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Full text of "Municipal register : containing rules and orders of the City Council, the city charter and recent ordinances, and a list of the officers of the City of Boston, for .."

(oi^l.l'^ Gov 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY ' 



3 9999 06583 135 4 

[Document 59 — 1990] 



CITY OF BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
FOR 1990-1991 



CONTAINING 

A REGISTER OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, EXCERPTS FROM 
STATUTE 1948, CHAPTER 452 AS AMENDED BY STATUTE 
1951, CHAPTER 376, STATUTE 1982, CHAPTER 190, STAT- 
UTE 1982, CHAPTER 605, STATUTE 1983, CHAPTER 342. 

EXCERPTS FROM STATUTE 1909, CHAPTER 486 AS AMENDED 
BY STATUTE 1982, CHAPTER 190 AND STATUTE 1986, 
CHAPTER 701. 

ALSO STATUTE 1987, CHAPTER 613 - REORGANIZING THE 
BOSTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

WITH 

LISTS OF PUBLIC OFFICERS, 

AND 

MEMBERSHIP OF FORMER CITY GOVERNMENTS. 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY THE CITY MESSENGER 

UNDER THE DIRECTION 

OF 

THE COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE 

OF 

THE CITY COUNCIL 

CITY OF BOSTON fSJ^^-* PRINTING SECTION 



CITY OF BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
FOR 1990-1991 




SEAL OF THE CITY 



OF 

BOSTON 






a BOSTONIA I 

C^^^ CONDITA AD. ^/ 






THE CITY SEAL 

As it appeared prior to 1827 

The City Seal was adopted by "An ordinance to establish 
the City Seal," passed January 2, 1823, which provides "That 
the design hereto annexed, as sketched by John R. Penniman, 
giving a view of the City, be the device of the City Seal; that 
the motto be as follows, to wit: 'Sicut patribus sit Deus nobis'; 
and that the inscription be as follows: — 'Bostonia condita, 
A.D. 1630. Civitatis regimine donata, A. D. 1822.' " The moto 
is taken from 1 Kings, viii, 57: "Cod be with us as He was 
with our fathers." 

The seal as it first appeared is shown above. 

The seal as it was afterwards changed, and has ever since 
continued to be used, was first shown on page 221 of the vol- 
ume of laws and ordinances, commonly known as the "First 
Revision," published in 1827, and is established as the City 
Seal at the present time by Revised Ordinances of 1914, Chap- 
ter 1, Section 5, which provides that "The seal of the City 
shall be circular in form; shall bear a view of the City; the 
motto SicuT Patribus Sit Deus Nobis,' and the inscription, 
'Bostonia Condita, A.D. 1630. Civitatis Regimine 
Donata A.D. 1822,' as herewith shown." 

The seal as changed in 1827 is shown on the opposite page. 



ORIGIN AND GROWTH OF BOSTON 



The Royal Patent incorporating the Governor and Company 
of Massachusetts Bay in New England passed the seals March 
* 4, 1628-29. At a General Court or, Meeting of the company, 
on August * 29 of that year it was voted "that the Government 
and patent should be settled in New England." To that end 
Governor Winthrop led the Puritan Exodus in 1630. Soon after 
his arrival at Salem on June * 12, 1630, he proceeded with a 
large following to Charlestown, where a plantation had been 
established the summer before. The Assistants held three 
Courts at Charlestown in the interval, August * 23 to Septem- 
ber * 28, inclusive. At their meeting on September * 7, they 
"ordered that Trimountaine shall be called Boston; Mattapan, 
Dorchester; and the towne upon Charles River, Waterton." 
Thus Shawmut of the Indians was named Boston, probably out 
of gratitude to the Merchants of Boston in Lincolnshire, who 
has subscribed generously to the stock of the Company. 

In the latter part of August, Governor Winthrop with the 
patent chose Boston as his abiding place. The first "Court" 
held in Boston was a "General Court" on October * 19, "for 
establishing of the government." On October * 3 1632, Boston 
was formally declared to be "the fittest place for publique 
meetings of any place in the Bay." 

Boston was the first town in Massachusetts to become a city. 
It was incorporated February 23, 1822, by St. 1821, c. 110, 
adopted by the voters March 4, 1822. This act was revised by 
St. 1854, c. 448; amended by St. 1885, c. 266, again by St. 
1909, c. 486, and again by St. 1948, c. 452 as amended by St. 
1951, c. 376. 

The neck of land called Boston, still called Boston Proper, 
contained perhaps 700 acres of land, judging from the 783 
acres shown by the official survey of 1794. (In the interval 
1630-37, Boston acquired jurisdiction over most of the terri- 
tory now included in Chelsea, Winthrop, Revere, East Boston, 
Brookline, Quincy, Braintree, Randolph and Holbrook, besides 
certain islands in the harbor) From 1637 till May 13, 1640, 
when "Mount Woolaston" was set off as Braintree, Boston ex- 
ercised jurisdiction over a territory of at least 40,000 acres. 
Within its present limits there are 30,598 acres, including flats 
and water 



Old ,St\le. 



Since 1640, grants of land have been made to Boston by the 
General Court as follows: (1) October * 16, 1660, 1,000 acres 
"for the use of a free schoole, layd out in the wildernesse or 
North of the Merimake River" (in Haverhill), in 1664. (2) June 
* 27, 1735, in abatement of Province Tax, three townships, 
each six miles square, or 69, 120 acres in all. These townships 
later became the towns of Charlemont, Colrain, and Pittsfield. 
Boston sold its interest in them on June * 30, 1737, for 
L3,330. (3) June 26, 1794, a township of land in Maine 
(23,040 acres) "to build a public hospital." This tract was sold 
by the City April 6, 1833, for $4,200. 

Muddy river was set off as the Town of Brookline on Novem- 
ber * 13, 1705, and Rumney Marsh was set off as the Town of 
Chelsea January * 8, 1739. 

The principal annexations of territory included within the 
present limits of the City of Boston have been made as follows: 

(1) Noddle's Island by order of Court of Assistants, March * 
9, 1636-37. (2) South Boston set off from Dorchester March 6, 
1804, by St. 1803 c. 111. (3) Washington Village set off from 
Dorchester May 21, 1855, by St. 1855, c. 468. (4) Roxbury 
January 6, 1868, by St. 1867, c. 359, accepted September 9, 
1867. Roxbury received its name by order of the Court of As- 
sistants October * 8, 1630. It was incorporated as a city March 
12, 1846, by St. 1846, c. 95, accepted March 25, 1846. (5) 
Dorchester January 3, 1870, by St. 1869, c. 349, accepted 
June 22, 1869. It received its name September * 7, 1630, by 
order of the Court of Assistants. (6) Brighton January 5, 1874, 
by St. 1873, c. 303, accepted October 7, 1873. Set off from 
Cambridge as the Town of Brighton February 24, 1807, by St. 
1806, c. 65. (7) Charlestown January 5, 1874, by St. 1873, c. 
286, accepted October 7, 1873. Setded July * 4, 1629. It was 
incorporated a City February 22, 1847, by St. 1847, c. 29, ac- 
cepted March 10, 1847. (8) West Roxbury January 5, 1874, by 
St. 1873, c. 314, accepted October 7, 1873. It was set off from 
Roxbury and incorporated a Town May 24, 1851, by St. 1851, 
c. 250. (9) Hyde Park January 1, 1912,' by St. 1911, c. 469, and 
583, accepted November 7, 1911. Incorporated a Town April 
22, 1868. 



old Stvle. 



CITY OF BOSTON 
IN CITY COUNCIL 



COUNCILLOR lANNELLA 



June 20, 1990 

ORDERED, — That the City Messenger be authorized, under the 
direction of the Committee of the Whole, to prepare and have 
printed the Municipal Register for the biennium 1990 — 1991, 
the expense of said register to be charged to the appropriation for 
City Documents. 

In City Council June 20, 1990. Passed. 
Attest: 



Patrick F. McDonough 

City Clerk 




Raymond L. Fhjnn 
Mayor of Boston 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/municipalregiste19901bost 




Christopher A. lannella 
President, Boston City Council, 1990 



[Document 59 — 1990] 



CITY OF BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
FOR 1990-1991 



CONTAINING 

A REGISTER OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT, EXCERPTS FROM 
STATUTE 1948, CHAPTER 452 AS AMENDED BY STATUTE 
1951, CHAPTER 376, STATUTE 1982, CHAPTER 190, STAT- 
UTE 1982, CHAPTER 605, STATUTE 1983, CHAPTER 342. 

EXCERPTS FROM STATUTE 1909, CHAPTER 486 AS AMENDED 
BY STATUTE 1982, CHAPTER 190 AND STATUTE 1986, 
CHAPTER 701. 

ALSO STATUTE 1987, CHAPTER 613 - REORGANIZING THE 
BOSTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

WITH 

LISTS OF PUBLIC OFFICERS, 

AND 

MEMBERSHIP OF FORMER CITY GOVERNMENTS. 



COMPILED AND EDITED 

BY THE 

OFFICE OF THE CITY MESSENGER 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 9,10 

The City Government, 1990-1991 11-14 

Committees of the City Council 15-16 

Officers of the City Council 17-18 

Excerpts from the City Charter 19-49 

Public Officials 50-53 

Notes of executive departments, lists of officials, term, etc. . . . 53-176 

Various City, County and State officials, term, etc 177-180 

Members of City Government, 1909-present 181-197 

Mayors of Boston, 1822-present 198 

Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen, 1855-1909 199 

Presidents of the Common Council, 1822-1909 200 

Presidents of the City Council, 1910-present 201 

Orators of Boston, 1771-1990 202-203 

Index 204 



9 
INTRODUCTION 



As a public document The Municipal Register is as old 
as the City of Boston itself, the first volume having been pub- 
lished in 1821, a year before the government of Boston 
changed from Town to City. Up to 1940 the title of the volume 
was: The Rules and Orders of the Common Council. From 
1821 to 1829 the document contained merely a register of the 
City Council and a list of the officers. 

In 1829 the City Charter was published as a part of the vol- 
ume, and in 1830 the Acts relating to Boston, also the ordi- 
nances, were added. In 1832 the size of the volume was in- 
creased by the addition of an index to the contents. The 
volume published in 1822 contained fifteen pages and for the 
year 1840 there were eighty-eight pages, including three pages 
of index. 

The tide The Municipal Register was adopted in 1841 
when the publication became more ambitious, incorporating in 
its pages the Rules and Orders of the Common Council, joint 
rules, ordinances of the City, statutes of the Commonwealth 
relating to the City, a list of the public schools, the City Gov- 
ernment of 1841, the committees and departments (consisting 
at that time of the treasury, law, police, health, public land and 
buildings, lamps and bridges, fire, and public charitable insti- 
tutions), and a list of the ward officers. 

From 1842 to 1864 it also contained a list of the members 
of preceding City Governments, a necrological record of those 
members, the latest ordinances and the special statutes relat- 
ing to the City In 1851 a list of the annual orators was added, 
and in 1853 a map of the City and the rules of the Board of 
Aldermen. In 1876, statistics of registration and voting were 
included, carried from 1879 to 1824 in tabulated form. 

From 1889 to 1896, inclusive. The Municipal register 
also continued a compilation of the Charter with the revision 
of 1854 and the amendments of 1885 and thereafter. The 
Amended Charter of 1909 (15 pages) was added in 1910, and 
the various changes since that year have been indicated by 
footnotes. 



10 



In 1924 the important amendments to the Charter enacted 
in that year (10 pages) were included. 

The 1925 volume contained, as the latest addition, descrip- 
tions of the ward boundaries as fixed for the 22 new wards 
(formerly 26) in December, 1924. 

The 1980-81 volume contained the City Charter as amended 
by Stat. 1948, Chap. 452, and Stat. 1951, Chap. 376, com- 
monly known as Plan A, including subsequent changes. 

In addition this volume contains excerpts from St. 1982, Ch. 
190; St. 1982, Ch. 605; St. 1983, Ch. 342; St. 1986, Ch. 701. 
Also the reorganization of the Boston School Department — 
St. 1987, Ch. 613. 



CITY COUNCILLORS AT LARGE 





c\^^^^^r:i-^«= 



, _,Yeft* Michael J. McCormack 

,V\et ^• 



At Large 



Albert L. O'Neil 

At Large 



"^•"•'a Sale 



DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 




Robert E. Travaglini 

District 1 






James E. Byrne 

District 1 




Charles C. Yancey 

District 4 




Bruce C. Boiling 

District 7 



Thomas M. Menino 

District 5 




David Scondras 

District S 



Maura A. Hennigan Casey 

District 6 




Brian J. McLaughlin 

District 9 



PRESS 
GALLERY 



n 



D 



ENTRANCE 



O O 9 



Christopher A lamella 



President 



n u I 



O O""-. 



McDonough 
jty Clerk 



Robert J McDonald 
City Messengei 



r^Ol 



Charles C. Yancey 



Mary E, Ford 

Official 
Stenographer 



n 

Bruce C. Boiling 

L_J 



Robert E. Travaglir 



u 



u 



David Scondras 



M. Hennigan Casey 



u 



Rosaria Salerno 






James M, Kelly 

LJ 


Albert L 
O'Noil 


Thomas M. 
Menino 


Brian J. 

McLaughlin 


Michael J, 
McCormack 


o 


o 


o 


o 



□ 



n 



PUBLIC 
GALLERY 



ENTRANCE 

COUNCIL 

GALLERY 



PUBLIC 
GALLERY 



Boston City Council Chamber 1990 



11 

GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1990 



RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 

Residence, 

1 Flint Place, South Boston 02127 



BOSTON CITY COUNCIL 

CHRISTOPHER A. lANNELLA, President 

At Large 

14 Jaeger Terrace, Jamaica Plain 02130 

BRUCE C. ROLLING 

District 7 
64 Harold Park, Roxbury 02119 

JAMES E. BYRNE 

District 3 
26 Rowena Street, Dorchester 02124 

MAURA A. HENNIGAN CASEY 

District 6 

19 Gloria Road, West Roxbury 02132 

JAMES M.KELLY 

District 2 
5A Bantry Way, South Boston 02127 

MICHAEL J. McCORMACK 

At Large 
4 Longfellow Place, Boston 02114 

BRIAN J. McLaughlin 

District 9 
68 North Beacon Street, Allston 02134 

THOMAS M. MENINO 

District 5 

102 Chesterfield Street, Hvde Park 02136 



12 



ALBERT L. O'NEIL 

At Large 
4354 Washington Street, Roslindale 02131 

ROSARIA SALERNO 

At Large 

149 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 02115 

DAVID SCONDRAS 

District 8 
34 Edgerly Road, Boston 02115 

ROBERT E. TRAVAGLINI 

District 1 
49 Saint Andrew Road, East Boston 02128 

CHARLES C. YANCEY 

District 4 
3 Hooper Street, Dorchester 02124 

Regular meetings in Council Chamber, City Hall, 
fifth floor, Wednesdays, at 1 P.M. 



13 



ELECTORAL DISTRICTS 



DISTRICT 1 TRAVAGLINI DISTRICTS HENNIGAN CASEY 

East Boston: Ward 1 , precincts 1-14. 
Charlestown: Ward 2, precincts 1-7. 
North End: Ward 3, precincts 1-6. 



DISTRICT 2 



KELLY 



South Boston: Ward 3, precincts 7, 8; 

Ward 6, precincts 1-9; Ward 7, precincts 1-9. 
South End, Chinatown: Ward 4, precincts 1-4; 

Ward 5, precinct 1 ; Ward 8, precincts 1 , 2; 

Ward 9, precincts 1 , 2. 



DISTRICTS 



BYRNE 



Dorchester: Ward 13, precincts 3, 6-10; 
Ward 15, precincts 1-9; 
Ward 16, precincts 1-12; 
Ward 1 7, precincts 4,9, 11-14. 

DISTRICT 4 YANCEY 

Mattapan, North Dorchester: 
Ward 14, precincts 1-14. 
Ward 17, precincts 1-3, 5-8,10; 
Ward 18, precincts 1-5,21. 



DISTRICTS 



MENINO 



Jamaica Plain: 1 1 , precinct 8. 

Hyde Park: Ward 18, precincts 6-20, 22, 23; 

Ward 1 9, precincts 7, 1 0-1 3. 
West Roxbury: Ward 20, precincts 1,2,4, 8, 9. 



Jamaica Plain: Ward 10, precincts 6-9. 

Ward 1 1 , precincts 6, 7, 9, 1 0, 

Ward 19, precincts 1-6, 8, 9. 
West Roxbury: Ward 20, precincts 3, 5-7, 10-20. 

DISTRICT? BOLLING 

South End: Ward 4, precincts 8, 9. 
Roxbury: Ward 7, precinct 10, 

Ward 8, precincts 3-7, 

Ward 9, precincts 3-5, 

Ward 10, precinct 1, 

Ward 11, precincts 1-5, 

Ward 12, precincts 1-9, 

Ward 1 3, precincts 1,2,4, 5, 

DISTRICTS SCONDRAS 

Back Bay-Beacon Hill: 

Ward 4, precincts 5-7, 10. 

Ward 5, precincts 2-10. 
Mission Hill: Ward 10, precincts 2-5. 
Allston: Ward 21 , precincts 1-3. 

DISTRICT 9 Mclaughlin 

Allston: Ward 21 precincts 4-16. 
Brighton: Ward 22, precincts 1-13. 



14 



BOSTON SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1990 

DANIEL R. BURKE, President 

District 3 

67 Cbickatawbut Street, Dorchester 02122 

GERALD ANDERSON 

District 4 
14 Abbot Street, Dorchester 02124 

ROSINA BOWMAN 

District 9 
37 Leicester Street, Brighton 02135 

ABIGAIL M. BROWNE 

District 8 
10 Otis Place, Boston 02108 

ROBERT M. CAPPUCCI 

District 1 

12 Barnes Avenue, East Boston 02128 

MARGARET E. DAVIS-MULLEN 

District 2 
508 East Broadway, South Boston 02127 

MARIAN J. EGO 

District 6 
1216 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury 02132 

JOHN P. GRADY 

District 5 

6 Corcoran Drive, Hyde Park 02136 

STEPHEN C. HOLT 

At Large 
94 Sawyer Avenue, Dorchester 02125 

JEAN M. McGUIRE 

At Large 
35 Dennison Street, Roxbury 02119 

JOHN D. O'BRYANT 

At Large 
52 Hillsboro Road, Mattapan 02126 

JUANITA B. WADE 

District 7 

70 Dale Street, Roxbury 02119 

RITA WALSH-TOMASINI 

At Large 
24 Grampian Way, Dorchester 02125 



15 

STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER^lisP, ]990 



The first named is the committee Chair; 
second, Vice-Chair 

COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE 

Councillors lANNELLA, Kelly (and all Councillors) 

COMMITTEE ON ARTS AND HUMANITIES 
Councillors MENINO, McLaughlin, 
Salerno, Scondras, Hennigan Casey 

COMMITTEE ON CITY 
AND NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES 

Councillors KELLY, O'Neil, 
McCormack, Hennigan Casey, Salerno 

COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE 

AND TRANSPORTATION 

Councillors TRAVAGLINI, McLaughlin, 

McCormack, Salerno, Yancey 

COMMITTEE ON COUNCIL RULES 

AND ADMINISTRATION 
Councillors lANNELLA, Menino, Kelly 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC EDUCATION 

Councillors McCORMACK, Boiling, 

Menino, Scondras, Travaglini 

COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT 

AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Councillors BYRNE, Hennigan Casey, 

O'Neil, Scondras, Yancey 

COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS 

Councillors McLAUGHLIN, Hennigan Casey, 

Menino, Byrne, Yancey 

COMMITTEE ON HOUSING 

Councillors BYRNE, McLaughlin, 

McCormack, Kelly, Boiling 

COMMITTEE ON PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT 

Councillors McCORMACK, Menino, 

O'Neil, Hennigan Casey, Byrne 

COMMITTEE ON POST AUDIT AND OVERSIGHT 

Councillors ROLLING, Travaglini, 

Salerno, O'Neil, McLaughlin 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SAFETY 

Councillors O'NEIL, Byrne, 

Kelly, Menino, Yancev 



16 



COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS 

Councillors MENINO, McLaughlin, 
Byrne, Kelly, McCormack, O'Neil, Salerno 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP, 1990 

COMMITTEE ON COMMUNITY INVESTMENT 

AND BANKING 

Councillors MENINO, Byrne, 

McLaughlin 

COMMITTEE ON THE ELDERLY 

Councillors KELLY, Scondras, 
Travaglini 

COMMITTEE ON EQUITY 
Councillors HENNIGAN CASEY, Yancey, O'Neil 

COMMITTEE ON HACKNEY CARRIAGE LICENSURE 

Councillors lANNELLA, Kelly, Byrne, 

McCormack, McLaughlin, Menino, O'Neil 

COMMITTEE ON HUNGRY AND HOMELESS 

Councillors O'NEIL, Menino, 

Travaglini 

COMMITTEE ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS 
Councillors SALERNO, Yancey, Byrne 

COMMITTEE ON NEIGHBORHOOD 

CRIME PREVENTION 

Councillors O'NEIL, Yancey, 

Menino 

COMMITTEE ON PERAMBULATION 
Councillors SCONDRAS, Yancey, Boiling 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC HEALTH 

Councillors SCONDRAS, Travaglini, 

Menino 

COMMITTEE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE 
Councillors KELLY, Salerno, Boiling 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY 

RELATIONS 

Councillors McLAUGHLIN, McCormack, 

Byrne 

COMMITTEE ON WASTE MANAGEMENT 

Councillors YANCEY, Kelly, 

McLaughlin 

COMMITTEE ON YOUTH SERVICES 

Councillors McCORMACK, Boiling, 

Hennigan Casey 



17 



OFFICERS 

of the 

CITY COUNCIL 




Patrick F. McDonough 
Citv Clerk* 




Alice G. Hennessey 
Staff Director 



*NOTE: John P. Campbell resigned from the office of City Clerk ef- 
fective June 14, 1990. Assistant City Clerk Patrick F. McDonough 
was elected City Clerk on June 20, 1990 to fill the unexpired term. 



18 

OFFICERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL 

1990 

City Clerk 

Patrick F. McDonough 

Assistant City Clerk 



Staff Director 
Alice G. Hennessey 

Liaison to Committee 
Edward T. Kelley 

City Messenger 

Robert]. McDonald 

Chief of Research 

Robert F. Hannan 

Supervisor of Finance 
Karen Ahern Connor 



19 



EXCERPTS FROM TiJ'^ ' -TTY CHARTER 

The following pages contain portions of the City Charter concerning 
the form of government; the election of the Mayor, the School Commit- 
tee, and the City Council, and the general powers and duties of those 
officers; and miscellaneous sections relative to the powers and duties of 
certain boards and officers. 

Users of the following material should bear in mind that these are only 
excerpts from the hundreds of special laws relating to the City of Boston, 
all of which comprise the "City Charter." The voters of Boston, on No- 
vember 8, 1949, adopted a form of government designated on the ballot 
as "Plan A," which is referred to in some of the following excerpts. Please 
note that this Plan A is not the same as the Plan A described in G.L. c. 43, 
although there are some similarities. Plan A, as chosen by the voters of 
Boston and as subsequently amended, is specifically tailored to the City 
of Boston. 



20 



SECTION NUMBERS REFER TO 
STATUTE 1948, CHAPTER 452 

AS AMENDED BY 
STATUTE 1951, CHAPTER 376 
STATUTE 1982, CHAPTER 190 
STATUTE 1982, CHAPTER 605 
STATUTE 1983, CHAPTER 342 
INCLUDING CERTAIN SUBSEQUENT CHANGES 
THROUGH 1989 

General Provisions 

Section 1 The following words as used in this act shall, unless the 
context otherwise requires, have the following meanings: 

"City", the city of Boston. 

"Board of election commissioners", the board of election commission- 
ers of the cit\' of Boston. 

"Regular municipal election", the biennial election held for electing 
officers of the city as provided in this act. 

"Preliminary election", the election held for the purpose of nominat- 
ing candidates whose names shall appear on the official ballot at a munici- 
pal election. 



Sect. 8. Whenever one of the plans provided in this act shall be 
adopted the terms of office of all elective officers in office, and the posi- 
tion of the cit\ manager if there be one, shall terminate at ten o'clock in 
the forenoon on the first Monda\' of Januar\ following the first municipal 
election held in accordance with the provisions of the plan so adopted. 

Sect. 9. Whenever one of the plans provided in this act shall be 
adopted, the fiscal year of the city shall begin on July first and shall end on 
June thirtieth next following;* and the municipal year thereof shall begin 
on the first Monday in January and shall continue until the first Monday of 
the January next following. 

Plan A. Government by Mayor, City Council, and School Com- 
mittee, Elected at Large with Preliminary Elections 

(A form of government designated on the ballot as "Plan A " was adopted by 
the voters of the City of Boston at the Municipal Election held November 8, 
1949, Yes, 146,162, No, 73,882). 

Sect. 11 There shall be in the city a mayor who shall be the chief 
executive officer of the city, a city council of thirteen** members which 
shall be the legislative body of the city, and a school committee of thirteen 
members which shall ha\ e the powers and duties conferred and imposed 
by law. 

Sect. 11 A.* Every person elected mayor and every person elected 
or chosen city councillor or school committeemenber shall, before enter- 
ing upon the duties of his office, take, and subscribe in a book to be kept 
by the city clerk for the purpose, the oath of allegiance and oath of office 
prescribed in the constitution of this commonwealth and an oath to sup- 



21 



port th( constitution of the United States. Such oaths shall be adminis- 
tered, to a person elected mayor, by a justice of the supreme judicial 
court, a judge of a court of record commissioned to hold such court within 
the city or a justice of the peace, and to a person elected or chosen city 
councillor or school committeemember, by the mayor or any of the per- 
sons authorized to administer said oaths to a person elected mayor. 

Sect. IIB. Whenever the mayor is absent from the city or unable 
from any cause to perform his duties, and whenever there is a vacancy in 
the office of mayor from any cause, the president of the city council, while 
such absence, inability or \ acancy continues, shall perform the duties of 
mayor. If there is no president of the city council or if he also is absent 
from the city or unable from any cause to perform such duties, they shall 
be performed, until there is a mayor or president of the city council or the 
mayor or president of the city council returns or is able to attend to said 
duties, by such member of the city council as that body by a vote which, 
for the piu-poses of section seventeen D, shall be deemed to be a vote 
electing an official, may elect, and until such elections by the city clerk. 
The person upon whom such duties shall devolve shall be called "acting 
mayor" and he shall possess the powers of mayor only in matters not 
admitting of delay, but shall have no power to make permanent appoint- 
ments. 

Sect. 12. At the next regular municipal election following the adop- 
tion of Plan A and at every second regular municipal election after a 
regular municipal election at which a mayor is elected, a mayor shall be 
elected at large to hold office for the four municipal years following the 
municipal year in which he is elected and thereafter until his successor is 
elected and qualified. 

Sect. 13. If a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor within sixteen 
weeks prior to a regular municipal election other than a regular munici- 
pal election at which a mayor is elected, or within sixteen months after a 
regular mimicipal election, or if there is a failure to elect a mayor or a 
person elected mayor resigns or dies before taking office, the city council 
shall forthwith adopt an order calling a special municipal election for the 

*By St. 1969, c. 849, as amended, changed the fiscal year of all cities 
and towns in the Commonwealth to begin on Jul\' 1, and to end on June 
30. 

**By St. 1982, c. 605, ss. 1 & 2 changed the composition of the city 
council and school committee effective with the preliminary election in 
September, 1983, "the city council to consist of nine members elected 
from equally populous districts and four members elected at-large, and 
the school committee to consist of nine members elected from equalK' 
populous districts and four members elected at-large." 

Section 3 of said c. 605, as amended by St. 19S6, c. 343, s.l, requires 
the city council, by ordinance, to redraw the districts "on or before (a) 
ninety days from the date that the nineteen hundred and eight\-fi\ e state 
census, including census figures for the city of Boston, is properK- certi- 
fied by the state secretary; and (b) on or before August first, nineteen 
hundred and ninety-six and on or before said August first, e\er\' subse- 
quent tenth year." 

*Sect. IIA Amended in entirety bv St. 1983, c. 342, s. 1. 



22 



purpose of electing at large a ma\or for the unexpired term, which elec- 
tion shall be held on such Tuesday, not less than one hundred and twenty 
da\ s nor more than one hundred and forty days after the adoption of such 
order, as the city council shall in such order fix. If a vacancy occurs in the 
office of the mayor at any other time, a mayor shall be elected at large at 
the next regular municipal election to hold office for a term expiring at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the first Monday of the fourth January 
following his election. A person elected mayor under either of the forego- 
ing provisions shall take and subscribe the oaths required by section 
eleven A as soon as conveniently may be after the issuance to him of his 
certificate of election. Such person shall hold office from the time of tak- 
ing and subscribing such oaths until the expiration of his term and there- 
after until his successor is elected and qualified. The provisions of this 
section shall not apply if a vacancy occurs in the office of mayor in the 
period beginning on the date of a regular municipal election at which a 
new mayor is elected and ending at the time he takes office. 

Sect. 13A.* The mayor shall be paid an annual salary of one hundred 
thousand dollars or such other sum as may from time to time be fixed by 
ordinance. The ma\'or shall not receive for his services any other compen- 
sation or emolument whatever; nor shall he hold any other office of emol- 
ument under the city government. 

Sect. 14.** At the next regular municipal election following the 
adoption of Plan A and at every regular municipal election thereafter, 
there shall be elected four at large and nine district city councillors, each 
to hold office for the two municipal years following the municipal year in 
which he is elected. 

Sect. 1,5.*** Ifat any time a vacancy occurs in the city council from 
any cause, the city clerk shall forthwith notify the city council thereof; 
and within fifteen days after such notification, the remaining city council- 
lors shall choose, as city councillor for the unexpired term, whichever of 
the defeated candidates for the office of city councillor at the regular 
municipal election at which city councillors were elected for the term in 
which the vacancy occurs, who are eligible and willing to serve, received 
the highest number of votes at such election, or, if there is no such de- 
feated candidate eligible and willing to serve, a registered voter of the city 
duly qualified to vote for a candidate for the office of city councillor. Ifat a 
regular municipal election there is a failure to elect a city councillor or if a 
person elected city councillor at such an election resigns or dies before 
taking office, the city clerk shall, as soon as conveniently may be after the 
remaining city councillors-elect take office, notify the city council of such 
failure to elect, resignation or death; and within fifteen days after such 
notification, the members thereof shall choose, as city councillor for the 
unexpired term, whichever of the defeated candidates for the office of 
city councillor at such election, who are eligible and willing to serve, 
received the highest number of votes at such election, or, if there is no 
such defeated candidate eligible and willing to serve, a registered voter of 
the city duly qualified to vote for a candidate for the office of city council- 

*CBC 2-7.11. 

**St. 1982, c. 605, s.l. 

***Sect. 15 as amended bv St. 1952, c. 190. 



23 



lor. If in anv of the aforesaid events a choice is not made as hereinbefore 
provided within fifteen days after the notification of the city council b> 
the city clerk, the choice shall be made by the mayor, or, if there is no 
mavor, by the city councillor senior in length of service, or, if there be 
more than one such, by the city councillor senior both in age and length of 
service. For the purposes of section seventeen D, votes of the city council 
under this section shall be deemed to be votes electing officials. 

Sect. 16.**** Eivery city councillor shall be paid an annual salary of 
forty-five thousand dollars; and on other sum shall be paid from the city 
treasury for or on account of any personal expenses directly or indirectly 
incurred by or in behalf of any city councillor. 

Sect. 17. The city council shall be the judge of the election and 
qualification of its members; shall elect from its members by vote of a 
majority of all the members a president who when present shall preside at 
the meetings thereof; and shall from time to time establish rules for its 
proceedings. The member eldest in years shall preside until the president 
is chosen, and in case of the absence of the president, until a presiding 
officer is chosen. 

Sect. 17A. The mayor may, whenever in his judgment the good of 
the city requires it, summon a meeting or meetings of the city council 
although said council stands adjourned to a more distant day, and shall 
cause suitable written notice of such meeting or meetings to be given to 
the city councillors. 

Sect. 17B. The city council may, subject to the approval of the 
mayor, from time to time establish such offices, other than that of clerk, as 
it may deem necessary for the conduct of its affairs and at such salaries as 
it may determine, and abolish such offices or alter such salaries; and with- 
out such approval may fill the offices thus established and remove the 
incumbents at pleasure. The city clerk shall act as clerk of the city coun- 
cil. 

Sect. 17C. All elections by the city council under any provision of 
law, including the choosing of a city councillor under section fifteen, shall 
be made by a viva voce vote, each member who is present answering to his 
name when it is called by the clerk or other proper officer, and stating the 
name of the person for whom he votes, or declining to vote, as the case 
may be; and the clerk or other proper officer shall record every such vote. 
No such election shall be valid unless it is made as aforesaid. 

Sect. 17D. Every order, ordinance, resolution and vote of the city 
council (except special municipal election orders adopted under section 
thirteen, votes relating to the internal affairs of said council, resolutions 
not affecting legal rights, votes electing officials, and votes confirming 
appointments by the mayor) shall be presented to the mayor for his ap- 
proval. If he approves it, he shall sign it; and thereupon it shall be in force. 
If he disapproves it, he shall, by filing it with the city clerk w ith his objec- 
tions thereto in writing, return it to the city council which shall enter the 
objections at large on its records. Every order, ordinance, resolution and 
vote authorizing a loan or appropriating money or accepting a statute 
involving the expenditure of money, which is so ret urned to the cit\ coun- 

****CBC 2-8.1. See also M.G.L. c. 39, s. 6A. 



24 



oil, shall be void, and no further action shall be taken thereon; but the city 
council shall proceed forthwith to reconsider every other order, ordi- 
nance, resolution and vote so returned, and if, after such reconsideration, 
two thirds of all the cit\' councillors vote to pass it notwithstanding the 
disapproval of the mayor, it shall then be in force; but no such vote shall 
be taken before the seventh day after the city council has entered the 
objections at large on its records. Every order, ordinance, resolution or 
vote required by this section to be presented to the mayor which, within 
fifteen days after such presentation, is neither signed by him nor filed 
with his written objections as hereinbefore provided, shall be in force on 
and after the sixteenth day following such presentation. 

Every order, ordinance, resolution or vote required by this section to 
be presented to the mayor shall be approved as a whole or disapproved as 
a whole; except that, if the same authorizes a loan or appropriates money, 
the mayor may approve some of the items in whole or in part and disap- 
prove other of the items in whole or in part; and such items or parts of 
items as he approves shall, upon his signing the same, be in force and such 
items or parts of items as he disapproves by filing with the city clerk his 
written objections thereto shall be void, and such items or parts of items 
as he neigher signs nor so disapproves with fifteen days after the order, 
ordinance, resolution or vote shall have been presented to him shall be in 
force on and after the sixteenth day following such presentation. 

*p]very order of the city council approving a petition to the general 
court pursuant to Clause (1) of Section 8 of Article 2 of the amendments 
to the Constitution of the Commonwealth shall be presented to the 
mayor who shall forthwith consider the same, and, within fifteen days of 
presentation, either approve it, or file with the city council a statement in 
detail of his reasons for not approving the same, including any objection 
based on form, on content, or both; provided, that no such order shall be 
deemed appro\ed or in force unless the mayor affixes his signature 
thereto. 

Sect. 17E.** The mayor from time to time ma\' make to the city 
council in the form of an ordinance or loan order filed with the city clerk 
such recommendations as he may deem to be for the welfare of the city. 
The city council shall consider each ordinance or loan order so presented 
and shall either adopt or reject the same within sixty da\'S after the date 
when it is filed as aforesaid. If such ordinance or loan order is not rejected 
within said sixty days, it shall be in force as if adopted by the city council 
unless previously withdrawn by the mayor. Nothing herein shall prevent 
the mayor from again presenting an ordinance or loan order which has 
been rejected or withdrawn. The city council may originate an ordinance 
or loan order and may reduce or reject any item in any loan and, subject to 
the approval of the mayor, may amend an ordinance. All sales of land 
other than school lands, all appropriations for the purchase of land, and 
all loans voted by the city council shall require a vote of two thirds of all 
the city councillors and shall be passed only after two separate readings 
and by two separate votes, the second of said readings and votes to be had 
not less than fourteen days after the first, except that in the case of loan 

*Added by St. 1982, c. 190, s. 22. 

**As amended bv St. 1966. c. 642, s. 14. 



25 



orders for temporar\ loans in anticipation of taxes the second of said 
readings and votes may be had not less than twenty-fonr honrs after the 
first. No amendment increasing the amount to be paid for the purchase of 
land, or the amount of loans, or altering the disposition of purchase 
money or of the proceeds of loans shall be made at the time of the second 
reading and vote. If a petition signed by three city councillors requesting 
that action be taken forthwith upon a loan order presented by the mayor 
is filed in the office of the cit> clerk not earlier than fourteen days after the 
presentation of such loan order, action shall be taken by the yeas and nays 
on the question of the adoption of such loan order at the next meeting of 
the council, or, if one vote has already been taken thereon, at the next 
meeting after the expiration of the required interxal after such vote; pro- 
vided, that such action thereon has not sooner been taken or such loan 
order has not been withdrawn by the mayor. 

Sect. 1 7F. The city council at any time may request from the mayor 
specific information on any municipal matter within its jurisdiction, and 
may request his presence to answer written questions relating thereto at 
a meeting to be held not earlier than one week from the date of the re- 
ceipt of said questions, in which case the mayor shall personally, or 
through a head of a department or a member of a board, attend such 
meeting and publicly answer all such questions. The person so attending 
shall not be obliged to answer questions relating to any other matter. 

* Specific information, as used in this section, shall include any and all 
records, other than those exempt from disclosure under clause Twent\- 
six of section seventy-seven of chapter four of the General Laws, within 
the control of any executive department or agency of the city, including 
the Boston water and sewer commission and the Boston Redevelopment 
Authority, whether the information is in printed or electronic form. For 
the purposes of enforcing this section, the city council shall have standing 
to request a justice of the superior court department of the trial court of 
the commonwealth to issue appropriate orders to compel compliance 
with this section. The mayor at any time may attend and address the city 
council in person or through the head of a department, or a member of a 
board, upon such subject as he may desire. 

Sect. 17G. Except as otherwise provided in chapter four hundred 
and eighty-six of the acts of nineteen hundred and nine, neither the city 
council nor any member, committee, officer or employee thereof shall 
directly or indirectly on behalf of the city or of the county of Suffolk take 
part in the employment of labor, the making of contracts, or the purchase 
of materials, supplies or real estate; nor in the construction, alteration, or 
repair of any public works, buildings, or other property; nor in the care, 
custody, or management of the same; nor in the conduct of the executive 
or administrative business of the city or county; nor in the appointment or 
removal of any city or county employee; nor in the expenditure of public 
money except such as may be necessary for the contingent and incidental 
expenses of the city council. Any person violating any provision of this 
section shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than one >ear, or 
by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or l)oth. 

Sect. 17H. No city councillor nor an\' person elected cit\ councillor 

*These sentences inserted bv St. 1982, c. 190, s. 16. 



26 



shall during the term for which he is elected or chosen, be appointed to, 
or hold, an)' office or position which is under the city government or the 
salary of which is payable out of the city treasury except the office of city 
councillor and any office held ex officio by virtue of being a member, or 
president, of the city council; provided, however, that nothing herein 
contained shall prevent a city councillor or any person elected city coun- 
cillor from, during the term for which he is elected or chosen, being 
appointed by the governor, with or without the adxice and consent of the 
council, to, and holding, any such office or position if before entering 
upon the duties of such office or position he resigns as city councillor or 
city councillor-elect. 

Sect. 18.** At the next regular municipal election following the 
adoption of Plan A and at every regular municipal election thereafter, 
there shall be elected at large four school committeemembers, and nine 
elected from equally populous districts, each to hold office for the two 
municipal years following the municipal year in which he is elected. 

Sect. 19.* If at any time a vacancy occurs in the school committee 
from any cause, the mayor, the president of the city council and the re- 
maining school committeemembers, meeting in joint convention, shall, 
by a majority vote, choose, as school committeemember for the unex- 
pired term, any registered voter of the city duly qualified to vote for a 
candidate for the office of school committeemember. If there is a failure 
to elect a school committeemember or a person elected school commit- 
teemember resigns or dies before taking office, the remaining school 
committeemembers elect upon taking office and the then mayor and the 
then president of the city council shall meet in joint convention and by a 
majority vote choose such a registered voter as school committeemem- 
ber for the unexpired term. 

Sect. 20. The members of the school committee shall meet and 
organize on the first Monday of January following their election. The 
school committee shall be the judge of the election and qualifications of 
its members. The members of the school committee shall serve with com- 
pensation. Said compensation shall be a sum as may from time to time be 
fixed bv ordinance.** 



Sect. 53. Every municipal officer required by sections twelve, thir- 
teen, fourteen and eighteen to be elected at large shall be elected at a 
biennial municipal election, or, in the case of a mayor for an unexpired 
term, at a special municipal election, after, in either case, nomination at a 
preliminary municipal election, except as otherwise provided in section 
fifty-seven C. In sections fifty-three to sixty-five, inclusive, the term "reg- 
ular election" shall be construed to refer to the biennial municipal elec- 

**Amended by St. 1982, c. 605, s. 2. 

*Sect. 19 amended in entirety bv St. 1983, c. 342, s. 2. 

**Amended by St. 1986, c. 352,'s. 1. 

Pursuant to CBC 19-2, annual stipend is $7,500, effective Jan. 1, 

1987. 



27 



tion or the special municipal election, as the case may be, and the term 
"preliminary election" to the preliminary municipal election held for the 
purpose of nominating candidates for election at such regular election. 
Every preliminary election shall, unless dispensed with under said sec- 
tion fifty-seven C, be held on the sixth Tuesday preceding the regular 
election. 

Sect. 54. Anv person who is a registered voter of the city duly quali- 
fied to vote for a candidate for an elective municipal office therein may be 
a candidate for nomination to such office; provided, that a petition for the 
nomination of such person is obtained, signed and filed as provided in 
sections fifty-five, fifty-five A, and fifty-six, and signatures of petitioners 
thereon, to the number required by section fifty-six, certified as provided 
in section fifty-seven by the board of election commissioners, in sections 
fifty-five to sixty-five, inclusive, called the election commission. 

Sect. 55.* A nomination petition shall be issued only to a person 
subscribing after the thirteenth Tuesday, and before the eighth Tuesday, 
preceding the preliminary election, in a book kept for the purpose by the 
election commission, a statement of candidacy in substantially the follow- 
ing form:- 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CITY OF BOSTON 

STATEMENT OF CANDIDACY. 

I, (name with first or middle name in full,) under the pains and penalties 
of perjury declare that I reside at (street and number, if any) in District 
(number) of the City of Boston; that I am a registered voter of said City 
duly qualified to vote for a candidate for the office hereinafter mem- 
tioned; that I am a candidate for nomination for the office of Mayor or 
City Councillor-at-Large or City Councillor representing District (num- 
ber) or School Committeemember-at-Large or School Committeemem- 
ber representing District (number); that I request that my name be 
printed as such candidate on the official ballot to be used at the prelimi- 
nary municipal election to be held on Tuesday, ,19 , for the 
purpose of nominating candidates for election to such office; and that I 
also request that my nomination petition contain the following statement 
(not exceeding eight words) concerning the elective public offices now or 
formerlv held bv me:- 



Signature of Candidate. 

Sect. 55A. A nomination petition shall be issued by the election 
commission not later than twelve o'clock noon on the second day (Satur- 



*Sections 55, 55A, 56, 57, 57C, 58, 59, 61 and 62 amended by St. 1983, 
c. 342. 



28 



days, Sundays and legal holidays excluded) after the subscription of a 
statement of candidacy, except that no such petition shall be issued be- 
fore the eleventh Tuesday preceding the preliminary election. A nomina- 
tion petition shall not relate to more than one candidate nor to more than 
one office. A nomination petition may state the elective public offices 
which the candidate holds or has held under the government of the com- 
monwealth, the county of Suffolk or the city of Boston or in congress as a 
representative or senator from the commonwealth; provided, that such 
statement shall not exceed eight words and shall, with respect to each 
such office, consist solely of the title, as hereinafter given, of such office, 
preceded, if the candidate is the then incumbent thereof, by the word 
"Present", otherwise, by the word "Former." 

For the purposes of such statement, the titles of the elective public 
offices which may be stated shall be deemed to be as follows:- city 
councillor-at-large, district city councillor, school committeemember-at- 
large, district city councillor, mayor, district attorney, sheriff, register of 
deeds, register of probate, county clerk of superior (criminal) court, 
county clerk of superior (civil) court, county clerk of supreme judicial 
court, state representative, state senator, governor's councillor, attorney 
general, state auditor, state treasurer, state secretary, lieutenant gover- 
nor, governor, congressman, and United States senator. 

If the candidate is a veteran as defined in section twenty-one of chapter 
thirty-one of the General Laws, his nomination petition may contain the 
word "Veteran," which, in the case of a candidate holding or having held 
elective public office as aforesaid, shall, for the purposes of this section 
and sections fifty-five, fifty-eight and sixty-two, be counted as a part of the 
statement concerning the elective public offices held by him, and, in the 
case of a candidate who does not hold and has never held elective public 
office as aforesaid, shall, for the purposes of said sections, be deemed to 
be a statement concerning the elective public offices held by him. 

A nomination petition may consist of one or more sheets; but each 
sheet shall be in substantially the following form:- 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CITY OF BOSTON 

NOMINATION PETITION. 

Whereas (name of candidate) residing at (street and number, if any) in 
District (number) of the City of Boston, (here insert any lawfully requested 
statement concerning the elective public offices held by candidate) is a can- 
didate for nomination for the office of (Mayor or City Councillor-at-Large 
or District City Councillor or School Committeemember-at-Large or 
District School Committeemember), the undersigned, registered voters 
of the City of Boston, duly qualified to vote for a candidate for said office, 
do hereby request that the name of said (name of candidate) as a candidate 
for nomination for said office be printed on the official ballot to be used at 
the preliminarv municipal election to be held on Tuesday, 
19 

Each of the undersigned does hereby certify that he or she has not 
subscribed (if the petition relates to the office of mayor or district city 



29 



councillor or district school committeemember, here insert: - any other 
nomination petition for said office: if the petition relates to the office of 
city councillor-at-large or school committeemember-at-large, here in- 
sert; - more than three other nomination petitions for said office). 

In case the above named candidate withdraws his name from nomina- 
tion or is found to be ineligible or dies, we authorize (names and resi- 
dences of a committee of not less than five persons) or a majority thereof as 
our representatives to fill the vacancy in the manner prescribed by law. 



Signature ol 
Nominators 
(To 1)6 signed in person 
with name as regis- 
tered) 



Residence 
January 1, 19 
(II registered after above 
date, residence when 
registered) 



Ward 



Pre- 
cinct 



Present Residence 



The Commonv/ealtii of Massachusetts 
Suffolk, ss. Boston, , 19 

The undersigned, being the circulator or circulators of this sheet, sev- 
erally certify, under the pains and penalties of perjury, that the persons 
whose names are written upon the lines the numbers of which appear 
opposite our signatures below, signed the same in person. 



namp:s and addresses of persons 
circulating this sheet 


Numbers of Lines Upon Wliicli 


Nume 


Address 


Appear Signatures as to W bicli 
C:ertification is Made Ilerel)y. 









Add here or at some other convenient place on the nomination petition 
sheet the following. 



I hereby accept the nomination. 



Signature of Candidate. 
This nomination petition sheet filed by 



Signature of Filer. 



Number, Street, City. 



30 



Every nomination petition sheet shall, before issuance, be prepared by 
the election commission by printing or inserting thereon the matter re- 
quired by the first two paragraphs of the foregoing form. Not more than 
three hundred nomination petition sheets shall be issued to any candi- 
date for nomination to the office of mayor under Plan A and not more than 
one hundred and fifty such sheets shall be issued to any candidate for 
nomination to the office of city councillor-at-large or any candidate for 
nomination to the office of school committeemember-at-large. Not more 
than twenty nomination sheets shall be issued to any candidate for nomi- 
nation to the office of district city councillor or district school commit- 
teemember. No nomination petition sheet shall be received or be valid 
unless prepared and issued by the election commission; nor shall any 
such sheet be received or be valid unless tlie written acceptance of the 
candidate thereby nominated is endorsed thereon, anything in section 
three A of chapter fifty of the General Laws to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing. 

Sect. 56. The nomination petition shall l)e signed, in the case of a 
candidate for mayor, by at least three thousand registered voters of the 
city qualified to vote for such candidate; in the case of a candidate for city 
councillor-at-large or school committeemember-at-large by at least fif- 
teen hundred registered voters; and in the case of a candidate for district 
city councillor or district school committeemember, by at least the num- 
ber of voters residing in the district as shall be set in ordinance by the city 
council and mayor, in accordance with the last paragraph of section three 
of chapter six hvmdred and five of the acts of nineteen hundred and 
eighty-two. 

Every voter signing a nomination petition shall sign in person, with his 
name as registered, and shall state his residence on January first preced- 
ing, or his residence when registered if subsequent thereto, and the place 
where he is then living, with the street and number, if any; but any voter 
who is prevented by physical disability from writing may authorize some 
person to write his name and residence in his presence. No voter may sign 
as a petitioner more than one nomination petition for the office of mayor 
or district city councillor or district school committeemember, nor more 
than four nomination petitions of the office of city councillor-at-large or 
school committeemember-at-large. If the name of any voter appears as 
petitioner on more nomination petitions for an office than prescribed in 
this section, his name shall, in determining the number of petitioners, be 
counted, in the case of the office of mayor, district city councillor or 
district school committeemember, only on the nomination petition sheet 
bearing his name first filed with the election commission, and in the case 
of the office of city councillor-at-large or school committeemember-at- 
large, only on the four nomination petition sheets bearing his name first 
filed with the commission. If the name of any voter appears as petitioner 
on the same nomination petition more than once, it shall be deemed to 
appear but once. The signature of any petitioner which is not certified by 
the circulator of the sheet as provided in the form set forth in section fifty- 
five A shall not be counted in determining the number of petitioners. 

The separate sheets of a nomination petition may be filed all at one 
time or in lots of one or more from time to time, but shall all be filed with 
the election commission at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the 



31 



eighth Tuesday preceding the preliminary election. Every nomination 
petition sheet shall be filed by a responsible person, who shall sign such 
sheet and, if he is other than the candidate, add to his signature his place 
of residence, giving street and number, if any; and the election commis- 
sion shall require satisfactory identification of such person. 

The names of candidates appearing on nomination petitions shall, 
when filed, be a matter of public record; but no nomination petition shall 
be open to public inspection until the signatures on all nomination peti- 
tions for the same office have been certified. 

Sect. 57. Upon the filing of each nomination petition sheet the elec- 
tion commission shall check each name to be certified by it on such sheet 
and shall certify thereon the number of signatures so checked which are 
the names of registered voters of the city qualified to sign the same; pro- 
vided, however, that said commission shall not certify, in connection with 
a single nomination petition, a greater number of names than required by 
section fifty-six with twenty per cent of such number added thereto. 
Names not certified in the first instance shall not thereafter be certified 
on the same nomination petition. All nomination petitions not containing 
names certified pursuant to this section, to the number required by said 
section fifty-six, shall be invalid. The election commission shall complete 
the certification required by this section at or before five o'clock in the 
afternoon on the thirty-fourth day preceding the preliminary election. 

Sect. 57A. A nomination petition which has been filed and is in 
apparent conformity with law shall be valid unless written objection 
thereto is made by a registered voter of the city. Such objection shall be 
filed with the election commission at or before five o'clock in the after- 
noon of the forty-ninth day preceding the preliminary election. Objec- 
tions filed with the election commission shall forthwith be transmitted by 
it to the Boston ballot law commission. Certification pursuant to section 
fifty-seven shall not preclude a voter from filing objections to the \alidity 
of a nomination petition. 

Sect. 57B.* Any candidate may withdraw his name from nomina- 
tion by a request signed and duly acknowledged by him; provided, how- 
ever, that all withdrawals shall be filed with the election commission at or 
before five o'clock in the afternoon on the forty-ninth day preceding the 
preliminary election. If a candidate so withdraws his name from nomina- 
tion before five o'clock in the afternoon of the twenty-ninth day preced- 
ing the preliminary election, or is found to be ineligible or dies, the va- 
cancy may be filled by a committee of not less than five persons or a 
majority thereof, if such committee be named and so authorized in the 
nomination petition; provided, however, that all certificates of substitu- 
tion, except any certificate of substitution for a deceased candidate for 
mayor under Plan A, shall be filed with the election commission at or 
before five o'clock in the afternoon on s?id twenty-ninth dav. 

The certificate of substitution for a deceased candidate for ma\or un- 
der Plan A shall be filed with the election commission (a) at or beh)re five 
o'clock in the afternoon on the first Tuesday preceding the preliminary 
election if he dies on or before the second Frida\ preceding the prelimi- 
nary election (h) at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the first 

*Sect. 57B as amended by St. 1958, c. 257. 



32 



Friday following the preliminary election if he dies after the second Fri- 
day preceding such election and before the closing of the polls at such 
election (c) at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the Tuesday 
preceding the regular election if he dies after the closing of the polls at 
the preliminary election and on or before the second Friday preceding 
the regular election, and (d) at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on 
the first Friday following the regular election if he dies after the second 
Friday preceding such election and before the closing of the polls at such 
election; provided, however, that no certificate of substitution for such a 
deceased candidate shall be filed after the closing of the polls at the pre- 
liminary election unless such candidate, if living, would be deemed under 
either section fifty-seven C or sixty-one to have been nominated for the 
office of mayor under Plan A. 

If a certificate of substitution for a deceased candidate for mayor under 
Plan A is filed at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the first Tues- 
day preceding the preliminary election, the ballots for use at such elec- 
tion shall be printed with the name, residence and ward of the substitute 
in the place of the name, residence and ward of the deceased; and the 
voting machine ballot labels for use at such election, if not previously 
printed, shall be printed with the name, residence and ward of the substi- 
tute in the place of the name, residence and ward of the deceased, and, if 
previously printed shall have a slip containing the name, residence and 
ward of the substitute pasted over the name, residence and ward of the 
deceased. If such a certificate is filed after five o'clock in the afternoon on 
the first Tuesday preceding the preliminary election, all ballots and vot- 
ing machine ballot labels for use as such election shall bear the name, 
residence and ward of the deceased but shall be deemed as a matter of 
law to bear the name, residence and ward of the substitute in the place of 
the name, residence and ward of the deceased, and a vote for the de- 
ceased at such election shall be counted as a vote for the substitute. If 
such a certificate is filed at or before five o'clock in the afternoon on the 
first Tuesday preceding the regular election, the ballots for use at such 
election other than absent voting ballots shall be printed with the name, 
residence and ward of the substitute in the place of the name, residence 
and ward of the deceased; and the absent voting ballots for use at such 
election, if not previously printed, shall be printed with the name, resi- 
dence and ward of the substitute in the place of the name, residence and 
ward of the deceased and, if previously printed, shall be deemed as a 
matter of law to bear the name, residence and ward of the substitute in 
the place of the name, residence and ward of the deceased so that a vote 
thereon for the deceased shall be counted as a vote for the substitute; and 
the voting machine ballot labels for use at such election, if not previously 
printed, shall be printed with the name, residence and ward of the substi- 
tute in the place of the name, residence and ward of the deceased, and, if 
previously printed, shall have a slip containing the name, residence and 
ward of the substitute pasted over the name, residence and ward of the 
deceased. If a candidate for mayor under Plan A in whose nomination 
petition a committee of not less than five persons or a majority thereof is 
authorized to fill a vacancy dies after the second Friday preceding the 
regular election and a certificate of substitution is not filed at or before 
five o'clock in the the afternoon on the first Tuesday preceding such 
election, so far, but only so far, as it is for the purpose of electing a person 



33 



for the office of mayor shall be postponed for four weeks and no vote cast 
for any candidate for mayor at the originally scheduled election shall be 
counted. 

Every certificate of substitution shall state: — (1) the name of the substi- 
tute, (2) his residence, with street and number, if any, and ward, (3) the 
office for which he is to be a candidate, (4) the name of the original candi- 
date, (5) the fact of his death, withdrawal or ineligibility, and (6) the pro- 
ceedings had for making the substitution. The chairman and secretary of 
the committee shall sign and make oath to the truth of the certificate; and 
it shall be accompanied by the written acceptance of the candidate sub- 
stituted. A certificate of substitution shall be open to objection in the 
same manner, so far as practicable, as a nomination petition. 

Sect. 57C. On the first day, other than a legal holiday or Saturday or 
Sunday, following the expiration of the time for filing withdrawals and the 
final disposition of any objections filed, the election commission shall 
post in a conspicuous place in city hall the names, residences and districts 
of the candidates for nomination for mayor and for city councillor-at-large 
and school committeemember-at-large who have duly qualified as such 
candidates, as they are to appear on the official ballots to be used in the 
preliminary election or special preliminary election for filling an unex- 
pired term of mayor, except to the order of the names. The election com- 
mission shall also post in city hall the names, addresses and districts of all 
candidates for nomination as district city councillors and school commit- 
teemembers, the lists grouped by numerical identifying district and 
showing names of candidates duly qualified to appear on the official bal- 
lots to be used at the preliminary election to fill a district vacancy. In at 
least one place in a public building in each of the districts the election 
commission shall cause to be posted the names and addresses of all candi- 
dates for district office in the respective district office in the respective 
district and the names, addresses and districts of at-large candidates. If 
there are so posted the names of not more than two candidates for the 
office of mayor or district city councillor or district school commit- 
teemember, the candidates whose names are so posted shall be deemed 
to have been nominated for said office and the preliminary election for 
the purpose of nominating candidates thereof shall be dispensed with; if 
there are posted the names of not more than eight candidates for the 
office of city councillor-at-large or school committeemembers-at-large, 
the candidates whose names are so posted shall be deemed to have been 
nominated for said office, and the preliminary election to nominate can- 
didates therefor shall be dispensed with. 

Sect. 58. On the day of the posting provided for by section fifty- 
seven C, or as soon thereafter as conveniently may be, the election com- 
mission shall draw by lot the position of the candidates on the ballot. Each 
candidate shall have an opportunity to be present at such drawing in 
person or by one representative. As soon as conveniently may be after 
such drawing, the election commission shall cause the ballots to be 
printed. Said ballots shall, in addition to the directions and numbers pro- 
vided for by section fifty-nine, contain, in the order drawn by the election 
commission, the names posted as aforesaid (except those of candidates 
deemed under section fifty-seven C to have been nominated,) and no 
others, with a designation of residence and district and the title and term 



34 



of the office for which the person named is a candidate, and the state- 
ment, if any, contained in his nomination petition concerning the elective 
pubHc offices held by him. Said ballots shall be official and no others shall 
be used at the preliminary election. Said ballots shall be headed as fol- 
lows: 

OFFICIAL PRELIMINARY MUNICIPAL 
ELECTION BALLOT 

Candidates for nomination for the offices of in the 

Citv of Boston at the preliminary municipal election to be held on Tues- 
day, , 19 . ' 

The heading of said ballots shall be varied in accordance with the offices 
for which nominations are to be made. 

Sect. 59. At every preliminary election, and every regular election 
under Plan A, each voter shall be entitled to vote for not more than one 
candidate for the office of mayor, district city councillor or district school 
committeemember and not more than four candidates for the office of 
city councillor-at-large or school committeemember-at-large. On the bal- 
lots and voting machine ballot labels for use at each of said elections, 
there shall, as a direction to the voter, be printed in capital letters, near 
the title of each office to be voted for, the words "VOTE FOR (here insert 
in words the number of candidates specified in this section with respect to 
such office"). The election commission, when drawing under section fifty- 
eight the position on the ballot of the candidates for nomination at every 
preliminary election, shall draw the positions of all candidates for mayor, 
if any are to be drawn, before drawing the position of any candidate for 
city councillor or school committeemember and shall draw the positions 
of all candidates for city councillor, if any are to be drawn, before drawing 
the position of any candidate for school committeemember. The election 
commission immediately prior to drawing positions for mayor, if such 
office is to be contested, shall announce and deposit in alphabetical order 
in the receptacle from which names are to be drawn cards bearing the 
names and addresses of candidates for nomination or for election for the 
office. Names then drawn shall determine the order of appearance on the 
ballot. After the drawing for mayor has been completed, the election 
commission shall announce and deposit in alphabetical order in the re- 
ceptacle from which names are to be drawn, cards bearing the names and 
addresses of all candidates for election to the city council, whether for at- 
large or district seats. Cards for candidates for city councillor-at-large 
shall have no other marking; provided, however, that each card for a 
candidate for district city councillor shall bear the number of the district 
in which the candidate is running. After all cards have been deposited, 
the election commission shall proceed to draw names, the order of draw- 
ing to determine the sequence each name will have on its respective at- 
large or district ballot. After all names have been drawn for city council, 
the election commission shall proceed in the same fashion to announce, 
deposit, draw and assign ballot positions to candidates for school 
committeemember-at-large and from districts. 

Sect. 60. The election officers shall, immediately upon the closing 
of the polls at preliminary elections, count the ballots and ascertain the 
number of votes cast in the several voting places for each candidate, and 



35 



forthwith make return thereof upon the total vote sheets or, if voting 
machines are used, the general or precinct record sheets, as the case may 
be, to the election commission which shall forthwith canvass said returns 
and, subject to the provisions of the first sentence of section one hundred 
and thirty-seven of chapter fifty-four of the General Laws, determine and 
declare the result thereof, publish said result in one or more newspapers 
in the city, and post the same in a conspicuous place in the city hall. 

Sect. 61. The two persons receiving at a preliminary election under 
Plan A the highest number of votes for nomination for the office of mayor, 
district city councillor or district school committeemember, shall be 
deemed to have been nominated for said office; and the eight persons 
receiving at such election under Plan A the highest number of votes for 
nomination for the office of city councillor-at-large or school 
committeemember-at-large shall be deemed to have been nominated for 
such office. If a preliminary election under Plan A or D results in a tie vote 
among candidates for nomination receiving the lowest number of votes, 
which, but for said tie vote, would entitle a person receiving the same to 
be deemed to have been nominated, all persons participating in said tie 
vote shall be deemed to have been nominated, although in consequence 
there be printed on the official ballot to be used at the regular election 
names to a number exceeding twice the number to be elected. 

Sect. 62. The name of every person deemed under section fifty- 
seven C or section sixty-one to have been nominated, together with his 
residence and district and the title and term of the office for which he is a 
candidate, and the statement, if any, contained in his nomination petition 
concerning the elective public offices held by him, shall, in addition to 
the directions provided for by section fifty-nine, be printed on the official 
ballots to be used at the regular election; and said persons shall be the sole 
candidates whose names may be printed on such ballots. As soon as con- 
veniently may be after the sixth Tuesday preceding every regular elec- 
tion, the election commission shall draw by lot the position of said names 
on said ballots; and said names shall be printed on such ballots in the 
order so drawn. Each candidate shall have an opportunity to be present at 
such drawing in person or by one representative. 

Sect. 63. No ballot used at any preliminary or regular election shall 
have printed thereon any party or political designation or mark, and there 
shall not be appended to the name of any candidate any such party or 
political designation or mark or anything showing how he was nominated 
or indicating his views or opinions. 

Sect. 64. On every ballot to be used at a preliminary or regular 
election, there shall be left, at the end of the list of candidates for each 
office, blank spaces equal to the number for which a voter may vote for 
such office, in which blank spaces the voter may insert the name of any 
person not printed on the ballot for whom he desires to vote for such 
office. 

Sect. 65. At every preliminary election, and every regular election 
under Plan D, each voter shall be entitled to vote for not more than six 
candidates for the office of city councillor and not more than three candi- 
dates for the office of school committeeman. On the ballots for use at both 
of said elections, there shall be printed directions to the voters that each 
voter shall not vote for more than the number of candidates specified in 
this section. 



36 



SECTION NUMBERS REFER TO 

CHAPTER 486 OF THE ACTS OF 1909 

AS AMENDED THROUGH 1989 



The Mayor and City Council 

Sect. 3*. All appropriations, excepting those for school purposes, to 
be met from taxes, revenue or any source other than loans, shall originate 
with the mayor. The mayor, not later than the second Wednesday in April 
of each year, shall submit to the city council the annual budget of the 
current expenses of the city and county for the forthcoming fiscal year, 
and may submit thereafter such supplementary appropriation orders as 
he may deem necessary. The city council may reduce or reject any item 
but, except upon the recommendation of the mayor, shall not increase 
any item in, nor the total of, a budget, nor add any item thereto, nor shall 
it originate a budget. Not later than the second Wednesday in June, the 
city council shall take definite action on the annual budget by adopting, 
reducing or rejecting it, and in the event of their failure so to do, the items 
and the appropriation orders in the budget as recommended by the 
mayor shall be in effect as if formally adopted by the city council and 
approved by the mayor. The city council shall take definite action on any 
supplementary appropriation order and any order for a transfer of appro- 
priations by adopting, reducing or rejecting it within sixty** days after it 
is filed with the city clerk; and in the event of their failure so to do, such 
supplementary appropriation order or transfer as submitted by the mayor 
shall be in effect as if formally adopted by the city council and approved 
by the mayor. It shall be the duty of the city and the county officials when 
requested by the mayor, to submit to the mayor forthwith in such detail as 
the mayor may require estimates for the next fiscal year of the expendi- 
tures of the department of office under their charge, which estimates 
shall be transmitted to the city council; provided, however, that the 
mayor shall neither submit, nor thereafter reduce, the appropriations for 
the city council at or to a level below that which existed for the previous 
fiscal year, nor shall the city council reduce the appropriations for the 
mayor's office below that which existed for the previous fiscal year. 

Sect. 3A.t In the period after the expiration of any fiscal year, and 
before the regular appropriations have been made by the city council and 
the school committee, city and county officers who are authorized to 
make expenditures, and the school committee, may incur liabilities in 
carrying on the work of the several departments and offices entrusted to 
them, and payments therefor shall be made from the treasury from any 
available funds therein and charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion, or special appropriation, if any is made; provided, that the liabilities 

*Sect. 3 as amended by St. 1982, c. 190, s.l5. 
**Amended by St. 1986, c. 701, s. 2. 

tSect.3A as inserted by St. 1941, c. 604, Sect. 1, and as amended by St. 
1947, c. 120. 



37 



incurred during such interval for regular employees do no exceed in any 
one month the average monthly expenditure of the last three months of 
the preceding fiscal year, and that the total liabilities incurred during said 
interval do no exceed in any one month the sums spent for similar pur- 
poses during any one month of the preceding fiscal year; and provided, 
further, that said officers who are authorized to make expenditures may 
expend in any one month for any new officer or board lawfully created an 
amount not exceeding one twelfth of the estimated cost for the current 
fiscal year; and provided, further, that until a regular or special appropria- 
tion has been made for snow removal, expenditures may be made for that 
purpose to an amount not exceeding the average of the annual expendi- 
tures for snow removal in the five preceding fiscal years. Notwithstanding 
the foregoing limitations upon the authority of city officers to incur liabili- 
ties during said interval, such officers may incur liabilities to such extent 
as may be necessary for the purpose of compensating first assistant asses- 
sors for their regular duties. 

Sect. 3B.* After an appropriation of money has been made by the 
city for any specific purpose, or for the needs and expenditures of any city 
department or county office, no transfer of any part of the money thus 
appropriated, between such department or office and another depart- 
ment or office, shall be made, except in accordance with and after the 
written recommendation of the mayor to the city council, approved by a 
yea or nay vote of two-thirds of all of the members of the city council, 
provided that the city auditor, with the approval in each instance of the 
mayor, may make transfers, other than for personal service, from any item 
to any other item within the appropriations for a department, division of a 
department or county office. After the close of the fiscal year, the city 
auditor may, with the approval of the mayor in each instance, apply any 
income, taxes and funds not disposed of and make transfers from any 
appropriation to any other appropriation for the purpose only of closing 
the accounts of such fiscal year, provided further that the city auditor 
within seventy days after the close of the fiscal year, shall transmit to city 
council and the city clerk a report listing what income, taxes or funds 
were applied and what transfers were made and the reasons therefor. 

Sect. 4A.t The mayor may designate one clerical assistant for whose 
acts he shall be responsible to sign his name in approval of all vouchers of 
less than five hundred dollars each. 

Sect. 5.* The city council with the approval of the mayor may from 
time to time make bylaws or ordinances for any or all of the following 
purposes: — (a) to create a new department or agency; (b) to abolish, in 
whole or in part, any department or agency; (c) to reorganize, in whole or 
in part, any department or department head or any agency or agency 
head; (d) to confer or impose on any department or agency any power or 
duty of the city not appertaining at the time of the making of the bylaw or 
ordinance to any department or agency; (e) to transfer any or all of the 
powers, duties and appropriations of any division of any department or 

*Sect. 3B as amended by St. 1986, c. 701, s. 3. 
tSect. 4A inserted by St. 1924, c. 479, Sect. 3. 
*Sect. 5 as amended by St. 1953, c. 473. 



38 



agency to another division of the same department or agency; (/) to trans- 
fer any or all of the powers, duties and appropriations of any department 
or division thereof or of any agency or division thereof either to another 
department or division thereof or to another agency or division thereof; 
and (g) to increase, reduce, establish or abolish the salary of any depart- 
ment or agency head. Every department or agency head created by, or 
resulting from a reorganization effected by, a bylaw or ordinance made 
under this section shall, unless ex-officio, be appointed by the mayor 
without confirmation by the city council for a term expiring on the first 
Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at 
which a mayor is elected or, in the case of a person serving without com- 
pensation or of a person serving on the board of appeal, the board of 
examiners, the board of examiners of gasfitters or other like board, for 
such other term as the bylaw or ordinance may prescribe. Every person 
holding an office or position subject to the civil service law and rules shall, 
if the office or position is abolished by a bylaw or ordinance made under 
this section and the bylaw or ordinance so provides, be reappointed with- 
out civil service examination or registration to a similar office or position 
with similar status in any new department or agency, or division of either, 
thereby created or in any department or agency, or division of either, not 
thereby abolished; and every such person shall upon such reappoint- 
ment, retain all rights to retirement with pension that shall have accrued 
or would thereafter accrue to him; and his services shall be deemed to 
have been continuous to the same extent as if such abolition had not taken 
place. As used in this section, the term "agency" shall be construed to 
mean any office in charge of a board or officer not subject to the direction 
of a department head. Nothing in this section shall authorize any action in 
conflict with the civil service laws or rules except as expressly provided 
herein; nor shall any bylaw or ordinance made under this section affect in 
any way the school committee or any board or officer of the school com- 
mittee or school department, or the board of commissioners of school 
buildings or the superintendent of construction, or the board of trustees 
of the teachers' retirement fund or the board of trustees of the permanent 
school pension fund, or the Boston retirement board, or the city clerk, or 
the board of election commissioners, or the Boston traffic commission, or 
any board or officer appointed by the governor. 

Sect. 6. No contract for lighting the public streets, parks, or alleys, or 
for the collection, removal, or disposal of refuse, extending over a period 
of more than one year from the date thereof, shall be valid without the 
approval of the mayor and the city council after a public hearing held by 
the city council of which at least seven days' notice shall have been given 
in the Citv Record. 



Sect. 8. Neither the city council, nor any member or committee, 
officer, or employees thereof shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
act, directly or indirectly on behalf of the city or the county of Suffolk take 
part in the employment of labor, the making of contracts, the purchase of 
materials, supplies or real estate; nor in the construction, alteration, or 
repair of any public works, buildings, or other property; nor in the care. 



39 



custody, and management of the same; nor in the conduct of the execu- 
tive or administrative business of the city or county; nor in the appoint- 
ment or removal of any municipal or county employee; nor in the expend- 
iture of public money except such as may be necessary for the contingent 
and incidental expenses of the city council. . . . 

It shall be unlawful for the mayor or for a member of the city council or 
for any officer or employee of the city or of the county of Suffolk or for a 
member of the finance commission directly or indirectly to make a con- 
tract with the city or with the county of Suffolk, or to receive any commis- 
sion, discount, bonus, gift, contribution or reward from or any share in 
the profits of any person or corporation making or performing such con- 
tract, unless such mayor, member of the city council, officer, or employee 
or member of the finance commission immediately upon learning of the 
existence of such contract or that such contract is proposed, shall notify in 
writing the mayor, city council, and finance commission of such contract 
and of the nature of his interest in such contract and shall abstain from 
doing any official act on behalf of the city in reference thereto. In case of 
such interest on the part of an officer whose duty is to make such contract 
on behalf of the city, the contract may be made by any other officer of the 
city duly authorized thereto by the mayor, or if the mayor has such inter- 
est by the city clerk; provided, however, that when a contractor with the 
city or county is a corporation or voluntary association, the ownership of 
less than five percent of the stock or shares actually issued shall not be 
considered as being an interest in the contract within the meaning of this 
act, and such ownership shall not affect the validity of the contract, unless 
the owner of such stock or shares is also an officer or agent of the corpora- 
tion or association, or solicits or takes part in the making of the contract. 

A violation of any provision of this section shall render the contract in 
respect to which such violation occurs voidable at the option of the city or 
county. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or by imprisonment 
for not more than one year, or both. . . . 

The Executive Department 

Sect. 9. All heads of departments and members of municipal boards, 
including the board of street commissioners, as their present terms of 
office expire (but excluding the school committee and those officials by 
law appointed by the governor), shall be appointed by the mayor without 
confirmation by the city council. They shall be recognized experts in such 
work as may devolve upon the incumbents of said offices, or persons 
specially fitted by education, training or experience to perform the same, 
and (except the election commissioners, who shall remain subject to the 
provisions of existing laws) shall be appointed without regard to party 
affiliation or to residence at the time of appointment except as hereinafter 
provided. 



Sect. 12. A vacancy in any office to which the pnnisions of section 
nine of this act apply, shall be filled by the ma\or under the provisions of 



40 



said section and pending a permanent appointment he shall designate 
some other head of a department or member of a board to discharge the 
duties of the office temporarily. 

Sect. 13.* Members of boards shall be appointed for the terms es- 
tablished by law or by ordinance. Heads of departments shall be ap- 
pointed for terms of four years beginning with the first of May of the year 
in which they are appointed and shall continue thereafter to hold office 
during the pleasure of the mayor. 

Sect. 14.1 The mayor may remove any head of a department or 
member of a board (other than the election commissioners, who shall 
remain subject to the provisions of existing law) by filing a written state- 
ment with the city clerk setting forth in detail the specific reasons for 
such removal, a copy of which shall be delivered or mailed to the person 
thus removed, who may make a reply in writing, which, if he desires, may 
be filed with the city clerk, but such reply shall not affect the action taken 
unless the mayor so determines. The provisions of this section shall not 
apply to the school committee, the public facilities commission, or any 
official by law appointed by the governor. 

Sect. 15. The positions of assistants and secretary authorized by sec- 
tion twenty of chapter four hundred and forty-nine of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five except those in the election depart- 
ment are hereby abolished, and except as aforesaid the said section is 
hereby repealed. 

The civil service laws shall not apply to the appointment of the mayor's 
secretaries, nor of the stenographers, clerks, telephone operators and 
messengers connected with his office, and the mayor may remove such 
appointees without a hearing and without making a statement of the 
cause of their removal. 

Sect. 16.* No official of said city or county except in case of extreme 
emergency involving the health and safety of the people or their property, 
shall expend intentionally in any fiscal year any sum in excess of the ap- 
propriations duly made in accordance with law, nor involve the city in any 
contract for the future payment of money in excess of such appropria- 
tions, except as provided in section six of this act. Any official who violates 
the provisions of this section shall be personally liable to the city for any 
amounts expended intentionally in excess of an appropriation to the ex- 
tent the city does not recover such amounts from the person to whom 
paid. The trial court of the commonwealth or a single justice of the su- 
preme judicial court shall have jurisdiction to adjudicate claims brought 
by the city hereunder and to order such equitable relief as the court may 
find appropriate to prevent further violations of this section. Any official 
who shall violate the provisions of this section shall be punished by im- 
prisonment for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one 
thousand dollars, or both. 

Sect. 16A.** Anything in section three A or section sixteen to the 
contrary notwithstanding, city and county officers who are authorized to 

*Sect. 13. Affected by St. 1953, c. 473. 

tSect. 14 as amended by St. 1966, c. 642, s. 11. 

*Sect. 16. Amended by St. 1982, c. 190, s. 17. 
**Sect. 16A. Inserted bv St. 1951, c. 182. 



41 



make expenditures, and the school committee, may, during any fiscal 
year, at the time of, or after, contracting for the performance of delivery 
during the remainder of such year of any work, services or supplies of a 
constantly recurrent nature, contract, without an appropriation, upon 
like or more favorable terms and conditions, for the performance or deliv- 
ery of such work, services or supplies for the whole or any part of the first 
three months of the next fiscal year; provided, that in no event shall the 
average monthly liability incurred with respect to the next fiscal year 
exceed the average monthly liability for such work, services or supplies 
during the last nine months of the then current fiscal year. 

Miscellaneous Provisions 

Sect. 26. Repealed by St. 1983, c. 643, s. 18. 

Sect. 27. t Every officer and board in charge of a department of the 
city of Boston or county of Suffolk shall, on or before the sixth day of 
February in each year, prepare and furnish to the city auditor a list of the 
officials and employees under said officer or board and paid by the city or 
county on the first of such February. Such list shall give the name, resi- 
dence by street and ward, designation, compensation, and date of elec- 
tion or appointment of each of said officials and employees and the date 
when each first entered the employ of the city or county. It shall be the 
duty of the city auditor to verify said lists by the pay rolls and to keep a 
copy of said lists open for public inspection, and to prepare and publish in 
the City Record on or before the tenth day of April in each year a compar- 
ative table containing the number of such officials and employees holding 
office or employed in each such department or board and paid by the city 
or county on the compilation date in each of the ten years next preceding 
such publication. The term "compilation date," as herein used, shall be 
construed to mean, with respect to the year nineteen hundred and fifty- 
one or any prior year, the first day of January, and with respect to the year 
nineteen hundred and fifty-two or any subsequent year, the first of Feb- 
ruary. 

Sect. 28. The jurisdiction now exercised by the board of aldermen 
concerning the naming of streets, the planting and removal of trees in the 
public ways, the issue of permits or licenses for coasting, the storage of 
gasoline, oil, and other inflammable substances or explosive compounds 
and the use of the public ways for any permanent or temporary obstruc- 
tion or projection in, under, or over the same, including the location of 
conduits, poles, and posts for telephone, telegraph, street railway, or illu- 
minating purposes, is hereby vested in the board of street commissioners, 
to be exercised by said board with the approval in writing of the mayor; 
and the mayor and city council shall have authority to fix by ordinance the 
terms by way of cash payment, rent, or otherwise, upon which permits or 
licenses for the storage of gasoline or oil, or other inflammable substances 
or explosive compounds, and the construction or use of coal holes, vaults, 
bay windows, and marquises, in, under, or over the public ways shall be 
issued. 
Sect. 29.* Within ninety days after the passage of this act and there- 

tSect. 27 as amended by Special St. 1919, c. 168, s. 1; St. 1922, c. 133, 
s. 1; St. 1938, c. 263, s. 1; and St. 1951, c. 111. 

*Sect. 29 as amended bv St. 1934, c. 185, s. 1; and St. 1947, c. 447, s. 1. 



42 



after there shall be published at least once a week and distributed and 
sold under the direction of the mayor and on terms to be fixed by the city 
council and appro\ ed by the mayor a paper to be known as the "Cit>' 
Record." All advertising with reference to the sale of property for non- 
payment of taxes shall appear exclusively in the City Record. All other 
advertising, whether required by law or not, with reference to the pur- 
chase or taking of land, contracts for work, materials or supplies, and the 
sale of bonds, shall appear in said paper, and in such newspaper or news- 
papers as the mayor, in his discretion, may order; a list of all contracts of 
one thousand dollars or more, as awarded, with the names of bidders, and 
the amount of the bids; appointments by the mayor; and changes in the 
number and compensation of employees in each department, shall be 
published in the City Record. Failure to publish in such newspaper or 
newspapers as the mayor may order shall not invalidate any purchase, 
contract or sale made or action taken by the city. The proceedings of the 
city council and school committee together with all communications 
from the ma\ or, shall be published in the City Record; provided, that the 
substance of debates by and among the members of the city council shall 
not be so published or published elsewhere at the expense of said city. 

Sect. 30.* Every officer or board in charge of a department in said 
city and every officer, board or official of the county of Suffolk having 
power to incur obligations on behalf of said county in cases where said 
obligations are to be paid for wholly from the treasury of said city, when 
authorized to erect a new building or to make structural changes in an 
existing building, shall make contracts therefor, not exceeding five, each 
contract to be subject to the approval of the mayor; and when about to do 
any work or to make any purchase, the estimated cost of which alone, or 
in conjunction with other similar work or purchase which might properlv 
be included in the same contract, amounts to or exceeds two thousand 
dollars, shall, unless the mayor gives written authority to do otherwise, 
invite proposals therefor by advertisements in the City Record. Such ad- 
vertisements shall the state the time and place for opening the proposals 
in answer to said advertisement, and shall reserve the right to the officer, 
board or official to reject any or all proposals. No authority to dispense 
with advertising shall be given by the mayor unless the said officer, board 
or official furnishes him with a signed statement which shall be published 
in the City Record giving in detail the reasons for not inviting bids by 
advertisements or unless the law department has given its approval to 
such award. 

Sect. 31t. Without obtaining the consent of any other board or offi- 
cer or further authority than that contained in this act, the public facilities 
commission, in the name of the city, may acquire by purchase, lease, gift, 
devise or otherwise for any municipal purpose a fee simple absolute or 
any lesser interest in any land, public or private, within the limits of the 
city, including air rights and riparian rights, and may take by eminent 
domain under chapter seventy-nine or chapter eighty A of the General 

*Sect. 30 as amended bv St. 1939, c. 156, S. 1; St. 1952, c. 376, s. 2; St. 
1955, c. 60, S. 2; and St. 1976, c. 159, s. 2. 

tSect. 31 as amended bv St. 1966, c. 642, s. 12. See also St. 1983, c. 643, 
s. 11. 



43 



Laws any fee or interest except in parks and playgrounds and except also, 
unless there be express consent, in lands belonging to or covered by con- 
tract with the United States, the commonwealth, the Boston Housing 
Authority or the Boston Redevelopment Authority. Whenever the price 
proposed to be paid for any land to be acquired for any municipal purpose 
is more than twenty-five percent higher than its average assessed valua- 
tion during the previous three years, such land shall not be acquired by 
purchase but shall be taken by eminent domain. No land shall be taken 
until an appropriation by loan or otherwise for the general purpose for 
which land is needed shall have been made by the mayor and city council 
by a two thirds vote of all its members; nor shall a price be paid in excess 
of the appropriation, unless a larger sum is awarded by a court of compe- 
tent jurisdiction. Nothing in this section shall affect in any way the powers 
and duties of the real property board under chapter four hundred and 
seventy-four of the acts of nineteen hundred and forty-six as now or here- 
after amended, or of the public improvement commission as successor in 
function to the board of street commissioners under chapter four hun- 
dred and thirty-seven of the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety-three or 
chapter four hundred and twenty-six of the acts of eighteen hundred and 
ninety-seven or chapter three hundred and ninety-three of the acts of 
nineteen hundred and six, as severally now or hereafter amended, or acts 
in addition thereto. 

Sect. 31A.* Without obtaining the consent of any board or officer 
other than the mayor, and without interdepartmental payment, the pub- 
lic facilities commission, without further authority, may transfer any land 
now or hereafter belonging to the city, except parks and playgrounds, but 
including school lands and land acquired by foreclosure of tax title, from 
the municipal purpose, if any, to which it is devoted at the time of such 
transfer to any other specific municipal purpose, and may also transfer 
the care, custody, management and control of any such land, except parks 
and playgrounds, but including school land and land acquired by foreclo- 
sure of tax title, from such board or officer, including itself, as at the time 
of such transfer may have the same to such other board or officer, includ- 
ing itself, as it may determine. 

Sect. 31B.** Without obtaining the consent of any board or officer 
other than the mayor, the public facilities commission, without further 
authority, may, for such rent or price and upon such terms as said com- 
mission may deem appropriate, lease or sublease or sell, grant and convey 
any surplus land, as hereinafter defined, to the federal government or an)- 
agency thereof, the commonwealth or any political subdivision or author- 
ity thereof or, if notice of intent to lease or sell such land or buildings 
together with a statement of when and where written details of such 
proposed lease or sale may be examined shall first have been publicly 
advertised in the City Record once a week for two successive weeks, to 
any person, firm, corporation or trust. "Surplus land", as used in this 
section, shall be deemed to mean land, buildings and real estate now or 
hereafter belonging to the city and in the care, custod\', management and 
control of said commission (except parks and playgrounds) which at the 

*SeeSt. 1983,c. 643, s. 11. 
**SeeSt. 1983,c. 643, s. 11. 



44 



time of such lease or sale are or have been used for school purposes, or 
which have been acquired by foreclosure of tax titles or acquired under 
section eighty of chapter sixty of the General Laws, or which, irrespective 
of the manner or time of acquisition, are not held by the city for a specific 
purpose, or which have been transferred to the commission by the city 
council. 

Sect. 31C.* Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or spe- 
cial law to the contrary the proceeds from the disposition of any surplus 
property other than that acquired through tax title foreclosure shall be 
deposited in a separate fund which shall be set up on the books of the city 
and shall be known as the Surplus Property Disposition Fund, and shall 
be used only as follows: 

(1) The amount equivalent to the debt incurred, and interest paid or 
payable thereon, as a result of the acquisition or improvement from time 
to time of the property shall be used only for purposes for which the city is 
authorized to incur debt for a period often years or more; 

(2)t All proceeds in excess of such amount shall be credited to the 
capital fund of the city unless the city council by a majority vote deter- 
mines with the approval of the mayor to credit such proceeds to the gen- 
eral fund of the city. 

Sect. 31D* Notwithstanding the provisions of chapter four hundred 
and seventy-four of the acts of nineteen hundred and forty-six or any 
other general or special law to the contrary, the public facilities commis- 
sion of the city of Boston may dispose of any or all of the off-street parking 
structures, including the real estate related thereto, owned by the city of 
Boston, as surplus property in accordance with sections thirty-one B and 
thirty-one C of chapter four hundred and eighty-six of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and nine, only when transferred to the commission by a majority 
vote of the city council. 

Sect. 32.** Beginning in the year nineteen hundred and twenty- 
five, the municipal election in said city shall take place biennially in every 
odd numbered year on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. 



City of Boston — School Committee — Superintendent 

Compensation and Removal — Duties 

Statute 1987, Chapter 613 

An act reorganizing the Boston school department. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

Sect. 1. Chapter 231 of the acts of 1906, as most recently amended 
by section 1 of chapter 701 of the acts of 1986, is hereby further amended 
by striking out sections 1, lA and 2 and inserting in place thereof the 
following sections: 

*Sects. 31C and 31D inserted by St. 1982, c. 190, s. 24. 
tFurther amended by St. 1986, c. 701, s. 4. 

**Sect. 32 as amended by St. 1914, c. 730, s. 1, St. 1921, c. 288, s.l, and 
St. 1924, c. 479, s. 4. 



45 



Section 1. (a) The school committee of the city of Boston shall, by 
majority vote of the whole number of its members, elect and contract 
with a superintendent of schools for any period of time not to exceed six 
years. The school committee exclusively shall fix the compensation of 
such superintendent, which sum shall be in full for all services rendered 
to said city. The school committee may remove the superintendent for 
just cause by a vote of three-fifths of the whole number of its members 
after proper notice and public hearing. The superintendent shall upon 
taking employment become, and during such employment remain, a resi- 
dent of said city as the term resident may be defined by ordinance. Fail- 
ure to maintain such residence shall be deemed a voluntary termination 
of employment. 

(b) The superintendent of schools shall be the executive officer of the 
school committee in all matters pertaining to the powers and duties of the 
school committee. The school committee shall take no action on any par- 
ticular matter without first receiving the superintendent's recommenda- 
tion thereon. The superintendent shall give his recommendation before 
or during the regularly scheduled meeting of the school committee next 
following the meeting at which the particular matter is raised and at 
which the superintendent is asked to prepare a recommendation 
thereon; provided, however, that the superintendent in his sole discre- 
tion may elect to present any such recommendation at the school com- 
mittee meeting at which the particular matter is raised or thereafter but 
prior to the next regularly scheduled school committee meeting. Any 
such recommendation of the superintendent shall include the superin- 
tendent's estimate of the cost or savings involved, if any, and if ihe super- 
intendent estimates that there are costs involved, the recommendation 
shall identify available budgeted funding sources or new funding sources. 
If the superintendent fails to make a recommendation on a particular 
matter when raised at such next regularly scheduled school committee 
meeting, the school committee may take action thereon without receiv- 
ing the superintendent's recommendation. 

(c) The superintendent of schools shall at the beginning of the term 
for which he was appointed, submit to the school committee a manage- 
ment plan for all administrators and community and deputy superintend- 
ents serving at the discretion of said superintendent. The school commit- 
tee of said city, in the year nineteen hundred and eighty-nine and every 
sixth year thereafter or in the year when a superintendent is appointed 
shall vote by a two-thirds majority to accept or reject the management 
plan submitted by the superintendent of schools. The school committee 
shall accept a management plan of the superintendent on or before Sep- 
tember first in the year that the superintendent is appointed to term. 

Section lA. (a) For the purposes of this section, all individuals engaged 
to render services and paid pursuant to the school department's budget 
shall be deemed to be school department employees and their positions 
shall be deemed to be school department positions. 

(b) The superintendent of schools shall have the exclusive authorit\- 
to make appointments and promotions for all school department posi- 
tions except for the positions of community superintendent, an election 
or appointment of a chairman, secretary or treasurer of the school com- 
mittee, of school committee administrative assistants appointed pursuant 



46 



to chapter four liundred and sixty-five of the acts of nineteen hundred and 
sixt\-f()ur, and of special assistant corporation counsels. Prior to making 
an appointment or promotion to the position of community superintend- 
ent, the superintendent of schools shall present his recommendation 
thereon to the school committee at a regularly scheduled meeting. Any 
such appointment or promotion shall be deemed approved by the school 
committee on the sixth business day following the presentation of said 
superintendent's recommendation, unless a majority of the whole num- 
ber of the school committee's members file with the secretary of the 
school committee a written objection to the intended appointment or 
promotion within five business days following the presentation of said 
superintendent's recommendation; in which case, the appointment or 
promotion shall be approved only upon majority vote of the whole num- 
ber of the members of the school committee. 

(c) An\- general or special law to the contrary notwithstanding, a vote 
of the school committee shall not be required for the appointment or 
promotion of any school department employee except as provided in sec- 
tion one A. 

(d) Except as may be required by any collective bargaining agree- 
ment or by the provisions of chapter thirty-one and chapter one hundred 
and fifty E of the General Laws, and, subject to appropriation, the super- 
intendent of schools shall have the exclusive authority to fix the compen- 
sation of all school department employees with the exception of school 
committee members; provided, however, that the school committee shall 
fix the compensation of the superintendent as provided in section one 
and shall fix the compensation of school committee administrative assist- 
ants appointed pursuant to chapter four hundred and sixty-five of the acts 
of nineteen hundred and sixty-four. 

(e) The superintendent of schools shall have the exclusive authority 
to assign, reassign, suspend, lay-off, demote, remove and dismiss any 
school department employees except school committee members and 
administrative assistants appointed pursuant to chapter four hundred 
and sixty-five of the acts of nineteen hundred and sixty-four. Any general 
or special law to the contrary notwithstanding, the actions of the superin- 
tendent of schools pursuant to this subsection shall be deemed to be the 
actions of the school committee under the General Laws. In exercising 
his authority under this subsection, the superintendent shall have the 
authority and powers, and be subject to the limitations, otherwise appli- 
cable to the school committee, including but not limited to the terms of 
any collectixe bargaining agreement imposed by chapter one hundred 
and fifty E of the General Laws. In the case of actions taken pursuant to 
this subsection as to which notice or hearing, or both, would otherwise be 
afforded to the subject school department employee by the school com- 
mittee, such notice or hearing, or both, shall be afforded instead by the 
superintendent of schools or his designee. In the event that said superin- 
tendent delegates to a designee the conduct of a hearing for an affected 
school department employee, said superintendent shall base his decision 
upon the evidence presented at such hearing. This section shall not affect 
the rights of teachers under sections forty-two, forty-three A and forty- 
three B of chapter seventy-one of the General Laws. 



47 



(f) The superintendent of schools shall have the authority to super- 
vise and direct school department employees except school committee 
members and administrative assistants appointed pursuant to chapter 
four hundred and sixty-five of the acts of nineteen hundred and sixtv -four, 
and special assistant corporation counsels to the extent that their legal 
work is directed and supervised by the corporation counsel of the city of 
Boston. 

(g) Except as specifically provided herein, nothing in this section 
shall be construed or interpreted so as to limit in any way the existing 
employment rights of school employees, including rights of tenure and 
seniority as provided by chapter seventy-one and chapter thirty-one of 
the General Laws as well as those employment rights provided under 
applicable collective bargaining agreements and chapter one hundred 
and fifty ¥. of the General Laws. 

Section IB. (a) The school committee may delegate, in whole or in 
part, to the superintendent of schools the authority to approve for the 
school department the acceptance and expenditure of grants or gifts of 
funds from the federal government, charitable foundations, private cor- 
porations, individuals, or from the commonwealth, its counties, munici- 
palities or an agency thereof, the provisions of section fifty-three A of 
chapter forty-four of the General Laws notwithstanding. 

(b) The superintendent of schools shall provide to the school com- 
mittee, the city auditor and the city office of budget and program evalua- 
tion of the city of Boston a report, detailing the source, purpose and bal- 
ance on hand of all funds received or expended pursuant to subsection 
(a), quarterly. 

Section ID. The superintendent of schools shall submit to the school 
committee for approval an annual budget of the school department for 
the forthcoming fiscal year no later than the first Wednesday in February 
prior to the beginning of such fiscal year. The school committee may 
adopt, reject, reduce or increase any item in the recommended budget; 
provided, however, that if the school committee fails to take definite 
action on the annual budget on or before the fourth Wednesday in March 
of each year, the annual budget as recommended by the superintendent 
shall be deemed approved as if formally approved by the school commit- 
tee. After approval of an annual budget by the school committee, said 
superintendent shall submit said approved budget to the mayor who may 
approve or reduce the total recommended budget. Thereafter, not later 
than the second Wednesday in May of each \'ear, the mayor shall submit 
said annual budget to the city council for an appropriation of funds. Said 
superintendent shall not approve the appointment of any person except 
to a budgeted position. 

Section IE. For the purposes of section sixteen of chapter four hun- 
dred and eighty-six of the acts of nineteen hundred and nine, members of 
the school committee and the superintendent of schools shall be deemed 
to be the officials responsible for the expenditures of the school depart- 
ment, the provisions of section eighteen of chapter one hundred and 
ninety of the acts of nineteen hundred and eighty-two to the contrarx' 
notwithstanding. 



48 



Section 2. (a) Subject to appropriations therefor, the superintend- 
ent of schools shall have the exclusive authority to make on behalf of the 
school committee contracts, or amendments to contracts, for the pur- 
chase or rental of equipment, materials, goods or supplies, leases of prop- 
erty, alterations and repairs of school property, and for professional or 
other services, with the exception of collective bargaining agreements 
and contracts for the transportation of students. All school department 
contracts or amendments to contracts shall otherwise conform to the 
requirements of the city charter of the city of Boston. 

(b) With respect to all contracts, agreements or amendments thereto 
made or entered into by the school department, the superintendent shall 
be responsible for establishing procedures for auditing and monitoring 
the compliance of the parties with the terms and obligations of such con- 
tracts, agreements or amendments thereto. 

Sect. 2. Chapter 224 of the acts of 1936 is hereby amended by strik- 
ing out section 2, as most recently amended by section 5 of chapter 701 of 
the acts of 1986, and inserting in place thereof the following section: 

Section 2. (a) The city of Boston shall annually provide an amount of 
money sufficient for the support of the public schools as required by law; 
provided, however, that said city shall not be required to provide more 
money for the support of the public schools than is appropriated in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of chapter four hundred and eighty-six of 
the acts of nineteen hundred and nine, as amended. In acting on appro- 
priations for educational costs, the city council shall vote on the total 
amount of the appropriations requested by the mayor, but neither the 
mayor nor the city council shall allocate appropriations among accounts 
or place any restriction on such appropriations. The appropriation of said 
city shall establish the total appropriation for the support of the public 
schools, but may not limit the authority of the school committee to deter- 
mine expenditures within the total appropriation; provided, however, 
that if the city auditor determines that school department expenditures in 
any fiscal year are projected to be in excess of total budgeted expendi- 
tures for that fiscal year, as supported by appropriation and other availa- 
ble funding, then the school committee shall not reallocate or transfer 
funds from any item in the budget for that fiscal year to fund any such 
projected additional expenditures. 

(b) After the fourth Wednesday of March of any fiscal year, the school 
committee shall not initiate or authorize any new or additional programs 
or categories of expenditures requiring additional unbudgeted expendi- 
tures unless such programs or categories have been incorporated and 
fully funded in the budget for the subsequent fiscal year. If such programs 
or categories have not been incorporated or fully funded in the budget for 
the subsequent fiscal year, they shall not be initiated or authorized until 
the school committee shall have amended its budget submission for the 
subsequent fiscal year to reduce or eliminate other costs, programs or 
categories in amounts equal to the projected annualized costs of the new 
or additional programs or categories of expenditures. 

(c) The superintendent of schools shall prepare and submit to the 
school committee, the city auditor and the city oflPice of budget and pro- 



49 

gram evaluation, a monthly budget update report which shall detail and 
itemize year-to-date and projected school department expenditures and 
budget transfers. 

(d) The superintendent may, after the fourth Wednesday in March, 
but prior to the annual appropriation, enter into contracts with the pub- 
lishers or suppliers of instructional materials and books for the timely 
purchase and delivery of the same to be used in the schools of the school 
department of the city of Boston for the school year commencing during 
the fiscal year for which a recommended appropriation has been submit- 
ted but not yet approved; provided, however, that such contracts for the 
supply and delivery of said instructional materials and books shall be 
charged to the appropriation of the next fiscal year, and provided further 
that the total amount of funds obligated for such instructional materials 
and books ordered prior to the annual appropriation shall be limited to 
the amount appropriated for such expenditures in the then current an- 
nual budget and shall not exceed that amount. Pending the final annual 
appropriation for the school department, the city auditor may approve 
such contracts for the purchase and delivery of instructional materials 
and books, provided, however, that such contracts shall in all other re- 
spects conform to the requirements of the city charter of said city. 

Section 3. Nothing in this act shall be deemed to affect the term of 
office of the superintendent of schools in office upon its effective date, 
nor abrogate or alter any collective bargaining agreement or other con- 
tract in force and effect on such effective date. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved December 29, 1987. 



50 



PUBLIC OFFICIALS 



The following table shows a partial listing of the manner in which pub- 
lic officials are appointed or elected, the time of appointment or election 
and the term of office as prescribed bv statute or ordinance. 
(SEE CITY OF BOSTON CODE FOR DETAILED INFORMATION) 





IIow 
Created 


Appointed or Elected 


Term 


Okkiciai.s 


Bv Whom 


When 


Begins 


Length 


Administrative Senices, 

Director of 


Ord. 


Mayor 


* 


* 


* 


Air Pollution Control Commis- 


Ord. 








3 vrs. 


Animal Control Commission 
(Nine) 


Ord. 






* 


* 


Appeal, Board of (Five) 


Statute 
and Old. 




AnnualK', 
one 


Mayl 


5yTS. 


Archives and Records 












Advisor) Commission 
(Three) 


Statute 




* 


* 


* 


Arson Prevention 
Commission (Nine) 

Art Commission (Five) 


Ord. 








2\TS. 


Statute 
and Ord. 




Annually, 
one 


May 1 


5 \TS. 


Assessing, Commissioner 

of 


Statute 
and Ord. 

Statute 
and Ord. 




. 


* 


* 


Assessing, Associate Com- 
missioner of (Two) 


* 


Auditor 


Ord. 




t 


t 


t 


Back Ba\' Architectural 


Statute 








•5 yrs. 


Bay Village Historic District 


Statute 


Mayor and 






3yrs. 

5 VTS. 


Beacon Hill Architectural 


Statute 
Statute 




AnnualK', 
one 


May 1 


Boston Employees Credit 




Boston Finance Commis- 




Annually 










Go\ernor 


one 




5 vrs. 









*For a term expirin)^ on the first Monday of tlie January followinK the next liiennial municipal election at 
which a mayor is elected. 



51 



Officials 



How 
Created 



Appointed or Ki.ected 



By Whom 



Wfif.n 



Term 



Begins 



Length 



Boston Housing Authorit) 
(Five) ', 

Boston Recle\elopinent 
Authority (Five) 

Browne Fund, Edward 
Ingersoll (Three) 

Charital)!e Donations for 
Inhabitants of Boston, 
Trustees of 

Citv Clerk 



Collector-Treasurer . 
Corporation Counsel 



Economic Development and 
Industrial Corporation 

(Seven) 

Election Commissioners 

(Four) 

Examiners, Board of 

(Three) 

Fire Cominissioner 



Franklin Foundation 

(Twelve Managers) 

Freedom Trail Commission 
Hospital Members 

(Nine) 

Inspectional Serxices 

Commissioner 

Library Trustees (Five) . . . . 



Licensing Board (Three) . . . 
Old South Association in 

Boston (Two Managers) . . 
Parks and Recreation, 

Commissioner of 

Parks and Recreation, 

Associate Commissioners 

of (Four) 



Statute 



Ord. 



Statute 

Statute 
and Ord. 
Ord. 



Statute 

Statute 
Statute 
and Ord. 
Statute 



Statute 



Ord. 
Ord. 



Statute 



Statute 
and Ord. 



Statute 
and Ord. 



Jan. 8 
Sept. 17 



Mayor 
City 
Counci 



Mayor and 
Citv Council 



Mayor 



Supreme 
Court 
Ma\or 



Governor 
Citv Coun- 



Mavor 



Annually, 
four 
Trien- 
niallv 



Quadren- 
nialK 



Annually 
Annualh', 

one 
.Annually, 

one 
Quadren- 

nialK- 



Annualh 
one 



Annually, 

one 
BiennialK 

one 

.AnnualK' 



AnnualK', 
one 



May 1 
1st Mon. 
in Feb. 



Mayl 

July I 
April 1 
Mayl 
Mayl 



Mavl 



Mavl 



When 
elected 



Ma\ 1 



3 \rs. 
■3 yrs. 

4 yrs. 

3 yrs. 

4 yrs. 

3 \TS. 

4 vrs. 



3 yrs. 

5 yrs. 

6 \TS. 
1>T. 

* 

4 \ rs. 



**F()iir memhers appointed by tlie Mayor and City Council and one appointed ijy the Massaciiusetts State 
IIoiisinK Board. 

A As vacancies occur. 



52 





How 


Appointed or Elected 


Term 


Officials 












Created 


By Whom 


When 


Begins 


Length 


Penal Institutions Commis- 






Quandren- 








Ord. 
Ord. 


Mayor 


nially 
t 


May 1 
t 


4 vrs. 


Personnel, Supenisor of 


t 


Police Commissioner 


Statute 




Quinquen- 












nially 


Mayl 


5yrs. 


Public Facilities Commis- 














Statute 




* 


* 


* 


Public Works, Commis- 












sioners of 


Ord. 




* 


* 


* 




Ord. 




* 


* 


* 


Real Estate, Committee on 














Ord. 




§ 


§ 


§ 


Real Property, Commis- 


Ord. 
Ord. 




* 
Annually, 


* 

* 




Real Property, Assistant 




Real Property, Associate 
Commissioners of 




(Three) 


Ord. 




one 


Mayl 


3 vrs. 








Triennially 






Retirement Board (Three) 


Statute 




one 


Oct. 1 


3yrs. 




Statute 




See 


See 


See 


Review, Board of (Three) 


and Ord. 




footnote 
Citv elec- 


footnote 
1 st Mon. 


footnote 


School Committee (Thirteen) . 


Statute 


Elected 


tion 


in Jan'y 


2yrs. 


Transportation Department 


Statute 


Mayor 


* 


* 


* 


Veterans' Benefits and 


Statute 








Services Commissioner .... 


and Ord. 






* 


* 



* For a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at 
which a mayor is elected. 

t Position placed under C^ivil Service by St. 1959, c. 603. 

§ The C;hairman and two other members of the Real Property Board are appointed by the Mayor from the 
Real Property Board. 



53 





How 
Created 


Appointed or Elected 


Term 


Officials 


By Whom 


When 


Begins 


Length 


Veterans' Graves and 
Registration, Supervisor 
of 


Statute 
and Ord. 

Statute 

Statute 
and Ord. 

Bequest 

Statute 
and Ord. 


Mayor 

Mayor and 
City Council 


* 

Annually, 
One 

t 


January 

t 




Water and Sewer 

Commission (Three) 

Weights and Measures, 


4yrs. 
t 


White Fund, George 

Robert (Five Trustees) 

Zoning Commission 


Mayor and 
City Council 


Annually, 
four 


Mayl 


3 vrs 







* Position place under C^ivil Service by St. 1949, c. 24.5. 

t Position placed under C]ivil Service l)y St. 1909, c. .382. 

NOTE: — Tlie mayor appoints three persons to this Board as follows: — ( 1 ) such person in the service of the 
real estate appraisal division of the assessing department as the mayor, by a writing filed v\ith the city clerk 
after the commencement of a municipal year, shall designate to serve ex officio on said board at his pleasure 
during such year, who, while so serving, shall be chairman of said board, (2) such person in the service of the 
statistical research division of the assessing department as the mayor in like manner shall designate to serve ex 
officio on said board at his pleasure during such year, and (3) such person as the mayor shall appoint from the 
public at large to serve on said board for a term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next 
l)iennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected. 



MUNICIPAL DEPARTMENTS 
BOARDS AND AGENCIES 



The Statutes and Ordinances, as amended, relating to the depart- 
ments, boards, offices, authorities and commissions contained herein, 
may be found in the City of Boston Code. 

The various agencies are arranged alphabetically to the principal word 
of their title. 



54 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

Room 603, City Hall 

[Rev. Orel. 1961, Chaps. 3 and 4; Orel. 1968, Chap. 2; Orel. 1969, Chap. 4, 
Sees. 1 and 2A; Ord. 1974, Chap. 486, Sec. 5, Acts of 1909, as 
amended by Sec. 1, Chap. 473, Acts of 1953, C.B.C. 5-1.] 

Administrative Services Board 

Raymond Dooley, Director of Administrative Services, Chairman 
Barbara Gottsciialk, Director of Office of Budget and Program Evalua- 
tion 
Felix Arroyo, Director of Office of Personnel Management 
*0. Tony Streeter, Purchasing Agent 
Sally Degan, Acting City Auditor, ex officio 
Lee Jackson, Collector-Treasurer, ex officio 
TiiADDEUS Jankowskl Commissioner of Assessing, ex officio 
Cynthia Denton , Supervisor of Labor Relations 
Joseph F. Fisher, Executive Secretary 

The Administrative Services Department provides much of the inter- 
nal framework and support services for the operation of the City govern- 
ment. Its eleven divisions interact with the City's service departments, 
overseeing their efficient operations. The Offices of Personnel Manage- 
ment, and Labor Relations, and the Health Benefits and Insurance Divi- 
sion manage the needs of City employees, which include employee de- 
velopment, training, compensation, health insurance, and centralized 
collective bargaining. The Office of Budget and Program Evaluation 
oversees the City's revenue and operating expense budgets, ensuring 
that the City's funds are allocated in a manner that is fisically prudent and 
that enhances service and program delivery. The Management Informa- 
tion Systems Division maintains and enhances the City's computer infor- 
mation systems. The Intergovernmental Relations Division coordinates 
the City's relationship with the federal, state, and other local govern- 
ments and oversees the dealings of the executive branch with the City 
Council. The Purchasing and Printing Divisions, the Minority and 
Women Business Office, and the Office of Contract Management handle 
the economical procurement of those goods and services needed by City 
departments. The Office of Cable Communications is charged with 
watching over the installation of the cable system in the City. 

OFFICE OF BUDGET AND PROGRAM EVALUATION 

Barbara S. Gottsciialk, Director 
Office 812 

The Office of Budget and Program Evaluation coordinates the gather- 
ing, analysis, and presentation of appropriate budget data as part of the 
Mayor's proposed operating budget. The operating budget is presented 
in program budget format and contains relevant program evaluation cri- 
teria. OBPE also gathers, analyzes, and presents data with respect to 



*Mr. Streeter died August 30, 1990. Frank Chin was appointed Pur- 
chasing Agent by the Mayor effective October 1, 1990. 



55 



revenue, and proposes amendments to City ordinances or state laws that 
ensure revenue predictability and growth. 

The Office develops policies with respect to expenditure of appropria- 
tions and improving the operating budget as it is used as a short and long 
term planning document. The Office also assists department managers in 
establishing performance criteria for City programs and services, works 
to improve the quality, effectiveness and efficiency of those programs and 
services, and attempts to minimize the cost of program delivery. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Annual Appropriation Process, Ch. 190, s. 15, Acts of 1982 (Tregor Legis- 
lation) as amended by Ch. 701, s. 2, Acts of 1986 (Tregor Amend- 
ment) 

Reserve Fund, Ch. 701, s. 7, Acts of 1986 

Budget Allotment Process and Reallocations, Ch. 180, s. 18, Acts of 1982 
as amended by Ch. 701, s. 8-9, Acts of 1956 

Duties of Supervisor of Budgets, CBC Ord. 5-1.5 

Transfer of Appropriations, Ch. 190, s. 23, Acts of 1982 as amended by 
Ch. 701, s. 3, Acts of 1986 

Penalty for Overspending Budget, Ch. 190, s. 17, Acts of 1982 

OFFICE OF CABLE COMMUNICATIONS 

Thomas P. Cohan, Director 

Office 708 

The Office of Cable Communications is responsible for enforcing the 
cable television license and overseeing the construction and operation of 
the cable system. It is also responsible for all programming on the Munici- 
pal Channel and development of municipal utilization of the Public Insti- 
tutional Network (PIN). In addition, the Cable Division operates the City 
Hall mail system. 

The Office of Cable Communications monitors the cable system oper- 
ator, resolves consumer complaints related to the cable system, serves as 
liaison between all City departments and the cable operator, advocates 
on behalf of consumers before federal and state regulatory and legislative 
bodies, and coordinates PIN use by City departments. It produces or 
coordinates the production of all municipal related programming for the 
Municipal Channel. In addition, the Division processes and posts all City 
Hall outgoing, inter-office and incoming mail. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 
M.G.L. Ch. 166A; CBC 18-1.3 (23). 

OFFICE OF CONTRACT MANAGEMENT 

Dale K. Nesbary, Director 
Office 800 

The Office of Contract Management (OCM) ensures that the City's 
awards are advertised, selected, and processed in an efficient and ac- 
countable environment. The Office seeks to expand the pool of vendors 



56 



willing to do business with the City, and to increase the proportion of City 
of Boston contracts that are advertised. 

The Office tracks contract and vendor information in order to process 
contracts efficiently, and maintains a vendor profile database to provide 
City departments with accurate information on available vendors. In con- 
junction with these efforts, the Office produces the City Record. 



HEALTH BENEFITS AND INSURANCE DIVISION 

Irene Carrington, Director 
Room 807 

The Health Benefits and Insurance Division is responsible for provid- 
ing life insurance and a variety of health insurance plans to active and 
retired employees of the City of Boston as efficiently and economically as 
possible within the guidelines of MGLA Chapter 32B. The Workers' 
Compensation Service, a self-insured entity with respect to workers' 
compensation insurance, provides compensation and medical benefits 
for all insured City of Boston employees suffering an industrial accident. 

The Division's health benefit program offers participating employees 
the option of enrolling in one of four health maintenance organizations 
(HMOs), a traditional health insurance plan, or a managed care plan. The 
life insurance program offers basic coverage of $5,000 term life insurance 
and optional insurance to a maximum of $74,000. 

The Workers' Compensation Service investigates claims and makes 
payments in a timely manner. It provides City departments with informa- 
tion to assist them in managing claims resulting from employee injuries 
and to reduce costs associated with workers' compensation. The Service 
also seeks to reduce workers' compensation loss exposure and to recoup 
some of the compensation paid to injured employees from the state's 
Second Injury Fund and from third party actions where appropriate. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 
Group Insurance Plan to Municipalities, MGLA c. 32B, s. 1-17 
Generally, MGLA c. 152 

Third Parties; Subrogation, MGLA c. 152, s. 15 
Operation As Self-Insurer, MGLA c. 152, s. 25 
Second Injury Reimbursement, MGLA c. 152, s. 37 

Special Fund; Trust Fund; Assessment Rase and Rates; Payments; Reports; 
Audits,MGLAc. 152, s. 65 

INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS DIVISION 

Howard Leibowitz, (Federal) 

Francis Doyle, (State) 

Robert Finneran, (City Council) 

Office 960 

The Intergovernmental Relations Division coordinates the City's rela- 
tions with the federal, state, and other local governments, seeking to fos- 
ter constructive links between the City and these entities. The Division 
keeps the Mayor informed on intergovernmental issues and assists him in 



57 



representing the City's interests in these matters. In addition, the Divi- 
sion provides a Haison between the Administration and the Boston City 
Council. 

The Division tracks legislation and policy initiatives that concern the 
City directly, or urban and regional affairs more generally. It arranges for 
testimony by the Mayor, or on behalf of the Mayor, at legislative hearings 
of special concern. It maintains liaison with and coordinates the City's 
participation in national, state, and municipal organizations. The Divi- 
sion also seeks out federal and state grant opportunities. 

OFFICE OF LABOR RELATIONS 

Cynthia Denton, Supervisor 
Office 624 

The Office of Labor Relations serves as the City's agent in all dealings 
with collective bargaining units, and provides legal services in the area of 
labor relations and employment law. 

The Office of Labor Relations represents City and County depart- 
ments in all labor relations matters before state and federal courts, state 
agencies, and in various other forums. The Office negotiates and adminis- 
ters collective bargaining agreements with 17 unions and 28 bargaining 
units covering 10,000 employees. Additionally, the Office advises City 
managers and supervisors on labor-management relations. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 
CBCOrd. 5-1.4. 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS DIVISION 

Allan Stern, Director 
Office 703 

The Management Information Systems Division is responsible for the 
design, purchase, development, and maintenance of information systems 
for the City of Boston. This includes acquisition of hardware, software, 
and consultant services. 

The Management Information Systems Division maintains and en- 
hances the City's computing capacity to support ongoing City operations 
and to increase overall efficiency. It meets the hardware, software, and 
consulting needs of departments, especially in the areas of major systems, 
office automation, and telecommunications. 

MINORITY AND WOMEN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICE 

SiiEiLA A. Hubbard, Director 
Office 808 

The mission of the Minority and Women Business Enterprise Office is 
to encourage, assist, and provide the maximum opportunity for minority 
and women-owned businesses to participate in the City's contracting 
arena by assisting the City and its departments to increase both the num- 
ber of minority and women businesses that receive City contracts, and 
the amount of contractual dollars awarded to those businesses. 



58 



The Minority and Women Business Enterprise Office works with City 
departments to promote and affirmatively market contract opportunities 
for minority and women-owned businesses in the areas of construction, 
goods, and services. City ordinance requires that the City award a mini- 
mum of 15% of its construction contracts and contracts for goods and 
services to minority businesses and 5% to women-owned businesses. 
The Office provides outreach to minority and women-owned businesses 
and assistance to City departments. It also monitors the performance of 
City departments and produces quarterly and annual performance re- 
ports. Finally, the Office initiates any necessary enforcement procedures 
to ensure the achievement of the City's targets. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 
Establishment, CBC Ord. 4-4. 



OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

Felix D. Arroyo, Director 
Office 612 

The Office of Personnel Management's (OPM) mission is to provide 
personnel services to all City departments. Through OPM, departments 
are provided with management systems with which to hire, classify, com- 
pensate, and promote employees; pursue good labor relations, provide 
unemployment benefits and, in each process, have access to relevant re- 
cords. OPM also carries out a variety of training and assistance programs 
to encourage and enhance human resource management in the City of 
Boston. 

The Office of Personnel Management provides all City departments 
with management systems to hire, classify, and compensate personnel. 
The Office pursues good labor relations and arranges for employment 
benefits. OPM conducts recruitment and affirmative action programs, 
and provides City employees access to continuing education benefits. 
The Office operates the City's employee assistance program and con- 
ducts a wide range of training and development programs. OPM also 
oversees the City's Managing Attendance Program, the implementation 
of an employee performance appraisal system, and the City's pay equity 
study. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Civil Service, MGLA c. 31, as amended 

Collective Bargaining, CBC St. 6, s. 202 

Compensation of Employees; CBC St. 4, s. 12; CBC Ord. 5-5.18 

Employees Subject to Civil Service Laws, CBC St. 5, s. 110 

Duties of Supervisor of Personnel, CBC Ord. 5-1.6 

County Employees Salary classification, MGLA c. 35, s. 56 

PRINTING DIVISION 

William J. Hannon, Superintendent 
174 North St. 

The Printing Division supplies state-of-the-art printing, binding, and 
composition services to City departments. 



59 



The Division provides City departments with typesetting, composi- 
tion, layout and design services, printing and binding, and delivery of 
finished printed materials. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Printing Plant; Union Label, CBC Ord 5-1.9 
City Documents, CBC Ord. 5-1.10 
Departmental Charges, CBC Ord. 6-1.6 
Printing and Office Supplies, CBC Ord. 5-5.24 

PURCHASING DIVISION 

Frank Chin, Purchasing Agent 
Office 809 

The Purchasing Division is responsible for the acquisition of goods and 
materials necessary for the operation of City departments, the disposition 
of surplus property, and the operation of the City Hall Copy Center, the 
Central Facsimile Unit, and the Central Store. 

The Purchasing Division procures all supplies, materials, and equip- 
ment for City and County departments. The procurement process entails 
selecting vendors through public bidding, and managing purchase con- 
tracts and orders. The Central Services Program provides large-volume 
and fast-copy reproduction service through its Copy Center. The central- 
ized facsimile service and the Central Store for office supplies are also 
maintained by the Division. The surplus property unit ensures the effi- 
cient and economical disposal of all City surplus property excluding land 
and buildings. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, MGLA c. 41, s. 103 
Duties of the Purchasing Agent, CBC Ord. 5-1.8 
Contracts, CBC St. 4, s. 1; CBC St. 4, s. 1, 8 

Public Safety Commission 

Raymond Dooley, Chairman: Director of Administrative Services 
Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner, Public Works Department 
Francis M. Roache, Commissioner, Police Department 
Leo D. Stapleton, Commissioner, Fire Department 

Thomas P. Glynn, III, Chairman, Mass. Bay Transportation Authority, 10 
Park Plaza, New Transportation Building, Boston, 02116 

, Superintendent, School Department 

Richard A. Dimino, Commissioner, Transportation Department 
Chief Robert Laing, Fire Department 

Judith Kurland, Commissioner, Department of Health and Hospitals 
Joseph F. Fisher, Executive Secretary 

CBC Ord. 5-3 

It is the duty of this Commission to coordinate the work of all depart- 
ments of the City concerned with public safety to the end that there may 
be efficient and concerted action by said departments, particularly in 
times of emergency or disaster. The Commission shall meet at least once 
each month, at the call of the Director of Administrative Services, for the 
purpose of discharging said duty. 



60 



DESIGNER SELECTION BOARD. 
CBC Ord. 4-1 

There shall be located within the Administrative Services Department 
a Designer Selection Board, consisting of five (5) members. Four (4) 
members shall be appointed by the Mayor within sixty (60) days of the 
effective date of this ordinance, as follows: one from three (3) candidates 
nominated by the Boston Society of Architects, one from three (3) candi- 
dates nominated by the Massachusetts Society of Professional Engineers, 
one from three (3) candidates nominated by the Boston Municipal Re- 
search Bureau, one from three (3) candidates nominated by the Boston 
Society of Civil Engineers, and the director of Administrative Services ex 
officio. The nominee of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers shall be 
appointed for a term of two (2) years; of the Boston Municipal Research 
Bureau for a term of three (3) years; of the Massachusetts Society of Pro- 
fessional Engineers for a term of four (4) years; and of the Boston Society 
of Architects for a term of five (5) years. As the term of any commissioner 
expires, his successor shall be appointed for a term of five (5) years. Va- 
cancies in the Commission shall be filled for the unexpired term. The 
members of the Board shall serve without compensation. The Board shall 
elect each year one member to serve as the chairman. The Director of 
Administrative Services shall serve as the secretary thereof and shall keep 
all records of the Board. The Board shall not be subject to the supervision 
or control of the Administrative Services Board or any member thereof 
and shall, on or before the last Monday of January, 1982, and annually 
thereafter, make a report of its proceedings and votes to the City Council. 

The Board shall have jurisdiction over the selection of all designers, 
programmers, and construction managers performing design services in 
connection with any building projects for all City departments. 

INSTITUTIONAL EXPANSION BOARD. 
CBC Ord. 10-5 

There shall be a Board within the Administrative Services Department 
to be called the Institutional Expansion Board. 

The Board shall have nine (9) members, each appointed by the Mayor, 
as hereinafter provided. Six (6) shall be appointed from a list of not less 
than twelve (12) persons determined eligible by the City Council to rep- 
resent areas of the City especially impacted by institutional uses. To the 
extent the City Council shall determine practical, each such shall be a 
president or nominee of civic associations of such neighborhoods. Two 
(2) shall be appointed from a list of not less than four (4) residents of such 
neighborhoods determined eligible by the City Council; and one shall be 
an officer of a tax-exempt institution having an office in the City of 
Boston. All members shall be residents of the City of Boston and no mem- 
ber, or member's immediate family, shall be an employee of the City of 
Boston or a public institution, except for the institutional representative. 
Those persons who are appointed by virtue of being an officer of a civic 
association as described above need not hold such office for the duration 
of their appointment to the Board. As any vacancy occurs it shall be filled 
in like manner as the original appointment. In those cases where the City 



61 



Council shall determine eligibility, it shall find eligible not less than two 
(2) persons for each vacancy to be filled. During the first three (3) years of 
the effectiveness of this ordinance, civic associations in the following 
neighborhoods shall be among those represented on the Board; Allston- 
Brighton, Audubon Circle, Back Bay-Beacon Hill, Chinatown, Dorches- 
ter, Fenway and Mission Hill 

The Board shall have the following powers: 

a. To investigate expansion by public institutions and the effect of such 
expansion on the City's neighborhoods and the supply of decent, afforda- 
ble housing in the City. 

b. To publish reports and conduct hearings on expansion of public 
institutions. 

c. To advise other City Boards and Departments with respect to expan- 
sion by public institutions. 

d. To make recommendations for preventing expansion by public insti- 
tutions which results in the removal of decent, affordable housing from 
the City's housing market or which adversely affects a neighborhood of 
the City. 

The Board of Appeal, the Public Improvement Commission, the Zon- 
ing Commission, the Inspectional Services Department and the Boston 
Redevelopment Authority shall give prompt notice to the Board of each 
application of a public institution for a permit, license or other public 
approval. 

See Also: Neighborhood Impact Commission CBC Ord. 10-7 



Archives and Records Advisory Commission 

Room 601, City Clerk 

The Commission shall consist of the city clerk who shall serve as its 
chairman, the city registrar, the corporation counsel, the director of the 
public library, the director of the office of arts and humanities, and the 
director of administrative services, ex-officio, or their respective desig- 
nees, and three persons to be appointed by the mayor. The appointed 
members of the commission shall serve for a term expiring on the first 
Monday of the January following the next biennial municipal election at 
which a mayor is elected. In making such appointments, the mayor shall 
give preference to those persons associated with or representative of pub- 
lic or private institutions concerned with the care, custody or use of archi- 
val materials. 

Megan Sniffen-Marinoff, Appointed Member 
Maurice Nobles, Appointed Member 
John F. Bok, Appointed Member 

Authorizing Statutes/Ordinances 
Acts of 1988, Ch. 68 



62 

ARSON PREVENTION COMMISSION 

Robert Costello, Chairman 

Leo Stapleton, Fire Commissioner 

Francis M. Roache, Police Commissioner 

Thomas McNicholas, Inspectional Service 

Lee Jackson, Collector-Treasurer 

David Scondras, City Councillor, District 8 

Frank N. Jones, Commissioner, Real Property 

John E. Barry, Jr 

Russell Lopez 

Lucius Wilder 

John Golembeski 

Leticia Rivera-Torres 

Office, 113 City Hall, Ext. 3609 

There shall be in the city a commission, known as the Arson Prevention 
Commission, consisting of the fire commissioner; the police commis- 
sioner; the commissioner of inspectional services; the collector- 
treasurer; the chairman of the Boston City Council Committee which 
deals with issues regarding housing, development and planning, serving 
in ex officio capacities; and four commissioners appointed by the Mayor, 
who shall be residents of the City of Boston who have knowledge or ex- 
pertise in the area of arson or live in areas affected by arson. Each com- 
missioner shall serve a term of three years. Any vacancy in office of a 
commissioner shall be filled in like manner for the unexpired term. 

The commission shall elect one of its members as Chairman and an- 
other as vice-chairman to serve in these capacities for the term of one 
year The commission shall elect a secretary who need not be a member of 
the commission. The commissioners shall serve without compensation, 
and shall be deemed special municipal employees for the purposes of 
chapter 268A of the General Laws. 

The commission shall meet on a regular basis; shall study the problem 
of arson in the city; shall work with neighborhood organizations to imple- 
ment remedies arrived at by studying the problem of arson in the city; 
shall from time to time, and at least twice a year on July 1 and January 1, 
make written reports to the Mayor and City Council assessing incidents of 
arson on a neighborhood basis and recommend means to prevent arson; 
shall conduct independently or in conjunction with appropriate agencies 
such programs relating to the prevention of arson in the city as the com- 
mission deems necessary; and shall propose new programs as the com- 
mission deems feasible in view of the particular program and the needs of 
the city in regard to arson prevention. 

Authorizing Statutes/Ordinances 
C.B.C.9-10 



63 

Arts and Humanities 
(An Office of the Mayor) 

Bruce P. Rossley, Executive Director 
Office 803 

The mission of the Office of Arts and Humanities is to stimulate and 
support efforts to preserve and develop cultural facilities in the City of 
Boston. In addition, the Department advocates for the concerns of 
Boston's visual, performing, and literary artists and 150 non-profit cul- 
tural organizations, while serving as a link between individuals and orga- 
nizations within the arts community and within the public and private 
sectors. Other responsibilities include improving public access to affor- 
dable cultural programming, providing technical assistance to artists and 
arts organizations, and regranting Arts Lottery funds to nonprofit cultural 
organizations. 

The Office of the Arts and Humanities evaluates proposals and regrants 
Arts Lottery funds each year to support non-profit, affordable arts pro- 
gramming throughout the City. The Office also provides technical assist- 
ance to artists and to arts organizations, provides opportunities for intern 
placement with cultural organizations, and conducts outreach programs 
in minority communities and in Boston's public schools in conjunction 
with the School Department. The Office develops policy for and imple- 
ments decisions relative to design and siting of public art, distributes an 
informational newsletter, and serves as a link between the arts community 
and private funding sources. The Office encourages preservation and cre- 
ation of cultural facilities in the Midtown Cultural district in conjunction 
with the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA), conducts needs assess- 
ment surveys, and makes recommendations to other City agencies formu- 
lating and implementing policies affecting the City's art community. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Art Commission Enabling Legislation, Ch. 122, s. 1-4, Acts of 1890 
Establishing Arts 6- Humanities Division, C.B.C Ord. 15-9 
Boston Arts Lottery Council, C.B.C. 5-9 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

Room 301, CITY HALL 

Thaddeus J. Jankowski, Jr., Commissioner 

BOARD OF REVIEW 

John D. Moore, Ex-Officio, Chairman 

Richard A. Cohen, Member 

Valarie Ifill, Member 

The Assessing Department exercises the City's power to levy a prop- 
erty tax and certain excise taxes pursuant to the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth. 



64 



The Assessing Department operates under the jurisdiction of an offi- 
cer, known as the Commissioner of Assessing. 

The Department determines the fair cash value and classification of all 
real and personal property located in the City, as of January first of each 
year. Pursuant to state law, the Department conducts a revaluation pro- 
gram every three years which must meet the certification standards of the 
Department of Revenue, Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The Department annually records all ownership transfers and docu- 
ments changes in property condition. Property sales and other economic 
data are analyzed to determine fair cash value assessments on taxable and 
exempt property. The Department maintains official maps, property de- 
scription data, ownership records and assessment, abatement and exemp- 
tion records. The Department administers an exemption program for el- 
derly, blind, surviving spouse and disabled veterans who meet certain 
income and wealth criteria pursuant to state law. 

The authority of the Assessing Department with respect to the assess- 
ment of real and personal property is set forth in Chapter 59 of the Gen- 
eral Laws of the Commonwealth. 

The Department administers the motor vehicle excise tax (G.L. Ch. 
60), the boat excise tax (G.L. Ch. 60B) and urban redevelopment corpora- 
tion excise (G.L.Ch. 121A). A payment in lieu of tax program is adminis- 
tered with respect to tax-exempt institutions. 

The Department is divided into three major programs: 1) Tax Adminis- 
tration, 2) Valuation and 3) Abatement. 

A Board of Review reviews every application for the abatement of a real 
or personal property tax and reports to the Commissioner of Assessing its 
findings and recommendations. 

The Board of Review consists of (1) a person in the service of the ap- 
praisal division as the mayor, by a writing filed with the city clerk, shall 
designate to serve ex officio, who while so serving, shall be chairman of 
the board, (2) a person in the research division as the mayor in like man- 
ner shall designate to serve ex officio, and (3) a person appointed by the 
mayor from the public at large. 

The Department defends assessments at the Appellate Tax Board (G.L. 
Ch. 58A) and in the courts of the Commonwealth. 

Authorizing Statutes/Ordinances 

Organizations, CBC St. 6, s. 100-107; CBC ord. 6-2 
Taxation, MGLA c. 59; MGLA c. 60A; MGLA 

c. 61A-61B;MGLAc. 121A 
Abatement of Back Taxes, MGLA c. 58, s. 8 
Classification, MGLA c. 59, s. 2a; MGLA c. 40, s. 56 
Annual Assessment, MGLA c. 59, s. 23 
Proposition 2 1/2, MGLA c. 59, s. 21c 
Cherry Sheets - State Aid, MGLA c. 58, s. 18a - c, 25a 



65 

AUDIT COMMITTEE 

Daniel Finn 
Rosalind Watson 

Louis Cabot 

John J. Jennings 

Lawrence DiCara 

Section 14. There shall be appointed by the mayor subject to 
confirmation by the city council, an audit committee of five mem- 
bers, all residents of the city of Boston, whose members shall serve 
for five years, except that of those first appointed, one shall be 
appointed for a term of five years, another for four years, another 
for three years, another for two years, and another for one year. 
Members shall serve without compensation but may be reim- 
bursed for expenses necessarily incurred, and shall be deemed 
special municipal employees for the purposes of chapter two hun- 
dred and sixty-eight A of the General Laws. 

The city shall retain the services of an independent, certified 
public accounting firm which shall annually audit the accounts of 
the city. The audit committee shall monitor the progress of such 
audit and shall meet with the accounting firm at least quarterly. 
The said committee shall review the recommendations of the firm 
and shall present to the mayor and city council such recommenda- 
tions as it may have. 

Acts, 1982 - Ch. 190 (Tregor) 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT 

Sally Degan, Acting City Auditor 
Office, Mezzanine 1 

The Auditing Department provides the controllership and au- 
dit functions for the City and its departments and agencies. The 
Department implements fiscal controls over departmental spend- 
ing, prepares detailed departmental expenditure reports, pre- 
pares the City's annual financial statements, and conducts on-site 
internal audits and reviews of departments and agencies. The De- 
partment also is responsible for the development of a technically 
skilled, proficient, and professional management team. 

The Auditing Department has four broad areas of responsibil- 
ity: (1) controllership functions (accounting and fiscal records 



66 



maintenance); (2) accounts payable and payroll processing; (3) fi- 
nancial management of grant receipts; and (4) administration of 
internal and external financial and compliance audit require- 
ments. The Auditing Department serves as the accounting and 
fiscal records manager for the City. The Department is responsi- 
ble for generating timely and accurate internal management re- 
ports for use by the other City fiscal agencies. In addition, the City 
Auditor's staff manages the reconciliation of all ledgers main- 
tained within the City's accounting system. These ledgers include 
accounts payable, payroll, expenditure, appropriation, encum- 
brance, and the general ledgers. 

Authorizing Statutes/Ordinances 

CBC 6-1 

Annual Audit, 31 USC C75; MGLA c. 41, s. 50, 53; MGLA c. 44, s. 

40, 53d; MGLA c. 60, s. 97; Ch. 190, s. 14, Acts of 1982; CBC 

Ord. 6-1.5 
Annual Appropriation, MGLA s. 41, s. 57-58; Ch. 701, s. 3, 7-9, 

Acts of 1986; Ch. 190, s. 18 Acts of 1982; CBC St. 6, s. 25a; 

CBC Ord. 6-1.10 
Execution of Contracts, MGLA c. 40, s. 4g; MGLA c. 41, s. 17;CBC 

St. 4, s. 7-8; CBC Ord. 5-5.28 
Payment of Bills, MGLA Ch. 41, s. 51; CBC Ord. 5-5.16; CBC Ord. 

6-1.4, 6-1.6; CBC Ord. 11-6.36 
Payment of Payrolls, MGLA Ch. 41, s. 56; Ch. 190, s. 18, Acts of 

1982; CBC Ord. 5-5.29; CBC Ord. 6-1.3 
Debt Service, Ch. 190, s. 4, 8, Acts of 1982; MGLA Ch. 41, s. 57; 

CBC St. 6, s. 254; CBC Ord. 6-1.1, 6-1.2 
Financial Accounting and Reporting, 31 USC C. 75; MGLA Ch. 41, 

s. 54, 57, 81; MGLA Ch. 44, s. 43; CBC St. 6. s. 2-3; CBC Ord. 

5-5.34; CBC Ord. 6-1.7,6-1.8 



BUSINESS AND CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT 

(An Office of the Mayor) 

RosEMARiE E. Sansone, Director 
Office 802 

The mission of the Mayor's Office of Business and Cultural Develop- 
ment (MOBCD) is to provide assistance to the cultural, business, and 
residential communities of Boston in order to enhance the City's vitality 
and economy. The Office maintains a working relationship between City 



67 



government and the business, tourism, cultural, hospitality, and interna- 
tional communities. 

The MOBCD works actively with the tourism, convention, and hospi- 
tality industry on programs to market and promote the City of Boston as a 
visitor destination. The Office coodinates and assists major public cele- 
brations and special events. Additionally, the Office provides neighbor- 
hood groups with entertainment, technical, logistical, promotional assist- 
ance and funding for neighborhood events. The MOBCD administers 
Boston's International Sister City Program, and facilitates the visits of 
prominent international government and business leaders and other dis- 
tinguished guests to the City. The Office acts as a liaison between the City 
and neighborhood business associations, assists individual businesses 
with information and referral, and administers the Business to Neighbor- 
hood Resource Bank. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, CBC Ord. 15-3 



CAPITAL PLANNING 

(An Office of the Mayor) 

Mary Nee, Director 
Off'ice 959 

The Office of Capital Planning (OCP) is responsible for the preparation 
of multi-year capital plans, and for oversight of capital construction and 
equipment acquisition. Additionally, OCP has established internal finan- 
cial management systems to coordinate and oversee management of all 
capital revenues including bonds, grants, and trust funds. 

OCP manages the organizational systems necessary to prepare multi- 
year capital plans and budgets. OCP also manages the internal account- 
ing, budget, and reporting systems which monitor all capital accounts. In 
addition to capital budget management, OCP represents the Mayor and 
the Administration in its presentation of capital programs and policy. 



CITY CLERK 

Patrick F. McDonough, City Clerk 
Office 601 

The City Clerk is the official filing agency of the City of Boston, and is 
responsible for accepting, filing, recording, and maintaining all municipal 
records. The City Clerk publishes the agenda for all City Council meet- 
ings, records all Council and related Mayoral actions, and edits and com- 
piles the minutes of Council meetings. The Department also maintains 
the City Council document system database and publishes, on a yearly 
basis, all ordinances and amended codes. The City Clerk is also responsi- 
ble for overseeing the work of the Archives Commission. 



68 



Services to the public include the sale of various licenses and permits, 
notarizing and attesting to documents, and filing, recording, and copying 
papers in the custody of the Clerk. Services to City government consist of 
providing informational resources and technical assistance, administra- 
tion of the state's open meeting law, administration of oaths of office, 
attestation of various legal papers, and custody of records. The Archives 
Commission oversees the protection of City records, files, and other 
items of historic interest. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Election of the City Clerk, St. 1821, c. 110, s. 10; St. 1854, c. 448, s. 30-31; 
St. 1885, c. 266, s. 2; St. 1909, c. 486, s. 22; Rev. Ord. 1898, c. 11; 
MGLAc. 41,5.12-19 

Duties of the City Clerk, CBC Ord. 2-10; CBC St. 2, s. 750; MGLA c. 41, s. 
12-19; Ch. 68, Acts of 1988 

City Archives and Records Commission, MGLA c. 68 

REGISTRY DIVISION 

Room 213, City Hall 

[Stat.1892, Chap. 314; Stat. 1898, Chap. 398; Gen. Laws, Chap. 46; Rev. 
Ord. 1925, Chap. 28; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 28; Ord. 1954, Chap. 2, § 
31; Stat. 1965, Chap. 656.] 

Judith A. McCarthy, City Registrar 
Marilyn A. Greenwood, First Assistant City Registrar 
Therese a. D'Agostino, Assistant City Registrar 
Mary L. Sheehan, Assistant City Registrar 

The City Registrar keeps the records of births, deaths and marriages, 
issues certificates of the same and marriage licenses, receives and records 
affidavits of, additions to, and amendments and corrections of said re- 
cords, and forwards copies of all records to the office of the Department 
of Public Health and to outside cities and towns when nonresidents are 
involved. Annual reports have been published since 1849, except in 1860 
and 1861. 

By ordinance, approved July 12, 1892, the Department of Ancient Re- 
cords and the office of Record Commissioners (established July 6, 1875) 
were abolished, and the duties of the Record Commissioners, including 
the publication of documents relating to the early history of Boston, were 
transferred to the City Registrar. 

The Registry Division has custody of all birth, death, and marriage 
records pertaining to Boston dating back to 1629. The Division is com- 
posed of six units: births; deaths; marriages; depositions; clerical; and 
archives. Each unit is designed to promptly and accurately respond to the 
public's demand for certified records. 

The Registry Division issues certified copies of birth, marriage, and 
death certificates when needed to support Social Security, other govern- 
ment assistance and passport applications, school entrance, and insur- 
ance claims. This Division also processes all Marriage Intentions applied 
for in the City of Boston and handles all corrections to any records in the 
custody of the City Registrar. 



69 



AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Civil Service, MGLA c. 31 

Births, Marriages, Deaths, and Depositions, MGLA c. 46; MGLA c. 190, s. 

7; MGLA c. 207; MGLA c. 209c; MGLA c. 210; MGLA c. 272, s. 96 
Fees & Charges, CBC Ord. 18-1 

CITY COUNCIL 

Offices 5th Floor 

The Boston City Council is a separate branch of City government es- 
tablished under the Plan A type of municipal government outlined under 
Massachusetts law (MGLA c. 452, Stat. 1948; Ch. 376, 1951.) The City 
Council consists of thirteen members, nine of whom represent Council 
Districts; the remaining four are elected City-wide. Elections are held 
every two years. 

The City Council enacts ordinances, adopts orders and resolutions and 
is the appropriating authority of the City. The City Council approves the 
City and School Operating Budgets, the Capital Budget, loan orders, 
grant applications and expenditures, the sale or transfer of land and con- 
firms appointments to certain City boards and Commissions. The City 
Council at any time may request from the Mayor specific information on 
any municipal matter within its jurisdiction. The City Council has thir- 
teen standing committees and twelve special committees. 

The Document Room of the City Council is the depository for annual 
reports, ordinances, regulations. Council minutes, electoral district maps 
and street books. Bound volumes of the City documents date back to 
1834. An average of 25 visitors each week use the Document Room. 

Council staff provides administrative, computer and reception services 
for the Council, researches and drafts legislation filed by councilors and 
prepares analyses of legislation filed by the Mayor. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Structure of City Council, Ch. 453, Acts of 1948, as amended bv Ch. 

376, Acts of 1951 

District Representation, Ch. 605, Acts of 1982 

CLEAN CITY COMMISSION 
CBC Ord. 7-11 

There shall be within the City a Commission, to be known as the Clean 
City Commission, consisting of the Commissioners of the Public Works 
Department, Inspectional Service Department and Parks and Recreation 
Commission and the Office of Service Management, or their respective 
designees, and not less than five (5) others, each appointed by the Mayor, 
to represent the business community, and neighborhood, civic and park 
enhancement organizations located in the City of Boston. 

b. The Commission shall annually elect from its membership a Chair- 
man and a Secretarv. 



70 



c. All members shall serve at the pleasure of the Mayor without com- 
pensation and shall be deemed special municipal employees. 

d. The said Commission shall evaluate public and private efforts to 
improve the cleanliness of the City and comparable efforts in other cities, 
and from time to time make reports and recommendations concerning 
programs to combat unlawful dumping, littering, improper storage and 
disposal of waste, and like matters. The Commission shall operate as a 
separate agency of the City, but shall make reports only through the Di- 
rector of Administrative Services. The said Director shall make available 
to the Commission reasonable clerical assistance. 

e. Subject to acceptance of the same by the Mayor and City Council, 
the said Commission shall have authority to expend gifts, grants, and 
grants in aid for the purposes given. 

COMPARABLE WORTH COMMISSION 
CBC Ord. 5-5.39 

The CWC shall consist of fifteen (15) members, appointed by the 
Mayor, to serve staggered terms of one (1) and two (2) years. The members 
of the CWC shall be as follows: 

1. Six (6) persons who are representatives of municipal labor unions 
and women's advocacy organizations. Due consideration shall be given to 
appoint individuals who have a record of involvement with issues related 
to comparable worth. 

2. Two (2) persons who are employed in the private sector. 

3. The Supervisor of the City of Boston Office of Labor Relations, to 
serve ex officio. 

4. The Mayor's Advisor on Women's Issues, to serve ex officio. 

5. The Director of the City of Boston Office of Personnel Manage- 
ment, to serve ex officio. 

6. The Director of the City of Boston Affirmative Action office, to 
serve ex officio. 

7. The Director of the City of Boston Office of Budget and Program 
Evaluation, to serve ex officio. 

8. The Equal Rights Advisor to the Mayor, to serve ex officio. 

9. A member of the City Council designated by the President of the 
City Council. 

Members of the CWC shall serve without compensation and shall be 
designated special municipal employees for the purposes of Chapter 
268A of the General Laws. 

The CWC shall provide advice on issues related to comparable worth 
to the Office of Personnel Management during the conduct of the reclas- 
sification and pay equity study. During the course of the study, the Office 
of Personnel Management shall consult with the CWC, or a subcommit- 
tee thereof, at CWC's request upon reasonable notice, and shall provide 
access to information related to comparable worth issues, also at CWC's 
request upon reasonable notice, prior to the Office of Personnel Manage- 



71 



merit's making decisions on comparable worth issues. The Supervisor of 
the Office of Labor Relations, the Commissioner of the Women's Com- 
mission and, where appropriate, other Administration Officials, shall pro- 
vide CWC with assistance at CWC's request upon reasonable notice. The 
CWC shall meet at least monthly at the call of the Chair. Notwithstanding 
any other provision herein to the contrary, powers with respect to the 
executive and administrative business of the City remain with the Mayor, 
and he does not hereby delegate those powers to any person or entity. 

BOSTON COMPENSATION ADVISORY BOARD 
CBCOrd.5-5.10A 

David Mitchelson Chairman Term Expires 6/30/90 

Lawrence DiCara Member Term Expires 6/30/93 

John Gould Member Term Expires 6/30/94 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 



There shall be in the City of Boston a Boston Compensation Advisory 
Board consisting of five(5) members appointed by the Mayor. The Mayor 
shall annually designate one member as chairman. Said Board shall study 
the adequacy of salaries and expenses of the mayor, members of the City 
Council, members of the School Committee, members of Boards, Com- 
missions, and Authorities in the City of Boston, City Officers whose com- 
pensation is set or subject to approval by the Mayor and City Council and 
other senior municipal officials not covered by collective bargaining 
agreements. At least two (2) members of the Board shall have demon- 
strated experience in the field of personnel management. 

Members shall be appointed to the Board on a staggered basis. When 
the Board is first established, the member designated by the Mayor as 
initial Board Chairman shall be appointed for a term of five (5) years. The 
remaining members shall be appointed to initial terms of four (4) years, 
three (3) years, two (2) years and one (1) year, respectively. Thereafter, 
each member shall be appointed for a term of five (5) years. Each member 
shall serve until June 30 of the year in which his or her term expires and 
until the member's successor is appointed and approved. Vacancies in the 
board shall be filled by the Mayor for the unexpired term. The Supervisor 
of Personnel shall serve, ex officio, as a non-voting member of the Board 
and shall provide secretarial support and clerical assistance, including but 
not limited to, printing and duplicating services. 

The Board shall meet at least once a year and shall, in each even num- 
bered year, report its recommendations to the Mayor, City Council and 
School Committee by the first Wednesday in March by filing the same 
with the City Clerk. Nothing in this section shall prohibit the Board from 
filing recommendations on any subject within its jurisdiction at any time 
between the required biennial reporting periods. Notwithstanding any 
other requirement of this subsection, the Board shall, not later than thirty 
(30) days after the time when it is first established, study the adequacy of 
all salaries of City Officers whose compensation is set by ordinance and 
whose salary is subject to approval of the Mayor and City Council, and, 



72 



report its conclusions and recommendations to the Mayor, City Council, 
and School Committee within said thirty (30) days. Memebers of the 
Board shall be deemed Special Municipal Employees. The members of 
said Board shall serve without compensation but shall be reimbursed for 
their expenses actually and necessarily incurred in the performance of 
their duties. 

CONSUMER AFFAIRS AND LICENSING 

(An Office of the Mayor) 

Room 613 

[C.B.C.Ord. 17, ss 13.1-13.6] 

[C.B.C. Ord. 15-5; M.G.L. c. 140, ss. 177A, 181, 183A, 185H; M.G.L. c. 

93A] 

Diane J. Modica, Executive Director 

Donna M. Mueller, Deputy Director/Legal Advisor 

The Office of Consumer Affairs and Licensing it responsible for licens- 
ing and regulating all forms of entertainment in the City of Boston for the 
purpose of protecting the public safety. It issues licenses for all live enter- 
tainment, coin operated amusements, arcades, theaters, dancing, carni- 
vals, concerts and sporting events. 

The office processes new applications and license renewals, inspects 
premises and holds hearings on licensing requests and violations. It works 
with other city departments, including the police and fire departments, 
the Inspectional Services Department and the Mayor's Office of Neigh- 
borhood Services to address safety violations and neighborhood concerns 
regarding the operation of licensed premises. The Office also monitors 
licensees to deter unfair and deceptive practices affecting consumers and 
serves as a resource for the Mayor's Office on consumer issues. 

CITY OF BOSTON CREDIT UNION 

Room 242, City Hall 

(Gen. Laws, Chap. 171.) 

Officers 

Albert G. Sullivan, President and Chairman of the Board 

John P. Hardiman, First Vice-President 

Paul F. Fitzgerald, Second Vice-President 

Paul J. Francis, Treasurer 

Veronica T. Mahoney, Assistant Treasurer 

Thomas E. Newcomb, Security 

Maureen E. Hart, Clerk 

Board of Directors 

Joseph P. Canavan Eugene M. McCarthy 

Dorothy Curran Patricia Craven Ross 

Peter J. DeRosa Ann Tierney-Meade 

Gene J. DiBenedetto Charles P. Scordino 

Thomas Gately Robert P. Walsh 

Daniel F. Martini Francis J. Wilson 



73 



This organization was incorporated under the laws of Massachusetts on 
October 25, 1915. 

The incorporators were twenty-one in number and included, besides 
the Mayor, the Corporation Counsel, the City Auditor, City Treasurer, 
Park Commissioner, the Principal Assessor and fifteen other city employ- 
ees occupying responsible positions. 

Since its incorporation the Credit Union has been functioning for the 
benefit of the city employee by the promotion of thrift among its mem- 
bers and the loaning of money to members in need of financial assistance. 
These loans are made at a low rate of interest, saving the borrower from 
exorbitant rate charged by loan agencies. Approximately 95 percent of 
the borrowers have their weekly loan payment deducted from their salary 
by means of the payroll deduction plan. 

The Credit Union at the present time has assets of $54,711,192.82 and 
reserves of $5,306,349.79 with 15,513 members, 6,169 of whom are bor- 



Most departments of the city and county government are represented 
on the Board of Directors which has 19 members. Successors to those 
Directors completing their term each year are elected each annual meet- 
ing for a term of three years. 



COMMISSION FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 

James Brooks, Executive Director 
Office 708 

The Commission facilitates full and equal participation in all aspects of 
life by persons with disabilities in the City of Boston. To accomplish its 
purpose, the Commission strives to reduce architectural, procedural, at- 
titudinal, and communication barriers which affect persons with disabili- 
ties. 

The Commission for Persons with Disabilities provides information 
and referral services to disabled persons. It advocates on behalf of per- 
sons with disabilities, for their civil and legal rights to programs, services, 
employment, housing, transportation, recreation, and education. The 
Commission coordinates and monitors City compliance with federal, 
state, and City civil rights laws for persons with disabilities. The Commis- 
sion meets with community groups to discuss their concerns and pro- 
motes recommendations for the improvement of services to disabled per- 
sons. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, CBC Ord. 12-4 

Access to Public Buildings by Physically Handicapped, CBC Ord. 21- 

4 

Issuance of Temporary Parking Pennits, CBC Ord. 6-7 

Amend Housing Equity Ordinance, CBC 10-2. 9A 



74 



DRUG ABUSE COORDINATING COUNCIL 
CBC Ord. 12-7 

There shall be in the City a Board, known as the Coordinating Council 
on Drug Abuse, consisting of the Corporation Counsel, the Commis- 
sioner of Health and Hospitals, the Penal Institutions Commissioner, the 
Police Commissioner and the Chairman of the Youth Activities Commis- 
sion, ex officiis, or their respective designees, and sixteen (16) persons 
appointed by the Mayor each for a term expiring on the first Monday of 
the January following the next biennial municipal election at which a 
Mayor is elected. In making the appointments to be made by him, the 
Mayor shall give consideration to the appointment of persons associated 
with, or representative of, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Danger- 
ous Drugs, the Division of Food and Drugs in the State Department of 
Public Health, the probation officers of the Municipal Court of the City of 
Boston, the Boston Juvenile Court, and the other municipal and district 
courts in the City, the public, and the nonpublic, schools in the City, the 
Model Cities Drug Program, the Boston Teachers Union, the Drug Treat- 
ment and Drug Education Committee of United Community Services of 
Metropolitan Boston, and the project currently coordinated by the 
Boston University Mental Health Center and the Boston College-Urban 
League Joint Center for Intercity Change. At least two (2) of the persons 
appointed by the Mayor shall be doctors or psychologists who have dealt 
with the medical and psychological problems of youth in Boston. 

The Mayor shall from time to time designate one of the members of the 
Board as Chairman and another as Vice-Chairman. The Mayor shall des- 
ignate a full-time executive secretary of the Board. The Board may ap- 
point clerical assistance. 

All members of the Board shall serve without compensation, but shall 
be reimbursed for expenses necessarily incurred in the performance of 
their duties. (Ord. 1969 c. 17; Rev. Ord. 1961 (Sup. 1971) c. IOC s. 1; 
CBC Ord. 12-7.) 

It shall be the duty of the Coordinating Council on Drug Abuse to meet 
at least once a month; to coordinate to the fullest possible extent the work 
of all public and private agencies dealing with drug abuse; to effect an 
ongoing dialogue and exchange of views between such agencies; to con- 
duct, either independently or in conjunction with the School Committee 
of the City, such drug education programs as said Council deems advisa- 
ble; to conduct studies, investigations and research into the sources and 
use of harmful drugs and narcotic drugs as those terms are respectively 
defined in Section 187A and Section 197 of Chapter 94 of the General 
Laws, as now or hereafter amended; to pursue a course of action to insure 
that all laws governing the sale, possession and use of both harmful and 
narcotic drugs are duly enforced; and by the use of such media of com- 
munication as said Council shall from time to time deems appropriate, 
keep the inhabitants of the City informed respecting the use of both 
harmful and narcotic drugs. 

(Rev. Ord. 1961 (Sup. 1971) c. IOC s. 2; CBC Ord. 12-7.2 s. 201) Cross 
Reference: G.L. c. 94 ss. 187A, 197. 



75 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL 
CORPORATION OF BOSTON 

38 Chauncy Street, 02111 
(Established by Chapter 1097 of the Acts of 1971) 

The Corporation consists of 7 members appointed by the Mayor 

and Confirmed by the City Council 

Donald A. Gillis, Executive Director 

Members 

Stuart J. Vidockler, Chair Term ends June 30, 1992 

Kevin C. Piielan, Vice Chair Term ends June 30, 1993 

Marguerite H. Connaugiiton Term ends June 30, 1993 

Robert W. Consalvo Term ends June 30, 1992 

J. D. Nelson Term ends June 30, 1992 

Arthur F. F. Snyder Term ends June 30, 1991 

Fletcher H. Wiley Term ends June 30, 1991 

The Economic Development and Industrial Corporation of Boston is 
the economic development agency of the City of Boston with a mandate 
to retain and create jobs within the City. EDIC employs its public powers 
and resources to maintain, expand, and create industrial and commercial 
activity that will have the most favorable impact on the economic devel- 
opment of the City. EDIC, through its five affiliates, uses the tools of job 
training and placement, business and development financing, business 
services, real estate development, leasing of affordable space, and busi- 
ness recruitment to fulfill its mandate. The corporation also seeks to en- 
hance the productivity of land and buildings in Boston's neighborhoods 
and to foster a healthy and diversified City economy. 

The Jobs and Community Services (JCS) department of EDIC re- 
ceives, administers, and allocates funds to Community-Based Organiza- 
tions received through various state and federal programs including the 
Federal Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) and Community Develop- 
ment Block Grant monies. Services provided by this department include: 
employment and training programs; educational programs such as adult 
literacy, and English as a second language; and human service programs 
as youth services, day care, health services, and elderly services. 

The mission of the Boston Employment Commission, the City-funded 
program within the Office of Jobs and Community Services, is to ensure 
compliance with the Boston Residents Jobs Policy (BRJP). The Commis- 
sion is authorized by City ordinance to make judgments and impose sanc- 
tions in cases of violations of the BRJP as it relates to construction em- 
ployment goals. The Commission, by City ordinance, also encourages 
minority and women business enterprises (M/WBEs) to participate in 
contracts awarded by the City of Boston. Other programs within the Of- 
fice of Jobs and Community Sei-vices receive federal, state, and pri\ate 
funds to combat poverty, hunger, and homelessness by increasing a per- 
son's ability to be economically self-sufficient. 



76 



EDIC AFFILIATES 

Boston Indutrial Development Financing Authority (BIDFA) 

Created by MGL Chapter 40D, BIDFA has a separate board appointed 
by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council. EDIC's Executive Di- 
rector serves as Executive Director of BIDFA. BIDFA issues both tax- 
exempt and taxable industrial development bonds. 

Boston Local Develvopment Corporation (BLDC) 

This is a Chapter 180 charitable corporation with a board elected by its 
membership which consists of community and business people. It is le- 
gally structured to meet SBA requirements for a local development cor- 
poration licensed to package SBA loans. It also has U.S. tax-exempt status. 
EDIC's Executive Director sits on the board ex-officio pursuant to By- 
Laws. 

Companies qualifying for EDIC financing are those locating or ex- 
panding in Boston based on the retention or creation of jobs for Boston 
residents, minorities, and women. In addition, a company must demon- 
strate its positive net worth is less than $6 million, and annual after-tax 
income is less than $2 million. There are no net-worth limitations for 
industrial development bond financing or equipment leasing. 

Boston Technical Center (BTC) 

This is a 501 C3 charitable and educational corporation with U. S. tax- 
exempt status. It is a licensed and accredited, post-secondary trade and 
business school. The Board of thirteen includes the EDIC Executive Di- 
rector as a permanent member. 

Boston Employment Commission (BEC) 

Appointed by the Mayor, this seven-member board represents the real 
estate, labor, and residential communities in the oversight of large con- 
struction projects for compliance with the Boston Residents Jobs Policy. 

Neighborhood Jobs Trust (NJT) 

This board, consisting of three members — one Mayoral appointee, 
one appointee from the City Council, and the City Collector/Treasurer — 
makes decisions regarding the allocation of Linkage funds from large de- 
velopment projects in the City for job training programs. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Boston Residents Jobs Policy, CBC ORD. 8-9 

Boston Employment Commission, CBC ORD. 12-10 

Office of Jobs and Community Service Created by Executive Order Nov. 15, 1985 



77 



COMMISSION ON AFFAIRS OF THE ELDERLY 

Room 271, City Hall 
CBC ORD. 12-3 

Daine Watson, Commissioner 
ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONERS 

NAME TERM EXPIRES 

Nellie Sullivan May 1, 1989 

Helen Pearl May 1, 1989 

Lena Silbergerg May 1, 1990 

Dorothy Curran May 1, 1990 

Ruth Tinsley May 1, 1991 

Anne Martin May 1, 1991 

Joseph Saia May 1,1991 

Saverio Messina May 1, 1992 

George Palmer May 1,1992 

Dorothy Bell May 1, 1994 

The Commission on Affairs of the Elderly shall be cognizant of federal 
and state legislation concerning financial assistance, information ex- 
change, and planning for better community programming for the elderly, 
and shall coordinate or carry out programs designed to meet the prob- 
lems of the aging in coordination with programs of the Commission on 
Aging established under Chapter 6 of the General Laws. The Commis- 
sion on Affairs of the Elderly shall send to said Commission on Aging a 
copy of the annual report transmitted by it to the Mayor under Section 25 
of Chapter 3 of these ordinances. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT 

Room 241, City Hall 

[Stat. 1906, Chap. 311; Stat. 1907, Chap. 560;§ 78; Rev. Ord. 1989, Chap. 
15; C. C. Title IV., Chap. 16; Stat. 1909, Chap. 486, §§ 53-61; Stat. 
1910, Chap. 520; Stat. 1911, Chaps. 304, 469, 517, 550, 735; Stat. 
1912, Chaps. 275, 471, 483, 641; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 286, 835; Stat. 
1914, Chap. 730; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 15; Gen. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 
48, 91; Gen. Chaps. 48, 91; Gen. Stat. 1916, Chaps. 16, 43, 81, 87, 
179; Gen. Stat. 1917, Chap. 29; Gen. Stat. 1918, Chap. 74; Stat. 
1920, Chaps. 129, 142; Stat. 1921, Chaps. 65, 93, 114, 209, 288, 340, 
387; Ord. 1921, Chap. 7; Stat. 1942, Chaps. 311,410, 453, 479; Stat. 
1925, Chaps. 39, 136; Stat. 1926, Chap. 105; Ord. 1938; Stat. 1938, 
Chap. 287; Stat. 1939, Chap. 450; Stat. 1941, Chap. 472; Stat. 1945, 
Chap. 139; Stat. 1947, Chaps. 227, 446; Stat. 1948, Chap. 452; Stat. 
1949, Chap. 347; Stat. 1951, Chap. 376; Stat. 1958, Chap. 257; Stat. 
1971, Chap. 920; Stat. 1977, Chap. 549; Stat. 1982, Chap. 605; Stat. 
1983, Chap. 342.] 

OFFICIALS 

Benjamin F. Thompson, Chairman 
Everette Siieppard, Secretary 



78 



COMMISSIONERS 

William Arrigal, Jr. Term ending April 1, 1993 

James Killilea Term ending April 1, 1992 

EvERETTE SiiEPPARD Term ending April 1, 1991 

Benjamin F. Thompson Term ending April 1, 1990 

One Election Commissioner is appointed by the Mayor each year, term 
beginning April 1. The two leading political parties must be equally rep- 
resented on the Board and the Chairman is designated annually by the 
Mayor. 

The Board of Registrars of Voters was appointed in May, 1874, and was 
succeeded July 1, 1895, by the Board of Election Commissioners. 

This department exercises all the powers and duties formerly con- 
ferred upon the Board of Registrars of Voters (including the preparation 
of the jury list), except the power and duty of giving notice of elections 
and fixing the days and hours for holding the same. 

The Board also exercises all the powers and duties formerly conferred 
upon the City Clerk and other officers by chapter 504 of the Acts of 1894. 
The voting precincts in the 22 wards number 252. 

POLICE LISTING BOARD 

Chapter 287 of the Acts of 1938 provides: "In Boston there shall be a 
listing board composed of the police commissioner of the city and the 
board of election commissioners. In case of disagreement between the 
members of the listing board, the chief justice of the municipal court of 
the city of Boston, or, in case of his disability, the senior justice of said 
court who is not disabled, shall, for the purpose of settling such disagree- 
ment, be a member of said listing board and shall preside and cast the 
deciding vote in case of a tie." 



EMERGENCY SHELTER COMMISSION 

Ann Maguire, Executive Director 
Room 603 

The Emergency Shelter Commission researches and articulates issues 
related to homelessness. The Commission acts as a liaison between shel- 
ter providers and the City, and also advocates on behalf of the homeless as 
it encourages state and federal agencies to be more responsive to the 
needs of the homeless. The Commission works with the Health and Hos- 
pitals Department to ensure that funds given to that department are ef- 
fectively used to support City-run shelter programs. 

The Commission provides placement assistance services to those in 
search of emergency shelter, and referral services to programs which 
serve meals and distribute clothing. The Commission also conducts re- 
search projects, provides statistical information concerning the home- 
less, and publishes semi-annual reports. The Commission advocates for 
the needs of the homeless in public forums and before public agencies. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, CBC ORD. 10-4 



79 



ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT 

Lorraine M. Downey, Director 

Office, 805 

THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT 

The Environment Department was created under Chapter 624, s 1-10, 
Acts of 1982 to coordinate the varied but related concerns of six separate 
commissions. The Air Pollution Control Commission, Back Bay Architec- 
tural Commission, Beacon Hill Architectural Commission, Boston Art 
Commission, Boston Conservation Commission and Boston Landmarks 
Commission retain their independence to act within their area of statu- 
tory responsibility; at the same time the Environment Department is de- 
signed to bring about more efficient use of each commission's staff re- 
sources. 

Air Pollution Control Commission 
CBC ORD. 7-2 

The Air Pollution Control Commission is responsible for enforcing city 
and state air and noise pollution regulations and for administering the 
City of Boston's parking freeze, intended to reduce the amount of auto- 
mobile emissions in the city and encourage the use of public transit. The 
regulations require that the commission hold quarterly hearings to review 
applications for any new public parking facilities within the freeze area. 

The commission also issues permits for abrasive blasting of buildings 
and for open burning within the city; no such activity may take place 
without prior approval from the commission. Violations of commission 
regulations are subject to civil and criminal penalties. 

In addition to their mandated activities, commission staff members are 
involved with the issue of household hazardous waste, both educating the 
public about source reduction and developing programs for the disposal 
of existing waste. 

Back Bay Architectural Commission 

(Chap. 625, Acts of 1966, as amended by Chap. 463, Acts of 1974 and 
Chap. 645, Acts of 1979) 

Established in 1966 to protect the distinguished Victorian architecture 
of the Back Bay, the commission reviews all changes to exteriors of build- 
ings in that district. The twelve-member commission holds monthly pub- 
lic hearings at which it determines the appropriateness of applications for 
proposed exterior building changes. It then votes to approve, to approve 
with conditions, or to disapprove the application. 

All such changes, including (but not limited to) demolition, new con- 
struction, installation of a sign, or new windows, must have commission 
approval before the work is begun or a building permit is issued. Work 
done without prior approval is cited for violation, and the commission 
may seek legal action to remove unauthorized alterations and restore the 
former appearance. 

Beacon Hill Architectural Commission 

(Chap. 616, Acts of 1955 as amended) 

Originating in 1955, the Beacon Hill Architectural Commission is the 



80 

oldest historical district commission in the commonwealth. Its statute 
authorizes the commission to review changes to the exteriors of all build- 
ings in one of the nation's most historic neighborhoods. 

At its monthly meetings, the commission determines if proposed 
changes to buildings — alterations visible from a public way — are appro- 
priate changes to the historic character of the Federal, Greek Revival, and 
Victorian styles of the neighborhood. It then votes to approve, to approve 
with conditions, or to disapprove the proposals. 

Without exception, exterior alterations to buildings must have the ap- 
proval of the commission prior to construction. Changes subject to review 
range from demolition and major reconstruction to signs and new paint 
colors. Work executed without approval is cited in violation, and the com- 
mission is empowered to seek a legal action to remove any unauthorized 
alterations and restore former conditions. 

Boston Art Commission 

(Statute 1898, Chapter 410 Paragraphs 3,4,6; Special Statute 1919, 
Chapter 87 Paragraph 2, Statute 1953 Chapter 473 Paragraph 1; Revised 
Ordinance 1961 Chapter 4 Paragraph 8; Cross Reference: General Laws 
Chapter 41, Paragraphs 82-84; CBC 5-2) 

Since 1890, the Boston Art Commission has been curator of city-owned 
public art, responsible for its acquisition, siting, maintenance and inter- 
pretation. 

The commission reviews and approves all acquisitions of public art 
works, such as statues, paintings, sculptures, fountains and plaques. To 
groups and individuals planning or offering art for public places in 
Boston, the commission provides technical assistance at all stages of the 
process and approves of the final design and siting. The commission spon- 
sors competitions for proposed works of art for Boston neighborhood and 
downtown spaces. 

In 1987 the Art Commission began its Adopt-A-Statue Program a 
public/private effort to raise $1.2 million to restore and maintain Boston's 
outdoor public art. The program will provide funds to restore thirty-nine 
pieces of outdoor public art and also establish a permanent maintenance 
of sixty-nine major sculptures in the city. 

*The Boston Art Commission is jointly administered by the Environment 
Department and the Office of the Arts and Humanities. 

The Boston Conservation Commission 

CBCORD. 7-1 

Under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection act, M.G.L. c. 131 s. 40, 
local conservation commissions review construction projects and pro- 
posals for their effect on wetland resources including rivers, ponds, estu- 
aries, fresh-and salt-water marshes, the ocean, and land under these wa- 
ters. 

Boston's Conservation Commission guards the public interest in these 
resource areas to assure water supply and quality, fin and shellfish habitat, 
prevention of flood and storm damage, and protection of wildlife habitat. 
The commission also seeks to protect and preserve the open space and 
natural areas of the citv. 



81 



Boston Landmarks Commission 

(Chapter 772, Acts of 1975 as amended) 

The Boston Landmarks Commission is the city's historic preservation 
agency, created in 1975 to cover a wide range of activities directed toward 
protecting Boston's uniquely built environment. 

The commission is responsible under state law for: 

- architectural surveys of all the city's neighborhoods, relating each com- 
munity's history as recorded by its buildings and sites; 

- public education on architecture and historic preservation, including 
publications and exhibitions; 

- designation of landmarks and several categories of historic districts 
within the city through a process involving the preparation of technical 
study reports and public hearings. The result is a review process for 
changes to designated properties within limits set at the time of designa- 
tion. 

Any ten Boston voters may petition the commission to designate a land- 
mark, landmark district, architectural conservation district or protection 
area. Since the inception of the Landmarks Commission, the Bay State 
Road/Back Bay West Architectural Conservation District, Bay Village 
Historic District, Mission Hill Triangle Architectural Conservation Dis- 
trict, St. Botolph Street Architectural Conservation District and South 
End Landmarks District have been established. 

In 1983, the Landmarks Commission began a program to protect 
Boston's archaeological resources. Today, the Environment Depart- 
ment's City Archaeology Program manages the archaeological remains 
located on public and private land in Boston. The City Archaeologist is 
responsible for surveying and inventorying sites, managing artifact collec- 
tions and providing educational resources to Boston public schools. 



ENVIRONMENTAL ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT 

COMMISSION 

Richard lannella, Director 

152 North St. 

725-4896 

CBC ORD. 7-12 

a. There shall be within the City a Commission, to be known as the 
Environmental Ordinance Enforcement Commission which shall consist 
of the Commissioners of the Public Works Department, Inspectional 
Services Department, Parks and Recreation Commission, Police Depart- 
ment, the Real Property Commission, and the Office of Service Manage- 
ment, or their respective designees, ex officio, and, a representative of the 
Office of Neighborhood Services appointed by the Mayor to serve at his 
pleasure. 

b. Members shall serve without compensation and shall be deemed 
special municipal employees. 

c. The Commission shall concern itself with the enforcement of ordi- 
nances, rules and regulations which have been designated for enforce- 
ment under the provisions of section 21 D of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth and shall study the enforcement of other 



82 



ordinances, rules and regulations of the City which are liable for designa- 
tion for alternative non-criminal enforcement. The Commission shall ex- 
ist as a separate budgetary unit of the City, attached to the Office of 
Neighborhood Services, but shall report to the Mayor. 

d. A copy of each report and study made by the Commission shall be 
filed with the Citv Clerk and transmitted by the Clerk to the City Coun- 
cil. 

e. The Commission shall, subject to acceptance and/or appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council expend such monies (including gifts, 
grants, and grants in aid) as are made available, for the purposes desig- 
nated. 

f. The Commission shall, subject to approval of the Mayor, employ a 
person to be known as the Director of Ordinance Enforcement, who, 
together with the Director's agents, employees and designees, and to- 
gether with all others authorized in the ordinances, shall have authority 
to enforce all of the Environmental Ordinances of the City under the 
provisions of said section 21D, or by criminal complaint. Such of these 
persons as the Police Commissioner shall appoint as Special Police Offi- 
cers shall have, in addition, authority to enforce all violations authorized 
by the said Police Commissioner. 

g. Any such person doing the same or similar work in another Depart- 
ment or Agency who is transferred to the Commission shall retain all 
benefits, seniority, sick leave, vacation leave, and the like, as if their serv- 
ice were continuous in the prior department or agency. 

BOSTON FAIR HOUSING COMMISSION 

Office 957 

David J. Cortiella, Esq. Executive Director 

NiATHAN Allen 

Robert Gittens 

Rev. Michael Haynes 

Martin Nee 

Ana Rivera 

COMMISSIONERS 

The mission of the Fair Housing Commission is to eliminate discrimi- 
nation and increase access to housing in Boston through education, en- 
forcement, legal action, and interagency coordination. 

Commission staff, under the direction of the Executive Director, is re- 
sponsible for processing complaints of prejudice or discrimination in 
housing. It holds hearings, subpoenas witnesses, and otherwise fully in- 
vestigates charges of discrimination. The Commissioners reports find- 
ings, and, where appropriate, makes recommendations to the Massachu- 
setts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) and U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). It develops material to edu- 
cate Boston residents about discrimination and promotes equal access for 
all residents to new housing created with City assistance. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, CBC Ord. 10-3 



83 
FINANCE COMMISSION, BOSTON 

Jeffrey Conley, Director 

John L. Tobin, Chairman 

Office, 294 Washington Street, Room 817, 

Boston, 02108, Tel. 482-9706 

The Finance Commission is constituted under the Amended Charter 
of 1909. It consists of five commissioners appointed by the Governor and 
confirmed by the Executive Council, the term of each being five years. 
The Chairman of the Commission is named by the Governor. The mem- 
bers of the Commission, other than the chairman, serve without pay. 

It is the duty of the Commission to investigate, at its discretion, all 
matters relating to appropriations, loans, expenditures, accounts and 
methods of administration affecting the City of Boston or the County of 
Suffolk, or any of their departments, and to report upon its investigations 
from time to time to the Mayor, the City Council, the Governor or the 
General Court. 

The Commission is required to make an annual report, in January, to 
the General Court. It is also the duty of the Commission to report to the 
Mayor, the City Auditor or the City Treasurer as to the validity or proper 
amount of any doubtful payroll, bill or claim referred to it by them. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Finance Commission, Ch. 562, Acts of 1908; Ch. 486, s. 17, Acts of 
1909; Ch. 740, s. 3, Acts of 1964 

Duties, Ch. 486, s. 18-19, Acts of 1909; Ch. 261, Acts of 1948 

Referrals to Finance Commission by the Mayor, Auditor, or Collector- 
Treasurer, Ch. 486, s. 18-19, Acts of 1909 

Expenses, Ch. 894, Acts of 1965 

Powers, Penalties, Perjury, Depositions, Protection Against Self- 
incrimination, Ch. 486, s. 21, Acts of 1909 

Off Street Parking Facilities, Eminent Domain, Ch. 474, s. la, Acts of 
1946 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 
CBCOrd. 11-4 

115 Southampton Street, 02118 

[Stat. 1850, Chap. 262; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449, section 9-11; Rev. Ord. 
1898, Chap. 17; Stat. 1909, Chap. 308; Stat. 1912, Chap. 574; Ord. 
1912, Chaps. 4, 6; Ord. 1913, Chap. 1; Stat. 1913, Chap. 800; Stat. 
1914, Chaps. 519, 795; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 16; Ord. 1917, Chap. 
4; Ord. 1919, Chap. 2; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 60, 68; Stat. 1921, Chap. 
196; Stat. 1923, Chap. 309; Stat. 1939, Chap. 237; Ord. 1944, Chap. 
10; Stat. 1945, Chap. 413; Ord. 1959, Chap. 3.] 

Leo D. Stapleton, Fire Commissioner/Chief of Department 
John D. White, Chief of Operations 
Gerard J. Morgan, Executive Assistant 



84 



Jeremiah Donovan, District Chief, Assistant to the Commissioner 

Richard F. Finnigan, Executive Secretary 

Martin Fisher, Fire Marshal 

Martin Pierce, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief, Training and Research Division 

Robert E. Laing, District Chief Planning and Logistics 

Paul Callaghan, Deputy Fire Chief 

John E. Clougherty, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief 

Paul A. Christian, Deputy Fire Chief 

John R. Harrison, Deputy Fire Chief 

Gerald P. Hart, Deputy Fire Chief 

Vincent D. Kane, Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward P. Kenney, Deputy Fire Chief 

Kevin J. Mociien, Deputy Fire Chief 

Nino N. Tramontozzi, Deputy Fire Chief Director of Civil Defense 

Robert McCarthy, Superintendent, Fire Alarm/Special Services 

Division 
Dennis B. Flynn, Superintendent, Maintenance Division 

The Department's mission is to provide fire protection throughout the 
City of Boston by adequately employing, training, and equipping fire 
fighters at specific locations within the City. The Department is responsi- 
ble for extinguishing fires, and protecting lives and property. The Depart- 
ment responds to all alarms within the City, and to certain alarms outside 
the City on a mutual aid basis. The Department maintains a fire alarm 
communication system for dispatching and controlling fire apparatus. In 
addition, the Department is responsible for code enforcement and for 
investigating fire causes. 

The Department provides fire and emergency protection for Boston 
residents and property. In addition, similar protection is given to hun- 
dreds of thousands of people who use the City for employment, shopping, 
and recreation. To provide this protection, the Fire Department deploys 
34 engine companies, 21 ladder companies, one tower unit, two rescue 
companies, a Safety Division, and two marine units through a dispatching 
system maintained by the Special Services Unit. The City's mutual aid 
agreement with surrounding areas continues to benefit the City and the 
involved communities. The Fire Prevention Program provides public ed- 
ucation and inspections of residential and commercial properties; investi- 
gates suspected arson fires; provides staff support for the Arson Preven- 
tion Commission; and issues permits and licenses. 

The Boston Fire Department was organized in 1837. The department 
is under the command of Leo D. Stapleton, Commissioner/Chief of De- 
partment. The Fire Department, in addition to fire fighting duties, oper- 
ates the following offices and divisions: 

The Civil Defense Office, is responsible for maintaining and supervis- 
ing the Emergency Medical Assistance Program and the Heart Savers 
Program. Under the latter, thousands have been instructed in the tech- 
niques of providing emergency first aid to victims of heart attack. 

The Training and Research Division has a twofold function, to initiate 
and supervise the job development of the fire fighters and to conduct 
research programs to improve fire fighting techniques, apparatus and 
equipment use. 



85 



The Maintenance Division is responsible for the repairs, maintenance 
and preventive maintenance of all fire apparatus and automotive equip- 
ment. The division also provides the everyday upkeep of all buildings and 
grounds under the control of the Fire Department. The Maintenance 
Division operates, in addition to the main automotive shops, machine 
shops, a hose and canvas shop, carpenter, paint and plumbing shop, as 
well as a stockroom and a battery and ignition room. 

The Fire Prevention Division has the responsibility of coordinating all 
fire prevention activities within the city. Beyond routine in-service in- 
spections, the division also inspects places of assembly such as night 
clubs, restaurants, schools, sports arenas, nursing homes, as well as vacant 
buildings and gas stations. 

The Planning and Logistics Division is involved in many endeavors that 
affect the department's operations. The division is responsible for the 
deployment of apparatus, planning routes, developing a mutual aid plan 
and acquaints companies with marine firefighting techniques. 

The Fire Alarm Division, located in the Fenway, controls the dispatch- 
ing of and communications between apparatus, fire houses and Head- 
quarters. The division maintains and installs all communications equip- 
ment within the department as well as underground cable, fire alarm 
boxes, and overhead wires. 

Boston Firemen's Relief Fund 

By Chapter 308, Acts of 1909, amended by Chapter 134, Acts of 1911, 
and Chapter 186, Acts of 1949, the Fire Commissioner and 12 members 
of the Fire Department, to be elected annually by all the members are 
constituted a corporate body for the purpose of holding and administer- 
ing the Firemen's Relief Fund. 



THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION 

41 Berkeley Street, 02116 
[Stat. 1905, Chap. 448; Stat. 1908, Chap. 569; Stat. 1927, Chap. 40; Stat. 
1941, Chap. 212; Stat. 1953, Chap. 77; Stat. 1957, Chap. 119; C. C. 
Chap. 48, § 5.] 

MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION OF THE FR.ANKLIN FOUNDATION 

C. William Anderson, President 

Daniel J. Finn, Vice-President 

Rev. Rhys Williams, Vice-President and Secretary, Congregational 

Minister (ex officio) 
John F. Smith, Vice-President 
George Cuker, Treasurer 

Rev. Robert W. Golledge, Episcopalian Minister (ex officio) 
Hon. Raymond L. Flynn, Mayor of Boston (ex officio) 
Ralph H. Young 

Rev. Bruce Bueschel, Presbyterian Minister (ex officio) 
Lynda M. Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
John E. Drew 



86 



C. WILLIAM Anderson, Daniel J. Finn, John F. Smith, George Cu- 
KER, Ralph Young, Lynda M. Connolly, Lawrence S. DiCara, 
John E. Drew, Appointed by the Supreme Judicial Court. 

Richard P. D'Onofrio, President, Franklin Institute of Boston effective 

Sept. 1, 1990 

The Frankhn Institute is incorporated under Chapter 569 of the Acts of 
1908, a board of citizens being named therein to act for the City in the 
control of the Franklin Fund and in maintaining the Franklin Institute of 
Boston as an independent technical college for adults. 

The Franklin Fund is the proceeds of a bequest of one thousand 
pounds to "the Inhabitants of the Town of Boston in Massachusetts" made 
by Benjamin Franklin, in a codicil to his will dated June 23, 1789. The 
codicil provided that the fund "if accepted by the Inhabitants of the Town 
of Boston" be managed "under the direction of the Select Men, united 
with the Ministers of the oldest Episcopalian, Congregational and Pres- 
byterian Churches in that Town," who were to make loans on certain 
conditions to "young married artificers, under the Age of twenty-five 
years." 

Dr. Franklin, who died April 17, 1790, calculated that, in one hundred 
years, the thousand pounds would grow to one hundred and thirty-one 
thousand pounds "of which," he says, "I would have the Managers then 
lay out at their discretion one hundred thousand Pounds in Public Works 
which may be judged of most general utility to the Inhabitants . . . The 
remaining thirty-one thousand Pounds I would have continued to be let 
out on interest in the manner above directed for another hundred 
years ... At the end of his second Term, if no unfortunate accident has 
prevented the operation the sum will be Four millions and Sixty-one thou- 
sand Pounds Sterling, of which I leave one Million sixty-one Thousands 
Pounds to the Disposition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, and 
Three Million to the disposition of the Government of the state, not pre- 
suming to carry my views farther." The Town accepted the donation at a 
Town Meeting held June 1, 1790. 

A futile suit brought by the Franklin Heirs in 1891 prevented the divi- 
sion of the fund at the expiration of one hundred years; but on January 17, 
1894, by direction of the three ministers and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City which board claimed to be the successors of the "Selectmen", 
$329,300.48 {~ of the fund) was paid to the City Treasurer, for "the pur- 
chase of land and the erection thereon of the Franklin Institute of Boston 
and for the equipment of the same." Owing to a series of complications 
the money remained in the custody of the Treasurer. Mayor Collins, in 
1902, caused a petition of the City to be filed in the Supreme Judicial 
Court, praying for instruction as to the authority of the persons then act- 
ing as Managers of the fund. The Court rendered an opinion November 
25, 1903 (184 Mass. 373) to the effect that the three ministers were Man- 
agers of the fund under Franklin's will, but that the Aldermen did not 
succeed the "Selectmen" as Managers and had no powers with reference 
to it. The Court, under its general power to care for public charitable 
funds, appointed, on March 16, 1904, nine Managers to take the place of 
the "Selectmen" and provided in the decree of the Court, that the Mayor 
of Boston should be one, ex officio. Successors to the other eight are ap- 



87 



pointed by the Court. In 1908 the Franklin Fund Managers were incorpo- 
rated as The Frankhn Foundation by the special act already referred to 
which was clarified by amendments in 1927 and 1953. In 1931 the Court 
held the incorporation to be constitutional, since it did not change the 
composition or duties with respect to the Franklin Fund of the Board of 
Managers, and answered various questions which had been raised (276 
Mass. 549). 

On December 2, 1905, the City Treasurer received from Mr Andrew 
Carnegie $408,396.48, said sum being equal to the amount of the ex- 
pendable portion of the Franklin Fund in August, 1904, which Mr Carne- 
gie agreed to duplicate. 

On November 17, 1927, $100,000 was received by the Foundation 
from the estate of the late James J. Storrow, the income to be used for 
maintenance of Franklin Institute of Boston. 

In 1906 the City appropriated $100,000, raised by a 20-year loan, to 
purchase a building site of about 16,000 square feet at the corner of Ap- 
pleton and Berkeley Streets. On January 31, 1907, the amount available 
to be "laid out" by the Managers was $438,741.98 and in that year the 
Franklin Union Building was erected and equipped at a cost of 
$438,528.80. It was opened in September, 1908, as a Technical Institute 
to train young men and women for positions of supervision in industry. In 
1941 the name was legally changed to Franklin Technical Institute. In 
1957, the Board of Collegiate Authority of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts voted to confirm the action of the Members of the Franklin 
Foundation to confer the Degree of Associate in Engineering upon quali- 
fied graduates of the Institute. 

In 1961, the name of the school was again changed to Franklin Institute 
of Boston. It is maintained partly by tuition fees ($2,403,445 for the fiscal 
year 1989), and income from the previously mentioned funds (i.e., the 
Andrew Carnegie donation and the Storrow bequest). The Franklin Un- 
ion Building contains eleven classrooms, two drafting rooms, one shop, 
fourteen laboratories, library, and offices. There is also an auditorium 
with a seating capacity of 927. 

A second building, acquired in 1960 at 4 Appleton Street, contains four 
classrooms, two laboratories, one shop, and two offices. Three hundred 
adult students received instruction at evening sessions and four hundred 
in day courses during the school year of 1989. 

In 1982 the Institute completed an expansion that added an adminis- 
tration building and automotive laboratories and classrooms in a triangu- 
lar area bounded by Berkeley, Tremont and Appleton Streets. 

The Franklin Fund (Second Part) will become available in 1991. 



88 



FREEDOM TRAIL COMMISSION 



Room 714, City Hall 
[Stat. 1965, Chap. 625. 



OFFICIALS 



Warren Berg, Chairman 

Joseph F. Casazza, Vice Chairman 

Robert R Meiiegan, Executive Secretary 



Members Nominated by 

Warren Berg Freedom Trail Foundation, Inc. 

Joseph F. Casazza Mayor's Selection 

Lawrence Dwyer Mayor's Selection 

Richard A. Dimino Mayor's Selection 

Robert Cumings Freedom Trail Foundation, Inc. 

There shall be in the public works department, or in such other depart- 
ment as the city council, with the approval of the mayor, shall from time to 
time determine, but not subject to the supervision or control of the officer 
or board in charge of such department, a board, to be known as the Free- 
dom Trail Commission, consisting of five commissioners appointed by the 
mayor, each for a term expiring on the first Monday of the January follow- 
ing the next biennial municipal election at which a mayor is elected, two 
of whom shall be so appointed from a list of seven candidates nominated 
by the Freedom Trail Foundation, Inc. The commission shall elect a 
chairman and vice chairman, who shall be members thereof, and a secre- 
tary, who need not be a member thereof The members of the commission 
shall serve without compensation. 

The freedom trail commission shall from time to time, after due notice 
and a public hearing, designate a route in the city, not over three miles in 
length, along which the public may walk and pass not less than twelve 
historic places. The city may from time to time appropriate moneys for 
the suitable delineation of such route by such means as the commission 
shall from time to time recommend. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HOSPITALS 

818 Harrison Avenue 

Boston, Massachusetts 02118 

Tel. 534-5000 

BOARD 

Judith Kurland, Commissioner James Hooley, Chairman 

Michael Mullane Steven Tierney 

Alexander Bok Antonio Molina 

Phyllis Cater Robert Guen, D.M.D. 
Rep. Kevin Fitzgerald 



89 



A Board of Health was first established in 1799 under a special statute 
of February 13, 1799. It was abolished by the first City Charter and from 
1822 to 1872 its functions were exercised through the City Council. 

A Board of Health was re-established by an ordinance of December 2, 
1872. It published annual reports beginning with 1873. 

By Chap. 1, Ord. 1914, 2d Series, the board was replaced by a Health 
Commissioner. Chap. 1, Ord. 1915, provided that the quarantine service 
should pass from the control of the Health Department when certain 
property was leased to the United States, in effect June 1, 1915. 

Ord. 1927, Chap. 1 abolished the Boston Sanatorium Department and 
placed the Tuberculosis Sanatorium at Mattapan under the jurisdiction of 
the Boston City Hospital Trustees and transferred all other powers and 
duties as well as the Out-Patient Department to the Health Commis- 
sioner. 

The Boston City Hospital was opened on June 1, 1864. 

The Relief Stations were closed to patients on March 15, 1938, but on 
October 15, 1945, the East Boston Relief Station was opened on a 24- 
hour basis. 

The Convalescent Home in Dorchester was closed in March, 1932. 

By Ord. 1954 the Institutions Department was abolished; and the 
powers and duties and appropriations of said department in relation to 
the commitment of the insane to Long Island and the institutions thereon 
were transferred to the Hospital Department. 

Chapter 656 of the Acts of 1965, accepted January 6, 1966, created the 
Department of Health and Hospitals — merging the former Health De- 
partment and former Hospital Department. The Board of Health and 
Hospitals by this same statute was incorporated as the Trustees of Health 
and Hospitals of the City of Boston and authorized to hold real and per- 
sonal estate to an amount not exceeding $10,000,000. 

The mission of the Health and Hospitals Department (DH&H) is to 
meet the health care needs of the residents of the City of Boston with 
particular focus on the poor and uninsured communities and their health 
and human service needs. The Department also strives to develop a con- 
tinuum of services directed to community needs that includes preventive, 
primary, outpatient, acute, chronic, community health, and ambulance 
programs. 

The Department operates three hospitals: Boston City, Long Island, 
and Mattapan. These facilities provide inpatient health services. An Am- 
bulatory Care Center and an extensive network of neighborhood health 
centers provide residents with essential ambulatory and preventive care 
in their home communities. Department-wide goals have been estab- 
lished to: 

• Reorganize community health and medical care services to reach 
more individuals and reduce disparities of outcome across neighbor- 
hoods. 

• Develop community-based care programs targeting areas of excess 
mortality and morbidity, and to reorder child and maternal programs 
to broaden and improve delivery of services. 

• Do more with less by reducing overtime and consolidating positions 
through redefinition and restructuring. 



90 

• Expand the utilization of education and training. 

• Increase recruitment and retention of minorities and women. 

• Broaden external funding for existing and anticipated programs 
through coordinated efforts of the Urban Health Institute. 

• Acquire an HIS system and move in the direction of sharing MIS 
resources throughout DH&H. 

• Continue the master plan for Long Island and Mattapan Hospitals. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Creation and Empowerment of Health 6- Hospitals, Trustees Corpora- 
tion, Ch. 656, Acts on965 

Care During Temporary Sickness, CBC St. 12 s. 5 
Chronic Disease, CBC St. 12 s. 6 
Care of Observation Cases, CBC St. 12 s. 7 

BOSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 

52 Chauncy Street, 02111 
[Gen. Laws, Chap. 121B, Sees. 1 to 59] 

By enactment of Chapter 88 of the Acts of 1989 ("Chapter 88"), ap- 
proved May 23, 1989, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) is managed 
and controlled by an administrator who is appointed by and serves at the 
pleasure of the Mayor. 

Effective as of November 13, 1984, Mayor Flynn appointed Doris 
Bunte as Administrator, with "the power and authority to act as the May- 
or's agent with respect to all matters affecting the BHA, including without 
limitation the power to execute any and all documents as needed with 
such matters." 

The BHA Monitoring Committee, comprised of nine members, includ- 
ing five public housing tenants, is appointed by the Mayor to periodically 
review matters relating to the management and performance of the BHA 
and to report thereon to the Mayor. 

The BHA was established by the Mayor and the City Council, in Octo- 
ber of 1935, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, chapter 
121, sees. 26 I et seq. 

The object of the public housing program administered by the BHA is 
to provide low-rent housing for low-income families and for elderly per- 
sons of limited income. 

To insure this purpose, the BHA has established specific policies gov- 
erning eligibility both for admission to and continued occupancy of all its 
public housing developments. 

Housing developments are built and operated either with federal or 
state financial assistance. The federal program dates back to the initial 
occupancy of the Mary Ellen McCormack Houses in May of 1938. State 
legislation, in 1948, initiated the state-aided program. 

The Boston Housing Authority has under management 25 federally 
aided and 8 state-aided developments for low-income families. 

Also under management, in its program of specialized housing for the 
elderly, are 35 federally aided and 2 state-aided developments. 

The location and number of dwelling units of these housing programs 
are noted in the following tables. 



91 



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93 



HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION 

James Williams, Executive Director Barbara DeCristoforo 

LiBBY Ciiiu, Chairperson Jaime Rodriguez 

William F. McDonougii, Esq. Dermot Meagher 

Office, 716 City Hall Ext. 3562 

The mission of the Boston Human Rights Commission is to create a 
more accessible and harmonious atmosphere within the City. The Com- 
mission works to ensure access to public services and accommodations, 
to enforce the Boston Human Rights Ordinance (which prohibits dis- 
crimination and harassment), and to educate residents about their civil 
rights. 

The Boston Human Rights Commission makes referrals, receives and 
investigates complaints, and resolves cases through mediation and adju- 
dicatory hearings. The Commission educates the public about their 
rights and obligations under the Boston Human Rights Ordinance. In 
addiition, the Commission advocates in support of human rights issues in 
coordination with municipal. Commonwealth, and federal agencies, with 
particular focus on the linguistic and minority communities in Boston. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation CBC ORD. 12-9 

Powers and Duties of Executive Director, CBC ORD. 1 2-9. 1 

Procedures, CBC ORD. 12-9.12 

INSPECTIONAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

1010 Massachusetts Avenue 5th Floor 
Boston, MA 021 18 

department ORGANIZATION 

Peter Welsh, Executive Director 

Thomas J. McNicholas, Acting Commissioner 

Leo F. Martin, Deputy Commissioner 

Margarette J. Dukes, Business Manager, Administration 

Gary Moocia, Assistant Commissioner, Building 6- Structures 

Frank Frattaroli, Assistant Commissioner, Regulatory Services. 

Daniel F. Kent, Director, Building Inspection 

Arthur Shaughnessy, Supervisor of Mechanical Inspections 

Daniel Clifford, Supet-visor of Electrical Inspections 

The Inspectional Sei-vices Department reviews, monitors and inspects 
construction projects within the City of Boston to assure that building 
safety standards and zoning requirements are fulfilled. The Department 
also maintains and promotes the public health and welfare by enforcing 
food preparation and service regulations, housing codes, accurate 
weights and measures, and animal and rodent control regulations. 

The Department provides protection to the public by enforcing all ap- 
plicable construction codes and processing all construction plans and 
applications for conformance with existing codes. The Department also 
enforces statutes and regulations authorized by the Commonwealth and 
by local government. 



94 



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95 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Establishment, CBC Ord. 9-9 

Building and Structural Regulation, State Building Code, St. 1972, c. 
802 

Housing Inspection, CBC Ord. 9-1, State Sanitary Code, 105 CMR 400- 
419 

Health Inspection, State Sanitary Code, 105 CMR 590-595, CBC 9-1.2 

Weights ir Measures, Ch. 50, s. 1-6, Acts of 1817; CBC St. 9, s. 10; CBC 
Ord.9-2 

Animal Control, MGLA C. 140, s. 137, 141, 151a; CBC Ords. 16-1.9, 
14-5 

Rodent Control, State Sanitary Code, 105 CMR 140 

Board of Appeals, CBC St. 9, s. 150-152; CBC Ord. 9-4 

Board of Examiners, CBC St. 9, s. 350; CBC Ord. 9-8 

Committee on Licenses, CBC Ord. 14-2.1 

DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION 

The Building Department was established bv Chapter 280 of the Acts 
ofl871. 

"An Act to Provide for the regulation and Inspection of Buildings, 

the More Effectual Prevention of Fire and the Better Protection of Life 

and Property in the City of Boston." 
and came into being on October 2, 1871. 

This act, with various revisions and amendments, controlled the erec- 
tion and alteration of buildings and related maters until July 16, 1892, 
when it was superseded by Chapter 419 of the Acts of 1892. This act, 
although amended from time to time, remained in effect until August 1, 
1907, when it was superseded by Chapter 550 of the Acts of 1907, which 
remained as the Building Law of the City of Boston until 1943. 

Chapter 479 of the Acts of 1 938 as amended, 

"An Act for the Codification, Revision and Amendment of the Laws 
Relative to the Construction, Alterations, and Maintenance of Build- 
ings and Other Structures in the City of Boston." 

was passed by the Legislature on June 27, 1938, with the provision that it 
take effect upon its acceptance by the Boston City Council, whereupon 
the Council proceeded to hold a series of public hearings on proposed 
amendments submitted by architects, builders, property owners, and var- 
ious civic organization. As a result of these hearings numerous amend- 
ments to the act were accepted by the Council. It was approved by the 
Council in 1943. Since 1943 the code has undergone several minor and a 
number of major amendments or revisions. 

On January 1, 1975, the Massachusetts State Building Code, Chapter 
802, Acts of 1972, as amended, went into effect in the City of Boston and 
superseded all previous codes. 

The Massachusetts State Code now places upon the Inspectional Ser\- 
ices Department the duty of inspecting the erection, alteration, repair, 
moving, or demolition of all buildings or structures, except those specifi- 
cally exempt, i.e.. Buildings Constructed by Federal, State or other gov- 
ernmental authorities. 



96 



The department administers the zoning regulations formulated and 
adopted by the Boston Zoning Commission under authority of Chapter 
665 of the Acts of 1956. These regulations, which became effective on 
December 31, 1964, superseded the original Zoning Act of June 5, 1924. 
The provisions of Chapter 143 of the General Laws, insofar as they are 
applicable to the City of Boston, are administered by the Inspectional 
Services Department. The department inspects and certifies all places of 
assembly such as stores, restaurants, taverns, dance halls, and places of 
similar occupancy accommodating fifty or more persons. 

Also placed in the department by ordinances of the City Council, but 
not under the control or supervision of the Inspectional Services Com- 
missioner except in the matter of communicating with the Mayor and 
submitting annual reports of their activities, are the Board of Appeal, the 
Board of Examiners, the Board of Zoning Adjustment and the Zoning 
Commission. 

Chapter 610 of the Acts of 1955 in order to promote the general welfare 
of the public and to maintain the area as a landmark in the history of 
architecture and as a tangible reminder of the old Boston as it existed in 
the early days of the Commonwealth created the Historic Beacon Hill 
District; it further established in the Building Department the Beacon 
Hill Architectural Commission, which Commission has the duty of pass- 
ing on the appropriateness of all changes in the exterior architectural 
features of buildings in the Historic Beacon Hill District. 

In 1982 all Historic Districts supervision was turned over to Land- 
marks Division of the Environment Department, 805 City Hall. Applica- 
tions are still screened through Inspectional Services Department as 
shown: 



HISTORIC DISTRICTS 

There are in the City of Boston several historic districts and their re- 
spective commissions set up to establish and monitor building activity in 
various areas of the city. They are as follows: 

Beacon Hill Wards 3, 5 

Back Bay Wards 4, 5 

Bav Village Ward 5 

South End Wards 3, 4, 8, 9 

St. Botolph Area Ward 4 

Bay State Road Wards 4, 5 

Mission Hill Triangle Ward 10 

No permits are issued before applications are stamped with appropri- 
ate designation from one of the Historic District commissions or their 
designee in I.S.D. that no exterior architectural feature is involved. If 
hearings and or approvals are required by any of the commissions. Build- 
ing Permits will not be issued until such approvals are received. 



97 



RODENT CONTROL PROGRAM 

Samuel C. Wood, Director 

As of July, 1986, the Rodent Control Program became a division of the 
Inspectional Services Department of the City of Boston. 

The principal goal of the ISD Rodent Control Program is to reduce 
rodent infestation and its causative conditions throughout the City of 
Boston to a point where rats will not be able to thrive and do not exert a 
public health or economic effect in our communities. 

The program's methods include educating and organizing communi- 
ties to proper sanitation practices, implementing code enforcement pro- 
ceedings where noncompliance of the state Sanitary Code is identified. 

We supplement these activities with an intensive rat-killing program. 
When active rat infestation is identified, licensed pest control operators 
perform the necessary rat-killing. Throughout the various phases of the 
program's activity, clean-ups are encouraged and initiated with the partic- 
ipation of various community groups. 

ANIMAL CONTROL UNIT catches and confines dogs and other ani- 
mals that are not properly licensed, leashed or wearing identification and 
rabies vaccination tags. The Unit also investigates complaints against 
noisy and/or vicious dogs and complaints of animal cruelty or neglect. 
Animals without identification tags are held by ISD for seven days; then 
they can be reclaimed by their owners or adopted by others. 

DIVISION OF HEALTH INSPECTIONS investigates eating and 
drinking establishments, food sellers and facilities used to process, store 
or transport food to enforce state standards of cleanliness, and to ensure 
that the food is safe for human consumption. Health inspectors will per- 
form investigations in response to complaints and they investigate reports 
of sickness caused by contaminated food. The Health Inspection Division 
also inspects hospitals, nursing/rest homes, day care centers, pools and 
bathing beaches. 



DIVISION OF HOUSING INSPECTIONS investigates rental housing 
units to ensure they meet the provisions of the State Sanitary Code, in- 
cluding provision regulating apartment heat. Such inspections may be 
requested by tenants. Housing inspectors will also investigate complaints 
that privately owned properties are not being properly maintained or that 
rubbish is not being properly disposed of. The division inspects vacant 
apartments within 30 days of rental. It also implements the city's program 
of cleanup on privately owned vacant lots. 

In addition. Chapter 143 of the General Laws, insofar as applicable to 
Boston, is administered by the Inspectional Services Department Com- 
missioner under delegated authority from the State Commissioner of 
Public Safety. 

The primary purpose of the public safety regulations promulgated un- 
der this chapter is to establish a minimum code of safety for the entire 



98 



state. Cities and towns may make further exactions in accordance with 
local building ordinances and not inconsistent with law, but in no case 
may the provisions of state law be avoided or minimized. 

The law falls with particular force on all places of assembly — restau- 
rants, taverns, dance halls, meeting halls and all places of similar occu- 
pancy in which fifty or more persons may be accommodated. Lodging 
houses and apartment houses in which there are eight or more rooms 
above the second floor, or in which ten or more persons are accommo- 
dated above the second floor come also within the provisions of this Act. 
All such buildings must be certified by the Inspectional Services Depart- 
ment Commissioner as to compliance with these particular regulations in 
addition to the Code requireliients. 

On May 1, 1954, in accordance with Ordinances of 1954, Chapter 2, 
Section 30, the powers, duties, appropriations and personnel of the elec- 
trical Inspection Division of the Fire Department were transferred to the 
Building Department (now ISD). 

By Chapter 2 of the Ordinances of 1954 the Board of Appeal, the Board 
of E.xaminers, and the Committee on Licenses were placed in the Build- 
ing Department and the Board of Zoning Adjustment and the Zoning 
Commission were placed in the said Department by Revised Ordinances 
of 1961, Chapter 9, Section 9 and 10, but none of said Boards, Commis- 
sion or Committee is subject to the supervision or control of the Building 
Commissioner, but unless otherwise ordered by the Mayor none of said 
Boards, Commission or Committee shall communicate with the Mayor or 
make any annual or other report, except through the Building Commis- 
sioner 

Licenses for gas filters are not issued bv the Gas Regulatory Board (Ch. 
623, Acts 1962). 

Ch. 254, Acts 1965, became effective May 5, 1965. Under its provisions 
the Electrical Code of the City of Boston was repealed and the Massachu- 
setts Electrical Code(G. L., Ch. 143, S. 3L) was substituted therefor 



COMMITTEE ON LICENSES 

1010 Massachusetts Avenue 
CBCOrd. 14-2.1 

COMMITTEE 

Thomas J. McNicholas, Acting Inspectional Services Department, 

Commissioner, ex officio 

Richard Dimino, Transportation Department Commissioner, ex officio 

Leo D. Stapleton, Fire Commissioner, ex officio 

William W. Keddy, Secretary 

The Committee on Licenses is in the Inspectional Service Depart- 
ment. This committee shall have the powers and perform the duties con- 
ferred or imposed on the board of street commissioners by Chapter 148 of 
the General Laws, as amended, by Chapter 577 of the Acts of 1913, as 
amended, by Chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, as amended, and by Chap- 
ter 349 of the Acts of 1953, as amended. 



99 

Board of Appeal 
Room 204, City Hall 

(Building Code: Statute 1972, Chapter 802, as amended, and the 

Boston Zoning Code: Statute 1956, Chapter 665, Section 8, as 

amended.) 

CBC Ords. 9-4; 9-9.5; 9-5.1; 5-5/lOA 

OFFICIALS 

Richard Dennis, Sr., Chairman 
Carol McDonougii, Executive Secretary 

THE board 

Members Nominated by Term ending 



Boston Society of Architects 

Chid-MingSze Boston Society of Civil Engineers May 1, 1993 

Building and Construction Trades Council of 
James Farmer The Metropolitan District May 1, 1984 

Richard Dennis Sr, Massachusetts Real Estate Board May 1, 1990 

Master Builders Association 

Alfred Gross Building Trades Employer's Association May 1, 1991 

Associated General contractors of Massachusetts, 
Inc 

Paul Parks Mayor's selection Mav 1, 1992 



The Board consists of five members appointed by the Mayor in the 
following manner: One member from two candidates, one to be nomi- 
nated by the Greater Boston Real Estate Board and one by the Massachu- 
setts Association of Real Estate Board; one member from two candidates, 
one nominated by the Boston Society of Architects and one by the Boston 
Society of Civil Engineers; one member from three candidates, one to be 
nominated by the Master Builder's Association, one by the Building 
Trades Employers' Association, and one by the Associated General Con- 
tractors of Massachusetts, Inc.; one member from two candidates nomi- 
nated by the Building and Construction Trades Council of the Metropoli- 
tan District; and one member selected by the Mayor. The term of office is 
five years. Each member is paid $200 per diem for actual service, but not 
more than $24,000 in any one year for the aggregate services rendered by 
him under building code and zoning law. 

Board of Examiners 
Room 204, City Hall 

[Sat. 1912, Chap. 713; Ord. 1912, Chap. 9; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 8; Ord. 
1920, Chap. 10; Ord. 1952 Chap. 5; Stat. 1938, Chap. 479 as amended 



100 



bv Orel. 1943; Stat. 1945, Chap. 626; Stat. 1952, Chap. 212; Ord. 1952, 
Chap. 6; Ord. 1954, Chap. 2, § 22. CBC Ords. 9-8, 9-9.5, 5-510A] 

OFFICIALS 

Maura Sweeney Doyle, Chairperson 
Carol McDonougii, Executive secretanj 

THE board 
Alexander MacLeod Term e.xpiring May 1, 1990 

Joseph Fallon Term expiring May 1, 1991 

Maura Doyle Term expiring May 1, 1992 

The Board of Examiners, as an adjunct of the Building Department, 
was established in 1912. It consists of three members appointed by the 
Mayor, the duty of said members being to act upon the qualifications of 
persons desiring to be registered as construction superintendents in the 
City of Boston. Under the law the personnel of the Board includes an 
architect or engineer, a contractor, and a lawyer. Compensation for 
services by said members is established at one hundred fifty dollars a 
day, the yearly salary not to exceed fifteen thousand dollars. 

CBC Ord. 18-1.2 
22. Builder's or Mechanic's License. The fee for an application for a 
license granted by the Board of Examiners under Section 120 of Chap- 
ter 479 of St. 1938 and classified by said Board under paragraph (c) of 
said section as an ABC license shall be fifty ($50.00) dollars; provided, 
that the fee for an application for a renewal of such a license shall be, if 
paid on or before or within thirty (30) days after the expiration date of 
the license renewed, thirty ($30.00) dollars, otherwise, thirty-five 
($35.00) dollars. The fee for an application for any other license or com- 
bination of licenses granted by the Board of Examiners under said Sec- 
tion 120 shall be forty ($40.00) dollars; provided, that the fee for an 
application for a renewal of such license, for which the fee is paid on or 
before or within thirty (30) days after the expiration date of the license 
renewed, shall be thirty ($30.00) dollars, otherwise, thirty-five ($35.00) 
dollars. No license shall be issued under this section until the licensee 
shall have certified that he owns a copy of the State Building Code. The 
fee to be charged by the Board of Examiners for the replacement of any 
lost license shall be five ($5.00) dollars. Each fee fixed by this clause 
shall include the cost of the photograph of the licensee contained in the 
license. The Board of Examiners may refund, only in the case of an 
applicant who takes and fails the qualifying examination, but in no other 
case, one-half ('/2) of the fee paid. 



101 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DIVISION 

1010 Massachusetts Avenue 
[Chap. 656, Act of 1965; CBC Ords. 9-2; 18-1.23 ss. 4 &5] 

John r. Lynch, Sealer 

Charles Distefano, Chief Deputy Sealer 

Jane Young, Principal Clerk 

The duties of the division are set forth in the General Laws, 
Chapters 94 through 98, 101 and 885, with amendments and 
additions thereto. 

The Sealer is required to give public notice annually by adver- 
tisement to all persons having places of business in the city and 
using weighing and measuring devises for the purpose of buying 
or selling goods, wares or merchandise, for public weighing or 
for hire or reward, to bring them into his office to be tested and 
sealed. After giving the said notice, he shall visit the places of 
business not complying and shall test, adjust, seal, or condemn 
in accordance with the results of the tests made on the weighing 
and measuring devices of said person. In addition the division is 
charged with the enforcement of all laws relative to the licensing 
of hawkers, peddlers, and transient vendors; the giving of false or 
insufficient weight or measure; the reweighing of coal and road- 
building materials; the reweighing or remeasuring of merchan- 
dise packaged in advance of sale and the inspection of standard 
containers as to the size, shape, dimensions, and capacity. The 
division also enforces the Unit Pricing Law. The division makes 
investigations of all complaints registered with the division rela- 
tive to the above duties and when the evidence warrants, shall 
prosecute the violators. 



102 

Zoning Commission 
Ninth Floor, City Hall 

[Stat. 1956, Chap. 665; Stat. 1957, Chap. 408; Stat. 1958, Chap. 77; 
Stat. 1960, Chap. 652; Rev. Ords. 1961, Chap. 9, § 10; Stat. 1964, 
Chap. 244; Stat. 1966, Chap. 193; Stat. 1972, Chap. 802 § 66; Stat. 
1973, Chap. 296; stat. 1974, Chap. 669; stat. 1987, Chap. 371] 

Boston Zoning Code, Adopted March 29, 1963; Filed with Clerk of 
Senate April 1, 1963; Effective December 31, 1964 

OFFICIALS 

Richard B. Fowler, Chairman 

Robert L. Mark, Vice-Chairman 

Linda S. Bourque, Advisor 

Marguerite Hildebrand, Secretary 



Members Nominated by Term ending 



Edward D. Casey Massachusetts Motor Truck Association, Inc .... May 1, 

Edward J. D'Agostino Mayor's Selection May 1, 

Robert L. Fondren Boston Society of Architects May 1, 

Richard B. Fowler Greater Boston Real Estate Board May 1, 

Joseph W. Joyce Greater Boston Massachusetts Labor Council 

AFL-CIO. . Mayl, 

Robert L. Marr Master Builders Association of Boston May 1, 

Joan McGrath Mayor's Selection May 1, 

Fernando J. Domenech, Jr, Mayor's Selection May 1, 

Seat vacant Associated Industries of Massachusetts May 1, 

Seat vacant Boston Society of Civil Engineers May 1, 

Brent E. Shay Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce May 1, 



986 
987 
987 



977 
991 
992 
988 
987 
993 



103 



The Commission consists of eleven commissioners appointed by the 
Mayor subject to confirmation by the City Council as follows: one com- 
missioner from two candidates nominated by the Associated Industries of 
Massachusetts, one commissioner from two candidates nominated by the 
Greater Boston Massachusetts Labor Council, AFL-CIO, one commis- 
sioner from two candidates nominated by the Greater Boston Real Estate 
Board, one commissioner from two candidates nominated, one by the 
Boston Society of Architects and one by the Boston Society of Landscape 
Architects, one commissioner from two candidates nominated by the 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers, one commissioner from two candi- 
dates nominated by the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, one 
commissioner from two candidates nominated by the Massachusetts Mo- 
tor Truck Association, Inc., one commissioner from two candidates nomi- 
nated by the Master Builders Association of Boston, and three commis- 
sioners selected at large by the Mayor, one of whom shall own alone or 
with one or more other persons, and shall occupy in whole or in part as his 
place of residence, a dwelling house having not more than three dwelling 
units. All zoning commissioners shall be residents of Boston. The term of 
office is for three years and the commissioners serve without compensa- 
tion. 

The commissioners may adopt a zoning regulation and from time to 
time amend it upon petition or otherwise, by the concurrent vote of not 
less than seven of its members, after a public hearing following advertise- 
ment. 

The Zoning Commission may adopt a zoning regulation for the pur- 
pose of promoting the health, safety, convenience, morals, or welfare of 
the inhabitants of the City of Boston. 

A zoning regulation shall be designed among other purposes to lessen 
congestion in the streets; to conserve health; to secure safety from fire, 
panic and other dangers; to provide adequate light and air; to prevent 
overcrowding of land; to avoid undue concentration of population; to fa- 
cilitate the adequate provision of transportation, water, sewerage, schools, 
parks and other public requirements; to conserve the value of land and 
buildings; to encourage the most appropriate use of land throughout the 
city; and to preserve and increase its amenities. 

Votes of the Zoning Commission adopting a zoning regulation or 
amendment thereof shall be subject to the same provisions of law in re- 
spect to approval by the Mayor as orders or votes of the City Council of 
the city, except that the concurrent vote of not less than nine members of 
the Zoning Commission shall be necessary to pass such a regulation or 
amendment over the veto of the Mavor. 



104 



LAW DEPARTMENT 



Room 615, Citv Hall 
[C.B.C., Ordinances 5-5.'25, 5-8.1, 5-8.2] 

Joseph 1. Mulligan, Corporation Counsel 

Albert W. Wallis, First Assistant Corporation Counsel 

Richard Probert, Office Manager 

Stephen Clark, Chief of Fiscal Affairs 

Joseph Tehan, Chief of Litigation 

Michael Bolden, Bureau Supervisor (Civil Rights) 

Kelam Derderian, Co-Bureau Supervisor (Government) 

John Devereaux, Bureau Supervisor (Urban Affairs) 

Walter Maguire, Co-Bureau Supervisor (Torts & Claims) 

DiANNE Taylor, Co-Bureau Supervisor (Government) 

Assistant Corporation Counsel 

Nancy Albano Daniel Sumption 

Robert Cohen Mark Sweeney 

Michelle Fuseyamore Steven Venezia 

Mary Kelley ' Bill Walsh 

Henry Luthin John Walsh 

Catherine O'Brien Marsha Weinerman 

Stephen Pfaff Susan Weise 
Gerard Pugsley 



Senior Legal Assistants 



Andrew Laudate 
Albert Manwaring 



William Pidgeon 
Peter Rabinovitz 



Special Assistant Corporation Counsel 



Charles Abate 
David Achenbach 
Marcia Adams 
Patricia Bass 
Tom Bradley 
Christopher Burke 
Stephanie Carter 
Susan Coyne 
James Creamer 
Danna Crowley 
Marien Evans 
David Gallogly 
John Giuliani 
Deborah Goddard 
Lori Grunberg 
Judy Hamlet 
James Hart 
Kevin Joyce 



Gerry Kelley 
Daniel Larner 
Marie Lawlor 
Kevin McDermott 
Anne McDonald 
Paul McGill 
Donna Mueller 
Kathy Palmer 
Dean Papademetriou 
Nicholas Poser 
John Reilly 
Paul Roche 
James Rose 
Howard Russell 
David Ryan 
Joan Schraeder 
Susan Whalen 



105 



The Office of Attorney and Solicitor was established in 1827, and su- 
perseded by the Office of City Solicitor in 1866. In 1881 this office was 
abolished and replaced by the Law Department under the sole authority 
of the Corporation Counsel. 

The Corporation Counsel has supervisory authority over all City attor- 
neys and legal affairs. The Law Department consists of twenty-two Assist- 
ant Corporation Counsel, four Senior Legal Assistants and a team of sup- 
port personnel, and there are thirty-five Special Assistant Corporation 
Counsel appointed by the Corporation Counsel and assigned to other 
agencies in City government. 

The Law Department has general charge of all City's legal affairs, and 
represents the City of Boston and the County of Suffolk in all litigation to 
which they are a party. The Department provides a comprehensive array 
of legal services: formal and informal opinions to the Mayor, the City 
Council, the Boston School Committee, and City or County officials and 
other employees in matters relating to the discharge of their official du- 
ties; and representation for these individuals and entities in litigation of 
all types. Additionally, the Law Department reviews all City and County 
contracts, pursues claims on behalf of the City through affirmative litiga- 
tion, initiates foreclosure proceedings on tax delinquent properties, and 
conducts a program which provides technical assistance to citizens and 
others with problems concerning immigration, residency status, and nat- 
uralization. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRABY 

Central Library Building, Copley Square, 02116 

[Stat. 1878, Chap. 114; Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 24; C. C, Title IV., Chap. 
23; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 21; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chap. 116; Spec. 
Stat. 1931, Chap. 50; Spec. Stat. 1943, Chap. 218, Spec. Stat. 1953, 
Chap. 167.] 



OFFICIALS 



Kevin F. Moloney, Esquire 
William M. Bulger 
Arthur Curley 
Jamie A. McGlone 



President 
Vice-President 
Director and Librarian 
Clerk of the Corporation 



TRUSTEES* 



Robert W. Consalvo 
William O. Taylor 
Arthur F. F. Snyder 
William M. Bulger 



Term ending May 1, 1991 
Term ending May 1, 1993 
Term ending May 1, 1994 
Term ending May 1, 1990 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, five in number, 
are appointed by the Mayor, one each year, for a term of live years. They 
were incorporated in 1878, and authorized to receive and hold real and 
personal estate to an amount not exceeding $1,000,000. This amount was 
changed to $10,000,000 in 1919, to $20,000,000 in 1931, and to 



*The Trustees serve without compensation 



106 



$50,000,000 in 1953. The first Trustees were appointed under an ordi- 
nance of October 14, 1852. 

The original Hbrary building on Boylston Street was opened to the pub- 
lic in September, 1858, and closed finally in January, 1895. The Central 
Library Building in Copley Square was first opened on March 11, 1895. A 
500,000 square foot addition to the Central Library Building was opened 
on December 12, 1972. 

The library is maintained by an annual appropriation made to the Trust- 
ees by the City Government. 

The annual reports, the first of which appeared in 1852, have been 
continued without interruption. 

THE LIBRARY SYSTEM 

The library system consists of the Central Library in Copley Square, 
the Kirstein Business Branch in the Edward Kirstein Memorial Library 
Building at 20 City Hall Avenue, twenty-five Branch Libraries, and exten- 
sion services which provide deposit collections and service to home- 
bound individuals. 

The component parts of the library system are the following: 

General Administrative Offices 

Community Library Sendees 

Research Library Services 

Resources and Processing Services 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 

The general administration of the library system as a whole is centered 
in the Director's Office. There is also administered from the Director's 
Office the work of the Personnel Office, the Information and Publication 
Office, the work of resources development, as well as the Business Opera- 
tions including: 

Accounting 

Bindery 

Buildings 

Business 

Duplicating 

Systems and Data Processing 

COMMUNITY LIBRARY SERVICES 
These services are administered from the Central Library in Copley 
Square, which houses a 750,000-volume, open-shelf, circulating collec- 
tion, an Audio-Visual Center, and Access Center for the Disabled, and 
Adults', Young Adults', and Children's Sections. City-wide services are 
also provided by the twenty-five Branch Libraries and an extension serv- 
ices department which provides deposit collections and service to home- 
bound individuals. 

The Branch Libraries and extension services distributed throughout 
the city are as follows: 

CENTRAL LIBRARY 
Copley Square, 536-5400 



107 

branch libraries 

City Proper: 

North End, 25 Parmenter St., 227-8135 
South End, 685 Tremont St., 536-8241 
West End, 151 Cambridge St., 523-3957 

Brighton: 

Brighton, 40 Academy Hill Road, 782-6032 
Faneuil, 419 Faneuil St., 782-6705 

ClIARLESTOWN: 

Charlestown, 179 Main St., 242-1248 

Extension Services, 380 Bunker Hill Street, 241-8961 

Dorchester: 

Adams Street, 690 Adams St., 436-6900 

Codman Square, 690 Washington St., 436-8214 

Fields Corner, 1520 Dorchester Ave., 436-2115 

Lower Mills, 27 Richmond St., 298-7841 

Mattapan, 8-10 Hazleton St., 298-9218 

Uphams Corner, 500 Columbia Rd., cor. Bird St., 265-0139 

East Boston: 

East Boston, 276 Meridian St., 569-0271 
Orient Heights, 18 Barnes Ave., 567-2516 

Hyde Park: 

Hyde Park, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St., 361-2524 

Jamaica Plain: 

Connolly, 433 Centre St., 522-1960 

Jamaica Plain, 12 Sedgwick St., cor South St., 524-2053 

ROXBURY: 

Dudley, 65 Warren St., 442-6186 

Egleston Square, 2044 Columbus Ave., 445-4340 

Grove Hall, 5 Crawford St., 427-3337 

Parker Hill, 1497 Tremont St., 427-3820 

South Boston: 

South Boston, 646 East Broadway, 268-0180 
Washington Village, 1226 Columbia Rd., 269-7239 

West Roxbury: 

Roslindale, 4238 Washington St., 323-2343 
West Roxbury, 1961 Centre St., 325-3147 



108 



RESEARCH LIBRARY SERVICES 
The public service areas include individual departments in the Central 
Library as well as the Kirstein Business Branch, which is located in down- 
town Boston. 

Kirstein Business Branch, 20 City Hall Ave., 523-0860 
Research Library Departments, Copley Square, 536-5400 
Fine Arts 

Government Documents 
Humanities 

Literature and Languages, 

Religion, Philosophy, and Psychology 

Music 

Newspapers and Microtext 

Prints 

Rare Books and Manuscripts 

Science 

Technology 

Patents 
Social Sciences 

Economics 

Education 

History 

Maps and Geography 

RESOURCES AND PROCESSING SERVICES 
This division is responsible for the acquisition and processing of all 
library materials and for their integration into the collections of the Li- 
brary. The division is made up of two units: 
Processing 
Resources and Acquisitions 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 

Lectures, concerts, films, and special programs are among the full 
schedule of events held in the Central Library. Several annual lecture 
series and special seasonal events bring distinguished scholars and writ- 
ers to the Boston Pubhc Library each year Exhibits in the Main Lobby, 
the Cheverus Room, the Cushman Room, and in the Puvis de Chavannes, 
Sargent, and Wiggin Galleries in the Central Library building afford op- 
portunities for emphasizing the Library's valuable resources. 

The BPL Calendar of Events listing all activities in the Central Library 
and Branches is distributed free throughout the system each month. 

STATISTICAL DATA 

Employes (in full time equivalents) 579 

Number of Volumes (includes prints, maps, docs., etc.) . . 25,993,970 
Trust Funds, approximate value $15,000,000 



109 



LICENSING BOARD 

Room 809, City Mall 
[Stat. 1906, Chap. 291; Stat. 1909, Chap. 423; Stat. 191S, Chap. 259; Stat. 
1921, Chap. 59; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 392, and 485; Stat. 1926, Chap. 
299; Stat. 1933, Chaps. 97, 284 and 376 (Chap. 376 is now the new 
Chap. 138 of the General Laws); General Laws, Chap. 140, §§ 2 and 
202.] 

OFFICIAL.S 

Thomas W. Stanton, Chairman 
Patricia A. Malone, Secretary 

THE BOARD 

Thomas W. Stanton Term ends in 1996 

Richard L. Arrington Term ends in 1992 

Gerald J. Morrissey Term ends in 1994 

The Licensing Board for the City of Boston was established by Statutes 
of 1906, Chapter 291. It consists of three members appointed by the 
Governor with the advice and consent of the Council. They must be citi- 
zens of Boston who have resided in Boston for at least two years preceding 
the date of their appointment. The two principal political parties must be 
represented on the Board and the term of the members is fixed at six years 
after the first appointment, which was for six, four, and two years. The 
Board was created to exercise all the powers and perform all the duties 
conferred upon the Board of Police of the City of Boston relative to intoxi- 
cating liquors (now called alcoholic beverages), innholders, common vict- 
uallers, billiard and pool tables, sippio tables, bowling alleys, intelligence 
offices and picnic groves. 

By Statute of 1909, Chapter 423, the Board was given the right to issue 
licenses to "Sunday dealers in ice cream, or confectionary, or soda water 
or fruit." (Repealed see c. 616 Acts of 1962.) 

By Statutes of 1918, Chapter 259, the Board was granted the right to 
issue licenses to lodging houses. 

By Statutes of 1922, Chapter 392, the Board was given the right to 
license "retail vendors of soft drinks." 

By Chapter 284 of the Acts of 1933, the Board was given authority to 
grant victuallers licenses to clubs, societies, associations or other organi- 
zations which dispense food and beverages on their premises, to their 
stockholders or members and their guests and to no others. 

By Chapter 376 of the Acts of 1933, now Chapter 138 of the General 
Laws, the Board was given the authority to issue alcoholic beverage li- 
censes to common victuallers, innholders, taverns, clubs, and retail drug- 
gist and package stores, and to suspend or revoke the same after a hearing. 

By Statutes of 1953, Chapter 622, in addition to the notice which the 
Licensing Board for the City of Boston is required b\' law to give to the 
public concerning applications for licenses, under Sections 12, 15 or 30A 
of Chapter 138 of the General Laws, and applications for transfer of loca- 
tion of said licenses, it shall also give notice of such applications to the 
state representatives of each representative district affected b\- the appli- 
cation, and also to such persons, groups and organizations as have for- 



110 



mally requested in writing that such notice be given thenn for Hcense 
applications in a designated representative district 

By Statutes of 1966, Chapter 729, the authority to grant employment 
office licenses, with the exception of "not for profit class" of employment 
agency, was transferred to the Department of Labor and industries of the 
Commonwealth. 

By Statutes of 1969, Chapter 59, Sections 41 to 46, inclusive of Chapter 
140 of the General Laws was repealed; and in Section 202 of said Chapter 
140, the words, "keepers of intelligence offices" to be stricken out. 

By Statutes of 1971, Chapter 486, the Licensing Board for the City of 
Boston was designated as the "Local Licensing Authority" under the pro- 
visions of said chapter (beano bill). 

[Note: Roller skating rinks, merry-go-rounds, etc., were transferred to the 
Mayor's Office by Chap. 169 of the Acts of 1936. The licensing of 
the sale of denatured alcohol for mechanical, manufacturing, and 
chemical purposes, under Section 76 of Chap. 138 of the General 
Laws, was eliminated bv Section 43 of Chap. 440 of the Acts of 
1935.] 

DEPARTMENT OF THE MAYOR 

Office, 511 City Hall 

[Stat. 1885, Chap. 266; Stat. 1895, Chap. 449; Stat. 1904, Chap. 450; Stat. 
1905, Chap. 341; Stat. 1906, Chap. 259; Stat. 1907, Chaps. 274, 463; 
C. C, Title II., Chap. 3; Stat. 1908, Chaps. 292, 494; Stat. 1909, 
Chap. 486; Stat. 1910, Chap. 373, Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1912, 
Chap. 550; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 280, 367, 788; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 274, 
730; Spec. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 184, 348; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 94; 
Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 75; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 6, 312, 613; Stat. 1921, 
Chaps. 169, 407, 497; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 35, 399, 521; Stat. 1924, 
Chaps. 453, 479; Stat. 1930, Chap. 167; Stat. 1938, Chap. 300; Stat. 
1945, Chaps. 4, 8; Rev. Ord 1947, Chap. 2; Stat. 1948, Chap. 452; 
Stat. 1951, Chap. 376.] 

RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor, 

ANN THERESA DWYER, 

MARGARET MORRISON, Administrative Assistants 
KATHLEEN McPHERSON, Appointments Secretary 
JOSEPH F. FISHER, Special Assistant to Mayor 
ROBERT W. CONSALVO, Manager, office of the Mayor 



AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Chief Executive Officer, CBC St. 2, s. 1; CBC St. 5, s. 100 

Election and Duration of Term, CBC St. 2, s. 3 

Administrative Powers and Duties, CBC St. 2, s. 7; CBC St. 5, s. 101- 
102; CBC Ord. 2 generally 

Legislative Powers and Duties, CBC St. 2, s. 750; CBC St. 2, s. 12, 15-16 

Fiscal Powers and Duties, CBC St. 6, s. 251, 253; Ch. 190, s. 15, Acts of 
1982 (Tregor Legislation) as amended by Ch. 701. s. 2, Acts of 1986 (Tre- 
gor Amendments) 



Ill 



COMMISSION ON MENTAL RETARDATION 
CBC Ord. 12-5 

There shall be in the City a Board, known as the Commission on Mental 
Retardation, consisting of the Commissioner of Parks and Recreation and 
the Commissioner of Health and Hospitals, ex officiis, or their respective 
designees, and thirteen (13) persons appointed by the Mayor, each for a 
term expiring on the first Monday of the January following the next bien- 
nial municipal election at which a Mayor is elected. In making the ap- 
pointments to be made by him, the Mayor shall give consideration to the 
appointment of persons associated with, or representative of, the Division 
of Social and Rehabilitation Services in the Federal Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare; the Area Director for Community Mental 
Health and Retardation Area VI in the Commonwealth, the Division of 
Special Education in the City's School Department, and the Greater 
Boston Association for Retarded Children; and nine (9) inhabitants of the 
City who are parents of retarded children and indicate a willingness to 
serve on the Board. 

The Mayor shall, from time to time, designate one of the members of 
the Board as Chairman. The Vice-Chairman shall be elected by the Board 
by majority vote. The Board may appoint a clerical assistant. 

All members of the Board shall serve without compensation, but shall 
be reimbursed for expenses necessarily incurred in the performance of 
their duties. 

(Ord. 1970 c. 1; Ord. 1971 c. 5; Rev. Ord. 1961 (Sup. 1971) c. ISA § 1; 
CBC 1975 Ord. T12 § 200) 
Cross References: Statutes, Title 12 § 1. 

It shall be the duty of the Commission on Mental Retardation to meet 
at least once each month; to coordinate to the fullest possible extent the 
work of all public and private agencies dealing with the problems beset- 
ting the parents of children who are mentally retarded and assisting re- 
tarded children in any manner; to bring about a continual dialogue and 
exchange of views between Federal, State, and local agencies concerned 
with the effective administration of programs for the mentally retarded; to 
conduct either independently or in conjunction with the School Commit- 
tee of the City or any other appropriate agency such education programs 
as the Board deems necessary; to coordinate the existing recreational 
programs for retarded children and to initiate where appropriate new and 
innovative recreational programs for retarded children. The board shall 
issue an annual report of its activities to the Mayor and City Council and 
shall at all times be free to suggest new programs for the City and request 
proper financing for such programs as the Board feels feasible for the 
program and the Citv's needs in the areaof mental retardation. 
(Ord. 1970 c. 1; Rev. Ord. 1961 (Sup. 1971) c. ISA § 2; CBC 1975 Ord. 
T12§201) 
Cross References: Ord. ss 5-5.32; Statutes, Title 7 §§ 109, 110. 



112 



Boston Municipal Research Bureau, Inc. 
24 Province Street 
Boston, MA 021 08 
(617)227-1900 

OFFICERS 

John P. Hamill, Chairman 
Robert L. Beal, Vice Chairman 
Joseph E. Mullaney, Vice Chairman 
Richard A. Soden, Treasurer 
Samuel R. Tyler, Executive Director 

The Boston Municipal Research Bureau is a non-profit, member- 
supported research organization established in 1932 to study Boston's 
financial management and administrative problems. Independent and 
nonpartisan, the Bureau provides objective analysis and basic informa- 
tion in an effort to promote more efficient, economical and responsible 
government for Boston. 

The Bureau operates with a full-time staff of four The Board of Directors, 
50 of Boston's most prominent business and civic leaders, provides sup- 
port and expertise as the Bureau addresses a wide range of city issues. 
The Bvn^eau's continuous presence, objective analysis and credibility en- 
ables it to play a stong role in shaping the direction of Boston's public 
policy. Over the years. Bureau recommendations have led to new policies, 
new laws and important management improvements for Boston. 



113 



OFFICE OF NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES 

(An Office of the Mayor) 

John Riordan, Acting Director 

Office 709 

The Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services facilitates the delivery of 
services to residents of the City of Boston and encourages the active par- 
ticipation of neighborhood residents in local decision making and other 
activities to improve the quality of life in their neighborhood. The major 
initiatives of the Office are: streamlining and monitoring of City service 
delivery; communicating to neighborhood residents pending decisions 
by departments and regulatory agencies; encouraging broad based in- 
volvement from neighborhood groups on neighborhood development and 
service issues; expanding neighborhood rezoning efforts; and responding 
to constituent and emergency calls on a 24 hour basis. 

The Office of Neighborhood Services has five programs that provide 
services to the residents of Boston. The Administration Program provides 
support services for the four other programs, and disseminates informa- 
tion to neighborhood groups concerning pending regulatory decisions. 
The Basic Service Delivery Program facilitates the delivery of City serv- 
ices and encourages the participation of neighborhood residents in pro- 
grams designed to improve their neighborhoods. The program also moni- 
tors the effectiveness of the service or program, and oversees the delivery 
of services to linguistic minority residents of the City of Boston through 
the Office's liaison staff The Neighborhood Service Program facilitates 
the active participation of neighborhood residents and organized civic 
groups in development and planning activities in their neighborhoods, 
primarily through neighborhood meetings and structured participatory 
mechanisms such as Neighborhood Councils and Planning and Zoning 
Advisory Committees. The Constituent/24 Hour Services Program acts 
as a referral office for constituent requests and provides access to emer- 
gency services on a 24 hour basis. The Neighborhood Information Pro- 
gram communicates the services, programs, and initiatives of the Office 
and City to elected officials and neighborhood residents. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

ESTABLISHING AN OFFICE OF CONSTITUENT SERVICES, 
CBC Ord. 15-4 

ESTABLISHING AN OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES, 
CBC Ord. 15-6 



114 



OLD SOUTH ASSOCIATION IN BOSTON 

310 Washington Street, 02108 
[Stat. 1877, Chap. 222, §§1,2.] 

The Mayor, ex officio. Councillors Bruce C. BolUng and Maura Henni- 
gan Casey, Managers on the part of the City of Boston. 

The association is managed by a Board of Managers, consisting of 
twenty-nine, of whom the Mayor of the City of Boston is one ex officio, two 
are elected annually by the City Council for the municipal year, and the 
others are chosen as provided by statute. 

The business of the Association is the operation of the Old South Meet- 
ing House on Washington Street as a historical monument. 

PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION 
Room 816 

Lawrence A. Dwyer, Commissioner of Parks and Recreation, 
Chairman. 

Victoria Williams, Assistant Commissioner of Parks and Recrea- 
tion. 

William Doherty, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recrea- 
tion. 

Herbert Gleason, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recrea- 
tion. 

Charles Titus, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recreation. 
William Walczak, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recrea- 
tion. 

Archie Williams, Associate Commissioner of Parks and Recrea- 
tion. 

OFFICIALS 

Lawrence A. Dwyer, Covimissioner 
Patrick S. Harrington, Deputy Commissioner 
Victoria Williams, Assistant Commissioner 
John F. Ruck, Executive Secretary 
Stanley Ivan, Chief Engineer 

The first Board of Park Commissioners was appointed on July 8, 1875. 
The Board consisted of three members who served without compensa- 
tion. As thus constituted, the department continued up to 1913, when, by 
the provisions of Chapter 10, Ordinances of 1912, it was merged with the 
Public Grounds, Bath and Music Departments, under the name of Park 
and Recreation Department. In 1920, the Cemetery Department was 
merged with the Park Department, the latter title being substituted for 
Park and Recreation Department. On May 1, 1954, the department be- 
came the Parks and Recreation Department. The four Associate Commis- 
sioners serve without compensation. 



115 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY NOTES 

The attached Boston Parks and Recreation Department inventory is 
organized in two parts: 

The first part hsts all the facilities which are in the jurisdiction of the 
Boston Parks and Recreation Department. These are arranged as follows: 

Signature Parks 

F. L. Olmsted's Emerald Necklace Park System 

Parks 

Playgrounds 

Play Areas 

Squares, Malls and Misc. Open Spaces. 

Cemeteries 

The second part lists Community Gardens and Urban Wilds in Boston 
regardless of their ownership. (Current ownership for each facility has 
been mentioned) 
I 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE NAMES OF FACILITIES WHICH ARE 
MARKED WITH AN "*" HAVE ACREAGE WHICH HAS BEEN IN- 
CLUDED WITH SOME OTHER FACILITY AND SHOULD NOT BE 
INCLUDED IN ANY TOTALING OF ACREAGE. 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF SIGNATURE PARKS 



NAME 



NEIGHBORHOOD 



ACRES 



Boston Common 
Commonwealth Ave. Mall 
Public Gardens 



Back Bay/Beacon 
Back Bay/Beacon 
Back Bay/Beacon 



51.00 
32.00 

24.25 



INVENTORY OF E L OLMSTED'S EMERALD NECKLACE 
PARK SYSTEM 



NAME 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


ACRES 


Back Bay Fens 


Fenway/Kenmore 


78.58 


Columbus Park 


South Boston 


57.00 


Franklin Park 


Roxburv 


427.00 


Jamaica Pond 


Jamaica Plain 


109.35 


Olmsted Park 


Jamaica Plain 


58.81 


Riverway 


Fenway/Kenmore 


28.22 



116 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF PARKS 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

Arborway Jamaica Plain 17.39 

Carroll Pond Playground West Roxbury 0.47 

Christopher Columbus Park Central Boston 4.30 

Dorchester Park South Dorchester 28.45 

Eliot North Park Central Boston 0.99 

Fidelis Way Park Allston Brighton 5.06 

Gallagher Mem. Park Allston Brighton 16.01 

Highland Park Roxbury 3.64 

Horatio Harris Park Roxbury 2.36 

Malcolm X (Wash.) Park Roxbury 15.35 

Savin Hill Park North Dorchester 8.20 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF PLAYGROUNDS 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

American Legion Plgd East Boston 3.38 

Barry Playground Charlestown 5.72 

Billings Field West Roxbury 10.83 

Carter Playground South End 5.02 

Cassidy Playground Allston Brighton 9.44 

Ceylon Park Roxbury 4.53 

Charlestown High Charlestown 6.02 

Clemente Field (Lee)* Fenway/Kenmore 5.00 

Clifford Playground Roxbury 7.60 

Crav\'ford St. Playground Roxbury 2.64 

Cronin Park South Dorchester 2.24 

Doherty Playground Charlestown 4.30 

Doherty-Gibson Plgd South Dorchester 5.86 

Draper Playground West Roxbury 5.76 

E. Boston Mem. Stadium East Boston 17.67 

Fallon Field Roslindale 7.57 

Calvin Park (Rogers) Allston Brighton 8.20 

Garvey Playground South Dorchester 5.33 

Hannon Playground Roxbury 1-69 

Harambee Mattapan 45.60 



117 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF PLAYGROUNDS 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

Hardiman Playground Allston Brighton 1.48 

Healy Playground Roslindale 9.63 

Hemenway Playground • . . . .South Dorchester 4.40 

Hunt (Almont) Playground Mattapan 17.81 

Hynes Playground West Roxbury 6.42 

lacono Playground Hyde Park 5.00 

Jefferson Playground Jamaica Plain 1.10 

Langone Park Central Boston 2.10 

Lee Playground South Boston 5.20 

LoPresti Park East Boston 10.67 

Marcella (Connolly) Park Roxbury 5.20 

McConnell Park North Dorchester 6.30 

McKinney Playground Allston Brighton 5.94 

McLaughlin Playground Jamaica Plain 11.54 

Mission Hill Playground Jamaica Plain 2.75 

Murphy Playground Jamaica Plain 3.17 

Noyes Playground East Boston 8.31 

Orchard Park Roxbury 2.49 

Parkman Playground Roslindale 2.06 

Pinebank Play Area* Jamaica Plain 0.00 

Portsmouth St. Playground Allston Brighton 4.29 

Puopolo Playground Central Boston 4.81 

Ramsay Park (Derby Park) South End 5.50 

Ringer Playground Allston Brighton 12.38 

Roberts Playground South Dorchester 10.20 

Ronan Park South Dorchester 11.65 

Ross Playground Hyde Park 13.03 

Rotch Playground South End 2.79 

Ryan Playground Charlestown 12.38 

Smith Playground Allston Brighton 14.00 

Sweeney Playground South Boston 0.47 

Walker Playground Mattapan 8.91 

Walsh Playground South Dorchester 6.97 

Wright Golf Course Roslindale 158.50 



118 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF PLAY AREAS 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

Amatucci Playground Hyde Park 0.47 

Beauford Play Area Roxbury 0.09 

Beeeher St Play Area Jamaica Plain 0.18 

Beetho\en Sch. Play Area West Roxburv 0.77 

Bradford St ' South End. .' 0.04 

Brewer/Burroughs Tot Lot Jamaica Plain 0.97 

Buckley Playground South Boston 0.65 

Byrne Playground South Dorchester 1.16 

Caldwell Play Area Charlestovvn 0.10 

Charter St Playground Central Boston 0.25 

Chester Park.' South End 0.68 

Childrens Park Roxbury 0.21 

Clarendon Tot lot Back Bay/Beacon 0.33 

Cook St Play Area Charlestown 0.10 

Corbett Park South Dorchester 0.94 

Cuttilo Park Central Boston 0.29 

DeFilippo Playground Central Boston 1.13 

Deer St Park North Dorchester 0.20 

Douglas Court Play Area Central Boston 0.01 

Downer Ave Playground North Dorchester 0.78 

Edgerly Road Playground Fenway/Kenmore 0.11 

Edgeworth St Play Area* Charlestown 0.40 

Edwards Playground Charlestown 1.29 

Erie-Ellington St Plgd Roxbury 0.12 

Eustis St Play Area Roxbury 0.23 

Flaherty Park South Boston 0.23 

Flaherty Playground Ro.xbury 0.32 

Foster St Play Area Central Boston 0.10 

Gateway Park Central Boston 0.13 

Gibbons Playground Jamaica Plain 0.10 

Hanson St Play Area South end 0.07 

Haverhill Playground* Charlestown 0.00 

Hayes Park South End 0.29 

Hobart St Play Area Allston Brighton 0.60 

Hooker St Playground Allston Brighton 1.00 

Howes Playground Roxbury 1.88 

Humboldt Plaza Roxbury 0.62 

Independence Square South Boston 6.40 

Jeep Jones Park Roxbury 1.63 

Joyce Playground Allston Brighton 1.31 

King School Park Roxbury 1.18 

King St Play Area Roxbury 0.32 

L Street Beach South Boston 7.10 



119 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF PLAY AREAS 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

Lambert (Don) Ave Plgd Roxbury 0.68 

Little Scobie Playground Roxbury 0.79 

Lond & Decatur Sts East Boston 0.L3 

Martin (Hilltop)Pldg South Dorchester L32 

McLean Playground East Boston 0.43 

Miranda Playground North Dorchester 0.20 

Monsg. Reynolds Plgd South End 0.32 

Mozart St Playground Jamaica Plain 0.81 

Mt. Pleasant Ave Roxbury 0.26 

Mt. Bowdoin Green South Dorchester 0.58 

Myrtle St Play Area Back Bay/Beacon 0.17 

Norton St Playground South Dorchester 0.06 

O'Day Playground South End 0.70 

Pagoda Park Central Boston 1.47 

Paris St Playground East Boston 1.27 

Penniman St Play Area Allston Brighton 0.94 

Peters Park South End 3.30 

Phillips St Plav Area Back Bav/Beacon 0.13 

Plympton St Spray Pool South End 0.09 

Polcari Playground Central Boston 0.40 

Porth Norfolk Park South Dorchester 0.12 

Porzio Park East Boston 2.38 

Prebble Circle Plgd South Boston 0.33 

Quincy St Play Area Ro,\bury 0.54 

Quincv/Stanlv Play Area North Dorchester 0.38 

Ringgold Park South End 0.38 

Ripley Playground South Dorchester 0.86 

Rutherford Ave Play Area Charlestown 0.21 

Ryan Play Area North Dorchester 0.64 

Saratoga St Play Area East Boston 0.23 

Shubow Park Allston Brighton 0.60 

South St Mall Jamaica Plain 0.44 

Sumner & Lamson St Plgd East Boston 0.48 

Symphony (Morville) Park Fenwav/Kenmore 0.50 

fhetford St Playground Mattapan 0.69 

Thornton St No. 134 Roxbury 0.06 

Titus Sparrow Park South End 1.55 

Trotter School Plgd Roxbury 1.30 

Walnut Park Plav Area Ro.xburv 0.32 

White Fund Plgd No 31 Roxbury 0.40 

Winthrop Playground Roxbury 1.57 

Worcester St Playground South End 0.00 



120 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF SQUARES, MALLS, & MISC. OPEN SPACES 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

Adams Park (Rosl. Square) Roslindale 0.78 

Alan Crite Park South End 0.01 

Alberta St Play Area West Roxbury 1.10 

Algonquin Square South Dorchester 0.04 

Allen Park North Dorchester 1.29 

Ames Square Back Bay/Beacon 0.05 

Amory Square Back Bay/Beacon 0.33 

Andrew Square South Dorchester 0.05 

Angell Memorial Square Central Boston 0.15 

Blackstone Square South End 2.41 

Braddock Park South End 0.09 

Brighton Square Allston Brighton 0.57 

Brophy Park East Boston 0.69 

Brucew'ood St West Roxbury 0.80 

Brunswick-King Play Area Roxbury 0.85 

Cardinal Cushing Park Central Boston 0.33 

Carleton & Canton* South End 0.50 

Carleton & Holyoke* South End 0.50 

Cedar Square Ro.xbury 0.60 

Centervale Park South Dorchester 0.22 

Central Square East Boston 0.92 

Charlesgate Wbst Fenway/Kenmore 1.07 

City Square Charlestown 0.20 

Cleary Square Hyde Park 0.10 

Concord Square South End 0.11 

Copley Square Back Bay/Beacon 1.88 

Coppens Square North Dorchester 0.30 

Copps Hill Terrace Central Boston 0.60 

Cummingham Park Allston Brighton 0.17 

Curlev Memorial Plaza Central Boston 0.24 

Custom St Play Area South End 0.02 

Dartmouth St Mall Back Bay/Beacon 1.11 

Decatur & Meridian Park East Boston 0.30 

Denton Square Roxbury 0.08 

Dock & Faneuil Hall Central' Boston 0.92 

Duffie Square West Roxbury 0.05 

Elm Hill Park Roxbury . . .' 0.16 

Emmel Square Roslindale 0.02 

Essex Square Charlestown 0.02 

Evans Way Park Fenway/Kenmore 1.95 

Everett Square North Dorchester 0.03 

Fens Rose Garden* Fenway/Kenmore 0.00 

Fern Square Allston Brighton 0.04 

Florida St Reservation South Dorchester 0.56 

Foley Square Hyde Park 0.01 

Forsythe Park Fenway/Kenmore 0.99 



121 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF SQUARES, MALLS, & MISC. OPEN SPACES 

NAME NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES 

Franklin Square South End 2.42 

Gaston Square* Fenway/Keninore 0.00 

Hanlon Square Jamaica Plain 0.04 

Harvard Mall Charlestown 0.85 

Hayes Square Charlestown 0.11 

Heath Square Jamaica Plain 0.06 

Hillside St Play Area Roslindale 0.44 

Jackson Square Allston Brighton 0.10 

Jones Square Hyde Park 0.01 

Joslin Park -. Fenway/Kenmore 0.31 

Kane Square North dorchester 0.04 

Kenmore Square Fenway/Kenmore 0.13 

Kittredge Park Roxbury 0.13 

Laviscount Plaza Roxbury 0.62 

Lincoln Square Central Boston 0.06 

Lincoln Square South Boston 0.22 

Linwood Park Roxbury 0.03 

Mahoney (Hyde) Square Jamaica Plain 0.07 

McGann Park* Roslindale 0.38 

Mothers Rest* Fenway/Kenmore 0.80 

Mullen Square North Dorchester 0.24 

North Square Central Boston 0.08 

O'Donnell Square South Dorchester 0.14 

Oak Square Allston Brighton 0.22 

Oak-view Terrace Jamaica Plain 0.12 

Old City Hall Grounds Central Boston 0.18 

Olsen Square South Dorchester 0.02 

Paul Gore St Jamaica Plain 0.74 

Paul Revere Mall .Central Boston 0.76 

Peabody Square South Dorchester 0.04 

Piemonte Park West Roxbury 0.09 

Prescott Square East Boston 0.28 

Public Ground Roxbury 0.06 

Public Grounds Allston Brighton 0.02 

Puddingstone Park Roxbury 0.33 

Putnam Square East Boston 0.27 

Quinn Way West Roxbury 0.03 

Rossmore/Stedman Park Jamaica Plain 0.08 

S.E. Library Park South End 0.09 

Savage Mini Park Roslindale 0.02 

Scaramella (Maverick) Sq East Boston 4.39 

Soldier's Monument Jamaica Plain 0.13 

St Stephen Square Fenwav/Kenmore 0.01 

Statler Park Central Boston 0.25 

Sullivan Square* Charlestown 0.33 

Tremlett Square South Dorchester 0.16 



122 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF SQUARES, MALLS, & MISC. OPEN SPACES 



NAME 



NEIGHBORHOOD 



ACRES 



Tubman Square South End 

Union Park South End 

Union St Play Area South End 

Vose Square South Dorchester , 

Waltham Square South End 

Warren Square Roxbury 

Watson Park South End 

Webster Square Hyde Park 

Wellesley Park South Dorchester 

West Rutland Square* South End 

Westland Ave Gates* Fenway/Kenmore 

Williams Square Hyde Park 

Winthrop Square Charlestovvn .... 

Wolcott Square Hyde Park 

Wolf Square Roxbury 

Wood\^■orth Square Hyde Park 

Worcester Square South End 



05 
37 
22 
05 
07 
03 
47 
01 
66 
17 
03 
02 
88 
01 
02 
01 
,37 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
INVENTORY OF CEMETERIES 



NAME 



NEIGHBORHOOD ACRES STATUS 



Bennington Street Cemetery . .East Boston 3.62 

Bunker Hill Cemetery CharIesto\\'n 0.42 

Central Cemetery Back Bay/Beacon 1.39 

Copp's Hill Cemetery Central Boston 2.04 

Dorchester North Cemetery. . .North Dorchester 3.27 

Dorchester South Cemetery. . .South Dorchester 2.19 

Eliot Cemetery Roxbury 0.79 

Evergreen Cemetery Allston Brighton 13.88 

Fain ievv Cemeter\ Hyde Park 44.20 

Granary Burial Ground Back Ba\/Beacon 1.88 

Havves Cemetery South Boston 0.26 

Kings Chapel Cemetery Central Boston 0.67 

Market Street Cemetery Allston Brighton 0.41 

Mt. Hope Cemetery Roslindale 125.00 

Phipps Street Cemetery Charlestown 1.76 

South End South Cemetery . . .South End 1.48 

Union Cemetery South Boston 0.1 ^ 

Walter Street Cemetery Roslindale • 

Westerly Cemetery West Roxbury 0.90 



Historic 

Historic 

Hist., National 

Hist., National 

Hist., National 

Hist., National 

Hist., National 

Hist., National 

Active 

Hist., National 

Hist., 

Hist., National 

Hist., National 

Active 

Hist., National 

Historic 

Historic 

Historic 

Hist., National 



Register 
Register 
Register 
Register 
Register 
Register 

Register 

Register 
Register 

Register 



Register 



123 



BOSTON 
INVENTORY OF COMMUNITY GARDENS 



NAME NEIGHBORHOOD JURISDICTION ACRES 

10 Jospehine St CG South Dorchester BUG 0.08 

29 Jospehine St CG South Dorchester BUG 0.00 

32 Bullard Street Garden South Dorchester BNAF 0.00 

33 Bullard Street CG South Dorchester BUG 0.10 

4-H Busybody's Garden Roxbnry BNAF 0.15 

Alexander St Garden North Dorchester Private 0.15 

Back to the Roots Garden Roxbnry Private 0.00 

Barry St Garden South Dorchester BUG 0.09 

Berkeley Gardeners Ass South End BRA 0.85 

Bessie Barnes Garden South End BRA 0.15 

Boston Food Coop Allston Brighton MDC 0.10 

Boston State Hospital Mattapan State 0.00 

Bromley Heath Jamaica Plain BHA 0.00 

Bunker Hill CG Charlestown BHA 0.00 

C. Wealth Tenants Assoc* Allston Brighton BHA 0.00 

Charles River CG* Allston Brighton MDC 0.33 

Charlestown-Hathon Charlestown Boy & Girls Club 0.10 

Charlestown-Sulli\an Charlestown BRA 0.33 

Chestnut Hill Allston Brighton MDC 0.31 

Christian Herter Garden* Allston Brighton MDC 0.50 

Common Ground Co-op Roxbury BNAF 0.00 

Cooper's Place Roxbury BNAF 0.32 

E. Brookline & St. George South End BRA 0.15 

Earth Song Garden Roxbury COB 0.00 

Faneuil Dream Garden* Allston Brighton BHA 0.00 

Fanny Lou Hamer Farm South Dorchester Private/COB 0.42 

Golden Age Center Central Boston BRA 0:00 

Green Village South Dorchester BNAF 0.00 

Greenwood CG South Dorchester BNAF 0.20 

Harrison & E.Dedham CG . . . .South End Archdiocese 0.22 

Hawthorn Youth Center Roxbury Private 0.06 

Jardin De La Amistad Roxbury Private 0.24 

Kendall & Lenox St Garden . . .South End BRA 0.25 

Leyland Street South Dorchester BNAF 0.00 

Log School CG South Dorchester COB 0.10 

Lucerne Street CG South Dorchester BNAF 0.00 

Magnolia & Woodford North Dorchester COB 0.20 

Margaret Wright Garden Roxbury Private 0.12 

Marginal St. Gardens East Boston BNAF 0.26 

Mission Hill Jamaica Plain BNAF 0.00 

Mrs. Bee's Gardens Charlestown BHA 0.00 

Mt Calvary Revival Garden Roxbury Private 0.00 

Nightingale CG South Dorchester COB 0.90 

Paige Academy Garden I Roxbury Pri\ ate 0.00 

Paige Academy Garden II Roxbury Private 0.00 

Paul Gore St Garden Jamaica Plain COB 0.26 

Paul Gore/Beecher St Jamaica Plain Parks/BNAF 0.46 



124 



BOSTON 
INVENTORY OF COMMUNITY GARDENS 



NAME NEIGHBORHOOD JURISDICTION ACRES 

Penniman Road CG* Allston Brighton Parks Department 0.40 

Plnllis Wheatley CG I Roxi)ur\ COB 0.00 

Phyllis Wheatley CG II Roxbury Private 0.00 

Roseclair St Garden North Dorchester COB/School Dept 0.00 

Rox. Land Trust Garden I Roxbury COB 0.00 

Rox. Land Trust Garden II Roxbury COB 0.00 

Rutland/Wtish. St Garden South End BRA 0.55 

SW Corridor Comm. Farm . . . .Jamaica Plain MBTA 1.10 

Sarnac/New Castle Garden South End BRA/MBTA 0.23 

Savin/Ma\'\vood St Garden Roxbury .BNAF 0.00 

Sealy Memorial Garden Roxbury BNAF 0.00 

Shangri-La Gardens* Mattapan Parks Department 17.81 

South St BHA Gardens Jamaica Plain BHA 0.00 

Southv\'est Boston Garden Rosliudale MBTA 0.47 

St Joseph's CG Roxbury Private 0.20 

Symphony Road Garden Fenway/Kenmore BRA 0.31 

Tenant's Development Corp . . .South End BRA 0.20 

Titus Sparrow CG South End Parks Department 0.00 

Torre Unidad Garden South End BHA 0.06 

United Neighbors South End BRA 0.30 

Victor\ Gardens* Fenway/Kenmore Parks Department 32.31 

Vinson-Gene\ a Garden South Dorchester Private 0.20 

Virginia-Monadnock North Dorchester BNAF 0.18 

Warren &: Clarendon St South End BRA 0.04 

Wellington Hill Garden Mattapan Private 0.00 

Wheatland Ave Garden South Dorchester BNAF 0.17 

White Garden Club* Allston Brighton BHA 0.00 

Worcester St Garden South End BRA 0.43 



125 

BOSTON 
INVENTORY OF URBAN WILDS 



NAME NEIGHBORHOOD JURISDICTION ACRES 

"Back of the Hill" Jamaica Plain Private 3.30 

107 Cedar Street Roxhury Private 3.30 

Adam.s Rock Soutli Dorche.ster COB 0.35 

Allandale Wood.s West Roxhury BCC 12.50 

Alleghany Street I Jamaica Plain Private 0.20 

Alleghany Street II Jamaica Plain Private 0.97 

Alpine Roxhury Private 2.52 

Baysvvater Street East Boston Massport 10.00 

Belle Isle Marsh Res East Boston MDC 139.42 

Belnel Hyde Park Private 1.28 

Blue Hill Rock Mattapan BHA 0.75 

Boston Gas Co. Easement South Dorchester Private/MDC 3.20 

Boston State Hospital Roslindale State 34.00 

Boundary I Hyde Park Private/COB/MDC .... 16.00 

Boundary II Hyde Park Private 39.00 

Bussey Brook Jamaica Plain Private 20.00 

Canterbury I Roslindale COB 2,50 

Canterbury II Roslindale MDC/Private , 46.32 

Cenacles Alston Brighton Private 17.50 

Chapman Jamaica Plain Private 12.30 

Charlestoun Overlook Charlestown Private/BRA 0.69 

Columbia Point North Dorchester BWSC 5.00 

Condor St Overlook East Boston BCC 10.40 

Condor Street Beach East Boston BCC 8.90 

Crittenton Hospital Allston Brighton Private 3.03 

Dana Avenue Hyde Park Private/PFD 0.36 

Dana Road West Roxhury Private 6.86 

Daughters of St Paul Jamaica Plain Private 1 1.62 

Dell Avenue Rock Hyde Park COB/BCC 1.32 

Don Orione East Boston Private 9.50 

Dudley Cliffs Roxhury COB 1.70 

Dump Shoreline West Roxhury BCC 8.90 

Eldon Street Roslindale Private/COB 11.04 

Eldon Street South Dorchester COB 1.75 

Euclid Street Hyde Park . Private 3.87 

Euston Path Rock Allston Brighton COB 0.67 

Fain iew Quarrv Hyde Park Private 6.71 

Fernald Terrace Rock North Dorchester BCC 0.06 

Foster St Hill Allston Brighton Private 5.73 

Geneva Ave Cliffs South Dorchester BCC 1.50 

Gladeside I Mattapan COB 4.50 

Gladeside II Mattapan Private 1.09 

Golden Stairs East Boston COB 0.16 

Granite Ave Ledge South Dorchester Private 0.23 

Hallet Street Brook South Dorchester Private 3.41 

Hancock Woods West Roxhury Private 47.30 

Harvard Quarry Jamaica Plain Private 6.59 



126 

BOSTON 
INVENTORY OF URBAN WILDS 



NAME NEIGHBORHOOD JURISDICTION ACRES 

Hellenic Hill Jamaica Plain Private 35.60 

Hilltop Street South Dorchester COB 1.00 

John Eliot Square Roxbury COB 0.13 

Judge Street Jamaica Plain Private 0.44 

Juniper Terrace Roxbury Private 1.58 

Kennedy Rock Allston Brighton Private 2.00 

Key,stone Shoreline South Dorche.ster Private 0.55 

Lawrence Farm Jamaica Plain Private 25.88 

Leamington Rock Allston Brighton Private 0.47 

Leatherbee Woods West Roxbury BNAF 7.90 

MBTA Extension East Boston -. .MBTA 0.60 

Margin Street Hyde Park MDC 0.40 

Meetinghouse Overlook North Dorchester COB/School Dept 2.82 

Metropolitan Ave Roslindale Private 2.50 

Montere) Hilltop Hyde Park COB/BCC 6,51 

Mother Brook 1 Hyde Park Private 0.36 

Mother Brook II Hyde Park BCC 5.96 

Mother Brook 111 Hyde Park BCC 4.46 

Mt St. Josephs Allston Brighton Private 6.50 

Neponset River 1 Hyde Park MDC 2.06 

Neponset River II Hyde Park MDC 3.19 

New Haven Street West Roxbury Private 9.73 

Nira Ave Rock Jamaica Plain COB 1.50 

O.G. Kelly South Dorchester MDC 19.00 

Oak\ iew Terrace Jamaica Plain Private 0.37 

Parker Hilltop Jamaica Plain Private 4.00 

Patten's Cove North Dorchester MDC 9.18 

Pendergast Preventorium Mattapan Private 20.80 

Penn. Central Easement South Dorchester Private 3.30 

Pleasant View Hyde Park COB 0.54 

Puddingstone Garden Roxbury BCC 0.55 

R&S Machine Co South Dorchester MDC 11.29 



127 

BOSTON 
INVENTORY OF URBAN WILDS 



NAME NEIGHBORHOOD JURISDICTION ACRES 

H.O.W. Shores South Dorchester MDC 6.25 

Raihoad Avenue Hyde Park BCC 1.24 

Ri\eruioor West Roxbury Private/MDC/COB 24.60 

Rock- Hill Jamaica Phiin Private 0..50 

Rockledge Street Roxbury BCC 0.53 

Roxl)ury Latin School West Roxbury Private 76.38 

Savin Hill Cove South Dorchester MDC 28.90 

Sawmill Brook West Roxbury MDC 68.80 

School Boy Track South Dorchester MDC 51.39 

Sherrin Street Hyde Park BCC 30.21 

Showa (form. Ha/.areth) Jamaica Plain Private 39.85 

Sprague Pond Hyde Park COB/BCC 0.38 

St John's Seminary Allston Brighton Private 42.25 

St Monica's Roxbury Private 1.28 

St. Sebastion's Allston Brighton Private 6.44 

Taylor Street South Dorchester MDC 0.11 

The "Humps" North Dorchester Private 0.76 

Tower Street East Boston Private 0.50 

Troy Landfill South Dorchester MDC 19.07 

Turnpike Overlook Allston Brighton Turnpike Auth 7.17 

W. Roxbury High Sch West Roxbury COB 10.00 

W Roxbury Quarry West Roxbury Private 70.00 

Warren Gardens Roxbury Private 1.46 

Waverly Road West Roxbury Private 1.75 

West Street Hyde Park MDC 1.45 

West and Austin Hyde Park COB/BCC 0.29 

Williams Street Jamaica Plain Private 4.00 

Willowwood Rock East Boston Massport 0.16 

Wood Island Bay Marsh East Boston Massport 152.00 

Woodhaven Mattapan COB 2.10 



128 



BOSTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC ART UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE BOSTON ART COMMISSION 
LOCATED IN AREAS UNDER JURISDICTION OF PARKS AND RECREATION DEPT 

1 Begheera Fountain Public Garden 

2 John Bail)' Memorial The Common 

3 Katherine Lee Bates Memorial Back Bay Fens 

4 Boston Common Tablet The Common 

5 Boston Massacre Memorial The Common 

6 Boy & Bird Fountain Public Garden 

7 Brewer Fountain The Common 

S Carty Parade Ground Tablet The Common 

9 Thomas Cass Statue Public Garden 

10 William Ellery Channing Public Garden 

11 Charlestown Ci\il War Memorial Charlestown, Winthrop Sq. 

12 Roberto Clemente Plaque Clemente Field, Back Bay Fens 

13 Patrick Collins Memorial Commonwealth Ave. Mall 

14 Declaration of Independence Tablet The Common 

15 "Desconsol" Back Bay Fens, Rose Garden 

16 Emancipation Group Park Plaza 

17 John Endecott The Fens, Forsyth Way 

IS Lief Eriksson Commonwealth Ave. Mall 

19 Ether Monument Public Garden 

20 Edward Filene Plaque The Common 

21 Football Tablet The Common 

22 The Founders Memorial The Comm.on 

23 William Llo\'d Garrison Commonwealth Ave. Mall 

24 Kahlil Gibran Plaque Cople>' Square Park 

2.5 John Glo\er Statue Commonwealth A\e. Mall 

26 Gold Star Mothers WWTI Memorial Adams Park, Roslindale 

27 Goody Memorial Public Garden 

28 Guild Memorial Steps The Common 

29 Edward Everet Hale Public Garden 

30 Alexander Hamilton Statue Commonwealth Ave. Mall 

31 John Han aid Memorial Hanard Mall, Charlestown 

32 Japanese Lantern Public Garden 

33 Japanese Temple Bell Back Bay Fens 

34 Tadeusz Koscius/.ko Statue Public Garden 

35 LaFayette Memorial Plaque The Common 

36 Merchant Marine Radio 

Operators Memorial North End Park 

37 Samuel Eliot Morison Statue Commonwealth Ave. Mall 

38 John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Back Ba>' Fens 

39 Papal Mass Tablet The Common 

40 Francis Parkman Memorial Jamaica Pond 

41 Parkman Plaza The Common 

42 Wendell Phillips Public Garden 

43 Paul Revere Statue The Prado, North End 

44 Domingo Sarmiento Statue Commonwealth Ave. Mall 

45 Small Child Fountain Public Garden 

46 1775 Soldiers Memorial Winthrop Sq., Charlestown 

47 Soldiers and Sailors Monument The Common 



129 



48 Soldiers Monument Meeting House Hill, Dorchester 

49 Soldiers Monument Center Street, Jamaica Plain 

50 Statler Fountain Statler Park 

51 Charles Sumner Memorial Public Garden 

52 Triton Babies Fountain Public Garden 

53 Twin Victorial Fountains Franklin & Blackstone Sqs., South End 

54 George Washington Statue Public Garden 

55 World War I Memorial Adams Park, Roslindale 

56 Westland Avenue Gates Back Bay Fens 

57 James M. Curley Memorial Curley Park 

58 Ducklins Sculpture Public Garden 

59 James B. Connolly Statue Columbus Park, South Boston 

60 Shaw/54th Memorial The Common 

61 Bust of Cardinal Gushing Gushing Park, Govt. Center 

62 Vietnam Veterans Memorial Independence Park, So. Boston 

63 Four Sculptural figures Park adjacent to V. Smith Sr Center Brighton 

64 Plaques and Central Medallion Oak Square, Brighton 



COMMUNITY SCHOOL FACILITIES 

COMMUNITY SCHOOL ADDRESS 

NAZARRO REG. CTR 30 N. Bennet St. Boston 02113 

*QUINCY CMTY. SCHOOL 885 Washington St. Boston 021 1 1 

*BLACKSTONE CMTY. SCHOOL 50 W. Brookline St. Boston 02119 

*CHARLESTOWN CMTY. SCHOOI 255 Medford St. Charlestovvn 02129 

KENT CMTY SCHOOL 50 Bunker Hill St. Charlestown 02129 

*CLOUGHERTY POOL Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown 

CLEVELAND CMTY SCHOOL 11 Charles St. Dorchester 02124 

*MARSHALL CMTY. SCHOOL 35 Westville St. Dorchester 02124 

^HOLLAND CMTY. SCHOOL 85 Olney St. Dorchester 02121 

*LEE CMTY SCHOOL 155 Talbot Ave. Dorchester 02124 

*MUKPHY CMTY. SCHOOL 1 Worrell St, Dorchester 02122 

*CONDON CMTY SCHOOL 200 D St. South Boston 02127 

TYNAN CMTY SCHOOL 650 W. Fourth St. So. Boston 02127 

"L' ST/CURLEY REG 1663 Columbia R. So. Boston 02127 

''HARBORSIDE CMTY. SCHOOL 312 Border St. E. Boston 02128 

PARIS ST REG. CTR 112 Paris St. E. Boston 02128 

*PARIS ST POOI 113 Paris St. E. Boston 02128 

J.P REGIONAL OFFICE 20 South St. Jamaica Plain 02130 

*CURTIS HALL MUNICIPAL 20 South St. Jamaica Plain 02130 

AGASSIZ CMTY SCHOOL 20 Child St. Jamaica Plain 02130 

ENGLISH HIGH CMTY. SCHOOI Williams St. Jamaica Plain 02130 

*HENNIGAN CMTY. SCHOOI 200 Heath St. Jamaica Plain 02134 

JACKSON/MANN CMTY. SCHOOL 500 Cambride St. Allston 02134 

* MADISON PARK CMTY SCHOOI 55 New Dudley St. Roxl)ur>' 021 19 

MISSION HILL REG. CTR 68 Annunciation Rd. Roxbury 02119 

TOBIN MUNI 1481 Tremont St. Roxbury 02120 

SHELBURNE REG. CTR 2730 Washington St. Roxbury 021 19 



130 

OHRENBERGER CMTY. SCHOOL 175 W. Boundary Rd. W. Roxbury 02132 

'^WEST ROXBURY CMTY. SCHOOL 1205 V.KW. Parkway W. Roxbury 02132 

HYDE PARK MUNICIPAL 1179 River St. Hyde Park 02132 

" MATTAHUNT CMTY. SCHOOL 100 Hebron St. Mattapan 02126 

ROSLINDALE MUNICIPAL 6 Cummins Hvvy Roslindale 02131 

^FLAHERTY POOL 160 Florence St. Roslindale 02131 

^Denotes Swiming Pools 
Re\ ised: Jime '90 

PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT 

Robert G. Walsh, Jr., Commissioner 
Office 716 
The mission of the Penal Department is to protect the pubHc from 
offenders by operating a secure and efficient facility at the Suffolk County 
House of Correction at Deer Island, which provides safe and humane 
conditions of confinement that meet current legal and professional stand- 
ards. 

The Department provides a full range of rehabilitative programs and 
services to between 650-750 inmates each day to encourage their suc- 
cessful reentry into the community The Department seeks and adminis- 
ters external funding to assist with the housing of 1 ,350 new inmates each 
year. The Department is also responsible for providing a safe work envi- 
ronment in which employees may find professional growth and personal 
satisfaction. In FY91, the Department will oversee the construction of a 
new facility and prepare for its opening, scheduled for early FY 92. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Obligation to Provide House of Correction, MGLA c. 34, s. 3 

Power to Build, Repair, etc., MGLA c. 34, s. 14 

Obligation to Receive Inmates Committed, MGLA c. 268, s. 20 

County Commissioners for Suffolk County, MGLA c. 34, s. 4 

Inspection, Operation, Supervision, etc., MGLA c. 126; MGLA c. 127, s. 

la- 10, 13-169 

Regulations, 103 CMR 900; 105 CMR 451-459; MGLA c. 6, 167-178; 

803 CMR 2-6 

Powers and Duties, CBC St. 12, s. 350-357; CBC Ord. 12-8 

NOTE: 1. Chapter 658 of the acts of 1986 provides for the relocation of 
the Suffolk County House of Correction from Deer Island to the 
South Bay section of Boston. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley Street, 02116 

Police Commissioner, CBC St. 11, s. 1; Ch. 322, Acts of 1962 
Appointment, Removal and Compensation of the Police and Complaints, 
CBC St. 11, s. 4 
Powers and Duties of the Police, CBC St. 11, s. 5; MGLA c. 41, s. 98 



131 



Detective Bureau, CBC St. 11, s. 6 

Generally, CBC St. 11, s. 1-25; CBC Ord. 11-1 

Public Nuisance/Padlock Law, MGLA c. 139, s. 19 

Hackney Carriage, Ch. 392, Acts of 1930; Ch. 408, s. 7, Acts of 1931 

Francis M. Roache, Police Commissioner 

Bureau Chiefs 

Superintendent Paul F. Evans, Chief, Bureau of Field Services 

Superintendent Joseph Saia, Chief, Bureau of Investigative Services 

Superintendent Joseph Carter, Chief, Bureau of Special Operations 

Deputy Superintendent J oin<i P. Meade, Chief, Bureau of Professional 

Standards 

Ellen Daley, Chief, Bureau of Administrative Services 



ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Boston PoHce Department is organized into six (6) major entities. 
The Office of the PoHce Commissioner, the Bureau of Professional Stand- 
ards, the Bureau of Special Operations, the Bureau of Field Services, the 
Bureau of Investigative Services and the Bureau of Administrative Serv- 
ices. 

Definitions: For the purpose of this rule the terms which are listed shall 
be defined as noted: 

Department: The Boston Police Department. 

Bureau: The first level of command under the Police Commissioner 
responsible for coordinating and directing a major grouping of like activi- 
ties in the Department. 

Area: The second level of command, responsible for two or more dis- 
tricts of the City. 

District: A geographical portion of an area of the City to which field 
personnel and other resources are assigned in sufficient quantity to pro- 
vide general police service on a 24-hour basis. 

Division: That portion of a Bureau which may or may not consist of a 
section or sections or units with specialized functions. 

Section: A part of an area, district, division or office with ongoing re- 
sponsibility for a particular function. 

Unit: Personnel and resources organized to perform a special task. 

Platoon: A group of officers composing the work force of an Area for a 
particular period of the day and containing its own supervisory and com- 
mand officers. 

Squad: A group of officers under the command of a sergeant for an 
operational task. 

Sector: A geographical area of variable size within an Area to v\'hich is 
assigned one or more patrol units. 

Beat: A geographical area of variable size within an area to which is 
assigned one or more officers for patrol purposes. 



132 



OFFICE OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 

The Office of the Pohce Commissioner consists of the Police Commis- 
sioner and the following: 

A. Administrative Section: is responsible for managing and coordinating 
the activities of the Commissioner's Office and staff; handling correspon- 
dence, scheduling appointments for the Commissioner and providing an 
effective working relationship with all other Bureaus within the Depart- 
ment. 

B. Informational Services Section: Responsibilities include: keeping 
members of the department, general public and news media informed of 
police activities through the preparation and dissemination of news re- 
leases; overseeing all news conferences involving department staff; pro- 
\iding policy recommendations in the area of news media relations and 
arranging all print, radio and television interviews for appearances involv- 
ing the Police Commissioner and members of the Command Staff This 
Office also oversees and monitors all public information requests re- 
ceived by the Police Department; develops and prepares materials for 
Department promotions and ceremonies; assigns police officers for vari- 
ous speaking engagements involving the public and private sector and 
oversees all tours of police facilities. The Office is also responsible for 
apprising all department members of Rule No. 300-(News Media Rela- 
tions) which concerns the release of official information and assisting the 
Police Commissioner in the establishment of procedural guidelines for 
the issuance of awards and commendations in recognition of officers' ex- 
emplary performance. 

C. Legal Advisors Section: Formulates legal opinions for the Commis- 
sioner and provides him with a legal perspective on policy matters. In 
addition, the Legal Advisor provides legal advice to members of the force 
concerning the performance of their duties. The office also prepares, re- 
views and participates in the legislative process. The Legal Advisor repre- 
sents the Department in selected civil litigation and maintains liaison 
with the City Law Department and other criminal justice agencies, en- 
couraging their participation in the development of responses to the legal 
problems of the police. The Legal Advisor assists in the development of 
law-related training programs and in the drafting of rules and regulations 
for the department. 

The Legal Advisors Section is responsible for the presentation of all 
cases where disciplinary charges are brought against Department em- 
ployees. The Legal Advisors Section presents the evidence against and 
handles subsequent litigation of these cases before the Civil Service 
Commission and State and Federal courts. 



BUREAU OF PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS 

The Bureau of Professional Standards has the responsibility for insur- 
ing that the professional standards of the department are maintained. The 
Bureau continually monitors, evaluates, and investigates adherence to 
the rules, regulations, procedures and policies of the Department. Com- 



133 



plaints concerning violations of the Department's rules, regulations and 
policies are handled by this Bureau. 

The overall professional integrity of the Boston Police Department is 
the main focus of this Bureau. The Deputy commanding the Bureau of 
Professional Standards reports directly to, and only to, the Police Com- 
missioner In this manner, all matters of standards and integrity become of 
priority concern to the Office of the Police Commissioner 

The Bureau of Professional Standards consists of the following divi- 
sions: 

A. Staff Inspection Division: is responsible for the evaluation of Depart- 
mental performance. The division evaluates the relevance and adequacy 
of rules and regulations, recommending changes when necessary. Assists 
in the development of policy and training to improve performance; re- 
views compliance with rules and regulations by Departmental units; as- 
sists in the development of performance standards; performs periodic 
inspections of units and areas to assess their level of performance, staffing 
and need. This Division is also responsible for supervising the operations 
and performance of private towing companies working with the Police 
Department. 

B. Internal Affairs Division: is responsible for the Departmental disci- 
plinary process including: investigating incidents of alleged police mis- 
conduct; reviewing complaint investigations and assuring that investiga- 
tions are thorough, complete and adequate; analyzing complaint data and 
advising the Deputy Superintendent when additional training and opera- 
tional changes are needed to reduce complaint frequency; recommend- 
ing disciplinary action based on complaint investigations; and reviewing 
all Departmental disciplinary actions to assess their fairness. 

C. Anti-Corruption Division: is responsible for providing the Deputy 
Superintendent with complete and accurate information concerning the 
integrity of the Department. Investigates thoroughly and aggressively all 
instances in which a member is reported or suspected of having accepted 
a bribe or of other alleged involvement in criminal activity and reports its 
findings. The Division also monitors the efforts and effectiveness of all 
Police Commanders to combat corruption, looks for weaknesses in the 
Department and makes appropriate recommendations to the Bureau 
Chief. 

BUREAU OF SPECIAL OPERATIONS 

The Bureau of Special Operations has primary responsibility for tacti- 
cal operations; meeting the public safety needs of residents of public 
housing developments; investigating and monitoring civil rights viola- 
tions; addressing issues of crime prevention, Domestic Violence, \'ictim 
Assistance and the In-School Drug Education Program. The Bureau of 
Special Operations is also responsible for the delivery of basic and in- 
service training to sworn and civilian personnel. The Bureau consists of 
the following: 

Office of the Chief: is responsible for directing and monitoring the ac- 
tivities of the Bureau, and administers the following: 



134 



Administrative Section: manages and coordinates the activities of the 
Bureau Chief and his staff. 

In-School Drug Education Program: provides drug awareness and pre- 
vention classroom programs to Boston public and parochial school stu- 
dents. 

Neighborhood Crime Watch Program: provides technical expertise to 
community organizations that wish to set-up and/or maintain neighbor- 
hood crime watch programs throughout the City. This program also 
serves to coordinate all activities connected with National Night Out. 

Asian-American Liaison Program: promotes valuable information ex- 
change between the Police Department and Boston's Asian Community. 

Comm^unity Disorders Unit: coordinates the Department's investiga- 
tive and field activities concerning those incidents and crimes in which a 
citizen's civil rights have been infringed upon by violence, threats or har- 
assment. Immediate and direct action is taken to identify perpetrators of 
these crimes, arrest them and cause such offenders to be brought before 
the court. This Unit also meets with community groups and leaders to 
discuss public safety problems, and develops strategies to prevent future 
acts of violence. 

Domestic Violence/Victim Assistance Unit: manages the police response 
to victims of violent crimes and provides technical assistance to local dis- 
tricts and other units. The unit's goals are: 1) to prevent homicides and 
assaults, 2) enhance the investigation and prosecution of offenders, 3) to 
lessen the impact of violent crime upon its victims, and 4) increase aware- 
ness of violent crime, victim's rights and options. The Unit seeks to iden- 
tify victims and develops methods for improved police response to victims 
of violent crimes. 

The Crime Prevention Unit: initiates and conducts programs that in- 
volve the community in preventing crime through the reduction of crimi- 
nal opportunities. This Unit provides specialized community presenta- 
tions, conducts residential and commercial security surveys, and 
administers the Officer Friendly Program, which provides personal secu- 
rity tips to Boston's younger school-age children. 

Team Police Division: is responsible for meeting the needs of the citi- 
zens of the various public housing developments throughout the City. 
The Division provides patrol and investigative services, as well as commu- 
nity outreach to housing development residents. 

The Mobile Operations Division: is responsible for patrol, tactical opera- 
tions and selective operations. The Division consists of the following sec- 
tions: 

A. The Canine Unit: maintains a city-wide availability for 9-1-1 re- 
sponse on selected calls and serves as a back up for service and rapid 
response units. Ancillary responsibilities include crowd control, assisting 
in finding lost or missing children, drugs and explosives. 

B. The Explosive Ordnance Unit: is responsible for bomb search and 
bomb threat response. The safe removal and the safe rendering of devices 
is the Unit's primary responsibility. 



135 



C. Assault and Apprehension Team: is available for control of situa- 
tions involving domestic violence, barricaded persons, terrorists or hos- 
tages. 

D. The Harbor Patrol Unit: is charged with the enforcement of Boston 
Harbor regulations, laws of the Commonwealth and the ordinances of the 
City of Boston which pertain to the Harbormaster's specific duties. They 
work in conjunction with the U.S. Coast Guard and United States Marshal 
and the officers of the Customs Service in enforcing the laws of the 
United States. The Boston Harbormaster is a member of this Unit and is 
exclusively charged with the maintenance of order and safe passage in the 
harbor waters. 

E. The Senior Response Unit: provides three basic services to elderly 
citizens: 1) motorcycle patrol of all senior citizen developments, 2) partic- 
ipation in community meetings focusing on crime prevention, and 3) liai- 
son function between senior citizens and the City's Commission on Af- 
fairs of the Elderly. 

F. Traffic Unit (Cadets): Cadets perform traffic control activities at 
major intersections throughout the City. 

G. Special Hazards Squad: provides for the enforcement and prosecu- 
tion of all violators of hazardous waste materials, laws and ordinances. It 
also includes the enforcement of all laws relating to the safe transporta- 
tion of said materials. 

H. Mounted Patrol Support Unit: includes training, care, custody and 
maintenance of Area Mounted Units. 

• Training and Education Division: is responsible for the development 
of Department training standards and the administration of all recruit, in- 
service and special training and eduction programs. It is organized into 
four units, each with specific responsibilities: 

• Audio/Visual Unit: prepares all educational video materials for the 
Department. 

• Canine Training Unit: is responsible for the training of police dogs for 
the City of Boston and for police departments throughout the region. 

• Firearms Training Unit: operates the police range, develops firearms 
standards, and coordinates a firearm qualification training program. 

• Mounted Training Unit: is responsible for the training of police horses 
for the Citv of Boston. 



BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 

The Bureau of Field Services has primary responsibility for the delivery 
of effective and efficient patrol services to the community as well as pri- 
mary responsibility in multiple bureau operations, unless otherwise di- 
rected by the Police Commissioner In addition, the Bureau works closely 
with other Bureaus in preparing long range plans and contingency plans 
for the effective delivery of police services. This Bureau is responsible for 
providing general police services throughout the City and, for that pur- 
pose, is divided into one section, one unit, five areas and one division. 



136 



A Office of the Chief is responsible for directing and monitoring the 
activities of the Bureau, and administers the following: 

• Administrative Section: manages and coordinates the activities of the 
Bureau Chief and his staff 

• Paid Details Section: coordinates all off-duty police services rendered 
b>' members of the Department to private employers and administering 
the centralized paid details for Superior Officers. 

B. Anti-Gang Violence Unit: is comprised of uniformed and plain 
clothes officers whose mission is to disrupt the organizational structure 
and reduce the criminal activity and anti-social behavior of gangs through 
a program of aggressive police action and community based policing 
strategies. 

C. Areas A-B-C-D-E: The commanders of Areas A, (which includes 
the House of Detention and the Juvenile Pre- Arraignment Facility) B, C, 
D and E provide complete administrative and field supervision in the 
Area under their control. They are responsible for meeting the needs of 
citizens in the areas and for the accurate interpretation and implementa- 
tion of Department rules and policies. 

Each Area maintains a uniformed patrol and investigatory force suffic- 
ient in size to provide continuous and adequate coverage and each main- 
tains its own uniformed, investigatory, administrative, supervisory and 
command personnel who shall be responsible to and be supervised by the 
Area Commander or his/her designee(s). Each Area is responsible for all 
police services within the area boundaries except those that are specifi- 
cally assigned to other units in the Department. Area personnel are re- 
sponsible for providing the best possible police service to their communi- 
ties and they cooperate fully with specilized units in seeking ways to 
improve the overall effectiveness of police operations in the area. 

D. Operations Division: The Operations Division is responsible for 
receiving calls for assistance through the 9-1-1 Emergency Telephone 
System and directing the deployment of all 9-1-1 response units. The 
Division maintains current knowledge of conditions throughout the City 
and assigns police response units to meet the changing requirements for 
service. The Operations Duty Supervisor has final responsibility for 
movement of field units to provide the most effective police service possi- 
ble. The Operations Division is responsible for the following sections and 
units: 

9-1-1 Unit: receives all 9-1-1 calls and directs the deployment of all 
response units. 

The Police Dispatch Unit: dispatches response units in accordance with 
Department directives and plans developed by the Bureau of Field Serv- 
ices. 

The Stolen Car Unit: is responsible for recording and maintaining De- 
partment files on stolen cars and those recovered. 

Tow Unit: maintains listings of all vehicles towed within the City on 
police orders or privately ordered trespass tows from private property 
(M.G.L. c. 266sl20D). 



137 



Ilarrij Base Section: upon request provides motor vehicle listings, 
stolen checks and warrant information to sworn personnel. 

Teletype Section: coordinates the receipt and distribution of administra- 
tive messages from law enforcement agencies and is responsible for dis- 
semination of information from Boston Police Department to all other 
law enforcement agencies. 

Tape Room Section: is responsible for maintaining recordings of 9-1-1 
and dispatch communications as well as coordinating requests for same 
from department personnel as well as outside law enforcement agencies. 

BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 

The Bureau of Investigative Services oversees the activities of the vari- 
ous Investigative Units that comprise the Criminal Investigation Divi- 
sion, the Technical Services Division, the Intelligence and Dignitary Pro- 
tection Division, the Investigative Planning Division, Organized Crime 
Division and the Drug Control Unit to assure that the most effective in- 
vestigatory practices and procedures are maintained on a daily and con- 
tinuing basis. The Bureau also has the responsibility to insure that proper 
liaison is maintained with the many Federal, State and local departments 
and agencies which are concerned with all of the aspects of the criminal 
investigation process. 

The six divisions comprising the Bureau of Investigative Services are: 

A. The Technical Services Division: is responsible for obtaining, pre- 
serving and analyzing physical evidence for eventual court presentation 
and for assisting in the development of techniques and procedures for 
effective crime scene search. It includes: 

1. The Ballistics Section 

2. The Crime Laboratory Section 

3. The Identification and Photography Section 

B. Criminal Investigation Division: is responsible for providing city- 
wide investigative support to supplement area investigative strategy and 
management. It consists of the following units: 

The Homicide Unit: investigates and prepares cases for Grand Jur\- pre- 
sentation on all homicides, suspicious deaths, serious assaults and bat- 
tered children in which the victim is in danger of death. The Unit makes 
investigations of death at the direction of the District Attorney or Medical 
E.xaminer as well as the investigation of the sudden death of infants or 
those apparently still-born. 

The Sexual Assault Unit: is responsible for the coordination and super- 
vision of all Department investigations concerning rape, attempted rape 
and sex crimes. The unit coordinates data and provides anal\ sis and infor- 
mation concerning rapists in conjunction with the Bureau of Special Op- 
erations. The unit provides speakers for civic and educational groups 
upon request and also maintains a continuous liaison with agencies in- 
volved in medical and psychological aid to victims. 

General Investigations Unit: is responsible for city-wide investigations 
of crime against persons and property such as robbery, crimes against 



138 



banking institutions and retail stores, fraudulent and larcenous schemes, 
consumer fraud, automobile theft, prostitution, gaming, liquor violations 
and other crimes. The Unit will supplement other Criminal Investigation 
units, when required, by conducting aggressive predirected anti-crime 
patrol surveillances, investigations and related duties. 

Area Investigative Units (A-E): Area detectives are responsible for the 
performance of such investigative tasks as may be assigned by the Area 
Detective Supervisor. Investigations include assuring crime scenes are 
secured, identifying and preserving evidence, effective forensic investiga- 
tion; proper classification and clearance of crimes occurring in the areas 
and assistance in the prosecution in the Courts. Area Detective Supervi- 
siors are jointly accountable for all Homicide and Sexual Assault Investi- 
gations with the appropriate specialized units. Area detectives are re- 
sponsible for complete and timely follow-up investigations; 
documentation and clearance of reported crimes consistent with the Uni- 
form Crime Reports (U.C.R.); conducting interviews of witnesses/victims 
and conducting interrogations/identifications of suspects; complete and 
accurate preparation of the investigated matter for trial and assuring that 
witnesses are properly notified and making every effort to assure they are 
present in Court and all evidence is suitably prepared for presentation to 
the Court by the Office of the Attorney General of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts or the Office of the United States Attorney (F.B.I., D.E.A., 
A.T.F., Customs, I.N.S., I.R.S., U.S.S.S., U.S. M.S., and U.S. Military Law 
Enforcement Officials). 

The Warrant Enforcement Unit: acts as a clearing house for all warrants 
and summonses. It has the responsibility for warrant enforcement, distri- 
bution and service returns between the courts, other agencies and the 
Department. 

Missing Persons/Exploited Children Unit: is responsible for receiving, 
disseminating and filing personal information gathered concerning per- 
sons reported to be missing. The Unit coordinates the documentation, 
entry, follow-up investigation and cancellation (when reported missing 
person returns) of all missing persons reported with the detective super- 
visor in each area. The Unit insures that missing person information re- 
ceived will be recorded and provided to the appropriate State and Federal 
agencies. Upon return of the missing person, the missing person report 
will be cancelled through NCIC so that the Federal Clearing House file 
can be cleared. 

Arson Squad: is responsible for the investigation of all fires that the 
FI.U.A.S. is called to; prepares and assists the FI.U.A.S. on court and 
legal matters of the law and investigates all fatal fires. 

Auto Squad: is responsible for City-wide investigations of "Chop 
Shops", theft rings and motor vehicle insurance fraud. The Unit identi- 
fies, arrests and prosecutes all persons involved in the theft or attempted 
theft of motor vehicles. 

C. Intelligence and Dignitary Protection Division consists of: 

1 . The Intelligence Section: keeps the Commissioner informed of all 
the operational responses of the Department to planned criminal occur- 
rences. 



139 

2. The Gan<i IntcUig^ence Unit: develops information on the activities 
and membership of criminal gangs and will work the Anti-Gang \'iolence 
Unit to target appropriate gang enforcement. This unit will also serve as a 
liaison to the District Attorney's Office, Court Corrections, Department 
of Youth Services, the Probation and Parole Departments and the Federal 
law enforcement agencies to coordinate priority prosecution of criminal 
gang offenders and where appropriate, the use of Federal Prosecution. 

3. Dignitary Protection Section and escort service is provided in coop- 
eration with the Office of the Mayor of the City of Boston, the United 
States Treasury Secret Service and the United States Department of State. 

D. Investigative Planning Division: provides logistical assistance to 
the Bureau Chief and Assistant Bureau Chief in administration and opera- 
tional needs of the department's investigative services; develops and im- 
plements the investigatixe information systems to coordinate information 
for the management of investigative resources; provides administrative 
support to all divisions, areas, sections and units within the Bureau of 
Investigative Services. This Division includes the following sections: 

1. Investigative Training Section: coordinates investigative training of 
all Bureau of Investigatixe Services personnel with the Training and Eidu- 
cation Section of B.S.O. to achieve the highest level of investigative com- 
petence and proficiency. 

2. Licensing Section: Investigates, processes and records all applica- 
tions for licenses issued b\' the Police Commissioner. When appropriate, 
it also investigates and reports upon applications for licenses and permits 
issued by other City or State Agencies. 

• The Pawn Unit: records and monitors all pawn sheets submitted by 
pawn shops and secondhand dealers in the Cit\', examining the sheets to 
discover property which may have been stolen. 

• Licensed Premises Unit: is responsible for insuring the receipt and 
recording of those violations forwarded by the Areas and/or Units of the 
Department for the notice of the City of Boston Licensing Board and the 
Mayor's Office of Consumer Affliirs and Licensing Di\ision. 

E. The Organized Crime Division: conducts investigations of criminal 
activity of highly organized and disciplined groups engaging in supplying 
illegal goods and services (i.e. extortion, bribery, white collar crimes, por- 
nography, gambling, hijacking, "fencing" and illegally suppKing drugs, 
weapons, contraband, and designated offenses in M.G.L. Ch. 272, S. 99). 
In furtherance of its investigatixe responsilMlities, it maintains active liai- 
son and coordinates with other local, state and Federal Law Enforcement 
Agencies and maintains confidential files in conjunction with the Intelli- 
gence Unit. 

F. The Drug Control Unit: is responsible for C jt\ -w ide enforcement of 
the Massachusetts Controlled Substance Act (Chapter 94C), dexelop- 
ment and implementation of drug-related public education programs and 
liaison with public and private organizations in\ol\ed in the pre\ention 
and control of drug abuse. 



140 



BUREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

The Bureau of Administrative Services is responsible for providing 
services to support the field activities of the Department. Divisions and 
Sections organized within this bureau deal with personnel, fiscal, man- 
agement, maintenance, communication and procurement functions re- 
quired for the Department to accomplish its mission and meet the needs 
of the public in the most effective manner possible. The Bureau is com- 
prised of the following divisions, sections and units: 

A. Unman Resources Division: 

• Personnel Section: is responsible for the administration of the Depart- 
ment's personnel system. It develops standards and policies for all per- 
sonnel transactions, including the establishment of job specifications, re- 
cruitment, selection and promotions, transfers, leaves, discipline, 
retirement and the monitoring of personnel activities. The Section coor- 
dinates processing of all new personnel actions affecting existing person- 
nel and maintains central personnel files. 

• Cadet Program: provides an opportunity for qualified young people to 
join the Department in support positions in furtherance of their interest 
in a law enforcement career and as a means to improve their opportuni- 
ties for achieving a position as a police officer. 

• Labor Relations Section: Represents the Commissioner at employee 
collective bargaining negotiations, conferences and grievance discus- 
sions and assists in the development of policies regarding labor relations 
and negotiations. It advises command officers to ensure their compliance 
with the provisions of various collective bargaining agreements and works 
to resolve grievances at the unit or area level when possible. 

It supervises the medical program of the Department, the Stress Pro- 
gram and related personnel service activities. It is the primary liaison 
with City's Personnel Department and the Massachusetts Division of Per- 
sonnel Administration. The Section includes: 

• Personnel Records Unit: maintains personnel files and related records 
for all Department employees. 

• Personnel Processing Unit: processes all appointments, transfers, pro- 
motions, leaves, suspensions, job postings, retirement forms, termina- 
tions and monitors the Managing Attendance Program. 

• Recruit Investigation Unit: processes all police applicants and in- 
structs them on the application package, takes applicant's photographs 
and fingerprints, and provides a preliminary medical examination. The 
Unit conducts investigations of all recruit applications, including medical 
information, previous employment, previous criminal records, etc. Coor- 
dinates with Recruit Training Section under the direction of the Training 
and Education Division Commander, Bureau of Special Operations. 

• Medically Incapacitated Unit: includes all sworn and civilian person- 
nel absent from duty for more than 15 calendar days, as a result of sick- 
ness or injuries. 

B. Finance Division: is responsible for the preparation of the annual 
and supplemental budgets of the Police Department; continual tracking 



141 



and monitoring of department expenditures and preparation of reports 
concerning all budgetary matters. It consists of the following: 

• Fiscal Section: is responsible for accounts payable, general account- 
ing, technical assistance in the preparation of the Department budget, 
internal control procedures for receipt of revenues or reimbursements, 
and overtime monitoring. This Section also has responsibility for moni- 
toring and controlling Federal, State and Private Grants. 

• Contracts Section: is responsible for the data collection, advertising 
and awarding of Professional and Service Contracts; and the coordination 
of data for grant documentation for submission in accordance with grant 
guidelines. 

• Detail Billing and Payment Unit: This Section keeps accurate records 
of all private detail activity and is responsible for billing and processing 
payments received. 

• Payroll Section: prepares and maintains accurate records and files of 
all payroll related activities. 

• Purchasing and Inventory Section: is responsible for acquisition and 
distribution of supplies and equipment; maintaining inventory of depart- 
mental property; auctions and disposal of surplus property and repairs to 
equipment. 

• Indemnification Section: processes all medical bills associated with 
injuries suffered on-duty by department personnel. 

C. Operational Support Division: 

• Building Maintenance Section: is responsible for the repair and main- 
tenance of all police buildings. 

• Office of Facilities Management: is responsible for the preparation of 
the capital budget and the execution of the Capital Plan, for all mainte- 
nance and alterations of buildings. 

• Data Collection Section: keypunches and verifies all documents nec- 
essary for maintaining computer files and delivers its output to the com- 
puter facility. The Section responds to public requests for police docu- 
ments and reports. It is responsible for the following Units: 

• Field RepoTis Unit: reviews, codes and ensures that reports are prop- 
erly filled out and correctly routed and prepares data received from other 
units for the Data Collection Unit. 

• Insurance Reports Unit: is responsible for preparing and issuing mis- 
cellaneous reports upon request for private individuals, insurance com- 
panies and government agencies. Responsible for issuing good conduct 
letters for the Department of Immigration. 

• Fleet Management Section: is responsible for the repair and mainte- 
nance of police vehicles. 

• Graphic Arts Section: prepares illustrations, department forms, 
graphic layouts, crime scene sketches and other art work as required by 
the various units and divisions of the Department. 

• Print Unit: prints and prepares for distribution all forms, directives. 



142 



bulletins, news releases and other official documents necessary for the 
efficient administration of the Department. 

• Mail Unit: receives and distributes both U.S. and Department mail as 
well as operating the large duplicating machine used by various units in 
Headquarters. 

• The Hackney Cai'riage Unit: investigates and processes all applica- 
tions for Hackney Carriage Medallions and Hackney Carriage Operator's 
Licenses as well as supervising the operation of the Hackney Carriage 
industry within the City. The Unit provides training to Hackney Carriage 
drivers and enforces all rules, regulations, laws and ordinances relative to 
Hackney Carriage Operation. 

• Management Information Systems Section: consists of the following 
three Units: 

• Computer Operations Unit: uses computers to maintain files and 
produce reports responsive to the information needs of the Depart- 
ment. It is a 24-hour, seven day a week operation and is available to 
street officers via on-line terminals in the Operations Sections. 

• Office Automation Unit: is responsible for the improvement of 
administrative efficiency, record keeping, and departmental com- 
munications through the implementation of office automation tech- 
nology. 

• Systems Analysis and Programming Unit: is responsible for analy- 
sis, design, programming and implementation of all computer sys- 
tems. 

• The Research and Analysis Section: is responsible for researching op- 
erational and administrative issues in the Department and assisting effec- 
tive policy implementation. This section works closely with other units in 
preparing long-range and immediate plans and is responsible for re- 
searching departmental policy, and analyzing crime patterns and trends. 

• Communications Maintenance Section: is responsible for the pur- 
chase, installation and maintenance of all Departmental communications 
and electronic equipment. Maintains and operates field command posts. 
Submits recommendations and specifications for new equipment. 

• Electrical Maintenance Unit: is responsible for the installation, main- 
tenance, repair and alteration of all electrical appliances, equipment, 
lines and related accessories in Department buildings. 

POLICY OFFICE 

(An office of the Mayor) 

David A. Cortiella, Director 

Mayor's Office, 5th Floor 

The Policy Office supports the Mayor in setting priorities through an 
annual goal setting process, in conjunction with line departments and the 
Office of Budget and Program Evaluation, and through ongoing research 
and policy development. In addition, the Policy Office staff assumes proj- 
ect management responsibilities for many of the Mayor's key initiatives. 



143 



The Policy Office serves the Mayor l)y providing research and project 
management for many of tlie Mayor's key initiatives. In addition, the an- 
nnal goals process facilitates more effective policy direction and strategic 
planning with City departments. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

CBC Ord. 15-7 



PRESS OFFICE 

(An Office of the Mayor) 

Arthur L. Jones, Press Secretary 

Office, 603 

The Press Office provides information pertaining to City programs, 
policies, and activities to the public through neighborhood. City, re- 
gional, state, and national media outlets. 

The Press Office disseminates information about City policies and pro- 
grams to the public through media outlets. In addition, the Press Office 
provides the Mayor, his staff, and department heads with news accounts 
on a daily basis 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Reference, CBC Ord. 15-8, Office of Public Information 



PUBLIC FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

Lisa Ciiapnick, Director 

26 Court St. 

Boston, 02108 

PUBLIC F.'XCILITIES COMMISSIONERS 

Joseph Delgardo, Member 

Joseph Fisher, Member 

Thomas Snyder, Member 

The Public Facilities Department mission is to plan, design, and re- 
build the City's public facilities; provide security for the City's facilities; 
develop and preserve affordable housing; transfer City-owned land and 
buildings for housing and commercial development; revitalize neighbor- 
hood business districts; assist non-profit organizations in improving their 
facilities; reclaim and dispose of vacant lots for use as community gar- 
dens, tot lots, and open space; and preserve the cleanliness of the Cit\' by 
enforcing ordinances goxerning litter, improper storage and disposal of 
trash, medical waste, and abandoned vehicles. 

The Department is responsible for implementing the public facilities 
portion of the City of Boston Capital Plan, providing alterations, repairs, 
preventive maintenance, and security to City-owned properties, and 
managing a variety of grants for communitx and economic de\elopment 
purposes. 



144 



AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislatio7i, St. 1966, c. 642, s. 1-3 
Sale of Certain Surplus Property, St. 1982, c. 190 
Design Services, MGLA c. 7, s. 38 A 1/2 
Public Works Construction, MGLA c. 30, s. 39M 
Building Construction, MGLA c. 149, s. 44A-44J 
Municipal Participation in Condoniiniums, MGLA c. 183 A, s. 20 
Boston Urban Homestead Program, Ord. 1973, c. 13 
Code Enforcement, MGLA c. 40, s. 21d; M GLA c. 270, s. 16; CBC Ord. 
16, various sections 

PFD/COMMUNITY SCHOOLS DIVISION 

William P. Doiierty, Director 

1010 Massachusetts Avenue 

Boston, 02118 

The purpose of the Boston Community Schools (BCS) Division is to 
stimulate the development of local community school councils to identify 
local needs and problems, and introduce educational, social, cultural, and 
recreational programs in response to those needs and problems. The Di- 
vision, through local councils, is responsible for the delivery of human 
services throughout Boston's neighborhoods. 

Boston Community Schools, through 19 local community school coun- 
cils and two advisory boards, operates 34 community schools, recreation 
centers, and municipal facilities throughout Boston. Service categories 
include recreation, senior services, youth services, child care, youth edu- 
cation, adult education, counseling, and special needs. Community 
Schools is the City's largest provider of human services. Through partner- 
ships and programmatic collaborations, it coordinates service delivery 
with over 100 different community agencies, groups, and organizations 
annually. 

This Community Schools budget more than doubles the current num- 
ber of street workers to support recommendations included in the May- 
or's Safe Neighborhoods Plan. Funding is also included to extend recrea- 
tional opportunities and expand youth leadership development activities 
as outlined in the Safe Neighborhoods initiative. Additional funding to 
support the Plan is found in the Department of Health and Hospitals 
budget and in the new Youth Fund. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Community School Program, CBC Ords. 8-1 

See Listing of Community School Facilities Under Parks and Recrea- 
tion Department. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner 
Room 714, City Hall 
The Public Works Department was created in 1911 under the provi- 
sions of Chapter 486, Acts of 1909, through the consolidation of the exist- 
ing street, water, and engineering departments. The department was 



145 



placed in the charge of a commissioner who was required by ordinances 
to be a civil engineer of recognized standing. The department now oper- 
ates through its Central Office and three (3) major divisions, each in the 
charge of a division engineer These divisions carry out the major pro- 
grams of the department; namely, the maintenance and construction of 
highways, bridges, street lighting, snow removal, sanitation, street clean- 
ing, removal of refuse and garbage. All engineering in connection with 
the foregoing programs is performed by the Engineering Division. The 
Central Office performs general administrative functions including per- 
sonnel management, payrolls, cost accounting, purchasing, inventory 
control, property and equipment maintenance, and contracts. 

The primary mission of the Public Works Department is to ensure that 
the City's roadway and bridge infrastructure meets high standards of 
safety and is clean and attractive. This involves construction and mainte- 
nance of roadways, highways, bridges, sidewalks, and street lights; and 
street cleaning, snow removal, and household garbage collection and dis- 
posal. Through the Public Improvement Commission, the Department 
also reviews all requests from outside groups to make changes on, over, or 
under public ways. 

The Public Works Department directs the general construction, main- 
tenance, and cleaning of approximately 785 miles of roadways throughout 
the City. It also supervises the removal of snow and ice from City streets. 
In addition, it operates four major drawbridges and maintains 46 vehicu- 
lar and pedestrian bridges, maintains 27,000 City-owned street lights, 
and supervises contracts for the removal and disposal of approximately 
240,000 tons of solid waste generated by City households annually. 

Central Office 

Room 714, City Hall 

Robert P. Meiiegan, Executive Secretary 

A. Administrative Branch 

This branch is in charge of administrative functions that include per- 
sonnel, payroll management, supplies, inventories, accounting and con- 
tracts. 

B. Maintenance Branch 

The Maintenance Branch is responsible for the care, control, and main- 
tenance of all department-owned motor vehicles and for the operation, 
care, and maintenance of all real estate and related facilities of the Public 
Works Department. 

C. Permit Branch 

The Permit Branch issues all permits to open, occupy, and obstruct, 
portions of the streets, as well as water and sewer permits. 
Highway Division 
Room 708, City Hall 
John Vozzella, Division Engineer 
This division has charge of the construction and maintenance of all 
public streets, street cleaning and flushing by department forces, the care 
and upkeep of electric and gas lamps on public streets, parks and public 
grounds; the construction, operation, and maintenance of the highway 
bridges under the control of the department, and the abolition of grade 
crossings, and snow operations. 



146 



Sanitary Division 
Room 708, City Hall 
The Sanitary Di\ ision has charge of the contract collection, removal, 
and disposal of ashes, garbage, and refuse. It also supervises the removal 
of commercial waste under contractual arrangement between the pro- 
ducer and the contractor. 

Engineering Division 
Room 709, City Hall 
Gordon Baknes, Division Engineer 
The division performs engineering services for the divisions of the Pub- 
lic Works Department and other city departments. 



Public Improvement Commission 
Room 709, City Hall 
TIIK BO.A,RD 
Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner of Public Works, ex officio. Chairman 
Frank N. Jones, Commissioner of Real Property, ex officio, 
Vice-Chairman 
Richard A. Dimino, Commissioner of Transportation, ex officio 
Thomas McNicholas, Acting Commissioner of Insp. Services, ex officio 
Kevin Moriarty, Acting Executive Secretary 
The Public Improvement Commission was established May 1, 1954. 
This commission was assigned many of the powers and duties of the 
former Board of Street Commissioners, including the authority to lay out, 
widen, relocate, alter, or discontinue highways, and to order specific re- 
pairs to be made therein; to name or rename public highways and private 
ways; to permit the opening of private ways for public travel; to levy as- 
sessments for street and sidewalk betterments and to issue permits for the 
location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, pipes, tracks, signs, and similar 
uses of the public ways. 

The administration functions include the processing of petitions, ar- 
ranging public hearings, preparing orders relating to land damages and 
street betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of streets and the 
construction of streets, for eminent domain land takings, and for the 
granting of permits for use of public highways, erection of poles, signs, 
etc. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation: Powers b- Duties, CBC Ord. 11, s. 6:1-6:44 

Bills Posting, CBC Ord. 14, s. 286A, 348, 350 

Licenses for Street Occupancy, CBC St. 11, s. 164-174 

Public l7nprove7nent Commission, CBC Ord. 8-7 

Refuse, CBC Ord. 14, s. 261, 264-264A, 294, 296-297, 301-303 



147 

REAL PROPERTY DEPARTMENT 

Room 811, City Hall 
HEAL PU0PP:UTY BOARD 

Frank N. Jones, Commissioner of Real Property, Chairman 

Marie A. Turley, Assistant Commissioner of Real Property 

J. Edward Roche, Associate Commissioner 

John Chilingerian, Associate Commissioner 

Donald Walsh, Associate Commissioner 

Daniel R. Nuzzo, Executive Secretary 

The Real Property Board has the powers and performs the duties con- 
ferred or imposed on the Board of Real Estate Commissioners by the St. 
1943, c. 434, as amended, and by the St. 1946, c. 474, as amended, and 
has also the powers and performs the duties conferred or imposed by 
statute on the Board of Street Commissioners in relation to the abatement 
of taxes. 

By the Ord. 1954, c. 2, s. 43, the Public Buildings Department was 
abolished and the powers, duties and appropriations of the superintend- 
ent of Public Buildings with respect to the appointment, suspension, dis- 
charge, compensation, and indemnification of subordinates were trans- 
ferred to the Commissioner of Real Property, and all other powers, duties, 
and appropriations of the Public Buildings Department were transferred 
to the Assistant Commissioner of Real Property. 

The Real Property Department is responsible for the management, 
maintenance, and repair of many of the City's municipal buildings includ- 
ing City Hall, Faneuil Hall, and the Old State House. The Department 
maintains and manages tax-foreclosed buildings and land up to the point 
of disposition. It also repairs, develops, maintains, and manages 22 neigh- 
borhood municipal parking facilities and 19 downtown revenue produc- 
ing parking facilities. 

The Department provides custodial and repair services to City-owned 
buildings and foreclosed properties. This currently includes approxi- 
mately 75 buildings and 2,600 parcels of land. As required, it periodically 
cleans vacant lots in the City's neighborhoods. Through the Disposition 
Support Program, it provides information on tax delinquent properties 
and coordinates with the Public Facilities Department for the disposition 
of this property. It develops, repairs, renovates, and maintains parking 
facilities under the Department's care and coordinates plans to establish 
new parking lots in the neighborhoods. The Department is also responsi- 
ble for space planning and analysis for City departments, security, events 
management, centralized telephone services, and the coordination of 
capital improvement programs for properties within its jurisdiction. 

COMMITTEE ON FORECLOSED REAL ESTATE 

Frank N. Jones, Chairman 
Marie A. Turley 
Donald Walsh 

The Committee on Foreclosed Real Estate consists of the chairman 
and two other members of the Real Property Board appointed by the 
Mayor from said Board. The Committee has the powers and performs the 



148 



duties conferred or imposed by law on the Committee on Foreclosed Real 
Estate established under St. 1943, c.434, s.4. 

Real Property; Powers and Duties, CBC Ord. 11-7; St. 1943, c. 434, as 

amended; St. 1946, c. 474, as amended 
Committee on Foreclosed Real Estate; Powers, CBC Ord. 11-7; St. 1943, c. 

434, s. 4-5, as amended 
Powers and Duties of Commissioner of Real Property, CBC Ord. 11-7; St. 

1943, c. 434, as amended; St. 1946, c. 474, as amended 
Powers and Duties of Assistant Commissioner of Real Property, CBC. Ord. 

11-7 
Public Off-Street Parking Facilities: Establishment; Leasing, St. 1946, c. 

474, as amended 
Public Off-Street Parking Facilities; Power to Acquire by Eminent Domain, 

St. 1946, c. 474, as amended 
Parking Facilities Fund: Establishment: Availability for General Municipal 

Purposes, St. 1946, c. 474, s. 3c & 4, as amended 
Parking Facilities Loan: Issue and Sale of Serial Bonds or Notes, St. 1946, c. 

474, s. 5 
Transfers of Property to Boston Redevelopment Authority, St. 1943, c. 434, 

s. 4, as amended by St. 1961, c. 314 



BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Room 900, City Hall 

Clarence J. Jones, Chairman Term ends in 1994 

Michael F. Donlan, Co-Vice Chairman Term ends in 1990 

Francis X. O'Brien, Co-Vice Chairman Term ends in 1992 

James K. Flaherty, Treasurer Term ends in 1993 

CONSUELO GONAZLES-TiiORNELL, Member Term ends in 1991 

Stephen Coyle, Director 
Kane Simonian, Executive Director and Secretary 

The Boston Redevelopment Authority was established by the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature in October 1957.' In 1960, the City Planning Board 
was abolished and its powers were transferred to the BRA.- Since that 
time, the BRA has operated in a dual capacity as the city's planning board 
and urban renewal agency. 

The Authority consists of five Members, four of whom are appointed by 
the Mayor and one of whom is appointed by the Commissioner of Com- 
munity Affairs, Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The appointment of 
mayoral Members must be submitted to the City Council for their confir- 
mation. 

In its early years the focus of BRA activities was implementation of 
more than 20 urban renewal projects which had been created throughout 
the city. In recent years, as the City Planning Board, the BRA has concen- 
trated on drafting plans and updating the city's zoning code to manage 
and coordinate the growth of the city's economy in order to produce affor- 
dable housing and to increase economic opportunities for residents of 
Boston's neighborhoods. 



149 



The BRA programs are established und^r the leadership of the Mayor, 
in consultation with the City Council and with participation by the pub- 
lic. Specific policies and actions are promulgated by the BRA Board in the 
24 to 30 public meetings held each year. In addition, BRA staff members 
are involved in excess of 400 meetings each year with neighborhood 
groups throughout the city. 



' The BRA's powers and responsibilities are outlined in Chapter 121B, 

Massachusetts General Laws. 
2 Chapter 652, Acts of 1960. 

The BRA's program is designed to allocate resources among competing 
priorities to achieve balanced growth through comprehensive planning, 
with particular emphasis on five key objectives: 

• Expanding the tax base; 

• Increasing housing production and affordability; 

• Diversifying Boston's economy; 

• Completing the rezoning of Boston; and 

• Revitalizing Boston's waterfront. 

1 . Expanding The Tax Base — Expanding the city's tax base is of criti- 
cal importance at a time when federal cutbacks and reductions in local aid 
threaten vital services. 

Development and development-related growth contributes more to 
the increase in Boston's property tax revenues than the 2 1/2 % standard 
growth allowance provided for by law. For the four years including fiscal 
years 1985-1989, the total of annual 2 1/2% growth allowance was $49.1 
million. The new incremental revenues from development and related 
economic growth totaled $101.5 million over this same period. Of this 
$101.5 million, $59.4 million was derived from development construc- 
tion. The remaining $42.1 million was generated from changes in tax sta- 
tus from exempt to taxable, condominium developments, other subdivi- 
sions, and new personal property accounts. 

Once the new revenues are added to the levy, they are also allowed to 
grow at a compound rate of 2 1/2 percent annually. The actual value of the 
development generated tax revenues was $62.9 million in FY89, or 13 
percent of that year's $483.7 million levy. This is slightly more than the 
annual property tax yield of the city's 47,496 one- and two-family homes. 
When completed, all of the projects approved by the BRA since early 
1984 will generate nearly $88 million in annual property tax revenue. 

2. Increasing Housing Production and Affordability — While tax base 
expansion, new jobs and enhanced economic \dtality are meaningful out- 
growths of the development climate, the BRA recognizes the impact that 
large-scale downtown development projects may have on inner city 
neighborhoods. As the City's planning agency, the BRA has primary re- 
sponsibility to manage the delicate balance between the need for growth 
and the preservation of neighborhoods and community life. In addition, 
the BRA recognizes the critical need to share the economic growth and 
the subsequent benefits of the Boston economy with the inner city neigh- 
borhoods. 

Boston has a critical need for more housing, particularly affordable 



150 



housing, to meet the demand generated both l)y long-term and new resi- 
dents. The Flynn Administration has placed the production of affordable 
housing among the City's highest priorities. 

Since 1984 the BRA has produced a total of 86 affordable housing pro- 
jects through the disposition of over three million square feet of land and 
buildings. The BRA has disposed of the properties below their market 
value to increase affordability. Between 1984 and 1991, 3,849 units of 
housing will have been built on BRA properties, half of these units will be 
affordable to low and moderate income households. Projects approved in 
1990 will bring the total housing production program to 5,000 units. 

The BRA's affordable housing production programs also serve to in- 
crease opportunities for minority and community based development 
teams. Of the 86 housing development projects designated since 1984, 54 
(or 63%) have involved teams of minority or community based devel- 
opers. 

While working with neighborhood groups to achieve the appropriate 
design and scale of projects subject to Board of Appeal approval, the BRA 
has helped in the creation of additional housing units. A substantial num- 
ber of the units created through this process are affordable to low and 
moderate income families. 

3. Diversifying Boston's Economy — Biomedical, high-tech, research 
and development activities are emerging as leading economic growth ar- 
eas of the 1990s. Boston's numerous hospitals and universities, several of 
which are nationally and internationally renowned, have long been an 
important part of the city's economy. As these medical and educational 
institutions continue to pioneer in medical, biomedical, and high- 
technology research, they are also creating "new economies" to replace 
the service economy and ensure Boston's future economic health and 
prosperity. Strategies to promote this new economic growth include de- 
velopment of a "Technopolis" within the City of Boston. The "technopo- 
lis", or center of technology, will join together the resources and energies 
of academic and clinical research institutions, private industry, and entre- 
preneurial developers with government participation to foster research 
advances and applications in medicine and biotechnology. Specific areas 
targeted for near-term development of the technopolis concept include 
South Station and the Charlestown Navy Yard. 

At South Station, Tufts University Development Corporation has been 
tentatively designated as developer of a research center to be constructed 
on the air-rights over the track area of South Station. The project will 
include, in addition to 478,000 square feet of research space, an office 
building of 750,000 square feet, 1,200 parking spaces and a 675-room 
hotel. 

At the Charlestown Navy Yard, Massachusetts General Hospital has 
purchased 650,000 square feet of space for research laboratories in Build- 
ing 149. As part of the Navy Yard's Master Plan, Charlestown Holdings 
Incorporated has been given tentative designation to develop the Yard's 
End for a hotel, adjacent to the new Aquarium and a biomedical research 
center. 

4. Completing, The Rezoning of Boston — The BRA is currently en- 
gaged in an effort to formulate a new, simplified zoning code based on 



151 

planning. The new zoning code will correct the ambiguities and inconsis- 
tencies in the old code. In addition, new zoning districts are being added 
to the code including Open Space, Residential Two, Three and Six-Family 
Districts, Neighborhood Business Districts, Conservation Planning 
Overlay Districts, Neighborhood Design Districts, Economic Develop- 
ment Areas and Institutional Districts. 

Neighborhood Planning initiatives promote citizen participation in the 
land use decisions affecting Boston's neighborhoods. The purpose is to 
enact revised zoning which responds to particular neighborhood needs as 
articulated by community residents. Of critical importance are the needs 
to protect residential areas from encroachment by commercial uses and 
to provide more usable open space, affordable housing, and parking. The 
focus in the neighborhoods is on master planning to balance competing 
land uses. The major zoning changes proposed in the neighborhoods in- 
clude districts reserved for affordable housing, new light manufacturing 
districts, institutional districts, two-, three-, and six-family residential dis- 
tricts, and neighborhood business districts. Special planning for major 
boulevards, cross streets, transportation, parking controls, open space, 
and institutional growth will help to shape the new neighborhood zoning. 
Special overlay districts such as the Conservation Protection Overlay Dis- 
trict and Neighborhood Design District preserve open space qualities on 
potential development sites and enhance neighborhood character 
through quality urban design. 

The current work program for the rezoning effort is as follows: 

• Developing interim zoning plans with residents from the Fort Point 
Channel area, Fenway/Kenmore, Mattapan, Mission Hill, and 
Charlestown. The interim zoning plans will be in effect and will con- 
trol the review of proposed development for a two to three year per- 
iod, during which time the final zoning plans will be created. 

• Complete final zoning plans for Allston-Brighton (interim zoning 
plan enacted August, 1987), Roxbury (interim zoning plan enacted 
August, 1987), and along Dorchester Avenue (interim zoning plan 
enacted September, 1988). Neighborhod master planning studies 
for Chinatown, the South E^nd, Harbor Point, and the Charlestown 
Navy Yard will be developed by the end of 1990. 

• Continuing work on final zoning plans for East Boston, Jamaica 
Plain, and West Roxbury (interim zoning plans enacted in 1989). 

• Completing permanent zoning studies for the North End and Wash- 
ington Street. 

• Developing institutional planning studies and communit\ participa- 
tion procedures for neighborhood inxolvement in institutional plan- 
ning decisions. 

Downtown Planning initiatives were enacted by the Zoning Commis- 
sion in September 1987. The initiatives focus on re-establishing height 
limits as part of Boston's land use tradition, redirecting development to 
underutilized areas, promoting economic development outside the con- 
gested Financial District, establishing historic preser\ ation as a City pri- 
ority, preserving Boston's open space, and pro\ iding barrier free access in 
new developments. Master planning for downtown Boston also requires 
that careful stud>' and planning be undertaken in each of the districts 
within the downtown area. 



152 



Work continues on the Plan for Downtown Boston which includes the 
Central Artery, North and South Stations, and Prudential/Huntington Av- 
enue Districts, the Financial District, Government Center, Cambridge 
Street, Bulfinch Triangle, and Leather District. The planning studies will 
address issues of use, design, traffic, and pedestrian access. The studies 
will require the continuing participation of the community, local busi- 
nesses, and design professionals. 

Development review will continue on major downtown projects in ac- 
cordance with the Development Review Requirements established in 
1987 (Article 31 of the Zoning Code). This amendment focuses on traffic 
and environment impacts, urban design, impact on historic resources, 
and infrastructure system requirements. Major projects brought to com- 
pletion of review and to initial construction will include the Prudential 
Center redevelopment and at least one major Midtown project. 

Major projects, such as the development of the Midtown Cultural Dis- 
trict, redevelopment of Prudential Center, the new Boston Garden facil- 
ity, and the relocation of the New England Aquarium will lay the ground- 
work for improving the already high quality of life in Boston. 

• Realization of the Midtown Cultural District Plan will establish an 
anchor for the city's retail economy and create additional perform- 
ing arts and visual arts spaces in a previously blighted area of the city. 

• The revitalized Prudential Center will create a link between the 
South End and Back Bay communities. 

• The new Boston Garden will create a multi-purpose sports arena as 
well as hotel, office, retail and parking space. 

• Relocation of New England Aquarium to the Charlestown Navy Yard 
will allow for extensive expansion of the Aquarium and create a ma- 
jor center for tourism development. Following the Aquarium's relo- 
cation, its present site at Central Wharf will be prepared for mixed- 
use development. 

• A new focus will be the review of back office/medical research devel- 
opment proposals. 

• Monitoring the Third Harbor Tunnel and Central Artery depression 
projects to ensure that infrastructure consequences and environ- 
mental impacts have a minimal effect on Bostor, and its neighbor- 
hoods. 

With the completion of the rezoning, the initial phase of the "Plan for 
Boston" will be complete. The next phase will provide detailed master 
plans for downtown districts and neighborhoods, as well as development 
of a comprehensive plan to guide the growth in the 1990s and beyond. 
The Plan for Boston, comprising initiatives for revitalizing the harbor, 
building affordable housing and creating jobs, and diversifying and stabi- 
lizing Boston's economy, will be the City's guide to future growth. 

5. Revitalizing Boston's Waterfront — Harbor Planning and Develop- 
ment objectives are designed to create and coordinate programs that pro- 
mote balanced growth, new jobs, housing, economic investment, tax reve- 
nue, water transportation, and publicly accessible open space along the 
Harbor. Job generating commercial development will be encouraged in 
the Charlestown Navy Yard for uses which include medical research, ho- 
tel, retail, leisure and recreational, and office space on Parcels 4, 6, and 7 



153 



(Yard's End) and in the Historic Monument Area. The New England 
Aquarium (the world's largest) will also be relocated to the Charlestown 
Navy Yard on Parcel 5 in Yard's End. Over 1 15,000 square feet of commer- 
cial office space and 600,000 square feet of medical research space has 
tentatively designated for development this year. 

The Charlestown Navy Yard commitment to improvement to the water 
transportation system will continue in cooperation with the City's Trans- 
portation Department. 

Affordable housing will continue to be developed at the Navy Yard; the 
goal is to achieve 25% housing affordability in the housing constructed at 
the Navy Yard. 

Harbor Planning & Development will contribute to the protection of 
Downtown Waterfront/Inner Harbor Piers by coordinating with the Cen- 
tral Artery planning program to ensure that the transportation needs of 
the Harbor neighborhoods are met. Community-based planning and zon- 
ing initiatives will continue, and include: 

• Completion of the Charlestown Navy Yard Master Plan, the largest 
historic preservation effort in the country. Construction in the Navy 
Yard will include $850 million in investment and provide 6,700 con- 
struction jobs and 4,575 permanent jobs. In addition, 25% of all 
housing in the Navy Yard will be affordable to working families. 

• Completion of permanent zoning regulations for the Harborpark 
area , with over 75% already completed. 

• Community review of the Charlestown IPOD. 

• Finalizing guidelines and standards for the 20-mile segment of Har- 
borwalk which stretches from Little Mystic Channel in Charlestown 
to Fish Pier in South Boston. 

• Pedestrian-oriented uses, and the reuse plan for the Northern Ave- 
nue Bridge in the Fort Point Channel area. 

• Completing improvements to Shipyard Park, Pier 3, to provide ac- 
cess and open space in the Harborpark area. 

• Complete the construction of an additional three (33 lineal miles of 
Harborwalk, bringing the total complete to-date to more than 14 
miles. 

• Gain state approval of Boston's Harbor Plan, which will govern 
Chapter 91-Tidelands licensing for waterfront projects. 



CHAPTER 121A 

Under Chapter 121 A of the General Laws as amended, the Authority, 
with the approval of the Mayor, is the administrative agency responsible 
for the approvals of Chapter 121 A projects which provide for payments in 
lieu of taxes to encourage and stimulate residential and commercial de- 
velopment in substandard, decadent, deteriorating or blighted areas. 
Over 130 project applications have been reviewed and approxed after 
duly advertised public hearings. The Prudential Center in the Back Bay is 
the most notable Chapter 121A project. The estimated total \alue of 
these projects amounts to well over one and one-half billion dollars (15). 



154 

RENT EQUITY BOARD 

Constance |. Doty, Administrator 
Office, 709 

MKMBERS 

Maurice Frye 
Stephen Graham 
David Passafaro 

Agnes Porter 
Doris Thompson 

The Rent Equity Board implements and ensures compliance with the 
City of Boston's Rent Equity Ordinance (Chapter 34, Ordinances of 
1984, as amended). The Rent Equity Board is an adjudicatory agency that 
regulates rent increases, evictions, and displacement due to condomin- 
ium conversion for both rent-controlled and vacancy-decontrolled hous- 
ing accommodations. The Board provides special protections to lodging 
houses and trailer parks through a removal permit system. Federally fi- 
nanced properties receive protections to ensure their affordability to low- 
to-moderate income families. The Board also provides the public with 
general information about the Rent Equity law and general landlord/ 
tenant law. The buildings which are subject to the Board's jurisdiction are 
those built before 1969 and containing four or more units. Three unit 
buildings are subject to the Ordinance if they are not owner-occupied. 
Federally financed buildings constructed prior to 1975 are also subject to 
jurisdiction. 

The Department provides information about Boston's Rent Equity Or- 
dinance and assists property owners and tenants with filing proper appli- 
cations and registrations. In addition to processing all application and 
registration documents, the Department holds hearings when appropri- 
ate, assembles documents, and makes inspections to resolve cases. The 
legal staff defends Board decisions, investigates complaints of non- 
compliance, and seeks resolution of violations. The Board handles rent 
adjustments, evictions, condominium protections, exemptions, removal 
permits for lodging houses and trailer parks, building registrations, va- 
cancy decontrol applications, and the annual general adjustment in rents. 
Final decisions on all matters are made by the five-member Board based 
on staff recommendations. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Regulating Certain Residential Rents, Evictions, and Conversions, CBC, 
Ord. 10-2 

State Administrative Procedure, MGLA c. 30A 



155 

RETIREMENT BOARD, BOSTON 

James F. O'Donnell, Executive Officer 
Office, 816 

MEMBERS 

Sally Degan, Acting City Auditor 
Thomas Gately 
John Jennings 

The Boston Retirement System was established on February 1, 1923, 
under the provisions of Chapter 521 of the Acts of 1922, which was ac- 
cepted by the Mayor and City Council in August, 1922. 

An additional retirement system for city and county employees was 
provided by chapter 658 of the Acts of 1945. This act was accepted by the 
City Council June 3, 1946, and approved by the Mayor June 5, 1946. The 
new system, designated as the State-Boston Retirement System, went into 
effect October 1, 1946. Every employee appointed after that date be- 
comes a member of the new system. 

Both systems are administered by a Retirement Board consisting of a 
member appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council; the 
City Auditor, ex-officio; and a member elected by the members of the 
system. The Board serves without compensation. 

The Retirement Board manages the State-Boston Retirement System 
(SBRS) which serves the members and retirees of the City and its agen- 
cies, including the School Department, the Boston Redevelopment Au- 
thority, and the Boston Housing Authority. The three members board 
includes the City Auditor, an appointee of the Mayor, and a third member 
elected by the members of the System. The Board distributes pensions 
and refunds while preserving the System's assets through prudent invest- 
ment. The board governs the SBRS in accordance with the state retire- 
ment law for local governments and the regulations of the state's Public 
Employee Retirement Administration (PERA). 

The Retirement Board is responsible for processing payroll benefits 
each month for approximately 13,300 SBRS retirees and approximately 
1,200 retirees of the noncontributory retirement systems. The Board also 
maintains accounting records pertaining to cash receipts, disbursements, 
and investment transactions of multiple investment funds totalling over 
$800 million. 

The Retirement Board maintains computerized records for 22,000 ac- 
tive member accounts and offers counseling and assistance to its mem- 
bers, particularly as they terminate their employment or retire. The 
Board oversees various other aspects of the retirement system, such as the 
auditing of disability retirees' earnings and the review of the disability 
status of retirees. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Contributory Retirement System for Public Employees, MGLA c. 32s. 1- 
104; Ch. 697, Acts of 1987 

Boston Retirement Act. Ch. 521, Acts of 1922 as amended 
Rules and Regulations, 840 CMR 
CBC Ords. 5-6 & 5-7 



156 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Administration Building, 26 Court Street, 02108 
[Stat. 1875, Chap. 241; Stat. 1898, Chap. 400; Stat. 1900, Chap. 235; Stat. 
1901, Chap. 448; Stat. 1903, Chap. 170; Stat. 1905, Chap. 249; C. C, 
Chaps. 33, and 48; Stat. 1906, Chap. 205, 123, 259, 318, 505; Stat. 
1907, Chaps. 295, 357, 450; Stat. 1908, Chap. 589; Stat. 1909, 
Chaps. 120, 388, 446, 537, 540; Stat. 1910, Chap. 617; Stat. 1911, 
Chaps. 540, 708; Stat. 1912, Chap. 195, 569, 711; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 
337, 363, 389, 615, 779; Stat. 1914, Chaps. 128, 331,489, 73Q, 738; 
Gen. Stat. 1915, Chaps. 78, 81, 90 and Spec. Stat., Chaps. 189, 300, 
304, 372; Spec. Stat. 1917, Chaps. 86, 88, 213, 267, 289 and Gen. 
Stat., Chap. 102; Gen Stat. 1917, Chaps. 84, 169 and Spec. Stat. 
Chap. 146; Spec. Stat. 1918, Chap. 132; Spec. Stat. 1919, Chaps. 
132, 199, 206, 249; Stat. 1920, Chaps. 140, 524, 641; Stat. 1921, 
Chaps. 169, 351; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 169, 351; Stat. 1922, Chaps. 
273, 286; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 284, 308, 381, 460, 488; Stat. 1924, 
Chaps. 380, 479; Stat. 1925, Chaps. 309, 327; Stat. 1926, Chaps. 
153, 314; Stat. 1928, Chap. 382; Stat. 1929, Chap. 256; Stat. 1930, 
Chaps. 283, 313; Stat. 1931, Chaps. 100, 155, 229, 247, 250; Stat. 
1933, Chap. 121; Stat. 1934, Chaps. 145, 228; Stat. 1935, Chaps. 19, 
284; Stat. 1936, Chap. 224; Stat. 1937, Chap. 366; Stat. 1939, Chap. 
142; Stat. 1946, Chaps. 388, 497; Stat. 1947, Chap. 226; Stat. 1948, 
Chaps. 167, 301, 452, 602; Stat, 1949, Chaps. 117, 681; Stat.1951, 
Chaps. 376, 468, 781; Stat. 1952, Chaps. 190, 624; Stat, 1955, 
Chaps. 236, 298, 396, 594, Stat. 1963, Chap. 786; Stat. 1965, Chap. 
208; Stat. 1972, Chap. 150; Stat 1978, Chap. 333; Chap. 190, Acts of 
1982.] 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Term ends January, 1992 

Gerald Anderson 

RosiNA Bowman 

Abigail Browne 

Daniel Burke 

Robert Meany Cappucci 

Margaret Davis-Mullen 

Marian Ego 

John R Grady 

Stephen C. Holt 

Jean McGuire 

John D. O'Bryant 

Juan iTA Wade 

Rita Walsh-Tomasini 

Officers of the School Committee — 1990 

Daniel R. Burke, President 

John R Grady, Vice-President 

Jean McGuire, Treasurer 

* Laval S. Wilson, Superintendent 

**JoSEPii M. McDONOUGii, Acting Superintendent 

Bartholomew P. McCauley, Secretanj 

Leo J. Burke, Business Manager 

* Resigned March 18, 1990 

* "Effective March 1 ' 1 990 



157 
CABINET MEMBERS 



William T. Abbott Chief of Staff 

Joseph Bage West Zone Superintendent 

Mary B. Daniels Executive Assistant to the Superintendent 

School based Management 

Edward Dooley Executive Director, Boston Compact 

Catherine Ellison Senior Officer — Implementation 

Marien Evans General Counsel 

Barbara Fields Senior Officer — Equal Opportunity 

Michael Fung High School Zone Superintendent 

Joyce Grant Deputy Superintendent — Curriculum 

and Instruction 

Clifford B. Janey East Zone Superintendent 

Nydia Mendez Director — Bilingual Education 

Manuel Monteiro Senior Manager, Personnel 

Mary Grassa-O'Neill North Zone Superintendent 

Judith Reigelhaupt Senior Officer Special Education 

Peter Rowe Deputy Superintendent — Management 

Services 



158 



DIRECTORY OF BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
FY 1989-1990 

HIGH SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL 


ADDRESS 


BOSTON HIGH 

451-6860 


152 Arlington Street 

Boston, MA 02116 


BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 


78 Avenue Louis Pasteur 


566-2250/2251 


Boston, MA 02115 


BOSTON LATIN ACADEMY 

266-7546 


174 Ipswich Street 

Boston, MA 02115 


BOSTON TECH HIGH 


55 New Dudlev Street 


445-4381 


Roxbury, MA 02119 


BRIGHTON HIGH 


25 Warren Street 


782-6386/6828 


Brighton MA 02135 


BURKE, JEREMIAH E 


60 Washington Street 


427-0240 


Dorchester, MA 02121 


CHARLESTOWN HIGH 


240 Medford Street 


242-1450/2224/1444 


Charlestnwn MA 021 29 




DORCHESTER HIGH 


9 Peacevale Road 


436-2065 


r)nrr'Vip<;tpr MA 09.1 9.4 




EAST BOSTON HIGH 


86 White Street 


567-2140 


East Boston, MA 02128 


ENGLISH HIGH 


144 McBride Street 


524-4074/3373 


Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 


HYDE PARK HIGH 


655 Metropolitan Avenue 


361-8080/8081/8082 


Hyde Park, MA 02136 


MADISON PARK/HHHORC 


55 New Dudley Street 


445-2440/2441 


Rnvhiirv MA 021 19 




SNOWDEN INT'L HIGH 


150 Newburv Street 


267-9805 


Boston, MA 021 16 


SOUTH BOSTON HIGH 


95 G Street 


268-2751/2928/2929 


South Boston, MA 02127 


WEST ROXBURY HIGH 

323-4866 


1205V.RW. Pafkway 

Wpst Rnvhiirv MA 02132 





MIDDLE SCHOOLS 159 

SCHOOL ADDRESS 

BARNES, JOSEPH H 312 Border Street 

569-6280-6281 East Boston, MA 02128 

(Umana High Address) 

CLEVELAND, GROVER 11 Charles Street 

825-9201/6105 Dorchester, MA 02122 

CURLEY, MARY E 493 Centre Street 

524-2020 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

DEARBORN 35 Greenville Street 

427-2524 Roxbury, MA 02119 

EDISON, THOMAS A 60 Glenmont Road 

782-3005 Brighton, MA 02135 

EDWARDS, CLARENCE R 28 Walker Street 

242-0779 Charlestown, MA 02129 

GAVIN, PATRICK E 215 Dorchester Street 

269-1723 South Boston, MA 02127 

IRVING, WASHINGTON 114 Cummins Highway 

323-2633 Roslindale, MA 02131 

KING, MARTIN L. JR 77 Lawrence Avenue 

445-4120 Dorchester, MA 02121 

LEWENBERG, SOLOMON 20 Outlook Road 

298-9360 Mattapan, MA 02126 

LEWIS 131 Walnut Avenue 

427-4546 Roxbury, MA 02119 

McCORMACK, JOHN W 325 Mt. Vernon Street 

825-7949 Dorchester, MA 02125 

ROGERS, WILLIAM B 15 Everett Street 

361-1990 Hyde Park, MA 02136 

SHAW, ROBERT COULD 20 Mt. Vernon Street 

325-2727 West Roxbury, MA 02132 

TAFT WILLIAM HOWARD 20 Warren Street 

782-0080 Brighton, MA 02135 

THOMPSON, FRANK V 100 Maxwell Street 

282-4040 Dorchester, MA 02124 

TIMILTY JAMES P 205 Roxbury Street 

445-3114 roxbury, MA 02119 

WHEATLEY PHILLIS 20 Kearsage Avenue 

427-3340/3341 Roxbury, MA 02119 

WILSON, WOODROW 18 Crofdand Avenue 

288-4730 Dorchester, MA 02124 



160 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL ADDRESS 

ADAMS, SAMUEL 165 Webster Street 

567-1328 East Boston, MA 02128 

AGASSIZ 20 Child Street 

524-0360/0361 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

ALIGHIERI, DANTE 37 Gove Street 

569-1027 East Boston, MA 02128 

BALDWIN, HARRIET A 121 Corey Road 

566-3511 Brighton, MA 02135 

BATES, PHINEAS 426 Beech Street 

323-2761 Roslindale, MA 02131 

BEETHOVEN 5125 Washington Street 

323-4470 West Roxbury, MA 02132 

BLACKSTONE, WILLIAM 380 Shawmut Avenue 

267-7050/7051 Boston, MA 02118 

BRADLEY, MANASSAH E 110 Beachview Road 

567-5583 East Boston, MA 02128 

CHANNING, WILLIAM 35 Sunnyside Street 

361-0489 Hyde Park, MA 02136 

CHITTICK, JAMES J 154 Ruskindale Road 

361-0353 Mattapan, MA 02126 

CLAP ROGER 35 Harvest Street 

436-8400 Dorchester, MA 02125 

CONDON, JAMES 200 D Street 

269-1000/1002/1003 South Boston, MA 02127 

CONLEY, GEORGE H 450 Poplar Street 

325-0014 Roslindale, MA 02131 

CURLEY, JAMES M 40 Pershing Road 

524-1743 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

DEVER, PAUL A 325 Mt. Vernon Street 

436-7375 Dorchester, MA 02125 

DICKERMAN, QUINCY E 206 Magnolia Street 

445-9479 Roxbury, MA 02121 

ELIOT 16 Charter Street 

227-6595 Boston, MA 02113 

ELLIS, DAVID A 302 Walnut Avenue 

445-0432 Roxbury, MA 021 19 



'\ 



161 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL ADDRESS 

EMERSON, RALPH W. 6 Shirley Street 

427-2790 Roxbury, MA 02119 

ENDICOTX WILLIAM E 2 McLellan Street 

825-5196 Dorchester, MA 02121 

EVERETT, EDWARD 71 Pleasant Street 

265-2762 Dorchester, MA 02125 

FARRAGUT 10 Fenwood Road 

232-1522 Boston, MA 021 15 

FIFIELD, EMILY A 25 Dunbar Avenue 

825-7706 Dorchester, MA 02125 

FULLER, MARGARET 25 Glen Road 

524-3586 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

GARDNER, THOMAS 30 Athol Street 

782-2288 Allston, MA 02134 

GARFIELD, JAMES A 95 Beechroft Street 

254-3145 Brighton, MA 02135 

GREENWOOD, ELIHU 612 Methropolitan Avenue 

361-5393 Hyde Park, MA 02136 

GREENWOOD, SARAH 189 Glenway Street 

436-7690 Dorchester, MA 02121 

GREW, HENRY 40 Gordon Avenue 

361-6618 Hyde Park, MA 02136 

GUILD, CURTIS 5 Ashley Street 

567-4194 East Boston, MA 02128 

HALE, NATHAN 51 Cedar Street 

427-1930 Roxbury, MA 02119 

HALEY, DENNIS C 570 American Legion Hwy 

522-1661 Roshndale, MA 02131 

HAMILTON, ALEXANDER 198 Strathmore Road 

782-0900 Brighton, MA 02135 

HARVARD-KENT 50 Bunker Hill Street 

242-5303 Charlestown, MA 02129 

HENNIGAN, JAMES 200 Heath Street 

427-4573 '. Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

HERNANDEZ, RAFAEL 61 School Street 

522-9571 Roxbury, MA 02119 



162 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL ADDRESS 

HIGGINSON, HENRY L 160 Harrishof Street 

427-7708 Roxbury, MA 02119 

HOLLAND, JOHN P. 85 Olney Street 

265-6656 Dorchester, MA 02121 

HURLEY, JOSEPH J 70 Worcester Street 

536-2566 Boston, MA 02118 

JACKSON MANN 40 Armington Street 

787-5310/5311 Allston, MA 02134 

KENNEDY, JOHN E 7 Bolster Street 

522-3353 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

KENNEDY, PATRICK J 343 Saratoga Street 

569-2681 East Boston, MA 02128 

KENNY THOMAS J 19 Oakton Avenue 

825-7423 Dorchester, MA 02122 

KILMER, JOYCE 35 Baker Street 

327-7745 West Roxbury, MA 02132 

LEE, JOSEPH 155 Talbot Avenue 

265-6500 Dorchester, MA 02124 

MANNING, JOSEPH P 130 Louders Lane 

524-2652 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

MARSHALL, JOHN 35 Westville Street 

436-3130 Dorchester, MA 02124 

MASON, SAMUEL W 150 Norfolk Avenue 

445-2255 Roxbury, MA 02119 

MATHER Meeting House Hill 

265-3764 Dorchester, MA 02122 

MATTAHUNT 100 Hebron Street 

298-0785 Mattapan, MA 02126 

McKAY, DONALD 122 Cottage Street 

567-3967 East Boston, MA 02128 

MENDELL, ELLIS 164 School Street 

524-6986 Roxbury, MA 02119 

MOZART 236 Beech Street 

323-2757 Roslindale, MA 02131 

MURPHY RICHARD J 1 Worrell Street 

288-7621/7622 Dorchester, MA 02122 

O'DONNELL, HUGH R 33 Trenton Street 

569-4072 East Boston, MA 02128 



163 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL ADDRESS 

O'HEARN, PARTICK 1669 Dorchester avenue 

282-3178 Dorchester, MA 02122 

OHRENBERGER, WILLIAM 175 West Boundary Road 

323-7456 '. West Roxbury, MA 02132 

OTIS, JAMES 218 Marion Street 

567-1409 East Boston, MA 02128 

PERKINS, MICHAEL J 50 Burke Street 

269-1959 South Boston, MA 02127 

PERRY, OLIVER H 745 E. Seventh Street 

268-2994 . South Boston, MA 02127 

PHILBRICK, JOHN D 40 Philbrick Street 

327-3883 RosUndale, MA 02131 

QUINCY JOSIAH 885 Washington Street 

426-3514 Boston, MA 02111 

ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN 95 Needham Road 

361-4879 Hyde Park, MA 02136 

RUSSELL, WILLIAM E 750 Columbia Road 

265-7051 Dorchester, MA 02125 

SHAW, PAULINE A 429 Norfolk Street 

436-3145 Dorchester, MA 02124 

STONE, LUCY 22 Regina Road 

825-2656 Dorchester, MA 02124 

SUMNER, CHARLES 15 Basile Street 

325-5322 RosUndale, MA 02131 

TAYLOR, CHARLES H 1060 Morton Street 

298-1486 Mattapan, MA 02126 

TOBIN, MAURICE J 40 Smith Street 

427-3990 Roxbury, MA 02119 

TROTTER, WILLIAM H 135 Humboldt Avenue 

427-3180/3181 Dorchester, MA 02121 

TYNAN, JOSEPH P 650 E. Fourth Street 

268-5316 South Boston, MA 02127 

WARREN-PRESCOTT 50 School Street 

242-5486 Charlestown, MA 02129 

WINSHIP 54 Dighton Street 

254-2007 Brighton, MA 02135 

WINTHROP JOHN 35 Brookford Street 

445-8660 Dorchester, MA 02125 



164 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 
SCHOOL ADDRESS 

ANOTHER COURSE TO 655 Metropolitan Avenue 

COLLEGE — A.C.C Hyde Park, MA 02136 

742-5711/5712 (Hyde Park High Address) 



BARRON ASSESSMENT 


25 Walk Hill Street 


COUNSELING CENTER 

469-4606 


Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

(Parkman Address) 


BOSTON PREP 


86 White Street 


442-5676 


Fast Boston MA 021 28 


(East Boston High Address) 


CARTER CENTER 


396 Northampton Street 


267-6881 


Boston, MA 02118 


EARLY LEARNING 


50 Beechroft Street 


CENTER — NORTH 

254-6672 


Brighton, MA 02135 

^Marv Lvons Center^ 




EARLY LEARNING 


200 Heath Street 


CENTER — WEST 

287-1093 


Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 


EARLY LEARNING 


370 Columbia Road 


CENTER— EAST 


Dorchester, MA 02125 


HORACE MANN UNIT 


40 Armington Street 


787-5313 


Allston, MA 02134 


McKINLY SCHOOLS 
MCKINLEY ELEMENTARY 


90 Warren Avenue 


298-6972/5678 


Boston, MA 02116 


McKINLEYTECH HIGH 


90 Warren Avenue 


298-1142/1403 


Boston, MA 02116 


McKINLEY MIDDLE 


50 Saint Marv Street 


536-4476/4491 


Boston, MA 02215 


McKINLEY VOCATIONAL 

266-3930/3530 


97 Peterborough Street 

Boston, MA 02215 



165 

BOSTON TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 

Room 721, 
Boston City Hall 

Stat. 1986, Chapter 608, changed the name of the Traffic and Parking 
Department to the Boston Transportation Department. 

Officials 

Richard A. Dimino, Commissioner 

William Good, Deputy Commissioner for Operations 

Cm HsiN SiiAO, Deputy Commissioner for Policy & Planning 

Commission Members 

Richard A. Dimino, Chairman 

Ex officio, Associate Commissioners 

Francis M. Roache, Police Commissioner 
Joseph F. Casazza, Commissioner of Public Works 
Leo Stapleton, Fire Commissioner 
Frank Jones, Real Property Commissioner 

Traffic Engineering Division 
Robert A. Drummond, Director 

Enforcement Division 
Jeremiah Connors, Director 

Operations Division 
Chester Morelli, Director 

Office of the Parking Clerk 

Richard A. Dimino, Parking Clerk 
Bruce Graubart, Assistant Parking Clerk 

Policy and Planning 
Cm HsiN Shao, Commissioner 

The mission of the Boston Transportation Department (BTD) is to im- 
prove access into and around the City of Boston. Departmental activities 
involve managing more efficiently the City's current transportation sys- 
tem, enhancing public transportation seivices, managing more efficiently 
the City's limited parking resources, adjudicating and collecting parking 
fines, cooperating and coordinating with relevant government agencies, 
encouraging the use of alternate transportation modes and helping to 
ensure public safety on Boston's streets. 

The BTD monitors and regulates traffic and parking for approximately 
785 miles of roadway and 3,708 public streets. In order to ensure efficient 
and safe flow of traffic and to balance the competing demands for parking 
resources, the Department enforces 42 parking regulations, maintains 
nearly 700 signalized intersections and annually replaces or repairs sev- 
eral hundred of the city's street and traffic signs. 



166 



The Department also continually evaluates and responds to the chang- 
ing transportation needs of the City and its neighborhoods by reevaluat- 
ing traffic patterns, increasing parking enforcement in response to neigh- 
borhood requests, incorporating the city's interests into state and federal 
roadway developments and working to promote alternative modes of 
transportation for commuters. 



AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Establishing Boston Traffic Commission: Power and Duties, Ch. 263, s. 1- 

2, Acts of 1929 as amended by Ch. 253, s. 1, Acts of 1957 
Powers and Duties of Commissioner of Traffic and Parking, CBC St. 7, s. 
201 

Off-street Parking, Parades, Loading Zones, CBC St. 7, s. 206, 207 214 
Violation of Parking Rules in the City of Boston, MGLA c. 90, s. 20A 1/2 
Abandoned Motor Vehicles, MGLA c. 90, s. 22C, Ch. 212, Acts of 1988 
Towing of Illegally Parked Vehicles, CBC St. 7, s. 210; Ch. 228, s. 1, Acts of 

1966 as amended by Ch. 253, Acts of 1973 
Parking Violations, Ch. 190, s. 13-13c, Acts of 1982 (Tregor Legislation) 



BOSTON TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 

August, 1990 

One Way Streets in Boston 1,803 

No Parking Regulations on City Streets 4,118 

Stop Street Locations in Boston 1,487 

Traffic Signals Controlling City Traffic 654 

Off-Street Parking Lot Licenses Issued 180 

Fees Collected from Parking Lot Licenses $683,000 

Parking Meters in the City 8900 

Designated Loading Zone/Valet Parking Areas 340 

Loading Zone/Valet Parking Signs 680 
Fees Collected from Loading Zones/Valet Parking $235,000 

Crosswalks Painted 1,840 

Stop Lines Painted 700 

Centerlines Painted 370 

Lane Lines Painted 185 
Vehicles Removed from City Streets Under Boot 

and Tow Program Jurisdiction 1 1 ,700 

Parking Tickets Issued 2,090,000 

Revenue from Parking Tickets $42.8 Million 

Hearings Conducted on Parking Tickets 14,000 

Resident Parking Permits Issued 44,855 



167 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 

Mezzanine, City Hall 

[Rev. Ord. 1898, Chap. 40; Stat. 1908, Chap. 210; Ord. 1908, Chap. 4; 
C.C, Title IV., Chap. 9; Stat. 1911, Chap. 413; Stat. 1913, Chaps. 
367, 672, 788; Rev. Ord. 1914, Chap. 36; Stat. 1920, Chap. 140; Ord. 
1920, Chap. 12; Ord. 1921, Chaps. 1, 2; Stat. 1922, Chap. 521; Ord. 
1925, Chap. 2; Ord. 1926, Chap. 1; Ord. 1930, Chap. 7; Ord. 1935, 
Chap. 3; Ord. 1945, Chap. 10; Ord. 1954, Chaps. 2, 6; Rev. Ord. 
1961,Chap. 25; Ord. 5-5.10.] 

Lee F. Jackson, Collector-Treasurer 

George E. Mahoney, First Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Treasury Divi- 
sion 
John E. Foley, First Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Collecting Division 
Vivian Leo, Second Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Treasury Division 
Celia Barton, Second Assistant Collector-Treasurer, Collecting Division 

Treasury Division 
Office, Mezzanine, City Hall 

The Collector-Treasurer has the care and custody of the current funds 
of the City, of all monies, properties, and securities placed in his charge by 
any statute or ordinance, or by any gift, devise, bequest, or deposit, and 
pays all bills and demands against the City. 

The Collector-Treasurer is also County Collector-Treasurer, Treasurer- 
Custodian of Boston Retirement Board; Custodian of the Boston Public 
School Teachers' Retirement Fund, Managing Trustee of the Neighbor- 
hood Housing Trust, Managing Trustee of the Neighborhood Jobs Trust, 
and Treasurer of the George Robert White Fund. He publishes reports 
yearly, also monthly statements. 

Trust Office 

708 City Hall 

Robert Fleming, Acting Executive Secretary 

TRUSTEES OF CHARITABLE DONATIONS 
FOR INHABITANTS OF BOSTON 

(Chap. 368, Acts of 1970) 

TRUSTEES 

Terms ending May 1, 1991 

Minnie Clark, Secretary Mary Donovan 

Juan A. Flores Mary MacInnes 

Rev. Walter J. Martin, Vice Chairman 

Terms ending May 1, 1992 

John J. Lee, Treasurer Joseph Tehan 

Ellen Parker 

Terms Ending May 1, 1993 

Mary Baker Joe P.K. Chin 

Joseph F. Fisher, Chairman 



168 



OPERATIONS/FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 

Citv of Boston, Trust Office 

Boston Citv Hall, Room 717, Boston, MA 02201 

725-3692 

TiiERESE M. Donovan, Coordinator 

The Overseers of the Poor in the Town of Boston, a corporation estab- 
lished in 1722 by act of the Legislature, were succeeded in 1864 by the 
corporation called "Overseers of the Poor in the City of Boston," consist- 
ing of twelve residents of Boston, all of whom are appointed annually to 
serve for the term of three years from the first day of May. In 1921 the 
name of the corporation was changed to Overseers of the Public Welfare. 
The members of the corporation also constitute the Trustees of John Boyl- 
ston's Charitable Donations. The total book value of the 18 permanent 
charity funds in the custody of the corporation on March 31, 1990 was 
$1,993,925, the annual income from which ($1 10,000. in 1990) is distrib- 
uted in accordance with the terms of the donations. 



The George Francis Parkman 
Trust Fund 

Operations/Financial Management 

City of Boston, Treasury Department — Trust Office 

Boston City Hall, Room 717, Boston, Massachusetts 02201 

725-3414 

Robert J. Fleming, Executive Secretary 
Richard DePiano, Financial Manager 

Mr. George Francis Parkman, a noted 19th century Boston banker, di- 
rected in his will of 1887 that the residue of his estate be used by the City 
of Boston to create a permanent fund for "the maintenance and improve- 
ment of the (Boston) Common and Parks now existing." He further di- 
rected that any income from this fund not expended within one year must 
be returned to the fund for reinvestment. 

Acting on these instructions, the City of Boston officially established 
the George Francis Parkman Fund on March 9, 1909. Disbursements 
from the fund are made upon the recommendation of the City of Boston 
Parks Commissioner subject to the rules governing appropriations. 

The following parks, in existence in 1887, which by their area cover 
(over 1 acre) and by their topography and character are "parks" in the 
sense of this word as used in Mr. Parkman's Will are: 

1. The Boston Common 

2. The Public Garden 

3. The Fens 

4. Olmsted Park, Riverway 

5. Ward's Pond, Riverway 

6. Jamaica Pond 



169 

7. Franklin Park 

8. Highland Park 

9. Horatio Harris Park 

10. Malcolm X (Washington) Park 

Disbursements from the Parkman Fund have funded more than $2.0 
Million in capital improvements at the above mentioned parks over the 
last five years (ending 1990). 

George Robert White Fund 

Trustees (FY '91) 

Raymond L. Flynn, Mayor, City of Boston, Chairman 

Christopher A. Iannella, President, Boston City Council 

Sally Degan, Auditor, City of Boston 

Rudolph F. Pierce, President, Boston Bar Association 

Stephen J. Sweeney, President, Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce 

Operations/Financial Manager 

City of Boston Treasury Department — Trust Office 
Room 717, Boston City Hall, Boston, Massachusetts 02201 

725-3414 

Robert J. Fleming, Executive Secretary 

Richard DePiano, Fund Manager 

Judith Akins, Fund Manager 

Legal Advisor 

Joseph I. Mulligan, Jr., Corporation Counsel, City of Boston 

The late George Robert White, who died in Boston, January 27, 1922, 
left the residue of his estate to the City of Boston to be held as a perma- 
nent charitable trust fund "the net income only to be used for creating 
works of public utility and beauty, for the use and enjoyment of the inhab- 
itants of the City of Boston." 

Acting on these instructions, the City of Boston officially established 
the George Robert White Fund in 1922. The control and management of 
the fund is in the hands of a board of five trustees, consisting of the Mayor 
as Chairman, the President of the City Council, the City Auditor, the 
President of the Boston Bar Association and the President of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Since its inception, monies from the White Fund have been earmarked 
for cultural, recreational and community projects that address the bene- 
factor's intent. The first expenditures, during the 1920s, created a net- 
work of community health centers to serve the medical needs of neigh- 
borhood residents. These centers continue to provide vital senices today. 
The Paul Revere Mall in the North End, created in 1922 and featuring a 
statue of the patriot designed by Cyrus E. Dallin, serves as a continuing 



170 



reminder of Boston's place in American history while offering a pleasant 
respite from the congestion of Hanover Street. White Fund monies were 
also used to build the Rosa Parks Day Care Center in Roxbury; the Orient 
Heights Recreation Center in East Boston; the War Veterans Section of 
the Mount Hope Cemetery; pools in the North End and Charlestown; and 
the Community Resource Center in Franklin Park. 

In 1985, to ensure that these facilities continued to meet the changing 
needs of Boston's diverse neighborhoods, the White Fund Trustees un- 
dertook a detailed analysis of the structural conditions and operational 
needs of the fund's various facilities. 

With this analysis as a guide, the Trustees over the ensuing five years 
authorized more than $7.0 Million for a series of comprehensive capital 
improvements. These expenditures have allowed for expanded services 
and increased building efficiency and will ensure that the facilities owned 
by the White Fund continue to provide a "public utility" for the citizens 
of Boston for years to come. 

White Fund Facilities 

GRW Bunker Hill Health Center, Charlestown 

GRW East Boston Health Center 

GRW Harvard Street Health Center, Dorchester 

GRW Hyde Park Health Center 

GRW North End Community Health Center 

GRW South Boston Health Center 

GRW Uphams Corner Health Center, Dorchester 

GRW Cloughtery Pool, Charlestown 

GRW Mirabella Pool, North End 

GRW War Memorial Site, The Fens 

GRW War Veterans Memorial, Mt. Hope Cemetery 

GRW Orient Heights Rec. Center, East Boston 

GRW Paul Revere Mall ("The Prado"), North End 

GRW Community Resource Center, Roxbury 

GRW Rosa Parks Day Care Center, Roxbury 

GRW Youth Leadership Center, James Michael Curley House, J. P. 



The Edward Ingersoll Browne 
Trust Fund 

CBC 20-5 

Commissioners 

Raymond L. Flynn, Mayor, City of Boston 

Christopher A. Iannella, Vice-Chairman, Boston City Councillor 

Lee F. Jackson, Collector-Treasurer, City of Boston 

Joseph L Mulligan, Jr., Corporation Counsel, City of Boston 



171 



Operations/Financial Management 

City of Boston Treasury Department — Trust Office 

Boston City Hall, Room 717, Boston, MA 02201 

725-3414 

Robert J. Fleming, Executive Secretary 
CiiANTAL F. DuciiARD, Fund Manager 



Mr Edward I. Browne, a successful Trust Attorney, directed in his will 
of 1892 that one third of his estate be used by the City of Boston to create 
a special fund "for the adornment and benefit (of Boston) by the erection 
of statues, monuments, fountains for men and beasts and for the orna- 
ment of its streets, ways, squares, and parks in such a manner as will 
promote the pleasure, comfort, education, patriotism and good taste of its 
citizens". This bequest, Mr. Browne explained, was to be treated as a 
special fund to be "forever held, managed, invested and reinvested" by 
the City. The money became available to the City in 1974. As of 1990, 
more than 100 projects totalling approximately $9,500,000 have been 
funded by the Browne Fund. 

The guidelines of the Browne Fund are outlined in a City Ordinance 
passed in 1975. The ordinance established the Browne Fund Commis- 
sion, a body which acts as the Fund's Trustees. The Commission consists 
of the Mayor, who serves as Chairman, the senior member of the City 
Council and the Collector-Treasurer. The Commissioners are the sole 
and exclusive agents of the City for the purpose of expending the income 
of the Fund. The ordinance further established the Browne Fund Com- 
mittee to review all proposals to the Browne Fund. The Committee, com- 
prised of a representative of the Boston Society of Landscape Architects 
and the Boston Art Commission, and the Commissioners of Public Works 
and Parks and Recreation, reports its recommendations to the Commis- 
sioners through the fund's manager 

General guidelines for the Browne Fund require that proposed pro- 
jects: 

• Transform the space; 

• affect a maximum number of people in the area; 

• encourage or complement development of additional amenities in 
the area; 

• improve existing facilities; 

• should be in an area where the surroundings lack similar amenities; 

• are durable; 

• are in an area of high visibility; 

• include a maintenance agreement with abuttors and/or local organi- 
zations: 

To assure that sites are maintained properly, the staff of the Browne 
Fund annually inspects all projects supported by the Fund. 



172 



VETERANS' SERVICES DEPARTMENT 
20 CHURCH STREET 02116 

Thomas B. Materazzo, Veterans' Benefits and 

Services Commissioner 

Thomas J. Lyons, Deputy Commissioner 

The Veterans' Services Department was established as a department of 
the City of Boston by the ordinances of 1954, Chapter 2, Section 66, and 
is under the charge of a Commissioner who is appointed by the Mayor. 
This department performs the functions of the Department of Veterans' 
Services, which it replaces. The Commissioner exercises all powers and 
duties for the distribution of state and city benefits to eligible veterans 
and their dependents in the City of Boston. Under his direction assistance 
is rendered to veterans and their dependents of the Spanish-American 
War, Philippine Insurrection, China Relief Expedition, Mexican Expedi- 
tion, World War I, World War II, and service with the Armed forces dur- 
ing the Korean and Vietnam Conflicts. 

This department provides information, advice and assistance to vet- 
erans of all wars to enable them to procure the benefits to which they are 
entitled relative to employment, vocational and educational opportuni- 
ties, hospitalization, medical care, pensions and other medical benefits. 

GRAVES REGISTRATION DIVISION 
20 CHURCH STREET 02116 

This division maintains the record of all veterans who were Boston resi- 
dents at the time of their death. It provides information to persons making 
inquiries relative to the burial benefits of deceased veterans. It assists in 
the application for grave markers or headstones for veterans graves. The 
division contracts with veterans organizations to ensure the decoration of 
veterans graves and veterans memorial squares on Memorial Day. It as- 
sists in the burial expenses for indigent veterans. It also assists in the 
burial of veterans at the National Cemetery in Bourne, Massachusetts. 
AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, Ord. 1954, c. 2, s. 66, CBC Ord. 12-2 

Veterans' Benefits, MGLA c. 115, as amended 

Appropriation for Grave Decoration, MGLA c. 115, s. 9 

BOSTON WATER AND SEWER COMMISSION 

425 Summer Street, 02210 

[Chapter 436 of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1977.] 

COMMISSIONERS 

RoxANA Marchosky Term Expires 1/92 

Lisa G. Chapnick Term Expires 1/93 

Mary C. Nee Term Expires 1/94 

Robert J. Ciolek, Executive Director 

In July of 1977, a Boston home rule petition proposing the establish- 
ment of a Boston Water and Sewer Commission was filed with the Massa- 



173 



chusetts State Legislature. Having been approved by the Boston City 
Council and Mayor Kevin H. White, this petition charged a commission 
with sole responsibility for the provision and maintenance of water and 
sewer services formerly provided by the Water and Sewer Divisions of the 
City of Boston's Public Works Department. 

Upon signing by the Governor of chapter 436 of the General Laws of 
Massachusetts on July 18, 1977, the home rule petition was adopted as 
state law and the Boston Water and Sewer Commission came into exist- 
ence. 

The Boston Water and Sewer Commission assumed full operations on 
January 1, 1978. Also on that date, all former employees of the city's 
Water and Sewer Divisions became employees of the commission. 

The three commissioners, who serve without compensation are ap- 
pointed to staggered terms by the Mayor with the approval of the City 
Council. The commissioners hire the executive director who is responsi- 
ble for the day-to-day management of the Boston Water and Sewer Com- 
mission. 

Since its inception, the Boston Water and Sewer Commission has prac- 
ticed innovative financial strategies that have allowed for capital improve- 
ments while securing a reputation for the Commission as one of the best 
managed utilities in the country. 

Today, however, we are faced with a future that calls for tighter cost 
controls, fiscal austerity and an ever-vigilant, ongoing scrutiny of our 
budgets and resources. 

The clean-up of Boston Harbor involves costs of staggering propor- 
tions. Unfortunately, because of the abdication of the responsibility of the 
federal and state governments in providing grants for this project, our 
customers will pay much more for water and wastewater services. Due to 
existing laws and our commitment to the quality of our water and waste- 
water systems, capital cost increases are largely unavoidable. 

As we enter this period of rapidly escalating rates, BWSC will actively 
seek ways to continue delivering high quality services in the most cost- 
effective manner 

The major impetus for the creation of the Commission was to generate 
adequate revenue to meet the cost of proper operation and maintenance 
of the City's water and sewer system. 

Currently, rates must be established at a level sufficient to generate 
revenues to recover the full costs of operations on a fair and equitable 
basis, to encourage water conservation, and to provide continued dis- 
counts for the elderly and disabled. 

With the creation of the MWRA and its mission to clean up Boston 
Harbor as well as upgrade the existing water and sewer infrastructure, the 
City is now feeling the impact of increased rates. To assure accurate rate 
levels, the Commission carefully monitors metering at the 29 points 
where water is delivered by the MWRA and independently reviews Au- 
thority ratemaking methodology. 

The BWSC has developed several model conservation programs to in- 
sure that Boston residents, businesses and visitors continue to receive a 
stable supply of clean pure water Successful conserx ation programs in- 
clude: 



174 



• An aggressive leak detection and repair program which has 
helped to reduce Boston's water consumption from 150 milhon gal- 
lons per day in 1976 to 111.4 million gallons per day in 1989 - a 
reduction of 26 percent. In 1989 alone, the program saved 10.1 mil- 
lion gallons per day; 

• A progressive rate structure which promotes water conservation 
by charging a higher rate for higher amounts of water used; 

• Ongoing domestic and industrial conservation programs. 

The BWSC has taken several major steps to control daily discharge of 
sewage into the harbor. Through the construction of two new interceptors 
in 1988 and the systematic cleaning of existing interceptors, we have en- 
larged our capacity for transporting sewage and have virtually eliminated 
dry weather overflows. 

During wet weather, Boston's sewage system, which combines waste- 
water and storm drainage, often overflows at dozens of points around the 
harbor. These combined sewer overflows (CSOs), are a major source of 
pollution in the harbor and its tributaries. 

The BWSC has already separated over 4,600 feet of combined sewers, 
significantly reducing the threat of sewage spills during wet weather. In 
addition, the Commission exceeds federal permit requirements for in- 
spection and maintenance of our tidegates and regulators, which help 
control the flow of combined sewage into the harbor. 

The BWSC is actively locating and correcting illegal sewage connec- 
tions to storm drains, thus reducing another source of contaminants being 
discharged into the City's waterways. And by using the Calf Pasture CSO 
Pumping Station as a back-up to the Massachusetts Water Resources Au- 
thority treatment plant, BWSC is providing an outlet for combined sew- 
age during storms and is treating harmful bacteria by chlorinating the 
flow into Dorchester Bay. 

WOMEN'S COMMISSION 

(An Office of the Mayor) 

Elaine Taber, Mayor's Advisor on Women 

Office 603 

The mission of the Boston Women's Commission is to assist women of 

the City in overcoming all barriers to full equality and equal participation. 

This is accomplished through research, education, outreach, advocacy, 

and special projects. 

The services provided by the Women's Commission include outreach 
to individuals and groups; communications through a newsletter and 
mailings; organizing through working groups and task forces; educatiqn 
through a variety of special projects; and advocacy through support of 
legislative initiatives. The Commission collaborates with various state and 
City agencies and non-profit organizations in addressing women's issues. 
It also offers referrals to outside agencies that deal more specifically with 
issues of concern to the Commission. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 
CBC. Ord. 15-1 



175 

YOUTH FUND 
SAFE NEIGHBORHOOD FLAN 
MAYOR'S OFFICE 5TH FLOOR 

The Youth Fund appropriation will be used to support a wide range of 
activities to assist community groups, non-profit organizations, and City 
agencies to reduce violence, gang activities, and drugs plaguing Boston 
neighborhoods. While many City departments provide services to 
Boston's youth, the Youth Fund will be directed to activities outlined in 
the City's Safe Neighborhood Plan, Other specific components of the 
Plan are included in appropriations to Community Schools and the De- 
partment of Health and Hospitals. 

This appropriation will be used to support grants to fulfill or support 
initiatives outlined in the Mayor's Safe Neighborhood Plan. The Parks and 
Recreation Department will be responsible for providing staffing and ad- 
ministrative support for the Fund. 

The Safe Neighborhood Plan of the City of Boston is a comprehensive 
blueprint reflecting the input of hundreds of people and scores of com- 
munity organizations. Neighborhood meetings, seminars and discussions 
have produced hundreds of ideas which have been distilled into dozens of 
points comprising an action agenda for Boston's Safe Neighborhood Plan. 
The action agenda contains numerous items, each of which demands sus- 
tained attention and priority. 

Overall, the Plan is organized around these themes which together 
create a balanced approach: 

• IMPROVE OUR EDUCATION SYSTEM AND EXPAND ECO- 
NOMIC OPPORTUNITY We must work together to enhance our 
education system and to expand economic opportunities and jobs 
in our communities. Without hope and opportunity we will never 
replace the drugs and despair which threaten a whole generation of 
voung people. 

• COORDINATE LAW ENFORCEMENT We must insure that law 
enforcement at all levels — city, state and federal — is coordinated 
and that the criminal justice system works effectively for the peo- 
ple. 

• FOSTER COMMUNITY AND FAMILY RESPONSIBILITY We 
must work to foster community and parental responsibility to both 
prevent criminal behavior on the part of youth and to be account- 
able to the communitv when such behavior occurs. 



YOUTH SERVICES COMMISSION 

CBCOrd. 12-6.1 

There shall be in the City of Boston a \buth Services Commission con- 
sisting of the Superintendent of Schools, the Commissioner of Health and 
Hospitals, the Police Commissioner, the Commissioner of Parks and Rec- 
reation, the director of the Community School program and tlie director 
of the Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services, ex officio or their 



176 



respective designees, the Chairman of the City Council Special Commit- 
tee on Youth Services, ex officio, and eight (8) members appointed by the 
Mayor each for a term expiring on the first Monday of the January follow- 
ing the next biennial municipal election at which a Mayor is elected. In 
making appointments to the commission, the Mayor shall appoint per- 
sons with demonstrated experience in counseling, advising or employing 
youth; experience as a supervisor or director of a youth program or agency 
in Boston; experience in traditional or alternative educational programs 
for youth; or experience in the delivery of health or drug abuse prevention 
services to children or adolescents. At least one of the Mayor's appointees 
to the commission shall be a young person between the ages of fifteen (15) 
and nineteen (19). At least one of the Mayor's appointees to the commis- 
sion shall be a parent of a child or children under age eighteen (18). At 
least one of the Mayor's appointees shall be a Boston Housing Authority 
tenant. 

The Mayor shall designate one member of the Commission as Chair- 
man. All members shall serve without compensation, but shall be reim- 
bursed for expenses necessarily incurred in the performance of their du- 
ties. 

The Commission shall evaluate the delivery of youth services in 
Boston; shall advise the Mayor and the City Council on ways to expand 
and coordinate counseling, employment, health, educational and recrea- 
tional programs for the youth in Boston and to minimize drug abuse and 
violence among children and adolescents; shall work to coordinate the 
delivery of youth services by the various departments and agencies of the 
City; shall work to coordinate the delivery of youth services in Boston by 
other governmental and private agencies; shall work to coordinate and 
encourage private sponsorship and investment in youth programs in 
Boston and shall direct and oversee the annual compilation and publica- 
tion of a comprehensive directorv of youth services in Boston. 
(Ord. 1989 c. 10 §§1,2) 



COUNTY 
OFFICIALS 



178 
COUNTY OF SUFFOLK 

The care, custody and control of the Suffolk County courts was trans- 
ferred from the City to the Commonweath on October 1, 1988 pursuant 
to Chapter 203 of the Acts of 1988. All other debts and expenses of the 
Countv of Suffolk are borne by the Citv of Boston, unless otherwise speci- 
fied. 

County Commissioners for the County of Suffolk — The Mayor and 
City Council of Boston 

County Auditor — Sally Degan 
County Treasurer — Lee Jackson 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

5th Floor, Old Court House, 02108 

Register of Deeds — Paul R. Tierney, Esq. Elected by the people in 1976, 

1982, and 1988. Term ends the first Wednesday in January, 1995. 

The Register is ex officio Assistant Recorder of the Land Court. 
First Assistant Register — James C. Doyle, Jr., Esq., Gen. Laws, Chap. 36, 

Sec. 4. 
Second Assistant Register — Michael T. O'Brien, Esq., Gen. Laws, Chap. 

36, Sec. 5. 
Third Assistant Register — Joseph F. Ciardi, Gen. Laws, Chap. 36, Sec. 5. 
Fourth Assistant Register — Ronald J. Itri, Esq., Gen. Laws, Chap. 36, 

Sec. 5 
Technical Assistant — Henry H. Silverman, Esq., Gen. Laws, Chap. 185, 

Sec. lOA. 
Technical Assistant — Eugene F. Sullivan, Esq., Gen. Laws, Chap. 185, 

Sec. lOA. 

The Suffolk County Registry of Deeds is responsible for recording 
deeds, mortgages, liens, agreements, and other legal documents pertain- 
ing to real estate within Suffolk County which includes the Cities of 
Boston, Chelsea, Revere, and the Town of Winthrop. 

Legal documents pertaining to real estate in Suffolk County are re- 
corded, indexed, microfilmed, enlarged and bound into permanent re- 
cord books for public use in the examination of real estate titles. Micro- 
film of all record books is stored for protection. The Registered Land 
Division, upon the conveyance of real property, issues a new Certificate of 
Title which is guaranteed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All 
related documents are endorsed by the Assistant Recorder who is also 
Register of Deeds for Suffolk County. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Enabling Legislation, MGLA c. 36 

Election of Register, MGLA c. 54, s. 157 

Conveyance of Land, Condominiums, and Real Property, MGLA c. 
183, MGLA c. 183A, MGLA c. 184 

Liens on Building and Land, MGLA c. 254 



179 



SHERIFF 

SherifFs Office 
Room 104, New Court House, 02108 — 725-8200 

Sheriff — Robert C. Rufo. Term ends first Wednesday in January, 
1993. 

Suffolk County Jail 
200 Nashua Street, 02114 — 725-4009 

Special Sheriff — John M. Brassil 

Civil Process Division 
11 Beacon Street, 02108 — 227-2541 

Chief Deputy Sheriff — Mark C. Gaisford 

Deputy Sheriffs for the Service of Civil Process — 

James Crowley, James Brooks, Stephen A. Christophono, 

Peter Golden, Linda A. Joyce, William Lawlor, William 

Monahan, Salvatore Oliva, Daniel Sullivan, Edward J. 

Tobin, Melvin T. Toon, Richard Turner, Robert G. Tyler. 

The Department is responsible for the care, custody, and control 
of prisoners housed at the Suffolk County Jail. The Sheriff also main- 
tains a leadership role in ongoing efforts to improve the law enforce- 
ment and criminal justice systems within Suffolk County. 

The Department provides safe and secure confinement for all pris- 
oners committed to the Suffolk County Jail. It maintains detainee 
intake and release records, provides daily food, laundry, legal, and 
medical services, and transports prisoners to and from the courts of 
Suffolk County and various detention centers throughout the Com- 
monwealth. FY91 will be the first full fiscal year of operations at the 
new Suffolk County Jail at Nashua Street. 

AUTHORIZING STATUTES/ORDINANCES 

Provisions of a County Jail, MGLA c. 34, s. 3 

Election, Term of Sheriff, MGLA c. 37, s. 1; MGLA c. 54, s. 159 

Custody and Control of Jails, MGLA c. 125, s. 1; MGLA c. 126, s. 

16,33 

Transportation of Prisoners, MGLA c. 37, s. 24-25 

Compliance with Correctional Standards, MGLA c. 127, s. la-lb 

Detention of Prisoners from other Countries, MGLA c. 279, s. 15 

Classification of Prisoners, MGLA c. 127, s. 20 

Medical Care for Prisoners, MGLA c. 127, s. 177a 

Custody of Prisoners, MGLA c. 248, s. 18 



ISO 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Sixth Floor, New Court House, 02108 

[Gen. Laws, Chap. 12, § 12, etc.; Stat. 1910, Chaps. 373, 439; Stat. 1912, 
Chap. 576; Stat. 1913, Chap. 602; Gen. Stat. 1919, Chap. 269; Stat. 
1920, Chap. 451; Stat. 1922, Chap. 277; Stat. 1923, Chaps. 398, 

485.] 

District Attorney — Newman A. Flanagan 
Executive Assistant — David M. Rodman 
Administrative Secretary — Helen Capeless 
First Assistant — Paul K. Leary 

Chief Trial Counsel — Thomas J. Mundy, Jn 

Administrative Secretary — Audrey Megguier 



Ames, Mary K. 
Andrus/.kiewicz, Lillian C. 
Barbara, Dominic J. 
Bartoloni, Charles J. 
Baylor, Robert E. 
Beauchesne, Philip T. 
Beland, Lynn M. 
Benson, Robert F. 
Brody, Alvan 
Broker, Phyllis J. 
Burns, Edward M. 
Canavan, John A. 
Carabetta, Ralph 
Cass, Marcy C. 
Coffey, James W. 
Coffey, John F. 
Conley, Daniel F. 
Connolly, Paul F 
Coughlin, Francis E. 
Curran, Hugh R. 
Daly Charles R. 
Doherty Daniel E. 
Donahue, Ellen M 
Donovan, John F. Ill 
Dunn, Vincent P. 
Dwyer, Bernard J. 
Evangelidis, Lewis G. 
Feeney Robert F. 
Franzese, William P. 
Freedman, Forrest S. 
Fulham, Ellen L. 
Gaffney, Michael F. 



Assistants 

Gannon, Paul J. 
Griffm, Robert M. 
Harjo, Jennifer 
Henson, Leonard J. 
Hines, Karene-Sean E. 
Honan, Brian J. 
Hurley, Nancy A. 
Inker, Lauren 
Kelly, Eileen A. 
Kelly, Joseph C. 
Khanzanov, Marina 
King, Frances A. 
Kirkpatrick, Katherine J. 
Kopelman, David H. 
Larkin, James J. 
Leone, Gerard T. Jr 
Lewis, Maryanne 
Lindmark, Pamela 
Lugo-Frank Pedro 
Makaitis, Nijole 
Malone, Gerard F. 
Mark, David B. 
Markham, DebraJ. 
Marposon, Daniel M. 
McCarthy Kathy M. 
McClellan, Andrew R. 
McDonough, James M. 
McDonough, Joseph A. 
McKenna, Robert J. 
Miller, Rosalind Henson 
Motherway, Carmel A. 
Moynahan, Ronald F. 



Mullane, Daniel C. 
Murray Joseph F. 
O'Brien, Leslie W. 
O'Meara, Francis A. 
Orfanello, Mary A. 
Perry, Douglas J. 
Phelan, Kathleen M. 
Pizziferri, Mark J. 
Pomarole, Michael J. 
Pricopoulos, Rosemarie 
Redstone, Brent D. 
Relyea-Chew, Annemarie 
Riordon, Brendon T. 
Santisi, Frank J. 
Schubert, Gary W. 
Shea, Gerald B. 
Shea, Walter J. 
Stanziani, Susan T. 
Sullivan, Edward Michael 
Sullivan, Jane A. 
Sullivan, Mark 
Sullivan, Richard J. 
Summerville, Mark Hart 
Sweeney, James S. 
Tiernan, Arthur M. 
Tochka, Robert N. 
Tracy, Sheila J. 
Trevellion, Charles H. 
Underwood, Susan 
Valerio, John R. 
Wechsler, Pamela J. 
White, Mark G. 



181 



MEMBERS OF CITY GOVERNMENT 



Mayors and Certain Other Officials 
Since 1822 
1909-1990 



Orators Appointed by the City Since 1771 



182 



James M. Curley 
Daniel A. Whelton 
Daniel J. Donnellyt 
George P. Anderson 
Walter Ballantyne 
Frederick J. Brand 
W. Dudley Cotton, Jn 



1909 

Mayor 

GEORGE A. HIBBARD* 

Aldermen 

Frederick J. Brand, Chairman 

James P. Timiltv 
J. Frank O'Hare 
John J. Attridge 
Charles L. Carr 
Thomas J. Giblin 
Matthew Hale 



Wardl 
Edward C. R. Bagley 
Frank A. Goodwin 
Joseph A. Hoey 

Ward 2 
Joseph H. Pendergast 
Dannis A. O'Neil 
Michael J. Brophy 

Ward 3 
James J. Brennan 
Joseph A. Dart 
William J. Murray 

Ward 4 
Francis M. Ducey 
Patrick B. Carr 
James I. Green 

Ward 5 
John J. Buckley 
William E. Carney 
Edward A. Troy 

Ward 6 
Stephen Gardella 
Francis D. O'Donnell 
Alfred Scigliano 

Ward? 
John L. Donovan 
John T Kennedy 
Dominick F Spellman 

Wards 
James J. Ryan 
James A. Bragan 
Adolphus M. Burroughs 

Wards 
Issac Gordon 
Robert J. Howell 
Thomas B. McKeagney 



John T. Priest, City Clerk 

COUNCILMEN 

George C. McCabe, President 

Ward 10 
J. Henderson Allston 
Channing H. Cox 
William S. Kinney 

Ward 11 
Courtenay Crocker 
Theodore Hoague 
Charles H. Moore 

Ward 12 
Seth Fenelon Arno 
Alfred G. Davis 
Francis J. H. Jones 

Ward 13 
Leof McCullought 
Stephen A. Welch 
Coleman E. Kelly 

Ward 14 
Cornelius J. Fitzgerald 
Thomas J. Casey 
Joseph L. Collins 

Ward 15 
John O'Hara 
William T Conway 
Joseph A. O'Bryan 

Ward 16 
John D. McGivern 
Hugh M. Garrity 
William D. McCarthy 

Wardl? 
Thomas M. Joyce 
Francis J. Brennan 
John D. Connors 



Joseph O'Kane, Clerk 



Ward 18 
Daniel F. Cronin 
Michael F O'Brien 
Goerge Kenney 

Ward 19 
Peter A. Hoban 
William J. Kohler 
John J. Donovan 

Ward 20 
Charles T Harding 
Harry R. Gumming 
William Smith, Jr. 

Ward 21 
William N. Hackett 
John Ballantynr 
Walter R. Meins 

Ward 22 
William H. Morgan 
George Penshorn 
Bernhard G. Krug 

Ward 23 
George W Garruth 
George W Smith 
Ward D. Prescott 

Ward 24 
Frank B. Crane 
James A. Hart 
Clifford C. Best 

Ward 25 
Edward C. Webster 
George C. McCabe 
Charles H. Warren 



"Elected for two years tDied June 23, 1909 

tResignedJune3, 1909 



183 



Term Ends in 1913 
John J. Attridge 
Matthew Hale 
Walter L. Colhns 



1910 

Mayor 
JOHN F, FITZGERALD 

City Council 
Walter Ballantyne, President 

Term Ends in 1912 
James M. Ciirley 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 



Term Ends in 1911 
Frederick J. Brand 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 



Term End in 1914 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 
Ernest E. Smith 



1911 

Mayor 

JOHN E FITZGERALD 

City Council 

Walter L. Collins, President 

Term Ends in 1913 
John J. Attridge 
Matthew Hale 
Walter L, Collins 



Term Ends in 1912 
James M. Curley 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 



Term Ends in 1915 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 
John A. Coulthurst 



1912 

Mayor 

JOHN F FITZGERALD 

City Council 

John J. Attridge, President 

Term Ends in 1914 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 
Ernest E. Smith 



Term Ends in 1913 
John J. Attridge 
Matthew Hale 
Walter L. Collins 



Term Ends in 1916 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James A. Watson 



1913 

Mayor 
JOHN F FITZGERALD 

City Council 
Thomas J. Kenny, President 

Term Ends in 1915 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 
John A. Coulthurst 



Term Ends in 1913 
Daniel J. McDonald 
Timothy J. Buckley 
Ernest E. Smith 



Term Ends in 1917 
Daniel J. McDonald 
George W. Coleman 
William H, Woods 



1914 

Mayor 

JAMES M. CURLEY 

City Council 

Daniel J. McDonald, President 

Term Ends in 1914 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James A. Watson 



Term Finds in 1913 
Walter Ballantyne 
Thomas J. Kenny 
John A. Coulthurst 



Note. — The Board of Aldermen and Conimoii Oouncil were abolished by tlie amended City Clharter of 
1909 and the City C^ouncil was estal)Iished, consistiiiR of nine members. 



184 



Term Ends in 1918 
Walter Ballantyne 
John A. Coulthurst 
Henry E. Hagan 



1915 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 
City Council 
George E. Coleman, President 
Term Ends in 1917 
George W. Coleman 
Daniel J. McDonald 
William H. Woods* 



Term Ends in 1916 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James A. Watson 



*C;ouiicillor Woods died May 3, 1915, and the CHty Council elected James J. Storrow, May 24, to serve in his 
place for the remainder of the municipal year 



Term End in 1919 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James J. Storrow 



1916 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
Henry E. Hagan, President 

Term Ends in 1918 
Walter Ballantyne 
John A. Coulthurst* 
Henry E. Hagan 



Term Ends in 1917 
Daniel J. McDonald 
George W Coleman 
Thomas J. Kenny 



*C:ouncillor Coulthurst died June 30, 1916, and the C;ity Council elected Geoffrey B. Lehy, October 1 7, to 
serve in his place for the remainder of the municipal year 



Term Ends in 1920 
Francis J. W Ford 
Daniel J. McDonald 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1921 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T Moriarty 



Term Ends in 1922 
Walter L. Collins 
John A. Donoghue 
Edward F. McLaughlin 



Term Ends in 1923 
David J. Brickley 
Francis J. W. Ford 
James A. Watson 



1917 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
James J. Storrow, President 

Term Ends in 1919 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James J. Storrow 

1918 

ANDREW J. PETERS, Mayor 

City Council 
Walter L. Collins, President 
Term Ends in 1920 
Francis J. W Ford 
Daniel J. McDonald 
James A. Watson 

1919 

ANDREW J. PETERS, Mayor 

City Council 
Francis J. W. Ford, President 
Term Ends in 1921 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T Moriarty 

1920 

ANDREW J. PETERS, Mayor 

City Council 
James T Moriarty, President 

Term Ends in 1922 
Walter L. Collins 
John A. Donoghue 
Edward F. McLaughlin 



Term Ends in 1918 
Walter Ballantyne 
Henry E. Hagan 
Alfred E. Wellington 



Term Ends in 1919 
John J. Attridge 
Walter L. Collins 
James J. Storrow 



Term Ends in 1920 
Francis J. W Ford 
Daniel J. McDonald 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1921 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T Moriarty 



185 



Term Knds in 1924 
Henry K. Hagan 
Daniel W. Lane 
James T. Moriarty 



1921 

ANDREW J. PETERS, Mayor 

City Councii, 
James W. Watson, President 

Term Ends in 1923 
David J. Brickley 
Francis J. W Ford 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1922 
Walter L. Collins 
John A. Donoghue 
Edward F. McLaughlin 



Term End in 1925 
John A. Donoghue 
George F. Gilbody 
William J. Walsh 



1922 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
David J. Buckley, President 

Term Ends in 1924 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W Lane 
James T. Moriarty 



Term Ends in 1923 
David J. Brickley 
Francis J. W. Ford 
James A. Watson 



Term Ends in 1926 
David J. Brickley 
William C. S. Healey 
James A. Watson 



1923 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
Daniel W. Lane, President 

Term Ends in 1925 
John A. Donoghue 
George F Gilbody 
William J. Walsh 



Term Ends in 1924 
Henry E. Hagan 
Daniel W Lane 
James T Moriarty 



Daniel W Lane 
James T Moriarty 
James T Purcell 



1924 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
John A. Donoghue, President 
David J. Brickley 
William C. S. Healey 
James A. Watson 



John A. Donoghue 
George F. Gilbodv 
William J. Walsh 



Daniel W. Lane 
James T Moriarty 
James T. Purcell 



1925 

JAMES M. CURLEY Mayor 

City Council 
James T Moriarty, President 

David J. Brickley 

William C. S. Healey 

James A. Watson 



John A. Donoghue 
George F. Gilbody 
William J. Walsh 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John L Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Michael J. Mahoney 
Henry Parkman, Jr 
William G. Lvnch 



1926 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, Mayor 
City Council 
Charles G. Keene, President 
John F. Dowd 
Michael J. Ward 
Walter J. Freeley 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Ruby 



Thomas W. McMahon 
George F. Gilbod\' 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 
Walter E. Wragg 
Horace Guild 
Frederic E. Dowling 
John J. Heffernan 



186 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F. Arnold 
Michael J. Mahoney 
Henry Parkman, Jr 
William G. Lvnch 



1927 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, Mayor 
City Council 
John J. Heffernan, President 
John F Dowd 
Michael J. Ward 
Walter J. Freeley 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Rubv 



Thomas W. McMahon 
George F. Gilbody 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 
Walter E. Wragg 
Horace Guild 
Charles G. Keene 
Frederic E. Dowling 



Timothy F Donovan 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F Arnold 
Henry Parkman, Jr. 
Michael J. Mahoney 
William G. Lynch 
John F. Dowd 



1928 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, Mayor 
City Council 
Thomas H. Green, President 
Michael J. Ward 
Roger E. Deveney 
William A. Motley Jn 
Herman L. Bush 
Frank E. Sullivan 
Israel Rub>- 
Thomas W McMahon 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Peter J. Murphy 

Peter A. Murray 

Charles G. Keene 

Frederic E. Dowling 

Edward M. Gallagher 



Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F Arnold 
Henry Parkman, Jr. 
Michael J. Mahoney 
William G. LjTich 
John F Dowd 



1929 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, Mayor 

City Council 
Timothy F. Donovan, President 
Michael J. Ward 
Roger E. Deveney 
William A. Motley, Jr. 
Herman L. Bush 
Frank E. Sullivan 
Israel Ruby 
Thomas W. McMahon 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Peter J. Murphy 

Peter A. Murray 

Charles G. Keene 

Frederic E. Dowling 

Edward M. Gallagher 



Timothy F Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F Arnold 
Laurence Curtis, 2nd 
Michael J. Mahoney 
John F. Dowd 



1930 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
William G. Lynch, President 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F Power 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Ruby 
Francis E. Kellev 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

Joseph P. Cox 

James Hein 

Edward M. Gallagher 



Timothy F. Donovan 
Thomas H. Green 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Seth F Arnold 
Laurence Curtis, 2d 
Michael J. Mahoney 
William G. Lynch 



1931 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
Joseph McGrath, President 
John F Dowd 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F Power 
Edward L. Englert 
Herman L. Bush 
Israel Ruby 
Francis E. Kellev 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

Joseph P. Cox 

James Hein 

Edward M. Gallagher 



187 



1932 



William II. Barker 
Thomas II. Green 
John I. Fit/.gerald 
George W. Roberts 
Laurence Curtis, 2nd 
George P. Donovan 
William G. Lvnch 



JAMKS M. CUHLKY, Mayor 
City Councii. 
Edward M. Gallagher, President 
John F. Dovvd 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F. Power 
Edward L. Englert 
David M. Brackman 
Joseph McGrath 
Israel Rubv 



Albert L. Fish 
Francis E. Kelley 
Thomas Burke 
Clement A. Norton 
Peter A. Murray 
Joseph P. Cox 
James Ilein 



William H. Barker 
Thomas II. Green 
John I. Fit/.gerald 
George W Roberts 
Laurence Curtis, 2nd 
George P. Donovan 
William G. Lynch 



1933 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
Joseph McGrath, President 
John F. Dowd 
Richard D. Gleason 
Leo F. Power 
Edward L. Englert 
David M. Brackman 
Israel Ruby 
Francis E. Kelley 



Albert L. Fish 
Thomas Burke 
Clement A. Norton 
Peter A. Murray 
Joseph P. Cox 
James Ilein 
Edward M. Gallagher 



1934 



FREDERICK W MANSFIELD, Mayor 
City Council 
JOHN A. Dowd, President 
Henry Selvitella Richard D. Gleason 

Thomas II. Green John J. Doherty 

John I. Fitzgerald Edward L. Englert 

George W. Roberts David M. Brackman 

Henry L. Shattuck Joseph McGrath 

George P. Donovan Maurice M. Goldman 

John E. Kerrigan Martin II. Tobin 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1935 



FREDERICK W. MANSFIF^LD, Mayor 
City Council 
John I. Fitzgerald, President 
Henry Selvitella Richard D. Gleason 

Thomas II. Green John J. Doherty 

George W Roberts Edward 1. Englert 

Henry L. Shattuck David M. Brackman 

George P. Donovan Joseph McGrath 

John E. Kerrigan Maurice M. Goldman 

John F. Dowd Martin II. Tobin 



Albert L. Fish 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



1936 



FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD, Mayor 
City Council 
John I. Fitzgerald, President 
Henry Selvitella Richard D. Gleason 

James J. Mellen John J. Doherty 

George W Roberts James J. Kilroy 

Henry L. Shattuck David M. Brackman 

George A. Murray Peter J. Fit/.gerald 

John E. Kerrigan Sidney Rosenberg 

John F. Dowd Martin H. Tobin 



John J. McGrath 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter J. Murphy 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



188 



1937 

FREDKRICK W. MANSFIELD, Mayor 
City Councii, 
John I. Fitzgerald, President 
Henry Sel\itella Mildred M. Harris 

James J. Melleii John J. Doherty 

George W. Roberts James J. Kilroy 

Henr>' L. Shattuck David M. Brackman 

George A. Miirra>' Peter J. Fit/.gerald 

John E. Kerrigan Sidne\' Rosenberg 

John F. Dowd Martin H. Tobin 



John J. McGrath 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 

Clement A. Norton 

Peter A. Murray 

James F. Finley 

James E. Agnew 

Edward M. Gallagher 



Francis W. Irwin 
William J, Gahin 
John I. Fitzgerald 
Perlie D>'ar Chase 
Henr\ L. Shattuck 
Goerge A, Murra\' 
John F. Dowd 



1938 

MAURICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

City Councii. 
John E. Kerrigan, President 

Mildred M. Harris 

William A. Carey 

Edward L. Flnglert 

Charles I. Taylor 

Edward A. Hutchinson, Jr 

Sidne}' Rosenberg 

John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 
Clement A. Norton 
Peter A. Murray 
Theodore F. Lyons 
James E. Agnew 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



Francis W. Ii-win 
William J. GaKin 
John I. Fit/.gerald 
Perlie D\ar Chase 
Ilenr}' L. Shattuck 
John E. Kerrigan 
George F. McMahon 



1939 

MAURICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

City Council 
George A. Murray, President 

Mildred M. Harris 
William A. Carey 
Edward L. Englert 
Charles I. Ta>lor 
Edward A. Hutchinson, Jr 
Sidne^• Rosenberg 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr 
Clement A. Norton 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F Lyons 
James E. Agnew 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



James S. Coffey 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
IlenPiL. Shattuck 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 
William F. Hurley 



1940 

MAURICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

City Council 
William J. Gai.vin, President 

Daniel F. Sulli\an 

William A. Carey 

F]dward L. Englert 

Charles I. Ta>'lor 

Hldward A. Hutchinson, Jr 

Joseph J. Gottlieb 

John B. Kelly 



Philip Autsin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, Jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
Michael J. Ward 
Maurice H. Sullixan 



James S. Coffey 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
IlenPi' L. Shattuck 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 
William F Hurlev 



1941 

MAURICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

City Council 
William J. Galvin, President 

Daniel F Sullivan 

William A. Care\' 

Edward L. Englert 

Charles I. Taylor 

Edward A. Hutchinson, Jr. 

Joseph J. Gottlieb 

John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, Jr 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
Michael J. Ward 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



189 



James S. Coffey 
Michael L. Kinsella 
Joseph Riisso 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
A. Frank Foster 
Joseph M. Scannell 
WilHam F. Ilurlev 



1942 

MAUHICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

Cnv CouNcii, 
Thomas K. Lineiian, President 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Matthew F, Ilanley 
Charles I. Taylor 
Thomas J. Ilannon, Jr. 
Joseph J. Gottlieb 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, Jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F. Lyons 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice 11. Sullixan 



James S. Coffey 
Michael L. Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
A. Frank Foster 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 



1943 

MAUHICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

City Council 
Thomas J. IIannon, President 

William F. Hurley 

Daniel F. Sullivan 

William A. Carey 

Matthew F. Ilanley 

Charles I. Taylor 

Isadore 11. Y. Muchnick 

John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
John C. Wickes 
James J. Goode, Jr. 
James M. Langan 
Theodore F Lyons 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice II. Sullivan 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, Jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
William F. Ilurlev 



1944 

MAURICE J. TOBIN, Mayor 

City Council 
John E. Kerrigan, President 
Daniel F Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
Matthew F Ilanley 
Charles I. Taylor 
Thomas J. Ilannon 
Isadore II. Y. Muchnick 
John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael Paul Feeney 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Thomas G. J. Shannon 
William F Dwyer 
Maurice II. Sullivan 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Baykley, Jr 
Joseph M. Scannell 
William F. Ilurlev 



1945 

JOHN E. KERRIGAN, Mayor 

City Council 
John E. Kerrigan, President 

Daniel F Sullivan 

William A. Carey 

Matthew F Ilanley 

Charles I. Taylor 

Thomas J. Ilannon 

Isadore II. Y. Muchnick 

John B. Kelly 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael Paul Feeney 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Thomas G. J. Shannon 
William F. Dwyer 
Maurice H. Sullivan 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Russo 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, Jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 



1946 

JAMES M. CURLEY Mayor 
City Council 
John B. Kelly, President 
William F- Hurley 
Daniel F Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
William A. Moriarty 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Ilannon 
Isadore H. Y. Muchnick 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael II. Cantwell 
Thomas J. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Edward C. Madden 



190 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
Joseph Uusso 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
James C. Bayley, Jr. 
Joseph M. Scannell 
Thomas E. Linehan 



1947 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 
City Council 
John B. Kei.i.y, President 
William F, Hurley 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
William A. Carey 
William A. Moriarty 
Milton Cook- 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Isadore II. Y. Muchnick 



Philip Austin Fish 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael 11. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Edward C. Madden 



James S. Coffey 
Michael LEO Kinsella 
George T Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wen/.ler 
Thomas E. Linehan 



1948 

JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor 

City Council 
Thomas J. IIannon, President 

William F. Hurley 

Daniel F. Sullivan 

William A. Carey 

Philip A. Tracy 

Milton Cook 

Julius Ansel 

Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



James S. Coffey 
Michael L. Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wenzler 
Thomas E. Linehan 



1949 

JAMES M. CURLF;Y Mayor 

City Council 
William F. Hurley, President 

Daniel F. Sullivan 

William A. Carey 

Philip A. Tracy 

Milton Cook 

Thomas J. Hannon 

Julius Ansel 

Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
William Joseph Keenan 
Michael H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wenzler 
*Thomas E. Linehan 
tjohn J. McColgan 



1950 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
William F. Hurley, President 
Daniel F. Sullivan 
Francis P. Tracey 
Philip A. Tracy 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Hannon 
Julius Ansel 
Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
Anthony J. Farin 
Michaei H. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



* Resigned June L5, 1950. 



tFrom .September 20, 1950. 



James S. Coffey 
Michael Leo Kinsella 
George T. Lanigan 
Perlie Dyar Chase 
John E. Yerxa 
John B. Wen/.ler 
John J. McColgan 
*DanieI F. Sullivan 



191 



1951 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
William F. Hurley, President 
tEaurence II. Banks 
Francis P. Tracey 
Philip A. Tracy 
Milton Cook 
Thomas J. Ilannon 
Julius Ansel 
Robert J. Ramsey 



John J. Beades 
Anthony J. Farin 
Michael II. Cantwell 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Walter D. Bryan 
Edmund V. Lane 
Vincent J. Shanley 



*To August 6, 19.51. tFroiii August 6, 19.51. 

Note. — This was the final year of the CMty C^ouncil of twenty-two members elected from wards. A CMty 
C^ouncil of nine members elected at large under the provisions of C'hapter 452 of the Acts of 1948. commonly 
known as Plan A, took office on the first Monday of January, 1952. 



Francis X. Ahearn 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, Jr. 



19.52 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
Gabriel F. Piemonte, President 
William F. Hurley 
Francis X. Joyce 
John F". Kerrigan 



Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Michael J. Ward 
Joseph C. White 



Francis X. Ahearn 
tMichael H. Cantwell 
William J. Foley, Jr 
Frederick C. Hailer, Jr. 



1953 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
Francis X. Ahearn, President 
William F. Hurley 
Francis X. Joyce 
John E. Kerrigan 



Gabriel F Piemonte 
*Michael J. Ward 
Joseph C. White 



*To December 28, 19.53. 



tFrom December 28, 195.3, 



Francis X. Ahearn 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, Jn 



1954 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
Joseph C. White, President 
William F. Hurley 
John E. Kerrigan 
Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 



FZdward F. McLaughlin, Jr. 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



Francis X. Ahearn 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
Frederick C. Hailer, Jr. 



1955 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
William F. Hurley, President 
William F Hurley 
John E. Kerrigan 
Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 



Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr. 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



192 



Francis X. Ahearn 
John F. Collins 
William J. Foley, Jr. 



1956 

JOHN B. IIYNKS, Mayor 
City Councii, 
Edward J. McCormack, President 
John E. Kerrigan 
Edward J. McCormack, Jr 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Edward F. McLaughlin, Jn 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



Francis X. Ahearn 
*John F. Collins 
William J. Fole\, Jr. 
tFrederick C. Ilailer, Jr 



1957 

JOHN B. IIYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
William J. Foley, Jr., President 
John E. Kerrigan 
Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr. 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



*ToFet)riiarvl8, 19.57 



tFroni February 18, 19.57. 



tjames S. Coffey 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
*Frederick C. Ilailer, Jn 
ttPeter F Ilines 



1958 

JOHN B. IIYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
Patrick F. McDonough, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
**F;dwardJ. McCormack, Jr 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr. 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



*To April 21. 19.58. 
*To .Septeml)er 1 2. 1 958. 



tFroni April 22, 1958. 
ttFrom .Septemlier 15, 1958. 



James S. Coffey 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
Peter F. Ilines 



1959 

JOHN B. HYNES, Mayor 
City Council 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr., President 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
Patrick F McDonough 



Edward F McLaughlin, Jr. 
Gabriel F Piemonte 
Joseph C. White 



James S. Coffey 
John Patrick Connolly 
William J. Foley, Jr 



1960 

JOHN E COLLINS, Mayor 
City Council 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr., President 
Peter F Ilines 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



Patrick F. McDonough 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr 
Joseph C. White 



James S. Coffey 
John Patrick Connolly 
William J. Foley, Jr. 



1961 

JOHN F COLLINS, Mayor 
City Council 
Patrick F. McDonough, President 
Peter F Hines 
Christopher A. lannella 
John Vj. Kerrigan 
ttFrederick C. Langone 



Patrick F. McDonough 
* Edward F. McLaughlin, J 
tThomas A. Sullivan 
** Joseph C. White 



*To January 5, 1961. 
**To April 27, 1961 



tFrom January 9, 1961. 
ttFrom May 1,1961 



193 



James S. CofFey 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
Peter F. I lines 



James S. CofFey 
William J. Foley, Jr. 
Peter F. Ilines 



1962 

JOHN F COLLINS, Mayor 
City CouNcii, 
CiiRisiOPiiER A. Ianneij.a, President 
Christopher A, lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
Patrick F. McDonough 

1963 

JOHN F COLLINS, Mayor 
City Council 
Peter F. IIines, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 
Patrick F McDonough 



Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Thomas A. Sullivan 
John J. Tierney, Jr. 



Gabriel F Piemonte 
Thomas A. Sullivan 
John J. Tierney, Jr. 



Katherine Craven 
George F Foley, Jr 
William J. Foley, Jr 



Katherine Craven 
George F Fole); Jr 
William J. Foley, Jr 



1964 

JOHNB.IIYNFS, Mayor 
City Councii, 
John J. Tierney, Jr., President 
Peter F. Ilines 
Barry T. Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 

1965 

JOHN F COLLINS, Mayor 
City Council 
John J. "Rerney, Jr., President 
Peter F. Ilines 
Barry T. Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 



John K. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
John J. Tierne); Jr 



John F. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
John J. Tierney, Jr. 



Katherine Craven 
William J, Foley, Jr 
Peter F Ilines 



Katherine Craven 
William J. Foley, Jr 
Peter F. Ilines 



1966 

JOHN F COLLINS, Mayor 

City Council 
Frederick C. Langone, President 
Barry T. Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 

1967 

JOHN F COLLINS, Mayor 

City Council 
Barry T Hynes, President 
Barry T. Hynes 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F McDonough 
Galjriel F Piemonte 



Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F McDonough 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 



Thomas J. Atkins 
Garrett M. Byrne 
William J. Foley, Jr. 



1968 

KFIVIN II. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
William J. Foley, Jr., President 
John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F McDonough 



Gerald F O'Leary 
John L. Saltonstiill, Jr 
Joseph F Timilt>' 



194 



Thomas I. Atkins 
Garrett M. Byrne 
William J. Foley, Jr. 



Thomas I. Atkins 
Louise Day Hicks 
Christopher A. lannella 



Thomas I. Atkins 
*Louise Day Hicks 
Christopher A. lannella 



1969 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Councii, 
Gerald F. O'Leary, President 
John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 

1970 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Gabriel F. Piemonte, President 
John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
Gerald E O'Leary 

1971 

KEVIN II. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Gabriel F. Piemonte, President 
John E. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 
Gerald F Ol.eary 
tAlbert L. O'Neil 



Gerald F O'Leary 
John L. Saltonstall, Jr. 
Joseph F. Timilty 



Gabriel F Piemonte 
John L. Saltonstall, Jr. 
Joseph F. Timilty 



Gabriel E Piemonte 
John L. Saltonstall, Jr. 
Joseph F. Timilty 



*to January 25, 1971 



tFrom January 25. 1971 



Lawrence S. DiCara 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



Lawrence S. DiCara 
Christopher A. lannella 
John E. Kerrigan 



1972 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Gabriel F. Piemonte, President 
Patrick F McDonough 
John Joseph Moakley 
Gerald F O'Leary 

1973 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Patrick F. McDonough, President 
*Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F McDonough 
tjohn Joseph Moakley 
Gerald E O'Learv 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Gabriel F Piemonte 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Gabriel F Piemonte 
Joseph M. Tierney 



*From January 4, 1973 



tTo January 1,1973 



1974 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louise Day Hicks 



KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Gerald F. O'Leary, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 



Gerald E O'Leary 
Albert L. O'Neil ' 
Joseph M. Tierney 



195 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCaia 
Louise Dav Hicks 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louise Day Hicks 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Louise Dav Hicks 



James Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Raymond L. Flynn 



IJames Michael Connolly 
Lawrence S. DiCara 
Raymond L. Flynn 



Lawrence S. DiCara 
Raymond L. Flynn 
Christopher A. lannelta 



Lawrence S. DiCara 
Raymond L. Flynn 
Christopher A. lannella 



1975 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Councii, 
Gerald F. O'Leary, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 

1976 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 

City Council 
Louise Day Hicks, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
John J. Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 

1977 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Joseph M. Tierney, President 
Christopher A, lannella 
John J, Kerrigan 
Frederick C. Langone 

1978 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Lawrence S. DiCara, President 
Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 

1979 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Joseph M. TTtERNEY, President 
* Louise Day Hicks 
Christopher A. lannella 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 
1980 

KEVIN II. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Christopher A. Iannella, President 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 
Albert L. O'Neil 

1981 

KEVIN H. WHITE, Mayor 
City Council 
Patrick F. McDonough, President 
Frederick C. Langone 
Patrick F. McDonough 
Albert L. O'Neil 



Gerald F. O'Leary 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Patrick F. McDonough 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Patrick F. McDonough 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M, Tierney 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Rosemarie E. Sansone 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Albert L. O'Neil 
Rosemarie E. Sansone 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Rosemarie E. Sansone 
John W. Sears 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Rosemarie E. Sansone 
John W Sears 
Joseph M. Tierney 



*From January 10, 1979 



JTo January 3, 1979 



196 



Bruce C. Boiling 
Raymond L. Flynn 
Maura A. Ilennigan 



Bruce C. Boiling 
Raymond L. Flynn 
Maura A. Ilennigan 



1982 

KEVIN II. WHITE, Mayor 

City Council 

Christopher A. Ianneijj\, President 

Christopher A. lannella 

Frederick C. Langone 

Michael J. McCormack 

1983 

KEVIN II. WHITE, Mayor 

City Council 

Joseph M. Tierney, President 

Christopher A. lannella 

Frederick C. Langone 

Michael J. McCormack 



Terence P. McDermott 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Terence P. McDermott 
Albert L. O'Neil 
Joseph M. Tierney 



Bruce C. Boiling, Dist. 7 
James E. Byrne, Dist. 3 
Maura A. Ilennigan, Dist. 6 
Christopher A. lannella. At Large 



1984 

RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 

City Council* 

Joseph M. Tierney, At Large, President 

James M. Kelly, Dist. 2 
Michael J. McCormack, At Large 
Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 
Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 



Albert L. O'Neil, At Large 
David Scondras, Dist. 8 
Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 1 
Charles C. Yancev, Dist. 4 



^District Representation, EfFective with Preliminary Election, September, 1983, Acts 1982, CH. 605 



1985 

RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 
City Council 
Joseph M. "Rerney, At Large, President 
Bruce C. Boiling, Dist. 7 James M. Kelly, Dist. 2 

James E. Byrne, Dist. 3 Michael J. McCormack, At Large 

Maura A. Ilennigan, Dist. 6 Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 

Christopher A. lannella, At Large Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 



Albert L. O'Neil, At Large 
David Scondras, Dist. 8 
Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 1 
Charles C. Yancey, Dist. 4 



197 



1986 



RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 
City Council 
Bruce C. Boi.ling, Dist. 7, President 
James K. Byrne, Dist. 3 Michael J. McCormack, At Large 

Maura A. Ilennigan, Dist. 6 Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 

Christopher A. lannella. At Large Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 
James M. Kelly, Dist. 2 Albert L. O'Neil, At Large 



David Scondras, Dist. 8 
Joseph M. Tierney, At Large 
Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 1 
Charles C. Yancey, Dist. 4 



1987 

RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 
City Council 
Bruce C. Rolling, Dist. 7, President 
James E. Byrne, Dist. 3 Michael J. McCormack, At Large 

Maura A. Ilennigan, Dist. 6 Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 

Christopher A. lannella. At Large Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 
James M. Kelly Dist. 2 Albert L. O'Neil, At Large 



David Scondras, Dist. 8 
Joseph M. Tierney, At Large 
Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 1 
Charles C. Yancev, Dist. 4 



1988 



RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 

City Council 
Christopher A. Iannella, At Large, President 



Bruce C. Boiling, Dist. 7 
James E. Byrne, Dist. 3 
Maura A. Ilennigan Casey, Dist. 6 
James M. Kelly, Dist. 2 



Michael J. McCormack, At Large 
Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 
Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 
Albert L. O'Neil, At Large 



Rosaria Salerno, At Large 
David Scondras, Dist. 8 
Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 1 
Charles C. Yancev, Dist. 4 



1989 



RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 

City Council 

Christopher A. Iannella, At Large, President 



Bruce C. Boiling, Dist. 7 
James E. Byrne, Dist. 3 
Maura A. Ilennigan Casey, Dist. 6 
James M. Kelly Dist. 2 



Michael J. McCormack, At Large 
Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 
Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 
Albert L. O'Neil, At Large 



Rosaria Salerno, At Large 
David Scondras, Dist. 8 
Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 1 
Charles C. Yancev, Dist. 4 



1990 



RAYMOND L. FLYNN, Mayor 
City Council 
Christopher A. Iannella, At Large, President 

Bruce C. Boiling, Dist. 7 Michael J. McCormack, At Large Rosaria Salerno, At Large 

James E. Byrne, Dist. 3 Brian J. McLaughlin, Dist. 9 David Scondras, Dist. 8 

Maura A. Ilennigan Casey, Dist. 6 Thomas M. Menino, Dist. 5 Robert E. Travaglini, Dist. 

James M. Kelly Dist. 2 Albert L. O'Neil, At Large Charles C. Yancey Dist. 4 



198 
MAYORS OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

From 1 822 to the Present Time 



Name 



Place and Date of Birth 



Died 



Years of 
Serx'ice 



*J()hn Phillips 

*Josiali Quincy 

*IIarris()n Gray Otis 

*C:liarles Wells 

*Tlie()d<)re Lymaii.jr .... 
*SaniueI T. Armstrong . . . 

*SaimieI A. Eliot 

*Jonatliaii C^hapmaii 

*Martin Brimnier 

*Thomas A. Davis 

*J(>siali Quincy, jr 

*John H Bigelow 

*Benjamin Seaver 

*Jerome V. C^. Smith 

*Alexancler II. Rice 

*Frecleric W. Lincoln, jr. . 
"Joseph M. Wightman . . . 
*Freaeric W. Lincoln, jr.. . 

*Otis Norcross 

*Nathaniel B. Shurtleff. . . 

*Wilham Gaston 

*IIenry L. Pierce 

*§Leonard R. Gutter .... 

*Samuel C). C^obb 

"Frederick O. Prince .... 

*Henry L. Pierce 

"Frederick O. Prince .... 

"Samuel A. Green 

*All)ert Palmer 

"Augustus P. Martin 

"Hugh O' Brien 

"Thomas N. Hart 

"Nathan Matthews, jr. . . . 

"Kdwin Courtis 

*+Josiah Quincy 

"fThomas N. Hart 

"iPatrick A. Gollins 

*§Danie! A.Whelton . . , . 

"tjohn F. Fitzgerald 

"tGeorge A. IIibl)ard .... 

"Ijohn F. Fitzgerald 

"^James M. Gurley 

"lAndrew J. Peters 

"IJames M. C^urley 

"iMalcolni E. Nichols . . . 

"Ijanies M. Gurley 

"IFrederick W. Mansfield 

"ttMaurice J. Tobin 

*++John E, Kerrigan 

"IJames M. C^urley 

"•John B. Ilynes 

"tJohn B. Ilynes 

"ttjohn B. Ilynes 

ttjohn F C:ollins 

tttKevin II. White 

Raymond L. Flynn 



Boston Nov. 26, 1770 

Boston Feb. 4, 1772 

Boston Oct. 8, 176.5 

Boston Dec. 30, 1786 

Boston Feb. 19, 1792 

Dorchester April 29, 1 784 

Boston Mar .5, 1798 

Boston Jan. 23, 1807 

Roxburv Junes, 1793 

Brookhne Dec. 11,1798 

Boston Jan. 17, 1802 

Groton Aug. 25, 1797 

Roxbury April 12, 1795 

C:onvvay, N.II July 20, 1800 

Newton Aug. 30, 1818 

Boston Feb. 27, 1817 

Boston Oct. 19, 1812 

(See above) 

Boston Nov. 2, 1811 

Boston June 29, 1810 

Killingly, Conn Oct. 3, 1820 

Stoughton Aug. 23, 1825 

(See C;hairman of Aldermen) 

Taunton May 22, 1826 

Boston Jan. 18, 1818 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Groton Mar 16, 1830 

Candia, N.II Jan. 17, 1831 

Abbot, Me Mar 13, 1835 

Ireland July 13, 1827 

North Reading Jan. 20, 1829 

Boston Mar 28, 1854 

Roxbury Mar 26, 1861 

Quincy Oct. 15, 1859 

(See above) 

Fermoy, Ireland . . . .Mar 12, 

Boston Jan. 21, 

Boston Feb. 11, 

Boston Oct. 27, 

(See above) 

Boston Nov. 20, 1874 

Jamaica Plain Aprils, 1872 

(See above) 

Portland, Me May 8, 1876 

(See above) 

Boston Mar 26, 1877 

Boston May 22, 1901 

Boston Oct. 1, 1907 

(See above) 

Boston Sept. 21, 1897 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston) July 20, 1919 

Boston .Sept. 25, 1929 

Boston July 22, 1939 



1884 
1872 
1863 
1864 



May 29, 

Julvl, 

Oct. 28, 

June 3, 

July 17, 

Mar 26, 

Jan. 29, 

May 25, 

April 25, 

Nov. 22, 

Nov. 2, 

July 4, 

Feb. 14, 

Aug. 20, 

July 22, 

•Sept. 13, 

Jan. 25, 

(See above) . . 

Sept. 5, 

Oct. 17, 

Jan. 19, 

Dec. 17, 



1823 
1864 
1848 
1866 
1849 
1850 
1862 
1848 
1847 
1845 
1882 
1872 
1856 
1879 
1895 
1898 
1885 



1882 
1874 
1894 
1896 



Feb. 18,1891 
June 6, 1899 

(See above 

(See above 

Dec. 5, 1918 
Mav21, 1887 
Mar. 13, 1902 
Aug. 1, 1895 
Oct. 4, 1927 
Dec. 11, 1927 
Mar 20, 1922 
Sept. 8, 1919 

(See above) 

Sept. 14, 1905 

Nov. 27, 19.53 

Oct. 2, 1950 

May 29, 1910 

(See above) 

Nov. 12, 1958 
June 26, 1938 

(See above) 

Feb. 7, 1951 

(See above) 

Nov. 6, 1968 
July 19, 1953 
May 2, 1987 

(See above) 

Jan. 6, 1970 

(See above) 

(See above) 



1822 


1 


1823-28 . . 


.6 


1929-31 . . 


.3 


1832-33 . . 


.2 


1834-35 . . 


.3 


1836 


1 


1837-39 . . 


.3 


1840-42 . . 


.3 


1843-44 . . 


.2 


1845 


1 


1846-48 . . 


.3 


1849-51 . , 


.3 


18,52-53 . . 


.2 


1 8.54-55 . . 


.2 


1856-57 . . 


.2 


1858-60 . . 


.3 


1861-62 . . 


.2 


1863-66 . . 


.4 


1867 


1 


1868-70 . . 


.3 


1871-72 .. 


.2 


1873, 10 mo 




1863, 2 mo. 




1874-76 . . 


.3 


1877 


1 


1878 1 


1879-81 . . 


.3 


1882 


1 


1883 1 


1884 1 


188.5-88 . . 


.4 


1889-90 . . 


.2 


1891-94 .. 


.4 


1895 


1 


1896-99 . . 


.4 


1900-01 . . 


.2 


1903-0.5,3 3/4 


1905— 3 1/2 mo. 


1906-07 . . 


.2 


1908-09 . . 


.2 


1910-13 . . 


.4 


1914-17 .. 


.4 


1918-21 .. 


.4 


1922-25 . . 


.4 


1926-29 . . 


.4 


1930-33 . . 


.4 


1934-37 . . 


.4 


1938-44 . . 


.7 


1945 


1 


1946-49 . . 


.4 


1947— 5mo 




1950-51 . . 


.2 


1952-59 . . 


.8 


1960-67 . . 


.8 


1968-83 . . 


16 


1984 


7 



iTwice elected for two years, 
telected for four years. 
§Mayor for balance of unexpired term. 



"Deceased. 

telected for two years. 

ttTwice elected for four years. 

tttFour times elected for four years. 

tt.'^ppointed Mayor by Act of Massachusetts Legislature. 

• Apointed Temporary Mayor by Act of Legislature. 

NOTE. — Andrew J. Peters was the first Mayor not eligible to succeed himself See Special Acts, 1918, C;hapter 
94. See also Acts 1938, C;hapter 300. 



199 

Note. — From January 6, 1845, to February 27, 1 845, or from the close of Mayor Brimmer's 
term in office till the election of his successor, Thomas A. Davis, the Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen, William Parker, performed the duties of Mayor. 

In the interim between the death of Mayor Davis, on November 22, 1845, and the election 
on December 11, 1845, of his successor, Josiah Quincy Jr., Bensin Leavitt, Chairman of the 
Board of Aldermen, acted as Mayor 

There were three ballotings for the election of Mayor for 1854, between December 12, 18.53, 
and Januar> 9, 1854. In the meantime the duties of Mayor were performed by Benjamin L. 
Allen, Chairman of the Board of Aldermen. 

In 1873 Mayor Pierce resigned his office on November 29, on his election to the Congress of 
the United States. During the remainder of the municipal year Leonard R, Cutter, Chairman of 
the Board of Aldermen, ser\'ed ex officio as Acting Mayor. 

Mayor Collins died on September 14, 1905. Daniel A. Whelton, Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen, acted as mayorfor the remainder of the municipal year, viz., September 15, 1905, to 
January 1,1906. 

Mayor Tobin, having been elected Governor, resigned January 4, 1945. By Chapter 4 of the 
Actsof 1945, John F,. Kerrigan, the President of the City Council was given all the powers of the 
Mayor and serxed from January 25, 1945, for the remainder of the year. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 580 of the Acts of 1947, City Clerk John B. Hynes served, 
under the title of Temporary Mayor, with full powers as Mayor, for the period from June 26 to 
Nox'ember 28, 1947, during the absence of Mayor Curley. 

Chairmen of the Board of Aldermen 



Name 



Place and Date of Birth 



Died 



Years of 
Seivice 



William Washburn 

Pelliain Boiiney 

Joseph Milner Wightman 

Silas Peirce 

Otis C;lapp 

Silas Peirce 

Thomas Phillips Rich . . . 
Thomas C^offin Amory, jr 

Otis Norcross 

George W, Messinger . . . 
C;harles Wesley Slack ... 
George W. Messinger ... 

Benjamin lames 

Newton Albert 

Gharles Edward Jenkins. 

Samuel Little 

Leonard R. Gutter 

John Taylor (Mark 

Solomon Bliss Stebbins . 

Hugh O'Brien 

Solomon Bliss Stebbins . , 

Hugh O'Brien 

C:harles Varney Whitten . , 
Gharles Hastings Allen. . . 
Patrick John Donovan . . . 
Gharles Hastings Allen. . . 

Homer Rogers 

William Power Wilson . . , 
Herbert Schaw C;arruth . . 

John Henry Lee 

Alpheus Sanford 

John Henry Lee 

*Perlie Appleton Dyar . . . 
*Joseph Aioysius C;onry . . 
David Franklin Barry . . . . 
Michael Joseph O'Brien . . 

James Henry Doyle 

Daniel A. Whelton 

tC;harles Martin Draper. . 

tEdward L. Gauley 

William Berwin 

Louis M. Glark 

Frederick J. Brand 



Lyme, N.H Oct, 7, 1808 

Pembroke Feb. 21, 1802 

Boston Oct. 19,1812 

Scituate Feb. L5, 1793 

Westhampton Mar 2, 1806 

(See above) 

Lynn Mar 31, 1803 

Boston Aug. 16, 1812 

Boston Nov. 2, 1811 

Boston Feb. 5, 1813 

Boston Feb. 21, 1825 

(See above) 

Scituate Aug. 22, 1814 

Stoughton Mar 10, 181.5 

Scituate July 29, 1817 

Hingham Aug. 1.5, 1827 

Jaffrey, N. H Julyl, 1825 

•Sanbornton, N.H. . .Sept. 19, 1825 

Warren Jan. 18,1830 

Ireland July 13, 1827 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Vassalboro, Me May 10, 1829 

Boston June 14, 1828 

Gharlestown April 9, 1912 

(See above) 

.Sudburv Oct. 11, 1840 

Baltimore, Md Nov. 15, 1852 

Dorchester Feb. 15, 1855 

Boston April 26, 1856 

North Attleboro July 5, 1856 

(See above) 

Lynn Mar 26, 1857 

Brookline Sept. 12, 1868 

Boston Feb. 29, 1852 

Ireland Feb. 11, 1855 

Boston June 17, 1867 

Boston Jan. 21, 1872 

Dedham Nov. 1, 1869 

Ghariestown Aug. 8, 1870 

New Orleans, La. . . Dec. 16, 1858 

Dorchester Dec. 14, 18.58 

Plainville, Gonn Fel). 3, 1861 



Oct. .30. 1890 
April 29, 1861 
Jan. 2.5, 1885 
Aug. 27, 1879 
.Sept. 18, 1886 

(See above) 

Dec. II, 1875 
Oct. 10, 1899 
Sept. .5, 1882 
April 27, 1870 
April 11, 1885 

(See above) 

April 13, 1901 
Feb. 3, 1904 
Aug. 1, 1882 
Dec. 21, 1906 
July 13, 1894 
Oct. 29, 1880 
Junes, 1910 
Aug. 1.18.59 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Mar 18, 1891 
Mar 31, 1907 
Sept. 18,1912 

(See al)ove) 

Nov. 11, 1907 
Date unknown 
Julv27, 1917 
Sept. 12,1923 
Aug. 10, 1944 

(See above) 

May 15, 1930 

June 22, 1943 

Julv23, 1911 

April .5, 1903 

Oct. 3, 1952 

Nov. 27, 19.53 

Jan. 25, 1943 

April 19, 1928 

July 9, 1935 

Mar 15, 1914 

Mar 16, 1912 



18.55 

18.56-57 

18.58 

18.59 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

186.5-66 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874-77 

1878 

1879-81 

1882 

1883 

1884-85 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892-93 

1894-95 

1896 

1897-98 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901-04 

1905 

1906 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 



NOTE. — The Mavor was ex officio C;hairman of the Board of Aldermen from the incorporation of the Git\- 
until 1855; the Board elected a permanent C:hairnian from 18.55. 

♦Perlie A. Dyar from January 25, 1898, to April 1, 1898. and October 1, 1898, to end of year. Joseph A. 
Gonryfrom ,\pril 1898, to October 1, 1898. 

tGhades M. Draper from February 28, 1 906, to Septenil)er 1 0, 1 906. Edward L. C;auley from September 
10, 1906, to end of vear 



200 



Presidents of the Common Council 



Name 



Place and Date of Birth 



Died 



Year of 
Service 



William Prescott 

John Welles 

FraJK'is Jononnot Oliver .... 

John Richardson Adan 

Kliphalet Williams 

Benj. Toppan Pickman 

John Prescott BiKelo" 

Josiah Quincv, Jr 

Phillip Maret't 

Kduard Blake 

Pelej; Whitman (Chandler . . . 
GeorKe Stillman Ilillard . .. . 

Benjamin Seaver 

Francis Brinle\ 

Henry Joseph Gardner 

Alex Hamilton Kico 

Joseph Story 

Oliver Stevens 

Samnel W Waldron, Jr 

Josiah Putnam Bradlee 

Joseph Ilildreth Bradley . . . . 

Joshua Dorsey Ball 

George Slisbee Ilale 

Wm. Bentley Fowie, Jr 

Joseph Story 

Weston Lewis 

C;harles Hastings Allen 

William Giles Harris 

Melville K/.ra Ingalls 

Mathias Kich 

Marquis Fayette Dickinson. Ji 
Edward Olcott Shepard . . . . 
Halsev Joseph Boardman . . . 

John Q. A. Brackett 

Benjamin Pope 

William H. Whitmore 

Harvey Newton Shepard. . . . 

Andrew Jackson Bai!e\ 

C:harles Edward Pratt 

James Joseph Flynn 

Godfrey Morse 

John Henr\ Lee 

Edward John Jenkins 

David Franklin Barry 

Horace Guvnn .Mien 

David Franklin Barry 

C:hristopher Francis O'Brien 

Joseph Aloysius Oinry 

Timothy Lawrence GonnolK' 

Daniel Joseph Kiley 

Arthur Walter Dolan 

William John Barrett 

Leo F. McCullough 

George C:heney McC:al)e . . . 



Pepperell Aug. 19 

Boston Oct. 14 

Boston Oct. 10 

Boston July 8 

Taunton Mar 7 

Salem Sept. 17 

Groton Aug. 25 

Boston Jan. 1 7 

Boston Sept. 2.5 

Boston Sept. 28 

N. Gloucester, Me.. .April 12 

Machias, Me Sept. 22 

Hoxhurv April 12 

Boston' Nov. 10, 

Dorchester June 14 

Newton Aug. 30. 

Marblehead Nov. 1 1 

Andover June 22 

Portsmouth, N.IL . . .Oct. 24 

Boston June 10. 

Haverhill Mar 5 

Baltimore, Md Jul. 1 1 

Keene, N. II Sept. 24 

Boston July 27 

Marblehead Nov. 1 1 

Hinghani April 1 

Boston June 1 4 

Revere May 15 

Harrison, Me Sept. 6 

Truro June 8 

Amherst Jan. 16 

Hampton, Nil Nov. 25 

Norwich, \'t Mav 19 

Bradford, N.H June 8 

Waterford, Ire Jan. 13 

Dorchester .Sept. 6 

Boston July 8 

Charlestown July 18 

Vassalboro, Me Mar 13 

.St.John, N. B 

Wachenheim, Ger. . May 17 

Boston April 26 

London, Eng Dec. 20 

Boston Feb. 29 

Jamaica Plain July 27 

(See above) 

Boston Feb. 17 

Brookline Sept. 12 

Boston Oct. 5 

Boston Julv 27 

Boston Sept. 22 

Boston June 24 

Boston July 1 

Carmel. N.Y. July 5 



1762 
1764 
1777 
1793 
1778 
1790 
1797 
1802 
1792 
1805 
1816 
1808 
1795 
1800 
1818 
1818 
1822 
1825 
1828 
1817 
1822 
1828 
1825 
1826 
1822 
1834 
1828 
1828 
1842 
1820 
1840 
1835 
1834 
1842 
1829 
1836 
18.50 
1840 
1845 
1835 
1846 
1846 
18.54 
18.52 
18.55 



1869 
1868 
1871 
1874 
1876 
1872 
1882 
1873 



Dec. 8, 1844 
Sept. 26, 18.55 
Aug. 21, 18.58 
July 4. 1849 
June 12, 18.55 
Mar 22, 1835 
Julv 4, 1872 
Nov. 2, 1 882 
Mar 22, 1869 
.Sept. 4, 1873 
Mav 28, 1889 
Jan. 21, 1879 
Feb. 14, 18.56 
June 14. 1889 
July 19. 1892 
Julv 22. 1895 
June 22. 1905 
Aug. 23. 1905 
Aug. 24. 1882 
Feb. 2, 1887 
Oct. 5. 1882 
Dec. 18, 1892 
Julv 27, 1897 
Jan. 21, 1902 
June 22, 1905 
April 6, 1 893 
Mar 31, 1907 
Oct. 29. 1897 
Julv 11. 1914 
Dec. 13, 1914 
.Sept. 18, 1915 
April 27. 1903 
Jan. 15. 1900 
April 6, 1918 
Sept. 24, 1879 
June 14, 1900 
April 14, 1936 
Mar 21. 1927 
Aug. 20. 1898 
Mar 26. 1884 
June 20. 1911 
Sept. 12. 1923 
Oct. 3. 1918 
Julv 23. 1911 
Feb. 12, 1919 
(See above) . . . 
April 25. 1 899 
June 22. 1943 
Dec. 5. 1928 
Nov. 12. 19.35 
Sept. 28. 1949 
May 29. 1933 
Mav 12. 1951 
Dec. 27. 1917 



1822 

1823 

1824-25 

1826-28 

1829 
1830-31 
1832-33 
1834-36 
1837-40 
1841-43 
1844-45 
1846-47+ 
1847-49§ 
18.50-51 
1852-.53 
1854 
18.55 
18.56-57 

18.58 

18.59-60 

1861 

1862 

1863-64 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873-74 

1875 

1876 

1877-78 

1879 

1880 

1881* 

188It-82 

1883** 

1883tt 

1884 

188.5-86 

1887-88 

1889-90 

1891-93 

1894-95 

1896-97 

1898 

1899-1901 

1902-05 

1906-07 

1908 

1909 



*To October 27. 



+To July 1 
tFrom October 27. 



§From July 1 
**To June 1 1. 



JifFrom June 1 1. 



201 



Presidents of the City Council 



Name 



Place and Date of Birth 



Died 



Year of 
Ser\ice 



Walter Ballaiityne 

Walter Leo Oollins 

John Joseph AttridK^ . . . , 
Thomas Joseph Kenny . . 
Daniel Joseph McDonald , 

George W C'oleman 

Henry Iv Ilafjan 

John j. Stornm 

Walter Leo C^olliiis 

Francis J. W. Ford 

James T. Moriarty 

James A. Watson 

DavidJ. Brickley 

Daniel W Lane 

John A, Donoghne 

James T. Moriarty 

Oharles G. Keene 

John J. HefFernan 

Thomas IL Green 

Timothy F. Donovan 

William G. Lynch 

Joseph McGrath 

F.dH ard M . Gallagher ... 

Joseph McGrath 

John F Doud 

John L Fit/gerald 

John I. Fit/.gerald 

John L Fit/gerald 

John K. Kerrigan 

George A. Murray 

William J. Galvin 

William J. Galvin 

Thomas E. Linehan 

Thomas J. Ilainion 

John K. Kerrigan 

John K. Kerrigan 

JohnB. Kellv 

John B.Kelly 

Thomas J. Ilannon 

\^'illiam F. Hurley 

William F. Hurley 

William F Hurley 

Gabriel F. Piemonte 

Francis X. Ahearn 

Joseph C;. White 

William F Hurley 

F.duard J. McGormack, Jr 

William J. Foley, Jr 

Patrick F. McDonough . . , 
Edward F McLaughlin, Jr 
Edward F McLaughlin, Jr 
Patrick F McDonough . . , 
Christopher A. lanuella . 

Peter F, Hines 

John J. Tierney, Jr 

John j. Tierney, Jr 

Frederick C). Langone. . . 

Barry T. Hynes 

William J. Foley, Jr 

Gerald F O'Leary 

Gabriel F Piemonte 

Gabriel F Piemonte 

Gabriel F Piemonte 

Patrick F McDonough . , 

Gerald F. O'Leary 

Gerald F. OT-eary 

Louise Day Hicks 

Joseph M. Tierney 

Lawrence S. DiCara .... 

Joseph M. Tierney 

Christopher A. lannella . 
Patrick F McDonough . . 
Christopher A. lannella . 

Joseph M. Tierney 

Joseph M. Tierney 

Joseph M. Tierney 

Bruce C. Boiling 

Bruce C:. Boiling 

Christopher .\. lamiella . 
Christopher A. lannella . 
C^hristopher A lamiella . 



Hawick, .Scotland . . Mar 17, 1855 

Boston April?, 1878 

Boston Feb. 8, 1878 

Boston Nov. 18, 1863 

C:helsea Aug. 14,1873 

Boston June 16,1867 

St.John, N.B Feb. 26,1865 

Boston Jan. 21, 1864 

(See above) 

Boston Dec. 23, 1 882 

Amesbury ,Sepl.22, 1876 

Boston June 24, 1870 

Boston Mar 14, 1889 

Boston Dec. 11, 1872 

Boston Aug. 12, 1885 

(.See above) 

Gardner, Me Aug. 6, 1880 

Boston Jan. 27, 1893 

Boston May 11,1883 

Boston Aug. 21, 1889 

Boston Oct. 20, 1892 

Boston Dec. 20, 1890 

Charlestown Jan. 25, 1 877 

(.See above) 

Boston Nov. 28, 1895 

Boston July 18, 1882 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Oct. 1, 1907 

Boston .Sept. 1, 1905 

Boston Jan. 31, 1904 

(See above) 

Boston June 28, 1904 

Boston Dec. 9, 1900 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston July 21, 1904 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Aug. 3, 1895 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Jan. 28, 1909 

Cohasset Feb. 26, 1917 

Boston Jan. 30, 1898 

(See above) 

Boston Aug. 29, 1923 

Boston Dec. 18, 1923 

Galwav, Ireland Feb. 6, 1925 

Boston Aug. 18, 1920 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Avellino, Italy May 29, 1913 

Boston Nov. 30, 1927 

Boston Feb. 18, 1926 

(See above) 

Boston Oct. 31, 1921 

Boston Nov. 9, 1934 

(See above) 

Boston Aug. 7, 1932 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston Oct. 16, 1923 

Boston Jan. 1, 1941 

Boston April 30, 1949 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

Boston April 29, 1945 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 

(See above) 



Sept. .30, 1932 
Unknown . . . . 
Unknown . . . . 
Mavl7, 1926 
June 28, 1937 
July 31, 19.50 
May 18, 1933 
Mar 13, 1926 

Unknown . . . . 
April 5, 1950 
Dec. 5, 1941 
Oct. 31, 1960 
Unknown . . . . 
Unknown . . . . 

Fei). io, 1946 
Aug. 2.5, 1927 
June 13, 19.58 
April 21, 1933 
Julv , 1964 
April 25, 1927 
Oct. 25, 1961 

Aug. 14, 1961 
Unknown . . . . 

May 2, 1987 
Mar 19, 1965 
May 25, 1988 

Aug. .5, i974 

Aug. ,i969 
Mar 15, 1965 

July 31, 1967 
June 24, 1984 

Oct. 9,1984' 



1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
19.36 
1937 
1938 
19.39 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
19.50 
1951 
19.52 
19.53 
19.54 
19.55 
1956 
19.57 
19.58 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 



Single chamber established in 1910 (see Chap. 486, Acts of 1909, Sects. 48-51). 



202 



Orators of Boston 
APPOINTED BY THE PUBLIC AUTHORITIES 

For the Anniversary of the Boston Massacre, March 5, 1 770 



1771 James Lovell 

1772 Dr. Joseph Warren 

1773 Dr Benjamin Church 

1774 John Hancock 

1775 Dr Joseph Warren 

1776 Rev. Peter Thacher 

1777 Benjamin Hichborn 



1778 Jonathan Williams Austin 

1779 William Tudor 

1780 Jonathan Mason, jr. 

1781 Thomas Dawes, jn 

1782 George Richards Minot 

1783 Dr Thomas Welsh 



For the Anniversary of National Independence, July 4, 1 776 



1783 Dr. John Warren 

1784 Benjamin Hichborn 

1785 John Gardiner 

1786 Jonathan L. Austin 

1787 Thomas Dawes, jr. 

1788 Harrison Gray Otis 

1789 Rev. Samuel Stillman 

1790 Edward Gray 

1791 Thomas Crafts, jr 

1792 Joseph Blake, jr. 

1793 John Quincy Adams 

1794 John Phillips 

1795 George Blake 

1796 John Lathrop 

1797 John Callender 

1798 Josiah Quincy 

1799 John Lowell, jr. 

1800 Joseph Hall 

1801 Charles Paine 

1802 Rev. William Emerson 

1803 William Sullivan 

1804 Dr. Thomas Danforth 

1805 Warren Dutton 

1806 Francis Dana Channing 

1807 Peter O. Thacher 

1808 Andrew Richie, jr. 

1809 William Tudor, jr. 

1810 Alexander Townsend 

1811 James Savage 

1812 Benjamin Pollard 

1813 Edward St. Loe Li verm ore 

1814 Benjamin Whitwell 

1815 Lemuel Shaw 

1816 George Sullivan 

1817 Edward T Channing 

1818 Francis C, Gray 

1819 Franklin Dexter 

1820 Theodore Lyman, jr. 

1821 Charles G. Loring 

1822 John C.Gray 

1823 Charles Pelham Curtis 

1824 Francis Bassett 

1825 Charles Sprague 

1826 Josiah Quincy, Mayor 

1827 William Powell Mason 

1828 Bradford Sumner 

1829 James T. Austin 

1830 Alexander H. Everett 

1831 Rev. John G. Palfrey 



1832 Josiah Quincy, jr. 

1833 Edward G. Prescott 

1834 Richards. Fay 

1835 George S. Hilliard 

1836 Henry W. Kinsman 

1837 Jonathan Chapman 

1838 Rev. Hubbard Winslow 

1839 Ivers James Austin 

1840 Thomas Power 

1841 George Ticknor Curtis 

1842 Horace Mann 

1843 Charles Francis Adams 

1844 Peleg W Chandler 

1845 Charles Sumner 

1846 Fletcher Webster 

1847 Thomas G. Carey 

1848 Joel Giles 

1849 William W Greenough 

1850 Edwin R Whipple 

1851 Charles Theodore Russell 

1852 Rev. Thomas Starr King 

1853 Timothy Bigelow 

1854 Rev. A. L. Stone 

1855 Rev. A. A. Miner 

1856 Edward GrifRn Parker 

1857 Rev. William R. Alger 

1858 John S.Holmes 

1859 George Sumner 

1860 Edward Everett 

1861 Theophilus Parsons 

1862 George Ticknor Curtis 

1863 Oliver Wendell Holmes 

1864 Thomas Russell 

1865 Rev. Jason M. Manning 

1866 Rev. S. K. Lothrop 

1867 Rev. George H. Hepworth 

1868 Samuel Eliot 

1869 Ellis W. Morton 

1870 William Everett 

1871 Horace Binney Sargent 

1872 Charles Francis Adams, jr. 

1873 Rev. John F W. Ware 

1874 Richard Frothingham 

1875 Rev. James Freeman Clarke 

1876 Robert C. Winthrop 

1877 William Wirt Warren 

1878 Joseph Healey 

1879 Henry Cabot Lodge 

1880 Robert Dickson Smith 



203 



Orators of Boston — Concluded 



188] George Washington Warren 


1937 


1882 John Da\is Long 


19.38 


1883 Hex. II. Bernard Carpenter 


19.39 


1884 IlarAcyN.Shepard 


1940 


1885 Thomas J. Gargan 


1941 


1886 George Fred Williams 


1942 


1 887 |ohn E. Fit/.gerald 


1943 


1888 William E. L. Dillawav 


1944 


1889 John L.Swift 


1945 


1890 .'VJbert E. PilKshury 




1891 Josiah Qiiincv 


1946 


1892 JohnH. Mnrphy 


1947 


189.3 Henry W.Putnam 




1894 Joseph II. O'Neil 


1948 


1 89.5 Ke\ . .'\dolph .\ugustns Berle 


1949 


1896 John F Fit/.gerald 




1897 Hex. Edward Everett Hale 


19.50 


1898 Hex . Denis O'Callaghan 


1951 


1899 Nathan Matthevxs, jr. 


1952 


1900 Stephen O'Meara 


1953 


1901 Curtis Guild, jr 


19.54 


1902 Joseph A. Conrx 


19.55 


1903 EdxvinD. Mead 


1956 


1904 John A. Sullivan 


1957 


1905 LeBaron B. Colt 


1958 


1906 Timothy W.Coakley 


1959 


1907 Hev. Edward A. Ilorton 


1960 


1908 Arthur D. Hill 


1961 


1909 Arthur L. Spring 


1962 


1910 James II. Wolff 


1963 


1911 Charles William Eliot 


1964 


1912 Joseph C. Pelletier 


1965 


1913 Greenxille S. MacFarland 


1966 


1914 Hex. James A. Supple 


1967 


1915 Louis D. Brandeis 


1968 


1916 Joe Mitchell Chappie 


1969 


1917 Daniel J. Gallagher 


1970 


1918 William II. PFaunce 


1971 


1919 Charles Ambrose DeCourcy 


1972 


1920 Jacob L. Wiseman 


1973 


1921 Lemuel H. Murlin 


1974 


1922 Jeremiah E. Burke 


1975 


1923 Rev. Charles W. Lyons 


1976 


1924 Rev. Dudley II. Ferrell 


1977 


1925 Thomas H. Doxvd 


1978 


1926 Andrew J. Peters 


1979 


1927 William McGinnis 


1980 


1928 Edith Nourse Rodgers 


1981 


1929 Robert Luce 


1982 


19.30 Herbert Parker 


1983 


1931 Daxid I. Walsh 


1984 


1932 Robert E. Rogers 


1985 


1933 Joseph A. Tomasello 


1986 


1934 His Eminence William 


1987 


Cardinal O'Connell 


1988 


1935 Albert Bushnell Hart 


1989 


1936 Faris S. Malouf 


1990 



Louis J. A. Mercier 

David I. Walsh 

Stephen F. Chadwick 

John P. Sullixan 

Daniel L. Marsh 

Gerald F. Coughlin 

John W. McCormack 

Francis Malonex- 

His Excellencx' Richard J. 

Gushing, D. D. 

John F. Kennedx' 

Judge Robert Gardiner 

Wilson, jr. 

Hon. James M. Curley 

Most Reverend John J. 

Wright, D. D. 

Francis C. Gray 

Judge Elias F. Shannon 

Judge Elijah Adloxx- 

Dr. Mordecai W Johnson 

Herbert A. Philbrick 

Clare Booth Luce 

Timothy J. Murphy 

Judge Felix Forte 

Rev. Daniel Linehan, S.J. 

Admiral Carl F. Espe 

Judge Jennie Loitman Barron 

Edward M. Kennedy 

Erxvin D. Canham 

General James M. Gavin 

Louis Lyons 

Alexander Brin 

Philip J. McNiff 

Daniel J. Finn 

Robert C. Wood 

Gerald F O'Leary 

Gabriel F Piemonte 

Frederick Homberger 

John J. Moaklex' 

Prof. Benjamin W. Labaree 

Prof. Richard Bushman 

El ma Lexxis 

John Silber 

Juanita Kreps 

Prof. Samuel Huntington 

Archibald Cox 

David McCord 

Frank N. Jones 

John W. Sears 

Paul Tsongas 

John Kerry 

Kip Tiernan 

Raxnnond L. Flxnn 

Allan Weinstein 

Ilenrx' Hampton 

Theodore Landsmark 

Cindv Walker 



205 
INDEX 

Page 
A 

Administrative Services Department (ASD) 54-61 

Air Pollution Control Commission (Env. Dept.) 79 

Aldermen, Chairmen of the Board of 1855-1909 199 

Animal Control (ISD) 97 

Appeal, Board of (ISD) 99 

Archives and Records Advisory Commission 61 

Arson Prevention Commission 62 

Art Commission, Boston 80 

Arts and Humanities 63 

Assessing Department 63-64 

Board of Review 64 

Audit Committee 65 

Auditing Department 65-66 

B 

Back Bay Architectural Commission (Env. Dept.) 79 

Beacon Hill Architectural Commission (Env. Dept.) 79-80 

Births, Registrar of (City Clerk) 68 

Boston Art Commission (Env. Dept. and Arts and Humanities) . 80 

Boston Employment Commission (EDIC) 76 

Boston Housing Authority 90-92 

Boston Industrial Development Financing Authority 

(BIDFA)(EDIC) 76 

Boston Local Development Corporation (EDIC) 76 

Boston Origin and Growth of 4, 5 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 148-153 

Boston Resident Jobs Policy (EDIC) 75 

Boston Retirement Board 155 

Boston Technical Center (EDIC) 76 

Browne Fund, Edward Ingersoll 170-171 

Budget and Program Evaluation (ASD) 54-55 

Business and Cultural Development 66-67 

C 

Cable Communications (ASD) 55 

Capital Planning 67 

Cemetery Division, Parks & Rec. Dept 122 

Charitable Donations, Trustees of 167 

City Charter, Excerpts from 19-49 

City Clerk 67-68 

City Council 69 

1990-1991 11-12 

Committees of 1990 15-17 

Officers of, 18 

Presidents of, 1910-present 201 



206 

Page 

City Government, 1990 1 1-14 

City Government, 1909-present 181-197 

City Hospital 88-90 

City Record (official weekly of City) (Contract Mgmt.) 55 

City Registrar 68 

City Seal, origin of and present form 3 

Clean City Commission 69-70 

Code Enforcement (Env. Ord. Enforcement Comm.) 81-82 

Collector-Treasurer 167 

Common Council, Presidents of 1822-1909 200 

Community Gardens 123-124 

Community School Facilities (Parks & Rec.) 129 

Comparable Worth Commission 70-71 

Compensation Advisory Board 71-72 

Conservation Commissioner (Env. Dept.) 80 

Consumer Affairs and Licensing 72 

Contract Management (ASD) 55 

Corporation Counsel (Law Dept.) 104, 105 

County Commissioner, Suffolk 178 

Credit Union, City of Boston Employees 72-73 

D 

Deaths, Registrar of (City Clerk Dept.) 68 

Deeds, Register of (Suffolk County) 178 

Designer Selection Board (ref. ASD) 60 

Disabilities, Commission for Persons with 73 

District Attorney. Suffolk County 180 

Districts, Electoral 13 

Drug Abuse Coordinating Council on 74 

E 

Economic Development and Industrial Corporation of Boston . . 75-76 

Elderly, Commission on Affairs of the 77 

Election Department 77-78 

Electoral Districts 13 

Emergency Shelter Commission 78 

Engineering Division (Public Works Dept.) 146 

Environment Department 79-81 

Environmental Ordinance Enforcement Commission 81-82 

Examiners, Board of (ISD) 99-100 

Executive Departments of City 54-176 



Fair Housing Commission 82 

Finance Commission, Boston 83 

Fire Department 83-85 

Firemen's Relief Fund 85 

Foreclosed Real Estate, Committee on (Real Property) 147 

Fourth of July Orators 202, 203 

Franklin Foundation, The 85-87 

Freedom Trail Commission 88 



207 

Page 



G 



Government of Boston, 1990-1991 1 1-14 

Government of Boston, Members of, 1909-present 181-197 

H 

Health Benefits and Insurance Division (ASD) 56 

Health and Hospitals, Department of 88-90 

Health Inspections (ISD) 97 

Highway Division (Public Works Dept.) 145 

Historic Districts (ISD) 96 

House of Correction, Deer Island (Penal) 130 

Housing Authority, Boston 90 

Public Housing Developments 91-92 

Housing Inspection (ISD) 97 

Human Rights Commission 93 

I 

Inspectional Services Department 93-98 

Organizational Chart 94 

Institutional Expansion Board (ref. ASD) 60-61 

Intergovernmental Relations Division (ASD) 56-57 

J 

Jailer and Sheriff (Suffolk County) 179 

Jobs and Community Services 75 

July Fourth Orators 202, 203 

L 

Labor Relations, Office of (ASD) 57 

Landmarks Commission (Env. Dept.) 81 

Law Department 104-105 

Library, Boston Public 105-108 

Licenses, Committee on (ISD) 98 

Licensing Board 109-1 10 

Licensing Division, Mayor's Office, Consumer Affairs and .... 72 

Listing Board (Election Dept.) 78 

M 

Maintenance Branch (Public Works Dept.) 145 

Management Information Systems Division (ASD) 57 

Market, Faneuil (Real Property) 147 

Marriage Certificates, Registry Division 68 

Mayor, Department of the 110 

Mayors of Boston, 1822 to present 198 

Mental Retardation, Commission on Ill 



208 

Page 

Minority and Women Business Enterprise Office (ASD), see 

also EDIC 57-58 

Monuments, Memorials, Statues (Parks & Rec.) 120-122 

Municipal Research Bureau, Boston 1 12 

N 

Neighborhood Jobs Trust (EDIC) 76 

Neighborhood Services, Office of 113 

O 

Old South Association 114 

Orators of Boston since 1771 202, 203 

Origin and Growth of Boston 4,5 

P 

Parking Clerk, Office of 165 

Parkman, George Francis Trust Fund 168-169 

Parks and Recreation Department 1 14-130 

Parks 115-119 

Penal Institutions Department 130 

Personnel Management, Office of (ASD) 58 

Play Areas 118, 119 

Playgrounds 116,117 

Police Department 130-142 

Policy Office 142-143 

Press Office 143 

Printing Division (ASD) 58-59 

Public Art, Statues etc. (Parks & Rec.) 128-129 

Public Facilities Department 143-144 

Community Schools Division 144 

Public Improvement Commission 146 

Public Safety Commission (ref. ASD) 59 

Public Works Department 144-146 

Purchasing Division (ASD) 59 

R 

Real Estate, Committee on Foreclosed 147 

Real Property Department 147-148 

Redevelopment Authority, Boston 148-153 

Register of Deeds, Suffolk County 178 

Registry Division (City Clerk) 68-69 

Rent Equity Board 154 

Retirement Board, Boston 155 

Rodent Control (ISD) 97 



209 

Page 

S 

Safe Neighborhood Plan 175 

Sanitary Division (Public Works Dept.) 146 

School Committee 14 

School Department 156-157 

Schools, Boston Public, Directory of 158-164 

Seal of the City 2,3 

Sheriff, Suffolk County 179 

Squares, Malls, etc 120-122 

Statues, Public Art (Parks & Rec.) 128. 129 

Suffolk County 177-180 

T 

Transportation Department, Boston 165-166 

Treasury Department 167 

Trust Office 167 

Trustees of Charitable Donations for Inhabitants of Boston 167 

U 

Urban Wilds (Parks & Rec.) 125 

V 

Veterans' Services Department 172 

Graves Registration Division 172 

W 

Water and Sewer Commission, Boston 172-174 

Weights and Measures Division (ISD) 101 

White Fund, George Robert 169-170 

White Fund Facilities 170 

Women's Commission 174 

Y 

Youth Fund 175 

Youth Services Commission 175-176 

Z 

Zoning Commission (ISD) 102-103