(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "My folks the Dixons"

HAROLD B. LEE LIBRARY 
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
PROVO. UTAH 



igitized by 


the Internet 


Archive 






in 2013 









http://archive.org/details/myfolksdixons02tayl 



MY FOLK S THE DIXONS 

Volume II 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION I 

My Folks The Dixons 2 

Preface 3 

Dedication to Maria Dixon Taylor 4 

Photograph of Maria Dixon Taylor 5 

Very Brief Life Sketch of Maria Dixon Taylor 7 

Very Brief Life Sketch of Arthur N. Taylor 8 
DLxon Arms and Crest p, 9 
Photograph of Henry Aldous Dixon - Patriarch 11,12 

Photograph of Sarah DeGrey Dixon 12 

Photograph of Mary Smith Dixon 12 

Photograph of First Generation Dixon Family 13 

Children of Henry Aldous Dixon 14 

"My Folks" (verse) by Rhea Dixon Reeve 15 



SECTION II 

Henry A. Dixon Family Articles of Incorporation 17 

List of many of the Dixon Enterprises 22 

Dixon Cousin Club 23 

The Dixon Brickyard History 25 

Taylor Brothers Company History 27 

Taylor Bros. Building Photo - 1890 - 1900 - 1959 26 

Wildwood Resort Histo ry 31 

Wildwood Photo's : 37 

Timp Hike - Tennis Court - River 
Tubing - Swimming in River - A.N.T. 
Cabin - Pasture - Walter Dixon on Glacier - 
Residents meeting train - Diving board 
Stewart's Cirque and Brickerhaven 

Wildwood Lot Plat 40 

Listing of Wildwood lot owners - present and past 41 

Brickerhaven History 43 

Provo Ice & Cold Storage Co. History 47 

Block print of Harvesting Ice from a pond in winter time 46 

Dixon Taylor Russell Co. History 51 

Photo of Dixon Taylor Russell Co. Building 50 

Dixon Real Estate Co. History 55 

Photo of Dixon Real Estate Building 50 

Farmers & Merchants Bank History 56 

Photo of Farmers & Merchants Bank Building 50 

Taylor Investment Co. History 57 

Photo of Taylor Investment Co. Building 50 



iii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



SECTION II (Continued) 

Page 



South Fork Cattle Co. History ol 

Photo of Charles O. Dixon, Mgr. of South Fork Cattle Co. 58 

Photo of cattle in South Fork, Provo Canyon 58 

Photo of Walter Dixon & wife, South Fork, Provo Canyon 58 

Some of Dixon Fruit Farms and Ranches 59 

Photo of Peach Packing at Hillcrest Farm 63 

Photo of Taylor children at Hillcrest Farm, Provo Bench 63 

Dixon Family and Education, History 65 

List of Dixon School Teachers and Educators 66 

Photo of Dixon Junior High School Building - Provo, Utah 68 

Photo of 1820 Settlers First School Building - South Africa 68 



SECTION III 

List of Second Generation Dixons - in order of birthdate 
Table counting 1st generation Dixon Families 
Children of H.A.Dixon - their dates of birth and death 
Grandchildren of H.A.Dixon who died as children 

SECTION IV 

Histories and Photo's of 1st & 2nd Generation Dixons: 



Very Brief Life Sketch of John DeGrey Dixon 88 

Very Brief Life Sketch of Sarah Lewis Dixon 122 

Henry Aldous Dixon II Photo 75 

Lucile Knowlden Dixon Photo 75 

Henry Aldous Dixon II Family Photo 76 

Henry Aldous Dixon II Houses in Provo - Ogden 76 

Henry Aldous Dixon II History 77 

Stanley Lewis Dixon Photo 83 

Luella Mad sen Dixon Photo 83 

Maurine Welker Dixon Photo 83 

Photo's of Stanley Lewis Dixon Families 84 

Photo of Stanley Lewis Dixon House in Provo 84 

Stanley Lewis Dixon History 85 

Arthur Dixon Taylor Photo 89 

Maurine Goodridge and Arthur D. Taylor Photo 89 

Arthur Dixon Taylor Family Photo 89 

Photo of Arthur Dixon Taylor House - Provo 89 

Arthur Dixon Taylor History 9I 



69 
72 
73 
74 



iv 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SECTION IV (Continued) 



Page 



Lynn Dixon Taylor Photo 97 

Celestia Johnson Taylor Photo 97 

Lynn Dixon Taylor Family Photo 98 

Photo of Lynn Dixon Taylor House - Provo 98 

Photo of Brickerhaven summer home 98 

Brief Sketch of Life of Lynn Dixon Taylor 99 

"Our Home on the Hill" by Lynn D. Taylor 100 

Photo of "Our Home on the Hill - 1933" 111 
John & Janice Taylor, children on the Hill, Photo 111 

Photo of "Telephone Booth on the Hill" 111 

Photo of Stewart's Cirque and Falls 112 

Photo of Lynn D. Taylor at Brickerhaven 112 

Photo of North Fork Creek 112 

Rulon Sterling Dixon Photo 113 

Erma Murdock Dixon Photo 113 

Rulon Sterling Dixon Family Photo 114 
Photo of Rulon Sterling Dixon House, Salt Lake City 114 

"Abe" Dixon Photo 114 
Photo of Rulon with his prize winning BantamChickensl 14 

Rulon Sterling Dixon History 115 

Elton LeRoy Taylor Photo 123 

Ethel Scott Taylor Photo 123 

Elton LeRoy Taylor Family Photo 124 
Photo of Elton LeRoy Taylor House, Lakeview -Provol24 

Photo of Elton at Lakeview farm 124 

Hillcrest farm Photo with Elton 124 

Elton LeRoy Taylor History 125 

Erma Dixon Boshard Photo 129 

Arnold Boshard Photo 129 

Erma Dixon Boshard Family Photo's 130 

Photo of Erma Dixon Boshard House - Provo 130 

Erma Dixon Boshard summer Home - Wildwood 130 

Erma Dixon Boshard History 131 

Maud Dixon Markham Photo 133 

Fred Lewis Markham Photo 133 

Maud Dixon Markham Family Photo 134 

Photo of Maud Dixon Markham House - Provo 134 
Wildwood summer Home of Maud Dixon Markham 134 

Maud Dixon Markham History 135 



V 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV (Continued) 

Rhea Dixon Reeve Photo ^^"^ 

Fenton W. Reeve Photo 137 

Rhea Dixon Reeve Family Photo 138 

Photo of Rhea Dixon Reeve House - Provo 138 

Rhea Dixon Reeve History 139 

Nancy Shearsmith McConachie Armstrong Photo 145 

Anthon Armstrong Photo 145 

Nancy, Doris, Mary Shearsmith Photo 146 

Mary Doris Armstrong Photo 146 

Nancy McConachie Armstrong House - Provo 146 

History of Nancy McConachie Armstrong 147 

Royden James Dangerfield Photo 151 

Birthplace Photo of Royden James Dangerfield 151 

Royden James Dangerfield History 153 

Leah Dixon Ford Photo 155 

Mayo Ford Photo 155 

Leah Dixon Ford Family Photo 156 
Wallsburg summer Home of Leah Dixon Ford, Photo 156 

Salt Lake City House of Leah Dixon Ford, Photo 156 

Leah Dixon Ford History 157 

Henry Dixon Taylor Photo 161 

Alta Hansen Taylor Photo 161 

Henry Dixon Taylor Family Photo's 162 

Photo of Henry Dixon Taylor House - Provo 162 
Brickerhaven summer Home of Henry Dixon Taylor 162 

Henry Dixon Taylor History 163 

Vernon Lee Dixon Photo 169 

Loleta Wiscombe Dixon Photo 169 

Vernon Lee Dixon Family Photo 170 

Photo of Vernon Lee Dixon House - Provo 170 

Vernon Lee Dixon History 171 

Fred Walter Dixon Photo 175 

Helen Chipman Dixon Photo 175 

Fred Walter Dixon Family Photo 176 

BYU "Preferred" Man - Fred W. Dixon Photo 176 
"BuckI'Dixon, "Heintz" Taylor, "Putt" Thomas Photo 176 

Photo of Fred Walter Dixon House - Provo 176 

Fred Walter Dixon History I77 

vi 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV (Continued) 

Paul Smoot Dixon Photo 181 

Ora Anderson Dixon Photo 181 

Paul Smoot Dixon Family Photo 182 

Photo of Paul Smoot Dixon House - Salt Lake City 182 

Paul Smoot Dixon History 183 

Harold Dixon Dangerfield Photo 191 

Florence John Dangerfield Photo 191 

Photo's of Harold Dixon Dangerfield Family 192 
"Gingerbread" House of Harold D. Dangerfield, N. Y. 192 

Harold Dixon Dangerfield History 193 

Clifford Dixon Dangerfield Photo 195 

Birthplace Photo of Clifford Dixon Dangerfield 195 

Clifford Dixon Dangerfield History 197 

Alice Taylor Nelson Photo 199 

G. El Roy Nelson Photo 199 

Alice Taylor Nelson Family Photo 200 

Brickerhaven summer Home of Alice Taylor Nelson 200 

Photo of Salt Lake House of Alice Taylor Nelson 200 

Alice Taylor Nelson History 201 

Afton Dixon Wagstaff Photo 203 

Dermont W, Wagstaff Photo 203 

Afton Dixon Wagstaff Family Photo 204 

Photo of Afton Dixon Wagstaff House - Orem, Ut. 204 

Afton Dixon Wagstaff History 205 

Donald Maiben Dixon Photo 207 

Lettie Romney Dixon Photo 207 

Donald Maiben Dixon Family Photo 208 

Photo of Salt Lake House of Donald Maiben Dixon 208 

Donald Maiben Dixon History 209 

Ve^Dixon Booth Photo 213 

Albert Booth Photo 213 

Ves1a.Dixon Booth Family Photo 214 

Photo of Provo House of Vesta Dixon Booth 214 

Vesta Dixon Booth History 215 



vii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

CTION IV (Continued) 

Lynn Dixon West Photo 219 

Mabel May Hansen Photo 219 

Lynn Dixon West Family Photo's 220 

Brief History of Lynn Dixon West 221 
Donald Lynn West's Search and Finding Dixon Family 

His Conversion to the LDS Church 222 

Glen Hands Dixon Photo 225 

Elva Schemensky Photo 225 

Glen Hands Dixon Family Photo's 226 

Birthplace of Glen Hands Dixon - Provo 226 

Photo of Glen Hands Dixon House - Provo 226 

Glen Hands Dixon History 227 

Verl Grant Dixon Photo 229 

Adryne Hodson Dixon Photo 229 

Virginia Poulsen Dixon Photo 229 

Verl Grant Dixon Family Photo's 230 

Photo of Verl Grant Dixon House - Provo 230 

Wildwood summer Home of Verl Grant Dixon 230 

Verl Grant Dixon History 231 

Eugene Pari Dixon Photo 233 

Photo of Eugene Pari Dixon House - Provo 233 

Eugene Pari Dixon History 235 

AUie Dixon Gardner Photo 237 

Reed Snow Gardner Photo 237 

Photo of the Reed S. Gardner Family 238 

Photo of AUie Dixon Gardner House - Berkeley 238 

AUie Dixon Gardner History 239 

Clarence Dixon Taylor 

Life History in Pictures 241 

VaLera Dixon Ririe Photo 249 

Martin C. Ririe Photo 249 

VaLera Dixon Ririe Family Photo's 250 
Photo of VaLera Dixon Ririe House - San Bernardino 250 

VaLera Dixon Ririe History 251 



viii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SECTION IV (Continued) 



Page 



Grace Dangerfield Harding Photo 257 

Curtis P. Harding Photo 257 

Grace Dangerfield Harding Family Photo 258 

Photo of Grace Dangerfield House - Salt Lake City 258 

Grace Dangerfield Harding History 259 

Harry Albert Dixon Photo 263 

Cecile Clark Dixon Photo 263 

Harry Albert Dixon Family Photo 264 

Photo of Harry Albert Dixon House - Provo 264 

Harry Albert Dixon History 265 

Mary Dixon Aikele Photo 267 

Hyrum A'ikele Photo 267 

Mary Dixon Aikele Family Photo's 268 

Photo of Mary Dixon Aikele House - Santa Barbara 268 

Mary Dixon. Aikele History 269 

Sarah Dixon Summerhays Photo 273 

Clyde J. Summerhays Photo 273 

Sarah Dixon Summerhays Family Photo's 274 
Brickerhaven summer Home of Sarah D. Summerhays 274 
Photo of Sarah Dixon Summerhays House - Salt Lake 274 

Sarah Dixon Summerhays History 275 

Reed Dangerfield Dixon Photo 283 

Mary Matilda Hills Dixon Photo 283 

Reed Dangerfield Dixon Family Photo 284 

Photo of Reed D. Dixon House - Provo 284 

Reed Dangerfield Dixon History 285 

Edna Dixon Ballif Photo 289 

Mark Squire Ballif Photo 289 

Edna Dixon Ballif Family Photo 290 

Photo of Edna Dixon Ballif House - Ogden, Utah 290 

Edna Dixon Ballif History 291 

Mildred Dixon Tangren Photo 295 

James Colin Tangren Photo 295 

Mildred Dixon Tangren Family Photo 296 
Photo of Mildred Dixon Tangren House - San Leandro 296 

Mildred Dixon Tangren History 297 

ix 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SECTION IV (Continued) 



Page 



301 
301 
302 



Ruby Dixon Cowley Photo 
Angus Wayne Cowley Photo 
Ruby Dixon Cowley Family Photo 

Photo of Ruby Dixon Cowley House - Provo ^02 

Ruby Dixon Cowley History 303 

Ralph Dixon Photo 307 

Ruth Ward Dixon Photo 307 

Ralph Dixon Family Photo 308 

Photo of Ralph Dixon House - Orem 308 

Ralph Dixon History 309 

Ronald Dixon Photo 311 

Verneda Jackson Dixon Photo 311 

Ronald Dixon Family Photo 312 

Wildwood summer Home of Ronald Dixon 312 

Photo of Ronald Dixon House - Provo 312 

Ronald Dixon History 313 

Howard Banks Dixon Photo 315 

Fulvia Call Dixon Photo 315 

Howard Banks Dixon Family Photo 316 

Photo of Howard Banks Dixon House - Provo 316 

Howard Banks Dixon History 317 



Faye Dixon Bjorklund Photo 321 

Erling Bjorklund Photo 321 

Faye Dixon Bjorklund Family Photo' s 322 
Photo of Faye Dixon Bjorkl\ind House - San Luis Obispo 322 

Faye Dixon Bjorklund History 323 

Maurine Dixon Childs Photo 325 

Myron D. Childs Photo 325 

Maurine Dixon Childs Family Photo 326 

M. D. Childs Ranch, Diamond Fork Canyon 326 

Photo of Maurine Dixon Childs House - Springville 326 

Maurine Dixon Childs History 327 

Orson Kenneth Taylor Photo 3 29 

Ethelyn Peterson Taylor Photo 329 

Photo of Taylor House, Briar Ave, Provo 330 
"Kenwood" Brickerhaven summer Home, Provo Canyon 330 

Taylor Terrace, 2208 Temple View Circle, Provo 330 

Orson Kenneth Taylor History 331 



X 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV (Continued) 



Inez Dixon Denison Photo 




337 


Byron Leslie Denison Photo 




337 


Inez Dixon Denison Family Photo's 




338 


Photo of Dixon House - Provo 




338 


Inez Dixon Denison History 




339 


Edith Dixon Fallentine Photo 




341 


Bernard Fallentine Photo 




341 


Edith Dixon Fallentine Family Photo 




342 


Photo of Edith Dixon Fallentine House - Salt Lake 


342 


Edith Dbcon Fallentine History 




343 


Stella Dixon Lewis Photo 




345 


FtpHp T"i pic AAr«=>Rlf»v Tj^WI^ PhfTfo 

^ X w U ^ X X £\. V * O J. ^ y -l—J ^ VV X O IX w L w 




345 


Stella Dixon Lewis Family Photo 




346 


Photo of Stella Dixon Lewis House - 


Provo 


346 


Stella Dixon Lewis History 




347 


Amy Dixon Larson Photo 




351 


Doyle R. Larson Photo 




351 


Amy Dixon Larson Family Photo's 




352 


Photo of Amy Dixon Larson House - 


Provo 


352 


Amy Dixon Larson History 




353 


Helen Dixon Payne Photo 




357 


E. Junius Payne Photo 




357 


Helen Dixon Payne Family Photo 




358 


Photo of Helen Dixon Payne House - 


Scottsdale 


358 


Helen Dixon Payne History 




359 


George Smith Dixon Photo 




363 


Veon CoUings Dixon Photo 




363 


George Smith Dixon Family Photo 




364 


George Smith Dixon History 




365 


Photo of George S, Dixon House - Santa Maria 


364 


Anna Dixon Barrett Photo 




369 


John Barrett Photo 




369 


Anna Dixon Barrett Family Photo 




370 


Anna Dixon Barrett History 




371 



xi 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV ( Continued) 

Ruth Taylor Kartchner Photo 373 

Fred Dixon Kartchner Photo 373 

Ruth Taylor Kartchner Family Photo 374 
Wildwood summer Home of Ruth Taylor Kartchner 374 

Photo of Ruth Taylor Kartchner House - Provo 374 

Ruth Taylor Kartchner History 375 

Evelyn Dixon Smith Photo 381 

Donald H. Smith Photo 381 

Evelyn Dixon Smith Family Photo's 382 

Evelyn Dixon Smith History 383 

Alice Dixon Andrews Photo 387 

Robert Bruce Andrews Photo 387 

Alice Dixon Andrews Family Photo 388 

Photo of Alice Dixon Andrews House - CanogaPark 388 

Alice Dixon Andrews History 389 

Norma Dixon Jess Photo 393 

Richard G. Jess Photo 393 

Norma Dixon Jess Family Photo 393 

Norma Dixon Jess History 394 

Bert Lester Dixon Photo 395 

Helen Andelino Dixon Photo 395 

Bert Lester Dixon Family Photo 395 
Photo of Bert Lester Dixon House - Rochester, N. Y. 395 

Bert Lester Dixon History 396 

Raymond Lane Dixon Photo 399 

Eva Ruthe Mildenhall Dixon Photo 399 

Raymond Lane Dixon Family Photo's 400 

Raymond Lane Dixon House - Provo 400 

Photo of Raymond Lane DLxon House, Las Vegas 400 

Raymond Lane Dixon History 401 

Grant DeGrey Dixon Photo 403 

Florence Marks Dixon Photo 403 

Grant DeGrey Dixon Family Photo's 404 

Grant DeGrey Dixon History 405 



Xll 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV (Continued) 

Vera Dixon Anderson Photo 409 

Dean A. Anderson Photo 409 

Vera Dixon Anderson Family Photo 409 

Vera Dixon Anderson History 410 

Owen George Dixon Photo 411 

Florence Janeczko Photo 411 

Owen George Dixon House - Long Beach, Calif. 411 

Owen George Dixon. History 412 

Eldon Arnold Dixon Photo 415 

Sarah Jean Dastrup Dixon Photo 415 

Ila Jean Nielsen Dixon Photo 415 

Eldon Arnold Dixon Family Photo 416 

Photo of Eldon' s first owned home in Provo 416 

Eldon Arnold Dixon History 417 

Gladys Dixon Nelson Photo 419 

Ivan William Nelson Photo 419 

Gladys Dixon Nelson Family Photo 420 

Photo of Gladys Dixon Nelson House - Phoenix 420 

Gladys Dixon Nelson History 421 

Virginia Dixon Schugk Photo 425 

Percy John Schugk Photo 425 

Virginia Dixon Schugk Family Photo 426 
Photo of Virginia Dixon Schugk House - Salt Lake 426 

Virginia Dixon Schugk History 427 

Bruce Royden Dixon Photo 431 

Colleen Callister Dixon Photo 431 

Bruce Royden Dixon Family Photo's 432 

Photo of Bruce Royden Dixon House - Provo 432 

Bruce Royden Dixon History 433 

Floyd Preston Dixon Photo 437 

Lois Dickenson Dixon Photo 437 

Floyd Preston Dixon Family Photo 438 

Photo of Floyd Preston Dixon House - Simi, Cal, 438 

Floyd Preston Dixon History 439 



xiii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV (Continued) 

Melvin Rasmus sen Dixon Photo 

Carol Collard Dixon Photo "^^^ 

Melvin Rasmus sen Dixon Family Photo 444 

Photo of Melvin R. Dixon House - Salt Lake City 444 

Melvin Rasmus sen Dixon History 445 

Gloria Dixon Richardson Photo 447 

Thomas W. Richardson Photo 447 

Gloria Dixon Richardson Family Photo 448 
Photo of Gloria Dixon Richardson House - Saratoga, Cali^. 448 

Gloria Dixon Richardson History 449 

Robert Norman Dixon Photo 453 

Genniel Larsen Dixon Photo 453 

Robert Norman Dixon Family Photo's 454 

Photo of Robert Norman Dixon House - Orem 454 

Robert Norman Dixon History 455 

Douglas Wayne Dixon Photo 459 

Helen Konopelski Dixon Photo 459 

Douglas Wayne Dixon Family Photo's 460 
Photo of Douglas Wayne Dixon House - Spring Lake 460 

Douglas Wayne Dixon History 461 

Doris Ann Dixon Christensen Photo 463 

Bruce J. Christensen Photo 463 

Doris Ann Dixon Christensen Family Photo 464 
Photo of Doris Dixon Christensen House - San Jose 464 

Doris Ann Dixon Christensen History 465 

Very Brief Life Sketch of: 

John DeGrey Dixon 88 

Sarah Ann Lewis Dixon 122 

Arthur DeGrey Dixon 398 

Catherine Kezia Morgan Dixon 398 

Alice Smith Dixon Dangerfield 194 

Jabez W. Dangerfield 262 

Sarah Ann Dixon McConachie 150 

Alexander Collie McConachie 150 



xiv 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SECTION IV (Continued) 



Page 



Very Brief Life Sketch of: 

Maria Louise Dixon Taylor 7 

Arthur Nicholls Taylor 8 

William Aldous Dixon 272 

Harriet Hands Dixon 368 

Ernest DeGrey Dixon 314 

Mary Ann (Mae) Painter Dixon 314 

Charles Owen Dixon 414 

Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead Dixon 414 

Albert Frederick Dixon 300 

Sena Rasmussen Dixon 446 

Walter DeGrey Dixon 143 

Luthenia (Louie) Maiben Dixon 144 

Parley Smith Dixon 372 

Mary Etola (Etta) Dangerfield Dixon 372 

Le Roy Dixon 282 

Electa LaPrele Smoot Dixon 362 

Harriet Amelia Dixon West 218 

George Washington West 218 

Arnold Dixon 408 

Latitia May Banks Dixon 408 

SECTION V 

"Third Ward Sandy Alley" Shield 469 

List and location of Dixon Interments 471 

Map of Prove City Cemetery 475 

SECTION VI 

December 31, 1979 Roster of Dixon Family Members 477 

Index to Descendants of Henry Aldous Dixon 521 

Explanation of I.D. (Identification numbers) 540 



XV 



SECTION I 



MY FOLKS, THE DIXONS 



Their Births 
Their Marriages 
Their Children 
Their Death 

THEIR HISTORY 

My Name 
My Heritage 
My Guide 
My Goal 

My Responsibility 
My Future 

MY FOLKS, THE DIXONS 



Volume Two 



PREFACE 



In Volume I of My Folks The Dixons, its purpose was to bring 
together in a single binding, the written histories, stories, blessings 
and other historical notes about our Patriarch progenitor, Henry 
Aldous Dixon, his father, his father-in-law; and his two wives, Sarah 
DeGrey Dixon and Mary Smith Dixon and their sixteen children. Some 
of the material was collected from the remote corner of the world. 
South Africa, but most of it was located in many widely scattered 
areas of Utah. 

Where there were no written histories, verbal information was 
taken and written up for inclusion in this first volume. Its acceptance 
by the Dixon Family was most gratifying; even to the extent that a 
second volume of 69 family members history was formulated. 

Unlike the first volume where there were some written docu- 
ments and histories; there were no individual written histories ofthe 
second generation, but all had to be written and accumulated for this 
second volume. For many, what began as a short life history, extend- 
ed itself into an intimate, detailed, lengthy life story, for the benefit 
of only their own family; and which also fullfilled one of the requests 
made by the Church leaders. 

Very few biographies give a physical description of the subject. 
Photographs in this volume makes it unnecessary. A picture of the 
house and address brings back many fond memories of the past. 

Families are all together for such a short time - - - a family 
group picture preserves this family unity for life. 

To include so many pictures in the volume has been most ex- 
pensive, but over the years they will be most valuable and well worth 
to-day's cost. 

In the Dixon Family Roster of December 31, 1979, in this book; 
you will find many changes in dates and spelling from the first roster 
of December 31, 1969, in the first volume. It is surprising how many 
persons memories do not agree with their written records, and which 
requires a correction when compared. 

A conscientious effort has been made to eliminate and avoid all 
errors in this volume, but there will be many; and when they are found 
please report them so that future records may be correct. 

Our thanks and appreciation to Vernon Lee Dixon and Loleta 
Wiscomb Dixon; the Arthur N. and Maria Dixon Taylor Family; and 
the Henry A. Dixon Family Organization; for their contribution of 
$1000 each, towards the printing of this book. 

Clarence Dixon Taylor 



3 



This book is dedicated to the 
memory of 

MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 

A loving mother, who by her 
example, initiated the collec- 
tion of family histories and 
family pictures for inclusion 
in a Dixon Family Book. 



4 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



Born at Provo, Utah on January 5, 1872 to Sarah DeGrey and Henry 

Aldous Dixon. 
Baptized in about 1880 by David Holdaway. 

Rebaptized and confirmed on May 5, 1894 by T. N. Taylor. 

The Provo Third Ward records had been destroyed by fire in 

the Ward Clerk's home. 
Married to Arthur NichoUs Taylor in the Salt Lake Temple on May 9, 

1894. 

Children: 

Arthur D. , Lynn, Elton, Henry, Alice, Clarence, Kenneth 
and Ruth. 

Attended Provo Schools, including one year at the partly finished 
Parker School. For two terms attended the B. Y. Academy, 
temporarily meeting in the Z. C.M.I, warehouse. 

After the death of her father, she worked in the Provo Book and Station- 
ery store and for Robert Skelton, until her marriage. 

While her young family was growing up, she worked in the Primary as 
teacher and in the Presidency of the Ward. 

Served the rest of her life in the Relief Society as a teacher and Theo- 
logy teacher for twenty years. 

Treasurer of the Utah Co\inty Camp of Daughters of Pioneers. Histor- 
ian of Camp Provo, Daughter of Utah Pioneers. 

Chairman of Third Ward Widows to raise enough money to carpet the 
remodeled Chapel. 

Her later years were spent in genealogical research, writing family 
histories and doing Temple work. 

She died at the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City on February 17,1947. 



For her Autobiography see page 173, volume I 
"My Folks The Dixons" 



7 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 

Born at Provo, Utah on November 2, 1870, the son of Eliza Nicholls 

and George Taylor. 
Baptized by Myron Tanner about 1878. 
Confirmed by David Holdaway about 1878. 

The Provo Third Ward records had been destroyed in the fire 

which destroyed part of the Ward Clerk's house. 
Re-baptized and confirmed by T. N. Taylor on May 5, 1894. 
Married Maria Louise Dixon in the Salt Lake Temple on May 9, 1894 

by John R. Winder. 

Children: 

Arthur D. , Lynn, Elton, Henry, Alice, Clarence, Kenneth 
and Ruth. 

Attended the Provo City Schools and graduated from the B. Y.U. Bus- 
iness College in 1891. 

As a boy he shared the vicissitudes and hardships of Pioneer life and 
learned the homely lessons of honest toil and integrity. 

Became a Director of the newly organized Taylor Brothers Company 
in 1890, where he was associated for the next 30 years. 

In 1921, he with other co-workers in Taylor Bros. Co. organized the 
Dixon Taylor Russell Co. , a home furnishings store. 

Served a mission in Birmingham, England, from October 1900 to 
February 190 3. 

Served in Utah Stake Sunday School and was a Utah Stake High Council- 
man for over twenty- five years. 

Took an active interest in farming, reclamation, education, industry. 

He owned a dairy, a fruit farm, a chicken ranch, a hog farm, 
a pleasure resort ( Provonna Beach). Organizer of Skipper 

Bay Drainage District, and Wildwood Resort in Provo Canyon. 

Was a prime mover in getting Columbia Steel Co. to locate 
in Utah County. 

Served on the Provo Board of Education for fifteen years. 

He died September 10, 1935 at Provo, Utah. 



8 



HENRY 
Patriarch 



ALDOUS DIXON 
of our Dixon Family 



Husband of two wives: 

Sarah DeGrey Dixon 
Mary Smith Dixon 

Father of sixteen children: 

Henry Alfred Dixon 
John DeGrey Dixon 
Arthur DeGrey Dixon 
Alice Dixon Dangerfield 
Sarah Dixon McConachie 
Maria Dixon Taylor 
William Aldous Dixon 
Ernest DeGrey Dixon 
Robert Smith Dixon 
Charles Owen Dixon 
Albert Frederick Dixon 
Walter DeGrey Dixon 
Parley Smith Dixon 
LeRoy Dixon 

Harriet Amelia Dixon West 
Arnold Dixon 

( Group picture on page 13 ) 

As of December 31, 1979: 

Grandfather to eighty-four children. 

Great grandfather to two hundred twenty-six children. 

Great, great grandfather to five hundred ninety-five children. 

Born at Grahamstown, Cape Colony, South Africa on March 
14, 1835. Emigrated to Utah Territory in 1857. Died at Provo 
Utah, May 4, 1884, at the early age of forty-nine years. 



10 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
1835 - 1884 




MI FOLKS 
THE HENRI iUbDOUS DIXON FAMILJC 




Left to Right 

Top Row - Parley S., William A., Sarah, Ernest D. , 

Charles 0., Walter D,, LeRoy. 
Middle - Alice, Mary Smith, Sarah DeGrey, 

John D., Arthur D. 
Bottom - Albert F., Harriet, Maria, Arnold. 

Picture on Wall - Henry A. Dixon 



13 



ID No. 



CHILDREN OF HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Birth 



Death 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Sarah DeGrey 
Mary Ann Smith 


14 
4 

3 


Mar 

Feb 
Oct 


1835 
1844 
1852 


4 
17 
27 


May 

Apr 

Jun 


1884 
1926 
1907 


1 


HENRY ALFRED DIXON 


14 


Nov 


1865 


1 


Jul 


1867 


2 


JOHN DE GREY DIXON 


16 


Jul 


1867 


4 


Oct 


1923 


3 


ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 


5 


Oct 


1869 


5 


Jun 


1911 


4 


ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGERFIELD 


29 


Apr 


1870 


8 


Dec 


1948 


5 


SARAH ANN DIXON MC CONACHIE 


7 


Dec 


1871 


26 


Dec 


1950 


6 


MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 


5 


Jan 


1872 


17 


Feb 


1947 


7 


WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 


21 


Apr 


1873 


22 


Jun 


1937 


8 


ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 


22 


Dec 


1873 


15 


Jun 


1938 


9 


ROBERT SMITH DIXON 


1 n 


IN vJ V 


J. O 1 T 


■I o 


D«i<- 


1 R74. 


10 


CHARLES OWEN DIXON 


?? 




1 O 1 -3 




iVid i 




11 


ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 




IV J. d X 


1 R7 A 


-1 o 


A Ti nr 

AUg 


1 

1 y^D 


12 


WALTER DE GREY DIXON 


1 5 


X 1 vj V 






iN vJV 


1 y o 


13 


PARLEY SMITH DIXON 


9 


Jun 


1878 


30 


Jan 


1947 


14 


LE ROY DIXON 


16 


Oct 


1881 


28 


Dec 


1926 


15 


HARRIET AMELIA DIXON WEST 


24 


May 


1882 


23 


Apr 


1931 


16 


ARNOLD DIXON 


30 


May 


1884 


1 


Se p 


I960 



14 



MY FOLKS 



Dedicated to the posterity of HENRY ALDOUS, SARAH 
DE GREY and MARY SMITH DIXON 

It has always been my priviledge 

to have real folks around 

For I was born among them, 

None better can be found. 

Some folks boast of famed Ancestors 

Who first settled this wonderful land. 

Others have titles and wealth 

Live in mansions - costly and grand. 

I boast of a birth- right from sturdy pioneers, 

Whose courage surmounted all hardships and fears. 

They did not endow me 

With titles or gold, 

But with virtues and values 

That aren't bought and sold. 

I cherish my heritage, 

I'm proud of my kin, 

I have no regrets of what might have been. 

For I will not covet 

The spoils of this land, 

As long as I can be with folks 

Who love and understand. 

It must be very lonely 

When your folks are far away. 

To never know their heart-aches. 

And what they do and say. 

Or meet with them and clasp their hands 

And pass the time of day, 

Oh, I'm so very fortunate 

To have folks steadfast and true. 

Who appreciate understanding each other - - - 

The way you folks all do. 

It is said, "We can choose our friends. 
But our relatives we have to take" 
I'm very glad to claim you folks 
I'll never you forsake. 
It's such a satisfaction 

To have brothers, sisters, uncles , aunts. 



15 



MY FOLKS (Con't) 



Who are very choice among people, 
With Personalities that enhance. 
I hope we will stay united 
Together share joys and tears, 
With courage of Pioneer kin 
Carry on! through- out the years. 
May we, follow in their example 
Love God and fellow man 
Be prayerful and obedient, 
Doing all the good we can 

RHEA DIXON REEVE 



16 



SECTION II 



FIRST and SECOND GENERATION DIXON ENTERPRISES 



Dixon Coal Co. 
Arthur Dixon Bldg. Contr. 
Farmers & Merchants Bank 
John Do Dixon Fruit Farms 
Dangerfield Printing 
Royden House Hotel 
Greer House Resturant 
Chesapeak Cafe - Salt Lake 
Taylor Brothers Co. 
Dixon Taylor Russell Co. 
Provonna Beach 
Hillcrest Farm 
Will Dixon Elect. & Gift Shop 
Ernest Dixon Masonry Contr. 
South Fork Cattle Co. 
Dixon Ranch Blue Bell Bench 
Parley S. Dixon Masonry Contr. 
West & Sparks Ranch, San Bern. 
Geo W. West Contr. 
Dixon Real Estate Co 
Provo Ice & Cold Storage 
Arnold Dixon Poultry Farm 
Rulon Dixon Supply Co. 
Boshard Electric Contr. 
Fred L. Markham A I A 
Henry D. Taylor Real Estate Co. 
Vern Dixon Masonry Contr. 
Paul S. Dixon Investments 
Harold Dangerfield, M. D. 
Clifford Dangerfield, M. D. 
Wagstaff Grandview Store 
Verl G. Dixon Contr. 
Harry Dixon Collection Agency 
Clyde Summerhays Agency (Ben, Life) 
Reed Dixon Masonry Contr. 
Ralph Dixon Contr. 
Fred Dixon Kartchner, M. D. 
Bert L. Dixon Contr. 
Raymond Dixon Sign Advertising 
Ivan W. Nelson Agency (Ben. Life) 
Bruce Dixon Associates, Architect 
Melvin R. Dixon, M. D. 



Bob Dixon Spray Service 
Chas. Dixon, Excavation & Drayage 
Skipper Bay Drainage 
Taylor Terrace 
Taylor Hill Subdivision 
Wildwood Resort 
Brickerhaven 
Bonneville Development 
Oak Hills Subdivision 
Dixon Brokerage Co. 
J. D. Dixon 

And many others not listed 



22 



THE DIXON COUSINS 



The Dixons love to talk, and they love to talk to each other! So 
it seemed only natural that they should want to have some kind of an 
organization where they could see one another, catch up on the latest 
doings of everybody, talk and just plain enjoy themselves. Whenever 
a group of them were together, sometime before leaving, some one 
would say, "Why don't we get together more often, it's sure been fun 
talking to you". So one day in the fall of 1961, a few of them got to- 
gether and did something about it. Ruth T. Kartchner, Elayne Fisher, 
and Nan Stewart, got the ball rolling, by inviting all the Dixon Cousins 
to a luncheon at Ruth's home. It was such fun, and everyone enjoyed 
themselves so much, it was decided that very day, to make it a semi- 
annual, or even three times a year affair. So it was begun. The news- 
paper clipping of the event went as follows: 

September 6, 1961: 

"40 Cousins Enjoy Party at Provo Home". 

"The birth of a unique group was initiated on Saturday at the 
home of Mrs. Fred (Ruth) Kartchner, when 40 of her cousins gathered 
to begin an organization known as the Dixon Cousins. Kin gathered 
from Salt Lake City, Ogden, Wallsburg, Orem and Provo. 

Sparking the first meeting and instigating the idea were: Mrs. 
Kartchner, Mrs. Grant (Elayne) Fisher, and Mrs. Keith (Nan) Stewart. 

A buffet luncheon was served and each guest gave a short state- 
ment of her present status, her husband and children; to bring every- 
one up to date . 

Assisting the committee were Mrs. Arthur D. (Maurine) Taylor, 
Mrs, Elton (Ethel) Taylor, Mrs. Kenneth (Julia) Anderson, and Mrs. 
Boyd ( Dixie ) Frampton, Mrs. Mark ( Ruth ) Cannon, Mrs. Lynn 
( Celestia ) Taylor, and Linda Kartchner. 

It was decided to hold meetings three times a year with a family 
reunion in the summertime. " 

The next meeting was held in Salt Lake City at the Lion House, 
with the Salt Lake Cousins as hostesses. Mrs. ElRoy (Alice) Nelson, 
Mrs. Clyde (Sarah) Summerhays, and Mrs. Paul (Ora) Dixon, were 
in charge of the affair. All cousins from the Salt Lake area helped 
with a luncheon, and entertainment. It was such fun! One of the act- 
ivities that was enjoyed most, was a song sung by the group, to the 
tune of "Happy Talk" from the show "South Pacific", with original 
words by Sarah, just for us. We've enjoyed it so much, we sing it 
occasionally now and then. 

As time went on, we felt it would be easier to let each family or 
group of families take their turn at entertainment, so this plan has 
been followed since. Some families do not have as many members 
around; so quite often, two or even three families will combine their 



23 



THE DIXON COUSINS 



efforts for our entertainment. 

In October, 1968, it was discussed about having our gathering 
only once a year, rather than twice, as we had our regular Dixon Re- 
union in the fall and a summer party for the children. This was voted 
on and approved by the majority present. The Saturday following April 
Conference was named to be the annual meeting. Due to higher enter- 
tainment costs and the shortage and higher price of gasoline, has re- 
sulted in it being a very wise decision. 

Our gatherings have each been different, according to the hostess 
group. Each time being something distinctive. We have had readings, 
dancing, games, singing, histories, both read and sung; stories, and 
the honoring of several of our members, including two male cousins, 
Henry Aldous Dixon II, and Arthur Dixon Taylor, both of whom have 
now passed away. 

Our meeting places have been varied from the Sky Room at the 
B.Y.U. , Royal Inn, Ward Houses, Women's Club House in Provo, 
The Lion House, Hot Shoppe, the Fort Douglas Country Club in Salt 
Lake, and a reputable Inn at Ogden, as well as many others. Our 
original group started out at forty. Our last meeting numbered one 
hundred twenty-eight ( 128 ). 

The purpose behind the group has not changed since its beginning 
to know and appreciate one another and find fun in doing so. 

We are seeing each new generation join us and participate. Our 
number continues to grow, and we are constantly seeing new talents, 
gaining greater appreciation, with tributes given, that make us know 
and love one another better. 

Our younger generations are tremendous! We are in capable 
hands, and know we have a very choice group. 

Ruth Taylor Kartchner 



24 



THE DIXON'S OWNED AND RAN A BRICK YARD 
By Arthur Dixon Taylor 



The Dixon Family at one time owned property on the banks of 
the Provo River, North of 12th North, A portion of it was pasture 
land and when I was a boy I had the job of driving our cows down Baum's 
Lane to the pasture every morning. There was a swimming hole in 
the river near the pasture where the Provo lads went swimming. They 
called it Dixon's Hole. Boys from all parts of the town went there 
swimming. It was the days when they didn't wear swimming suits. 

On this Dixon property there were rich clay beds and Uncle Art, 
Uncle Ern, and Uncle Parley, who were brick masons, started a 
brick yard. It was known as Dixon's Brick Yard. Nearly all of the 
Dixon boys, at one time or another, worked there. Uncle Art Dixon 
was the manager. Sun-dried brick and "dobies" were first made and 
later they built kilns and produced burnt brick. Grandma Dixon's 
home on Fifth West and Aunt Mary's home on Fourth West, were 
built with the first burnt brick that was produced. The Dixon Brick 
Yard later was sold to S. H. Belmont and became known as the Provo 
Pressed Brick Company. For many years it furnished brick for build- 
ings all over the State of Utah. Mr. Belmont died and a short time after 
the plant discontinued operation, the buildings were torn down, and the 
property sold. 

The first job, for pay, that I ever had when I was a small lad 
was at Uncle Art's brick yard. I laid platforms down for Ike King to 
place the fresh moulded bricks on, before they were wheeled out to 
the yard to dry. I remember, so well, the old horse powered box 
mill where the clay was emptied and water was added. A horse hook- 
ed to the end of a pole walked around the mill and produced the power 
which mixed the clay into a dough. 

The lump of clay dough was then thrown into a mold that formed 
the bricks. Machinery was later installed with water power from a 
near-by canal and the bricks were formed under pressure and wheeled 
into the kilns to be burned. 

The Dixon Brick Y ard was one ofProvo's first brick manufacture 
ing plants. 



25 




1 23456789 
Taylor Bros. Co. 1890 



1. Bob Cunningham 
2. 

3, Thomas N. Taylor 
4. 

5. Walter D. Dixon 

6. LeRoy Dixon 

7. Orson Bird 

8. John D. Dixon 

9. Arthur N. Taylor 





Taylor Bros. Co. 1959 
26 



A Brief History of the Origin of Taylor Brothers Co. 



Taylor Brothers Company and the Dixon Family grew up together 
^and were very closely related, 

George Taylor, a pioneer to Utah and Provo in 1863, opened a 
photographic studio at approximately 250 West Center Street and in 
1866 was the first photographer in Provo. 

To supplement his photographic income, he started selling furn- 
iture pieces made by the Cluff Brothers at their factory located on the 
ground floor of the Cluff Hall, the corner of 2nd North and 2nd East. 
This furniture was made by hand and sold by George Taylor on a 
commission basis. George Taylor proved to be an excellent salesman 
and decided to become a merchant dealing in furniture. 

Being without capital to start his furniture- selling venture, he 
was required to borrow the necessary jcnoney at an interest rate of 
24% per annum. Desiring to stock a greater variety of furniture than 
that manufactured by the Cluff Bros, , he made the acquaintance with 
Henry Dinwoody of Salt Lake City, who sold him the additional furn- 
iture he desired to put in his stock at Provo. 

The Cluff Brothers must be given the credit for the stimuli pro- 
vided to get George started in the furniture business and for him to 
continue in business and become the successful merchant he became. 

Having no delivery wagon, it was no unusual sight to see George 
Taylor and one of his sons deliveriag; a load of furniture on their backs , 
from his store to the customer's home. 

Although the George Taylor Furniture & Music Store continued 
to prosper and grow, George retained his photographic shop in connec- 
tion with the Furniture & Music Store until 1890, 

With the passage of the Edmund Law in 1882, it became necessary 
for George Taylor to go on the "underground" to avoid being appre- 
hended by the "federal agents" for having two wives. For five years 
he had been able to keep out of the reach of the "feds" by living with 
the Poulton Family and other friends in Provo and Utah County, On 
one occasion he was hanging a picture in his store, when a "fed" 
sneaked up behind him. To avoid being caught, George had to outrun 
his pursuer by going clear to the river bridge at the top of Fifth West, 
before he could shake him. 

In about 1886 after having evaded the "federal agents" for five 
years, he was finally arrested by an agent named Norell, who had rep- 
resented himself as a traveling salesman taking orders for nnerchan- 
dise to re- sell in George Taylor's Furniture & Music Store, 

At the trial, there was no complaining witness so he was set free 
without a sentence or fine. 

Previous to his going on the "underground" George had trans- 
ferred title to his business and property to his oldest son George 



27 



28 



TAYLOR BROTHERS CO. 



Taylor, Jr. He did this to avoid his property being confiscated by the 
Federal Government in case he was arrested for being married to two 
wives. 

In November 1886, George Taylor made a separation agreement 
with his 2nd wife, Henrietta, and made a division of his property. Each 
wife was given the home she and her family were living in. To Eliza he 
gave five acres of land between 7th and 8th West on 4th North, and a 
lot of a block) on the corner of 7th West and 5th North. To Henri- 
etta he gave the five acres of farming ground in the Southwest part of 
Provo, called the "fort fields". He then moved into one of the rooms 
of his sister's, Mrs. George Hickman, at about 245 West Center, which 
was owned by John Beesley. 

There had been some conversation relative to the sale of the 
George Taylor Furniture and Music Store by George and Henry South- 
worth, who owned a general merchandise store in the old "Round 
House" on the corner of 5th West and 1st North. Mr. Southworth had 
offered George $1 0, 000 for his merchandise , fixtures and building, 
George was seriously thinking about the sale and also contemplating a 
trip to England with the proceeds. 

Inasmuch as title to the property and the business had been trans- 
ferred to the oldest son, George Taylor, Jr. so as to avoid possible 
confiscation by the "feds", and since the sons of Eliza had worked 
with their father in building the business, they thought it only fair and 
right that they and their mother should have first chance to buy the 
business; so the boys through their mother offered to pay the same 
price ( $10,000) that Mr. Southworth had offered to pay. The offer of 
$10,000 was refused by George Sr. Since he did not have title to 
the property and the business, he knew he had to work out some kind of 
a deal with the family; so he agreed to sell the business, including the 
land, buildings, and stock for $11,000. The new purchasers were: 
Eliza N. Taylor, George Taylor, Jr., Thomas N. Taylor, Arthur N. 
Taylor and John D. Dixon, doing business as Taylor Bros. Co, 

To raise this $11,000, the First National Bank agreed to under- 
write the following settlement whereby George Taylor was paid for 
his mercantile business in Provo: $3,000 cash was paid at the signing 
of the agreement. Four bank- guaranteed notes of $2,000 each were 
given by the purchasers, each bearing interest at 10% per annum. One 
note was to be paid off every three months and all were to be paid with- 
in one year. All notes were paid promptly as agreed. 

The Taylor Brothers Company was then incorporated under the 
State laws of Utah in 1890 with "Grandma" Eliza NichoUs Taylor as 
President, George Taylor, Jr., as vice-president, John DeGrey 
Dixon as secretary and treasurer, Arthur N. Taylor as director and 
Thomas N, Taylor as a director and manager. 



TAYLOR BROTHERS CO. 



29 



Taylor Brothers Company was incorporated for $50, 000 with a 
paid-up capital of $30, 500. The land, buildings and stock of merchan- 
dise taken over from George Taylor were set up on the books at $22, 000; 
$11, 000 of which went to Eliza Nicholls Taylor, She mortgaged her 
home and the 5-acre "promised land" farm and contributed this to the 
corporation, bringing her total investment up to $14, 000. George 
Taylor, Jr. put in $5, 000, Arthur N. Taylor (Who was still in school) 
$1,500, Thomas N. Taylor $5 , 000 and John D. Dixon $5, 000. This 
made a total of $30, 500 subscribed and paid-up stock. 

The name "Taylor Bros," was derived from the original three 
brothers: George Taylor, Jr. , Thomas N. Taylor and Arthur N. Taylor 
and the two younger brothers, Walter G, Taylor and Ashted Taylor, 
who joined the Company after 1890. 

The year of Incorporation was a boom year for business. A 
normal year's business volume amounted to between $13,000 and 
14, 000. Sales volume for the year 1890 amounted to $50, 000. 

Such prosperity and youthful optimism encouraged them to ex- 
pand, so a three-story brick building was constructed, one of the first 
on Provo's Main Street. Things went along smoothly and successfully 
for a few years, then the depression of 1893 struck. For the next few 
years it was really a struggle for this new and growing corporation 
to meet its obligations and stay solvent. 

James F, McClellan, his wife, Hattie Taylor McClellan, Arthur 
N. Taylor and Walter G. Taylor went to the gold mining area of Mont- 
ana where they worked in the ore mills, sending their wages back to 
the struggling corporation to help defray their expenses and keep the 
business doors open. 

In the beginning, furniture, carpets, organs and wallpaper were 
the main lines of merchandise. Later, stoves, hardware, crockery 
and all household items were added. In 1913, Walter Needham of 
American Fork joined the organization and a dry goods department 
was added. A year later a men's clothing department was added. 

After "weathering" the depression of 93, Taylor Bros. Co. con- 
tinued to grow physically as well as financially. A three- story building 
106 feet wide fronting on Center Street, the original site of the small 
store first started by George Taylor, and extending nearly one-half a 
block long to the north, was built. Years later a special warehouse 
building of two stories and over one hundred feet long was built adjac- 
ent to the northwest corner of the main building. 

Eventually Taylor Bros , Co, expanded their operations in the way 
of branch stores in Eureka and Spanish Fork. Albert F. Dixon, a well- 
liked and long-time employee, was manager of this Spanish Fork branch. 

From the date of its incorporation down to the Corporation dis- 
olvement into a partnership, Taylor Bros, Co. "was represented by the 
Dixon Family in the role of stockholders, officers, employees and 
Customers. 



30 



TAYLOR BROTHERS CO. 



John DeGrey Dixon was the first secretary and treasurer and 
long time stockholder. 

Arthur N. Taylor, husband of Maria Dixon, worked in the ore- 
mining mills of Montana, sending his wages to the newly- organized 
company to tide them over during the slow and difficult times of the 
1893 depression. He was a director, asst. manager, and furniture- 
department buyer. 

William A. Dixon, at the time of his marriage, was working in 
the furniture department. 

Albert F. Dixon was a super salesman, working in the mining 
camps of Eastern Utah and the Eureka District and the Southern part 
of the State of Utah, where he was a beloved and trusted friend of all 
who resided in those small town. He was later manager of the Spanish 
Fork Branch. 

Walter D. Dixon joined the organization while still a lad, and 
worked up to head bookkeeper and office manager at the time of his 
death, 

LeRoy Dixon was a salesman and piano tuner prior to his call to 

the British Mission, 

Stanley L. Dixon became office manager and Sec, & Treas, 
Arthur Dixon Taylor worked as a cashier and bookkeeper, 
Lynn Dixon Taylor was employed in the Dry Goods Department 
Fred W. Dixon worked in the office as a bookkeeper, 
Donald M, Dixon worked, while he was going to school in the 

warehouse and on the delivery truck. 

Maurine Dixon Childs was employed as a cashier. 

Gladys Dixon Nelson was employed as a stenographer, 

Verl G. Dixon was a salesman in the Furniture Exchange Dept. 



There may be other Dixons who worked full time and many who 
worked part time which we do not have record of. 



WILDWOOD 
By Maria Dixon Taylor 

The main reason for our becoming a stockholder and building 
a cabin at Wildwood, Provo Canyon( North Fork as it was then called) 
was because of our love for the mountains and out-of-doors. Every 
summer our ^racation was spent either in Strawberry Valley or Provo 
Canyon, Our family was increasing and it worked a hardship upon me 
caring for the small children in a tent pitched on the hillside or near 
a stream. 

The summer of 1904 or 1905, T, N. and his family and ours to- 
gether with some young girls and boys, planned a trip to Bunnell's 
Fork, in the South Fork of Provo Canyon. Maud and I got together 
and decided we would not venture on this trip unless the boys built a 
tent, boarded on the sides and a wooden floor. This would protect us 
from the wifcd animals and those horrid rattle snakes, that infested 
South Fork. 

A few years before we were camped near the South Fork Creek, 
and a terrible storm arose which resulted in a cloudburst. We were 
afraid of being waahed away, but that was not the worst. One day my 
sister Alice and I were across the creek visiting Edith Holt. When 
Alice came back to our tent she saw a huge rattler coiled on our sack 
of coal, and my baby was asleep in the hammock. By this time our 
shrieks brought our friend Al Davis, to our rescue. Mr. Snake was 
crawling over a log underneath the hammock, where my baby slept. 
Al disposed of the snake in a short time, but every woman in camp 
vowed she would not wait until the husbands came up at night. We 
bribed Al to crowd all the women and children into his covered wagon 
and take us to Slick's (Vivian Park) in time to catch the train for Provo. 

When we arrived at Smoot's Station, Provo, and telephoned the 
men, they were certainly disgusted to think a poor snake would cause 
such a lot of trouble. The men had to make a special trip to the Can- 
yon to get all of our belongings which we had left behind. 

So now I have told the reason for our demanding the protection, 
and I imagine the expense and effort of having all of the lumber haul- 
ed up the Canyon and put together only to be torn down and hauled back 
again in two or three weeks. It had the desired eff ect on Tom and Art 
for seeking a permanent spot where they could build permanently and 
not have to tear down and build up each season. 

When the proposition of buying the Taylor Ranch in North Fork 
came along, they readily accepted. 

In June of 1906, a group of men and some women met at the 
George I. Taylor Ranch in North Fork, Provo Canyon, to select lots 
on which to erect tents and later cabins as summer homes, for their 
families . 



31 



32 



WILDWOOD 



I think Alfred Osmond and Eddie Holt were responsible for the 
idea of purchasing this ranch for summer homes, for the use of their 
families and friends. They enjoyed fishing, especially on the North 
Fork Creek, which brought them in contact with Mr. Taylor. When 
he was approached about selling, he was agreeable and willing, so a 
Company was formed and secured the rights and title to about two 
hundred acres of ground, as I remember correctly. A portion was 
selected to be divided into lots. Each lot was numbered and the num- 
ber placed in a hat to be drawn. 

This drawing took place on a Sunday in June. I was unable to be 
present, but my husband, Arthur N. Taylor drew lot number one, 
where our cabin now stands. All property below that was to become 
a recreational ground. Edith Holt was there and she arrived home be- 
fore my husband and phoned to me and said, "Rye, I don't want you to 
have the lot Art drew; it is nothing but a river bed with big boulders 
as big as a range on it." Of course when my husband came home I 
was furious for keeping such a lot. He only laughed and said not to 
get excited, for he had already hired Bro, Kofford to take his team 
and wagon and haul the big rocks from the place, adding that he was 
sure I would be delighted with the location when I saw it, I have al- 
ways been glad we kept it, for I think it one of the choicest spot* iii 
the canyon. It has taken many, many years of expense and labor to 
make it what it is. 

Before Clarence went into the mission field, he used a little 
truck and hauled over a hundred loads of soil onto the front yard, fill- 
ed up a deep ravine, and when it was level enough he planted lawn. 

We built a 12 x 14 ft. frame and put a tent over it. In the front 
of the tent we laid a large platform. At the west end we had a small 
sheet-iron stove which had an oven, but not very desirable and reliable 
for good baking. We had a crude table made from a packing box with 
two long benches on each side. This was our kitchen. The tent serv- 
ed as a bedroom with two sanitary couches, which took the place of 
beds since there was no room for chairs. Our flour and provisions 
were kept under the bed. In case of rain, anyone touching the tent 
often caused it to leak. 

I came up the canyon in July and stayed into September as I was 
expecting a baby and my home was being remodeled. I was very glad 
to have my "mountain retreat" where I could be away from the confu- 
s ion. 

During August, the Tabernacle Choir, under the direction of 
J. R. Boshard, had an encampment here for nearly a week. They 
brought the removable floor from the parquet of the Opera House (now 
the Armory) which was placed over near where the duck pond is now. 
Here they gave concerts each night and also dances. As there was 
plenty of wood close by at that time, they made huge bon fires for light 



WILDWOOD 



33 



while the entertainments were going on. 

One morning the children of the camp were playing, jumping off 
the platform, barefooted. My little boy Henry was about three years 
of age, and he was trying to do what the others did; but he jumped in- 
to the hot ashes of the bonfire, and his feet were badly burned. Large 
blisters hung from the soles of his feet. One of the women in camp 
grabbed a bucket of molasses and put his feet in it. She said we must 
keep the air from the burns. Well, if it didn't help it did no harm. 

The transportation was quite a problem. The first time we came 
up was in a wagon which was heavily loaded. We had to bring every 
thing we expected to use during the summer. There were many steep, 
rocky dugways. I think Springdell dugway was the most dreaded. It 
was not only steep, but big boulders made it hard for the horses to 
pull a heavy load. 

There have been many changes in the thirty-nine years I have 
been here. The first year and some time after, the road came across 
from where the bridge now crosses the North Fork Creek, over and 
near the Rock House, then around the hill to South Fork. The pasture 
ran down to the river bank. Near Claude Ashworth's cabin, the creek 
separated and formed a small island. Some of the young boys with 
their 22 rifles, shot some rattle snakes near there. On the hill to the 
East, they saw many rattlers, so they named this hill Rattle-snake 
Hill. On this same hill we used to gather choke cherries. The road 
up North Fork went through the center of this resort, 

George Scott, Sr. had a cabin and worked a mine about 2-| miles 
up the creek. It was necessary for them to drive their teams right up 
the stream, over the large rocks and over very rough roads. There 
was more horseback riders than teams going up. We found this condi- 
tion very dangerous; many times our children, playing out, narrowly 
escaped injury from these reckless riders. The Company, realizing 
the danger, petitioned the County Commissioners to make a public 
road around the hill, which wasn't too good at first, but since the Timp- 
anogos Hikes, the Alpine Summer School and the scenic loop through 
American Fork Canyon, a very good road has been made. 

The first year I stayed here until late in September, never going 
home once during the entire summer. When I arrived home I was very 
happy to find many improvements. The most appreciated was a mod- 
ern set of indoor plumbing. 

On the 18th day of November, our family was overjoyed to wel- 
come a baby girl. The four boys now had a baby sister, who they had 
wanted so long to welcome. We named her Alice Louise, 

One of the problems of this canyon home was the milk situation. 
Every family had small children, which needed fresh milk daily, I de- 
cided the only thing to do was bring a cow, although I had never learn- 
ed to milk one. We had a small Jersey cow, which was quite a pet and 



34 



WILDWOOD 



very gentle. After many attempts I finally decided I could do the job 
even if I was no expert. When it was time to move to our summer home, 
two of my small boys or a friend, were called at four o'clock in the 
morning, and with a lunch put in a flour sack and a rope around the 
cow's neck, they started on their long trek. On one of these occasions 
Clarence and his cousin Donald Dixon were making the trip and when 
they got to the Springdell dugway, the cow made a bolt over the dug - 
way; both boys hanging onto the rope, and they went over with the cow. 

We had a nice large pasture and the grass was so fresh and 
green; this with the aid of a bran mash gave us a very good, rich milk. 

The boys would go to the pasture with me and catch the cow and 
stand by while I did the rest. 

There were many children in camp and many suffering from 
summer complaint. I couldn't give my own children the milk when I 
knew others needed it so badly. Many times I have measured it out in 
tea cups so that each could have a little. 

When other cows came into camp and I had some extra milk I 
put it in pans and saved the cream which was put in a fruit jar with a 
rubber ring and lid and shook until little balls appeared. In this way 
we had our own fresh butter. 

After two years of living in a tent, we had our present home 
built. In the fall of 1908, my brother Charles hauled the lumber and 
slabs from the saw mill in Strawberry Valley. That fall the bedroom 
was closed in so that we were able to store our mattresses and other 
things. 

The next spring, on the llth of May, my fifth son Clarence was 
born. I had what they called milk leg and was quite ill. I told my hus- 
band I knew if they could take me to the canyon, I would gain my stre- 
ngth much faster than what I was. By July 1 was walking with the aid 
of a crutch, and after we reached Wildwood,My husband had to lift me 
from the buggy and carry me into my new home. My baby was only two 
months old, but no queen was more proud of her palace than I was of 
mine. For it was now all built up with slabs and screen all the way 
around. I knew no snakes or wild animals would molest me. But in 
a few nights I had another thought coming, fori heard a terrible scrat- 
ching noise; soon I heard it on the screen, and as the moon was bright, 
I saw a huge RAT trying to get in. I covered my head and tried to be 
brave (for my husband was not with me; he only came up on Saturday 
evening) and did not want to make the girl that was staying with me, 
nor the children become frightened. But the torture I went through, 
no one will ever know. Only those who have had the same experience 
can realize my horror. I would chill, then perspire until day light 
then Mr. Rat would leave and find other quarters. 

I had only been in the canyon for about a week when I discarded 
my crutches and soon got strong and well again. I have seen many 



WILD WOOD 



35 



people and children come up feeling sick and go home feeling well. 

Each year our numbers increased. The first year we were here, 
Bert Eastmond (later Prof. E, H, Eastmond, the artist) and his moth- 
er lived in the Rock House, and he said he would like to buy a lot if 
they would let him have his choice. He wanted to be where he could 
look down the canyon and see the wonderful view of the mountains from 
his door. This ground had been set aside for recreational purposes, 
but they granted his request and since then have sold two other lots to 
Ashworths and Dr. Calderwood. 

Another thing that worried me was thunder and lightning. I would 
be so frightened I could scarcely speak, when the children would cling 
to me and say, "Mamma will we get struck? Are You frightened? " I 
put on a bras^e face and said, "What is there to frighten you? Don't 
you remember what our caretaker, Mr. Noon told us; that as long as 
we had screen near us, lightning would never come through." ( I 
think he told me that as he knew how I felt not having my husband or 
any older person around). But it had the desired effect, and my child- 
ren have often boasted to others that their mother was not afraid of 
anything. 

Most people lived in tents for the first year or two. T.N.Taylor 
had the first cabin. When we built our cabin, it was the largest place 
in camp. When it rained hard, I could not go to sleep and feel com- 
fortable, for I knew so many people in the camp were in leaky tents. 
I had a large old fashioned umbrella I kept for emergencies. I usual- 
ly took the umbrella or sometimes a quilt, and went to the different 
places. Where the families were getting wet, we would roll the child- 
ren up in the bedding and bring them to my cabin and put the children' s 
beds on the floor; and the mother on the old sanitary couches. There 
was very little sleeping; we laughed, sang songs or told stories, and 
made a joke out of the stormy night. 

When I look back through the years, I can see so many amusing 
things, I think I could write pages. One incident is very outstanding: 

I had a very dear neighbor. She was a great deal larger than I 
and should have been braver, but that was not the case this time, I 
had been in bed some time when I heard a voice calling, "Aunt Rye, 
are you awake?" I said, "yes, what is the matter." She said, "I am 
sure there is an animal trying to get in this cabin. I lighted the coal 
oil lamp and stepped out onto the porch, but could see nothing. I told 
her to get ready and come over. I held the lamp and one of the funniest 
sights I think I ever saw came into view. First Maud, in her night 
clothes, with bare feet which made it hard for her to walk, came carry- 
ing her large feather bed in her arms, and behind her was a very tall, 
lanky girl with her hair in two braids down the back. Then came Mary 
and Delenna, all carrying pillows, quilts, etc, I insisted on Maud 
taking one of the beds, but she said, "no, just let me lie on the floor 



36 



•WILDWOOD 



where I can be safe and I will not envy the queen on her throne." Words 
can never describe these little incidents, but I can still see them and 
have a good laugh anytime, all to myself. 

We all had children, that was one reason why we loved our sum- 
mer homes so much, we did not have to be on a nervous tension about 
keeping them spic and span. They all played together and were very 
congenial and happy. I never heard any of them use bad language nor 
have I seen a very bad fight, 

I think that one of the most outstanding things about the people 
of Wildwood was their willingness and desire to want to share with 
each other. In case of sickness or trouble, they were right there to 
assist in every way possible. 

During the thirty- seven years I have been comiag to Wildwood, 
I have seen many persons who were ill, regain their health again. One 
of the first good examples was my brother, John. 

One time while we were yet in the tent, before our cabin had 
been built, my sister-in-law, Sarah, phoned from Salt Lake and asked 
if they could come up the canyon. John had typhoid fever and had suf- 
fered a relapse. They were living in Salt Lake at that time, since 
John had been elected State Treasurer. Even though he was ill, he had 
so many callers, including the Governor and other State officials, that 
it was getting too much for him and the Doctor advised Sarah to take 
him right away from the City, where he would be quiet. I told her how 
we were living in this tent, but if they could manage I could. 

The morning they came on the Heber Train, it was pouring down 
in torrents. One of the campers said he would meet the train and help 
them to the tent. It was only a short distance, and with the aid of um- 
brellas and blankets they made it to the tent without getting too wet. 
We put John to bed and tried to make things as comfortable as possible, 
in our crowded quarters. After a few days he was able to be up and 
became extremely hungry, having been denied food for some time. 

One day we were cooking nice slices of ham, and corn on the 
cob. While we were eating he came to the table and took a helping of 
both. Sarah and I expected him to die, but nothing happened, in fact 
he began to gain from that time, and in seven days time he had gained 
seven pounds. 

Sometime before buying our share of stock in Wildwood, my hus- 
band had been speculating in mining stocks, I was very much opposed 
to it, as we had no money to lose. So after buying into Wildwood, he 
promised if Iron Blossom paid a dividend he would build me a cabin, 
so that the children and I would be comfortable in the canyon. The 
mine did pay a dividend and I got my comfortable cabin in the mount- 
ains, one of my most cherished possessions. 



37 





Wildwood Tennis Court 





Tubing on Provo River 



39 




Arthur N. Taylor Cabin 
Wildwood 




CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION 
OF 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON FAMILY ORGANIZATION 



/, DA VID S. MONSON, Lt. Governor/Secretary of State of the State of 

Utah, hereby certify that duplicate originals of Articles of Incorporation for 

the incorporation of 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON FAMILY ORGANIZATION 

duly signed and verified pursuant to the provisions of the Utah Non-Profit 
Corporation and Cooperative Association Act, have been received in my office 
and are found to conform to law. 

Accordingly, by virtue of the authority vested in me by law, I hereby 
issue this Certificate of Incorporation of 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON FAMILY ORGANIZ/^TION 

and attach hereto a duplicate original of the Articles of Incorporation. 
File #078753 




IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have 
hereunto set my hand and affixed the 
Great Seal of the State of Utah at Salt 

Lake City, Utah, this L?*-„„ day of 

SeB tembe r A.D. 19 7^3. 



LT. GOVERNOR/SECRETARY OF STATE 



..LEO In Vnh brflft* U. 

:•=.... o '-^ • -'y^RTicLES OF INCORPORATION 



of 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON FAMILY ORGANIZATION 



The undersigned, acting as incorporators of a corporation 
under the Non-Profit Corporation Act of Utah, adopt the following 
Articles of Incorporation for such corporation. 

ARTICLE 1 
Name 

This family organization shall be known as the Henry Aldous 
Dixon Family Organization. 

ARTICLE 11 - 

Term 

The corporation shall be perpetual unless sooner terminated 
by law, or under such terms and conditions as may be hereinafter 
referred to, 

ARTICLE 111 



Corporate Purposes 

The purpose of this corporation's existence shall be lawful 
purposes set forth in and provided for by the State of Utah but 
particular emphasis shall be placed upon the following specific 
purposes to carry out the intent of this corporation: 

A. The activities and pursuits of this corporation shall be 
guided by and be consistent with the principles of re- 
ligious belief of The Church of Jesus Christof Latter-day 
Saints and particularly as such religious teachings em- 
brace and direct genealogical research. 

B. To lay the foundation through genealogical and other 
research and activity either by or in behalf of said 
corporation, for the performance of special religious 
ordinances in the appropriate Temples of The Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

C. To educate the membership and others with a knowledge 
of the history and family traditions in the genealogical 
lines of the membership. 

D. To engage in and to hire specialists to engage in genea- 
logical and historical research anywhere in the world 
pertaining to family history. 



E. To prepare or cause to be prepared genealogical records 
and information strictly in accordance with requirements 
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for 
fulfillment of its religious requirements with regard thereto. 

F. To compile current records and establish a means for per- 
petuating such records of the ancestors, present contem- 
porary descendants, and future descendants of Henry Aldous 
Dixon. 

G. The above purposes shall not be construed as limitation in 
any way upon the activities of this corporation and it shall 
be entitled to pursue any or all of the purposes cited in or 
provided for in such statutes. 

ARTICLE IV 

Members 

The corporation shall have members. All of the descendants of 
Henry Aldous Dixon are eligible for membership in this corporation. 
Each descendant may become a member thereof by submitting to the 
Secretary a written statement containing his name, address, and a 
showing of relationship to Henry Aldous Dixon. 

ARTICLE V 

Shares of Stock 

Shares of stock evidencing membership in the corporation shall 
not be issued or required. 

ARTICLE VI 

Annual Meeting 

An annual meeting of the members of this corporation shall be 
held at a time and place determined by the Governing Board. 



ARTICLE VII 



Governing Board 

The property, business, and affairs of the corporation shall be 
managed by a Governing Board of Trustees of no less than three (3) 
or more than 14 in number. Trustees need not be members of the 
corporation nor residents of the state of incorporation. The initia 
Governing Boar^-^hall consist of five (5) Trustees. The names an 
addresses of .tj/e initi 




The initial 

The names and 

f the Governing Board are:__ ~ ,,1 

Address 



Ml 



o 

( Ut . 



-2- 



The Trustees of the Governing Board shall be elected by the 
members at the annual meeting. Except for the initital Govermng 
Board, the term of office of the Trustees of the Govermng Board 
shall be one (1) year and until their successors have been elected 
and qualified. A Trustee may be removed by vote of the members, 
A vacancy in the Governing Board may be filled by the affirmative 
vote of a majority of the remaining Trustees, though less than a 
quorum of the Governing Board. 

ARTICLE VIII 



Officers 

The officers of the corporation shall consist of a President. 
Vice-President« Secretary. Treasurer, (any others as desired) 
who shall be appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the Governing 
Board and who shall exercise such duties as authorized by law and 
as the Governing Board shall prescribe. Any or all of the offices 
may be held by the same person. The initital officers of the corporation 
are; 



President 



Verl G.. Dixon 

342 North 500 West, Provo, Utah 84601 



1st Vice-President 



2nd Vice-President 



Robert N. Dixon 

121 Inglewood Drive. Orem. Utah 84057 
Donald R. Dixon 

4112 Crestview Avenue. Provo, Utah ^4601 



Secretary 



Treasurer 



Lois D. McEwan 
2292 North 100 East 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 84062 

Clarence D. Taylor 

2130 Temple View Drive, Provo. Utah 84601 



ARTICLE IX 



Incorporators 

;et ^dress of each of the incorporators is: ^ .'^ 

^^^^ 

Address -^f^pyT^^ Olfi f\ 



ARTICLE X 



Initial Principal Office 

The initial principal office of the corporation is in care of 
Clarence D. Taylor, 2130 Temple View Drive, Provo, Utah 84601. 

ARTICLE XI 

Termination and Dissolution 

No part of the proceeds from the sale or distribution of assets 
of this corporation shall inure to any individual thereof. If said 
corporation shall for any reason be dissolved,- the assets shall be 
transferred to a non-profit corporation with similar purposes to 
those provided herein. 



DATED this 




Incorporators 



STATE OF 



County o 



) ss: 



an( j^^^g£;,/Vj^^ J? f/^ L/C-^f2- i being each first duly sworn, deposes 
and says, that he is one'bf the incorporators named in the foregoing 
Articles of Incorporation of Henry Aldous Dixon Family Organization; 
that he has read the same, knows aiytTunder stands the 9erf^tents thereof, 
and that the statements contained^therein a.re tr/ 




[JBSG] 



SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me th 
19 




.,v..^xxx PUBLIGp ^ 
Residing a t W^^T^n/T? (_i JUA~~J 



My commission expires: 




50 



DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL COMPANY 



The first furniture store in Provo, started in pioneer days, 
was owned and operated by George Taylor, His son, Arthur N. Taylor, 
with a group of young Provo business men, in the summer of 1921, or- 
ganized the DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL COMPANY. Arthur N. Taylor 
was the President and Manager; Albert F. Dixon, Vice-president; 
Sidney W. Russell, Sec, & Treas. ; and Orson G. Bird, J. W, Howe, Jr. 
and William D. Norman were Directors. The Company received its 
charter to do business on October 6, 1921, and opened the doors of its 
first store, in Provo - a three story brick building, at the corner of 
Third West and Center Street - on the First day of November 1921. 

Arthur N. Taylor, who had been in the furniture business for 
more than 30 years, believed that merchandise should be sold at one 
price to all - the lowest possible price - and that partiality and special 
favors to individuals should not be. This One Price Policy was the 
foundation of the Dixon Taylor Russell Co. Discounts were done away 
with. Goods were sold at the cash price, and if people desired install- 
ment payments , convenient terms were arranged and the customer paid, 
in addition to the cost of his merchandise, a small carrying charge 
covering the length of time he wished to run his account. 

This policy, for a furniture store, was revolutionary in this inter- 
mountain country at that time. It was a hard program to start with, as 
the publichad been schooled to trade for discounts. Every man, depend- 
ing on who he was, seemed to have a different purchasing power. It 
was not long, however, before the public realized that the Dixon Taylor 
Russell Co, was sincere in carrying out their policy of One Price to all. 
They saw that every man, regardless of whether he was a good friend, 
a rich man, a poor man, or a stranger, paid the same price, A child 
could go into the store and buy a bedroom set or any other item, and 
would receive the same deal as the most skilled traders. This policy 
established confidence with the public and brought increased business 
and resulted in a pleasing growth. 

Arthur N. Taylor also dreamed of a business that would bring 
furniture, house furnishings, and service into the rural communities 
at prices as low as could be had in the larger cities and trading centers. 
In order to do this, he could see that a large buying power in carload 
lots direct from the factory was necessary. It would be necessary also 
to have a display in the smaller towns where it would be convenient for 
the people to see the things offered for their homes. 

This started the opening of Branch Stores in : Springville, Nephi, 
Payson, Pleasant Grove, Spanish Fork, Heber, American Fork, Price, 
and Helper. 

By the year 1 929, < ten stores and three districts were in operation 
in Central, Eastern and Southern Utah, Carload shipments were roll- 
ing constantly direct from factories to the Provo warehouse and from 



51 



52 



DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL CO. 



that point distributed by company trucks to the branch stores. 

In November of 1946 a warehouse on railroad trackage at the 
corner of 5th South and 5th West was purchased and three large ware- 
house buildings were constructed. Furniture and furnishings were ship- 
ed in by carload lots and were emptied directly into this spacious ware- 
house. Company trucks then distributed the merchandise from here to 
the stores. 

Other services rendered were: A large drapery workshop, em- 
ploying ten to twelve women who made up curtains, draperies, slip 
covers, etc. 

An upholstering shop, employing eight men who reconditioned 
and rebuilt furniture. 

A shade shop, making up custom made window shades. 

A furniture repair shop for the repair of broken furniture. 

A refinishing shop for reconditioning damaged surfaces and mak- 
ing new finishes and color effects on furniture. 

An appliance repair shop for installing and repair of major home 
appliances. 

A floor covering service department of ten men to install linol- 
eum, carpets, tile and other floor coverings. 

Trained decorators to advise on the decoration of the home with 
draperies, floor coverings, wallpapers and furniture. 

After a fire on July 20, 1963, which did considerable smoke 
damage to the building and merchandise, business was never the same. 
So, after nearly forty-three years of operation, the Board of Directors 
decided to cease operation of the Dixon Taylor Russell Co. 



Some of the Dixon and Taylor family members who helped to 
make D. T. R. Co. so successful were: 



Arthur N. Taylor 
Albert F, Dixon 
Harry A. Dixon 
Arthur D. Taylor 
Lynn D. Taylor 
Elton L. Taylor 
Henry D. Taylor 
Arnold Dixon 
Alice T. Nelson 
Erma D, Boshard 
Clarence D. Taylor 



O. K enneth Taylor 
Eldon A. Dixon 
John A. Taylor 
Robert N. Dixon 
Henry D. Taylor, Jr. 
Douglas W. Dixon 
Ethel S. Taylor 
James S. Taylor 
Paul S. Taylor 
Kent G. Taylor 



D . T. R. : LIKE LOSING AN OLD FRIEND 



( Taken from TODAY"S EDITORIAL in The Daily Herald 
Thursday April 30, 1964.) 

Before the year 1964 has faded away, the merchandising oper- 
tion of one of Central Utah's best-known business institutions, Dixon- 
Taylor-Russell Company, will have been concluded. 

Announcement by the firm some time ago that it will go out of 
business brought atinge of sadness to thousands of Central Utahns who 
have been customers at onetime or another during the nearly 43 years 
DTR has operated. 

It may take the company two or three years to complete all the 
busines s phases of its operation, including settlement of credit accounts . 
But in keeping with the announced liquidation plan, the furniture and 
appliance operation already has been turned over to McMahan' s , which 
has leased the three-story brick building constructed by the D. T, R. 
founders. 

The Provo store will continue to operate until draperies, floor 
coverings and giftware are completely liquidated and until a backlog 
of work contracted, such as draperymaking, is finished. As for the 
branch stores, DTR has sold out its interest in American Fork; the 
Spanish Fork store will close July 1; and the Payson branch will op- 
erate until the liquidation has been completed. 

It takes a lot of courage, vision, and know-how to launch a bus- 
iness as Arthur N, Taylor and a group of young associates did when 
they formed the Dixon Taylor Russell Company, built their store, and 
opened the doors for business November 1, 1921, 

It isn't easy either, to close an institution of this kind. It isn't 
easy to make the decision that had to be made, nor to liquidate the 
business which has meant so much to so many. 

One of the most difficult sides to the liquidation, insofar as the 
owners are concerned, is the necessity to release trusted employees 
who have served so long and so faithfully. "However, we are happy 
that many of our key people already have been able to secure other 
positions," one of the top DTR men said the other day, 

Arthur N. Taylor, whose father George Taylor had operated the 
first furniture store in Provo in Pioneer days, was the first president 
and manager of DTR. The "Dixon" was the late Albert F, Dixon, vice- 
president; and the "Russell" was Sidney W. Russell, the original sec- 
retary-treasurer and now vice president. 

Arthur D. Taylor, now president and manager, was one of the 
original organizers. He, as well as Henry D, Taylor, secretary- 
treasurer and assistant manager; Clarence D. Taylor, assistant sec- 
retary-treasurer, Lynn D. Taylor and Elton L. Taylor, directors, 
are all sons of the original president and manager. 



53 



54 



DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL CO. 



Dixon Taylor Russell, which celebrated its 42nd anniversary- 
last November, began to branch out after two years of operation. 
Its first branch store was opened at Springville February 1, 1924. 
Then followed expansion that included stores atNephi, Payson, Pleasant 
Grove, Spanish Fork, Heber, American Fork, Price and Helper. Thus 
by 1929 there were 10 stores. 

The depression in the Thirties closed three stores. There were 
seven still operating when the store observed its 25th anniversary. 
After that a branch store was opened in Orem. 

Now, with the American Fork interest sold out and the Spanish 
Fork store to close July 1, only the Payson store and the parent store, 
now operating in the east section of the Provo building, will be left 
after mid-year. 

DTR, over the years, won a reputation for sound, honest dealings. 
With men of high character and business training at the helm, it earned 
the trust and confidence of the public. 

What the company has meant to the economy of Central Utah is 
another story in itself. Through peacetime and war, prosperity and 
depression, DTR provided jobs and payrolls. 

As liquidation proceeds, the Herald salutes Dixon Taylor Russell 
and the men and women who made it the fine business institution it has 
always been. 



DIXON REAL ESTATE CO. 



In a small one room office, upstairs over the entrance to the 
Farmers & Merchants Bank (290 West Center Street, Provo), in 1909 
the Dixon Real Estate Company was organized and began selling real 
estate and insurance to the citizens of Provo by LeRoy Dixon. 

For two years before his mission call to Great Britain, LeRoy 
had been associated with the W, H. Ray Real Estate & Loan Co. Here 
he had become well trained in the handling of real estate and loan trans- 
actions. 

Shortly after the business was started, LeRoy invited J. Elmer 
Jacobsen to join him as a partner in the business. Elmer accepted 
and it continued as such until the untimely death of LeRoy in 1926. 

From the very start the business was successful, not always 
making "piles of money", but in making lasting friends who were at- 
racted by LeRoy's magnetic personality and his genuine desire to be 
of service to other people and to help them with their personal prob- 
lems, regardless of cost or time. Like his older brother, John De- 
Grey Dixon, people liked to do business with an honest, ambitious and 
well qualified, intelligent businessman. It soon became one of Utah's 
best real estate organizations. 

LeRoy Dixon became an authority on property values in Utah 
County. With the organization of the Provo Building & Loan, he be- 
came one of the incorporators and was its first real estate appraiser. 
He represented his business and the City of Provo by joining and be- 
coming active as a Director of the American Building & Loan Ass'n. 

For many years, the Dixon Real Estate Co. was sole represent- 
ative of the Beneficial Life Insurance Co. in the making of real estate 
loans in Utah County and also as a sales agent for their life insurance. 

In about 1921 the upstairs office over the Bank was too small to 
handle the large volume of business and number of customers, so the 
building at 240 West Center Street was purchased from George Taylor 
Sr. and completely remodeled and a second story added, giving a spa- 
cious and modern real estate office. 

Elsie Ross Whitaker, an English Convert, was the bookkeeper 
for the Company for many years. Just before Henry D. Taylor went 
on his mission to the Eastern States, he was employed and became 
qualified to start his own real estate business after graduating from 
college. In its earliest years of existence, LeRoy's brother Albert 
F. Dixon became a salesman for the Company. 

Upon the death of LeRoy Dixon, the surviving partner, J. Elmer 
Jacobsen bought LeRoy's share of the partnership and incorporated it 
as Dixon Real Estate Co. , InCo The good will and Dixon name is still 
used to this date, ( February 1980) and at the same location. 



55 



FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANK 



In 1906 John DeGrey Dixon was living in Salt Lake City, serving 
as secretary to the State Land Board. This job had been offered him 
upon finishing his ternn of office as Secretary of State of Utah. 

His very close friend and business partner, Thomas N. Taylor 
of Provo, had written him asking him to join in organizing a bank in 
Provo. This John consented to do, so the Farmers and Merchants 
Bank was organized with a capital of $50, 000. The first officers were: 
Thomas N. Taylor, president; Homer J. Rich of Salt Lake City, vice- 
president; John D. Dixon, cashier; John F. Bennett and William R. 
Wallace, directors. A new building was built on the corner of Center 
Street and Third West. 

As Cashier of the Bank it was John D. Dixon's responsibility to 
oversea all operations of the Bank, including the approval of all loans. 
His desk was strategically situated in the front of the Bank, near a 
large plate glass window overlooking Center Street. There were very 
few men, women or children who passed that window, who did not get 
an acknowledging nod or hand wave from the personable John D. Dixon. 

It has been said that the genuine interest John D. Dixon had in the 
welfare of his customers, that if he felt a loan detrimental to that cus- 
tomers best interest, he could turn down the loan and still retain the 
good will of the customer and keep him as a friend. 

The Bank continued to prosper and grow. It increased its capital 
from 50, 000 to $100, 000. Paid a stock dividend of $25 , 000. Paid a 
dividend every year, from the first year. Space for the bank was dou- 
bled with an addition to the north of the building and the interior of the 
building was completely remodeled. It was one of the best looking small 
banks in the State. 

Arnold Dixon had worked for some time in the Utah National 
Bank in Salt Lake City and had gained considerable banking experience 
there. With the opening of the new bank in 1906, in his home town of 
Provo, he became a bookkeeper and worked up to the position of cash- 
ier during the twenty- six years he was employed at the bank. 

At the time Dr. Fred Dixon Kartchner was born, his father, 
Asael Kartchner was a bookkeeper at the bank. He and his wife, Rose 
thought so much of John and Sarah Dixon that they gave the Dixon 
name to their last born baby. 

Upon the sudden and unexpected death of one of the banks found- 
ers and chief officer, John D. Dixon in 1923, the Board of Directors 
requested Henry Aldous Dixon assume his father's position. 

With the great "depression" of 1932, the bank was forced toclose. 
It was later re-opened and eventually merged with the Walker Bank of 
Salt Lake City as a Branch Bank. 



56 



SOUTH FORK CATTLE CO. 



For a good many years, a group of the young folks from Prove 
had spent many happy times hunting, fishing, riding and vacationing in 
the South Fork of the Provo Canyon. Some had even contemplated build- 
ing themselves permanent summer cabins in the South Fork area. 

There had been only three or four homesteads taken up in this 
area, and a group of these young Provo men could see the great pos- 
sibility of buying up two of these homesteads, one from Oscar Mann 
and the other from a Mr. Long, thus opening up a large area for the 
grazing of cattle. The water rights were on the homesteaders land, 
and a vast area of Government grazing land adjoined. 

In the latter part of 1903, John DeGrey Dixon, LeRoy Dixon, 
Ernest Dixon, Charles O. Dixon, Arthur N. Taylor, Thomas N. Taylor, 
and Ashted Taylor and others organized the South Fork Cattle Co. A 
beautiful young herd of bald-faced cattle was purchased and Charles 
O. Dixon was appointed as manager, with his brother Ernest as his 
as sistant. 

To supplement this summer range in the South Fork, eighty acres 
of land was purchased west of Spanish Fork, where enough hay could 
be raised in the summer to feed the cattle through the long and hard 
winters. 

W. W. Ercanbrack and Tholnas Lewis offered the Company a 
very good proposition for the purchase of their holdings which was ac- 
cepted by the Compjtny, thus ending the existence of the South Fork 
Cattle Co. 

TAYLOR INVESTMENT COMPANY 

In 1906 when the Farmers & Merchants Bank building at the cor- 
ner of Third West and Center was being constructed, the lot to the east 
of this new building was purchased by the Taylor Investment Co. , a 
partnership comprised of John D. Dixon, Thomas N. Taylor, John F, 
Bennett, W. R. Wallace and Arthur N. Taylor. 

The purpose of this organization was to acquire and manage real 
estate, A two story brick building was built on this vacant lot and a 
long time lease on the ground floor was entered into with E. D. Firm- 
age, manager and partner of the J, C, Penney Co. of Provo. The up- 
stairs was converted into offices. Congressman J. Will Robinson and 
his brother Robert Robinson, lawyers, were long time tenants in the 
offices at the front. Dr. Walter D. Hasler was a long time tenant of 
another suite of offices. 

This proved to be a very profitable venture and each year return- 
ed a very good dividend to the members. 

The partnership was later converted to a corporation and gradual- 
ly changed hands until at the time of the re-organization of the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank in 1932, the Bank acquired all the stock and event- 
ually liquidated the Taylor Investment Co. 



57 





•J 










u 


< 

■ 




z 


« 




< 






> 








I 




J 
til 


« 


HOI 


o 


1 


LU 


z 






UJ 


111 








-i 




a 


e 


a 


c 


Q 




to 





c - u. 



c > 



X c 



c 



c 
a 

g > 




O 

' D 
I 

.3 



— Q«3 O 



>r 

(- 
a: 
u 



2 



I UJ 

<< o 



X 

C < < 
O C Ul 



91 
id 



Q 

c X 

I- o 
o: -> 

. u 

2 -I 



o o 



IT 

-I - Q. 

_l 

_) ^ir 
6 



o 



Si 



to ^ 

O 2 t 

u > 



C 

u < 

ft o 

u. o 

2 m 

< 

3 < 

, CO 



IT 

J UJ 



WILDWOOD RESORT COMPANY 
On the fifty year charter issued by the State of Utah in June of 
1906 when the Wildwood Resort Company was incorporated, the follow- 
ing nannes appeared: 

Edward H. Holt William Rawlings 

Alfred Osmond Caleb Tanner 

Thomas N. Taylor Elbert H. Eastmond 

Arthur N. Taylor E. D. Partridge 

John C, Swensen W, Lester Mangum 

Joseph B, Keeler Alfred L, Booth 

John Saxey Clair Reid 

The last three persons above listed, did not build on a lot in 
Wildwood. Others who built cabins or tent, frames soon after the Com- 
pany was organized were: 

John D, Dixon John E. Hayes 

Arthur Dixon Dr. Christensen 

George Startup Dr. H. G. Merrill 

Mose Gudmanson LeRoy Dixon 

J. W. Dangerfield Leslie Cockrell 

Caretakers of the Wildwood Resort and who lived in the old Rock 
House included: 

E. H. Eastmond and his mother. 
Bro. Koffard and his family. 
Mr. Noon and his family. 

Mr, Brooks, Section foreman for the railroad and his family, 

Y, M. Offret and his family who lived there for 36 years. 

A plat of the lots in Wildwood as of July 7, 1959 is shown on the 
opposite page, which also shows the original owners and subsequent 
owners. The lots outlined with a double line, had improvements on 
them prior to 1920, All others have been built since that time. 

WILDWOOD LOT OWNERS 

A list of the original lot owners in Wildwood and their subsequent 
owners down to the present: 

Commencing at the South end on the East side of the road: 



LOT #1 A. L. BOOTH LOT # 5 

William B. Ashworth 

Claud Ashworth LOT # 6 

Dean Ashworth 
LOT # 2 ELBERT H. EASTMOND 

Dr. J. C, (Laura) Clark 
LOT #3 DR. W. CALDERWOOD LOT # 7 

Dr. Da Costa Clark 
LOT # 4 ARTHUR N. TAYLOR LOT # 8 

Arthur N. Taylor Estate 

Dixie T. Frampton LOT # 9 



THOMAS N. TAYLOR 
H. Rex(Delenna)Taylor 
ALFRED OSMOND 
Mrs. Alfred Osmond 
Irene O. Spear & Nan 

O. Grass 
WILLIAM S. RAWLINGS 
Ashael Fisher 
EDWARD H. HOLT 
Paul Holt 
CALEB TANNER 
Ida Tanner Hamblin 



41 



Wildwood Lots 
LOT # 1 



( Cont'd) 



South end, 
LOT # 1 



LOT # 1 1 



LOT # 1 2 



Albert F. Dixon 

Paul Ashworth 

Dr. Grant Y. Anderson 

J. Clifton Moffit 
Robert L. Hamblin 



Lester R. Taylor 

Philip Taylor 
LOT # 13 DR. H. G. MERRILL 

A. G. Brockbank 

Dr. Creed Brimhall 
LOT # 14 J. W. DANGERFIELD 

Isaac Brockbank 

Helen Weech 
LOT # 15 ARTHUR DIXON 

Arnold Dixon 

Monroe Paxman 
LOT # 16 JOHN D. DIXON 

Fred L. (Maud) Markham 
LOT # 17 GEORGE STARTUP 

Ernest Dixon 

Vern Whiting 



LOT # 1 8 



LOT # 19 



Dr. Thomas L. Martin 
Dr. Stanley Clark 



LOT # 2 



LOT # 3 



LOT # 4 



LOT # 5 



LOT # 6 



LOT # 7 
LOT # 8 

LOT # 9 



Victor J. Bird 
LOT # 20 LESLIE COCKRELL 

Dr. L. Weston Oaks 

Ralph Reed Olsen 
LOT # 21 DR. LLOYD CULLIMORE LOT # 10 

Orville Ellsworth 
LOT # 22 HARVEY R. STAHELI LOT # 11 

Chester Oliver 
LOT # 23 IVAN W. YOUNG 

Merrill Chr istopherson 

LeRoy Johnson LOT # 1 2 

LOT # 24 DR. MADISON W. MERRILL # 13 
LOT # 25 WAYNE BOOTH LOT f 14 

ROCK HOUSE - South end, West side. 

George I. Taylor ranch house # 15 

Wildwood caretakers home LOT #16 

G. Byron Done LOT #17 

LOT # 18 



West side of road: 
JOHN C. SWENSEN 
Fred C. Dust 
Ruby Clark (D.Spencer) 
Fae C. Cartwright 
Bruce Hafen 

Jacob Coleman 

John Booth 

Wilson (J.J. ) Booth 

Ruth T. Kartchner (Fred D.) 

James Pierpont 
Thomas Cordner 
EDWARD D. PARTRIDGE 
Franklin J, Madsen 
Ruth M. Bracy 
JOHN SAXEY 
Marion R. Taylor 
Richard Taylor 
JOSEPH B. KEELER 
Jesse W. Johnson 
J, W. Dangerfield 
Sidney W. Russell 
Carol Gray 

DR. D. K. CHRISTENSEN 
LE ROY DIXON 
Verl G, Dixon 
MOSE GUDMUNDSEN 
Clarence Hawkins 
Clifton Tolboe 
Taylor Eastmond 
Grant A, Fisher 
JOHN E. HAYES 
Fenton Miller 
TRACY Y. CANNON 
Frank Speckhart Sr. 
Phil Speckhart 
Mary J, Shipman 
RONALD DIXON 
ARNOLD BOSHARD 
MAURICE DAVIS 
Catherine N. Smith 
FRANK SPECKHART, Jr. 

DR. WENDELL VANCE 
DR. J. WEIGHT -G. BALLIF 
Dr. Jesse Weight 



42 



BRICKERHAVEN 



With so many members of the Dixon and Taylor families being 
the pioneers in organizing, acquiring, developing and owners in this 
Corporation, a history of its origin may be of interest. 

Lynn Dixon Taylor writes: "In the spring of 1918 B, Y, U. was 
asked to send a contingent of men to an Officers' Training School at 
the Presidio in San Francisco, along with most of the other Universi- 
ties of the Western States. Several of the younger faculty men joined 
our group (who were mostly freshmen) and we joined the camp which 
was already in progress. We were scattered thru the entire regiment. 
The camp was disbanded in September and we were returned to the 
B. Y. U. campus to form the nuclfiEsiB of the SATC. " 

"The Armistice was signed in November and we were mustered 
out shortly after. We resumed schoolwork and classes and most of 
the fellows still wore their uniforms during the year. Several of us 
who had been very close friends were drawn even closer by our Army 
experience and we decided to have a series of social affairs. The only 
clubs in school at that time were geographical clubs such as the Ariz- 
ona Club, the Canadian Club, etc. We organized our club and some- 
one suggested a name -- a new term just coined--which was very fam- 
iliar to us from our Army experience and somewhat of an epithet as 
well. When anyone tried to pass the buck or by-passed an unpleasant 
detail he was called a "goldbricker, " It was customary to facetiously 
call each other "goldbricker s. " 

"The new Club was given this name and became a recognized soc- 
ial club on the campus. Notices of meetings were read along with other 
announcements from the rostrum. We had a reporter on the Y News 
and a page in the Banyan. At that time we had a membership of approx- 
imately twelve men." 

"We began having initiations and we really thought they were some- 
thing. " 

"Other clubs began to be formed and the school authorities de- 
cided they were obnoxious and must be abolished from the Campus. 
In accordance with the request of President Harris, our group agreed 
to discontinue its organization in school. Arrangements were made 
for a big funeral. The dance programs were edged in black and an ap- 
propriate obituary was . inscribed. In front of the orchestra a coffin 
was placed with a large gold brick inside. One of the dance numbers 
was a formal march of the mourners to the tune of a funeral dirge. 
The next day a coffin was discovered in the hallway of one of the office 
buildings down town and created quite a furore. The boys who had 
rented the coffin had failed to return it properly. " 

"That was Saturday night. The next day was Easter Sunday and 
we resurrected the club down at the Roberts Hotel. Inasmuch as sev- 
eral of us had been graduated from School and were working downtown 
we reorganized the club as a down-town club with regular luncheon 



43 



44 



BRICKERHAVEN 



meetings at the hotel. The students who had belonged were dubbed 
"Nuggets" and were special guests. In fact at all luncheons and dances 
they were "paying" guests. Thus the club functioned off the campus 
until it was invited back under the school's social unit system." 

"Certain occasions became important annual affairs. Perhaps 
the climax became the annual canyon week-end. Prospective members 
were goated the last week of school and staged the canyon party. They 
did all the cleaning, bed making and cooking for the entire group. Each 
night they put on a program for the entertainment of the group. The 
last night they were taken thru the final rituals. These parties were 
held at Wildwood and were wonderfully successful." 

"The good time enjoyed at these canyon parties developed into an 
urge to buy some property where old Brickers could build cabins and 
perpetuate the school time comrade- ships which had become so close. 
Twenty- five acres of choice property at the back of Timpanogos, above 
the Mutual Girls' Home was purchased on a contract and payed out 
monthly with the regular club dues. A number of summer homes are 
now located on this site known as "Brickerhaven" and the old time 
friendships stU per sist. " 

In May of 1926, three members of the Goldbricker Club, an off- 
campus organization, but comprised mainly of B. Y. U. students, were 
delegated to meet with Scott P. Stewart, Sec. & Treas. of the North 
Fork Investment Co. , owners of approximately 2000 acres of land in 
the North Fork of Provo Canyon. These three members, Lynn D. 
Taylor, William J. Snow, Jr., and Victor R. Taylor, were charged 
with the responsibility of selecting the most desirable site in all North 
Fork on which a summer Haven or retreat could be established with 
summer homes for the Alumni and a club house or lodge for the un- 
married active school members, 

January 18, 1927, a contract for the purchase of 15.5 acres of 
land from the North Fork Investment Co. was signed by Lynn D. Taylor, 
William J. Snow, Jr. and Victor R. Taylor. 

It was not until July 19, 1928, that the Articles of Incorporation 
for Brickerhaven Country Club, a non-profit corporation, was filed 
with the Secretary of the State of Utah. 

In the summer of 1930, members of the Utah and Sharon Stakes 
and a group of fifteen Brickers, were able to complete a rough graded 
road up to the white clay deposits, which was about halfway to the new- 
ly acquired Mutual Girls' property. 

With the advent of the "depression" and other factors, it was not 
until 1938 before an automobile road was constructed to the East line 
of the Brickerhaven property. A roughly graded road along the creek, 
then circling back among the trees on the upper level was bulldozed in 
June of 1938. 

The following year the first cabin to be built at Br ickerhaven was 
started by Lynn D. Taylor. For culinary water, he dug into the south 



BRICKERHAVEN 



45 



hillside and developed a spring which he piped into his cabin. Kerosene 
lamps and candles were used until 1951 when the electricity was made 
available by the extension of the power lines from the Mutual Girls 
home. Clyde and Sarah Dixon Summerhays had just built their summer 
home. Clyde and Lynn each guaranteed to pay a minimum payment of 
$3 per year for the next five years in order to get this power. 

At the annual stockholders meeting held at Brickerhaven onAug-" 
ust 19, 1950, the stockholders authorized the officers to proceed to 
amend the Articles of Incorporation. The Amended Articles of Incor- 
poration was accepted by the Secretary of State and a new certificate 
issued October 28, 1950. 

1, Briefly, this amended articles of incorporation changed the 
name from Brickerhaven Country Club to Brickerhaven Corporation. 

2, It amplified the purpose and objectives of the non-profit 
organization. 

3, It added the office of vio- president and defined his duties. 

4, It provided for a Board of Trustees to consist of between 
five and nine members. Their three year terms of office to be stag- 
gered. 

5, Qualification of new membership consisted of at least a two- 
thirds favorable vote of existing members. Previous membership was 
limited only to members of the Brickers or Nuggets Club. 

6, Action to be followed for termination of membership. 

7, Period of existence was changed from 50 years to 99 years. 
With the filing of the plat plan of lots and in order to meet the 

County zoning ordinances, a new arrangement of lots was necessary^ 
Where formerly there were 100 lots, the new plat provided for only 
30 lots. 

Beginning in 1961, the total acreage of Brickerhaven has been 
enclosed with a chain link fence, with locked gates on both the East 
and West ends. 

Among family members and relatives who pioneered Bricker- 



aven were: 




Dwelling Construction: 


Lynn D, Taylor 


O.Kenneth Taylor 


L. D. Taylor 


1942 


Rulon S. Dixon 


Grant A, Fisher 


Summe rhay s 


195 


Victor R. Taylor 


Ivan W. Nelson 


Brown 


1951 


Elmer Baddley 


El Roy Nelson 


Keeler 


195 2 


Fred Markham 


Richard McKay 


Austin 


1958 


Paul S, Dixon 


Clarence Taylor 


Chr istensen 


1961 


Henry D, Taylor 




Clark 


1964 


Fred W. Dixon 




E.P. Taylor 


1965 


Donald M. Dixon 




Mayfield 


1967 


Clyde J. Summerhays 




E.R, Nelson 


1967 


Harold W. Brown 




H.D. Taylor 


1968 






Edwards 


1969 






Firmage 


1970 






McKay 


1977 



• fCe CUWNG ' 

woodcut by Ciare Leighlon 



PROVO ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. 



In the early days of Utah, small, perishable foods, such as meat 
and milk were kept from spoiling by placing in a small screened box 
which was generally located in the shade of the house or a tree. 

The early settlers built a storage cellar , cons isting of four thick 
walls of rock or logs, a dirt floor and a dirt roof. It had a low door 
and at least one window (small) to provide circulation. The dirt floor 
was excavated from two to four feet below the surrounding ground level. 
In this storage cellar, fruits, vegetables, meats and other foods were 
kept cool in the summer and did not freeze in the winter. 

Fish caught on the upper Provo River or at Strawberry or quite 
adistance fromhome always presented the problemof preserving them 
until they could be taken home and made available to the families. 
On the lumber wagons which hauled lumber from the Strawberry Valley 
saw mills and which required two or three days' journey to Provo, the 
fishermen would wrap their catch of big, red salmon trout and native 
trout in their bed rolls. At night the sacks containing the fish were 
hung out in the cold night air; then in the morning they would be again 
wrapped in their bed roll, which served as an insulation against the 
heat of the day. Thus they were able to preserve part of their catch 
and were able to distribute fish to their families or amongst their 
friends. 

Later as more people Irved in the cities and were not required 
to store their produce which they had raised on the farm;but purchased 
most of their foods from the stores, an ice chest was utilized for the 
preservation of their perishable foods. 

This ice chest came in many sizes, but generally it was a rec- 
tangular box about x 2' x 4'. It was an air-tight chest with at 
least two doors. One door on top provided access to the ice chamber 
where a block of ice was placed. The cold air from the ice circulated 
down to the food chamber located underneath the ice chamber, and 
which had its separate door in the front of the chest. Heavy insulation 
was used in the walls of the chest to retain the cold air created by the 
slowly- melting block of ice. Ice was delivered daily, or not less than 
every other day, during the hot summer months. 

Those persons living near a lake, a river, or a pond were very 
fortunate in being able to harvest their own ice in the winter time and 
store it in their own ice- storage buildings which were well insulated 
with sawdust. When the water in the ponds had frozen to a depth of 
from one to three feet, large saws were used to cut the ice into large 
squares and they were stacked inside the ice house and let freeze 
into one solid chunk of ice. Sawdust was then placed on the sides, and 
on the top of the ice which insulated and kept the ice from melting. 

In the summer, a person would climb up on top of the ice and the 
sawdust, uncover the top layer of sawdust, break off a chunk of ice. 



47 



48 



PROVO ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. 



wash off the sawdust and put it in the refrigerator, the icecream 
freezer, a tub of cold water for cooling beverages , or for whatever 

use they might have. 

T^rovo had two large commercial ice companies, the Allen Ice 
Company and the Prove Ice Company. The Allen Ice Co. had two large 
ice houses and an ice pond in the area of Sixth West between Sixth 
and Eighth North. The Provo Ice Co. was located at Twelth North 

and Second West. 

In 1905 LeRoy Dixon was instrumental in organizing and incorp- 
orating the Provo Ice & Cold Storage Company. The old grist mill 
which had been built by John Mills and later owned by James Smith, 
was purchased together with its water power rights. 

With the incorporation of the Provo Ice & Cold Storage Co. they 
built a brick building between the D. & R.G.W. Railroad tracks and 
the Mill Race. This building was equipped with compressors and mach- 
inery for freezing of water into ice each day. By this method, very 
little storage space was required. 

The machinery, compressors and pumps were run by water 
power from the Mill Race. A large wooden flume was extended to 
the north towards the old Dixon Brickyard, where the water was divert- 
ed from the Mill Race and provided sufficient height to drop the water 
onto a water «heel to turn the machinery in the Lee plant. 

Later the water power was augmented by a steam boiler and 
eventually was used exclusively for their source of power. 

As I remember from my visits to the Plant, there was a large 
three-story storage room on the south end of the building. Extending 
north from this storage building was a story-and-a-half building. The 
lower portion of this building contained a huge brine tank about five 
feet deep. The tank was divided into sections of about 2' x 3' feet. A 
2'x3' wooden block was placed on top of the tank, which made a wooden 
floor when all the blocks were in place covering the brine tank. 

A 2'x3'x5' foot metal container was filled with "drinking" water 
from a near-by spring, or if necessary "distilled" water was used. 
An overhead crane carried this container of water over one of the floor 
blocks. The floor block was removed and the container of water 
was lowered into the brine tank and left there until the water became 
frozen. The frozen container was then lifted out of the brine tank, 
by the crane. These 300 pound blocks of ice were emptied onto a shoot 
and slid into the storage room or slid outside onto the west platform 
for loading into delivery wagons , railroad freight cars, or fruit cars 
which were on the railroad spur, along side of the wooden platform 

The ammonia-filled cooling pipes which were interwoven all 
through the big brine tank, were extended into the large storage room 
on the south end of the building, where the temperature was kept 
down near freezing. On a hot day, it Was most delightful to go into 
this big room and cool off, but only for a short time. At times dur- 
ing the year this storage room was completely filled with surplus 



PROVO ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. 



49 



blocks of ice, meat, apples, vegetables and many other items which 
were perishable products and needed preserving. 

Vere Olsen was the manager of the plant, LeRoy Dixon was the 
president. Ray Brown was the chief engineer. 

In the summer time the Provo Ice & Cold Storage Co. would 
hire six or eight men to drive a horse and wagon loaded with ice and 
deliver this ice to the homes of the residents of Provo and Springville, 
Kids of the neighborhood would gather around the wagon to pick-up 
some ice chips to cool their dry mouths. 

An ice deliveryman's main equipment consisted of a pair of ice 
tongs to pick up the ice, a sharp ice pick to cut the huge cakes of ice 
into a size which would fit in the ice chest; a pair of scales to weigh 
the ice which was delivered ( for the ice was sold by the pound), and a 
waterproof apron which was strapped to the back of the deliveryman 
to protect him from the ice water which melted from the cake of ice 
he carried on his back from the ice wagon to the ice chest in the home. 

With the introduction of delivery trucks, the ice operation was 
spread to all towns of the County. It previously had been pretty much 
confined to the Provo-Springville and Heber Valley areas. The latter 
received its delivery daily from the Heber Branch "Heber Creeper " 
of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, 

With the introduction of the electric refrigerator, the home use 
of ice for cooling foods was doomed. 




58 



SOME OF THE DIXON FRUIT FARMS AND RANCHES 



The Dixons have always had an attraction to the good earth, 
especially farms and ranches, going back to 1820 when John Henry 
Dixon organized 11 families with 27 children into the Dixon Party for 
the purpose of each family obtaining a hundred acres of land from the 
British Government in the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. 

When Henry A. Dixon was asked by Brigham Young to go to 
Provo as secretary to the Provo Woolen Mills, one of the first things 
he did was purchase a quarter of a city block from William A. Follett 
to build a home for his family. This building lot was just one-half 
block from his work, on Second North between Second and Third West, 
and in the Provo Third Ward. 

On March 20, 1878, William Follett received a patented deed 
from the U.S. Government for 130 acres of land in Section 36. Part 
of this land was later sold to Henry A. Dixon and became known as 
the Provo River Brickyard Farm. This farm was left by will to 
Sarah DeGrey Dixon and later sold to S. H. Belmont for the Provo 
Brick & Tile Co. 

On July 23, 1880, the President of the U.S., Rutherford B. Hayes, 
issued a deed to Henry A, Dixon for 80 acres of land in Section 24, on 
the West side of the Provo River at about 3700 North. This farm was 
left by will to Aunt Mary S. Dixon. 

In Grandfather Dixon's will, dated October 27, 1879, he bequeaths 
to his wife, Sarah DeGrey Dixon the Provo River Brickyard Farm, 
situated in Sec. 36. And to his wife Mary Smith Dixon, the Farm on 
Provo Bench in Sec. 24. He also deeded 20 acres of land on Provo 
Bench to his wife, Mary Smith Dixon's children. 

For years these farms furnished the two widows and their fami- 
lies with fruit and vegetable for sustenance, and pastureland for their 
cows and horses. Since Grandfather had bequeathed two lots with the 
buildings theron in the Third Bishop's Ward to Sarah's children, the 
children of AuntMary desired to have their ownhome for their mother, 
so they sold their 20 acres of land on Provo Bench and built a home 
for their mother in the First Ward. 

Mary and Sarah had lived together to long to be separated, across 
town, so Mary's children built their mother a new home just one 
block West of the old Dixon homestead and in the Third Ward. Aunt 
Mary lived in this home the remainder of her life, and her oldest son 
William, bought the home and lived there the rest of his life. 

From their early farm experiences, it was just natural for the 
Dixon boys to own land of their own. 

John D. Dixon became one of the largest producers and shippers 
of fruit in the State of Utah. At one time he and his family owned 
nearly 110 acres of fruit trees on Provo Bench, and shipped out of the 
State, 19 railroad cars (about 12, 000 bushel) of peaches to the Eastern 
Market, one year. The forty acres of land on which the Orem Civic 



59 



60 



DIXON FARMS & RANCHES 



Center is now located, was one of John D. Dixon's peach farms. 

Arthur Dixon and his brother-in-law, Arthur N. Taylor, pur- 
chased a newly planted orchard on the crest of the hill Northwest of 
Provo, in what is now Grandview. About half of this farm was planted 
with peach, pear and apple trees. The remainder of the farm was in 
alfalfa, beets, grain and a large area for a garden. It was in this 
garden plot that Maria Dixon Taylor ( Aunt Rye) raised some of the 
earliest peas and corn in this area. She had a standing order with 
John T. Taylor Grocery Store to supply him with the season's earliest 
peas and corn. Her "golden bantam" corn was the first of this variety 
introduced in this area. 

During the fruit harvesting season, many of the relatives, neigh- 
bors and friends made their services available to pick, sort, pack and 
ship the fruit to the Eastern and West Coast markets. 

A two story packing shed was built which became the center of 
activity; in the receiving the fruit from the orchard, the sorting and 
packing and boxing the fruit; mingled with the chatter and shouting of 
orders, requests, directions and gossip. It was a great relief and 
feeling of accomplishment to see the last refrigerated railroad car 
pull off the railroad siding for the Market, 

The Slate Canyon Farm having been willed to the children of 
both Sarah and Mary became the property of Sarah's children when 
they purchased the one-half interest from Mary's children. Before 
Charles O. Dixon acquired the farm, it had been rented out and was 
more of a rock pile than a farm, raising only a little hay. Charles 
hauled off tons and tons of rock and planted most of it in orchard. He 
produced some of the finest strawberries and vegetables in the area. 
This farm being located at the end of the East Union irrigation canal, 
a full stream of water was never assured. 

The South Fork Cattle Company is written up in another chapter 
of this book. 

In 1917 the Dixon Brothers acquired about 10,000 acres of native 
sagebrush land on the Blue Bench of Duchesne County, near Tabiona. 
They had made the first water filing on the Moon Lake and made plans 
to construct canals to bring the water onto the undeveloped land. 

A herd of milk cows was purchased in Utah Cotuity and driven to 
the Reservation, under the direction of Ernest Dixon. Here they would 
locate their dairy herd, milk the cows and sell and deliver the milk 
and cream to the milk processing plant in Duchesne. 

In order to meet the every day living expenses for the first few 
years, Ernest contracted with the Knight Investment Co. to construct 
buildings and "breakup" uncultivated ground for them. 

Pioneer living was experienced by the Ernest Dixon Family, 
which consisted of Erma, age 17; Leah, age 14; Verl, age 8; Ralph 
and Ronald, age 5; Edith, age 2; with their mother. May, and father 
Ernest; all cramped into a one room log cabin. The wind drifted the 



DIXON FARMS & RANCHES 



61 



sand everywhere. Water had to be hauled in. There was no green 
grass or trees or electricity or indoor plumbing. Just miserable, 
blowing, drifting sand. 

To get the cows milked, morning and night, all who were able 
had to pitch in and help. 

During the day while her father was plowing, Erma drove a four 
horse leveler, in order to help get the ground in shape for planting. 
It was Erma and Leah's job to drive a "white top" wagon and deliver 
the cream to the Creamery. It was Verl's job to herd the cows. 

After a year of this "pioneering", Ernest and his family moved 
back to Provo. No further improvements were made to the property 
and during the "depression", when money was so tight, the taxes were 
not paid, the land was sold for taxes and the water filings were lost. 

Later, oil was struck on this property. 

In 1 932 construction work came to a stop. Work became so 
scarce that Parley S. Dixon decided to get a farm where they could 
raise something to eat and thus help their family. They traded the 
house they were living in for a 15 acre farm in Orem, Utah, which 
was planted in fruit trees. 

For three years there was no brick work for Parley or his boys. 
The fruit on the farm provided the food and necessities that kept them 
living comfortably. 

During those depres sion years there was very little money avail- 
able; so in order to dispose of the fruit. Parley would load up a truck 
of fruit and go out to the Reservation, where they did not raise fruit. 
Here he would trade the fruit for anything he could use. Returning 
home he would trade these products for other commodities he needed. 

Arnold Dixon and family moved fromGrandmother, Sarah DeGrey 
Dixon's old home on Fifth West to a newly constructed home at eighth 
North on Fifth West, and which had an acreage of apple and prune 
trees on it. Here he built a barn, three large chicken coops which he 
filled with 2,000 chickens. The raising of fruit in the orchard was a 
secondary consideration. He sold hundreds of dozen eggs each week. 

Besides a cow, a Shetland pony for the kids, he raised white 
Collie dogs. During the dark days of the depression he lost the farm 
and moved into rented houses. 

The youngest Dixon girl, Hattie, married a well respected con- 
tractor and rancher, George Washington West. He owned a large 
ranch at Colton, just out from San Bernardino, California. This was 
a large operation and provided living quarters right on the ranch for 
the employees, which consisted mainly of Mexicans. Uncle William 
Dixon and his family lived on the ranch for a short time when he was 
an employee. Fruit and nuts were the chief crops raised on this 
ranch. 



62 



DIXON FARMS & RANCHES 



After Sarah DeGrey Dixon's boys built her new house at 270 
North Fifth West, she desired that her only daughter, Maria, live near 
her; even as her mother had persuaded her yovmgest daughter and her 
husband, Henry A. , to live next door to her in Salt Lake. So Sarah 
arranged with her family that "Rye" trade her one-eighth interest in 
the old homestead on Second North and Third West and her undivided 
interest in the Slate Canyon Farm for the South half of her lot adjoin- 
ing her new home on Fifth West. 

It was here at 256 North Fifth West, on the South side of a lane 
that serviced a large, red brick, jointly owned barn, that Maria Dixon 

Taylor and her husband, Arthur N. Taylor, built their home next 

door to Grandma Sarah DeGrey Dixon. 

Skipper Bay Farms: 

John D. Dixon, LeRoy Dixon, Aldous Dixon and Arthur N. Taylor 
spearheaded the creation of the Skipper Bay Drainage District, on the 
shore of Utah Lake, for the purpose of reclaiming land for farming. 
A good part of this land was normally under water in the early part of 
each year, and produced nothing more than cattails, bull rushes and 
carp. 

This reclamation district covered the land North of the mouth of 
the Provo River, extending along the Lake front to the "green knolls" 
then East to the high ground of Lakeview, then South to the Provo 
River and West along the bank of the river to the Lake. There were 
about 607 acres of land in the district. 

An 8 foot high dirt dike was thrown up along the Lake front with 
a moat behind it to collect the water so that it could be pumped back 
into the lake by a large gasoline operated pump. 

With the tmusual high runoff of water in the Provo River in the 
Spring of 1920, the river overflowed its banks, below the Lakeview 
highway bridge and washed out the dirt dike from its unprotected back 
side, allowing the lake water to flood back into the low lands of the 
Skipper Bay. 

Some of the other farms and ranches, but not all, for there are 
many others, are: 

Vern Dixon and his son's Mink Ranch in Lindon. 
Vern Dixon's Edgemont Farm 

Leah Dixon Ford's Turkey Ranch in Hobble Creek. 
Elton Taylor's Farm in Lakeview. 
Maurine Dixon Childs' Ranch in Diamond Fork. 
Douglas Dixon's Farm at Spring Lake. 




G. Smith, F, Salt, K, Taylor 

A. Taylor, Leona Smith 
Nellie Smith, Maria Taylor 

, Leona Taylor 

C.Dixon, Arthur Taylor 
Elton Taylor, Lynn Taylor 

, Henry Taylor 

Clarence Taylor, Alice 
Taylor, Roy Taylor 

Pictures taken by 

Walter D. Dixon 



Picking & Packing Peaches 
Hillcrest Farm 





63 




"Old Mike" Rulon John D, Dixon 




64 



THE DIXONS and EDUCATION 



The prominence and support of education in the lives of members 
of the Dixon Family in the City of Provo and particularly of former 
Superintendent of Schools Henry Aldous Dixon TI, prompted the Provo 
School Board of Education to name a new Junior High School in honor 
of the Dixon name. 

The Dixon Junior High School was built on Second North between 
Seventh and Eighth West, which was within the boundaries of the orig- 
inal Provo Third Ward. Architect for the building was Joseph Nelson. 

Many of the younger grandchildren and great grandchildren of 
Henry Aldous Dixon I, who lived in Provo, attended and graduated from 
Dixon Junior High School, 

The art of teaching in the Dixon Family can be traced back to the 
Rev. William Boardman, who was Master of Grammar School at Black- 
burn, Lancaster, England. He left the school in 1819 to serve as the 
first Colonial Minister to the 1820 Settlers at the Cape of Good Hope, 
South Africa. 

In the new settlement, the Rev. William Boardman not only serv- 
ed as Minister to the spiritual needs of the settlers, but he contributed 
to the education of their children. 

In 1825 he was appointed Minister and Master of the Grammar 
School at Bathhurst, C. P, , South Africa. He also established another 
school at Cuylerville, C. P. , South Africa. After his death, the Bath- 
hurst School was run by his eldest daughter, Mary, and her husband 
W. J. Earl. 

The father, of John Henry Dixon the 1820 Settler to South Africa, 
Thomas Dixon in about 1780 was school master at St. Anne's School in 
West Ham, England. 

Henry A. Dixon was manager of the Provo Branch of Z.C„M.I. 
in 1882 and it was under his supervision that a new two story brick 
warehouse building on South University Avenue was nearing completion 
in March of 1884, at a cost of $11, 134. 11. 

Permission to use part of the building to house the B. Y , Academy 
had been made in April of 1884 and negotiations were underway when 
Henry A. Dixon was stricken with pneumonia on April 28, 1884, and 
died on May 4, 1884. 

Henry Aldous Dixon II was appointed Superintendent of the Provo 
City Schools in the summer of 1920, succeeding L. E. Eggertsen. He 
previously had been an instructor at Weber Junior College from 1914 
to 1918 and served as its President in 1919-1920. Later he served as 
President of Weber State College from 1937 to 1953 and then as Presi- 
dent of Utah State University at Logan, Utah, 

Upon the sudden death of his father, John DeGrey Dixon, cashier 
and executive officer of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Provo 



65 



66 



THE DIXONS AND EDUCATION 



Aldous was requested by the Bank to fill the vacancy of his father as 
managing vice-president of the Bank. This necessitated his resigning 
as Superintendent of the Provo City Schools at the close of the school 
year of 1924. 

That year the Provo High School annual publication, "The White 
and Green" was dedicated to the retiring Superintendent, as follows: 

" DEDICATION " 

" To our Superintendent HENR Y ALDOUS DIXON who has 
successfully piloted us through four short years of happy school life; 
whose love for all that is good and noble has inspired us to make and 
attain the glory of higher ideals; whose happy smile has cheered us on 
to victory in the tasks we have undertaken; and who has made our lives 
richer for having known him, we sincerely and graciously dedicate 
this Year Book. " 

Again in 1932, Henry Aldous Dixon was appointed Superintendent 
of the Provo City Schools and served until 1937 when he was appointed 
President of Weber State College. 

Below is a list of the FIRST and SECOND generation(after Grand- 
father Dixon) Dixons and their spouses, who have been teachers and 

Provo City Schools, Weber College, 

Utah State Univ. , B.Y.U. 
Timpanogos School, Provo, Utah 
B. Y. Academy 
Provo City Board of Education 
B. Y. U. 

Grantsville High, B. Y, U. 
Timpanogos School, Provo, Utah 
Pleasant Grove High, Pi. Grove, Utah 
B„ Y. U. 

Provo High, Granite High 
Franklin School, Provo, Utah 
Spanish Fork High 

Univ. of Oklahoma, Univ. of Illinois 
Provo High School, Provo, Utah 
Wallsburg, Rose Park, S. L. C. 
Weber High, B. Y. U. 

Russell Sage, Denver U. , Univ. of Utah 
Lincoln High, Orem; Granite & Olympus. 
B. Y. U. 

Gunnison High, B.Y.U. , Oakland, Cal. 
Maeser, San Bernardino Schools 
Paige, Indianola, No. Ogden, Utah 



administrative educators: 

Henry Aldous Dixon II 

Lucile Knowlden Dixon 
Etta Dangerfield Dixon 
Arthur N. Taylor 
Lynn Dixon Taylor 
Celestia J. Taylor 
Maurine Goodridge Taylor 
Rulon Sterling Dixon 
Maud Dixon Markham 
Fred L. Markham 
Rhea Dixon Reeve 
Fenton Reeve 
Royden James Dangerfield 
Alta Hansen Taylor 
Leah Dixon Ford 
Fred Walter Dixon 
ElRoy Nelson 
Donald Maiben Dixon 
Verl Grant Dixon 
Allie Dixon Gardner 
VaLera Dixon Ririe 
Edna Dixon Ballif 



THE DIXONS AND EDUCATION 



67 



Mark S. Ballif 
Ruby Dixon Cowley- 
Wayne Cowley 
Maurine Dixon Childs 
Ethelyn P. Taylor 
Stella Dixon Lewis 
Ruth Taylor Kartchner 
Fred Dixon Kartchner 
Alice Dixon Andrews 
Robert Bruce Andrews 
Owen George Dixon 
Floyd Preston Dixon 
Lois Mai Dixon 
Robert Norman Dixon 
Nancy McConachie Armstrong 
Ruthe Mildenhall Dixon 
Eldon Arnold Dixon 
Bruce Royden Dixon 
Fulvia C. Dixon 
Mildred Dixon Tangren 



Ogden High School, Ogden, Utah 
Timpanogos School, Provo, Utah 
Provo High School, Provo, Utah 
Spanish Fork, Provo High 
Spanish Fork High, B. Y, U. 
B. Y. U. 

Franklin School, Provo, Utah 
Lyman, Wyo, 

Draper Jr. High, Farrer, Lehi, Calif. 

Duchesne Dist. , California Schools 

B.Y.U. , Long Beach, Cal. 

Vista Elm School, Simi Valley, Calif. 

Simi Valley Unified School Dist. , Calif. 

Timpanogos School, Provo, Utah 

Lafayette, Salt Lake City 

Provo, Las Vegas Schools 

Farmington, Intermountain Indian School 

B. Y. U. 

Juarez, Mexico; Rio Tinto, Nevada 

Del Rey School, San Lorenzo Dist. , Calif. 



AND OTHERS NOT MENTIONED 



Dixon Junior High School 
Provo City School District 
Provo, Utah 




Home of Rev. Wm. Boardman's First 
1820 Settlers Grammar School 
Bathurst, Cape Colony, South Africa 



68 



SEC TION III 



1— 'nOoo— aoui«tkUj 
o 



tT» Ul ^ OJ M O 



Ul i^i. 

ro 



roooorooiooro 



ro ro 
ro 



— ouijxojroi— 'O 



Z 

p 
o 



> 
►1 

3 



a. 



d r 

o -< 
D 3 



(!) H 

n 

n 
o 

3 
P> 

n 

3- 



> CO 
rr 3 

-« -< 



3 



> X 

3 ►I 

O ^ 

a. o' 



i t7 o 



(U o 

3 CD 

3 3 



H 
O 

o 



- C ^ C a - - (t) - - 3 (5 



^ > 

3 2, 

D 

S' 
o 

3 



1- ^ ^ 

53 «• 



o 1 
cr 3 

(6 (S 



D 

5' 

o 

3 



^ 2 

— 1 

5' 5>' 
3 

M 

to □ 

d S" 

§ =^ 

A) 



CO > 



Z 
W 53 



^ > 

r 



►1 



n d 
O 2 

3 (JQ 

3- r:; 
(t — 

a, 



3- 
c 

d 

O a 
^ d 

X 3 
O 
3 



2 3^0 



> 2-^ d 

>i O 

n 3 
a. 



2x 
^ o 



la >i cocou) 



3 3 



OOvOvDvOvDOOOO(»(»00(»<»00 00 00 00(»(»(»t»(»OOC»{X300(»OOC»00(»C» 

oooooovO'-o-x)vOvOvOs00oc»(»^-o^-j^^-j~j-j-vja^oom>;ku> 
i>jts)-''-'OOOooooouiuiroo4i.ro— (»-joui>tk(jii>»ro— 'OvO-vjuiroifktn 



n n 
3 3 



z > n 

O C P) 

H( CD CO 



►1 



rt- rt- r^ ID 



3" i-( (t 
^ ft> 1 



(t 



rt- 

to CO 



3 

" 3 J? 
P 



o 
c c 

CO (0 

(S (D 

1 1 

(5 (S 



> > 
3 3 

I I 

W CO 

> > 

O O 



E K to 

o o c o 

c c to c: 

to to • 



> 

3 
■< 

(A 
> 

n 



(t 



> 
3 



(t 



o 

(C 

1 

3 
p 
3 



C/2 
O 

c 
? 

3 

rt- 
P 

(t 

(a 



z 

p 



o 

(3 
P 
►i 



cn 
o 

> 

n 
p 

W 
►1 



p 

n 

P 

p 
►1 



n n 



ST' 2° 

n 
n 
a. 



d H 

P (6 

3 P 

n 

1 - 



H 5^ ►t) H 
n 
p 



p (t 
►1 P 



d3 



H 
(t 
P 
o 

3- 

(II 
1 



i6 .t 
M n 
o 
-1 
P 

rr 
O 



^ w > 

rt. C o 

to o 

(S p1 3 

r ^ p 

< 



H > 

(t o 
P r) 
o o 

3- C 

(T> 3 

■-1 

p 

3 



W I w o tn 2 

" p o (II o fT 
P 3 o 



3- 

O 

2, m (c 



3 c 

00 ^ |-|- 



M P (t, 

to O rtl 



3- 

p 



n 
to' 

3" 



p o '2 

(I 



3 (t 



p 

3 

n 
p- 

(8 



v-»i 



o o 

c c c 

CO to X 

ft (b 

t t i 



P (S (II (t 
3 



o 



o 
o 

i ^ n 

(0 ft ^ 



CO 00 

P 



o 

n TT 
1-1 n 

(D 

O (D 

o 1 
3 
(n 
1 

(B 



^ ° 



^ o 

3(11 

P T3 



« o 
3 



p 
3 

n 



p 



H 
►1 

n 



n 

o 
c 

3 



n 



p 
3 

n 



Z 
o 



Z 
> 



13 





to 


ro 



ro 





ro 
ro 

















ro 
ro 


ro 
lb. 









ro 
i-> ro 





ro 
ro 


ro 




-J 


ro 

vO 







>(x oJ 4^ 


d 
> 


Oct 


> 

C 

oq 


Z 

< 


n 
cr 


CD 

•u 


t-i 
C 
3 


(II 
*o 


> 

30 


P 
■< 





P 
1 


•0 


t-i 
C 
3 


p p 

■<! 





c 

3 


z 



< 


u 
^ < 


Z 

<; 


d 
(t 
n 


> 
1 


p 

3 


d 

n 



> 

T3 
►1 





rt- 


C 


Z ^ 2 

n (TI 

< 0- 





d 
> 

M 



> 

3 

(t 

a 

m 
i-( 
<_ 

n' 

(ii 



►1 

§■ 

P 

O 
o 
o 
c 
•o 
p 

5' 

3 

W 
(6 

O 
3 

a. 

p 



O 
o 
o 
c 

•D 
P 

O 
3 



O 



50 
cn 
H 

> 
Z 
d 

Cfl 

W 

o 
o 
z 
d 

o 
n 
z 

?o 
> 

H 
O 

z 



o 
z 



o 

a> 
1 



5" 

a. 
p 

rt- 
(S 
CD 



c 
o 

a 
s 

u 

u 

O 



V V 

u u 

R) (« 

0! a> 



(« 
•u 
c 
o 
u 

0) 

m H H 
c 
.2 

<4 

a, 
s 

^< 

c o 
0. w 



3 



< 

u 
3 

u 



< 



W 

"(5 



c 



o 

4) 



3 

D3 



o o 
•»-> 

u u 

o o 

Q Q 

"rt "(5 

u V 

2 2 



(4 












hi 

























ec 






a 






Q 






















u 







he 




Idei 


ra 


u 




u 






0) 





nl 














V 





3 





c 


U 








U 



X 

u 
rt 
o 

SM ^ *— " 



B aj ^ 05 

O i 

1 I < K 



£ 
E 

o 

X o 
n! rt 

2 2 



u 

X 

u 



rt 



n ^ u 

^ rt rt 

3 <U 4) 

2 H 



U 

e 

00 



o 
U 



0) i) 



0) v 



4) O V 4) 

o n 

3 3 

3 



n 01 
3 3 
O O 



I < I K « K I 



c ^ 

.2 S. 

U ^ <U li 

Oj U (U 

i: X ^ X 



rt o 



s 

o 
a 

g S .s 

rt 4) .5 



w H m H 2 





V 


4) 


<>l-l 














$ 




4) 


4) 


V 


ID 


n 


ID 


3 


3 


3 


O 


O 





X 




X 



c 

rt 



O 3 



e 
u 

> 

4J 
W 

"D 

4) 

£ 



> 
rt 
Z 



T3 
I 

I 



4) 

u n 

u V 

o V 

I. rt 



c 

0) 

4) 

a 

o 

3 

w 

I 

£ 
< 



o 
rt 

I 

£ 
< 



to 
e 



rt 



rt 

U 



e 

rt 

.2 
'i5 

? 
rt 



rt 
c 

41 

m 
rt 
W 



e 
2 



c 
u 
« 

■ 

ft 



X 
u 
c 

4) 



C 
rt 
u 

u 

< 

X 

3 

O 



X 

u 
c 

4) 



CO 

ri 

w 



X 



X 

s 

o 



CO ro f*^ CO ^ ^ ^ 
O O O O O O O 



2 ^ 

00 r~- 



•8 ^ 

g ^ 2 ^ 



O 4) 



rt rt 

2 2 



<M 00 <M O 

rj ^ N m 



3 ^ 







sD 












vD 


r~ 




CO 


00 


00 








o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 








O- 






o 




a- 






a- 
















> 






u 


>- 


>■ 


>- 


> 


> 




c 


bc 


> 


> 


X 


u 




&0 





rt 


a 


a, 


rt 


rt 


rt 








rt 


3 


3 








V 


a 


rt 


3 




2 


< 


< 


2 


2 


2 


Z 


Z 


2 


1-5 


< 


Z 


2 




< 


2 


< 


o- 


o 




in 








CO 


o 


CO 


O 


00 


in 


>£> 


r~- 


in 












M 






ro 




CO 










CO 








CO 


























ID 


IS 




(0 










ID 


T3 






ID 




ID 


ID 




ID 




;h 






« 






3 


41 


c 


c 


i) 


c 


4> 


41 


c 


4J 


3 


3 


T3 


3 


4J 


c 


rt 


X 


3 


4J 


o 





3 


3 


3 


3 





3 


X 


X 


4) 


X 


3 


3 


W 


H 


H 




2 


2 




W 


H 


H 


2 


H 


H 


H 




H 


H 





ro CO CO <M (M 






CO CO 



vn 

^ CO 



f~- v£> v£> >£> •— > 
^ CO ^ ^ « 



C g C 

0^0 

2 H 2 



4) 4) 



O O V 

Uh 2 2 ^ 



o 

VM 

4) 
bO 

c 
rt 
Q 

OQ 

w « 
2 £ 

< 

2 



rt 4> 



c 

o 



X c 



4) 



>- rt u c £ Ih 
O c; 3 0) 0) 
a J J I < > 



c Q 

41 

"D X ^< 



o 

O 



u 

.5 c 

n rt 

C 



r E 

rt W ^ £ 

o ^ w 

T3 CC C 

4) rt 3 

4) rt 

U< J o 



C X 

< D 



41 
C U 

u rt 



•a 

V 

u 

4) C 

bC O 

C X 

Q Q 

Q I 



u ^ 



c 5 

o 5 X 

CD B, 

2 ^ c 

, > 4) 

^ X 

c rz 

-r o rt 

rt 2 

H Q ^ 

4) C 

o o S 

i; o 

< < D 



CO •-• 



QC0C0\i>'^fnrO(\J.^f^w, 
^C0C0NOTf.-^»^,-,tM„ 



f<^T}>inf-<inmcorOinro 

ocT»>Tfr^vD^-^r-.-.t^ 



c o ^ 

o .5 ^ 

.Sort 

Q O 

c rt o 

rt 0< X 
u 



C — 4) 4) 



4) 
C 
4) 

6C _ 
3 — 
U < 



(4 

o 

>> 41 

H ± 2 



c 

u 
rt 



c 
c 
X 

Q .5 



K .IS 
c 


X 



— rt 



rt 
4) 
rt 

U > 



C 

o 

4, 

C Q 
Q < 

4) >~ 
U ^ 

rt 

h rt 

o a: 



>- 

rt 
X 

u 

V 

ii £ 

4) C 

:S 3 
•< w 

o o 

X .?< 

5 Q 

yr* rt 



rt 



2 § 

4) X 

^ 5 

C 4) 

rt ^ 



rt 

4) c 
M o 

Q D 
T! rt 

4> 
4) 



a; u 



ooi-i^vD-^'^.-ir^»-iT}> 



c 










V 










Vi 








e 


bO 
c 
rt 


ey 






lOXI 


H 








Q 


c 


o 











U 




c 




X 




c 





c 




c 





X 


rt 


D 


o 

X 


X 


5 


CQ 


ed 


5 


5 


TJ 


TJ 
U 


Idr 


by 


Iph 


nal 


rt 




3 


rt 


o 


o 


2 


a 


a 


K 




CO 


CO 










o 


in 


vD 


sO 






00 


CO 





Q tT m ^ 

2- „ ^ ^ 



•-•-^Jco^Jcoco^Jpoco^Jcofn^o^Ofo^o^n^^f<^^<^(«^TJ.r^T^-T}•TJ<•^}.Tt••«^-T}•Tt<ln 



■)(■ -Yr -If * ■> * -X- * * * ^ 



00 00 00 00 00 -J ~j 

W ts) — O sO 00 



-J -J 



0s CT\ t-^ * O 



— v£> 

o 

d o 
o c 

>i TO 

>l 
§ f 



oo~J-X)00ouia^-Joo 



» O 



2 s 

O 11> 



2 D 



2x- 

X o 

O 3 
3 

50 
o 

3- 
|u 
>i 
O. 
n 
o 

3 



2 CP w 

^« T s- 

• ft o -2 
t-, » a. 

a 

3 



< » a w 



1 rt- |U 
TO 3" CL 



o 

3 

W 
o 

ET 
TO 



O 

° 3 
3 = 

> o 

3 O 
X- TO 

a. n 
O D 

o o 

3 3 



§: H H ^ H H H 

O 3- =r J' 3- 3- 3- 
i\ C C n. C C u 



vo Ln tn — ro 



S S 2 D O Z 2 

p p (y n> n o jj) 













sD 


— 


OS 






(>> 




< 


O 


50 


















3 




rt- 






D 


on 


x' 


n 


a. 





G 




3 


>i 


r 


> 


n> 


an 


3 




n 


n> 


Di 


g 


1 


X 


X* 


01 


o 




O 


3 





3 




3 



0s 0\ QN 

OS m oj ro 



OsOOo-oosijirf^u)r\)'-'P 



^ i>> O 00 



'—CTs.t'.ISJO-^J'-'OJ 



o o 

3 3 



^ -J Ln 4^ rM 



> W 

3 rt- 

S 



w^kOOOO'-'OotsJ'— • 



C-l <-H C-l 

C P c 

3 3 — 



cn 






H 


c 






c 


3 






n 






u 


01 


ro 




ro 














> 




z 






o 


o 




1 


< 


< 



z > 



= > 

t-i 3 



tt W > 
< C 3 

t 2: 3 

d •< X 

5" 5* § 

^ 

q 

rr 3- ?J 

3 

n 



— W M 

O 00 O O 



S ? ^ 

P) O n p -p 



-sj 

-J 4^ Ln 



3 2 

° TO 

> a> 
3- • 



X 3 



n: > 

n 3 
(t •< 

!,d 

2 X- 

X o 

O 3 

HI i-( 

^ to 

3 O 
(t 3 



5^ ? 

2 

3 

01 3 
5' 

n 



3- 1 



t\) IS) IM rsJ 
-J ts) rsJ o ro 



t-t <-t <p> 

c c c ^ 



o 

IB 

o 

3 

3 
3 

n 



►1 



(I 



b CO 

o 



re ft 

IB IB 



IS) 

•-• O U» ~J 



^ »^ S H H S 
ft !? o S 5 33 

d 
- > 

S Z O > 
p ft o o -o e° 
^ u- < ^ n 

d 

O sO sO sD nD 

:^ - r- r- M 



vO sO sD v,0 nO sO nO sO ^-D nO ^-D sX) vO vO vO \C sX5 \0 sO sO \0 

wwL»Jts)rs)rs)r\)is)rs)rjrJcs)rors)'-''--''-'i--''-"i-''-' — "-'-'I-"'-' — 



IjJ (>) u> 



CB 

n 

9 
PI 
Qi 

M* 
P> 
P 



X 

n" 
p 



DD 

3* 



> 

3 

«< 

w 
c 

►J 
o 
•o 

A 



> > 

3 3 
I 

p 

n 



p ' 

n 



Z > 
p 1 

2. s 



> z 
^ < 

o 
n 

n 
ft 
I 

p 
r» 



ft 
p 

cn 

n 
n 



> 



> 
►1 

3 

ft 

CO 
a 
1 
< 

n 



a: d H sc H 



O 1 ft 

C P P 

IB 15 n 

5 ot, 

!. 3 

f>\ p) 
3 



ft 



O 
C 

IB 

3- ft 
ft < 
►( ... 



ft 



n 3- 
iu rt 

d 
o 
n 

o 
►1 



> K 
1 o 

O C 

cr CB 

ft ^ 

rt 



X ^ > X VI a X X X X X ^ X X X X 



rt 

P C 

y rt- rt 

1 " 2 



n ft 3 

O TO 

p 
n 



O OQ 

ft 

09 > 

ft 



ft p.. 
n 3 

»1 OQ 



o o o o 
c c c c 



ft ft ft rt rt 

1 1 1 1 t 
rt rt rt rt rt 



o o o o 
» c c c c 

^ OD ID OS IB 

rt rt rt ft 

TO H*^ I-*, 

1 a a n n 



X > X X "il. 
o Q- o o 
C < C C 3 

OO rt IB IB P 

ft 11 ft ft 1 

^ ^ ^ ^ 
::; 2. O 

ft j3 ft rt 
TO n 
C 

•o 

p 



W HI Cfl 

ft JD 

m 3 
ft 



p 



p 



rt 



ft 



2- S 

P o 

— ET 

o 
►1 
?r 
ft 
►1 



n H ^ H 



(B P) 

3* O 



3- 

ft m 



ft 
P 

n 

3- 

rt 



ts n o 
c r p 



rt 



3- ?r ::. 
ft ft 
1 1 



3 'i^ 
rt- ft 

(t p 

"( o 

d 

ft 

o 
o 
►1 
p 

rt- 


1 



w 

n 
n 
O 
3 

a. 
p 

■< 

O 
o 
n 
c 
•o 
p 

rt- 

o' 

3 



Henry Aldous Dixon Descendants 
By Families 



* 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Sarah De grey 
Mary Smith 



6 
7 
8 
9 



Henry Alfred Dixon 
John De Grey Dixon 
Arthur De Grey Dixon 



Sarah Dixon Mc Conachie 
Maria Dixon Taylor 
William Aldous Dixon 
Ernest De Grey Dixon 
Robert Smith Dixon 



10 Charles Owen D 



1 X o n 



11 Albert Frederick D 



1 X o n 



12 Walter De Grey Dixon 

* 13 Parley Smith Dixon 
14 Le Roy Dixon 

* 15 Harriett D ixon West 



Male 
1 



1 

77 
5 



Alice Dixon Dangerfield 25 



16 Arnold D 



IX o n 



1 1 4 
6 1 
8 3 
1 

6 1 
24 
60 
96 
74 
9 

60 



Female Total 
1 



64 
6 

1 9 
3 

1 3 
5 7 
79 

5 

28 

56 

1 06 

64 

1 2 

58 



1 
1 

1 

1 4 1 

1 1 
44 

6 

2 1 7 
1 1 8 
1 6 2 



1 1 1 
5 2 

1 1 6 

2 2 

1 3 8 

2 1 

1 1 8 



TOTAL 



7 5 5 



7 7 



14 6 2 



72 



CHILDREN OF HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



ID No. 




Birth 




Death. 




HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 






17 


Apr 


1 926 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 


Oct 1 


852 


27 


June 


1907 


1 HENRY ALFRED DIXON 


14 


Nov 1 


865 


1 


July 


1867 


2 JOHN DE GREY DIXON 


16 


July ] 


867 


4 


Oct 


1923 


3 ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 


5 


Oct 1 


869 


5 


June 


1911 


4 ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGERFIELD 


29 


Apr 1 


870 


8 


Dec 


1948 


5 SARAH ANN DIXON MC CONACHIE 


7 


Dec 1 


871 


26 


Dec 


1950 


6 MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 


5 


Jan 1 


872 


17 


Feb 


1947 


7 WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 


21 


Apr 1 


873 


22 


June 


1937 


8 ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 


22 


Dec 1 


873 


15 


June 


1938 


9 ROBERT SMITH DIXON 


10 


Nov 1 


874 


18 


Dec 


1874 


10 CHARLES OWEN DIXON 


22 


Nov 1 


875 


3 


Mar 


1943 


11 ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 


31 


Mar ] 


876 


18 


Aug 


1945 


12 WALTER DE GREY DIXON 


15 


Nov 1 


877 


26 


Nov 


1922 




Q 

7 


June ' 


878 


■J u 


Tan 




14 LE ROY DIXON 


16 


Oct 1 


881 


28 


Dec 


1926 


15 HARRIET AMELIA DIXON WEST 


24 


May 1 


882 


23 


Apr 


1931 


16 ARNOLD DIXON 


30 


May 


884 


1 


Sept 


I960 



73 



Grandchildren of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Who died before reaching the age of maturity: 



I. D. NO. No. b,y Birth 

22 John William Dixon 2 

51 Donald Collie Mc Conachie 6 

41 Jabez Aldous Dangerfield 11 

26 Luc ian Dixon 16 
43 Afton Dangerfield 18 
14.1 LeRoy Smoot Dixon 21 

27 Grant Dixon 22 
83 Ernest Arnold Dixon 24 
71 William Hands Dixon 27 
47 Donna Mae Dangerfield 43 

II. 3 Clifton Ras smus sen Dixon 55 
11.4 Elmo Arthur Dixon 61 
14.7 Arthur Smoot Dixon 68 

11.7 Ruth Dixon 75 

11.8 Baby Dixon 78 



74 



SECTION IV 



1st Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 21 




HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




LUCILE KNOWLDEN 



75 



Henry Aldous Dixon Family 




1464 - 36th Street, Ogden, Utah 



408 No. Fifth West 
Provo, Utah 




7 6 



BIOGRAPHY OF HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

1890 - 1967 



Congressman Henry Aldous Dixon coraes from a long line of 
pioneer stock. His great-grandfather, John Henry Dixon led Dixon's 
Colony from London to colonize Grahamstown, South Africa. His 
grandfather, Henry Aldous Dixon, was called by Brigham Young to be 
one of the first managers of ZCMI in Provo and was also called by 
Brigham Young to be treasurer and comptroller of the Provo Woolen 
Mills in the early days. Dr. Dixon's maternal grandfather, William 
Lewis, was one of the first fruit growers in Provo. He helped build 
the roads and was especially prominent in planning and constructing 
the irrigation systems of that area. He was one of the first bishops of 
Provo Third Ward. 

John DeGrey Dixon, father of Dr. Dixon, helped organize Taylor 
Brothers Company of Provo and was Treasurer of that company for 
many years. He ran for office and was elected the second State Treas- 
urer of Utah. While in that position he visited several states which 
had inheritance tax laws. He studied these laws and helped write a 
law for Utah. He introduced it to the committees in the Utah Legis- 
lature and helped secure its passage. This law was passed just in 
time to catch the Harriman estate and several other large estates, in- 
cluding the Eccles estate. It was from the proceeds of the Inheritance 
Tax Law that the Utah State Capitol was constructed. John DeGrey 
Dixon and T. N. Taylor organized the Farmers and Merchants Bank 
at Provo, Utah. He was the first cashier and remained so from 1907 
until his death in 1923. 

Who's who in American Education 1943-44, Page 253 gives a 
short biography of Henry Aldous Dixon as do also all of the Congres- 
sional Directories from 1955-1960. The following is taken from the 
U.S. Congressional Directory of January, 1958, page 157: 

"HENRY ALDOUS DIXON, Republican, of Ogden, Utah; born in 
Provo, Utah, June 29, 1890, the son of John DeGrey and Sarah Lewis 
Dixon; educated in public schools of Provo, Utah; B.A. degrees, 
Brigham Young University 1914; M.A. degree, University of Chicago, 
1917; Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1937; instructor, 
Weber College 1914-18; president, Weber College, 1919-20 and 1 937- 
1953; supe rintendent, Provo City Schools 1920-24 and 1932-37; manag- 
ing vice - president, Farme rs and Merchants Bank 1924-32; member of: 
Advisory Committee, United States Office of Education; President's 
Commission on High Education 1946-48; Executive Committee, North- 
west Accrediting Association; director, Association of Junior Colleges 
1 950-54; president, Utah Conference, Higher Education 1 938; president, 
Utah State University, August 1953 - - - December 1954; president, 
Chamber of Commerce, Ogden, Provo; Board of Directors and chair- 
man of Salt Lake Branch of Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 
1945-51; Advisory Committee , First Security Bank of Utah; Utah Acad- 



77 



78 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



emy of Sciences, Arts and Letters; L.D.S. (Mormon) Church; Phi 
Delta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Rotary Club, Ogden 1937-5 3; Rotary Club, 
Logan 1953; Kiwanis Club, Provo 1923-32; author of "The Investment 
of Permanent School Funds, "1937, and "The Organization and Develop- 
ment of Terminal Vocational Curricula in Junior Colleges"; married 
Lucile Knowlden June 2, 1915; six children: Phyllis Dixon Shaw, Ogden; 
Dorothy Dixon Harrison, Ogden, Utah; Louise Dixon Larkin, Ogden; 
Dr. John Aldous Dixon, Ogden; Ruth Dixon Cannon, Ogden; and David 
R. Dixon". Cong^ ressional Directory of 85th Congress 1958, P. 157. 

Dr. Dixon has written extensively in professional and religious 
areas. His book, "The Investment of Permanent School Funds" was 
published by the University of California as its Ninth Educational Mon- 
ograph, in 1937. It was written for the Utah Legislature, and as a 
result the Legislature passed six laws in the interest of protecting the 
school childrens' $8, 000, 000 endowment derived from Utah Public 
School land sales and rentals. 

Another book, "The Organization and Development of Terminal 
Occupational Curricula in Thirty-two of the Junior Colleges of the 
United States" was published in 1944 by a grant given to Weber College 
by the General Education Board. It is an early work on vocational 
education showinghow the best Junior colleges in the United States were 
developing vocational courses. Weber College was recommended for 
this grant by the American Association of Junior Colleges because of 
Weber's outstanding record in vocational education and the philosophy 
of its administrators. Weber College was listed in Look Magazine as 
one of fifteen universities and junior colleges in America that best 
fulfilled the needs of its community through its diversified program. 

Dr. Dixon was a member of the INSTRUCTOR committee of 
the Latter Day Saint Sunday Schools. He was a member for 
twenty-four years and has contributed many articles to that magazine. 
He had great affection for the Sunday Schools and General Superintend- 
ency and the General Board members. He has also written a three 
volume account of his work in Congress called "Six Years in Congress." 
In these volumes he records his experiences in his capacity as U. S. 
Congressman from Utah. 

Henry Aldous Dixon was brought to Ogden September 9, 1914 by 
the new president of Weber Academy, James L. Barker and Chairman 
oftheBoard, David O. McKay, to teach German to the students. He 
immediately saw the need of adding college work to Weber Academy 
and that would necessitate the demand for a faculty with master's and 
doctor's degrees. Accordingly, Dr. Dixon attended the University of 
Chicago every summer and two quarters one year until he received 
his master's degree in School Administration. In the year 1916 two 
years of college work was added to Weber, and the name changed from 
Weber Academy to Weber Normal College. With the addition of col- 
lege work, Dr. Dixon was advanced to the head of the College Depart- 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



79 



ment and given charge of all teacher training. 

After four years at Weber College, he was appointed professor 
of Education at B.Y.U. but stayed there only one year when President 
McKay asked him to come back to Weber College as President. Dr. 
Dixon served as President only one year, 1919, during which the 
Weber Gym on 25th Street was planned and the drive started to build it. 

Much to his surprise, in the spring of the first year back at 
Weber, the president of the Provo City Board of Education phoned that 
Dr. Dixon had been selected superintendent of the Provo City Schools. 
This offer he refused over the phone saying that his heart was at Weber. 
That same evening, however, his father came to Ogden, told him that 
he needed him very much and asked him to come home. This became 
the determining factor and Dr. Dixon served as superintendent of 
Provo City Schools from 1920 to 1924. At that time John DeGrey Dixon 
died of apoplexy and Aldous was immediately appointed by the directors 
of the Farmers and Merchants Bank as Managing Vice President where 
he served eight years. During this time he was Bishop of the Provo 
Third Ward and President of the Provo Chamber of Commerce for two 
te rms . 

In 1931 there was a vacancy in the superintendency of the Provo 
City Schools and Dr. Dixon was asked to return to his former position 
which he did, and served until the spring of 1937 when he was invited 
to return to Weber College for a second time as its president. 

He served Weber College as its president for sixteen years be- 
fore leaving to become president of Utah State University in 1953. In 
November of 1954 he was elected to the U. S. House of Representatives 
and served three terms. He refused to run for a fourth term because 
of his health and withdrew from Congress at the close of the year I960. 

It was during his last sixteen year period at Weber College that 
he did much to bring national recognition to himself, the college, and 
its faculty. For example, the Weber College Faculty Philosophy be- 
came a guideline for Junior Colleges all over America. This phil- 
osophy of "making a living as well as a life" enabled the school to 
reach into all the homes of all the people who did all of the work of the 
area and helped them to do that work better and to live more richly in 
those homes. Military leaders stated that this was one of the major 
factors in bringing Hill Air Base, the Second Street Defense Depot, 
Marquart and Thiokol to Ogden. 

Adaptations to the needs of the Ogden area and sensitivity to the 
needs of its people were the watchwords at Weber. The staff achieved 
much of this through their close affiliation with Ogden Chamber of 
Commerce, the City and County Commissions, the legislators from 
the County, the Schools, the service clubs, and especially Rotary, 
which contributed $25,000 to build the beautiful entrance to the new 
campus. This encouraged Judge Howell to contribute the basis of what 



80 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



is now the Howell Library. The staff members also worked with the 
Federal Employment Service in making occupational surveys so they 
could know just where the job openings were and what to teach. 

Another adaptive mechanism within the framework of the school 
was the advisory committees (fourteen to twenty of them) consisting of 
two employers, two employees (union men where the occupation was 
unionized) and one outstanding neutral citizen. These committees did 
wonders in sponsoring their respective courses, getting students, sec- 
uring jobs for the students when they had completed their course work, 
and in making the teaching practical. 

It was the success of these programs, the rapid, but solid growth 
of "Weber College, the purchase of the new campus, expansion of the 
curriculum to pe rmit further growth, the unexcelled community support, 
the strong faculty, and the master plan for the future that really put 
Weber College on the map and much to create a demand for its president 
to be selected for national honors such as junior college representative 
of President Truman's National Committee for Higher Education; and 
a member of the Executive Committee of the American Association of 
Junior Colleges; a member of the Advisory Board to U. S. Commission- 
er Earl McGrath in Washington, D. C. ; a member of the Board of Ac- 
crediting of the Northwest Association of Junior Colleges and Institu- 
tions of Higher I-/earning;President of Utah State Agricultural College; 
and one of Utah's Representatives in the Congress of the United States. 

"Wealth is produced by money, materials, and men, but the 
greatest of these is men" (Bernard Shaw). At one time Weber College 
had as high as 6,000 people enrolled in its Defense Training Programs 
with a faculty of nearly 200. When there was no more room at the 
College other space was found in the Armory, the Browning Arms 
building, and other temporary buildings. It was also necessary that 
the college send dozens of its teachers out into the Depots to train 
people while on the job. 

Ezra Fjelsted and Dr. Dixon, representing the Ogden Chamber of 
Commerce, visited Col. Behrman who was sitting in a little shack 
heated by an old pot-bellied stove on the lonesome sand hills where 
Hill Field now stands. They asked him what he needed most and he 
replied, "More housing than you can ever imagine. We shall also need 
teachers and facilities for thousands of our un-skilled employees who 
will be brought here shortly. 

Ezra Fjelsted started immediately to work on the housing prob- 
lem and Dr. Dixon brought George Sanders from Washington D. C. to 
work on developing courses of study with the help of Col. Russell 
Minty whom Col. Behrman loaned to the college. The result was the 
famous and successful Weber College Hill Field Learner Program in 
which the government paid its new people to go to school before they 
went on the job, and also after they were on the job. Similar programs 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



81 



were installed in all of the military depots in the area. Many of the 
veterans returned to school in the spring of 1946 from places all over 
the country because they were sold on the program and facilities at 
Weber College as they had been exposed to them during the war. 

As veterans returned the need for additional curricula and space 
became critical. Pres. Dixon asked for and received permission from 
the Utah State Board of Education (Weber's governing body) to appoint 
a Citizens' Committee to develop a master plan for the College. He 
appointed eighty prominent citizens from all walks of life. This com- 
mittee first advised the purchase of all available houses on the old 
Weber College block. This was done out of money saved out of the 
Weber College budgets. It was thought at the time that Lester Park 
could be obtained when the need for expansion arose. But the school 
grew so rapidly that it soon became apparent that its plans were en- 
tirely inadequate and that a larger acreage must be sought. 

Secretary Ezra Fjelsted appeared before the Utah Legislature on 
behalf of the Committee and the Ogden Chamber of Commerce and ask- 
ed for $50,000 to buy land if and when the Chambe r of Comme rce would 
raise $50,000 from the community. (The community raised $65,000 
in eight days!) The John M. Mills farm of approximately 175 acres 
was purchased for $75,000 and many people sold lots upon which they 
had planned to build in order to give the college a 600 foot parcel of 
land from the Mills farm down to Harrison Boulevard . Betore ths Leg- 
islature adjourned the Ogden people succeeded in getting it to pass a 
bill making Weber College a four-year institution, but it was vetoed by 
the governor. 

The administration and one State Legislature watched the growth 
of the State Building Trust Fund until it grew to $1, 100,000. They took 
a delegation from Ogden, asked for the money and got it. With this, 
the first four buildings were built on the new campus. 

There is a complete record of the activities of Henry Aldous 
Dixon and his achievements during his six years in the U.S. Congress 
in his volumes in the libraries entitled "Six Years in Congress". But 
there is space here to mention only three major roles especially sig- 
nificant to Weber County. They are his work in helping to acquire the 
Upper Colorado Reclamation Project (Flaming Gorge Dam, etc. ), the 
forty-two miles of Interstate Highway down Weber Canyon from Echo 
Junction to Ogden, and the Ogden Federal Building. 

There is room here for details only on the Interstate Highway. 
For some reason which is difficult to understand, the Weber Canyon 
road was hot included in the interstate highway, but the highway was 
mapped to go from above Echo Canyon and down to Salt Lake City, 
leaving Ogden out entirely. Congressman Dixon worked for years get- 
ting surveys and reaction from the truckers who drove both routes and 
working with the Federal Bureau of Public Roads and Louis S. Roths- 
child of the United States Department of Commerce to include this 42 



82 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



miles. 

He worked so long and hard at this project that the^ Department 
of Public Roads, Ellis Armstrong especially, called it "Dixon's Cutoff". 
The only way he could get this included was to present a bill which 
added 1,000 miles to the 40,000 miles of the interstate road system. 
This was done largely with the help of the Colorado people because 
Denver wanted a road straight west from Denver. 

One of the most remarkable qualities of Dr. Dixon was his un- 
canny ability as a trouble shooter. For just a few examples take the 
situation of Weber College in 1 91 9, when completely new demands were 
made for educating teachers; the Provo City Schools 1920-21 when 
every administrative officer was discharged; the upset there in 1931; 
the state of chaos at Utah State Agricultural College in 1953; and the 
situation of the Republican Party in 1954 when its candidate for the 
U.S. House of Representatives was forced to withdraw under the most 
\infortunate circumstances fourteen days before the election and Pres. 
Dixon was drafted and won from a very strong opponent conceded the 
election by odds of 7 to 1 in what Time Magazine termed the shortest 
congressional campaign in history. He was and is generally conceded 
to have been extremely successful in all of these most difficult situa- 
tions. Unlimited affection for his fellow men, tested integrity, and 
excellent training in public administration went a long way towards 
achieving the high purposes which he worked so hard to achieve. 

He was selected for the Weber County Hall of Fame in I960. 

After his retirement from the U.S. Congress in 1959, Henry 
Aldous Dixon returned to B. Y. U. as a special instructor from 1961 
to 1965. He endowed the HENRY ALDOUS DIXON AWARD FUND for 
Research and Achievement at the B.Y.U. College of Education in 1966. 
This award is given annually to deserving students and faculty members . 

The H. Aldous Dixon Memorial Award is given annually to an 
outstanding Weber State faculty or staff member in honor of the mem- 
ory of Henry Aldous Dixon, who served for seventeen years as Weber 
State President. 

His Congressional files of three terms in Washington was given 
to the J. Reuben Clark, Jr. Library at B. Y. U. 

The following broadcast was aired over Station K.S. L. : 

"Utah lost a warm friend and a distinguished public servant this 
week ( Sunday January 22, 1967 at age 76 of a heart attack ) in the 
death of Dr. Henry Aldous Dixon. " 

"Here was a man who lived life successfully because he loved it. 
He loved people, and as a keen student of human nature, learned to 
enjoy enormously watching the foibles as well as the strengths of those 
around him. He understood people because he loved them, and was a 
vitally important force for good in many lives. " 

Submitted by Phyllis Dixon Shaw 



3rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 23 




STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 




'LUELLA MADSEN MAURINE WELKER 



83 



Stanley Lewis Dixon 



Family 





Linda 



Beth 



■DeGrey Maureen Stanley, Jr. 




372 No. Fifth West 
Provo, Utah 

84 



BIOGRAPHY OF 
STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 
By Maud Dixon Markham 

Stanley Lewis Dixon was born in Provo, Utah in the little, old 
Henry A. Dixon, adobe house on the corner of Second North and Third 
West, to John DeGrey Dixon and Sarah Lewis Dixon, His birth is re- 
corded in our big, brown family Bible as follows: 

"Stanley Lewis Dixon, son of John DeGrey Dixon and Sarah Ann 
Lewis Dixon, was born in Provo City, Utah March 3rd on a Sunday 
morning at 7:25 o'clock in the year 1895, He was blessed by his father 
at 8 days old onMarch 10th 1895--The same day of the funeral of Pres. 
A. O. Smoot. He was born in the 2nd adobe house at 9th and G street". 
(Provo City Streets were re-named after this recording.) 

Stanley was a handsome little boy having very blond hair, blue- 
grey eyes and fine even features, with an especially appealing small 
mouth. 

He was always very sensitive, high strung, and of a nervous 
temperament. I remember Mother saying as a teen-ager he dashed 
home from school one day, earlier than usual, with his face scarlet 
with apprehension. "I've got scarlet fever or small pox or something". 
Mother quickly assured him it was just hives. This pre-occupation 
with his ailments may have had something to do with his joining the 
medical corps of the U.S. Army early in our participation in World War 
One. It may also shed light on the impact that the deaths caused by 
the "flu" epidemic in CampsCt Macon, Georgia, had on him. More of 
that later. 

When Stanley was six years of age we moved to Salt Lake City. 
For five years we lived at 189 Mead Street during the time that Father 
was State Treasurer. We have pictures of Stan, neat and attentive, 
standing with others in his Sunday School class in the 30th Ward. 

Father returned to Provo to be cashier and help T. N. Taylor 
organize and operate the Farmers & Merchants Bank. 

Stanley went to the Timpanogos School and always did well in his 
classes. Later he graduated from the B. Y. U. High School, 

He always had plenty of friends. Especially did he enjoy his 
cousin. Art Taylor, as we lived first in Grandma Dixon's house just 
North of Uncle Arthur and Aunt Rye Taylor's home on Fifth West. He 
and the Third Ward gang had an eventful and happy time. (Cousin Art 
can give the details of this. ) 

I remember Stanley best as a young man of 18 or 20 years of age. 
He always worried about his height, thinking that he was way too tall. 
Now- a- days he would be considered somewhat above average but only 
a good height, around about six feet. He was always very critical of 
his appearance, always wanting to appear just right. He did not take 
out girls much until he was in his middle twenties. 



85 



86 



STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 



Stanley was very bright and intelligent. He preferred to work at 
Taylor Bros, store as an accountant and credit manager, rather than 
finish college and obtain his degree. 

At 19 years of age he was called on a mission to the Eastern 
States which then included Maryland. Here he had the misfortune of 
being placed with a presiding Elder whose passion was visiting mort- 
uaries, this being his vocation at home. Stanley had a strong dislike 
for this and didn't get into the real spirit of a mission. He was also 
an avid reader and unfortunately spent too much time reading such 
agnostic authors as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Robert Ingersol. Bro. 
Fielding was one of his companions and has everything good to say of 
Stanley as a missionary. 

Upon his return from the mission field he worked in the Timpan- 
ogos School Religion Class after school along with other church 
as signments , 

When war was imminent he didn't wait to be drafted but volun- 
teered. He was soon made an officer and looked very handsome in 
his tailor-made uniform. The pressure to do what the other officers 
did, became too strong for him. On one of his visits home he confided 
in me that he had taken up smoking. I still remember the sickening 
shock it was to me, knowing how my parents would feel, I also sensed 
that this was only one of his bad habits. Drinking and occasional 
carousing parties were also a part of his falling away from the fine 
standards he had always lived up to and had been taught to himat home. 
He explained that the numerous deaths and always expecting to be 
called over seas made diversions a must. The war ended just before 
his unit was to be called abroad. He came home and took up his work 
at Taylor Bros. Co. and the Farmers & Merchants Bank. 

He became acquainted with Luella Madsen, an attractive twin, 
who lived just thru the block, north, from Taylor Bros, store. They 
were married July 1, 1920 and lived with us for a year and then moved 
into John T. Taylor's old home at 1st North and 2nd West, just across 
the street fromLuella's parents home. Later they moved to the Orson 
Bird home on Fifth West. They had twin girls, Jean and June and a 
little girl two years younger, named Barbara. Luella and Stanley 
were divoraed after about 12 years of marriage. Luella went to Salt 
Lake to 1 ive with her sister Josephine Madsen. Stanley married 
Maurine Welker and they lived in St. George where he was an accoun- 
tant for an oil company. Later Stanley and Maurine moved to Calif- 
ornia, but his drinking problem became so acute that he was unable to 
hold jobs very long. 

In 1938, Stanley was for forcedto come to live with us for six 
months. His wife went to Ephraim to have her baby and while there 
their little girl Beth was killed crossing the road as a car coming too 



STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 



87 



fast did not see her. 

Stanley was able to pass a civil service exam and he and his fam- 
ily, which now consisted of two children, DeGrey and the baby girl; 
moved to California. We never heard from them until four years later 
when Arnold Boshard was working at a government installation on the 
Nevada desert and said Stan had a bookkeeping job there. Mother sent 
him presents, but we never heard from him. 

Word came of his death at Sawtelle, California Hospital. He 
died of throat cancer, induced by his heavy smoking. He had been a 
bookkeeper at the Veterans Hospital. Maurine had left him and taken 
the children to Nebraska, three or four years before. There fihe had 
done very well as a teacher and principal of the school, 

Stanley was buried from the Larkin Mortuary in Salt Lake City 
in April of 1947. It all seemed so sad, so futile. He had been the 
most intelligent, brilliant, kind, cultured and promising young man 
in this area. What circumstances had brought this dreadful change in 
his life? I attribute it mostly to the pressures of war on a sensitive, 
high-strung, nervous young man. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
JOHN DE GREY DIXON 

rD# 2 

Second child of Sarah DeGrey and Henry Aldous Dixon, 
Born at Salt Lake City, Utah on July 16, 1867. 
Baptized by Albert Jones on August 29, 1875. 
Confirmed by Edson Whipple on August 29, 1875. 

Received his education in Provo Public Schools and the Brigham Young 
Academy. 

At the age of 1 7 years, his father died, leaving two wives and 13 child- 
ren. He being the oldest child, assumed the responsibility 
of helping support the families. 

Married Sarah Ann Lewis in the Manti Temple on September 18, 1889. 

His occupations included: 

Bookkeeper for Samuel Liddiard, building contractor. 
Clerk for Provo School Board. 

First Secretary & Treasurer of Taylor Brothers Company. 

Utah State Treasurer. 

Secretary of Utah State Land Board. 

First Cashier and Manager of Farmers & Merchants Bank. 
Church Activities: 

Southern States Mission in 1896. 

President of Utah Stake Y. M. M. I. A. 

Utah Stake High Council for 15 years. 

In Bishopric of Salt Lake Thirtieth Ward, 
Was one of the largest farmers for raising and shipping fruit, in the 

State. His farms consisted of nearly 100 acres on Provo Bench. 
Children: 

Henry Aldous II, John William, Stanley Lewis , Rulon Sterling, 
Maud, Lucian and Grant, 
Died at Provo, Utah on October 4, 1923. 



88 



Arthur D. Taylor Family 




89 



Home 270 No. 5th West 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF 



ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 

Whether I was rewarded for actions in the life before I came to 
this earth, or whether Father-in-Heaven was just unusually kind to me, 
I do not know, but like Nephi of old, " I was born of goodly parents". 
No more righteous, kind, and loving people ever lived on this earth 
than my earthly parents, Arthur NichoUs Taylor and Maria Louise 
Dixon. They gave me a strong, healthy body of flesh and bones to live 
in during my mission here on this earth, 

I was born October 4, 1895 in an adobe house, on the corner of 
Second North and Third West, Provo, Utah. This was where my Grand- 
father, Henry Aldous Dixon and my Grandmother Sarah DeGrey Dixon 
had lived before the family moved to their new brick home at 270 North 
Fifth West. This was the old Dixon property. There were two houses; 
Grandma Dixon had lived in one and Aunt Mary, Grandpa's other wife, 
had lived in the other one. I lived here until I was two years old, then 
father and mother took me with them to our new home which was built 
next to Grandma Dixon's home at 256 North Fifth West. Here I grew 
up to maturity and after my marriage I bought Grandma Dixon's home 
and have lived on this spot for sixty-eight years. 

The earliest remembrance that I have was the partly finished 
home. Newly-weds starting out generally have financial problems and 
Father and Mother were only able to finish two rooms of their new home, 
the kitchen and a bedroom. Planks were laid across the joists in the 
unfinished rooms and going across these planks to get out of the front 
door is my first memory. As years went by additional rooms were 
finished. Mother was a good house keeper and we had a lovely com- 
fortable home which I have been grateful for all the days of my life. 

My Mother was a beautiful woman, with an abundance of beauti- 
ful black hair and pure blue eyes. Many people have told me that she 
was one of the prettiest girls in Provo and, of course I have always 
thought so. She was just as beautiful in character as she was in looks 
and people who associated with her, loved h^r. The rich and the poor, 
the unfortunate as well as the talented, were always treated the same. 
One of the outstanding characteristics of herlife washer effort to help 
the "under-dog" or the unfortunate. Her heart was full of love for her 
children and my unusual love for her has done much in the accomplish- 
ments and the framing of my life. 

My Father was a fine looking man; well built and standing six 
feet in height. His hair was sandy or a light brown. He was a man of 
clean habits and strong character. He was a faithful member of the 
L,D,S. Church all the days of his life and lived its teachings. In our 
home activities and all other activities he would never ask us to do 
something that he would not do himself. He always set the example. 



91 



92 



ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 



He believed that work and responsibility were important in our lives 
and from earliest age we had cows to milk and chores to do. He pur- 
chased farms for us to work on that we might learn how to work and 
assume responsibility. He was a first-rate business man, a commun- 
ity worker, a spiritually-minded man, trusted by his fellow associates 
and well liked by all who knew him. His example and encouragement 
greatly influenced my life. I have always been proud to be his son. 

Our family life also played an important part in building my life. 
I had five brothers: Lynn, Elton, Henry, Clarence and Kenneth and 
two sisters: Alice Louise and Ruth Elaine. Every one of them was a 
wonderful character and I loved them very much. Five of us boys 
were red headed and one (Henry) was black haired for which we some- 
times called him the "black sheep". 

We were a happy family, well trained by righteous parents in the 
way we should go. There was love in our home and there has always 
existed a family unity and a love for one another. 

Some of my earliest remembrances take me back to the year 
1900 when my Father was called on a mission to England. His fare- 
well was held in the old adobe meetinghouse that was just south of our 
present Chapel. It previously had been Provo's Town Hall as well as 
the Provo Branch Chapel and the Town's Dance Hall and Theatre. This 
was before the Town was divided into Wards. On this occasion I rem- 
ember sitting on his lap while the dancing was going on. I also recall 
many plays that were staged in this old Hall, especially Bob Cunning- 
ham's magician and "jail break" shows. Bob Cunningham was a Provo 
Third Ward Boy. He worked as a deliveryman for Taylor Bros. Co. 
He became a great showman and a world-wide celebrity. The show 
business took him through the United States, Canada, many European 
countries and to Hawaii and Australia, He became nearly as popular 
as the world famous Houdini. He and his wife, "Aunt AUie", were 
dear friends of Mother and Father and were in the same social 
group in the early days of the Provo Third Ward before he went into 
the show business. 

The Old Chapel had a stage in the West end of the dance floor 
where the Third Ward Dramatic Company put on some of its thrilling 
plays. Many of them I attended as a little boy. Later in years I 
took part in many of the Third Ward Plays associated with William F, 
Clayton, Amanda Young Pierpont, and many other Third Ward theat- 
rical celebrities. 

I went with Mother to the dedication of the present Third Ward 
Chapel when I was eight years old and have a picture with those that 
attended. It shows the old as well as the new building. The "Good 
Old Third Ward" has meant much to me in my life and I have loved 
it and the wonderful characters who have made its history. 



ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 



93 



I must not forget to mention the old "Davis Swimmin Hole" back 
of Mary Davis' barn. There I spent some of the happiest hours with 
my companions in my boyhood days. 

My school life started in a kindergarten in the old Carter Hotel 
building on the corner of First North and Fifth West where the Handy 
Service Station is now located, A Mrs. Jones was my teacher. When 
I was six years old I went to the Old Timpanogos School, where the 
new building is at present located, Etta Dangerfield, who later mar- 
ried my Uncle, Parley Dixon, was my teacher. The teachers I rem- 
ember as I advanced in the elementary grades were: Nora Young, 
granddaughter of Brigham Young; Henry Oberhansley, Ole Harris and 
Euphema Johnson, Ella Deal, one of the teachers, led our school 
orchestra. I played a cornet. In September 1910 all of the eighth 
grade students from the four Provo Schools were taken to the New 
Central School, just being constructed on the corner of First South 
and Fourth West. (It is at this time being torn down). Our class room 
and the Auditorium were the only rooms finished at that time. Frank 
Bennett was our teacher. We respected and loved him very much. He 
was a splendid teacher. I was president of the class. The graduating 
exercises were held in the new Auditorium on February 2, 1911. Here 
I had my first public speaking experience and gave the Class President' s 
address. Our class orchestra gave a number on the program. I was 
in the orchestra and played the trumpet. During my high school days 
I took trumpet lessons from Professor Robert Sauer and played in 
the Junior B. Y. U Band. I also belonged to an orchestra conducted 
by Arnold Burgner and besides playing frequently at Parcell's Hall on 
Provo Bench went on several tours to Kamas, Midway, Heber, Park 
City, etc, , playing for dances. 

In September 1911 I entered High School at the Brigham Young 
University. I enjoyed High School very much. I represented my class 
in Tennis and became Tennis Manager, In my last year at the B, Y. U, 
I was elected Tennis Manager of the Brigham Young University and 
with Stanley Bonnett, Waldo Parry, entered the tournament at the 
Utah Agriculture College at Logan, I graduated from the Brigham 
Young University High School in the class of 1915. This was the end 
of my school- room experiences. I was called on a Mission to Austra- 
lia for four years, which time was given instead of college. 

My mission to Australia was the most importantand valuable ex- 
perience of my life. It was here that I received a testimony of the 
truthfulness of the Restored Gospel of Jesus Christ of the L. D. S. 
Church. In May of 1916 I left Provo and visited my Aunt Hattie West 
in San Bernardino, California, who in company with Uncle George, 
we went to the Worlds Fair then being held at San Diego. From here 
I went on up to San Francisco where I joined a group of Elders, at the 
Golden West Hotel, who were going to Hawaii, Samoa, and Australia, 



94 



ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 



We boarded the"S. S, Sonoma" an American mail line, and after 
six days of sea sickness, landed in Honolulu. We spent one day sight- 
seeing, then on the sea again for another six days and landed at Pago 
Pago, Samoa, Here I met Elder Elmo Giles, an old Provo School pal 
who was filling a mission in Samoa. After a days visit in Pago Pago, 
we again boarded the "Sonoma" and after six more days at sea we pas- 
sed through the Sydney Heads into one of the world's finest harbors at 
Sydney, Australia. Here I labored four years as a missionary. Eight- 
een months I was engaged in tracting and regular missionary work 
then I was called into the office as secretary of the Australian Mission. 
The fourth year of my mission I was called to be President of the New 
South Wales Conference. While I was Mission Secretary, Mission 
President Arnold D. Miller was required to take Sister Miller to the 
United States because of a serious illness and he left the Mission in 
charge of Elder J. C. Foresgren and me. 

I was in Australia during World War #1. We had no new Elders 
for two years during the War and there were only ten Elders in all of 
the Australian Mission when the Armistice was signed. We old Elders 
were required to stay until the new Elders arrived and were sufficient- 
ly schooled to take over our work. Elder Carr, Elder Tonks and I 
were the last of the old line of Elders to be released. We left Sydney 
and rode to Auckland, New Zealand, in a small mail boat about the 
size of a tug. It was a wild ride, plenty of sea sickness, and a happy 
landing. We spent three weeks living among the Maoris and touring 
New Zealand. We sailed from Auckland on the "S.S, Makura" via 
Fiji Islands and Honolulu and landed in Vancouver, Canada. We ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City on May 2, 1920. I reported my mission to Pres. 
Heber J. Grant. I went back to work in the office of Taylor Brothers 
Company where I had been employed part time before going on my 
mission. 

At a Sunday School Outing, at Utah Lake, I was swimming and a 
beautiful girl popped up out of the water in front of me and one year 
later this lovely mermaid became my wife. 

Maurine and I were married June 29, 1921 in the Salt Lake 
Temple, by Apostle George F. Richards, and the Lord has blessed us 
with three lovely daughters, Elayne, Nancy and Dixie and one fine son 
Kent G. I am proud of them all and love them very much. 

Maurine and I purchased Grandma Dixon's home, 270 North Fifth 
West in 1921 and have lived there ever since. 

The membership in my Church has always come first in my life. 
At this point I will give some of my Church activities and callings. I 
was blessed and received my name November 7, 1895 by Alfred W. 
Harding, a member of the Third Ward Bishopric. I was baptized on 
October 10, 1903 by Oscar W. Wilkins, Jr. and confirmed October 
25, 1903, by my Uncle, Bishop Thomas N. Taylor. I was ordained a 
Deacon on May 2, 1910, by Bishop Thomas N. Taylor and a short time 



ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 



95 



later was the President of my Quorum. I was ordained a teacher by- 
Alfred W. Harding, a member of the Bishopric and I was ordained a 
Priest by George Powelson, a member of the Third Ward Bishopric. 
I received my Patriarchal Blessing by Patriarch John G. Jones on 
September 1, 1912. I was ordained an Elder by Robert Sauer, a mem- 
ber of the Presidency of the Elders' Quorum, on the 17th of April 1916. 

Before I went on my Mission I was Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Third Ward Y . M. I. A. I was blessed and set apart for a Mission 
to Australia by Francis M. Lyman, a member of the Twelve Apostles, 
in May 1916. I was Secretary of the Austrailian Mission and I was 
President of the New South Wales Conference of the Australian Mission. 
When I returned from the missionfield in May of 1920, I was called to 
be a counselor to Supt. B. F. Larsen in the Provo Third Ward Sunday 
School. Six years, from 1924 to 1930, I was Superintendent of the 
Provo Third Ward Sunday School. I was ordained a High Priest Sept- 
ember 14, 1930, by J. William Knight. 

From 1930 to 1938 I served as a Counselor to Bishop Alfred E. 
Eves, in the Bishopric of the Provo Third Ward, as second Counselor 
until J. C, Moffit was released and then first Counselor. In 19391 
was called into the Utah Stake High Council by President Royal J. Mur- 
dock. In September 28, 1941 I was called to be Bishop of the Provo 
Third Ward and served until 1952 when I was released and called 
again, into the Utah Stake High Council where I have served fourteen 
years. I was released March 20, 1966. I have been a member of the 
Provo Third Ward Prayer Circle for forty-five years which has bro- 
ught me the most inspirational and satisfying hours of my life. I was 
called to be a Patriarch of Utah Stake and was sustained as such in the 
morning session of Quarterly Conference, February 27, 1966. I was 
ordained at the close of the morning session by Harold B. Lee, a 
member of the Quorum of Twelve Apostles, in the southwest room of 
the Provo Tabernacle. 

My business career started with Taylor Brothers Company in 
1912. I worked in their office after school each day when I was attend- 
ing the Brigham Young University Commercial School. When I return- 
ed from my mission in 1920 I resumed my position at Taylor Brothers 
for one year. In August of 1921 I went with my Father and his assoc- 
iates and helped organize the Dixon-Taylor-Russell Company home 
furnishings business. My Father was the first President and was 
General Manager. March 29, 1929 I was made Secretary and Treas- 
urer and on September 18, 1935 I was chosen by the Board of Direct- 
ors to be Vice-president and General Manager. I served in this posi- 
tion for ten years. 

On September 28, 1945 I became President and General Manager 
and in this position I have served twenty- one years. 



96 



ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 



Two fraternal organizations, the Provo Kiwanis Club and the 
Timpanogos Knife and Fork Club have given me a great deal of enjoy- 
ment, I was elected President of the Provo Kiwanis Club and served 
during the Golden Anniversary Year of 1965o 

Good music has had a place in my life. I took vocal lessons 
from Professor Anthony C. Lvind, of the B.Y.U. Music Department, 
which aided me in my missionary work, I have been a member of the 
Provo Third Ward Choir and the Mendelsohn Male Chorus. 

I wish to acknowledge the goodness of my lovely wife, Maurine, 
who has made it possible for me to carry through the many assign- 
ments and responsibilities given me. She has been patient and spent 
many lonely hours without my companionship that I might succeed in 
my duties. 

I am now in my 70th year and have only a few more years to 
complete my mission here on earth. I have been greatly blessed and 
have enjoyed living. The Restored Gospel of Jesus Christ and my 
membership in the Church and Kingdom of God has always come first 
in my life. 

In closing I wish to give my testimony to my children, my grand- 
children, members of my family: God, the Eternal Father, the Creator 
of this earth and all that is in it, lives and answers our prayers ; Jesus 
Christ is His Son and gave his life that we might live again in the pre- 
sence of God in another great world; Joseph Smith was a prophet of 
God and the instrument in the Lord's hands of establishing His Church 
again, in these later days; the President and General Authorities of 
this Church are Prophets of the Living God and will guide us safely 
through the confusion and perilious times ahead, if we will heed their 
advice and counsel and follow their instructions. I bear this testimony 
to you in the name of Jesus Christ. AMEN 



Arthur Dixon Taylor died July 20, 1979, at the age of 84. 



5th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




97 



Lynn Dixon Taylor Family 




98 



Brickerhaven 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



Born May 6, 1898 at Provo, Utah 

Son of ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR and MARIA LOUISE DIXON 
Baptized in Provo Third Ward, October 28, 1906 by Don W. Conover 
Confirmed October 28, 1906 by Thomas N. Taylor 

Commenced Grammar School at the old Timpanogos School in Sept. 
1904. Commenced High School at B.Y.U. in 1913, graduating 
in 1917. Enrolled at B. Y . University in 1918, graduating with 
an A, B. Degree in June 1923. Awarded the Block Y for playing 
tennis. Was appointed manager of all minor sports for one year. 

In June 1920 left for the Northwestern States Mission. Was appointed 
Pres. of South- West Washington Conf. Was released from the 
Mission in August of 1922 

Church activities include the following: 

Supt. of Sunday School in Pleasant View Ward. Bishop of Pleas- 
and View Ward 1938-1944. Oak Hills Ward Building Committee. 
Oak Hills Fourth Ward Asst. Clerk 

Community, Civic and other activities: 

Served in U. S. Army-First World War. Member of Lions Club. 
Member of American Legion. Officer in Provo Advertis ing Club. 
1st Pres. of Brickerhaven Corporation. One of organizers of 
Bonneville Development Co„ ( Oak Hills Subdivision) 

Married CELESTIA M. JOHNSON on August 17, 1927 in Salt Lake 
Temple 

Spent several years as draftsman and designer in Joseph Nelson's 
architect office. Spent 6 months working at Barker Bros. , Los 
Angeles. Manager of D.T.R. Co. Drapery Dept. Graduated 
from School of Interior Decoration, New York. On B. Y. U„ 
Faculty as special instructor of Interior Decoration. Advertis- 
ing Manager, D.T.R. CO. 

Among the many hobbies and interests: 

Athletics, the reading of good books, music, designing and 
building construction. Several store buildings on Provo Center 
Street, and several homes are his creations. Designed and 
built his Canyon Home at Brickerhaven, Provo Canyon 

CHILDREN: 

John Arthur Taylor 
Janice Taylor DeGraw 
Lynn Anne Taylor Richards 
Kathryn Dee Taylor Brockbank 
George Terry Taylor 

Died at Provo, Utah July 2, 1967 



99 



"OUR HOME ON THE HILL" 
By Lynn Dixon Taylor 

Many times during the past 30 years I have been asked the ques- 
tion: "Why did you pick that particular spot on which to build your home? " 

For many years this question was tinged with incredulity, but 
now I detect a hint of envious curiosity. Never in all these years has 
there been any change in the answer, "Because we love it here". 

As I look in retrospect, I am aware of tremendous physical 
changes in the area in which we chose to live. 

As a boy, I recall hiking up Rock Canyon, a long way from 
"Sandy Alley, " home of the Dixons and Taylors. I remember trudg- 
ing over "Temple Hill" to a winding wagon road, little more than a 
trail which is now known as "Martin Lane". 

This, at that time was the only passable road for a vehicle, to 
Rock Canyon. At the foot of the hill near the culvert currently lead- 
ing up Oak Lane, there was a slaughter house. Remains of the old 
rock and concrete walls and floors are still visible. A pipeline up the 
hill ended in an open concrete reservoir which was about 10' x 10' in 
size. 

I recall stopping at the slaughter house and watching with curious 
nausea, the killing of a cow and several pigs. At this time the slaugh- 
ter house was owned and operated by the later defunct Provo Meat and 
Packing Co. .whose market was located just South of the State Bank on 
University Avenue, 

Perhaps the most vivid of my trips to Rock Canyon (one which 
stamped itself indelibly on my mind, and one which was pleasurably 
recalled many times), was one of those incomparable sunny days in 
June, when we climbed the foothills to the old Muhle stein House on the 
upper bench, stopping for a drink of cold canyon water and a rest. 

At this time a clay pipeline extended from the springs in Rock 
Canyon, along the hillside, and stopped at the Muhlestein Home. Parts 
of this old waterline are still in evidence. 

To the West the entire valley with its green farms, clusters of 
houses and trees, framing the sparkling expanse of Utah Lake, was 
breathtaking. To the South, Mount Nebo; to the North, majestic Timp- 
anogos; and practically overhead, the towering crags of Squaw Peak, 
seemed to create a picture I had never before seen. 

Here was an old fashioned garden in full bloom. The lazy dron- 
ing of bees in the flowers and the pungent perfume from scores of nat- 
ive lilacs, with the comfortable warmth of June sunshine, brought to 
my mind a glimpse of Paradise that I have never forgotten. 

During the early period of Provo's history, the Fort was located 
in what became known as the "Fort Fields". Here was level rich black 
loam with no rocks, plenty of water, and close proximity to the Fort 
for protection from the roving bands of Indians. 



100 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



101 



Two families from Switzerland, the Muhlesteins and the Liechtys 
had other ideas. These families were industrious, religious, and very- 
ingenious. 

Instead of acquiring fertile acres in the Fort Fields area, they 
looked to the mountains on the East. They settled on one of the bench- 
es left by prehistoric Lake Bonneville, Here was a lack of fertility in 
the soil. Rocks, clay and quicksand was the soil with hard-pan close 
to the surface in many places. No available water was apparent. 

Settling on this terrain called for hard work and determination 
to scratch out a living. As a result, these families became practically 
self-supporting. They even built an almost impossible road up Rock 
Canyon to Dutchman's Flat (now the Camp Ground), where certain 
crops were planted and produced. I recall seeing parts of an old ab- 
andoned hayrake in this area. 

An Uncle of mine told me he remembered, as a boy, seeing 
Nicholas Muhlestein who wore a gold earring in one ear, driving a 
yoke of oxen, on a Provo Street, draw;ing a bobsled loaded with Maple 
and Oak logs, to make delivery of soneone's firewood. A few of the 
big Oak trees are still growing on the hill, and are responsible for 
the name "Oak Hills". 

These self-supporting people made their own shoes from self- 
produced leather. They sheared, carded and spun their wool to make 
their own clothes. Straw was woven to make hats. I remember Eph- 
raim Liechty showing me an old granary where spinning wheels, a 
straw hat weaver, shoe-maker's lasts and a great deal of other equip- 
ment was stored. 

Too much praise cannot be given these families for their frugal- 
ity, resourcefulness, honesty, and integrity. 

In 1929, my brother Henry D. and I drove up toward Rock Canyon 
and after parking at the foot of the bench, climbed up the hill and sat 
down to rest, about where my home now is. It was another spring day 
and the hillside was covered with Sego Lilies, and sort of a blue pea- 
type wild flower. 

Gazing at the lake and the valley, we began to talk about a problem 
which concerned us both. We had married recently and were living 
in rented homes. To live and raise families in homes of our own was 
a situation we both were anxious to achieve. However we were facing 
the fact that the worst part of the depression made it the poorest time 
possible to think of building. 

As we reclined on the sunny hillside, I made the remark: "How 
would you like to live up here? " It sounded like wishful thinking, 

Henry, however, seemed to think it was not a silly question, and 
we began to discuss the possibility of getting a couple of lots and some- 
day in the far- distant future, build on them. At this time, the only 
houses were Muhlestein's , Liechty's, the old Bean home and a few 



102 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



More nearer the heart of the present Upper Campus B. Y. U. structures. 

We had noticed a man over near the north edge of the bench, 
planting some peach trees. We decided to ask him about the ground, 
and introduced ourselves. After a while we asked if he would consider 
selling us a couple of lots, on which we could build. He thought we 
were crazy and it took him quite awhile to get the idea. 

He said he did not wish to sell any of his ground as he needed all 
he had for farming. We pointed to the rocky ridge running from where 
we had been sitting, north to the edge of the bench overlooking the 
Rock Canyon wash, which was not under cultivation. He said it was 
too high and rocky to farm and there was a huge pile of rocks at the 
South end where they had been dumping those gathered up from the 
fields for many years. 

However, if we were crazy enough to want to buy it he would let 
us have it. We made a deal with Ephraim Liechty on the spot, for 
approximately three acres along the edge of the hill. 

It was heartening when we brought Celestia and Alta up to see 
the view and the lots, to find they both were thrilled with the outlook. 
We made a number of visits up in the evening to look at the glorious 
sunsets and each visit increased our desires to move up there. 

It became a habit to drive up on the hill each evening and enjoy 
these beautiful sights. On one occasion Ephraim Liechty, who frequent- 
ly came out to chat with us, looked at the magnificent scene and re- 
marked:"I've lived up here all my life and never noticed these sunsets 
before. They are kind of pretty, aren't they? " 

We faced a problem that many times seemed insurmountable. 
It was the worst part of the depression; we had no cash and it was im- 
possible to get a loan on houses located in such an unheard-of place, 

Henry had worked in the Dixon Real Estate Co. and was acquaint- 
ed with certain people who put money out to loan. I remember visiting 
some of them with poor success. One man said, "I've already got all 
the houses I want!" (assuming that if he made a loan on our homes he 
would soon have to foreclose on them). 

Another man said he had every confidence in us and that if we 
would pick lots inProvoCity he would gladly let us have the necessary 
money. 

It was a very disTCOuraging period but failed to dampen our en- 
thusiasm for the idea of getting up on the hill. 

Father, who was always starting projects, had purchased the 
area at the mouth of the Provo River on the north side, and with some 
others, dyked certain areas to protect the ground from the flood waters 
of Provo River during the spring run-off. The soil was very fertile and 
the proposition looked excellent until one spring the dyke was breached 
and a small fortune went with it. 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



103 



The next project was the Provonna Resort Co. A number of bath 
houses, a store and a dance pavilion were built. A great deal of ex- 
perience, but little profit was the result. 

Desperately struggling with our problem of building on the hill, 
we suddenly came up with the idea of using lumber from the now de- 
serted Provonna Beach structures as part of the building materials we 
needed. 

The dance pavilion had a beautiful maple floor. The bath houses 
were covered with lumber which would make exterior sheathing, to- 
gether with dimension timbers. 

After several years of part-time employment in the architectural 
office of Joseph Nelson, I was able to draw up plans for our two houses, 
so that we knew exactly what materials we needed for construction. 

Father, meanwhile, had become interested in starting the Dixon- 
Taylor- Russell Co. , and we had become financially interested in the 
business. During the depression the business had its troubles as did 
most others. Being an installment business, a large amount of its 
assets were tied-up in customer accounts. People with good credit 
were out of work and could not make their monthly payments. 

The Company set up for each of the owners and employees what 
became known as "Produce Accounts", A certain percentage of one's 
wages went each month into this account. It was a period of trade and 
barter. Farmers traded hay, butter, milk, eggs, etc, to employees, 
and accounts were debited and credited accordingly. 

We began to see a glimmer of hope for our house projects. Why 
not find men whose various services we needed, and give them credit 
on their accounts for these services? 

We lined up a good carpenter, and helpers, men and teams for 
excavating and road building, sand and gravel suppliers, laborers, 
roofers, electricians, and many other craftsmen. With such assist- 
ance, for example, the beautiful maple floor of the Provonna dance 
pavilion, including the floor joists underneath, were sawed into sec- 
tions which would rest on our basement walls in the exact size needed. 
These sections were loaded and moved by a housemover who had an 
overdue account. 

We will not forget how Parley Larsen went to bat for us on a 
finance plan enabling us to pay for the plumbing and heating. We were 
turned down on our application to use the manufacturer's finance plan, 
but "P. L. " swore we were good risks and refused to take "no" for an 
answer. I know the manager in Salt Lake City thought they were mak- 
ing the wildest kind of a gamble, but Parley vouched for us all the way. 

Before we could think of starting construction, there were cer- 
tain basic things that had to be accomplished. The first was roads. 
Our lots stood in a field with no access. Our best approach appeared 
to be the idea of starting near the Slaughter house site, cross the creek 



104 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



and make a dugway following the present Oak Lane, then to circle my 
lot and run North to Henry's. 

We were able to get some pieces of used bridge conduit to put in 
the creek, then fill over the top with dirt from further up the road un- 
til we had a passable roadway. We had made a deal with the Giles 
Family for merchandise at the store, to pay for covering the entire 
road with gravel. 

The whole cost of this road expense was borne by us. In the 
winter we had no help from the County but had to park at the bottom 
of the hill or churn up the hill through the snow with the aid of tire 
chains. Frequently Ephraim Liechty would appear with his horse- 
drawn snow-plow to help clear our road as well as his own. 

The greatest problem of all was the water situation. This prob- 
lem held back the development of the area for many years. 

The pipeline serving the Liechty and Muhlestein homes had been 
allowed to disintegrate after the Rock Canyon Water Co, had develop- 
ed a source of water which pretty well dried up the old springs used 
by the Miihlesteins and others. 

When we moved up on the hill, the families there were using 
water from the irrigation ditch, diverted from the concrete flume in 
Rock Canyon. The water was run through a gravel bed for settling 
and then into a concrete reservoir, which had a hand pump on the top. 

After a great deal of thought we decided that pending the develop- 
ment of the old springs, drilling a well, or getting a connection with 
Provo City's system which was reservoired at the foot of the bench, 
we would use the same system as the Liechty's. 

We bought several shares of water in the Rock Canyon Water Co, , 
and received delivery of the stream approximately once a week. Our 
water system involved building a concrete, watertight reservoir under 
the living room of Henry's house, A pipeline was run from thereto my 
house, A pressure pump was connected to the system which proved 
to be annoying. It frequently leaked and it was noisy, going on at any 
time of the night or day. At intervals the reservoir had to be drained 
and scrubbed. Samples of the water were sent to the State Board of 
Health frequently, and when showing pollution, we brought our culinary 
water up from town each day. 

An incident typical of our water dilemma occurred a few years 
later when Karl and Elma Young rented Henry's house for a year, 
while he, with his family, was in New York where he worked on his 
Master's Degree, 

It was a bitterly cold winter with one of the heaviest snows in 
our experience. One January day we discovered the reservoir was 
empty. This calamity had to be resolved quickly because there were 
hot water jackets in each furnace and because of the bitterly cold 
weather it was necessary to keep the furnaces going continually. 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



105 



Karl and I took our shovels, after dressing as warmly as we 
could, and struggled up to the "Devils 's Kitchen" where the water could 
be diverted into our ditch. We fixed the dam and coaxed the water by 
shovelling the snow and debris out of the ditch ahead of the water. 
Several times itcloggedand froze into ice and we had to check back on 
it frequently. 

We struggled all day and finally by dusk, had the water nearly to 
Henry's house. However the freezing snow and ice clogged the ditch 
and we were forced to give up. 

After a restless sleep, worrying about the pipes freezing and 
bursting, morning came and we slogged up the ditch and started all 
over. Some moderation in the weather began and we finally were able 
to get a steady trickle of water into the reservoir. 

We had missed two days from school but had added another ex- 
perience we would not soon forget. Had Karl not sprung from "Pion- 
eer Stock", and had he not the fortitude and determination to assist in 
overcoming our plight, it might have been a sad episode. 

Incidentally, it brings to mind another occasion connected with 
our struggle to keep the reservoir full. 

Upon returning home from a Bishop's Meeting, late one evening, 
Celestia informed me that we had no water. According to the Water 
Turn Schedule our turn began at 6:00 a. m. the following morning. 
However, it should have read at 6:00 p, m. that evening. 

As I thought the matter over I felt that due to the lateness of the 
hour and the fact that I would only need the water about 30 minutes, I 
decided to "borrow" someone else's water. 

Not stopping for a lantern, I grabbed a shovel and climbed the 
trail to the point in Rock Canyon where a headgate combination divert- 
ed the water either west in our ditch or south to the Liechty's, 

Feeling my way in the pitch black darkness, I found the he ad gates 
and discovered a big stream of water going south. After feugging with 
the gate which was tightly jammed, I finally got it out and turned the 
water down our ditch. 

All of a sudden I was struck with a brilliant glare of light and an 
angry voice cried: "Stealing my water, are you? ' I couldn't help 
thinking of how many quarrels and deaths had resulted from stealing 
water, and I was mighty scared. 

Then the light was turned at an angle and I discovered my friend 
Heber Liechty, who did not know until then, who had been splashing 
around in the ditch, stealing his water. 

Of course, when I explained my troubles to Heber he was sympa- 
thetic and helped me turn the water, and said to keep it as long as I 
needed it. 



106 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



The problem of communication was slowly solved. No mail 
delivery was available and all mail was sent to the store. A satis- 
factory arrangement was made with the Utah Power & Light COo to 
service us with electricity, but our problem of telephones was not so 
simple. 

The ruling on telephones for a situation like ours, was that a 
minimum of three phones was necessary. We agreed to pay for three 
phones, but red tape said no. There must be three houses. 

After much deliberation, we solved the problem by moving an 
old sleeping porch from Father's home, and placing it equidistant be- 
tween our two houses, A phone was installed in it along with our?,in 
the name of my brother Clarence, and every time a phone on our nine 
party system rang, you could hear it in the old sleeping porch. 

The soil on our hill was such that after a rain you could "sink a 
blanket" on it. Romantically inclined couples began parking along our 
roadway, admiring the moonlight on the lake, and in rainy weather 
becoming mired in the mud. After being awakened many nights with 
pleas to help extricate cars, we finally put a shovel where we could 
tell them to help themselves and dig their own way out. 

One of our biggest problems was that of mud everytime it rain- 
ed. I spent many hours of backbreaking toil gathering and placing 
large boulders, with the flat side up, around the house, serving as 
walks and a flagged area. Lawns were planted and gravel was spread 
to help the situation. 

A near tragedy occurred in connection with gathering the rocks. 
One July 24th morning at daybreak, John, my oldest son, who was 
about 10 years old, went with me to scout for additional rocks, I had 
just purchased a beautiful new Dodge Sedan of which we were very 
proud. John and I rode up Rock Canyon to a site just below the weir. 
We were stopped by a deep wash about ten feet deep and 20 feet across. 
In order to turn around safely I got out of the car to check my position. 
I told John to stay in the car, but fortunately he climbed out, dogging 
my heels. As I looked up the canyon, John grabbed my leg and yelled. 
I turned just in time to see the rear of that beautiful new car, rise, 
rise, as the front plunged down to the bottom of the wash, then turn 
and come to rest on its side, 

I can still feel that sick sensation in my stomach as I scrambled 
down and removed the key from the ignition. 

We hurried home and got Henry up to see what our insurance 
status was. Fortunately we were covered by a reliable company and 
the car was repaired in first class condition. 

The Rock Canyon water shed had been scalped year after year 
by so many herds of sheep that every spring a roaring flood came 
down, sometimes going all the way to the highway. The ground from 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



107 



our bench to Indian Hills would frequently be a raging torrent, some- 
times on the north side, sometimes over against our bench. I recall 
standing there with Ephraim Liechty watching the flood roll boulders 
the size of pianos down its course. 

Naturally, people 1 iving in the area were much concerned. One 
evening, when we returned home in a rainstorm we were surprised to 
find Darweeish Kader, his wife and little girl, sitting in our kitchen. 
The Kaders were Syrians and it was hard to understand their speak- 
ing, Mrs. Kader was tatooed on the forehead and around her mouth 
and could speak no English. 

When we entered the house, Darweeish said in his high-pitched 
voice: "Big storm, we come stay with you. " Fortunately the storm 
was soon over and they were able to return to their home. 

We became quite well acquainted with both Darweeish and his Uncle 
"Mose". They frequently stopped us as we drove past and insisted on 
our accepting fruit, until it became rather embarrassing to us. 

Returning home in somewhat of a hurry one day, I approached 
the large culvert where the road crosses a canal. The culvert is rather 
high and conceals the road for some distance ahead. Skimming over 
the culvert I saw a flock of chickens directly in my path. Setting my 
brakes I did my best to stop but ploughed thru the chickens, stopping 
the car I jumped out and ran back to try to pay for the damage. 

Suddenly, Mrs, Kader came running out of her house, brand- 
ishing a huge knife and screeching at the top of her voice. I thought 
"Well, this is it," and I started to tell her I would pay the damage. 
She kept coming and grabbed a big Plymouth Rock rooster, who was 
flopping around with a broken leg, and whacked off its head, grabbed 
a newspaper from under her arm, rolled the chicken in it and handed 
it to me saying, "You take him home and eat him! " 

One of our problems was transportation. Each family had a car 
but there was the problem of getting to work, getting the children to 
school, and having a car available for the girls' use for social affairs, 
etc. Each morning we loaded one car with children and dropped them 
at school on our way to work. There were no school busses and inas- 
much as we lived in the County we were not allowed to send them to 
the City Schools. The BYU Training School had a full compliment of 
Taylor Kids, 

In the evening on the way home our pick-ups started with the 
Store (DTR), with stops at the Library, Training School, and home of 
friends, not to mention stops for culinary water, gas, and our daily 
supply of milk or groceries. Today, there are four school buses that 
pass our house. 

In the meantime the old Muhlestein House was abandoned and be- 
came a "haunted house"for our children, especially at Halloween time. 
All members of the Muhlestein Family had left for other areas, and 
the old homestead and its 160 acres of barren ground, with deep ravines, 
bare hillsides, and profusion of scrub oaks began to return to its orig- 
inal state. 



108 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



Arrangements were made to pasture two of Father's saddle 
horses on the property and we all enjoyed riding them. 

Meanwhile, other people began to drive up and enjoy the view. 
We watched them with trepidation because we had begun todreamabout 
a subdivision at some future date which would cover this area with fine 
homes. We felt it had sound possibilities and the longer we considered 
it, the more sure we became. 

However, there were two stumbling blocks in our way that seem- 
ed insurmoxintable. The old Muhlestein Estate was now owned by thir- 
teen heirs, and to set a price and to get a 100% agreement from so 
many individuals seemed an impossibility. The other obstacle was a 
familiar one to us- -we had very little capital we could raise to make 
such a purchase. 

The more we thought about it the more certain we were of its 
possibilities. We began to mention it to some of our family and friends. 
Little interest was shown by some, but certain ones, particularly 
J. Hamilton Calder, saw the possibilities and became unfailing part- 
icipants . 

Henry began to work with the Muhlestein Family and after untold 
hours, finally reached an agreement for the sale, satisfactory to each 
member of the family. Only because of their implicit confidence in 
Henry's integrity, was he able to handle this transaction. Without 
Henry's far-sightedness and loyal support, we would never have ach- 
ieved success on the hill. 

In order to raise the money, many people were visited and a lot 
of salesmanship occurred before a small group were included in the 
Bonneville Development Company which was the Corporation owning 
and responsible for its development. 

Before any lots could be sold, many things had to be done. A 
complete survey of the property, including topographical dat^t, location 
of lots and roads, and a sales program had to be made. 

The biggest problem of all, however, was out- old bugaboo- -an 
adequate water supply. The deed to the property gave us the major 
interest in the old springs developed by a tunnel part way up Rock 
Canyon, This had now caved in, and the Rock Canyon Water Co. had 
done considerable development work in that area. Reclaiming this 
tunnel and springs appeared to be a wonderful idea. We could develop 
our own water supply and be independent of Provo City. 

After investigation we discovered that such construction would 
undoubtedly lessen the flow of the Rock Canyon Water Co. and inas- 
much as they had been using the water longer than seven years, we 
would get into a costly legal battle with questionable success. 

We examined sites where drilling had brought good flows of 
water, and engaged Dr. George Hansen to advise us. It is a known 
fact among geologists that the strata of rocks in Rock Canyon are 
slanted to drain the water below this, finally coming up near the sur- 
face down in the valley. There is agreat deal of water behind this dyke , 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



109 



some of it spilling off to Bridal Veil Falls. 

A location for drilling was selected in the mouth of Rock Canyon, 
and a contract was signed with a driller. The hole finally turned out to 
be a "duster", and another location was selected with a similiar lack of 
succes s . 

A number of shares in the Rock Canyon Water Co. had been acq- 
uired with the purchase of the property, and it was decided to try to 
use these. Fred L. Markham {always generous with his architectural 
services, and a pillar of support in the new corporation designed a 
large reservoir, inclosed completely with a man-hole in the top, in the 
mouth of the canyon, near the weir where the concrete conduit spilled 
into the diversion box, 

Len Creer received the contract to construct the reservoir and 
to dig a trench for the 4" cast iron pipe line which led to the site of the 
new homes. 

Later, taking turns at filling the reservoir and scrubbing its 
walls became something of a social occasion. 

About this time, Clarence D, Taylor, Ham. Calder, Wesley F. 
Knudsen, and L. O. Turner had built their homes, and we began to 
feel like a community. 

Our water system left much to be desired. We had always felt 
that we should be part of Provo City and that pur water system should 
be connected with the City lines, A petition, meanwhile, to annex our 
area into Provo City had been granted and we were paying City Taxes 
which were considerably higher than those in the County. We were 
constantly working with the Mayor and Commissioners to co-operate 
with us on a water system. We received all sorts of objections, es- 
pecially a constant battle with the City Engineer, We were told to move 
down and fill up some of the vacant lots in Provo; that we were crazy 
to build on such a bare hilly country, and that the City could not afford 
to extend its utilities to such a small community. We argued that it 
was so desirable a place to live, that we would soon have plenty of 
homes to justify it, and that such a des irable tcixing unit would be creat- 
ed, it would be a profitable source of income to the City. 

In one meeting with the Commissioners, one of them said: "Why 
did you join the City? It's because you thought you would get City Water ! " 
We agreed. He said that if we thought they were going to extend the 
lines to our property and make us rich we had another guess coming. 

Time after time we would have the majority converted to our 
proposition, only to have them defeated at the polls and a new comm- 
ission be installed in office. In almost every case, they had the same 
opinion of our foolhardy venture. They constantly relied on the City 
Engineer (who unfortunately had a permanent position), and our ans- 
wer would be the same. 



110 



LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 



Finally with the advent of a City Manager the idea did not seem 
so far-fetched, and orders were given to the Engineer's Office to out- 
line some plans which would deliver water to the higher elevations. 

The result was a concrete tank built up on the hillside with an 
8" pipeline down to the main City Reservoir, where a pump was in- 
stalled. We were forced to advance the cost of these with a connection 
charge on each lot which would eventually come back to us in payment 
for the original amount we had advanced. 

A considerable amount of money had to be raised, in addition to 
the water system expense. Sewer line, roads, the cost of topograph- 
ical maps and plat plans which had to be made and submitted to the 
Engineer's Office before approval to sell lots was obtained. 

Deed restrictions covering the design, construction and mater- 
ials going into each home were strictly enforced, as well as landscap- 
ing restrictions. Lots in many case sold themselves, and lovely new 
homes began to arise. Additional acreage had to be subdivided. 

By the Fall of 1965 when this was written, 83 individual homes 
had been built with several other lots sold and houses in the planning 
stage. Somewhat over half of the original acreage has now been sold 
as building lots, with plans to develop the balance on a par with those 
now finished. 

Note: 

The area where Lynn and Henry built their homes is officially 
recorded in the Utah County Records as "TAYLOR HILL SUBDIVISION". 
The old Muhlestein property, to the South, is officially designated as 
"OAK HILLS SUBDIVISION". 



Taylor Hill 




The Old Sleeping Porch 
"Telephone Booth on the Hill" 
A\int "Rye" Taylor 



1 1 1 



North Fork of Provo Canyon 




112 



7th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




113 



Hulon Sterling Dixon Family 




"TH"E MOSTEST OF ABE"S BESTEST" 
RULON STERLING DIXON - 1 8 9 8 - 1 9 65 



•'My hair might be an off shade of pink, but it ain't carrot orange. " 
So quoted Rulon Sterling Dixon (Abe) when called "carrot top". 

Rulon inherited this sandy hair from his Grandfather Henry 
Aldous Dixon and was born on Provo's "Sandy Alley" , September 9, 
1898, the fourth son of John DeGrey Dixon and Sarah Ann Lewis. 

The nickname "Abe" was hung on him by his playmates in his 
early youth and remained with him the rest of his life. 

In his early teens, his father's youngest brother, Arnold, gave 
him a Bantam rooster and several hens. From this early gift he be- 
came one of the most successful producers of prize-winning Bantam 
chickens in the West. Not only was he interested in Bantam chickens, 
but he branched out to raising and showing prize-winning dogs, horses, 
sheep and rabbits. 

It was nothing unusual for him to spend hours upon hours of time, 
washing, grooming his pets to display in pet shows and fairs in all 
parts of the United States. He won hundreds of prize ribbons and 
trophies. In Later years his service as judge in fairs and stock shows 
was in great demand. 

As a boy of nine years; how proud I was to be asked by Rulon and 
entrusted with the transporting of a pen of his prize chickens from the 
American Express freight depot on University Avenue to his coops at 
440 North Fifth West. After school I would take my little red wagon 
to the freight depot where the cages of chickens were waiting, after 
having been on display in some distant fair or show. Most always, 
there were prizewinning ribbons on the cages. For this delivery 
service, I would receive a quarter, which to me was a generous wage. 

My first chickens were Golden Bantams. One rooster and two 
hens, given to me by Rulon one day after having helped him. How 
proud I was when one of these hens stole away, laid a nest full of 
eggs and hatched eleven fluffy, yellow biddies, 

Rulon attended the old Timpanogos School, which was just across 
the street from his home. He graduated from the B, Y. U, High 
School and went onto college on the same campus , obtaining his degree 
in 1923. 

Recognizing his need for specializing in the Animal Husbandry 
field, he attended Wyoming State University and obtained his Masters 
degree. In 1925-1926 he taught school at the Laramie, Wyoming 
High School, 

While teaching at Pleasant Grove High School, he realized the 
need for a good Animal Husbandry High School textbook. So he author- 
ed a text book, "Livestock Judging", 

At the B. Y. U, he was a charter member of the Goldbricker 's 
Club. Abe's cousin, Lynn D. Taylor (Sunbeam) records the following 
about the activities of this club: 



115 



116 



RULON STERLING DIXON 



"We had a character in the Club known as"Abe" Dixon. Abe now 
lives in Salt Lake and is a mutual cousin of Buck and myself. He was 
always a hefty lad -- he's a conservative 250 pounds now -- and was 
always the life of the party. He had an old model T Ford one of the 
first in town and he called it "Inertia". It was always driven through 
the gate on the lower campus and tied up to one of the trees on the 
lawn, with a piece of cord string. It had no key and all the "Brickers" 
used it whenever they wished. It was quite a sight to see "Inertia" 
dodging through the trees and along the walks, around the buildings, 
with a load of guys and gals. " 

"Each spring, Girls Day was celebrated. "Aunt Alice Reynolds" 
the counterpart of your Dean of Women today, had charge of the ar- 
rangements for this day. It was customary to nominate several girls 
for Queen and elect the winner the day before the event. When the 
nominations were completed it was discovered that "Abe" Dixon's 
name was entered. All the Brickers got out and worked and "Abe" 
polled by far the biggest vote, "Aunt Alice" wrung her hands and pled 
for justice. The highest girl vote was finally named Queen and "Abe" 
was featured as "King. " 

"The Annual Bricker Festival was a canyon week-end party. 
These parties were held at Wildwood and were wonderfully successful. 
It was here that the loving cup contest developed. I'm reminded of one 
little incident. "Abe" Dixon's fiance' was on a mission and he had as- 
ked another girl to go to the party with him. We ganged up on him the 
last day while loving cup nominations were being made and insisted 
that he won, hands down. Some impassioned oratory supported his 
candidacy, while "Abe" squirmed, and stuttered and tried to plead 
innocent. As a matter of fact, the girl he had taken was upset because 
he had been so distant. " 

In the 1922 Banyan, opposite a picture of Rulon "Abe" Dixon,who 
was dressed in a football suit, appeared the following: 

" Rulon "Abe" Dixon was sadly hoodooed this year. First he 
burned his finger, then he broke his ribs and presently he sprained 
his ankles. Altogether his red headed luck kept him busted up. In 
spite of this he kept on the field till the end of the season. "Abe" is a 
chicken fancier, a sheep fancier and a prize winner by habit. Also he 
is a senior with this wonderous philosophy: "There Aint' no Hell!" 

While still at the B, Y.U. , Rulon sponsored an Extempioraneous 
Speaking Contest and donated "The Rulon Dixon Silver Cup" to the 
winner. In 1923, his cousin, Royden Dangerfield, won this award. 

Since Rulon's father was the largest fruit farmer onProvo Bench, 
own ing and operating three large farms of nearly one hundred acres, 
there was always plenty of work to keep him busy during the spring, 
summer and fall. There was always plowing, cultivating, watering, 
spraying of the orchards. In the fall, the big job of picking, packing , 
and shipping of the fruit to the Eastern markets, was a tremendously 
big job, requiring the vmdivided support of the whole Dixon Family. 



RULON STERLING DIXON 



117 



Even the relatives contributed their efforts to harvesting of the fruit. 

In 1923 Rulon was called and filled a mission for the Church in 
the Western States Mission. 

In 1927, he was appointed Smith-Hughes agricultural instructor 
at the Pleasant Grove High School. This same year (October 15, 1927) 
he married Erma Murdock in the Salt Lake Temple. 

In his own words this is how he was "trapped"; 

" How I first met mom (Erma Murdock):" 

" I was walking through the gates at the B. Y. U. with "Louie" 
Edwards. He was a six-foot-four basketball star and a HE beauty. All 
the gals fluttered like wounded doves when he just looked at them. We 
approached three lovelies and among them was this gorgeous brunette 
with raven black hair, dressed in the very latest. It was a sweater 
and skirt, not one of those Sloppy Joe deals of today, but a cashmere 
sweater that if it could have talked would have said, "doesn't she just 
fill a sweater as it should be filled? And I think I will cling to her." 
And it did. The skirt was a long slinky one. When they had said "hi" 
and moved on, she smiled, and it did make you FIZZ (in a nice sort of 
way). I asked "Louie who she was and he said, "Why? " I told him 
that was the gal I wanted to marry. That really startled him, coming 
from a guy who had always taken a dim view of women. He said, "You 
couldn't do better." He told me her dad was president of most every- 
thing in Wasatch County, and her mom was the most respected and 
lovely lady in the Coiinty, so why shouldn't she be something special? 
As I looked at Mom yesterday, I thought; how lucky can a lug like me 
be? As I look back over the years, and they have been good years, 
Mom has continued to gain in stature ( and I don't mean weight)." 

"After much calling, I found that my friend Erma was in Provo, 
I asked her if she wouldn't like a ride in our beautiful hill country, and 
she said it would be fine. I told her I would bring the lunch and call 
for her in two hours, " 

" I picked up Brown Eyes at Henroid's, and as soon as she was 
in the car, she wanted to know what was for lunch, so I handed her a 
box and told her to look. She asked about the cocktail, and it was crab, 
her favorite. The salad was "ummy". By this time she had spotted 
the apple pie, too. When she asked what was in the sandwiches, I 
told her I would have to look. She was very polite and said everything 
looked delicious, "But Pet", I said, " I gave you MY lunch box, this 
other one is yours." She really hated apple pie! When she opened the 
box, she said, "Why you, so and so, everything I like !" It was no mis- 
take. " 

"Then she opened a box of chocolates. "I'll take a bite and then 
if I don't like the flavor, you can have it, " she said. "I'll be big and 
divide." The next question was, "when do we eat? " I told her when 
we found a good place up the canyon, "Oh no", she said, "I'm starv- 
ing, and a growing girl must keep up her strength," She said she 
would take just a few tastes, " 



118 



RULON STERLING DIXON 



" After she kicked off her shoes and got comfy, she started to 
nod. Being a gentleman, I made her as comfortable as possible. One 
thing that caused her trouble was a small gob of frosting that she could 
hardly reach with her tongue, but she finally made it and to sleep. As 
the paperback in my day would have said: "Here was the sleeping 
beauty with all her charms, when suddenly passion reared its ugly 
head and this cad, this fellow of low degree, stole a kiss." I was 
either excited or hit a rut because my aim was rotten and it landed 
between her upturned nose and shell pink ear. By this time, Brown 
Eyes was wide awake, and she gave me one of her dirtiest looks and 
said: "Rulon Sterling Dixon, I never was so insulted in my life, and if 
you can't do better than that, don't try again." Wow, what a gal!" 

"It had been nearly three years since I had last seenErma, and 
she was everything I expected! More beautiful than ever, with a few 
extra curves where they do the most good, along with a maturity, 
polish and poise. And she didn't have that "thus saith the Lord" at- 
titude I disliked in so many Lady Missionaries. All in all a livin' doll, 
and was I ever thrilled to see her. She seemed equally happy to see 
me. We had a few dates and I just assumed she was my steady girl 
friend. How wrong can a guy be? " 

" Later I called on her without phoning and asked her to go for 
a ride. She said she would have to be back at seven. You guessed it, 
my chickadees, she had a date at seven, and this, as the Union would 
say, was our "cooling off period". She explained it was her mission- 
ary companion's wedding and the missionary who was going to take her 
had asked weeks ago. She then said: "Let's go for the ride, I'll skip 
the wedding, " 

" We headed for Heber via Charleston, I told her I no doubt had 
assumed too much, but to hear me out with no interruptions. I said I 
thought my feelings towards her were mutual, but it seemed not, and I 
didn't like the situation at all, I resented her going out with other boy 
friends, I realized she hadn't said anything like she would only go out 
with me, but had seemed to care for me as much as I did for her. 
Things being as they were, I didn't think we should see each other. 
She asked me if I was through talking, and I told her only one other 
thing; that I thought it would be very nice if she would change her name 
to Mrs. Rulon Sterling Dixon, as one R.S.D. loved her very much, 
and she said "OH! YES!" 

" And you brats ask me how the story ended. Well, for your in- 
formation, the stork didn't lose his way to our place four times," 

" We had decided to get married during "beet vacation". We had 
a week off and I didn't believe in long engagements (not more than four 
years). Also, Mom had about decided to go back to school, and of all 
schools, the U. Of U, " 

"We had rented an apartment across the street from the High 
School in Pleasant Grove, We had new everything to put into it, the 
best of furniture, china, glassware, etc. and it really was beautiful." 



RULON STERLING DIXON 



119 



" Our wedding day was to be a Saturday and Aldous had asked 
Pres ident McKay if he could make it on a Saturday and he said he would 
be delighted to marry us. So at 9:00 a.m. we were to arrive for the 
fatal hour. I couldn't get to sleep, and as the light appeared over Mt. 
Timpanogos, I crawled out and dressed in my finery. At least I had 
a new pair of socks. I was ready to hie me to Salt Lake, I just knew 
my beloved wo\ild be in a tizzie. I was delayed for some reason and 
didn't arrive until 8:30, and expected my bride to be pacing the floor, 
I really had thought up a dilly of a reason why I was late. " 

" Grandma Murdock let me in and told me to go in and wake her 
daughter up, as she had called her but as yet had no response. I gazed 
at Erma, sound asleep. Could she be snoring? What a cad I was to 
even let a thought like that cross my mind! In deep slumber, yes, 
but the other, decidedly not. As I gazed at her, I thought: Dixon, how 
can a guy like you be so lucky? " 

" This would never do -- we were nearly late. I shook her a 
couple of times, and still no response. This called for something 
drastic. So I smacked her where it would do the most good. She 
stretched and finally opaned one eye and smiled, but she had a wicked 
gleam in her eye. In mock terror she gathered a sheet around her 
38-22-36 and let out the most blood-curdling scream you ever heard. 
Grandma was in the room in a bound and her lovely daughter points a 
finger at me and says: "Look, Mom, a man in my room, " and adds, 
"and the coward won't even stay and help me get dressed. " When she 
recovered. Grandma said: "Erma Murdock, you ought to get a good 
spanking." I told them I would love to spank her, but they shooed me 
out, and as I paced the floor musing on life in general and Mrs. R.S. 
Dixon-to-be in particular , the door opened and my radiant bride (to be) 
said she was ready and we better get started. I thought my problem 
would be to calm her down and reassure her what a wonderful step we 
were taking to face life together, but now I knew my problem would be 
to keep her awake while we said our I doos. After all these years, 
Mom was up the other day and waved to me from the car, and I still 
get butterflies, only more and better. She has all the fine qualities 
her Mom had, and turned out to be something very, very special. 
WOW WHAT A GAL!" 

Rulon and family lived in Ogden for about three years and Idaho 
Falls for about three year s , working for some of the largest feed mills 
in the intermountain area, including General Mills and Sperry. 

Rulon then concluded he had sufficient clientele , who had become 
sold on his superior diagnosis, service and supply of poultry and 
animal feed, to start up his own feed company. He called this comp- 
any the R. S. DIXON PRODUCTS COMPANY. 

He developed many new and far-reaching formulas which were 
registered under his name. Even duringhis last illness in the hospital, 
he was still making up new formulas to register and market. 

Through his early diagnosis and diligent service he was able to 
save many flocks and herds from being wiped out by disease. 



120 



RULON STERLING DIXON 



Rulon was constantly being called upon to act as a judge in some 
of the largest and best livestock and poultry shows and fairs in the West. 

He was a true Dixon and loved to visit, even going out of his way 
to call upon one of his ailing, aged aunts or uncles. He always had the 
right thing to say which left encouragement and happiness on his depart- 
ure. 

Even when "Abe" was hospitalized inOgden, his wit, good nature, 
his enthusiasm for life, and his art of expression are revealed in the 
following thoughts he penned: 

" This is Saturday and Mom( Erma) generally makes it up here. 
She sure is a "dream boat". 

" Hitch your wagon to a star, keep your seat, and there you are, " 

" To me: - six months and it doesn't seem a day over ten years. 
Oh! how time flies." 

" An Avon saleslady was asked if she ever tried to sell Mrs. 
Dixon any of her products. She said, "No, there is a woman who is 
just too pretty for even Avon to do any good, " 

" I heard a newscaster say that there should be five freedoms 
and he included freedom to choose. Boy, he has something there. When 
you get right down to facts, it is a basic. I say I will choose lamb 
chops, sliced tomatoes, and a baked potato, I get a cut-up weiner in 
a sea of tomato soup. " 

" The orderly just brought me a chair that has casters so that I 
can hang onto the chair and push it. I guess I was making them dizzy 
with my walk. " 

"One of the internes, who was checking me, touched one of my 
shingles, and I went about three feet in the air. He looks at me and 
asks me if it hurt. I said, "No, I just took off like that for the sheer 
hell of it." 

ON THANKSGIVING DAY in the hospital: 

" Thought for the Day: I am thankful for my family, nation and 
Church. 

Program for the Day : As our old Charley would say, "Let's 
just sit around and josh and sing hymns. 

For those away from Home: At least no dishes to wash or ice 
cream to freeze. " 

" They have a new batch of student nurses from St. Marks. 
There is one blonde among them that the local gentry thinks is really 
something. Yesterday she passed the room across the hall and one of 
the local Romeos yells, "Come on in, bright eyes!" Andwas he floored 
when their instructor, a girlish sixty, fluttered in like a wounded 
dove. She was right behind the blonde and thought it was for her and 
she beamed all day, " 

Even after thirty-eight years of married life, and after one of 
Erma's weekly visits to the hospital, he writes: " Boy, what do you 
mean, you trapped me? Did I ever want to be trapped? I chased you 
for seven years, but it was worth it, you cute brat. After your visits 
I just walk around in a fog for the rest of the week. " "Doll, you is the 



RULON STERLING DDCON 



121 



mostest, and have always been." "So long for now you beautiful hunk 
of womanhood. I adore you. " 

" If it was in my power to send you any gift in the world to repay 
you in a small way for the gifts you have given me down through the 
years of love and devotion (sure we had minor explosions, but never 
a dull moment), it would not be jewels, mink or Cadillacs, but it would 
be PEACE OF MIND. " 

" So a salute to the most wonderful wife in the world, and a 
merry, merry Christmas to you my darling. " 

After a confinement of forty months in the hospital at Ogden, 
Rulon Sterling Dixon passed away on October 27, 1965. 

He and his wife Erma had the following family of boys: 
James R. Dixon (Jim ) 

Joseph M. Dixon (Joe ) 

G, Michael Dixon (Mike ) 
Peter M. Dixon (Pete ) 



Compiled from material furnished by the Rulon Sterling Dixon 
family. September 1973. 

Clarence D. Taylor 



See also: "MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST" 

Written by Rulon S. Dixon 
In "My Folks The Dixons" 
Volume I, Page 151 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
SARAH ANN LEWIS DIXON 

ID# 2 Wife 



Born April 23, 1868 at Provo, Utah to Jane Davis and William John 
Lewis . 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church on April 23, 1876. 
Married John DeGrey Dixon by A. N. Lund in the Manti Temple on 

September 18, 1889. 
Children: 

Henry Aldous II, John William, Stanley Lewis, Rulon Sterling, 
Maud, Lucian and Grant. 

Her education was scarce and at intervals when she was not helping 
her father plant and harvest the crops. Or she attended school 
when the freezing weather closed the Woolen Mills, after she 
became a weaver there. 

Her first school was Benjamin Walton's private school. She also at- 
tended the B. Y. Academy, in the old Lewis Hall and in the 
Z.C.M. I. warehouse. 

Her early life was a typical Pioneer Family life, including the trading 

of fruit and vegetables for other necessities; the making of soap, 
starch and lye, to be used in washing the clothes; white-washing 
the walls in the house; filling the bed ticks with straw and corn 
shocks for mattresses; drying fruit in the sun; picking and dry- 
ing ground cherries; and self amusements. 

She opened her home to many B.Y.U. students, for a place to live in a 
good L. D. S. home. Many of them bear testimony to a good 
influence here, which played a major part in moulding their 
successful lives. 

She was President of the Provo Third Ward Y. L. M. I. A. 

President of the Provo Third Ward Relief Society for nearly twenty 
years . 

She died at the Utah Valley Hos pital, Provo, Utah on October 28, 1951. 



122 



8th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 63 




ELTON LE ROY TAYLOR, 



ETHEL L. SCOTT 




123 



Elton LeRoy Taylor Family 




RFD Box 333, Lakeview 
Provo, Utah 




Elton - Lakeview Farm Elton - Hillcrest Farm 



124 



EVENTS IN MY LIFE 
ELTON LE ROY TAYLOR 

June 22, 1900, at 256 North Fifth West, Provo, Utah, was the 
time and place where I first saw the light of day, being the third child 
of Arthur Nicholls Taylor and Maria Dixon Taylor, the second child to 
be born in their new home. I once remarked to Mother that this was 
the next to the longest day of the year --She quickly replied, "It was the 
longest. " 

Shortly after my birth. Father received a call to go on a mis- 
sion for the Church to England, leaving three small boys, with Mother 
at home. The new home was rented and we moved in next door to live 
with Grandma Sarah DeGrey Dixon, she having been a widow for many 
years. Mother was able to get her old job back at Mr. Skelton's Book 
Store, enabling her to help with Father's mission expenses. Six months 
before Father returned from his mission Mother, at the urging and 
with the assistance of her family, joined Father in the mission field, 
in Birmingham, England, he being the Conference President there. 
This left us in the sole care of Grandma Dixon, she bearing the brunt, 
with the help of my older brothers Arthur D. and Lynn D. ; of my ted- 
ious care. 

Upon the return of Father and Mother from England, we moved 
back into our own home, which became a beehive of activity. Mother's 
brothers, the Dixon boys, being skilled brick masons, had built a 
large two story, red brick, barn in the rear of our houses, which was 
used jointly by the two families. The Dixon brothers, having formed 
the South Fork Cattle Co. , fed their cattle there in the winter time. 

Our fruit and dairy farm at Hillcrest was sold and Father 
purchased land near the mouth of Provo River. Most of this land was 
lake bottom land and had to be broken up. This was done mostly by 
Uncle Jim McClellan and myself. It was done with three horse teams 
on sulky riding plows. Later Father bought a Cletrac Crawler gas 
tractor, which I drove in the farming operation. The principle crops 
we raised were sugar beets, grain, and native or wild hay. 

After the Skipper Bay dike washed out and flooded all the farm 
land, we decided to build a bathing resort on the Lake front. We pur- 
chased bathing suits and towels and acquired rowboats. We built a 
wooden bridge across the river, permitting access by automobile to 
the beach. We named our enterprise, "The Provonna Beach Resort." 
Henry D. and myself were given charge of the operation, with all 
members of the family participating. The next spring ice piles from 
the lake demolished our bathhouses. They were rebuilt and a dance 
hall and dining room and store were added. 

When the resort was first begun, a neighbor boy and close 
friend from an adjoining farm, Alfred J. Madsen, brought his sister 
Gladys, with her almost inseparable companion, Ethel Scott, also of 
Lake view, to visit us. They came in a horse and buggy. This was my 



125 



126 



lELTON LE ROY TAYLOR 



first meeting with Ethel. With her jet black hair, dark eyes, contag- 
ious smile and quick wit, I thought she was the most beautiful girl I 
had ever met. She just plain did something to me. I met her again at 
a party at LaMar Bird' s home. She was in nurses training at the Provo 
General Hospital. A few days later I got up enough courage to call her 
on the phone and ask her for a date. She accepted. From then on we 
were going steady. 

My early schooling was in the old Timpanogos Grade School. 
Later all of the eighth grade pupils in Provo were transferred to the 
Central School. Here I was graduated from the eighth grade in 1914. 
Next I attended the B . Y . High School for four years, from which I grad- 
uated in 1 918. In the fall of 1918 a unit of the U.S. Army, the Students 
Army Training Corps was established at B. Y.U. I enlisted along with 
Lynn, and became a part of that unit. We were quartered in the Maeser 
Memorial Building, on the hill. While there the flu epidemic broke out. 
Lynn and I both came down with it. Medical facilities being very in- 
adequate in the unit, all of the boys from Utah County, who were 
stricken, were senthome to have their families provide the necessary 
care for them. This Mother gladly and efficiently did for us. 

After the Armistice, I enrolled in college at B. Y.U. which I 
attended for parts of two years. Then Father feeling that I was to be 
the farmer of the family, suggested that I attend the Agricultural 
College at Logan. Accordingly I enrolled at the Utah State Agricult- 
ural College and for the first year lived at the home of William A. Noble . 
Besides my Agricultural and Business courses, I was required to take 
Military Science and Drill, and enjoyed swimming, handball and long 
distance running. I also went out one spring for football. 

In 1921 when Father was building a new building for the newly 
organized Dixon Taylor Russell Co. , I worked as a laborer on the 
construction until it was completed. With the arrival of new merch- 
andise, I was made the official truck driver and later was installed as 
store deliveryman. 

I left on my mission in January 1923, serving in the Eastern 
States Mission under one of the General Authorities, President Brig- 
ham H. Roberts. It was a great privilege to labor under this great 
missionary, historian and prolific writer. I wrote to Mother during 
one of my discouraging moments, telling her of some of my problems. 
I did not get much sympathy from her. She wrote back, "It will make 
a man out of you." I received my mission release in 1924. 

I returned to my work at D. T. R. Co. , as a salesman in the 
North end of Utah County, which eventually developed into a Branch 
Store in Pleasant Grove, and my appointment as store manager. 

Ethel and I felt it was now time for us to get married. We 
were married in the Salt Lake Temple on March 31, 1926, by Presi- 
dent George F. Richards. After the ceremony President Richards 
handed the marriage certificate to Ethel, saying, "Sister Taylor this 
is yours." Not having been called by that name before, she turned 



ELTON LE ROY TAYLOR 



127 



around and waited for Mother to take it. After leaving the Temple we 
drove to Aunt Sarah McConachie's beautiful home onNorthMain Street 
where Aunt Sarah had prepared a lovely wedding breakfast for us. 
We spent our honeymoon in California, and returned to Pleasant Grove 
to make our home. 

In the spring of 1929, Ethel and I accompanied by her Father 
and Mother, took a drive to Price to inspect the progress being made 
on the new D. T. R. Co. building there. The last of June our house- 
hold goods were loaded on a large truck and Fred Williams drove it to 
Price, we going ahead in our Ford Model T. Sedan. 

We we re fortunate in moving next door to some wonderful neigh- 
bors, Carl and Catherine Raile Saxey. She brought over a large bask- 
et filled with a delicious lunch and jumped in and helped with the clean- 
ing of the house. All the while she was giving Ethel a pep talk, with 
these prophetic words: J'You can learn to like any place if you will 
make up your mind to do it. The way you react to people is the way 
they will react to you. There are good people here in Price, the same 
as those you have left. When the time comes you will hate to leave 
them." How true this proved to be. We stayed there thirty-one years. 

Because of business and church work, I was away from home 
a great deal. Ethel said when the children saw me coming home, they 
went to get their bibs, chair, or nightgowns. They thought it was time 
to eat or go to bed. Ethel became known as the "church widow" in our 
ward. I served in the Bishopric for five years and then served on the 
High Council for seven years. Bishop of the Price First Ward for ONE 
WEEK, and Carbon Stake President for seventeen years. 

In 195 2 I began experiencing back problems. I was in constant 
pain and was losing partial use of my legs. After our trip to Mexico 
City, my back problem continued to get more critical. An appoint- 
ment was made with Dr. Nephi K. Kezerian, an Orthopedic Surgeon 
inProvo,who gave me an intensive examination, taking x-ray pictures. 
His diagnosis was a blockage in the nerve system of my spinal column. 
He recommended an operation but suggested we make an appointment 
with Dr. Alfred M. Okelberry in Salt Lake City to check his diagnosis. 
Dr, Okelberry confirmed Dr. Kezerian's diagnosis and treatment. 

Prior to my admittance to the Utah Valley Hospital in Provo, 
I attended a meeting held tntrbe Dese ret Coal Mine, near Orangeville. 
The mine was part of the Church Welfare Program. To this meeting. 
Stake Presidencies, High Counselors, Bishoprics, Relief Society 
Presidencies and other leaders of the Central Utah Region, of which I 
was serving as chairman; had been invited to attend. The place of the 
meeting was inside the coalmine in a room of the mine, the black coal 
walls of which had been "rock dusted" until the room was a gleaming 
white. Electric lighting was installed and chair and benches provided. 
The room was appropriately designated as "The Chapel". In attend- 
ance from The General Authorities were: Elders Spencer W. Kimball, 
Delbert L. Stapley, Henry D. Moyle and Dr. LeRoy Wirthlin of The 



128 



ELTON LE ROY TAYLOR 



General Church Welfare Committee. 

I was having a difficult time to sit through the meeting, exper- 
iencing much discomfort and pain. Without my knowledge, my coun- 
selors Presidents Arvel R. Stevens and Asa L. Draper had requested 
the Brethren to administer to me and give me a blessing, after the 
meeting, to which they agreed. When the meeting was over we went 
from the mine down the hill to the tipple where the scale house, wash 
and clothes change room, which we entered; was located. The three 
Stake Presidencies joined in the circle with The General Authorities 
in giving me the blessing. Elder Kimball, being the senior Apostle 
present, requested Elder Stapley to be "mouth" in giving the blessing. 
Elder Stapley started with words usually used in a blessing, then sick 
as I was, I felt the power of the Priesthood in the promise, "Your life 
will be spared. The Lord still has much work for you upon earth to 
do. You will be given a complete recovery of your health and strength. " 

About a week later I went into the Utah Valley Hospital for the 
operation. During the operation it was found that I had a tumor on my 
spinal Column, putting pressure on the nerve system. It had also 
caused deterioration on some of my vertabrae. Test showed the tumor 
to be malignant. I had cancer. The tumor was removed, the decayed 
parts of the spinal column were chipped away. After the operation 
Ethel was told that my condition was critical, my future was bleak. 

Six years later I returned to Provo for a check-up by Dr. Kez- 
erian where more x-ray pictures were taken. In his letter as to the 
results of his findings, he said, "Six years ago, at the time of your 
operation, we found an active tumor (cancer) on your spinal column. 
The x-ray pictures just taken show no evidence of a re-occurance of 
the tumor and where we scraped the diseased part of your vertabrae, 
it has now completely been filled in. The tumor has been arrested, or 
you have been completely healed. " 

With the closing of the D.T.R. Co. store at Price and our re- 
turn to Provo, we purchased Ethel' s folks farm and house inLakeview, 
which we completely remodeled and added to, making an attractive, 
convenient and modern home and with one of the best gardens in Lake- 
view. This garden supplies our family, neighbors and friends with 
"dirt fresh" vegetables all summer and our winter potatoes and carrots. 

Ethel and myself were invited to attend a local Farm Bureau 
dinner where I was presented with an award as being "The best gardner 
in the Lake view Ward". 

Shortly after this we were able to purchase 18 acres of farm- 
land, just two blocks west of our home, from Spencer Madsen. Later 
15 acres of pasture land was purchased from Mark Scott. 

With persistent hard work of digging drain ditches, leveling, 
fencing and cultivation, this swampy land has been re-claimed and 
turned into a productive farm and pasture land supporting up to twenty 
head of beef cattle for our family and friends consumption. 

I am now serving as Patriarch of the West Sharon Stake. 



9th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
First Granddaughter 




129 





130 



E R MA 



MAE 



DIXON 



BOSHARD 



Erma Mae Dixon Boshard was born on September 10, 1900 in 
Provo, Utah. She was the first child of Ernest DeGrey and Mary Ann 
Painter Dixon. She was the first granddaughter of Henry Aldous Dixon, 
and as such was given a new silk dress made by Aunt Mary, as she 
had promised. 

Her childhood years were happy ones and she spent much of her 
time playing with her younger sister Leah and her cousin Rhea. She 
attended kindergarten at the Brigham Young Academy and at the age of 
six began school at the Timpanogos Elementary School. Her father 
attended this school as did her sons and grandsons. 

On the 21st of March 1909 she was baptized by Paul Ashworth 
and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day 
Saints by Roy Passey. 

Many happy days were spent with cousins and relatives at Nephi. 
Family outings at the Old Resort on Utah Lake were always an occasion 
for happy celebration. One of the highlights of her youth, was her 
first ride in Provo' s first automobile. 

Little did she realize in 1915, the year she graduated from the 
8th grade at Central Junior High, when she and her family went on an 
extended trip to Duchesne in a covered wagon, that they would be mov- 
ing to this area. She attended Provo High School for two years and 
then the family moved to Blue Bench, near Duchesne and the Indian 
Reservation. Here she experienced real pioneer living. The family 
lived in a one room log cabin, no electricity, no running water. Water 
had to be hauled in barrels from the nearby stream. There were no 
trees for shade; just lots of drifting sand from the newly plowed land. 

Erma being the oldest child in the family, it became her job to 
help her father get the land leveled, after plowing, so crops could be 
planted. She drove a span of four horses on a leveler for days at a 
time. It was also her job to deliver the milk to the creamery at 
Duchesne, driving a team of horses and wagon. 

After the family moved back to Provo, Erma attended the B. Y.U. 
for three years where she majored in Domestic Science. During this 
time she worked at the Woolen Mills and at Wm. M. Roylance whole- 
sale fruit and produce Company. She was working at the Woolen Mills 
at the time it was destroyed by fire. 

Arnold Boshard was also working at Wm. M. Roylance Co. the 
same time as Erma was working there. Casual acquaintenance develop- 
ed into love and they were married on March 10, 1921 by Thomas N. 
Taylor. Erma's mother prepared and served a full course dinner to 
over forty people. This marriage was later solemnized in the Salt 
Lake Temple. 

Their first son. Dean Dixon Boshard, was born March 5, 1923. 
Their second son, Arnold Bliss Boshard, was born January 8, 1929. 

A few years after Dean was born Arnold and Erma went into 



131 



132 



ERMA DIXON BOSHARD 



business with Arnold's mother at her grocery store in Provo. Erma 
worked at the store and Arnold worked at the Pacific States Pipe Co. 
At this time Arnold and Erma's father, Ernest bought the Startup's 
cabin at Wildwood in Provo, Canyon. 

The depression years were hard ones as the children were grow- 
ing up and Arnold was working as a truck driver with the Conservation 
Corps. He later returned to work at the pipe plant. After the depres- 
sion, Erma began to work atDixon Taylor Russell Co. drapery depart- 
ment. They also commenced to remodel their home. She has always 
taken pride in her home and has used her creative talents to make it a 
beautiful place to live. She has always been interested in antiques, 
and her Provo home and summer home at Wildwood have many of these 
antiques she had acquired over the years. 

Shortly before 1940 they bought the East Side Store and remodel- 
ed it. A year later, when Dean graduated from high school, war was 
declared, so Arnold rented the store and went to work in the Small 
Arms factory outside of Salt Lake City. Dean went into the Service in 
1942 as a Navy Flyer and was gone until the war ended. Bliss enlisted 
in the Navy and served for four years, mostly aboard the aircraft 
carrier, Princeton. 

In 1945 Erma moved to Bakersfield, California, where Arnie 
worked in Inyokern. By 1950 they were back in Provo and sold their 
old cabin at Wildwood so that they could build a new summer home. 
Erma, like so many of the Dixon, loved living at Wildwood. She has 
spent more than thirty summers there and enjoys every minute of it. 

In 1953 Arnie secured work in Alaska, where his sister Genevieve 
was living. Erma also secured work in a furniture and drapery store 
in Anchorage. It was a beautiful place and both Erma and Arnie en- 
joyed it for awhile. 

In 1954 they went to Rico, Colorado where Arnie had a job. They 
had to live in a hotel and eat in a restaurant every night. The town was 
just like a scene out of the Western Movies. 

Erma has been active in the Church, holding many positions in- 
cluding, secretary of the Mutual in the Provo Third Ward and on the 
Utah Stake Relief Society Board. 

Erma is a long time member of the Sons and Daughters of Utah 
Pioneers of Provo, who have charge of the relics and pictures in the 
Pioneer Museum located in the North Park. 

She anxiously looks forward to the meetings of the Dixon Cousins 
Organization to renew acquaintenance with over a hundred of her Dixon 
cousins. They now meet each year in April. 

Now after many years, Erma and Arnie are the proud parents of 
two boys, six grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. Three 
grandsons have now served missions for the Church. 



10th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D.# 25 




FRED L. MARKHAM 



133 



Maud Dixon Markham Family 




440 North Fifth West 
Provo, Utah 



Wildwood 




134 



MAUD DIXON MARKHAM 
MY PERSONAL HISTORY 



I was born in a big two story house on the corner of 2nd North 
and 4th West. It has recently been made a Historic Site. Now that it 
has been restored it is pleasant to see with its grey walls and white 
trim. 

When three weeks old we moved to Salt Lake City as father was 
elected State Treasurer, so that my earlier days were spent in the 
Thirtieth Ward and our home was located at 1 89 Mead Street, two blocks 
west of Governor Cutler, with whom father worked closely. 

Six years later Uncle T. N. Taylor wanted to start the Farmers 
and Merchants Bank and asked father to be the cashier. So again we 
were back in Provo living in part of Grandma Dixon's house, at 270 
North Fifth West, while our present home at 440 North Fifth West was 
being built. 

I went to the Timpanogos School just across the street ( since 
torn down). The new Timp. building is on the north corner of the block. 

With all my cousins I had a good time even catching forbidden 
sled rides from passing vehicles. 

Then I spent one year at the old Junior High at Central School 
and three happy years at B, Y. High School. 

College at the Y had the close knit feeling of a small high school, 
enrollment being about six hundred with about sixty college students 
graduating each year. 

Fred and I went to most events together and had a great time. 
By taking easy classes, I graduated Summa Cum Laude and was pre- 
pared to teach. Deciding to go on to a Masters degree, I stayed in 
college. Midyear, Bro. L. John Nuttall asked me to teach English in 
the Junior and Senior grades at B. Y. High. I enjoyed my work. 

Fred and I were married June 25, 1924, the day he left for the 
Eastern States Mission. Having been engaged a year, we decided that 
day would be best, and were able to be married that afternoon in the 
Salt Lake Temple, Temple President George F. Richards, parents 
and relatives attending. We were so happy, that parting was not sad. 

Meeting Fred in New York two years later and staying there two 
months seeing all its wonderful attractions was an exciting time for me. 

Two years later Fred and I left for Boston so that he could attend 
M.I. T. in architecture. After teaching another year at the Y I quit to 
rear a family - John, Dix, Barbara and Diana. 

As my father had died the year we were married Fred and I came 
to live with Mother in our present home which we purchased from her 
a few years later. She lived with us until her death in October 1951. 
It was wonderful to have her with us. 

My home, family and church were always my first priorities. 

At fifteen I was dear Uncle Walter Dixon's assistant, teaching 



135 



136 



MAUD DIXON MARKHAM 



the intermediate Sunday School classes. Then I was on the Sunday- 
School Board under Supt. of the Utah Stake Sunday Schools, Victor 
Bird. Then the Mutual called me from 1926 to 1973, with a few years 
out - making about thirty-five years in that organization as President 
and teacher. I was on the Relief Society Stake Board under Sister 
Josephine Bird. As Spiritual Living Teacher in the Relief Society, I 
taught from 1945 until 1974, with the exception of three or four years 
during that time. 

I belonged to the N. L. U. and O.S. Travata at B.Y.U. and was 
an officer in the B.Y.U. Women of the Faculty organization. I have 
been a long time member of the Literary League and have been active 
in the district Republican organization. 

My hobbies besides getting lessons have been cooking, reading, 
walking, hiking and traveling. 



12th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




137 



Rhea Dixon Reeve 



Family 




Rhea Ruth 
Fenton 




232 North Fifth West 
Provo, Utah 



138 



A BIOGRAPHY OF RHEA DIXON REEVE 



Shortly after the turn of the century in lovely Utah Valley a beau- 
tiful,- sandy- haired daughter was born to the happy union of Walter 
DeGrey and Louie Maiben Dixon. The date was August 21, 1901 and 
the place the old family home on Znd North and 3rd West in Provo, 
Utah. For their firstborn, Walter chose the name Rhea Luthenia. 
The middle name was chosen because it was Louie's Mother's name. 
In later years Verl Dixon and other cousins would often tease Rhea by 
calling her "Luthenia". 

Four other outstanding children were born to these goodly parents: 
Fred Walter (Buck), Donald Maiben (Sank), Edna Dixon Ballif, and 
Amy LaVerne Dixon Larson. This was an extremely close family and 
Rhea was always very devoted to her parents and her brothers and 
sisters, and their mates and children. 

When Rhea was three years old the family moved into a new 
home at 232 North Fifth West, thereafter affectionately referred to as 
"232". Walter's brothers had helped with the building of the house and 
it was well constructed. The family were elated over their new dwell- 
ing located amidst uncles, aunts, and cousins. The area was called 
"Sandy Alley" because of all the red-headed Dixons and Taylors who 
resided there. Love and comradery were the order of the day and Rhea 
basked in the association of so many loving, kind people, and it made 
for a secure, happy childhood. Through the years Rhea always re- 
mained close to her uncles, aunts, and cousins as well as her immed- 
iate family. She always maintained a special fondness for all the 
Dixons and commented often how proud she was of her "kin". 

Rhea in her appearance was a good composite of her parents. 
She inherited the auburn hair from the Dixons; she had her Father's 
hazel eyes and light fair complexion; but she also resembled her 
Mother. She was slim and of medium height and grew into a very pretty 
young lady and later a strikingly attractive woman who was always well 
groomed. Rhea favored wearing vivid colors like aqua blue and pink 
and was often stunning in monochromatic color schemes. 

School days were rewarding and pleasant for Rhea. She attended 
Timpanogos School to the 7th grade , Central School up to and including 
the eighth grade and then two years at Provo High School with her good 
friends Erma Dixon Boshard, Maud Dixon Markham, Henrietta Taylor, 
and LaVerne Banks Singleton. 

From 1917 to 1919 Rhea attended the Brigham Young High School. 
She made many new acquaintances there and was especially friendly 
with sisters Joyce and Ruth Isgreen. She graduated from college in 
1949 after several years of taking night classes, summer school, and 
correspondence courses. She must have been inspired in choosing 
education for her major as she became a master teacher and teaching 
was the love of her life. 



139 



140 



RHEA DIXON REEVE 



While she was pursuing an education she had odd jobs to help out 
with the family income. One of these was at the Provo Woolen Mills. 
When a serious fire broke out at the Mills the family were concerned 
about her safety. 

Rhea's Mother was a homebody and liked to stay near the hearth 
and so Rhea became her Father's constant companion at Bishopric and 
church socials and would accompany him as he visited relatives, 
friends, and people in need, Rhea simply adored her Father and he 
was always her ideal. She thought he was the kindest most loving, 
Christ-like person she ever knew. To her he was 100% perfect and 
she idolized him and held him in high esteem. She often remarked 
that she always felt safe and secure in his presence. 

Rhea's beloved Father died on November 26, 1921 when he was 
only forty-four years old. This was probably the greatest loss she 
ever suffered in her life. Her heart was truly broken and she lost her 
best friend, her closest confident, and the person she respected and 
loved more than anyone else. 

However, she did not allow herself to suffer self pity and grief 
long and being the eldest child she keenly felt the financial and emotion- 
al responsibility on her shoulders for her dear Mother and her two 
brothers and two sisters. She even delayed her marriage for five 
years while she worked and helped tiie family. 

Following her education she accepted a teaching position in the 
small community of Fillmore, Utah. Because of the death of her 
Father she returned to Provo and taught at the Franklin School from 
1921 to 1927. These were busy years teaching, helping with her fam- 
ily, courting, and being active in church, college, and school affairs. 

After a five year engagement, Rhea was married to Fenton West 
Reeve on June 18, 1925 in the Salt Lake Temple. The marriage was 
sealed by David O. McKay. Fenton was a tall six foot three husky 
football player from Hinckley, Utah whom she had met at Brigham 
Young University. Fenton was a high school football and track coach 
and they resided at 87 North 200 East in Spanish Fork, Utah until 1938. 
Rhea was a homemaker during those years as well as being active in 
church, community, and social affairs. 

On June 27, 1929 a plump, nine pound baby daughter was born 
to the Reeves and she was named Ruth. Fenton had been counting on 
a potential football player but Rhea was delighted to have a girl. Ruth 
resided with her until September 4, 1951 when she was married to 
Howard D. Lowe. Although Ruth was to be Rhea's only child, she was 
blessed with one lovely granddaughter and four handsome grandsons. 
Her grandchildren are as follows: Kevin Howard Lowe, Linda Ann 
Lowe Weaver, David "Jordan" Lowe, Kenton "Alan" Lowe, and Mark 
Douglas Lowe. Rhea now has three beautiful great-grandchildren 
with hopefully many more to come. 

From 1938 to 1940 Rhea divided her time between teaching in 



RHEA DDCON REEVE 



141 



Provo and residing in Los Angeles, where her husband had moved for 
employment reasons. In 1940 Ruth and she returned to Provo and she 
resumed her profession of teaching and taught uninterrupt ed until 1968 
when she retired after an illustrious career of thirty-five years. 
Thirty-three of these years were at the Franklin School. She usually 
walked to school at dawn and returned home at dusk with an armload 
of papers to correct. The Franklin School was her second home and 
the faculty and students there were her second family. There has 
probably never been a more dedicated, conscientious, and devoted 
teacher than Rhea Dixon Reeve. She seemed to love all her students, 
both the slow and rebellious and the bright and obedient, and she was 
beloved by three generations of students. She was a member of local, 
state and national educational organizations. She served on the State 
Language Arts Book Committee for four years, and was a delegate to 
national educational conventions to New York and Los Angeles. After 
her retirement she exclaimed that she enjoyed every moment of her 
teaching career and it was truly a labor of love. 

Through the years, Rhea was a loving, devoted daughter to her 
Mother, dedicating her life unselfishly in caring for her needs, espec- 
ially in her declining years when she was ill. She would often walk 
home from the Franklin School to fix her Mother's lunch and then lit- 
erally run back to school. Her Mother had an unquenchable sweet 
tooth and Rhea would bring pastries, candy, and assorted treats to 
her almost daily. She would also always have a supply of goodies on 
hand in the pantry for guests. Louie Maiben Dixon died on April 19, 
1964 and Rhea had again lost a much loved parent. 

The Dixon family always put great emphasis on holidays, espec- 
ially Christmas. Rhea played a big part in helping her parents make 
them memorable occasions. Every year she had a long Christmas 
card and gift list and spent hours shopping, wrapping, and preparing 
for the holiday season. She was a regular Mrs. Santa Claus to her 
family and remembered not only her brothers and sisters but all her 
nieces and nephews and their families. She has been the beloved 
"Aunt Rhea", ever interested in the activities of her brothers and 
sisters and their families. Being generous to a fault she not only re- 
membered her family and friends on Christmas but on birthdays, 
Valentine's Day, Halloween, etc. 

Rhea has always been a talkative, outgoing person with a warm, 
extrovertish personality. She has had a great deal of energy and up 
until the last few years has had a very active life. In addition to her 
church activity she has been a member of the American Association 
of University Women, the Business and Professional Women's Club, 
literary clubs, and has been a joiner and a doer. One of the highlights 
of her social life has been her long association with the "Glamorous 
Eight" Club. This group consists of the following four Ermas - - - - 



142 



RHEA DIXON REEVE 



Erma Boshard, Erma Hedquist, Erma Anderson, Erma Wiest, plus 
Elsie Miller, Vi Wasden, and formerly Gladys Davis and Florence 
Jensen who are now deceased. These lovely ladies met at least once 
a month but formerly met every two weeks for dinner, bridge, and 
visiting, Rhea has attended hundreds of weddings of relatives, friends, 
and former students and has always been faithful to attend funerals 
in spite of the long trek to the mortuary. Never having owned a car or 
learned to drive she has been an avid walker. One of her favorite 
pastimes has been her almost daily trip to town for shopping, visiting 
with sales clerks, and chatting with people along the way. Rhea, her 
sister Amy and brother Buck are some of Provo City's best known 
citizens. Rhea loves people and could never be happy as a loner. Her 
friendliness, sincerity, concern for others, enthusiasm, and kindness 
to the youth, aged, and less fortunate have endeared her to the hearts 
of many. 

Rhea acquired a talent for creative writing and through the years 
has written tributes, poems, and toasts for countless people, rarely 
if ever declining a request. She also was author of many plays and 
operettas that were presented at the Franklin School and she was re- 
sponsible for the narrations of many church programs. 

For most of her life she has resided in the Provo Third Ward, 
holding many positions. She was M.I. A. President for several years, 
on the Utah Stake M.I. A. Board, and her last assignment was Cultural 
Refinement Leader in the Relief Society Organization. She prepared 
all her lessons well and when asked to work at the cannery, help with 
luncheons at Relief Society or take any other assignment she was al- 
ways willing to render service. 

Rhea has traveled to Canada, across the country to the East 
Coast, to Hawaii, California and other places but her heart has always 
belonged at "232" in Provo, where she grew up among those gentle 
hearts and kind people. 

Although she is receiving excellent care from her younger sister 
Amy, it is difficult in her later years to accept a slower pace of life. 
Even though her vitality has somewhat dimished, her love for her "kin" 
remains constant. She has made a great contribution to the lives of 
many people through her kindness and willingness to render service to 
others . 

Ruth Reeve Lowe 
Kailua, Hawaii 
April 1980 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



Born November 15, 1877 at Provo, Utah to Sarah DeGrey and Henry 
Aldous Dixon. 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church on June 1, 
1886. 

Married Luthenia (Louie) Maiben on October 10, 1900 in the Salt Lake 

Temple . 
Children: 

Rhea, Fred W. , Donald M. , Edna, Amy Lavern. 
He truly lived his short forty-four years of life by his creed: 

"Do all the good I can, by all the means I can, in all the ways 

I can, in all the places I can, to all the people I can, as long 

as ever I can. " 
Walter attended the Provo City Schools to the 8th grade. 
At 16 years of age he was employed as office boy in Taylor Bros. Co. 

store. When his brother John went on his mission, he became 

bookkeeper. 
Walter's many interests included: 

Sports of all kind, especially soccer, tennis, baseball. 

Photography and tinting the black and white pictures (long 

before colored film). 

Hiking -- helped organize the annual Timp hike. 

Fishing, Drama, Holiday Festivities, Penmanship. 

A Lover of Nature and all Mankind. 
Was in the Bishopric of Provo Third Ward at the time of his death. 

Interested in Temple Work and helping the Old Folks. 
Died in the Aird Hospital, Provo, Utah on November 26, 1921. 



The Biography of Walter DeGrey Dixon is given 
on page 215, Volume I of 
"My Folks The Dixons" 



143 



Very 
LUTHENIA 



Brief Life Sketch 
( LOUIE ) MAIBEN 



of 

DIXON 



Born January 30, 1878 in Provo, Utah to Luthenia Lydia Crockett and 

Henry Joseph Maiben. 
Married Walter DeGrey Dbcon in the Salt Lake Temple on October 10, 

1900. 

Children: 

Rhea, Fred, Donald, Edna, Amy. 

Louie's mother died when she was born and her early childhood was 
not as happy as it could have been. 

She worked for Grandma Dixon, assisting in cooking for the 
boarders. Here she fell in love with Walter and after a brief 
courtship they were married. At the wedding dinner given by 
Walter's sister "Rye", the newlyweds were the last to arrive 
because Louie, who was a fastidious housekeeper , was fussing 
with the curtains in their first home. She was very unselfish 
and self sacrificing. She lived in the Provo Third Ward for 
60 years, and most of that time in the same house. 

Her home was her castle, where she delighted in entertaining with her 
delicious food and friendly atmosphere. 

She was active in the Y. W.M.I. A. and Relief Society. 

She died at Provo, Utah on April 19, 1964. 



144 



13th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




145 



Nancy Shears mith McConachie Armstrong Family 




146 



HISTORY OF 
Nancy Shearsmith McConachie Armstrong 



My family was living in Hull, England when I made my entrance 
into the world at 4:00 a.m. on the 7th of October 1902. I was the 
second child born to Walter and Fanny Smith Shearsmith. My sister 
Doris had arrived two years earlier, 

I almost passed through this life in a hurry. On my third day I 
contracted pneumonia and Father sent for the minister to baptize and 
christen me. But by January I was well enough to be brought down- 
stairs and included in the family circle. 

My sister Mary Alice was born a few years later and two years 
after this event our father died. Mother went to work in a laundry. 
Doris and I attended infant's school, just across the street from our 
grandparents home and Grandmother Smith took care of Mary during 
the day. 

Our parents had joined the Mormon Church through the mission- 
ary efforts of Albert and LeRoy Dixon. After Father's death, Uncle 
Albert offered to loan Mother money to come to Utah. Although her 
parents, especially her father, were much opposed to it, she disposed 
of her few possessions and in January of 1910, we set sail on the S.S, 
Dominion, from Liverpool. 

In Salt Lake City we were met by Sarah Dixon McConachie, 
Mother's second cousin. A few days later we traveled to Provo where 
Mother set up housekeeping and went to work for Uncle Jabe Danger- 
field at the Royden House. 

Sarah and Alexander McConachie had lost their only child and 
were anxious to adopt one. Mother finally consented to let them have 
one of her girls, and I was their choice. On April 7, 1910 I was legal- 
ly adopted and given their name. From then on I called them Mama 
and Dad. No one was ever blessed with finer parents. 

That fall I entered the second grade at Lafayette School and loved 
everything about America, except being teased about my English accent. 
In November, I was baptized in the Tabernacle font. The brother who 
baptized me spoke broken English and Mama had to go to the edge of 
the font and pronounce each of my names for him to repeat. But then, 
Nancy Manchester Shearsmith McConachie is quite a mouthful. 

I studied dancing and elocution and believe I recited at mission- 
ary farewells in every ward in Salt Lake. In those days farewells 
were held on week nights with a program, dancing, and refreshments. 

After graduation from the eighth grade I attended East High where 
I enjoyed taking parts in plays. When the United States entered World 
War I, we students made bandages during our free periods. Then a 
flu epidemic closed schools for many weeks. During this time, the 
Armistice was signed and crowds danced in the streets to express 
happiness. FolloDwing this big celebration, the epidemic was mu c h 
worse. 



147 



148 



NANCY MC CONACHIE ARMSTRONG 



At the University of Utah I majored in Drama and Physical Ed- 
ucation, taking part in many school plays and dancing in several operas. 
In those days, the shows were performed at the old Salt Lake Theater. 
At present, students think nothing of flying around the world, in school 
activities. I was on cloud nine when one cast I played with was allow- 
ed a ten day tour to such remote places as Nephi and Richfield. 

After three years at the "U*' I became assistant kindergarten 
teacher at the Lafayette School. Right back where I started, only this 
time in a new building. The old building having burned down shortly 
after I graduated. The following year I taught the First Grade. 

Dancing was still my first love and I continued to study. When 
the Perry-Mansfield Dancers came to Salt Lake in concert, I was so 
impressed with their work, I attended their school at Steamboat 
Springs, Colorado, the following summer. In December of that year 
I received a telegram from Portia Mansfield asking me to join one of 
their acts in New York. A week later I was dancing in the act. I spent 
six years working in dance acts and one season playing a dramatic 
part in the road show company of "Street Scene". By this time the 
depression was well underway and talking pictures caused one theater 
after another to drop live entertainment. It became increasingly 
difficult to keep working. 

Dad's business, the "Chesapeake Cafe", had been greatly affect- 
ed by the depression and his health was failing. I went home and was 
glad to help a little by doing the cashier work. The following spring 
the restaurant closed and Mother asked me to go to England with her. 
Doris and Mary were both raising families and not free to go and 
Mother didn't want to go alone. Seeing the places I knew as a child 
and getting acquainted with English relatives made it a wonderful 
summer. 

The next four years I worked with Mother in her little restaurant, 
"Mickey's Place" in Price, Utah. During that time Dad died and 
Mamma moved to Provo. When Mother sold "Mickey's Place" and al- 
so moved to Provo, I went to live with Mama in her apartment. That 
winter I registered for a class in vocabulary building, A gentleman 
by the name of Anthon Armstrong sat next to me. He had the latest 
edition of Webster's dictionary. Mine was an old one, sol kept borrow- 
ing his. Soon we were seeing each other nearly every evening. Now 
he tells me he decided to marry me so he could keep the dictionary. 
Well -- we still have it. 

We were married on July 4th 1940, by Bishop Frank Bennett. 
After living for a year in Provo, we bought an old farm house in 
Lindon and found wonderful neighbors and friends there. 

World War II burst upon the world and Tony was drafted with the 
first group of married men from Utah County. When he was at radio 
school in Madison, Wisconsin he asked me to join him. Nothing was 
as important as being together, so I went. Tony had one 24 hour pass 



NANCY MC CONACHIE ARMSTRONG 



149 



a week and two free hours each day we could spend together on the post. 
Six weeks later he was shipped out and I returned home. Mama moved 
to Lindon to be with me and stayed there with us until her death seven 
years later. 

Our only child was born January 2, 1945 while Tony was in Italy. 
The baby died at birth but was christened Mary Doris, The bitter 
disappointment caused by the baby's death made this one of the most 
unhappy periods of my life. One morning, while sitting at the dining 
room table writing a letter to Tony, and crying as usual, a strange 
feeling of intense quiet came over me. No voice spoke to me but words 
formed so clearly in my mind that it seemed as if someone said, "You 
have not only lost her in this world but also in the world to come, un- 
less you do something about it. And there is something you can do, 
you know. " 

In my letter I told Tony that as soon as he came home I wanted 
us to make oursehfes eligible to go to the Temple, Long before there 
was time for him to even receive my letter, I received one from him 
saying he had been to an L(,D,S. Conference in Foggia and he felt the 
wisest thing we could do was prepare ourselves for the privilege of 
going to the temple. 

A few months after his return we knelt at the altar in the House 
of the Lord and were married for eternity and had our baby sealed to 
us. The weight of grief I had carried was lifted from me. 

Not having had the opportunity to attend college , Tony was anxious 
to take advantage of the G.I. Bill. After a few years working full time 
for the Bureau of Reclamation, while taking classes at B. Y. U. and 
being very active in the Lindon Ward, we realized the load had to be 
lightened or Tony would never get a degree. So we moved into one of 
Mother's apartments in Provo. Tony graduated with honors in 1953, 

After doing accounting for B, Y. U. for three years, Tony went 
back to the Bureau of Reclamation in the regional office in Salt Lake. 
We lived there for three years until the Central Utah Project office 
opened in Provo and Tony was offered the opportunity to come back as 
Budget Analyst. We were happy to return to Provo because it is our 
first choice as a place to live. We bought a home in Pleasant View 
Second Ward and have lived here ever since. 

I have served as Cultural Refinement class leader in four differ- 
ent wards and one stake for a total of nineteen years. I have also 
served as Drama Leader in M.I. A. and twice as a counselor in Relief 
Society. Because of a severe hearing problem I cannot do many things 
I used to, but at present I am serving as Visiting Teacher Message 
leader and have been a visiting teacher for about 35 years. Since re- 
turning to Provo to live I have become interested in Juvenile writing 
and have had stories and articles published in many children's maga - 
zines, including the Friend. I am a member of the League of Utah 
Writers and have won several awards on both the State and National 
level. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
SARAH ANN DIXON MC CONACHIE 

ID# 5 



Born December 7, 1871 in Provo First Ward to Mary Ann Smith and 

Henry Aldous Dixon. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church in May 1879. 
Married Alexander Collie Mc Conachie, October 7, 1897. 
Children: 

Donald Collie McConachie and Nancy Shearsmith McConachie. 

Her first school was Miss Whitesides private school in Salt Lake City. 
Later she attended school in Provo. 

Her youthful health was very delicate. At age fourteen her illness al- 
most claimed her life. She was a very capable dressmaker. 
Ella Arrowsmith taught her the trade, after which she start- 
ed a very successful dressmaking business. 

Sarah was a Relief Society Teacher for 25 years. 

She was a supervisor of Art and Work in both Ward and Stake. 

During World War I, was Director of gauzework for the Red Cross. 

Assisted in making burial clothes for the dead. 

Was a member of the Daughters of Pioneers. 

She was a most willing, generous and friendly person, entertaining 

family, friends and strangers. 
She died at Lindon, Utah on December 26, 1950. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ALEXANDER COLLIE MC CONACHIE 

ID# 5 Husband 

Born October 8, 1863 in Glasgow, Scotland to Ann Paul and Alex- 
ander Mc Conachie. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church, October 29, 1937. 
Married Sarah Ann Dixon on October 7, 1897 at Provo, Utah. 
Children: 

Donald Collie McConachie and Nancy Shearsmith Mc Conachie. 

Mac worked in the Vienna Cafe, Salt Lake City, before he was married, 
and continued to work there iintil it burned down. He later 
owned and operated the Chesapeake Cafe in Salt Lake City. 

Died at Salt Lake City, Utah on January 16, 1938. 



150 



14th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 



I. D.# 42 




•ROYDEN JAMES DANGERFIELD 



Birthplace 




550 West Second North 
Provo, Utah 



151 



ROYDEN JAMES DANGERFIELD 



Royden J. Dangerfield was born December 31, 1902, in Provo 
Utah, the son of Jabez W. Dangerfield and Alice Dixon Dangerfield. 
He attended the Provo City Schools and the B.Y.U. High School where 
he graduated in 1921. He continued his education at the Brigham 
Young University where he became an outstanding scholar and extra- 
curricular student. In 1923 he was a student body officer. Manager of 
Dramatics. He belonged to the Commerce Club, participated in one 
of the school's plays, was a member of the Inter- class debating cham- 
pionship team and was winner of the Extemperaneous Speaking Contest 
receiving the "Rulon Dixon Silver Cup". He graduated from the B.Y.U. 
in 1925 with a major in Political Science, Finance and Banking. 

In 1931 he received his doctor's degree from the University of 
Chicago, where a scholarship was tendered him to attend the Interna- 
tional School of Foreign Relations, at Geneva, Switzerland. While in 
Europe he attended the Sorbonne in Paris and the London School of 
Political Science in London, which is regarded as the outstanding 
school of its kind in Europe. 

Royden began his academic career at the University of Oklahoma, 
where he was assistant professor of political science from 1928 to 
1934 and an associate professor from 1934 to 1938. 

After teaching at the University of Oklahoma for ten years and 
at the early age of 36, he became a full professor and assistant dean 
of the Graduate School in 1938, retaining the latter position until he 
was named dean of the faculty in 1942. 

He was administrative assistant to the president of the Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma from 1945 to 1947 and executive vice president of 
the University during 1947-48, leaving Oklaiioma University for the 
University of Wisconsin, where he was a professor of political science 
from 1948 to 195 0. 

Dr. Royden J. Dangerfield went to the University of Illinois at 
Champaign, Illinois in 1950 as a professor of political science and 
director of the Institue of Government and Public Affairs. He took 
leave of absence during the summers of 1951 and 1952 to teach at 
the University of Tokyo and the University of Kyoto and then at the 
University of Kyoto and Deshisha University in Japan. 

After seven years as Professor of Political Science at the Univ- 
ersity of Illinois, he was appointed associate provost, a post he held 
until 1967. He served as dean of administration from 1957 to 1964 and 
was director of international programs at the University of Illinois 
from 1962 to 1967. 

He became MUCIA executive director in 1964, overseeing the 
development of the year- old organization set up to help participating 
universities carry on activities overseas and strengthen their own in- 
ternational programs. 

His retirement from that post was announced this summer, and 



153 



154 



ROYDEN JAMES DANGERFIELD 



he said then he hoped to take a sabbatical leave from the University 
of Illinois and resume research in American diplomacy, working in 
the archives of the State Department. 

On a number of occasions during his career, Royden was on 
leave from the full-time job he held, serving with various government 
agencies. 

The first such appointment was in 1930, when he was principal 
research associate to the President's Committee on Recent Social 
Trends under the Hoover Administration. Others were: 

Forum director for the U S, Office of Eduction during 1936-37. 

Chief of Blockade Division of the Board of Economic Warfare 
in 1942-44. 

Chief International law officer with the Navy's Judge Advocate 
General's Office, with rank of lieutenant commander in 1944-45. 

Assistant chief in charge of research for the State Department's 
Division of Research and Publications in 1945. 

Civilian professor with the National War College and a professor 
and director of studies 1948-49. 

Civilian member of Advisory Survey Team of the Army War Col- 
lege in 1951. 

The professional affiliations of Dr. Dangerfield, include the 
American Political Science Association, the American Society of In- 
ternational Law and the Social Science Foundation of the University of 
Denver, the Council of Foreign Relations, Southwest Social Science 
Association, Chicago Council of Foreign Relations, Tau Kappa Alpha 
and Theta Phi, 

He was the author of two text books on political science and 
gove rnment and the author or editor of a number of books and articles, 
among them "The Hidden Weapon; The Story of Economic Warfare," 
written with David Gordon. 

Royden J. Dangerfield married Helen Morrison of Norman, 
Oklahoma, on March 30, 1931, in Washington D. C. They were the 
parents of two daughters, Mrs. Helen K. Nunnally of Chicago and 
Mrs. Karen Fisher of Champaign, Illinois. 

On October 28, 1969 Royden was taken to the Carle Hospital in 
Champaign suffering from emphysema and died on Saturday, November 
1, 1969 at 3:00 a.m. 

At the time of his death at the age of 67, he was living at 601 
Haines Blvd., Champaign, and was professor of political science at 
the University of Illinois and recently had retired executive director 
of the Midwest Universities Consortium for International Activities. 

Private services were held on Monday, November 3rd, at the 
Weaver-Henderson Funeral Home, with Bishop Joseph Larsen of the 
Mormon Church officiating. He was taken to Norman, Oklahoma, for 
burial. 



15th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




Leah Dixon Ford Family 




i575 West Fifth North 
Salt Lake City, Utah 




156 



LIFE HISTORY OF 
LEAH LILLIAN DIXON FORD 



I was the second child born to Ernest DeGrey and Mary Ann 
Painter Dixon on May 18, 1903, at Provo, Utah County, Utah, the day 
■we had a four inch snowstorm. Before father and mother were married, 
father built a brick home on the east portion of the Henry A. Dixon lot 
on Second North between Second and Third West. It was in the front 
room of this house that I was born. 

We did not have a lot of toys to play with, but those we had we 
were taught by Mother to take care of them and make them last for 
more than just one year. I had a minature cast iron toy stove that I 
could make a real fire in it and bake in the oven. I was ever so proud 
of it, I still have my little rocking chair that I got for Christmas when 
I was four years old and I can still sit in it. 

When I was three years old I had rheumatic fever and couldn't 
walk for months, because of the severe ache in my legs. To encourage 
me to take cod liver oil, my father would give me a dollar for every 
dollar bottle of cod liver oil I would drink. Before I fully recovered 
from this illness my bank was almost filled with silver dollars, 

Erma was three years older than I and she wanted to play with 
the older kids who could run faster, so I spent a good deal of my time 
playing with my younger brother Arnold. He was two and one half years 
yo\inger than I. He received a concussion of the brain when his sled 
struck a telephone pole, and died from this accident. He was age nine. 

On January 21, 1912, I was baptized by William Russell and con- 
firmed on January 21, 1912, by Alfred Booth. 

I attended the elementary Timpanogos School on 4th North and 
5th West, the Provo Junior High School, the Provo Senior High School 
and the Brigham Young University, from which I later graduated with 
a B.S. degree in 1958. My major was education with a minor in Art. 

Before our twins were born, father decided that our home on 
Second North was getting too small for our family of four children 
who had all been born in this house, namely, Erma, myself, Arnold 
and Verl; so he sold this house to his cousin George Smith and built a 
new home on 8th West and 5th North where he had ten acres of land. 
This was a lovely new white, brick home and Mother enjoyed it very 
much, but it had one drawback in that it was quite a distance from town. 
While it was being built during the summer, we lived in Aunt Rye 
Taylor's |»ome. She and her family were living at their farm on Provo 
Bench for the summer. Uncle Arthur wo\ild eat dinner with us each 
day and then go out on the farm at night. 

We moved into our new home before the twins were born; Ralph 
and Ronald were born September 16, 1912. Mother was quite sick for 
a long time. Ronald was very small and ill, weighing only 3 lbs. 
Ralph weighed 6 lbs. 



157 



158 



LEAH DIXON FORD 



My little brother, Arnold, was killed on January 26, 1915, and 
a little more than a nnonth later, on March 2, 1915, Edith was born. 

Father sold our home on 5th North and 8th West and we moved 
into Uncle Albert Dixon's home on 6th West and 3rd North. It was here 
that I contacted diptheria and became very ill. For some time after 
my heart was not so good. 

We moved to Duchesne to live one summer, on the Jesse Knight 
Ranch, Father built some buildings for them and broke up sage brush 
ground on a homestead for the Knight Investment Co. Father bought a 
herd of milk cows and sold the cream to the creamery in Duchesne. 
The creamery was managed by Parley Ford. That fall we moved back 
to Provo and father bought the old Hoover home on the corner of 6th 
West and 4th North. He did some remodeling work on the home and 
I lived here the remainder of my single life. 

In 1924 after completing two years of college at B.Y.U. , I then 
had a First Class Elementary Teaching Certificate and went to Walls- 
burg to teach school. Jessie Carter and I started teaching there to- 
gether. We lived at Martin and Amber Ford's home. Here I met and 
was courted by Mayo Ford and we were married in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
on January 30, 1926. 

The next fall, September 29, 1926, our own baby Marilyn Mae 
was born in Provo, Utah, at the Crane Maternity Home. We lived in 
Provo in a small basement apartment at the Harris House across the 
corner from the Provo High School, From here we moved South a 
few blocks to the Stewart Apartments. It was here that Marilyn had 
a bad case of whooping cough. When she was about 16 months old we 
moved to Park City where Mayo worked in the mines. His work at the 
Judge Mine consisted of operating a drill machine which made the holes 
and loaded them with blasting powder. In Park City we lived in the 
Ervin Maxwell house, next to Elmer and Mercy Maxwell, They became 
very good friends of ours. 

On November 25, 1928, our precious little Lois Amber was born, 
and we were liicky to have her. We had such a hard birth. Lois and I 
almost died. She was black for hours after birth. My health was not 
good after that. I had ulcers of the stomach and hemorrhages in the 
stomach and very bad headaches. 

Mayo left the Judge Mine and we moved over to the Park Con- 
solidated Mine up Deer "Valley in Park City. That summer we lived 
in a boarded tent. By fall we built us a good little two- room- house, 
which I just loved. I grubbed the sage brush off the hill which allowed 
the wild grass to spread and cover the ground. Between the house and 
the road we had a bunch of about fifty quaking aspens growing. This 
was really a beautiful view. 

The mine was hard on Mayo's health, so we sold our house, and 
Mayo moved it for the Mills to their ranch below Park City. 



LEAH DIXON FORD 



159 



It was while we were at the Park Consolidated that my father 
suffered a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 57 years. He recover- 
ed some but not completely. He died June 15, 1938. 

July 30, 1932 our first dear little boy Dixon Alton was born at 
Provo, Utah, in the Crane Maternity Hospital. We moved a one room 
house from Uncle Mart's farm in the Second Ward over to the lot in 
Wallsburg which Mayo's parents had given to us. We built a kitchen 
addition on the back of the house. 

We moved back to Park City, first up on the hill then later down 
by the High School. 

On July 26, 1934, our sweet last little baby Janice Ann came to 
us. She was born in Provo at the Crane Maternity Hospital, She was 
premature and we almost lost her. Aldous Dixon came and blessed 
her and named her when she was just a few days old. She was so ill 
that we took her to Salt Lake to Dr, Blood, a baby specialist. Dr. 
CuUimore and Dr. Merrill had worked with her all one night in giving 
her infusions in the tissues. Aunt Electa Dixon and Aunt Lizzie Clark- 
son helped the Doctors. She recovered and has been such a joy to us, 
as have all of our children. I am so thankful for them; they are all 
so good. 

In the spring of 1935, we left Park City and moved back to Walls- 
burg in our own little home. Mayo built a large coop to brood turkeys 
in and we went into the turkey business. We started with 1000 turkeys 
that first year. That first year we learned about the turkey business 
and did quite well so we decided to try it again the next year. For the 
next 18 years we raised turkeys on a large commercial scale of about 
4 to 6 thousand each year. Sometimes we would put the turkeys on a 
summer range, on the bench back of nur home, in the Roundy's fields. 
One year we went up Springville 's Hobble Creek, another year down on 
the Deer Creek, or over to Charleston, on the bank of Deer Creek Res- 
ervoir, 

Mayo and I were married in the Salt Lake Temple on February 
28,1940, and our four precious children were sealed to us for time and 
all eternity, for which I was so thankful. 

In 1948 we bought a beautiful ranch in Hobble Creek Canyon 
which provided us with a perfect range for our turkeys and cattle. 
This Graham Ranch had the clear Hobble Creek stream running thru 
it and was a most delightful place to spend our summers. We loved 
this place. 

In the fall of 1942, I started teaching school in Wallsburg, I 
taught there for 13 years. All four of our children received their 
elementary education at the Wallsburg School and they all graduated 
from Heber High School and Seminary, Dixon and Janice attended the 
Brigham Young University at Provo. Marilyn attended the University 
of Utah and graduated from the Salt Lake General Hospital Nursing 
School. 



160 



LEAH DIXON FORD 



In 1953 Mayo and I sold the Hobble Creek ranch and in July we 
took Janice and went to Alaska where we had a lovely trip. 

Upon our return from Alaska, we moved to Salt Lake where 
Janice was working. Mayo had a job at Kearns, building houses, and 
I taught school at Rose Park Elementary for 14 years. 

My mother, May Painter Dixon, died April 3, 1954 at Provo. 

We lived in Rose Park for 11 years, then bought the home we 
now occupy at 15 75 West 5th North, Salt Lake City. 

On January 13, 1967, at about 1:00 a.m. while sleeping, I suffered 
a cerebral thrombosis, (stroke). My entire left side was paralized. 
The Doctor said I could not live two days. He also said I would never 
walk again. I was very thankful I had my mind and could talk. I was 
in the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake for 28 days. Upon my return home 
from the hospital, Mayo has been with me night and day, and has been 
so very patient. I owe my life to his good care. I have continued to im- 
prove. Mayo made me a three legged walker from alumimum tubing. 

I learned to walk, the power of the Priesthood and faith and 
prayers were my greatest help. I can walk with a cane and can do a 
lot of my own work. My arm and leg are still paralized but they are 
getting a little better as time goes by. 

On the 16th of August 1970 Mayo was advanced in the Priesthood 
to a High Priest. I am so thankful for the blessings we have and for 
my good husband and children. All of our children have been to the 
Temple to be married and have had their children sealed to them. 

I have ewrorked in the Church since I was eighteen, at which time 
I was asked to be secretary of the Third Ward Primary in Provo. At 
this time I was attending the B. Y. U. 

At Wallsburg in 1923-24 I taught religion classes early in the 
morning, before the regular school session. I have also worked in the 
Sunday School, Mutual, Primary and was President of the Primary and 
Young Ladies M.I. A, in our Ward for many years. 

In January, 1972, I developed trouble in my left leg. Diabetic gan- 
gren set in. Dr. AUred, a Orthopedic surgeon had to amputate my leg 
above the knee. It has been hard to get used to being confined to a wheel 
chair. Luckily I still have my right leg and an artificial left leg. 

I am thankful for the blessings Mayo and I have received. My 
faith has never been shaken by my illness and trials. Mayo has done 
a great work in the Church, in his Priesthood and home teaching. For 
these blessings I am so very thankful. I thank my Heavenly Father for 
the health aur family enjoys. I know that Jesus is the Savior of men 
on earth and that Joseph Smith is a true Prophet of God, and that the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the true Church. I am 
thankful for my good children and grandchildren and three great-grand- 
children and my husband and I ask them that they will always keep the 
commandments of our Heavenly Father that we might all be together in 
eternity. I seal this with my love for them and for the Gospel. 



17th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 64 






2025 No. Oak Lane 
Provo, Utah 





Brickerhaven 



162 



HENRY 



DIXON 



TAYLOR 



"It was inevitable that he should reach high places", was said of 
Henry Dixon Taylor when he was called as an Assistant to the Council 
of the Twelve in April 1958. He was trained for leadership from his 
early days of disciplined farm life in Provo, Utah, where he was born 
at 256 North Fifth West on November 22, 1903, to Arthur N. and 
Maria Dixon Taylor. 

He was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints in the Provo Third Ward on December 21, 1912 by 
William Russell and confirmed the same day by George Powelson. 

He attended the Timpanogos School for seven years after which 
he attended the Central School for the eighth grade. Upon his gradua- 
tion from the eighth grade he enrolled at the BYU High School in the fal 
of 1917, graduating four years later in the spring of 1921. 

After his Freshman year of College study, he was employed as 
bookkeeper at Dixon Real Estate Co, , where he worked for two years, 
prior to his mission call to the Eastern States Mission, 

Henry departed for his mission on October 8, 1924, not yet fully 
recovered from a bout with typhoid fever. The Mission President of 
the Eastern States Mission was B. H. Roberts, who was Senior Pres- 
ident of the First Council of the Seventy, and therefore a General Auth- 
ority. President Roberts assigned him to labor first, in Brooklyn, 
then New York City, then when summer arrived, he and his compan- 
ion, went to the upper part of New York State, where they travelled 
without purse or script. After about a month in the country. Pres- 
ident Roberts called him back to mission headquarters, to serve as 
bookkeeper or Assistant Secretary of the Mission, 

On November 5, 1925 he was appointed Connecticut Conference 
President with headquarters at Hartford. 

President Roberts' letter of July 1, 1926, requested Henry to 
return to Mission Headquarters in Brooklyn and serve as Mission 
Secretary, and also have supervision of the Sunday Schools and MIA 
work in the Mission, 

It was on a July morning (July 27, 1926), as the office staff as- 
sembled in the living room of the Mission Home for devotional exer- 
cises prior to breakfast. President Roberts said to Henry: "Brother 
Taylor, how would you like to be a Seventy? " Somewhat startled, he 
replied: "President Roberts, that would be a great honor." President 
Roberts then said: "Sit down in that chair." He then ordained him to 
the office of a Seventy, and gave him a tender and beautiful blessing. 

Henry was honorably released in the latter part of December and 
arrived home from his mission just before Christmas in 1926. He en- 
rolled at B.Y.U. for the winter quarter of 1927. He was active in the 
off campus Goldbrickers Club and became the President of Social Unit 
Number One (Nuggets) when the Goldbrickers were invited back on 



163 



164 



HENRY DIXON TAYLOR 



campus with a new name. With the granting of a Alpha Kappa Psi 
business fraternity charter to B.Y.U. , Henry became a charter mem- 
ber. He was elected Second Vice-president of the Student Body, hav- 
ing charge of the Public Service Bureau. Chosen to assist him were, 
John L. Allen, Ruth Clark and Audrey Ostlund. 

Henry graduated from Brigham Young University in 1929 and in 
i960 was awarded the Y's Alumni Distinguished Service Award. He re- 
ceived a master's degree fromNew York University School of Retailing 
in 1937. 

In his senior year in 1928, he courted Alta Hansen of Richfield. 
They were both graduated in the Spring of 1929. He then went to work 
for Dixon Taylor Russell Company, and she taught English in the Provo 
High School. The day after Christmas, December 26, 1929, they were 
married in the Salt Lake Temple by Elder Melvin J. Ballard of the 
Council of the Twelve, They have four sons; Henry D. Jr. , who 
married Colette Green of Lethbridge, Canada, who with their family 
of eight children (5 boys and 3 girls), live in Palo Alto, California, 
Anthony, who lives in Salt Lake as yet has not married. Stephen K. , 
who lives and teaches school in Payson, married Lorna Bird of Spring- 
ville. They have three children, two boys and a girl. David A. , who 
lives in Provo, and teaches school at the B. Y. U. , married Kristine 
Boynton of Mesa, Arizona. They are the parents of two girls and a 
boy. Their mother, Alta, passed away of cancer on July 6, 1967. 

In a Salt Lake Temple ceremony on Monday September 9, 1968, 
Henry was married to Ethelyn Peterson Taylor, his younger brother, 
Kenneth's, widow. 

Henry has held the following Church positions during his lifetime: 
President of his Deacons Quorum 
President of his Teachers Quorum 
Secretary of Provo Third Ward Sunday School 
Secretary of Utah Stake Sunday School Board 
Assistant Secretary of Eastern States Mission 
President of Connecticut Conference 
Secretary of Eastern States Mission 
President of 123rd Quorum of Seventy 
Sunday School Teacher in Pleasant View Ward 
Member of Sharon Stake High Council 
Sharon Stake Clerk 

Bishop of Pleasant View Ward, Sharon Stake 

Pres. of Sharon Stake -succeeding Arthur V, Watkins 

President of East Sharon Stake 

Cha irman of Central Utah Welfare Region 

Chairman of Mt. Timpanogos Welfare Region 

President of California Mission 



HENRY DIXON TAYLOR 



165 



Church positions (continued) 

Assistant to the Twelve - General Authority- 
Managing Director of Church Welfare Program 
Member of First Quorum of the Seventy 

His Civic Activities have been: 

On original Board of SCERA - Trustee for the Bondholders 
On Board of Utah Valley Hospital 

Board Member of Provo Chamber of Commerce - Served 

as Pres. at time President Harry S, Truman visited BYU 
Board Member of Provo Kiwanis Club, also President 

Business Activities in which he has been engaged: 
Dixon Real Estate Company 

Henry D, Taylor Company - Real Estate & Insurance 
Dixon Taylor Russell Co. - Home Furnishings Store 
Bonneville Development Co, - Land Developer 
Brickerhaven Corporation - Canyon Home Development 
Taylor Terrace Home Owners Association 
Henry's memories of his Grandfather, George Taylor, Sr.: 
"At the conclusion of the school year in the Spring of 1922, Uncle 
LeRoy Dixon offered me the position of bookkeeper at the Dixon Real 
Estate Co, Elsie C. Ross who held the position had received a call to 
serve as a missionary in the Eastern States Mission." 

"The Dixon Real Estate Co. had purchased a parcel of business 
property from Basil T. Kerr, upon which a mortgage was held by my 
grandfather, George Taylor, from whom Basil had acquired the prop- 
erty. Grandfather insisted that the interest on the mortgage be paid 
on the morning of the first of each month. It was my responsibility to 
deliver the check to him. He lived on the East bank of the Mill Race, 
in a home facing the West on Second West and Center Street. " 

"Grandfather was a hard-working man and even in his advanced 
years would be found laboring in his garden or cutting wood. He was 
very thrifty and conservative. His word was his bond. He was exact- 
ing in keeping his word and expected others to be the same way." 

"On the first of one month I was involved in affairs at the office, 
and it was after 1:00 p.m. before I was able to go to his home with the 
interest check. He was waiting for me. What a blistering tongue lash- 
ing I received! He gave me to understand that the payment was due the 
very first thing in the morning. He taught me a lesson in punctuality 
and promptness that has stayed with me through-out my lifetime. After 
that experience, I was never late again in delivering his check," 

"He was a sincere, devout member of the Church in his earlier 
years, but in later life he became disillusioned with the Church through 
bus ine s s dealings with some of the early Church leaders in Provo, This 



166 



HENRY DIXON TAYLOR 



made him critical and somewhat bitter." 

"In 1924, after I had received a mission call to the Eastern States 
Mission, when I went to deliver his monthly interest check, I advised 
him of my call, and that this would be my last visit to him. He looked 
at me for a few moments, then said: "I think that you are a damn fool, 
but go my boy and do your best and may the Lord bless you. " He then 
reached in his wallet and handed me a $5. 00 bill. " 

"That evening at the dinner table as I related my visit with Grand- 
father and told of his gift. Father was amazed and said that Grandfather 
had not offered nor provided him a single cent when he was a mission- 
ary. " 

Henry points out three men who influenced his young manhood 
years: 

" As a person reviews his or her life, he becomes aware that 
certain persons have had a tremendous influence in his life for good or 
otherwise. As I contemplate my life, I discover that three men in- 
fluenced my young manhood most. The first was my father, Arthur N. 
Taylor, a reserved but forceful man, short on words, but long on per- 
formance. The second was my Mission President, Brigham Henry 
Roberts, who was a powerful orator and an effective defender of the 
Church and its doctrines; and the third was Arthur V. Watkins, with 
whom I first served as a fellow President in the 123rd Quorum of 
Seventy, then later on the Sharon Stake High Council for eight years 
when he was President of that Stake, followed by four years as his 
Stake Clerk, then as Bishop of the Pleasant View Ward for two years, 
and finally succeeding him as President of the Sharon Stake. " 

On President Harry S. Truman's visit to the BYU in 1952, where 
he addressed the students, the official Provo Chamber of Commerce 
greeter, was its president for that year, Henry D. Taylor. 

"Welcome to Provo, Mr. President, we trust that you will have 
an enjoyable time, while here." To which President Truman replied: 
"Thank you. I always have an enjoyable and good time, wherever I go," 

Later, when talking to one of those present, the man asked the 
question: "Wasn't it an honor to shake hands with the President of the 
United States'? " To which Henry replied: "Yes, it surely was, but no 
greater honor and thrill than shaking hands with the Prophet, because 
it is always a great honor and privilege to shake hands with President 
McKay. " 

For the April Conference of 1958, all mission presidents and 
wives in the United States, Canada, and New Mexico had been extended 
an invitation by the First Presidency to attend, Henry, as President 
of the California Mission, eagerly accepted the invitation and made 
reservation for rooms at the Hotel Utah. 

He attended the Friday and Saturday sessions, sitting by Los 
Angeles Stake President, John M. Russon, near the front of the Taber- 



^EiSTRY DIXON TAYLOR 



167 



nacle on the Saturday afternoon session. At 4:15 p.m. he was handed 
a note by the head Tabernacle usher, David Thomas. It was a note 
written by Sister Clare Middlemiss, President McKay's secretary, re- 
questing that he be in President McKay's office at five o clock. He was 
there on time. 

"President McKay pointed out that a vacancy or vacancies 'WDtd.d 
exist in the Assistance to the Council of the Twelve, and it was his de- 
sire and the desire of the Brethren that I should fill one of those vacan- 
cies. " 

"President McKay, when you called me to be a mission president, 
I advised you that I did not give long talks; and they haven't lengthened 
much, and I also assured you that when a call came from the Church 
leaders, there could be but one answer, and that answer must be YES, 
I'll do my very best." 

President McKay took him by the hand and looked into his eyes, 
with eyes that pierced his very soul, as he said, "Brother Taylor, this 
is the will of the Lord. " 

The next morning, which was Easter Sunday, April 6, 1958, his 
name was read by President J. Reuben Clark, Jr. and sustained by the 
members of the Church, who were assembled in the Tabernacle. 

The following Thursday, April 10, 1958, in the Council Room of 
the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve in the Salt Lake Temple, 
he was set apart by the members of the First Presidency and all the 
Council of the Twelve. 

In fullfilling these weekly Church assignments , Henry has visited 
most all the Missions and Stakes throughout the world, including visits 
to Dudley, England and Grahamstown, South Africa, the birthplace of 
his Dixon Grandparents. 

Following a Stake Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa, he 
and his wife, Ethelyn, flew to Grahamstown, Grandfather Dixon's birth- 
place. They were impressed with the importance attached and accord- 
ed to the 1820 Settlers, Upon going out into the country in the Coombs 
Valley, they saw a mail box with the name of Bert Dixon painted on it. 
Upon talking with Mrs. Dixon and her son, they learned that her hus- 
band, Bert, was a great grandson of John Henry Dixon, and his first 
wife Margaret, who had passed away, prior to his marriage to Judith 
Boardman, 



Message Of Inspiration 

While man is struggling to 
achieve security and in- 
dependence, he should also 
realize that happiness and 
joy can be his. This joy 
comes from performing un- 
selfish acts for others, 
a life filled with love for 
fellowman, the rewards that 
come from honest toil, 
from a home where love and 
kindness abide. 




— Elder Henry D. Taylor 



168 



19th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




169 



VERNON LEE DIXON 



I, Vern Dixon, was born 22 May 1904, the son of Parley Smith 
and Mary Etola Dangerfield Dixon. I was given a name and a father's 
blessing by my grandfather, Jabez Dangerfield. My mother says of 
me: "Our first child came 22 May 1904 born at the home of my parents. 
He was a beautiful blue-eyed, round faced, seven pound boy and the 
apple of his Daddy's eye. He had him out on parade in his wicker, 
bronze and lace trimmed pram before he was two weeks old. We named 
him Vernon Lee, but you all know him as just plain, "Vern. " 

Because mother was teaching part time at BYU Training School, 
I spent my early months with my Dangerfield grandparents. I like to 
think that I was Grandma's pet, for she was always making little treats 
for me. During the war when white flour was so scarce and being ra- 
tioned, she found enough to occasionally make a small loaf. She always 
saw to it that I got a slice or two of it. Her pies were the best in the 
world. 

Dad, as a builder, was able to construct our homes as we wanted 
them. We moved into our home on Sixth West and Third North when 
I was just a baby. This home is still standing, a sturdy building and 
still in use to this day. 

I started school in the old Timpanogos building when I was six 
years old. It was near our homes, so some of my cousins and I spent 
many hours on its playground both during the winter and summer. 
Miss Lewis was my teacher in the Fourth grade. Lucile Knowlden 
was one of my teachers here. Although she was a small person, we 
learned early that she meant what she said and when she said it. One 
day we were having singing practice. One of the big boys decided he 
didn't want to sing. He laid down his book, left his seat and started 
for the door. Miss Knowlden met him there with a brass lined ruler 
and whacked him back to his seat. Thereafter when she said sing, that 
is just what we did. She was later to become my cousin by her marriage 
to Aldous Dixon. 

I have always enjoyed math and arithmetic. The later led me to 
meeting my wife-to-be. That is another story. These subjects have 
been a great help to me in my business. I finished my schooling at the 
High School and a year at BYU. 

It was the summer that I worked with Dad on the new addition to 
the High School that I decided I wanted to be a brick mason, like my 
dad. I think that he was pleased with my choice and so he took me on 
as an apprentice. He gave me the opportunity to learn the trade well. 
Four years of apprenticeship is required in this trade. First one must 
become a helper to the mason, learn how to mix the mud and how to 
run a job for the greatest efficiency. As a helper, one can make or 
break a mason. Dad was always proud of his work as a mason, for he 
was the best. So ithas come to me to have that same pride in my work. 
We Dixons have never, and I hope never will feel that our work is not 



171 



172 



VERNON LEE DIXON 



the best. 

In 191 6, Dad's business took he and his family to the big 24th of 
July celebration in the Uintah Basin. Many in the crowd were Indians. 
I was the center of attention on my Shetland pony. As the men crowded 
around this tiny animal, there were many bids for him. Yes, it didn't 
take long for one of them to make an offer that Dad felt he couldn't 
resist, so my pony was sold. Dad promised me another one when we 
got home, I often wonder if the new owner had the same experience 
with this skittish, flighty little cuss as I did. He would, if he felt so 
inclined, find a mud hole or even a stream and dump me off in it and 
then stand off and laugh at me. 

It was during this trip that Dad contracted to build the Duchesne 
High School. This contract proved very costly to him for it was al- 
most impossible to get brick, the building was on poor shifting sands, 
the men got typhoid and had to go home, and it seemed that everything 
went wrong. Our family was to lose our lovely home on Third West 
and Second North and take years to pay for the job that turned out so 
badly. 

Dad continued to take work both in Utah and out of State. As 
soon as I could I went with him. It was a great experience for me and 
I know I benefited from it in many ways. In our jobs in Grand Junction 
and Colorado, we met many fine people who remained friends the rest 
of our lives. 

On the 14th of November 1923 I was married to Loleta Wiscomb 
in the Salt Lake Temple, We had dinner after the ceremony with Uncle 
Mac and Aunt Sarah McConachie in Salt Lake. Aunt Sarah came back 
to Provo with us for our wedding reception. We rented an apartment 
in the Choules home and here our first child, a girl, Lois was born 
on August 25, 1924, 

I was fortunate to find work at Ironton, when they were building 
the coke ovens. It was hard work and long hours but the experience 
was invaluable to me. I was there until Dad called from Grand Junc- 
tion that he needed my help, so I went out there. Between jobs from 
here, we took jaunts "over the mountains" and liked what we saw, so 
in 1926 we took off for the midwest, working as we went. One of our 
trips took us into Wisconsin and on down to Chicago. There was plen- 
ty of work and we were urged to stay here, but we felt we should get 
back to the job in Springfield where a Mr, Fisher had been so kind to 
us. After working with him for a time, he offered me a partnership. 
I knew that he was elderly and needed me but when Dad called for me 
to come home and help, we left all and went West again. I often wond- 
er just what our lives would have been had we stayed. We met so 
many fine people and still have correspondence with many of them. 

I guess I have never satisfied my curiosity about the world, for 
we have done quite a bit of traveling in the United States and Mexico, 



VERNON LEE DIXON 



173 



and Canada. It has always been a wonderful experience to see and 
learn more about people. 

Back home we settled in Edgemont and it was a wise move. It 
was 1928 and in 1929 the depression hit the nation. It had crippled the 
building trades much earlier and so we were fortunate to have our own 
home free of debt, a cow, chickens, fruit trees and a garden spot. I 
know that we were much better off than many of our age. We had been 
able to save some, and when money became almost non-existent we 
were able to have a bit of cash for what was needed. Almost in the 
middle of this time our second child Lee was born 8 April 1929. 

It was also at this time that Dad and family moved out to Orem, 
on a fruit farm. As family members, we all pitched in to harvest the 
crops and get them ready for sale. Many of them were trucked out to 
the Basin and other places where fruit was scarce and exchanged for 
meat (beef on the hoof) or anything that could be used by the family, or 
sold for cash. It was interesting to see the truck come home, for it 
might have any number of things which had been exchanged for the fruit. 
I guess the depression was hard on most people, but we didn't look on 
it as a disaster. Even tho times were hard, there was sickness and 
etc. , we were a close-knit family and there were many happy times 
when we were together. I know now that my parents had much to do 
with this feeling of security that we had. They were special people. 

As time went on. Dad was unable to work full time and so I took 
over the contracts and we worked together as much as we could. Gene 
and Bert, who had returned from the service, went to work with us as 
apprentices, as did Reed. It was great to work as a family. We pool- 
ed our time and resources and made it a point to see that each of us 
had a good home and the boys became more proficient in the work. It 
has been their vocation, Bert did some carpentering in his time, but 
he is still in the brick trade. Unlike Dad I have never taken jobs away 
from home. I didn't want to leave my family and have never seen the 
need for it because I have always had plenty to do right at home. 

Carl, our third child, was born 21 May 1935. In 1929 we had 
sold our home in Edgemont and moved to Provo, We built three homes 
on Sixth West. One we sold and the other two we occupied for a time. 
It was a beautiful location and we were sure we were settled there for 
life. We found the area building up very fast around us and I was in- 
strumental in helping it build, for I did the brickwork on all the homes 
in the Riverside Subdivision, taking in most of the original Knudsen 
farm. 

We bought property, gave some to the Church, sold a lot to Bert 
who built a home just across the street from us. To-day what was 
known as the old Allen Ice Pond, is the center of our home { or we are 
in the center of the old pond area. I had plans to retire and take it easy 
but then:- We were called on a building mission for the Church in 
Hawaii. I was to train young men in the brick trade and build chapels. 



174 



VERNON LEE DIXON 



I feel that it was one of my greatest and best experiences. I did train 
young men and we did good work and they are doing it as I trained them, 
which is what I wanted. We learned to love the Island people and that 
they are great people. The chapels that we built are a tribute to the 
fine men that I had with me. 

Home again, we had decided that our home and grounds were too 
large for us to keep up. We were like two peas in a large pod. With the 
family all settled in their own homes, we sold and built a tri-plex in 
Orem and again decided to retire. 

Well again, the Church stepped in and we were called as ordin- 
ance workers in the Salt Lake Temple. It was three days a week and 
nine hours a day, counting travel time. Again this was an outstanding 
experience and a great blessing to me who for the most part was of a 
retiring nature. When one learns all of the speaking parts required 
in the temple ceremony and gives them letter perfect before anaudience 
of 300 people, one is no longer of a retiring nature. It is one of the 
blessings which has come into my life. 

When the Provo Temple was opened, we were set apart for the 
same work here. 

In 1971 I had a serious operation, nearly losing my life. It has 
curtailed my activity to a great extent. My lungs are full of silica 
dust, brick and mortar dust and they are a great handicap to my doing 
much in the way of strenuous work, I know what I have to live with and 
I am learning to cope with it by being as comfortable as I can. I am 
grateful that I stay as well as I do, since I just passed my 74th birth- 
day, 22 May 1978. 

My wife and I are parents to 3 children, grandparents to 12 child- 
ren and gt. grandparents to 21, with more coming. Our eldest great- 
grand child, Terri Lyn Morgan, was the first of Henry Aldous Dixon's 
Third great grandchildren. 



20th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 12.2 




FRED WALTER DDCON 




HELEN CHIPMAN 



175 



Fred Walter Dixon Family 




BYU "Preferred" Man 




"943 No. University Ave. 
ProvQ, Utah 



FRED 



WALTER 



DIXON 



I was born on July 30, 1904 in Provo, Utah to Walter DeGrey 
Dixon and Louie Maiben Dixon. I was the second of a family of five. 
Rhea, the oldest; and Donald, the third; Edna, the fourth; and Amy, the 
fifth. 

I was named after my Doctor and Father. Fred for Dr. Fred 
Taylor and Walter for my Dad. All of us but Rhea were born at 232 
North Fifth We st, and we all lived there while we were growing up and 
until we were married. It is still the home for Amy and Rhea, who 
have both lost their husbands. It is still a home we all love. 

My life has been a happy one and I have wonderful memories that 
constantly come back to me. My early childhood was full of activity. 
We lived in a neighborhood of many friends and relatives. Fifth West, 
where we lived, was called "Sandy Alley"because of the many redheads 
that lived there. I missed having red hair but did have a red face. 
Many of the Dixons and Taylors that lived in the Third Ward (my Ward) 
had red hair, and we were a close family. 

My first school was the Timpanogos Elementary School on the 
corner of Fifth West and Fourth North. I was six years old in 1910, 
when I entered the first grade. We went to the seventh grade at Timp. 
and we were then promoted to the eighth grade at Central Junior High. 
All seventh grade students from the four Provo City grade schools 
attended the Central School for one year when they were graduated to 
High School. 

My High School education was two years at the Provo High and 
two years at the B. Y. U. High School. I graduated in 1922. 

My college schooling was at B. Y. U. from 1922 to 1926 when I 
graduated with a B.S. degree. Later in 1939 I completed work for a 
Masters degree at B. Y. U. I attended numerous coaching schools and 
my family and I had six months of further schooling at West Virginia 
in Morgantown, in 1950. 

From early youth I was interested in sports of all kinds. We 
have a picture of myself at the age of three years holding a basketball 
and I was to be actively engaged in sports for most of my life. 

There was basketball, baseball and track in the grades, but it 
was in High School that the real competition started, both at the Provo 
High and B. Y.High. I made letters in football, basketball, track and 
tennis. In my senior year at Provo High, I won the John McAdam 
Medal for all-around achievement in athletics. 

In College at the B. Y. U. , I won fifteen letters in the above men- 
tioned sports. I also won the Ed. Stein Medal for all-around athlete. 
I was picked on the All- Conference football and basketball teams and 
won the singles and doubles all Conference in tennis. 

I was Intermountain Tennis singles champion for many years and 
with my brother. Sank, was also doubles champions in both State and 
Intermountain Tournaments. We went to Boston, Mass. four straight 



177 



178 



FRED WALTER DIXON 



years to represent the Intermountain Area. 

In the past few years I have had the honor of receiving the fol- 
lowing athletic awards: 

The Dale Rex Trophy which is given yearly to the outstand- 
ing Utahn for past achievement in amateur athletics. 

Installed in the Utah Sports Hall of Fame. 

B. Y. U. Sports Hall of Fame. 

I also played on the Provo Baseball team and the Provo Golf team. 

After my school days I still competed in many sports but mostly 
in golf, tennis and bowling. Athletics have been very good to me. 

My first job after graduating in 1926, was at Weber High inOgden. 
I was the Coach of all the sports and taught bookkeeping and Physical 
Education. I was at Weber High for two years. 

In the fall of 1928 I accepted a job at B. Y. U. in Athletics and 
Physical Education. I coached in most of the sports and was Head 
Coach of tennis and golf for many years. 

I was at the B.Y.U. for about forty- five years before retiring in 
1973. It was a wonderful time. 

In the fall quarter of 1930, I was teaching a class in Kinesiology, 
when a pretty blonde girl came to my class. She was about two or three 
weeks late and after class I told her she would be better off if she 
would wait until the next quarter to take this class. She insisted she 
could make up the work, and she did. Several weeks later I finally 
asked her for a date. Three weeks after our first date we were engaged. 
Her name was Helen Chipman Heiselt. She was the daughter of Wash- 
burn Chipman and Margaret Chipman of American Fork. Mr. Chipman 
was the president of four banks in Utah County. We were married in 
the Salt Lake Temple on May 27, 1931. 

Helen had a seven year old daughter, Mary Lou,when we were 
married. Our three sons are: 

Fred Chipman Dixon, born June 15, 1932. 

Richard Chipman Dixon, born April 30, 1936. 

David Chipman Dixon, born October 20, 1944. 

We were married at the start of the depression and at that time 
I was making about $150 a month. In the next two years we took two 
cuts of 10% and 1Z^%. It became necessary to have more income. We 
decided to take in boarders for the next few years. 

Helen has been employed in many jobs, the last was being manager 
of Castleton's in Provo, for several years. We have often had a good 
laugh at the number of ways we both have had to help out the income. 
But we got by and in the process have helped all four children through 
College and two of the boys on missions. 

Helen and I have many friends. We have enjoyed belonging to 
several groups and clubs. One of the social groups have kept together 
for nearly fifty years. We are both retired now but manage to keep 
busy. 



FRED WALTER DIXON 



179 



Helen and I have been married for nearly forty-nine years and 
it has been a wonderful life. 

Over the years I have been active and had interests in several 
activities. They are: Gardening, music, golf, bowling, reading and 
going to Provo Canyon, especially Wildwood; to name a few. 

I have never played a musical instrument but have always enjoy- 
ed good music. I have acquired hundreds of albums in opera, symphon- 
ies, concerts and etc. We have enjoyed hearing them over and over. 

When we were first married, we started a garden in our back 
yard and it has been an enjoyment to us and to hundreds of our friends. 
I specialized in buying tulips from Holland. One year I had over 
14,000 tulips on my lot, in bloom. We still grow many flowers. 

I have enjoyed golf and bowling, which has helped to keep me 
active in my later years. 

I love to read books, mainly history, novels, auto- biographie s , 
and others. It is an interest I have always enjoyed. 

Provo Canyon and especially Wildwood, has always been a keen 
pleasure for me. Just to ride through the Canyon always gives me a 
big lift. When I was young we always spent two weeks in Wildwood 
each summer and I still remember the good times we had. 

I am now a High Priest and like most other Mormon men, have 
come up through the ranks. I have held Church jobs as a teacher and 
the leader of the High Priests Group, Superintendent of Sunday School. 

Provo has been my home all my life, except two years I spent in 
Ogden, I have enjoyed my life here very much. 

FRED BUCK DIXON 
Is Named To Utah Sports Hall of Fame 
By Joe Watts, Daily Herald, Nov. 7, 1972 
Fred "Buck" Dixon, a former all-around athlete at Brigham 
Young University in the 1 920' s, has been named to the Utah Sports Hall 
of Fame and will be formally inducted into the elite group of athletes 
next Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1972. 

The Utah Sports Hall of Fame has been organized by the Old Time 
Athletes Association and those selected to the Hall of Fame will be 
pictured in a special section of the Salt Palace especially set aside for 
that purpose. 

Buck was an all-around athlete , competing in football , basketball, 
track, and tennis while in school at BYU through the years 1922-1926. 
He earned 15 letters during those four years. 

Interestingly enough, BYU didn't have a baseball team in those 
days, but he was playing for the Provo City team and was even the 
manager of the team one year. Had the Cougars had a baseball team 
he would undoubtedly have even earned more letters. 

He was an all- conference fullback in football and also an all- con- 



180 



FRED WALTER DIXON 



ference basketball player. Some of his more prominent teammates 
during those years included Golden Romney, Eddie Kimball, Ariel 
Ballif, and Elwood Romney. 

While he was outstanding in those sports it was in tennis that he 
gained national recongnition. In his day, he was one of the premier 
players in the West. He was Utah State Singles champion five times 
and captured four intermountain singles titles. He was conference 
champion in tennis on two occasions. 

Competing with his brother Don "Sanky" Dixon, the two gained 
fame as a doubles team. They won the Intermountain doubles title a 
number of times and competed together nationally. 

Since graduating from college Buck has taken up a number of 
other sports and has excelled. He is a fine golfer, and tied for the 
championship in the first Provo Tournament at the Timpanogos Golf 
Course with a one under par 69. He has sunk two aces during his golf- 
ing career, and even now, at the age of 68, still plays golf nearly every 
good day at the Riverside Country Club, 

He has also taken up bowling and has developed a high skill in that 
sport. His highest score was a 280 several years ago. He started with 
a strike and then a spare and then finished out with ten strikes. 

He is still an active bowler and is participating in a bowling 
league, as well as teaching bowling classes at BYU. 

Participating wasn't the extent of Buck's contribution to sports. 
After graduating from B Y U he started a coaching career at Weber 
High School and taught classes in bookkeeping. 

Weber High recently honored him for the standards of excellence 
he set while acting as the school's first coach. Sportsmanship, prepar- 
edness, and determination were the hallmarks of his teams. 

In 1928 he returned to BYU where he was an assistant football 
coach to Ott Romney. Before his coaching career ended some 45 years 
later he had coached nearly every major sport. He was head basket- 
ball coach in 1937 and 1938, and served in a dual role as coach of the 
golf and tennis teams. 

In 1957 he was named the winner of the coveted Dale Rex Mem- 
orial Award which goes annually to a Utahn who has contributed great- 
ly to amateur athletics in Utah. 

Sports are not his only interests. He is an avid music lover and 
has a collection of classical music. He also has a keen interest in 
raising flowers, and each year has a beautiful garden full of tulips and 
other flowers. 

He is a gentleman with a sense of humor. Like the other night 
in his bowling league he called his team together to give them a pep 
talk and said, "Let's bowl like we've never bowled before- -bowl good. " 

Buck didn't need the pep talk. He's always done his best at 
everything. 



23rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 14.2 





OR A ANDERSON 



181 




182 



A Profile of my Father 



PAUL SMOOT DIXON 
By Vivian Dixon McKay 

"Why, Mr, Dixon was one of my best friends," the elevator man 
from the Union Pacific Building said to me as he stopped to talk to the 
family at the mortuary that cold, wet December evening prior to the 
funeral of Paul Smoot Dixon. "I'm really going to miss him!" 

Paul Dixon was a great man; and I'm proud to say he was one of 
my closest friends," said another. And another "Your Father was 
one of those few special people that come to earth, I hope you realize 
how much he was loved. " 

So many similar comments were expressed by people from all 

walks of life bankers, church leaders, janitors, secretaries, 

switch board operators, investment brokers, teachers, business men 
of all kinds. I have reflected many times about these comments voiced 
by so many that night. What was the "special quality" that made him 
the kind of man who claimed admiration and love from so many? 

Was it his twinkling eyes or warm smile? Was it his drive to 
accomplish his goals? Was it his love and loyalty for his family? Was 
it his sincere interest and love of others? Was it his great faith and 
unsfa.ltering testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ? Was it his limit- 
less energy? Was it his kindness and extended hand of friendship to all? 
Was it his desire to serve the Lord? Was it his love of country and 
his patriotism? What was it that made Paul Dixon the man we, as his 
wife and children, loved so much? 

In the following pages, I will with the help of my Mother, brother 
and sister try to describe him to the reader as we knew him: 

To tell the story of Paul Smoot Dixon, one must begin long be- 
fore April, 1906 when he was born in Provo, Utah. 

He was, as Nephi said, "born of goodly parents. " These parents 
were unusual people. A cousin of Daddy's (Fred Dixon) said to me a 
few years ago, "I'm sorry you never knew your grandfather, Vivian, 
Uncle Roy was one of the finest men I ever knew. In his short life he 
achieved a stature of greatness that few men ever attain." Another 
cousin of my father's (Aldous Dixon) said in a letter he wrote to me 
speaking of LeRoy Dixon, "There was no brighter star in the Dixon 
Family. " 

Grandfather (LeRoy Dixon) was a leader by nature. He served 
as mayor of Provo for many years and at the time of his death, he was 
serving as a State Senator. Always active in the Church, he held ex- 
ecutive positions in his spiritual callings. I have always felt sorry that 
I was not able to know him; for he died before I was born. 

Grandmother (Electa LaPrele Smoot) was a very active, energet- 
ic woman devoting the greater part of her life to the service of others-- 



183 



184 



PAUL SMOOT DIXON 



first as a wonderful mother of eight children ( 6 lived to maturity) and 
second as a Relief Society President ministering to the needs of the 
sisters in her ward and stake. My mother has told me many times that 
her mother-in-law was "an angel and a queen," Few daughters-in-law 
are found saying such glowing compliments of their mothers-in-law; 
but mother has aaid this so often that I know it must be true. 

Again from the letter of Aldous Dixon (1966) "Paul Dixon comes 
from a long line of outstanding pioneer leaders. He perpetuated the 
finest of their family traits. He was short, muscular, light complex- 
ioned, fair skin, very quick of reaction, too energetic for the sake of 
his health, very keen of intellect, highly spiritual and he possessed an 
abundance of the love of Christ in his heart for children and his fellow 
men. This later trait has been and is one of the chief assets of the 
Dixon clan. I simply adored him when he was a child. Father's 
family lived next door and Paul was Uncle Roy's only boy. " 

In this same letter written to me, Aldous related the following 
story about my father when he was twelve years of age. 

"Uncle Roy had just returned from his mission; so father hired 
him to help me break-up 18 acres of land and plant to peach trees. 
Later we planted the whole 40 acres to peaches. Paul used to ride out 
to the farm with me from time to time, from the time he was about 
seven years of age. 

When the trees came into full bearing, we employed as many as 
105 people and Paul was always on the job to help. When he was about 
12 years of age, we had one of our heaviest years. We shipped 
around 6600 bushels of peaches - - 11 freight car loads. 

During the middle of the havest when father was checking out 
some cars at the Orem railroad station, he tripped on a railroad tie, 
striking the rail so hard that it broke his nose and also caused a 
slight concussion. I had to rush him to the hospital. 

When quitting time came, our people simply dropped their work 
and went home leaving one load of 110 bushels of peaches standing in 
the sun in the orchard and leaving Paul alone. 

After night fall when he did not come home, Uncle Roy drove out 
to the farm to see what had happened. He found Paul just unhitching a 
huge team of horses of our (weighing about 700 po\inds each) from the 
rack used for hauliog peaches. 

Uncle Roy said, "What are you doing way out here this time of 
night? We were worried sick!" 

Paul said, "Well, Dad, Uncle John is hurt and Aldous took him 
to the hospital and the driver just unhitched his team and left this big 
load of peaches out in the sun to spoil; so I just went to the barn, got 
this big team of stallions out, stood on a box and put their harnesses 
on. It took me an awful long time to get their bridles on and I could 
hardly lift the harnesses; but I did and took them over to the wagon, 
hitched them onto it and drove it over to the railroad switch, but the 
man was gone so I unloaded the peaches into the refrigerator car 



PAUL SMOOT DIXON 



185 



myself, " 

"All of us, especially Uncle Roy, never forgot that. It gave us 
some kind of idea what kind of kid he was -- certainly an unusual one 
to say the least, " 

Kindness and thoughtfulness was an integral part of Daddy's 
nature. As we see by this incident given by Aldous that it was a 
characteristic he had from the time he was very young. . . perhaps 
an inherited trait from his parents who possessed the same virtue. 

April 17, 1906, was a very important day in the lives of LeRoy 
and Electa Dixon when their second son was born. Pneumonia had 
claimed the life of their first son, LeRoy, when he was less than a 
year old. 

Paul could not be mistaken as their child for he came equipped 
with a very special Dixon characteristic -- red hair. He grew up on 
Fifth West in Provo -- among many cousins, aunts, grandparents 
who supplied the love and sense of belonging that creates a security 
so needed for a well-adjusted and happy childhood. 

When Paul was just a young boy, his father LeRoy was called to 
fill a mission to Great Britain. When there were just six months re- 
maining of this mission. Grandmother was allowed to join him and to 
work with him in his missionary labors. Paul was left in Provo with 
Aunt AUie Coleman, Grandmother's sister. 

As time passed, the Dixon Family was blessed with five daughters 
and one more son: AUie, Sarah, Maurine, Helen, Arthur, and Gladys, 
Young Arthur was the "apple of the family's eye"; but when he was 
four years old, he contracted pneumonia, and his little life was snuff- 
ed out. 

From earliest recollections, Paul was a man of projects, wheth- 
er it be the raising of rabbits, running a lemondade stand, selling butter 
wrappers, or producing a neighborhood circus. It was fun to prepare 
for the 4th of July in Provo. His younger sister Allie was always 
"fair game" for Paul's latest project. She often starred as the main 
attraction on the float or in the circus or wherever she was needed. 

The Dixons and Taylors of 5th West had a very warm place in 
their hearts for the Third Ward Chapel. Many significant events were 
witnessed there and it is where Paul received his first formal teach- 
ing of the Gospel. Between his wonderful parents and the training he 
had at the 3rd Ward, Paul's testimony grew and developed until he had 
an abiding and strong testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, 

The LeRoy Dixon family was an unusual family. There was a 
tremendous love and loyalty thfe.t developed between the children and 
the parents that one rarely sees in families today. Oh, there was the 

normal teasing and tantalizing that only a big brother can display 

but underlying such behavior was always this deep and abiding sense 
that they were blessed to belong to a great family. 

When Paul was a young man, he helped his father and some 
friends his father had hired to build a small cabin at Wildwood in 



186 



PAUL SMOOT DDCON 



Provo Canyon. Each summer, Paul would drive the family cow up 
Prove Canyon so the family would have daily milk. Many wonderful 
hours were spent each summer Wildwood was inhabited by many of 
the Fifth West family, and family memories continued to grow. One of 
Paul's favorite stories is how Aunt Rye (Maria Dixon Taylor) would 
take "all the kids" to swim in the Provo River. It didn't seem to 

matter that Aunt Rye couldn't swim but everyone knew they were 

safe if she were along. 

As a missionary called to serve in the Eastern States Mission, 
Paul had the great fortune of serving under the direction of President 
B. H. Roberts - - a man for whom he had profound respect and love. 
President Roberts' impact on Paul's life was tremendous; and we know 
that his spiritual growth in the mission field was a significant period 
of his life. His mission was primarily spent in the western part of 
Pennsylvania. Not long before his anticipated release, Paul's father, 
LeRoy Dixon, died very suddenly with complications from an abscess- 
ed tooth. Paul was released early so he could help his mother and 
five sisters. Needless-to-say this was a very sad time in the lives of 
this family. But the Dixons are optimistic people, and I'm sure this 
experience was a maturing one for each member of the family. 

Shortly after the death of his father, while Paul was attending 
B, Y. U. , he was introduced to a lovely coed on campus by the name 
of Ora Anderson. She was from Fairview, Utah, and a daughter of 
A. R. and Ida Anderson. Her father was a wool grower in Sanpete 
County. 

B. Y, U. was a great experience for Paul and Ora. There were 
only 2500 students at the time and it seemed that everyone was ac- 
quainted. Paul was one of the first members of the Bricker Social 
Unit. Together this group purchased a tract of land farther up Provo 
Canyon near Aspen Grove and behind Timpanogos. It was the dream 
of each Bricker to build a beautiful summer home at what theyhad now 
named the land, Br ickerhaven. Death interfered with Paul's realiz- 
ation of this dream. ( As his daughter and son-in-law, we hope to 
fulfill my father's dream by building a summer home there. ) 

Ora, a home economics major, was president of O. S. Travata 
and was involved in many campus activities. 

It did not take long for Paul and Ora to realize how much in love 
they were. It was now time to take Paul to Fairview to meet Grand- 
father and Grandmother Anderson. Paul captured their hearts and 
they knew he was the right choice for Ora. 

Business was Paul's major in college where he received a fine 
background in the Business College with Herald R. Clark as Dean. 
Dean Clark knew the value of a formal education beyond a bachelor's 
degree. He encouraged the young business students to go east for 
graduate training. 

Following graduation in June of 1929, Paul and Ora were married 
by Stephen L. Richards in the Salt Lake Temple on June 6, 1929. They 



PAUL SMOOT DIXON 



187 



began their new life together as they traveled east to New York. On 
their way, they stopped in Pennsylvania where Paul introduced his 
new bride to members of the Church and friends he made while serving 
his mission. 

They visited a very sweet family who were very poor. They 
were so thrilled to see Elder Dixon and his new wife. They insisted 
that they stay for dinner. Paul and Ora were not aware that the only 
thing they had to give them for dinner was the pet rooster. The roost- 
er had been killed and prepared. As the dinner was served, one by 
one each member of the family put their forks down and simply could 
not eat. When the Dixons found out, they were so sad to have been 
responsible for this sacrifice. But it is an example of how strongly 
these fine people felt abeut Paul and how desperately they wanted to 
please him. 

Life in New York was exciting and filled with surprises. The 
1929 Crash on Wall Street was a horrifying experience for most New 
Yorkers, But Ora was fortunate to obtain work as a dietician for a 
chain of five restaurants which helped greatly during the first two 
years. Paul was in school at New York University pursuing his 
Masters Degree in Business. He later attended Columbia University 
where he added to his education in the field of Real Estate Appraising, 
Soon afterward he became qualified as a residential appraiser in 
real estate. During the 18 years that the Dixons lived in New York, 
Paul worked for the Bank of Manhattan and as a real estate appraiser 
and agent. 

The small group from Utah were very close to each other. In 
a sense, they were family away from home. These friendships have 
been lifelong and are still strong, forty- five years later. The Church 
became the center of their social life. The ward picnics and outings, 
the days spent working on the Church Welfare Farm, the Sunday 
dinners shared at each other's homes, etc. Always active in the 
Church, Paul served in the Bishopric of the Queens Ward in Flushing, 
Long Island. The Ward met in the Good Citizenship League Hall. It 
was an old club that was not what one would consider an ideal place 
for spiritual learning. But this never seemed to matter. The diffi- 
cult circumstances only seemed to weld the members closer together 
and bring them closer to the Lord, 

The Dixon's home in New York became a "HAVEN" for visitors 
from Utah. They were always welcome and Paul and Ora enjoyed 
sharing their hospitality. 

Children came into the Dixon Family as Paul Smoot Dixon, Jr. 
arrived on February 25, 1932. Paul was identified quickly as a 
Dixon for as his Father, he had sandy coloring and red curly hair. 
Their new little son was truly a joy for Paul and Ora. 

Four years later on June 13, 1936, Vivian joined the family. 
Shortly after her birth, the Dixons moved from Jackson Heights to 
Little Neck on Long Island. Paul had long since finished his school- 



188 



PAUL SMOOT DIXON 



ing; but because they had grown to love New York, the family became 
permanent residents. 

Then the war years came. Because Paul was in the Bishopric, 
he was classified as a member of the clergy and would be called to 
active duty only if they needed more chaplains. Instead he put in hours 
after work in an arms factory and served as an air raid warden. 

Suddenly in 1945 without any previous indication, Ivor Sharp 
called Paul in New York and offered him a position as Comptroller of 
K, S, L, Ra dio in Salt Lake City. Returning to Utah had always been 
in the back of their minds; but this was something they planned for the 
future. "Mixed emotions" was definitely the state they were in. Paul 
had just been called as Bishop of Queens Ward. Ora was pregnant and 
was experiencing all the typical problems of any expectant mother. 
They were so close to their dear friends and did not want to leave. 
But in a matter of two weeks, the house was sold, packing done, the 
goodbyes were said; and they were on the train headed for Utah. 

July 19, 1945, was another important day as another daughter, 
Margaret Electa, was born. Margaret was named for her Grand- 
mother Dixon, Electa Smoot Dixon. Ora had loved her mother-in-law 
so much that she had always wanted to name a child for her. I'm sure 
there was nothing that pleased Paul more than to have a child named 
for his mother that he had adored. 

Margaret was a happy baby and has always been a happy person- 
able young woman. In many ways, it seems that her warmth and per- 
sonality are more like my father's than any of the children. Still a very 
young child when Paul first became plagued with cancer, Margaret was 
a real comfort and very special to Paul and Ora during his five years 
of illness. Her darling childlike ways helped to distract them from 
the anxieties of his illness. 

One of Paul's philosophies of life is explained in the following 
statement from one of his talks he delivered in Church: "HAPPINESS 
COMES THROUGH LIVING A LIFE IN BALANCE- SPIRITUAL, MORAL, 
PHYSICAL AND INTELLECTUAL." 

Paul Dixon was a man of many interests. He was industrious and 
hard working. He was at his desk at K. S. L. shortly after 6:00 a. m. 
each morning and had usually put in a good two hours work before any- 
one else on the staff arrived. His secretary, Edith Johnson, has told 
me, "Mr. Dixon was a wonderful man and a joy to work for. " 

Church work was a special love for Paul. He sincerely loved 
people; he cared about them, and loved to work with them. While living 
in Salt Lake he worked as Ward High Priest Leader and at the time of 
his death, he was serving as a High Councilman in Bonneville Stake. 
As long as I can remember, my father had a strong testimony of the 
Gospel and was eager to share it. 

Uranium, oil and gas were speculative areas that were of great 
interest to Paul. He always hoped he would be part of a successful 
find. Perhaps if he had lived longer, he might have seen this come to 



PAUL SMOOT DDCON 



189 



pass . 

He was a stalwart supporter of B.Y.U. He served in executive 
capacities of the B. Y. U. Alumni Association. Politics was another 
interest. His father, LeRoy, had been Mayor of Prove and a State 
Senator. Paul never aspired to public office; but he was truly commit- 
ted to good government and the support of the Republican Party. 

A happy man by nature, he radiated optimism in whatever he was 
doing. He was even tempered and rarely needed to discipline or scold 
his children. He was, however, very definite in his feelings of utmost 
respect for Mother at all times. This is something only a father can 
do; and I am most grateful that this is one way he chose to show us his 
love for Mother. He was, by nature and heredity, an affectionate man. 
A pat on the back; a hug or a kiss was always a welcome acknowledge- 
ment and reassurance of his love. 

Personal hygiene was very important to Paul. He was always 
careful to be impeccably clean and well groomed. One never saw his 
desk at the office at the end of the day left in disorder. It was import- 
ant for him to see that he left his office in an organized manner. 

One of the rich experiences of my youth was the travelling to 
and from New York to Utah in the summer for vacations. 

Daddy loved to sing! He and Mother taught us all the college 
songs they had loved: "Down by the Old Mill Stream, " "Let Me Call 
You Sweetheart", "Smiles", "A Long, Long, Trail", etc. These were 
happy memories. These were also the times of developing an interest 
in U.S. and Church History. Mother and Daddy were very interested 
in government and historical things. Our trips seemed to be planned 
to incorporate many new sites and experiences. All three of us child- 
ren are vastly interested in history, and I know thkt these trips helped 
to trigger this interest. 

The measure of a truly great person often comes during times 
of stress, illness, or discouragement. Our family learned a great 
deal about strength and greatness during the last five years of Daddy's 
life. 

Cancer is an ugly disease that can ^ake a strong, healthy, vital 
man in his mid-forties and whip him. But with Paul Dixon, this dread 
disease would not accomplish this without a fight. 

A tumor was removed from the colon and we all had great 
hopes that the surgery would solve the problem. Paul Jr. and I were 
teenagers at the time and Mother made a decision not to share the 
fact that the tumor had, indeed, been malignant. For four long years 
Mother shared this information with no one. She wanted our lives to 
be as normal as possible. I have often thought this was too much for 
one person to bear alone -- but she did it unselfishly and nobly. I am 
sure that she was a great strength through his entire illness. 

Four years passed and the malignancy began to reoccur. It was 
now necessary for further surgery, I shall never forget the look on 
Dr. LeRoy Wirthlin's face as he returned to the room following the 



190 



PAUL SMOOT DDCON 



operation to tell us the outcome. He had been a long time friend of 
Daddy's and he was deeply affected by what he had to tell us. As tears 
welled up in his eyes, he told us that the cancer was too wide spread. 
There was no need to remove any further tumors. How long? Any- 
where from six weeks to one year -- was the answer. 

Now the complete facts about his condition became ours to share 
as a family. The following year was not a tragic one. Daddy's great 
faith sustained him as he planned for a discovery to combat this dis- 
ease. As a family we drew closer than we had ever been before. 

Determined to continue working, each day he would be at the 
office, not always for the full day, but he continued to do his work at 
K. S. L. 

In the month of November, 1955, his illness took over and Daddy 
was confined at home. His faith and hope of recovery was still a very 
real part of him. 

Earlier in this account, I spoke of the unusual love and loyalty 
that Daddy and his sisters shared. During that last month, each one 
of his sisters left their families and spent a great deal of time at our 
home. It was a pleasure for us to have them with us. 

It was during this month that many, many friends came to visit, 
to buoy him up, but instead they were the ones who seemed to have their 
spirits lifted. He never complained nor was he out of sorts nor im- 
patient. He appreciated everything and everyone who helped him. He 
sustained great pain, but never let us feel this burden. Mother was 
constantly at his side and slept only as he could rest. 

How pleased Daddy was one evening when the entire High Council 
arrived and had a prayer circle around his bed. And then again, just 
a few days before he died. Brother LeGrand Richards came to the door 
one night and told us he had come to see Daddy and to give him a bless- 
ing. These wonderful moments always buoyed Daddy up and helped 
him to handle his illness with the unwaivering faith he had always had. 

One of the most touching and emotional experiences I have ever 
witnessed was on the day before he died, Daddy had now accepted the 
inevitable. Paul Jr. , Mother and I were in his room. 

"Help me, son. You are the only one who can help me now!" 
The young man torn with emotion of the love he had for his dying father, 
laid his hands on the head of this father and gave him a blessing of re- 
lease from an illness that had cut short the life of a great man. The 
next morning, Sunday, December 4, 1955, his strong and beautiful 
spirit slipped quietly from this body that could no longer house it. 

LIFE HAD BEEN FULL AND HAPPY FOR HIM FOR FORTY- 
NINE YEARS. ALWAYS "ON THE GO" --- ALWAYS A GOAL TO BE 
ACHIEVED. HIS SMILE, HIS ENTHUSIASM, HIS LOVE OF PEOPLE, 
HIS REVERENCE AND LOVE OF GOD, HIS LOVE AND LOYALTY TO 
HIS FAMILY AND HIS LIMITLESS ENERGY- ARE ALL THINGS THAT 
I HOLD DEAR AS MEMORIES OF MY FATHER - Paul Smoot Dixon 



25th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 44 




HAROLD DDCON DANGERFIELD 




FLORENCE JOHN 



191 



Dangerfield Family 




Brief History of HAROLD DIXON DANGERFIELD 



I was born May 14, 1906 in Provo, Utah, the third son of Alice 
DLxon and Jabez W. Dangerfield. I attended the Parker School which 
was located on Second North and First East, from the first through 
the seventh grades. 

I attended the Provo High School which was located on Third 
West between Center Street and First South, and was graduated in 
1925. 

For the next three years I attended the Brigham Young Univer- 
sity and in September of 1927 I married Florence John of Provo. 

In 1934 I returned to school and in 1935 I graduated from the 
Brigham Young University with an A. B, degree. 

I then enrolled at the University of Utah Medical School in 1935 
and in 1937 was graduated with a two year medical certificate. ( I 
was ill and unable to attend school during the year of 1936.) The 
University of Utah at that time was a two year Medical School, teach- 
ing only the laboratory courses in medicine. 

In 1937 I transferred to the University of Pennsylvania where 
I was graduated in 193 9 with an M.D. degree. 

For the next two years, I interned at Staten Island Hospital, 
Staten Island, N. Y, then received a preceptorship under Dr. Donald 
E, Law in Obstetrics and Gynecology. I continued my practice of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology at Staten Island Hospital until the end of 
1968. 

In the years 1964 and 1965 I served as Chief of the Obstetrics 
and Gynecology Service of Staten Island Hospital. In 1963 and 1964 
I served as Treasurer of the Richmond County Medical Society. 

After thirty years of the private practice of Medicine, in 1969, 
I retired and went to work for the State of New York at Willowbrook 
Development Center , a school for retarded children, where I remain- 
ed until 1975, when I retired completely, 

I served in the Army in 1942 and was stationed at Camp Lee, 
Virginia. I received a medical discharge in late 1942. 

I am now a life member of the Richmond County and New York 
State Medical Societies, and also a member of the Staten Island 
Chamber of Commerce, and a priviledged member of the Kiwanis 
Club of Staten Island. 

My wife, Florence and I celebrated our Golden Wedding Anni- 
versary in 1977. We have two daughters, Diane and Carolyn, alsp 
six grandchildren and one great grandson, who was born on his 
great grandmother's birthday in 1978. 

My wife and I still live in our home of the past thirty years at 
101 Cebra Avenue, Staten Island, N. Y, , which is known locally as 
"The Gingerbread House". 



193 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGERFIELD 



Born to Mary Ann Smith and Henry Aldous Dixon at Salt Lake City, 

Utah on April 29, 1869. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church in 1878. 
Married Jabez W. Dangerfield December 5, 1900 in Salt Lake Temple. 
Children: 

Jabez Aldous, Royden James, Afton, Harold D. , Clifford D. , 
Grace, and Donna Mae. 

She received a limited education in the Provo City Schools and attend- 
ed the Brigham Young Academy in the old Lewis Hall. 

Was an excellent cook, especially for large groups. She cooked for 
Dave Stagg's construction crew. She and her husband owned 
an operated the old "Greer House" Restaurant and "Royden 
House" Hotel. 

She was a favorite clerk to many customers of the R. R. Irvine 
Dry Goods Store, before her marriage. 

She was very energetic, big hearted, and very much concerned about 
the welfare of other people. She and her husband's gener- 
osity was unlimited. 

She was a teacher in Primary and Relief Society. 

She was a member of the Daughter of Utah Pioneers and the Alice 

Louise Reynolds Club, 
Died December 7, 1948 at her home at the age of 78 years. 



194 



26th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D.# 45 




CLIFFORD DIXON DANGERFIELD 




CLIFFORD 



D IX ON 



D ANGE RFIELD 



Twin boys were born to Alice Dixon Dangerfield and Jabez W. 
Dangerfield at their home on Second North in Provo, Utah on May 14, 
1906. One of these twin boys was christened Clifford Dixon Danger- 
field in the Frovo Third Ward. 

When Clifford was about three years of age, his family moved 
into the newly remodeled "Royden House" Hotal. His father had pur- 
chased this property together with adjoining property where he had 
built a modern printing plant. The rooming house and adjoining "Grill 
Cafe" would be managed by the mother, with the help of the father, 
when he could be spared from his printing business which was not very 
often; and by the other members of the family. 

Cliff and his twin brother Harold attended the old Parker public 
school, located on the corner of First East and Second North, for the 
six grades taught there. They were then transferred to the Central 
Junior High School for the next three grades - 7th - 8th - 9th. Grades 
10-11 -and 12 were considered the Provo High School and was located 
on the same block as the Junior High. This was on First South between 
Third West and Fourth West. 

While here at the Provo High School he became a member of 
Coach "Prof C. S. Leaf's" swimming team and when he entered BYU 
he continued his swimming and became a member of that school's 
team. 

After taking a pre-medic course at the BYU he moved to Aunt 
Sarah McConachie's home in Salt Lake City and attended the Univer- 
sity of Utah Medical School. He also attended the Universtiy of Okla- 
homa where his brother Royden was a member of the faculty. Cliff 
received his M.D, degree from the University of Pennsylvania Medi- 
cal School in Philadelphia. He interned for 18 months at the Staten 
Island Hospital, New York, and spent another 6 months of internship at 
the Sailor Snug Hospital in New York. 

After his internship. Dr. Dangerfield returned to Helper, Utah 
where he took over the practice of one of the local doctors, while he 
was on leave. In October, 1934, he joined the medical staff of the Civil- 
lian Conservation Corps at Fort Douglas, Utah, and served here until 
1935. He received his commission this year from the United States 
Regular Army Medical Corps as a First Lieutenant. His first assign- 
ment was to Fort Logan, near Denver, Colorado. 

While here at Fort Logan, Cliff remembered the many kindnesses 
he and others had received from Aunt Sarah McConachie, while they 
attended school at the U. of U. So he insisted that she come and live 
withhimand his wife atFort Logan. Here he would see that she received, 
at no cost to her, all the surgical and medical care necessary for the 
removal of cataracts which had developed over her eyes. She stayed 
at his place in Colorado for the better part of a year. 



197 



198 



CLIFFORD DIXON DANGERFIELD 



For the next 12 years he served in the Army, and as is the case, 
was transferred from one hospital to another. At one time he was the 
Commander of an Army Hospital. 

After his discharge from the Army he joined the staff of the 
Staten Island Hospital in New York where he had interned and where 
his twin brother Harold was a member of the staff. 

He also served as ship's Doctor on many of the cruises to South 
America and Round-the-world tours. 

Doctor Clifford D. Dangerfield was a member of the American 
Medical Association and the New York Medical Society. 

At the time of his death from cancer on February 13, 1973, he 
was a member of the Brookdale Hospital in Brooklyn, New York. 

Graveside services were held at the family plot, on Tuesday 
February 20, at 11:00 a.m., at the Provo City Cemetery. 

He is survived by his son, J. William (Billy) Dangerfield. 



28th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 65 




G. EL ROY NELSON 




199 




200 



Life Sketch of 

Alice taylor nelson 



Life on Fifth West in the early nineteen hundreds was colorful 
and unique. Unique in the sense that relatives lived side by side in 
apparent harmony and love. These relatives were not only on my 
mother's side, the Dixons, but on Father's side too. So Dixons and 
Taylors were thought to be all related. This was true only in our 
family. They were, however, all close friends, for instance, my 
Uncle Tom Taylor, who lived a block north from us, was my Uncle 
John Dixon's closest friend. They were even married at the same 
time , 

The cousins all played to-gether, went to church to-gether, 
were invited to the same parties. I was "Sank" Dixon's date for years 
until he got up enough courage to ask other girls. 

Extra school curricular activities took place in Uncle Walter 
Dixon's chicken coop. With Rhea as the teacher we were given free 
tutoring in the three R's. No wonder she became such a good school 
teacher. We should perhaps take credit for her later success. 

As we grew older we were drawn to other friends, but the strong 
ties have always remained, which inspired the Cousins' Club. 

My family was a family of boys. There were four of them when 
I was born. From accounts I've heard, it was pretty novel to get a 
sister and cause for celebration. There were two more boys before 
Mother succeeded in getting me a sister. She was well worth the wait- 
ing. Helping to care for her was one of the choicest experiences in my 
life. She has grown into as nearly faultless as any one can be. Every- 
one loves her, which indicates it's not wholly partiality on my part. 

The folks sent me to the B. Y, U. Training School, which was 
an elementary school, with the finest teachers. They trained pros- 
pective teachers. Aunt Maud Taylor had suggested I attend with Mary, 
a cousin just six months older. 

When I had finished the seventh grade at the Training School, I 
chose to go to Provo Junior High. At graduation I was presented my 
certificate of graduation by my Father, who was on the Board of Ed- 
ucation at that time. 

High School was uneventful for me, except for an art class, 
taught by O. D. Campbell. This class created an interest in art, which 
has been a great source of enjoyment. 

My brother Lynn got me launched at B. Y , University. My class- 
es were mostly in art, along with French, and some required courses, 
B, F. Larsen taught most of the art, although E, H, Eastmond was 
head of the Department, They were both great men and wonderful to 
work with. My major was art when I graduated four years later, with 
a minor in English. 

In the spring of my Junior year, Harold Glen Clark put my 
name lip for Secretary and Historian of the Student Body for the follow- 



201 



202 



« 

ALICE TAYLOR NELSON 



ing year. I thought it a great joke, as the girl on the opposite ticket 
was a secretarial major. I was astounded and shaken when the elec- 
tion was in my favor, I couldn't even type. That year I had been 
Secretary of the Junior Class; ElRoy Nelson was President. This 
position had entailed none of the duties I was faced with. 

That summer, 1928, Henry, Clarence, and I, with the help of 
Edna Dixon, ran Provona Beach Resort, Father's land facing the lake 
on the Provo River had facilities for bathing, dancing, etc, I gave my- 
self the task of learning to typewrite , by getting up at the crack of dawn 
to practice each morning, much to the disgust of the boys, trying to 
sleep in the next room of our cabin quarters. 

ElRoy Nelson was a student body officer in 1929 also, and though 
we had mutual friends and activities in common, few dates, but lots 
of kidding, like: Why wouldn't I marry him and go to Hawaii on a 
honeymoon. After graduation he left with other fellows to do graduate 
work in New York. He received his Ph.D. five years later. He return- 
ed to Utah at this time, I was working with Lynn in the Interior Dec- 
orating Department at Dixon Taylor Russell Co. We had dates during 
the summer, a trip to Grand Canyon with his family, and ended the 
summer with an agreement to write during the winter, which resulted 
in engagement at Christmas and marriage the following August. 

After our marriage in 1935, we left for Troy, New York, where 
ElRoy had accepted a position with Russell Sage College, as head of 
the School of Business. This period was a new and most interesting 
experience for us both. Our first baby was born here in 1937. The 
next year we left for the West, and spent the next nine years in Denver, 
where Roy was connected with the Business School at Denver University. 
The next three children were born here. The youngest, Henry, or 
"Hank" was one year old when we returned to Utah and Salt Lake City, 
where Roy was to teach at the University of Utah, This was in 1947, 
Jim, our youngest, was born here in 1950. 

Our children are all married, except Jim. Art to Bonnie McKay, 
John to Lynne Sanders, Christina to Ron Preston, and Hank to Kristy 
Stewart, We have seven grandchildren and feel that life has been 
good to us, for which we are most grateful. 

The above history of Alice Taylor Nelson was read at the Dixon 
Cousins Heritage Luncheon on April 10, 1971 by her sister Ruth Taylor 
Kartchner, 
NOVEMBER 1979: 

Jim is married to Consuela Marquez. In 1975 sold our home 
in Salt Lake and built a new house in Taylor Terrace, across the 
street, east of the Provo Temple. "My dream house". 

To-date, there are now sixteen grandchildren. 



29th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS 




A FT ON DIXON 



DERMONT W. WAGSTAFF 



203 



Wagstaff Family 




Donna, Gary, Afton, Mont, Kathy, Norma 




175 East 400 North 
Orem, Utah 



204 



AFTON DIXON WAGSTAFF 



On November 20, 1906, I made my entrance into this world, the 
daughter of Parley Smith and Mary Etola Dangerfield Dixon, 

I was the second child of seven children, four brothers and two 
sisters: Vern, Eugene, Reed, Inez and Anna. 

I was blessed with the name of Afton. Mom and Dad built their 
first home on the corner of 6th West and 3rd North in Provo, Utah. 
On their second wedding anniversary they moved into their new home, 
and I was born in this home. 

It wasn't very long after this that they built their large two story 
home on the corner of 2nd North and 3rd West and this is where I 
lived until I was fourteen years old. I was baptized June 27, 1915, 

I have many fond memories of my childhood and teenage years, 
and I had the most wonderful parents any girl ever had. 

Some of my most cherished memories were the ones I spent with 
my friends and cousins in Wildwood at Aunt Rye's and Aunt Alice's 
cabins . 

I attended the Timpanogos Grade School, the Central Junior High, 
and the Provo High School. 

In 1924 I met my husband, Dermont (Mont) Wagstaff, at a Mutual 
dance in the Third Ward Amusement Hall (as it was called then). On 
October 6, 1926, we were married in the Salt Lake Temple. 

When our oldest daughter was a year old, we moved to Ogden, 
Utah where Mont worked for his Uncle Ben Hunsaker in the Gateway 
Garage. After two years the depression hit, business slowed down 
in the Garage, so we moved back to Provo, 

Soon after our return to Provo, Uncle Jabez Dangerfield asked 
us to take over the operation of his Royden House Hotel, We managed 
the Hotel for five years. 

About a year after we left the Hotel, we bought a store and service 
station in Grandview, which we operated for about five years. 

We were blessed with four wonderful childi*en, three daughters 
and one son: Donna, Norma, Gary, and Kathleen (Kathy). We are 
very proud of all of them. We have twenty- one grandchildren and 
eleven great, grandchildren, of whom we are also very proud. 

We have four grandchildren who have served fxill time missions, 
and one grandson who is serving in the Louisiana, Baton Rouge Mis- 
sion now. 

Donna and Jerry's sons: David Russell Olson in Austrian Miss ion 

Kurt Dixon Olson in Louisiana 

Norma and Lorus' sons: Jay Ladd Johnson in Cal, -Los Angeles 

Jerry Dixon Johnson in Washington D. C, 
Lori Johnson in Minnesota 

Mont and Iwere called to serve on a Building Mission in the North 
Eastern States. We received our call from the First Presidency on 



205 



206 



AFTON DIXON WAGSTAFF 



April 16. 1964. 

In May of 1 963 we went to Kalamazoo, Michigan, where Mont 
was building supervisor on a new L.D.S. Church chapel being built 
there. We were here a year when we received a mission call to go 
on a building mission for the Church. We served for two years and 
six months at Long Island, New York, building an addition to a chapel 
there. For the next year and a half, we worked on two chapels in 
New England. We enjoyed our mission very much and made many 
friends. We were released January 31, 1966. 

After we returned home, I went back "to work for BYU until June 
1973, On January 2, 1974 we received a call from President Harold 
Glen Clark to work in the Provo Temple. Mont was called as an 
Ordinance Worker, and I was called as a Receptionist, which we are 
still doing at the present time, November 1979. 

We have enjoyed working in the Temple very much and are 
grateful for the opportunity and blessings that are ours. 

On April 26, 1979 we were saddened by the death of our lovely 
daughter, Donna, and we miss her very much. She was a beautiful 
girl and a very spiritual one. 

We want our family to know we love them very much, and are 
very proud of them. Our family has grown to forty- seven members. 

I have held many positions in the Church including a Teacher in 
the Primary for a great number of years, a Relief Society President, 
Counselor, Secretary, Teacher and Librarian; a MIA Counselor and 
Teacher, a Jr. Sunday School Coordinator and Librarian, and a 
Counselor in the Stake Relief Society. 

My Father in Heaven has blessed me so much, and I'm proud to 
be a member of His Church. 

My most cherished experiences were going to the Temple with all 
of our children and three of our grandchildren to see them married 
and sealed to their mates. Another grandson was married and seal- 
ed in the Swiss Temple. Donna and Jerry were there with him. 

I have a wonderful husband and we have had fifty-three happy 
years together. 



30th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 



I.D.# 12. 3 




DONALD MAIBEN DDCON 




LETTIE ROMNEY 



207 



Donald Maiben Dixon Family 




DONALD MAIBEN (SANKY) DIXON 



I was born March 12, 1907 in Provo, Utah to Walter and Louie 
Maiben Dixon. Our family consisted of Rhea, Fred (Buck), Edna, 
Amy and myself. At an early age we ( Buck and myself ) started in 
sports. Dad was a good athlete and spent many hours with us. 

The Arthur N. Taylor family have been extra special to our 
family. Aunt Rye was idolized by all of us. Clarence "Bud" Taylor 
was my buddy and best friend. We spent many happy hours together. 
Also, cousin Alice was my favorite girl friend until I was a Senior in 
High School. 

The neighborhood kids put a hoop up in Uncle Art's barn. We had 
some heated games and this is where we sharpened our basket shooting 
ability. 

Aunt Rye was a second mother to me and I spent several summers 
with her family at Wildwood. Each summer. Bud and I were given the 
job of taking "old Jersey" ( a cow ) from Provo to Wildwood. It was 
very slow walking ( 13 miles) and we would leave early in the morning 
and get there in late afternoon. It was a thrill to go down across the 
Provo River and meet the "old Heber Creeper" train, which always 
brought new friends, mail, newspapers, and etc. 

When you think of it, my generation has lived in a rather excit- 
ing age. World War I with all the sorrow and happy moments and the 
wild celebration at its end. The great depression of 1929 followed 
World War I when the stock market failed and banks closed. I remem- 
ber going down town on this morning and seeing people lined a block 
long hoping to get into the bank and drawing their money out. We didn't 
suffer much as we had $1.29 overdraft. 

We lived through many exciting inventions. The radio came into 
being. Ear phones were held to the ears to hear and it was very much 
like a telephone conversation. Then the many improvements. The 
most popular program was "Amos and Andy". I remember in my early 
coaching of taking a basketball team to Manti and we couldn't start the 
game until this program had finished. 

Then the evolution of the old "Tin Lizzie", to the beautiful cars 
of today. Then the Television and the wonderful medical discoveries 
to stamp out sickness and disease such as: Polio, Typhoid, Measles. 
Then World War II and the terrible struggle with Hitler's forces. I 
was too young in World War I and too old in World War II so I had to 
settle as a guard at Geneva Steel Plant along with Buck and fifty others. 

During World War I, I remember coming home sick. An influenza 
epidemic had hit Utah. The Doctor was called in and I was isolated 
from the rest of the family. However, every one in the family but 
Father ended up with it. Aunt Sarah Monk, a practical nurse, took 
care of us. 

At this time I would like to recall the sadest event of my life. I 



209 



210 



IDONALD MAIBEN (SANKY) DIXON 



was thirteen years old at the time. Father had been bothered with 
stomach trouble for a long time and had to work such long hours. He 
was finally operated on and became weaker and weaker. Finally all 
the family were called to his room in the hospital and I realized he was 
dying. Buck and Rhea remained with Mother and the rest of us were 
taken home. Not long after, Aunt Electa (Paul's Mother, Uncle Roy's 
wife) came in, visited a minute then picked up the telephone and said, 
"Uncle Walt just passed away". The bottom of the world dropped out 
for Buck and myself. He had been such a wonderful Father and so 
close to us. The funeral was held in the Third Ward Meeting House 
and I remember we had a funeral procession from our house to the 
Church. Father had served in the Bishopric for many years. The 
Church was filled to overflowing and many people stood outside. He 
indeed, was a wonderful person and loved by many people. It took 
some time for Mother to get over this tragedy and her whole life was 
devoted to her family. We were surely blessed with two wonderful 
parents . 

Father left very little money and Rhea, the oldest, was faced 
with taking care of four younger kids and Mother. She quit school atii 
began a teaching career. She was honored by the Provo District for 
her outstanding teaching career. 

Uncle Tom Taylor (Taylor Bros. Company) had Buck and myself 
come to work in their warehouse. We both worked part time all through 
high school and college. We would go to school from 7:00 to 12:00 a.m. 
then hurry to work until 4:00 p. m. , then hurry for athletics which con- 
sisted of football, basketball and tennis. While going to college I work- 
ed for several years at the Utah Power and Light Co. for Jim Bullock. 

Uncle Roy Dixon became a second Dad to us and would take us to 
Salt Lake to compete in the Utah State and Intermountain tennis tourna- 
ments . 

After my graduation from college, I met a most beautiful gal 
from Salt Lake City by the name of Lettie Romney and I fell "hook, 
line and sinker" for her. My first date with her was at a Lincoln High 
Faculty party. As I remember, she was awarded a pair of baby shoes 
and was quite embarrassed. Her father, a wonderful religious man, 
thought I was just a playboy because of my tennis playing. He wrote to 
my Bishop in the Provo Third Ward to find out a little about me. It so 
happened my cousin Aldous Dixon was the Bishop and I got a real good 
recommendation. 

We became engaged in the tower of the Old Mill in Salt Lake in a 
very picturesque setting. We were married October 17, 1930, during 
Teacher's Institute. After the Temple marriage we honeymooned in 
Ogden on Friday. Attended a B. Y.U. - Utah State football game on 
Saturday. Set up a little apartment on Sunday and I put her to work on 
Monday. This year we will be celebrating our 50th Wedding Anniversary. 



DONALD MAIBEN (SANKY) DIXON 



211 



Alan, my youngest son was injured in child birth. It was a sad 
blow to us when we found out he was not normal. It was impossible 
for him to get along in our society. When he was ten years old we 
placed him in the American Fork Training School. Alan had an unusual 
personality and made many friends and brought to our family ahumility 
that brought us close together. We all loved him and I was so proud of 
Don and Diane for the way they accepted his handicap and the love 
they had for him. He passed away at age twenty-eight, April 17, 1973. 
Lettie wrote an article "My Special Child" that was beautifully worded. 

I attended grade school at the old Timpanogos School, Jr. High 
at Central, and High School at Provo High. I graduated from B. Y. U. 
withaB.S. Degree, in 1929. I spent two summers at Univ. of So. Cal. , 
and a summer at Washington State, working on my Masters Degree. 

After graduation I signed a contract to coach at the old Lincoln 
High School in Orem. I was there for nineteen years and in 1948 my 
football team won the State High School Championship and I had the op- 
portunity of accepting the coaching of football at Granite High School in 
Salt Lake City. I spent five years at this school and when it was divid- 
ed I signed up at Olympus High School ( a new school) as football coach 
and counselor. I retired from Olympus in 1972. 

I have always been active in athletics. At Provo High School I 
played football, basketball, cross country running, and in tennis I won 
the State High School Singles Championship. Also in my Senior year I 
was named on the State High School Basketball First Team. 

At the Brigham Young University I won three letters in football, 
four letters in basketball and four letters in tennis. My Senior year I 
was picked on the All Conference Team in football. I played with Buck 
my Freshman year and my Senior year Ott Romney was my coach. 

Buck and Ott have had the most influence on my life. 

Buck picked me up as his doubles partner in tennis when I was 
quite young. We won eight Utah State Championships, four Inter moun- 
tain Championships and participated in the National Tournaments in 
Boston, Mass. four straight years. The last year we entered the 
National Tournament, we were both married and we took our wives, 
Lettie and Helen, back East with us, where we spent most of the summer. 

In the summertime I also played baseball for the Provo Timps 
and enjoyed some fine moments in this sport. 

In my Junior year at B. Y. U. , I followed in Buck's footsteps by 
winning the Anderberg All iAround Athletic Medal. Other awards I 
have been proud of receiving are: The Stevens and Brown Pla .que for 
service in the betterment of Utah High School Athletics. 

The Utah High School Activities Award for outstanding serv- 
ice to High School Athletes. 

The "76" Award for Sports Achievement. 



212 



DONALD MAIBEN (SANKY) DDCON 



The Utah Tennis Association Pla que for contribution to 

te nnis . 

The Sportsman Sporting Goods Award for contribution to 
High School Athletics. 

The Distinguished High School Coaches Award presented by 
the Old Timers Athletes Association. 

The Granite Education Award for service in the Education of 

Youth. 

I have spent many hours with young people giving them lessons, 
taking them to tournaments outside of Utah. I was in charge of the 
tennis program in Salt Lake County, and on one occasion was sent back 
to Pittsburgh, Pa. to bid on getting the National Public Parks Tourna- 
ment in Salt Lake City, which we were able to get. 

Much of my church work was involved with youth in the M. I. A. 
sports program as coach and athletic coordinator. I spent several 
years in the Sunday School Supe rintendency in charge of the Junior 
Sunday School, and several years in the High Priests Quorum of the 
Holladay First Ward Presidency. 

One of the high lights of my coaching caree r occurred onNovem- 
ber 10, 1974. After being away from Orem for nineteen years, I was 
honored at a special banquet by my former Athletes and their wives at 
the Old Lincoln High School. Lavell Edwards, successful coach at 
B.Y.U. and my football captain in his Junior and Senior years and an 
all State player, was the main speaker. 

Back in 1929, Orem was just a farming community, with a very 
small High School. They had never had a football team so I started 
from scratch. The first year we had no field and practiced in Tom 
Cordner's pasture. There were many potential hazards the boys had 
to contend with, but developed some outstanding open field runners. 
We played several Jr. varsity teams on their field and that was the 
beginning of football at Lincoln High (now Orem High School). We had 
no allotment for equipment. B.Y.U. Coach Ott Romney gave me a lot 
of old stuff he was going to throw away and these were our uniforms. 
I think we had about eighteen boys on the squad. We took our lumps 
for several years but I am very proud of the great football tradition 
we established at this school. We won eight region championships. 
We were often in the State Playoffs and in 1947 lost the State Finals by 
a score of 1 3 to 12 on a pass in the last second of play. Then in 1948 
we won the State Championship. 

We presently reside at 2262 Carriage Lane in Holladay, Salt 
Lake City. Lettie and I have three children and nine grandchildren that 
we are very proud of. 



31st Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 72 




213 



Vesta Dixon Booth Family 




HISTORY OF VESTA DIXON BOOTH 

I was born in the "White House" apartments in San Pedro, Los 
Angeles County, California on 10 of Jxme 1907, just seventeen days be- 
for the death of my grandmother, Mary Smith Dixon. I was a very 
welcome addition to my parents, William Aldous and Harriet Hands 
Dixon's home. They were very happy when I arrived safely and 
healthy, for their first child was still born. 

I have been told how proud my Dad was as he pushed me down 
the street in my baby buggy, proudly showing me to both friends and 
strangers. 

Just before I was to be named, the people in the apartment house 
met in our apartment to witness the selection of a name. All contrib- 
uted their favorite names, including Gladys, Harriet, Baradina and 
Vesta. The names were put in a hat and my Dad put my hand in and 
I held onto the slip of paper with the name "Vesta" on it. This was 
repeated three times and each time I came up with the name "Vesta". 

Shortly after, we moved back to Provo, Utah and it was here on 
the 5th of November 1908 that my brother Glen was born. My Dad's 
health became worse, so we moved back to California. This time to 
Aunt Hattie and Uncle George West's ranch at Colton, just out of San 
Bernardino, California. It was here in San Bernardino that my sis- 
ter Mary was born on the 23 January 1911. 

There were quite a number of Mexican men and women employ- 
ed on the ranch, so my brother Glen and I picked-up their language 
and was able to speak it quite fluently. We often blessed the food at 
mealtime in Spanish (Mexican). 

I have a few memories I can remember while there, but not 
very many, for when I was five years old, we moved back to Provo, 
Utah, because of Dad's health. 

We moved into Grandmother Dixon's home on 4th West and 
Second North, and I lived there until I was married. 

I received my schooling in the old Timpanogos School, from 
the first grade including the sixth grade. Some of my teachers there 
were: Velma Howe, Olive Gilchrist, Miss Arbuckle, Miss Harmer, 
Maurine Goodridge, and Barney Hyde. Then I went to Provo Jr. 
High School, graduating from the ninth grade on 22 May 1924. The 
next two years I went to Provo High School. Rather than complete 
my senior year at this time, I went to work in Woolworth office for 
a short time. After the Christmas holidays I enrolled at B. Y. U. 
I had the intention of registering as a special student in the business 
school, but thanks to Pres. Franklin S. Harris who talked to me and 
convinced me that I should graduate from High School, for I lacked 
such a little credit, and at the same time take some college classes, 
which I did. I graduated from B. Y. High School on 24 May 1928 and 
had 12 hours of College credit. The next year I completed two quart- 
ers of College study. 



215 



216 



VESTA DIXON BOOTH 



I had some very happy times in the Provo Third Ward. On the 
long summer evenings, the neighborhood boys and girls would play 
"Run my sheepie run" "Dare Base", "Kick the can", using the area 
under the street lights as the home base. 

Then there was Christmas Morning when we would go all over 
the neighborhood to see what presents each received. It wouldn't 
even be day light when we were at some of the places. 

There was the fun we had acting out the serial movies we had 
seen the previous Saturday afternoon. We each had a part to act out 
on Clayton's porch. 

At this time, my closest friend was Thelma Strong, we were 
inseparable. Others were Atha and Chloe Murdock, Afton Dixon and 
Alene Manson. 

While in Jr. High and High School, we had the D,D.D, Club, 
in which we met every two weeks. The group that had their annual 
summer vacation at Wildwood at Alice Taylor's cabin consisted of: 
Florence John, Ida Knudsen, Afton Dixon, Rhea Dixon, Irene and 
Viola Clayton, Alice Taylor, Lucille Manson, Bessie Collins, Afton 
Baker, One by one we got married but through the years, the one's 
around have tried to continue our club. 

At a dance on Thanksgiving night in 1928, I met Bert. We be- 
gan going steady from then on. We had a lot of fun. We were married 
25 Aug, 1930 in the Salt Lake Temple by Geo. F. Richards, Glen and 
Elva were married the same day. We had a double wedding. After 
the marriage ceremony, we all went to Aunt Sarah McConachie's 
home to a wedding dinner. 

Late in the afternoon the four of us left for a honeymoon trip 
to Yellowstone Park, spending our first night at a motel in Ogden. 
We had a wonderful time on this trip, one that we never will forget. 

After S\ years of happily married life, out first child was born 
on 16 Feb. 1936 at Provo, Utah, He was a beautiful, long, black 
haired boy weighing 8z pounds. We named him Gordon. 

It was not until 8 years later, 4 June 1944, that we were blessed 
with another 8-^ pound baby boy. He was another beautiful, black 
haired boy. We named him Gary Lynn, I only had the two children 
but I am very thankful to my Heavenly Father that I was blessed with 
my two wonderful boys, I am proud of them, and have tried to raise 
them right and to be a good mother to them. We have had a very 
happy home. 

Having no girls, I have gone fishing and h\inting with my men 
folks, and have enjoyed it very much. I am like my Dad, I love the 
beauty of the great outdoors, 

I have worked in the Mutual as a secretary and a Beehive 
teacher and have been a Relief Society teacher since 1954. I guess 
Primary has received my most attention, for I have served in it for 



VESTA DIXON BOOTH 



217 



over 17 years, acting as President, Secretary, a Counsellor, a 
teacher for the Larks, Blue-birds and Seagulls, 

In later years I have been very interested in Genealogy and 
was on the Genealogy Committee in the Orem 13th Ward. 

We have lived in the Provo Third Ward, where Gordon was 
born. We were living in Vallejo, California, when Gary was born. We 
lived in the Thirteenth Ward in Orem for over fifteen years. It was a 
lovely ward. From here Gordon was called on his mission to old 
Mexico. This was a wonderful experience for our whole family. He 
was gone for two and a half years. 

On the 25 Jiine 1959, Gordon presented me with a lovely, new 
daughter, in the form of his bride, June Phoebe Erskine. If I had 
picked a daughter myself I couldn't have done better. They have 
three boys and three girls. We love them all very much. They love 
to come and stay with their grandparents. 

Then Gary married a lovely little girl, Sherry Ann Gaudio, on 
October 8, 1962. They have two fine boys. 

My hobbies and interests are traveling, oil painting, collecting 
poems and spiritual thoughts, sewing, collecting recipes and caring 
for my family. 

We have been on some nice trips in our married life: Yellow- 
stone Park, Chicago, Mexico, the deep South, going thru 16 states 
and Canada and Hawaii, British Columbia, Glacier Park, Nauvoo, 
and other Church points of interest in Missouri, Montana, Colorado, 
Nevada, Idaho, Utah Canyons and Arizona, Wyoming, Nebraska and 
Iowa. Hope to see Europe, especially England and Alaska. I would 
love to go around the world, I guess I have gypsy blood in me. 

Many of our trips have been with Afton and Mont Wagstaff. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
HARRIET AMELIA DIXON WEST 

ID # 15 

Born at Provo, Utah, May 24, 1882 to Mary Ann Smith and Henry 
Aldous Dixon 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church in May 1890 by 

Alfred Harding and Myron Tanner, respectively. 
Married George Washington West in July 1907. 
Children: 

Lynn Dixon West. 

After the death of her mother in Provo, she and a girl friend took a 

trip to California where she met a wonderful man, George W. 

West, After a courtship of less than a month, they were 

married in California. 
She lived at Seal Beach and San Bernardino, California the rest of her 

life, with occassional visits to Utah in the summer time. 
For many years she was bedfast, and had very delicate health for a 

good portion of her married life. 
Her home was always open to the missionaries laboring in that area. 
Died April 23, 1931 at Seal Beach, California. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
GEORGE WASHINGTON WEST 

ID # 15 h 

Born February 24, 1 866 at San Bernardino, California to Adeline Weeks 
and James Monroe West. 

His parents were pioneer settlers of San Bernardino in 1856. In part- 
nership with G. W. Sparks, James West purchased a large 
ranch, about three miles East of San Bernardino, where he 
raised his family. 

For many years, George W. West was engaged in Railroad grade con- 
tracting in California and Arizona. He was a wonderful, gen- 
erous man of up right principles and honesty. He had accum- 
ulated sufficient wealth to lavish on his younger second wife, 
most everything she wanted. 

During Hattie's illness, he provided the best medical help in hospitals, 
on doctors and nurses and often personally caring for her 
needs . 

Although not a member of Hattie's Church, he welcomed the Elders 
into his home for meals and lodging and even trans poratation 
in the use of his automobile. 

About a year after the death of his wife, Hattie, he died at San Bern- 
ardino, California on February 26, 1932. Services were con- 
ducted by the Church of Jesus Chirst of Latter Day Saints. 



218 



32nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




219 



Lynn Dixon West Family 





Donald, Mabel, Audrey 



220 



Brief History of LYNN DIXON WEST 
By Donald L. West 



My Father, Lynn Dixon West was born in San Bernardino, Cal. 
18 August 1908, the only child of George Washington West and Harriet 
Amelia Dixon. 

From the pictures I've seen, I have reason to believe he was just 
a little bit spoiled. He had his own little buggy with two matched 
ponies to pull it. 

My Father was baptized July 1, 1917 by his Uncle, Albert F. 
Dixon, and confirmed, the same day, by Joseph Brockbank. 

His childhood and youth years are generally obscured. He grad- 
uated from San Bernardino Senior High School in 1926. 

Lynn Dixon West, married my mother, Mabel May Hansen on 
the 26 of April 1927 in Riverside, California. From here they moved 
to Seal Beach, California where I was born. My Mother and Father 
were apparently unhappy in their marriage and eventually it ended in 
divorce . 

In one of the happier times, while living in Seal Beach, I remem- 
ber when a violent storm washed up a fishing boat on the beach, near 
where we lived. My Father claimed salvage rights and had the boat 
brought up to a vacant lot next to our house. He worked on it very hard 
as we all did. He worked to repair the engine and calk the hull and 
eventually refloated it. We didn't take any long trips in the boat but 
I believe he did a lot of fishing aboard, but without me. I was still a 
little young. 

His problems, he thought, were too much for him and he took 
his own life on 12 June 1940. 

I have his graduation diploma, and a document from the Church 
Historian concerning his ordination to the office of Deacon on October 
20, 1921 by William B. Hawkins. 



221 



ME AND MY FAMILY'S CONVERSION TO THE MORMON CHURCH 

DONALD LYNN WEST 

I, Donald Lynn West, son of Lynn Dixon West and Mabel May 
Hansen have been requested to relate in print the story of how my fam- 
ily and I joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, which 
my Grandmother, Harriet Amelia Dixon West and my father was a 
member, and how I became re -united with the large Dixon family, 
which I knew nothing about. 

My story begins in 1963, we were stationed in Northern France 
at Laon Air Base with the U.S. Air Force. During this time my 
mother sent me a letter with a list of some of my relatives in our fam- 
ily tree that my Grandma Hansen had written down before she passed 
away the summer before. She thought that I would like to have it for 
my file and to pass down to my children someday. I thought that was 
really nice and certainly I would keep it, even though most of the 
names I had never heard of before. 

One day I became bored with all my spare time and needed 
to have a hobby that I could be active with, so I said to myself, "may- 
be I should try and trace my family tree, to learn who my family is, 
and where they came from. " 

The idea was presented to my wife Winnie, as I usually do my 
best to enlist her help in my little projects. Her answer was, "This 
will just be another of your little projects that you get all wound up 
about but never finish. " Well, at that point I did have my doubts, but 
never-the-less I was going to at least try. I didn't have the foggiest 
idea of where I was supposed to start. 

"Where do I start? " I asked myself. So I went to our small 
Base Library to try and learn anything about tracing my family tree, 
and how I should start. I was told that "genealogy" is the word for 
what I wanted to do, and they did have a couple of books on the subject 
which I read through thoroughly. At this point in time the LDS Church, 
the Book of Mormon, were never a part of my vocabulary. 

I wrote to my Mother that I was going to try and trace my 
"genealogy" and asked her for everything she had on the family. We 
exchanged letters during the next few months concerning my newfound 
hobby of genealogy. She wrote back on one letter that she thought one 
of my relatives was a Mormon missionary in South Africa and chal- 
lenged me to "try and trace that!" 

I went again to the Base Library and began to learn about 
South Africa and in an encyclopedia it stated that the Rhodes Univer- 
sity Libarary was located there. So I decided to write for infornnation 
on any record of Mormon missionaries there, specifically if ( one of 
them could have been a Dixon). It took several weeks to receive a 
reply, but finally they informed me to make contact with the Mormon 
Church in Salt Lake City, I never had the experience of writing to a 



222 



DONALD LYNN WEST'S CONVERSION 



223 



church, and didn't know if I was supposed to start off with "Your Ex- 
cellency" or just "Dear Sir". I also thought that the Mormon Church 
was probably like all other organizations - difficult to obtain records 
from- - -and surely why would the Mormon Church want to give me 
information or records to a non- member - - -even if they had any? I 
pondered this for a while and wondered how I would ever get the add- 
ress for the Church. 

One day, again in the Base Library, I picked up another book 
of American Organizations, and there in front of my eyes listed the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I had just been informed 
that members belonging to this Church were called Mormons. After 
much thought I got up the nerve to write, with the hope that I might 
learn something, no matter how small. One day when I least expected 
it, a letter came from the Genealogical Society, and a family group 
sheet was enclosed. This sheet, listing my relatives also had the 
name of the person who had submitted it. This was really a find! 
Loleta Dixon had sent that sheet in and I contacted her immediately. 
She sent me back a packet of material that overwhelmed me. When I 
first started this search, I believed I had no relatives at all, outside 
of my own immediate family. Apparently I had hundreds of relatives 
in Utah, many of whom are or were prominent. My new found relat- 
ives in Utah told me I was truly an answer to their prayers, as they 
knew I existed but had no idea where I or my family were located. We 
continued to exchange letters and I learned a great deal about my new 
found family. 

After my return from France, we visited with these fine 
Mormon relatives in Utah and got to meet the majority of them at a 
reunion. We were received like "royality". These people lived the 
way everyone should. We had never given religion much thought, but 
had been going to the Protestant Chapel on Base in France. We were 
both amazed at how Mormons lived and how happy they truly are. 
They had great principles to base their life on. Who knows, one day 
we might look into it further. 

In October of 1966, I received my orders for the Republic of 
Viet Nam. Up to this time, we still had not talked about religion or 
the Church to any great extent. We both knew that something was 
needed in our lives, especially for our children. A short time after 
my departure, Winnie wrote that she had a visit from the missionaries 
and had invited them to return. A few letters later, we were beginning 
to think the same things. She wrote and told me all about the things 
she and the kids were being taught. During this time I was also start- 
ing to investigate the Church, reading the Book of Mormon and other 
things, like they were doing at home, I received my lessons from our 
Group Leader in his quonset hut quarters at Da Nang Air Base. One 
day I received a letter from Winnie asking my permission for her and 



224 



DONALD LYNN WEST'S CONVERSION 



the kids to be baptized. I thought this was great and immediately con- 
sented. 

On 28 January 1967 they were baptized in the Palmdale Ward, 
at Palmdale, California. Iwas a bit slower, because my lessons had 
to be given when it was convenient, and also a place had to be found 
where I could be baptized. Many places were thought of and rejected 
because of polluted water or the danger of the Viet Cong in the area. 
Finally the South China Sea was selected near Da Nang. After waiting 
for a good while for the dangerous rip tides to subside and the deadly 
sea snakes to leave the area, I was taken out into the ocean, along a 
lovely beach by our District Leader, to be baptized. On my son's 
birthday, 22 April 1967,1 was baptized and what a beautiful day it was. 
I was immersed twice, the first time my foot was out, but the second 
time was a good one, as our two witnesses confirmed. 

After my return to the States , things again slowed down. My 
membership records had been lost and therefore I could not be ad- 
vanced in the Priesthood. Eventually my records were located and on 
my birthday, 9 July 1968, we were sealed together as a family for 
time and all eternity in the Los Angeles Temple. 

We have thought about all these events in our lives, and have 
truly wondered, and been amazed at our growth and the way things 
turned out. We know that our Father in Heaven was leading us by His 
hand even in the very beginning when I first had the tiniest mark of 
wanting to work in genealogy. Could it have been the Spirit of Elijah? 
Whatever it was, we know we were being blessed with a desire to con- 
tinue on in our search for our genealogy. 

Both of our children have since married in the temple and 
have strong and secure marriages because of it. I am presently a 
High Priest in the Edwards Ward, Palmdale, California Stake and 
teach the Ward Genealogy Class. My wife, Winnie, is the Sunday 
School and Relief Society Secretary. My son, Donald Jr., is a Senior 
at B.Y.U. majoring in Justice Administration, along with his wife, 
Helen and daughter Christina Marie. Mydaughter, Denise Irene, and 
her husbandRobert Rowley Jr. and son Robert III, daughters Lynette, 
Kristine, and Sarah live in Price, Utah. 

This is our story, which is a happy beginning for the start of 
our eternal family. 



33rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




225 



Glen Hands Dixon Family 




226 



GLEN HANDS DIXON 



On November 5, 1908, the second son of William Aldous and 
Harriet Hands Dixon was born at Provo, Utah. He was a big baby 
weighing 8 poirnds 8 ounces. He was given the name of Glen Hands 
Dixon and a blessing by his Uncle Jabez W, Dangerfield. 

Glen was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-Day Saints by Elvon L, Jackson and confirmed a member by 
Elwood Olson on August 12, 1917. He advanced in the Priesthood as 
follows: 

Ordained a Deacon by his Uncle Walter D. Dixon, Nov. 20, 1921, 
Ordained a Teacher by his neighbor , S. W. Russell, Jan27, 1924. 
Ordained a Priest by his cousin, H, A. Dixon, Jan 8, 1928. 
Ordained an Elder by Bishop A. E. Eves in the Provo Third 

Ward. 

Glen was promoted from the sixth grade of the old Provo Timp- 
anogos School in May of 1921 and graduated from the ninth grade of 
the old Central Junior High School in 1924. He was unable to attend 
the May graduation exercises because of illness. He had contracted 
mengitis and was in bed for 17 weeks. He luckily recovered with no 
permanent disability and continued his education at Provo High School 
where he graduated. 

Glen being very handy with his hands, and mechanically minded, 
obtained a summer job in a local bicycle shop. He quickly learned 
the bicycle repair business and when he returned to school, his em- 
ployer requested he continue to work after school and on Saturdays. 

After finishing High School he went to work for Thomas Pierpont 
at the Provo Foundry and Machine Shop, which at that time occupied 
most of the block between 5th West and Sixth West and between Center 
Street and First North. 

One of Glen's assignments at the Provo Foundry was to install 
the Foundry manufactured "Superior" automatic coal stoker. He 
traveled all over the intermountain area installing and servicing this 
product. He became one of Tom Pierpont's key men, always depend- 
able and willing to go day or night, when called. 

On the 25th day of August 1930 he married Elva Schemensky in 
the Salt Lake Temple. It was a double wedding for brother and sister. 
His sister, Vesta, married Albert W. Booth and the couple honeymo- 
oned in Yellowstone Park, 

After the wedding ceremony, the bridal party went up to Aunt 
Sarah McConachie's lovely home and enjoyed a delicious dinner, 

Provo had been Glen's home all of his life, with the exception of 
about a year when he and his family moved to Los Angeles, where he 
worked in a machine shop. They moved back to Provo in 1944 where 
he was employed by the Columbia Geneva Steel Co. Here he worked 
the remainder of his life. He first worked as a Machinist. In 1945 



227 



228 



GLEN HANDS DIXON 



he was promoted to Machine Shop Inspector. In 1947 he was given 
another promotion to Machine Shop Turn Foreman and in 1953 became 
Maintenance Field Foreman Machine Shop. 

Glen was a good, reliable and concientious worker. He always 
was on the go, and had to be always doing something. He helped build 
his two houses, doing all the work on them he could; and spending 
hours before and after work, at the Plant, so he could finish them. 

W. A. Lane, one of Glen's old supervisors of the U, S. Steel Co. 
paid the following tribute to Glen: "Glen will ever be remembered as 
the finest friend and associate 1 have ever encaiintered. His devotion 
tohis work, honesty, and sense of fairplayhas always been an outstand- 
ing example of those of us who have been close to him No man ever 
gave more and asked less, " 

Glen has always loved to fish and hunt. Elva and his family 
shared this enjoyment. During the summer they spent many week-ends 
at their cabin at Strawberry, enjoying the fishing there. Many hunting 
and fishing trips were taken by Glen, Elva, Bill and Richard, and oc- 
cassionally some close friends were invited. 

Glen loved his wife and their family of three boys and two girls 
and nine grandchildren. 

At the age of 56 years. Glen passed away at 1:00 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Janury 20, 1965 at the L. D, S. Hospital in Salt Lake City. 
His wife, Elva, was at his bedside, never having left the hospital for 
two weeks. 

Glen loved his family, his friends, his work and his men. On 
the job he showed it by the work he did to help his men. "It was often 
said, that on a large job, one couldn't tell Glen from his men. " Always 
willing to go the "second mile" by putting in extra hours to complete a 
job - no assignment to hot or dirty - no area to far out of the way - no 
request for help too difficult to require his personal attention and effort- 
Giving a full days work for his pay - honest - concientious - reliable - 
and dependable. Those were some of the many qualities of GLEN 
HANDS DDCON. 



34th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




ADRYNE HODSON VIRGINIA POULSEN 



229 



Verl Grant Dixon Family- 




Mary Ellen 
Verl Virginia 
Merrill Verl 




342 No. 5 00 West 
Provo, Utah 



Wildwood 




230 



BIOGRAPHY OF VERL GRANT DIXON 
By Virginia P. Dixon 

Verl Grant Dixon was born November 26, 1908, at Provo, Utah 
the son of Ernest and Mary Ann (May) Painter Dixon. His father was 
a building contractor and brick layer who built many public edifices, 
including the First Ward Chapel in Provo. His grandparents were 
pioneers of Utah. 

The old Timpanogos School gave Verl his first years of educa- 
tion. From there he went to Central Jr. High School and then to Provo 
High School, His college education was at Brigham Young University. 
In 1932 he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts at Brigham Young 
University. The following years (1933) he did post-graduate work at 
the Teachers College of Columbia University in New York City, While 
in New York City he became associated with the National Office of the 
Boy Scouts of America as Assistant to the Director of Registration 
Department. While working in the National Office he took night class- 
es at Columbia University under Dr. Harry D, Kitson, studying Per- 
sonnel Administration. 

After four years in this capacity (1937) he was transferred to 
the position of Field Executive and served for the next two years at 
Visalia, San Joaquin Valley, California, When his father passed 
away he returned to Provo. Verl is an Eagle Scout, 

He joined Fred L. Markham's staff as a draftsman. Upon the 
recommendation of Mr. Markham, he worked for the United States 
Army of Engineers, who were constructing Hill Field at Ogden, Utah. 
When this task was completed he returned to Provo and became an 
aide to Elmer Jacob, the Provo City Engineer, as a building inspector. 

Verl has always been active in the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints, During the years 1929 to 1931, he served as a 
missionary in the French Mission, Later he served as Superintendent 
of the YMMIA in the Provo Third Ward and was a Sunday Schoolteacher 
for a number of years. He was Scoutmaster of the Ward Troop and 
served as president of the 45th Quorum of Seventy. He served as a 
counselor to Bishop Ralph C, Fletcher in the Provo Third Ward for 
eight years and Bishop of the Provo Third Ward for four years and 
three months. At the present time he is on the Utah Stake High Council. 
His responsibilities on the High Council is the Relief Society and 
Temple Work, 

Merrill Christopherson was the first to arouse his interest in 
aviation. Later, under Merrill's leadership, Verl gained a private 
pilot license, a commercial license and then an instructor rating. 
As an instructor, Verl taught Army and Navy Cadets \inder the War 
Training Service Organization in Provo, Richfield and Logan, Follow- 
ing a period of flight training, he was commissioned a Flight Officer 
at the Douglas Air Force Base in Arizona and was assigned to the Air 
Transport Command on February 28, 1944. During World War Two 



231 



232 



VERL GRANT DIXON 



he served in Europe, Africa, Middle East and the Asiatic-Pacific 
Theaters. On January 25, 1946 he was released from active duty as 
a flight officer and returned to civilian life in Provo. 

In November 1946, he was elected to the position of Utah County 
Clerk and served four years. Following this he served eight years as 
Utah County Commissioner. He was President of the Utah Ass'n. of 
County Officials in 1955, He was manager of the Provo Metropolitan 
Water District until he resigned to work for the re -establishment of 
the Commission Form of Government in Provo City. He was victor- 
ious in this battle and was elected Mayor of Provo City, serving for 
three four year terms in that position. He was President of the Utah 
State Municipal League in 1966. 

In connection with his work with the Boy Scouts of America, he 
is on the Executive Board of the Utah National Parks Council, serving 
as Provo District Chairman. He is retiring President of the Provo 
Youth Council. 

Verl is a former treasurer of the Rheumatic Fever Foundation, 
He is an active Kiwanian and has maintained a perfect attendance 
record in the Provo Kiwanis Club for 25 years. He is a member of 
the Dean Mendenhall Provo Post #13 of the American Legion, and is 
a former trustee of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He is a member 
of the George A. Smith Chapter of the Brigham Young Chapter of the 
Sons of Utah Pioneers and is a member of the National Society of the 
Sons of Utah Pioneers , having served as President for the year ending 
in August of 1972, He is a major in the Mormon Battalion. 

In politics Verl is a staunch Republican, and is former chairman 
of the Provo Precinct of the Republican Party for the years 1946-47. 

Professionally, Verl holds a general building contractor's 
license. 

The guidance of such great men as George H. Brimhall, Dr. O, 
K. Hansen, Roy Passey, Scout Executive A, A, Anderson, Dr, Wayne 
B, Hales, Dr, Carl F, Eyring and many others on a District and 
Council level was most important in the scouting development of Verl. 
He served as a Patrol Leader, Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Scout- 
master and Scoutmaster in the Provo Third Ward Troop, From the 
Troop to the National Council was a wide jump but gave him a vision 
of the greatness of the Scout program. 

On October 8, 1943, at the Salt Lake Temple, Verl married 
Adryne Hodson, daughter of William and Madeline McNary Hodson. 
Adryne passed away on June 28, 1945, while Verl was in the Service, 
leaving an infant daughter, Linda, Linda now has five children. 

Verl married Virginia Poulsen in the Salt Lake Temple on June 
17, 1952. They have two children: Mary Ellen and Merrill Verl. A 
Navajo Indian girl is also living with them. 



35th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 13.2 




EUGENE PARL DIXON 




243 No. 900 West 
Provo, Utah 



233 



Life Story of EUGENE PARL DIXON 
By his brother, Reed Dixon 

Eugene Pari Dixon, the son of Parley Smith Dixon and MaryEtola 
Dangerfield, was born February 17, 1909 in Provo, Utah, at their home 
on Third West and Second North. Gene was the third of seven children 
born to Pari and Etta Dixon. The other children were: Vern, the eld- 
est, Afton, Reed, Inez, Anna and Bert. 

Gene was a very ambitious and conservative boy, and throughout 
his life. As a young boy he would gather scrap metal, zinc, copper 
and etc. and sell it to Dave Penrod, a junk dealer, who lived just a 
block south of his home. He also did odd jobs for Dave and also work- 
ed for Dave's brother-in-law, Jake Olsen, a brick layer; as a mason 
helper and on his farm. 

In 1917 most everyone in the Third Ward had a cow. Each morn- 
ing, Gene would go to Fifth North and start to gather the cows and drive 
them to the First Ward Pasture, located at the south end of Academy 
Avenue, where the Timpanogos Golf Course is now located. By the 
time he arrived at the pasture he would have a herd of about thirty or 
forty cows. In the evening, about five o'clock, he would separate and 
gather his herd of cows and drive them home. He was an has always 
been a very dependable person. 

About 1919 due to a bad job and the flu epidemic, financial re- 
verses forced his father to sell this big, lovely home on Third West 
and start all over. We rented for about a year and then Dad built a 
new house on Fifth North between Sixth and Seventh West. While we 
were in this home, Gene had a bad accident. He was swimming down 
at the Provo High School where four boys took hold of his hands and 
feet, after three swings they threw him into the water. This last time 
instead of landing out into the water. Gene struck his head on the edge 
of the tile pool. He suffered a severe brain concussion. After some 
time and tender, loving care by his mother, he completely recovered. 

Gene was a self conscious person. If he did something he knew 
he shouldn't have done, he would punish himself by working harder. 

About 1930 at the start of the depression years, there was no 
work, so Dad tore down an old house for the School Board, which was 
located on the old Franklin School grounds; in exchange for the mat- 
erials in it. Gene took some of the materials from it and with new 
brick and materials he built himself a new house on Ninth West between 
Second and Third North, which he rented. 

During the next year or two. Gene worked for John Manson pros- 
pecting for coal around Schofield, Utah. 

About 1932 Dad traded two houses he had in Provo, for a fifteen 
acre fruit farm on Provo Bench. Gene gave up his coal prospecting 



235 



236 



EUGENE PARL DIXON 



and came to the farm to help Dad run the farm, in fact he took over and 
run it by himself. He spent long hours and worked very hard and 
really made the farm pay. I think he really enjoyed it. There was 
practically no construction work so all we boys worked on the farm. 
When it became time to harvest the fruit, all of the families pitched 
in. Gene ran the farm, the men folks picked the fruit and the women 
sorted it. Dad had a one and a half ton truck which we would load up 
with cull peaches, pears, apples and etc. and haul out to Duchesne 
County and trade for pigs, chickens, turkeys, cows, coal, gas or 
whatever we could get. The farm kept four families in food and the 
necessities throughout the depression years. Gene decided he would 
like to buy the farm and Dad agreed to sell it to him. 

By now Gene was approaching thirty and decided it was time to 
get married. He started going out with Mary Bernard, a divorcee. 
They were married January 27, 1939. At first they fixed up a small 
shed in back of the house, and later moved into the farm house. After 
Gene's marriage, mother and Dad had moved from the farm to Gene's 
house on Ninth West. After a few month's living on the farm, Mary 
decided she did not want to be a farmer's wife, so Gene traded living 
in the farm house with his Mother and Dad who were living in his 
house on Ninth West. Dad hired a man from Mount Pleasant to run 
the farm, which he ran for one summer, after which Dad agreed to 
sell it to him in 1940 or 1941. 

In January of 1940, Gene and I went to Hill Field to work. We 
worked here and in Ogden, laying brick, for about a year. After that 
Gene went to work in Las Vegas for a while, then came back to Provo 
where Gene went to work at Geneva Steel during its construction. 
Gene and Mary were renting a house on Fourth West and Third South. 

In September 1943, Gene entered the Armed Forces of World 
War II and was stationed in the Aleution Islands, near Alaska. 

After the war he and Mary moved to Bountiful, Utah, where he 
worked in Salt Lake for a couple of years. They then moved to 
Denver where they lived for ten years. It was in Denver that tragedy 
struck. There was a fire and Mary was unable to get out of the house 
in time. Prior to this, Mary and Gene had separated and Gene had 
moved back to Provo. 

After Gene's Mother passed away May 27, 1952, he continued to 
live with his sister Inez at their home at 445 South Fourth East, Provo, 
Utah, until her death on December 27, 1969. When this house was 
sold. Gene rented an apartment on First West between Second and 
Third South where he is now living, April 1980. 



36th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 14.3 




ALLIE DIXON 




REED GARDNER 



237 



Gardner Family- 




James David 



Reed P. Allie Vilate Reed Snow 




425 Spruce Street 
Berkeley, California 



238 



ALLIE 



DIXON 



GARDNER 



I was born April 15, 1909, in Provo, Utah. My parents were 
living at 270 North Fifth West, I was a very cross baby and caused my 
parents many sleepless nights. With the help of our English friends, 
I survived the first few months of colic and became a more normal 
baby. 

I was three years old when we moved to 418 North Fifth West, 
our new home. This home was the location for many wonderful mem- 
ories. 

We lived in the Provo Third Ward. We attended Sunday School, 
Primary, Religion Class, Mutual and other Church meetings and soc- 
ials. I remember with fondness the church dinners. 

My first class in school was at the B.Y.U. Kindergarten with 
Aunt Ida Smoot Dusenberry for a teacher. When I was old enough, I 
attended the Timpanogos School. Garda Gee was my first teacher. 
Other teachers were Jennie Harding, Elfie Bean, Estelle Manwaring, 
Thelma Eggertsen and Winnie Clyde, I loved school, 

I attended the Provo Junior High and the Provo High Schools. 
My father encouraged me to graduate from High School a year early 
(1926) and have an extra year of college. After spending four years 
at B.Y.U. , I was graduated in 1930, My extra year of education be- 
gan on my graduation day. 

The plan was to drive back to New York in the car. Mother and 
my four sisters went with me to see Paul and Ora and to have a trip. 
After the visit, Paul and Ora would drive Mother and the girls home 
and leave me in New York. 

My year in New York was very rewarding. The experiences I 
had were educational and happy ones. I was graduated as a hospital 
dietition from Fifth Avenue Hospital, I loved my New York experience. 
My best friend, Ida Tanner, came to New York at Christmas time and 
went into training with me. 

After our completion of the course at the hospital, we came home 
by way of the Panama Canal. It was a tremendous trip. 

Jobs were scarce in the early 1930's. Whenlwas offered a 
teaching job in Gunnison, Utah, I accepted. I taught there for two and 
a half years. 

In 1934 I enrolled in a Nursing School in the Highland Hospital in 
Oakland, California, It was one of the best experiences I have had. It 
fulfilled a need I had to help people witiirfe direct fle rv^ce>. I was grad- 
uated in 1936 and became a registered nurse. I taught for one year in 
the Nursing School before leaving to teach at the B. Y. U. in Provo. I 
left my teaching to be married to Reed Snow Gardner. 

Reed and I were married September 18th, 1940, in the Salt Lake 
Temple. He had been married to Margaret Pierpont. She died from 
cancer. They had three children: Reed, ten years of age; David, age 



239 



240 



ALLIE DDCON GARDNER 



seven; and Vilate, age two; at the time of our marriage. I was well 
received by the children in Berkeley. They seemed happy to have a 
mother again. 

In 1943, we were blessed with a baby boy, James Dixon Gardner. 
His birth seemed to bring a security to the other children. They seem- 
ed to know that I couldn't leave them now that we had a baby to care for. 

We lived in Berkeley at 425 Spruce Street until January 1966. 
Walnut Creek, California, was then our home until 1976 when we mov- 
ed to Salt Lake City, Utah where we still live at 123 -2nd Avenue. 



'Clarence Dixon Taylor 




With Sister Alice 




Wild flowers- Timp. hike-1917. With Harold 

and Clif. Dangerfield. Picture by Uncle Walt. Dixon 



241 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 





Utah Stake Adm. Bldg. 
Baptized J\ine 24, 1917 
Confirmed June 24, 1917 



Provo Third Ward- Blessed, 
Named, ordained Deacon, Teacher, Priest, 
Elder. Called on a mission in 1930. 




Provo High School - 1924-1927 





Provo High Football 1925-26 



Ull, ill !jfrii|iii 




m Hi 



Central Jr. High 1921-23 
Clarence Dixon Taylor 

242 




Provo High Basket Ball 
1924-27 



o5 /.f^^ 



Clarence D. Taylor 
B.Y.U. Freshman, Br icker 192' 




•Provanna Beach- Utah Lake 
Arthur N. Taylor and Six Sons 
Arthur, Lynn, Elton, Henry, Clarence, Kenneth 





Mission Home, Salt 
Lake City. Sept. 1930 



Depart for South Afric 
Sept. 18, 1930 



'1st Dixon Relatives discovered 
while tracting in South Africa. 
The Humph r is 





Cousin William Hartman & wife Florence 
at Cradock, South Africa 



243 



South African Mission Secretary 
2-20-31 to 3-14-1932 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 



Grahamstown, South Africa, Birthplace of 
Henry Aldous Dixon. Visited in 1932 




Jerusalem 1933 

•Provo Fourth Ward 



Ordained a Seventy by Richard 




Employed from 1933 to 1964 Dead Sea 

244 

Clarence Dixon Taylor 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 




Home - 2180 Oakcrest, Provo 




B.Y.U. BOOKSTORE 
May 15, 1964 - May 1974 





I'st B.Y.U. CHURCH HISTORY TOUR 
May 1951 



RETIRED ? ? ? 
1 974 





Dak Hills Chapel 
Ordained High Priest 
May 23, 1971 





Provo Temple Worker 
January 1 978 



Lt Camp Pickett, Va, 
route to European Theatre 
of War. World War II . 2130 Temple View Dr. 
Jan. 1942 to Sept. 1945 Present Home 

245 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 






"IVKKKS 
THt 




Lake Titicaca 

Peru 
Reed Fishing 

Boats 





m 



Playground Taylor Hill 





Matchu Picchu 
Peru 




246 



Iguassu Falls 
Uruguay 



1969 




World War II 

5 Battle Clusters: 

1. No, France 

2. Normandy 

3. Ardennes 

4. Rhineland 

5. Central Europe 



Neighborhood Playground 




247 



37th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 66 




CLARENCE DIXON TAYLOR 



248 



38th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




VA LERA DIXON 





250 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No, Page 
ADAMS 



11. 92 h 


Kenneth Brent 


503 


11.921 


Kenneth Dixon 


503 


11. 922 


Laura Ann 


503 


11. 92 


Susan Dixon 


503 




AIKELE 




743 


Bonnie Ann ( Cornish ) 


492 


7421 


Eric Allen 


492 


74 h 


Hyrum 


492 




Photo 


267 


741 


Hyrum D, 


492 


742 w 


Irene Svensen 


492 


74 


Mary Dixon 


492 




Photo 


267 




History 


269 




Family Photo 


268 




Home Photo 


268 


7422 


Shaunty Maja 


492 


742 


William Eugene 


492 




ALVEY 




13. 5232 


Andrew Arthur 


510 


13. 5231 


Ann Marie 


510 


13. 523 h 


Bruce 


510 


13. 5233 


Douglas Byron 


510 


13. 5234 


Katrina Michelle 


510 


13. 523 


Terry Laws 


510 


ANDERSON 




6312 w 


Annette Buffo 


487 


14.414 


Brian S. 


512 


14.41. 10 


Bruce Summerhays 


513 


14.419 


Caroline 


513 


14.418 


Catherine 


513 


11. 61 


Carol Leslie ( Hipp ) 


502 


14.413 


Clair 5. 


512 


14.416 


Clyde Summerhays 


513 


14.415 


Colleen ( Stokes ) 


513 


14.412 


Craig S. 


512 


14.41. 11 


David Summerhays 


513 


11.6 h 


Dean Albert 


502 


14.417 


Janae 


513 


6314 


Jed Taylor 


487 


631 


Jvilia Taylor 


487 


14.414 w 


Karen Amato Beveridge 


512 


6313 


Kennen ( Band ley ) 


487 


631 h 


Kenneth R. 


487 


6311 


Kristine ( Bandley ) 


487 


14.413 w 


Linda Stokes 


512 


14.411 


Lynette ( Engle ) 


512 


63121 


Mandi Alese 


487 


11. 62 


Michael Albert 


502 


14.41 h 


Raymond G. 


512 


14.41 12 


Sara 


513 


14.41 


Sarah Summerhays 


512 


6312 


Scott Taylor 


487 


14.4141 


Shane Raymond 


512 


14.4142 


Tiara Lynn 


512 


14.4131 


Tori 


512 


11.6 


Vera Dixon 


502 



I.D. No. 




Page 




ANDREWS 




10.4 


Alice Delenna Dbcon 


500 




Photo 


387 




History 


389 




Family Photo 


388 




Home Photo 


388 


10.41 


Charlene ( Peppinger ) 


500 


10.43 


Dixie Lee ( Paden ) 


500 


10.42 


Jeanne Katherine Truxal 


500 


10.44 


Joseph Dixon 


500 


10. 4 


Robert Bruce 


500 




Photo 


387 


10.42 


Robert Dale 


500 




ARMSTRONG 




52 h 


Anthon H. 


484 




Photo 


145 


521 


Mary Doris 


484 


52 


Nancy McConachie 


484 




Photo 


145 




History 


147 




Family Photo 


146 




Home Photo 


146 




AUSTIN 




13,435 


Julie Ann 


510 


13,436 


Ke ith 


510 


13.433 


Michael Re.ed 


510 


13.43 h 


Richard M. 


510 


13.434 


Richard Scott 


510 


13.432 


Sandra Kay 


510 


13.431 


Shauna Dee 


510 


13.43 


Sherrie Lillie Dixon 


510 




BALLIF 




12.42 


Barbara (Olson)(Wade) 


506 


12.431 


Becky Jean ( Garner ) 


506 


12.432 


Brian Scott 


506 


12.4121 


Brittany Kay 


506 


12.434 


Bryce Dixon 


506 


12.412 w Carolee Christensen 


506 


12.4111 


Chelsea 


506 


12.433 


Debra Ann 


506 


12.4 


Edna Dixon 


506 




Photo 


289 




History 


291 




Family Photo 


290 




Home Photo 


290 


12.413 


Jan 


506 


12.41 w 


Kay Anderson 


506 


12.411 w Linda Marie Towers 


506 


12.41 


Mark Dixon 


506 


12.412 


Mark Gordon 


506 


12.4 h 


Mark Squires 


506 




Photo 


289 


12.411 


Michael Edward 


506 


12.43 


Scott Walter 


506 


12.43 w 


Shernna Nancy Craven 


506 




BAKER 




13.741 


Andrew Jayson 


511 


13.742 


Daniel Joseph 


511 


13.74 


Judy Dixon 


511 


13.74 h 


Robert Daniel 


511 



521 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I. D. No. 




Paget 


LD. No. 




Page 




BAND LEY 


1 




BIGELOW 




631 3 h 


Fred 


487 


822 


Lois Amber Ford 


495 


6311 1 


Jeremiah Phillip 


487 


822 h 


Rex 


495 


6313 


Kennen Anderson 


487 


8223 w 


Vickie Lee Davis 


495 


631 1 


Kristine Anderson 


487 




BJORKLUND 




63131 


Nicholas Edward 


487 


752 


Barbara Gail ( Meyers ) 


493 


631 ] h 


Phillip Bench 


487 


7513 


Bobbi Joan 


493 




BARRETT 




7511 


Cindy 


493 


13. 6 


Anna Dixon 


511 


7512 


Debbie 


493 




Photo 


369 


7551 


Deena 


493 




History 


371 


755 w 


Diane 


493 




Family Photo 


370 


75 h 


Erling T. 


493 










Photo' 


321 


13. 61 w 


Carol Roundy 


511 


753 


Gloria Faye ( Nichols ) 


493 


13. 62 w 


Cynthia Gordon 


511 


75 


Harriett Faye Dixon 


493 


13.611 


Jackie Kim 


511 




Photo 


321 


13. 6 h 


John Byron 


511 




History 


323 




Photo 


369 




Family Photo 


322 


13. 621 


John Michael 


511 




Home Photo 


322 


13. 615 


Kandie Lee 


511 


754 


Janet Marie ( Machado ) 


493 


13. 613 


Kristine ( Harward ) 


511 


751 w 


Pat Nicholes 


493 


13. 612 


Lewis Kevin 


511 


755 


Richard Erling 


493 


13. 62 w 


LindaDee Urvina 


511 


751 


Robert Gary 


493 


13. 622 


Melissa Dawn 


511 




BOOTH 




13. 62 


Michael Wayne 


511 


72 h 


Albert Warren (Photo) 213 


491 


13. 6111 


Rusty Lee 


511 


722 w 


Carrie Hendricksen 


491 


13. 6112 


Ryan Kim 


51 1 


7212 


Catherine 


491 


13. 61 w 


Sandra Good 


511 


7216 


Christianne 


491 


13. 61 


Shirl Jack 


511 


7214 


Cynthia 


491 


13. 611 u 


' Tracy Lynn Jensen 


511 


7223 


Gary Lee 


491 


13. 614 


Veda Kay Lynn 


511 


722 


Gary Lynn 


491 


13. 62 w 


Vicki A, 


51 1 


7211 


Gordon David 


491 




BECKER 




721 


Gordon Dixon 


491 


3552 


Benjamin Mark 


497 


7222 


Greeorv 


491 


855 


Cheryl Ann Dixon 


497 


721 w 


June Phoebe Erskine 


491 


B551 


Jonathan Lloyd 


497 


7215 


Michael Thomas 


491 


355 h 


Mark Stanley 


497 


722 w 


Sherry Ann Gaudio 


491 




BELBACK 




7213 


Stephen M. 


491 


16. 921 


Crystal 


519 


722 w 


Tawn Lee 


491 


16. 92 h 


Don 


519 


72 


Vesta Dixon 


491 


16. 92 


Michele Dixon 


519 




Photo 


213 




BELL 






History 


215 


2114 h 


John Dalton 


477 




Family Photo 


214 


21141 


Mary Mellissa 


477 




Home Photo 


214 


2114 


Sylvia Shaw 


477 


7221 


Warren Lynn 


491 




BEYERS 




21 1 3 h 


BORDEAUX, Will 


477 


11. 21 h 


James Lawrence 


502 




BOREN 




11. 212 


Johanna 


502 


13. 521 


Cynthia Laws 


510 


tl. 213 


Katherine Norma 


502 


8511 


David 


496 


tl. 211 


Marrissa Suzanne 


502 


8513 


Elisabeth 


496 


11.21 


Sharon Lynn Tangren 


502 


13. 5213 


Emily Kay 


510 




BIGELOW 




13. 5214 


Joshua Kenneth 


510 


5225 


Amber 


495 


13. 52 h 


Kenneth 


510 


J221 1 


Brand ie Lee 


495 


851 


Marjorie Jean Dixon 


496 


J221 


Brent R. 


495 


8512 


Michael 


496 


^2231 


Camille 


495 


851 h 


Robert Reed 


496 


?221 w 


Carol Ann Sutton 


495 


8514 


Stephen Ralph 


496 


iZZ4 


Cindy ( Gunter ) 


495 




BOSHARD 




^2212 


Cody Rex 


495 


8113 w 


Andrea Stubbs 


494 


^222 


Elaine (Nicol)(Martinez) 


495 


81 h 


Arnold 


494 


5223 


Glen M. 


495 




Photo 


129 


52232 


Leslie Amber 


495 


812 


Arnold Bliss 


494 



522 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



[.D. No. 




Pace 




BOSHARD 




B113 


Arnold Von HoUen 


494 


8112 


Beverly Ann ( Wakefield ) 


494 


3121 


Gary Bliss 


494 


Bllll 


Clifford Dean 


494 


B1112 


Dallas Nelson 


494 


811 


Dean Dixon 


494 


8111 w 


Dianne Nelson 


494 


8121 w 


Eileen Boswell 


494 


81 


Erma Mae Dixon 


494 




Photo 


129 




History 


131 




Family Photo 


130 




Home Photo 


130 




Wildwood Home 


130 


B123 


Gina 


494 


312 w 


Glenna Rae Edwards 


494 


B1211 


Jessica Ann 


494 


31212 


Kelly 


494 


311 w 


Norma Heatherly 


494 


8111 


Norman Dean 


494 


8122 


Steven Allan 


494 




BOVINGDON 




i41 


Diane Dangerfield 


483 


i41 h 


James 


483 


4411 


James, Jr. 


483 


4413 


Lynne 


483 


4412 


Michael 


483 




BOWERS 




4421 h 


Roger 


483 


4421 


Susan Lanahan 


483 




BOWLES 




10. 62 h 


Brent 


501 


to. 622 


Brent Jason 


501 


10. 624 


Heather 


501 


10. 623 


Jinette 


501 


10.621 


Robert John 


501 


10. 625 


Ryan Duane 


501 


10. 62 


Suzette Schugk 


501 


10. 626 


Vaughn Jay 


501 




BROCKBANK 




324 h 


Allen Brent 


486 


i241 


Allen Brent, Jr, 


486 


b242 


Anne 


486 


d246 


Dixon Taylor 


486 


■)24 


Kathryn Dee Taylor 


486 


j244 


Laura 


486 


)243 


Lynn (F) 


486 


)247 


Mary Kathryn 


486 


i245 


Rebecca 


486 




BUCKLEY 




:3. 212 h 


Gaylen Mel 


508 


.3. 2122 


Kirsten Mae 


508 


:3. 2121 


Mayken Dot 


508 


'3. 212 


Shelly Olson 


508 


13. 2123 


Trevor Rusken 


508 




BUSHNELL 




il41 


Marrianne Frampton 


485 


il41 h 


Ned Booth 


485 



I.D. No. Page 
CANNON 

2153 Kristen Dixon 479 

2151 Lucile Dixon 479 

2152 Mark Dixon 479 
215 h Mark W. 479 
215 Ruth Dixon 479 

CARROL 

13.5261 Berniece Elaine 510 

13. 526 h Charles 510 
13.526 Linda Laws 510 

13.5262 Shaun 510 
CHID ESTER 

8712 Brook 497 
871 Jo Ann Fallentine 497 
871 h Lynn U. 497 
8711 Scott 497 

8713 Whitney Kate 497 
CHILDS 

14. 51 Ann ( Daybell ) 513 
14. 56 w Ann Lee Averett 514 
14.561 Benjamin Steven 514 
14.542 Cody Bernell 514 

14.535 Crystal 514 
14.531 Jason Myron 514 

14.53 John Myron 514 
14. 532 Joshua Norman 514 
14. 52 Judith ( Lucia ) 513 

14.536 Kenneth Parker 514 

14.55 Kristine ( Osborn ) 514 
14. 562 Linda Ann 514 
14. 533 Marie 514 
14.5 Maurine Dixon 513 

Photo 325 

History 327 

Family Photo 326 

Home Photo 326 

Ranch House 326 

14.5 Myron DeVere 513 

Photo 325 

14.534 Nathan John 514 

14.54 Richard Dixon 514 

14.56 Steven LeRoy 514 
14. 53 w Susan Parker 514 
14. 54 w Trudy Edna Jenson 514 
14.541 Yancy Richard 514 

CHRISTENSEN 

16. 10 h Bruce J. 519 

Photo 463 

16.10 Doris Ann Dixon 519 

Photo 463 

History 465 

Family Photo 464 

Home Photo 464 

16.10.5 Jason Dixon 519 

16.10.3 Jennifer 519 

16.10.6 Joshua Daniel 519 
16.10.2 Kyle DeGrey 519 
16.10.1 Lesa Ann 519 

16.10.4 Matthew B. 519 



523 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. Page 
CLEGG 

233 Barbara Ann Dixon 480 

2332 Brent D. 480 

233 h Jack Alvin 480 

2331 Michaels. 480 
CORNISH 

7432 Ashlie Melissa 492 

743 Bonnie Ann Aikele 492 

743 h Clayton J. , Jr. 492 

7431 Rebecca Lynn 492 
COWLEY 

10. 2 h Angus Wayne 499 

Photo 301 

10. 22 w Cheryl Janeene Tueller 500 

10. 222 Corbin Tyler 500 

10.21 w Norma Jean Hadley 499 

10.212 Robin 499 
10.2 Ruby Dixon 499 

Photo 301 

History 303 

Family Photo 302 

Home Photo 302 

10.221 Sheri Lyn 500 

10.22 Shirl Curtis 500 

10.213 Susan 499 
10.21 Wayne Dixon 499 
10.211 Wendy 499 
10. 223 Whitney Anne 500 

CRAIG 

&341 h John 488 

6341 Shelly K. Woodruff 438 
CROWLEY 

3612 Colette 497 

3613 Colin Thos. 497 
361 Kathryn Dixon 497 
361 h Thomas Edward 497 
3611 Trent 497 

DAHLBERG 

10, 33 h Kenneth E. , Jr. 500 

10.33 Lynn Ann Lewis 500 

10.331 Wayne Kenneth 500 

DAINES 

2532 Anne Elaine 482 
253 Barbara Ann Markham 482 
J534 John Thomas 482 
2531 Richard Weldon 482 

2533 Russell Lewis 482 
253 h Weldon Lee 482 

DANGER FIELD 

13 Afton 483 
I Alice Smith Dixon 483 

Very Brief Life Sketch I94 

142 Carolyn ( Lanahan ) 483 

15 Clifford Dixon 483 

Photo , History 197, 195 

Birthplace I95 

141 Diane ( Bovingdon ) 433 

17 Donna Mae 434 

14 w Florence John 483 

Photo 191 

16 Grace ( Harding ) 4g4 



I.D, No. Page 
DANGERFIELD 

44 Harold Dixon 433 

Photo 191 

History 193 

Family Photo 192 

Home Photo jgg 

42 w Helen Morrison 433 

41 Jabez Aldous 433 
4 h Jabez W. 433 

Very Brief Life Sketch 262 

451 J. William 433 

4511 J. William. Jr. 433 
422 Karen ( Fisher ) 433 
421 Kay ( Nunnally ) 433 
451 Patricia Ellen McEwen 433 

42 Royden J. 433 

Photo 151 

History 153 

Birthplace 151 

4512 Stephanie Deanne 433 
DA VIES 

21124 Amber Rebecca 477 

21123 Jennifer Erin 477 

2112 h John Alleman 477 

21121 Jon Shaw 477 

21122 Michael Scott 477 
2112 Sandra Shaw 477 

DAVIS 

7324 Amy Ellen 492 

7322 Becki 492 
8562 Brant Coy 497 
856 h Brent Lee 497 

7323 Glen Harold 492 
732 h Harold Keith 492 

7325 Jill Ann 492 
8561 Jordan Daniel 497 
7321 Micki 492 
856 Sandra Lee Dixon 497 
732 Shirley Mae Dixon 492 

DAYBELL 

J4. 51 Ann Childs 513 

14.51 h Grant Lanny 513 

14.512 Jesse Glen 513 
14.514 Katherine Ann 513 
14.511 Keith Grant 513 

14.513 Richard Myron 513 
DECKER 

82122 Brooke 494 

82121 Christopher Gean 494 

8212 Lori Jean Simmons 494 

8212 h Willard Gean 494 
DE GRAW 

6222 Derk Taylor 486 
622 Janice Taylor 486 

6223 Gregory Taylor 436 
6225 Michael 436 
6221 Michele 436 
622 h Monte 436 

6224 Nicole 436 
DE GREY 

Sarah DeGrey Dixon 477 

Photo 12 



524 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



;.D. No. 


DENISON 


i^age 






Page 


13. 5 h 


Byron Leslie 


510 


7*^ 1 4 


Bret Glen 


491 




Photo 


337 




B ria,n Garth 


t rt rt 

509 


13. 52 


Elaine Joyce (Laws) (Pa-tterson) 51 


16. 5 


x,./x^ix^c xv^^yucxi 


3 i O 


13. 51 


Inez Bemiece 


510 




X not o 


43 i 


13 5 


Inez Dixon 


510 




.niscory 


433 




Photo 


337 




r amiiy x^noto 


43^ 




H 1 sf"r> T*v 

X X ^ O I. w X y 


339 




Home Photo 


432 




Familv Photo 


338 


16 111 

X U . Ill 


^amiiie 


CIV 
31 / 




HoTTip Photo 


338 


1 471 


a TV^ 1 1 1 A 

v^ciixiiiie 


RIO 




DENS LEY 




13 133 

X « X. ^ 


v.>elXX VCXXX 


3UO 


1 Cf «■ Cf X J. 


CjoII^^ti T* avl OT 

\J X L C C X C(> y X X 


504 






c n Q 

3UO 


17 7 1 1 A 




504 


747 w 


Carleen ^4ay Dyer 


4.Q 1 
40 1 


17 711"^ 

i £« • ^ X J. J 


J-JUXXSjwxX ^ llvLXlO'O 


504 


1 I , 7 W 


v-'arox v-<oiiara \ r^noxo ) 


3 U3 




T*1J1 TITI^ 
XVX A X XGk XXXXC 


504 




x^atne nne xj raciiora 


4Q 1 


12.211 h 


w V ^ XX X 11 iixct o 


504 


3 w 


l! 9 ^ri A i n A TCa 91 a \A t» cr a n 


4ft7 
O ^ 


12 2111 

Aw* J. X X 


^tCV^XX XXO'VXS 


504 




\/ A Tir 1 A T T . 1 T A .^l^ A ^ ^ fl 

V cx y XJX^XCX J_(1XC t-'cv.CtdX 


370 


17 7117 


T* 1 f fa T1 V T ^VTITI 
X XX XCLIX y JLj y XXXX 


504 


11 1 TO 

X I « X >w 


1^ A ^ 1 1 A 1 ^ V 1^ 


3U£ 


17 7 1 1 


■ ▼ ~ iiu y 


504 




'PVirif rk 

"noLO 






DEVINE 

^/X_J T XX^X_J 




11 11 

1 1 • X 1 


v^eciie iviarjoxie ^ ouiim j 


3U^ 


i U • ( ^ 


xvx<i X 11 y xx x\ xk..iicix u 9 uxi 


«l X o 


1 n 


v^naneo vywen 


4vy 


1 ^ 7"? 1 


A 1 1 a G 3 
xvxc X X 9 o el 


518 

^ X O 




V cTy xjx xcx xjixc t>^i\.t;i.cn 


4i4 


If) 73 h 




51R 

^ X o 


7 "^44 


l!Vl A t^i 1 TrTl Trt 

v^iic x^xiy 11 \j \j 


47^ 




DIXON 




O ^ ^ 


l!Vl A l*^rl A TlTl n "5 IT rtn / A O If A T* 1 

V,<«ilCx yX x^Xlxl X^xaOXX \X-ICvlXCx/ 


49 < 


2141 1 


AHfia Atiti 

X XCL X^XXXX 


479 


2421 


c! n T* 1 Q'i'rt nri a Ti va y 
V.'IIX X9LV./LylXCX x.^ y C X 


4Q 1 
40 1 




Ad r vne tlod s on 

A &u X y XX ^ X .X v( o XX 


496 


7?1 7 


ixxu 1 ivxd X X€ He \ x\ u x 1 9 f 


471 


1 *^ 7 


Afton { Wapstaff ^ 


508 


1 f< 44 -at 


l^iTl^^r HrtVkAV^O 

v^ixxuy xvu Oc X to 


3 1 


17 '^'^ 


Alan Romney 


505 


1 1 w 

X J » X J w 


1 A rt Tl A ri O rt rt 1 A ' 1 ' M 11 T» rtA 

V'lc oxie x\ cLppiey x n\xx oc x 


ft n 




Albe rt Frede rick 


502 


1 1 ^ 

X X « ^ 


C. 1 1 T+rtTi R a o TTin q a ati 

N-' X XX LUXl X\ cl O XX 111 9 9 cxx 






V#* T*v Ri'ipf Til f ^ Slr^^T'Vi 
* cx y J—' X xcx x^xxc ihi/x^c lv>ix 


300 




rt 1 1 A A Tl I. oil 1 04*01* 
V^LIlXCCll v^cLlXlSl.CX 


31 


763 w 


A 1 T*^3 ^Aa^ 

xXX Lie X LCL XVXciC 


4Q3 




Photo 


*3 1 


1 4 


Alifi* T^^l^TTna f Andf^wfl \ 

x^XX^e J.'' C X C XXXXCl \ xXXXU X CWO J 


500 


16 Rl 2 

X \J « O X x« 


Col 1 <aft*» 


3 1 7 


1 

Z 


Al i CG Smith (D anff e rf ield 1 

X X WVr *^ XXXX (#XX y X.' c»xxg X X X \X f 


483 


761 

1 V X 


V.^' wXX9 tCLXX^e J-^eC \ X\ XVrlX / 




14 3 


All ie f G ardne r \ 

X ^XX X^ \ GL X U XX^ X / 


512 


1 2 222 


CTm+Viin fin^ ( ihhQ ^ 
v^yxiLxiici tic \ vji xukio f 


3U3 


ID, Ot 


Anvils 

X^XXg c XCl 


519 


3 X 


tl 9 1 A T A A 


4oU 


1 jO J 


Anori^ T jVTlTl 
x^xxk xc y M' ' 


492 


1 A Al 
X U . U X 


li a n o T rt ri Ti 
x^olxxa J vinxx 


3 1 


J\J J w 


A Tin AA 3 T* 1 o A cr 1 n 

xXxXxX XVXclx^XC J^CgXXX 


497 


12. 233 


T^aTii^l Pof'*»T*Bon 
x-^ cixxxe X -A- C X o V/XX 


RDR 
3U3 


13. 6 


AtiTia 1 RaT'T"^'^ \ 

xXXXlxCl \ -LJ A X X e lrl> J 


511 


7351 


Darin Richard 


4Q7 

"±7 £. 


12 5 


A TTnv T J a T'TI f TjaTflOn 1 
x^lXX y XJCt V C X XX y JLJ A X O XX y 


506 


16. 123 


David Allen 

X^ V XU XXXX W XX 


517 
3 X r 


1 1 Qfi 


Akmv T*vnTi#* 
i X 1 y •1-' y xxxxe 


503 


16 'i'^ 


T^aviH CalliS'^AT* 
x^ cL V xu el.xxxo tc x 


m R 

3 X 




A TVi AA a t o 
xvixiy ivxo. X xc 


497 


12. 24 


T^a VI d CVi 1 r>ma n 

X_y d V XU V^XX X L/11 XCLXX 


505 


1 O , X 1 rt 


AtiHv^tx/ T*a'f*ald 

xXXXU X C KJ C X aXU 


517 


1 7 74'^ 


Tloxrirt ri 1 rtVl^ a Tl T 
x^elvxU Vp/II 1LIII1<1X1 J u x« 


3 tl 




A n H t* A A T .xmn 
xxxiu X c c y XXXX 


496 


11 Q4 

XX, 7*T 


a Tri H ^Ta i* i*Tr 
d V lu x^ci X X y 


j\j ^ 


ID, 


Ai*iiol d 

x^X xxwxu 


517 


216 

d X U 


a VI rl R n Ha T*'f 

Xy CL V XU XW^ X U 


479 




V CX y X-' X XC X XJXXC wXVwLV.'XX 


408 


ft62 


A a T\T\ a ^ ^^a T"fl Vi a 1 1 \ 

X_/ ^ CiXXXlCL \ ^"XCL X O IXCtX X / 


497 


2 


A T*^ rin ^ T) O Ci T" A V 

x^XtXiUX x-'CNJxcy 


482 


1 2 7? w 


F)AaTin#» P^fAf^on 

* -* "Tr ' * ' ' Vr X ^ i.^ X O W XX 


505 




V c x^ y X../ X i\; X xjixc ^jxck^xi 


398 


1 2 321 


O A VlHl A 
X^C I^L^XC 


505 


Id. 7 


Armu-r oixioo t 


515 


1 1 Q'? 

X X , 7 J 


A Hn 7*3 Vi 
X-/C Uwx axx 


503 


1 7 74.7 


ASnie y 


505 


235 


aG t*p V La R ov 


4R0 


I ^, ^rr J. 


^\id I* SI 


505 


1 A R7 


nAniflA 1 tcaIIv I 

X,/ C XX XD C y X^^ y / 


317 


1 1 R 


r>a,Dy 


^07 


16.43 


T^RTTni R Oa fli'Tiiri 

X^ C XXXX X D X^ Ck O b X 


3 X 




i3arDara Ann \ <-'iegg/ 


XSD 


16. 112 


Diana 


3X1 


>^«;7 


Barbara ^^[aureen 




741 7 


Ti 1 a Ti A 
x^ icixxc 


4Q 1 
*0 X 


1 7 
I J. 1 


Bert Lester 


3 1 i 




Ti 1 a Ti a T jVTIti 
x^ icLXXcl J~iyxxxi 


ROQ 




Photo 


395 


12 1 

X b « ^ X 


niariA ( TAmnAflt \ 

XAXX^ ^ X C IXXL/C O l> f 


3 U 3 




ms uo ry 




1 41 •or 
1 3 • t X W 


W \ A n A \A rt n rt TI a 1 H 

i.^1 XxxlC XVXCi.^VlllotXtX 


Rno 

3U7 




Family Photo 


395 


17 "^7 w 

X Ci a 3 4> W 


1 a 1^ A rt rt 

X-/XclXlC i.^t..ULL 


RnR 

3U3 




Home Photo 


395 


234 


ni"5riP Bpfcfh 

X^ X^L X^ ^ Ir 1 X 


4Rn 

*r VI 




Bonnie Kay Howell 


503 


12 3 


Tlonald ^4!aihpn 

^/ wXX AXU XVXCl X l>^^ XX 


3U3 


12, 231 


Brenda ( Hills ) 


505 




Photo 


207 


'364 


Brennan Russ 


480 




H i ato rv 

X X X o b V X y 


7nQ 


16, 33 


Brent 


517 




Family Photo 
Home Photo 


208 
208 



525 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



L , U . IN o , 




Page 


T Ti Nn 

X • I—' • x> u « 


DIXON 


a fro 

jr age 


1 "7 1 ■? 
1 C., D C. 


Donald Romney 


505 


863 


Ira t^TT onal/l 
V— leLxy x\\JXielxU 


497 




Donna Penrod 


496 


1 A R •«/ 

J u « w 


w c nxi le 1 j-icL p e n 


519 


1 D, J U 


Doris Ann ( Christensen ) 


519 




-IT IHJ lU 


453 


7^ 7 

1. C 




478 


76 


Ge r ge S , 


493 


Q A A 


Do r se y 


4Q7 




PVinf r» 

X liW L ^.^ 


363 


1 D , 7 


Douglas Wayne 


51 Q 




xxioLwx y 


365 




r^noco 


45Q 
1 J 7 




n^a TY\ 1 1 l^rt 

-L cllilliy xrilUtU 


364 




Histo ry 


46 1 




xxv^IIlC X llCtL/ 


364 




Family Photo 




Rt; 




AQf\ 




riome r-'noto 




ft ^77 
ti* ^ 


1 n a T A A 
IXlcL Xj€e 


4QA 
^70 


Q c 7 c: 


Drew Ward 


4QA 


14. ft 

X *r . 


It 1 a /I Tr a I ^^a 1 a \ 


5 1 5 

^ X ^ 


O 7 

f 


iijaitn Alice \ r aiientme ; 


AO"? 


73 


It 1 A 1^ r-T a n rH o 


4Q1 
1 7 J 


I c, ^ 


Tr(^r\o ( R n i f ^ 
iijQna \ oaLLii ] 


tin A 

DUD 




PViotn 


225 


i D , rt 


Utiuon ripnoiQ 


3 1 




XXXot^X y 


227 




It nu 1 


Al S, 
1 1 D 




r" a TV^ 1 1 ^^ri rtt-rt 
J- dlxXlly X rii^kU 


226 




nis to ry 


A^ 7 




i X (J ilxc x^ IlUt U 


226 




i: amiiy x noto 


A 1 A 


312 w 

-J X b< W 




4R7 

*x ^ 




rrumc r^notu 


41 A 


13 1 3 w 

± mJ ^ X ^ VV 


loT^ia Ann tra n 


-? u 




TPl r1 rtn a r1 




16. 7 


Ci 1 T" 1 a \A a^r 1 Ri^Viat^r^cr^n^ 
vjxv-'X la. ivxeiy \ x\ iciid. x ti UIi^ 


^1 ft 

J X 






Die 


27 


rant 






"V A "I'^r "R 1 A f T . 1 f A S IT A t ^ n 
V c 1 y xj X ic x IXC JVC t 


Q 


16.3 


T"p n't" 1~5 ^ v 
X cLxiL x^ c \wi X ^ y 


517 

^ X 1 


1 1 4. 


■i:^ I iXid rxxLiiiMlx 


D U ^ 




Phntn 

X 11 U L U 


4*1'^ 

*X\J J 


1 J w 


ti I xr Ih ' 1 1 A TTi ^ ^ ri Q yv*\ Ana l^' 

ndva Hjnen ocncmcnoK.y 


40 1 




XX i a ry 


t U 3 




X noto 


^ ^3 




A amiiy "noto 


404 


733 


J— ' ivcl ucaix \ xj 1 1 IV./ L L / 


4Q1 

1 7 J 


10. 512 


Cj T* <^ C T" V ClVl51T*l^S 
X G g V X y \^iicL X xc 


500 


1 A ft 1 w 


x-jiildxdic v.Jx all 


D J 7 


16.31 


' X c g u X y xvxd P i\. 


1 7 


1 1 Q6 


ni'miltr Ann 
x^iiiiiy x^iixi 




8533 


(riiv \A/a vnA 
^ y ▼ * cL y xxc 


4Q6 


PI 


X 1 1 id xvxo, y xj u 11 a X u / 


4Q4 


1 5 


Ha f f i ^ f A mf> 1 i a ^ AAA a c f ^ 


516 


24 w 




4R 1 


75 


X xc» xxxcL xckyc \ ±j j x i\.x U-xxu / 


493 




Photo 


113 


7 w 


X XCb X X i-C L X XCbXXU 


491 


-J 


X^ X lie 3 L X IIV^ 1 U 


4Qii 

*±73 




\/ A l"Tr ^ i A T T 1 TA ^l^'A^/^Vl 

vcxy J-Jxid J_«llt; k-> IV. G t dl 


368 

J vi 


fi 


E TTi ^ Q t" T~) ^ C~i 

x^ X lie L X./ c X c y 


4Q4 


1 1 1 


Harry Albert 


502 




V C X y i— » X Id J— i 11c IVC U i« 11 


314 




x-'noto 


263 


1 3 3 


n! n CT A *n ^ a 1 
x-i Lig c 11c X a. X .L 


J u 7 




History 


265 




Photo 


233 




r amiiy x noto 


264 




History 


235 




xiorric "noto 


264 


31 w 


Home Photo 


233 


I 6. 4ZZ 


Hayley 


3 1 


Eva Ruthe Mildenhall 


482 


1/1 A 
J 4. D 


rlelen ( x-'ayne ) 


CIA 
3 14 




Photo 


3QQ 

-'7 7 


1 J. 1 w 


Helen A.ndelino 


311 


85 w 


Eva Ruth Ward 


4Q A 




Photo 


one 


16. 2 


Photo 


307 


1 <i, ^ w 


Helen Chipman 


K r\A 
3 U4 


Evelyn ( Smith ) 


5 1 7 




x-'noto 


113 


763 


Evelyn Rose 


Hy D 


1 b. 9 w 


Helen Konopelski 


C 1 Q 

3 1 7 


10. 5 w 


Florence Janeczko 


D U U 




irnoto 


4.t; Q 

t:3 7 




Photo 


41 1 




A y\ T* V r A 1 ^ ^ 11a 

nenry x^iuoixs 


ATI 
til 


16. 3 w 


Florence Rosella Nlarks 


i; 1 7 




r'noto 


1 1 


16. 6 


Photo 


403 




XX € xxx y uoixo XX 


All 


Floyd Preston 


5 1 ft 




r^noto 


ic. 
1 3 




Photo 


4"^ 7 




H istory 


77 
f 1 




History 


43Q 
1 J 7 




x" aiTiixy X noto 


7A 
1 




Family Photo 


43R 




xiome "noto 


7A 


12. 22 


Home Photo 


4'^ C 


1 


Henry Alired 


All 




J U 3 


16.12 


TT— J All 

Howard Allen 


517 


12. 2 


Fred Walter 


3 Ufr 


16. 1 


Howard Banks 


517 




Photo 


1 7(1 
1(3 




Photo 


J 1 3 




History 


1 77 

111 




History 


J 1 1 




Family Photo 


1 

i 1 




TT* . Till T >1- ^ X ^ 

r amily irnoto 


n A 
J 1 


16. 1 


Home Photo 


1 7A 
i 1 




Home Photo 


1 A 
3 1 D 


Fxilvia Call 


517 


1 A lie 
ID, 113 


Howard Marks 


1; 1 7 
3 1 ( 




Photo 


315 


16.4 w 


Ila Jean Hair 


518 


243 


G. Michael 


481 


Photo 


415 



526 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. 


DDCON 


Page 


731 w 


Ina Mae Woolsey 


491 


13. 5 


Inez ( Denison ) 


510 


1 3. 31 


James Eugene 


509 


241 


James R. 


481 


16. 13 


Janet ( Rees ) 


517 


231 


Jean Luella ( Smith ) 


480 


16.45 


Jeannine 


518 


11. 941 


Jennifer Kay 


503 


16. 11 


Jerald Lamar 


517 


7621 


Jeremy Matthew 


493 


16. 52 


Joan 


518 


8524 


Joe Erik 


496 


214 


John Aldous 


479 


2 


John DeGrey 


477 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


88 


242 


Joseph M. 


481 


236 w 


Judith Louise Russ 


480 


13. 74 


Judy ( Baker ) 


511 


762 w 


Judy Gayle Woods 


493 


12. 23 w 


Judy Williams 


505 


16. 122 


Jul ia 


517 


12. 224 


Julie Anne 


505 


232 


June Mary ( Robinson ) 


480 


16. 11 w 


Karen Raymond 


517 


16. 91 


Karen Joan 


519 


352 w 


Karen Lee Marrott 


496 


734 w 


Karen McClellan 


492 


214 w 


Karma Jeppson 


479 


B61 


Kathryn ( Crowley ) 


497 


2142 


Kay ( Lee ) 


479 


235 w 


Kay Darlene Dix 


480 


16, 14 


Kenneth Call 


517 


12. 325 


Kerry E, 


505 


10. 52 


Kevin Charles 


500 


3534 


Kimberly 


496 


16. 54 


Kristin 


518 


7354 


Kristin Ann 


492 


16. 121 


Kristina 


517 


16. 94 


Kurt Douglas 


519 


16.42 


Larry Dean 


518 


10. 51 


Larry Owen 


500 


16.423 


Laura 


518 


3543 


Laura Joanne 


496 


J121 


Le Ann Layne 


482 


IZ 


Leah Lillian ( Ford ) 


494 


7631 


lee Andrew 


493 


13. 121 


Le Ann ( Rowley ) 


507 


14. 


Le Roy 


512 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


282 


14. 1 


Le Roy Smoot 


512 


511 


Leslie ( Hardin ) 


482 


12. 3 w 


Lettie Vilate Romney 


505 




Photo 


207 


16. w 


Letitia May Banks 


517 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


408 


i37 


Linda 


480 


341 


Linda ( Rose ) 


496 


16. 12 w 


Linda Jean Mangum 


517 


1 1. 91 


Linda Kay ( Mariotti ) 


503 


1143 


Lisa 


479 


7343 


Lisa Ann 


492 



I.D. No. 


DDCON 


Page 


12. 223 


Lisa Kay 


505 


1 3. 1 1 


Lois ( McEwan ) 


507 


16. 6 w 


Lois Mai Dickenson 


518 




Photo 


437 


13. 1 w 


Loleta Wiscomb 


507 




Photo 


169 


7313 


Lori Jean 


491 


213 


Louise ( Larkin ) 


479 


26 


Lucian DeGrey 


482 


21 w 


Lucile Knowlden 


477 




Photo 


75 


23 w 


Luella Hannah Madsen 


480 




Photo 


83 


12. w 


Luthenia (Louie) Maiben 


504 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


144 


16. 51 


Lynn Ann ( Fa rns worth ) 


518 


8523 


Marc Stanley 


496 


13. 12 w 


Margaret Anne Simpson 


507 


14. 23 


Margaret Electa 


512 


244 w 


Maria Cristina Puerta 


481 


6 


Maria Louise ( Taylor ) 4, 


485 


851 


Marjorie Jean ( Boren ) 


496 


2354 


Mark DeGrey 


480 


2411 


Mark Eyring 


481 


74 


Mary ( Aikele ) 


492 


13.42 


Mary Ann ( Olson ) 


509 


8 w 


Mary Ann Painter 


494 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


314 




Mary Ann Smith 


483 




Photo 


12 


13. 73 w 


Mary DeGruchy 


511 


842 


Mary Ellen 


496 


13. w 


Mary Etola Dangerfield 


507 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


372 


13.41 w 


Mary Jane Chattin 


509 


12. 21 


Mary Lou ( Taylor ) 


504 


13.4 w 


Mary Matilda Hills 


509 




Photo 


283 


13. 3 w 


Martha Bernard 


283 


16. 113 


Matthew Jerald 


517 


25 


Maud ( Markham ) 


481 


23 w 


Maureen Welker 


480 




Photo 


83 


14. 5 


Maurine ( Childs ) 


513 


731 


Max Glen 


491 


2362 


Megan 


480 


11.9 


Melvin Rasmussen 


503 




Photo 


443 




History 


445 




Family Photo 


444 




Home Photo 


444 


843 


Merrill Verl 


496 


12. 232 


Michael 


505 


16. 32 


Michael DeGrey 


517 


2353 


Michael Kent 


480 


312 


Michael Layne 


482 


2432 


Michael Romney 


481 


16. 92 


Michele ( Belback ) 


519 


12. 323 


Michelle 


505 


12. 221 


Michelle Jo ( Gregg ) 


505 


11.2 


Mildred ( Tangren ) 


502 



527 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. 


DIAON 


Page 


i . JJ , IN . 


n TV M 
UlA *JiN 


Page 


16.811 


Ik if • 

Monica 


519 


80 


Konald 


497 


Z422 


"NT • 1 TVT _ ^ 1 1 

Nicole Noelle 


48 1 




r-'hoto 


Oil 

311 


11.5 


Norma (Jess ) 


502 




T T ■ _ i. _ 

History 


3 1 3 


854 w 


"NT T All - -_ 

Norma Jeanne Allan 


496 




Family Photo 


312 


16. 83 


Norman Paul 


519 




Home r-'noto 


312 


14, Z w 


Ora Anderson 


CIO 

5 1 Z 




w iidwood Home 


312 




r^hOtO 


1 O 1 




Ronald Jesse 


49d 


10,5 


Owen George 


500 


C y1 

od4 


Konald Ward 


496 




irhOtO 


A \ y 

41 1 


1 r\ 9 
I U . ^ 


Ruby ( Cowley ) 


499 




rlome r^noto 


>1 1 1 

411 




Rulon Sterling 


481 




History 


412 




i"^noto 


1 1 3 


854 1 


Pamela Jeanne 


49b 




History 


115 


13. 


Parley Smith 


507 




r amily irnoto 


1 14 




Very rsriei J_iiie oKetcn 


O O 




Home Photo 


y y A 

114 


J J, (J 


Patricia 


511 


■1 1 . ( 


Kutn 


502 


J C, CL W 


Patricia Donahue 


c n c 


7 1 


Ruth Marion ( Cannon ) 


479 




Patricia Stewart 


505 




Ryan Aldous 


479 


1 b. bZ 


Paul Raymond 


518 


-a c 


Kyan Ulen 


492 




Paul Smoot 


512 


c A A 


Ryan James 


496 




r^noto 


1 81 


7 1 A 7 


Ryan Patrick 


480 




History 


1 83 


ODD 


Sandra Lee ( Davis ) 


497 




Family Photo 


1 dZ 


c 
D 


Sarah Ann ( McConachie ) 


A C\ A 

484 




Home i^hoto 


TOO 

1 8Z 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


A 

All 


J 4. ii 1 


Paul Smoot, Jr. 


CIO 

512 




Very rJriet i^iie oketch 


1 22 


in 1 "5 O 

13. \lL 


Hauiine ( Wilder ) 


508 




Sarah DeGrey 


477 


A A 


"T~~> \ 4^ 

r'eter M. 


48 J 




r^noto 


1 z 


1-3 -y •3 1 


r^naed ra 


C 1 1 

511 


1 A An, 
1 , 4 W 


Sarah Jean Dastrup 


CIO 

518 


"7 11 

<1 1 J 


irnyllis ( onaw ) 


47 / 




r'nOtO 


415 




ixaipn 


4^0 


1 A A 


Sarah Vera (Summerhays) 


C 1 "7 

5 1 Z 




Knoto 


^ "7 

307 


1 Z. 3ZZ 


ocott 


505 




History 


309 


1 Z. 3Z4 


bean K. 


505 




r amily 1-^noto 


308 


11. w 


bena Kasmussen 


502 




rlome r-'hoto 


308 




Very oriei Liiie bketch 


A A L 

446 


o c ^ 


Kalpn otanley 


496 


-J A 1 
Z3b 1 


Shannon DeGrey 


480 


1 1 
J 1 


Raymond Lane 


482 


1 A 1 >1 

1 b. 1 Z4 


bhaunna 


480 




r^noto 


399 


11 1 OA 
13,1 a4 


sneriine ( JViitcneli } 


c rv 
5Ub 




History 


40 1 


13,43 


Sherrie Lillie ( Austin ) 


510 




Family Photo 


400 


735 W 


Sherry Lynn Pyper 


492 




Home Photo 


A f\t\ 

400 


1 A AO 

1 b . 4 A W 


Shiela Higgins 


CIO 

518 


J J , 'I 


Reed Dangerfield 


509 


^7 A 1 

r b 3 


Shirel Ferris 


493 




i noto 


Z83 


1 A C 1 

1 U , 5 1 W 


Shirley Ann Orpen 


500 




H isto ry 


285 


73Z 


Shirley Mae ( Davis ) 


492 




Family Photo 


284 




Stacy Lynn 


A e\y 

491 




Home Photo 


Z84 


Z3 


Stanley Lewis 


480 


I J, rr I 


Reed Garth 


509 




r^noto 


83 


IC., l 


Knea i-iutnenia ( Keeve ) 


504 




History 


85 




Richard 


505 




Family Photo 


A A 

84 




Kicnard o. 


492 




Home Photo 


84 




Iv e\ ^ f - ^ n ' — > 

x\\jDert 'wJcorge 


A r\l 
493 


■7 1 A 


Stanley Lewis, Jr. 


A ^ f\ 

480 


i D . O 


Robert Norman 


519 


in 1 
1 U, 3 


Stella ( Lewis ) 


500 




■I not o 


/I c o 

453 


1 A A "5 

1 b . b3 


Stephanie Gwyn 


518 




H isto ry 


>i c e 

455 


*> 1 >i 1 
Z 1 4 1 


Steven John 


A 1 f\ 
479 




Family Photo 


A e A 

454 


1 z. 01 

16,81 


Steven Lewis 


519 




rlome r-'noto 


454 


1 1 , 92 


Susan ( Adams ) 


503 


1 J . 4 1 c 


Kobert Keed 


509 


13. 123 


buzane ( Pulsipher ) 


508 


9 


Robert Smith 


498 


241 w 


Suzanne Eyring 


481 


13. 73 


Robert Timothy 


511 


8531 


Teresa 


496 


ID, rt^l 


Roger Duane 


518 


13. 132 

7311 

8532 


1 eresse Kay 

Terri Mae ( Vaksinick ) 

Thai Wade 


508 
491 
496 



528 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. 




Paffe 


I.D. No. 








DIXON 






ENGLF 

X_j X N \vi J— i XIj 




13. 72 


ThonxEis Anthony 


^ X i 


14.4113 


XVXC LclXiXC 


K 1 7 

Die 


7341 


Timothy Hugh 


4Q2 
"176 


X ~ a Tr X X X 


XVXC 1 1 d 


K 1 9 

I C 


7632 


Timothy Paul 




14. 4114 


S r^o n r» !• t*. a 1 
^[JCXX^CX v.yclic(J 


m 7 


16. 93 


Todd DeGrey 






FALLFNTTNF 




7342 


Todd William 


4Q2 


873 w 


A trn p fff» Rp a Ti 


A.OQ 
^70 


10. 511 


Travis Owen 


500 


87 h 


Be rnard Carl 


4Q7 
*7 ( 


2141 w 


Val Fulmer 


477 




Photo 


jft 1 


10. 1 


VaLera ( Ririe ) 


"±77 


872 


C^pTolvn ( Cj 1 1 fl T*a n ^ 
^k^cb X v^x y XX ^ Vkrfi xxoLxcbu f 


^7 ' 


76 -w 


Veon Collings 




8731 


Till Q ^ 1 I . ra ■••1 
J^usuxxx N>>a.xrx 


4QS 




Photo 


J D J 


R7 


xIjUILXI xVilC" ±^LA.\JxL 


4Q7 

*t7 I 


11.6 


Vera ( Anderson ) 


502 




Photo 


341 


84 


Vei"! Grant 






XX X9 L%j X y 


343 




Photo 


22P 




Familv Phofo 


342 




History 


231 




X X V IX X XX \J L \J 


242 




Family Photo 


230 


871 


-To Ann ( dViiHp^fp'r \ 


497 




Home Photo 


230 


873 w 


TCa tVi 1 p p n TCa ^i'TinWa s 

X^CiLXlX^CXX X^CLOLX XXXIVAD 


497 




Vrildwood Home 


230 


875 


XVXl^LlcLCX X-^ XAV^Xl 


498 


13. 12 


Vern Lee 




873 


X\ \J UVi X L J-J C X XXck X U 


498 


86 w 


Verneda Jackson 


"T7 1 


874 


Silvan / Fl atH*^ T<y ^ 

^U9CLXX \ X XCkUUC ' 


498 




Photo 


311 




EARNS WORTH 




13 1 


Vernon Lee 


507 


16. 51 


Lvnn A.nn Oivon 

x^ y xxxx xxxxxx x^ x^^\^xx 


518 




Photo 


169 

X u 7 


16.51 h 


Paul J. 


518 




H i sto rv 


171 




FARRER 

X xxX\X\X_JX\ 






Familv Photo 


170 

X f V 


6841 


iJaviH CtIpti 

X^ fX V XU L C XX 


4Qn 




HoTYip Photo 


170 

X 1 V 


684 


Fl 1 f> n Tt" f*Vi np ir 

X^XXwXX X^OkX L^XXXX^ X 


4Qn 
^7U 


72 


Vesta { Booth ) 


491 


684 h 


Rand Glen 


4Qn 


10 6 


'ViT'Cfi'niA ( SpHiicflc 1 


501 

■y V X 




FISHER 

X X*-* X X JL»J XV 




10 w 


Virginia Beckstead 


499 


611 


Elayne Taylor 


4R5 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


414 


611 h 


Grant A. 


485 


13. 7 w 


Virginia Oswald 


511 


61121 


Hillary 


485 


84 w 


Virginia Poulson 


496 


6112 


Joffrey Taylor 


485 




Photo 


22<3 


422 


Karren Danperfield 

X JL X ^ X* X^ vdXAK V X X X ^4 


4R^ 


14. 22 


» 1 V XGLXl \ XVX^^X^Ciy / 


^ X c 


6113 


Ka+V\ V ( l~)iTnr'an ^ 


4fi 


12. 


Walter DeGrey 


504 


6112 w 


Donnette Morrison 


485 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


143 


6111 


Terri ( Jensen ) 


4ft 

"TO J 


7633 


Wayne Daniel 


493 




FLAT BERG 




7 


William Aldous 


4Q1 

"*7 1 


874 h 


David R. 


4QR 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


772 


8741 


Jenny 


4Qft 
'*70 


734 


'\Ar 1 1 1 1 a m T*^ T»a nW 

« « IX X Xcl XXX X X cL xxx\. 


*7£ 


874 


Susan Fallentine 


498 


71 

f X 


^AT" 1 1 1 1 9 TV^ T-T U ^ Q 
VV lilicllll XXdllLlS 






FORD 




243 w 


X vwxxxxc x\v^iixxicy 


^0 X 


823 w 


Anginita Maria Van Derbeck 494 




DOMINE 




11. 222 


Cambric Emma 


502 


2124 


Lisbeth Harrison 


47fi 
^ 1 


11. 221 


Cimony Anna 


502 


2124 h 


Steven Anthony 


478 


8233 


Cynthia 


494 




DUNCAN 




8232 


Dale 


494 


Si 1 3 


x^ciLxiy X xoii^x 




11. 223 


David Menton 


502 


Si 131 


Of a n 


4fl5 

* VJ .y 


823 


Dbcon Alton 


494 


S113 h 


Paul H. 


4S5 


1 1 . 22 h 


James Eric 


502 




EJOVEC 




824 


Janice Ann ( Neerings ) 


494 


1423 


A, Tn V T*ariaVian 

1 X 1 y JUJCL AAiCblXCL H 


4S3 


8231 


Kathleen 


494 


1423 h 


Op 1 H 


483 


82 


Leah Lillian Dixon 


494 




ELLIOTT 






Photo 


155 




X-j1vcI J C dxX LJwLIXX 


4Q7 




History 


157 


1 J J 1 


•L\eLLie J€oiix v VV iT;i.e j 


407 




Family Photo 


156 


t J J n 


Kennetli Lee 


4Q7 




Home Photo 


156 


1 O .J c 


x\.eri x-iee 


4Q7 




Wallsburg Home 


156 


t J D D 


onsiixe -L'. 


4Q7 

^7t 


822 


Lois Amber ( Bigelow ) 


495 


7334 


X X CL V X B '^-M UXXIA C X 


492 


8235 


Marianne 


494 




ENGLE 

X-y X ^ X^ X-y 




821 


Marilyn Mae ( Simmons ) 


494 


14.411 h 


Eldean Roy 


512 


82 h 


Mayo Alton 


494 


14.4112 


Joshua 


512 




Photo 


155 


14.411 


Lynette Anderson 


512 


11. 22 


Nancy Ann Tangren 


502 



529 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No. 




Page 




FORD 






GRIGGS 




8234 


Steven Mathew 


494 


16. 211 


Brian Wilfred 


517 




FRAMPTON 




16. 212 


Deborah Kay 


517 


6146 


Alan Taylor 


485 


16. 216 


Julie Dionne 


517 


614 h 


Boyd M. 


485 


16. 21 


Karen Ann Smith 


517 


6143 


Bruce Taylor 


485 


16. 215 


Kathryn Ann 


517 


6143 w 


Connie Lynne Bird 


485 


16. 214 


Kent David 


517 


6142 


David Taylor 


485 


16. 213 


Stephen Smith 


517 


614 


Dixie Taylor 


485 


16. 21 h 


Wilford Charles 


517 


61431 


Jeremy Taylor 


485 




GUNTER 




6147 


Kent Taylor 


485 


8224 


Cindy Bigelow 


495 


6142 w 


Keri Ann Wheadon 


485 


82242 


Gale Tex 


495 


6141 


Marrianne ( Bushnell ) 


485 


82241 


Jeremiah Michael 


495 


6145 


Paul Taylor 


485 


8224 h 


Robert Michael 


495 


6144 


Susan 


485 




HARDIN 






GAMBLES 




311 


Leslie Dixon 


482 


2113 he 


Amy Suzanne 


477 


3111 


Leslie Layne 


482 


21131 


Anna Kathleen 


477 


311 h 


Thomas Ray 


482 


21132 


Erin 


477 


3112 


Vernon Shayne 


482 


2113 


Kathleen Shaw 


477 




HARDING 




2113 he 


Kerry Scott 


477 


46 h 


Curtis P. 


484 


2113 h 


Kirk Edward 


477 




Photo 


257 




GARDNER 




46 


Grace Dangerfield 


484 


14. 3 


Allie Dixon 


512 




Photo 


257 




Photo 


237 




History 


259 




History 


239 




Family Photo 


258 




Family Photo 


238 




Home Photo 


258 




Home Photo 


238 


462 


Judy Ann ( Pugh ) 


484 


14. 312 


Genevieve 


512 


461 


Miriam ( Waterman ) 


484 


14. 31 


James Dixon 


512 




HARMON 




14. 31 w 


Martha G rover 


512 


14. 611 h 


Mark Lewis 


514 


14. 3 h 


Reed Snow 


512 


14. 611 


Robin Lee Ipsen 


514 




Photo 


237 




HARRISON 




14. 311 


Robert Grover 


512 


2127 


Angela 


478 


14. 314 


Stewart Grover 


512 


212 


Dorothy Dixon 


478 


14. 313 


Thomas Grover 


512 


2125 


Heather 


478 




GARNER 




2126 


Holly ( Jensen ) 


478 


12.431 


Becky Jean Balllf 


506 


2123 


Judith ( George ) 


478 


12.4311 


Shane Vern 


506 


2121 


Linda Lucille ( Welling ) 


478 


12.431 h 


Vern J. 


506 


2124 


Lisbeth ( Domine ) 


478 




GEORGE 




2122 


Patricia ( Patcyk ) 


478 


2123 


Judith Harrison 


478 


212 h 


Virl L. 


478 


21231 


Samuel Nephi 


478 




HARWARD 




2123 


Steven Michael 


478 


13.613 h 


Gregory J. 


511 




GIBBS 




13. 613 


Kristine Barrett 


511 


12. 222 


Cynthia Sue Dixon 


505 


13. 6131 


Tamera Lynn 


511 


12. 222 h 


Richard F. 


505 


13. 6132 


Tasha Lee 


511 




GILSTRAP 






HEAL 




872 


Carolyn Fallentine 


497 


687 h 


Alan Perry 


490 


8721 


Christopher 


497 • 


6872 


Amy Louise 


490 


8722 


Mo Hie 


497 


6871 


Maria Ann 


490 


8721 h 


Ralph M. 


497 


687 


Rosena Louise Kartchner 


490 




GRAHAM 






HILLS 




14.43 h 


Daniel Watkins 


513 


12. 231 


Brenda Dixon 


505 


14.43 


Diana Summerhays 


513 


12. 231 h 


Dal 


505 




GREGG 






HIPP 




12. 221 h 


Mathew 


505 


11.61 


Carol Leslie Anderson 


502 


12. 221 


Michelle Jo Dixon 


505 


11.611 


Daniel Edward 


502 




G REGS ON 




11. 612 


Robert Dean 


502 


6231 


Carol Lyn Richards 


486 


11.61 h 


William E. 


502 


62311 


Daniel Kim 


486 




HODSON 




6231 h 


Kim Wolsey 


486 


6331 


Diane Taylor 


487 








6331 1 




487 






530 


6331 h 


Scott Linn 


487 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


T n Nn 




Page 




IPS EN 






KARTCHNFR 




14. 61 




514 


687 


xxiJot^licl X^Ulxloe \ xieGLX / 


47U 


14. 613 


Bra-dley Psiyne 


514 


68 


x-vuLix J— ixuxxic X dyxv.'x 


4Qn 

ft7U 


14. 614 


Deind. Kaye 


514 




Photo 


■J I J 




T a n a 1 Trn 
u diicLi y 11 


1^ 1 4. 




nis ro ry 


Q "7 c 


14 6 1 h 




1 4. 

-J X *± 




x" amiiy r^noto 


i (4: 


14 611 


■^VV^UIU C y X lA 1 lllV/ll / 


m 4. 




xxLiiiie X noto 


374 




JENSEN 






VV llUVVvlUU iHJlTie 




21 26 h 


-1— ' CL V XU J— ' w ^ 


H 1 


6853 


X. d y i. u X x^ ilu c X D c u 


490 


21 26 


Hnl 1 V Hat ti s on 

1 JL 1 ^ y ^ XCI> X X X w W IX 


J ( o 




KELLY 


61111 


U dlllllC 1 XVXci LLX 1 




1 u « u 


-L-^ClllS€ xJ\X.\JXl. 


519 


A 1 1 1 >i 

o 1 1 1 n 


-L/d W X^c XICC J C X C Illy 


^ o c 


J « ^ J 




519 


6111 


^ ^ X X X X XO X 




16. 82 h 


Mark E 

XVXCl X Zx. X_4 ^ 


519 




JESS 






LAN AH AN 


11 51 


RaT*hflTa Ann 

■U X VJGk X Or ^ ^XXXX 




4423 


**. Ill y \ J « V c ^ / 


4 7 


1 1 5 


NnTTYiA T~)ivon 


502 


442 


C^a Tol vn T^a ■nar^arfi^lH 
^k^ct X v^i y 11 J-/ cLxxgc X X xc xu 






Photo 


073 


442 h 


JuU W cL X U 


4 7 




1 X 19 X y 




4477 


IVJlC 1 1 cl 


y1 D 1 


11 >i 


R 1 a r1 It q ri a 
x\ l^^xid 1 U xclliollll 


D u ^ 


4421 


t^UacLll ^ JJUwCxo / 


y| 7 




x\ iciici ru »-J tc veil 






T ,A RKTN 

j—t.r\. x\x\.j.XN 






TOHNSON 




2131 w 


v>oi X wi JLJ y 1111 * V ii X 


47 Q 
ft f 7 


7321 1 


TaQon TiafTv 

\3 3 \J XX X-icL X X y 


4Q7 


2131 1 


X-'Cl V ILl l^lkWll 


4 7Q 
^17 


13. 222 


Ta V T flH 




2131 


T^i von ffi "n 

X^kWXl X ^ X X XXX 


47G 
4 17 


13. 2221 


.Tav LamaT 

U Ck y 'Cb ^ X 1 fir X 




213 h 


E EeTrin 

J « -A- ^ X X XXA 


47Q 
4 f "J 


13. 22 h 


Tsiv Tirjfnfl 

o ci y 




2134 


u Cl> XX XC XV ^ X U 


47Q 


13 ?75 


ucxxxy Tvcixxcxx 


3U7 


2136 


T a 


A7Q 
4 f 7 




Jerry x-'uturi 


3U 7 


2132 


Tnlia 1 .^rtnifofl \ 
»J id \ wauixco / 


4 r 9 


r ^ ^ 1 ^ 


Jv^SllUcL x^e ICll 




21 341 

X 1 


\j trllxixlC X 


4 / V 




xjcLv^y ■xi.xxxx 


407 


14. 221 


T ja TI f *a 




7321 h 


T »a T" T"v R ona 1 A 
x^cL X X y x\\_/xxcLxu 


4.Q7 


213 


T .On 1 Q ^ 11 1 "vo n 
jLj\j yjkxo^ xj XJ^\J XX 


47Q 
4 f V 


13. 224 


Lis a 


3U7 


2133 


^sA^y^rVyTi Ann 

XVXCfc X LllA -XjLIXXX 


47Q 


13. 221 


Xjor i 


500 

3U7 


2134 w 


T'f Vi 7\ Cj Cl 1 ^ a Ron 

XV^Ck X UXX CL « ^wl X C Cl O w XX 


470 
*t J 7 


7321 


Micki Davis 




21351 

£■1 1 ^ 1 


"hJi ol 

X>l 11.. 


47Q 
4 (7 


13. 22 


Norma Jean Wagstaff 




21352 


^^anl R^niaTYTin 

X OL IXl X^ C XX 1 OL IXIXXX 


47Q 
ft f 7 


13. 223 w Sandra Jean Linford 


3U 7 


14 771 


xXcUcC^d J-^XJuUXl iVlC,x^cLy 


C 1 7 


13. 222 w Tammy Jones Sutton 


3U7 


7 1 1 7 

Ci X J X 


a a h 
vJCt X dll 


A7Q 
4/7 




KARAWOWSKI 




2135 w 


SHa 7*nn El T^yr 
k^ixcix 1-/XX x^i^c y 


A70 
4 /7 


761 


Constance Lee Dixon 




2135 


MTilliam IjvI^ 

* * XXX XCL XXX X 4 y X ^ 


A7Q 
^ f 7 


761 h 


Eddie 


ft 7 J 




LARSON 




7611 


Scott Edward 




12.5 


Amy LaVern 


^OA 




KARTCHNER 






Photo 


jO 1 


6862 


Benjamin Nelson 


47U 




rT 1 Q ^" 
X X xo X y 




686 


David Taylor 


ft 7U 




Ea TTn 1 1 \r T^Vi o^"0 
X ctiiiiiy X ii^juw 


J J ^ 


6821 


Drew 


400 
ft 7u 




X X \J X X X^ X 11, \J t \J 


f^7 

•J C 


683 


Elaine 


400 

** 7U 


12, 51 w 


Anne B re inliolt 


506 


684 


Ellen ( Farrer ) 


400 
^ 7 V 


12. 513 


Barrv O Neal 

J-J Ob X X y * ~ 0*X 


506 


68 h 


Fred Dixon 


400 

"±7W 


1 2. 5 


Dovle R 


506 




Photo 


373 




Photo 


351 


6822 


Heather 


^7U 


17 ^7 w 


x^cn-iiy TV L 


«;oA 

OKJO 


6861 


Jeffrey Nelson 


4Qn 

t7U 


12.51 


Larrv O N^al 

i X X y x^ccLx 


^oA 
I? \j 


686 w 


Karen Renee Nelson 


4Q0 
«t7U 


1 2. 52 


^/TiphaAl T~)ivon 

XVX XVpiLlCLC X X^ X^ViWXX 


^OA 


685 w 


Kathryn Andersen 


400 
1 7U 


12. 521 


IR van \sA \ c\\ a ^ 1 

x\ y CLXX xvx x^xicbc X 




6854 


Kelli 


4Q0 
fl7U 


12. 512 


Sl"acv »Tf*an 

uck ^ y o ^ cLxx 


OA 


682 


Kenneth Taylor 


4on 
47U 


12.511 


Sn ^a n nf* 

^ \XXjCXXXXXw 


■^OA 


6852 


Kerianne 


47U 




LAWS 




681 


Linda ( Tyler ) 


/ion 
47U 


13. 524 


Becky 


1 n 


682 w 


MarlAnne AUene Davis 


47U 


13. 522 w Carol Eileen Patterson 


Kin 


6851 


Mark Andersen 


Aon 
47U 


13. 521 


Cynthia ( Boren ) 


Kin 


688 


Mary Ann ( Warner ) 


4Qn 

^7U 


13. 5221 


Dennis Marvin 


K 1 


6824 


Nathan 


400 


13. 52 


Elaine Joyce Denison 


510 

^ X v 


685 


Richard Taylor 


490 


13. 52 h 


LaMar R. 


510 


6823 


Robin 


490 


13. 525 


Lamar 


510 



531 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



[.D. No. 


LA Wb 


Page 


1. D , INO. 


"K >f A T3 "L^TJ A TV A 

iVL A KKH AM 


Page 


13. 5Zd 


Linda ( Carrol ) 


t; 1 n 


9 K 9 C 


Allen Lewis 


A 1 
40 1 


13, 522 


Marvin 


c 1 n 
b 1 


9 C ^ 

Zd3 


Barbara Ann ( Daines ) 


>1 9 

48Z 


13. 5Z3 


pri /AT \ 

Terry ( Alvey ) 


c 1 n 


9 C 1 1 1 

Zd 111 


Brian 


>4 1 

4o 1 




T T7* 17* 




9 c 1 9 


JJavid faui 


yl 1 

4e 1 




A 11 ^ ^ n M 

Allison 


A7 Q 


9 K A 
^D4 


Diane Louise ( Stewart ) 


A Q 9 

4oZ 


Z142 h 


David 


4 f V 


9 C 1 
£.0 1 


Douglas Fred 


A 1 

4ol 


Z14Z 


Kay Dixon 


47 Q 
4 J V 


9 C U 

^D n 


Fred Lewis 


A 1 
4o 1 




Nicole 


il7Q 
4 f V 




1DV. ^4- A 

r'noto 


111 
13 3 




LE Wlb 




9 c 1 ^ 
ZD 1 D 


J ae Uaniel 


AO 1 
401 


10. 314 


Erin 


c n n 


Zd 14 


James Lewis 


A 1 

4o 1 


10.31 


Frederick Dixon 


K n n 


Zd 1 


John i rederick 


A Q 1 

4ol 


10. 3 h 


Frederick Wesley 


K n n 


Z5Z 


J oseph Uixon 


AO 1 
401 




i"^noto 


14. 


9 c 9 
ZdZ w 


Junece Jex 


4Q 1 


1 Oil 

10. 311 


Jason Frederick 


3 uu 


9 c 9 >1 

ZdZ4 


Karl William 


481 


10. 316 


J essica 




9 c 1 7 

Zd 1 ( 


Kay April 


481 




John Stephen 


3 U U 


9 c 99 


Kevin Richard 


481 


10. 315 


T — — 1_ — 1~\ _ ■ J 

Joshua David 




9 c 9 9 ... 

cocc w 


Lisa Dawn Hansen 


481 


I U. 3 1 


Kerry Bradford 




9 K9 1 


^^ary Ann 


481 


10. 33 


Lynn Ann ( JJahlberg ) 


K n n 


9 C 

Zd 


Maud Dixon 


481 


10. 31 w 


Hatty Kay otott 


3 UU 




rtlOtO 


133 


10. 313 


Kachel 


c n r\ 

DUU 




History 


135 


10, 34 


Sandra Lee 


DUU 




Family Photo 


134 


10, 3 


bteila JJixon 


dUU 




TT „ . „ T3l ^ 4. 

Home r'noto 


134 




r^noto 


1A c 
34D 




w lidwood Home 


134 




History 


1 A "7 

34 / 


9 c 9 1 
^D Z 1 


Michael Dixon 


481 




Family Photo 


t A C 

34d 


9 c 1 1 

Zd 1 3 


T^ _ „ 1 T~) 

Keed rS, 


481 




Home x-'hoto 


1 /( /L 

34o 


9 c 1 ... 

ZdI w 


Reeda Bjarnson 


481 




LilN U Jl, KM. AiN 




9 c 1 c 
^D 1 D 


Robert Dixon 


481 


11 1 9 7 v. 

i. J, I n 


Donald Dale 


D U f 


9 1; 1 1 ii» 
CO 1 i W 


Rosanne Gibson 


481 


11 loo 


Pauline Dixon 


c r> 7 

DU f 


9 C 1 1 9 
ZD 1 1 Z 


Ste phanie 


481 


13. I ^ 


Kandy 


K fl 7 
DU ( 


9 K 1 1 
ZD 1 1 


Steven John 


481 


T 1 19 9 1 

13.1 ccl 


Rebecca 


C A7 
D U f 




X A A Xy C T_T ATT 

MAKoHALL 






LOW L 




^ 9 C 

odZd 


Amber Nicole 


497 


19 1119 

1 <i, lilt: 


Drenda J-iisa 


D U4 


A 9 

Hoc 


Deanna Dixon 


497 


19 111 
1 c., 113 


David Jordan 


D U4 


Q A 9 1 
OOZ 1 


iLric oteven 


497 


19 1 1 V, 


Howard U. 


D U4 


A 9 9 

ooZZ 


Erin 


497 


19 1111 

Id, 1 1 I J 


Julie Renee 


D U^ 


9 1 

odZ3 


Ryan Dixon 


497 


19 114 
1 C, 114 


Kenton Alan 


D Vx 


A 9 U 

ooc n 


Steven c. 


497 


19 111 
1 C., Ill 


Kevin Howard 


D Urt 


A 9 A 


Tera Cassandra 


497 


19 119 

1 Z. 1 1 z 


Lynda Ann ( Weaver ) 


D U^t 




MAK 1 INEZ, 




12. 115 


Mark Douglas 


R HA. 
D Url 


oZZZ 


Elaine Bigelow 


495 


12. 11 


Ruth Reeve 


K r\A. 
D U4 


82224 


Jason Dale 


495 


12.111 w Shavina Renee Johnson 


D 


82ZZ h 


Kenneth Boyd 


495 




LUCIA 






1 ravis is.en 


495 


14. 52 


Judith Child s 


K 1 1 

D 1 3 




tyUJNAv^Hilli 




14. 521 


Matthew Bruce 


1^ 1 1 
D 1 J 


b n 


Alexander Collie 


484 


14. 522 


Rachel Maurine 


t; 1 1 

D 1 O 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


150 


14. 523 


Seth Thomas 


C 1 1 

D 1 3 


5 1 


Donald 


484 


14. 52 h 


Thomas Allen 


C 1 1 
D 1 3 


bZ 


Nancy Shear8mith(Arm6trong) 48^ 




MACHADO 




c 

b 


Sarah Ann Dixon 


484 


754 


Janet Marie Bjorklund 


AO 1 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


150 


7542 


Kimberly Ann 


A Q 1 
473 




MC EWAN 




754 h 


Manuel H. 


493 


13. 113 


Alan Dixon 


507 


7541 


Rodney Wayne 


493 


1 ^ 1 1 ^ 

13. 1 1 3Z 


Alan Dixon, Jr. 


507 




MARIOTTI 




13. >133 


Amanda Kay 


507 


11.912 


Amanda Jamie 


e n ^ 

503 


13. 1141 


Andrea Lyn 


507 


11.91 h 


Francesco 


cm 
dU3 


19 1 1 1 

13. 1131 


Christina 


507 


11.91 


Linda Kay Dixon 


503 


13. 1124 


Cynthia Kay 


507 


11.911 


Sarah Kate 


503 


13. 114 


David Vernon 


507 



532 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No. 




Page 


MC EWAN 






NEERINGS 




13. 113 w 


Debra Lynn Cook 


507 


824 


Janice Ann Ford 


495 


13. 112 w 


Dorcus Rita Powers 


507 


8241 


Jill 


495 


13. 115 


Glen Richard 


507 


824 h 


John Theodore 


495 


13. 112 


James Harold 


507 


8244 


Lisa 


495 


13. 11 h 


Junius Harold 


507 


8243 


Shellia 


495 


13. 11 


Lois Dixon 


507 


8242 


Troy 


495 


13. Ill 


Lynda ( Morgan ) 


507 




NEILSEN 




13. 114 w 


Mary Ann Warner 


507 


2322 


Julie Ann Robinson 


480 


13. 1123 


Melissa Ann 


507 


2322 h 


Martin David 


480 


13. 1125 


Richard James 


507 


23221 


Ryan Wayne 


480 


13. 1121 


Sandra Lee 


507 




NELSON 




13. 1122 


Tamara Lyn 


507 


65 


Alice Louise Taylor 


489 




McKay 






Photo 


199 


14. 222 


Catherine Dixon 


512 




History 


201 


14. 223 


Christine Dixon 


512 




Family Photo 


200 


14. 225 


David Dixon 


512 




Home Photo 


200 


14. 226 


Kimberly Dixon 


512 




Brickerhaven Home 


200 


14. 221 


Rebecca Dixon ( Larkin ) 


512 


6545 


Allison 


489 


14. 22 h 


Richard Llewelyn 


512 


6542 


Annie 


489 


14. 224 


Richard Llewelyn, Jr. 


512 


651 


Arthur Taylor 


489 


14. 22 


Vivian Dixon 


512 


651 w 


Bonnie McKay 


489 




MC KIBBEN 




14. 85 


Carolyn 


515 


15. 121 h 


Darwin 


516 


6523 


Catherine Louise 


489 


15. 1211 


Shawn C. 


516 


653 


Christina Louise ( Preston) 


489 


15. 121 


Susan Lynne 


516 


6521 


Christine 


489 




MENDENHALL 




14. 82 w 


Claudia Greene 


515 


10.635 


Jeromy Ron 


501 


655 w 


Consuelo Marquez 


489 


10.634 


Monica 


501 


6522 


David Christian 


489 


10.63 


Nancy Schugk 


501 


14.82 


David LeRoy 


515 


10.633 


Paul Brandon 


501 


14. 882 


David Taylor 


515 


10.632 


Roche lie 


501 


14.83 


Diane 


515 


10.63 h 


Ron Lynn 


501 


65 h 


G. El Roy 


489 


10.631 


Troy Lynn 


501 




Photo 


199 




MEYERS 




14.8 


Gladys Dixon 


515 


752 


Barbara Gail Bjorklund 


493 




Photo 


419 


7521 


Kenneth 


493 




History 


421 


752 h 


Tom 


493 




Family Photo 


420 


7522 


Thomas Craig 


493 




Home Photo 


420 




MITCHELL 




14. 821 


Heather 


515 


13. 1242 


Janie Lyn 


508 


654 


Henry Aldous 


489 


13. 124 h 


Jerry Leon 


508 


14. 8 


Ivan William 


515 


13. 124 


Sherline 


508 




Photo 


419 


13. 1241 


Wendy Sue 


508 


14.81 


Ivan William II 


515 




MOOS MAN 




655 


James NichoUs 


489 


12.2142 


Eric Taylor 


504 


6512 


Jeanne Louise 


489 


12.214 


Julie Ann Taylor 


504 


14. 81 w 


Jeanne Newman 


515 


12. 2143 


Melissa Ann 


504 


652 


John Christian 


489 


12. 2141 


Ryan Travis 


504 


14, 86 


Julie Anne 


515 


12. 214 h 


Travis 


504 


14. 84 w 


Kathleen Jo Dana 


515 




MORGAN 




14.84 


Kent Dixon 


515 


13. 1116 


Allison Kay 


507 


14.813 


Kevin Wayne 


515 


13. 1117 


Amber Joy 


507 


654 w 


Kristy Stewart 


489 


13. 1114 


Cheryl Lee 


507 


652 w 


Mary Lynne Sanders 


489 


13. Ill h 


Eldon Ray 


507 


6524 


Matthew John 


489 


13. 1112 


Eldon Ray, Jr. 


507 


6544 


Melissa 


489 


13. 1113 


Lisa La Dawn 


507 


6511 


Michael McKay 


489 


13. Ill 


Lynda Mc Ewan 


507 


6541 


Rebecca 


489 


13. 1115 


Robert Adam 


507 


14.811 


Ryan William 


515 


13. nil 


Teri Lyn 


507 


6551 


Sarah Jane 


489 



533 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. Page 
NELSON 



6543 


Scott Aldous 


489 


14. 812 


Shannon 


515 


14. 842 


Steven Aa.ron 


515 


6525 


Steven Sharp 


489 


6513 


Thomas Taylor 


489 


14. 841 


Wayne Ke nt 


515 




NICHOLS 




753 h 


Clavton 


493 


753 


Gloria Fave Biorklund 


493 


7531 


Jul ie 


493 


7534 


Roberta Ann 


493 


7532 


Sherrie 


493 


7533 


Tina 


493 




NICOL 




8222 


Elaine Bigelow 


495 

~ 7-/ 


82222 


Jalayne 


495 


82221 


Ste phanie 


495 


8222 h 


Steven Ted 


495 




NUNNALLY 




421 


Kay Dangerfield 


483 




OHRAN 




13. 5212 


Angelia Elaine 


510 


13. 521 h 


B r adley 


510 


13. 521 


Cynthia Laws 


510 


13. 521 1 


Joseph Scott 


510 




OLSON 




13. 2131 


Adam Hogan 


508 


12. 42 


Barbara Ballif 


506 


13. 214 


Cory Mont 


508 


13.421 


Christine 


509 


13. 2111 


Dane Russell 


508 


13. 42 h 


Darrel W. 


509 


13. 211 


David Russell 


508 


13. 216 


Denise 


508 


13.424 


Denise Leona 


509 


13. 21 


Donna Mae Wag staff 


508 


13. 422 


Jamps Darrpl 


509 


13. 213 w 


r .T 3 n H <y a n 

\J Cb XX X X \J OL XX 




13.21 h 


Jerald Russell 


^ v O 


13. 21 1 -vi 


' Judy ^/lortenson 


50fi 


13. 214 w 


' Karen Dee Green 


508 


12. 42 h 


Kenneth 


506 


13. 2132 


Kirk Russell 


508 


13. 215 


Kurt Dixon 


508 


13. 2113 


Mandy Sue 


508 


13.42 


Mary Ann Dixon 


509 


13.423 


Robert Reed 


509 

J V 7 


13. 212 


Shelly ( Buckley ) 


508 


13.425 


Stephen Jeffery 


509 

J U 7 


13,213 


Sl'pvpn Cfaior 

^ V ^ XX X 




13. 21 14 


Travis Paul 

A X a> V X o cv VAX 


508 


13. 2112 


TriTida Lvnn 

X X XX %x 1 * y XIII 


ii/ vo 


13. 426 


Vicki 


7 




OSBORN 




14. 554 


Erin Iris 

X XXX A X X9 


514 


14. 55 h 


Gregory Robert 


514 


14. 551 


Jacob Gregory 


514 


14.55 


Kristine Childs 


514 


14. 553 


Luke Childs 


514 


14.552 


Megan Kristine 


514 



I.D. No. Page 

PAD EN 

10.43 Dixie Lee Andrews 500 

10.43 h Donald Edward 500 

10.432 Hope Elizabeth 500 

10.433 Mark Christopher 500 
10.431 Peter James 500 

10.434 Tiffany Ann 500 
PATCYK 

2122 h Leonard John 478 

2122 Patricia Harrison 478 

PATTERSON 

13.52 Elaine Joyce Denison 511 

13.52 h Milton W. 511 

PAYNE 

14.61 Barbara June ( Ipsen ) 514 

14.62 Bette Lyn (Petersen) 514 
14. 6 h E. Junius 514 

Photo 357 

14.6 Helen Dixon 514 

Photo 357 

History 359 

Family Photo 358 

Home Photo 358 
PEPPING ER 

10.41 Charlene Andrews 500 

10.411 John Robert 500 

10.41 h Michael G. 500 

PETERSEN 

14.62 Bette Lyn Payne 514 

14. 623 Brian Warren 514 

16.712 Christine 518 
16.71 Cynthia Richardson 518 
14.624 David Warren 514 

14. 621 Kristi Lyn 514 

14. 622 Lisa Ann 514 
14.62h Robert Warren 514 
16. 711 Scott Weslie 518 
16.71 h Stephen Henry 518 

16.713 Suzanne 518 
PITCHER 

14.451 Allison 513 

14.454 Emilee 513 
14.45 h Frank Lee 513 

14.452 Frank Summerhays 513 

14.453 Marianne 513 

14.455 Michael Summerhays 513 
14.45 Sandra Summerhays 513 

PRESTON 

653 Christina Louise Nelson 489 

6533 Elizabeth 489 

653 h Ronald W. 489 

6531 Suzanna 489 

6532 Trevor Jorge 489 
PUGH 

4623 Brian Curtis 484 

4624 Jason Richard 484 
462 Judy Ann Harding 484 
4622 Kevin James 484 
462 h Lorin K. 484 
4621 Scott Christopher 484 



534 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No. 


Page 




PULSIPHER 






RICHARDSON 


13. 123 h 


Don Wayne 


508 


16.77 


Sandra 


518 


13. 1232 


Kerry Lee 


508 


16. 722 


Thomas Blaine 


518 


13. 1233 


Mandy Rae 


508 


16. 7 h 


Thomas Weslie 


518 


13. 1231 


Shantel 


508 




Photo 


447 


13. 123 


Suzanne Dixon 


508 




RIRIE 






PURVES 




10. 152 


Adam Kent 


499 


16. 221 


David Byron 


517 


10. 14 


Annette ( Turner ) 


499 


16. 222 


Jennifer Lynne 


517 


10. 13 w 


Barbara Warrene Temple 


499 


16. 223 


Katherine Ann 


517 


10. 122 


Brent Richard 


499 


16. 224 


Lorraine Dawn 


517 


10. 13 


Craig Martin 


499 


16. 225 


Nathan Daniel 


517 


10. 11 


Dixon Farrell 


499 


16. 22 h 


Robert Byron 


517 


10. 121 


Janeal 


499 


16. 22 


Susan Louise Smith 


517 


10. 124 


Jarrem Boyd 


499 




REES 




10. 134 


Kendall Rochell 


499 


16. 13 h 


David Michael 


517 


10. 15 


Kent Hyrum 


499 


16. 13 


Janet Dixon 


517 


10. 12 w 


Larraine Humphries 


499 


16. 132 


Michelle 


517 


10. 15 w 


Margaret Valee Jolley 


499 


16. 131 


Steven Michael 


517 


10. 126 


Mariah 


499 


16. 133 


Wendy 


517 


10. 123 


Mark Owen 


499 




REEVE 




10. 1 h 


Martin C. 


499 


12. 1 h 


Fenton W. 


504 




Photo 


249 




Photo 


137 


10. 11 w 


Monta Mae Morris 


499 


12.1 


Rhea Luthenia 


504 


10. 131 


Paige Diane 


499 




Photo 


137 


10. 12 


Richard Owen 


499 




History 


139 


10. 115 


Scott David 


499 




Family Photo 


138 


10. 132 


Seth Stephen 


499 




Home Photo 


138 


10. 113 


Shari 


499 


12. 11 


Ruth ( Lowe ) 


504 


10. 114 


Shelly 


499 




RICH 




10. Ill 


Stephen Dixon 


499 


7612 


Darrin Lee 


493 


10. 112 


Susan 


499 


761 h 


David Lee Rich 


493 


10. 125 


Taylor Martin 


499 


761 


Constance Lee Dixon 


493 


10. 133 


The r on Keith 


499 




RICHARDS 


10. 1 


VaLera Dixon 


499 


6233 


Bryan Taylor 


486 




Photo 


249 


6231 


Carol Lyn { Gregson ) 


486 




History 


251 


623 h 


H. Bryan 


486 




Family Photo 


250 


6235 


Heidi 


486 




Home Photo 


250 


6237 


Jenny Lynn 


486 


10. 151 


Valerie Jo 


499 


6238 


John Taylor 


486 




ROBERTS 




623 


Lynn Anne Taylor 


486 


7312 


Cindi Marlene Dixon 


491 


6236 


Rebecca 


486 


73121 


Rodney Jory 


491 


6234 


Robyn 


486 


7312 h 


Rodney Kay 


491 


6232 


Shari 


486 




ROBINSON 






RICHARDSON 




2321 w 


Brenda Marie Brotnov 


480 


16. 72 w 


Colleen Larsen 


518 


232 h 


George W. 


480 


16.71 


Cynthia ( Petersen ) 


518 


2322 


Julie Ann ( Neilsen ) 


480 


16.74 


David Thomas 


518 


2323 


Jon Jay 


480 


16. 7. 10 


Diana 


518 


232 


June Mary Dixon 


480 


16.75 


Don Dixon 


518 


2321 


Stanley Wayne 


480 


16.72 


Douglas Weslie 


518 




ROSE 




16.76 


Glen Alan 


518 


8414 


Adryne Cathlene 


496 


16.7 


Gloria May Dixon 


518 


8412 


Christine 


496 




Photo 


447 


8415 


Gary Paul 


496 




History 


449 


841 h 


Gary T. 


496 




Family Photo 


448 


8413 


James 


496 




Home Photo 


448 


841 


Linda Dixon 


496 


16.7. 11 


Linda 


518 


8411 


Robert Dixon 


496 


16.73 


Marilyn ( Devine ) 


518 




ROWLEY 




16.78 


Patrick Arnold 


518 


15. 122 


Denise Irene West 


516 


16. 721 


Paul Douglas 


518 


15. 1223 


Kristine Ruby 


516 


16.79 


Rebecca 


518 


13. 121 


Le Ann Dixon 


507 



535 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No. 




Page 




ROWLEY 






SMITH 




15. 1222 


Lynette Dawn 


516 


16. 2 h 


Donald H. 


517 


13. 1212 


Marie 


507 




Photo 


381 


13. 1211 


Robert Lee 


507 


16. 2 


Evelyn Dixon 


517 


15. 122 h 


Robert Lee, Jr. 


516 




Photo 


381 


15. 1221 


Robert Lee III 


516 




History 


383 


15. 1224 


Sarah Irene 


516 




Family Photo 


382 


13. 121 h 


Thomas Robert 


507 


13. 5241 


Jackson Kay 


510 




SCHUGK 




13. 5244 


Jake 


510 


10. 611 


Baby- 


501 


231 


Jean Luella Dixon 


480 


10. 616 


David Charles 


501 


16. 21 


Karen Ann ( Griggs ) 


517 


10. 61 


Dennis Charles 


501 


11. 112 


Kip Dixon 


502 


10. 61 w 


Elisabeth Hall Rees 


501 


13. 5242 


Lucas Robert 


510 


10. 613 


John Edward II 


501 




Mary Ann Smith (Dixon) 


483 


10. 64 


Judy 


501 


231 h 


Ralph Nye 


480 


10. 615 


Kristy Lynn 


501 


231 1 


Robert Nye 


480 


10.63 


Nancy ( Mendenhall ) 


501 


2312 


Rodney 


480 


10. 6 h 


Percy John 


501 


11.11 h 


Ronald Jay 


502 




Photo 


425 


13. 5243 


Sarah Jane 


510 


10. 617 


Richard Alfred 


501 


13. 5245 


Sonjia Inez 


510 


10.61 w 


Sharon Kilpatrick 


501 


16. 22 


Susan Louise ( Purves ) 


517 


10. 65 


Sonjia 


501 




SQUIRES 




10. 612 


Stefanie 


501 


2132 


Julia Larkin 


479 


10. 614 


Stephanie Ann 


501 


21321 


Lisa 


479 


10. 62 


Suzette ( Bowles ) 


501 


2132 h 


Ray White 


479 


10. 6 


Virginia Dixon 


501 


21322 


Teresa 


479 




Photo 


425 




STEWART 






History 


427 


6131 


Brent Taylor 


485 




Family Photo 


426 


254 


Diane Louise Markham 


482 




Home Photo 


426 


2541 


Elizabeth Ann 


482 




SHAW 




2542 


Emily 


482 


21114 


David Austin 


477 


613 h 


G. Keith 


485 


21 15 


Erin Jean ( Taggart ) 


477 


254 h 


Gary 


482 


211 h 


John Austin 


477 


6133 


Jan 


485 


211 1 


John Austin II 


477 


6134 


Jon Taylor 


485 


21113 


John Christopher 


477 


6131 w 


Karen Gardner 


485 


2113 


Kathleen ( Gambles ) 


477 


6132 


Kim Taylor 


485 


211 12 


Marian 


477 


613 


Nancy Taylor 


485 


21111 


Mary Elizabeth 


477 




STOKES 




2111 w 


Mary Wilson 


477 


14. 415 


Colleen Anderson 


513 


2116 


Phyllis Anita ( Wiggins ) 


477 


14. 415 h 


Reed Chester 


513 


211 


Phyllis Dixon 


477 


14.4151 


Tyler A. 


513 


2117 


Robert Dixon 


477 




SUMMERHAYS 




2118 


Rose Mary 


477 


14. 444 


Bethany Ann 


513 


2112 


Sandra ( Davie s ) 


477 


14. 442 


Candice 


513 


21115 


Sarah Anne 


477 


14.42 


Clyde Dixon 


513 


2114 


Sylvia ( Bell ) 


477 


14. 4 


Clyde J. 


513 




SIMMONS 






Photo 


273 


82131 


Adam David 


494 


14. 43 


Diana ( Graham ) 


513 


8213 


David Edwin 


494 


14. 443 


Eric Allen 


513 


821 h 


Edwin Van Dyke 


494 


14.44 w 


Janice Gayle Allen 


513 


8212 


Lori Jean ( Decker ) 


494 


14.441 


Michael Allen 


513 


821 


Marilyn Mae Ford 


494 


14. 44 


Michael Dixon 


513 


8213 w 


Terrie Lee Brewer 


494 


14.45 


Sandra ( Pitcher ) 


513 


8214 


Timothy Ford 


494 


14.41 


Sarah ( Anderson ) 


513 


8211 


Wendy Lee ( Tegeder ) 


494 


14.4 


Sarah Vera Dixon 


513 




SMITH 






Photo 


273 


13. 524 


Becky Laws 


510 




History 


275 


11. 11 


Cecile Marjorie Dixon 


502 




Family Photo 


274 


11. Ill 


Cory Garner 


502 




Home Photo 


274 


13. 524 h 


I Creig B. 


510 




Brickerhaven Home 


274 



536 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. 


TAGGART 


Page 


2115 h 


Douglas Andrew 


477 


2115 


Erin Jean Shaw 


477 


21152 


Robert John 


477 


21151 


Stephanie 
TANGREN 


477 


11. 2 h 


James Colin 


502 




Photo 


295 


11. 23 


James Dixon 


502 


11.2 


Mildred Dixon 


502 




Photo 


295 




History 


297 




Family Photo 


296 




Home Photo 


296 


11. 22 


Nancy Ann ( Ford ) 


502 


11. 21 


Sharon Lynn ( Beyers ) 
TAYLOR 


502 


65 


Alice Louise ( Nelson ) 


489 


6254 


Allen Craig 


486 


64 w 


Alta Hansen 


488 




Photo 


161 


6433 


Amelia Katharine 


488 


6414 


Amy 


488 


632. 11 


Anna 


487 


6442 


Anna 


488 


6523 


Anna Lise 


486 


642 


Anthony Hansen 


488 


61 


Arthur Dixon 


485 




Photo 


89 




History 


91 




Family Photo 


89 




Home Photo 


89 


6 h 


Arthur NichoUs 


485 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


8 


6413 


Bradford Green 


488 


6417 


Brigham Green 


488 


621 w 


Catherine Pearson 


486 


62 w 


Celestia M, Johnson 


486 




Photo 


97 


66 


Clarence Dixon 


489 




Photos 


241 


641 


Colette Green 


488 


12. 211 


Colleen ( Densley ) 


504 


12. 2121 


Cori Lynn 


504 


644 


David Arthur 


488 


6325 


David Hoen 


487 


5252 


David Lynn 


486 


S213 


David Pearson 


486 


S32 w 


Deanna Kay Hoen 


487 


d25 w 


Debra Sue Wagstaff 


486 


S411 w 


Denise Meshinski 


488 


S331 


Diane ( Hodson) 


487 


12.213 w Diane Taylor 


504 


3l4 


Dixie ( Frampton ) 


485 


12. 212 


Douglas Dixon 


504 


S251 


Douglas Dixon 


486 


Sll 


Elayne ( Fisher ) 


485 


53 


Elton LeRoy 


487 




Photo 


123 




History 


125 




Family Photo 


124 




Home Photo 


124 




Farm Photo 


124 



I.D. No. 


TAYLOR 


Page 


6441 


Emily 


488 


63 w 


Ethel L. Scott 


487 




Photo 


123 


67 w 


Ethelyn Peterson 


489 




Photo 


329 


12. 21 h 


Floyd R. 


504 


6415 


George Green 


488 


625 


George Terry 


486 


64 


Henry Dixon 


488 




Photo 


161 




History 


163 




Family Photo 


162 




Home Photo 


162 




Brickerhaven Home 


162 


641 


Henry Dixon, Jr. 


488 


6411 


Henry Dixon III 


488 


6321 


James Hoen 


487 


632 


James Scott 


487 


622 


Janice ( DeGraw ) 


486 


621 


John Arthur 


486 


6211 


John Arthur, Jr. 


486 


6333 


John Tanner 


487 


631 


Julia ( Anderson ) 


487 


6326 


Julie 


487 


12. 214 


Julie Ann ( Moosman ) 


504 


624 


Kathryn Dee (Brockbank) 


486 


6324 


Kathy 


487 


612 


Kent G. 


485 


6329 


Kent Hoen 


486 


644 w 


Kristine Boynton 


488 


12. 2132 


Leslie Ann 


504 


12. 215 


Lisa Jeanne 


504 


12. 212 w 


Lori Dunford 


504 


643 w 


Lorna Bird 


488 


634 


Louise ( Woodruff ) 


488 


62 


Lynn Dixon 


486 




Photo 


97 




History 


99 




"Our home on the hill" 


100 




Family Photo 


98 




Home Photo 


98 




Brickerhaven Home 


98 


623 


Lynn Anne ( Richards ) 


486 


6 


Maria Louise Dixon 


485 




Photo 


5 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


7 


12. 21 


Mary Lou Dixon 


504 


61 w 


Maurine Goodridge 


485 




Photo 


89 


6418 


Megan 


488 


613 


Nancy ( Stewart ) 


485 


633 w 


Nancy Lee Tanner 


487 


6416 


Nicole 


488 


67 


Orson Kenneth 


489 




Photo 


329 




History 


331 




Home Photo 


330 




Brickerhaven 


330 


633 


Paul Scott 


487 


6334 


Paul Scott, Jr. 


487 


6443 


Phillip David 


488 


64111 


Rachel 


488 



537 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



1, JJ , XNO 




Page 


T TA TVT 

I.D. No. 




Page 




T* A "V T /"MD 
i A I IjiJK 








Id, C.L 5 


Kichard r loyd 


504 


1 3 . Z3 


Gary Mont 


509 


68 


Ruth Elaine ( Kartchner ) 


490 


1 3. Z3 w 


Jolene Robb 


509 


63Z2 


Scott Hoen 


487 


1 3. Z4 


Kathleen ( Yorgason ) 


509 


Cl 51 


ocott Kichardson 


504 


1 ^ 9 9 

13. Z3Z 


Mark Allen 


509 


I C.1 LC, 


O J T _ _ 

otacey Juee 


C A >4 

504 


1 1 99 
1 3 . ZZ 


Norma Jean ( Johnson ) 


509 


La -a 


Stephen Kroge 


A O G 

488 


1 3 . Z34 


Stacey 


509 


D4 J 1 


Ste phen Kroge , Jr. 


A O O 

488 




TArAVTriTTTrT T> 
W/VJS.lljr liLil-iU 




/. "5 "7 

d3Z7 


oteven Hoen 


487 


1 1 9 i« 
1 1 Z h 


Alan rsiaine 


494 


d3Z. 10 


bus an 


487 


8 1 1 Z 


Beverly Ann Boshard 


494 


6323 


1 en 


487 


8 1 1 Z 1 


Lori Ann 


494 




Thomas 


A O C 


oil 99 
oil. ^Z 


Xviicnelle 


494 


La. 1 9 


Thomas Green 


4oO 


Q 1 1 9 1 
1 1 


ocott 


A C\A 
494 


6328 


Thomas Hoen 






W AKIN J1,K 




6332 


Wayne Tanner 


487 


000 


Mary Ann Kartchner 


490 


6432 


William Oliver 


488 


A 1-1 

000 n 


Steven Lane 


Ann 
490 




TEGEDER 






WAT TTR X/f A TM 




82111 


Andrew Robert 


494 


aL ^ "i. 

4D 1 J 


Bradley James 


A A 

4o4 


821 1 h 


Robert William 


494 


AL 1 1 
40 1 1 


uaviu kjien 


A A 

484 


821 1 2 


Troy Dixon 


494 


4d 1 n 


Olen 


A A 

484 


821 1 


Wendy Lee bimmons 


494 


AL^ 7 

401^ 


Michael Curtis 


A A 

4o4 




1 EMPEoT 




4D 1 


^^iriam Harding 


4o4 


12. 313 


Daniel Dixon 


505 




W XL, A V iL,X\ 




1 2. 3 1 


Diane Dixon 


505 


19 1 1 9 K 

1 ^. i 1 c n 


David Gary 


K (\A 
D U4 


IZ. 31 h 


T ,^1 T T _ _ T T T 

John Henry 111 


505 


19 1191 


i^uBiin jjaviu 




12. 312 


Stephen Dixon 


505 


19 119 

1 c, lie. 


Lynda Ann Lowe 


bU4 


12. 311 


Terri Lynn ( Williams ) 


505 




WELLIInCj 




12. 314 


William Henry 


505 


cl cl 1 


Bart Harrison 


A ^ 

478 




TURNER 




9 1917 


Cassandra Ann 


A ^ 

478 


10. 14 


Annette Ririe 


499 


9191 Vi 


uaviu i\oDert 


A 

478 


lU. i4Z 


Keed Martin 


499 


9191 


j-iinaa j-iuciiie narrison 


478 


1 A 1 it ^ 

10. 144 


Rhett Marshall 


499 


9 19 19 


Mathew Dean 


478 


1 A 1 il C 

10. 145 


Rick Mathew 


499 








1 A 1 il 1 

10. 141 


Robert Morris 


499 


IK 11 


Audrey Lorraine 


516 


10. 14 h 


Ronald Morris 


499 


1 3 . 1 Z3 1 


Christine Marie 


516 


10. 143 


Ryan Michael 


499 


1 C 19 9 

lb. 1 ZZ 


Denise Irene ( Rowley ) 


516 




i Y LER 




IK 19 
1 3 . 1 6 


Donald Lynn 


5 1 D 


Do 1 Z 


Daniel Kartchner 


490 




"Our conversion to the 




Do 1 J 


J ennilynn 


490 




Mormon Church" 


990 

ZZZ 


Del 


Linda ivartcnner 


490 


1 C 19 9 

13. 1 Z3 


Donald Lynn, Jr. 


516 


681 1 


Michael 


490 


15. h 


George Washington 


516 


6814 


Ruth Ann 


490 




Very Brief Lite bketch 


218 


781 h 


bteven L, 


490 


15. 


Harriet Amelia Dixon 


516 




TATA FA TT^ 

WADE 






Very Brief Life bketch 


•510 

Z 1 8 


I Z. 4Z 


rSarbara liallii 


506 


1 C 1 9 Q 

1 D . 1 Z3 


' Helen Kae Neilsen 


bib 


I z, 4Z n 


r&iaine 


506 


1 C 1 9 ..t 

lb, 1 Z w 


Jackie Jean Ricks 


CIA 

bib 


1 9 49'? 


Daniel George 


506 


IK 1 

1 b . 1 


Lynn Dixon 


K 1 A 
b 1 D 


12.421 


David Kenneth Olson 


506 




Photo 


219 


12.4211 


Kristalyn 


506 




bhort History 


9 9 1 

ZZl 


12.421 w Lynne Harris 


506 




Family Photo 


9 9 A 
ZZO 


12.422 


Pamela Olson 


506 


15. 1 w 


Mabel Xvlay Hansen ^r-noxo; 


9 1 Q 
Zl V 




WAGSTAFF 




1 C 19 1 

lb. 1 Zl 


Susan Lynne ( McKibben ) 


K 1 A 


13. 2 


Aft on Dixon 


508 


15. 1 Z w 


Winifred Marie Marker 


K 1 A 
b 1 D 




Photo 


203 




WILDER 






History 


205 


13. 1223 


Connie 


C A 

508 




Family Photo 


204 


13. 122 


Pauline Dixon 


508 




Home Photo 


204 


13. 122 h 


Thomas C. 


508 


13. 233 


Brenda Ann 


509 




WILLIAMS 




13. 231 


Cindi Rae 


509 


19 711 V. 

1^.311 n 


Brooke S, 


C A C 

bUb 


13. 2 h 


Dermont W. 


508 


12 311 


T"** TTT T .Vim T^TTi ^1" 
J. c X X 1 J-J y xxxx X ^ xxxL^w 1* 


DKJD 




Photo 


203 








13. 21 


Donna Mae ( Olson ) 


508 









538 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 


Page 


I.D. No. 




Page 




WIGGINS 






VAKSINICK 




21161 


Bradford Jay 


477 


73112 


April Ann 


491 


2116 h 


Jay Brad 


477 


7311 h 


Kurt R. 


491 


2116 


Phyllis Anita Shaw 


477 


73111 


Rudolph Kurt 


491 




WITTE 




7311 


Terri Mae Dixon 


491 


73311 


Crystal Star 


492 




YORGASON 




7331 


Kellie Jean Elliott 


492 


13. 24 h 


Blaine M 


509 


7331 h 


Wesley Taylor 


492 


13. 245 


Daniel Gayle 


509 




WOOD 




13. 244 


David Travis 


509 


6342 


Becky Lynn Woodruff 


488 


13. 24 


Kathleen Wagstaff 


509 


6342 h 


David 


488 


13. 246 


Michelle 


509 


63421 


Jenifer Lynn 


488 


13. 242 


Nathan 


509 


63422 


Trevor Martin 


488 


13. 243 


Ste ve n 


509 




WOODRUFF 




13. 241 


Tannara Lynn 


509 


6343 


Barry Clifford 


488 








6342 


Becky Lynn ( Wood ) 


488 








634 h 


Clifford A. 


488 








634 


Louise Taylor 


488 








6344 


Russell Elton 


488 








6341 


Shelly K. ( Craig ) 


488 








6345 


Taylor Jarvis 


488 








6346 


Wendy Louise 


488 









539 



i 



Autobiography of VA LERA DIXON RIRIE 



At 9:10 a.m. Sunday, August 21, 1910, as the first child of 
Charles Owen and Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead Dixon, I made my de- 
but, weighing in at 10 pounds at the family home, 295 North Fifth We st, 
Provo, Utah. Dr. Fred W. Taylor officiated. Then on October 2, 
1910, dressed in a beautiful, long, white, lacy christening dress,! was 
blessed and given the name of "VaLera" by my father in the Provo 
Third Ward. I was told I was named after a great singer or writer - 
a name my parents had seen in the newspaper and liked very much. 

Many of my pre-school years were spent in bed, recuperating 
from re-curring attacks of typhoid fever. It was not until September 
of 1917 that I entered the first grade at the Timpanogos School, which 
was just a block from my home. My teachers at the Timpanogos 
School were: Jeannie Kerr, 1st grade; Jennie Harding, 2nd grade; 
Miss Thorpe, 3rd grade; Fern Oberhansley, 4th grade; Miss Forrest, 
5th grade; Barney Hyde, 6th grade and principal. My grade school 
friends were: Edda Jones, Helen Goodridge , Dana Edwards, Lois Pen- 
rod, Donna Leavitt, and Sarah Dixon, my cousin. 

On a beautiful day, March 16, 1919,1 was baptized by Glen Banks 
and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints by Myron Crandall, Jr. at the old Provo Administration Build- 
ing, on First North and First West. My mother had made me a beau- 
tiful tan spring coat with large buttons down the front. As we were 
leaving the building, we crossed the street and on past the woolen 
Mills. As we children ran happily down the little hill on the sidewalk, 
I fell and scraped the button on my coat. The scraped button always 
reminded me of what a happy, wonderful day my baptism was. 

My mother was a delicate, particular person, very skilled in 
sewing for her family. Sometimes before a holiday she would stay up 
late to finish dresses for us girls. Ruby and I usually had dresses 
alike . 

With the birth of Virginia, June 4, 1922, our family was com- 
plete except that mother took sick with milk leg, and had to have her 
legs propped up. Girls were hired to help take care of the home. 
Other complications set in and many doctors held conferences in our 
front rooms trying to decide what to do for her. Mother's brother. 
Dr. Frank Beckstead of Nephi came to help. At one time, seven 
doctors were there. 

On August 19, 1922, I was playing outside. Ida Knudsen passed 
and asked how my mother was doing and I answered, "She's better. " 
a short time later I was told that mother had died. We children were 
rushed across the street to Aunt Rye Taylor's. I stood at her front 
room window looking at my home, crying broken heartedly. Then as 
friends came to pay their respects I impulsively told them that I would 
be twelve on August 21st. My birthday did come and I received 



251 



252 



VA LERA DIXON RIRIE 



many lovely gifts. But the next day, August 22nd, my mother was 
buried in the Provo Cemetery, following a large funeral service in the 
Provo Third Ward Chapel. Father and we children rode with Allie S. 
Coleman, in the funeral procession. It was by far the saddest funeral 
and such a tragedy, for our mother to be taken at age thirty- five, leav- 
ing father and us six small children. 

As the oldest of the six children, I tried to take care of the fam- 
ily. Virginia was but two months old and Grandmother Dixon came to 
help. Father would get up in the night to give Virginia her bottle to re- 
lieve his mother, who was then 77 years old, (She lived to be 81.) 
She taught me how to mix bread in the bread mixer even though at 12 
I had to stand on a chair to turn the mixer. I made eight loaves, plac- 
ing them in a big black pan to bake in a coal stove oven, before going 
to school. With homemade bread, the vegetable and fruit father grew 
so well, some pigs and cows, we were kept busy and had plenty to eat. 
In order to vary the menu, I would run to Aunt Rene's or Aunt Rye's 
to ask how to cook something different for our meals. 

When I graduated from the ninth grade at the Central Junior High 
School in 1926, my Grandmother Beckstead presented me with a beauti- 
ful Elgin white gold, oblong wrist watch. How pleased and proud I was. 

In 1929, I graduated from the Provo High School, wearing the 
pale, blue graduating dres s I had made in my domestic art sewing class. 
This same year I graduated from Seminary. J. A. Washburn had been 
my Seminary Teacher. I had been active in the Dramatic Art Club, the 
Home Economics Club and Opera. 

I spent the summer of 1929 working at Provona Beach Resort, 
owned by Uncle Art Taylor, and managed by Clarence Taylor at Utah 
Lake. They had swimming and boating facilities and a picnic area. 
I worked fixing sandwiches, soft drinks, ice cream, etc. I earned 
$100. 00, $89.50 of which I spent for a year's tuition at Brigham Young 
University and the balance of $10.50 was used for material to make 
clothes for school. 

In the fall of 1930, the beginning of my sophmore year , the B. Y , U. 
football team went to Salti Laka-^City to play the University of Utah. A. 
group of B. Y. U. student body paraded down Main Street in Salt Lake 
and up to the game at U. of U. stadium. As I walked along with the 
group, a good-looking fellow came up beside me and we talked as we 
walked along. As we passed the theater, he looked up and said, "Oh, 
I saw that show in France", I looked at him in disbelief. Martin C. 
Ririe from Lewiston, Utah, had made an impression! He had gone to 
the 1929 World Boy Scout Jamboree in England. Now he was staying 
with his sister on Tenth West in the Provo Pioneer Ward. We saw 
each other often after our first meeting, sometimes at the Heber J, 
Grant Library, and he would carry my books. He was so loaded down 
it's a wonder he made it on those long blocks to the "Y"(About a mile 
each way. ) 



VA LERA DIXON RIRIE 



253 



June 3, 1931, I graduated from Brigham Young University with 
a Normal Diploma and a State of Utah First Class Certificate, effect- 
ive July 27, 1931, authorizing me to teach in the Grammar and Prim- 
ary grades of the Public Schools of Utah until June 30, 1936. 

That summer, Martin gave me a birthday dinner party at his 
Mother's home in Lewiston. It was such a lovely and memorable 
affair. Soon after he received his mission call to Czecholovakia. 

In February 1932, I commenced teaching at the Maeser School 
First Grade. During the next year I taught the Second Grade, and the 
following year the Third Grade. 

During June and July 1934, Ernest Paxman and his wife. Norma 
Jensen, Florence Jones, and a teacher from Brigham City, and my- 
self, went on a trip to the Chicago World's Fair and on to New York, 
Hill Cumorah, Joseph Smith's home and the Sacred Grove. The feel- 
ing at the Grove is so quiet, peaceful, sacred and unforgetable. We 
all had a wonderful time. 

During April Conference time, 1935 at Aunt Golda's in Salt Lake 
City, Martin having returned from his mission in December, presented 
me with a diamond ring. (Instead of touring Europe, he had bought this 
ring for me). We were married June 4, 1935, in the Salt Lake Temple 
by President George F, Richards. I wore Mother's wedding dress of 
white silk with fine lace insertions down the front. Immediately follow- 
ing the ceremony, a lady came up and kissed me, then disappeared, I 
asked others if they saw her and no one had. I have always felt it was 
my mother who had died thirteen years previously. Our honeymoon 
was spent on a lovely trip through Southern Utah. 

Upon our return to Provo, we were given a lovely Trousseau tea 
and reception at the family home on Fifth West. I had a lot of lovely 
clothes to show and lovely embroidery hand work which Martin brought 
home from his mission in Czechoslovakia. 

We spent the summer in a small apartment in the upstairs of the 
Ririe home on the farm at Lewiston, 

In September I received a call from Superintendent Aldous Dixon 
asking me to return to the Maeser School and teach. After talking it 
over, Martin decided to return to school, so we moved to Provo. My 
teaching job lasted a month, then I substituted in other schools. 

On April 2, 1936, our first child, Dixon Farrell, was born in the 
Crane Maternity Home, He weighed 91bs. 6 oz. We selected sur- 
names Dixon for my family and Farrell for Martin's mother's maiden 
name , 

For nearly a year, until the newspaper strike of 1938, we lived 
in Portland, where Martin was working with the Portland Oregon 
Journal. We returned to the Lewiston farm on March 6, 1938. I was 
sustained as a member of the Benson Stake Primary Board in Sept- 
ember of 1938. Martin was in the Benson Stake Sunday School Super- 
intendency. 



254 



VA LERA DIXON RIRIE 



President Roosevelt declared Thanksgiving Day to be observed 
on the Third Thursday of November, 1939. Our second child, whom we 
named Richard Owen, chose this day for his birth at Jennie Bergeson 
Maternity Home. About this same time, Martin received his United 
States Citizenship, having been born in Canada. 

In order to complete residency requirements for graduation, it 
was necessary for Martin to return to the B. Y, U, forgone quarter 
in order to graduate. We returned to Provo in September, 1941. Here 
we were when the electrifying news of the Pearl Harbor bombing oc- 
curred. Martin completed requirements for graduation at the close of 
the fall quarter, and obtained employment with the Uo S. Government 
at Hill Air Force Base at Ogden, Utah. 

In the spring of 1942, I was asked to take Dorothy Dixon's class 
at Polk Elementary School in Ogden, when she married and left for the 
East with her husband. I taught for seven weeks until school was out. 

Tragedy once again came into my life with the death of my father 
March 3, 1 943. He had taken a walk on a cold wintry night, lost his 
way, and was found two days later lying in the snow asleep, never to 
awaken. Although my brother, Owen, was in Michigan in the Army, he 
was allowed to come home for the funeral March 1 1, 1943, 

About a month later, I took Farrell and Richard with me to Lew- 
iston, to prepare for the arrival of our third child, Craig Martin, on 
April 17, 1943, at the Bergeson Maternity Home. Martin's folks looked 
after Farrell and Richard while I was confined. 

Having out- grown the basement apartment on Eccles Avenue, we 
moved to South Ogden into our first new home in the Spring of 1944, 
at 142 Country Club Drive. 

In August 1945s I once again took the children and travelled to 
Lewiston to await the arrival of our fourth child. Finally on the 17th 
to my great joy, a little girl was privileged to become a member of 
our household, Martin visited us on week ends while working for the 
Ogden News Company, We could hardly believe that we finally had a 
little daughter to assign the name of Annette to --we had been saving 
the name since Richard arrived and finally had a chance to make use 
of it. The whole country celebrated with dancing in the streets and 
cheering and shouting with great relief- -it being "VJ" day when Japan 
finally capitulated at the close of World War II, Of course we all cel- 
ebrated too. 

Having served what we thought was an apprenticeship in the mag- 
azine business, we took an opportunity to move to Price, Utah to open- 
an agency of our own. We bought a home at 388 North 5th East. We 
ran the Ririe News Agency, distributing magazines and newspapers to 
retail dealers all over Carbon County. It was nice to be our own boss. 
But we had to work hard. We were active in the ward, Martin was 
selected to teach Seminary in Junior High School and I substituted in 



VA LERA DIXON RIRIE 



255 



the grade schools. We enjoyed getting acquainted with Ethel and Elton 
Taylor (my cousin) who was President of Carbon L. D.S. Stake. 

During the summer of 1951 I returned to B.Y.U. for special in- 
struction during summer School in preparation for teaching school in 
Wellington, Utah. I taught until November 1951. 

On March 24, 195 2, our fifth and final child, Kent Hyrum arrived. 
Martin's cousin, Carl Brockbank was the attending doctor in the Price, 
Utah, Hospital. 

At the close of school in May 1952, the coal strike in Carbon 
County forced us out of business, and we moved back to Ogden, Utah. 

While serving as counselor of the Relief Society in the Ogden 
48th Ward, on its first year birthday, I decorated a big sheet cake, 
carved in the shape of the Chapel with one candle on the chimney. It 
was a sensation among ward members. 

During our vacation of 1955, we travelled down the coast of Cal- 
ifornia from Sacramento, stopping at all Government installations 
along the way, seeking a chance to transfer from Hill Air Force Base, 
When we reached Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino, an open- 
ing there appealed to Martin, so in October, 1955, we moved to 1203 
West Marshall Blvd. , San Bernardino, California, where we have 
lived ever since. 

As a family we attended the dedication of the Los Angele s Temple 
in March of 1956 which was a marvelous experience for all of us. 

In September, 1956, we returned to Utah to witness the marriage 
of our son Farrell to Monta Mae Norris in the Salt Lake Temple-- a 
joyous occasion. 

Martin and I have sung in Ward and Stake choirs wherever we 
have lived. In 1957 and 1958 I sang with the Southern California Sing- 
ing Mothers in many performances and recordings , The singing in the 
General Semi-annual Conference of October, 1958, was truly an inspir- 
ing experience, never to be forgotten. 

In 1961 Martin and I were called to serve together as San Bern- 
ardino Stake Missionaries for two years, during which time we were 
successful in bringing several persons into the Church. We both en- 
joyed this experience very much. 

Our second son, Richard, served a mission in the Southern Far 
East Mission, Hong Kong, China from March I960 to 1962, No sooner 
had Richard arrived home when our third son Craig, was called to 
serve in the Argentina Mission. 

1964 was a busy year for us. Our only daughter, Annette, had 
attended B.Y,U. on a scholarship and Richard also attended. So we 
had three at the "Y" the fall of 1963, Ronald M. Turner, from Farm- 
ington, Utah, had filled a mission in Southern California and had met 
and fallen inlove with Annette. Theybecame engaged during the spring 
and were married May 29, 1964, in the Salt Lake Temple. President 



256 



VA LERA DIXON RIRIE 



Bryan L. Bunker, Ron's former mission president performed the 
ceremony. I baked a fruit cake in San Bernardino and took it to Utah 
to decorate. A lovely reception was held in the evening in the Farm- 
ington Ward. Two weeks later a reception was held in San Bernardino 
Second Ward. I made another cake and decorated it for them. 

In April, 1964, Martin accepted a position of safety officer at 
Oxnard Air Force Base, so we moved to join Martin in Camarillo, 
California. During the year we lived there I substituted in teaching. 

In 1965 we moved back to San Bernardino, and in 1966, I was 
selected to teach "Head Start", a new program among the under-priv- 
ileged children. I taught at Jefferson in 1966, at California School 
during the summer and winter 1966-1967, and in 1968 at Lytle Creek. 
In 1969 I went to Waterman Gardens where I have been to the present. 
(I97I). It is very enjoyable and gratifying to see the progress these 
little children make, 

January 28, 1966, Craig married Barbara Warene Temple in 
the Los Angeles Temple and on July 28, 1967, Richard married Lar- 
raine Humphries in the Los Angeles Temple. I made the wedding cake 
for both weddings. 

In 1968 I was elected Captain (president) of the San Bernardino 
Camp, Daughters of the Utah Pioneers for two years. In April our 
D.U. P. Group sang at the convention, wearing Pioneer Dresses, in 
Salt Lake City. 

In April, 1971, I was honored at the Dixon Cousin Luncheon, in 
Provo. Virginia read the tribute Annette had prepared. It was a 
thrilling experience for me to be with my relatives for this occasion. 

My hobby has been baking special cookies, candies, etc. for the 
seasons, holidays and birthdays- -decorating wedding cakes, Martin's 
mother taught me this art, I not only use it for making and decorating 
cakes for the family birthdays and special occasions, but have made 
and sold a large number for friends and acquaintances who wanted 
something special for their occasion, 

I have enjoyed a happy, fulfilling life. I know I have done my 
best. I look forward to the eternities with the hope that my children 
and grandchildren will gather around me and call me Blessed, Then, 
all will have been worth all the effort put forth. 



39th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

ID. # 46 




Harding 



Family 




Judy Miriam Curtis Grace 




2545 Lynnwood Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



258 



MARY GRACE DANGERFIELD HARDING 

It was one of those clear, clean, crisp September days in 
1909, September lOth to be exact, that a baby girl was born to Alice 
and Jabez Dangerfield. Perhaps it was that September crispness and 
cleanliness, maybe generations of genes speaking all at once saying, 
"Keep it clean, keep it nice, keep it tidy." Anyway, this baby girl 
that was christened Mary Grace from the day she was born and, as you 
will see if you visit her now, kept her house, her home, and herself 
neat, clean, and sparkling. 

She grew up as most children do, playing with the neighbor- 
hood children--no "bearies" out tonight, kick the can, steal the sticks, 
etc. She had many friends and a home where she could bring them and 
there her mother, one of the kindest and most generous mothers that 
ever lived, always had time and treats for everyone. 

Across the street from the Dangerfield home was the Merry- 
go-round and other concessions operated by the Eldreds, good friends 
of the family. Of course, for Grace rides were free, and she still re- 
members how much fun it was. 

Grace's father was well known as "J.W,"and was also a kind, 
generous, and very helpful person- -with eyes that sparkled as he talk- 
ed. He was ambitious, and busy as a bee, day and night operating his 
printing business, his cafe, and his hotel. Yet he had plenty of time 
for his children, and being a child of his just naturally created a feel- 
ing of confidence, of security, of well being, and happiness. 

Each year about July 4th the Dangerfield family moved to the 
Canyon cabin in Wildwood. Here together with cousins by the dozens, 
Grace spent many a delightful summer. There was the river to swim 
in, mountains to climb, tennis , croquet and volley ball to play , evenings 
with bon-fires, refreshments and programs, and Sunday School Sunday 
mornings. They were good summers, good times and good fun always. 

Summers for Grace as she grew older also included trips to 
Salt Lake City to visit her Aunt Sarah and Uncle Mac. Once there be- 
sides the fun in Wandermere Park there was the open air train to Salt- 
aire, the trips to Lagoon, and all the fun at both places. 

Aunt Hattie West lived in California. This meant several trips 
through the desert for a visit. There were no paved roads, but a few 
days at Seal Beach and at Anaheim among the orange, nut, and grape- 
fruit groves made the miseries of the driving through the heat and the 
sand worthwhile. 

As a child, Grace developed a liking for the theatre, perhaps 
because her mother took her so many times to Salt Lake City to attend 
the stage plays at the Old Wilkes Theatre. 

Grace attended the Parker School, Provo Junior High, and the 
Provo High School. In the second grade she invited the entire class to 
her home for a surprise birthday party, the mother being the surprised 
party, and this happened again and again as the years went by. Even in 



259 



260 



GRACE DANGERFIELD HARDING 



her college days you could call around at the Dangerfield home, now 
on First East, and find lots of friends assembled. 

Along with going to school and having fun, Grace also had her 
share and more of private lessons, dance, speech, and piano, though 
it must be observed that though she did well in dance and speech, the 
piano was more an exposure than a success. How could there be time 
for practice with so many things to do? 

As for the dance, you would often see Grace and others in 
public performances, school skits, and especially each summer skip- 
ping aro\ind and twirling their scarfs at the Annual Timpanogos Hike 
evening program. 

Very vivid in Grace's memory was each year's day before 
Christmas; on this day the whole family, as planned by her mother, 
visited those not so well to do and left sacks of coal, sacks of sugar, 
clothing, and other items that make life more pleasant if they are 
around. Often her mother would return home without her coat as she 
believed someone whom shehad visited needed it more than she did. 

At Provo High Grace and her friends organized themselves as 
a group and called themselves the Zippe rettes and functioned very much 
like the Pep Club that came along later, helping out always with the 
school programs, assemblies, etc. Even today, 1980,the Zipperettes 
are still meeting. 

Grace attended the B.Y.U. graduating in 1933. It was in her 
freshman year that she met Curt, among many others. By her junior 
year she was dating Curt far more than anyone else. It was June 1, 
1934 that Curt and Grace were married in the Salt Lake City Temple. 

At this time Curt was working and living in Salt Lake so Salt 
Lake became the home for her, where she and Curt have resided for 
forty- six years, except for three years in Washington, D. C. After 
Curt retired fromhis position as Administrator of the Utah Department 
of Employment Security, he accepted an assignment in Washington D.C. 
The time spent at the nation's capital was a delightful experience. 

It was on April 8, 1939 that a new beautiful life began for 
Grace and her husband. On this day Miriam, their first child was born. 
A couple of years later, December 3, 1931, their second daughter, 
Judy Ann, was born. Miriam and Judy brought siinshine and happiness 
to their home . 

The girls grew up, as all children do, doing most of the right 
things and sometimes the trying ones. They looked cute as dolls in the 
Primary parades, Sunday School, Mutual, grade school, and high school 
with the related activities of cheer leade rs , dance , skit participations , 
etc. All these activities added their bits to the lives of the girls. 

The Harding family was a close, happy family. They played 
together, vacationed together, grew up together. Both girls spent 
many hours of their growing up years at the dance bar. When ballet 



came to Salt Lake City the girls became part of it. Many, many times 
as the Nutcracker was presented you would find Curt and Grace in the 
audience and Miriam and Judy on stage. 

Both girls graduated from the University of Utah with high 
honors and prospective husbands. By this time both girls had travel- 
ed to Europe and Hawaii and had seen many, many things. Wedding 
time was at hand and much to Grace and Curt's satisfaction, both were 
temple marriages. Miriam was married June 8, 1962 and Judy on 
December 18, 1964. 

Both girls, Miriam (now Mrs. Glenn Waterman), and Judy 
(Mrs.Lorin Pugh) settled in Salt Lake City and are enjoying their own 
lives and families as they move along life's road. 

The Hardings have seven grandchildren, all boys. Curt and 
Grace have now become Bobo and Nanny and they love it, as they love 
their grandchildren -- each filled with love being able to give it and 
receive it in never ending quantities. 

During the family years Curt served as administrator of the 
Utah Department of Employment Security. He became very active in 
the National organization, which took him to most of the States, Puerto 
Rico, Hawaii, and Europe. Grace went along on many of these trips, 
and sometimes the whole family went. All in all, the trips and con- 
ventions plus the planned family vacations afforded Grace and her 
family many enjoyable days and considerable broading experiences. 

Grace and her traveling companion, usually Allayne Summer- 
hays, made five trips to Europe, Mexico, and Canada traveling ex- 
tensively and enjoying themselves. They continued to learn more 
about other people and other countries. Allayne enjoys the theatre as 
much as Grace, so on those trips to Europe they usually spent an 
additional two weeks in London enjoying the theatre. 

Curt and Grace are now (1980) back in their home in Salt 
Lake City. Grace, who did considerable volunteer work as a Pink 
Lady at the L.D.S. Hospital, is now a volunteer hostess at the Church 
Office Building, 

Someday, perhaps, you'll find Curt and Grace a retired 
couple, but not yet. Curt now is affiliated with the National Office, 
is quite busy developing and coordinating management information 
systems dealing with the operation and management of the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Program. 



261 



Very Brief 



Life Sketch of 



JABEZ WILLIAM DANGERFIELD 



Born to Mary Ann James and Jabez Dangerfield on April 17, 1872 in 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church May 4, 1880. 
Attended Mr. Kendall's School in the old Salt Lake 11th Ward Chapel, 

through the Third Primer where he learned to read and write 

on his slate. 

At thirteen, he left school and started working. He was apprenticed 
as a printer to the Salt Lake Herald at age sixteen. 

Served as a missionary to the Samoan Islands in 1894. 

In 1898 he moved to Provo as an employee of the Grocery Job Printing 
Company and later acquired a half interest in it. 

Married Alice Smith Dixon in the Salt Lake Temple on December 5, 
1900. 

Children: 

Jabez Aldous, Royden James, Afton, Harold D. , Clifford D. , 
Mary Grace, and Donna Mae. 
From 1933 to 1949 was Provo Postmaster. 

J. W. Dangerfield's way of life was thrifty, industrious and courageous. 
Never having had a sick day in all his life, he suffered a heart attack 
and died September 26, 1949 in the Utah Valley Hospital. 



262 



40th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




263 



Harry Albert Dixon Family 






Harry, Grandson Cory, Cecile 
Margie 




72 North First East, Provo 
264 



HARRY 



ALBERT 



DIXON 



Harry Albert Dixon was born in Fairview, Utah on October 4, 
1910 to Albert Frederick and Sena Rasmussen Dixon. Sena took the 
unborn Harry from Provo to Fairview to be born because that was 
where her mother lived at the time. After a few weeks, when the two 
could travel, Harry and his mother moved back to their home in Provo, 
Utah. 

When he was five years old, Harry and his family moved to 
Spanish Fork. It was in Spanish Fork that his father, Albert, was to 
become manager of Taylor Brothers Company. There, Harry began 
his education at Reese Elementary School. When Harry began fifth 
grade, his family moved back to Provo so Albert could organize the 
Dixon Taylor Russell Company Store. Because of this move, Harry 
attended the fifth grade at Maeser Elementary School. The sixth 
grade was spent at Franklin Elementary. 

Junior and Senior High were spent in Provo. Since the "final 
move" from Spanish Fork, Harry has lived in Provo ever since. 
Harry loved school and his classmates. This love was evident in re- 
turn by his classmates' admiration for him. Harry spent his Senior 
year in High School serving his fellow students as senior class presi- 
dent. He was active in many organizations and clubs while he was in 
school. 

From the fall of 1930 to 1933, Harry labored in the French 
Mission which at that time involved Belgium, Switzerland and France. 
He served a very successful mission. His love for the French people 
and his concern for them seemed to come naturally to Harry as he 
labored to serve his Lord. 

Having fulfilled his mission in 1933, Harry returned to Provo 
to attend Brigham Young University. It was at BYU that Harry gained 
his knowledge in Business Administration/Management. 

When World War II "called" in 1941, Harry served his country 
by fighting in the army. Harry was First Sergeant in the 431st Fighter 
Squadron of the 475 Group. Harry commanded his "boys" to fight side 
by side with McArthur from New Guinea to Korea. 

When the War ended in 1943, Harry returned home and finish- 
ed his schooling at BYU. After that, he worked at Dixon Taylor Rus sell 
Company. After thirty-five years of service at DTR, Harry left and 
established on his own, Dixon Collection Agency. He currently is still 
owner-manager of this agency. 

On March 5, 1936, Harry married Cecile Clark in the Salt Lake 
Temple. They have one daughter, Margie, who was born February 19, 
1951. She married Ron Smith on May 27, 1972 in the Provo Temple. 
Harry has two grandsons--Cory Garner Smith born December 13,1974 
and Kip Dixon Smith born October 22, 1979. 

From "just talking" to Harry, one can readily see that he is 
not at all boastful -- even the "bare historical essentials" are difficult 



265 



266 



HARRY ALBERT DIXON 



to have him expound upon. One who enters Harry's home is first met 
by a magnificent display of needlepoint items --stools, chairs, bench- 
es, pillows, etc. He has been offered monetary reward many times 
for his art work and a man in the community constantly pressures him 
to co-establish a shop with him. Being so humble, it is hard for Harry 
to even admit to making these beautiful pieces of art. Due to poor 
health, though, Harry has been forced to abandon two of his most fav- 
orite hobbies, fishing and hunting. Throughout the past years, he has 
been an avid sportsman. 

From a five year old grandson's point of view, one can easily 
see how special Harry is -- he is truly one of God's very finest . . , 
When expecting our second child, we asked our first ----- 
Harry's only grandson at the time -- "What should we name 
our baby if he's a boy? Would Harry Dixon Smith be OK with 
you, Cory? " With no hesitation at all, Cory definitely stated, 
"No, that won't do, he can't be named Harry. There is only 
one Harry ! " 

And that last statement stands uncorrected -- believe five that 
know -- Cecile, Ron, Marge, Cory and now Kip --, THERE IS ONLY 
ONE HARRY ! 

Margie Dixon Smith 



Additional Historical Facts in the Life of HARRY 

Graduated from Provo High School in 1929 
Attended B Y U in 1 930, 1933 and 1934 

Class President of the Senior Class at Provo High School 
Baptized a member of the LDS Church on August 3, 1919 
In the French Mission he labored in the Herstal, Seraing and Grenoble 
Districts . 

He is a High Priest and served as Ward Clerk 

Is a member of the Provo Lions Club and Provo Chamber of Commerce 
Is a member of the American Collectors Association 
Affiliated with Mountain States Collectors 

In 1970 he became the donor of the Dixon Tennis Trophy awarded each 
year to the outstanding Lady Tennis Player at B Y U. 



41st Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 74 




HYRUM AIKELE 



267 



A ik e 1 e 



Family 




Hyrum Mary Ashlie Rebecca 




450 Apple Grove Lane 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 



268 



HISTORY OF MARY DIXON AIKELE 



On January 23, 1911 a baby girl was born to William Aldous and 
Hattie Hands Dixon. This was the second girl to be born to the family. 

She was born on a ranch, belonging to Uncle George West, just 
out of San Bernardino, California. The town is now known as Colton. 

Mary was blessed March 27, 1911 by David R. Taylor. She was 
baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 
May 18, 1919, by David L. Van Wagenen. She was confirmed by John 
C. Swensen in the Provo Third Ward, located at the corner of Fifth 
West and First North, the same day. 

Mary received her education in the old Timpanogos School and 
the old Parker School. The Timpanogos School was too crowded for 
one of her grades and she had to attend the Parker School, located on 
the corner of Second North and First East. She attended the Central 
Junior High School and Provo Senior High School. 

Mary was always on the go, loved people and knew everyone. 
She especially loved babies and would do the dishes and tend the babies 
for only twenty- five cents an hour. She loved to dance and was very 
active in the Provo Third Ward M.I. A. She was the chairman of the 
Dance Committee and was always planning dances. When she was 
small they gave her the name of "chatterbox" because she was constant- 
ly talking and laughing. 

Her father once offered her some money if she could sit still for 
five minutes without saying a word. After a few minutes she said, 
"I'd sooner talk than have the money". 

After Mary finished high school in 1930, she and three of her 
girl friends went to California to look for work. She had some inter- 
esting jobs working as a waitress. She worked at the Santa Anita race 
track, the San Diego 1935 Fair, and several first class restaurants. 
She made good tips because she loved people and was blessed with the 
"Dixon Gab". 

In 1933 she was on a vacation at Provo and met Hyrum Aikele 
from Logan, Utah. He was working in Provo at that time, as a West- 
ern Union Office Manager, They met at the Utahna Dance Hall. It 
wasn't "love at first sight". She thought he was conceited, but after 
only a few dates, they soon fell in love. 

They were married June 10, 1937. Bishop Arthur D, Taylor per- 
formed the marriage ceremony. He was Mary's cousin and a very 
special person to her. They were married at the home of Mary's 
sister, Vesta, located at 386 North Fifth West in Provo. It was a 
small wedding with family and a few close friends. A dear friend of 
Mary's, Joe Dinner, came from California. The wedding wasn't the 
happy affair it should have been as her father was very ill at the time. 
Mary wanted to postpone the wedding, but it was her father's desire 
that they go through with it on the day planned. Almost the last thing 



269 



270 



MARY DIXON AIKELE 



he talked about was for Mary to go through with the wedding. He died 
two days later. 

The Aikele's moved to Salt Lake City where Hy worked for the 
Mountain States Telephone Connpany as Head Clerk and Telegrapher. 
On March 21, 1938 her first child was born, a boy whom they named 
Hyrum D. Aikele. He died a few minutes after birth. This was quite 
a blow to Mary at the time. She wanted a baby so bad, it took her a 
long time to get over it. 

They later moved to North Hollywood, California where Hyrum 
was transferred to the Bell Telephone, They lived there for about one 
year. Hy was transferred to Los Angeles where he was promoted to 
Supe rvision. 

On February 28, 1941 Mary gave birth to a son, William Eugene 
(Bill) Aikele. Her happiness was complete. On January 30, 1944 
along came a beautiful baby girl, whom she named Bonnie Ann Aikele. 

Mary's husband, Hy, worked for twenty-one years for the Bell 
System. In 1957 they moved to Santa Barbara, Calif. , where they 
bought a lovely home. Bill and Bonnie finished high school in Santa 
Barbara and both went to college. 

Bill went to Europe in 1961 and met Irene Svenssen in Copenhagen, 
Denmark. She was a beautiful blond Swedish girl. They fell in love 
and were married May 27, 1963. They moved to Frankfurt, Germany 
where she gave birth to her first child, September 2, 1965, a boy Erik 
Alan Aikele. When Erik was three months old they moved to Santa 
Barbara, California. On May 14, 1969, a baby girl was born to them, 
Shanti Maja Aikele. They lived in Santa Barbarafor eight years, then 
moved back to Sweden. On July 17, 1976, a baby girl was born to 
them, Allena Naomi. They now live in Sollentuna, a suburb of Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

When Bonnie was in her first year at college, she met and fell 
in love with Clayton Judson Cornish the Third. They were married 
September 8, 1962. Bonnie gave birth to a beautiful baby girl on 
March 20, 1964 in Santa Barbara, California. They named her Rebec- 
ca Lynn Cornish. On June 28, 1967 another girl was born to them, 
Ashlie Melissa Cornish. 

A year later tragedy struck Bonnie's husband, (Duke) his nick- 
name, was killed December 19, 1968 in an automobile accident. He 
was on a new job, his first day, in Simi, Calif. , a town about sixty 
miles from Santa Barbara towards Los Angeles. He was on his way 
home and hit the steel upright in front of a railroad semaphore on a 
"S" turn in the highway and was killed outright. Bonnie was spending 
the night with her mother in Santa Barbara, when she heard the news 
of Duke's death. She went into a deep depression and never fully re- 
covered. He was only twenty- five years of age and was buried on the 
day before Christmas, December 24th. 



MARY DIXON AIKELE 



271 



Rebecca was four years old and Ashlie was one at the death of 
Duke. Thereafter, Bonnie was never the same. She lost her will to 
live. They had a beautiful marriage and was so in love. Mary did 
everything to help Bonnie. On April 28, 1973 Bonnie passed away. 
She was just twenty-nine years old, Rebecca nine years old and Ashlie 
six years old. They both loved their mother very much and was very 
close to her. It was a great shock and loss to the children as well as 
to Mary and Hy. But Mary had to be strong for the sake of the girls. 
God gave her inner strength and blessed her with good health so she 
could bring up these two beautiful children who were left orphans. She 
knew she had a purpose in life and a job to do in raising these children. 
They are such a blessing and a joy to both Mary and Hy. 

They are good girls, both attend Church regularly. Rebecca has 
a perfect record in attendance in Seminary. They both have been 
baptized for the dead. They are soon going to the Temple and be seal- 
ed to their parents. Their father was a Catholic. They put his name 
in the Temple to be baptized. They are very well adjusted and happy 
girls. I'm proud of them, they know someday they will be together 
again with their parents. They have that to look forward to. 

Rebecca will be in the eleventh grade at school next year. Her 
plans are to go to the B. Y.U. to college. Ashlie will be in the eighth 
grade. She also plans on college at the B.Y.U. 

We have all accepted Bonnie and Duke's deaths. Mary thanks 
God for these two beautiful girls that have come to share her life and 
for Bill and his family, who she don't see very often. 

Mary worked for years in Primary, teaching the four year olds 
(Star B) and also in the Sunday School. Mary was privileged to teach 
some of the parents, twenty years ago, of the children she now teaches. 
She is also a visiting teacher in the Relief Society. 



Mary Dixon Aikele 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 

ID # 7 

Born in Provo, Utah, April 21, 1873 to Mary Ann Smith and Henry 
Aldous Dixon. 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church in July 1881. 
Married Harriet Hands in Provo, Utah on December 15, 1904. 
Children: 

William Hands, Vesta, Glen H., Mary, Fay Harriet, George. 
His schooling was at the B.Y. Academy and Provo Schools up to and 

including the 6th grade. 
His early life handicapped by poor health, forced him to move several 

times. 

Worked on the construction of the first high tension power line from 
the power plant in Provo Canyon to Mercur mining camp. 
Long time employee of Utah Power and Light Co. 

Hobbies were fishing and hunting and the raising of flowers. 

Died on June 22, 1937 at Provo, Utah. Age 64. 



272 



42nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




273 




Brickerhaven 



1436 East 1300 South 
Salt Lake City, Utah 




274 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF 



SARAH VERA DIXON SUMMERHAYS 

On March 23, 19H, in the city of Provo, Utah County, Utah, I 
was privileged to become the fourth child and second daughter of 
Electa La Prele Smoot Dixon and LeRoy Dixon. Statistics show I was 
the largest of their eight children; weighing in at a husky ten pounds. 

At the age of two years I was stricken with a severe case of 
Polio. Through faith, prayers and the Priesthood administration, a 
miraculous healing took place, leaving only my right leg and lower 
back affected. Throughout my life, my parents gave constant care, 
love and encouragement; always reminding me, as a child, that "Jesus 
was my doctor". Faith and testimony were constant reminders of my 
many blessings. 

Lack of participation in activities never seemed to be a part of 
my life. Crutches, braces, tricycles and later bicycles and, occas- 
ional use of the family car enabled me to be active in many areas. 
My father was a strong swimmer and an avid participant in tennis and 
handball. He taught me to swim and later had me take swimming 
therapy from Professor Earl Leaf, who had accomplished great things 
with weak muscles. 

As I grew older, Dad would take me to the Knight Woolen Mills 
Tennis Courts to play tennis with He taught me to serve "like a 

man". This proved a great asset when I entered small tournaments 
a few years later. Tennis and swimming became an important part 
of my physical growth and confidence. 

We were always a close-knit family, full of fun and love for 
another. Our summers at Wildwood, Provo Canyon were very special 
times in our lives; times of "rexinioning" with cousins, uncles, aunts 
and grandmothers. (Our grandfathers had both passed away early in 
life. ) Memories of bonfire parties, swimming in Provo River, hiking 
the trails and blazing "new trails", gathering aroiind the fireplace to 
hear stories and exchange problems, pleasures, experiences ... all 
fill my mind with happiness. Jobs and work were very important in 
our lives also. Picking berries, tending children, weeding gardens, 
bringing the cows home, feeding chickens, learning to mend, sew, 
cook and clean were all a part of our growing up. In our teens we had 
occasional jobs at the Court House, Chamber of Commerce; and we 
loved folding statements at the end of the month at the Farmers and 
Merchants Bank. In my Sophmore year in college, I also worked in 
the advertising area of a ladies clothing store. 

Sharing these important growing up years were three very spec- 
ial English "sisters": Aunt Lizzie (Eliza Ann Clarkson), Aunt Lily 
(Lily Owens Bushman, sister to Aunt Lizzie), and Aunt Elsie Ross 
Whittaker, They had known Daddy when he served as a missionary to 
England. As many other English folks had made our home "headquart- 
ers" until they got settled in a home of their own; so did these "sisters" 



275 



276 



SARAH DIXON SUMMERHAYS 



However, they lived with us all during my life at home, until they 
eventually married. Aunt Lizzie stayed on with mother for many years, 
eventually moving to Mesa, Arizona to live with her sister. Also liv- 
ing with us most of my life was dear little Grandma Dixon. We loved 
her very much and thought it a great treat to be invited into "Grandma's 
Room" to visit with her, share some candy from the Christmas before, 
or hear about all the pretty dishes on her "sideboard" and find out who 
all the pictures represented. Her feather bed was the most fun. What 
sport it was to run and jump in the middle of it! Her name was Sarah 
DeGrey Dixon. ( I was named for her.) Eventually, at the age of 81 
years, Grandma died in the same little bedroom at "418" (our home 
address was always referred to as "41 8") North on Fifth West, Provo. 

Always thinking of ways to help me be unconscious of my "awk- 
wardness", my folks encouraged me to take part in speech and drama 
activities. This area of involvement became a happy part of my "grow- 
ing up years". Books, poetry, music, etc, influenced my life greatly 
and brought much joy to me. 

At the age of twelve years, I had my patriarchal blessing from 
Joseph B. Keeler. In that wonderful blessing was given a promise 
that "my board would be surrounded by my posterity". Not fully under- 
standing the meaning of those terms, my mother explained to me that 
it meant I would have a "family"! (At the time I was so critically ill 
with Polio, the doctors had questioned any possibility of my bearing 
children.) Mother was so overjoyed she shed tears as she explained 
it all to me. Later, that promise was fulfilled with the birth of five 
lovely children. And eventually, having them with their children 
(and their children) "surround my board". 

School and Church were sources of real joy to me. Timpanogos 
Grade School, Provo City Junior High School, B. Y. U. High School 
and two years at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah; greatly 
shaped my life. Student body offices, participation in plays; choice 
associations with teachers as well as students made them very re- 
warding years. I had always vowed I would graduate from college, 
but in my second year, serving as Sophmore Class Vice President, I 
fell in love with the Sophmore Class President, Clyde Johnson Sum- 
merhays. The following October Fourth, 1931, we were married in 
the Salt Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints by David O. McKay, then acting as an apostle. 

Depression years marked this era, but despite lean years, we 
never knew anything but happiness and promise for the future. Work 
took us to California. Here Clyde also took extension courses from 
the University of California in Berkeley, California. Our first homes 
were in Oakland and Berkeley, California. We loved it here and 
fo\ind fulfillment for almost twelve years. In our first year, the 
promise of my "blessing" came true. We were parents of a beautiful 
baby girl. My husband named her Sarah, but she has always been 
known as "Sally", Four years later we were blessed with a handsome 



SARAH DIXON SUMMERHAYS 



277 



son, Clyde Dixon Summerhays. We truly felt the Lord was blessing us. 

During much of this time we were privileged to have Grandma 
Hilda Johnson Summerhays live with us. Although crippled with poor 
health, she was an inspiration to us all and we loved her dearly. 

We had some wonderful years in California. Church and bus- 
iness activities kept us very busy, Clyde served five years as coun- 
selor to President Eugene Hilton of the Oakland Stake Presidency. 
Clyde was 31 years of age when he was ordained a High Priest and 
called to the Stake Presidency. While in Oakland, Clyde was also 
fortunate in the business world; receiving an assignment from his 
company to act as General Agent in Boise, Idaho. (Beneficial Life 
Insurance Company), 

During our last years in Oakland, my mother. Electa Smoot 
Dixon, passed away after having spent a week with each of her child- 
ren prior to Christmas. Such a special visit with her we enjoyed. 
She died Christmas night of 1940, What an example of love, unselfish 
service and devotion she was to all of us. My father, LeRoy Dixon, 
had died December 28, 1926 at the early age of 45 years. 

Our move to Boise, Idaho resulted in choice new friends , church, 
civic and school responsibilities, and best of all, our third child, 
Diana.was born to us. After two brief years in Boise, Clyde was call- 
ed to the Home Office in Salt Lake City, Utah. Here he was appointed 
Superintendent of Agents, He eventually became Vice-president in 
charge of marketing, advertising, etc. He held the position of Vice- 
president until his retirement in July 1970. 

With our arrival in Salt Lake City, Utah, many new opportunities 
opened up. One of the first matters of business was to check on our 
Provo Canyon lot at Brickerhaven. Finding it still secure, we happily 
settled into our new life. Church activities involved us from the be- 
ginning. Many assignments came to Clyde, among which were Stake 
High Councilman, Bishop, President of the Ireland Mission, Counsel- 
or in the Temple Square Mission Presidency. Among assignments 
coming to me were stake and ward aiixiliary positions, five years on 
the Y. W.M.I. A. General Board, four years as Mission Mother in the 
Ireland Mission, and now Inservice Leader and Visiting Teacher. 
Recently I was called and set apart as a Hostess in the Visitor's 
Center on Temple Square, My companion and I were the first hostesses 
to officiate in the new program. It is a wonderful calling. We meet 
people from all over the world and realize what an important mission- 
ary tool the Visitors' Center is. 

Many choice experiences, opportunities, challenges and friends 
blessed our lives. Clyde's business contacts and assignments brought 
opportunities for travel and close association with many church and 
business leaders. After serving Beneficial Life Insurance Company 
for thirty- five years, he retired in 1970, when we were called to pre- 
side over the Ireland Mission with headquarters in Belfast, Northern 
Ireland. Our mission included all of Ireland and the Isle of Man. 



278 



SARAH DIXON SUMMERHAYS 



Within five years of our move to Salt Lake City, Utah, we were 
overjoyed to have a second son, Michael Dixon Summerhays , born to 
us. Three years later, our final child was born and given the name of 
Sandra (but called "Sandy" because of her beautiful red hair). Some 
complications accompanied the arrival of our babies and we felt the 
Lord really watched over us in the fulfillment of that promise given so 
long ago in my patriarchal blessing. Surely, our "posterity does 
surround our board"! At this date (March 1976) our eldest daughter, 
"Sally" and her husband Raymond George Anderson are living in Afton, 
Wyoming (beautiful Star Valley). They have eleven wonderful children 
and expect number twelve in July. They also have two grandchildren 
(our great grandchildren). Our eldest son, Clyde, is yet unmarried. 
He lives an interesting life filled with hobbies, cars, animals, loves 
hunting, photography, music, etc. He is Executive Secretary of the 
Intermountain Sjwxck Exchange in Salt Lake City. Our third child, 
Diana, married Daniel W, Graham. They are in Athens, Greece on a 
fellowship in Classical Studies, They are tremendous students and 
fill a vital need in church service wherever they are. Michael Dixon 
Summerhays married Janice Allen and they have two children, "Mike" 
graduated from the B, Y. U, in 1975 and is working in the financial 
department of the Church in Salt Lake City, Utah Sandra, our young- 
est, married Frank Lee Pitcher. They are completing their final 
year in the dental school at Northwestern University in Chicago. They 
have two living little girls, having lost a premature baby boy. They 
are expecting a fourth child in September 1976. Our "posterity" is 
just beginning. We are most grateful for our countless blessings and 
our wonderful children. 

Having returned from four years in the Ireland Mission, we are 
now caught up in many areas of responsibility and joy. There has 
never been time to "retire"! Being with our family is happiness be- 
yond expression. Each summer brings very special reunions of family 
and friends at beloved Brickerhaven in Provo Canyon. It is truly a 
gathering place for loved ones. Our prayer is that our children and 
their children will always find joy in staying close to one another. May 
they take their responsibilities in carrying on the great traditions of 
the family in past years and create new areas of their own traditions 
and achievements that will result in close family love and happinesss. 



A SPECIAL WITNESS TO THE POWER OF THE PRIESTHOOD 

Sarah Dixon Summerhays 

As far back as my memory goes, a vivid, wonderful story lives 
for me. From my childhood my parents instilled in me a gratitude for 
life itself; for the power of the priesthood, for the special gift of being 
able to move and walk, of having children, of living a life of service 
to our fellowmen and our Heavenly Father. May I share the story with 
you, as it was told to me throughout my life? 

The time was cherry- canning time (cherry- "feasting" time for 
me at the tender age of two years, ) Father had taken me out of a busy 
kitchen, where I had become a nuisance stuffing myself with the lusc- 
ious fruit. He carried me atop his broad shoulders out into the sun- 
shine, where he put me down. Across the pastures and gardens we 
went, with me sometimes walking, sometimes being carried, or 
"riding" as I knew it then. Having been a husky, healthy child, I walk- 
ed a good part of the way. 

Returning, however, was a different story. I kept falling down, 
stumbling and complaining. Daddy lifted me again to his shoulders. 
Realizing I was not well, he hurried home. At first the trouble was 
thought to be caused from eating too many cherries. But my temper- 
ature rose at an alarming rate. The doctor was called. Other doctors 
were also consulted. It proved to be Polio! 

At the time I was stricken, several other persons living inProvo 
and Springville, Utah were also afflicted. Many died in this epidemic 
from the effects of the dread disease about which so very little was 
known at that time. Of the remaining cases, I was considered to be 
one of the most seriously afflicted. Everything was done that could be 
done. Several doctors were in consultation, among whom were Dr. 
Aird and Dr. Taylor. Little hope was held for my recovery. The op- 
inions varied. "She can't last but a short time. ""If she does pull 
through, she'll be in a wheel- chair . " "It's doubtful she could ever 
have children." Apparently, my lungs were in good shape, (because I 
was crying constantly with discomfort (the abdominal organs were un- 
able to function properly and both sides were paralyzed). 

The family had fasted and prayed, sending my name into the 
Salt Lake Temple to be added to the Prayer Roll. On this particular 
evening, my father had called in a circle of elders to help him admin- 
ister to me. Two of the doctors happened to be there. They were in- 
vited to remain only if they had faith in the administration. One left, 
but Dr. Aird, who didn't belong to the L.D.S. Church, stayed. 

Mother related that she had me lying in a buggy which she wheel- 
ed into the living room. The elders gathered around me in prayer. 
During the blessing, I stopped crying! Mother said the sudden silence 
brought a little fear into her heart, and made the few minutes of the 
administration seem like an eternity! Though she had faith I would be 



279 



280 



SARAH DIXON SUMMERHAYS 



helped, she allowed fear to creep in, for a fleeting moment, that I 
could have passed away. As the prayer ended, she hurriedly bent down 
to examine me and found me able to move everything except my right 
legj She also found the pillow upon which I was lying was completely 
soaked! Comfort had been restored as the organs began to function 
again. According to my mother's story of this remarkable experience. 
Dr. Aird turned to her and said, "Some power beyond us has accom- 
plished this. " How true this was. 

From that moment on I seemed to improve in every way. One 
evening, as Father and Mother were kneeling at the bedside in prayer, 
they became aware of my moving very close to the edge of the little 
"trundle" bed they had placed in their room for me. Mother started 
to try to prevent my fall, but Father suggested she should let me alone 
and see what I could do by myself, I wriggled off the edge and stood 
for just a moment before falling to the floor. My legs had actually 
supported my weight for a short minute! Mother said she and Daddy 
both wept with joy and thanksgiving. 

Within the next few days. Daddy took me to the hospital to see 
Dr. Aird. He stood me atop Dr. Aird's desk. Again, I stood for a 
few seconds! Dr. Aird commented that it was nothing short of a 
miracle! "Dr. Taylor must see this," he said. So again I "performed" 
for Dr. Taylor. So it was that Dr. Aird called me the "little miracle 
girl" from then on. 

Months went by, filled with dedicated treatment. Long before 
the world prescribed special treatment for Polio, "doctor" Electa 
Smoot Dixon, my mom, was massaging, exercising, hot and cold pack- 
ing, etc. How well I remember the challenges from my Dad to try to 
hop, to try to stand, etc. 

When I was four years old, specialists were advising several of 
us who had been afflicted to go to St. Louis, Missouri, to a sanitarium 
for special treatment. They suggested cutting the cord above the back 
of the heel to allow the heel to rest down on the floor. Clearly do I 
remember the number of doctors there- - stretching my leg, having me 
stand, bend, pulling my leg this way and that! 

My being so young in years, Daddy and Mother both favored all- 
owing nature to take its course for a time. It was a wise decision. I 
grew strong and was able to get around with crutches and day and night 
leg braces. The braces reached from the bottom of my foot to my thigh. 
The "night" brace was much lighter, being made of white padding and 
aluminium metal. The day brace, I remeber, was steel with brown 
leather padding. I remeber the "electric vibrator" with all its differ- 
ent "heads" that would tickle and sometimes hurt my leg and the lower 
part of my back. My dear, wonderful mother literally massaged my 
leg into life! Dad was the exercise coach - - - what a team they were 



SARAH DIXON SUMMERHAYS 



281 



People marveled at my progress and would often ask, "Who is her 
doctor? " My parents had taught me to reply and to know in my own 
heart that, "Jesus is my doctor," 

From this stage I progressed to tricycles, bicycles, swimming, 
to eventually driving a car. The doctor's opinion that my ability to 
bear children would be very unlikely was also disproven. At the age 
of twelve years, I received my patriarchal blessing, which stated 
that "my posterity would surround my board". What a wonderful 
promise to be given to one who had been told she would, in all prob- 
ability, never bear children! The phrase had to be defined for me by 
my mother on our way home. She pointed out the great happiness 
that lay ahead for me _IF "I would keep the Lord's commandments 
and live worthily". 

Surely, "my cup runneth over"! The Lord has blessed me so 
abundantly . . . and for some special reason . . . not because I have 
lived perfectly ... I have many shortcomings ! But this I do know . , . 
I shall never be able to merit all the love, care, patience and devotion 
my parents and family showered upon me. My spiritually dedicated 
husband has been a great guide and help to me. He is the epitome of 
consideration and love. Together, we have been blessed with five 
wonderful children. They and their families will continue to serve 
our merciful Heavenly Father in love and trust. Many times, "my 
posterity" has and does "surround my board"! 

Life has been so very good. The Lord not only blessed me 
with wonderful parents and the choicest brothers and sisters in the 
world, but He gave me fulfillment when Clyde J. Summerhays and I 
were married for time and all eternity in the Salt Lake Temple on 
October 4, 1931. He has always been a real sweetheart in every way, 
a patient, loving husband, and a perfect father! Surely, "my cup 
runneth over" ! 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
LE ROY DIXON 



ID # 14 

Born to Sarah DeGrey and Henry Aldous Dixon in Salt Lake City, Utah 

on October 16, 1881 . 
Baptized in June 1890 by Myron Tanner . 
Confirmed in June 1890 by W. S. Gibby. 
Received his education in the Provo Public Schools. 

Married Electa LaPrele Smoot in the Salt Lake Temple on August 26, 
1903. 

Children: 

LeRoy, Paul, Allie, Sarah, Maurine, Helen, Arthur, Gladys. 
In 1898 started working for Taylor Bothers Co. 

1906 to I9O8 served a mission to Great Britain, working mostly in the 

Birmingham District. 
1909 organized the Dixon Real Estate Co. in one small room upstairs 

over the Farmers & Merchants Bank. 
Organizer and President of Provo Ice & Cold Storage Co. 
President of Blue Cliff Canal Co. and of State Realty Association. 
Secretary of Utah Land Owners Ass'n. and of South Fork Cattle Co. 
Supervisor of Skipper Bay Drainage District. 
Appraiser for Provo Building & Loan. 

Director of American Bldg. & Loan, and of Dixon Ranch Co. 
1912-1917 Provo City Commissioner. 

I9I8-I922 Mayor of Provo City, 1913-1926 Treasurer of Provo City 

Schools, 1923-1926 Member of the Utah State Senate. 
Library Board member for 12 years. 
10 years on State Municipal League, 
Member of Utah Water Storage Association. 
On executive committee of Public Health Association. 
Director of Provo Chamber of Commerce. 

Active member of Provo Tennis Club, playing on the clay courts of 

the Knight Woolen Mills. 
He was a booster of BYU and Town Sports, encouraging his own family 

and all young people to go to college and assisting many with 

finances . 

Took an interest in everything of a constructive nature. 
Died at Provo, Utah, December 28, 1926. 



282 



44th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 13.4 





Reed D. Dixon Family- 




Garth Reed Sherrie 
Tillie Mary Ann 




•299 East 3 200 North 
Provo, Utah 



284 



LIFE OF REED DANGERFIELD DIXON 



Written By His Wife Tillie 

Reed was born in Provo, Utah, August 19, 1911, the son of Parley 
and Mary Etola Dangerfield Dixon. Reed was born on his parent's 8th 
wedding anniversary. 

One of his father's favorite stories was about the day Reed was 
born. His father was working on a school building at Thistle when he 
received the news that a new son had arrived. Not wanting to wait for 
a passenger train to take him to Provo, he jumped on the first freight 
train coming down the Canyon. In his excitement to get home he lost 
his hat on the train, so he arrived in Provo hatless. 

Reed was a normal boy full of life and loving the great out-of- 
doors. As a man he still loves to camp out and fish and hunt. 

As a young boy he spent much time over to the Provo River, 
swimming, fishing and ice skating. He liked to be with the older boys 
and preferred his older brother's friends to boys of his own age. 
Anything the older boys tried, young Reed would do it right along with 
them. 

One of their favorite sports was to getup on the old iron railroad 
bridge and as the train passed under them, the boys would drop into 
the coal cars which were filled with slack coal. Another dangerous 
pastime was to get under the old Orem railroad bridge and wait for 
the one or two car electric railroad cars to appear from Salt Lake en- 
route to Payson, or vice versa. When the boys could see the train 
coming, they would stick their heads up between the railroad ties and 
see who could keep their heads up the longest before having to duck 
down and letting the train pass over them. 

Reed's family lived in the Provo Third Ward until 1919 when 
they sold their home and moved into the Provo Second Ward where he 
lived until his marriage in July, 1931. 

Reed attended his first school, the old Timp School on Fifth West. 
Later he went to the Franklin and Provo High School. 

In 1929 he quit High School and went to work "tending mason" 
for his father on a school building at Delta, Utah. That same fall he 
went to Los Angeles, California to the National Automotive and Elec- 
trical School. In June of 1930 he returned home having graduated. 
He went to work for Roy Boshard on the Dixon Jr. High School. 

After working for some time as an Electrician, Reed decided he 
would rather follow his father's trade. With the help ofhis father as a 
teacher. Reed learned to lay brick. 

Reed has always been a very good bricklayer. In 1964 he was 
given a plaque at a State Contractors and Brick Mason party held in 
Salt Lake City, engraved with the words, "Mason of the Year - - - 
Local Union No. 2, Reed Dixon". 



285 



286 



REED DANGERFIELD DDCON 



As Reed grows older and works with the younger fellows, they 
often call him, "The Old Master". At age sixty, Reed can still lay 
brick with the best of them. 

In 1929, Reed met and started going with Mary Matilda (Tillie) 
Hills. Two years later on July 28, 1931, they were married with a 
reception being held at the Grandview Church - one of the many church 
buildings Reed's father had laid the brick on. 

We were married during the depression. Work was prettyhard 
to come by. Reed got a job working on the cement hi-way near Lehi 
for $3.00 a day. He worked two weeks and saved $15,00 so we were 
married. The next week he was laid off. 

Reed's father had sold some of his property in Provo and bought 
a five-acre farm in the Grandview area, just two blocks west ofTillie's 
folks. So we moved into his old farm home and lived there the first 
four yeao-s of our married life. 

One experience we will never forget was the day Tillie drowned 
the cow. There was some nice green grass growing down by the canal, 
so she tied the cow on the bushes next to the canal and took the baby 
and walked up to her mother's place. When she came home she went 
to move the cow and it had slipped into the canal. The rope had held 
its head under the water and the cow was dead. This was a great loss 
to the Dixon family. Money was hard to come by during the depression 
and the cow had supplied milk and butter for three families. 

Our oldest child, a son, was born while we were living inGrand- 
view. We named him Reed Garth. He was born April 7, 1933. When 
he was seven months old we moved to Salt Lake for a short time. Reed 
had found a job up there, but when they found out he was from Provo, 
they laid him off. They said work was so scarce they would have to 
hire men from Salt Lake. 

While working in Salt Lake, we bought an old washer from the 
Landlord for $ 5. 00. When we moved back to Provo we rented a small 
house in Lake View and paid our first months rent with the old washer. 
Reed wired the house for electricity for the second months rent. These 
were depression days but we look back (when) they were happy days. 

Our second baby came while we were living in this house, a baby 
girl. We named her Mary Ann. She was born November 14, 1935. Mary 
Ann seemed to change our luck. When she was a few days old. Reed 
got his first good job at Ironton Steel Plant, unloading brick. Work 
was becoming a little more plentiful and with the help of Reed's father 
he started laying brick. 

In February of 1 935 , Tillie 's father passed away and she received 
$300 from his estate. After paying to have Garth's tonsils out, we 
bought a building lot with the rest of the money. Then we borrowed on 
the lot and with the help of Reed's father we built our first house on 
the lot at 465 North Seventh West in Provo. 



REED DANGERFIELD DIXON 



287 



In February of 1941 we sold our home and moved to Ogden. 
Reed was working up there at Hill Field and also at the Defense Depot 
on Second Street. 

While living in Ogden our thirdchild was born, a little girl we 
named Sherrie Lillie. She was born December 3, 1941. When she was 
two months old we moved back to Provo, Work was starting at Geneva 
Steel Plant, where Reed worked for the next few years. He worked 
both on construction and defense work. 

We rented while building our second new home on Third North, 
across the road from Dixon Jr. High School. We lived in this home 
for a year and sold it. We bought an old home at 456 East First North, 
Reed remodeled it and built two bedrooms on the back. We lived there 
about five years and sold it and built a new home at 770 East 620 North. 
We lived in it about three years and sold it and bought a home in Univ- 
ersity Gardens at 1010 East 800 North, Once again. Reed remodeled 
and built on it, then we sold it and built a new one out in the Edgemont 
area. 

Each new home he built was nicer than the one before, but to me 
(Reed's wife) there will never be one quite so nice as the first one we 
built after the depression. 

Reed has been a good husband, a good provider, a wonderful 
father, and if you ask the grandchildren, "The Best Grandpa in the 
World". 

In 1964 we were called to go on a Work Mission for the Church 
to the South-east area. 

Reed with the help of the young labor missionaries and members 
of the Church, built an addition of the Chapel at Waynesboro, Virginia, 
also at Fredericksburg, Virginia and also a large addition af GJaffney, 
South Carolina. Making this chapel into a Stake Center, He laid out 
the brickwork and finished it at Valdosta, Georgia and helped the 
missionaries get started laying brick at New Bern, North Carolina. 
He worked on the brickwork at Atlanta and Augusta, Georgia and fin- 
ished a chapel at De Funick Springs, Florida. He also did brick re- 
pair work on a chapel at Bellview, Florida. 

This was a wonderful experience for both of us. With Reed's 
talents in laying brick, he was sent to work on many chapels giving 
us the chance to see a lot of the South. We loved it down there and 
made many friends. We could see the hand of the Lord helping us and 
guiding and directing us in his work. It really strengthened our testi- 
mony in the gospel. 

We were gone twenty- seven months. Utah looked good to us when 
we came home. We had missed our families a lot but this was two, 
never to be forgotten, years filled with wonderful experiences. 

We have enjoyed our work in the Church. Reed holds the office 
of High Priest in the Edgemont 7th Ward, for which we as a family 
are very proud. 



288 



REED DANGERFIELD DDCON 



Reed has always been an active member of the Brickmason Union. 
He has been secretary for many years and has been on various commit- 
tees, working hard to make better working conditions for his fellow 
workers . 

THE MOST EXHILARATING AND SATISFYING EXPERIENCE OF 

MY LIFE: 

In 1963 a few days before Christmas, Tillie and I were called 
into the office of the Church Building Department in Salt Lake City. 
Here the Church Building Chairman asked us if we would go on a Build- 
ing Mission for the Church, 

It was decided that we would go to the South East Area of the U. 
S. , with headquarters inAtlanta, Georgia. A local building contractor, 
Brother Wesley Carter from Provo and whom I had known nearly all 
of my life, was Area Supervisor. 

We left for Atlanta on April 15, 1964. When we arrived at the 
Mission Headquarters, we were assigned to build additions on three 
of the existing chapels, making one of them into a Stake Center. 
After this assignment, we were asked to complete one chapel which 
was about one-third completed, which we did. We built the steeples 
on two new buildings and laid all the brick on another new building and 
helped with the brickwork on two other chapels. This was all done 
with the help of from three to six volunteer building missionaries and 
Ward members. None of these workmen had any previous building 
experience or knowledge of building construction. 

It was amazing the things we accomplished and the beauty of the 
buildings when completed. I know it could not have been done without 
the help of the Lord. 

I never had a testimony of the Gospel before going on this building 
mission assignment, but after seeing and experiencing what was accom- 
plished in this twenty- seven months, with the help and guidance of the 
Lord, I gained a very strong testimony of the truthfulness of theGospel 
and the things that can be accomplished through prayer. 



45th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 12.4 




EDNA DIXON 




289 



Ballif Family 




Mark D. Barbara Scott 
Edna Mark S. 




581 East 2600 North, Ogden, Utah 



290 



EDNA DIXON BALLIF 
My Personal History 

I was born October 25, 1910, in Provo, Utah, at 232 North Fifth 
West Street. I was blessed to have such wonderful parents, Walter 
DeGrey Dixon and Louie Maiben. Others in the family were, Rhea, 
my oldest sister, two older brothers - Fred Walter and Donald Maiben 
(always called Buck and Sank), and a few years later a younger sister. 
Amy Laverne. 

My father was a kind, wonderful man, very devoted to his wife 
and family. He loved the Gospel and his fellowman, and was truly a 
servant of God. He taught me many things, especially the Gospel 
Principles. I loved to go with him onhikes up the Canyon and to church 
activities. He worked very hard to provide for us, and because of his 
love and concern, and pleasant ways, our home was a happy place to be. 
I felt so sad when he died November 26, 1921, at the young age of 44. 
I was only eleven years old at the time. Through the years, how I 
have missed not having a father, but I have many fond memories of my 
dear father. I know I will be with him again someday. 

How I loved my dear sweet mother. As a child I was very shy 
and stayed close to my mother's apron strings. She was a pretty 
woman and always looked neat and clean. Her home was her castle 
and was spotless at all times. After she lost her beloved companion, 
at such an early age, she dedicated her life to her home, family , 
relatives, and friends. No one could cook like my "Mom". Out of 
the old black stove oven came delicious pies, cakes, bread, and other 
good things to eat. I enjoyed the tantalizing smells of homemade 
bread and cookies as I came up the streetfrom school. She was always 
there to great me with a smile and a kiss. Mother was Aunt Lou to 
everyone and all of the neighbors, relatives, and friends loved her. 
If anyone came to visit, we always had to serve them some goodies. 
She loved everyone and was so kind to all, especially her family. I 
am so grateful for all of the things that she taught me - especially to 
work hard and always finish the thing you start. She always encouraged 
me in the things that I did. Mother worked very hard when she had 
boarders, and I remember coming home from school to a table full of 
dishes to wash. Clothes washday was an all day activity and in the 
Fall I helped put up bushels and bushels of fruit. 

My parents encouraged me in my music. I took lessons just two 
or three years, but I was blessed with the talent of being able to play 
by ear, and enjoy this talent today. From my grandfather and father 
I inherited the gift of creative writing. This has brought much joy in- 
to my life, and I have tried to share it with others by writing many 
poems and tributes. Like father I have enjoyed sports; tennis, soft- 
ball, and others, the beauties of nature and fun outdoor experiences. 

I have so many happy memories of family fun at home. My 



291 



292 



EDNA DIXON BALLIF 



parents loved holidays. Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, birth- 
days, were always very special occasions. As a widow, mother con- 
tinued to make these special days, even with a meager income. 

It was exciting growing up on Sandy Alley with aunts, uncles and 
cousins living all the way up Fifth West and on near by streets. What 
fun it was to visit them often. I went all through my school years with 
some of my cousins; Aline Manson, Valera, Sarah, and Allie Dixon. 
What dear folks the Dixons and Taylors are, and all of my relatives. 
I have always loved them and been very proud to be a part of the Dixon 
Clan. 

I attended the old Timpanogos School, grades one to six, and have 
special memories of teachers and friends I met there. My Junior High 
years were spent at Central Junior High School, and later attended 
Provo High School, where I graduated in 1927. These were years fill- 
ed with many experiences, mostly very pleasant ones. I felt sad when 
I had to say goodbye to dear teachers and friends I had known. 

During my childhood and later years I went to church at the Third 
Ward building, just a few blocks away from our home. I loved that 
Ward and remember the good times we had in the old Amusement Hall. 
I attended Ward dinners, dances, shows, Halloween parties, and other 
activities. I enjoyed being in several M. I. A. Road Shows. I also 
played the organ for Sunday School and other meetings. Father was at 
one time in the Bishopric. 

In 1927 I enrolled at the Brigham Young University for a two 
years Normal Course that was given then. In 1929 I rece ived a degree 
to teach in Elementary Grades. Rhea was already teaching, and I 
guess I wanted to follow in her footsteps. I taught my first year in the 
Alpine District and the next year in Sanpete County. It was important 
for all of us to work to help with the family income. 

When Fred (Buck) graduated and went to coach at Weber High 
School in Ogden, he met an athlete by the name of Mark Squires Ballif. 
He was the son of Joseph Ballif and Florence Squires. He encouraged 
Mark to come to the B. Y. U.to play football and stay at our home. This 
chain of events led to our first meeting and later courtship. It was an 
unusual one when you both live in the same house, and there were a 
few problems, but we had some good times. I was away teaching during 
Mark's last year at school. He graduated in June 1931. We were 
married July 29, 1931, in the Logan Temple. 

Mark had a job as coach at Weber High School in Ogden. After 
our marriage we went to live in North Ogden in his brother Jeff's 
house. On June 18, 1932, our first son Mark was born. We later 
moved to 12th Street in Ogden. Our daughter Barbara was born there 
on November 10, 1933. We moved to 1462 Washington Boulevard where 
our youngest son Scott Walter was born December 8, 1935. Our child- 
ren have always brought a great deal of joy and happiness into our lives. 



EDNA DIXON BALLIF 



293 



We moved back to North Ogden in 1944. Teachers were very 
scarce and I was asked to substitute, which I did for many years. My 
husband was coach there for two years, and all of our children were 
attending the school at this time. There was a Junior High and Elemen- 
tary. I taught Girl's Physical Education and Fourth Grade. Mark 
went to Ogden High School to coach and teach Physical Education and I 
continued to teach at the North Ogden School, later the Third Grade. 
I retired in 1970, after having taught for 28 years there. I have many 
choice memories of the children I taught and the fine teachers and 
principals I worked with. During these teaching years I took many ex- 
tension classes and attended workshops from the colleges. I graduated 
from Utah State University in June 1959. 

We are very proud of our three children. Mark Dixon graduated 
from the B. Y. U. and has a Master's Degree . He is a golf Pro and 
architect and has designed many golf courses. He designed and con- 
structed the Patio Springs Golf Course in Eden, Ogden Canyon, and 
Sherwood Hills Golf Course in Brigham City Canyon, where he is now 
the Pro there. He married Kay Anderson in the Salt Lake Temple, and 
they have two sons, Mark and Michael, a daughter Jan and a grand- 
daughter, Brittany. He excelled in sports in high school and college. 

Barbara graduated from Utah State Unive rsity and taught Physical 
Education at Ben Lommond High School in Ogden. She married Kenneth 
Olsen from Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They were later divorced. She has 
a sonDavid and daughter Pamela from this previous marriage. She is 
now married to Blaine Wade and they have a son, Danny. Barbara and 
Blaine are very active in the Church. He has been a Bishop and is now 
in the Stake Presidency of the Pleasant View Utah Stake. Barbara is 
in the Relief Society Presidency and has talents in music and creative 
writing. They have been sealed in the Logan Temple. 

Scott, our youngest son, graduated from the Utah State Univer- 
sity. He married Sherma Craven in the Logan Temple. They have 
two sons, Brian and Bryce, and two daughters, Debra and Becky. 
Also a grandson, Shane. Scott excelled in many sports in high school 
and college. He and his brother played basketball for their dad at 
Ogden High School. He coached at Bonneville High School for five 
years, then was an assistant principal at Bonneville and Roy High 
Schools, in Ogden, Weber County. He was principal at South Junior 
High School in Ogden and is now the principal of the Valley School in 
Eden, Ogden Valley. He is also the Bishop of the Weber College 
Branch, in Ogden. 

We have ten grandchildren and four great grandchildren at this 
time. My husband and I are so grateful for our dear family. We have 
been married forty-nine years. 

I have held many positions in the Church and have a great love 



294 



EDNA DIXON BALLIF 



for the Gospel. I have been an organist, teacher in every organization, 
a counselor in the M.I. A. Presidency, Road Show Director, Stake 
Primary Inservice Leader, member of the Ward Choir, and served on 
many committees. I am also a member of the Daughters of Utah 
Pioneers and give the lessons at our Camp Meetings. 

Mark and I were officiators at the Ogden Temple for five years. 
We started at the time of the dedication and Open House, and were 
released when we received our mission call. 

On December 11, 1976 we left for our mission to the Oakland 
Temple Visitor's Center in Oakland, California. It was a choice 
spiritual experience for eighteen months. We returned home June 9, 
1978. At the present time we are working as officiators again in the 
Ogden Temple. We have truly been blessed. 

My life has been a series of varied and wonderful experiences, 
I am so grateful for my heritage, my goodly parents and noble ances - 
tors, who sacrificed so much that I may enjoy all of the comforts and 
blessings that we as a family have today. 

I have a strong testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel and 
know the joy it brings into our lives. I am very thankful for my mem- 
bership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 

Edna Dixon Ballif - 1979 

A MEMORABLE AND SATISFYING EXPERIENCE IN MY LIFE 

In my lifetime I have had many satisfying experiences relating 
to teaching children. Letters and tributes I have received from them, 
and being remembered by those I taught many years ago. The honors 
bestowed upon me when I retired last year were very much appreciated . 

As a mother, I think the most satisfying experience that you can 
have is to hold your new born baby in your arms for the first time. 
As the children grow you rejoice and share in their experiences and 
achievements . 

One experience in my life that was so impressive that I will al- 
ways remember it, was my temple marriage. As Mark and I knelt at 
the beautiful altar, there was a wonderful, peaceful spirit all around 
us. We knew that we would be together for time and eternity. 



46th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D. # 11.2 




MILDRED DDCON 




JAMES COLIN TANGREN 



295 



Tangren Family- 




Nancy James Dixon Sharon 
Mildred James Colin 




Mildred Colin 
First Grandchild 
Maris sa 

15157 Norton St. , San Leandro, Cal. 



296 



MILDRED DIXON TANGREN 

The afternoon of July 17, 1912 was hot in Provo, Utah. Sena 
Rasmus sen Dixon, Wife of Albert F. Dixon, was weary as she was 
scrubbing the kitchen floor. She was thinking how pleasant it had been 
to have her mother visiting with her the past few days, and she was 
thankful her mother had been there this morning to help with the can- 
ning of raspberriesv She was sorry her mother could not stay longer, 
but Mama had returned to Fairview, Utah, where she lived with Harry 
Rasmussen, Sena's brother. Already Sena missed her. 

Sena was expecting her second baby the first part of September. 
She had a little boy, Harry, who was 21 months old. She was tired 
and the baby was active. ( I'm sure the baby was objecting to all the 
work.) Then -- the baby came with no idea it was supposed to wait 
until September when Grandma could return to help. 

The baby, a girl, was named Mildred. I am Mildred, daugh- 
ter of Sena Rasmussen and Albert Frederick Dixon, born July 17, 1912 
at Provo, Utah County, Utah. My parents had nine children: Harry 
Albert, Mildred, Clifton, Elmo Arthur, Norma, Vera, Ruth, a still- 
born boy, and Melvin R. Clifton, Elmo Arthur and Ruth died in infancy. 

When I was a small child my family moved to Spanish Pork, 
Utah where my father was manager of the Taylor Bros. Store. I was 
baptized there on August 1, 1920 by John Wells Calderwood, and con- 
firmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 
by my father. 

My early childhood was a happy, carefree time. School was 
fun, not difficult, and I had many friends. I particularly remember 
the third grade in those early years. Cleo Pierce was my teacher, and 
I liked her very much. That year we presented a play called "The Old 
Woman in the Shoe" and we went down town to give it in the old "Opera 
House". I was the Old Woman with a lovely old pioneer dress and bon- 
net borrowed from a very old lady. 

My father with others, organized the Dixon Taylor Russell 
Company, so we moved back to Provo when I was in the fourth grade. 
I remember particularly the sixth grade. Byron Jones was my teacher. 
He loved music and we did many interesting and enjoyable things that 
year. We had a girls baseball team. We played in competition with 
the other city schools, and that year we won the championship and re- 
ceived a silver cup. I played second base and pitcher. 

During my growing up years I loved to go to Ephraim in San- 
pete County, to visit my mother's sister. Aunt Molla (Karen Amalia), 
Uncle Otto Nielson, and their family. We would also visit Uncle Harry, 
A\int Anne and family in Fairview. We had many good times there. 

I graduated from Provo High School in 1930 and attended 
Brigham Young University, graduating in 1934 with a Bachelor of Arts 
Degree in Accounting and Business Administration. I worked at Dixon 



297 



298 



MILDRED DDCON TANGREN 



Taylor Russell Company while attending school and continued after 
graduation. In 1 936 I went to Salt Lake City to take a job with the U. 
S. Treasury Departnnent. In 1942 I went to work for Rennington Arms 
Company. They had a plant to manufacture ammunition. 

Harry married Cecile Clark and they lived in Provo. My 
mother was ailing at this time. She was ill for many years, and the 
family members were always concerned about her. 

I was married to James Colin Tangren on March 28, 1942, in 
Preston, Idaho, by Bishop C. Earl Gosslind. In October, 1942, Norma 
married Richard Graham Jess. During 1943 and 1944 we were in 
Denver, Colorado where Colin was stationed at Lowry Field. I worked 
for Remington Arms Company there, having been transferred from the 
Utah plant. During this time I went to Provo many times because of 
the illness of my mother. She passed away in March of 1944. 

In October of 1944, Colin was sent overseas and I returned 
to Provo to live with Dad. In April 1945, Vera married Dean Albert 
Anderson, he was home on leave, having been in Europe. The men in 
our family; Harry, Melvin, Colin, Dick and Dean were all in the ser- 
vice and were sent to various places in the world. Harry and Colin 
served in the South Pacific. Melvin and Dean were in Europe, and 
Dick was on the West Coast preparing to go to China when the war end- 
ed in 1945. 

On May 21, 1945 I had a baby girl, Sharon Lynn. What a 
welcome baby she was. My Dad and I really enjoyed her. Then on 
August 16, in Berkeley, California, where he had gone to be with 
Norma and Dick for a few days, Dad had a heart attack and died, just 
after the war ended. We had planned on soon having all our men home. 
It was a severe blow to us all. 

By Christmas all the men were home and we all took up the 
task of going on with our lives. Melvin married Carol CoUard and 
started to school, to be a doctor. In 1946 Colin and I moved to Oak- 
land, California, where he had worked before going into the service. 
Finding a house to buy was a real problem. For two years we lived 
in rental units, and had Nancy Ann and James Dixon join our family. 
We were now five, and on October 4, 1948 we moved into a new home 
in San Leandro, We still live in that home. 

Colin's sister, Zola, moved to this area. His brother Glen 
and wife, Leila and family lived there. His mother later came to live 
with Zola, so we had our family living close to us. Over the years we 
had many wonderful, memorable times together and we are truly thank- 
ful for this, and for the love we shared. 

In 1956 my sister, Norma, died suddenly, leaving Dick with 
two small children they had adopted; three year old Barbara Ann and 
one year old Steven. In 1958 Vera died, leaving Dean with two child- 
ren: Carol Leslie, eleven years, and Michael Albert, age 9. The loss 



MILDRED DDCON TANGREN 



299 



of both my sisters was a great one for me. 

Bluebirds, Cub Scouts, Campfire Girls, Scouts, P.T.A. , 
Primary, Mutual, teaching, family, church -- these things took my 
time and energy for the next several years. Many great times we had. 
Sharon and Nancy went to the B. Y. U. and Jim went to a local college. 

Sharon married James Lawrence Beyers and at this writing 
they have four girls: Marissa Suzanne, Johanna, Katherine Norma, 
Laura Ellen. He is an attorney and they live in Santa Rosa, California. 
Nancy married James Eric Ford and they have four children: Cimony 
Anna, Cambric Emma, David Menton, Gillian Sarah. They live in 
Provo, where he is a professor at B.Y.U. Jim is not married, he 
lives in Concord, California. 

In 1973 I retired from the teaching profession. Teaching has 
been a very enjoyable and rewarding profession. The next year, Colin 
had two heart attacks, so he retired. We have been active in the 
Church, holding many positions; teaching in Sunday School, Mutual and 
Relief Society, and serving in the Presidency of Relief Society and 
Mutual in the Ward and Stake. 

On Jxme 28, 1977, Colin and I were set apart as ordinance 
workers in the Oakland Temple. We serve there on Tuesday and 
Thursday mornings. We are grateful for the opportunity and the re- 
sponsibility of this work. It is a source of great satisfaction and joy 
to us. 



Very Brief Life 



Sketch of 



ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 

Born March 31, 1876 at Provo, Utah to Mary Ann Smith and Henry 

Aldous Dixon. 
Baptized by John S. Holdaway on Jxine 3, 1884. 

Confirmed a member of the LDS Church on June 3, 1884 by Edward 
Harding. 

Married Sena Rasmussen in the Manti Temple on March 23, 1910. 
Children: 

Harry, Mildred, Clifton, Elmo, Norma, Vera, Ruth, Baby, 
and Melvin. 

Albert's early education was in the Provo City Schools and later in 

the Brigham Young Academy. 
His first job was a construction worker on the Salt Lake and Mercur 

Railroad. He later became a brakeman. 
In 1902 he was called as a missionary to the British Mission. 
Upon return from his mission he worked for Taylor Bros. Co as a 

salesman in the mining camps and throughout Southern Utah. 
In 1913 he became manager of Taylor Bros. Branch Store at Spanish 

Fork, Utah. 

Was one of the organizers of Dixon Taylor Russell Co. in 1921, later 

becoming President of the Company. 
Held many positions in the Church, including Supt. of the Sixth Ward 

Sunday School, 
Was an ardent fisherman and hunter. 

Albert F. Dixon was an honest, sincere man. He had many friends. 

He loved little children and always had a special treat for them. 
He died August 18, 1945 while visiting in Berkeley, California. 



300 



47th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 

I.D.# 10.2 




301 



Cowley 



Family 




302 



RUBY 



DIXON 



COWLEY 



At the beginning of my life I was given the gift of pleasant im- 
agination, a sense of observation to gain knowledge, skill and power to 
communicate in artistic reality and personal symbolic beauty. As a 
child free to visulize and accomplish usefulness through a great need 
to be sociable and appreciative in having experiences with family and 
many friends, which is self-contentedness. The human organs of the 
soul, music and song, make joy a silent yodel in the spectacular geo- 
graphical surroundings of mountains and canyons in this beautiful Utah 
valley, which Charles Owen Dixon returned to from serving a Western 
States L. D.S. Mission in Butte, Montana and Portland, Oregon. He 
met and married lovely Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead on August 25, 
1909 in the Salt Lake L. D.S. Temple by John R. Winder. 

A second child and daughter was born July 26, 1912 in the beau- 
tiful home Charles had built on the corner of 295 North 500 West in 
Provo, September 1, 1912 in the Third Ward Chapel he gave me a 
blessing and the name of Ruby, I was baptized by Arthur D. Taylor 
and confirmed by Walter D. Dixon. Instilled by our dedicated and 
loving parents with six children, there has been an ambition for self- 
improvement and wholesome living with minds so acquisitive and avid 
for knowledge. We prepared to make our goals along with dividing 
household tasks, so very young, learning responsibility and yet so 
mature at a time when parental guidance was accepted and a commun- 
ity way of life was prevalent and yet we were free to form our princi- 
ples. I discovered that I could live ahappier life by obeying my parents, 
especially in practicing religious beliefs. We were raised with a to- 
getherness of our dear relatives with large families close by, working, 
sharing, and socializing, which brought true belongingness , joy and 
comfort to me all of my life. 

Through keen study I became an educator and teacher, artist 
and writer with special talents in teaching language arts and creativity. 
Most of all I was inspired, teaching hundreds of children to compose 
and write poetry and created and color their drawings with water-color 
to illustrate and put in cloth- covered books their art and crafts for ex- 
hibits displayed in the City Center, Eldred Center, and at B.Y.U. I 
was asked to include the photographs of these in my thesis when I grad- 
uated with aMasters degree at the Ninety- fourth Commencement at the 
B. Y. U. August 1969 with a major in curriculum and instruction, and a 
minor in art. 

My career of twenty-eight years spanned the elementary field 
from rural Principal of the Hanna School, teacher of first and fourth 
grades at Altonah School in Duchesne County, to Parker, Grandview, 
Timpanogos, and Provost Schools in the Provo School District, First 
I had a "white collar" position teaching remedial reading to students 
from first to sixth grades at Parker School with government pay. 



303 



304 



RUBY DIXON COWLEY 



I remember the year in fourth grade they sent me to the Parker 
School because the Timpanogos School was too crowded. Here I made 
new friends and I could "spelldown" every pupil in the school. After 
that, on August 19, 1922, my Mother passed away. I enjoyed Provo 
High School most, next to College, We took swimming in the pool, 
marched in the Posture Parade leading the band and in contests, de- 
corated for dances, sang in the operas, and danced in the Dance Review 
in elegant costumes. Our Glee Club rode the Interurban to Salt Lake 
City and sang for Conference in the Tabernacle. The Type teacher 
took us in her one- seated Ford down to the Lake ice-skating after 
school. In Altonah I would ice-skate for miles down the frozen canals. 
In the spring we attended the Ute Indian Bear Dance where the Braves 
chose their brides at the ceremony of dancing and singing. 

I learned to skii down the mountains back of Hoover's Ranch in 
Provo Canyon while in High School, The B. Y. U, had winter carnivals 
up Daniels Canyon and I won the women's Skii glide and was presented 
a beautiful amethyst bracelet from a Provo Jewelry store. 

Va Lera and I had such good times at the Ward and B. Y. U. 
dances and our Social Unit parties and dances. She introduced me to 
Wayne Cowley at a matinee dance. He invited me to be his partner for 
a Ballroom Dance Class. We graduated twice together wheni received 
a Normal Diploma in 1932 and Wayne received his B.A. degree. Then 
in 1934 I received a Three-year diploma and Wayne his Master of Arts 
degree with a thesis in Physics. I respected Wayne for his values of 
achievement and brilliant knowledge in his profession. He was fun to 
be with, gentle, kind and soft spoken, clean and neat and very hand- 
some, and after all I had known him for six years. In 1937 he accepted 
a position in Idaho to teach chemistry, physics and mathematics at 
Rigby High School. So on my parents 28th wedding anniversary, August 
25, 1937 we were married in the Salt Lake L. D, S, Temple. Grand- 
mother Beckstead enjoyed informing the ladies in the beautiful Brides 
Room that I wore my Mother's wedding gown of silk and inserts of 
lace, which was her daughter's. 

Wayne enjoyed acting in productions and was very talented so 
we were the young "lovers" in plays in the Wards and traveled around 
to the other towns and also taught the Ward and Stake M, I, A. dances. 

A Faith- promoting Experience: A son, Wayne was born 
October 14, 1938 at the Goody Maternity Home in Rigby, Idaho, When 
he was five months old I tucked him in his crib, pinning the blanket 
down. Later, I looked at him and there was blood on his bib. I check- 
ed his mouth and found nothing in it so I held him upside down. His 
face was going black so I turned his face away over my shoulder and 
ran across the road to our nearest neighbor and asked Mrs. Johnson 
to telephone Dr. Tall to come. I went back home and put the baby down 
and knelt down by a chair. I prayed that I might find that safety pin. 



RUBY DIXON COWLEY 



305 



The Doctor and his nurse and Wayne came and checked the baby. We 
put him on a pillow to drive twelve miles to the Idaho Falls Hospital. 
As we crossed the yard toward the car I looked down and picked it up 
happily saying, " This is the safety pin, " 

Another son, Shirl was born December 18, 1941. In July 1942 
we moved to Frovo where Wayne accepted a teaching position at Provo 
High School and taught physics and mathematics, for eighteen years. 

Fifty Physicists were selected to participate in the National 
Science Foundation Physics Institute at the University of Washington 
at Seattle and Wayne was selected. That summer of I960 was like a 
second honeymoon. I registered for a special course on the Gifted 
Child Program. Our son, Wayne was serving a mission in Northern 
California and Shirl was employed at Jackson Lake Lodge in Wyoming 
so we rented an apartment in Seattle and toured with other couples 
from other States, on weekends. 

I was chosen to have my biography in Who's Who of American 
Women for 1 974- 1 975 as career positions and outstanding achievements . 

On April 13, 1975 I was awarded a plaque from the Provo Ed- 
ucation Association which reads: "In appreciation for your 26 years 
of devoted service to Education." A retirement party and dinner was 
given for me, an orchid corsage and luggage gifts and a program of 
original songs to sing and the following tribute: "We honor Ruby, the 
young girl who grew up without a mother's help but became the woman 
any mother would be proud of. To Ruby, the young teacher, who rode 
horseback to her first teaching assignment and acted as principal and 
teacher. To Ruby, the young wife and mother helping her husband in 
his new teaching career and taking seriously the vows "in sickness 
and health". To Ruby, a fellow teacher, who's sense of humor and 
high professional standards were an inspiration because she believed 
in doing her best, being an enthusiastic member of the organizations 
she joined, and sharing freely all she had. Ruby, the mother, who 
picked up the pieces after Wayne's death and raised her sons the way 
he would have wanted should be honored too. She gave unselfishly and 
with pride. " 

As a family we have reached out for communication with God 
and have hope, courage and trust, with an enduring bond of understand- 
ing, Wayne and Shirl have an awareness and the knowledge dedicated 
to developing solutions in science, industry, education, medicine and 
creativity for the benefit of all mankind. 

Wayne served an L.D.S. Mission to Northern California and 
Oregon. Shirl served in Southern Australia and a Utah Stake Mission 
and a Huntington Beach, California Stake Mission. Shirl has a practice 
in Podia trie Medicine and Surgery in Southern, Utah. Shirl and Janeen 
have two daughters and two sons and live at 114 North Cove Drive, 
Cedar City, Utah. 



306 



RUBY DIXON COWLEY 



Wayne is a Professor of Technology and Engineering for South- 
ern Illinois University and teaches at Travis Air Force Base. Wayne 
and Norma Jean have three daughters and live at 455 Wilmington Way, 
Vacaville, California. 

The following biography appeared in the Ninth Edition of Who's 
Who of American Women Volume 10: 

"COWLEY, Ruby Dixon ( Mrs. Angus Wayne Cowley) , educator; 
born Frovo, Utah, July 26, 1912; daughter of Charles Owen and Vir- 
ginia Elizabeth ( Beckstead ) Dixon; B.S. , Brigham Young University, 
1951, Master Education, 1969; postgraduate University of Washington, 
I960; married Angus Wayne Cowley, August 25, 1 937; children - Wayne 
Dixon, Shirl Curtis. Teacher remedial reading Parker School, Provo, 
Utah, 1934; principal Hanna School, Duchesne County, Utah, 1935-36; 
teacher, Altonah School, Duchesne County, 1936-37, Grandview School, 
Provo, 1951-53; teacher Timpanogos School, Provo School District, 
1953 - , District chairman Democratic party, 1962 - . Member of 
American Childhood Educational Association International. ( Presid- 
ent Provo Branch 1969-71, publication chairman 1971 - ), N.E.A. 
( convention representative 1968), American Association of University 
Women ( historian, art study leader 1951-57), Utah Education Assoc- 
iation ( chairman education and professions). Standards committee 
1966-70), Utah Art Educators Association, XI Beta, Delta Kappa 
Gamma ( program committee I960 - ). Member of Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints. Home: 1430 North 380 West, Provo, Ut. 



48th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 




307 



Ralph Dixon Family 





RALPH 



DIXON 



On the 16th of September 1912, twin boys arrived at the Dixon 
home; Ralph was the elder by minutes. 

Provo was a wonderful place for twin boys to grow up in those 
times. They had chickens, cows, horses, rabbits, and Shetland ponies. 
One pony named Tony was so balky and contrary that Ralph in disgust 
traded his half to his twin brother, Ron, for a rabbit and then gave the 
rabbit away. There were always friends waiting for the boys to finish 
their chores so they could play and these twin "Tom Sawyers" were 
very adept at trading pony rides and driving privileges for help with 
their chores. 

It has been said that two heads are better than one. Ralph and 
Ron were a testament of that statement. They spent hours over at the 
river in their Tepees, making snares, bows and arrows, and ev en 
leather slings (like the one David used on Goliath). Ralph had a natural 
ability with his hands and was always making something. 

No history of Ralph would be complete without the "Watermelon 
Business". One warm summer day when watermelons were ripe, the 
Dixon twins and a friend pulled two coaster wagons all the way up the 
Grandview Hill, purchased five watermelons at five cents each (all the 
money they had), and returned down the hill to easily sell them for ten 
cents apeace. Up the hill they went and purchased ten melons, this 
time with visions of wealth making the work seem light. Coming down 
that steep grade, they soon learned that five melons in each wagon was 
more than they could handle. The wagons broke away, turned over and 
all the melons were broken open. The young, would-be business men 
were bankrupt, but refused to come away empty handed. They sat down 
in the road and ate the hearts out of each of the melons before heading 
home , 

Sports were another of Ralph's loves. In the fifth grade at the 
Timpanogos School, his baseball team won the city championship and 
the track team won the May Day meet. As a ninth grader, he swam 
himself to fame in the backstroke by capturing the State championship 
before the money crunch of the thirties ended scholastic swimming at 
Provo High. Skating was to fill this void for the rest of his life. A 
love of skating that had begun with trips to Allen's pond, became a 
self taught avocation of a figure skater "par excellent". Later, he 
taught his younger daughters, Cheri and Sandy to skate and dance on 
the ice with him. 

Work was a Dixon tradition. Under the guidance of his father, 
Ralph started out cutting tie wires and carrying water for the brick 
masons. He then learned to lay brick and finish concrete, and went on 
to learn the many other aspects of the building trades. He built his 
first contract home in 1938 under an architect. As a licensed general 
contractor, he worked most of his life in Idaho and Utah. Many homes 



309 



in Utah County have been enhanced with his creative ability in rock fire- 
place construction. 

In 1965 Ralph became interested in oil painting, especially of 
the things he loved: horses, wildlife and landscapes. When arthritis 
stopped his painting, he had Cal Bee teach him the old, fancy leather 
work, round braiding and round sewing. If it could be made with the 
hands, Ralph could do it. From turning a piece of Ivory soap into a 
horse to changing a stick into a whistle, children would marvel at 
his talents. 

Born to Ernest DeGrey and Mary Ann Painter Dixon, Ralph 
married Eva Ruth Ward in Twin Falls, Idaho onfourth of September 
1938. Parents of six children { three boys and three girls), they now 
have twenty-one grandchildren, 

Ralph has always loved the land and the natural wonders of the 
environment in which he was raised. His love of the land; his know- 
ledge of flowers, trees, birds, fish, animals and rocks; his ability 
to create articles with his hands; and his willingness to teach his 
children and grandchildren to do the same are the worth of this man. 

Ralph Dixon, at the age of sixty- seven, died Saturday, February 
9, 1980 at the Utah Valley Hospital of a lingering illness, cancer. 



310 



49th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




311 



Ronald Dixon Family- 




Gary, Ron, Tom, Kathy, Deanna, Verneda 

Dorsey 




Wildwood 

312 



RONALD 



DIXON 



Ronald Dixon was born at Provo, Utah on September 16, 1912, 
to Ernest Dixon and May Painter Dixon. He was the sixth in order of 
seven children, a twin to his brother Ralph. 

The Timpanogos School was just across the street from his home 
which he attended through the sixth grade. On the school playground 
he became interested in sports and later in high school participated in 
track, baseball, football, swimming and boxing. 

While in school he was one of the four track participants to win 
the only two first prizes in the 440 and 880 yard relay races at the 
B, Y. U. Invitational Track Meet. He was also a member of the 
Provo City Championship baseball team. 

While still in high school, he worked at the Paramount Theater 
for three years. He graduated from Provo High School. As a young 
man he worked for his father in the construction business, and later 
in the construction of the Geneva Steel plant. Upon completion of the 
construction, he continued to work for the U. S. Steel Co. 

With the completion of their new building, Ron became one of 
the first employees for the E. D. Firmage Department Store. He was 
employed here for over twelve years. 

As an automobile salesman, Ron worked for A. L. Duckettand 
later for Naylor Auto Co. where he retired after thirty-five years 
service . 

On November 23, 1939, he married Verneda Jackson in Provo, 
Utah. They are the parents of four children: Kathryn, Deanna, Gary, 
and Darcy. 

His boyhood experiences with the family horse, "Buckskin", the 
Shetland ponies of Uncle Ashted, Parley, Walter and Arthur developed 
in him a love for these animals. For the last forty years he has 
raised Shetland ponies, and has enjoyed working with them and training 
them. He has brought much joy to many of the young people of the area 
with rides on the ponies or in one of his buggies. He enjoys the comp- 
any of young people and they love him for it. 

Another one of his hobbies has been the construction of minature, 
built to scale, models of pony wagons, carts, cutters and chariots. 

His love of the outdoors has taken him on horse -back or pack-in 
trips to many of the remote mountain areas, exploring the back trails. 
With his more recent jeep trips he has explored most of the back roads 
of the State. On these frequent mountain trips, he has always found 
time to do his share of fishing, for he is an avid fisherman and hunter. 

With his wife they built a comfortable summer home atWildwood 
where they and their family have enjoyed many happy days. 



313 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 



ID # 8 



Born to Sarah DeGrey and Henry Aldous Dixon, December 22, 1873 in 
Provo, Utah. 

Baptized by John Cottam, January 31, 1882 in Salt Lake and confirmed 

by Alex McRae on February 2, 1882 in Salt Lake City. 
Married Mary Ann (May) Painter at Nephi on December 19, 1899. 
Children; 

Erma, Leah, Arnold, Verl, Ralph, Ronald, Edith. 

He was one of the first students to attend the Timpanogos School. 

He earned the reputation of an honest f reliable, and industrious brick- 
layer and contractor. 

"Ern" was a good ice skater, swimmer, horseman and jockey. 

He was a barber, a rancher, a farmer and horse buyer. He loved 
little children. 

Died June 15, 1938 at Provo, Utah. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
MARY ANN PAINTER DIXON 

ID# 8 w 

Born September 14, 1875 at Nephi, Utah to Mary Ann Brooks and 

John Scoffing Painter. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church, June 6, 1883. 
Attended the Public Schools in Nephi, Utah. 

She remembered seeing the ox carts in Nephi and was often frightened 
by the Indians that came to town with their faces painted. 

When her mother died, at age eleven, she came to Provo and lived 
with "Lizzie" and George Taylor until she was married. Al- 
though she was not legally adopted, she was accepted as a 
member of the Taylor Family. She called them "Papa and 
"Mamma" Taylor. 

She married Ernest DeGrey Dixon at Nephi, Utah on December 19, 
1889. 

Children: 

Erma, Leah, Arnold, Verl, Ralph, Ronald, Edith, 
Died at Provo, Utah on April 23, 1954. 



314 



50th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16. 1 




HOWARD BANKS DIXON 




Howard B. Dixon Family 




316 



LIFE HISTORY OF HOWARD BANKS DDCON 
December 11, 1912 - September 7, 1975 



Howard Banks Dixon was born December 11, 1912 at the family 
home at 270 North 500 West, Provo, Utah. He was the first of ten 
children born to Letitia May Banks and Arnold Dixon. The doctor at- 
tending the birth had some difficulty in getting the baby to breathe, 
and when at last he gave a healthy cry his grandmother Sarah DeGrey 
Dixon said, "Oh, thank the Lord for that cry." Since then many others 
have had reason to thank the Lord that he lived. 

He grew up right across the driveway from his Aunt Maria D. 
Taylor, his Uncle Arthur N. Taylor and their family. From this be- 
ginning he and his cousin Kenneth Taylor became fast friends. As 
young boys they played together, and went to school together. They 
worked together and often slept together. 

After some years the Dixons moved to their new home at 885 
North 500 West, Provo, There Howard's father, who was a banker by 
profession, raised chickens and Howard's responsibility was to help 
take care of them. 

He began his schooling at the old Timpanogos School on Fifth 
West in Provo. The building was later torn down and a new school was 
erected on the same site and also called Timpanogos. From there he 
attended Central Junior High School. It was during these years that 
he worked diligently on scouting and was awarded the Eagle Scout 
badge at age fourteen. Many boys now are receiving that award at 
that age; however, they now begin scouting at age eleven. Then they 
had to wait until twelve to start. He and one other boy received the 
recognition at the same time. It was quite an honor. Their badges 
were the first to arrive in Provo by air mail. (1927). 

After Central Jr. High he attended Provo High School where he 
graduated in May 1932. During these depression years he worked at 
whatever job he could find. Sometimes it was in the beet or celery 
fields or in the fruit orchards. 

After high school he entered Brigham Young Univers ity where 
he majored in geology and minored in chemistry. He did very well in 
his classes and made good grades. Whenever he had a journal to hand 
in he went the second mile. It was typed, with drawings inked in and 
then bound before handing it in. 

He graduated with a bachelor's degree from BYU in 1936 and 
then continued his studies, earning his master's degree in 1938. 

On September 22, 1937, in the Salt Lake Temple, he married 
Fulvia Call, whom he had met during his junior year in a class at BYU 
where students were seated alphabetically. Because his interest were 
in the field of geology, after graduating he took a job working in a mine 
in Dividend, Utah. 

On May 26, 1939, their first child Jerald La Mar, was born 
to them at the Crane Maternity Home in Provo. 



317 



318 



HOWARD BANKS DIXON 



In 1941 they moved to Rio Tinto, Nevada where Howard worked 
as a chemist in the assay office of Mountain City Copper Company, a 
branch of Anaconda Copper Company. It was while he was there em- 
ployed that World War II broke out. He had already registered for the 
draft, but because he was a father and then because he was working 
in essential industry, he was never called into military service. He 
worked in the assay office for three years, then when the steel plant 
was built near Provo he was able to get a transfer from one essential 
industry to another and he worked for thirty-two years in the chemical 
laboratory at Geneva Works of United States Steel Company. 

During the years of living in Rio Tinto another son, Howard Allen 
was born to them in Provo at Utah Valley Hos pital on October 31, 1942. 

While living in Nevada there was very little contact with the 
Church as the small branch there had been dissolved, and being eighty- 
seven miles away from the ward in Elko, Nevada where they had their 
membership, there was no opportunity to attend meetings regularly. 
In Rio Tinto there was a Community Sunday School and Howard was the 
teacher for the adults. Only a few attended, but he taught them Mor- 
monism. 

Upon returning to Provo they lived in Provo Third Ward where 
Howard was born and had been reared. He became a ward clerk and 
was happy to again become involved in church work. 

On September 2, 1946 a daughter, Janet was born at Utah Valley 
Hospital in Provo. 

In 1947 Howard and Fulvia bought their first home located at 
470 North 100 East in Provo. The move took them from the Third 
Ward into Manavu Ward. It was not long before Howard was again 
called to be a ward clerk. During the nine years they lived in that 
ward he was a clerk to three bishoprics. 

On November 9, 1951 another son, Kenneth Call was born. 

In 1957 the family moved to a new home which they had built at 
326 East 1900 North in Provo. This home was larger and had adequate 
space for the many family gatherings held there. Howard was always 
a cordial host. He was proud of this home which his brother, Bruce 
had designed and one of his days of triumph came when he made the 
final payment on it considerably ahead of schedule. 

Through the years, Howard's generosity made welcome in the 
home, many of the relatives on both sides of the family and others . 
Some stayed for a short time, and some stayed for long periods of 
time . 

Againhe was called to be a ward clerk in the Pleasant View Ward, 
and a little later was called on a Stake Mission. He enjoyed the work, 
even though there were very few converts made at that time in the 
Provo area. 

Howard's mother died May 3, 1955 and in 1958 his father came 
to make his home with Howard and Fulvia. He lived with them until 



HOWARD BANKS DIXON 



319 



his death September 1, I960. Howard did all he could to make him 
comfortable and happy. 

Family ties were strong and he cared for his father with love and 
devotion. He was proud of his heritage and worked in the Dixon Family 
Organization to promote genealogical research and appreciation for his 
ance stors. 

From 1959-1961 Jerald filled a mission to New Zealand. 

From 1962-1964 Allen filled a mission to Bavaria, Germany and 
from 1971-1973 Kenneth served a mission in New Zealand where Jerald 
had served twelve years earlier. During these years Howard was very 
faithful in writing to his sons. Every Sunday after meetings he settled 
down to his weekly letters. 

Howard was a hard worker, always giving a full day's work for 
his day's pay. He was totally honest, and his life was an example of 
this. His bills and obligations were paid promptly. One of his bishops 
said that on the evening of Howard's pay day he could regularly expect 
him to call at his home to bring his tithing. 

Education was also an important part of Howard's life. This is 
evidenced by the fact that all four of his children graduated from the 
Brigham Young University. 

On May 2, 1963 Jerald married Karen Haymond in the Manti 
Temple. On August 9, 1968 Allen married Linda Jean Mangum in the 
Oakland Temple and on March 22, 1968 Janet married David Michael 
Rees in the Salt Lake Temple. Kenneth married Janalee Marie Judd 
on February 22, 1979. All of these children gave Howard great joy 
and precious grandchildren whom he loved dearly. 

In a routine physical examination in April 1973 it was discovered 
that Howard had an abdominal aeortic aneurysm. After thorough test- 
ing he entered theL.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City to have it repaired. 
The operation was entirely successful and he returned to work a few 
weeks later feeling well. Very soon after he was taken ill again and 
entered the Utah Valley Hospital where it was discovered that he was 
suffering from adhesions from the first operation. More surgery 
followed to correct the problem. This time the recovery was slow and 
long, but Howard was faithful in doing all the doctor prescribed to try 
to strengthen himself. His doctor was Dr. H. David Rees, his son-in- 
law's father. He admired Dr. Rees for his professional excellence 
and also as a very fine friend. For two years he was apparently heal- 
thy and strong. 

On Saturday, September 6, 1975 he worked at the Lab as usual, 
and that evening went to a ward high priest's party and then to a wedd- 
ing reception. The next morning, September 7, 1975 he was up before 
seven o'clock and said he didn't feel very well. Fulvia said she would 
call the bishop and let him know he would not be at Priesthood Meeting, 
but Howard would not allow it; he was secretary of his High Priest 



320 



HOWARD BANKS DIXON 



group and was determined to go and do his duty. He came back to bed 
to rest for a while and in a matter of a few minutes he was dead. 

Funeral services were held in the Pleasant View Third Ward on 
September 10, 1975 and he was buried in the Provo City Cemetery. 
He was survived by his wife, Fulvia, their four children and nine grand- 
children. All of his six brothers and three sisters also survived him. 

He left a legacy of honor and integrity and was highly respected 
by all who knew him. 

Howard had a strong testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and 
he lived a life in harmony with that testimony. His children were rear- 
ed in a home filled with love, where they learned by example to be 
honest and worthy members of the Church. There was never any 
question in their minds as to what was right and wrong because their 
father set an example of faith and devotion to correct principles. 

He completely supported his wife and children in all their church 
callings and took much pride in seeing them achieve. Each one of them 
honestly says, "I'm thankful and proud that he was my dad. " 



Fulvia Call Dixon 



St Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 



I.D.# 




321 



Bjorklund Family 




Barbara, Bob, Gloria, Rick, Janet 




J 380 Fernwood Drive 
San Luis Obispo, California 



322 



BIOGRAPHY OF FAYE DIXON BJORKLUND 



I was born "April Fools Day", April 1, 1913 in Provo, Utah to 
Will iam Aldous and Harriet (Hattie) Hands Dixon. I was named Harriet 
Faye, after my Mother, Harriet Hands, my Grandmother, Harriet 
Nicholls, and my Great Grandmother, Harriet Ball. They call me Faye. 

I was a shy and bashful child. I have many fond memories of my 
happy childhood. I have two older sisters, and two brothers, one 
older and one younger. We lived in the Provo Third Ward. Our home 
was on the corner of Fourth West and Second North. 

I went to the old Timpanogos School. It was located on the corn- 
er of Fifth West and Fourth North. I graduated from Provo High 
School in June 1931. I worked for "Woolworths" , Five and Ten Cent 
Store. 

I loved to dance, and went to a lot of Church and School dances. 
I love animals, we always had a dog or some pet. Today, sixty years 
later, I have a pet monkey "Quito". He has lived in our back yard for 
nine years. He is very smart and has been a wonderful pet. Our 
grandchildren have taken him to school to show him off. He not only 
is loved by us, but all our neighbors enjoy him also. 

I met my prince charming "Erling Bjorklund" in Provo in 1935. 
He was born in Brooklyn, New York on April 12, 1914. His mother 
Marie Elizabeth Ellingsen, was born in Bergen, Norway. His father 
Gustave Wilhelm Bjorklund, was born in Gottenburg, Sweden. 

Erling was employed with Safeway Stores. When he moved to 
Beverly Hill, California, he asked me to marry him. Yes ! , I gladly 
accepted, and we became engaged. 

My Father passed on to his reward, June 22, 1937, at the age of 
64. He died of encephalitis. We felt a great loss. Everyone that 
knew him loved him. He had as a hobby a beautiful flower garden, and 
enjoyed sharing his flowers with others. 

After we had our first child, Robert Gary, born April 16, 1938, 
my Mother came to Richfield to live with us for awhile. Robert kind 
of filled that void spot in her heart. So she lived with us most of the 
time from then on. 

In 1940 we moved to Glendale, California. In 1941, the 24th of 
February, our daughter Barbara Gayle was born. When she was about 
three months old we moved to Santa Maria, California. March 30, 
1943 we had another daughter, Gloria Faye, came to live with us. 

Then the war came! That brought another move ; Navy Ship Yard, 
Mare Island, Vallejo, California. While living at Vallejo we were 
blessed with two more children. Janet Marie arrived on December 
10, 1945. Richard Erling was born July 1, 1947. 

The war ended and we moved to San Luis Obispo, California. We 
love San Luis Obispo. It's a beautiful place! Hills are all around us. 



323 



324 



*FAYE DIXON BJORKLUND 



It reminds us of Provo. It is a college town also. We are about fifteen 
minutes from the Ocean, and about two hours from the snow in the 
winter. We are very content and happy here. We hope we never have 
to leave here. 

In June 1967 we bought a grocery store, "Santa Rosa Market". 
We enjoyed it for six years. Then we bought anitalian Deli, "Muzio's". 
It is located in the middle of town. We carry the regular groceries, 
gourmet and specialty items, pasta, imported candies, cracker, cook- 
ies, and we make sandwiches. It's a fun store. We love it! 

We are both active in the Church. My callings have been in the 
Ward and Stake Primary Presidency, Ward Relief Society Teacher 
and Presidency, and Jr. Sunday School Coordinator. I am grateful 
for the callings that I've had and the rich blessings that come with them. 

One of the happiest days of my life was the 13th of September 
1958, that was the day my dear companion took me and our five child- 
ren to the House of the Lord, The Los Angeles Temple, to be married 
and sealed for time and eternity. A Long time goal achieved. 

We are grateful for our children and our seventeen grandchildren. 
They all live close by us. On holidays, anniversaries, and special 
events, we get together and celebrate. We put an extra effort to make 
these days very special, something to be remembered. We have 
twenty- nine in our family. 

We count as another blessing the privilege of having my dear 
Mother live with us. We all cherish the sweet memories of her, and 
the many experiences she shared with us. It was delightful to have 
her around. She was in good health until she was 95 years old. If she 
could have lived for six months more she would have been 100 years. 
I am very grateful for the privilege that was ours to have her share 
our home with us, and for the love and the many blessings she brought 
into our lives. 



52nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS' DIXON 



I.D.# 14.5 




MYRON D. CHILDS 



325 



Childs Family- 




Judith Ann Kathleen John 

Richard 

Kristine Maurine Steven Myron 




245 E. 200 North 
Springville, Utah 




M. D. Childs Ranch 
Diamond Fork Canyon 



326 



M AURINE 



DIXON 



CHILDS 



I have a small newspaper clipping from the Provo Herald, now 
yellowed with age which says, "Provo City Commissioner LeRoy 
Dixon returned home last night from hunting DEER to find his wife. 
Electa Smoot Dixon, had beaten him to it and presented him with a 
DEAR little 7j lb. , red haired daughter, born October 7, 1913." 
Thus was my birth announced. I was the fifth child in a family of 
eight. Three boys ( two of whom died when small) and five girls, I 
was the first child born in our home at 418 North Fifth West, which 
was our home for the rest of our growing years. 

I was blessed with the most wonderful parents a child could be 
privileged to have. Their family was their first consideration and 
they did everything they could to see that we had a secure, rich and 
happy life. Daddy once said, "If I could leave my children anything I 
wanted,! would leave them the desire to love and get along with people, 
stay close to our Church and know the value and blessing of hard work 
well done." I have tried to implement this into my life and into the 
lives of my children. 

As a child I loved music and always wanted to play the violin. As 
soon as I was old enough I began music lessons. I used to get up 
early, before the rest of the family, and go into the tile bathroom to 
do my practicing, I guess there is no instrument that sounds worse 
as you learti, than the violin. The sound-proof tile did much to make 
my career as a musician more bearable to the family, I progressed 
at this until I was good enough to play in the school orchestra and 
accompanied by my sister Sarah, played solos for the Daughters of 
Utah Pioneers and various church and club functions. My enthusiasm 
left me at the death of my father. I felt that I wanted to work at extra 
jobs to help pay my way, but the time I spent with my violin gave me 
an appreciation of good music which I treasure to this day, 

I was always such a busy child, I am sure mother was relieved 
to have me attend kindergarten at B. Y, U. Then on to school at the 
Timpanogos, and Provo Junior and Senior High. I finished high school 
at sixteen and felt that I was too young to go on to B. Y. U, so I found 
a job clerking at Taylor Bros. Co. and Butler Department Stores. 
This was a good experience and helped me save money for college. 
I majored in Homemaking Education. I joined the O. S. Social Unit 
and belonged to Gamma Phi Omicron, Honorary Home Economics 
Scholastic Society. I graduated with a B.S. degree in 1936 from B. 
Y.U. I taught one year at Spanish Fork High School and six years at 
Dixon Junior and Provo High Schools. I loved my teaching experience 
and the close association of the many fine young people I taught. 

I have always loved the Church. I have a strong testimony of it, 
I am thankful for the guidance and help it has given me in rearing my 
family. I have always been active and since I was twelve years old 



327 



328 



MAURINE DDCON CHILDS 



have had one calling or another, which I have served. I have taught 
in the Sunday School, Primary, M.I. A. and Relief Society. I have 
served on the Stake Board of Sunday School, M.I, A, , Reliei Society, 
and Primary. I served four years as Stake Primary President. At 
present I am a class leader and visiting teacher in Relief Society. 

During World War II I took Red Cross nursing and did volunteer 
nursing for three years at Utah Valley Hospital. I also taught Adult 
Education, both in Provo and Springville, in Foods and Nutrition and 
Family Sewing. 

In 1943 I met Myron D. Childs. This association seemed to be 
meant to be and on December 2, 1943, we were married at my sister 
Sarah's home in Boise, Idaho. The following November 29, 1944, 
we were married in the Salt Lake Temple. 

Myron had lost his wife and had a darling little girl, Kathleen, 
whom I have been privileged to rear as my own. We were blessed 
with six wonderful, loving children: Kathleen married to Robert 
Yates; Ann to Lanny Daybell; Judith Maurine to Thomas Lucie; John 
Myron to Susan Parker; Richard Dixon to Trudy Jensen; Kristine to 
Gregory Osborn; and Steven LeRoy to Ann Averett. These couples 
have given me, to date, twenty- five precious grandchildren and two 
great grandchildren. 

Ours has been a happy, loving and busy family. We have had 
many interesting experiences, both at our home in Springville and 
our Ranch in Diamond Fork Canyon. We have had our walls bursting, 
so to say, with our friends, family and employees, who come and 
shared our home. Our life in the great outdoors has given us all a 
love of God's creation. From our summer grazing land, high above 
Strawberry Valley, to the desert where our sheep wintered; and the 
center of it all at Mapleton and the Ranch in Diamond Fork Canyon. 
Just recently we made our ranching and livestock operation into a 
family corporation. We used the initials of both Myron and I and we 
call it, M D. CHILDS, Inc, 

On June 21, 1967, I suffered a great tradgedy in the death of my 
loving husband and companion. He had always wanted to have us go 
on with his business, so with the love and unity of all the children we 
have and are carrying on. 

I am thankful for the love and support my children have given me 
since their father's death. It is the thing that makes such a separa- 
tion possible. At sixty- six years of age I am still busy with work, 
family and Church, I find my greatest happiness in my children and 
darling grandchildren. I am grateful for my testimony that Myron 
and I and our family will be reunited and be a family forever. 



53rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




329 



ORSON 



KENNETH 



TAYLOR 



On Monday morning, November 3, 1913, one of the sweetest and 
most angelic spirits to come to the earth, arrived at the Maria D. and 
Arthur N. Taylor home at 256 No. Fifth West, Provo, Utah, In the 
Provo Third Ward Chapel on December 7, 1913, an uncle, and Bishop 
of the P rovo Third Ward, Thomas N, Taylor blessed him and gave him 
the name of Orson Kenneth Taylor, 

The Father, Arthur N, Taylor, was an ardent admirer of the 
writings and life of Orson F. Whitney, so the first name of "Orson" 
was chosen and given to his youngest baby boy. 

Living in the home and taking care of many of the household duties 
at this time, was an English convert to the Church, Janet Poole, To 
most of us she was like a big sister, but Ken's pleasant disposition and 
sweet spirit found a choice and vital spot in Janet's heart, and she be- 
came his second mother. In her sight, Ken could do no wrong - - - he 
was perfect. While serving as a missionary to her native country, 
England, she wrote the following tribute: "If there ever was a boy that 
possessed a choice spirit it is you, Kenneth. I always felt it from a 
baby and the older you get the more it shows itself. " 

This curley, red-headed, freckled faced boy became the favorite 
of the neighborhood. He was very quiet, never getting into mischief, 
yet very pleasant company for both old and young. Yet he was a boy 
through and through. He liked to play football, basket ball, and tennis. 
For hours he could sit on the ditch bank and watch the water dance by. 
Or he would sit a safe distance from construction workmen and watch 
them perform their work. 

When Uncle Walt Dixon was raising a garden, he would sit on the 
edge of the garden and watch and talk with Uncle Walter for hours. 
Almost every day he would go down to the pig pen with Uncle Walter, 
when he was feeding the pig, in hopes he would be allowed to scratch 
the pigs back, and listen to the pig grunt, " Ken, Ken, Ken". 

At six years of age, Ken was taken to the old Timpanogos School 
and placed in Mrs. Child's first grade. She, like everyone else, was 
won over by his pleasant personality and took a special interest in his 
first year's education. 

By his eighth birthday, Ken was ready to be baptized a member 
of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the old Stake Ad- 
ministration building font, whidi was located on the corner of First 
West and First North, Provo, He was baptized by William R. Scott, 
an English convert and former King of England soldier- guard , on Nov- 
ember 20, 1921. The same day in the Provo Third Ward Chapel he was 
confirmed a member of the Church by his Uncle Walter D. Dixon, then 
a member of the Provo Third Ward Bishopric. 

It was while he was in the first or second grade that a slight twit- 
ching was occasionally noticed, but it was not until he was about four- 



331 



332 



GRSON KENNETH TAYLOR 



teen years of age that the doctor ordered him to bed and to get all the 
rest possible, to combat the rheumatic fever he had developed. 

To most of us this would be a time of irritability, discourage- 
ment and despair. But Ken accepted it in his easy, matter of fact, un- 
complaining manner, which was one of his dominant, admirable and 
pleasing characteristics. 

As rest was the prescription ordered by the doctor, he was not 
required or permitted to do many of the chores handed down from 
brother to brother. Janet was especially diligent in not allowing him 
to over-exert himself physically, for she as the rest, would do his 
work rather than run the risk of overexertion. 

With such an even temperament, a sunny disposition, a very ob- 
servant and curious interest in all activity ( but never mischievous or 
objectionable) and the baby boy of the family, naturally he became the 
favorite of the family, from the father on down to and including his 
baby sister and all the neighborhood. 

The summer before Ken went into the mission field, a book agent 
at school sold him his line of "how to finance your college education" 
by selling religious books. 

Father advanced the money to buy a fairly good looking old Ford 
car. Ken packed his books and headed for Cache Valley. Here Janet 
would line up with her friends, appointments for Ken to explain and 
show to them these religious books no family "could be without". One 
of the books was "Hurleburts Story of the Bible", Financially he did 
not score a big success, but it provided him with experience which 
aided him in his missionary labors and it was a real pleasure for Janet 
and her girls to have his companionship prartof this summer. 

Ken graduated from the Provo High School in May of 1932 and 
enrolled as a Freshman at the B. Y. U. the following September. 
These were the depression years, years of wanting and going without. 
In order for him to participate in some of the social activities of school 
life, and which he felt he could not financially afford, Alice agreed to 
help him if he would join the Bricker Social Unit. He also joined the 
business fraternity. Alpha Kappa Psi, and served as its vice-preaident 
for one year. Upon the organization of the Associated Men's Students 
on campus, he became a member of its first Council, In June of 1939, 
he and Ruth received their "sheepskins" from the B. Y. U. He spent 
one summer attending the University of Denver, working part time and 
living with Alice and Roy, 

After his graduation from B. Y, U. , his brother Lynn requested 
him to enter the employ of Dixon Taylor Russell Company and help 
him in.tbeadvertiang department and hopefully to expand into the in- 
terior decorating field, which he did. 

Realizing the need for specialized training, he enrolled and at- 
tended the special course in interior decoration at the New York School 
of Interior Decoration during the summer of 1940, 



ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 



333 



In the P rovo Third Ward, Ken was a Sunday School teacher, Sec- 
retary of the ward Y . M. M. I. A. and Superintendent of the Sunday School 
for about three years, where the ward members learned to love and 
appreciate his abilities and devotion as an executive. He was ordained 
to the office of a Seventy by John Harris Taylor on June 28, 1939 and 
served as the President of the 34th Quorum of Seventy's. 

The Arthur N. Taylor family, members of the Provo Third 
Ward, and especially the Pr ovo Third Ward Bishop, Alfred E, Eves, 
were most thrilled and delighted with the mission call that came to 
Ken to serve as a missionary for the Church to Great Britain. This 
was the same mission his father and mother had served in 1900-1903. 
Bishop Eves had joined the Church and had been taught the Gospel by 
Ken's father here. This was the miss ion field where three of his grand- 
parents had heard the Gospel and had joined the Church. His fourth 
grandparent served as a missionary here in 1860-61 while waiting for 
passage to the South African Mission and later was called on a second 
mission to Britain in 1879. 

On November 14,1934, Ken said goodbye to his brave mother and 
ailing father, not knowing if he would ever see his father again in this 
life, which he didn't; he boarded the train at Salt Lake City enroute to 
his field of labor in England. 

His first mission assignment was to the South- sea- Portsmouth 
District and was most fortunate in having a mature, energetic, devot- 
ed and dedicated Elder by the name of Richard G. Harston, as his 
first missionary companion. He immediately caught the missionary 
spirit and plunged into the work with enthusiasm and vigor, Ports- 
mouth was the birthplace of his grandmother Eliza NichoUs Taylor, 
In due time he became President of the Portsmouth District, 

It was while he was in this District that word of the death of his 
father was brought by his first missionary companion, whom he ad- 
mired so much. 

The following is a part of the letter Ken wrote to his Mother 
telling her how he felt upon receiving word of his Father's passing: 

"I know that Father is not dead, he has just gone on a little journ- 
ey through the mist of life to the great and glorious valley of Eternal 
Life where he is preparing and arranging conditions for us, so that 
when we are ready to go and meet himhewill have things all prepared 
for us, everything will there be set in perfect order, just as in this 
life he has always taken care of our wants and needs and kept things 
running smoothly," 

"I know that things are going to go along smoothly with you all at 
home. With the Lord's help everything is going to come out for the 
best. Always keep me posted on finances and general conditions there, 
I want to live as cheaply as possible and want to make it as easy on 
you at home 



334 



ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 



In November of 1935, after having been in the Portsmouth Dist- 
rict for almost a year, Ken was transferred to the Birmingham Dist- 
rict, to the town of Northampton. Here he was appointed senior com- 
panion over three other missionaries. The mission president thought 
there were great possibilities for increased Church activities here in 
Northampton, so the challenge had been given these four Elders to de- 
termine its future potential. Under Ken's leadership much progress 
and increased activity resulted. His success here was partially re- 
sponsible for his being assigned as Supervising Elder of the Birming- 
ham District. This was the comparable assignment his father had 
been called to, in this same mission and district, thirty-six years 
earlier. Even now, some of the older church members still remem- 
bered "President Taylor". This appointment was made on March 10, 
1936. 

After nearly two years in the mission field, the damp, foggy 
English weather started telling on Ken*s health. His mission presid- 
ent, Joseph J. Cannon was aware of this health problem, and was very 
much concerned about it, and suggested he be released. 

So on December 3, 1936, like it or not, he was released from 
the mission field to return home by way of Paris, France. 

While at the B. Y. U. he became re-acquainted with Ethelyn 
Peterson, granddaughter of William S. Rawlings, an old timer of the 
Wildwood Resort in Provo Canyon. 

Although Ethelyn was from Ephraim, Utah and her father Peter 
Canute Peterson and mother, Ethel Rawlings Peterson, still lived 
there; she spent one year in Spanish Fork teaching school and one 
summer on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon working in the Lodge, 
This special attraction resulted in Ken making a couple of trips to 
Grand Canyon that summer, and Spanish Fork became a regular des- 
tination point the school year Ethelyn taught there. 

Before going to New York City for advanced study in Interior 
Decoration, Ken and Ethelyn decided they would be married and make 
this Eastern Study Trip, partly a honeymoon. 

Immediately after the wedding dinner, the newly married couple 
left by train for New York City, where Ken was to enroll in the New 
York School of Interior Decoration, for the summer. 

In New York they were very fortunate in being able to occupy the 
William F, Edwards home, while they were spending the summer in 
the West. 

Here in New York City, besides attending school, the newlyweds 
were able to visit many of the museums, art galleries, plays and mus- 
icals, and see much more of the "big City" than the ordinary tourist. 

Upon successfully completing his schooling with honors. Ken and 
Ethelyn returned to Provo in September of 1940. Here Ken was to 
continue his work at Dixon Taylor Russell Co, in the advertising dep- 
artment as well as assume more reponsibility in the Interior decora- 
tion department 



ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 



335 



Upon arriving at Provo, Ken caught a severe cold which forced 
him to bed. In the meantime, Ethelyn went house-hunting and was 
fortunate in renting William J. Lewis mother's house on Sixth West, 
just south of the old family home. This home was within walking dis- 
tance of work; was in the Third Ward, which Ken had been a member 
of all his life and loved so much; was close to the majority of his rel- 
atives, and many of his friends. 

The bed-rest cure just didn't seem to help him, for instead of 
his health improving, it became worse. Other complications set in 
which required hospitalization the latter part of October and he died 
of a heart ailment on October 31, 1940 at the Utah Valley Hospital, 
Provo, Utah. 

Funeral services were held in the Provo Third Ward on his 27th 
birthday, November 3, 1940. 

Some of the speakers expressed their feeling and thoughts for the 
exemplary life Ken had accumulated in the short span of 27 years in 
the following words: 

WILLIAM D. NORMAN: "It is not how long we live, but how 
well we do while we do live. " 

MAURICE HARDING, Bishop of Provo Third Ward: 

"He was not a self-made man. The secret of his splendid char- 
acter and personality is the result of certain definite causes through 
obedience to definite laws. He came to this earth with a heritage of 
unexcelled quality. His parents, his grandparents, are and were 
people of sturdy stock, of highest honor and integrity. He believed the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ with all the convictions of his conscience. 
When he was sound and vigorous in health, and believed it in his suf- 
fering and prostration in the last conscious thought that his wearied 
mind upon the issues of life- - -He was content in his mind, justified 
in his conscience, immovable in his convictions to truth. The heritage 
that he received from his noble parents and the way of life taught to 
him and lived by him, account for his surpassing personality." 

ALDOUS DIXON Bishop while Ken was Superintendent of the 
Provo Third Ward Sunday School. 

" He placed the sun in the bronze of his hair, and the blue of the 
sky in his eyes." He had the bluest eyes and bronze hair; and as Pres. 
ident Watkins said, "You didn't need to know Ken to Know he was a 
righteous man. All you needed to do was to look at him". A contag- 
eous personality and a positive social force in every way, Ken had the 
will to be kind. That is why he did so well in the Sunday School and the 
little children loved him. In his heart was nothing else but kindness. 
He had the will to be just, and that is why he didn't have an enemy in 
the world; and that is why he placed the friends far above his own in- 
terests; because he had the will to be just. He had the will to believe. 
That is why he had the faith to go on his mission; that is why he con- 
fided in his friends and why they confided in him; because they always 



336 



ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 



knew where he stood. And this will to be kind, and this will to be just, 
and this will to believe, are the characteristics of aChristian. We 
feel to thank God for the life of this wonderful boy, who was really the 
favorite almost of the entire family. We swore by him, we loved to 
see him cross our threshhold. We give thanks to Him for the exam- 
ple Kenneth has set; we give thanks to Him for the inspiration which 
Kenneth has given us. " 

A tribute to Orson Kenneth Taylor by his cousin Rhea Dixon 
Reeve, who was living in California and could not attend the funeral. 
The following verse was read by Aldous Dixon: 

KENNETH'S SMILE 

God knew, we would need more sunshine 

When life's clouds blot the sun from our view. 

So, he sent his trusted servant to us. 

This wonderful work to do. 

He endowed him with a steadfast soul. 

And a heart so pure and true, 

An intellect alert and keen. 

To see life's problems through. 

He placed the sun in the bronze of his hair. 

The blue of the sky in his eyes. 

The song of the bird in his kind sweet voice, 

And a radiant smile from on high. 

He brought to us the "love of God", 

The love of fellow-men; 

A friend to all and loved by all 

Who knew this chap called "Ken", 

He loved little children and 

I have often heard him say, 

" Hello there, sonny" 

How are thing with you today? " 

His creed was to be pleasant 

And keep on the sunny side. 

He carried this cheer across the sea. 

And over the continent wide. 

Now God has called him home again 

In his life 'tis even-tide, 

I know his Heavenly Father is proud of this good son; 

I know He will say, "Kenneth, your work has been well done," 

And because God loves us. 

He will bless and comfort give, 

In this thought, 

" I know my Heavenly Father lives," 
Although we will be lonely. 
As we travel life's weary mile, 
Our hearts will be lifted up 
Remembering, " Kenneth's Smile", 



54th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 13.5 




INEZ DIXON 




BYRON LESLIE DENISON 



337 



Inez Dixon 



D e n i s o n 



Family 




Inez Byron 
Berniece Elaine 




A Short Life Sketch of INEZ D. DENISON 
Written by her sister, Afton D. Wagstaff 

Inez Dixon Denison was born February 20, 1914 at 195 North 
Third West in Prove, Utah. She was the daughter of Parley Smith and 
Mary Etola Dangerfield Dixon. She was the fifth child of seven child- 
ren, four boys and three girls. 

Inez was a beautiful baby and grew into a beautiful woman. She 
had many fond memories of her childhood. 

She attended the Franklin Grade School and graduated fromProvo 
High School. She worked as a secretary for a dairy company in Provo 
before her marriage. 

Inez married Byron Leslie Denison in 1933. They were blessed 
with two daughters, Be mice and Elaine. At the birth of both of her 
children, she developed toxemia, a kidney problem and almost lost 
her life. When Bernice was born she had one convulsion after another, 
and was very sick. Bishop Manning Jolley came many times to mother's 
and dad's home in Orem, where Inez had her baby. We held prayer 
circles with the family and some of the brethren of the Ward. The 
doctor said he had done all he could for her, and it was up to a higher 
power than his to save her. She had great faith and wanted to live. 
She finally recovered fully and was back to her old self again. The 
doctor didn't warn her about having more children. He said it might 
not ever happen again. Then, two years later when Elaine was born 
the same thing happened in her seventh month of pregnancy. She went 
to the Crane Maternity Home to have her baby. After the baby was 
born she was unconscious, and her blood pressure was very high. At 
this time our cousin, Dr. Clifford Dangerfield was here visiting with 
his folks, and mother asked him to go and see her. He had specialized 
in this particular illness in New York. After seeing her chart he told 
mother they weren't doing anything for her and suggested taking her 
home with a trained nurse and treating her there. Her doctor was 
glad for his help. I don't think he had had much experience with this 
type of illness . 

Mrs. Crane let one of her best nurses go to take care of her, 
and with Cliff's instructions to her doctor, they took her home. I spent 
many days helping the nurse. We would put a blanket in hot water, 
wring it out and lay it over a rubber sheet and wrap her in it to sweat 
the poisons out of her system. She was unconscious and had this treat- 
ment for six weeks. 

During this time due to the high blood pressure, she had a slight 
stroke, and there was some brain damage that occured. After she be- 
gan to get well she had to learn to walk and talk all over again. She 
never was able to read or write again. 

Her husband worked for W. W. Clyde Co. on road construction 
and when Elaine was almost two years old, Inez was able to go with 
him to Idaho where he was working. They lived in a trailer while he 



339 



340 



INEZ DDCON DENISON 



was up there. They had a gasoline lamp in the trailer and on Sept. 18, 
1937 in the evening, he was lighting it and it exploded. Inez had the 
baby in her arms and he told her to hurry and get out. He went to get 
Be mice who was on the couch, but by this time the whole place was on 
fire and Byron and Be mice were burned so badly they both died. This 
terrible tragedy was almost more than Inez could take. It was also 
very hard on mother and dad after all the worry they had gone through. 

After that Inez and Elaine made their home with mom and dad 
and as the years went by her health improved and she was able to live 
a normal happy life. Even with all that she had suffered she never 
complained, and was always thankful to her Heavenly Father for her 
blessings and was so thankful for her daughter. 

Mother and Inez helped take care of Aunt Alice Dange rfield when 
she was ill. They would walk to her home each day to care for her. 
When dad died, Uncle Jabe asked her to move into an apartment in his 
home so she would be close to Aunt Alice. Before dad died he had 
planned to build a new home for mother, and signed an agreement to 
sell the home they were in. His death was quite sudden so the home 
was never built. After they moved to Uncle Jabe's in 1947, Aunt Alice 
died on December 7, 1949. 

Mother developed a heart condition in 1949 and wasn't able to do 
anything. Inez took care of her. After Uncle Jabe died on Sept. 26, 
1950, mother suffered another heart attack and had to go to the hospi- 
tal. While she was there and with her permission, Vern bought a 
home she had decided she wanted. We moved all of her things into it, 
so she could go right from the hospital to her home. 

Inez took care of her, cooked all the meals, and did all the house 
work. After mother died in May 195Z, Elaine got married. Inez stay- 
ed in the home. She was active in the Provo First Ward Relief Society 
and was on the luncheon committee for years. She went regularly to 
the Salt Lake Temple with the ward members. She was a visiting 
teacher, 

Inez was a good cook and was always willing to furnish food for 
anything in the ward she was asked to. She was anxious and willing to 
help anyone who was ill and needed her help. When Tempie Penrod 
was ill, Inez would walk from Fourth South and Fourth East to Temple's 
home on Third West and First North in Provo to help her. She did this 
for quite awhile until Tempie died. 

In May 1969 I noticed a change in her health. She gradually got 
worse and she passed away on December 27, 1969. As of February 
1980 she has six grandchildren and seventeen great grandchildren. 

Inez was a wonderful person and was loved by everyone who 
knew her. Her daughter Elaine and the Grandchildren were her whole 
life. 



56th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




341 



Fallentine Family 





•Edith 

Carolyn 

Robert 

Susan 



Be rnard 
Jo Ann 



Michael 




1785 Grove r Lane 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



342 



EDITH ALICE DIXON FALLENTINE 



I was born March 2, 1915 in Provo, Utah to Ernest DeGrey and 
Mary Ann Painter Dixon. I was blessed on May 2, 1915. 

Being the youngest in the family, I was thoroughly spoiled by my 
loving parents and older sisters and brothers. I was a tomboy because 
I played with my twin brothers and their friends. I loved to ride my 
tricycle and bicycle, and also to roller skate. 

We lived across the street from Timpanogos School. Amy, 
Helen, Stella and I were always close friends and did lot of fun things 
together. At school we always joined in the Maypole dance and the 
ball games. We were all born the same year, within a few months of 
each other, and lived within a few blocks of one another. Our fathers 
were brothers. In school we were known as the Four Dixons. We 
graduated from Provo High School together in 1933. 

Most of our summers were spent in Wildwood, Provo Canyon. 
We enjoyed going to the river every day with Aunt Rye Taylor to swim. 
We took many hikes to Aspen Grove, Scott's Hollow and Stewart's Flat. 
Some days we would walk to Vivian Park. 

One fond memory I have was playing along the Provo River while 
my Dad fished. In the evenings the kids in the neighborhood would all 
get together to play "Run Sheep Run" and "Grey Wooley Wooley". 

I went to B. Y. U. for three years. I met Bernie Fallentine and 
we were married November 26, 1936. We lived in Provo and our old- 
est daughter, Jody, wcis born there on September 1, 1937. We moved 
to Pocatello, Idaho and then to Salt Lake City. While in Salt Lake City 
our next daughter, Carolyn, was born February 15, 1940. We moved 
again, this time to Ogden, and our first son, Robert Bernard, was 
born there on August 23, 1942. Once again we moved, this time to 
Spokane, Washington. We lived there for two years before we moved 
back to Provo. While living in Provo, our third daughter, Susan, was 
born on December 8, 1944. We moved to Salt Lake City in 1946 where 
we bought a grocery store with a house attached. The following years 
were busy ones for me with four little children to care for as well as 
helping out in the grocery store. 

Thinking back on those years, I wonder where I fo\ind the time 
for Mutual and Primary as well as P. T. A. ; but somehow I did. I was 
known in the neighborhood as"Nancy Nurse" for any time there was an 
accident in a neighbor's home, or a child was hurt while playing, I 
was the one they called on to give first aid. 

My husband, Bernie, began selling real estate so we sold the 
grocery store. With Bernie in the real estate business, I became in- 
volved in the Real Estate Auxiliary. I belonged to this organization 
from 1962 until 1965. I thoroughly enjoyed the good fellowship of the 
group and was president of the Auxiliary in 1964-65. 

I did not lose my enjoyment of tomboy activities as I grew older 



343 



344 



EDITH DIXON FALLENTINE 



and kept active in sports. I joined the Silver Spurs, a women's horse 
riding club and rode with them for ten years, I was the flag bearer 
for our participation in parades and competition. We won many troph- 
ies for our precision drills. 

The children went on to University classes and then on July 3, 
1961 our second son, Michael Dixon, was born. Two months later 
our second daughter, Carolyn was married to a Navy Air Force Lieut- 
enant, Ralph Gilstrap. This marriage gave me an opportunity to visit 
many places in United States, as they were transferred from the West 
Coast to the East Coast and then back to the West Coast. 

My marriage to Bernie ended in a divorce in 1969. 

Jody is the Perfectionist of the family. Whatever she does, she 
concentrates on her goal of doing it well. One time, when she decided 
to learn to ski, she took time out from University classes and spent 
every day at Alta until she was an expert skier. 

Carolyn is the Teacher. She loves children and likes to watch 
their learning abilities improve. She is now teaching in Montessori 
School in Pennsylvania. 

Robert is the Hunter. He loves dogs and at one time was breed- 
ing hunting dogs. Every fall you will find him the first on the hills for 
the deer hunt. 

Susan is the Homemake r . She has a talent in interior decorating 
to put just the right things together to make a home comfortable and 
delightful to look at. 

Michael has just finished welding classes at Utah Trade Tech 
and is now working in his chosen field. He is an avid hunter and fish- 
erman and also enjoys back- packing. Usually goes into the high 
Uintahs for a week or more with a friend and they live on what they 
can catch or trap. Michael has recently joined the College Rodeo 
Circuit. 

I am proud of my heritage and it was fun to have so many cousins 
in school and in church. I love my children and my grandchildren. 



57th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




345 



Lewis Family 




1-373 No. 1450 E. , Provo, Utah 
346 



STELLA DIXON LEWIS 

Count your many blessings - how that song fills my mind and 
heart as I sit in my beautiful new home on "Y" mountain overlooking 
Provo and Utah Valley, the place of my birth. 

I was born 26 June 1915 in Provo, Utah, the third daughter of 
Charles Owen Dixon and Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead. 

My parents were married 25 August 1909 in the Salt Lake Temple. 
A lovely wedding reception at the Beckstead home in Provo honored the 
happy couple. They moved into the new white brick home my father 
had built for the iTi on the corner of Third North and Fifth West, where 
members of the family lived until they were married and had homes of 
their own. 

My mother was a beautiful and talented woman, loved and re- 
spected by everyone who knew her. She loved her husband and child- 
ren dearly and kept a clean, attractive home for them to enjoy. She 
was active in church and community activities. Her life was much too 
short. After the birth of her youngest child, Virginia, she died 19 Aug- 
ust 1922, at thirty- five years of age. Her marriage to Charles, who 
she loved so dearly, lasted only thirteen years. 

My father had to assume the role of both father and mother to 
six young children - ages twelve to two months. Fortunately, he had 
help from his mother - Sarah DeGrey Dixon, his sisters - Rye Taylor, 
Louie, Electa, and Rene Dixon - living as close neighbors to us. 
Grandmother Beckstead was very helpful and made lovely hand-made 
articles for the girls trousseaus, 

I feel as though I grew up like "Topsy", getting information on 
how to cook and keep house from all our Aunts living near. Many times 
the ideas would conflict and it was not until I took classes at school in 
home economics that I finally felt secure in many home making techniques, 

Timpanogos School was just a block from our home where I re- 
ceived my grade school training. Central Junior High School for two 
years with J. W. Thornton as our principal and many years later I 
taught at Farrer Junior High with him as principal. I grgLduatedfrom 
Provo High School and Seminary in 1933, I was fortunate to have rel- 
atives and friends to go to school with, especially Amy, Helen, and 
Edith Dixon who were my cousins ( our fathers were brothers ). We 
were known as the " 4 Dixons". 

These were the years of the "Depression" and I found it difficult 
to stay in school. I worked on the Press at the Y and at Woolworth's 
down town. I worked my way through and graduated from Brigham 
Young University in 1938 with a degree in Foods and Nutrition and a 
minor in Clothing and Textiles and Home Management. 

Helen Allman, my teacher trainer, helped me make arrange- 
ments in Alamo, Nevada with the Will Stewarts to live with them while 
teaching at the Pahranagat High School. Helen had taught her first year 
in Alamo, also. 



347 



348 



STELLA DDCON LEWIS 



What an experience - living out on the desert in a very small 
community with an LDS Church, a store, school, and service station! 
We had three faculty members, myself, the principal, and the agri- 
culture teacher. We only had thirty-five students in the school and I 
taught things I hadn't dreamed of teaching. Fae Whittwer from Las 
Vegas and I lived with the Stewart family for a year. 

The next two years teaching were at Wasatch High School in 
Heber City, Utah. It was really cold; 40 degrees below zero but I en- 
joyed teaching there and lived with Nada Ellsworth from Provo who I 
had known at BYU. We could drive down Jrrovo Canyon and be home 
for the weekends. It was interesting because they were building the 
Deer Creek Dam in the canyon and we could watch the progress each 
week. The following two years, I taught at Far re r Junior High, Provo, 

My father had been ill for several years and died 3 March 1943. 
He had been so lonely without mother but he did not r.emarry. He did 
everything he could to help his children grow and develop into indepen- 
dent, well educated, religious individuals. He was a kind and loving 
father and sacrificed much for his children; we loved him very much. 

My brother and most of the people I knew were involved in serv- 
ing in various capacities^ Just teaching school at the Farrar did not 
seem important enough at this time. I wanted to do more to help end 
this conflict and bring our loved ones home, Virginia and I enlisted in 
the WAAC on the 4th of June 1944 and were sent to Fort Oglethorpe in 
Georgia for basic training. What an experience! Living under army 
discipline, being told what to do instead of making our own decisions. 
When we finished basic training, the WAAC changed to a part of the 
Army WAC, Anyone wishing to be discharged at this time could do so. 
I had enlisted to be trained in Dietetics for hospital duty. The school 
was closed to military personnel; if I stayed I would have to go to cook 
and bakers school and work in a mess hall. I could serve better as a 
teacher, so I asked for a discharge. 

After returning home, I went toEphraim to teach at Snow College 
and enjoyed it very much. While there, I became aware of a new pro- 
gram offered to college graduates in physical therapy by the army. I 
was excited about this and applied, and was accepted. While waiting 
for my school to start, Itaught six weeks at Dixie College, St. George. 

I was sent to DeMoines, Iowa for a refresher course in basic 
training. My orders came through for Stanfo id University for train- 
ing. While waiting for my class to start, I worked at Pasadena Reg- 
ional Hospital in California, receiving training and experience in the 
Orthopedic Department and Clinic, Once again, the program for 
military personnel was closed at Stanford, so I was sent to Percy 
Jones General Hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan - from the beauti- 
ful, warm Pasadena to sub-zero Michigan in January, 

I received excellent training in physical therapy by outstanding 
doctors and specialists. We worked in the clinic and on the wards in 



STELLA DIXON LEWIS 



349 



this huge hospital. It was the second largest in the country after 
Walter Reed in Washington, D. C. We had 28, 000 amputees and nerve 
injury cases. These fellows came right from the battle field to us. 

After completing six months training (equal to a year's training 
in peace time), I was scheduled for work in plastic surgery at Menlo 
Park, California for three months before being commissioned. The 
war ended and I decided to return home instead of remaining in the 
Army. I planned to do physical therapy at the Bushnell General Hos- 
pital but grandmother Beckstead, living at our home, fell and fractured 
her hip; sol went back to teaching at the Farrer and taking care of her. 

Wesley Lewis, a distant cousin who I had known since he came 
to Provo from Park City when we were in Junior High School, return- 
ed from the war in the Pacific. He had been wounded on Biac Island 
and had spent time in Australia recovering from his injuries. 

We had gone around in the same group of friends in High School 
but hadn't dated each other (just good friends). We lived in the Third 
Ward, a few blocks from each other, and sang in the choir; our fam- 
ilies were close friends. Wes' father had lived at grandmother Beck- 
steads when he was going to school at BYU. He would tell me what a 
beautiful woman my mother was. Wes' great grandmother and mine 
were sisters from Wales. This made a relationship on the Lewis, 
Beckstead side of the family. Also his great Aunt, Sarah Lewis, 
married my Uncle John Dixon, making a relationship on the Dixon, 
Lewis line, 

Wes and I started dating and were engaged on Valentine Day 
14 February 1946. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple, 1 May 
1946 by J. William Knight, We had a beautiful wedding breakfast in 
the Empire Room at Hotel Utah and stayed in a suite of rooms on the 
sixth floor on our wedding night. We spent our honeymoon painting 
and decorating the little purple brick house next to Wes' parents home 
that had been built for his grandmother Lewis. What a darling house! 
We carpeted and furnished it, transplanted roses and shrubs from my 
home to make it pretty outside. 

How happy we were and our happiness increased when our son, 
Fred, arrived 1 April 1947, an April Fools baby. He was the first 
grandson for the Lewis family and they were excited about him. 

When Fred was about 18 months old, BYU asked me to teach in 
their Clothing and Textiles Department. I taught a year and was ex- 
pecting another child. John Stephen arrived two weeks early; we just 
made it to the hospital in time on 1 1 October 1949. 

We sold our home and bought a new three bedroom house at 
952 East 150 North in Provo. It was great having three bedrooms and 
we soon filled them with two darling little girls: Lynn Ann, born 23 
March 195 2 and Sandra Lee, 23 July 1954. 

We lived in this home twelve years. My husband, Wes, became 
ill; at the time he was working at Geneva Steel Company in the Account- 



350 



STELLA DIXON LEWIS 



ing Department. He was out of work for several months and our doc- 
tor advised me to secure employment to care for our little family 
because his recovery would take some time. 

I applied for teaching at Brigham Young University and was 
fortunate to teach in the new College of Family Living in the Home 
Management Department. I was Supervisor of the Home Management 
House and taught management and household equipment classes. 

It was difficult teaching, taking care of my family, keeping up 
our home and trying to help my husband regain his health. I was pres- 
sured to continue my education in acquiring a Masters Degree which I 
obtained 27 May 1966 in Health Education from Brigham Young Univ. 

I took an early retirement from BY U in 1972 after having taught 
there for 17 years. I had an accident with an electric toothbrush blow- 
ing up and losing some of my hearing. Nevertheless, ready for a new 
challenge, I decided to work for the ZCMI Department Store (a newly 
built store) in the Orem Mall. I worked for one year as their first 
manager of the China, Crystal, and Silver Department under Keith 
Mitchell, the store manager. It was exciting to watch the store grow 
around us as we were being trained. I worked in the Valley Fair Mall 
and Downtown ZCMI in Salt Lake as part of my training program. I 
Learned so much and enjoyed the experience. 

Joanne Losee asked me to manage the China, Silver, and Cry- 
stal Department at the new Bullock and Losee Jewelry store in the 
Orem Mall, It was fun for a year and I learned much about diamonds 
and jewelry. 

Finally retirement, but not to sit still, Steve talked us into 
selling our large, beautiful home we really enjoyed but was too large 
for us at the time, and built a new one which was planned to meet our 
needs for the present and for retirement. 

I had a very special experience as the President of the Dixon 
Family Organization for two years. We are making strides in seeking 
our ancestors, which is a rewarding experience, 

I am so grateful for all the many blessings that are mine: To 
have had the wonderful heritage that is mine, ancestors looking for a 
better life, freedom of religion - not afraid of work and hardships to 
attain their goals and make a better life for themselves and their 
posterity, 

, , , , For my parents, a mother I am looking forward to know- 
ing in the next life, a father that sacrificed everything for his children, 

, , , ,A husband, the father of our four fine children. We are 
so proud of our two fine and handsome sons, our two beautiful talented 
daughters, our darling seven grandchildren; they all bring us a great 
deal of joy. 

, . . .A beautiful, comfortable home surrounded by our glorious 
valley and mountains and our warm, loving neighbors and friends. 

.... For my four sisters and brother and their families. 



58th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 





DOYLE R. LARSON 



351 



The Larson Family 




Amy Doyle 





AMY LAVERN DIXON LARSON 



On July 2, 1915 a little red haired girl was born to Louie Maiben 
and Walter DeGrey Dixon. No one could have been more welcomed and 
loved into this world. Her Father blessed and gave her the name of 
Amy Lavern Dixon. My Mother would have chosen Lavern as the first 
name, but Dad seemed to like Amy better and he had the last say of 
the matter. 

I was blessed from the very first day I came into the world with 
wonderful health and have had very little illness in my life. I'm sure 
it was through the love and care of my parents that this was possible. 
The happiness and well being of their children was so important to 
them. I'm sure we all felt this being wanted made our family ties very 
close. 

I have such fond memories of my early childhood. Every special 
holiday, including birthdays, was celebrated and family dinners were 
extra special on these days. My Mother was a wonderful cook and loved 
her old Majestic coal range. She seemed to know just the right temp- 
erature to bake, and her home-made bread was out of this world. Our 
parents finances were very limited, but somehow we didn't lack for all 
the enjoyments that went with these special events. The X'mas Holi- 
days were extra special and all of us would help to decorate the house, 
and I remember how hard it was for my parents to keep us from getting 
up in the middle of the night on Christmas Eve. We had a phonograph 
and my Dad would play a X'mas tune and that was the signal that it was 
time to get up. 

It makes me feel very sad when I think what a short time I had with 
my Father, I was the baby of the family and was just barely six when 
he became ill and died while being operated on for ulcers. This was a 
terrible shock and loss to our family and the community. He was so 
dearly loved by everyone. I have often heard different people say they 
couldn't think of a fault he had unless it was working too long and hard. 
I can remember vividly the day of his funeral and my whole first grade 
class coming to the funeral. Death was such a mystery to me, and I 
could see how heart broken my Mother was. She and Dad had such a 
perfect marriage and they were so young to have it end so abruptly. 
Many times after the funeral I would come home from school and find 
my Mother in tears with grief and loneliness, I would climb up on her 
lap and I'm sure she found much comfort and love in her baby daughter. 
Even as I grew older, I was always introduced as the baby of the family. 

Being left with five children and very little income, my Mother 
took in B.Y.U students. My brothers continued on with school and 
found part time jobs, which were made possible through good relatives 
and friends, Rhea was teaching school down South at the time of my 
Father's death. She and Father had such a wonderful relationship, 
because Mother didn't like to leave the children and home and go out 



353 



354 



AMY DIXON LARSON 



socially, so Dad would take Rhea as his partner. My Mother's home 
was her heaven and she didn't like to leave it for any length of time. 
Even though Mother made very little profit from her boarders she en- 
joyed fixing lovely meals for them and we had some wonderful times 
singing in the evening and hearing all about the school activities. Our 
home life was very exciting and busy. There was never a dull moment. 
Meal times were a special time. We looked forward to my Mother's 
good cooking and the association of each other. 

My school days were so great. I was so lucky to have four 
cousins just a few months difference in age. We all lived in the same 
Ward and attended school and church together. We were called the 
four Dixons, all the way through school. I'm sure the closeness and 
love we had for each other helped us to keep our standards of living 
high. Our parents had no fears of our picking up bad habits. We all 
were active in the Church. We spent many wonderful vacations at 
Wildwood, in Provo Canyon, where the Dixons had summer homes. 

After we graduated from High School, we knew we couldn't re- 
main as close because some of us would, continue with college and 
others would find employment. I did have the privilege of going two 
semesters at the B. Y, U. and getting a taste of college life before it 
was necessary for me to find work. My Mother sacrificed so much 
for her children and did want us all to have a college education, but 
the burden became a little bit heavy and I wanted to relieve her of this 
worry. My Aunt Electa Dixon knew Mr. Christensen, the owner of the 
City Drug, and she was able to get me my first job. I really enjoyed 
meeting people and even though the wages were very small, because of 
the depression, I was able to help at home. By this time all of my 
brothers and sisters were married, however, this didn't stop them 
from coming home often. Mother did a wonderful job keeping our 
family ties close. 

I enjoyed my work at City Drug. The people working in that area 
would come to the Drug Store to relax and I made many fine friends 
including Devere Ship, who worked for the Utah State Liquor Commis- 
sion. She informed me that she was quiting her job to get married 
and thought I would have a chance to get it if I applied. I had mixed 
emotions about quiting the Drug Store, but the salary was so much 
better and I could certainly use it. I didn't have an idea I would get it 
because there were so many that applied, but I was the lucky one. 

At the time I was at the State Liquor Store, World War II had 
started, I became acquainted with Delda Russell who managed the eat- 
ing counter at Hedquist Drug, She was having a hard time finding help 
and asked me if I could type their luncheon menu's. I was happy to do 
this because they gave me my lunch for this service, 

I knew Delda had a brother in the service. She talked of him 
often, I had the privilege of meeting him while he was home on fur- 
lough, I guess because we were so extremely different we attracted 



AMY DIXON LARSON 



355 



each other. Doyle was very quite and shy, while I am a very out- going, 
sociable person. We had several dates while he was honae, and con- 
tinued to write each other until the war was over. I guess after know- 
ing each other for three or four years, I thought it was time we talked 
of marriage, I'm sure I did most of the planning, but Doyle went right 
along with my decisions. We were married by Arthur D. Taylor at my 
home with all the family members on both sides attending. My sister, 
Rhea, gave us a lovely wedding party at Silver Dollar Cafe. After just 
a few days in Salt Lake it was necessary for us to return to Provo and 
our employment. Doyle was working at Pacific States Pipe Plant at 
that time. On December 7, 1972, Doyle and I were married for time 
and all eternity by Earl Lewis in the Provo Temple, and our two boys 
were sealed to us. 

Before we were married, Doyle had been making his home with 
his Mother, so we continued to live with her. I kept on working, and 
Grandma Larson enjoyed keeping the house nice and clean and prepar- 
ing lovely meals for us. This arrangement worked out fine. 

On January 5th 1949, a handsome baby boy was born to the Doyle 
Larson family. I will never forget that year; it was one of the coldest 
and longest winter we have had. The snow was at the tops of the 
fences and it seemed months before I could get out with my new son. 
Doyle and I were both elated with being parents. Larry was such a 
healthy, darling baby. Grandma Larson offered to continue taking care 
of the things at home and tending Larry, if I wanted to return to work. 
I was offered a very good position at Granite Furniture, which wasn't 
far from where we lived. The hours and pay were good, so I accepted. 
This working arrangement worked out fine. Larry was five years old 
when Grandma Larson had a short illness that resulted in her death. 
We missed her very much, she had been so helpful to us. 

On May 18, 1954, Michael Larson became a member of our 
family. We were so happy with our two sons and it was so good to be 
home with my family and be able to have free time to be more active 
in the Church and attend P. T.A. Our boys were active in the Ward and 
it was one of the happiest periods of our married life. It was quite 
difficult living on one salary, but somehow we managed. It was good 
to be able to visit with my Mother every afternoon. She adored my 
children. How happy I am that at least the boys could remember their 
grandmothers. I feel sad that -they were cheated out of knowing their 
grandfathers. My Mother passed away soon after Grandma Larson. 
Her death was also very sudden. We all loved our home at 232 North 
Fifth West, so it was decided one of the children could have the first 
chance to buy it. Doyle and I were the only ones who didn't own a home, 
and Rhea was happy to just have us buy it and she would live with us. 
I can't help but think that I was supposed to live and die on Fifth West 
Street, "Sandy Alley" as it was nick named. 

We loved fixing up Mother's home by putting in a furnace and 



356 



AMY DIXON LARSON 



making a few other changes to make it more comfortable. This extra 
expense made it tempting for me to find another job. Doyle's sister 
lived in the same apartment house as the manager of Lerner's Dress 
Shops, She mentioned to Delda one day that she surely would like to 
find a more mature woman to be head cashier at Lerner's. Delda knew 
that I had mentioned wanting to go back to work, so she told Mrs. Mills 
about me. I had an interview the following day and went right to work 
for her. I worked eight years for Lerner's and enjoyed the association 
I had with the girls I worked with, I have always liked people, so I 
enjoyed mixing with the public once again. 

My boys were both in school and with Aunt Rhea living with us. 
They were very seldom alone, and their Dad loved doing things for them 
and helped so much in the home to relieve me, Doyle was such a good 
cook and prepared so many of the meals. We loved being in the "good 
old Third Ward" again, and the boys adjusted to the change. We had 
the good fortune of sending them both on Missions from the Third Ward, 
Larry went to England and Michael to Denmark, We were very proud 
to be missionary parents and our boys represented us and the Ward in 
a splended fashion. 

It seemed that whenever our expenses continued to grow, there 
seemed to be a like opening to increase our income. The opportunity 
came to me to again work for the State. The wages were so much 
better than at Lerner's Shop. Again, I had mixed emotions about leav- 
ing the people I was working for, I had made some wonderful friends. 
But I could see there was no chance for future advancement, I accepted 
the State job and held this job until my retirement this year, 

Doyle and I have had our disappointments and heart aches, but 
our blessings far outweigh them. The companionship and love that 
Doyle and I have for each other is most precious and we are so very 
proud of the love and respect and happiness our two sons have been to 
us. Suddenly on November 19, 1978, my dear husband, Doyle, passed 
away. I am very grateful that he was able to read this history before 
his death. It brought back fond memories to both of us. 

We now have two lovely daughter-in-laws and four darling grand 
children. 

On Februry 15, 1980, I retired after having worked for more 
than thirty-five enjoyable years. My sister Rhea and I are still making 
our home at the family home at 232 North Fifth West, Provo, Utah. 



59th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D.# 14.6 




E. JUNIUS PAYNE 



357 



Payne Family 




Helen Bette 
Barbara June 




8109 E. Edgemont Ave. 
Scottdale, Arizona 



358 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF 
HELEN DIXON PAYNE 



The afternoon of July 21, 1915 my parents Electa La Prele 
Smoot and LeRoy Dixon had overnight guests arrive. My arrival had 
been expected sometime the latter part of July, but during the night 
Electa started her labor. By early morning the doctor arrived to be 
told by mother to be quiet, as she had guests eating breakfast in the 
next room. He told her if she could keep quiet he was sure he could. 

I was born and made my first announcement with my first cry 
to the family and guests at breakfast time July 22, 1915. 

At the age of about two years old, during the Flu epidemic .dur- 
ing the First World War, I had the flu. My fever was so high and for 
so long it destroyed part of the auditory nerve in my hearing. 

This hearing loss didn't seem too much of a hindrance during 
my childhood years , however I did feel self conscious and shy for fear 
of misunderstanding people. I feel I received much growth through- 
out my life through this challenge. 

I had a wonderful childhood. I was christened Helen Dixon and 
have been grateful of my heritage and upbringing in the Church. 

I started school at the Timpanogos School, across the street 
from our home, at the age of six. I attended Sunday School, Primary, 
Religion Class, Mutual, and Seminary through my growing years. 

Many happy memories of my early life are of "Wildwood" , Provo 
Canyon. It was such fun to hike to Aspen Grove to buy a "Holloway 
Black Cow" sucker (carmel and chocolate) to eat on the way home; 
then to climb the mountains; swim in the river; walk down the "line" 
to meet the train (Heber Creeper); the bonfires and programs we had 
down by the Rock House and our trips with the family to the Hot Pots. 
I was very fortunate to have parents that were so much fun and so 
desir ous of filling our lives with all the opportunities that were possible. 

It was a terrible loss to me to lose Daddy. He had taken us on 
a trip the summer before he died and I had my twelth birthday while 
we were gone. 

I attended Junior High School and Provo High School. I graduated 
from Seminary in 1932 and from the Provo High School in 1933. 

I attended Brigham Young University where I met my husband 
E. Junius Payne. We were married April 2, 1935 in Salt Lake Temple 
by President David O. McKay. He was an apostle at the time. June 
ran out of money and had to leave school, so we were married and 
moved to El Paso, Texas. 

We lived in El Paso for a few months and decided to go back to 
school. With the depression on we found we couldn't manage school, 
we moved to Oakland, California. 

We lived in California for ten years and they were happy one's. 
We loved the Church and working in it. We became parents, which 



359 



360 



HELEN DIXON PAYNE 



has been one of my most choice blessings and has brought me so much 
love and happiness. 

Our first born, Barbara June, was born on December 31, 1937 
and Bette Lyn was born on July 8, 1939. They have always been love- 
ly daughters whom I have always been proud of. 

In the year of 1940 on Christmas day I lost my mother, who had 
been such an example and inspiration to me throughout my life; being 
mother, father, friend and companion to me. I could always tell her 
anything and know she would be kind and understanding. 

In 1943 we bought our first home "Suits Us" in Oakland, Calif- 
ornia. 

While living in Oakland I served as Sunday School teacher, and 
Primary secretary. 

In 1945 we moved to Provo, Utah. I was happy to be home again. 
We bought a home north of the North Park, where we had always play- 
ed as children. While in Provo I taught the Beehive class in the MIA. 

We lived in Provo for two years and decided to move to Mesa, 
Arizona and try building our own home and be close to some of June's 
family. His father was President of the Arizona Temple. 

Just before moving to Mesa I had experienced the first shock of 
being totally without hearing. This cleared up for a few weeks, and 
then struck me. again. This condition continued until I was completely 
without hearing. It was quite an adjustment for us all. Everyone has 
been wonderful to me, and I have been truly blessed in being able to 
read lips, and understand people as well as I have. 

We found Mesa was very hot and after completing our house we 
moved back to Provo. We were only in Provo for two or three years 
when June was offered a nice position in Phoenix at the nicest furn- 
iture store in the area. So once again we came back to Arizona in 
October of 1950. 

In 1956 Barbara married and gave us our first son, Robert Lee 
Ipsen. In 195 9 Bette married Robert Warren Peterson. They both 
have had four children, Barbara, three girls and one boy; Bette, two 
girls and two boys. These eight grand children are treasures to me 
and bring much happiness to me. 

In i960 we sold our Phoenix home and moved to Scottsdale, 
Arizona where I am still living. ( 1979 ) 

I am grateful for the privileges I have had in serving in the 
Church, In Arizona I taught in the Primary, Relief Society; been coun- 
selor to several Ward Relief Society Presidents. I served four years 
as a counselor in East Phoenix Stake Relief Society Presidency and 
served as Homemaking leader in three different wards, I have been 
a visiting teacher since 1951. I have loved all these experiences. I 
have enjoyed the Temple through the years in Arizona, 

In 1965 I started working in an Electronics Plant in Scottsdale as 



HELEN DIXON PAYNE 



361 



a warehouse clerk. I kept this job until 1975 when I suffered a severe 
heart attack and have been unable to go back to work, 

I lost my beloved husband July 9, 1971, which has left a deep 
void in my life. 

During my illness and since, I have surely been blessed by the 
love of my Heavenly Father and my children and family. Their love 
and help and support makes my life fulfilled. 

I hope to have many more happy years to add to my history. 



AN EXPERIENCE I WILL NEVER FORGET 
Helen Dixon Payne 

My younger brother Arthur was dying and our whole family was 
around his bed, I was just six and a half years of age and he was four 
years old, 

Arthur had been sick for a period of time. During this time 
Uncle Walter Dixon had had surgery and died. (Uncle Walt and Arthur 
had a love for one another, that was strong enough that Uncle Walter 
would walk up to our house every evening just to see Arthur). 

Arthur kept asking Mother where Uncle Walt was and why he 
hadn't been to see him. Arthur was so ill and still so young, she 
wouldn't tell him Uncle Walt had gone to the hospital for an operation. 
He was never told of his death. 

While we were all around Arthur's bed he opened his eyes and 
looked up into the corner of the room and said to Mother, "Mama 
there-'s Uncle Walt". Mother told him she couldn't see him and he 
said, "Mama he is right there, he has come for me." He looked back 
up and said, " I'm coming Uncle Walt. " He passed away within the 
hour. 

As I have grown older and have realized the spiritual meaning 
of this to have one so young and see and recognize loved ones from 
the spirit world coming to meet them. It has been beautiful and I 
recognize this experience as being my first knowledge of having a 
testimony. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ELECTA LA PRELE SMOOT DIXON 

ID# 14 w 

Born September 25, 1883 at Provo, Utah to Electa Bullock and Abra- 
ham Owen Smoot. 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church August 20, 
1892. 

Married Le Roy Dixon August 26, 1903, in the Salt Lake Temple. 
Children: 

Le Roy, Paul, Allie, Sarah, Maurine, Helen, Arthur , Gladys . 

Received her education in the Provo City Schools and attended BYU, 

In July 1908 she took Grandma, Sarah DeGrey Dixon, back to her 
birthplace, England for a visit and to return home with her 
missionary husband, LeRoy. 

She not only was a mother to her five girls and three boys, but also to 
several English converts and BYU students who made 418 No. 
Fifth West their home. 

She served in the Utah Stake Tabernacle Choir, the Primary, Sxinday 
Schools, and Mutual organizations. 

Secretary of Utah Stake Relief Society Board for 11 years and Presi- 
dent of the Board for 5 years. 

She was very active in the Red Cross organization. 

She died December 25, 1940 at Provo, Utah. 



362 



60th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




363 



George Smith Dixon Family 




371 Hobbs Lane, Santa Maria, Calif. 



364 



HISTORY OF GEORGE SMITH DIXON 



I was born in Provo, Utah on September 27, 1915, at 390 West 
Second North. I was named George after my Uncle George West from 
California, whom my father worked for. Uncle George West was very 
helpful and kind to my father and family. I was named Smith, after 
my grandmother, Mary Smith Dixon. I was the youngest of five child- 
ren. I had three sisters and one brother. We were a very close 
family, and watched out for each other and tried to help our parents 
as much as possible to relieve them of some of their burdens. 

When I was very young I was tongue tied. When any one asked 
me my name, it sounded like "dod e ditin" so my brother Glen nick- 
named me "dod". I held that name for some time, especially from 
him. As I got older it became George. 

The playmates I had when I was young were great. When I would 
go to their homes to play I was treated as one of their family. Their 
mother and father were very kind and I always left with a good feeling 
and something to snack on. I remember we played lots of "cowboys". 
We used wood lathe for our horses. I always had four or five hidden 
away in the shed. We each had cowboy names from the movies. I 
was "Hoot Gibson". As we grew older it became model cars and air- 
planes and larger things as our ages permitted. 

I wasn't a church going man, but I believed in my religion. I 
had high standards and morals to live by, and I lived them to the best 
of my knowledge. When we were young, Siinday School was a must, 
and we all attended the Third Ward on Sunday. I looked forward for 
Tuesdays to come, so I could go to Scout Meeting and then play in the 
new Ward gymnasium. 

For our summer vacation we used to go to Wildwood and stay 
for a few weeks, where it was like a family reunion all summer. We 
were one big happy family, mostly all Dixons and Taylors. We had 
lots of fun, young and old, leaving lots of good memories. 

I have some wonderful memories of my mother and father. 
One vivid memory of my mother, was coming home from school, in 
the winter, and opening the door and what an "aroma". Her bread 
was just coming out of the oven and she would give me a big slice of 
the heel, still steaming hot, with lots of butter and honey or jam on it 
and a cup of hot chocolate, and was it "yummie". 

My father was an outdoor person. He liked hunting and fishing, 
and took me along on most of his trips. We went to Fishlake and out 
to Strawberry fishing, and down to Southern Utah hunting. Dad and 
Glen were always good at both, but I was just fair. I especially enjoy- 
ed going to the wrestling matches with him at the old Provo Armory. 
We saw some pretty wild matches. We had our favorites which were 
local boys, such as: Henry Jones, Dean Parks and Ira Dern. They 
were very good and we did a lot of cheering for them. I really did 



365 



366 



GEORGE SMITH DIXON 



enjoy them and especially being with my Dad made it more interesting. 

I didn't take too much interest in school. I dropped out in the 
eleventh grade. I had very seldom missed a day, and had fun and did 
learn a little. But it was in business that I had to learn the three R's 
in a hurry in order to financially survive. 

When I was young I raised rabbits . I had some very rare breeds. 
I used to sell them, and did some trading. And of course, like all little 
boys, I had my pet dog. 

In the summer I used to thin sugar beets, pick strawberries, 
cherries and other fruit sol would have a dollar to spend on the Fourth 
of July, and which included a whole thirty cents to take my girl friend 
to the movies and buy her a big Babe Ruth candy bar. What good old 
days they were. 

Leaving school I got a job with Sewells United Grocery Store, a 
chain that moved into Provo. I worked as a box boy until Bob Wight- 
man hired me in the meat department. I worked with Bob for about 
six months. He resigned and went to work for another company. Dean 
Hiller and Johnie Dawson, my supervisors, came down from Salt Lake 
and put me in as manager. I was thrilled and so were my parents, for 
I was the youngest manager in the chain of some fifty stores. I have 
remained in the meat business for the past forty-five years, retiring 
in 1976, due to a health problem. 

It was when I was working at Sewells in Provo, that I met my 
wife, Veon Collings. Her mother was a good customer at the store, 
operating an eating house near Springville, called the Chicken Roost. 
Her mother Flo, called me one day for an order of meat, and wanted 
me to deliver it. I took the meat order over that night. She said Veon 
was her daughter and was working there and I should know her, as she 
used to run around with my sister Faye . I did remember seeing her 
at our house, but I never paid any attention to her until that night. 
After then it was all attention. I became a steady customer. After 
her day was through, we would take a ride so she could relax. Then I 
was transferred to Salt Lake. On my days off, to Springville I would 
go. One rainy, cold day in November, which happened to be the 18th, 
I went down to the Chicken Roost early in the morning and told Veon's 
mother we were going to get married. We went to Evanston, Wyoming 
in a bad snow storm. At the clerks office we got our license and ask- 
ed for a Mormon Bishop to perform the ceremony. One came from 
his work long enough to marry us. After the ceremony we headed 
back to Salt Lake City. We stayed with Veon's aunt and my sister 
Mary, until we found an apartment of our own. Veon had a two year 
old son by a previous marriage, which I adopted. He was named 
Shirel. We lived in Salt Lake for a while, then back to Provo. 

A friend had a store in Grants, New Mexico. He sent for us to 
help run it. So off we go. We stayed there for a while then back to 



GEORGE SMITH DIXON 



367 



Provo. After a short stay in Provo we decided to go to California. 
We ended up in Pasadena and I went to work for Safeways as a meat 
manager in Altadena. We enjoyed it there very much and had lots of 
good friends. 

On July 22, 1942 we got something we both wanted, a baby girl. 
We named her Constance Lee. Now with a son and a daughter we were 
very proud and happy. Then, on July 27, 1944 We had another son. 
We named him Robert George. We now had three beautiful children. 

The war was now going full force, and I was drafted. I ended up 
in Leyte, in the Phillipine Islands. Veon and the children moved back 
to Springville. She went to work for her mother to help our finances. 
Army pay then was very small and you couldn't exist without another 
income and other help. She did a marvelous job taking care of herself 
and the three children, on what money was coming in. She will always 
be admired for her wonderful help in finances and sickness. 

I was discharged from the service in 1946 at Fort Douglas in 
Salt Lake. After working for a while in Utah, we decided to come back 
to California. First we went to San Luis Obispo, where I went to work 
for Mr. Ed Sears in his Market as a meat manager. Sears sold out 
so we moved to Solvang to open our own business. Then we moved to 
Santa Maria and bought a new house. I went to work for Bob Schutz. 
Veon went to work at the Santa Maria Country Club, After thirteen 
years with Bob I bought him out and it became "GEORGES MEATS". 
Connie and Robert both live here in Santa Maria and Sheril in Simi, 
about one and one-half hours drive from here. We are blessed with 
six grandsons. Maybe some day we will have a granddaughter. 

I have had two surgical operations on my hip, with a third one 
coming up, which we know will be successful. 

Now being retired, I love to putter around the house. I do some 
cooking and making things out of wood. I hope I can get back to doing 
my gardening, which I like. When all my problems are back to norm- 
al, my wife and I can do the things we love to do together, and share 
the most important thing in life, "Happiness", with our children and 
our grandchildren and friends, until our time here is ended. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
HARRIET HANDS DIXON 

ID # 7 w 

Born May 25, 1874 at Birmingham, England to Harriet NichoUs and 
Ebenezer Hands. 

Married William Aldous Dixon December 15, 1904 at Provo, Utah. 
Children: 

William H. , Vesta, Glen H. , Mary, Faye Harriet, George. 

"Hattie", was the daughter of Grandma Eliza Taylor's younger sister , 
Harriet Nicholls. When she was 16 years of age, she accom- 
panied Grandma Eliza N. Taylor back to Utah for a visit. 
While in Utah she was baptized in the Provo River and con- 
firmed a member of the L. D. S. Church the same day by T.N. 
"B-ylor and W. J. Lewis . The Third Ward records were later 
destroyed by fire, so she was re-baptized October 20, 1940. 

After 10 years in Utah she returned to England as she had promised 

her parents she would. One more year in England convinced 
her that America was where she wanted to live. Soon after 
her return to Utah she was married. 

She loved her family; visiting and traveling frequently from Utah to 
California and vice-versa. 

She missed living to be 100 years old by just seven months. 

Died at San Luis Obispo, California on October 10, 1973. 



368 



62nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




369 



Barrett Family- 




Michael 

Anna John 
. Jack 





\ 

1 

'v 

MM m 


-t ■ 






1 -»,-.. 







450 No. 825 West 
O rem, Utah 



370 



ANNA MAE DIXON BARRETT 



I was born April 13, I9I6 and was named Anna Mae, daughter of 
Mary Etola Dangerfield and Parley Smith Dixon. I am the sixth child 
of seven children, four boys and three girls. 

Mother and Dad lived at 195 North Third West when I was born. 
I had light curly hair and blue eyes. I'm told I was a very busy little 
girl. 

The year the Provo Woolen Mills burned down, during all the 
excitement, I came up missing. They were all out looking for me and 
when they found me I was on the corner of University Avenue and Main 
Street watching the men pour cement in front of the new Post Office 
building that was built on that corner. I had Afton's doll and doll buggy 
and had pushed it all the way up there, which was five blocks from 
home . 

I didn't have any of the childhood diseases and when the flu 
epidemic was around in 1918, I was the only one in the family that 
didn't get it. So I've been blessed as far as sickness was concerned. 
I've had very little sickness in my life. 

Dad and Mother moved several times while I was growing up and 
in February 1923 they bought a home on Tenth West between Center 
Street and First South in Provo. 

I attended the Franklin Grade School and Dixon Junior High School. 
During the depression years Dad and Mother thought it would be better 
if they had a farm as the boys were out of work. So in 1933 they 
bought a fruit farm in Orem, Utah. 

I graduated from the Lincoln High School in Orem. After that 
I moved to Provo where I worked for Afton and Mont while they were 
managing the Royden Hotel for Uncle Jabe Dangerfield. 

The cafe next door was run by the Barretts. This is where I 
met my husband, John Barrett. We were married May 26, 1937 in 
Orem, Utah, in Dad and Mom's home. We moved in the basement of 
my brother Reed's home. Our son. Jack was born there. 

In about 1938 we moved to California. We lived in Los Angeles, 
Indio, and Santa Ana, California. Then we bought a home in San Bern- 
ardino and our son Michael was born there. 

My husband, John was drafted into the Navy in 1944. After the 
war we moved back to Provo in 1950. We lived there for a while then 
bought a home in Orem, Utah. Both of our sons went to school in Orem. 

My husband's mother was running the Royden Hotel and when she 
became very ill, with cancer, we sold our home in Orem and moved 
into the Hotel to take care of her. After she died, we moved into the 
Academy Hotel where we managed it for quite a few years. 

We bought a mobile home in Provo in 1973 and this is where we 
now live. 

We have two sons, eight grandchildren and four great, grand- 
children. 



371 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
PARLEY SMITH DIXON 

ID # 1 3 

Born in a little house at 10 East between 2nd & 3rd South in Salt Lake 
City on June 9, 1878 to Mary Ann Smith and Henry Aldous 
Dixon. 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church in 1887. 
Married Mary Etola (Etta) Dangerfield in the Salt Lake Temple on 

August 19, 1903. 
Children: 

Vernon, Afton, Eugene, Reed, Inez, Anna, Bert. 

As a boy he was very energetic and mischie vious . Aunt "Etta" des- 
cribes him as: "A lover of animals, of water, of the hills 
and nature in general". 

His hobbies were: " Fishing, hunting, and the collecting of all animal 
life, from white rats and snakes to dogs, goats, ponies, 
horses and cows", "his pals knew him as a shrewd trader". 
He collected and owned about every variety of chickens found 
in the United States. His favorite was the game bird. 

Parley became an experJt and stuntman on walking on the slack wire, 
belonging to Bob C\inningham' s group of boys who traveled 
throughout the valley putting on shows. 

He was a reputable and exellent brick mason and building contractor. 

Died at Provo, Utah on January 30, 1947. 

Very Brief Life Sketch of 
MARY ETOLA ( ETTA) DIXON 

ID # 1 3 w 

Born September 18, 1877 in Salt Lake City, Utah to Mary Ann James 

and Jabez Dangerfield. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the L.D.S. Church, December 

1, 1885. 

Married Parley Smith Dixon on August 19,1903 in the Salt Lake Temple . 
Children: 

Vernon, Afton, Eugene, Reed, Inez, Bert. 

Her first school was a private school held in the home of her lady 
teacher in Salt Lake City. After two years she went to the 

Bryant School, and graduated from the Salt Lake High School in 1898. 

Graduated from the University of Utah, which was then located on the 
West side of Salt Lake City, in 1899. 

She started teaching at the FranklinSchool in Salt Lake City and for one 
year at Riverside School, before moving to Provo. Taught 
for one year at Timpanogos School in Provo, and one year as 
Critic teacher in the first grade at BYU Training School. 

She moved and made new homes 18 times. 

Served as a teacher in the Third Ward Sunday School and Primary, 

Y.W.M.I.A. , Relief Society. 
Died May 27, 1952 at Provo, Utah. 



372 



63rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 68 




RUTH ELAINE TAYLOR 



FRED DIXON KARTCHNER 




373 



Ruth Taylor Kartchner Family 





2025 No. 1220 East 
Provo, Utah 




Wildwood 

374 



RUTH ELAINE TAYLOR KARTCHNER 



I was born on March 20, 1917, to Arthur Nicholls Taylor and 
Maria Louise Dixon Taylor. It was an early Monday morning. Henry 
had been sent to milk the cows, someone else had gone for "Aunt Sarah 
Monk", to help in the delivery. When Henry returned, he was told he 
had a new baby sister. Word spread like wildfire that Aunt Rye had a 
healthy new baby girl. This was a direct answer to my sister Alice's 
prayers. After six brothers she said if she could just have a baby 
sister, she would always take care of her, and Mother would never 
have to worry. Alice lived up to every word of that. 

My Mother was 45 years old at this time. She was under five 
feet tall and had long, thick, black hair, with hazel eyes. She was 
very talkative, vivacious, and loved working outside. She loved her 
home and always was there when we needed her. I have only warm, 
secure feelings about my home life. 

Father was tall, about six feet, with red hair, deep blue eyes. 
He was a quiet, deliberated, kind person, and my memory of him is 
only with white hair. He knew it was important to keep his family busy 
and learn how to work. He was always patient and understanding with 
me. Father was a strong father figure, as well as precise, and very 
"English" in so many ways. 

I was born while my oldest brother Arthur D. was on a mission 
to Australia, so that I was three years old when he returned. I had a 
cousin, Evelyn Dixon who lived next door, and was just two months 
younger than I. They dressed us up in identical dresses, with ribbons 
on our heads, and had Arthur D. choose which one was his sister. Of 
course, I had been told so much about this big brother of mine, that I 
had never seen, that I was all eyes, while Evelyn couldn't have cared 
less, and was looking everywhere but at him. So naturally he chose 
me. 

Lynn was always very pleasant with me, and used to tease me a 
lot, as did all my brothers. I remember the day he was married, and 
everyone was going to the reception, but because of my age, I had to 
stay home. I had the nickname "Dewey", and he used to always sing 
the song about Admiral Dewey to me "And Along Came Brave Dewey". 
I always admired his artistic abilities in furnishing homes. 

I remember always having fun when Elton was around. One of 
my early recollections was that I had been left home alone for some 
reason, and Elton had a date with Ethel, so they put me in the back 
seat of the car and took me with them. I had a grand time, I'm not so 
sure about them. 

Henry went on his mission to the Eastern States, as did Elton. 
While he was there, he sent me my first pair of silk hose. They were 
black, real silk, and I knew I was the luckiest girl in the City of Provo. 
His hair seemed so much curlier to me when he came home than when 
he left, and I asked him how he got his hair so curly (as mine was as 



375 



376 



RUTH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 



straight as sticks). He told me he got it from sleeping in his compan- 
ion's ribs. 

I can't imagine the patience and love my sister Alice must have 
had for me to put up with my growing up years. I must have been a 
real trial to her. She truly lived up to her word of taking care of me, 
and I was one to roam the whole neighborhood freely, so that it was 
hard to know where I was. She used to worry especially about me when 
the gypsies were in town, because she knew they could steal me. I 
can't begin to express the care and love and concern she has given me 
all my life. She was always trying to bring me up to be the kind of 
person I should be. One day she was telling me what I should do and I 
turned on her, stamped my foot and said, "You'r not going to be the 
boss to me any longer!" My Father was there and heard it, and just 
threw back his head and laughed. It was my Declaration of Independence. 

My brother Clarence (Bud) used to tease me a great deal, but I 
think I really liked it. He was always so good to me and a favorite of 
"the Gang". Often I would go with him to milk the cows in the old 
brick barn. He would sit me in the window to watch, then often would 
squirt warm milk at me, which I hated, but still always wanted to go 
out with him. 

My brother Kenneth was just older than I, and I remember hav- 
ing many fun times with him. I remember one day playing in the back 
yard, and one of the neighbor kids threw a "binik" (5th West rock) at 
him, which hit him just above the eye. It gave him the most beautiful 
black eye. How I envied him, and to this day, have never had a black 
eye of my own. 

I had a marvelous childhood, with many cousins living on the 
same block, or within a 2-3 block radius. We seemed like one big 
family. 

Through Junior High and High School "Our Gang" was notorious 
up and down Fifth West. Every Sunday afternoon, we would start at 
"John'.s" (Margaret Johnson) above Fifth North and work our way down 
to "Click's" ( Fae Clark Cartwright ), eating some delicious tidbit at 

each place laughing, playing games, talking, playing on the player 

piano whatever. Besides Margaret and Fae, there was Dorothy 

Dixon (Harrison), Vesta Taylor, Alice Dixon (Andrews), Evelyn 
Dixon pmith), and myself. We spent many summers together at Wild - 
wood, swimming, hiking, putting on plays, playing tennis , telling 
ghost stories, and others; and having taffy pulls. There were many 
cousins both older and younger that were drawn into our activities from 
time to time. It was a wonderful period of growing-up years. 

During high school, and on into college, we had another "gang" 
made up of friends we met through the school years. We had many 
happy hours and wonderful times. It started from becoming acquainted 
in a Botany class. I'm not sure how it all came about, but through our 
high school years and into college, we had innumerable, wonderful fun 



RUTH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 



377 



experiences. The basic eight were: Scott Allen, Thorn Barrett, 
LeGrande Lewis, Helen Ward (Allen), Fae Clark (Cartwright) , Emma 
Zabriskie (Olson) and myself. There were several others who came 
and went throughout the years, including Don and Mary Bee Jensen . 
To this day, we are still good friends, but don't see one another often. 

I graduated from Provo High School in May of 1935. My Father, 
who had been ill for sometime died that fall. It was a great loss to me. 

I began my freshman year at the "Y"that fall, and graduated with 
an B.A. degree in Elementary Education in 1939. 

I was offered a job at the Franklin School, teaching the Fourth 
Grade. I enjoyed my teaching immensely, and made some wonderful 
friends in the teachers, the students, and the parents. My cousin, 
Rhea Reeve taught there also, and we used to walk back and forth from 
school together. Many of those people in the Franklin district were 
the "Salt of the earth". I taught for three years; the 4th grade, 3rd 
grade, and 6th grade, with half the day as librarian. 

The summer after my first year of teaching, I met Fred Dixon 
Kartchner at a party in Wildwood. He had just finished four years of 
teaching grade school and was entering his first year of medical 
school at the U. of U. The Sunday following the party, he drove up to 
Wildwood with one of his friends, and asked for a date, the beginning 
of a wonderful relationship. 

We saw each other occasionally his first grueling year of medi- 
cal school. He joined our "gang" for many activities, when he would 
come to Provo. It was wonderful when Fred had a school break. 

The following February 7, Fred gave me a diamond. We were 
married that June 8, 1942 in the Salt Lake Temple by Stephen L. Chip- 
man. We left the next day for Denver, Colo, on the train, to start the 
last two years of medical school at the Univ. of Colo, at Denver. 

My sister Alice and her husband, ElRoy Nelson had generously 
invited us to live in their basement apartment. It was a marvelous 
thing for us, as it was within walking distance of the Colo. General 
Hospital, where the medical school was. I will never forget their 
generosity, love and company. 

After medical school, we returned to Salt Lake for internship at 
the U. of U. and the old Salt Lake General Hospital. Following the 
year of internship, Fred had a commission in the Medical Corps of the 
Army, so was called into the service. I went to Provo to live in my 
Mother's home. Fred went to Carlisle, Pa. for his basic training. 
After the war was over, Fred was transferred to Hawaii at Schofield 
Barracks, on Oahu and he was allowed to send for his family. 

We packed up and left. Mother hated to see us go, and we hated 
to leave, but were anxious to be a family again. It was the last time 
I saw Mother, as she died of cancer while we were still in Hawaii. 

We spent almost two years in the Hawaiian Islands. Mother 
Kartchner came and stayed with us the last part. Fred was supposed 



378 



RUTH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 



to have been released, but was declared "essential", so we remained 
an extra six months. The Hawaiian sister loved Mother Kartchner , 
and she joined in many "quilting" bees with them. 

I taught school for a short time there. We had a heartbreaking 
experience when our little daughter, Elaine, was born June 26, 1947, 
with a severe hair-lip, cleft palate, and a damaged heart. Fred flew 
to San Francisco with her, after a few days, where she was given 
treatment at the Letterman General Hospital, by an expert plastic 
surgeon. After our return to the Mainland, our little Elaine died on 
October 21, 1947. 

Another sad experience was given me while we were on the 
Hawaiian Islands. Mother had developed cancer since we had left, and 
she passed away in February of 1947. I wanted so much to come home 
to the funeral, but the army would not give us leave or permission. 
It was a difficult time for me, and again our good friends helped us 
over this, especially the Noels. 

Fred's Ob. Gyn. Residency with the Univ. of Utah Medical School, 
had been held open for him. We stayed in "Uncle Bud's" house on the 
hill until Fred found an apartment in Ogden for us that we could afford. 
After two years in Ogden, we went to Salt Lake for the last year of the 
Residency. Upon completion of Fred's Residency, we moved to Provo 
to begin the practice of Medicine. 

After leaving Denver and Alice and Roy's lovely apartment and 
home, we lived in many interesting places, choosing what we could 
find to suit our limited budget. A few interesting features were as 
follows : 

During Internship, the one and a half rooms we lived in had a 
closet. Everytime it rained or thawed, we had to pull everything out 
of the closet as it would fill up with water. 

Our first home in our Residency in Ogden, was a long, narrow 
apartment, with one window in the front and one window in the back. 
The children slept in narrow army bunkbeds in a long narrow hall, as 
a bedroom. That place also had an old-fashioned toilet room with the 
water tank above your head, and a long pull chain to pull when you 
flushed it. The tank leaked ( on your head). 

Another place, the last year of our Residency in Salt Lake, was 
a converted old mansion, the "LaFayette Villa". It had been turned 
into three apartments. It was here that the mice were so many, they 
would race across my waxed floor and slide into the mop boards. This 
was a real trial to me, as rats and mice are my one big fear. We 
also tended the furnace in the place. In the remodeling, they had cov- 
ered over the steps to the basement with a patio, so that we had to lug 
coal by the sack-full down through a hole, which had once been a 
window, in order to feed the furnace. And I was pregnant. 

While in the service, we lived in old World War I housing units 
in Hawaii, that hadn't been used for years. Once we scoured them up, 



RUTH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 



379 



it wasn't so bad. The Japanese prisoners of war did the painting of 
some of it. When they would paint the floors, they wouldn't kneel 
down, but would take a sitting position on their heels and paint. This 
is also the way they sat to talk, and rest. The termites were a real 
problem, and one day the toilet fell right through the floor. 

Following our service stint, and all of the medical training, we 
moved to Provo to set up business. We found a small bungalow which 
we converted the downstairs rooms to Fred's offices. Our family of 
eight, tightly filled the upstairs of only two bedrooms. By putting two 
sets of bunkbeds and one crib in one small bedroom, Fred and I used 
the other bedroom. We fixed an old storage room downstairs into a 
bedroom for Linda. The house was heated by an old coal furnace, 
which would periodically "blow up", sending soot and ashes through- 
out the house and office, necessitating a thorough housecleaning after 
each "blow up". We finally gave up and converted the old coal furnace 
to a new gas furnace. Ken and I carried the coal dust out from the 
old coal bin, which was back of the furnace. We swept down and wash- 
ed the walls, calcimined them, and converted it into "Ken's room" A 
small bed could barely fit in. 

While living here, Fred took up raising English Bulldogs for a 
hobby. At one time, we had a litter of eight tiny pups, that had to be 
watched and fed every two hours, night and day, as the mother was so 
awkward, she would sit on them and smother them. While they were 
so small, we kept them in Linda's bedroom. We also had two adult 
bulldogs, a paraquet, a canary, a cat. We lived here for seven years, 
when we finally were able to move into our beautiful new home with 
six bedrooms, and lots of room everywhere. What luxury! 

After being up all night with me, his patient in labor, Fred 
started out early one morning for Salt Lake to give a lecture at the 
Medical School. He was so tired, he went to sleep while driving. The 
car swerved across the highway, just missing a cement abutment, and 
landed in a canal. It proved to be near-fatal. I was in Provo in the 
hospital; Fred was in Salt Lake in the hospital. He remained there 
for several weeks. Upon his release, I took the new baby and stayed 
at Alice's in Salt Lake until he was able to travel to Provo. 

It was a long and difficult struggle before we were a normal 
family again. Fred, unknowingly, had become addicted to Demerol, 
a drug they had given him to ease the terrific pain he suffered from 
the accident. Fred was able to rid himself of his addiction. 

Our last baby was delivered with a Caesarean section, followed 
with complications and a serious operation and hemorhaging. It was a 
hard time. But through many trials and great effort and the help 
from our family members, our health was restored. We were blessed 
with a lovely family and a growing practice in spite of our difficulties. 
Our Heavenly Father was a great factor in our restored health. 

While teaching school, I saved a small part of my salary and 



380 



RUTH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 



became a stockholder in the Bonneville Development Co. , developers 
of the Oak Hills Subdivision. As a stockholder I was given a beautiful 
lot overlooking the Utah Valley, on Provo's foothills near the mouth of 
Rock Canyon. The small bungalow we were in was literally bursting 
at the seams, with our growing family of eight. 

Fred's brother Ray and brother-in-law Marion Hammond, both 
school t eachers , agreed to build us a home during their summer vaca- 
tion. By De cembe r 1 5th of the second year, we moved into this spacious 
home. What a beautiful home and what a haven for us all, after twenty- 
three years, now our dream come true. 

After a years time in our new home, a wonderful blessing came 
to us. Mary Ann came to our home. She was just five days old, and 
weighed less than five pounds, but it was like the frosting on the cake 
to have a sweet little baby in such roomy and pleasant surroundings, 
and we so loved her. 

Each of the children grew into healthy, beautiful adults and are 
a blessing beyond measure to us. The boys filled missions; Ken in 
Argentina, Richard to the Spanish-Florida, David to the Phillipines. 
The girls, Linda and Rosena became school teachers, Ellen became 
a registered nurse and Mary Ann has excelled in Ballet and though 
not dancing at this time is going to school in Gemnology and hopes to 
design and set jewelry. 

All have responsible jobs in the Church, and all are positive 
thinking, progressive individuals, who help one another as well as 
others . 

Through the contacts of our children and other families , we have 
had the privilege of having many people live in our home from periods 
of a few weeks and months to several years. It has made us all aware 
of other countries, their people, as well as those who have needed a 
place to stay, and in so doing, have been with us and blessed our lives. 

We have travelled widely, going to each of the boys' missions 
upon their completion, and seeing the surrounding countries and cities. 

I am doing something now, I have wanted to do for forty years. 
I am taking an Art class and am thoroughly enjoying it. 

I have worked in the Church all my life. It has been primarily 
with the youth in Primary and Mutual. I have been blessed beyond 
words with the Gospel, my heritage, my immediate family, as well as 
my extended family; my sorrows, as well as my joys, and good health 
having been restored to me through several traumatic incidences. 
Life is good, and I thank my Heavenly Father for a rich and rewarding 
life. 

I have been deeply saddened by the death of my husband and 
sweetheart of thirty-eight years. He suffered heart failure on March 
14th and suddenly passed away on March 16th 1980. He has left us all 
a great heritage and strength that will help me to carry on without 
him, as painful as it is. 



64th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16.2 




381 



Smith Family 




382 



EVELYN 



DIXON 



SMITH 



I arrived in this world barely, that is between 11 p. m. and mid- 
night, on my father's birthday, May 30, 1917; the second child and 
first daughter of Arnold Dixon and Letitia May Banks Dixon. Thus 
began my early life on 5th West and in the Third Ward in Provo, Utah. 

One of my earliest remembrances is my parents taking me and 
my baby brother Grant up 5th West to visit our house that was being 
built. Daddy helped me walk the planks that crossed above the base- 
ment. We had some wonderful years in that house, with its apple 
orchard, poultry farm, ponies, collie dogs and even at one time some 
baby lambs. The family was growing- -every other year a new baby 
brother arrived until there were six of us with me the only girl. When 
I was nine years old Daddy told me I had a new baby sister at the 
hospital. I wouldn't believe it until I saw her. We all waited with 
cheeks wrapped for her arrival home - - yes we all had the mumps. 

Another fond memory of those days was our yearly exodus to, 
and stay at Wildwood in Provo Canyon. Every Fourth of July, dress- 
ed in new clothes, we went to town to see the parade and celebrate 
with balloons, firecrackers, and some special treat. Sunburned and 
weary we returned home to a freezer of home-made ice cream. We 
then went to the Canyon to stay until Labor Day at Wildwood with rel- 
atives and friends, hikes and swimming in the river, climbing the 
mountains, meeting the train and big bonfires with programs, singing 
and excitement. 

My elementary education was at Timpanogos School. I liked 
school and was a good student. In those days there were the operettas 
and May Day braiding of the maypole. While in the fifth grade I began 
ballet lessons which came to a tearful end as I gave up my recital 
costume since I had rheumatic fever and would not be in the recital 
nor continue ballet. Mother was a gifted seamstress and my costume 
and clothes brought many a compliment. 

It was while I was at Dixon Junior High School that our happy 
times received a mighty blow. The depression hit the country and 
Farmers and Merchants Bank, where Father was cashier, was one 
of the many banks that closed its doors. We sold our home and lived 
in several other places thru the next years -- Father having different 
jobs, and these were struggling years. The family grew to ten child- 
ren, seven boys and three girls. 

The high school years were enjoyable in spite of financial prob- 
lems. Classes were an interesting challenge and I managed the honor 
roll often. At graduation from Provo High School, I realized the 
family could use some extra income but I wanted to continue my stud- 
ies. My parents decided if I could earn my own tuition and spending 
money I could go on to college. I was doing typing for Fred Markham 
during the high school years and continued with Ashworth and Mark- 
ham, architects. The Library at B. Y. U. was where I earned my 
tuition and became so interested I majored in English towards a 



383 



384 



EVELYN DIXON SMITH 



Library Science Master's Degree. 

Between my sophomore and Junior years of college I spent a 
year in New York City with the Paul Dixon family. That was my 
first trip out of Utah. Little did I know it was the beginning of many 
travels in my life and living in many states and a foreign country. 

Returning from New York to B.Y.U. I began my third year of 
college, Ruth Taylor (Kartchner) introduced me to a nice young man, 
Donald H. Smith, who became my future husband. Don graduated 
from the "Y" that year and began working for the U.S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture and was sent to Louisiana, I finished my senior year and 
graduated in June, 1940. September 24, 1940, we were married in 
the Mission Home in Houston, Texas, by Pres. ElRay Christiansen. 
We began our married life in Mansfield, Louisiana. Don was part of 
the Mobile Soil Survey and it was very mobile. We moved about every 
six months, from Louisiana to Texas first and then numerous small 
towns in Texas, south of Fort Worth and Dallas. 

Our first year of marriage was the first year I had spent with 
just adults about me. It was very enjoyable but then I felt we should 
have a baby. During my junior year of college we found that my bouts 
with rheumatic fever had affected my heart. And then when I wanted 
to start our family the doctors advised against having children. 

It was at this time too that the U.S. entered World War II. 
Don enlisted in the Army Air Force in 1942, as an aviation cadet. 
During his early training I returned to Utah, stayed with my family 
who were living back on 5th West, and worked at the steel mill that 
was being constructed. Later I joined Don while he took his pilot 
training. We knew Don would be going overseas. We found a doctor 
who thought I could safely have a child, Don went to England and I 
went back to Utah to wait for the birth of our first baby, a daughter. 
Karen Ann arrived at Utah Valley Hospital on Feb. 4, 1945. Don had 
completed his bombing missions and arrived in Provo when the baby 
was two weeks old. Soon after V. E. Day, Don was discharged from 
the service and we were back in Texas with the Soil Conservation 
Services. The next year we moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. While 
living here we went to Utah and on June 27, 1947 were married in the 
S. L. Temple and had Karen sealed to us. The same year Don decid- 
ed to return to school. 

We moved to Ames, Iowa, where Don did his graduate work at 
Iowa State University. There were many young LDS graduate students 
there and we made many new friends that we still keep in touch with. 
My sister Gloria came to stay with us in 1948 while I was confined to 
bed with my second pregnancy. On July 30, 1948, our second daught- 
er, Susan Louise, was born. We had hoped for a boy but when we saw 
the sweet little girl with a blonde curl on top of her head she won our 
hearts and we decided two daughters were a wonderful family. 

Don finished up his doctorate in Soil Microbiology and Chem- 



EVELYN DDCON SMITH 



385 



istry and we moved to Maryland in April, 1951. Don was with USDA 
again, this time at the Plant Industry Station. We belonged to the 
Capitol Ward in Washington, D. C. Our daughters were growing up 
and Karen began school there. 

During the cold winters while we were in Iowa, Don had 
thought of living in a milder climate and had applied for a position 
in Hawaii. In 195 2 a job opening became available and he accepted 
the position with Pineapple Research Institute in Honolulu, Hawaii. 
We drove from Washington, D. C. to Provo for Christmas. 

We arrived in beautiful Hawaii in January, 1953. This was our 
home for the next ten years. After about a year we settled in Manoa 
Valley and were active in the Waikiki Ward. 

By the summer of 1954 my heart condition had become so bad 
that I was practically an invalid. The doctor said my one hope for 
better health was heart surgery. Our daughters were nine and six 
years old at this time and needed a mother to take care of them so I 
decided in favor of the surgery if it could be done. In July, 1954, I 
went to San Francisco and had a valvulotomy. During my convales- 
cence I spent a week with Mother and Dad at Wildwood. It was a 
tender experience. I had a renewal of life and felt very appreciative 
and aware of the beauty of living. Dad was adjusting to his artificial 
leg after an amputation due to thrombosis. Mother was worrying 
over both of us, doing so many things for us though in very poor 
health herself. I've always been thankful for that peaceful, intimate 
week the three of us had together. That was the last time I saw 
Mother since she passed away the following May. 

After a year of ups and downs I was feeling much better and act- 
ive again. Our daughters were good students and were taking piano, 
swimming, dancing and other lessons. Even I needed a new interest 
and took a few oil painting lessons. Father came to Hawaii to visit 
us. And my sister Gloria Richardson and family spent a few years 
in Hawaii living across the street from us - - the only time we have 
lived near family or relatives. 

From August 1958 to January 195 9, we had a sabbatical leave 
in Fort Collins, Colorado. This was a most friendly town to live in. 
Our daughters would have liked to stay there but we returned to 
Hawaii after experiencing a perfect autumn and the delight of a white 
Christmas again. We soon moved to a new home in Hawaii, in Kailua, 
over the Pali from Honolulu. We were active in the Kailua Ward there. 

One Sunday night after church where I had been singing in the 
Choir, we had just been home a short time when I felt a terrible blow 
inside my chest which almost knocked me over. When both legs be- 
came numb we realized I had a saddle embolis. Sunday night is not 
a good time for emergencies. I told Don it was probably the end of 
life for me but he insisted it wasn't and called a friend to help with 
administering to me while waiting for the ambulance. It was much 



386 



EVELYN DIXON SMITH 



later that I found out the doctors had given up and Don and a nurse 
hovered over me that night as oxygen was pumped to keep me alive. 
When I regained consciousness and found I still had both legs I knew 
I would live besides Karen was singing the lead in "Promised Val- 
ley" in just two weeks, I made the last performance, though it was in 
a wheel chair, 

Don came home one night in 1963 to announce his receiving an 
offer of employment with Del Monte in the Phillippines , which we ac- 
cepted. Although Manila was our mailing address, we lived on the 
biggest pineapple plantation in the world, which is at Mindanao, five 
hundred miles by plane and car from Manila. 

While on the plantation, I began to have health problems again, 
in spite of the household help of two house girls and a yard boy. Before 
leaving to attend Karen's wedding in the Salt Lake Temple on February 
24, 1966, I promised Don I would check with Dr. Gerbode about open- 
heart surgery. He not only recommended immediate open-heart sur- 
gery but also lung surgery, which was scheduled for June. This time 
with open-heart surgery the mitral valve of my heart was replaced 
with an artificial valve. I was able to attend Karen's senior voice re- 
cital and graduation from BYU in August and by September I was well 
enough to go on our long planned trip through Europe. Since the sur- 
gery I have been in the best of health, the best I have had in manyyears. 

At Del Monte, Don was advanced from Agricultural Research 
Director to Research Manager and now worked at the cannery as well 
as the plantation. We now took our second home leave visiting more 
European Countries before attending our daughter Susan's wedding in 
the Salt Lake Temple on September 4, 1969. Susan was married by 
Elder Henry D, Taylor, to R, Byron Purves of England. It was a 
beautiful wedding. 

My life to date has been and is a happy one. There is much I 
am thankful for. It is a wonderful experience and privilege to be en- 
joying good health. My husband is all I could ask for. He has always 
encouraged me to live to my full capacity and helped me over my dis- 
appointments. He has never complained of the inconvenience and ex- 
pense my poor health has caused but rejoices with me when each 
hurdle is cleared. We are blessed with two wonderful daughters 
married to fine men, both studying for a Ph, D, They also presented 
us with grandsons and granddaughters. 

Don and Evelyn moved to Walnut Creek, Cal. in 197 3^ Evelyn's 
improved health continued and they enjoyed a full life , enjoying friends , 
pursuing hobbies, traveling, and being near enough to family to visit 
often. Evelyn gave lessons in Relief Society and took art classes. 

In March of 1980, Evelyn began having minor problems and en- 
tered the hospital for tests. Several days later she had a major stroke 
and passed away quietly at 3:25 a.m. on March 28, 1980. 



Karen Smith Griggs 



65th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 10.4 




ALICE DELENNA DIXON 



J 




ROBERT BRUCE ANDREWS 



387 



Andrews Family- 




Robert D, Dixie Lee Charlene 



Alice Joseph Robert Bruce 




20618 Cohasset Street 
Canoga Park, Los Angeles 
California 



388 



HISTORY OF ALICE DELENNA DIXON ANDREWS 



November 18, 1917, a daughter was born to Charles Owen and 
Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead Dixon at 295 North Fifth West, Provo, 
Utah, the fourth girl in the family. 

At the Provo Third Ward on January 6, 1918, she was given the 
name Alice Delena Dixon by her father. (Changed middle name to 
Delenna) Thomas N. Taylor was Bishop and John L. Russell was 
Clerk at that time. 

I wondered and asked my father if I was named after Alice Taylor, 
my cousin, who lived across the street and whose birthday was the 
same as mine (November 18) or after Aunt Alice Dixon Dangerfield 
and my middle name after Delenna Taylor who also lived across the 
street? (Delenna is not a relative). 

My father said, "No, your mother and I just liked that name." 

At three years old I got scarlet fever and was very sick along 
with VaLera and Ruby, my two older sisters. We slept upstairs. 
Mother would put our food on the steps and call and we would come 
down and pick it up. Sometimes the outside door from the kitchen 
would be opened from the stairs we could see Stella, my other sister, 
standing there eating little green onions. I had the feeling it was the 
onions that kept her from getting the disease. 

My mother died August 19, 1922, from heart and kidney trouble, 
when VaLera was 12 years old and Virginia, my youngest sister, 3 
months old, I was 4 years old. 

Mother was such a beautiful woman, tall, with long dark, brown 
hair, worn up high on her head. She always looked so nice in her 
lovely clothes. She loved beautiful hats; to be a good cook and a neat 
housekeeper. 

It was a sad day at her passing, leaving Father, my sisters - 
VaLera, Ruby, Stella, Virginia, my brother - Owen George, and my- 
self. 

I remember running over to Aunt Rye's, across the street, and 
she, Ruth, and I kneeling down at a chair, crying and praying. 

Grandmother Dixon came to stay with us. She was about 80 years 
old. She helped us organize our work. She was so nice. 

After Grandmother Dixon passed away, Aunt Rye took us under 
her wing and was like our second mother. She was always sending 
over food - - - stew, rice puddings, potatoes and gravy, creamed 
corn, etc. , such a good cook and so good to us, especially me. 

I started school at Timpanogos Elementary at the age of six. 
My first grade teacher was Mrs. Childs. We studied about Holland. 
Mr. Childs made a large windmill on a hill of artificial grass and a 
white picket fence with paper tulips looking through it. Robert Sumner 
and Roberta Hindmarsh were in Dutch costumes, and we all sang "It's 
Tulip Time in Holland" for the Parent Teachers Association, 



389 



390 



ALICE DIXON ANDREWS 



Miss Marva Bullock was my second grade teacher, she was a 
very pretty lady. 

My third grade teacher was Ida Knudsen for a while. I can't re- 
member who took her place. Miss Perkins was my fourth grade teach- 
er, Mrs. Vance my fifth grade and Mr. Staheli my sixth grade teacher, 

Mr. Staheli taught us the song "Out On An Indian Reservation. " 
We would learn a verse a day, the chorus the next, and then the second 
verse, but we each had to know it before going out for recess. My 
love was playing ball, being pitcher or first base, so I really tried 
hard to learn the song. 

Mr, J. Clifton Moffitt was my High School Principal and Psy- 
chology teacher and later the Superintendent, I owe him a lot. He 
gave me a job in the Summer Recreation at North Park for three sum- 
mers and hired me at Farrer Jr. High as Physical Education Teacher. 
He was also a very good friend of the family and to me, 

I was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints at the age of eight years on February 28, 1926, by J, Wesley 
Robertson and confirmed by my father, Charles O, Dixon, Our Bishop 
was H, A. Dixon and the Clerk was Eugene Olsen, of the Provo Third 
Ward. 

In elementary school some of my best friends were Genevieve 
Mitchel, Fay Snow, Deon Christensen, Erma Smith, Emma Clark, 
Martell Bird, Jack Halliday and David Fielding. 

In Jr. High and High School my cousins - Ruth Taylor, Dorothy 
Dixon, Evelyn Dixon and friends - Fae Clark, Vesta Taylor and Mar- 
garet Johnson, were the gang on Fifth West. We were sometimes 
called "Sandy Alley" because there were so many red heads living on 
that street. 

I went to Provo High in the seventh grade. Then the new Dixon 
Jr, High was built and I went there in the eighth and ninth grades. 

Dorothy Dixon left BYU High School and came to Dixon Jr. High. 
We were together in most of our classes in both Jr. High and Sr. High 
School, She was smart and helped me a lot scholastically and socially. 

After graduating from Jr. High, I went to Provo High for the 
tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades. I graduated from Provo High and 
I also graduated from three years of Seminary. 

In the tenth grade I was secretary of our class. Dorothy Dixon 
was vice-president and Frank Sutherland was president. 

When I was a senior, I was athletic manager and Dorothy was 
editor of the school paper. We had so much fun doing things together 
and with our gang - - Venice Cottam, Helen Brockbank, Edna Jensen, 
Mary Kirkham, June Crowther, Mildred Smart, Kay Pace and Marjory 
Mensel. 

I went to the Brigham Young University for four years. I received 
my B.S. degree, majoring in Physical Education and minoring in Cloth- 
ing and Textiles. 



ALICE DIXON ANDREWS 



391 



In sports I excelled best in basketball. I was on the school team 
from Jr. High through College. 

My favorite teachers have always been my Physical Education 
teachers - - Melva Boyle, Dorothy Richmond, Wilma Jeppson, Aline 
Coleman Smith and Leona Holbrook. 

My best friends at B.Y.U. were Jean Webb, Beth Soffe, Leith 
Hayes, Marjory Merrill, Fae Clark and my cousins Ruth Taylor and 
Evelyn Dixon. 

I worked hard to get through school. I scrubbed floors for Aunt 
Sarah Dixon and did general housework for Aunt Rye Taylor. I worked 
at Woolworth's on Saturdays and Holidays. I worked at B. Y. U, Physical 
Education Department for my tuition and I also worked for the Recrea- 
tion Department at North Park. 

I taught school at Draper Jr. High and Elementary for two years, 
Lincoln High for one year, Farrer Jr. High for two years, Lehi High 
for three years, Mendocina High in California for one year and sub- 
stituted for four years in the Los Angeles School District. 

My father died when I was teaching at Lincoln High, March II, 
1943. He died of exposure on a cold, snowy night with the temperature 
below zero. He had a large funeral. The Provo Third Ward was filled 
inside and out with people listening. He was liked by everyone. I 
love him so much. He was a wonderful father and went through a lot 
raising the six of us without Mother, and going through the depression 
of the thirties. He worked for the Provo City Road Department, driv- 
ing a big truck and hauling gravel. He would come home riding on his 
bike. He was a hard worker - - would do the work of three men. He 
was very independent, religious, kind and loving, always telling me 
about his mission to Montana and Oregon. 

Some of my best days were staying at Aunt Rye Taylor's cabin 
in Provo Canyon "Wildwood". Ruth and I would go help clean it, then 
I got to stay most of the summer for several years. We played ball, 
tennis, went on hikes, swimming in the river, had big bon- fires and 
sang songs. My favorites were "Springtime in the Rockies" and "Long, 
Long Trail A Winding". Aunt Rye was the greatest cook, everything 
tasted so good - - pancakes, oatmeal mush, big pots of stew, and the 
best divinity candy, 

I married Robert Bruce Andrews, son of David Ray and Letitia 
Ann Davis Andrews from Bennett, Utah, later Roosevelt. We both 
graduated from Brigham Young University June 5, 1940. I met Bob 
in Salt Lake City at Teacher's Educational Week at Covey's Motel. A 
mutual friend of both, Eloise Kay, introduced us. She had taught in 
Duchesne School District with Bob and then in Lehi with me. We were 
staying at Covey's when he came to see Eloise, That next weekend 
was B. Y. U. Homecoming, Bob asked me to go with him and from then 
on we dated. We were engaged December 25th and married in the Salt 
Lake Temple June 4, 1948. 



392 



ALICE DIXON ANDREWS 



I wore my mother's wedding dress, which had been worn by all 
four of my sisters and all in the Salt Lake Temple. 

We now live in Canoga Park, California at 20618 Cohasset and 
have lived at this address for 21 years. 

I have been very active in school and church work, I served for 
8 years in Sunday School, 17 years in Primary and am now teaching 
the "Merrie Miss B" girls class. I was in M.I. A. about 12 years and 
in Relief Society, I was 2nd Couselor twice; Social Relations teacher; 
Luncheon Chairman; and President, June 21, 1970, for 1 year, I have 
also been a visiting teacher for 25 years. 

I worked several years with the Cub Scouting Program in Ward, 
Stake and West Valley District. I received a Den Mother's Award and 
Outstanding Scouter's Award. 

Bob, my husband, taught school at Altomount and Roosevelt Jr. 
High in Duchesne District before we were married and served in the 
Air force as weatherman in Australia and the Phillippines. Since we 
were married he taught at Roosevelt Jr. High in Utah, Mendocina High, 
Sutter Jr. High, Columbus and now at Lawrence Jr. High in California, 
teaching mathematics. 

He also received his Scouter's Award and Outstanding Scouter's 
Award in the Scouting Program, 

He was in the Branch Presidency in Fort Bragg, Secretary of 
the Elders Quorum, one of the 7 Presidents of Seventy, and is now a 
High Priest and Financial Clerk in the Canoga Park 2nd Ward. 

His hobby is rocks, making jewelry and giving them away. He 
is a kind, loving husband and father, 

I am now working in the Relief Society once again as Spiritual 
Living teacher. 

Bob is High Priest Group Leader in the Canoga Park 2nd Ward, 

July 3, 1977, I was set apart to be Educational Counselor in 
Relief Society Canoga Park 2nd Ward. I have also been put in as Cap- 
tain of Daughters of Utah Pioneers, West Valley Camp for 1977 - 1978. 

Bob and I are very proud parents of two sons and two daughters. 
Our two daughters, Charlene and Dixie Lee, have both been married in 
the Los Angeles Temple and have given us four beautiful grandchildren. 

My goal now is to have our two sons, Robert and Joseph, marry 
in the Temple and raise a good and religious family and for all of us 
to be happy. 



Norma Dixon Jess Family 
66th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 11.5 




Ik 



NORMA DIXON 




393 



NORMA DIXON JESS 

Norma was born May 6, 1918 at Spanish Fork, Utah, to Albert 
Frederick and Sena Rasmussen Dixon. Her father was the manager of 
Taylor Bros. Co. in that small town. 

When Norma was a very small child her family moved toProvo, 
Utah, where her father, along with some other men organized the 
Dixon-Taylor-Russell Company in 1921. Norma attended school in 
Provo at the Franklin Grade School, and after graduating from the 
Provo High School, went to Brigham Young University. 

In October, 1942 Norma traveled to Ohio to marry Richard 
Graham Jess, who was in the U. S. Army. Here they were married 
on October 13, 1942. They lived in various places during the next 
two years. A good part of this time was spent in New Jersey. 

In 1945 Dick was sent to Berkeley, California to the University 
of California, for the purpose of learning the Chinese language, in 
preparation to go to China. Here, in Berkeley, while visiting with 
Norma and Dick, her father had a heart attack on August 18, 1945, 
and died. This was a trying time for them, as they were newly arriv- 
ed, knew no one at all in that area. It was indeed a sad homecoming 
for them to bring Dad home, to Provo. 

The war ended and by Christmas 1945 all the men were home. 
Dick went to work for General Motors as Service Manager. He re- 
mained with this company until retirement, serving as zone and dis- 
trict manager in several locations. 

Norma and Dick lived inSaltLake City and then moved to Alamo, 
California. They adopted Barbara Ann and Richard Steven and enjoyed 
their children very much. 

On September 20, 1956, Norma suffered an aneurysm and died 
suddenly. Barbara was almost three and Steven had just turned one . 
Norma was taken to Provo and buried beside her parents in the Provo 
City Cemetery. 

Mildred Dixon Tangren 



394 



67th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




395 



Short Sketch of BERT LESTER DIXON 
By his sister, Afton D. Wagstaff 

Bert Lester Dixon was born September 17, 1918 at 195 North 
Third West in Provo, Utah. He is the son of Parley Smith and Mary 
Etola Dangerfield Dixon, the youngest child of seven children, four 
boys and three girls. He had blond hair and blue eyes. 

The First World War had been going on for a number of years 
and the Armistice was signed November 11, 1918. It was also in the 
years 1918 and 1919 that the "flue epidemic" was going around. Very 
few homes escaped the flu. Many people died. 

In our home everyone was sick except Anna. She was around 
two years old and the only one that didn't get the flue. Bert had bron- 
chitis and was very sick. The beds were moved downstairs on the 
main floor to make it easier to wait on us. We were all very sick at 
the same time. We were very blessed, however, to have Aunt Alice 
Dangerfield and a friend, Mrs. Smith ( a nurse) to help out. We all 
recovered and back on our feet in a few weeks. 

When Bert was one year old. Dad had contracted the High School 
in Roosevelt, Utah. During this time a typhoid epidemic struck 
Roosevelt and most of his men were sick and those who escaped, quit 
their jobs. Because of these factors, Dad lost a lot of money and had 
to mortgage the home they were living in, in order to clear the debt. 

So in November 1919 they sold their home and rented until they 
built another home on Fifth North between Sixth and Seventh West in 
Provo. They moved into this home in May , 1920. Bert lived here 
until September 1922 when this home was sold and a house was bought 
on Tenth West between Center Street and First South in Provo where 
Bert did most of his growing up. He attended the Franklin Grade School 
and Dixon Junior High School in Provo. 

When the depression hit the country in 1931, it was very hard 
for the boys to find work. They had been working with Dad doing brick 
work and there just wasn't any work, so Dad thought it best to invest 
in a farm to give them work. He bought a fifteen acre farm in Orem. 
They moved to Orem in May 1933. 

Bert graduated from Lincoln High School and was married to 
Virginia Oswald, October, 1938. After his marriage they moved to 
California. They had one daughter, Patricia Ann born in 1939 or 1940. 

While in California they had trouble in their marriage and it end- 
ed in divorce in 1945. 

While Bert was in the Service he met Helen Andelino from Roch- 
ester, New York, whom he admired very much. He kept in touch with 
her and in 1946 they were married. Helen is a very wonderful person 
and has been a very special wife and mother. 

After their marriage they lived in Provo for about four years, 
then they built a home in Orem. Their two sons were born in Provo. 
In the fall of 195 3 they moved to Rochester, New York where their 



396 



BERT LESTER DIXON 



397 



daughter, Judy was born May 26, 1954. 

Bert is a brick mason by trade. While working on a building in 
Rochester, New York, a few years ago, the scaffold broke and Bert 
fell fifty feet to the ground. It was a very bad accident and he was in 
the hospital quite a while. Since that time his health hasn't been too 
well. 

Bert worked for Kodak Company for a number of years and the 
last few years he has been working at a hospital in Rochester as a 
maintenance man. 

Bert and Helen have three children: 

Thomas Anthony, born January 24, 1947 at Prove, Utah. He is 
doing research in physical chemistry at Harvard University. He has 
his Ph. D. 

Robert T. Dixon, born March 13, 1950 in Provo, Utah. He is 
married to Mary DeGrunchy and they have one daughter Phaedra. 

Their daughter Judith Ann, born May 25, 1954 in Rochester, 
New York, married Daniel R. Baker on May 26, 1973. They have 
two boys, Andrew Jason Baker and Daniel Joseph Baker. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 



Born October 5, 1869 at Salt Lake City, Utah to Sarah DeGrey and 

Henry Aldous Dixon. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church in 1877. 
Married Catherine Kezia Morgan by Bishop T. N. Taylor at Provo, 

Utah on May 29, 1905. 
His occupation was a contractor and builder. 

Many of the finest, older public buildings, schools, banks, 

stores, meeting houses and homes, in this area, were built 

by him. 

His hobbies were fishing and hunting. 

He was one of the best fishermen in this area. 

His cabin at Wildwood was one of the first to be built there. 
While helping to move a heavy transformer at the Murdock Power 

Plant at Heber, Utah, he came in contact with a live wire and 

was electrocuted on June 5, 1911. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
CATHERINE KEZIA MORGAN DIXON 

Born at Salt Lake City, Utah on March 19, 1886 to Sarah Ann Lane 

and Joseph H. Morgan. 
Baptized March 16, 1913 by LeRoy Dixon. 
Confirmed March 16, 1913 by T. N. Taylor. 

Married Arthur DeGrey Dixon at Provo, Utah on May 29, 1905. 
Children: 

Raymond Lane Dixon. 
Attended grade school at the Proctor Academy and the Lincoln Grade 
School. 

She was a member of the Third Ward Relief Society Flower Committee 

for 1 3 J years . 
Her hobby was the raising of flowers. 
She died at Provo, Utah on March 6, 1966. 



398 



69th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D.# 31 




RAYMOND LANE DDCON 




EVA RUTHE MILDENHALL 



399 



Raymond 



Lane Dixon Family 




524 West 200 North, Provo, Utah 
400 



HISTORY OF RAYMOND LANE DIXON 



On Tuesday, November 26, 19^8, Catherine Kezie Morgan be- 
came the mother of a healthy baby boy, at Provo, Utah and was given 
the name of Raymond Lane Dixon. He was the joy of his mother's life 
and her every thought was for him. He was a happy child and he grew 
up in a home filled with love. 

Raymond's cousin, Owen Dixon, lived just two doors north of his 
home, and being near the same age, they grew up to-gether as constant 
playmates. They were nicknamed "Mick and Mike" and you very sel- 
dom would see one without the other. Later in school, Raymond's 
nickname evolved into "Mink", which he was called by all his pals. 

Both Raymond and Owen progressed through the Provo Third 
Ward Primary, Sunday School and were members of the Third Ward 
Scout Troop. 

For six years Raymond attended the Timpanogos Elementary 
School and was promoted to the Dixon Junior High School for three 
years schooling. 

At the Provo High School, where he graduated, he became very 
interested in his art class and became very proficient in lettering and 
making posters and signs. He was a natural born artist. There were 
many times when some of his classes became dull and monotonous, so 
in order to overcome this situation, Raymond would hastily sketch out 
a humerous cartoon and start it circulating among his class mates, 
which brought life and activity back to the class. 

While at Provo High School, his Art instructor, Farrell CoUett, 
encouraged him to develop his artistic talents. Raymond responded by 
making posters for the School, the Church, his friends and even some 
commercial jobs. 

This exposure and training in his Art class gave him a taste of 
the type of work he enjoyed doing. With his entrance to the B. Y. U. 
he took as many commercial art classes as he could and it became the 
foundation for his life's work, which has become a most successful one . 
While at the B. Y.U. he wanted to learn to do Gold Leaf work but there 
was no class instruction available. Bishop Alfred E. Eves, of his 
Ward, was an old master sign painter, who had learned well his trade 
in his old home town in England, was prevailed upon to teach him all 
he knew about Gold Leaf sign painting. Bishop Eves took Raymond 
under his wing and taught him the art. To-day it is almost a lost art 
for there is not much of it done, it being very expensive. Raymond has 
done a lot of it in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. 

In 1940 on January seventh, he married Ruthe Eva Mildenhall in 
Farmington, Davis County, Utah. They are the parents of two children, 
Leslie Dixon Hardin and Michael Layne Dixon. They have three grand- 
children: Leslie Layne Hardin and Vernon Shayne Hardin and LeAnna 
Layne Dixon. These grandchildren are the joy of Raymonds life. 
When Michael died in Portland, Oregon on October 14, 1977 it was a 



401 



402 



RAYMOND LANE DIXON 



terrible blow for Raymond and he had a hard time bringing himself 
to-gether. For it hadn't been too long since he had lost his wife,Ruthe 
to cancer on March 30, 1973, after a two years losing battle. 

All of Raymond's life he loved good music and he played in the 
school bands. Years later he started taking organ lessons and is now 
a very accomplished musician, getting much pleasure and happiness 
during the hours he spends at the console of his beautiful organ in his 
home . 

After his marriage he worked at Geneva Steel for a few years 
but became dissatisfied with his work and wanted to try his wings 
somewhere else. 

In 1955 Raymond and his family moved to Las Vegas, Nevada 
where his wife continued to teach in the City Schools and he established 
his own commercial art business, which he named "The Associated 
Sign Co . " 

For the first few years it was ahard job trying to get established 
in his new profession, but with lots of hard work and determination it 
paid off for him and he has become a very successful businessman. 

Later Raymond became interested in flying and enjoyed it very 
much. He now owns his own plane and flies all over the country. It 
was the thrill of his life when he flew his mother to Las Vegas. Al- 
though she was "scared to death", all went well and after they landed 
safely, she was happy to have had the experience. 

During World War II, Raymond served for two years in the Navy 
in the South West Pacific. (1944-1946). 

A few years ago, Raymond took his son, Michael on a trip around 
the world. After his return he remarked that in all his travels he had 
never seen any place that he would trade for his home here in the West. 
He has also been on enjoyable trips to Australia and New Zealand. 

Everyone enjoys the hos pitality of Raymond' s home . The welcome 
mat is always out and you can feel his love for his fellowmen. He is 
a member of the Las Vegas Rotary Club and enjoys the association 
of his fellow Rotarians. 

Raymond has always been a hard worker and a very energetic 
person. He has inherited his mother's traits of being an early riser 
and getting the work of the day done early. It is not an unusual sight 
early in the morning to see him skimming the pool and cleaning it for 
the day, so that any neighbor could use it, if so inclined. 

If he can find time, hunting and fishing are his enjoyable sports. 



70th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D.# 16.3 




GRANT DE GREY DIXON 




403 



GRANT 



DE GREY 



DIX ON 



FAMILY 





Brent 




Michael 



404 



GRANT 



D E GREY 



DIXON 



I, Grant DeGrey Dixon, was born in Provo, Utah on April 11, 
1919. My parents were May Banks and Arnold Dixon. We lived, on 
about five acres of land, at 885 North 5th West, Provo, Utah. We had 
a fruit orchard where we raised and sold Jonathan and Roman Beauty 
apples. There were ponies for the kids to ride. And our Z,000 chick- 
ens kept us in eggs and the extras were sold. I can remember going 
to the river with my father to snag suckers to grind and feed to the 
chickens; we would also bring back a bushel basket of fish. 

Dad lost his job as a bank cashier when the Farmers and Mer- 
chants Bank closed daring the depression. He lost both his bank stock 
and the farm. He was out of work for over a year, and had a pretty 
tough time sleding with his large family. That year we picked apples 
from the ground for twenty-five cents a bushel, and canned forty bush- 
els of applesauce without sugar. We had lots of potatoes, bean and 
applesauce. And we would go to the dairy to buy skim milk for two 
cents a gallon. I worked that entire summer in a celery field for a 
Chinaman for fifty cents a day. These times sound bad, but we got by 
just fine . 

I attended Timpanogos Grade School, Dixon Junior High School, 
and Provo High School. Then, like my brothers and sister, I worked 
my way through Brigham Young University. I worked in the BYU 
Library bindery repairing books for twetity-five cents per hour. I 
later worked as a janitor for the Farmers and Merchants Bank. 

Then at the end of my Junior year. World War II started. Lock- 
heed Aircraft recruited my brother Eldon and myself to work in the 
aircraft plant in Los Angeles, California. Eldon and I went to school 
for five weeks and learned how to rivet . We started work in L.A. on 
the swing shift riveting the Hudson Bomber wing. In a few weeks, 
after attending a toolmakers class, taught during the swing shift, I was 
transferred to tool inspection in Burbank. I worked, for a while, in the 
main plant inspecting templates; then in the experimental area where 
I worked on the P-38 and other aircraft. After several months I was 
transferred to the Maywood plant where I worked with a senior tool 
inspector shooting all the tooling in the plant on the swing shift. Short- 
ly after, I was accepted as an aviation cadet in meteorology and term- 
inated my employment with Lockheed. During our work at Lockheed 
five of us fellows had an apartment in Hollywood. 

I attended the Class A Cadet Meteorology Course at UCLA from 
September 1942 to September 1943. This course included all the prof- 
essional requirements for meteorology , and I received a professional 
certificate. I was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant on September 6, 
1943. My first assignment was at the 1st Weather Sq. stationed at 
Wendover Field, Utah. After a month I was reassigned for six months 
to the Long Range Research Unit of the Weather Information Branch 
at the California Institute of Technology. The duty consisted of: 



405 



406 



GRANT DE GREY DIXON 



Analysis of Northern Hemisphere Maps, assisting with climatological 
studies, and some long range weather forcasting research. After we 
completed the analysis of the Northern Hemisphere Maps, I was re- 
assigned for eight months to Van Nuys Metropolitan Airport as Assist- 
ant Weather Officer. The duty consisted of: analyzing weather data, 
making weather forecasts, instructing weather information to pilot 
trainees, and briefing air-crews on weather conditions. During this 
period, I also completed a Staff Weather Officers Course at the Army 
Air Forces School of Applied Tactics in Orlando, Florida. 

In December of 1944 I attended, for four weeks , an Air Transport 
Command Traffic Technician Course at Morrison Field in West Palm 
Beach, Florida. I was then assigned to the 502nd AAF Base Unit at 
Gravelly Point, Washington, D.C. and for five months served as an 
Air priorities Control Office in Los Angeles, California. There I re- 
viewed requests for commercial air transportation of personnel and 
air cargo; denied, granted, and assigned proper priorities in accord- 
ance with the existing policies and situations. Then for approximately 
three months, I was in the Bay area coordinating the evacuation act- 
ivities of Priorities and Traffic of Ferry Division with the Pacific Div- 
ision of ATC. Then I went to Galena Field Spokane, Washington where 
I was responsible for all the military air priorities in the Northwest 
area covering Washington, Oregon, Montana, and part of Idaho. I 
received an honorable discharge, as a captain, on September 20, 1946. 

I met Florence Marks, a nursing student at the Deacones Hos- 
pital in Spokane, at church one day. That was my lucky day. After a 
short courtship we were married on February 8, 1946 in the home of 
Bishop Alva Green in Spokane, Washington. We have had a wonderful 
life together. Florence is bubbling with energy, always pleasant, and 
there's seldom a dull moment when she is aro\ind. She is very dedi- 
cated to her Nursing Profession. 

We moved to Provo, Utah after my discharge. I went back to 
school while Flo worked at the hospital. I received a B. S. degree in 
physics with a minor in mathematics at B. Y.U. in June 1947. We then 
moved to Eugene, Oregon where I studied Architecture at the Univer- 
sity of Oregon. Of course Flo was working in a doctor's office putting 
me through school. However, I was recalled to active duty before 
completing the fifth year for the Bachelor of Architecture Degree. 

This recall to duty took me to Tokyo, Japan where I was assigned 
to the 1503rd Air Traffic Squadron at Tokyo International Airport. 
Shortly after I arrived in Japan I arranged for Flo to join me and we 
took up housekeeping in the Japanese version of an American house. 
We had an interesting three years living with the people of Japan. Our 
two oldest sons, Greg and Mike, were born in Japan. 

Our return to the States was to Fairchild Air Force Base in 
Spokane, Washington -- back to where I had met Flo. My job was 



GRANT DE GREY DIXON 



407 



staff Transportation Officer in the HQ 814th Air Base Group. I also 
had the additional duty of Base Housing Officer on this two wing SAC 
Base. In Japan I had been reclassified as a civil engineer due to my 
schooling at the University of Oregon. I was transferred to the 814th 
Installations Squadron as an Assistant Base Installation Engineer due 
to a shortage of civil engineers. I had various jobs like Real Property 
Acco\intable Officer with an account in excess of $1 00, 000 , 000. 00, one 
month as a Squadron Adjutant, two months as a Squadron Supply Officer 
and an officer in charge of Production Control. 

In September 1956 we moved to Wright-Patterson Air Force 
Base in Ohio where I attended the Advanced Installation Engineering 
Course. The next tour took me to Baffin Island, Northwest Territories 
of Canada where I was a Maintenance Engineering Officer for the 926th 
AC&W Squadron (ADC). This remote Artie assignment lasted a year. 
Three of us would hold church services each Sunday. While I was in 
the Artie our youngest son. Brent, was born in Enterprise, Oregon. 

I returned to Corvallis , Oregon at Adair Air Force Station where 
I was assigned to the Portland Air Defense Sector as Civil Engineer. 
I supervised approximately one hundred officers, engineers, crafts- 
men, technicians, clerks, etc. plus approximately fifty contract 
personnel. While in Corvallis we built our own house. Flo said never 
again would she want to put up with such a mess and clutter. 

June i960 found us heading North again, this time with the family. 
We drove up the Alaskan Highway to Fairbanks, Alaska where we 
spent six months at Ladd Air Force Base. We turned the base over 
to the Army and then headed down the road to Anchorage, Alaska 
where I was assigned to Hq. Alaskan Air Command, Elmendorf Air 
Force Base, Alaska. We enjoyed Alaska. We had a camper for our 
weekends of fishing and h\inting. The salmon runs were something; 
there were also caribou and moose. The Alaskan earthquake was also 
something. It shook for about five minutes. There was extensive 
damage everywhere; in one area the land mass raised over forty feet. 

A month after the earthquake we returned to the lower 48. Since 
no one gets out of the service without serving in Texas we ended up in 
the Headquarters Air Training Command at Randolph Air Force Base. 
My positions were Chief of Utilities Branch, Utilities Division, Oper- 
ations and Maintenance Directorate, DCS/CE and Acting Chief of the 
Utilities Division. My final position was Chief, Engineering Manage- 
ment Systems Division, Resource Planning Directorate, DCS/CE. I 
retired on September 1, 1967 in the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 

Since retiring from the Air Force we have resided in Lakeview, 
Oregon. I am working for the Fremont National Forest as a civil 
engineer, Flo works for the Lake District Hospital as Charge Nurse 
on the night shift. We are building a new solar home in Halfway, 
Oregon. We will retire for good in 1981. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
ARNOLD DIXON 

Born at Provo, Utah, May 30, 1884 ( Z6 days after the death of his 
father, Henry Aldous Dixon). His mother was Sarah DeGrey. 

Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church by R. S. Gibby 
in June of 1892. 

Married Letitia May Banks on November 15, 1911 in the Salt Lake 
Temple . 

Children: 

Howard, Evelyn, Grant, Eldon, Bruce, Floyd, Gloria, Robert, 

Douglas and Doris. 
Received his education at the Timpanogos and Parker Grammar schools , 

BYU High School and BYU Commercial Department. 
Worked four years in the State Treasurer's Office. 

Employed at Utah National Bank in Salt Lake City and the 

Commercial and State Banks in Provo. 

Started as bookkeeper in the newly organized Farmers and 

Merchants Bank of Provo and advanced to Cashier. 

Bookkeeper for B.D. Palfreyman Construction Co. 

Auditor at Geneva Steel Co. and D.T.R. Co. 
Served for five years as Ward Clerk for the Provo Third Ward. 
For many years was treasurer of the Ward Missionary Committee. 
Served as Ward Teacher in several Wards. 

Died September 1, I960 at Utah Valley Hospital, Provo, Utah. 

Very Brief Life Sketch of 
LETITIA MAY BANKS DIXON 

Born at Lake Shore, Utah County, Utah on May 15, 1891 to Esther 

Adamson and Willard Heber Banks. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church in July 1900. 
Married Arnold Dixon in the Salt Lake Temple on November 15, 1911. 
Children: 

Howard, Evelyn, Grant, Eldon, Bruce, Floyd, Gloria, Robert, 
Douglas and Doris. 

Lived in Starrett, Idaho; Logan, Salt Lake City, and Provo, Utah. 

Attended school in Idaho in a one- room school which was used for 
church and social activities. After her marriage she lived 
in Grandmother Dixon's house. Her youngest s ister, Lave rn 
lived here with them for 5 years. Much of her married life 
she had poor health due to a heart condition, but she never 
complained and never shirked her family res ponsibilites . 

May was a quiet, pleasant person, very easy to get along with. She 
was a talented seamstress with ability to design and make 
clothes and costumes without patterns. 

May Banks Dixon passed away on May 3, 1955 at Provo, Utah. 



408 



Vera Dixon Anderson Family 



I.D.# 11.6 




/ 



i 



VERA DIXON 
71st Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 




Vera 
Dean 





jLeslie Vera Dean 
Michael 



409 



VERA DIXON ANDERSON 

When Vera was born on February 22, 1920, her very small 
sister. Norma, was enchanted with the new "Dede" (her word for baby, 
we supposed), and Dede she became to the family from then on, al- 
though they did give her the name of Vera. She was tiny, very fair of 
complexion, and pretty. She was the daughter of Albert Frederick and 
Sena Rasmussen Dixon. She had a brother Harry and two sisters, 
Mildred and Norma. 

Vera was born in Spanish Fork, Utah. When a baby, the family 
moved to Provo where she grew, attended school, and married Dean 
Albert Anderson on April 27, 1945. 

After the war they lived in Milwaukee, Wisconsin while Dean 
went to school. They lived in Salt Lake City, Utah, and in 1953 moved 
to Long Beach, California, They had two children, Carol Leslie and 
Michael Albert. 

The Andersons had completed a swimming pool in their yard. 
Vera dived into the pool, felt a terrific pain in her head. She had to 
be rescued from the pool. She had had an aneurysm. She was in the 
hospital for over a month. She was operated on, but never regained 
consciousness. Vera passed away on April 11, 1958. Carol was 11, 
and Mike was 9 years of age. 

Her death was a great sorrow to her family. Now there were 
only three of the Dixon Family left: Harry, Mildred and Melvin. 

Dean married Louise Saunders and they made a happy home 
for the children. They enjoy their grandchildren and each other. It 
is a happy marriage. 

Carol married William E. Hipp and had two boys, Daniel 
Edward and Robert Dean, She now lives in Redding, California, She 
is a nurse in the hospital there. 



410 



72nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




3707 McNab, Long Beach 
Califo rnia 

411 



OWEN 



GEORGE 



DIXON 



By Virginia Dixon Schugk 

" It's a boy!" - - - What a thrill when this baby was delivered 
by "old Doc Taylor's son, Fred Jr. Fred Sr. had delivered four girls 
to Charles Owen Dixon and Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead, at 295 North 
Fifth West Street, Provo, Utah, but it took a new Doctor, his son, to 
finally bring a boy to this home. This eventful and proud day was the 
28 March 1920. This baby boy was named "Owen" after his father and 
"George" after his grandfather, George Francis Beckstead. His older 
sisters were: VaLera, Ruby, Stella and Alice Delenna, 

Two years later, another sister Virginia was born, making five 
sisters that idolized their brother. What could be nicer than a brother 
to stick up for you, when boys were picking on you in grade school. 
A brother to have fun with during High School years, A football cap- 
tain when you were a Freshman at the B, Y, U, and who introduced 
you to all the "neat" fellows in school. No one could ask for a better 
brother, 

A lot of fun childhood experiences were had at the Timpanogos 
Grade School and at the Old Provo Third Ward Chapel, 

Owen was Father's light hand. There were lots of chores to do: 
Milk the cow, feed the pigs and horses, weed the vegetable garden, 
mow our lawns as well as Grandmother Beckstead's, At the "field" 
he helped irrigate, plant fruit trees and strawberries. 

The "field" was located just south of the State Mental Hospital. 
We had lots of stories to tell of the patients coming to the "field". 
Father would find them there at night, when he was irrigating, and 
would take them back to the Hospital. 

Owen was fun to be with. His friends called him "Jokey", He 
was very active in Church and School affairs. He received many 
awards. One award, given for a perfect attendance at Sunday School 
for a continous thirteen years, in the Provo Third Ward, 

Owen graduated from the Dixon Jr. High, the Provo High and 
the Brigham Young University. After graduation from B. Y. U. , 
where he majored in Physical Education, he became a coach at the 
B. Y. High School, Freshman and later Varsity Coach at B. Y. U, , 
Coach at Dixie College and Long Beach, California. 

At B,Y. High School he taught Dallin Oaks, now President of 
the Brigham Young University. Owen really enjoys his visits with 
Dallin during his visits to Long Beach, California. 

Owen's "den", in his home at Long Beach, is covered with 
pictures of his teams, medals, awards, newspaper articles and etc. 
He produced many winning teams. He coaches at Wilson High School 
where he is Dean of Coaches. 



412 



OWEN GEORGE DIXON 



413 



Back to High School days, Owen was a good student and wrote 
with such pretty penmanship. He loved to dance and participate in 
plays. We put on a 3 act play at the Provo Third Ward that was really 
fun. There were many of our friends and cousins who made up the 
cast. 

What a snappy dresser! He dated the nicest and most popular 
girls and took themto the best places to eat and dance. His girl friends 
were so good to me, his little sis. He liked people and they liked him. 

Owen was called into the US Army during World War II. He was 
with the 2nd Division Field Artillery, He went to many European 
Countries. He was in the "Battle of the Bulge" where he received the 
bronze star. He was really in the "thick" of it all. The buddie that 
he was very close to was Don Snow, son of Wanda, from Provo. They 
went through a lot of training and fighting together, such as: Ski man- 
euvers in Wisconsin; training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma and Fort Sam 
Houston, Texas . More training in Northern Ireland then to the beaches 
and hedge rows of Normandy. It was hard to keep up with the areas 
in Europe because of the secrecy. 

Army life is such a contrast from the sheltered life in Utah. 
Sometimes, when looking back, it's almost like throwing a lamb into 
a den of lions. Our anchor was our Bishop and cousin, Arthur D. 
Taylor. We'd send a letter to him with our tithing, after each pay day. 
How we loved and needed his counsel. He never failed us. 

While in the service, Owen met his wife to be, Florence Sophie 
Janeczko. They were married in Chicago, Illinois on December 2, 
1945. 

They are the parents of two boys: 

Larry Owen Dixon was born at Provo, Utah on 1 2 Sept. 1946. 
KotB-^i Charles Dixon was born at Provo on 30 August 1948. 
Owen and Florence now have two grandchildren. 

In selecting the Big Seven Conference Football Team for 1941, 
one sports writer commented on the selection of Owen as "All Con- 
ference Guard" - - -because Co-captain Owen Dixon fired the B.Y.U. 
team week after week with his unmatched spirit and fine all-round 
play, he was a first team choice." 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
CHARLES OWEN DIXON 

1. D. # 10. 

Born to Sarah De Grey and Henry Aldous Dixon on November 22, 1875 

at Provo, Utah. 
Baptized by John S. Holdaway on Jiine 3, 1884. 
Confirmed by Edward Harding on June 3, 1884. 
Attended the Timpanogos Grammar School. 

Married Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead in the Salt Lake Temple on 

August 25, 1909. 
Children: 

VaLera, Ruby, Stella, Alice, Owen, Virginia. 
Left for a mission to Montana- Northwestern States on April 9, 1898. 
He was a construction worker, a teamster hauling brick and lumber, 

a Woolen Mills worker, a rancher, a farmer, a Provo City 

road employee, a State employee in Salt Lake and a Father 

and Mother to his children. 
He loved to have the finest horses, cows and other livestock around 

his place. He owned and raced one of the finest thoroughbred 

race horses in this area named "Billy Sherbet". 
After his health failed him, he developed one of the best orchards and 

strawberry patches in the area, out of the gravel-bed farm 

near the mouth of Slate Canyon. 
He died March 3, 1943 at Provo, Utah. 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
VIRGINIA BECKSTEAD DIXON 

I.D. # 10. w 

Born December 10, 1886 at Riverton, Utah to Charlotte Emeline Ham- 
ilton and George Francis Beckstead. 
Baptized and confirmed a member of the LDS Church on April 4, 1894. 
Married Charles Owen Dixon on August 25,1909 in the Salt Lake Temple . 
Children: 

VaLera, Ruby, Stella, Alice, Owen and Virginia. 
She was so attracted to Charles Dixon that she broke her engagement to 

another suitor to marry him. 
She was a delicate, particular person, very skilled in sewing and kept 

a clean and attractive home. 
She was active in both church and comm\inity activities. 
After only 13 years of married life, at the age of 35, she died at Provo, 

Utah, August 19, 1922. 



414 



73rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16.4 




ELDON ARNOLD DIXON 




SARAH JEAN DASTRUP ILA JEAN NIELSEN 



415 



£l 1 d o n A. Dixon Family- 





First Owned Home 
132 North 900 West 
Provo, Utah 



416 



E LDON 



ARNOLD 



DIXON 



Eldon Arnold Dixon, was born March 31, 1921, in the family- 
home at 885 North 500 West in Provo, Utah. At 5:40 p.m. Doctor 
Charles M.Smith gavehimthat famous spank letting his father (Arnold) 
and mother (Letitia May) plus two brothers (Howard and Grant) and 
one sister (Evelyn) know that all six pounds of him was around. Bruce, 
Floyd, Gloria, Robert, Douglas and Doris were brothers and sisters 
that graced our home later. 

While spending a summer in Provo Canyon as a small boy, I 
was, one day, seated on a log by the camp tennis court watching my 
older brother. Grant, and his friend play tennis. All of a sudden I 
hurriedly glanced behind and to the right of me. I didn't know what had 
prompted me to do so, but to my horror I saw a rattlesnake, coiling 
in their fashion, for a strike. I immediately went straight into the 
air, and was several feet away and in a run when I finally set foot on 
mother earth again. I obtained help from my brother and several 
other people, and threw rocks at it. When it was finally killed I ob- 
tained the nine rattles as a souvenier. 

September 3, 1927, I started grade school, but when I made it 
to the sixth grade and completed it, they told me that I had to take it 
all over again. Ohwell, I started Junior High at the Dixon Junior 
High on September 3, 1934 and then moved on to the Provo HighSchool 
September 3, 1937, graduating May 27, 1940. On October 6, 1940, I 
entered the B. Y. U. , but in the middle of the fourth quarter I left to go 
to Lockheed Aircraft Company in Burbank, California. This was in 
May 1941. I was employed there until I entered the Service September 
1942. 

I returned to the United States from overseas, February 1945 
as an Aviation Machinist's Mate 2/C and found the gal of my dreams. 
I married Sarah Jean Dastrup in the Salt Lake Temple June 4, 1945 
by Jesse William Knight. On October 19, 1945, I was released hon- 
orable from the Navy. 

Now that I had a wife, 1 had to find work and was lucky to get it 
at D. T. R. Co. I was given the responsibility of decorating the windows. 
I must have done OK for myself and the store, for I won several de- 
corating contests. Along with the work I went back to the B. Y.U. on 
the G.I. bill and four years later received a B.S. degree in Art. 

While living at 885 North Fifth West, life was good until the 
crash of 1929. My dad was a cashier at the Farmers and Merchants 
Bank, and we lost our home when the bank closed. We were forced 
to rent, going to Second West and Fifth North, where our pony "Bright 
Eyes" died. That same night the large flour mill near by, burned 
down. Over a period of time the family has lived at 265 North Third 
West, 270 West First North, Fourth East and Second North, Third 
North and Second East. While I was in California we lived at 1339 
one-half North LaBreaAve., Hollywood, California. My wife and I 



417 



418 



ELDON ARNOLD DIXON 



lived at 2255 Woolsey Street, Berkeley, California and an apartment at 
543 North Fifth West, Provo, Utah. On August 18, 1946, my wife and 
I and our first son. Reed, had a home of our own at l32 North Ninth 
West, Provo, Utah. 

My love for Art had to take a back seat, while I worked at the 
Hill Air Force Bade at Ogden,Utah from September 1951 to September 
1954. We lived near the Farmington Ward where I became a custodian. 
I also attended the University of Utah and Utah State University, Logan, 
Utah for the years of 1955 to 1957 and earned an Elementary Ce rtificate . 
I taught at the Elementary School at Clearfield from September 1957 to 
1959. From August 23, 1 95 9 to July 20 , 1964, I had the rating of GS7 
and was an Elementary Teacher at the Indian School at Brigham City. 
In 1967 Hill Field asked me with others, to go to the Philippine Islands 
and work on the Phantom Jets . We left about July and got back Decembe r 
1967. This same month I was almost totaled out in a Volkswagon acc- 
ident at Brigham City, Utah. I was in three hospitals in six months. 
I had a fractured neck and brain concussion. A lot of people thought I 
would become a"vegetable", but I proved them wrong. My only trouble 
now, is some memory and sense of smell loss. 

I was told that my Mother died on May 3, 1955 and my Father 
died September 1, I960. My second trial, to endure, was a civil di- 
vorce on July 15, 1969. 

I had a light heart attack, while working at Deseret Industries, 
Provo, in 1970. After some recovery time, my heart is doing great, 
but I see my doctor once a year to make sure. 

In 1971, I met the most wonderful woman of my life. Her name 
is Ila Jean Nielsen. We were married by Bishop Mervin Ralph Dudley 
at her father's home in Spanish Fork on March 31, 1972. It's great to 
celebrate a birthday and anniversary on the same day. On March 8, 
1974, a Temple Divorce came through allowing Ila Jean and me to be 
sealed in the Provo Temple on June 13, 1974. 

In October 1978, Ila Jean and I sold our home at 964 West 630 
North in Orem, Utah and bought a condominium in Camelot at 1412 
Lancelot Drive, Provo, Utah. We love it here and feel that the Lord 
guided us here . 

My children are: Eldon Reed Dixon, born July 21, 1946. 

Larry Dean Dixon, born January 3, 1949. 
Dennis Dastrup Dixon, born October 2, 1959. 
Roger Duane Dixon, born June 4, 1953. 
Jeannine Dixon, born June 21, 1959. 

Ila Jean and I now have eight grandchildren between us. 

On September 7, 1975, my oldest brother, Howard, died. I'm 
pleased that I have wonderful memories of him. 



74th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




419 



74th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Gladys Dixon Nelson Family I.D.# 14.8 




Bill, Diane David 
Jeanne Carolyn, Claudie 

Ivan, Gladys, Kent, Kathleen, Julie Anne 




915 W. Encanto Blvd. 
Phoenix Arizona 



420 



GLADYS DIXON NELSON 



On Monday, July 18, 1921, at 7:40 p. m. , a little s even and one- 
half pound daughter was born to Electa La Prele Smoot Dixon and LeRoy 
Dixon. I was born in their faraily home at 418 North Fifth West, Provo 
Utah. 

My father, LeRoy christened me on Sept. 4, 1921. The name I 
was given was "Gladys Dixon". The unusual thing about this name was 
how it was given me. A name had been decided upon. The name was to 
be "Diana" after my mother's grandmother, Diana Eldredge Smoot, 
with whom she had lived as a child. Her own mother, Electa Bullock 
Smoot, passed away when my mother was just three years of age. My 
father LeRoy, had favored the name of "Gladys", but he conceded to 
Electa's desire to have me named "Diana". Imagine my mother's sur- 
prize when during the blessing, my father named me "Gladys"! It al- 
most brought her to her feet. But, being the dutiful wife that she was, 
she kept quiet, and I have been known as "Gladys" ever since. Had I 
been able to choose, 1 would have preferred "Diana". That is why we 
named our first daughter "Diana" because I have always been fond of 
that name. 

Being the youngest of eight children, I had a wonderful childhood. 

There was so much love in our home a good deal of teasing too from 

my brother Paul. He was the only brother I ever knew. My parents 
had three sons: LeRoy who died at the age of seven weeks, of Bron- 
chial Pneumonia; Paul Smoot Dixon, who died at the age of forty-nine 
of cancer; Arthur Smoot Dixon, who was three years old when he died 
of Pneumonia. Paul was the eldest living child. Then came AUie, 
Sarah Vera, Maurine, Helen, Arthur (had he lived), and Gladys. 

Another reason my childhood was so happy is that our home was 
in the midst of what was affectionately called "Sandy Alley". It was 
really a few blocks along Fifth West where mostly Dixons and Taylors 
lived. A number of them had red hair from Grandfather Dixon, I 
suppose, and that is where the neighborhood got the name of "Sandy 
Alley", Those were happy days playing with cousins and being in and 
out of the homes of loving Aunts and Uncles. It kind of seemed like one 
big happy family. I had many happy days at Wildwood, Provo Canyon. 
We swam in Provo River, climbed the mountains, went on long hikes, 
played tennis, had a big camp bonfire with programs and stories from 
the camp people. 

I attribute much of my strong testimony of the gospel to the things 
I learned, examples I witnessed, inspirational stories I heard of Pion- 
eer Ancestors and miracles brought about through faith, fasting and 
prayers. 

When I was twelve years old, I was given a Patriarchal Blessing 
by Joseph B. Keeler. It was memorable experience, and I have re- 
ferred to it many times for direction and comfort. So far, everything 
has come to pass. I pray that I may be worthy of having the remainder 
fulfilled. 



421 



422 



GLADYS DIXON NELSON 



M. Verne Thurber baptized me July 28, 1929, and I was confirm- 
ed by Alfred E, Eves, Bishop and an English friend of my parents. 
This was done on the same day. 

The schools I attended were Brigham Young University Training 
School (Elementary), Dixon Jr. High School (named after the Dixon 
Family being so prominent in the West side of Provo), and Provo High 
School, I graduated from the Dixon Jr. High, May 21, 1936 and from 
the Provo High in 1939. I attended Oakland High School for one year 
after my mother moved to Oakland, California to be near my sisters 
who were living there at that time. 

When I was in the seventh grade, I won first place in a Flag 
Day Essay Contest that the City of Provo sponsored. I was on the 
program at the Provo City & County Building. They presented me with 
a silk American Flag and a gold medal. I then gave the flag to the 
Principal of Dixon Jr. High, John F, Mower. 

As a young girl, my favorite sports were swimming and tennis, 
I also did quite a bit of sewing. 

Brigham Young University was the college of my choice because 
I never wanted to leave home. My year in Oakland, I had suffered so 
with homesickness that I felt I never wanted to leave home again. All 
through my school years, I was active in Student Government, holding 
several class and student body offices. 

On December 28, 1 926 my father died at the early age of forty- 
five. It was said of him that he had lived twice his years in the things 
he had accomplished. He left mother, a widow at the age of forty- 
three with six children to rear. However, she did a wonderful job of 
being both mother and father to us. She died on Christmas Day in 
1940 at the age of fifty- seven. A child never had two more wonderful 
parents than I. I felt especially dependent on my mother because I was 
just five and one-half years old when my father died. 

My first full-time employment was at Taylor Brother Company 
in Provo, I worked there as a stenographer during my college and 
after my marriage while my husband attended school. It was pleasant 
working there because President Thomas N.Taylor and all the employ- 
ees were so kind and nice to work with. I worked there about three 
years on and off. 

Ivan William Nelson and I were married November 12, 1941. We 
were sweethearts from the time of Dixon Jr. High, We went with 
others, of course, but we always knew something special existed be- 
tween us. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple by President 
Stephen L. Chipman, who was the President of the Temple. 

We went to Panguitch, Utah to live first, Ivan was employed by 
the Soil Conservation Service (U.S.) as a Civil Service Clerk doing 
shorthand, typing and general office work. While we were there, the 
Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Ivan and I went to California where 
he learned to weld and worked on Liberty ships being built in the war 
effort. Then we returned to Provo where he attended the B,Y,U. un- 
til he enlisted in the Naval Reserve Program as an Ensign. He had to 



GLADYS DDCON NELSON 



423 



leave for training at Ottumwa, Iowa, Princeton and Harvard Univer- 
sities. "When I couldn't be with him, I lived with my sister Maurine in 
Provo, 

While Ivan was at Princeton, N, J. , our first child, Ivan William 
II (Bill), was born. He was born July 7, 1943 at the Utah Valley Hos- 
pital in Provo. It was what might be called "mental telepathy" at the 
time he was being born, Ivan sent me a telegram and an orchid at the 
very time I was in labor. Bill was born at night, and the next morning 
I received the telegram and orchid. The telegram said that Ivan was 
especially thinking of me on that day (July 7th) ! Maurine was allowed to 
be with me as she was a Nurse's Aid at the hospital. Dr. Don C. Mer- 
rill was my doctor. He knew that Ivan was in the service and that my 
mother had passed away so I think he let Maurine be with me. I really 
was gratefiil for her love and support, as I was for Helen when she 
helped me after about four of my other childreno My sisters have 
really gone the extra mile, so to speak, in being a mother to me and I 
will be forever grateful to them. 

Bill and I became very close, at this time, because his Daddy 
was away. I was very grateful to have someone of my own to care for 
and for someone to keep me busy. A letter written every day for al- 
most three years was my "nightly visit" with my husband. I had it 
better than he though, because I was around my sisters' families, his 
parents, and some girl friends whose husbands were also away in the 
service. Ivan must have been very lonely just on the ship looking at 
the blue Pacific for such a long time. Of course, they were in actual 
warfare much of the time which really kept him busy. He was a Com- 
munication Officer on the Admiral's staff on three different aircraft 
carriers - the Bunker Hill, the Yorktown and one other. The Yorktown 
received a Presidential Unit Citation for which he has a ribbon. 

After Bill was four months old, the doctor released me. Bill and 
I traveled to New York to stay at my brother Paul's home. This was 
the first time Ivan had ever met our son. Paul, Ora, and their child- 
ren, Paul Jr. and Vivian, were most kind to us to let us stay for over 
a month. Then Ivan was transferred to Cambridge, Mass, to attend 
Harvard University, We were able to accompany him there, and we 
were together as a little family for about four months until he was 
sent overseas. 

During this period of my life, I began losing some sight, in the 
form of blind spots that occured from time to time. For several years 
I went to doctors about it. One of the most famous doctors on the eye. 
Dr. Cordes, in San Francisco, thought it may be neuritis. But Dr. 
Weston Oaks, of Provo, thought it was spasms in the tiny blood vessels. 
After everyone's prayers and administration from the Priesthood, the 
condition was fortunately arrested. However, these blind spots still 
remain with me. Therefore, I have been slowed up in my reactions, 
unable to play ball of any sort or tennis, and sewing has been more 
difficult. But I am thankful to have had any sight at all. 



424 



GLADYS DIXON NELSON 



A few years later, I suffered Menier's Disease - acute dizziness, 
nausea, and some loss of hearing. Again, through prayers and fastkig 
and blessings from my husband and others, this problem has also slow- 
ed down. These afflictions come to us, perhaps, to help us to have 
spiritual experiences while overcoming them. They also keepusmore 
humble and test our patience. The love and patience of Ivan and my 
family have helped me a great deal. 

Upon Ivan's return from World War II, in January of 1946, he 
began working for Beneficial Life Insurance Company of Salt Lake City. 
We lived in both Provo and Salt Lake City while he was the Field Sup- 
ervisor. Then he was transferred to Phoenix, Arizona, in 1951, as 
the General Agent for the State of Arizona, We have lived in Phoenix 
for Twenty-seven years. Our last four children were born here. 

We have been blessed with three fine sons and three lovely dau- 
ghters: Ivan William Nelson II (Bill) born in Provo in 1943, David Le- 
Roy Nelson born in Provo in 1946. Our third son, Kent Dixon Nelson 
was born in Phoenix as were our three girls: Diane, Carolyn and Jtilie 
Anne. Our children are our pride and joy and have been the greatest 
blessing to our lives. Our grandchildren that are coming along are 
"the frosting on the cake", so to speak! 

The Church has been the main thing in my life, next to my hus- 
band and children, and I have always been active in it. My callings 
have been many and have given me experience in each organization. 
I have been a teacher in the Sunday School and Y.LJvl.I.A. and Primary 
Secretary, In the Relief Society, I have served as a Visiting Teacher, 
Visiting Teacher Message Leader in both Phoenix Third Ward and 
Phoenix Stake; Counselor in the Relief Society Presidency for both 
Phoenix Third Ward and Phoenix Stake, Having worked as a Spiritual 
Counselor to unwed mothers for the LDS Social Services has helped 
me love the Lord for his mercy in offering repentance and a way back 
through changing their lives, 

I love the Gospel of Jesus Christ with all my heart, I know that 
it has been given to us as a guide for our lives to help us merit etern- 
al life with our Heavenly Father, I have always been very thankful for, 
and proud of, my progenitors; for their courage in accepting the gos- 
pel and all the hardships that they endured; and for their example to 
me. All this has made it easy for me to live and love the gospel. It 
has been a large contributing factor in making my testimony of it 
strong, I am truly indebted to them. 

It gives me joy to be able to help with my grandchildren when 
ever I am able, I am happy that my daughters-in-law and sons make 
me feel wanted. We have three very sweet, thoughtful daughters- in 
law. They are all devoted wives and excellent mothers and homemakers. 
We love and appreciate them each one. I pray I will be able to help 
my own three daughters when they need me. 



76th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 10.6 




f^ERCY JOHN SCHUGK 




Virginia Dixon Schugk Family 




1578 W. Manzanita Dr. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



426 



MY LIFE HISTORY 
Virginia Dixon Schugk 



Provo, Utah, the place of my birth, gives me a warm, wonder- 
ful feeling, whenever I think of it. Provo is such a beautiful city with 
Mount Timpanogos to the North and a range of the Wasatch Mountains 
to the East, with Utah Lake glimmering in the West. I shall never 
forget the sunset's that shone through our kitchen window in the even- 
ings. "Mount Timp" was like a big guardian angel watching over us. 
My children will now say, "Mother, you love that mountain, don't you? " 

The people of Provo are very education minded and take advant- 
age of the opportunities afforded them at the Brigham Young University. 
They are very outgoing, ambitious, but gentle and sweet with lots of 
understanding for each other. Now they have been blessed with a 
beautiful Temple which resembles " a candle to the Lord." 

This is the setting I grew up in, and all thoQBtb-I have visited and 
lived in many States and Countries, this is the most beautiful place of 
all. 

I was born June 4, 1922, at 295 North Fifth West, in the Provo 
Third Ward, the daughter of Charles Owen Dixon and Virginia Beck- 
stead Dixon. I am thankful that I have been able to be a Mother to my 
children. I was not that fortunate. When I was thirty- six I had some 
anxious moments, because this was the age that my mother was when 
she died. I was two months old, just a baby. Mother could not even 
feed me because she had so much infection. Susie Manson Steadman, 
a dear friend, had just had a new baby, Geraldine, so she offered to 
feed me. She said I was practically starved. She also took Elayne, 
my cousin. So when we don't behave just right, she tells us, "I know 
where you get your meanness from," 

"Family" "Home" "Love" are the sweetest words that have 
been given to us. My father, Charles Owen Dixon, was one of the 
hardest working man I have known. He loved the gospel, his family 
and his home. He provided us with a beautiful home. It was my 
mother, Virginia Beckstead's wedding gift. I was his baby! Even 
when I was the age of nineteen, just before he died, he would say, 
"this is my baby!" He gave me mother's name to cherish. All I have 
ever heard about my mother was the best. What a beautiful mother 
and sweetheart she was. Father longed for her so, and with six child- 
ren: VaLera, age 12; Ruby, age 10; Stella, age 7; Alice Delenna, age 
5; Owen George, age 2; and myself, age 2 months; toraise. 

My childhood was filled with happiness because of my family and 
friends. In my Patriarchal Blessing it says, "You have had a devoted 
mother and a splendid father who has loved and cherished you as the 
apple of his eye. Your grandmother also has greatly loved you as well 
as your other relatives and friends," My blessing is one of the shortest 
I have ever seen, but what more could one ask for than this? 



427 



428 



VIRGINIA DIXON SCHUGK 



Aunt Rye Taylor would have a hot stew or rice pudding waiting 
for our supper. Aunt Lou loved to bake with rich ingredients and 
samples were always available, and nickles and dimes too when I'd go 
up to Crawley's Grocery Store for her. Aunt Rene, was a jewel! She 
would always be on hand to help with taking our bread out of the oven 
to putting up peaches. She'd make round loaves of white bread and put 
raspberry jam on it. What a treat! Aunt "Leek", was a very "elect" 
woman. Her daughter Gladys was one of my favorite cousins. We had 
such fun together. In later years we lived in Arizona, and had such 
nice visits in their beautiful home in Phoenix. Another favorite cousin 
and friend was Elayne Taylor Fisher. Her parents, Arthur D, and 
Maurine, were like parents to me, always helping me with my personal 
problems. How I loved to go to Wildwood with them. 

My Mother's mother , Charlotte Emiline Beckstead , was a wonder- 
ful Grandmother to us. Each evening I would take her over a pint of 
fresh milk from our cow. We would sit in front of her fireplace with 
only the light illuminating from it, and talk about what I had been doing 
that day, or about her experiences of the past. She lived to be ninety- 
three years old, and we loved and cared for her. 

When attending the old Timpanogos Grade School, I met Gerald- 
ine Steadman and Maurine Hoover. Elayne, Gerry, and Maurine and 
I went all through school together. We still get together and have fun 
talking about our children and the "good ole days". We used to plan 
our "old Maids Home" and had such fun over this. Our teachers in 
Mutual would try to talk us out of it but we had our minds made up 
to be "old maids". But in spite of this we were busy at Dixon Jr. 
High learning how to cook, sew and how to raise children. At Provo 
High we spent most of our time in the Speech Department, putting on 
plays and etc. In my Senior Year I was student director under 
Maurine Murdock. This was a challenge to me. 

After school I would stop at Andy Anderson's Service Station, 
across the street from the Third Ward Meeting House, and pick-up 
their adding machine, I'd carry this up the block to his home where 
I would do his bookkeeping. I was paid $20. 00 a month for this. 

At Brigham Young University we were the greenest freshmen 
you ever did see, I wonder when we ever studied, we were having 
such fun in Social Units, We practically lived in formals, and we loved 
it. In my second year I took shorthand at the earliest hour, so that 
meant 13 blocks up to the Brimhall Building on upper campus, from 
our home on Fifth West, After class I would run down to West Center 
Street to Bennett's Paint & Glass Company, There I worked for Al 
Wright as a secretary, bookkeeper, sales clerk. What fun it was to 
carry a bag full of silver dollars to the Farmers & Merchants Bank, 
next door, Al Wright was truly a man to be admired. He had a darl- 
ing wife and he treated her like a china doll. The Wright's were 



VIRGINIA DIXON SCHUGK 



429 



wonderful to me. They had only one son, so they treated me like their 
daughter. 

In 1942, things changed with World War II on. My only brother 
Owen was in the thick of it, attached to the 2nd Division in Europe. 
I was very fond of my brother. He was two years older than I was. 
This made it so nice to have a big brother that was a football captain 
and an all around guy. At the BYU mat dances he would always have 
the first dance with me, I decided I didn't want to read about the war, 
that I wanted to be a part of it. It was a big day when I reached the 
age of twenty, so I could sign up. My sister Stella and I were all doll- 
ed up in attractive outfits and the news reporter took our picture for 
the Provo Herald, because we had joined the WAACS. We thought all 
of this was going to be so exciting and glamorous to wear a uniform 
and travel all over. In June, Georgia, with 10,000 women was any- 
thing but. Things were better the next year when I was in Italy. We 
worked at the Castle in Casserta, south of Naples. I was assigned to 
the payroll department in the King's Stables. They had been bombed 
so they were very open with no heat. We used to warm our hands 
over a candle so we could type. 

The one experience I remember most about Italy was the oppor- 
tunity to see what an audience with Pope Pius XII of Rome was like. 
His Holliness was carried in on a gold throne, so his holy feet would 
not touch the floor, until he got to the pulpit. The procession was 
very historical and colorful. Costumes were worn from the early 
days of Spain. The Pope receives audiences of thousands in the vast 
Belvedere Court or the red and gold Sala Clementina, Smaller groups 
are admitted to his throne room or study. When he came past me he 
stopped and said "May the Lord Bless You" in English. He honored 
me because I was an American Woman, He spoke to the thousands in 
five different languages. St, Peter's Church is something to behold, 
beneath its 400 foot dome are some of the most cherished art treasures 
of the Vatican. Riches of the world are here and yet the people of this 
great church are beggers in the street. They give so much and re- 
ceive so little. 

Before leaving for Italy I came home on furlough. I had been 
writing to Paul Brown, a missionary from our Ward, His companion, 
Percy Schugk started to write to me. We corresponded for two years. 
He called while I was home and asked to see me. The first thing I 
asked him was how do you pronounce your name? "Schugk" (Shook). 
We liked each other a lot after our first date. He had just gotten 
home from his mission (Spanish- American) and he knew he would be 
called in to the Service. I went to Italy and he went to Japan. We 
just about lost track of each other until after the War. We were 
married in the Salt Lake Temple, 14th February 1947. 



430 



VIRGINIA DIXON SCHUGK 



Percy John Schugk, my husband, was born inSpandau, Germany, 
19th January 1921, His parents, John Edward Schugk and Erna Math- 
ilda Klara Utecht, were stalwarts of the Church. Seeing what World 
War I can do to a country they were anxious to bring their son to 
America where they could be sealed in the Temple at Salt Lake City. 
So they arrived in America when Percy was five years old. They 
worked for thirteen years as Temple workers in the Salt Lake Temple. 
I have learned that the Germans are very clean, hard working people. 

Most of our five children: Dennis Charles, Suzette, Nancy, Judy 
and Sonjia; spent their childhood on the Mexican Boarder, from Cal- 
ifornia to Texas and Arizona. Percy has been employed with the U.S. 
Immigration Service. It gave them a lot of freedom and yet they had 
to be good examples of correct living, because they were some of the 
few "Mormons" in their schools. We moved thirteen times in thirteen 
years. Some of the houses would have to be fumigated before we 
could move in. We would paint and decorate them so cute that the 
owner's would want them back. In Naco, Arizona there wasn't another 
house available, so we built one out of adobe, ourselves. I remember 
how heavy the adobe block was to lift. 

We took a loss in salary to come back to Salt Lake City. Denny, 
Susy and Nancy were in their teens so we were anxious for themtodate 
in the Church. All three chose partners from this area of Taylors ville. 

In 1973 I had one of the choicest opportunities of my life. I flew 
to Europe so I could "walk in the footsteps of my ancestors". As our 
life goes on we have certain strong desires. One of mine has been to 
show in some way the appreciation I have for the Dixon Family, be- 
cause they have been so good to me. Also because of the strong test- 
imony of my father and his father. They knew with every fibre of 
their body that Jesus is the Christ. 

1976 has been a wonderful year to remind us of our love for our 
country. Percy and I enjoy traveling in our 5th wheel trailer with our 
friends. We have had a lot of fun trips visiting our children. We 
have 15 grandchildren. They call me "Grandma Ginny", Judy is on 
a mission in Indiana and doing a great job there. 

I keep very busy working in the Church, Relief Society, Gen- 
ealogy. Also in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers, And a member of the 
women's Endowment Committee in getting funds for the Primary 
Medical Center by putting on the Festival of Trees, I have a busy life 
and this make life rich. We are happy and proud of the lives our 
children are living. 



77th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16.5 




BRUCE ROYDEN DIXON 




COLLEEN CALLISTER 



431 



77th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Bruce Royden Dixon Family 

I.D.# 16.5 




Colleen Bruce David 

Joan Lynn Ann Kristin 




310 East 1900 North, Provo, Utah 
4 3 2 



BRUCE 



R OY D EN 



DIXON 



I was born February 13, 1923 in Provo, Utah, the fifth child of 
Arnold and Letitia May Banks Dixon. Our family lived at 885 North 
Fifth "West at this time. As a small boy I was impressed with our 
house and the large lot that included a large front lawn, a large garden 
plot on the south, fruit orchards on the north, chicken coops, a granary, 
a small barn and a pasture at the west end of the property. We had 
dogs, cats, chickens, and ponies. 1 remember playing on the dining 
room floor while mother sewed, the grocery boy delivering groceries 
to the kitchen, and standing on the built in bench in the breakfast nook 
looking out the window watching the sun go down. We enjoyed living 
here \intil the depression hit us when I was six years old, and Dad was 
forced to sell our house. 

We moved into the Hoover house located about 490 North Third 
West. Bright Eyes, our Shetland pony was the only pet that I remember 
taking with us. She died the night the old Hoover Flour Mill, located at 
2nd West and 5th North, burned down. During our stay in this house 
I remember our first radio, making roads for toy cars on the ditch 
bank in front of the house, and going after milk with Grant or Eldon to 
Ercanbrack's who bought our house on 5th West. During this time I 
attended first and second grades at the old Timpanogos School, on the 
corner of 4th North and 5th West. 

We then moved to 133 South 3rd West in Provo. Although we 
moved out of the boundaries, I attended the Timpanogos School and the 
Third Ward. We lived here for about one year then moved back into 
the Third Ward in the old Carter house at 470 West 1st North. 

While living in the Carter house we experienced our roughest 
times during the depression. The house was poor quality, inadequately 
heated during the cold winters. Four of us boys shared a small \m- 
heated bedroom. When mother had a serious illness it was necessary 
for me to live with Aunt Alice and Uncle Jabz Dangerfield, for a couple 
of months. I will always remember when Dr. Cliff Dangerfield re- 
moved my brothers Bob and Doug's tonsils on the ironing board in our 
dining room. 

In the 4th grade I attended the old Parker School and returned to 
the Timpanogos School for the 5th and 6th grades. I attended Dixon Jr. 
High for the 7th and 8th grades. Dad worked on a track gang for the 
railroad for a short period of time and I spent part of one summer 
living with him in a tent up Spanish Fork Canyon. He finally got a job 
as an accountant for B. D. Palfreyman Construction Company, a road 
contractor. 

We lived at 227 East 1st North when I was in high school and a 
freshman at BYU. I also worked as a custodian with Grant for the 
Farmers and Me rchants Bank and the Dixon Real Estate. In high school 
I took math, art, physics, chemistry; graduating in 1941. In 1942 we 



433 



434 



BRUCE ROYDEN DIXON 



moved into the rear apartment of Aunt Rye's, 256 North 5th West, and 
our family remained there until after I was married. 

When I was a freshman at BYU, the news broadcast that I listen- 
ed to in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium on December 8, 1941, 
was a milestone in my life;President Roosevelt declared war onJapan. 
Dr. Wayne B. Hales, my physics professor, advised we students to 
stick with our math and physics so that we could qualify for commis- 
sions as officers in the Armed Forces. I followed his advice. In order 
to avoid being classified as 4F (physically deficient) by the draft board 
and to pass the physical exam for an officer candidate; I saved enough 
money that I earned from Dixon Taylor Russell during the summer of 
1942 to have a hernia operation. I passed the physical exam and was 
accepted as an officer candidate in the U.S. Naval Reserve V- 1 2 pro- 
gram in October 1942. I attended BYU during the 1942-43 school year 
majoring in physics and minoring in mathematics , as an inactive mem- 
ber of the Navy Reserve. 

The first of July 1943, along with 50 or 60 other BYU students, 
we boarded a train at the Provo Depot and reported for active duty with 
the Navy at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. I spent two 
semesters at U. N. M. studying electronics, math, and a few Navy 
courses. In the spring of 1944 I reported at the USNR Pre-midship- 
man School at Ashbury Park, New Jersey, and spent 3 months training 
while waiting for assignment to a midshipman school. I then spent 4 
of the most strenuous months of my life as a midshipman at Cornell 
University, Ithaca, New York. I received my commission as an Ensign 
in the U.S. Naval Reserve in July 1944. 

I was assigned to the Pre-Radar School at Bowdoin College, 
Br\inswick, Maine and spent 4 months studying electronics and radio. 
After completing the course at "Bowdar" I was assigned to the Radar 
School at Massachusetts Institute Of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. 
The classes in radar were classified and were taught in the Harbor 
Building in downtown Boston. The 4 months of courses in radar were 
very technical and extensive. 

My first assignment after my schooling was completed, was to 
the Radar School at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. I sailed as a passenger 
aboard the super battleship USS New Jersey in a zig-zag course to 
Hawaii. A few days after my arrival at Pearl Harbor, the atomic 
bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, August 6, 1945, and the Japanese 
surrendered soon after. While at Pearl Harbor I was assigned as the 
Electronics Officer for a group (12) of LCI (Landing Craft Infantry), 
that had been scheduled for the invasion of Japan. I was then assigned 
to the USS Hanson DD832,a brand new long hull radar picket destroyer 
as the Electronics Officer. After missing the ship on the East Coast, 
I caught it at San Diego on Thanksgiving Day 1945, then sailed back to 
Pearl Harbor. We left Pearl Harbor on December 8, 1945 with eleven 



BRUCE ROYDEN DDCON 



435 



other destroyers in our squadron for Japan. After surviving a 5 day- 
typhoon we were grateful to see Mt. Fuji on the horizon on December 
22nd. Our assignment was to inspect the remanents of the Japanese 
fleet for contraband and to make sure they remained demilitarized . 
We were anchored in the harbor at Sasebo, Japan most of the time but 
did visit most of the harbors on all of the major Japanese Islands. 
After nine months of exciting duty aboard the Hanson in Japan, I re- 
turned home in August 1946. 

I completed my senior year at BYU in the Spring of 1947 and 
graduated with a B.S, degree in Physics and a minor in Mathematics. 
In the Fall of that year I enrolled in the Department of Architecture at 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After three years of in- 
tensive study, and an enjoyable life in Boston, I received a Bachelor 
in Architecture in the summer of 1950. 

I returned to Provo to work for Fred L. Markham, Architect. 
A few weeks after I started work for Fred, he hired an exceptionally 
talented secretary, Colleen Callister from Spanish Fork. Even though 
she was a little taller than the ideal girl that I was looking for, I 
couldn't resist dating Colleen. We became engaged in March and were 
married in the Salt Lake Temple May 17, 1951. After a honeymoon 
in the Northwest, we lived the remainder of the summer in the family 
cabin at Wildwood it was wonderful! 

We started our first home in a one bedroom apartment upstairs 
at 77 East 4th North, Provo. Here our first daughter LynnAnn was 
born on November 20, 1952 and our second daughter Joan was born 
June 13, 1954. We started construction at our present house at 310 
East 1900 North, Provo in June 1954 and moved in August 1955, before 
the house was fully complete. Our only son, David Callister, was 
born on December 13, 1957 and our youngest daughter Kristin was born 
on Colleen's birthday, January 28, 1961. 

Colleen and I have been active in church and civic affairs. My 
church service has been continuous and I have held many positions, 
primarily in the Mutual and Sunday School. In civic matters I have 
participated on a number of Provo City Boards, active in the Utah 
County Republican Organization, on the boards of musical and artistic 
organizations, president and board member of the Timpanogos Kiwanis 
Club. I served many years as an officer, board member, and presi- 
dent of the American Institute of Architects for the State of Utah and 
also as president of our local A. I, A. Chapter. I am an Educational 
Counselor for my alma mater MIT; a member of the Utah State Univer- 
sity Concrete Conference Committee; have been recognized in "Who's 
Who in the West", and have participated with a number of other organ- 
izations . 

I received my license to practice architecture in Utah in 1954. I 
have also been licensed in Nevada and Wyoming. I worked for Fred 



436 



feRUCE ROYDEN DIXON 



Markham from 1950 until 1956 when I started my own architectural 
practice. In 1959 I promoted two of my employees, Lee Knell and 
Kenneth Long, to form the partnership of Dixon, Knell and Long. Mr. 
Knell left the firm in 1961 and the firm changed to Dixon & Long. 
The two firms of architects Dixon, Knell, and Long designed the follow- 
ing significant buildings including the Sunset View Elementary School, 
Rock Canyon Elementary School and Utah Technical College in Provo; 
two dormitory projects at the College of Southern Utah in Cedar City; 
the Pleasant View Chapel and 9th Ward Chapel in Provo. We also 
designed the Springville Civic Center, the BYU Motion Picture Depart- 
ment and Sound stages. 

In 1968 Mr. Long moved to Seattle and I organized my present 
architectural firm, Dixon & Associates, Architects with my yo\inger 
brother Douglas and Kenneth Harris as associates. Some of our 
projects include the Provo High School Swimming Pool, the Executive 
Building in Provo, Moon Lake Electric Association Office Building in 
Roosevelt, Utah, two Golden Living Center projects in Salt Lake City 
and one in Provo, a large addition to the Mapleton Elementary School, 
an my own office building at 350 East Center, Provo. Our firms 
have received four major awards for outstanding architectural design. 
In 1973 I received the annual Award of Merit from the intermountain 
Chapter of Producers Council as the outstanding Utah architect in 
recognition of my community service, cooperative efforts with the 
Producers Council and maintaining the high standards of integrity in 
the practice of architecture. Since 1964 our firms have associated with 
the offices of Markham & Markham and Willard Nelson Associates as 
Central Utah Architects. 

In October 1967 I had a mild heart attack. In the fall of 1979 I 
decided that I would like to keep up with Colleen while jogging on the 
track, so I checked with my doctor to see if I could take medication 
to make this possible. He told me Utah Valley Hospital had the facil- 
ities to perform an angiogram and recommended that I have one done 
before he could recommend a more vigorous exercise program. InNov- 
ember I had the angiogram and it revealed that although my heart 
muscles and valves were in excellent condition there was a partial 
blockage of some of the coronary arteries supplying blood to the heart. 
He recommended that although it wasn't urgent it would be advisable 
to have by- pass surgery since there was the potential for a serious 
heart attack. On Tuesday, March 18, 1980, Dr. Conrad Jenson per- 
formed quadruple coronary by- pass graft surgery. My recovery has 
been excellent and I have been able to return to the office earlier than 
normally would be expected. At the present time I am near the end of 
my convalescence and looking forward to starting a more vigorous 
exercise program; fishing during the summer and skiing next winter. 



79th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 




437 



79th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
'Floyd Preston Dixon Family 

I. D . ff 16.6 




Dana Floyd 

Paul 

Stephanie Lois 




1477 Branch Avenue, Simi, California 



438 



FLOYD PRESTON DIXON 



I, Floyd Preston Dixon, was born November 6, 1924 at my 
parents home in Provo, Utah, Utah County. My parents were Letitia 
May Banks and Arnold Dixon. The home was on my parents farm loc- 
ated along the west side of Fifth West and approximately 885 North. I 
was blessed 30 November, 1924 by William O. Greer. 

Because of the depression our farm was sold and we moved to a 
rented house at 4th West between 4th and 5th North next to North Park. 
During our time there, the old Hoover flour mill burned down, and the 
smoke suffocated our pony. We later moved to 1st North and 5th West, 
near the Provo Third Ward Chapel. 

I attended kindergarten at the BYU Training School. My school- 
ing was continued at the old Timpanogos School. As a small boy I 
remember going with my brother to Second North, where we watched 
the fire which destroyed the Provo Woolen Mills. 

A very important thing in my life was my baptism. The font was 
located in the Administration Building on 1st North and 1st West in 
Provo. This date was the 13th of November, 1932. I was baptized by 
Max Gray and confirmed the same day by Arthur Dixon Taylor. On 
the 17th of January, 1937 I was ordained to the office of a Deacon by 
Robert H. Boswell. 

When we moved to First North and Second East, I attended the 
old Parker School, which was torn down the next year. Moving again 
to another home at Third North and Fifth East, I attended the Farrer 
Junior High School. My best friend was Blaine Diamond who lived 
through the block from me. We went to church together and both built 
model airplanes. On November 3, 1940, I was ordained to the office 
of a Teacher by Alonzo J. Morley. 

Some of my most pleasant times were spent at our summer 
home in Wildwood Resort, Provo Canyon. Here my best friends were 
Henry Off ret and Bryant Hopkins. I learned to swim in the Provo 
River under the help of Aunt Rye Taylor. Nick Woffinden helped me 
learn to fish and ride a horse. Sunday School was held at different 
cabins each Sunday. 

Our next move was to 256 North Fifth West and back into the 
Third Ward. Here I was advanced in the priesthood to the office of a 
Priest, which took place the 23rd of November 1941 under the hands 
of Milton H. Knudsen. Arthur D. Taylor was the Bishop and taught 
the Priests. During my time under his instruction I really took an 
interest in learning the gospel. Thanks for his patience and interest. 
Any questions I needed answering, I could go next door and he would 
answer them for me. My own parents taught me honor and respect for 
the Church and directed us toward high goals. Mother and Dad exhibit- 
ed a great love and concern for each child's success. 

Provo High School was the next part of my schooling. It was in 



439 



440 



FLOYD PRESTON DIXON 



1944 when I graduated. I attended vocational classes along with High 
School credit at the old Fair Grounds building, south of Provo. 

I received my Patriarchal Blessing from Andrew M. Anderson 
on October 2, 1944, and was ordained an Elder in the Melchizedec 
Priesthood by Arthur Dixon Taylor on December 10, 1944. 

My vocational classes were in Aircraft Repair and EngineOver- 
haiil. Mike Jense was my main instructor. I was always visiting the 
airport and helping to earn rides. Merrill Christopherson was my 
flight instructor, and my first solo flight was under his supervision at 
the Provo Airport. 

Some of my High School friends were: Jack Madsen, Kirk Neil- 
son, Van Washburn, Marvin Mecham, and Dick Singleton, my cousin; 
Thomas W. Richardson from Benjamin, who later married my sister 
Gloria. At the end of school I went to San Francisco, California to 
work for Pan American Air Lines. I was an Aircraft Mechanic, and 
worked on engines. 

My next experience was to be drafted into the U. S. Army. I 
trained at Camp Roberts, California in the 76th Infantry Batallion. 
After a short leave, my orders sent me to Fort Ord, California. There 
I trained to make beach landings from amphibian barges. I was sent by 
troop train to Fort Lawton, Washington, just outside of Seattle, Wash. 
Several days later I boarded an A. P. A. ship named the USS Grimes. 
We sailed into the Pacific in a zig zag pattern and we were told that a 
submarine was following us. Orders were opened three days out to 
sea and we learned that Hawaii was our destination. 

I served in three branches of the service during World War II . 
First the Infantry station at Wahiawa, where I had jungle training. 
Next, about twelve of us were taken to Pearl Harbor area and I became 
a member of the Army Landing Force Air Support Control Unit # 5. 
We were really assigned to the Navy. Third, after Japan surrendered 
I was assigned to the Army Air Forces, Far Eastern Air Forces, at- 
tached to the Hawaiian Air Depot. I was in the services for 20 months. 

During the time in Hawaii I attended Church in Honolulu every 
time I could get a leave or pass. I met Apostle Matthew Cowley and 
Spencer W. Kimball there at a Ward function. I'll always remember 
shaking hands with them and talking briefly to them. B efore leaving the 
Islands I was endowed in the Hawaiian Temple in July 1946. 

I want my family and relations to know that I did all I could to be 
close to the Lord and to keep all the commandments. Many promises 
that were given in my Patriarchal Blessing came true. I was promised 
to be protected on land, sea, and in the air. Some of the things that 
have happened proved to me this was true and that my Father in Heaven 
really did care about me and will always keep his promises. I have 
always prayed a lot and have never been ashamed to say that I am LDS, 
and believe in God, and that Jesus is the Christ. 



FLOYD PRESTON DIXON 



441 



After arriving home I returned to school at B. Y. U. I again en- 
joyed being back with my family and friends once more. I attended 
college for the next three years, and my interests were toward Art. I 
also took some Education classes to become a teacher, but was dis- 
couraged. Spanish classes were also taken. I enjoyed the dances and 
socials so much that I think my parents thought 1 was dance crazy. 

I mentioned to my Bishop my desire to go on a mission. I re- 
ceived a call to the Mexican Mission and departed for Mexico September 
21, 1949. I first was assigned to Ozumba, in the Ixta-Popo District, 
South-east of Mexico City. I spent two years working in Mexico City 
and six months in the City of Carnavaca ( a tourist town). I loved the 
people and the beautiful country. 

After my return home from my mission, I again attended B. Y. U. 
and graduated in the spring of 1953 with a Bachelors Degree in Art and 
a minor in Spanish. I had a part time job at the University working at 
the carpenter shop and later with Car r Greer doing survey work on the 
Campus. This work was for the location of buildings and roads. 

My Axint Elsie Banks talked me into staying atherhome inRiver- 
ton, Utah. I took a job at Bingham Copper Mine open pit. Work was 
not plentiful and that was a place I secured work without any problems. 
I was put on the track gang. A push cart was dropped on my leg the 
first day of work and I hobbled around for weeks in pain. I was trans- 
ferred to the survey team. I had a hard time keeping up with the others 
and the climbing was hard on me. Later I was put in charge of a switch 
along the railroad tracks. What a boring job that was. 

My weekends were spent mostly in Provo, and I would travel 
back to Riverton at night in order to go to work each morning at the 
mine. I did this to take advantage of the B. Y, U. activities. There at 
one of the dances I was introduced by Mark Beecroft to a California 
girl who had come to B.Y.U. I met Lois Dickenson and started dating 
her. She was from Santa Paula, California. We found we had many 
things in common and enjoyed doing things together. Some of our dates 
were visiting different temples. We were married 15th of February 
1957 in the Manti Temple. Our first home was located on Fifth West 
between Second and Third S outh in Provo, Utah. Our honeymoon was 
to Arizona where we visited many of the Indian ruins. 

A new job was working at the Utah County Assessors Office under 
Clarence Olsen. I did the engineering and platt work and record land 
books and set them up for taxation. I worked there for seven years. 

We had our first son born while we lived on Fifth West. Dana 
John Dixon was born 6 May 1958 at the Utah Valley Hospital, Provo, 
Utah. Fred Kartchner was our doctor. Our next home was on 1200 
North between Fourth and Fifth West. Paul, our second child was 
born while at this residence. Paul Raymond Dixon was born 23 August 
1959 at Utah Valley Hospital. 

Lois and I purchased our first home at 335 West 880 North, Provo, 



442 



FLOYD PRESTON DIXON 



Utah. Stephanie Gwyn Dixon was born 16 March 1962 at the Utah 
Valley Hosputal and Dr. Fred Kartchner delivered all our children. 
We credit him for saving Lois and Stephanie's life during this birth. 

Next we moved to New Brunswick, New Jersey. 776 Bevier 
Road, University Heights was our apartment while Lois attended Rut- 
gers University (School of Librarianship). I was able to get a teaching 
job at John Adams Jr. High School, in Edison Township, New Jersey. 
I taught Wood Shop, Metal Shop, and Mechanical Drawing for Girls. I 
taught there one year and took other work in Franklin Township. I 
worked with the Township Engineer doing survey and platt work. 

After Lois graduated from Rutgers University we moved to Mill- 
stone Township, New Jersey. Next we moved to Clarksburg where 
we rented a 200 year old house on a 90 acre farm. Lois established a 
Library at the elementary school and I taught just down the hall from 
her. Robert E. Garin was our principal. We had a wonderful time 
there and on the farm. 

After extensive travelling in the Eastern United States, Eastern 
Canada, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, we headed for California to be 
near Lois' ill mother. We visited all the Church Historical sights on 
the way. 

We both had jobs waiting for us with the Simi Valley Unified 
School District. After 13 years I am still teaching at Vista Elm School 
in the 4th to 6th grades. Our house address is 1477 Branch Avenue, 
Simi, California. 

I have tried to keep my hobbies active by taking more painting, 
guitar, jewelry, lapidary, prospecting classes. Flying is something 
that I really like. I enjoy travelling. We have taken two trips into 
Mexico, summer trips to Idaho, family and business trips to Utah. 
We spend some time at Lois' parents beach house, in the summers. We 
took a gold prospecting trip with our family into Northern California, 
and we panned gold on the same land Lois' California Gold Miner An- 
cestors actually claimed. As I write, I display a variety of interests 
and like to try new things. 

Our family has been very active in the Church here, and I have 
been a Stake Missionary through the Seventy's calling working with the 
full time missionaries. I was a Seventy for 25 years and now a High 
Priest. I am now in the Sunday School, having worked with the Scouts, 
Weblows and been a Stake Genealogical Library Helper. I have tried 
to dedicate myself to teaching children good principle of honesty and 
good citizenship. I hope that I have been of some value to others and 
have contributed something of myself to the Lord's work in this life. I 
am glad that I am alive and there are many things I desire to do. I ex- 
press my greatest appreciation and deepest love to my dear wife, Lois, 
whose patience and great support has encouraged me. 



80th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D # 11.9 




MELVIN RASMUSSEN DIXON 




CAROL COLLARD 



443 



Melvin Rasmussen Dixon Family 




444 



ME L VIN 



R ASMUSSE N 



DIXON 



Melvin R. Dixon was born October 2Z, 1925, in Provo, Utah, 
to Albert Frederick and Sena Rasmussen Dixon. He was the youngest 
of nine children born to that family, but four of the children died in in- 
fancy so he was raised as the youngest of five: Harry, Mildred , Norma , 
Vera and Melvin. The family was living on Third West between Second 
and Third South, Provo. Later they moved to 72 North First East and 
that remained the family home. 

Melvin attended the Parker School for the first through sixth 
grades. At some time he was called "Mick" and he was known by that 
nickname until he finished high school. The seventh, eighth and ninth 
grades were spent at Farrer Junior High School. In the seventh grade 
he started playing the drums and continued to do so through high school. 
Melvin was a good student and one of the valedictorians of his class. 
His sophomore, junior, and senior.years were spent at Provo High. 
He played percussion for the school band and orchestra and enjoyed 
the trips and parades and concerts the groups participated in. His 
senior year he also played in the Brigham Young University Band. 

As a child he remembers earning his spending money by pass- 
ing bills for the Dixon Taylor Russell Company and picking fruit. 
Later he worked as a janitor for the telephone company; as a stock 
boy in a grocery store; and as an usher for Intermountain Theaters. 
During his last years in high school he worked at Dixon Taylor Russell 
in the warehouse and driving a truck. 

After graduating from high school in 1943, Melvin enlisted in 
the army. He was sent to Bozeman, Montana and for three months he 
studied engineering at Montana State University. When he turned 
eighteen he was sent to Ft. Benning, Georgia, for basic training in 
the infantry. He was then assigned to the 301st Infantry Regiment of 
the 94th Division, at Camp McCain, Mississippi. He received his 
combat training in Mississippi and Tennessee. He was sent to Europe 
and spent fifteen months in combat duty in France and Germany. He 
served in the Army of Occupation in Germany and Czechoslovakia and 
was discharged in 1945. 

Melvin then was able to continue his schooling. He attended 
Brigham Young University and received his A. B. degree. He then 
attended Boston University for four years and received his M.D. de- 
gree. 

While Melvin was attending B.Y.U. he married Carol CoUard 
in the Salt Lake Temple. Linda was born before they moved to Boston 
and Susan and Debbie were both born while they lived in New England. 

Melvin returned to Salt Lake City for his internship at L.D.S. 
Hospital. Following his internship he had a three year residency in 
obstetrics and gynecology. He began private practice in Salt Lake in 
1957 and is still practicing. 

David, Amy and Emily were born in Salt Lake City to complete 



445 



446 



MELVIN RASMUSSEN DIXON 



his family of six children. 

Melvin is a High Priest in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter 
Day Saints . 

Melvin's spare time is spent assembling and finishing beauti- 
ful pieces of furniture or enjoying the mountains in Fairview Canyon 
where he has a summer home. 



Carol CoUard Dixon 



Very Brief Life Sketch of 
SENA RASMUSSEN DIXON 



Born October 16, 1885 in Ephraim, Utah to Sena Jensen and Mads 
Rasmussen. 

Baptized a member of the L.D.S. Church September 1, 1903. 
Married Albert Frederick Dixon in Manti Temple on March 23, 1910. 
Children: 

Harry, Mildred, Clifton, Elmo, Norma, Vera, Ruth, Baby 
and Melvin. 

Received her education in Ephraim City Schools and graduated from 

Snow Academy in 1903. 
She had delicate health a good part of her married life. 
She died at Provo, Utah, March 16, 1944. 



81st Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16.7 




447 



81 St Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Gloria Dixon Richardson Family 

I.D.# 16.7 




Don, Thomas, David, Douglas, Glen, Patrick 
Cynthia , Sandra, Linda, Gloria, Rebecca, Diana, Marilyn 




448 



GLORIA MAY DKON RICHARDSON 



I was born December 1 , 1926 at the Crane Maternity Hospital in 
Provo, Utah. My parents were Letitia May Banks and Arnold Dixon. 
I was the seventh child of a family of ten. I was told that the family 
was very pleased with my entrance into this world, because I was the 
second girl in a family of five boys. After my birth followed two more 
brothers and then a baby sister. I was given a name and a blessing by 
Henry Aldous Dixon II, a cousin. 

I remember as a small child in the neighbor's back yard I found 
an old torn, black umbrella in the ashes. I was so pleased with it, I 
went home and Howard, my oldest brother, was getting ready for a 
date. I wanted to go with him, but he said no. I decided I would sur- 
prise him. I layed on the floor in the back of the car. When he stop- 
ped to go into a store, I popped up and said, "Surprise", dirty faced 
and all, with my prize umbrella over my head. I don't remember 
much of what happened after that, only that I was taken home. I don't 
think Howard was very pleased. 

Some of my fondest memories were those summers we spent at 
Wildwood in Provo Canyon. Oh! how we enjoyed staying in our cabin 
there. The creek that ran behind the cabin would sing us to sleep at 
night. I remember Sunday School under the trees, swimming in the 
river, campfires, picnics, berry- picking, scavenger h\ints , hikes and 
the many friends and relatives that had cabins up there. I remember 
sitting on Aunt Rye Taylor's porch with my cousins Nancy and Julie. 
Celeste Taylor asked each of us what we wanted to be when we grew 
up. I said, "I just want to be a mother with lots of children and if I 
don't marry I want to be a lady head of an orphanage. " 

I received my education in the Provo Schools. I graduated from 
Provo High School and Seminary. 

After my first year of college at Brigham Young University, I 
went to Santa Fe , New Mexico to stay with Evelyn and Don. Evelyn's 
health wasn't too good, so I came to help her out. I also worked as a 
telephone operator until I came down with rheumatic fever. As soon 
as I was able to travel I returned home. 

The next fall I went back to school at B. Y.U. In December of 
that year my brother Floyd and I were in a Sociology class to-gether. 
On the other side of Floyd sat Helen Jones from San Francisco, Calif- 
ornia. She was writing a letter to a friend. Floyd asked her who she 
was writing to. She answered that she was writing to Tommy Richard- 
son. Floyd replied, "That's a friend of mine. May I write a few lines 
at the bottom of the page. " Floyd had attended vocational school with 
Tom in Provo. They also went to work for Pan American World Air- 
ways as aircraft mechanics at the same time. Tom and Floyd's paths 
crossed again in Honolulu, Hawaii. Floyd was still in the Service and 
Tom was still with Pan American. 



449 



450 



GLORIA DIXON RICHARDSON 



In January on a Friday afternoon there was a knock at the door. 
I answered it and the re stood a nice looking young man asking for Floyd. 
He said he was Tom Richardson. Floyd wasn't at home, so I told him 
to be sure to come back because Floyd was looking forward to seeing 
him. As I closed the door I said to my mother, " I would like to go 
with him." This really surprised me because this was unlike me. I 
thought he was Helen Jones' boyfriend and I wouldn't have a chance. 
As it turned out, Tom had never dated Helen. She was just a good 
friend. 

The next afternoon Tom came back to see Floyd. Tom asked if 
I would like to go for a ride with them. From then on, Tom came to 
see me. After four dates, Tom left and went to Wake Island, where 
he was stationed for the next nine months. 

In April, I went to stay with Evelyn and Don in Ames, Iowa. Don 
was attending Iowa State College. Evelyn was in the campus hospital 
with rheumatic fever and expecting her second child, Susan. A few 
days after my arrival, Evelyn came home. She spent the remaining 
months in bed until after Susan's birth on the 30th of July. 

The middle part of September, I received word that my mother 
was ill so I left for Utah. My mohter had poor health most of her life. 
She was a very sweet, lovely mother. She very seldom complained. 

Tom came back from Wake Island soon after my arrival from 
Iowa. He spent the next ten weeks vacation with his parents in Ben- 
jamin. He worked during this time at an appliance store to keep busy. 
It was during this time, after nine months of writing letters , we became 
better acquainted. The latter part of November we became engaged. 
Two weeks later, Tom left once again for Wake Island and more letters 
to follow. 

I married Thomas Weslie Richardson in the Salt Lake Temple on 
the 29th of June 1949, by Elder Ezra Taft. Benson, a member of the 
Quorum of Twelve Apostles. That evening we had a lovely dinner at 
the home of Tom's sister Betty, and Wayne Galloway. The following 
evening we had a reception in the Provo First Ward. The next five 
weeks we spent on our honeymoon. 

Our first home was in an apartment in the hills of Redwood City, 
California. We lived here four months. Then back to Utah for me and 
Midway Island for Tom, for the next four months. We then moved to 
Woodside, California where we lived on a small estate in a little white 
cottage with a picket fence covered with sweet peas. It was so quiet 
and peaceful here. It was while we were here that our first child, 
Cynthia, was born. She arrived on our second anniversary. The day 
before the baby was born we bought our first home in East Palo Alto, 
California. We spent the next five years here. March 2, 1953, our 
son Douglas Weslie was born and September 17, 1955 Marilyn arrived. 



GLORIA DIXON RICHARDSON 



451 



In 1956 Tom became a Flight Engineer for Pan American, so we 
were transferred to Honolulu, Hawaii. Hawaii became a state while 
we were here. We lived here for three and a half years. We rented 
a furnished home across the street from Evelyn and Don. It was so 
nice living so close to the Smiths. While we were here, David Thomas 
was born in the Kapialani Hospital in Honolulu. 

Our little home was getting too small for us, so we started build- 
ing a new home in Kailua right across the street from the Smith's new 
home. About two months before it was to be finished, Tom was trans- 
ferred back to the mainland. We were disappointed that we had to leave 
at this time, not only because of our new home, but we were expecting 
our fifth child any day. I felt like I should stay and have the baby there, 
but Tom wanted me to go try and see if some of the children and I 
could get on a flight. There was only room for Cynthia and I. Cynthia 
had to sit a couple of rows behind me. We were both so sick and were 
glad when we arrived in San Francisco. We spent the next five days 
with my sister Doris and her family until Tom arrived with the other 
children. We then moved into a motel and stayed for a week \intil the 
renters moved out of our home in Palo Alto. The day we moved 
Don Dixon Richardson arrived on the 17th of November, 1959. We 
lived here three months until our new home in San Jose was completed. 

Not long after we moved to San Jose, California, Bruce and 
Doris Christensen moved here and we were in the same Ward. We 
lived here for seven years. The Church really grew during this time. 
There were many chapels built. Tom spent many hours working on 
the Fourth and Ninth Ward Chapels. It was here that he learned all 
about cement work. The Church building is beautifully built. All the 
outside walls are of concrete exposed aggregate. 

These were hard and busy years for us. My health wasn't too 
good at this time. Our sixth child, Glen Alan, was on the way and I 
wondered if I would live to see him, but through faith and prayers our 
beautiful dark haired son was born. The next two and half months I 
spent a great deal of time going to the doctors. My blood pressure 
was still very high and the medication didn't seem to help much. The 
attacks in my right side were still coming and back pain was still wak- 
ing me out of a sound sleep. The Doctor put me in the hospital for 
tests. I had minor surgery at that time and major surgery five days 
later. They fo\ind the bladder in pretty bad shape and a very enlarged 
kidney. They thought they may have to remove it, but didn't. They 
found an obstruction in the right uterer and this was the reason for my 
problems. The Doctor said that infection had been going throughout 
my system for at least five years. 

It was difficult during this period after surgery. Tom had 
been receiving lay off notices, so he and two others started a cement 
business. He was selling insurance, building a chapel and working 



452 



GLORIA DIXON RICHARDSON 



for Pan Am. It was this way for two years. 

It wasn't long after Glen Alan's birth and I was expecting again. 
I was having problems and the doctor wanted to take the baby. He said 
I shouldn't have anymore and I told him I had been through hard times 
before and could do it again. I knew I was to have this child and that 
I was to have others. Sandra arrived on May 24, 1962, a healthy, 
beautiful baby. Two years later on the 12th of June, Patrick Arnold 
arrived. 

In July of 1966 we moved to Saratoga, California, just on the out- 
skirts of San Jose. This is a very beautiful area to live in. We lived 
here for 13 years. While living here our last three daughters were 
born: Rebecca, Diana, and Linda. I had to spend months in bed with 
each one of them, but what a blessing they have been to us. 

Saratoga is a nice place to raise children. We lived among 
people of all faiths. Our children realized there are good people in 
all faiths. Our children had many opportunities here. We depended 
a lot on the Church for our children's social life, so we were very 
close to the members of the Church. 

After thirty years of marriage we are once again back in Utah. 
We are living in the farming community of Benjamin, just west of 
Spanish Fork. This is where Tom was raised. It is really a different 
kind of life to what we were used to. The people are friendly and I 
think in time, we will love it here as we did in Saratoga. It is nice 
being close to our families. Tom commutes to San Francisco, Calif- 
ornia to work two or three times a month. It means that he is gone a 
little more by living here. But he thinks it is worth it. 

I am so grateful to my Heavenly Father for the many choice 
blessings I have received. For my wonderful husband, who has been 
a pillar of strength to me. For our eleven children, son-in-laws, 
daughter-in-law, and seven grandchildren. I am thankful for my mem- 
bership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. To have 
been born here, in America, the land of the free. I say these things 
in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen. 



82nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16.8 




ROBERT NORMAN DIXON 




GENNIEL LARSEN 



453 



82nd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D.# 16.8 




Genniel Steven Denise Bob 




121 So. Inglewood Dr. ,Orem, Utah 



454 



ROBERT NORMAN DIXON 
By Genniel L. Dixon 

Robert Norman Dixon was born May 15, 1930, which was his 
mother's birthday. He was born in Provo, and his parents were May 
Banks Dixon and Arnold Dixon. Arnold was the youngest child of 
Henry Aldous Dixon. Robert was the 8th of 10 children, 7 boys and 
3 girls. 

Robert attended the old Timpanogos Elementary School, the old 
Parker Elementary School and the Joaquin School. In the sixth grade 
he attended the new Timpanogos School. He lived at 256 North Fifth 
West, Provo, from the age 12 until he married. He attended the Dixon 
Jr. High and Provo High School where he was a member of the Key 
Club. After graduation from Provo High School, he attended B. Y. U. 
He graduated from B.Y.U. in 1954 with a major in Landscape Archi- 
tecture and two minors. Ornamental Horticulture and Botany. While 
at B.Y.U. he enrolled in the Air Force Reserve Officers' four year 
training program and became a flight commander with the rank of 
Cadet-Major. His graduation from AFROTC qualified him for a Sec- 
ond Lieutenant commission in the regular United States Air Force. 
He was not called into active duty due to a Congressional cut-back of 
all military services. The Korean War was just ending. He contin- 
ued in school until the spring of 1955 when he received an elementary 
teaching certificate. In 1966, he received a Masters Degree from 
B.Y.U. in Recreation-Education, He has also taken many hours of 
schooling beyond his Master's Degree, 

Robert has been gainfully employed since the age of twelve. At 
that age, he obtained work with D. T. R. Furniture Co, for three hours 
each night, after school. When he graduated from Jr. High School, his 
Physical Education teacher recommended him to the High School foot- 
ball coach as a prospective football player. He loved football very 
much and really wanted to try out for the high school team. But he 
knew that would probably mean having to give up his after school job 
at D. T, R. 's. He came from a large family and his job meant he could 
pretty well take care of his own needs. He knew what a help this was 
to his parents, so without any pressuring from his parents, he made 
the decision to keep his job and not go out for foot ball. He has always 
had the ability to see the long range consequences. Bob worked at 
D.T.R. Co. until he graduated from college. 

After completing his schooling, he began teaching at Timpanogos 
Elementary School in the fall of 1955. He still teaches at this school, 
currently teaching the Fifth grade. 

In 1956 he worked for Reid Wayman in his spray business. For 
the next three summers he ran the business and was a partner, since 
Reid had moved to Payson and could no longer be involved. In I960 
Bob started his own spray business - - Dixon Spray Service - - which 
was custom insecticide spraying of yards and trees. He ran this bus- 



455 



456 



ROBERT NORMAN DDCON 



iness each summer until he received his Master's degree in 1966. 

He became the Director of Timpanogos Community School Rec- 
reation Program in the summer of 1966. As part of this program, he 
was coach of the girls softball team. He has won several first place 
tournaments with his teams and they are usually in the finals. During 
the 1976 summer recreation program at Timpanogos, he designed and 
helped build an Indian float which won first place in the Provo City 
Bi-centennial Children's Parade. 

For many years he refereed flag football and basketball for the 
Elementary and Jr. High School's Saturday games, and was Director 
of the Community-School Flag- football Program for Provo City and 
the Provo Schools. He has also taught math and reading in the summer 
school program. His out-door education summer program culminated 
in a five day stay in Big Spring Hollow up the South Fork of Provo 
Canyon. Bob really enjoys teaching boys and girls and has a special 
rapport with his students. 

On April 4, 1951, Bob married Genniel Larsen, daughter of 
Ariel and Vera Larsen of Orem. They had four children, spaced 
rather far apart due to Genniel's poor health. Their first child, Steven 
was born June 21, 1952, He filled a mission in the French-Belgium 
Mission and married Emarene Graff. Steven's first child, Monica, 
was born December 22, 1976, Steven will graduate with honors from 
the University of Utah Medical School in June 1979, with an M. D, 
degree. 

Our second child, Denise, was born August 18, 1956. She mar- 
ried Mark Kelly of Orem. They have one child, Lisa Anne, born Dec. 
3, 1978. They live in Provo and Mark works at Geneva Steel Co. 

Norman was born February 27, 1965 and is in the eighth grade 
at Lakeridge Jr. High School in Orem. Angela was born March 15, 
1973 and is a kindergarten student at Scera Park Elementary School 
in Orem. 

Bob's wife, Genniel, teaches piano lessons. Their present home 
is at 121 Inglewood Drive, Orem, Utah, 

Bob has held presidency positions in the Aaronic Priesthood and 
leadership positions in scouting. He was one of the Scouts chosen to be 
in the Color Guard in the big July 24, 1947 Centennial Parade in Salt 
Lake City. He was chosen to help unveil the "This Is The Place" mon- 
ument that same day. After his marriage, Bob was Explorer Advisor, 
a member of the Scout Troop Committee, Cub Scout Committeeman, 
Assistant Scout Master for many years. He has been a Scout Master, 
Counsellor in M.I. A. Presidency, served on the Stake MIA Board as 
Stake Venture Leader, Deacon Quorum Advisor, Elders Quorum Ad- 
visor, Sunday School Teacher, Counsellor in Sunday School, President 
of Sunday School, First Couneellor in Elders Quorum and is currently 
Second Counsellor in the Orem 33rd Ward Bishopric. 



ROBERT NORMAN DIXON 



Robert has been Chairman of the Credit Committee of the Provo 
School District Credit Union several times and is currently a member 
of the Committee. He is a member of the Phi Delta Kappa, a profes- 
sional educators association. He is a member of the Utah Science 
Teachers' Association, and has been a member of the House of Dele- 
gates of the Utah Education Association several times. Over the years 
he has served on several committees of the Provo Education Associa- 
tion. He is a member of PEA, UEA, NEA. 

Bob likes HO Model railroading. He has several complete train 
sets and wants to find time to make a model layout, complete with 
buildings, landscaping, etc. He likes to build models. As a teenager, 
he put together many model kits. He wanted to build a battleship, but 
the kits were too expensive or unavailable. He saw a battleship in a 
magazine, and getting his own supplies, he built one from scratch. 
It looked exactly like the picture, with all the details, and he worked 
it to scale. 

Bob has insect, plant, rock, mineral and fossil collections. He 
enjoys building and constructing. When we petitioned off a room in 
our basement, he did all the work, which included the electric wiring, 
plumbing, carpentering, and painting. He likes music and drama and 
really enjoys attending the plays and concerts at B.Y.U. 

Bob has put on some outstanding plays atTimpanogos School, He 
is very fussy about all details being exactly right. He is able to inspire 
his students to work for this perfection without their feeling pressured 
by him. In 1977 he played the parts of Fezziwig and Old Joe in 
Dickens Christmas Carol, put on by the Valley Center Theater. 

Bob is proud to be a descendant of Henry Aldous Dixon and en- 
joys meeting with relatives at the Dixon Reunions. He is currently 
President of the Henry A, Dixon Family Organization, - 1979. 



83rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 




459 



83rd Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D.# 16. 9 



Douglas Wayne Dixon Family 





Karen, Michelle, Helen, Dougl 
Kurt, Todd 



Kurt, Todd 
Karen Michelle 
Helen, Douglas 




Spring Lake, Utah County 
Utah 



460 



DOUGLAS 



WAYNE 



DIXON 



On May 5, 1932, I was born to Letitia May Banks and Arnold 
Dixon at the Crane Maternity Home on Unive rs ity Avenue and Third 
South, Provo, Utah. The doctor that attended my Mother was Doctor 
Charles M. Smith. 

I am the seventh son and the ninth child. At the time of my birth, 
my family was residing at 480 West First North in Provo. While living 
here, my younger sister Doris Ann was born March 19, 1934. 

We moved to the East part of Provo where I started summer 
school in 1937. My teacher was Miss Christensen and I remember 
many of the activities we did in class that fall. That fall I started 
kindergarten at a new school, the Joaquin at 550 North 600 East, Provo. 
I attended this school through the fourth grade. 

At the beginning of the fifth grade we moved to 256 North 500 
West in a apartment in Aunt Rye's house. I lived at this home the 
rest of my single life. I finished grade school at Timpanogos and then 
went on to Dixon Jr. High. I graduated from Provo High School in 1950. 
I spent that summer in Boston, Mass. , with my brother Bruce, while 
he finished Architectual School at M. I. T. 

While I was attending both Junior and Senior High School, I work- 
ed at Dixon Taylor Russell Co. , part time during the school year and 
full time during the summer. I worked with some wonderful people 
there and gained a lot of good experience. When I returned from 
Boston I went back to D. T. R. Co. to work while I attended B. Y.U. 
Half way through my Freshman year, I started working part time for 
Ariel Davis Mfg. Co. as a draftsman, drawing electrical circuits. 

During the summer of 1950, the Korean war started and I was 
drafted into the Army on November 2, 1952. I spent about a year in 
San Luis Obispo, California, in basic training and to the Southwest 
Signal School where I graduated as the honor student in telephone cen- 
tral office maintenance. My next assignment was Honefels, Germany, 
where I worked in the signal office as a radio operator and repaired 
and maintained the telephone switchboards and main frame. Because 
of my father's health I returned to the States and finished my Army 
service at Camp Carson, Colo. When I returned home I went back to 
B. Y. U. While I was in the Service, Ariel Davis had moved his manu- 
facturing plant to Salt Lake City, so I went to work for Fred L. Mark- 
ham as an architectural draftsman. 

While in the Army I had a lot of chance for advancement and 
thought of staying in the Army and making it my career. My life long 
desire was to fill a mission for the Church. When 1 returned from the 
Army, my Bishop asked me if I would consider going on a mission. 
I was very happy about a call to a mission, but when I told my Dad he 
thought I had better wait for a while. He said that one of us might not 
be here very long, referring to mom and himself. I told the Bishop 



461 



462 



DOUGLAS WAYNE DIXON 



that I would have to wait a little longer before I could accept a mission 
call. While I was on jury duty, May 3, 1955, my Mother passed away. 

In the fall of 1955, while at a Third Ward party, I met a couple 
of girls from Canada. The one girl, Helen, later became my wife. 
When I first met Helen she was so shy I really didn't get to know her, 
but there was something about her that drew me to her. The first 
"date" I was to have had with her was a threesome, Helen, myself and 
Alice, Helen's girl friend. To make a long story short, Helen came 
down with a cold and so Alice and I ended up going rabbit hunting. At 
this time, Helen and Alice, were not members of the Church but they 
both joined the Church that winter. We had a lot of fun dating but it 
was soon cut short by my mission call to Western Canada. 

Helen decided that while I was on my mission she would go back 
to Canada and work. Upon my arrival in the mission field, I told my 
mission president that my girl friend lived in Sask, so I was never 
sent to the ice box of the Canadian Mission. 

The end of March 1958 I was released from my mission and 
Helen was in Salt Lake City to meet me when I got home. Helen 
Konopelski and I were married in the Salt Lake Temple on May 2, 1958 . 
At this time I was employed by Fred L. Markham in his architect 
office and later that summer I went to work for my brother, Bruce as 
a draftsman, and have worked for him to date. 

During our married life we have had many hard times. We want- 
ed to start our family early but were not able to; and so far our four 
children are adopted and we love them as our own. 

Michelle, our first child, we were blessed with her when she was 
only four hours old. Todd, the next one, was about ten days old when 
he came to us. Karen, who is two years older than Michelle, was 
eight years old, when she came to live with us. Kurt, our fourth child, 
was almost nine years old when he came to live with us. 

We have lived in Prove, Orem, Lindon and we are now living in 
Spring Lake, which is a small area just south of Payson. We love 
living in the country where we can have a large garden, some chickens, 
ducks, geese, goats, four dogs and a cat. Helen was raised on a large 
farm in Sask, Canada and I have always wanted to live on a farm, so 
we both enjoy it very much. 

I have always been an active member of the Church having served 
a full time mission, a stake mission, president of all the Priesthood 
Quorums, except for the High Priest. I was a Seventy for twenty-three 
years, Sunday School President, Sunday School teacher, in the M.I. A. 
Presidency and a Ward Clerk in two Bishoprics. I love the Gospel 
and know that it is the only way to live. Some time in the future, 
Helen and I would like to serve on a mission together. 



84th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



I.D. # 16. 10 




•DORIS ANN DIXON 




463 



84th Grandchild of HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Doris Dixon Christensen Family I.D.# 16,10 




Bruce Doris 
Jenifer Lesa 

Matthew Jason Kyle 




"1108 Hyde Avenue 
San Jose, California 



464 



PERSONAL HISTORY OF 
DORIS ANN DIXON CHRISTENSEN 



I was born March 19, 1934, at home on First North between Fourth 
and Fifth West. I was the tenth child of Arnold Dixon and Letitia May 
Banks Dixon. I have seven brothers: Howard Banks, Grant DeGrey, 
Bruce Royden, Eldon Arnold, Floyd Preston, Robert Norman and 
Douglas Wayne. I have two sisters: Evelyn Smith and Gloria Richard- 
son, 

Evelyn was sixteen when I was born and watched the delivery. I 
was born breach and weighed 6 pounds and 3 ounces. Gloria said I had 
one eye opened and one shut when she first saw me, I have been told 
that I chose my own name by drawing it out of a hat which several 
names had been put into. May-be they just told me this so I wouldn't 
complain about my name. 

When I was the age of two, my brothers Bob and Doug were pull- 
ing me in a little red wagon on a chair. The wagon tipped over and I 
fell out and broke my arm. At a later date Doug was carrying me on 
his shoulders and he tripped and I broke my arm again in the same 
place, the right elbow; and Doug chipped his tooth. Another time Doug 
and I were having a contest to see who could jump the fartherest, over 
some pillows, and I fell and broke my arm again in the same place. 
Doug and I were always in competition with each other and I would try 
so hard to beat him, but he being two years older would always win. 
I remember when I was in the second grade, some kids telling me I 
was a "tom boy" because I always played with my brothers. 

I went to the Joaquin School for kindergarten, First and Second 
grades. I can remember walking to school in the snow and running to 
keep up with my brothers. When I was in the Third grade we moved 
to 5th West in the back apartment of Aunt Rye's house. I finished the 
rest of my elementary school at Timpanogos School, 

Each summer at the end of school we would go up to Wildwood to 
spend the summer. I can remember sitting on a small chair between 
the back seat of the car. We used to always say a prayer as we reach- 
ed a certain hill because our car wouldn't make it half of the time. We 
called it our"old tin Lizzie". I have many fond memories of Wildwood, 
We used to go bare footed all summer and our feet were one solid 
callus on the bottom. We used to go swimming in the river, make clay 
dishes out of clay from the clay mine; slide down Devils Slide on a 
paste board box, climb Eagles Cliff and yell down at Mother to come 
out and see us; have camp fires at night and go to Sunday School, 

I attended Dixon Junior High - 7th, 8th and 9th grades. Then I 
went to Provo High for 10th, 11th and 12th grades. After school and 
on Saturday, during 11th and 12th grades, I worked at University 
Dairies. I had many good times there. I was a member of Provo Third 
Ward and taught Sunday School, 



465 



466 



t)ORIS DIXON CHRISTENSEN 



After graduating from Provo High, I went back East with my 
sister Evelyn and her husband Don. I'll never forget getting my drivers 
license before leaving. I had a learner's permit and wanted to get my 
license before leaving so it wouldn't expire, I had been taught to drive 
by a few boyfriends. My brother Doug also had taken me out at times. 
Don, my brother-in-law, took me down and I drove his car for the 
first time that morning, down to take my test. I was really nervous 
and did everything wrong, even honked at a pedestrian. Needless to 
say, I didn't pass, Don talked to the man and asked him if I could try 
again that day as we were leaving for the East in the morning. So I 
went back later. This time my boy friend saw me and honked at me 
and I killed my motor right in the middle of Center and University 
Avenue. Then I almost hit a dog. When I got home everyone looked 
with anticipation on their face and I broke down in tears and told them 
I hadn't passed. Don talked the man into one more try. This time I 
didn't care whether I passed or not. After going through the test the 
man said I had passed with flying colors and wondered what had been 
the matter with me the other times, I think it was a case of nerves. 

After arriving in Maryland a few days later, Evelyn put me on 
the train to go into Washington, D. C, to take a civil service test for a 
job. For a little sheltered Provo girl this was quite an experience. 
They gave me a map and said if I got lost to ask a policeman for help, 
I got a job as a clerk typist at the Department of Agriculture in Wash- 
ington, D, C. I was only there about four months when Evelyn and Don 
were transferred to Hawaii, I had many interesting experiences 
while there. I went back to Provo and went to the BYU for one year. 
Then I went to Hawaii and spent a month's vacation staying with Evelyn 
and Don, 

I was secretary for the Machinist Union for two years and a 
secretary at the GRA Credit Union for four years. I really enjoyed 
secretarial work. 

My Mother passed away May 3, 1955, when I was 21 years old. 
I wasn't married at the time and really felt lost without her. I really 
appreciated Doug's love and care for me at that time. He liked to 
cook better than me so he did most of the cooking which had curry in 
everything. My specialty was Cream of Wheat and Rice Pudding. 

I really appreciated my parents. They set such good examples 
for me. They had so much faith in me and this gave me a great deal 
of help and confidence, I remember so many times I would want my 
Mother to make up my mind and she would always tell me to pray and 
then make up my own mind. Mother was always so sweet and I didn't 
ever hear her say a bad thing about anyone. I remember Dad and 
Mother loved each other so much and were so kind and considerate of 
each other. Daddy always kissed Mother three times before leaving 
her, 

I had several opportunities to get married and before making up 
my mind I prayed and asked the Lord's help, I made a list of the 



DORIS DIXON CHRISTENSEN 



467 



qualities of the last two boys and chose Bruce J, Christensen, We 
met in November of 1955. Bruce was going to the Y. On our second 
date, Bruce told me that in his patriarchal blessing it told him when 
he met the girl he was to marry, there would be no doubt in his mind, 
that she would be the right one. He told me I was the one. This didn't 
go over too well with me and it took him a while to convince me. We 
were engaged on July 6, 195 6. I took out my endowments in the Salt 
Lake Temple on September 11, 1956. We were married in the Manti 
Temple September 13, 1956 by Louis R Anderson. He had married 
Bruce's grandparents and parents. The night before we got married 
I got cold feet and wasn't sure. Poor Bruce said it wasn't too late to 
call it off. After many tears and a night's sleep, I decided I was just 
nervous. When Bruce came over to get me I was still asleep and sweet 
Daddy said I was tired and needed the rest. We made it in time though. 
After the beautiful ceremony I had such a good peaceful feeling and 
knew the Lord had been watching over me and I had done what was 
right. It was a wonderful feeling standing on the hill that day looking 
down at that beautiful valley as we were to start our lives out together. 

Our first three months of marriage were a riot. Bruce was 
assistant manager at the Academy Theater 50 hours a week and carried 
16 hours at school, I worked 8 hours each day. We didn't see much 
of each other, I was very independent and had a lot of growing up to do. 
I had my own car and hadn't quite settled down. Bruce was so kind 
and understanding with me and since then each year has been better, 
I really feel privileged to be his wife. He treats me like a queen and 
is still as kind and considerate of me as he was before we were 
married, 

Bruce has served on a mission and two stake missions. He has 
filled many positions in the Church and is presently 2nd Counselor to 
Bishop John R, Hulme in the San Jose 14th Ward. He was Vice- 
President and Controller for American Savings and Loan, Northern 
California Division for ten years and was manager of Corp, Account- 
ing for Liquid Air in San Francisco. He is now controller for Orchard 
Supply Hardware in San Jose, California, 

After we were married we lived in Provo and Daddy lived with 
us for about a year. We really did enjoy his love and companionship. 
Daddy passed away, September 1, 1969. We were all grateful that he 
would be with Mother again, for he lived a good full life. 

On February 17, 1958, in Utah Valley Hospital, our first baby, 
Lesa Ann, was born. This was three months before Bruce graduated 
from the BYU. I will never forget that experience. I had always 
wanted to be a mother and the anticipation was exciting for both of us. 
We had a long, hard time getting her here, I will never forget, Dr. 
Kartchner wheeling me down the hall and letting me tell Bruce what it 
was, and seeing the tears of joy run down his face as I held the small 



468 



DORIS DIXON CHRIS TENS EN 



baby in my arms, I felt like a different person. I was a mother and 
my whole life had a different meaning and different responsibility. It 
was glorious. 

After graduating we accepted a job with a CPA firm in San Fran- 
cisco. We moved to Menlo Park. In 1959, July 15th, our second 
child, a son, Kyle DeGrey, was born in Stanford Hospital, We then 
moved to San Jose and Bruce went to work for American Savings, On 
January 19, I960, Jennifer was born in the San Jose Hospital. On 
December 25, 1963, Matthew Bruce was born in the Los Gatos Hospi- 
tal, He was named after his father and Matthew Cowley who set Bruce 
apart for his mission. When Matthew was six months old we moved 
to Lodi, California, for six months and then back to San Jose, On 
September 3, 1969, Jason Dixon was born in the Los Gatos Hospital. 
He is a very special spirit and we all enjoy him so much. 

I have held many pos itions in the Church and through this my 
testimony has grown considerably, I have been a teacher in Primary, 
MIA, Relief Society, Sunday School and Jr. Sunday School Coordinator, 
I have been 1st and 2nd Counselor in the Relief Society, My present 
position is 1st Counselor in the Relief Society. I love the gospel with 
all my heart. There is no doubt in my mind of its truth. I'm so grate- 
ful for having the privilege of having such choice spirits for our 
children and for the guidance the Church gives us in raising them. 
I'm thankful for the family home evening lessons. It seems as though 
they were written just for us. I am appreciative of my patriarchal 
blessing and the guidance and strength it has given me. I am grate- 
ful for my husband and children's testimony of the gospel. I pray 
that the Lord's choicest blessing will be upon us all and that we will 
have the courage and faithfulness necessary to reach our eternal sal- 
vation, I say these things in the name of our Savior Jesus Christ, 
Amen, 



SECTION V 



THIRD WARD "SANDY ALLEY" 
DIXON SHIELD 




1. The Lion -" King of Beasts" of Africa - Grandfather, Henry Aldous 

Dixon's birthplace. 

2. The Sailing Ship "Unity" which Henry Aldous Dixon sailed on when he 

left Port Elizabeth, Cape Colony, South Africa in 1856. 

3. The covered Wagon and Ox Team, Henry Aldous Dixon drove across 

the "plains" to reach Utah in 1857 

4. The Elm Tree, Henry Aldous Dixon planted on his homesite in Provo 

in 1875 and which is still living (1970). 

5. The Red Hair - A Dixon "trade mark" inherited from Henry Aldous 

Dixon by many of his posterity. 

6. The Red Underwear - The course Woolen Mills Factory material worn 

by the Dixon children and in abundant display, on the Dixon drying line 
on washday 

MOTTO: Be pretty if you are. Be witty if you can. 

But be cheerful if it kills you! 

Created from descriptive story of Maud Dixon Markham. 
Illustration by A ithony H. Taylor 



469 



SECTION VI 



DIXON 



INTERMENTS 



ID. No. Name 

JOHN HENRY DIXON 
JUDITH BOARDMAN DIXON 
WILLIAM BOARDMAN 
MARGARET HAYES BOARDMAN 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
SARAH DE GREY DIXON 
MARY SMITH DIXON 

1 HENRY ALFRED DIXON 

2 JOHN DE GREY DIXON 

2 w Sarah Lewis Dixon 

21 HENRY ALDOUS DIXON II 

2117 ROBERT DIXON SHAW 
21111 MARY ELIZABETH SHAW 

22 JOHN WILLIAM DIXON 

23 STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 

23 w Luella Hannah Madsen Dixon 
236 DIXIE BETH DIXON 

24 RULON STERLING DIXON 

26 LUCIAN DE GREY DIXON 

27 GRANT DIXON 

3 ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 

3 w Catherine Morgan Dixon 
31 w Eva Ruthe Mildenhall Dixon 
312 MICHAEL LAYNE DIXON 

4 ALICE DIXON DANGERFIELD 
4 h Jabez William Dangerfield 

41 JABEZ ALDOUS DANGERFIELD 

42 ROYDEN JAMES DANGERFIELD 

43 AFTON DANGERFIELD 
45 CLIFFORD DDCON DANGERFIELD 
47 DONNA MAE DANGERFIELD 
4421 h Roger Bowers 



Buried at: Description: 

Grahamstown, C. P. South Africa 
Uitenhage, C. P., South Africa 
Bathurst, C. P. , South Africa 
Bathurst, C. P. , South Africa 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Salt Lake City Cem. Plat D, Bk. 12, Lot 4 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Washington Hts . Mem. Park, Ogden, Utah 
Circleview Plat, Row 16 Space 74 



Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Salt Lake City Cem. Plat X, Bk. 1 , Lot 100, 3E 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 4, Lot 72 A 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Salt Lake City Cem. Plat X, Bk. 1 , Lot 94 3E 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Mausoleum, Las Vegas, Nevada 
Mausoleum, Las Vegas, Nevada 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 34 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 34 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 34 

Norman, Oklahoma 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 34 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 34 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 34 



471 



DIXON 



INTERMENTS 



ID No. Name Buried at: Description: 

5 SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE Salt Lake City Cem. Plat D, Bk. 12, Lot 4 

5 h Alexander C. McConachie Salt Lake City Cem. Plat D, Bk, 12, Lot 4 
51 DONALD MC CONACHIE Salt Lake City Cem. Plat D,Bk. 12, Lot 4 
521 MARY DORIS ARMSTRONG Salt Lake City Cem. Plat D, Bk. 12, Lot 4 

6 MARIA DIXON TAYLOR Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 173 

6 h Arthur Nicholls Taylor Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 173 

61 ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 139 

62 LYNN DIXON TAYLOR Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 87 
6325 DAVID HOEN TAYLOR Provo City Cemetery, Block 1 1 , Lot 11 
6329 KENT HOEN TAYLOR Provo City Cemetery, Block 11 , Lot 11 
64 w Alta Hansen Taylor Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 87 

67 ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 173 

68 h Fred Dixon Kartchner Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 126 
683 ELAINE KARTCHNER Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 126 

7 WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 

7 w Harriet Hands Dixon Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
71 WILLIAM HANDS DIXON Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
73 GLEN HANDS DIXON E. L. Mem. Hills-Provo. Blk. 1 36, Lot A 
741 HYRUM D. AIKELE Santa Barbara Cem.-Cal. 

743 BONNIE ANN AIKELE CORNISH Santa Barbara Cem.-Cal. 

743 h Clayton J. Cornish, Jr. Santa Barbara Cem.-Cal. 

8 ERNEST DE GREY DIXON Provo City Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 132 

8 w Mary Ann Painter Dixon Provo City Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 132 

82 LEAH LILLIAN DIXON FORD Wallsburg Cemetery 

83 ERNEST ARNOLD DIXON Provo City Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 132 

84 w Adryne Hodson Dixon Provo City Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 132 

85 RALPH DIXON E. L. Mem. Hills , Sec. B, Lot 125 , Space #3 
8611 TRENT CROWLEY Provo City Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 132 
82231 CAMILLE BIGELOW 

9 ROBERT SMITH DIXON Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 

10. CHARLES OWEN DIXON Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 37 

lO.w Virginia Beckstead Dixon Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 37 

10. 2 h Angus Wayne Cowley E. L. Mem. Hills- Provo, Sec. 40 D# 5 

10.431 PETER JAMES PADEN 



472 



DIXON INTERMENTS 



ID No, 



Name 



Buried at: Description: 



11. ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 

11. w Sena Rasmussen Dixon 

11.3 CLIFTON R. DIXON 

11.4 ELMO ARTHUR DIXON 

11.5 NORMA DIXON JESS 

11.6 VERA DIXON ANDERSON 

11.7 RUTH DDCON 

11.8 BABY DDCON 

12. WALTER DE GREY DIXON 
12. w Luthenia Maiben Dixon 

12. 1 h Fenton W. Reeve 

12. 3 ALAN ROMNEY DDCON 
12.5 h Doyle O. Larson 

13. PARLEY SMITH DIXON 
13. w Etta Dangerfield Dixon 

13.21 DONNA MAE WAGSTAFF OLSON 

13.5 INEZ DIXON DENISON 

13.5 h Byron L. Denison 

13.51 INEZ BERNIECE DENISON 

13. 1131 CHRISTINA MC EWAN 

13. 122 h Donald Dale Linderman 

13. 3 w Martha Bernard Dixon 



Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Sunnyside Mem. Park, Long Beach, Cal. 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 10, Lot 208 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 10, Lot 208 
Valhalla Mem. Park, No. Hollywood, Cal. 
Wasatch Lawn Mem. Park, Salt Lake City 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 10, Lot 208 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 
Orem City Cemetery 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 1, Lot 35 



14. LE ROY DDCON 

14. w Electa Smoot Dixon 

14. 1 LE ROY SMOOT DIXON 

14. 2 PAUL SMOOT DDCON 

14.5 h Myron DeVere Childs 

14. 5 32 JOSHUA NORMAN CHILDS 

14. 6 h Ezrel Junius Payne 

14.452 FRANK SUMMERHAYS PITCHER 
14.7 ARTHUR SMOOT DDCON 

15. HARRIET DDCON WEST 
15. h George Washington West 
15.1 LYNN DDCON WEST 

15. 11 AUDREY LORRAINE WEST 



Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 11c 
Springville Evergreen, Sec. B, Lot 168 
Springville Evergreen, Sec.G, Lot 69 #3 
Phoenix, Arizona 

Evanston, III. Mt. Olive Cemetery, Sec. R 
Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Mt. View Cemetery, San Bernardino, Cal. 
Mt. View Cemetery, San Bernardino, Cal. 
Olive Mem. Park, Norwalk, Cal. 

Sec. D, Lot 63 A, Grave 1 
Cypress Hill Mem. Park, Petaluma, Cal. 
Lot 549 D 



473 



D IX ON 



INTERMENTS 



ID No. Name 

16. ARNOLD DDCON 

16. w Letitia May Banks Dixon 

16. 1 HOWARD BANKS DIXON 

16. 2 EVELYN DIXON SMITH 



Buried at: Description: 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 3, Lot 6 

Provo City Cemetery, Block 2, Lot 51 
Provo City Cemetery, 



474 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID. No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eGrey 


4 Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DE GREY DIXON 


16 Jul 1 


867 


4 


Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 Apr 1 


868 


23 


Oct 


1951 


21 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON II 


29 Jun 1 


890 


22 


Jan 


1967 




Lucile Knowlden 


9 Dec 1 


891 








211 


PHYLLIS DIXON 


21 Aug 1 


916 










John Austin Shaw 


1 Feb 1 


915 








211 1 


JOHN AUSTIN SHAW II 


5 May 1 


942 










Mary Wilson 


14 Feb 1 


946 








211 11 


MARY ELIZABETH SHAW 


23 Jun ] 


969 


1 1 


Oct 


1969 


211 12 


MARIAN SHAW 


2 Feb 1 


971 








21 1 13 


JOHN CHRISTOPHER SHAW 


18 May 1 


972 








211 14 


DAVID AUSTIN SHAW 


12 Mar 1 


975 








21115 


SARAH ANNE SHAW 


3 May 1 


977 








2112 


SANDRA SHAW 


16 Aug 1 


944 










John Alleman Davie s 


24 Mar 1 


940 








21121 


JON SHAW DAVIES 


18 Nov 1 


968 








21122 


MICHAEL SCOTT DAVIES 


2 Feb 1 


971 








21123 


JENNIFER ERIN DAVIES 


8 Aug 1 


974 








21124 


AMBER REBECCA DAVIES 


6 Jun '. 


979 








2113 


KATHLEEN SHAW 


3 Jan '. 


947 










Will Bordea\ix 


6 Dec 1 


941 










Kirk Edward Gambles 


23 Sep ] 


941 










Kerry Scott Gambles 


1 3 Jun ] 


963 










Amy Suzanne Gambles 


20 Dec 1 


969 








21131 


ANNA KATHLEEN GAMBLES 


2 Jan 


978 








21132 


ERIN GAMBLES 


23 Nov ] 


979 








2114 


SYLVIA SHAW 


4 Dec ] 


.949 










John Dalton Bell 


27 Apr ] 


952 








21141 


MARY MELLISSA BELL 


26 Apr 1 


979 








21 15 


ERIN JEAN SHAW 


16 Mar 1 


954 










Douglas Andrew Taggart 


13 Mar 1 


952 








21151 


STEPHANIE TAGGART 


17 Jun ] 


975 








21152 


ROBERT JOHN TAGGART 


3 Dec 1 


976 








21 1 6 


T^TT^T T T T*** A TV T T m A ("^ T T A TIT 

PHYLLIS ANITA SHAW 


1 3 Feb 


957 










Jay Brad Wiggins 


J Apr J 


L 7D D 








21161 


BRADFORD JAY WIGGINS 


15 Nov ] 


i978 








2117 


ROBERT DIXON SHAW 


21 Dec ] 


958 


23 


Feb 


1959 


2118 


ROSE MARY SHAW 


13 Sep ] 


960 








1 


HENRY ALFRED DIXON 


14 Nov 


1865 


1 


Jul 


1867 



* Children of Kirk by a previous marriage. 



477 



HENRY A DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID. No. Birth Death 



HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 


Feb 


1844 


17 Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DE GREY DIXON 


16 


Jul 


1867 


4 Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 


Apr 


1868 


23 Oct 


1951 


21 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON II 


29 


Jun 


1890 


22 Jan 


1967 




Lucile Knowlden 


9 


Dec 


1891 






212 


DOROTHY DIXON 


26 


May 


1918 








Virl L. Harrison 


30 


Dec 


1916 






2121 


LINDA LUCILLE HARRISON 


31 


May 


1944 








David Robert Welling 


24 


Sep 


1944 






2121 1 


BART HARRISON WELLING 


24 


Aug 


1972 






21212 


MATHEW DEAN WELLING 


24 


Mar 


1975 






21213 


CASSANDRA ANN WELLING 


5 


Jun 


1978 






2122 


PATRICIA HARRISON 


4 


Feb 


1947 








Leonard John Patcyk 


16 


Feb 


1947 






2123 


JUDITH HARRISON 


8 


Aug 


1950 








Steven Michael George 


17 


Jan 


1950 






21231 


SAMUEL NEPHI GEORGE 


24 


Oct 


1976 






2124 


LISBETH HARRISON 


19 


Jan 


1952 


16 Feb 


1980 




Steven Anthony Domine 


14 


Jul 


1957 






2125 


HEATHER HARRISON 


22 


Dec 


1956 






2126 


HOLLY HARRISON 


22 


Dec 


1956 








David Dee Jensen 


1 


Dec 


1956 






2127 


ANGELA HARRISON 


17 


Mar 


1964 







478 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 
ID No. Birth Death 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeG 


rey 


4 Feb 


1844 


17 


Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DEGREY DIXON 


16 Jul 


1867 


4 


Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 Apr 


1868 


23 


Oct 


195] 


21 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON II 


29 Jun 


1890 


22 


Jan 


1967 




Lucile knowlden 


9 Dec 


1891 








213 


LOUISE DIXON 


18 Sep 


1920 










E. Ferrin Larkin 


7 Jul 


1917 








2131 


DDCON FERRIN LARKIN 


3 Jul 


1947 










Carol Lynn White 


18 Sep 


1946 








213] 1 


DAVID DIXON LARKIN 


7 Jul 


1975 








21312 


SARAH LARKIN 


20 Jul 


1977 








2132 


JULIA LARKIN 


1 3 Oct 


1948 










Ray White Squires 


20 Apr 


1949 








21321 


LISA SQUIRES 


7 May 


1976 








21322 


TERESA SQUIRES 


22 Mar 


1978 








2133 


MARTHA ANN LARKIN 


19 Jan 


1951 








2134 


JAMES ROBERT LARKIN 


24 Jun 


1952 










Martha Christine Gleason 


2 Oct 


1951 








21341 


JENNIFER LARKIN 


2 Jan 


1979 








2135 


WILLIAM LYLE LARKIN 


21 Aug 


1953 










Sharon Elzey 


2 Oct 


1953 








21351 


NICOLE LARKIN 


26 May 


1977 








21352 


PAUL BENJAMIN LARKIN 


2 1 Jun 


1979 








2136 


JANE LARKIN 


13 Aug 


1957 








214 


JOHN ALDOUS DIXON 


16 Jul 


1923 










Karma Jeppson 












2141 


STEVEN JOHN DIXON 


1 3 May 


1950 










Val Fulmer 












2141 1 


ADRIA ANN DIXON 


30 Sep 


1975 








21412 


RYAN ALDOUS DIXON 


16 Sep 


1977 








2142 


KAY DIXON 


13 Nov 


1951 










David Lee 












21421 


NICOLE LEE 


17 Jan 


1976 








21422 


ALISON LEE 


14 Feb 


1978 








2143 


LISA DIXON 


25 Apr 


1962 








215 


RUTH MARION DIXON 


19 May 


1927 










Mark W. Cannon 


29 Aug 


1928 








2151 


LUCILE DIXON CANNON 


12 Nov 


1957 








2152 


MARK DIXON CANNON 


15 Sep 


1959 








2153 


KRISTEN DIXON CANNON 


22 Dec 


1962 








216 


DAVID ROBERT DIXON 


24 Jun 


1931 









479 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No. 






Birth 




De 


ath 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


4 


Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DEGREY DIXON 


16 


Jul 1 


867 


4 Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 


Apr 1 


868 


23 Oct 


1951 


23 


STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 


3 


Mar 1 


895 


6 Apr 


1947 




Luella Hannah Mad sen 


19 


Jan ] 


900 


27 Jul 


1975 


231 


JEAN LUELLA DIXON 
Ralph Nye Smith 


11 


May 1 


921 






231 1 


ROBERT NYE SMITH 


9 


Oct 1 


943 






2312 


RODNEY SMITH 


25 


Mar 1 


948 






232 


JUNE MARY DIXON 


1 1 


May ] 


921 








George W. Robinson 


29 


Mar ] 


915 






2321 


STANLEY WAYNE ROBINSON 


30 


Aug ] 


946 








Brenda Marie Brotnov 


20 


Dec ] 


949 






2322 


JULIE ANN ROBINSON 


27 


Jul 1 


951 








Martin David Neil sen 


30 


Jan 1 


951 






23221 


RYAN WAYNE NEILSEN 


4 


Nov 1 


976 






2323 


JON JAY ROBINSON 


1 


Apr 1 


959 






233 


BARBARA ANN DIXON 


16 


Oct 1 


922 








Jack Alvin Clegg 


23 


Dec ] 


920 






2331 


MICHAEL S. CLEGG 


7 


Sep 


953 






2332 


BRENT D. CLEGG 


10 


Jan '. 


956 






23 


STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 


3 


Mar ] 


895 


6 Apr 


1947 




Maureen We Ike r 


1 


Feb 1 


909 






234 


DIXIE BETH DIXON 


4 


Mar ] 


933 


13 Oct 


1937 


235 


DE GREY LEROY DIXON 


4 


Jun 


935 








Kay Darlene Dix 


5 


Apr ] 


938 






235 1 


DALE LEE DIXON 


22 


Apr ] 


960 






2352 


BARBARA MAUREEN DIXON 


14 


Dec ] 


963 






2353 


MICHAEL KENT DIXON 


3 


Jun 


968 






2354 


MARK DE GREY DIXON 


22 


Oct 1 


970 






236 


STANLEY LEWIS DIXON, Jr. 


24 


Se p 


938 








Judith Louise Russ 


8 


Se p 


938 






2361 


SHANNON DE GREY DIXON 


5 


Apr ] 


965 






2362 


MEGAN DIXON 


1 1 


Jun 


966 






2363 


RYAN PATRICK DIXON 


21 


Aug ] 


968 






2364 


BRENNAN RUSS DIXON 


29 


May ] 


972 






237 


LINDA DIXON 


4 


Mar 


940 







480 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1979 










ID No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eGrey 


4 Feb ] 


844 


17 


Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DEGREY DIXON 


16 Jul ] 


867 


4 


Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 Apr ] 


868 


23 


Oct 


1951 


24 


RULON STERLING DIXON 


9 Sep ] 


898 


27 


Oct 


1965 




Erma Murdock 


5 Jul ] 


904 








24] 


JAMES R. DIXON 


22 Jun 


929 










Suzanne Eyring 


20 Feb ] 


931 








241 1 


MARK EYRING DIXON 


28 Mar 1 


954 








2412 


DIANE DIXON 


1 Aug ] 


957 








242 


JOSEPH M. DIXON 


12 Feb ] 


932 










Carleen May Dyer 


30 Sep ] 


939 








2421 


CHRISTOPHER DYER DIXON 


1 2 Aug ] 


967 








2422 


NICOLE NOELLE DIXON 


8 Aug ] 


969 








243 


G. MICHAEL DIXON 


2 Aug 1 


937 










Yvonne Romney 


16 Aug 1 


937 








2431 


CATHERINE BRADFORD DIXON 


28 Aug 1 


966 












1 1 WC L J 


Q A R 
7D o 








244 


PETER M. DIXON 


21 Mar 1 


945 










Maria Cristina Puerta 


29 Aug 1 


945 








25 


MAUD DIXON 


28 Feb 1 


901 










Fred L. Markham 


3 Jul 1 


902 








251 


JOHN FREDERICK MARKHAM 


5 Sep ] 


928 










Reeda Bjarnson 


18 Jan 1 


927 








251 1 


STEVEN JOHN MARKHAM 


18 Oct 1 


951 










Rosanne Gibson 


21 Nov 1 


955 








251 1 1 


BRIAN MARKHAM 


23 Nov 1 


975 








251 12 


STEPHANIE 


8 Aug 1 


977 








2512 


DAVID PAUL MARKHAM 


13 Dec 1 


952 








251 3 


REED B MARKHAM 


14 Feb 1 


957 








2514 


JAMES LEWIS MARKHAM 


28 Jul 1 


959 








2515 


ROBERT DIXON MARKHAM 


4 Oct 1 


961 








2516 


JAE DANIEL MARKHAM 


11 May 1 


964 








2517 


KAYE APRIL MARKHAM 


3 Apr 1 


966 








2518 


DOUGLAS FRED MARKHAM 


31 May 1 


968 








252 


DIXON JOSEPH MARKHAM 


18 Sep 1 


931 










Junece Jex 


23 Jun ] 


935 








2521 


MICHAEL DIXON MARKHAM 


10 May 1 


957 








2522 


KEVIN RICHARD MARKHAM 


25 Jul 1 


958 










Lisa Dawn Hansen. 


15 Sep 1 


95 9 








2523 


MARY ANN MARKHAM 


31 Jul 1 


963 








2524 


KARL WILLIAM MARKHAM 


4 Mar 1 


967 








2525 


ALLEN LEWIS MARKHAM 


26 Apr 1 


972 









481 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No. 






Birth 




Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


4 


Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DEGREY DIXON 


16 


Jul 1 


867 


4 Oct 


1 923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 


Apr 1 


868 


23 Oct 


1 95 1 


25 


MAUD DIXON 


28 


Feb 1 


901 








Fred L. Markham 


3 


Jul 1 


902 






253 


BARBARA ANN MARKHAM 


29 


May 1 


935 








Weldon Lee Daines 


14 


Mar 1 


931 






25 31 


RICHARD WELDON DAINES 


1 


Oct 1 


958 






2532 


ANNE ELAINE DAINES 


25 


May 1 


960 






2533 


RUSSELL LEWIS DAINES 


2 


Feb 1 


964 






2534 


JOHN THOMAS DAINES 


1 


May ] 


968 






254 


DIANE LOUISE MARKHAM 


28 


Jun ] 


940 








Gary Stewart 


27 


Mar 1 


937 






2541 


ELIZABETH ANN STEWART 


29 


Aug 1 


963 






2542 


EMILY STEWART 


27 


P eb 1 


968 






26 


LUCIAN DEGREY DIXON 


17 


Jun ] 


903 


22 Mar 


1904 


27 


GRANT DIXON 


30 


Mar 1 


905 


18 Dec 


1905 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No. 






Bir 


th 


Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


4 


Feb 


1844 


17 Apr 


1926 


3 


ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 


5 


Oct 


1869 


5 Jun 


191 1 




Catherine Kezia Morgan 


19 


Mar 


1886 


3 Mar 


1966 


31 


RAYMOND LANE DIXON 


26 


Nov 


1918 








Eva Ruthe Mildenhall 


20 


May 


1918 


30 Mar 


1973 


311 


LESLIE DIXON 


7 


Apr 


1943 








Thomas Ray Hardin 


4 


Jul 


1942 






311 1 


LESLIE LAYNE HARDIN 


1 


May 


I960 






31 1 2 


VERNON SHAYNE HARDIN 


17 


Dec 


1961 






312 


MICHAEL LAYNE DIXON 


29 


Jan 


1947 


14 Oct 


1977 




Glenda Cleveland 


2 


Apr 


1956 






3121 


LE ANN LAYNE DIXON 


12 


May 


1978 







482 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID No. 






Birth 


X— ' C 


d LIX 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 4 

J. ~ 


•ivici r 


i. O jo 


*T xvx d y 


X 0^ 


Mary 


Ann Smith 




Orf 




1 J un 


1 007 


4 


ALICE SMITH DIXON 




A PIT* 


1 O 1 w 


i-j e c 


1 7^0 




Jabez W. Dangerfield 


1 7 


A TTT 
XX LJ X 


1 R7? 

X O 1 ^ 


oe p 


1 04Q 

J 7^7 


41 


JABEZ ALDOUS DANGERFIELD 




Nov 


1901 


C\j iVidlx 


1 7 ^ 


42 


ROYDEN J. DANGERFIELD 


31 


Dec 


1902 


1 Nov 


1969 




Helen Morrison 












421 


KAY DANGERFIELD 














Niinnal 1 v 












422 


KARREN DANGERFIELD 














F ishe r 












43 


AFTON DANGERFIELD 


1 8 


May 


1904 


14 Feb 


1 905 


44 


HAROLD D. DANGERFIELD 


14 


May 


1906 








Florence John 


17 


Nov 


1904 






441 


DIANE DANGERFIELD 


30 


Jan 


1930 








James Bovingdon 












4411 


JAMES BOVINGDON 


23 


Jul 


1954 






4412 


MICHAEL BOVINGDON 


12 


Aug 


1957 






4413 


LYNNE BOVINGDON 


16 


Feb 


1961 






442 


CAROLYN DANGERFIELD 


3 


Ma r 


1933 








Edward Lanahan 


6 


Se p 


1931 






4421 


SUSAN LANAHAN 


29 


Apr 


1956 








Rodger Bowers 


1 


Mar 


1954 


26 Se p 


1 978 


4422 


MELISSA LANAHAN 


18 


Dec 


1958 






4423 


AMY LANAHAN 


21 


Jan 


196 1 










1 7 


Apr 


1957 






45 


CLIFFORD D. DANGERFIELD 


14 


May 


1 906 


13 Feb 


1 973 


451 


J. WILLIAM DANGERFIELD 


7 


Apr 


1940 








Patricia Ellen McEwen 


20 


May 


1941 






4511 


J. WILLIAM DANGERFIELD, Jr 


. 1 


Mar 


1973 







4512 STEPHANIE DEANNE DANGERFIELD 26 May 1975 



483 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 







As of December 31, 


1 979 








ID No. 






Bir 


th 


Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1 884 


Mary 


A 

A 


an omith 


3 Oct 


1 852 


cl Jun 


1 907 


A 

4 




ALICE SMITH DIXON 


29 Apr 


1 870 


8 Dec 


1 948 






Jabez W. Dangerfield 


17 Apr 


1872 


Z6 oep 


1 949 


46 




GRACE DANGERFIELD 


10 Sep 


1 910 










Curtis P. Harding 


1 Jun 


1 910 






46 J 




MIRIAM HARDING 


8 Apr 


1939 










Glen Waterman 


18 Apr 


1 939 






461 1 




DAVID GLEN WATERMAN 


26 Sep 


1 965 






46 I Z 




MICHAEL CURTIS WATERMAN 


2 Dec 


1 967 






46 ] 3 




BRADLEY JAMES WATERMAN 


7 Jan 


1974 






462 




JUDY ANN HARDING 


3 Dec 


1941 










Lorin K. Pugh 


24 Jul 


1 941 






4621 




SCOTT CHRISTOPHER PUGH 


5 Jan 


1968 






4622 




KEVIN JAMES PUGH 


23 Oct 


1969 






4623 




BRIAN CURTIS PUGH 


27 Nov 


1972 






4624 




JASON RICHARD PUGH 


26 Jan 


1976 






47 




DONNA MAE DANGERFIELD 


1 1 Sep 


1911 


15 Mar 


1912 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


^ a a A 

1 884 


Mary 


A 


nn Smith 


3 Oct 


1 852 


cl J un 


1 n n "7 

1 VU7 


5 




SARAH ANN DIXON 


7 Dec 


1871 


cb JJec 


i V-»vJ 






Alexander Collie McConachie 


8 Oct 


1863 


i D J an 




51 




DONALD MC CONACHIE 


1 6 Aug 


1 898 


A \ /t 

4 Mar 


1902 


52 




NANCY SHEARSMITH MC CONACHIE 














7 Oct 


1902 










Anthon G. Armstrong 


24 Jan 


1911 






521 




MARY DORIS ARMSTRONG 


2 Jan 


1945 


2 Jan 


1945 



484 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID No. 




Birth 






De 


ath 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1 884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 Feb I 


844 


17 Apr 


1 9Zd 


A 
\j 


MAPTA T OTTT'^TT DTVOKr 


C T 1 

5 Jan 1 


87Z 


17 


Feb 


1 947 




A T-fVlTlf TvJ T -3 trl f 

-rt.rLnur in, x ayior 


Z JNOV I 


O ^7 A 

870 


10 Sep 


1 c 

1935 




ARTWTTR DT'^rnKr TAVT DP 


4 vJct J 


O Q C 


■7 

CKJ 


Till 

J U. I 


i 9 f 9 




o 1 1 >• 1 A 1 » 1 ^ ^ 

iviaurine v-iooariuge 


d JNOV 1 


O C\ C\ 

899 










T AYINJTT TAVT OP 


1 Z Jun 1 


92Z 










f • ^ ^ + A L 1 e 1^ ^ ^ 

<jrant -rt., r isner 


8 Jun ] 


91 9 








\J 1 1 1 




Z7 May I 


95 










j-jawrerice jereniy Jensen 


1 7 J an I 


95 








\J X A X X 


TF'N'MTfrFR MATTRTMTT TTr'Nr^F''l\J 


^iV i-'ec 1 










6112 

\J X X 


TEFFRFY TAYLOR FTST-TFR 

hJ X.I X X X\J^ X X .C\. X XJ\m/X\ X: Xw-7X^X1jX\ 


^14 May I 


V-? z 












1 o vJct I 










611 21 


HILLARY FISHER 

XXX X-J X-J XX X \ X X XW^ X xx^ x\ 


c(j Dec 1 


V ' 8 








61 1 3 


KATHY FISHER 

^ ^ X XX X X Xim/ X X I.J X \ 


1 ^ Apr J 












* d IX X X X « X^ VXIX ^ CLLX 


1 vj xje c 1 


Oc^ A 








611 31 


MEGAN DUNCAN 

XV X ' / XXX ^ X^ X ^ ^> X X X ^ 


1 Till 1 


Q7 Q 

7 ' 7 








612 


KENT G TAYLOR 

Xi 1 li 1. ^ ^ ^ail ^ X X X X X.J X V 


D ue c J 










613 


NANCY TAYLOR 

X ^ X XX N Nu' X ^ XX X .1 i X V 


10 iNOV 


Q9 7 










« X ^ ^ X U XX W Cl> X I* 


X ^ /\Ug J 


09 

y Co 










RRFNT TAYLOR STFWART 


6 Mar 


L 7D4 










^ A I T If* n m A >• 




734 










KTM TAYT OR STFWART 

XVXIVX X X J-jV^* X\ O X XIj VV x^X\ X 


1 D Apr J 


A 

7D D 








O 1 J J 


J r^iN O X ill VV /T.X\ X 


V JVLar J 


Q ^ r> 
70 u 








Al 


TOM TAVT OP QTITWAPT 


JJec J 












■RTYTTT TAVT OP 


y JVLar J 


I 7 J ^ 










Boyd M. Frampton 


dKj Apr J 


t 7 J <i 








D 14 1 


MARRIANNE FRAMPTON 


ZD iNOV J 


I 7-> D 










Ned Booth Bushnell 


1 D J un J 


L 7-> 








ATA"? 

D 1 4 ^ 


DAVID TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


9 May ] 


n c 

I 73o 










Keri Ann Wheadon 


1 May 1 


1 95 9 








6143 


BRUCE TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


22 Feb ] 


Q A n 

70 u 










Connie Lynne Bird 


11 Dec ] 


I V-5 7 








61431 


JEREMY TAYLOR FRAMPTON 11 Sep 1 


1 Q7 Q 
[ 7 ' 








6144 


SUSAN FRAMPTON 


30 Nov 1 


1961 








6145 


PAUL TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


12 Sep ] 


1964 








6146 


ALAN TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


22 Dec ] 


1967 








6147 


KENT TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


25 Sep ] 


1969 









485 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1 O O A 

I oo4 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 £ eb 1 


Ci A A 

844 


1 » Apr 


1 Q "5 <L 


D 


JVLAKIA J_jUUiolli JJiAVJiN 


5 Jan 1 


872 


1 ( r e D 


1 74 / 




Arthur No iaylor 


Z Nov ] 


o ^7 r\ 

870 


1 u oe p 


1 Q 7 C 


bZ 


T V MM T "V TVT A V T T3 

LjiJNJN DiAUJN lAYi-iUK 


b May 1 


a Ci a 

898 


"5 Till 
Z J Ul 


J 9b 1 




Celestia M, Johnson 


n A 1 

8 Apr 1 


903 






621 


JOHN ARTHUR TAYLiOR 


2 Oct 1 


928 








Catherine ±-'earson 


24 Dec 1 


931 






621 1 


JOHN ARTHUR TAYLOR, Jr. 


13 May 1 


958 






621 2 


THOMAS TAYLOR 


14 Aug 1 


959 






621 3 


DAVID x^EARSON TAYLOR 


21 Jan ] 


974 






622 


JANICE TAYLOR 


24 Feb 1 


931 








Monte DeGraw 


31 Mar 1 


929 






6221 


MICHELE DE CKAW 


9 Aug 1 


956 






/ O O "5 

dZZZ 


T-\T7-> -r) iy i-p A T/ T D ■PN TT" TD A TAT 


Y O A 1 

1 8 Aug 1 


958 






6223 


GREGORY TAYLOR DE GKAW 


21 Jul 1 


962 






6224 


NICOLE DE GRAW 


25 Jul 1 


966 






6225 


MICHAEL DE GRAW 


1 Dec 1 


979 






623 


T T7TVTTVT A TVTTV,T T* A T7 T 

LYNN ANNE TAYLOR 


1 7 May I 


935 








T T n • 1 1 

H, Bryan Richards 


1 8 Mar 1 


934 






623 1 


A 1"^ T T T7 "NT T~k T T T A T^C 

CAROL LYN RICHARDS 


29 Apr 1 


959 








• TXT 1 

Kim Wolsey Gregson 


10 Jan 1 


956 






623 1 1 


DANIEL KIM GREGSON 


23 Jun ] 


979 






623 2 


oHARI RICHARDo 


28 Nov 1 


960 






623 3 


BRYAN 1 AY LOR RlCHAKDo 


20 Sep 1 


962 






6Z34 


ROBYN RICHARDS 


28 Dec ] 


965 






6 Z J D 


rlJLiIDi KiCrlAKUo 


3 May J 


^0 1 






bZ 3 6 


KHj Jd±Li L-.v^ A KlL^rlAKJJo 


Z3 Jul J 


o ^ rv 

970 






O CD 1 


TTrMMV T VNTM T? T ^ TJ A T? 'P* C 
JiliiNiNi IjiiNiN KiL^rlAKiJO 


8 Nov 


972 






A *? Q 


J vJrIiN 1 A 1 J_/Wrv. KiL/rlAKJJiD 


20 Jan ] 


975 






D ^4 


XV A i rlK 1 IN UxLiXLi lAiJ_/LJK 


1 1 Sep ] 


941 








Allen Brent BrocKbank: 


O C A ^ 1 

25 Apr J 


937 






6 ^4 1 


ATT Tns.T U O T "NTT" "D U /^t^ T3 A TVTV T 


r. 3 Sep ] 


9b4 






A O y1 O 

6 Z4 Z 


ANNll< BKwCKBANlS. 


4 Jan J 


9o7 






6 Z4 J 


J-iY NN BRUCKBANK (r ) 


29 Jul J 


9b8 






6Z44 


T ATTTJA TDTi /^T^ *D A TVTT^ 

LAURA BROCKBANK 


3 Jul J 


L 970 






6245 


REBECCA BROCKBANK 


20 Jun ] 


1973 






6246 


DIXON TAYLOR BROCKBANK 


11 Nov ] 


975 






6247 


MARY KATHRYN BROCKBANK 


30 Sep ] 


977 






625 


GEORGE TERRY TAYLOR 


13 Sep ] 


944 








Debra Sue Wagstaff 


12 Mar ] 


[951 






6251 


DOUGLAS DIXON TAYLOR 


19 May 1 


972 






6252 


DAVID LYNN TAYLOR 


1 Dec ] 


1973 






6253 


ANNA LISE TAYLOR 


21 Mar ] 


[977 






6254 


ALLEN CRAIG TAYLOR 


9 Feb ] 


[979 







486 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



TT) 'Mo 




ijirtn 




Death 


jnjiliN xx. 1 




1 4 iviar 1 




1 IV J- d, y 


•I Ott 


k->a.rari u 


evj re y 


rr r e D 1 


QAA 


1 7 Aor 


1 Q26 


A 


MART A T.OTTTSF DTXON 


5 Jan J 


879 


1 7 Fph 


1 Q47 

i 7*T { 






t. iNOV 1 


87 n 


1 Seo 


\ Q35 


63 


FT. TON T.FROY TAYTOR 


99 T„„ 1 










FfVif>1 T. Srriff 


1 Till ^ 
1 J J ixi i 










JULIA TAYLOR 


30 Aug 1 


Q97 








Kenneth R. Anderson 


2 Feb 1 


Q'y A 






O J J. I 


KRISTINE ANDERSON 


25 May 1 


QH 9 

7 J 








Phillip Bench Bandley 


8 Feb 1 


Q 






63111 


JEREMIAH PHILLIP BANDLEY 27 Jun 1 


Q77 






631 2 


SCOTT TAYLOR ANDERSON 


30 Mar 1 


Q54 








Annette Buffo 


27 Mar 1 


7-' O 






631 21 


MANDI ALESE ANDERSON 


26 Jan 1 


979 

7 ' 7 






631 3 


KENNEN ANDERSON 


11 Apr 1 


958 

7 -' O 








Fred Bandley 


2 Jul 1 


957 






63131 


NICHOLAS EDWARD BANDLEY 18 Mar 1 


Q78 

7 1 O 






6314 


JED TAYLOR ANDERSON 


1 May ] 


Q60 






632 


JAMES SCOTT TAYLOR 


1 Mar 1 


930 








Deanna Kay Hoen 


8 May 1 


Q40 

71 U 






6371 

\J ^ 1. 


JAMES HOEN TAYLOR 


3 Dec 1 


Q60 






yj J O Ci 


SCOTT HOEN TAYLOR 


15 Oct 1 


Q67 






A ^ 9 7 

D J J 


TERI TAYLOR 


1 6 May 1 


QA4. 






A7 9/1. 


KATHY TAYLOR 


12 Nov ] 


70 D 






A 7 9 1; 


DAVID HOEN TAYLOR 


11 May 1 


QA7 
70 f 


1 3 Mav 


1 967 


A'^9 A 


JULIE TAYLOR 


26 May 1 


70 7 






A^ 97 
O J ^ r 


STEVEN HOEN TAYLOR 


8 Feb ] 


Q7 1 

7 ' J 






A 9 Q 

D J ^ 


THOMAS HOEN TAYLOR 


7 Apr ] 


7 1 -> 






D J t. 7 


KENT HOEN TAYLOR 


29 Nov ] 


Q74 
7 1 •* 


2 Dec 


1 974 


A'^9 1 r> 


SUSAN TAYLOR 


3 Sep ] 


Q7A 

7 J D 






A79 1 1 


ANNA TAYLOR 


6 Oct ] 


7 1 






D J J 


PAUL SCOTT TAYLOR 


7 Jul ] 


Q33 

7 J J 








Nancy Lee Tanner 


30 Aug ] 


Q37 

7-> ( 






D J J 1 


DIANE TAYLOR 


27 Jun '. 


Q3Q 

■ 7-' 7 








Scott Linn Hodson 


4 Feb ] 


Q5 9 

7J 7 






63311 


LANE TAYLOR HODSON 


11 Sep ] 


978 






6332 


WAYNE TANNER TAYLOR 


27 May 1 


[960 






6333 


JOHN TANNER TAYLOR 


18 Jul ] 


1963 






6334 


PAUL SCOTT TAYLOR, Jr. 


25 Jul ] 


[973 







487 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No„ 






Birth 






De 


ath 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eGrey 


4 


Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1926 


6 


MARIA LOUISE DIXON 


5 


Jan 1 


872 


17 


Feb 


1947 




Arthur N, Taylor 


2 


Nov 1 


870 


10 Sep 


1935 


63 


ELTON LEROY TAYLOR 


22 


Jun 1 


900 










Ethel L. Scott 


13 


Jul 1 


904 








634 


LOUISE TAYLOR 


I 


Aug 1 


938 










Clifford A, Woodruff 


1 1 


Dec 1 


937 








6341 


SHELLY K. WOODRUFF 


14 


May 1 


958 










John Craig 


26 


Dec 1 


957 








6342 


BECKY LYNN WOODRUFF 


1 1 


Nov 1 


959 










David Wood 


1 9 


Dec 1 


958 








63421 


JENIFER LYNN WOOD 


1 2 


Nov 1 


977 








63422 


TREVOR MARTIN WOOD 


6 


Apr 1 


979 








6343 


BARRY CLIFFORD WOODRUFF 


3 


Mar 1 


962 








6344 


RUSSELL ELTON WOODRUFF 


21 


Nov 1 


963 








6345 


TAYLOR JARVIS WOODRUFF 


30 


Mar 1 


971 








6346 


WENDY LOUISE WOODRUFF 


1 3 


Jun ] 


975 








64 


HENRY DIXON TAYLOR 


22 


Nov 1 


903 










Alta Hansen 


17 


Dec 1 


905 


6 


Jul 


1 967 


641 


HENRY DIXON TAYLOR, Jr. 


27 


Feb 1 


931 










Colette Green 


1 3 


Apr 1 


933 








641 1 


HENRY DIXON TAYLOR III 


14 


Apr 1 


956 










Denise Meshinski 


28 


Mar 1 


957 








641 1 1 


RACHEL TAYLOR 


2 


Aug 1 


977 








641 2 


THOMAS GREEN TAYLOR 


1 


Sep 1 


957 








641 3 


BRADFORD GREEN TAYLOR 


8 


Apr 1 


960 








6414 


AMY TAYLOR 


22 


Sep 1 


961 








641 5 


GEORGE GREEN TAYLOR 


3 


Jun ] 


964 








641 6 


NICOLE TAYLOR 


1 2 


Nov 1 


965 








641 7 


BRIGHAM GREEN TAYLOR 


8 


Apr 1 


967 








6418 


MEGAN TAYLOR 


5 


Apr 1 


969 








642 


ANTHONY HANSEN TAYLOR 


4 


Apr 1 


935 








643 


STEPHEN KROGE TAYLOR 


6 


Jan 1 


942 










Lorna Bird 


16 


Feb 1 


947 








6431 


STEPHEN KROGE TAYLOR, Jr. 


1 5 


May ] 


972 








6432 


WILLIAM OLIVER TAYLOR 


1 ! 


Mar 1 


974 








6433 


AMELIA KATHARINE TAYLOR 


1 2 


Nov 1 


977 








644 


DAVID ARTHUR TAYLOR 


27 


Mar 1 


946 










Kristine Boynton 


29 


Oct 1 


952 








6441 


EMILY TAYLOR 


2 


Aug 1 


973 








6442 


ANNA TAYLOR 


18 


Sep 1 


975 








6443 


PHILLIP DAVID TAYLOR 


6 


Mar 1 


978 









488 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID. No. 






ij irtn 




jJe 


atn 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


1 A 

1 4 


JVLar 1 


o o c 


4 May 


1 884 


Sarah DeGrey 


A 


F/i K 1 
r e D 1 




1 r Apr 


1 7<iD 


6 


MARIA LOUISE DTXON 


c 


J an 1 


R7 7 


1 7 FoK 
i ( r e D 


1 047 

1 7rl 1 




Arthur N Tavlor 


7 


1 N (J V 1 


Rvn 


1 n S#:>n 

X \) lJC p 


1 70 D 


65 


ALICE LOUISE TAYLOR 


i o 


IN O V X 


7 U D 








G, El Roy Nelson 




Jun J 








651 


ARTHUR TAYLOR NELSON 

A ^ ^ V A XX \^ ^ X X X X X X i XV X ^ ' f X^L^ X ^ 




K'lay J 


Q"^ 7 

7-J ' 










7 7 


K 1 

r e D 1 


Q 

7<- 7 






651 1 


MICHAEL MCKAY NELSON 

AVXX X Xa XX_i X^ XVX X >.XX X X ^ -L-J X^h^ \^ X N 


J. ^ 


J— 'C C 1 


7 D D 






651 2 


JEANNE LOUISE NELSON 

U X«iX XX ^ X ^ X_U J-J Xv^ X_J X ^ ' ■* X_ik^ x»/ X ^ 


■J 

D 


J an J 


Q7 n 

7 1 U 






6513 


THOMAS TAYLOR NELSOPsI 


1 7 


J an J 


Q71 






652 


JOHN CHRISTIAN NELSON 

U X XX ^ >k>XXX\Xt»/ X XXXX^ I'M I-/ ^ 


1 4. 


In 1 


Q4.fl 
7^ V 








xvxdx y j^yiiiic i-'cLiiLici^iro 


Q 

7 




Q4? 

7^1: C 






6521 


CHRTSTTNF NFT.SON 


7C 


A 11 re 1 

Aug I 


7D D 






\J D Ut d 


DAVID rWRTSTTAM MTTT '^DM 


7 




QA Q 

70 








r* A TRTTRTISTF' T OTTT^F MF'T ^OM 


1 O 

I o 


IN O V J 










■N/TATTWFW TDWNT MTTT CIOTST 

iVlXl. i J. LlILj VV J wn.J.N IN JZj J_/0 WIN 


7 

1 


Till 1 


Q7 A 
y (0 






\J ^ C u 


STFVFN SHARP NFT,SON 


D 


Till 1 
J UL 1 


077 

y I 1 








rWRTSTTNA T OTTTSF NFLSOTsT 


1 R 

I O 


A A o ir 1 

iviay i 










xXU'ilcLXiJ VV ^ X CoUUIX 


/I 


IN O V i 


Q47 

y*tc. 






6^31 


55TT7ANNA PRFSTON 




Aviay i 


QA Q 

yvy 






\J ^ O Li 


TRFVOR TORGF PRFSTON 

X X\ Xli V V^X\ U V-/ X\ \Jl Xw • X\ Xl*Lj X W J. N 


■2 
J 


J un J 


Q77 

y I L 








FTJ7ARFTH PRFSTON 

J-j X-i X x^ X^ XLf X XX ^ X\x-ji-7 X V^'IN 


1 D 


A 11 rr 1 

Aug 1 


Q7Q 

7 ' 7 






654 


HENRY ALDOUS NELSON 


7 R 


A r% >• 1 

r 1 


Q4A 

7^D 








X^-XlOLy k^LC? W CLX L 


7 A 


Tnl 1 

J Ui 1 


Q4Q 






D 3t i 


pTTRTTpPA TsTFT <^OT\r 

IxJZj IJS1jK^KjT\. in JCj J_jvJ win 


Q 

7 


Apr 1 


Q7 1 










Q 

7 


A Ti rr 1 
AUg I 


7 ' J 








SrOTT AT DOTTS NFT,SON 


t. 7 


J Uli X 


Q7R 






6544 


MELISSA NELSON 


77 


A n>* 1 

Apr J 


077 
7 1 ' 






6545 


ALLISON NELSON 


7"^ 


IN O V J 


07 Q 

7 ' 7 






655 


JAMES NICHOLLS NELSON 


•3 

J 


M.ar J 










Consuelo Marquez 


9 

7 




946 






6551 


SARAH JANE NELSON 


21 


Jun ] 


979 






66 


CLARENCE DIXON TAYLOR 


11 


May 1 


909 






67 


ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 


3 


Nov 1 


913 


31 Oct 


1940 




Ethelyn Peterson 


2 


Dec 1 


914 







489 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID. No. 




Birth 




HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 Feb 1 


844 


6 


MARIA LOUIoE DIXON 


5 Jan 1 


872 




Arthur N, Taylor 


2 Nov 1 


870 


68 


RUTH ELAINiL lAiL^UK 


20 Mar 1 


917 




ired Dixon Kartchner 


6 Dec 1 


914 


d8I 


LINDA KAKiOHNEK 


23 Apr I 


943 




bteven E. iyler 


17 Feb 1 


943 


681 1 


MICHAEL TYLER 


8 Dec 1 


968 


6812 


DANIEL KARTCHNER TYLER 


15 Jan 1 


970 


6813 


JENNILYN TYLER 


7 Jan ] 


972 


6814 


R U i H AJNJN 1 Y LER 


16 Nov 1 


976 


^ o o 




11 Dec 1 


944 




MariAnne Allene Davis 


1 2 Jun ] 


944 


A O 1 


JJKiLiW xS-ZlK i LjrliN JliK 


5 May 1 


971 




rlxL(/Vl rl±Li x\ rvArv. 1 L>riiN±L«x\ 


27 Oct 1 


972 






27 Nov 1 


974 


A C 9 A 


NATHAN KARTCHNER 


14 Jul 1 


976 


A O "J 
Do J 


ELAINE KARTCHNER 


26 Jun 1 


947 




ELLEN KARTCHNER 


I 3 Oct 1 


948 




Rand Glen Farrer 


1 2 Jul 1 


947 


A O >1 1 


DAVID GLEN FARRER 


14 Nov 1 


975 


A o c 
685 


RICHARD TAYLOR KARTCHNER 


7 Apr 1 


950 




Kathryn Andersen 


21 Sep 1 


952 


685 1 


MARK ANDERSEN KARTCHNER 20 Feb 1 


974 


6852 


KERIANNE KARTCHNER 


1 9 Jul 1 


975 


6853 


TAYLOR ANDERSEN KARTCHNER 21 Sep 


1976 


6854 


KELLI KARTCHNER 


8 Jun 1 


978 


686 


DAVID TAYLOR KARTCHNER 


3 Apr 1 


951 




Karen Renee Nelson 


15 Mar 1 


952 


A Q A 1 

Otto I 


JEFFREY NELSON KARTCHNER 6 Apr 1 


976 


6862 


BENJAMIN NELSON KARTCHNER 8 Apr 1 


978 


687 


ROSENA LOUISE KARTCHNER 


14 Jul 1 


952 




Alan Perry Heal 


28 Nov 1 


95 


6871 


MARIA ANN HEAL 


27 Nov 1 


976 


6872 


AMY LOUISE HEAL 


22 Sep 1 


978 


688 


MARY ANN KARTCHNER 


27 Nov 1 


958 




Steven Lane Warner 


8 May 1 


956 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1 926 
17 Feb 1947 
10 Sep 1935 

16 Mar 1980 



21 Oct 1947 



490 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 



As of December 31, 

ID Njo. 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Mary Ann Smith 
7 WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 

Harriet Hands 

71 WILLIAM HANDS DIXON 

72 VESTA DIXON 
Albert Warren Booth 

721 GORDON DIXON BOOTH 

June Phoebe Erskine 

721 1 GORDON DAVID BOOTH 

7212 CATHERINE BOOTH 

7213 STEPHEN M. BOOTH 

7214 CYNTHIA BOOTH 

7215 MICHAEL THOMAS BOOTH 

7216 CHRISTIANNE BOOTH 

722 GARY LYNN BOOTH 
Sherry Ann Gaudio 

7221 WARREN LYNN BOOTH 

7222 GREGORY BOOTH 
722 GARY LYNN BOOTH 

Tawn Lee 

7223 GARY LEE BOOTH 
722 GARY LYNN BOOTH 

Carrie Hendricksen 

73 GLEN HANDS DIXON 
Elva Ellen Schemensky 

731 MAX GLEN DIXON 

Ina Mae Woolsey 

7311 TERRI MAE DIXON 
Kurt R. Vaksinick 

73111 RUDOLPH KURT VAKSINICK 

73112 APRIL ANN VAKSINICK 

7312 CINDI MARLENE DIXON 
Rodney Kay Roberts 

73121 RODNEY JORY ROBERTS 

7313 LORI JEAN DIXON 

7314 BRET GLEN DIXON 

7315 STACY LYNN DIXON 



1979 

Birth 
14 Mar 

3 Oct 

21 Apr 

25 May 

22 May 
10 Jun 

22 Jan 
16 Feb 

7 Jan 
1 Feb 

8 Aug 
24 Feb 

23 Sep 

14 Jan 

1 Apr 

4 Jun 
10 Dec 

15 Aug 

24 Nov 
4 Jun 

21 Sep 

2 May 

4 Jun 

26 Jun 

5 Nov 
28 Dec 

7 Sep 
21 Jan 

16 Apr 
20 Jul 
13 Jan 

17 Mar 
16 May 

9 Aug 
7 Jul 
7 Feb 

6 Sep 
10 Jun 



1835 
1852 
1873 
1874 
1906 
1907 
1905 
1936 
1938 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1968 
1974 
1976 
1944 
1946 
1963 
1966 
1944 
1948 
1973 
1944 
1950 
1908 
1912 
1931 
1934 
1954 
1953 
1973 
1975 
1957 
1955 
1979 
1959 
I960 
1964 



Death 
4 May 1884 



27 Jun 
22 Jun 
10 Oct 
22 May 



1907 
1937 
1973 
1906 



20 Jan 1965 



491 



ID No. 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 

Birth 



HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 


1835 


Mary A 


nn Smith 


3 


Oct 


1852 


7 


WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 


21 


Apr 


1873 




Harriet Hands 


25 


May 


1874 


732 


SHIRLEY MAE DIXON 


12 


be p 


1 935 




Harold Keith Davis 


23 


Sep 


1 936 


7321 


MICKI DAVIS 


10 


May 


1 960 




Larry Ronald Johnson 


19 


Nov 


1957 


7321 1 


JASON LARRY JOHNSON 


26 


Aug 


1975 


73212 


LACY ANN JOHNSON 


14 


Dec 


1977 


73213 


T O T T T T A T"^ T m T T T T TV T O ^^TV T 

JOSHUA KEITH JOHNSON 


8 


Aug 


1979 


7322 


BECKI DAVIS 


1 1 


be p 


1 963 


7323 


T T~»1VT T T A Ti T T*V T*^ A ^ T T O 

GLEN HAROLD DAVIb 


1 7 


Jul 


1 965 


7324 


AMY LJ-iJLEJN jJAVics 


18 


T.. 1 

J ul 


1 969 


7325 


T T T T A TVT M T~\ A T T T C 

JILL ANIN DAVib 


7 


Jun 


1 97 1 


733 


ELVA JEAN DIXON 


6 


"H K 

May 


1 940 




Kenneth Lee Elliott 


3 


Dec 


1936 


7331 


KELLE JEAN ELLIOTT 


20 


be p 


1 960 




Wesley Taylor Witte 


20 


Nov 


1 957 


73311 


CRYbTAL fc>TAR WITIE 


28 


Jan 


1 978 


7332 


KERI LEE ELLIOTT 


1 3 


Aug 


1 961 


7333 


T T* A ■» T" ■ ' » 1 '«v '|i 1 T T T I'll t 1 1 

SHANE D. ELLIOTT 


26 


Dec 


1968 


7334 


TRAVIS GUNNER ELLIOTT 


19 


Aug 


1 972 


734 


WILLIAM FRANK DIXON 


4 


Aug 


1944 




Karen McClellan 


21 


Oct 


1947 


7341 


TIMOTHY HUGH DIXON 


1 3 


be p 


1 968 


7342 


TODD WILLIAM DIXON 


1 3 


bep 


1 968 


7343 


T T A A TV T TV T ^ ^^TV T 

LISA ANN DIXON 


29 


Jun 


1971 


7344 


CHERILYN JO DIXON 


23 


Se p 


1 972 


735 


RICHARD S. DIXON 


9 


Dec 


1 946 




Sherry Lynn Pyper 


27 


May 


1949 


735 1 


DARIN RICHARD DIXON 


22 


Jan 


1971 


7352 


RYAN GLEN DIXON 


10 


Jul 


1 973 


7353 


ANGIE LYNN DIXON 


30 


May 


1975 


7354 


T ^ T 1^ r 1 1 TTVT A TVTTVT TV T 

KRISTIN ANN DIXON 


19 


Feb 


1979 


74 


MARY DIXON 


23 


Jan 


191 1 




Hyrum Aikele 


2 


Jun 


1912 


741 


HYRUM D. AIKELE 


21 


Mar 


1 938 


742 


WILLIAM EUGENE AIKELE 


28 


Feb 


1 941 




Irene ovenssen 


2 


Jun 


1 944 


7421 


T~» 1~\ TT ^ AT T TV T A T T 

ERIK ALLEN AIKELE 


2 


be p 


1 965 


7422 


SHAUNTY MAJA AIKELE 


14 


May 


1969 


743 


BONNIE ANN AIKELE 


30 


Jan 


1944 




Clayton J. Cornish, Jr. 


19 


Feb 


1943 


7431 


REBECCA LYNN CORNISH 


20 


Mar 


1964 


7432 


ASHLIE MELISSA CORNISH 


28 


Jun 


1967 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
22 Jun 1937 
10 Oct 1973 



21 Mar 1938 



28 Apr 1973 
19 Dec 1968 



492 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No. 






XJ 1 rtn 




HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 A 

1 rt 


ivxa r 1 


0-5 7 


Mary 


Ann StnifH 


•3 
J 


O/^ +• 1 
wet J 


Q t; 9 
OO C 


7 


WILLIAM ALDOUS DTXON 


c, 1 


Apr 1 


O i J 




T-T 1* 1 4" T-Tii r1 c 


o c 
CO 


May ] 


874 




HARRTFT FAYF r>T"X"OM 


J 


Apr ] 






T^^ T 1 1 r\ CT T" 'R lOT'lrlnnrl 
J—' ilXll^ X, XJJ\JXjs.L Liriu 


1 c 


Apr 1 


V i 4 


75 1 


RORFRT PiARY RTORKT TTMH 

X\ N-' J-J X_/ X\ X \_J xA. X\ X XJ »J Vw-/ X\ X i. X_j U 1 N LJ 


^ A 
1 b 


Apr ] 


n ^ o 
V38 




Pat Nicholes 


9 7 


Se p ] 


74U 


75 1 1 


riNDY RTORK'TTTMn 


CD 


oe p 1 




75 1 7 


r)tr-D-DTTp "R TOR K"T TIMD 

i-J iLi XD IJ lILd XJ J w x\ r\ J_/ U IN -LJ 




ue c i 


Q A 9 

yO C 


751 


RORRT THAN RTDRKT TTIMD 




Aug 1 


VdY 


752 


BARBARA GATL RTORKLTTND 

XJii.X\ X_»Xi.X\X4. VJX1.XX— J XJ U V-^ X\ X i. X_J i N X-y 




r e D 1 


74 1 




X uxix ivxti y e rb 


J 


oe p J 




75? 1 


X\.X_j i N I N xLi X XX iVX X_j X XIj X\ O 


Q 

7 


wet I 


Q A 7 
yO C 


7572 

I Cr £-1 


THOMAS CRATn MFYFRS 


1 A 


Ue c J 


QA A 


75 3 


GLORIA FAYF RTORKT TTND 

J-J V> X\ XxTl X X X_j J-J tJ X\ X\. J-j i N J_y 


jU 


Ma r ] 


74 J 






Z -3 


May ] 


74 J 


75 1 


TTTT JF NirHOT S 


o 

o 


Ue c I 


qa 1 

7D 1 


75 '^2 

I J -J Ct 


SHFRRTF TMTPHOT S 
i 1 X-j x\ x\ X x_j iN X Vw* rxv-y xjO 


i U 


J an i 


Q A A 
7D4 


75 


TINA NICHOLS 

X XiNXi. i N X V** X X >^ J_JlJ 




r e D i 


Q A A 
7DD 


7534 


ROBERTA ANN NICHOLS 

X\ X^ X^ X\ X XX XXX >l X N X ^ X ^> X X X^l^ 


CG 


J an I 


Q A 7 
7D f 


754 


JANET MARIE BJORKLUND 


I U 


iJe c i 


74D 




Mannpl T-T Mprln;^Ho 

■LVXCl' LX IX w L i- X a xVXcL 11 CI l-J 


c^ 


ue c J 


7^D 


7541 


RODNEY WAYNE MACHADO 


1 


J vin ] 


QA7 
7 u 1 


7542 


KIMBERLY ANN MACHADO 

X VX A VX J-J X_J X\ X^ X XXX N X ^ XVXX X X XxXX^ 


1 c 




QAQ 
707 


755 


RICHARD ERLING BJORKLUND 

X \ X X XX XX V X^ 1 if X V .XXX X 1 X^ kJ X V X X X» < X ^ x.^ 


1 
'1 


Till 1 
J Hi J 


Q47 
7'* / 




T~)i3r\p T^inTlrlnnH 

I—' XOl lie J— ' \\J ± CVXClllU 


Q 

C 


IN O V J 


QA7 
7^ / 


755 1 


DFENA BTORKLUND 

J-/ X_J X N XX X-J U >^ X\ X V X^ w X ^ x^ 


cy 


wet i 


QA7 
70 ( 


76 


GEORGE S. DIXON 


77 


Se p ] 


Q 1 ^ 
7 J 3 




Vf*nn OnllinO'c; 

» \J LX, V-.* W.LXlllti O 




X-'C C J 


7 J t 


761 


CONSTANCE LEF DIXON 

VXJ. N X XX X ^ X-J X-JX;^ X-J X^ XX X X > 


c c 


Tnl 1 

J U.X J 


Q4? 




FHHip TC^Ti^ \x7n\x7^ Ic i 

X_j IXLilw XVCLXd W \J W O IN. 1 








1 D 1 1 


c;cnTT irnwARn karwow^kt 


7 Q 


M!a r ] 


Q A 7 
7D / 






Q 

7 


wet J 


Q4. A 
7^ 


7A 1 7 

1 D 1 C 


DARRTN T.FF RTCH 

X_/xx X\ X\ XxN xjX_j XL* X\ X V-' X X 


1 C 


J an i 


Q7 1 
7 « 1 


7 A? 


RORFRT GFORGF DTXON 

X\V-^X_)X_jX\ X XL/ V-/ X\ v_J XL/ X-/ Xx\ v-' ' N 


77 


Jul J 






J Liu y v^cLy Lc vv t^^-'u 


1 Q 

1 7 


IN \J\ J 


QAR 
y^O 


7A? 1 


TFRFMY MATTHEW DIXON 

U ' ■* X\ X.J IVX X IVXxx X XIX XL# V V X-V Xx X V— ' 1 N 


7 1 

C i 


FoK 1 
r e D J 


Q7 1 
7 1 i 


7 A 1 


QT-ITRFT FFRRTQ F>T'VOM 
Orli±\il/JLj JJl^X\X\iij UiAWiN 


C 


ivia r J 


y ~>0 




Evelyn Rose 










Alberta Mae 


1 8 


Mar ' 


V j4 


7631 


LEE ANDREW DIXON 


10 


Apr ] 


962 


7632 


TIMOTHY PAUL DIXON 


1 1 


May ] 


964 


7633 


WAYNE DANIEL DIXON 


27 


Nov ] 


969 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
22 Jun 1937 
10 Oct 1973 



6 Mar 1966 



493 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1 979 








ID No. 




B irth 




Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


iviay 


^ o OA 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 r e b 1 


844 


17 A r->-i- 

1 1 Apr 


1 Q9A 
ly CO 


o 
o 


XL. K. IN iiiO 1 U sLi w±\JtLiJL UiJ^wiN 


22 Dec 1 


873 


i 5 J une 


1 O O o 

1938 




Mary Ann Painter 


14 bep 1 


875 


91 A r^-.. 

Apr 


1 O C /4 


Q 1 




10 Sep 1 


900 








JWTiOLQ. ijosnara 


CC May J 


O Pi o 

898 






ell 
oil 


DTTANr DTVOKT R ONWARD 


D Ma r 1 


923 








iNorma rieatneriy 


CO r eo 1 


923 






fill! 

O i -L 1 


NTORA/TAKr DTTAM RO^^T-TARD 

IN w r\iVJ..flLiN i--'Alj.rt.i> O \JiD Ll.t\.I\l-J 


23 Dec 1 


948 








j.-'idnne iNtjioun 


21 bep 1 


950 






R 1 1 1 1 




4 May 1 








Rill? 


DALLAS NELSON BOSHARD 


cti Jun 1 


n o 

978 






ft 1 1 7 


BEVERLY ANN BOSHARD 


ci JVLar J 


95 ^ 








Alan Blaine Wakefield 


o wet J 


95 c 






C 1 1 ■? 1 


LORI ANN WAKEFIELD 


1 o May J 


9 M 






C 1 1 ■? 

O 1 1 cc 


MICHELLE WAKEFIELD 


7 May 1 


9(4 








SCOTT WAKEFIELD 


17 Feb 1 


97d 






o 1 1 J 


ARNOLD VON HOLLEN BOSHARD 24 Aug 


1956 








Andrea Stubbs 


30 Jul 1 


959 






o i ^ 


ARNOLD BLISS BOSHARD 


8 Jan 1 


929 








Glenna Rae Edwards 


29 Oct 1 


930 






O 1 O 1 

o J <i 1 


GARY BLISS BOSHARD 


30 Sep 1 


95 2 








Eileen Boswell 


14 Nov ] 








o i ^ i 1 


JESSICA ANN BOSHARD 


10 Jan 1 


t~\ ''7 '-J 

977 






O 1 O 1 o 


KELLY BOSHARD 


8 Jun 1 


978 






O 1 "? "7 

O J ^1 ^ 


STEVEN ALLAN BOSHARD 


6 Jul 1 


956 






O 1 O "3 

oi. c5 


GINA BOSHARD 


24 Nov 1 


9d 1 






o o 
82 


LEAH LILLIAN DIXON 


18 May 1 


90 3 


9 A 1^ >• 

Apr 


1 Q7R 

•I 7 1 O 




Mayo Alton Ford 


4 Mar ] 


o r\ ^ 

906 






O O 1 


MARILYN MAE FORD 


29 Sep 1 


92d 








Edwin Van Dyke Simmons 


6 Aug 1 


923 






oil 


WENDY LEE SIMMONS 


6 May 1 


95 1 








Robert William Tegeder 


18 Jun 1 


95 1 






C "? 1 1 1 


ANDREW ROBERT TEGEDER 


11 Jan 1 


978 








TROY DIXON TEGEDER 


21 Sep 1 


o ^ n 

979 






C 9 1 9 


LORI JEAN SIMMONS 


30 Jun 1 


95 3 








Willard Gean Decker 


24 Jun ] 


951 






82121 


CHRISTOPHER GEAN DECKER 9 Sep 1 


976 






82122 


BROOKE DECKER 


14 Nov 1 


978 






821 3 


DAVID EDWIN SIMMONS 


17 Oct 1 


954 








Terrie Lee Brewer 


16 Dec 1 


955 






82131 


ADAM DAVID SIMMONS 


28 Apr 1 


979 






8214 


TIMOTHY FORD SIMMONS 


24 Jul 1 


959 







494 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No. 






Birth 




HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


o o c 

835 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 


J eb 1 


844 


Q 

o 


iLKiNitiOl UiL, LiKEi UiXUJN 


22 


Dec J 


873 




Mary Ann Painter 


14 


bep 1 


875 


Q ■? 
OC.C 




25 


Nov J 


928 




Rex Bigelow 


D 


A 1 

Aug 1 


931 


O "7 "5 1 
OCC X 


riKiLiiN i K. oiLrEJ-iUW 


1 5 


J ul 1 


948 




Carol Ann outton 


3 1 


J an 1 


95 1 




"D T? A TVyPi T IT T TT* XT" 13 T/" TT" T f~\'\\T 

ijKAiNjJiJi, LiiLhj oiUEJ-iUW 


8 


T 1 1 

Jul J 


973 






5 


bep I 


974 


Q 9 ■? 9 




21 


Sep 1 


952 




Steven Ted Nicol 


/ 

D 


Jul 1 


956 


R99 9 1 

G d d Cl 1 


o ± xijr^JrixTLiN iiii iNiv^wJ_i 


"5 O 
L C 


J ul J 


o A o 
9d9 


O d d Cj Cl 


TAT AYIMTT KTTr'nT 


L5 


J Ul J 




(J Cl 


FT.ATNF RTHTTT OW 


9 1 


Se p ] 


Qt; 9 




rV A M A "4" r~S ^1 r/^ 1\ ^ O >* 4" T -r^ £i ry 

Xi-cnnccfi j_)vjya iviamnez 


1 « 


Aug 1 




Kj t-t ^ 




9 "7 

/I r 


iJec 1 


y 1 J 


G d Cl d^ 


TASON DAT F Tv/T A R TTKTF 7 


1 U 


iJe c 1 


y 1 


9i77'\ 

OCiCi J 


GLEN M. BIGELOW 


c 
D 


ue c i 


yOO 




Vickie Lee Davis 


1 


ue c J 


Q£^ C 
73 o 


R99 1 

O C C D 1 


CAMILLE BIGELOW 


9 9 


Apr J 


7 ( ft 


D 9 9 9 


LESLIE AMBER BIGELOW 


15 


Jan ] 


Q7 7 
7 f ( 




CINDY BIGELOW 


4 


Feb 1 


Q C O 
73 O 




Robert Michael Gunter 


26 


Jan ■ 


QC A 
7D4 


O "5 9 /I 1 

OCC^:l 


JEREMIAH MICHAEL GUNTER 21 Jan 1 


n ^ ^ 


O O O /I 1 


GALE TEX GUNTER 


8 


Nov 1 


n 'T "7 

977 


o o o c 


AMBER BIGELOW 


26 May 1 


n ^ o 

9d^ 


O O "2 


DIXON ALTON FORD 


30 


Jul 1 


yjc. 




Anginita Maria Van Derbeck 


26 


Jan 


7 jd 


O O 9 1 


KATHLEEN FORD 


9 Feb ] 


Q C O 
75 


O "? "5 O 


DALE FORD 


13 


Sep 


Q A n 
Vol) 


O O "J '2 


CYNTHIA FORD 


16 Dec 1 


7D 1 


O O O /I 


STEVEN MATHEW FORD 


4 


Jun \ 


o A o 

9d9 


QO 7.C. 
OCJO 


MARIANNE FORD 


1 


Jun 


9 1 1 


9,24 


JANICE ANN FORD 


26 Jul ] 


7 j4 




John Theodore Neerings 


24 Apr 1 


Q 1 Q 
7 1 7 


8241 


JILL NEERINGS 


9 Jul 1 


7-> O 


8242 


TROY NEERINGS 


14 


Feb ] 


960 


8243 


SHELIA NEERINGS 


17 


Nov ] 


961 


8244 


LISA NEERINGS 


17 


Nov ] 


1963 


83 


ERNEST ARNOLD DIXON 


25 Apr 


1906 



495 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1979 




ID No. 




Birth 




HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


4 Feb 1 


844 


8 


ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 


22 Dec 1 


873 




Mary Ann Painter 


14 Sep 1 


875 


84 


VERL GRANT DIXON 


26 Nov 1 


908 




Adryne Hodson 


11 Aug 1 


921 


841 


LINDA DIXON 


22 Jun ] 


944 




Gary T. Rose 


14 Nov 1 


940 


841 1 


ROBERT DIXON ROSE 


11 Apr 1 


961 


8412 


CHRISTINE ROSE 


4 Feb 1 


965 


8413 


JAMES ROSE 


11 Aug 1 


966 


8414 


ADRYNE CATHLENE ROSE 


30 Apr 1 


970 


8415 


GARY PAUL ROSE 


15 Oct 1 


971 


84 


VERL GRANT DIXON 


26 Nov 1 


908 




Virginia Poulson 


7 Aug 1 


921 


842 


MARY ELLEN DIXON 


25 Jan ] 


960 


843 


MERRILL VERL DIXON 


31 Jan ] 


965 


85 


RALPH DIXON 


16 Sep 1 


912 




Eva Ruth Ward 


30 Jun 1 


920 


851 


MARJORIE JEAN DIXON 


22 Jul 1 


939 




Robert Reed Boren 


8 Nov 1 


936 


851 1 


DAVID BOREN 


22 Dec 1 


959 


851 2 


MICHAEL BOREN 


9 Aug 1 


962 


8513 


ELISABETH BOREN 


4 Mar 1 


969 


8514 


STEPHEN RALPH BOREN 


27 Feb 1 


973 


852 


RALPH STANLEY DIXON 


21 Jan ] 


941 




Karen Lee Marrott 


22 Mar 1 


943 


8521 


ANDREE LYNN DIXON 


3 Dec 1 


965 


8522 


GINA LEE DIXON 


29 Jan 1 


969 


8523 


MARC STANLEY DIXON 


18 Apr 1 


971 


8524 


JOE ERIK DIXON 


9 Jun 1 


973 


853 


GERALD ERNEST DIXON 


21 Mar 1 


944 




Donna Penrod 


21 Nov 1 


943 


8531 


TERESA DIXON 


9 Jul 1 


968 


8532 


THAL WADE DIXON 


16 Nov 1 


971 


8533 


GUY WAYNE DIXON 


3 Oct 1 


973 


8534 


KIMBERLY DIXON 


16 Dec 1 


975 


8535 


DREW WARD DIXON 


23 May 1 


979 


854 


RONALD WARD DIXON 


19 Dec 1 


948 




Norma Jeanne Allan 


27 Jun ] 


951 


8541 


PAMELA JEANNE DIXON 


22 Apr 1 


974 


8542 


RONALD JESSE DIXON 


4 Aug 1 


975 


8543 


LAURA JOANNE DIXON 


20 Sep 1 


977 


8544 


RYAN JAMES DIXON 


12 Aug 1 


979 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
15 Jun 1938 
23 Apr 1954 

28 Jun 1945 



9 Feb 1980 



496 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - 
As of December 31 , 197 



ID No. 



ROSTER 
9 

Birth 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


I *t xvia r 


1 Q t; 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


*t X e D 


1 QAA 


8 


ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 


c c ue c 


1 O 1 J 




K4.aT*v Ann Paintp^r 


1 *t oe p 


1 Q7 c; 


855 


CHERYL ANN DIXON 


1 o J an 






* * -^tl* X JEN. ' U CL- 11 L ^ y J— ' C IV ^ X 




1 Q48 

1 7*1 O 


855 1 


JONATHAN LLOYD RFCKFR 


^su J iin 




8552 


BENJAMIN MARK BECKFR 

J—* X^ X 1 X XXVXXX 1 ^VX.£X XV X ^ X— ' X^ V-* X xXIj X\ 


1 J r e D 


1 Q77 
ly ( ( 


856 


SANDRA LEE DIXON 


-J Ma -r 

j ivid. r 






Brent Lee Davis 


7 IVidy 


1 Q4^ 


8561 


JORDAN DANIEL DAVIS 


23 Anr 

-J XX LI X 


1 Q7'i 

17(3 


8562 


BRANT COY DAVIS 


6 T\i1 


1 Q7Q 

17(7 


86 


RONALD DIXON 


16 Sen 


1912 




Verneda Jackson 


2 Sep 


1919 

X / X / 


861 


KATHRYN DIXON 


15 May 


1 942 




Thomas Edward Crowley 


16 Jul 

X \J %J KMX 


1 939 

J. 7 _» 7 


861 1 


TRENT CROWLEY 


2 Dec 

-X— ' Vw- 


1 962 


8612 


COLETTE CROWLEY 


7 V 
1 xvxGi y 


1 972 


861 3 


COLIN THOS CROWLEY 


14 Tnl 


1 977 


862 


DEANNA DIXON 

X^ X JX X X ^ A, ^ X X X^ XiA ^ X ^ 


A T a M 


1 944 
1 yt'* 




^ V ^ 1 1 X-/ a X VXCL X Oil O, X X 


1 A A >• 


1 944 


R621 


ERTC STFVFN MARSHALL 

XljXVXV^ \^ X XLt V XlilN J.VXXX X\kJl XxJL XJXJ 


CD J a.T\ 


1 9A9 

1 7 D 7 


R622 


ERIN MARSHALL 

XlJ XV XI ^ IVXxx X\ X Xxx X^ J-J 


7 Tnl-ir 

1 J uiy 


1 970 

J. 7 ( U 


8623 

\j \J i-d ~J 


RYAN DIXON MARSHALL 


Q 'N/iaTT- 

7 iviay 


1 Q7 

1 7 1 -J 


8624 


TERA CASSANDRA MARSHALL 

X I 4 X V X X ^/ ^ X 1^ X X X ^ X^ X V X X XVXX X X \ 1 X X X J ^ X mJ 


It X c u 


1 97A 

1 7 ( D 


8625 


AMBER NICOLE MARSHALL 


3 Ma r 


1 98(1 


863 


GARY RONALD DIXON 


Ci\J o c u 


1 949 
1 yt y 




Ann Ivlarie Begin 


6 Feb 


1953 

1 7 _> -» 


8631 


AMY MARIE DDCON 


1 Q Anr 


1 978 
17(0 


864 


DORSEY DIXON 

X^ X \. X_J X X^ X>c * 1 ^ 


7 Nov 


1 956 

1 7 <J 


87 


EDITH ALICE DIXON 

\ / X_^ X X X X XX X-J X v..' X_J X^ XX ^ X ^ 


2 Ma r 

XVXCL X 


1915 
171.; 




T\f^ Tn^iTH C^stI T^j^llf^nfinf* 

XJ W X IXCL X U V-' dX.L X CL.LX^LXL'XLi^ 


1 7 Anr 

J. 1 p I; 


1 7 1 J 


87 1 


JO ANN FALLENTINE 

O XX 1 ^ 1 ^ X XX X-J X^ X ^ X X X ^ x^ 


1 S*> n 


1 937 

1 7 J f 




Tjvnn TT CliiHf^sfpT 


A A n or 


1 937 
1 7 J ( 


871 1 


SCOTT CHIDESTER 

kw^ Nu' X^ X X V. ' X X XXa' * — ' I li X 


7 An cr 


1 963 


871 2 


BROOK CHIDESTER (f) 


X J—/ C 


1966 


871 3 


WHITNEY KATE CHIDESTER 


6 Feb 


1 970 

1 7 1 V 


872 


CAROLYN FALLENTINE 


16 Feb 


1 940 

1 7^ yj 




Ralph M. Gilstrap 


6 Oct 


1 936 


8721 


CHRISTOPHER GILSTRAP 


24 Aug 


1965 


8722 


MOLLIE GILSTRAP 


16 Dec 


1968 


873 


ROBERT BERNARD FALLENTINE 23 Aug 


1942 




Kathleen Kastrinkas 


25 Apr 


1946 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
15 Jun 1938 
23 Apr 1954 



14 Dec 1962 



497 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 

ID. No. Birth Death 



HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


4 Feb 


1844 


17 Apr 


1926 


8 


ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 


22 Dec 


1873 


15 Jun 


1938 


87 


EDITH ALICE DIXON 


2 Mar 


1 915 








Bernard Carl Fallentine 


17 Apr 


1915 






873 


ROBERT BERNARD FALLENTINE 23 Aug 


1942 








t\ *^ «M A- ^ \ A/ H ^ 

rvniiette vv , jDean 


1 Q A n rr 


1947 






8731 




^A Till 

1 ^ J U.1 


1979 






874 


CTTCAT\.T TTAT T TTTVIT'T "NT TP 


o Uec 


1 944 








David R. Flatberg 


1 Dec 


1946 






8741 


JENNY FLATBERG 


14 May 


1976 






875 


MICHAEL DIXON FALLENTINE 


3 Jul 


1961 






HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Mary A: 


nn Smith 


3 Oct 


1852 


27 Jun 


1907 


9 


ROBERT SMITH DIXON 


10 Nov 


1874 


18 Dec 


1874 



498 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 
As of December 3] , 1979 



ID. 


No. 






Birth 


Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 A 


M^a r 1 


o 7 c; 


4 iviay 


^ Q A 


Sarah 


a_/ C v_i X c y 


4 


F o K 1 

r e D J 


Q44 
o44 


17 A r->>- 

j ( Apr 


1 Q 9 A 
J 7 CD 


1 n 




CHART pre; OWTTTV DTVOKT 




IN V J 


O 1 9 


9 iVXcL r 


i 7^ 9 






V irginid, xLiiizaDetn xjecKSteau 


J u 


XJ e c 1 


Q C A 

O o D 


1 Q A n rr 

J 7 -^Ug 


1 Q 9 9 
\ ^ CC 


] 


] 


VA T Pr R A PlTVOKT 

V s\ 1 1 r < JTV-rt. 1^ W IN 


L J 


A n rr 1 

Aug J 


Q 1 n 

7 i U 












9 "? 




Q 1 n 

7 i U 






1 


J X 


DTyOlM TTARRTPT T R TR TTP 
i-* l-'i- WiN i: Yt. JA x\ ill Xj l_i xxixxiilj 




■tr\. p X i 


7 J D 










ivionta iviae jviorris 


1 9 


ivxay i 


Q "^7 
7 J f 








1 1 1 

J i J 


C T' TT "Pt-T TTM PlTVOM RTRTTT 


C. 


Aug J 


Q 7 
79 f 






■J u . 


1 1 ? 




1 9 


-fA. pr i 


Q A n 








1 1 

i J J 


C;w A R T RTRTTT 


1 

J o 


Till 1 
JUL J 


Q A^i 
7 D 9 








J J rr 


c;TJTr T T V RTRTTT 


9 A 


xvxd. y J 


Q A ft 

7D 










CiPOTT T^AVTT^ RTRTTT 

<D\-jKJ X X LJ Jr\. V LlJ X\1x\XJCj 


9 Q 


ivxcL y 1 


Q7 1 
7 ' J 






1 n 


1 2 


RTCHART^ OWTTM RTRTF 

X\ i. rX X\ X-/ VV XljiN X\XX\XJ-j 




IN vj V 1 


Q 3 Q 

7 -> 7 










j-zcLx r d int; rxurripri rie b 


9 c; 


A t; u J 


Q4ft 
7 1 






1 


1 21 


T ANF A T R TR TF 




iVXci X J 


7 D 7 








1 72 


RRTTTNTT RTPRARH RTRTF 

J~>X\X1jLN X Xv 1 ilxVX\i-V X\XX\XX_i 


1 Q 
-1 C5 




Q7 1 

7 1 X 






1 n 


1 2 3 


MARK OWFN RTRTF" 

IViX^ X\ VV JLi IN X\ XX\ XXI* 


1 4 
J rr 


A n CT 1 


Q7 3 
7 1 J 






1 n 


1 24 


TARTTTvf ROYD RTRTF 
J x\ xzj xvx xj X -L-' x\ x x\ x x_j 


O 
O 


Or f 1 


Q75 
7 1 J 






1 


1 2^ 


TAYT.OR MARTIN RTRTF 

X Xi. X J_iV^X\ IVi-Ti-iA X XIN X\XX\XX_J 


1 Q 

■1 7 


T a 1 


7 < 








1 2f^ 


MARTAT-T RTRTF 

iVXx^XvXx^XX XvXXvXXlj 


2 1 


An cr 1 


P7Q 
7 ' 7 






1 n 


J ^ 


r'RATPr MARTTN RTRTF 

V>>X\X^XV_J XVXjrVXv X liN XxXXxXXLv 


1 7 


A r\-r 1 


Q4 3 

7'T J 










xjaroara vvarrene xempie 


A 


A n cr 1 
/\Ug J 


Q43 






1 n 


J J J 


T^ATriF T^TATvTF RTRTF 
r^±\L\JSLi LJ jIj X\xr\.XXLi 


/I 


-£1. p X i 


QA7 

7 U 1 






1 
i u . 


1 "^2 


CTTTH crnr TTTDUXTM RTRTF 
JXLd X xx O X XLiX^rXxLiiN x\Xx\Xx1j 


c 
D 


Or f 1 


Q7n 

7 f u 








J J _) 


TT-TFROKT T<rFTTT-T RTRTF 
X n jCj x\ v_/iN iVcj X X rx x\xx\xxii 


jU 


IN U V J 


Q7 1 
7 1 ^ 






-1 u . 


-1 J rr 


TiTFKrr^AT T ROr^HFT T RTRTF 

XVXlj IN i-J -f\ X_; X_j Jl\ w rXXL; X^ X_i X\ IXvlX-j 


1 Q 


Tnl 1 

J VX L i 


Q74 

7 ( rt 








1 4 
i rr 


AN"MFTTF RTRTF 

^iNiNxl(X X xLi XxXxxXXLi 


1 7 


A n CT 1 
i^Ug J 


Q4^ 










xvonaLu iviorris xurner 


97 


Ana 1 


Q42 

7" ^ 








1 41 


RORFRT MORRIS TTTRNFR 

x\ V-y X-) x\ X xvxv— ' x\ x\ x^-? x w xv i n j_j x\ 


2 


1 1 in 1 
J IXLJL J 


7 U J 






1 


1 d? 

X '-I L, 


RFFD MARTTN TTTRNFR 

r\ Pi f I J iVXZ^ X\ X XlN X v.JX\iNX!jX\ 


9C 


Tnn 1 


967 






1 n 




RYAN MTPT^AFT TTTRNFT? 

X\ 1 JA.iN XViX XX^TtXLi i-j X U x\ IN SLi X\ 


2Q 


Anr 1 


969 

7 <j 7 






1 n 


1 44 


Ru-pXT MARSHATT, TURNER 

X\XXJ_j X X ,t V 1 / V r\ L J 1 1 / V i j I J i k-'X\iNXjX\. 


24 


M^a r ] 


972 






1 


1 4^ 


RICK MATHEW TURNER 


1 n 


Feb 1 


979 






J u . 


J D 


TCFTMT FTYRTTM RTRTF 
xvxLiiN X n. X x\ u ivx xaxxxxxl/ 


24 


Mar ] 


952 










xviargaret vaieer joLiey 


1 6 


Tnl 1 


954 






1 u . 


1 D J 


\T \ T tr T3 TIT T?Tt3TIT 


J u 


IN U V J 


97 1 






1 n 
i u , 


J D <!. 


A T^ A TV/T KF1\TT RTRTF 
J\yJr\sS/L xVCj IN X X\Xx\Xxli 


9 7 


Ann 1 

Aug J 


Q74 
7 < 4 








2 


RTTRV T^TVOKT 
x\ U xj X XJXy\wi\ 


9 A 

CO 


Tnl 1 

J IX L J 


91 2 

7 i c 










Angus Wayne Cowley 


2 Q 
Cy 


Tnl 1 

U l_X L i 


9 1 n 

7 J w 


9 A CTo 

^ D oe p 


1 Q An 

i 7 DU 


10. 


21 


WAYNE DIXON COWLEY 


^ 4 


Oct 1 


938 










Norma Jean Hadley 


30 


Mar 1 


946 






10. 


211 


WENDY COWLEY 


15 


Jan '. 


969 






10. 


212 


ROBIN COWLEY 


22 


May 1 


972 






10. 


213 


SUSAN COWLEY 


17 


May ] 


977 







499 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 

ID. No. Birth Death 

10.2 RUBY DIXON 26 Jul 1912 

Angus Wayne Cowley 29 Jul 1910 26 Sep I960 

10.22 SHIRL CURTIS COWLEY 18 Dec 1941 

Cheryl Janeene Tueller 30 Oct 1946 

10.221 SHERI LYN COWLEY 10 Oct 1971 

10.222 CORBIN TYLER COWLEY 15 Mar 1975 

10.223 WHITNEY ANNE COWLEY 26 Sep 1976 

10.3 STELLA DIXON 26 Jun 1915 
Frederick Wesley Lewis 6 Jul 1915 

10.31 FREDERICK DIXON LEWIS 1 Apr 1947 
Patty Kay Stott 19 Nov 1946 

10.311 JASON FREDERICK LEWIS 17 Feb 1970 

10.312 KERRY BRADFORD LEWIS 20 Jul 1971 

10.313 RACHEL LEWIS 29 Sep 1972 

10.314 ERIN LEWIS 24 May 1974 

10.315 JOSHUA DAVID LEWIS 12 Jun 1976 

10.316 JESSICA LEWIS 25 Nov 1978 

10.32 JOHN STEPHEN LEWIS 1 1 Oct 1949 

10.33 LYNN ANN LEWIS 23 Mar 1952 
Kenneth E. Dahlberg, Jr. 12 Apr 1952 

10.331 WAYNE KENNETH DAHLBERG 2 Oct 1977 

10.34 SANDRA LEE LEWIS 23 Jul 1954 

10.4 ALICE DELENNA DIXON 18 Nov 1917 
Robert Bruce Andrews 19 Jul 1917 

10.41 CHARLENE ANDREWS 15 Apr 1949 
Michael G. Peppinger 3 Apr 1950 

10.411 JOHN ROBERT PEPPINGER 6 May 1975 

10.42 ROBERT DALE ANDREWS 6 Jun 1950 
Jeanne Katherine Truxal 10 Oct 1954 

10.43 DIXIE LEE ANDREWS 8 Apr 1952 
Donald Edward Paden 

10.431 PETER JAMES PADEN 17 Feb 1972 20 Sep 1973 

10.432 HOPE ELIZABETH PADEN 3 Aug 1973 

10.433 MARK CHRISTOPHER PADEN 30 Oct 1974 

10.434 TIFFANY ANN PADEN 10 Nov 1978 

10.44 JOSEPH DIXON ANDREWS 1 3 Nov 1954 

10.5 OWEN GEORGE DIXON 28 Mar 1920 
Florence Janeczko 13 May 1924 

10.51 LARRY OWEN DIXON 12 Sep 1946 
Shirley Ann Orpen 

10.511 TRAVIS OWEN DIXON 10 Sep 1973 

10.512 GREGORY CHARLES DIXON 17 Oct 1975 

10.52 KEVIN CHARLES DIXON 30 Aug 1948 



500 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID 


No 






ij irtn 






D 


VTPftTTVTTA "niVT^KT 
V ix\>JiiNi./\. DLJ\\JV^ 


4 


J un 1 


mo 






-t^ercy jomi ocniigK 


1 Q 


J 3.n 1 


'ici 


10 


61 


DENNIS CHART.FS SCHTTPiK 


^ 7 


Se p 1 


y'r 






Sh aT on Ki 1 1 1* i r k 


23 


Ana 1 


Q4R 


1 


6 1 1 


BABY SCHTinK 








1 


612 


w-/ X Hj JC -tx IN J.XL< O v_y XX LJ V.J XV 


1 ? 

i ^ 




Q7 n 
7 f U 


1 


613 


TOWN FDWARn ^rWTTnK TT 




ivxay J 


Q7 9 






Fl 1 "T-n h*afVt Hall Rotfic 


o 
o 


iVicLy J 


7T-0 


10. 


614 


STEPHANIE ANN SCHTIGK 




A r\y 1 
XI p X J 


QAR 

7 O o 


1 


6 1 5 


KRISTY LYNN SCHITGK 

X VX\ Xk^ X X J— J X X N X N \^ X X \J \-J L\. 


24 


.tv p X J 


Q7n 


1 


616 


DAVID CHARLES SCHTIGK 


1 3 

X -J 


X-/ C J 


7 f D 


1 


617 


RICHARD AI,ERED SCHITCK 

X\ X ' X Xx^ XxX-/ Jr\. X^JL X\ Xlj 1-^ \J V-> X^. w V-J Xv 


1 3 

X O 


Dfa 1 

x^c c J 


7 f 3 


1 n 


62 


STT7FTTF SCHTTCK 

\J \J Z-i JZj Jl X IZ-i O LX KJ V_J XV 


J X 


Tan 1 


7^0 








Q 


WC L J 


7rr'± 


1 n 
1 u . 




xxWJDJIjJa 1 J wriiN jDWVV XjSLiO 


1 A 

I D 


Jan ] 


Q A C 
7DO 


1 n 
■I u . 


D ^ C 




c 
D 


ivxa r i 


Q7n 

7 1 U 




O ^ J 


J xiN Hj X X Jl/ xj w vv 1 J r lO 


1 A 


WC L J 


Q7? 
7 ' 


1 


624 


HEATHER BOWLES 

X xx_./Xa. X X xxii xrv xj vv j_^x-/i^ 


1 5 

X ^ 


Ort 1 


Q74 

7 ( *r 




D £-3 




o 



Tnl 1 
J Ui J 


Q7 A 
7 ( O 


1 n 


626 

D D 


VATTCWM TAY ROWT TTQ 




x" e D J 


Q7ft 
7 ' 


1 n 


6 


NANCY SCHUGK 


16 


Jul 1 


73 U 






Ron Lynn Mendenhall 


26 


May 1 


7^7 


1 fi 
i u . 


6 1 


TROY LYNN MENDENHALL 


3 


Jun ] 


QAR 
7D0 




D J c. 


ROCHELLE MENDENHALL 


5 


Jun ] 


Q7n 


1 u . 


D J J 


PAUL BRANDON MENDENHALL 21 Sep 1 


Q7 1 
7 1 i 


10. 


634 


MONICA MENDENHALL 


7 


Oct 1 


975 


10. 


635 


JEROMY RON BENDENHALL 


13 


Jul 1 


979 


10. 


64 


JUDY SCHUGK 


27 Apr 1 


953 


10. 


65 


SONJIA SCHUGK 


19 Dec 1 


960 



501 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



. D. No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 

X rr xvxct X 


X O -J 


4 


May 


1 8 84 

X 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 Oct 


1852 


27 


Jun 


1907 


1 


AT^RFRT FRFDFRICK DIXON 

ii. J-J ±Li XV X X X\ Xl* X-/ XLd X\X v_> X i. X-/ ±u\ N-/ X N 


31 Mar 

— ^ X XVXCL X 


1 R76 

X O 1 ^ 


18 Aug 


1 945 




Sena Rasmussen 


X \J V-/ \^ L 


X O O J 


16 

X \J 


^/la r 


1 944 

X 7*±'± 




HARRY ALBERT DIXON 
Cecile Clark 


4 Orf 
1 Aug 


1 Q 1 

X 7 X U 

1913 








1 1 1 


CECILE MARTORIE DIXON 

X_J Vv' X X_J XVXxXXVtJ >^X\XX_J X-/X^^Vi^XY 

"Ronalfl Taxr S m i ■f* n 

Xx^XXCL LVJ U Ci y ^XXxXLii 


1 Q Feb 

X y X \3 LJ 

7 Oct 


1 Q5 1 

X yj X 

1945 








1 111 


CORY CARNFR SMITH 

X\ X \wf X \ X N X-.> X\ XVXX XXX 


1 3 Dpr 

X —I x_/ C 


1 Q74 

X 7 f 1 








1 112 


KIP DIXON SMITH 

X^X X X^ X^^ X N XV X X XXX 




1 Q7Q 

X 7 ( 7 








1.2 


MILDRED DIXON 

T 3 TT^^ Q (^ollTI \ 7k T\ o y* T\ 
%J oi L11\Z O V> l_/.LXll XCLxX^Xdl 


1 7 Till 
1 R Anr 

X O XX. LI X 


X 7 X 

1 Ql 3 

X 7 X J 








1 2 1 


SHARON LYNN TANGREN 

T p m ^ T AX/ "TP npf* Rpvpfs 

U CL 1 X 1 w O XJCL W X C XX C J—' ^ y w X O 


21 May 
3 Mar 

^ \J XVXd X 


1945 
1 Q45 

X 7** 








1.211 


MARISSA SUZANNE BEYERS 


27 Ort 


1 Q73 

X 7 ( J 








1.212 


JOHANNA BEYERS 


3 lul 


1 975 

X 7 ( J 








1 213 


KATHERINE NORMA BEYERS 

X^X X X. XX ' ' X V X X ^ ' ^ X ^ X \ ^ V A. X X XJ ' ■* X ' * X Vli^ 


24 Aug 


1 977 

X 7 1 1 








1 . 22 


NANCY ANN TANGREN 
James Eric Ford 


31 Jan 
4 Nov 


1 947 
1 943 








1 . 221 


CIMONY ANNA FORD 


IR Oct 


1 974 

X 7 1 -I 








1 . 222 


CAMBRIC EMMA FORD 

X XXVX X-/ X V X X»J XVXXVXXX X X \ 


10 Jun 


1976 








X ^ Cm ^ 


DAVID MFNTON FORD 

x^ XX T xx-J xvx X-J X N X X ^ X x\ xy 




1 978 

X 7 ( 








1. 23 


JAMES DIXON TANGREN 


20 Mav 


] 948 

X 7"0 








J.J 


c^ TTrTON R nTyoiM 

v_/XjX-r i WIN x\ . JU'xyvv^iN 


1 T Ma r 

J. 1 XVXd. JT 


1914 


25 


Mar 


1914 

X 7 X •* 


1.4 


ELMO ARTHUR DIXON 


24 Feb 


I9I6 


1 4 


\A a r 

IVXCl X 


1917 


J- . -7 


NORMA DIXON 

T< 1 ^ r\ ^ ^ n f » ^ o o T ^ c c 

xxicnaru oranam jess 


D IVid-y 

1 1 Dec 


-I 7 X 


70 


^ A r\ 


X 7 


1 . i 


■R A R R A R A ANN TTT'CIc: 


30 S#»nf 


19^3 










RICHARD STFVFN TFSS 


1 o i->e pr 


1 7 -> 








1 6 


VERA DIXON 

V X_J X\XX X-/ X^^ X >i 

Dean Albert Anderson 


Ci Ci X c u 


1 970 

X 7 ^ 


1 1 


Apr 


1 9'i8 
X 7 


1.61 


CAROL LESLIE ANDERSON 
William E. Hipp 


?R Tan 
C^O J dxX 


1 947 








1.611 


DANIEL EDWARD HIPP 


22 Jan 


1970 








1.612 


ROBERT DEAN HIPP 


3 Jan 


1972 








1.62 


MICHAEL ALBERT ANDERSON 


23 Jun 


1949 








1.7 


RUTH DIXON 


23 Jan 


1922 


21 


Mar 


1923 


1.8 


BABY DIXON 


22 May 


1924 


22 May 


1924 



502 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



I.D. No. 






Birth 




HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 


Oct 1 


852 


1 1 . 




3 1 


Mar 1 


876 




oena Kasmussen 


1 6 


Oct J 


885 


1 J . 9 


JVLiljljViiN K. DiAvJiN 


22 


Oct 1 


925 




Carol Collard 


21 


Oct 1 


926 


11 n 1 


J-diNUA ixAY DiAvJiN 


30 


Jiin 1 


948 




Francesco Mariotti 


15 


Sep 1 


941 


11 Oil 


C: A U A U V A T "IT TV A A 15 T/^ T" 


1 6 


Mar ] 


975 


11 Q 1 9 


ATv/TAMnA TATvATTT 'N/T A R TOTTT 
r^iVi/\XNUA J r\lViiJlj IViiiLXxiW 1 J. J. 


25 


A 1 

Aug 1 


976 


1 1 


QTTQATVT "nTVOTJ 
OUoAiN UiAi^iN 


19 


Oct 1 


949 




Kenneth Brent Adams 


5 


Aug J 


950 


11 Q "7 1 


xS-JLiNiNxL. i rl JJiAwiN AUAJVliD 


o 1 

3 1 


Dec 


r> "7 c 


11. 922 


LAURA ANN ADAMS 


4 


Jun 1 


.977 


11.93 


DEBORAH DIXON 


8 


Aug ] 


952 


11 . 94 


DAVID HARRY DIXON 


10 


Mar J 


959 




Bonnie Kay Howell 


23 


Sep 


1959 


11.941 


JENNIFER KAY DIXON 


13 


Jul ] 


[977 


11.95 


AMY LYNNE DIXON 


2 


Dec ] 


I960 


11.96 


EMILY ANN DIXON 


6 


Oct ] 


L969 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
18 Aug 1945 
16 Mar 1944 



503 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1979 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1 884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 Feb 1 


844 


"1 ^ A 

1 7 Apr 


1926 


12 


WALTER DEGREY DIXUN 


15 Nov 1 


877 


26 Nov 


1 921 




T t\ ' / T — " \ TV yT— • 1 

LiUthenia (JLouie) Maiben 


30 Jan 1 


878 


19 Apr 


1 964 


12.] 


RHEA LUTHENIA DIXUN 


21 Aug 1 


901 








renton W . Reeve 


29 Aug 1 


899 


i bep 


1 976 


1 Z . J J 


■DTTT'T-T ID XT' TT" T /■ TT" 
KUiH RiLiiLVil, 


27 Jun ] 


929 








Howard D. Lowe 


1 1 Apr 1 


923 






1 O 111 

i c. 111 


x\EVilN HvJWAKU LikJW sL, 


23 Mar 1 


953 








Shauna Renee Johnson 


2 Mar 1 


953 






1 c., J J J J 


TTTT TIT ■DTTIMTTIT T OAAA TT 


21 Jan ] 


976 










16 Feb 1 


978 






^ o 1 1 "5 
1 c, lie 


T VTvT'Pi A A l\TTvT T OlAr IT 


30 Mar 1 


955 








J-Javiu ^wTary weaver 


11 Oct 1 


956 






1 O 1 1 O 1 

1 C. J 1 £ 1 


rMTCT^TTM T^AArTT^ ■\A7' XT' A ■\7' TT" D 

UUoiiiN UA V iU WxL.AV±L,K 


29 Aug 1 


979 






1 C. 115 


T> A ArTT^ TOP 'HAM T OAAfTT 


20 Feb 1 


957 






1 O 11/1 


KEN 1 UN ALAN LUWE 


10 May 1 


959 






12. 115 


TV >r A n fj^ T\ T T/^ TACT /~\'\\T TP 

MARK DUUGLAb LUWE 


22 Jul 1 


963 






12.2 


FRED WALTER DIXON 


30 Jul 1 


904 








Helen Chipman 


21 Sep ] 


902 






12,21 


MARY LOU DIXUN 


16 May 1 


924 








i loyd R . Taylor 


24 Apr 1 


918 






12.211 


COLLEEN TAYLOR 


1 2 Apr 1 


950 








isteven Ihomas Densley 


21 Feb 1 


947 






12.2111 


STEVEN TRAVIS DENSLEY 


16 Feb 1 


970 






1 *^ Olio 

12.2112 


riirANY LYNN DENbLEY 


2 Oct 1 


971 






TO Olio 

12.2113 


LONDON THOMAS DENSLEY 


12 Apr 1 


974 






1 O O 1 1 il 

12.2114 


MARIANNE DENSLEY 


28 Nov 1 


975 






12. 2115 


WENDY DENSLEY 


29 Jun 1 


977 






12. 2116 


LOGAN TAYLOR DENbLEY 


17 Apr 1 


979 






1 O O 1 o 

12. 212 


DOUGLAS DIXON TAYLOR 


6 Apr 1 


953 








Lori Dunford 


10 May 1 


955 






12. 2121 


CORI LYNN TAYLOR 


26 Feb 1 


973 






1 O O 1 o o 

12. 21 Z2 


STAGEY LEE TAYLOR 


3 Sep 1 


975 








RICHARD FLOYD TAYLOR 


23 Nov 1 


954 








Diane Taylor 


1 2 Aug 1 


956 






1 "5 "5 1 "J 1 

1 c.. cl 5 1 


SCOTT RICHARDSON TAYLOR 20 Mar 1 


978 






i £ . C. I D C 


LESLIE ANN TAYLOR 


6 Oct 1 


979 






12. 214 


JULIE ANN TAYLOR 


24 Jan 


956 








Travis Moosman 


17 Apr 1 


956 






12. 2141 


RYAN TRAVIS MOOSMAN 


15 May 1 


976 






12. 2142 


ERIC TAYLOR MOOSMAN 


6 Jan 


978 






12. 2143 


MELISSA ANN MOOSMAN 


24 Mar 1 


980 






12. 215 


LISA JEANNE TAYLOR 


11 Aug ] 


L959 







504 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 



As of December 3], 

ID No. 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Sarah DeGrey 
12. WALTER DEGREY DIXON 

Luthenia (Louie) Maiben 

12.22 FRED CHIPMAN DIXON 
Patricia Donahue 

12. 221 MICHELLE JO DIXON 

Ma the w Gregg 
12. 222 CYNTHIA SUE DIXON 

Richard F. Gibbs 
12.223 LISA KAY DIXON 

12. 224 JULIE ANNE DIXON 

12.23 RICHARD DIXON 
Deanne Peterson 

12.231 BRENDA DIXON 
Dal Hills 

12.232 MICHAEL DIXON 

12. 233 DANIEL PETERSON DIXON 

12.23 RICHARD DIXON 
Judy Williams 

12.24 DAVID CHIPMAN DIXON 
Patricia Stewart 

12.241 AUDRA DIXON 

12.242 ASHLEY DIXON 

12.243 DAVID CHIPMAN DIXON, Jr. 
12.3 DONALD MAIBEN DIXON 

Lettie Vilate Romney 
12. 31 DIANE DIXON 

John Henry Tempest III 
12.311 TERRI LYNN TEMPEST 

Brooke S. Williams 
12. 312 STEPHEN DIXON TEMPEST 

12.313 DANIEL DIXON TEMPEST 

12. 314 WILLIAM HENRY TEMPEST 

12. 32 DONALD ROMNEY DIXON 

Diane Scott 
12.321 DEBBIE DIXON 

12. 322 SCOTT DIXON 

12.323 MICHELLE DIXON 

12.324 SEAN R. DIXON 

12.325 KERRY E. DIXON 
12.33 ALAN ROMNEY DIXON 



1979 

Birth 

14 Mar 
4 Feb 

15 Nov 
30 Jan 
18 Jun 

21 Sep 

11 Apr 

4 Oct 
13 May 

25 Feb 
2 Jul 

5 Dec 
28 Apr 
13 Nov 

2 Jun 
18 Aug 

16 Jan 

5 Oct 
28 Apr 

9 Apr 
20 Oct 

27 Nov 
18 Aug 

22 Jul 
20 Sep 

12 Mar 
12 Jul 

7 Mar 

26 Jul 

8 Sep 

26 Apr 

24 Dec 
18 Feb 

1 Jul 
18 Nov 

4 Jun 

6 Feb 
1 2 Jan 

28 Oct 

5 May 

25 Nov 

27 Jan 



1835 
1844 
1877 
1878 
1932 
1935 
1958 
1957 
I960 
1958 
1961 
1967 
1936 
1938 
I960 
1958 
1963 
1969 
1936 
1945 
1944 
1943 
1972 
1975 
1977 
1907 
1909 
1932 
1933 
1955 
1952 
1957 
1962 
1966 
1936 
1939 
I960 
1962 
1966 
1970 
1974 
1945 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
26 Nov 1921 
19 Apr 1964 



18 Apr 1973 



505 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1979 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1 926 


12. 


WALTER DEGREY DIXON 


15 Nov 1 


877 


26 Nov 


1 921 




Luthenia (Louie) Maiben 


30 Jan 1 


878 


1 9 Apr 


1 964 


12.4 


EDNA DIXON 


25 Oct 1 


911 








Mark Squire Ballif 


7 Nov 1 


906 






12. 41 


MARK DIXON BALLIF 


18 Jun 1 


932 








Kay Anderson 


23 Apr 1 


937 






12.411 


MICHAEL EDWARD BALLIF 


5 May 1 


95 3 








Linda Marie Towers 


16 Apr 1 


954 






12.4111 


CHELSEA BALLIF 


1 3 Dec 1 


979 






12.412 


MARK GORDON BALLIF 


4 Jan ] 


955 








Carolee Christensen 


1 Mar 1 


955 






12.4121 


BRITTANY KAY BALLIF 


3 Apr 1 


978 






12.413 


JAN BALLIF 


22 Jan ] 


963 






12.42 


BARBARA BALLIF 


10 Nov 1 


933 








Kenneth Olson 


23 Mar 1 


930 






1 2. 421 


DAVID KENNETH OLSON WADE19 Oct 1 


961 








ijynne n.arris 


J ivia r J 


963 






1 O /toil 


xS-Kib 1 AJ-i Y IN WADE 


1 D J an J 


980 






J 2. 422 


PAMELA OLSON WADE 


10 Apr 1 


964 






J 2. 42 


BARBARA BALLIF 


10 Nov 1 


933 








Blaine Wade 


4 Feb 1 


921 






12. 423 


DANIEL GEORGE WADE 


15 Jun 1 


970 








SCOTT WALTER BALLIF 


9 Dec 1 


935 








Sherma Nancy Craven 


30 May 1 


936 






12.431 


BECKY JEAN BALLIF 


29 Mar 1 


958 








Vern J. Garner 


12 Feb 1 


953 






12.4311 


SHANE VERN GARNER 


8 Jul 1 


978 






12. 432 


BRIAN SCOTT BALLIF 


26 Jan 1 


961 






12.433 


DEBRA ANN BALLIF 


7 Apr 1 


963 






12. 434 


BRYCE DIXON BALLIF 


23 Dec 1 


965 






12.5 


AMY LAVERN DIXON 


2 Jul 1 


915 








Doyle R. Larson 


9 May 1 


91 3 


1 9 Nov 


1 978 


12.51 


LARRY O NEAL LARSON 


5 Jan 


949 








Anne Breinholt 


1 Oct 1 


945 






12. 511 


SUZANNE LARSON 


19 Sep 1 


974 






12. 512 


STACY JEAN LARSON 


29 Aug 1 


977 






12. 513 


BARRY O NEAL LARSON 


22 Apr 1 


979 






12. 52 


MICHAEL DIXON LARSON 


18 May 1 


[954 








Kathy West 


13 Oct ] 


958 






12. 521 


RYAN MICHAEL LARSON 


10 Mar ] 


979 







506 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



ID No. 
HENRY 
Mary A 

13. 

13. 1 
13. 11 

13. 1 11 

13. Ill 1 
13. 1112 
13. 1113 
13. 11 14 
13. 1115 
13. 1116 
13. 1117 
13. 112 

13. 1121 
13. 1122 
13. 1123 
13. 1124 
13. 1125 
13. 113 

13. 1131 
13. 1132 
13. 1133 
13. 114 

13. 1141 
13. 115 
13. 12 

13. 121 

13. 121 1 
13. 122 

13. 1221 
13. 1222 

13. 121 2 



ALDOUS DIXON 
nn Smith 
PARLEY SMITH DIXON 
Mary Etola Dangerfield 
VERNON LEE DIXON 
Loleta Wiscomb 
LOIS DIXON 
Junius Harold McEwan 
LYNDA MCEWAN 
Eldon Ray Morgan 
TERI LYN MORGAN 
ELDON RAY MORGAN 
LISA LA DAWN MORGAN 
CHERYL LEE MORGAN 
ROBERT ADAM MORGAN 
ALLISON KAY MORGAN 
AMBER JOY MORGAN 
JAMES HAROLD MCEWAN 
Dorcus Rita Fowers 
SANDRA LEE MC EWAN 
TAMARA LYN MC EWAN 
MELISSA ANN MC EWAN 
CYNTHIA KAY MC EWAN 
RICHARD JAMES MC EWAN 
ALAN DIXON MC EWAN 
Debra Lynn Cook 
CHRISTINA MC EWAN 
ALAN DIXON MC EWAN, Jr. 
AMANDA KAY MC EWAN 
DAVID VERNON MC EWAN 
Mary Ann Warner 

ANDREA LYN MC EWAN 
GLEN RICHARD NC EWAN 
VERN LEE DIXON 
Margaret Anne Simpson 
LEE ANN DIXON 
Thijmas Robert Rowley 

ROBERT LEE ROWLEY 
PAULINE DIXON 
Donald Dale Linderman 
REBECCA LINDERMAN 
RANDY LINDERMAN 

MARIE ROWLEY 



Birth 
14 Mar 
3 Oct 
9 Jun 

18 Sep 

22 May 

12 Jun 

25 Aug 
14 Aug 

14 Aug 
11 Jan 
28 Oct 

13 Dec 

11 Jul 

7 Oct 

24 Feb 

26 Apr 

26 Apr 

8 Apr 

25 Jul 
24 Apr 
24 Apr 

27 Nov 

5 Sep 

12 Dec 

16 Oct 

15 Jan 
10 Jun 
21 Aug 

17 May 

19 Dec 

6 Sep 
24 Jul 
10 Apr 

8 Apr 

26 May 
24 Aug 

23 Jun 
15 Apr 

5 Jan 



11 


Dec 


1973 


22 


Mar 


1975 


26 


Nov 


1978 



835 
852 
878 
877 
904 
905 
924 
924 
945 
944 
966 
967 
970 
974 
976 
979 
979 
948 
949 
971 
971 
973 
975 
978 
951 
955 
975 
976 
978 
954 
956 
978 
960 
929 
924 
952 
953 
975 
954 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
30 Jan 1947 
27 May 1952 



10 Jun 1975 



1976 



507 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 







As of December 31, 


1979 




ID 


No. 




Birth 




HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


Mary A 


nn Smith 


3 Oct 1 


852 


13. 




PARLEY SMITH DIXON 


9 Jun 1 


878 






Mary Etola Dangerfield 


18 Sep 1 


877 


13. 


122 


PAULINE DIXON 


5 Jan ] 


954 






Thomas C. Wilder 


23 Nov ] 


957 


13. 


1223 


CONNIE WILDER 


6 Jan ] 


978 


13. 


123 


SUZANE DIXON 


24 Aug 1 


955 






Don Wayne Pulsipher 


18 Dec 1 


951 


13. 


1231 


SHANTEL PULSIPHER 


16 Jan ] 


974 


13. 


1232 


KERRY LEE PULSIPHER 


31 Oct 1 


975 


13. 


1233 


MANDY RAE PULSIPHER 


6 Nov 1 


977 


13. 


124 


SHERLINE DIXON 


3 Mar 1 


957 






Jerry Leon Mitchell 


21 Oct ] 


954 


13. 


1241 


WENDY SUE MITCHELL 


12 May 1 


975 


13. 


1242 


JANIE LYN MITCHELL 


24 Mar 1 


977 


13. 


13 


CARL WILLIAM DIXON 


21 May 1 


935 






Gloria Ann Evans 


14 May 1 


937 


13. 


131 


DIANA LYNN DIXON 


31 Oct 1 


959 


13. 


132 


TERESSE KAY DIXON 


1 3 Jun 1 


961 


13. 


133 


CARL VERN DIXON 


30 Aug 1 


962 


13. 


13 


CARL WILLIAM DIXON 


21 May 1 


935 






Cleone Rappley Thurber 


8 Oct 1 


934 


13. 


2 


AFTON DIXON 


20 Nov 1 


906 






Dermont W. Wagstaff 


19 Jan 1 


905 


13. 


21 


DONNA MAE WAGSTAFF 


28 Sep 1 


928 






Jerald Russell Olson 


6 Sep ] 


928 


13. 


21 1 


DAVID RUSSELL OLSON 


21 Nov 1 


949 






Judy Mortenson 


10 Aug ] 


951 


13. 


21 1 1 


DANE RUSSELL OLSON 


16 Mar 1 


972 


13. 


2112 


TRINDA LYNN OLSON 


25 Aug 1 


974 


1 3. 


21 1 3 


MANDY SUE OLSON 


16 Feb 1 


976 


13. 


2114 


TRAVIS PAUL OLSON 


12 Dec 1 


978 


13. 


212 


SHELLY OLSON 


19 Nov 1 


951 






Gaylen Mel Buckley 


29 Jun ] 


952 


13. 


2121 


MAYKEN DOT BUCKLEY 


29 Aug 1 


974 


13. 


2122 


KIRSTEN MAE BUCKLEY 


12 May 1 


976 


13. 


2123 


TREVOR RUSKEN BUCKLEY 


8 Sep 1 


978 


13. 


213 


STEVEN CRAIG OLSON 


20 Dec 1 


953 






Jan Hogan 


3 Aug ] 


1953 


13. 


2131 


ADAM HOGAN OLSON 


9 Dec 1 


975 


13. 2132 


KIRK RUSSELL OLSON 


30 Aug ] 


I960 


13. 


214 


CORY MONT OLSON 


30 Nov 1 


957 






Karen Dee Green 


12 Apr ] 


962 


13. 


215 


KURT DIXON OLSON 


30 Aug 1 


960 


13. 


216 


DENISE OLSON 


26 Sep ] 


963 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
30 Jan 1947 
27 May 195 2 



26 Apr 1979 



508 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 



As of December 31, 



1979 

ID No. Birth 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 14 Mar 1835 

Mary Ann Smith 3 Oct 185 2 

13. PARLEY SMITH DIXON 9 Jun 1878 

Mary Etola Dangerfield 18 Sep 1877 

13.22 NORMA JEAN WAGSTAFF 1 8 Aug 1932 
Jay Lorus Johnson 14 Aug 1933 

13.221 LORI JOHNSON 21 Nov 1954 

13.222 JAY LADD JOHNSON 25 Dec 1955 
Tammy Jones Sutton 8 Jul 1958 

13.2221 JAY LEMAR JOHNSON 1 3 Jun 1978 

13.223 JERRY DIXON JOHNSON 2 Feb 1957 
Sandra Jean Linford 14 Mar 1957 

13.224 LISA JOHNSON 28 Jul 1963 

13.225 JEFFRY WARREN JOHNSON 24 Feb 1965 

13.23 GARY MONT WAGSTAFF 5 Dec 1940 
Jolene Robb 22 Mar 1941 

13.231 CINDY RAE WAGSTAFF 10 Aug 1964 

13.232 MARK ALLEN WAGSTAFF 16 Dec 1969 

13.233 BRENDA ANN WAGSTAFF 22 Feb 1972 

13.234 STAGEY WAGSTAFF 21 Aug 1974 

13.24 KATHLEEN WAGSTAFF 16 Jan 1945 
Blaine M. Yorgason 6 Dec 1942 

13.241 TAMARA LYNN YORGASON 20 Jan 1966 

13.242 NATHAN YORGASON 26 Apr 1967 

13.243 STEVEN YORGASON 6 Apr 1968 

13.244 DAVID TRAVIS YORGASON 12 Feb 1970 

13.245 DANIEL GAYLE YORGASON 5 Nov 1972 

13.246 MICHELLE YORGASON 22 Jan 1975 

13.3 EUGENE PARL DIXON 17 Feb 1909 
Martha Bernard 27 Jan 1919 

13.31 JAMES EUGENE DIXON Dec 1945 

13.4 REED D. DIXON 19 Aug 1911 
Mary Matilda Hills 13 Jul 1910 

13.41 REED GARTH DIXON 7 Apr 1933 

Mary Jane Chattin 9 Aug 1931 

13.41 REED GARTH DIXON 7 Apr 1933 
Di Ane McDonald 4 Nov 1933 

13.411 BRL\N GARTH DIXON 1 Aug 1973 

13.412 ROBERT REED DIXON 26 Nov 1966 

13.42 MARY ANN DIXON 14 Nov 1935 
Darrel W. Olson 1 3 Apr 1931 

13.421 CHRISTINE OLSON 1 Dec I960 

13.423 ROBERT REED OLSON 19 Nov 1962 

13.424 DENISE LEONA OLSON 8 Nov 1966 

13.425 STEPHEN JEFFERY OLSON 21 Dec 1967 

13.426 VICKI OLSON 27 Jul 1970 

13.422 JAMES DARREL OLSON 5 Sep 1961 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
30 Jan 1947 
27 May 1952 



1965 



27 Jul 
6 Sep 



1970 
1961 



509 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1979 










ID No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1884 


Mary A 


an Smith 


3 Oct 1 


852 


27 


Jun 


1907 


13. 


PARLEY SMITH DIXON 


9 Jun 1 


878 


30 


Jan 


1947 




Mary Etola Dangerfield 


18 Sep 1 


877 


27 


May 


1952 


13.43 


SHERRIE LILLIE DIXON 


3 Dec 1 


941 










Richard M. Austin 


21 Jul 1 


934 








13. 431 


SHAUNA DEE AUSTIN 


13 Jul 1 


961 








13.432 


SANDRA KAY AUSTIN 


15 Feb 1 


963 








13.433 


MICHAEL REED AUSTIN 


9 Jan 1 


966 








13.434 


RICHARD SCOTT AUSTIN 


1 Jan ] 


967 








1 3. 435 


JULIE ANN AUSTIN 


23 Jul 1 


970 








13.436 


KEITH AUSTIN 


19 Feb 1 


972 








13.5 


INEZ DIXON 


20 Feb 1 


914 


27 


Dec 


1969 




Byron Leslie Denison 


4 Apr 1 


914 


21 


Se p 


1937 


13. 51 


INEZ BERNIECE DENISON 


19 Nov 1 


933 


20 


Se p 


1937 


13. 52 


ELAINE JOYCE DENISON 


12 Jan ] 


936 










La Mar R. Laws 


19 Nov 










13. 521 


CYNTHIA LAWS 


9 Oct 1 


954 










Bradley Ohran 












13. 5211 


JOSEPH SCOTT OHRAN 


26 Sep ] 


970 








13. 5212 


ANGELIA ELAINE OHRAN 


17 May 1 


972 








13. 521 


CYNTHIA LAWS 


9 Oct 1 


954 










Kenneth Boren 


19 Feb 


1955 








13. 521 3 


EMILY KAY BOREN 


15 Aug 1 


977 








13. 5214 


JOSHUA KENNETH BOREN 


11 May 1 


979 








13. 522 


MARVIN LAWS 


19 Jan 1 


955 










Carol Eileen Patterson 


Feb 


1958 








13. 5221 


DENNIS MARVIN LAWS 


31 Jan 1 


974 








13. 523 


TERRY LAWS 


13 May 1 


956 










Bruce Alvey 


2 Apr 1 


949 








13. 5231 


ANN MARIE ALVEY 


20 Jul 1 


973 








13. 5232 


ANDREW AR THUR ALVEY 


22 Sep ] 


974 








13. 5233 


DOUGLAS BYRON ALVEY 


15 Jun ] 


976 








13. 5234 


KATRINA MICHELLE ALVEY 


3 Nov 1 


979 








13. 524 


BECKY LAWS 


22 May 1 


957 










Creig B. Smith 


7 Jun 1 


953 








13. 5241 


JACKSON KAY SMITH 


26 Jul 1 


973 








13. 5242 


LUCUS ROBERT SMITH 


2 Oct 1 


974 








13. 5243 


SARAH JANE SMITH 


27 Nov 1 


975 








13. 5244 


JAKE SMITH 


19 Feb 1 


976 








13.5245 


SONJIA INEZ SMITH 


Apr 1 


978 








13. 525 


LAMAR LAWS 


9 Dec 1 


95 9 








13. 526 


LINDA LAWS 


27 Nov 1 


961 










Charles Carrol 


14 Dec 


1955 








13. 5261 


BERNIECE ELAINE CARROL 


4 May 


1977 








13. 5262 


SHAUN CARROL 


1 Nov 


1978 









510 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID No. 






Birth 




HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 


Oct 1 


852 


1 J. 


PARLEY oMliH. UlAUN 


9 


Jun 1 


878 




Mary Etola Dangerfield 


1 8 


Se p ] 


877 


1 3 . C 


TP T A TIMTT* T/^'V/~'ir 'P* CP T\T TC /^IVT 

ilji_(AiiNlli JwiUHj JJiLiN ioLJiN 


1 2 


Jan 1 


936 




Milton W. Patterson 








t 1 L 
1 3 . D 


ANNA JJiAvJN 


1 3 


Apr 1 


916 




John Byron Barrett 


23 


May 1 


919 


I 3 . D 1 


CtJ T ID T T A T/" T5 A TD D IT" T' T' 


1 3 


Dec 1 


937 




Carol Roundy 








1 /111 


JAL>lSJ.Jii rvlJVL rSAKKiL, i i 


1 6 


Dec 1 


957 




iracy Lynn Jensen 








13.6111 


RUSTY LEE BARRETT 


1 2 


Feb 1 


978 


1 3 . 6 1 1 Z 


RYAN KIM BARRETT 


7 


Jun 1 


979 


1 3. 61Z 


LEWIS KEVIN BARRETT 


27 


Dec 1 


958 


J 3 . D 1 3 


KRIoTINE BARRETT 


7 


Aug 1 


961 




uregary J. Harward 








1 "3 1 ^ 1 


lAMEKA IjY NN rlAKWAKU 


5 


Feb 1 


978 


13. D 1 3 Z 


T* A CT_T A T XT' TT" tJ A TD WT A T3 T^ 

lAoHA LEE HARWARU 


1 


Jan ] 


980 


13. D 14 


V 1l,JJA rvAi 1-iYNN J3ARRE 1 i 


17 


Jul 1 


963 


17 /Lie 

13. 615 


Tv^ A "NTT^ T T7* T TT* TT* TD A TD TD TT* 

KANUIE LEE BARREI 1 


24 


Oct 1 


964 


1 ^ ^1 
1 3 . D 1 


C TLJ" T TD T T A "XT' TD A TD TD TP T* 

oHlRL JACK BARREI i 


1 3 


Dec 1 


937 




Sandra Good 








1 3. 6Z 


"K >r T T T A TT* T TATA "VTIVT TP TD A TD TD TP HP 

MICHAEIj WAYNE BARREI i 


1 1 


Dec 1 


946 




T • J T^ T T - * 

Linda Dee Urvina 








17 W) 
1 3 . D ^ 


■N/TT/^XJ A TPT WT AVNTTP TJAT^DtPTT" 

JVLl Lyrl A JCj I-i WAiiNiL. rSAKKiLii i 


1 T 

1 1 


T~\ „ „ T 

Dec J 


946 




V icki A. 








13.62 


"X >r T T T A 1~* T 1 XT' A '\7 "NT TT* TD A T^ T^ TT* 'X' 

MICHAEL WAYNE BARRETT 


1 1 


Dec 1 


946 




Cynthia Cordon 








17 Z. O 1 

13. oZl 


T /^t-IAT X /TT /^T_I ATPT lUATDTDTP'T'T' 

J (JHN MiCrlAEL rSAKKE i i 


20 


Jul ] 


977 


13. 622 


"N H T TO C* A A TXT TvT TD A TD TD TP HP T* 

MELISSA DAWN BARREI i 




Jun ! 


979 


17 "7 

13.7 


13EKi IjILiO i EK UiAvJlN 


17 


Sep J 


918 




Virginia Oswald 








17 "7 1 

13.71 


TDAT'TDT/^TA r~»T"VOT\T 

IrAiKiUiA JJiAvJiN 






939 


17 7 
13. ^ 


■RTPP'T TTrc:'TTrP FlTVOM 
xjJliX\.l 1 1 r . 1 v.Ts. iJi.J^\JV\ 


1 '1 

17 


oep 


918 




rieien Andeiino 


1 U 


May ] 


QIC 


17 "7 

13.72 


1 rH^iVlAo AIN i rHJiN x JJiAwiN 


O T 

3 1 


J an J 


947 


13. 73 


ROBERT TIMOTHY DlAON 


1 3 


Mar J 


[ 950 




Mary DeGruchy 








13. 731 


PHAEDRA DIXON 


1 2 


Oct J 


[973 


13.74 


JUDY DIXON 


25 


May ] 


954 




Robert Daniel Baker 








13. 741 


ANDREW JAYSON BAKER 


23 


Apr ] 


1977 


13.742 


DANIEL JOSEPH BAKER 


20 


Dec ] 


979 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
30 Jan 1947 
27 May 1952 



511 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID. No. 






Birth 




Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 


Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1926 


14. 


LE ROY DIXON 


16 


Oct 1 


881 


28 Dec 


1926 




Electa LaPrele Smoot 


25 


Sep 1 


883 


25 Dec 


1940 


14.1 


LEROY SMOOT DIXON 


19 


Nov 1 


904 


6 Jan 


1 905 


14, 2 


PAUL SMOOT DIXON 


17 


Apr 1 


906 


4 Dec 


1955 




Ora Anderson 


5 


Jul 1 


906 






14. 21 


PAUL SMOOT DIXON, Jr. 


25 


Feb 1 


932 






14. 22 


VIVIAN DIXON 


13 


Jun ] 


936 








Richard Llewelyn McKay 


26 


Feb 1 


929 






14. 221 


REBECCA DIXON MCKAY 


14 


Aug 1 


958 








Lance C. Larkin 


25 


Aug 1 


956 






14. 222 


CATHERINE DIXON MCKAY 


6 


Sep 1 


960 






14. 223 


CHRISTINE DIXON MCKAY 


9 


Oct 1 


962 






14. 224 


RICHARD LLEWELYN MCKAY 


2 


Oct 1 


965 






14. 225 


DAVID DIXON MCKAY 


3 


Oct 1 


973 






14. 226 


KIMBERLY DIXON MCKAY 


6 


Aug 1 


976 






14. 23 


MARGARET ELECTA DIXON 


19 


Jul 1 


945 






14. 3 


ALLIE DIXON 


15 


Apr 1 


909 








Reed Snow Gardner 


5 


Sep 1 


900 






14. 31 


JAMES DIXON GARDNER 


26 


May 1 


943 








Martha Grover 


12 


Feb 1 


943 






14. 311 


ROBERT GROVER GARDNER 


16 


May ] 


973 






14. 312 


GENEVIEVE GARDNER 


18 


Dec 1 


976 






14. 313 


THOMAS GROVER GARDNER 


20 


Aug 1 


977 






14. 314 


STEWART GROVER GARDNER 


28 


Sep ] 


978 






14.4 


SARAH VERA DIXON 


23 


Mar 1 


911 








Clyde J. Summerhays 


28 


Apr 1 


905 






14. 41 


SARAH SUMMERHAYS 


16 


Jul 1 


932 








Raymond G, Anderson 


9 


Feb ] 


926 






14. 411 


LUNETTE ANDERSON 


20 


Jul 1 


952 








Eldean Roy Engle 


25 


May ] 


953 






14. 41 1 1 


MELISSA ENGLE 


2 


May 1 


974 






14. 41 1 2 


JOSHUA ENGLE 


18 


Nov ] 


975 






14.4113 


MELANIE ENGLE 


27 


Jun ! 


977 






14. 41 14 


SPENCER CALEB ENGLE 


16 


Nov ] 


979 






14.412 


CRAIG S. ANDERSON 


19 


Oct ] 


[954 






14. 413 


CLAIR S. ANDERSON 


2 


May ! 


[95 6 








Linda Stokes 


10 


Aug ] 


1959 






14.4131 


TORI ANDERSON 


30 


Apr ] 


[979 






14.414 


BRIAN S. ANDERSON 


26 


Sep ] 


[957 








Karen Amato Beveridge 


13 


Mar 1 


[952 






14.4141 


SHANE RAYMOND ANDERSON 16 Apr ] 


1977 






14.4142 


TIARA LYNN ANDERSON 


16 


Dec ] 


[978 








Brian Beveridge 


18 


Jun 


1970 







512 



ID. No. 
14.4 

14.41 

14.415 

14.4151 

14.416 

14.417 

14.418 

14.419 

14.41. 10 

14.41. 11 

14.41. 12 

14.42 

14.43 

14.44 

14.441 

14.442 
14.443 
14.444 
14.45 

14.451 
14.452 
14.453 
14.454 
14.455 
14.5 

14.51 

14. 511 
14. 512 
14. 513 
14. 514 
14.52 

14.521 
14.522 
14.523 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 

Birth 



Death 



SARAH VERA DIXON 
Clyde J. Summerhays 
SARAH SUMMERHAYS 
Raymond G. Anderson 
COLLEEN ANDERSON 
Reed Chester Stokes 
TYLER A. STOKES 



23 Mar 
28 Apr 
16 Jul 
9 Feb 
2 Apr 
6 Apr 
22 Aug 



CLYDE SUMMERHAYS ANDERSON 28 Ap 
JANAE ANDERSON 22 Jul 

CATHERINE ANDERSON 2 Aug 

CAROLINE ANDERSON 28 Mar 

BRUCE SUMMERHAYS ANDERSON 30 Au 
DAVID SUMMERHAYS ANDERSON 7 Oc 
SARA ANDERSON 1 1 Jul 

CLYDE DIXON SUMMERHAYS 20 Jun 
DIANA SUMMERHAYS 1 3 Sep 

Daniel Watkins Graham 28 Mar 

MICHAEL DIXON SUMMERHAYS 15 Aug 
Janice Gayle Allen I Mar 

MICHAEL ALLEN SUMMERHAYS 18 Jul 
CANDICE SUMMERHAYS 28 Jul 

ERIC ALLEN SUMMERHAYS 14 Jan 
BETHANY ANN SUMMERHAYS 15 Apr 
SANDRA SUMMERHAYS 28 May 

Frank Lee Pitcher 25 Mar 

ALLISON PITCHER 15 May 

FRANK SUMMERHAYS PITCHER 15 Aug 
MARIANNE PITCHER 31 Jan 

EMILEE PITCHER 27 Sep 

MICHAEL SUMMERHAYS PITCHER 14 Ju 
MAURINE DIXON 7 Oct 

Myron DeVere Childs 20 Aug 

ANN CHILDS 29 Jan 

Grant Lanny Daybell 19 Jan 

KEITH GRANT DAYBELL 20 Dec 

JESSE GLEN DAYBELL 4 May 

RICHARD MYRON DAYBELL 23 May 
KATHERINE ANN DAYBELL 4 Aug 
JUDITH CHILDS 7 Nov 

Thomas Allen Lucia 9 Apr 

MATTHEW BRUCE LUCIA 25 Oct 

RACHEL MAURINE LUCIA 5 Jul 

SETH THOMAS LUCIA 6 Apr 



1911 
1905 
1932 
1926 
1959 
1954 
1978 
r 1961 
1962 
1966 
1969 
g 1970 
t 1972 
1976 
1936 
1943 
1948 
1948 
1953 
1974 
1975 
1977 
1978 
1951 
1948 
1972 
1973 
1975 
1976 
1 1979 
1913 
1907 
1945 
1944 
1964 
1967 
1971 
1978 
1946 
1946 
1970 
1973 
1976 



15 Aug 1973 



21 Jun 1967 



513 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID. No. 



Birth 



HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 


1835 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 


Feb 


1844 


14. 


LE ROY DIXON 


16 


Oct 


1881 




Electa Lat'rele Smoot 


25 


Sep 


1883 


14. 5 


MAURINE DIXON 


7 


Oct 


1913 




Myron DeVere Childs 


20 


Aug 


1907 


14. 53 


JOHN MYRON CHILDS 


13 


Apr 


1949 




Susan Parker 


1 


Dec 


1950 


14.531 


JASON MYRON CHILDS 


23 


Oct 


1969 


14,532 


JOSHUA NORMAN CHILDS 


12 


Dec 


1971 


14. 533 


MARIE CHILDS 


26 


Apr 


1 973 


14. 534 


"K T A m T T A TV. T T T TTV T /"* T T T T 1^ O 

NATHAN JOHN CHILDS 


1 3 


Apr 


1 975 


14. 535 


CRYSTAL CHILDS 


1 


May 


1977 


14. 536 


KENNETH PARKER CHILDS 


3 


Oct 


1 979 


14. 54 


RICHARD DIXON CHILDS 


4 


Dec 


1951 




Trudy Edna Jenson 


1 


Dec 


1953 


14. 541 


YANCY RICHARD CHILDS 


5 


Dec 


1976 


14. 542 


CODY BERNELL CHILDS 


1 


Nov 


1978 


14. 55 


KRISTINE CHILDS 


1 3 


Apr 


1955 




Gregory Robert Osborn 


9 


Apr 


1953 


14.551 


JACOB GREGORY OSBORN 


10 


Jul 


1973 


14. 552 


MEGAN KRISTINE OSBORN 


21 


Mar 


1975 


14„ 553 


LUKE CHILDS OSBORN 


27 


Oct 


1976 


^ A f f A 

1 4, 554 


ERIN IRIS OSBORN 


24 


Aug 


1978 


14. 56 


STEVEN LEROY CHILDb 


22 


Jul 


1 957 




A T A J J 

Ann Lee Averett 


3 


Oct 


1 95 7 


14. 561 


BENJAMIN STEVEN CHILDS 


17 


Oct 


1 976 


14„ 562 


* T ^ T 1 V A A TV ▼ TV T T T T T T^ 

LINDA ANN CHILDS 


1 7 


Dec 


1977 


14. 6 


HELEN DIXON 


22 


Jul 


1 915 




E. Junius Payne 


30 


Oct 


1912 


14. 61 


BARBARA JUNE PAYNE 


31 


Dec 


1937 




Robert Lee Ipsen 


11 


Aug 


1936 


14. 61 1 


ROBIN LEE IPSEN 


5 


Sep 


1957 




Mark Lewis Harmon 


21 


May 


1953 


14. 612 


JANALYN IPSEN 


15 


Dec 


1959 


14. 61 3 


Tf— V "7— V A T 1' V ^ 7 T i A ^ T TV T r \ T T tC^ 1 \ TV T 

BRADLEY PAYNE IPSEN 


28 


Jan 


1961 


14. 614 


DANA KAYE IPS EN 


18 


Dec 


1964 


14.62 


BETTE LYN PAYNE 


8 


Jul 


1939 




Robert Warren Petersen 


27 


May 


1933 


14. 621 


KRISTI LYN PETERSEN 


21 


Feb 


1961 


14. 622 


LISA ANN PETERSEN 


21 


May 


1963 


14. 623 


BRIAN WARREN PETERSEN 


11 


Jun 


1965 


14. 624 


DAVID WARREN PETERSEN 


1 


Sep 


1968 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
28 Dec 1926 
25 Dec 1940 

21 Jun 1967 



11 Jan 1972 



9 Jul 1971 



514 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID, No. Birth Death 



HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1 884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 


Feb 


1 844 


17 Apr 


1 926 


14. 


JL/ili K^Jl UlA.V-'lN 


1 6 


Oct 


1881 


28 Dec 


1 926 




iHecta ijaJr^rele omoot 


25 


Sep 


1 883 


25 Dec 


1 940 


■14, I 




5 


Nov 


1918 


14 Jan 


1 922 


14, o 




1 8 


Jul 


1921 








Ivan William Nelson 


3 


Apr 


1 921 






14, 81 


IVAN WILIjIAM NJt.L/oUN 11 


7 


Jul 


1 943 








Jeanne Newman 


14 


Jan 


1 947 






1 >• oil 
14. «1 1 




5 


Jun 


1973 






14, o 1 




6 


Oct 


1975 






14, 813 


KEVIN WAYNE NELbUN 


4 


May 


1979 






14, 8Z 


DAVID EEROY NEEoUJN 


7 


Oct 


1946 








Claudia Cjrreene 


14 


Jul 


1948 






14, 821 


HEATHER NELoUN 


25 


Jan 


1 976 






14, 822 


DAVID TAYLOR NELSON 


1 5 


Oct 


1978 






14, 83 


DIANE NELSON 


17 


Oct 


1951 






14. 84 


KENT DIXON NELSON 


18 


Oct 


1954 








Kathleen Jo Dana 


5 


Feb 


195 2 






14. 841 


WAYNE KENT NELSON 


2 


Dec 


1976 






14. 842 


STEVEN AARON NELSON 


3 


Jun 


1978 






14. 85 


CAROLYN NELSON 


14 


Aug 


1956 






14. 86 


JULIE ANNE NELSON 


18 


Dec 


I960 







515 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



ID No. 






Birth 


Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 


Oct 


1852 


27 Jun 


1907 


15. 


HARRIET AMELIA DIXON 


24 


May 


1882 


23 Apr 


1931 




George Washington West 


24 


Feb 


1866 


26 Feb 


1932 


15.1 


LYNN DIXON WEST 


18 


Aug 


1908 


1 2 Jun 


1940 




Mabel May Hansen 


10 


Se p 


1909 






15.11 


AUDREY LORRAINE WEST 


5 


Dec 


1928 


11 Feb 


1980 


15. 12 


DONALD LYNN WEST 


9 


Jul 


1930 








Jackie Jean Ricks 


27 


Sep 

XT 


1932 






15. 121 


SUSAN LYNNE WEST 


14 


Se p 


1950 








Darwin McKibben 












15. 121 1 


SHAWN C, MC KIBBEN 


18 


Jan 


1971 






15. 12 


DONALD LYNN WEST 


9 


Jul 


1930 








Winifred Marie Marker 


17 


Dec 


1932 






15. 122 


DENISE IRENE WEST 


12 


Nov 


1952 








Robert Lee Rowley, Jr. 


4 


Jul 


1949 






15. 1221 


ROBERT LEE ROWLEY III 


1 


Nov 


1 974 






15. 1222 


LYNETTE DAWN ROWLEY 


23 


Sep 


1975 






15. 1223 


KRISTINE RUBY ROWLEY 


17 


Apr 


1977 






15. 1224 


SARAH IRENE ROWLEY 


21 


Oct 


1979 






15. 123 


DONALD LYNN WEST, Jr. 


22 


Apr 


1955 








Helen Kae Neilsen 


18 


Aug 


1957 






15. 1231 


CHRISTINE MARIE WEST 


26 


Jan 


1979 







516 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



I.D. No. 




Birth 






Dp, 




HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1 884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 Ff>h 1 


844 


17 


Apr 


1 9?6 


16. 


ARNOLD DIXON 


J \j J.VXCI y J 


o 


1 


Se p 


1 9 An 

i 7 f 




Letitia May Banks 


1 5 Mav 1 


891 


3 May 


1955 

X 7 — ' — ' 


16. 1 


HOWARD BANKS DIXON 


1 1 Dec 1 




7 


Sf> n 


1975 

X 7 » _» 




Fulvia Call 


1 1 Nov 1 


916 

7 X \_> 








16. 11 


JERALD LAMAR DIXON 


26 Mav ] 


939 

7 _> 7 










Karen Haymond 


1 1 Feb 1 


942 

7-T 








16. Ill 


CAMILLE DIXON 


23 Mav 1 


966 








16. 112 


DIANA DIXON 


15 Apr ] 


970 








16. 113 


MATTHEW JERALD DIXON 


16 Sep 1 


971 


16 


Se p 


1971 

X / \ X 


16. 114 


ANDREW JERALD DIXON 


25 Mar 1 


975 








16.115 


HOWARD MARK DIXON 


25 Apr ] 


976 








16. 12 


HOWARD ALLEN DIXON 


31 Oct 1 


942 










Linda Jean Mangum 


2R Mav ] 


946 

7-T i_i 








16. 121 


KRISTINA DIXON 


20 Nov 1 


969 








16. 122 


JULIA DIXON 


1 Q A nr 1 


972 
7 ' ^ 








16. 123 


DAVID ALLEN DIXON 


^ Tito 1 


975 








16. 124 


SHAUNNA DIXON 


10 Feb ] 


978 








16. 13 


JANET DIXON 


2 Sep 1 


946 










David Micliael Rees 


21 Oct ] 


943 

7~x ~J 








16. 131 


STEVEN MICHAEL REES 


22 Jul 1 


969 








16. 132 


MICHELLE REES 


6 Dec 










16 133 


WENDY REES 


^ s o 


974 
7 1 ** 








16. 14 


KENNETH CALL DIXON 


Q Nov 


95 1 

7 _» X 








16. 2 


EVELYN DIXON 


30 Mav ^ 


917 

7x1 










Donald H Smith 


15 Feb ] 


918 

7x0 








16. 21 


KAREN ANN SMITH 


4 Feb ] 


[ 945 

I 7~ 










Wilford Charles Griffffs 


5 Oct 


I 942 

L 7-X t- 








16.211 


BRIAN WILFRED GRIGGS 


23 Dec ] 


[ 967 

L 7W 1 








16. 212 


DEBORAH KAY GRIGGS 


1 9 Jun ] 


1 970 

L 7 1 V 








16. 213 


STEPHEN SMITH GRIGGS 


2R Sen 


972 








16. 214 


KENT DAVID GRIGGS 


16 Jan ] 


974 

7 1 "X 








16. 215 


KATHRYN ANN GRIGGS 


27 Jun 


[975 








16. 216 


JULIE DIONNE GRIGGS 


11 Jan ] 


L977 








16. 22 


SUSAN LOUISE SMITH 


30 Jul ] 


1948 










Robert Byron Purves 


11 Feb ] 


1945 








16. 221 


DAVID BYRON PURVES 


28 Mav 1 


1970 








16. 222 


JENNIFER LYNNE PURVES 


25 Mar 1 


1972 








16. 223 


KATHERINE ANN PURVES 


1 3 Jan 


1974 








16. 224 


LORRAINE DAWN PURVES 


1 3 Jun 


1975 








16. 225 


NATHAN DANIEL PURVES 


30 Nov ] 


1977 








16. 3 


GRANT DE GREY DIXON 


11 Apr ] 


1919 










Florence Rosella Marks 


14 May 


1945 








16. 31 


GREGORY MARKS DIXON 


26 Jun ] 


1952 








16. 32 


MICHAEL DE GREY DIXON 


4 Feb : 


1954 








16. 33 


BRENT DIXON 


31 Jan ! 


1958 









517 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1979 



I.D. No. 






Birth 






Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 


Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


4 


Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


1926 


16. 


ARNOLD DIXON 


30 


May ] 


884 


1 


Sep 


I960 




Letitia May Banks 


15 


May 1 


891 


3 May 


1955 


16. 4 


ELDON ARNOLD DIXON 


31 


Mar 1 


921 










Sarah Jean Dastrup 


1 


Jan ] 


925 








16. 41 


ELDON REED DIXON 


21 


Jul 1 


946 








16. 42 


LARRY DEAN DIXON 


3 


Jan ] 


949 










Shiela Higgins 


24 


Dec 1 


949 








16. 421 


CAMILLE DIXON 


31 


Jan ] 


971 








16. 422 


HAYLEY DIXON 


5 


Oct 1 


975 








16. 423 


LAURA DIXON 


26 


Aug 1 


977 








16. 43 


DENNIS DASTRUP DIXON 


2 


Oct 1 


950 








16. 44 


ROGER DUANE DIXON 


4 


Jun ] 


953 










Cindy Roberts 


15 


Jan 1 


956 








16. 45 


T T ~> A TVTTVTTTVT T — > T T" TV T 

Ji^ANNINE DIXON 


21 


Jun ] 


959 








1 / A 

16. 4 


ELDON ARNOLD DIXON 


31 


Mar 1 


921 










Ila Jean Hair 


8 


Se p ] 


926 








16.5 


BRUCE ROYDEN DIXON 


13 


Feb 1 


923 










Colleen Callister 


28 


Jan ] 


926 








16. 51 


LYNN ANN DIXON 


20 


Nov 1 


952 










Paul J. Farnsworth 


18 


Oct 1 


953 








16. 52 


JOAN DIXON 


13 


Jun ] 


954 








16. 53 


DAVID CALLISTER DIXON 


13 


Dec 1 


957 








16. 54 


KRISTIN DIXON 


28 


Jan ] 


96] 








16. 6 


FLOYD PRESTON DIXON 


6 


Nov 1 


924 










Lois Mai Dickenson 


21 


Apr 1 


930 








16. 61 


DANA JOHN DIXON 


6 


May '. 


958 








16. 62 


PAUL RAYMOND DIXON 


23 


Aug ] 


959 








16. 63 


STEPHANIE GWYN DIXON 


16 


Mar ] 


962 








16. 7 


GLORIA MAY DIXON 


1 


Dec ] 


926 










Thomas Weslie Richardson 


6 


Jul 1 


925 








16. 71 


CYNTHIA RICHARDSON 


29 


Jun ] 


951 










Stephen Henry Petersen 


23 


Feb ] 


949 








16.711 


SCOTT WESLIE PETERSEN 


25 


May ] 


973 








16. 712 


CHRISTINE PETERSEN 


4 


May '. 


975 








16. 713 


SUZANNE PETERSEN 


3 


Sep '. 


977 








16. 714 


EMILY PETERSEN 


20 


May ] 


980 








16. 72 


DOUGLAS WESLIE RICHARDSON 


2 


Mar 


953 










Colleen Larsen 


19 


Feb ] 


955 








16. 721 


PAUL DOUGLAS RICHARDSON 


19 


Apr ] 


976 








16. 722 


THOMAS BLAINE RICHARDSON 29 May 1 


1978 









518 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1979 



I.D. No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1 884 


Sarah D 


eG rey 


4 Feb 1 


844 


17 Apr 


J 7 t-> u 


16. 


ARNOLD DIXON 


30 Mav ] 


884 


1 

i 


Sep 


1 9An 

1 7 u u 




Letitia May Banks 


1 ^ }\A a "vr 1 
X xvxcL y J 


8Q 1 

O 7 -l 


-X 


ividy 


1 9^^^ 


16. 7 


GLORIA MAY DIXON 


1 Dec ] 

X. X-^ ^ V_ X 










Thomas Weslie Richardson 


6 Till 1 


Q? 5 








16. 73 


MARILYN RICHARDSON 


17 Spn 1 


Q5 5 










Robert Frank Devine 


8 Nov ] 


7 J J 








16. 731 


MELISSA DEVINE 


19 Sep 1 


979 

7 ' 7 








16. 74 


DAVID THOMAS RICHARDSON 


18 Apr 1 


958 








16. 75 


DON DIXON RICHARDSON 


17 Nov 1 


959 








16. 76 


GLEN ALAN RICHARDSON 


3 Feb 1 


961 








16. 77 


SANDRA RICHARDSON 


24 May ] 


962 








16.78 


PATRICK ARNOLD RICHARDSON 


1 2 Jun ] 


964 








16. 79 


REBECCA RICHARDSON 


15 Nov 1 


967 








16. 7. 10 


DIANA RICHARDSON 


19 Jul 1 


969 








16. 7. 11 


LINDA RICHARDSON 


25 Nov 1 


973 








16. 8 


ROBERT NORMAN DIXON 


15 May 1 


930 










Genniel Larsen 


9 Dec 1 


931 








16. 81 


STEVEN LEWIS DIXON 


21 J u.n ] 


952 










Emarene Graff 


21 Jun ] 


955 








16. 811 


MONICA DIXON 


22 Dec 1 


976 








16. 812 


COLLETTE DIXON 


4 Feb 1 


979 








16. 82 


DENISE DIXON 


18 Aug 1 


956 










Mark E. Kelly 


17 May 1 


953 








16. 821 


LISA ANNE KELLY 


3 Dec ] 


978 








16. 83 


NORMAN PAUL DIXON 


27 Feb ] 


965 








16. 84 


ANGELA DIXON 


15 Mar 1 


973 








16. 9 


DOUGLAS WAYNE DIXON 


5 May " 


l932 










Helen Konopelski 


17 Jul ] 


.935 








16 91 


KAREN JOAN DIXON 


22 Jul ] 


960 








16. 92 


MICHELE DIXON 


2 1 Se p 1 


961 










Don Belback 


4 Jan ] 


960 








16. 921 


CRYSTAL BELBACK 


11 May ] 


979 








16 93 


TODD DE GREY DIXON 


29 Apr ] 


964 








16 94 


KURT DOUGLAS DIXON 


2 Se p '. 


1963 








16. 10 


DORIS ANN DIXON 


19 Mar 1 


[934 










Bruce J. Christensen 


2 1 Se p " 


1929 








16. 10. 1 


LESA ANN CHRISTENSEN 


17 Feb ] 


[958 








16 10 2 


KYLE DE GREY CHRISTENSEN 


15 Jul ] 


959 








16. 10. 3 


JENNIFER CHRISTENSEN 


19 Jan ] 


L961 








16. 10.4 


MATTHEW B. CHRISTENSEN 


25 Dec ] 


L963 








16. 10. 5 


JASON DIXON CHRISTENSEN 


3 Sep 


1969 








16. 10. 6 


JOSHUA DANIEL CHRISTENSEN 


27 Jul ] 


1979 









519 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I. D. No. 

II. 92 h 
11. 921 
11 . 922 
11. 92 

743 
7421 
74 h 

741 

742 w 
74 



7422 
742 

13. 5232 
13. 523] 
13. 523 h 
13. 5233 
13. 5234 
13. 523 

d312 w 
14.414 
14.41. 10 
14.419 

14.418 
11.61 
14. 413 
14.416 
14. 415 
14. 412 
14.41. 11 
11. 6 h 
14, 417 
d314 
d31 

14. 414 w 
d313 
631 h 
S311 

14.413 w 
14. 41 1 
d3121 
11. 62 
14.41 h 
14.41 12 
14. 41 
S312 
14.4141 
14.4142 
14.4131 
11.6 





Page 


I. D . 


No. 


Pag: 


ADAMS 






ANDREWS 


K.f^ n n R tVi R T" *3 n f 


bO J 


in A 

1 U . 4 


Alice Delenna Dixon 


500 




bO J 




Photo 


387 


TianT*ti A y-» -»-\ 
J-JCl Hid 2^1111 


503 




History 


389 


Susan Dixon 


n 

D U J 




Family Photo 


388 


AIKELE 






Home Photo 


388 


Bonnif^ Ann ( ("InTniGVi \ 




in A ^ 


Charlene ( Peppmger ) 


500 


Eric Allen 


4Q7 


1 n 


Dixie Lee ( Paden ) 


500 






i 0. 4(1 


Jeanne Katherine Truxal 


500 




6o I 


in yl *l 

1 0. 44 


Joseph Dixon 


500 






10.4 


Robert Bruce 


500 


Irene Svensen 






Photo 


387 


J-vxa, 1 y J-/j_x.UIi 


4 V ^ 


1 , 4Z 


Robert Dale 


500 




9 A 7 




ARMSTRONG 




n. lo LVJ xy 


■5 A Q 


DC h 


Anthon H. 


484 


r a Tt~\ 1 1 Tr ^^Vi rvf 
J- cLiiiiiy X IIUHJ 


o 




Photo 


145 


Home Photo 


268 




Ivlary Doris 


484 


Shaunty Maja 


492 


52 


Nancy McGonachie 


484 


William Eugene 


492 




Photo 


145 



ALVEY 

Andrew Arthur 
Ann Marie 
Bruce 

Douglas Byron 
Katrina Michelle 
Terry Laws 
ANDERSON 

Annette Buffo 
Brian S, 

Bruce Summerhays 
Caroline 
Catherine 

Carol Leslie ( Hipp ) 
Clair S. 

Clyde Summerhays 
Colleen ( Stokes ) 
Craig S. 

David Summerhays 
Dean Albert 
Janae 
Jed Taylor 
Julia Taylor 
Karen Amato Beveridge 
Kennen ( Band ley ) 
Kenneth R, 
Kristine ( Bandley ) 
Linda Stokes 
Lynette { Engle ) 
Mandi Alese 
Michael Albert 
Raymond G. 
Sara 

Sarah Summerhays 
Scott Taylor 
Shane Raymond 
Tiara Lynn 
Tori 

Vera Dixon 



510 
510 
510 
510 
510 
510 

487 
512 
513 
513 
513 
502 
512 
513 
513 
512 
513 
502 
513 
487 
487 
512 
487 
487 
487 
512 
512 
487 
502 
512 
513 
512 
487 
512 
512 
512 
502 



History 
Family Photo 
Home Photo 
AUSTIN 

13.435 Julie Ann 

13.436 Keith 

13.433 Michael Reed 
1 3.43 h Richard M. 

13.434 Richard Scott 
13.432 Sandra Kay 
13.431 Shauna Dee 

13.43 Sherrie Lillie Dixon 

BALLIF 



147 
146 
146 

510 
510 
510 
510 
510 
510 
510 
510 



12, 


,42 


Barbara (Olson)(Wade) 


506 


12. 


, 431 


Becky Jean ( Garner ) 


506 


12. 


, 432 


Brian Scott 


506 


12. 


,4121 


Brittany Kay 


506 


12. 


,434 


Bryce Dixon 


506 


12. 


.412 w 


Carolee Christensen 


506 


12. 


,41 ] 1 


Chelsea 


506 


12. 


,433 


Debra Ann 


506 


12. 


4 


Edna Dixon 


506 






Photo 


289 






History 


291 






Family Photo 


290 






Home Photo 


290 


12. 


413 


Jan 


506 


12. 


41 w 


Kay Anderson 


506 


12, 


41] w 


Linda Marie Towers 


506 


12. 


41 


Mark Dixon 


506 


12. 


412 


Mark Gordon 


506 


12. 


4 h 


Mark Squire s 


506 






Photo 


289 


12. 


41 1 


Michael Edward 


506 


12. 


43 


Scott Walter 


506 


12. 


43 w 


Sherma Nancy Craven 


506 




BAKER 




13. 


741 


Andrew Jayson 


511 


13. 


742 


Daniel Joseph 


511 


13. 


74 


Judy Dixon 


511 


13. 


74 h 


Robert Daniel 


511 



521 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Pagej 


I.D. No. 




Page 




BAND LEY 


1 




BIGELOW 




631 3 h 


Fred 


487 


822 


Lois Amber Ford 


495 


63111 


Jeremiah Phillip 


487 


822 h 


Rex 


495 


6313 


Kennen Anderson 


487 


8223 w 


Vickie Lee Davis 


495 


631 ] 


Kristine Anderson 


487 




BJORKLUND 




63131 


Nicholas Edward 


487 


752 


Barbara Gail ( Meyers ) 


493 


6311 h 


Phillip Bench 


487 


7513 


Bobbi Joan 


493 




BARRETT 




751 1 


Cindy 


493 


13.6 


Anna Dixon 


5 1 1 


7512 


Debbie 


493 




Photo 


369 


7551 


Deena 


493 




H istory 


371 


755 w 


Diane 


493 




F amily Photo 


370 


75 h 


Erling T. 


493 










Photo' 


321 


13.61 w 


Carol Roundy 


51 1 


753 


Gloria Faye ( Nichols ) 


493 


13.62 w 


Cynthia Gordon 


51 1 


75 


Harriett Faye Dixon 


493 


13.611 


Jackie Kim 


51 1 




Photo 


321 


1 3. 6 h 


John Byron 


51 1 




History 


323 




Photo 


369 




Family Photo 


322 


13, 621 


John Michael 


511 




Home Photo 


322 


13.615 


Kandie Lee 


51 1 


754 


Janet Marie ( Machado ) 


493 


13. 613 


Kristine ( Harward ) 


51 1 


751 w 


Pat Nicholes 


493 


13. 612 


Lewis Kevin 


51 1 


755 


Richard Erling 


493 


13.62 w 


LindaDee Urvina 


5 1 1 


751 


Robert Gary 


493 


1 3. 622 


Melissa Dawn 


5 1 1 




BOOTH 




13.62 


Michael Wayne 


51 1 


72 h 


All iTIT / T 1 1 1 \ A ^ n 

Albert Warren (Photo) 213 


491 


13.6111 


Rusty Lee 


51 1 


722 w 


Carrie Hendricksen 


491 


13.6112 


Ryan Kim 


51 1 


7212 


Cathe r ine 


491 


13. 61 w 


Sandra Good 


51 1 


7216 


Christianne 


491 


13. 61 


Shirl Jack 


5 1 1 


7214 


Cynthia 


491 


13. 611 w Tracy Lynn Jensen 


51 1 


7223 


Gary Lee 


491 


13. 614 


Veda Kay Lynn 


51 1 


722 


Gary Lynn 


491 


13. 62 w 


Vicki A. 


51 1 


721 1 


Gordon David 


491 




BECKER 




721 


Gordon Dixon 


491 


8552 


Benjamin Mark 


497 


7222 


Gregory 


491 


855 


Cheryl Ann Dixon 


497 


721 w 


June Phoebe Erskine 


491 


8551 


Jonathan Lloyd 


497 


7215 


Michael Thomas 


491 


855 h 


Mark Stanley 


497 


722 w 


Sherry Ann Gaudio 


491 




BELBACK 




7213 


Ste phen M. 


491 


16. 921 


Crystal 


519 


722 w 


Tawn Lee 


491 


16. 92 h 


Don 


519 


72 


Vesta Dixon 


491 


16. 92 


Michele Dixon 


519 




Photo 


21 3 




BELL 






History 


215 


2114 h 


John Dalton 


477 




Family Photo 


214 


21141 


Mary Mellissa 


477 




Home Photo 


214 


2114 


Sylvia Shaw 


477 


7221 


Warren Lynn 


491 




BEYERS 




21 1 3 h 


BORDEAUX, Will 


477 


11. 21 h 


James Lawrence 


502 




BOREN 




11. 212 


Johanna 


502 


13.521 


Cynthia Laws 


510 


11. 213 


Katharine Norma 


502 


851 1 


David 


496 


11. 211 


Marrissa Suzanne 


502 


8513 


Elisabeth 


496 


11 . 21 


Sharon Lynn Tangren 


502 


13.5213 


Emily Kay 


510 




BIGELOW 




13.5214 


Joshua Kenneth 


5 1 


8225 


Amber 


495 


1 3. 52 h 


Kenneth 


510 


8221 1 


Brandie Lee 


495 


851 


Marjorie Jean Dixon 


496 


8221 


Brent R. 


495 


8512 


Michael 


496 


82231 


Camille 


495 


851 h 


Robert Reed 


496 


8221 w 


Carol Ann Sutton 


495 


8514 


Stephen Ralph 


496 


8224 


Cindy ( Gunter ) 


495 




BOS HARD 




82212 


Cody Rex 


495 


8113 w 


Andrea Stubbs 


494 


8222 


Elaine (Nicol) (Martinez) 


495 


81 h 


Arnold 


494 


8223 


Glen M. 


495 




Photo 


129 


82232 


Leslie Amber 


495 


812 


Arnold Bliss 


494 



522 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



i . jj . In o . 




Page 








O Jl 1 -J 


r\rnuiu V on n.oiien 


4Q4 


O 1 1 £ 


oeverly Ann ( WaKeiield ) 


494 


o i £ 1 


Gary Bliss 


494 


fi 1 1 1 1 

O i 1 i i 


Clifford Dean 


494 


R 1 1 1 ■? 
o 1 1 1 ^ 


Dallas Ne Ison 


494 


R 1 1 

oil 


Dean Dixon 


494 


O i i 1 w 


D ianne Ne 1 s on 


494 


8121 w 


i—i 11 C C IJL JJ \J o w c 11 


yl n y1 

494 


81 


n^t"TY^a o a Tin von 

J— t 1 11 Id IVldC i-J k.A.\J 11 


A ClA 

4 V4 




r^noto 


1 29 




Histo ry 


1 3 1 




Family Photo 


1 30 




Home Photo 


1 30 




Wildv/ood Home 


1 30 




G ina 


494 




ic nna lAae Hju w apu s 


A CiA 
494 




Je s s ica Ann 


494 


C 1 7 1 7 


ive I ly 


494 


Q 1 1 ITT 


Norma Heatherly 


494 


C 1 1 1 

O 1 I I 


Norman Dean 


494 


R 1 7 7 


Steven Allan 


A dA 

4^4 




"R D V T Kf r; n n TM 




rrrt J. 


Diane Dangerfield 


4C 
40-3 


441 h 


J dillc b 


4.R'^ 
to J 




J ame s , Jr. 


>i ^ 

4o J 




Lynne 


/t ^ 
4o5 


AA 1 7 


Nlichael 


/I 7 

4o -3 




JD W W il,KO 




44/1 1 n 


Roger 


483 


.d /! 7 1 
44 1 


Susan Lanahan 


483 








in /Lou 


B rent 


c n 1 


In /L 7 7 


Brent Jason 


i;n 1 


in A 


rieatne r 


1^ m 


in A 7 7 


J inette 


^ u 1 


in A7 1 


rvoDci t J umi 


J W 1 


in A7 5 


R a n Tl 1 1 3 n ^ 
x\ y d 11 i-J tid lie 


501 


in A 7 


Suzette Schugk 


5ni 


in A 7 


Vaughn Jay 


5n 1 




ID i\ IV JD A IN IS. 




A u 
D<i4 n 


Allen r>rent 


4R^i 

TOO 


A74 1 


/^iien ID rem, j r. 


4QA 
400 


A747 

U T 


A.nne 


4H A 


A 74 A 


Dixon Taylor 


4 A 


A74 


ii-dCliryil J.-'CC -i-dyHJX^ 


AR A 

TtO 


A744 


Laura 


4RA 
rr 


A 74 ^ 


Lynn (F) 


A L 
40D 


A 7 /I •? 


Mary Kathryn 


y1 A 

4oo 


A 74 K 
t) ii4 D 


Rebecca 


4Q A 
4o D 








1 7 1 7 Vi 


V-Jdyitiii ivitjL 




1 717 7 


T\ 1 T" O 4- Q A A O A 

x\.iroLen ividc 


5nR 


13. 2121 


Mayken Uot 


c n 


1 J . 1 


Sneliy uison 


i^nR 

DUO 




Trevor Rusken 


D U t? 




■ir> T TC^ T TXT T"* T T 

BUbHNELL 




6141 


Marrianne Frampton 


485 


6141 h 


Ned Booth 


485 



I.D. No. Page 
CANNON 

2153 Kristen Dixon 479 

2151 Lucile Dixon 479 

2152 Mark Dixon 479 
215 h Mark W. 479 
215 Ruth Dixon 479 

CARROL 

1 3.5261 Berniece Elaine 510 

13. 526 h Charles 510 

13. 526 Linda Laws 510 
13.5262 Shaun 510 

CHID ESTER 

8712 Brook 497 
871 Jo Ann Fallentine 497 
871 h Lynn U. 497 
8711 Scott 497 

8713 Whitney Kate 497 
CHILDS 

14. 51 Ann ( Daybell ) 513 
14.56 w Ann Lee Averett 514 

14.561 Benjamin Steven 514 
14.542 Cody Bernell 514 
14. 535 Crystal 514 
14.531 Jason Myron 514 

14.53 John Myron 514 
14. 532 Joshua Norman 514 
14. 52 Judith ( Lucia ) 513 
14.536 Kenneth Parker 514 

14.55 Kristine ( Osborn ) 514 

14.562 Linda Ann 514 

14.533 Marie 514 
14.5 Maurine Dixon 513 

Photo 325 

History 327 

Family Photo 326 

Home Photo 326 

Ranch House 326 

14.5 Myron DeVere 513 

Photo 325 

14.534 Nathan John 514 

14.54 Richard Dixon 514 

14.56 Steven LeRoy 514 
14, 53 w Susan Parker 514 
14. 54 w Trudy Edna Jenson 514 
14.541 Yancy Richard 514 

CHRISTENSEN 

16. 10 h Bruce J. 519 

Photo 463 

16,10 Doris Ann Dixon 519 

Photo 463 

History 465 

Family Photo 464 

Home Photo 464 

16.10.5 Jason Dixon 519 

16.10.3 Jennifer 519 

16.10.6 Joshua Daniel 519 
16.10.2 Kyle DeGrey 519 
16. 10. 1 Lesa Ann 519 

16.10.4 Matthew B, 519 



523 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No. 




Page 




CLEGG 






DANGERFIELD 




233 


Barbara Ann Dixon 


480 


44 


Harold Dixon 


483 


2332 


Brent D. 


480 




Photo 


191 


233 h 


Jack Alvin 


480 




History 


193 


233 1 


Michael S. 


480 




Family Photo 


192 




CORNISH 






Home Photo 


192 


7432 


Ashlie Melissa 


492 


42 w 


Helen Morrison 


483 


743 


Bonnie Ann Aikele 


492 


4 1 


Jabez Aldous 


483 


743 h 


Clayton J. , Jr. 


492 


4 h 


Jabez W. 


483 


743 1 


Rebecca Lynn 


492 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


262 




COWLEY 




451 


J. William 


483 


1 0. 2 h 


Angus Wayne 


499 


4511 


J, William, Jr. 


483 




Photo 


301 


422 


Karen ( Fisher ) 


483 


10.22 w 


Cheryl Janeene lueller 


500 


421 


Kay ( Nunnally ) 


483 


10. 222 


Corbin Tyler 


c An 
DUU 


45 1 


Patricia Ellen McEwen 


483 


10. 21 w 


Norma Jean Hadley 




42 


Royden J. 


483 


10.212 


Robin 


499 




Photo 


151 


10.2 


Ruby Dixon 


499 




History 


153 




Photo 


301 




Birthplace 


151 




History 


303 


4512 


Stephanie Deanne 


483 




Family Photo 


302 




DAVIES 






Home Photo 


302 


21 1 24 


Amber Rebecca 


477 


10. 221 


Sheri Lyn 


500 


21123 


Jennifer Erin 


477 


1 0. 22 


Shirl Curtis 


500 


2 1 1 2 h 


John AUeman 


477 


10. 213 


c 

ousan 


499 


21121 


Jon Shaw 


477 


10.21 


Wayne Dixon 


499 


21 122 


Michael Scott 


477 


10. 211 


Wendy 


499 


2112 


Sandra Shaw 


477 


10. 223 


Whitney Anne 


500 




DAVIS 






CRAIG 




7324 


Amy Ellen 


492 


6341 h 


John 


488 


7322 


Becki 


492 


6341 


Shelly K. Woodruff 


488 


8562 


Brant Coy 


497 




CROWLEY 




856 h 


Brent Lee 


497 


8612 


Colette 


497 


7323 


Glen Harold 


492 


861 3 


Colin Thos. 


497 


732 h 


Harold Keith 


492 


861 


Kathryn Dixon 


497 


7325 


Jill Ann 


492 


861 h 


Thomas Edward 


497 


8561 


Jordan Daniel 


49' 


861 1 


T rent 


497 


7321 


Micki 


492 




DAHLBERG 




856 


Sandra Lee Dixon 


497 


10. 33 h 


Kenneth E. , Jr. 


500 


732 


Shirley Mae Dixon 


492 


10.33 


Lynn Ann Lewis 


500 




T*N A ^7 X^ X^ T T 

DAY BELL 




10.331 


Wayne Kenneth 


500 


14.51 


Ann Childs 


513 




DAINES 




14.51 h 


Grant Lanny 


513 


2532 


Anne Elaine 


482 


14. 512 


Jesse Glen 


513 


253 


Barbara Ann Markham 


482 


14. 514 


Katherine Ann 


513 


2534 


John Thomas 


482 


14. 511 


Keith Grant 


513 


2531 


Richard Weldon 


482 


14. 513 


Richard Myron 


513 


o c o o 

2533 


TJ 1 1 T 

Russell Lewis 


482 




XA X^ X^ 

DECKER 




253 h 


Weldon Lee 


482 


821 22 


Brooke 


494 




DANGER FIELD 




82121 


Christopher Gean 


494 


43 


Afton 


483 


8212 


Lori Jean Simmons 


494 


4 


Alice Smith Dixon 


483 


821 2 h 


Willard Gean 


494 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


194 




DE GRAW 




44Z 


Carolyn ( Lanahan ) 


483 


6222 


Derk Taylor 


486 


45 


Clifford Dixon 


483 


622 


Janice Taylor 


486 




Photo , History 197^ 


195 


6223 


Gregory Taylor 


486 




Birthplace 


195 


6225 


Michael 


486 


441 


Diane ( Bovingdon ) 


483 


6221 


Michele 


486 


47 


Donna Mae 


484 


622 h 


Monte 


486 


A A 

44 w 


Florence John 


483 


6224 


Nicole 


486 




Photo 


191 




DE GREY 




46 


Grace ( Harding ) 


484 




Sarah DeGrey Dixon 


477 










Photo 


12 



524 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 


DENIS ON 


Pa CTp 
i age 


I.D. No. 


DIXON 


I- age 


13. 5 h 


Byron Leslie 


510 


7314 


i-' 1 c t VJ 1 C Xi 






Photo 


337 


13.411 


r\ >• 1 o Tl (t 3 ri 


c r\ n 


13. 52 


Elaine Joyce (Laws) (Patterson) 51 


16.5 


Bru.ce Royden 


D 1 O 


13,51 


Inez Berniece 


510 




Photo 


A'3.^ 

^ J 1 


13. 5 


Inez Dixon 


510 




•LXIOLWX y 


At.'K 




Photo 


337 






H J L. 




History 


339 




1. X\J L k ±. 11 \J \,\J 


A'^7 




Family Photo 


338 


16, 111 


C3 a m 1 1 1 p 


0X1 




Home Photo 


338 


16.421 


a m i 1 1 p 

CL 1. 1 i. i. i. i. 


■J 1 o 




DENS LEY 




13, 133 


Carl Ve r n 


508 

-J \J o 


12.211 


Colleen Taylor 


504 


13.13 


C~] a t1 AA/^ 1 1 1 1 a m 

CLll *• llllCLlli 


D\J O 


1 2. 21 ] 6 


Logan Taylor 


504 


242 w 


c! a 7* 1 A A n ^/t a \t \Tt=^ t 
^ d X ic c 11 xvxcL y y xz X 




12. 21 1 3 




504 


1 1 . 9 w 


Carol Collard (Photo) 


503 


12.2114 


Nla r ia nne 


504 


2431 


C a th PTinp BfaHfoT'H 


"TO i 


12,211 h 


Stpvpn Th OTna ^ 


504 


3 w 


C a the r ine Ke zie K4.o r gan 


482 


12.2111 


Steven Travis 


504 




Ve ry B rief Life Sketch 


398 


12,2112 


T if fany Lynn 


504 


1 1 . 1 w 


Cpf^ilf* Cl a T'W 

' C ^ 1 1 C v.' 1 CL 1 XNi 


502 


12. 2115 


^^e ndy 


504 




Photo 






DEVINE 




11,11 


C V- 1 1 C IVX CLiJWXlC V ^ llilLll y 




16.73 


Marilyn Richardson 


518 


10, 


l, n a T" 1 *a G (Jtx/ A n 

V-'ilCLX LC O V— 'WCll 


AQQ 


16.731 


Me lis sa 


518 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


A ^ A 


16. 73 h 


Robert Frank 


518 


7344 


Cherilyn Jo 


49? 




DIXON 




855 


Cheryl Ann Dixon (Becker) 


4Q7 


21411 


Adria Ann 


479 


2421 


Ch r is to phe r Dye r 


481 


84 w 


Adryne Hodson 


496 


7312 


Cindi Marlene ( Roberts ) 


491 


13.2 


Afton ( Wagstaff ) 


508 


1 6. 44 w 


CinHv RnhpTts 

XX y J- \ \j X L> ^ 


D I O 


12. 33 


Alan Rom^ney 


505 


13.13 w 


Clponp Rannlpv Thiirhp'T 


J u o 


11. 


Albert Frederick 


502 


11,3 


Clifton Rasmussen 


J V/ ^ 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


300 


1 6. 5 w 


Colleen Callister 


D 1 O 


763 w 


Alberta M^ae 


493 




Photo 


431 


10.4 


Alice Delenna ( Andrews ) 


500 


16,812 


Collette 


519 

3 17 


4 


Alice Smith (Dangerfield ) 


483 


761 


Con^tanrp Lpp ( Rif*h \ 

^ XX ucLix v.. -1—' y .Lvx^xi / 


t 7 J 


14. 3 


Allie ( Gardner ) 


512 


12, 222 


C vntVi ia Slip ( G ihhs ^ 


-J U -J 


16. 84 


Angela 


519 


2351 


D a 1 p T jPp 


4Rn 


735 3 


Angie Lynn 


492 


16.61 


Dana TnVin 

X.-'CLllCL U Willi 


D J. 


863 w 


Ann Jvlarie Begin 


497 


12. 233 


Daniel Peterson 


U J 


13. 6 


Anna ( Barrett ) 


511 


7351 


Darin Richard 


492 


12. 5 


Amy LaVern ( Larson ) 


506 


16. 123 


David Allen 


517 


1 1 95 


Amiy Lynne 


503 


16, 53 


David Callister 


518 


8631 


Amy Marie 


497 


1 2. 24 


David Chipman 


505 


16. 114 


Andrew Jerald 


517 


12, 243 


David Chipman, Jr© 


505 


8521 


And re e Lynn 


496 


1 1 , 94 


David Harry 


503 


16 


Arnold 


517 


216 


David Robert 


479 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


408 


862 


Deanna ( Marshall) 


497 


3 


Arthur DeGrey 


482 


12,23 w 


Deanne Pete r son 


505 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


398 


12. 321 


De bbie 


505 


14. 7 


ATtVmr Smoot 


515 


11,93 


De bo rah 


503 


12, 242 


A Q Vt 1 \r 
■£1. D XI I c y 


505 


235 


DeGrey LeRoy 


480 


12. 241 


A.\id r a 


505 


16. 82 


Denise ( Kelly ) 


519 

_/ X 7 


11 R 


-i— ' d u y 


502 


16, 43 


Dennis Dastrup 


518 

J X o 


233 


Rarhfl ra Ann ( Cleffff) 


480 


16.112 


D iana 


517 


2352 


■i—f CL X vJCL X OL iLV^Cd \JL 1. \^ \^ 


480 


2412 


Diane 


481 


13.7 


Bert Lester 


511 


13. 131 


Diana Lynn 


508 




Photo 


395 


12,31 


Diane ( Tempest ) 


505 




H i sto ry 


396 


13,41 w 


Di Ane K4cDonald 


509 

3 U 7 




Family Photo 


395 


12. 32 w 


Diane Scott 


505 




Home Photo 


395 


234 


Dixie Beth 


480 


1 1 . 94 w 


Bonnie Kay Howell 


503 


12. 3 


Donald Maiben 


505 


12. 231 


Brenda ( Hills ) 


505 




Photo 


207 


2364 


Brennan Russ 


480 




Histo ry 


209 


16. 33 


Brent 


517 




Family Photo 
Home Photo 


208 
208 



525 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I,D. No, 


DIXON 


Page 


I.D. No. 


DIXON 


Page 


1 2. 32 


Donald Romney 


505 


863 


Gary Ronald 


4V ( 


853 w 


Donna Penrod 




1 6. 8 w 


Genniel Larsen 


D 1 9 


] 6. ] 


Doris Ann ( Christensen ) 


5 1 7 




Photo 




212 


Dorothy ( Harrison ) 


Ana 
4/0 


•7 A 
( D 


George S. 


4Q 9 


864 


Dor sey 


A c\n 
4V ( 




Photo 


9A9 


16.9 


Douglas Wayne 


519 




History 


9 A i; 

J D J 




Photo 






Family Photo 


364 




History 


46 1 




Home Photo 


364 




Family Photo 


460 


n c o 

853 


Gerald Ernest 


496 




Home Photo 


460 


8522 


Gina Lee 


496 


8535 


Drew Ward 


496 


14. 8 


Gladys ( Nelson ) 


515 


87 


Edith Alice ( Fallentine ) 


497 


73 


Glen Hands 


491 


12.4 


1 / n 11"/" \ 

Edna ( Ballif ) 


506 




Photo 


99c 

ZZ5 


16.4 


Eldon Arnold 


518 




History 


9 9 •? 




Photo 


415 




Family Photo 


226 




History 


417 




Home Photo 


226 




Family Photo 


416 


3 1 2 w 


Glenda Cleveland 


482 




Home Photo 


416 


1 3. 1 3 w 


Gloria Ann Evans 


508 


16.41 


Eldon Reed 


518 


16.7 


Gloria May ( Richardson) 


518 


14. w 


Electa I^aPrele bmoot 


512 


Z7 


G rant 


482 




Very iJriei i-iiie oketcn 


362 


lb . i 


Grant DeGrey 


517 


11.4 


Elmo Arthur 


502 




Fhoto 


403 


73 w 


Elva Ellen bchemensky 


49 1 




History 


405 




Photo 


225 




Family Photo 


404 


•7 9 "J 


ii.lva Jean ( ii.lliott ) 


491 


in c 1 9 
1 U , i c 


Gregory Charles 


500 


16.81 w 


Emarene Graff 


5 1 9 


1/1 9 1 

16.31 


Gregory Marks 


517 


1 1 . 7D 


Emily Ann 


503 


c 9 9 


Liuy Wayne 


A C\C 


81 


Erma Mae ( Boshard ) 


494 


1 5 . 


Harriet Amelia ( West ) 


516 


O A 

Z4 w 


Erma Murdock 


48 1 


75 


Harriet Faye { Bjorklund ) 


493 




r-^noto 


111 


1 ... 


T T _ __ ■ i T_T _ J 

Harriet Hands 


4 V i 


83 


Ernest Arnold 


495 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


368 


o 
o 


Ernest DeGrey 


A Ci A 

4V4 


11 1 
11.1 


Harry Albert 


C A 
D\JC 




Very rSriei l-,iie oketcn 


1 ^ A 
3 J 4 




Photo 


1 

263 


13. 3 


Eugene Pari 


509 




History 


265 




r^noto 


C5 i 




Family Photo 


9 A /t 

Z64 




H isto ry 


9 "3 C 
^ J D 




Home Photo 


9 Aa 
664 




Home Photo 


23 3 


16,422 


Hayley 


518 


J I w 


ii.va Kutne JVLiidennaLl 


48 


14. 6 


Helen ( Payne ) 


514 




r'noto 


399 


1 3. 7 w 


Helen Andelino 


511 


o b w 


Hiva Kuth Ward 


496 




Photo 


395 




Jr noto 


307 


12. 2 w 


Helen Chipman 


504 


1 D . ^ 


Evelyn ( Smith ) 


517 




Photo 


175 


76"^ 


Evelyn Rose 


493 


1 6. 9 w 


Helen Konopelski 


519 


in ^ ttr 

i U . D w 


Florence Janeczko 


500 




Photo 


459 




r^noto 


411 




Henry Aldous 


477 


1 A 7 
I O . J w 


Florence Rosella Marks 


517 




Photo 


11 






403 


21 


Henry Aldous II 


477 


1 O . D 


Floyd Preston 


5 1 8 




Photo 


75 




ir noto 


437 




History 


77 




H isto ry 


439 




Family Photo 


76 




Family Photo 


438 




Home Photo 


76 




riome r-^noto 


438 


1 


Henry Alfred 


477 




Fred Chipman 


505 


16. 12 


Howard Allen 


517 


^ ? 7 


r reu vv alter 


504 


16, 1 


Howard Banks 


517 




x^noto 


1 75 




Photo 


315 




Histo ry 


1 77 




History 


317 




Family Photo 


1 76 




Family Photo 


316 




riome r^noto 


1 76 




Home Photo 


316 


1 D . 1 


Fulvia Call 


5 1 7 


16.115 


Howard Marks 


517 




Photo 


315 


16. 4 w 


Ila Jean Hair 


518 


243 


G, Michael 


481 




Photo 


415 



526 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 


DIXON 




731 w 


Tna K4a W^nn 1 v 

J.11CL AViCL C » » W W LOC y 


4Q1 


1 3 ^ 


me z ^ -L-'eniboii ^ 


CIA 
D J U 




J 3. me S Ellg6 IIG 




7 A ^ 

C*T 1 


J 3.rne s R , 


>1 1 
4o J 


J \J a 1 J 


1 O >^ £i ^ I ^ A C 1 


X ( 


231 


U C CL 11 -L-J LiCLLd V ^IlliLil / 




16.45 


kJ CCLXilXiliC 




11. 941 




503 

J \j ~j 


16.11 


ij C 1 CL L U J— 'CL 11 id X 


1 7 


7621 


T o T* TVi a ^" f" n o \xj 

\J KZ 1. Clliy IVXcLt tlXC w 


40 


16.52 


J 02L n 


J 1 


8524 


T O *=> H 1 It 
U \J C 1— ' X its. 


4Q A 




*J UIlll jT.lUt.'LlO 


47Q 


2 


John DeGrey 


477 




vciy i-'iici J— ( lie ixc t \^ii 


88 


242 


kj w o \^ Mil ^v± g 


481 


236 w 


UiV4 X Lli. •L-iNa' U X O J.\ V_l O O 


480 


13 74 


T 1 1 H 1 a l/* o T* 1 

J liuy ^ iJcLixc 1 } 


511 


1 \J c w 


u UUy vJdy ic VV UUUb 


4Q3 


12. 23 w 


T n n \A/ 1 1 1 i a ty^ c 
■J LIU y VV ilXlcLIlio 


505 


1 A 177 




5 1 7 


12. 224 


Julie Anne 


505 


232 


kj vXllv^ XVXCL 1 y \ v> !_/ X 11 ^ 11 7 


480 


16.11 w 


Ts a T'^i'n T-Ta^rmnnH 
^^dxc^ii xxdy 11 11-' iiu 


517 


16.91 


rvat*fin T n a n 

l-^dX 11 U tk>dll 


519 


852 w 


rx a 7" Tl \ ^/T a T* TTll" f 
X^CL X 11 -1— C IVlcL X X V-' I, I. 


496 


734 w 


Karen McClellan 


492 


214 w 


X. ^CL X XX ICl <J \^ \J yj ^ w XX 


479 


o u 1 


r\ a4"riT*^m f (. >■ (^xt7 1 l 
Xi-d uii X y XI ^ V— ' X w icy / 


497 


7 1 4.7 


x\.d y V x-ic e / 


479 


LtJD W 


r\ a ^ r Tl a y] oT\a it i v 

x\.d y -I—/ d IT L e lie xv xa 


480 




xs.e nne tn v_» ai i 


517 


17 7 7 K 


Kerry E, 


505 


in 7 


xvevm v_>ndxLe& 


500 


c c: ? A 


Kirnbe rly 


496 


1 A 1^4 
ID. D*± 


x\.n b 1 1X1 


518 


7354 


KTi^fiTi Ann 

XxX XOUlll ^ XXX i. 


492 


16. 121 


K "Tl s fi na 

J- X X O I, X XXd 


517 


1 Q4 


x^lXX L l—'LJLieXdo 


519 


16.42 


T T TV T~)p n 

-1 — ' cx X X y x.-'ccixx 


518 


10.51 


Larry Owen 


500 


16. 423 


Laura 


518 




T,anT*a TnannA 

LJCX Li i d tJ L'dllllC 


496 


3171 

^ X C X 


T if* Ann Tj3vnf 

J — 1 KZ xxllll J—iaL y lie 


482 


B7 
o c 


T .A aVi T.illtan i T'^riT'H i 

J^Cdil J— fiiildll \ 1- L* 1 Ll / 


494 


7631 


\& A n H T* p w 


493 


1 17 1 
1 J , X Cx 


j-ic ^nn \ xxuwLcy } 


507 


1 4 


juiG x\ oy 


512 




V C X y J—J X iC 1 J-J iiC kJlVCLL-ll 


282 


^ A 1 




512 


31 1 


T.jaclifa I |-TaTHin \ 
J-JC? OLXC \ lldlUl 11 ) 


482 


1 2. 3 w 


-1 i L L Xe V 11 CL W .L \ ^ 1 X J.AX\.^ y 


505 




Photo 


207 


1 A IT/ 

1 D. W 


T £i + 1 1- 1 a A A a a nlr c 
J— «e L 1 L Id ivxd y xj d iiiN. a 


517 




V x^ y x^ X xc X j_iixc ^ in.c l^ii 


408 


7 7 


L ind a 


480 


R41 

04 1 


T.inHa i IRo^f^ I 

X^lllLld \ X\ V./ o c / 


496 


1 A 1 7 


T.inHa Tf^an K4ano'^iim 

X_JillUd O CdXl XVi. CL XXg IX X 


517 


11 Q 1 

1 J . 7 J 


TinHa PCaxr ^ Tl off 1 ^ 

J-flXlUd XVd y \ IVXdXiL^LLi ; 


503 


2143 


Lisa 


479 


7343 


Lisa Ann 


492 



I.D. No. 


1.A, L_^1N 






Lisa Kay 


DUD 


17 11 
1 J . 1 1 


Lois ( McEwan ) 


DU ( 


1 D . D W 


Lois Nla i Dickenson 


K 1 

Die 




"noto 


4.7 7 
4j / 


17 1 TTI 


Loleta W^iscomb 


D U f 




"PU ri+r» 


1 A Q 


7 717 


x-iuri jedii 


4Q 1 


7 1 7 


j-jQU lb e V J— /d r K. in ^ 


470 
4 f 7 


9 A 


Lucian DeGrey 


4R9 
4 fc< 


9 1 ^ij 


Luc ile Knowlden 


477 




r^noto 


71; 


9 7 Ti; 


J— <Lie iia xxdnndii ividubeii 


4Rn 

T u 






R 3 


1 7 TI7 


J— 'ULnenid vx-iLJLiiey ividiucii 






V e X y J — ' 1 xc X J — i X X * — ' i V \^ L \> 1 1 


1 44 


1 A m 


x-jyxiii r^iin \ 1. d i lib wvj x^ ill ; 


D 1 


8 c: 7 7 


ivxa rc otdmey 


4Q A 
4 7D 


17 1 7 Tir 


a r ga r e t Anne S im p s on 


n 7 
D U 1 


14 7 7 


ivx drgdxet Ji<Lectd 


c; 1 9 

D 1 ^ 


744 117 


IVX d. rid v>ribtlild x^LlcX^Ld 


4fi 1 
40 1 




"KAaTia T</^nisp ^ T'avlnT' \ A. 

XVXCL X Xd X-^LJLIXOC \ idyiwx / *t 


4Ri; 

4oD 


R5 1 

J 1 


\4aTir)Tip Tpan 1 RoTPn 1 

XVXCL X I \J X Xe CLXX \ ^— ' X V-' XX ^ 


4QA 

rr 7 \J 


2354 


N^ark. DeGrey 


480 


241 1 


K/Ta tU" F^vrinc 

XVXCL X IN. j-^ y X Xllg 


481 


74 


\A a-TTr ( AiItpIp \ 
xvxd X y \ x^irv-cic / 


4Q2 


17 4 7 


\Ao>"ir Ann 1 I) 1 n 1 
IVldry /xilll ^ \->15Uil ) 


HOO 

-? U 7 


w 


a T"tr Ann a i n f 

XVXdX y xxllll X dillLCX 


494 




very xi>nei j-<iie iJi\.eL\..ii 


-J 1 *x 




"KA a T"\r Ann S m i i" n 

XVXCLX y XkXXXX t—'XXlXLiX 


483 




Photo 


1 2 


1 7 7 7 «/ 


ivxd ry x-ze vj X uciiy 


511 


OA 9 
04 :i 


Nlary Ellen 


40A 

47D 


1 7 *.T 

J J . W 


Klary Etola Dange rfield 


^07 




V e ry xDnei x-iiie ojs.eLcii 


377 


17 A 1 TT7 

1 J , 4 1 W 


K'la ry J ane Chattin 


■^no 

DU7 


19 9 1 
X C, C.X 


N^Iary Lou ( Taylor ) 


^ n4 

13 U4 


17 A TTT 

I J , 4 w 


ivxary ivxaciLctd rxiiib 


J U 7 




x^ 1 1 U t U 


283 


17 7 11; 
X J , J w 


ivxa rrna jDemdiu 


283 


1 A 117 
ID, X X J 


iviattnew jeraiu 


5 1 7 

_/ X 1 


9 i; 


ivi auu \ ivi a X Kn a m / 


4R 1 

'TO X 


9 7 Tii 


iviaureen vvciisex 


480 




X 11 LJ L L* 


83 

-J 


14 


"KA aiiTinp ( (^.HiTHq ^ 

IVidLIX illC ^ V^llXiLlO / 


513 


7 71 
/ J 1 


^ A r m 1 ^ T-t 

iVidX LcXl 


401 

ty X 


9 7 A7 

^ .J ^ 


fro n 

xvxe ^cLU 


4Rn 

^ L/ 


11 Q 
11.7 


\A /al^rin RaG m n q ^ p n 

xvxc L V ill X\. dOiiiLlOOt^lX 


503 




PVi of 

X li L* LLJ 


443 




History 


44 
44 D 




X dixixxy 1- iiuuL^ 


444 




XX Lf X X iC X ii L^ L L/ 


444 


R43 


\/i^(=» Tflll VpT*1 
XVXC XXlLi vcxx 


496 


1 9 979 


AA 1 ^ n a 1 
XVX I C 11 d C 1 


505 


1 A 79 


"WA 1 V» a t» 1 Tl It t 
iVX X L. I X d C X J-/ C J X C y 


517 


9 7 7 


X/Ti <^Via o1 T\ <a n f 
iVX i II d C i X^t^ XX 1, 


480 


7 19 

DXL 


iVi ic na e i x-^ ay ne 


482 


94 7 9 

ii4 J L 


IVX icndei x\u r niic y 


481 

*o 1 


1 A Q9 


Mi("Viplfa ( Rplhark ) 

XVX i^IlCXC \ 1— ' C i U d L- IX / 


519 


12. 323 


K4 1 f Vi p 1 1 p 

XVX X^lX^ XXv.li 


505 


12. 221 


Michelle Jo ( Gregg ) 


505 


11.2 


Mildred ( Tangren ) 


502 



527 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No. 




Pag 




DIXON 






DIXON 




16.811 


Monica 


519 


86 


Ronald 


497 


2422 


Nicole Noelle 


481 




Photo 


31 1 


11.5 


Norma ( Jess ) 


502 




History 


313 


854 w 


Norma Jeanne Allan 


496 




Family Photo 


312 


16.83 


Norman Paul 


519 




Home Photo 


312 


14, 2 w 


Ora Anderson 


512 




W ildwood Home 


312 




Photo 


181 




Ronald Jesse 


496 


1 0. 5 


Owen George 


500 


854 


Ronald Ward 


496 




Photo 


411 


1 0. Z 


Kuby ( Cowley ) 


499 




Home Photo 


411 


A 

Z4 


Rulon Sterling 


481 




History 


412 




Photo 


1 1 3 


8541 


Pamela Jeanne 


496 




T T • J 

History 


1 1 5 


1 3. 


Parley bmith 


507 




Family Photo 


1 14 




Very Brief Life oketch 


372 




Home Photo 


114 


13.71 


Patricia 


51 1 


11 n 


Ruth 


502 


12.22 w 


Patricia Donahue 


505 


01c 


Ruth Marion ( Cannon ) 


479 


1 2. 24 w 


Patricia Stewart 


505 


21412 


Ryan Aldous 


479 


16.62 


Paul Raymond 


518 


7352 


Ryan Glen 


492 


14. 2 


Paul Smoot 


512 


C A A 


Ryan James 


496 




Photo 


181 


c.5oi 


Ryan Patrick 


480 




History 


183 


85d 


bandra Lee ( Davis ) 


497 




r amily Photo 


1 82 


c 
b 


Sarah Ann ( McConachie ) 


484 




rlome Photo 


1 82 


c w 


Sarah Ann Lewis 


477 


14.21 


Paul Smoot, Jr. 


512 




Very Brief Life bketch 


1 22 


13, 122 


Pauline ( Wilder ) 


508 




oaran UeOrey 


477 


244 


Peter M. 


481 




Photo 


1 2 


13. 731 


Phaed ra 


ell 

5 1 1 


1 ^ A ... 

1 . 4 W 


Sarah Jean Dastrup 


518 


211 


Phyllis ( bhaw ) 


477 




Photo 


415 


85 


Kal ph 


496 


14. 4 


Sarah Vera (Summerhays) 


CIO 

5 1 2 




Photo 


307 


12. 322 


bcott 


505 




History 


309 


12. 324 


Sean R. 


505 




Family Photo 


308 


11. w 


bena Rasmussen 


502 




Home Photo 


308 




Very Brief Life bketch 


446 


852 


Ralph Stanley 


496 


2361 


Shannon DeGrey 


480 


31 


Raymond Lane 


482 


16. 124 


Shaunna 


480 




Photo 


399 




oherlme ( Mitchell ) 


508 




History 


401 


1 3. 43 


bherrie Lillie ( Austin ) 


510 




Family Photo 


400 


735 w 


Sherry Lynn Pyper 


492 




Home Photo 


400 


] 6. 4Z w 


Shiela Higgins 


518 


i J . 4 


Keed JJangerlieid 


509 


76 3 


bhirel r ems 


493 




Photo 


283 


1 U. D 1 W 


Shirley Ann Orpen 


500 




History 


285 


73Z 


Shirley Mae ( Davis ) 


492 




1? amily Photo 


284 


7 315 


Stacy Lynn 


491 




Home Photo 


284 


23 


btanley Lewis 


480 


13.41 


Keed Uarth 


509 




Photo 


83 


12. 1 


Rhea Luthenia ( Reeve ) 


504 




History 


85 


1 Z. 23 


Kichard 


505 




i amily Photo 


84 


735 


Richard b. 


492 




Home Photo 


84 


IOC 


Robert George 


493 





Stanley Lewis, Jr. 


480 


1 fa. 8 


Robert Norman 


519 


10.3 


btella ( Lewis ) 


500 




Photo 


453 


Id. 63 


btephanie Gwyn 


CIO 

518 




History 


455 


2141 


Steven John 


479 




Family Photo 


454 


16.81 


Steven Lewis 


519 




Home Photo 


454 


11.92 


Susan ( Adams ) 


503 


13.412 


Robert Reed 


509 


13. 123 


buzane ( Pulsipher ) 


508 


9 


Robert Smith 


498 


241 w 


Suzanne Eyring 


48 1 


13.73 


Robert Timothy 


511 


8531 


Te resa 


496 


16. 44 


Roger Duane 


518 


13. 132 


Teresse Kay 


508 








7311 


Terri Mae ( Vaksinick ) 


491 








8532 


Thai Wade 


496 



528 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D. No, 








DIXON 






ENGLE 


13. 72 


Thomas Anthony 


511 


14.4113 


\/f P 1 a n i f» 

A.vx^ L CL 11 i, W 


Die. 


7341 


Timothy Hugh 


492 


14.4111 


\\A 1 1 Q Q a 


1 c. 


7632 


Timothy Paul 


493 


14,4114 




OIL. 


16. 93 


Todd DeGrey 


519 




FALLENTINE 




7342 


Todd William 


492 


873 w 


Annette W, Bean 




10. 511 


Travis Owen 


500 


87 h 


Bernard Carl 


4Q7 


2141 w 


Val Fulmar 


477 




Photo 


341 


10. 1 


VaLera ( Ririe ) 


499 


872 


Carolyn ( Gilstrap ) 


t7 1 


76 w 


Veon Collings 


493 


8731 


Dustin Carl 


498 

T 7 




Photo 


363 


87 


Edith Alice Dixon 


497 


11.6 


Vera ( Anderson ) 


502 




Photo 


341 


84 


Verl Grant 


496 




History 


343 




Photo 


229 




Family Photo 


342 




History 


231 




Home Photo 


242 




Family Photo 


230 


871 


Jo Ann ( Chidester ) 


497 




Home Photo 


230 


873 w 


Kathleen Kastrinkas 


497 




Wildwood Home 


230 


875 


Michael Dixon 


498 


13.12 


Vern Lee 


507 


873 


Robert Bernard 


498 


86 w 


Verneda Jackson 


497 


874 


Susan ( Flatberg ) 


498 




Photo 


311 




FARNSWORTH 




13. 1 


Vernon Lee 


507 


16,51 


Lynn Ann Dixon 


518 




Photo 


169 


16,51 h 


Paul J, 


518 




History 


171 




FARRER 






Family Photo 


170 


6841 


David Glen 


490 

T 7 U 




Home Photo 


170 


684 


Ellen Kartchner 


•x 7 U 


72 


Vesta ( Booth ) 


491 


684 h 


Rand Glen 


490 


10. 6 


Virginia ( Schugk ) 


501 




FISHER 




10 w 


Virginia Beckstead 


499 


611 


Elayne Taylor 


485 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


414 


611 h 


Grant A. 


485 


13. 7 w 


Virginia Oswald 


511 


61121 


Hillary 


485 


84 w 


Virginia Poulson 


496 


6112 


Jeffrey Taylor 


485 




Photo 


229 


422 


Karren Dangerfield 


483 


14. 22 


Vivian ( McKay ) 


512 


6113 


Kathy ( Duncan ) 


4R5 


12. 


Walter DeGrey 


504 


61 12 w 


Donnette Morrison 


485 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


143 


611 1 


Terri ( Jensen ) 


485 


7633 


Wayne Daniel 


493 




FLATBERG 




7 


William Aldous 


491 


874 h 


David R, 


498 

~ 7 




Very Brief Life Sketch 


272 


8741 


Jenny 


^ 7 


734 


William Frank 


492 


874 


Susan Fallentine 


498 


71 


William Hands 


491 




FORD 




243 w 


Yvonne Romney 


481 


823 w 


Anginita Maria Van Derbeck 


494 




DOMINE 




11, 222 


Cambric Emma 


502 


2124 


Lisbeth Harrison 


478 


11. 221 


Cimony Anna 


502 


2124 h 


Steven Anthony 


478 


8233 


Cynthia 


494 




DUNCAN 




8232 


Dale 


494 


6113 


Kathy Fisher 


485 


1 1. 223 


David Menton 


502 


61131 


Me gan 


485 


823 


Dixon Alton 


494 


6113 h 


Paul H, 


485 


11. 22 h 


James Eric 


502 




EJOVEC 




824 


Janice Ann ( Neerings ) 


494 


4423 


Amy Lanahan 


483 


8231 


Kathleen 


494 


4423 h 


Gerald 


483 


82 


Leah Lillian Dixon 


494 




ELLIOTT 






Photo 


155 


733 


Elva Jean Dixon 


492 




History 


157 


7331 


Kellie Jean ( Witte ) 


492 




Family Photo 


156 


733 h 


Kenneth Lee 


492 




Home Photo 


156 


7332 


Keri Lee 


492 




Wallsburg Home 


156 


7333 


Shane D. 


492 


822 


Lois Amber { Bigelow ) 


495 


7334 


Travis Gtinner 


492 


8235 


Marianne 


494 




ENGLE 




821 


Marilyn Mae ( Simmons ) 


494 


14.411 h 


Eldean Roy 


512 


82 h 


Mayo Alton 


494 


14,4112 


Joshua 


512 




Photo 


155 


14.411 


Lynette Anderson 


512 


11. 22 


Nancy Ann Tangren 


502 



529 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 




Page 


I.D, No. 




Page 




FORD 






GRIGGS 




8234 


Steven Mathew 


494 


16. 211 


Brian Wilfred 


517 




FRAMPTON 




16. 212 


Deborah Kay 


517 


6146 


Alan Taylor 


485 


16. 216 


Julie Dionne 


517 


614 h 


Boyd M. 


485 


16. 21 


Karen Ann Smith 


517 


6143 


Bruce Taylor 


485 


16. 215 


Kathryn Ann 


517 


6143 w 


Connie Lynne Bird 


485 


16. 214 


Kent David 


517 


6142 


David Taylor 


485 


16. 213 


Ste phen Smith 


517 


614 


Dixie Taylor 


485 


16. 21 h 


Wilford Charles 


517 


61431 


Jeremy Taylor 


485 




GUNTER 




6147 


Kent Taylor 


485 


8224 


Cindy Bigelow 


495 


6142 w 


Keri Ann Wheadon 


485 


82242 


Gale Tex 


495 


6141 


Marrianne ( Bushnell ) 


485 


82241 


Jeremiah Michael 


495 


6145 


Paul Taylor 


485 


8224 h 


Robert Michael 


495 


6144 


Susan 


485 




HARDIN 






GAMBLES 




311 


Leslie Dixon 


482 


2113 he 


Amy Suzanne 


477 


3111 


Leslie Layne 


482 


21131 


Anna Kathleen 


477 


311 h 


Thomas Ray 


482 


21132 


Erin 


477 


3112 


Vernon Shayne 


482 


2113 


Kathleen Shaw 


477 




HARDING 




2113 he 


Ke r ry Scott 


477 


46 h 


Curtis P. 


484 


21 13 h 


Kirk Edward 


477 




Photo 


257 




GARDNER 




46 


Grace Dangerfield 


484 


14. 3 


Allie Dixon 


512 




Photo 


257 




Photo 


237 




History 


259 




History 


239 




Family Photo 


258 




Family Photo 


238 




Home Photo 


258 




Home Photo 


238 


462 


Judy Ann ( Pugh ) 


484 


14. 312 


Genevieve 


512 


461 


Miriam ( Waterman ) 


484 


14. 31 


James Dixon 


512 




HARMON 




14. 31 w 


Martha G rover 


512 


14. 611 h 


Mark Lewis 


514 


14, 3 h 


Reed Snow 


512 


14. 611 


Robin Lee Ipsen 


514 




Photo 


237 




HARRISON 




14. 311 


Robert Grover 


5 1 2 


2127 


Angela 


478 


14. 314 


Stewart Grover 


512 


212 


Dorothy Dixon 


478 


14. 313 


Thomas Grover 


512 


2125 


Heather 


478 




GARNER 




2126 


Holly ( Jensen ) 


478 


12, 431 


Becky Jean Ballif 


506 


2123 


Judith ( George ) 


478 


12.4311 


Shane Vern 


506 


2121 


Linda Lucille ( Welling ) 


478 


12.431 h 


Vern J. 


506 


2124 


Lisbeth ( Domine ) 


478 




GEORGE 




2122 


Patricia ( Patcyk ) 


478 


2123 


Judith Harrison 


478 


212 h 


Virl L. 


478 


21231 


Samuel Nephi 


478 




HARWARD 




2123 


Steven Michael 


478 


13.61 3 h 


Gregory J, 


511 




GIBBS 




13. 613 


Kristine Barrett 


511 


12. 222 


Cynthia Sue Dixon 


505 


13. 6131 


Tamera Lynn 


511 


12. 222 h 


Richard F. 


505 


13. 6132 


Tasha Lee 


511 




GILSTRAP 






HEAL 




872 


Carolyn Fallentine 


497 


687 h 


Alan Perry 


490 


8721 


Christopher 


497 • 


6872 


Amy Louise 


490 


8722 


Mollie 


497 


6871 


Maria Ann 


490 


8721 h 


Ralph M. 


497 


687 


Rosena Louise Kartchner 


490 




GRAHAM 






HILLS 




14.43 h 


Daniel Watkins 


513 


12. 231 


Brenda Dixon 


505 


14.43 


Diana Summerhays 


513 


12. 231 h 


Dal 


505 




GREGG 






HIPP 




12. 221 h 


Mathew 


505 


11.61 


Carol Leslie Anderson 


502 


12. 221 


Michelle Jo Dixon 


505 


11.611 


Daniel Edward 


502 




GREGSON 




11.612 


Robert Dean 


502 


6231 


Carol Lyn Richards 


486 


11.61 h 


William E. 


502 


62311 


Daniel Kim 


486 




HODSON 




6231 h 


Kim Wolsey 


486 


6331 


Diane Taylor 


487 










Lane Taylor 


487 






530 


6331 h 


Scott Linn 


487 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No, 




Page 


I.D. No. 




Page 




IPSEN 






KARTCHNER 




14. 61 


Barbara June Payne 


514 


687 


Rosena Louise ( Heal ) 


490 


14. 633 


Bradley Payne 


514 


68 


Ruth Elaine Taylor 


490 


14. 614 


Dana Kaye 


514 




Photo 


373 


14. 612 


Janalyn 


514 




History 


375 


14.61 h 


Robert Lee 


514 




Family Photo 


374 


14. 611 


Robin Lee ( Harmon ) 


514 




Home Photo 


374 




JENSEN 






Wildwood Home 


374 


2126 h 


David Dee 


478 


6853 


Taylor Andersen 




2126 


Holly Harrison 


378 




KELLY 




61111 


Jennifer Maurine 


485 


16. 82 


Denise Dixon 


519 


611 1 h 


Lawrence Jeremy 


485 


16. 821 


Lisa Anne 




6111 


Terri Fisher 


485 


16. 82 h 


Mark E. 


519 




JESS 






LANAHAN 


11.51 


Barbara Ann 


502 


4423 


Amy ( Eiovec ) 


483 


11,5 


Norma Dixon 


502 


442 


Carolyn Dangerfield 


483 




Photo 


393 


442 h 


Edward 


483 




History 


394 


4422 


Melis sa 


483 

TO-' 


1 1. 5 h 


Richard Graham 


502 


4421 


Susan ( Bowers ) 


483 


1 ] . 52 


Richard Steven 


502 




LARKIN 






JOHNSON 




2131 w 


Carol Lynn White 


479 


73211 


Jason Larry 


492 


21311 


David Dixon 


479 


13. 222 


Jay Ladd 


509 


2131 


Dixon Ferrin 


479 


13. 2221 


Jay Lamar 


509 


213 h 


E, Ferrin 


479 


13. 22 h 


Jay Lorus 


509 


2134 


James Robert 


479 


13. 225 


Jeffry Warren 


509 


2136 


Jane 


479 


13. 223 


Jerry Dixon 


509 


2132 


Julia ( Squires ) 


479 


73213 


Joshua Keith 


492 


21341 


Jennife r 


479 


73212 


Lacy Ann 


492 


14. 221 


Lance C. 


512 


7321 h 


Larry Ronald 


492 


213 


Louise Dixon 


479 


13. 224 


Lisa 


509 


2133 


Martha Ann 


479 


13. 221 


Lori 


509 


2134 w 


Martha C. Gleason 


479 


7321 


Micki Davis 


492 


21351 


Nicole 


479 


13. 22 


Norma Jean Wagstaff 


509 


21352 


Paul Benjamin 


479 


13. 223 w Sandra Jean Linford 


509 


14. 221 


Rebecca Dixon McKay 


512 


13. 222 w Tammy Jones Sutton 


509 


21312 


Sarah 


479 




KARAWOWSKI 




2135 w 


Sharon Elzey 


479 


761 


Constance Lee Dixon 


493 


2135 


William Lyle 


479 


761 h 


Eddie 


493 




LARSON 




7611 


Scott Edward 


493 


12. 5 


Amy LaVern 


506 




KARTCHNER 






Photo 


351 


6862 


Benjamin Nelson 


490 




History 


353 


686 


David Taylor 


490 




Family Photo 


352 


6821 


Drew 


490 




Home Photo 


352 


683 


Elaine 


490 


12. 51 w 


Anne Breinholt 


506 


684 


Ellen ( Farrer ) 


490 


12. 513 


Barry O Neal 


506 


68 h 


Fred Dixon 


490 


12. 5 


Doyle R. 


506 




Photo 


373 




Photo 


351 


6822 


Heathe r 


490 


12. 52 w 


Kathy West 


506 


6861 


Jeffrey Nelson 


490 


12. 51 


Larry O Neal 


506 


686 w 


Karen Renee Nelson 


490 


12. 52 


Michael Dixon 


506 


685 w 


Kathryn Andersen 


490 


12. 521 


Ryan Michael 


506 


6854 


Kelli 


490 


12. 512 


Stacy Jean 


506 


682 


Kenneth Taylor 


490 


12. 511 


Suzanne 


506 


6852 


Kerianne 


490 




LAWS 




681 


Linda ( Tyler ) 


490 


13. 524 


Be cky 


510 


682 w 


MariAnne Allene Davis 


490 


13. 522 


' Carol Eileen Patterson 


510 


6851 


Mark Andersen 


490 


13, 521 


Cynthia ( Boren ) 


510 


688 


Mary Ann ( Warner ) 


490 


13. 5221 


Dennis Marvin 


510 


6824 


Nathan 


490 


13. 52 


Elaine Joyce Denison 


510 


685 


Richard Taylor 


490 


13. 52 h 


LaMar R. 


510 


6823 


Robin 


490 


13. 525 


Lamar 


510 



531 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I.D. No. Page 





T AW*^ 

±jS\. VV L3 




X J t 3 LtO 


Linda ( Carrol ) 


J X yj 




^'l^arvin 


1 n 




Terry ( Alvey ) 


=1 1 n 

D X yj 




T 

■L^ J_j J— ( 




7 1 477 


r\LL 15 O n 


47Q 


7 1 47 Vi 


D a vid 


47Q 


7147 


i\.d.y x-zlxljh 


47Q 


71471 


IN IC U ltJ 


479 




A—iILi VV IkJ 




in 1 4 

J U , J XH 


Erin 


"inn 

~f \j \j 


in 71 


Frederick Dixon 


J \J \J 


in Vi 


Frederick Wesley 


500 






345 


in 111 


Jason Frederick 


500 


in '^^ 


Jess ic a 


500 


1 n ■^7 


John Stephen 


J \J \J 


in 3 1 "i 




500 


in 717 


Kerry Bradford 


5on 

~J \J KJ 


in 77 


Lynn Ann ( Dahlberg ) 




in 71 tij 


r^a L xy rvay o t otr 


J \j \j 


in 717 


r\<x c ne i 


500 


1 0. 34 


Sandra Lee 


500 


1 n 3 




500 

■J \j \j 






■^4 5 




n. lo CO ry 


747 




It arniiy x^rnjuu 


74 A 




rr o II le r^nvjco 






LTNDFRM AK 




17 1 7 7 v. 




5 7 


17 177 




507 


17 177 7 






17 17 7 1 


Re be c ca 


n 7 
D yj 1 




T nw TP 




17 1117 


Hrencia Lisa. 


5 04 


17 117 




504 


1 7 n h 




504 


12. Ill] 


Tll1i^ R ^ <^ 


504 


12. 114 


rVf^n^oTi Alan 


504 


17 111 

X C 9 XXX 


£a T r ^ T— J ^ XT 7 o 

xvcvin iiuwcLrQ 


504 


12. 112 


Lynda Ann ( Weaver ) 


504 


12. 115 


Mark Douglas 


504 


12. 11 


Ruth Reeve 


504 


12.111 w Shauna Renee Johnson 


504 




LUCIA 




14. 52 


Judith Child s 


J X J 


14. 521 


Matthew Bruce 


5 1 

^ X J 


14. 522 


Rachel Maurine 


5 1 


14. 523 


Seth Thomas 


5 1 3 


14. 52 h 


Thomas Allen 


5 1 3 




MACHADO 




754 


Janet Marie Bjorklund 


493 


7542 


Kimberly Ann 


4Q7 


754 h 


Manuel H. 


4Q7 


7541 


Rodney Wayne 


4Q 7 




MARIOTTI 




11. 912 


Amanda Jamie 


A 7 

D U J 


11.91 h 


Francesco 


503 


11. 91 


Linda Kay Dixon 


503 


11. 911 


Sarah Kate 


503 



I.D, No. Page 

MARKHAM 

2525 Allen Lewis 481 

253 Barbara Ann ( Daines ) 482 

25111 Brian 481 

2512 David Paul 481 

254 Diane Louise ( Stewart ) 482 
2518 Douglas Fred 481 
25 h Fred Lewis 481 

Photo 133 

2516 Jae Daniel 481 

2514 James Lewis 481 

251 John Frederick 481 

252 Joseph Dixon 481 
252 w Junece Jex 481 
2524 Karl William 481 

2517 Kay April 481 
2522 Kevin Richard 481 

2522 w Lisa Dawn Hansen 481 

2523 Mary Ann 481 
25 Maud Dixon 481 

Photo 133 

History 235 

Family Photo 134 

Home Photo 134 

Wildwood Home 134 

2521 Michael Dixon 431 

2513 Reed B. 431 
251 w Reeda Bjarnson 481 

2515 Robert Dixon 481 
2511 w Rosanne Gibson 481 

25112 Stephanie 481 
2511 Steven John 481 

MARSHALL 

8625 Amber Nicole 497 

862 Deanna Dixon 497 

8621 Eric Steven 497 

8622 Erin 497 

8623 Ryan Dixon 497 
862 h Steven B. 497 

8624 Tera Cassandra 497 
MARTINEZ 

8222 Elaine Bigelow 495 

82224 Jason Dale 495 

8222 h Kenneth Boyd 495 

82223 Travis Ken 495 

MC CONACHIE 

5 h Alexander Collie 484 

Very Brief Life Sketch 150 

51 Donald 484 

52 Nancy Shearsmith(Armstrong) 484 
5 Sarah Ann Dixon 484 

Very Brief Life Sketch 150 
MC EWAN 

13, 1 1 3 Alan Dixon 507 

13.1132 Alan Dixon, Jr. 507 

13.1'133 Amanda Kay 507 

13.1141 Andrea Lyn 507 

13.1131 Christina 507 

13.1124 Cynthia Kay 507 

13.114 David Vernon 507 



532 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. Page 





MC EWAN 




13. 113 -w 


UpHts TjVTin Clonic 


507 


13.112 w 


Dofpnc; Rita T^nwfiT'Q 


507 


13. 115 


" J.\^ 1.1. X\ d JL 




13.112 


James Harold 


507 


13.11 h 


Junius Harold 


^07 


13. 11 


Lois Dixon 




13.111 


Lynda { M.organ ) 


OKJ 1 


13. 1 14 w 


TV A Tin W^S4 TTIP' T 


D U ( 


13. 1123 


!Mf*lissa Ann 

^•■■■^ L O CL J ^ 11_1X 


n 7 


13. 1125 


Richard Jarnes 


1^07 

ov 1 


13. 1121 


^dlit-i J. CL 


c n '7 


13. 1122 


TaTna.Ta T ^vt* 

->- CllXlcLX Cl J-~i y Jti. 


C f\ '7 




McKay 




14. 222 


C?i f h PT'inp Divfin 

v^cxi-ii^ 1, xxx\^ i-Z^yj 


CIO 

Die 


14. 223 


C3Vi T 1 st 1 nf=» l~)ivnn 


Die, 


14. 225 


David Dixon 


^ 1 7 

D i ^ 


14. 226 


Kimbe rly Dixon 


D X ^ 


14. 221 


R p rvfa f a l) lYOn 1 T.aT"lrin ^ 

UC V_. CL J_/ XA. \J XL \ Xj d X IV. 1 XI ) 


D 1 


14. 22 h 


x\n„iicxx \A j—i L c vV c 1 y 11 


CIO 


14. 224 


RichsTH T ^1 F»wf* 1 vn Tt 


CIO 


14. 22 


Vivian Dixon 


CI? 




MC KIBBEN 




15. 121 h 


Darwin 


DID 


15. 1211 


Shawn C. 


516 


15. 121 


Susan Lynne 


D i U 




MENDENHALL 




10. 635 


Jeromy Ron 


3 U 1 


10. 634 


^A.Q nic a 


5f)1 


10. 63 


Nancy Schugk 


501 


10. 633 


Paul Brandon 


501 


10.632 


Rnf*Vif^lltf* 

xvvj^li^ lie 




10. 63 h 


Ron Lynn 


501 


10.631 


Tt^ov Lvnn 

■1- X w y y xxxx 


501 




MEYERS 




752 


Barbara Gail Bjorklund 


493 


7521 


TCfi nnf* tVi 




752 h 


Tom 


493 


7522 


Thomas Craig 


493 




MITCHELL 

XVXX -i- V> X X X_J .^J 




13. 1 242 


Janie Lyn 


508 


13. 124 h 


■»* T"\r T <#a on 
ij X X y -1— / v.. ^.^11 


Duo 


13. 124 


She rl ine 


508 


13, 1241 


Wendy Sue 


508 




MOOS MAN 




12. 2142 


Eric Taylor 


504 


12, 214 


Tnlif^ Ann T^a^rloi* 
u uii 1 -^^11X1 X ct y L ^ X 


D U*T 


12, 2143 


K4p1ieco Ann 

XVX^ XXO k7 CL ^ XXXI 


^04 


12, 2141 


Ryan Travis 


504 


12, 214 h 


T ra vis 


504 




MORGAN 




13. 1116 


Allison Kay 


507 


13.1117 


Amber Joy 


507 


13. 1114 


GhpT'VT'l Tjf^f* 

'ix^ X y X -i — i \^ 


507 


13.111 h 


Eldon Ray 


507 


13. 1112 


1^^ IHon Ra^r it* 
x-jX<jvjii x\ cl y j tj x « 




13. 1113 


Lisa La Dawn 


507 


13. Ill 


Lynda Mc Ewan 


507 


13. 1115 


Robert Adam 


507 


13. 1111 


Teri Lyn 


507 



I.D, No, Page 
NEERINGS 

824 Janice Ann Ford 495 

8241 Jill 495 
824 h John Theodore 495 
8244 Lisa 495 
8243 Shellia 495 

8242 Troy 495 
NEILSEN 

2322 Julie Ann Robinson 430 

2322 h Martin David 480 

23221 Ryan Wayne 480 

NELSON 

65 Alice Louise Taylor 439 

Photo 199 

History 201 

Family Photo 200 

Home Photo 200 
Brickerhaven Home 200 

6545 Allison 489 

6542 Annie 489 

651 Arthur Taylor 489 

651 w Bonnie McKay 489 

14.85 Carolyn 515 

6523 Catherine Louise 489 

653 Christina Louise ( Preston) 489 

6521 Christine 489 
14. 82 w Claudia Greene 515 
655 w Consuelo Marquez 489 

6522 David Christian 489 
14, 82 David LeRoy 515 
14. 882 David Taylor 515 

14.83 Diane 515 
65 h G, El Roy 489 

Photo 199 

14, 8 Gladys Dixon 515 

Photo 419 

History 421 

Family Photo 420 

Home Photo 420 

14,821 Heather 515 

654 Henry Aldous 489 
14.8 Ivan William 515 

Photo 419 

14,81 Ivan William II 515 

655 James Nicholls 489 
6512 Jeanne Louise 489 
14.81 w Jeanne Newman 515 

652 John Christian 489 

14.86 Julie Anne 515 
14, 84 w Kathleen Jo Dana 515 

14.84 Kent Dixon 515 
14,813 Kevin Wayne 515 
654 w Kristy Stewart 489 
652 w Mary Lynne Sanders 489 

6524 Matthew John 489 
6544 Melissa 489 
6511 Michael McKay 489 
6541 Rebecca 489 
14.811 Ryan William 515 
6551 Sarah Jane 489 



533 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A, DIXON 



I,D. No. 




XT dge 


I.D. No. 




1--* 3 □r<=> 




NELSON 






PADEN 




6543 


Snnft AlHmi<? 




10, 43 


Tj 1 Y 1 ^ T A n H T" *a \X7 G 

x^uLie J— f e e -r^xiuxevvo 




14 812 


SVi3 Tmon 

' L1.CL XXX XV XX 


51 5 


10. 43 h 


Don^lH EHwatH 

J — ' \J XX CL X U X_J <wl W CL X <Ji 


_/ u u 


14 R42 

11, oi ^ 






10.432 


T-T V\f^ P^. It "7 a H *^ Vi 
1 iw L/e x^ 1 1 d i-Je uii 


DUU 


6525 


Si"f^vf*n SVia_i*n 

k-' V ^ XX 'XX CL X 1^ 


*±C3 7 


10. 433 


^'la rk Ch, r i st phe r 


J u u 




-x 11 W I lid O -L CL y L U X 


ACQ 


10.431 


V^o^-^y* T a c 
i^cLex Udxx le 


n n 

DUU 


14. 841 


T * cx yxx^ x^^ixL 


515 


10. 434 


Tiffanv Ann 

xxxcLxx y X ^xxxx 






NICHOLS 






PATCYK 




753 h 


' L CL y L W 11 


493 


2122 h 


T.onnsTr! TnVin 

J— 'eWllCLX \A U Willi 


47R 


75"? 

1 3 o 


[» 1 ^^ T" 1 3 o A TOT* Lr 1 n n ri 
LL/lXcL -L dye -'—'J '-^ 1 t**- 1 LlllU 




21 22 


1-^ a t T" 1 1 a r-i a t* i c r\n 
X dtx x\_ xd xxdx X louxx 


47R 
'±10 




J TJ.1 ic 






PATTFRSON 




75 34 


i-\\JLJV^L LcL ./^lUl 


^7 J 


13.52 


■i^xdxiie tJ w y ^ e x,/eixx9^xi 


"ill 
D X X 


7532 


S n f» T* 1 /a 
v-'IlC 1 X IC 




13.52 h 


Milton W 

IVX 1 1 L ^ 11 V V , 


1 1 

D X X 


753 3 


T ins. 






PAYNE 






NICOL 




14. 61 


Ba r ba ra June { I p s en ) 


514 


8222 


Ela, ine B i ge 1 ow 


4Q5 
*± 7_> 


14. 62 


Bette Lyn { Petersen ) 


514 


o ^ ^ ^ ^ 


T a 1 a Trn <a 
>j d I d y lie 


4Q c; 

•^7D 


14. 6 h 


J—t, LLIXXLIO 


1; 1 4 

D X *T 


82221 


o a n 1 o 
^ Lc; IJiidXilc^ 


4Q 




.1 11 \J LV/ 


7 

J D ( 


8222 h 


StGVGii Ted 


4Q5 


14. 6 


T-T<alpn Divon 

X X^ X ^ XX X-^V vXX 


514 




NUNNALLY 






Photo 


357 


421 


rC a 11 anoro t*ti*^1 m 
i-^d y 1^ dii^c^ 1 X xcxu 


4R 




ixxotux y 












Pamilv Plintn 
X CL iiiixy X iiv^Lu 


35R 

J J 




OH RAN 






Home Photo 


358 


13. 5212 


A ngelia. Elcii ne 


510 




PEPPINGER 




13.521 h 


R T* a H 1 f> ^7 
-1— ' 1 cLu 1 c y 


5 1 


10,41 


v—' iicil xeiie iiu X e w 9 


500 




^rn "f r» i a T , a \X7 c 
V-> y XX LIl 1 d J-J d w o 


-? X u 


in 411 

X U a ^ X X 


J unix xxuiJcxt 


DUU 


13.5211 


.T o ^ p nH S r* n 




10.41 h 


\A 1 f V» a f» 1 Cj 

^vxxv.iicLe 1 >^ • 


500 




OLSON 






PETERSEN 

X X_&l