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Full text of "The musical miscellany : a select collection of Scots, English and Irish songs, set to music"

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THE GLEN COLLECTION 
OF SCOTTISH MUSIC 

Presented by Lady Dorothea Ruggles- 
Brise to the National Library of Scotland, 
in memory of her brother, Major Lord 
George Stewart Murray, Black Watch, 
killed in action in France in 1914. 
28th January 1927. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

National Library of Scotland 



http://www.archive.org/details/musicalmiscellanOOrugg 



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fet to Mufie. 




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THE 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY: 

A 

SELECT COLLECTION 

OF 

SCOTS, ENGLISH and IRISH 
S O N G S, 

SET TO 

MUSIC. 



PERTH: 
PRINTED BY J. BROWN* 



DCCIX2XVJ', 



T H E 



PREFACE. 



r-fpi 



i HE Editors of the following Com- 
pilation, unwilling to am-ufe the Pu- 
blic with an empty harangue, or a 
gaudy apparatus of words, by way of 
introduction to their Book ; only beg 
leave to make the following; obferva- 



tions : — 

Since time immemorial, it has liQQn. 
allowed, that Mufic has always been 
efteemed an ancient and powerful 

Science. 

We are informed, from Heathen 
Mythology, that Mufic was invented 
by Apollo, who was ftyled the God 

of Willi era, 

'. .-. ' .'. fy^ me concordant carmina ncr-vls. 

OVIDI METAM, 

a ii 



iv THE PREFACE. 

How miific was cultivated In thofe 
early ages, impartial hiilory alone can 
tell* Suffice it to fay, that this ele- 
vating Science had it's patrons, and 
proficients, in moil ages and nations. 
And it is with pleafure we obierve,' 
that this celeftial progeny has ilill it's 
abettors in our own country. The 
public attention paid by many Gentle- 
men of Scotland, to this polite and 
very neceffary part of education, is at 
once patriotic and laudable. 

The Publifhers of the following 
fheets, look forward to that Golden 
JEra, when, they trail, that Mujlc fhall 
not only attract the attention of fupe-' 
rior minds, but when it fhall acquire- 
that univerfal eilimation,that a Science 
fo fablime, richly deferves. 

With a fincere view to promote 
-this end, the following Collection of 
Songs, fet to Mufic. is, with all fub- 
miilion, offer ed to the Public. The 
Selectors of this Work, humbly ima~ 



THE PREFACE. v 

giiie, they may without the lead fha- 
dow of vanity, aver, that it is the fird 
Publication of the kind, ever attempt- 
ed in Scotland. — The arrangement of 
the Words, as well as the Muiic, has 
been (hidied with the greateft atten- 
tion ; and being de-figned for the en- 
tertainment both of Ladles and Gentle-- 
men, the ftricleft care has been taken, 
to avoid inddicacy. 

Befides a great number of modern 
Songs of real humour and tafle, there 
are alio inferted, a great variety' of the 
mo ft beautiful Scots Airs, to many 
of which, the Baffes are added. 

How far the Editors of this Work,; 
have been fuccefsful in the Selection 
they have made, Time and a candid 
Public, only mufl determine. 

Let it only be obferyed in one 
word, that the influence of Muiic over 
the human mind, is fully evinced, by 
the Prince of Latin poetry.— Vir^iL 



aiy 



\i THE P R E F A C E. 

in his inimitable Eclogue, called Sile- 
mis, where, introducing Chromis and 
Mnafylus, two youthful fwains, find- 
ing Silemis aileep in his cave, (often 
the Sire had aniufed them, with the 
promife of a fong) and, in order to 
make him perforin his engagement, 
they bind him with his own wreaths. 
He awaking, and fmiiing at the trick, 
fays, Why*thefe bonds ? Loofe me, ye 
fwains, and hear the fong which you 
deflre :— — 

Tu?;i vero in numerum Faimofqtieferafque videres 
Liidcre y turn rlgidas motare cacumina quercus. 

ECL. vi. 1, %f. 

Miijlc has charms to foot be the.fa-vage brcqft^ 
{often rocks, and bend the knotted oak. 



17S6, 5, 



C O N T E N T S 



A. Page 

AT the fign of the horfe i 2. 

As walking forth to view the plain 26 

And gin ye meet a bonny laffie ■ 29 

All in the downs 76 

A cobler there was . 85 

As you mean to fet fail 152 

Adieu, ye groves, adieu ye plains 187 

A pox'of your pother, 189 

Ah! Chloris 1 96 

As down on Banna's banks 2 1 6 

As Jamie Gay 221 

All you who would wifh to fucceed 223 

Affift me ye lads 233 

A lafs that was laden'dwith care 260 

AH you that are wife, and think life 265 

At letting day, and rifing morn 29.2. 

Believe my fighs, my tears,. my dear 1 16 

Blyth, blyth, blyth, was fhe 133 
By the gaily circling glafs 
Beneath a green made 



177 

2 6S- 



Blow high, blow low zz$ 

C. 

Contented I am, and contented . - $8. 

•Come, come, my jolly lads 41 

Ceafe rude Boreas 109 

Come roufe brother fportfmen 1 64 

Come, come, my brave tars 2 c 1 

Come gie's a fang the lady cry'd 278- 

Come all ye young- lovers 322. 

Curtis was old Hoge's w^*e 332, 



vili CONTENT S. 

D. Page 

Down the burn Davie I 

Dear ' ! 'o!ii, this brown jug 53 

Dear Kathleen you no doubt 14^ 

Dear Roger if your Jenny geek 274 

De'el take the wars 340 

E. 

iiv'ry man take his glafs in his hand 67 

F. 

For lake of gold 3 

For me, my fair, a wreath 20 

I ill your glades 31 

ell to Loehaber 43 

Free from the buftle, care, and ilrife 227 

b fongtlers apologies too often ufe 229 

and twenty il on a row 240 

the caft breaks the morn - 244 

. R^flio cattle's echoing walls 302 

fcarewell, ye green fields 325 



G. 

I had a wee !:orJe { . . 205 

...': failor, oft you told'me 295 

H, 

H 

iway, 'tis the merry tcn'd hern ■' £7 

k ! the joy inspiring horn 7 1 

How little do the landmen know • 12-7 

ftands the glafs around 146 

1 art forfarfehood fram'd - £17 

me, ye nymphs, and e^ery (wain, 290 
How happy 's he 

I. 

I'll never leave thee 3 

I'm net high church, nor low church $7 



CONTENTS. g# 

Page 

Tfigh and lament me in vain 94 

I'ts open the door forne pity to fhow 10 1 

If I live to grow old 104 
Iantbe the lovely , 112 

I'm in lore with twenty . 128 

In the garb of old Gaul 178 

In winter when the rain ratn'd cauld 193 

If to force me to fing, it be your intention 212 

In April when primrofes 282 

Jove in his chair 344 

L. 

Lad time I came o'er the muir 5. 

Let a fet of fober affes 49 

Life is checquer'd 114 

Let gay ones and great - 246 

M. 

My temples with clufters 121 

My daddy is a canker'd carle 123 

My Patie is a lover gay 182 

My fond fhepherds 191 

My love was once a bonny lad i$-$ 

My fheep I've forfaken. 292 

Man may efcape from rope or gun . 5.13. 

My laddie is gone far awa o'er the plain 334 

N. 

Now Phcebus gilds the orient fkies 140 

Now fmiling fprjng. again appears i$£ 

No more my foeg fnall be, ye fwains 3 1 1 

O. 

O Beffy Bell and Mary Gray 7 

On Etrick Banks 15 

O faw ye my father ~ 25 

Once more I'll tune the vocal lhell 81 

On a bank of flowers 83 

O thou lov'd country 9:! 

O what bad I ado for to marry 14a 



CONTENTS. 



O fweet Sir, for your courteHe i ~ ~) 

O greedy Midas, I've been told iGi 

O I hae loft my fiiken fnood 163 

Oi'j women we are, - . ] 66 

O what pleasures will abound - 169 

One morning very early 214 

O fend Lewis Gordon' hame 277 

O late in an ev'ning forth Tweat 317 

P. 

Proud Paris, defpifing fair Helen's great pomp 289 

-R. 

Rail no more, ye learned alfes - . 246 



Songs of fnepherds, in ruftical roundelays 58 

;-<V, I Have loll my love 75 

Says Colin to me, I've a thought in my bead 129 

■ you mean to hire for fervice 1 73 

Sweet Annie frae the fea- beach came 185 

Somettalk of Alexander, and. fome of Kercules 231 

~ 4 latc, why mould ma$ be vain 255 

Such beauties in v^w . 270 



T he laft time I came o'er the muir 5 

To Anacreon in beav'n 22 

women all tell me I'm falfe to my lafs 47 

be was a jolly miller once 61 

The dulky night rides down the flcy 62 

V. . topfails ihiver in the wind 73 

The echoing horn 88 

moon had climb'd the higheft hill 96 

'.'lent fable wore 98 

. life icS 

Tw's I learnt, -arprettv fong in France 1 ?o 

Th, failing mora ; 135 

The Wealthy foci with gold in ftore 137 

Tin/ late I was plump, round, and jolly 139 



CONTENTS. xl 

Page 

man that's contented is void of all care 149 

inhere was a little man I yi 

The law-land lads think they are fine 170 

There liv'd a man in Baleno crazy 203 

The fields were green 224 

Thro' the fierv flames of love - 235 
The lafs of Peatie's mill 
The plowman he's a bonny lad 

'Twas fummer, and foftly 262 

The whittling plowman 2 5<5 
'"Twas within a mile of Edinburgh town 
This cold flinty heart. 

The world, my dear Myra 29.0 

'Twas in that feafon of the year ?oi 

The wand'ring failor plows the main 208 

The charge it prepar'd 324 

Thurfday in the morn i a ;o 

Tho' wifdom will preach about joys, Sir , 2 26 

W. 

When the fheep are in the fauld 10 

"Will ye go the ew-bughts, Marion - 3 3 

What {ports can compare 2^ 



242 



2 7 2 
275 



When i was a young one 

When war's alarms cj 

Whence comes it, neighbour Dick 55 

Vv r hat is't to us who guides the llate 6r 

When once the g- c?, like us below - 78 

What woman car. do 00 

When my locks are grown hoary 102 

Where-ever I'm going, and all the day lorg 107 

Welcome, welcome, brother debtor ' 120 

ire's my fwain fo bh the and clever 126 

When merry hearts were gay i 5 6 

Why heaves my fond bofom iy* 

When late I wander'd o'er the plain , 206 

When Britaimfirfi at lieav'h's command : 20S 

'■ en earth's foundation firfc was laid 21 1 

"Whatever fqueamifh lovers may fay - ' 218 

¥£hat iieanzies does Flora difclofe 236 



, j 



&i CONTENTS. 

Page 

When Maggy and I fell acquaint 239 

When I was in my fe'enteen years 256 

When firft my dear laddie 284 

We're gaily yet, and we're gaily yet 288 

When firlt I came to be a man 304 

When I have a faxpence under my thumb 320 

Y. 

Ye lads of true fpirit, pay courtihip to claret 1 8 

Ye belles, and ye flirts 68 

You know I'm your prieft 105 

You the point may carry I i8 

Ye fluggards, who murder your lifetime in fleep 200 

Ye fportfmen draw near v 314 



THE MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 




SONG I. 

DOWN THE .BURN DAVIE. 



E g 






*—i 



When trees did bud, and fields were 

" ".hi 



^^^sa 



green, And broom bloom'd fair to fee ; When 

b_ 



iiiiiii:Siii: 



Mary- was complete fifteen, And love laugh'd 



SipII 



•fe 



in her ee' : 



BIyth Davie's blinks her 







heart did move, To fpeak her mind, thus free ; 



iHi^liiis^ 



Gang down the burn, Davie love, And I will 



f- — seR«s3!3cnal — f— 



J lo W thee. 



A 



1 THE MUSICAL 

Now Davie did each lad furpafs 
That dwelt on this bum fide; 

And Mary was the bonnieft lafs, 
Juft meet to be a bride. 

Blyth Davie's blinks, £&. 

Her cheeks were rofy, red and white, 

Her ee'n were bonny blue, 
Her looks were like Aurora bright, 

Her lips like dropping dew. 
Blyth Davie's blinks, £sV. 

What pafs'd, I guefs, was harmlefs play, 
And nothing, fure, unmeet ! 

For, ganging Hame, I heard them fay, 
They lik'd a walk fo Tweet. 
Blyth Davie's blinks, &c. 

His cheeks to her's he fondly laid ; 

She cry'd, " Sweet love be true ; 
«< And when a wife, as now a maid, 

» To death I'll follow you." 
Blyth Davie's blinks, fyc* 

As fate had dealt to him a routh, 

Straight to the kirk he led her ; 
There plighted her his faith and truth. 

And a bonny bride he made her. 
No more amam'd to own her love, 

Or fpeak her mind thus free j 
. " Gang down the burn, Davie, love* 

" And I will follow thee." 



MISCELLANY. 



SONG II. 
I'LL NEVER LEAVE THEE. 



iSp^igiiiii 



One day I heard Mary fay, How (hall I 




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X " 



SEffi*ffi£ 



-@ 



leave thee. Staydeareft Ado - nis, flay, 




°_b ^zz"~^ir 



saEsatif^i 




Why wilt thou grieve me. A -las myfond 



m — - 





Prwt* 



feM 



heart will break, If thou (hould leave me, I'll 



^mm 



:zzzm 



ZDX 




-£t:i 



live and die for thy fake, Yet ne - - ver 









t 



', 



leave thee. 

Say, lovely Adonis, fay, 
Has Mary deceiv'd thee. 

Did e'er her young heart betray 
New love to grieve thee. 

Aij 



4 THE MUSICAL 

My ccnftant mind ne'er mall ftray, 

Thou may believe me ; 
I'll love thee, lad, night and day, 

And never leave thee. 

Adonis, my charming youth, 

What can relieve thee. 
Can Mary thy anguhfh focthe. 

This fereaft Mil receive tbe'e. 



> /r 



y paljion can ne er oecay, 

Never deceive thee : 
Delight fhall drive pain away, 
Fleafure revive thee. 

But leave thee, leave thee, lad, 
How mall I leave thee. 

O ! that thought makes me fad 
I'll never leave thee. 

Where would ray Adonis fly ; 
Why does he grieve me. 

Alas ! my poor hear! will die, 
• If I mould leave thee. 



MISCELLANY. 5 

SONG III. 

LAST TIME I CAME O'ER THE MUIR. 



^mig&m^i 



The lad time I came o'er the muir, I 



-0- 



:___J*L 



•s^___ — 1_ ;sjs& 



FH- 



left my love be - hind me ; Ye pow'rs, what pain do 



I endure, Vv r hen foft i - de - - as mind me. 
Soon as the ruddy morn difplay'd, The 
beaming day enfuing, I met betimes my ^ 

&* , ^ — . 

lovely m.sj.&j In 'fit re - - treats for wooing;. 
A iij 



6 THE MUSICAL 

Beneath the cooling made we lay. 

Gazing and chaftely fporting ; 
We krfs'd and promis'd time away, 

Till night fpread her black curtain.- 
I pitied all beneath the fides, 

Even kings, when flie was nigh me 5 
In raptures I beheld her eyes,. 

Which cou'd but ill deny me. 

Shon'd I be call'd where cannons roar, 

Where mortal Heel may wound me 5. 
Or cafl: upon fome foreign ft ore, 

Where dangers may furround me ; ! 
Yet hopes again to fee my love, , 

To feaft on glowing kifTes, 
Shall make my care at diilance move, 

In proipeci of/uch hliffes. 

In" all my foul there's not one place 

To let a rival enter ; 
Since fne excels in every grace, 

In her my love (hall center. 
Sooner the feas mall c&ife to flow", 

Their waves the Alps to cover ; 
On Greenland's ice mall rofes grow, 

Before I ceafe to love her. 

The next time I gang o'er the muuv 

She- mail a lover find me; 
And that my faith is firm and pure, 

Tho' I left her behind me : 
Then Hymen's- facred bonds mail chain 

My heart to her fair bofom ; 
There, while my being does remain, 

My love more Frefh fhqJl bloSbiiu 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG IV. 

BESSY BELL AND MARY GRAY. 






O Ba- fy Bell, and Mary Gray, They 






^ratfb 



war' twa bonny laf - fes. They higg'd a 



ifbEfcE 






£'- 



bow'r on yon burn brae, And theek'd it o'er wi' 

pj|EiH."z:E3zE: 



5a 



t 



t 



Wm 



ra - - ines. 



Size: 



Fair Bef- - f y Bell 1 



jgjp ppgj 



::; 



oo'd yeitreen, And thought I ne'er cou'd 



Si^^p 



alter ; But Mary Gray's twa pawky een, They 



ISiSaia 



gar my fan - cy fal - ten 



8 



THE MUSICAL 



Now BeiTy's hair's like a lint- tap ; 

She fmiles like a May morning - , 
When Phoebus itarts frae Thetis' lap, 

The hills with rays adorning : 
White is her neck, fait is her hand, 

Her waifl and feet's fu' genty ; 
With ilka grace fhe can command ; 

Her lips, O vow ! they're dainty. 

And Mary's locks are like a craw, 



I- 



m like diamonds glances 



She's ay fae clean,, redd up, and braw, 
She kills whene'er fhe dances : 

Blyth as a kid, with .wit at will, 
She blooming, tight, and tall is ;. 



And guides 1: 



er airs iae 



:fu' Mill, 



O Jove^ file's like thy Pallas. 

Dear BefTy Bell and Mary Gray, 

Ye unco fair cpprefs us ; 
Our fancies jee between you tway, 

Ye are fie bonny laiTes: 
Waes me ! for baith I canna get, 

. To ane by law we're flented ; l 
Then I'll draw cuts, and tak' my fate 3 

And be with ane contented. 



SONG V. 

FOR LAKE OF GOLD. 



p^iPi^^liii] 



•5- 



For lake of gold fhe's left me O! And of 

~w — I — l — W 7 r: tt EIL U ' n-l 4 r J EL. 



all that's dear be - reft me O! She me for-' 



MIZJ. 



MISCELLANY. 

J* — £. 






fook, for a great duke, And to eridlefs 

A four" and 



■%L—2>.—iwvwz — . 1 — *sL_i K ^r~ j_m 



atti: 



roe foe's left me O ! 



^Hz£z|!!l:^:T:ziizi3izz:r^:xz#:g- 



^~^z£z 



gar - ter has more art, Than youth, a 



P^^Epi 



Z-Eij: 



isp 




£ 



true and faithful heart, for emp - ty 



ir&mt^ M 



ti - ties we mull part, And for glitt'ring 



:_J£- 




fhow {he's left me O ! 



No cruel fair fnall ever move 
My injur'd heart again to love; 
Through diftant climates I mufl rove, 

Since Jeany me has left me. 
Ye pow'rs above, I to your care 
Give up my charming lovely fair ; 
Your choiceft bleffings be her mare> 

HOkcr flic's for ever left me. 



10 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG VI. 

AULD ROBIN GRAY. 




When the (Keep are in the fauld, and the 




ky at hame, And a' the vvarld to 



RL_) 



-3i-AiLi 



#3^2 



p-i 






-WSBSt 




P—£ 



t-Jw: 



&d 



fleep aregane,The waes of my heart fa's in 
0= 



0£0^mBM 




fhow'rs frae my ee', When my gudeman lies 




found by me. 



Young Jamie Ioo*d me well, and he fought me for his 
bride, « 

But laving a crown, he had naething befide ; 
To make that crown a pound, my Jamie went to fea, 
And the crown and the pound were baith for me. 

He hadna* been awa' a week but only twa, 
When my mither (he fell nek, and the cow was ftown'n 

awa' ; 
My father brake his arm, and my Jamie at the fea, 
And auld Robin Gray came a-courting me. 



MISCELLANY. , 1 1 

My father cou'dna' wirk, and my mither cou'dna' fpin, 
I toil'd day and night, but their bread 1 cou'dna' win ; 
Auid Rob maintained them baifch, and wi' tears in hisee', 
Said, jenny, for their fakes, O marry me. 

My heart it faid na', I looli'd for Jamie back, 
But the wind it blew high, and the fhip it was a wreck; 
The ihip it was a wreck, why didna' Jenny die, 
And why do I live to cry, JVacs me! 

Auld Robin argu'd fair, tho' my mither didna' fpeak, 
She look'd in my face, till my heart was like to break ; 
So they gied him my hand, tho' my heart was in the fea, 
And auld R.obin Gray is gudeman to me. 

I hadna' been a wife a week but only four, 
When, fittiag fae mournfully at the door, 
I faw my Jamie' ; wreath, but didna' think it he, 
Till he faid, I'm come back for to marry thee. 

fair did we greet, and muckle did we fay, 
We took but ae kifs, and we tore ourfelves away; 
I wifli I were dead, but I'm no like to die, 
And why do I live to fay, V/aes me ! 

1 gang like a ghaift, and carena' to fpin, 

I darena' think on Jamie, for that wou'd be a fin ; 
But I'll do my bell, a gude wife to be, 
For auld Robin Gray is kind to me. 



12 THE MUSICAL 

SONG VII. 
THE VICAR AND MOSES. 



SEggJ^feplE^llJEJEl 



Z3a 



At the fign -of the horfe, old Spintext of 



I 



m. 






EfeS:| 



courfe, Each night took his pipe and his pot. O'er a] 



JEZJ3EZK 



iSS? 



JN-J^-p 



i 



jorum of nappy, quite pleafant and happy, Was 
I tb ^^- ^-fc-^-fe— fc— 



& b_fs p^-— _fc-_JS_fc_..A-. 



plac'd this canonical fot. Tol de rol de rol 



i 



n 



1 



//' - dol di dol. 



The evening was dark, when in came the dark, 

"With reverence due and fubmiflion ; 
Firil ftrok'd his cravat, then twirl' d round his hat, 

And bowing, preferred his petition. 

Pm come, Sir, fays he, to beg look, d'ye fee, 

Of your reverend worfhip and glory, 
To inter a poor baby, with as much fpecd as may be, 

And I'll walk with the lanthorn before you. 



MISCELLANY. 1 3 

The body we'll bury, but pray where 'a the hurry ? 

Why Lord, Sir, the corpfe it does ftay : 
You fool hold your peace, lince miracies ceafe, 

A corpfe, Mofes, can't run away. 

Then Mofes he fmil'd, faying, Sir, a fmall child 

Cannot long delay your intentions ; 
Why that's true, by St Paul, a child that is fmall, 

Can never enlarge it's dimenfions. 

Bring Mofes fome beer, and bring me fome, d'ye hear, 

I hate to be call'd from my liquor : 
Come, Mofee, The King, 'tis a fcandalous thing-, 

Such a fubjecl mould be but a Vicar. 

Then Mofes he fpoke, Sir 'tis pall twelve o'clock, 

Befides them's a terrible mower ; 
Why Mofes, you elf, fince the clock has ftruck twelre, 

I'm fure it can never flrike more. 

Befides, my dear friend, this leffon attend, 
Which to fay and to fwear I'll be bold, 

That the corpfe, fnow or rain, can't endanger, that'splain, 
But perhaps you or I may take cold. 

Then Mofes went on, Sir the clock has flruck one, 

Pray mailer look up at the hand ; 
Why it ne'er can flrike lefs, 'tis a folly to prefs 

A man for to go that can't Hand. 

At length, hat and cloak old Orthodox took, 

But firil cram'd his jaw with a quid ; 
Each tipt off a gill, for fear they mould chill, 

And then ftagger'd away lide by fide. 

When come to the grave, the 'clerk hum'd a Have, 
Whilft the furplice was wrapt round the Priell ; 

Where fo droll wrfs the figure of Mofes and Vicar, 
That the parifh flili talk of the jeft. 



14 THE MUSICAL 

Good people, let's pray, put the corpfe t'other way, 

Or perchance I mall over it -itumble ; 
'Tis beil to take care, tho ? the fages declare, 

A mortuum caput can't tremble. 

Woman that's born of a man, that's wrong, the leaf 's 
torn ; 

O man, .that is born of a woman, 
Can't, continue an hour, but is cut down like a flow'r; 

You iee, Moles, death fpareth no man. 

Here, Mofes, do look, what a confounded book, 
''Sure the letters are turn'd upfide down. 

Such a fcandalous print, fure. the devil is in't, 
That this Bafket mould print for the Crown. 

Prithee, Mofes, you read, for I cannot proceed, 

And bury the corpfe in my (lead. 
(Amen. Amen.) 
Why, Mofes, your're wrong, pray hold ft ill your tongue, 

You've taken the tail for the head. 

O where's thy fling, Death! put the corpfe in the earth, 

For, believe me, 'tis terrible weather. 
So the corpfe was interr'd, without praying a word. 

And away they both flagger'd together, 
Singing To) de rol de rol tt dol dt doL 



■m- 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG VIII. 
ON ETRICK BANKS. 



1 5 



geg^SES 



m 



On Etrlck banks, ae fummer's night, at 



^H^HHe^I 



gloming when the flieep drave hame, I 



rixWmifm 



raet my laffie braw and tight, Came wading 



^^p^S^g 



barefoot, a' her lane : My heart grew 



^:- 



mimm 



light, I ran, I Hang My arms about her 



-m- 



Hiii 



•.— 



± 



m 



lil - - ly neck, And kifs'd and clap'd her there fu' 



imiiSiffii 



lang, My words they were na mony feck. 

Bij 



1 6 THE MUSICAL 

I faid, My laflie, will ye go 

To the Highland hills, the Earfe to lear 
I'll baith gi'e thee a cow and ew, 

When ye come to the brigg of Earn. 
At Leith auld meal comes in, ne'es- fafh. 

And herrings at the Broomieluw. 
Chear up your heart, my bonny lafs, 

There's gear U> wia we never favv. 

All day when we have wrought enough, 

When winter, froft» and (haw begin, 
Soon as the fan gaes weft the loch, 

At night when ye fit down to fpin, 
1 11 fere w my pipes and play a fpring : 

And thus the weary night we'll end, 
Till the tender kid and lamb- time bring 

Our pleafant fummer back again. 

Syne when the trees are in their bloomy 
And go wane glent o'er ilka field, 

I'll meet my lafs amang the broom, 

- And lead you to my fummer fhield. 

Then far frae a' their fcornfu din, 

That make the kindly hearts their fport 

We'll laugh and kifs, and dance and fing,. 
And gar the langefi day feem fhort. 



Plaintive, 



MISCELLANY* 

SONG IX. 

HERE AW A, THERE AWA. 



j 7 







Here awa, there awa, here awa, Willie ; 






Here awa, there awa, here awa hame. 






r _ ~-"Tgr ~ P — > — "~-zr 



fe-VJ- 



Lang have I fought thee, dear have I 



bought thee, Now I have gotten my Willie a- 



^£=§-3:1 



±fcfc 



;e 



jam. 



Through the Iang muir T have foJlow'cl my Willie, 
Through the lang muir I have follow'd him hame, 
Whate'er betide us, nought mall div-ide us ; 
Love now rewards all my forrow and pain. 

Here awa, there awa, here awa, Willie'; 
Here awa, there awa, here awa hame ; 
Come love, believe me, naething can grieve me, 
>leafes while Willie's at hame* 



Ilka tiling pi 



Biy 



i8 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG X. 
YE LADS OF TRUE SPIRIT. 



liip!! 



a 






Li. 



*£} 



Ye lads of true fpirit,pay courtfhip to claret, Re 



WZM 



SEg^i 



ifc=~ 



.^ — _ r _^. — ^ — 7V 

leas'd from the trouble of thinking. A fool long a- 




i 



E« 



go faid we nothing could know ; The fellow knew 



gj^p=p 



m. 



K 



nothing of drinking. To pore over Plato, or 



.pra£tife with Cato, Difpaifionate dunces might 




is p ff f rr^P 



make us; But men, now more wife, felf- denial de- 




fpife, And live by the leffons of Bacchus 



Big-wig'd, in fine coach, fee the doctor approach ; 

He folemnly up the flair paces ; 
Looks grave — fmells his cane — rp-; lies finger to vein, 

And counts the repeats with grimaces. 



MISCELLANY. 19 

As he holds pen in hand, life and death are at Hand— 

A tofs up which party fhall take us. 
Away with fuch cant — no prefcription we want 

But the nourifhing noftrum of Bacchus. 

We jollily join-in the practice of wine, 

While mifers 'midft plenty are pining ; 
While ladies are fcorning, and lovers are mourning', 

We laugh at wealth, wenching, and whining. 
Drink, drink, now 'tis prime ; tofs a bottle to Time, 

He'll not make fuch hafte to overtake us ; 
His threats we prevent, and his cracks we. cement, 

By the ftyptical balfam of Bacchus. 

What work is there made, by the newfpaper-trade, 
Of tins man's and t'other man's ftation ! 

The inns are all bad, and the outs are all mad ; 
In and out is the cry of the nation. 

The politic patter which both parties chatter 
. From bumpering freely fnan't make us ; 

With half-pints in hand, independent we'll Hand 
To defend Magna Charta of Bacchus. 

Be your motion's well- tim'd ; be allcharg'd and all prim'd 

Have a care — right and left — and make ready. 
Right hand to glafs join — at your lips red your wine ; 

Be all in your exercife fteady. 
Our levels we boaft when our women? we toad ; 

May graciouiiy they undertake us ! 
No more we defire — fo drink and give fire, 

A volley to beauty and Bacchus 1 



2© 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG XL 

FORME MY FAIR. 



^iMm^^^fM 



V 

For me my fair a wreath has wove, where rival 



3=iP! 



?pgp=§^iEp 



*ovv rs in union 



meet, where rival flow'rs in union 



meet; As oft (he kifs'd this gift of love, her 



"CJ- 



Hz — *H -i-r^-F-h- -^—rj:^- ^- ft*- 

H —l -^-"^af— ■■«■-■ J^ J -lad 



breath gave fwettnefs to the fweet, as oft me kifs'd the 




— -# — j — ■#— 



=^|KEfe 



texa! — -£3 — ; 



gift of love, her breath gave fweetnefs to the fweet. 



-FrF 






T _^zpZ-^r : l : l 



her breath gave fweetnefs to the fweet. 



MISCELLANY. 21 

A bee within a damafk rcfe 

Had crept, the ne&ar'd dew to fip, 

But leiler fweets the thief forgoes, 
And fixes on Louifa's lip. 

There tailing all the bloom of fpr'ng, 
Wak'd by the rip'ning breath of May, 

Tti' ungrateful fpdper" left his fling, 
And with the k<?ney fkd away, 



22 THE MUSICAL 

SONG XII. 

TO ANACREON IN HEAVEN. 






To Anacreon in heav'n, where he fat in full glee, 




lliilli 



■jr- 

A few fons of harmony fent a petition, That he 



-*r*— 



Wm 



i 



their infpirer and patron would be ; When this 



g^^g&pi 



anfwer arriv'd from the jolly eld G-recian — Voice 



jSili igB S 



-75-* 



fiddle, and flute, No longer be mute, I'll lend 



*d£ 



p- 



aEdrfc 



s 



=fc 



you my name and infpire you to hoot; And befides 






I'll inflnift you like me to in twine The myrtle of 



MISCELLANY. 23 

E=S±fe§feEE«3 

Venus with Bacchus's vine. And bejidis, PH 
snftruB you like me to inttvine the myrtle of Venus 

fg^~ _iri';"rr— L,"- i *~--~c'--nr,i^ cirr7"7~~"5 , ' 

with Bacchus's vine. 

The news through Olympus immediately flew ; 

When old Thunder pretended to give himfelf airs-— 
" If thefe mortals are fuffer'd their fcheme to purfue, 
• " The devil a % oddcfs will itay above Hairs. 
" Hark ! already they cry, 
" la tranfports of joy, 
fi Away to the foris of Anacreon we'll fly, 
" And there, with good felWws> we'll learn to iatwine 
" The 'myrtle of Ve.nus with Bacchus's vine. 

'• The yellow-hair'd God and his nine fufty maids, 

" From Helicon's banks will incontinent flee, 
" Idal'a will boaft but of tenantlefs fhades, 

" And the bi- forked hill a mere defart will be. 
" My thunder, no fear on't, 
" Shall loon do it's errand, 
" And, dam'me ! I'll fwinge the ringleaders, I warrant, 
" I'll trim the young dogs, for thus daring to twine 
" The myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's vine." 

Apollo rofe up ; and faid, " Pr'ythee ne'er quarrel, 
" Good king of the Gods, with my vot'ries below ; 

" Your thunder is ufelefs" — then, mewing his laurel, 
Cry'd, <{ Sic evitabile fulmen, you know ! 



24 THE MUSICAL 

" Then over each head 

•« My laurels I'll fpread ; 
" Somyfonsfromyourcrakerenomifchiefmallcireru!, 
il Whilft fnug in their club- room, they jovially twine 
" The myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's vine. 

Next Momus get. up, with his rifible phiz, 

And fwore with Apollo he'd chearfully join — 
" The tide of full harmony ftill {hall be his, 

" But the fong,and the catch, and thelaugh fhallbe mine. 
" Then, Jove, be not jealous 
« Of thefe honeft fellows," 
Cry 'd Jove, * ' We relent , fmce the truth you now tell us ; 
" And fwear, by eld Styx, that they long mall intwine 
" The myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's vine." 

Ye fons of Anacreon, then, join hand In hand ; 

. Preferve unanimity, friendfhip, and love ; 
J Tis your's to fupport what's fo happily plann'd ; 
You've the fan£tion of Gods, and the fiat of Jove. 
While thus we agree, 
Our toaft let it be. 
May our club jflourim happy, united, and free ! 
And long may the fons of Anacreon intwine 
The myrtle, of Venus with Bacchus's vine. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG XIII. 

SAW YE MY FATHER 



t* 



fct 



&m 



faw ye my father, or faw ye my" 

fa 



lilpipgpil 



motlier, Or faw ye my true love John ? 



Sliiiifiiiii 



I faw not your father, I faw not your 



-Sf- 



&r-r+- 



^zinz^ii-^zi 




mother, But I faw your true love John. 

Up Johnny rofe, and to the door he goes, 

And gently tirled the pin. 
The laffie taking tent, unto the door me went, 

And fhe open'd and let him in. 

Flee up, flee up, my bonny grey cock, 

And craw when it is day ; 
Your neck fhall be like the bonny beaten gold, 

And your wings of the filver grey. 

The cock prov'd falfe, and untrue he was, 

For he crew an hour o'er foon. 
The laffie thought it day when fhe fent her love away. 

And it was but a blink of the moon. 
C 



26 



TPJE MUSICAL 

SONG XIV. 
KATHARINE OGXE 



■^ As walking forth to view ti 






. — -__ -*-._ — r—»~i-, 1 r~L r -f r T I — Ri — fT3n 

iSfe^33|3S^ilEEF 

j Up- on a morning ear - ly, While May's 

' 3tSlP±|E|Ei^rf==3E=E 



~HfE!££i! 



-tr^trra 






. *-k3F:SSBr — bbr 

«{ fweet fcent did chear my hrain, From 

•^ flow'rs which grew fo rarely. 



^E^E^EEgEg^ 



MISCELLANY, 



27 



fepE?z^^=r 



4: 



s~\ 



tt i r- : £i' 



-mx 

chanc'd to meet a pret - ty maid, She fhin'd 



W&aosa 









c tho' it was foggy J I afk'd her 

_k-P-_ J!: _ _|_ ~^ - : 



ftsn^sin _. 



pippl 




^ name, Sweet Sir, me faid, My name is 

fc-r, -t— — irg — p"~^~ff: 






e 



n 



Is: TZ~r — its' 



=f 



feat 



eIIee1=z*es== 



Katharine Ogie. 

ta 




1 flood awhile, and did admire, 
To fee a nymph fo ftately ; 



28 THE MUSICAL 

So brilk an air there did appear 

In a country- maid fo neatly ? 
Such natural fweetnefs me difplay'd, 

Like a lillie in a boggie. 
Diana's felf was ne'er array'd 

Like this fame Katharine Ogie. 

The fioiv'r of females, beauty's queen, 

Who fees thee, fure mull prize thee ; 
Though thou art drefs'd in robes but mean. 

Yet thefe cannot diiguife thee ; 
Thy handfome air, and graceful look, 

Far excels any clownish regie ; 
Thou'rt match for laird, or lord, or duke* 

My charming Katharine Ogie. 

O were I but fome fiiepherd fwain ! 

To feed my flock befide thee, 
At bughting-time to leave the plain, 

In milking to abide thee ; 
I'd think rn^felf a happier man. 

With Kate, my club, and dogie, 
Than he that hugs his thoufands ten, 

Had I but Katharine Ogie. 

Then I'd defpife th' imperial throne, 
And flatefmens dangerous Rations °. 
9 d be no king, I'd wear no crown, 
' I'd fraile at conqu'ring nations : 
Might I carefs and ilill pofTefs 

This lafs of whom I'm vogie, 
Tor thefe are toys, and ft ill look lef3, 
Compar'd with Katharine Ogie. 

But I fear the gods have not decreed 

For me fo fine a creature, 
Whofe beauty rare makes her exceed 

All other works in nature. 
Clouds of defpair furround my love, 

That are both dark and foggy : 
Pity my cafe ye powers above, 

Elfe I die for Katharine Ogie. 



MISC ELLAKY. 

SONG XV. 
FY GAR RUB HER OE& WP SfRAE. 



29 



ffiSSl 



=±±1*3*3 



—4ir~ 



eb; 



And gin ye meet a bonny laflky Gie'er 
a kifs and let her gae ; But if ye meet a 



5=H 



feBft 



1 — ri^ - " 



Ht£:l 



dirty hufTy, Fy gar rub her o'er wi' ilrae* 






Be fare ye dinna quit the grip Of ilka 






r^P 



#*-*■ — 



iE3E&ESEEEEgE 

joy when ye are young, Before auld age 3 

»-n=n3a33pfc£: 



SESifrrSi 



ILX 



Wi 



vi - tal 



s nip, And lay ye twafald o'er a 



Sweet youth's a blyth and heartfome time ; 

Then, lads and laffes, while 'tis May, 
Gae pu' the gowan in it's prime, 

Before it wither and decay. 
Cii] 



30 THE MUSICAL, 

Watch the faft minutes of delyte, 

When Jenny fpeaks beneath her breath 3 

And kiffes, laying a' the wyte 
On you, if fhe kepp ony fkaith. 

Haith ye're ill-bred, flie'll fmiling fay, 

Ye'U worry me, ye greedy r»ok : 
Syne frae your arms fhe'U rin away, 

And hid herfelf in fome dark nook. 
Her laugh will lead you to the place,. 

Where lies the happinefs ye want, 
And plainly tell you to your face, 

Nineteen na-fays are ha'f a grant. 

Now to her heaving bofom cling, 

And fweetly toolie for a kifs : 
Frae her fair finger whoop a ring, 

As taiken of a future blifs. 
Thefe bennifons, I'm very fure,^ 

Are of the gods indulgent grant : 
Then, furly carls, whiiht, forbear 

To plague us with your whining cant. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG XVI. 

FILL YOUR GLASSES. 



3 1 




Fill your glaffes banifh grief, Laugh and worldly 



pHipgl^ 



care defpife; Sorrow ne'er will bring relief: Joy from 



ie ! :3H-;,. 



#*- 



E~ A 



w- 



m§ 



drinking will arife. Why mould we, with wrinkl'd care 



ism 



Change what nature made fo fair ? Drink, and fet the 



m 



IE«2 



p@SSi 



heart at reft ; Of a bad market make the bell* 

Bufy brains we know, alas ! 

With imaginations run ; 
Like the fands i' th' hour-glafs, 

Turn'd and turn'd, and ftill run on P 
Never knowing where to flay, 
But uneafy ev'ry way. 
Drink, and fet the heart at reft j 
Peace of mind is always beft, 



\1 THE MUSIC At 

Some purfue the winged wealth, 
Some to honours high afpire : 
Give me freedom, give me health \. 

There's the fum of my ddl're. 
What the world can more pretent 
Will not add to my content, 
Drink, and fet the heart at reft ; 
Peace of mind is always bell. 

Mirth, when mingled with our wme 3 
Make the heart alert and free ; 

Should it fnow, or rain, or dune, 
Still the fame thing 'tis with me* 

There's no fence againft our fate ; 

Changes daily on us wait. 

Drink, and fet your hearts at reft ;; 

Of a bad market make the beiL. 



MISCELLANY. 



33 



SONG XVII. 
EW-BUGHTS MARION. 



Will ye go to the ew bug 



Will ye go to the ew bughts Marion, And 

23 



£=fzzzz 



wear in the fiieep wi' me? The fun {hines 
-w-S? — 



^si^fniii^ 



i'weet, my Marion, But nae half fae fweet 




as thee. The fun mines fweet, my Marion, But 






§ 



\*3t 



nae half fae fweet as thee. 

O Marion's a bonny lafs, 

And the blyth blinks in her ee'j 
And fain wad I marry Marion, 

Gin Marion wad marry me. 

There's goud in your garters, Marion, 
And filk on your white haufs-bane j 

Fu' fain wad I kifs my Marion, 
At e'en when I come hame. 



34 



THE MUSICAL 



I've nine miks ewes, my Marion ; 

A cow and a brawny quey, 
I'll gi'e them a* to my Marion ; 

Jurl on her bridal-day ; 

And ye's get a green fey apron, 

And waftecoat of the London brown, 

And vow but ye will be vap'ring, 
Whene'er ye gang to the town. 

I'm young and ft out. my Marion ; 

Nane dances like me on the green : 
And gin ye forfake me, Marion, 

I'll e'en draw up wi' Jean ; 

Sae put on your pearlins, Marion, 
And kyitle of the cramafie ! 

And foon as my chin hasnae hair on, 
I (hall come weft, and fee y$. 



MISCELLANY, 

SONG XVIII. 

HUNTING THE HARE. 



35 



■^z^^^z-z^z-jii^zt^T 



What fport can compare, to the knitting of the 



— ,_.._h. 



hare, In the morning, In the morning, In fair and 



.*L_ 4i--L-l- 



pleaiant weather, With our horfes and our hounds, 



gtfeEgg 



Sdtqazdfe: 



S : Mf 



fcrir 1 -^— n 



kawh 



we will fcour o'er the grounds, and Tan-ta-ra, Huz- 



->£- 



^MSg 



za, and Tan-ta-ra, Huz-za and Tan-ta-ra, Hi 



_L. 



£3 






za, brave boys we will folk 



When poor pufs doth rife, 
Then away from us fhe flies, 
And we givQ her a thundering hollow, 



36 THE MUSICAL 

With our horfes and our hounds 
We will pull her courage down, 
And Tantara, Huzza, brave boys we will follow. 

When poor pufs is kill'd 

We retire from the field, 
To be merry boys, and drink away all forrow, 

We have nothing more to fear 

But to drown old father Care, 
And to baniih, Huzza, all his wants till to-morrow. 



MISCELLANY, 

SONG XIX, 
HARK AWAY. 



37 



HilSiiiiiiiiil 



Hark a- way 'tis the merry ton'd horn, Calls the hunt- 



ers all up with the morn, To the hills and the woodlands 

iililiiiiiil 



we ileer, To unharbour the out lying deer And 




jij^j^fefc 



all the day long this this is ourfong, ilill hollowing 



and following fo frolic and free. Our joys 



know no bounds«while we're af-ter the hounds, No 



-M ' ■ \m\ — bai — ' lassl— B M — ** 



mortals on earth are fo jol - ly as we. 
D 



33 



THE MUSICAL 



Hound the woods when we beat how we glow, 
While the hills they all echo Hollow ! 
With a bounce from his cover the flag flies, 
Then our fhouts long refourid thro' the ikies. 
Chorus. And all the day long, &c. 

When we fweep o'er the valleys, or climb 
Up the health breathing mountain fublime, 
What a joy from our labours we feel, 
Which alone they who tafte can reveal. 
Chorus. And all the day long, &c. 



SONG XX. 

CONTENTED I AM. 



zd I am, and contented I'll be, For what can 
lis world more afford, Than a lafs who will fociably 

:E=t^k : ; ! == ? = Ud::trtrt=:t:b: 



fit on my knee, And a cellar with liquor well 

k — & 



3EB^ 



f~i. 






55 



ilor'd, My brave bo - - 



ys, And a cellar 



m 



ti:p2==3I 



»zr.z±l=±zM 



with liquor well Ilor'd, 



MISCELLANY. 39 

My vault- door is open, defcend and improve ; 

That cafk, fir, ay, that we will try ; 
'Tis as rich, to the taftflfcas the lips of your love, 

And as bright as her cheeks to the eye. 

In a piece of flit hoop fee my candle is ftuck ; 

'Twill light us the bottle tp hand, 
The foot of my glafs for the purpofe I broke, 

For I hate that a bumper fnould Hand.- s 

Sound thefe pipes, they're in tune; fearch the bins, they're 
well nll'd ; 

View that heap of old hock in the rear. 
Yon bottles are Burgundy; mark how they're piPd, 

Like artillery, tier over tier. 

My cellar's my camp ; my foldiers my flafks, 

All glorioufly rang'd in review ; 
When I caft my eyes round, I confider my calks 

As kingdoms I've yet to fubdue. 

Like Macedon's madman, my glafs I'll enjoy, 

Defying hyp, gravel, or gout. 
He cry'd when he had no more worlds to deftroy : 

I'll weep when my liquor is out. 

'Tis my will, when I die not a tear mall be fhed, 

No hic jacet be cut on my ftone ; 
But pour on my coffin a bottle of red, 

And fay that his drinking is done. 



Dij 



40 THE MUSICAL 

SONG XXL 

THE HOUNDS ARE ALL OUT. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

THE hounds are all out and the morning does peep, 
Why how now you Haggardly lot I 
£Iow can you. how can you lie fnoring a-afleep, 
While we all on horfeback have got my brave boy- 
While we all on horfeback have got. 

X cannot get up, for the over night's cup, 

So terribly lies in my head, 
Befides my wife cries, my dear do not rife, 

But cuddle me longer a- bed my dear boy. 
But cuxldle me loager a bed. 

Come on with your boots, and faddle your mare, 

Nor tire us with your longer delay, 
The cry of the hounds, and the fight of the hare, 

Will chafe all our vapours away my brave boy& 
Will chafe all our vapours away. 



MISCELLANY. 



4* 



SONG xxn. 

COME, COME,' MV JOLLY LADS. 



p!^:fzI:rzz^:^-L4-3:=-— Pi=-- 



■^ l^ "b^ 



sfe 



Come come, my jolly lads, the wind's abaft, b rifle 






^ales our fails mall croud, Come buftle, buftle, .buftle 



i^ — i 



EtH 






oatfwain pipes aloud; ihe 

jz§:zji:±zzz:^zi:pzt[z±±izzt 



boys, hawl the boat, the boatfwain pipes aloud; The 

_Q __ 

§2 : iz 

fhip's unmoor'd, all hands on board, The riling gale 

(-,,,.> -<-i j — i__^_J5^ p — p r pzp — ^i 

1EJr~*«<=5r* t- :! ^=_- s tea! ! "far*H '. 



fills ev'ry fail the (hip's wellmann'd and itor'd. Then 

^fczszzq zzzz i:d: pziazzpzztpz^xii-zzj^ 
pzjzz:?z-jz?x^zz?:±:ztzizl=zt±t5c 

fling the flowing bowl, Fond hopes arife, the girls we 



-O-- 



z~i;e: ; f;:^zzzzizqz^:pT:pzz-zzz 
g!_t__Szi_^_-S_„U„ K t Nfl l __[ = _ 

prize mall blefs each jovial foul. The cann boysbring, 






^..p^ _ . 



well drink and ting while foaming billows roll.' 



4^ The musical 

Tho> to the Spanifh coaft 

We're bound to iteer, 
We'll ftill our rlglfts maintain, 
Then bear a hand, be Heady boys* 

Soon we'll fee 
Old England once again : 

From fhore to fliore^ 

While cannons roar, 
Our tars fliall mow 
The haughty foe, 

Britannia rules the main... 

Then fling the flowing bowl,. 

Fond hopes arife 

The girls we prize 
Shall blefs each- jovial foul : 

The cann hoys bring, 

We'll drink arid ling, 
While foaming billows roll. 

Cho. Then fling the, fcfo 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG XXIII. 
LOCHABER NO MORE. 



43 






^ n ^\i-r^ i= m 



Farewell to Lcchaber! and farewell my 



SEffiIp3a 



Jean ! where heartfome with thee I have mony 



gjjggjj fBgglgi 



days been; For, Lochaber no more, Eocha- 



ber no more, We'll may be re-turn to Loch- 



Hi^Sl 



aber no more. Thefe tears that I fhed, 



i^^ 



they are a* for my dear, And no for the dangers 



MljJM 



attending on weir ; Tho' bore on rough feas to 




THE MUSICAL 



.pea?—.— j_ -~fSB — jeb? „ 

a far bloody fhore, May be to re -turn to 

JLochaber no more. 

Tbo' hurricanes rife, and rife every wind, 
They'll ne'er r/nke a temper!., like that in my mind : ; 
Tho' loudert of thunders on 1 vder waves roar, 
That's naething like leaving my love on the more. 
To leave -thee behind the, my heart is fair pain'd, 
By tafe that's inglorious, no feme can be gain'd. 
And beauty and love's the reward of the brave : 
And I mulr'deferve it, before I can crave. 

Then glory, my Jeanv, maun plead my excufe, 
Since honour commands me, how can I refufe ? 
Without it I ne'er car: have merit for thee, 
And without 1 thy favour I'd better not be. 
I gae then, my lafs, to win honour and fame. 
i\nd if I fhould luck to come glorioufly hame. 
I'll bring a heart to thee with love running o'er, 
And then I'll leave thee and Lochaber no more. 



&m 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG XXIV. 

WHEN I WAS A YOUNG ONE 



45 



f^iiti 




Efl±: 



When I was a young one, what girl was like me, So 



SUp^l^ll 



wanton, fo airy, and brifk as a bee, I tattl'd 



sippilpiiii 

I rambl'd, I laugh*d, and where e'er a fiddle was 



§^P^W=I 



heard, to be fure, I was there. 

To all that come near I had fomething to fay, 
*Twas this Sir, and that Sir ! but fcarce ever nay* 
And Sundays dreft out in my filks and my lace, 
I warrant I flood by the bell in the place. 

At twenty, I got me a hufband — poor man f 
Well reft him — we all are as'good as we can ; 
Yet he was fo peevifh, he'd quarrel for ftraws, 
And jealous — tho* truly I gave him fome caufe. 

He fnub'd me and huff'd me — but let me alone, 
Egad I've a tongue — and I paid him his own ; 
Ye wives take the hint and when fpoufe is untowr'd, 
Stand firm to our charter — and have the laft word. 



46 the musical 

But now I'm quite alter'd, the more to my woe, 
I'm not what I was forty fummers ago; 
This Time's a fore foe, there's no manning his dart 
However I keep up a pretty good heart. 

Grown old, yet I hate to be fitting mum chance, 
I ft ill love a tune tho' unable to dance. 
And, books of devotion laid by on the fhelf, 
I teach that to others-—! once did myfelf. 




MISCELLANY. 

SONG XXV. 

THE WOMEN ALL TELL ME. 



47 






=fe 



The women all tell me I'm falfe to my lafs ; That I 



quit my poor Chloe, and flick to my glafs. But to 
you, men of reafon, my reafons I'll own; And if you 

*"**-* ^rrmtTrrz: — ^ — w 

"Hr 



! S^=iteiEiE! 



don't like them, why let them alone. 

Although I have left her, the truth I'll declare ; 
I believe me was good,, and I'm fure fh'e was fair ; 
But goodnefs and charms In a bumper I fee 
That make it a3 good and as charming as (he. 

My Chloe had dimples and fmiles, I miift own ; 

But, though fiSe could fmik,yet in truth fhe could frown 

But tell me, ye lovers of liquor divine, 

Did you e'er fee a frown in a bumper of wine I 

Her lulies and rofes were juft in their prime ; 
Yet lillies and rofes are conquer'd by time : 
But, in wine, from it's age fuch benefit flows, 
That we like it the better the older it grows. 



48 THE MUSICAL 

They tell me my love would in time have been cloy'd, 
And that beauty's infipid when once 'tis enjoy'd ; 
But in wine I both time and enjoyment defy, 
For, the longer I drink, the more thirfty am I. 

Let murders, and battles, and hiftory, prove 

The mifchiefs that wait upon rivals in love ; 

But in drinking, thank heav'n, no rival contends^ 

For, the more we love liquor, the more we are friends. 

She too might liave poifon'd the joy of my life, 
With nurfes, and babies, and fqualling and ilrife ; 
But my wine neither flurfes or babies can bring, 
And a big-bellied bottle's a mighty good thing. 

We fhorten our days when with love we engage ; 

It brings on difeafes and haftens old age : 

But wine from grim death can it's votaries fave. 

And keep out t'other leg when there's one in the grave. 

Perhaps, like her fex, ever falfe to their word, 
She has left me — to get an eftate, or a lord ; 
But my bumpers (regarding nor titles nor pelf) 
Will ftand by me when I can't Hand by myfelf. 

Then let my dear Chloe no longer complain ; 
She's rid of her lover, and I of my pain ; 
For in wine, mighty wine, many comforts I fpy. — 
Should you doubt what I fay, take a bumper and try. 



V 



* 



MISCELLANT, 

SONG XXVI. 
LET A SET OF SOBER ASSES. 



49 



Siaai 



s^piip 




Let a fet of fober alfes Rail againft the joys of 



Si^iS 



drinking, While water, tea, And milk agree To 



Siskin 



ts 



fet cold brains a thinking. Power & wealth, Beauty, 



::w 



E 



■m* 1 



m 



health, Wit, and mirth, in wine are crown'd. Joys a- 



ffi.fMJ'-tflf^ 



bound, Pleafure's found,-'Ocly where the glafs goes 

m 



round. 

The ancient fe&s on happinefs 
All differ'd in opinion ; 
But wifer rules 
Of Modern fchools 

In wine fix her dominion. 
Power and wealth, fcJV. 



^O THE MUSICAL 

Wine gives the lover vigour, 

Makes glow the cheeks of beauty ; 

Makes poets write, 

And foldiers fight, 
And friendfhip do it's duty. 

Power and wealth, &c. 

Wine was the only Helicon 

Whence poets are long-liv'd fo j 

'Twas no other main 

Than brifk champaign 
Whence Venus was deriv'd too. 

Power and wealth, £sfc. 

When heaven in Pandora's box 
All kind of ill had fent us, _ 

In a merry mood 

A bottle of good 
Was cork'd up to content us. 

Power and wealth, &V. 

All virtues wine is nurfe to, 
Of ev'ry vice detlroyer ; 

Give dullards wit, 

Makes juft the cit, 
Truth forces from the lawyer. 

Power and wealth, Sc, 

*\§7"ine fets our joys a-flowing, ^ 
Our care and forrow drowning. 
Who rails at the bowl, 
Is a Turk in's foul, 
And a Chriftian ne'er mould own him. 
Power and wealth, &c. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG XXVII. 
WHEN WARS ALARMS. 



s« 



3ET=tr. 



When wars alarms entic'd my Willy frc 




:tb:=t::: 



-*** -tna — ' — 1 asi "H r~ 



My poor heart with grief did figh, Each fond re-? 

y* tit v_ » 

membrance brought frefli forrow on me, I woke e'er 

yet the morn was nigh. No other could delight 
-*— -r -£- 



iiiiii^iiP=S 



him, ah why did I e'er flight him? Coldly anfw'rin^ 



-'*- 



*F3F3 






d* 



his fond tale, Which drove him far Amidll the rage 

of war, And left fillv me thus to bewail. 
Eij 



$4 THE MUSICAL' 

But I no longer, tho' a maid forfaken,. 

Thus will mourn like yonder dove, 
For, 'ere the lark to-morrow mall awaken* 

I will feek my abfent love ; 

The hoftile country over 

I'll fly to feek my lover, 
Scorning ev'ry threat'ning fear ; 

Nor diitant more, 

Nor cannon's roar, 
Shall longer keep me from my dear* 



MISCELLANY. 



55 



SONG XXVIII. 

DEAR TOM. 



Slow. 



M 



E5 






a 






Dear Tom, this brown jug, that now foams with 



llPlilii 



mild ale, (in which I will drink to fweet Nan of the 



vale), Was once Toby Filpot, a thirily old foul As 

rr-W— i^ssiai _psi^«s» _j^_ -h-^.^ 

e'er drank a bottle or fathom'd a bowl. In boozing about 

— E 



V^ ---jpai| — j 1 — =— t» isswp+ — 

"£y kasaal ■ . feass^ — L •» 



'twas his praife to excel, And among jolly topers he 
-Sfc— f 8 ^ — K — PH"? 13 ^ ^^^--■r* 52 ^ 



•^ — -$ — -**= — ■$ l UWmj— I — UUJ 




boi-e off the bell, 

tt±£3zsizs 



he bore off the bell. 



E iij 



54 t HE MUSICAL 

It chanc'd as in dog-days he fet at his eafe, 
In his flow'r- woven arbour, a3 gay as you pleafe, 
With a friend and a pipe puffing for row away, 
And with honeft old ilingo was ibaking his clay, 
Trlis breath- doors of life on a fucden were fliut. 
And he dy'd full as big as a Dorchefter butt. 

His body, when long in the ground it had lain, 

And time into clay had refolv'd it again, 

A potter found out in it's covert fo fhug, 

And with part of fat Toby- he form'd this brown jug, 

Now facred to friendihip, to mirth, and mild ale ; 

So here's to my lovely fweet Nan of the \-ak. 



MISCELLANY, 

SONG XXIX. 
HAPPY DICK. 



55 



Whence comes it, neighbour Dick, That you with 

youth uncommon, Have ferv'd the girls this tri - - - - 
------ ck, And w 



- - ck, And wedded an old wo - - - man? 



Happy Dick ! 

Each belle condemns the choice 
Of a youth fo gay and fprightly j. 

Eut we, your friends, rejoice, 
That you have judg'd fo rightly i 

Happy Dick ! 

Though odd to fome it founds, 
That on threefcore you ventur'd,- 

Yet in ten thoufand pounds 

Ten thoufand charms are center' d 

Happy Dick I 

Beauty, we know will fade, 
As doth the fhort liv'd flower ; 

Nor can the fairell maid 
infure her bloom an hour : 

Happy Dick ! 



$6 THE MUSICAL 

Then wifely you refign, 

For iixty, charms fo tranfient ; 
As the curious value coin 

The more for being ancient : 
"Happy Dick ! 

With joy your fpoufe mall fee 
The fading beauties round her, 

Ar.dfheherfclf ftillbe 

The fame that firil you found her : 

Happy Dick ! 

Oft 's the married Rate 

V\ ithjealoufies attended ; 
And hence, through foul debate, 

A:e nuptial joys fufpended : 
Happy Dick ? 

But you, with fuch a wife, 
No jealous fears arc under ; 

She's yours alone, for liie, 

Or much we all mall wonder : 

Happy Dick ! - 

Her death would grieve you fore, 
But let not thai toiment you ; 

My life ! (he'll fee fourfcore, 
If that will but content you : 

Happy Dick ! 

On this you may rely, 

For the pains you took to win her. 
She'll ne'er in child-bed die, 

Unlefs the d— l's in her : 
Happy Dick ! 

Some have the name of hell . 
« To matrimony given : 
How falfely you can tell, 

Who find it fuch a heaven : 
Happy Dick ! 



MISCELLANY. 

With yon, each day and night 
Is crown'd with joy and gladnefs ; 

While envious virjins bite 

The heated meets for madnefs : 

Happy Dick I 

With fpoufe long {hare the blifs 
Y had mifs'd in any other ; 

Ann when you've bury'd this, 
May you have fuch another : 

Happy Dick ! 

Obferving hence, by you, 
In marriage fuch decorum, 

Ourwifer youth mail do 

As you have done before 'em : 

Happy Dick I 



SONG XXX. 

HOW NOW MADAM FLIRT. 

To the foregoing Tune. 
HY how now, madam Fh'rt ; 



57 



W 



If you thus muft chatter, 
And are for flinging dirt, 

Let's try who beft can fpatter ; 

Madam Flirt ! 
Why how now, fancy jade ; 

Sure the winch is tipfy ! 
How can you fee me made 
The fcoif of fuch a gipfy ? 

Saucy Jade ? 



5» 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG XXXI. 
SONGS OF SHEPHERDS, 



Not too fad. 



^IeEcSSe?=3 



Songs of (hepherds in ruftical roundelays, Form'd in 



*-gr> 



HIUW 



a 



fan-cy, and whittled on reeds, Sung to folace youn< 



m 



i 



.■fc 



m 



nymphs upon holidays, are too unworthy for wonderful 




mmwmm 



deeds. Sottifh Silenus to Phoebus the genius Was fent ky 



nus, a fong to prepare, In phrafe nicely 



coin'd, and verfe quite refm'd, How the dates divine 



w-m "0 ' 41 — 



Runted the hare- 



MISCELLANY. 59 

Stars qulite tired with pallimes Olympical. 

Stars and planets that beautiful (hone, 
Could no longer endure that men only ihould 

Revel in pleasures, and they but look on. 
Round about horned Lucina they fwarmed, 

And quickly inform'd her how minded they were, 
Each god and goddefs to take human bodies, 

As lords and ladies, to follow the hare. 

Chafte Diana applauded the motion, 

And pale Prpferpina fat down in her place, 
To guide the welkin and govern the ocean, 

While Dian conducted her nephews in chace. 
By her example, their father to trample, 

The earth old and ample, they foon leave the air : 
Neptune the water, and wine Liber pater, 

And Mars the flau.gh.ter, to follow the hare. 

Young god Cupid was mounted on Pegafus, 

Borrow'd o' th' mufes with kifies and prayers; 
Stern Alcides upon cloudy Caucafus 

Mounted a centaur that proudly him bears. 
The poftilion of the fky, light-heel'd fir Mercury, 

Made his fwift courfer fly fleet as the air ; 
While tuneful Apollo the paltime did follow, 

To whoop and to hollow, boys, after the hare. 

Drowned Narciffus, from his metamorpholls 

Rous'd by Echo, new manhood did take. 
Snoring Somnus upitarted from Cim'ries : 

Before for a thoufand years he did not wake. 
There was lame club-footed Mulciber booted ; 

And Pan, too, promoted on Corydon's mare. 
Eolus flouted; with mirth Momus fliouted; 

While wife Pallas pouted, yet follow'd the hare. 

Grave Hymen ufhers in lady Aftrea. 

The humour took hold of Latona the cohL 
Ceres the brown too, with bright Cytherea, 

And Thetis the wanton, Beltona the bold ; 



6o THE MUSICAL 

Shamefac'd Aurora with witty Pandora, 
And Maia with Flora did company bear ; 

But juno was Hated too high to be mated, 

Although, Sir, me hated not hunting the hare. 

Three brown bowls of Olympical neftar 

The Troy-born boy"now prefents on his knee ; 

Jove to Phoebus caroufes in nectar, 

And Phoebus to Hermes, and Hermes to me : 

Wherewtih iniufed, I piped and muied, 

In language unuiec, their iports to declare, 

Till the valthoufe of jovelike the bright fpheres did move- 
Here's a health, then, to all that love hunting the hare- 



IvIISCKLLANY. 

SONG XXXII. 
THERE WAS A JOLLY MILLER. 

E5q£ 



>±4 




There was a jolly miller once liv'd on the ri-ver 



*=H 



dtdrr 






£-fcf^^(B: 



U 



:c=5- 



\0 

Dee. He danc'd and he fang from morn till night ; 



Hfe 






iSl 



no lark fo blithe as he. And this the burden of 






^silSfflSS 



t=±.-zt±t:^Er: 



-J%-#S7$- 



his fona for e-ver us'd to be : I care for 



, fc i n> ,. p j» s^33 -3B 



5 



-i— h 



ffi^e? 



&* 



dy, no, not I, if no-body cares for me. 

I live by my mill, God blefs her ! (lie's kindred, child, 

and wife ; 
I would not change my Hation for any other in life. 
No lawyer, furgeon, or doclior, e'er had a groat from mi 
i care for nobody, no, not I, if nobody cares for me. 
When fpring begins it's merry career, oh ! how his heart 

grows gay I 
No fummer's drouth alarms his fears, nor winter's fad decay, 
Noforefightmarsthemiller'sjoy,who'swonttofingandfay, 
Let others toil from year to year, I live from day to day. 
Thus, like the miller bold and free, let us rejoice and ling: 
The days of youth are made for glee, and time is oh the 

wing. 
This fong (hailpafsfrom metothee, along this jovial ring : 
Let heart and voice and all agree to fay long live the kin g, 
F 



6% 



THE MUSICAJL 



SONG XXXIIL 

THE DUSKY NIGHT. 






The dufky night rides down the fky, And ufhers 

iS3SE 






?=*££ 



in the morn, The hounds all join in jovial cry, 




are 



pg{==±fcg} 



The hounds all join iii jovial cry, The huntfraan 



^inds his horn. The huntfman winds his horn. 1 

a hunting we will go, A hunting we wiligo, 

L^l — yt-yj;— Hrnbd 1 " 



A hunting we will go , A hunting we will 

go And a hunting we will go. A hunting v* 



MISCELLANY. 



63 



9 



li^Siliiiil 



will go - -, And hunting we will go - - -, A 






"3E3 

hunting we will go 

The wife around her hufband throws 
Her arms to make him ftay, 

My dear it ruins, it hails, it blows, 
You cannot hunt to-day. 
Yet a hunting, &c. 

Sly Reynard now like light'ning flies, 
And fweeps acrofs the vale, 

But when the hounds too near he fpies 
He drops his bufhy tail. 
Then a hunting, &c. 

Fond eccho feems to like the fport, 

And join the jovial cry, 
The woods and hills the found retort, 

And mufic fills the fky, 
When a hunting, &c. 

At laft his ftrength to faintnefs worn, 
Poor Reynard ceafes flight ; 

Then hungry homeward we return 
To feaft away the night. 
And a drinking, Iste, 

Ye jovial hunters in the morn 
Prepare then for the chace. 
Rife at the founding of the horn, 
And health with fport embrace, 
When a hunting, &jV. 
Fij 



6'4 THE MUSICAL 

SONG XXXIV. 

FATHER PAUL. 
J o the foregoing Tune. 

W'KILE grave divines preach up dull rules,. 
And moral wits refine, 
The precepts taught in human fchools, 
The precepts taught in human fchools,. 
We Friars hold divine, 
We Friars hold divine. 

Mere's a health to Father Paul, 

A health to Father Paul; 
For 'flowing ooivls inspires the fouls 
Of jolly Friars all.- : 

When in the convent we're all met, 

We laugh, we joke-, we fing, 
Affairs divine, we fo.on forget, 
Affairs divine, we foon forget, 

Since Father Paul's our King, 

Since Father Paul's our King. 

Here's a health, &c. 

Our beads and crofs, we hold divine 

We pray with fervent zeal, 

To rofy Bacchus god of wine, 

To rofy Bacchus god of wine, 

, "V^ho does each joy reveal, 

Who does each joy reveal, 

Here's a health, tJXY. 

Here's abfolution you'll receive,. 

You blue eye'd nuns fo fair, 
And benediction we will give ? 
And benediericn we will give, 
So banifh all your cares, 
So'baniih all your cares, 

Here's a health, $£c« 



MISCELLANY. 

So fill your bumpers fons of mirth, 

Let Friars be the toaft ; 
Long may they all exift on earth, 
Long may they all exift on earth, 
And nuns their order boaft, 
Aud nuns their order boaft, 
Here's a health, £sV, 



SONG XXXV. 
WHAT IS'T TO US. 



$ S 



3 



«-£ 



ilEES 



.q=5 



j=* 



What is't to us who guides the Hate ? Who's 

j- N-pg 



gEg 




out of favour, or who's great? Who are the mini 





--m 




fters or fpies ? Who votes for places,, or who 
•buys ? Who are the mini - - fters or fpies? Who 



•buys ? Who are the mini - - fters or 



votes for places, or who Buys I 



66 THE MUSICAL 

The world will ftill be rul'd by knaves, 
And fools contending to be Haves ; 
Small things, my friend, ferve to fuppoit 
Life, troublefome at belt, and fhort. 

Our youth' runs back, occafion files, 
Grey hairs come on, and pleafure dies ; 
Who would the prefent bleffing lofe 
For empire which he cannot ufe ? 

Kind providence has us fupply'd 
With what to others is deny'd ; 
Virtue which teaches to condemn 
And fcorn ill actions and ill men. 

Beneath this lime-tree's fragrant fhade,. 
On beds of flow'rs fupinely laid, 
Let's, then, all other cares remove,. 
And drink and fins: to thofe we love. 



MISCELLANY, 



n 



SONG XXXVI. 
EV'RY MAN TAKE HIS GLASS. 



Ev' 



take Ills glafs in his hand, Andd'nnk 



xf — V" 



ai_#._ — J- — .<&. — L_.i-c — 1_ — 



•«> 



:z:rzrc 






Wi 



^ 



£ 



^ 



a good health to our king; Many years may he rule 
o'er this land ; May his laurels for ever frefh fpring. 



-ir- 



&^S 



jj" 






Let wrangling and jangling ftraitway ceafe; Let 






piigiiiEpp 

every man ftrive for his country's peace ; Neither 



i-a 



* 



l^ :s 



tory nor whig With theirparties look big: Here's 



asges 



a health to all hcneil men. 



68 THE MUSICAL 

^Tis not owning a whirnfical name 

That pi-oves a man loyal andjuil : 
Let him fight for his country's fame ; 

Be impartial at home, if in trull. 
'Tis this that proves him an honeft foul : 
His health well drink in a brim-full bowL 
Then let's leave off debate, 
No confufion create : 
Here's a health to all honed men. 

When a company's honeftly met, 

With intent to be merry and gay, 
Their drooping fpirits to whet, 

And drown the fatigues of the day,— 
What madnefs is it thus to difpute, 
When neither fide can his man confute ? 
When you've fatd what you dare, 
You're but j nil where you werew 
Here's a health to ail •honeit men. 

Then agree, ye true Britons,, agree, 

And ne'er quarrel about a nick- name ; 
Let your enemies trembling fee 

That a Briton is always the fame. 
For our king, our laws, our church, and right* 
Let's lay by all feuds and fttaite unite : 
Then who need care a fig 
Who's a tory or whig ? 
Here's a health t© all honeit men. 



SONG xxxvn. 

YE BELLES AND YE FLIRTS. 



Ye belles and ye flirts, Andy e pert little things. 



MISCELLANY. 



6g 



Who trip in this forlickfome round, Prithee tell 
me from whence this in-decency fprings, The fexes 



:mzk 



izziazTztizz 



fcZjCZ 



"t? 



J 



at once to confound, What means the cock'd hat, 



3£1 



1 



ZfZKZK 



^ESE 



Bfc£r±:£ 



and the mafculine air, With each motion deiign'd 



i3£Et£;^£sjSz 



to perplex, Bright eyes were intended to Ian- 



irfziz:EtiiEzRz:E 



:z^ziz:±j^i:tzftz:pzfc:rq::p— ■ 



guilli, not ilare, And foftnefs the tell of your fex, dear 

wit: 



PR 






girls, and foftnefs the tefl of your fex. 

The girl who on beauty depends for fupport, 

May call ev'ry art to her aid, 
The bofom difplay'd, and the petticoat mort, 

&.H famples (he gives of her trade, 



JO THE MUSICAL 

But you, on whom fortune indulgently fmilet, 
And whom pride has preferv'd from the fnare, 

Should flily attack us with coynefs and wiles, 
Not with open and infolent airs, 

Brave girls, not with, £sV. 

The Venus, whofe ftatue delights all mankind, 

Shrinks modeflly back from the view, 
And kindly fhou'd feem by the artiii defign'd, 

To ferve as a model for you, 
Then learn with her beauties to copy her air, 

Nor venture too much to reveal, 
Our fancies will paint what you cover with care, 

And double each charm you conceal, 

Sweet girls, and double, &u 

The blufiies of morn and the mildnefs of May, 

Are charms which no art can procure, 
Oh ! be but yourfelves and our homage we'll pay, 

And your empire is folid and fure, 
But if Amazon like, you attack your gallants, 

And put us in fear of our lives, 
You raay do very well for fillers and aunts, 

But believe me you'll never be wives, 

Poor girls* believe me, SsV. 



MISCELLANY, 



7'. 



^5 



m 



SONG XXXVIII. 

HARK! HAPvK! 



t±at±± 



2: 



** 



Hark! hark! the joy in - fpi -ring horn, Salutes 



the ro-fy ri-iingmorn, And e - chocs thro* the 

3 






b0 w 

dale - - - - And e - choes thro* the dale, With 






~ s \-p~ 

>— f ^ — -i^J — 






:gH=£ 



clam'rous 'peals the hills refound, The hounds quick 



-4-4— 



ipiiiiij 



fcentedfcow'r the ground, And fnuff the fragrant 
•0>_ _ rv» 






gale 



- And fnuff the fragrant gale. 



J 2 THE MOSICAL 

Nor gates nor hedges can impede, ' ■■< 
The brifk high-mettl'd flatting (teed, 

The jovial pack purfue ; 
Like lightening darting o'er the plains, 
The diftant hills with ipeed he gains, 

And fees the game in- view. 

Her path the timid hare forfakes, 
And to the copie for fhelfer makes, 

There pants a while for breath ; 
When now the noife alarms her ear, 
Her haunt's defcry'cl' her fate is near, ... 

She fees aproaching death. 

Directed by the well-known breeze, 
The hounds their trembling viclim feize, 

She faints, Hie falls, fhe dies ; 
The diilant couriers now come in, 
And join the loud triumphant din, 

Till eccho rend the ikies. 



MISCELLANY 



SONG XXXIX 
TOPSAILS SHIVER IN THE WIND. 




^.^-^ijf^LiElfcj 



^-£m=m^^ 



M 



The topfails mi - - ver m the wina, I he imp 



1 teo-sisEsr — ' — L eBBaj»! — r~" 



me cafls to Tea - - - But yet my foul, my 



Kr^Pffe; 



Ci— -C-^* 




heart, my mind, are, Ma-ry, moor'd with thee. 



For tho' thy Tailor's bound a - far, Hill 






-p-~ 



love (hall be his leading ftar; For tho' thy 



' ~z aznzt — Mr — H— M— H — r-^'-Vi — 

- ^g mi — teases! bar ' kssaisjl — " kcs&a! *ju 



failor's bound a - - far, Still love mall be 






®-ri 



5bE3x=^B 



X 



his lead - - ing (tar. 
G 



74 THE musical 

Should landmen flatter when we're fail'd, 

O doubt their artful tales ; 
. No gallant failor ever fail'd, 

If love breath'd conftant gales : 
Thou art the compafs of my foul 
Which iteers my heart from pole to pole. 

Sirens in every port we meet, 
More fell than rocks or waves ; 

But fuch as grace the Britifh fleet, 
Are lovers and not flaves : 

No foes our courage fhall fab due, 

Although we've left our hearts with yoo. 

Thefe are our cares, but if you're kind, 
We'll fcorn the dafhing njain, 

The rocks, the billows, and the wind, 
The pow'r of France and Spain ; 

Now England's glory rerts with you, 

.Qur fails are full, fweet girls * Aditu ! 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG XL. 

BANKS OF BANNA. 



75 



ftSi 



:■■: 



iHiHg^ 



Shepherds, I have loft my love, Have you feen my 



a> — - 










Anna ? Pride of ev'ry mady grove, Upon the 



:;:i: 



5p!i|Sii 



banks of Banna. I for her my home forfook, 



si — 1 — Q-£ i— i — i — yizyzi — 



near yon mifty mountaifi, Left my flock, my pipe, 



. my crook, Greenwood fhade and fountain* 

Never (hail I fee them mere 

Until her returning ; 
All the joys of life are o'er', 

From gladnefs chang'd to mwurning. 
Whither is my charmer flown ? 

Shepherds tell me whither ? 
Ah, woe for me-, perhaps fhe's gone 

For ever and for ever. 

Gij. 



2« 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG XLL 

ALL IN THE DOWNS. 

All in the Downs the fleet was moor'd, the ilreamers 



waving to the wind, When black eyd Sufan came 



liiiigiHi:l§ 



en board, Oh! where {hall I my truelove find; Tell 

. ® 

me, ye jovial failors, tell me true, If my fweet 



llMiiiiiisi 






William, if my fweet Willi - am, fails a - monf 



gill 



your crew. 



MISCELLANY. jf 

William, who high upon the yard, 

Rock d with the billows to and frcu 
Soon as h^r well known voice he heard, 
He figh'd and call his eyes below : 
The cord glides fwiftly thro' his glowing hands, 
And quick as lightening on the deck he Hands. 

So the fweet lark, high pois'd in air, 

Shuts clofe his pinions to his bread, 
If chance his mate's fn rill call he hear, 
And drops at once into her neft, 
The nobleft captain in the Britifh fleet, 
Might envy William's lips thofe kiffes fweet* 

O Sufan, Sufan, lovely dear, 

My vows (hall ever true remain ; 
Let me kifs off that falling tear, 
We only part to meet again, 
Change as ye lift, ye winds, my heart (hall bev 
The faithful compafs that ftill points to thee. 

Believe not what the landmen fay,. 

Who tempt with doubts thy conftant mind* 
They'll tell thee Tailors when away, N 
In ev'ry pott a miftrefs find ; 
Yes, yes, believe them when they tell thee fo 3 
For thou art prefent wherefoe'er I go. 

If to far India's coaft we fail,- 

ThyVyes are feen in diamonds bright, 
Thy breath is A kick's fpicy.gale, 
Thy fkin is ivory fa white ; 
Thus ev'ry beauteous object that I view, 
Wakes in my foul fome charm of lovely Sue;,- , 

Though battle calls' me from thy arms, 

Let not my pretty Sufan mourn ; 
Though cannons roar, yet fafe from harms.,, 

William mail to his dear return, 
G iij 



7 S 



THE MUSICAL 



Love turns afide the balls that round me fly, 
Leil precious tears fhould drop from Sufan's eye a 

The boatfwain gave the dreadful word, 

The fails their fwelling bofom fpread, 
No longer muft flie flay aboard : 

They kifs'd, me %h 5 d, lie hung his head; 
Her lefs ning boat, unwilling rows to land : 
Adieu, fhe cries, and wav'd her lily hand. 



S ON G XLII. 
WHEN ONCE THE GODS. 

I3|^iiiip||lil 

When once the gods, like us below, To keep it up 






de - %n, Their goblets with frefline&ar flow, Which 






makes them more divine. Since drinking de-i-fiea 

, — th 






the foul. Let's pufh a - bout the flowing bowl*. 



MISCELLANY. 



79 






HIHH 



Since drinking de-i-fies the foul, Let's pufli about 



S^3E 




±afc: 

the flowing bowl. A flow 






g^SjB 



^TrfTKIZE 






bowl, A flow - -- ing bowl. Sine 



irsii1Sli§i 



drinking deifies the foul, Let's puih about tl 



flowing bowl ! 

The glittring flar and ribbon blue, 
-That deck the courtier's breaft, 
May hide a heart of blacked hue, 

Though by the king carefs'd. 
Let him in pride and fplendor roll ; 
"We'er happier o'er a flowing bowl. 
A flowing bowl, &c. 

For liberty let patriots rave, 
And damn the courtly crews 

Becaufe, like them, they want to have 
The loaves and fillies too. 



So THE MUSICAL 

I care not .who divides the cole, 
So I can mare a flowing bowl. 
A flowing bowl, &c. 

Let Mansfield Lord-chief-juftice be, 

Sir Fletcher fpeaker ft ill ; 
At home let Sandwich rule the fea, 

And North the treafury fill : 
No place I want, throughout the whole*.- 
'JBut one that's near a flowing bowl. 

A flowing .bowl, &c, 

The fon wants fquare-toes at old Nick^ 

And mils is mad to wed ; 
The docior wants us to b"e lick. ; 

The undertaker, derad. 
Ail have their v/ants from pole to pole i 
I want an ever flowing bowl.. 

A Sowing howl,. Es*£. 



MTSCELLAN?. 

SONG XLIII. 

ONCE MORE I'LL TUNE. 



___j A 



mmm^m 



Once more I'll tune the vo - cal fliell, To hills 






i"i"" , TT' i n*T~Pi — t~I — i — -t p„ > — 



-=rpH 



t: 




and dales my paf - - lion tell, A flame which time 
ver quell, That burns for lovel 1 



-gg- 



;if=fc 



F — r— - p-^-TF^^—J^-T 



Peggy. Ye greater bards the lyre mould hit, For fay 



iipiiiilliy 

what fubjed is more fit, Than to record the 



:*E=&E 



n 



P-ra 



"C? M» '=3Bl 



I— -4 — 



mmim 



fparkling wit, And bloom of lovely Peggy, 

The fun firft rifing in the morn, 
That paints the dew befpangled thorn, 
Does not fo much the day adorn. 
As does my lovely Peggy. 



gg the musical 

And when in Thetis lap to reft, 
He ftreaks with gold the ruddy weft, 
He's not fo beauteous, as undrefs'd 
Appears my lovely Peggy. 

Were (he array'd in ruftic weed, 
With hei the bleating flocks I'd feed,. 
And pipe upon mine oaten reed, 

To pleafe my lovely Peggy. 
With her a cottage would delight, 
All's happy when flue's in my light, 
But when (he's gone it's endlefs night, 

All's dark without my Peggy. 

The zephyr's air the violet blows, 
Or breath' upon the damaflc rofe, 
He does not half the fweets difelofe, 

That does my lovely Peggy. 
I dole a kits the other day, 
And truft me, nought but truth I fay, 
The fragrant breath of blooming May, 

Was not fo fweet as Peggy. 

While bees from flow'r to flow'r fhall rove, 
And linnets warble thro' the grove, 
Or llately fwans the waters love,. 

So long (hall I love Peggy. 
And when Death with his pointed dart, 
Shall ftrike the blow that rives my heart. 
My words fhall be wheft I depart. 

Adieu! rgy lovely Peggy. 



MISCELLANY. 83 

SONG XLIV. 

ON A BANK OF FLOW'RS. 

On a bank of flow'rs in a fummer's day, invit- 



'i> 



fere-H — h-^r-H r— lH— H — ts — MZ^^~L-XC. 






ing and undrefs'd In her bloom of years, bright Celia 



4- ,- r : 

lay, With love and deep opprefs'd ; When a youthful 



_«.__fc_^_ 



TZr£ 



fk—p — ^-^4 ~T~~p~~~Prf — -h 






fwain, with admiring eyes, WihYd he durft the 



^rf 



$£ 



2! 






fair maid furprife, With a fa, la, la, Cs' 






"fig 






Batfear'd approaching fpies. 

As he gaz'd, a gentle breeze arofe, 

That fann'd her robes afide ; 
And the fieepi ng nymph did charms difciofe 

Which, waking, fhe would hide, 
Then his breath grew fhort, and his pulfe beat high 
He long'd to touch what he chanc'd to fpy, 

With a fa, la, la, &c. 
But dm it not yet draw nigh. 



94 THE MUSICAL 

All amaz'dhe Hood, with her beauties fir'd, 

And blefs'd the courteous Wind ; 
Then in whifpers figh'd, and the gods defir'd, 

That Celia might be kind. 
Then, with hope grown bold, he advanc'd amain ; 
But Cne laugh'd aloud in a dream, and ag'ain, 

With a fa, la, la, £sV. 
Repell'd the tim'rous fwain. 

Yet, when once defire has enflam'd the foul, 

All modeft doubts withdraw, 
And the god of love does each fear controul 

That would the lover awe. 
Shall a prize like this, fays the venfrous boy, 
Efcape, and I not the means employ, 

With a fa, la, la, &c. 
To feize the proffer'd joy ? 

Here the glowing youth, to relieve his pain, 

The flumb'ring maid carefs^d, 
And with trembling hands (oh ! the fimple fwain !-) 

Her glowing- bofom prefs'd. 
Then the virgin wak'd, and affrighted flew, 
Yet look'd as wifhing he would purfue, 

With a fa, la, la, &fr. 
But Damon mifs'd his cue. 

Now, .repenting that he had let her fly, 

Himfelf he thus accus'd : 
What a dull and flupid -thing was I, 

That fuch a chance abus'd ! 
To my mame 'twill now on the plains be faid, 
Damon a virgin afleep betray d, 

With a fa, la, la, &c. 
Yet let her <ro a maid 1 



MISCELLANY, 



8 5 



SONG XLV. 
A COBLER. THERE WAS. 



iSSi 



:l 



gagfe 



--P^3 — -«-- - 



Acobler there was, And he liv'd in a Hall, Which 




ferv'd him for parlour, for kitchen, and hall. No 



2 



± 



t±r4;rtzi;H 



-*«- #-»- « - ' 



■•«-+-# 



!z_:^r:=:z^i'£E 



coin in his pocket, no care in his pate; No ambition had 



Siiiiiiiiiii 



he, nor yet duns at his gate. Derry down, down, 



-£>— e- 



==33 



K3&EiE=? 



down, derry down. 

Contented he work'd, and he thought himfelf happy 
If at night he could purchafe a cup of brown nappy : 
He'd laugh, then, and whittle, and fing, too, moil fweet, 
Saying, juil to a hair I've made both ends to meet. 
Derry down, &c. 

But love, the difturber of high and of low, 
That moots at the peafant as well the beau, 
He mot the poor cobler quite thorough the heart ; 
I wifh'd it had hit fome more ignoble part. 
Derry down, £sV. 

H 



86 THE MUSICAL 

It was from a cellar this archer did play. 
Where a buxom young damfel continually lay : 
Her eyes fhone fo bright, when (he rofe cv'ry day, 
That fhe (hot tlie poor cobler quit over the way. 
Derry down, &c. 

He fang herlove-forigs as he fat at his work, 
But file was as hard as a Jew or a Turk ; 
Whenever he fpoke (he would flounce and would fleer, 
Which put the poor cobler quite into defpair. 
Derry down, £sfc 

He took up his awl that he had in the world, 
And to make away with himfelf he refolv'd : 
He peirc'd through his body inftead of the sole ;** 
So the cobler he dy'd, and the bell it did toll. 
Derry down, &c. 

And now, in good will, I advife, as a friend : 
All coblers, take notice of this cobler's end ; 
Keep your hearts out of love, for we find, by what's paft, 
That love brings us all to an end at the last. 
Derry down, down, down, derry down. 



MISCELLANY. 8/ 

SONG XLVI. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

I'M not high church nor low church, no tory nor whig-, 
No nattering young coxcomb, nor formal old prig, 
Not fond of much talking, nor filcntly quaint, 
No profligate finner-, nor pragmatical faint. 
Derry down, down, down, deny down. 

But to know truth from falfehood, I do what I can, 

And if that 1 do err, I'm a fallible man, 

Nor can I in nature conceive any other, 

Of the wifeft arch pried that is born of his mother. 

I can laugh at ajeft, if it's not out of time, 
And excufe a miitake, tho' not flatter a crime 
The faults of a friend I fcorn to expofe, 
And deteft private fcandal, tho' call on my foes. 

I put none to the blufh, on whatever pretence, 
Forimmodefty (hocks both good breeding and fenfe, 
To amend, not reproach, is the bent of my mind, 
A reproof is half loit, where ill nature is join'd. 

When merit appears, tho' in rags, I refpedl it, 

And pleads virtue's caufe, tho' the world (hould re- 

jed it ; 
To no party a flave, in no fquabble I join, 
Nor damns the opinion that differs from mine, 

Evil tongues I contemn, no mob treafon I fing, 
I doat on my country, and am true to my king, 
And as for the path, after death to be trode, 
I fubmit to the will of a merciful God. 

Deny down, down, down, deny down» 

Hij 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG XLVIL 

THE ECHOING HORN. 



W&^fe^ M 



The echoing horn calls the fportfmen abroad, To 



gUiilligi 



® 






£50= 



horfe my brave boys and away ; The morning is up, 



iHlliiifipp] 



and the cry of thehounds, Upbraids ourtootediousde- 



fen 



mmmmm 



£ 



a 



lay. What pleafure we feel in purfuing the fox, O'er 



ii^piiiiiii 



hilLand o'er valley he flies; Then follow, we'll foon o= 



m^mm^ 



vertake him,huzza!The traitoris feiz'd on and dies, 



OL ~& 







He dies ---«------- - « - - The traitor 



^mr^zwzs: 



MISCELLANY. 
Chorus. 



8 9 




is feiz'd on and dies; Then follow, we'll foon overtake 




iili^HS 



him, huzza ! The traitor is feiz'd on and dies, 

Triumphant returning at night with the fpoil, 

Like Bacchanals ihouting and gay; 
How fweet with a bottle and lafs to refrefh, 

And lofe the fatigues of the day: 
With fport, love, and wine, fickle fortune- defy, 

Dull wifdom all happinefs fours; 
Since life is no more than a paffage at beftj 

Let's ftrew the way over with flow'rs. 

With now'rs, let's ftrew, SsV. 



H iij. 



9'0 THE MUSICAL 

SONG XLVIII. 

WHAT WOMAN CAN DO. 



WWyrmm 



What woman can do, I have try'd to be free, 



mm 



£gg 



~^H~ 



pi=g 



Yet do what I can, I find I love him, And 



^^Sl^fpifeil= 



tho' he flies me, Still, ftill,he's the man. They 



SifpplfEppiilp 



tell me at once, he to twenty will fwear: When vows 

k 



ipggilipgig 



are fo fweet, who the falfehood can fear ? So when 
you have faid all ycu can, Still, ftill, he's the man, 



iipi*rp 



MISCELLANY. 5 

I caught him once making love to a maid, 

When to him I ran, 
He turn'd and he kifs'd me, then who could upbraid 

So civil a man ? 

The next day I found to a third he was kind, 

I rated him foundiy, he fwore I was blind ; 

So let me do what I can, 

Still, — ftill, he's the man. 

All the world bids me beware of his art: 

I do what I can ; 
But he has taken fitch hold of my heart, 

I doubt he's the man ! 
So fweet are his kiffes, his looks are fo kind, 
He may have his faults, but if none "I can find ? 
Who can do more than they can. I 

He, — ft ill is the man. 



92 THE MUSICAL 

SONG XLIX. 

THE FAREWELL. 

Written by Mary Queen of Scots, in her pajfage from 
France to Scotland. 






O ! thou lov'd country, where my youth was 

fcfc=: 



Hizisz^it^gz^z ~~ h — p- — |LN T~® 



fpent, Dear golden days all paft in fweet con- 



ini^iiiigi 



tent, where the fair morning of my clouded day, 



^jpi^ppi 



Shone mildly bright, and temperately gay, Dear 



mm?fF0 $mt 



France, adieu, a long and fad fare- well j No 



j^j=j 



g^c5:rq_ 




m 



thought can image, And no tongue can tell, The 



MISCELLANY. 



93 



iiESHillliii] 



pangs I feel at that drear word, Farewell ! 

The fhip that wafts me from thy friendly fhorc, 
Conveys my body, but conveys no more. 

My foul is thine, that fpark of heav'nly flame, 
That better portion of my mingled frame, 

Is y holy thine, that part I give to thee, "1 

That in the temple of thy memory, >• 

The other evtx may cnfhringd be. 3 



94 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG L. 

QUEEN MARY'S LAMENTATION. 



I iigh and lament me in vain, Thefe 



z^in=i 



£ 



ir§r=ef:fc±f: 



£ 



3333333 







W- 



walls can but e - - cho my moan, A - - las, 



3C±=fc 



^lisiiiii^ 



±± 



it in - creafes my pain when I think of the 



-#? 




days that are gone. Thro' the grate of my 



^z^i^SS?:^z^iz^z:tzix^z_:?: 



prifon, I fee the birds as they wanton in 



air, My heart, how it pai 



air, My heart, how it pants to be [free, My 

_— J3BI 



looks they are wild with de - fpair. 



:53m 



MISCELLANY. 

Above tho' opprefl by my fate, 

I bum with contempt for my foes, 
Tho' fortune has alter'd my itate 

She ne'er can fubdue me to thofe ; 
Falfe woman in ages to come, 

Thy malice detefted mall be 
And when we are cold in the tomb 

Some heart it ill will forrow for me. 

Ye roofs where cold damps and dlfmay, 

With filence and folitude dwell, 
How comfortlefs paffes the day, 

How fad tolls the evening bell ; 
The owls from the battlements cry, 

Hollow wind feems to murmur around, 
Mary, prepare thee to die, 

My blood it runs cold at the found. 



95 



9& 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG LI. 

MARY'S DREAM. 



-:'* 



The moon had climb'd the high-eft hill, 



.&.. 



z3i?z±i 



ims 



Which, rifes o'er the fource of Dee, And 

:mz 



s— 



±4 



.gj |^p. 



:_^_. 



*_3£ 




— _pq — t xLP-uF 

iiedHer fi 



from the eafteru fum - mit fhed Her ill - ver 



ibfcdfet 



zcz z±jfc3fc 

light on tow'r and tree ; When Mary laid her 



WZ& 



-~~£i -1- leal — bfc» «* ., 

down to fleep, Her thoughts on Sandy, far 

j^ I*3Lj3 LLLIj. _ A— -4 '^® J 1 — ksasr 



at fea ; When foft and low a voice w< 
3$_&-f» Tct-^-^Pl 1 ZZ)ZZ!-WZ 



33 



|z£zBEfb*3i 



heard, Say, Mary, weep no more for me. 



MISCELLANY-. 

She from her pillow gently rals'd 

Her head to afk, who there might be. 
She faw young Sandy fhiv'ring (land, 

With vifage pale and hollow eye ; 
4t O Mary dear, cold is my clay, 

44 It lies beneath a ftormy lea, 
" Far, far from thee, I fleep in death, 

'.' So Mary, weep no more for me. 

t( Three ftormy nights and ftormy days 

" We tofs'd upon the raging main : 
«* And long we ftrove our bark to fave, 

<c But all our ftriving was in vain. 
« c Ev'n then, when horror chii'd my blood, 

" My heart was rlll'd with love for thee : 
<c The ftorm is paft, and I at reft, 

" So Mary, weep no more for me. 



lore. 



"• O maiden dear, thyfelf prepare, 

ic We foon mall meet upon that {lioi _, 
iC Where love is free from doubt and care, 

u And thou and I (hall part no more." 
Loud erow'd the cock, the fhadow fled* 

No more of Sandy could (he fee ; 
But foft the palling fpirit laid, 

(i Sweet Mary, weep no more for me" 



9 8 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG LII. 

SHE ROSE AND LET ME IN. 



*J The night her filcnt fa - ble wore, Anc 



3= 



BEE 



V ^ 



gloomy were the ikies, Of glittering flars 



3E5EtEPE3E3Ei 






~l appear'd no more than thofe in Nel - ly's 

l — jHS 1- 1 -^ 



E3fc± 



eyes ; When to her father's door I 



MISCELLANY. 



99 






came, Whei\j 1 had of- ten been, I 



eeeeSeEeSeS 



£-- 



&£ 



^ :__ .i_.fe 



T*Sf J egggpffi 



=£=± 



^ begg'd my fair, my love - ly dame, To rife 



3= 



S=SS=gli^ 



isms 



ff 



and let me ii 



3 



I 



L — i — 



&' 



But flie, with accents all divine, 

Did my fond fuit reprove; 
And while (he chid my rafh defign, 

She but inflam'd my love. 
Her beauty oft had pleas'd before, 

While her bright eyes did roll : 
But virtue only had the pow'r- 

To charm my very foul. 



i : O tHE MUSICAL 

Then who wou'd cruelly deceive, 

Or from fuch beauty part ! 
I lov'd her fo, I could not leave 

The charmer of my heart. 
My eager fondnefs I obey 'd, 

Refolv'd flie mould be mine, 
Till Hymen to my arms convey'd 

My treafure fo divine. 

Now happy in my Nelly's love, 

Tranfporting is my joy ; 
No greater bleiHng can I prove, 

So blefs'd a man am I ; 
"For beauty may a while retain 

The conquer'd flutt'ring hearty 
But virtue only is the chaia 

Holds never to depart. 



MISCELLANY. 



icr 



SONG LIIL 
OPEN THE DOOR TO ME 



mm^ 






open the door, fome pi-ty to (how, 



>b 



It's open the door to 



mmmm 

door to me, Oh! Tho' you 



have been falfe, I'll always prove true, So 




S=JjJzz=::iz: 



open the door to me, Oh! 



Cold is the blafl upon my pale chetk, 
But colder your love unto me, Oh! 
Though you have, &c. 

She's open'd the door, Die's open'd it wide, 
She fees his pale corps on the ground, Oh ! 
Though you have, &c. 

My true love, flie cry'd, then fell down by his fJde 9 
Never, never to (hut again, Oh ! 
Though you have, £sV. 



Hij 






THE MUSICAL 



SONG LIV. 

THE MATRON'S WISH. 




When my locks are grown h©ary, And my vifage 






looks pale, When my forehead has wrinkles, and mine 






eye-fight does fail, May my words and mine actions be 

free from all harm,. May I have a good hufband 

Chorus. 



:±:st-: 



:±z3: 



5==5 : 



to keep my back warm. O the pleafures of 









youth, they are flow'rs but of May, our life's but a 

jg— ^ _„p_^._^_ _^: 

vapour., cur bodies but clay, Yet let me live well, tho* 



fe:tg=El?:. 



MISCELLANY. I0j 



With a fermon on Sunday, and a Bible of good print ; 
With a pot on the fire, and good viands in't ; 
With ale, beer, and brandy, both winter and fummer, 
To drink to my goffip, and be pledg'd by my cummer, 
The pleafures of, &c. 

With pigs and with poulty, and fome money in ftore, 
To purehafe the needful, and to give to the poor ; 
With a bottle of Canary, to fip without fin, 
And to comfort my daughter whene'er me lies in. 
The pleafures of, &c. 

With a bed foft and eafy to reft on at night, 
With a maid in the morning to rife with the light, 
To do her work neatly, and obey my defire, 
To make the houfe clean, and blow up the lire. 
The pleafures of, &c» 

With health and content, and a good eafy chair; 
With a thick hood and mantle, when I ride on my mare. 
Let me dwell near my cupboard, and far from my foes, 
With a pair of glafs eyes to clap on my nofe. 
The pleafures of, £sV. 

And when I am dead, with a figh let them fay, 
Our honeft old cummer's now laid in the clay : 
When young, fhe was cheerful, no fcold, nor no whore 5 
She affiiled her neighbours, and gave to the poor. 
Tho'-theJlGVu'r of her youth in her age did decay > 
Tho" her life like a vapour evani/b'd aivay, 
She IWd well and happy unto her laji day. ' 



104 THE MUSICAL 

SONG LV. 

THE OLD MAN'S WISH. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

IF I live to grow old, as I find I go down, 
Let this be my fate : in a fair country town, 
Let nre have a warm houfe with a ilone at my gate, 
And a cleanly young girl to rub my bald pate. 

May I govern my paflions with an abfolute fway ; 
And grow wifer and betteras my ftrength wears away, 
Without gout or ilone, by a gentle decay, 

In a country town, by a murmuring brook. 
With the ocean at diftance, on which I may look ; 
With a green fpacious plain without hedge or itile, 
And an eafy pad nag to ride out a mile. 
May I govern, s&fe. 

With Horace and Petrarch, and one or two more 
Of the bell wits that liv'd in the ages before ; 
With a dim of road mutton, not ven'fon nor teal, 
And clean, though coarfe linen at every meal. 
May I govern, l5c. 

With a pudding on Sundays, and (lout humming liquor. 
And remnants of Latin to puzzle the vicar ; 
With a hidden referve of good Burgundy wine, 
To drink the king's health as oft as we dine. 
May I govern, £sfc. 

With a courage undaunted may I face my laft day : 
And, when I am dead, may the better fort fay, — — 
In the morning when fober, in the ev'ning when mellow, 
He is gone, and has left not behind him his fellow : 
For he govern'd his pafiions with an abfolute fway ; 
And grew wifer and better as his ftrength wove away, 
Without gout or Hone, by a gentle decay. 



MISCELLANY. H5j 

SONG LVI. 
KNOW I'M YOUR PRIEST. 



p pgji g ggip ^i 



You know I'm yourprieft, and your confcience is 



IHSgiilif^p 



Srl^rSri 



S^ 



mine; But if you grow wicked, 'tis not a good fign 



?=?^rp 



rrroCT 



tzs 



iLzrz:§: 



So leave off your raking, and marry a wife, And 



s^^s 



tf*= 



I-P 



frgrf: — gr[—^ * T ^ Ti t; V-k-3 

Ballina-raona, o - ro, Ballina-mona, o - ro, 

PlSfliillli 



Ballina-mona, o - ro, A good merry wedding 



r;:b;M 



r=R 



1 



mi wm 



10$ THE MUSICAL 

The banns being publifh'd to chapel we go, 
The bride and the bridegroom in coats white as fnow, 
So modeft her air and fo iheepifh your look, 
You out with your ring and I pull out with my book. 
Sing, &c. 

I thumb out the place, and I then read away, 
She blumes at love and ihe whifpers obey, 
You take her dear hand to have and to hold, 
I fhut up my book and I pocket your gold. 

Sing Ballinamona oro. 

That fnug little guinea for me. 

The neighbours wifh joy to the bridegroom and bride, 
The pipers before us you march fide by fide, 
A plentiful dinner gives mirth to each face, 
The piper plays up, myfelf I fay grace. 

Sing, £sfc. 

A good wedding dinner for me. 

The joke now goes round and the flocking is thrown, 
The curtains are drawn and you're both left alone, 
J Tis then my good boy I believe you're at home, 
And hey for a chriftening at nine months to come. 

Sing Ballinamona oro, 

A good merry chriftening for me. 



w 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LVIL 
BALLINAMONA.. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

HEREVER I'm going, and all the day 1< 
At home and abroad, or alone in a throne 



I07 



I find that my paffion's fo lively and ftrong, 

That your name, when I'm filent, ftill runs in my iong 

Sing Balinamona ovo,-&c. 

A kifs of your fweet lips for me. 

Since the firft time I faw you I take no repofe ; 

I deep all the day to forget half my woes j 

So hot is the flame in my itomaeh that glows, 

By Sc. Patrick, I fear it will burn through my clothes. 

Sing Balinamona ora, &c. 

Your pretty black hair for me. 

In my confcience I fear I {hall die in my grave, 
Unlets you comply and poor Phelim will five, 
And grant the petition your lover does crave, 
Who never was free till you made him your flavc. 

Sing Balinamona ora, £sV, 

Your pretty black eyes for me. 

On that happy day when I make you my bride, 
With a f winging long fword how I'll ftrut and I'll ftride, 
With coach and fix horfes with honey I'll ride, 
As before you I walk to the church by your fide. 

Sing Balinamona oro, &c. 

Your lily-white fill for me. 



io8 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG LVIII. 

THE WHEEL OF LIFE. 



m 



i mmm m 



The wheel of life is turning quickly round, And 



±: 



gppgi^pi 



nothing in this world of certainty is found. The 
¥- rV— r — IS — P* ■ rV 



Se 



£ 






midwife wheels us in, and death wheels us out; Good 



iSf 



*ttx 



lack ! good lack ! how things are wheePd about 

Some few aloft on fortune's wheel do go, 
And, as they mount up high, the others tumble low; 
For this we all agree, that fate at firll did will 
That this great wheel mould never once Hand {till. 

The courtier turns, to gain his private ends, 
'Till he's fo giddy grown, he quite forgets his friends: 
Frofperity oft-times deceives the proud and vain, 
And wheels fo fall, it turns them out again. 

Some turn to this, to that, and ev'ry way, 

And cheat and fcrape for what can't purchafe one poor 

day : 
But this is far below the gen'r.ous hearted man, 
Who lives, and makes the m©ft of life he can. 



MISCELLANY. 10'} 

"' • 2 
And thus we're wheel'd^bout in life's fhort farce, 

'"Till we at la ft are wheei'& off in a rumbling hearfe : 

The midwife wheels us in, and death wheels us out, 

Good lack 1 good lack ! 'how things are wheel'd about. 



SONG LII, 

THE STORM. 



:4: 



__j —JOBS « !? t ■ . 




Ceafe rude Boreas, bluft\ing railer, Lift ye landf- 
men, all to me, meffinateshear a brother faiior, 



*=^a 









fing the dangers of the fea, From bounding Mows 



ffljife 



firft in motion, when the diftant whirlwinds rife ; 



b1h§ 



5 — •-■ 

to the tempeff troubled o-cean, Where the feas 



i 



contend with fides. 



*io The musical 

Lively. 
Hark ! the boatfwain hoarfely bawling, — 

By topfail fheets, and haulyards (land ! 
Down top-gallants quick be hauling ! 

Down your Hay- fails, hand, boys, hand ! 
Now it frefhens, fet the braces ; 

Quick the topfail fheets let go ; 
Luff, boys, luff, don't make wry faces I 

Up your top fails nimbly clew ! 

Slow. 
Now all you on down- beds fporting, 

Fondly lock'd in beauty's arms, 
Frefh enjoyments wanton courting, 

Free from all but love's alarms, — 
Round us roar the tempeft louder ; 

Think what fear our mind enthrals ; 
Harder yet, it yet blows harder ; 

No again the boatfwain calls : 

Quick. 
The topfail-yards point to the wind, boys ! 

See all clear to reef each courfe ! 
Let the fore-meets go ; don't mind, boys, 

Though the weather mould be worfe. 
Fore and aft the fprit-fail yard get ; ' 

Reef the mizen ; fee all clear : 
Hand up ! each preventer-brace fet ; 

Man the fore- yard j cheer, lads, cheer ! 

Slow. 
Now the dreadful thunder's roaring ! 

Peals on peals contending clafh ! 
On oiir heads fierce rain falls pouring ! 

In our eyes blue lightnings flafh! 
One wide water all around us, 

All above us one black iky ! 
DifPrent deaths at once furround us. 

Hark ! what means that dreadful cry,? 



MISCELLANY. Ill 

Quick. 

The foreman's gone, cries every tongue out, 

O'er the lee, twelve feet 'bove deck. 
A leak beneath the cheft-tree's fprung out ; 

Call all hands to clear the wreck. 
Quick the lanyards cut to pieces ! 

Come, my hearts bt flout, and bold ! 
Plumb the well, the lake increafes ; 

Four feet water in the hold ! 

Slow. 
While o'er the fhip wild waves are beating, 

We for wives or children mourn ; 
Alas ! from hence there's no retreating ; 

Alas ! from hence there's no return. 
Still the lake is gaining on us ; 

Both chain- pumps are choak'd below, 
Heav'n have mercy here upon us ! 

For only that can fave us now ' 

Quick 

O'er the lee-beam is the land, boys j 

Let the gunso'er-board'be thrown ; 
To the pump come ev'ry hand, boys ; 

See our mizen-mafl is gone, 
The leak we've found ; it cannot pour faft : 

We've light en'd her a foot or more ; 
Up, and rig a jury fore-mail ; 

She rights, (he rights, boys! wear off more. 

Now once more on joys we're thinking, 

Since kind fortune fpar'd our lives ; 
Come the cann, boys, let's be drinking 

To our fweetheants and our wives. 
Fill it up, about fhip wheel it ; 

Clofe to th' lips a brimmer join. 
Where's the tempetl now ; who feels it ? 

None ! .our danger's diown'd in wine ! 

KIj 



3 1Z 



THE MUSICAL 
SONG LX. . 
IANTHE THE LOVELY. 



*£ 






S3 

p 

I-an-the the lovely, the joy of her .Twain, by 



St 



Iphis was lov'd and lov'd Iphis again, She liv'd 



fcsi- °r~ — ' — -p— — -f--# — ■ — p~\~ 



in the youth, and the youth in the fair> their pleafure 



:izFiz:±z:±zi5:Sii5:^:^ 



t^±Eil 






| — pz^-jz. 

was equal, and equal their care, n# delight no enjoy ■ 



&- 



-4—4 -CP^— 

-h-J-Utel- 



±££ 



■ ^f ^E 



ment their dotage withdrew, but the longer they 



giiigplppil 



HEM 

liv'd ftill the fonder they grew, No delight no enjoy- 



— JF~-a— 



fel^lsi^ppJii^ 



ztir^fc 



ment their dotage withdrew, But the longer they liv'd 



MISCELLANY. 



"3 



±dt=3L 



I^eIeI 



ftill the fonder they grew. 

A paffion fo happy alarm'd all the plain, 

Some envy'd the nymph, but more envy'd the fwain, 

Some fwore 'twou'd be pity their loves to invade, 

That the lovers alone for each other were made. 

But all, all confented that none ever knew, 

A nymph be more kind, or a mepherd fo true, 

Love faw them with pleafure and vow'd to take care, 
Of the faithful, the tender the innocent pair, 
What either might want he bid either to move, 
But they wanted nothing but ever to love. 
He faid all to blefs them his god- head cou'd do, 
That they ft ill fhou'd be kind and they mould be true, 



k.;.j 



U4 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG LXL 



LIFE IS CHECQUER'D. 
Philofophical. Jovial. 



Life is checquer'd ; toil and pteafure Fill up all the 



Izi3:3; 



^gigiLirsii 



■arious meafure. See the crew in flannel jerkins, 






Drinking, toping fiipby firkins; And, as they raife the tip 



$ 



-g— 



FFff 



arg:zi 



s 



J* 
icfc 



To their happy lip, On the deck is heard no o- 



:E^e|eEeIzB=IS 



ther found, But prithee, Jack, prithee, Dick, pri- 



thee, Sam, prithee, Tom, 



thee, Sam, prithee, Tom, Let the cann go round. 



±3grTdn£±433 

Then hark to the boatfwainswhiftle ! whittle ! Then 



MISCELLANY. 



--TB-T-P- 



-~m 



^^^^ ^^ =P 



hark to the boatfwain's whittle! whittle! Buttle, 



)—w~d — TT""~r~~r — - — ^— #- - 4-~r— 




buttle, buttle, my boy; Let us ftir, let us toil; 



m 



§=ps 



But let's drink all the while, For labour's the price of 

-'lirlifliiP 



t= 



our joy, For labour's the price of our. joy,, 

X.ife is checquer'd ; toil and pleafure 
Fill up all the various meafure. 
Hark ! the crew, with fun-burnt faces,.. 
Chanting black ey'd Sufan's graces : 

And, as they raife their note* 

Through their rutty throats, 
On the deck is heard no other found, SsV. &c* 

Life is cheequer'd; toil and pleafure 
Fill up all the various meafure. 
Hark ! the crew their cares dtfcarding 
-With huttle-cap or with chuck-farthing : 

Still in a merry pin, 

Let them lbfe or win, 
On the deck is heard, no other fouad, &c. &k, 



n6 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG LXIL 

BELIEVE MY SIGHS. 



■m- 



SB 



==*=££=£ 



'.Z.'SJZK 



^mW^mt 



Believe my fighs, my tears, my dear, be-lieve 



-*- 



i§iiiHE^Eii 



a heart you've won ; Believe my vows to you 



fincere, or Jenny, I'm undone. 



-M- 




fay I'm fickle, and apt to change, at every 
Chorus. 



BS 



ligggig 



face that's new. Of all the girls I ever 



sfg p g feWl i 



faw, I ne'er lov'd one like you, I ne'er lov'd one 






MISCELLANY 



-&7** 



Eel: 



33= 



like you, my dear, I ne'er lov'd one like you; 



■■#■ -U^-l S ^^--b~^"-«a*£- X -l 



P 



Of all the girls I ever faw, I ne'er lov'd one 



Eg 



fc . 



like 



you. 



My heart was like a lump of ice*. 

Till warm'd by your bright eye : 
And then it kindled in a trice, 

A flame that ne'er can die. 
Then take and try me, you mall find 

That I've a heart that's true ; 
Of all .the girls I ever faw, 
I ne'er lov'd one like you, 

/ ne'er Ion) d one like you my dear* 
I ne'er lovd one like you, 
0/ all the girls I ever/aiu s 
I ne'er lovd one like you,. 



u8 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG LXIII. 

YOU THE POINT MAY CARRY. 



fEefepj ^p tl 






You the point may carry, If a- while you tar-ry, 



- ^_fc 



m^mMm 



But for you, I tell you true, no you, I'll never 



gjjgJE|Eg^Fg|l 




&£=*=** 



marry. You the point may carry, If a-while you 






tarry, But for you, I tell you true, no you, I'll ne- 



kr d - mT * tt 



ver marry. 

Care our fouls difowning, 
Punch our forrows drowning, 

Lausffi and love 

And ever prove 
Joys our wjfhes crowning. 
Care our, &c. 



MISCELLANY 

To the ckurch 1*11 hand her. 
Then thro' the world I'll wander, 

I'll fob and figh 

Until I die 
A poor forfaken gander. 
To, the church, &c. 

Each pious prieft fince Mofes, 
One mighty truth difelofes, 

You're never vex't 

If this his text, 
Go fuddle all your nofes. 
Each pious, &c. 



*20 THE MUSICAL 

SONG LXIV. 

WELCOME BROTHER DEBTOR, 

Tune — Ceafe rude Boreas— Page 109. 

WELCOME, welcome, brother debtor, 
To this poor but merry place, 
Where no bailiff, dun, or fetter, 

Dare to mew a frighful face. 
But, kind Sir, as your're a ftranger, 
Down your garnifh you rauft lay, 
Or your coat will be in danger; 
You rauft either ftrip or pay. 

Ne'er repine at your confinement 

From your children or your wife : 
Wifdom lies in true refinement, 

Through the various fcenes of Irfe, 
Scorn to mew the leaft refentment, 

Though beneath the frowns of fate 9 
Knaves and beggars find contentment. 

Fears and cares attend the great. 

Though our creditors are fpiteful, 

And reftrain our bodies here, 
Ufe will make a jail delightful, 

Since there's nothing elfe to fear, 
Every ifland's but a prifon, 

Strongly guarded by the fea : 
Kings and princes, for that reafon, 

Pris'ners are as well as we. 

What was it made great Alexander, 

Weep at his unfriendly fate ? 
'Twas becaufe he could not wander 

Beyond the world's ftrong prifon-gate. 
The world itfelf is ftrongly bounded 

By the heavens and {tars above : 
Why mould we then be confounded, 

Since there's nothing free but love ? 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXV. 

MY TEMPLES WITH CLUSTERS. 



121 



gsmum 



My temples with clutters of grapes I'll entwine, 
And barter all joys for a gob - let of wine, And 

tr _ 






barter all joys for a goblet of wine. In fearch of 



3* 1 ' — 1 1 SfiEU'ZH ! \ X MB" "^ 



-EJP- — 1 — L -i 1 — team! — ! — K-kHl~- :s ^=^-^-#^^— ®--®-;-- 

a Venus no long--er I'll run, But flop and 



iE@!iiifgi 



t£ 



for-get her at Bacchus's tun; No longer I'll run 



o±— TIL- 






S 



*• *-*g 



-2£- 



M| 



But (lop and forget her at Bacchus's tun- 



122 THE MUSICAL 

Yet why this refolve to relinquish the fair? 
s Tis a folly with fpirits like mine to defpair; 
For what mighty charms can be found in a glafs, 
If not fill'd to the health of fome favourite lafs? 

*Tk woman whofe charms every rapture impart, 
And lend a new fpring to the pulte of the heart ; 
The mifer himfelf, fo fupreme is her fway, 
Grows a convert to love, and refigns her the key. 

At the found of her voice forrow lifts up her head, 
And poverty liftens, well pleas'd, from her med; 
While ag-e, in an ecftacy, hob'ling along, 
Beats time, with his crutch, to th*e tune of her fong. 

Then bring me a goblet from Bacchus's hoard, 
The largeft and deepeft that Hands on his board j 
I'll fill up a brimmer, and drink to the fair; 
s Ti& the thirft of a lover — and pledge me who dare! 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXVI. 

LOW DOWN IN THE BROOM 



12 






My daddy is a canker d carle, He'll nae twin 
wi' his gear, My min-ny fhe's afcolding wire,hadg 






=t 






* a' the houfe a fteer. But let them fay, or let 

them do, it's a' ane to me; For he's low down he's 



-&-■ 



:~=:±=: 



w 



-frFf 



zt a 



•ir-sr 



in the broom, _that's waiting on me, waiting on 

fe W-. IKES' N 



me, my love, he's waiting on me, For he's low down 






:S: 






he's in the broom, That's waiting for me, 
L ij 



3-4 THE MUSICAL 

My aunty Kate fits at her wheel, 

And fair fhe lightlies me ; 
But weel ken I it's a' envy j 

For ne'er a jo hag fhe. 
But let them fay, &f . 

My coufin Kate was fair beguil'd 

"VVi' Johnnie i' the glen : 
And aye fince fyne, fhe cries, beware 

Of falfe deluding men. 
But let her fay, &c. 

Glee'd Sandy he came weft ae night, 
And fpeer'd when I faw Pate, 

And aye fin ce fyne the neighbours round 
They jeer me air and late. 

But let them fay, or let them do, 

It's a arte to me ; ■ 
For I'll gae to tlye bonny lad 

That's waiting on me ; 
Waiting jm me, my love, 

He's 'waiting on me j 
F&r he's low down, htfs in the hroom 

That's waiting for me. 



MISCELLANY. 



12$ 



SONG LXVII. 
KGW LITTLE DO THE LANDMEN KNOW. 



How little do the landmen know, of whatwciai- 

^E^P:xzzzzi::T-z]z:_b=i{z"izi:z:^=pz: 
^z«:i|zzzd:iziz:tz-Zzti:zt :: --5-^ 



E_ZZ 



lors fetl, When waves do mount, and winds do-blow,, 

^|:fTzzpp:zzzz^]:=];z:-^^~z|iiTz^zj 



-^- — ^j-P— LP — ^U— 3~ 

but we have hearts of Heel. 



No danger can 



.<*.____^ 



* _ raj ^= ^-_ 

|^ 3 ^±pzKz^lz:p 



Zisisiia: 



a - fright us, no enemy mail flout, we'll make the 

; Is — M-iii 



^zzczzrFEz z ^l^Ez'^zSi' * 

mo-nfieurs right us, fo tofs the canri" about* 



Sick Mont to orders me {filiates,. 

We'h plunder, burn, and fink, 
Then France have at your firft ra*cs 3 . 

For Britons never fhririk. 
We'll rummage all we fancy, 

We'll bring them li\ by {'cores,. 
And Moll and Kate and Nancy, 

Shall roil in lucis d'ors. 



126 



THE MUSICAL 



While here at Deal we're ly'ng, 

With our noble commotio) e, 
We'll fpend our wages freely boys, 

And then to fea for more. 
In peace we'll drink and fmg boys, 

In war we'll never fly, 
Here's a health to George our king, boys, 

And the royal family. 

SONG LXVIII. 

WHRE'S MY SWAIN. 



ffiggmw 



Where's my i Vain fo blithe and clever, why d'ye 






**a 



:=t=to^i F : 



I£3£2si — 



EE 



leave me all in forrow? Three whole days are gone 

s$~ l — h t ~h'fcu — *" — **» C, "z^bpzbzt 



for ever, fince you faid you'd come to - morrow ; 

^-bt^t4;^±=t=:tp:fcp-±±:c:-tb:H=: _ 

If you lov'd but half as I do, you'd beenhefie with 
looks fo bonny, Love has fly-ing wings I well 



MISCELLANY. 



127 




know, not for ling'ring la - - zy Johnny, Love 
has flying wings I well know, not for ling'rim; 





la - zy Johnny. 



What can he be now a doing, 

Is he with the laiTes Maying ? 
He had better here be wooing, 

Than with others fondly playing* 
Tell me truly where he's roving, 

That I may no longer forrow | 
If he's weary grown of loving, 

Let him tell me fo to-morrow. 

Does fome fav'rite rival hide thee, 

Let her be the happy creature, 
I'll not plague myfelf to chide thee, 

Nor difpute with her a feature. 
But I can't and will not tarry, 

Nor will kill myfelf with forrow, 
I may loofe the time to marry, 

If I wait beyond to-morrow. 

Think not fhepherd thus to brave me, 
If I'm your's pray wait no longer, 

If you won't another 'll have me, 
I may cool but not grow fonder. 



128 THE MUSICAL 

If your lovers, girls, fbrfake ye, 

Whine not in defpair and forrow, 
Bleil another lad may m;.ke ye ; 

Stay for none beyond to-morrow. 

SONG LXIX. 

VARIETY IS CHARMING. • 
Tune — Ton the point may carry- — Page iiS* 

I'M in love with twenty, 
I'm love with twenty, 
And could adore 
As many more, 
There's nothing like a plenty- 
Variety is charming, 
Variety is charming, 
A conftancy 
Is not for me, 
So ladies take your warning 

For a man in one love, 
For a man-in one love, 

Ke looks as poor 

As any boor, 
For a man in one love. 
Variety, &c. 

Girls grown old and ugry. 
Girls grown old and ugly, 

They can't infpire 

The fame defue, 
,As when they're young and fmugljv 
Variety, pe, 

'Tis not the grand regalia,. 
"Tis not the grand regalia 

Of eaftern kings ' 

Thatpoets lings, 
But O the fweet feraglio. 
Variety, &c. 



MISCELLANY. 



3 29 



SONG LXX. 

AS SURE AS A GUN. 



isns 



■b- 

\z±z± 



K 



mmmm 



± 



Says Co-lin to me, I've a thought in my head, 



wz: 



I know a young damfel I'm dying to wed, I 

7 — m ~ 

know a young damfel I'm dying to wed. So 



)w a young damfel I'm dying to wed. So 
r ir is done, you'll 

§ESfe± 



w — --*■-' — 5~^ 

pleafe you, quoth I, and whene'er it is done, you'll 

SEfc 






^ 



P 



quarrel and you'll part again, as fure as a gun! As 



*SE£fEE|EE 



fure as a gun! As fure as a gun! You'll quarrel 



and you'll part again as fure as a gun. 



i 3 o 



THE MUSICAL 



And fo when you're married (poor amorous wight ? 
You'll bill it, and coo it from morning till night : 
But truil me, good Colin, you : ll find ft bad fan, — 
Inftead of which you'll fight and fcratch — as fure as a 
gun ! 

But fhou'd me prove fond of her own deareft love, 

And you be as fupple, and foft as her glove ; 

Yet be (he a faint, and as chafte as a nun — 

You're faften'd to her apron-ihings— -as fure as a gun 1 

Suppofe it was you then, faicl he, with a leer ; 
You wou'd not ferve me fo, I'm certain, my dear : 
In troth I replied, I will anfwer for none,— 
But do as other women do — as fure as a gun ! 



M 



SONG LXXL 
FAL DE RAL TIT. 



'Twas I learnt a pretty long in France, And I 



brought it o'er the fea by chance; And then in Wapping- 




I did dance,. Oh ! the like was ne-ter feen : For I 



' W;«Bi ' 1 ' * 



:xc: 



made the mufic loud for to play, All fortopafs the 




MISCELLANY. 



131 






dull hours a way, And when I had nothing left for 

-p~P- p~m — £-5H — J 

to fay, Then I fung Fa! de ral tit, Tit fal de ral, 

Chorus. 



.&_£- 



:tt-T-P-^--T^z-rz- 



s 



E 



Tit fal de ray, Then I fung Fal de ral tit, Then we 



__Q_. 



E 



zs 



£=» 



J r P r "' 

^1_[_.-L g-P P— 

fung Fal de ral tit. 



As I was walking down Thames flreet, 

A fhip mate of mine I chanc'd for to meet, 

And I was refolv'd him for to treat, 

With a cann of grog, gillio ! 

A cann of grog they brought us (Irak, 

All for to pleafure my (hip mate, 

And fatisfa&ion give him ftrait, 

Then I fung Fal de ral tit, &c. 

The macaronies next came in, 
All dreft fo neat, and loak'd fo trim, 
And thinking for to llrike me dum. 
There was half a fcore or more. 
Some was fhort, and fome was tall, 
But 'tis very well known that I lick'd them all. 
For I dous'd their heads againft the wall, 
Then I fung Fal de ral tit, &c. 



I32 THE MUSICAL 

The landlord then aloud did fay, 

As how he wifh'd I wou'd go away ; 

And if I 'tempted for to Hay, 

As how he'd take the law, 

Lord d — me, fays I, you may do your word, 

For I've not fcarcely quench'd my third, 

All this I faid, and nothing worfe, 

Then 1 fung Fal de ral tit, SsV. 

It's when I've crofl: the raging main, 

And be come back to Old England again, 

Of grog I'll drink galore ; - 

With a pretty girl for to fit by my fide, 

And for her collly robes I'll provide, 

So that me mall be fatisfied, 

Then I'll fing Fal de ral tit, fcfr. 



MISCELLANY. 



l 31 



SONG LXXII. 

ANDRO WF HIS CUTTY GUN. 






Blyth, blyth, blyth was me, BIyth was me but and 



-iizlfrlfJzP 1 



ben; And well (lie loo'd a Hawick gill, And leugh. 

-b — :-^ - fiT ft— -N— i-i-^r-K-P"P:T-p- 




±± 



to fee a tappet hen. She took me in, and 



::i — ^_g_::^xgz^_pSz:| 



fet me down, And hechtto keepmelawing free; But 



m ^ mm 



cunnin carlin that me was, me gar'd me birle my 



B5 



1 r 1.0 



bawbee. 



M 



J 34 , THE. MUSICAL 

We loo'd the liquoV well enough; 

But waes my heart ray cam was done, 
Before that I had quench'd my drouth, 

And laith I was to pawn my moon. 
When we had three times toom'd our iloup, 

. And the neift chappia new begun, 
In ftarted, to heeze up our hope, 
Young Andre wi' his cutty gun. 
Blyth, Myth, CsV. 

The carlin brought her kebbuck ben, 
With girdle-cakes well toafted brown ; 

Well does the canny kimmei- ken, 
They gar the feuds gae glibber down. 

We ca'd the bicker aft about, 

, Till dawning we ne'er jee'd our bum. 

And ay the cleareft drinker out, 
Was Andro wi' his cutty gun. 
Blyth, blyth, &?V. • 

He did like ony mavis fir.g, 

And as I in his oxter fat, 
He ca'd me ay his bonny thing, 

And mony a fappy kifs I gat. 
I ha*e been ealr, I hae been well, 

I hae been far ayont the fun ; 
But the blytheft lad that e'er I faw, 

Was Andro wi'his cutty gun. 
Blyth, blyth, e?V. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXXIIL 

BIRKS OF INVERMAY. 



*2>5 






fpa 



(La«i3tj*fc=d 



-=&- 



The fmiling morn, the breathing fpring. in- 






3q^..H--4-9- : j-# ^--4- -| — - 



1--T- 

vite the tuneful birds to" fing, And while 



Hg^ptf 



:fc 



SSiiii^ 



-r 

they warble from each fpray, love melts the u- 




ni - ver - fal lay 



Let us, A • man - da, 



-"fe#i 



. k ^r\ ^^ ^ ^- 



timely wife, like them im -prove the hour 
that flies, and in foft raptures wafte theday, A- 

tr 



mong the birks ' of In-ver-may. 
M.ij 



*2>6 THE MUSICAL 

For foon the winter of the year, 
AncTage, life's winter, will appear ; 
At this thy living bloom will fade, 
A3 that will flrip the verdant fhad« ; 
Our tafie of pleafure then is o'er, 
The feather'd fongfters are no more; 
And when they droop, and we decay, 
Adieu the bjrks of Invermay. 

Behold the hills and vales around, 
With lowing herds and flocks abound ; 
The wanton kids, and frifking lambs, 
Gambol and dance about their dams; 
The bufy bees with humming noife, 
And all the reptile kind rejoice ; 
Let us, like them, then fing and play 
About the birks of Invermay. 

Hark, how the waters, as they fall, 
Loudly my love to gladnefs call ; 
The wanton waves fport in the beams, 
And fimes play throughout the ftreams--; 
r J2he circling fun does now advance, 
And all the planets round him dance s 
Let us as jovial be as they 
Among the birks of Invermay. ' 



MISCELLANY. 137 

SONG LXXIV. 

FRIEND AND PITCHER. 

Moderato. 

■r^-J. J gr 

The wealthy fool, with gold in ftore, will Hill 
_ fa h. _ 






ic^JzjEtj: 



rawl 



=fc 



de-fire to grow richer, give me but thefe, I aik 



mm 



3zi;x:3:r; 



no more, My charming girl, my friend, and pit 



Chorus. 






^--j-^-#-|-H--^- M --FF^-r-^-^T:t::J: 

cher. My friend fo rare, my girl ib fair, With 

Pz:37Eiz?±^=lE£i:&fet± 

fuch, what mortal can be richer; Give me 

fa 



■**! 



j-f^y "" 



but thefe, a fig for care, With my fweet girl, 



■Inrr- 



-£? ^" ;—g --d^—^ — J— - 

my friend, and pitcher. 

M iij 



338 THE MUSICAL 

From morning fun I'd never grieve 

To toil a hedger or a ditcher, 
If that, when I come home at eve, 

I might enjoy my friend and pitcher. 
My friend fo rare, bV. 

Tho' fortune ever fhuns my door, 
I know not what can bewitch her j 

With all my heart can I be poor, 

With my fweet girl, my friend, and pitcher. - 
My friend, fo' rare,. &c. 



-m 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXXV. 

THO' LATE I WAS PLUMP. 

O 



39 



93% 



mim 



¥^_ 



w~5&_ 



-*-f-k- 



Tho' late I was plump, round, and jolly, I now 





-**_- 




fc 



__: — V0. 



tmm 



am as thin as a rod, Oh love is the caufe of my 



ilipppplgifi 






folly, and foon I'll lie under a fod. Sing ditherum 

(7S 



wrn^m 



doodle, nagety, nagety, tragety,rum, andgooie- 



'M 



*- 



2 ™ s . N 



therum foodie, Fidgety, fidgety, nigety, mum 

Dear Kathleen, then why did you flout me, 

A lad that's fo cofey and warm. 
Oh ! ev'ry thing's handfome about me, 

My cabin and fnug little farm. 
Sing ditherum, &c. 

What tho' I have fcrap'd up no money, 
No duns at my chamber attend j 



340 



THE MUSICAL 



On Sunday I ride on my poney. 
And ft ill have a bit for a friend. 
Sing ditherum, &c.c 

The cock courts his hens all around me. 
The fparrow, the pigeon, and dove ; 

Oh! how all this courting confounds me* 
When I look and think of my love. 
Sing ditherum, &c. 

SONG LXXVI. 

NOW PHCEBUS GILDS. 

Recit. 



S^illllipiii 



Now Phoebus gilds the Orient ikies, the lark 




r-2-P_J $~ JL __^-_S? • — 



begins the lay, The fonorous horn bids fportfmen 

£>- 




rife, to hail the new-born day : The hounds are out, 



^ x 4 — — 1 — ^— 1 — ^- 



their cheerful notes refound, while diftaut hills re- 



.:&- 



■t-pg 



BfflS 



jEgfpasHflS 



:?.:: 



turn it all around. O'er hill and o'er dale, over 



MISCELLANY- 



141 



HSIIE 



!E 



"JET"- 4"~ W~~ 



m 



-p-\ 



-arfV 



t-EL 



wm 



ditches or pale, as fwift as the wind we pur-fue, as 



:w 



Zjj±=: ^:^x:=]-il:iTi::i:|ti:r 



Sep 



fwift as the wind we pur - - fue,the fox or the hare, 

L K » „ ? 






#fb; t ■ , j*i40^ 



or the fwift footed deer, no matter whatfport is in 

view 




No matter what fport is in view. 



Health waits on the chace, 
Paints with blufhes the face, 

Spleen and vapours are left in the rear 
The brooks and the floods, 
And the deep embrown'd woods, 

Delightful around us appear. 

To the fports of the field 
All others mull yield, 
For hunting's of ancient renown ; 



142 THE MUSICAL 

Kings and princes, of old, 
Have this paftime extoiFd, 
Royal hunters have fat on the throne. 

Hills and valii''s o'erpaft, 
Now hdmewaid we hafte, ■ 

And our miilreffes hearty embrace : 
New ftrength we obtain, 
By our fports on the plain, 

For (Irength ftill attends on the chace„ 

Now the bowl comes in view, 
'• Which with glee we purfue, 
And thus happily finifh the day : 

To the huntrefs divine, 

To Diana we join, 
While each chorus loudly huzza*. 



MISCELLANY. 



I43 



SONG LXXVIL 

HOOLY AND FAIRLY. 



Oh ! what had I a - do for to marry ; My wife (he 



M 



heeSh 



Z3zzn 



gi#g==giEggig=g 



drinks naething but fack and canary, I to her friends 



wmmmmm 



complain'd right airly: O gin my wife wou'd drink 



gjlji^lJEllfl^SrpEp 



hooly and fairly, Hooly and fairly, Hooly and fairly ; 




O gin my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairly. 



Firft me drank Crummie, and fyne fne drank Garie, 
Now flie has drunken my bonny gray marie, 
That carried me thro' the dub and the larie. 
Oh ! gin my wife, &c. 

If fhe'd drink but her ain things, I wad na much care, 
She drinks my claiths I canna well fpare, 
To the kirk and the market I gang fa' barely. 
Oh ! gin ray wife, Z$c. 



144 THE MUSICAL 

If there's ony filler, fhe maun keep the purfe; 
If I feek but a baubee, fhe'll fcald and (he'll curie; 
She gangs like a queen, I fcrimpet and fparely. 
Oh i gin my wife, £sV. 

I never was given to wrangling nor flrife, • 
Nor e'er did refufe her the comforts of life, 
E'er it come' to a war, I am ay for a parley. 
Oh ! gin my wife, &c. 

A pint wi' her cummers I wad her allow, 
.But when 1he fi(:s down fhe fills herfel fou ; 
And when me is fou, {he's unco' camfteriei 
Oh! gin my wife, &c. 

She ries out to the cafey, fhe roars and fhe rants, 
Has nae dread o' her nibours, nor minds the houfe wants, 
But lings fome fool- fang, Tak' up your heart Charlie. 
Olj ! gin my wife, &c. 

And when fhe comes hame me lays on the lads, 
She ca's the lafFes baith limmers and jades, 
And I my ainfel an auld cuckold carlie, 
Oh ! gin my wife, &fa 



MISCELLANY, 



US 



SONG LXXVIIL 
GOOD MORROW TO YOUR NIG'HT-CAP. 



:r£S: 



:sizm 



tepCT fl B 



Dear Kathleen you no doubt find Sleep how very 






fweet 'tis, Dogsbark,andcocks have crow'd outyoune 



33 



Hiipli^g 



ver dream how late 'tis. This morning gay, I 



'M.JZZ 



rff 






gel 



£^£ 



poft away, to have with you a bit of play, on two legs 



mgHliilip 



rid a-long to bid,goodmorrowtoyournightcap 

Laft night a little browfy, 

With whifky, ale, and cyder* 
I afk'd young Betty Bloufy 
To let me fit belide her ; 
Her anger rofe, 
And four as floes, 
The little gipfey cock'd her nofe. 
Yet here I've rid along to bid, 
Good- morrow to your night-cap, 



146 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG LXXIX. 

HOW STANDS; THE GLASS AROUND. 

Moderate 



mnii 



Pt 



How ftandsthe glafs around: 



m 



-~~ ars — &■ 



&■ # 



£: 



-F-& 



tz 



How ftands the glafs a- round ? For 



I _-_»_ JZZJT — j 3 



fhame ! -5 


-e take no care, my boys. How itands tlie 


r Yl 1 


m: T "■ 




*2-b..i , 


, — J_ (6J — &>; — 0^— «r — -f— 


. ft -•._ 


— -&J 


.. . *; , J- . ft T. r— , ' ~ 


1 — ' C- 

— 1— 



fhame! ye take no care, my boys. 



How 



sumiyiiii 



glafs around ? J Let mirth and wine a 



SS 



t ; 1 

S~3 



*■ {lands the glafs around? Let mirth iind wine • a- 



MISCELLANY. 



147 



bound. , The trum-pets found, the colours 



FV p — _qp 



zMz: 



bound. The trum-pets found, the colours 



they are flying, boys, to fight, kill, or wound, may 



i§5 



* ~- '-^-i^T-p— 71-- 1 



PS&E^ 



they are flying, boys, to fight, kill, or wound, may 



ligiSipiEiEgi 



we fr ill be found, con - tent with our hard 



|p£p&^^^^^ 



we flill be found, con - tent with our hard 



f5±5i:iz 



^9~ 



=ihz?EEf:Pzd:|zp 



dfctW^ 



-r- 



fate, my boys, on the cold ground. 



S^M^ 






fate, my boys, on the cold ground: 



I48 THE -MtJSICAL 

Why, foldiers, why, 
Shcu'd we be .melancholy, boys ? 

Why, foldiers, why I 

Whofe bufinefs 'tis to die ! 

What, fighing? fie! 
Don't fear, drink on, be jolly, boys! 

'Tis he, you, or I ! 

Cold, hot, wet, or dry, 
We're always bound to follow, boys. 

And fcorn to fly ! 

5 Tis but in vain,— - 
I mean not to upbraid you, boys, — •> 

J Tis but in vain 

For foldiers to complain, 

Should next campaign 
Send us to him who made us, boys? 

We're free from pain ! 

But, if we remain, 
A bottle and kind landlady 

Cure all again. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXXX. 

THE CONTENTED MAN. 



149 









The man that's contented is void of all care, 



m 



s — — - — n — T® — 



■'6T 



Tol de rol-tol de rol tol de rol la dy, He far b- 
■m- N 



ver tops the foul fiave-ry of fear, Tol de vol tol 






de rol tol de rol la dy. A mind that's ferene, and 
a body in health, gives a man all the pleafure 

PI 



P±H- 



teur of w 

3fc£B 



and grandeur of wealth. Tol de rol la dy, Tolde 






ifciiFFzfe 



■gf— L B^ 






rol la dy, Tol de rol tol de rol tol de rol la dy 

Niij 



I50 THE MUSICAL 

Laft day I went out with a heart full of joy* 

Tol de rol, &c . 
Which nothing but vice or fharp pain could annoy ; 

Tol de rol, &c. 
The firft that I met was a mifer, whofe gloom 
Shew'd a foul that was muddy, and ftraiten'd in room. 

Tol d6 rol, &c* 

In Britain's fair iffand there's none to be feen 

Tol de rol, mc. 
Of more fullen, felfifh, and fordid a mein ; 

Tol de rol, &c. 
Regardlefs of honour, a flave to his gold, 
Defpis'd of the young, and contemn'd of the old, 

Tol de rol, £sV. 

The next that I met wa3 a profligate afs, 
Tol de rol, &V. 
Whofe brains were of cork, and his forehead of brafs |. 

Tol de rol, £sV. 
By game he was galloping thro' his eftate, 
And mis'ry attended his fad finking fate. 

O place me, kind heav'n ! in what flation you pleafe> 
Tol de rol, £sV. 
So my body's in health, and my foul be at eafe ; 

Tol de rol, &c. 
By command of myfelf, independent and free,, 
Contentment mall ftill be a pleafure to me. 
i. Tol de rol, &c. . 

O rather in a cottage may I be fed 

Tol de rol, &c, 
With roots the mofl common, and coarfeft brown: breads 

Tol de rol, &c. 
Than to riot with luxury, fopp'ry, and vice, 
They're the lofs of contentment, too precious a pri-e>, 

Tol de rol, Sec* 



MISCELLANY. 151 

Let rakes ramble after their harlots and wine, 

Tol de rol, &c. 
'Till with poxes and palfies their carcafes dwine ; 

To! de rol, &c. 
Grow old while they're young, and have wafted their ftore, 
While the vot'ries of Virtue are blithe at fourfcore. 

Tol de rol, &c. 

The thun3er may roar, and the hurricanes make 

Tol de rol, &c. 
The ocean to boil, and the forefts to fhake ; 

Tol de rol, &c. 
The light'ning may flam, and the rocks may be rent, 
But nothing can ruffle the mind that's c©ntent. 

This world's well freighted with wonders in ftore ? 

Tol de rol, Sec. 
And we're fent into it to think and explore ; 

Tol de rol, &c. 
And when the due fummons mall call us away, 
Ho more's to be faid, but contented obey* 

Tol de rol, &..c. 



*3* 



TW& MUSICAL 



"SONG LXXXI. 

"THE LAND 0*F DELIGHT. 






As you mean to fet fail for the land of de- 







light, And in wedlock's fo ft hammock to fwing ev'ry 




HEfe 



S^^iii 



night; If you hope that your voyage fuc-cefs>ful 







mou'd prove, Fill your fails with affection, your ca- 




bins with love. If you hope that your voyage 



a^^s 



fuccefsful fhou'd prove, fill your fails with affec= 



MISCELLANY. 153 






tion, your cabins with love. Fill your fails with 






affection, your ca- bins with love. 

Let your heart, like the main-mall, be ever upright, 
And the union you boaft, like our takle, be tight ; 
Of the fhoals of indiff'rence be fure to keep clear, 
And the quickfands of jealoufy never come near. 

But if vapours and whims, like fea-ficknefs, prevail, 
You mull fpread all your canvas, and catch the frefh gale, 
For, if brifk blows the wind, and there comes a rough 

fea, 
You inuft lower your top-fail, and feud under lee. 

If hufbands e'er hope to live peaceable lives, 

They muft reckon themfelves, give the helm to their 

wives ; 
For the fmoother we fail, boys, we're fafeft from harm, 
And on fhipboard the head is flill rul'd by the hdm. 

Then lift to your pilot, my boys, and be wife ; 
If my precepts you fcorn, and my maxims defpife, 
A brace of proud antlers your brows may adorn, 
And a hundred to one, but you double Cape Horn. 



w 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG LXXX1L 

THE LITTLE MAN AND MAID. 



iteimiE 



'?%mm 



There-was a little man, and he wco'iT a little 






-a-d" 1 -- c 

maid. And he faid, little maid, willyou wed, wed wed. 



Z&±*ZMZ3Z& 







I have little more to fay, than will you, aye or 



it 



nay, For little faid is foon - eft mended- ed, 



The little maid reply'd, Little Sir, you've little faid,. 

To induce a little maiden to wed; 
You rnuft fay a little more, and produce a little ftore,. 

'Ere I to the church will be led. 

The little man reply'd, If you'll be my little bride, 

I will raife my little note a little higher : 
Tho' I've little for to prate, yet my little heart is great, i 

By the little god of love I'm en fire. 



MISCELLANY. I 



55 



TI;e little maid reply'd, If J be your little bride, 

Pray, wh it . ould you give me to eat? 
Would the flams that you're fo rich in, put a fire into 
the kitchen. 

Or the little god. of love ftir the fpit-? 

The little man reply'd, and fome fay a little cry'd, 
For his little heart was fill'd with forrow, 

With the little that I have I will be your little (lave, 
And the reit, my little dear, we will borrow. 

Thus did the little gent, make the little maid relent, 

For her little heart began for to beat ; 
'Tho' his offers were but final!, file accepted of them ail, 

Now {he- thanks her little itars for her fate. 



'56 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG LXXXIIL 

DONNEL AND FLORA, 



§§iiiiii§i^ 



131 

When merry hearts were gay, Carelefs of ought 

_g£( 1 , |HqaE? T 1_ 



mmmmm 



but play,Poor Flo-ra flipt away, fad'ning to Mo- 



-*? — -r 

m 



ZZZ'M 



i^iH 



ra, Loofe flow'd her coal black hair, quick heav'd 



rterpzp- 






her bofom bare, And thus to the troubled air 



gpliiip 



fhe vented her for-row. 

" Loud howls the northern blaft, 
«' Bleak is the dreary waile ; — 
" Hafte, then, O Donnel, hafte, 

" Hafte to thy Flora. 
u Twice twelve long months are o'er, 
H Since in a foreign more, 
«• You promis'd to fight no more, 

(i But meet me in Mora. 



MISCELLANY, 1 5 



" Where now is Donnel dear? 
" Maids cry with taunting fneer, 
" Say, is he ftill fincere 

" To his lov'd Flora. 
«' Parents upbraid my moan; 
* l Each heart is turn'd to ftone — > 
" Ah Flora ! thou'rt now alone> 

" Friendlefs in Mora. 

" Come then, O come away, 
" Donnel no longer Hay; 
tl Where can my rover ftray 

" From his dear Flora, . 
*'« Ah fure he ne'er could be 
" Falfe to his vows and me. 
*< O heav'n, is not yonder he 

" Bounding in Mora." 

" Never, O wretched fair," 
( Sigh'd the fad mefTenger ) 
" Never mail Donnel mair 

" Meet his lov'd Flora. 
" Cold, cold beyond the main 
" Donnel thy love lies flain ; 
** He fent me to foothe thy pain 

(t Weeping in Mora. 

" Well fought our gallant men, 
'« Headed by brave Burgoyne ; 
" Our heroes were thrice led on 

" To Britifh glory. 
" But ah! tho* our foes did flee* 
" Sad was the lofs to thee, 
" While ev'ry frefh victory 

" Drown'd us in forrow." 

" Here, take this trufty blade," 
(Donnel expiring faid) 
*' Give it to yon dear maid 
" Weeping in Mora ; 
O 



I58 THE MUSICAL 

« Tell her, O Allan tell, 
" Donnel thus bravely fell, 
" And that in his fea farewell, 

" He thought on his Flora." 

Mute flood the trembling fair, 
Speechlefs with wild defpair, 
Then ilriking her bofom bare, 

Sigh'd out poor Flora, 
" Oh Donnel! O welladay!" 
Was all the fond heart could fay : 
At length the found died awajf, 

Feebly in Mora. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXXXIV. 

MY JO JANET. 



'59 






O fweet Sir, for your courtefie, When you come 






by the Bafs, then, And for the love ye hear to me, 

— Bte 



ii^ii^iiilpi 



buy me a keeking' glafs, then- Keek into the 



draw- well, Janet, Janet, And there ye'll fee your 



m 



bonny fell, My jo Janet. 

Keeking in tfce draw-well clear, 
What if I fhou'd fa' in, Sir ? 
Syne a' my kin will fay and fwear, 

I drown'd myfel for fin, Sir. 
Had the better be the brae, 

Janet, Janet ; 
Had the better be the brae, 
My jo Janet. 

Oii 



l6o THE MUSICAL 

Good Sir, for your courtefie, 

Coming through Aberdeen, then, 
For the love ye bear to me, 

Buy me a pair of fheen, then. 
Clout the auld, the new are dear, 

Janet, Janet ; 
Ae pair may gain ye ha'f a year, 
My jo Janet. 

But what if dancing on the green, 

And flapping like a mawkin, 
If they mould fee my clouted fheen, 
'. O' me they will ke taukin. 
Dance ay laigh, and late at e'en, 

Janet, Janet, 
Syne a' their fauts will no be feen, 

My jo Janet. 

Kind Sir, for your courtefie, 

When ye gae to the crofs, then, 
For the love ye bear to me, 

Buy me a pacing horfe, then. 
Pace upo* your fpinning wheel, 

Janet, Janet ; 
Pace upo' your fpinning wheel, 
My jo Janet. 

My fpinning wheel is auld and ft iff, 

The rock o't winna fiand, Sir, 
To keep the temper-pin in tiff, 

Employs aft my hand, Sir. 
Make the befl b't that ye can, 

Janet, Janet, 
But like it never wale a man,, 
My jo Janet. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG LXXXV. 

O GREEDY MIDAS. 



161, 







tc 



O greedy Midas, I've been told, that what 



r!afc: 



ppggi g 



'EEiES 



-P- 



you touch you turn to gold, that what you touch 



rjgf— H- — r~^~w^~ --4-+- fat — r— 

you turn to gold. O had I but a pow'r 

ike thine, O had I but a pow'r like thine, I'd tu - - 

r3~:KEf -E-E-kF-FiL ±Uz±^W--f L ~z -f 
!:fz-gigtpz^:3f:tb±^b:p:^:§p:t=^x 



, I'd 

-— ~ 

turn whate'er I touch to wine. I'd turn whate'er 






ifeill 



:^_i±z^z:tz 
i 



z: 



touch to wine. 



O iij 



I 62 THE MUSICAL 

Each purling ftream fhou'd feel my force, 
Each fifh my fatal power mourn, 

Each fifli, &c. 
And wond'ring at the mighty change, 

And wond'ring, &c. 
Shou'd in their native regions burn, 

Shou'd in, &c. 

Nor fhou'd there any dare t' approach 
Unto my mantling fparkling fhrine, 

Unto my, &c. 
But firft fhou'd pay their votes to me 3 

But firft, Zffc. 
And ftile me only god of wine. 

And ftyle, &V, 



MISCELLANY, 

SONG LXXVIII. 
TWINE WEEL THE PLAIDEN. 



1*3 



iglpiigfi 



O I hae loft my filken fnoodjthat tied my 



ii^g^liip 



hair fo yellow, I've gi'en my heart to the 

333. 



lillpfllflipp 



lad I lood, he was a gal-lant fel - low. 

P3 



Upli^gip 



#- 



And twine it weel my bonny dow, and twine 



I 



g l Bg fe 



it weel the plaiden, the laffie loft her filken 



Mrfr^te l 



fnood, in pu'ing of the bracken. 



164 



THE MUSICAL 



He prais'd my e'en fae bonny blue, 

Sae lilly white my fkin, O, 
And fyne be prte'd my bonny mou% 

And fwore it was nae fin, O. 
And twme it weel, my bonny dovv, 

And twine it weel the plaidenj 
The laffie loft her filken fnood, 

In pu'ing of the bracken. 

But he has left the lafs he loo'd, 

His am true love forfaken, 
Which gars me fair to greet the fnood, 

I loft among the bracken. 
And twine it weel, ray bonny dow, 

And twine it weel the pi a i den ; 
The laffie loft her filken fnood, 

In pu'ing of the bracken. 

SONG LXXXVII. 

COME ROUSE BROTHER SPORTSMEN. 




yEEEz? : 



Come roufe brother fportfmen, the hunters 




IllfgiliSS 



We've got a flrongfcent,anda favouring iky, we've 




got a flrongfcent we've got a ftrongfeent we've got 



a ftrong fcent and a fa-vouring fky. The horns 



L-tb-^-Kttti — i — zp±_t--- 



fprightly notes and the lark's early fong will chide 



*---r.^L_„ 



SS&gg 



the dull fportfmen for fleep- ing fo long, will 



:dr: 



h-p#*r— r 







0-arr— 




;#*= 



2TTt 



I 



P-r-* 



& 



Sfcfc 



1 — ■ — I — 






will chide the dull fportfmen for fleeping fo long, 



iS^ga 



ffefj 



t 



will chide the dull fportfmen for fleeping fo long*. 



i66 



THE MUSICAL 



Bright Phoebus has {hewn us the glimpfe of his face, 
Feep'd in at our windows, and call'd to the chace, 
He foon will be up; for his dawn wears away, 
And makes the fields blufh with the beams of his~ ray. 

Sweet Molly may teaze you perhaps to lie down, 
And if you refufe her perhaps me may frown, 
But tell her fweet love muft to hunting give place, 
For as well as her charms, there are charms in the chace. 

Look yonder, look yonder, old Reynard I fpy, 
At his brum nimbly follows briik Chanter aud Fly, 
They feize on their prey, fee his eye -balls they roll, 
We're in at the death, now return to the bowl. 

There we'll fill up our glaffes, and toaft to the King, 
From a bumper frefh loyalty ever will.fpring, 
To George peace and plenty may heaveii drfpenfe, 
And fox hunters flourifh a thoufand years hence. 



SONG LXXXVIII. 



THE OLD WOMAN'S SONG. 



3i: 







Old women we are, and as. wife in the chair, and 




as. fit for the quorum as men. We can fcold 



MISCELLANY. 



16' 



on the bench, and ex- a -mine a wench, and 



lifelpS^|ig| 



like them, and like them, andlikethemcanbe wron<v 



±±= 



lHIpiiipi3i 



now and then, now and then, now and then, andlike 
k Chorus. 

fcfcgg — • P — Nrn — 



^£MM 



them can be wrong now and then. For look the world 
thro* and you'll find, nine in ten, Old wo - men can 



§IS|li§lli 



do, Old wo - men can do, Old wo-men can 
^T" 



Sippfci 



do, as much as old men, 



l68 THE MUSICAL 

We can hear a fad cafe, with a no-meaning face, 
And tho' fhallow, yet feem to be deep ; 

Leave all to the clerk, and when matters grow dark ? 
Their worfhips had better go fleep. 
For look, &c» 

When our wifdom is ta(k'd, and hard queftions are 
afk'd, 
We anfwer them beft with a fnore ; 
We can mump a titbit, and can joke without wit, 
And what can their worfhips do more. 
For look, £sV, 



MISCELLANY, 



1 69 



SONG LXXXIX. 

WHEN MY WIFE IS LAID IN GROUND. 



iiiiiri-Hiiiiii 

O what pleafures will abound, When my wife 



is laid in ground. Let earth cover her, we'll 




dance over her, when my wife is „laid 



mm 



ground. 



Oh how happy mould I be, 

Wou'd little Nyfa pig with me ; 

How I'd mumble-her, touze and tumble her, 

Wou'd little Nyfa pig with me. 



/© THE MUSICAL 

SONG XC. 

THE HIGHLAND LADDIE. 

The law-land lads think they are fi 

S*553zfz5zz^zi:^3^3:p:[ 

- — ' * 1 — ■ Wjmln&l — ' — L eEE*W'» — a 



*?3 



-*?-= 




zxxzfiz^ 



aon p«s^ 

ilKl 



O they're vain and i - dly gawdy : How much 



fiary.-j? — i — y-t-f-r — r — f 



un-like th?t graceful rnein, And manly looLs 

zzzzzzzzb^JzzzEz 



E&7EEEB 



-^ — 



±. 



f3B^: 



3S 



of my Highland laddie. O my bon r ny 



3**— 


ii. 


f-^. 


zz& 


w 


'"kssB^iseef™'" 






MISCELLANY. 



*7* 



Highland laddie, My hand fame fmiling Highland 

-F- -B- m m 






srfc 



#■ — C 



P 



sriSii=Sj|? 



•<( laddie, may heaven ft ill guard, And love reward, the law- 






IllpiSiiig 






land lafs and her Highland laddie. 



jlggJ 



3i: 

^j — L 









If I were free at will to chufe 

To be the wealthieil lawland lady, 

I'd take young Donald without trews, 
With bonnet blew, and belted plaidy. 
O my bonny, &c. 

The braweft beau in burrow's-town, 
In a* his airs,, with art made ready, 

Compar'd to him, he's but a clown ; 
He's finer far m's belted plaidy, 
O my bonny, £fjY. 



1J2 THE MUSICAL 

O'er benty hills with htm I'll run, 

And leave my lawland kin and daddy ; 

Frae winter's cauld, and fummer's fun, 

He'll fcreen me with his Highland plaidy, 
O my bonny, &e. 

A painted room, and filken bed, 

May pleafe a lawland laird and lady j 

But I can kifs, and be as glad, 

Behind a bufti in's Highland plaidy. 
O my bonny, &c. 

Few compliments between us pafs, 
1 ca' him my dear Highland laddie, 

And he ca's me his lawland lafs, 

Syne rows me in beneath his plaidy. 
O my bonny, &c*~ 

Nae greater joy I'll e'er pretend, 

Than that his love prove true and fteady, 

Like mine to him, which ne'er (hall end, 

While heaven preferves my Highland laddie* 
O my bonny, &c. 



MISCELLANY. 



17$ 



SONG XCI. 

WHY HEAVES. 




Why heaves my fond bo-fom! Ah! what can 



:fc:r 



isiiiSi 



~i- 



it mean : Why flut - ters my heart which was 



iSplpiig 



once fo fe - rene; Why^ this figh-ing and 



trembling, when Daphne is near ; Or why when 



Ihe's ab - fent, this for-row and fear; Or 

liiflilir 




wby when flic's abfent, this for-row and fear. 



PiJj 



174 THE MUSICAL 

For ever, methinks, I with wonder could trace. 
The thoufand foft charms that embellifh thy face ; 
Each moment I view thee, new beauties I find, 
With thy face I am charm'd, but enflav'd by thy mind. 

Untainted with folly, unfullied by pride, 
There native good humour, and virtue refide ; 
Pray heaven that virtue thy foul may fupply 
With compamon for him who without thee mull die* 



MISCELLANY. 



*7S 



SONG XCII. 

SINCE YOU MEAN TO HIRE. 



-38 — - — ~T—g;"~ 



^mwtm 



HS^Ei; 



Since you mean to hire for fervicc, come with me, 



mm 



m 



you jol-ly dog. You can help to bring home har- 



mm¥mm 



veil, You can help to bring home harveft, 'tend the 




E^H^pjjgl 



fheep, and feed the hog. Farra diddle dol, Farra 




i^f^B 



^feg|g% 




diddle dol, tol ti di tol di ti di tol dol doL 



With three crowns, your (landing wages, 

You (hall daintily be fed ; 
Bacon, beans, falt-beef, and cabbage, 

Butter, milk, and oaten bread. 
Farra diddle, Csfc. 



176 THE MUSICAL 

Come, ilrike hands, you'll live m clover, 
When we get ypu once at home ; 

And when daily labour's over, 

We'll all dance to your ftrum ftrura, 
Farra diddle, We. 

Done, itrike hands, I take your offer? 

Farther on I may fare worfe ; 
Zooks, I can no longer fufFer 
• Hungry guts an^ empty purfe. 
Farra diddle, £sV. 



MISCELLANY. 



l 77 



SONG CXIII. 

BY THE GAILY. 



?ll^lS=ll^fe 



By the gaily circling glafs, We can fee how rai- 



s^z: 



t 

nutespafs. By the hollow calk we're told How the wa- 

nipiiiigiiii 



ning night grows old, How the waning night grows 






old. Soon, too foon, the bu - fy day drives us 

z?3±5~SSizL^b~t:EzE££E 







from our fport a-way, What have we with day 



z rnr * rrm 



m 



to do? Sons of care, 'twas made for you! Sons of care 



JH§5 B 



hil 



% 



-e- 

'twas made for vou ! 



i 7 8 



THE MUSICAL 



By the filence of the owl, 

By the chirping on the thorn, 
By the butts that empty roll, 

We foretel the approach of morn. 
Pill, then, fill the vacant glafs, 

Let no precious moment flip ; 
Flout the moralizing afs, 

Joys find entrance at the lip. 



SONG CXIV. 
HIGHLAND MARCH. 



^Ql^=ii=i^^i§^l 



In the garb of old Gaul, and the fire of old 
Rome,Fron. the heath cover'd mountains of Scotia 




-a*- 



fc 



m 



fee 



gz^:6:fc:~3zS:: 



we come: On tho-fe mountainstheRomansattempt- 



ed to reign ; But our anceftore fought and they 



MISCELLANY. 



179 



m 



JK* - 



fought not in vain. Tho' no ci - ty nor court 



: ==P 



-j^wi & 



of our gan 

, 3£^ '-■&r—f^—*r — ® *- 



of our garment ap-rove/Twas pre-fent-ed by 






BS 



Mars, at a fe - nate to Jove, And when Pallas 






obferv'd at a balTtwou'd look odd. Mars receiv'd 



S5± 



iifip 



i^ 



from his Venus, a fmile and a nocl. 



No intemperate tables our finews unbrace ; 
Nor French faith nor French fopery, our country dif- 

grace : 
Still the hoarfe founding pipe breaths the true martial 

drain, 
And our hearts ft ill the true Scottifh valour retain. 
'Twas with anguilh and woe, that, of late, we beheld 
Rebel forces rum down from the hills to the field ; 



l8o THE MUSICAL 

For our hearts are devoted to George and the laws \ 
And we'll fight, like true Britons, in liberty's caufe. 

But ft ill, at a diftance from Briton's lov'd more, 
May her foes, in confufion, her mercy implore ! 
May her coafts ne'er with foreign invafions be fpread, 
Nor detefted rebellion again raife it's head! 
May the fury of party and faction long ceafe ! 
May our councils be wife, and our commerce increafe! 
And, in Scotia's cold climate, may each of us find, 
That our friends fliJl prove true, and our beauties prove 
kind. 



SONG XCV. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

IN the garb of old Gaul, wV the fire of old Rome, 
From the heath- cover'd mountains of Scotia we come, 
Where the Romans endeavour'd our country to gain, 
But our anceftors fought, and they fought not in vain. 
Such our love of liberty, our country, and our laws, 
That, like our anceftors of old, we Hand by freedom's 

caufe ; 
We'll bravely fight, like heroes bold, for honour and 

applaufe, 
And defy the French, with all their art, to alter our 
laws. 

No effeminate cuftoms our fmews unbrace, 
No luxurious tables enervate our race; 
Our loud- founding pipe bears the true martial ftrain, 
So do we the old Seottifh valour retain. 
Such our love, &c. 

We're tall as "the oak on the mount of the vale, 
Are fwift as the roe which the hind doth affail : 
As the full moon in autumn our fhields do appear, 
Minerva would dread to encounter our fpear. 
Such our love, &r. 



MISCELLANY. l8l 

As a ftor'm in ihe ocean when Boreas blows, 
So are we enrag'd when we rufh on our foes ; 
We fons of the mountains, tremendous as rocks, 
Dafh the force of our foes with our thundering ftrokes. 
Such our love, £sV. 

Quebec and Cape Breton, the pride of old France, 
In their troops fondly boafted, till we did advance ; 
But when our claymores they faw us produce, 
Their courage did fail, and they fu'd for a truce. 
Such our love, &c. 

In our realm may the fury of faction long ceafe, 
May our councils be wife, and our commerce increafe, 
And in Scotia's cold climate may each of us find, 
That our friends ftill prove true, and our beauties prove 

kind ; 
Then we'll defend our liberty, our country, and our laws, 
And teach our late pofterity to fight in freedom's caufe, 
That they, like our anceftors bold, for honour and ap- 

plaufe, 
May defy the French and Spaniards to alter our laws. 



Q_ 






l'82 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG CXVI. 
CORN-RIGS. 



-ttX 




SZ-TMZM'lzBl 



:r?±^di: 



4— «pt — 



My Pa-tie is a lo -- ver gay, His mind 



!±zsfcz:f: 



l~ 



fcr.ir vi.^ r ' F 






e: 



* — "i/ — b~^c~ 

is ne - ver mud-dy, His breath is fweeter 

flJI -k=faEg 










than new hay, His face is fair and rud- 






dy. 



His fhape is handfome, middle 



pE£H 1 — — -1-1 ^ a— h-F~£~ -f-; + 



MISCELLANY. 



18 




fize, He's ftately in his wa'king, the 




mining of his een fur-priie, 'Tis lieav'n 

^Hfr-ftfo «. ftA. _ 

l g£ — jl ^_pz-£-X-.p-- 



a:±: 



to hear him ta-wking. 






fe 



Lad night I met him on a bawk, 

Where yellow corn was growing, 
There mony a kindly word he fpake, 

That fet my heart a glowing. 
He kifs'd, and vow'd he wad be mine. 

And loo'd me bell of ony ; 
That gars me like to fing finfyne, 

O corn -rigs are bonny I 



* 84 THE MUSICAL 

Let maidens of a filly mind 

Refufe what maift they're wanting 5 
Since we for yielding were defign'd, 

We chaftely mould be granting : 
Then I'll comply, and marry Pate, 

And fyrie my cockernony 
He's free to touzle, air or late, 

Where corn-rigs are bonny. 



SONG XGVII. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

LORD, what czre I for mam or dad ? 
Why let them fcold and bellow ; 
For while I live I'll love my lad, 
He's fuch a charming fellow. 
The lail fair day, on yonder green, 
The youth he dane'd fo well, O, 
So fpruce a lad was never feen, 
As my fweet charming fellow. 

The fair was over, night was come, 

The lad was fomewhat mellow ; 
Says he, my dear. I'll fee you home, 

I thank'd the charming fellow. 
You rogue, fays I, you've ftopp'd my breathy 

Ye bells ring out my knell, O, 
Again I'd die fo fweet a death, 

With fuch a charming fellow. 

We trudg'd along, the moon flioae bright, 

Says he, my fweeteft NeU, O, 
I'll kifs you here by this good light, 

Lord, what a charming fellow ! 
You rogue, fays I, you've ftopp'd my breathy 

Ye bells ring out my knell, O ; 
Again I'd die fo fweet a death, 

With fuch a charming fellow. 



MISCELLANY, 

SONG XCVIIL 

SWEET ANNIE. 



ig 



ifciM 



^ii^tessigi 



aa! ^"cs — -^ 



Sweet Annie frae the fea-beach came, Where 



SfczSzfaszzizi — »»fr~ z — iz i?Z"ii"t^*t 



Jocky fpeel'd the vef - fel's fide, Ah! wha can 



2Et 



zpiriS 



^^^^^^ffiSfe 



:feiff:?^jz:jz:;z 



keep their heart at hame, When Jocky's toft 

i:£ifc==C5=!r-«-«-~^T-^v-??~=^- 






a-boon the tide. 
ISzt^ZZHIfcfZ 



Far afF to di- ftant 



m 



realms he gangs, Yet I'll prove true as he 

±z: 



i^-jpL 



"*i™3zzi3izj 3SB, " d **l 



has been ; And when ilk lafs a - bout him 



ffltea 



thrangs, He'll think on Annie, his faith-ful ane, 
QJ'l 



lB6 THE MUSIC AI, 

I met our wealthy laird yeftreen, 
Wi* gou'd in hand he tempted me, 

He prais'd my brow, my rolling een, 
And made a brag of what he'd gi'e; 

What tho* my Jocky's far away, 

Toll up and down the anfome main, 

I'll keep my heart anither day, 
"j Since Jockey may return again. 

Nae mair, falfe Jamie, ling nae mair,- 

And fairly aaft your pipe away ; 
My Jocky wad be troubled fair, 

To fee his friend his love betray : 
For a' your fongs and verfe are vain, 

While Jocky's notes do faithful flow | 
My heart to him mall true remain, 

I'll keep it for my conftant jo. 

Blaw faft, ye gales, round Jocky's head, 

And gar your waves be calm and ftillj 
His hameward fail with breezes fpeed, 

And dinna a 5 my. pleafure fpill. 
What tho' my Jocky's far away, 

Yet he will braw in filler fhioe ; 
I'll keep my heart anither day, 

Since Jocky may again be mme> 



MISCELLANY. 



187 



SONG CXIX. 

WINTER. 



±: 



Si 



i 



fefri vf l l p igjpj; 



A - dieu, ye groves, adieu, yc plains, all 




nature mourning lies. See gloomy clouds 



and thickning rains ob-fcure the laboring fides. 






See, fee,, from a- far, tli* impending itorm, with 



r^rfc: 



zfF^BE 



4_ ^—1^,1 — — — l 



Ibte 



^-rH 



j~jpH?Hq 



ful-len hafte ap - pear, See winter comes, a 






IF 



dreary form^ to rule the falling year. 



I 88 THE MUSICAL 

No more the lambs with gamefome bound. 

Rejoice the gladen'd fight ; 
No more the gay enamell'd ground, 

Or Sylvan fcenes delight. 
Thus lovely Nancy, much lov'd maid j 

Thy early charms mitil fail, 
Thy rofe muft droop the lilly fade, 

And winter foon prevail. 

Again the lark, fweet bird of day, 

May rife on active wing, 
Again the fportive herds may play, 

And hail reviving fpring. 
But youth, my fair, fees no return, 

The pleafmg bubble's o'er, 
In vain it's fleeting joys you mourn, 

They fall to bloom no more. 

Hade, then, dear girl, the time improve* 

Which art can ne'er regain, 
In blifsful fcenes of mutual love, 

With fome diftinguifh'd fwain, 
So (hall life's fpring, like jocund May ? 

Pafs fmiling and ferene, 
Thus fummer, autumn, glide away, 

And winter foon prevail. 



MISCELLANY. 



189 



SONG C. 

A POX OF YOUR POTHER. 



|liiEl||iiElll^|S; 



A pox of your pother about this or that, your 



t iffiwriifm 



fhrieking or fqeaking a fharp or a flat, I'm fharp 



wmmmm 



by my bumpers, you're flat mailer Pol, fo here goes a 

— p- - 



^ii^^iiii 



fet to a Tol de rol lol de rol tol de rol dc 



uliiili^il 



rol, tol de rol lol, tol rol tol de rol lol de rol 



i 



tol de rol loh 



190 THE MUSICAL 

Mankind are a medley, a chance medley race, 
All ftart in full cry to give dame Fortune chace ; 
There's catch as catch can, hit or mifs, luck's all, 
And luck's the beft tune of life's Tol lol de rol, &V. 

When Beauty her pack of poor lovers would hamper, 
And after Mils Will- o'- the- wifp, the fools fcamper ; 
Ding-dong, in fing-fong, they the lady extol, 
Pray what's all this fufs for, but Tol lol de rol, &fr. 

I've done, pleafe your wormip, 'tis rather too long, 
I only meant life is but an old fong ; 
The world's but a tragedy- comedy droll, 
Where all a& the fcece of Tol lol de rol, ttc. 



MISCELLANY. 



191 



Sfc 



SONG CI. 

MY FOND SHEPHERDS. 



h^^f'ZT 



s£ 



My fond Shepherds of late were fo bleft, The! 



WrrvruhM 



fair nymphs were fo happy and gay, That each 



iElill|il= 




fcfa 



nicrht they went fafely to reft, And they mer-rily 

mm 



:z:ks: 



~r~ — P — w T ss — 

§Eipg 



(ung thro' the day. But ah ! what a fcei 



Vr— 1 P 



4 



gmpmiiii 



muft appear, Mad the fweet rural paftime be o'er, 



tarr 



zttztttez 



'U 



^igii^lEp 



PL 



Shall the tabor, the tabor no more ftrike the ear, 






Shall the dance on the green be no more, 



192 THE MUSICAL 

Will the flocks from their paftures be led, 

Muft the herds go wild ftraying abroad, 
Shall the looms be all ftopp'd in each fhed, 

And the mips be all moor'd in each road, 
Muft the arts be all fcatter'd around, 

And fhall commerce grow fick of it's tidc^ 
Muft religion expire on the ground, 

And fhall virtue fink down by her fide. 



MISCELLANY. 



93 



SONG CII. 
TAK YOUR AULD CLOAK ABOUT YE. 




In winter when the rain rain'd cauld, and froft 
and fnaw on il - ka hill, And Boreas with his 

&k:E=zpzJz::t$tt&±zi:z^i: 

■^F — La— &-— -^-->- J -4 



& b* 

blaits fae bauld, was threat'ning a' our ky to 



It 



pfczqsqz^ 



=:3: 



±Cz±~mzz±z±z±iz±z'MZZ 



kill, Then Bell my wife, wha lo'es na ftrife, She 



W~< -*~r — - — J fc? i V^ fe-g ' . £r 

faid to me right haftily, get up gudeman, fave 



^y — g&— — »*— 

Crummy's life, and tak your auld cloak a - bout 



mi 



7 e - 



R 



194 THE MUSICAL 

My Crummie is a ufeful cow, 

And me is come of a good kyne ; 
Aft has me wet the bairns' mou', 

And I am laith that (he mould tyne ; 
Get up, gudeman, it is fu' time, 

The fun fhines in the lift fae hie ; 
Sloth never made a gracious end, 

Go tak' your auld cloak about ye. 

My cloak was anes a good grey cloak, 

When it was fitting for my wear ; 
But now it's fcantly worth a groat, 

For I have worn't this thirty year ; 
Let's fpend the gear that we have won, 

We little ken the day we'll die ; 
Then I'll be proud, fince I have fworn 

To have a new cloak about me. 

In days when our King Robert rang, 

His trews they coft but ha]f-a-crown ; 
He faid they were a groat o'er dear, 

And ca'd the taylor thief and lown. 
He was the king that wore a crown, 

And thou the man of laigh degree, 
'Tis pride puts a' the country down, 

Sae take thy auld cloak about ye. 

Every land has it's ain laugh, 

Ilk kind of corn it has it's hool, 
I think the warld is a' run wrang, 

When ilka wife her man wad rule ; 
Do ye not fee Rob, Jock, and Hab, 

As they are girded gallantly 1 
While I lit hurklen in the afe, 

I'll have a new cloak about me. 

Gudeman, I wat 'tis thirty years 
• Sine? we did ane anither keif; 
And we have had between us twa 
Of lads and bonny lalfes ten : 



MISCELLANY. 195 



Now they are women grown and men, 
I wim and pray well may they be ; 

And if you prove a good hufband, 
E'en tak' your auld cloak about ye. 

Bell my wife, (lie lo'es nae ftrife ; 

Bat me wad guide me, if (he can, 
And to maintain an eafy life, 

I aft maun yield, tho' I'm gudeman 
Nought's to be won at woman's hand, 

Unlefs ye give her a' the plea : 
Then I'll leave aiT where I began, 

And tak my aald <:loak about me. 



R 



ig6 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG cm. 

AH! CHLORIS. 



Ah ! Chloris, cou'd I now but fit, as 



iiso_p_tp_ p. — ex _w — s 



unconcern'd as when your in - faat beau- 



SiiiggS^g 



._n 



p-tt-zr-: 






iiiiiiiii 



ty couM beget no hap-pi-nefs nor pain. 






mf+*.-£~f>- 






=4 



=3t£i:£:±I 



I 



'siTiccfcar^tt 



as 






Egp© 



When I this dawning did admire, and prais'd 






IIISe 



MISCELLANY. 



197 



the co - ming day, I lit - - tie thought 



111=11 



-•F- 



li 



SSiiiiBii 



that ri - fing fire, would take my reft a- 



^*-**£~A 



— M 



::t 




jjjsggggi 



:fc 



way. 






Your charms in harmlefs childhood lay, 

As metals in a mine ; 
Age from no face takes more away, 

Than youth conceal'd in thine : 



R iij 



I98. THE MUSIC A& 

But as your charms infenfibly 
To thefr perfection prefs'd ; 

So love as unperceiv'd did fly, 
And center'd in my breaft. 

My paffion with your beauty grew* 

While Cupid at my heart, 
Still as his mother favour'd you, 

Threw a new flaming dart. 
Each gloried in their wanton part 5 

To make a lover, he 
Employ'd the utmeft of his art ;. 

To make a beauty, fhe, 



MISCELLANY. - 199 

SONG CIV. 

Tune — The wealthy fool — Page 137, 

THE filver moon that mines fo bright, 
I fwear, with reafon, is my teacher ; 
And if my minute-glafs runs right, 
We've time to drink another pitcher. 
'Tis not yet day, 'tis not yet day, 

Then why mould we forfake good liquor ? 
Until the fun-beams round us play, 
Let's jocund pum about the pitcher. 

They fay that I muft work all day, 

And fleep at night, to grow much richer ; 

But what is all the world can fay, 

Compar'd to mirth, my friend, and pitcher. 
'Tis not yet day, &c. 

Tho' one may boaft a handfome wife, 

Yet ftrange vagaries may bewitch her 5. 
Unvex'd I live a cheerful life, 

And boldly call for 'tother pitcher. 
'Tis not yet day, &c. 

I dearly love a hearty man, "^ 

(Nofneaking milk-fop Jemmy Twitcher)j 

Who loves a lafs, and loves a glafs, 
And boldly calls for 'tother pitcher. 
Tis not yet day, &&, 



200 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG CV. 
YE SLUGGARDS. 



ggiiiiliilli! 

Ye fluggards who murd< 

-- . ■■ ■% £ p-y (&— A-pffi- =^_ 



Ye iluggards who murder your life-time in fleep 



P ^g 



awake and purfue the fleet hare, From life fay what 



*3Z 



pgj jjgf 



joy, fay what pleafure you reap, that e'er could with 



p ^g^p ^lgp 



hunting compare, that e'er could with hunt - 



^ ^» 



Br -P 1 -9- 



^^iii^gl 



- ins: compare, that e'er eouid with 
-pi -§>. 



hunting compare, that e'er could with hunting com- 



MISCELLANY. 



20 1 



— ±T_p._ £ _pi:p:pgT±zp_^i:§rrt 



pare. When Phoebus begins to enliven the morn, the 



huntfman at-tend-ed by hounds, Rejoices and glows 

i-giiiiliiiliii 



at the found of the horn, whilft woods the fweet 






j±p4:3: 



— j-jt^jjjj 



echo refound, whilft woods the fweet e - 






-t*-3£- 



EgEl! 






- cho refound, whilft woods the fweet echo refound 



pgp^p^gEg= 



whilft woods the fweet echo refound. 



£02 THE MUSICAL 

The courtier, the lawyer, the prieft have a view, 

Nay ev'ry pvofeffion the fame, 
But fportfmen, ye mortals, no pleafures purfue, 

But fuch as accrue from the game. 
While drunkards are pleas'd in the joys of the cup, 

And turn into day ev'ry night, 
At the break of each morn the huntfman is up, 

And bound* o'er the lawns with delight. 

Then quickly, my lads, to the foreft repair, 

G'er hills, dales, and valleys let's fly, 
For who can, ye gods, feel a moment of care, 

When each joy will another fupply ? 
Thus each morning, each day, in raptures, we pafs, 

And defire no comfort to fhare, 
But at night to refre/h with the bottle and glafs, 

And feed on the fpoil of the hare. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG CVI. 

ALLY CROAKER, 



203 



ipigiiiasp 



There lived a man in "Bale-no era - zy, who 



wanted a wife to make him un - ea - fy, Long 



e had iigh'd for dear Ally Croaker, And thus 



the gentle youth be-fpoke her, Will you marry me, 



mmmmmm 

dear Al - ly Croaker, will you marry me, dear 



Ally, Ally Croaker. 



204 THE MUSICAL 

This artlefs young man, juft come from his fchoolery, 
A novice in love, and all it's foolery ; 
Too dull for a wit, too grave for a joker, 
And thus the gentle youth befpoke her, 
Will you marry, &c* 

He drank with the father, he talk'd with the mother, 
He rompt with the lifter, he gam'd with the brother; 
He gam'd till he pawn'd his coat to the broker, 
Which loft him the heart of his dear Ally Croaker, 

Oh! the fickle, fickle Ally Croaker, 

Oh! the fickle Ally, Ally Croaker. 

To all ye young men who are fond of gaming, 
Who are fpending your money, whiill others are faving, 
Fortune's a jilt, the de'il may choke her, 
A jilt more inconftant than dear Ally Croaker, 
Oh! the inconftant Ally Croaker, 
Oh ! the inconftant Ally, Ally Croaker, 



MISCELLANY, 



205 



SONG CVIL 

BIDE YE YET. 



iljifeSEiES 



-fi: 






Gin I had a wee houfe, and a canty wee fire, 
a bon-ny wee wine to praife and admire, a 



bonny we& yardie, a - iide a wee burn, fareweel 

Chorus. 



to the bodie3 that yammer and mourn. Sae bide ye 



te 



-&- 



yet, and bide ye yet, ye little ken, what may betide 

- ~ : M 

F-P~r 






"^~b 



you yet; fome bonny wee body may be my lot, and 







M 



I'll ay be canty wi' thinking o't. 
S 



2o6 



THE MUSICAL 



When I gang afield, and come hame at e'en, 
I'll get my wi wine fu' neat and fu' clean, 
And a bonny wee bairnie upon hex- knee, 
That will cry Papa or Dady to me. 
And bide ye yet, &c. 

And if there mould happen ever to be 
A difference a'tween my wi wifie and me, 
In hearty good humour, altho' fhe be teaz'd, 
I'll kifs her, and clap her, until me be pleas'd. 
And bide ye yet, &c. 

SONG CVIII. 
WHEN LATE I WANDER'D. 



^P^^^ ^^^a^ 



When late I wander'do'ertheplain,Fromnymph 

iiPiitliiii 



to nymph I ftrove in vain My wild defires to 



mfm 



rally, to rally, My wild de - fires to rally. 



sas 



3^p=!£E 



* 



But nowthey're of themfelves comehome,and ftrange! 



MISCELLANY. 



2107 



no longer wifli to roam, They centre all in 




Sally, in 



Sally, They centre all in 



Sally. 

Yet me, unkind one, damps my joy, 
And cries I court but to deftroy ; 

Can love with ruin tally ? 
By thofe dear lips, thofe eyes, I fwear, 
I wou'd all deaths, all torments bear, 

Rather than injure Sally. 

Come then, O come, thou fweeter far. 
Than violets and rofes are, 

Or lillies of the valley ; 
O follow love, and quit your fear, 
He'll guide you to thefe arms, my dear, 

And make me bleft in Sally. . 



0& 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG CIX. 

RULE, BRITANNIA. 

"I j^S^p ^ Fp^ 

-<( Whe.n Britain, fi - rft, at Heav'n'^ command, 

When Britain firft,. at HeavVscommancl, 



f= 






a - rofe from cut the a • zure 



mam; 



H^Lel. ~-3-Ul{ZCL,Lrt 



-$-- 



-;*- 



zrrrrz: 



a - rofe - - - from out the a - zure main 



:£r 



^ 






«£ arofe from_out - - - the a- zure main ; This 

L 






rofe from out - - the a - zure main; Thi 



MISCELLANY. 



20 a 



-{ was the charter, the charterof the land, and guardian 



liii^ 



was the charter, the charterof the land, and guardian 
angels - - - - fung this {train ; Rule, Britannia, 



angels - - - - fang, this drain; Rule, Britannia, 



■^ " *' '££* 



Britannia, rule the wave?, Britons ne - - - - : $<£f 

zsr' — r ~zzzzzzszjF~ZT — ~z — zzzz'^tt 

— tt.L._c„L_^_„c — t-i — p-tasa^fet 

Britannia, rule the waves, Britons ne - - - - ver 

^--f---f-~p--r~-V-| -f" — -— — 

~p~J — j. — jZ IJL '. m-_;ju. — ! _.«™,™Z 



(hall be Haves. 

Lzzrzfczziicz 






ihall be'ilaves 



Siii 



210 THE MUSICAL 

The nations, (not fo bleft as thee) 
Muft, in their turns, to tyrants fall ; 
Mad, in their turns, to tyrants fall ; 
Whilft thou {halt flourifh— fhalt ftourifh great and free. 
The dread and envy of them all. 
Rule Britannia, &c. 

Still more majeftic fhalt thou rife, 
More dreadful, from each foreign iiroke ; 
More dreadful, from each foreign flroke ; 
As the loud blaft that — loud bkft that tear the fkies, 
Serve but to root the native oak. 
Rule Britannia, iyc. 

The haughty tyrants ne'er fhall tame. 
All their attempts to bend thee down, 
All their attempts to bend thee down, 
Will but aroufe thy — aroufe thy gen'rous flame. 
But work their woe, and thy renown-. 
Rule Britannia, &c. 

To thee belongs the rural reign ; 

cities mall with commerce mine, 
I . /- cities (hall with commerce mine ; 
And thine fhall be. the — mall be the iubjecl: main %' 
And ev'ry fhorejt circles, thine. 
Rule Britannia, &~c. 

The Mufes flill with freedom found. 
Shall to thy happy coafls repair, 
Shall to thy happy coafts repair : 

Bleflifle ! with matchlefs — -with matchlefsbeauty crown'dj. 
And manly hearts to guard the Fair. 
Rule Britannia! fcfo 



MISCELLANY. 211 

SONG CX. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

WHEN earth's foundation firft was laid, 
By the Almighty Ar tilt's hand, 
By the Almighty ArtifVs hand, 
'Twas then our perfect — our perfect laws were made* 
Eitablim'd by his flri& command. _ 

Hail ! myfterious — hail ! glorious Mafonry, 
That makes us ever great and free. 

As man throughout for fhelter fought, 
In vain from place to place did roam, 
In vain from place to place did roam, 
Until from heaven — from heaven he was taught 
To plan, to build, and fix his h©me. 
Hail ! mytienous, £jV. 

From hence illuftrlous rofe our art, 
And now it's beauteous piles appear, 
And now it's beauteous piles appear, 
Which mail to endlefs — to endlefs time impart, 
How worthy and hew great we are. 
Hail ! myfterious, &c. 

Nor we, lefs fam'd for ev'ry tye, 
By which the human thought is bound, 
By which the human thought is bound, 
Love, truth, and friendlhip— -and friendfhip focially^ 
Doth join our hearts and hands around. 
Hail ! myfterious, &'c. 

« Our anions, ftill by virtue bleft, 
And to our precepts ever true, 
And to our precepts ever true, 
The world admiring,— admiring, mail requeft 
To learn, and our bright paths purfue. 

Hail ! myllerioLis — hail ! glorious Mafomyj. 
That makes us great, and good, and free. 



212 THE MUSICAL 

SONG CXI. 

NO BODY. 



>■! — h_. __*. „_& 



^:-:d:ri:tx:M:3:±:i::fiiz_±:t:ztrc::fi 

If to force me to ling, it be your inten- 

^zz__yz:iv_gz^z|zz:£?zt±:^Z-_ zg;z^:. 

tion, Some one I will hint at, yet no body men- 



aprtepq 



hFSF ®— ^4^^P-z;s.z^z : zpzezzLzi zzzjz 

tion, no body, you'll cry, pmaw, that muft be Huff,. 

^S:^iz:zziz=&z^:iK:^z^.-Ezd:x 

m~zzm±iztz±z±z±rj±:±z±z±z±± 



zizi _fz _ Sz_:z~_z^::it : ?z xzM: z^ 

at finging I'm no body, That's thi. firft proof. 

Chcrus. 

Kj^:S:j^z^^d!3:zzi^:i^zzi3z:^:j 

No, no body, No, no -body, No body, 



— fcrb~^ ~ s? — 

no body, no body, aa 



MISCELLANY, 2 I 3. 

No body's a name every body will own., 
When fonaething they ought to be afham'd of have done ; 
J Tis a name well apply* d to old maids and young beaus, 
What they were intended for, no body knows. 
No, no body, &e. 

If negligent fervants mould china-plate crack, 
The fault is (till laid on poor no body's back ; 
If accidents happen at home or abroad, 
When no. body's blam'd for it, is not that odd } 
No, no body, £sV. 

No body can tell you the pranks that are play'd, 
When no body's by, betwixt mailer and maid : 
She gently crys out, Sir, they'll fome body hear us, 
He foftly replies, my dear, no body's near us. 
No, no body, &e. 

But big with child proving, flic's quickly difcarded, 
When favours are granted, no body's rewarded ; 
And when ihe's examin'd, crys, mortals, forbid it, 
If I'm got with child, it was no body did it. 
No, no body, iffc. 

When by Health the gallant the wanton wife leaves, 
The hufband affrighten'd, and thinks it is thieves ; 
He roufes himfelf, and crys loudly, Who's there ? 
The wife pats his cheek, and fays, no body, dear. 
No, no body, &c. 

Enough now of no body, fure has been fung, 
Since no body's mention'd^ nor no body's wrong'd; 
I hope, for free fpeaking,'! may not be blam'd, 
Since no body's injur'd, nor no body's nam'd* 
No, no body, Sjfei 



THE MUSICAL 



£ 



. SONG CXU. 

THE MAID IN BEDLAM. 

ztxi3zz#iz^i£i2pE~^"~ 



i 



fei@p££ 



1 



One morning, very eay-ly ; one morning, in 

^s|±:^gE§EEEEE335E 



the fpring, I heard a maid in Bedlam, who mourn- 



i. r^ £_* @L__ _ _ _«_ P* f 

-pizH-p- _r|::^:^g-pz:gzpz 



ful-ly did fing, Her chains me rattl'd on her hands 






while fweetly thus fungfhe, I love my love-becaufe 



PS 



P 



PIC 



a 



I know, my love lovea me. 

Oh ! cruel were his parents, who fent my love to fea ; 
And crue), cruel, was the fhip, that bore my love from me, 
Yet I love his parents., fmce they're his, although they've 
ruin'd me. 

For I love my love, £sV. 



« 

MISCELLANY* 2T5 

O ! fhould it pleafe the pitying paw'rs, to call me to 
the iky, 
I'd claim, a guardian angel's charge around my love to fly, 
For to guard him from all dangers, how happy mould 
I be? 

For I love my love, tffc. 

I'll make a ftrawy garland, I'll make it wondrous fine, 
With rofes, lillies, dallies, I'll mix the eglantine : 
And I willprefent it to my love, when he returns from 
fea. 

For I love my love, &c. 

O if I were a little bird, to build upon his breaft ; 
Or if I were a nightingale, to fing my love to reil; 
To gaze upon his lovely eyes, all my reward mould be. 
For I love my love, £sV. 

O if I were an eagle, to foar into the fky, 
.I'd gaze around, with piercing eyes, where I my love 

might fpy: 
But ah ! unhappy maiden, that love yo« ne'er (hall fee. 
Yet I love my love, SsV. 

Whilft thus fhe fung, lamenting, her love was come on 

more, 
He heard fhe was in Bedlam : then did he afk no more; 
But flraight he flew to find her, while thus replied he : 
I love my love, £sV. 

O Sir, do not affright me : are you my love, or not ? 
Yes, yes, my dearefl Molly ; I fear'd I was forgot. 
But now I'm come to make amends for all your injury, 
And I love my love, &c. 



-l6 THE MUSICAL 

SONG CXIII. 

GRAMACHREE MOLLY. 
To the foregoing Tune. 

AS down on Banna's banks I ilray'd, one evening 
; in May, , ' g 

The little birds, in bly theft notes, made vocal ev'ry fpray: 
They fung their little notes of love ; they fung them 
o'er and o'er. 
Ah ! gramachree, mo challeenouge, mo Molly aftore. 

The daily pied, and all the fweets the dawn of nature 

yields ; 
The primrofe pale, the vi'let blue, lay fcatter'd o'er the 

fields ; 
Such fragrance in the bofom lies, of her whom I adore. 
Ah ! gramachree, &c. 

I laid me down upon a bank, bewailing my fad fate, 
That doom'd me thus the {lave of leve, and cruel Mol- 
ly's hate. 

How^ can fhe break the honeft heart, that wears her in j 
it's core i 

Ah ! gramachree, &c. 

Ycu fa'd you lov'd me, Molly dear; ah ! why did I be- % 

lieve ? 
Yea, who could think fuch tender words were meant but 

to deceive ? 
That love was all I afk'd on earth ; nay heav'n could 

give no more. 

Ah ! gramachree, &c. 



MISCELLANY. 21 7 

Oh! had I all the flocks that graze on yonder yellow hill, 
Or low'd for me the num'rous herds, that yon green 

paftures fill, 
With her I love I'd gladly fhare my kine and fleecy ftore, 
Ah ! gramachree, &c. 

Two turtle doves, above my head, fat courting on a 

bough, 
I envy'd them their happinefs to fee them bill and coo ; 
Such fondnefs once for me (he fhew'd, but now, alas ! 

'tis o'er, 

Ah! gramachree, &c. 

Then, fare thee well, my Molly dear ? thy lofs I ft ill 

(hall moan, 
Whilft life remains in Strephon's heart, 'twill beat for 

thee alone. 
Tlio' thou art falfe, mayheav'n on thee it's choiceft blef- 

lings pour ! 

Ah ! gramachree, £f?V. 

SONG CXIV. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

HAD laheart for falfehood fram'd, I ne'er could in- 
jure you ; 
For tho' your tongue no promife claim'd, your charms 

wou'd make me true, 
To you no foul fhall bear deceit, no flranger offer wrong; 
But friends in all the ag'd you'll meet, and lovers in the 
young. 

But when they learn that you have blefs'd another with 

your heart, 
They'll bid afpiring paffion reft, and ad a brother's part, 
Then, lady, dread not their deceit, no fear to fuffer wrong; 
For friends in all the ag'd you'll meet, and brothers in 

the young. 

T 



2l8 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG CXV. 
THE BOTTLE. 



iisgngifii 



Whate'er fquamifh lovers may fay, a mif- 



iiililislgi 



trefs I've found to my mind ; I en-joy her by 






~E= 



night and by day, yet flie grows ftill more lovely 






and kind: Of her beauties I ne-ver am cloy'd, 



^±itz±S 



I 



___-K_J*_ 



S=*3=&Sb= 



the' I conftantly ftick by her fide, nor defpife 
her becaufe fhe's en - joy'd by a legion of lo- 



¥ 



im 



igiiiiipi 



^ 



r srsbe-fide j For tho' thoufands may broach her,. 



MISCELLANY. 



219 



-■%■- 



Air 






•■- 



^z^z 



may broach her, may broach her, By Jove I fhall 






-P-T-W- 






g=i 



:sz!f:z 



EZ 



feci neither envy nor fplcen,- nor jealous can prove 



:si: 



iggi^igfe^ 



of the miftrefs I love, For a bottle, 

ipiilfii 



JMJM 



bottle, a bottle's the miftrefs I mean, Nor 



3E 






jealous can prove of the miftrefs I love, for a 



|ltiiilp=ilpli 



^~* 



-sa 3£ 



bottle, a bottle, 



a bottle's the miftrefs 



I 



I mean, 



Tij 



2 20 THE MUSICAL 

Should, I try to defcribe all her merit, 

With her praifes I ne'er mould have done 5. 
She's brimful of fweetnefs and fpirit, 

And fparkles with freedom and fun : 
Her ftature's majeftic and tall, 

And taper her bofom and waift, 
Her neck long, her mouth round and final], 
And her lips how delicious to taile ! 
For tho', £2V. 

You may grafp her with eafe by the middle, 

To be open'd how vafi her delight, 
And yet her whole fex is a riddle, 

You never can flop her too tight ? 
When your inftrument you introduce, 

To her circle and magical power, 
Pop away from within flies the juice, 

And your fenfes are drown'd in the fhower. 
For tho', £9V. 

But the fweeteft of raptures that flow 

From the bountiful charmer I prize, 
Is fure when her head is laid low, 

And her bottom's turn'd up to the fides 1 
Stand to her and fear not to win her, 

She'll never prove peevifh or coy, . 
And the farther and deeper you're in her, 

The fuller me '11 fill you will joy. 
For tho', &c. 

Thus naked and clafp'd in my arms, 

With her my fweet moments I'd fpend » 
And revel the more on her charms, , 

When I fhare her delight with a friend ; 
To divinity, phytic, or law, 

Her favours I never (hall grudge, 
Tho' each night fhe may make a faux pas 

With the bifhop, the do&or, or judge, 
For tho', 6V. 



Affe&uofo. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG CXVI. 

JAMIE GAY. 



221 



ji^^B 



As Jaraie Gay gae'd blythe his way, A- 



-m 






long the banks of Tweed, A bon - ny lafs 






gf^PfS^ffl 



as e - ver was, came tripping o'er the 

liiifliiiil 

mead. The hear - ty fwain, un - taught 






to feign - - , the buxom nymph fur- 
■%■- -j^-j ~-f"* 1 H-T— -~ var^- — 

'w — ; — ^4— i — h* — r-H-H-H*-^- "pi-*-— 



vey'd ; and, full of glee, as lad could be, 



rflliipii 



be-fpoke the blooming maid. 
Tiij 



2 22 THE MUSICAL 

. 
Dear Iaffie, tell, why by thy-fell 

Thou lonely wander' it here ? 
My ewes, me cry 'd, are ftraying wide %. 

Canit tell me, laddie, where ? 
To town I hie, he made reply, 

Some pleafmg fport to fee : 
But thou'rt fo neat, fo trim, fo fweet, 

I'll feek thy ewes with thee. 

She gave her hand, nor made a Hand ; 

But lik'd the youth's intent : 
O'er hill and dale, o'er plain and vale, 

Right merrily they went. 
The birds fang fweet, the pair to greet, 

And flow'rets bloornM around ; 
And as they walk'd, of love they talk'd, 

And lovers joys when crown'd. 

And now the fun had rofe to noon, 

The zenith of his power, 
When, to the (hade, their fteps they made., _ 

To pafs the mid-day hour. 
The bonny lad row'd in his plaid, 

The. lafs, who fcorii'd to frown :, 
She fcton forgot the ewes fhe fought* 

And he to gang to town. 



MISCELLANY. 



223 



SONG CXVIL 

ALL YE WHO WOU'D WISH. 






ifa 



feEz:f:zE±:fcixE~:t:Ezpz 



All ye who wou'd with to fucceed with a lafs, 



w the affair's, to be d 



learn how the affair's, to be done ; For if 



you Hand fooling and fhy,like an afs, you'll loofe 




Hg^il 



her, loofe her, You'll loofe her, as fure as a 



p---^ 



I: 



g , 



With whining, and fighing, and vows, and all that, 

As far as you pleafc you may run ; 
She'll hear you, and jeer you, and give you a pat ? 

But jilt you, jilt you, 
She'll jilt you, as fure as a guru 



224 



THE MUSICAL 



To worftiip, and call her bright goddefs is fine, 
But mark you the confequence, mum : 

The baggage will think herfelf realy divine, 
And fcorn you, fcorn you, 

She'll fcorn you as fure as a gun. 

Then be with a maiden bold, frolic, and Rout, 

And no opportunity fhun ; 
She'll tell you me hates you, and fwear fhe'll cry out. 

But mum — mum — 
But mum — fhe's as fure as a gun. 



SONG CXVIII. 
HE STOLE MY TENDER HEART AWAY. 



jrw— z zsMzt zr~pr ~f "krP~~f rz^zn 

The fields were green^the hills were gay, and 



^msm 



-p^r 



birds were fmging on each fpray,Whtn Colin met 
me in the grove, and told me tender tales of 



MISCELLANY. 



225 



fc=£r 



ih-^- 



=j=:j=j|:fe:±rp 



3*3 

love Was ever fwaln fo blythe as he, fo kind, 



HpiiSiSiiii 



fo faithful, and fo free, in fpite of all my 



±z 



nx»3^i 



^pEg=g^p 



friends cou'd fay,young Colin dole my heart away, in 



R^ffH^4M ffi 



fpite of all my friends cou'd fay, young Colin ftole my 



^feer 



heart away. 



When ere he trips the meads along, 
He fweetly joins the woodlark's fong \ 
And when he dances on the green, 
There's none fo blythe as Colin feen : 
If he's but by I nothing fear, 
For I alone am all his care ; 



226 THE MUSICAL 

Then fpite of all my friends can fay, 
He's Hole my tender heart away. 

My mother chides when ere I roam, 
And feems furpris'd I quit my home : 
But fhe'd not wonder that I rove, 
Did (he but feel how much I love ; 
Full well I know the gen'rous fwain, 
Will never give my bofom pain ; 
Then fpite of all my friends can fay, 
He's ftole my tender heart away. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG CXIX. 
THE YOUNG MAN's WISH. 



227 



^ii^lliilllllli 



Free from the bailie, care, and ftrife, Of this 



ftM^ 




fhort va - rie - ga - ted life, O let me fpend my days, 



-t\ — u-^-U m-h- — &* 



la rural fweetnefs wij:h a friend, To whom my 









r* 



mind I may unbend, Nor cenfure, heed or praife. 



•jr##g j-- 1- — ziSizqzzzzip: 



Nor cenfure, heed, or praife. 

I Riches bring cares— -I afk not wealth, 
Let me enjoy but peace and health, 

I envy not the great ; 
'Tis thefe alone can make me bled, 
The riches take of eafL and weft, 

I claim not thefe or Hate, 



228 THE MUSICAL 

Tho' not extravagant nor near, 

But through the well fpent checker'd year. 

I'd have enough to live; 
To drink a bottle with a friend, 
Affift him in diftrefs, ne'er lend, 

But rather freely give. 

I too would w!fh, to fvveeten life, 
A gentle, kind, good natur'd wife, 

Young fenfible and fair, 
One who could love but me alone, 
Prefer my cot to e'er a throne, 

And footh my every care. 

Thus happy with my wife and friend, 
My life I cheerfully would fpend, 

With no vain thoughts opprefl ; 
If heav'n has blifs for me in ftore, 
O grant me this, I afk no more, 

And I am truly bled. 



MISCELLANY 



22Q 



S O N G CXX. 
THE THING. 



■*?■ — Jmr - ; "' — w t" M 

Fine fong iters apologies too often ufe, when 

^=zpz:^z[zr[irhzt=:i:[izz=:li:±:Hz:fezb= 

call'd on I'm ready to fmg ; With hums, or- with 

^zz[=z£=fiiz:tp 



:z»: 



rzzgzp: 



^-r f - P -rr 



V b- 



haws ne'er attempt to refufe, And egad, Sirs, .I'll 

iiillllSllii§ 



give you the thing, thethhig.andegad.Sirs.I'Hgive 



3 



:izgzff J ' 



you the things . 



Conceited our beaux arm in arm walk the ftreet, 

In idlenefs take their full fwirlg ; 
Each levels his glafs, when a lady they meet. 

And if handfome, they fwear (he's the thing. 



U 



0.$® THE MUSICAL 

Thus at Smithfield, the Jocky his nag will commend, 
What a fhape, why he's fit 'for the king ; 

He's found, wind and limb, on the word of a friend, 
And for fpirits — he's really the thing. 

With fmile of felf-intereft, the landlord imparts, 

Butt-entire I always do bring ; 
Old Hingo, I draw, that will cherifh your hearts, 

And in flavour indeed 'tis the thing. 

See Jenny with Jocky to playhoufe repair, 

Mifs Brent to hear warble and fing ; 
Pretenders to mufic they praife ev'ry air, 

With I vow and proteft (lie's the thing. 

The fportfman with joy views the hare in full fpeed, 

In ecftacy hears the fky ring; 
With cry of the hounds, and of each neighing fleed, 

And in tranfport he cries 'tis the thing. 

* 
The prude her own perfon confults in the glafs, 

Admiring her finger and ring ; 
Then concludes that her beauty all others furpafs, 

And that man muft confefs file's the thing. 

Jack Tar full of glee to the garden wiliftroll, 
In fearch, Sirs, of fomething like 1 — g ; 

There boards on Moll Jenkins, and fwears by his foul, 
She's rig'd fore and aft, quite the thing. 

The parfon well pleas'd trims the fmoaking Sir Loin, 

And flyly leers at the pudding ; 
Lordblefs me, he cries, how nobly I dine, 

O pudding and beef is the thing. 

But clafp'd in the arms of a good natur'd pair, 

With mutual embraces we cling ; 
That enjoyment alone difpelis ev'ry care, 

Which you all muft allow is the thing. 



-m- 



MISCELLANY. 23 1 

SONG CXXI. 
THE BRITISH GRENADIERS. 

jz ; "[~t"Z"z"~_r — I — 1 ui~ * 



Some talk of Alexandt 



d lome of Hercu- 






1 



les, of Conon, and Lyfander, and feme Miltia- 



:^J-iz:p=:±=^: 



-# 



:±3t3= 



des ; but of all the world's brave heroes, there's none 



■m- r#— 



FW 



h N 



svt~h — rwz "sf — iTrirT ^Ti 



^ij-^- F fl^j 






that can compare, with a tow, row, row, row, row, to 

Chorus. 

' jit — *§--?& as--Te~ — S£p— 4&-I — ' 



::o 



!±: 



:z=p:±F::^:Tp^z^T:[z:^z:pzz{=: 



— ter 



the Britim grenadiers. But of all the world'sbrave 

-S -§ 



^"k"j; — j-~ ~fc~~ 



.T~^^pZL^zpixiipz:zjEi^T:P:z 



heioesj there's none that can compare, with a tow 



gg-f^p|E:gE=:b|±:^rE:g|g| 

row, row 3 row, row, to the Britim grenadiers, 
Uij 



232 THE MUSICAL 

None of thofe ancient heroes e'er faw a eannon ball. 
Or knew the force of powder to flay their foes withal 5 
But our brave boys do know it,~and'baniih' all their fears-, 
With a tow, row, row, row, row, the Britim grenadiers. 
But our brave boy?, £5r. 

When e'er we are commanded to florm the palifad.es, 
Our leaders march with fa fees and we with hand grenades 
We throw them from the glacis about our enemies ears, 
With a tow, row, row,- row, row., the Britifh grenadiers* 
We throw them, &c. 

The god of war was pleafed, and great Bellona fmiles. 
To fee thefe noble heroes, of our Britifh ifles ; 
And all the gods celeftial, defcending from their fpheres, 
"Beheld with admiration the Britifh Grenadiers. 
And all the goods celeftal, &c. 

Then let us crown a bumper, and drink a health to thofr , 
Who carry caps and pouches that wearthe louped cloaths, 
May they arid theif commanders, live happy all their years, 
With a tow, row, row, row, row, the Britifh grenadiers* j 
May they- and their commanders., £sV. 



MISCELLANY. 

SONG CXXII. 

ONE BOTTLE MORE. 



_h K, . 



Afiift me ye lads, who have hearts void of guile, 




"r tlrUl i^ 



-j 

to fing in the praifes of old Ireland's iflej 






SPfct£i^£f:g 



"Where true ho-fpi-ta-li-ty o-pens the door, 






And friendihip detains us for one bottle more, 



"■*- '■ HP- i- __^"|S 



one bottle more, arrah, one bottle more, And 

:q=n: 






■ fe 4==? 



.zzzwzw 



friendihip detains, us for one bottle, more. 
U iij 



2-34 THE MUSICAL 

Old England, your taunts on our country forbear ; 
With our bulls, and our brogues, we are true andfincere, 
For if but one bottle remain'd in our ft ore, 
We have generous hearts, to give that bottle more". 

In Candy's, in Church- ftreet, I'll fing of a fett 
Of fix Irim blades who together had met ; 
Four bottles a piece made us call for our fcore. 
And nothing remained but one bottle more. 

Our bill being paid, we were loath to depart, 
For friendfhip had grappled each man by the heart ; 
Where the leaft touch you know makes an Irimman roar 
And the whack from fhilella, brought fix bottles more. 

Slow Phoebus had {hone thro' our window fo bright. 
Quite happy to view his bleft children of light, 
So we parted, with hearts neither forry nor fore, 
Refolving next night to drink twelve bottle more. 



MISCELLANY. 235 

SONG CXXIII. 

Tune- — Ally Croaker — Page 20< 



o- 



THRO' the fiery flames of love, I'm in a fad taking, 
I'm fmock'd like a hog-, that's hung up for bacon, 
My ilomach 'tis fcorch'd,Iike an over-done mutton-chop, 
That of good gravie, wont yield you one Angle drop. 
O love, love, love is like a giddinefs, 
That wont let a poor man gang about his bufinefs. 

My great guts, and little guts, is burnt to a cinder ; * 
As a hot burning-glafs, burns a difhclout to tinder, 
As cheefe, by a hot falamander is toaiied, 
By the beauty of your cheeks, like mutton I am roafted, 
O love, &c. 

Come all you young men, who after ladies dandle, 
I'm girlt like a duck's-foot, fing'd over a candle, 
By this, and by 'tother, I m treated uncivil, 
Like a gizard I am pepper' d, and then made a DsviL 
Olove, £sV, 



2 3 6 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG CXXIV. 

TWEED SIDE. 



2t— l: 



Sillliiliii 



What beauties does Flora dif - clofe, How 



^te&EEBE 



i 



:± 



t: 



EitiggfePg 



li 



-? fweet are her imiles up- on Tweed, yet Mary's 

-t>— 











^ 



J flill fweet- er than thofe, both na-ture and 



mmmw^M 



fan - cy ex - ceed. No daify, nor 



• 9 W 9 



MISCELLANY. 



37 



^ fweet blufhing rofe, nor all the gay flow'rs 

====:fc:czUz:i~zjiDa-:±^z:^:u-:iy=: 



z:d ±z&-zPzr ~t±z^ 



3QH! 



:ki 



EIEEEE 



-r^.'> 



SB 



cf the field, Nor Tweed ^gliding gent - ly 

■It 



-&■. 



thro' thofe, fech beau-ty and pleafure does 

IIlZZIIlZZJIZXZ" ' 



: £EI-h-EExE-Zb_?_:x :jz: 



^c. 



ield. 



:r: 



238 " THE MUSICAL 



The warblers are heard in the grove, 

The linnet, the lark, and the thrum, 
The blackbird and fweet cooing dove, 

Witli inline enchant every bum. 
Come, let us go forth to'the mead, 

Let us fee how the primrofes fpring ; 
We'll lodge in fome village on Tweed, 

And love while the feather'd folks fmg 3 

How does my love pafs the lang day ? 

Does Mary not tend a few fheep ? 
Do they never carlefsly {tray, 

While happily fhe lies aileep ? 
Tweed's murmurs mould lull her afleep ; 

Kind nature indulging my blifs, 
To relieve the fa ft pains of my breaft, 

I'd ileal an ambrofial kifs, 

J Tis Ihe does the virgin excel, 

No beauty with her may compare ; 
Love's graces around her do dwell : 

She's faireft where thoufands are fair. 
Say, charmer, where do the flocks flray, 

Oh ! tell me at noon where they feed ; 
Shall I feek them on fweet winding Tav» 

Or the pleafanter banks of the Tweed, 



MISCELLANY. 239 

* 

' SONG CXXV. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

WHEN Maggy and me were acquaint, 
1 carry 'd my .noddle fu' hie, 
Nae lintwhite on all" the gay plain, 
Nor goudfpiuk fae bonny as {he. 
I whittled, I pip'd, and I fang, 

I woo'd, but I came nae great fpeed, '' 
Therefore I maun wander abroad, 
And lay my banes over the Tweed. 

To Maggy my love I did tell, 

Saut tears did my paliion exprefs ; 
Alas ! for I lo'ed her o'er well, 

And the women lo'ed fie a man lefs. 
Her heart, it was frozen and cauld, 

Her pride had my ruin decreed, 
Therefore I will wander abroad, 

And lay my banes far f'rae the Tweed. 



240 



THE MUSICAL 



■§T 



-r 



SONG CXXVI. 

FOUR AND TWENTY FIDDLERS. 

Four and twenty fid - lers all on a row, Four and 
twenty fid - lers all on a row, there was fiddle fad- 



die fiddle and my double damme femi quible down 



fc=!zi5Tr!r^:J::r| 



_ 7~~" ~i"¥^;"~T' 



below. 



It is my lady's holiday, there- 









fore let us be mer- ry. 



2 Four and twenty drummers all on a row, there was hey 

rub a dub ho rub a dub fiddle faddle, &c. 

3 Four'and twenty trumpeters all on a row, there wa 3 

tantara rara tantara vera hey rub a dub, &c. 

4 Four and twenty coblers all on a row, there was flab 

awlandcoblerandcobler andftabawl tantara rera, &c* 



MISCELLANY. 24I 

5 Four and twenty fencing matters all on row, there was 

pufti carte and teirce down at heel cut him acrofs, 
flab -awl and cobler, &c, 

6 Four and twenty captains all on a row, there was Oh ! 

d— n me kickhim down Hairs nufh carte and teirce,^. 

7 Four twenty parfons all on a row, there was Lord 

have mercy upon us, O ! d — n me kick him down 
flairs, &c. 

8 Four and twenty taylors all on arow, one caught aloufe, 

another let it loofe and another cried knock him down 
with the goofe, Lord have merey upon us, £sfc. 

9 Four and twenty barbers all on a row, there was bag 

whigs, mort bobs, toupees, long ques, fhave for a 
penny, Oh d — n'd hard times two ruffles and ne'er 
a fhirt, one caught a loufe, &*V. 

do Four and twenty Quakers, all on a row, there was 
Abraham begat Ifaac, and Ifaac begat Jacob, and 
Jacob peopled the twelve tribes of lirael, with bag 
wigs, fhort bobes, toupees, long ques, (have for a 
penny, Oh d — n'd hard times two ruffles and ne'er 
a fhirt, one caught a loufe, another ler it loofe, and 
another cried knock him down with the goofe, Lord 
have mercy upon us, Oh d—n me kick'him down 
flairs, pufli carte and teirce, down at heel cut him 
acrofs, flab awl and cobler, and cobler and flab awl, 
tantara rera, tantara rera, hey rub a dub, ho rub a 
dub, fiddle faddle riddle and my double damme ferm 
quibble down below, It is my lady's holiday, there- 
fore let us be merry. 



X 



1\% , THE MUSICAL 

SONG CXXVII. 

THE LASS OF PEATIE's MILL. 




The Iafs of Peatie's mill, So bon 






isii^r-aS — t^iX- |~4f — P-r^-M — f 

-gK-LI ilJE_3..-iJ.^ "^^ '" 

ny blythe and gay, In fpite of all my 



fC±K, 



^riirr=^_inir:e: 



55 



_-i_ s j±-kg~L— 









"igEgi 

fkill, < hath Hole my heart away 

[fllillliiiiii 



When 



F~^S£E& 



- 



ggg^ig^^jg^gE 



tedding of the hay 



bare - headed on 



L 






MISCELLANY. 



243 



^^"^j^^^^^-^f: 






^ the green, Love 'midil her locks did play, 

j §3 f EEEjEsSzE jE3EE£Ep5 



\ J--L 




And wanton'd in her een. 

3E 



- — f-s- — 



Her arms, white, round, and fmooth j 

Breafts riling in their dawn ; 
To age it would give youth, 

To prefs them with his hand. 
Through all my fpirits ran 

An extafy of blifs, 
When I fuch fweetnefs fand, 

Wrapt in a balmy kifs. 

Without the help of art, 

Like flow'rs which grace the wild, 
Her fweets (he did impart, 

Whene'er fhe fpoke or fmil'd. 
Her looks, they were fo mild, 

Free from affected pride, 
She me to love beguil'd j 

I wifh'd her for my bride. 



Xij 



2 4 4 



THE MUSICAL 



O ! had I all that wealth 

Hoptouns high mountains fill,, 
Infur'd long life and health, 

And pleafure at my will ; 
I'd promife, and fulfil, 

That none but bonny fhe, 
The iafs of Peatie's mill, 

Should (hare the fame with me. 



SONG CXXVIIL 

FROM THE EAST BREAKS THE MORN. 



-$& 



fcfi: 



b_ 






_.— zsz::~ik_g3 



From the eail breaks the morn, fee the fun beams a« 



sfizzr-Tr^ziz. 



isrjEr 



PH B 



~j§x:tm 



dom The wild heath and the mountains fo high, 



The wild heath and the mountains fo high, 



x^_.:r_™_%5^_@ 






m 






Shrilly opes the (launch houud, the fteed neighs to 



MISCELLANY. 



245 



iglisii^ia 



the found, And the floods and the valleys re 



zzss^d. 




ply, And the floods and the valleys re-ply. 



Our forefathers, fo good, 
Prov'd their greatnefs of blood, 

By encount'ring the pard and the boar, 
Ruddy health bloom'd the face, 
Age aad youth urg'd the chace, 

And taught woodlands and forefts to roar, 

Hence of noble defcent, 

Hills and wilds we frequent, 
Where the bofom of nature's reveal'd, 

Tho' in life's bufy day, 

Man of man make a prey, 
Still let ours be the prey of the field. 

With the chace in full fight, 
Gods how great the delight, 

How our mutual fenfations refine, 
Where is care, where is fear, 
Like the winds in the rear, 

And the mam's loll In fomething divine. 

Now to horfe, my brave boys, 
Lo each pants for the joys, 

That anon (hall enliven the whole, 
-Then at eve we'll difmount, 
Toils and pleafures recount, 

And renew the chace over the bowl. 
Xiii 



14& 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG CXXIX. 

To the foregoing Tune, 

LET gay ones and great, 
Make the moft of their fate, 
From pleafure to pleafure they run> 
Well who cares a jot, 
I envy them not, 
While I have my dog and gun. 

For exercife air 

To the field I repair, 
With fpirits unclouded and light t 

The bliffes I find' 

No (lings leave behind, 
But health and diverfion unite. 



SONG CXXX. 
RAIL NO MORE. 

^|^3:iJ:c^z-ZT==!.:=: 

if}' 






Rail no more, ye learned affes, ? Gainftthe joys 



*$%- 



5335 



a: 



^H 






±=t 






the bowl fupplies ; Sound it's depth, and fill your 



MISCELLANY. 



247 



*:*- 



J 



-#^-C— l--gj— — 1 — LI^— JLa — ^ 



#-*-= 



glaffes, Wifdom at the bottom lies. 



Fill them 



^^^ ^ t^Ej^^ijjr =^— j-j-: 



:^zi!z 



higher, flill and higher; Shallow draughts perplex 






the brain; Sipping quenches all our lire, Bum- 



-^ 



i 




r"H 




mi:: 



-J-jl~ 




fr 



pers light it up agai 






zz3:t£Ezp:^z^i^E 




• - - n. Sipping quenches all our fire, Bumpers 

izszEj: 



g^is 



iMiizztzJJ^ 



light it up a - gain. 



2 4 8 



THE MUSICAL 



Draw the fcene for wit and pleafure ; 

Enter jollity and joy ; 
We for thinking have no leifure ; 

_ Manly mirth is our employ. 
Since in life there's nothing certain, 

We'll the prefent hour engage ; 
An4x when death (hall drop the curtain, 

With applaufe we'll quit the ftage. 



-w-3S- 



SONG CXXXI. 

THE PLOWMAN. 



The plowman he's a bonny lad, his mind 
is e-ver true, O, His garters tied below his knee 



Chcrus. 



sX'zHzi. :tz:tz _rL:i zz£i' J Jzfti~ Eirrij 






Lis bonnet it is blue, O. Then up wi't a' 
my plowman lad, O hey, the merry plowman, gk. 



MISCELLANY. 



249 




gfefcBdErfc£jr 




a' the lads that e'er I faw, commend me to the 




plowman. 



As I was walking in a field, 
I chanc'd to meet a plowman, 

I told him I would learn to till, 
If that he would prove true man. 
Then up wi't a', £sV. 

He faid, my dear, take you no fear. 
But I will do my belt, O ! 

I'll ftudy for to pleafure thee, . 

As I have done the reft, O. 

Then up wi't a\ £sV. 

My oufen they are flout and good, 
As ever labour'd ground, O ! 

The foremoft ox is lang and fma% 
The others firm and round, O. 
Then up wi't a' &c. 

So he with fpeed did yoke his plough, 
And with a gad was driven, 

But when he came between the (lilts, 
He thought he was in heaven. 
Then up wi't a', &c. 



The foremoft ox fell in a fur, 
The other's then did founder, 



2-5° THE MUSICAL 

The plowman lad he breathlefs grew, 
In troth it was nae wonder. 
Then up wi't a', csV. 

Plowing once upon a hill, 

Below there was a ftane, O ! 
Which gard the fire flee frae the foci:, 

The plowman gied a grane, O ! 
Then up wi't a', S& 

*TiS I have tilled mdkle ground, 

I've plowed faugh and fallow, 
He that will not drink the plowman's healthy 

Is but a faucy fellow. 
Then up wi't a', &c» 



¥ 



MISCELLANY. 



25 i 



SONG CXXXII. 

COME ON, MY BRAVE TARS. 



&^^^^ Z ^ Z '' E ^^~^^ Z 



Kz^tE^r 




Come on my brave tars, let's away to the wars, 



To h( 



ind glory ad - vance ; 



For 






now we've beat Spain, let us try this campaign, To 



fc—Ts--- t— 



humble the pride of old France, my brave boys, to hum- 



m 



ib— r— 



g TP"""P'To~e- 



m 



J: 



ble the pride of old France. 

See William, brave prince, 

A true blue ev'ry inch, 
Who will honour th* illuftrious name : 

May he conqueror be 

O'er our empire the fea, 
And tranfmit Britifh laurels to fame, 
My brave boys, &c. 



$5 2 THE MUSICAL 

Three heroes combin'd, 

When the dons they could find, 
Vied who fhould be foremoft in battle ; 

By no lee fhore affrighted, 

Altho' they're benighted, 
They made Britifh thunder to rattle, 
Brave boys, £sV. 

See Dalrymple, Prevoft, 

Gallant Barrington too, 
And Fanner who glorioufly fell : 

With brave Pearfon, all knew 

That the hearts of true blue, 
Once rouz'd, not the world could excell, 
My brave boys, &c. 

With fuch heroes as thofe, 

Tho' we've numberlefs foes, 
Britifh valour refplendant mall fhine : 

And we flill hope to fhow 

That their pride will be low, 
In eighty, as fam'd fifty-nine, 
My brave boys, &c. 

Then brave lads enter here, 

And partake of our cheer, 
You (hall feaft and be merry and ling : 

With the grog at your nofe, 

Drink fuccefs to true blues, 
Huzza ! and fay God fave the king, 
My brave boys, &c. 



MISCELLANY. 



253 



S O N.G CXXXIIL 

THE FLOWERS OF EDINBURGH. 
Slow. 

My love was once a bon - ny lad, he was 

tr 

_ . IB"!-. -'«*--— '/ 



the flower of all his kin, the abfence of 

Jjmtssm . —j—^-, — p< ike-— 



rZKZZt 



3E 



his bon - ny face, has rent my ten- der heart 



- ag — -^ - E - 5a Ls;^— ^bwskal - ter — J - 



in twain. 



I day nor night find 



TjjFjr ESHB&r- e - "-baa 1 



no delight," in fi - lent tears I ftill com- 



=£ 



— -W-> 



'..'- 



3 




_:e_^ 



E 



js 



plain, and exclaim 'gainft thofe my rival foes, 



that hae ta'en from me my darling fwain. 



254 THE MUSICAL 

Defpair and anguifh fills my bread, 

Since I have loll my blooming rofe ; 
I figh and moan while others reft, 

His abfence yield me no repofe. 
To feek my love I'll range and rove, 

Thro' ev'ry grove and diilant plains 
Thus I'll ne'er ceafe, but jpend my days, 

T' hear tidings from my darling fwain. 

There's nothing ft range in nature's change, 

. Since parents (hew fuch cruelty ; 
They caus'd my love from me to range, 

And knows not to what deftiny. 
The pretty kids and tender lambs 

May ceafe to fport upon the plain ; 
But I'll mourn and lament, in deep difcontent, 

For the abfence of my darling fwain. 

Kind Neptune, let me thee in treat, 

To fend a fair and pleafant gale ; 
Ycdolphins fweet, upon me wait, 

And do convey me on your tail. 
Heav'ns blefa my voyage with fuccefs, 

While croffing of the raging main, 
And fend me fafc o'er to that diilant more, 

To meet my lovely darling fwain. 

All joy and mirth at our return 

Shall then abound from Tweed to Tay ; 
The bells (hall ring, ancHweet birds fing, 

To grace and crown our nuptial day. 
Thus blefs'd with charms in my love's arms, 

My heart once more I will regain ; 
Then I'll range no more to a diilant more, 

But in love will enjoy my darling fwain. 



MIS CELL \NY, 



*5S 



J n 



CXXXIV. 



PLATO's ADVICE. 



Says Pla--to, why mould man be vain ? Since 



.j_ ljk. a— .ra .-;X — — d— — r— j— ? — h— t — — 1 — 



ss: 



■ __:p:x: — 5_._j_:xj r __^_^-u — L- 



9 

'€? H bm-— I b^" '**-— ,—- — h ^-B*--r r^r 

bounteous heav'r, has madehim great, Why lookelhhewith 
a, — -^ 

pE£:£E^rH'^:t±rE=i±3=:f=E± 

infolentdifdain On thofe undeck'dwith wealth or Rate? 

mrti' — r-T— r-f #t P mzie "~ Sr&itzzzzrz 

Can fplendid robes, or beds of down, or coilly gems 
that deck the fair, Can all the glo - - - 

Tl7 ■'-kEsBiseiah-— i ss&isa, — '-gsiliisanw i — HI — "^z: — 

ries~ of a 

crown, Give health, or esfe the* brow of care ? 



2$& THE MUSICAL 

The fcepter'd king, the burthen'd flaw*. 

-The humble, aifd the haughty, die ; 
The rich, the poor, the We, the brave, 

In duft, without diilirclion, lie ; 
Go, fe.arch the tombs where monarehs reft. 

Who once the greater! title s bore : 
The wealth and glory they poffefs'd, 

And all their honours, are no more. 

So glides the meteor through the fky, 

And fpreads along a gilded train ; 
But^ when it's fhort-liv'd beauties die, 

DifTolves to common air again. 
So 'tis with us, my jovial fouls ! — 

Let friendmip reign while here we flay j 
Let's crown our joys with flowing bowls,-— 

When Jove us calls we muft away. 



SONG CXXXV. 

JOHNNY's GREY BREEKS. 



LQL_. 






When I was in my fe'nteen years, I was 
f£i"._r LJ i . .5fej l l _J__rX X_L-— [__&__ 

.prnrq — i !-X^~ ^_^_5px_p — &-— 

baitii blythe and bonny, O, the lads loo'd me 









_ — >m ^j.. 



baith far and near, but I loe'd nane bi 



MISCELLANY, 



257 



:§=|Eilpi^piiE?|^| 



Johnny, O. He gain'd my heart in twa 



— fiL^-r- 



theee weeks, he fpake fae blyth and kindly, O, and 



-g. -- _ _ ^ j- .^ 

I made him new grey b reeks that fitted him molt 
finely, O. He gain'd my heart in twa three weeks, 



ii:=i~=-s=P.r£eT5r==-=i£xf-.: 









fcfct! 



!::-:-:-"■ 



*# — 



he fpake fae blyth and kindly, O, and I made 




him new grey breeks, that fitted him moil fine- 

^ ly, O. 



Y iij 



2 5 8 



THE MUSICAL 



He was a handfome fellow, 

Kis humour was baith frank and free? 
His bonny locks fae yellow, 

Like gou'd they glitter'd in my ee'j 
His dimpl'd chin and rofy cheeks, 

And face fo fair and ruddy, O, 
And then a days his >grey breeks, 

Was neither auld nor duddy, O. 

But now they are thread bare worn, 

They're wider than they wont to be*. 
They're tafhed like, and fair torn, 

And clouted fair on ilka knee. 
But gin I had a fummer's day, 

As I have had right mony, O, 
I'll make a web o' new grey, 

To be breeks to my Johnny, O. 

For he's well wordy o' them, 

And better gin 1 had to gi'e, 
And I'll tak pains upo' them, 

Frae fau'ts I'll urive to k-.ep them free. 
To dead him weel mail be my care, 

And pleafe him a' my ihifiy, O, 
But he maun wear .he auld pair, 

A wee, llio' they be dudcy, O, 

For when the lad was in his prime, 

Like rwr. there was nae mony. O, 
He ca'd me aye his bonny thing, 

Say, wha wou'd nae lo'e Joheny, O. 
So I lo'e Johnny's grey breeks, 

For a' the care they've gi 7 en me yet, 
.And gfn we live amther year, 

We'll keep them hail between us yet. 

Now to conclude his grey breeks, 

I'll fing them up wi' m rih and glee 5 

Here's luck to all the grey fte.ks, 
That mows themfelves upo' the knee,. 



MISCELLANY. %$<) 



And if wi' health I'm fpaired, 
A wee while as I wifh I may, 

I fhall hae them prepared, 
As well as ony that's o' grey. 



w 



SONG CXXXVL 

To the foregoing Tune. 

"OW fniiling fpring again appears, 
With all the beauties of her tram s ' 
Love foon of her arrival hears, 

And flies to wound the gentle fwain. 
How gay does nature now appear, 

The lambkins frifking o'er the plain, 

Sweet feather'd fongfters now we hear, 

While Jenny feeks her gentle fwain. 

' Ye nymphs, Oh ! lead me thro' the grove, 

Thro' which your ftreams in filence mourn 
There with my Johnny let me rove, 

'Till once his fleecy flock return ; 
Young Johnny is my gentle fwain 

That fweetly pipes along the mead, 
So foon's the lambkins hear his ftraip, 

With eager fteps return in fpeed. 

The flocks now all in fportive play 

Come frifking round -the piping fwain, 
Then fearful of too long delay, 

Run bleating to their dams again, 
Within the frefli green myrtle grove, 

The feather'd choir in rapture flag, 
And fweetly warble forth their love, 

To welcome the returning fpring. 



200 THE MUSICAL 

S N G ' CXXXVII. 

SAE MERRY AS WE TWA HAE BEEN, 
S'ow. 



^.L^_px:s:^ j — u4 zi_ zj —4 _L-!_u-tJ:3[ 

— ^W- J — J- — &->-- «- -•— 4- ---^-^-S- 1 -^ 

* A lafs that was ■ laden'd with care, fat hea- 

-# — 
vi - ly under yon thorn, I liftea'd a while 

tt — n-'-n-rn — h— ^ -- r - 1 - T -^^— jwr— < p» 

-4;* — — -3j — j — — i -s- — i — f — i- - ; — *-• -44 — •— • — H — +—'4- 

5Erz?rt±si3fcJz 1 zi zrz 9 i£r^i^3E 

*? -•' ■ " £j " " " : ■■ "*© 

for to hear, When thus fhe be - gan for to 

-p— ,— 1'"-^_ pxs? , 



< 11 zi_: :i - iziz if 

mourn: Wnene'et 1 mj 'car fhepherd was 

^Sq^i^3^f^S3 J 4 Be) 3E 
HSFit^ Bar*---' e- f H' -{— 

there, the birds did melodioufly fing, and cold 

fetoLX5:a3t::-::^-- s::c 

-£y™ k»l — bii — ' *r-9 — *- — -» — - - ■-■-•— — r— L 



nifjpmg winter dia wear a 



that re- 



fe if ifiijzu z.; c :i:.:|i- in ;;i: - .. Jii.::±z 



fembled the fpring. Sae merry as we t\\ 



MISCELLANY. 



26l 



zBHS±z^lwz±: 



t— Eh-t] — yJcjJJ^Z'^L.j^Jzx — __ 



hae been; Sae merry as we twa hae been; 
my heart it is like far to break, when I 



1—7 



J — y— Ul — ' *-*-#^-L- — 1— 

think on the days we have feen. 

Our flocks feeding; clofe by his fide, 

He gently -prefling my hand, 
I vievv'd the wide world in it's pride, 

And laugh'd at the pomp of command ! 
My dear, he wou'd aft to me fay, 

What makes you hard-hearted to me ; 
Oh ! why do you thus turn away, 

From him wha is dying for thee ? 
Sae merry, &c. 

But now he is far from my fight, 

Perhaps a deceiver may prove, , 
Which makes me lament day and night, 

That ever I granted my love, 
At eve, when the reft of the folk 

Were merrily feated to' fpin, 
I fet myfelf under an oak, 

And heavily fighed for him, 
Sae merry, &c. ■ 



202 



TF MTT 



MUSICAL 



SONG CXXXVIIL. 
THE BANKS OF THE DEE. 



-^ 



-^ 



I\vas fummer and foftly the bieezes were 



±%p 



±r- 



^^iriE^tivpEi: 



blowing, and fweetly the nightingale fung from the 

§.E§ = Ep-5p|3ri^JEfe|;F£l : ;^: 

v-3^ s ._ i_X_-J. M &L ~-L— i_[_X_L_ fe' \g0 

tree, at the foot of a rock where the river was 



£=aci£ 



6*^ U<* 



^^W 



^ t^ 3 



-«—- — 



flowing, I fat myfelfdown on the banks of the Dee. 



•m — -r 



Ezfcz^r" tziFEz:^" j 



4| 

— «-4- 



Flow on, lovely Dee, flow on thou fweet river, thy 



m$ 






banlvs pure ft flre-am mall be dear to me ever, for 






there I fir ft gain'd the affection and favour of 



MISCELLANY. 



Jamie the glo-ry and pride of the Dee. 

But now he's gone from me, and left me thus mourning, 
To quell the proud rebels, for valiant is lie ; 
And ah ! there's no hopes of his fpeedy returning, 
To wander again on the Banks ef the Dee. 
He's gone, hdplefs youth ! o'er the rude roaring billows,; 
The kindeft and fweeteil- of all the gay fellows ; 
And left me to flray ? mdrtg ft the once loved willows, 
The lonelieil maid Qn the Banks of the Dee. 

But time, andmy prayers, may perhaps yet re More li'm ; 
Ble'A peace may re.ftore my dear fhepherd to me ; 
And when he returns, withfueh careTil watch o'er him, 
He never mall leave the fweet BanksKf the Dee. 
The Dee then Avail flaw, all it's beantfes displaying ; 
The lambs on it's banks (hall again bene en playing ; 
While I, with my Jamie, am careleiViy it raying, 
And taftiiig again all the fweets of thefifee. 



ADDITIONS BY A LADY. 

THUS fung the fair maid on the banks of the river, 
And meetly re-eeho'd each neighbouring tree ; 
But now all thefe hopes muf-l evaniih for ever, 
Since Jamie mail ne'er fee the Banks, of the Dee. 
On a foreign more the fweet youth lay dying, 
In a foreign grave his body's now lying ; 
While friends and acquaintance in Scotland are crying 
For Jamie the glory and pride of the Dee. 

Mifhap on the hand by which he was wounded ; 
Mifhap on the wars that cali'd him away 
From a circle of friends by which he was fu '.-rounded,' 
Who mourn for dear Jamie the tedious day. 



264 THE MUSICAL 

Oh ! poor haplefs maid, who mourns difconten ted, 
The lofs of a lover fo juftly lamented ; 
By time, only time, can her grief be contented, 
And all her dull hours become cheerful and gay. 

'Twashonourand braverymadehimleaveher mourning, 
From unjuft rebellion his country to free ; 
He left her, in hopes of his fpeedy returning 
To wander again on the Banks of the Dee. 
For this he defpis'd all dangers and perils ; 
'Twas thus he efpous'd Britannia's quarrels. 
That when he camehome he might crown her with laurels, 
The happieft maid on the Banks of the Dee. ; 

But fate had determin'd his fall to be glorious, 
Though dreadful the thought mufl be unto me y 
He fell, like brave Wolfe, where the troops were victorious* 
Sure each tender heart muft bewail the decree : 
Yet, though he is gone, the once faithful lover, 
And all our fine fchemes of true happinefs over, 
No doubt he implored his pity and favour 
For me he had left on the Banks of the Dee. 



MISCELLANY, 2(>5 

SONG CXXXIX. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

A LL you that are wife and think life worth enjoying, 
Jl\, O r foldier or failor, by land or by fea, 
In loving and laughing your time be employing ; 
Your glafs to your lip and your lafs on your knee. 
Come iing away, honeys, and caft off all farrow ! 
Though we all die to-day let's be merry to morrow j 
A hundred years hince 'twill be loo late to borrow 
A moment of time to be joyous and free ! 
Thenfing, Esfa. 

My lord and the bifhop, in fpite of their fplindor, 
When death gives the call, from their glories muft part ; 
Your beautiful dame, whin the fummons is fent her, 
Will feel the blood ebb from the cheek to the heart. 
Then fing away, honeys, and caft off your forrow ! 
Though you all die to-day, yet be merry to morrow ! 
A hundred years hince 'twill be too late to borrow 
A cordial to cherifh the forrowful heart J 

Then iing, &c. 

For riches and honour, then, why all this riot, 
Your wrangling and jangling, and all your alarms ? 
Arrah ! burn you, my honeys, you'd better be quiet, 
And take, while'you can, a kind girl, to your arms. 
You'd better be ringing and calling off forrow ! 
Though you ail die to-day, fure, be merry to-morrow ! 
A hundred years hince 'twill be too late to borrow 
One moment to toy and enjoy her fweet charms ! 

You'd better, £gV. 



Z 



2#6 THE MUSICAL- 

SONG CXL. 

THE WHISTLING PLOWMAN. 
Recit. 

^_ri?zi:zEz:E^t~: gz :Bb£ zzitzbz 

The whittling plowman hails the blufhing dawn? 

rszziz:E:zz:zz^rTz:i:zz^z:fz:i:zz:zzz::x 

The thrum melodious drowns the ruftic note; Loud 

ft— £— - 



:rprv- 



:a: 



;zfegEg^EE|^g 



lings the blackbird thro' refpunding; groves, and the 

sr-^T~zzzzz:zzzzzzz:z1zi:i:zi.iiL^z±z=l.] 
*- ^ P P 1 s* ^ -s - 

lark foars to meet the rirmgiun. Away to the 



copie, to the copfeieadaway, And now myboys throw 



off the hounds, I'll warrant he (hews us, he fnevv 

us fome play, See yonder he fkulks thro' the 

WZ3 H'.ZZ_Jf:i MM ^5? 1 F ^ -I — 

Grounds ------ -See vender be fkulks thro' 



E 



MISCELLANY. 5.6j 

! CI - 1 ! — r — JC^p — r±zt 



:zcz 



j_. 



the grounds. Then fpur your brifk couriers and {moke 

:DZ=ct=^zztp±ptL.^^„i^ h 
^ztzE±zE==fctibbEFEt=rz^ 

'em my bloods 'tis a delicate feent ly - ing morn, 



What concert is equal to thofe of the woods, be- 

^rf:j£ztz f iZ4:z^zzi:zi:Tz-zz|:T-: 



twixt echo, the. hounds and the horn, the hounds and 



P^FR 



EEEFhEEEzF 



.^-I__L__ 



a 



E=E: 



f— 



»- 



the horn, the hounds and the horn, the hounds and 



— <tzL*a 



the horn, 



ip~^ 



betwixt echo, the hounds 



~ 



|1IIe^1=z1 



and the horn. 



Z iij 



268 



THE MUSICAL 



Each earth fee he tries at in vain, 

The cover no fafety can find, 

So he breaks it and fcowers amain , 

And leaves m at diiknce behind ; 
O'er rocks and o'er rivers and hedges we fly, 

AH hazard and danger we fcorn ; 
Stout Reynard we'll follow until that he die, 

Cheer up the. good dogs with the horn. 

And now he fcarce creeps through the dale, 
All parch'd from his mouth hangs his tongue, 
His fpeed can no longer prevail, 
Nor his life can his cunning prolong y 

Prom our Haunch and fleet pack 'twas in vain that he fled ? 
See his brum falls bemir'd forlorn, 

The farmers with pleafure behold him lie dead, 
And (bout to the found of the horn. 



SONG CXLT. 

THE BRAES OF BALLENDEAN. 



Be - neath a green made, a Ioyq - ly young 



fwaln, one evening re - clin'd to dif - - co* 



* 



his pain. 



So fad, ret fo fwee£ 



MISCELLANY. 



269 



t:ibSKz=t~Mri^SE:lrEr?:z 

ly he warbled his woe ; The winds ceas'd 



iESfirt 



to breathe, and the fountains 






flow, 




p^S±rffp=p^Tp 



^zxzri^zzz 

Rude winds with compaffion could hear him 

.^g—jK-x^ — antes; 



4" 



nplain; yet Chloe kfs gentle, was deaf 

§^3i|g||lizzi||zEz 



to his ilvain. 



• How nappy he cry'd, my moments once flew, 
'E'er Chile's bright charms fir ft flafh'd in my view I 
T'hefe eyes, then, with p'eaiure, the dawn could furvcy 
Nor fmli'd the fair morning more cheerful than they. 
Now, fcehes of diftriefs pleafe only my fight : 
I ikken in pleafure, and languifh in light. 

Thro 5 changes, in vain, relief I purfue : 



All, all, but 



conipire, my gneisto renew 



From funfhine, to zephyrs and (hades, we repair 
To funfhine we fly from too piercing an air : 
Z iij 



270 



THE MUSICAL 



But love's ardent fever burns always the fame j 
No winter can cool it, no fummer inflame. 

But, fee the pale moon, all clouded* retires I 
The breezes grow cool, not Strepon's defires ! 
I fly from the dangers of tempeft and wind ; 
Yet nourifh the madnefs that preys on my mind. 
Ah, wretch ! how cafflife thus merit thy care, 
Since lengthening it's moments, but lengthens difpair I 



SONG CXLIL 

WHAT POSIES AND ROSES. 









Such beauties in view, I can never praife too high 



S^gg£ggfef=§ii. 



brp± 

not Pallas's blue eye is brighter than thine, nor 
fount of Sivfannah, nor gold of fair Dans, 
nor moon of Diapoa fo clearly can mine. Not 



MISCELLANY, 



2 7 l 



:g£ — £zSL_px ££J= u — pi @z 

beard of Silenus, nor treffes of Venus, I fwear by 

&?ziz£E[zz5f E5=>z5~bEgx&zFE r E 

quse genus, with your's can compare, not hermes ca- 
duces, nor flower delwces, nor all the nine mufes 

Chorus. 



w~yR — 



M6S 



be,! ie; - 1 - 



to me are fo fair. What poiies and rofes to 



x£fc-a 



nofes difclofes, your breath all fo fweet, your breath 



#=r 



j-qpscrfc:. 

*rr — ;^e; 

all fo fweet, to the tip of your lip, as they trip, the 



X uil @?_ \Z — l^—X-u,*— U. 






:zzz±3: 
:2zzi 



Igiii 



beesjip, honey fip,like choice flip, and their Hybla 



forget. 



272 



THE MUSICAL 



When girls like you pafs us 
I laddie Pegaffus, 
And ride up ParnaHus, 

To Helicon's ft re am. 
Even that is a puddle, 
Where others may muddle ; 
My nofe let me fuddle 

In bowls of your cream ! 
Old jove the great Hector, 
May tipple his nec/tar, 
Of Gods the director, 

And thunder above : 
I'd quaff off a full can, 
As Bacchus, or Vulcan, 
Or Jove the eld bull can 

To her that I love. 
What pofies, fjjV. 



SONG CXLIII. 
WITHIN A MILE OF EDINBURGH. 

J 1 j BW_J S$ 



La- _ 



'Twas within a mile of Edin- burgh town 



~Ri~ 






in the ro - - fy time of the year, When 

•£=^-1* — ~ g — -■— — : — &*f^--d~-$—£ — -^~ 

Hcwers was blocnw, and grafs was down. 



MISCELLANY. 



73 




and each fhepherd woo'd his dear, bonny 



f 






■p- 



-iHE—I 1 



=Se£ 



Jocky blythe and gay kifs'd fweet Jenny' making 
N 



liSjiippilip 

hay, the laffie blufh'd and frowning faid, No, no 



-#■ S 1 



|llfei=i 



it wan - not do t I can- not, can - not 

— ft-" 



■ N— 

:;pr: 



E=J=£3gg 



: = : 5 




i 



won- not, won-not, man-not buckle too. 



O Jocky was a wag, that never wou'd wed, 
Though long he had followed the lafs, 
Contented me work'd, and eat her brown bread, 
And merrily turn'd up the grafs. 
Bonny Jocky blythe and gay, 
Won' her heart right merrily, 
But dill (he blufh'd, and frowning faid, 
I cannot, &c. 



274 TH£ MUSICAL 

But when that he vow'd he wou'd make her his bride, 
Tho' his herds and his flocks were not few, 
She gave him her hand and a kifs befides, 
And vow'd fhe'd for ever be true. 

Bonny Jocky blythe and gay, 

Won' her heart right merrily, 

At church me ho more frowning faid, 
I cannot, £fff. 

•SONG CXL1V. 

Tune — Fy gar rub her o'er <w? Jirae—Vzgt 2$. 

BEAR Roger, if your Jenny geek, 
And anfwer kindnefs wi' a flight* 
JSeem unconcern'd at her neglect : 

For women in a man delight ; 
But them defpife who're foon defeat, 

And wi' a fmrple face give way: ; 
To a repulfe — Then be not blate ; 
Pufh bauldly on, and win the day. 

When maidens, innocently young, 

Say aften what they never mean, 
Ne'er mind their pretty lying tongue, 

But tent the language of their een : 
If thefe agree, and fhe perfiil 

To anfwer a' your love with hate, 
Seek elfewhere to be better bleft,. 

And let her %h when it's too late. 



MISCELLANY 



-75 



SONG CXLV. 
THIS COLD FLINTY HEART. 

This cold flin - ty heart, it is yon who have 






warm'd. You waken'd my paffions, my fen - fes 

-«c/- fesKsh- j :i ^^; ^-kes! W — ssssk> — — u 

have charrn'd, You waken'd my paffions, my 




fen - - - fes have charrn'd. In vain againft me- 



rit and Cy-mon I ftrove, What's life without 

ft, (7\ fc |B*SS*E| 



paffion, fweet paf - fioh of love, fweet paf- 
-$$._._,-*=-_ &__ _^__ _ H __£ 



vjzzz: 





<£v— -;®-LzH - jHzz izz~!zz iz bH^z'fzz ttSo 

BSHsWii 

lion, fweet palfiorij fweet paf - fieri of love. 



2j6 THE MUSICAL 

The froft nips the Buds, and the rofe cannot blow, 
From the youth that is frofl nipp'd no rapture can (low, 
Elyfium to him but a defert will prove, 
What's life without paffion, fweet paffion of love. 

The Spring mould be warm, the young feafon be gay, 
Her birds and ;her flow'rets make blithfome fweet May, 
Love bleffes the cottage and lings thro' the grove. 
What's life without paffion, fweet paffion of love. 



MISCELLANY. 



2J7 



SONG CXLVI. 

LEWIS GORDON. 



Very flow.. 



Oh ! fend Lewis Gordon harae, And the lad 



I winna name ; Tho* his back be at the wa' 

Chorus. 






3fc*=fe 



H 


;re*s to him that 


'3 far a-wa' Oh hon 


my 


^-dv-fe 


-f'~ 


>$z~M 


— fir?:If 


ErEr£-§r|=rir3 


=br 



Highlandman, Oh! my bonny Highlandinan, weel 
wou'd I my true love ken, a-mang ten thou- 



ZW=E=Z3S==3rxr 



I 



*— *& — ig — - 

fand Highlandmen, 



i-ti._ 



J: 



27§ 



THE MUSICAL 



Oh to fee his tartan trews, 
Bonnet blue, and laigh heel'd {hoes, 
Philebeg aboon his knee, 
That's the lad that I'll gang wi\ 

The princely youth that I do mean, 
Is fitted for to be a king : 
On his breaft he wears a ftar, 
You'd take him for the god of war. 

Oh, to fee this princely one, 
Seated on a royal throne ; 
Difafters a' wou'd difappear, 
Then begins the jub'ke year, 



SONG CXLVII. 
TULLOCHGORUM. 

Fiddlers, your pins in temper fix, 
And rofet weel your fiddle-flicks; 
But banifh vile Italian tricks 

Frae out your quorum : . _ 

Koryor^'s wi' piano's mix, 

Gie's 'Tidiockgorum. 

FERGTJSSON. 

Come gie's a fang, the la - dy cry'd, and lay 




t 



^=^z^±r:gzdp:r^z:^z=Jitp 



folks to chide, for what's been done before them. 



MISCELLANY. 



279 



Let Whig and Tory all agree, Whig and Tory, 



N- 



V — j 



S^z 



'.mUL-1 



Whig and Tory, Whig and Tory all a - gree, to 

iiElE^lllii^lPili 



-i*-gH — - — j — ** 

drop their whig meg morum, Let Whig and Tory all 






agree, to fpend the night wi' mirth and glee, and 



IgiSilfl 



r-9" 



"iiZfiSZL— 



E 



cheerfu* ling a-iansc wi* me the reel of Tulloch- 



E£ 



Tullochgorum's my delight, 

It gars us a' in ane unite, 

And ony fumph that keeps up fplte, 

In conference I abhor him. 
Blithe and merry we's be a', 
Blithe and merry, blithe ^nd merry, 
Blithe and merry we's be a', 

To make a chearfu' quorum. 
Aiij 



28o THE MUSICAL* 

Blithe and merry we's be a', 
As lang's we ha'e a breath to draw, 
And dance, t.ll we be like to fa', 
The reel of Tullochgorum. 

There needs na' be fo great a phrafe 
Wi' dringing dull Italian lays, 
I wadna gi'e our ain Strathfpeys 

For half a hundred fcore o'm. 
They're douiFand dowie at the beft, 
DoufFand dowie, douff and dowie, 
They're douff and dowie at the beft% 

Wi' a' their variorum. 
They're douff and dowie at the beft, 
Their allegro's, and a' the red, 
They cannot pleafe a Highland tafle, 

Compar'd wi' Tullochgorum, 

X.et warldfy minds themfelves opprefs 
Wi' fear of want, and double cefs, 
And filly fauls themfelves dillrefs 

Wi' keeping up decorum, 
Shall we fae four and fuJky fit, 
Sour and fulky, four and fulky, 
Shall we fae four and fulky fit, v 

Like auld Philofophorum ? 
Shall we fae four and fulky fit, 
Wi' neither fenfe, nor mirth, nor wit, 
And canna rife to fhake a fit 

At the reel of Tullochgorum. 

My choiceft blefiings ft ill attend 
Each honeft- hearted open friend, 
And calm and quit be his end, 

Be a' that's good before him ! 
May peace and plenty be his lot, 
Peace and plenty, peace and plenty, 
May peace and plenty be his lot, 

And dainties a great ft ore o' cm !• 



MISCELLANY. 28 1 



May peace and plenty be his lot, 
Unftain'd by any vicious blot ! 
And may he never want a groat 
That's fond of Tullochgorum. 

But for the difcontented fool, 
Who wants to be opprefilon's tool, 
May envy gnaw his rotten foul, 

And blackell fiends devorehim ! 
May dole and forrow be his chance, 
Dole and forrow, dole and forrow, 
May dole and forrow be his chance, 

And honeil fouls abhore him ! 
May dole and forrow be his chance, 
And a' the ills that come frae France, 
Whoe'er he be that winna dance 

The reel of Tuliochgorum I 



A a uj 



afar 



THE MUSICAli 



SONG CXLVIII. 
THE YELLOW HAIR'D LADDIE. 

r -tc-^tt — P"H— 1 1 — I— 5^=-- 1 ^-r^"©-* 1 — i 



4- In April, when primrofes paint the fweet 

^ plain, and fum-mer ap ■■- proach ■■ - ing, re- 



I g n^ T 7~'T . f T'f "^ 



^N S^ 



I •*&- — " — "w'"jg O — ■Baal — Sara' — ■•"""" 

I joiceth the fwain. joiceth the fwain, 



lUgHili 



SE 



.(_- 




ft» 



s 



s^sp 



The Yellow ha.r'd Laddie wou'd often - times 



zm 



l iEO-HW f n 



£=35=:* 



MISCELLANY. 



#3 




hawthorn trees grow, hawthorn trees grow. 



J ha 



There, under the fhade of an old facred thorn, 
With freedom, he fung his loves, evening and morn. 
He fang wjth fo foft and inchanting a found, 
That Sylvans and Fairies, unfeen, danc'd around. 

The ihepherd thus fung: tho' young Maddie be fain 
Her beauty is dafh'd with a fcornful, proud air : 
But Suiie was haudfome, and fweetly could fing ; 
Her breath, like the breezes, perfum'd in the fpring. 

That Maddie, in all the gay bloom of her youth, 
Like the moon, was incon lant, and never fpoke truth: 
But Sufic was faithful, good humour'd, and free, 
And fair ad the goddefs that fprung from the fea. 



284 THE MUSICAL 

That mamma's fine daughter, with ; 
Was aukwardiy airy, and frequently fL,_. 
Then, fig-hing, he wifh'd, would parents agree, 
The witty, fweet Sufie, his miitrefs might" be. 



SONG CXLIX. 

To the fo> "going Tune. 
FROM THE GENTLE SHEPHERD. 

Peggy. 

WHEN firfl my dear laddie gade to the green hill, 
And I at ewe-milking firft fey'd my young ikill, 
To bear the milk-bowie, nae pain was to me, 
When I at the bughting forgather'd with' thee. 

P A T I E. 

When corn-rigs wav'd yellow, and blue heather-bells 
Bloom'd bonny on moorbnd and fweet rifing fells, 
Nae birns, briers, or breekens gave trouble to me, 
If I found the berries right ripea'd for thee. 



r e g a y. 

"When thou ran, or wreilled or putted the ftane, 
And came aff the vi£tor, my heart was ay fain, 
Thy ilka fport manly gave pltafure to me ; 
For nane can putt, wreftle, or run fwift as thee. 

P A T 1 E. 

Our Jenny fings faftly the Cowden broom-know9 3 
And Rolie lilts fweetly the Milking the ewes j 



j MISCELLANY. 2&£" 

There's few Jenny Nettles, like Nancy, can fing j . 
^t—Thro' the wood, laddie, Befs gars our lugs ring. 

But when my dear Peg; y fings, with hetter fl<lll» 
The Boatman, Tweedfide. or the Laf* of the mill, 
'Ti8 mony times fweeter and plea'ant to me ; 
For tho' they fing nicely, they cannot like thee. 

Peggy. 

How eafy can laffiVs trow what they defire ! 
When praifing fae kindly increafts love's fne ; 
Give me Hill this pleafure, my itudy (hall be, 
To make myfelf better, and fweeter, for thee. 



285 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG CL. 

HAD HEPTUNE. 



zSaaiSHESs; 



iMmmWMm 



*t 



Had Neptune, when firfl he took charge of 



t=ft=r 



stir 



___*^ 



Sigfiillil 



the fea, been as wife, or at leaft been as 



mer - ry as we, he'd have thought better 

-fc=:-~^ir-rrSrd3i;q— :£::&: 



o'nt, and infield of the brine, would have fill'd 






the vad ocean with ge-ne-rous wine - 




would have 



^^rpErfc=K-=t=tng5=tt=t 






©- 



fill'd. the vaft ocean with ge-ne-rous wine. 



MISCELLANY. 287 

What "trafficking then would have been on the main, 
For the fake of good liquor, as well as for gain, 
No fear then of temped, or danger of linking^ 
The fifties ne'er drown that are always a-drinking. 

The hot thirfty fun would drive with more hatle, 
Secure in the evening of fuch a repalt ; 
And when he'd got tipfey, wou'd have taken his nap, 
With double the pleafure in Thetis's lap. 

By the force of his- rays, and thus heated with wine, . 
Confider how glorioufly Phcebus would ftiine, 
What vail exhalations he'd draw up on high, 
To relieve the poor earth as it wanted fupply. 

How happy us mortals, when bleft with fuch rain, 
To fill all our veffels, and till 'em again, 
Nay even the beggar that has ne'er a difh, 
Might jump in the river and drink like a fim. 

What mirth and contentment, on every one's brow, 
Hob as great as a prince, dancing after his plough, 
The birds in the air as they play on the wing, 
Altho' they but fip would eternally ling. 

The ftars, who I think, don't to drinking incline, 
Would frifk and rejoice at the fume of the wine 5 
And merrily twinkling would foon let us know, 
That they were as happy as mortals below. 

Had this been the cafe, what had we enjoy'd, 
Our fpirits ftill rifing our fancy ne'er doy'd ; 
A pox then on Neptune, when 'twas in his pow'r, 
To flip like a fool, fuch a fortunate hour. 



188 



THE MUSICAL 



WE'RE GAILY YET. 
SONG CLL 

Moderate 



We're gaily yet, and we're gaily yet, and we're no 



very fou but we're gaily yet s then fit ye awhile, and 



pE 



tE: 



feifE 



__g___«:__a. e . 

tipple a bit for we're no very fou, but we're 



iigii 



gaily yet. 



There was a lad, and they cau'd him Dick ; 
He gae me a kifs, and I bit his lip ; 
And down in the garden he mew'd me a trick; 
And we're no very for, but we're gaily yet. 
And we're gaily yet, &c. 

There were three lads, and they were clad ; 
There wtrt three lafTes, and them they had. 
Three trees in the orchard are newly fprung ; 
And we's a get gcer enough, we're but young. 
And we're gaily yet, Zzfc. . 



MISCELLANY. 



289 



Bn'Ik. 



Then up wi't Ailey, Ailey ; up wi't Alley now, 
Then up wi't Ailey, qou' cummer, we's a' get roar- 



insr fou. 



S=P=|e£ 



-^-*- 



And one was kifs'd in the barn ; 

:=5i:- 



ElS 



£:=<£: 



Another was kifs'd on the green; and the t'other 



p-2*=£-E=£ 



tr— * 



z-g: 



behind the peafe- flack, till the mow flew up 
g.J* .___ 



1 ** 

to her een. 



1 



Then up wi't Ailey. £sV. 



Nov/ fye, John Thomfon, rin, 
Gin ever ye ran in your life ; 
De'el get ye, but hye, my dear Jock ; 
There's a man got to bed with your wife. 
Then up wi't Ailey, &c 



c. 
B b 



190 



THE MUSICAL. 



Then away John Thomfon ran, 
And I true he ran with fpeed ; 
But, before he had run his length, 
The falfe loon had done the deed. 
Then up wi't Ailey, &c. 

(End with thejirji verfe : 
We're gaily yet } and we're gaily yet, &c.y l 



SONG CLIL 
BUSH ABOON TRAQUAIR. 






1- — ^Tai- r i^-^-tesst - tBsisaaSiil f 1- 



Hear me, ye nymphs, and ev-e-ry fwain, I'll 



HP- 






sn 



= J-r±rr^ft : rtH--Br = P : 



tell how Peggy grieves me, tho' thus I languifh 



lipEppipiill 

and complain, A-las ! ilie ne'er believes me. 



isdfcrrf 



My vows and fighs, like fi - lent air, un - heed- 



MISCELLANY. 




ed, ne-ver move her, The bon-ny Bum 




a-boon Tra-quair, was where I firft ' did 




That day foe fmiPd, and made me glad. 

No maid feem'd ever kinder : 
I thought myfelf the luckieft lad, 

So fweetly there to find her. 
I try'd to foothe my am'rous flame, 

In words that I thought tender ; 
If more there pafs-'d I'm not to blame, 

I meant not to offend her. 

Yet now flie fcornful flees the plain, 

The fields we then frequented ; 
If e'er we meet, fhe (hews difdain^ 

She looks as ne'er acquainted. 
The bonny bufh bloom'd fair in May, 

It's fweet's I'll ay remember ; 
But now her frowns make it decay, 

It fades as in December. 

Ye rural pow'rs, who hear rny ftrains, 
Why thus fhould-Peggy grieve me . ? 

Oh ! make her partner in my pains, 
And let her fmiles relieve me : 
Bij 



92 



THE MUSICAL 



If not, my love will turn defpair ; 

My paffion no mere tender ; 
I'iUeave the bufh aboon Traquair, 

To lonely wilds I'll wander. 



1 SONG CLIIL 

Tc the! foregoing Tune. 

AT fettin^ day, and rifino- morn. 
Wi' foul that ft ill mall love thee, 
I'll aik of heav'n thy fafe return, 
Wi' a' that can improve thee. 
I'll viiit aft the Birken-bufli, 

Where firft. thou kindly tald me 
Sweet tales of love, and hid my bluih 
Whilft round thou didft in f aid me. 

To a' our haunts I will repair, 

To Greenwood-maw or fountain, 
Or where the fummer day I'd fhare 

Wi' thee upon yon mountain. 
There will I tell the trees and flow'rs, 

From thoughts unfeign'd arid tender, 
Bv vows you're mine, by love is yours- 

A heart which cannot wander. 



SONG CLIV. 

AMYNTA. 




My fheep Pve forfaken, and left my fheep- 



MISCELLANY. 



*93 



3:dz3zdd«z»:Ki=g=qrqg:=H:; 



hook, And ail the gay haunts of my youth I've 



*r 



1 3 



m 



izz:q 



forfook; No more for A - myn - ta frefh gar- 



4 



z:s:±:^: 



-TT*^-: 



lands I wove, for ambition, 1 faid, wou'd 



iJK — ^-L[ — ^lj__l a-i-L^u-Lj — Lj_-y-j , 

foon cure me of love. O what had my youth 



If* 



with ambition to do, why left I A-myn- 
ta, why broke I my vow ? O give me my fheep, 



r^ls^Eizcz^szrzii;:^ 



and my fheep-hook re - ftore, and I'll wander 



* r »- — — U*4 j r ! — -UUpX_w_I§JL 

— 3^3 x -a-5-^ XL — !i§»-^tx JJ 

from love and A-myn-ta no more. 
B b hj 



±94 THE MUSICAL 

Through" regions remote in vain do I rove, 
And bid the wide ocean fecure me of love ; 
O fool to imagine that ought can fnbdue, 
A love fo well founded, a paffion fo true ! 
O what had my youth, &c. 

Alas ! 'tis too late at thy fate to repine ; 
Poor (hepherd, Amynta no more can be tljine ; 
Thy tears are all fruitlcfs, thy wifhes are vain ; 
The moments negle&ed return not again. 

O what had my youth with ambition to do ? 

"Why left I Amynta ? why broke I my- vow ? 

O give me my fheep, and my fheep-hook re ft ore* 

And I'll wander from love and Amynta no more. 



MISCELLANY. 



295 



SONG CLVL 

THE GALLANT SAILOR. 




iii§i 



Bern 






Gallant failor oft you told me that you'd ne-ver 



*Trfc! — I"T""Ij — HH — \ t£t — isyw 

— V-* — ^~-— 1-— — — *!— - a ■- " -\~ — — . m -*3 — — i — -3-.. — j_i — — — — ns »«-, 



leave your love, To your vows Inowmuftholdyou 





now's the time your love to prove to your vows I now 



iiiiiiiiiil 



mull hold you, ' now's the time your love to prove, 
Sailor, 
Is not Britain's flag degraded, 
Have not Frenchmen brav'd our fleet ? 
How can failors live upbraided, 
While the Frenchmen dare to meet ; 
How can failors live upbraided, 
While the Frenchmen dare to meet. 

Nan. 
Hear me, gallant failor, hear me, 
While your country has a foe, 
He is mine too, never fear me, 
I may weep but you mull go ; 
I may weep, I, may weep, 
I may weep, but you {hall go. 



290 



THE MUSICAL 



b A I L O R. 

Though this flow'ry feafon woos you 
To the peaceful fports of May, 
And love fighs fo long to loofe you, 
Love to glory fliall give way, 
Love to glory, love to glory, 
Love to glory, mull give way. 

Can the fous of Britain fail her, 
While her daughters are fo true ; 
Your foft courage mufl avail her,, 
We love honour loving you, 
We love honour, we love honour. 
We love honour loving you. 

B o a t s w a 1 m 

War and danger now invite us, 
Blow ye winds, aufpicious blow ; 
Ev'ry gale will molt delight us 
That can waft us to the foe, 
Ev'ry gale will moll delight us ? 
That can waft us to the foe. 



SONG CLVIII. 

ON FRIENDSHIP. 



The world, my dear Myra, is full of de-ceit, 

. tr 

and friendfhip's a jewel we fel - dom can meet. 



MISCELLANY. 



597 



±* 



How ftrange'does it feem, that in fearchlng a- 
of con - tent is fo rare tc 

|t pxz__z!k:l::„l yzziflzziti— t- 525 

balm and 



md, that fource of con - tent is fo rare to 



be found. O friendship, thou balm and rich 



-v--;- 



fvveet-ner of life, kind pa - rent of cafe, and 



mmmm^ 



a 



4~, 



S-2- 



compoftr of ftrife, Without thee, a-las ! what 






31 



J:E;EK3=SE: 



BEffig 




are riches and pow'er, But emp-ty . de - lu- 

(9) 



zE± 




fion, the joys of an hour, 



But 






emp-ty de - lu - fion, the joys of an hour, 



298 



THE MUSICAL 



How much to be priz'd and efteem'd is a friend, 
On whom we may always with fafety depend ; 
Our joys when extended will always increafe, 
And griefs when divided are hufh r d into peace. 
When fortune is fmiling what crouds will appear, 
Their kin an efs to offer and friendfhip fmcere, 
Yet change but the profpecl: and point out diftrefs, 
No longer to court you they eagerly prefa. 



SONG C^LIX 

THE SEIGE OF TROY. 



Proud Paris, defpifing fair Helen's great pomp, 



Siii|^^=Si=p^ 



he ventur'd the foaming bil-lows t© jump, for 




to Troy with a numerous train, whereof the great- 



MISCELLANY, 



299 



2?sii^5 



©ECF U-l^-^- 1 -!-^ — ^ — ^ gr 

eft part was flain, for her fa la lal de ral lal 

k «« h _ -=^ in ^r'-'fi <7! - 

fe^E^^n±^g=ff=t±p^z-s 

de ral, Whereof the greateft part was flain, 



-0 — -N — 3- ""dTtit"l1"lB~^ ' 



'JZZZWI. 

for her 






--^--lir — ■ 



fa 



la lal de ral lal. 



Menelau's enrag'd at fuch a great lofs, 
With a thoufand mips the ocean did^crofs, 

For her fa la, &c. 
And fteer'd on his courfe, tho' the feas they did roar, 
Queen Nell's bright charms drew his ihips to the fhore, 

Ofherfala, &c. 

Agamemnon regardlefs of his country's harms, 
Difpatch'd to Achilles two heralds at arms, 

For her fa la, &c. 
But ilern Achilles he threw clown his fhield, 
And fwore by his fceptre, he'd ne'er take the field 

For the lofs of her fa la, &c. 

Ulyffes renowned for prudence and wit, 

He feign'd himfelf crazy, to flick by the butt 

Of Penelope's fa la, &c. 
And.plow'd up the fand with an afs and a hog, 
A rare pretention to keep him in. cog. 

To manure her fa la, &;e. 



THE MUSICAL 



But Heeler may cutwff, and fo ir.sy his Sire, 
For/if was the ?/jfW, that fee Troy on fire, 

Her fa la, tSV. 
And himfelf to be drag'd round the town by the heels, 
At ft era Achilla's chariot wheels, 

For her fa la, &c. 

But {tern Achilles, he falling in love, 

With Priam's fair daughter, which did his death prove, 

Her fa la, &c 
For cunningly Paris fnot him in the heel, 
With a. poifoned arrow made of the line ftecl. 

For her fa la ? &c. 



''MISCELLANY. 

SONG CLX. 

ROS.LIN CASTLE, 






3d 



'Twas in that feafon of the year, when 
all things gay and fwect appear, that Co - lin with 



the morning ray, a - role and fung his ru- 

iiliiiiiiii^l 

ral tay, v Of Nanny's charmsthe (hepherd fung, 



the hills and dales with Nanny rung, while Rcf- 






:r»:i3 




lin caftle heard the fwain and echoM, 



E3«piz±2 



n 



f!?f±3=J} = HzzrJi 



;=-e 



back the cheerful {train. 
C c 



302 THE MUSICAL 

Awake, fweet mufe ! the breathing fprjng, 
With rapture warms ; awake and fmg j 
Awake, and join the vocal throng, 
Who hail .the morning with a fong ; 
To Nanny raife the cheerful lay ; 
O ! bid her hafte and come away ; 
In fweeteft fmiles herfelf adorn, 
And add new graces to the morn. 

O hark, my love ! on ev'ry fpray, 
Each feather'd warbler tunes his lay ; 
'Tis beauty fires the ravim'd, throng ; 
And love infpires the melting fong : 
Then let my raptur'd notes arife : 
For beauty darts from Nanny's eyes ; 
And love my rifing bofom warms, 
And fills my foul with fweet alarms, 

O ! come, my love ! thy Colin's lay 

With rapture calls, O come away ! 

Come, while the mufe this wreathe mail twine 

Around that modeft brow of thine : 

O ! hither hafte, and with thee bring 

That beauty blooming like the fpring, 

Thofe graces that divinely mine, 

And charm this raviih'd breaft of mine I 

5 ONG CLXI. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

ROM Roflin caftle's echoing walls 
Refounds my fhepherd's ardent calls, 
My Colin bids me come away, 
And love demands I mould obey. 
His melting ftrain and tuneful lay 
So much the charms of love difptey, 
• I yi e ld — nor longer can refrain ^ 
To own my love, and blefs my twain. 



MIS CELL ANY. 303 

No longer can my heart conceal 

The painful pleating flame I feel, 

My foul retorts the am'rous ftrain, 

And echoes back in love again, 

Where lurks my tanglier ? from what grove 

Does Colin pour his- notes of love? 

O bring me to the happy bow'r, 

Where mutual love may blils fecure. 

Ye vocal hills that catch the fong, 
Repeating, as it flies along, 
To Colin's ear my ftrain convey, 
And.fay, I hafte to come away. 
Ye zephyrs foft that fan the gale, 
Waft to my love the foothing tale j 
In whifpers all my foul exprefs, 
And tell, I hafte his arms to blefs. 



Ccij 



3<H 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG CLXII. 
JOHN s BADENYON. 



fa 



E^-±z-£z i=^=?5z§>z| 

When firfl I came to. be a man, of twenty 

tiwiiliiiii 



y» & &■ *- • -^ ^ 

years or fo, I thought myfelf a handfome youth, 



H^y. jv~ h 



ESEE 






And fain the world wou'd know, in beft attire I 



|fez|=~IE?E 



^ -i~r 



zrz 






ftept abroad, with fpirits brifk and gay, and here 



m^ 



?z^z±zzfz:x±^:: 
& m & -d- - 



and there, and every wliere, was like a morn 



3EirT^zJ~cirtrzlz~ 



^ — z 



in May. No care I kad, nor fear ofwant,bii; 



MISCELLANT. 



m 



i 



5°S 



£t=£=Sz 



rambled up and down, and for a beau I might 

nmwusmMH 



-g 






have pafs d, in country or in town j I Hill was 




teOTfrW i 



pleas'd where'er I went, and when I was alone, 

T 1 



~-s 



I tun'd my pipe, and pkas'd myfell, wi' John o* 

Badenyon. 

Now in the days of youthful prime, 

A mlftrefs I muft find ;■ 
For love they fay, gives one an air, 

And ev'n improves the mind : 
On Phillis fair, above the reft, 

Kind fortune fix'd my eyes, 
Her piercing beauty ftruc~t my heart 3 

And (he became my choice : 
To-Cupid then, with hearty pray'r, 

I offer'd many a vow, 
And danc'd and fung, and figh'd and fwore.. 

As other lovers do : 

Ceiij 



3° 6 



THE MUSICAL 



But when at laft I breath'd my flame, 

I found her cold as (lone ; 
I left the girl, and tun'd my pipe 

To John of Badenyon. 

When love had thus my heart beguil'd, 

With foolim hopes and" vain, 
To friendfhip's port. I fteer'd my courfe, 

And laugh'd at lovers' pain ; 
A friend: I got by lucky chance, . 

'xfwas fomething like divine ; 
A honeft friend's a precious gift, 

And fuch a gift was mine : 
And now, whatever -might betide,. 

A happy man was I, 
In any ftrait I knew to whom 

I freely might apply : 
A ftrait foon came, my friend I try V«, 

He laugh'd and fpurri'd my moan : 
I hy'd me home, and pleas'd myfelf 

With John of Badenyon. 

I thought I mould be wifer next, 

And would a patriot turn ; 
Began to doat on Johnny Wilkes, 

And cry up Parfon Home : 
Their noble fpirit I adrnir'd, 

And prais'd their manly zeal, 
Who had, with flaming tongue and ptn, 

Maintain'd the public weal ;' 
But 'ere a month or two was paft, 

I found myfelf betray'd ; 
'Twas felf and party after all, 

For all. the ft if they made. 
At laft I faw thefe factious knaves 

.Infult the very throne ; 
1 cT.rs'd them all, and tun'd my pipe- 
To John of Badenyon, 



MISCELLANY. 307' 



What nest to do I mus'd a while, - 

Still hoping to fuccecd, 
I pitch'd on books for company, 

And gravely try'd to. read ; 
I bought and borrow'd ev'ry where, 

And ftudy'd night and day ; 
Net- mift what dean or doctor wrote, 

That happen'd in myway: 
Philofophy I now efteem'd 

The ornament of youth,, 
And carefully, thro' many a page, 

I hunted after truth : 
A thoufand various fchemes I try'd,. 

And yet waspleas'd with' none ; 
I threw them by, and tun'd my pipe 

To John of Badcnyon.. 

And now, ye youngfters, ev'ry where, 

Who want to make a ihovv, 
Take heed in time, nor vainly hope , 

For h.ippim-fs below ; 
What you may fancy pleafure here, 

Is but an empty name ; 
For girls, and friends, and books, and fo, 

You'll lind them all the fame. 
Then be advis"'d, and warning take, 

From fuch a man as me, 
I'm neither Pope nor Cardinal, 

Nor one of low degree, 
You'll lind dilpleafure ev'ry where : 

Then do as I have done. 
E'en tune your pipe, and pleafe yourfelf 
With John of Badenyon. 



3P8' 



1*HE MUSICAL 

SONG CLXIII. 

THE WAND'RING SAILOR. 




^-H 



The wand'ring failor ploughs the main- a com- 



--^if3 : ^— ^^i-^-pyi^ 



petence in life to gain, Undaunted braves the 






::=5 
-3- 



ftormy feas, To find at laft content and eafe, 



To find at lafl content and eafe, In hopes when 

toil and danger's o'er, To anchor on his 
native fh ore, In hopes when toil and danger's 

^.--:«BJ--,BBJ--J--j»-p ~j H3 «• T -j— L. 

-j— L jZlZlubL ilZtrid "3. S3 Lg TrZr 'Pl !«"" rj 

= : 5t -%±a ht-±^.^±±S£^S 

o'er, To anchor on his na - tive fhore, to anchor 



MISCELLANY- 



mmmm 



3°9 
~tz:izfcz iCP- 






on his native fhore. When winds blow hard, and 






mountains roll, and thnnders fhake from pole to 









I 












pole, Tho' dreadful waves furrounding foam, flill 

HI 






flatt'ring fan - cy wafts him home, flill flatt'ring 



" 3S " 5 -£ — ^ Tut j- I — 




S3:^z: 



fan - cy wafts him home, In hopes when toil and 



3±* 




till 



S3IS1I 



e-*£Qr= 



danger's o'er, to anchor on his native fhore, 
» » i i 



5 i pu — ------ — -r- — Hi — H — H—H™!" 



5 

In hopes when toil and danger's o'er, to anchor on 

1^5 • ' , 

— . ^ -$ 

his aa - tive fhore, to anchor on his native fhore. 



3IO THE MUSICAL 

* When round the bowl the jovial crew,, 
The early fcenes of youth renew, 
Tho' each his fav'rite fair will bo aft, 
This is the univerfal toaft i 
This is the univerfal toaft i 

May we when toil and danger's o'ery 
Call anchor on our native more, 
May we when toil and danger o'er, 
Caft anchor on our native more, 
Caft anchor on his native more. 

*■• Theft word* to btfung to thefrj pari of the tune* 



MISCELLANY. 



311 



SONG CLXIV. 

HIGHLAND QUEEN. 



-sr^-Pr 






No more my foflg mall be, yc fwains, of 

■zgm. 






pur-ling ftreams, or flow'- ry plains; more pleaf- 






ing beauties now infpire, And Phoebus tunes 



& 
K-3- 



iil^iii^iilp 



the war-bling lyre ; Di-vine-ly aided, thus 

'"7"" ^T"! « _ ib. ~T^ 



iggiiiiig 



it 




I mean To ce - le - brate to ce - le - brate 



r§SS±idz=S 



my Highland (^ueen. 



3 ; I2 THE MUSICAL 

In her, fwcet innocence you'll find, 
With freedom, truth, and beauty join'dj 
From pride and affectation free, 
Alike me fmilesonyou and me, 
The brighter! nymph that trips the green* 
I do pronounce my Highland Queen. 

No fordid with, or trifling joy, 
Her fettled calm of mind deflroy ; 
Strict honour -fills her fpotlefs foul, 
And adds a luftre to the whole ; 
A matchlefs fhape, a graceful mien., 
All center in my Highland Queen. 

How bleft that youth, whom gentle Fate 
Has deftin'd For fo fair a mate ; 
Has all thefe wond'rous gifts in flore, 
And each returning day brings more : 
No youth fo happy can be feen, 
Poffeffing thee, my Highland Queers 



km CELL ANY. 

SONG CLXV. 

MAN Mx^Y "ESCAPE. 



3 T 3 






Man may efcape from rope or gun, nay fome have 
outliv'd the doctor's pill •■: Who takes a woman 






:rrTirt 



m-dix be undone, that ba - ill - ilk is fure | to 






;«r F £=3 FS xr: s 



kill. The fly that fips treacle is loll in the 



-*— — — -IT""*" P— -j— J 



••flSF ic3 






fweets, fo he that tafles "woman, woman, woman, 



p^isiEiEtEgl3gE: 

he that taftes woman, ruin meets. 



D d 



3H 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG CLXVI. 

TALLY HO. 

Ye fportfmen draw near, and ye fpor.fwoisnen 



too, who delight in the joys of the field, who de- 



light in the joys of the field. Mankind, tho' they 



mmmMSmm 

tp ys W- ^ ^ fe* fc* ^ 

blame are all eager as you, and- no one the con- 



=23 




tell will yield, - - - - and no one the conteft will 



Adagio 

.Jh. 



AI1 C 



i^iiPiP& 



i : - : ' 



:±!^_U*_: 



yield. His ilrdlKipj his worfhip, his honour, his 



MISCELLANY. 3*5 

grace, a hunting cci - - tinual - - ly go, AH 



ranks and degrees are engag'd in the cliace, with hat 



4-f 



m± 






¥92* 



forward, huzza, Tally ho, - - - - All ranks and 






Ls3 b£* 

degrees are engap-'d in the chace, hark forward, 



■SF 






huzza, Tally ho, Tally ho, Tally ho, Tal- 

ly ho, Tally ho, Tally ho, Tally ho, Tally ho, - - 



ly ho, Tally ho, Tally ho, Tally 



Hark forward, huzza, Tally ho. - 
Dd ij 




3 ! ^ THE MUSICAL 

The lawyer will rife with the firft of the morn 

To hunt for a mortgage or deed ; 
The hu/band gets up at the found of the horn 

And rides to the comu.ons full fpeed ; 
Thepatriot is thrown Mi-purfuiJs of his game j 

The poet too often lays low, 
Who, mounted on Pegsfus, flies after fame, 

With hark forward, hu 2Z a, Tally ho. 

While fearlefs o'er hills and o'er woodlands we fweep, 

Tho' prudes on our paftime may frown, 
Plow oft do they decency's bounds overleap, 

And the fences of virtue break down ? 
Thus public, or private, for penfion, for place, 

For amufement, forpaffion, for fhow, 
All ranks and degrees are engag'd in the chacej, 

With hark forward, huzga, Tally., ho.. 



MISCELLANY, 






SONG CLXVIL 
THE AULD GOODMAN. * 



:rtz?:^zjvzqz:z Tzqzizzrzrizi: 

O late in an evening forth I went, a 

§rr.liEESEp^|=^EjFii£E 

little before the fun- gae'd down, and there I 

:zr!tzH„r— Tijz— J" tz s =: ^~js~ = n — t 
Pzi^'zzyf^zfzyizfiz^z^iiil-^t 

chanc'd by accident, to light on a \ kattle 
-$e— — ar-H K-p K g— ^— -j -, >— 



z3:fft±fex:fc*r?=:j 

un. A man and his wife, w 

;zziz5=3zS:^z:$z5zdz^zFF? 

— is* -5- — 3- 1 — - Jt — — F^fe 

in a flrife, I can - na' weel tell you how it 
began, but ay fhe watl'd her wretched life, and cry'd 



•*-- 



:~f:q.~^ 



r:FEr?3; 



ess 



-&- 



&—@- 



U „ 



ever, Alake, my auld ^oqdman. 
I) 4 Sij 



31 8 THE MUSICAL 

He. 

Thy auld goodman that thou tells of, 
The country kens where he was born, 

Was but a filly poor vagabond, 
And ilka ane leugh him to fcorn ; 

For he did fpend, and make an end 
Of gear that his forefathers wan, 

He gart the poor ftand frae the door, 

Sae tell nae mair of thy auld goodman. 

She. 

My' heart alake, is liken to break, 

When I think on my winfome John, 
His blinkin eye, and gate fae free, 

Was naething like thee, thou dofen'd drone* 
His rofie face, and flaxen hair, 

And a flan as white as ony fwan, 
Was large and tall, and comely withal, 

And thou'it never be like my auld goodman 

.He. 

Why doft thou pleen ? I thee maintain, 

For meal and mawt thou difna want ; 
But thy wild bees I eanna pleafe, 

Now when our gear ? gins to grow fcanl. 
Of houfehold fluff thou haft enough, 

Thou wants for neither pot r.or pan ; 
Of fiklike ware he left thee bare, 

Sae tell nae mair of thy auld gocdman* 

She. 

Yes, I may tell, and fret myfell, 

To think on thefe blyth days I had ? 

When he and I together lay - 
In arms into a well-made bed ; 



MISCELLANY.- 3$*$ 

But now Ifigh and may be fad. 

Thy courage is cauld, thy colour wan, 
Thou falds thy feet, and fa's afleep, 

And thou'lt ne'er be like. my auld goodman, 

Then coming was the night fae.dark, 

And gane was a' the light o' day ; 
The carl was fear'd to mifs his mark, 

And therefore wad nae langer flay ; 
Then up he gat, and he ran his way, 

I trow the wife the day flie wan, 
And ay the oe'rword of the fray 

Was ever, Alake, my auld goodman... 



320 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG CLXVIII. 

TODLEN HAME. 






:.Jvr: 



-4-zr— -K 



f-f-P~ 



=*=|: 






When I have a faxpence un-der my thumb, 



fk h-4-^- 



.Nzi^ZI^T-bT; 



353E33$i- 



■ E:i"~^-^""^"' K ~ ^ 4-3-i 3- 



then 1*11 get credit in ilk a town, but a 



?SP=PF* 



ecse* N-re 



-r-S 4^ tJ-— 4-4 



^ — — * — . r ^ 

when I'm poor, they bid me gac bye, O poverty parts 

good com-pa-ny. Todlen hame, Todlen hame, 

O cou'dna my love come todlen hame. 

Fair fa' the goo^wife, and fend her good fale. 
She gi ? fes us white ban necks to drink her ale, 
Sync ; ? 'hat her tippony chance to be ima', 
We'!; tak a good fceur o't. and ca't awa'. 

i'cdlen hame, todlen hame, 

As round as a ncep come todlen hame, 



MISCELLANY. $%W 

My kimmer and I lay down to fledp, 
And twa pint-ftcups at our bed's feet ; 
And ay when we waken'd, we drank them dry: 
What think ye of my wee kimmer and I ? 
Todlen butt, and todlen ben, 
Sae round as my love comes todlen name. 

Leez me on liquor, my todlen dow, 
Ye're ay fae good-humour'd when weeting your mou' '% 
When fober, fae four, ye'li fight with a flee, 
That 'tis a blyth fight to the bairns and me, 
When todlen hame, todlen hame, 
When round as a neep you come todlen hame- 



J22 



'HE MUSICAL 



SONG' CLX1X. 

BY JOVE I'LL BE FREE. 



Come, all ye young lovers, who wan withdefpair,com- 









L 



sprier 

3 idle fc 

enhancing their charms, and tell 



:gq=:: 

pcfe idle fonnets and figh for the fair; who puff up 

4 — r 



their pride by enhancing their charms, and tell them 



'tis heaven to lie in their arms: be wife by example; 



mmmmm 



take pattern from me ; For, let what will happen, 



§i?Sl^l 



by Jove I'll be free, by Jove Til be free ; For, let 



-w*e— 



igii 



fer 






E^fej|=E 



what will happen, by Jove I'll be free. 



MISCELLANY. 323 

Young Daphne I faw, in the net foon was caught ; 
I ly'd and I rlatter'd, as caftom has taught : 
I prefs'd her to blifs, which fhe granted full foon ; 
But the date of my paffion expir'd with the moon. 
She vow'd fhe was ruined ; I faid it might be ; 
I'm ferry, my dear: but by Jove I'll be free. 

The next was young Phyllis, as bright as the morn ; 
The love that I preffer'd fhe treated with fcorn ; 
I laugh'd at her folly, and told her my mind, : 
That none can be handfome but fuch as are kind. 
Her pride and ill nature were loft upon me : 
For, in fpite of fair faces, by Jove I'll be free. 

Let others call marriage the harbour of joys ; 
Calm peace I delight in, and fly from all noife ; 
Some choofe to be hamper'd, 'tis fure a ft range rage, 
And, like birds, they ling belt when they're put in-a cages 
Confinement's the devil ; 'twas not made for me ; 
.Let who will be bound-flaves, by Jove I'll be free. 

Then let the brifk bumper run over the glafs, 

In a toait to the young and the beautiful lafs, 

Who, yielding and e'afy, prefcribes no dull rule, 

Nor thinks it a wonder a lover mould cool. 

Let us bill like the fparrow, and rove like the bee ; ■ 

For, in fpite of grave leffons f by Jove I'H'be free. 



3 24- 



TH £ music a; 



SONG CLXX. 
THE CHARGE IS PREPAR'p. 

The charge is prepar'd, the lawyers are met, the 



-to — ^-j- 



judges all rang-d, a ter-ri-ble {how, I go undifmay'd 



:n--i— j- 



for death is a debt, a debt on demand, fo take 






:^ — ejsjL.: 



-C. 



T" 



IB 



I- 



what I owe. Then farewell, my love, dear charm- 



^± 



fczrzq: j: -4 



TEEESEr!-?cEf#¥z^F 



ers, adieu ! contented I die, 'tis the better for 






0~ P— -P-r-®— 0- 1 — I — ! 



you. Here ends all dif-pute the reft of oar lives, for 

-ol-b-Z-gp--- 



this way at once I plcafe all my wives. 



MISCELLANY, 



3*5 



SONG CLXXL 

FAREWELL^ YE GREEN FIELDS. 

Moderato. ... 



w& 



t=£ 



Fare- well, ye green fields and fweet groves, where 



:t:::: 






jfc: 



Phillfs engaged my fond heart, where nightingale s 



-*-*^- 






X 



M 



warble their loves, and nature is drefs'd without 



art. No pleafure ye now can afford, nor rau^ 






^lipiiii 



fie can lull me to refl ; for Phillis proves falfe 

to her word, and Strephon can never be bleit. 
E e 



326 THE MUSICAL 

Oftimes by the fide of a fpring, 
Where rofes and lillies appear, 
Gay Phillis of Srephon would fmg, 
For Strephon was all fhe held dear. 
But foon as fhe found by my eyes, 
The paffion that glow'd in my breaft, 
She then to my grief and furprife, 
Frov'd all (lie had faid was a jell, 

Too late to my forrow I find, 
The beauties alone that willlaft,^ 
Are thofe that are fix'd in the mind, 
Which envy or time cannot blaft. 
Beware then, beware how ye truft, 
Coquets who to love make pretence. 
For Phillis to me had beenjuft, 
If nature had blcfs'd her with fenfe, 

SONG CLXXII. 

To the foregoing Tune. 

THOUGH wifdom will preach about joy, Sir, 
Truth, folly will pra&ife as well ; 
Man is firnple, and life's but a toy, Sir, 
In toying it is we excel. 
Is it worth our while, for learning to toil, 
To labour, to love, and to think, 
Thought ne'er was defign'd to trouble the mind, 
So only let's mind who's to drink. 

King Solomon, (I'm not profane, Sir,) 

Was a wife, yet a whimfi.cal one, 

He never thought any thing vain, Sir, 

Till once that his pleafure was gone. 

He ufed to fay, there's a time to play, 

To labour, to love, and to think. 

Let thofe in their prime, remember their time, 

At preient it's time we fnou'd drink. 



MISCELLANY. 327 

A pox on refle&ion, be jolly, 

DifpaiTionate dulnefs defpife, 

Did you onee know the pleafure of folly, 

You'd ne'er be fo weak to be wife. 

Let the trumpet of Fame, thofe heroes proclaim, 

"Who never at Gannon-ball blink, 

Let the bufy in trade, be cent, per cent, made, 

'Tis cent, per cent, better to drink. 

Come, about with a bumper, boys, hearty, 

To our king and our country, fuccefs j 

Toad oblivion to envy and party, 

May freedom our fire-fides blefs. 

Here's a health to all t4iofe, who will face our foe?. 

To thofe who dare fpeak as they think, 

To fuch fort of men, again and again, 

Again and again let us drinkr 



ey 



n8 



THE MUSICAL 



SONG CLXX1II. 
BLOW HIGH, BLOW LOW. 



-5H3?- 




-i)— af 



pi 






;s-: 



Blow high, blow low,let tempefls tear, the main- 






mail by the board, My heart with thoughts of thee my 



dear, and love well ftor'd, mail brave all danger, fcorn 



all fear, the roaring winds the raging fea, in hopes 







ZI\TZ~~-¥.—W. 



m 



on more to be once more, fafe moor'd with thee. 



P£ 



gii§iiiii 



A-loft while mountains high we go, the whittling 

—* — _jy 



SSiiSiEllHil 



winds that feud along, and the forge roaring from be- 



MISCELLANY. 



329 



-pr3g~ 



-K, 



m& 



1 — .^,1 — ——.-i ftaaiK — ~~— " 



low, mall my fignal be to think on thee, (hall 



iiilliiiiigg 

y iignal be, to tl 

Si 



my iignal be, to think on thee, and this (hall be my 



Da Cape 



§ 



ea 



(brig. And on that night when all the crew the 



mem'ry of their former lives o'er flowing cans of flip 






b 



-i L 



renew, and drink their fweethearts and their wives. 



:ezzir:iq-zb±z: 



I'll heave a figh, I'll heave a hgh and ihinkonthee 
-^-P-r^=~r t— : Pi fa -r J5 






S 



and as the (hip rolls thro' the fea, the burden of my 

(7>t :St 



— ^ Da C«/o. 

fong fhall be. 

E e nj 



53° 



Moderato. 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG clxxiv; 

RUSSEL's TRIUMPH. 



rn, the nmteenth of M 

llHip 



Thurfday in the morn, the ninteenth of May, 



recorded for ever the famous Ninety- two, 



— $--£ --- 



3T*-NT-br 



brave RufTcl did difcern, by break of day, the lofty 

roi!!~ — — rj a l^r-feT^~— — — z&xN 



fails of France advancing too. All hands aloft. 



:??I 



they cry, let Bri-tifh valour fliine, let fly a 
eulverine, the fig - nal of. the line, let ev'ry man 



MISCELLANY. 



33* 



§ll§pil| 



T h -N- 



fupply his gun. Follow me, you (hall fee, that the 



battle it will foon be won, follow me, you mail fee 




— — n i .- i-— — k^-j^ — ^gt — i — 



that the battle it will foon be won, 

Tourville on the main triumphant rowl'd, 

To meet the gallant Ruffel in combat on the deep 3 
He led a noble train of heroes bold, 

To fmk the Englifh Admiral at his feet. 
Now every valiant mind to victory doth afpire, 
The bloody fight's begun, the fea is all on fire ; 
And mighty fate Hood looking on, 

Whilft a flood all of blood, 
Fili'd the fcuppers of the rifing fun. 

Salphur, fmoak", and fire, difturbing the air, 

With thunder and wonder affright the Gallic more 3 
Their regulated bands flood trembling near, 
To fee the lofty ftreamers now no more : 
At fix o'clock, the red, the fmiling victors led. 
To give a fecond blow, the fatal overthrow % 
Now death and horror equal reign, 

Now they cry, run and die, 
Britifh colours ride the vaaquifh'd main, 



3J 2 



THE MHSICAL- 



See they fly, amaz'd, thro' rocks and fanclsj 

One danger they grafp at to fhun the greater fate; 
In vain they cry for aid to weeping lands, 

The nymphs and fea-gods mourn their loft eftate, 
For evermore adieu, thou dazzling rifing fun, 
From thy untimely end thy mailers fate begun ;, 
Enough, thou mighty god of war : 

Now we fing, blefs the King ! 
Let us driak to every Britiih Tar. 



SO N G CLXXV. 
OLD SLY HGDGK 



^^^^^^^^^^=^ 



Curtis was old Hodge's wife, for vir-tue none was 



mas^*Mi£-t 



:mt 



e-ver fuch, me led fo pure fo chaile a life, 
She led fo pure fo chafte a life, Hodge faid it 




m k — — m - 



-£—- J- 




t: 



was vir - tue over mi eh. For fays fly old Hedge 



MISCELLANY. 



333 






:«:.A..^-i- 






fays he. 



For fays old fly Hodge fays he 






Great talkers do the leaft d'ye fee, great talkers 




I 



do the leaft d'ye fee. 



Curtis fwore if men were rude, 

She'd pull their eyes out, tear their hair j 

My dear fays Hodge, you're wondrous good, 

My dear fays, &C. 

However let us nothing fwear. 

For fays fly old Hodge, &fc. 

One night me dream'd a drunken fool, 

Be rude in fpite of her, wou'd fain, 

She makes no more than with joint llooly ., 

She makes no more, &c. 

Fell on her hufband might and main, 

Still fays fly old Hodge, fcf*. 

By that time me had broke his nofe, 
Hodge made a fhift to wake his wife, 
Oh ! Hodge fays (lie, judge by thefe blow*, ; . 
' Dear Hodge, &c. 
I prize my virtue as my life, 
But fays fly old Hodge, £fc. - 



354 



THE MUSICAL 



I dream'd a rude man on me fell, 

However I his project marr'd, 

Dear wife, fays Hodge, 'tis mighty well, 

Dear wife fays Hodge, &c. 

But next time, dcn't kit quite fo hard, 

For fays old fly Hodge, &c. 



SONG CLXXVL 

. MY DEAR JOCKEY. 
Andante. 



My laddie is gone far a-way o'er the plain, 






While in for-row behind I'm forc'd to re- 




main, Tho' blue bells and violets the hedges adorn, 



W- 






Tho' tre.es are in bloflbm, and fweet blows the 



MISCELLANY. 



3j:> 




ssawj L3_ 

-■1-4-- 



pps* 



thorn, No pleafure they give me, in vain they 



-3S— 



p: 



1. _.___fci 



irn:~^^-^— - 



— F 3 ^-^ — ~ ! 






look gay; there's nothingcanpleafenow.my Jockey's 



ac*±BE=: 



££=GjS 






SS5 



Sffi 



N— IS- 



--- 1 — — tr 



away. Forlorn I fit finging, and this is my 



:i 



ftrain, Halle, hafte, my dear Jockey, 3E&uV, hafts* 



: izfrzszciz^rzzzi 

± E^p^^- 

my dear Jockey, Halle, hafte, my dear Jockey, 



-«f — 



pp 



to me back a- gain. 



When lads, and their lafTes, are on the green met ; 
They dance, and they fing ; and they laugh, and they 

chat ; 
Contented and happy, with hearts full of glee ; 
I can't without envy, their merriment feej 



336 ' THE MUSICAL 

Thofe paftimes offend me ; my fhepherd's not there : 
No pleafure I relifh, that Jockey don't (hare. 
It makes me to figh ; I from tears fcarce refrain, 

•I wifh my dear Jockey, 

I wifh my dear Jockey, 

I wifh my dear Jockey return'd back again, 

But hope fhall fuftain me ; nor will I defpair : 

He promis'd he would in a fortnight be here. 

On fond expectation my wifhes I'll feaft ; 

For love my dear Jockey to Jenny will hafte. 

Then, farewell, each care ; and, adieu, each vain figh 

Who'll then be fo bleft, or fo happy, as I ? 

I'll fing on the meadows, and alter my ftrain, 

When Jockey returns, 

When Jockey returns, 

When Jockey returns to my arms back again. 



MISCELLANY. 



37 



SONG CLXXVII. 
BANKS OF THE TWEED. 



Recit 



fecit. __ K_N__N_ 



-fe 

wzzt: 



As on the banks of Tweed I lay re- 



ii§EiirlEl=iilEp£ 



clin'd, beneath a ver - dant fhade, I heard a 



_3L b — S-:g— ±_t-=g — gg-|- 

found more fweet than pipe or flute, fure more en- 



*=■=) 



:z@. 



gZZI 



b- 



zszze: 



•-1-- 



zzifpE 



chanting was not Orpheus' lute ; while M'ning and 






m 






ett=: ^-~ 



fi- 



fes' b*» ' y 
amaz'd, I turn'd my eyes, the more I heard, 



IMI^Zf 



-* — U+-ZU--F * 



up 



the greater my furprife. I rofe and folio w'd, 
F f 



338 



THE MUSICAL 



l^iEiEiig-li=ilEiig 



guided by my ear, and in a tfiickfet grove, 



F^-=T- : 



:CrfH 



Las -1 



I faw my dear, unfeen, unheard, fhe thought, 



-7?-*— 



! — ^:j^z:kzz_zz::i: 



thus fung the maid, 
Air. 

To the foft murm'ring flream I will fing of my 



^::z3ziz:zfei:«ip:pie:-: 

^L Q_j ZZLtJ- : k^(-b»i 



«S^_- 



&=&=P 



love, how de - light - ed am I, when a- 
broad I can rove, to in-dulge a fond paf- 



-*- 



j_ "~ _Z 30_ JLeJ Ml—- - 



fc=t 

Be 



fion for Jock-ey my dear, when he's abfent 



MIS-CELL ANY. 



339 



"mm; 



^sp-. 







-w—r* 






I fio-h, but how blythe when he's near, 'tis thefc 

' • - ^i 3 # 

rural a - mufe - ments de-light my fad heart ; 



£fc 






come away to my arms, lore, and ne - - ver 

-L-i- Uwh-- L 

de - part, to his pipe I could fing, for he's 



_ , — ts—J — a JS-r— i 



fe«rf- J 



fc-jfejfcaj 






bon - ny and gay, did he know how I lov'd 



-*? 



— 7— i 3 ^-Td a 






him, no long - er he'd flay. 



-iSHZS 



Neither linnet or nightingale fing half fo fweet ; 
And the foft melting ilrain did kind echo repeat ; 
It fo ravifh'd my heart, and delighted my ear, 
Swift as lightning I new to the arms of my dear. 

Ffij 



54° 



THE MUSICAL 



She, furpriVd, and detected, fome moments did ftand j- 
JLike the rofe was her cheek, and the lilly Ker hand, 
Which me plac'd on her breaft, ar,d faid, Jockey I fear 
I have been too imprudent : pray, how came you here ? 

For to vifit my ewes, and to fee my lambs play, 

By the banks of the Tweed, and the grove?, I did ft ray : 

But, my Jenny, dear Jenny, how.x>ft J have I figli'd,' 

And have vow'd endleis love, if you'd be my bride ? 

To the altar of Hymen, my fair one, repair, 

Where the knot of affection- mall- tie the fond pair: ' 

To the pipe's fprightly notes the gay dance we will lead. 

And will blefs the dear grove, by the Banks of the Tweed. 



SONG CLXXVIIL. 



DE'IL TAK> THE WAR. 







De'il tat' the war, that hur-ri'd Wil - ly frae me, 



ilfiKilii 




who to love me juft had fworn, they made him 







captain fure to un - - do me, wae is me, he'll 
tr j 'PS 



Ed: 






ne'er re-turn, a thoufand loons a - broad will 



MISCELLANY.- 



34 1 



at 



izHj 



^ 



HzibzEEK^z 



fight him, he from thoufands ne'er will run, day 
T^ aBB M~H TZftz3TZT3~:iHT~"~ 



and night I did in - - vite him, to ftay fafe 
"■ © 

■— -EEBM3 — F-F-ST-F-E^ 



WbW^I 



¥■ 



from fword or gun. I usM alluring graces, with 



&frl^:fl P 3 



■ muckle kind embraces, now fighmg, now crying, 



then tears dropping fall ; and had' he my foft arms 



~ t i:" z: ztzii" 3z:^x?zz3£ -rp- 



pre-ferr'd to wars alarms, my love grown mad^ 

» K_ WEES^-. b^ : p— 1 (8.- 



z^zE§-Z±zi±3zE:g 



without the man of Gad, I fear in my fit I had" 



granted all. 



F f iij 



34 2 THE MUSICAL 

I wafh'd, and patch'd, to make me look provoking 

Snares that they told me would catch the men, 
And on my head a huge commode fat poking, - 

Which made me fhew as tall again ; 
For a new gown too I paid muckle money, 

Which with golden flow'rs did mine ; 
My love well might think me gay and bonny, 
No Scots lafs was e'er fo fine. 
My petticoat I fpotted, 
Fringe too with thread I knotted, 
iLace /hoes, and filk hofe garter'd o'er tWkneej. 
But, oh ! the fatal thought, 
To Billy thefe are nought ; 
Who rode to towns, and rifled with dragoons, 
When 'he, filly loon, might have plundered, me* 



X 



MISCELLANY. 34 J 

SONG CLXXIX. 

Tune — Myjbeep Fveforfaken — Page 292. 

AH CWoe ! thou treafure, thou joy of my breaft, 1 
Since I parted from thee, I'm a ilranger to reft, j 
1 fly to the grove, there to languifh and mourn, 
There figh for my charmer, and long to return ; 
The fields all around are finding and gay, 
But they fmile all in vain — my Chloe's away ; 
The field and the grove can aiford me no eafe,— 
But bring me my Chloe, a defart will pleafe. 

No virgin I fee that my bofom alarms, 
I'm cold to the fair.efl, tho' glowing with charms, 
In vain they attack me, and fparlde the eye ; ^ - 
Thefe, are not the looks of ray Chloe, I cry. 
Thefe looks, where bright love, like the fun fits enthron'dj 
And fmiling diffufes his influence round ; 
'Twas thus" I firft view'd thee, my ch?irmer amaz'd, 
Thus gaz'd thee with wonder, andlov'd while I gaz'd. 

Then, then the dear fair one was ft ill in my fight. 
It was pleafure all day, it was rapture all night ; 
But now by hard fortime.remov'd from my fair, 
In fecret I languifh, a prey to defpair ; 
But abfence and torment abate not my flame, 
My Chloe's ftill charming, my paifion the fame ; 
! would (he preferve me a place in her breaft, 
Then abfence would pleafe me, for I would be blefs'd. 



344 THE MUSICAL 

SONG CLXXX. 

JOVE IN HIS CHAIR 



Jove in his chair, of the fky lord mayor, with 






his nods men and gods keep in awe; when he winks 

2% : 3 

heaven fhrinks,whenhefpeaks helliqueaks earth's 



globe is but his ta - • w. 



Cock of 



:wz. 



the fchool, he bears defpotic rule, his word tho' 



5EfrPEE»3EE= 



?iiipp=iiip 



abfurd, muft be law, even Fate, tho'fc great, inuft 



MISCELLANY. J45 

— I U^ *git — — i kfi::al — '-■bjobI tSSMB- — OBI 

not prate his bald pate, Jove wou'd cuff, he's 









fo bluff, fora'ftraw.cow'd de-i-ties, like mice 






in cheefe, to ftir mud ceafe, or gna - 



PzEEE-~l£ : 



246 



THE MUSICAL 

SONG CLXXXI. 
GOOD NIGHT AND JOY BE WP YOU. 



e p^igB! 



How happy's he, who e'er he be, that in his 



p L'Ti ~F" 



rjKr; 






lifetime meets one true friend, who cordially does fym- 

SeEEESE E:E EEEEB5EEEEEil3i 



t 



pathife in words, in ac-ti-on, heart, and mind. 



5Sx1e§|[eSSSeS§e 



■My kind, refpects do not ne - glecl, although 

:i:fe|E 



-CBZ 



I! 



— ®- 



.__K_fe 



my wealth of flate be fmall, with a melt-ing heart, 

L iwi — U bs!-- 1 -^— Li — -U— U--M-- 

and a mournful eye, I beg the Lord be with 

HEEEOEEzEEEEEiEEEEEEEEE 



ult=3t 
you alL 



3 



MlbCELLANY. 347 

My loving friends, I kifs your hands, 

For time invites me for to move ; 
On your poor fervant lay commands, 

Who is ambitious of your love. 
He — whofe pow'r and might, both day and night, 

Governs the depths, makes rain to fall, 
To fun and moon gives courfe of light, 

Direct, protect, defend you all. 

I do proteft, within my breaft, 

Your memory I'll not neglect ;. 
On that record I'll lay arretf, 

Hell's fury mall not alter it. 
All I defire of earthly blifs, 

Is to be freed from guilt or thrall ; 
i hope my God will grant me this : 

Good-night, and God be wi' you alL 



F I N I S. 



X