street 
cleaning, removal or refuse and garbage. All engineering in connection 
with the foregoing programs is performed by the Engineering Division, 
The Central Office performs general administative functions including 
personnel management, payrolls, cost accounting, purchasing, inven- 
tory control, property and equipment maintenance, and contracts. 

*For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the 
next biennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected. 



137 



Central Office 

Room 714, City Hall 

Robert P. Mehegan, Executive Secretary 

A. Administrative Branch 

This branch is in charge of administrative functions that include per- 
sonnel, payroll management, supplies, inventories, accounting and con- 
tracts. 

B. Maintenance Branch 

The Maintenance Branch is responsible for the care, control, and 
maintenance of all department-owned motor vehicles and for the opera- 
tion, care, and maintenance of all real estate and related facilities of the 
Public Works Department. 

C. Permit Branch 

The Permit Branch issues all permits to open, occupy, and obstruct, 
portions of the streets, as well as water and sewer permits. 

Highway Division 

Room 708, City Hall 

John Vozzella, Acting Division Engineer 

This division has charge of the construction and maintenance of all 

public streets, street cleaning and flushing by department forces, the 

care and upkeep of electric and gas lamps on public streets, parks, and 

pubHc grounds; the construction, operation, and maintenance of the 

highway bridges under the control of the department, and the abolition 

of grade crossings, and snow operations. 

Sanitary Division 
Room 708, City Hall 

The Sanitary Division has charge of the contract collection, removal, 
and disposal of ashes, garbage, and refuse. It also supervises the 
removal of commercial wastes under contractual arrangement between 
the producer and the contractor. 

Engineering Division 
Room 709. City Hall 
Angelo J. Ialuna, Division Engineer 
The division performs engineering services for the divisions of the 
PubUc Works Department and other city departments. 

Public Improvement Commission 
Room 709, City Hall 

the board 

Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner of Public Works, ex officio, Chairman 

Joanne A. Prevosj, Commissioner of Real Property, ex officio, Vice-Chairman 

William T. Noonan, Commissioner of Traffic and Parking, ex officio, 

Joyce E. Burrell, Executive Secretary 

The Public Improvement Commission was established May 1, 1954. 

This commission was assigned many of the powers and duties of the 

former Board of Street Commissioners, including the authority to lay 

out, widen, relocate, alter, or discontinue highways, and to order 



138 



specific repairs to be made therein; to name or rename public highways 
and private ways; to permit the opening of private ways for pubUc 
travel; top levy assessments for street, sidewalk, and sewer betterments 
and to issue permits for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, 
pipes, tracks, signs, and similar uses of the pubUc ways. 

The administration functions include the processing of petitions, ar- 
ranging public hearing, preparing orders relating to land damages and 
street betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of streets and the 
construction of streets, for eminent domain land takings, and for the 
granting of permits for use of public highways, erection of poles, signs, 
etc. 



139 



REAL PROPERTY DEPARTMENT 

Office, City Hall, Room 811 
[Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 22.] 

[St. 1943, c. 434, as amended by St. 1945, c. 433; St. 1949, c. 317; St. 
1950, c. 318; St. 1951, c. 159; St. 1952, c. 196; St. 1961, c. 314, See 
also St. 1962, c. 762, s. 4; St. 1946, c. 474, as amended by St. 1948, 
c. 612; St. 1950, c. 316; St. 1951, c. 625; St. 1951, c. 734; St. 1955, 
c. 450; St. 1958, c. 273; St. 1960, c. 413; St. 1962, c. 338; St. 1963, 
c. 263; St. 1964, c. 567; St. 1965, c. 203; St. 1965, c. 218; St. 1965 
c. 342; St. 1969, c. 815; St. 1973, c. 962. See also G.L. c. 40, s. 22B, 
22C, 22E.] 

REAL PROPERTY BOARD 

Joanne A. 'Pkevost, Commissioner of Real Property, Chairman* 

Bernard W. Callahan, Assistant Commissiner of Real Property* 

Robert Kline, Associate Commissioner 

Thomas F. Kelly, Jr. 

Rose V. O'Connell, Executive Secretary 

Thomas J. DeRosa, Deputy Commissioner of Real Property 

The Real Property Board has the powers and performs the duties con- 
ferred or imposed on the Board of Real Estate Commissioners by the St. 
1943, c. 434, as amended, and by the St. 1946, c. 474, as amended, and 
has also the powers and performs the duties conferred or imposed by 
statute on the Board of Street Commissioners in realation to the abate- 
ment of taxes. 

By the Ord. 1954, c. 2, s. 43, the Public Buildings Department was 
aboUshed and the powers, duties and appropriations of the superinten- 
dent of Public Buildings with respect to the appointment, suspension, 
discharge, compensation, and indemnification of subordinates were 
transferred to the Commissioner of Real Property, and all other powers, 
duties, and appropriations of the Public Buildings Department were 
transferred to the Assistant Commissioner of Real Property. 

Committee on Foreclosed Real Estate 

Joanne A. Prevost, Chairman 

Thomas F. Kelly, Jr. 

Bernard W. Callahan 



The Committee on Foreclosed Real Estate consists of the chairman 
and two other members of the Real Propety Board appointed by the 
Mayor from said Boacd. The Committee has the powers and performs 
the duties conferred or imposed by law on the Committee on Foreclosed 
Real Estate established under St. 1943, c. 434, s. 4. 

*For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the 
next biennial municipal election at which a Mayor is elected. 



140 



RENT BOARD 

Ellen Gordon, Chairperson * 

Robert Banker 

Claudette Worthington 

The Rent Board performs the following functions: 

Regulates residential rents and evictions in certain federally sub- 
sidized housing, and makes certain transitional provisions in relati 3n to 
rent control in other housing. 



RETIREMENT BOARD, BOSTON 

Office, 224, City Hall 

[Stat. 1922, Chap. 521; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 284, 381, 426; Stat. 1924, 
Chaps. 89,249,250,251; Stat. 1925, Chaps. 18, 90, 152; Stat. 1926, 
Chap. 390; Stat. 1933, Chap. 243; Stat. 1937, Chap. 163; Stat. 
1939, Chap. 131; Stat. 1943, Chap. 204; Stat. 1945, Chap. 658; 
Stat. 1947, Chap. 520; Stat. 1950, Chap. 355; Stat. 1951, Chap. 
644; Stat. 1952, Chap. 379; Stat. 1954, Chaps. 423, 434, 684; Stat. 
1955, Chap. 309; Stat. 1958, Chap. 391; Stat. 1971, Chap. 481.] 

OFFICIALS 

Thomas J. McGrimley, Chairman 

Edward W. Donovan 

Walter W. Merrill 

Harold B. Sacks, Secretary and Executive Officer 

Charles R. Curran, Assistant Executive Officer 

THE board 
Edward W. Donovan Term ends September 30, 1976 

Walter W. Merrill, City Auditor (ex officio) 
Thomas J. McGrimley Term ends September 30, 1978 

The Boston Retirement System was established on February 1, 1923, 
under the provisions of Chapter 521 of the Acts of 1922, which was ac- 
cepted by the Mayor and City Council in August, 1922. 

An additional retirement system for city and county employees was 
provided by chapter 658 of the Acts of 1945. This act was accepted by 
the City Council June 3, 1946, and approved by the Mayor June 5, 1946. 
The new system, designated as the State-Boston Retirement System, 
went into effect October 1, 1946. Every employee appointed after that 
date becomes a member of the new system. 

Both systems are administered by a Retirement Board consisting of 
Edward W. Donovan, chosen by the two other members; Walter W. 
Merrill, City Auditor, ex-officio; and Thomas J. McGrimley, elected by 
members of the system. The Board serves without compensation. 



141 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CITY OF BOSTON 

Administration Building, 26 Court Street 

[Stat. 1875, Chap. 241; Stat. 1898, Chap. 400; Stat. 1900, Chap. 235; 
Stat. 1901, Chap. 448; Stat. 1903, Chap. 170; Stat. 1905, Chap. 
249; C. C, Chaps. 33 and 48; Stat. 1906, Chaps. 205,231, 259, 318, 
505; Stat. 1907, Chaps. 295, 357, 450; Stat. 1908, Chap. 589; Stat. 
1909, Chaps. 120, 388, 446, 537, 540; Stat. 1910, Chap. 617; Stat. 
1911, Chaps. 540, 708; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 195, 569, 711; Stat. 1913, 
Chaps. 337, 363, 389, 389, 615, 779; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 128, 331, 
489, 730, 738; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 78, 81, 90 and Spec. Stat. 
Stat., Chaps. 189, 300, 304, 372; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 86, 88, 
213, 267, 289 and Gen. Stat., Chap. 102; Gen. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 
84, 169 and Spec. Stat. Chap. 146; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 132; 
Spec. Stat. 1919, Chaps. 132, 199, 206, 249; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 140, 
524, 641; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 169, 351; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 273, 286; 
Stat. 1923, Chaps. 284, 308, 381, 460, 488; Stat. 1924, Chaps. 380, 
479; Stat. 1925, Chaps. 309, 327; Stat. 1926, Chaps. 153, 314; Stat. 
1928, Chap. 382; Stat. 1929, Chap. 256; Stat. 1930, Chaps. 283, 
313; Stat. 1931, Chaps. 100, 155, 229, 247, 250; Stat. 1933, Chap. 
121; Stat. 1934, Chaps. 145, 228; Stat. 1935, Chaps. 19, 284; Stat. 
1936, Chap. 224; Stat. 1937, Chap. 366; Stat. 1939, Chap. 142; 
Stat. 1946, Chaps. 388, 497; Stat. 1947, Chap. 226; Stat. 1948, 
Chaps. 167, 301, 452, 602; Stat. 1949, Chaps. 117, 681; Stat. 1951, 
Chaps. 376, 468, 781; Stat. 1952, Chaps. 190, 624; Stat. 1955, 
Chaps. 236, 298, 396, 594; Stat. 1963, Chap. 786; Stat. 1965, Chap. 
208; Stat. 1972, Chap. 150; Stat. 1978, Chap. 333.] 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Term ends January, 1980 
David I. Finnegan 
John J. McDonough 
John D. O'Bryant 
Kathleen Sullivan Alioto 
Paul R. Tierney 

officers of school committee 
David I. Finnegan, President 
John D. O'Bryant, Treasurer 
Robert C. Wood, Superintendent 
Edward J. Winter, Secretary 
Leo J. Burke, Business Manager 

administrative staff 
Robert E. Donahue, Deputy Superintendent, Academic Operations 
David P. Bernstein, Deputy Superintendent, Management Operations 
James P. Breeden, Senior Management Officer, Planning and Policy 
Paul A. Kennedy, Senior Management Officer, Collective Bargain- 
ing/Personnel Policy 
John R. Coakley, Senior Management Officer, Implementation 



142 



Robert S. Peterkin, Director of Budget Management 
Bernice J. Miller, Manager of Curriculum and Competency 
Elizabeth G. Cook, Manager of Community and Public Affairs 
Peter G. Meade, Senior Officer, Intergovernmental Affairs 
, Senior Officer, Affirmative Action 

COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENTS 

Donald Burgess (Acting) Anne B. O'Brien 

Leo M. Howard Joseph McDonough 

Peter J. Ingeneri Ronald Spratling (Acting) 

Mildred Griffith (Acting) John McGourty 
Roger Beattie (Acting) 



boston business school 
latin and day high schools (18) 
Boston Latin, Boston Latin Academy, Boston Technical High, Brighton 
High, Charlestown High, Dorchester High, East Boston High, 
Enghsh High, Hyde Park High, Jamaica Plain High, Jeremiah E. 
Burke High, South Boston High, Boston Trade High, Copley 
Square High, Boston High, Madison Park High, West Roxbury 
High School, Roxbury High, Mario Umana High. 

middle schools 
Brighton — William Howard Taft, Thomas A. Edison, Robert N. 

Mead 
Charlestown — Clarence R. Edwards 
City Proper — Michelangelo 
Dorchester — Champlain, Grover Cleveland, Oliver W. Holmes, 

Martin Luther King, Jr., John W. McCormack, Frank V. Thompson, 

Woodrow Wilson 
East Boston — Joseph H. Barnes, John Cheverus 
Hyde Park — William Barton Rogers 
Jamaica Plain — Mary E. Curley 
Mattapan — Solomon Lewenberg 
RosLiNDALE — Washiugtou Irving 
Roxbury — Dearborn, Lewis, Phillis Wheatley, Theodore Roosevelt, 

James P. Timilty 
South Boston — Patrick F. Gavin 
South End — Charles Mackey 
West Roxbury — Robert Gould Shaw 

elementary SCHOOLS 

Allston — Barrett, Jackson-Mann 

Brighton — Baldwin, Gardner, Garfield, Oak Square, Winship, 

Hamilton 
Charlestown — Bunker Hill, Harvard-Kent, Warren-Prescott 
City Proper — Carter, Eliot, McKinley, Milmore, Prince, Quincy 
Dorchester — Brooks, Clap, Dever, Dickerman, Endicott, Everett, 

Fifield, Greenwood, S., Hernandez, Holland, Kenny, Lee, Marshall, 

Mather, Motley, Murphy, O'Hearn, Richards, Rochambeau, Russell, 

Shaw, Stone, Winthrop 



143 



East Boston — Alighieri, Bradley, Guild, Kennedy, P., Lyman, 
McKay, O'Donnell, Otis, Sheridan, Adams 

Hyde Park — Channing, Fairmount, Greenwood, E., Grew, Hemen- 

way, Roosevelt, F. 

Jamaica Plain — Abrahams, Agassiz, Bowditch, Curley, J., Fuller, 
Hennigan, Kennedy, J., Manning, Mendell, Parkman, Seaver 

Mattapan — Bradford, Chittick, Taylor, Mattahunt 

RosLiNDALE — Barron, Bates, Conley, Haley, Longfellow, Mozart, 
Philbrick, Sumner 

RoxBURY — Ellis, Emerson, Farragut, Fenwick, Hale, Higginson, 
Mason, Tobin, Trotter 

South Boston — Bigelow, Condon, O'Reilly, Perkins, Perry, Tucker- 
man, Tynan 

West Roxbury — Beethoven, Cannon, Kilmer, Lyndon, Morris, 

Ohrenberger, Ripley 

South End — Blackstone, Hurley, Bancroft 

SPECIAL SCHOOLS 

School for the Deaf — Jackson-Mann — Mann Unit 

English Language Center — For instruction in English language 

Administrative offices 
Administration Building, 26 Court Street. Headquarters of all officials 



TRAFFIC AND PARKING DEPARTMENT 

Office, 721 City Hall 

[Stat. 1929, Chap. 263; Stat. 1954, Chap. 97; Stat. 1956, Chap. 12; Ord. 
1956, Chap. 2; Stat. 1957, Chap. 253; Stat. 1960, Chaps. 84, 267, 
755; Stat. 1962, Chap. 338; Stat. 1965, Chap. 365.] 

OFFICIALS 

Emily Lloyd, Commissioner of Traffic and Parking* 
Traffic and Parking Commission 
Emily Lloyd, Commissioner of Traffic and Parking, Chairman 
Joseph M. Jordan, Police Commissioner, ex officio. Associate 

Commissioner of Traffic and Parking 
Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner of Public Works, "ex officio. 

Associate Commissioner of Traffic and Parking 
George H . Paul, Fire Commissioner, ex officio. Associate Commissioner 
of Traffic andj*arking 

Joanne A. Prevost, Commissioner of Real Property, ex officio, Associate 
Commissioner of Traffic and Parking 

Edna Jacobs, Executive Secretary 

*For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the 
next biennial municipal election at which a Mayor is elected. 



144 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

Robert F. Drummond, Traffic Engineering Director 
Andrew Quintiliani, Associate Traffic Engineer 

The Act establishing the commission became effective April 30, 1929, 
after approval by the Governor and acceptance by the Mayor and City 
Council. By Stat. 1957, Chap. 253, and Stat. 1962, Chap. 338, the Com- 
mission was reorganized. The Commissioner of Traffic and Parking is 
appointed by the Mayor, and until the qualification of his successor, 
receives compensation established by the Mayor and City Council, and 
may be removed by the Mayor. The associate commissioners of traffic 
and parking receive no compensation. 

The commissioner of traffic and parking may employ, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor and to chapter thirty-one of the General Laws, 
engineers, experts, assistants and other officers and employees. The 
commission has exclusive authority to adopt, amend, alter, and repeal 
rules and regulations relative to vehicular street traffic, and to the move- 
ment, stopping or standing of vehicles on, and their exclusion from, all 
or any streets, ways, highways, roads and parkways, under the control 
of the city. The commission has the power to erect, make and maintain, 
or cause to be erected, made and maintained, traffic signs, signals, 
markings and other devices for the control of such traffic in the city and 
for informing and warning the public as to the rules and regulations 
adopted by the commission. 

The latest revision of the Traffic Regulations contains 1,727 one-way 
streets, 3,126 no-parking regulations, and 1,349 stop streets. The com- 
mission maintains 605 traffic signals, including 8 interconnected systems 
in downtown Boston, and 327 miles of lines painted in the roadway, in- 
cluding crosswalks, center lines, lane lines, and stop lines. There are 647 
loading zones, requiring 22,966 feet of painted curbing maintained by 
the commission. Fees amounting to $71,472 are collected for the 
establishment and maintenance of these loading zones. There were 315 
loading zone signs installed this year for which we collected $14,900. 
The commission also maintains 7,900 parking meters, and received 
$1,343,567 in revenue from this source during the year 1977. Issued 198 
licenses for off-street parking lots and collected $97,846 in fees for these 
licenses. 



145 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 

Office, Mezzanine, City Hall 

[Rev. Ord.1898, Chap. 40; Stat. 1908, Chap. 210; Ord. 1908, Chap. 4 
C. C, Title IV., Chap. 9; Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1913, Chaps 
367, 672, 788; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 36; Stat. 1920, Chap. 140 
Ord. 1920, Chap. 12; Ord. 1921, Chaps. 1, 2; Stat. 1922, Chap 
521; Ord. 1925, Chap. 2; Ord. 1926, Chap. 1; Ord. 1930, Chap. 7 
Ord. 1935, Chap. 3; Ord. 1945, Chap. 10; Ord. 1954, Chaps. 2, 6 
Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 25.] 

Lowell L. Richards, III, Collector-Treasurer 

James J. Hyde, First Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Treasury Division 

, First Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Collecting Division 

James J. Cunningham, Second Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Treasury 

Division 
William F. Stoia, Second Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Collecting 

Division 

Treasury Division 
Office, Mezzanine, City Hall 

The Collector-Treasurer has the care and custody of the current funds 
of the City, of all moneys, properties, and securities placed in his charge 
by any statute or ordinance, or by any gift, devise, bequest, or deposit, 
and pays all bills and demands against the City. 

The Collector-Treasurer is also County Collector-Treasurer, 
Treasurer of the Sinking Funds Department, Treasurer-Custodian of 
Boston Retirement Board, Custodian of the Boston Public School 
Teachers' Retirement Fund, and Treasurer of the George Robert White 
Fund. He publishes reports yearly, also monthly statements. 

Collecting Division 
Office, Mezzanine, City Hall 
[Stat. 1875, Chap. 176; Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1888, Chap. 390; 
Stat. 1890, Chap. 418; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 14; Ord. 1908, Chap. 
1; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 10; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486; Stat. 1913, 
Chap. 672; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 13; Ord. 1914, 2d Series, Chap. 
2; Spec. Stat. 1916, Chap. 291; Ord. 1921, Chap. 1; Stat. 1922, 
Chap. 390; Ord. 1925, Chap. 1; Ord. 1954, Chap. 36; Rev. Ord. 
Chap. 25.] 
The Collector-Treasurer collects and receives all taxes and other assess- 
ments, betterments, rates, dues, and moneys payable on any account to 
the City of Boston or the County of Suffolk. Annual reports have been 
pubUshed since 1876, also weekly and daily statements. The Collector- 
Treasurer is also Collector-Treasurer of the County of Suffolk. 



146 



Board of Commissioners of Sinking Funds 
Office, Mezzanine, City Hall 
[R. L., Chap. 27, § 14; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 35; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 9, 
§ 5; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, § 26; Stat. 1910, Chap. 437; Stat. 1911, 
Chap. 165; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 31; Stat. 1914, Chap. 324; Spec. 
Stat. 1915, Chap. 184; Ord. 1916, Chap. 7; Ord. 1925, Chaps. 2, 
30; Ord. 1954, Chap. 2; Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 25.] 

OFFICIALS 

, Chairman 

, Vice-Chairman 



Walter W. Merrill, Secretary 

, Assistant Secretary 

Lowell L. Richards, III, Treasurer 
James J. Hyde, Assistant Treasurer 

commissioners 
Filbert Bellouin 
Alfred W. Archibald 
John Howe 
Patrick E. Roche 
Stephen O. Slyne 
Sarah Lawrence Lightfoot 

The Board of Commissioners of Sinking Funds for the payment or 
redemption of the City debt consists of six members, two of whom are 
appointed annually by the Mayor for a term of three years from May 1 . 
The Board has published annual reports since 1871. The amended City 
Charter, Section 26, prohibits the further establishing of sinking funds, 
but an exception was afterwards made by the Legislature regarding loans 
for Rapids Transit purposes. It also prohibits the depositing of City or 
County money in any bank of which any member of the Board of Sink- 
ing Funds Commissioners is an officer, director or agent. 

Chapter 2 of the Ordinances of 1954 placed the Board of Commis- 
sioners of Sinking Funds in the Treasury Department but not subject to 
the supervision or control of the Collector-Treasurer. 



147 

VETERANS' SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

Office, 294 Washington Street 

[Stat. 1897, Chap. 441; Gen Laws, Chap. 115, as amended; Ord. 1954, 

Chap. 2, §66; Rev. Ord. 1961, Chap. 26.] 
Thomas B. Materazzo, Veterans' Benefits and Services Commissioner 
George L. Glennon, Sr., Administrative Assistant 

The Veterans' Services Department was established as a department 
of the City of Boston by the ordinances of 1954, Chapter 2, Sections 66, 
and is under the charge of a Commissioner who is appointed by the 
Mayor. This department performs the functions formerly performed by 
the Department of Veterans' Services, which it replaces. The Commis- 
sioner exercises all powers and duties for the distribution of state and 
city benefits to veterans and their eligible dependents in the City of 
Boston, such as were formerly vested in the Mayor and Board of 
Aldermen. Under his direction, assistance is rendered to veterans and 
their dependents of the Spanish-American War, Philippine Insurrec- 
tion, China Relief Expedition, Mexican Expedition, World War I, 
World War II, and service with Armed Forces from June 25, 1950, 
through the Korean Conflict and the determination of the Vietnam 
Campaign.*** 

This department provides information, advice and assistance to 
veterans of all wars, to enable them to procure the benefits to which 
they are entitled relative to employment, vocational and educational op- 
portunities, hospitahzation, medical care, pensions, and other veterans' 
benefits. 

David E. Gately, Supervisor of Veterans' Graves and Registration 
Office, 721 City Hall 

By the Ordinances of 1954, Chapter 2, Section 66, there was placed in 
this department an officer, known as the Supervisor of Veterans' Graves 
and Registration, who is appointed by the Mayor subject to the provi- 
sions of Chapter 3 1 of the General Laws and who has the powers and 
performs the duties from time to time conferred or imposed by general 
laws applicable to Boston on persons appointed under Section 9 of 
Chapter 115 of the General Laws. This officer is not subject to the 
supervision or control of the Veterans' Benefits and Services Commis- 
sioner, but, unless otherwise ordered by the Mayor, such officer shall 
not communicate with the Mayor, or make any annual or other report, 
except through such commissioner. 

***February 1, 1955, and the termination of the Vietnam campaign, 
both dates inclusive. 



148 

BOSTON WATER AND SEWER COMMISSION 

10 Post Office Square 

[Chapter 436 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1977.] 

COMMISSIONERS 

John S. Howe, Chairman 

Melvin B. Miller, Vice-Chairman 

Michael J. Rotenburg 

John F. Snedeker, Executive Director 

In July of 1977, a Boston home rule petition proposing the establish- 
ment of a Boston Water and Sewer Commission was filed with the 
Massachusetts State Legislature. Having been approved by the Boston 
City Council and Mayor Kevin H. White, this petition charged a com- 
mission with sole responsibility for the provision and maintenance of 
water and sewer services formerly provided by the Water and Sewer 
Divisions of the City of Boston's Pubhc Works Department. 

Upon signing by the Governor Michael Dukakis of Chapter 436 of the 
General Laws of Massachusetts on July 18, 1977, the home rule petition 
was adopted as state law and the Boston Water and Sewer Commission 
came into existence. 

On August 5, 1977, Mayor White appointed the three commissioners 
to head the commission. 

The Boston Water and Sewer Commission assumed full operations on 
January 1, 1978. Also on that date, all former employees of the city's 
Water and Sewer Divisions became employees of the commission. 

The three commissioners, who serve without compensation are ap- 
pointed to staggered terms by the Mayor with the approval of the City 
Council. The commissioners hire the executive director who is responsi- 
ble for the day-to-day management of the Boston Water and Sewer 
Commission. 



149 



GEORGE ROBERT WHITE FUND 

Office, City Hall Room 620 
Trustees, 1978-1979 
Kevin H. White, Mayor, Chairman 
Lawrence DiCara (78) Joseph M. Tierney (79), President, Boston City 

Council 
Walter W. Merrill, City Auditor 

Edward I. Masterman, President, Boston Bar Association 
John L. Thompson, President, Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce 
Norma L. Fine, Manager 

The late George Robert White, who died in Boston, January 27, 1922, 
left the residue of his estate to the City of Boston to be held as a perma- 
nent charitable trust fund, "the net income only to be used for creating 
works of public utility and beauty, for the use and enjoyment of the in- 
habitants of the City of Boston." 

The control and management of the funds is in the hands of a board 
of five trustees, consisting of the Mayor as Chairman, the President of 
the City Council, the City Auditor, the President of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce and the President of the Bar Association of the 
City of Boston. 

At a meeting of the Trustees held on Tuesday, April 5, 1938, it was 
unanimously voted that the services of a paid manager be engaged. In 
accordance with this vote the custody care, control and management of 
the George Robert White Fund is now in the hands of a Manager; all 
legal matters are attended to by the Corporation Counsel; all financial 
disbursements and investments are in the hands of the Collector- 
Treasurer; all collections and receipts are handled by the Collector- 
Treasurer; and the examination of all bills and demands rendered 
against the Fund, together with the approval of all expenditures and the 
auditing of all accounts, rests with the City Auditor. 

Health Units have been provided at Baldwin Place and North Margin 
Street in the North End, at Paris and Emmons Streets, East Boston, at 
Dorchester and West Fourth Streets, South Boston, at Blue Hill Avenue 
and Savin Street, Roxbury, at High and Elm Streets, Charlestown, at 
Blossom and Parkman Streets, West End, at Whittier and Hampshire 
Street, Roxbury, at Central Avenue, Hyde Park, and at Blue Hill 
Avenue and Harvard Street, Dorchester, in the hope of being able, by 
proper instruction, to better the living and health conditions of the com- 
munities in the congested districts. 

A Prado has been established at Hanover and Unity streets in the 
North End, to provide an open air space for the residents of the North 
End. In 1935, the Trustees voted to change the name of the Prado to 
Paul Revere Mall. 

In the spring of 1936 the Trustees voted to establish a wading pool 
and locker building in the yard in the rear of the Whittier Street Health 
Unit, Roxbury. The wading pool and locker building have since been in 
full operation for the use and enjoyment of the inhabitants of the City. 



150 



In the summer of 1936 the Trustees voted to have thirteen memorial 
bronze tablets fabricated and placed in the walls of the Paul Revere Mall 
in the North End. The inscriptions to be placed on these tablets involved 
considerable research work and as a consequence these tablets were not 
completed until the summer of 1940. This was done as an improvement 
to the Mall. 

On January 27, 1940, the Trustees voted to purchase an equestrian 
statue of Paul Revere — made by Cyrus E. Dallin, sculptor — to be placed 
in the Paul Revere Mall in the North End, as an addition and further im- 
provement in accordance with provision of the will. 

On September 22, 1940, the Trustees dedicated the thirteen bronze 
tablets and the statue of Paul Revere at the Paul Revere Mall in the 
North End. 

Starting in the spring of 1946 and ending in the fall of 1949 the 
Trustees of the fund voted to establish the following projects from the 
Income of the Fund: 

Health Unit at Central avenue and Elm street, Hyde Park. 
Health Unit at Blue Hill avenue and Harvard street, Dorchester. 
Swimming Pool, Diving Pool and Locker Building, Doherty 

Heights, Charlestown 
Schoolboy Stadium in Franklin Park 
War Memorial Center in the Fens 
Swimming Pool, Diving Pool and Locker Building, Commercial 

street. North End Park 
War Memorial Veterans Section, Mt. Hope Cemetery 

May 25, 1971, the Trustees voted to make extensive improvements to 
the George Robert White Fund, Health Units in East Boston and South 
Boston. Such improvements were completed in 1974. 

In June, 1975, the Trustees voted to acquire the National Theatre in 
the South End for the purpose of renovating the theatre to provide a 
community performing arts facility. 

In November, 1975, the Trustees voted to purchase the land and 
building located at 332 Hanover Street, to be used as a community 
health center in the North End, and to renovate the South Boston 
Health Unit at 133 Dorchester Street, South Boston. 

In April, 1976, the Trustees voted to authorize funds for the purpose 
of making capital improvements to the George Robert White Fund 
Health Unit on 895 Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester. Such improvements 
were completed in 1978. 

In December, 1977, the Trustees acquired the land and building at 
180-2 Tremont Street. The building is presently leased to the City of 
Boston and occupied by various City agencies, including the Office of 
Cultural Affairs, the Air Pollution Control Commission, the Conserva- 
tion Commission, the Back Bay/Beacon Hill Little City Hall, and the 
Office of Public Information on Classification. 



151 



YOUTH ACTIVITIES COMMISSION 

73 Hemenway Street, Boston 
(Chapter 391 of the Acts of 1965) 

OFFICIALS 

Thomas C. Heffernan, Chairman 
John F. Kelly, Executive Director 

COMMISSIONERS 

Mary Aaron, term ending May 1, 1981 
RoscoE Baker, term ending May 1, 1978 
John J. Connelly, term ending May 1, 1972 
Ann T. Murphy, term ending May 1, 1975 
Bernard Fitzgerald, term ending May 1, 1979 
Thomas C. Heffernan, appointee of School Superintendent 
William W. Francis, appointee of Chairman of Youth Services 
Department 

The Youth Activities Commission consists of seven members, five of 
whom are appointed by the Mayor, and one each by the Superintendent 
of Schools and the Chairman of the Department of Youth Services. 

The commission is responsible for the prevention and control of 
juvenile delinquency in the city. In its effort to meet this mandate, the 
commission has established eleven Youth Resource Centers 
(AUston/Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, East Boston, Hyde Park, 
Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Roslindale, Roxbury, South Boston and the 
South End) and maintains individual area youth workers in other high 
delinquency areas in the city. 

The youth workers at each Youth Resource Center provide intensive 
counseling for the select number of juveniles in their respective 
caseloads and also perform outreach group work. Extensive referrals 
are solicited from the police, the courts, and the schools. Area youth 
workers assigned to individual neighborhoods perform outreach work 
with their groups of clients and also stress individual contact. Youth 
Resource Center and outreach workers are both supported by the com- 
mission's counseling, community organization, recreation and special 
projects, research and planning staffs in a coordinated and comprehen- 
sive effort of dealing with delinquency prevention and control. 





Fold Out 
Here 



•S 



* * 



COUNTY 

AND COURT 

OFFICIALS 



154 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK 

AH debts and expenses of the County of Suffolk are borne by the City 
of Boston, unless otherwise specified. 

County Commissioners for the County of Suffolk— The Mayor and 
City Council of Boston 

County Auditor — Walter W. Merrill 
County Treasurer — Lowell L. Richards III 



SUFFOLK COUNTY COURT HOUSE 
COMMISSION 

Office, Room 318, New Court House 

[Stat. 1939, Chap. 383.] 

John E. Powers, Chairman, Appointed by the Chief Justice of the 

Supreme Judicial Court 
Dennis J. Kearney, Sheriff of Suffolk County 
Albert Sherman, Appointed by the Governor 

The Commission chooses its own Chairman and its own Secretary. 
Its members receive no compensation for their services. 

The Commission was estabUshed by Special Act of the Legislature, 
for the care, custody and control of the Suffolk County Court House, 
and is required to appoint a Custodian and such other officers as it may 
deem necessary for the proper operation of the building and to deter- 
mine their term or terms of service. 

The Commission succeeded to the authority given to the Sheriff of 
Suffolk County over the Suffolk County Court House, in Chapter 525 
of the Acts of 1922, and took over the management and control of the 
Court House upon its completion during 1939, by the Special Commis- 
sion created under Chapter 474 of the Acts of 1935 for providing addi- 
tional accommodations and facilities for the Suffolk County Court House. 

A thirty percent contribution by the Commonwealth to the annual 
costs and charges of maintenance and operation of the Court House be- 
gan in the calendar year 1939 when the additional Court House enlarge- 
ments and improvements, made under authority of Chapter 474 of the 
Acts of 1935, were "substantially completed" and in "actual use," and 
the remaining 70 percent is paid by the City of Boston. While the Com- 
monwealth now pays 30 percent of the operating costs of the Court 
House, it has taken no part in its operations, other than the exercise of 
its authority in the makeup of the Commission in charge, and other than 
expanding its tenancy of state-supported departments on a 24-hour-a-day 
basis, like the State Board of Probation, Land Court, State Supreme 
Judicial Court, and Recorder of Decisions. 



155 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Room 627, New Court House 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 12, § 12, etc.; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 373, 439; Stat. 1912, 

Chap. 576; Stat. 1913, Chap. 602; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 269; Stat. 

1920, Chap. 451; Stat. 1922, Chap. 277; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 398, 485.] 

District A ttorney — Newman Flanagan 

Executive Assistant — David M. Rodman 

Administrative Secretary — Dorothy E. VanDanich 



Assistants 



Stephen S. Abany 
Joseph S. Ayoub, Jr. 
Philip T. Beauchesne 
John D. Doyle 
Alvan L. Brody 
James R. Brunette 
Paul V. Buckley 
Timothy M. Burke 
Thomas J. Butters 
James E. Caffrey 
Charles M. Campo 
Willie I. Carpenter, Jr. 
Christopher F. Connolly 
Robert L. Cooperstein 
Margaret A. Corrigan 
Judith A. Craven 
Gary C. Crossen 
Thomas F. Cunningham, Jr. 
Kathleen M. Curry 
William A. Doherty 
William J. Doyle 
Robert M. Duzan 
Bernard J. Dwyer 
William G. Ferullo 
James E. Foley 
Ellen L. Fulham 
Clyde W. R. Garrigan 
Francis X. Gaughen (Sp.) 
John W. Gibbons 
Brian F. Gilligan 
John B. Glynn 
BRUcfi G. Goldman 
Bonita M. Gottschalk 
Sandra L. Hamlin 
Suzanne Grealy 
James S. Hamrock, Jr. 
Leonard J. Henson 
Mary E. Hogan (Sp.) 
Thomas C. Horgan 
Lloyd T. Horton, Sr. 
Barbara E. Johnson 
Richard W. Kelly 
John A. Kiernan 
David H. Kopelman 
James J. Larkin 



Joseph A. Laurano 
Paul K. Leary 
Alan L Levine 
Robert A. Long, Jr. 
James M. Lynch 
Margaret M. Madden (Sp.) 
John C. Mahoney 
John V. Mahoney, III 
Vincent G. Mannering 
Michael J. Martin 
James D. McDaniel, Jr. . 
Joseph A. McDonough '^ 
Robert J. McKenna, Jr. 
Frank Mondano 
John M. Moscardelli 
Ronald F. Moynahan 
Gerald F. Muldoon 
Daniel C. Mullane 
Thomas J. Mundy, Jr. 
Stephen M. Needle 
Robert W. Nelson, Jr. 
Mark Newman 
Louis M. Nordlinger 
Francis A. O'Meara 
Timothy P. O'Neill 
Michael J. Powell, Jr. 
M. Suzanne Presley (Sp.) 

ROSEMARIE PRICOPOULOS 

Dennis A. Quilty 
Thomas Reardon 
Brent D. Redstone 
Christopher C. Rich (Sp.) 
John J. Rogers, Jr. 
Robert J. Schilling (Sp.) 
Gary W. Schubert 
Earl M. Seligman 
Walter J. Shea 
Jeremiah P. Sullivan, Jr. 
Stephen J. Tassinari 
Arthur M. Tiernan, Jr. 
Robert E. Tierney 
Philip A. Tracy, Jr. 
Michael J. Traft 
William T. Walsh 



156 

SUFFOLK COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE 

Downtown Center, University of Massachusetts 
Boston MA 02125 

[Chapter 128, Sec. 40-45, as revised by Chapter 77 of the Acts of 1975 
and amended by chapter 924 of the Acts of 1977.] 

Trustees 

John E. Powers, Chairman 
Joseph M. Tierney 
Augusta H. Bailey 
John McColgan 
George A. Johnson 
Andrew P. Quigley, Sr. 
Reverend Hillary Zanon 
Ann Kehoe 
Lorraine Sitewicz 

Charles Yergatian, Director 

The Board of Trustees for Suffolk County Extension was established 
in 1975. The board consists of nine members, elected by the Boston City 
Council. Trustees who serve without compensation, oversee and govern 
the activities of the Suffolk County Cooperative Extension Service 
Staff. 

Cooperative Extension is a voluntary, noncredit system of education 
for adults and young people in agriculture, home economics and related 
areas. Extension staff organize, conduct, provide and facilitate public 
service educational programs and services in agricultural related areas 
and make their services available to residents throughout Suffolk 
County. The County of Suffolk, the University of Massachusetts and 
the United States Department of Agriculture and cosponsors of 
Cooperative Extension in Suffolk County. 



LAND COURT DEPARTMENT 

Room 408, Court House, Boston MA 02108 
617-227-7470 
Administrative Justice — William I. Randall, Framingham 
Justice — Marilyn M. Sullivan, Wollaston 
Justice — John E. Fenton, Jr., Andover 
Recorder — Margaret M. Daly, Boston 
Deputy Recorder — Jeanne M. Maloney, Belmont 
Chief Title Examiner — Orrin P. Rosenberg, Boston 
Title Examiner — Margaret D. Cronin, Quincy 
Title Examiner — Ann-Marie J. Breuer, Hamilton 
Title Examiner — John Whelton, North Quincy 
Title Examiner — Glendon J. Buscher Jr., Quincy 
Assistant Clerks — Charles W. Trombly, Jr., North Andover, 

Melvin a. Karas, Swampscott 
Deputy Assistant Clerks — Frank J. Richmond, Mattapan, 

Edwin Hawkridge, Wellesley Hills 



157 



MEDICAL EXAMINERS FOR SUFFOLK COUNTY 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 38; Stat. 1908, Chap. 424; Stat. 1909, Chap. 273; 
Stat. 1911, Chaps. 252, 274; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 466, 631; Gen. 
Stat. 1916, Chap. 114; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 216; Stat. 1920, 
Chap. 188.] 

The county is divided into two medical districts, Northern and 
Southern, by a hne beginning at the junction of the Brookline line with 
Huntington avenue; thence through Huntington avenue and Fencourt; 
thence through middle of Fens, through Boylston, Berkeley, and Pro- 
vidence streets, Park square, Boylston and Essex streets, Atlantic 
avenue and Summer street to Fort Point Channel; thence through said 
channel. East Berkeley Street, Dorchester avenue, Dorchester street. 
East Fourth and G streets to the harbor. 

Medical Examiners — Northern District, Michael A. Luongg.M.D., 784 
Massachusetts avenue, Boston. Term ends in 1983. Southern Dis- 
trict, 784 Massachusetts avenue, Boston. George W. Curtis, M.D., 
Term ends in 1971. 
Associate Medical Examiners — George G. Katsas, M.D., 784 
Massachusetts avenue, Boston. Term ends in 1983. Leonard Atkins, 
M.D. Term ends in 1971. 
Each is appointed by the Governor for a term of five years. 
Northern District Mortuary is located at 784 Massachusetts avenue. 
Southern District Mortuary is located at 784 Massachuestts avenue. 
George W. Curtis, M.D., is now Medical Examiner, Southern 
District, and George G. Katsas, M.D., is an Associate Medical Ex- 
aminer. Term ends in 1983. 



REGISTER OF DEEDS 

5th Floor, Old Court House 
[Gen. Laws, Chap. 36; Stat. 1895, Chap. 493; Stat. 1904, Chap. 452; 
Stat. 1910, Chap. 373; Stat. 1913, Chap. 737; Gen. Stat. 1919, 
Chap. 296; Stat. 1920, Chap. 495] 

Register of Deeds— Pavl R. Tierney, Esq. Elected by the people in 1976. 

Term ends first Wednesday in Janaury, 1983. 

The Register is ex officio Assistant Recorder of the Land Court. 

Assistant Register— Lawrence 3 . Fallon, Gen. Laws, Chap. 63, Sec. 4. 

Second Assistant Register— ]oHbi Barry, Gen. Laws, Chap. 36, Sec. 5. 

Third Assistant Register— Henry H. Silverman, Gen. Laws, Chap. 36, 

Sec. 5. 
Fourth Assistant Register— John DvFFY. Gen. Laws, Chap. 36, Sec. 5. 



158 



SHERIFF AND DEPUTY SHERIFFS 

Room 102, New Court House 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 37; Stat. 1910, Chap. 373; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 

269, Stat. 1922, Chap. 525.] 

Sheriff— Dej^nis J. Kearney. Term ends first Wednesday in January, 

1981. 
Chief Deputy Sheriff —i maes Regan 
Deputy Sheriffs for Service of Writs — Paul Duffley, Arthur O'Neill, 

Morton Silver, Melvin Toon, Richard Turner, Paul Spellman, Francis, 

DuGGAN, Lois Glass 



COURTS AND COURT OFFICIALS 

Offices in New Court House, Pemberton Square 

SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT 

Chief Justice — Edward F. Hennessey 

Associate Justices — Francis J. Quirico, Robert Braucher, Benjamin 

Kaplan, Herbert P. Wilkins, Paul J. Liacos, Ruth L Abrams 
Clerk for the Commonwealth — Frederick J. Quinlan. Appointed by 

the Court. 
First Assistant Clerk — William M. Cloran, Appointed by the Court. 
Clerk for the County of Suffolk — John E. Powers. Elected. 
Assistant Clerk — Jean M. Kennett. Appointed by the Court. 
Assistant Clerk — Joseph a. ligott. Appointed by the Clerk. 
Assistant Clerk — Patrick J. Hurley. 

Reporter of Decisions — Thomas B. Merritt, Appointed by the Court. 
Executive Secretary — Appointed by the Court. 

Assistant Executive Secretary — John F. Burke. Appointed by the Court. 
Assistant Executive Secretary — Robert S. Bloom. Appointed by the 

Court. 

superior court 

Administrative Judge — John H. Meagher 

Associate Justices — August C. Taveira, James L. Vallely, Francis 
John Good, Vincent R. Brogna, Francis L. Lappin, Joseph Ford, 
Robert H. Beaudreau, Henry H. Chmielinski, Jr., Joseph S. Mit- 
chell, Jr., Samuel T. Tisdale, Andrew R. Linscott, Edward H. 
Bennett, Jr., Alan J. Dimond, Paul V. Rutledge, Paul K. Con- 
nolly, Thomas E. Dwyer, John F. Moriarty, Herbert F. Travers, 
Jr., John J. McNaught, George J. Hayer, James P. Lynch, Jr., 
Kent B. Smith, Raymond R. Cross, Arthur M. Mason, Eileen P. 
Griffin, Roger J. Donahue, David S. Nelson, James P. McGuire, 
Robert J. Hallisey, Samuel Adams, John P. Sullivan, John T. 



159 



RoNAN. Thomas R. Morse. Jr., Francis W. Keating, Robert S. 
Prince, John M. Greaney, Francis P. O'Connor, Charles R. 
Alberti, John J. Irwin, Jr., Paul G. Garrity, Gordon L. Doerfer, 
Edith W. Fine, William G. Young, William W. Simons, Joseph R. 
Nolan 
Executive Secretary, Francis X. Orfanello 
Assistant Executive Secretary — Francis M. Masuret, Jr. 

For Civil Business 
Clerk — Michael Joseph Donovan. Elected by the people in 1976. Teriri 

ends first Wednesday in January, 1983. 
Assistant Clerks — Robert J. Dorgan, First Assistant Clerk, Thomas F. 

Brophey, Assistant Clerk for Equitable Remedies, Francis B. 

Tyrrell, Thomas F. McDonough, Albert L. Crimmins, Walter V. 

Brennan, Rita M. Dunlap, Michael J. Sclafani, Christine M. 

Mackey, John Peter Connolly, Mary T. Gaquin, Francis T. Foley, 

James P. Kelly, Daniel Leo Dailey, Catherine M. McGillicuddy, 

Vera L. Gavin, Kevin G. Murphy, John F. Leary, John J. Lynch. 

For Criminal Business 

Clerk — Edward V. Keating 

First Assistant Clerk — Paul K. Leary 

Second Assistant Clerk — Mary C. Phelan 

Assistant Clerks — Theodore S. Bakas, Thomas M. Ford, Benjamin F. 
Forde, Jr., Dennis P. Glynn, Jr., Ernest J. Handy, A. Daniel 
Keohan, Jr., Patrick J. Lee, Irwin R. Macey, Paul D. Nagle, 
Diana M. Prift, Joseph M. Rubino, Robert J. Shone, Lawrence E. 
Sullivan, John H. Voke, William T. Walsh, Gary D. Wilson 

boston housing court 

Room 1003, New Court House 

[M.G.L. Ch. 185A, Ch. 700, Acts of 1974] 

Chapter 185 A created the Boston Housing Court with jurisdiction 
over a broad range of civil and criminal matters, including those arising 
under statutes concerning "health, welfare, or safety" of landlords and 
tenants. A second judgeship was created in 1974. 

The justices and the clerk are appointed by the Governor. 

The Court has six housing specialists who aid the justices with fact- 
finding and housing expertise. 
Chief Justice — E. George Daher 
Associate Justice — Patrick J. King 
Clerk — R. Susan Dillard 
First Assistant Clerk — Robert L. Lewis 
Assistant Clerk — Ernestine Grace Masone 
Assistant Clerk — Marion G. McElhaney 
Assistant Clerk — Malcolm S. Cone 
Chief Housing Specialist — Felix Vazquez, Jr. 
Assistant Chief Housing Specialist — John E. Laurenti 



160 



BOSTON JUVENILE COURT 

Room 161, Court House 

[Chap. 334, Acts of 1903; Chap. 489, Acts of 1906; Gen. Stat. 1919, 
Chap. 225; Stat. 1922, Chap. 659, Acts of 1965; Chap. 1073, Acts 
1973; Chap. 478, Acts 1978.] 

Justice — Francis G. Poitrast 

Special Justices — George W. Cashman, Roderick L. Ireland 

Clerk — Paul P. Heffernan 

First Assistant Clerk — John P. Bulger 

Second Assistant Clerk — Leonard C. Alkins (on leave) 

Third Assistant Clerk — Judith M. Brennan 

Fourth Assistant Clerk — Leo J. DiCarlo 

Fifth Assistant Clerk — Bruce H. Wall 

Pro-Tern — Kathleen M. Brock 

Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1906, establishing a court to be knov^^n as 
the Boston Juvenile Court for the "Care, Custody, and Discipline of 
Juvenile Offenders," provides for the transfer to said court of the juris- 
dictions, authority, and powers hitherto vested in the Municipal Court 
of Boston, under Chapter 334 of the Acts of 1903. The act took effect 
September 1, 1906. 

The jurisdiction of the court has been increased from time to time, 
and was most recently amended by Chapter 478, Acts of 1978. Presently 
the court serves as an appellate court for the Juvenile Sessions of the 
District Courts of Suffolk County. It is also responsible for all cases 
concerning neglected and abused children in Suffolk County, as well as 
Children in Need of Service petitions in the same jurisdiction. 

Additionally the court has concurrent jurisdiction, with the Boston 
Municipal Court, over adults charged with Contributing to the Delin- 
quency of Minor Children. 

MUNICIPAL COURT OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 218; Stat. 1907, Chap. 179; Stat. 1908, Chap. 191; 
Stat. 1909, Chaps. 386, 434; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 231, 469, §5; Stat. 
1912, Chaps. 648, 649, 660, 672; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 289, 430, 612, 
716, 748; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 35, 409; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chap. 166; 
Gen. Stat. 1916, Chaps. 69, 71, 109, 195, 261, 263; Gen. Stat. 1917, 
Chaps. 262, 330; Gen. Stat. 1918, Chap. 250; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 
553, 614; Stat. 1921, Chap. 284; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 309, 399, 532.] 

Chief Justice — Jacob Lewiton 

Associate Justices — Francis X. Morrissey, Theodore A. Glynn, Jr., 
Harold W. Canavan, A. Frank Foster, Joseph A. Deguglielmo, 
Harry J. Elam, Mario Umana, Margaret Ann Burnham 
All judges are appointed by the Governor, subject to confirmation by 

the Executive Council. 

For Civil Business 
Room 374, Old Court House 

Clerk — Michael J. Coleman. Appointed by the Governor. 
First Assistant Clerk — Neil P. Murphy 



161 



Assistant Clerks — Kevin F. Callahan, John R. Cavanaugh, James P. 

GiANELis, Elizabeth J. Gillis, Margaret Hourigan, George D. 

Lambrenos, Josephine A. Maori, Lucian C. Maori, Richard P. 

Maloney, Thomas F. Necktas, George L. Shea. 

Appointed by the Clerk of the Court with the approval of the 

Justices. 

For Criminal Business 

Room 411, New Court House 

Clerk — John J. Craven, Jr. Appointed by the Governor. 
First Assistant Clerk — Robert E. Block 

First Assistant Clerk in Charge of Juries — Domenic A. Procopio 

Assistant Clerks — John F. Greene, Joseph L. Kenny, John P. 
McCoole, Ruth M. Hunter, Anthony F. Sarno, Francis X. Cun- 
ningham, Michael J. White, J. Peter Donovan, John J. Barlett, 
Paul J. Hartnett 

Appointed by the Clerk of the Court with the approval of the Justices. 

municipal court, BRIGHTON DISTRICT 

52 Academy Hill Road 

Justice — Charles J. Artesani 

Clerk — G. Sherman Blair, Appointed by the Governor. 

Assistant Clerk — Elizabeth P. Crane 

Assistant Clerk — Paul V. Crowley 

Assistant Clerk — Mary Ellen Ryan 

Deputy Assistant Clerk — Maureen A. Callan 

municipal court, charlestown district 

City Square 
Justic — Richard C. Woods 
Special Justice — James J. Mellen 
Full-time Magistrate — S. John Hamano 
First Assistant Clerk — Josephine Brennan 
Second Assistant Clerk — John F. Mullen 
Third Assistant Clerk — Robert E. O'Leary 
Fourth Assistant Clerk— Edward W. Manley 

municipal court, DORCHESTER DISTRICT 

Washington Street and Melville Avenue 

First Justice — Paul H. King 

Presiding Justice — Herbert E. Tucker, Jr. 

Full-time Special Justices — Margaret C. Scott and James W. Dolan 

special Justices— Margaret C. Scott and James W. Dolan 

C/erAr— Manuel V. McKenney 

First Assistant Clerk— Bewamin J. Wall 

Second Assistant Clerk— James T. Buckley 

Third Assistant Clerk— Francis X. Holland 

Fourth Assistant Clerk— Philip D. Oliver 

Fifth Assistant Clerk— Eleanor F. Cadigan 

Sixth Assistant Clerk— James A. Foley 

Seventh Assistant Clerk— Carole E. Boyd 



162 

EAST BOSTON DISTRICT COURT 

Meridian and Paris Street 

Justice — Joseph V. Ferrino 

Special Justice — Neil Colicchio 

Clerk — Joseph R. Faretra 

First Assistant Clerk — Joseph Fiandaca 

Assistant Clerk — Nora N. Benincluore 

Assistant Clerk — Claire Kelley 

Assistant Clerk — Robert T. Fitzpatrick 



trial court of MASSACHUSETTS 
DISTRICT COURT DEPARTMENT, ROXBURY DIVISION 

First Justice — El wood S. McKenney 

Justices — Richard L. Banks, Phillip A. Tracy, John C. Crastley, and 

Baron H. Martin 
Magistrate — Keesler H. Montgomery 
First Assistant Clerk— John A. D' Arcy 
Second Assistant Clerk — Theodore J. Zaborski 
Third Assistant Clerk — Paul W. Shannon 
Fourth Assistant Clerk — William A. Mahoney 
Fifth Assistant Clerk — Joseph Silva 
Sixth Assistant Clerk — William Kaszanek 
Seventh Assistant Clerk— John F. Devlin 
Eight Assistant Clerk — Mildred L. Riley 
Ninth Assistant Clerk — Douglas A. Cox 
Chief Probation Officer — Edward Keegan, Jr. 



municipal court, south boston district 
Municipal Building, East Broadway 

Justice — Lawrence L. Cameron 

Special Justice — Joseph F. Feeney 

Clerk — John E. Flaherty. Appointed by the Governor. 

Second Assistant Clerk — Ralph F. Clougherty 

Assistant Clerk — Helen T. Joyce 

Assistant Clerk — John P. Roache 

Assistant Clerk — William Kennedy, Pro Tern 



municipal court, west ROXBURY DISTRICT, INCLUDING HYDE PARK, 

JAMAICA PLAIN AND ROSLiNDALE, 445 Arborway, Forest Hills, 02130 

Justice — Paul Murphy 
Clerk — John J. Desmond, Pro Tern 
First Assistant Clerk— John J. Desmond 
Second Assistant Clerk — Roger P. Gill 
Third Assistant Clerk— J. Brian Walsh 
Fourth Assistant Clerk— Robert E. Colbert 
Fifth Assistant Clerk— John L. Scolponeti 
Sixth Assistant Clerk— J\mes F. Mannering 



163 



PROBATE COURT AND COURT OF INSOLVENCY 

2nd Floor, Old Court House 
1st Floor, Registry of Probate 
[Gen. Laws, Chaps. 215-217; Stat. 1904, Chap. 455; Stat. 1910, Chap. 
373; Stat, 1912, Chap. 585; Stat. 1913, Chap. 791; Gen. Stat. 1919, 
Chap. 269; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 386, 487; Stat. 1922, Chap. 532.] 

Judges — Mary C. Fitzpatrick, Robert L. Yasi, Joseph P. Warner 
Register — James W. Hennigan, Jr. — 1978 

James M. Connolly — 1979 
First Assistant Register — Arthur A. Kelley 
Second Assistant Register — Thomas N. Foley 
Third Assistant Register — Nancy Gould 
Fourth Assistant Register — John C. Harney 
Fifth Assistant Register — Dorothy M. Conroy 
Sixth Assistant Register — Diane J. Capozzoli 
Executive Assistant — James J. Twomey 

The judges of Probate are appointed by the Governor. The assistant 
registers are appointed by the judges. They and the other officials of this 
Court are paid by the State, as are the clerical assistants to the register. 

Probation Officers 
[Stat. 1880, Chap. 129, §1; P.S. 212, §74; Stat. 1882, Chap. 125; Stat. 
1891, Chap. 256, § §1, 6; Stat. 1892, Chaps. 242, 276, § §1, 3; Stat. 
1897, Chap. 266, §§3; Stat. 1898, Chap. 511, §§1, 2; R.I. Chap. 
217, § §81, 92; Stat. 1905, Chap. 295; Stat. 1906, Chaps. 329, 489, 
§6; Stat. 1907, Chaps. 223, 261; Stat. 1908, Chaps. 190, 637; Stat. 
1909, Chap. 216; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 332, 479; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 
116, 470; Stat. 1912, Chaps. 648, §2, 664; Stat. 1913, Chap. 612, 
§1; Stat. 1915, Chaps. 89, §1, 254, §1; Stat. 1936, Chap. 360; Stat. 
1937, Chap. 186; Stat. 1947, Chaps. 566, §1, 639, 655; Stat. 1948, 
Chap. 640 (Acts of 1949, Chap. 783 has amended the above); 
Chaps. 513, 531, Acts of 1950; Chap. 774, Acts of 1951; Chap. 731, 
Acts of 1965; Chap. 478, Acts of 1978.] 

These officers are appointed by the judges of the respective criminal 
courts to ascertain all facts relating to the offenders brought before the 
courts. In the performance of their official duties they have all the 
powers of poHce officers. 
Chap. 276, Sec. 83 as amended by Sec. 290 of Chap. 478 of the Acts 

of 1978 
"... The administrative justices of the municipal court of the city of 
Boston, subject to the approval of the associate justices thereof, and the 
justices of each other district court and of the Boston juvenile court . . . 
may appoint such male and female probation officers as they may 
respectively from time to time deem necessary for their respective 
courts; . . . and provided further that any such appointment shall be 
revised by the chief administrarive justice of the trial court for com- 
pliance with the standards promulgated under section eight of chapter 
two hundred and eleven B. If the chief administrative justice finds that 
any such appointment does not comply with said standards he shall res- 
cind the appointment ..." 



164 



MUNICIPAL COURT OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

Chief Probation Officer— {Dec. 7/21/78; no appt. to date) 

First Assistant Chief Probation Officer— John S. Tobin 

Second Assistant Chief Probation Officer — Margaret E. Conley 

Court Physician — H. Bernard fisher, M.D. 

Deputy Probation Officer — Francis J. Burke 

Deputy Probation Officer — Matthew C. Regan 

Probation Officers — Thomas E. Curry, Jr., Dorothy M. Murray, 
Edward M. Sacks, Daniel F. Griffin, Jr., Phyllis M. Folkes, Elisabeth 
Fuller, Nazzareno N. Modica, Leo Osgood, Jr., Joseph B. Tavada, 
Joseph C. Tomasello, Ann L. Fuller, Thomas W. Lally. Jr., Robert 
P. Nichols, Joseph T. Tracey, Dana N. Bulger, Nancy M. Escott. 
William F. Fleming, Barbara J. Wells, John K. Cahill, Marie 
Griffin, Nancy H. Hezel, Norbert F. Leary, Jr., James C. Taylor. 

BOSTON JUVENILE COURT 

Chief Probation Officer— Lovis G. Maglio 
First Assistant Chief Probation Officer — Nicholas F. Gatto 
Assistant Chief Probation Officers — Katherine M. Connolly, Edward 
R. Sheffington, Joseph M. O'Reilly, Dorothy L. Parks, Law- 
rence S. Plenty, Salvatore Paterna. 
Probation Officers— Daniel J. Byrne, Charles Bevilacqua, Paul V. 
Kelley, Anthony R. Polcari, Evelyn G. Porter, Mary Gal- 
lagher, Daniel J. Passacantilli, William J. Barrett, Michael 
Garbacik, Barry E. Hickman, Teresa A. Marino, Joseph T. 
McMann, Francine L. Pope, Gary L. Ambler, Rhonda Bolling, 
Thomas J. Butler, Theresa M. Craven, Gloria Fernandez, 
Thomas L. Gately, Kim V. Marrkand, Annmarie E. Rock- 
well, Richard M. Scott, Amy Jo Freedman, Linda J. Romano, 
Charles J. McCarthy, Janet M. Maher, William P. Kilroy, 
Patrick J. King. 

district court department 
Brighton Division— Chief Probation Officer Thomas C. O'Brien, 
Assistant Chief Probation Officer David M. Crane, Assistant Chief 
Probation Officer Donald W. Stevens, Probation Officers, Joseph 
Bianculli, Melvin G. Briggs, Thomas E. Casey, John T. Driscoll, 
Timothy F. Murphy, David Noonan, Charles Oullette, Donald 
W. Stevens, Marjorie A. Van, Brian Wallace. Charlestown Divi- 
sion — Chief Probation Officer James W. Conway, Assistant Chief 
Probation Officer Daniel Doherty, Probation Officers, Harvey F. 
Brooks, John D. Collins, James L. Dunn., Chelsea Division — Chief 
Probation Officer David D. Greenspan, Assistant Chief Probation 
Officer Donald J. Proctor, Probation Officers, Vito J. Alvia, 
Diane Barrett, John E. Hurley, Howard Martin, Jacqueline 
Miller, James P. Monahan, Mark Panarese, Karen M. Smith, 
Edward P. Volta, Donald A. Waggenheim, William J. White. 
Dorchester Division — Chief Probation Officer Richard Dwyer, Assist- 
ant Chief Probation Officer Pearlis M. Jones, Assistant Chief Proba- 
tion Officer Winston J. Prescod, Assistant Chief Probation Officer 
William J. Vaughan, Assistant Chief Probation Officer Brian Cal- 



165 



LERY (Acting), Assistant Chief Probation Officer Bernard Fitzgerald 
(Acting), Probation Officers, James A. Adams, Mary P. Brennan, 
John Clough, James L. Crowe, Mira Fish, John R. Englebretsen, 
Maureen S. Jones, Francis E. Kelly, James D. Kent, Brian M. 
Leahy, Robert P. Manion, William D. Manning, Ann Marie 
McDoNOUGH, James R. McLaughlin, Eugene P. O'Brien, Paul G. 
O'Hara, Juan Jose Palmerola, Lloyd Parham, Jr. Edward Pollis, 
William J. Stewart, III, Robert J. Sullivan, Timothy F. Sullivan, 
John Taylor, Richard C. Woods, Patricia A. Wynn. East Boston 
Division — Chief Probation Officer James A. Sartori, Assistant Chief 
Probation Officer Vincent D. Basile, Assistant Chief Probation 
Officer Ciriaco Tordiglione, Probation Officers, Clyde DeBay, 
Brenda Kane, Marianne Kelly, Albert N. Newcomb, William J. 
Pepicelli, Vincent Santosuosso, Michael Wilk. Roxbury Division 
— Chief Probation Officer Edward J. Keegan, First Assistant Chief 
Probation Officer Norma Kilson, Assistant Chief Probation Officer 
JocELYN L Covington, Assistant Chief Probation Officer Benjamin 
Dames, Assistant Chief Probation Officer Arthur A. Devin, Assistant 
Chief Probation Officer Luis Duran, Assistant Chief Probation 
Officer Marcia Scott (temporary), Assistant Chief Probation Officer 
John M. Teehan; Probation Officers, Jeannette Ronan Akerstrom, 
Mary S. Ball, Salvatore Bellistri, David C. Comerford, Evan P. 
Cook, Dennis R. D'Arcy, Willl\m P. Dever, Robert Fillipone, Ellen 
F. Genereux(Slaney), Richard J. Gorman, Ronel W. Gunn, Richard 
Hyde, Katherine M. Kane (Calada), Christina M. Kerr, Pedro 
Lopez, Raul Marrero, Peter J. Mazzapica, Barbara Martin, 
Robert McDonough, William McCormick, Donald Mumford, 
Albert Murphy, Eugene O'Brien, Edward Pina, Edward P. 
Rooney, Pamela Rosengard, John Rourke, Henry Scagnoli, Jr., 
Raymond A. Slayton, James E. Spencer, Dorothy Steward, 
Joseph J. Underwood, William Wallace, James Wynn. South 
Boston Division— Chief Probation Officer William R. Gillespie, 
Assistant Chief Probation Officer Regina Gibbons, Probation Of- 
ficers; Daniel P. Connors, William R. Hanrahan, Francis J. 
Pedersen. West Roxbury Division — Chief Probation Officer Edith 
V. Mace, Assistant Chief Probation Officer James F. Holland, 
Probation Officers, Leo D. Brannelly, Gerald Palmer, James J. 
Rush, Timothy F. Tobin, Jr., Adita Vasquez. 

superior court 
Chief Probation Officer— Kenneth G. Lehane 
First Assistant Chief Probation Officer — Daniel Paul Toomey 
Assistant Chief Probation Officers — Joseph P. Donnelly, Jr., 

Richard A. Luccio 
Probation Officers (male) — Robert L. Boyer, Milton L. Britton, 
James P. Concannon, John F. Cremens, Jr., Richard H. 
Cronin, Henry DeLeon, Henry J. Dobbyn, Joseph G. 
Guerreiro, Thomas A. McPhee, Robert C. O'Shea, Michael 
G. Pano, Sandy J. Stillwell, David R. Sullivan, Edward F. 
Walsh, Charles R. Wiley 
Probation Officers ifema.le)—MRS. Rosalyn J. Agbodoe, Miss Laura 
R. Alfieri, Miss Denyse J. Williams 



MEMBERS OF 
CITY GOVERNMENT 



Mayors and Certain Other Officials 
Since 1822 
1909-1977 



Orators Appointed by the City Since 1771 



168 



1909 



MAYOR 
GEORGE A. HIBBARD* 

ALDERMEN 
FREDERICK J. BRAND, Chairman 



James M. Curley 
Daniel A. Whelton 
Daniel J. Donnelly t 
George P. Anderson 
Walter Ballantyne 
Frederick J. Brand 
W. Dudley Cotton, Jr. 



James P. Timilty 
J. Frank O'Hare 
John J. Attridge 
Charles L. Carr 
Thomas J. Giblin 
Matthew Hale 



Ward 1 
Edward C. R. Bagley 
Frank A. Goodwin 
Joseph A. Hoey 

Ward 2 
Joseph H. Pendergast 
Dennis A. O'Neil 
Michael J. Brophy 

Wards 
James J. Brennan 
Joseph A. Dart 
William J. Murray 

Ward 4 
Francis M. Ducey 
Patrick B. Carr 
James I. Green 

Wards 
John J. Buckley 
William E. Carney 
Edward A. Troy 

Ward 6 
Stephen Gardella 
Francis D. O'Donnell 
Alfred Scigliano 

Ward? 
John L. Donovan 
John T. Kennedy 
Dominick F. Spellman 

Wards • 
James J. Ryan 
James A. Bragan 
Adolphus M. Burroughs 

Ward 9 
Issac Gordon 
Robert J. Howell 
Thomas B. McKeagney 



John T. Priest, City Clerk 
COUNCILMEN 
GEORGE C. MCCABE, President 
Ward 10 
J. Henderson AUston 
Channing H. Cox 
WiUiam S. Kinney 



Ward 11 
Courtenay Crocker 
Theodore Hoague 
Charles H. Moore 

Ward 12 
Seth Fenelon Arno 
Alfred G. Davis 
Francis J. H. Jones 

Ward 13 
Leo F. McCuUough % 
Stephen A. Welch 
Coleman E. Kelly 

Ward 14 
Cornelius J. Fitzgerald 
Thomas J. Casey 
Joseph L. Collins 

Ward 15 
John O'Hara 
William T. Conway 
Joseph A. O'Bryan 

Ward 16 
John D. McGivern 
Hugh M. Garrity 
William D. McCarthy 

Ward 17 
Thomas M. Joyce 
Francis J. Brennan 
John D. Connors 

Joseph O'Kane, Clerk 



Ward 18 
Daniel F. Cronin 
Michael F. O'Brien 
George Kenney 



Ward 19 
Peter A. Hoban 
William J. Kohler 
John J. Donovan 

Ward 20 
Charles T. Harding 
Harry R. Gumming 
William Smith, Jr. 

Ward 21 
William N. Hackett 
John Ballantyne 
Walter R. Meins 

Ward 22 
William H. Morgan 
George Penshorn 
Bernhard G. Krug 

Ward 23 
George W. Carruth 
George W. Smith 
Ward D. Prescott 

Ward 24 
Frank B. Crane 
James A. Hart 
Clifford C. Best 

Ward 25 
Edward C. Webster 
George C. McCabe 
Charles H. Warren 



♦Elected for two years fDied June 23, 1909 

^Resigned June 3, 1909 



169 



Term Ends in 1973 
John J. Attridge 
Matthew Hale 
Walter L. Collins 



1910 

Mayor 

JOHN F. FITZGERALD 

CITY COUNCIL 

WALTER BALLANTYNE, President 



Term Ends in 1912 
James M. Curley 
Walther Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 

1911 



Term Ends in 1911 
Frederick J. Brand 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 



Terms Ends in 1914 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 
Ernest E. Smith 



Mayor 

JOHN F. FITZGERALD 

CITY COUNCIL 

WALTER L. COLLINS, President 



Term Ends in 1913 
John J. Attridge 
Matthew Hale 
Walter L. Collins 

1912 



Term Ends in 1912 
James M. Curley 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 



Term Ends in 1915 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 
John A. Coulthurst 



Term Ends in 1916 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James A Watson 



MAYOR 

JOHN F. FITZGERALD 

CITY COUNCIL 

JOHN J. ATTRIDGE, President 

Term Ends in 1914 Term Ends in 1913 

Daniel J. McDonald John J. Attridge 

Timothy J. Buckley Matthew Hale 

Ernest E. Smith Walter L. Collins 

1913 

Mayor 

JOHN F. FITZGERALD 

CITY COUNCIL 
THOMAS J. KENNY, President 



Term Ends in 1915 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 
John A. Coulthurst 

1914 



Term Ends in 1914 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 
Ernest E. Smith 



Term Ends in 1917 
Daniel J. McDonald 
George W. Coleman 
William H. Woods 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

DANIEL J. MCDONALD, President 



Term Ends in 1916 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1915 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 
John A. Coulthurst 



Note. — The Board of Aldermen and Common Council were abohshed by the amended 
City Charter of 1909 and the Qity Council was established, consisting of nine members. 



170 



1915 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
GEORGE E. COLEMAN, President 



Term Ends in 1918 
Walter Ballantyne 
John A. Coulthurst 
Henry E. Hagan 



Term Ends in 1917 
George W. Coleman 
Daniel J. McDonald 
William H. Woods* 



Term Ends in 1916 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James A. Watson 



♦Councillor Woods died May 3, 1915, and the City Council elected James J. Storrow, 
May 24, to serve in his place for the remainder of the municipal year. 

1916 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
HENRY E. HAGAN, President 

Term Ends in 1918 Term Ends in 1917 

Walter Ballantyne Daniel J. McDonald 

John A. Coulthurst * George W. Coleman 

Henry E. Hagan Thomas J. Kenny 



Term Ends in 1919 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James J. Storrow 



♦Councillor Coulthurst died June 30, 1916, and the City Council elected Geoffrey B. 
Lehy, October 17, to serve in his place for the remainder of the municipal year. 

1917 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
JAMES J. STORROW, President 

Term Ends in 1919 Term Ends in 1918 

John J. Attridge Walter Ballantyne 

Walter L. Collins Henry E. Hagan 

James J. Storrow Alfred E. Wellington 

1918 

ANDREW J. PETERS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
Walter L. Collins, President 

Term Ends in 1920 Term Ends in 1919 

Francis J. W. Ford John J. Attridge 

Daniel J. McDonald Walter L. Collins 

James A. Watson James J. Storrow 

1919 

ANDREW J. PETERS, MAYOR 

City council 
Francis J. W. Ford, President 

Term Ends in 1921 Term Ends in 1920 

Henry E. Hagan Francis J. W. Ford 

Daniel W. Lane Daniel J. McDonald 

James T. Moriarty James A. Watson 

1920 



Term Ends in 1920 
Francis J. W. Ford 
Daniel J. McDonald 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1921 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T. Moriarty 



Term Ends in 1922 
Walter L. Collins 
John A. Donoghue 
Edward F. McLaughlin 



Term Ends in 1923 
David J. Brickley 
Francis J. W. Ford 
James A. Watson 



ANDREW J. PETERS, MAYOR 
City council 

JAMES T. MORIARTY, President 

Term Ends in 1922 Term Ends in 1921 

Walter L. CoUins Henry E. Hagan 

John A. Donoghue Daniel W. Lane 

Edward F. McLaughlin James T. Moriarty 



171 



Term Ends in 1924 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T. Moriarty 



1921 

ANDREW J. PETERS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

JAMES A. WATSON, President 

Term Ends in 1923 Term Ends in 1922 

David J. Brickley Walter L Collins 

Francis J. W. Ford John A. Donoghue 

James A. Watson Edward F. McLaughlin 



Term Ends in 1925 
John A. Donoghue 
George F. Gilbody 
William J. Walsh 



1922 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
DAVID J. BUCKLEY, President 



Term Ends in 1924 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T. Moriarty 



Term Ends in 1923 
David J. Brickley 
Francis J. W. Ford 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1926 
David J. Brickley 
William C. S. Healey 
James A. Watson 



1923 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

DANIEL W. LANE, President 

Term Ends in 1925 Term Ends in 1924 

John A. Donoghue Henry E. Hagan 

George F. Gilbody Daniel W. Lane 

William J. Walsh James T. Moriarty 



Daniel W. Lane 
James T. Moriarty 
James T. Purcell 



1924 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 

JOHN A. DONOGHUE, President 

David J. Brickley John A. Donoghue 

William C. S. Healey George F. Gilbody 

James A. Watson William J. Walsh 



Daniel W. Lane 
James T. Moriarty 
James T. Purcell 



1925 

JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 

JAMES T. MORIARTY, President 

David J. Brickley John A. Donoghue 

William C. S. Healey George F. Gilbody 

James A. Watson William J. Walsh 



1926 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Michael J. Mahoney 
Henry Parkman, Jr. 
William G. Lynch 



MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 
CHARLES G. KEENE, President 
John F. Dowd Thomas W. McMahon 

Michael J. Ward George F. Gilbody 

Walter J. Freeley Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Edward L. Englert Walter E. Wragg 

Herman L. Bush Horace Guild 

Joseph McGrath Frederic E. Dowling 

Israel Ruby John J. Heffernan 



172 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Michael J, Mahoney 
Henry Parkman, jr. 
William G. Lynch 



1927 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

JOHN J. HEFFERNAN, President 



John F. Dowd 
Michael J. Ward 
Walter J. Freeley 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Ruby 



Thomas W. McMahon 
George F. Gilbody 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 
Walter E. Wragg 
Horace Guild 
Charles G. Keene 
Frederic E. Dowling 



Timothy F. Donovan 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Henry Parkman, jr. 
Michael J. Mahoney 
William G. Lynch 
John F. Dowd 



MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
THOMAS H. GREEN, President 



Michael J. Ward 
Roger E. Deveney 
William A. Motley, jr. 
Herman L. Bush 
Frank E. Sullivan 
Israel Ruby 
Thomas W. McMahon 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 

Peter J. Murphy 

Peter A. Murray 

Charles G. Keene 

Frederic E. Dowling 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1929 



Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Henry Parkman, jr. 
Michael J. Mahoney 
WilHam G. Lynch 
John F. Dowd 



MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
TIMOTHY F. DONOVAN, President 



Michael J. Ward 
Roger E. Deveney 
William A. Motley, jr. 
Herman L. Bush 
Frank E. Sullivan 
Israel Ruby 
Thomas W. McMahon 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 

Peter J. Murphy 

Peter A. Murray 

Charles G. Keene 

Frederic E. Dowling 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1930 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Laurence Curtis, 2d 
Michael J. Mahoney 
John F. Dowd 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
WILLIAM G. LYNCH, President 



Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F. Power 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Ruoy 
Francis E. Kelley 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

Joseph P. Cox 

James Hein 

Edward M. Gallagher 



173 



1931 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Laurence Curtis, 2d 
Michael J. Mahoney 
William G. Lynch 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

City council 
JOSEPH McGRATH, President 
John F. Dowd 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F. Power 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Israel Rudy 
Francis E. Kelly 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

Joseph P. Cox 

James Hein 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1932 



William H. Barker 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
George W. Roberts 
Laurence Curtis, 2d 
George P. Donovan 
William G. Lynch 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

EDWARD M. GALLAGHER, President 



John F. Dowd 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F. Power 
Edward L. Englert 
David M. Brackman 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Ruby 



Albert L. Fish 
Francis E. Kelly 
Thomas Burke 
Clement A. Norton 
Peter A. Murray 
Joseph P. Cox 
James Hein 



1933 



William H. Barker 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
George W. Roberts 
Laurence Curtis, 2d 
George P. Donovan 
William G. Lynch 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
JOSEPH MCGRATH, President 

John F. Dowd 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F. Power 
Edward L. Englert 
David M. Brackman 
Israel Ruby 
Francis E. Kelly 



Albert L. Fish 
Thomas Burke 
Clement A. Norton 
Peter A. Murray 
Joseph P. Cox 
James Hein 
Edward M. Gallagher 



1934 



FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD, MAYOR 



Henry Selvitella 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
George W. Roberts 
Henry L. Shattuck 
George P. Donovan 
John E. Kerrigan 



CITY COUNCIL 
JOHN F. DOWD, President 
Richard D. Gleason 
John J. Doherty 
Edward L. Englert 
David M. Brackman 
Joseph McGrath 
Maurice M. Goldman 
Martin H. Tobin 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson jr. 

Cement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



174 



1935 



Henry Selvitella 
Thomas H. Green 
George W. Roberts 
Henry L. Shattuck 
George P. Donovan 
John E. Kerrigan 
John F. Dowd 



FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD, MAYOR 

CITYCOUNCIL 
JOHN I. FITZGERALD, President 

Richard D. Gleason 
John J. Doherty 
Edward L. Englert 
David M. Brackman 
Joseph McGrath 
Maurice M. Goldman 
Martin H. Tobin 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1936 



Henry Selvitella 
James J. Mellen 
George W. Roberts 
Henry L. Shattuck 
George A. Murray 
John E. Kerrigan 
John F. Dowd 



FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 



JOHN I. FITZGERALD, President 



Richard D. Gleason 
John J. Doherty 
James J. Kilroy 
David M. Brackman 
Peter J. Fitzgerald 
Sidney Rosenberg 
Martin H. Tobin 



John J. McGrath 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1937 



Henry Selvitella 
James J. Mellen 
George W. Roberts 
Henry L. Shattuck 
George A. Murray 
John E. Kerrigan 
John F. Dowd 



FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 



JOHN I. FITZGERALD, President 



Milfred M. Harris 
John J. Doherty 
James J. Kilroy 
David M. Brackman 
Peter J. Fitzgerald 
Sidney Rosenberg 
Martin H. Tobin 



John J. McGrath 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1938 



Francis W. Irwin 
William J. Galvin 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
Henry L. Shattuck 
George A. Murray 
John F. Dowd 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
JOHN E. KERRIGAN, President 
Mildred M. Harris 
William A. Carey 
Edward L. Englert 
Charles I. Taylor 
Edward A. Hutchinson, jr. 
Sidney Rosenberg 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 
Clement A. Norton 
Peter A. Murray 
Theodore F. Lyons 
James E. Agnew 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



175 



1939 



Francis W. Irwin 
William J. Galvin 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
Henry L. Shattuck 
John E. Kerrigan 
George F. McMahon 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
GEORGE A. MURRAY, President 



Mildred M. Harris 
William A. Carey 
Edward L. Englert 
Charles I. Taylor 
Edward A. Hutchinson, jr. 
Sidney Rosenberg 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, jr. 
Clement A. Norton 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
James E. Agnew 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



1940 



James S. Coffey 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
Henry L. Shattuck 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 
William F. Hurley 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
WILLIAM J. GALVIN, President 



Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Edward L. Englert 
Charles I. Taylor 
Edward A. Hutchinson, jr. 
Joseph J. Gottlieb 
John B. Kelly 



Phihp Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
Michael J. Ward 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



1941 



James S. Coffey 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
Henry L. Shattuck 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 
William F. Hurley 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
WILLIAM J. GALVIN, President 



Daniel F. SuUivan 
Wilham A. Carey 
Edward L. Englert 
Charles I. Taylor 
Edward A. Hutchinson, jr. 
Joseph J. Gottlieb 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
Michael J. Ward 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



1942 



James S. Coffey 
Michael L. Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
A. Frank Foster 
Joseph M. Scannell 
William F. Hurley 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
THOMAS E. LINEHAN, President 



Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Matthew F. Hanley 
Charles I. Taylor 
Thomas J. Hannon, jr. 
Joseph J. Gottlieb 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



176 



1943 



James S. Coffey 
Michael L. Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
A. Frank Foster 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
THOMAS J. HANNON, President 



William F. Hurley 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Matthew F. Hanley 
Charles I. Taylor 
Isadore H. Y. Muchnick 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



1944 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
William F. Hurley 



MAURICE J. TOBIN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
JOHN E. KERRIGAN, President 



Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Casey 
Matthew F. Hanley 
Charles I. Taylor 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Isadore H. Y. Muchnick 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael Paul Feeney 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Thomas G. J. Shannon 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



1945 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
William F. Hurley 



JOHN E. KERRIGAN, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
JOHN E. KERRIGAN, President 



Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Matthew F. Hanley 
Charles I. Taylor 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Isadore H. Y. Muchnick 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael Paul Feeney 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Thomas G. J. Shannon 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



1946 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 
JOHN B. KELLY, President 
William F. Hurley 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
William A. Moriarty 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Isadore H. Y. Muchnick 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas J. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Edward C. Madden 



177 



1947 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 
John B. Kelly, President 
William F. Hurley 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
William A. Moriarty 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Isadore H. Y. Muchnick 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Edward C. Madden 



1948 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wenzler 
Thomas E. Linehan 



JAMES M. CURLEY, MAYOR 

City Council 
THOMAS J. Hannon, President 



William F. Hurley 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Philip A. Tracy 
Milton Cook 
Julius Ansel 
Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



1949 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wenzler 
Thomas E. Linehan 



james m. curley, mayor 

City council 
William f. Hurley, President 



Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Philip A. Tracy 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Julius Ansel 
Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



1950 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wenzler 
•Thomas E. Linehan 
t John J. McColgan 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

City council 

William F. hurley. President 



Daniel F. Sullivan 
Francis P. Tracey 
Philip A. Tracy 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Julius Ansel 
Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
Anthony J. Farin 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



♦Resigned June 15,1950. 



t From September 20, 1950. 



178 



1951 

JOHN B. hynes. Mayor 

CITY Council 

William F. Hurley, President 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wenzler 
John J. McColgan 
* Daniel F. Sullivan 



t Laurence H. Banks 
Francis P. Tracey 
Philip A. Tracy 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Julius Ansel 
Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
Anthony J. Farin 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



♦ To August 6, 1 95 1 . f From August 6, 1 95 1 . 

Note. — This was the final year of the City Council of twenty-two members elected from 
wards. A City Coucil of nine members elected at large under the provisions of Chapter 452 of 
the Acts of 1948, commonly known as Plan A, took office on the first Monday of January, 
1952. 



Francis X. Ahearn 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, jr. 



1952 

JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

Gabriel F. Piemonte, President 



William F. Hurley 
Francis X. Joyce 
John E. Kerrigan 

1953 



Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Michael J. Ward 
Joseph C. White 



Francis X. Ahearn 
t Michael H. Cantwell 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, jr. 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

City Council 

FRANCIS X. AHEARN, President 



William F. Hurley 
Francis X. Joyce 
John E. Kerrigan 



Gabriel F. Piemonte 
•Michael J. Ward 
Joseph C. White 



•To December 28, 1953. 



tFrom December 28, 1953. 



1954 



Francis X. Ahearn 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, jr. 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 
JOSEPH C. WHITE, President 
William F. Hurley 
John E. Kerrigan 
Edward J. McCormack, jr. 

1955 



Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



Francis X. Ahearn 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, jr. 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

City council 

William F. hurley, President 

William F. Hurley Edward F. McLaughlin jr. 

John E. Kerrigan Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Edward J. McCormack, jr. Joseph C. White 



179 



1956 



Francis X. Ahearn 
John F. Collins 
William J. Foley, jr. 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

EDWARD J. MCCORMACK, President 

John E. Kerrigan Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 

Edward J. McCormack, jr. Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Patrick F. McDonough Joseph C. White 



1957 



Francis X. Ahearn 
*John F. Collins 
Wilham J. Foley, jr. 
tFrederick C. Hailer, jr. 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

WILLIAM J. FOLEY, JR., President 

John E. Kerrigan Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 

Edward J, McCormack, jr. Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Patrick F. McDonough Joseph C. White 



•To February 18, 1957 



tFrom February 18, 1957. 



1958 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 
PATRICK F. MCDONOUGH, President 
tJames S. Coffey Christopher A. lannella Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 

William J. Foley, jr. John E. Kerrigan Gabriel F. Piemonte 

♦Frederick C. Hailer, jr. **Edward J. McCormack, jr. Joseph C. White 

ttPeter F. Hines Patrick F, McDonough 



*To April 21, 1958. 
•To September 12, 1958. 



tFrom April 22, 1958. 
ttFrom September 15, 1958. 



1959 



JOHN B. HYNES, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

EDWARD F. MCLAUGHLIN, JR. President 



James S. Coffey 
WiUiam J. Foley, jr. 
Peter F. Hines 



Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



1960 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

EDWARD F. MCLAUGHLIN, JR., President 



James S. Coffey 
John Patrick Connolly 
William J. Foley, jr. 



Peter F. Hines 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



Patrick F. McDonough 
Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 
Joseph C. White 



180 



1961 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 

Patrick F. McDonough, President 



James S. Coffey 
John Patrick Connolly 
William J. Foley, jr. 



Peter F. Hines 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
ttFrederick C. Langone 



Patrick F. McDonough 
♦Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 
tThomas A. Sullivan 
** Joseph C. White 



•To January 5, 1961 
••To April 27, 1961 



tFrom January 9, 1961 
tf-FromMay 1, 1961 



1962 



James S. Coffey 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Peter F. Hines 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

CHRISTOPHER A. lANNELLA, President 

Christopher A. lannella Gabriel F. Piemonte 

John E. Kerrigan Thomas A. Sullivan 

Patrick F. McDonough John J. Tierney, jr. 



1963 



James S. Coffey 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Peter F. Hines 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 
CITY COUNCIL 
PETER F. HINES, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Thomas A. Sullivan 
John J. Tierney, jr. 



1964 



Katherine Craven 
George F. Foley, jr. 
William J. Foley, jr. 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

JOHN J. TIERNEY, JR. President 



Peter F. Hines 
Barry T, Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 



John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
John J. Tierney, jr. 



1965 



Katherine Craven 
George F. Foley, jr. 
Wiliam J. Foley, jr. 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

JOHN J. TIERNEY, JR., President 



Peter F. Hines 
Barry T. Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 



John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
John J. Tierney, jr. 



181 



Katherine Craven 
William J. Foley, jr. 
Peter F. Hines 



1966 

JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 

City council 

FREDERICK C. LANGONE, President 



Barry T. Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 

1967 



Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 



JOHN F. COLLINS, MAYOR 

City Council 
Barry T. hynes, President 
Katherine Craven Barry T. Hynes Frederick C. Langone 

William J. Foley, jr. Christopher A. lannella Patrick F. McDonough 

Peter F. Hines John E. Kerrigan Gabriel F. Piemonte 

1968 



Thomas I. Atkins 
Garrett M. Byrne 
William J. Foley, jr. 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

WILLIAM J. FOLEY jr.. President 



John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick McDonough 

1969 



Gerald F. O'Leary 
John L. Saltonstall, jr. 
Joseph F. Timilty 



Thomas I. Atkins 
Garrett M. Byrne 
William J. Foley, jr. 



Thomas I. Atkins 
Louise Day Hicks 
Christopher A. lannella 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

GERALD F. O'LEARY, President 

John E. Kerrigan Gerald F. O'Leary 

Frederick C. Langone John L. Saltonstall, jr. 

Patrick F. McDonough Joseph F. Timilty 

1970 

KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

GABRIEL F. PIEMONTE, President 

John E. Kerrigan Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Frederick C. Langone John L. Saltonstall, jr. 

Gerald F. O'Leary Joseph F. Timilty 

1971 



Thomas I. Atkins 
* Louis Day Hicks 
Christopher A. lannella 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

GABRIEL F. PIEMONTE, President 

John E. Kerrigan Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Frederick C. Langone John L. Saltonstall, jr. 

Gerald F. O'Leary Joseph F. Timilty 

t Albert L. O'Neil 



♦To January 25, 1971 



tFrom January 25, 1971 



Lawrence S. DiCara 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



182 

1972 

KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

GABRIEL F. PIEMONTE, President 



Patrick F. McDonough 
John Joseph Moakley 
Gerald F. O'Leary 

1973 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph M. Tierney 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

PATRICK F. MCDONOUGH, President 



Lawrence S. DiCara 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



* Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 
t John Joseph Moakley 
Gerald F. O'Leary 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph M. Tierney 



♦From January 4, 1973 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louis Day Hicks 



tTo January 1, 1973 
1974 

KEVIN H. White, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

GERALD F. O'LEARY, President 



Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 

1975 



Gerald F. O'Leary 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M. Tierney 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louise Day Hicks 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

GERALD F. O'LEARY, President 



Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 

1976 



Gerald F. O'Leary 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M. Tierney 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louise Day Hicks 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYO?v 

CITY COUNCIL 
LOUISE DAY HICKS, President 
Christopher A. lannella Patrick F. McDonough 

John J. Kerrigan Albert L. O'Neil 

Frederick C. Langone Joseph M. Tierney 

1977 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louise Day Hicks 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

City Council 
JOSEPH M. TIERNEY, President 

Christopher A. lannella Patrick F. McDonough 

John J. Kerrigan Albert L. O'Neil 

Frederick C. Langone Joseph M. Tierney 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Raymond L. Flynn 



183 

1978 
KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

City council 

Lawrence S. DICARA, President 



Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Partick F. McDonough 

1979 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Rosemarie E. Sansone 
Joseph M. Tierney 



% James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Raymond L. Flynn 



KEVIN H. WHITE, MAYOR 

CITY COUNCIL 

JOSEPH M. TIERNEY, President 



* Louise Day Hicks 
Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Rosemarie E. Sansone 
Joseph M. Tierney 



'From January 10, 1979 



tTo Januarys, 1979 



184 

Mayors of the City of Boston 

From 1822 to the Present Time 



Place and Date of Birth 



Years of 
Service 



*John Phillips 

•Josiah Quincy 

•Harrison Gray Otis .... 

•Charles Wells 

•Theodore Lyman, jr. . . . 
•Samuel T. Armstrong . . 

•Samuel A. Eliot 

•Jonathan Chapman .... 

•Martin Brimmer 

•Thomas A. Davis 

•Josiah Quincy, jr 

•John P. Bigelow 

•Benjamin Seaver 

•Jerome V. C. Smith .... 

•Alexander H. Rice 

•Frederic W. Lincoln, jr. . 
•Joseph M. Wightman . . 
•Frederic W. Lincoln, jr. . 

•Otis Norcross 

•Nathaniel B.Shurtleff.. 

•William Gaston 

•Henry L. Pierce 

•§Leonard R. Cutter . . . . 

•Samuel C. Cobb 

•Frederick O. Prince . . . . 

•Henry L. Pierce 

•Frederick O. Prince . . . . 

•Samuel A. Green 

•Albert Palmer 

•Augustus P. Martin . . . . 

•Hugh O'Brien 

•Thomas N. Hart 

•Nathan Matthews, jr. . . 

•Edwin U. Curtis 

•JJosiah Quincy 

•fThomas N. Hart 

•tPatrick A. CoUins 

•§Daniel A. Whelton 

•tJohn F. Fitzgerald . . . . 
•fGeorgeA. Hibbard . . . 
•iJohn F. Fitzgerald . . . . 

•^James M. Curley 

•i Andrew J. Peters 

*lJames M. Curley 

•^Malcolm E. Nichols . . . 

•IJames M. Curley 

•^Frederick W. Mansfield 
•ftMaurice J. Tobin . . . . 

ttJohn E. Kerrigan 

•ijames M. Curley 

••John B. Hynes 

•fJohn B. Hynes 

•ftJohn B. Hynes 

IJohn F. Collins 

ttJohn F. Collins 

IKevin H.White 

ttKevin H.White 

tttKevin H. White 



Boston Nov. 26, 1770 

Boston Feb. 4,1772 

Boston Oct. 8,1765 

Boston Dec. 30, 1786 

Boston Feb. 19,1792 

Dorchester April 29, 1784 

Boston Mar. 5,1798 

Boston Jan. 23,1807 

Roxbury June 8, 1793 

Brookline Dec. 11,1798 

Boston Jan. 17,1802 

Groton Aug. 25, 1797 

Roxbury April 12, 1795 

Conway, N.H July 20,1800 

Newton Aug. 30, 1818 

Boston Feb. 27,1817 

Boston Oct. 19,1812 

(See above) 

Boston Nov. 2,1811 

Boston June 29, 1810 

Killingly, Conn Oct. 3, 1820 

Stoughton Aug. 23, 1825 

(See Chairman of Aldermen) 

Taunton May 22, 1826 

Boston Jan. 18,1818 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Groton Mar. 16, 1830 

Candia, N.H Jan. 17,1831 

Abbot, Me Mar. 13,1835 

Ireland July 13,1827 

North Reading Jan. 20, 1 829 

Boston Mar. 28, 1854 

Roxbury Mar. 26, 1861 

Quincy Oct. 15,1859 

(See above) 

Fermoy, Ireland Mar. 12, 1844 

Boston Jan. 21,1872 

Boston Feb. 11,1863 

Boston Oct. 27,1864 

(See above) 

Boston Nov. 20, 1874 

Jamaica Plain April 3, 1872 

(See above) 

Portland,Me May 8, 1876 

(See above) 

Boston Mar. 26, 1877 

Boston May 22, 1901 

Boston Oct. 1,1907 

(See above) 

Boston Sept. 21, 1970 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston July 20,1919 

(See above) 

Boston Sept. 25, 1929 

(See above) 

(See above) 



May 29, 1823 
July 1,1864 
Oct. 28, 1848 
June 3, 1866 
July 17, 1849 
Mar. 26, 1850 
Jan. 29, 1862 
May 25, 1848 
April 25, 1847 
Nov. 22, 1845 
Nov. 2, 1882 
July 4, 1872 
Feb. 14, 1856 
Aug. 20, 1879 
July 22, 1895 
Sept. 13, 1898 
Jan. 25, 1885 
(See above) . . 
Sept. 5, 1882 
Oct. 17, 1874 
Jan. 19, 1894 
Dec. 17, 1896 

Feb. 18, 1891 
June 6, 1899 
(See above) . . 
(See above) . . 
Dec. 5, 1918 
May 21, 1887 
Mar. 13, 1902 
Aug. 1,1895 
Oct. 4, 1927 
Dec. 11, 1927 
Mar. 20, 1922 
Sept. 8, 1919 
(See above) . . 
Sept. 14, 1905 
Nov. 27, 1953 
Oct. 2, 1950 
May 29, 1910 
(See above) . . 
Nov. 12, 1958 
June 26, 1938 
(See above) . . 
Feb. 7, 1951 
(See above) . . 
Nov. 6, 1968 
July 19, 1953 

(See above) . . 
Jan. 6, 1970 
(See above) . . 
(See above) . . 



1822 1 

1823-28 6 

1929-31 3 

1832-33 2 

1834-35 3 

1836 1 

1837-39 3 

1840-42 3 

1843-44 2 

1845 1 

1846-48 3 

1849-51 3 

1852-53 2 

1854-55 2 

1856-57 2 

1858-60 3 

1861-62 2 

1863-66 4 

1867 1 

1868-70 3 

1871-72 2 

1873, 10 mo. 
1873, 2 mo. 

1874-76 3 

1877 1 

1878 1 

1879-81 3 

1822 1 

1883 1 

1884 1 

1885-88 4 

1889-90 2 

1891-94 4 

1895 1 

1896-99 4 

1900-01 2 

1902-05, 33/4 
1905— 3 '/2 mo. 

1906-07 2 

1908-09 2 

1910-13 4 

1914-1917 ...4 

1918-21 4 

1922-25 4 

1926-29 4 

1930-33 4 

1934-37 4 

1938-44 7 

1945 1 

1946-49 4 

1947—5 mo. 

1950-51 2 

1952-59 8 

1960-63 4 

1964-67 4 

1968-71 4 

1972-75 4 

1976-79 4 



•Deceased. 

tElected for two years. 

ttTwice elected for four years. 

tttThrice elected for four years. 

ttAppointed Mayor by Act of Massachusetts Legislature. 

•Appointed Temporary Mayor by Act of Massachusetts Legislature 



JTwice elected for two years. 

^Elected for four years. 

§Mayor for balance of unexpired term. 



NOTE.— Andrew J. Peters was the first Mayor not eligible to succeed himself. See Special Acts, 1918, 
Chapter 94. See also Acts 1938, Chapter 300. 



185 



NOTE. — From January 6, 1845, to February 27, 1845, or from the close of Mayor 
Brimmer's term in office till the election of his successor, Thomas A. Davis, the Chairman of 
the Board of Aldermen, William Parker, performed the duties of Mayor. 

In the interim between the death of Mayor Davis, on November 22, 1845, and the election 
on December 11,1 845 , of his successor, Josiah Quincy, Jr. , Benson Leavitt, Chairman of the 
Board of Aldermen, acted as Mayor. 

There were three ballotings for the election of Mayor for 1854, between December 12, 
1853, and January 9, 1854. In the meantime the duties of Mayor were performed by 
Benjamin L. Allen, Chairman of the Board of Aldermen. 

In 1873 Mayor Pierce resigned his office on November 29, on his election to the Congress 
of the United States. During the remainder of the municipal year Leonard R. Cutter, Chair- 
man of the Board of Aldermen, served ex officio as Acting Mayor. 

Mayor Collins died on September 14, 1905. Daniel A. Whelton, Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen, acted as Mayor for the remainder of the municipal year, viz., September 15, 1905, 
to January 1, 1906. 

Mayor Tobin, having been elected Governor, resigned January 4, 1945. By Chapter 4 of 
the Acts of 1945, John E. Kerrigan, the President of the City Council was given all the 
powers of the Mayor and served from January 25, 1945, for the remainder of the year. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 580 of the Acts of 1947, City Clerk John B. Hynes served, 
under the title of Temporary Mayor, with full powers as Mayor, for the period from June 26 
to November 28, 1947, during the absence of Mayor Curley. 

Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen 



Place and Date of Birth 



Years of 
Service 



William Washburn 

Pelham Bonney 

Joseph Milner Wightman 

Silas Peirce 

Otis Clapp 

Silas Peirce 

Thomas Phillips Rich. . . . 
Thomas Coffin Amory, jr 

Otis Norcross 

George W. Messinger . . . . 
Charles Wesley Slack . . . . 
George W. Messinger . . . . 

Benjamin James 

- Newton Albert 

Charles Edward Jenkins . 

Samuel Little 

Leonard R. Cutter 

John Taylor Clark 

Solomon Bliss Stebbins . . 

Hugh O'Brien 

Solomon Bliss Stebbins . . 

Hugh O'Brien 

Charles Varney Whitten . 
Charles Hastings Allen . . 
Patrick John Donovan . . 
Charles Hastings Allen . . 

Homer Rogers 

William Power Wilson. . . 
Herbert Schaw Carruth . . 

John Henry Lee 

Alpheus Sanford 

John Henry Lee 



Lyme, N.H Oct. 7, 1808 

Pembroke Feb. 21, 1802 

Boston Oct. 19,1812 

Scituate Feb. 15,1793 

Westhampton Mar. 2, 1806 

(See above) 

Lynn Mar. 31, 1803 

Boston Aug. 16, 1812 

Boston Nov. 2,1811 

Boston Feb. 5,1813 

Boston Feb. 21,1825 

(See above) 

Scituate Aug. 22, 1814 

Stoughton Mar. 10, 1815 

Scituate July 29,1817 

Hingham Aug. 15, 1827 

Jaffrey, N. H July 1,1825 

Sanbornton, N.H....Sept. 19,1880 

Warren Jan. 18, 1830 

Ireland July 13,1827 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Vassalboro, Me May 10,1829 

Boston June 14, 1828 

Charlestown April 9,1912 

(See above) 

Sudbury Oct. 11,1840 

Baltimore, Md Nov. 15,1852 

Dorchester Feb. 15, 1855 

Boston April 26, 1846 

North Attleboro July 5, 1956 

(See above) 



Oct. 30, 1890 
April 29, 1861 
Jan. 25, 1885 
Aug. 27, 1879 
Sept. 18, 1886 
(See above) . . 
Dec. 11,1875 
Oct. 10, 1899 
Sept. 5, 1882 
April 27, 1870 
April 11, 1885 
(See above) . . 
April 13, 1901 
Feb. 3, 1904 
Aug. 1, 1882 
Dec. 21, 1906 
July 13, 1894 
Oct. 29, 1880 
June 8, 1910 
Aug. 1,1859 
(See above) . . 
(See above) . . 
Mar. 18, 1891 
Mar. 31, 1907 
Sept. 18, 1912 
(See above) . . 
Nov. 10, 1907 
Date unknown 
Dec. 27, 1917 
Sept. 12, 1923 
Aug. 10, 1944 
(See above) . . 



1855 

1856-57 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865-66 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874-77 

1878 

1879-81 

1882 

1883 

1884-85 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892-93 

1894-95 

1896 



NOTE.— The Mayor was ex officio Chairman of the Board of Aldermen from the incorporation of the 
City until 1855; the Board elected a permanent Chairman from 1855. 



186 



Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen — Concluded 



Name 


Place and Date of Birth 


Died 


Years of 
Service 


♦Perlie Appleton Dyar 

♦Joseph Aloysius Conry 

David Franklin Barry 

Michael Joseph O'Brien 


Lynn Mar. 26, 1857 

Brookline Sept. 12, 1868 

Boston Feb. 29, 1852 

Ireland Feb. 11,1855 

Boston June 17, 1867 

Boston Jan. 21,1872 

Dedham Nov. 1,1869 

Charlestown Aug. 8,1870 

New Orleans, La Dec. 16,1858 

Dorchester Dec. 14, 1858 

Plainville, Conn Feb. 3, 1861 


May 15,1930 
June 22, 1943 
July 23, 1911 
April 5, 1903 
Oct. 3, 1952 
Nov. 27, 1953 
Jan. 25, 1943 
April 19, 1928 
July 9, 1935 
Mar. 15, 1914 
Mar. 16, 1912 


1897-98 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901-04 


Daniel A. Whelton 


1905 
1906 


fEdward L Cauley 


1906 




1907 


Louis M Clark 


1908 




1909 







Presidents of the Common Council 



Place and Date of Birth 



Years of 
Service 



William Prescott 

John Welles 

Francis Jononnot Oliver . 
John Richardson Adan . . 

Eliphalet Williams 

Benj. Toppan Pickman . 
John Prescott Bigelow . . 

Josiah Quincy, jr 

Phillip Marett 

Edward Blake 

Peleg Whitman Chandler 
George Stillman Hillard 

Benjamin Seaver 

Francis Brinley 

Henry Joseph Gardner . 
Alex. Hamilton Rico . . . 

Joseph Story 

Oliver Stevens 

Samuel W. Waldron, jr. . 
Josiah Putnam Bradlee . 
Joseph Hildreth Bradley 

Joshua Dorsey Ball 

George Silsbee Hale .... 
Wm. Bentley Fowle, jr. . 



Pepperell Aug. 19, 1762 

Boston Oct. 14,1764 

Boston Oct. 10,1777 

Boston July 8,1793 

Taunton Mar. 7, 1778 

Salem Sept. 17, 1790 

Groton Aug. 25, 1797 

Boston Jan. 17,1802 

Boston Sept. 25, 1792 

Boston Sept. 28, 1805 

N.Gloucester, Me. .. .April 12,1816 

Machias, Me Sept. 22, 1808 

Roxbury April 12, 1795 

Boston Nov. 10, 1800 

Dorchester June 14, 1818 

Newton Aug. 30, 1818 

Marblehead Nov. 11,1822 

Andover June 22, 1825 

Portsmouth, N.H. . . Oct. 24, 1828 

Boston June 10, 1817 

Haverhill Mar. 5,1822 

Baltimore, Md July 11,1828 

Keene, N. H Sept. 24, 1825 

Boston July 27,1826 



Dec. 8, 
Sept. 26, 
Aug. 21, 
July 4, 
June 12, 
Mar. 22, 
July 4, 
Nov. 2, 
Mar. 22, 
Sept. 4, 
May 28, 
Jan. 21, 
Feb. 14, 
June 14, 
July 19, 
July 22, 
June 22, 
Aug. 23, 
Aug. 24, 
Feb. 2, 
Oct. 5, 
Dec. 18, 
July 27, 
Jan. 21, 



1844 
1855 
1858 
1849 
1855 
1835 
1872 
1882 
1869 
1873 
1889 
1879 
1856 
1889 
1892 
1895 
1905 
1905 
1882 
1887 
1882 
1892 
1897 
1902 



1822 

1823 

1824-25 

1826-28 

1829 

1830-31 

1832-33 

1834-36 

1837-40 

1841-43 

1844-45 

1846-471 

1847-49§ 

1850-51 

1852-53 

1854 

1855 

1856-57 

1858 

1859-60 

1861 

1862 

1863-64 

1865 



•Perlie A. Dyar from January 25, 1 898, to April 1 , 1 898, and October 1 , 1 898, to end of year. Joseph 
A. Conry from April, 1898, to October 1, 1898. 

tCharles M. Draper from February 28, 1906, to September 10, 1906. Edward L. Cauley from 
September 10, 1906, to end of year. 

tTo July 1 §From July 1 



187 



Presidents of the Common Council — Concluded 



Place and Date of Birth 



Years of 
Service 



Joseph Story 

Weston Lewis 

Charles Hastings Allen 

William Giles Harris 

Melville Ezra Ingalls 

Matthias Rich 

Marquis Fayette Dickinson, jr 

Edward Olcott Shepard 

Halsey Joseph Boardman . . . , 

John Q. A. Brackett 

Benjamin Pope 

William H. Whitmore 

Harvey Newton Shepard 

Andrew Jackson Bailey 

Charles Edward Pratt 

James Joseph Flynn 

Godfrey Morse 

John Henry Lee 

Edward John Jenkins 

David Franklin Barry 

Horace Gwynn Allen 

David Franklin Barry 

Christopher Francis O'Brien. . 

Joseph Aloysius Conry 

Timothy Lawrence Connolly . 

Daniel Joseph Kiley 

Arthur Walter Dolan 

William John Barrett 

Leo F. McCuUough 

George Cheney McCabe 



Marblehead Nov. 

Hingham April 

Boston June 

Revere May. 

Harrison, Me Sept. 

Truro June 

Amherst Jan. 

Hampton, N. H Nov. 

Norwich, Vt May 

Bradford, N.H June 

Waterford, Ire Jan. 

Dorchester Sept. 

Boston July 

Charlestown July 

Vassalboro, Me Mar. 

St. John, N. B 

Wachenheim, Ger. . . .May 

Boston April 

London, Eng Dec. 

Boston Feb. 

Jamaica Plain July 

(See above) 

Boston Feb. 

Brookline Sept. 

Boston Oct. 

Boston ■. . . . .July 

Boston Sept. 

Boston June 

Boston July 

Carmel, N. Y July 



1822 
1834 
1828 
1828 
1842 
1820 
1840 
1835 
1834 
1842 
1829 
1836 
1850 
1840 
1845 
1835 
1846 
1846 
1854 
1852 
1855 



1869 
1868 
1871 
1874 
1876 
1872 
1882 
1873 



June 22, 1905 
April 6, 1893 
Mar. 31, 1907 
Oct. 29, 1897 
July 11,1914 
Dec. 13, 1914 
Sept. 18, 1915 
April 27, 1903 
Jan. 15, 1900 
April 6, 1918 
Sept. 24, 1879 
June 14, 1900 
April 14, 1936 
Mar. 21, 1927 
Aug. 20, 1898 
Mar. 26, 1884 
June 20, 1911 
Sept. 12, 1923 
Oct. 3, 1918 
July 23, 191 1 
Feb. 12, 1919 
(See above) . . 
April 25, 1899 
June 22, 1943 
Dec. 5, 1928 
Nov. 12, 1935 
Sept. 28, 1949 
May 29, 1933 
May 12, 1951 
Dec. 27, 1917 



1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873-74 

1875 

1876 

1877-78 

1879 

1880 

1881* 

1881t-82 

1883t 

1883§ 

1884 

1885-86 

1887-88 

1889-90 

1891-93 

1894-95 

1896-97 

1898 

1899-1901 

1902-05 

1906-07 

1908 

1909 



•To October 27. 



tFrom October 27. 



tTo June 1 1 . 



§From June 11. 



188 

Presidents of the City Council 



Place and Date of Birth 



Walter Ballantyne 

Walter Leo Collins 

John Joseph Attridge 

Thomas Joseph Kenny 

Daniel Joseph McDonald . . 

George W. Coleman 

Henry E. Hagan 

James J. Storrow 

Walter Leo Collins 

Francis J. W. Ford 

James T. Moriarty 

James A. Watson 

David J. Brickley 

Daniel W. Lane 

John A. Donoghue 

James T. Moriarty 

Charles G. Keene 

John J. Heffernan 

Thomas H. Green 

Timothy F. Donovan 

William G. Lynch 

Joseph McGrath 

Edward M. Gallagher 

Joseph McGrath 

John F. Dowd 

John 1. Fitzgerald 

John 1. Fitzgerald 

John 1. Fitzgerald 

John E. Kerrigan 

George A. Murray 

William J. Galvin 

William J. Galvin 

Thomas E. Linehan 

Thomas J. Hannon 

John E. Kerrigan 

John E. Kerrigan 

John B. Kelly 

John B. Kelly 

Thomas J. Hannon 

William F. Hurley 

William F. Hurley 

William F. Hurley 

Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Francis X. Ahearn 

Joseph C. White 

William F. Hurley 

Edward J. McCormack, jr. 

William J. Foley, jr 

Patrick F. McDonough . . . 

Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 

Edward F. McLaughlin, jr. 

Patrick F. McDonough . . . 

Christopher A. lannella . . . 

Peter F. Hines 

John J. Tierney, jr 

John J. Tierney, jr 

Frederick C. Langone . . . . 

Barry T. Hynes 

Willian J. Foley, jr 

Gerald F. O'Leary 

Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Patrick F. McDonough . . . 

Gerald F. O'Leary 

Gerald F. O'Leary 

Louise Day Hicks 

Joseph M. Tierney 

Lawrence S. DiCara 

Joseph M. Tierney 



Hawick, Scotland. ...Mar. 17,1855 



7, 1878 
8, 1878 
18, 1863 
14, 1873 
16, 1867 
26, 1865 
21, 1864 



11, 1883 
21, 1889 
20, 1892 
20, 1890 
25, 1877 



Boston April 

Boston Feb. 

Boston Nov. 

Chelsea Aug. 

Boston June 

St. John, N. B Feb. 

Boston Jan. 

(See above) 

Boston Dec. 23, 1882 

Amesbury Sept. 22, 1 876 

Boston June 24,1870 

Boston Mar. 14, 1889 

Boston Dec. 11,1872 

Boston Aug 12,1885 

(See above) 

Gardner, Me Aug. 6, 1880 

Boston Jan. 27,1893 

Boston May 

Boston Aug. 

Boston Oct. 

Boston Dec. 

Charlestown Jan. 

(See above) 

Boston Nov. 28, 1895 

Boston July 18,1882 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Oct. 1,1907 

Boston Sept. 1,1905 

Boston Jan. 31,1904 

(See above) 

Boston June 28, 1904 

Boston Dec. 9,1900 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston July 21,1904 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Aug. 3,1895 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Jan. 28,1909 

Cohasset Feb. 26, 1917 

Boston Jan. 30,1898 

(See above) 

Boston Aug. 29, 1923 

Boston Dec. 18, 1923 

Galway, Ireland Feb. 6, 1925 

Boston Aug. 18, 1920 

(See above) 

(See above) 

AvelHno, Italy May 29,1913 

Boston Nov. 30, 1927 

Boston Feb. 18,1926 

(See above) 

Boston Oct. 31,1921 

Boston Nov. 9, 1934 

(See above) 

Boston Aug. 7,1932 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Oct. 16,1923 

Boston Jan. 1, 1941 

Boston April 30, 1949 

(See above) 



Sept. 30, 1932 
Unknown . . . . 
Unknown . . . . 
May 17, 1926 
June. 28, 1937 
July 31,1950 
May 18, 1933 
Mar. 13, 1926 



Unknown . . . . 
April 5, 1950 
Dec. 5, 1941 
Oct. 31,1960 
Unknown . . . . 
Unknown . . . . 



Feb. 10, 1946 
Aug. 25, 1927 
June 13, 1958 
April 21, 1933 
July , 1964 
April 25, 1943 
Oct. 25, 1961 



Aug. 14, 1961 
Unknown . . . 



Mar. 19, 1965 



Aug. 5, 1974 



Aug. 



Mar. 15, 1965 



July 31,1967 



Single chamber established in 1910 (see Chap. 486, Acts of 1909, Sects. 48-51). 



189 



Orators of Boston 



APPOINTED BY THE PUBLIC AUTHORITIES 

For the Anniversary of the Boston Massacre, March 5, 1770 



1771 James Lovell 

1772 Dr. Joseph Warren 

1773 Dr. Benjamin Church 

1774 John Hancock 

1775 Dr. Joseph Warren 

1776 Rev. Peter Thacher 

1777 Benjamin Hitchborn 



1778 Jonathan Williams Austin 

1779 William Tudor 

1780 Jonathan Mason, jr. 

1781 Thomas Dawes, jr. 
1882 George Richards Minot 
1783 Dr. Thomas Welsh 



For the Anniversary of National Independence, July 4, 1776 



1783 Dr. John Warren 

1784 Benjamin Hichborn 

1785 John Gardiner 

1786 Jonathan L. Austin 

1787 Thomas Dawes, jr. 

1788 Harrison Gray Otis 

1789 Rev. Samuel Stillman 

1790 Edward Gray 

1791 Thomas Crafts, jr. 

1792 Joseph Blake, jr. 

1793 John Quincy Adams 

1794 John Phillips 

1795 George Blake 

1796 John Lathrop 

1797 John Callender 

1798 Josiah Quincy 

1799 John Lowell, jr. 

1800 Joseph Hall 

1801 Charles Paine 

1802 Rev. William Emerson 

1803 William Sullivan 

1804 Dr. Thomas Danforth 

1805 Warren Dutton 

1806 Francis Dana Channing 

1807 Peter O. Thacher 

1808 Andrew Ritchie, jr. 

1809 William Tudor, jr. 

1810 Alexander Townsend 

1811 James Savage 

1812 Benjamin Pollard 

1813 Edward St. Loe Livermore 

1814 Benjamin Whitwell 

1815 Lemuel Shaw 

1816 George Sullivan 

1817 Edward T. Channing 

1818 Francis C. Gray 

1819 Franklin Dexter 

1820 Theodore Lyman, jr. 

1821 Charles G. Loring 

1822 John C. Gray 

1823 Charles Pelham Curtis 

1824 Francis Bassett 

1825 Charles Sprague 

1826 Josiah Quincy, Mayor 

1827 William Powell mason 

1828 Bradford Sumner 

1829 James T. Austin 

1830 Alexander H. Everett 

1831 Rev. JohnG. Palfey 



1832 Josiah Quincy, jr. 

1833 Edward G. Prescott 

1834 Richard S. Fay 

1835 George S. Hillard 

1836 Henry W. Kinsman 

1837 Jonathan Chapman 

1838 Rev. Hubbard Winslow 

1839 Ivers James Austin 

1840 Thomas Power 

1841 George Ticknor Curtis 

1842 Horace Mann 

1843 Charles Francis Adams 

1844 Peleg W. Chandler 

1845 Charles Sumner 

1846 Fletcher Webster 

1847 Thomas G. Carey 

1848 Joel Giles 

1849 William W. Greenough 

1850 Edwin P. Whipple 

1851 Charles Theodore Russell 

1852 Rev. Thomas Starr King 

1853 Timothy Bigelow 

1854 Rev. A. L. Stone 

1855 Rev. A. A. Miner 

1856 Edward Griffin Parker 

1857 Rev. William R. Alger 

1858 John S. Holmes 

1859 George Sumner 

1860 Edward Everett 

1861 Theophilus Parsons 

1862 George Ticknor Curtis 

1863 Oliver Wendell Holmes 

1864 Thomas Russell 

1865 Rev. Jacon M. Manning 

1866 Rev. S. K. Lothrop 

1867 Rev. George H. Hepworth 

1868 Samuel Eliot 

1869 Ellis W. Morton 

1870 William Everett 

1871 Horace Binney Sargent 

1872 Charles Francis Adams, jr. 

1873 Rev. John F. W. Ware 

1874 Richard Frothingham 

1875 Rev. James Freeman Clarke 

1876 Robert C. Winthrop 

1877 William Wirt Warren 

1878 Joseph Healey 

1879 Henry Cabot Lodge 

1880 Robert Dickson Smith 



190 



Orators of Boston — Concluded 



1881 George Washington Warren 

1882 John Davis Long 

1883 Rev. H. Bernard Carpenter 

1884 Harvey N. Shepard 

1885 Thomas J. Gargan 

1886 George Fred Williams 

1887 John E. Fitzgerald 

1888 William E. L. Dillaway 

1889 John L. Swift 

1890 Albert E. Pillsbury 

1891 Josiah Quincy 

1892 John R. Murphy 

1893 Henry W. Putnam 

1894 Joseph H. O'Neil 

1895 Rev. Adolph Augustus Berle 

1896 John F. Fitzgerald 

1897 Rev. Edward Everett Hale 

1898 Rev. Denis O'Callaghan 

1899 Nathan Matthews, jr. 

1900 Stephen O'Meara 

1901 Curtis Guild, jr. 

1902 Joseph A. Conry 

1903 Edwin D. Mead 

1904 John A. Sullivan 

1905 LeBaron B. Colt 

1906 Timothy W. Coakley 

1907 Rev. Edward A. Horton 

1908 Arthur D. Hill 

1909 Arthur L. Spring 

1910 James H. Wolff 

1911 Charles William Eliot 

1912 Joseph C. Pelletier 

1913 Greenville S. MacFarland 

1914 Rev. James A. Supple 

1915 Louis D. Brandeis 

1916 Joe Mitchell Chappie 

1917 Daniel J. Gallagher 

1918 William H. P. Faunae 

1919 Charles Ambrose DeCourcy 

1920 Jacob L. Wiseman 

1921 Lemuel H. Murlin 

1922 Jeremiah E. Burke 

1923 Rev. Charles W. Lyons 

1924 Rev. Dudley H. Ferrell 

1925 Thomas H. Dowd 

1926 Andrew J. Peters 

1927 William McGinnis 

1928 Edith Nourse Rodgers 

1929 Robert Luce 

1930 Herbert Parker 

1931 David I. Walsh 

1932 Robert E. Rogers 

1933 Joseph A. Tomasello 



1934 His Eminence William Car- 

dinal O'Connell, Arch- 
bishop of Boston 

1935 Albert Bushnell Hart 

1936 Paris S. Malouf 

1937 Louis J. A. Mercier 

1938 David I. Walsh 

1939 Stephen F. Chadwick 

1940 John P. Sullivan 

1941 Daniel L. Marsh 

1942 Gerald F. Coughlin 

1943 John W. McCormack 

1944 Francis Maloney 

1945 His Excellency Richard J. 

Gushing, D. D. Arch- 
bishop of Boston 

1946 John F. Kennedy 

1947 Judge Robert Gardiner 

Wilson, jr. 

1948 Hon. James M. Curley 

1949 Most Reverend John J. 

Wright, D. D. Auxiliary 
Bishop of Boston 

1950 Francis C. Gray 

1951 Judge Ehas F. Shamon 

1952 Judge Elijah Adlow 

1953 Dr. Mordecai W. Johnson 

1954 Herbert A. Philbrick 

1955 Clare Booth Luce 

1956 Timothy J. Murphy 

1957 Judge Felix Forte 

1958 Rev. Daniel Linehan, S.J. 

1959 Admiral Carl F. Espe 

1960 Judge Jennie Loitman Barron 

1961 Edward M. Kennedy 

1962 Erwin D. Canham 

1963 General James M. Gavin 

1964 Louis Lyons 

1965 Alexander Brin 

1966 Philip J. McNiff 

1967 Daniel J. Finn 

1968 Robert C. Wood 

1969 Gerald F. O'Leary 

1970 Gabriel F. Piemonte 

1971 Frederick Homberger 

1972 John J. Moakley 

1973 Prof. Benjamin W. Labaree 

1974 Prof. Richard L. Bushman 

1975 Elma Lewis 

1976 John Silber 

1977 Juanitz Kreps, Secretary 

of Commerce 

1978 Prof. Samuel Hrntington 



191 
INDEX 



Page 
A 

Administrative Services Department 51,52 

Air Pollution Control Commission 55 

Aldermen, Chairmen of the Board of, 1855 to 1909 185 

Amended City Charter of 1909 (with Plan A Charter) 19-43 

Appeal, Board of (Building Dept) 65 

Art Commission (Administrative Services Dept.) 52, 53 

Assessing, Board of 56 

Assessing Department 55-57 

Board of Review 56 

Auditing Department 57, 58 

Auditorium Commission 59 

B 

Back Bay Architectural Commission 60 

Beacon Hill Architectural Commission 68 

Births, Registrar of (City Clerk Dept.) 73 

Boards and Commissions of the City (alphabetical list): 

Administrative Services Board 51 

Air Pollution Control Commission 55 

Appeal, Board of 65 

Art Commission 52, 53 

Assessing 55-57 

Auditorium Commission 59 

Back Bay Architectural Commission 60 

Beacon Hill Architectural Commission 67, 68 

Boston Consumer's Council 75 

Boston Housing Authority 86 

Boston Landmarks Commission 94, 95 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 128-135 

Boston Retirement Board 140 

Conservation Commission 74 

Coordinating Council on Drug Abuse 75, 76 

Development and Industrial Commission 76 

Elderly, Commission on Affairs of the 77 

Election Commissioners, Board of 78 

Examiners, Board of 66 

Finance Commission 80 

Frankhn Foundation Members 82 

Freedom Trail Commission 84 

Health and Hospitals, Board of the Dept. of 85 

Library Trustees 96 

Licensing Board 101 , 102 



192 



Page 

Listing Board 78 

Mental Retardation, Commission on 103 

Parks and Recreation Commission 104-1 18 

Physically Handicapped, Commission on 119 

Public Facilities Commission 136 

Public Improvement Commission 137 

Public Safety Commission 54 

Public Welfare, Overseers of the (see "Trustees of 

Charitable Donations") 72 

Real Property Board 139 

Rent Board 140 

Review, Board of 56 

School Committee 141 

Sinking Funds, Board of Commissioners of 146 

Traffic and Parking Commission 143, 144 

White Fund Trustees 149 

Youth Activities Commission 151 

Zoning Commission 70-72 

Boston City Record (official weekly of City) 50 

Boston Consumers' Council 75 

Boston Housing Authority 86 

Boston Housing Court 159 

Boston Industrial Development Financing Authority 92 

Boston Landmarks Commission 94, 95 

Boston Metropolitan District 103 

Boston, origin and growth of 4, 5 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 128-135 

Boston Retirement Board 140 

Brighton (Wards 21 and 22): 

Municipal Court of 161 

Public Schools in 142 

Budgets, Supervisor of 51 , 52 

Building Code 65 

Building Department 63-72 

Beacon Hill Architectural Commission 67, 68 

Board of Appeal 65 

Board of Examiners 66 

Committee on Licenses 67 

Zoning Commission (Building Dept.) 70 

C 

Cemetery Division, Park Department 118 

Charitable Donations, Trustees of, for Inhabitants of 

Boston 72 

Charlestown (Ward 2): 

Municipal Court of 161 

Public Schools in 142 

City Charter 19-43 



193 



Page 

City Clerk Department 73 

City Council of 1978-1979 11, 12 

Committees of, 1978 15 

Committees of, 1979 16 

Officers of 13, 14 

President of 11,12 

City Council, Presidents of, 1910-present 188 

City Government, 1978-1979 11,12 

City Governments, 1909-present 167-183 

City Hospital 85 

City Messenger (City Council) 13, 14 

City, origin and growth of 4, 5 

City Proper (Wards 3 and 5): 

Public Schools in 142 

City Record (Boston City Record) 50 

City Registrar 73 

City Seal, origin of and present form 3 

City SoHcitor, office of, abolished 93 

Clerk of Committees (City Council) 13, 14 

Collecting Division (Treasury Dept.) 145 

Collector-Treasurer 145 

Commission on Affairs of the Elderly 77 

Commission on Mental Retardation 103 

Commission on the Physically Handicapped 119 

Committee on Foreclosed Real Estate 139 

Committee on Licenses (in Building Department) 67 

Common Council: 

Presidents of, 1822-1909 186, 187 

Conservation Commission 74 

Consumers Council, Boston 75 

Coordinating Council on Drug Abuse 75, 76 

Corporation Counsel (Law Dept.) 92 

Council on Aging (see "Commission on Affairs of the 

Elderly") 77 

County of Suffolk: 

Auditor 154 

Commissioners 154 

Court House Commission 154 

District Attorney 154 

Treasurer 154 

Courts and Officers of: 

Land Court 156 

Register of Deeds 1 57 

Sheriff 158 

Credit Union, City of Boston Employees 79 

D 

Deaths, Registrar of (City Clerk Dept.) 73 

Deeds, Register of (Suffolk County) 157 



194 



Page 

Departments of the City (alphabetical list): 

Administrative Services 51,52 

Assessing 55-57 

Auditing 57, 58 

Building 63-72 

City Clerk 73 

Election 78 

Fire 81 

Health and Hospitals 85 

Housing Inspection 90, 91 

Law 92, 93 

Library 96-100 

Licensing Board 101 , 102 

Parks and Recreation 104-1 18 

Penal Institutions 119 

Police 120-127 

Public Facilities 136 

Public Works 136-138 

Real Property 139 

Retirement Board 140 

Traffic and Parking Department 143, 144 

Treasury 145 

Veterans' Services 147 

Welfare (see "Trustees of Charitable Donations") .... 72 

Development and Industrial Commission 76 

District Attorney (Suffolk County) 155 

Assistants 155 

Donations, Charitable, Trustees of, for Inhabitants of 

Boston 72 

Dorchester (Wards 13-17): 

Municipal Court of 161 

Public Schools in 142 

Drug Abuse, Coordinating Council on 75, 76 

E 

East Boston (Ward 1): 

District Court of -. 162 

Public Schools in 143 

Economic Development and Industrial Corporation 77 

Elderly, Commission on Affairs of the 77 

Election Department 78 

Engineering Division (Pubhc Works Dept.) 137 

Examiners, Board of (Building Dept.) 66 

Executive Departments of City 49-151 

Executive Officers, with term, etc 49-151 



195 

Page 

Finance Commission, Boston 80 

Fire Department, with officials, etc 81 

Firemen's Relief Fund 81 

Foreclosed Real Estate, Committee on 139 

Fourth of July Orators appointed by City Government .... 189, 190 

Franklin Foundation 82-84 

Franklin Institute of Boston 82 

Freedom Trail Commission 84 



G 

Government of Boston, 1978-1979 11 

Government of Boston, Members of, 1909-present 167-183 

Government of Boston, Organization of 11 



H 

Health and Hospitals, Department of 85 

Highway Division (Pubhc Works Dept.) 137 

Hospital Department (City Hospital) 85 

House of Correction, Deer Island 119 

Housing Authority, Boston 86 

Housing Court, Boston 159 

Housing Inspection Department 90, 91 

Hyde Park (Ward 18, part): 

Municipal Court of (with West Roxbury) 162 

Public Schools in 143 



I 

Industrial Commission, Development and 76 

Industrial Development Financing Authority, Boston 92 

Insolvency and Probate, Court of 163 



196 

Page 

Jailer and Sheriff (Suffolk County) 158 

Jamaica Plain (Ward 19): 

Public Schools in 143 

July Fourth, Orators appointed by the City 189, 190 

Justices of Municipal Courts 160-162 

Juvenile Court 160 

L 

Land Court (Suffolk County) 156 

Landmarks Commission, Boston 94, 95 

Law Department 92, 93 

Library Department 96-100 

Central and Branch Libraries of 99, 100 

Officials and Trustees of 96 

Trust funds, appropriation, etc 96 

Volumes, number belonging and circulated 97 

License and Permit Fees: 

Board of Examiners (Building Dept.) 66 

Public Works Dept 137 

Licenses, Committee on (Building Dept.) 67 

Licensing Board, Boston 101 , 102 

Licensing Division, Mayor's Office (Amusement Licenses) . 50 

Listing Board 78 

Long Island Hospital (Hospital Dept.) 85 



M 

Maintenance Branch (Public Works Dept.) 137 

Markets, Faneuil and Quincy Markets (in charge of As- 
sistant Commissioner of Real Property) 139 

Marriage Certificates, Licenses (Registry Division, City 

Clerk Dept.) 73 

Mattapan: 

Pubhc Schools in 143 

Mayor: 

City Record (Editorial Office) 50 

Office, staff of 50 

Mayors of Boston, 1822 to Present Time 184 

Medical Examiners (Suffolk County) 157 

Mental Retardation, Commission on 103 

Metropolitan District, Boston 103 

Monuments, Memorials, Statues 115-117 

Mortuaries (Suffolk County) 157 

Municipal Court: 

Boston Proper 160, 161 

Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, East Boston, 

Roxbury, South Boston, West Roxbury 161, 162 

Justices of (regular and special) 160-162 



197 

^ Page 

Old South Association 103 

Orators of Boston since 1771 189, 190 

Origin and Growth of Boston 4,5 

Overseers of Public Welfare (see "Trustees of Charitable 

Donations") 72 

P 

Parks and Recreation Department 104-1 18 

Commissioners and chief officials of 104 

Penal Institutions Department 119 

Personnel, Supervisor of 52 

Physically Handicapped, Commission on 119 

Plan A Charter 19-43 

PoHce Department 120-127 

Commissioner and chief officials of 120 

Printing Section (Purchasing Division) 52 

Probate and Insolvency, Court of 163 

Probation Officers (Suffolk County) 163-165 

Pubhc Buildings (in charge of Assistant Commissioner of 

Real Property) 139 

Public Facilities Department 136 

Public Improvement Commission (Public Works Dept.) ... 137 

Public Library (Library Dept.) 96-100 

Public Officials 45-48 

Public Safety Commission (Administrative Services Dept.) 54 

Public Works Department 136-138 

Engineering Division of 137 

Highway Division (includes former Bridge Division) . . 137 

Lamps, on streets 137 

Sanitary Division of 137 

Purchasing Agent , 52 

Printing Plant 52 



R 

Real Estate, Committee on Foreclosed 139 

Real Property Department 139 

Redevelopment Authority, Boston 128-135 

Refuse, removal of 137 

Register of Deeds (Suffolk County) 157 

Registry Division (City Clerk) 73 

City Registrar of births, marriages, and deaths 73 

Rent Board 140 

Retirement Board, Boston 140 

Roslindale (Wards 19 and 20): 

Public Schools in 143 

Roxbury (Wards 8-12): 

Municipal Court of 162 

Public Schools in 143 



198 

S Page 

Sanitary Division (Public Works Dept.) 137 

School Committee 141 

Department of, with officials 141 , 142 

High and Latin Schools 142 

Special schools 143 

Seal of the City, origin of and present form 3 

Sheriff of Suffolk County 158 

Sinking Funds, Board of Commissioners of 146 

South Boston (Wards 6 and 7): 

Municipal Court of 162 

Public Schools in 143 

South End (Wards 3, 4, 9): 

Public Schools in 143 

Suffolk County (County of Suffolk) 154 

Superior Court, justices and clerks of 158, 159 

Supreme Judicial Court, justices and clerks of 158 



T 

Traffic and Parking Commission, Boston 143, 144 

Traffic and Parking Department 143, 144 

Treasury Department 145 

Collecting Division 145 

Treasury Division 145 

Trustees of Charitable Donations for Inhabitants of Boston 72 



199 



^ Page 

Veterans' Graves and Registration, Supervisor of 147 

Veterans' Services Department 147 



W 

Water and Sewer Commission 148 

Weights and Measures Division (Housing Inspection Dept.) 91, 92 
Welfare Department (see "Trustees of Charitable Dona- 
tions") 72 

West Roxbury (Wards 19 and 20): 

Municipal Court of 162 

Pubhc Schools in 143 

White Fund, George Robert 149, 150 



Youth Activities Commission 151 



Z 

Zoning Code 70 

Zoning Commission (Building Dept.) 70-72 

Members of 71 



M