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Full text of "[Musical bouquet] Sixty selected popular songs"

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SIXTY 



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THE LADS OF THE VILLAGE. 

Melody, with Words and Pianoforte Accompaniments, in "The Musical Bouquet," No. 177 Price 3d. 

Allegretto. 
# Jg* Music by Chas. Dibdin. 



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gun, When the gay voice of glad - ness re - sounds from each bow'r, And thou 

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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

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CATAWBA WINE: 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2107, Pr. 3d. 

Words by Longfellow. Music by W. R. Dempster. 

Allegretto con spirito. 



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This song of mine Is a song of the vine, To be sung by 



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There grows no vine 
By the haunted Rhine, 

By the Danube or Guadalquiver, 
Nor on island or cape, 
That bears such a grape, 

As grows by the beautiful river. 
Very good in its way 
Is the Verzenay, 

Or the Sillery, soft and creamy ; 
But Catawba wine 
Has a taste more divine, 

More dulcet, delicious, and dreamy. 



And pure as a spring 
Is the wine I sing, 

And to praise it one needs but name it, 
For Catawba wine 
Has need of no sign, 

No tavern bush to proclaim it. 
And this song of the vine, 
This greeting of mine, 

The winds and the birds shall deliver, 
To the Queen of the West, 
In her garlands dress'd, 

On the banks of the beautiful river. 



CEASE FOND HEART. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2023, Pr. 3d. 
Words by Horace Martin. Music by C. M. yon Weber. 



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Far from home, no smiles to greet me, 
No one sees the exile's tear, 

And my heart for e'er is beating 
For the land to me so dear. 

All around though grand and lovely, 
Mountains, lakes, and valleys green, 



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die! 



Seem, alas ! but to remind me, 
And recall each home-lov'd scene. 

Cease, fond heart, no longer grieve thee, 
Soon the grasp of friendships hand 

Will, with smiles of welcome cheer me, 
In my own lov'd Switzerland. 



POPULAR SONGS AND BAXLADS. 



THE TIGHT LITTLE ISLAND. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the "Musical Bouquet," No 614, Pr. 3d. 
Moderato. Words and Music bv Dibdix. 



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Julius Cassar the Roman, who yielded to no man, Then the Spanish Armada set out to invade her, 

Came by water, he could not come by land, Quite sure if they ever came nigh land, 

And Dane, Pict, and Saxon, their homes turn'd theirThey could not do less than tuck up Queen Bess, 



And take their full swing in the Island ; 
The drones came to plunder the Island, 
Oh ! the poor Queen and the Island, 
But snug in the hive, 
The Queen was alive, 
And buz was the word at the Island. 

These proud pufF'd np cakes thought to make duck3 
and drakes 
Of our wealth, but they scarcely could spy land, 
It would be much more handy to leave this Nor- Ere our Drake had the luck to make their pride 
mandy, duck, 

And live on yon beautiful Island." And stoop to the lads of the Island ; 

Says he, " 'tis a snug little Island," The good Wooden Walls of the Island, 

Shan't us go visit the Island? Huzza ! for the lads of the Island, 

Hop, skip, and jump, Devil or Don, 

There he was plump, Let 'em come on, 

And he kicked up a dust in the Island. But how'd they come off at the Island. 



backs on, 
And all for the sake of our Island. 
Oh ! what a snug little Island, 
They'd all have a touch at the Island, 

Some were shot dead, 

Some of them fled, 
And some stayed to live in the Island. 

Then a very great war man, call'd Billy the Norman, 
Cried " hang it, I never lik'd my land, 



Yet party deceit help'd the Normans to beat, 

Of traitors they managed to buy land, 
By Dane, Saxon, or Pict we had never been lick'd, 
Had they stuck to the King of the Island; 
He lost both his life and his Island, 
Poor Harold the King of the Island ; 
That's very true, 
What could he do ? 
Like a Briton he died for his Island. 



I don't wonder much that the French and the Dutch 

Have since been oft tempted to try land, 
And I wonder much less they have met no success, 
For why should we give up our Island ? 
Oh ! 'tis a wonderful Island, 
All of 'em long for the Island, 
Hold a bit there, 
Let 'em take fire and air, 
But we'll have the Sea and the Island. 



Then since Freedom and Neptune have hitherto kept 
tune 
In each saying "This shall be my land," 
Should the Army of England, or all they can bring, 
land, 
We'd show them some play for the Island ; 
We'd fight for our right to the Island, 
We'd give them enough of the Island, 
Invaders should just 
Bite at the dust, 
Bnt not a bit more of the Island. 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. { 

WE MET BY CHANCE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1985, Pr. 3d. 

Words by H. Martin. Music by F. Kucken. 

Allegretto. 



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At eve - ning ere the sun has set, I has - ten to her bow'r, 



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glan - ces meet the u - sual way, Our glan - ces meet the u - sual way, Our 



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And many times I've shared the bliss, 

But how I cannot say, 
Her lips were close, and so a kiss, 

And neither whisper'd nay ; 
I do not ask, she does not give. 
Our lips will meet but nothing say, 
As if bv chance the usual wav. 



The dew-drop loves to woo the rose, 
The white, the pink, the red, 

It leaves a kiss before it goes, 
Bnt not a word is said ; 

'Tis thus with us as both must know, 

But neither tells the other so. 



EICH AND RARE WERE THE GEMS SHE WORE. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1751, Pr. 3d. 
Words by T. Moore. 
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" Lady, dost thou not fear to stray, 
So lone and lovely, thro' this bleak way ? 
Are Erin's sons so good or so cold, 
As not to be tempted by woman or gold ? ' 

".Sir Knight, I feel not the least alarm, 
No son of Erin will offer me harm ; 



For tho' thev love woman and golden store, 
Sir Knight, they love honour and virtue more." 

On she went, and her maiden smile, 
In safety lighted her round the green isle ; 
And bless'd for ever is she who relied 
Upon Erin's honour and Erin's pride. 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



THE RAINY DAT. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 952-3, Pr.6d. 
Words by H. W. Longfellow. Music by C. Reinhakdt. 



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My life is cold, and dark, and dreary, 
It rains, and the wind is never weary ; 
My thoughts still cling to the mould'ring Past, 
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast, 
And the days are dark and dreary. 



is dark and drea - - - - ry. 

Be still, sad heart, and cease repining, 
Behind the cloud is the sun still shining ; 
Thy fate is the common lot of all, 
Into each life some rain must fall — 
Some days must he dark and dreary. 



THOU LOVELY ANGEL MINE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1934, Pr. 3d. 

Music by C. L. Fishek. 



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When slowly on the glist'ning waves, 
The hark floats homeward down the Rhine, 

With music echo'd from its caves, 
I think of thee, my light divine, 

I think of thee, of thee, 
Thou lovely angel mine. 



When, in a weary wanderer's eve, 

The lights of well-known places shine ; 

And move his lips to songs of joy: 
I think of thee, my light divine, 

I think of thee, of thee, 
Thou lovely angel mine. 



POPDAR SONGS AND BALLADS. ( 

THE NEW YEAR'S BELLS. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet." No. 1994, Pr. 3d. 
Words by Tennyson. Music by F. Boott. 

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go - ing, let it go, Ring out the false, Ring in the true. 

Ring in the valiant man and free, 
The larger heart, the kindlier hand ; 
Ring out the darkness of the land, 

Ring in the light that is to be. 



Ring out the grief that saps the mind, 
For those that here we see no more, 
Ring out the fear of rich and poor, 

Riug out redress for all mankind. 



THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1740-1, Pr. 6iL 
Words by T. Moore. 
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I'll not leave thee, thou lone one, 

To pine on the stem ; 
Since the lovely are sleeping, 

Go, sleep thou with them: 
Thus kindly 1 scatter 

Thy leaves o'er the bed, 
Where thy mates of the garden 

Lie scentless and dead. 



So soon may I follow 

When friendships decay, 
And from love's shining circle 

The gems drop away ! 
When true hearts lie wither'd, 

And fond ones are flown, 
Oh ! who would inhabit 

This bleak world alone ? 



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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



FLY NOT YET. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1748, Pr. 3d. ' 

Words by T. Moore. 
Lively. 



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To break its links so soon. . 

Nor kindle till the night, returning, 
Brings their genial hour for burning 
Oh ! stay — oh ! stay — 
When did morning ever break, 
And find such beaming eyes awake, 
As those that sparkle here ! 



this to - night, that oh ! 'tis pain 

Fly not yet, the fount that play'd 
In times of old thro' Ammon's shade, 
Tho' icy cold by day it ran, 
Yet still, like souls of mirth, began 

To burn when night was near. 
And thus should woman's heart and looks 
At noon be cold as winter brooks, 



FAREWELL! BUT WHENEVER YOU WELCOME THE HOUR. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1797, Pr. 3d. 

Words by T. Moore. 
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vi - sion, that threw Its en - chant-ment a - round him, while ling' - ring with you ! 



And still, on that evening, when pleasure fills up, 
To the highest top-sparkle each heart and each 

cup, 
Where'er my path lies, he it gloomy or bright, 
My soul, happy friends, shall bo with you that 

night, 
Shall join in your revels, your sport, and your 

wiles, 
And return to me beaming all o'er with your smiles — 
Too blest, if it tells me that, mid the gay cheer, 
Some kind voice had murmured, "I wish he were 

here ! " 



Let Fate do her worst, there are relics of joy, 
Bright dreams of the past, which she cannot de- 
stroy, 
Which come in the night-time of sorrow and care, 
And bring back the features that joy used to wear. 
Long, long be my heart with such memories fill'd, 
Like the vase in which roses have once been dis- 

till'd— 
Tou may break, you may ruin the vase, if you will 
But the scent of the roses will hang round it still. 



BEWARE! BEWARE! 

Published, fnll Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," Nos. 950-1, Pr. 6d. 

Words by H. W. Longfellow. Music by Franz Kullak. 

Allegretto Moderato. 



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thee ! She's fool - ing thee! Trust her not, She's fool - ing thee! Be - ware, Be - ware! 



She has two eyes so soft and brown, 
Take care ! Take care ! 

She gives a side glance and looks down, 
Beware ! Beware ! 

Trust her not, she's fooling thee, 
Beware ! Beware ! 

And she has hair of a golden hue, 
Take care ! Take care 1 

And what she says it is not true, 
Beware ! Beware ! 

Trust her not, she's fooling thee, 
Beware ! Beware I 



She has a bosom as white as snow, 
Take care ! Take care ! 

She knows how much it is best to show, 
Beware ! Beware ! 

Trust her not, she's fooling thee, 
Beware 1 Beware ! 

She gives thee a garland woven fair, 
Take care ! Take care ! 

It is a fool's cap for thee to wear, 
Beware ! Beware ! 

Trust her not, she's fooling thee, 
Beware ! Beware 1 



10 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

LESBTA HAS A BEAMING EYE. 



Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1781, Pr. 8d. 

Words by T. Moore. 
P Moderato. 

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ma - ny eyes, But love in yours my No - ra Crei - na ! 



Lesbia wears a robe of gold, 

But all so close the nymph has laced it, 
Not a charm of beauty's mould 

Presumes to stay where nature placed it. 
Oh ! my Nora's gown for me, 

That floats as wild as mountain breezes, 
Leaving ev'ry beauty free 

To sink or swell as heaven pleases ; 
Yes, my Nora Creina dear, 

My simple, graceful Nora Creina ; 
Nature's dress is loveliness, 

The dress you wear my Nora Creina. 



Lesbia has a wit refin'd, 

But when its points are gleaming round us, 
Who can tell if they're design'd 

To dazzle merely or to wound us ? 
Pillow'd on my Nora's heart, 

In safer slumber love reposes ; 
Bed of peace, whose roughest part 

Is but the crumpling of the roses. 
Oh ! my Nora Creina dear, 

My mild, my artless Nora Creina, 
Wit, tho' bright, has not the light 

That warms your eyes, my Nora Creina 1 



GOODNIGHT! FAREWELL! 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 719, Pr.3d. 

Music by F. Kucken. 

P Con anima. -■"" ^ 



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dieu ! 



Out from thy heart was breathed a sigh 
When last thou said farewell 1 

A look of love beam'd from thine eye, 
'Twas more than tongue could tell. 

No pledge of troth thou gav'st to me, 
And yet thy faith is known ; 



For though I may be far from thee, 

I claim thee as my own. 
Farewell, my only lore, 
A thousand times adieu. 
Good night, good night, farewell, good night. 



THE HARP THAT ONCE THROUGH TARA'S HALLS. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1747 Pr. 3d. 
Words by T. Moore. 
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No more to chiefs and ladies bright 

The harp of Tara swells ; 
The chord alone, that breaks at night, 

Its tale of ruin tells : 



Thus Freedom now so seldom wakes, 

The only throb she gives 
Is when some heart indignant breaks, 

To show that still she lives. 



12 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



THE SOLDIEE'S ADIEU. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 667, Pr. 3d, 

Words and Music by Dibdin. 
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an - gel down, Shall call a guar-dian an - gel down, To watch me in the bat-tie. 



My safety thy fair truth shall be, 

As sword and buckler serving ; 
My life shall be more dear to me, 

Because of thy preserving: 
Let peril come, let horrors threat, 

Let thund'ring cannons rattle, 
I'll fearless seek the conflict's heat, 
Assur'd when on the wings of love, 
To heav'n above thy fervent orisons are flown, 
The tender pray'r thou put'st up there, 
Shall call a guardian angel down, 

To watch me in the battle. 



Enough, with that benignant smile, 

''Some kindred god inspired thee, 
Who saw thy bosom, void of guile, 

Who wonder'd and admir'd thee : 
I go assur'd, my life adieu, 

Tho' thund'ring cannons rattle, 
Tho' murd'ring carnage stalk in view, 
When on the wings of my true love, 
To heav'n above thy fervent orisons are flown, 
The tender pray'r thou put'st up there. 
Shall call a guardian angel dowu, 

To watch me in the battle. 



WHEN THOU WERT NIGH. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Mcsical Bouquet," No. 1954, Pr.3d. 
Words by Eliza Cook. Music by J. R. Thomas. 

Andante espressivo. 



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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



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al -wavs scrune a flow'r as well. Th( 



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But, now thou'rt gone, the morning ray. 
Seems dim and dull as evening's close, 

I see the cypress on my way, 

But cannot find the rich red rose. 



The cloud now comes with gloom alone, 
The weed now springs with baneful pow'r ; 

With secret tears my heart must own, 
Thou wert the rainbow and the flow'r. 



GO WHEKE GLORY WAITS THEE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1742, Pr. 3d. 

Words by T. Moore. 
P Slow and tenderly. 



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But when friends are nearest, And when joys are dear-est, Oh! then re-mem-ber me. 



When, at eve, thou rovest, 
By the star thou lovest, 

Oh ! then remember me. 
Think, when home returning, 
Bright we've seen it burning, 

Oh ! thus remember me. 
Oft as summer closes, 
When thine eye reposes, 
On its ling'ring roses, 

Once so lov'd by thee, 
Think of her who wove them, 
Her who made thee love them- 

Oh ! then remember me. 



When around thee, dying, 
Autumn leaves are lying, 

Oh ! then remember me. 
And, at night, when gazing 
On the gay hearth blazing, 

Oh ! still remember me. 
Then, should music, stealing 
All the soul of feeling, 
To thy heart appealing, 

Draw one tear from thee ; 
Then let mem'ry bring thee, 
Strains I used to sing thee, 

Oh ! then remember me. 



14 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



THE YOUNG MAY MOON. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1793, Pr. 3d. 
Words by T. Moore. 
P Lively. 



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length - en our days, Is to steal a few hours from the night, my dear. 



Now all the world is sleeping, love, 

But the sage, his star.watch keeping, love, 

And I, whose star, 

More glorious far, 
Is the eye from that casement peeping, love! 



Then awake, till rise of sun, my dear ! 
The sage's glass we'll shun, my dear, 

Or in watching the flight 

Of bodies of light, 
He might happen to take thee for one, my dear. 



MY HEART'S ON THE RHINE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the "Musical Bouquet," No. Ill, Pr. 3d. 

Music by Speyek. 
P Vivace. 



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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



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My heart's on the Rhine, My 



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own na - tive land. My heart's on the Rhine, My 



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The bright orb of day changing mist into morn, 
Brought freshly the flowers my cot to adorn ; 
Whilst the glittering waters of streamlet and rill, 
Reflected his rays on the old watermill. 
Fond scene of my boyhood, how sadly I pine, 

To behold thee again ! 
My heart, my heart, oh! my heart's on the Rhine, 



My heart's on the Rhine, the true land of mirth, 
My heart's on the Rhine, the scene of my birth ; 
Those scenes when reflected so clear to my mind, 
Bring nought but regret that I left them behind: 
For there with loved faces I wander'd and play'd, 
And 'long thy lov'd waters I cheerfully stray'd, 
And for ever thy banks and thy waters are mine, 
My heart, my heart, yes ! my heart's on the Rhine 



THE MEETING OF THE WATERS. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Booquet," No. 1753, Pr. 3d. 
Words by T. Moore. 



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fade from my heart ! Ere tho bloom of that val - ley shall fade from my heart. 



Yet it was not that Nature had shed o'er the scene 'Twas that friends, the beloved of my bosom, were near, 

Her purest of crystal and brightest of green ; Who made every scene of enchantment more dear, 

'Twas not the soft magic of streamlet or hill : And who felt how the best charms of nature improve 

Oh, no! it was something more exquisite still. When we see them reflected from looks that we love. 

Sweet vale of Avoca ! how calm could I rest 

In thy bosom of shade, with the friends I love best, 

Where the storms which we feel in this cold world should cease, 

And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace 1 



16 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

THE GREEN TREES WHISPERED LOW AND MILD. 



Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 964-5, Pr. 6d. 

Words by H. W. Longfellow. Music by C. Rexnhardt. 

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ALL'S FOR THE BEST. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., In the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1620, Pr. 3d. 

Words by M. F. Tupper. 
P Allegretto. -> 



Music by J. K. Thomas. 



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All's for the best ! Hope and be hap - py, Then all's for the best ! 



All's for the best! — set this on your standard, 

Soldier of sadness or pilgrim of love, 
Who to the shores of despair may have wander'd, 

A way-wearied swallow or heart-stricken dove. 
All's for the best!— be a man, but confiding, 

Providence tenderly governs the rest, 
And the frail bark of his creature is guiding, 

Wisely and warily — all's for the best ! 

All's for the best, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



All's for the best ! — dispel idle terrors, 

Meet all your fears and your foes in the van ; 
And, in the midst of your dangers and errors, 

Trust like a child and strive like a man. 
All's for the best ! — unfailing, unbounded, 

Providence wishes that all may be blest, 
And both by wisdom and mercy surrounded, 

Hope and be happy, then— all's for the beet! 
All's for the best, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 
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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



'TIS SAD TO PART. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 2111, Pr. 3d. 

Words by C. Sheard. Music by W. H. Montgomery. 

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And when from those we have to part 
Who've loos'd a friendship's tie, 

'Tis then that sorrow wounds the heart 
And makes the bosom sigh ; 

Kind words and acts will ever prove 
The means to bury hate ; 



Then let us all forgive and love, 

Ere it may be too late. 
'Tis sad to part from those we love, 

We ne'er may meet again; 
When kindred spirits friendship prove, 

They sever but with pain. 



EVANGELINE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1600, Pr.3d. 

Words and Music by J. R. Thomas. 
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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



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now she blooms un - fa - ding 

She was lovelier than the glowing 
Of the morning's rosy beam; 

And a light seemed round her flowing, 
Like the radiance of a dream. 



In a bright - er land than ours. 

She faded from our vision, 

Like a calm, sweet summer day; 

But the image of her beauty 
Shall never pass away. 

Alas ! that one, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



THE OLD, OLD STORY. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Ff. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1444-5, Pr. 6d. 

Words by Eliza Cook. Music by W. H. Montgomery. 

P Moderato. 



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Sum-mer moon - beams soft - y play - ing, Light the woods of Cas - tie 



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And there I see a mai-den stray-ing, Where the dark - est sha - dows 



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rare, Mai-den fair, oh ! have a care ; Vows are ma - ny — truth is rare. 



He is courtly, she is simple, 

Lordly doublet speaks his lot; 
She is wearing hood and wimple — 

His the castle, hers the cot. 
Sweeter far she deems his whisper 

Than the night-bird's dulcet trill : 
She is smiling, he beguiling — 

'Tis the " old, old story," still. 
Maiden fair, oh ! have a care — 
Vows are many, truth is rare. 



The autumn sun is quickly going 

Behind the woods of Castle Keep, 
The air is chill, the night wind blowing, 

And there I see a maiden weep. 
Her cheeks are white, her brow is aching, 

The " old, old story," sad and brief, 
Of heart betray'd and left nigh breaking, 

In mute despair and lonely grief. 
Maidens fair, oh have a care — 

Vows are many, truth is rare. 



20 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



DKINK TO HER WHO LONG. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1767, Pr. 3d. 

Words by T. Moore. 
P Playful. 



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wak'd the po - et's sigh — The girl, who gave to Song What Gold could ne - ver buy ! 



At Beauty's door of glass, 

When Wealth and Wit once stood, 
They ask'd her, " Which might pass ? " 

She answer'd, " He who could." 
With golden key Wealth thought 

To pass — but 'twould not do ; 
While Wit a diamond brought, 

Which cut his bright way thro'. 
Then here's to her who long 

Hath wak'd the poet's sigh — 
The girl who gave to song 

What gold could never buy. 



The love that seeks a home 

Where wealth or grandeur shines, 
Is like the gloomy gnome 

That dwells in dark gold mines: 
But oh ! the poet's love 

Can boast a brighter sphere, 
Its native home's above, 

Tho' woman keeps it here. 
Then drink to her who long 

Hath wak'd the poet's sigh — 
The girl who gave to song 

What gold could never buy ! 



THE CAPTAIN WITH HIS WHISKERS. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1992, Pr. 3d. 

Arranged by T. Comer. 
p Allegretto. 



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look-in;: at tha men. 



POPULAR BONGS AND BALLADS. 



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When we met at the ball, I of course thought 'twas 

right 
To pretend that we never had met before that night ; 
But he knew me at once I perceived by his glance, 
So I hung down my head when he ask'd me to dance. 
Oh ! he sat by my side at the end of the set, 
And the sweet words he spoke I shall never forget ; 
For my heart was enlisted and could not get free, 
As the Captain with his whiskers took a sly glance 

at me. 

But he marched from the town, and I saw him no 

more, 
Yet I think of him oft, and the whiskers he wore ; 
I dream all the night, and I talk all the day, 
Of the love of a Captain who went far away. 



I remember, with superabundant delight, [night: 
When we met in the street and we danc'd all the 
And keep in my mind, how my heart jumped with 
glee, [at me, 

As the Captain with his whiskers took a sly glance 

But there's hope, for a friend just ten minutes ago 
Said the Captain's return'd from the war, and I know 
He'll be searching for me with considerable zest ; 
And when I am i'ound — but ah ! you know all the 

rest. 
Perhaps he is here — let me look round the house — 
Keep still, ev'ry one of you — still as a mouse — 
For if the dear creature is here he will be 
With his whiskers a-taking sly glances at me. 



THE MINSTREL BOY. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1794, Pr. 3d, 

Words by T. Moore. 

p Moderato. , . 



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sword, at least, thy rights shall guard, One faith - ful harp shall praise thee." 



The minstrel fell, but the foeman's chain 
Could not bring that proud soul under, 

The harp he lov'd ne'er spoke again, 
For he tore its chords asunder ; 



And said, "No chains shall sully thee, 
Thou soul of love and bravery ! 

Thy songs were made for the pure and free, 
They shall never sound in slavery ! " 



22 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



BELIEVE ME IF ALL THOSE ENDEARING YOUNG CHARMS. 

Published, full Music size, withWords and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1765, Pr. 3d. 

Words by T. Moore, 
j, f) Moderate. 

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It is not while beauty and youth are thine own, Oh ! the heart that has truly lov'd never forgets, 

And thy cheeks unprofaned by a tear, But as truly loves on to the close, 

That the fervour and faith of a soul can be known, As the sun -flow'r turns on her god when he sets 

To which time will but make thee more dear. The same look which she turn'd when he rose. 



PRETTY NELLY. 

Published by permission of Messrs. Metzlek & Co., the Proprietors of the Copyright. 
Words by J. Brougham, Esq. Music by J. E. Thomas. 

p Moderate. . 



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Pretty Nelly, guileless Nelly, 

Pretty Nelly's ever mild, 
Lovely as a poet's dreaming, 

Simple as a very child: 
Let the wealthy boast their splendour, 

Still a greater gift have we, 
For she says, " I am her treasure," 

And she's all the world to me. 

Pretty Nelly, <fcc. (Repeat Chorus.) 



Pretty Nelly, faithful Nelly, 

Pretty Nelly's true as gold, 
With a heart as pure as ever 

Beat within a mortal mould ; 
Are we poor, then, I and Nelly ? 

No I but rich as rich can be, 
For I know I am her treasure, 

And she's all the world to me. 

Pretty Nelly, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



WE'LL BE TRUE TO EACH OTHER. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1955, Pr. 3d. 

Words by Eliza Cook. Music by J. R. Thomas. 

P Moderate). 



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hope for the rest, We'll be true to each o - ther and hope for the rest. 

Let us chafe not unwisely by rudely defying We are parted, but tru3t me it is not for ever, 

The doubts and denials that echo in vain ; Our vows, breathed in earnest, will surely be blest; 

Like the ship in the stream on her anchor relying, So we'll work and we'll wait with Love's fervent 
We'll live on our truth till the tide turns again. endeavour, 

Be true to each other, and hope for the rest. 



24 



POP0LAB SONGS AND BALLADS. 



THE FOND HEARTS AT HOME. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1892, Pv. 3d. 

Music by J. E. Thomas. 
P Andante con espressione. 



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may be thou leav'st us for e - ver, Oh ! stay with the fond hearts at home." 



But dreams of the future allured me, 

Such dreams as young hearts only know, 
When the skies are all sunshine and glory, 

And this earth seems a heaven below ; 
And swiftly my bark bore me onward, 

As gaily she dashed through the foam, 
Par from the arms of my kindred — 

The true hearts, the fond hearts at home. 



Like the beautiful tints of the evening. 

My fancy's bright dream soon was o'er, 
I returned to the home of my fathers, 

To the arms of my kindred once more; 
" Stay, stay," said the lov'd ones at meeting, 

" Oh ! say thou wilt never more roam ;" 
"If there's bliss," I replied, "in this wide world, 

'Ti6 found with the fond hearts at home." 



GATHER YE ROSEBUDS WHILE YE MAY. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1956, Pr. 3d. 
Words by Hekeick. Music by W. Knowles. 

P Moderato. 




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When, in the days of youth and love, 
The heart with joy is glowing, 

Remember age will soon remove 
The pleasures now o'er-flowing. 

Then, be not coy, go use your time, 
And, while ye may, go marry, 



For having lost, but once, your prime, 

Ye may for ever tarry. 
Then gather ye rosebuds while ye may, 

Old Time is ever flying, 
And the same flower which blooms to-day 

To-morrow may be dying. 



WOMAN'S RESOLUTION; 

OR, THE SOBER SECOND THOUGHT. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1881, Pr. 3d, 

Music by L . Heath. 
f) Allegretto. 



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Oh, he whisper'd of devotion, of devotion pure and He was here last night to see me, but he made so 

deep, long a stay, 

And it seemed so very silly, that I almost fell asleep ; I began to think the blockhead never meant to go 
And he thinks it would be pleasant, as we journey away ; 

down the hill, At first I learnt to hate him, and I know I hate him 

To go hand-in-hand together — but I hardly think I still, 

will. Yet he urges me to wed him — but I hardly think I 

will. 

He has told me of a cottage, of a cottage 'mong the I am sure I would not choose him, but that I am 

trees ; fairly in it : 

And don't you think the fellow tumbled down upon For he says if I refuse him, he could not live a 

his knees, minute ; 

While the tears the creature wasted were enough to Now you know that the commandment plainly says 

turn a mill, we must not kill, 

And he begged me to accept him — but I hardly So I've thought the matter over — and I rather think 

think I will. I will. 



26 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

THE FALSE HEARTED. 



Published, fall Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1898, Pr.Sd. 

Music by J. R. Thomas. 

P Moderato. >. 






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and I have lov'd in vain — False heart - ed one, fare - well 1 



So false and yet so fair to see, 

Her dream-like beauty haunts me yet, 
And, tho' she now be dead to me, 

I cannot all forget. 



But now 'tis past, and ne'er again 

Shall love enthrall me with its chain ; 

'Tis past, and I have lov'd in vain — 
False-hearted one, farewell ! 



THE GAY DECEIVER. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1979-80, Pr. 6d. 
Words by Eliza Cook. Music by W. H. Montgomery. 

P Allegro moderato. , , 



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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



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Scout him and flout him with pride and scorn, For he'll 

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pride and scorn, For he'U sue you, and woo you, and leave you for - lorn. 



He holds up his head, and tells of the dead, 

And the wounded his beauty has left ; 
Lightly he'll boast of the love-smitten host 

By his charms of their peace bereft. 
Oh ! heave not a sigh at the blink of his eye, 

Though melting its beam may be ; 
He seeks to entrance your souls with a glance, 

But a gay deceiver is he. 
Scout him and flout him — he worships a stone, 

For the image he doats on is only his own. 



This gallant and gay Sir Harry, they say, 

Has reckon'd his worth in gold, 
Sir Harry is not to be given away, 

He is only a thing to be sold. 
Maidens, don't fret, though his whiskers of jet 

Right daintily trimm'd may be ; 
Oh I give him no part of a woman's warm heart, 

For a gay deceiver is he. 
Scout him and flout him with pride and scorn, 

And leave him and his beauty to live forlorn. 



DEEP GAZE TO GAZE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2022, Pr. 3d 

Music by Carl Wilhelm 
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Deep gaze to 




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can be, my child, Thou 
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Who truly loves, he has no time 
This love in words to measure, 

Who once has lov'd if that is fled, 
Ne'er finds in love a pleasure. 

But what are words ? the blissful glance, 
The firm hand's silent pressure, 



The glowing kiss — they tell the tale 
In words that have no measure. 

But really love, oh ! truly love, 

Sigh, weep, long love complaineth ! 

But shout aloud, through all that lives, 
'Tis love eternal reigneth. 



J>8 POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

BE QUIET DO, I'LL CALL MY MOTHER. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 196S, Pr. 3d. 
P Moderato scherzando. Music by J. R. Thomas. 



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As Kate was sit-ting in a wood, Be - Death an oak tree's leaf - y co - ver, 






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In a subdued tone. 



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qui - et do, I'll call my mo-ther! Be qui - et, 

With a shrill voice. 



be qui - et, 



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call, I'll call my mo-ther! Be quiet do, Be qui - et, I'll call, I'll call my mo-ther! 
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He saw her anger was sincere, 

And lovingly begun to chide her ; 
Then wiping from her cheek the tear, 

He sat him on the grass beside her ; 
He feigned such pretty, am'rous woe, 

Breathed such sweet vows one after t'other, 
She could but smile and whisper — low, 

Be quiet do, I'll call my mother ! 

Be quiet, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



He. talk'd so long, and talk'd so well, 

And vow d he meant not to deceive her, 
Kate felt more grief than she could tell, 

When, with a sigh, he rose to leave her. 
" Ohl John," said she, "and must you go ? 

I love you better than all other ; 
There is no use to hurry so, 

I never meant to call my mother ! 

Be quiet, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



GOOD BYE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1508, Pr. 3d. 

Music by J. R. Thomas. 



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good bye, good bye, good bye, good bye, bye, good bye, 



Good bye, 



good bye, 



The mother sending forth her child 

To meet with cares and strife, 
Breathes through her tears, her doubts, her fears, 

For the lov'd one's future life. 
No cold "Adieu," no "Farewell" lives 

Within her choking sigh, 
But the deepest sob of anguish gives, 

" God bless thee, boy, Good-bye." 

Good-bye, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



Go watch the pale and dying one, 

When the glance has lost its beam, 
When the brow is cold as the marble stone, 

And the world's a passing dream j 
And the latest pressure of the hand, 

The look of the closing eye, 
Yield what the heart must understand — 

A long and last " Good-bye." 

Good-bye, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



WE MEET AGAIN. 

COMPANION TO "GOOD BYE.'* 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bodquet,'' No. 1509, Pr. 3d. 

Music by J. E. Thomas. 
P Andante affettuoso. 
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The wand'rer far from those he loves, 

And all his heart holds dear, 
Oft ling'ring, as he onward roves, 

To check the rising tear : 
When thoughts of home and by-gone days 

Come crowding o'er his brain, 
How sweet the voice within that says, 

"Hope on, we meet again." 

We meet again, &c. (Repeat Cfmrns.) 



And when we near the bed of death, 

Shall watch life's less'ning ray, 
While, as we gaze, the feeble breath 

Is fleeting fast away ; — 
In that dark hour of bitter woe, 

When tears are all in vain, 
Calm o'er the soul these words shall flow, 

"In Heav'n we meet again." 

We meet again, &c. (Repra.t Chorus.) 



so 



POPDLAE SONGS AND BALLADS. 



I KNOW A PRETTY WIDOW. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2036, Pr. 3d 

Music by F. Buckley. 
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Are you sad? how very serious will her handsome Ye old bachelors of forty, who have grown «o bald 

face become; and wise, 

Are you angry? she is wretched, lonely, friendless, Fast young Englishmen of twenty, with the love-locks 

tearful, dumb; in your eyes, 

Are you mirthful? how her laughter, silver-sounding, You may practise all the lessons tanght by Cupid 

will ring out ; since the fall. 

She can lure, and catch and play you as the angler But I know a little widow who would win and fool 

does the trout. you all. 

TOM BOWLING. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 518, Pr. 3d. 

Words and Music by DrBDm. 



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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



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now he's gone a - loft And now he's gone 



loft. 



Tom never from his word departed, 

His virtues were so rare, 
His friends were many and true-hearted, 

His Poll was kind and fair : 
And then he'd sing so blythe and jolly, 

Ah, many's the time and oft ; 
But mirth is turned to melancholy, 

For Tom is gone aloft. 



Yet shall poor Tom find pleasant weather, 

When He who all commands, 
Shall give, to call lite's crew together, 

The word to pipe all hands. 
Thus Death, who Kings and Tars despatches, 

In vain Tom's life has doff 'd, 
For though his body's under hatches, 

His soul has gone aloft. 



HEARTS OF OAK. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Mcsical Booq.het," No. 2026, Pr.3d. 
mf Boldly. . Music by Dr. Boyce. 



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add something more to this won - der - ful year ; To ho - nour we call you — Not 



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press you like slaves — For who are so free as the sous of the waves ? Hearts of 



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Oak are our ships 1 Hearts of Oak are our men ! 



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Stea - dy boys, stea - dy ; We'll fight and we'll con - quer a - gain and a - gain. 



We ne'er see our foes but we wish them to stay, 
They never see us but they wish us away ; 
If they run, why we follow and run them ashore, 
For if they won't fight us we cannot do more ! 

Hearts of Oak, &c. (Repeat Chorus.") 

They vow they'll invade us, if all lose their lives, 
But that scarcely frightens our children and wives; 



But should their screw steamers in darkness get o'er, 
Free Britons they'll find to receive them on shore ! 
Hearts of Oak, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 

Our Rifles are ready our rights to maintain — 
Like their sires be victorious again and again ; 
Then cheer up, my lads, let them come if they mean, 
And we'll all fight like Britons for country and Queen ! 
Hearts of Oak, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



82 



POPULAR SONGS ANT BALLADS. 

BE WHAT YOU SEEM TO BE. 



Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1500-1, Pr. 6d. 

Words by B. S. Montgomery. Music by W. H. Montgomery. 

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Be what you seem, Let Truth be your com - pats And be what you seem ! 

Be what you seem to be, staunch friend or foe, " Honour and Truth ever win men's esteem " — 

Steadily, manfully, onward still go ; Let this be your motto, and be what you seem. 



IN THE SPRING TIME. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 1627, Pr. 3d 
Words by Horace Martin. Music by Flotow. 

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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



33 




Thoughts of grate - ful me - mo - ry, Thoughts of grate - ful me - mo - ry. 



Joy has come, and sorrow's dying, 
For thy smiles have cheered the past, 

Ever on thy faith relying, 
Thou wilt love me to the last ; 



I was left thee — to thee gireu, 
And have had a mother's care, 

Thy reward will be in heaven 

When the angels greet thee there. 



THE PORTER SONG. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 1628, Pr. 3d. 
Words by Horace Martin. Music by Flotow. 

p Jovially. 



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And who among all this jovial throng 
Will praise the beer in joyous song ? 

You're all agreed? Ah, well! 
Let all who will deride and jeer, 
What more hearty than porter-beer? 



So bright, and clear, and fragrant, too — 
My comrades all, I drink to you ! 
Hurrah, the porter, it drives away fear, 
Hurrah, the malt, the hops, and the beer, 
Hurrah, tra la la tra la la tra la la. 



34: POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

THE WIDOW'S DREAM. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2093, Pr. 3d. 
Words by T. Loker, Esq. Music by W. H. Montgomery 



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Ed -win first wooed me, a gal-lant Hus-sar. The moon dim - ly shone, and the 



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gain stood be - fore me As when he first wooed me, a gall - lant Hus-sar. 



"Oh, Ellen !" he cried, "give no heed to their story, 

Who say I am fallen and sleep with the slain ; 
Behold me return'd, crown'd with laurels and glory, 

In safety to home and my Ellen again : 
Again through the wild wood and green shady bow'rs, 

We'll seek with our darling the sweet-breathing 
flow'rs, 
And a foretaste of heav'n again shall be ours, 

As when you first call'd me your gallant Hussar." 



Oh ! my heart leapt with rapture again to behold him, 

I thought on his breast was a bright shining star, 
Which seem'd, as I eagerly strove to enfold him, 

To vanish, disclosing the life-letting scar. 
I awoke from my dream, 'twas the dawning of morning, 

So cheerless and cold with the sad truth returning, 
And knew that I still was a widow left mourning, 

For ever bereft of my gallant Hussar. 






POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

MARTHA, MARTHA, THOU WILT LEAVE ME. 



35 



Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bocquet," No. 1585, Pr.3d 

Words by Horace Martin. Music by Flotow. 

P Allegro moderato. 



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36 POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

THE MOONLIT SEA. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical BonQUET," No. 1507, Pr. 3d. 

p Allegretto moderato. 



Music by J. R. Thom-as. 



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bright moon - lit sea, No Ion - ger de - lay love, I'm wait - ing for thee. 

Come away, love, away, oh, why dost thou stay ? My bosom is burning with eager delight, 
'Tis love's witching hour, love, oh haste thee, I pray,To gaze on thy beauty, thou queen of the night. 
Above and below all is calm and serene, Then come, love, with me o'er the bright moonlit sea, 

It wants but thy presence to perfect the scene. No longer delay, love, I'm waiting for thee. 

Then, come, &c. (Repeat Chorus.') 



WILL YOU COME TO MY MOUNTAIN HOME? 

Published, full Music size, with Words andPf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1089-90, Pr. Od. 
Words by Alfred Wheeler, Esq. Music by F. H. Brows. 



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In the wild woods we will roam, love, With our spi - rits light and 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



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Oh ! sweet is the mountain air, love, 
Where our bridal couch shall be, 

And the bloom on thy cheek so fair, love, 
Shall ne'er fade in the wild wood free : 

Our dreams shall all be of fairy-laud, 
For we'll rest by a silv'ry lake, 



And fays shall be waiting for thy command, 
When each rosy morn shall break. 

And thus we'll dwell in the tiladsome dell, 
Where our love shall unchanging be, 

And at morning bright, or by pale moonlight, 
I'll ever be near to thee. 

Hark ! 'tis the woods, &c. 



3S POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

NATURE'S NOBLEMAN. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," No. 2106, Pr. 3d. 

Words by M. F. Tupper, Esq. Music by G. J. Webb. 

•p Allegretto con energia. 



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A - way with false fashion, so calm and so chill, Where pleasure it - self can - not 



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Af - fects to be quite at its ease. 



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And Na - ture's own No - ble - man, friend - ly and frank, Is 
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man with his heart in his hand, Is a man with his heart in his hand. 



Fearless in honesty, gentle yet just, 

He warmly can love and can hate, 
Nor will he bow down with his face in the dust, 

To fashion's intolerant state. 
For best in good breeding, and highest in rank, 

Though lowly or poor in the land, 
Is nature's own nobleman, friendly and frank, 

The man with his heart in his hand. 



His fashion is passion, sincere and intense, 

His impulses simple and true, 
Yet temper'd by judgment, and taught by good sense, 

And cordial with me and with you. 
For the finest in manners, as highest in rank, 

It is you, man, or you, man, who stand, 
Nature's own nobleman, friendly and frank — 

A man with his heart in his hand ! 



THE RED CROSS OF ENGLAND, THE FLAG OF THE BRAVE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words andPf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1930-31, Pr. 6d. 
Words by Eliza Cook. Music by W. H. Montgomery. 

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Old England thy name shall yet war-rant thy fame, If the brow of the foe-man should 



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POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



39 






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Eed Cross of England— the Flag of the Brave, the Flag of the Brave, the 

Repeat from : <g for Chorus. 



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Flag of the Brave, 'Neath the Red Cross of Eng-land — the Flag of the Brave. 



We have jackets of blue, still as dauntless and true, 

As the tars that our Nelson led on ■, 
Give them room on the main, and they'll show us 
again, 
How the Nile and Trafalgar were won. 
Let a ball show its teeth, let a blade leave its sheath, 

To defy the proud strength of our might, 
We have Iron-mouth'd guns, we have steel-hearted 
sons, 
That will prove how the Britons can fight, 
Our ships and our sailors are kings of the wave, 
'.Neath the Red Cross of England the flag of the 
Brave, The flag, &c. {Repeat Chorus.') 



Though a tear might arise in our women's bright eyes, 

And a sob choke the fearful " Good-bye," 
Yet those women would send lover, brother, or friend, 

To the war- field to conquer or die, 
Let the challenge be flung from the braggart's bold 
tongue, 
And that challenge will fiercely be met ; 
And our banner unfurl'd shall proclaim to the world, 

That " there's life in the old dog yet." 
Hurrah ! for our men on the land or the wave, 
'Neath the Red Cross of England— the Flag of the 
Brave. 

The Flag, &c. {Repeat Chorus.) 



KISS, BUT NEVER TELL. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps, in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2168, Pr. 3d. 

Words by S. Steele, Esq. Music by Buckley. 

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kiss but never tell. Oh kiss but never tell, 



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Repeat from Jj§ for Chorus. 



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spell, True lo - - vers pledge to keep 

At night when eyes like stars beam bright, 

And kindred souls commune, 
And heart to heart, love's vows impart, 

Beneath the smiling moon ; 
At such an hour of magic pow'r, 

What hallow'd raptures dwell, 



for e - - ver, Kiss but ne - ver tell. 

In each true breast by honour blest, 

To kiss and never tell. 
Then kiss but never tell oh never 1 

Breathing breaks the spell, 
True lovers pledge to keep for ever, 

Kiss but never tell. 



40 POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 

I'M THINKING OF THE TIME, MART. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 1502-3, Pr. 6d. 



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Words by R. S. Montgomery. 
Andante. 



Music by W. H. Montgomery. 



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I'm think - ing of the time, Ma - ry, When I wa9 young and gay, When 



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think - ing of the time, Ma - ry, 



I'm think - ing of the time, Ma - ry, I'm 
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think - ing of the time, Ma - ry, When 



was young and gny. 



When I was young and gay, Mary, 

I gave my vows to you ; 
For weary years we've sever'd been, 

Yet still this heart is true. 
I cast my all of earthly bliss 

Upon a hopeless die, 



Yet proudly boast that none but thee 
E'er won my heart's fond sigh. 

For oh, the heart that worshipp'd thee, 
Could never downwards stray ! 

The angel of my life thou wert, 
When I was young and gay. 

For oh, &c. 



POPOLAK SONGS AND BALLADS. 



41 



SHE'S BLACK, BUT THAT'S NO MATTER. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," No. 2169, Pr.3d. 

Music by Henry Howard Paul. 
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My Di - nab, dear me, she's as beau - ti - ful quite, As a star that shines 



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(Spoken.) But she's black, she's so very black. 
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black, but that's no mat - ter, She's black, but that's no mat - ter. 



She lives on the bank of a bright flowing stream, 
In a cabin that might have been built in a dream, 
Surrounded by roses and woodbines and leaves, 
That twine and climb lovingly up to the eaves, 

(Spoken.) But she's black, she's so very black, 

I know she is, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



If ever I marry this dark colour'd maid, 
You'll believe in the truth of what I have said ; 
I love her because her complexion will keep, 
And they say that all beauty is only skin deep. 

(Spoken.) But she's black, she's so very black. 

I know she is, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 

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42 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS 



THERE WOULD I BE. 

Published, full Music size, with Words andPf. Accomps., in the " Musical Bouquet," Nos. 215C-7, Pr. Cd. 

Words by Eliza Cook, Music by W. H. Montgomery 

f) Andante cctntabile. 



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Where the blue bil - lows and bright peb - bles meet, Where the sand glit-ters and 



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shell - stud - ded o - cean — there, there would I be there 



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storm de - mons moan, By the shell - stud-ded o - cean there, there would I be. 

Where the dark forest-lords tangle their boughs, Among the blue hills or beside the deep flood, 
And close shadow'd dew-drops are sparkling at Where the weed robes the rock and the moss folds 
noon ; the tree ; 

Where gipsy bands linger to sleep and carouse With the surge of the wave and the song of the wood, 

In the covert that shuts out the wind and the With freedom and nature there, there would I be, 
moon; 



HURRAH FOR OUR RIFLEMEN. 

Published, full Music size, with words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical Bouquet," Nos. 21G3-4, Pr. Gd 

Words by Eliza Cook. Music by J. L Hatton. 

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POPDLAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



43 



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kin - die War's brand, But to guard what that brand might set burn - ing. They have 



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Then here's to the Gray, and the Green, and the Blue, 



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Let them come from the loom, from the plough, and Let them dwell in sweet peace till a moment may 
the forge, come 

Let their bugles ring louder and louder ; When the shot of an enemy rattle ; 

Let the dark city street and the deep forest gorge And the spirits that cling the most fondly to home, 
Prove that labour makes valour the prouder. Will be first to rush forth in the battle". 

Then here's to the Gray, &c. (Repeat Chorus.) 



44 



POPULAR SONGS AND BALLADS. 



BREAK, BREAK. 

Published, full Music size, with Words and Pf. Accomps., in the "Musical, Bouquet," No. 1993, Pr. 3d. 

Words by Testnyson.. Music by F. Boott. 

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But the ten - - - der grace of a day that is dead, "Will 
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van - - -ish'd hand, And the sound of a voice that is still! 

Verse 2. 

Break, break, break, on thy cold gray stones, sea! 
And I would that my tongue could utter 
The thoughts that arise in me. 

O, well, ic.