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Full text of "Murmurmontis: [Yearbook] 1948"

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Alma Mater of the Mountains 

West Virginia Wesleyan 

At thy magic mystic fountains 

Noblest dream of life began. 

We, thy children, now adore thee; 

We, thy children, bow before thee; 

And pledge God, who watches o'er thee. 

Thou shall fill the ample measure of his plan. 



Alma Mater of the Highlands 

Guardian of romantic years 

Thou dost bring us to the skylands 

With thy faith dispel our fears. 

Give us friendship waning never 

And a call to the high endeavor 

And championship forever, with the 

God who guides the course of the spheres. 



(2) 



(4) 



Alma Mater, Queen of Learning, 

Of the Orange and the Black, 

At thy call to wisdom turning 

Naught of worth thy sons shall lack 

For the teaching of thy sages 

With the writ of sacred pages 

Will transmit the wealth of ages 

Down the future's ever wider, brighter track. 



Alma Mater of the Mountains 

West Virginia Wesleyan 

At thy magic mystic fountains 

Noblest dream of life began. 

We, thy children now adore thee; 

We, thy children, bow before thee; 

And pledge God, who watches o'er thee 

Thou shall fill the ample measure of his plan. 



-WALLACE B. FLEMING. 



there is time there. (Have we not heard strange time, 
dark time, strange tragic time there? Have we not heard 
dark time, strange time, the dark, the moving tide of time 
as it flows down the river?) 

And in the night time, in the dark there, in all the 
sleeping silence of the earth have we not heard the river, the 
rich immortal river, full of its strange dark time ? 

Full with the pulse of time it flows there, full with the 
pulse of all men living, sleeping, dying, waking it will flow 
there, full with the billion dark and sacret moments of our 
lives it flows there. Filled with all the hope, the madness and 
the passion of our youth it flows there, in the daytime, in the 
dark, drinking with ceaseless glut the land, mining into its 
tides the earth as it mines the hours and moments of our life 
into its tides, moving against the sides of ships, foaming 
about piled crustings of old wharves, sliding like time and 
silence by the vast cliff of the city, girdling the stony isle of 
life with moving waters — thick with the wastes of earth, dark 
with our stains, and heavied with our dumpings, rich, rank, 
beautiful, and unending as all life, all living, as it flows by 
us, by us, by us, to the sea! 

From OF TIME AND THE RIVER, by Thomas Wolfe. Re- 
printed by permission of Charles Scribner's Sons, publishers. 



The 1948 Murmurmontis 



WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE 

BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 




Published by The 1948 Murmurmontis Staff 



THOMAS B. CROSSAN, JR. 
Editor-in-Chief 



S15HJ 



ROBERT S. GAY 
Business Manager 



Facing our task of depicting the passing schoolyear in 
these pages, the Staff of the 1948 MURMURMONTIS was 
acutely aware of the words "time and change" which are 
the lifeblood of any college annual. Our thinking about time 
and change took a philosophical turn and we met one 
Heraclitus, sage of the Ephesus of ancient Greece. His 
imperturbable wisdom, reducing time and change to the 
delightful metaphor, "you can't step into the same river 
twice," started us thinking of time and change in terms of 
moving water. 

This trend of thought led us directly to the enormously 
modern Thomas Wolfe and his expansive novel, Of Time and 
The River, in which he likened the ceaseless-change character 
of time to the eternal flow of a mighty river. We knew 
instantly we'd found the theme material for which we'd been 
searching when we came on those time-river paragraphs of 
Wolfe's which appear opposite the title page of this '48 
MURMURMONTIS. 

Wolfe's time-river analogy inspired the cover design in 
which we have sought to portray, in terms of the theme and 
in modern symbolic forms, the essence of time and change 
at Wesleyan during the 1947-1948 schoolyear. The mouth 
in the distant mountain range was included for good measure 
to symbolize the meaning of MURMURMONTIS — namely, 
"the voice of the mountains." 



.7 



Foreword 5 

College Personnel 15 

Classes 25 

Sports 61 

Organizations 87 

Highlights 125 

Student Roster 137 




'poneuxncL fo t6e t 7%wimunmo*tti& fan 



t94Z 



We have been privileged to dedicate the 1948 MURMUR- 
MONTIS to two of West Virginia Wesleyan's greatest 
benefactors, Mary Lowe West and the late Calvin A. West. 

Time's tides in their ceaseless ebb and flow have carried 
the College far from its early life and death struggles with 
the material aspects of existence. To the many distinguished 
administrators who have labored faithfully in its service 
belongs our gratitude for much of the success our Alma 
Mater has enjoyed. We are equally indebted to a small group 
of philanthropists whose interests in higher education have 
centered on West Virginia Wesleyan. Their benefactions, 
together with the invaluable service rendered the College by 
capable administrators, have immeasurably ennobled the 
vision of Wesleyan's founders. 

It well behooves those of us in the College today, then, 
to know our benefactors — philanthropic and administrative 
— and, knowing them, give eternal thanks for their united 
interest in our beloved Alma Mater, 



Calvin Alexander West 
1871-1936 





*7KuftmcMMtortti& 'Dedication, 



Mary Lowe West 



Long a prominent figure in the national shoe industry, the late 
Mr. West was highly recognized in the field for his administrative 
leadership as a corporation director. He held many patents covering 
important technological processes basic in modern shoe manufacture, 
and he was, in addition, a leading shoe stylist. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. West were long active in the Church. Since the 
death of Mr. West, in 1936, Mrs. West has contributed even more 
largely of her services and resources. The lives of service to others 
lived by these two notable West Virginia Wesleyan benefactors will 
be remembered generations hence by students gathered to worship 
in the simple beauty of the Calvin A. West Memorial Chapel. 



The West Residence, Orlando, Florida 





Page Seven 



^cUlduty a (Zneaten 




Men's Dormitory Group 




The Administration Building 



The President's Home 



Agnes Howard Hall 



Page Eight 



'Weateycut 



The Men's Dormitory Group will be 
erected on the north end of the campus in 
the area between the Haymond Science Hall 
and the old College Spring. $200,000 has 
been raised and set aside to begin construc- 
tion on these buildings at an early date. 

Each of the two wings of the dormitory 
group has been designed to accommodate 1 10 
men. A great hall, planned to provide facili- 
ties for the social and recreational needs of 
those living in the dormitories, will eventually 
join the wings which are at present scheduled 
for construction as separate units. 



Calvin A. West 
Memorial Chapel 



The Calvin A. West Memorial Chapel, 
a gift of his wife, Mary Lowe West, has 
been planned to provide the campus com- 
munity with a center for worship. 

The simple architecture of the building, 
based on graceful Georgian Colonial lines, 
will focus in a spacious "meeting place" the 
spiritual unity of Wesleyan's religious herit- 
age. Provision has been made for the installa- 
tion of a pipe organ. The Chapel, it is 
planned, will serve not only as a center for 
regular services but also as a quiet place for 
daily meditation. 





Florida Street House 



Home Economics House 



College Avenue House 



Patje Nine 



*?<n *7&o4c *?4J6& 







Loar Memorial Hall of Music and Fine Arts 



The Loar Memorial Hall of Music and 
Fine Arts, scheduled for construction as soon 
as labor and materials are available, is the 
gift of the late Mrs. Lawson L Loar of 
Clarksburg. 

Mrs. Loar, widow of a Clarksburg business 
executive and civic leader, designated the 
College as residuary legatee in her will. 
$100,000 was allotted for construction costs 
and $150,000 has been established as an 
endowment fund to support and maintain 
the Memorial. 




Haymond Science Hall 



The Gymnasium 



The Music Hall 



Page Ten 



SicuU 'poUow 



The Annie Merner Pfeiffer Library, one 
of the many benefactions made by the late 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer to the cause of 
higher education, has been planned for con- 
struction in the area north of the Administra- 
tion Building near the tennis court. 

The first floor of this building will house 
the College Administrative offices. A large 
reference and general reading room will 
occupy the second floor. Ample stacks to 
house 50,000 volumes are planned. An out- 
standing feature of the building, a bas-relief 
memorializing the union of Methodism in 
West Virginia, will be located in the foyer. 




Annie Merner Pfeiffer Library 




Married Veteran's Housing, Unit II 



Student Center 



Single Veteran's Housing, Unit I 



Page t'A< < en 




William John Scarborough 



Same 7tote& 



from the 



'Pteaidettt <*£ t6e &Ueye 



"The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, 
Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit 
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line 
Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it." 

from THE RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KHAYYAM 
by Fitzgerald. 

Not only does this volume mark another 
year in the history of Wesleyan, recording as 
it does the outstanding events of the past 
twelve months, but it focuses thought on 
values. "For what shall it profiteth a man if 
he gain the whole world and lose his own 
soul." 

You, who are now leaving Wesleyan as 
graduates look back upon your time in its 
halls as precious memories. As you go remem- 
ber to take time for laughter, for objective 
thought, for clear-headed study, to walk in 
the woods and to remember the values of 
life as the days go by. We charge you to 
look back on college days with the realization 



that only those values which survive are 
worth giving time to. Therefore, "lay up for 
yourselves treasures in heaven where neither 
moss nor rock doth corrupt and where thieves 
do not break through or steal. For where 
your treasure is, there will your heart be also." 
The editors of the Murmurmontis for 
1948, in choosing the theme of "Time and 
Change," have called our attention to a 
significant aspect of modern life. We busy 
ourselves with endless details of time- 
consuming trivia and miss the majesty of 
life as it flows ceaselessly by. In the deeper 
sense life, itself, has meaning only in terms 
of the objectives for the investment of Time. 
Wesleyan has sought in the past, and will 
continue to seek in the future, to give 
foundation to the meaning of life as invest- 
ment in service to others — in the name of 
Christ — as the consecration of life lived to 
the full. 



Ok *7£*kc& /icU 



from the 



'Pte&tdeKt o£ t&e (ZamntUKity @auKcit 



Seven years have moved down the river 
of Time flowing by the Wesleyan campus 
since I arrived here in the Fall of 1941 and 
wore a Freshman dinky. Looking about me 
now, and back through my memories of those 
years, I have the feeling Change was kept 
constantly busy. 

Europe, during my Freshman year, was 
already at war, but the force of Hitler's power 
had not then reached America to any great 
extent. Much less had the thoughts of vio- 
lence entered my mind — other, that is, than 
the violence of smashing through the line of 
an opposing football team. Then, like all of 
you, I too was finally shocked, by the attack 
of the Japanese on Pearl Harbor, December 
7, 1941, into action toward the defense of 
our country. I won't dwell on those war years 
as familiar as all of us still are with those 
trying times. 

On returning to Wesleyan in the fall of 
1946, the campus seemed to me then to have 
resisted Time and Change — I found it com- 
fortingly familiar. There were quite a few 
familiar faces, both of the faculty and the 
student body. But, after being back a while, 
I soon began to realize Wesleyan had wel- 
comed Change and was thus better able to 
withstand the stresses of those war years. By 
that, I mean the spirit of West Virginia 
Wesleyan had been kept afloat and was 
slowly but surely regaining the old buoyancy 



of pre-war days. Gradually, more and more 
former students returned to the campus, and 
the Freshman Class more than doubled since 
the days when I was a Freshman With the 
student body getting larger, greater was the 
spirit of unity both in study and in play. 

In keeping with the needs of this greater 
student population a new Community Council 
Constitution was adopted this year. This 
move, demanded by Time and Change, has 
given the students an increased opportunity 
to participate more widely in governing their 
school activities and organizations. I believe 
this one organization, alone, has done much 
to unify the college, and I'm sure it will 
continue to do so in the years to follow. In 
moving beyond Wesleyan this year, the Senior 
Class places its trust in the classes we leave 
here, and the yet unborn classes of the future, 
to maintain a high interest in the Community 
Council. Their ideals, thereby united, will be 
found to be the stepping stones to the ideals 
required for the high level of competence in 
citizenship expected of college graduates. 

As we, the class of 1948, go our various 
roads striving to reach the goals of our lives, 
we will always remember and cherish in our 
hearts our years at West Virginia Wesleyan. 
In passing on the honor of my office of the 
Presidency of the Community Council, I want 
to thank each of you for the splendid coopera- 
tion you have given the Council this year. 




Charles William Pugh 



Page Thirl' < n 



The 1947-48 schoolyear has been carried swiftly along on 
the restless breast of the tide of time flowing steadily in the 
wide and deep expanse between the unmeasured banks of 
the eternal river. Seeking to capture in these pages some 
notion of the subtlety of Change, the itinerant artist of the 
pulsing time-river, we have tried to catch his brush at work, 
touching the year drifting on the moving stream of time and 
coloring it with the confusion, the inertia, the pain, the 
pleasure, the passion, and the glowing hope of our youth. 

The year, wearied with its minute-measured journeying, 
slides silently into the great mouth of the mighty river 
through which it will at the last be swept into the forever- 
gone swell of the lost, limitless sea of remembrances beyond. 
Given a moment to sum the total of those images of the year 
scattered two-dimensionally through these pages, we see 
clearly the tidemarks of change left on the campus by the 
alternating ebbs and floods of the restless river of eternal 
time. 

We are made instantly aware of the loss of faces grown 
familiar to us in our daily contact with the administration, 
the faculty, the staff, and — more rarely — with the College 
Trustees. But in remembering these departed ones we see an 
array of new faces, many of them, and we see Change has 
compensated for his taking away of old friends by adding 
to our happy measure of new friendships. 




7^ @o(teye 'P&i46«t*tel *)a 



Officers 

Clyde O. Law President 

B. C. McGinnis Vice-President 

Myron B. Hymes Secretary 

Members Emeritus 

J. W. Engle Clarksburg 

L. S. Grose Buckhannon 

H, W. Harmer Clarksburg 

0. J. Morrison Charleston 

J. E. Scott Parkersburg 

C. G. Stater Fairmont 

J. E. Wells Huntington 

Members Ex Officio 

The President of the College Buckhannon 

Bishop James H. Straughn Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Term Expires 1951 



MINISTERS 



LAYMEN 



C. E, Brandt Moundsville 

H E Kelso Huntington 

W. Knox Parkersburg 

M. C. Miles Parkersburg 

W. S. Patterson Buckhannon 



W. F. Curtis Moundsville 

Mrs. C. C. Hyre Clarksburg 

C. F. Israel Clarksburg 

A. V. G. Upton Clarksburg 

C. B. Whetsell Elkins 



f&e ^(jW o£ 




Clyde Otis Low 

President 
Wheeling, West Virginia 

Born in Lawford, Ritchie County, 
West Virginia, in 1883, Clyde O. 
Law came to Wesleyan in 1901 
where he received a B.S. degree in 
the Class of 1909. During those years 
he become associated with the North- 
western Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. 

Graduating from Harvard Univer- 
sity with a M.B.A. in 1913, Mr. Law 
was active in Clarksburg until 1920 
when he moved his family to Wheel- 
ing to become a Northwestern Mutual 
General Agent. Active in Methodism 
and anxious to serve his alma mater, 
Mr. Law was elected to the Board of 
Trustees in 1919. His elevation to 
the presidency of the Board in 1932, 
a post he has since continuously 
held, is evidence of the high regard 
in which he is held for his unflagging 
interest in promoting the fortunes of 
the College. 



Term Expires 1950 



W. P. Eastwood Wheeling 

J. E. Hanifan Clarksburg 

J. M. Helm Huntington 

F. L. Shaffer Charleston 

T. M. Zumbrunnen Huntington 



G. W. Bright Beckley 

Mrs. Florence Harmer.Clarksburg 

Clyde O. Law Wheeling 

Lawrence R. Lynch Clarksburg 

G. M. Nicholson Parkersburg 



Term Expires 1 949 



Alfred E. Bennett Charleston 

W. S. Boyd Pittsburgh, Pa 

C. G. Eastwood Bluefield 

R. S. Kenaston Huntington 

J L, Wolfe Parkersburg 



E. Ray Jones Oakland, Md. 

A. F. McCue Clarksburg 

A. G. Shannon Buckhannon 

L, C. Shingleton Clarksburg 

Mrs. C. A. West. _ .Orlando, Fla. 



Term Expires 1948 



D. C. Pickens Oakland, Md. 

W. S. Overstreet Buckhannon 

G. W. Stewart Beckley 

H. W. Ware Elkins 

H. W. Jamison. .Turtle Creek, Pa. 



Myron B. Hymes Buckhannon 

Miss Edna Jenkins Petroleum 

B. C. McGinnis Huntington 

Lewis H. Miller Ripley 

S. S. Tuckwiller Lewisburg 



Bishop James Henry Straughn 

Member Ex -Officio 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Resident Bishop of West Virginia 
since 1939, Bishop Straughn has 
shown a deep interest in the College 
from the beginning of his association 
with it. The fact that the College has 
received increased individual financial 
support and a greater student repre- 
sentation from the Pittsburgh area in 
recent years is indicative of the 
Bishop's abiding interest in West 
Virginia Wesleyan. 

Bishop Straughn was born in Cen- 
terville, Maryland, in 1 877. He was 
ordained in 1 903, and he holds the 
degrees of A.B., A.M., and D.D. 
from Western Maryland College. West 
Virginia Wesleyan conferred the de- 
gree of LL.D. on him in 1 94 1 . The 
Bishop is a Mason and a member of 
the Knights of Pythias. He is well 
known as a writer and a lecturer. 




Page 8ia r- .-,,. 



7*K4tee& o£ t£e fyUeye 




First row, left to right: C. G. Stoter, J. O. Gross,* B. C. McGinnis, R. S. Kenoston, W. J. Scorborough.t C. O. Low, L. C. Shingleton, H. W. Jomison, C. E. Brandt, G. W. Bright. 

Second row: T. M. Zumbrunnen, L. H. Miller, C. B. Whetsell, Mrs. W. M. Downs, Edno Jenkins, Mrs. Florence Harmer, J. E. Scott, E. R. Jones, G. M. Nicholson. Third row: M. 

B. Hymes, D. C. Pickens, H. E. Kelso, A. V. G. Upton, A. E. Bennett, J. E. Hanifan, A. G. Shannon, W. S. Patterson, W. S. Boyd. Fourth row: J. L. Wolfe, C. G. Eostwood, H. 

W. Wore, C. F. Israel, B. D. Raine, A. F. McCue, G. W. Stewart. ("Not a trustee; tmember ex-officio) (Picture taken November 15, 1946) 



I'tmi: s>-, , ,:!■■ n 




STELLA WARD 

Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic 

Arts; Dean of Students; Head of Residence, 

Agnes Howard Hall 



JAMES L. HUPP 

Professor of Education and Psychology; Dean 
of Students; Head of Counseling 



HEYWARD A. WILLIAMS 

Treasurer 



WILLIAM D. FOSTER 

Alumni Sec and Field Representative 




tne rfcUnwiAfoatCw, 



Change, no respector of rank in the College hierarchy, wielded his 
subtle brush among the Administrative personnel during the year. 

One broad stroke of his brush brought a genial new face, that of 
Charles R. Knapp, to replace, as the College Librarian, Mrs. Curry, 
who joined the Faculty Emeritus at the end of the 1946-47 school- 
year. Mr. Knapp came to Wesleyan from the University of Illinois 
where he was in charge of the Law Library. 

With another bold sweep of his brush, Change introduced a new 
administrative post, that of Assistant to the President, and brought 
Myron S. Baker from the War Assets Administration in Cleveland, 
Ohio, to fill the position. Mr. Baker's appointment, in November, 
1947, came after the individual portraits were taken for the 
MURMURMONTIS, hence we were unable to include his picture 
on this page. 

A highlight of the year for three of our Administrators, President 
Scarborough, Dean Schoolcraft, and Treasurer Williams, came on 
the night of the basketball game with Marshall College. Just before 
the game began, the three emerged somewhat sheepishly from the 
stands and led the Wesleyan rooters in a rousing FIGHT TEAM' 
Change, perched high in the rafters of the gymnasium, lifted his 
brush with a satisfied smile at his handiwork. 




WILLIAM B. HICKS 

Business Manager 



CHARLES R. KNAPP 

Librarian 



WILLIAM JOHN SCARBOROUGH 

President of the College 



ARTHUR ALLEN SCHOOLCRAFT 

Professor ot Education and Psychology; Dean of the 
College; Registrar; Director of Admissions 



Page Eighteen 



76e 'paccdty 



One of the final effects wrought by Change at the close of the 
1946-47 schoolyear was the retirement of Ora Douglass Curry. After 
twenty years of service, fourteen of them as College Librarian, Mrs. 
Curry joined the distinguished ranks of the Members Emeritus of the 
Wesleyan Faculty. Like most of her fellow Emeriti, however, Mrs. 
Curry has continued to give part of her time to serving Wesleyan 

As for the other Members Emeritus, Change continued to rock 
them gently in the forward current of the pulsing time-river. Dr. 
Haught spent part of the schoolyear working with Alumni Secretary 
Foster on the Alumni Directory which was published early in the 
year. Former President Fleming (1915-1922) participated in the 
successful campaign held early in the schoolyear to raise the second 
$100,000 required to begin construction on the proposed Men's 
Dormitory Group; he has also been active in forming a committee of 
the Methodist Attorneys of West Virginia to work with the College 
in the matter of settling wills and bequests. Mrs. Neil has continued, 
in view of the record enrollment of students, to meet classes in the 
required Fundamentals of Speech course — a typical gesture of the 
selfless giving which has endeared Mrs. Neil to many students and 
graduates of the College. Mrs. Ogden is living in retirement at her 
home in Hadley, Pennsylvania. 




THOMAS W. HAUGHT 

Professor of Geology, Emeritus 1896-1941 



WALLACE B. FLEMING 

Vice-President, Emeritus 1938-1944 



7He*Pt6et& Snt&uttu 





RACHEL C. OGDEN 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages 
Emeritus; 1926-1946 



MRS. C. EDMUND NEIL 

Associate Professor of Speech 
and Dramatic Arts, Emeritus; 1931-1946 



ORA DOUGLAS CURRY 

Librarian, Emeritus 
1927-1947 



Paqe Nineteen 




LEWIS HERBERT CHRISMAN 

Professor of English Literature 



NICHOLAS HYMA 

Professor of Chemistry 



RALPH C. BROWN JACOB BOS 

Biblical Literature and Philosophy Professor of German, French and Latin 



^%o£e4Aa>i4 



GEORGE LEASE GLAUNER 

Professor of History 



JAMES EDWARD JUDSON ARTHUR B. GOULD CARLETON HAMMOND CURRIE 

Professor of Biology Professor of Chemistry and Physical Science Professor of Sociology 




7^e 



Change fleefully wore his artful 
brush to the nub daubing the broad, 
heavy strokes of resignations, re- 
placements, and additions Time 
dictated as she swept the Faculty 
along swiftly in her restless tides 
at the beginning of the 1947-48 
schoolyear. A total of six members 
of the previous year's Faculty were 
carried beyond the Wesleyan cam- 
pus, but Time and Change compen- 
sated better than two-fold by cast- 
ing up no less than thirteen addi- 
tions to help tend the record 1947- 
48 student enrollment. 

Two resignations, those of Dr. 
Hans Tischler, Professor of Music, 
and Dr. Samuel D. Marble, Professor 
of Political Science, were balanced 
in the professorial rank by two 
additions, Dr. E. V. Bowers, Pro- 
fessor of Psychology, and Dr. 
George H. McKee, Professor of 
Spanish. Professor Tischler left 
Wesleyan after a period of two 
year's service. Professor Marble, 
after one year here, left to become 
President of Wilmington College, 
Wilmington, Ohio — the youngest 
college president in the country. 

Professor Bowers came to Wes- 
leyan after a distinguished twenty- 
five years of service at Marshall 
College, the last six of which he 
served as Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Professor McKee 
was associated with the New Lon- 
don extension of the University of 
Connecticut before coming to Wes- 
leyan. 



SAMUEL A. SMALL 

Professor of English 



JOSE A. FRANQUIZ 

Professor of Philosophy 



E. V. BOWERS 

Professor of Psychology 



GEORGE HOLLADAY McKEE 

Professor of Spanish 



Pn<ir 7V enty 



^accdtcf 



Especially active in the associate 
professorial rank, Change removed 
two familiar faces, Marie D. Boette 
and Louise H Tischler, both of the 
Dept. of Music, and presented a 
total of eight new associates. 

Professor Arnold came to Wes- 
leyan from o junior college in his 
home city of Moline, III. Mr. Bart- 
ley came from Lincoln Junior Col- 
lege, Lincoln, Neb. Professor Dow- 
ney brought to his work here the 
fruits of his studies at the Univer- 
sities of Virginia, Chicago, and 
Johns Hopkins. Choir Director For- 
lines brought a rich background of 
studies in music, he came here 
from Morris Harvey College. Com- 
ing here from William and Mary 
College, the Richmond Division, 
Professor Nichols has completed a 
substantial amount of work toward 
his Ph. D. degree at Columbia U. 

Professor Pollard, a graduate of 
Boston University, teaches Piano 
and Music Theory. Mr. Rice, who 
was appointed Director of Religious 
Activities at the beginning of the 
second semester, came to Wesleyan 
from McKendree College where 
President Scarborough formerly 
taught. Professor Shaver brought to 
Wesleyan his experience in teach- 
ing at Northwestern Missouri State 
Teachers College. Mr. Davis, a Wes- 
leyan alumnus, recently completed 
graduate studies at the University 
of Pittsburgh. Professor Godwin has 
his Master's degree almost com- 
pleted at Washington University. 




LETA SNODGRASS CECIL B. ROSS WILLIAM A. HALLAM 

Associate Professor of Fine Arts Director of Athletics and Coach Associate Professor of Mathematics 



rf&4ACi4,te4> 



DAVID ECHOLS REEMSNYDER GLADYS CRONEMEYER CALVIN BUELL AGEY FRANCIS B. ANDREW 

Associate Prof, of Physical Education Associate Prof, of Home Economics Associate Professor of Music Associate Professor of History 




E. KIDD LOCKARD 
Associate Professor of Economics 



BYRON ARNOLD 

Associate Professor of Biology 



LEWIS A. BARTLEY MARVIN DOWNEY 

Associate Prof, of Business Adm. Associate Prof, of Political Science 



Pafie Twenti/'One 




CHARLES W. FORLINES ROLAND PRESTON RICE JOHN DAVID SHAVER 

Associate Professor of Music 3iblical Literature, Religious Education Associate Professor of Speech 



*7^e ^acuity 



Change was doubly active too among the 
ranks of the Assistant Professors and the In- 
structors. Three resignations were noted, those 
of Assistant Professor of Speech, Ronald E. 
Sleeth, and two Instructors, Francis B. St. 
Clair, Business Administration, and John Scott 
Withers, Physics and Mathematics. Two addi- 
tions in the Assistant Professorial rank were 
Sidney D. Davis and John C Godwin. 

Other effects produced by the activity of 
restless Change were the promotions of Miss 
Knepshield and Miss Moore to Associate and 
Assistant Professorships respectively. Miss 
Wilson, on her appointment as full-time 
Director of Student Activities, relinquished her 
Assistant Professorship in Religious Education 



LEONARD DeGARMO NICHOLS WILLIAM FRANCIS POLLARD, JR. CHARLOTTE B. KNEPSHIELD 

Associate Professor of Economics Associate Professor of Music Associate Professor of Physical Ed. 



NELLIE G. WILSON 

Dir. of Student Activities 




Easing up somewhat on his 
worn brush, Change noted the 
passage of the office staff of the 
College in the swift stream of 
Time. He moved Billie Lou Whet- 
hered with her shiny, new Wes- 
leyan B A. into Mr, Foster's 
Alumni Office where she took over 
the post of the Secretary's secre- 
tary. Mary Ann Law left off her 
role of student and was added to 
the staff in the Dean's Office. 
Another student addition to the 
staff in the Dean's Office, but on 
a part-time basis, was Mildred 
Barckley who handles Public Law 
346 veteran's records. 

Dr. Hupp's secretary, Nita Ham- 
ilton, and Mr. Baker's secretary, 
Audrey W. Riffe, were appointed 
too late in the schoolyear to have 
their pictures included in these 
pages. 



SIDNEY THOMAS DAVIS 

Ass't Prof, of Rural Church Work 



JOHN COCHRAN GODWIN 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



MARY VIRGINIA MOORE 

Ass't Prof, of Business Admin 



RICHARD H. RALSTON 

Instructor in English 



Pane Twenty-ttco 



Mrs. Ada W. Bedell felt the touch of the 
subtle brush of Change near the end of the 
first semester of the 1947-48 schoolyear; she 
resigned as the College Avenue House Head 
of Residence. Mrs. Maude Mick heeded the 
beckoning finger of Chonge and accepted 
the position. 

Another of the many new faces Change 
introduced at the beginning of the year was 
Jean Ann McFadden who took on the task of 
planning menus in the College dining rooms. 
Madge Martin greeted Change happily as she 
surveyed the health office and infirmary the 
Time-Artist opened for her use in the new 
Student Center building. 

Change, who moves ever to the fore and 
pauses not a second to glance back over his 
shoulder, tarried not at all as the 1947-48 
schoolyear drew to a close. Our final glimpse 
of the itinerant artist of the time-river turned 
our faces, like his, to the future. Change, with 
a smile of anticipation, was selecting a new 
brush — a fine broad one — for the busy 1948- 
49 schoolyear he saw drifting down the 
eternal river. 



MARGARET GUSSLER 

Head of Residence 



Housing Unit I 



MAUDE MICK 

Head of Residence 
College Avenue House 



CAROLA B. REGESTER 

Assistant Head of Residence 
Agnes Howard Hall 




MARGARET DRUMMOND 

Housekeeper 

Agnes Howard Hall 



REGINA KENNY 

Assistant to the Treasurer 



WILLA LOUISE WETHERED 

Secretary to the Alumni Secretary 



HELEN STOCKERT 

Assistant Librarian 



JEAN McFADDEN 

Dietitian 



7<k Sta$ 



HARRIET WHETSELL 

Secretary to the President 



MADGE MARTIN 

Nurse 



MARY SHAW STRUGNELL 

Secretary to the Deon 





jO|\!hP 





CATHERINE ANN TRAVIS 

Secretary to the Registrar 



WINNIE HATHAWAY 

Assistant Librarian 



BEATRICE HICKMAN MARY ANN LAW 

Stenographer in Business Office Stenographer in Office of the Dean 



MILDRED BARCKLEY 

Veteran's Coordinator 



Page Twenty-three 



Mining into its swift, dark tides the silent, precious 
seconds of yet another year of our lives, the immortal river 
has swept us all still further along the downstream course of 
our great journey. Carrying us from our green-hued freshman 
days through the cynic sophomore year and the sudden 
seriousness of junior status to our wisdom-wizened senior 
pedestal, the impassive movement of stolid Time has loosed 
Change upon us all. Just as the campus buildings have 
weathered a barely perceptible deeper shade and the campus 
trees have added an unnoticed ring to their girth, so have we 
all stood silent this year while Change wrought the subtle 
effects of his skillful brush upon us. 

Bobbing quietly in the great mouth of the immortal river 
in the moment left before it is finally swept irrevocably out 
into the lost sea of Time beyond, the Class of 1948 sees with 
the startling clarity of sudden insight the whole of Time's 
carefully calculated schedule. For a second the broad canvas 
of life stands spread wide before the Class, and they see 
Change impatiently beckoning them on to the tasks he has 
set for them in the year immediately ahead. 

More, they see that as the Class of 1944 had to move on 
to make room for them so they must now make room for the 
yet unshaped Class of 1952 forming on the uppermost 
reaches of the pulsing time-river. 




7<^ (ZlatoeA, m 



7^e (^#44 



DORIS BELCHER 

Kimball 



RUBERT BENNETT 

Roanoke 



LORRAINE BODKIN 

Buckhannon 



VIRGINIA BODKIN 

Buckhannon 



GEORGE BROOKS 

West Milford 



JOHN CARPENTER 

Buckhannon 




RECTOR BROWN 

Chloe 



Page Twenty-six 



^/w 



RUTH YOUNG 

Weston 


JAMES NANCARROW 

Ravenswood 


\y\ 






k 



LAWRENCE RILEY 

Oakland, Md. 



J! ^r\ » *»i 



tet? 



JfkJT' 




JOHN WARE 

Ellamore 



WILLIAM WILLIS 

Moundsville 



HELEN YOUNG 

Charleston 



CHARLES FENTON 

Buckhonnon 



STEPHEN SMEGA 

Newark, N. J. 



ADAM FORINASH 

Webster Springs 



I'.ni- 1 ty \evei\ 



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m 

(Mr 




^B My* 


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HAZEL SHOMO 
Grafton 



7<£e {?&?44 



VIRGINIA SMITH 

Montvale, Va. 



MIRTH SPANGLER 

Weston 



WILLIAM STEMPLE 

Oakland, Md. 



HOBART DODRILL 

Buckhonnon 




LEE SUTTER 

Seward, Pa. 



MAXINE HINKLE 

Berea 



CATHERINE TRAVIS 

Buckhannon 



JANE SWISHER 

Lost Creek 



JOHN UHLER 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. 



WILLIS TRIPLETT 

Elkins 



Pnitr Twenty-eight 



o^m* 



GEORGE HICKS 

Buckhannon 



IVORY BOGGS 

Eolio, Ky. 



PARKER HOLLOWAY 

Madison, N. J 



RICHARD HOPKINS 

Clarksburg 



MELVIN HAROLD 

Kimball 



JOSEPH HUNTZ 

Wyoming, Pa 




DOROTHY JACKSON 

Charleston 



Parti Twt nty-nlnt 



7^e ^£44 



MARY CLELLAND 

Shinnston 



IRVIN CONNER 

Hurricane 



MARY COBERLY 

Elkins 



LEE COSGROVE 

Weston 



EDWIN CUNNINGHAM HATTIE DOWNER 

Madison St- Charles, Va. 




GENE HEBB 

Allentown, Pa 



*tmz 



TALLA HANNA 

Wesfernport, Md 




GEORGE REXROAD 

Clarksburg 



HUGH STOUT 

Alum Bridge 



"BILL" PUGH 

Gouley Bridge 



PAUL SMALL 

Newcastle, Pa. 



CHESTER STEYER 

Buckhannon 



ELIZABETH NORMAN 

Clarksburg 



Page Tft 



EDMUND GARRETT 

Bridgeport 



7<^e $&W4 



BENJAMIN WILSON 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SUE HEFNER 

Lewisburg 



JOHN JAMES 

West Liberty 



SUE JOHNSON 

Lewisburg 



DONALD MARTIN 

Pinnell Hill 



COY LANG 

Buckhannon 




WAYNE LAWSON 

Clarksburg 



Parte Thirty-tv:o 



o^mx 









ROBERT HUPP 

Buckhannon 



LARRY" MARQUESS 

Parsons 



PHYLLIS LOVETT 

Mt. Clare 



VELMA SMITH 

Buckhannon 



PEGGY DORSEY 

Mount Hope 



HERBERT MERCER 

Fairmont 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 

Buckhannon 




Pft(ie Thirt>i-lhr 




PATRICIA ALBRIGHT 

Tunnelton 



JOSEPH BROYLES 

Buckhannon 



CHRISTINE ANDERSON 

Smoot 



VIRGINIA ANDERSON 

Smoot 



MILDRED BARCKLEY 

Burlington, N. J. 



PATRICIA BASSEL 

Mt. Clare 



7<^e (tyate. 





jfk 




£& ^tk 



MAXINE BIRCKHEAD 

Glen Ferris 



"BILL" BROWN 

Buckhannon 



BERNARD CARDER 

Beaver 



"JUDY" CONAWAY 

Clarksburg 



WILLIAM CASTO 

West Milford 



RICHARD COLEMAN 

Buckhannon 



Page Thirty-tour 



0^1949 



ARTHUR GOLLER 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



RAY CROSS 

Parsons 



EDWARD CROW 

Cameron 



RACHEL DIVERS 

Basset, Va. 



ROBERT DOTSON 

Caretta 



DAVID DU BOIS 

Moundsville 





r^^St iG*) 


M?Md^± 




& 









EARL DUNN 

Morgontown 



LYLE DUNSMOOR 

Parkersburg 



HAROLD ELLIS 

McWhorter 



GLADYS EVANS 

Moundsville 



WALTER FOX 

Buckhannon 



JOAN FRAME 

Dai ley 




Page TMrty-flvt 




I ' 



^few 




BARBARA GUESS 

Wheeling 



J" mm \ 


MARY HADJIS 


m~ ^m 


Wheeling 


M ~ m 




■ ^ M 


PATRICIA HANNAH 


W m 


Buckhannon 


r W^r 






DORIS HINDS 




Green Village, N. J. 


'"■3 |R& \$ 




W- v m 


BIDDY HOGAN 

Charleston 



*76e (?&U6 




BETTY HOGSETT 

Swiss 



VIVIAN JOHNS 

Ford City, Pa. 



THOMAS LONG 

Lindside 



DOLORES KELLEY 

Gauley Bridge 



ELIZABETH KARICKHOFF 

Buckhannon 



PATRICIA KENT 

Glen White 



Paye Thirty-six 



^w? 



LEJEUNE LEWIS 

Buckhannon 



WALLACE KNIGHT 

Charleston 



NORMA KENERSON 

Boston, Mass. 



JOHN LYON 

Clarksburg 



WANDA MILES 

Buckhannon 



YVONNE MOORE 

Westernport, Md. 




LUCILLE MATHENY 

Clarksburg 



JAMES MILLER 

Buckhannon 



KENNETH WATKINS 

Roanoke 



ARTHUR NEWELL 

Nettie 



MARTHA DAILEY 

Buckhannon 



COLE POTTER 

Buckhannon 




4 »**.:* 




Page Thirtyst ven 




ALDINE POLING 
Philippi 



ALICE ROSS 

Buckhonnon 



KEITH QUEEN 

Buckhonnon 



FRED REED 

Beckley 



ALBERTA ROBINSON 

Buckhonnon 



ROSE WILLIAMS 

Clarksburg 



7<£e @Uu 




DONALD ROSE 

Uniontown, Pa. 



FRANCIS SAWYERS 

Weston 



DONALD SIMONS 

Buckhonnon 



JEAN SIMPSON 

Mt. Clair 



NANCY SMITH 

Salem 



BARBARA SUMMERVILLE 

Clarksburg 



Page Thirty-i Ight 



ot?949 



JAMES SNEDEKER 

Moundsville 



JOHN STOUT 

Lost Creek 



KATHLEEN SNYDER 

Bartow 



THOMAS TAWNEY 

Weston 



MARGUERITE FLOYD 

Buckhannon 



CHARLES THOMPSON 

Glen Ferris 




CHARLES TAYLOR 

Weston 



BILLIE WALLY 

Kittanning, Pa. 



HOLLACE WILSON 

Bridgeport 



VIRGINIA WITHERS 

Buckhannon 



DONALD ANTHONY 

Man 



ANN STONE 

Fayetteville 




Page Thirty-nine 



jpiu 






L^S S""" ~" J 




^^^^^ 




DATHAN WHITMAN 

Canvos 



"BILL" GOODWIN 

Bloomington, Ind. 



HOWARD WILFONG 

Buckhannon 



MAURICE MILLER 

Webster Springs 



THOMAS CROSSAN 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



MARGARET CROSSAN 

Beckley 



7<^e &<u& 




RICHARD REXROAD 

Weston 



MARETTIA BLACKBURN 

Thomas 



GEORGE HULL 

Bartow 



EVELYN HOLLOWAY 

Madison, N. J 



CHARLES CRAWFORD 

Clarksburg 



JANICE TRINKLE 

Weston 



Vaije Forty 



WILLIAM PAYNE 

English 



CHARLES TINNEY 

Weston 



WAYNE KILE 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



EDWARD OLDAKER 

Buckhannon 



GUY DOUGLASS 

Buckhannon 



CHARLES DONLEY 

Wellsburg 



<>{m9 




JACK DARTNALL 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



WALTER PUGH 

Gauley Bridge 



LENA FLINN 

Clarksburg 



ALVA JONES 

Cowen 



CHARLES Mcmullen 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



DAVID SMITH 

Logan 









Page Forty-one 




7&e @ta46 



JACK FISHER 

Turtle Creek, Pa. 



RONALD TERWILLIGER 

New Kensington, Pa 



MARVIN TINKLE 

Arlington, Va. 



w ■ 




CHARLES TERWILLIGER 

New Kensington, Pa. 



BETTY RUDE 

Charleston 



JAMES TIERNEY 

Weston 



ROBERT BOYD JANET ANDERSON ARTHUR BACHMAN PAUL BARBUTO 

Glen Alum Anjean Pickens Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ROBERTA BERGER BONNIE BROWN ROBERT ALLMAN GERALDINE DOWELL ROBERT BICKEL 

Clarksburg Diamond Weston Grafton Webster Springs 




GEORGE BLACKBURN AUGUSTINE BORRELLI CHARLES BROWN KENNETH BROWN GEORGE GROVE 

Vineland, N. J. Parkersburg Buckhannon Richwood French Creek 

KENNETH BLAKESLEE HELEN DORSEY VERENICE BROCK ROBERT GAY 

Wilmington, N. C. Holcomb Weston Roanoke 



Page Forty-two 



<>i1950 



RALPH MICKEL 

Parkersburg 



CHARLES VINEYARD 

Buckhannon 



CHARLES TUNSTALL 

Gassawoy 




*--*,, 



^. il' / 



WILLIAM TOWNSEND 

Durbin 




RICHARD WALTERS 

Weston 



GEORGE WEIGLE 

Vienna 



f 1 1 




1 * § 
r 4 






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EDGAR CHAPMAN LOIS CLARK ROBERT COBURN KENNETH CONANT 

Weston Glendale Burlington, N. J. Wesley vi Me, Pa 

BARBARA CAPET BURRELL CLARK MARY CLARK SIBLEY COEN EDWIN CONLEY 

Bridgeport Weston Pompton Lakes, N. J. Geanette, Pa. Bridgeport 





JOHN COX ALVIN CRICKARD JOSEPH CULLINGS ELDON CUPPET 

Turtle Creek, Pa. Elk Water Swissvale, Pa. Morgan town 

MARK COYNER LEWIS CRAWFORD BARBARA BERTHY 

Buckhannon Clarksburg Buckhannon 



THOMAS DARNALL 

Buckhannon 



WANDA CUTRIGHT 

Buckhannon 



l*a<je Forty-three 



VALJEAN EDINGER HELEN ELMER "JOE" BARTLETT JAMES FORBES 

Valley Chapel Jane Lew Lost Creek New York, N. Y. 

KENNETH DAVIS THOMAS ELDER JAMES ADKINS LEE FISHER RUTH JOYCE 

Clarksburg Clarksburg Richwood Clarksburg Washington, D. C. 




NORMAN FRIEND CHARLES GARDNER CHARLES GIVEN JOHN GLAUNER WHEELER HALL 

Oakland, Md. Charleston Cowen Buckhannon Clover 

JOHN POULICOS JULIA CHENG JOY GIORDANO BARBARA HALL 

Clarksburg Shanghai, China Great Neck, N. Y. Clarksburg 



ALDA WAGNER 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



JAMES WERTZ 

Clarksburg 



GERALD WILSON 

Hookersville 




"JACK" WHITE 

Bluefield 



7<^e 0tctM 



Page Fat 



HOWARD HENDERSON JUNE GIDLEY BEVERLY HILL "ROY" HOSTELLER 

Buckhannon Kingwood Moundsville Charleroi, Pa. 

MILDRED HAYES ROBERT HERMANN BARBARA HINSHELWOOD ELEANOR LEWIS CARL HOSTNIK 

New Kensington, Pa- North Braddock, Pa Charleston Lost Creek Charleroi, Pa. 




ROBERT CONNOR BETTY CUNNINGHAM ALDACE HUFFMAN "BETTY JO" JACOBS HAROLD HUMPHREYS 

Wendel Clarksburg Buckhannon Wheeling Buckhannon 

WILLIAM MOORE CHARLES HYMES JOHN SHEAHAN "JACK" HUFHAM 

Clarksburg Buckhannon Ellamore Wilmington, N. C. 



DOROTHY STEINKRAUS 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JOSEPH WITEK 

Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 



RONALD BISHOP 

Frederick, Md. 




^^* Kr? •!--■ *~-4 




JAMES DEAN 

Nutter Fort 



Robert Mcdonald 

Oak Hill 



HARVEY BROWN 

Buckhannon 



oJ/950 





m 11.1 






\ if i; i; i (V x s i»a ukj 

H O.VOA V* All ii LA 








r 
i 

1 

1 





Page Forty-five 



H6e &(044, 




MARGARET CYPHERS 

War 



DONALD DICK 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



WILLIAM KING 

Weston 



JOSEPH KEENER MARY KEMPER MARY MARSH JOHN KOEHNCKE 

Weston Morgansville Oakland, Md. Livingston, N J. 

JEAN JOHNSON LOREN KARICKHOFF JAMES KING ROY KELLY WILLIAM LAUGHLIN 

Lewisburg Buckhonnon Buckhannon Apollo, Pa. Mannington 




KENNETH LAWTON JOHN LAW CORINNA HILLMAN ROY HITESHEW PEGGY LIEVING 

Oakland, Md. Weston Lewisburg Weston West Columbia 

THOMAS JONES WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN JERRY CALLIEN WILLIAM GROVE 

Oakland, Md. New York, N. Y. Clarksburg Weston 



Page Forty-six 



<4?950 



MARY FALLON 

Buckhonnon 




LEE BORCHERT 
Weston 



DARRELL SHAMBLIN 
Point Pleasant 



SIMEON LAYFIELD 

Buckhonnon 



ROBERT LINDSTEDT WILLIAM MANSER STACIE HINKLE ROBERT MELPHIS 

Greenwich, Conn. Buckhonnon Queens Weston 

SUSAN LINCOLN LEOMA LINGER CARL LYON CHARLES MEANS JAMES MORRIS 

Kingwood Buckhonnon Clarksburg Clarksburg Clarksburg 




MARTHA KURSAVICH ROGER McCLUNG JOHN OURS 

Century Charleroi, Pa. Weston 

MILDRED MOYERS FRANK McKAIN CHARLES SHEPHERD 

Albright Grafton Weston 



MELROSE PERRY HERBERT PENNINGTON 

Butler, Pa Ronceverte 

RAY PAYNE 

Webster Springs 



Page Forty-seven 




JOHN DEMASTES 

Buckhannon 



7<^e ^&&*4 



JAMES MORRIS 

Clarksburg 



MARION WICKHAM 

Triadelphia 



WAYNE WRISTON 

Kingston 




MARY WHITE 

Weston 



OWEN HALL 

Holl 



EDWARD JACKSON 

Hall 



EARLO PERTZ PATRICIA PICKENS SAM PICONE CLIFTON QUEEN MARION RALSTON 

Weston Weston Pittsburgh, Pa. Buckhannon Weston 

HOWARD PHILLIPS GEORGE PHILLIPS ANDREW PORTER CHARLES SHAFFER FRENCH QUEEN 

Newton Adrian Beckley Buckhannon Buckhannon 



ft ft f£ dpi f^ 



^ ft C Q ffl 

illm X dim "' 




^ -~ TJ 



DONALD MORROW EUGENE RICKETTS ROBERT ROBINSON 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Boothwyn, Pa. Heaters 

BETTY BEER MARY RIFFE CONNEL RODGERS 

Ivanhoe Beckley Morgantown 



(*«\ foTtrf f ~~J 

M h 1 J^fc 

BETTY ROUSH JAMES DOLAN 

Letart Clarksburg 

WILTON TENNY HAROLD ASHBY 

Buckhannon Oakland, Md. 




Page Forty-eigM 



<4?950 



EMMOGENE SMITH 

Arlington, Va 



AARON WEINBERG 

Baltimore, Md. 



JAMES CAIN 

Clarksburg 



WALTER WISE 

Wheeling 



RICHARD SLACK 

Wheeling 



ROBERT GARRETT 

Clarksburg 




JOHN CASWELL 

East Douglas, Mass. 




JANE SHUTTLEWORTH BETTY SKAGGS JANE WYNCOOP JOHN SOUTHERN VIRGINIA WHITEFIELD 

Central City, Pa. Kingwood Irwin, Pa. Jane Lew Pitcairn, Pa. 

ERNEST SHAFFER CHRISTINE SHANAMAN JACK SKINNER RAY STROTHER JAMES SMITH 

Clarksburg Clarksburg Kittanning, Pa. Clarksburg Buckhannon 








MILDRED McCOY SHIRLEY THOMAS "BOB" STRAIGHT DONALD SWEENEY "BOB" SULLIVAN 

Wheeling Rhodell Mannington Long Island City, N. Y. Pennsboro 

VIRGIL STEMPLE DOROTHEA SMITH ZANE SUMMERS AGNES PAYNE "JACK" SNYDER 

Adrian Clarksburg Horner Arbovale Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Page Fort u-nu>,- 




DOROTHY SNOWDEN 

Porkersburg 

THOMAS SLACK 

Wheeling 



JAMES SNYDER 

Baltimore, Md. 

CHARLES SPELSBURG 

Clarksburg 



BETTY SNYDER 

Valley Bend 

CHARLES SPENCER 

Richwood 



JANE RENTCHLER 

Craigsville 

FOSTER STARCHER 

Hur 



EUGENIA UMSTEAD 
Grantsville 

CHARLES WOLFE 

Parkersburg 




7<£e $&W4 



VICTOR NORRIS MARGARET HARRISON WILBUR DURBIN 

Farmington Philippi Bridgeville, Pa 

STANLEY MEYERS ELBERT LINGER ROBERT VOLLE 

Baltimore, Md. Buckhannon Bridgeville, Pa- 




m , 



EDGAR HAMILTON ANNA PHILLIPS DOROTHY PHILLIPS 

Pittsburgh, Pa. French Creek Porkersburg 

HELEN PAYNE SALLY PIERCE WILLIAM PHILLIPS 

Webster Springs Clarksburg Beckley 



Poje /'i</.» 




PI 




otmt 



WILLIAM POST RICHARD PAUL RUSSELL QUEEN 

Roanoke El kins Buckhannon 

JENNINGS RITTER DORIS POST MELVIN PRITTS 

Hall Buckhannon Normalville, Pa. 





DORIS RADER WILLIAM REILLEY WAYNE RINEHART 

Frame Bayonne, N. J. Aurora 

MARGARET RANKIN RONALD BEACHLER RACHEL SHAVER 

Westernport, Md. Pennsboro Buckhannon 



HELEN STUCK 

Perryopolis, Pa. 

JOHN FLYNN 

Clarksburg 



L. LETTS 

Buckhannon 

EARL FLOWERS 

Clarksburg 



ROBERT THORP 

Weston 

ROSALIA STEPHENS 

Washington 



DONALD VUNKANNON 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

ALBERT TOMER 

New Kensington, Pa. 



ALICE BOONE 

Buckhannon 



MARGARET WAGGONER 

Gratton 




Pa<jc Fifty-one 



ANN ROBINSON NANCY ROUSH EVELYN SMITH 

Grafton Weston French Creek 

CLAYTON RICHMOND GEORGE ROESSING ELLEN ROUSH 




McQUAINE BROWN 

Arnold, Pa. 

RICHARD CLARK 

New Kensington, Pa. 



EDWARD PUGH 

Beckley 

STANLEY ELDER 

St. Marys 



PATRICIA WINSTON 

Surveyor 

LUCY WILLIAMS 

Glen Daniel 



DORIS WILLIAMS 

Green Village, N. J. 

MELVIN WOOLFORD 

Fort Ashley 



BETTY LANTZ 

Crellm, Md. 



CORINNE PARKES 

Uniontown, Pa. 



Tunnelton 



Buckhannon 



Beckley 




^*h 



DELORES RUSH 

Clarksburg 



ROBERT SCHROYER PATRICIA SHAFFER 

Friendsville, Md. Charleston 

ALICE SCHOAL CLINTON ALLMAN RICHARD SKOGLUND 

Lansdowne, Pa. Parkersburg Clarksburg 



7^e (fycut 




Page Pifty-tu o 



CURTIS SHREWSBERRY DORLA SIMONS JAMES BROWN 

Odd Buckhannon Kermit 

NELLE SELBY SAMUEL STROTHER JOHN WILSON 

Webster Springs Clarksburg Cutler, I nd. 




JOHN COURTNEY RICHARD ASHTON ANNA BAILEY 

Salem Wilkinsburg, Pa. Weston 

NORMAN ALLERS DeALTON AMBLER HAZEL BEALL 

Verona, Pa. Bethel, Conn. Gassaway 



tf 1951 




PATRICIA WEATHERED 

Buckhannon 



GARTH HOOD 

New Martinsville 



ALVIN ROHRER 

Beckley 

JANICE WILSON 

Rock Cave 



RICHARD HYDE 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ANNA YOUNG 

Gassaway 



JULIA WRAY 

Glen White 



CAROL STALNAKER 

Buckhannon 



GUY HANNAH 

Buckhannon 



MARY NORRIS 

Weston 




Page Fi/ty-tltref 




SUE HARDMAN 
Middlebourne 



ALONZA HARMAN 

Bluefield 



WILLIAM HASTINGS 

Charleston 



JEAN HARRIS 

New York, N Y 



RUTH HARTSAW 

Holden 



FRANCES HATFIELD 

Weston 



JOSEPH NESTOR 

Clarksburg 

GLELMA HELMICK 

Pickens 



JANE HERALD 

Webster Springs 

MARY HERRICK 

Crafton, Pa. 




7<£e @ttu& 



CONSTANCE BENNETT JEAN BORROR HOWARD BERGER 

Clarksburg Ridgeley Clarksburg 

BERNADINE BEAN ROBERT BEHARKA SUE BERRY 

Cowen Monaco, Pa Webster Springs 




PRESTON BOYCE GEORGE BRANDLI JEAN BURTON 

Weirton Lost Creek Moundsville 

JOHN CARNEY CHRISTINE CONTOS CECILE CASE 

Weston Weston Cowan 



Pag« Ftfty-foxtr 




otmt 



JUNE BUTLER 

Pork 



ANN CASTO 

Warren, Ohio 



BETTY CROSS 

Gassaway 



NEIL CASEY 

Salem 



BARBARA CHAFFEE 

Hartford, Conn. 



DAE CHILCOTE 

Ambridge, Pa 




3ERALD COCHRAN WILLARD CROSS 

Buckhannon Hendricks 

MARGARET COOK 

Amherstdale 



MARGARET CROSS 

Clarksburg 



VIRGINIA CUNNINGHAM 

Lumberport 

LORENE FITZWATER 

Summersville 



JOHN TUCKER 

Ravenswood 



JULIA HIGH 

Charleston 



PATRICIA HINKLE 

Clorksburg 

WILLIAM HYMES 

Buckhannon 



ZANER HINKLE 

Buckhannon 



JOAN HOPKINS 

Wardensville 



KATHRYN HORNICKEL 

Monongahela, Pa. 

ROBERT HORSTMAN 

Moundsville 



PATTIE LOUGH 

Hundred 



WILLIAM JOBSON 

Portsmouth, Va. 




Page Ftfty-livc 







CHARLOTTE KIRBY 

Bluefield 

WILLIAM LaMAR 

Kingwood 



JAMES KING 

Mount Hope 

BETTY KNOTTS 

Polatko, Flo 



BETTY KITCHEN 

Gouley Bridge 

MARY LAWSON 

Clarksburg 



HARRY LEFTWICH 

Connellsville, Pa. 

MARGARET WINNICHUKE 

Bridgeville, Pa. 



MELBA LINGER 

Buckhannon 



BENTON McKEE 

Johnstown, Pa 



HARRY LITTLE 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

JACK HARPER 

Buckhannon 




76e (?&Ki4 



BETTY DAWS BETTY DAVIS PAULINE EDMUNDSON 

Parkersburg Jeffrey Bridgeport 

HOWARD DAVIS DAVID DEVEY ROBERT EAKIN 

McKeesport, Pa. Pittsburgh, Pa. Weston 




MYRA ESKEW JULIUS FEOLA ALFRED FORINO 

Buckhannon Buckhannon Long Island, N. Y. 

HELEN FARRIS RALPH FARRIS EMMOGENE FITZWATER 

Clarksburg Clarksburg Diana 



Pa i Fifty-six 




<4195? 



JACK FRIEND SHIRLEEN SATTERFIELD HARLAN GARRISON 

Friendsville, Md. Fairmont Adrian 

BETTY FURR ROBERT GAINOR ROBERT GARRETT 

Volga Elkins Buckhannon 



ft O ffy 



■Atf/ i 




WILLIAM GASTON HUGH GRAHAM WILLIAM GWENNAP 

Buckhannon Industry, Pa. North Braddock, Pa 

EDSOL GENTRY CLAUDE GRIMMETT BARBARA GRIZZLE 

§^;.il Crab Orchard Craigmoore Clarksburg 



EDITH LOGSDON 

Moundsville 

BLAIR LOTTIG 

Cumberland, Md. 



PHYLLIS LOWE 

Buckhannon 



MARTHA HUNT 

Burton 



LOUISE MARSHALL 

Sunlight 

ESTHER MASON 

Weston 



NORMA MARPLE 

Heaters 



RAYMOND MOORE 

Westernport, Md. 



ROBERT LISENSKY 

Millvale, Pa. 

NANCY MURDOCK 

Pompton Lakes, N. J 



CARLETON McKITA 

Charleroi, Pa. 



JUDY McWHORTER 

Moorefield 




Page Fifty-seven 



@CaA4mcite4, 



SHARYN JEANNE MELPHIS 

1 8 months 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Melphis 

Weston 



TERRY PAUL STOUT PAULA JOAN STOUT 

9 months 22 months 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh P. Stout 

Alum Bridge 




H 



urrilfiMiiliiiiiA i j 




NANCY ELIZABETH BARKER ROBERT LEE ALLMAN, II 

9 months 3 months 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Barker, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Allman 

Beckley Buckhonnon 



i 








EDWARD LANG DONLEY REBECCA LOU McCUNE GERRY LEE CARDER SANDRA COLEMAN 

1 V2 months 4 months 5 months 5 months 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Donley Mr. and Mrs. George W. McCune Mr. and Mrs. Bernard L. Carder Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Coleman 

Buckhonnon Turtle Creek, Pa. Beaver Volga 



LINDA DIANE BROWN 

4 months 

Mr. and Mrs. Rector S. Brown 

Chloe 



PageFilti,- fjht 



o£ t6c futate 



Features of the 1948 campus 
community undreamed of as little 
as five years ago — and probably 
destined to be equally unheard of 
five years hence — are the bright 
and shining faces of these chil- 
dren, offspring of Wesleyan's 
large group of married students 
who are mostly veterans of World 
War II. 

The Class of 1970 may well 
find itself enriched with the 
talents and Wesleyan heritage of 
many of these youngsters. 



AUDRA KATHRYN REED 

7 months 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred H. Reed 

Beckley 



PAULA KAY SMALL — PAULETTE MAE SMALL 

4 months 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul P. Small 

New Castle, Pa. 




JOHN ROBERT CROSSAN THOMAS BENJAMIN CROSSAN, III 

4 months 27 months 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Crossan, Jr. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



JANET SUE TAWNEY 

I 7 months 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Tawney 

Weston 



DAVID ANDREW BOGGS 

7 months 
Mr. and Mrs. Ivory H. Boggs 

Eolca, Ky. 



DAVID LYNN OLDAKER, JR. 

1 1 months 
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Oldaker 

Buckhannon 



Page Fifty-nine 



The dictum of Heraclitus, "you can't step into the same 
river twice," describes aptly the year to year situation of the 
Department of Physical Education. The practical truth of the 
ancient Greek's universal metaphor is known nowhere more 
intimately than by the coach out on the playing field. Time 
and Change relentlessly dog the athlete's heels; the eternal 
river, mining the minutes and hours of his youth, flows 
under the constant and anxious surveillance of the eminently 
successful team-maker. 

Time gives the athletic coach but one favor — a clean 
slate at the beginning of every schoolyear. Change chooses 
to smile or frown on the coach at will. Like Janus, he may 
choose to do both at once, pushing talented team members 
into the ranks of the alumni while enrolling equally capable, 
younger men. 

The 1947-48 schoolyear saw Change play a minor part 
acting in this dual role. In this fleeting moment of appre- 
hension as the year is flushed toward the great sea of 
remote, lost, and forgotten time beyond, we see Change 
beckoning to many of Wesleyan's first-rate lettermen. 
Whether Change will choose to replace them with men of 
equal caliber in the yet unformed ranks of the Class of 1952 
is a question to which the answer is not presently at hand. 
Of one thing, however, we may be certain: Time and Change 
cannot keep a secret; they're bound to produce an answer in 
the year immediately ahead. 




BE 






t&e Sfiontb 'Review 





BARBARA CAPET 

Another Bridgeport girl, Bar- 
bara is a member of many 
campus organizations, devoting a 
large shore of her time to par- 
ticipating in such sports as bas- 
ketball, hockey, and swimming. 
She is a Sophomore and is 
studying dietetics and chemistry. 



BARBARA HINSHELWOOD 

A Sophomore from Charleston, 
Barbara is interested in religious 
education to prepare for a career 
in youth work. A member of 
the two campus religious organ- 
izations and the W.A.A., she is 
active in both these spheres of 
student activity. 




HOLLACE WILSON 

A Bridgeport girl, Holly is a 
Junior with a physical education 
major to prepare herself for 
director's work in recreational 
programs. She is a member of 
both the women's sports campus 
organizations. 



MARY HADJIS 

A Home Economics major, 
Mary, a native of Wheeling, is 
interested in merchandising. She 
is a Junior and holds a number 
of executive offices in the many 
compus organizations of which 
she is a member. A member of 
last year's team, Mary was cap- 
tain of the 1947-48 Cheerleaders 




Page Sixty-two 



1947-4$ Sft&ifo Summon^ 



PAUL SMALL 

All over the country every Autumn Saturday after- 
noon, millions of football fans gather in various 
stadiums to see their respective teams engage in bodily 
contact. There ore but a very few of this vast multitude 
who realize what goes on behind the scenes. 

It takes an excellent coaching staff in order to 
discover the opponent's weaknesses a week before every 
contest. In view of this, Paul Small was able to attend 
only the closing game of the season to watch the 
Bobcats ploy. It was through his excellent information 
and diagrams of the next opponent's weaknesses that 
enabled the Bobcats to go from one victory to another. 

Assistant Coach Small must be congratulated for 
his fine work in preparing the best defensive line in 
the State last seoson, thus enabling Coach Ross to 
further develop a galaxy of running backs. 




Moving along under the competent command of 
Coach "Cebe" Ross, the entire progressive athletic 
program of the College has brought to the campus 
community another successful year of extra-curricular 
activity and enjoyment. 

On the intercollegiate level, West Virginia Wesleyan 
produced teams in football, basketball, baseball, tennis, 
and golf. Ending the football season with a record of 
six victories against only two losses — both of them by 
narrow margins, the 1947 squad turned in a highly 
creditable performance. The highlight of the seoson, 
the Homecoming victory over a powerful Waynesburg 
eleven, added a certain lustre to the record. While 
the basketball record was hardly up to this high level 
of achievement, yet the 1947-48 hardwood season 
provided a series of surprises and was enjoyed by all. 
As is the custom, the State Intercollegiate Tournament 
was held in the Wesleyan gym; Davis and Elkins College 
emerged victorious this year. As for the baseball record, 
we must look back to the 1947 season which produced 
four victories against six losses. 

Of more personal interest to the average Wesleyan 
student is the widespread, integrated, and carefully 
coordinated intramurals program conducted for both 
men and women. A total of 478 men and nearly 500 
women students participated in these campus athletics. 
The men's intramurals, under the direction of Associate 
Professor Dave Reemsnyder, offered championship 
league contests in touch football, volleyball, basketball, 
tennis, handball and a number of other individual 
sports. Associate Professor Charlotte Knepshield directed 
the women's intramural program which offered hockey, 
volleyball, basketball, badminton, and shuffleboard in 
addition to other individual activities. 




COACH "CEBE" ROSS 



Moving from his position as Head Coach at the 
Buckhannon-Upshur High School, Cebe came back to 
his Alma Mater in 1925 to fill the vacancy left in the 
Physical Education Department by John Fulton. For 
seventeen consecutive years, with his first year here 
excepted, Coach Ross served the College as "Coach and 
Athletic Director." During those years his reputation 
for fairness, unexcelled sportsmanship, and consistent 
production of successful teams in football, basketball, 
and baseball, grew steadily. 

When, in 1942, the College dropped intercollegiate 
athletics for the duration of World War II, Cebe trans- 
ferred his talents to Charleston's Morris Harvey College. 
There he produced the championship Golden Eagle team 
widely touted in 1942. The following year Coach Ross 
accepted a commission in the U. S. Navy. 

The war over, Cebe climbed out of his Navy blue 
back into his old berth at Wesleyan. Taking over at 
the helm again in 1946, he has made notable successes 
of his 18th and 19th years here. 



Page Sixty-three 



7&c 0naduatt(€^ 1/anAitty 'Tften 



RECTOR BROWN 

While it is hard to believe, it is nevertheless 
true ole "Shadrack" finally made graduation 
day; he's been heading in that direction since 
the fall of 1941. Of course, there was a slight 
interval of nearly three years out for a hitch 
in the U. S. Navy during the late war. And, 
of course, there was that year at Morris Harvey 
in '42 when "Rec," following the abandon- 
ment of football here, helped Coach Ross 
capture the State Intercollegiate Football Con- 
ference championship. 

Originally from Chloe, Rec claims his main 
reason for coming to Wesleyan was to play 
football. Once here, it seems, he gradually 
came to realize there was a little more to 
going to college than playing sports. And 
there's that tale about that exciting week in 
'41 when all the "greenies" had to tip their 
hats; Rec somehow lost a few locks of hair in 
a friendly sort of way. 

Married now, Rec has become a real family 
man what with wife Helen and daughter Linda 
looking after him in one of the College hous- 
ing units. His easy-going, amiable-bigness has 
made him everyone's friend in the campus 
community. 



JOSEPH PETER HUNTZ 

Along about 1920 a child entered this wide, 
wide world at Wyoming, Pennsylvania; his 
proud parents promptly named him Joseph 
Peter Huntz. Joe eventually grew up and 
became another of those old boys of "Cebe's," 
playing ball his first year of school here in 
1940. After one more season of football here, 
he enlisted in the Army Air Forces upon the 
close of the spring semester, 1941, and served 
a total of 42 months as on airplane armorer. 
He received his discharge late in the Fall of 
1945 "Little Joe" reentered Wesleyan in the 
fall of 1946 and rejoined the squad to play 
two more years of football. His activities 
around the campus include membership in the 
Keystone Club, and he is Vice-President of the 
Wesleyan chapter of the Future Teachers of 
America. The major Joe chose was Business 
Administration with minors in History and 
Education. His spare time is employed in 
hunting and fishing, Joe's pet hobbies. 




CHARLES WILLIAM PUGH 

A star is in our midst. Yet, you would never 
believe such an unassuming fellow os Bill Pugh 
would fall in this category. He was one of 
those many freshmen of 1 94 1 who tried out 
for the football team. From what is told he 
was a mere 175 pounds then and half scared 
to death, but somehow he was one of the four 
"frosh" Coach Ross kept on the squad. In 
those days you had to earn a letter the hard 
way, but Bill sorta' picked up one his first 
year. 

Then in September of '42 he took to the 
road and followed his "Ole Coach" to Morris 
Harvey as did some others. There, he also was 
a member of that Championship Golden Eagle 
squad of '42. Along about then Bill decided 
the Navy had the best bet, and he went, in 
August of '43, as an athletic specialist. He 
completed a three year hitch before his dis- 
charge in 1 946. 

Bill reentered Wesleyan in the fall of that 
year and captained both the '46 and '47 
football squads. A measure of his campus 
popularity is evidenced by the fact Bill was 
awarded, by student vote, the Dempsey Sports- 
man's Trophy at the end of the 1947 school- 
year. He was also elected President of the 
1947-48 Community Council. An announce- 
ment was made recently that Bill will play 
professional football with the Los Angeles 
Dons this Fall. 

ADAM FORINASH 

Affectionately known to most students as 
"Tor," Adam is a product of Webster Springs 
High School, Class of '40. He starred in his 
last two years there as a boxer; out of ten 
bouts, he won nine and lost only to the 
State Champion. 

Entering Wesleyan in the Fall of 1940, Tor 
managed to get in two seasons of football 
before the Army beckoned to him. After a tour 
of duty as a drill instructor at Kelly Field, he 
spent 28 months in the Asiatic Theatre of 
Operations — China, Burma, and India. His dis- 
charge in his pocket, Tor returned to Wesleyan 
in 1946 to rejoin the squad for the ensuing 
two seasons. 

Adam has majored in Physical Education 
and chose minors in Biology and Education. 
His campus popularity as an athlete and his 
solid gold social personality mark him for 
success in his chosen profession of coaching 
The grape-vine has it that an excellent coach- 
ing position is waiting for him in the southern 
part of the State. 



Pagi 8ia ty-fowr 



*7U t947 'PootfcUt Seeuo* 



Coach "Silent Cebe" Ross brought forth a mighty 
football machine this fall composed mainly of returning 
lettermen of the highly successful '46 squad. With the 
help of a few outstanding freshmen, the '47 edition of 
the Bobcats came out with a lot of determination and 
speed. Storting with the opening kickoff, we found our 
stalwart warriors opening fast against those not-so-tame 
Tigers of Salem College. 

To be sure the Bobcats ran true to form until the 
closing minutes of play. Then, the passing combo, 
Swisher to McLean, produced victory for the Salem 
Tigers by the narrow margin of 7 to 6. The Bobcats 
opened the game very fast; in the first minute of play. 
Bob Means blocked a punt which wos recovered by 
Fuzzy Moore on the Salem sixteen. Bill Pugh, two plays 
later, drew the season's first blood for the Bobcats by 
punching over from the ten-yard- line. The kick after 
by Michaels was wide of the mark. 

The Wesleyan downfall was a direct result of Tiger 
passing accuracy; o cool eight completions for a total 
of 1 08 yards. The Orange and Black line gave up a 
mere eight-plus yards. Outstanding on opening doy were 
Means, Mazzei, Donley, and Straight on defense, while 



the new punting sensation, Joe Witek, bottled up the 
Salemites deep in their own territory. 

Still hoping to find a taste of victory, Cebe's "pore 
little boys" brushed up on plays all week ond came 
back with a vengeance by humiliating the Glen vi lie 
Pioneers 20 to 0. 

The scoring was started, as usual by the Rossmen, 
early in the game when John Mazzei and Bob Means 
collaborated in blocking Lilly's kick on the Glenville 20. 
After repeated thrusts through the stubborn Pioneer line 
did not produce a score, reliable Charlie Shepherd 
finally dove into pay dirt. Automatic Jody Michaels 
converted easily. From there on 'til half time, those 
rugged State linesmen fought the locals to a stand still. 

To open the third quarter, the Bobcats pulled in the 
pigskin on their own 20. Three successive first downs 
advanced our boys to the Glenville 43; from there, ever- 
elusive Bill Pugh danced around right end. Automatic 
Jody once again produced. Getting a little restless, those 
stalwarts of "Silent Cebe," spearheaded by hard-charg- 
ing Walt Pugh, plucked down a Pioneer aerial from 
somewhere around the Wesleyan 20, returning the oval 
to the 45. Their turn then, the Bobcats lost the pigskin 




WALT PUGH 

The younger half of a top-notch brother 
combination, Walt is o rollicking good pig- 
skin toter from down in the Southern part 
of the state — Gauley Bridge. A hard-driving 
competitor, Walt has shown a lot of the 
same capabilities as has brother Bill in 
many campus activities. Like Bill, too, he 
was a standout on the football squad in 
his Freshman year. He also put a little 
time in the Navy, but unlike Bill, Walt 
likes to play plenty of golf. 



JOE MICHAELS 

Automatic "Jody," a 170-pound quarter- 
back, is the ace Bobcat place-kicking 
stylist. Joe is a lover of football and 
athletics in general. A baseball letterman, 
too, he puts all he has into his two varsity 
sports. As an outfielder on the Wesleyan 
nine, Joe covers the turf by the county 
mile, and he's a pretty fair hitter. He 
stands in the batter's box with that baggy 
uniform draped as though he were a three- 
foot hole beside the plate. Parkersburg 
should be proud of this popular little fellow. 



ROBERT PATTERSON 

Now past a confusing freshman year in 
which he played at both tackle and end, 
Pat blossomed into a rattling good quarter- 
back this year. The Wesleyan opponents 
found out early in the season that Pat's 
defensive play was tops. With two seasons 
still before him, Pat shows considerable 
promise of even further development. He 
served during the war with the Army Air 
Forces. 



CHUCK DONLEY 

Completing season number three for his 
"old coach" this year, ex-marine "Snuffy" 
will be next year's last remaining link 
between Cebe's great pre-war ball teams 
and his present highly-geared grid machine. 
Always playing for keeps, Chuck is notori- 
ously known by all who have come in 
contact with his big, hard-charging hulk 
across the scrimmage line. Chuck's big 
moment this year came when he got the 
word it was a boy — Edward Lang, to be 
exact. 




Pagt Sixty-five 




via an interception on the Glenville 30. Lilly, Glenville's 
punter, hurried too much on the next play; as a result, 
the ball went over to the Bobcats on the Pioneer thirty. 
"Shorty" Crawford then, on an off-tackle slant, galloped 
13 yards — after which he shot a bullet pass to end John 
Mazzei, who maneuvered for the score. Joe Michaels 
failed to collect the point after. 

"Silent Cebe" and his men of might proceeded on 
to Charleston the following Saturday and very easily 
disposed of a game, but outclassed, Golden Eagle eleven, 
20 to 0. Coach Ross's single-wing attack rolled almost 
at will, the scoring starting early, as elusive Bill Pugh 
scampered 47 yards on two off -tackle slants to start 
the scoring for the Bobcats. Once again, automatic Joe 
Michaels converted and Wesleyan had a 7-0 lead. 

On the ensuing kickoff, Joe Michaels' effort traveled 
only a scant 1 3 yards; whereupon hard-driving Fuzzy 
Moore gathered in the loose oval to give Wesleyan 
possession on the Morris Harvey 47. Immediately, pile- 
driving Walt Pugh circled end for 30 to set the stage 
for runs by Charlie Shepherd and Bill Pugh which 
placed the ball on the nine; then, the one and only 
Bill Pugh scooted for the score. Mr. Michael's kick was 
wide at the half. 

As the third period started, Walt Pugh again circled 
end, this time for 52 yards, placing the ball on the 28. 
From here he passed to Mazzei who was dropped on 



the five. Hard-driving Fuzzy Moore toted the pigskin 
over on two bucks at the line. Automatic Joe Michaels 
closed out the scoring with the point after, as Coach 
Ross substituted freely and coasted into victory. 

The '47 edition of the Bobcats, moving along with a 
two to one record, indicated signs of developing into 
one of the best teams Wesleyan had seen in years. 
Traveling to the Smoky City up North for the next 
game with yet-untested Carnegie Tech, the Bobcats 
from the West Virginia hills clawed out a 27 to 6 
victory over the Tartans before 5,000 fans at Forbes 
Field in Pittsburgh. 

The Wesleyan attack seemed to bog down in the 
first two periods, but they returned to the battle with 
seemingly uncontrollable power and accomplished this 
Saturday afternoon task in a very convincing manner. 
Early in the second quarter, Tech went 65 yards via the 
air to gain their first and only tally, but Wesleyan could 
not be denied and roared back to score as Walt Pugh 
plunged over right guard at the holf. 

Still at it, the third period found Bob Patterson, the 
Orange and Black signal caller, leaping high to intercept 
one of Tech's many passes and race 34 yards to score. 
Jody Michaels split the uprights for the conversion. 
Wesleyan rolled up another score shortly after as Walt 
Pugh, faking an end-run, flipped a pass into the wait- 
ing arms of "little" Claude Crider who dropped over 



BOB MEANS 

Another of the ex-marines on the squad, 
this redhead is a standout at right guard. 
He kept his 195 pounds busy most of the 
season brushing aside opposing linesmen to 
break up plays in the enemy backfield A 
popular fellow around the campus, Bob is 
one of the stalwarts on the Wesleyan big 
eleven. 



ROBERT SULLIVAN 

"Sully" should be counted among the 
many boys who were flashy characters in 
their bell-bottomed trousers, and he's just 
as sharp in football togs. A little slow in 
building up confidence his first season, he 
began to loosen up this year much to the 
displeasure of Wesleyan's opponents and 
the delight of Coach Ross. Toward the end 
of the season. Bob was proving extremely 
reliable in the pinches. 



CHARLES SHEPHERD 

A 170-pound Weston High product, 
"Shep" is one ex-marine who goes in for 
hunting in a big way. For a while after his 
discharge it was a combination of women 
ond football. Now oil his time can be put 
to the gridiron with the fine results seen 
lost season. All are looking forward to a 
greater season next year for this very 
shifty, side-stepping back who can really 
lug that pigskin. 



JOHN SOUTHERN 

That character wearing the Orange and 
Black you may have seen being held at 
the end of a leash somewhere around the 
Bobcat sidelines this year — well, that was 
John. He comes from somewhere in the 
local vicinity; o place colled West Milford, 
wherever that is. His high-flying, fast- 
stepping, 180 pounds would be an asset 
to any combination of pigskin gridders. 




Page Sixty-aim 




JOE WITEK 

This btg-framed, good-natured Pennsyl- 
vanton pulled the Bobcat eleven out of a 
many a deep hole last season with his 
long-distance place- kicking. Joe is kept 
pretty busy squeezing enjoyment for the 
entire campus community out of that lively 
accordion of his. 



CLAUDE CRIDER 

This tall, shy fellow is a home-grown 
product — yes, Buckhannon. "Silent Claude" 
was a refreshing sight to behold with his 
live play this year. An ex-marine, he's a 
veteran at playing for keeps; out on the 
gridiron he covered a lot of territory fear- 
lessly. Not many doubted his ability to 
anchor down a line. 



CAL FORSYTHE 

A flashy 190-pound left end, Cal did a 
lot of rooming over the chalked stripes last 
Fall. A campaigner back from the 1946 
squad, he helped to show Wesleyan's oppo- 
nents why the Cats were known to have 
the best line in the State. Plagued with 
injuries all season long, he nevertheless 
turned in many remarkable performances 
for Cebe. 



BOB STRAIGHT 

It is seldom you find a football player 
who, after an excellent season at one 
position, can star the next season in an- 
other capacity. Bob managed to do just 
that; he traded his end position for a job 
as tackle. It has been by the ability of 
boys like this that Wesleyan was rated 
the toughest line in the State. 



the goal line to score. The automatic toe of Joe fl 
Michaels was true. 

Midway through the final period, Joe Huntz broke 
through to block a Tech punt; Shadrach Brown scurried 
to cover it, giving Wesleyan possession on the Tech 48. 
Walt Pugh then tossed an aerial to brother Bill to place 
the ball on the Tartan 25. After a Bobcat penalty, Bill 
Pugh took a pitchoff from quarterback Joe Michaels 
and did some fancy tightrope walking on the sidelines 
as he went over for the final score. Fuzzy Moore was 
delegoted to kick the point after, which he made good. 

The traditional Homecoming tilt with Waynesburg 
provided the next scene of victory as the Bobcats 
chewed the "Waynesburgers" 9 to before a record 
crowd of 5000 in Wesleyan's "splinter stadium." A 
sustained drive of 75 yards by Fuzzy Moore and the 
Pugh boys, in the first quarter, brought the game's only 
touchdown with Moore crossing the goal line from the 
five. The point after was duly collected by Michaels. 
In the second period, Mazzei collected the Bobcats' 
other two points by knocking a Ye I low- Jackets' kick 
bock into the end zone where Datko, Waynesburg half- 
back, fell on it giving the Cats a safety. Rough line 
play featured the remainder of the game, with a 
Waynesburg 89 yard touchdown sprint nullified by a 
15 yard penalty called by the officials for unnecessary 
roughness. Wesleyan ran up a total of eleven first 
downs to six for Waynesburg. 



Now possessing a consecutive win-skein of four 
straight, the Bobcats of West Virginia Wesleyan jour- 
neyed to Parkersburg and defeated a rugged Marietta 
College, 12 to 0, in a cold drizzling rain. The Rossmen 
did all their scoring in the first half on two line bucks 
by Fuzzy Moore and Lelond Hayhurst after the Cats 
recovered fumbles deep in Marietta territory. Wesleyan's 
offense bogged down in the second half due to a heavy, 
soggy gridiron that had all the aspects of a sea of mud. 

The first score was made after one of Witek's punts 
was dropped by Rutherford; Claude Crider pounced on 
the slippery oval to give Wesleyan the ball on Marietta's 
33. After runs by Bill and Walt Pugh, Fuzzy Moore 
plunged over from the five to score. Michaels' kick for 
the conversion was wide. In the second period, John 
Mazzie, who played a superb game at end, recovered a 
fumble on the Marietta four and Leland Hayhurst ripped 
over to give the Rossmen their second six-pointer. Again 
Michaels missed the conversion as the playing time 
drew to a close. 

Still a little damp from their last mud-eating contest, 
Cebe's boys made it six in a row by defeating the 
Bisons of Bethany College, 7 to 0, on a field suited 
for anything but football. There was very little chance 
for the Cats to go into high gear as the footing was as 
sure as the chances of a snowball to exist for long in 
the brimstone pits of the nether regions. 

The game was a punting duel throughout with "Jo- 





JOHN MAZZEI 

John is an end who brought to a virtual 
standstill all the opposition's plays aimed 
through his position. A Sophomore this 
season, he should rate high on future polls 
of great gridders. He was picked on the 
All-State Eleven this past season for his 
excellent all-round play. John is a fellow 
held in high esteem for his congeniality 
both on and off the playing field. 



BILL MOORE 

When will the Wesleyan football squad 
be without a Moore? Bill comes from an 
almost inexhaustible line of football greats. 
It was his all-round play that helped jell 
the backfield combination the Bobcats 
brought forth this year. A quiet spoken 
unassuming fellow, Bill is a thorough-going 
athlete that will always be successful re- 
gardless of the duties required of him. 



LEO WHITE 

He had the spirit last season and should 
be heard from in the very near future- 
Jack filled in often during the season when 
the going was rough. One of the married 
men on the team, Jack spent a lot of his 
spare time assisting with the intramural 
program during the winter months. 



REX JARVIS 
Parkersburg seems to be producing an 
abundance of talent of late. At a glance. 
Rex hardly appears the capable center he 
is. With Rex on the line, Wesleyan hA the 
center sector well under control. This being 
only his second season, we should see a lot 
of this curly-headed fellow on and off the 
gridiron. 




Jo" Witek proving to be the master, and he had a 
spotless uniform to turn in ot the conclusion of the 
game. His educated left foot kept the Bisons inside 
their own twenty with several boots going out of bounds 
within the five yard line. Our break came early in the 
third period when a Bethany kick was partially blocked; 
it was gobbled up by Charlie Shepherd, who galloped 
over unmolested to score. Automatic Joe Michaels split 
the uprights at the close of "operation mud." 

The Bobcats then brought their 6 to 1 record face to 
face with the Davis and Elkins Senators in the season's 
finale. The Senators 'til then had not looked too 
impressive, but followers of the locals looked for — and 
found — a highly entertaining Saturday afternoon of 
football as these two squads have long been intense 
rivals. Anyone who had witnessed last year's (1946) 
game, and other games of the past, could have testified 
as to what was liable to occur. Last year's game was 
played viciously up to the final gun; our Bobcats were 
victorious due to the outstanding work of the line and 
the brilliant play of all who gave our running backs, 
like Bill Pugh, a chance to hold the Senators helpless 
with their will-o-the-wisp runs. 

This year the boys from over Elkins way lived up to 
all advance billing. They were a definite underdog 
eleven that caught fire from the "T" to upset, 7 to 3, 
the best laid Wesleyan plans for a jubilant celebration 
that evening. The Senators displayed a deceptive brand 



brand of ball under the leadership of quarterback 
Leroy. His handling of the "T" formation was a study 
in the art of deception. Time and time again he out- 
smarted the Wesleyan defense. 

Wesleyan 's only score came when Jody Michaels 
booted a 22 yard field goal from a difficult angle. 
The Cats lacked that scoring punch so sorely needed 
to put over six-pointers. The Rossmen were often deep 
in Davis and Elkins' territory only to lose the ball 
on downs. 

The Senators set up their lone score on a pass from 
Leroy that was nicely caught on the Wesleyan one- 
foot-line. The fullback plunged over the double chalk 
line to score. The extra point was good on an under- 
handed pass from Leroy to his end, Close. The game 
was punctuated by both sides losing men because of 
the intensity of the bottle. 

This, the last spectacle of the 1947 gridiron season 
here at Wesleyan, was the end of the collegiate football 
trail for those seniors you will remember always for 
their sportsmanship and outstanding play both on and 
off that little close-cropped field with the chalked lines 
marking off those long one hundred yards. May good 
fortune, warm success, and happiness follow you from 
here, Rector Borwn, Adam Forinash, Joe Huntz, and 
Bill Pugh for all the rest of your auspiciously begun 
athletic careers. 



THE TRAINERS 

Behind all the action on the playing field 
and just short of all the glamour rightfully 
accorded the players — there stand the 
trainers. Not that they're out looking for 
sympathy; they know when they volunteer for 
their jobs just what they're getting them- 
selves into. 

Cheerfully taking the heavy load of their 
responsibility to make certain the needs of 
the squad are met promptly and both the 
players and their equipment kept in good 
condition, the trainers are mostly too busy 
to be anywhere but in the background of the 
situation. Nevertheless, these fellows, Bill 
Knox, Lee Sutter, Cole Potter (all pictured), 



and Bud Brooks, Guy Hannah, and Sam 
Picone, are all deserving of a rousing cheer 
for a good job well done. 

THE FOOTBALL SCORE BOARD 
Won 6; Lost 2 



Wesleyan 

Wesleyan 6 

Wesleyan 20 

Wesleyan 20 

Wesleyan 27 

Wesleyan 9 

Wesleyan 1 2 

Wesleyan 7 

Wesleyan 3 



Opponents 

Salem 7 

Glenville State 

Morris Harvey __ 

Carnegie Tech __ 6 

Waynesburg 

Marietta 

Bethany 

Davis-Elkins 7 




THE 1947 VARSITY FOOTBALL SQUAD — Left to right, first row: Sutter, Trainer; Huntz, Shepherd, Means, Forsythe, Allman, Walt Pugh, Barbuto, Witek, Brown, Donley. 

Second row: Brooks, Manager; Hayhurst, Beer, Forinash, Straight, Moore, Crider, Southern, Patterson, Mazzei, Michael. Third row: Knox, Trainer; Riffe, Feola, Milazzo, Brady, 

Wiley, Hinkle, Beachler, White, Bill Pugh. Fourth row: Hannah, Manager; Crawford, King, Devey, Spencer, Paul, Newbrough, Mailing, Porter, Sullivan. 





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1947-4% 



S*^4 IfoccM ^etptent&en 



DAVID OLDAKER 

There ore numerous Buccaneers of Buck- 
hannon prowling around our compus com- 
munity and Dave is no exception. He 
launched his illustrious college career at 
Wesleyan in September, 1940. Dave at 
first put forth his athletic talents in a 
field not known about by most students 
now here unless they followed last Fall's 
intramurals Yes, Wesleyan did in those 
days have a Tennis team and Dave was 
a star performer, as he showed evidences 
of in the Foil doubles tournament. 

The opening of the '42 basketball season 
found 'Snake" — yes, Dave — out on the 
hardwood for the orange and black. Wes- 
leyan, that year, went to the finals of the 
state tournament before being downed by 
Glenville. That same year Dave also tried 
his hand at handball and won the men's 
singles plus the doubles championship 
which he shared with partner Johnny 
Allopena. The following summer Dave 
entered the service. 

He re-entered Wesleyan, in February of 
'46, to perform with the outstanding team 
that brought to the college the State 
Intercollegiate Championship of that year. 
A Biology maior, with minors in Chemistry 
and Physical Education, Dave plans to 
enter medical school upon his graduation, 
but he is also considering coaching. 



BILL KNOX 

Another former Marshall College man. 
Bill made the break from Coach Hender- 
son's fold after a tour in the Navy as a 
Pharmacist Mate aboard the US S Hous- 
ton. A graduate in the Class of '41 from 
Huntington Central High, Bill entered Mar- 
shall that Fall. He continued there through 
the 1942 schoolyear before he accepted the 
U. S. Navy's invitation to see the world. 

With that all-important paper in his 
hand, Bill entered Wesleyan in June, 1946- 
His easy-going personality, plus that genial 
smile, marked him for immediate popularity 
on the campus. Interested in basketball 
and golf, Bill soon earned his varsity letters 
in both sports. In addition, he has been 
active in the intra-mural program and has 
given much of his time to serve as one of 
the football trainers 

An indication of his campus-wide popu- 
larity is seen in the fact he has twice 
been elected to the post of class vice- 
president, serving in his Sophomore and 
Junior years. He has also been a class 
representative on the Community Council, 
a member of the Cultural Enrichment Com- 
mittee of the Council, and has held execu- 
tive posts in a number of campus organ- 
izations. Bill has a yen to yank — that is, 
he is looking forward to a dental career. 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 

It looks as though Coach Ross scooped 
Cam Henderson, coach at Marshall, in 
getting Bill to come to Wesleyan. Bill was 
another Buckhannon Buccaneer, but he was 
different in a way. He entered Marshall 
College in September, 1 943. and played 
basketball for the "Big Green." Shortly 
after, however, he proceeded on to boot 
camp at Great Lakes to start a three year 
hitch with the U. S. Navy. 

Upon receipt of a discharge in January, 
1946, Bill entered Wesleyan immediately. 
He was one of those boys who was a 
member of the starting five which took the 
State Championship that year. This was 
lust a start for Bill; he completed his third 
season this year. 

Bill is sports-minded all the way. as his 
playing second base on the baseball team, 
in addition to other spare time athletic 
activities, shows. He has also excelled in 
campus extra-curricular organizations, be- 
ing elected President of the Sophomore 
Class, the Senior Class, and Beta Beta Beta, 
the National Honorary Biological fraternity. 
He has served as a member of the Social 
Activities Committee for the past two 
years. 

Expecting to go into business. Bill has 
maiored in Business Administration with 
minors in Biology and Chemistry. 



With the football season past, the king of the indoor 
sports, basketball, took over. The backers of the Orange 
and Black saw some great contests played on the floor 
of the college field house during those following 
months, 

Coach Ross had the same team, with the exception 
of Chet Marshall who had graduated, that fought its 
way to the finals in the Collegiate Basketball Tourna- 
ment of last year. With the help of the student body, 
the Bobcat basketeers played a season both hot and 
cold. The record books show the opening game, which 
began the long hard grind, to be a victory — almost, 
that is. The team lost in the closing minutes of play 
to the Green and White of Bethany College by a score 
of 54 to 51. It was a game that saw first one and then 
the other team picking up the lead with the Wesleynites 
on the short end of a 28 to 26 halftime score. 

The team then departed the following Tuesday for a 
two-game road trip through the Southern part of the 
state. Our lads of the Orange and Black first encount- 
ered a we 1 1 -seasoned Golden Eagle five at Morris 
Harvey College, paced by clever George King. The 
boys from Charleston had just a little too much season- 
ing for us, resulting in a loss, 80-45. 

The story goes around that after that hectic evening 
on the hordwood, Coach Ross refrained from going to 




Page Seventy 



CARL LYONS 

"Blue," in his second season 
here, made a mighty fine im- 
pression. Playing at guard and 
running the center slot on 'he 
fast break, Blue was a dead 
shot from the center lane as 
well as a deft playmaker. The 
oldest of a popular pair of 
brothers, Blue is the quieter, 
tallest one. 



HAROLD ELLIS 

For all the orthodox players 
out on the hordwood there must 
be a few who stand out for 
their unusual antics on the court. 
Harold might well be included 
among the latter, for, from the 
time he gets his hands on the 
ball 'til it drops in the basket, 
he's all over the place with it. 
This was Harold's second varsity 
season. 



JOHN LYONS 

The other half of those look- 
a-lot-alike brothers from Clarks- 
burg, Jack is a handy man to 
have around because of his de- 
fensive ability and board work. 
He saw plenty or action this 
past season, both at center and 
guard, continuing the same fast 
pace he set for himself last year. 




WILLIAM BROWN 

Bill is a conscientious, hard- 
working individual both on and 
off the basketball court. He 
played a lot of forward on the 
squad this year. The strong, 
silent type. Bill steers a careful 
course around the campus — 
spends much of his time on his 
studies and working with boys' 
groups. 



"SUGAR" MALLING 

Entering Wesleyan the second 
semester of the '46-47 cam- 
paign, Sugar soared immediately 
into the hardwood top ten. His 
steady play at the center slot 
helped push the underdog Bob- 
cats into the finals of the State 
tournament that season. With 
still a couple of seasons of 
eligibility left. Sugar is slated 
for even greater glory 



HARVEY BROWN 

Bill's brother, this sharp- 
shooting red-headed Buckhannon 
boy played a good bit of very 
capable forward for the Ross 
hardwoodmen this past season. 
When the going was rough. 
Harvey could usually be counted 
upon to boost the Bobcat tally. 
Both these Brown boys are 
expected to hit their top stride 
next season 



the same hotel with the boys; instead, he paced nervously around the 
Capitol Building trying to decide whether the Kanawho River was deep 
enough — or if the team left at home could speed to the rescue. 

"Cebe's" worries were alleviated a little on Wednesday night, how- 
ever, as the Orange and Black out-played a stubborn West Virginia Tech 
hardwood crew, finally pulling away to a 54 to 46 trampler. 

The arrival back home of the team with a victory under their belts 
produced a large turnout to see the encounter with Alderson Broaddus a 
week later — only to witness the Bobcats' downfall by a score of 7 1 -52. 
This game must have somehow inaugurated a streak that was to heavily 
overbalance the won- lost percentage column of the Wesleyanites. They 
did show remarkable recuperative powers the following Saturday though; 
it took an overtime period before Glenville could subdue the Wesleyan 
quintet, 71 to 67. 

The following three games participated in by Wesleyan were more or 
less used in the experimentation of different combinations by Coach Ross. 
The scores were: Wesleyan 49, Fairmont 82; Wesleyan 4 1 , Beckley 44, 
in another heartbreaker for the Cats; and Alderson Broaddus 86, 
Wesleyan 42. 

Starting with the West Virginia Tech home game, the Ross hardwood- 
men began to snap out of their lethargy with a start. This was an example 
of the potential scoring power possessed by the Rossmen as the game 
concluded with Wesleyan on the long end of a 79 to 50 score. Then, 
still showing power in spurts, yet lacking in the pinch, it brought about 
another addition to the loss column — losing 78 to 57 to Davis-Elkins. 

Once again, however, Wesleyan and the gods brought forth another 
bomb shell, this one to spell the downfall of the Golden Eagle five from 
Morris Harvey College. In this contest the Bobcats more than made up 
for their bruising defeat of two months previous by humiliating George 
King and his cohorts 76 to 58. Two days later, on Friday the thirteenth, 
Cam Henderson and his Marshall squad dropped in on the boys at the 
local emporium. The "Big Green" were fresh from a New Year's tourna- 
ment victory out on the West Coast and were not to be derailed by the 
Orange and Blacks of Coach Ross. True, the locals proved to be a definite 
threat for the first 30 minutes, but they eventually lost out 72 to 55, due 
to a pressing fast break employed by Marshall. 

On Monday, a couple of nights later, the Carmichael Auditorium jinx 
continued to hold as the Salem Tigers pulled away from the Bobcats in 




Pagt Si I onty-ont 



the final period to win 70 to 58. Coach Ross then decided perhaps a few 
closed sessions might help snap a few more victories out of his faltering 
team. It must have made a little impression on the squad as immediately 
the boys from the banks of the Buckhannon River began to show champ- 
ionship form in easily defeating a scrappy Glenville Pioneer quintet 73 to 
62 on their home court to even up another defeat earlier in the season. 

Wesleyan next journeyed to the North a few miles to throw a terrific 
scare into a Fairmont State five who were eyeing a second State Inter- 
collegiate Conference championship. The lead built up by the Cats melted 
in the closing minutes of play, however; the Falcons tied the game up as 
time ran out. The overtime found no let up in the sudden surge of the 
Falcons, and, helped by Wesleyan's ice-cold local team, Fairmont took the 
hard-fought tussle, 62 to 57. 

The Red and White of Davis-Elkins College were the next collegiate 
five to grace the local hardwood. That game saw the Wesleynites try hard 
to overcome an eleven-point first-quarter Senator lead, only to fall short 
os time ran out, finding Davis-Elkins ahead 67 to 57. In the following 
encounter, West Liberty found out the hard way that the West Virginia 
Wesleyan cagers were no soft touch — far from it — for the Bobcats put on 
one of their best performances of the season to defeot the Northerners 
73 to 43. After this triumph, the Bobcats evened up still another earlier 
defeat, by the Salem Tigers five, by winning on the home hardwood 64 
to 58. The local basketeers, closing out the season, then lost to Waynes- 
burg College 82 to 43. 

Thus seasoned, the Orange and Black hardwood quintet then played 
host to the best of the state collegiate teams in the well-played, hotly- 
contested annual State Intercollegiate basketball tournament, which was 
eventually won by Davis and Elkins College. 

The naming of individual stars has been left out of this over-all 
summary of the hardwood wizardry of Coach Ross and his squad os a 
tribute to the entire team who wholeheartedly did their best for West 
Virginia Wesleyan College, utterly disregarding any personal gains to 
be made. 

It should be mentioned, however, that three seniors did put forth their 
last efforts in this year for the Orange and Block. They will be remem- 
bered long for their brilliant play and sportsman-like conduct under all 
circumstances. These boys ore Dave Oldaker, Bill Phillips, and Bill Knox 
— all stars in their own right. 



1711 ™ ™ " 



i/- 






"BOB" MEANS 

Though his stock in trade is 
football. Bob is a good boy on 
the hardwood. His fast footwork 
around the court produces points 
here and prevents them there. 
Bob saw a lot of action this 
season, and he should see even 
more of it in the future. 



JOHN SOUTHERN 

John was all around the court 
for the Bobcats this past season, 
somehow always producing his 
share of points from his bag of 
tricks. The unusual thing about 
this fellow is his inability to 
shoot a basket when he's look- 
ing at it — but turn him loose 
and see what happens! 



EARL FLOWERS 

It is seldom you find a Fresh- 
man breaking into the top ten 
of a collegiate basketball squad 
since' there are usually that 
many already-tested lettermen 
around. After a somewhat slow 
start, "Doc" began to accelerate 
and soon proved his merit as an 
all-round player and play-maker. 
He has an unlimited future be- 
fore him. 




CHARLES SPELSBURG 

Another plucky Freshman who 
made the varsity squad this 
season, Chuck, in his final sea- 
son at W. & I. last year, was 
picked on the All-City team. 
His success at bridging the broad 
gap between high school and 
collegiate basketball predicates 
a brilliant future for him out 
on the Wesleyan hardwood. 



WILLIAM KING 
Another of the local men on 
the hardwood squad, Bill played 
his second season with the Bob- 
cats this year, but he is better 
known for his prowess out on 
the field in his major sport — 
football. A popular fellow both 
on and off the campus, the 
future holds the key to his 
success. 



CLAUDE CRIOER 

Claude was one of the re- 
turning boys Coach Ross made 
considerable use of during the 
season. Although primarily a 
football man, Claude is recog- 
nized for his play on the more 
crowded quarters of a basket- 
ball court. A Sophomore this 
year, more is expected to be 
heard of him in the coming 
seasons. 




Seated, left to right: Bill Brown, Bob Means, Eldon Mailing, Blue Lyon, Harvey Brown, Bill Phillips, John Southern, Jack Lyon, Bill Knox, Claude Crider, Doc Flowers. Standing, 
left to right: Coach Ross, Charles Spelsberg, James Brown, Bob Beharka, Bud Casey, Bill Hastings, Bill King, Jack Harper, Lester Brady, Preston Boyce, Dominic Raymond, Harold 

Ellis, Manager Pete Shaffer, Assistant Coach Small. 



THE BASKETBALL SCORE BOARD 
Won 6; Lost 13 



Manager Pete Shaffer; Trainer Jack Shepherd 



Wesleyan 51 

Wesleyan 45 

Wesleyan 54 

Wesleyan 52 

Wesleyan 67 

Wesleyan 49 

Wesleyan 41 

Wesleyan 42 

Wesleyan 79 

Wesleyan 52 

Wesleyan 76 

Wesleyan 55 

Wesleyan 58 

Wesleyan 73 

Wesleyan 57 

Wesleyan 57 

Wesleyan 73 

Wesleyan 64 

Wesleyan 43 



Bethany 54 

Morris Harvey 80 

West Virginia Tech 46 

Alderson-Broaddus 71 

Glenville 71 

Fairmont 82 

Beck ley 44 

Alderson-Broaddus 86 

West Virginia Tech 50 

Davis & Elkins 78 

Morns Harvey 58 

Marshall 11 

Salem 70 

Glenville 62 

Fairmont 62 

Davis & Elkins 67 

West Liberty 43 

Salem 58 

Waynesburg 82 




Page Seventy-three 



7^e 1947 %«m&*M Setuo*t 



The illustrious Bobcats of West Virginia 
Wesleyan proved to be just that during the 
1947 baseball season. This was a season 
highlighted by the signing of contracts to 
play professional ball by "Shorts" Humphreys, 
pitcher, and "Rocko" Meyers, outfielder. 

Having started with four straight innings 
of no-hit ball, "Sawbuck" Sawyers pitched 
the Bobcats to an 11-7 win over the Salem 
Tigers on the Wesleyan diamond, April 16. 
For the first few innings things appeared to 
be pretty much of romp until the Salemites 
finally adjusted their batting eyes to the 
smoking fast ball of Sawyers. It was not until 
the fifth inning did Salem get out of their 
slump to rush three runs across the plate. 

You can't always win them all, as the Bob- 
cats hurriedly found out on the local diamond 
the following Friday afternoon. The Falcons 
of Fairmont State racked up a one-sided score 
of 21-3 before a crowd of loyal Wesleyan fans 
who sweltered in the hot sun for nine long 
innings 

Practice seemed to be the by-word as the 
game progressed. Wesleyan had only one 
game under its belt and very little practice 
mainly due to wet grounds; therein lay the 
success of the Falcons. The Bobcat battery, 
paced by Humphreys, Ellis, and Patterson, 
worked hard — only to fall short. One of the 
main highlights of the game occurred when 
a long fly to left field was snagged by 
"Rocko" Meyers and snapped to Yurick at 
second for a beautiful play. Statistics show 
that Fairmont connected for 19 hits compared 
to the Bobcats' five, all singles. 

A single in the 10th inning, by Davidson, 
proved to be the deciding factor in the fol- 
lowing contest with West Virginia Tech which 
those boys wrapped up and took home, 9-8. 
For the first couple of innings it looked like 
Tech's ball game, but the Bobcats drove in 





two runs in the second, and four more in the 
third to make the scoreboard read 6-3 at the 
beginning of the fourth. The locals continued 
to lead the way until the ninth, when Tech 
pushed across three runs to tie the score at 
eight-all going into the 10th. 

In the next game, with the Glenville Pio- 
neers, Norman Page ("Lefty") Smith pitched 
a fighting Bobcat nine to a 14-5 decision on 
the Pioneer diamond. Allowing the Blue and 
White only five hits, Lefty was backed up 
by the Wesleyan slugging stalwarts. Glenville 
took a 3-1 lead in the first inning only to 
find themselves limited to just two more runs 
during the remaining eight innings while the 
Cats went on a rampage to score 13 more 
runs. This win evened up the won-lost game 
tally, two and two. 

A return game with West Virginia Tech 
followed, permitting the Wesleyan nine to 
even up the game score with a 3-2 win. 

Traveling north to Philippi to engage 
Alderson-Broaddus next, the Bobcats lost a 
heartbreaker, 7-6, to the boys up on the hill. 

On returning to the College diamond for a 
tussle with the Glenville Pioneers, out to 
avenge their earlier defeat, the locals emerged 
from the fracas even more heartbroken. In a 
nip and tuck horsehide duel all the way, both 
teams had garnered five runs at the end of 
the ninth inning. At bat the first half of the 
10th, the Pioneers scraped up one run on an 
error and a single to take home the game. 
One of Shorts Humphrey's better days, he 
allowed the Pioneers only seven hits and 
fanned 12 in the process. 

Of the three games remaining on the 
schedule, Wesleyan lost successive return 
engagements to Fairmont, 8-2, and Salem, 
8-1, before defeating a stubborn Alderson- 
Broaddus nine by a score of 6-4 to wind up 
the season. 



Pagt s> i ■ niii-iour 



SEASON SUMMARY 

Won 4; Lost 6 

Wesleyan 1 1 Salem 7 

Wesleyan 3 Fairmont 21 

Wesleyan 8 W. Va. Tech 9 

Wesleyan 14 Glenville 5 

Wesleyan 3 W. Va. Tech 2 

Wesleyan 6 Alderson-Broaddus 7 

Wesleyan 5 Glenville 6 

Wesleyan 2 Fairmont 8 

Wesleyan 1 Salem 8 

Wesleyan 6 Alderson-Broaddus 4 




Seated, left to right: Bill Smith, Ab Tokacs, Frank Sawyers, Joe Witek, Charley Yurick, Al Poling, Bob Myers. Standing, left to right: Bob Hupp, "Shorts" Humphreys, John 

Morchines, Bill Gilmore, Jim Morris, Chuck Donley, Joe Michaels. 




Page Seventy-five 



iomcA 



Touch football was the first Intramural 
sport undertaken at Wesleyan this year. With 
nine teams and some 80 boys participating, 
the games were started. They were played on 
the large green field which lies between the 
Student Center and the athletic stadium. The 
field was lined off by members of the intra- 
mural department, and then the pigskin sport 
got underway. 

Under the able direction of Dave Reem- 
snyder, men's intramural program director, 
and "Mel" Herold, student assistant to Mr. 
Reemsnyder, games were scheduled and 
played accordingly. 

Several students who were interested in 
athletics served as referees and thus gained 
valuable experience for themselves and 
greatly benefitted the intramural department 
by donating their time and services. Some of 
the fellows who served as referees were: Walt 
Wise, Dick Walton, "Rock" Myers, Garth 
Hood, Maurice Miller, and John Marchinnes. 



Touch Foe 


rbc 


II 


F 


nal 


Standings 




Variety Boys 
















5-0 


Panhandlers 
















5-1 


Fleabodies 
















4-3 


Mud Dobbers 
















3-2 


Shaffers 
















1-3 


Old Vets 
















1-3 


Clod Hoppers 
















0-2 


K. A. 
















0-2 
0-2 


Hillbillies 

















Of course Dave and Mel did their share of 
refereeing also. 

Intramural football was a feature activity 
on Wesleyan's campus those first three weeks 
of school. During the latter part of September, 
October, and the first part of November, 
touch football held the campus spotlight. 
Persons coming to the pits nearby to pitch 
horseshoes usually ended up watching a close 
game of intramural football. 

In spite of the rainy weather, fans kept 
coming to kibitz on the sidelines and the 
playoffs continued. 

The season wound up with the flashy 
Variety Boys winning the title with five 
straight wins against no losses. This fleet- 
footed team was captained by "Rock" Myers. 
Running a close second was the mighty team 
from northern West Virginia, the Panhand- 
lers. Captained by the shrewd Walt Wise, the 
Panhandlers racked up a record of five wins 
and one loss. 



Fleabodies 



Panhandlers 




Pagt Si pi n(j/-*(a 



'PoodaM 




Variety Boys 








Kappa Alpha 


Mud Dobbers 


Flea bodies 


Variety 


Boys 


Shaffers 


C. Lyon Dartnall 
J. Lyon Spurlock 
Davis Hood 
Starkey B. Garrett 


T. Slack Bolle 
Shamblin Snyder 
Rohrer Friend 
Young Lisensky 
Durbin Hamilton 


R. Andnck 

Vineyard 

Humphreys 

Gould 
Rohr 


J. Riley 

R. Myers 

Loyfield 

Cullings 

H. R. Brown 


Phillips Beozell 

Reilly Payne 
Monack Beharka 
Hyde Spongier 
Barnett 



Panhandlers 



Foernsler 
R. Slack 
Chamberlain 
R. Wise 



McBride 



Fisher 
Lucas 
W. Wise 
Rodgers 



Hillbill 


ies 


Comet 

Matheny 

Miller 

R. Garrett 

Bickel 


Poyne 

Riffe 

Scott 

Mouser 

Nancarrow 



Kappa Alpha 



Jim Morris 
Jim Dennis 
Ed Knight 
H. W. Brown 

Piggford 

Goller 



Herman 

T. Elder 

Given 

L. Terwilliger 

Wright 



Clod Hoppers 



Lentz 

Whiting 
Rosser 



Hoencke 
W. Hicks 
R. Hupp 



Old Vets 



Marchines 
Borrelli 
McMullen 
Takacs 



Walton 
Picone 
Sweeney 

Morrow 



Page Seventy-seven 



Boarding House Reachers 



Basketeers 




^afoa- 'Tttwial 



Between the two main intramural sports, football and 
basketball, there was a short season of volleyball. In the 
volleyball tournament the teams were divided into two 
leagues to make the playoffs easier. In the A league the 
Dirty Socks took the title with four wins and no losses. The 
B league ended in a three-way split for first place. The 
Sigmates, Happy Morons, and the Phoenix Club, all with 
two wins and one loss, shared the first-place honors. The 
staff regrets that we have been unable to get pictures of the 
volleyball teams. 

After intramural volleyball, basketball came into its own. 
This sport drew more interest and participants than football 
and volleyball together. Twenty-four teams with approxi- 
mately 200 men signed up to play basketball. There were so 
many teams that three leagues were formed. 

Games were played in each league until the middle of 
March, at which time tournaments were held in each league. 
Each team had an equal chance to win the championship of 
its own particular league. 

In the A league, the Wristons won the tournament 
playoffs; the Wolfpack won the tournament title in the B 
league, and in the C league, the Czars won the title. 



A LEAGUE 



Broqqs 



Braggs 



Phoenix Club 



Michael 
Borrelli 
Andrich 



Myers 

Strother 

Moore 



R. 
W. 

R. 



Panhandlers 

Wise Fairley 

Wise Phillips 
Slack Foernsler 
Forsythe 



Married Vets 



Shepherd 
Hupp 
Huntz 
Donley 



Porter 
B. Pugh 
Small 

Brown 



C.C.N.Y. 

W. Pugh Blakesley 
Kincade Yost 

Hutchinson 



Basketeers 

Myers Brooks 

Crawford Raymond 
Morris Payne 

Beer 



No Names 



Skunks 



Vineyard 
Manser 
Gould 
Whiting 



Humphreys 

Bartlett 

Shaffer 

Brown 



E, Oldaker 
B. Oldaker 
Friend 
Casey 



Coleman 

Rush 

Potter 

Lawson 



Phoenix Club 

Davisson Cain 

Reilly Flynn 

Wertz Davis 

Hull 



McKain 


s Hot Shots 


Wriston's 


Phillips 

McKain 

Patterson 

Hannon 

War 


Graham 
Hanna 
Hostnik 
Beharka 
d 


Wriston Hayhurst 
Weinburg Dunkle 
Wiley Sullivan 



Page Seventy-eight 



Scu6et&atl 



Kanawha Street Boys 



Rebels 



VOLLEYBALL SUMMARY 

A LEAGUE B LEAGUE 



Dirty Socks 4-0 



Vets . 



Married 
Uhlor's - 

Bears 

Panhandlers 
Wolf Pack . 



3-1 
1-2 
1-2 

1-2 
1-4 



Happy Morons 2-1 

Phoenix Club 2-1 

Sigmates 2-1 

Michaels 1-1 

K. A 1-2 

Fleabodies 0-2 



BASKETBALL SUMMARY 



A LEAGUE 



Braggs 6-2 

Skunks 6-3 

Phoenix Club 6-3 

No Names 4-3 

Married Vets 5-4 

Basketeers 6-3 

Wriston's 4-4 

Panhandlers 4-5 

CCNY 1-8 

McKain's 0-7 



B LEAGUE 

Rebels 6-1 

Phoenix Club___ 5-1 

Shafters 6-3 

Wolf Pack 4-4 

Boarding House 

Reachers 2-6 

Kanawha Street 

Boys 1-5 

Barbutos 0-6 



B LEAGUE 



C LEAGUE 



Czars 6-1 

Sigmates 4-2 

Happy Morons^- 3-3 

Beebees 2-3 

Glamour Manor _ 2-4 

Stoics 1-5 

K. A 0-1 



Shafters 

Payne Lewis 

Reiley Woolford 

Gwinn Devey 

Stansbury 



Rebels 



Barbutos 



Phoenix Club 



Matheny 

White 

Dixon 



H. Riffe 
J. Riffe 
Comet 



Takocs 
Hupp 
Casto 
Barbuto 



Morrow 
Yurick 
Andrews 
Hicks 



Pertz 

Fisher 
Perky 



Starkey 

Walters 
Crawford 




Happy Morons 



Stoics 



Boording House Reochers Kanawha Street Boys 



Bishop James 

Hastings Culpepper 
Boyle Cunningham 

Corder 



Mitchell Hiteshev. 

Simmons Miller 

Thorp 



Wolf Pack 

Rodgers Maynard 

Barnes Boyce 

Watkins Kelly 







C LEAGUE 








Happy Morons 


Czars 


Glamor Manor 


Beebees 


Sigmates 


Snyder Moore 
Tanner Gentry 
Voile Allers 
Wolfe 


Nebrough Hicks 
Millazio Lilensky 
Picone Slack 
Walton 


Pugh Chamberlain 
Spongier Shamblin 
Gainor Brown 
Ambler Grose 
Hyde 


Beazell Holloway 
Goller Jones 
Gwennap Wright 


K. Queen 
F. Queen 
C. Queen 
Hicks 
Hinkle 


Allman 

Rohr 

Borchert 

Fox 

Marsh 



Page Situ-nty-nine 




ywcUviduat 



Under the direction of Associate 
Professor Dave Reemsnyder, assisted 
by Physical Education student "Mel" 
Harold, the 1947-48 men's intra- 
murals attracted a total of 478 par- 
ticipants. A breakdown on this figure 
reveals about 80 men active in the 
touch football league, 84 volleyball 
players, 200 basketball participants, 
30 tennis enthusiasts, 36 ping pong 
players, and 48 men in the handball 
ladder tournaments. The program 
was obviously a huge success, with 
all who participated benefitting 
greatly not only physically but even 
more in promoting the friendly spirit 
of Wesleyan sportsmanship. 

In the singles tennis tournament, 
Jack Dartnell defeated Jack Hufham 
for the title in the final match, The 
Oldaker brothers, Dave and Ed, won 
over Dartnell and Hufham in the 
doubles tennis tournament for the 
title. 





i ii mmmmm 



Page Eighty 



Sfionfo 




SPORTS 

Women's athletics constitute an interesting and 
spectacular part of the physical education program of 
the College. The girls' portion of this program consists 
of a series of intramural contests in each of the popular 
sports under the sponsorship of the Women's Athletic 
Association. Credit for the success of the program is 
due not only to the individual class participants but 
also to Miss Knepshield, advisor to the W.A.A. and 
departmental head of the women's physical education 
program. Tournaments were held in hockey, volleyball, 
basketball, ping pong, shuffleboard, badminton, and 
Softball; a total of nearly 500 girls participated in 
these contests. 

Aside from taking part in these sports for the health- 
ful activity and the pleasure in them, the girls were 
working toward a higher goal — the W.A.A. Key — 
which marks the ultimate achievement for active partici- 
pation in the women's athletic program. The Key is 
awarded on the basis of a designated number of points 
earned for each sport played. This year there were on 
the campus two Senior girls wearing this award, both 
of whom earned their Keys at the start of their Junior 
year. The girls, Velma Smith and Fern Christofel, are 
seen in the softball picture in the panel at the right. 



Softball 

In the spring a young man's fancy turns to thoughts 
of love — but the girls on the Wesleyan campus turned 
to softball as something to occupy the sunny afternoons. 
Class teams participated in the tournament, and each 
team put on a good show with much gained physically, 
mentally, and (Ed. note: strangely enough!) socially. 

Badminton 

One of the newest of the individual sports to be 
added to the intramural program was badminton. 
Separate single elimination tournaments were held in 
both singles and doubles with approximately 50 girls 
taking part. Although one of the newest, this sport 
proved to be one of the most popular. 



Shuffleboard 

Another of the individual sports to be newly added 
to the intramural program this year was that popular 
indoor sport, shuffleboard. Single elimination tourna- 
ments were established for both singles and doubles, 
and the two courts in the gym were kept busy most 
of the time. 



Ping Pong 



Three cheers to Pat Pickens for winning the singles 
tournament in ping pong and teaming with Alda 
Wagner to win the doubles — proving she's really a 
master of the little white ball. Runners-up in the hard- 
fought elimination matches were: Mary Jo Gee, in the 
singles; and Mary Ellen Lawson and Peggy Cross, in 
the doubles. 




Page Eighty-one 




*7cUhMu€^ 



A group of approximately 12 agile girls 
contribute on occasion to the campus pro- 
grams sponsored by the Physical Education 
Department. The tumbling feats of these girls 
include a wide variety of specialties per- 
formed with precision and grace. 

Listed on their repertoire are such stunts 
as forward and backward rolls, flips, pyra- 
mids, cartwheels, chest rolls, all types of 
shoulder and thigh stands, and both double 
and triple rolls. The girls have developed and 
polished their performances entirely on their 
own during the off-hours of campus life when 
they were able to put in the required long 
periods of strenuous practice. 

In addition to their appearance as a feature 
of the traditional annual May Day Festival, 
the services of this group are made use of in 
assembly programs and other campus enter- 
tainments. 



Page Etghty-tu:o 



^oc^ey 



It's really the truth when we say that some 
girls on the campus swing a mean hockey 
stick — there were a good many bruises and 
bumps to prove it! Seven teams were entered 
in the hockey tournament and all seven 
played good, hard, and fast hockey. 

Schaal's Freshmen, Hunt's Freshmen, and 
Clelland's Seniors were eliminated the first 
round. In the second round, Wickham's 
Sophomores defeated Hinshelwood's Sopho- 
mores, and Simpson's Juniors slaughtered 
Young's Freshmen. In the final round of the 
tournament, neither Wickham's nor Simpson's 
crew could get the upper hand; after a game 
and an over-period, the score remained tied. 
So, as far as the hockey intramurals were 
concerned, we had co-champions with Simp- 
son's Juniors (pictured lower left) and Wick- 
ham's Sophomores (pictured upper right) shar- 
ing the title honors. 

And o rugged tournament it was! It hit the 
athletic field like a cyclone and gave the 
spectators a gay time keeping track of the 
little white ball as it was knocked from one 
end of the field to the other and then back 
again. All the games were played under the 
lights and did much to add some color and 
excitement to the campus scene for a couple 
of weeks in November. 




Page Eighty-three 



74J<xmw'& 'Jntna-'WCu'ial 




Page Eighty-four 



Scu6e£&aM ^?octn*uuneHt 



BASKETBALL 

The girls' basketball season was completed late in 
March, and the tournament proved to be quite long 
and exciting. W.A.A. Sports Manager Maxine Birck- 
head did a great job in organizing the intramural 
tournaments — and especially basketball. Two round 
robin leagues were run off with five teams in each 
league, then a final round robin was held among the 
winners and runner-ups of the two initial leagues. 

In League I, the Seniors, captained by Butler, took 
first honors. They were followed successively by Mur- 
dock's Freshmen IV team, Hayes's Juniors, the sorry 
Sophomores of Thomas, and Bailey's dilapidated Fresh- 
men II. In League II, the Junior proteges of Hadjis 
were too much for their league-mates; they took the 
title with a percentage of 1.000. Next in line came 
the Freshmen III team, driven on by Sue Berry; then 
Sophomore I, coaxed on by Alda Wagner; Freshmen I, 
urged by Cross; and finally, Freshmen V, consoled by 
Marshall. The winners of both leagues deserve a round 
of cheers for these games were hard fought. 

The final round robin, among the four leading teams 
of the two initial leagues, proved interesting though not 
quite as exciting as the earlier contests. One of the 
games, that between the Juniors and the Seniors was 
played as a preliminary game to the Salem-Wesleyan 
varsity tilt. It was a great game; and, though the 
Juniors won out in the end, the Seniors were leading 
with only one minute to play. Following this defeat, the 
Seniors decided to forfeit the rest of their games. This 
left only three teams in the running; from these the 
Juniors emerged first to become the Women's Basket- 
ball Champions of 1948 

A definite and necessary part of every game are the 
officials, of course; due credit must be given them for 
their efforts. The referees of this tournament were a 
group of seven girls; Robinson, Ross, Birckheod, Smith, 
Christofel, Clelland, and Evans. They had the ever- 
faithful assistance of Miss Knepshield when the going 
got tough. The success of this tournament is due also 
to the timekeepers and scorers; we take this opportunity 
to thank them for their services. 




Page BUjhty-jivc 



The river of Time, on which all things forever drift, 
guided in their courses by the restless figure of Change, has 
moved the campus organizations another year forward in 
what, for many of them, has been a long period of service to 
the campus community. The year in its swift passage down 
the deep-channeled, pulsing time-river saw Change, recog- 
nizing the greater variety of interests among the record 
student population, bring into being a number of new organ- 
izations. The struggles of some few of these new groups have 
gradually weakened in the swift current of the ceaseless 
flood, but others appear to hove a strong grasp on the straw 
of life breasting the rushing tides of Time. 

Meanwhile, the older organizations have been rolling 
majestically along, adding new achievements to their already 
long lists of noteworthy attainments. Change worked rather 
extensively during the year with a number of these long 
established groups; basic reorganizationol work has resulted 
in their thorough remodeling. Many have thus taken on a 
wider scope of activity, broadening the services rendered 
their members and the campus community at large. 

Change may well be proud of his artistry in effecting 
these far-reaching progressive steps which Time, we feel, 
will undertake to prove of inestimable value. The stature of 
any institution of higher learning is dependent, to an appre- 
ciable extent, on the number and nature of its extra- 
curricular organizations. 




(ne (fattfeub Cw^itfyatitot& m 




@ommututty @ouHeil 



OFFICERS 

Bill Pugh President 

Tom Crossan. Vice-president 

Mary Louise Coberly, 

Jane Wyncoop, 

Co-secretaries 



Senior Class Representatives 

Mary Louise Coberly 

Bill Knox 

Velma Smith 

Junior Class Representatives 

Charles Crawford 

Charles Donley 

Tom Crossan 

Sophomore Class 
Representatives 

Carl Lyon 
Jane Wyncoop 

Freshman Class 
Representatives 

Anna Young 
Lester Brady 

Administration 
Representatives 

President W. J. Scarborough 

Dean A. A- Schoolcraft 

Dean J. L. Hupp 

Dean S. Ward 

Faculty Representatives 

E. Kidd Lockard 
William A. Hallam 



The first task the 1948 Community Council set 
for itself immediately on assuming its responsi- 
bilities at the end of the 1946-47 schoolyear was 
a complete revision of the existing inadequate 
constitution. This objective was accomplished when, 
on June 20, 1947, the Council adopted the 
constitution under which it has functioned so ably 
this year. 

Working through the summer, the group com- 
pleted in its initial three meetings the necessary 
appointments of members to the standing com- 
mittees. In three July meetings, a determined 
effort on the part of the Council to bring Student 
Union finances out into the open resulted in the 
innovation of a bookkeeping system which permits 
regular quarterly reports covering all phases of 
the Union's financial situation. 

In the initial meeting of the Council after the 
College reopened in September, the first quarterly 
report of the Student Union finances was received. 
The Sigma Eta Delta reorganization was given 
recognition, and Pi Epsilon Theta was granted per- 
mission to organize as a chapter of the national 




philosophic fraternity. Late in October the new 
Student Union by-laws were approved; campus and 
building improvements were discussed, the World 
Student Service Fund drive approved, and $100 of 
the Union's finances was made available for the 
use of the Council. The November meeting of the 
governing group brought a promise of action from 
the administration on the proposed campus and 
building improvements. Registration of automobiles 
parked on the campus was scheduled for the second 
semester. An initial discussion of the chapel and 
assembly situation was held. 

The first December meeting resulted in a move 
to register the constitution, by-laws, and member- 
ship list of all campus student organizations. A 
committee was formed to plan a banquet for the 
football team; a report from the Religious Activities 
committee was heard, and a delegate was sent to 
the regional meeting of the National Student Asso- 
ciation in Lynchburg. The final meeting of the 
calendar year brought recognition to the Phoenix 
Club. Committees were formed to investigate 
affiliation with the N.S.A. and the dissatisfaction 
with the chapel and assembly programs. The 
College, through the Council, was host to the 
reorganizational meeting of the W. Va. Federa- 
tion of College Students on December 12 and 13. 

The first meeting of the new year brought 
reports from the Social Activities committee, the 
banquet committee, and a financial report from 
the Student Union. The presidents of each class 
were in attendance and a student government 
assembly was planned for February 5 to encourage 
student interest in this vital phase of campus life. 
The car registration plan was restated. Meeting 
late in February, the Council decided to dispense 
with the bulletin boards and assembly announce- 
ments by issuing weekly announcement bulletins. 
Reports were heard on the class meetings held 
following the student government assembly. A 
small deficit incurred by the football banquet 
committee was made up out of Council funds. 
Early in March, membership in the W. Va. Federa- 
tion of College Students was voted, and two 
Council delegates were appointed to attend the 
Federation meeting held April 9 and 10 at the 
University. 



Page Eighty. eight 



Student ?t«Uo*t @outtct£ 



Virtually an autonomous unit of the 
Community Council, The Student Union 
Committee holds as its responsibility the 
provision of an adequate social, recrea- 
tional, and extra-curricular program on 
the West Virginia Wesleyan Campus. It 
draws up plans and controls the operation 
of the Student Center, subject to the 
approval of the Community Council. 

The Student Center has been kept open 
nearly all the time for the use of the 
entire student body; the large Social Room 
was frequently reserved during the year 
for the parties and other activities of the 
various campus organizations. This whole 
new campus social program was begun 
with the advent of the new Student Center 
building; its construction was completed 
early last summer. 

All-campus affairs during the summer 
included several parties and an all- 
campus picnic. The Fall semester was 
begun by the kick-off party for Freshmen. 
Later, "Wesleyantics," the student variety 
show, was presented under the sponsor- 
ship of the Student Union Committee. 
This event began the Homecoming pro- 
gram which included a party for students 
and the visiting Alumni. 

During the holiday season a Christmas 
party was held, and a few weeks later the 
second semester was opened with a lively 
affair. A ball in honor of St. Patrick's 
Day, at which the varsity sports teams 
were also honored, came next on the 
program. 

Among the events entirely new to 
campus life this semester were regular 
Saturday night movies featuring such full 
length shows as "Grapes of Wrath," "The 
"Rains Came," and "Young Mr. Lincoln." 
Week-end mixers for students and faculty 




were held one evening nearly every week; and 
programs of classical music on records were 
given on Sunday afternoons. This last feature 
was presented in cooperation with the Reli- 
gious Activities Committee, another of the 
standing committees of the Community 
Council. These two committees also served an 
all-campus breakfast twice during the Lenten 
Season. 

A reception was held for the visiting alumni 
before the football banquet. The last big 
event presented during the past schoolyear 
was a May Day Dance which concluded the 
program featuring the crowning of the May 
Queen. Jerry Wald and his well-known orch- 
estra were highlighted at this main event 
concluding the committee's social program 
for the year. 



Members Ex-officio 

Mrs. Ethel Vaughn. -Financial Sec'y 
Miss Nellie G. Wilson. -Coordinator 

Members 

Parker B. Holloway Chairman 

Florence Lough Secretary 

Jack Fisher, Walter Hebb, Mary 
Hadjis, James Hupp, Charles Yurick 



Page Eighty-nine 



SfaftcUvty, @ammittee& o£ 



CULTURAL ENRICHMENT 
COMMITTEE 

This committee is responsible for 
planning a diversified program of 
entertainment for the cultural enrich- 
ment of the campus community. This 
year they presented such noted 
speakers as Rush Holt, Ellis Arnall, 
Carl Frashure, and a number of other 
interesting lecturers. 



AWARDS COMMITTEE 

This committee is responsible for 
arranging for the Recognition Day 
program, including the naming of 
recipients of all awards made at the 
time. It follows the point system in 
awarding the Wesleyan Key and 
establishes standards for the presenta- 
tion of other awards. 




Top, Conduct Committee; Bottom, Social Activities Committee 



CONDUCT COMMITTEE 

This committee has as its duty to 
deal with all matters of student con- 
duct having campus wide significance, 
provided that the power to dismiss a 
student from the college shall be 
reserved to the administration com- 
mittee of the faculty. 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

This committee is responsible for 
the policy, the scheduling, and the 
supervision of all social events. It is 
responsible for assigning the calendar 
dates for organizational meetings, 
programs, and similar activities. This 
is the first year that any attempt has 
been made to plan a complete 
schedule for an entire year at the 
beginning of the year. 



Cultural 






Sociol 


Enrichment 


Awards 


Conduct 


Activities 


Committee 


Committee 


Committee 


Committee 


Robert Hupp 


Charles Donley 


Tene Borrelli 


Dean Hupp 


Vivian Johns 


John James 


Rector Brown 


Dean Ward 


William Knox 


Martha Kursavich 


Gladys Evans 


Virginia Withers 


Leoma Linger 


Larry Marquess 


Corinna Hillman 


Bill Phillips 


Vernon Wills 


Velma Smith 


Dean Schoolcraft 


Professor Moore 


Dean Ward 


Dean Schoolcraft 


Dean Hupp 




Professor Lockard 




Dean Ward 
Professor Brown 
Prof. Reemsnyder 





I'age Ninety 



t6e @ommcot£tfy (Zouneil 



FRATERNITIES COMMITTEE 

This committee has as its responsi- 
bility the planning for Rush Week 
and Initiation Week. The committee 
coordinates the campus activities of 
all fraternities and clears all calendar 
dates with the Social Activities Com- 
mittee. Operating unofficially as a 
Pan-Hellenic group this year, the 
committee has taken on added signifi- 
cance with the establishment of two 
new national fraternities on the 
campus. 



RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 
COMMITTEE 

This committee is responsible for 
meeting religious needs on the cam- 
pus, to act as a coordinating body 
for all religious groups, to advance 
and sponsor the organization of a stu- 
dent religious group, and to arrange 
for religious speakers. 

Meetings are held once a month. 
The committee has been working 
toward better relationships between 
the town churches and the college. 

Dorothy Steinkraus was sent as the 
West Virginia Wesleyan delegate to 
the North America Student Council 
at Lawrence, Kansas. 




Top, Publications Committee; Bottom, Religious Activities Committee 



Publications 
Committee 

Mildred Barkley 
Roy Hebb 
Eugene Ricketts 
Jane Swisher 
President Scarborough 
Professor Gould 
Dean Ward 



Religious 
Activities 
Committee 

Tally Hanna 
Edward Crow 
Delores Kelly 
William Laughlin 
Dorothy Steinkraus 
President Scarborough 
Professor Currie 
Professor Rice 
Rev. Ross Linger 



Fraternities 
Committee 

Judy Conaway 
Charles Gardner 
Betty Hogsett 
Hank Rohr 
Billie Wally 
John Wright 



House 
Governing 
Committee 

(No Members) 




^\$S& ' 



PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE 

This committee is responsible for 
the editing and securing responsible 
people for these offices and as staff 
members for the Pharos, the Murmur- 
montis, the Handbook, and for any 
other student publications, and to 
guarantee to the campus community 
a businesslike administration of these 
publications. 

It is the responsibility of this com- 
mittee to provide a wholesome and 
free expression of the character and 
life of the campus community. The 
committee shall submit annual reports 
to the council, which will make them 
public. 



HOUSE GOVERNING COMMITTEE 

The duty of this committee is to 
require each College residence unit 
to formulate a system of house rules 
subject to the approval of the com- 
mittee. 

The committee, however, has not 
functioned during the 1947-48 school- 
year. 



Page Nintty-ottt 



'Women & f¥otc&e (fa/wwiag, /4^ociatcaK 




EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
MEMBERS 

Hazel Shomo President 

Doris Hinds Vice-President 

Marion D. Wickham Secretary 

Dolores J. Kelly Treasurer 

Gladys Evans, Jane Wyncoop, 
Jane Hall, Virginia Skaggs 



This organization, founded near the end 
of the 1946-47 schoolyear, endeavors to 
provide for unified democratic government of 
the women's dormitories. It follows a consti- 
tution drawn up by the residents of these 
halls. The members of the Executive Com- 
mittee are elected by the Association at large; 
these officers serve for one schoolyear. 

The purposes, as stated in the Association 
Constitution, are: "To help Wesleyan College 
women strive for the betterment of their 
school, for the strengthening of their char- 
acter, and for the development of their social 
competence; to encourage individual and 
community responsibility among themselves 
and throughout the College; to carry out such 
College Regulations as come under their 
jurisdiction; to form an official body for 
giving expression to the opinions of this group 
of college women in matters of general 
interest, with the authority given in the Grant 
of Powers established by this Constitution." 

All the women residing in the various 
dormitories of the College are members of 
the Association. 



Pci n Ninety-two 



T>dt* P&i 'Kapfoa 



Delta Psi Kappa is a national fraternity 
composed of women majoring in physical 
education. 

On May 17, 1947, the dreams of 14 girls 
were realized when the "phyeds" of West 
Virginia Wesleyan College became affiliated 
with Delta Psi Kappa. The phyeds had been 
an active organization on the campus since 
the fall of 1945. At that time a group of 
physical education majors banded together 
under the leadership of Miss Charlotte Knep- 
shield, with the goal in mind of later peti- 
tioning a National Physical Education Fra- 
ternity. The formal installation was held in 
May, 1947, with the national vice-president 
from Philadelphia conducting the service. 

Charter members were Velma Smith, Betty 
June Reed, Mary Algene Baily, Imogene 
Randolph, Rayma Gene Brother, Mary Alice 
Cole, Maxine Birckhead, Betty Jo Hogsett, 
Fern Christofel, Gladys Evans, Hollace Wilson, 
Alberta Robinson, and Alice Ross. 

The program of the year included the 
sponsoring of "Wesleyanantics," a student 
variety show, furnishing programs for the 
State College Basketball Tournament; and an 
initiation dinner. 




OFFICERS 

Velma Smith President 

Maxine Birckhead Vice-President 

Betty Jo Hogsett Secretary 

Fern Christofel Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Mary Clelland, Gladys Evans, Hollace 

Wilson, Alberta Robinson, Alice Ross, 

Leoma Linger, Wanda Cutwright 

PLEDGES 

Shirley Thomas, Pat Pickens 



Pane Ninety-three 



rftfifa, ^&i Omeya 



Alpha Rho Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, 
the national honorary dramatics fraternity, 
has been active in furthering dramatic efforts 
on the campus for many years. The original 
chapter of this fraternity was a local group 
at the Fairmont State Teachers College; tak- 
ing hold, it spread to become a national 
organization. Wesleyan's chapter was among 
the first to be formed. 



OFFICERS 

Larry Riley President 

Mary Hadjis Vice-President 

David DuBois Secretary 

Maurice Miller Treasurer 

Dean Wa rd Sponsor 

MEMBERS 

Parker Holloway, Sue Johnson, Jane 

Swisher, Larry Marquess, Joe Douglas, 

Mrs. Neal, Harriet Whetsell 



Members of the Playshop, the other cam- 
pus dramatic organization, are elected when 
they have given evidence of superior ability 
and when they have earned sufficient points 
for invitation to membership. The group has 
been little active this year except for electing 
and initiating new members. Many of the 
members of this group appeared in the plays 
presented here during the past year. 



'w;*\ ■ / m,» 




Page Ninety-four 



£>et& &et& &eta 



In 1943 the Beta Mu Chapter of this 
National Honorary Biological Fraternity was 
installed at Wesleyan. Bi-monthly meetings 
are held at which provisional members deliver 
reports on topics of interest pertinent to 
Biological study. This is a part of the entrance 
requirement; others are intention to major 
or minor in Biology, and satisfactory grades 
upon admission. 

The fraternity is very active. Some of their 



OFFICERS 

Bill Phillips President 

Fern Christofel Vice-President 

Jessie Butler Secretary 

Larry Riley Treasurer 

Professor J udson Co-sponsor 

Professor Arnold Co-sponsor 

MEMBERS 

Ray Cross, Lyle Dunsmore, Yvonne Moore, Gladys Evans, 
Delores Kelly, Bill Knox, Betty Hogsett 

PROVISIONAL MEMBERS 

Mildred Hayes, Harold Rohr, Bob McDonald, Bob Howe, 
Bill Payne, Thurmon Frashure, Don Anthony, Betty Rude, 
Money Smith, Dick Slack, Dave Smith, Dorothy Jackson, 
Bill Truban, Roberta Berger, Charles Tunstall, Lewis 
Stout, John Lawson, Dick Bond, Tom Long, David Brown, 
George Hull. 



major projects of the year have been the 
cleaning of the well in the Spring House, 
participation in the Biological Conference at 
Marietta College and the science exhibit at 
the meeting of the Academy of Science. They 
have repaired the campus greenhouse, replac- 
ing many old articles, and they sponsored the 
Arbor Day Program presented in assembly. 
Each year a memorial tree is planted on the 
campus on Arbor Day. 




Page Nin> r>i-tn e 



OFFICERS 

Betty Hogsett President 

Virginia Anderson, 1st Vice-Pres. 

Joan Frame 2nd Vice-Pres 

Voljean Edinger Treasurer 

Margaret Cyphers -Rushing Chm 
Alda Wagner -Sociol Chm 

MEMBERS 

Christine Anderson 

Janet Anderson 

Lorraine Bodkin 

Virginia Bodkin 

Jean Burton 

Thelma Carpenter 

Virginia Cunningham 

Mary Jo Gee 

Ruth Hartsaw 

Kothryn Hornickel 

Mary Lawson 

Mildred Movers 

Patricia Pickens 

Dons Roder 
Alberta Robinson 

Betty Roush 

Carol Stalnaker 

Lucy Williams 

Patricia Winston 

Helen Young 

PLEDGES 

Peggy Lieving 

Alice Boone 

Betty Beer 

Bonnie Brown 

Betty Skaggs 

Joanne Vauqht 

Hazel Beall 
Mary Herrick 

Anne Casto 





rftft&a tfamma *De(ta 



Alpha Gamma Delta, formerly the Sigma Pi Delta 
local social sorority, made its debut on West Virginia 
Wesleyan's campus March 20, 1948, when the Alpha 
Omicron chapter was installed. 

The second national women's fraternity to be 
established at Wesleyan, (Alpha Gamma Delta), has 
as its colors red, buff, and green The flowers are 
red and buff roses. The ideals and aims are "to gain 
understanding that wisdom may be vouchsafed to 
me, to cultivate acquaintance with the many whom 
I meet; to honor my home, my country, and my 
religious faith; to hold truth inviolable, and sincerity 



and kindness essential; and to possess high ideals, 
seeking to attain somewhat unto them." 

The activities of the year began with the home- 
coming float portraying the "typical Wesleyan girl." 
The annual formal rush dinner, featuring a visit 
from the stork, at Mrs. Alonzo Miller's, was followed 
by a dance at the Upshur Building. Other activities 
have been a pledge dance for the girls and their 
dates, a bake sale, a marshmallow party given by 
the pledges, and a sunrise breakfast climaxed by all 
attending church together. 



Page Ninct »■*> > 




OFFICERS 

Charles Gardner President 

Larry Marquess Vice-President 

Richard Hopkins Treasurer 

Joseph Cul lings Corresponding Secretary 

Robert Gay Secretary 

Donald Martin Chaplain 

MEMBERS 



DeAlton Ambler 

Ronald Bishop 

Charles Brown 

Ricard Coleman 

Joe Douglas 

Robert Gainor 

Jack Hufham 

Edward Jackson 

Loren Karickhoff 

Harry Little 

David Martin 

Ralph Mickel 

William Post 

Eugene Ricketts 

Charles Tenney 

Charles McMullen 



Kenneth Blakeslee 
Tene Barrelli 
James Brown 
John Courtney 
Lyle Dunsmore 
George Grove 
Charles Hymes 
Alva Jones, Jr. 

Roy Kelley 

Conrad Lynch 

Charles Means 

William O. Phillips 

Edward Pugh 

John Stout 

Joseph Witek 

William Newbrough 



PLEDGES 



George Blackburn 

Edward Casey 

William Cross 

Thomas Crossan 

Jack Dartnall 

William Gaston 

Gus Feola 

Guy Hannah 

Howard Henderson 

Robert Hinkle 

Wayne Kile 



Harry Kincaid 
Joe Hutchinson 
Ralph Lashlev 

Blair Lottig 

Russell Queen 

Jennings Rittcr 

Charles Spencer 

Leslie Teets 

Payne Thorp 

Russell Vineyard 



rftfc/ia, Sifma 'PAc 



This national social fraternity was founded at Yale 
College in 1845, and it is now one of the oldest and 
largest Greek letter fraternities. 

Originally Chi Alpha Tau, a local fraternity on the 
Wesleyan campus, the group went national when it 
merged with Alpha Kappa Pi. Its merger in 1946 
with Alpha Sigma Phi put Wesleyan on the map with 
a great many of the oldest and largest colleges and 
universities across the country. The Alpha Sig colors 
are cardinal red and stone grey; the official flower 
is the talisman rose. 

Beta Nu chapter participated wholeheartedly at 
Homecoming by entering a skit in "Wesleyantics," 
building a float for the parade, extensively decorating 
their house, and its members served as guides. Dur- 
ing the year they gave a dance for the actives, held 



a pledge dance, a spring formal, and assembly. 
Their minstrel show in March made good use of the 
Alpha Sig musical talent. This show was presented 
in the local high school and in other schools through- 
out the state. 

Among the many Alpha Sigs who have made 
valuable contributions to the leadership on the Wes- 
leyan campus are Bob Gay, Business Manager of the 
1948 MURMURMONTIS, Eugene Ricketts, Playshop 
treasurer and member of the Publications Committee, 
Tene Borrelli, PHAROS sports editor and member of 
the Conduct Committee, Joe Witek, varsity football 
and baseball player and president of the Spanish 
Club, and Alva Jones, member of the Wesleyan Band 
and dance orchestra leader. 




Page Ninety-Bi v< n 




The Alpha Xi Delta fraternity was founded at 
Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois, in 1893 and was 
the first national sorority to be founded at West 
Virginia Wesleyan; its charter was granted in Octo- 
ber, 1947. 

Beta Sigma chapter began its activities with its 
installation in October and a semi-formal dance. At 
Homecoming, Alpha Xi Delta won first prize for its 
parade float; Mary Louise Coberly was Queen, and 
Marion Wickham, Mary Hadjis, and Alice Ross were 
attendants. A Homecoming tea was held for the visit- 
ing alumnae, and later a party was given for Sigma 
Pi Delta, then pledged Alpha Gamma Delta. In 
February, Alpha Xi held a Valentine's Dance and 
in May the traditional Rose Dance. 



Other members of Alpha Xi Delta have distin- 
guished themselves on our campus. Barbara Capet, 
Mary Hadjis, and Barbara Hinchelwood are cheer- 
leaders. Mary is also Treasurer of the Betty Lamp 
Club. Lena Flinn is Secretary of the Junior Class, 
Mary Louise Coberly is Co-Secretary of the Com- 
munity Council, Lois Clark is Secretary of the Pan- 
handle Club, and Hazel Shomo is President of the 
Women's House Governing Association and the Betty 
Lamp Club. Jean Simpson is Secretary of the Betty 
Lamp Club and Jane Wyncoop is Secretary of the 
Sophomore Class, Co-Secretary of the Community 
Council, and Secretary of the Women's Athletic 
Association. Nelle Selby, one of the 21 pledges, is 
Secretary of the Freshman Class. 



/tfyifa, *Xi Vdfa 



OFFICERS 

Mary Louise Coberly President 

Peg Dorsey Vice-President 

Jane Wyncoop Secretary 

Velmo Smith . „_____. ___ Treasurer 



ACTIVES 



Patty Bassel 

Dons Belcher 

Barbara Berthev 

Barbara Capet 

Lois Clark 

Sibley Coen 

Judy Conaway 

Lena Flinn 

June Gidley 

Mary Hadiis 

Barbara Hall 

Jane Hall 

Pat Hannah 

Doris Hinds 

Barbara Hinchelwood 



Evelyn Holloway 

Elizabeth Kor.ckhoff 

Leoma Linqer 

Phyllis Lovett 

Mary Ruth Marsh 

Alice Louise Ross 

Hazel Shomo 

Virginia Dee Smith 

Ann Stone 

Jane Swisher 

Jean Simpson 

Shirley Thomas 

Marion Wickham 

Virginia Withers 

Rose Ella Williams 



PLEDGES 



Louise Bailev 

Roberta Berger 

June Butler 

Sue Berrv 

Marion Aspinoll 

Christine Contos 

Peg Cross 

Polly Edmundson 

Helen Ferns 

Jane Herold 

Pat Hinkle 



Ruth Joyce 

Barbara Guess 

Mary Lee Kemper 

Norma Kenerson 

Louise Marshall 

Mary Jane Norris 

Melrose Perry 

Nelle Selbv 

Jean Smith 

Pat Wethered 




Page Ninety-eight 



Kappa Alpha, one of the original southern fra- 
ternities, bases its doctrine and teachings on the 
idea of the "perfect gentleman" as exemplified in 
the life of Robert E. Lee. The first chapter was 
established at Washington College, now Washington 
and Lee University, in 1865. The flowers of the 
order are the Crimson Rose and the Magnolia 
blossom. Its motto is "Dieu et les Dames" and the 
colors are crimson and old gold 



This year the chapter entered a skit in Wesley- 
antics, participated in all intra-mural sports, and 
sponsored a hay-ride, masquerade and theater par- 
ties, a semi-formal Christmas dance, Saint Patrick's 
day dance, and their annual Spring Formal. 

Charles Donley was co-captain of the varsity foot- 
ball team, Jim Morris is President of the Sophomore 
class, and John Wright was Treasurer of the Benzene 
Ring, as well as Chairman of the Inter-fraternity 
Council. 




^T<^£# rflfi&a 





OFFICERS 

John Wright President 

Lynn Terwi Niger Vice-President 

Arthur Goller Secretary 

Roland Piggford Treasurer 

MEMBERS: 

Dick Beveridge 

Joe Broyles 

Howard Brown 

Bill Chamberlain 

Jim Dennis 

Chuck Donley 

Tom Elder 

Charles Given 

Bob Herman 

Parker Holloway 

Tom Jones 

Ed Knight 

Tom Long 

Jim Miller 

Jim Morris 

Jim Nancarrow 

Dick Slack 

Dave Smith 

Ronald Terwillrger 

Vernon Wills 

Ben Wilson 

PLEDGES: 

H. Phillips 
Spongier 
Schroyer 

Scott 
Tetrick 
Newell 
Coniey 
Weigle 
Lewis 
Culpepper 
Villers 
Beazell 
T. Slack 

Boyd 
Gwennap 
Hastings 
Townsend 
Skinner 
Wood 
Stokum 



Page Ninety-mine 



OFFICERS 

Billy Ann Wally President 

Catherine Travis Secretary 

Mary Catherine White Treasurer 

Sue Johnson Social Chairman 

Pat Albright Prep Master 

Moxine Birckhead Chaplain 

MEMBERS: 

Geroldine Dowell 

Joy Giordono 

Vivian Johns 

Jane Rentchler 

Jean Johnson 

Jean Huffman 

Mary Francis Fallon 

Christine Shanaman 

Marion Ralston 

Kitty Snyder 

Marietta Blackburn 



PLEDGES: 



Mildred McCoy 
Jo Ann White 
Corinne Parkes 
Nancy Murdock 
Ann Robinson 

Betty Davis 

Barbara Grizzle 

Noma Marple 

Virginia Whitfield 

Helen Payne 

Betty Snyder 

Nancy Smith 

Anna Belle Phillips 

Jean Harris 

Janice Wilson 




'Kafifia rftfr&a Omeya 




Kappa Phi Omega, the only local sorority remain- 
ing on the campus, was organized in October, 1925. 
It was the second woman's group on the campus. 
Included among their aims are friendship and love 
toward every student, a broader spirit of democracy, 
and a high standard of scholarship. Their sorority 
colors are orchid and yellow and their flower is the 
yellow tea rose. 

At the beginning of the year a party was held in 
Dr. Hyma's apartment. Several coke parties followed 



and a work-fest, held by the president, Billy Ann 
Wally, preceded the rush party which centered 
around the Presbyterian church and the Lion's Den. 
A timely float, predicting the death of Waynesburg, 
was entered in the Homecoming Parade. A pledging 
ceremony was held at Mrs. J. E. Reger's Buckhannon 
home. 

The sorority was not fully active this year, but it 
expects to resume full activities at the beginning of 
the next school year. 




OFFICERS 

Harold Rohr President 

Kenneth Lawton Vice-President 

Keith Queen. ^ Secretary 

Brannon Hicks Treasurer 

ACTIVES: 

Lee Brochert 
James King --' 
Clifton Queen 
French Queen 
Lee Cosgrove * 
Edward Oldaker 

PLEDGES: 

Frank Fox 
William Laughlin 
Robert Sullivan 
Charles Tunstall 
Aaron Weinburg 
Wayne Wriston 



Sc^ma Sta 'Deita 



The Sigma Eta Delta local fraternity was founded 
on West Virginia Wesleyan's campus in 1925. It 
was very active until 1943 when it merged with what 
was then the Alpha Kappa Pi. In 1947 it was re- 
established as a local group and now has 10 actives 
and 6 pledges. This fraternity exists in order that a 
group of Wesleyan men, possessing kindred interests, 
may be united within the bonds of fellowship for 
their mutual and individual benefit. The official 
colors are red and white, and the flower is the red 
carnation. 



Members of Sigma Eta Delta have distinguished 
themselves in various ways since their re-organiza- 
tion. Lee Cosgrove is Treasurer of the Benzene Ring 
French Queen is on the debate team, and Harold 
Rohr, President of Sigma Eta Delta, is Treasurer of 
the Senior class. 

The fraternity was active in intra-mural sports 
and won the volleyball tournament. It also sponsored 
several "smokers" and a semi-formal dance in 
February. 




Patje One Hundi ■ d and On 




The Benzene Ring dates back to 1921 when it was 
founded to "create a greater interest in physical 
science, acquire a wider knowledge of its various 
branches, and to establish the scientific department 
of the College on a higher plane." 

It is recognized as being the oldest existent student 
organization on the campus and, in the 1 947-48 
school year, it was the largest organization on the 
campus, having one hundred and ten members. 

Initiation is held at the beginning of each 
school year. Membership is by invitation to those 



students majoring or minoring in chemistry and who 
maintain an "A" or "B" average. 

Meetings are held on the first and third Mondays 
of each school month. Distinguished speakers hold 
discussions and give lectures of an educational nature 
on the latest progress in scientific fields. 

Part of the program of the year is "Wesleyan on 
Parade," an all student program of talent which is 
presented to raise money for campus improvements. 
The "crowning of the camphor king" is another 
tradition sponsored by the Benzene Ring. 



MEMBERS 



Virginia Anderson 

Maurice Miller 

Lee Cosgrove 

Conrad Lynch 

Bill Phillips 

Gray Marsh 

Bill Payne 

Steve Smega 

Edward Cunningham 

John James 

Rick Coleman 

Lyle Dunsmoor 

Harry Barker 

Church Crawford 

Jim Dennis 

Barbara Guess 

George Hicks 

Delores Kelley 

Tom Long 

Bill Wolfe 

Bill Manser 

Earlo Pertz 

George Blackburn 

Harold Ashby 

Sibley Coen 

Norman Mclntyre 

Robert Patterson 

Ralph Mickoi 

Barbara Capet 

Charles Kinzer 

Bill Willis 

Bill Truban 

Earl Reel 

Virginia Reardon 

David Smith 
Robert Foernsler 

Cecil Wood 

Lewis Crawford 

Kenneth Blakeslee 

Jim Wertz 

Mary Francis Fallon 

Don Anthony 

Wayne Kile 

Delbert Hall 

Kenneth Davis 

Bill Newbrough 

Roberta Berger 

James Forbes 

Charles Taylor 

Charles Tunstall 

Bill Casto 

Robert Young 

Frank McKain 

Aldace Huffman 



Lynn Lewis 

Betty Rude 

Dorothy Jackson 

Kitty Snyder 

Hank Rohr 

Harold Riffe 

Ed Tierney 

Walter Simmons 

Eleanor Lewis 

George Groves 

Charles Given 

Tom Jones 

George Hull 

Russell Vineyord 

Richard Slack 

Bob McDonald 

Emmogene Smith 

Donald Rose 

Charles McMullen 

Bob Howe 

Jack Dartnall 

Bill Grave 
Bob Melohis 
Ronald Bishop 
Lewis Stout 
Jack Skinner 
Jack Matheny 

John Ours 
Mildred Haves 
Richard Bond 
Robert Conner 
Ray Hiteshew 

Bill Knox 
Charles Yurick 

Dick Walton 
John Marchines 
Elbert Linger 
Melba Linger 
David Brown 

Max Beall 

Nobert Lentz 

Donald Whiting 

Nancy Smith 

Jomes Gwmn 

Billy Ann Wally 

Tene Borreli 
Eugene Mitchell 
Sue Johnson 
Russel Wise 
Bob Garrett 
Alda Wagner 
Donald Sweeney 
Lewis Wetzel 
Bunell Clark 



OFFICERS: 

Donald Simons President 

Walter Fox Vice-President 

Jessie Butler Secretary 

John Wright Treasurer 

Professor Nicholas Hyma Sponsor 



^>e*t$ine ^ivty 




Page Ow Hundred <i><<i Tv o 



At a meeting early in the schoolyear plans were 
made for the plays, both the major and one act 
dramas, that were to be presented during the year. 
The first major play, "Lost Horizon," was presented 
in January. Martie Kursavich, Donald Martin, Carle- 
ton McKita, James Snedeker, Stanley Meyers, and 
Margaret Ann Cyphers were members of the main 
cast. 

"Bargains in Cathay," a play by Rachel Field, was 
presented in assembly and in several high schools 
in the vicinity of Wesleyan. Leads in this drama were 
played by Carleton McKita and Margaret Ann 
Cyphers. 



The annual commencement play was "The Barretts 
of Wimpole Street," by Bosier. In addition to acting, 
two meetings were devoted to the development of 
make-up technique. 

Associate members have performed notably this 
year, and the organization anticipates on even better 
year next year. Initiation of members who have 
completed entrance requirements took place the first 
week of May. 

All major plays have been directed by Miss Stella 
Ward, faculty head of the organization. Plays are 
chosen by Miss Ward in cooperation with the officers 
and members of the group. 






OFFICERS 

Jim Snedeker President 

Mary Hadjis Vice-President 

Yvonne Moore Secretary 

Eugene Ricketts Treasurer 

MEMBERS: 

Sue Johnson Larry Riley 

Jane Swisher Barbara Guess 

Betty Jo Hogsett Vivian Johns 

Dorothy Jackson Marty Kursavich 

Larry Marquess Lucille Matheny 

Darrell Shamblin Beverly Hill 

Maurice Miller Joe Douglas 

Parker Holloway Virginia Smith 

David DuBois Kenneth Blakeslee 

PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS: 

Corinne Parkes Lorene Fitzwater 

Joy Giordano Joan Hopkins 

Ray Cross Margaret Rankin 

Merle Barnes Warren Garner 

Corinna Hillman Bill Gwenap 

Patricia Hannah Betty Lantz 

Phyllis Lovett Jean Burton 

Vernon Wills Ann Casto 

Don Martin Dolores Rush 

Dae Ann Chilcote Ed Conley 
Margaret Ann Cyphers Carol Jean Stalnaker 

Wilbur Durbin William LoMar 

Robert Lindstedt Robert Horstman 

Carleton McKita Ted Hamilton 

Nancy Smith Mary Herrick 

Polly Edmundson Horry Leftwich 

Stanley Myers Raymond Moore 

Margaret Wagonner Charles Tunstall 

Dorothy Steinkraus Peggy Winnichuke 

JaneWyncoop Norman Friend 

Patricia Albright Donald Anthony 

Betty Snyder Virginia Withers 
Betty Cross ■ 



Page One Hundred and Three 



OFFICERS 

John Caswell President 

Margaret Ann Cyphers Vice-President 

Dorothy Steinkraus Secretary 

William Laughlin Treasurer 

MEMBERS: 



Corinna Hillman 

Connel Rodgers 

Alvin Crickard 

Irvin Conner 

Eldon Cuppet 

Lexie Redden 

Charles Roth 

Earl Dunn 

Robert Horstman 

Rachel Divers 

Carleton McKita 

Robert Dotson 

Agnes (Tenny) Payne 

Valjean Edinger 

Biddie Ann Hogan 

Betty Murphy 

Albert Tomer 

Kenneth Conant 

William Trowbridge 

Melvin Pritts 

Rosalia Stephens 

Jack Snyder 

Randall Stump 

Edith Logsdon 

Curtis Saville 

Betty-Jo Jacobs 

Corrme Parkes 

Howard Phillips 

David DuBois 

Howard Brown 

Maxine Birckhead 



Robert Lisensky 
Llorence Lough 
Arnold Akers 
Alonzo Harman 
Margaret Cook 
Norman Alters 
Edgar Hamilton 

John Cox 

Dorothy Phillips 

Charlotte Kirby 

Herbert Pennington 

Betty Kitchen 

William Crawford 

Charles Thompson 

Robert Engle 

Barbara Hinshelwood 

Peter Garabedian 

Barbara Somerville 

Vivian Johns 

Tolly Hanna 

Maurice Miller 

David Devev 

Helen Pavne 

Ruth Hartshaw 

Ben McKee 
Robert Schroyer 
True Spongier 
Howard Wilfong 
Patricia Shaffer 
Robert Home 




(?kii4tiaa S&wice ?ell<wv&6ifr 




The Christian Service Fellowship, an organization 
growing out of the Ministerial Association, was 
founded at Wesleyan in 1946. It was begun under 
the leadership of Dr. Brown and its former president, 
Charles Johnson. 

This year Dr. Brown is their sponsor and Professor 
Sidney Davis is acting as counselor. In this capacity, 
Professor Davis directs and advises the ministerial 
students in their activities in rural Methodist churches 
in surrounding areas. The purpose of the Fellowship 
is to unite on the campus all students who are pre- 
paring for full-time Christian service. They endeavor 
to develop all phases of the student's life and to 



render all possible services wherever they are needed. 

One main project of the year, a continuation from 
last year's program, has been to hold religious serv- 
ices in the wards at the State Hospital in Weston. 
However most of their work is located in rural 
churches where they hold regular services to aid the 
student pastors. Also they work with the young 
people of these local areas to develop active youth 
groups. 

Weekly meetings ore held in Brown Chapel which 
the group remodeled last year. These meetings are 
characterized by discussions and special lectures on 
various phases of Christian work and needs. 



Page Onr Hundred and Four 




OFFICERS 

Professor Franquiz Honorary President 

Charles Thompson President 

George McCune Vice-President 

Mrs. Ruth Young Secretary 

Bill Willis Treasurer 

John James Voting Representative 

MEMBERS: 

Kenneth Watkins 

David DuBois 

Edward Crow 

Wallace Knight 

James Snedeker 

Parker Holloway 

Maurice Miller 

Professor Rice 

Dean Hupp 

Professor Brown 



*Pi Sfi&iltot 7&eta 



Wesleyan's chapter of the Philosophical fraternity, 
the first to be founded in West Virginia, was organ- 
ized in 1947 and was formally initiated April 20, 
1948. This fraternity strives to encourage the spirit 
of philosophical study, among students, both in and 
out of the classroom, and to emphasize the value of 
voluntary discipline in serious inquiry. The motto, 
"Through wisdom to love of God," serves as a guide 
to the fraternity members. 

All members of the fraternity must be Philosophy 
students who have maintained at least a "B" average 
in related courses. Another requirement is the writing 
of some philosophical paper which may be completed 
as part of a course of study. 



The main activities of the year have consisted of 
meetings at which discussions on designated subjects 
are held. Topics for discussion are frequently taken 
from "The Personalist," a philosophical review pub- 
lished by the University of Southern California. 
Subscriptions to this magazine were presented to the 
members of the fraternity this year. 

In November, a meeting of the entire West Vir- 
ginia society, which is affiliated with the Academy 
of Science, was held at Wesleyan with the local 
group acting as host. Professors and students from all 
schools in the state came to hold discussions on 
various topics and to make a survey of conditions 
concerning philosophical study over the State. 




Page One Hundred and Five 




The Women's Athletic Association was organized 
to increase recreational opportunities for Wesleyan 
Women. Its membership is open to all women 
students. 

It is one of the largest and most active organiza- 
tions on the campus. Meetings are held twice a 
month, one being a business meeting and the other 
a recreational one. 



Activities of this organization include: the annual 
week-end trips to Jackson's Mill, a Christmas party 
at which gifts are brought and distributed by the 
Girl Scouts among the unfortunate children of the 
town, a progressive party, a snow hike, picnics, and 
the presentation of the May Day program. The 
association is interested in furthering intramural 
sports and in promoting the physical welfare of 
women students. 



IV omen 4, rftMettc rfteactatiaa 



OFFICERS: 

Velma Smith President 

Fern Chnstofel Vice-President 

Jane Wyncoop Secretary 

Gladys Evans Treasurer 

Miss Charlotte Knepshield Sponsor 

MEMBERS: 

Christine Anderson Mary Ellen Lawson 

Virginia Anderson Peggy Lieving 

Lucille Bailey Patty Rae Lough 

Patty Bassel Phyllis Lowe 

Betty Beer Norma Marple 

Sue Berry Mary Ruth Marsh 

Maxine Birckhead Louise Marshall 

Alice Boone Peggy Martin 

Jean Burton Esther Mason 

Jesse Butler Lucille Matheny 

June Butler Judy McWhorter 

Barbara Capet Mildred Moyers 

Cecile Case Nancy Murdock 

Julia Cheng Corinne Parkes 

Mary Clelland Helen Payne 

Mary Louise Coberly Melrose Perry 

Christine Contos Anna Bell Phillips 

Betty Cross Sally Pierce 

Peggy Cross Dons Jean Post 

Betty Cunningham Marion Ralston 

Wanda Cutright Margaret Rankin 

Valjean Edinger Jane Rentchler 

Polly Edmundson Ann Robinson 

Myro Eskew Betty Roush 

Helen Farns Nancy Roush 

Lorene Fitzwater Shirleen Satterfield 

Betty Foster Jane Shuttleworth 

Mary Jo Gee Virginia K. Skaggs 

Jane Gidley Nancy Smith 

Mary Hodjis Dorothy Snowden 

Barbara Hall Betty Snyder 

Jane Hall Carol Jean Stalnaker 

Ann Harrison Ann Stone 

Mildred Haves Helen Stuck 

Jane Herold Agnes Tenney 

Mary Herrick Shirley Thomas 

Doris Hinds Janice Joan Tnnkle 

Barbara Hinshelwood Alda Wagner 

Betty Jo Hogsett Joan White 

Kate Hornickel Marion Wickham 

Marty Hunt Doris Williams 

Betty Jo Jacobs Lucy Lee Williams 

Jean Johnson Hollace Wilson 

Dolores Kelly Patricia Winston 

Norma Kennerson Susie Young 

Betty Lantz Patricia Pickens 




Page One Hundred and Bits 



The Morris Showkey chapter of the Future 
Teachers of America is open to all students who are 
preparing to teach. It is the fifth chapter in the state 
of West Virginia and was founded at West Virginia 
Wesleyan College in 1941. 

The purposes of the organization are to study 
educational problems and to develop an active in- 



terest in the teaching profession. Dr. James L. Hupp 
is sponsor of the chapter. 

Projects of the organization have been observance 
of American Education week, the study of teachers' 
goals to interest more people in becoming teachers, 
the organizing of a high school F.T.A., a banquet 
with an outside speaker, and other noted speakers 
each month. 




^utufie 7eac&e%4> o£ rfittcuea 




OFFICERS: 

Catherine Travis President 

William Wagner Vice-President 

Thelma Carpenter Secretary 

Mary Clelland Treasurer 

Fern Christofel Program Chairman 

Willis Triplett Librarian 

MEMBERS: 

Sally Anderson Betty Hogsett 

Doris Belcher Jean Huffman 

Marguerite Bassel Joseph Huntz 

Rubert Bennett Robert Hupp 

Maxine Birckhead Betty Jacobs 

Lena Bodkin Sue Johnson 

Ivory Boggs Mary Lawson 

George Brooks Phyllis Lovett 

Rector Brown Earl Marquess 

Mary Coberly Peggy Martin 

Julia Conawav Bobbie Morris 

Thomas Crossan Melrose Perry 

Helen Dorsey William Pugh 

Gladys Evans Alberto Robinson 

Marquerite Floyd Hazel Shomo 

Lorraine Fitzwater Velma Smith 

Willard Forinash Ann Stone 

Peter Garobedian John Stout 

Barbara Grizzle Curtis Srewsberry 

Melvin Harold Jane Swisher 

John Hebb Marion Wickham 

Mary Hefner Ruth Young 
George Hicks 



Page One Hundred and Seven 



OFFICERS 

Hazel Shomo President 

Barbara Guess Vice-President 

Jean Simpson Secretary 

Mary Hadjis Treasurer 

Lorraine Bodkin Program Chairman 

MEMBERS 

Patricia Hannah 
Patricia Bossel 

Melba Linger 

Delores Kelley 

Sue Johnson 

Peggy Lieving 

Christine Anderson 

Phyllis Lovett 

Betty Roush 

Mary Jo Gee 

Bonnie Brown 

Mary Herrick 

Geraldine Dowell 

Mary Fallon 

Phyllis Lowe 

Ruth Joyce 

Alda Wogner 

Barbara Berthy 

Jane Wyncoop 

Melrose Perry 

Helen Farns 

Virginia Whitfield 

Lena Flinn 

Anne Casto 

Julia Cheng 

Patricia Hinkle 

Virginia Cunningham 

Patricia Winston 




Setttf JleuKfr gtcd 




A chapter of the national American Home Eco- 
nomics Association, the Betty Lamp Club takes its 
name from a type of lamp used by pioneer house- 
wives. 

This organization is composed of members major- 
ing or minoring in Home Economics. It was estab- 
lished for the purpose of interesting girls in home 
economics and to provide social and professional aid. 
Meetings are held once a month at the Home 
Economics Cottage. 



The Betty Lamp Club has been active in sponsor- 
ing a special social affair in the Home Economics 
Cottage for Freshmen and transfer students. May 
held the most outstanding event of the year when 
the annual Mother-Daughter Banquet was served. 
At that time, the new officers for the following year 
were installed and recognition was given the senior 
members. Miss Gladys Cronemeyer acts as advisor 
for the group. 



Vagt One Hundred "<<f( Eight 




OFFICERS: 

Barbara Guess President 

Judy Conaway Vice-President 

Mildred Barkley Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS: 

Virginia Smith 

Mary Coberly 

Hazel Sherwood 

Jane Swisher 

Lena Flinn 

Jean Simpson 

Mary Hadjis 

Fern Chnstofel 

Patricia Albright 

Dorothy Steinkraus 

Joan Frame 

Doris Hinds 



*%auy6t *&(t&uwh Society 



Established in 1925 in honor of Dr. Thomas W. 
Haught, professor emeritus and college historian, 
this organization is limited to sixteen girls from the 
upper classes who are interested in the literary arts. 
Graduating members name their successors to the 
organization. 

The society's aims are to study literature and to 



encourage intelligent criticism of letters and life. It 
also fosters the appreciation of literature and creative 
writing on the campus. 

At each weekly meeting a discussion on a certain 
author is lead by a guest speaker or a member of 
the club. That week a quotation from his works is 
given by each girl in lieu of an answer to roll call. 




Page Om Hundred and Nine 




THE WESLEYAN PHAROS, published semi- 
monthly by the undergraduates of the College, is the 
student newspaper. This year, as in previous years, 
the staff has sought to report clearly and accurately 
the significant campus activities so that Wesleyan 
students may keep themselves informed about their 
school. 

The editor and the business manager are appointed 
by the Publications Committee on the basis of appli- 



cants' journalistic experience, their schoolwork, and 
their interest in the PHAROS. The editor and the 
business manager select their own staffs from among 
those students interested in gaining journalistic 
experience. 

The highlight of the 1947-48 schoolyear's activities 
was an April Fool edition of the PHAROS. It came as 
a complete surprise to the entire campus — including 
most of the PHAROS staff members. 



*7^e 'P&arute 



PHAROS STAFF 

Editor Pat Kent 

News editor Beverly Hill 

Sports editor Tene Borrelli 

Make-up editor Tom Jones 

Society editor Joan Hopkins 

Feature editor Betti Whitesel I 

Reporters — Ben Wilson, Edgar Hamilton, 
Julia B. Cheng, Darrell Shamblin, 
Margaret Rankin, Parker Holloway, 
Barbara Hall, Jane Swisher, Fern 
Christofel, Charles "Moon" McMullen, 
and John Courtney 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager James Miller 

Assistants Jean Harris, Joy Giordano 

Circulation manager Sue Johnson 

Faculty Advisor_ __.__Dr. Samuel Small 




Fage One Hundred and Ten 



Looking bock through this '48 MURMURMONTIS 
as we go to press, we note with dismay how far we've 
strayed from the perfectionistic ideals with which we 
undertook this task. Like most of our contemporaries 
unfamiliar with printing techniques, engraving pro- 
cesses, editorial methods, and the like, we accepted 
our task in the naive belief a yearbook practically 
makes itself — all we had to do was sort the pictures 
as they accumulated and "goo" them, not too 
sloppily, in some kind of order. Somehow we'd con- 
fused "yearbook" with "scrapbook." 



Of course we eventually caught on; then, face to 
face with the enormity of our task, we realized we'd 
have to compromise with ourselves on our perfection- 
ism if we were to get out a book at all. Consequently 
we limped along as best we could with what co- 
operation, equipment, and assistance we could com- 
mand. Lest all this sound too apologetic, take note 
of this parting shot: next year is another year and 
YOU will have the opportunity to make the 1949 
MURMURMONTIS everything you think a yearbook 
should be. Our blessings rest upon you. 




t94% t 7Hwwtwwt<Mti4, 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Tom Crossan Editor 

Charles R. Knapp Faculty Advisor 

Vivian Johns Organizations Editor 

Virginia Anderson .Organizations Assistant 

Barbara Hall Organizations Assistant 

Peggy Cross Highlights Editor 

Joy Giordano Highlights Assistant 

Sue Johnson — Classes and Student Roster 

Editor. 
Mary Lawson— Classes and Student Roster 

Assistant. 

Virginia Reardon Classes Assistant 

Bill Goodwin Varsity Sports Editor 

Darrell Shamblin_lntra-mural Sports Editor 

Velma Smith Women's Sports Co-editor 

Fern ChristofeL .Women's Sports Co-editor 

John Glauner Photography Co-editor 

Jim Morris Photography Co-editor 

Corinna Hillman Art Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Bob Gay Business Manager 

E. Kidd Lockard Faculty Advisor 

Loren Karickhoff Advertising Manager 

Gene Ricketts Advertising Assistant 

Bill Phillips Advertising Assistant 

Charles Hymes Advertising Assistant 

Jean Harris Advertising Assistant 

Shirley Thomas Advertising Assistant 

Betty Cunningham Circulation Manager 

Pat Hannah Circulation Assistant 

Myrt Blackburn Circulation Assistant 

Bill Post Circulation Assistant 

Barbara Hall Circulation Assistant 

Barbara Guess Publications Manager 



Page One Hundred and Eleven 




*7&c ^aneL 



The Wesleyan Band, formed to provide 
color and spirit at athletic events, and to 
permit study of the best music for the con- 
cert band, functions under the direction of 
C. Buell Agey. During the year it played at 
most of the football games and at the outdoor 
festivities during Homecoming Weekend. The 
band gained new prestige by winning a silver 
cup as a reward for being the best marching 
unit in the parade. Three Majorettes and two 
active Drum Majors also gave grace to our 
group. 

When Basketball season came around, the 
band appeared again, playing for several 
games. At various times the group was con- 
ducted by members of the class in Directing 



MEMBERS 

Jack Snyder Drum Major 

Carol Stalnaker Majorette 

Pattie H inkle Majorette 

Lucille Bailey Majorette 

• 

Thelma Carpenter, John Carpenter, Jane Cook, Martha 
Hunt, Pattie Lough, Pat Lamar, John Tucker, Anna 
Young, Charles Given, Darrell Shamblin, Norman Friend, 
William Gwennap, Thomas Slack, Thomas Jones, Charles 
Wolfe, George Weigle, Russel Wise, Alva Jones, Ray- 
mond Moore, Edward Crow, Lorene Fitzwater, Joan 
Frame, William Hastings, Richard Gregory, Pat Pickens, 
Joe King, Jack Simmons, John Stout, Carol Stalnaker, 
John Glauner, Robert Horstman, Dick Lawson, Don 
Martin, Jack Matheny, Willis Triplett, Harry Little, 
Charlotte Agey 



which was studying under Professor Agey. 

A good spirit of cooperation between the 
band and the cheer-leaders was shown and 
many events were heralded by the strains of 
"Here's To Old Wesleyan" and "West Vir- 
ginia Wesleyan." Some of the members were 
students of instrumental music but many of 
them play for pleasure alone. 

A successful season has prompted Mr. Agey 
to begin preparations for next year. The main 
feature of the preparation so far has been the 
purchase of new uniforms in the gay colors of 
the "Bobcat" orange and black. These uni- 
forms follow the style of the "battle jacket" 
and include a hat patterned after the hat of 
a flight officer. 



Page One Hundred and Twelve 



Under the direction of our new professor 
of music, Charles W. Forlines, the Wesleyan 
a capella Choir began the 1947-48 schoolyear 
by presenting a special anthem in the chapel 
services held each Tuesday morning in Atkin- 
son Chapel. The first full concert was not 
given, however, until the Thanksgiving holi- 
day, when a successful program was sung. 

During the first semester, the Choir moved 
from its accustomed spot in the balcony to 
occupy a prominent place on the stage at 
many of the religious services. During the 
Christmas season, a special concert was sung 
for the public. This service was carried out 
by candlelight, and was repeated next day 
in chapel. 

With the second semester came intensive 
preparation for the annual tour of the Choir. 
On Palm Sunday a sacred concert was pre- 



MEMBERS 

(Sopranos) 

Doris Belcher, Mary Hernck, Marilyn Lawson, Dolores Rush, 
Jane Swisher, Esther Mason, Barbara Chaffee, Connna Hillman, 
Kathryn Snyder, Ellen Roush, Betty Daws, Elizabeth Kanckhoff, 
Julio McWhorter, Shirleen Satterfield, Jo Ann Vaught, Dorothy 
Stein kraus, Polly Edmundson, Biddy Ann Hogan, Eugenie 
Umpstead, Helen Forns, Jean Johnson, Dorothy Phillips, Dorothy 
Snowden, Margaret Waggoner, Jean Borrer, Myra Eskew, Sue 
Johnson, Betty Skaggs. 

(Altos) 

Joan Frame. Edith Logsdon, Cortnne Parkes, Margaret Winni- 
chuke, Gladys Evans, Leoma Linger, Pat Pickens, Julia High, 
Lucille Matheny, Barbara Summerville, Martha Hunt, Lorene 
Fitzwater, Rachel Shaver, Judy Conaway, Gladys McQuain, 
Betty Kitchen, Pat Albright, Yvonne Moore, Betty Snyder. 

(Tenors) 

Richard Beveridge, John James, Robert Horstman, William 
Laughlin, Jomes Snedeker, Charles Thompson, Eldon Cuppett, 
Thomas Darnall, Ralph Mickel, Robert Voile, 
David DuBois, Tally Hanna, Flons Davisson, 
Maurice Miller, John Stout. 

(Basses) 

Howard Davis, Parker Holloway, George Weigle, Marvin Tinkle, 
Edward Crow, Don Welshon, Wilbur Durbin, Darrell Shamblin, 
Clayton Leftwich, Carleton McKito, Herbert Mercer, Stanley 
Elder, Foster Starcher, Bill Phillips, Edwin Conley, John Tucker. 



Preston Redden, 
Edgar Hamilton, 



sented, featuring the Women's Trio, the 
Orphenian Male Quartet, and the singing of 
several numbers which were to be a part of 
the tour program These concerts were pre- 
sented by the entire group, seventy in all. 

A picked choir, numbering thirty-five, 
travelled for a week over portions of the Tri- 
Stote area, leaving the College on Easter 
Monday. They appeared in both churches and 
high schools, and the programs included 
selected sacred and secular music. 

On April 1 8, the Choir conducted the morn- 
ing service in the First Methodist Church, 
Buckhannon, rendering their regular tour pro- 
gram. On the second of May, they appeared 
in Clarksburg and in Parkersburg. The final 
presentation of the Choir in the 1947-48 
schoolyear came in May when the group sang 
at the Baccalaureate Service for the '48 Class. 



T4e (2A&Oi 




4 



cooao v ^Qot)2 q 




Paye One Hundred and TMrteen 



rfttteniccut (^uiid o£ C%ya*U4t& 




The Guild is a national organization with 
headquarters in New York City. It has a dual 
purpose, one of which is improving church 
music. The other, and probably more import- 
ant, is the promotion of the organ as a 
concert instrument. 

Local chapters are located in nearly all 
American cities and are connected through- 
out the country with many music schools, 
conservatories, and colleges stressing music. 
In the Wesleyan chapter, meetings are held 
at which musical programs intended to further 
these purposes are presented. 

The membership is composed of Buck- 
hannon organists and students studying organ 
in the College. 



OFFICERS 

Mrs. Ruth Ross Dean 

Professor Charles Forlines Sub-Dean 

Mrs. Frederick Arnold Secretary 

Mrs. Allen Hamner Treasurer 

• 

MEMBERS 

Shirleen Satterfield, Fern Christofel, Mrs. Royden 

Caught, Helen Dorsey, Gladys Evans, Professor Bartley, 

Darrell Shamblin, Mrs. Joseph Clayton. 

• 

Mrs. Eleanor Williams Honorary Member 



Page One Hundred and Fourteen 



*7^e OicAetttcL 




Also under the direction of Professor C 
Buell Agey, the Wesleyan Orchestra has be- 
come an important part of the College music 
appreciation program. Emphasis in their work 
is placed on interpretation and execution of 
a high grade of symphonic literature. The 
organization affords a splendid medium for 
subjective art experience. 

The activities of the Orchestra are varied; 



MEMBERS 

• 

Julio High, Harry Little, Victor Norris, Carol Stalnaker, 
Thomas Slack, John Tucker, John Glauner, Mary 
Herrick, William Townsend, Anna Young, Pat Pickens, 
Helen Fischer, Grace Thompson, Roland Piggford, 
Richard Lawson, Edward Crow, Pat Lamar, George 
Weigle, John Stout, Russel Wise, Betty Skoggs, 
Charlotte Agey. 



they include formal concerts, assembly pro- 
grams, and other performances in corrobora- 
tion with the choral and dramatic societies 
on the campus. Since the advent of the radio 
station in Weston, with studios on the Wes- 
leyan campus, the Orchestra — or portions of 
it — have been featured on many programs. 
They have also appeared on other stations 
in surrounding towns to represent Wesleyan. 



Page "«- Hundred >t"d Fifteen 



'piettcA &tu& 




The French Club was introduced on the 
campus this year with the purpose of pro- 
moting the study of the French language 
and a love for French literature and culture. 

Members of the society are chosen from 
students who are taking, or have taken, 
French. In their bi-monthly meetings they 
sing, play games, read, hear lectures, and 
learn French habits, customs, and colloquial 
expressions. In addition, an effort is made to 
stimulate interest in other foreign languages. 



MEMBERS 

John Mazzei President 

Peggy Cross Secretary 

Shirley Thomas Treasurer 

• 

Richard Bond, Barbara Capet, Mary Anne Clark, James 
Dean, Barbara Hall, James Hall, George Hull, Don 
Kelly, Larry Marquess, Grey Marsh, Bill Newbrough, 
Paul Smith, Virginia Withers, Leslie Watkins, Julia 
Cheng, Jim Brown, Melrose Perry, Larry Riley. 



Page o>tr Hundred and Sixtt i n 



S fronted @tu& 



The Spanish Club was founded this year 
to increase interest in the Spanish language. 

At the bi-monthly meetings the members 
enjoy interesting programs designed to inform 
as well as entertain, and to promote good 
will toward our neighbors in the southern 
hemisphere. 

Dr. and Mrs. McKee are the sponsors and 
organizers and have done much to foment 
interest. They have presented lectures from 
time to time on phases of Spanish literature, 
music, history, and customs. Mrs. McKee, a 
concert soprano, has also taught the club 
members many songs and games. 




MEMBERS 

Joe Witek President 

Joan Trinkle Secretary 

Loren Karickhoff Treasurer 

• 

Don Anthony, Joy Giordano, Lee Borchert, Barbara Hall, 

James King, French Queen, Alice Schall, 

Christine Shannaman. 



Paye One Hundred and Seventt • ri 



rfmateun ^adia @lu& 




Under the sponsorship of Professor William 
Hallam, the Radio Club was organized in 
October, 1946. Professor Hallam, vitally inter- 
ested in radio himself, encourages all persons 
interested in radio to join the group. 

Weekly meetings are held on Wednesdays 
at which the members work on radio sets and 
study code and other phases of amateur 
broadcasting. Their purpose is to develop an 
interest in amateur radio, helping members 
to obtain their amateur radio licenses under 
the Federal Communications Commission 
regulations. A few of the members of the 
club are active in the new radio station set 
up in Weston, with studios in the College, 
early in the second semester. 

The group is now working to set up an 
amateur station in which the whole club 
may participate. 



OFFICERS 

Bill Wolfe President 

John James Vice-President 

Noncy Smith Secretary-Treasurer 

• 

MEMBERS 

Stan Elder, Bill Goodwin, Ivory Boggs, Ray Cross, 
Don Sweeney. 



Page One Hundred and Eighteen 



Jlam&tla V^eta Tftcc 



This local fraternity was founded on the 
Wesleyan campus in 1944. Membership is 
limited to the foodhandlers working in Agnes 
Howard Hall. They have organized to seek 
the best possible working conditions and to 
form a unit for social activities. It is con- 
sidered an honorary organization. 

The main events of the year for this group 
consisted of a Valentine party at the residence 
of Ed Crow, the daily "coffee club" and song 
fest, and a waiter's banquet at the end of 
the year to give some of the girls a chance 
to serve the waiters. 




OFFICERS 

Charles Crawford President 

Joan Frame Vice-President 

Maurice Miller Secretary-Treasurer 

Edward Crow Historian 

MEMBERS 

Robert Herman, Bob McDonald, Williom Gwennap, 
Raymond Moore, Parker Hollowoy, Eldon Cuppett. 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Ed Conley, Alexander Villers. 



Page One Hundred and Nineteen 




Students from the northern panhandle of 
the state of West Virginia compose the mem- 
bership of this active social organization. In 
addition to its primary social function, the 
group exists to promote the interests of 
Wesleyan in the northern panhandle. 

There is an alumni panhandle group in 
Wheeling. At Christmas the two groups held 
a Christmas party at the YMCA in Wheeling. 
Board of Trustees President, Mr. Clyde O. 
Law of Wheeling, is sponsor of the club. 



P<z*t&aacUe (?lo& 



OFFICERS 

Gladys Evans President 

Jim Snedeker Vice-President 

Lois Clark Secretary 

Walter Wise Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Russell Wise, Mildred McCoy, Barbara Guess, Betty Jo 
Jacobs, Mary Hadjis, Edwin Cunningham, Tom Slack, 
Richard Slack, Donald Welshon, William Willis, John 
James, David DuBois, William Chamberlain, Marion 
Wickham, Merle Barnes, Edith Logsdon, Jean Burton, 
Bob Hastman, Victor Wood, Charles Brown. 




Page One Hundred and Twenty 



OFFICERS 

Fern Christofel President 

Vivian Johns Vice-President 

Ted Hami Iton Secretary 

MEMBERS (Those Pictured) 

Don Rose, McQuaine Brown, Jack Snyder, Ben Wilson, 
Eugene Ricketts, Tom Crossan, Kitty Snyder, Jock 
Skinner, Dae Anne Chilcote, Mildred Hayes, Jane 
Shuttleworth, Virginia Whitfield, Melrose Perry, Jane 
Wyncoop, Alda Wagner, Mary Herrick, Jessie Butler, 
Billie Wally. 



This group, whose membership is composed 
of those students and members of the Faculty 
native to Pennsylvania, exists to promote 
Wesleyan's interests in the Keystone State as 
well as to bring together Pennsylvanians 
interested in planning social activities for the 
benefit of both the group itself and the 
campus community at large. 

Only loosely organized this past year, no 
list of members was kept, but approximately 
75 persons attended a "weiner roast" held 
in the City Park at the beginning of the 
first semester. 



^Te^eWe @lot& 





Page One Hundred and Twenty-one 



OFFICERS 

Bob Brannon President 

John Riley Vice-President 

Jim Hall Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

James Wertz 

Lee Fisher 

Zane Perkey 

Carl Lyon 

Jack Lyon 

Cecil Wood 

Ray Strother 

Charles Spelsburg 

Harold Ellis 

Floris Davisson 

Pete Shaffer 

Pete Wetzel 

Lewis Case 

William Puqh 

Rector Brown 

Neil Moron 

Gabnei Kalafat 

Richard Walters 

Earlo Pertz 

Eldon Mailing 

Robert Howes 

Larry White 

Harold Haddox 

William Starkey 

Emil Switzer 

Edward Tierney 

James Cam 

George Hull 

Lewis Crawford 

John Flynn 

Clarence Dawkins 

Kenneth Davis 

Joseph Keener 




P6oe*U% gtcd 




The Phoenix Club, a male social organiza- 
tion formed to promote fellowship among its 
members here on the campus and after 
graduation, was organized in October, 1947. 
Their aim is to take active part, as a group, 
in all phases of campus activity. 

They began the year by entering a float in 
the Homecoming Parade. This was followed 
by the participation of two active teams in 
the intramural basketball tournament; these 
teams tied each other for top honors during 
the season. On March 5th, the Club sponsored 
an all-campus dance at the Buckhannon 
Lion's Club den. This activity proved to be a 
very bright spot in the campus program. 



Club meetings are held on the second and 
third Tuesdays of each month. They are a 
non-fraternity group and are recognized as a 
full-fledged organization on the campus by 
the Community Council. Several of their 
members are well known on the campus — 
among them, "Sac" (Jim) Hall, the campus 
Kilroy. President of the Community Council 
Bill Pugh, and Bob Brannon, radio announcer 
and star of the Senior musical, "New 
Orleans," are also among the well-known 
members. Many of the men on the basketball 
squad and two of the football stars appear 
on the membership roster of this organization 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-two 




OFFICERS 

George Brandli President 

Edgar Hamilton Vice-President 

Bill Goodwin Vice-President 

Herbert Pennington Secretary 

Thomas Crosson Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Robert Coburn 

Charles Crawford 

Edward Crow 

Stanley Elder 

James Forbes 

Warren Garner 

Tally Hanna 

Melvin Harold 

James Miller 

Donald Vunkannon 

Dathan Whitman 

Jack Wilson 

ASSOCIATES 

Joseph Broyles 

Thurman Frashure 

LeJeune Lewis 

Robert Lindstedt 

Benton McKee 

David Martin 

Jack Snyder 

FACULTY 

President Scarborough 

Dean Hupp 

Professor Reemsnyder 

Professor Shaver 



Senun Scouts 



In April, 1947, a small group of students, who were once 
active Boy Scouts, got together and decided to form a campus 
chapter of the national Scout fraternity, the Alpha Phi Omega. 
Led by Jack Snyder, the group took a census of the student body 
and found that 1 52 men had at one time been Scouts. Of this 
number, three were Eogle Scouts, the highest rank in Boy 
Scouting. 

The national headquarters of the fraternity sent, in May, 
material for the group to build a chapter on the campus, but 
since the end of the schoolyear was so near only a small 
beginning was accomplished at that time. When the College 
opened again in September the group continued its efforts to 
attain the membership required to activate the chapter. When, 
at length, the group found it was unable to achieve this quota 
due primarily to the financial obligation required, it was decided 
to waste no more time in an inactive status. On December 3, 
1947, it was moved and passed that the potential campus 
chapter of the Alpha Phi Omega fraternity dissolve and reorganize 
in the senior scouting category of the Scout Movement. 

With the help of District Commissioner Thurman Frashure, 
it was decided the group could best organize itself as a Scout 
Explorer Post. In April, 1948, the group received its national 



post charter in which it was officially designated as the West 
Virginia Scout Explorer Post No. 129. 

Early last summer, two members of the embryo organization, 
Bill and Harvey Brown, went to aquatic school in Ohio for five 
weeks. They were qualified there to work as life guards and 
swimming instructors, in which capacity they served through the 
summer at the West Virginia Scout Camp. Two other members, 
Mel Harold and Jack Snyder, attended the Crippled Children's 
Camp at Camp Horseshoe where they served as instructors and 
counselors. 

During this schoolyear the organization sponsored o dance 
at the Student Union after one of the football gomes, and in 
January they held an evening of games and dancing also at the 
Student Union. A substantial amount of the decorating for the 
St. Patrick's Day dance was done by the group. The College 
weekly bulletins ore distributed regularly by members of the 
Explorer Post. 

Two of the members, Lejeune Lewis and Bob Lindstedt, serve 
as Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster, respectively, of the 
local Boy Scout troops. Thurman Frashure is District Commis- 
sioner of Upshur County. Jack Snyder is one of only two 
registered Chaplains in West Virginia. 




Page One Hundred and Twenty-three 



Tracing only superficially the unmarked passageway laid 
out by the unnumbered schoolyears journeying through Time 
in minute-measured precision out of the future, through the 
present, thence into the lost, unremembered, infinite past, 
the 1947-48 schoolyear seems one with those it has followed. 
It is one only seemingly, however; the skillful, busy brush of 
Change, working tirelessly, subtly, has made the year unique 
for those of us from whose lives the seconds and minutes of 
this year were mined by the flooding tides. 

We'll remember the year for its being more than a cease- 
less succession of weary days and endless nights; often, 
perhaps, it was only that, but more often, it was an intense, 
throbbing, living thing that lifted our hearts with its courage, 
its cry of hope in the darkness. We'll remember the year not 
for its total impression — few will stop to tally it in that 
sense — , but we will hoard among our memories its high- 
lights which we see in retrospection as the climbing crests of 
the surging wavelets breasting the great time-river moving 
the year out into the lost, unshored sea of Time past. 

(Ed. note: Those unfamiliar with the mechanical processes 
of yearbook composition may question the inclusion of some 
1946-47 schoolyear pictures while some of this year's signifi- 
cant events have gone unpictured. The answer is simply this: 
an annual scheduled for delivery in May cannot include 
pictures taken after mid-February due to the long interval 
required to complete the mechanical processes between 
taking the pictures and delivering the finished engravings 
to the printer. As a result, either events occurring after mid- 
February go unpictured entirely or, as in this case we have 
done, those pictures are carried over to the following year's 
annual.) 




(famfeccb *i¥igMCy6t4> o£ 




Pagi On* Hundred and Ttvi nty-si c 




Pago One Hundred and Twenty-seven 




Paye One Hundred and Twenty-eight 




Page One Hundred and Tuxufy-nine 




Page One Hundred and Thirty 




PageOm Hundred and Tlvirty-one 




Page On< Hundred and Th irty-two 




Page One Hundred and Thii ty-thret 




/■rf.i- One Hundred and Thirty-lour 




Page One Hundred and Thirty-five 



". . . there is time there. (Have we not heard strange time, 
dark time, strange tragic time there? Have we not heard 
dark time, strange time, the dark, the moving tide of time 
as it flows down the river?)" 

Its short course run, the 1947-48 schoolyear is now 
blended imperceptibly into the vast, void, rising sea of Time 
past, Time lost, Time forever beyond. Not an hour, a minute, 
a tiny, infinitesimal second shall ever return to do our 
bidding. It is all irrevocably lost, all forever-gone. 

And yet, who can deny the memories, the faint tracings 
of the flood's tide-morks, left behind by the year as it was 
swept relentlessly seaward? Are not these present evidences 
tangible assurance the year is not entirely gone — that some 
of it will live forever with us? Surely Change will not com- 
pletely disavow all this — surely Time will not erode these 
tracings so thoroughly as to leave us nothing of this year; 
some parts of it will surely remain indissolubly within us. 
And yet, yet: 

". . . in the night time, in the dark there, in all the sleep- 
ing silence of the earth have we not heard the river, the rich 
immortal river, full of its strange dark timei 3 " 




Studwt gotten and rfcLuen£i<b&i& fan 



7<£e &t*M o{ 194% 



BELCHER, DORIS LEE 

Kimball 

Music 

American Guild of Organists, Future Teachers of 

America, Choir, Alpha Xi Delta. 

BENNETT, RUBERT GEORGE 

Roanoke 
History and Political Science 

BODKIN, LENA LORRAINE 

Buckhannon 

Home Economics 

Alpha Gamma Delta, Betty Lamp Club, Future Teachers 

of America, Progrom Chairman of Betty Lamp Club 

BODKIN, VIRGINIA MAE 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

Alpha Gamma Delta 

BROOKS, GEORGE WILTON 

Bridgeport 

Business Administration 

Football Manager, Football Official, Basketball, Sigma 

Alpha Epsilon, Future Teachers of America 

BROWN, DAVID ROBERT 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

Freshman Class President 1943, Benzene Ring 

BROWN, MARVEL (MRS.) 

Buckhannon 

Education 

BROWN, RECTOR SHADRICK 

Buckhannon 

Physical Education 

Football, Phoenix Club, Future Teachers of America 

BUTLER, ALICE JESSAMINE 

Wattsburg, Pennsylvania 

Biology 

Secretary Tn-Beto, Women's Athletic Association, 

Women's Intramurals, Secretary Benzene Ring 

CARPENTER, THELMA MARGARET 

Buckhannon 

English 

Secretory of Future Teachers of America 1947-48, 

Scribe for Alpha Gamma Delta, '47, Member of 

College Band 



CHRISTOFEL, FERN MARIE 

Clairton, Pennsylvania 

Physical Education 

Women's Athletic Association, Vice-President; Delta Psi 

Koppa, Treasurer; Beta Beta Beta, Vice-President; 

American Guild of Organists; Future Teachers of 

America; Pharos Staff, Girls' Sports Editor; Murmur- 

montis Staff, Co-editor of Girls' Sports; Haught Literary 

Society; Keystone Club 

CLELLAND, MARY EVELYN 

Shinnston 

Business Administration 

Delta Psi Kappa, Women's Athletic Association, Future 

Teachers of America, Treasurer 

COBERLY, MARY LOUISE 

Elkins 

Sociology 

Co-Secretary of Community Council, Women's Athletic 

Association, Future Teachers of America, President 

Alpha Xi Delta, Acting Secretary of Panhellenic Council, 

Secretary of Senior Class 

CONNER, JOSEPH IRVIN 

Hurricane 

Bible 

COOPER, ROBERT CHARLES 

Clarksburg 

Sociology 




COSGROVE, LEE ALBERT 

Weston 

Chemistry 

Benzene Ring, Sigma Eta Delta 

CUNNINGHAM, EDWIN HAUGHT 

Wheeling 

Chemistry 

Benzene Ring, Panhandle Club, Kappa Alpha 

DODRILL, HOBART WESLEY 

Buckhannon 

Education 

DORSEY, PEGGY MARTIN 

Mt. Hope 

History 

Women's Athletic Association, Future Teachers of 

America, Alpha Xi Delta, Vice-President 

DOWNER, HATTIE WHIPPLE 

Clarksburg 

English 

EDMINSTON, GEORGE BLAND 

Buckhannon 

Biology 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

FENTON, CHARLES HERBERT III 

Buckhannon 

Biology 

Alpha Sigma Phi, Golf Team 1946-47, Playshop 1946, 

International Relations Club 1947. 

FOERNSLER, ROBERT OTTO 

Ozone Pork, New York 

Mathematics 

Benzene Ring, Pi Epsilon Theta, Intramural Sports 

(Football, Basketball, Volleyball) Tumbling 

FORINASH, WILLARD ADAM 

Webster Springs 

Physical Education 

Football 1940-41, 1946-47 

HALL, MABLE JANE 

Weston 

Business Administration 

Alpha Xi Delta, Women's Athletic Association 

HAROLD, MELVIN MONROE 

Kimball 

Physical Education 



Page One Hundred and Thirty** Ight 



Student Publications Are 

Important! 



THE PRODUCTION OF OUR MURMURMONTIS REQUIRES MASTERY OF A HOST OF 
SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES — PLUS WEEKS OF HARD WORK. IT REPRESENTS THE BEST 
IN STUDENT INTEREST AND ACCOMPLISHMENT. 



THE ADMINISTRATION AND THE FACULTY OF WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE 
CONGRATULATE THE MURMURMONTIS STAFF FOR A JOB WELL DONE. 






THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Paffi One Hundred and Thirty-nine 



7<£e $<W o£ J94X 



HEBB, GENE SHUMAKER 

Allen town, Pennsylvania 

Biology 

HEBB, JOHN WALTER 

Parsons 

Physical Education 

HICKS, GEORGE BRANNON 

Buckhannon 

Math and Physical Education 

Sigmo Eta Delta 

HINKLE, MAXINE FLEMING 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

HOLLOWAY, PARKER BRADBURN, JR. 

Madison, New Jersey 

English 

Koppo Alpha Order, Chairman Student Union 

Committee, Alpha Psi Omega 

HOPKINS, RICHARD C. 

Clarksburg 

Business Administration 

Treasurer of Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity 

HUNTZ, JOSEPH PETER 

Wyoming, Pennsylvania 

Business Administration — Football, Keystone Club 

HUPP, JAMES SHERWOOD 

Buckhannon 

History and Political Science 

Student Union Committee 

JACKSON, DOROTHY VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

Chemistry and Biology 

Playshop, Benzene Ring, Beta Beta Beta, Women's 

Athletic Association, Murmurmontis, 1942, Class Editor 

JOHNSON, CORA SUE 

Lewisburg 

Home Economics 

Betty Lamp Club, Benzene Ring, Playshop, Alpha Psi 

Omega, Wesleyan Choir, Women's Athletic Association, 

Future Teachers of America, Kappa Phi Omega, Pharos 

and Murmurmontis Staff 

JONES, HUGH HENRY, JR. 

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 



KNOX, WILLIAM DERRICK 

Parkersburg 

Biology 

Member of Community Council, Vice-President Senior 

Class, Vice-President of Sophomore Class, Member of 

Tri Beta and Benzene Ring, Basketball Team, Football 

Trainer, Golf Team 

LANG, COY ALVIN 

Buckhannon 

Political Science and History 

LAWSON, MARILYN KEIBLER 

Buckhannon 

Music 

College Choir, Orchestra 

LAWSON, RICHARD HOLTON 

Buckhannon 

Music Theory 

Band and Orchestra 

LOUGH, FLORENCE 
Bridge vi lie, Pennsylvania 

Religious Education 
Student Union Committee 

LOVETT, PHYLLIS MARIAN 

Mt, Clare 

English 

Alpha Xi Delta, Betty Lamp Club, Women's Athletic 

Association, Playshop, Future Teachers of America 





* 


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Pi 








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TmM^ v^ r *¥' 






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MARQUESS, EARL LAWRENCE 

Parsons 

History 

Debate, Alpha Sigma Phi Social Fraternity, Historian, 

Vice-President, President, Alpha Psi Omega (Dramatics), 

Murmurmontis Staff 1 947, Intramurals, French Club, 

Awards Committee, 1947-48 

MERCER, HERBERT BRAND 

Fairmont 

English 

President, Wesleyan Choir, Workship in Cafeteria 

MOFFETT, JACK 

Buckhannon 
Chemistry 

MORRIS, BOBBIE WILSON 
Buckhannon 

English 

McMILLION, CECIL SAMUEL 

Jane Lew 
History and Political Science 

OLDAKER, DAVID LYNN 

Buckhannon 

Biology 

Basketball 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM E, 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

President of Senior Class, President of Tri-Beta, 

Basketball Team Captain, Member of Benzene Ring, 

Member of Social Activities Committee, Baseball Team 

PIGGFORD, ROLAND RAYBURN 

Monongahela, Pennsylvania 

English 

Kappa Alpha Order, College Orchestra 

PRATT, ARLIE CAMDEN 

Alum Bridge 

Business Administration 

PUGH, CHARLES WILLIAM 

Gauley Bridge 

Physical Education 

President, 1948 Community Council; Captain, Varsity 

Football Team 



Pagi One Uundrt 'i and Forty 



+ 



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BIG CAR QUALITY 

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LOWEST COST 



CURRY CHEVROLET COMPANY 



Telephone 940 



BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



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Donate Them 
TO YOUR COLLEGE 



SHINGLETON BROTHERS 



Clarksburg, West Virginia 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred and Forty- 



7<£e <^t44 oj 194% 



REXROAD, GEORGE IRVIN 

Clarksburg 

Business Administration 

ROHR, HAROLD JUDSON 

Weston 

Biology 

President of Sigma Eta Delta, Treasurer of Senior Class, 

Benzene Ring, Beta Beta Beta, Intramural Football 

and Volleyball 

ROLLYSON, GEORGE RUSSELL 

Sutton 

Business Administration 

SAVILLE, LLOYD CURTIS 

Higginsville 

History 

SHOMO, HAZEL VIRGINIA 

Grafton 

Home Economics 

Future Teachers of America, Alpha Xi Delta, Betty 

Lamp Club, President; House Board, President 

SKAGGS, VIRGINIA KATHERINE 

Richwood 

Home Economics 

Betty Lamp Club 

SMALL, PAUL PERCY 

New Castle, Pennsylvania 

Physical Education 

SMITH, VELMA MAY 

Buckhannon 

Physical Education 

Delta Psi Kappa, President; Women's Athletic 

Association, President; Alpha Xi Delta, Treasurer; 

Future Teachers of America, Community Council, 

Senior Rep., Murmurmontis Staff, Intramurals, Field 

Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball, Awards Committee of 

Community Council, Women's Athletic Association, 

Athletic Awards. 

SMITH, VIRGINIA DEE 

Montvale, Virginia 

English 

Choir, Haught Literary Society, American Guild of 

Organists, Playshop, Alpha Xi Delta Sorority 



SPANGLER, MIRTH LESTER 

Weston 

Chemistry 

STANSBURY, ROBERT JAMES 

Charleston 

English 

Philosophical Society (Fraternity), Vice-President MSM, 

Intramural Basketball, Delta Sigma Theta (Methodist 

Fraternity), Christian Service Fellowship 

STEMPLE, WILLIAM BOWEN 
Oakland, Maryland 

Business Administration 
Alpha Sigma Phi 



STEYER, 



CHESTER GRIM 

Elkins 
English 



STOUT, HUGH PAUL 

Alum Bridge 
Business Administration 

SUTTER, EVERETT LEE 

Seward, Pennsylvania 

Psychology 

Alpha Sigma Phi, President; Tri-Beta 




SWISHER, MARTHA JANE 
Lost Creek 
English 
Playshop, Haught Literary Society, Alpha Psi Omega, 
Choir, Betty Lamp, Women's Athletic Association, Editor 
of Murmurmontis 1947, Pharos Staff, Freshman 
Counsellor '45, '46, '47, Alpha Xi Delta Officer '45, '47 

TRAVIS, CATHERINE ANN 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

President, Future Teachers of America 1947-48, 

Secretary, Kappa Phi Omega Social Sorority 

TRIPLETT, WILLIS FIDLER 

Elkins 

P. S. Music 

Band, Future Teachers of America Librarian 

UHLAR, JOHN AROAD 

Wilkes Bar re, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

WAGNER, WILLIAM VAUGHN 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

WILSON, BENJAMIN HARRISON 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mathematics 

Pharos, Reporter; Kappa Alpha Fraternity, 

Keystone Club 

WISE, RUSSEL CLARENCE 

Wheeling 

Mathematics 

Panhandle Club, Benzene Ring, National Honorary 

Math Fraternity, Intramural Sports (Football, Volleyball, 

Basketball, Softball, Ping Pong, Handball), and College 

Band and Orchestra 

WRIGHT, JOHN COLLINS 

Beckley 

Chemistry 

Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Benzene Ring 

YOUNG, RUTH DOVE 

Weston 

Education 



Pagt One Hundred <t>i>i Forty-tw o 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




East Main Street — Opposite Colonial Theatre 

24 HOUR SERVICE 
"Home — Our Only Competitor" 



Proprietors: 
Andy Xenakis Andrew Lygomenos George Xenakis 

"Buckhannon's Quality Restaurant" 

BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



HE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! Page One Bimdrei and Forty-three 



*76e (?Um oj J949 



ALBRIGHT, PATRICIA ANNE 

Tunnelton 

History 

ALLEN, JERRY RAY 

Salem 
Business Administration 

ANDERSON, SALLY CHRISTINE 

Smoot 

Home Economics 

ANDERSON, VIRGINIA LEE 
Smoot 
Biology 

ANDRICK, JAMES HOWARD 
Buckhannon 

Physical Education 

ARTHUR, SUSAN ELIZABETH 
Weston 

Music 

BARCKLEY, MILDRED LEESON 

Burlington, New Jersey 

Sociology 

BARKER, HARRY ROSS, JR. 

Buckhannon 
Psychology 

BASSEL, MARGUERITE PATRICIA 

Mt. Clare 

Home Economics 

BIRCHEAD, MAXINE CLARKE 

Glen Ferris 

Religious Education and Physical Education 

BLACKBURN, MARETTIA SHAFFER 

Thomas 

Physical Education 

BLACKMAN, DAVID HUGHES, JR. 

Stamford, Connecticut 

English 

BOGGS, IVORY HERSHEL 

Eolia, Kentucky 

Business Administration 

BRANNON, ROBERT COWEY 

Weston 

History and Political Science 



BROWN, CHARLES WILLIAM 

Buckhannon 
Physical Education 

BROYLES, JOSEPH WARREN 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

BURROUGHS, WILLIAM ERNEST 

Clarksburg 
Chemistry 

CARDER, BERNARD LEE 

Beaver 

Business Administration 

CARPENTER, JOHN MARTIN 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

CASTO, ARNOLD WADE 

Sago 

Business Administration 

CASTO, WILLIAM DOLIVER 

West Milford 

Biology 



<4H * P_ 




COLEMAN, RICHARD 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

CONAWAY, JULIA KATHRYN 

Clarksburg 

English 

CRAWFORD, CHARLES JAMES 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

CROSS, J. RAY 

Hendricks 

Biology 

CROSSAN, THOMAS BENJAMIN, JR. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

English 

CROSSAN, MARGARET WINDSOR 

Beckley 

Elementary Education 

CROW, EDWARD LAWRENCE 

Cameron 

Business Administration 

DAILEY, MARTHA JANE 

Buckhannon 

Home Economics 

DARTNALL, JACK THOMAS 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Chemistry 

DENNIS, JAMES LEWIS, JR. 
Elizabeth 
Chemistry 

DIVERS, RACHEL JEANETTE 

Bassett, Virginia 

Religious Education 

DONLEY, CHARLES EARL 
Buckhannon 

Physical Education 

DOTSON, ROBERT LEE 

Caretta 

Biblical Literature 

DOUGLASS, CHARLES WILLIAM 

Buckhannon 
Business Administration 



Vayc One Hundred and Poi ' y-four 



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bridge sets you'll be proud to 
own or give to a favorite friend. 
Designed by the West Virginia 
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WEST VIRGINIA GLASS 
SPECIALTY COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturers of 

Brilliant Crystal Handmade Glassware — Paste Mould Blowing 
Superb Artistic Decorations 

WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



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LEWIS RESTAURANT 



Wishes the Students of 



Success 



WESLEYAN 



and the Best in Life 



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Page One Htmdri dand Forty-five 



7«^ <^wo 4 ?949 



DOUGLASS, GUY JOSEPH 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

Dubois, earl david 

East Liverpool, Ohio 

DUNN, EARL FRANCIS 

Morgantown 

Biblical Literature 

DUNSMOOR, LYLE HALL 
Parkersburg 
Chemistry 

ELLIS, HAROLD VANCE 

McWhorter 
Business Administration 

ENGLE, ROBERT BROWNING 
Salem 
English 

EVANS, GLADYS MARJORIE 

Moundsville 
Physical Education 

FLINN, LENA EVELYN 

Clarksburg 
Home Economics 

FLOYD, MARGUERITE LORRAYNE 

Buckhannon 

English 

FORSYTH, HARR, JR. 

Wheeling 

Mathematics 

FOWKES, THEODORE HITE 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

FOX, WALTER CLYDE 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

FRAME, KATHERINE JOAN 

Dailey 
Business Administration 

GARRETT, EDMUND HOYT 

Bridgeport 

English 



GEE, MARY JO 

Trout 
Home Economics 

GOLLER, ARTHUR LOUIS, JR. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Business Administration 

GOULD, EDWARD LAWTON 

Buckhannon 

Pre-Engineering 

GUESS, BARBARA REBECCA 

Wheeling 

Home Economics 

HADJIS, MARY 
Wheeling 

Home Economics 

HALL, JAMES LEW 

Weston 

Business Administration 

HANNA, TALLY 

Westernport, Maryland 

Speech 




HANNAH, PATRICIA ANN 

Buckhannon 

Home Economics 

HARRISON, GEORGE ORV1LLE 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

HEBB, MALCOLM RAYMOND 
Parsons 
English 

HEFNER, MARY SUE (GARRETT) 

Lewisburg 

English 

HINDS, DORIS MARIE 

Green Village, New Jersey 

English and Sociology 

HOGAN, BIDDY ANN 

Charleston 

Religious Education 

HOGSETT, BETTY JO 

Swiss 
Physical Education 

HUFFMAN, PATRICIA JEAN 

Clarksburg 

English 

HULL, GEORGE HELTZEL 

Durbin 

Chemistry 

JAMES, JOHN CARY 

West Liberty 

Chemistry 

JOHNS, VIVIAN IONE 

Ford City, Pennsylvania 

English 

JONES, ALVA, JR 

Cowen 
Chemistry 

KARICKHOFF, ELIZABETH MARIE 

Buckhannon 

Music and English 

KELLEY, DOLORES JEAN 

Gauley Bridge 

Home Economics 



Pag* One Hundred and Fortysto 



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Tage One Hundred and Forty- even 



7^e gtcu* 04 1949 



KENDERSON, NORMA ELIZABETH 

East Lynn, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

KENT, PATRICIA HATFIELD 

Glen White 

English 

KILE, WAYNE, JR. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Chemistry 

KLOTZ, LAWRENCE 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

KNIGHT, WALLACE EDWARD 

Charleston 
English 

LAW, MARY ANN 
Weston 

English 

LAWSON, JOHN FRANCIS 
Weston 
Biology 

LAWSON, WAYNE ALFRED 

Clarksburg 

Business Administration 

LEWIS, LEJEUNE 

Buckhannon 

Biology 

LONG, THOMAS PORTER 

Lindside 

Chemistry 

LYNCH, CONRAD LINDEN 

Weston 

Chemistry 

LYON, JOHN WILLIAM 
Clarksburg 
Economics 

MARCHINES, JOHN 

Vestaburg, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

MARSH, GREY JUNIOR 

Weston 

Chemistry 



MARTIN, DAVID CLYDE 
Buckhannon 
Pre-Dental 

MARTIN, DONALD WOODSON 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

MATHENY, LUCILLE M. 
Clarksburg 
Education 

MILES, WANDA ALICE 

Buckhannon 

English 

MILLER, JAMES A. 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

MILLER, MAURICE ALFRED 

Webster Springs 

English 

MOORE, YVONNE IMOGENE 

Westernport 

Biology 




MORGAN, VICTOR C. 
laeger 
Biology 

MORRISON, WILLIAM BASCOM 
Weston 
History 

MYERS, JAMES KENNETH 
Buckhannon 

Economics 

McCUNE, GEORGE WILSON 
Buckhannon 
Philosophy 

McEWUEN, JAMES EDWARD 

Weston 

Chemistry 

McMULLEN, CHARLES DORSEY 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

NEWELL, ARTHUR 

Nettie 

Business Administration 

OLDAKER, EDWARD LAWSON 
Buckhannon 
Mathematics 

PAYNE, WILLIAM HARVEY 
English 
Biology 

POLING, ALDINE DEAN, JR. 

Philippi 

Business Administration 

POTTER, HAROLD COLE 

Buckhannon 

Economics 

PUGH, WALTER LEE 

Gauley Bridge 

Physical Education 

QUEEN, CLAYCE KEITH 

Buckhannon 

Chemistry 

REDDEN, LEXIE PRESTON 

Lockbridge 

English 



pagi One Hundred and Forty-eight 






1856 



1948 



Ninety-two Years 

of 

SERVICE 

is the Record of 

RALSTONS 
Jewelry Store 



' i Merch a n (Use of 
Quality" 



Gifts for All Occasions 



WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 







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Phone 777 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



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Page One Hun&n <i and Forty-ni7ie 



16e gfau, oj 1949 



REED, FRED HERMAN 

Beckley 
Business Administration 

RILEY, LAWRENCE PAUL 

Oakland, Maryland 

Psychology 

ROBINSON, EDNA ALBERTA 

Buckhannon 

Physical Education 

ROSE, DONALD EDWARD 

Uniontown, Pennsylvania 
Biology 

ROSS, ALICE LOUISE 
Buckhannon 

Physical Education 

SAWYERS, FRANCIS ERVIN 

Weston 

Business Administration 

SIMONS, DONALD MAX 
Buckhannon 
Chemistry 

SIMPSON, NORMA JEAN 

Mt. Clare 

Home Economics 

SMEGA, STEPHEN JOSEPH 

Newark, New Jersey 

Chemistry 

SMITH, NANCY CAROLINE 

Salem 
Chemistry 

SNEDEKER, JAMES H., JR. 

Moundsville 

English 

SNYDER, KATHLEEN LUCILLE 
Bartow 
History 

SOMMERVILLE, BARBARA LOUISE 

Clarksburg 

Religious Education 

STEIDING, HAZEL MAE 
Keyser 
English 



STONE, BETTY ANN 

Fayetteville 
Elementary Education 

STOUT, JOHN PARK 
Lost Creek 

Music 

TAWNEY, THOMAS MARTIN 

Weston 

Business Administration 

TAYLOR, CHARLES WILLIAM 

Weston 

Chemistry 

THOMPSON, CHARLES EDWARD 
Glen Ferris 

Philosophy 

TINNEY, CHARLES WILLIAM 
Weston 
Pre-Law 

VILLERS, ALEXANDER 
Weston 
English 




WALLY, BILLIE ANN 

Kittanning, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

WALTON, RICHARD ALLYN 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

WARE, JOHN RICHARD 

Ellamore 

Business Administration 

WATKINS, KENNETH GERALD 

Roanoke 

Philosophy 

WHITMAN, DATHAN 
Canvas 
Biology 

WILFONG, LESLIE HOWARD 

Buckhannon 
History 

WILLIAMS, ROSE ELLA SHUMAN 

Clarksburg 

English 

WILLIS, WILLIAM RUSSELL 

Moundsville 

Chemistry 

WILSON, HOLLACE HOPE 

Bridgeport 

Physical Education 

WITHERS, VIRGINIA BURKHART 

Buckhannon 

Business Administration 

WOLFE, WILLIAM RAY, JR. 

Grafton 

Chemistry 

WOODFORD, ROBERT HOWARD 

Frenchton 

English 

YOUNG, HELEN RAY 
Charleston 
Sociology 

YURICK, CHARLES 

Keisterville, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



I'mir One Hundred and Fifty 



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<l 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS — PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred find Fifty-one 



1U, &<u& oj 7949 



ADKINS, JAMES EDWARD 
Richwood 

ALLMAN, ROBERT LEE 
Buckhannon 

ANDERSON, JANET 
Anjean 

ANDREWS, JAMES ALLEN 
North Manchester, Indiana 

ANDRICK, ROBERT LEE 
Buckhannon 

ANTHONY, DONALD ELMER 

Man 

ASHBY, HAROLD CLAUDE 
Oakland, Maryland 

ARBOGAST, DALE 
French Creek 

AZELVANDRE, JOSEPH JAMES 

Clarksburg 

BACHMAN, ARTHUR CHESTER 
Pickens 

BARBUTO, PAUL FRANCIS 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

BARNES, MERLE DAVID, JR. 
Wellsburg 

BARTLETT, DORSEY JOSEPH 
Lost Creek 

BEALL, MAX W 
Gassaway 

BECK, CLARENCE DEAN 
Cleveland, Ohio 

BEER, BETTY LEA 
Ivanhoe 

BEER, CHARLES JUNIOR 
Ivanhoe 

BERGER, ROBERTA FRANCINE 

Clarksburg 



BERTHY, BARBARA ROSE 
Buckhannon 

BEVERIDGE, RICHARD DONALD 
East McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

BICKEL, ROBERT SAMUEL 
Webster Springs 

BISHOP, RONALD AARON 
Frederick, Maryland 

BLACKBURN, GEORGE HOWARD 
Vineland, New Jersey 

BLAIR, PERRY D. 

New Martinsville 

BLAKESLEE, KENNETH WALLACE 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

BLAYNEY, JACK GILMORE 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

BORCHERT, CLARENCE LEE 
Weston 




BORRELLI, AUGUSTINE EDWARD 
Parkersburg 

BOYD, ROBERT CONRAD 
Glen Alum 

BROCK, VERNICE W 
Weston 

BROWN, BONNIE ANNE 
Diamond 

BROWN, CHARLES LESTER 
Weston 

BROWN, CHARLES STANLEY 
Elm Grove 

BROWN, HARVEY ROSS 

Buckhannon 

BROWN, HOWARD WILLIAM 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

BROWN, KENNETH EUGENE 
Richwood 

BROWN, ROBERT LYNN 

Buckhannon 

BURKHAMMER, EUGENE WARD 
Weston 

BUTCHER, FLOYD EDWARD 

Buckhannon 

CAIN, JAMES SMITH 
Clarksburg 

CAPET, BARBARA JEAN 
Bridgeport 

CASWELL, JOHN ALPHONSO 
East Douglas, Massachusetts 

CHAMBERLAIN, WILLIAM RAYMOND 
Wellsburg 

CHAPMAN, EDGAR LEE 
Weston 

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Canton, China 



/'•"/< Otu a ninh- -I and "Fifty-t-u o 



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COMPLIMENTS 
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KOLLEGE KITCHEN 



35 College Avenue 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



4. — 



THE 



WESTON DEMOCRAT 

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Lewis County's Oldest 
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Sales and Service 

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BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



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+ 



! I 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred and Fi/ty-thrce 



16e {^W o£ 1950 



CLARK, ERNEST BURRELL 
Weston 

CLARK, LOIS RAE 
Glendale 

CLARK, MARY ANN 
Pompton Lakes, New Jersey 

COBURN, ROBERT THOMAS 
Burlington, New Jersey 

COEN, LENORE SIBLEY 
Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

COMET, RALPH 
Holden 

CONANT, KENNETH HERBERT 
Wattsburg, Pennsylvania 

CONLEY, EDWIN WILSON 
Bridgeport 

CONNOR, ROBERT FRANKLIN 
Wendel 

COX, JOHN CALVIN 
Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania 

COYNER, MARK, JR. 
Buckhannon 

CRAWFORD, LAWRENCE LEWIS 
Clarksburg 

CRICKARD, ALVIN MIKE 
Elkwater 

CRIDER, CLAUDE HEPNER 
Buckhannon 

CULLINGS, JOSEPH DuSHANE 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

CUNNINGHAM, BETTY JEAN 
Clarksburg 

CUPPETT, ELDON HOWARD 
Morgantown 



CUTRIGHT, WANDA JUANITA 
Buckhannon 

CYPHERS, MARGARET ANN 
War 

DARNALL, THOMAS ALEXANDER, JR 
Buckhannon 

DAVIS, KENNETH 
Clarksburg 

DAVISSON, FLORIS, JR 
Lost Creek 

DEAN, JAMES OBERT 
Nutter Fort 

DeBARR, EDWIN CLYDE 
Buckhannon 

DEMASTES, JOHN FRANKLIN 
Buckhannon 

DICK, DONALD GENE 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



■ ■,--■'** *Sw 




DOLAN, JOHN LEO 
Clarksburg 

DORSEY, HELEN ELIZABETH 
Holcomb 

DOWELL, GERALDINE FRANCES 
Grafton 

EDINGER, IRIS VALJEAN 
Valley Chapel 

ELDER, THOMAS GREY 
Clarksburg 

ELMER, HELEN MARIE 
Jane Lew 

FALLON, MARY FRANCES 

Buckhannon 

FARNSWORTH, DANIEL DUANE 
Buckhannon 

FISHER, HERMAN G 
Gassaway 

FISHER, HUNTER LEE 

Clarksburg 

FISHER, JACK RANDALL 
Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania 

FLINT, JAMES ARTHUR 

Canaan 

FORBES, JAMES ROBERT 
New York, New York 

FORSYTHE, CHARLES EDWARD 

Clarksburg 

FOSTER, BETTY LUGENE 
Buckhannon 

FOX, FRANK EDWARD 
Weston 

FRASER, JOHN HUGH 
Monte loir, New Jersey 

FRASHURE, THURMAN JUNIOR 
Buckhannon 



Paye One Hundred and Fifty-four 



For the Best 

TIRES — RADIOS — AUTO SUPPLIES 
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

Go to 

fir est on* 

B. F. & I. HOME & AUTO, INC. 

▲ 

Main Street — Phone 650 

BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



C. FRED IDEN MOTORS 

▲ 

CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH 

A 

Wrecker Service 



Phone 777 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 






FAIR-WAY MOTORS, 

Inc. 

Hudson — 

Corbitt Trucks 

— Packard 

▲ 

"Sales and Service" 

A 

Phone 999 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



+ + 



-.+ 






+ 



{. 

BUCKHANNON 


1 

! 

BUILDERS SUPPLY, 




Inc. 




A 


LUMBER AND MILLWORK 

CEMENT — SAND — GRAVEL 

LIME — PLASTER 

WALLBOARDS — WINDOW SASH 

DOORS — SEWER PIPE 

ROOFING — PAINTS — CONCRETE BLOCKS 

METAL — WOOD LATH 


38 East Main Street — Buckhannon 543 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Pat/e Onto Hundred and Fifty-five 



7<£e &<u& o( J950 



FRIEND, NORMAN HARRY 
Oakland, Maryland 

GALLIEN, JERRY 
Clarksburg 

GARDNER, CHARLES ROBERT 
Buckhannon 

GARRETT, GUY ROBERT 
Clarksburg 

GAY, ROBERT STRADER 
Roanoke 

GIDLEY, JUNE MARIE 
Kingwood 

GIORDANO, JOY ELLEN 
Great Neck, New York 

GIVEN, CHARLES H. 
Cowen 

GLAUNER, JOHN HORTON 

Buckhannon 

GOODWIN, WALTER R 
Bloomington, Indiana 

GRIMMETT, JOHN PAUL 
Clarksburg 

GROVE, GEORGE ARTHUR 
French Creek 

GROVE, WILLIAM SUMMERS 
Weston 

HADDOX, HAROLD EUGENE 
Parkersburg 

HALL, BARBARA JANE 
Clarksburg 

HALL, DELBERT JAMES 
Webster Springs 

HALL, OWEN STANLEY 
Holl 

HALL, WHEELER G. 
Clover 



HARTMAN, FRED STANLEY 
Buckhannon 

HAYES, MILDRED JEAN 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

HEATHCOTE, THOMAS BURDELL 
Weston 

HENDERSON, HOWARD CALVIN 
Duo 

HERMANN, ROBERT 
North Braddock, Pennsylvania 

HILL, BEVERLY JUNE 
Moundsville 

HILLMAN, HARRIETTE CORINNA 
Lewisburg 

HINKLE, STACIE LUELLA 
Queens 

HINSHELWOOD, BARBARA CLARISSA 
Charleston 




HITESHEW, ROY CLARK 
Weston 

HOLLOWAY, EVELYN CLAIRE 
Madison, New Jersey 

HOSTETLER, RAYMOND JAMES 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

HOSTNIK, CARL GEORGE 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

HOWES, ROBERT WINFIELD, JR. 
Parkersburg 

HUFFMAN, ALDACE LAIRL 

Buckhannon 

HUFHMAN, GURNEY JACKSON, JR. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

HUMPHREYS, HAROLD LEE 
Buckhannon 

HUTCHINSON, JOSEPH E., JR. 
Bellevue, Pennsylvania 

HYMES, CHARLES MATTHEW 
Buckhannon 

HYMES, WILLIAM RUSSELL 
Buckhannon 

JACKSON, EDWARD LEO 
Hall 

JACKSON, JEAN SEE 

Buckhannon 

JACOBS, ELIZABETH JOSEPHINE 
Wheeling 

JARVIS, REX CALVIN 
Parkersburg 

JOHNSON, FLORA JEAN 
Lewisburg 

JONES, THOMAS STUART 
Oakland, Maryland 

JOYCE, MARTHA RUTH 
Washington, D. C. 



Papi One H-wn&red and Fifty-aia 









-+ f- 



BROADWAY SALES 

▲ 

COATS - SUITS - DRESSES 

▲ 

Rich in Fabric 

Beautiful in Design 

Perfect in Workmanship 

▲ 

CHAS. B. CASTO 

5 North Kanawha St. 
BUCKHANNON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

C. A. BORCHERT 

GLASS COMPANY 



* t 



! I 



WESTON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



+— 

+ 



+ + _ 



The Music Mart 

Latest Records 
Sheet Music 

▲ 

Dave Casto 

Phone 280-R 

BUCKHANNON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



..— .+ * 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

GARLAND WEST 

A 

COLONIAL THEATER | 

▲ 

WEST 
SWIMMING POOL 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

W. H. ASPINALL 

AND COMPANY 



WESTON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



■* 
+ * 



■■+ * 



+ +.- 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

Corner Market 



H. S. Stathers, Owner 

▲ 

Phone 1080 

39 College Avenue 

BUCKHANNON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



Buckhannon "s 
Leading Shoe Store 

▲ 

ROGER — PHILLIPS 

▲ 

19 East Main Street 
MEN 

WOME N 
CHILDREN 

._, + 



— 4. + ., . + 4- 



ELLIS 
STUDIOS 



WESTON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



PHOTOGRAPHER 






HE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred and Fift < 



74e @Um *£ J950 



KALAFAT, GABRIEL GEORGE 
Weston 

KARICKHOFF, LOREN E 
Buckhannon 

KEENER, JOSEPH BENNETT 
Weston 

KEISTER, CHARLES WILLIAM 
Beckley 

KELLY, ROY DON 
Apollo, Pennsylvania 

KEMPER, MARY LEE 
Morgansville 

KING, JAMES RUSSELL 
Buckhannon 

KING, WILLIAM PRICE, JR. 
Weston 

KUHN, WILLIAM LLOYD 
Grafton 

KURSAVICH, MARTHA LYDWINA 
Century 

LAIGN, BARBARA ANNE 
Buckhannon 

LAUGHLIN, WILLIAM WESLEY, JR. 
Mannington 

LAW, JOHN TROXELL 
Weston 

LAWTON, KENNETH LEES 
Oakland, Maryland 

LAYFIELD, SIMEON JUNIOR 
Buckhannon 

LENTZ, NOBERT GREGORY 
Nanticoke, Pennsylvania 

LEVIER, WILLIAM ARLO 
Buckhannon 

LEWIS, ELEANOR 
Lost Creek 



LEWIS, LYNN LORRAINE 
Oakland, Maryland 

LIEVING, LORENA M. 
West Columbia 

LINCOLN, SUSAN KNOWLES 
Kingwood 

LINGER, LEOMA ERNESTINE 

Buckhannon 

LINSTEDT, ROBERT ERIC 
Greenwich, Connecticut 

LYON, CARL VERNON 
Clarksburg 

MALLING, ELDON KEITH 
Clarksburg 

MANSER, WILLIAM CHARLES 
Buckhannon 

MARING, ROBERT MILTON 
Adrian 




MARSH, MARY RUTH 
Oakland, Maryland 

MATHENY, JACK SIMS 
Clarksburg 

MAZZEI, JOHN JOSEPH 
Nutter Fort 

MEANS, CHARLES ROBERT 
Clarksburg 

MELPHIS, ROBERT EMILE 
Weston 

MICHAEL, JOSEPH 
Jackson, Ohio 

MICK, BILLEE SCOTT 
Buckhannon 

MICKEL, RALPH EWING 
Parkersburg 

MILLER, OLIVER JOHNAS 
Webster Springs 

MITCHELL, EUGENE LINGER 
Weston 

MOORE, JAMES HOWARD 
Connellsville, Pennsylvania 

MOORE, WILLIAM ANDREW 
Clarksburg 

MORRIS, JAMES LEE 
Clarksburg 

MORRIS, MARVEL STARR 
Mineral Wells 

MORROW, DONALD R. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

MOUSER, GEORGE MARPLE 
Shinnston 

MOYERS, MILDRED IONA 
Albright 

MYERS, ROBERT NELSON 
Jackson, Ohio 



Pape Our Hundred <mti Fifty-eiyht 





A picture of the present will become a fond memory, 
but what of the future — on your own? There will 
be no bonds to your vision, initiative, or application. 
Our best wishes are extended to you, knowing that 
you'll make the most of the opportunities which 
fortunately are still unrestricted in America. 



MONONGAHELA POWER CO. 



General Offices, Fairmont-, West Virginia 



ME 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



THE 



HORNOR-GAYLORD 
COMPANY 



Wholesale 
Grocers 



55 Years of Service 



CLARKSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 






Page One Hundred and Fifty-nine 



7^e ^«44 of 1950 



MYERS, WILLIAM 
West Englewood, New Jersey 

McCLUNG, ROGER ALAN 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

McCOY, MILDRED JEAN 
Wheeling 

McDANIELS, DIXIE RICHARD 
Selbyville 

Mcdonald, robert melvin 

Oak Hill 



PENNINGTON, HERBERT MARTIN 
Ronceverte 

PERRY, MELROSE M. 
Butler, Pennsylvania 

PERTZ, EARLO ROLAND 
Weston 

PHILLIPS, GEORGE ERNEST 
Adrian 

PHILLIPS, HOWARD MARSHALL CALVIN 
Newton 



POULICOS, JOHN ALEXANDER 
Clarksburg 

QUEEN, CLIFTON LeROY 
Buckhannon 

QUEEN, FRENCH WILSON 
Buckhannon 

RALSTON, MARION DAWSON 
Weston 

REARDON, VIRGINIA LEE 
Beckley 



McGINNITY, ROBERT BERNARD 
Brooklyn, New York 

MclNTYRE, NORMAN EDWIN 
Weston 

McKAIN, FRANKLIN PERCY 
Williamstown 

NANCARROW, JAMES ALFRED 
Ravenswood 

NAYLOR, PAUL ALLEN 
Buckhannon 

NEWBROUGH, WILLIAM LEE 
Clarksburg 

NORVELL, RICHARD HAROLD 
Queens 

OGDEN, MARGUERITE JUNE 
French Creek 

OURS, JOHN RICHARD 
Weston 

PATTERSON, ROBERT SLENTZ 
Vanport, Pennsylvania 

PAYNE, ORLANDO RAY 
Webster Springs 

PECK, JAMES McKINLEY 
Parkersburg 



PICKENS, PATRICIA JoANN 
Weston 

PICONE, SEBASTIAN 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

PORTER, ANDREW JOSEPH 
Beckley 




REEL, CARL PERSHING 
Moorefield 

RENTCHLER, JANE LOU 
Craigsville 

REXROAD, RICHARD LEE 
Weston 

RICKETTS, AUBREY EUGENE 
Boothwyn, Pennsylvania 

RIFEE, HAROLD MONTGOMERY 
Beckley 

RIFFE, MARY O. 
Beckley 

RILEY, JOHN FRANCIS 
Weston 

ROBISON, ROBERT WILLIAM 
Heaters 

RODGERS, CONNEL WADE 
Morgantown 

ROGERS, ROBERT CONNER 
Weston 

ROSSER, WILLIAM FRANK 
Munhall, Pennsylvania 

ROTH, G. CHARLES 
Frenchton 



Page One Hundred and Sutti 






WA TCHES— DIAMONDS 
JEWELRY 



CAPLAN'S 
JEWELRY STORE 

WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 






ROGERS MOTOR COMPANY 



DeSoto 



Plymouth 



373 East Third Street 

Phone 627 

WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

THE 



CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK 



'The Bank of Friendly Service" 



•* * 

■■* + 



— + 
— + 



Commencement Announcements and Cards 

Class Rings and Emblems 

Engraved Wedding Stationery 

Newest Booklet Diplomas — Caps and Gowns 

Medals and Trophies 

Engraved and Printed Letterheads and Envelopes 

▲ 

MERRELLS, INC. 

111-115 Second Street — Phone 2685 
CLARKSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 

▲ 
The School Announcement and Jewelry House 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred and 8ixty-otu 



7<£e &Um <^ 1950 



ROUSH, FLORENCE ELIZABETH 
Letant 

RUDE, BETTY ANNA 
Charleston 



SLACK, RICHARD LEE 
Wheeling 

SMITH, DAVID DAWSON 
Logan 



SPANGLER, DOTSON TRUE 
Derry, Pennsylvania 

SPENCER, HUGH EDWARD 
Buckhannon 



RUSH, MICHAEL ANDREW 
Weston 



SMITH, DOROTHEA ELAINE 
Clarksburg 



SPURLOCK, HOWARD DeFOREST 
Clarksburg 



SCHAEFER, JEROME ROBERT 
Zelienople, Pennsylvania 



SMITH, ETTA LOUISE EMMOGENE 
Parkersburg 



STARKEY, WILLIAM GROVER 
Clarksburg 



SCOTT, WINFIELD GRANT 
McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania 



SMITH, JAMES HENRY 
Buckhannon 



STEINKRAUS, DOROTHY ELLEN 
Brooklyn, New York 



SHAFFER, CHARLES RAYMOND 
Buckhannon 



SMITH, PAUL L. 
Nutter Fort 



STEMPLE, VIRGIL ANDREW 
Adrian 



SHAFFER, ERNEST EDWARD 
Clarksburg 



SNYDER, JOHN H. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



STONEKING, CHARLES CALVIN 
Weston 



SHAMBLIN, DARRELL RAY 
Point Pleasant 



SOUTHERN, JOHN WILLIAM 
Jane Lew 



STOUT, LEWIS MARSHALL 
Flemington 



SHANAMAN, MARY CHRISTINE 
Clarksburg 



STRAIGHT, CHARLES ROBERT 
Mannington 



SHEAHAN, JOHN TALBOTT 
Ellamore 



STROTHER, JASPER RAY 
Clarksburg 



SHELL, ROBERT LOUIS 
Logan 

SHEPHERD, CHARLES JUNIOR 
Weston 

SHUTTLEWORTH, MARY JANE 
Central City, Pennsylvania 

SIMMONS, WALTER RICHARD 
Weston 

SIMONS, ROBERT MARVIN 
Buckhannon 

SKAGGS, BETTY LOU 
Kingwood 

SKINNER, JACK STEWART 
Kittanning, Pennsylvania 




SULLIVAN, CHARLES ROBERT 
Pennsboro 

SUMMERS, ZANE HILL 
Horner 

SWEENEY, DONALD CHARLES 
Long Island City, New York 

TAKACS, ROBERT CLARKSON 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

TENNEY, VIOLA AGNES 
Arbovale 

TENNEY, WILTON RAY 
Buckhannon 

TERWILLIGER, CHARLES LYNN 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 



I'uijL out Hundred ami s«e( «-' u o 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 



| GASTON GROCERY 
COMPANY 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Buckhannon, West Virginia 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

ALVA JONES, JR 

and 
HIS ORCHESTRA 



Buckhannon, West Virginia 



■•* + 



■ — * * 



The 
1948 

MURMURMONTIS 
STAFF 

Wishes to Express 

Its Appreciation 

and Thanks 

to the Advertisers 

Who 

Have Helped Make 

This Publication Possible. 



CORNER 
RESTAURANT 

Wishes the Students of Wesleyan 
Success and the Best in Life 



EAT 



I | 



"Quality Food at a Quality Restaurant" 

Corner Locust and Main 

Buckhannon, West Virginia 



WESLEYANITES 

We Are Prepared to Fulfill 
Your Car Needs 



24 HOURS EVERY DAY 



WESTS SERVICE 



^ BUY AT OUR ^ 

£sso, 



Esso Corner — Phone 9749 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS — PATRONIZE THEM! 



Pane One Hundred and Sixty-three 



7<£e &CU4, oj f<?50 



TERWILLIGER, RONALD MERTON 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

THOMAS, SHIRLEY MARIE 
Rhodell 

TIERNEY, JAMES EDWARD 
Weston 

TINKLE, MARVIN CONRAD 
Arlington, Virginia 

TOWNSEND, WILLIAM BURLESS 
Durbin 

TRINKLE, JANICE JOAN 
Weston 

TROWBRIDGE, WILLIAM JUNIOR 
Kingwood 

TRUBAN, WILLIAM A. 
Gormania 

TUNSTALL, CHARLES BRIAN 
Gassaway 

UNDERWOOD, DONALD RAY 

Clarksburg 

VINYARD, CHARLES RUSSELL 
Buckhannon 

WAGNER, ALDA LOUISE 
North Braddock, Pennsylvania 

WALTERS, RICHARD WEASE 
Weston 

WARD, ROBERT JAMES 
Ellamore 

WATKINS, LESLIE EVERETT 
New Martinsville 

WEIGLE, GEORGE A 
Vienna 

WEINBERG, AARON YALE 
Baltimore, Maryland 



WERTZ, JAMES HOWARD 
Clarksburg 

WETZEL, LAWRENCE BARTLETT 
Clarksburg 

WHITE, JO ANN THERESE 
Weston 

WHITE, LAWRENCE CLERMONT 
Parkersburg 

WHITE, LEO JACKSON 
Bluefield 

WHITE, MARY CATHERINE 
Weston 

WHITESELL, HAZEL ELIZABETH 
Buckhannon 

WHITFIELD, VIRGINIA HOPE 
Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 




WHITING, DONALD EDWARD 
Buckhannon 

WICKHAM, MARION DORIS 
Triadelphia 

WILLS, VERNON GLENN 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

WILSON, GERALD LOVE 
Hookersville 

WINTERS, LEONIDAS S. 
Wheeling 

WIRGES, ROBERT JOSEPH 
Buffalo, New York 

WISE, WALTER EARL 
Wheeling 

WITEK, JOSEPH RAYMOND 
Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania 

WOOD, CECIL KENNETH 
Bridgeport 

WOOD, VICTOR CHARLES 
Moundsville 

WRISTON, JOHN WESLEY 
Jane Lew 

WRISTON, WAYNE ALDEN 
Kingston 

WYNCOOP, LOIS JANE 
Irwin, Pennsylvania 

YOUNG, CHARLES ROBERT 
Apollo, Pennsylvania 

YOUNG, JAMES ALBERT 
Woodsfield, Ohio 

ZIMMERMAN, WILLIAM 
New York, New York 



Pagt <>>,' Hundred and 8ixty-Jour 



WESTON LAUNDRY 



Cleaning 



+ +•- 

i 1 

I 1 

! I 

! I 
I I 






J. B. COX FURNITURE 



Pressing 



Buckhannon 822 



Weston 386 



i,.. 
*- 



I 
I 
-* * 



Since 1903 



WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 



WILSON 
BAKING COMPANY 






CLARKSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 



I i 

! I 

! I 

I I 

.+ + 



MURPHY'S 

FIVE AND TEN CENT STORE 

A 

BUCKHANNON'S LEADING STORE 
for 

COLLEGE APPAREL 

and 

CLASSROOM SUPPLIES 



THE 194B MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



!','.}• One Hundred and 8iecty~ five 



!6e (?Um o£ 1951 



AKER5, HERBERT ARNOLD 
Widemouth 

ALLERS, NORMAN TAIT 
Verona, Pennsylvania 

ALLMAN, ROBERT CLINTON 
Parkersburg 

AMBLER, DeALTON ST. JOHN 
Bethel, Connecticut 

A5HTON, RICHARD GARDNER 

Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania 

ASPINALL, MARION 
Weston 

BAILEY, ANNA LUCILLE 
Weston 

BAILEY, CALVIN ANDREW 

Buckhannon 

BARTLETT, RICHARD PEYTON 
Cumberland, Maryland 

BEALL, HAZEL RACHAEL 
Gossaway 

BEAZELL, LESTER STANTON 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

BEHARKA, ROBERT WILLIAM 
Monaco, Pennsylvania 

BENNETT, CONSTANCE PATRICIA 

Clarksburg 

BENNETT, DANA GLENWOOD 
Roanoke 

BERRY, HAROLD FRED 
Cleveland 

BERRY, SUE MARIE 
Webster Springs 

BOONE, ALICE ELISABETH 
Buckhannon 

BORGER, HOWARD SHAW 
Clarksburg 



BORROR, JEAN LOIS 
Ridgeley 

BOYCE, F. PRESTON 
Hollidays Cove 

BOYLEN, HAROLD K. 
Jane Lew 

BRADY, LESTER CALVIN 
Gassaway 

BRANDLI, GEORGE LUTHER 
Lost Creek 

BROOKS, DWIGHT WARD 
Hamlin 

BROWN, JAMES WILLIAM 
Kermit 

BROWN, McQUAINE LAVAN 
Arnold, Pennsylvania 

BURNETT, JOHN FRANCIS 
West Redding, Connecticut 

BURTON, DOROTHY JEAN 
Moundsville 





BUTLER, CHARLES EUGENE 
Park 

BUTLER, JUNE LUCILLE 
Park 

CARNEY, JOHN 
Weston 

CASE, CECILE L. 
Cowen 

CASE, LOUIS CYRIL 
Clarksburg 

CASEY, EDWARD NEIL 
Salem 

CASTO, ANNE STEWART 
Warren, Ohio 

CHAFFE, BARBARA JEAN 
Hartford, Connecticut 

CHILCOTE, DAE ANNE 
Ambridge, Pennsylvania 

CHRISTENSEN, ROBERT HAROLD 
Weston 

CLARK, RICHARD MILES 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

COCHRAN, GERALD FRANKLIN 
Buckhannon 

COLEMAN, ROBERT IRA 
Volga 

CONTOS, CHRISTINE 
Weston 

COOK, MARGARET JANE 
Amherstdale 

CORDER, JOHN ROBERT 
Jane Lew 

CORNELL, BURTON B. 
Parsons 

COURTNEY, JOHN EDGAR 
Salem 



I'ar/t One Hundred "n<i Sixty-six 



'■"■— —■"■—■■" "-— — » "— "-- — -' "■ T •§••- 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

MOUNTAINEER 
SALES COMPANY 

▲ 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



A pack of cigarettes costs more than wonder 
working NATURAL GAS, the world's greatest fuel. 

Our 45,760 household consumers pay an 
average of only \2ViC a day for house and water 

heating, cooking and refrigeration AND the 

price is the same as before the war. 



HOPE NATURAL GAS COMPANY 



* 



Keepsake 

D\l A ■ • M • ilN?C 




Hilleary Andrew 

Jeweler 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



+ - 
I 



I I 



■■+ * 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

MORRIS FREEDENBERG 



"A Wesleyan Booster' 



WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



ME )948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred and Sixty-seven 



74e (?Um o£ ?95t 



COYNER, MARK 
Buckhannon 

CRAWFORD, WILLIAM MAYNARD 
Weston 

CROSS, BETTY MAXINE 
Gassaway 

CROSS, MARGARET LOUISE 

Clarksburg 

CROSS, WILLARD EUGENE 
Hendricks 

CULPEPPER, MARVIN WESLEY 
Vienna 

CUNNINGHAM, VIRGINIA ALICE 
Lumberport 

CURRY, CHARLES ALLEN, JR. 
Buckhannon 

CURTIS, NORMAN KENT 
Hemlock 

DAVIS, BETTY LOU 
Jeffrey 

DAVIS, HOWARD 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

DAWKINS, CLARENCE ABNER 
Parkersburg 

DAWS, BETTY JEAN 
Parkersburg 

DEVEY, DAVID JAMES 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

DIXON, HOWARD EARLE 
Arlington, Massachusetts 

DODRILL, CARL DOTSON 
Duffy 

DUNKLE, JACK DRENOLD 
Pennsboro 

DURBIN, WILBUR LeROY 
Bridgeville, Pennsylvania 



EAKIN, ROBERT 
Weston 

EDMUNDSON, PAULINE WINIFRED 
Bridgeport 

ELDER, STANLEY WAYNE 
St. Marys 

ENGLE, HERMETTA GRAHAM 
Tallmansville 

ESKEW, MYRA LEE 
Buckhannon 

FAIRLEY, GEORGE F. 
Wheeling 

FARRIS, HELEN MARIE 
Clarksburg 

FARRIS, RALPH DEE 
Clarksburg 

FEOLA, JULIUS STEPHEN 
Buckhannon 

FITZWATER, EMOGENE FAYE 
Diana 

FITZWATER, LORENE 
Summersville 





FLOWERS, EARL NEWTON 
Clarksburg 

FLYNN, JOHN EDWARD 
Clarksburg 

FOLIO, RUSSELL JOSEPH 
Clarksburg 

FORINO, ALFRED BELISARIO 
Long Island, New York 

FORTNEY, BRADY ARLOS 
Clarksburg 

FRIEND, JACK DOUGLAS 
Friendsville, Maryland 

FURR, BETTY LOU 
Volga 

GAINOR, ROBERT 
Elkins 

GARABEDIAN, PETER 
Whitinsville, Massachusetts 

GARNER, WARREN L. 
Renick 

GARRETT, ROBERT GUY 
Buckhannon 

GARRISON, HARLAN WOODSON 
Adrian 

GASTON, WILLIAM ROLLINS 
Buckhannon 

GENTRY EDSOL LINNELL 
Crob Orchard 

GRAHAM, NATHAN HUGH 
Industry, Pennsylvania 

GRIMMETT, CLAUD CURTIS 
Craigmoore 

GRIZZLE, BARBARA RUTH 
Clarksburg 

GROSE, WILLIAM GERALD 
Clarksburg 



Page One Hundred and Btxty-eight 






* * 



RALSTONS DRUG STORE 

▲ 

Weston 's Oldest Prescription Store 

A 

Phone 911 
WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



ADRIAN 

BUCKHANNON 

BANK 



WISHES YOU MANY, MANY 
SUCCESSFUL YEARS 



ANDREWS MOTOR 
COMPANY 

A 

Buick and Pontiac Cars 
International Trucks 

A 

Sales and Service 

A 

WESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



..+ ,§..— .. 

-t *■— ■■■ 

I 
I 



+ 



MARTIN'S CLEANERS 



'STICKLEY" MARTIN 



Florida Street — Phone 1299 
BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 






! i 



I 

l 

-■* 



r HE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



t'ayt one Huntln d ' Sixty -nim 



16e @t<U4. oj ?951 



GWENNAP, WILLIAM THOMAS 
North Braddock, Pennsylvania 

GWINN, JAMES ALEXIUS 
Lockbridge 

HAMILTON, EDGAR R. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

HANNAH, GUY CLEMONT 
Buckhannon 

HARDMAN, SUE ELEANOR 
Middlebourne 

HARMAN, ALONZO LINCOLN 
Bluefield 

HARPER, URAL JACK 

Buckhannon 

HARRIS, JEAN 
Brooklyn, New York 

HARRISON, MARGARET ANN 
Philippi 

HASTINGS, WILLIAM SHANNON 
Charleston 

HARTSAW, RUTH ANN 
Holden 

HATFIELD, BEULAH FRANCES 
Weston 

HAYHURST, LEYLAND SHELBY 
Pennsboro 

HELMICK, GLELMA ORVIN 
Pickens 

HEROLD, NANCY JANE 
Webster Springs 

HERRICK, MARY AGATHA 
Crafton, Pennsylvania 

HICKMAN, ELDEN REED 

Salem 

HICKS, WILLIAM BERKLEY 

McMechen 

HIGH, JULIA LEE 
Charleston 



HINKLE, PATRICIA ANN 
Clarksburg 

HINKLE, ROBERT EUGENE 
Hall 

HINKLE, ZANER GARFIELD 
Buckhannon 

HOOD, GARTH EDWIN 
New Martinsville 

HOPKINS, JOAN CRETCHER 
Wardensville 

HORN, ROBERT HARRY 
Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

HORNICKEL, KATHRYN ELIZABETH 
Monongahela, Pennsylvania 

HORSTMAN, ROBERT THOMAS 
Moundsville 

HUNT, MARTHA ANN 
Burton 

HYDE, RICHARD 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

JOBSON, WILLIAM LEE 
Portsmouth, Virginia 

JONES, RICHARD HARLAN 
Buckhannon 

KINCAID, HARRY BRYAN 
Walkersville 

KING, JAMES DANIEL 
Mount Hope 

KIRBY, CHARLOTTE JEAN 
Bluefield 

KITCHEN, BETTY ANN 
Gauley Bridge 

KNOTTS, BETTY JEAN 
Palatka, Florida 

LeMAR, WILLIAM WAYNE 
Kingwood 

LANTZ, BETTY LOUISE 
Crellin, Maryland 



LASHLEY, RALPH EMMERT 
Cumberland, Maryland 

LAWSON, MARY ELLEN 
Clarksburg 

LEFTWICH, HARRY CLAYTON 
Connellsville, Pennsylvania 

LINGER, ELBERT LEON 
Buckhannon 

LINGER, MELBA JUNE 
Buckhannon 

LISENSKY, ROBERT PAUL 
Millvale, Pennsylvania 

LITTLE, HARRY ALBERT 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

LOGSDON, EDITH MAY 
Moundsville 

LOTTIG, ROY BLAIR 
Cumberland, Maryland 

LOUGH, PATTIE RAE 
Hundred 

LOWE, PHYLLIS IRENE 
Buckhannon 

MARPLE, NORMA LOU 
Heaters 

MARSHALL, MARGARET LOUISE 
Sunlight 

MASON, ESTHER LAYNE 
Weston 

MAYNARD, EARL EDWARD 
Matewan 

MEYERS, STANLEY 
Baltimore, Maryland 

MILAZZO, FRANCIS HENRY 
Syracuse, New York 

MILLER, LENORE 
Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

MONACK, JACK NELSON 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 



Pagi One Hundred and Ht venty 



+ 



+ 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



THE WESLEYAN 
STUDENT UNION 



"Your Home Away From Home" 






THE H48 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS — PATRONIZE THEM' 



■ Hundi ■ ■< I '" 



7<£e ^W4 *£ 1951 



MOORE, RAYMOND LEDBETTER 
Westernport, Maryland 

MORAN, NEAL WATSON 
Simpson 

MURDOCK, NANCY JEAN 
Pompton Lakes, New Jersey 

MURPHY, BETTY NAN 
Logan 

McBRIDE, JAMES CHARLES 
McMechen 

McCOY, JOHN JUNIOR 
Buckhannon 

McKEE, BENTON ROBERT 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

McKITA, CARLETON PAUL 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

McWHORTER, REBECCA JUDY 
Moorefield 

NESTER, JOSEPH BRONSON 
Clarksburg 

NORRIS, MARY JANE 
Weston 

NORRIS, VICTOR EUGENE 
Farmington 

OLDAKER, WILLIAM BAILEY 
Buckhannon 

OSBURN, VERN EARL 
Buckhannon 

PARKES, CORINNE FLASER 
Unrontown, Pennsylvania 

PAUL, RICHARD ALTON 
Elkins 

PAYNE, HELEN LOUISE 
Webster Springs 

PERKEY, ZANE GREY 
Weston 

PHILLIPS, ANNA BELLE 
French Creek 



PHILLIPS, DOROTHY MAE 
Parkersburg 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM ORIS 
Beckley 

PIERCE, SALLY LEE 
Clarksburg 

POST, DORIS JEAN 
Buckhannon 

POST, WILLIAM KARL 
Roanoke 

PRITTS, MELVIN J. 
Normalville, Pennsylvania 

PUGH, EDWARD NICHOLSON 
Beckley 

QUEEN, GLENN MARLYN 
Buckhannon 

QUEEN, RUSSELL VON 
Buckhannon 

RADER, DORIS JEAN 
Frame 

RANKIN, MARGARET ANN 
Westernport, Maryland 




RAYMOND, DOMINICK JOHN 
Clarksburg 

REILLY, WILLIAM LEO 
Bayonne, New Jersey 

RICHMOND, CLAYTON 
Tunnelton 

RIFFE, JAMES HENRY 
Beckley 

RINEHART, WAYNE DALE 
Aurora 

RITTER, JENNINGS G. 
Hall 

ROBINSON, ANN ELISABETH 
Grafton 

ROESSING, GEORGE HENRY 
Buckhannon 

ROHRER, ALVIN HOWARD 
Beckley 

ROMINE, RELAND RAY 
Buckhannon 

ROUSH, ELLEN GERTRUDE 
Beckley 

ROUSH, NANCY ELLISON 
Weston 

RUSH, HELEN DOLORES 
Clarksburg 

SATTERFIELD, SHIRLEEN MARIE 
Fairmont 

SCHAAL, ALICE MAE 
Lansdowne, Pennsylvania 

SCHIBLEY, RAYMOND DOWELL 
Washington, , D. C. 

SCHROYER, ROBERT FRANKLIN 
Friendsville, Maryland 

SELBY, NELLE ELIZABETH 
Webster Springs 

SHAFFER, PATRICIA SUE 
Charleston 



Dtu Hundred and Si venty-two 



+ + 



PEOPLE'S GROCERY 



and 



MEAT MARKET 



a 



Buckhannon 9 s Food Shop 



BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



?? 



THOMPSONS PHARMACY 

A 

DRUGS 
COSMETICS 

▲ 

BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 






* + 
i 



FEOLA'S FLOWERS 



FLOWERS 
For All Occasions 

A 

Phone 190 

BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 




I * 

i I 
i I 
I I 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS 

BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA 



+ 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS — PATRONIZE THEM! 



Pagi "--■ Hun&n 'i and 8t > nty-thrt ■ 



7<£e ^W4 o£ ?951 



SHAVER, RACHEL FAYE 
Buckhonnon 

SHREWSBERRY, WILLIAM CURTIS 
Odd 

SHUMAKER, LAYNE ALLEN 
Buckhonnon 

SIMONS, DORIA ANN 
Buckhonnon 

SKOGLUND, RICHARD DAVID 
Clarksburg 

SLACK, THOMAS WAY 
Wheeling 

SMITH, EVELYN MARGUERITE 
French Creek 

SMITH, MABEL H. 
Richwood 

SNOWDEN, DOROTHY MAE 
Parkersburg 

SNYDER, ELIZABETH VICTORIA 
Valley Bend 

SNYDER, JAMES BURRELL 
Baltimore, Maryland 

SPELSBERG, CHARLES AUGUST 
Clarksburg 

SPENCER, CHARLES HUGH 
Richwood 

SPENCER, CLARICE ELIZABETH 
Buckhonnon 

SPURLOCK, WILLIAM CLAYCE 
Clarksburg 

STALNAKER, CAROL JEAN 
Buckhonnon 

STARCHER, FOSTER EUGENE 
Hur 

STEPHENS, ROSALIA ANN 
Washington 



STEVENS, MILROY D. 
Mt. Clare 

STOKUM, WILLIAM FORREST 
Brooklyn, New York 

STROTHER, SAMUEL L. 
Clarksburg 

STUCK, HELEN JEANETTE 
Perryopolis, Pennsylvania 

STUMP, RANDALL THEODORE 
Buckhonnon 

SWEENEY, JAMES KELLY 
Weston 

SWITZER, GEORGE EMILE 
Clarksburg 

SWITZER, JACK HERMAN 
Clarksburg 

TEETS, LESLIE 
Buckhonnon 

TENNEY, ROBERT NORMAN 
Adrian 

TETRICK, ROBERT MARSHALL 
Buckhonnon 

THARP, ROBERT PAYNE 
Weston 

TOMER, ALBERT EUGENE 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

TUCKER, JOHN LEE 
Ravenswood 

UMSTEAD, EUGENIA LEE 
Grantsville 

UPDIKE, MARGARET ALICE 
Ithaca, New York 

VAUGHT, JO ANN 
Buckhonnon 

VOLL, CHARLES A 
Buckhonnon 

VOLLE, ROBERT LEON 
Bridgeville, Pennsylvania 



VUNKANNON, DONALD EUGENE 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

WAGGONER, MARGARET ALICE 
Grafton 

WELSHON, DONALD WOODRUFF 
Moundsville 

WENTZ, GEORGE DONALD 
Huntington 

WETHERED, PATRICIA MAY 
Buckhonnon 

WILEY, GUY 
Pennsboro 

WILLIAMS, DORIS JOAN 
Green Village, New Jersey 

WILLIAMS, FRANCES DUKE 
Beckley 

WILLIAMS, LUCY LEE 
Glen Daniel 

WILSON, CHARLES B. 
Little Otter 

WILSON, JANICE NAVOO 
Rock Cave 

WILSON, JOHN PAUL 
Cutler, Indiana 

WINNICHUKE, MARGARET ELEANOR 
Bridgeville, Pennsylvania 

WINSTON, PATRICIA ANN 
Surveyor 

WOLFE, CHARLES SCHOLL 
Parkersburg 

WOOLFORD, MELVIN LEE 
Fort Ashby 

WRAY, JULIA ALICE 
Glen White 

YOST, CHARLES LEROY 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

YOUNG, ANNA LOU 
Gassaway 



Papt One Hundred and Sevt nty-jour 



+ *■- 






COMPLIMENTS 

of 

REED 
Service Store 



RADIO AND 
SOUND SERVICE 



18 West Main Street 

Phone 251 
BUCKHANNON, W. VA. 



I 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

W. T. GRANT 
and Compny 



"Known 
for Values" 



! 

i 



I I 



EMPIRE 

LAUNDRY COMPANY 



+ 



i I 



Clarksburg, 
West Virginia 



i I 
I I 
I I 

i i 
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i I 



WESTON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



Master 
Cleaners & Dyers 



'Satisfying Services' 



— + * 



MANHATTAN 
RESTAURANT 

Wishes the Class 
of '48 

Success and the 
Best in Life 



CLARKSBURG, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

POUNDSTONE 
DRUG COMPANY 



24 West Main Street 

Phone 432 

BUCKHANNON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



* *■ 



I I 
I I 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 



W. C. CARPER, 

D.D.S. 

R. L HAWKINS, 

D.D.S. 






i 

— 4- 
— * 



i i 



4._.„ 



I 
+- 



, — + * 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

WARD'S 

CLEANERS & DYERS 



'We Back Wesleyan' 

▲ 

Phone 222 

BUCKHANNON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



i i 

i ! 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

P. K. CASTO 

GROCERY 

and 

CASTO 
RESTAURANT 



BUCKHANNON, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



+ * 



THE 1948 MURMURMONTIS WAS LARGELY MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR ADVERTISERS— PATRONIZE THEM! 



Page One Hundred and Seventy-five 







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