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Full text of "Ontario Sessional Papers, 1935, No.3-6"

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SESSIONAL PAPERS 



VOL. LXVIL— PART II 



FIRST SESSION 



OF THE 



NINETEENTH LEGISLATURE 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



SESSION 1935 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman^ Printer to the King's Most Ejccellent Majesty 

1936 



/J ^*^^ 



J 



CONTENTS 

FOR PART II. 



REPORTS 



LANDS AND FORESTS 

MINES 

INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSURANCE 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Minister of Lands and Forests 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1934 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3, 1935 



^. 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by Thomas E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1935 



To His Honour, 

The Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to your Honour, Report on the 
Operations of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 
31st October, 1934. 

Peter Heenan, 

Miyiister. 



[3] 



Honourable Peter Heenan, 

Minister of Lands and Forests. 

We have the honour to submit herewith a Report on the Operations of the 
Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 31st October, 1934. 

W. C. Cain, E. J. Zavitz, 

Deptity Minister, Lands and Forests. Deputy Minister, Forestry. 

L. V. Rorke, Surveyor-General. 



[5] 



CONTENTS 



PART I 

Appendices: Page 

No. 1. Department Inside Officers and Clerks 28 

2. Department Outside Agents and Inspectors 32 

3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased, with Collections 34 

4. Gross Revenue 35 

5. Revenue Refunds 37 

6. Receipts (Special Funds) 38 

7. Disbursements 39 

8. Timber Cut and Amounts Accruing re Dues, etc 40 

9. Revenue from Woods and Forests 42 

10. Acreage under License 42 

IL Timber Areas disposed of 43 

12. Locations, etc., under Free Grant Section, Public Lands Act 46 

13. Lands Sold and Patented 50 

14. Instruments Issued 61 

15. Report of Records Branch 61 



PART II 

Xo. 16. Report of Surveyor-General 63 

17. Statement of Crown Surveys in Progress 65 

18. " " " Completed 66 

19. " Municipal Surveys Ordered 66 

20. " " " Confirmed 66 

21. Survey Township of Vermillion Additional, District of Kenora 67 

22. Survey of Dam site and contour traverse of proposed storage basins on Grand 

River, near Waldemar, Township of East Garafraxa, County of Dufferin .... 68 

23. Traverse of Lakes Tendinendah or Alatinenda, Moon, Chiblow and other lakes 

in Townships 161 and 167, District of Algoma 70 



PART 111 

No. 24. Forestry Branch Report: 

(1) Forest Fire Protection 74 

(2) Report of Director of Air Service 94 

(3) Reforestation 100 



[6] 



Minister's Annual Report 
For Year Ending October 31st, 1934 



STAFF CHANGES 



During the fiscal year two members of the staff were superannuated in 
the persons of Miss B. M. Benson, who had been in the Service since May 
25, 1909, and Miss E. Hills, who entered the Service on July 31, 1912. 

The death of an old and faithful public servant in the person of James 
T. McDougall, formerly Crown Timber Agent at North Bay, is regretfully 
recorded. Mr. McDougall entered the Service on July 1, 1908, and was 
one of the few remaining links with the romantic past of lumbering in this 
Province. 

Five of the female members of the staff resigned during the year. 

Another old timer of the former timber administration staff is no longer 
in the Service, A. Stevenson, former Crown Timber Agent at Peterboro, being 
superannuated on July 4, 1934. Mr. Stevenson commenced his long and 
faithful service on October 4, 1905, and his popularity in Peterboro is evidence 
that he will be missed by friends and business acquaintances alike. 

Other staff changes appear in Appendix No. 1, which notes the foregoing 
and a number of additions and changes in Official classification. 

It may be noted that members of the staff have taken over duties formerly 
allotted to those no longer in the Service, and that they are making a sincere 
and serious attempt to meet the demands for economy. 



LAND TRANSACTIONS 

The lands of the Crown in this Province are administered by the Depart- 
ment of Lands and Forests. 

They have for approximately one hundred years been a consistent source 
of revenue but up to the end of the nineteenth century comparatively little 
of the lands of the Crown in Northern Ontario was alienated. The improve- 
ment however of transportation facilities and routes and the practical exhaus- 
tion of good Crown agricultural land in Southern Ontario led to rapid extensive 
development in Northern Ontario. The Department of Lands and Forests 
has been intimately involved in that development. All lands, regardless of 
the purpose for which they are required, providing they are Crown property, 
are controlled and dealt with subject to the Mining Act by the Department 
of Lands and Forests. With the passing of the years, it became evident that 
for speculative or other reasons, considerable areas were becoming privately 
owned and idle or non-productive. To eliminate the speculative element 
therefore a policy of renting where lands are only temporarily required was 

[7] 



8 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



adopted years ago and the annual revenue from these and other sources 
is shown in Appendix No. 3. 

Reference was made in last year's report to the closing of some Crown 
Land Ofifices and the transfer of services due to the inevitable changes rendered 
necessary by time. 

A list of the Oown Land Agents and their addresses appears in Appendix 
No. 2. 

They have rendered every possible assistance and effort in the interest 
of economical administration in difficult times. 

Appendix Xo. 12 herein contains the record of Free Grant Land trans- 
actions. As compared with the previous year, locations show a 30% decrease, 
the total number being 41G coxering an area of 48,152 acres. The area of 
assignments is decreased, as is that of the area of Free Grant Patents. The 
reduction is due to limited good lands remaining in free grant townships and 
to a dimunition of applications. 

Sale Lands are covered by Appendi.x Xo. 13, which reveals an increase 
in the number of successful applicants and a small increase in area to 82.775 
acres sold during the year. Assignments of sale lands also show a small 
increase. 

Last year the ratio of sales and free grants by districts appeared as follows: 



Sales 

Algoma 11 

Cochrane 595 

Kenora 14 

Nipissing 11 

Sudbury 72 

Temiskaming 113 

Thunder Bay 39 

Sundry 62 

Total 917 

The figures for the year just ended are: 

Sales 

Algoma 10 

Cochrane 591 

Kenora 16 

Nipissing 15 

Sudbury 76 

Temiskaming 113 

Thunder Bay 39 

Sundrv 100 



Free Grants 

Algoma 2 

Kenora 56 

X'ipissing 47 

Sudbury 134 

Parry Sound 34 

Thunder Bay 136 

Muskoka 46 

Rainy River 110 

Sundry 37 

Total 602 



Free Grants 

Algoma 2 

Kenora 62 

Xipissing 36 

Sudbury 60 

Parry Sound 24 

Thunder Bay 77 

Rainy River 110 

-Muskoka 10 

Sundry 35 



Total 956 Total 416 

Sales were largely confined to the Upper and Lower Clay Belts and 80% 
of the Free Grants were in Xorthern Ontario or above the French River and 
Lake Xipissing. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 

The annual transactions covering agricultural land are steady consistent 
evidence that during the past one hundred and fifty years Southern Ontario 
has been scoured from end to end by potential settlers who have taken the 
productive farm land with the result that below the French River and Lake 
Nipissing in Ontario there are but limited suitable agricultural lands remaining 
in the Crown to-day. Consequently the activities for the future must neces- 
sarily lie in the Clay Belts of the North. 

The above figures do not include those covered by Relief Land Settlement, 
reference to which is hereinafter made. 



RELIEF LAND SETTLEMENT 

This work has been proceeding since midsummer of 1932 and was briefly 
dealt with in the Departmental Reports for the fiscal year 1931-2 and 1932-3, 
and in a separate report by the Relief Land Settlement Committee published 
in 1933 to cover the work up to and including October 31st, 1933. 

The original Agreement executed between the Federal Government and 
the Province under the Relief Act, 1932, expired on March 31st, 1934, and in 
consequence thereof a new Agreement was executed in May, 1934, dating 
from April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1936. 

At the end of the fiscal year on October 31st, 1934, 499 settlers and their 
families remained on the land and 93 had returned. As a result of this, there 
are 2,480 souls on the land through the Relief Land Settlement work. Of 
this number, at the end of the fiscal year, the two-year period under the auspices 
of the Relief Land Settlement Committee had expired for 134 families. 

A number of those remaining are in difficulty and as yet far from being 
in a self-supporting condition. There is a small percentage, however, who 
by virtue of the assistance rendered and the exercise of good judgment and 
the necessary fortitude have become established. A certain amount of road 
work has been available to all. A percentage of them have been able to sell 
wood from their lots whether for fuel, pulpwood or ties. Stock has been 
purchased; roads have been constructed or improved; and in many cases 
there is a marked change in appearance and the children especially reflect 
the effect of the vigorous atmosphere and rugged surroundings in their colour 
and sturdy bodies. 

Municipalities participated in the work as follows: 
356 Settlers from 62 Municipalities to 62 Townships 

143 Settlers from _2^ Municipalities (Head of Lakes) to 20 Townships 
499 Settlers from 64 Municipalities to 82 Townships 

143 Settlers from Head of Lakes hold 9,538 acres — average 66.70 
356 Settlers from Elsewhere hold 29,142 acres — average 81 . 85 

499 38,680 ' 

2,480 Souls now in North— 499 Men; 493 Women; 1,488 Children. 
Settlers are distributed as follows: 



10 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

Number of 

Supervisor District Settlers Acreage 

Sprague, F. A Cochrane 86 6,900 . 75 

Poolton, T Kapuskasing 68 5,426.00 

Draves, F. H Matheson ' 102 8,115.85 

Fryer, J. F Monetville 10 1,561.00 

McVittie, N. C New Liskeard 62 5,523. 75 

Russell, J. W Head of the Lakes 143 9,538.40 

Miscellaneous 28 1.614. 63 



499 38,680.38 

Each of these settlers now has his own home, which, however, together 
with the chattels and equipment purchased from the funds set aside, remains 
in the Crown, with the settler as trustee until such time as he obtains patent, 
when it becomes his absolute property. Some settlers have as high as 25 
acres under cultivation, and the average is approximately 4 acres. 

The stock in possession of these settlers consists of the following: 

Thunder Kapus- Else- 
Bay KASixG Cochrane Matheson where Total 

Horses 70 40 33 60 5 208 

Cows 112 33 58 88 11 302 

Heifers 17 32 49 

Oxen . . 23 9 6 38 

Bulls 4 .. 4 .. 8 

Steers 2 4 6 

Calves 15 18 2 35 

Hens 2,367 1,462 841 1,105 111 5,886 

Ducks 7 . . 2 . . 9 

Geese 5 . . 10 . . 15 

Turkeys . . 3 . . 3 

Pigs 65 2 25 28 16 136 

Goats.... 11 .. .. 10 .. 21 

Sheep . . . . . . 4 4 

During the period the Plan has been in operation the efforts made by 
the administrative staff have been augmented by Social Service and Church 
Organizations who have interested themselves and procured donations of 
clothing, equipment and Christmas cheer. In addition to this, certain indus- 
trial enterprises have been good enough to donate tobacco and other various 
items and the result is that considerably more than would be represented by 
the maximum of S600.00, which is set aside for each Relief Land Settler's 
family, has actually been supplied to each and every one whose time has 
expired. The earnings from road work and other sources must be remembered. 

The sale of hay, vegetables, milk, butter and eggs, pulpwood, fuelwood and 
ties has also had a bearing on the operations of the different settlers, so that 
they have enjoyed benefits which are difficult to compute, but which are not 
all covered by the mere statement that $600.00 has been available to each and 
every Relief Land Settler's family. 

The Province, under the Agreement, has been obliged to bear the cost 
of administration, and in view of the fact that settlers have been placed as far 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 11 

west as Drydeii in the Kenora District, at the Head of the Lakes, in the neigh- 
bourhood of Lake Sinicoe and Uxbridge, in the Parry Sound District, in the 
Ottawa Valley and practically throughout the East part of Northern Ontario 
from New Liskeard to Hearst, the cost has been greater than would obtain if 
such class of settlement could be more centralized, but distribution of settlers 
was largely the result of efforts to place them on roads. 

The results to date, however, can best be proven by the expressed feelings 
of a considerable number of those placed in 1932. Their attitude has been 
and is that, notwithstanding the hazards of pioneer life and the discomforts 
and hardships that accompany the same, they take pride in the sense of owner- 
ship and the absence of rental, heating and light problems, and in the oppor- 
tunities of performing tasks and rendering services usually denied unemployed 
relief recipients. Discouragement and disillusionment natuially follow in 
some instances, but the efforts of those who for the most part have faced their 
difficulties with a good heart and with some success are evident and very 
many of them would not be willing to consider abandonment of such rights 
as they have been able to establish to date. 

But to pass a clear-cut definite opinion upon the ultimate success of the 
plan, laudable as it appears, one must wait for a reasonable period of years 
during which interval the settler will have ample opportunity of testing out 
his ability to apply his energies and de\'elop a spirit of independence. When 
the settler is freed from subsidized measures and is placed upon his own 
initiative and resources, and then measures up to individual responsibilities, 
the assistance given to him and the efforts directed on his behalf will be mani- 
festly justified. 

So many factors of a controversial character enter into a consideration 
of the merits of a Back to the Land Movement at the present time that a 
certain hesitancy to extend the plan in pioneer sections may be advisable. 

When long tried and old established settlers in well settled and fertile 
areas are faced with the complex problem of production and marketing, and 
are even urged in instances to restrict production, and when abandoned farms, 
well cleared, fertile and attractive, are lying idle awaiting only the return of 
the plow, it seems anomalous to induce individuals, though they are motivated 
by a desire to be self-supporting, to trek to bush lots and undertake the tedious 
task in unorganized areas of hewing out and establishing homes where even 
in normal times it takes years to develop paying farms. Under normal con- 
ditions the settler has a chance of bush work in the late fall and winter and 
limited employment in river driving in the spring, but when the lumber in- 
dustry is so harassed and pulpwood operations so reduced from what they 
were a few years ago the settler finds himself so handicapped that he is obliged 
to seek aia from the Government, and undertakes to devote a goodly portion 
of his time to doing road work, thus considering the clearing of land and 
ordinary farm labours a secondary concern. 

An exhaustive sur\'ey will be made towards segregating agricultural areas 
in the newer parts of the Province in order to consolidate settlement and to 
withdraw from agricultural disposition, where it is found advisable, certain 
areas that are obviously unsuitable for productive farming. 

It is important that a situation now grave throughout the Province with 
respect to farming, with so many producti\'e holdings so closely tied up with 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

mortgages and encumbrances, should not be aggravated by blindly encouraging 
in large numbers those with little or no means to "take the jump" into some 
farming venture or pioneer undertaking. 



SUMMER RESORT LANDS 

Toronto, February 12th, 1935. 

A perusal of Appendix No. 13 will show the parcels of mainland and 
islands sold and patented during the year. A sale for tourist or summer 
home purposes is made subject to the condition of erecting a building having 
a minimum value of $500, this requirement being an inducement to the pur- 
chaser to make an investment other than merely acquiring a piece of land. 
A limited time of 18 months is permitted the purchaser to put up his building. 
Interest in a reasonably substantial and permanent structure means the annual 
return of the holder to enjoy the attractiveness of his surroundings. Annual 
visitation makes for the stability of those upon whom the summer visitor 
depends for his staple supplies and encourages others to take up and invest 
in property in the same zone. 

While regular sales have in the past been permitted in certain areas, 
and in other instances only leases or licenses have been issued, it is considered 
in the public interest that the public lands of the Crown, when taken or acquired 
along rivers and lakes within timbered zones, pulp concessions or licensed areas 
for tourist, hunting, camping and various purposes other than for actual 
farming, should be disposed of on a lease or license tenure whereby the holder 
may be required to pay an annual rental to the Crown, this rental being con- 
sidered ordinary revenue. Only by appraising the value of our hinterland on 
the basis of an annual increment, and duly collecting same as and when oppor- 
tunity affords, can we hope in respect of this natural resource to assist in 
building up an ordinary revenue which alone can conduce towards a balanced 
budget. 

Already in our parks and other sections we have hundreds of parcels 
held only under lease, and extensiv^e investments have been made in the way 
of substantial structures and other improvements, and this fact is an answer 
to those who argue that the leasing of a parcel for summer purposes will not 
encourage the erection of homes. 

With the extension of our lateral and trunk road system and the com- 
pletion of our Trans-Canada Highway an added impetus will be given to the 
selection of lands along the highways for summer homes and other purposes, 
and a careful scrutiny of all such applications is necessary to determine the 
best method of disposition. 



PROVINCIAL PARKS 

Algonquin Park 

During the year considerable improvements were made in the erection 
of new buildings, repairing of others, dismantling old buildings, locating and 
clearing new trails, roads and portages, as well as the erection of telephone 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 13 

lines. Five Rangers' Cabins were constructed, all with Park labour, and three 
branches of the existing telephone line were extended and nine new portages 
were opened. 

There was a decided improvement in tourist activities over the previous 
season. With the co-operation of the Department of Game and Fisheries 
two lakes were stocked with one year old speckled trout, which lakes are to 
be used for propagation purposes, and in this connection it is interesting to 
note that during the year 1,044 Fishing Licenses were issued. The largest 
representation was from Ontario, but there were fishermen from as far West 
as British Columbia, as far South as Florida, while our neighbouring Province 
of Quebec was also represented. 

The exceptionally severe Winter of 1934 took a large toll of deer, and 
indications are that the wolves are becoming scarce. A study of other forms 
of wild life resulted in the discovery of a disease among young grouse, which 
is now being treated with satisfactory results. An unusual number of poachers 
were apprehended and con\'icted, being the largest during the past twelve 
years. This may be accounted for by the increased unemployment, but the 
close supervision of the Park staff has prevented any extensive infractions of 
the Law in this respect. Sanitation of camp sites has improved as a result 
of a new Travel Permit form which gives instructions and directions along 
that line. 

The patrol of the entire Park by aviation continues to be \ery efficient 
and is of great value in locating poachers or fires and giving immediate assist- 
ance. 

The fire season was more severe than normal, but the loss was not very 
heavy. Work on the Park Highway proceeded steadily during the Summer, 
and with its completion it is estimated that there will be an increase in tourist 
traffic. 

The Highland Inn was closed during the season with the result that the 
other tourist houses were largely patronized, there apparently being an in- 
creasing number of tourists who desire to obtain accommodation of this kind 
for short periods. Generally speaking, there was excellent fishing and the 
sportsmen given commendable reports of this class of sport. 

QuETico Park 

The mink and fisher are quite plentiful throughout the Park, while the 
otter are multiplying very fast. The moose and deer are less plentiful than 
they were a year ago, and the beaver are much scarcer owing to the inability 
of the reduced Park staff to satisfactorily patrol this large area, consisting 
of 1,722 square miles. 

During the year two new Rangers' cabins were erected, fifty-eight portages 
cleared, in addition to the construction of a new road half a mile long and the 
general repairs to buildings. The possibilities of this Park for angling purposes 
continue to be widely known and increasingly taken ad\'antage of, there 
being three hundred and twenty four non-resident angling permits issued during 
the year. This Park has been allowed to remain in a perfect state of Nature, 
and as such forms an attraction to an increasing number of American citizens 



14 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

and tourists generally. The Staff consists of a Superintendent and fifteen 
Rangers, a number of whom due to a restricted vote ha\e been subject to 
temporary lay-offs or reductions in wages. 

Rondeau Park 

This Provincial Park in Kent County is adjacent to one of the older 
settled portions of the Province and is, therefore, accessible by paved roads 
from Hamilton, London, Windsor, Detroit and other nearby American cities. 
It comprises approximately five square miles, much of which is virgin forest. 
Wild deer abound and many forms of bird life find habitation there. It 
also has one of the most attractive bathing beaches in the Province, and 
macadam roads reach cottages of artistic designs and homelike attractiveness. 
The Park affords a rare combination of modern Summer Resort possibili- 
ties with Restaurant, dancing, tennis, miniature golf and horseback riding 
on one hand and a mixed timber growth consisting of almost every species 
indigenous to Old Ontario. The Park, situated on a beautiful peninsula 
extending into Lake Erie and having water facilities on both sides, is in effect 
the only outstanding natural rendezvous within the South-western part of 
Ontario that is owned and controlled by and for the people. On certain 
occasions during the year it is estimated that 10,000 people visit this Park 
in a single day, and with the winding roads throughout the Park it abounds 
not only in scenic beauty but has all the advantages of an attractive Summer 
Resort, where those who wish to soliloquize in solitude or partake of the 
joyous activities of sport may readily do so. 



THE PROVINCIAL LAND TAX ACT 

This Act was passed in 1924 and became effective in the year 1927. Prior 
to the time of the passing of this Act, there were companies and individuals 
owning large tracts of land lying in the unorganized sections of this Province 
who did not contribute anything to the Provincial Revenue although they 
directly benefited from the general improvements made and the different 
conveniences provided such as roads, fire protection, provincial police pro- 
tection, etc. 

While this Act has been in force since the year 1927, there are large numbers 
Avho are in arrears of payment with a result that last September an ultimatum 
was issued to all delinquents over the signature of the Minister in which they 
were given a period of time to take care of the tax arrears in full or at least 
forward substantial payments to reduce the amounts outstanding. There 
were approximately six thousand notices issued and it is interesting to note 
that while we had only a month left in the Fiscal year, our revenue amounting 
to $131,447.74 increased 10% over the preceding year due no doubt to the 
urgent demands made. This increase in the collections gave us the second 
largest year we have had since the inception of this Act. 

While the tax arrears amount to approximately S360,000.00 without 
penalties it is worth noting that of this amount no less than 77% is owing by 
eight companies, several of which have never paid any taxes under the Act. 
One of these, responsible for no less than 65% of the total arrears, has disputed 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 15 

its account maintaining that the Act never contemplated making the com- 
pany subject to the Act and for various reasons asserts that the company 
should not be held assessible. 

The Act makes provision for a declaration of forfeiture after the taxes 
are in arrears for a period of at least two years. Up to the present time, how- 
ever, no land has been forfeited under this Act although steps will now be taken, 
where collections fail after every reasonable effort has been made, to provide 
for forfeiture. 

At least 50% of the taxpayers are non-residents of the Province of Ontario. 
Of the revenue, 65% is derived from companies and individuals owning large 
tracts of timber land such as Railway Land Grants, Veteran Grants and land 
acquired from the Department of Indian Affairs at Ottawa; 23% is derived 
from the owners of summer resorts, 10% from individuals owning land such 
as Veteran Grants and Indian Lands lying idle and possibly held for specula- 
tion. The remaining revenue representing 2% is derived from miscellaneous 
sources. 



TIMBER OPERATIONS 

The bush operations conducted throughout the Fall of 1933 and the 
Winter of 1934, which were extended into the Summer in respect of peeled 
pulpwood, accounted for a cut in log timber of more than two and a half times 
that of the preceding year, the total cut being 92,303,273 feet B. M., of which 
41% consisted of Red and White Pine, 23% of Jackpine and 26% of other 
species such as Birch, Maple, Hemlock, etc. Axe-ties were cut to the extent 
of 436,470, or 10,975 rfiore than last vear, but only about 40% of those cut 
in 1933. 

Although the board measure output was so much in excess of the previous 
year the fact is that it is only about one-quarter of the quantity logged in 
the year ending October 31st, 1929, when approximately 357,000,000 feet 
were cut, this figure, however, rapidly diminishing each season until an excep- 
tionally low figure was reached in 1933 when but 35,000,000 feet fell to the 
woodman's axe. 

These figures in themselves very clearly reflect the diminished markets 
resulting from the economic upheaval occurring the latter part of 1929 and 
finding its peak throughout the following years. 

Operators who had the courage to continue in producing material with 
an uncertain market did so mainly to maintain intact their essential skeleton 
working organization, the disintegration of which would seriously handicap 
them should a sudden reversal of business demand a renewal of activities on 
a normal scale. They were also urged by the hope that the building trades, 
which had suffered such an unfortunate decline, would take on an improve- 
ment under an expected encouragement from a Federal governmental and 
local municipal building programme to clean up slums and rehabilitate worn- 
out structures. 

The export dealers, to whom the American markets for their product 
have been practically shut out since 1932, when the excise duty of $3.00 a 
M feet B.M. with the tariff of SI. 00 a M feet B.M. made international trans- 
actions in lumber in effect prohibiti\e, while proceeding cautiously against the 



16 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

possibility of building up their yard stocks, still had the vision, as they yet 
have, of some modification being made in these fiscal barriers through an 
international pact and hesitated to close out even temporarily their produc- 
tion plants and business organization, and this vision was an added reason for 
placing men in the bush, because the operators, although pressing the Go^■ern- 
ment in the Fall of 1933 for some fair and equitable concessions in the way of 
reductions in prices of material, were refused any relief in respect of bonus 
prices for timber acquired from the Government during good times. 

As pointed out in the Minister's report of last year, the operators pressed 
the Government for a reduction in Crown dues and likewise a drastic reduction 
in bonus rates, but the only relief granted by the then Government consisted 
in a reduction of eighty per cent of the Crown dues where a bonus obtained and 
fifty per cent where only simple dues were applicable, while pulpwood operators 
were conceded a reduction in Crown dues of forty cents a cord on Spruce only. 

These concessions, while considered small favours by the industr\-, did 
not have an important bearing on the enlarged operations as the lumber 
dealers, for the various reasons above cited, had already firmh' determined to 
take their chances on an improved outlook. 



PROSPECTIVE OPERATIONS 

At the conclusion of the season's cut and throughout the summer of 1934 
grave doubts were expressed by the leading representatives of the lumber 
industry from time to time on the wisdom of renewing work during the coming 
winter, and every indication pointed to almost a complete cessation of lumber 
operations. 

The new Government was appealed to and, with a view to co-operating 
with the trade and sympathetically listening to grievances and undertaking to 
lighten the burdens of the operators and assist the placing of workers in the 
bush, conferences were held at the Parliament Building, the Cabinet, with the 
Honourable the Prime Minister, Mitchell Hepburn, in the chair, recei\'ing 
large and representative gatherings of the lumber industry. At these round 
table conferences it was elicited that for over four years the industry had 
been regularly and persistently pressing the former Government for a reduc- 
tion in bonus rates, payable according to contract prices bid under public 
competition and now too oppressive to be borne. These requests had been 
declined, and the operators, appealing to the new Government, represented 
that the once great lumber industry was in a wearied state and required en- 
couragement. Fears were expressed that but few would undertake to place 
men in the bush during the ensuing season unless some substantial assistance 
was meted out and concrete inducements offered. 

Careful study was given to the representations submitted, and as a result 
important concessions were granted to the industry in the way of reductions, 
not only in Crown dues, but also in bonuses, these concessions being on a 
mutually co-operative basis and applicable for the ensuing season and only 
where the operator undertakes to place a certain quota of workers in the 
bush, on the drive and in the sawmill. In consequence of this arrangement 
operators who otherwise would have remained inactive are making ample 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 17 

preparations to proceed with operations, and under agreements filed the 
Government is assured of having a minimum of 10,000 men busily engaged 
in the bush, on the spring drive and in sawmill operations. 

As a record of the extent to which assistance was thus granted the follow- 
ing copy of the Order-in-Council sanctioning same forms part of this report. 
Appendix No. 8 gives the detailed cut throughout the year of all species. 

Copy of an Order-in-Council approved by the Honourable the Lieutenant- 
Governor, dated the 11th day of September, A.D., 1934. 

Upon consideration of the Report of the Honourable the Minister of 
Lands and Forests, wherein he states: 

In order to re-establish the lumber industry in Ontario and bring about 
the employment of 10,000 men, the Ontario Government proposes to enter 
into an agreement with the sawmill operators in the Province covering this 
season's cut and providing somewhat reduced stumpage rates. 

The industry is at the present time in a very unsatisfactory condition. 
Logging camps have been closed down, large numbers of regular bush men 
are unemployed, many of whom are subject to direct Government relief, a 
number of Ontario's largest sawmills have ceased to operate, while others 
have been operating on a considerably reduced scale, in consequence of which 
Provincial revenues have been drastically reduced. 

This condition of affairs has been brought about by 

(a) Falling oft' of international trade, generally due to tariff restrictions, 
which have curtailed our buying power and in consequence our 
ability to sell the country's natural products, including those of the 
forests. 

(b) Keen competition from outside quarters such as British Columbia 
and Southern United States, as well as in some respects from the 
Eastern Provinces, stumpage prices, labour, freight rates and general 
price levels having operated to the disadvantage of Ontario producers. 

(c) Inability of the operators to secure continued bank credits to tide 
them over their difficulties. 

(d) The high stumpage prices bid in open competition at times when the 
prospect of fa\'ourable trade returns was bright. 

From time to time during the last five years strong appeals were made 
by the operators to the late Government for special consideration in the hope 
that effective steps would be taken to check the downward trend of the indus- 
try and to rehabilitate it on a basis approaching normalcy. While these 
representations were not denied, the only extent to which the late Govern- 
ment went towards asisstance was in the way of providing an abatement in 
the interest charges for the operating season of 1929-30 and certain reductions 
in the Crown dues only for the seasons of 1931-32, 1932-33 and 1933-34. Such 
reductions, however, were far from what the operators sought, as they felt 
the bonus, which is by far in most cases the larger portion of the prices paid 
the Crown, it being in addition to the Crown dues, should be reduced to the 
extent of fifty per cent. 



18 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

The Concessions granted have not been a sufficient incentive to the 
operators in the high-priced stumpage to proceed with any extensive opera- 
tions, and in many instances bush operations have been completely discon- 
tinued by certain companies hitherto constant and efficient operators and 
revenue producers for the Crown. 

Quite recently a special Committee of the lumbermen interviewed the 
present Go\-ernment and submitted their representations, reiterating to a 
noticeable degree the claims advanced to the late Government, the Committee 
representing largely the Red and White Pine, Jackpine and Spruce operators, 
although the Hardwood operators were likewise represented, they having 
previoush- sought consideration. 

Their submission contained two outstanding requests towards relief: 

(a) Fifty per cent, reduction in the bonus. 

(b) Fifty per cent, reduction in the Crown dues, with a $5.00 per M feet 
B.M. minimum in connection with Red and White Pine plus the reduced 
Crown dues and a Minimum of S3. 50 per M feet B.M. including reduced 
dues for Jackpine and Spruce. 

The Minister has given careful study to the whole question, and is of the 
opinion that the lumber industry is in a harassed condition and that a real 
practical attempt should be made towards retrieving it and that reasonable 
concessions in the way of reductions in prices should be granted. Furthermore, 
thousands of bush men accustomed to such line of work, who have been thrown 
out of employment and made subject to relief, should be afforded an opportunity 
of returning to their line of endeavour and a decided move made in the direc- 
tion of re-establishing an important revenue for the Crown. 

It will be remembered that last winter several serious strikes took place 
in the Northern forests due to excessively low wages, coupled with long hours 
and unsanitary living conditions. There was an intense industrial unrest, 
and it is proposed to eliminate a repetition of such an unsatisfactory situation 
by requiring operators to pay fair wages, make reasonable charges for van 
goods, other supplies and equipment and to comply fully with the regulations 
of the Department of Health. 

In return for these assurances by the industry, and for the purpose of 
promoting the forest enterprise in the timber woods as differentiated from 
the Pulpwood operations, the Government has agreed to a more uniform 
scale of rates. 

Having regard for the whole situation, the Minister has the honour to 
recommend to His Honour, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, that the 
rates paid on log timber should be subject to the following: 

Crown Dues — (1) A reduction of 50% of Crown dues on Red and White 
Pine, Jackpine and Spruce that is cut and manufactured into a finished pro- 
duct in Ontario sawmills. 

Bonus Reductions on Red and White Pine and Spruce — (2) A reduc- 
tion in the bonus as follows: The minimum bonus for Red and White Pine 
and Spruce shall be $3,00 per M feet B.M. and no reduction shall obtain in 
any bonus price covering such types of timber where such bonus price is $3.00 
per M feet B.M. or less. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 19 

Where the bonus is in excess of S3. 00 per M feet B.M. in the case of Red 
and White Pine and Spruce, the amount in excess shall be reduced 50%. 

Bonus Reductions on Jackpine — (3) In the case of Jackpine there shall 
be a minimum bonus of S2.50 per M feet B.M., or, in other words, there 
shall be no reduction in any bonus price for Jackpine where the bonus is S2. 50 
per M feet B.M. but where the bonus price of Jackpine is in excess of $2.50 
per M feet B.M. the amount in excess thereof shall be reduced 50%. 

Hardwood and other types — (4) A reduction of 50% of the Crown dues 
on Hardwood and other types of timber not mentioned in (1), '(2) and (3), 
and such reduction in the bonus thereof in each case, as may in the opinion 
of the Minister of Lands and Forests be deemed justified in the public interests. 

The Minister further recommends that such reductions be granted on 
the clear and distinct understanding that: 

(a) The reductions are of onh- a temporary measure and applicable to 
the bush operations carried on during the present operating season 
of 1934-35, which season expires on the 30th of April, 1935. 

(b) The reductions, subject to the rights granted thereunder, shall in 
no way operate as an impairment of the original contract entered 
into between the Licensee, operator or purchaser and the Crown. 

(c) The timber cut in accordance with or under or by virtue of such 
reductions shall be manufactured in Ontario sawmills into the finished 
product, such as lumber, ties, lath or such other product as is gener- 
ally deemed to come within the scope of sawmill operations. 

(d) Fair wage rates shall be paid to workmen, reasonable prices charged 
for van or other supplies and the Regulations of the Department of 
Health approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council dated 
17th of April, 1934, made under the Public Health Act, shall be 
adequately enforced. 

Where any grievances arise or dispute occurs in respect of this provision, 
the Minister shall be the arbiter and his decision shall be final and conclusive. 

(e) Each Licensee or operator shall be immediately called upon to make 
a survey of his possibilities and to submit a statement showing the 
types and quantities of timber to be cut, the area or areas on which 
proposed cutting is to take place and the location of the mill or mills 
where the manufacturing shall be conducted, and shall sign an agree- 
ment obligating himself to employ such numbers of men in the bush, 
drive and sawmill operations, to purchase such equipment and 
supplies and to cut such quantities of timber as shall be agreed upon 
between him and the Minister, and to meet such other terms and 
conditions as form part of any reductions in, or modifications to. 
the contract price. 

(f) Monthly or other periodic submissions as may be determined by the 
Minister shall be made by each licensee or operator showing the 
number of men employed, the kinds and quantities of timber cut and 
such other information as in the opinion of the Minister may be 
deemed desirable. 



20 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(g) Licensees or operators under any reduction arrangement shall be 
required to pay all necessary ground rent and fire protection charges 
at So. 00 and $6.40 a square mile respectively. 

(h) The Minister may in such cases where licenses are held in suspense, 
due to the non-payment of charges, and where he is of the opinion 
that sufficient security in the way of collateral is lodged in the Depart- 
ment, permit operations for the ensuing season of 1934-35. 

The Committee of Council concur in the recommendation of the Honour- 
able, the Minister of Lands and Forests, and advise that the same be acted 
upon. 

Certified, 

C. H. BULMER. 

Clerk Executixe Council 



PULPWOOD OPERATIONS 

The pulpwood cut amounted to slightly over a half million cords, the 
exact figures being 500,083. This has been the largest pulpwood operation 
on Crown Lands for five years, or since the season of 1929-30 when twice as 
much, or 1,051,631 cords, were cut. During the intervening years yard stocks 
were being depleted, and the operating companies, desirous during the past 
year of replenishing their piles and of taking advantage, no doubt, of the 40c. 
a cord reduction on Spruce granted to them in the fall of 1933, cut some 35,000 
cords more than the previous year. 

Uncertain conditions surrounding the pulp and paper industry continue 
to exist. The number of mills in Ontario now closed and others running on 
a partial basis provide a large and important problem, the solution of which 
may be found only after a careful survey of all the facts incidental thereto 
has been made and an intelligent study of such has been given. 

A number of pulpwood agreements have expired, and these, along with 
others where the obligations have not been met, are being reviewed for the 
purpose of enabling such steps to be taken as may ensure the re-opening of 
certain of the old mills now idle and maintaining the production of going 
concerns. 

The whole question of bringing into production certain of the large areas 
where matured pulpwood now exists and of re-allotting such portions thereof 
to accredited operators is being carefully considered. 

It is confidently predicted that without causing any undue apprehension 
on the part of concessionaires or their bond holders mutual arrangements can 
be eflfected or new undertakings reached whereby new avenues of business 
ma>^ be encouraged, a more sustained operation provided and substantial 
advantage to employment gained. 

Eft'orts will be directed to the end of increasing the price of newsprint to 
a point consistent with the need of providing a fair return to the investors and 
a standard li\'ing wage to the allied workers of the industry. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 21 

WOODMEN'S EMPLOYMENT ACT 

In 1933 at certain bush camps in the North the workers became dissatis- 
fied, alleging certain disabilities and undertaking to go on strike to assert their 
rights and secure their demands. While the then Government undertook 
through the Department of Lands and Forests to lend its efforts towards 
settling matters, there was really no legal machinery that could be readily 
put into operation. In due course, however, the disturbances, which showed 
a tendency towards reaching extensive proportions, were ended without any 
serious breaches of the law. 

The occurrence, however, favoured the idea of promoting legislation to 
enable the Government, through the Minister of Lands and Forests, to in- 
vestigate conditions in bush camps either before, during or after a strike, that 
disturbances and strikes might be ameliorated or settled or, even better, 
avoided. Consequently during the Session of 1934 there was passed The Wood- 
men's Employment Act, which aimed to meet the purposes briefly recited above. 

This Act, Chap. 66, 24 Geo. V., Statues of Ontario, provides for the 
appointment of an Inspector and enables him to investigate such questions 
as computation of wages, hours of labour, food supplies, charges for supplies, 
deduction for services, assessments, camp quarters, contracts, labour condi- 
tions and such other matters respecting Woodmen's employment as may be 
directed by the Minister or Deputy Minister of the Department. Timber 
licensees, or those holding a right to cut Crown timber, shall be responsible 
to the Crown for all things done or required to be done during lumbering 
operations, whether or not such operations are being conducted directly by 
the licensees or their agents. 

Provision is made for investigation report and recommendation to the 
Minister, who in turn ma\- make to the operators or the Lieutenant-Governor 
in Council such recommendations as he may deem advisable, and any regu- 
lations made by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall have the full effect 
of law when duly published. Certain powers are vested in the Inspector 
whereby he may make effective his investigations. No general regulations 
have yet been made under and by \irtue of this Act. 

Appointments have been made under this Act, the Chief Investigator 
or Inspector being Mr. Thorsten Ehn, and a co-inspector Mr. Walter Wood- 
ward. The former is a competent person of many parts, having had bush 
experience in varied lines in Northern Europe and over fifteen years in the 
Province of Ontario. His intimate knowledge of lumbering and pulpwood 
operations, his skill in handling men and his humanitarianism are essential 
qualifications for the position to which he has been entrusted. 

Mr. Woodward has for many years been closely identified with labour 
problems and workmen in the North-western part of the Province and has 
marked ability as a conciliator. His visitations to camps, listing men and 
acting as mediator between employer and employee, if and when the occasion 
arises, will, it is felt, redound to the mutual advantage of all concerned. Func- 
tioning in this capacity he has already proved the wisdom of the Department's 
choice. 



22 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

INDUSTRIAL DISTURBANCES 

In July of 1934 slight discontent was evidenced in the Spruce Falls Com- 
pany's operations in the Kapuskasing section, but what first appeared like a 
big and possibly protracted strike was amicably settled, and no further signs 
of unrest amongst these workers in the woods appeared. 

Early in September, however, discontent broke out amongst the workers 
of the Abitibi Power and Paper Company at their Iroquois Falls and Smooth 
Rock Falls operations. Here the men, organized by the Lumber Workers 
Industrial Union, made a demand upon the Company for a higher rate of pay, 
shorter working hours, better living conditions, recognition of camp com- 
mittees and for the right to organize and hold meetings in the lumber camps. 
No negotiations were entered into by the men and the Company, and a strike 
was declared. 

Careful inv^estigation by the Government disclosed the fact that there 
was no just cause for declaring a strike, and yet efforts to get the Compny 
and men together were in vain. The Minister of Lands and Forests personally 
met a delegation of the strikers at Iroquois Falls, gave them a most sympathetic 
hearing, made definite and reasonable proposals, which were refused. 

Subsequently, about a month later, a number of settlers desirous of 
working appealed to the Attorney-General for the right to work unmolested 
by the strikers, and a further investigation re\ealed the desire of over three 
hundred men to return to work if they could do so safely. The Minister of 
Lands and Forests caused a meeting to be called at Cochrane on the 30th 
of October at which was read his memorandum, in which he pointed out, 
amongst other things, that while they had a right to strike and picket they 
must do so peacefully and that no breach of the laws of Ontario would be 
tolerated. The following day a number of men returned to work and the 
strike was called off. A situation somewhat akin to this occurred during 
October in the same Company's operations in the Sault Ste. Marie section, 
where the Minister of Lands and Forests made certain proposals to the affected 
workers which were rejected. Later on the strikers, representing only a 
percentage of the workers, realizing they had not public sympathy behind 
them returned to work. 

The considered opinion of the Minister, who met the strike leaders and 
discussed the situation with them, is that some of the more prominent of 
them, sufficiently influential to sway the others, were not particularly anxious 
to efifect any settlement and were not in sympathy with methods of negotia- 
tions and conciliatory principles that apply in this country and that should 
govern the settlement of industrial disputes. 



TIMBER SALES AND LICENSES 

Only nineteen timber sales under public competition, as indicated in 
Appendix No. 11, took place during the fiscal year, all of these, excepting one, 
covering small areas and all carried out in favour of active logging operators, 
most of them being small dealers. Ten covered exclusive pulpwood proposi- 
tions where the cordage was limited, and the others, with the exception of one, 
were mixed propositions. There was but one tender each in thirteen cases. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 23 

three tenders each in three cases and two tenders each in the remaining three 
cases. In the Red and White Pine sale $7.65 per M feet B.M. was bid inckid- 
ing dues, while an exclusive Jackpine area brought $7.75 per M feet B.AL, 
this timber being required for Railway tie purposes to meet a standing con- 
tract. The largest area disposed of was part of McBride Township, in the 
District of Sudbury, from which the lumber is watered to Timmins. It was 
purchased by Rudolph and McChesney, whose mill is situated at this point 
from which they deliver largely to the Mining Companies. 

At the close of the operating season, April 30th, 1934, the area under 
Timber License was 10,407 square miles, represented by 602 timber licenses, 
while the pulp concessions cover an area of 53,011/4 square miles. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

The figures in the Records Branch, where all the incoming and outgoing 
letters, documents, maps, etcetera, except those of the Minister's office, the 
Land Tax and Forestry Branches, are recorded show an increase in both 
directions. Some 58,312 were received, or 1,427 in excess of the previous 
year, and some 62,030 were mailed as against 61,528 for the year 1933. 

It may be remarked that all notices of mining claims recorded or can- 
celled are cleared through and entered in the Records Branch of the Depart- 
ment of Lands and Forests, and as the unit of claim is 40 acres the entries of 
these comprise against each half lot four times as much work as a land trans- 
action where the unit of measurement is a half lot or 160 acres. Now files 
are being constantly created and transfers are being made from current filing 
vault boxes to reference vaults. The space required for such and for future 
expansion is an important factor in the allotment of vault area, and unless 
ample vault accommodation can be regularly provided for current material 
and normal growth the problem of housing original documents and keeping 
permanent records that cannot be deemed obsolete will be acute. 



INSTRUMENTS ISSUED 

Appendix No. 14 details the number of patents, leases, licenses and other 
instruments that have been engrossed, recorded and issued throughout the year. 
The total numbered 1,596, being 241 greater than the preceding year. Included 
in this number are Mining patents, leases, licenses and mining rights, the 
Patents Office attached to the Lands Branch having been the entry and clearing 
medium of all such mining documents prior and subsequent to the creation of 
the Department of Mines in 1920. 

The importance of the Patents Office cannot be too emphasized as here is 
maintained a record of every parcel of land alienated, leased or granted in the 
Province of Ontario, and the land descriptions and names are so catalogued as 
to provide a ready source of information bearing upon all land grants. 



24 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

SURVEYS, WATER POWERS, ENGINEERING, MAPS, ETC. 

The Crown Land surveys carried on during the year consisted of miscellane- 
ous work, including the running of base and meridian lines, the traversing of 
roads and lakes, the survey of shore lands along Eake Huron and the perpetua- 
tion of original monuments in several of the older Townships of the Province, 
details of which may be found in the Surveyor-General's Report. 

During the year, five water power leases were issued, namely: — 

No. 60 — On the east branch of the Montreal River, at the outlet of Gow- 
ganda Lake, District of Timiskaming. 

No. 61 — At Ragged Chute, on the Montreal River, in the District of 
Timiskaming. 

No. 62 — On the Sagawitchuan Ri\'er, in the District of Kenora (Patricia 
Portion.) 

No. 63 — On the Raven River (now Larder River), Township of McFadden, 
District of Timiskaming. 

No. 6Jf — On the Spanish River, Township of Nairn, District of Sudbury. 

The revenue under water power leases was S308,495.62 being an increase of 
— S646.37, over last year. 

Maps of the Province and Districts have been revised and published, as 
required, during the year. 



FOREST FIRE PROTECTION 

Minor amendments were made to the Forest Fires Prevention Act, 1930, 
with a view to facilitating the disposal of slash and the collection of depart- 
mental costs in connection with fires of certain classes. 

The staff was slightly larger in number than in 1933, and it was possible 
to make some additions to equipment and permanent structures. 

The season as a whole was less severe than any of those during the preceding 
five years although some districts did experience a very severe hazard. 

There were 1,568 fires with a total area burned of 198,633 acres. Of this 
total area 68,873 acres were mature growth, 31,944 acres second growth, 31,785 
acres young growth, 22,824 acres slashings, 31,575 acres old burn, and 11,632 
acres muskeg, barren and grass land. 

Aircraft were again used to assist in fire detection and suppression, 21 
machines doing a total of 7,082 hours. 



REFORESTATION 



During the spring of 1934, 5,973 persons received trees for general reforesta- 
tion and windbreak planting amounting in all to 6,200,610. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 25 

The total number of trees distributed for all purposes was 8,978,176. 

Nursery work was carried on in the usual way at St. Williams, Orono and 
Midhurst. Some loss was sustained owing to the extreme weather conditions 
but a supply of nursery stock has been produced very little below our recent 
yearly average. 

Work on the nine county Forests was curtailed and only necessary planting 
and protection was taken care of. A program of inspection was carried out on 
all important demonstration plots. 

Seed collecting consisted of procuring only those species which were 
absolutely necessary for our present work. 

Tree planting was carried on again this year in connection with the Federal 
Government at Camp Borden, Petawawa and Val Cartier, using unemployed 
relief labour. 



REVENUE 



The total collection, as shown by Appendix No. 4, of the Department up 
to the end of October 31st., 1934, amounted to $2,258,320.92, which was in 
excess of the previous year by S359, 873.48, the increase obtaining during the 
last three months of the year. Certain of these collections, however, having 
been applied in reduction of expenditures lessened the total by S420,521.72, 
the details of which are shown in the same appendix.^ This left a net revenue 
of $1,837,799.20, an amount greater than the previous year by $228,404.24. 
There was a slight increase in Land Collections, about $12,000.00 in Provincial 
Land Taxes and over $225,000.00 in the Woods and Forests accounts. 

This level of Revenue is still comparati^"ely low, but it is recognized that 
the greatest source of the Department's income is the Forest, and only as and 
when the great Forest Products Industry gets reasonably firmly established 
can it be expected that substantial increases in the Revenue will result. 



ENPENDITURES 



A perusal of Appendix No. 7 discloses an aggregate expenditure of $2,152,- 
851.08 on all services representing an increase over the previous year of 
$214,277.86. Of the total expenditure slightly over eighty per cent, is ordinary 
and the balance capital. 

While certain of the services showed decreases, these were counteracted 
by additional expenditures in fire-ranging to the extent of some $163,000.00, 
the total cost of such service being $1,241,895.07, or considerably over fifty 
per cent of the entire expenditures of the Department. Forest Ranging 
accounted for an increase of nearly $50,000.00, Reforestation over $10,000.00 
and Surveys some $3,600.00. 

Although there has been during the last few years a decidedly adverse 
situation with regard to the entire forest products industry, in that operations 



26 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

in the bush have been lessened and the revenue from forest resources propor- 
tionately reduced, the fact remains that the natural resources in the matter 
of timber wealth have to be protected against the ravages of fire, and such 
protective measures, even though carried on under a consistently economical 
basis, must be maintained, otherwise a tremendous risk would be taken, and it 
is on this ground that a fair expenditure in protecting the vast areas of the 
Provincial forests is justified. 

Comprehensive surveys are being made with a view to eliminating all but 
the essential machinery for efihciently caring for the forests, and it is readily 
believed that under a systematic check and a closer supervision of expenditures, 
with a merging of certain of the services, a decided reduction in the expenditures 
in respect of this service will result. The fire protection expenditure, being the 
largest in the Department, is more or less uncertain due to the influence of the 
weather and unexpected emergencies. 



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34 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 3 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased, Amount of Sales and Leases, and Amount of 
Collections for the year ending October 31st, 1934. 



Service 



Acres sold 

and 

Leased 



Amount of 

Sales and 

Leases 



Collections on all 

Sales, Leases, 
Land Taxes, etc. 



Lands Sold: 

Agricultural, Townsites, etc. 

University Lands 

Common School Lands . . . . , 
Grammar School Lands. . . . - 



Lands Leased: 
Crown 



Provincial Latid Tax. 



82,857.375 
1,745.5 



20,142.70 



104,745.575 



$ c. 

73,012.62 

872.30 



8,608.83 



82,493.75 



S c. 
71,269.12 
556.81 
735.24 
264.20 



375,916.15 
131,447.74 
579,925.06 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



35 



Appendix No. 4 

Statement of the Revenue of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1934. 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Lands Collections 

Crown Sales: 
Agricultural 


55,473.55 
15,795.57 


71,269.12 

735.24 
556.81 
264.20 




Townsites 








Common School Lands 






University Lands 






Grammar School Lands 










72,825.37 


Rent (Not including Parks) : 

Crown Leases and Licenses of Occu- 
pation 


352,549.54 

1,882.21 

376.45 

6,475.38 


Bruce Beach 






Jordon Harbour 






Temagami Islands 










361,283.58 
131,447.74 


Provincial Land Tax 




Woods and Forests: 

Bonus 




459,870.50 

651,224.81 

95,733.43 

296,241.83 

3,225.00 

403.00 

28,504.32 




Timber Dues 






Ground Rent 






Fire Protection Tax 






Transfer Fees 






IVIill Licenses 






Scalers' Wages 








5,289.81 
1,391.00 
5,842.10 
2,251.82 


1,535,202.89 


Parks: 

Algonquin Provincial Park: 

Rentals 


14,774.73 

11,414.33 

4,948.16 


Perquisites 




Licenses 




Miscellaneous 








Rondeau Provincial Park: 

Rentals 


9,057.73 
150.00 

1,661.90 
544.70 




Perquisites 




Sale of Lumber, etc 




Miscellaneous 








Quetico Provincial Park: 

Rentals 


285.03 

366.13 

4,297.00 




Perquisites 




Licenses 












31,137.22 


Agents: — Office Fees 


278.35 

67,627.82 

517.12 

133.70 

9.10 

5.85 


Back to the Land Movement 






Casual Fees 






Clearing Townsites, etc 






Contingencies — Lands 






Contingencies — Forestry 














68,571.94 




Carried forward 


2,131,896.80 











36 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 4 — Concluded 

Statement of the Revenue of the Department of Lands and Forests for the vear ending 

October 31, 1934. 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




68,571.94 

35,297.65 

13,718.57 

7,046.97 

1,788.99 


2,131,896.80 


Fire Ranging — -Perquisites, etc 




Lac Seul Storage Dam 






Reforestation — Perquisites, etc 






Survevs — Maps, Office Fees, etc 










126,424.12 






Total Collections 


2,258,320.92 


Deduct: 

Collections applied in reduction of 
Expenditure 






Fire Protection Tax 

Fire Ranging — Perquisites 

Scalers' Wages 

Back to the Land Movement 

Reforestation 


280,259.65 

35,297.65 

16,571.06 

61,439.33 

7,046.97 


400,614.66 

13,718.57 

6,188.49 




Collections transferred to Interest 
Account (State Xo. 18 Pub. Accts.) 
Lac Seul Storage Dam 






Collections transferred to Loan Re- 
payments (State Xo. 20 Pub. Accts.) 
Back to the Land 










420,521 . 72 






Net Revenue 


1,837,799.20 











DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



37 



Appendix No. 5 

Statement of Revenue Refunds of the Department of Lands and Forests 
for the year ending October 31st, 1934. 



Service 



Algonquin Provincial Park: — 

Miscellaneous 

Rentals 

Back to the Land Movement 

Bruce Beach Rentals 

Casual Fees 

Crown Rent 

Crown Lands Sales 

Jordan Harbour Rentals 

Mill Licenses 

Provincial Land Tax 

Rondeau Provincial Park — Miscellaneous 
Timber Dues 



42.89 
27.50 

2,655.61 

15.50 

8.50 

40.00 

1,318.17 

10.00 

6.00 

75.70 

22.60 

616.10 

4,838.57 



38 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6 

Statement of Receipts of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 
October 31st, 1934, which are considered as Special Funds. 



Service 


$ c. 


« c. 


Common School Lands: 

Principal . 


4.33.00 
302.24 




Interest 








735.24 


Grammar School Lands: 
Principal 


165.50 
98.70 


Interest 








264.20 


University Lands: 
Principal 


372.04 
184.77 


Interest 








.556.81 








1,556.25 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



39 



Appendix No. 7 

Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Lands and Forests 

for the year ending October 31st, 1934. 



Service 



Main Office and Branches: 

Salaries — Lands 

Salaries — Forestry 

Salaries — Surveys 

Agent's Salaries and Disbursements 

Allowances to School Sections 

Township of South Walsingham 

Township of Vespra 

Township of Clarke 

Township of Charlotteville 

Annuities and Bonuses to Indians 

Back to the Land Movement $157,472.40 

Less Amounts Paid by Dominion Government and Muni- 
cipalities transferred from Revenue: 61,439.33 

Board of Surveyors 

Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire H.\zards 

Contingencies — Lands 

Contingencies — Forestry 

Contingencies — Surveys 

Display at Canadian National Exhibition 

Expenditures under the Forestry Act 

Fire Ranging 1,557,452.37 

Less Fire Protection Tax and Perquisites Transferred 
FROM Revenue 315,557 . 30 

Forest Ranging and Measurement of Timber 170,607.04 

Less Scaler's Wages Transferred from Revenue 16,571 .06 

Forest Reserves 

Forest Research 

Grant — Canadian Forestry Association 

Insect Control 

Insurance 

Moving Expenses of Officials 

Parks: 

Algonquin Provincial Park 32,999 . 52 

Rondeau Provincial Park 14,596 . 27 

Quetico Provincial Park 14,939.05 

Reforestation 177,835 .02 

Less Perquisites etc.. Transferred from Revenue 7,046.97 

Salaries, Expenses etc., Re-Inspection of Dams, etc 

Surveys 

Specl\l Warrants: 

Air Service Investigation 

International Joint Commission 

Payment to Canadian Lumberman's Association 

Statutory: 

Minister's Salary 

Refunds 

Less Salary Assessment 



121,937 


51 


46,637 


50 


31,833 


53 


73,759 


64 


150 


00 


250 


00 


150.00 


150.00 


19,688.00 



96,033.07 

200.00 

16,951.25 

17,261.13 

5,772.85 

7,487.07 

194.56 

12,011.89 



1,241,895.07 



154,035.98 

5,317.94 
1,341.61 
1,000.00 

984.11 
1,108.56 

248.95 



62,534.84 



170,788.05 

10.00 
56,690.93 



9,445.51 

2,169.69 

797.59 



9,387.07 
177.30 



2,168,401.20 
15,550.12 

2,152,851.08 



40 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



A ppendix 
Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground 





Area 
covered 

by 
timber 
licences 


Saw Log Timber 


Boom 


PROVINCE 

OF 
ONTARIO 


Red and White Pine 


Jack Pine 


Other 


Red and White Pine 


Square 
Miles 


Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces Feet 




10,407 


933,899 


36,825,760 


1,248,622 


20,729,634 


887,431 


31,157,161 


12,642 


1,305,892 



STATEMENT OF 



PROVINCE 

OF 
ONTARIO 


Boxwood 


Lagging 


Ties 


Pulp- 
wood 


Telle- 
graph 
Poles 


Posts 


Bolts 


Cords 


Cords 


Feet 


Pieces 


Cords 


Pieces 


Pieces 


Cords 




1,238 


477 


690 


436,470 


500,083 


2,090 


3,113 


23 



Total amount received from all Forest Sources, $1,506,959.97. See Appendix No. 9. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1933 



41 



No. 8 

Rent, Fire Protection and Bonus, etc., during the year ending 31st October, 1934. 



and Dimension Timber 


Waney Pine 


Piling 


Cordwood 


Jack Pine 


Other 


Pieces 


Cubic 
Feet 


Lineal 
Feet 


Board 
Measure 


Hard 
Cords 




Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 


Soft 
Cords 


6.633 


355,938 


23,005 


1.929.888 


46 


2,700 


16.636 


6,170 


12,290 


40.247 



TIMBER— Concluded 



Amounts Accrued 


Timber 
Dues 


Bonus 


Trespass 


Interest 

on Dues 

and Bonus 


Ground 
Rent 


Transfer 
Fees 


Fire Tax 


Mill 

License 

Fees 


Annual 
Bonus 


Toul 
Accruals 


$ c. 

$660,072 14 


$ c. 

$493,465 40 


$ c. 
$5,672 76 


$ c. 

$44,665 60 


$ c. 
$97,444 75 


$ c. 
$3.225 00 


$ c. 

$325,895 60 


$ c. 

$409 00 


$ c. 

$6,860 00 


$ c. 

$1,637.710 25 



42 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Appendix No. 9 
Statement of Timber Revenue, Year 1933-34 

Timber Dues $596,069.21 

Interest on Timber Dues 44,665 . 60 

Timber Sale Deposits 10,490.00 

$651,224.81 

Bonus on Timber Cut 453,010.50 

Annual Minimum Bonus Certain Agreements 6,860.00 

459,870.50 

Fire Protection 292,614.67 

Interest Fire Protection 3,627 . 16 

296,241 . S3 

Ground Rent 92,945. 16 

Interest Ground Rent 2,788.27 

95,733.43 

Transfer Fees 3,225.00 

Mill License Fees 403.00 

Scalers' Wages 28,504 . 32 

$1,535,202.89 



Statement of Timber Revenue, Year 1933-34 

Timber Dues $651,224.81 

Bonus 459,870.50 

Fire Protection 296,241 . S3 

Ground Rent 95,733.43 

Transfer Fees 3,225.00 

Mill License Fees 403.00 

Scalers' Wages 28,504. 32 

$1,535,202.89 



Appendix No. 10 

Acreage under License 

The area covered by timber licenses where the holder pays regulation 
ground rent and fire tax charges, at the end of the license season, April 30th, 
1934, was 10,407 square miles. 

The number of Crown Timber Licenses issued for the license season of 
1933-34 (1st of May, 1933, to April 30th, 1934) was 602. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



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Area 

sq. 

miles 


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a. 


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c 




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c 


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t^ 


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2^ 

a 


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a 






^ 


a 


r" 


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/- 


- 




U 


< 


< 


1 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



45 





_4; 


CD 

O 

CO 






c- 






c- 












c 
.2 

'en 

O 

p 

£ 


0) 


1 

3 


§ 

3 


o 
o 


bo 

"So 

o 


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oo 


o 


OO 


ooo 


o o 




CO 


o 


CO o 


lit lO o 

cc o CO 




S 




00 




ooo 
ocxo 


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c 
c 

c 


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c 
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c 


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7 

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c 


O 'x 

9 S 

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c 


c 




1 

o 


3 

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c . 


c 

li- 


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No. of 
Tend- 
ers 


!M 


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- 


cc 


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Area 

sq. 

miles 


s 


2^ 


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CO 


8 


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gut 

< 


o'i 

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in _ 

II . 


« c 

Si 


C 
0) tn 

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^ 'S. 

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d, . 

o ^ 
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Date 
Sold 
1934 


o 




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c 


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C 







46 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 12 

Statement showing the number of Locatees and of acres located; of purchasers and of acres sold; 

of lots resumed for non-performance of settlement duties, and of patents issued in Free 

Grant Townships during the year ending 31st October, 1934. 



Township 



District 
or County 



Agent 



6^ 



O 01 






^■v. 



6 ^ 



Korali 
Prince 



Aberdeen . . . 
Galbraith . . . 
Plummer . . . 

Hilton 

Jocelyn . . . . 

Cardiff 

Gahvay . . . . 

Bangor 

Carlow 

Dungannon. 
Faraday. . . . 
Herschel . . . 

Mayo 

Monteagle. . 
McClure . . . 
Wicklow . . . 
Wollaston . . 

Aubrey 

Britton 

Eton 

Langton . . . . 
Melgund . . . 

Mutrie 

Redvers. . . . 

Rowell 

Rugby 

Sanford . . . . 
Southwcrth. 
Temple . . . . 
Van Home.. 
Wabigoon . . 
Wainwright. 
Zealand .... 

Melick 

Pellatt 

Abinger . . . . 
Denbigh. . . . 

Baxter 

Brunei 

Cardwell . . . 
Chaffey .... 
Freeman . . . 
Morrison . . . 



Algoma 



Haliburton. 
Peterboro. . 

Hastings . . 



Kenora . 



Lennox and 
Addington 

Muskoka 



C. A. Duval. 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Albert 

Grigg ... 

Bruce Mines. 



W. J. Trainor. 
Hilton Beach.. 

A. N. Wilson. . 
Kinmount . . . . 



David Fuller. 
Bancroft . . . . 



J. E. Gibson, 
Dryden . . 



J. D. C. Smith, 
Kenora 



Chas. Both, 
Denbigh. 



W. G. Gerhart, 
Bracebridge. 



158 



54 



111 

100 
100 
485.5 
71 
100 
224 



122 
52.5 



332.5 
480.5 



221 
1,222 
170 
442.5 
1,010 
160 
78.75 
364 
1,136.5 
80 

162.5 
80 
751.55 

510 



100 



100 
100 



10 
100 



23.5 



2.5 



23.4 
31.5 



158 



325 



54 

366 
199 

219.5 



147.5 
471 
296 
441 



100 



94 
480 
151.5 



759.5 

123 

779 

280 

160 



124 
431 
198 



80 
422.8 

78.5 



100 



100 



80 



148.5 
100 



1 100 



131 



120 



229 



104 



159.5 
160 



82 
80 



160 



159.5 
925.8 

791.5 
141 

96 



100 



99 
147 
295 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



Appendix No. 12 — Continued 



Agent 


District 
or County 


Township 


tr. 

C 

<D 

6 


in 


2 

■§ 
3 
C. 

"o 
d 


o 

tn 

"o 

6 
Z 


-a 
jj 

"aj 
o 

c 

o 
en 

C 

a, 
d 


o >- 


u 

3 
tn 
to 

en 

53 

c 

d 


<u — 

d a< 


Muskoka . . . . 


Muskoka. . 

« 
» 

u 

it 

a 

Nipissing. . 

« 

u 
a 
(1 
li 
u 
u 

Parry Sounc 

(( 

u 

u 
ti 
u 
u 
u 
ti 
ti 
« 

a 
u 

(1 

ti 
ti 
(1 
a 
a 

Rainy River 
c 

a 
tt 
It 

it 
a 

(( 
a 
ti 
ti 


. W. G. Gerhart, 
Bracebridge. . 


2 


203 






2 
2 

1 
1 
5 
1 
2 


203 

182 
100 
100 
479 
78 
200 






McLean 










Oakley 


<i 

a 

tt 
it 
a 

J.P.Marchildon 
North Bay. .. 

it 
It 
11 
ti 
ti 

1 N. B. Fletcher, 

Parry Sound. 

(( 

ti 
ti 
ti 
ti 
it 

a 
It 
tt 
tt 
« 
ti 
ti 
a 

ti 
It 
a 
a 
11 
it 
a 

J. A. Alexander, 
Fort F" ranees . 


3 


285 






1 


59 


Ridout 








Rvde 


2 


200 






1 


100 


Sinclair 








Stephenson . . 


1 


100 










Stisted 






1 
1 


100 


Watt 










2 
3 

4 
2 
3 

1 
2 


203 
340 
422 
200 
269 
100 
190 


91 


Wood 












Bonfield 


1 

3 
7 
5 
6 
2 


100 

300 

773 

444 

588.09 

264 






2 


200 


Calvin 








Cameron 






2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
4 

1 
2 

1 


177 


Chisholm .... 






100 


Ferris 

Lauder 




12 


294 
204 


IMattawan . . . 




6.3 


1 
2 

1 
1 
6 
1 


186 
200 

100 
100 

758 
100 


164 


Papineau .... 


2 


200 




348 8 


Armour 






65 


Bethune 










279 


Carling 


2 

1 


200 
100 






175 


Chapman. . . . 








Christie 






1 


198 


Ferguson .... 










5 
5 
1 


506 

491 

91 




Gurd 










1 

"l 

1 


101 


Hagerman . . . 


1 


91 








Hardv 






118 


Himsvvorth . . 
Henvev 


6 

2 

1 


620 

107 

79 




22 

7 


4 
2 


509 
107 


200 


Humphry. . . . 






Lount 






3 
4 
2 
2 

1 


222 
423 
198 
200 
100 






Laurier 


1 
2 


100 

198 










Monteith .... 










McConkev. . . 










McDougall . . 


2 


292 










Nipissing .... 






1 
2 
1 


220 


Patterson .... 


1 
3 
1 


70 
292 
100 










270 


Pringle 










100 


R\erson 






2 


200 




Shawanaga . . 




8 


1 


208 


Spence 








1 

1 


100 
100 




Strong 


1 


100 










Wilson 






1 


200 


Carpenter. . . . 


1 


81.5 












Crozier 






1 
3 


81 
477.5 






Dance 


a 
ti 
ti 
ti 
li 
it 

W. Cameron, 

Stratton ' 

ii 

ti 

a 


5 
2 


809.5 
242 




170.5 
2 






Devlin 






Fleming 


1 
2 


160.5 
371.5 






Kingsford. . . . 
Aliscampbell . 


3 
1 


531.5 
80 




46.5 


1 

1 


162.5 
160 


Woodyatt .... 






1 
4 

1 
6 


36 
566 
164 
670.75 




Blue 


4 
1 

8 


484 
164 
972.25 






1 
1 


162 


Curran 

Dewart 




2 


162 


Dobie 






1 


88.5 


Mather 


S 


415 
162 




1 


1 
2 


175.5 
200 




Morley 


ll 







48 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 12 — Continued 



Township 



District 
or County 



Agent 



o— ' 







-a 




-o 










OJ 










0) 


•■', 


1) 




3 




s 


c 




tn 


X 


in 




X 






8 




?^ — 




a 


O 




o 4; 


4; 


. , , 


'•-. 


u 


.of 
esu 


03 


o 


o 


a 




o 


o 


o 


o >- 


d 


^ 


Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 



d — 
Z 



Morson .... 
McCrosson . 

Nelles 

Pattullo. . . . 

Potts 

Pratt 

Richardson . 

Sifton 

Spohn 

Sutherland. . 

Tait 

Tovell 

Alice 

Algona S. . . 
Buchanan . . 

Clara 

Fraser 

Head 

Maria 

Rolph 

Wilberforce. 

Wylie 

Merritt .... 

Blezard .... 

Broder 

Chapleau. . . 

Dill 

Garson 

Hanmer. . . . 
Lumsden . . . 
Macpherson. 
Morgan .... 

Neelon 

Appleby .... 
Casimir .... 
Dunnet .... 

Hagar 

Jennings . . . 
Kirkpatrick. 
Ratter 

Blake 

Conmee. . . . 

Crooks 

Dawson Road 
Dorion .... 

Gillies 

Gorham . . . 
Lybster . . . 
Macgregor 
Marks .... 
Mclntyre. 

Oliver 

Paipoonge. 
Pardee. . . . 
Pearson . . . 
Scoble .... 



Rainy River 



Renfrew. 



Sudbury 



Nipissing 
Sudbur>' . 



Nipissing 
Sudbury . 

Thunder 
Bay. . 



W. Cameron, 
Stratton . . . 



E. L. Ward, 
Pembroke 



E. Arthurs, 

Espanola .... 
J. K. Maclennan 

Sudbury 



T.A.Millichamp 
Markstay. . . . 



S. H. Wilson, 
Port Arthur. . 



573 

304.125 

645 

201.25 

809.5 
80 

570.75 

656.75 

601.375 
1805.125 

405 
1340 

100 



304 



100 
426.8 

98.25 
569 
160 
776.23 



320 
120 

77 

80 
1276 
631.5 
160 
758.875 
171 
157.5 
827.5 

236,5 

317.25 

553 

190 

160 

153.5 

157.5 



2042 
622 



100 
1531 
641.5 
642 



14.5 



164 
2 

19 
1 



2.75 

80 
2 

18 



27.75 



1.5 



45 



86.5 

'ss'" 

^5 



11 



40 
34'5 



2.5 



484.88 

301.75 

323 

162 

647.5 



319 

322.5 

803 

923 

647 

396 



100 
138 



168.8 



89 



520.23 
243 



120 



1018.5 
473 



800.25 



659 

80 
449 
189 
240 
312 



127 



1204 
319 



100 
1219 
236.5 
642.5 



245.5 

'si'"' 



330.5 

159.5 

80 

348.5 



81 
79 . 75 



113.278 
101 
132 
152.96 



27.75 
100 
1020.5 

78 
364 



160 



320 



153.86 
160 



309.792 



783.87 
160 



339.5 
495 



161. 

89 

160 



136 

160.5 

159.5 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



49 



Appendix No. 12 — Continued 



Township 


District 
or County 


Agent 


-a 

% 
u 
_o 

■ji 

c 

s 

u 

o. 

6 
Z 




(0 

u 
a 
en 

cfl 

JZ 

id 

3 

a 
'o 
d 


12 

"o 

in 

<u 

'J 

d 


T3 
_4J 

"u 

U 

C 
rt 
u 
« 
c 
o 

00 

i 


U ^ 
O 0) 

« E 

o >- 
Z 


-a 

V 
3 
en 
i> 

x 

C 

<u 

a 

d 
Z 


°^ 

da 
Z 


Strange 

Ware 

Glamorgan.. . 
Stanhope. . . . 
Redditt 


Thunder 
Bay 

Haliburton.. 

Kenora 


S. H. Wilson, 
Port Arthur. . 

Unattached. . . . 


5 
20 


651.75 
2703.75 






3 
10 

1 


317.5 
1530.25 

100 








10.5 


2 


240 










1.5 
3 






11 ' ' ' ' 


3 


401.5 












Revell 


It 
Nipissing. 

<< 
11 

Renfrew. . 

11 

11 
11 

Sudbury. . 




1 

1 
4 
4 


142 
105 
644 
364 






Airy 

Grant 

Lyell.. 

Murchison 


11 
11 


1 
5 


105 
779 


1 


25 
.5 






1 
1 
1 


160 
200 


11 










101 


Sabine 


11 
11 

11 


1 
1 


94 
160 












Springer 

Algona N . . . . 
Brougham . . . 
Brundenell. . . 






2 


320 










1 
4 
3 
1 

1 


106 


11 














184.64 


11 
11 


1 


49 




46.27 






401.27 


Burns 






200 


Gratton 


II 














194 


Griffith .... 


11 


1 


fi."^ 












Jones 

Lyndoch .... 
Radcliffe .... 


31 3Q9 






4 


206 














1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 


105 


II 










2 
1 


118 
100 


200 


Raglan 

Richards 


II 


4 


377.0 






149 






90 


Sherwood .... 


II 
II 
11 


1 
4 
3 


50 
578 
461.5 


1 


27 
19 






80.14 


Baldwin 

Cosby 

Martland. , . 


2 
2 


326 
311.5 


397 
240 






155 


Secord 


11 








. . . 6 . 












Total 
























416 


48,152.42 


13 


1,253.97 


321 


37,384.71 


154 


19,662.41 



Number of lots assigned, 174. Number of acres assigned, 49,227.98. 



50 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Appendix Xo. 13 

Statement showing the number of purchasers and of acres sold; of lots resumed for non-perform- 
ance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in Townships other than Free-Grant 
during the jear ending October 31st, 1934. 











— 


_5 




3 












o 


;i 




■Ji 




Township 


District 
or County 


Agent 


1 

a 


'J 


o 




5 










'*« 


■*-i 


. 


... _ 




^ ft) 








o 


o 


o 




a 


°S 








o 


o 


o 




o 


o - 


■ 






Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 




Algoma 

(1 


C. A. Duval, 


4 


176.4 










Tarentorus . . . 


S. S. Marie 






1 


80 






VanKoughnet 

Bright 

Cobden 


a 


u 


5 


341.25 


9 


188 






u 


Albert Grigg 
Bruce Mines. 


1 


160 










u 


1 


85.5 










Johnson 






1 


152 


u 


" 










1 


149 


Parkinson .... 


« 


« 


1 


159 










Patton . . . 


u 
a 

u 

u 


u 
u 


2 
1 


287 
160 










Rose 


1 
1 


159 

148 








1 


138 


Wells 


1 


161 




Blount .... 


Cochrane 


H.T.Vincent, 
Cochrane . . 


10 
2 


763 
160.25 


6 
2 


450.5 
160.25 






Brower 


7 


1,039.05 




(1 


u 
u 


17 
10 


1,312.5 
736.5 


27 
13 


2,509.27 
1,231 






Clute 


7 


1,011.87 


Colquhoun . . . 
Fournier 


(1 


u 


4 


300 


9q 


2,250 






u 


u 


7 


566.5 


6 


468.50 


1 


153 




u 


u 
u 


8 
6 


620.25 
399.74 


7 

4 


562 
374.5 






Glackmeyer . . 


5 


764 


Kennedy 


u 




6 


450 


1 


/o 


2 


302 


Lamarche .... 


u 


u 


7 


554.41 


o 


559 


2 


324 


Leitch 


u 


u 


15 


1,183 


22 


1,701.5 


1 


150 


Machin 


u 


u 


11 


831 


To 


842 






Newmarket . . . 


u 


u 


15 


1,195.27 


6 


627.75 






Pyne 


u 
u 


a 
u 


5 

8 


476.5 
599 


4 
12 


402 
1,296.5 


3 

1 


479 


Shackleton 


131 


Barker 


(1 


T. Tremblay, 
Hearst 


3 


225 






1 


72.93 


Casgrain 


<( 


26 


2,045.70 


20 


1,567.7 


2 


299 


Devitt 


(( 


u 


72 


5,542.405 


53 


4,051.455 


o 


671.74 


Eilber 


a 


11 


24 


1,790 


12 


975 


8 


737.5 


Hanlan 


u 


u 


63 


4,711.5 


19 


1,471 


3 


451 


Kendall 


u 


a 


57 


4,277.5 


34 


2,553 


2 


295 


Lowther 


a 


u 


44 


3,321 


38 


2,956 


2 


237.72 


McCowan .... 


u 


u 


3 


225 


1 


/o 


1 


107 


Fauquier 


a 


H. E. Shep- 


















pard, 


19 


1,389 


8 


819.75 


o 


623.5 


Idington 


u 


Kapuskasing 


20 


2,053 


16 


1,769 


3 


358 


McCrea 


u 


a 


23 


1,705.8 


24 


1,796.5 


2 


226 


Nansen 


a 


u 


8 


604.45 


10 


765 


3 


327 


O'Brien 


u 


a 


3 


214.5 


1 


1 


6 


583 


Owens 


u 


u 


13 


1,272 


4 


402 


2 


198 




u 


u 

J. A. Hough, 


8 
5 


729 
402.5 


1 
2 


100 
319 






Beattv 


1 


iei 


Bond 


u 

u 


Matheson . 

u 


3 
9 


240.75 
789 










Bowman 


3 


238.5 


1 


145.5 


Calvert 


u 


a 


3 


241 


1 


161 






Carr 


u 
11 


u 
u 


2 
6 


240 
479.5 


1 
2 


160 
279.5 






Clergue 


1 


167 




u 


u 


16 


1,275.5 
311 


3 


240 






Dundonald . . . 


(< 


u 


4 


4 


351.75 


2 


237 


German 


u 


« 


8 


577.25 


1 


79.75 


1 


214 


Hislop 


u 


" 


5 


469 


5 


734.75 


5 


854.39 


Matheson . . . . 


" 


" 


13 


1,124.25 


2 


237 


1 


160.5 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



51 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 



Township 


District 
or County 


Agent 


en 

JZ 

a 

3 

a 
d 


•a 

a 

u 
d 


-a 
_aj 

u 

c 

tn 

"o 

d 


u T3 
o 0) 

o *- 
Z 


a 

3 

to 

C 
V 

a 

d 
Z 


U3 

d o- 

z 


Mountjoy .... 
McCart .... 


Cochrane 

u 

u 

u 
u 
a 
(1 

Kenora 

u 
a 

Nipissing 

u 
l( 

Sudbury 

(( 

u 
u 
u 

a 
u 
u 
u 
u 
11 
u 
« 
u 
u 
u 
u 
(I 
a 
« 

Temiskaming . 

u 

u 
u 
u 
u 
u 

H 
U 
U 

u 
u 

K 


f. A. Hough, 
Matheson . 

u 

H.T.Vincent, 
Cochrane. . 

y. D.C.Smith, 
Kenora . . . 

J.T.McDoug- 
all, North 
Bay 


4 
6 
5 
6 
4 
8 


277.75 

478 

400.5 

472.15 

397.25 

691.75 






1 


72.8 


4 


476 




Play fair 

Shaw 


7 


1,102.74 


2 
3 
2 


155 
239 
230 




Stock 






Taylor 

Tisdale 


2 
1 


309.5 
158 . 5 




2 

2 

2 
5 
4 

14 
14 


151.5 
125 

170 

77.38 
361.25 

2,245 
2,040.75 


1 


161 




Hanna .... 






Drayton 

" Reserve . 


1 


105.5 










Jaffray 

Phelps 

Widdifield .... 










2 
3 


320 
311 






2 


319.5 


Crerar 


T. A. Milli- 
champ, 
Markstay . 

u 

u 

J. S. Lowe, 

Massey. . . . 

i< 

J.K. MacLen- 
nan, Sud- 
bury 

i( 

u 
a 
i( 
« 
II 
u 
u 
u 

J. A. Hough, 
Matheson.. 
John Clark, 
Englehart . . . 

u 
u 

(1 
<i 

u 

u 

a 
a 


1 


169.5 


1 


156.5 






Hugel 


2 


299 


3 

8 

12 
1 
2 
1 
2 
5 

10 
1 

17 
3 
3 
2 
4 

15 
2 


460.5 

639.5 
1,188.75 
80.5 

240.98 

158.5 

292.72 

785 
1,551.75 

85 
1,278.55 

234.5 

373 

235 

385.5 
1,239.25 

253.5 








Awrey 

Henry 

Loughrin 

Hallam 


1 
3 
1 


80 

322.5 

80 










2 


315.5 


Harrow 

May 


1 
1 
2 


117.5 

283 

308 


2 

1 
1 
1 


315 
137.2 


Salter 

Bigwood 


77 
165.5 


















Creighton .... 

Delamere 

Dowling 

Drury 

Dryden 

Falconbridge . 










1 


160 


1 
2 


80 
319.5 




























1 


81.75 




4 

1 
1 
3 
6 


652.5 

118 

160 

319.75 

431.38 


















Trill 






2 
1 
3 


280 


Waters 






160 


Benoit 

Burt 


1 
1 


80.25 
77.5 


474.75 




3 
1 
1 
1 


237 

80.5 
100 

80.25 






Chamberlain . 

Dack 

Ebv 


1 

2 


80.5 
235.75 
400 


1 


161 


1 
3 
1 


79.75 


Evanturel 


310 


Ingram 

Marquis 

Marter 

Otto 


7 

e 

4 
4 
] 
( 


522.5 
) 360.38 
[ 320.25 
i 617.25 
[ 398.75 
[ 320 
L 67.75 
) 802 






160 


2 
1 

c 

] 

f 

< 


236.75 

75 
) 397.25 

80 
) 492.5 
5 240.5 
) 878.5 




1 


160.5 


Pacaud 

Pense 

Robillard... . 
Savard 






1 


79.75 


1 


160.5 



52 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 



Township 



District 
or County 



Agent 



■s 



"S 



•s 



6 o- 



Sharpe 

Truax 

Lorrain 

Armstrong .... 

Auld 

Beauchamp. . . 

Brethour 

Bryce 

Bucke 

Cane 

Casey 

Firstbrook. . . . 

Harley 

Henwood 

Milliard 

Hudson 

Kerns 

Lundy 

Tudhope 

Devon 

Forbes 

Fowler 

Goldie 

Jacques 

Lyon 

McTavish .... 

Nipigon 

Sibley 

Upsala 

Lewis 

Morin 

Wicksteed .... 

Elderslie 

Barrie 

Hinchinbrooke 

Oso 

Wolford 

Bentinck 

Glenelg 

Holland 

Osprey 

Proton 

Sullivan 

Elzevir 

Tudor 

Haycock 

Umbach 

Burgess North 

Darling 

Lanark 

Kaladar 

Sheffield 

Rutherford . . . 



Temiskaming 



Thunder Bay 



Algoma . . 



Bruce. . . . 
Frontenac 



Grenville 
Grey 



Hastings 

u 

Kenora . . 

Lanark. . 



Lennox and 
Addington 

Manitoulin . . 



John Clark, 
Englehart . 

N.J.McAulay 
Haileybury 

S. C. Mac- 
Donald, . . . 

C.T.A. New 
Liskeard. . . 



S. H. Wilson, 
Port Arthur 



Unattached. 



239.75 
705.25 
211 



418 
240 



321.25 
238.5 

80 
240 
160.5 
237 

79.75 

80 



199.25 
571 
1301.5 



752.75 

158 

480 

155 

330 

284 

160 

"44^67 



205 
100 



50 

100 



100 
85 

290 
38 

100 



115 
160 



240 

687.5 

320 

477.5 

316 

120 

237.25 

479.5 

314.5 



401.75 
79.75 



319 



905 
1437 
158.5 
469.5 
952 



518 
155 
967.5 
126.5 



14.17 
5 



100 



100 



100 



239.25 
131 "" 



159.6 
160 



161 



79.5 



169.5 
315 



314 
i49 



141 



166.6 



101 

206 

298 

6 

26 

70 



50 



49.6 
109 
96.126 



38 
100 



174 
200 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



53 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 



Township 


District 
or County 


Agent 


ni 

u 
3 

a 

*o 

6 
Z 


o 

■Ji 

b 

a 

6 
2 


Ji 

c 
nJ 

■■J 

_o 

"o 

6 
Z 


■r. 

!" — 

U w 
U 0) 

nJ 3 

o •- 
Z 


-a 

3 

.2 
m 

C 
4) 

la 
a 

d 
Z 


v» lU 
o «^ 

Z 


Badgerow .... 
Falconer 


Nipissing 

Peterborough . . 

Sudbury 

Peterborough . . 
Renfrew 

u 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming . . 
Thunder Bay . . 
Rainy River. . . 
Thunder Bay. . 
Victoria 


Unattached. . 

II 
II 

II 
II 
II 

II 
11 

11 
II 

II 


1 
2 

1 
1 


78.75 
291.5 
160.5 
160 






1 


159 


Field 








Gibbons 






1 


160 


Burleigh N.. . . 
Haddo 


2 


123 




1 
1 
1 


168.5 

127 

200 






Harvey 






2 
2 


168 2 


Bagot 






200 


Blithfield 


1 


100 




Bromley 






1 


200 


Rolph 

Denison 






1 


21 




1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


110.5 
402 
139.5 
36 

141.5 
147.5 
160 




Foleyet 

Garvey 














1 


139.5 


Gough 

Hendrie 












1 


141.5 


ScoUard 








Shakespeare.. . 
Cairo 




160 


1 


16 


Nakina 


2 
1 
2 


66.5 
76 
210.8 


1 


51 




Unsurveyed. 

Unsurveyed. 

Digby 












1 


50 


2 


179 










943 


82,775.935 


571 


53,473.845 


173 


22,748.615 



Xo. of lots assigned, 458. No. of acres assigned, 49,227.98. 



54 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 
Statement showing the number of purchases, acres sold and patents issued in cities, towns and 
townplots. 



Towns, etc. 


District or County 


No. of 

acres 

sold 


No. of 

pur- 
chasers 


No. of 
patents 
issued 


No. of 

acres 

patented 


VVaVVa City 


Algoma 


.75 
.32 
46.3 


6 
1 
1 






Sault Ste Alarie .... 




1 


32 


Alma 


Bruce 




Missinaibi 


Cochrane 


2 

14 

1 

3 

1 
3 
3 


34 


Tisdale 




1.230 
.26 


16 
1 


1 688 


Hallewood 


<> 


26 


Alexandra 


'< 


1 


Windsor 


Essex 


1.74 
.92 

1.36 

1. 
.76 
.39 
.40 


1 
2 
10 
1 
2 
1 
4 


1 74 


Macfarlane 


Kenora 


1 15 


Hudson 




57 


Muskokaville 


Muskoka 




Temagami 


Nipissing 






Goldpines 

Foleyet 


Patricia 


1 
3 
1 


39 


Sudbury 


43 


Dryden 




5 


Bigwood Subd 




.22 
.999 


1 
11 




Kirkland Lake 

Larder City 


Temiskaming 


20 
4 

4 
1 

1 
4 
1 
1 


1.909 
37 


Matachewan 

Smyth 


" 


10.911 


10 


4.964 
25 


Swastika 


<i 






22 


Nakina 


Thunder bay 

Victoria 


.68 

1.37 

.26 


4 
3 
1 


68 


Bobcaygeon 

Dundas 


5 


Wentworth 

Total 


26 








69.87 


75 


69 


17.541 



Number of Sales cancelled 12. 
Number of Lots assigned 25. 



Number of acres resumed 2.79. 
Number of acres assigned 53.332. 



Locations by Returned Soldiers and Cancellations 


'or Non-performance of Settlement Duties. 


District 


Agency 


Locations 


Cancellations 




No. 


Area 


No. 


Area 


Algoma 


Sault Ste. Marie 


1 
3 

14 
5 
5 
8 
1 

14 
1 
1 


74. 
320. 
1,081.75 
412.5 
402.5 
715.5 
100. 
1,195.75 

79. 

64. 






II 


Massey 






Cochrane 


Cochrane 


7 


612 75 


a 


" R.L.S 

Hearst 




" 


7 

1 


594 6 


u 


Kapuskasing 


75 


u 


R.L.S 

Matheson 




u 


4 


496 5 


u 


R.L.S 

Unattached 




" 


2 
2 


161 5 


Kenora 


u 


163 


Manitoulin 


u 


1 
2 
9 
1 

14 
1 

11 
1 
1 

11 
1 
7 


156. 

320. 
1,200.25 

127. 
1,177. 
160 . 
1,342.13 

160. 

166. 

927.25 
79.75 

637. 




Nipissing 


Markstay 






" 


North Bay 


5 


720 25 


" 


Unattached 




Sudbury 


Markstay 


4 


482 5 


« ^ 


Massey 




'<■ 


Sudbury 


4 


629 


« 


Unattached R.L.S 




« 






Temiskaming 


Englehart 


5 


458 


« " 


R.L.S 

New Liskeard 




(1 


6 
3 


696 75 


Thunder Bay 


Port Arthur 


480 




Total 










113 


10,897.38 


50 


5,569.75 



Number of lots assigned, 14. Number of acres assigned, 1,512. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



oo 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 

MAINLAND SOLD AND PATENTED 

Under Summer Resort Regulations 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



No. of 
acres 
sold 



No. of 

acres 

patented 



District of Algoma: 

C.K. 13, Speckled Trout Lake 

C.K. 16, Speckled Trout Lake 

C.K. 15, Stan Lake 

Pt. Lot 3, Con. 3, Bear Head Lake. 



Tp. 28, Rge. 16. 



Scarfe . 



County of Haliburton: 

Pt. Lot 19, Con. 10, Little Hawk Lake 

Pt. Lot 19, Con. 10, Little Hawk Lake 

Pt. Lots 21, Concessions 9, and 10, Little Hawk Lake. 
Pt. Lot 19, Con. 10, Little Hawk Lake 



Stanhope . 



County of Hastings: 

Pt. Lot 21, Con. 5, Long Lake 

Pt. Lot 28, Con. 7, Lake Kiminskeg. 
Pt. Lot 21, Con. 6, Baptiste Lake. . . 
Pt. Lot 6, Con. 11, St. Peter Lake . . 



Herschel . 
Bangor. . 
Herschel . 
McClure. 



District of Kenora: 

D. 13, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods 

Pt. D. 12, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods. . . . 

Pt. D. 12, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods 

A. 9, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods 

L.K. 456, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods. . . . 
L.K. 457, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods. . . . 
Pt. D. 12, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods. . . . 

Pt. D. 13, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods 

Pel. East end of D. 194, Clearwater Bay 

Pt. 10 "A", Clearwater Bay 

L.K. 382, Trout Lake 

L.K. 453, Trout Lake 

Loc. N.T. 87, Otter Lake 

Loc. N.T. 88, Otter Lake 

Loc. N.T. 89, Otter Lake 

463 P., Pine Portage Bay, Lake of the Woods 

Pt. P. 463, Pine Portage Bay, Lake of the Woods . 

L.K. 464, Whitefish Bay, Lake of the Woods 

L.K. 465, Whitefish Bay, Lake of the Woods 

Loc. G. 1970, Sabaskong Bay, Lake of the Woods. 

L.K. 407, Eagle Lake 

L.K. 420, Two Mountain Lake 

L.K. 421, Two Mountain Lake 

L.K. 368, Two Mountain Lake 

N.T. 90, Moth Lake 

L.K. 416, Granite Lake 



Boys . . 
Gidley , 

u 

Rudd . 



Twp. 38. 
Forgie . . 



L.K. 451, Granite Lake 

L.K. 452, Granite Lake 

L.K. 458, Granite Lake 

L.K. 424, Granite Lake 

L.K. 441 and Pt. P. 71, Granite Lake 

L.K. 427, Granite Lake 

Old Mg. Loc'n 71-P, East of Granite Lake 

Pt. K. 23, Woodchuck Bay, Lake of the Woods. . 
Pt. K. 23, Woodchuck Bay, Lake of the Woods. . 
Pt. K. 23, Woodchuck Bay, Lake of the Woods. . 
L.K. 413, Woodchuck Bay, Lake of the Woods . . 
L.K. 438, Woodchuck Bay, Lake of the Woods . . 
Pt. D. 249, Woodchuck Bay, Lake of the Woods. 



Boys. 



5. 
5. 



3.5 



1. 
1. 
5. 
4. 



3. 



4.9 

4.8 



2.75 
1.55 



5.2 



4.5 
4.5 



5. 

4.55 

5. 

1. 

3.05 

4.8 



5. 



5. 

1.66 
4.5 
.10 
4.6 



3.5 

4. 

3.65 



4.6 



5. 
5. 
1.32 



1. 

1.75 
3.5 
3. 



5. 

4.68 

4.8 

5.52 

4.9 

4.8 

4.6 

2.75 

1.55 

5. 

4.4 

"4'5' 

i'.k" 

3.6 

4.5 



4.8 
4.83 

'4; 33" 



4.8 



4.26 
3.24 
5. 
4.6 



56 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 

MAINLAND SOLD AND PATENTED 

Under Summer Resort Regulations 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



No. of 
acres 
sold 



No. of 

acres 

patented 



District of Kenora (cont'd) 

L.K. 445, Cache Lake 

L.K. 449, Dog Tooth Lake 

Pt. 12, Con. 3, WTiitney Lake 

N.T. 72, Long Pine Lake 

Pt. S. 332, Willard Lake 

Pt. S. 332, Willard Lake 

Pt. S. 332, Willard Lake 

L.K. 405, Willard Lake 

L.K. 460, Longbow Lake 

R.F.D. 17, Boulder Lake 

Pt. P. 328, Lake of the Woods 

County of Lanark. ■ 

Pt. Lot 17, Con. 3, Rideau Lake 

County of Lennox and Addington: 

Pt. Lot 18, Con. 3, Weslemkoon and Otter Lakes 

Pt. Lot 30, Con. 1, Weslemkoon Lake 

Pt. Lot 4, Con. 10, Loon Lake 



District of Muskoka: 

Pt. Lot 25, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot 25, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot 25, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot 25, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot 22, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot 22, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot 22, Con. 8, Wood Lake 

Pt. Lot H, Con. 19, Morrison Lake 

Pt. Lots G. & H., Con. 19, Morrison Lake 

Pt. Lot 5, Con. 5, Lake of Bays 

Pt. Lot 5, Con. 5, Lake of Bays 

Pt. Lot 3, Con. 8, Shoe Lake 

Lot 29, Con. 11, Muskoka Lake 

Pt. Lot 4, Con. 8, Kah She She Bog A Mog Lake. 

Pt. Lot 27, Con. 4, Riley Lake 

Pt. Lot 33, Con. 3, Mattawa Rv 

Pt. Lot 34, Con. 3, Mattawa Rv 

Pt. Lot 5, Con. 1, Nasbonsing Lake 

District of Parry Sound: 

Pt. Lot 75, Con. 11, Georgian Bay 

Pt. Lot 7, Con. 5, Ahmik Lake 

Pts. 11, Con. A, Georgian Bay 

Pt. Lot 16, Con. 5, Codes Lake 

Pt. Lot 17, Con. 5, Balsam Lake 



Redditt . 
Gundy. . 
Twp. 41. 
Twp. 41. 
Twp. 41. 
Twp. 41 . 



Twp. 39. 



North Burgess 
Ashby 

u 

Anglesea 



Oakley. 



Wood. 



Franklin 



Ridout. . . . 
Muskoka. . 
Morrison . . 

Ryde 

Mattawan . 

Ferris 



County of Peterborough: 

Pt. 14, Con. 17, Salmon Lake 

Pt. 14, Con. 17, Salmon Lake 

Pt. Lot 15, Con. 8, Long Lake 

District of Rainy River: 

Pt. Lot 36, Con. 2, Rainy Lake 

Loc. 70, Clearwater Lake 

Loc. 79, Clearwater Lake 

Loc. 129, Clearwater Lake 

Lot 50, One Sided Lake 

Lot 35, One Sided Lake 

J.K. 201, Pt. Locn. G. 285, Seine River, S. of Bennett 
Twp.. 



Carling. . . . 

Croft 

McDougall 
Conger. . . . 



Cavendish .... 

(I 

Burleigh, N.D. 



Watten . 



3.76 
3.42 

1. 



4.36 
3.52 
3.52 



4.4 

2. 

5. 

2.5 



6.25 

5.96 

5.3 

4.65 

5.8 

5.47 

5. 

4.89 

4. 



4.85 



1.25 



I 2 



1.9 
4.42 



1. 
4.6 



1.83 



2.5 



3.5 
2.93 



5. 
4.96 



10. 
5. 



6 
6 


3 


5. 


.35 





1.964 

1.852 

.68 



5. 

1.9 

1.16 



1.40 

.88 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



57 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 

MAINLAND SOLD AND PATENTED 

Under Summer Resort Regulations 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



No. of 
acres 
sold 



No. of 

acres 

patented 



County of Simcoe: 

Ft. Lot 23, Con. 13, Sparrow Lake. 



North Orillia. 



District of Sudbury: 

A.E. 3, Trout Lake 

A.E. 7, Trout Lake 

A.E. 8, Trout Lake 

W.D. 2553, Lake Panache 

W.D. 2558, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 20, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 6, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 17, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 7, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 16, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 14, Lake Panache 

Loc. F.L. 8, Lake Panache 

Loc. L.N. 45, Lake Panache 

Pt. Lot 2, Con. 3, French River 

Pt. E. ^, Lot 4, Con. 1, Little Panache Lake. 
Pel. 37, Pt. Lot 6, Con. 4, Wahnapitae Lake 



District of Thunder Bay: 

Pt. Lot 15, Con. 7, Surprise Lake . . . 
Pt. Lot 15, Con. 7, Surprise Lake . . . 
Pt. Lot 15, Con. 7, Surprise Lake . . . 

Loc. 19, Trout Lake 

Loc. 20, Trout Lake 

P.P. 629, Two Island Lake 

P.P. 630, Two Island Lake 

P.P. 648, Two Island Lake 

P.P. 654, Two Island Lake 

P.P. 650, Two Island Lake 

S.F. 79, Lower Shebandowan Lake. . 
P.P. 181 Lower Shebandowan Lake . 
P.P. 179, Lower Shebandowan Lake. 
P.P. 250, Lower Shebandown Lake. . 
P.P. 221, Lower Shebandowan Lake. 
P.P. 247, Lower Shebandowan Lake. 
P.P. 219, Lower Shebandowan Lake. 



Twp. 83. 



Twp. 91 . 
Twp. 83 . 



Bigwood . . 
Louise .... 
Maclennan 



Gorham . 



Jacques. 



District of Temiskaming: 
B.R. 4, Sesikinika Lake. 



County of Victoria: 

Pt. 11, Con. 9, Crooked Lake. 



Grenfell . 
Digby 



.58 



4.78 

4. 

4.3 



2.5 

1.3 

5. 

4.26 

4.29 

2.1 

5.25 

3.13 

2.5 



4.9 
3.1 



5. 
5. 
4. 



.73 
.71 



4.1 

1.86 



1.52 
2. 



2.74 



298.45 



4.78 



2.34 



5. 
4^29 



3.13 

' ' ^75' 
3^1 







3 


6 


4 


6 


6 


1 


3. 


2 35 


1 


99 


1 


7 




1 


54 



fl.14 



255.166 



Number of parcels cancelled 1. Number of acres resumed 5. 



58 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. IS — Continued 

ISLANDS SOLD AND PATENTED 

Under Summer Resort Regulations 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



No. of 
acres 
sold 



No. of 

acres 

patented 



District of Algoma: 

"Archie Forest," Lake Denman. . 
Pel. 28, Pine Island, Lake Huron 



District of Cochrane: 
"B", Nellie Lake. 



Patton 

0pp. Laird and 
Tarbutt 



Calvert 



County of Frontenac: 

Bond, Loughborough Lake 

Horseshoe, Loughborough Lake. 
Hemlock, Loughborough Lake.. 

Pt. "A", Sharbot Lake 

Island "B", Sharbot Lake 

Island "i", Sharbot Lake 



Storrington . 

Olden 

Oso..! 



County of Haliburton: 

Island "C", Koshlong Lake. 



Glamorgan 



District of Kenora: 

L.K. 418, (J.O. 98), Lake of the Woods 

L.K. 414, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods 

Pt. S.F. 81, Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods 

G-1973, Sabaskong Bay, Lake of the Woods 

"G" 1988, Sabaskong Bay, Lake of the Woods 

G-1996, Sabaskong Bay, Lake of the Woods 

S. Pt. G-1919, Sabaskong Bay, Lake of the Woods . . . 
N. Pt. G. 2035, Sabaskong Bay, Lake of the Woods. . 

Pt. of Island, Dog Tooth Lake 

Pt. Island (L.K. 462), Dog Tooth Lake 

Loc'n. L.K. 433, Longbow Lake 

Loc'n. L.K. 444 Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods. 
W. Pt. G.F. 81 Clearwater Bay, Lake of the Woods. . 

L.K. 463, Trout Lake 

Pt. L.K. 464, Whitef^sh Bay, Lake of the Woods 



South of Haycock 
Boys 



Gidley 



County of Lanark: 
"Boot", Otty Lake. 



North Elmsley. 



County of Leeds: 

No. 80, Newboro Lake. 
Butterfield, Otter Lake 



County of Lennox and Addington: 
Gibraltar, Weslemkoon Lake . . 

Island, Weslemkoon Lake 

"B", Otter Lake 

Island "F", Weslemkoon Lake. 



South Crosby. 
" Elmsley 



Ashby 



District of Manitoulin: 

T.P. 2337, W. Vi Pel. No. 1, (Neptune), Lake Huron. 

T.P. 2974, Whitefish Bay, Lake Huron 

J.K. 2332 Beaver Stone Bay, Georgian Bay 

T.P. 3092 Lake Huron 

T.P. 3818 South Bay, Lake Huron 



6. 
6.4 

.75 
5. 
1. 
1.31 



4.83 
2.2 
.6 
4.5 
2. 
3. 
5. 
4.8 



1.25 



1.5 
5.5 



1.25 



DEPARTAIEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



59 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 

ISLANDS SOLD AND PATENTED 

Under Summer Resort Regulations 



Part or Parcel 



TowTiship 



No. of 
acres 
sold 



No. of 

acres 

patented 



District of Muskoka: 

Island opp. Lot 21, Con. 9, Clear Lake .... 
Island "C", Brackenrig Bay, Rosseau Lake 

Island, Skeleton Lake 

E. Pt. Stuart, Wood Lake 

Echo Island, Wood Lake 

Island 127, Gloucester Pool 

Island, Wood Lake 

Lily- Vie, opp. Lot 13, Con. 6, Dickie Lake . 



District of Nipissing: 

Island opp. Lot 39, Con. 14, Lake Nipissing. 

County of Ontario: 

Pel. 2, Rama Island 



District of Parry Sound: 

Island opp. Lot 33, Con. 5, Bay Lake 

B-642 (White Pigeon), Georgian Bay 

Island, Eagle Lake 

Big Chief, Eagle Lake 

No. 4, McQuaby Lake 

T.P. 3540, Pickerel River : 

• Pt. Pel. 3, Isld. 2oA, Georgian Bay 

Pt. B. 55, (Moon), Georgian Bay 

T.P. 3562, French River 

Pt. Isld. Opp. Lot 49, Con. 17, Lake Nipissing. 

Pt. B. 516, Georgian Bay 

Pt. "V", Huckleberry (15 "C"), Georgian Bay. 



County of Peterborough: 

Pts. Island opp. Lot 2, Con. 14, Buckhorn Lake 

District of Rainy River: 

Pel. A. 154, Berry Island, Rainy Lake 



County of Simcoe: 

Island 126, Severn River. 
Island 129, Severn River. 



District of Sudbury: 

Pel. 2, G.R. 47, Wanapitei Lake 

No. 38, French River, Wanapitei Bay 
E. Pt. T.P. No. 3190 Panache Lake . . 

T.P. 3223, Panache Lake 

E. 3^ Flat, Panache Lake 

W. 3^ Flat, Panache Lake 

Pel. 1, Island G.R. 4-D, Wanapitei. . . 



District of Temiskaming: 

Pel. 3 of Isld. A-2, Sesekinika Lake. 

Island, Wendigo Lake 

D. D. Larder Lake 



Total. 



Wood . . . , 
Watt . . . 
Cardwell 
Oakley. . 
Oakley.. 
Baxter . . 
Oakley. . 
McLean . 



West Ferris. 



Rama. 



Perry 

opp. Cowper. 
Machar 



Nipissing 

Mowat 

opp. Harrison, 
opp. Conger . . 



Patterson . . 
McDougall 

Harvey . . . 



Matchedash 



Rathbun 
Alien . . . 
Tp. 91 . . 
Tp. 83 . . 
Tp. 83 . . 
Tp. 83 . . 
Norman. 



Grenfell . 
Bayly... 
Hearst . . 



.25 
.13 



4. 
1.7 

.2 
3. 

.65 



.1 

.4 

3.39 



1. 
4. 
3. 
2.24 



41.2 



.1 



5.54 
5.54 
4.35 



2.91 
162.09 



.25 

.125 

.25 



4.5 
.94 
.87 

1. 



5. 
5. 



7.97 



.4 
.333 



5.5 
.1 

8. 
2.5 



4.4 
2.1 



110.668 



60 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13— Continued 

Statement showing the number of Miscellaneous purchases; acres sold and Patents, Vesting 
Orders, Conveyances, etc., issued during the year ending Oct. 31st, 1934. 



Township 



District or County 



Sales 



No. 



Area 



Patents, etc. 



No. 



Area 



Clute 

Eilber 

Haggart 

Matheson 

Owens 

Sandwich West 

Pels. A & B. Fighting Isld. 

McDougall 

Shenston 

Loughrin 

Pardee 

Forbes 

Dack 

Barr 

Marter , 

Cairo 

Verulam 



Hudson Townplot. . . 
Temagami Townplot 

Barrie, Town of 

Crooks Townplot .... 
Barr Townplot 



Total. 



Cochrane . 



Essex 

(Detroit Rv.) Essex 

Parry Sound 

Rainy River 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 



Temiskaming 



Victoria . 



Vesting Orders, Etc. 



Kenora 

Nipissing 

Simcoe 

Thunder Bay . 
Temiskaming. 



10 



15. 



.35 



4.93 
.2 



16. 
1. 



.08 



42.56 



20 



1. 
2. 
2. 



.325 



15. 



1. 
1. 
2. 

4.82 
4.93 



2. 

i. 



.26 

.84 

';08 
.2 



42.455 



No. of lots assigned 1. No. of acres assigned 1. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 61 

Appendix No. 14 

PATENTS OFFICE (Lands Branch) 

Statement of Patents, etc., Issued from Nov. 1st, 1933 to October 31st, 1934. 

Public Lands Patents 285 

Free Grants " 154 

Pine " 5 

Transfers (Town Lots) 42 

Patents " 27 

Miscellaneous Patents, Vesting Orders, etc 20 



Mining Lands Patents 418 

Rights " 32 

Leases " 130 

Crown Leases 11 

Algonquin Park Leases 13 

Bruce Beach Leases 16 

" " Renewals 88 

Jordan Harbor Leases 4 

Rondeau Park Leases 6 

Temagami Leases 25 

Water Power Leases 2 

Licenses of Occupation (Mines) 109 

(Lands) 203 

Algonquin Park 2 

" " Rondeau Park 3 

" " Temagami Lake 1 



533 



580 



165 



318 



Total 1,596 

No. of Crown Leases cancelled 26. No. of Licenses of Occupation cancelled 94. 



Appendix No. 16 

RECORDS BRANCH, 1933-34 

Communications received: 

From Crown Lands Agents 10,319 

From Crown Timber Agents 4,482 

From Mining Recorders 8,596 

From Homestead Inspectors 2,523 

From Superintendent (Algonquin Park) 661 

From Superintendent (Quetico Park) 146 

From Superintendent (Rondeau Park) 331 

Orders-in-Council 155 

Telegrams 435 

All other sources 30,664 

Total incoming (Minister's Office and Land Tax Branch not included) 58,312 

Communications sent out to Crown Lands and Timber Agents, Inspectors and Park Super- 
intendents 21,600 

To General Public 26.200 

Re Statistics 2.109 

Re Mill Licenses 3.500 

Re Maps and Blue Prints 6.900 

Summer Home Booklets and Pamphlets 1,640 

Total outgoing, (Minister's Office and Land Tax Branch not included) 62,030 

Files: 

New Files Issued — General 4,000 

New Files Issued — Accounts Chargeable 664 

New Files Issued — Accounts Free 216 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
ONTARIO 

1934 

PART II— SURVEYS BRANCH 



[62] 



DEPART^IEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 63 

Appendix Xo. 16 

REPORT OF SURVEYOR-GENERAL 

The survey work carried on under instructions from this Department 
during the past year consisted of the running of two base Hues, east of the 
Nipigon Forest Reserve, in the District of Thunder Bay, where the staking 
of mining claims was active, consisting of a base Hne running west from the 
Township of Rajmar, by Ontario Land Surveyors PhilUps & Benner of Port 
Arthur and a base Hne west from Long Lac to the Nipigon Forest Reserve, 
with an addition of meridian hnes. 6 miles in length, adjoining the base line, 
bj' H. W. Sutcliffe, Ontario Land Surveyor of New Liskeard. 

A survey of the shore lands along Lake Huron, was carrietl out by 4 
different parties, namely:— 

R. W. Code, 0. L. S Windsor 

Speight & Van Nostrand, 0. L. S Toronto 

E. D. Bolton, 0. L. S Listowel 

J. W. Tyrrell, O. L. S Hamilton 

In addition to these major surveys, the Department undertook the work 
of re-establishing the location of original monuments in several of the older 
townships, where the original surveys had been almost totalh' obliterated. 
This work was initiated for the purpose of retaining and marking with perman- 
ent monuments, such of these original points as can now be accurately deter- 
mined from evidence of the old settlers and from field notes of surveys made 
of former surveys in the Townships. 

The work has proved a great boon to the settler in assisting him to deter- 
mine his lawful boundaries and the reports on the work are very encouraging 
as to the benefit which accrues therefrom. 

The several Townships which were dealt with in 1934 and the Surveyors 
engaged are as follows:- — • 

Twp. of Coleman, Dist. of Timiskaming T. G. Code, O.L.S., Cobalt. 

Twp. of Ferris, Dist. of Xipissing E. L. Moore, O.L.S., North Bay. 

Twp. of Himsworth, Dist. of Xipissing G. P. Angus, O.L.S., Xorth Bay. 

Twps. of Tarentorus and Korah, Dist. of Algoma C. R. Kenny, O.L.S., Sault Ste. Marie. 

Twp. of Dorion, Dist. of Thunder Bay S. E. Flook, O.L.S., Port Arthur. 

Twp. of Johnson, Dist. of Algoma E. M. McQuarrie, O.L.S., Sault Ste. Marie. 

Twp. of Alice, Co'y of Renfrew H. J. Beatty, O.L.S., Pembroke. 

Twp. of Matchedash, Co'y of Simcoe E. L. Cavana, O.L.S., Orillia. 

Twp. of Smith, Co'y of Peterborough J. \V. Pierce, O.L.S., Peterborough. 

Twp. of McDougall, Dist. of Parry Sound J- T. Coltham, O.L.S., Parry Sound. 

Twp. of Carr, Dist. of Cochrane G. R. Bradshaw, O.L.S., Swastika. 

Twp. of Olden, Co'y of Frontenac M. E. Crouch, O.L.S., Kingston. 

Twp. of Xottawasaga, Co'y of Simcoe E. Stewart, O.L.S., Collingwood. 

Twp. of Hallam, Dist. of Sudbury T. J. Patten, O.L.S., Little Current. 

Twp. of Scarfe, Dist. of Algoma J. S. Dobie, O.L.S., Thessalon. 

Other miscellaneous surveys carried on were, traversing of flooded lands, 
Lac Seul, Dist. of Kenora, as required under the agreement between the 
Dominion and the Province re the clearing of the shores of Lac Seul; 

Traversing of certain lakes in Townships 161 and 167, Dist. of Algoma; 
Survey of additional lands at Hudson, known as Township of Vermilion 
Additional; 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Survey of the trans-Canada Highway, Kenora to Manitoba Boundary- 
Survey of the Fort Frances — Kenora Highway from Kenora to Robinson 
Lake. 

Owing to the expenditure on these several surve3's exceeding the appro- 
priation for such work, it was found necessary to suspend field operations in 
August, but reports, plans and field notes on the work done up to date, are 
filed. 

Municipal Surveys 

The following municipal surveys were performed on petition of the Muni- 
cipality and the authority of the Lieutenant Governor in Council, and 
confirmed. 

Xo. 788 — Defining and establishing certain angles of lots in the sub- 
division of the Village of Sturgeon Point, in the Township of Fenelon, in 
the County of Victoria. 

Xo. 789 — Defining a parcel of land on Broken Lot 13, Concession 4, 
Township of Stanhope, County of Haliburton. 

TowNsiTE Subdivisions 

The following townsite subdivisions on lands patented, subsequent to 
the 19th day of March, 1910, were submitted and approval given, as required 
under the "Townsites Act." 

Geraldton — -being a subdivision on Mining Claims TB-10731 and 
10732, in the District of Thunder Bay. 

Matachewan (M.117) — being a subdivision of part of Mining Claim 
MR-6252, in the Township of Cairo, in the District of Timiskaming. 

Subdivision of part of the north-half of Lot 3, Concession 2 
(near Timmins), Township of ]Mountjoy, District of Cochrane. 

Maps 

During the year the following maps have been revised and published, and 
brought up to date — 

Xo. ^5-A— District of Thunder Bay. 

Xo. 22-C — Islands in Georgian Ba}"-, in front of the Townships of 
Conger and Cowper, District of Parry Sound. 

The Boundary- Commissioners appointed to delimit the inter-Provincial 
boundary- between the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, through Lake St. 
Francis, have made progress and have determined the position of said boundary 
line, from the easterly boundary' of the Province of Ontario westerly through 
Lake St. Francis, as far as a point south from Hamilton Island and have 
established reference monuments on the shores of the Lake in respect to this 
part of the boundary. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



6; 



From the point south of Hamilton Island westerlj^ to the international 
boundary, the matter is not yet completed. 

Extracts from the reports of the several surveyors employed under 
instructions from this Department, other than those employed on road surveys 
and the perpetuation of original monuments, will be found in Appendices 21 
to 23. 



Appendix No. 17 
Statement of Crown Surveys in progress during the twelve months, ending October 31st, 1934. 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name of Surveyor 



Description of Surveys 



Amount 
Paid 



Sept. 12 
Mar. 22 

Apr. 21 
Mar. 26 



Apr. 21 

Apr. 21 

Apr. 21 

Apr. 30 

Apr. 25 



10 j.May 1 

11 Mav 1 



12 
13 
14 



May 1 
May 1 
Apr. 25 



15 I May 3 



16 
17 

18 



Apr. 25 
Apr. 30 
Mav 3 



19 May 1 



20 
21 
22 



Apr. 30 
Apr. 30 



1933 
1934 

1934 
1934 



1934 
1934 
1934 
1934 
1934 



C. E. Bush. .. . 
H. W. Sutcliffe. 



J. W. Tyrrell 

Phillips & Benner. 



Speight & VanNostrand. 

R. W. Code 

E. D. Bolton 

R. F. Dynes 

J. S. Dobie 



1934jBeatty & Beatty 
1934 T. G. Code 



1934|T. G. Patton.. 
1934JJ. W. Pierce . . 
1934|j. T. Coltham. 
1934JR. S. Kirkup.. 
1934JE. L. Moore.. 
1934 C. R. Kennv.. 



1934 
1934 
1934 
1934 



J. A. Shirley King 

S. E. Flook 

E. L. Cavana 

C. R. Bradshaw. . . 
Petrie Brass Co 



Survey fixing of contour shores Lac Seul 

and' Lost Lakes in District of Kenora.| $6,960.00 

Survey base line and township boundary 
East of Lake Nipigon, District of 
Thunder Bay 4,890.00 

Survev of beach lands in front of part of 

the county of Bruce ! 2,324 . 00 

Survey of Base line in District of Thunder 
Bay, East of Lake Nipigon, District of 
Thunder Bay 4,050 00 

Survev of beach lands in front of part of 

County of Huron 1,000.00 

Survey beach lands in front of part of the 

County of Lambton | 2,949 . 00 

Sur\'ev beach lands in front of part of thei 

County of Bruce | 1,000.00 

Survev Township Vermilion additional! 

District Kenora j 1,000.00 

Establish original monuments in Town-1 
ship Scarfe and traverse the Lakes, j 
District Algoma 2,300.00 

Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Alice, County of Renfrew 1,100.00 

Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Coleman in Timiskaming 
District 2,393.89 

Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship Hallam, District of Sudbury 1,147.80 

Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Smith, County of Peterborough. 713.00 

Establish original monuments Township! 

of McDougall, District of Parry Sound.! 1,100.00 

Traverse certain roads and summer camp 

sites, District of Kenora 1,950.00 

Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Ferris, District of Nipissing . . . 1,215.00 

Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Korah, District of Algoma . . . . i 1,059.00 

Survev part of Fort Francis-Kenora' 

Highway I 500 00 

Establish original monuments in Town-I 

ship of Dorion, District of Thunder Bay! 1 ,270 . 00 

Establish original monuments Township! 

of Matchedash, County of Simcoe .... 1,215.00 

Establish original monuments. Township) 

of Carr, District of Cochrane j 900.00 

Surseyors rock posts 452 . S3 

Total ' 41,489. 



66 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 18 
Statement of Crown Surveys completed and closed during 12 months ending October 31st, 1934. 



No.' Date of 


Name of Surveyor 


Description of Surveys 


Amount 


1 Instructions 






Paid 


1 


Aug. 


15, 


1933 


R. S. Kirkup 


Sur\e\" of lines in Township of Crooks, 
District of Thunder Bay 


$1,090.45 


2 


Aug. 


it, 


1933 


J. S. Dobie 


Survey of lines in Township 176,183, 
District of Algoma 


557.30 


3 


Oct. 


4, 


1933 


Phillips & Benner 


Retrace lines in the Township of Mac- 
gregor, District of Thunder Bay 


2,923.55 


4 


June 


27, 


1922|Beattv & Beattv 


Survey of island in Muskrat River at 














Pembroke 


74.00 


o 


June 


6, 


1934 


C. P. Railway 


Freight on surveyors' posts 


2.18 


6 


Apr. 


19, 


1934 


A. McMeekin 


Survey to fix original post corners Mining 
Claims 253 P 287 P West side Rat 
Portage Bay, District Kenora 


35.00 


7 


Oct. 


1, 


1933 


Speight & VanNostrand. 


Survey Grand River Valley in Township 
East Garafraxa and Amaranth, County 






Apr. 


25, 


1934 


E. M. iMcQuarrie 


of Dufferin 


500.00 


8 


Establish original monuments in the 














Township of Johnson, District of 














Algoma 


2,167.48 


9 


Apr. 


25, 


1934 


C. P. Angus 


Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Himsworth, District of Parry 
Sound 


2,176.50 


10 


Apr. 


25, 


1934 


M. E. Crouch 


Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Olden, County of Frontenac. . . 


3,283.91 


11 


May 


21 


1934 


Elihu Stewart 


Establish original monuments in Town- 
ship of Nottawasaga, County of 
Simcoe 


2,391.04 




Total 






$15 201 41 









Appendix No. 19 

Statement of Municipal Surveys for which instructions issued during twelve 
months ending October 31st, 1934. 



No. 


Date of 
Instructions 


Name of 
Surv^eyor 


No. 


Descriptions of Surveys 


1 
2 


Nov. 22, 1933 
May 1,1934 


J. W. Pierce 

Speight & X'anNostrand 


789 
790 


Parcel of land, broken lot 13, in Con. 4, Twp. of 
Stanhope. 

Survey certain portions of King St. and Bay St. in 
the City of Toronto. 



Appendix No. 20 
Statement of Municipal Surveys confirmed during the twelve months ending October 31st, 1934. 



No. 


Date of 
Instructions 


Name of 
Surveyor 


No. 


Description of Surveys 


Date of 
Confirmation 


1 
2 


July 28, 1933 
Nov. 22, 1933 


Oliver Smith. . . . 
J. W. Pierce. ... 


788 
789 


Mark with durable monuments the S.E. 
and N.E. angle of Lot 26, S.E. angle of 
Lot 90, N.E. angle 89, Village of 
Sturgeon Point 

Parcel of land, broken Lot 13, Conces- 
sion 4, Township of Stanhope 


May 16, 1934 
Mar. 28, 1934 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 67 

Appendix A'o. SI 

Report of the survey- of the Township of Vermihon Additional, District of 
Kenora, surveyed by R. F. Dynes, O.L.S., in 1934. 

Honorable Sir: — - 

I have the honour to submit herewith plans and other returns in con- 
nection with the survey of part of Township Vermilion Additional Ij'ing between 
Vermilion Lake and Lost Lake near Hudson on the Canadian National Railway 
in the District of Kenora. 

This part Township is bounded on the south by Vermilion Township, 
on the west by Fifth Meridian run by O.L.S. Niven, on the North by the 
Indian Reserve No. 28 and Lost Lake and on the east by the G.T.P. Block 10 
and Drayton Township. 

This area is contiguous to the thriving hamlet of Hudson which owes 
its present thriving condition almost whollj'- to the transportation needs of 
the mining Districts to the north which use Hudson as the shipping point for 
all freight transported by water; then there is activitj^ through the fishing 
industry and the lumbering industry. The continued combined activity 
tends to promote stabilization in employment and the natural sequence is 
home-making; the hamlet is growing and already is in need of further extensions 
to the townsite and it will not be long until requests will be made with this 
end in view. 

The survey of the Township lines will form a base from which to plan 
further extensions and will serve to satisfy the present demands for homesites 
of a contributory nature such as small farms which will supply Hudson with 
such farm products as can be grown locally. 

There is considerable portion of good arable land in this part Township 
but at some distance from Hudson near which the land is sandy, stoney and 
gravelly mainly. The northern half of Concession 1 is the best agricultural 
section of the Township, especially lots 4 to 10; another favourable section 
lies east of Hudson along the newh' built Provincial Highway leading to 
Sioux Lookout. This portion, however, is intercepted by so many roads, 
creeks, etc., that it is suitable onl}^ for portioning in small plots. 

Timber 

The best timber has been logged off and later the area close to Hudson 
has been cut off for fuel and building material, but there is still an abundance 
of good useful timber scattered over the Township which could be used for 
building and fencing by intending settlers. The accompanying Timber 
Plan shows graphically how this condition presents itself. The portion colored 
yellow represents second growth light timber, mostly poplar, birch and jack 
pine and usuallj^ also reflecting a condition brought about by bush fires and 
mostly identified with light soil and high exposure; the portion colored green 
is the opposite extreme respesenting swamps, mostly spruce and cedar which 
are likely to furnish timber for many years as the renewal is rapid and the 
inaccessibility in some seasons tends to prevent overcropping; the areas colored 



68 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

brown indicate good claj' land mainly and heavy growth of useful timber from 
7" to 16" in diameter mostly jack pine and spruce. 

A considerable area is ruggedly rocky especially on the east of Badland 
Lake but in the vicinity there are some patches of rich loam. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. F. Dyxes, O.L.S. 



Appendix No. 22 

Report of the survey for the dam site and a contour traverse of the proposed 
storage basin on the Grand River, near Waldemar, Township of East 
Garafraxa, in the County of Dufferin, surveyed by Speight & Van Xostrand, 
O.L.S. Dated 2nd February, 1934. 

Sir:— 

Following 3'our instructions dated October 19th, 1933, to make the neces- 
sary surveys for the dam site and a contour traverse of the proposed storage 
basin on the Grand River, near Waldemar, we have carried out the work as 
instructed and report as follows: 

The dam site provisionally selected by the Power Commission was im- 
mediately northeast of the allowance for road between Concessions XII and 
XIII in the Township of East Garafraxa, Ijing in lot number 14, of Concession 
XIII. Elevations were taken over this area and a plan prepared on a scale 
of fifty feet to the inch. 

In order to obtain a datum for the work, it was considered advisable to 
connect with the nearest geodetic bench mark, which proved to be on the 
C.P.R. branch line running through Bellwoods, and was about five miles from 
the proposed dam site. 

The feature controlling the height to which it is feasible to raise the water 
was considered to be the clearance under the C.P.R. bridge crossing the Grand 
River at Waldemar. This clearance was fixed at four feet. Our levels show 
that the lowest point on the main girders of the bridge was at elevation 1475.56. 
A four foot clearance beneath this girder fixed the high water level at elevation 
1471.56. Contour 1475, which had been spoken of in our preliminary discus- 
sions as the elevation to which land should be bought, is 3.44 feet above the 
water level so determined. It was thought advisable, however, to work to 
the 1475 contour. No great amount of additional land is involved in the 
extra fraction of a foot of height, as the limit of the flooded area is throughout 
much the greater part of its length along well defined hillsides. 

The position of this contour was located at one hundred foot intervals 
throughout, and was traversed with transit and tape. From this contour 
additional contours were located by hand level. The four hundred and eight}' 
foot contour was located above the main contour, and for the most part, 
three five-foot contours were located below. Where the land was heavily 
wooded, however, or the contours widely separated, only the first contour 
below was located, as it was felt that other information was more essential. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 69 

Acting under instructions from Dr. Hogg, cross sections were made of the 
valley at intervals of approximately one thousand feet, and these cross sections 
have been plotted on a separate sheet which forms part of the returns. 

Cross sections were taken on the C.P.R. for approximately one thousand 
feet each side of the river, for a double purpose; to enable the Power Com- 
mission to estimate the amount of rip-rap required, and to enable an estimate 
to be made of the cost of raising the C.P.R. track, if such were considered 
desirable. 

The road leading north through Waldemar, which is in effect a deviation 
of the allowance for road between Concessions IX and X, Township of Amar- 
anth, will be affected by the proposed development. We accordingly ran a 
line of levels along this road from a point opposite the Post Office in Waldemar 
Village a distance of about a mile to the High ground north of the bridge 
opposite Township Lot 4, in order that the Commission might have infor- 
mation for obtaining the comparative cost of raising the present road, or 
diverting it to the higher ground to the west. 

The Fourteenth Line Road will have to be diverted at its northern end, 
and additional contours were located in this area so that a diversion could 
be projected. This diversion need not be of any great length — probably 
sixteen or seventeen hundred feet in all. 

With regard to the Thirteenth Line, which will be closed, our opinion 
is that to make a diversion either to the Fourteenth Line or to the Twelfth 
Line would entail greater expense than would be warranted b}' the benefit 
of such diversion to the farmers affected, and we think that it would probably 
be better to arrange, if necessary, some form of compensation to the injured 
land owners. 

Station Street leading east across the river from the main street of Walde- 
mar will require raising, and a profile of this street was also obtained, to enable 
an estimate of cost to be developed. 

The Power Commission was desirous of getting certain information with 
regard to an alternative dam site in Concession XII. We accordingly traced 
the 1475 contour for about twenty-four hundred feet below the Twelfth Line, 
and took two cross sections there. The work done here, however, was kept 
to a minimum, as it was felt that the funds available were not sufficient to 
investigate this area further. 

Areas have been computed of the several different holdings affected, and 
where it was thought that the area of the residue left to the present owner 
would affect the costs of the project, these were also computed. The owners' 
names are shown from information gathered on the ground, and have not been 
checked at the Registry Office, so, while we feel that they are probabh' correct, 
there may be errors in the information supplied us. 

Above the line between the Townships of East Luther and Amaranth, 
the proposed construction will not flood any additional land, but, at the 
suggestion of the Power Commission, we carried our levels up the stream as far 
as the main street of the Village of Grand Vallev. 



70 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

In order to facilitate the computations of the Power Commission, we 
have supphed them with information from time to time as it became available 
during the course of the work. 

So that the plans, etc., may be placed in your hands at the earliest possible 
moment, we are forwarding them in advance of the accounts, chain-bearers' 
oaths, pay lists, etc. 

The plans consist of: 

(a) Proposed site of Waldemar Dam in lot 14 Concession XIII, Townshi-p 
of East Garafraxa. 

(b) Plan showing Waldemar Storage Area, in three sheets. 

(c) Profiles of C.P.R., Station Street and Waldemar Road. 

(d) Cross sections of Grand Vallej'. 

(e) Cross sections of C.P. Ry. 

Yours truly, 

Speight & Van X'ostrand, 

Ontario Land Surveyors. 

Appendix No. 23 

Report by James S. Dobie, O.L.S., of the traverse of Lakes Tendinendah or 
Matinenda, Moon, Chiblow and other lakes in Townships 161 and 167, 
District of Algoma, 1934. 

In accordance with your instructions dated April 25th, 1934, I have made 
a traverse of Lakes Tendinendah or Matinenda, Moon, Chiblow and other 
lakes in Townships 161 and 167 in the District of Algoma. I have also retraced 
certain lines and planted permanent monuments in the Township of Scarfe 
and have completed the unsurveyed portion of the boundary between Town- 
ships 155 and 161, all in the District of Algoma, and beg to submit the following 
report : 

The party consisted of six men besides myself and assembled at Thessalon 
on May 28th. A large truck had been engaged which conveyed the whole 
party including canoes, supplies and equipment to Tendinendah Lake to 
which a good motor road had recently been constructed. 

The actual survey was started on the morning of May 30th. As I was 
instructed to traverse only those portions of the lakes mentioned which were 
outside the subdivided townships of Scarfe and Mack, it was first necessary to 
locate the boundaries of these townships. This was a difficult matter as the 
country' has all been lumbered and repeatedlj^ swept by fires so that most of 
the posts have been burnt long ago and traces of the lines almost entirely 
obliterated. However intensive search rewarded our efforts and these bound- 
aries were successfully located. In the case of the north boundary of the 
township of Mack, the only l)lazes we could find wore a long distance from the 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 71 

shore and it was necessary to re-run three quarters of a mile of this line between 
these blazes and Lake Tendinendah. In running the line, however, some 
other blazes were discovered not far from the shore and the line was corrected. 
An observation showed the bearing of this boundary to be N 89 35' 30" W Ast. 
or 270 24' 30". A rock post was planted in a large boulder on the line near 
the shore and from this point a line was projected across the lake and an 
original blaze was found on a fellen tree in the water which had escaped our 
notice. A trial line was run West Ast. from this point to Lake Chiblow, and 
two more original blazes were discovered. One of these was on the south 
side of a pine tree not far from Lake Chiblow, whereas the trial line passed 
very close to the north side of the tree. The trial line was so close to the 
original that the line was not re-run, but a correction of 4 minutes was made 
to allow for the difference, the bearing of this boundary being shown in 
the field-notes as S 89 56' W Ast. or 269 56'. 

The traverse of the different lakes was carried on in the usual manner 
described in the reports of previous surveys. The distances were obtained 
by stadia and the angles measured with a transit equipped with an object 
glass sufficiently powerful to permit of observations on Polaris being taken at 
any time during the day when the sky happened to be clear. Such obser- 
vations were taken at sufficiently frequent intervals to reduce the angular 
errors to a minimum. A number of these observations were recorded on the 
detail sheets supplied for that purpose, and a copy of these is included with 
the returns. 

The traverse of the portion of Lake Chiblow lying within Township No. 
167 was started at a point on the north boundary of the Township of Scarfe 
68 links west of a rock post on top of a rocky peak on the said boundary, and 
was continued west along the lake shore to the east boundary of the Township 
of Montgomery. 

The post marking the corner of the Townships of Scarfe, Montgomery, 
Patton and 167 could not be found and no satisfactory location of this corner 
could be made. This corner comes on a small island and since the original 
survey of these townships was made a dam has been constructed on the Blind 
River at the outlet of Lake Chiblow which has raised the water several feet, 
and I am satisfied that the corner is now under water. At one time there was a 
portage on the stream by which DeMorest Lake empties into Lake Chiblow 
but there is now continuous navigation for small boats between these two 
lakes. Stumps which had been cut off close to the ground along the banks of 
this stream are now under six feet of water. The dam referred to on the Blind 
River has been rebuilt and is now used to hold back the water in Lake Chiblow 
for water power purposes, the power being transmitted to Blind River. 

The unsurveyed portion of the boundary between Townships 155 and 
161 amounting to a little over two and a half miles was also run out. The 
post planted by D. Beatty, P.L.S., in 1885 at a point on the boundary between 
Townships 155 and 161, three and a half miles south of the northern extremity 
of this boundary, was found after a short search, and after an observation on 
Polaris this line was run South Ast. to intersect the north boundary of the 
Township of Mack at a point 47.76 chains west of the north-east corner of that 
township. The Mack boundary was hard to find as the country had been 
burnt over and grown up with second growth so that traces of the original line 



72 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

had almost disappeared. It was finally located 14.77 chains south of the six 
mile where I naturally expected to find it. In searching for the north boundary 
of the Township of ]\Iack some of my men discovered a well blazed survey line 
which had apparently been run to mark out this boundary many years ago. A 
post was found where this line intersected the north boundary of the Township 
of Mack, this post being located 12.79 chains east of where the corner of 
Townships 155 and 161 is located according to my survey, this post being 
marked 155 on the north-east and 161 on the north-west. This line is shown on 
the field-notes submitted herewith. 

The portion of the boundary between Townships 155 and 161 surve^-ed by 
me runs over a rough hilly country. A small portion of the first half-mile has 
been burnt over and is growing up with second-growth, but the rest of the 
line is through original forest of maple, birch, oak, hemlock, spruce, balsam and 
cedar from which only the pine has been cut. The hardwood predominates and 
the line continues in this class of timber until within a few chains of the north 
boundary of the Township of Mack where it enters a belt of second growth. 
This line is about half a mile east of Baker's Ba\' on Lake Tendinendah and an 
old log road crossed it on which the walking is good but the bridges and culverts 
are all washed out and rotted awav. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
ONTARIO 

1934 

PART III— FORESTRY BRANCH 



[73] 



74 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 24 
I — Forest Fire Protection 
(1) Legislation 
Sections twenty-three, twenty-four and twenty-nine of the Forest Fires 
Prevention Act, 1930, were amended to facilitate the efforts of the Department 
towards the removal of slash and debris, to strengthen its hand in dealing with 
the more or less irresponsible operator and to provide for the collection of 
Departmental costs in the case of fires caused by or as a result of a contra- 
vention of the provisions of the Act. 

On the twenty-third day of March an Order-in-Council was passed declar- 
ing the area within the following described boundary a "Travel Permit" area — 

"Commencing at the south-east corner of Nipigon Provincial Forest 
thence east twenty-six miles, more or less, to the west shore of Long Lake, 
thence northeasterly along the west shore of Long Lake to the western boun- 
dary of the Long Lake Indian Reserve, thence north along the west boundary 
of said Reserve to the northwest corner thereof, thence east along the north 
boundary of said Reserve to the right-of-way of the Canadian National 
Railways, thence northerly along the west boundary of said right-of-way to the 
point of intersection with the south boundary of the Kowkash Mining Division, 
thence due west twenty-two miles, more or less, to the east shore of Mountain 
Lake, thence due south four and one-half miles, thence due west twenty-one 
miles, more or less, to the east boundary of Nipigon Provincial Forest, thence 
south along said east boundary fifty-four miles, more or less, to the point of 
commencement." 

On the twenty-ninth day of May an Order-in-Council was passed with- 
drawing from the Fire District the following areas — 

The Townships of Mclrvine, Crozier, Roddick, Burriss, Devlin, Woodyatt. 
Aylesworth, Carpenter, Lash, Barwick, Dobie, Mather, Roseberry, Shenstone. 
Tait, Morley, Patullo, Dilke, Worthington, Blue, Atwood, Curran, Morson. 
McCrosson and Tovell in the district of Rainy River, the Township of Rayside 
in the District of Sudbury, the Township of Dalton in the County of Victoria, 
the Township of Minden and that part of the Township of Lutterworth lying 
east and south of Gull River and Gull Lake in the County of Haliburton. 

(2) Organization and Personnel 

Few changes were made in the supervisory personnel and no extensive 
increase in numbers. 

On march 1st the Chief Ranger at Fort Frances was promoted to the 
position of Fire Inspector but continued to carry on the duties of Chief Ranger 
for the Rainy River Division. 

On August 31st the two men engaged in the inspection of fire protective 
appliances on locomotives were relieved of their duties. 

On September 15th the services of the District Forester and of the Fire 
Inspector at Port Arthur were dispensed with and the Forest Supervisor from 
Macdiarmid placed in charge. 

The total field supervisory staff for the twelve districts was as shown in 
the following table and consisted of eleven District Foresters, eleven Forest 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1933 



75 



ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL 



District 


Area 


Head- 


Supervisory Staff 


Chief Ranger 


Headquarters 




(Acres) 


quarters 




Division 




Hudson. . . 


15,800,000 


Sioux 


1 — District F"orester 


Red Lake 


Goose Island 






Lookout 


1 — Forest Assistant 


Sioux Lookout . . 


Sioux Lookout 








2 — Chief Rangers 


Armstrong 


Armstrong 








11- — Deputy Chief Rangers 






Kenora . . . 


9,600,000 


Kenora.. . 


1 — District Forester 


Kenora 


Kenora 








1— Forest Assistant 


Minaki 


Minaki 








2 — Chief Rangers 












8 — Deputy Chief Rangers 






Rainy 


4,000,000 


Fort 


1 — District Forester 


Rainy River .... 


Fort Frances 


River. . . 




Frances 


1 — Fire Inspector and 

Chief Ranger 

4 — ^Deputy Chief Rangers 






Port 


11,360,000 


Port 


1 — District Forester 


Thunder Bay . . . 


Port Arthur 


Arthur. . 




Arthur 


1 — Forest Assistant 

1 — Forest Supervisor and 

Chief Ranger 

1 — Fire Inspector and 

Chief Ranger 

10 — Deputy Chief Rangers 


Nipigon 


Macdiarmid 


Cba .... 


16,720,000 


Kapus- 
kasing 


1 — District Forester 


Nakina 


Nakina 






1 — Forest Assistant 


Longlac 


Longlac 








2 — Fire Inspectors 


Oba 


Oba 








6 — Chief Rangers 


Franz 


Franz 








13 — Deputy Chief Rangers 


Hearst 

Kapuskasing. . . . 


Hearst 
Kapuskasing 


Cochrane. . 


10,000,000 


Cochrane 


1 — Fire Inspector 


Cochrane 


Cochrane 








4 — Chief Rangers 


Abitibi 


Stimson 








13 — Deputy Chief Rangers 


Timmins 

Swastika 


Timmins 
Swastika 


Sault Ste. 


7,400,000 


Sault Ste. 


1 — District Forester 


A. C. R 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Marie. . . 




Marie 


1 — Forest Assistant 


Blind River 


Blind River 








3 — Chief Rangers 


Mississagi South. 


Ranger Lake 








9 — Deputy Chief Rangers 






Sudburj' . . 


12,650,000 


Sudbury. . 


1 — District Forester 


Folevet West . . . 


Foleyet 








1 — Forest Assistant 


Folevet East .... 


Gogama 








2 — Fire Inspectors and 


Mississagi West . 


Chapleau 








Chief Rangers 


Mississagi East . 


Biscotasing 








1 — Divisional Forester . . . 


Webbwood 


Espanola 








5 — Chief Rangers 


Timagami West . 


Shining Tree 








16 — Deputy Chief Rangers 


Sudbury North . . 
Sudbury South. . 


Skead 
Sudburv 


North Bay 


5,100,000 


North 


1 — District Forester 


Timagami North 


Elk Lake 






Bay 


1 — Forest Assistant 


Timagami East . 


Timagami 








1 — Fire Inspector and 


Latchford 


Latchford 








Chief Ranger 


North Bay 


North Bay 








3 — Chief Rangers 












10 — Deputy Chief Rangers 






Georgian 


3,160,000 


Parry 


1 — District Forester 


Georgian Bay W. 


Parrv Sound 


Bay 




Sound 


2 — Forest Assistants 

1 — Divisional Forester . . . 

1 — Chief Ranger 

5 — Deputy Chief Rangers 


Georgian Bay E . 


Powassan 


Algonquin 


3,350,000 


Pembroke 


1 — District Forester 


Algonquin North 


Pembroke 








1 — Forest Assistant 


Algonquin South 


Whitney 








2 — Chief Rangers 












8 — Deputy Chief Rangers 






Trent 


3,200,000 


Tweed . 


1 — District Forester . 


Trent 


Bancroft 






1 — Forest Assistant 


Madawaska 


Dae re 








2 Chief Rangers 












4— Deputy Chief Rangers 







Total Area, 102,340,000 acres. 

Assistants, one Forest Supervisor, eight Fire Inspectors, two Divisional 
Foresters, thirty Chief Fire Rangers and one hundred and eleven Deputy 



76 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Chief Fire Rangers. The Forest Supervisor at Macdiarmid, the Fire Inspectors 
at Fort Frances, Port Arthur, Elk Lake, Gogama and Biscotasing, and the 
Divisional Foresters at Chapleau and Powassan also acted as Chief Fire Rangers. 



There was direct supervision of one Chief or Deputy Chief Ranger to an 
average of every five rangers. 

The average daily force, including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, 
was as follows: April, 161; May, 523; June, 906; July, 934; August, .923; 
September, 703; October, 265. The largest number of men on duty at any 
one time, including Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers was 944. 



NUMBER OF MEX OX DUTY IXCLUDIXG CHIEF AXD 
DEPUTY CHIEF RAXGERS 



April 1st 

April loth 

May 1st 

May loth 

June 1st 

June loth 

July 1st 

July loth 

August 1st 

August loth . . . . 
September 1st. . . 
September loth . 

October 1st 

October loth. . . . 
October 31st 



1934 



143 
150 
243 
526 
834 
920 
933 
937 
916 
923 
889 
784 
356 
262 
186 



1933 



1932 



94 
109 
183 
441 
775 
813 
812 
S21 
841 
838 
775 
742 
332 
200 
171 



106 
117 
231 
524 
960 
987 
999 
1,010 
1,035 
1,035 
917 
735 
317 
225 
185 



1931 



1930 



1929 



121 

191 

471 

878 

1,112 

1,164 

1,195 

1,210 

1,212 

1,207 

1,114 

901 

332 

244 

196 



104 

189 

454 

880 

1,111 

1,173 

1,216 

1,235 

1,205 

1,208 

1,184 

1,136 

477 

288 

179 



77 

139 

454 

683 

981 

1,066 

1,090 

1,085 

1,072 

1,081 

1,083 

987 

407 

245 

154 



1928 



49 

98 

293 

628 

992 

1,026 

1,071 

1,080 

1,068 

1,055 

988 

778 

242 

131 

93 



(3) Expenditures 

The total expenditure for the year was SI, 557, 452. 27. The amount of 
Fire Tax collected was S280,259.65 which with miscellaneous expenditure 
refunds made up a total of S315.557.30, leaving the net expenditure at 
81,241,894.97. 

CLASSIFICATIOX OF EXPEXDITURES 



Item 



1934 



1933 



1932 



Pay roll 

Equipment 

Improvements 

Extra fire fighting 

Express, postage, etc 

Gasoline and oil 

Maintenance 

Travel 

Rent 

Miscellany 

Expenditure Refunds 
Totals 



.S83 1,390. 09 

103,697.76 

38,623.62 

295,577.87 

24,297.63 

80,560.01 

142,118.54 

31,047.54 

8,231.25 

1,907.96 



.8748,288.58 

102,118.04 

24,457.97 

239,021.48 

22,833.21 

93,173.53 

107,517.05 

27,848.30 

7,578.91 

2,711.30 



81,557,452.27 
35,297.65 



Sl,375,548.37 
21,320.57 



$1,522,154.62 Sl,354,227.80 



8921,535.78 

119,757.02 

31,195.86 

314,947.16 

25,967.85 

80,522.66 

134,788.67 

32,639.79 

8,719.83 

5,864.34 



$1,675,938.96 



§1,675,938.96 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 77 

(4) Fires 

Considering the Province as a whole the season was somewhat less severe 
than that of any of the preceding five years. In some districts, however, 
conditions were again abnormal particularly in the Soo, Georgian Bay, and 
parts of the Sudbury and Oba Districts. 

There were 1568 fires with a total area burned of 198^633 acres. Of 
this area sixty-six per cent was burned in the month of May when thirty per 
cent of the fires occurred. Of the total number of fires those due to lightning 
formed thirty-one per cent, campers twenty-three per cent and smokers 
thirteen per cent. Of the area burned, however, lightning was responsible for 
thirty-six per cent, campers eight per cent and smokers about four per cent. 
Fires due to logging operations, while forming only two per cent of the 
number, were responsible for nearly thirty per cent of the area. 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Month 



Month 



1934 



No. 



Percent. 



1933 



Per cent. 



1932 



1931 



Per cent. 



Per cent. 



1930 



Per cent. 



1929 



Per cent. 



1928 



Per cent. 



November. 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September. 
October . . . 



Totals 



21 
483 
189 
432 
413 
17 
13 



1.3 
30.8 
12.1 
27.6 
26.3 
1.1 
0.8 



2.4 
13.9 
14.1 
23.6 
26.2 
18.4 

1.4 



0.2 

6.1 

.29.8 

32.1 

7.2 
11.3 
12.0 

1.3 



4.2 

7.0 

20.0 

11.6 

15.6 

31.8 

8.4 

1.4 



8.7 
29.0 
16.3 

5.5 
30.0 

6.6 

3.9 



5.8 
11.7 
11.2 
19.2 
30.5 
13.4 

8.2 



1,568 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



6.5 
45.3 
23.0 
11.0 
11.2 
2.4 
0.6 



100.0 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Origin 



Origin 


1934 


1933 


1932 


1931 


1930 


1929 


1928 


No. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Settlers 


154 

372 
31 

495 
34 
21 

210 
78 
64 
7 
22 
80 


9.8 

23.7 

2.0 

31.6 

2.2 

1.3 

13.4 

5.0 

4.1 

0.4 

1.4 

5.1 


13.0 

25.5 
2.9 

24.2 
0.6 
0.6 

13.5 
2.3 
5.3 
1.3 
2.4 
8.4 


15.6 
28.4 

2.7 
10.5 

1.3 

0.2 
13.5 

1.3 
16.4 


13.6 
33.8 

5.2 
16.0 

1.1 


18.1 
28.6 

8.5 
13.6 

3.1 


7.2 
26.7 
12.0 
16.1 

3.6 


15.5 


Campers 


21.7 


Railways 


18.3 


Lightning 

Logging operations 
Mining operations . 
Smokers 


6.3 
5.4 


13.1 
1.5 
1.8 


10.8 
2.6 


10.3 
1.4 


12.3 


Road construction . 

Incendiary 

Prospectors 

^Miscellaneous 

Unknown 


1.3 








2.0 
8.1 


7.1 

6.8 


7.3 

7.4 


3.9 

18.8 


6.7 
12.5 






Totals 


1,568 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



/8 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
Bv Size 



Size 



1934 



No. 



Per 
cent. 



1933 



Per 
cent. 



1932 



Per 
cent. 



1931 



Per 
cent. 



1930 



1929 



Per 
cent. 



Per 
cent. 



1928 



Per 
cent. 



Quarter acre and under . . 
Over quarter to 5 acres . . 

Over .5 to 10 acres 

Over 10 to 100 acres 

Over 100 to 500 acres. . . . 
Over 500 to 1,000 acres. . 
Over 1,000 to 10,000 acres 
Over 10,000 acres 

Totals 



387 
577 
136 
309 
106 
24 
27 

9 



24.6 
36.9 
8.7 
19.7 
6.8 
1.5 
1.7 
0.1 



22.0 
41.4 
8.0 
20.1 
5.5 
1.3 
1.3 
0.4 



24.1 
37.1 
8.9 
18.1 
7.5 
1.7 
2.0 
0.6 



1,568 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



26.8 
40.1 
7.8 
17.4 
5.4 
1.1 
1.3 
0.1 



23.6 
38.2 
9.1 
15.9 
8.1 
1.8 
2.7 
0.6 



26.0 
39.6 
7.3 
14.5 
6.5 
2.0 
3.2 
0.9 



27.2 
42.5 
7.8 
16.4 
3.6 
0.8 
1.1 
0.6 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



100.0 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



79 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



81 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF RAILWAY FIRES PER HUNDRED MILES OF LINE 
THROUGH FOREST SECTIONS 



Railway 



1934 



1933 



1932 



1931 



1930 



1929 



1928 



Canadian National Railways (northern trans- 
continental line only) 

Canadian National Railways (exclusive of 
northern line) 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Algoma Eastern Railway 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway. . . 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway. 

Nipissing Central Railway 

Miscellaneous Private Railways 



0.8 

0.7 
0.7 

0.3 



0.5 

1.1 
1.1 

4.3 
0.2 



1.4 

1.3 

0.9 



0.9 
3.1 



1.2 

1.8 
0.8 
2.3 
1.5 
6.2 
6.2 



1.4 

2.1 
2.0 
14.8 
2.8 
3.3 



Totals. 



0.6 



1.1 



1.1 



1.9 



2.3 



2.9 

4.2 
5.0 
2.3 
1.2 
0.5 



3.7 



0.7 

1.4 
3.4 
1.1 
1.6 
0.5 



2.1 



1.8 



RAILWAY FIRES 



Railway 



Canadian National Railways (northern trans- 
continental line only) 

Canadian National Railways (exclusive of 
northern line) 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Algoma Eastern Railway 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway. . 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway. 

Nipissing Central Railway 

Miscellaneous Private Railways 



1934 



20.0 

43.3 
33.3 

3.4 



Per cent, of Total Number of 
Railway Fires 



1933 



7.1 

37.5 

28.6 

25.0 
1.8 



100.0 



100.0 



1932 



20.0 

43.6 
25.5 



1931 



9.1 
1.8 



100.0 



9.3 

36.1 

/12.4 

\ 2.0 

5.2 

33.0 

2.0 



100.0 



1930 



9.2 

33.7 
25.2 
10.9 
7.6 
13.4 



100.0 



1929 



11.8 

44.1 

39.8 

1.1 

2.1 

1.1 



100.0 



1928 



5.1 

29.6 

54.1 

1.0 

5.1 

2.0 



3.1 
100.0 



82 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 







H3 


4,903 

3,949 

590 

20,929 

17,809 

17,198 


82,129 

18,349 

10,413 

3,818 

2,555 


Potals 

acres) 


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in 

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not 
restocking 


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of co" o CO of >— '" 








c: C5 C X X o 
co'co"— L-fx"— ' 

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c; CT. CT. cr. c; c; 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



83 







2 


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cr 


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84 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 





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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



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86 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



(5) Burni?ig Permits 

The number of burning permits issued, 20,962, and the acreage covered 
by them, 55,583, was less than in 1933. This is due largely to the 
elimination of control in a number of organized municipalities. 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



Division 



Number of Permits 



1934 



1933 



1932 



1931 



1930 



1929 



1928 



Red Lake 

Sioux Lookout .... 

Armstrong 

Kenora 

Minaki 

Rainy River 

Thunder Bay 

Xipigon 

Xakina 

Hearst 

Longlac 

Oba 

Franz 

Kapuskasing 

Smoky Falls 

Cochrane 

Abitibi 

Swastika 

Timmins 

A.C.R 

Blind River 

Mississagi South . . , 

Foleyet West 

Foleyet East 

Mississagi West. . . . 
Mississagi East . . . . 

Webbwood 

Sudbury North .... 

Sudbury South 

Timagami West . . . . 
Timagami North. . . 
Timagami East. . . . 

Latchford 

North Bay 

Georgian Bay West 
Georgian Bay East. 
.\lgonquin North . . . 
Algonquin South. . . 

Trent 

Madawaska 

Totals 



139 

314 

187 

875 

63 

45 

2,049 

123 

33 

2,023 

82 

38 

49 

2,696 

2,456 

1,825 

1,299 

296 

452 

i45 
189 

88 
118 
626 

90 
1,089 

50 
1,082 

64 

66 

1,051 

288 

303 

70 
203 
150 
246 



105 

123 

93 

840 

113 

40 

1,728 

16 

13 

2,780 

6 

66 

29 

3,770 

3,714 

7 

2,262 

1,605 

464 

731 

182 

250 

153 

161 

794 

165 

2,119 

56 

1,287 

10 

96 

1,085 

353 

471 

61 

309 

417 

448 



53 

96 

853 

110 

92 

1,689 

9 

21 

2,644 

7 

39 

7 

2,514 

2,580 

1,497 

1,065 

428 

911 

2 

138 

144 

71 

90 

590 

462 

2,014 

37 

1,564 

21 

155 

1,539 

342 

281 

55 

303 

314 

361 



107 

115 

98 

863 

108 

121 

1,763 

37 

13 

2,845 

8 

56 

10 

3,824 

4,723 

3 

3,105 

1,836 

132 

387 

'i41 
167 

50 

84 

435 

185 

1,669 

37 
1,367 

20 

249 

1,091 

288 

295 

35 
173 
217 
374 



20,962 



26,922 23,187 



27,031 



111 
66 
10 

606 
66 
40 

395 

"2 

1,173 

2 

24 

13 

2,113 

2,755 

8 

1,915 

1,093 

93 

250 

"74 
170 

48 

64 
225 
129 
962 

18 
294 

17 

18 
731 

93 
224 

41 
122 
172 
327 



15,094 



63 

78 

13 

769 

55 

40 

293 

3 

7 

1,074 

2 

15 

9 

1,903 

16 

2,078 

20 

1,664 

1,241 

95 

191 

43 
199 

55 

6 

222 

12 
854 

27 
988 

277 

914 
105 
165 
50 
106 
150 
235 



129 

40 

5 

611 

44 

29 

333 

4 

42 

1,501 

5 

24 

6 

2,274 

2,637 

1,236 

1,034 

51 

134 

2 

43 

185 

22 

12 

169 

15 

540 

12 

951 

139 

724 
111 
155 

29 
105 

77 
181 



14,038 



13.611 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



Division 



Acreage Covered by Permits 



1934 



1933 



1932 



1931 



1930 



1929 



1928 



Red Lake 

Sioux Lookout .... 

Armstrong 

Kenora 

Minaki 

Rainy River 

Thunder Bay 

Nipigon 

Nakina 

Hearst 

Longlac 

Oba 

Franz 

Kapuskasing 

Smoky Falls 

Cochrane 

Abitibi 

Swastika 

Timmins 

A.C.R... 

Blind River 

Mississagi South . . . 

Foleyet West 

Foleyet East 

Mississagi West. . . . 
Mississagi East. . . . 

Webbwood 

Sudbury North .... 

Sudbury South 

Timagami West . . . . 
Timagami North . . . 
Timagami East . . . . 

Latchford 

North Bay 

Georgian Bay West 
Georgian Bay East. 
Algonquin North... 
Algonquin South . . . 

Trent 

Madawaska 

Totals 



3,855 
3,266 
1,601 
2,008 
2 
1,651 
5,698 

720 

117 
5,225 

138 
38 

257 
4,783 

5,731 

3,740 

1,863 

957 

1,664 

"72 

127 

66 

39 

2,300 
230 

2,471 
140 

1,048 
577 
280 

1,949 
592 
633 
104 
591 
382 



257 

685 

1,019 

1,531 

33 

63 

7,978 

543 

12 

7,119 

1 

146 

23 

7,928 

8,161 
21 
5,107 
2,356 
1,584 
3,138 

"i92 

69 

121 

23 

2,330 

337 

4,759 

84 

1,339 

244 
1,950 

833 
1,312 

138 

614 
1,023 

968 



440 

218 

142 

1,925 

22 

209 

5,927 

17 

11 

7,665 

2 

47 

1 

5,607 

6,069 

5,667 

1,798 

1,171 

1,210 

2 

39 

59 

50 

16 

1,763 

1,008 

5,121 

6 

1,244 

66 

771 

2,756 

691 

711 

227 

443 

649 

849 



572 

757 

412 

2,124 

17 

344 

7,068 

93 

7 

13,591 

2 

109 

1 

10.894 

12,407 

1 

11,331 

5,795 

466 

1,422 

205 

252 

77 

19 

1,964 
664 

3,387 
523 

2,087 

11 

535 

1,612 
531 
742 
110 
305 
472 

1,043 



1,786 
375 

1,738 
22 
90 

2,201 



4,805 

"25 

6,437 

8,735 

39 

8,441 

5,669 

603 

690 

"l9 

161 

83 

27 

915 

339 

1,670 

5 

1,692 

1 

9 

875 

169 

623 

121 

180 

437 

1,296 



29 

570 

4 

2,170 

18 

403 

1,137 

15 

3 

4,898 



7,443 

22 

6,414 

19 

7,554 

6,801 

184 

380 

"23 

65 

331 

9 

648 

13 

2,184 

34 

1,228 

579 

1,697 
307 
730 
3,362 
1,753 
295 
423 



109 

85 

18 

1,671 

5 

378 

7,777 

2 

18 

7,119 



13,807 

16,961 

5,031 

2,222 

1,121 

130 

1 

29 

87 

310 

26 

449 

14 

941 

3 

1,272 

217 

1,366 
157 
380 
33 
141 
268 
810 



55,583 64,041 



54,619 



81,952 



50,278 



51,752 



62,905 



88 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



Month 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . 
October 

Totals 



1934 



598 
5,376 
4,841 
3,948 
3,813 
2,028 

358 



Number of Permits 



1933 



1,615 
5,116 
7,741 

2,758 

4,861 

4,284 

547 



1932 



1,317 
5,437 
5,316 
3,281 
4,161 
3,246 
429 



1931 



1,564 
6,173 
7,528 
3,450 
4,545 
3,139 
632 



1930 



756 
3,531 
3,025 
2,150 
2,753 
2,469 

410 



1929 



640 
2,579 
5,043 
2,937 
1,520 
1,220 
99 



1928 



116 
3,372 
4,494 
2,581 
2,139 

899 
10 



20,962 



26,922 



23,187 



27.031 



15,094 



14,038 



13,611 



MOXTH 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . 
October 

Totals 



Acreage Covered by Permits 



1934 



5,119 
16,701 
11,947 
7,383 
6,547 
6,179 
1,707 



55,583 



1933 



6,324 
14,665 
18,850 
4,802 
8,720 
8,421 
2,259 



64,041 



1932 



4,844 

16,401 

13,146 

5,514 

7,453 

6,329 

892 



54,619 



1931 



6,919 
22,898 
25,440 

7,521 
10,318 

7,238 

1,618 



81,952 



1930 



4,888 
14,134 
10,696 
7,263 
6,871 
4,923 
1,503 



50,278 



1929 



2,662 
9,882 
24,581 
8,627 
2,693 
2,302 
1,005 



51,752 



1928 



701 

21,435 

23,453 

9,589 

5,796 

1,812 

119 



62,905 



(6) Equipment 



While considerable major equipment was purchased during the year 
the bulk of this was for replacement. This was particularly true in the case 
of hose, blankets and trucks. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



89 



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REPORT OF THE 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 91 

(8) Improvements 

Major building carried out consisted of the erection of 11 cabins, 6 store- 
houses, 2 combined storehouses and boathouses, 3 steel lookout towers, and 
117 miles of telephone line. 

Radio stations were operated at Sioux Lookout (two stations) Watcomb, 
Goose Island, Red Lake, Swain's Lake, Pickle Lake, Armstrong, Caribou Lake, 
Savant Lake, Kenora, Whitefish Bay, Upper Manitou Lake, Nester's Falls, 
Sphene Lake, Port Arthur, Garden Lake, Obonga Lake, Jackfish Island, 
Macdiarmid, Stimson, Adair Tower, Puckaskwa, Sault Ste. Marie, North Bay, 
Elk Lake, Latchford Tower, Maple Mountain Tower, Mount Collins Tower. 



Permanent Improvements 

Completed to October 31st, 1934 

Cabins 321 

Storehouses 79 

Boathouses 40 

Combined Storehouses and Boathouses, etc 16 

Bunkhouses 64 

Offices 17 

Garages 59 

Other Buildings 139 

Hose Towers 57 

Wooden Lookout Towers 91 

Steel Lookout Towers 143 

Permanent Telephone Lines (miles) 3,735 



(9) Air Operations 

Aircraft were used as usual in the detection and suppression of fires. 
In addition to the Departmental machines it was necessary at times to make 
use of commercial machines due to the extreme hazard in some districts. 

Machines were located as follows: — 

Goose Island 1 Moth 

Caribou Lake 1 Moth 

Sioux Lookout 1 D.H. 61 

2 Moths 
Kenora 1 Hamilton 

1 Moth 

Ignace 1 Moth 

Fort Frances 1 Hamilton 

Port Arthur 1 Fairchild 

Whitefish Lake 1 Moth 

Orient Bay 1 Vedette 

Twin Lakes 1 D.H. 61 

1 Moth 

Oba Lake 1 Moth 

Remi Lake 1 Moth 

Sault Ste. Marie 1 Moth 

Biscotasing 2 Moths 

Sudbury 1 Moth 

Algonquin Park 1 FairchildK.R.34 



I 



^1 REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



(10) Hazard Disposal 

No major projects were undertaken although considerable cleaning ud 
was managed by the regular staff during the season. 

(11) Travel Permits 
A total of 12,178 travel permits were issued covering 30,162 persons. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 93 



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94 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



(12) Operating Permits 

The number of operating permits issued totalled 6,029 covering 56,405 
persons. This is an increase over 1933 due largely to the mining activity 
in the Little Longlac Area. 



OPERATING PERMITS, 1934 



District 



Mining Operations 



No. of 
Permits 



Men 
Engaged 



j Miscellaneous 
Woods Operations| Operations 



Totals 



No. of 
Permits 



Men 
Engaged 



No. of 
Permits 



Men 
Engaged 



No. of Men 
Permits Engaged 



Hudson 

Kenora 

Rainy River . . . . 

Port Arthur 

Oba 

Cochrane 

Sauk Ste. Marie 

Sudbury 

North Bay 

Georgian Bay. . . 

Algonquin 

Trent 

Totals. . . . 



356 

159 

72 

244 

306 

848 

109 

630 

705 

39 

15 

27 



1,779 

906 

316 

1,257 

1,870 

3,698 

874 

5.099 

3,507 

224 

100 

148 



239 

257 

7 

258 

14 
226 

29 

997 

150 

9 

38 

86 



1,206 
1,506 

800 
4,156 
1,828 
5,068 
2,378 
7,403 
1,809 

184 
1,774 

788 



3,510 



19,778 



2,310 1 28,900 



11 
137 
15 
20 
19 



21 



1,044 

1,350 

683 

652 

627 



3,350 



209 



7,727 



595 

420 
79 

502 

331 
1,211 

153 
1,647 

874 
48 
53 

116 



6,029 



2,985 
2,433 
1,116 
5,413 
4,742 

10,116 
3,935 

13,154 

5,943 

408 

1,874 

4,286 



56,405 



II— REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF PROVINCIAL AIR 

SERVICE 

1. Introduction 

The season 1933-34 was one of sub-normal fire hazard. Due to excessive 
rainfall in the Western Division this part of the Province was well below the 
average, but the hazard in the Eastern Division could be considered to be 
normal, or slightly above, due to an excess of lightning storms. 



2. Features of Flying Operations 

(a) The sub-normal condition of hazard resulted in the Service being 
called upon to supply approximately 1,000 hours less flying this year than in a 
normal year, and permitted the release of Service craft for the use of other 
Government Departments at various times, and flying has been successfully 
carried out for these Departments as follows: — 

Department of Mines, 

Northern Development Branch, 

Ontario Provincial Police, 

Ontario Hydro Electric Commission, 

T. & N. O. Investigation Commission. 

In addition to the above, members of the Department of Health and the 
Welfare Board, were carried in Service craft during the course of regular 
duties. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 95 

(b) The flying supplied, during the various months, would indicate that 
the peak hazard was reached during the month of July. 

(c) The Service also carried out some very useful operations in the Sioux 
Lookout and Hudson area in the months of October and November. At these 
points an unprecedented accumulation of freight had occurred, and due to bad 
weather and lack of adequate facilities, commercial operators in this district 
were admittedly unable to cope with the situation. 

A considerable quantity of supplies was moved from this area to Rat 
Rapids, at which point a new Hydro Development is under way. The Service 
was largely instrumental in keeping this project going, and in addition, moved 
other supplies which were urgently required by the Central Patricia and Pickle 
Crow Gold Mines. 

It is pleasing to note that the Service has been able to step into this emer- 
gency and materially assist in the development of this rich mining area. 

(d) In addition to this the Service has been called upon to carry out a 
number of mercy flights, and it is felt that a number of lives have been saved 
through this medium. 

It has been the policy of the Service to stand ready, at all times, to carry 
out any humanitarian work of this kind when called upon to do so, and it is 
most gratifying to note that the operations of the Service, for the entire year, 
have been carried out without injury to any of the personnel. 

3. Operations General 

(a) Table I following shows the allocation of Service craft during the 
1933-34 season. In this connection it should be noted that machine G-CAPG 
stationed at Twin Lakes did a considerable amount of flying out of Oba Lake. 
Also after machine CF OAG was written off, machine G-CAPA, allocated to 
Whitefish Lake, was transferred to Oba Lake for a period of ten days, and 
subsequently machine CF-OAF, stationed at Remi Lake, carried out work 
required in the Oba Lake District until the close of the season. 

(b) A diagnosis of the various records maintained by the Service indicates 
that the already high degree of efficiency has reached an even higher standard 
as shown by the accompanying Table II. The totals as given in Table III 
presents a record of loads carried in the various craft. A reference to Table 
IV, which gives detailed information on the operation of the transport craft, 
will show that there is a slight increase in the effective loads carried per flying 
hour, and per flight, over 1933, while the operating load has been slightly 
decreased, making for increased efficiency. 

(c) Table V relating to machine days supplied by the Service shows a 
gratifying increase in machine elBciency from 97.9 per cent to 99 per cent in 
1934. 

(d) Table VI gives a comparison of flights and loadings of all craft for the 
years 1930-34 inclusive, while in Table VII there is set out the distribution of 
flying hours for the year 1933-34. 

(e) One aircraft was lost as a result of a forced landing, which occurred 
in a very small lake. The machine was damaged beyond repair, and conditions 
were such it was not possible to salvage same. 



96 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Table I 

Allocation of Flying Equipment 

Base Type Registration 

Sault Ste. Marie Moth II G-CAPC 

Sudburv Moth II G-CAOX 

Oba Lake Moth II CF-OAG 

Biscotasing Moth I CF-OAD 

Moth I G-CAOZ 

Remi Lake Moth II CF-OAF 

Twin Lakes Moth II G-CAPB 

D.H. 61 G-CAPG 

Sioux Lookout Moth II CF-OAA 

Moth II G-CAO\V 

D.H. 61 CF-OAK 

Goose Island Moth II G-CAOU 

Kenora Moth II CF-OAC 

Hamilton CF-OAJ 

Ignace Moth II G-CAOY 

Fort Frances Hamilton CF-OAH 

Caribou Lake Moth II CF-GAE 

Port Arthur Fairchild 71-C CF-OAAl 

Whitefish Lake Moth II G-CAPA 

Orient Bav Vedette CF-OAB 

Algonquin Park Fairchild KR-34 CF-AOH 

TABLE II 

Classification of Flying During the Past Eleven Years. 

Classification Hours Performed 

Fire Detection 28,321.05 

Fire Suppression 22,051 .01 

Transportation Ordinar^' 10,770.25 

Tran.sportation Special 3,778 .02 

Sketching 3,035.33 

Photography 1,207.40 

Ferrying 3,617.51 

Forced Landings 628 . 04 

Operations 4,149 . 48 

Flying Instruction 2,369.23 

Observers' Instruction 94 . 09 

Tests — Aircraft 974 . 47 

Tests— Wireless , 69 . 10 

Dusting 41 . 35 

Game Super\'ision 32 . 00 

Inspection 951 . 20 

Total 82,091 .53 



TABLE III 

Totals for Eleven Year Period. 

Hours Flown 82,091 . 53 

Miles Flown 5,303,194 

Passengers Flown 34,242 

Personnel Flown 44,008 

EfiFective Load Flown (pounds) 15,883,421 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



97 



TABLE IV 
Transport Aircraft— Loads Carried 
Operating Season 1934 



Machine 


Operating Load 


Efl^ective Load 


Total Load 


D.H. 61 

G-CAPG 


584,186 lbs. 
292 tons, 186 lbs. 


291,680 lbs. 
145 tons. 1,680 lbs. 


875,866 lbs. 


Hours 388 . 30 
Flights 617 


437 tons, 1,866 lbs. 


D.H. 61 

CF-OAK 


565,753 lbs. 
282 tons, 1,753 lbs. 


391,739 lbs. 
195 tons, 1,739 lbs. 


957,492 lbs. 


Hours 504.40 

Flights 645 


478 tons, 1,492 lbs. 






Fairchild 71C 

CF-OAM 


352,928 lbs. 
176 tons, 928 lbs. 


197,637 lbs. 
98 tons, 1,637 lbs. 


550,565 lbs. 


Hours 399.25 

Flights 428 


275 tons, 565 lbs. 


Hamilton 

CF-OAH 


484,670 lbs. 
242 tons, 670 lbs. 


279,569 lbs. 
139 tons, 1,569 lbs. 


764,239 lbs. 


Hours 432.05 

Flights 522 


382 tons, 239 lbs. 






Hamilton 

CF-OAJ 


515,277 lbs. 
257 tons, 1,277 lbs. 


203,039 lbs. 
101 tons, 1,039 lbs. 


718,316 lbs. 


Hours 320.45 

Flights 468 


359 tons, 316 lbs. 






Total Transport Section — 

Total Flying Time 
2,045 . 15 

Total Flights 2,680. 

Total Loading lbs 

Total Loading tons 

Loading average per machine. . . . 
Loading average per flying hour. . 
Loading average per flight 


2,502,814 lbs. 

1,251 tons, 814 lbs. 

500,562 lbs. 

1,223 lbs. 

934 lbs. 


1,363,664 lbs. 

681 tons, 1,664 lbs. 

272,733 lbs. 

667 lbs. 

508 lbs. 


3,866,478 lbs. 

1,933 tons, 478 lbs. 

773,295 lbs. 

1,890 lbs. 

1,442 lbs. 



98 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



TABLE V 
OPERATIONS STATISTICS— MACHINE DAYS 



Machines 


to 

c 
_o 

'3 
cr 


Number of days 
machine available 
during season 


tC 

c 

3 

u 
(U 

(U 


4) 

1 


•a Ji 
^^ 

O rt 

U (J 


Clear days — 
machine available 
but not required 


Machine days 
machine employed 




Auk 


87 
83 
88 
67 
83 

125 

175 
80 
55 
65 
56 

110 
86 
79 

102 
72 

116 
82 

175 
73 

149 


169 
310 
175 
150 
170 
302 
172 
130 
134 
160 
69 
271 
302 
252 
174 
226 
163 
163 
186 
141 
128 


37 
83 
42 
32 
21 
42 
23 
24 
42 
26 
9 
59 
48 
26 
33 
68 
22 
30 
23 
21 
15 


132 
227 
133 
118 
149 
260 
149 
106 

92 
134 

60 
212 
254 
226 
141 
158 
141 
133 
163 
120 
113 


4 


1 
1 
2 

2 
1 
2 

7 
5 
1 

2 



2 


2 


34 

137 

46 

42 

61 

116 

38 

20 

36 

37 

14 

84 

144 

124 

28 

57 

34 

48 

52 

49 

7 


94 

90 

87 

75 

87 

142 

111 

84 

55 

95 

46 

121 

105 

101 

113 

99 

107 

85 

109 

71 

104 


97.0 


Avocet 


100 


Blackbird 


100 


Bobolink 


99.1 


Crane 


99.3 


Crow 


99.2 


Dove 


100.0 


Emu 


98 1 


Flamingo 


98 9 


Goose 


98.5 


Grouse 


100.0 


Hawk 


96.7 


Heron 


98.1 


Jay 


99.5 


Kite 


100.0 


Martin 


98.8 


Upstart 


100.0 


Wren 


100.0 


Xbec 


98.7 


Yellowbird 


100.0 


Zeno 


98.3 






Totals 


2,008 


3,947 


726 


3,221 


32 


1,208 


1,981 


99.0 







DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



99 



TABLE VI 



1934 1933 1932 1931 



1930 



Flights 

Total number of flights 

Average duration of flight 

Average miles per flight 

Average altitude 

Average number of flights per day per 
machine on days machines em- 
ployed 

Number of miles flouTi 

Loading. 

Total load-weight carried 

Total operating load 

Effective (pay) load 

Passengers carried 

Average number of passengers per 

flight 

Average number of passengers per 

machine 

Total passengers and personnel 

Machine days — one machine for one 

day employed 

Fair weather machine days — machine 

available and idle 

Machine days — machine available but 

weather unfit 

Total machine days supplied by the 

Service 

Number of times one machine unser- 
viceable for one day 

Total possible machine days in the 

season 



8,865 

47.9 min. 

60.5 

2,013 



4.47 
532,395 

6,677,154 
4,646,037 
2,031,117 

3,997 

' .45 

190 
6,601 

1,981 

1,208 

726 

3,915 

32 

3,947 



10,022 

52.2 min. 

64.3 

1,843 



4.31 

643,602 

8,173,894 
5,721,220 
2,452,674 

5,248 

.52 

239 

8,454 

2,374 
1,106 
503 
3,983 
77 
4,060 



9,728 

1.00 hrs. 

69.3 

1,987 



3.81 
674,198 

8,148,047 
5,890,338 
2,257,709 

4,482 

.46 

172 

8,028 

2,552 
1,409 

737 
4,698 

120 
4,818 



10,617 
1.03 hrs. 
67.6 
2,112 



3.78 
717,731 

8,648,324 
6,375,977 
2,272,347 

4,369 

.41 

162 
8,910 

2,807 
999 
876 

4,682 
181 

4,863 



11,955 

1.19 hrs. 

73.2 

1,892 



4.13 
875,043 



9,477,384 
7,179,208 
2,298,176 

4,766 

.40 

191 
9,821 

2,893 
642 
633 

4,168 
286 

4,454 



TABLE VII 

HOURS FLOWN ON VARIOUS PHASES OF FLYING OPERATIONS 

1933-34 



Fire Detection 2,174 . 45 

Fire Suppression 1,844 . 55 

Transportation — Ordinary 1,820.35 

Transportation — Special 675.50 

Sketching 19.10 

Photography 59.50 

Wireless Tests 48 . 55 

Game Supervision 5 . 10 

Operations 160 . 30 

Forced Landings 11 . 30 

Ferrying 193 . 50 

Tests— Aircraft 20.25 

Tests — Engine 29 . 15 

Flying Instruction 18 .00 

Total 7,082 .40 



100 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



1 1 1 .—REFORESTATION 
1. NURSERIES 

The season of 1933-34 was marked by extremes of precipitation and 
temperature. Owing to the early snowfall in November, nursery operations 
were curtailed somewhat and the sub-zero temperature of the winter afifected 
the stock, particularly at Midhurst. Labour employed was kept at a minimum 
to insure proper care of the routine work, and at St. Williams this was supple- 
mented with men from the Turkey Point relief camp. 



TABLE 1— SEED BEDS 
Conifers 





NURSERY 




Quantity 


— Pounds 


Beds 




Spring 


Fall 


Spring 


Fall 


St Williams 


3983^ 


1,809M 

1,3343^ 

8763/f6 


4ii 


1.1523^ 
902 


Orono 


Midhurst 


684 










Totals 


398K 


4,020S/r6 


411 


2,738H 


Grand total- 


-Quantity — 
Beds 


-pounds 4,4185^6 
3,149K 



Hardwoods 





NURSERY 


Quantity 


— Pounds 


Quantity- 


— Bushels 




Spring 


Fall 


Spring 


Fall 


St. Williams 

Orono 

Midhurst 




180 


115 
5 

8 


26k 
15 


1*,557^ 


Total 


180 


128 


41M 


1,6385^ 


Grand total- 


-Quantity — pounds 308 
Quantity — bushels 1,679% 



TABLE 2 
SUMMARY OF NURSERY STOCK FOR PLANTING, 1935 



Place 


Conifers 


Hardwoods 


Cuttings 


Totals 


St. Williams 


2,397,000 
4,397,000 
3,135,100 


592,800 

68,700 

323,200 


220,000 

55,000 

150,000 


3,209,800 


Midhurst 


4,520,700 


Orono 


3,608,300 




Totals 


9,929,100 


984,700 


425,000 


11,338,800 







DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AXD FORESTS FOR 1934 101 

Improvements 

(a) Buildings: 

Three buildings were constructed at St. Williams, as follows. A small 
green-house 10' x 20' for experimental work and plant propogation. Two 
moveable 12' x 12' shanties for woods operations, and a 14' x 28' tool house. 

All buildings on the Orono nursery were painted. 

(b) Roads and Bridges: 

Three quarters of a mile of nursery road was built at St. Williams. 

A new road 125 rods in length wax built at Orono, also the bridge over the 

C.N.R. right-of-v/ay was rebuilt. 

At Midhurst a new road was put through. 

(c) Other Improvements: 

Five miles of telephone line were constructed at St. Williams to hook up 
with the Port Rowan terminal. 



i 



102 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



PERMANENT PLANTATIONS 
St. Williams 



Experimental or General 



New or 
Refills 



Mixture 



Quantity 



No. of 
Plantations 



Park area T. Point. 
Gravel Pit T. Point . 

U.T. Point 

BankT. Point 

T. T. Point 

F. T. Point 

63. Station No. 1.. . 

69. Station No. 1. . . 

70. Station No. 1. . . 

Long Point 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

Experimental 

R. PineT. Point... 
W. Sp. T. Point . . . . 

K. T. Point 

L. T. Point 

Q. T. Point 

59. Station No. 1 . . . 



New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
Refills 
Refills 
Refills 
Refills 
Refills 
Refills 



12 different species 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 

Jack Pine 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 

Red & Sc. Pine 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 

Larch — Red Pine 

Larch — W. Spruce 

Larch — Red Cedar 

Larch — Wh. Pine 

Larch 

Larch — Wh. Spruce 

Larch 

Larch — R. Poplar 

Larch — Red Cedar 

Larch — R. Poplar 

Larch — Jack Pine 

Larch — Jack Pine 

Larch — Red Pine 

Larch — Sc. Pine 

Larch — Sc. Pine 

Birch 

Maple S. 

Maple Nor. 

Maple Man. 

Misc. 

Red Pine 

Wh. Spruce 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 

Red Pine 



11,625 

2,000 

14,000 

2,000 

62,000 

11,300 

8,200 

20,600 

23,000 

10,000 

22,010 

22,024 

22,071 

2,428 

1,255 

2,384 

2,025 

2,340 

2,540 

2,224 

2,400 

2,184 

2,576 

2,460 

2,376 

1,800 

1,200 

600 

600 

355 

800 

15,000 

9,000 

900 

8,000 

11,600 



Total. 



307,887 



37 



Oroxo 



Experimental 


or General 


New or 
Refills 


Mixture 


Quar.tity 


No. of 
Plantations 


General 


Refills 
Refills 
Refills 


Norway Spruce 
White Spruce 
Red Pine 


500 
600 
350 


1 


General 


1 


General 


1 


Total 






1,450 


3 











Grand Total 309,337 

Protection 



(a) Fire: 



One small fire, caused by lightning, broke out at Station No. 1 St. Williams. 
About one acre was burned over. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 103 

(b) Insects: 

All outbreak "Ips pini" occurred in plantation No. 27 St. Williams where 
193 trees were affected. The reduction of injury due to weevil at St. Williams 
amounted to 29%. 

Insect infestations at Orono were of minor importance this year. 

The white pine weevil and the Nantucket pine shoot moth are still serious 
pests attacking the white pine at Midhurst. 

(c) Birds: 

There was very little damage caused by birds at St. Williams. Severe 
damage was caused at Orono by pheasants in the seed beds. There was very 
little damage caused by birds at Midhurst. 

{d) Other Animals: 

There was no damage done by either mice or rabbits at St. Williams. 
Rabbits did considerable damage in the seed beds during the winter at Orono. 
The damage from animals was small at Midhurst. 

(e) Fungus Diseases: 

The following conditions were reported from St. Williams: 

Damping off of seedling stock was light. 

Practically all of the native sweet chestnut trees are dead as a result 
of the chestnut blight. 

No evidence of white pine suffering from blister rust was observed. 
However, 323 plants of the family "Ribes" were dug up and burned. 
The following conditions were reported from Orono: 

Damping off of seedling stock was very severe; as a result losses 
were heavy. A more satisfactory condition exists with regard to "Ribes." 
Very few infected plants were located, consequently white pine seed beds 
were sown for the first time since 1930. 

The'following conditions were reported from Midhurst: 

An extensive "Ribes" eradication programme was carried on. The 
nursery is practically free from blister rust. 

WooDLOT Improvement 

At St. Williams thinnings were carried out in plantations as follows: 

A one-quarter acre plot in red pine plantation No. 27 was very heavily 
thinned for the purpose of observing growth reaction. The balance of Scotch 
pine plantation No. 16 was thinned and trimmed, completing these operations 
on the entire plot. A small section of white pine plantation No. 23, on which 
no thinning had been done, was completed. Plantation No. 37 was also sub- 
jected to thinning. 

At St. Williams during the fiscal year a revenue of S5,620.78 was obtained 
from wood operations in Stations Nos. 1 and 2, where badly fire-scarred oak 
and pine were removed and converted into lumber and fuelwood and sold 
locally. 



104 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



105 



At Orono there was no woodlot improvement owing to the fact that Lot 
22, Con. 1, Manvers Twp., which had formed for some years part of the nursery 
property, was returned to the owner so that in future all fuel-wood required 
at the nursery will have to be purchased. 

At Midhurst a piece of young hardwood bush was given a second thinning 
and the poplar removed from another section. In the swamp type about 10 
acres were improved. These improvements yielded about 5,000 ft. of lumber, 
fence posts and fire-wood. 

Publicity 

In accordance with polic}' to curtail expenditures wherever possible, only 
one exhibit was shown during 1934. This was at the county fair held in Simcoe 
in October. 

2. County Forests 

Work on the county forests this year, as in previous years, was drastically 
curtailed. Planting was limited to two county forests proper, namely, Vivian 
and Orr Lake. Three acres being planted on the former and sixty on the latter. 
At Camp Borden 350 acres were planted entirely by unemployed relief labour. 

Careful watch was kept for fire, insects and fungus disease and any out- 
breaks were promptly dealt with. The amount of labour employed was kept 
to a minimum. 

3. Municipal Forests 

This name is applied first to any municipally-owned tract of land con- 
sisting of 50 acres or more which is under the supervision of the Forestry 
Branch, for the purpose of improving existing woodland, protection and 
conservation of water supply and soil erosion, and for recreational purposes, 
or, second to any municipally-owned tract of land consisting of from 25 to 50 
acres under management, one-quarter or more of which is woodland. 



TABLE 4— MUNICIPAL FORESTS 



Municipal Forests 



Owned by 



Area in 
Acres 



Area 

Planted 

1934 



Number of 
Trees 



Beeton Waterworks . . . . 

Brantford 

Coldwater 

Ebor Park 

Guelph 

Hanover 

Inglis Falls 

Kitchener 

King's Forest 

Mono 

Mulmur 

Oro 

St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 

Township of Brantford . 

Vespra 

Windham 

Woodstock 



Total. 



Town of Beeton 
City of Brantford 
Village of Coldwater 



Town of Hanover 
City of Owen Sound 
City of Kitchener 
City of Hamilton 
Township of Mono 
Township of Mulmur 
Township of Oro 
City of St. Catharines 
City of St. Thomas 
Twp. of Brantford 
Township of Vespra 
Township of Windham 
City of Woodstock 



107 

75 
50 
50 

105 

140 

100 

700 

50 

50 

130 

50 

350 

'46 
50 



30 acres 

20 acres 

2 acres 
25 acres 



11 acres 
70 acres 
30 acres 



6 acres 



40,000 
26,600 



2,450 
30,000 



14,000 

85,261 

35,000 

7,000 



239,711 



106 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

4. Demonstration Plots 

This name is applied to any publicly-owned piece of waste land in close 
proximity to a travelled road. This land is owned or purchased expressly 
for the purpose of showing the public in any municipality what may be done 
for their community by tree-planting. These acres may vary in size from 
one to twenty -five acres. A sign which can be seen from the road is placed 
on the property and states that the planted area is a demonstration plot and 
that it is supervised by the Forestry Branch. 

110 plantations were inspected and advice given when needed to the 
various municipal owners. 

The conditions found on the majority of these plots were excellent and the 
expense of these establishments quite justified. Many of the older plantations 
have made splendid growth and now constitute a first-class demonstration of 
the value of tree-planting on non-agricultural soil. 

The majority of the municipalities who own the plots take a great deal 
of pride and interest in them and for that reason they are generally well cared 
for. That is, fences are maintained, protection from fire is provided by plough- 
ed fire-guards and any insect damage is reported to the Ontario Forestry 
Branch. 

Up to date the total number of plots established is 110. 

The following list shows the number of trees planted on demonstration 
plots during the spring of 1934. 

Additions to plots previously established: 

ADDITIONS TO PLOTS PREVIOUSLY ESTABLISHED 

Bov Scout Plantations 75,000 

Brantford 5L000 

Midland 24,000 

Highway Plantation 18,000 

Kitchener 10,800 

Preston 7,500 

York Township 6,200 

East York 5,000 

Wiarton 5,000 

Windsor 4,000 

Langstaff 3,500 

Waverley 3,500 

London 2,750 

Waterford 2,000 

Sturgeon Falls 1,191 

Sudburv 815 

Highway (Barrie-Orillia) 750 

Barrie 450 

Hespeler 350 

Simcoe 153 

222,059 
NEW PLOTS ESTABLISHED 

Village of Fonthill 5,000 

CoUingwood 4,S00 

New Toronto • . . 4, 100 

East Windsor 3,000 

16,900 

Grand Total 238,959 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 107 

5. Demonstration Woodlots 

This name is applied to privately-owned areas of woodland adjacent to a 
travelled road. These areas are used expressly for the purpose of showing 
the public what may be done by applying forestry methods to the management 
of the woodlot for continuous production. An officer of the Ontario Forestry 
Branch advises the owner on improvement cuttings, thinnings and any planting 
that may be required to bring the woodlot into proper condition. 

The number of demonstration woodlots was increased from 56 to 108. 
A sign which can be seen from the road is placed on the property and states 
the woodlot is a demonstration woodlot and that it is supervised by the Forestry 
Branch. It is planned to have at least one in each township. The following 
list gives the number and the location by counties. 



DEMONSTRATION WOODLOTS ESTABLISHED TO DATE 

Bruce 7 Dufferin 2 

Elgin 2 Grey 3 

Haldimand 1 Halton 5 

Huron 1 Lambton 2 

Middlesex 4 Norfolk 2 

Oxford 6 Peel 8 

Perth 1 Simcoe 11 

Waterloo 5 Wellington 4 

Wentworth 4 York 11 

Dundas 3 Durham 3 

Grenville 1 Frontenac 1 

Lanark 1 Leeds 1 

Northumberland 2 Ontario 10 

Peterborough 2 Prince Edward 2 

Renfrew 1 Victoria 2 

Total 108 



6. RANGER PLANTATIONS 



These were planted at various ranger headquarters as follows: 

Parry Sound, District of Parry Sound 15,181 

Ranger Lake, District of Algoma 7,600 

Blind River, District of Algoma 3,000 

Total 25,781 



7. UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF 

Camp Borden: 

Last year's programme of work was continued using men from one of the 
camps installed by the Department of Militia anJ Defence for the relief of 
unemployed single men. 

The work consisted of planting and thinning and also clearing of fire- 
guards. 



108 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The planting was begun in April and continued until the last week in 
May, 425,000 trees being planted. The other work which was begun as soon 
as the planting was finished will probably go on all winter until the work is 
completed. 

The number of men supervised each day b}' the Ontario Forestry Branch 
varied from 20 to 40. 

Petaivawa : 

This project was continued under the relief scheme of the Department of 
Militia and Defence on the Petawawa Military Reserve. 

The Ontario Forestry Branch gave technical assistance and supplied the 
trees and equipment for planting while the Department of Militia and Defence 
supplied the labour, board, freight and other expenses. 

756,000 trees were planted in all, half of the number in the High View 
area and the other half at the Chalk River Bridge. 

Planting commenced on May 6th and was completed June 1st. 
Kingston: 

This project was carried on under the relief scheme of the Department of 
Militia and Defence on Barriefield Common east of Kingston, and was handled 
in the same manner as Petawawa. 

21,073 trees were planted. Planting commenced April 25th and was 
completed May 19th. The average number of men employed per day was 20. 
Valcartier, Que.: 

540,000 trees were supplied and planted under Federal Government 
supervision at Valcartier by unemployment relief labour. 
Fredericton, N. B.: 

102,000 trees were supplied and planted under Federal Government 
supervision at Fredericton by unemployed relief labour. 



8. Trees Distributed for Private Planting and Schools 

In the spring of 1934, 5,973 people secured trees from the Ontario Forestry 
Branch, totalling in all 6,416,030. 

In the spring of 1934, 232 schools secured trees from the Ontario Forestry 
Branch, totalling in all 54,830. 

The following tables give the species and the number distributed: 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 



109 





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110 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

9. Seed Collecting 

During the autumn of 1934 seed-collecting was undertaken to procure 
only those species which were essential to the immediate needs of the nurseries. 
The largest quantity of any of the species being used is still red pine and 
practically all of this sown during the 1934 season was seed of the 1932 crop. 

For convenience in handling this work the province has been divided into 
five zones each with a central storing and shipping point from which the zone 
takes its name. For a better understanding of these a brief outline of seed 
crop conditions in each zone is here set down. 

(a) Seed condition throughout the province were as follows: 

1. Eagle River. 

From Eagle Lake to Dryden, north to the Canadian National Railway and south 

for a distance of 60 miles. 

Crop Notes: Red Pine— over entire area J^ crop 

White Pine — over entire area Not known 

White Spruce — over entire area 34 crop 

2. Massey. 

From Pancake Bay to Warren and adjacent County north and including Manitoulin 
Island. 

Crop Notes: Red Pine — Pancake Bay J^ crop 

Batchewana 34 crop 

Thessalon 3^ crop 

Elsewhere No crop 

White Pine — over entire area 3^ crop 

White Spruce — over entire area 34 crop 

3. North Bay. 

From Warren to Chalk River and as far south as Powassan. 

Crop Notes: Red Pine — over entire area No crop 

White Pine — over entire area 3^ crop 

White Spruce — over entire area 3^ crop 

4. Douglas. 

From Chalk River to Renfrew and south to Denbigh and Barry Bay. 

Crop Notes: Red Pine — over entire area No crop 

White Pine— over entire area 34 crop 

White Spruce — over entire area J^ crop 

5. Angus. 

From Bruce Peninsula to Toronto, east to Uxbridge and west to Orangeville. 

Crop Notes: Red Pine — over entire area 3^ crop 

W'hite Pine — over entire area ^ crop 

White Spruce- — over entire area % crop 

{b Quantity of Seed Collected: 

The following table gives the number of bushels of each species gathered 
throughout the Province during 1934. and includes 72 bushels of soft maple 
and 22 bushels of white elm which were collected in Toronto: 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1933 



111 



TABLE 6— SEED COLLECTED 
Conifers 



Angus 



Bushels of 
Cones 




Orono 



Bushels of 
Cones 



White Pine 

White Spruce. . . 
White Cedar. . . . 

Red Pine 

Scotch Pine 

Jack Pine 

Hemlock 

Balsam 

Norway Spruce . 
European Larch . 

Totals. . . 



1,049 7/8 
640 5/8 
586 6/8 
527 

235 2 /8 

147 2 /8 

27 2/8 

25 2/8 



3,245 2 /8 



H.\RD\VOODS 



Angus 



St. Williams 



Bushels 



Bushels 



Orono 



Bushels 



Walnut 

Butternut . . . 

Hickor>' 

Soft Maple. . . 

Red Oak 

White Oak. . . 
Black Locust . 
Hard Maple. . 
Basswood .... 
White Elm . . . 

Beech 

Black Cherrj-. 
White Birch. . 
Yellow Birch. 
Honey Locust 
Iron wood 

Totals 



568 
475 7 /8 

"12" 
61 7/8 

'533/8 

47 4/8 
28 
22 

20 1/8 

16 7 /8 

11 3/8 

6 6/8 

4 2/8 

3/8 



1,388 3/8 



1,215 
197 
80 2/8 

' " 10 ' 
5 
32 * 
23 4/8 



4* 
6 4/8 



1,573 2/8 



432 
15 



447 



"Sole — * approximately. 



112 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



TABLE 7— SEED IN STORAGE 



Species 


Angus 


St. Williams 


Orono 


Midhurst 




Lbs. 


Oz, 


Bus. 


Lbs. 


Oz. 


Bus. 


Lbs. 


Oz. 


Bus. 


Lbs. 


Oz. 


Bus. 


Wh Pine 


1,310 

10,654 

3 

10 

28 
2,347 
28 
57 
108 
19 

5 
68 

7 
27 
88 
77 


13 

10 

9 

10 

13 

14 

10 

13 

4 

4 

2 

1 

5 

3 




116 


8 
















Red Pine 
















Jack Pine 

Scotch Pine 




206 
250 
12 
563 
383 
2 


































Aust Pine 


















Wh. Spruce 

Nor. Spruce 

Wh. Cedar 


































8 
















Hemlock 






































Red Cedar 


2/8 












IH 








Larch 


3 
















Wh. Birch 


















Yellow Birch . . . . 






















Black Cherry 














2 








10 


'2 ■ ■ ■ 

2 2/8 
3/8 

2 7/8 
17/8 


18 
















Red Oak . . . 










8 
13H 

34 
342 








Hard Maple . . 






















Basswood 






















Butternut 






















Walnut 






















Ironwood 




8 
3 


















Sycamore 


















































14,844 


4 


9 5/8 


1,554 










493 

























Grand Total- 



-16,398 pounds 4 oz. 
502 5 /8 bushels. 



(c) Germination: 

The germination of seed was conducted again this year in the Angus 
seed germinating laboratory as it is very necessary that accurate tests of all 
seed in storage be recorded, especially if we continue to sell our surplus seed. 
Such information is also necessary for the guidance of our nursery superin- 
tendents when sowing their seed. 

The method used during the past year has been the Jacobsen Method as 
improved by Professor Toumey. 

The number of tests by species is as follows: 



White Pine 172 

Red Pine 1,946 

Jack Pine 7 

Scotch Pine 9 

White Spruce 190 

Norway Spruce 6 

White Cedar 21 

Hemlock 17 

Tamarack 3 

Balsam 

Japanese Larch 5 

Total 2,376 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 113 

(d) Improvements: 

The improvements to the Angus seed extracting plant are as follows: 

A new solid concrete seed storage vault 33' 3" x 36' x 8' 6" was put up. 
This was necessary to reduce the deterioration of seed caused by variations in 
temperature. 

A dual purpose steel tower was erected to support the tank for the water 
pressure system and to serve as a lookout tower for fire-detection. The 
height of the tower is 100', and the height of the tank 65'. 

A dust remover was installed to improve the working conditions for the 
men. This was done by the installation of a suction fan which is connected 
to each unit of the cleaning machinery by a system of pipes through which 
the dust is drawn. 

The main building, bungalow, germinating laboratory, foreman's house 
and the tower house were painted. 

(e) Publicity: 

1. During the period of May 23rd to May 25th a meeting of the boy 
scouts, comprised of about 90 boys, was held at Angus for the purpose of 
demonstrating the practicability and need of reforesting the waste land of the 
province. The boys were instructed in the methods of planting and were 
required to plant trees under the supervision of Forestry Branch officers for a 
few hours of each of the three days that the camp was held. 75,000 trees were 
planted during the period. The camp was financed by the boys themselves. 

This is a valuable educational feature, giving the youth of the province 
an insight into the value of utilizing non-agricultural soil for the purpose of 
growing timber. 

2. The summer meeting of the Canadian Society of Forest Engineers was 
held at Angus in June of 1934. Among other items on the agenda of the meet- 
ing was an inspection of the seed-extraction plant and all work carried on by 
the Forestry Branch at Angus. 

10. Investigations 

(a) Special Groups of Seed Trees: 

In order to obtain information with regard to the quality of red pine seed 
from the province as a whole, groups of trees were selected in various parts of 
the province from which cones containing such seed could be collected. 

To make this investigation as comprehensive as possible, a strip of country 
traversing a large area of the province was selected, and groups of trees in this 
strip were marked, care being taken to make the distance between groups as 
nearly uniform as possible. 

The first group, at the northwest end of the strip, was at Pancake Bay on 

the shores of Lake Superior, and the twelfth and last group was at Tweed. 
The following list shows the location of the various groups: 

1. Pancake Bay 

2. Batchewana Bay 

3. Thessalon 

4. Algoma 

5. Massey 

6. Whitefish 



7. 


North Bay 


8. 


Mattawa 


9. 


Moore Lake 


10. 


Pembroke 


11. 


Griffith 


12. 


Tweed 



114 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

(b) Tree Seed: 

During the year the following studies were undertaken: 

1. Improved methods for the curing of cones. 

2. Date of maturity of some conifers other than red pine. 

3. The relation between size of cone, size of seed and germination. 

4. Nurser}' bed tests to form a basis of comparison with laboratory tested 
seed. 

5. Several sample plots were established at Camp Borden of trees grown 
from seed of known provenience. 

6. Nursery counts were made in the fall at each nursery for the purpose of 
determining variations in the quality of seed and the effect of different nursery 
practice. 

11. Surveys 

Inglis Falls Municipal Forest: 

This area, which is approximately 137 acres in extent, is located between 
3 and 4 miles south of the City of Owen Sound and to the west of No. 10 highway. 
Inglis Falls is a scenic spot on the Sydenham River which flows northerly across 
the extreme west side of the property. 

The City of Owen Sound purchased this property in order to control to 
better advantage the flow of water in the river and its use by a mill-owner 
located at the top of the falls. 

The survey provided the data upon which maps were constructed to show 
forest types, roads, trails and contours. It also provided material for a report 
showing forest conditions and with recommendations for the management of 
the property. 

Camp Borden Forest: 

The object of this survey was to re-establish the boundaries of the Camp 
Borden area north of the Pine River, which is being planted and protected 
under the direction of the Forestry Branch and to sub-divide it into blocks 
according to the fire-guards and the two rivers. 

In addition to the boundary survey, a traverse was made of the Lisle 
road which crosses the property diagonally. The two fire-guards were also 
located in relation to the boundary and the Lisle road. 

A traverse was also made of the high bank on the north side of the Bellajosh 
Creek starting from the west boundary and terminating at the junction of the 
Bellajosh Creek and the Pine River. 

The survey of this Forest was not completed. 

Oro Township Municipal Forest — County of Simcoe: 

This property was surveyed. Traverses made of boundaries, roads, 
margins of natural woodland and plantations. All data has been collected for 
the map. Approximate area 100 acres. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 115 

Norfolk County Municipal Forest No. 1 — Codling Tract: 

This property consisting of Lot 18 in Concession 5 of the Township of 
South Walsingham was surveyed in the fall of 1934. Traverses were made of 
boundaries, roads, margins of natural woodland and plantations. Some 
studies of tree-growth were made as well as collecting all necessary data for 
the map. 

Approximate area 100 acres. 

Norfolk County Municipal Forest No. 2 — Turner Tract: 

This property consisting of Lot 8 in Con. 9 of the Township of Charlotte- 
ville was surveyed. Traverses were made of boundaries, roads, margins of 
natural woodland and plantations. All data was collected for the map. 

Approximate area 100 acres. 

Norfolk County Municipal Forest No. 3 — Red Pine Tract: 

This property consisting of Lot 6 in Con. 10 of the Township of Charlotte- 
ville was surveyed. Traverses were made of boundaries, roads, margins of 
natural woodland and plantations. 

Approximate area 100 acres. 

Norfolk County Municipal Forest No. 4 — Windham Tract: 

This property consisting of Lot 19 in Con. 14 of the Township of Windham 
was surveyed. Traverses were made of boundaries, roads, margins of natural 
woodland and plantations. Some studies of tree growth were made. 

Approximate area 50 acres. 
Norfolk Comity Municipal Forest No. 5 — Payne Tract: 

This property consisting of Lots 11 and 12 in Concessions 1 and 2 of the 
Township of Charlotteville was surveyed. 

Approximate area 150 acres. 

Norfolk County Municipal Forest No. 6 — Sinies Tract: 

This property consisting of Lot 18 in Con. 6 of the Township of Walsing- 
ham was surveyed. 

Approximate area 75 acres. 



12. Lectures 

Illustrated lectures on reforestation and farm forestry were given at the 
one month and three months' courses conducted by the Department of Agri- 
culture. 

In addition, other lectures were given to farmers' clubs, service organiza- 
tions, etc., throughout the Province. 



116 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



13. Income 



TABLE 8— REFORESTATION INCOME 





1932 


1933 


1934 


Total 


Sale of Seed 


$13,507.50 

2,858.35 

152.55 


$10,751.14 

2,408.83 

92.38 


$2,002.50 

3,101.03 

18.70 


$26,261.14 


Sale of Wood 


8,368.21 


Sale of Trees 


263 . 63 






Grand Total 








$34,892 . 98 













TABLE 9— SUMMARY OF TREES PLANTED PERMANENTLY 1934 



Place 

Private Planting: 

Reforestation 

Windbreaks 

School Planting 

County Forests: 

Vivian 

Orr Lake 

Municipal Forests 

Demonstration Plots . . . 

Relief Planting: 

Camp Borden 

Petawawa 

Kingston 

Valcartier 

Fredericton 

Rangers' Plantations .... 

Nurseries: 

St. Williams 

Midhurst 

Orono 

Totals 



Conifers 



Hardwoods 



Cuttings 



Totals 



4,169,093 

1,300,034 

48,171 



16,000 
97,500 

239,711 

238,959 



425,000 
756,000 
21,073 
540,000 
102,000 

25,781 



307,887 



1,450 



469,052 
"4,266 



6,205 




207,601 
2,393 



4,845,746 

1,300,034 

54,830 



16,000 
97,500 

239,711 

238,959 



425,000 
756,000 
21,073 
540,000 
102,000 

25,781 



314,092 



1,450 



8,288,659 



479,523 



209,994 



8,978,176 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1934 117 



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LETTER OF TRANSMISSION 

To The Honourable Herbert Alexander Bruce, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it please Your Honour: — 

The undersigned has the honour to transmit to you herewith, for presenta- 
tion to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, the Forty-fourth 
Annual Report, 1934, of the Department over which I have the honour to preside. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Paul Leduc, 

Minister of Mines. 
Department of Mines, 
Toronto, 1935. 



INTRODUCTORY LETTER 

To The Honourable Paul Leduc, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir, — The undersigned has the honour to submit the Fortv-fourth Annual 
Report of the Department of Mines, issued in eight parts, as follows: — ■ 

Part I 

Statistical Review of the Mineral Industry of Ontario for 1934, by A. C. Young. 

List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934. 

Mines of Ontario in 1934, bv D. G. Sinclair, E. C. Kecley, D. F. Cooper, E. B. Weir, A. R. Webster. 

Mining Accidents in 1934, by D. G. Sinclair, R. H. Cleland, D. F. Cooper, E. C. Keeley. A. R. 

Webster. 
Classes for Prospectors, 1934-35, by E. M. Burwash. 

Part II 

Geology and Ore Deposits of the Matachewan-Kenogami Area, with maps Nos. 44a and 44b, 
by W. S. Dyer. 

Part III 

Little Long Lac Gold Area, with map No. 44d, by E. L. Bruce. 

Part IV 

Geology of the Rowan-Straw Lakes Area, with map No. 44e, by Jas. E. Thomson. 
Gold Deposits on the Lake of the Woods, by Jas. E. Thomson. 
Some Gold Occurrences West of Port Arthur, by Jas. E. Thomson. 

Part A' 
Natural Gas in 1934, by R. B. Harkness. 
Petroleum in 1934, by R. B. Harkness. 

Part VI 

Gold Deposits in the \'icinity of Red Lake Mines, by M. E. Hurst. 

Geology of the Cat River-Kawinogans Lake Area, with map No. 44f, by W. D. Harding. 

Part VII 

Geology of the Opeepeesway Lake Area, with map No. 44g, bj' H. C. Laird. 

Horvvood Lake Area, by H. C. Laird. 

Recent Developments in the Swavze and West Shiningtree Areas, by H. C. Laird. 

Part of Strathy Township, by W. S. Savage. 

Mongowin Township and \'icinity, by H. C. Rickab^'. 

Part VIII 
Geology of the Lochalsh-Missinaibi Area, with map No. 44c, by E. IM. Burwash. 

Only Part I is bound with the Sessional Papers of the Legislature. All 
parts, together with accompanying geological maps as indicated above by number 
and letter, are available on application to the Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. Sutherland, 

Deputy Minister of Mines 
Department of Mines, 
Toronto, 1935. 




PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES 



Hon. Paul Lhduc, Minister of Mines T. F. Sutherland, Deputy Minister 

FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF MINES 

BEING 
VOL. XLIV, PART I, 1935 



Statistical Review of the Mineral Industry of Ontario for 1934 1-53 

List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934 54-66 

Mines of Ontario in 1934 67-167 

Mining Accidents in 1934 168-174 

Classes for Prospectors, 1934-35 175 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 4, 1933 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1936 



CONTENTS 
Vol. XLIV, Part I 



Letter of Transmission . 
Introductory Letter . . . 



Statistical Review of the Mineral 
Industry of Ontario for 1934 

General Summary 1 

Alineral Production 1 

Metal Production 5 

Diamond-Drilling 5 

Prospecting 6 

Metallics 6 

Gold 6 

General Summary 6 

Gold-Milling Plants 7 

Labour Statistics 9 

Production and Dividends 9 

Mint Receipts from Ontario Mines. 17 

Exchange Equalization 17 

World Output 18 

Silver-Cobalt 19 

Nickel-Copper and Platinum Metals . . 24 

Production of Platinum Metals .... 26 

Dividends 26 

Iron Ore, Pig Iron, Steel, and Coke. . . 27 

Iron and Steel 27 

Ferro-Alloys 28 

Coke 28 

Chromite 29 

Radium and Uranium 30 

Non-Metallics 30 

Arsenic 30 

Barite 31 

Diatomite 31 

Feldspar and Nepheline Syenite 31 

Fluorspar 32 

Graphite 32 

Gypsum 32 

Iron Pyrites and Sulphuric Acid 32 

Mica 33 

Mineral Waters 33 

Natural Gas and Petroleum 33 

Peat 34 

Quartz, Quartzite, and Silica Brick. . . 34 

Salt 34 

Talc 35 

Structural Materials 36 

Building Permits 36 

Construction Contracts 36 

Cement 37 

Cement Products 37 

Lime 38 

Sand and Gravel 39 

Sand-Lime Products 40 

Stone 40 



PAGE 

Clay Products 40 

Refractory Clays 40 

Heavy Clay Products 41 

Miscellaneous Statistics 41 

Mining Company Incorporations 41 

Mining Revenue and Expenditures. . . 48 

Temiskaming Testing Laboratories. . . 51 

Provincial Assay Office 52 

Draughting Office, North Bay 53 

List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934 

Metallics 54 

Metallurgical Works 58 

Non-MetalUcs 59 

Structural Materials 62 

Clay Products 66 

Mines of Ontario in 1934 

Chromium 67 

Chromium Mining and Smelting Cor- 
poration, Ltd 67 

Gold 67 

Algold Mines, Ltd 67 

Algoma Summit Gold Mines, Ltd 68 

Alschbach Gold Mining Co., Ltd 68 

Amalgamated Gold Fields Corpora- 
tion, Ltd 68 

Anglo-Huronian, Ltd 69 

Ardeen Gold Mines, Ltd 70 

Ashley Gold Mining Corporation, Ltd. 71 

Bankfield Gold Mines, Ltd 72 

Barry-Hollinger Mines, Ltd 72 

Bathurst Gold Mines, Ltd 72 

Bidgood Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd.. . 73 

Bob Tough Gold Mines, Ltd 73 

Bousquet Gold Mines, Ltd 74 

Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines, Ltd. ... 74 

Canadian Kirkland Mines, Ltd 76 

Canusa Gold Mines, Ltd 77 

Casey Summit Gold Mines, Ltd 77 

Centennial Gold Mines, Ltd 78 

Central Canada Mines, Ltd 78 

Central Patricia Gold Mines, Ltd 79 

Central Porcupine Mines, Ltd 81 

Churchill Mining and Milling Co., Ltd. 82 

Cole Gold Mines, Ltd 83 

Concordia Gold Mining Co., Ltd 83 

Coniaurum Mines, Ltd 83 

Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. 

of Canada, Ltd 85 

Afton Mine 85 

McKenzie Claims 85 

Mackey Point Property 85 



[V] 



VI 



Contents 



PAGE 

Gold — Co7i tinned 

Cooper and Barry 86 

Coulson Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd. 86 

Craig Gold Mines, Ltd 86 

Darwin Gold Mines, Ltd 87 

Delnite Mines, Ltd 87 

De Santis Gold Mining Co., Ltd 88 

Dome Mines, Ltd 89 

Duport Mining Co., Ltd 92 

Ed. Hargreaves Kirkland Gold Mines, 

Ltd 92 

Excello Mines, Ltd 92 

Federated Mining Corporation, Ltd. . 93 

Foley O'Brien Corporation, Ltd 93 

Foley Syndicate 94 

Four Nations Consolidated Gold 

Mines, Ltd 94 

Fox Lake Gold Syndicate 95 

Gold Eagle Gold Mines, Ltd 95 

Gold Lands Syndicate of Algoma. ... 95 

Gold Range Alines, Ltd 96 

Golden Gate Mining Co., Ltd 96 

Golden Star Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 96 

Golden Summit Mines, Ltd 97 

Goodfish Mining Co., Ltd 97 

Greenlaw Gold :Mines, Ltd 98 

Halcrow-Swavze Mines, Ltd 98 

Hard Rock Gold Mines, Ltd 98 

Harkness-Havs Gold Mines, Ltd 99 

Hillside Gold'Mines, Ltd 99 

HoUinger Consolidated Gold Mines, 

Ltd 100 

HoUinger Mine 102 

Young-Davidson ]Mine 102 

Hislop Property 102 

Cochenour-Willans 103 

Gold Island 103 

Horseshoe Mines, Ltd 103 

Howey Gold Mines, Ltd 103 

Hudson Patricia Gold Mines, Ltd. . . . 105 

J-M Consolidated Mines, Ltd 106 

Kenora Prospectors and Miners, Ltd. 106 

Mikado 107 

Cedar Island 107 

Kenty Gold Mines, Ltd 107 

Kirkland Consolidated Mines, Ltd.. . . 108 

Kirkland Gold Belt Mines, Ltd 108 

Kirkland Lake Gold Mining Co., Ltd. 108 

Lake Caswell Mines, Ltd 109 

Lake Shore Mines, Ltd 110 

Lakeland Gold, Ltd 113 

Lakeside-Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd.. 113 

Lebel Oro Mines, Ltd 114 

Lee Gold Mines, Ltd 114 

Little Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd 114 

Lucky Cross Leasing Syndicate 115 

Lucky Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd 116 

Macassa Mines, Ltd 116 

Mclntyre-Porcupine Mines, Ltd 117 

McKenzie Red Lake Gold Mines, Ltd. 121 

McLaren-Porcupine Gold Mines, Ltd. 122 

MacLeod-Cockshutt Gold Mines, Ltd. 122 

J. Bruce McMartin 123 

McMillan Gold Mines, Ltd 123 

Manitoba and Eastern Mines, Ltd.. . . 124 

Marbuan Gold Mines, Ltd 124 

Martin Bird Syndicate 127 

Matachewan Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 127 
Miller Independence Mines (1924), 

Ltd 127 



PAGE 
Gold — Continued 

Minto Gold Mines, Ltd 127 

Moffatt-Hall Mines, Ltd 128 

Munro Croesus Mines, Ltd 128 

Naybob Gold Mines, Ltd 129 

Neville Canadian Gold Mines, Ltd... . 129 

North Shores Gold Mines, Ltd 129 

Northern Empire Mines Co., Ltd 130 

O'Connell Gold Mines, Ltd 131 

Orecana Trusts, Ltd 131 

Kozak Property 131 

Michael-Boyle Property 131 

Pamour Porcupine Mines, Ltd 131 

Parkhill Gold Mines, Ltd 132 

Paymaster Consolidated Mines, Ltd. . 133 

Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Ltd 134 

Porcupine Peninsular Gold Mines, Ltd. 135 

Ramore Gold Mining Co., Ltd 136 

Red Crest Gold Mines, Ltd 136 

Red Lake Gold Shore Mines, Ltd 137 

Richelieu Gold Mines, Ltd 137 

Roche Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd. . . . 137 

St. Anthony Gold :Mines, Ltd 138 

Sakoose Gold Mines, Ltd 139 

Saundary Syndicate 139 

Selected Canadian Golds, Ltd 139 

Sinclair Mines Syndicate 140 

S. B. Smith 140 

South Vermillion Gold Alines, Ltd.. . . 140 

Stanley Gold Mines, Ltd 141 

Stellar Gold Mines, Ltd 141 

Straw Lake Beach Gold Mines Syn- 
dicate, Ltd 141 

Swayze-Huycke Gold Mines, Ltd 142 

Sylvanite Gold Mines, Ltd 142 

Talisman Gold Mines, Ltd 145 

Tashota Goldfields, Ltd 145 

Teck-Hughes Gold Mines, Ltd 145 

Teddy Bear Valley Mines, Ltd 147 

Toburn Gold Mines, Ltd 147 

Tom Johnson-Nipigon Mines, Ltd.. . . 148 

Vermilion Lake Gold Mines, Ltd 149 

Wawa Goldfields, Ltd 149 

Wells Longlac Alines, Ltd 149 

Wendigo Gold Alines, Ltd 150 

West Red Lake Gold Alines, Ltd 150 

Witch Bay Gold Alines, Ltd 151 

Wright-Hargreaves Alines, Ltd 151 

Young-Davidson Alines, Ltd 154 

Young-Shannon Gold Alines, Ltd. . . . 154 

Graphite 154 

Black Donald Graphite Co., Ltd 154 

Gypsum 155 

Canadian Gypsum Co., Ltd 155 

Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, Can- 
ada, Ltd 155 

Alolybdenite 156 

Phoenix Alohbdenite Corporation, 

Ltd '. 156 

Nickel and Copper 156 

Cuniptau Alines, Ltd 156 

Falconbridge Nickel Alines, Ltd 156 

International Nickel Co. of Canada, 

Ltd 158 

Radium 161 

Canada Radium Alines, Ltd 161 

Silver and Cobalt 162 

Cain and Taylor 162 

Cobalt Properties, Limited 162 

George Alartin 162 



Contents 



Vll 



PAGE 

Silver and Cobalt — Contiynied 

Mining Corporation of Canada, Ltd. . 162 

Xipissing Mining Co., Ltd 162 

M. J. O'Brien, Ltd 163 

Cross Lake Mine 163 

Miller Lake O'Brien Mine 164 

Peterson Cobalt Mines, Ltd 164 

C. W. Price 164 

Sandoe and Moyle 164 

Smith Cobalt Mines, Ltd 164 

A. Wood 165 

Talc 165 

Canada Talc Co., Ltd 165 

Geo. H. Gillespie Co., Ltd 165 

Metallurgical Works 165 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Ltd 165 

Canadian Furnace Co., Ltd 165 

Canadian Industries, Ltd 166 

Deloro Smelting and Refining Co., Ltd. 166 
International Nickel Co. of Canada, 

Ltd 166 

Ontario Refining Co., Ltd 166 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 166 



MiNixG Accidents in 1934 

PAGE 

Accidents during 1934 168 

Fatal Accidents 168 

Non-Fatal Accidents 170 

Infection 171 

Accidents from Explosives 171 

Electric Accidents 172 

Mine Fires 172 

Goodfish Mining Co., Ltd 172 

HoUinger Consolidated Gold Mines, 

Ltd 173 

Spontaneous Combustion in Carbide Re- 
fuse 173 

Prosecutions 174 

Summary of Rope Tests, 1934 174 



Classes for Prospectors, 1934-35 

General Summary 175 

Analvsis of Class Attendance 175 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

Chart of average monthly and yearly prices of gold in Canadian funds from 1931 to 1934, in- 
clusive 1 ' 

Graph showing fluctuations of the buying rate in Canada for New York funds from 1918 to 

1934, inclusive 1 ' 



Statistical Review of the Mineral Industry 
of Ontario for 1934 

By A. G. Young 



GENERAL SUMMARY 
Mineral Production 

Mineral production for 1934, valued at $145,854,173, exceeded that of 
any previous year. For purposes of compilation the mineral industry is grouped 
into four main sections: metallics, non-metallics, structural materials, and clay 
products. Of these, metallics, including the famous gold-producers and the 
nickel-copper mines, is by far the most important. Owing to the increased price 
of gold ($35.00 per ounce) the production value by this group exceeded the total 
output from all sources in 1929, the peak year in Ontario's mineral record. An 
examination of the table, "Summary of Mineral Statistics, 1934" (page 2), 
shows improvement in every group. Metals gained in value $33,908,668, or 
35.5 per cent. ; non-metallics were up $458,925, or 6.4 per cent. ; structural mate- 
rials $1,430,586, or 22.6 per cent.; and clay products $236,427, or 23 per cent. 

The Dominion Bureau of Statistics has reported the value of Ontario field 
crops as $143,734,000 for 1934, or the highest figure since 1930. For the first 
time in the history of the province mineral production has had a value in excess 
of field crops; this affords a striking illustration of the growing importance of 
the mineral industry in the economic life of Ontario. 

Reference to the table "Comparative Value of Mineral Production, 1930- 
1934" (page 3), shows that the value of gold production has increased 19.3 per 
cent.; silver, 35.9; nickel, 59.6; copper, 46.4; and the platinum metals, which 
are a by-product of the nickel-copper industry and dependent entiicly upon the 
prosperity of that industry, showed a gain of 312.6 per cent. 

Activity in prospecting was widespread throughout the province during the 
year, and many claims were staked and recorded in the area east of Lake Nipigon. 
New properties came into production or were preparing to produce. Manv 
old mines in the Lake of the Woods area were again taken up, giving work to 
many of the unemployed, besides attracting attention to this area, which figured 
so prominently during the nineties of the last century. 

In the Monthly Revieiv of Business Statistics for January, 1935, published 
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, the trend in the business affairs 
of Canada was reported as follows: — 

Economic conditions in Canada showed improvement in 1934, adding to the advance 
recorded in the greater part of the preceding year. Most of the principal factors measuring 
the trend of economic activity were consequently much more favourable than during the low 
point of the depression reached in 1932 and the first quarter of 1933. The improvement was 
well defined during the first part of the year just ended, many factors reflecting a process of 
consolidation during the later months. The physical volume of business at the dawn of the new 
year [1935] was about equivalent to that of the later part of 1931. 

The level of business operations in the last half of 1934 was, of course, far below that of 
1928 or 1929. The result was that large numbers of the increasing active population remained 
unemployed, and many plants were either idle or operated at a point far belpw capacity levels. 

A feature of the year was the advance in high-grade bond prices to the maximum point 
since the pre-war period. Wholesale prices remained stable at a level somewhat higher than 
that of 1933. After considerable fluctuation, common stock prices were slightly higher at the 
end of the year than at the beginning. The average of the official index for the twelve months 
ended December was 24.9 per cent, greater than the average for 1933. Trading on the Montreal 
and Toronto stock exchanges was inactive as compared with the preceding year. 

[1] 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



SUMMARY OF MINERAL STATISTICS,. 1934 



Product 



Metallic 

Gold oz. 

Exchange equalization 

Silver oz. 

Copper in matte exported' lbs. 

Copper, metallic and in concentrates, 

exported lbs. 

Nickel in matte, in speiss, and in ore ex- 
ported; metallic nickel; and nickel con- 
tent of oxides and salts lbs. 

Platinum metals oz. 

Selenium lbs. 

Tellurium lbs. 

Bismuth lbs. 

Cobalt in metal, oxides, salts, ores, and 
residues lbs. 

Lead in concentrates exported lbs. 

Chromite tons 



Quantity' 



A'alue Employees 



2,105,341 



Wages 



$43,521,249 
29,287,439 
5,523,938 2,600.393 
13,383,479 602,257 



191,676,060 



128,687,340 

200,109 

51,574 

5,130 

7,552 

594,671 

21,558; 

40 



14,220,447 



32,139,425 

6,187,992 

91,2861 

25,599 

3,444 

592,497 
525 
480 



10,193 
272 



•^5,793 



450 



16 



$15,920,169 
' 291,243 



^8,603,461 



449,580 
9,485 



Total. 



$129,273,033: 16,424 



$24,973,938 



Non-Metallic 

Actinolite 

Arsenic, white 

Diatomite 

Feldspar, crude and ground. . . . 

Fluorspar 

Graphite, crude and refined . . . . 

Gypsum 

Sulphur'' 

Mica 

Mineral waters 

Natural gas 

Peat 

Petroleum, crude 

Quartzite and quartz 

Silica brick 

Salt 

Talc 



tons 

lbs. 

tons 

tons 

tons 

tons 

tons 

tons 

lbs. 

Imp. gals. 
, . M cu. ft. 
tons 

bbls. 

tons 

M 

tons 

tons 



30 

1,647,513 

46 

7,302 

150 



Total . 



33,234 

14,598 

1,236,302 

21,775 

7,682,851 

1,878 

141,385 

89,838 

369 

276,751 

13,934 



$365 

56,412 

1,920 

61.665 

2,100 

64,998 

141,389 

145,980 

9,059 

1.622 

4,741,368 

7,343 

299,874 

134,572 

14.730 

1,734.196 

135,978 



e) 



{') 



49 

4 

21 

69 



$10,767 

825 

11,564 

53,718 



19 
931' 



1,395 
1,010,979 



$7,553,571 1,659 



204 

55 

8 

252 
47 



110,008 

28,746 

7,558 

296,116 
33.796 



$1,565,472 



Structural Materials 

Cement, Portland bbls. 

Hydrated lime tons 

Quicklime tons 

Sand and gravel tons 

Sand-lime products" 

Stone: limestone, trap, granite, sandstone . tons 
Slate tons 



1,702,128 

22,281 

168,760 

7,254,926 



2,460,301 
120 



$2,403,590 
249,038 ' 
1,287,250/ 
1,714,569 
146,009 
1,965,507 
600 .. 



341 

187 

334 

50 

810 



$328,648 

116,020 

178,502 

39,113 

368,109 



Total . 



$7,766,563 



1,722 



$1,030,392 



Clay Products 

Brick, face 

Brick, common 

Brick, fancy and ornamental 

Brick, sewer 

Tile, drain 

Tile, structural, roofing, and floor. . . 
Sewer pipe, copings, flue-1'inings, etc. 

Pottery 

Haydite 



No. 
No. 
.No. 
No. 
No. 



23,410,266 

16,114,490 

14,277 

307,147 

6,017,379 



Total. 



$479,850 

227.276 

S35 

5,992 

137,699 

120.981 

226,005 

52,578 

9,790 



717 



$311,732 



$1,261,006; 



717 



$311,732 



Total Value in Canadian funds $145,854,173! 20,522 



$27,881,534 



'All tons in this table are 2,000 pounds. 

-Copper in matte valued at 41.2 cents per pound, and nickel at 18 cents. 

'Employees and wages for nickel-copper mines, smelters, and refineries include statistics of 
the Ontario Refining Company. 

^Employees and wages for silver-cobalt smelters and refineries. 

■'Employees and wages included with figures for silver-cobalt smelters and refineries (■*). 
''Tonnage given is sulphur content of sulphuric acid; no iron pyrites was sold in 1934. 
"No deduction made for lime used in manufacturing. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



COMPARATIVE VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTION, 1930-1934 



Product 



1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



Metallics 

Gold (Canadian value) 

Silver 

Platinum metals 

Cobalt' 

Nickel- 

Copper, metallic and in matte . 

Selenium 

Tellurium 

Lead, pig and in ore 

Zinc in ore and concentrates. . 

Bismuth 

Molybdenite 

Chromite 



$35,923,260 

3,998,112 

2,436,683 

1,144,007 

24,455,134 

15,186,467 



$45,043,837 

1,880,860 

2,812,834 

651,179 

15,005,080 

8,907,069 

32,108 



116,034 

127,004 

6,366 



41,987 



3,532 
280 



$53,418,449 
1,910,937 
1,998,911 
587,957 
7,179,862 
5,025,684 



$61,044,951 

1,912,934 

1,501,233 

597,752 

20,130,480 

10,118,847 

53,745 



1,756 



7,289 



692 
'3,73i 



$72,808,688 

2,600,393 

6,187,992 

592,497 

32,139,425 

14,822,704 

91,286 

25,599 

525 



3,444 



480 



Total . 



$83,393,067 



$74,378,766 



$70,130,845 



$95,364,365 



$129,273,033 



Non-Metallics 

Actinolite 

Arsenic, white 

Barite 

Diatomite 

Feldspar, crude and ground . 

Fluorspar 

Graphite, crude and refined . 

Gypsum 

Iron pyrites and sulphur ' . . . 

Mica 

Mineral waters 

Natural gas 

Peat fuel 

Petroleum, crude 

Quartzite and quartz 

Silica brick 

Salt 

Talc and soapstone 



$437 
109,932 



$456 
135,170 



$98,914 



140 

104,670 

1,240 

86,543 

776,069 

73,855 

34,275 

20,754 

,061,588 

1,602 

235,746 

274,674 

19,120 

,558,405 

133,213 



840 

103,008 

620 

32,149 

374,469 

65,080 

23,465 

8,578 

4,635,497 

1,096 

219,993 

148,642 

13,702 

1,760,388 

122,044 



309 

42,920 

464 

18,483 

186,176 

33,320 

2.752 

2,473 

4,719,297 

10,107 

247,468 

93,574 

4,303 

1,789,752 

111,585 



$56,534 

60 

1.298 

45,350 

1,064 

16,145 

112,319 

81,960 

9,371 

2,347 

4,523,084 

900 

253,486 

86,146 

7.351 

1,755,087 

142,134 



$365 
56,412 



1,920 

61,665 

2,100 

64,998 

141,389 

145,980 

9,059 

1,622 

4,741,368 

7,343 

299,874 

134,572 

14,730 

1,734,196 

135,978 



Total . 



$8,492,263 



$7,642,308 



$7,361,897 



$7,094,636 



$7,553,571 



Structural Materials 

Cement, Portland 

Lime, hydrated and quicklime. . . 

Sand and gravel 

Sand-lime brick^ 

Stone: limestone, trap, granite, etc. 
Slate 



$5,779,404 

2,177,587 

3,559,487 

424,178 

4,630,970 



$5,006,826 

1,221,190 

2,317,015 

253,228 

3,197,297 



$2,288,975 

1,273.230 

2,000,298 

78,398 

1,655,016 



n,587,812 

1,227,196 

2,467,916 

69,785 

983,268 



$2,403,590 

1,536,288 

1,714,569 

146,009 

1,965,507 

600 



Total . 



$16,571,626 



$11,995,556 



$7,295,917 



5,335,977 



$7,766,563 



Clay Products 

Brick, face 

Brick, common 

Brick, fancy and ornamental . . . . 

Brick, sewer 

Tile, drain 

Tile, structural, roofing, and floor 
Sewer pipe, copings, flue-linings, 

etc 

Pottery 

Haydite 



$1,811,569 

779,744 

23,858 

12,490 

593,980 

848,556 

834,361 

89,384 

227,275 



,278,954 
622,777 
16,829 
33,321 
244,368 
378,193 

696,964 

73,860 

167,533 



$532,728 

286,928 

1,790 

18,638 

144,579 

169,824 

451,786 
67,866 
16,366 



$351,292 

163,338 

387 

3,683 

179,015 

74,064 

185,138 
52.650 
15,012 



$479,850 

227,276 

835 

5,992 

137,699 

120,981 

226,005 

52,578 

9,790 



Total . 



$5,221,214 



$3,552,799 



$1,690,505 



$1,024,579 



$1,261,006 



Grand Total \$113,678,170,$97,569,429;$86,479,164 .$109,819, 557|S145, 854, 173 

'Cobalt in oxide, metallic cobalt, and cobalt content of residues marketed. 

-Nickel in matte, oxide, and metallic nickel. 

^Includes value of sulphuric acid produced. 

••No deduction made for lime consumed in manufacturing. 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



The table below shows the aggregate value of metals from the time produc- 
tion began in Ontario and of other minerals beginning with 1891. Since 1914 the 
statistics of annual production credit the province only with the value of the pig 
iron made from Ontario ore. This is but a small part of the total output, since 
the great bulk of the iron ore charged to the blast furnaces of the province is 
"lake" ore from the mines of Minnesota and Wisconsin. In the production 
tables, credit is taken only for the ore exported or shipped to points other than 
Ontario blast furnaces, since to include the value of the domestic ore converted 
into pig iron in Ontario would involve a duplication of this item. 

TOTAL MINERAL PRODUCTION 



Year 


Exchange 
equalization 
or discount 


Metallics 


Non- 
metallics 


Structural Clay 
materials products 


Total 






S9,520,269 

388,715 

864,382 

614,762 

842,750 

616,055 

963,288 

1,038,089 

1,689,002 

2,055,592 

2,565,286 

5,016,734 

6,257,499 

5,242,575 

4,906,677 

10,201,010 

13,353.080 

14,550,835 

16,754,986 
22,928,496 


.^ 




Before 1891 ' 


' 


$9,520,269 


1891 




$4,316,958 
4,509,757 
5,505,991 
5,244,008 
4.554,083 
4,271,715 
4,480,452 
5,546,875 
6,361,081 
6,733,338 
6.814,352 
7,134,135 
7,628,018 
6.665,970 
7,653,286 
9,035,303 


4.705,673 


1892 




5,374,139 


1893 




6,120,753 


1894 




6.086.758 


1895 




5.170.138 


1896 




5.235.003 


1897 




5,518,541 


1898 




7,235,877 


1899 




8,416,673 


1900 




9,298,624 


1901 




11,831,086 


1902 




13.391,634 


1903 




12,870,593 


1904 




11,572,647 


1905 




17,854,296 


1906 




22,388,383 








1907 


3,020,537 
2,629,749 


3 876 "^75 S ■'^^l 79!fi 


25,019,373 


1908 




3,396,406 

4,028,206 

4,380,000 

4,935,609 

4,701,170 

5,866,775 

4,505.368 

3,609,371 

3,734.065 

4,962.284 

4,297,401 

7,208,413 

11,921,019 

13,967.386 

13,640,166 

13,139,757 

12.398.465 

12.451.174 

12.681,308 

14,160.552 

14.815.814 

18,541,687 

16,571,626 

11,995.556. 

7,295.917 

6.335,977 

7,766,563 


2,856,476 
3,198.922 
3,630,559 
4,263,395 
4,831,056 
5,561,151 
4,105,597 
1,871,379 
1,584,699 
2,596.749 
2,018,450 
3,776,562 
4,735,154 
5,183,125 
6,944,218 
6,269,140 
5,137,865 
5,148,626 
5,356,469 
5,853.035 
6,177,664 
6,830,162 
5,221,214 
3.552,799 
1,690,505 
1 ,024,579 
1.261,006 


25,637,617 


1909 




32,981,375 


1910 




28,161,678 j 3,141,658 
29,102,867 ; 3,674,926 
34,799,734 i 4 nOQ 64.'? 


39,313.895 


1911 




41.976.797 


1912 




48.341.603 


1913 




37,507,935 
33,345,291 
44,109,769 
55,002,918 
5(i..'<ol.S.57 
6t;.17s.0.1<) 
41,590,759 
48.281,553 
28,777,581 
40,290,157 
44,07o,660 
52,130,314 
62,495,472 
59,218,297 
62,631,255 
71.267,003 
83,967,446 
83,356,365 
72,452,544 
63,997,017 
78,877,928 
99,985,594 


4,296,450 
4,339,703 
4,655,250 
4,982,140 
7,702,942 
7,815,062 
6,308,182 
8,141,796 
6,6.36.217 
7,591,913 
8,511,786 
7,555,283 
7,488,034 
7,842,632 
7,638,605 
7,822,641 
8,621,427 
8,492,263 
7,642,308 
7,361,897 
7,094,636 
7,553,571 


53.232.311 


1914 




46.295,959 


1915 




54,245,679 


1916 




65,303.822 


1917 




72.093,832 


1918 




80,308,972 


1919 




58,883,916 


1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 


$1,376,275 

1,359,636 

208,621 

279,446 

196,749 

—2,838 

—595 

—235 

2,811 

157,456 

36,702 

1,926,222 

6,133,828 

16,486,437 

29,287,439 


74.455,797 

55,923.945 

68,675,075 

72,276,789 

77.418,676 

87,580,468 

85,098,111 

90,283,212 

100,085,933 

118,118,178 

113,678,170 

97,569,429 

86,479,164 

109,819.557 

145.854,173 


Total . . . 


S57,447,954 


$1,498,806,045 $633,288,916 


$2,189,542,915 



'Prior to 1891, when the Ontario Bureau (now Department) of ZMines was established, it is 
estimated that metals to the value of $9,520,269 were produced. No estimate has been made 
of the output of non-metallics up to 1891. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



Metal Production 



In the total production of metals in Ontario, noted hereunder, gold moved 
up from third to first place in 1927: — 

METAL PRODUCTION TO DECEMBER 31, 1934 



Metal or product 


To December 31, 
1933 


1934 


To December 31, 
1934 


Gold 


$486,081,471 

28,160,515 

359,383,615 

257,686,623 

145,225,872 

84,775,556 

25,929,269 

24,806,192 

9,463,516 

4,485,314 

535,696 

210,015 

151,459 

85,853 


$43,521,249 

29,287.439 

32,139,425 

2,600,393 

14,822,704 


$529,602,720 


Exchange equalization 


57,447 954 


Nickel, including nickel oxides and salts. . . 
Silver 


391,523,040 
260,287 016 


Copper^ 


160 048 576 


Pig iron from domestic ore 


84,775 556 


Cobalt- 


592,497 
6,187,992 


26,521,766 


Platinum metals 


30,994,184 


Iron ore' 


9,463,516 


Lead 


525 


4,485,839 


Zinc, in ore and concentrates 


535,696 


Molybdenite 




210,015 


Bismuth 


3,444 

91,286 

25,599 

480 


154,903 


Selenium 


177,139 


Tellurium 


25,599 


Chromite 




480 








Total 


$1,426,980,966 


$129,273,033 


$1,556,253,999 



^Includes small quantities of copper sulphate. 

^Includes metal, oxide, salts, and cobalt contents of residues exported. 

^Value of ore shipped out of the province. 



Dividends. — During 1934 dividends were paid by 12 gold, 2 nickel-copper, 
and 2 silver-cobalt mining companies. Total payments by metal mines of the 
province are rated hereunder by groups: — 

DIVIDENDS PAID BY METAL MINES TO DECEMBER 31, 1934 



Industry 


To end of 1933 


1934 


To end of 1934 


Nickel-copper 

Gold 

Silver-cobalt 


$149,723,449 

153,107,391 

97,691,281 


$10,126,014 

26,841,464 

260,000 


$159,849,463 

179,948,855 

97,951,281 






Total 


$400,522,121 


$37,227,478 


$437,749,599 







Diamond-Drilling 

During the past two years diamond-drilling in Ontario has been active. 
Sixteen companies were operating, and the statistics which follow present a 
fairly complete picture. In 1933 there were 143 drills in use, and employment 
was given to 251 men who received §375,236 in wages. The corresponding 
figures for 1934 are 285 drills, 518 men, and S759,285 in wages. Diamond- 
drilling operations afford an excellent yard-stick in appraising the general trend 
in mining development and prospecting. As these Ontario firms do considerable 
drilling in the neighbouring provinces, Quebec and Manitoba, and also much 
farther afield, statistics covering the work done in these outside areas are also 
shown. It should, however, be pointed out that the data for outside provinces 
may be incomplete. 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 





DIAMOND-DRILLING OPERATIONS, 1933 AND 1934 






Province 


1933 


1934 




Holes 


Core footage 


Holes 


Core footage 


Ontario . ' 


2,692 
472 

277 
4 


389,764 

138,692 

39,462 

798 


3,891 
1,023 

418 
33 


672,011 


Quebec 


215,153 


^lanitoba 


81,226 


Saskatchewan 


and N.W.T 


5,791 


Total 


3,445 


568,716 
(107.7 miles) 


5,365 


974,181 
(184.5 miles) 



On the other hand consumption of diamonds used in drilling refers to footage 
drilled in all provinces in which work was reported, and is indicative of the trade 
available for diamond merchants as well as the amount of wear or wastage of 
these abrasives in our hard pre-Cambrian rocks. The total consumption of 
borts, ballas, and carbons was 39,975.43 carats, as shown below: — 

CONSUMPTION OF DIAMONDS BY REPORTING FiRMvS, 1934 



Period 


Borts 


Ballas 


Carbons 


On hand December 31, 1933 

Purchased in 1934 


carats 
10,402.79 
40,835.30 


carats 
76.61 
32.19 


carats 
3,100.90 
2,680. 13 


On hand December 31, 1934 


51,238.09 
13,380.92 


108.80 
76.57 


5.781.03 
3,695.00 


Consumed (39,975.43) in 1934 


37,857. 17 


32.23 


2,086.03 



Prospecting 

An index of prospecting activity is afforded by the following table: 
MINING CLAIMS RECORDED, 1907-1934 



Year 



No. 



1907 13,996 

1908 4,634 

1909 9,746 

1910 5,792 

1911 9,001 

1912 3,104 

1913 4,320 

1914 1,913 

1915 2,519 

1916 2,470 

1917 1.936 

1918 1,534 

1919 2,918 

1920 2,160 



Year 



No. 



1921. 
1922. 
1923. 
1924. 
1925. 
1926. 
1927. 
1928. 
1929. 
1930. 
1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 



2,459 

5,686 

6,092 

5,222 

4,751 

13,496 

15,554 

15,046 

8,207 

3,886 

5,779 

4,945 

8,077 

16,888 



METALLICS 
Gold 

General Summary 

At the old price of gold the record of production from all sources in Ontario 
during 1934 was 81,037,265 below the figures for 1933. Taking the exchange 
equalization and world price into consideration, the production value in 1934 



1935 Statistical Review for 1934 7 

in Canadian funds was §11,763,737 in excess of that for 1933, the total figures 
of value being S72,808,688 as against 861,044,951. 

Referring to the gold mines separately, the year 1934 has shown marked 
improvement, and while the ounces recovered in Ontario declined, the quantity 
of ore treated increased, moving up from 5,621,517 tons during 1933 to 6,413,010 
tons in 1934, or an increase of 14 per cent. This expansion indicates the in- 
creased milling facilities and the ability of operators to treat much lower grade 
ore, thereby increasing the life of the mines and the communities now dependent 
on this industry. At Porcupine the average value per ton of ore treated, at 
the Canadian price of gold, was $8.88; at Kirkland Lake, 817.47; in Matachewan, 
86.15; and in Northwestern Ontario, 84.83. In this connection it is of interest 
to note that in the Transvaal the record for 1934 as compared with 1933 shows 
an increase in tonnage milled of nearly 8 per cent., but a decrease in grade from 
5.844 to 5.150 pennyweights per ton of ore, or almost 12 per cent. During 
1934, 8 mines reported production from Porcupine, and 4 properties carried 
on small part-time operations. Ten were active at Kirkland Lake, 3 in Mata- 
chewan, and 18 in Northwestern Ontario. 

Although the output from the northwestern portion of the province was 
small and mainly produced by one mine, the Howey, it is of interest to record 
the reopening of many old properties which were producers in the nineties and 
which are now being taken up again. In addition important new mines have 
recently come into production, e.g. Little Long Lac and others. The increased 
price of gold, modern milling methods, and improved transportation facilities 
have created a considerable change in the outlook of the gold-mining industry 
in this area. When it is remembered that favourable gold formations are known 
to exist and that new finds are becoming general over a wide area, the develop- 
ments in gold-mining in this part of the province promise to be of considerable 
importance during the next few years. 

In the late summer new finds were reported from the Sturgeon River area, 
which is east of Lake Nipigon. A gold "rush" followed, and hundreds of claims 
were staked and recorded, but it is too soon to estimate the importance of this 
new field. Very rich veins on the claims of the Sturgeon River Gold Mines 
have been found on surface and by diamond-drilling. Favourable develop- 
ments at the Little Long Lac mine and at the Central Patricia and Pickle Crow 
mines near the Albanv river, with continued interest at Red Lake, are an earnest 
of a revival of gold-mining in the northwestern part of Ontario. McKenzie Red 
Lake, the second producer at Red Lake, turned over its new 125-ton mill in 
February, 1935. 

The number employed in producing gold mines, exclusive of salaried officials, 
increased from 8,706 in 1933 to 10,193 in 1934, while for the whole industry the 
number gainfully employed rose from 16,103 to 19,387, an increase of 21.6 per 
cent. This is exclusive of the great army of men absorbed in prospecting and 
developing newly staked claims. From the point of view of claims recorded, 
the year 1934 was the highest on record, a total of 16,888 claims having been filed. 
This is more than double the figure for 1933, when 8,077 claims were recorded. 
Previous high records were made in 1907, 1926, 1927, and 1928. 

Gold-Milling Plants 

The milling capacity in tons per day of idle and producing gold mines in 
Ontario at the end of 1934, and that of projected plants and proposed expansion 
of existing plants for 1935, are summarized as follows: — • 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



GOLD-MILLING PLANTS AT ONTARIO MINES, 1934 



Area and mine 


Tonnage 
idle 


Tonnage 
operating 


Proposed 
tonnage 


KiRKLAND Lake Belt: 

Barrv-Hollinger 




100 
100 




Bidgood 






Canadian Reserve (Larder lake) 


500 




Kirkiand Gold Belt 




100 


Kirkland Lake Gold 




150 
2,325 




Lake Shore 






Luck}- Cross (Golden Gate Mining Co.) 


20 




Macassa 


200 
325 

1,325 
100 

1,000 

300 
25 

350 
25 

400 
1,500 




Sylvanite 






Teck-Hughes 






Toburn 






Wright-Hargreaves 






Porcupine Belt; 

Anglo-Huronian (Vipond) 






Blue Quartz (Amalgamated Goldfields) 






Buffalo Ankerite 






Canusa 






Coniaurum 






Dome 






Gillies Lake Porcupine 




75 


Hayden 


40 






Hollinger 


5,000 




Lakeland 


25 




Mclntyre-Porcupine 


2,250 

3 

200 




McLaren-Porcupine 






Marbuan (March) 






Munro Croesus 


25 




Northern Turnbull 


15 
200 




Paymaster Consolidated 






Porcupine Peninsular (Night Hawk lake) 


200 




Matachewan and West Shiningtree: 

Ashley 


125 




Churchhill 




10 


Matachewan Consolidated 




100 
500 

25 




Young- Davidson 






Sudbury District: 

Halcrow-Swayze 






Lebel Oro (Long Lake) 




200 


McMillan 




125 




MiCHIPICOTEN AND GOUDREAU: 

Algold (New Goudreau) 


50 




Algoma Summit 


25 

80 

100 

200 
200 




Minto 






Parkhill 






Thunder Bay District: 

Ardeen (Moss) 






Little Long Lac 






McMartin, J. Bruce (Dikdik) 




10 


North Shores (McKellar-Longworth) 




25 
125 

125 




Northern Empire (Beardmore) 






St. Anthonv 






Tashota 




50 


Patricia Portion of Kenora: 

Casey Summit 




50 

50 

1,100 

30 




Central Patricia 




-f50 


Howey 






J-M Consolidated 






McKenzie Red Lake 




200 


Pickle Crow 






100 


Rainy River District: 

Foley Syndicate 




5 
5 
5 




Golden Star 






Saundary Syndicate 














860 


18,893 


795 







1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



Labour Statistics 

The following figures summarize labour statistics for the gold-mining 
industry, as reported to the Ontario Department of Mines: — 

AVERAGE YEARLY WAGE, GOLD-MINING INDUSTRY, 1933 AND 1934 





1933 


1934 


Locality 


No. of 

wage 

earners 


Wages 
paid 


Average 

wage 
per annum 


No. of 

wage 

earners 


Wages 
paid 


Average 

wage 
per annum 


Porcupine 


4,728 

3,493 

485 

665 


$7,645,825 H!;i.617 5.295 


$8,541,490 
5,706,528 
1,672,151 

1,059,506 


$1 613 


Kirkland Lake 

N.W. Ontario 

Operating but non- 
producing 


5,584.787 
717,492 

514,056 


1,599 
1,480 

773 


3,525 
1,373 

1,195 


1,619 
1,217 

886 


Total 


9,371 


$14,462,160 ' $1,543 


11,388 


$16,979,675 


$1 491 











Production and Dividends 

The following tables show the total gold production from 1866 to 1934, 
the production by regions in 1934, the total production by regions since 1910, 
and the dividends paid by the various gold-mining companies. 

GOLD PRODUCTION, 1866-1934 
(On the standard basis of $20.671834 per ounce, or one dollar = 0.048375 ounces) 



Total 
Year production, 
value 


Porcupine belt 


Kirkland Lake belt 


N.W. Ontarioi 


Value Per cent. \'alue 


Per cent. 


Value 


Per cent. 


1866-1891'-.. $190,258 










1892-19095 2,509,492 


1 








1910. . 68,498 


$35,539 j 51.8 

15,437 1 36.2 

1,730,628 1 81.8 

4,294,113 94.1 










1911 42,637 










1912 2,114,086 










1913. . 4,558,518 


$86,316 


1.9 
2 

6.5 

6.8 

4.6 

7.4 

4.7 

8.8 

10.4 

10.5 

13.5 

13.4 

17.8 

23.2 

28.7 

37.5 

41.8 

47.9 

50.4 

50.3 

46.7 

46.9 






1914 . 5,544,979 


5,206,006 93.8 i 114.154 






1915 . 8,501,391 


7,462,111 
9,391,408 
8,229,744 


88.6 
90.8 
94.5 


551,069 
702,761 
404,346 
632.007 






1916 10,339,259 






1917 8,698,735 






1918 .... 8,502,480 


7,767,907 


91.4 






1919... 10,451,709 


9,941,803 95.1 486.809 






1920... 11,686,043 


10,597,572 


90.7 1 1.033.478 






1921 . 14,692,357 


13,103,526 
18,374,658 
17,313,115 
22,135,534 
24,733,120 
23,680,670 
23,851,857 


89.5 
89.3 
85.9 
86.2 
81.8 
76.5 
70.9 


1,524,851 

2,159,581 

2,719,939 

3,446,632 

5,385,256 

7,174,083 

9,674,114 

12,233,524 

14,046,596 

17,172,770 

21,734,729 

23,782,313 

20.817,277 

20,424,716 






1922 . 20 579,569 






1923 20 136 287 






1924 . . . 25,669,303 






1925 . . . 30,206,432 






1926 . . 30,950,753 






1927 . . 33,627,040 






1928. 32,629,111 


20,246,319 


62 






1929 33,535,226 

1930 35,886,558 

1931 43,117,615 

1932 47,284,621 

1933 44,558,514 

1934 43,521,249 


19,281,286 
17,758,842 
19,891,521 
21,422,117 
21,624,617 
19,634,097 


57.6 
49.6 
46.2 
45.2 
48.5 
45 


$22,988 
461,730 
1,007,756 
1,607,831 
1,352,017 
2,214,385 


0.07 

1.3 

2.3 

3.4 

3 

5 


Total $529 602 720 •'SS47 72.'^ .'i47 ; 65 6 $166 307 321 


31.4 





















'Recent production only. Gold output from 1866 to 1909, inclusive, came from Hastings 
county and Northwestern Ontario. No segregation of statistics can now be made. 
^Estimated. 
^Maximum yearly output was $424,568 in 1899. 



10 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



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Statistical Review for 1934 



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Department of Mines 



No. 4 



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Statistical Review for 1934 



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1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



17 



Mint Receipts from Ontario Mines 

The table below shows the record over a five-year period of receipts of 
crude gold bullion from Ontario mines at the Royal Canadian Mint. 



RECEIPTS OF CRUDE GOLD BULLION FROM ONTARIO MINES AT THE 
ROYAL CANADIAN MINT, OTTAWA, 1930-1934 



Year 



Quantity 



Precious metals 



Gold 



Silver 



Total 

value 

(standard) 



Buying rate 

in Canada 

for New York 

funds ^ 



1930. 
1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 



crude ounces 
908,209 
1,762,481 
2,865,271 
2,441,467 
2,668,456 



fine ounces 
713,527 
1,441,602 
2,248,106 
1,879,659 
2,031,719 



fine ounces 
86,419 
171,408 
300,927 
270,377 
292,445 



$4,760,111 
29,850,774 
46,554.898 
38,945,178 
42,134,234 



cents 
100. 147 
104.272 
113.580 
109.472 
.990 



^The average rate of premium on New York funds is based on the day to day record of cur- 
rent quotations. The Federal Department of Finance pays for gold in Canadian funds and 
reimburses producers by an amount equivalent to the exchange premium on New York funds. 
Export of gold is prohibited except under license. After April 19, 1933, when the United States 
forsook the gold standard, Canadian output was marketed in London. 



1931 



1932 




Chart of average monthly and yearly prices of gold in Canadian 
from 1931 to 1934, inclusive. 

Exchange Equalization 

The figure for exchange equalization published for 1933, namely $16,486,437, 
refers to the actual quantity of gold marketed during that period. Owing to 
the fact that in former years some mines reported only the exchange received 
during the calendar year and not exchange actually due on the year's gold 
shipments, some small corrections have been made on the following table for 




Graph showing fluctuations of the buying rate in Canada for New York funds 
from 1918 to 1934, inclusive. The average yearly premium or discount rate is 
noted in percentage figures at the base of the chart. 



18 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



the years 1931 and 1932, as follows: 881,728.42 received in 1933 should be 
credited to 1932; at the same time SI 13,088.91 should be deducted from 1932 
and credited to 1931. In 1930, the exchange did not overlap with 1931. The 
corrections have been applied in the accompanying table. 

EXCHANGE EQUALIZATION RECEIVED ON GOLD MARKETED BY 
ONTARIO PRODUCERS. 1920-1934 



Year Porcupine Kirkland Lake 1 N.W. Ontario Other areas 


Total 


1920 


$1,265,664.29 .SI 10,354. 42 S2.5fi.78 




$1 376 275 49 


1921 


1,238,210.72 121,425.28 
189,022.11 ! 19,590.77 
241,602.00 37.844.00 






1,359,636.00 


1922 




$7.87 


208,620.75 


1923 




279,446.00 


1924 


172,721.71 
—2,607.00 


24,027.67 
—231.00 
—595.48 






196,749.38 


1925' 






—2,838.00 


1926' 






— 595 48 


1927' 




—235. 10 






—235.10 


1928 




2,810.55 

70.283.00 

15,790.69 

1.006.607.22 

3,106,487.10 

7,448,933.00 

13.694,400.00 






2.810.55 


1929 


87,173.00 

20,911.63 

830,799.04 

2,815,381.21 

8,249,321.00 

13,275,684.00 






157.456.00 


1930 






36,702.32 


1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 


61,857.38 

211,630.04 

495.309.00 

1,482,486.00 


26,958.00 

329.66 

292,874.00 

834,869.00 


1.926,221.64 

6.133,828.01 

16,486,437.00 

29,287.439.00 


Total 


.$28,383,883. 71 


.525,657,492.12 


$2,251,539.20 | $1,155,038.53 $57,447,953.56 



'Discounts paid during years when Canadian funds were at a premium. Figures for the 
three years have been deducted to arrive at the net totals. 

World Output 

The figures for the output by the leading gold-producing countries from 
1930 to 1934, inclusive, in the following table have been abstracted chiefly from 
reports of the Director of the United States Mint and the American Bureau of 
Metal Statistics. Canada, which in 1930 attained second place among the 
gold-producing countries of the world, in 1934 dropped to third place, having 
been overtaken by Russia. 

OUTPUT BY LEADING GOLD-PRODUCING COUNTRIES, 1930-1934 
(One dollar = 0.048375 ounces) 



Source 



1930 



1931 



1932 



fine ounces 



World 20,836 



Transvaal (S. Africa) . 
Russia (U.S.S.R.)... 
Canada 

Ontario 

United States'- 

California 

S. Dakota 

Oceania' 

Australia 

West Australia . 

S. Rhodesia 

Alexico 



0,716, 

1,433, 

2,107, 

1,736. 

2,100 

450 

406 

621 

462 

416 

547 

671 



318 
351 
665 
073 
,012 
,395 
,289 
,297 
,936 
,164 
,369 
,630 
,871 



fine ounces 

22,329,.525 

10,877,777 

1.700,960 

2,693,892 

2,085,815 

2,213,741 

521,158 

431,200 

783,934 

590,423 

510,570 

532,111 

628,468 



fine ounces 

24,141,486 

11,558,532 

1.990.085 

3,051.676 

2,287,394 

2,279.305 

566,031 

485,051 

994,655 

707,412 

605,561 

574,135 

584,487 



1933 



19341 



fine ounces 

25,369,879 

11,013,713 

2,814,000 

2,949,309 

2,155,518 

2,276,711 

594,867 

519,548 

,156.569 

813.721 

637,207 

642.499 

637,727 



1, 



fine ounces 

27,339.233 

10,479,857 

4.200,000 

2,972,074 

2,105,341 

2,734.415 

701.000 

481.727 

1,248.127 

873,127 

651,000 

693,263 

662,000 



'Preliminary figures from various sources subject to revision. The world estimate is that 
of the American Bureau of Metal Statistics. -Exclusive of the Philippine Islands. 
'Includes Australia, Tasmania. New Zealand, and New Guinea. 

Maximum Canadian production 3,051,676 ounces in 1932. 

Maximum Russian production 4,200,000 ounces in 1934. 

Maximum L'.S. production 4,887,604 ounces in 1915. 

Maximum Transvaal production 11,558.532 ounces in 1932. 

Maximum World production 27,339,233 ounces in 1934. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



19 



Silver-Cobalt 

A revival of activity has recently been observed in the old Cobalt camp, for 
many years so famous as a silver producer. Advancing prices for silver and a 
keener demand for cobalt ores indicate some measure of prosperitv where the 
depression formerly was most keenly felt. 

During the year twelve properties at Cobalt and one at Elk Lake made 
shipments totalling 2,899 tons. The properties, six of which were operated under 
lease, were as follows: Beaver, Cobalt Properties, Crown Reserve, Drummond 
lease, Dominion Reduction Company, Foster lease, Hudson Bay lease, Mining 
Corporation lease, McKinley-Darragh lease, Nipissing lease, O'Brien, and 
Temiskaming. The Miller Lake O'Brien shipped from Gowganda. 

The price of silver on the New York market rose from 44.188 cents per ounce 
in January to 54.39 cents in December, and averaged 47.973 cents for the twelve 
months. The monthly average in Canadian funds was 47.46 cents. Early in 
August the United States nationalized silver at 50.01 cents an ounce, that is the 
United States government decided to take over all floating silver in that country 
and to pay 50.01 cents per ounce for it, while newly mined silver was to be paid 
for at 64.5 cents. Later the Treasury Department at Washington announced 
its intention of issuing silver certificates against the purchase of silver on the 
basis of $1.29 per ounce. An official announcement stated that the objective 
in view was a 25 to 75 silver-gold ratio, which would involve the purchase of 
about 1,350,000,000 ounces. This programme will doubtless require some 
vears for completion. 

This stabilizing of the price of silver in the United States definitely suspended 
the trading in silver in New York, which had developed the world's largest market 
for that metal, and directly led to the organization in Canada of the Canadian 
Commodity Exchange for trading in spot and future contracts in silver, with the 
trading floor in Montreal. To this exchange the members of the Toronto Stock 
Exchange and the ^Montreal Stock Exchange were given equal privileges of 
membership. 

The following table shows the total silver production for the years 1933 
and 1934:— 

SILVER PRODUCTION, 1933 AND 1934 





1933 


1934 














Fine ounces 


Value 


Fine ounces 


Value 


Sales of bullion by the reduction com- 










panies, smelters, and mines^ 


3,602,529 


$1,258,362 


2,681,104 


$1,244,081 


Contained in silver-cobalt concentrates 










and residues exported 


100,642 


41,480 


288,552 


141,544 


Estimated as recovered from concen- 










trates treated outside of Ontario .... 


236,863 


87,922 


299,084 


146,094 


In crude gold bullion 


408,626 


136,867 


432,905 


204,028 


Recovered by nickel-copper refineries . . 


1,026,370 


388,303 


1,822,293 


864,646 


Total 


5.375,030 


$1,912,934 


5,523,938 


$2,600,393 







'There is included with the 1933 figures, 800,000 ounces of bullion produced in 1931 but 
held in storage for future sale. 

The shipments of ores and concentrates from the Cobalt area in 1934, as 
reported by the T. & N.O. railway, were 940.27 tons to Deloro; 210.5 tons to 
Trail, B.C.; 821.63 tons to Noranda; and 926.11 tons exported to other coun- 



20 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



tries; or a total of 2,898.51 tons, as compared with 1,-145.09 tons in 1933. The 
increase is in proportion to the revival in mining operations in this famous old 
silver camp. 

Shipments of silver mines by camps during 1933 and 1934 were as follows: — 

SILVER SHIP:MENTS by camps, 1933 AND 1934 



Camp 


1933 


1934 


Silver 


Cobalt! 


Silver 


Cobalti 


Cobalt 

Gowganda 


fine ounces 

2,397,118 

1,244,812 


lbs. 
66,859 
40,729 


$20,265 


fine ounces 
1,990,073 
1,039,565 


lbs. 

201,025 

32,273 


$59,867 






Total 


3,641,930 


161,911 


$20,265 


3,029,638 


233,298 


$59,867 



^Figures represent the quantities paid for by the smelter and values received by the mines. 

Since the discovery of silver at Cobalt in 1903, silver shipments from this 
and outlying silver camps, as reported by the operators, have been as follows: — 



SILVER SHIPMENTS BY CAMPS, 1904-1934 



Year 



Cobalt 



Casey 
township 



South 
Lorrain 



Gow- 
ganda 



Montreal 

R., Maple 

Mountain, 

etc. 



Total 



Average 

price per 

ounce 

(New York) 



1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 



troy 
ounces 

206,875 

2,451,-356 

5,401,766 

10,023,311 

19,424,251 

25,658,683 

29,849,981 

29,989,893 

28,605,940 

28,105,505 

24,155,699 

24,280,366 

19.008,517, 

18,327,258 

16,807,407 

10,314,689 

10,402,249 

7,673,535 

9,239,147 

7,259,858 

6,704,787 

6,252,115 

6,262,249 

4,482,543 

3,934,020 

4,823,529 

5,329,335 

3,706,880 

3,262,380 

2,397,118 

1,990,073 



trov 



troy 
ounces 



troy 
ounces 



troy 
ounces 



500 
26,185 
92,544 
114,789 
253,824 
825,108 
499,643 
223,939 
445,900 



13,124 
194,955: 
221,133 
933,912 
834,1191 
248,992; 
108,199 



143,901 
171,278 



1,101 
1,028 



77,280 

10,000 

72,188 

4,586 

8,253 

328,886 

1,284,.307 

2.955,646 

2,633,058 

3,099,964 

3.044,584 

2,319.356 

1,133,952 

876,006 

1,754,989 

594,360 

22,144 



471, 

468, 

549, 

502, 

399, 

242, 

383! 

1,064, 

638, 

723, 

433, 

258, 

170, 

160, 

598, 

1,355, 

1,236, 

1,741, 

1,677, 

2,081, 

2,141, 

1,697, 

1,374, 

1,244, 

1,039, 



688, 
687 
976 
370 
300 
229' 
393 



18,002 

9,835 

510 



635 
198 
764 
352 
292 
651 
761 
057 
156 
640 
614 
429 
894 
234 
242 
780 
812 
565 



12,467 

117 

-15,994 

1,581 



=52 



troy 
ounces 

206,875 

2,451,356 

5,401,766 

10,023,311 

19,437,875 

25,897,825 

30,645,181 

31, .507,791 

.30,243,859 

29,681,975 

25,162,841 

24,746,534 

19,915,090 

19,401,893 

17,661,694 

11,214,317 

10,846,321 

8.261,931 

10,711,127 

10,377,846 

9.9.35.902 

10,707,235 

10,543,473 

8,543,513 

6.745,401 

7,781,429 

9,225,610 

5,998,482 

4,659,304 

3.641,930 

3,029,638 



cents 
57.221 
60.352 
66.791 
65.237 
52.864 
51.502 
53.486 
53.340 
60.835 
57.791 
54.811 
49.684 
65.661 
81.417 
96.772 
111.122 
100.900 
62.654 
67.528 
64.873 
66.781 
69.065 
62.107 
56.370 
58. 176 
52.993 
38.154 
28.700 
27.892 
34.727 
47.973 



Total. . 



376,331,315 



2,799,740' 22,773,993 



22,655,719 48,558 



424,609,325; 



'Includes 885 ounces from Silver Islet, Lake Superior. 

-Silver Islet, Lake Superior. 

■^Nickel Hill Syndicate in the Sudbury area shipped silver-cobalt ore. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



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Statistical Review for 1934 



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24 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Nickel-Copper and Platinum Metals 

The nickel-copper industry during the past twelve months has made a 
remarkable recovery and may now be said to have regained the prosperity noted 
in 1929. The name nickel-copper, so long used by the Department of Mines, 
has become a misnomer, since in point of quantity of metal recovered the copper 
far outstrips the nickel. In his note of November 15, 1934, to the shareholders, 
R. C. Stanley, President of the International Nickel Company of Canada, 
Limited, said in part: — 

In extracting nickel and making it an important servant of industry, approximately two 
pounds of copper are recovered for every pound of nickel. This means that copper is now being 
mined at the rate of more than 200,000,000 pounds per year as the direct result of providing the 
nickel now required in diversified industrial markets throughout the world. 

To refine its copper to the high degree of purity demanded by modern industry your company 
participated in the organization of the Ontario Refining Company, Limited, for the construction, 
as a custom refinery, of a modern electrolytic plant at Copper Cliff, Ont. Your company now 
owns 90 per cent, of the capital stock of the Ontario Refining Company, Limited, and that 
refinery is now engaged exclusively in the production of 'ORC" brand electrolytic copper from 
our company's blister copper. 

The table below has been changed somewhat from the one carried for so 
many years in these reports. It wdll be noted that the figures for matte pro- 
duced no longer appear. This change has been made because of the reorganiza- 
tion in plant practice that has taken place during the past five years. Blister 
copper, which formerly was not produced at Sudbury, is now made direct from 
the high-grade copper ores of the Frood mine ; and figures for matte, that is the 
nickel-copper Bessemer matte that was produced heretofore and still is, would 
not reflect the true conditions. From the table it is possible to secure figures 
showing total- nickel or total copper produced, e.g. the sum of items -i and 6 
equals the total nickel from all sources, in matte and as refined, while the sum 
of items 3 and 7 gives the total copper. 

An examination of the statistics presented indicates that ore smelted rose 
by 90 per cent. ]Matte exported showed an increase of 8 per cent., and matte 
treated at Port Colborne was up by 68 per cent. Comparing 1934 with 1930, 
the year in which the highest previous production was recorded, increases may 
be observed in the quantity of ore smelted and matte exported. 

NICKEL-COPPER MIXING AND SMELTING, 1930-1934 



Item 



1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



tons 

1. Ore shipped ! 2,115,139 

2. Ore treated 2,357,154 

3. Blister copper produced in Ontario . 57,467 

4. Nickel produced in Ontario 30,852 

5. Matte exported' 34,550 

6. Nickel content of matte exported-... j 20,978 

7. Copper content of matte exported- . . 5,855 



tons 

1,690,192 

1,884,959 

49,786 

15,939 

30,294 

16,847 

6,620 



tons 

790,614 

793,552 

29,682 

7,063 

21,778 

8,068 

8,825 



tons 
1,533,887 
1,523,814 
60,398 
20,748 
43,315 
25,811 
12,323 



tons 

2,903,310 

2,896,959 

95,826 

35,487 

46,755 

28.771 

6,692 



'All matte was exported prior to 1918, when refining in Canada began at Port Colborne, 
Ont. The British America Nickel Corporation commenced refining operations at Deschenes, 
Que., in 1920, and closed down finally in July, 1924. 

-In 1932, after the reorganization of the metallurgical practice, the Orford process, i.e. the 
separation of the matte into copper tops and nickel bottoms, was carried out at Copper Cliff. 

The recovery of this industrial group is also well illustrated in the record 
of wage-earners employed: In 1933 the total was 3,804 in mines, smelters, and 
refineries; in 1934 the pav-roll rose to 5,793, or an increase of 52.5 per cent. 

Late in 1934 construction of 4 new converters at the Copper Cliff smelter 
was completed. These added to the former battery of 8 make 12 in all, which with 
the addition of other smelter units has resulted in a marked increase in capacity. 



Statistical Review for 1934 



25 



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26 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Production of Platinum Metals 

The production of metals of the platinum group has increased to such an 
extent that the Sudburv nickel-copper mines have become one of the world's 
most important sources of these precious metals. With the exception of the 
rear 1930, the entire production has been derived from the Sudbury area and 
has risen from 68,040 ounces in that year to a total of 200,109 for 1934. The 
metals gold and silver are also of importance. 

PRECIOUS METALS RECOVERED, 1930-1934 







1930' 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


Platinum metals: 
Platinum 




ounces 

34,000 
29,907 

4,133 


ounces 

44,725 
39,313 

7,605 


ounces 
27,284 

'r 37,613 

J 


ounces 
24,746 
31,009 


ounces 
116,177 


Palladium 

Rhodium, ruthenium, 
and iridium 


osmium 


83.932 


Total 

Value 


. ounces 


68,040 
.S9 43fi.fi83 


91,643 
82,812,834 


64,897 
§1,998,911 


55,755 
.$1,501,2.33 


200,109 
86,187,992 






Gold 

Silver 


. ounces 
.ounces 


22,867 
1,067,154 


23,381 
822,971 


22,675 
663,795 


36,983 
1,026,370 


60,370 
1,882,293 



^In 1930, 5 ounces of gold, 62 of silver, 4 of platinum, and 14 of palladium were included in 
ore exported from Strathy township. 

Dividends 

Total dividends paid to the end of 1933 and payments in 1934 are given in 
the following table. For convenience of comparison ]Mond figures have been 
converted to dollars on the basis £l = S-4.866o. The Falconbridge Nickel 
Mines paid its first dividend in 1933. 

DIVIDENDS PAID BY NICKEL COMPANIES TO END OF 1934 



Company 



Period 
(inclusive) 



To end of 
1933 



1934 



Canadian Copper Company 

International Nickel CompanvV ^ 

^ - common . . 

International Nickel Company preferred. 

of Canada, Limited'- common . . 

Falconbridge Nickel Mines, Limited 



1894-1901 
1906-1928 
1909-1928 
1929-1932 
1929-1932 
1928-1933 



81,975,000.00 
12,299,273.00 
65,811,694.00 
9,448,811.53 
33,085,113.56 
812,609.97 



81,933,898.75 

7,289,084.50 

903,030.79 



Total ! 8123,432,502. 06 



810,126,014.04 



fdeferred 1906-1914 

Mond Nickel Companv'-' preferred ' 1904-1929 

ordinarv 1905-1929 



£264,043 
2,556,359 
2,581,984 



Total . 



£5,402,386 
or 826,291,126 



Grand Total ; 8149,723,628.06 | 810,126.014.04 

'Successors to the Canadian Copper Company. The International Nickel Company paid 
dividends on the common stock from 1909 to 1919, inclusive, and again from 1925 to 1928, 
inclusive. Common stock outstanding was 841,834,600, and preferred stock 88,912,600, or a 
total of 850,747,200 at the beginning of 1928. On December 19, 1928, the authorized capital 
stock of 862,000,000 of the New Jersey company was reduced by changing the par value of the 
shares from 825 to 81 each, and at the same time the name of the company was changed to 
Nickel Holdings Corporation. On December 31, 1928, the authorized capital was further 
reduced to 8993,425 fully issued or subscribed-for stock, consisting of 8843,700 preferred stock 
and 8149,725 common stock, par value in each case. 

-See bottom of page 27. 

^See bottom cf page 27. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



27 



Iron Ore, Pig Iron, Steel, and Coke 

As shown in the following table, foreign ore charges amounted to 462,705 
long tons, the average price of which was S4.65 (American funds, sales tax extra) 
at lower lake ports. From this ore, 271,725 long tons of pig iron was produced, 
including 177,361 long tons of basic, 49,655 of foundry, and 44,709 of malleable. 
Figures for the past five years follow: — 

IRON AND STEEL STATISTICS, 1930-1934 





Foreign 


Limestone 




Pig iron 


produced 


Steel made 






for 


Coke 












smelted 


flux 




















Quantity 


\'alue 


Quantity 


Value 




long tons 


short tons 


short tons 


long tons 




long tons 




1930. . .. 


935,005 


234,309 


542,094 


534,542 


•SI 1, -165,435 


639,128 


S22,369,480 


1931 .... 


568,886 


149,454 


320,133 


318,645 


6,363,101 


444,107 


15.099,638 


1932. . .. 


198,063 


58,880 


119,064 


113,665 


2,558,799 


244,693 


8,319,562 


1933 


182,060 


46,944 


113,102 


110,502 


2,066,049 


258,841 


8,800,594 


1934. . .. 


462,705 


1 18,350 


253,532 


271,725 


6,249,675 


476,699 


16.207,766 



At Montreal Xo. 1 pig iron (2.25 to 2.75 per cent, silicon) was quoted at 
$23.00, and malleable the same. No quotations were available for basic pig 
iron. Steel billets were quoted at $34.00 per long or gross ton at Hamilton. 



PIG IRON, STEEL, AND FERRO- AND OTHER ALLOY PRODUCERS, 1934 



Company 



Location 



Abrasive Company of Canada, Ltd.* -. . . 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Ltd.- ' ^ 

Canadian Atlas Steels, Ltd.^ 

Canadian Carborundum Co., Ltd.' ^ 

Canadian Electro Castings, Ltd.^ 

Canadian Furnace Co., Ltd.- ^ 

Dominion Foundries and Steel, Ltd.'' 

Electro-Metallurgical Co. of Canada, Ltd. 

Exolon Company, Ltd.^ ^ 

Kennedy, \Vm., and Sons, Ltd.^ 

Lionite Abrasives, Ltd.' - 

Steel Company of Canada, Ltd.^ ^ 

Superior Alloys, Ltd.^ 

Welland Electric Steel Foundrv^ 



Hamilton. 

Sault Ste. Alarie. 

Welland. 

Niagara Falls. 

Orillia. 

Niagara Falls. 

Hamilton. 

Welland. 

Thorold. 

Owen Sound. 

Stamford. 

Hamilton. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Welland. 



'These firms produce ferro-silicon as a by-product in the manufacture of ferro-alumina. 

-Ferro-alloys. 

'Pig iron. 

^Steel. 

^Calcium molybdate. 

Iron and Steel 

During 1934 the output of pig iron increased from 110,562 to 271,725 long 
tons, and although the increase amounts to 145.6 per cent, in quantity this 
figure remains considerably below the 769,359 tons produced in 1929, the peak 

-Dividends paid by the International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited, on the common 
stock in 1929 were 90 cents per share, and $1.00 per .share in 1930. Common stock was increased 
to 15,000,000 shares of no par value on July 25, 1930; as a result shares issued were increased 
from 13,758,208 to 14,584,025. Seven per cent, preferred stock (cumulative) now stands at 
$27,627,825. Dividends on common stock aggregated 45 cents a share in 1931. 

'Upon completion of the exchange of stock under the amalgamation of the Mond and 
International companies, effective December 31, 1928. stock issued or issuable was as follows: 
$27,627,825 of 7 per cent, cumulative preferred, and 13,758,208 common shares without par 
value. Dividends paid on February 16, 1929, by the Mond company cover the 8 months' 
period ending December 31, 1928. 



28 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



year. The Algoma vSteel Corporation at Sault vSte. Marie had a 450-ton furnace 
in blast until June 16, which remained banked until October 16. It was again 
banked November 24 until the end of the year. The Steel Company of Canada 
at Hamilton operated a ooO-ton unit throughout the year, and the Canadian 
Furnace Company at Niagara Falls operated its 350-ton furnace from July 12 
to the end of the year. 

The following tables give details of the iron blast furnace operators: — 

IRON BLAST FURNACES IN OPERATION, 1934 





Stacks 
operating 


Furnaces 




Company 


No. of 
stacks 


Daily 
capacity 


Location 


Algoma Steel Corporation, Ltd ... 
Canadian Furnace Company, Ltd. . 
Steel Company of Canada, Ltd. . . . 


1 

1 


4 
1 
2 


long tons 
1,600 
350 
825 


Sault Ste. Marie. 
Port Colborne. 
Hamilton. 



Ferro-Alloys 

Of the fourteen plants listed in the 1931 report only six reported production, 
which with an additional plant, namely, the Canadian Carborundum Company, 
Limited, not listed in 1931, produced a total of 32,932 long tons of various kinds 
of ferro-alloys in 1934 as against 30,569 tons in the previous year. The pro- 
duction of these materials during the past five years in Ontario was as follows : — 

STATISTICS OF FERRO-ALLOYS PRODUCTION IN ONTARIO, 1928-1934 



Year 


No. of 
producing 
companies 


Quantity 
produced 


Kind of material 


1928 


3 

■4 
5 

8 
5 
6 

7 


long tons 
44,842 
81,137 
60,545 
46,440 
15,595 
30,569 
32,932 


1 


1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 


Ferro-silicon, ferro-manganese, 

silicon Spiegel, spiegeleisen, 

} calcium manganese silicon, 

1 zirconium manganese silicon, 

calcium molybdate. 


1934 



Coke 

The coking industry in Ontario is carried on by the large iron and steel 
metallurgical works and by chartered companies operating in the cities supplying 
artificial gas to householders and industries. 

Coke statistics for the past five vears, as collected bv the Dominion Bureau 
of Statistics, are shown in the following table: — 

COKE STATISTICS, 1930-1934 





1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


Production 

Imports 


short tons 

1,489,415 

993,753 


short tons 

1,113,509 

694,982 


short tons 

1,087,122 

605,307 


short tons 

1,153,509 

615,818 


short tons 

1,411,516 

881 ,235 






Total 


2,483,168 
.■^17 


1,808,491 
106 


1,692,429 


1,769,327 


2,292,751 


Deduct exports 


54 










Apparent consumption. 2,482,851 


1,808,385 i 1,692,429 


1,769,327 


2,292,697 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



29 



The statistics shown in the following table are combined and show raw 
materials used and products made. These figures were supplied by the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics. 

THE COKING INDUSTRY, 1934 



Quantity Cost at works 



Materials Used: 

Coal 

Coke 

Oil 

Absorbing and wash oil 

Caustic soda 

Lime 

Oxide for purification 

Sulphuric acid 66' Be. purchased. 
All other materials 



I 

tons 

tons 

Imp. gals. 

Imp. gals. 

lbs. 

tons 

tons 

lbs. 



1,912,620 

40,485 

6,190,940 

137,01.3 

511,085 

706 

3,357 

25,180,960 



88,559,510 
280,626 
360,388 

19,989 
16,626 
6,402 
38,067 
186.741 
12,401 



Total. 



§9,484,340 



Gas Made: 

Retort coal gas 

Coke oven gas 

Straight water gas 

Carburetted water gas . 
Oil gas 



M cu. ft. 

5,267,740 

15,051,798 

3 

2,313,889 

12,378 



Total . 



22,645,808 



Gas Consumed: 

Sold 

Used in producing plants 

Used in associated metallurgical works. 

Otherwise accounted for 

Not accounted for 



M cu. ft. 

10,199,903 

6,425,562 

6,170,354 

680,887 

807,762 



87,877,086 

1,015,095 

943,186 

138,354 

682,333 



Total . 



24,284.468 ' §10,656,054 



Coke and By-Products Made: 

Coke, including breeze 

Tar....... 

Ammonia liquor 

Ammonium sulphate 

Benzol 

Other light oils 



tons 

Imp. gals. 
. . lbs. XH., 

lbs. 

.Imp. gals. 



1,-388.709 
17,020,066 

1,863,266 
30,853,599 

2,908,126 
271,628 



.S10,200.363 
937,842 

18,633 
306,970 
538,799 

28,305 



Total .S12,030,912 



Coke Sold and Used, axd Stocks: 

Used by reporting companies 

Sold for domestic use 

Other uses 

On hand. December 31, 1932 



tons 
407,609 
762,374 
180,732 
233,494 



Chromite 

The Chromium ^Mining and Smelting Corporation, Limited, in 1934: shipped 
40 tcrs of chromium from the Obonga Lake deposits, w^est of Lake Nipigon, 
all of which was used for experimental purposes. From this material, ferro- 
chrome was made in the electric furnaces of General Abrasives at Niagara Falls, 
X.Y. The company estimated that 1,100 tons of ore were mined from surface 
open cuts between June and December, and the material shipped was valued at 
•S12 per ton. A considerable amount of diamond-drilling was done in 1934. 



30 Department of Mines No. 4 

An average of 16 men was employed at the mine, in addition to about 50 on 
road construction. Tractors will be used for conveying high-grade ore some 
28 miles north to Collins station on the Canadian National railway. 

Radium and Uranium 

Although pitchblende, which is the source of radium and uranium, has not 
been produced in commercial quantities in Ontario, there is now a well-equipped 
extraction plant in successful operation at Port Hope, owned by Eldorado Gold 
Mines, Limited, for the treatment of pitchblende concentrates from Great Bear 
lake, some 4,000 miles distant. The refinery was placed in commission in 1933, 
and considerably enlarged in the autumn of 1934. In January, 1935, the con- 
centrator of the company, at Labine point, Great Bear lake, commenced opera- 
tions. It has a capacity of 75 tons of ore daily. A 2-ton Bellanca air-cruiser 
will be used to transport the silver-pitchblende concentrate a distance of about 
1,200 miles to the rail-head at Waterways, Alta., thus ensuring a constant supply 
to the refinery during winter months. 

The initial output of radium needles in 1933 (approximately 788 milligrams) 
was purchased by the Ontario Government for use in cancer clinics in four of 
the larger cities. An economic extraction process was perfected in 1933 for both 
radium and uranium products. The chemical process employed is intricate and 
will not be described here. Recovery of radium is in the form of a readily soluble 
bromide and less soluble sulphate, the latter being used for hospital work. 
Special care is taken at all stages to prevent the loss of radium by emanation 
and to protect the workers by fan ventilation. 

Uranium yellow and orange (two sodium salt pigments) are produced for 
use in porcelain manufacture. Europe is the chief market for these pigments. 
The black oxide of uranium is also produced. Satisfactory arrangements for 
marketing both radium and uranium products were completed in 1934. This 
is a most creditable Canadian performance, as heretofore radium production 
was practically a Belgian monopoly. The Department of Mines, Ottawa, reports 
production to the end of 1934 as 6.1 grams of radium, from 61 tons of concentrates; 
uranium compounds, totalling 60,000 pounds; and 30,500 ounces of silver as a 
by-product. Henceforth, with the production of high-grade concentrates at the 
mine, the grade shipped will, it is expected, be considerably enhanced. 

NON-METALLICS 

With the exception of arsenic, mica, mineral waters, salt, and talc, every 
non-metallic mineral showed an increase in value in 1934; and salt actually 
increased in quantity, although the selling value was lower. As these minerals 
are consumed in a wide list of manufacturing industries, the record of increases, 
even though small in some cases, is indicative of a definite recovery in the in- 
dustrial life of the country. The total value of the non-metallic group in 1934 
was $7,553,571, as against $7,094,636 in 1933, a slight increase. The details 
of quantities and values marketed are set out in the table, "vSummary of Mineral 
Statistics, 1934," on page 2. 

Arsenic 

Arsenic in the native state is a metallic mineral, but since it is produced 
in Ontario in the oxide form, called in the trade "white arsenic," it has been 
customary to include it with non-metallics. The whole production is recovered 



1935 Statistical Review for 1934 31 

in the smelting of the silver-cobalt arsenides of Northern Ontario by the Deloro 
Smelting and Refining Company. The production in 1934 was 1,647,513 pounds, 
valued at $56,412, as against 1,468,022 pounds, worth 856,534, in the previous 
year. 

Barite 

A small output of barite was reported in 1933, after being absent from the 
list since 1923. Several deposits of this mineral are known to exist in the province. 
Although considerable investigation into markets has been undertaken, and 
several enquiries have been received from outside sources, no steady develop- 
ment work was under way at any of the Ontario deposits. Canada Night 
Hawk Mines, which is equipped for milling, did not report any work. The 
deposits in Yarrow township and at Tionaga were idle, and no shipments 
were reported. 

Diatomite 

Several deposits of this mineral have been under development for a number 
of years in Muskoka, but the production to date has been small. In 1934 
shipments totalling 46 tons, having a value of $1,920, were reported, as against 
28 tons worth $1,298 in 1933. 

Feldspar and Nepheline Syenite 

Feldspar 

Production rose from 4,387 tons in 1933 to 7,302 tons in 1934. This in- 
creased consumption of ground spar in domestic manufacturing plants is a 
positive indication that a distinct business revival has been made in the enamel- 
ling, glazing, and porcelain-insulator manufacturing trades. 

As exports to the United States are practically non-existent the increase 
in the output of feldspar, although small in actual money value, is of signal 
importance, showing as it does the industrial recovery now apparent. The 
only domestic grinding plant in Ontario is that of the Frontenac Floor and Wall 
Tile Company, Limited, at Kingston, which draws its supply of crude spar 
mainly from Lanark county. The Ontario spar is particularly rich in potash 
and alumina. 

Nepheline Syenite 

The Nepheline Company, Limited, was incorporated in Ontario on August 
10, 1934, with a capital of $100,000. Headquarters are at Lakefield, and it is 
the purpose of Wm. Morrison, the promoter, and associates to develop a deposit 
of nepheline syenite at Mountain lake in Methuen township, Peterborough 
county. This particular rock has a chemical composition that makes it suitable 
for use in the glass industry. The combined alkalies, soda and potash, run 
about 15 per cent. Low silica and high alumina content give this rock a low 
fusion or fluxing point. 

Markets have been canvassed in the United States, and in England some 
members of the Glass Manufacturers' Federation have reported satisfactory 
tests and are prospective buyers, provided the price is right. It is proposed to 
quarry the rock, crush to 20-mesh, transport by truck to Stony lake, ship by 
barge to Lakefield, and thence by rail. 

Other deposits of nepheline syenite occur in Eastern Ontario, and some are 
being investigated. 



32 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Fluorspar 

Although Ontario's production of this mineral is insignificant and is drawn 
from old mine dumps near Madoc in Hastings county, the output increased from 
73 tons in 1933 to 150 tons in 1934. The material, which is consumed at smelters 
as a flux and in various chemical industries, has a ready sale. Some foreign spar 
is imported; consumption, however, is not large. 

Graphite 

There is only one producer in Ontario, the Black Donald Graphite Company, 
Limited. Its mine is on lots 16, 17, and 18, concession III, Brougham township, 
Renfrew county, near the village of Calabogie. The total value of the production 
in 1934 was S(34,998, as against 816,145 in the preceding year. A new feature 
in the development of the graphite industrv in Ontario is its successful appli- 
cation to the manufacture of leads for pencils. In this connection the following 
excerpt from Tlic Financial Post of January 12, 1935, is of interest: — 

Overcoming the chief obstacle to the use of Canadian graphite, in the making of lead pencils, 
the Dixon Pencil Company, Limited, of Newmarket, Ont., states that for the first time in 
history, Canadian graphite from the well-known Black Donald mines at Calabogie is now being 
used by that company. Canadian graphite has always been noted for its strength, high grade, 
and true intensity of colour, but owing to its texture, it could not successfully be employed in 
pencil-lead making, as ordinary methods of refining and pulverizing would not prepare the 
Caiiadian graphite in workable form for pencil leads. Now, however, the technical staff of the 
Dixon Pencil Company has successfully devised a patented process called "impact pulverizing," 
license for which is held exclusively by this company. The result, it is claimed, is a stronger, 
smoother writing lead of true black colour. The company states that it hopes to extend the 
use of this graphite not only to the market of Canada but to the markets of the world, thereby 
increasing the demand for Canadian graphite. 

Gypsum 

The output of gypsum in Ontario rose from 24,460 tons in 1933 to 33,234 
in 1934, and came from two companies: Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, Canada, 
Limited, with plant at Caledonia, and the Canadian Gypsum Company at 
Hagersville. The increase of about 26 per cent, in qtiantity coincides with the 
general revival in the building industry of Ontario. 

Sales in 1933 fell to a very low ebb, as will be noted in the table which 
follows : — 

GYPSUM SALES, 1930-1934 



Grade 


1930 


1931 


19.32 


1933 


1934 


Crushed 

Fine-ground 

Calcined, sold 

Calcined, used in products 


tons 

25,130 

1,190 

3,515 

65,111 


tons 

10.263 

451 

1.606 

41,038 


tons 

5,656 

364 

217 

29,418 


tons 

2,753 

795 

165 

20,747 


tons 

5.636 

376 

226 

26,996 


Total sold or used 


94,946 


53,358 


35,655 


24,460 


33,234 


Total value . . 


$776,069 

■92 

$92,918 


$374,469 

155 

$87,263 


$186,176 

'98 

$85,036 


$112,319 
'79 

$46,782 


$141,389 

'69 

$53,718 


No. of workers 

Wages paid 





'Exclusive of wage-earners employed in the manufacturing division of the Caledonia plant. 



Iron Pyrites and Sulpliuric Acid 

The sulphur content of the acid manufactured at Copper Clifif by Canadian 
Industries, Limited, from sulphur fumes derived from nickel-copper smelting was 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



33 



14,598 tons, worth §145,980, in 1934, as against 8,196 tons, valued at 881,960, 
in 1933. Xo pyrite ore was shipped. 



Mica 

The mica industry, which is principally in the hands of small producers, 
is almost entirely dependent on the electrical manufacturing business. The 
decline in consumption was particularly marked in 1932 and there were fewer 
producers than during the past two decades. 

The prices for the various sizes and grades of thumb-trimmed mica, as 
reported by the producers in 1934, were as follows: — 

Size Price per lb. SirE Price per !b. 

1 by 1 inch SO. 07 2 by 4 inches SO. 45 

1 by 2 inches 15 3 bv 3 inches 60 

2 by 2 inches 20 3 bv 4 inches 91 

2^4 by 21 2 inches 40 3 bv 5 inches 95 

2 by 3 inches 30-. 50 4 by 6 inches 1 . 35- 1 . 75 

Scrap mica, S9.00 per ton (net). 
Rough-cobbed, 20 cents per pound. 

By grades the shipments in 1932, 1933, and 1934 were as follows: — 
SHIPMENTS OF MICA, 1932, 1933, AND 1934 



Grade 


1932 


1933 


1934 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


\'alue 


Ground and rough 

Thumb-trimmed 

Splittings and knife- 
trimmed 

Scrap 


pounds 
232' 

"536.980 


S224' 

"'2.528' 


pounds 
19,000 
44,219 

11 
1,268,200 


S239 
3.287 

19 
5,820 


pounds 
2,459 
30,315 

303 
1,203,225 


$514 
3,094 

110 
5.341 


Total 


537,212 


S2,752 


1.331.430 


S9,371 


1,236,302 


S9,059 



Mineral Waters 

The output in Ontario from live or six mineral springs during the past 
decade has ranged from 21,775 to 309,000 Imperial gallons. During 1931 six 
wells, all in Eastern Ontario, produced 197,540 Imperial gallons, worth 88,578 
at the shipping point; and in 1932 four wells produced 61,208 gallons. In 1933, 
the production was 29,794 gallons, valued at 82,347, from three wells; and in 
1934, 21,775 gallons, worth 81,622. 



Natural Gas and Petroleum 

The Natural Gas Commissioner of Ontario supplied the following notes: — - 

Natural Gas 

The production of natural gas in the year 1934 was 7,682,851 M cubic feet, and the value 
S4, 741, 368. a small increase over 1933. An annual increase of 150.000 M cubic feet is so small 
that it is difficult to attribute it to any particular cause, unless it is to slightly reduced rates 
in the cities in Essex. Kent, and Lambton. Certainly there has been a considerable increase 
in the sale of more efficient appliances, which would stimulate the demand for gas. The past 
year has been a successful one in the search for gas. A new field was discovered in Bayham 
township, Elgin county, east of the village of Eden. The Declute field in Raleigh township 
and the Dover field in Dover township, Kent county, have been extended. In each of these 
fields several large wells were drilled, and this has helped to maintain public interest in the 
development of natural gas fields. 



34 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Petroleum 

The year 1934 has shown an increase in petroleum production for the fourth consecutive 
year, as noted in the table below. This new production came from the Bothwell field and from 
Brooke township in Lambton county, where sixteen wells were drilled in the past year. At 
Bothwell old wells were opened that have not been operated for 20 or 30 years, and an extension 
of the Bothwell field was discovered south of the Thames river. This oil is all from the Onondaga 
formation at about 500 feet from the surface. 

CRUDE PETROLEUM PRODUCTION, 1930-1934' 



Field 



1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



Petrolia and Enniskillen township . . . 

Oil Springs 

Moore township 

Sarnia township 

Plympton township 

Bothwell 

Dover township 

Dawn township 

Onondaga township 

Mosa ti.vvnship 

Thamesville 

Dunwich township (Dutton and lona) 

Tilbury East township 

Raleigh township 

Brooke 



barrels 

55,130 

29,160 

1,576 

1,149 

296 

21,176 

457 



231 
7,166 
447 
365 
149 



barrels 

57,515 

30,792 

3,739 

1,466 

296 

18,084 

891 



34 

8,517 

462 

628 



barrels 

58,871 

31,438 

3,272 

1.227 

274 

19,460 

453 

5,061 

543 

8,429 

534 

781 



barrels 

57,298 

31,343 

2,192 

2,181 

211 

22,935 

763 

8,589 

946 

8,168 

847 

346 



barrels 

57,938 

29,863 

2,963 

825 

202 

32,133 

558 

4,169 

601 

9,031 

614 

283 



239 



264 
1,941 



Total quantity 

A'alue 

Average price per barrel . 



117,302 122,364 130,343 136,058 

$235,746 $219,993 $247,468 ; $253,486 

$2.00 I $1.80 I $1.89 $1.87 



141,385 
$299,874 

$2. 12 



'Information furnished by the Imperial Oil Refiners, Limited, of Sarnia, and others. 

Peat 

During the past year or tw^o considerable interest has been noted in the 
peat bogs of Ontario. The names of operators and locations are given on page 
61. The production by seven operators during 1934 was 1,878 tons, valued at 
$7,343, excluding 224 tons of humus having an estimated value of S224. 

Quartz, Quartzite, and Silica Brick 

The production of quartz and quartzite, which in 1933 was below that of 
previous years, showed a marked recovery in 1934. Silica brick advanced in 1933 
over the preceding year, and increased its gain in 1934. Production figures for 
the past five years follow: — 

QUARTZ, QUARTZITE, AND SILICA BRICK, 1930 1934 



Year 


Rock sold or used 


Silica brick sold or used 






Quantity 


\'alue 


Quantity 


Value 




1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 


tons 
167,487 
97,888 
66,135 
66,562 
89,838 


$274,674 

148,642 

93,574 

86,146 

134,572 


M 
378 
279 
93 
183 
369 


$19,120 

13,702 

4,303 

7,351 

14.730 


$293,794 

162,344 

97,877 

93,497 

149,302 



Salt 

During 1934 six companies produced salt (or brine, which is used in the 
manufacture of chemicals by Canadian Industries, Limited, and Brunner Mond, 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



35 



Canada, Limited). The Warwick Pure Salt Company was a newcomer on the 
Hst in 1933, and Kincardine Salt, Limited, owned by Canadian Industries, 
Limited, reported no production. This industry, which is located in the south- 
western part of the province, is well organized, and the fluctuations shown in the 
figures of output reflect fairly closely the general progress of industry in the 
province. Production figures covering a 5-year period follow: — 

SALT SOLD OR USED, 1930-1934 



Schedule 



1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



Table and dairy 

Fine 

Coarse 

Land 

Other grades (pressed blocks)' 



tons 
49,467 
52,604 
21,085 
245 
7,655 



tons 

115,180] 

17,678 
513 



tons 
59,620 
59,036 
15,673 
557 



tons 
61,231 
63,786 
14,086 
283 



tons 
69,779 
67,777 
14,730 
347 



Total 

Brine (salt equivalent) 



131,056 
114,737 



133,371 

97,928 



134,896 
96,242 



139,386 
104,721 



152,633 
124,118 



Total sold or used . 



245,793 



231,299 



231,138 



244,107 



276,751 



^'alue 

Wage-earners- No. 

Wages 



1,568,250 
263 

$288,237 



$1,760,388 

233 

$259,646 



$1,789,752 

215 

$253,579 



$1,755,087 

242 

$261,214 



;l,734,196 

252 

$296,116 



'Pressed blocks included with table and dairy grade after 1930. 
-Workers at the Sandwich salt and chemical works are included. 



The Walker Salt Corporation, Limited, of London, Ont., has drilled a salt 
well 1,485 feet deep at Port Franks in Lambton county. This company has com- 
pleted the foundations of the salt plant and ordered the machinery for open-pan 
production early in 1935. This grade of salt is particularlv suited for dairy use, 
and will supply the local market. The Goderich Salt Company is putting in a 
triple eft'ect vacuum-pan evaporation, which is expected to be in operation early 
in 1935. An important feature is that for the first time all the machinery in 
connection with this plant has been manufactured in Canada. Formerly all 
salt-making machinery was imported from the United States. This will give a 
capacity equal to the vSandwich plant. 

Talc 

A fairly stable market has been developed for this mineral, both in the 

ground and prepared condition. The domestic consumption is steady, and 

exports are made to the United States and Europe. The production record, as 

reported by two companies at Madoc, in Hastings county, for the last five years, 

follows : — 

TALC STATISTICS, 1930-1934 





Sales 


Wage- 
earners, 
mine and 
mill 


Wages 




Quantity 


Value 


paid 


1930 

1931 


tons 
11,664 
11,806 
12,064 
15,114 
13,934 


$133,213 
122,044 
111,585 
142,134 
135,978 


No. 
36 
36 
38 
43 
47 


$32,718 
29,419 


1932 


30,587 


1933 


31,813 


1934 


33.796 







36 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Increased talc sales in 1933 were due partly to the gradual betterment in 
some lines of business using talc products, stich as textiles, cosmetics, etc. Some 
of the buying, however, may have arisen from the fear of possible higher prices, 
which would accotmt for the falling off in the demand during 1934. 



STRUCTURAL MATERIALS 

Building Permits 

In 61 Canadian cities btiilding permits in 1934 were valued at §27,457,524. 
Of this total 30 Ontario cities accounted for $14,351,380, as noted in the following 
table abstracted from the Anuiial Review of Building Permits in Canada in 1934, 
issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Department of Trade and Com- 
merce, Ottawa: — 

BUILDING PERMITS. 1920-1934 



Year 


30 Ontario 
cities, 
value 


Wholesale 
prices 
index' 


Toronto 

metropolitan 

area,' 

value 


Wages index 
1913 = 100' 


1920 


$58,636,365 


n44 


$30,049,413 


180.9 


1921 


59,315,845 


122.8 


31,979,346 


170.5 


1922 


81,396,259 


108.7 


36,405,625 


162.5 


1923 


74,673.080 


111.9 


39,530,877 


166.4 


1924 


57,330.141 


106.6 


29,636,428 


169.1 


1925 


59.888.867 


102.9 


32,408,636 


170.4 


1926 


6.3.373.757 


100 


31,588,124 


172.1 


1927 


79,8X3.344 


96.1 


37,316,511 


179.3 


1928 


104.777.566 


97.4 


59,817,568 


185.6 


1929 


95.()5o,S27 


99 


57,522,927 


197.5 


1930 


69,042,946 


90.8 


38,371,587 


203.2 


1931 


44,371,578 


81.9 


27,950,136 


195.7 


1932 


16,887,761 


77.2 


9,461,050 


178.2 


1933 


9,116,743 


78.3 


5,114.351 


158 


1934 


14,351,380 


83 


8,396,775 


154.8 



'Applies to average index numbers for Canadian wholesale prices of building materials 
on the basis of 1926 = 100, as compiled by the Dominion Bureau of vStatistics. In 1913 the 
index was 67, dropping to a low of 60.5 in 1915. 

-Includes York and East York municipalities. 

'Average index numbers of wages in Canadian Iniilding trades as compiled by the Federal 
Department of Labour on the basis of 1913 = 100 

^Peak year. 

Construction Contracts 

The value of Canadian construction contracts awarded for 1934, reported 
by the McLean Building Review, was $125,811,500, as compared with $97,289,800 
in 1933. Ontario contracts in 1934 amounted to $63,358,300, or 50.4 per cent, 
of the total. Prices of materials were considerably below the peak of 1920, and 
decided drops were recorded in 1930, 1931, and 1932, but a perceptible recovery 
is recorded in 1934. Canadian construction contracts in 1933 were on a par 
with the war years, 1916-18, dropping below the $10,000,000 mark. Figures 
by classes of construction for a 5-year period follow : — 

VALUE OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS, 1930-1934 



Classification 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


Residential 

Business 

Industrial 

Engineering 


$44,427,000 
52,636,400 
12,787,400 
65,608,800 


$39,274,300 

28,819.400 

6,836.300 

50,522,300 


$14,143,200 

16,925,600 

1,871,000 

16,352,000 


$12,653,800 

9,716,100 

4,699,700 

15,503,800 


$17,578,600 

15,795,600 

4,305.200 

25,678,900 


Total 


$175,459,600 $125,452,300 


$49,291,800 


$42,573,400 


$63,358,300 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



37 



Cement 

Ontario's production of cement came from four plants: Belleville, Lakefield, 
and Port Colborne, of the Canada Cement Company, and the St. Marys plant 
of the St. Marys Cement Company. 

Production during the past decade is given in the following table :^ 

PORTLAND CEMENT STATISTICS, 1925-1934 



Year 



Operating 
plants 



Sales 



Quantity 



^'alue 



Average price 
per barrel 



1925. 
1926. 
1927. 
1928. 
1929. 
1930. 
1931. 
1932 . 
1933. 
1934. 



No. 
4 
3 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 



barrels' 
3.462,358 
3,398,860 
3,751,786 
3,911,795 
4,624,712 
3,942,690 
3,470,056 
1,599,342 
1,095,845 
1,702,128 



$5,253,911 
4,792,857 
5,144,326 
5,520,897 
6,608,246 
5,779,404 
5,006,826 
2,288,975 
1,587,812 
2,403,590 



$1.52 
1.41 
1.34 
1.41 
1.43 
1.47 
1.44 
1.44 
1.45 
1.41 



'350 pounds. 

The cement industry and the building and construction trades are inter- 
dependent. This is well illustrated by the annual report of the president of the 
Canada Cement Company for the fiscal year ending November 30, 193-1. He 
says in part: — 

Referring more particularly to the building industry, in which you are vitally interested, 
some progress has been made, but less progress than in the majority of other lines of business. 
In no other important country is this industry at so low a point relatively as in Canada. It will 
be recalled, however, that the building industry in Canada was one of the industries that was 
late in feeling the effects of the depression, and it is, therefore, probably natural that its revival 
should lag. The improvement which took place during the year is indicated by the building 
permits, which increased 34 per cent, over 1933, a substantial improvement as expressed in 
percentages, but bearing in mind the extremely low volume of 1933, the volume increase is not 
of great proportions. It should be said that the public works programme of the Federal Gov- 
ernment will not be reflected in demand for materials in substantial quantities until 1935. 

Your company's business showed an increase in volume of sales during the year in line with 
the somewhat better conditions prevailing in the building industry. We might state that the 
total consumption of cement in Canada was on a very restricted scale. While improvement 
was made over the 1933 volume, the total sales were disappointing when compared with 
normal years. 

It is difficult to make a forecast for the coming year, but, from information gained from 
various sources at your company's command, we are inclined to believe that improvement in 
the building industry will be slow for the immediate future. Nevertheless, the year should 
show some improvement over that of 1934. 



, Cement Products 

In recent years the cement products industry in Ontario has assumed con- 
siderable importance. Since 1924 no data have been included in the tables of 
mineral production, as the raw materials entering into the manufacture of these 
products have all been accounted for. Cement products being so closely allied 
to the building industry, statistics are included so that complete information 
covering all structural materials is available under one cover. Monolithic con- 
struction is not included. The following tables give the record of materials used 
and products made during the past two years and general statistics for a 5-year 
period : — 



38 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



CEMENT PRODUCTS MANUFACTURE, 1933 AND 1934' 



Materials used 



1933 



Quantity 



Cost at 
works 



1934 



Quantity 



Cost at 
works 



Portland cement , 

Quicklime 

Sand 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 

Cinders 

Boxes, crates, lumber, etc. 

Reinforcing 

Haydite 

Brass 

Other materials 



. ..bbls. 

bu. 

. cu. yds. 
. cu. yds. 
. cu. yds. 
. cu. yds. 



37,900 
81 

13,017 
7,481 
2,624 



. . . . tons 
cu. yds. 



4,780 



$90,461 

43 

14,207 

8,068 

4,798 

9,277 

6,345 

5,707 

16,730 

16,717 

39,857 



64,755 

8 

21,985 

10,621 

4,298 

2,867 



145 
9,120 



$154,039 

8 

23,233 

14,078 

5,958 

6,159 

7,340 

9,741 

31,921 

11,350 

57,258 



Total. 



$212,210 



$321,085 



Products made 



Quantity 



Selling 
value 



Quantity 



Selling 
value 



Artificial stone 

Cinder blocks M 

Cement bricks M 

Cement hollow building blocks M 

Cement laundry tubs No. 

Cement posts, poles, etc 

Cement sewer, culvert, and drain pipe 

Cement stucco 

Burial vaults 

Crushed stone 

Haydite blocks tons 

Haydite roof slabs tons 

Other products 

Custom work and repairs . 



237 
166 



2,697 



835 
2,352 



$37,417 

39,377 

4,140 

122,689 

19,576 

694 

133.300 

5,424 

9,444 

3,162 

7,103 

66,414 

98,680 

2,765 



617 

372 

1,251 

2,204 



$32,314 

72,509 

7,645 

179,814 

17,115 

6,610 

119,086 

8,215 

9,805 



5,019 
2,084 



$40,248 

55,517 

137,647 

651 



Total. 



$550,185 



$687,176 



'Supplied by Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 



PRINCIPAL STATISTICS OF THE CEMENT PRODUCTS INDUSTRY, 1930-1934' 



Year 



No. 

of 

plants 



Wage- 
earners, 
average 

No. 



Salaries 

and 
wages 



Cost of fuel 

and 
electricitv 



Capital 
invested 



Value of 

products at 

work 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 



92 
69 
48 
54 



533 
562 
352 
245 

251 



$658,381 
599,640 
308,898 
199,056 
274,045 



$44,697 
43,429 
27,692 
19,008 
24,394 



$13,148,950 
2,995,610 
2,286,460 
1,642,244 
1,784,166 



$1,921,018 

1,782,400 

737,326 

550,185 

687,176 



^Supplied by Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 



Lime 

Lime is used quite extensively for chemical purposes in addition to being 
an ingredient of mortar and sand-lime brick. During 1934, 19 companies and 
individuals, operating 22 plants, reported sales that totalled 191,041 tons, valued 
at $1,536,288, as against 146,193 tons, worth SI, 227, 196, in 1933. Statistics 
for the past five years follow: — 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



39 



LIME STATISTICS. 1930-1934 





Lime marketed or used 


Fuel 
costs 


Wage- 
earners 




Year 


Hydrated 


Quicklime 


Wages 




Quantity 


Total 

value 


Per 

ton 


Quantity 


Total 
value 


Per 
ton 




1930. . . 

1931 . . . 

1932. . . 

1933 . . . 

1934 . . . 


tons 
42,726 
34,284 
23,518 
19,733 
22,281 


$504,178 
379,996 
255,223 
220,291 
249,038 


$11.80 
11.08 
10.85 
11.16 
11.18 


tons 
209,340 
113,267 
143,185 
126,460 
168,760 


$1,673,409 

841,194 

1,018,007 

1,006,905 

1,287,250 


$7.99 
7.43 
7.11 
7.96 
7.63 


$343,237 
177,310 
204,546 
188,317 
173,951 


No. 
330 

287 
203 
210 
187 


$352,768 
216,337 
154,361 
111,637 
116,020 



Distribution of the quicklime and hydrated lime sold in 1934, as reported 
by the producing companies, was as follows: — 



Industrial consumption 



Quicklime 



Quantity 



Value 



Hydrated lime 



Quantity 



Value 



Building trades: finishing and masons. 

Sand-lime brick 

Agriculture 

Chemical and metallurgical industries: 

Smelters 

Iron and steel 

Gold-milling 

Pulp and paper 

Glass 

Sugar 

Tanneries 

Fertilizers and insecticides 

Dealers and others 

Other chemicals' 



tons 
15,885 
2,321 
162 

2,635 
8,612 
6,168 
3,239 
2,226 
3,198 
2,189 
747 
2,059 
119,319 



$104,492 

16,912 

1,121 

14,598 
60,255 
38,868 
19,784 
16,472 
47,573 
15,210 
5,229 
13,881 
932,857 



tons 
19,375 
635 
461 

102 



$223,836 
4,516 
4,393 

918 

72 



110 



990 



257 
397 
154 

782 



2,313 
3,573 
1,386 
7,041 



Total 168,760 



$1,287,250 



22,281 $249,038 



•Uses for lime under this heading include the manufacture of alkali, acetate of lime, and 
calcium carbide, the last-mentioned being used largely for making cyanamid. 



Sand and Gravel 

Preliminary figures for the year 1934 show a marked rise in the quantity 
of sand and gravel produced, but the selling value did not increase proportionally. 
The figures, however, are encouraging, reflecting as they do a greatly increased 
consumption by a revived construction industry. 

OUTPUT OF SAND AND GRAVEL, 1933 AND 1934 



Source 



1933 



Quantity 



Value 



1934 



Quantity 



Value 



Private pit operators 

Dredged from Great Lakes and rivers. . 
Department of Northern Development. 

Department of Highways 

Miscellaneous counties and townships'. 



tons 
2,429,042 

243,633 
1,038,108 

408,700 
1,550,547 



1,145.316 
135,352 
207,624 
204,.350 
775.274 



tons 

551,145 

464,507 
4,345,694 

620,000 
1,273,580 



$249,980 
292,467 
225,332 
310,000 
636,790 



Total 6,670,0.30 .$2,467,916 7,254,926 I $1,714,569 



'Figures for 1933 used as an estimate for 1934. 



40 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Sand-Lime Products 

The past three years have been dull for marketing sand-lime brick. This 
is in part owing to a depressed construction industry, but competition of other 
products, such as cinder blocks and kindred materials has cut into this trade 
considerably. Four companies were active in the Toronto metropolitan area, 
and in addition to brick produced sand-lime building blocks, ready mixed mortar, 
and plaster. These items have been included in the table "vSummary of ^Mineral 
Statistics, 1934," on page 2, under the title "sand-lime products," and the selling 
value as a result shows a decided increase. It should be pointed out, therefore, 
that, prior to 1934, the figures of value refer to sand-lime brick only. The selling 
value in 1934 was S146,009, as against S69,7S5 in the previous year. 



Stone 

The output of limestone, trap, granite, and sandstone in 1934, was almost 
double that for 1933 in quantity, but the proportional increase in value was 
not quite so great. A partially revived building industry and a larger highway 
construction programme were instrumental in reopening many quarries. 

A new feature in the stone-production industry was the inclusion of slate, 
which has been absent from the list of building materials for several decades. 
A slate quarry situated in the northwest corner of lot 5, concession VI, Madoc 
township, was worked fifty years ago and supplied roofing slates for a few build- 
ings in various towns of Eastern Ontario. It was reopened in 1934. There is 
a potential market for roofing shingles, blackboards, granules, and slate flour. 
The new operator is Ontario vSlate Mines, Limited. An initial shipment of 120 
tons of granules was made during the year. 

OUTPUT OF STONE, 1932, 1033, AND 1934 



\'arietv 



1932 



Quantity Value 



1933 



Quantity | Value 



1934 



Quantity Value 



Limestone and marble . 

Trap 

Granite 

Sandstone 

Slate 



tons 

1,827,858 

36,915 

36,357 

4,008 



$1,459,224 

52,659 

133,698 

9,435 



tons 
1,225.754 
17,201 
2,449 



$931,501 
26,629 
12,804 
12.334 



tons 
2,374,671 
48,298 
27,227 
10,105 
120 



$1,808,663 
96,314 
32,072 

28,458 
600 



Total . 



1,905,138 $1,655,016 



1,253,907 



$983,268 



2,460,421 ,$1,966,107 



CLAY PRODUCTS 
Refractory Clays 



The following information has been furnished by W. S. Dyer, former geolo- 
gist of the Ontario Department of Mines, who visited the Hilder deposit during 
the summer of 1934: — 

It is well known that fire clay and sedimentary clay exist in the Moose River basin in 
Northern Ontario. Deposits that are near the railway, like the grey and black fire clays of the 
Onakawana lignite field, are covered under 50 to 100 feet of glacial debris and would have to 
be mined by underground methods. Deposits under shallow overburden, like the highly 
refractory white and mottled clays of the Missinaibi river, are 30 miles across the muskeg from 
a railway. 

The only development at present in operation is known as the Hilder deposit, now being 
investigated bj' Minefinders, Limited. It is located on the west side of the Mattagami river. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



41 



7 miles north of Smoky falls, the terminus of a 50-miIe logging railway from Kapuskasing. The 
work to date has indicated that a good body of clay rises above the water level of the iMattagami 
river and is overlain by overburden of about 35 feet. In the summer of 1934, Alinefinders, 
Limited, built a road into the property, erected camps, took in a shovel with 1 ^ o cubic yards 
capacity, and completed an open cut 350 by 150 feet. In the bottom of the open cut, which is 
25 to 30 feet in depth, Cretaceous refi'actory clay and silica sand are exposed. 



Heavy Clay Products 

The following table shows in detail the quantities, and values of the several 
kinds of clay products made and sold by Ontario producers: — 

HEAVY CLAY PRODUCTS MARKETED, 1934 



Kind 



Quantity 



Value 



Brick: 

Of. J [face No. 

Soft-mud process< t^t 

^ l^common No. 

c^-ct J ^ • ^^ fface No. 

Stm-mud (wire cut) processx t.t 

^ ' ^ \common No. 

T^ [face No. 

Drv-press< ^.^ 

- ^ ^common No. 

Fancy or ornamental brick (including special shapes, embossed 

and enamelled brick) No. 

Sewer No. 

Tile: 

Structural (hollow blocks, including fireproofing and load- 
bearing tile) = tons 

Roofing tile No 

Floor tile (quarries) sq. ft 

Drain No. 

Sewer pipe (including copings, flue linings, etc.) 

Pottery (flower pots), from domestic clay 

Havdite .' 



3,514,125 
7,192,829 
15,060,236 
6,875,503 
4,835,905 
2,046,158 

14,277 
307,147 



13,576 

44,115 

77,604 

6,017,379 



$64,642 
96,776 

311,490 
97,323 

103,718 
33,177 

835 
5,992 



102,243 

1,852 

16,886 

137,699 

226,005 

52,578 

9,790 



Total value . 



$1,261,006 



The value of clay products marketed for the last pre-war year, 1913, for 
the year of maximum output, 1922, and for the past five years is given below: — 



VALUE OF CLAY PRODUCTS SOLD OR USED, 1913, 1922, AND 1930-1934 


Product 


1913 


1922 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


Brick: 

Common 

Pressed, fancy, 
building tile, etc. 

Pottery 

Drain tile 

Sewer pipe 

Havdite 


$3,283,894 

1,162,860 

52,875 

292,767 

600,297 


$2,614,120 

2,899,205 

88,889 
368,180 
973,824 


$792,234 

2,683,983 

89,381 

593,980 

834,361 

227,275 


$662,777 

1,707,297 

73,860 

244,368 

696,694 

167,533 


$305,566 

704,342 

67,866 

144,579 

451,786 

16.366 


$167,021 

425,743 
'52,740 
179,015 
185,048 
15.012 


$227,276 

607,658 

52,578 

137,699 

226,005 

9,790 












Total 


$5,392,693 


$6,944,218 


$5,221,214 


$3,552,799 $1,690,505,$1, 024,579 


$1,261,006 



'Includes fire-clay blocks and shapes worth 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 
Mining Company Incorporations 

A summary of mining companies incorporated and licensed in Ontario 
from 1913 to 1934, inclusive, is given hereunder: — - 



42 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



MINING COMPANIES INCORPORATED AND LICENSED, 1913-1934 



Year 



Incorporated 



Extra-provincial and 

mortmain companies 

licensed 



No. 



Nominal 
capital 



"No par" companies 



No. 



No. 



Shares 



Capital for use 
in Ontario 



1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 



119 

80 

59 

83 

100 

59 

149 

119 

67 

91 

88 

85 

70 

145 

199 

211 

97 

37 

44 

43 

95 

212 



S78.000.000 

39. 030. 000 

42,005.000 

109,079,500 

117.183,000 

4'.i>()(l ,000 

2'2:;.i'i(H) nnO 
14(1,1 1;t4. IK lO 
10.5, 71.5, 000 
181,040.000 
17',t,205.500 
156.4S5.000 
107.400,000 
165,655,750 
344,145,000 
495,575,000 
142.390.000 
23,234.600 
60,670,000 
58,766,000 
158,365.000 
488,335,000 



4 
28 
30 
28 
27 
20 
15 
12 
21 
82 



9,010,000 
22,386,500 
40,034,000 
30,778,400 
32,557,200 
16,808,909 
5,909,000 
5,844,000 
23,165,000 
86,183,000 



12 


821,735,000 


13 


5,445,000 


2 


10,200,000 


8 


7,011,650 


7 


7,302,000 


7 


15,000,000 


10 


9,554,197 


12 


9,4.35,000 


6 


1,030,500 


6 


830,000 


6 


1,775,000 


2 


200,000 


3 


162,510 


6 


4,850,000 


10 


3,260,000 


17 


7,208.500 


13 


1,540,000 


6 


5.525,000 


1 , 


400,000 








1,290,000 
925.000 



Of the 294 companies incorporated in 1934, 212 had specified capital only, 
82 were companies having shares without nominal or par value exclusively, 
and 4 companies had shares of both kinds. 

MORTMAIN AND EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANIES LICENSED BY ORDER-IN- 

COUNCIL IN 1934 



Name of company 



Place of 
incorporation 



Date of 
license 
(O.C). 



A'alue of land 

holdings in 

Ontario 



Clark Gold Mines, Limited 

Cobnor Silver Mines, Limited 

Consolidated Chibougamau Goldfields, Ltd. 

Lake Rowan Gold Mines. Limited 

Manitoba and Eastern Mines, Limited .... 
Pamour Porcupine Mines, Limited. ........ 

Red Crest Gold Mines, Limited 

Reliance Gold Mining Company 

Sakoose Gold Mines, Limited 



Quebec! Qct. 30 -8100,000 

Canada^ Oct. 25 ! 50,000 

Quebec! ^pril 5 , 100,000 

Canada' Oct. 25 I 100,000 

Canada' Dec. 14 100,000 

Canada' Mar. 23 .100,000 

Canada' Oct. 25 100,000 

Delaware- May 8 25,000 

Quebec' July 10 250,000 



Total (9 companies) 8925,000 

'Incorporation under The Companies Act, Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906, Part 1 of 
Chapter 79. Licenses are issued pursuant to the provisions of The Mortmain and Charitable 
L'ses Act, Province of Ontario, "to acquire, hold and assure land in mortmain in Ontario." 
This applies also to Quebec province. 

-Where a company is of foreign incorporation, or is incorporated in a province of Canada 
other than Quebec with which a reciprocity agreement exists, it is necessary for it to take out 
an Extra- Provincial license to do business in Ontario and to declare the amount of capital 
for use in Ontario. 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



43 



MINING COMPANIES INCORPORATED IN ONTARIO IN 1934 HAVING SHARES 
WITHOUT NOMINAL OR PAR VALUE 



Name of company 



Head office 



Date of 
incorpo- 
ration 



No. of 
shares 



Alcanada Mining Corporation, Limited 

Algold Mines, Limited 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Limited' 

Amalgamated Mills and Mines, Limited 

Associated Mine Managers, Limited (private) . . . 

Atigo Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Atnel Mines, Limited • 

Banner Gold Mines, Limited 

Bathurst Gold Mines, Limited 

Belmore Syndicate, Limited, The 

Belorrain Mines, Limited 

Bilmac Gold Mines, Limited 

Blue Eagle Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Boundary Lake Mining Company, Limited 

Bruce-Matachewan Gold Syndicate, Limited. . . . 

Bruell Geld Syndicate, Limited 

British United Natural Gas, Limited. 

Canadian Gold Refining Company, Limited 

Canadian Slate Mines, Limited 

Cardiff Waters, Limited 

Chromium Alining and Smelting Corporation, Ltd 

Concordia Gold Alining Company, Ltd 

Custom Smelters of Canada, Limited. 

Dominion Royalty Corporation, Limited 

Ensign Gold Alines, Limited 

Germac Exploration Company, Limited (private) 

Howard Holdings, Limited ' 

Inez, Limited (private) 

Jackpine-Sturgeon Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Jomac Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Karl Springer Exploration Company, Limited. . . 

Kawinogan Gold, Limited 

Kenogamisis Gold Mines, Limited 

Key Properties, Limited (private) 

K. L. Exploration Company, Limited 

Knox Sturgeon River Alines, Limited 

Koch Daneff Gold Alines, Limited 

Lac-Teck Gold Alines, Limited 

La Fond Geld Alines, Limited 

Long Lac Inlet Alines, Limited 

AIcLaren-Porcupine Gold Alines, Limited 

AIcNeil Longlac Gold Alines, Limited 

Alargo Alines, Limited 

Alat-a-Lac Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Alinemakers, Limited 

Alining Claims Alart, Limited (private) 

AIurray-Algoma Alining Company, Limited 

Nepheline Company, Limited, The' 

Neville Canadian Gold Alines, Limited 

Newfoundland South Coast Syndicate, Limited. . 

Northern Alining Syndicate, Limited 

Nu Sigma Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Oklend Gold Alines, Limited 

Oliver Severn Gold Alines, Limited 

Ontario Chemical Minerals, Limited (private) . . . 

Orecana, Limited 

Pershing Gold vSyndicate, Limited 

Playfair Iron Alines, Limited (private) 

Quebec Eureka Gold Alines, Limited 

Rahn Lake Alines Corporation, Limited 

Security Gold Alines, Limited 

South Porcupine Alines, Limited 

Springer Sturgeon Gold Alines, Limited 



Toronto 

Toronto 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Toronto , 

Toronto 

Port Arthur . . . , 
Sault Ste. Alarie 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Cobalt 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Windsor 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto , 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

South Porcupine 

W'indsor 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Lakefield 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

North Bay 

Uxbridge 

Toronto 

Toronto 



June 21 
Feb. 13 
Dec. 12 
May 7 
July 9 
April 30 
Sept. 4 
Nov. 2 
April 20 
April 3 
Dec. 1 
Sept. 11 
June 18 
June 19 
July 13 
July 27 
Aug. 3 
Feb. 15 
May 22 
Nov. 28 
Alav 12 
May 12 
Julv 25 
Alar. 17 
April 30 
Aug. 10 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
June 
Feb. 
May 
Sept. 26 
May 14 
Sept. 12 
Oct. 11 
Nov. 16 
Sept. 26 
April 12 
Aug. 20 
Aug. 21 
Oct. 18 
Alay 4 
June 5 
Alay 16 
July 4 
Jan. 19 
Aug. 10 
Alar. 23 
Sept. 13 
Oct. 17 
June 14 
Aug. 28 
Sept. 27 
Nov. 21 
Alay 21 
Nov. 8 
May 3 
Feb. 21 
June 25 
April 18 
Alar. 20 
Sept. 6 



1,000,000 

2,500,000 

130,000 

200,000 

4,000 

100,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 

4,000,000 

6,000 

1,000,000 

2,000,000 

7,000 

30.000 

10,000 

10,000 

1,000,000 

10,000 

1,000,000 

100,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 

100,000 

350,000 

1,500,000 

40,000 

40,000 

40,000 

100,000 

10,000 

40,000 

40,000 

3,000,000 

40,000 

40,000 

3,000,000 

4,000,000 

3,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

3,000,000 

40,000 

150,000 

6,000 

20,000 

100,000 

40,000 

50,000 

3,000,000 

100,000 

10,000 

10,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 

300,000 

100,000 

25,000 

20,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

3,000,000 



44 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



MINING COMPANIES INCORPORATED IN ONTARIO IN 1934 HAVING SHARES 
WITHOUT NOMINAL OR PAR VALVE— Continued 



Name of company 


Head office 


Date of 
incorpo- 
ration 


No. of 
shares 


Sterling Exploration Company, Limited^ 

Strathy Explorers, Limited 

Straw Lake Beach Gold Mines Syndicate, Limited . . 

Sturgeon Aurora Mines, Limited 

Sturgeon Bridge Gold Mines, Limited 

Sturgeon River Gold Basin Syndicate, Limited 

Summit Range Gold Mines, Limited 

Sweet-Sturgeon Syndicate, Limited 

Tasmijopen Mining Company, Limited 

Temagami Development Company, Limited 

Trans-Canada refining Corporation, Limited 

Universal Exploration vSyndicate, Limited 

Vanquelin-Sifton Lake Mines, Limited 

Velma Gold Mining vSyndicate, Limited 

Walker Salt Corporation, Limited, The 

William Irwin and Company, Limited (private) .... 

Wilmac Trusts, Limited' (private) 

Woman River Gold Mines, Limited 

Yellow Metal Syndicate, Limited 


Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

London 

Toronto 

Toronto 

New Liskeard .... 
Toronto 


May 23 
Oct. 17 
Aug. 21 
Oct. in 
Sept. 17 
Oct. 3 
April 6 
Oct. 30 
Sept. 20 
Mav 28 
April 13 
Oct. 12 
Aug. 22 
Sept. 15 
Sept. 20 
Julv 24 
Aug. 29 
Oct. 22 
Oct. 17 


10,000 

40,000 

115,000 

100,000 

3,000,000 
10,000 

1,000,000 
25,000 

3,000.000 
60,000 
40,000 
20,000 

3,000.000 

10,000 

250,000 

50.000 

25.000 

5,000,000 
10,000 


Total (82 companies) 






86.183,000 



^See also list with specified capital. Four companies having both specified capital and 
'no par" shares are included in both lists. 



ONTARIO COMPANIES WITH SPECIFIED CAPITAL INCORPORATED IN 1934 



Name of company 



Head office 



Date of 
incorpo- 
ration 



Capital 



Ace Exploration and Holding Company, Limited . . . 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Limited' 

Algoma Summit Gold INIines. Limited 

Amity Gold Mines, Limited 

A. R. L. Gold Mines, Limited 

Atlas Securities Company, Limited 

Austin Rouyn Gold INIines, Limited 

Avocalon Alining Syndicate, Limited 

Ballantyne Long Lac Alines. Limited 

Bankfield Gold Mines. Limited 

Bessey and Company, Limited, N.R. (private) 

Big Divide Gold Mines, Limited 

Bigstone Bay Gold Mines, Limited 

Birch Bay Gold Mines, Limited 

Boyles Brothers Drilling (Eastern), Limited 

Bouchard Clericy Gold Alines, Limited 

Bourbeau Lake Chibougamau Alines, Limited 

Bramor Alining (Ontario), Limited 

Brennan and Kenty Brothers Prospecting Co., Ltd. . 

British Guiana Goldfields, Limited 

Bur-Ley Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Burmas Mines, Limited 

Burwash Yellowknife Mines, Limited 

Calder-Bousquet Gold Alines, Limited 

Canadian Gold and Aletals Alining Company, Limited 
Canadian Leviathan Exploration Company, Limited. 

Canador Alining, Limited 

Canamerican Corporation. Limited (private) 

Cardinal Gold Alines, Limited 

Centralac Alining Company, Limited 

Central Alalartic Alines, Limited 



Toronto 

Sault Ste. Alarie 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Kenora 

Toronto 

Kirkland Lake . 

Toronto 

New Liskeard . . 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto . 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 



Mar. 21 
Dec. 12 
May 17 
Feb. 21 
Sept. 22 
May 9 
Oct. 27 
June 5 
June 28 
April 18 
June 20 
Sept. 28 
June 22 
June 25 
Alay 30 
Aug. 29 
Alav 15 
Feb. 9 
Feb. 20 
July 27 
July 3 
May 
Oct. 
Feb. 
July 
Nov. 



Mar. 17 
Sept. 17 
Feb. 24 
Dec. 7 
June 28 



$100,000 
2,700.000 
5.000.000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 

40,000 

4,000,000 

400,000 

3,000,000 

3,000.000 

25,000 
3,000.000 
2,500.000 
2.000.000 

10.000 
3,000.000 

30,000 
1,500,000 
1,000.000 
2,000.000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000.000 
3,000,000 
10,000,000 
100,000 

40,000 

40,000 

75,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



45 



ONTARIO COMPANIES WITH SPECIFIED CAPITAL INCORPORATED 

IN 19M— Continued 



Name of company 



Head office 



Date of 
incorpo- 
ration 



Capital 



Central Porphyry Contacts, Limited 

Craig Gold Mines, Limited 

Chappie-Mammoth Gold Mines, Limited 

Chieftain Gold Mines, Limited 

Cintorico Gold Mines, Limited 

Cripple Creek Mining and Milling Company, Ltd. . . 

Crossroads Gold ]\Iines, Limited 

Darwin Gold Mines, Limited 

Delhi (Temagami) Gold Mines, Limited 

Delnite Mines, Limited 

Dimbarr Gold Mines, Limited (private) 

Dime Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Dominion Explorers, Limited 

East Lamaque Gold Mines, Limited 

Edgecreek Consolidated Gold Syndicate, Limited. . . 

Edgelake Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Edwalt Corporation, Limited 

El-Bonanza Mining Corporation, Limited 

Ellen Gold Mines, Limited 

Federated Mining Corporation, Limited 

Foley-O'Brien Corporation, Limited 

Fort Hope Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited 

Franklin Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Frontier Red Lake Gold IMines, Limited 

Gale Gold IMines, Limited 

Gardner Silver Mines, Limited 

General Mining and Development, Ltd. (private)... 
General Ventures Mining Corporation, Limited. . . . 

Goderich Matachewan Gold Mines, Limited 

Goldcrest Mines, Limited 

Gold Eagle Gold Alines, Limited 

Golden Arm Alines, Limited 

Golden Arrow Mining Company, Limited (private) 
Golden Gate Mining Company, Limited 

Golden Spur Syndicate, Limited 

Golden Star Consolidated Alines, Limited 

Goldfinders, Limited 

Gold Range Alines, Limited 

Gold Valley Alines, Limited 

Goodwin Gold Alines, Limited 

Gosark Golds, Limited 

Graham Bousquet Gold Alines, Limited 

Greater Canada Alines Corporation, Limited 

Grierson Sturgeon River Alines, Limited 

Groundhog Gold Alines, Limited 

Hard Rock Gold Alines, Limited 

Hargreaves Kirkland Gold Alines, Limited, Ed. . . . 

Harkness-Hays Gold Alines, Limited 

Harlake Gold Alines, Limited 

Harrison and Company, Limited, W. F. (private).. 

Harwood Lake Alines, Limited 

Hillside Gold Alines, Limited 

Hudson-Patricia Gold Alines, Limited 

Interlac Gold, Limited 

James Kirkland Alines, Limited 

Jaroba Sturgeon Gold Alines, Limited 

Jellicoe Gold Alining Company, Limited 

Kert-AIacDonald Red Lake Gold Alines, Limited. . 

Keyroc Gold Alining Company, Limited 

Killoran Home Alines, Limited 

Kinghorn Sturgeon Alines, Limited 

Kirkland Consolidated Alines, Limited 

Kirmaque Gold Alines, Limited 



Toronto 

Madoc 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Schumacher 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Porcupine 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

North Bay 

Toronto 

Trafalgar tp 

Toronto 

Goderich 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Red Lake 

Trafalgar tp 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Kirkland Lake . . 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Sault Ste. Alarie. 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Kirkland Lake . . 



Jan. 3 
Alay 19 
Sept. 19 
Aug. 28 
Sept. 8 
Aug. 9 
Dec. 3 
Aug. 16 
Sept. 5 
Oct. 23 
Dec. 19 
Aug. 17 
Mar. 14 
Mar. 17 
June 27 
Sept. 21 
Aug. 1 
Jan. 13 
Alav 30 
April 27 
May 21 
July 12 
Aug. 17 
May 3 
April 3 
Jan. 26 
Alay 30 
April 3 
April 3 
Aug. 31 
Feb. 13 
April 27 
Aug. 28 
July 30 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 15 
Nov. 28 
July 14 
Mar. 23 
Aug. 7 
Alay 18 
May 15 
Feb. 5 
Sept. 26 
June 18 
Jan. 6 
Aug. 24 
Julv 6 
April 11 
Dec. 21 
Feb. 21 
Aug. 21 
April 3 
Aug. 10 
April 17 
Oct. 2 
Alay 17 
July 6 
Aug. 14 
May 4 
Oct. 12 
June 11 
Sept. 20 



3,000,000 
5,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,500,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
50,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
150,000 
3,000,000 
40,000 
5,000,000 
3,000.000 
5,000,000 
2,100,000 
3.000,000 
3,500,000 
3,000.000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
500,000 
2,000.000 
3,000.000 
3,000,000 
3,000.000 
3,000,000 
150,000 
3.000,000 
120.000 
2,000,000 
40,000 
3,000,000 
5.000.000 
2.000.000 
1.000,000 
3,000,000 
6.000,000 
3.000.000 
3,000,000 
2.500.000 
3.000.000 
3,000,000 
3,000.000 
40.000 
3,000.000 
3,000.000 
2.500.000 
500,000 
3.000.000 
3.000,000 
3,000,000 
3.000,000 
5,000.000 
2.000,000 
3,500,000 
7,000,000 
3,000,000 



46 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



ONTARIO COMPANIES WITH SPECIFIED CAPITAL INCORPORATED 

IN IQ34— Continued 



Name of company 



Head office 



Date of 
incorpo- 
ration 



Capital 



Kozak Gold Mines, Limited 

Lac Development, Limited (private) 

Lake Caswell Mines, Limited 

Lakeland Gold. Limited 

Lake St. John Company, Limited 

Langmuir Longlac Gold Mines, Limited 

Lapa Cadillac Gold rvlines. Limited 

L. B. United Mines, Limited 

Leader Gold IMines, Limited 

Lois Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

Longacre Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Longlac Adair Alines, Limited 

Longlac Lagoon Gold Mines, Limited 

Lucky Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited 

Macandrew Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

]\IacFarlane Long Lac Gold IMines, Limited 

Alacjoe Sturgeon Gold Mines, Limited 

McQuaig Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

Magnet Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

]\Iagwell Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

^Mahood and Company, Limited, Grant (private) 
Manitario Investments and Exploration, Limited 

r^Ianitou Gold, Limited 

IManley Gold Mines, Limited 

]\Ianley Quebec Gold Mines, Limited 

Matheson District Gold Mines, Limited 

May-Spiers Gold ]\Iines, Limited 

Michipicoten Gold Mines, Limited 

Middle Bav Mines, Limited 

Alid-Tyrreil Gold, Limited 

Millar Mineral Exploration Company, Limited. . 

Mine Seekers and Developers, Limited 

IMonarch Mines, Limited 

Monetary Metals, Limited 

Mooshla Gold Mines, Limited 

IMosher Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

IMurwood Gold Mines, Limited 

Muton-Champagne Gold Mines, Limited 

Naybob Gold Mines, Limited . 

Neda Gold Mines, Limited 

Nepheline Company, Limited, The' 

Neswoba Mines, Limited 

Net Lake Timagami Mines, Limited 

Nezah Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Nipsona Mines, Limited 

Norbell Gold Mines, Limited 

Norco Thompson Mines, Limited ■. . 

Nordic Sturgeon Gold ^Mines, Limited 

Norontic Gold Mines, Limited 

Northern Quebec Prospectors, Limited 

North Tiblemont Gold Mines, Limited 

North Whitney Gold vSyndicate, Limited 

Nugold Mines, Limited 

Otter Lake Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Patricia Participators, Limited 

Paulore Gold Alines, Limited 

Payore Gold Alines, Limited 

Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Limited 

Pike Consolidated Gold, Limited 

Pilgrim Gold Alines, Limited 

Plator Longlac Gold Alines, Limited 

Porcupine Ores and Aletals, Limited (private) . . . 
Porcupine Watborn Gold Alines, Limited 



Toronto 

Leaside 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Longford Mills 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Kirkland Lake 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Walker's Point 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Lakefield 

Kirkland Lake 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Sioux Lookout 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 



May 31 
May 22 
June 26 
Aug. 23 
May 15 
July 9 
Oct. 26 
May 9 
April 17 
April 24 
April 3 
Mar. 27 
Feb. 23 
April 6 
Oct. 3 
July 9 
Oct. 4 
Feb. 28 
Mar. 26 
Dec. 6 
Jan. 26 
Oct. 10 
Dec. 1 
April 7 
Aug. 29 
Nov. 9 
June 7 
Mar. 19 
May 18 
Jan. 16 
April 28 
Mar. 15 
Nov. 3 
Mar. 20 
July 18 
May 2 
June 8 
June 22 
Jan. 3 
Oct. 16 
Aug. 10 
April 21 
Dec. 17 
Aug. 17 
April 3 
April 27 
Alar. 20 
Oct. 22 
April 3 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 28 
Alar. 17 
May 16 
Oct. 19 
July 19 
July 26 
Alay 25 
Jan. 8 
AprU 18 
Aug. 31 
June 28 
Feb. 9 
April 28 



2,000,000 

100,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
40,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,500,000 

100,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000.000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3.500,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
50,000 

300,000 
3,000.000 
3,500,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3.000.000 
2.500,000 
3,000,000 
2,500,000 

100,000 

500,000 
5,000,000 
1,000,000 

200,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,500,000 
3,000,000 

100,000 
1,000,000 
2,500,000 
3.000,000 
3.000,000 
2,000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
30.000 
1,000,000 
4,000,000 

300,000 
3.000,000 

150,000 
40,000 
3,000.000 
4,000,000 
3.000,000 
1.000,000 

500,000 

3,000,000 

10,000 

2,000,000 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



47 



ONTARIO COMPANIES WITH SPECIFIED CAPITAL INCORPORATED 

IN 193A— Continued 



Name of company 



Head office 



Date of 
incorpo- 
ration 



Capital 



Quebec Viking Gold Mines, Limited 

Queen Lebel Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Rahill Red Lake Mining Company, Limited 

Ramore Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Raven River Mines, Limited 

Raymond Tiblemont Gold Mines, Limited 

Richelieu Gold Mines, Limited 

Rickard Ramore Gold Klines, Limited 

Richland Gold ^Mines, Limited 

Richmond Development Company, Limited (private) 

Rocdor Gold Mines, Limited 

Roche Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Rouyn Reward Gold Mines, Limited 

Rupert's Land Gold Syndicate, Limited 

Scadding Gold Mines, Limited (private) 

Schreiber Pyramid Gold Mines, Limited 

Seal Harbor Gold Mines, Limited 

Shawkey Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Sinclair Mines, Limited 

Smith and Co., Canada, Ltd., C. Morrison 

Sol-D'Or Gold Mines, Limited 

South McKenzie Island Mines, Limited 

South Vermillion Gold Alines, Limited 

Springbrook Sturgeon Gold Mines, Limited 

Stabell Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

Standard Minerals of Canada, Limited 

Sterling Exploration Company, Limited 

Stillar-Temagami Gold Mines, Limited 

Strathy Basin Alines, Limited 

Sturgeon River Gold Mines, Limited 

Supreme Gold Mines, Limited 

Swayze Gold Field, Limited 

Tamarac Gold Mining Company, Limited (private) . 

Thunder Bay Gold Alines, Limited 

Tiblemont Central Gold Alines, Limited 

Timagami Gold Alines, Limited 

Trafalgar Gold Alines, Limited 

Trident Gold Alines, Limited 

Tylac Sturgeon Gold Alines, Limited 

Valora Gold Exploration Company, Limited 

Vanguard Long Lac Alines, Limited 

\'imy Gold Alines, Limited 

Wanapitei Basin Alines, Limited 

Wells Longlac Alines, Limited 

West Red Lake Gold Alines, Limited 

West-Side Long Lac Alines, Limited 

Wilder Gold Alines, Limited 

Williamson Alines, Limited 

Wilmac Trusts, Limited' (private) 

Wilton Gold Alines, Limited 

Windigokan Lake Gold Alines, Limited 

Witch Bay Gold Alines, Limited 

Woodhouse, Limited, H. (private) 

Yellowknife Gold Alines, Limited 

York Investments, Limited (private) 



Toronto 

Kitchener 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Smiths Falls 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Scadding tp 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Sault Ste. Alarie. 

Toronto 

Grace Lake 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Trafalgar tp 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Timmins 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Kirkland Lake . . 

Timmins 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 



Sept. 20 
April 26 
April 30 
Sept. 27 
Nov. 23 
Sept. 15 
May 18 
Oct. 29 
July 10 
Oct. 25 
July 23 
May 7 
April 25 
April 10 
July 11 
Dec. 8 
Jan. 3 
Mar. 6 
May 15 
Mar. 19 
Sept. 24 
April 17 
April 27 
Oct. 10 
April 27 
July 23 
May 23 
Sept. 10 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 22 
Feb. 20 
July 11 
Oct. 25 
May 21 
April 21 
May 19 
May 10 
April 25 
Oct. 15 
April 4 
July 26 
Aug. 7 
June 7 
June 18 
Alar. 26 
Aug. 
Dec. 
Nov 
Aug. 
Dec. 
Sept. 10 
July 25 
May 14 
Mar. 28 
Sept. 11 



2,500,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
2,500,000 
3,500,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
4,000,000 

40,000 
2,000,000 
2,500,000 
3,000.000 

10,000 
100,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 
3, .500,000 
1,000,000 

40,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
1 ,500,000 
3,000,000 
2,500,000 
2.000,000 

40,000 
2,500,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
2,000,000 
150,000 
3,000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
3,000,000 
100,000 
1,000,000 
2,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 
3,000,000 
3,000 000 
3,000,000 
3.000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 

15.000 
3,000,000 

40,000 

50,000 

40,000 
3,000,000 

40,000 



Total (212 companies) 



$488,335,000 



'"No par" shares issued in addition, 
or par value. 



See list of companies having shares without nominal 



48 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Mining Revenue and Expenditures 

The revenue of the Department of Mines for the fiscal year ending October 
31, 1934, was $1,487,886.94, as compared with $942,721.62 in the previous year. 
Expenditures were $298,520.74. Details of revenue follow: — 

REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF MINES, 1934 
Ordinary: 

Sand and gravel — 

Royalties $21,690. 17 

Licenses 1.600. 00 

$23,290. 17 

Casual fees $1,732. 33 

Sale of record books, Unwrought Metal Sales Act S4. 00 

Gas leases 4,100. 00 

Boring permits 100. 00 

6,016.33 

Inspection — cable-testing fees 4,269. 53 

Assessment — 

Acreage tax $35,446. 84 

Profit tax 1,073,824. 46 

Gas tax 32,001 . 80 

1,141,273.10 

Chemical and assay — fees 3,024. 80 

Mine rentals — 

Mining leases $7,599. 73 

Licenses of occupation 5,908. 31 

Miners' licenses 71,034. 62 

Fees — 

Recording 148,985. 60 

Miscellaneous 5,691 . 15 

Maps — sales 3,654. 45 

Sale of old mill 350. 00 

243,223 . 86 

Natural Gas Commissioner — permits 1,875. 67 

Sulphur Fumes Arbitrator — damages 7. 09 

Temiskaming Testing Laboratories — fees 10,178. 79 

Sale of old equipment 135.85 

$1,433,294.47 
Capital: 

Mining recorders — mining land sales 54,592. 47 

Total revenue $1,487,886.94 

The figures of monies derived from sales and leases, divided according to 
district, do not agree with corresponding items of the preceding revenue state- 
ment, which records collections of monies actually received during the fiscal 
3^ear. Details are given in the following table: — 



MINING LANDS SOLD AND LEASED FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCT. 31, 1934 





Sales 


Leases 


Total sales and leases 




No. 


Acres 


Amount 


No. 


Acres 


Amount 


No. 


Acres 


Amount 


Algoma 


36 
30 

28 


1,238.70 

1,221.72 

914.05 


3,262.76 
12,703.57 
2,332.93 








36 
30 
28 
11 

100 
6 

114 
13 

170 
32 


1,238.70 
1,221.72 

914.05 

365.14 
3,251.90 

245.74 
4,247.07 

502.70 
6,881.35 
2,125.00 


3,262.76 


Cochrane 








12,703.57 


Kenora 








2,332.93 


Nipissing 


11 


365. 14 


204.23 


204.23 


Patricia 


100 
6 
95 
11 
75 
32 

413 


3,251 . 90 
245.74 

3,542.10 
397.10 

2,849.39 

2,125.00 


8,199.44 
614.35 
10,990.94 
1.012.75 
7,270.16 
1,557.00 


8,199.44 


Rainv River. . . . 








614.35 


Sudbury 

Thunder Pay. . . 
Timiskaming. . . 
Elsewhere 


19 
2 

95 


704.97 

105.60 

4,031.96 


327.65 
164.10 
942.43 


11,318.59 
1,176.85 
8,212.59 
1,557.00 












Total 


15.785.70 


47,943.90 


127 


5,207.67 


1,638.41 


540 


20,993.37 


49,582.31 



1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



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1935 



Statistical Review for 1934 



51 



The following is a comparative statement of mining licenses and renewals 
issued, mining claims recorded in Ontario, and profit tax and total mining 
revenue during the past ten years, 1925 to 193-i, inclusive: — 

PROSPECTING ACTIVITY, PROFIT TAX, AND TOTAL REVENUE, 1925-1934 



Year 



Calendar year 



New 
miner's 
licenses 
issued 



Miner's 
licenses 
renewed 



Total 
licenses 

and 
renewals 



Mining 

claims 

recorded 



Fiscal year ending Oct. 31 



Profit 
tax 



! Total 
mining 
revenue 



1925. 
1926 
1927. 
1928. 
1929. 
1930. 
1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 



2,391 
6,631 
6,923 
6,059 
3,271 
1,554 
2,174 
2,035 
3.365 
7,409 



4,439 
5,521 
7,221 
8,688 
8,049 
5,885 
4,808 
3,670 
3,911 
4,757 



6,830 

12,152 

14,144 

14,747 

11,320 

7,439 

6.982 

5,705 

7,276 

12,166 



4,751 

13,486 

15,564 

15,046 

8,207 

3,886 

5.779 

4,945 

8,077 

16,888 



S287, 
410, 
340. 
356 
397 
502 
480 
515 
679 

1,073 



186.88 
974. 17 
890.08 
033.83 
004.41 
525.38 
300.69 
,153.59 
,731.07 
,824.46 



$613, 
838 
839, 
968, 
882, 

1,017, 
799 
793 
942 

1,487 



411.96 
415.81 
793.43 
243.84 
026.05 
030.67 
240.06 
759.20 
721.62 
886.94 



Under The Mining Tax Act, a graduated tax is levied on the net profits 
of mining companies in excess of 810,000 per annum. The basic rate is 3 per 
cent, on profits up to 81,000,000. On profits over 81,000,000 and up to 85,000,000, 
the tax is 5 per cent.; and on profits in excess of the latter amount, the rate is 
6 per cent. A part of this money is returned to organized municipalities. 

The following statement, prepared by the Accounts Branch of the Depart- 
ment, gives details of the profit tax collected under the supervision of G. R. 
Mickle, Mine Assessor, for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1934: — 



DETAILS OF PROFIT TAX 
Gold: 

Anglo-Huronian, Limited 

Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines, Limited 

Coniaurum Mines, Limited 

Dome Mines, Limited 

Hollinger Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited 

Howey Gold Mines, Limited 

Kirkland Lake Gold Alining Company, Limited 

Lake Shore Mines, Limited 

Mclntvre-Porcupine Mines, Limited 

Parkhi'll Gold Mines, Limited 

Sylvanite Gold Mines, Limited 

Teck-Hughes Gold Alines, Limited 

Toburn Gold Mines, Limited 

Wright-Hargreaves Mines, Limited 



Silver: 

Cobalt Properties, Limited 

Mining Corporation of Canada, Limited 

O'Brien, M. J., Limited (O'Brien mine, Sl,735.29; Miller Lake 
O'Brien mine, 84,037.35) 

Nickel-Copper: 

Falconbridge Nickel Alines, Limited 

International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited 



81,420.35 

3,235.85 

455.65 

133,289. 12 

200,747.92 

1,716.94 

721.47 

297,466.39 

93,790.81 

61.29 

7,399.05 

87,805.11 

4,116.41 

65,766.65 



.S533.26 
782.53 

5,772.64 



§12,265.27 
156.477.75 



$897,993.01 



7,088.43 



168.743.02 



Total ?1,073,824.46 

Temiskaming Testing Laboratories 

This plant, located at Cobalt and equipped for sampling and assaying, has 
been operated by the Ontario Department of Mines since July, 1921, under the 
management of A. A. Cole, mining engineer, of the T. & X.O. Railway Com- 



52 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



mission, and George Dickson, superintendent. The following is a comparative 
financial report for the calendar years 1922 to 1934, inclusive: — 



COMPARATIVE FINA^X1AL STATEAIENT OF THE TEMISKAMIXG 

LABORATORIES, 1922-19.34 


TESTING 


Year 


Cash 
receipts 


Earnings 


Expendi- 
tures 


Operating 
profit 


Operating 
loss 


1922 


$18,096.19 
18,699.22 
26,0.32.20 
19,922.37 
20,. 302. 51 
19,-387.66 
14,875.58 
19,604.70 
25.070.27 
18,522.88 
13,. 323. 28 
6,206.68 
9,816.20 


$17,749.51 
20,117.81 
25,417.61 
20,041.08 
21,119.98 
19,400.55 
14..369.66 
21,690.60 
24,316.82 
20,770.06 
11,150.42 
6,508.49 
11,-359.81 


$19,173.19 
19,781.25 
23,206.66 
20,043.31 
20,658.19 
20,012.09 
18,181.68 
18,088.41 
24,153.03 
23,553.61 
15,219.64 
13,318.18 
12,762.68 




$1,424.68 


1923 


$3.36.56 
2,200.95 


1924 




1925 


2 23 


1926 


461 . 79 




1927 


611 54 


1928 




3 812 02 


1929 


3,602.19 
163.79 




1930 




1931 


2,783.55 
4 039 22 


1932 




1933 




6,809.69 
1,402.87 


1934 


. . . 






Gross operating profit 
and loss 








.$6,765.28 


$20 915 80 









The following is a brief summary of operations for the year 1934: — 

Assaying: Gold, 1,896 samples; silver, 1,107; copper, 832; silver bullion, 71 ; cobalt,40; 
lead, 1; nickel, 487; zinc, 355; silica, 3; arsenic. 5; iron, 3; sulphur, 1; lime, 3; platinum, 82; 
manganese, 2. 

Silver Ore Milled and Sampled: Weight, 233.23 tons; silver content, 354,575 ounces. 
Base Bullion Melted: 71 bars, containing 55,929 ounces of silver (gross). 
Gold Ore Sampled and Assayed: 1 lot of 2.000 pounds. 

Provincial Assay Office 

As an aid in the development of the mineral resources of Ontario an Assay 
Office was established at Belleville in July, 1898, by the Bureau (now Depart- 
ment) of Mines. The office was moved to .5 Otieen's Park, Toronto, in November, 
1911, and in the spring of 1927 to the Hast Block, Queen's Park. W. K. McNeill, 
Provincial Assayer and Chemist, reports as follows for 1934: — 

The activity in prospecting in the province during the year was reflected 
in the Chemical Branch of the Department by the large number of samples 
received for investigation. A total of 5,901 chemical determinations were 
made and reported on. These determinations may be classified as follows: — ■ 

COMPLETE ASSAY RETURNS. 1934 



Assay 


Free assays 

under 

The Mining Act 


General custom 

and Department 

work 


Total 


Gold 


3,135 
244 

11 
74 
22 
14 
27 
4 
6 


1,966 

149 

4 

47 

5 

1 

14 

2 

18 

14 

132 


5,101 
393 


Silver 


I latinum 


15 


Copper 


121 


Lead 


27 


Zinc 


15 


Nickel 


41 


Cobalt 


6 


Iron 


24 


Limestone 


14 


Miscellaneous 


12 


144 






Total 


3,549 


2,352 


5.901 



1935 Statistical Review for 19 34 53 

In addition, complete analyses of 16 rocks were made for the geologists of 
the Department; and 222 samples for identification were received by mail and 
reports issued. A large number were brought directlv to the Laboratory; of 
these no record was kept. 

Several samples of water were analysed for the Natural Gas Commissioner. 
The work in this Branch was carried on with the assistance of T. E. Rothwell 
and W. F. Green, assayers and chemists, and William Ley, laboratory assistant. 

The schedules of charges for the Provincial Assay Office and Chemical 
Laboratory may be obtained on application. Minerals and rocks not requiring 
chemical analvsis are identified free of charge. Tests for radio-activity are free. 

Draughting Office, North Bay 

As mining claims are recorded in each mining division, sketches and record- 
ing notices are forwarded by the recorders to the Draughting Office, North Bay, 
and the same practice applies when surveys are filed. Tracings are prepared 
from the data furnished and blue-prints supplied to the recorders and to the 
general public at a nominal charge. North Bay is a convenient centre, and 
considerable time for Northern Ontario residents is saved through the mails com- 
pared with former practice when blue-prints were prepared at Toronto. The 
office was established in Februarv, 1920. It is now in charge of A. D. Williams. 



54 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



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List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934 



55 



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Department of Mines 



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List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934 



57 



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1935 



List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934 



59 





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1935 



List of Mines, Quarries, and Works, 1934 



61 



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MINES OF ONTARIO IN 1934 

By 

Chief Inspector of Mines, D. G. Sinclair, Toronto; Inspectors, E. C. Keeley, Kirkland 
Lake; D. F. Cooper, Sudbury; E. B. Weir, Timmins; A. R. Webster, Toronto 



CHROMIUM 
Chromium Mining and Smelting Corporation, Limited 

The Chromium Mining and Smelting Corporation, Limited, was incor- 
porated in ]May, 1934, succeeding the Chromium Alloy Company, Limited. 
It has a capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of no par value. 

The officers and directors are: A. R. Globe, president; R. S. Hart, vice- 
president; R. O. Denman, secretary-treasurer; Scott Misener and F. J. Maw, 
directors. The head office is 700 Bank of Commerce Building, Hamilton. 

The company's property consists of 44 claims, about 1,800 acres, situated 
26 miles south of Collins on the main line of the Canadian National Railways, 
in the Obonga Lake area, Thunder Bay district. 

Development to date on the property includes one 2-compartment shaft, 
350 feet deep, and about 600 feet of lateral work on the 100-foot level; a second 
shaft, 25 feet deep; about 3,000 feet of surface trenching; and 33 diamond-drill 
holes, with a total footage of 6,150 feet. 

Two carloads of ore have been shipped to Niagara Falls for test and 
demonstration purposes, and 1,400 tons of high-grade ore are now stock-piled 
at the mine for shipment, awaiting completion of a road from Collins to the 
mine. A gang of men were cutting the road early in January and were expected 
to finish that part of the work about the end of the month. A caterpillar tractor, 
run by a Diesel oil engine, capable of hauling 35 tons per load is used for trans- 
porting the ore from the mine to the railway. 

The mine plant equipment consists of the usual early-stage boiler, com- 
pressor, hoist, etc. Buildings include 6 camps, with accommodation for 40 men, 
laboratory, boiler-house, and compressor-house. 

An average of 38 men was employed at the property during the last seven 
months of the year. Operations were suspended at the property early in 
January, 1935, until the road from Collins is completed. No work was done 
underground in 1934. A. R. Globe is mine manager. The mine address is 
Collins. 

GOLD 

Algold Mines, Limited 

Algold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in February, 1934, with an author- 
ized capital of 2,500,000 shares of no par value. A first mortgage bond issue of 
8270,000, issued by New Goudreau Mines, Limited, stands against the property. 
The officers and directors were: W. R. Knox, president; J. G. Merrick, secretary- 
treasurer; M. C. Van der Voort, J. J. Gra}^ and J. A. ]McAndrew, directors. 
The head office is at 45 Richmond Street West, Toronto. 

The property acquired included that of the New Goudreau Mines, Limited, 
located in township 28, range 26, district of Algoma. It is about 6 miles west 
of Goudreau station on the Algoma Central railway. The post-office address is 
Goudreau. 

[67] 



68 Department of Mines No. 4 

Previous operators sank a 425-foot and a 200-foot shaft, both of which 
are 2-compartment, 70-degree shafts. They established levels at 100, 200, and 
400 feet, and sublevels at 130 and 160 feet. A 50-ton amalgamation mill was 
constructed in 1925. 

Work was started in July, 1934. The underground workings were dewatered 
and a small amount of development work accomplished by the end of the year. 

The plant used included an 1,100-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand electric com- 
pressor, and an 8}/^- by 10-inch air hoist. Electric power is obtained from the 
High Falls plant of the Great Lakes Power Company. 

An average of 7 men was employed under the direction of R. F. Mitchell. 

Algoma Summit Gold Mines, Limited 

Algoma Summit Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in Ma}^ 1934, with 
an authorized capitalization of 5,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers 
and directors were: F. A. Brant, president; J. J. Gray, vice-president; E. O. 
Slingsby, secretary; J. J. Marth, treasurer; R. A. Hutchison and S. D. Terry, 
directors. The head office is at 514 McKinnon Building, Toronto. The mine 
office is at Goudreau. 

On incorporation the company acquired the assets of McCarthy-Webb- 
Goudreau Mines, Limited, which included a group of 7 claims located in township 
27, range 29, district of Algoma, about 5 miles east of Goudreau. Considerable 
surface work had been done on this property, and a small test mill had been 
constructed late in 1933, with which several test runs were made early in 1934. 

This company started surface work in June. The mill was enlarged to 
25-ton capacity and was operated intermittently on surface ore. The total 
tonnage milled during the entire year amounted to 421 tons. 

Shaft-sinking was started late in December with a portable gasoline com- 
pressor, and by the end of the year the shaft was down 18 feet. 

The mill equipment included a Bramor mill, small classifier, corduroy 
blanket tables, and amalgamation plates. It was operated by a 25 h.p. Diesel 
engine. Buildings included two bunk-houses, office, two dwelling-houses, cook- 
house, mill, garage, blacksmith shop, and powder-house. 

An average of 12 men was employed under the direction of F. A. Brant. 

Alschbach Gold Mining Company, Limited 

The Alschbach Gold Mining Company, Limited, owns 6 claims in Grenfell 
township, district of Timiskaming. The officers are: Clarence Alschbach, 
president; F. W. Hendry, vice-president; F. L. Hutchinson, secretary-treasurer; 
Wesley McKnight, Donald McLellan, Frederick Lawrence, and W. A. Taylor, 
directors. The head office is at New Liskeard. The company is capitalized 
at 2,500,000 shares of SI par value, of which 1,621,539 have been issued. 

The property was operated in 1935 for three months; work was discontinued 
in November. The total amount of work done to the end of 1935 was: the 
sinking of a 2-compartment shaft to 250 feet, with levels at 125 and 250 feet; 
875 feet of drifting and crosscutting on the 125-foot level; and 40 feet of cross- 
cutting on the 250-foot level. An average of 15 men was employed under the 
direction of Clarence Alschbach while the property was in operation. The mine 
address is Goldthorpe. 

Amalgamated Gold Fields Corporation, Limited 

Amalgamated Gold Fields Corporation, Limited, is capitalized at 5,000,000 
shares of no par value. The company took over the assets of the Blue Quartz 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 69 

Gold Mines, Limited, for 2,000,000 shares pooled for an indefinite period. The 
company owns 600 acres in Beatty township, district of Cochrane; and 2-i men 
were employed from Ma}^ 1933, to August 31, 1934, when the property was 
closed down. 

The plant consisted of an Atlas Diesel engine, an Ingersoll-Rand belt- 
driven compressor of 700-foot capacity, and a 10- by 12-inch single-drum steam 
hoist. A 50-ton cyanide mill, driven by a Diesel engine, was constructed. 

The development work done previous to 1933 was as follows: shaft, 500 feet; 
winze, 250 feet; raise, 400 feet; crosscuts and drifting, 6,000 feet. The develop- 
ment work done in 1934 was: stoping, 100 tons; tons milled, 1,768. 

The officers and directors are: H. C. Crow, president; Dr. J. A. Tuck, 
vice-president; A. D. Van Home, secretary-treasurer; H. W. Laird, A. G. Parker, 
and Lewis Payne, directors. C. D. Salkeld was mine manager. The mine office 
is at Painkiller Lake, via Matheson. 

Anglo-Huronian, Limited 

Anglo-Huronian, Limited, was incorporated in October, 1933. Its author- 
ized capitalization is 2,000,000 shares of no par value. The total number of 
shares issued is 1,252,605, of which 927,063 shares were issued at the time of the 
formation of the company for properties and assets received from predecessors. 
These companies were the Huronian Mining and Finance Company, Limited; 
Keeley Silver Mines, Limited; and Vipond Consolidated Mines, Limited. Share- 
holders of each of these companies received one share of the new company for 
each five shares of the old companies. 

The officers and directors of the company were: R. Home Smith, Toronto, 
president; Andre Dorfman, Toronto, vice-president and managing director; 
J. Ingram, Toronto, secretary-treasurer; J. H. Black, Toronto, F. H. Hamilton, 
Eric Turk, Sir A. Hamilton Grant, London, England, directors. The head 
office is 80 King Street West, Toronto. 

The holdings of Anglo-Huronian now include all the assets of its prede- 
cessors and their subsidiaries, as follows: the Vipond property of 320 acres 
adjoining the Hollinger mine at Timmins; a three-quarter interest in 6 Ridgeley 
claims in the same area adjoining Coniaurum mine; Keeley mine and Keeley 
Extension in South Lorrain; and other claims of lesser importance. They hold 
889,612 shares of the 1,150,000 issued shares of Inspiration Gold Mines, which 
has 3 claims adjoining the Vipond property; nearly half of the issued shares of the 
Minto Gold Mines, Limited, in the Michipicoten area; and interests in Gilgreer 
Mines, Limited, Prospectors Airways Company, Limited, and McWatters Gold 
Mines. The latest acquisitions are large interests in Porcupine Peninsular Gold 
Mines, Limited, and options on a large block of shares of Bousquet Gold Mines, 
Limited, in the Sudbury area, 65 miles west of Sudbury. J. Ingram, secretary- 
treasurer of Anglo-Huronian, has recently been made treasurer and director of 
Bousquet Gold Mines. 

In 1934 the old Vipond mine was the only wholly owned property under 
production. This property has been developed to a vertical depth of 1,450 feet. 
It has a mill capable of handling 300 to 325 tons per day. During the fiscal year 
ending July 31, 1934, the mill treated 101,347 tons and produced bullion to the 
value of $647,015.87, an average of S6.38 per ton. During the same period the 
development work done at the mine was as follows: crosscutting, 1,630 feet; 
drifting, 2,847 feet; raising, 1,739 feet; diamond-drilling, 17,525 feet. 

Robert E. Dye was mine manager at the Vipond property, employing an 
average of 179 men. The mine address is Timmins. 



70 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



During the fiscal year ending July 31, 1934, the Anglo-Huronian's first year 
of operations, a surplus of $1,249,698, or SO. 997 per share was earned. 

The revenue and expenditures for the same period were as follows :^ 

STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE 
for the year ended July 31, 1934 

Revenue : 

Metal recoveries, including premium $647,015. 87 

Dividends received 81,639. 50 

Net profit on foreign exchange 38,381 . 81 

Interest earned, less interest paid 64,560. 39 

Sundry earnings 3,128. 08 

$834,725.65 

Expenditure : 

Mine operating expense, including development $521,091.87 

Insurance 4,898. 50 

Municipal taxes • • • 2,115. 29 

General, administration, and organization expense, less portion 

charged to mine operations 90,463. 33 

Examinations written off $1,700. 36 

Reserve for depreciation 10,560. 32 

12,260.68 

630,829.67 

Profit carried to surplus account $203,895. 98 

Surplus Account: 

Profit for the year ended July 31, 1934 $203,895. 98 

Profit realized on investments 1,239,315. 42 

1,443,211.40 

Deduct: reserved for taxes, etc 193,513.39 

Surplus, July 31, 1934, carried to balance sheet ' $1,249,698.01 



Ardeen Gold Mines, Limited 

Ardeen Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in December, 1933, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and 
directors w^ere: H. G. White, president; A. R. Miller, Jr., vice-president; W. A. 
Williams, secretary-treasurer; C. G. Greenshields, J. J. Mclnerney, and J. H. 
Kitchen, directors. The head office is at 132 St. James Street, Montreal, Que. 

On incorporation this company took over the property and assets of Moss 
Gold Mines, Limited, which had gone into receivership in September, 1933. 
The property is located in Moss township, district of Thunder Bay, and is 18J^ 
miles by road from the Fort Frances branch of the Canadian National railway. 
The post-office address is Tip Top Spur, via Port Arthur. 

Underground operations were carried on continuously throughout 1934, but 
were suspended on January 5, 1935, owing to lack of finances. 

The lateral work accomplished from January 1, 1934, to January 5, 1935, 
and the total done to the latter date, on the various levels, was as follows : — 





Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Level 


January 1, 1934, 

to 
January 5, 1935 


Total 


January 1, 1934, 

to 
January 5, 1935 


Total 


195. foot 


feet 


feet 
1,499 
2,369 
3,341 
1,506 
1,906 
1,561 
1,156 
468 


feet 


feet 
222 


250-foot 


549 

1,014 

119 


64 

100 

33 

10 


393 


375-foot 


710 


500-foot 


192 


625-foot 


289 


750-foot . ... 




240 


875-foot 


1,156 
468 


190 
299 


190 


1 000-foot 


299 






Total 


3.306 


13,806 


696 


2,535 







1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 _. 71 

During the year the 3-compartment vertical shaft was sunk an additional 
268 feet to a total depth of 1,038 feet, and levels were established at 875 and 
1,000 feet. When operations were suspended stoping had just been started on 
the 875-foot level. A total of 37,298 tons of ore and 10,763 tons of waste were 
hoisted from January 1, 1934, to January 5, 1935. 

The 200-ton cyanide mill was operated until January 9, 1935, and treated a 
total of 39,072 tons of ore from January 1, 1934. 

An average of 165 men was employed, of whom 89 were underground. 
N. O. Lawton was general manager, J. D. Tolman was mine superintendent, and 
J. E. Sullivan was mill superintendent. 

Ashley Gold Mining Corporation, Limited 

The Ashley Gold Mining Corporation, Limited, has a capitalization of 
$3,000,000, in shares of SI par value. The ofhcers and directors are: J. P. 
Watson, president; G. C. Ames, secretary-treasurer; E. H. Rose, H. A. Millman, 
C. E. Trafiford, and J. G. Watson, directors. M. F. Fairlie is managing engineer. 
The head office is at 350 Bay Street, Toronto. The mine address is Elk Lake. 

The mine in Bannockburn township, district of Timiskaming, was operated 
continuously throughout the year. 

The following is taken from the report of the managing engineer for the 
year ending December 30, 1934: — 

The tonnage treated at this property was increased over that of the previous year, with 
the double object of maintaining gold production and reducing the per-ton cost, in the face of 
lowered grade of ore. 

Development 

The fault conditions which govern vein occurrence were described in the last annual report, 
but it might be repeated that the original Ashley vein, striking north and south, is the normal- 
faulted section of a vein situated to the west, and this section extends only from the 5th level to 
the surface; a second faulted section of the same vein extends from the 5th level to above the 
2nd level; and a 3rd faulted section extends from an unknown depth to above the 5th level. 
To reach the .3rd section, long crosscuts to the west from present workings are necessary, and 
this work was deferred during the year until the Ashley vein and its second section had under- 
gone further development to the north and south. Any new ore so found would be much more 
cheaply developed and extracted. 

A drift on the Ashley vein on the 250-foot level was advanced north of the porphyry dike 
for a distance of 700 feet, showing a strong quartz vein, but with the exception of one rich ore 
shoot, 50 feet in length, the values were generally below profitable grade. Recently raises 
have been put up at intervals, and values disclosed above the level show considerable improve- 
ment over those shown in drifting, but as yet this section cannot be included in ore reserves. 

Long drifts were run north on the second vein section on the 375-foot level, also south on 
both the 375- and 500-foot levels, but were generally unproductive of ore. Late in the year 
a crosscut was started west to intersect the 3rd vein section on the 625-foot level, but the vein 
has not yet been reached. The Ashley vein has to date bnen proven to a total length of 2,000 
feet, by underground work. Drifting and crosscutting completed during the year totalled 
4,500 feet. 

Ore Reserves 

Development work failed to maintain the ore reserve position of approximately 50,000 tons 
at the beginning of the year. After extraction of 43,532 tons, the ore reserves at December 
31 were 31,000 tons of slightly over 0.3-ounce grade. 

Production 

The tonnage treated during the year was 43,532 tons with average grade of 0.315 ounces, 
as compared with 37,975 tons with average grade of 0.456 ounces in the previous year. Gold 
bullion shipments for the year realized $456,831.86 in Canadian funds, compared with $497,- 
969.00 in 1933. Total bullion shipments from inception of operations to December 31, 1934, 
have netted $1,024,942.27. 

The average cost per ton, including mining, development, milling, and administration, 
was $8.68 per ton of ore milled, and in late months was further reduced below $8.00 per ton. 
Conditions at this property do not lend themselves to low costs and include exceedingly hard 
rock with high mining and grinding costs, excessive water with high pumping costs, as well as 
narrow vein and fault conditions, which increase development charges. 

An average of 148 men was employed. Eric Hargreaves is resident manager. 



72 Department of Mines No. 4 

Bankfield Gold Mines, Limited 

Bankfield Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in April, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and 
directors were: C. D. H. MacAlpine, president; T. H. Stinson, vice-president; 
F. J. Bailes, secretary-treasurer; Jos. Errington, D. M. Morin, and J. H. C. 
Waite, directors. The head office is at 1006 Concourse Building, Toronto. 

The property acquired by this company consists of a group of claims, 
totalling about 730 acres, in the Magnet Lake section of the Little Long Lac 
area. Thunder Bay district. It is reached by a 3-mile road from a siding on the 
Port Arthur-Long Lac branch of the Canadian National Railways, 1 3/^ miles west 
of Bankfield station. The post office address is Geraldton. 

Work was started on June 1, 1934. Following diamond-drilling and 
trenching a 3-compartment vertical shaft was commenced in August on claim 
T.B. 10,213. Shaft-sinking was still in progress at the end of the year, at which 
time the shaft had reached a depth of 158 feet, and a station had been cut at 150 
feet. A total of 7,398 feet of diamond-drilling had been accomplished. 

The plant installed included two 90 h.p. boilers, an 8- by 11-inch IngersoU- 
Rand double-drum steam hoist, and a 750-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand steam 
compressor. Buildings erected included a power-hooise, blacksmith shop, dry- 
house, assay office, 2-storey bunk-house, 2-storey cook-house, stable, powder- 
house, office, and manager's residence. 

An average of 68 men was employed, of whom 1 1 were underground, during 
the period of work. J. W. McKenzie was in charge of operations. 

Barry-Hollinger Mines, Limited 

Barry-Hollinger Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 4,000,000 shares of SI par 
value. The officers and directors are: Dr. E- Herbert Greene, president; J. P. 
Patterson, vice-president; D. McKinnon, secretary-treasurer; H. K. Wood, 
director. The head office is at 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto. 

The mine, in the township of Pacaud, district of Timiskaming, was operated 
throughout the year with an average force of 68 men. 

The value of the production for the year was as follows : — - 

Value of production at $20.67 per ounce $91,139. 68 

Plus premium on exchange 60,936. 58 

Total $152,076.26 

Underground development work during the year was as follows: — 

Feet 

Drifting 822 

Crosscutting 399 

Diamond-drilling 2,343 

Raising 1,171 

Cu. ft. 

Diamond-drill stations 539 

Shaft station 5,376 

Douglas Bryden is mine manager. The mine address is Boston Creek. 

Bathurst Gold Mines, Limited 

Bathurst Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1934 with an authorized 
capitalization of 4,000,000 shares of no par value. This company succeeded 
Bathurst Mines, Limited. The officers and directors are: T. W. Bathurst, 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 73 

president; E. P. Gleeson, vice-president; Dr. F. P. Quinn, secretary-treasurer; 
Leon Mutt and P. Smith, directors. The head office of the company is at 51 
Sparks Street, Ottawa. The mine office address is Narrow Lake. 

The property of Bathurst Gold Mines is located in Skinner township, 
district of Kenora, Patricia portion. Gold was discovered on this property 
during the active prospecting season of 1926. Surface exploration was carried 
on, and in 1929 a plant was installed and a 10-ton Tremaine stamp mill was put 
in operation. The value of bullion sold amounted to 83,107, being production 
from a rich pocket on the surface and a small amount of ore from underground. 
Operations were suspended the same year. The property had then been explored 
to 300 feet, with levels established at 200 and 300 feet. " Only about 300 feet of 
lateral work was done on the lower level. Nearly -1,000 feet of drifting and 
crosscutting was done on the first level. 

Late in 1934, Bathurst Gold Mines started to deepen the shaft to 600 feet 
and intend to open up two more levels. 

Bidgood Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited 

Bidgood Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited, has an authorized capitalization of 
$2,000,000, in shares of 81 par value. The officers are: A. L. Herbert, president; 
S. H. Whitfield, vice-president; N. W. Byrne, secretary-treasurer; Harry Korson, 
Harry Koza, E. G. Budd, and Joseph Nichols, directors. Both the head office 
and mine office are at Kirkland Lake. 

The company owns 753 acres in the township of Lebel, in the East Kirkland 
Lake area, district of Timiskaming. 

A 100-ton mill was built and put into operation in July at the rate of 50 
tons a day. 

The following development work was done during the year in the Bidgood 
mine: raising, 10 feet; drifting, 870 feet; crosscutting, 697 feet; diamond-drilling, 
2,382 feet. There were 2,560 tons of ore hoisted and 2,433 tons milled, which 
yielded a total value of $6,804.93. 

Oscar Knutson was mine manager, employing an average of 45 men during 
the year. 

In August, 1934, the company took a lease on 10 acres of the Moffatt-Hall 
property, which is also in Lebel township. Further details regarding this 
operation will be found on page 128 of this report. 

Bob Tough Gold Mines, Limited 

Bob Tough Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in September, 1933, 
with an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of no par value. The 
officers and directors were: R. R. Tough, president; H. J. Tiedt, vice-president, 
E. B. Ratcliflfe, secretary-treasurer; F. H. Gage, R. E. Thompson, J. H. Stevens; 
and H. J. Simons, directors. The executive office is at 207 Turner Building, 
Hamilton. 

The property is located in McKinnon township, district of Sudbury. There 
is a 16-mile winter road from Massey station on the Canadian Pacific railway. 
The post-office address is Massey. 

Surface work was started in April, 1934. During April, May, and June, 
2,500 feet of diamond-drilling was done. In September, the company started 
work on a 3-compartment, vertical shaft, using a gasoline compressor. By 
the end of the year the shaft had been sunk to a depth of 30 feet, a headframe 
was being erected, and a steam plant was being installed. 

An average of 16 men was employed under the direction of E. B. Ratcliffe. 



74 Department of Mines No. 4 

Bousquet Gold Mines, Limited 

Bousquet Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1920, with an authorized 
capital of 2,000,000 shares of $1 par v?lue. The officers and directors were: 
Lionel Brooke, president; C. H. Hitchcock, vice-president; W. B. McPherson, 
secretary-treasurer; L. P. Wood and H. P. Snelgrove, directors. The head office 
was at 171 Yonge Street, Toronto. The mine address is Willisville. 

The property consists of 20 mining claims located in two groups in township 
11, district of Sudbury. It is 7 miles by winter road from West River on the 
Algoma Eastern railway. 

Operations were carried on throughout 1934. The sinking of the 2-com- 
partment, vertical shaft was continued to the 150-foot level, where considerable 
lateral work was accomplished. Towards the end of the year the shaft was 
deepened to the 300-foot level, and development work started at that horizon. 

The plant used included an 80 h.p. boiler, a 500-cubic-foot steam compressor, 
and an 8- by 10-inch steam hoist. Buildings included a power-house, blacksmith 
shop, stable, bunk-house, and cook-house. 

An average of 25 men was employed under the direction of Lionel Brooke. 

Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines, Limited 

Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines, Limited, incorporated in 1932, has an 
authorized capitalization of $1,000,000, in shares of $1 par value, of which 577,307 
shares have been issued. 

The officers and directors are: Geo. R. Feine, president; G. R. Loesch, 
vice-president; H. Kobler, treasurer; R. P. Kinkel, assistant- treasurer; E. G. 
Kinkel, secretary and managing director; H. J. Tiedt, J. Betz, A. J. Baldeck, 
directors. The head office is at 902 Lumsden Building, Toronto. The mine 
address is vSouth Porcupine. 

The property, which consists of 3 claims, adjoining the property of the 
Paymaster Consolidated Mines, Limited, is situated in Deloro township, district 
of Cochrane. It has been developed by shafts and winzes to a depth of 1,000 
feet. Prior to the formation of the present company the property had produced 
$862,115 worth of bullion. From 1932 to the end of 1934 the present company 
has produced $1,107,008 worth of bullion (old gold value). The mill has a rated 
capacity of 500 tons, which will allow a step-up in tonnage of about 100 tons 
above the highest monthly average milled to date. 

The following is taken from the report of the managing director for the 
fiscal year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Although diligent effort was made by the management to increase the milling capacity to 
500 tons per day during the year 1934, it was found that the development work had not pro- 
gressed sufficiently to enable the withdrawal of this amount of tonnage. The actual average 
tonnage treated during the year per day was 345.6, and the tons treated per 24 hours running 
time was 363.8. The daily average during the year 1933 was 321 tons; the average daily during 
the month of December was 401 tons. 

In December, 1934, over $2,000 in precipitates were stolen from the mill, which theft was 
covered by insurance and which loss has been paid. 

During the year 1934, Revere P. Kinkel acted as assistant to the managing director and 
was recently appointed assistant treasurer of the company. Mr. Kinkel spends practically his 
entire time at the property. 

The winze was placed in operation in the early part of 1934 from the 600-foot level to the 
1,000-foot level, but considerable difficulty has been encountered with unusual pressure of soft 
rock on the winze-frame from the 875-foot level to the 1,000-foot level, and the management 
intends to abandon this part of the winze as a safety element. However, crosscutting and 
drifting had already taken place on the 1,000-foot level enabling the company to utilize this 
level at a later date. 

A substantial body of ore encountered in the No. 7 vein, north area of the property', made 
it advisable to construct a haulage drift directly from this ore body to the vicinity of the winze 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 75 

station, and two IVIancha locomotives and additional 2-ton mining cars were purchased and are 
now in operation. Although the ore in this area has not been definitely proven our mine manager 
has estimated that there is possible and probable ore from the surface to the 800-foot level in 
the No. 7 zone amounting to 369,000 tons with an assay value of $8.80, giving a total value of 
$3,247,200.00 (valued at $20.67 per ounce). 

Because of the difficulty encountered in the sinking of the winze and the opening up of the 
ore bodies in the north zone of the property no further eff'ort was made during the year 1934 
to sink the main shaft, as the management desires a further study of the vein system before 
proceeding. 

The management has decided to defer a part of its development costs to the year 1935, as 
it is anticipated that the recoveries will materially increase during the year 1935, the recoveries 
during the month of December, 1934, having been the largest for any month during the j^ear. 

The plant and equipment are in excellent condition, as considerable money was expended 
for this purpose during the year. 

The following is taken from the mine manager's report for the year ending 

December 31, 1934:— 

Production 

Some 126,450 dry tons of ore were treated, yielding $712,898.29. The average value of 
all ore treated was 0.182 ounces per ton, with a recovery of $5.64 per ton (market price of gold). 

Mining 

Tons 

Ore broken in stopes 105,038 

Ore broken in development 16,520 

Ore hoisted and transferred 133,499 

Waste hoisted 13,745 

The major tonnages for the year were obtained from stopes on the Nos. 1, 2, and 5 veins 
on the 200-, 250-, 350-, 475-, and 600-foot levels. vStopes were started late in the year on the 
Nos. 5 and 7 structures on the 600-, 725-, and 875- foot levels. Minor tonnages were hoisted 
from these workings. Vein widths vary from 3 to 60 feet. The Nos. 784 and 884 stopes show- 
maximum widths of from 50 to 60 feet. The No. 690 stope averages 3 feet. 

Development 

Feet 

Drifting 4,564 

Crosscuts 1,104 

Raises 573 

Winzes 51 

Total 6,292 

Cu ft. 

Stations 7,368 

Sumps 3,024 



Total 10,392 

Winze-sinking was finished early in January, 1934. The 1,050-foot level station and pump 
sump were completed and ore passes raised through to the 725-foot level. The objectives for 
the period were the development of the Nos. 5 and 7 vein structures on the 600-, 725-, 875-, 
and 1,050-foot levels. Lateral workings on the 725-, 875-, and 1,050-foot wdnze levels partially 
developed the No. 5 structure. Lengths of ore on this vein on these horizons total 429 feet. 
On the upper levels, i.e. 250, 365, 475, and 600 feet, the Nos. 2 and 7 structures development 
shows ore lengths of 534 feet. On the 600-foot level the No. 7 ore zone is 170 feet wide and 
includes four stru lures (Nos. 689, 690, 691, and 693). The deepest working at the end of 1934 
was the No. 1 winze at a vertical depth of 1,0S5 feet. 

New ore areas, as developed on all horizons, are indicated to be of a better grade than the 
tonnage milled during 1934. 

Diamond-Drilling 

Contract Drilling: Feet 

Surface 1,012 

Underground 5,095 

Total 6,107 

Company Drilling: 

Underground 9,743 

Total Drilling 15,850 



76 Dep artment of Mines No. 4 

Surface drilling prospected the No. 6 vein north and east of the main shaft. Results were 
negative. Underground drilling proved the downward and lateral extensions of the Nos. 2 and 
5 veins. Results were favourable. 

Milling 

The mill treated 126,450 dry tons during the period at a cost of $0,871 per ton. 

Percentage of total possible running time 95.11 

Tons treated per day 345.6 

Tons treated per 24 hours running time 363.8 

Average mill head (at $20.67) $3.68 

Average mill tailings $0.30 

Indicated extraction per cent. .92 

Tonnage milled for 1934 was obtained from the Nos. 1, 2, and 5 vein workings on the 200- , 
250-, 350-, 475-, and 600-foot levels. 

Plant Additions 

The following installations were made in the mill: a Hardinge 6- by 14-foot counter-current 
classifier, operating in closed circuit with the Hardinge ball mill; pumps and air lifts, so that 
thickeners could be operated in either series or parallel circuits; a 10- by 16-foot string filter 
placed in mill circuit, having a capacity of 500 tons per day. 

In the mine, the additions included 2 motor trammers; mine cars for main haulageway; 
drill machines; centrifugal pump having a capacity of 250 gallons per minute at 700-foot head, 
installed on the 600-foot level; pump installed on the l,OoO-foot winze level. 

A 2,620-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand compressor was installed, and three k.v.a. transformers 
were purchased and installed. 

General 

The main haulageway on the 600-foot level from the main shaft to the Nos. 690 and 691 
stope areas was completed. The 600- and 400-foot level pockets were slashed to increase storage. 

Development is at present behind production. It is planned to remedy this condition during 
1935. 

MINE OPERATING STATEMENT 
for year ended December 31, 1934 
Earnings: 

Gold bullion recovery (including premium) $707,118. 72 

Cost of Production: 

Mining $261,165.67 

Milling 85,896.20 

Power and sundry 61,122. 93 

General supervision 6,491 . 26 

Workmen's compensation 8,446. 84 

Plant heating 7,164.01 

Miscellaneous 5,242. 19 

Stable operation 2,796. 10 

Insurance, fire, etc 4,872. 57 

Repairs to buildings 7,460. 37 

Repairs to machinery and equipment 9,089. 59 

Surface improvements and fire protection 2,479.44 

Hospital fees 1,883.50 

Box-holes 682. 10 

Loading pocket 1,599. 54 

Sump 1,986. 63 

Air and water 289. 47 

468,668.41 

Gross Profit from Mining Cperations $238,450. 31 

Martin Knutson was mine manager until November, when he was succeeded 
by Chas. L. Hershman. An average of 277 men was employed. 

Canadian Kirkland Mines, Limited 

Canadian Kirkland Mines, Limited, owns 6 claims in Teck township, district 
of Timiskaming. The company is capitalized at 84,500,000, in shares of SI par 
value. The officers and directors are: George Tough, president; F. J. Carew, 
vice-president; W. B. McPherson, secretary-treasurer; B. L. McLean and 
W. J. Beckett, directors. The head office is at 171 Yonge Street, Toronto. 
The mine office is at Kirkland Lake. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 77 

The following is a summary of the work done to January, 1935, when the 
property closed down. The No. 1 shaft had been sunk to a depth of 816 feet, 
and drifting and crosscutting done as follows: 80-foot level, 100 feet; 250-foot 
level, 120 feet; 400-foot level, 440 feet; 800-foot level, 1,442 feet. In addition, 
20 feet of raising had been done. 

No. 2 shaft had been sunk to a depth of 150 feet, and stations cut at 65 
and 125 feet. On the 65-foot level, 25 feet of crosscutting had been accom- 
plished; and on the 125-foot level, 375 feet of drifting and crosscutting. 

Hugh Jardine is mine manager. An average of 20 men was employed 
during the year. 

Canusa Gold Mines, Limited 

Canusa Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1932. It is capitalized 
at 1,500,000 shares of $1 par value. The ofhcers and directors for 1934 were: 
D. D. Wessels, president; Geo. Neukom, vice-president; Robt. Schram, treasurer; 
Thos. R. Deacon, secretary; H. Kendrick, P. Du Bois, R. E. Olds, and C. C. 
Drake, directors. The business of!ice is at 3400 Union Guardian Building, 
Detroit, Mich. The mine address is South Porcupine. E. Y. Dow is in charge 
of operations. The property, which consists of 440 acres in Tisdale and Whitney 
townships, district of Cochrane, was bought from Canusa Mining and Exploration 
Company, Limited, in 1932. 

The mine, formerly known as the Scottish-Ontario, has a 2-compartment 
shaft to the 100-foot level and a 3-compartment shaft from the 100-foot level to 
the 320-foot level. About 2,300 feet of lateral work was done on these levels by 
former owners. 

No work had been done on the property for some time prior to the reopening 
of the mine in May, 1934, by the present company. In 1934, the mine was 
pumped out, the buildings and machinery were reconditioned, a 24-ton Myers 
mill was installed, and an assaying laboratory and machine shop were built. 

Up to the end of the year the tonnage treated by the mill was small, the 
whole procedure being more or less an experiment. 

About 14 men were being employed at the end of the year. 

Casey Summit Gold Mines, Limited 

Casey Summit Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 5,000,000 shares, of 
no par value, 2,962,848 of which have been issued. The controlling interest is 
held by Maple Leaf Mines, Limited. The following were officers in 1934: 
R. G. Williamson, president; C. S. Kennedy, secretary-treasurer; Eraser D. Reid, 
managing director; R. S. Banbury, W. R. M. Williamson, Eraser Raney, and 
J. A. Wilson, directors. In November, 1934, C. S. Kennedy was succeeded as 
secretary-treasurer by Eraser Raney. The head office is at 465 Bay Street, 
Toronto. 

The property consists of 800 acres at Casummit lake, about 100 miles 
north of Sioux Lookout, in the district of Kenora, Patricia portion. The plant 
is on claim K. R. L. 9,681. The first work on the property was done in 1931, 
when a shaft was sunk 85 feet and 140 feet of lateral work was done at the 75-foot 
level. The property was idle from the fall of 1931 until the late summer of 1933. 
The shaft was then deepened to 325 feet, and stations were cut at the 200- and 
300-foot horizons. 



78 Department of Mines No. 4 



The following lateral work is reported to have been done during 1934 : — 


Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 




feet 
145 
670 
720 


feet 
85 


200-foot 


80 


300-foot 


250 






Total 


1,535 


415 







A raise was run from the 300-foot to the 200-foot level. 

A 50-ton mill was installed and put into operation in September, 1934. 
During the 82 davs it operated, 4,094 tons, averaging 0.514 ounces of gold, were 
treated. Of this tonnage 3,310 tons were drawn from stopes and the balance 
from development or the ore dump on surface. Operating costs amounted to 
S8.00 per ton for mining and 81.78 per ton for miUing, of which 83.42 was 
chargeable to power expense. 

Operations were suspended in November, 1934, pending reorganization to 
meet liabilities incurred. 

Clifford Gibson was manager in charge of operations. The mine address is 
Casummit Lake, via Sioux Lookout. 

Centennial Gold Mines, Limited 

Centennial Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in November, 1933 
with an authorized capitalization of 2,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The 
officers and directors were: Fred Deagle, president; Lome Burk, vice-president; 
A. A. Wishart, secretary; R. P. vScott, treasurer; Lloyd Deagle, J. C. Allan, and 
S. E. Fleming, directors. The head office is at Blind River. 

The propertv consists of a group of 7 mining claims, formerly known as the 
Kitchigami property, located in township 29, range 22, in the Michipicoten area, 
district of Algoma. It is 12 miles by road from Wawa station on the Algoma 
Central railway. The post-office address is Wawa. 

Work was started on the property in May, 1934. Previous operators sank 
five shafts, the deepest of which was 110 feet. These old shafts were dewatered 
and sampled, and the construction of a plant was started. Electric power was 
obtained from the High Falls plant of the Great Lakes Power Company, which is 
less than a mile away. In September a 7- by 11-foot, 30-degree shaft was 
started. Operations were suspended early in December, at which time the 
shaft had reached a depth of 130 feet. 

The plant included a 218-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand electric compressor and 
an electric hoist. Buildings erected included a power-house, blacksmith shop, 
warehouse, and powder-house. 

An average of 13 men was employed during the period of operation. W. H. 
Lewis was in charge of operations. 

Central Canada Mines, Limited 

Central Canada Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1930 with an author- 
ized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and directors 
are: C. G. Smith, president; C. S. Parsons, vice-president; F. F. Montague, 
secretary- treasurer ; Harold Smith and Nerval Leslie, directors. The executive 
office is at 232 Grain Exchange, Winnipeg, Man. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 79 

The property held by this company includes a group of claims in the Sapawe 
Lake area, Rainy River district, 125 miles west of Fort William on the Fort 
Frances branch of the Canadian National Railways, on which a 2-compartment 
vertical shaft had been put down to a depth of 92 feet in 1930. 

Operations were resumed in the spring of 1934. Following a considerable 
amount of diamond-drilling a small steam plant and a 2o-ton amalgamation mill 
were installed. The old shaft was cleaned out and timbered, and a small amount 
of lateral work done on the 92-foot level. The mill was used for test runs only. 

The plant used included a 80 h.p. boiler, a steam hoist, and a 150-cubic-foot 
steam compressor. The mill equipment included a 50 h.p. boiler a Dodge 
crusher, and a double Tremaine stamp. 

Work was suspended in January, 1935, pending further financing. 

Central Patricia Gold Mines, Limited 

Central Patricia Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1931, succeeding 
Central Patricia Mines, Limited, formed in 1927. It has an authorized 
capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of SI par value. 

The officers and directors are: F. M. Council, president; W. H. Connell, 
vice-president; Alan Cockeram, secretary-treasurer; J. H. Rattray, L. Cohen, 
and G. B. Webster, directors. 

The mine is situated in the Crow River area, district of Kenora, Patricia 
portion. The mine camp is about 110 miles north of Savant Lake Station on 
the Canadian National railway. It lies about 6 miles west of the property of the 
Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Limited. The holdings include 85 claims, which lie 
in several large groups in the surrounding district. 

Most of the underground work was done in 1930. When the property was 
closed down in the fall of that year, the shaft had been sunk to a depth of 527 
feet and lateral development on four levels at 125-foot intervals to the extent 
of 994 feet of crosscutting and 1,713 feet of drifting had been accomplished. 
This work disclosed in three ore zones approximately 45,000 tons of ore, having a 
gross value of about §600,000, averaging about 813.25 per ton (based on gold at 
$20.67). 

Operations were again started in 1932, but the loss of much mill equipment 
through the ice delayed matters, and it was not until the winter of 1933-34 that 
the mill was finally finished. Production began in the spring of 1934 from a 
50-ton cyanide unit powered by steam. Late in the summer the company 
decided to put in a second 50-ton unit. The equipment for this was taken into 
the propertv over the winter roads and will be put into operation when the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission line from the Albany river to the property 
is completed. It is believed that electrical power will be available for the mine 
about the middle of March, 1935. 

At the end of the year the 50-ton unit was producing about 1,000 ounces 
of gold per month. 

The following is taken from the president's report to the shareholders for 
the year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Production 

Milling operations were commenced on May 27, 1934, with a 50- to 60-ton cj^anide mill. 
During the period under review, 1L536 tons of ore were treated, the recovery therefrom amount- 
ing to $219,562.56. In the profit and loss statement you will notice an item of $38,159.43 
(undistributed to mining and milling). This represents the cost of steam power during the period. 
This item will be greatly reduced when the hydro-electric power is available. You will also notice 
that after making allowances for depreciation and taxes there remains a net profit of $42,127.38. 



80 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Hydro-Electric Power Contract 

On March 7, 1934, a contract was entered into with the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
of Ontario. Your company paid $40,000 cash under the contract, and a bond for $10,000 is to 
be deposited with the commission when power is dehvered at the mine. The cost of power for 
the first o-year period is to be $65 per horse-power, and after that period $35. 

Transportation 

In order to materially improve the transportation facilities, arrangements were made between 
your company. Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Limited, and the Northern Development Branch of the 
Province of Ontario, whereby the Northern Development Branch undertook to construct a 
summer transportation route from Hudson to the east end of Lake St. Joseph, your company 
having paid $16,667 toward the cost of this development. This will enable transportation of 
supplies to be made in the summer months at a greatlj- reduced cost. 

Addition to Mill 

In August, 1934, it was decided that mine developments justified an increase in the milling 
capacity. The necessary equipment was purchased to double the capacity of the mill. This 
equipment has since been delivered to the property. 

Financing 

On March 1, in order to make the payments to the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
and the Northern Development Branch, 100,000 shares of treasury stock was sold to Anglo- 
Huronian, Limited, to net the treasury $50,000. On August 29, after the decision to double 
the capacity of the mill, a further 68,940 shares, being the balance of the treasury stock, was 
disposed of to the same company to net the treasury $1.10 a share. The above sums, together 
with the moneys received from mine production, are sufficient to pay all capital commitments 
incurred until the increased production is effective. 

Programme of Exploration and Development Work for 1935 

During the coming year, it is proposed to sink the main shaft from the 500-foot to the 750- 
foot level, and also to carry on lateral exploration work on the upper levels. 

Springer 

It is proposed to sink a shaft 125 feet and to carry on underground exploration work on this 
level. Work will be commenced the early part of IMay. The necessary mining equipment has 
already been delivered to the property, and the necessarj- buildings have been erected in pre- 
paration for this work. 

The following is taken from the mine manager's report for the year ending 
December 31, 1934:— 

Mining 

All development work was done in sections where ore had previously been indicated, and 
no new areas were explored. The development work proved the known ore occurrences to be 
of greater width and lengths than had previously been estimated. The continuity of the ore 
bodies between the levels was established by raising. 

The following is a summary of the development work: — 



Footage Tons ore 



Tons 
waste 



Per cent, 
in ore 



Drifting and crosscutting 

Raising 

Slashing 

Total 



314 
350 
262 



1,035 
583 
944 



126 

58 
267 



79.5 
90 

78.5 



926 



2,562 



451 



Diamond-drilling, 2,035 feet. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



81 



The table below shows the ore estimate: — 



Tons 



Grade 



"A" ore body 

"B" ore body 

"C" ore body 

Broken ore in stopes. 



Probable ore in "B" and "C" ore bodies on the 500-foot level and 50 



feet below level . 



Total 77,670 



5.358 
19,825 
30,358 

8,129 



63,670 



14,000 



ounces 

0.56 

.66 

.76 

.63 



0.67 



0.64 



0.66 



Milling 

On May 27 the mill was put into operation. The extraction at the commencement of opera- 
tions was very low, but a gradual improvement in the milling methods resulted in an improve- 
ment of recovery to 97 per cent, in September and for the following months. 

The mill operation for the seven months is summarized as follows: — 

Tons treated 11,536 

Daily tonnage (average) 54 

Heads (average) ounces 0. 634 

Tails (average) ounces . 048 

Bullion shipped ounces 6,369 

In August it was decided to increase the mill to 100 tons daily capacity. The equipment 
for this increase, together with the necessary electrical equipment and material to electrify the 
entire plant, was ordered. The addition to the mill building was erected in readiness to receive 
the equipment. 

Construction 

The construction consisted of a refinery, a new bunk-house to accommodate seventy men, 
and the addition to the mill building providing for the 50-ton increase. The mine saw-mill 
manufactured the 110,000 feet board measure of lumber and timber used in the above construction . 

Springer 

A small crew of men started clearing and burning the area in the vicinity of the Springer 
vein, and camp buildings were erected in preparation for shaft-sinking, which will be commenced 
early in May, 1935. 

Summary 

The known ore has been opened up to greater widths and lengths than was previously 
reported. The treatment of the ore has been solved to a point where high recovery can be 
depended upon. The reagent and other milling costs have been gradually reduced, and with 
the increased tonnage further reductions are anticipated. 

A. J. Anderson was mine manager, employing an average of 61 men. The 
mine address is Hudson. 

It has been stated that the company plans to install, in the spring of 1935, a 
mine plant and sink a shaft on the Springer group of claims, belonging to Central 
Patricia Gold Mines, which lies 5 miles distant from the main property. This 
group has already been diamond-drilled. Finances for this work will be secured 
from the profits of the Central Patricia mill, which will then be operating on a 
100-ton basis. 

Central Porcupine Mines, Limited 

The holdings of Central Porcupine Mines, Limited, comprise 9 claims held 
outright and 4 claims (Gold Centre Mines, Limited), in which the company 
holds the controlling interest, in the Porcupine area, district of Cochrane. The 
claims owned outright were formerly known as Parmac Porcupine Mines (2 
claims), the Dignam group (3 claims), and the Digby Vet group (4 claims). 



82 D epartment of Mines No. 4 

The holdings, which form a soUd block, lie east of the Alclntyre and Hollinger, 
south of the Coniaurum, and north and west of the Dome Mines, and are 
contiguous at some point to all four of the mines mentioned. 

The company is capitalized at 5,000,000 shares of SI par value, of which 
2,600,007 are issued or to be issued. The officers and directors are : E. Ward 
Wright, president; C. D. H. MacAlpine, vice-president; Geo. G. Blackstock, secre- 
tary; W. J. Aikens, E. M. Buchanan, H. C. McCloskey, and Jos. Montgomery, 
directors. The general manager is Frank G. Stevens, and the consulting geol- 
ogist is D. G. H. Wright. The mine address is vSchumacher. 

An average of 8 men was employed from May to the end of the year 
on company construction work. New buildings erected include a combined 
office and residence, boiler-house, powder magazine, fuse-house, carbide-house, 
blacksmith shop, oil-house, dry-house, and garage. 

At the inception of operations the Central Porcupine Company made an 
agreement with Coniaurum Mines, Limited, whereby they might operate for a 
period of three years through the Goldale shaft of the latter company. Central 
Porcupine Mines repaired the original Goldale shaft and the compressor and 
hoist buildings, and a new compressor and hoist, operated by steam, was installed. 
This hoist is small and is only used for handling supplies. A new 150 h.p. 
Canadian Ingersoll-Rand single-drum electric hoist with Westinghouse motor, a 
new Babcock-Wilcox-Goldie-McCulloch vertical compressor, with a capacity of 
1,030 cubic feet per minute, and a 200 h.p. Canadian Westinghouse motor have 
been set up to replace the smaller hoist and compressor and will be used when 
the hydro line is completed to the property. 

In the meantime, Coniaurum Mines, on a contract basis, are crosscutting 
from the Goldale shaft area of their property into the property of the Central 
Porcupine Mines. This work is being done on the 1,000-foot level. At the end 
of December, 1934, some 1,303 feet of crosscutting had been accomplished. At 
the same rate, another three months' work will advance the crosscut close to the 
boundary between the two properties. B}^ that time or earlier the power line 
should be completed, and Central Porcupine Mines will then be able to proceed 
with their own men on their exploration scheme. 

Churchill Mining and Milling Company, Limited 

The Churchill ^Mining and Milling Company, Limited, was incorporated 
in 1918, and has an authorized capitalization of 4,000,000 shares of SI par v£>lue. 
The officers and directors were: W. R. Knox, president; J. G. Merrick, secretary- 
treasurer; D. Lieberman and F. H. Geddes, directors. The head office is at 
45 Richmond Street West, Toronto. 

This company holds a group of four claims in Churchill township, in the 
West Shiningtree area, district of Sudbury, on which a 7- bv 9-foot vertical shaft 
was put down to a depth of 40 feet some years ago. 

Operations were started on this property in May and suspended in October, 
1934. A headframe was erected over the old shaft, a plant installed, and the 
shaft sunk to a depth of 109 feet. The plant used consisted of a 15 h.p. boiler 
and a 6- by 8-inch Jenckes hoist. vSteam was used for drilling. 

A 10-ton mill was installed on the property, and included a Straub stamp, 
concentrating table, regrind mill, and amalgamation equipment. It was 
operated by a gasoline engine and was only used for test runs. 

An average of 9 men was employed under the direction of H. L. McClelland, 
who was later succeeded by R. F. Mitchell. The mine address is Shiningtree. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 83 

Cole Gold Mines, Limited 

Cole Gold Mines, Limited, is the outgrowth of a private mining enterprise 
that was started on two claims in 1932. The property was then known by the 
owner's name, J. Y. Cole. A company capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of $1 par 
value was formed in 1933 to operate on this property. 

The company now holds 24 claims, all in one group, situated in the Pipestone 
Bay section of Red Lake, district of Kenora, Patricia portion. The company 
has been operating since February, 1933, when a 2-compartment shaft was 
started. The shaft has been completed to a depth of 200 feet, and on the 200- 
foot level 1,500 feet of lateral work has been accomplished in crosscutting and 
drifting, on several veins. The following extract has been taken from a 
preliminary report on the Red Lake area by M. E. Hurst: — 

During the past year, underground exploration at the Cole property on Pipestone bay 
has been concentrated on the 200-foot level. Crosscuts run north and south in the vicinity 
of the shaft have intersected a broad area of sheared quartz porphyry in which occur strips of 
greenstone, diabase dikes, and zones containing auriferous quartz stringers. Drifting east and 
west of the shaft on the mineralized sections is now being carried on. Most of the drifting has 
been done on a zone, 1 to 4 feet wide, containing one or more narrow veins of bluish-grey quartz, 
which dip about 70° N. The quartz is well mineralized with pyrite, chalcopyrite, and pyrrhotite 
and, in places, contains visible gold. 

The officers of the company are: J. Y. Cole, Jr., president and treasurer; 
Wm. Exton, Jr., vice-president; Cicily Cole, secretary. The head office of the 
company is at Red Lake. J. Y. Cole, Jr., is mine manager. The post-office 
address is Red Lake. 

Concordia Gold Mining Company, Limited 

Concordia Gold Mining Company, Limited, was incorporated in May, 1934, 
with a Quebec charter and took over the property of the Jones Porter Mines, 
Limited, in the southern part of Deloro township, district of Cochrane. At the 
time of organization the officers and directors were: Robert Starke, president; 
A. A. Ladoucer, vice-president; J. A. Mclnnis, G. C. Murdoch, and A. C. 
Kennedy, directors. The company is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of $1 pat 
value. 

The Jones Porter property consisted of 14 claims. No underground work 
has been done on this property since 1928, when a 3-compartment shaft was sunk 
about 149 feet and a station cut at the 125-foot level. Parts of the old Croesus 
mining plant from Munro township were moved to the property in 1929 but were 
never used. No work was done from that time until the midsummer of 1934, 
when John Pringle was sent to the property by Concordia Gold Mines to 
recondition the plant preparatory to starting underground work. Three or four 
men were employed during the last four months of the year in renovating the 
buildings and equipment. It is expected that underground development will 
start in the spring of 1935. 

John Pringle is manager. The mine address is Timmins. 

Coniaurum Mines, Limited 

Coniaurum Mines, Limited, has an authorized capitalization of 6,000,000 
shares of no par value, of which 2,717,947 are issued or to be issued. The head 
office is at 25 King vStreet West, Toronto. 

The officers and directors are: Thayer Lindsley, president; A. L. Bishop, 
vice-president; H. Whittingham, secretary-treasurer; D. M. Hogarth, Alex. 
Longwell, H. Lindsley, and T. H. Rea, directors. The mine address is 
vSchumacher. John Redington is mine manager. 



84 Department of Mines No. 4 

The Coniaurum mine in Tisdale township, district of Cochrane, adjoins the 
Mclntyre property on its east boundary. Two additional claims purchased in 
1934 make the total number of claims now held 19, or approximately 760 acres. 

The following is taken from the president's report on behalf of the directors 
for the year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Following the policy of active development in depth, your directors have authorized the 
erection of a new steel headframe and a large hoist capable of handling 1,.500 tons per day from 
the 3,500-foot level. It is expected that this new plant will be in operation by next fall. Sink- 
ing from the present depth of 3,1.50 feet will commence shortly to open up a main working level 
at a depth of 3,500 feet. From this horizon it is planned to establish an interior hoisting plant 
to permit opening up the property to still greater depths. Geologically and structurally, the 
indications are that our most productive areas will be found in depth. 

During the year, 138,114 tons were milled and, in spite of a heavy programme of mine 
development, an' operating profit of .$216,228.98 was realized. After making the necessary 
write-offs for taxes, deferred development, and depreciation, and taking credit for non-operating 
revenue, we show a net profit for the period of §17,693.32. Working capital was increased to 
approximately 8745,000. 

Two more claims lying between the Canadel claim (acquired last year) and your most 
southeasterly claim were purchased for the modest sum of 810,000. These purchases now make 
a row of four contiguous claims along j'our southern boundary. 

Reviewing the past year, it may be said that your company has made marked progress 
in opening up the property to depth, in adding materially to its indicated ore reserves, and at 
the same time making a fair profit. During the coming year development work in depth will 
be pushed actively, as well as active exploration in the area between the 2,000-foot and 3,000- 
foot levels. 

The following is an extract from the mine manager's report for the year 
ending December 31, 1934: — 

Development 

The year's development has been confined chiefly to Xos. 15A and 7A vein systems. Lateral 
development and raising have been extensively carried forward on the 1,000-foot, 1,2.50-foot, 
1,500-foot, 2,000-foot, 2.750-foot, and 3,000-foot levels. The results of this work have been 
very gratifying, and all the different horizons have responded quite liberally to exploration. Of 
the two vein systems, Xo. loA has been more fully developed. 

SuMM.^Rv OF Development 

Feet 

Drifting 3.593 

Crosscutting 6,350 

Raising 3,599 

Diamond-drilling 17,757 

The footage driven in ore amounted to 3,384 feet, with an average value of 5.1 penny- 
weights per ton over a width of 5.3 feet. Vein No. 15A has been developed on the 1,000-, 1,250-, 
and 1,500-foot levels, and development is still in progress on the 2,000-foot level. 

Exploration 

The 3,000-foot level is being extensively explored bj- means of a main crosscut known as 
No. M2. This extends westerly from No. 10 crosscut to the east boundary of the Mclntyre- 
Porcupine ]Mines. This crosscut has been driven parallel to our vein system. Vein No. 7A 
has been driven on for a length in ore of 483 feet. When this ore shoot is fully developed it will 
add considerably to our present ore reserves. It is not considered advisable to make any definite 
estimate of the tonnage and grade of this ore body until it has been further developed. 

Nos. 20 and 22 veins are also under exploration on the 3,000-foot level. These two veins 
promise to be of considerable importance and will enlarge the reserves. They are new discoveries 
and are located in the northwest portion of the Goldale claim and somewhat north of the Pearl 
lake porphyry mass. 

Diamond-drilling has been carried on quite extensively. The major portion of this work, 
or 56.9 per cent., has been done on the 3,000-foot level. The remainder is distributed between 
the 1,000- and 2,000-foot levels. Sixty-three holes were drilled, and 22 per cent, indicated ore. 

Broken Ore Reserves 

Broken ore reserves have been somewhat increased since last year and are now 134,113 
tons. Sloping supplied 125,549 tons and development another 28,356 tons of ore. The mill drew 
138,102 tons, leaving a carry-forward of 134,113 tons of ore available at the end of the year. 

Milling 

During the year the mill treated 138,114 tons of ore, with an average recovery of $7 108 
per ton, extracting 95.14 per cent, of the gold content, operating 348.96 days, or 95.60 per cent. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 85 

of the possible running time. The mill was closed down for twelve days in March while the main 
shaft was under repairs, and this accounts for the low percentage of possible running time. Owing 
to the higher price of gold, the miUing grade is considerably higher than that of last year. 

New Equipment and Improvements to Buildings 

The boiler-house has been enlarged to accommodate an additional boiler. This boiler was 
removed from the Goldale plant. Two Livingston automatic stokers were installed, making a 
very up-to-date heating unit. A vault has been constructed adjacent to the office building. 
This is of fireproof construction; concrete with brick lining. A new oil-house has been built 
with concrete foundations and oil tanks and pumps in cellar. 

Tailings Dam 

A tailings dam is under construction. When this is completed, it will take care of our 
mill tailings for some years in advance. 

An average of 259 men v^^as employed during the year. 

Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited 

This company is capitalized at $20,000,000, divided into 800,000 shares of 
$25. The officers and directors are: Jas. J. Warren, president; Jas. E. Riley, 
secretary-treasurer; Jas. J. Warren, E. W- Beatty, S. G. Blaylock, Henry Joseph, 
J. C. Hodgson, F. G. Osier, R. S. McLaughlin, Sir Herbert Holt, W. A. Black, 
R. H. McMaster, Thayer Lindsley, Hon. R. R. Bruce, W. J. B. Wilson, L. A. 
Campbell, directors. The head office is at 1010 St. Catherine Street, Montreal, 
Que. An office is maintained at 302 Bay Street, Toronto. 

Afton Mine 

In June, 1934, the company optioned the property of Afton Mines, Limited, 
located in Afton township, Timagami Forest Reserve, district of Sudbury. 

Diamond-drilling was started in July and continued until November, during 
which period a total of 2,775 feet was drilled. During the rest of the year the 
old plant and buildings were renovated with the intention of dewatering the old 
workings and starting underground development early in 1935. 

McKenzie Claims 

The company has under option the McKenzie claims in Garrison township, 
district of Cochrane. The property consists of 8 claims, or about 360 acres. 
The following work was done in 1934: 5,071 feet of diamond-drilling in 21 holes, 
which explored the southeast corner of claim L. 26,343; approximately 1,500 feet 
of trenching, with blasting in most of them; a test pit 20 feet deep near the 
southeast corner of claim L. 26,344. At the end of March, 1935, a 2-compartment 
shaft at 60-degrees incline was down 65 feet near the southeast corner of claim 
L. 26,344. 

The plant consists of a gasoline compressor with a capacity of 310 cubic 
feet and a small single-drum air hoist. About 16 men are employed at the 
property. 

Mackey Point Property 

The company optioned the Mackey Point property, located in township 29, 
range 23, in the Michipicoten area, district of Algoma, early in 1934 and started 
work on claim Y. 104 in April. Operations were suspended late in December. 

A 2-compartment, 25-degree shaft was sunk to a depth of 252 feet, and 
levels were established at 130 and 230 feet. A total of 29 feet of drifting, and 
22 feet of crosscutting was done on the 1st level; and 154 feet of drifting and 
39 feet of crosscutting, on the 2nd level. A similar shaft was sunk to a depth 
of 41 feet. A total of 4,835 feet of diamond-drilling was also done. 



86 Department of Mines No. 4 

The plant installed included a small boiler, a small steam hoist, and a 
gasoline compressor. An average of 13 men was employed under the direction 
of J. J. Hawkins. 

Cooper and Barry 

W. D. Cooper and P. A. Barry obtained from the Mclntyre-Porcupine 
Mines, Limited, a lease on the property commonly known as the jMcIntyre 
Birch Lake, about two miles east of Casey Summit Gold Mines, Limited, in the 
Casummit Lake area, district of Kenora, Patricia portion. 

The Mclntyre company had prospected the property, doing a considerable 
amount of trenching and pit-sinking. This disclosed at one point a high-grade 
zone of gold ore. It is on this showing that Cooper and Barr}^ are working. 
When the property was inspected in June they had installed a set of Tremaine 
stamps and were preparing to open-cut and sink on the showing and mill the 
ore removed. 

Other equipment included a 25 h.p. boiler, a 235-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand 
portable compressor, and a 5- by 8-inch steam hoist. 

At the time of the inspection of the plant 6 men were employed. The post- 
ofiice address is Birch Lake, via Sioux Lookout. 

Coulson Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited 

Coulson Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited, has a capitalization of 3,000,000 
shares of SI par value, of which 1,378,980 shares have been issued. The officers 
and directors are: Nicholas Kinsella, president; Matthew Weimar, vice-president 
and treasurer; A. Ritchie, secretary; L. V. Sutton, Raymond Sutcliffe, G. S. 
Haines, and D. McKenna, directors The head office is at 1104 Northern 
Ontario Building, Toronto. 

The property, consisting of 10 claims in Coulson township, district of 
Cochrane, was reopened in May, 1934. 

The development work in 1934 was all done at the south shaft, which was 
down 200 feet with a level at 160 feet, as follows: crosscutting, 319 feet; drifting, 
826 feet; sinking, 64 feet. Previous to 1934 the following work was done: 
crosscutting, 846 feet; drifting, 186 feet. 

The plant at the south shaft consists of a new Ruston Diesel engine and 
Bellis-Morcome compressor; and an 834- by 10-inch Rand hoist, single-drum. 
At the north shaft there is a Fairbanks-Morse oil engine and an Ingersoll-Rand 
compressor, about 400 feet capacity. The north shaft is down 440 feet, and 
1,500 feet of lateral work has been done. 

C. D. Salkeld is manager, employing an average of 30 men. The mine 
address is Painkiller Lake, via Matheson. 

Craig Gold Mines, Limited 

Craig Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 5,000,000 shares of $1 par 
value. The officers and directors are: H. L. Pearl, president; W. N. Agnew, 
vice-president; Geo. S. White, secretary; H. Lemmen, treasurer. The executive 
and mine offices are at Madoc. The property is in Tudor township, Hastings 
county. 

Previous operators sank two shafts on the property, 210 and 165 feet deep, 
and did 1,800 feet of lateral work. 

During 1934 a small crew was employed erecting plant and equipment. 
J. G. A. Stevenson is mining engineer. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



87 



Darwin Gold Mines, Limited 

Darwin Gold ]Mines, Limited, was incorporated in August, 1934, w^ith an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and 
directors were: Geo. Royce, president; H. H. Lang, R. E. Hore, Robert Fennell, 
and R. A. Darwin, directors. Corporation Management & Executives, Limited, 
is secretary-treasurer. The executive office is at 357 Bay Street, Toronto. 
The mine address is Wawa. 

The company took over the property of the United iVlgoma Mines, Limited, 
which includes the old Grace mine. It is located in township 29, range 23, in 
the Michipicoten area, district of Algoma, and is about 7 miles by road from 
Wawa station on the Algoma Central railway. 

Previous operators sank a 2-compartment, 60-degree shaft to a depth of 
443 feet, and established four levels at 100-foot intervals. vStoping was done on 
the first three levels, the 100-foot level being stoped out. 

The company started work in August, 1934, which consisted of surface 
construction and shaft-timbering until December, when underground develop- 
ment was started. Xo work had been done since 1930. 

The development work accomplished during 1934, and the total to the end 
of 1934 on the various levels was as follows:^ 





Dri 


fting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 




1934 


Total 


1934 


Total 


1934 Total 


200-foot 


feet 


feet 
640 
759 

1.304 


feet 


feet 
106 
226 
381 


feet 


feet 
50 


300-foot 


22 

35 






115 


400-foot 


25 


78 


118 






Total 


57 


2,703 


25 


713 


78 353 



The plant used included a 750-cubic-foot vSullivan electric-driven compressor, 
and an electric hoist. Electric power is obtained from the High Falls plant of 
the Great Lakes Power Company. There is a 50-ton amalgamation-flotation 
mill on the property, which was constructed in 1929. 

Buildings constructed in 1934 included a combined office and staff-house, 
two dwelling houses, and a stable. 

An average of 16 men was employed, of whom 4 were underground from 
August. AI. H. Frohberg was in charge of operations. 



Delnite Mines, Limited 

Delnite Mines, Limited, was incorporated in November, 1934, to develop 
the former La Roche property. This property was optioned by Erie Canadian 
IMines, Limited (a subsidiary exploration company wholly owned by Sylvanite 
Gold Mines, Limited) from July, 1934, until the new company was able to take 
it over. The company has an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 
SI par value, of which 2,999,990 shares are common and 10 are preferred. There 
were 840,000 shares issued to La Roche Mines, Limited, for the property. 
Sylvanite Gold ]Mines, Limited, has an option on 1,200,000 shares. 

The officers and directors are: E. L. Koons, Buffalo, president; W. L. 
Marcy, Buffalo, vice-president; W. V. Moot, Buft'alo, managing director; C. L. 
Ingham, Buft'alo, treasurer; W. S. Walton, Toronto, secretary; Jas. E. Day, 



88 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



James Savage, and Harry Yates, directors. The head office is 603 Royal Bank 
Building, Toronto. The mine address is Timmins. W. S. Maguire is general 
manager. 

The property consists of 3 claims in Deloro township, district of Cochrane. 
They lie one mile west of the Marbuan and Ankerite mines. Two claims, 
H.R. 1,001 and H.R. 1,002 were formerly known as La Roche mine. The third 
claim, H.R. 944, the Rendix claim, was bought separately. 

The following is taken from the report of the general manager for the period 
from July 19, 1934, to April 30, 1935:— 

Prior to the commencement of operations by Erie Canadian Mines, Limited, there had been 
done on the two south claims, which then belonged to La Roche Mines, Limited, in addition to 
considerable surface trenching, 2,301 feet of diamond-drilling, 145 feet of shaft- sinking, and 610 
feet of lateral work at the 125-foot level. 

During the period July 19, 1934, to April 30. 1935, there was completed a total of 5,206 feet 
of diamond-drilling. Of this footage, 3,272 feet was drilled from surface prior to the commence- 
ment of underground operations. The balance of 1,934 feet was drilled from the 125-foot level 
while underground operations were in progress. 

The 2-compartment shaft was dewatered and underground operations were commenced 
October 10, 1934. Three machine shifts per day were employed in addition to the diamond- 
drilling. During the period a total of 1,897 feet of lateral work was done on the 125- foot level, 
of which 465.5 feet was crosscutting and 1,432 feet was drifting. 

In this lateral work, five ore shoots were developed with a combined ore length of 405 feet, 
which is estimated and classified as follows: — 



Length 


Width 


Average value 
at.S20.67 


Average value 
at $35.00 


215 feet 


feet 
5.2 
5.1 


$3.86 
6.99 


$6.53 


190 feet 


11.83 







Preparations are now being made to deepen the shaft to the 250-foot level and to open up 
this horizon to establish the downward extensions of the above ore shoots. Lateral work on the 
125-foot level will be continued. 

The plant and equipment at the property are in satisfactory condition and are sufficient 
for the proposed development. The mine machinery is operated by electricity and consists of a 
l,200-cubic-ft)ot compressor driven by a 200 h.p. motor; an S- by 10-inch single-drum, air-operated 
hoist; steel sharpener; machine shop equipment; and electric-driven underground pump, with 
capacity for handling an increased flow of water. 

The mine buildings include a headframe and shaft-house, hoist and compressor building, 
machine shop, carpenter shop, office, cookery, bunk-house with accommodation for thirty men, 
and mine superintendent's residence. 

ISline communications have been improved during the year. The mine office has been 
connected by telephone with Timmins exchange. The road improvements made by the company 
now permit access from Timmins to the mine by motor in twenty minutes. 

Exploration work has been in a strongly sheared and fractured zone in which the ore deposits 
are of an irregular character but have indicated encouraging values. 

The ore sections developed to date on the 125-foot level and the diamond-drill intersections 
below this level warrant the continuation of the present shaft to the 250-foot level and the 
opening up of the mine at this horizon. 

The manager in charge at the end of the year was Patrick Hamilton, who 
has since resigned. J. F. R. Akehurst is now mine manager. About 8 men are 
employed. 

De Santis Gold Mining Company, Limited 

De Santis Gold Mining Company, Limited, has a capitalization of 4,000,000 
shares of SI par value. The shares are all issued or under option. The following 
are the officers and directors: Peter De Santis, president and manager; Jos. 
V. Friel, vice-president; Giuseppe Giustini, secretary-treasurer; Luigi De Luca, 
Frank Prest, Biagio Ferreri, and Theodore Schulze, directors. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 89 

During 1934 the property in Ogden township, district of Cochrane, was 
worked from February until May and again from November until the end of 
the year. During that time about 1,600 feet of development work was accom- 
plished. During the latter working period the results were very encouraging. 
Formerly indicated ore bodies have been developed on the 200-foot level and 
new bodies located on the western end of the same level in previously unexplored 
ground. Diamond-drilling has also indicated sections of ore in areas not yet 
reached by drifting. Development work is being continued aggressively. 

There is no mill on the property. During 1933 some ore was trucked to 
the Hayden mine and milled there, when that company was inactive; during 
1934 the work done at the De Santis has been entirely development and 
exploration work. 

At the end of the year there were about 23 men employed at the mine. 
The superintendent in charge is Fred Knutson. 

The head office of the company is located at 243^2 Second Avenue, Timmins. 
The post-office address is Box 1299, Timmins. 

Dome Mines, Limited 

The authorized capital stock of Dome Mines, Limited, consists of 1,000,000 
shares of no nominal or par value, of which 46,666 are held under an agreement 
in trust for the company; the dividends on these shares are returned to the 
treasury of the company. The mine is in the township of Tisdale, district of 
Cochrane. 

The officers of the company are: Jules S. Bache, president and treasurer; 
H. P. De Pencier, first vice-president; G. C. Miller, second vice-president; 
Morton F. Stern, third vice-president; Alex. Fasken, secretary; E- P. Goetz, 
assistant treasurer and assistant secretary; C. C. Calvin, assistant secretary; 
John B. Robinson, assistant secretary. 

The directors are: Jules S. Bache, Morton F. Stern, New York; G. C. Miller, 
Buffalo; Dwight B. Lee, Detroit; G. H. Harris, Innis P. Allen, Rochester; Alex. 
Fasken, Frank E- Maulson, Frederick Burnett, Toronto. 

H. P. De Pencier is the general manager of the company, and J. H. Stovel 
is general superintendent. 

The office of the executive and financial department is at 42 Broadway, 
New York. The Toronto office is at 36 Toronto Street. The mine address is 
South Porcupine. 

The following is an extract from the general manager's report for the year 
ending December 31, 1934: — 

During the year 587,200 tons were hoisted; of this 547,600 tons was ore which was sent 
to the mill and treated, and 39,600 tons was waste which was dumped on the surface. In addi- 
tion, 16,200 tons of waste was dumped into old stopes. 

The 547,600 tons of ore milled yielded bullion containing 203,896,878 ounces of gold, the 
yield per ton being 0.3723 ounces. In addition, there was recovered from the retreatment of 
by-product, 2,265.89 ounces. 

All values of ore, etc., will be expressed in pennyweights throughout this report. One 
pennyweight equals one-twentieth of an ounce, troy weight. 



90 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



The following statement gives particulars of revenue and expenditure for 
the year under review: — 

OPERATING STATEMENT 

for the year ended December 31, 1934 

Earnings: 

Bullion production (after deduction of Dominion Government gold tax 

—$504,365.40) $6,672,721.08 

Operating and Maintenance Expenditure: 

Development and exploration $440,776. 84 

Mining, including hoisting 802,717. 15 

Crushing and conveying 100,385. 15 

Milling 538,072. 47 

Bullion expense 28,152. 15 

Fire protection 7,407. 36 

Warehouse expense 11,680. 84 

Auditing expense 2,695. 53 

Administrative expense: 

Mine office 82,794.29 

Executive office 59,063 . 19 

Registrar and transfer fees and expenses 13,812. 15 

Municipal taxes 18,706.09 

Insurance 15,627. 97 

Ontario corporation capital tax 1,213. 00 

2,123,104.18 

Net Operating Profit for the Year $4,549,616. 90 

Development 

The following table gives details of the development accomplished during the year: — 



Summary of Development by Levels for Year 1934 



Level 


Sta- 
tions 


Drifts 


Cross- 
cuts 


Drifts 
and 

cross- 
cuts, 
slash- 
ing 


Raises 


Winzes 


Box- 
holes 


Raises, 
winzes, 
and 
box- 
holes, 
slash- 
ing 


Total 


Dia- 
mond- 
drilling 


1st 


feet 


feet 
571 


feet 
117 


feet 
169 
14 
24 
2 
27 
11 
79 
28 
23 
53 


feet 

26 

42 

15 

247 

194 

249 

285 

478 

220 

128 


feet 
6 

""25' 

104 

40 

73 


feet 

580 

462 

39 

75 

125 

463 

694 

275 

627 

26 

44 


feet 
84 

261 
9 

177 
57 

183 

318 
67 

295 


feet 

1,553 

779 

126 

508 

597 

1,414 

2,237 

1,269 

1,888 

1,267 

52 

532 

125 

644 

1,617 

1,100 

1,970 

1,836 


feet 


3rd . . . 




3,281 


5th 




39 
7 
113 
322 
366 
320 
360 
468 


"56' 

82 

455 

28 

363 

592 

8 

272 

"""76' 
452 
160 
192 
655 


2,058 


6th 






10th 






11th 






12th 




2,346.-5 


13th 




4,326.5 


14th 




2,732 


15th 




560 


16th 




2,135 


17th 




248 
96 
45 

870 

611 
1,172 

733 


12 

18 

46 
156 

62 
161 

80 








18th 




ii 

388 
139 
113 
246 
197 








4,254.8 


23rd 








95 




24th 








2,732 


25th 




120 
150 
122 




34 
23 

23 


7 250 9 


26th 

27th 


26 
26 


1,365 
419 


Total . . 


52 


6,341 


3,502 


965 


2,978 


640 


3,410 


1,626 


19,514 


33.460.7 



Approximately 19,500 feet of drifting, crosscutting, raising, winzing, and box-holing, and 
34,000 feet of diamond-drilling have been done in the course of searching for and opening up 

the various ore bodies. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



91 



Above the 6th level approximately 1,900 feet of development was done, mostly in con- 
lection with ore mined in the open pit area. This area yielded about 100,000 tons. 

From the 6th to the 18th level about 7,600 feet of development was done, mostly in con- 
tiection with known ore bodies or extensions of same. 

In further development of the ore zone on and below the 23rd level, 2,968 feet of drifting, 
:rosscutting, raising, and sinking has been done, also 9,982.9 feet of diamond-drilling. The 
svinze has been sunk 386 feet, and 1,364 feet of drifting and crosscutting done on the 26th level 
md 1,388 feet on the 27th level, in partial development of these areas. 

While no large mass of ore similar to that found on the 24th level has been disclosed by 
this work, the downward continuation of the vein structure in drift No. 2,504 described in last 
year's report has been located and drifted on for 560 feet on the 26th level and 60 feet on the 
27th level. The 26th and 27th levels have been connected by raising, showing the ore to be con- 
tinuous between these levels. From the appearance of the vein and its geological location it 
:an safely be assumed that the vein is continuous to some point above the 25th level. 

The presence of much visible gold in this vein makes it impossible to state definitely the 
^rade of ore to be won but it will undoubtedly be high, possible about 15 dwt. 

The work done to date indicates the possibility of securing upwards of 350,000 tons of good 
jrade ore from the zone from the 23rd to 27th levels. 

Development of a second entry to these levels is now under way. The work started will 
pve needed ventilation to these lower levels and will permit of actual mining being done should 
Further development not indicate the presence of ore bodies which would necessitate larger 
;cale operations. 

This new entry involves sinking from the 18th level and raising from the 23rd level. The 
raise from the 23rd level starts in a low-grade zone opened by No. 2,314 drift, which averages 
3.09 dwt. for 120 feet. The raise shows this zone to extend upwards 160 feet above the 23rd 
level; also diamond-drilling indicates the possibility that it extends below the 24th level. The 
new entry will also enable further exploration to be done on the block of ground between the 
18th and 23rd levels. 

Of the tonnage milled, the stopes yielded 498,000 tons, averaging 7.8 dwt. per ton, and 
development work yielded 49,600 tons, averaging 5.06 dwt. per ton; a total of 547,600 tons, 
averaging 7.55 dwt. per ton. 

Ore from stopes wholly in the sedimentary area yielded 95,171 tons, averaging 7.45 dwt. 
per ton. Ore from stopes wholly in the greenstones and partially in the greenstones yielded 
102,829 tons, averaging 7.88 dwt. per ton. 

The expenditure on mining was $802,717. 15, or $1.47 per ton milled. The expenditure on 
levelopment was $440,776.84, or $0.80 per ton milled. 

Ore Reserves 

The ore reserves are estimated at 2,000,000 tons. This includes 776,700 tons of broken 
jre but does not include the 350,000 tons indicated as possible ore between the 23rd and 27th 
evels. Ore in the sediments is estimated at 212,000 tons, and the ore in the greenstones and 
••ontact is estimated at 1,788,000 tons. 

Exploration 

As hitherto, we have continued to examine prospects and properties. Early in the year 
we took an option on control of a group of 21 claims in Bourlamaque township, Quebec. These 
:laims are now held under the charter of Sigma Mines, Limited. 

Mill 

The following are the results of the mill operations during the year from a total of 547,600 
tons treated. 



Heads. . . 
Recovery 



Value 
per ton 



dwt. 
7.5499 
7.4467 



Extraction 
per cent. 



98.63 



Under j\Ir. C. W. Dowsett's skilful guidance the recovery in the mill has reached the high 
figure herewith recorded. 

The small plant treating old iron and other scrap has produced approximately 2,266 ounces 
of gold. 

General 

Operating costs for the year were $3,877 per ton milled, as against $3,729 in the j^ear 1933. 
The increase is due to increase in broken ore reserves and underground conditions. 



92 Department of Mines No. 4 

Duport Mining Company, Limited 

Duport Mining Company, Limited, was incorporated in 1929, with an 
authorized capitahzation of 2,000,000 shares of no par value. The officers and 
directors are: J. G. Cross, president; Thayer Lindsley, vice-president; W. J. 
ISIatthews, secretary-treasurer. The head office is at the Public Utilities 
Building, Port Arthur. The mine address is Box 591, Kenora. 

The property held by this company includes Cameron Island, located in 
Shoal lake, Lake of the Woods area, district of Kenora, on which is situated 
the old Damascus mine. Former operators sank a 2-compartment inclined 
shaft to a depth of 132 feet in the early days, and established levels at 61 and 
124 feet, where they accomplished 80 and 232 feet of drifting, respectively. 

During the winter of 1933-34 a considerable amount of diamond-drilling 
was done through the ice around the island, and in July a mining plant was 
taken in to the property and the construction of buildings started. Under- 
ground work was begun in December, and by the end of the 3^ear 30 feet of 
drifting had been accomplished on the 124-foot level. 

The plant included an 84 h.p. boiler, 40 h.p. boiler, 300-cubic-foot steam- 
driven compressor, and a 7- by 9-inch hoist. Buildings constructed during the 
year included a shaft-house, power-house, office, and cook-house. 

J. G. Cross was in charge of operations, employing about 20 men, 9 of whom 
are underground. 

Ed. Hargreaves Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited 

Ed. Hargreaves Kirkland Gold ]Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,000,000 
shares of SI par value, 1,300,000 of which have been issued. The officers and 
directors are: Floyd J. Zuck, president; C. W. Zuck, vice-president; Harvey 
AI. Willis, secretary-treasurer; S. A. Waugh, J. A. MacVichie, and D. R. Dewart, 
directors. The head office and mine oflfice are at Kirkland Lake. A business 
office is maintained at 1007 Bank of Hamilton Building, Toronto. 

The company owns 5 claims in Lebel township, district of Timiskaming, 
on which a shaft had previously been sunk to a depth of 162 feet. The present 
company began underground operations in December, 1934, driving a crosscut 
on the 160-foot level. 

The plant consists of a 60 h.p. locomotive-type boiler, a 300-cubic-foot steam- 
driven compressor, and a 6- by 8-inch steam hoist. 

J A. Mac\"ichie is mine manager, employing 20 men. 

Excello Mines, Limited 

Excello Mines, Limited, was incorporated in December, 1933. It is 
capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and directors are: 
John R. Serson, president; John J. Gardner, vice-president; Hugh Dougherty, 
secretary-treasurer; J. E. Dougherty, H. R. 'M. Turner, and Eric Horwood, direc- 
tors. The head office is at 159 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property consists of 5 claims bordering on the boundary line between 
Deloro and Shaw townships, district of Cochrane, two claims being in the former 
township and three in the latter. The property w^as at one time held by Furness 
Mines, Limited, and later by the Dougherty vSyndicate. It is 3 miles south of 
the town of South Porcupine, which is the post-office address. 

A shaft has been sunk on the property to a depth of 185 feet and one level 
at the 125-foot level developed to the extent of about 1,200 feet of lateral work. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 93 

Some surface work consisting of trenching and diamond-drilling was done 
on the property during the summer of 1934, but the work was discontinued in 
the fall. No work was done underground during the year. There was no 
mining plant on the property when inspected in August, 1934. At that time 
there were 10 men employed at the property under the supervision of H. R. M. 
Turner. 

Federated Mining Corporation, Limited 

The authorized capitalization of the Federated Mining Corporation, Limited, 
is 5,000,000 shares of SI par value. Officers and directors are: Maj.-Gen. Alex. 
McDougall, president; Frank E. Home, vice-president; R. J. Kennett, secre- 
tary-treasurer; Ingersoll E. Haight, managing director; A. F. Kenning, Martin 
Knutson, and Thos. K. Smith, directors. The head office of the company is at 
11 King Street West, Toronto. 

The company acquired the assets of New York Porcupine Mines, Limited, 
which company surrendered its charter in 1933. The main asset of the company 
is a 40-acre claim (southwest quarter of the south half, lot 4, concession I), 
which adjoins the Dome mine on the south side, in the township of Tisdale, 
district of Cochrane. Other properties held are an additional 160 acres in the 
same area and 8 claims in the Kowkash area of Thunder Bay district. 

On the old New York Porcupine property a shaft has been sunk to a depth 
of about 265 feet. Two levels, at 125 feet and 250 feet, have been partly 
developed. About 325 feet of development work has been done from the first 
level. On the second level, there has been approximately 4,000 feet of cross- 
cutting and drifting done and several raises started and a winze sunk approxi- 
mately 90 feet. This winze was full of water when the property was inspected. 
A short sublevel drift has also been driven from one raise from the 250-foot level. 

Surface equipment on the property is fairly complete. The plant equipment 
includes a Jenckes hoist, driven by 75 h.p. motor; a Sullivan air compressor, 
510-cubic-foot capacity, powered by an electric motor; an Atlas Diesel engine, 
type T2K, 100 h.p., not in use; a 75 h.p. locomotive-type boiler, used for heating 
only. 

Buildings include a compressor-house, shaft-house, blacksmith shop, dry- 
house, carpenter shop and machine shop, cookery, bunk-house, office, power 
substation, and residence. 

At the end of the year the company was reported to be making preparations 
to deepen the shaft to the 500-foot level. No work was done underground by 
the Federated Mining Corporation during 1934 other than pumping out the 
mine. Geo. Doane is mine manager. The mine address is Box 501, South 
Porcupine. 

Foley O'Brien Corporation, Limited 

The Foley O'Brien Corporation, Limited, was incorporated in 1934, with 
2,100,000 authorized shares of SI par value, of which 600,000 shares were paid 
to the shareholders of Foley O'Brien, Limited, for property purchased and as 
commission on the transaction. 

The officers and directors of the company are: Wm. H. Kinch, president; 
Samuel J. Dark, secretary- treasurer; John G. Ullmann, A. J. McNab, and Carroll 
Searls, directors. The head office and mine office are at South Porcupine. 

The property consists of 520 acres in concessions I and II of Tisdale 
township, district of Cochrane, and adjoins the holdings of Dome Mines, Limited, 
on the northeast corner. 



94 Department of Mines No. 4 

Prior to taking over the property in 1934, a considerable amount of work had 
been done. No. 1 shaft had been sunk to a depth of 79 feet and the following 
lateral work done: on the 39-foot level, 80 feet; on the 50-foot level, 10 feet; on 
the 79-foot level, 65 feet. No. 2 shaft had been sunk to a depth of 165 feet. 
On the 160-foot level 700 feet of lateral work had been done, and from this level a 
winze had been sunk 90 feet; from the bottom of the winze on the 250-foot level 
670 feet of lateral work had been done and 20 feet of raising. 

No. 3 shaft has not been pumped out by Foley O'Brien Corporation, Limited, 
but it is said to be 235 feet in depth, and on the 80-foot level 145 feet of lateral 
work is said to have been done, and 130 feet more at the 230-foot level. The 
property has had no production. 

Foley O'Brien started active work in July, 1934, and for the balance of the 
year employed an average of about 25 men. 

Their work has consisted principally of diamond-drilling from surface and 
from underground, and of surface exploration work. About two-thirds of the 
labour has been employed at the former work. Two machines have been kept 
in operation on three shifts per day. The only other drilling done underground 
was the drilling of short raises to make room to set up the diamond-drills under- 
ground. vSurface exploration has consisted of deep trenching, much of which 
has been done by mechanical shovels. 

There is a small mining plant on the property. P. C. Benedict is super- 
intendent in charge of the work. 

Foley Syndicate 

In November, 1932, British Canadian Mines, Limited, turned over their 
Foley mine near Mine Centre, in Rainy River district, to the Foley Syndicate, 
under an operating agreement. 

This syndicate continued operations at the old south shaft until Mf.rch 25 
1934, when the agreement was cancelled. From Januarv 1, 1934, until opera- 
tions were suspended, about 300 tons of ore was obtained from open stoping on 
the 50-foot level, and milled in the small amalgamation mill on the property. 

The property remained dormant until August 1, when British Canadian 
Mines, Limited, turned it over to Russell Cone, to whom they owed wages. 
Cone operated the mine until October 25, during which period about 200 tons of 
ore was obtained from underhand stoping on the 50-foot level, and milled for 
sufficient profit to pay his back wages. 

About 8 men were employed during both periods of operation under the 
direction of Russell Cone. 

Four Nations Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited 

Four Nations Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited, own 6 claims (250 acres) 
in Gauthier township and 11 claims (416 acres) in Grenfell township, district of 
Timiskaming. Four Nations acquired a 90 per cent, interest in these claims 
for $100,000, payable over a period of 5 years. The company is capitalized at 
$5,000,000, in shares of $1 par value, and 2,673,261 shares are issued. The 
officers and directors are: H. W. Waters, president; W. G. Rook, vice-president 
and general manager; E- M. Williamson, secretary; Max Kaplan, treasurer; 
Sam Harris and Fred Killer, directors. J. F. R. Akehurst was mine manager. 
The executive office is at 372 Bay Street, Toronto. 

Previous to 1933 a shaft was sunk 500 feet, with levels at 125, 250, 375, and 
500 feet, and considerable lateral work had been done. Operations were resumed 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 95 

on November 25, 1933, and ceased on November 1, 1934. During that time 
1,065 feet of drifting and 1,451 feet of crosscutting was done. An average of 
about 40 men was employed. 

Fox Lake Gold Syndicate 

The officers of Fox Lake Gold Syndicate are: H. H. Childs, president, and 
J. W. Westervelt, trustee. The executive office is at the New Bank of Toronto 
Building, London. The mine address is Box 175, Espanola. 

The property includes a group of 9 mining claims in Mongowin township, 
district of Sudbury. It is on the Espanola-Little Current highway, about 12 
miles from Espanola. Surface work was started on this property in June, and 
in November the construction of a 25-ton amalgamation mill was commenced. 
By the end of the year it was nearly completed. It is planned to use this mill 
at first to treat ore from surface operations. No underground work was done 
in 1934. 

Mill equipment includes a jaw-crusher, ball mill, concentrating table, and 
amalgamation plates. It is to be operated by a Diesel engine. Buildings 
erected included a mill, blacksmith shop, office, bunk-house, cook-house, and 
four dwelling houses. 

An average of 19 men was employed under the direction of L. W. Adams. 

Gold Eagle Gold Mines, Limited 

Gold Eagle Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of $1 
par value, about half of which have been issued. The officers and directors are: 
Chas. E. St. Paul, Toronto, president and managing director; Howard O. 
Babcock, Buffalo, vice-president; John T. Oliver, Toronto, secretary- 
treasurer; Nelson S. Taylor and William L. Marcy, Jr., Buffalo, directors. The 
head office is at 357 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property is situated on McKenzie island in Red lake, district of Kenora, 
Patricia portion. The holdings total approximately 960 acres. 

A diamond-drilling campaign was commenced on this property in December, 
1933, and completed in May, 1934. About 5,000 feet of drilling was done. 
The following buildings were constructed later in the year: 2 bunk-houses, each 
20 by 24 feet; storehouse, 20 by 30 feet; dry-house, 16 by 24 feet; blacksmith 
shop, 16 by 24 feet; hoist-house, 24 by 30 feet; water tank, 15,000 gallons capacity; 
powder magazine; pump-house, 8 by 10 feet; office building, 16 by 24 feet. 
Equipment installed includes 2 steam, return tubular boilers, each 100 horse- 
power; Marsh hoist; 10 by 12 inches; Ingersoll-Sargent 4-drill compressor; steel 
sharpener and oil furnace; and a single-action pump, 1,500 gallons per hour 
capacity, powered by a 25 h.p. vertical steam boiler. 

The entire plant was in operation by December, 1934; sinking was then 
begun. It is the intention to put the shaft down to the 500-foot level. The 1st 
level station at the 125-foot level was being cut about the end of the year. Alex. 
Gillies is the resident manager. An average of 6 men was employed. The 
mine address is Red Lake. 

Gold Lands Syndicate of Algoma 

In 1933 the Gold Lands Syndicate of Algoma took over a group of 9 mining 
claims, known as the Edwards property, in township 48, range 27, district of 



96 Department of Mines No. 4 

Algoma. It is 6 miles southwest of Lochalsh station on the Canadian Pacific 
railway. H. C. Miller, 29 Melinda Street, Toronto, is trustee of the syndicate, 
which has a capitalization of 833,000. 

Underground operations were suspended at the end of January, 1934, at 
which time 60 feet of crosscutting had been accomplished on the 100-foot level. 
Surface work was carried on until July. At the end of the year the property 
was optioned to Orecana Trusts, Limited, who then started examination work. 

Gold Range Mines, Limited 

Gold Range Mines, Limited, was incorporated in Jul}*, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and 
directors were: M. L. Piper, president; A. V. Hannam, vice-president; and E- 
Duguid, secretary-treasurer. The head office is at 1604 Royal Bank Building, 
Toronto. 

The property acquired by this company consisted of a group of 47 claims, 
located about 2 miles east of Schreiber, on the main line of the Canadian Pacific 
railway, in Thunder Bay district. On claim T.B. 3,326 previous operators drove 
two adits, in which they accomplished a total of 190 feet of development work. 

This company started work in August and suspended operations in 
December. A total of 45 feet of drifting was done in the old No. 2 adit. 

The plant installed included a 20 h.p. vertical boiler, and a 220-cubic-foot 
Ingersoll-Rand gasoline compressor. Buildings on the property consisted of a 
power-house, warehouse, powder-house, 2 bunk-houses, 4 dwelling houses, cook- 
house, and office. 

About 14 men were employed, under the direction of A. V. Hannam. 

Golden Gate Mining Company, Limited 

Golden Gate Mining Company, Limited, is capitalized at 3.000,000 shares 
of $1 par value. The officers and directors are: F. G. Fitzgerald, president; 
C. H. Kemp, secretary-treasurer; both of 59 Yonge Street, Toronto. vS. A. Pain 
was mine manager. The mine address is Kirkland Lake. The property consists 
of 250 acres in the township of Teck, district of Timiskaming, which was acquired 
from Kirkland Gateway Gold Mines, Limited, through the Lucky Cross Leasing 
Syndicate, in return for the issue of 850,000 shares of Golden Gate to Kirkland 
Gateway and 250,000 shares to the syndicate. 

The mine was dewatered by the Lucky Cross Leasing Syndicate in February, 
1934, and sampled. The Golden Gate Mining Company, Limited, took over 
operations in August, 1934, and kept the mine dewatered for the balance of the 
year while financing was in progress. Two drills were put into operation under- 
ground on March 1, 1935; and 150 feet of drifting had been completed on the 
200- and 350-foot levels when operations were suspended on March 24, 1935. 
The mine is being kept dewatered, and it is planned shortly to start diamond- 
drilling underground. 

Golden Star Consolidated Mines, Limited 

Golden Star Consolidated Mines, Limited, was incorporated in February, 
1934, with an authorized capitalization of 2,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The 
officers and directors were: W. J. Beckett, president; Brig. -Gen. C. L. Hervey, 
vice-president; L. J. Vetter, secretary-treasurer; J. V. Ronaldson and T. S. 
Ronaldson, directors. The head office was at 306 vSterling Tower, Toronto. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 97 

The property acquired included the old Golden Star mine, which produced 
S161,000 in gold prior to 1901. It consists of three claims located about two 
miles south of Mine Centre, on the Fort Frances branch of the Canadian National 
railway, in the district of Rainy River. In addition, an option was taken on the 
adjoining Ferguson property. 

Previous operators of the Golden Star mine sank a 2-compartment, 65- 
degree shaft to a depth of 480 feet on the incline, and established levels at 75, 
155, 231, 306, 337, and 431 feet. Stoping was done on the first four levels. 
They left a small amalgamation mill on the property. 

Work was started in Alarch, 1934, and suspended in November. A mining 
plant was installed, and the old workings were dewatered and sampled. The 
old amalgamation mill was used intermittently from March until October, during 
which period it treated a total of 260 tons of ore. The major part of this ore 
was obtained from the surface dumps on the Ferguson property, and the balance 
trom those on the Golden Star property. 

The plant installed included two 30 h.p. boilers, a 175-cubic-foot compressor, 
and a 9- by 12-inch steam hoist. Buildings constructed included a power-house, 
tioist-house, blacksmith shop, cook-house, and bunk-house. 

The mill equipment included a jaw-crusher, 5 gravity stamps, concentrating 
table, cone regrinder, and amalgamation plates. It was operated by steam. 

An average of 26 men was employed under the direction of C. N. Thompson. 

Golden Summit Mines, Limited 

Golden Summit Mines, Limited, has a capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of 
§1 par value, of which 1,551,152 have been issued. The oflEicers and directors 
ire: Wm. J. Simpson, president; Benjamin Kerr, Jr., vice-president; Gordon 
Belyea, secretar^^-treasurer ; John M. Calder, J. G. Jarvis, Dr. J. J. Matheson, 
md Theodore G. Miller, directors. The head office is at 2374 Bloor vStreet West, 
Foronto. The mine ofhce is at Sesekinika. 

The company owns 460 acres in the townships of Maisonville and Grenfell, 
iistrict of Timiskaming. 

The shaft was sunk from 142 feet to 405 feet during 1934. Lateral work 
consisted of 307 feet of crosscutting on the 250-foot level, and 330 feet of cross- 
mtting and 50 feet of drifting on the 375-foot level. 

During the year a new hoist, compressor, two 60 h.p. boilers, air-receiver, 
^age, and several mine cars were added to the equipment. 

Wm. J. Simpson was manager, employing an average of 28 men. 

Goodfish Mining Company, Limited 

Goodfish Mining Company, Limited, owns 16 claims in Morrisette township, 
iistrict of Timiskaming. The present company was formed as a reorganization 
)f the Goodfish Gold Mines, Limited, and old shareholders were given 1,749,629 
ihares, on the basis of one of the new shares for two of the old. The company is 
capitalized at 3,500,000 shares of SI par value. The directors are: A. J. Perron, 
^resident; Melvin G. Hunt, vice-president and secretary-treasurer; George 
Zooper, Jessie L. Hunt, and Ida Larkin, all of Kirkland Lake, directors. The 
lead office and mine office are at Kirkland Lake. 

Operations were resumed in July, 1934. Nos. 1 and 3 shafts were dewatered 
md sampled, and approximately 370 feet of drifting was done on the 200-foot 
evel of No. 3 shaft. The mine was closed down in November, 1934. 

I. E. Mosher was manager, employing an average of 12 men. 



98 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Greenlaw Gold Mines, Limited 

Greenlaw Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1933, with an authorized 
capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and directors 
were: J. J. Byrne, president; W. B. McPherson, secretary-treasurer; M. J. 
Shunsby, J. C. Byrne, and M. D. Gray, directors. The head office is at 244 
Bay vStreet, Toronto. 

The property of the company includes a group of 19 claims in Greenlaw 
township, in the vSwayze area, district of Sudbury. 

In January, 1934, a 7- by 9-foot, 7o-degree shaft was started. Operations 
were suspended in March after sinking the shaft to a depth of 50 feet and 
accomplishing about 50 feet of lateral work at that horizon. This work was done 
by hand-steel and windlass. Buildings consisted of a blacksmith shop, bunk- 
house, cook-house, and powder-house. 

Three men were employed under the direction of Martin Shunsby. 

Halcrow-Swayze Mines, Limited 

Halcrow-Swayze Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1932, with an 
authorized capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and 
directors were: Horace F. Strong, president; H. A. Butt, vice-president; J. B. 
Allen, secretary-treasurer; W. J. Yeoell and Martin vShunsby, directors. The 
head office is at 25 King Street West, Toronto. 

The company continued operations throughout 1934 at their property in 
Halcrow township, in the vSwayze area, district of Sudbury. The 2-compartment 
vertical shaft was sunk an additional 159 feet to a total depth of 371 feet, and a 
sublevel was established at 270 feet and a level at 354 feet. 

The total development work accomplished to the end of 1934 on the various 
levels was as follows: — 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 


200-foot 


feet 

1.198 

40 

306 


feet 

420 

40 

170 


feet 
30 


270-foot sub 


30 


354-foot 


42 






Total 


1,544 


630 


102 







A total of 4,330 feet of diamond-drilling had been done to the end of 1934, 
of which 2,328 feet was from underground. 

A 25-ton test mill was constructed on the property in the fall of 1934, and a 
total of 270 tons of ore was treated by the end of the year. The mill equipment 
included a jaw-crusher, ball mill, drag-classifier, and flotation cell. A 38 h.p. 
Diesel engine was installed as motive power but was found unsatisfactory and 
replaced by a gasoline engine. 

The plant used included two 25 h.p. boilers, an 8)4- by a 10-inch steam 
hoist, and a 310-cubic-foot GD gasoline compressor. 

An average of 24 men was employed during the year, of whom 8 were 
underground. Horace F. Strong was in charge. The mine address is Chapleau. 

Hard Rock Gold Mines, Limited 

Hard Rock Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in January, 1934, with 
an authorized capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of SI par value. The officers 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 99 

and directors were: T. H. Rea, president; Jos. Errington, vice-president; W. S. 
Walton, secretary-treasurer; A. B. Gordon and H. R. Aird, directors. The head 
office is at 603 Royal Bank Building, Toronto. 

This company was formed to take over the property of the Hard Rock 
Syndicate, which comprises 15 claims, totalling about 810 acres, in Ashmore 
township, in the Little Long Lac area. Thunder Bay district. It is reached in 
summer by boat from Hardrock station, and in winter by road from Geraldton 
station. The post-office address is Geraldton. 

During the spring and summer of 1934 a total of 10,109 feet of diamond- 
drilling was accomplished. A 3-compartment vertical shaft was started in 
September on claim T.B. 9,985, and sinking was still in progress at the end of 
the year, at which time the shaft had reached a depth of 140 feet. 

Buildings erected included a power-house, boiler-house, blacksmith shop, 
warehouse, bunk-house, cook-house, powder-house, and manager's residence. 
The plant installed included a 100 h.p. boiler, a 9- by 8-inch Ingersoll-Rand 
double-drum hoist, a 530-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand Diesel compressor, and a 
300-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand semi-Diesel portable compressor. 

An average of 36 men was emploved from August, under the direction of 
J. C. Dumbrille. 

Harkness-Hays Gold Mines, Limited 

Harkness-Hays Gold Klines, Limited, was incorporated in July, 1934, with 
an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers 
and directors were: A. M. Nielsen, president; and H. L. Van Norstrand and 
Herbert Duncan, directors. The head office is at 372 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property acquired by this company consisted of a group of 8 claims, 
situated two miles east of Schreiber, Thunder Bay district, which included the 
property of Harkness-Hays Gold Mining Company, Limited. Three adits were 
driven by the latter company on claims T.B. 3,327 and 3,354, in which they 
accomplished a total of 1,270 feet of development work. 

Operations were started by the present company in July. Two new adits 
were started, in which a total of 255 feet of development work was accomplished 
by the end of 1934. This work was done with a 220-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand 
gasoline compressor. 

Buildings on the property consisted of a power-house, blacksmith shop, oil 
storage, 2 bunk-houses, and a cook-house. 

About 10 men were employed, under the direction of J. F. Anderson. The 
mine address is vSchreiber. 

Hillside Gold Mines, Limited 

Hillside Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in August, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3.000,000 shares of $1 par value. E. V. McMillan 
was president; G. E. McMillan, 45 Queen Street East, Sault Ste. Marie, was 
secretary-treasurer. 

The property consists of 35 mining claims, located in the northeast part of 
township 29, range 23, in the Michipicoten area, district of Algoma. 

Work was started on claim S.S M. 4,925 in Septemb2r and suspended early in 
December, during which period an adit was driven for a distance of 400 feet, 
using a gasoline compressor. Buildings erected included a power-house, black- 
smith shop, office, 3 small bunk-houses, and a cook-house. 

An average of 15 men was employed under the direction of D. S. Baird. 
The mine address is Wawa. 



100 Department of Mines No. 4 

Hollinger Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited 

The authorized capital of HolHnger Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited, is 
$25,000,000, in 5,000,000 shares of $5 par value; 4,920,000 shares were out- 
standing on December 31, 1934. The head office is at Timmins. 

The officers of the company are: Noah A. Timmins, president; Jules R. 
Timmins, vice-president; John B. Holden, secretary-treasurer; A. F. Brigham, 
consulting engineer; John Knox, general manager. The directors are: Noah A. 
Timmins, John B. Holden, Jules R. Timmins, Wilson Bell, Senator W. L. 
McDougald, Leo H. Timmins, Allen A. McMartin, James Y. Murdoch, and 
John I. Rankin. 

The following is taken from the general manager's report for the vear 
ending December 31, 1934: — 

PROFIT AND LOSS STATEMENT 
for year ending December 31, 1934 

Sources of 1934 Income: 

Net proceeds from gold and silver (after deducting amount of Dominion 

bullion tax, $1,091,626. 26) $13,988,824. 04 

Interest on investments and other income 188,438. 89 



Disposal of 1934 Income: 

General charges $648,070. 62 

Mining charges 5,650,091 . 93 

Milling charges 1,131,857. 10 



$14,177,262.93 



Deduct: 
Taxes — 

Province of Ontario $237,335. 35 

Royalty to Town of Timmins 60,873. 43 

Municipal to Town of Timmins 58,554.93 

Royalty to Township of Tisdale 12,126. 91 

Municipal to Township of Tisdale 2,296.03 

Municipal to City of Toronto 33. 82 

Dominion, provincial, and municipal, 

reserve for 282,406. 33 



7,430,019.65 
56,747,243.28 



$653,626.80 
Silicosis assessment, 1934 35,257. 19 



688,883.99 
Net profit from operations before depreciation $6,058,359. 29 

Depreciation: 

Plant $15,017. 60 

Investments in other companies and pro- 

perties written down 2,662. 76 

E.xpenditures on properties abandoned 48,234.09 

65,914.45 



Net Profit from Operations Carried to Surplus Account $5,992,444. 84 

SURPLUS ACCOUNT 

Balance brought forward, January 1, 1934 $5,439,325. 79 

Net profits from operations 5,992,444. 84 

Net profits from the sale of securities and other assets 512,917. 83 

Transferred from continge.nt reserve 246,324. 33 



$12,191,012.79 
Paid out in dividends 6,888,000. 00 



Balance carried forward, December 31, 1934 $5,303,012. 79 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



101 



BULLION STATEMENT 

Inventory, January 1,1934: 

Solutions $104,257. 24 

Slags, litharge, and miscellaneous 880. 00 

Precipitates held over 2,435. 00 

Gold in process to scavenger 14,500. 00 

Silver 11,802. 83 

$133,875.07 

Values Produced in 1934: 

Ore milled $14,601,036. 80 

Tailings loss 612,212. 76 

— — 13,988,824.04 

$14,122,699.11 
Inventory, December 31, 1934 

Solutions 92,403. 20 

Slags, litharge, and miscellaneous 880. 00 

Precipitates held over 3,671 . 00 

Gold in process to scavenger 4,500. 00 

Silver 3,987. 94 

$105,442. 14 
Bullion Shipped during 1934 14,017,256. 97 

$14,122,699.11 
Yearly Average Costs 



Account 



Sundries 



Labour 



Stores 



Total 



Per ton 
ore milled 



General miscellaneous charges 

and administration 

Surface services 

Fire insurance 

Group insurance 

Marketing bullion 

Workmen's compensation .... 

Milling charges 

Mining charges 

Silicosis assessment 



$18,328.46 



$248,614.27 
53,073.00 



$129,807.49 
37,690.00 



33,448.74 



53,399.80 



73,708.86 

446,471.30 

3,983,770.85 

35,257. 19 



685,385.80 
1,666,321.08 



$378, 
90, 
18, 
53, 
33 
73 
1,131 
5,650 
35 



421.76 
763.00 
328.46 
399.80 

448.74 
708.86 
857.10 
091.93 
257.19 



$0. 1991 
.0478 
.0096 
.0280 
.0176 
.0388 
.5956 
2.9730 
.0186 



Total charges. 



$51,777.20 



$4,894,295.27 



$2,519,204.37 



$7,465,276.84 



$3.9281 



Employees 

The average number of men employed during the year has been 2,660, distributed as follows: 

Miners: 

Exploration 31 

Development 441 

Production 1,386 



Mechanics: 




General: 




Operation 


. 112 


Mill and refinery . . 


213 


Maintenance . . . 


. 190 


Technical 


77 






Clerical 


39 






Miscellaneous .... 


133 






Outside properties. 
Total 


38 


Total 


. 302 


500 



Total 1,858 

There were also emploj'ed at outside properties on December 31, 1934, a total of 116 men, 
as follows: Hislop, 39; Cochenour-Willans, 37; Gold Island, 26; Long Lake, 14. 



The Mill 

Milling results were as follows: — 

Ore milled tons 

Average value per ton 

Gross value $14,601,036.80 

Deduct loss in tailings 612,212. 76 



1,900.490 

$7.68 



Net value received $13,988,824. 04 



102 Department of Mines No. 4 

Average tons per day 5,236 

Per cent, of possible time run 90. 8 

Tons per 100 per cent, running time 5,767 

Solution precipitated per ton ore tons 0. 98 

Value per ton tailings $0. 32 

Cyanide consumed per ton of ore lbs. 0. 482 

Zinc consumed per ton of ore lbs. 0. 045 

Zinc consumed per ton of solution lbs. 0. 046 

Lime consumed per ton of ore lbs. 2. 170 

Lead acetate per ton of ore lbs. 0. 007 

Average value of pregnant solution $7. 54 

Average value received per ounce of gold sold $32. 16 

Ore Reserves 

Our ore reserves on the 31st of December, 1934, consisted of 7,061,926 tons, of a total value 
of $51,440,260, having an average value of $7.28 per ton. These figures compare with 6,487,559 
tons of a total value of $48,430,451.00, having an average value of $7.47 per ton, at the end of 1933. 

In the calculations dealing with ore reserves, the statutory price of gold, namely $20.67 
per ounce, has been taken as the basis of value, and the same minimum ore grade as used in 
former years continued. 

Hollinger Mill 

During the year investigations have been carried on to determine the possibility of im- 
proving the extraction, having in mind the greater loss in tailings due to the increase in value 
of gold. As yet these investigations have not Ijeen productive of any positive results. 

Hollinger Mine 

As stated in the last annual report, operations have been carried on on all levels from the 
surface to the 3,950-foot level. About 35.8 per cent, of the ore milled came from above the 
800-foot level. During the year 877,837 tons of backfill were placed. There has been a further 
increase in exploration in the backfilled areas mentioned in the last report, and as a result you 
will note that the total percentage of ore mined above the SOO-foot level is slightly in excess of 
the figure of last year. 

Operations in the block between the 2,750-foot level and the 3,950-foot level are still con- 
fined to development. It is gratifying to note that there has been a further increase of $3,000,000 
in the ore reserves. 

The drift west from the Schumacher shaft, mentioned in the last annual report, has been 
extended, and some interesting ore occurrences disclosed. Investigations have as yet not pro- 
ceeded far enough to give these discoveries any weight in the general picture. 

The shaft below the 3,950-foot level, known as No. 25 shaft, has been sunk to 50 feet below 
the 4,2o0-foot level, but no development commenced as yet. 

Young-Davidson Mine 

As noted in the president's remarks, the Young- Davidson mill went into operation September 
8, 1934, and has continued to operate with a surprisingly small number of adjustments. There 
was some difficulty with the crushing due to the toughness of the ore ; this has been overcome 
and the daily tonnage is now about 625 tons. 

The open-pit operation has continued throughout the winter, but under many difficulties, 
and our experience indicates that underground mining will be more satisfactory during the 
winter months. Plans are under way for this development. 

To date the gold content in the Young-Davidson ore has been $1.76 on $20.67 basis, or 
$2.88 on the new price. Bullion shipments are being regularly made. Some 51,842 tons had 
been treated to the end of the year, and operating profits amounted to $53,604.99. 

The minor changes and alterations in methods have prevented us from arriving at a true 
cost, but operations to date have been conducted at a profit. 

Hislop Property 

A shaft was sunk to a depth of 150 feet and a crosscut driven to intersect the east ore body. 
In drifting on this level some encouraging assays have been obtained, but the work has not 
proceeded sufficiently to justify any definite statements as to average values and widths of ore 
body. The crosscut on the same level being driven to the west has not advanced sufficiently to 
intersect the west ore body. 

The following is taken from the consulting engineer's report on outside 
properties as at December 31, 1934: — 

During 1934, 108 prospects were examined, 96 in the province of Ontario, 10 in the province 
of Quebec, and one each in Manitoba and Nova Scotia. In many cases the properties were 
examined in considerable detail, but none showed sufficient merit to warrant our further interest. 

The immediate vicinity of the Young-Davidson and Hislop Township properties were given 
very thorough investigations in order that similar occurrences of ore should not be overlooked. 

Prospecting, development, and exploration work on outside properties (except the Young- 
Davidson) involved an expenditure of $320,000. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



103 



Cochenour-Willans 
An option was obtained on the Cochenour-Willans property in the Red Lake 
area, district of Kenora, Patricia portion. This property consists of about 500 
acres adjoining the claims of McKenzie Red Lake Gold Mines. Work com- 
menced late in the fall of 1934, and by the end of the year a 3-compartment shaft 
had been sunk to a depth of 150 feet and 80 feet of lateral work had been done 

on the 150-foot level. 

Gold Island 

An option was obtained on the Gold Island property at Night Hawk lake, 
township of Cody, district of Cochrane. Work commenced late in the year and 
continued until about the end of January, 1935. At the time of cessation of 
operations a shaft had been sunk 180 feet and a station had been cut at the 
170-foot level. 

Horseshoe Mines, Limited 

Horseshoe Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1929, with an authorized 
capital of 4,500,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and directors were: 
W. A. Lamport, president; A. Kelly Evans, vice-president; C. M. Chandler, 
secretary-treasurer; J. H. Lumbers, W. B. Kendall, and G. G. Goodelle, directors. 
The head ofhce is at 302 Royal Bank Building, Toronto. 

The property of this company includes the old Regina mine in the Lake of 
the Woods area, district of Kenora. It is 45 miles southeast of Kenora. 

Operations at the Regina mine were carried on from July, 1933, until early 
in February, 1934. During July and August, the mine was again dewatered and 
a small amount of work done, following which operations were again suspended. 

Howey Gold Mines, Limited 

Howey Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in March, 1926. It has an 
authorized capitalization of 5,000,000 shares of $1 par value, all issued. The 
officers and directors are: R. T. Birks, president; W. vS. Cherry, vice-president, 
H. C. McCloskey, secretary-treasurer; J. E. Hammell and John A. Northway; 
directors. Eraser D. Reid is general manager, and Edward Futterer is resident 
manager. The head office and mine office are both at Red Lake. The executive 
office is at 717 Federal Building, Toronto. 

The company holds approximately 900 acres in the Red Lake area, district 
of Kenora, Patricia portion. Transportation to the property is by water route 
from Hudson, on the Canadian National railway, or by airplane. The average 
number of men employed per month during 1934 was 231. 

The following is taken from the general manager's fiscal year ending 
December 31, 1934:— 

Summary of Work Accomplished 



19:34 



1933 



1932 



Drifts, crosscuts, raises, etc feet 

Shafts and winzes feet 

Shaft stations, slashing, etc cu. yds. 

Diamond-drilling (underground) feet 

Diamond-drilling (outside exploration) feet 

Box-holes feet 

Ore broken tons 

Low-grade material discarded by sorting tons 

Milled after sorting tons 

Broken reserves in stopes (Jan. 1, 1935) tons 



3,955 

177 

296 

3,629 

851 

972 

481.492 

85,648 

396,109 

301,990 



1,879 
200 
3,860 
1,837.6 



1,883 

414,611 

53,170 

290,965 

276,526 



3,562.5 
430.5 
1,550 
1,856. 6 
701 
8.30.5 
339,675 
44,585 
284,664 
206,150 



104 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Earnings Statement 





1934 


1933 


1932 


Total receipts from sales of gold and silver 

Total operating cost, including Toronto office expenses 


$1,594,222.51 
881,869.52 


$1,158,470.03 $1,268,780.07 
770,010.56 813,368.11 


Operating profit 


$712,352.99 


$388,459.47 


$455,411.96 





Miscellaneous Operating Data 



1934 



1933 



1932 



Total from 

start of 
operations 



Tonnage milled and sorted 

Tonnage discarded by sorting 

Tonnage milled 

Value a ton hoisted 

Value a ton material discarded by sorting 

Value a ton of ore milled 

Loss in tailings a ton milled 

Loss a ton of ore hoisted (in milling and 

sorting) 

Net percentage recoverj' a ton of ore 

hoisted 

Total net recovery of gold and silver. . . 



481,757 
85,648 

396,109 
$2.20 
$0.21 
$2.64 
$0,214 

$0,213 

90.3 
$1,594,222.51 



344,135 

53,170 
290,965 

$2.73 

$0.54 

$3.12 

$0.24 

$0,286 

89.5 
,158.470.03 



329,249 
44,585 

284,664 
$3.70 
$0.42 
$4.21 
$0.27 

$0.29 



1,493,247 
199,519 

1,293,728 
$3.12 
$0,387 
$3.54 
$0,257 

$0. 274 



92.4 I 91.2 
,268,780.07 $5,396,191.55 



N.B. — All values are figured on gold at $20.67 per ounce. 



Analysis of Costs 





1934 

(481,757 tons) 


1933 
(344,135 tons) 


1932 
(329,249 tons) 




Total 
cost 


Cost 

per ton 

milled and 

sorted 


Total 
cost 


Cost 

per ton 

milled and 

sorted 


Total 
cost 


Cost 

per ton 

milled and 

sorted 


Mine operation 

Outside exploration.. 
Crushing and convey- 
ing .. . 

Ore sorting 


$497,155.74 
2,389.43 

44,902.88 

23,485.72 

217,909.85 

63,993.85 


$1,032 
.005 

.093 
.049 
.452 
.133 


$445,033.50 
484.39 

34,918.07 

15,612.00 

198,877. 14 

48,277.67 


$1,293 
.002 

.102 
.045 

.578 
.140 


$425,094.74 
2,089.95 

38,866.59 
12,820.98 


$1,292 
.006 

.118 
.039 


Milling 


216,049.24 -656 


General expense 


59,337.36 


.180 


Total plant cost . . . 

Toronto office salaries 
and general ex- 
pense 

Interest and exchange 


$849,837.47 

32,028.69 
3.36 


$1,764 
.066 


$743,202.77 
27,578.92 


$2. 160 
.080 


$754,258.86 

45,313. 19 
13,796.06 


$2,291 

.138 
.042 












Total operating ex- 
pensesbeforedepre- 
ciation. Dominion 
and provincial 
taxes, and pre- 
operating charges . . 

Dominion and pro- 
vincial taxes ... 


$881,869.52 

43,284. 59 

132,749.76 
96,351.40 


$1,830 

.090 

.276 
.200 


$770,781.69 

13,016.83 

119,108.64 
103,240.50 


$2,240 

.038 

.346 
.300 


$813.368. 11 


$2. 471 


Depreciation (on 10 

per cent, basis) .... 

Pre-operating charges 


115,333.90 
197.549.40 


.350 
.600 


Total cost 


$1,154,255.27 $2,396 


$1,006,147.66 


$2,924 


$1,126,251.41 


$3,421 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 105 

Capital Expenditixres 
buildings : 

New change-house $6,676. 54 

New bunk-house 6,065. 43 

Addition to hospital 323. 03 

Total $13,065. 00 

EQUIPMENT : 

X-ray $2,418. 54 

Telephone system 3,488. 78 

Tractor 2,182.96 

Rotomill, etc 716. 32 

Fire-fighting equipment, etc 569. 11 

Miscellaneous 2,796. 82 

Total 12.172. 53 

ADDITIONS IN CONNECTION WITH INCREASED TONNAGE AND DEPTH 
DEVELOPMENT: 

Aldrich pump on ,'1,300-foot level $5,671.81 

IVIine electric power — light and signal system 3,273.88 

Mill equipment 638. 00 

Total 9,583. 69 

Total capital expenditures $34,821.22 

Ore Reserves 

The broken ore reserves in the mine as of December 31, 1934, amounted to 301,990 tons, 
compared to 276,526 tons the previous year. The unbroken reserves amounted to 1,853,097 
tons, compared to 1,751,755 tons the previous year. The value of the broken and unbroken 
reserves is estimated to he approximately $3.50 per ton, based on the current price of gold. 

Exploration 

During the year the 500-foot level and the 750-foot level west drifts were extended to points 
710 feet and 630 feet, respectively, west of the shaft. This development added a substantia 
tonnage of slightly lower than average-grade ore to the unbroken reserves. 

The 1,000-foot level east drift was driven to a point 1,430 feet east of the shaft. A narrow 
ore bod}' was encountered, having a length of 110 feet, width of 5 feet, and an average assay value 
of $8.40 per ton, at current gold prices. It was found that this vein does not extend upward to 
the S75-foot level. The 1,175-foot level east drift is being driven to explore its possible down- 
ward extension. 

The main shaft was sunk to the 1,500-foot level and a crosscut started. During the year 
1935 the winze also will be sunk to the 1,500-foot level and connected at that elevation to the 
shaft by an exploration drift, from which drift the dike will be systematically explored. 

Further exploration work in the dike beyond the present most easterly workings can be 
carried on more economical!}^ by diamond-drilling from the surface. 

Operating Costs 

It was estimated in January, 1933, that the recommended increase in tonnage would reduce 
the cost per ton of ore treated to $1.85. The actual cost for 1934 was $1.83 per ton. This 
outstanding achievement is a direct result of the skill and efficiency of Mr. Futterer and his staff. 

Hudson Patricia Gold Mines, Limited 

Hudson Patricia Gold Mines, Limited, has an authorized capitalization of 
2,500,000 shares of SI par value. The company was organized to take over the 
property of the Metals Development Company, Limited, in the Woman Lake 
area, district of Kenora, Patricia portion. The holdings consist of 26 patented 
claims, totalling 1,140 acres, in the tov^mships of Goodall and Dent. 

The officers and directors of the company are: W. R. Salter, president; 
C. H. Ackerman, vice-president; B. A. R. Dignam, secretary-treasurer; M. H. 
Lebel, P. A. Lavallee, J. L. A. Tetreault, B. R. Hepburn, G. Cockerill, directors. 
The executive office is at 112 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

This property has been operated intermittently since 1929. When Hudson 
Patricia Gold Mines took it over in April, 1934, the following work had been 



106 Department of Mines No. 4 

done: No. 1 shaft, inclined, had been sunk to the inchned depth of 100 feet; 
from it 15 feet of crosscutting had been driven and 312 feet of drifting done. 
No. 2 shaft, vertical, had been sunk 237 feet, and a station cut at the 211-foot 
level; about 900 feet of lateral work had been done at this level. 

From April to the end of November, 1934, Hudson Patricia Gold Mines 
crosscut 849 feet and drifted 1,061 feet on the 210-foot level; they also drove 
169 feet of raise from the 211-foot level to the 100-foot level, and were sinking a 
winze from the 2nd level, with the 32o-foot level as their objective. This winze 
was down 75 feet on December 11, 1934. 

The plant includes an 80 h.p. locomotive-type boiler, a 500-cubic-foot com- 
pressor, a 7- by 6-inch reversing steam hoist, a steam generator for the electric- 
lighting system, a C.I.R. drill-sharpener, and an oil furnace. 

The buildings include a fully equipped assay office, blacksmith shop, cookery, 
bunk-houses for 50 men, 6 dwelling houses, stable, and powder magazine. 

J. M. Thompson is manager at the property. The mine address is Narrow 
Lake, via Sioux Lookout. 

J-M Consolidated Mines, Limited 

J-M Consolidated Alines, Limited, was incorporated in February, 1932, 
with a capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of -SI par value. The officers and 
directors are: J. E. Day, Toronto, president; Charles Taylor, St. Catharines, 
vice-president; T. J. Day, Toronto, secretary-treasurer; Hon. J. D. Chaplin, 
St. Catharines, and J. B. Tudhope, Waubaushene, directors. The head office 
of the company is at 1116 Federal Building, Toronto. 

The company acquired the assets of Jackson-Manion Mines, Limited, and 
Mint-Ore Mines, Limited. The holdings consist of 34 claims, 21 of which are 
in the main mine group. All are located in the Woman Lake area, Patricia 
portion of Kenora district. 

The mine was idle from August, 1929, to October, 1933. During the 
previous operation a shaft had been sunk to a depth of 404 feet, and levels had 
been established at the 125-, 250-, and 375-foot levels. At the end of 1934 the 
total lateral work was as follows: 890 feet on the 125-foot level, 1,020 feet on the 
250-foot level, 50 feet on the 200-foot sublevel, and 760 feet on the 375-foot level. 
A winze had been sunk 30 feet from the 375-foot level, and 340 feet of raises had 
been driven. 

A C3"anide mill capable of handling 30 tons a day was put into operation in 
May, 1934, and at December 10 had treated 3,066 tons of ore, having a value 
of $31,200. 

The mill equipment includes a 6- by 8-inch jaw-crusher, a 5- by 3-foot ball 
mill in closed circuit with cone classifier, thickener, Pachuca tank, clarifiers, and 
filters. 

D. M. Thomson is in charge of operations, employing an average of 46 men. 
The mine address is Jackson Manion. 

Kenora Prospectors and Miners, Limited 

The capitalization of Kenora Prospectors and Miners, Limited, was increased 
from 500,000 shares to 1,000,000 shares of SI par value in 1934. The officers 
and directors were: Thayer Lindsley, president; I. A. Lindsley, vice-president; 
Geo. H. Ince, secretary-treasurer; I. M. Alachin and Jos. Errington, directors. 
The executive office is at 25 King vStreet West, Toronto. The mine office is at 
Kenora. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



107 



The property held by this company includes the old Mikado mine and the 
Cedar Island mine, both of which are located at Shoal lake, in the Lake of the 
Woods area, district of Kenora. They are about 45 miles bv water from Kenora. 



Mikado 

Underground work was carried on at the Mikado mine from January 1 to 
about July 20, 193-i. During this period 212 feet of drifting was done on the old 
10th level, which is 560 feet vertically from surface. Also a total of 2,760 feet 
of diamond-drilling was accomplished from underground. 

Cedar Island 

In May. 1934, work was resumed at the Cedar Island mine, which had been 
idle since October, 1932. Operations were transferred farther inland to the old 
Cornucopia shaft, as the workings from the inclined shaft beside the lake were 
making considerable water. The Cornucopia shaft had been sunk vertically to a 
depth of 81 feet in the early days, and about 100 feet of lateral work accomplished 
at that depth. In 1934 this shaft was timbered, a headframe and plant were 
erected, and sinking was carried on to a depth of 393 feet. A level was established 
at 284 feet, where 1,066 feet of drifting and 836 feet of crosscutting was accom- 
plished. A total of 1,800 feet of diamond-drilling was done from surface. 

The plant used included a 55 h.p. boiler, an 83<4- by 10-inch IngersoU-Rand 
divided-drum hoist, and a 600-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand Diesel compressor. 
New buildings erected included a power-house, dry-house, blacksmith shop, and 
powder-house. 

An average of 45 men was employed by this company during the year, of 
whom 11 were underground. Geo. H. Ince was in charge, with H. Johnson as 
contractor. 

Kenty Gold Mines, Limited 

Kenty Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of SI par 
value. The officers are: F. L. Trethewey, president; S. W. Black, secretary- 
treasurer. The executive office is at 8 Wellington Street East, Toronto. 

The company suspended all operations at its property in Swayze township, 
district of Sudbury, in July, 1934, following unfavourable results. 

The development work accomplished during 1934, and the total to the 
suspension of operations, on the various levels, was as follows: — 





Drifting 


Crosscutting 




1934 


Total 


1934 


Total 


No. 1 Shaft 
250-foot 


feet 

64 

382 


feet 
434 
840 
166 


feet 


feet 
74 


375-foot 


335 


518 


500-foot 


202 










Total 


446 


1,440 


335 


794 


Xo. 2 Shaft 

290-foot 


1,533 
417 


1,991 
554 


701 


1.277 


525-foot 


189 705 






Total 


1,950 


2,545 


890 


1,982 







108 Department of Mines No. 4 

Xo. 1 shaft was sunk to a depth of 510 feet, and No. 2 shaft to 534 feet. 
Both are vertical 2-compartment shafts; they are about 1,800 feet apart. 

The total footage of diamond-drilling done on the property from the 
commencement of operations was 7,401 feet, of which 6,298 feet was from 
underground. No changes w^ere made in the plant during 1934. 

An average of 37 men was employed, of whom 22 were underground. E. T. 
Corkill was in charge, with R. ]\I. Williams as assistant. 

Kirkland Consolidated Mines, Limited 

Kirkland Consolidated Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 7,000,000 shares of 
SI par value. There are issued 4,675,708 shares, of which 3,250,000 shares are 
pooled until July 1, 1935. The officers and directors are: J. W. Rudhard, 
president; Ferdinand Frohe, vice-president; C. C. Ty.x, Tonawanda, N.Y., 
secretary-treasurer; Geo. F. Pfeiffer, Kevin Killeen, Norman R. Davis, Richard 
W. Langford, directors. The head office is at 1717 Metropolitan Building, 
Toronto. 

The company owns 1,200 acres: 4 claims in ]Mc\'ittie township, 14 in 
Gauthier township, and 14 in Grenfell township, district of Timiskaming. A 
2-compartment shaft has been sunk to a depth of 265 feet, with levels at 150 
and 250 feet. During 1934 the following work was done on the 250-foot level: 
drifting. 820 feet; crosscutting, 1,280 feet; sinking, 50 feet; diamond-drilling 
underground, 2,270 feet; diamond-drilling from surface, 1,488 feet. Diamond- 
drilling on surface from January 1 to February 20, 1935, was 1,398 feet. Under- 
ground work was stopped on November 10, 1934. 

Ralph Hurd is mine manager, and employed an average force of 25 men. 
The mine address is Sesekinika. 

Kirkland Gold Belt Mines, Limited 

Kirkland Gold Belt Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 4,000,000 shares of no 
par value. The officers and directors are: George W. Morris, president; Jas. 
E. Day, vice-president; ]M. C. vSmith, treasurer; Roy Weldon, secretary; Dr. 
W. H. Bennett, H. B. Anderson, and Walter B. Robb, directors. Howard 
Brassaw is mine superintendent. The mine address is King Kirkland. 

The property consists of 292 acres in Lebel township, district of Timiskaming. 
The average number of men employed during the year was 21. 

The development work on the property is as follows: — 

Total 
to date 

feet 
Shaft-siiiking . 
Crosscutting . 
Drifting 

The mine closed on December 31, 1934. On January 23, 1935, work was 
again started by ]Morris Kirkland Gold Alines, Limited, a new company formed 
to take over the property. 

Kirkland Lake Gold Mining Company, Limited 

The officers and directors of the Kirkland Lake Gold Mining Company, 
Limited, are: J. B. Tyrrell, president; R. G. O. Thomson, vice-president; 




1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 109 

R. Graham, secretary; V. H. Emery, managing director; A. C. Matthews, 
J. A. Dalton, J. C. Haight, R. V. Le^ Sueur, and W. S. Walton, directors. The 
company owns 465 acres in the township of Teck, district of Timiskaming, and 
is capitalized at 5,500,000 shares of $1 par value. The head office is at the Bank 
of Commerce Building, Toronto. The mine address is Kirkland Lake. Wm. 
Sixt was mine manager until the latter part of the year, when he resigned. An 
average of 139 men was employed during the year. 

The following is taken from the president's report to the shareholders for 
the year ending December 31, 1934: — 

The total income for the year amounted to $717,005.03, of which $702,720.20 was bullion 
produced. This is $181,310.14 more than was produced in 1933. Of the above income, 
$297,629.56 was paid in wages, and $193,790.00 for equipment and supplies, almost all of 
which was purchased from Canadians or Canadian companies. In addition $65,990.00 was paid 
for hydro-electric power and $10,545. -47 in taxes. 

The profit derived from operations for the year was $163,512.88, after allowing depreciation 
but before providing for income tax. In December last an interim dividend of 3 per cent, on 
the issued stock of the company was paid, which called for an expenditure of $157,173.60. 

The following is a summary of the work done in the mine during the year : — 

Ore mined and hoisted to mill tons 64,952 

Drifting feet 5,524 

Crosscutting feet 750 

Sinking feet 408 

Raising feet 983 

Station-cutting cu. ft. 10,200 

Slashing cu. ft. 28,833 

Diamond-drilling feet 5,904 

The No. 2 winze was sunk to 5,885 feet, and levels were begun or partly opened at 5,600, 
5,725, and 5,850 feet. One hundred and forty-five feet of crosscutting and 1,445 feet of drifting 
was done here, but with the exception of a ventilation and second exit raise from the 5,600- 
to the 5,450-foot level, work has been discontinued on these levels while the intensive exploration 
of the upper levels is in progress. 

In co-operation with the management of the Teck-Hughes mine, a connection was made 
from our 5,200-foot level to their 42nd level, in order to provide an escapement way for the 
men of one mine into and through the other mine in case of emergency. 

The 2,475-foot level, which, at the request of Macassa Mines, Limited, had been driven 
into their property, was cleared out, so that there is now a free passage westward at this level 
into their mine, as well as the passage eastward at the 5,200-foot level into the Teck-Hughes 
mine. 

During the year two independent mining engineers, namely Messrs. V. H. Emery and 
S. N. Graham, were engaged to make a thorough examination of your mine. Their extended 
report, with plans and sections, was received on the 4th of September, 1934. On the 21st of 
September, a synopsis of this report, approved by these engineers, was mailed to all registered 
shareholders, and notices were inserted in the newspapers advising all shareholders, whether 
registered or not, that the original report was open to inspection at the head office of your com- 
pany. A number of persons, including representatives of several newspapers, came to the 
office and examined the report. 

As a result of such report a more thorough and intensive programme of lateral exploration 
and diamond-drilling was undertaken in the mine, including the upper portions, which had not 
been worked for some years. This lateral exploratory work was in progress at the end of the 
year and was beginning to show very favourable results, and it is the intention to continue it 
during the present year. 

Since the above report was submitted, a decided improvement has been made in the opera- 
tion of the mill. Following the recommendations therein contained, the capacity of the primary 
rock crushers was increased by the installation of larger motors, which enables the ore to be 
ground finer throughout the circuit, and the result has been to increase the amount of gold pre- 
cipitated by the cyanide solution. This, with a general tuning-up of the mill, has, without large 
expenditure or material increase of costs, raised the percentage of gold extracted from the ore 
in the mill higher than previously attained with the tonnage now being treated. 

Mr. Emery was subsequently appointed consulting engineer to supervise and watch the 
operations undertaken as the result of the report. 

Lake Caswell Mines, Limited 

Lake Caswell Mines, Limited, was incorporated in April, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and 
directors were: F. J. vSullivan, general manager; M. F. Millward, secretary; 



110 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



T. A. Burke, G. Cockerill, A. Godfrey, L. J. Layden, and A. E. Dawson, directors. 
The head office is at 2201 Sterling Tower, Toronto. 

The property of this company includes the old Westree or Champion Reef 
mine in Macmurchy township, in the West vShiningtree area, district of Sudbury. 
It consists of a group of four claims, on which previous operators put down two 
shafts, one to 500 feet and the other to 100 feet. They established levels at 
240 and 500 feet, where they did 325 and 780 feet of lateral work, respectively. 
In addition a station was cut at a depth of 92 feet. 

This shaft was dewatered in July, 1934, and 70 feet of lateral work was 
accomplished on the 500-foot level. Underground work was then suspended in 
favour of surface w^ork for the balance of the year. 

The old mining plant was used, which included a 95 h.p. boiler, a 10- by 12- 
inch hoist, and a 460-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand steam compressor. 

An average of 19 men was employed under the direction of F. J. vSullivan. 
The mine address is Westree. 

Lake Shore Mines, Limited 

Lake vShore Mines, Limited, is capitalized at S2, 000, 000, in shares of $1 
par value. The executive officers and directors are: Harry Oakes, president; 
W. H. Wright, vice-president; A. L. Blomfield, managing director; Dr. W. P. 
St. Charles, treasurer; Kirkland Securities, Limited, secretary; Albert Wende 
and Ernest ^Martin, directors. The mine and works are at Kirkland Lake, 
Teck township, district of Timiskaming. 

An average of 1,299 men was employed during the year. E. W. Todd is 
mine superintendent. 

The following is taken from the report of the superintendent for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1935: — 

During the year, 8:33,094 dry tons of ore were treated, yielding -460,442 ounces of gold 
and 105,514 ounces of silver, having a gross value of .?16. 026, 108.57. The total production, 
after deduction of the federal bullion tax, amounted to $14,578,936.13. 



Production Recorx) 



Period 



IMonths 



Tons 
milled 



Gross value 
of bullion' 



Dividends 
paid 



Mar. 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 
Julv 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
Julv 1 
Julv 1 
Julv 1 
July 1 
Julv 1 
Julv 1 
Julv 1 
July 1 



1918, 
1918, 
1919, 
1920, 
1921, 
1923, 
1924, 
1925, 
1926, 
1927, 
1928, 
1929, 
1930, 
1931, 
1932. 
1933, 
19:34, 



to Nov. 30 
to Nov. 30 
to Nov. 30 
to Nov. 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 
to June 30 



1918. 
1919. 
1920. 
1921. 
1923. 
1924. 
1925. 
1926. 
1927. 
1928. 
1929. 
1930. 
1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 
1935. 



9 
9 
12 
12 
19 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 



14,948 

11.907 

18,889 

21,681 

36,825 

24,223 

96,838 

125,676 

214,335 

237,962 

367.015 

467,648 

698,624 

834,434 

797,673 

836,991 

833,094 



$372, 

302 

525, 

523, 

850, 

590 

1,812, 

2,2:33 

3,105 

3,629 

5,519 

6,609 

9,153 

13,798 

13,277 

16,382 

16,026 



352.35 

518.17 
278.38 
597.39 
282 92 
Tl9^98 
008.05 
475.85 
047.85 
317.57 
138.86 
728.42 
546.62 
128.33 
685.72 
274.27 
108.57 



$100,000 

100,000 

80,000 

120,000 

160,000 

160,000 

600,000 

700,000 

1,200,000 

1,600,000 

2,000,000 

2,600,000 

3,600,000 

6.000,000 

6,000,000 

6,000,000 

8,000,000 



Total. 



5.638,763 



$94,710,609.30 ^$39,020,000 



'Includes exchange premiums. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



111 



Development Footage for the Year 



Level 


Drift- 
ing 


Cross- 
cutting 


Rais- 
ing 


Box- 
holing 


Sub- 
drifting 


Ore 

and 

waste 

passes 


Total 
footage 


Dia- 
mond- 
drilling 


Sta- 
tion- 
cutting 


feet feet 
200-foot 99-5 47.8 


feet 


feet 


feet 
4 
117.6 
392 
805.7 
900.9 
395.6 
338.3 
97.4 
29.6 
146.5 
372.9 
123.6 
135.2 
339.8 
206 
24 


feet 


150.8 

600.7 

891.1 

1,883.7 

1,634 

894.8 

578.9 

971.2 

657.2 

1,874.4 

1.569 

1,148.3 

1,170.5 

2,504.5 

1,588.9 

943.7 

1,505.8 

585.3 


ft. in. cu. ft. 
420 ' 


400-foot.... 

600-foot. . . . 

800-foot... . 
1,000-foot... . 
1,200-foot.... 

1,400-foot 

1,600-foot... . 
1,800-foot... . 
2,000-foot... . 
2,200-foot.... 
2,325-foot.... 
2,450-foot.... 

2.575-foot 

2,700-foot. . . . 
2,825-foot.... 
2,950-foot 


228. 7 
188.8 
51.2 
163.7 
168.4 
88.1 
352.4 
578.4 

1,015.3 
444.6 
738.1 
697.8 

1,387.9 
686.1 
272.9 

1,208.8 


71.3 
130.8 
190 

87.6 
129.8 

'"36i.'2' 

"l76.'7 

'"'43.'6' 

"380 .6 
435 
114.5 
194 4 


113.9 
179.5 
836.8 
481.8 
201 
152.5 
160.2 
49.2 
535.9 
751.5 
243 
337.5 
396.2 
195.4 
532.3 
102 fi 


69.2 
' 66.4 


1,093 

1,378 
611 7 

1,147 11 

1,103 2 
70 6 
392 8 
263 
866 6 
694 3 
395 11 
682 3 

1,125 1 
465 4 

1,114 
269 11 
440 4 


""60 
"408 


3, 075- foot... . 


373 9 41 4 170 










3,200-foot.. . 258 2 84.7 










342.9 391 1 




3,325-foot 1 1 
















3,450-foot . 


1 
















3,575-foot 


1 
















3,700-foot 


















3.825-foot. . 




92. i 










92.1 


706 9 




3,950-foot. 














4,075-foot 


1 
















4,200-foot 




11 
44.4 








154 


16.^ 






4325-foot 










93.7: 13S.1 




4,800 
3.108 


4,450-foot 


'?84 


44.3 








33.9 362.2 


559 4 












Total 


9,286.8 


2,680.7 


5.439.3 


135.6 


4,429.1 


281.6 


1 22,253.1 


il4,190 7 


8,376 



Summary of Ore Hoisted for the Ye-vr 



Level 



200-foot . 

400-foot. 

600- foot. 

SOO-foot. 
1,000-foot. 
1,200-foot. 
1,400-foot. 
1,600-foot. 
1,800-foot. 
2,000-foot. 
2.200-foot. 
2,325-foot. 
2.450-foot . 
2,575-foot. 
2,700-foot . 
2.825-foot. 
2,950-foot. 
3,075-foot. 
3,200-foot . 
3,450-foot. 
4,450-foot. 

Total.. 



Ore from 
development 



Ore from 
mining 



tons 

184 

1,017 

650 

1,248 

687 

503 

380 

324 

1,154 

4,540 

3,007 

1,583 

1,798 

1,354 

1,862 

39 

2,045 

282 

54 

"423 

23,134 



tons 

2,657 

9,821 

48,684 

62,744 

31,970 

20.246 

31,0.34 

7.625 

4,227 

37,032 

63,515 

93.575 

147,262 

133,980 

43,174 

35.508 

17.253 

12.692 

3,036 

8 



806,043 



112 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Summary of Development Work Performed since the 
Beginning of Operations 

Feet 

Drifting 121,852 

Crosscutting 31,335 

Raising 78,934 

Subdrifting 16,143 

Ore and waste passes 11,647 

Shaft-sinking 7,998 

Shaft-raising 1,340 

Shaft-slashing 761 

Winze-sinking 1,151 

Diamond-drilling 104,931 

cu. ft. 

Box-holing 337,636 

Station-cutting 761,681 

Sumps 57,068 

Statement of Costs for the Year 

Cost per 
ton milled 

Development $0. 399 

jNIining 3. 515 

Milling and refining 1 . 264 

Marketing bullion 072 

General and administrative expense 249 

Operating cost $5. 499 

Depreciation 1 . 053 

$6,552 
Provision for taxe? (exclusive of bullion tax) 1 . 248 

Total cost $7,800 

Development 

During the period, development drifting was limited almost entirely to further exploration 
in the No. 1 or south vein zone. Total drifting amounted to 9,286.8 feet, of which 3,238 feet 
were driven in ore averaging 0.77 ounces over an average exposed width of 58 inches. 

An ore shoot opened up in No. 1 vein on the 1,800-foot level, near the west side of the 
property, was extended to the 2,700-foot horizon. The average length of this ore body was 
380 feet, and its width, as indicated in preparation for sloping, was 13 feet. Its downward 
continuation has been determined by diamond-drilling at the 2,825-foot level. 

In a section of No. 1 vein situated to the east of No. 1 shaft, further development has 
proven a continuous ore body extending from the 1,800-foot level to a minimum depth of 
3,200 feet. The average length of this occurrence was determined to be 480 feet, and the 
average width 14 feet. 

Other ore shoots, more erratic in character, were discovered in the central section of the 
No. 1 vein zone. These may be mined profitably at the prevailing market value of gold. 

The relative importance of No. 1 vein at the present time is indicated in the table below: — 

Tons Hoisted per Month from Nos. 1 and 2 Veins 



Month 



No. 1 vein 



No. 2 vein 



Total 



July, 1934 

August, 1934... 
September, 1934 
October, 1934 . . 
November, 1934 
December, 1934. 
January, 1935. . 
February, 1935. 
March, 1935 . . . 

April, 1935 

May, 1935 

June, 1935 

Total 



tons 
27,397 
32,847 
27,516 
36,141 
33,592 
29,816 
30,878 
26,771 
31,795 
29,563 
24,276 
28,050 



per cent. 
41.47 
45.59 
42.12 
49.48 
48.61 
42.45 
43.37 
41.65 
46.05 
43.24 
34.12 
40.45 



tons 
38,660 
39,209 
37,809 
36,901 
35,507 
40,423 
40,315 
37,505 
37,244 
38,799 
46,869 
41,294 



per cent. 
58.53 
54.41 
57.88 
50.52 
51.39 
57.55 
56.63 
58.35 
53.95 
56.76 
65.88 
59.55 



tons 
66,057 
72,056 
65,325 
73,042 
69,099 
70,239 
71,193 
64,276 
69,039 
68,362 
71,145 
69,344 



358,642 



43.25 



470,535 



56.75 I 829,177 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 113 

Development of No. 1 vein has been stressed in order to permit the extraction of ore from 
this hanging-wall zone, in advance of mining out the footwall ore bodies situated in No. 2 vein. 

At the end of the year, there was exposed in drift backs a total of 16,540 lineal feet of ore 
in which no stoping had been done. The indicated average grade before slashing was 0.67 
ounces per ton across 61 inches. Of the total, a length of 10,696 feet was in No. 2 vein and 
5,844 feet in No. 1 vein. 

The success attending exploration work in the upper and middle levels of the mine, 
coupled with the present higher value of gold, continues to render unnecessary any immediate 
further development of lower horizons. 

No. 5 Shaft 

To expedite the early removal of all ore in the upper and intermediate levels, it was 
decided to construct a new main hoisting shaft from surface to the 3,950-foot horizon. This 
No. 5 shaft was started in the footwall of the No. 2 vein zone, a location advantageous from the 
standpoint of economy of construction and operation, as well as safety from possible subsidence 
of ground over stoped areas. 

Crosscuts were started on certain levels to connect present workings with the new shaft 
location. From these and other crosscuts, raises will be driven, from which the shaft and 
station excavations will be completed. 

In order to maintain the desired location for No. 5 shaft in the footwall, it was necessary 
that the upper 70 feet be sunk through the bed of Kirkland lake, now filled with tailings. This 
work was placed on contract in the hands of the Foundation Company of Canada a reliable firm 
capable of successfully completing this particular type of undertaking. 

Stoping 

All lower new stoping operations, in No. 2 vein, were started on a filled square-set rill 
method, considered to be most suitable to the ground conditions. A start was made to prepare 
for mining, under this method, a block of ground extending from the 2,450- to the 3.075-foot 
levels. New work consisted mainly of slashing drift walls, timbering, and driving fill raises. 

Stoping was resumed on the 2,575- and 2,700-foot levels, using the rill method. Slashing 
of drift walls in No. 1 vein was partiallv completed to the 2,825-foot level, and a number of 
new stopes were started. During the year, 473,022 tons of backfill were placed. 

The position of the mine, in regard to reserves of ore, broken and in place, was fully 
maintained. 

Milling 

Large-scale research work was continued throughout the year, resulting in further increase 
in extraction. A new precipitation and refining plant was completed, to replace the previously 
existing installation, which had become inadequate to serve present requirements. 

Lakeland Gold, Limited 

Lakeland Gold, Limited, was formed to take over the assets and liabilities 
of Lakeland Gold Mines, Limited. The shares of the old company were 
exchanged at the rate of four shares of the old company for one of the new. 
The company owns 1,120 acres at Wolf lake, Maisonville township, district of 
Timiskaming. The company is capitalized at 2,000,000 shares, of which 
1,100,000 are issued. The officers and directors are: F. A. Pollard, president; 
M. D. Wynman, secretary-treasurer; A. R. Timms, first vice-president; B. 
Thornber, second vice-president; Robert Johnston, T. Brittain, Thos. Pope, 
Bruce Mason, directors. Geo. Schmelzle is mine manager. The head office is 
at 19 vSun Life Building, Hamilton. The mine address is Bourkes. 

The following work was done from March 24 to Mav 15, 1934: crosscutting, 
80 feet; drifting, 412 feet; and raising, 89 feet. The mine is being kept pumped 
out. 

Lakeside- Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited 

Lakeside-Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited, owns 7 claims in Lebel township, 
district of Timiskaming. The original company. Queen Lebel Gold Mines, 
Limited, sold its assets to the Queen Lebel Gold Mining Company, Limited, the 
shareholders to receive one share of the new companv for two of the old. Later, 
in 1934, the name of the company was changed to Lakeside-Kirkland Gold 
Mines, Limited, the exchange of shares being made on a basis of one for one. 



114 Department of Mines No. 4 

The capitalization is 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. A permanent directorate 
has not yet been appointed. At present E. B. Knapp is managing director; 
and E. B. Wood, director. 

The mine operated from May 2 to November 2, 1934, with an average 
force of 22 men. During that time 600 feet of drifting and crosscutting and 
1,700 feet of diamond-drilling were done on the 300-foot level. 

The plant consists of: 2 locomotive-type boilers, of 40 h.p. each; a 400- 
cubic-foot compressor; and an 8- by 10-inch single-drum steam hoist. 

Richard Callin was superintendent. The mine address is Kirkland Lake. 

Lebel Oro Mines, Limited 

Lebel Oro Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1920, and the present 
authorized capitalization is 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and 
directors are: W. J. Green, president; F. E. Pentz, vice-president; P. Fahren- 
holtz, secretary-treasurer; W. H. Englebright and J. R. Hetherington, directors. 
The executive office is at 703 Northern Ontario Building, Toronto. 

The property of this company includes the old Long Lake mine, located in 
township 69, district of Sudbury. 

Operations at this mine were suspended at the end of February, 1934, 
following the dewatering and sampling of the old workings. Late in June the 
construction of a 200-ton mill was started, which was completed at the end of 
October. Work was then suspended, but is expected to be resumed in the 
spring of 1935, when it is planned to start milling the tailings from the original 
operation. 

Lee Gold Mines, Limited 

Lee Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1931, with an authorized 
capital of 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and directors were: 
J. J. Byrne, president; W. B. McPherson, secretary; D. A. Ampleford, treasurer; 
M. J. vShunsby, M. D. Gray, and E. M. Howells, directors. The head office is 
at 244 Bay Street, Toronto. 

In 1933 the company acquired a group of 17 claims in Greenlaw township, 
in the Swayze area, district of Sudbury. Surface work was started in April, 
1933, followed by 2,000 feet of diamond-drilling. The installation of a mining 
plant was started in January, 1934. 

A 2-compartment vertical shaft was started in March. It was sunk to a 
depth of 275 feet, and levels were established at 125 and 250 feet. Underground 
work was suspended in November. A total of 480 feet of drifting, and 624 feet 
of crosscutting was accomplished on the 125-foot level, and a total of 35 feet of 
drifting and 400 feet of crosscutting was done on the 250-foot level. The 
property was closed down at the end of January, 1935. 

The plant installed included two 33 h.p. boilers, an 8- by 12-inch AC hoist, 
and a 52.5-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand steam compressor. Buildings erected 
included a power-house, blacksmith shop, 2-storey office, 2-storey bunk-house, 
cook-house, stable, and powder-house. 

An average of 21 men was employed during 1934. A. Jamieson succeeded 
R. E. Miller as manager. 

Little Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Little Long Lac Gold IMines, Limited, was incorporated in January, 1933, 
with an authorized capitalization of 2,000,000 shares of no par value. The 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



115 



officers and directors are: Jos. Errington, president; Thayer Lindsley, vice- 
president; L. A. MacDonald, secretary-treasurer; W. S. Morlock, A. B. Gordon, 
and D. M. Morin, directors. The executive office is at 25 King Street West, 
Toronto. The mine address is Geraldton. 

The property is in the Little Long Lac area, district of Thunder Bay, two 
miles south of the Long Lac-Port Arthur branch of the Canadian National 
Railways. 

During 1934 the 3-compartment vertical shaft was sunk an additional 269 
feet to a total depth of 719 feet, and levels were established at 445, 570, and 695 
feet. 

The development work accomplished during the year on the various levels 
was as follows: — 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 


204-foot 


feet 
156 
740 
756 
380 
120 


feet 


feet 
250 


325-foot 




80 


445-foot 


442 




570-foot 




695-foot 












Total 


2,152 


442 


320 







In September a 48-mile hydro-electric power line was completed from the 
Northern Empire mine to the property. The original hoist and compressor 
were replaced by an Ingersoll-Rand double-drum electric hoist and a 1,250- 
cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand electric compressor. The boiler plant was retained 
for heating and standby service. 

A 150-ton mill was constructed and put in operation on November 24, 1934. 
A total of 5,485 tons of ore had been milled by the end of the year, which was 
obtained from the ore dump and from back-slashing, in preparation for stoping, 
on the 204-, 325-, and 445-foot levels. 

The mill equipment includes a 15- by 24-inch jaw-crusher, a 5-inch New- 
house crusher, a 7- by 5-foot ball mill, a 54-inch Akins classifier, a 5- by 16-foot 
tube mill, a 36-inch duplex Akins classifier, two 28- by 12-foot Dorr tray 
thickeners, four 20- by 15-foot Dorr agitators, one 16- by 12-foot Dorr agitator, 
two 8- by 10-foot Oliver filters, a Merrill-Crowe continuous precipitation unit, 
six corduroy blanket tables, and amalgamation equipment. Approximately 60 
per cent, of the gold is obtained by amalgamation, which is used on the primary 
classifier overflow and the tube-mill discharge. 

Buildings erected during 1934 included a new dry-house, new general office, 
new 2-storey cook-house, hospital, school, a second 2-storey bunk-house, nine 
dwelling houses, mill, refinery, and assay office. 

An average of 142 men was employed, of whom 27 were underground. 
A. A. Barton was in charge of operations, with A. Rennick as mill superintendent. 

Lucky Cross Leasing Syndicate 

The Lucky Cross Leasing Syndicate is capitalized at 700 units of S50 each. 
The officers are: W. J. Cook, president; Gerald D. O'Meara, secretary-treasurer 
S. A. Pain, managing director; R. J. Carter and Dr. R. J. Neelands, directors. 
The secretary's office is at the Bank of Commerce Building, Kirkland Lake. 



116 Department of Mines No. 4 

In 1933 the syndicate obtained a lease on the Lucky Cross property in 
Teck township, district of Timiskaming. A further report regarding the work 
on the property is given under Golden Gate Mining Company, Limited, on 
page 96. 

Lucky Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited 

Luckv Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in April, 1934, 
with an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value, 1,600,905 
of which are issued. The officers and directors are: T. B. Armstrong, president; 
S. L. MacDonald, vice-president and manager; J. J. Gray, secretary-treasurer; 
G. C. Kirkpatrick, director. The head office is at 159 Bay Street, Toronto. 
The mine address is Swastika. 

Operations were carried on during May and June, 1934, on the property 
in Eby township, district of Timiskaming, with an average force of 15 men. 
About 100 feet of drifting was done on the 400-foot level, making a total of 
4,000 feet of lateral work to date. The shaft is 415 feet deep. 

The mining plant consists of a 60 h.p. boiler, a 6- by 8-inch Jenckes hoist, 
and a 300-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand compressor. There is a camp to accom- 
modate 30 men. 

Macassa Mines, Limited 

The capitalization of this company is 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. 
The oflficers and directors are: Robert A. Bryce, president; L. Soliague, secretary- 
treasurer; John D. Perrin, Henry M. Porteous, Thomas Riggs, and Arthur 
G. Slaght, directors. G. A. Howes is mine manager. The head office is at 
85 Richmond Street West, Toronto. The mine office is at Kirkland Lake. 
About 134 men were employed at the mine during the year. 

The company owns 6 claims, adjoining the Kirkland Lake Gold mine on 
the west, in Teck township, district of Timiskaming. On November 1, 1934, 
the companv paid its initial dividend at the rate of 5 cents per share. 

The following is an extract from the report of the mine manager for the 
twelve months ending March 31, 1935: — 

Production 

During the year 66,534 tons of ore were treated, from which $1,058,958.29 was recovered, 
or .$15.91 per ton. The daily average miUing rate was 182.3 tons at 91.95 per cent, running 
time. The average extraction was 93.89 per cent. 

Construction 

To bring the original plant and equipment in line with the rate of production and the amount 
of underground development work required, several additions were made during the year. The 
principal expenditures consisted of four cottages, air compressor, large hoist motor, raising head- 
frame, underground equipment, new steel shop and small mill additions, as follows: — 

Staff residences (4) $11,605. 10 

Hoist and compressor-house equipment 18,152.92 

Carpenter and electrical shop 257. 03 

Raising headframe, ore and waste bin, etc 7,102. 97 

Klill and sprinkler system additions 7,465. 00 

]\Iine equipment 17,650. 55 

New steel shop and equipment 3,615. 77 

IMiscellaneous 6,400. 45 

Total $72,249. 79 

Development 

While hoisting ore and waste with cages, new exploration and development was limited. 
To correct this condition, it was decided to change over to skip-hoisting which necessitated 
cutting underground loading pockets and raising the headframe. These additions were made 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



117 



during the first five months of the fiscal year, since which time we have had ample hoisting capa- 
citv. Since the main shaft has now reached 3,000 feet in depth, this will permit the opening up 
of new levels at 2,575, 2,675, 2,825, and 3,000 feet. The drift on the 2,475-foot level, west of 
the shaft, has followed the main break, which has been strong and persistent so far. The face 
of this drift is now half way between the shaft and the western boundary of the property. Work 
here has disclosed short sections containing commercial values, but no workable ore shoot in 
this section has yet been found. The summary of development work is as follows: — - 





1934-35 


1933-34 


Drifting 


feet 

5,988 

1,033 

1,409 

481 

91 


feet 
3,483.5 


Crosscutting 


349 


Raising 


744 


Shaft-sinking 




Station-cutting 


30 






Total 


9,002 


4,606.5 






Diamond-drilling 


3,489 


2,701.5 







Ore Reserves 

To date, no level has been fully explored, but new ore shoots have been opened up on the 
1,400-, 1,500-, 1,750-, 1,850-, and 2,675-foot levels during the past six months. Some of these 
shoots are not sufficiently developed to be included in the ore estimate. Taking only positive 
ore and not making any estimate of a partially developed good tonnage of similar grade nor 
including indicated lengths of lower grade, the following is an estimate: — 





Tons 


Ounces 
per ton 


Value per ton 
at $35 


Unbroken ore 

Broken ore 

Surface dump 


56,900 

11,600 

3,490 


0.44 
.49 
.43 


$15.40 
17.15 
15.00 







With lateral work under way on five levels, and the shaft at sufficient depth to commence 
work on four more, the coming j^ear will be one of intensive exploration with excellent possi- 
bilities of developing ore. 

Operating Costs 

All work, apart from capital expenditures, has been written off into the operating costs. 
The development and exploration costs include two major developments, namely, the 2,475-foot 
west drift and 481 feet of shaft-sinking, which amounts to $0.72 per ton milled. 

The operating costs, before provision for depreciation and taxes, are as follows: — 

Cost per 
ton milled 

Development and exploration $2. 44 

Mining 2.27 

Milling 1.70 

Administration and general charges .98 

Total $7. 39 

The plant and equipment expenditures are now complete for the present scale of production, 
so that capital expenditures in the immediate future will be small. 

Mclntyre-Porcupine Mines, Limited 

The authorized capitalization of this company is 800,000 shares of $5 par 
value. The officers and directors are: J. P. Bickell, president; E- D. Fox, 
secretary; Balmer Neilly, treasurer. The directors are: J. P. Bickell, W. J. 
Sheppard, J. B. Tudhope, D. H. McDougall, Strachan Johnston, and Bernard 
E. Smith. The head ofhce of the company is at 15 King Street West, Toronto. 
R. J. Ennis is general manager. The mine address is Schumacher. 



118 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



The company's main property is at Schumacher, in Tisdale township, 
district of Cochrane. Other holdings of the company are: (1) an option on a 
property in Hislop township in the new gold area east of Matheson on the T. and 
N.O. railway, which the company diamond-drilled during the summer and fall 
of 1934; (2) a property of approximately 400 acres in the Birch Lake area, which 
is now being worked by lessees, W. D. Cooper and P. A. Barry; (3) a 90 per cent, 
interest in approximately 390 acres adjoining the Howey mine in the Red Lake 
area; (4) a 50 per cent, interest with Temiskaming Mines Company, Limited, 
in the Blue Diamond Coal Company, Brule, Alta.; (5) an option to acquire 
Canadian Coal Fields, Limited, Hay River, Alta.; (6) an option on the property 
of O'Leary Malartic Mines, Limited, and other claims owned outright, at Mud 
Lake, Que. ; (7) a 90 per cent, interest in a group of claims in the Beardmore area. 

The following information regarding the property at Schumacher is taken 
from the general manager's report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1935: — 

Production 

Ore treated tons 862,100 

Value per ton (0.294 ounces at $34. 67') $10. 23 

Gross value $8,819,660. 27 

Bullion recovered: 

Gold (242,235. 876 ounces at $31 . 34^) $7,590,632. 35 

Silver (64,746. 15 ounces at $0. 494) 32,038. 75 

Total value $7,622,671. 10 

Recovered per ton (0. 281 ounces) $9. 79 

Less bullion levy .94 

Total value ....'. $8 . 85 

Bullion marketing costs 29,105. 52 

Net value of bullion recovered $7,593,565. 58 

Production since the Beginning of Milling Operations in 1912 







Period 




Months 


Tons 


Value 


Gross 


Recovery 


Total 












milled 


per ton 


value 


per ton 


value 


1912. . 








12 


14,500 


$7.00 


$101,555.16 


$5.25 


$76,166.38 


1913. . 








12 


31,979 


7.85 


251,314.45 


7.05 


225,752.25 


Jan. 1, 


'14, 


to isiar. 31, 


'15.. 


15 


85,654 


8.87 


760,232.16 


8.39 


718.331.71 


Apr. 1, 


'15. 


to Mar. 31, 


'16.. 


12 


105,758 


7.71 


815,345.49 


7.38 


779,990.94 


Apr. 1. 


'16, 


to June 30, 


'17.. 


15 


195,307 


10.00 


1,954,793.28 


9.55 


1,864,914.28 


Julv 1, 


'17, 


to June 30, 


'18.. 


12 


178,327 


10.05 


1,793,197.55 


9.61 


1,714,258.00 


July 1, 


'18, 


to June 30, 


'19.. 


12 


179,874 


9.78 


1,759,627.40 


9.29 


1,671,646.03 


July 1. 


'19. 


to June 30, 


'20.. 


12 


188,835 


11.52 


2,175,891.31 


11.02 


2,080,178.44 


July 1. 


'20, 


to June 30, 


'21.. 


12 


171,916 


11.67 


2,005,672.00 


11.08 


1,904,326.36 


July 1, 


'21, 


to June 30, 


'22.. 


12 


193,971 


10.69 


2,074.088.40 


9.99 


1,937.105.07 


July 1, 


'22, 


to June 30, 


'23.. 


12 


240.615 


9.96 


2,397,:303.00 


9.35 


2,249,741.63 


Julv 1, 


'23, 


to June 30, 


'24.. 


12 


360,140 


9.69 


3,488,863.00 


9.14 


3,291.178.22 


July 1. 


'24, 


to June 30, 


'25.. 


12 


400,259 


9.43 


3,774,068.00 


8.86 


3,546,637.52 


July 1, 


'25, 


to June 30, 


'26.. 


12 


460.909 


8.72 


4,020,326.00 


8.25 


3,804,774.90 


July 1, 


'26, 


to Mar. 31, 


'27.. 


9 


385,409 


8.08 


3.113,500.07 


7.67 


2,957,060.97 


Apr. 1, 


'27. 


to Mar. 31, 


'28.. 


12 


520,460 


8.09 


4.207,553.00 


7.66 


3,987,634.94 


Apr. 1, 


'28, 


to Mar. 31, 


'29.. 


12 


538 165 


8.24 


4,433,378.00 


7.83 


4,212.624.82 


Apr. 1, 


'29 


to Mar. 31, 


'30.. 


12 


550,495 


8.46 


4,657.188.00 


8.05 


4,433.626.45 


Apr. 1, 


':3() 


to Mar. 31, 


'31.. 


12 


558,115 


8.84 


4,934,122.00 


8.30 


4,633,140.73 


Apr. 1, 


'31, 


to Mar. 31, 


'32.. 


12 


655.030 


8.47 


5,548,278.10 


8.10 


5,305,475.29 


Apr. 1, 


'32, 


to Mar. 31, 


'33.. 


12 


736.300 


8.45 


6.224.493.40 


8.12 


5.981,714.69 


Apr. 1, 


'33, 


to Mar. 31, 


'34.. 


12 


776.845 


10.68 


8,296,704.60 


10.24 


7,957.252.54 


Apr. 1, 


'34, 


to Mar. 31, 


'35.. 


12 


862.100 


10.23 


8.819,660.27 


8.85 


7.622.671.10 


Total . 








8.390.963 


$9.25 


$77,607,154.64 


$8.70 


$72,956,203.26 



1 Average open market price. 
^Alarket price less bullion levy 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



119 



Mining 

Tons 

Ore broken in stopes 760,334 

Ore from development 1 12,587 

Total 872,921 

Ore hoisted 858,179 

Development 

Development work amounted to 28,240 feet. This includes 15,803 feet of drifts, of which 
2,063 feet was on line and 13,740 feet in vein material; of this, 6,980 feet was in ore averaging 
0.300 ounces per drift width. 



Ore Reserves, 1934-35 





Tons 


Fine ounces 
gold 


Value at 
$20.67 


Estimated 

Broken 


3,219,460 
211,021 


1,046,226 
57,600 


$21,625,486 
1,190 320 






Total 


3,430,481 


1,103,826 


$22,815,806 


Average per ton 




.3217 


$6.65 









Summary of Development and Exploration, 1934-35 



Period 


Drifts 


Crosscuts 


Raises 


Winzes 


Shafts 


Stations 


Sumps 


Pockets 

and 
passes 


Total 
footage 


Total 
excava- 
tion 


Dia- 
mond- 
drilling 


1 


feet 

1,369.5 
1,225 
811 
1,275 
1.155 
1,026 
1,546 
1,424 
1.330 
1.415 
1,427 
1,799 


feet 

413 

528 

984 

893 

956 

1.322 

1.342 

1,230 

690 

1.112 

1,188 

812 


feet 

165 

23 

30 


feet 


feet 


cu. ft. 

2.736 

16,431 

2.165 


cu. ft. 


feet 


feet 

1,947.5 

1,776 

1,825 

2,168 

2,179 

2,394 

3,067 

2,708 

2,096 

2,527 

2,804 

2,748 


cu. ft. 

2.736 

16,431 

2,165 


feet 
2 554 


9 










3,084 


3 










3,231 


4 










2,961 


5 


68 
46 
179 
54 
76 














4,124 


6 














4,189 


7 














4 502 


8 














3,533 


9 














3,674 


10 














3,851 


11 


189 
137 














4,072 


12 














4.705 


















Total . . . 


15,802.5 
216,854.3 


11,470 
102,255.8 


967 
21,592.9 






21,332 
992,250 






28,239.5 
355,865.1 


21,332 
1,186,988 


44,480 


Previous 
to date . 


612.7 


14,549.4 


55,039 


139,699 


393,148 


Tjtal to 
date 


232,656.8 


113,725.8 


22,559.9 


612.7 


14,549.4 


1,013,582 


55,039 


139,699 


384,104.6 


1,208,320 


437,628 



Operating Costs 



Total cost 



Cost per ton 
ore milled 



Mining : 

Exploration 

Development 

Breaking and stoping 

Milling 

Administration and general expense 

Total 



$79,495.17 

441,489.81 

2,367,449.37 



$0.0922 

.5122 

2.7461 



,888,434.35 
619,581.39 
102,880.62 



$3.3505 
.7187 
.1193 



$3,610,896.36 



$4. 1885 



120 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Analysis of Mining Costs per Ton Milled 





Stoping Drifting 


Cross- 
cutting 


Raising 


Shafts and Stations 
winzes i and sumps 


Total 
cost 


Cost 
per ton 


Labour 

Explosives 


81,154,985.22 $137,487.85 
112,936.41 44,593.08 
99,633.86 5,242.48 
74,983.03 13.788 38 


$84,047.38 

34,181.76 

6,511.44 

7,360.87 


$7,366.67 

1,776.64 

362.20 

1,740.79 


$181.61 


$9,521.57 

176.14 

6,254.21 

81.44 

273.00 


$1,393,590.30 81.6165 
193,664 03 2246 


Supplies 


672.06 


118,676.25 .1377 
97 954 51 1136 


Timbering 


234,571.00 
4,781.30 

214,720.79 
36,199.72 
24,639.51 

33.385.43 




7,267.26 


242,111.26 
4,781.30 

214,720.79 
56,495.44 
32,437.47 

43,770.45 

48,303.16 

14,187.96 

7,950.57 

209.64 

5,077.78 
112,669.83 

8,181.45 
243,826.25 


.2808 


Shaft repairs. . . . 








. 0055 


Backfilling 












.2492 


Steel-sharpening. 


12.025.96 
4,711.93 

6.261 57 


7.396.65 
2,497.13 

3,300.53 

1,713.62 

1,043.40 

542.50 


779.32 
552.06 

780.50 

399.27 
247.81 
127.69 




93.79 
36.84 

42.42 


.0655 


Drill repairs 




.0376 


Surveying and 
engineering. . . 




.0508 


Sampling and 

assaying 42.934.89; 3.255.38 




.0560 


Pumping 10,807.43 

Ventilating 6.198.23 


1,926.85 
1,073.25 


29.22 


133.25 
8.90 


.0165 
.0092 


Fire protection . . 


209 . 64 




.0002 


Underground 
lighting 


5.077.78 












.0060 


Tramming ' 89,269 . 28 


14,016.69 
919 30 


7,678.50 


1,705.36 






.1307 


Underground ! 

crushing 7,262.15 






.0095 


Hoisting ' 214,853.70 24,075.00 






470.57 


4,426.98 


.2828 










Total 


$2,367,449.37 


$269,377.72 


$156,273.78 


$15,838.31 


$8,620.72 


$21,048.54 


$2,838,608.44 S3. 2927 


Less undistrib- 
uted develop- 


29,669.26 


.0344 

















Exploration 














$2,808,939.18 
79,495.17 


$3 . 2583 
.0922 


















Total 












$2,888,434. 3c 


$3 . 3505 




$2 7461 Sn 3125 


$0.1813 


$0 0184 


$0 0100 


$0 0244 





















Summary of Milling Costs 





Labour 


Supplies 


Shop repairs 

and 
maintenance 


Power 


Total 
cost 


Cost 
per ton 


Crushing and 
conveying .... 

Flotation 

Cyanidation 

Refining 

Assaying 

Mill alterations . . 


$36,302.23 

44,802.30 

39,636. 12 

6,622.20 

5,938.20 


$35,511.61 

123,391.50 

168,594.36 

9,059.34 

3,340.02 

2,791.53 


$6,124.33 

10,248.11 

4,379.39 

548.26 

1,295.28 

1,554.90 


$20,155.80 

70,002.86 

25,984.98 

1,248.74 

2,049.33 


$98,093.97 

248,444. 77 

238,594.85 

17,478.54 

12,622.83 

4,346.43 


$0.1138 
.2882 
.2768 
.0203 
.0146 
nn5n 










Total 


$133,301.05 


$342,688.36 


$24,150.27 


$119,441.71 


$619,581.39 


$0.7187 



Additions to Plant BuildiIngs and Equipment 

Miscellaneous surface buildings and equipment $27,771 . 01 

Additional air compressor equipment 25,648. 28 

Auxiliary surface man hoist at No. 11 shaft 32,333. 86 

Mine timber treatment plant 28,909. 10 

Electric steam generator at main heating plant 7,917. 84 

Tailings disposal development and equipment 24,866.42 

Transportation equipment 25,078. 22 

Miscellaneous underground equipment 38,732.58 

Total additions $211,257. 31 

General 

In accord with the policy projected or outlined in last year's report, our development work 
and stoping operations were further extended into what was previously considered marginal 
ground. While this had the effect of decreasing the grade of ore treated, we increased the mill 
capacity to an extent sufficient to compensate, and the gross value of our production closely 
approximates the total of a year ago. 

The results obtained in the process of extending old drives on the upper levels were as 
favourable as they were unexpected. A great deal of work must still be done to prove the actual 
extent of the ore bodies indicated or found. More extensive work in the upper levels necessitated 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 121 

some changes in our undergroiind programme and curtailed the amount of development originally 
planned from the No. 12 shaft. 

On this lower horizon crosscuts have been advanced south through the quartz porphyry 
into the basic schists on the 4,175-, 4,475-, 4,925-, and 5,375-foot levels. On the 4,175-foot level, 
the No. 22 vein was intersected with results as previously described. On the other levels rock 
formation and structural conditions were as anticipated, but as yet no ore bodies of economic 
importance have been intersected. Erifting on the more promising veins crosscut to date is 
now under way. 

McKenzie Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

McKenzie Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares 
of $1 par value, with 2,800,000 shares outstanding. The following are officers 
of the company: W. G. Armstrong, president; F. D. Reid, vice-president; 
H. M. Anderson, secretary-treasurer; M. F. Fairlie and G. W. Quinn, directors. 
The mine office is at Red Lake. The head office is at 509 National Building, 
Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property is located on McKenzie island in Red lake, district of Kenora, 
Patricia portion, and consists of 11 claims, with an area of approximately 400 
acres. This property was formerly known as the Martin-McNeely claims. 

The McKenzie Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited, took over the property in 
April, 1933, and commenced construction of buildings and plant the following 
month. The plant was put in operation about August 1, 1933. By the end of 
1933, the 3-compartment vertical shaft had been completed to a depth of 272 
feet, and at the 150-foot level 98 feet of crosscutting and 372 feet of drifting on 
the vein had been done; at the 250-foot horizon 160 feet of crosscutting and 
418 feet of drifting had been done. 

Drifting on the 1st level had then showed 320 feet, averaging 0.38 ounces 
of gold per ton across 5 feet; and on the second level, 304 feet, averaging 0.36 
ounces across 5.4 feet. The distance between levels on the dip of the vein is 
140 feet. At the end of 1933 the estimated ore in sight was 37,819 tons, 
containing 13,992 ounces of gold. 

In 1934 work was actively carried on throughout the whole year. The 
following extract is from a progress report made to the shareholders on November 
22, 1934:— 

Under date of November 12 last, Mr. Shaw, our general manager, estimates ore reserves 
of 97,900 tons, having an average value of 0.4.37 ounces per ton (.$15 at present gold price). This 
does not include the ore in the dump, nor any ore from drifting on the 450-foot level. 

The mine development work has been continued on the loO-foot and 250-foot levels, and 
according to Mr. Shaw's report, this work has added to the ore lengths on these levels, so that 
we now have on the 150-foot level, one block of 400 feet with an average width of 5.4 feet, and 
another length of 150 feet with a width of 5.2 feet. On the 250-foot level there is continuous 
ore over a length of 580 feet and 5-foot width, containing ore of mine average, and also a short 
section 100 feet long and 5.2 feet wide of somewhat lower grade. Drifting in ore on the 2.50-foot 
level is proceeding at present. 

Following the satisfactory results on these two level?, and in accordance with the recom- 
mendations of our engineer, it was decided to proceed with development to greater depth in 
order to obtain information to guide us regarding mill installation. This work has been accom- 
plished by the sinking of an inclined winze on the vein from the 250-foot level, and the opening 
up of a 3rd level at a vertical depth of 350 feet. A limited amount of lateral work on the 350- 
foot level gave several good ore sections, and in doing this work we encountered a new vein 
branching from the main shear and striking west. This new vein was drifted on for a distance 
of about 165 feet in ore of mine average grade and width. 

The winze was continued and has now reached a depth of 450 feet vertically, where a new 
level is being opened up. The results encountered in the sinking of the winze were highly satis- 
factory, and with the exception of a few places where the vein flattened or rolled, there was 
continuous ore from a point in a raise above the 250-foot level down to the present depth at 
the 450-foot level, making a total length on the dip of the vein of about 3.50 feet. The average 
width of the vein in the winze is 4.7 feet, and the values are higher than the mine average, with 
the best results encountered below the 350-foot level. 

Following the milling tests, to which reference is made in the general manager's supple- 
mentary report presented at our annual meeting, your directors made arrangements for the 



122 Department of Mines No. 4 

design and preparation of plans for a cyanide mill, which should give maximum extraction at 
minimum cost. Hydro-electric power being available, negotiations were entered into with 
the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for a supply of power for operating purposes, 
and work was commenced on the construction of a power transmission line of about 51^ miles 
in length. This work is about completed and the power should be turned on at our plant in 
December. During the summer, preparations were made to replace our steam plant by the 
installation of electrically driven equipment. Xew buildings to accommodate increased forces 
were erected, and in the meantime orders were placed for all materials, machinery, and supplies 
necessary for mill construction and operation. We were very fortunate in being able to eflfect 
delivery at the mine of everything needed before the close of navigation. 

The construction of the mill, which is of steel frame with steel tanks and bins, all on con- 
crete foundations, is now well advanced, and the roofing and sheeting of the main building is almost 
completed. A new steel headframe and mine ore bin are being erected. The initial capacity 
of the mill is estimated at 125 tons daily, and the design of the building and layout is such that 
additional units can be added at comparatively low cost to increase the capacity to at least 200 
tons. According to the present plans of our manager, the mill should be turned over in February. 

The electric power line mentioned in the above quotation was completed 
at the end of the year, and the 125-ton mill was nearing completion. 

W. P. Mackle has been superintendent at the property since the beginning 
of operations. John W. vShaw is general manager. 

McLaren-Porcupine Gold Mines, Limited 

IMcLaren-Porcupine Gold IMines, Limited, has an atithorized capitalization 
of 3,000,000 shares of no par value, of which 2,300,000 have been issued. 

The officers and directors are: Dr. W. M. McLaren, president; J. M. 
McLaren, vice-president and managing director; J. J. Gallagher, treasurer; 
N. W. Kingsland, Gerald Ruel and Robt. D. McLaren, directors. The head 
office and mine office are at South Porctipine. vStanley vSaxton is manager. 

The property consists of seven patented claims comprising about 300 acres 
in Deloro township, district of Cochrane. The property is one mile south of 
the Marbuan mine and about five miles from vSouth Porcupine. During 193-i a 
small number of men were employed prospecting and mining from an open pit. 
A 3-ton Kennedy Nutt mill was operated for part of the summer on ore from 
this open pit. A lo-ton mill of the same type was installed late in December. 
Sixteen men were employed at the mine at the end of the year. 

Power is supplied by a portable Sullivan compressor. Two Climax drills 
are used. The material from the pit is handsorted before being sent to the mill. 
By crushing to finer size than the Kennedy Xutt mill calls for, the tonnage being 
handled has been raised to between 20 and 25 tons per day. 

MacLeod-Cockshutt Gold Mines, Limited 

MacLeod-Cockshutt Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in September, 
1933. It has a capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers 
and directors are: F. G. IMacLeod, president; W. H. Council, vice-president and 
managing director; A. H. Cockeram, secretary-treasurer; A. Cockshutt and 
G. B. Webster, directors. The head office of the company is at 1001 Federal 
Building, Toronto. The mine-office address is Geraldton. 

The property consists of 22 claims lying south and east of the Little Long 
Lac mine in the Little Long Lac area, Thtmder Bay district. In the summer 
of 1933 the Connell Alining and Exploration Company held an option on the 
property and did 8,780 feet of diamond-drilling and a considerable amount of 
trenching and sank two pits to 15 and 30 feet. 

In the spring of 1934, the company installed a mining plant consisting of 
two (30 h.p. locomotive-type boilers, a 520-cubic-foot compressor, and an S- by 
6-inch hoist with a 24-inch drum. vSinkin^r was started earlv in the summer. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 123 

A 3-compartment shaft was put down and one level opened at the loO-foot level. 
Work done on the level consisted of: main crosscut north and south, 231 feet; 
north zone exploration crosscutting and drifting, 662 feet; central zone exploration 
crosscutting and drifting, 163 feet; and south zone exploration crosscutting and 
drifting, 726 feet. The results obtained were disappointing and underground 
operations ceased in December. A diamond-drilling campaign, started about 
the time of suspension of underground operations, has been planned as a further 
test of the north zone, which had provided the most favourable results. 

Work on the property has been carried out under the management of 
C. H. E. Stewart. An average of 37 men was employed during the period of 
operation. 

J. Bruce McMartin 

On October 10, 1934, J. Bruce McMartin of Montreal, acquired the 
property of the Dikdik Exploration Company, Limited, situated at Atigogama 
lake, Rickaby township, district of Thunder Bay. This property consists of a 
group of 9 claims, and is about 12 miles northwest of Kinghorn station, on the 
Port Arthur-Long Lac branch of the Canadian National Railways. 

Work was commenced on this property in December, 1933, and a narrow 
high-grade vein was mined by an open cut on claim T.B. 11,071 to a depth of 
50 feet over a length of 80 feet. In Alarch a 2-compartment vertical shaft was 
started from the bottom of the open cut, and continued to a depth of 160 feet 
below surface. A level was established at 150 feet. 

Underground operations were suspended from July until October. In 
December shaft-sinking was resumed, and the shaft had reached a depth of 233 
feet by the end of the year. A total of 218 feet of drifting was accomplished on 
the 150-foot level during 1934. 

Two shipments of sorted ore, totalling about 293 tons, were made to the 
Flin Flon smelter early in 1934. The recovery from this ore was 1,081 ounces 
of gold and 600 ounces of silver. 

The plant installed included a 310-cubic-foot gasoline compressor, and a 
6- by 5-inch Ingersoll-Rand single-drum air hoist. Buildings on the property 
consisted of a power-house, office, bunk-house, cook-house, stable, and powder- 
house. 

An average of 12 men was employed, of whom 5 were underground. K. W. 
Fritzsche was in charge of operations. The mine address is Jellicoe. 

McMillan Gold Mines, Limited 

McMillan Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1926, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and 
directors were: R. L. Patterson, acting president; G. A. Foot, vice-president; 
Dr. F. C. Fraser, secretary-treasurer; C. B. Goldsborough, J. M. R. Corbet, 
W. J. Hussey, C. A. Durkee, G. M. Miller, and R. Martin, directors. The 
head office is at Sudbury. 

The property is about 60 miles southwest of Sudbury, in Mongowin 
township, district of Sudbury, and is within 2 miles of the Little Current branch 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The mine address is Footbanks. 

In the spring of 1934 work was started on the construction of a 125-ton 
cyanide mill, which was put in operation on August 13, 1934. An electric power 
line was constructed from Espanola to the property. 



124 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Underground operations were carried on throughout the year with the 
exception of June and July, when electric equipment was installed. 

The development work accomplished during 1934, and the total to the end 
of 1934, on the various levels, was as follows: — 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 


1934 


Total 


1934 


Total 


1934 


Total 


225-foot 


feet 
340 


feet 
365 

1,355 
333 

1,609 
768 


feet 


feet 


feet 
32 

302 
32 
45 
50 


feet 
32 


325-foot 




504 

95 

639 

143 


302 


425-foot 




30 


32 


525-foot 




45 


625-foot 


412 


108 


50 






Total 


752 


4,430 


138 


1,381 


461 


461 



Shrinkage stoping was started on the 225- and 32o-foot levels. 

The new plant installed included a 1,000-cubic-foot electric compressor, and 
an Ingersoll-Rand double-drum electric hoist. Buildings constructed included a 
mill, refinery, assav office, dry-house, manager's residence, office, and cook-house. 
The mill equipment installed included a 12- by 20-inch jaw-crusher, Newhouse 
crusher, 7- by 5^-foot ball mill, 5- by 26-foot Dorr classifier, two 30- by 12-foot 
Dorr thickeners, three 16- by 16-foot Dorr agitators, two 8- by 8-foot Oliver 
filters, and a Merrill-Crowe continuous precipitation unit. Up to the end of the 
year the mill treated a total of 12,313 tons of ore. 

An average of 84 men was employed during the year. L. H. Heidenreich 
was succeeded by J. G. McGregor as manager. George Dunn was mine 
superintendent, and W. R. Dennis was mill superintendent. 

Manitoba and Eastern Mines, Limited 

Manitoba and Eastern Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 5,000,000 shares, 
of which 3,100,006 were issued, 2,000,000 shares being optioned to Bobjo Mines, 
Limited, for $202,500. 

The property consists of 16 claims in Strathy township, district of Nipissing. 
The head office is at 25 King Street West, Toronto. The officers of the company 
are: W. E. Hurd, president; W. G. Chipp, treasurer; T. M. Mungovan, secretary; 
R. J. Jowsey and L. K. Fletcher, directors. The mine address is Timagami. 

The following development work was done during the year: shaft, 323 
feet, with levels at 200 and 300 feet; 495 feet of crosscutting; 1,322 feet of 
drifting; and 2,243 feet of diamond-drilling. The plant consists of a new 700- 
foot Rand compressor, driven by a 160 h.p. Atlas Polar Diesel engine; a 50 h.p. 
boiler, locomotive-type, for heating; and a 7 h.p. Diesel D.C. lighting unit. 
A new double-drum, 6- by 8-inch hoist, air or steam, was installed. 

An average of 16 men was employed during 1934. 

Marbuan Gold Mines, Limited 

Marbuan Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1933 with a capital- 
ization of 1,000,000 shares of $1 par value, of which 732,898 are issued. The 
officers and directors are: E. G. Kinkel, president; Jacob Betz, vice-president; 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 125 

Henn," Kobler, treasurer; R. P. Kinkel, assistant treasurer; G. R. Peine, 
secretary; Gustave R. Loesch, Henry J. Tiedt, and Clarence Leo, directors. 
The head office is at 902 Lumsden Building, Toronto. The mine address is 
South Porcupine. Charles L. Hershman is mine manager. 

The property, which consists of 5 claims adjoining the Buffalo Ankerite, in 
Deloro township, district of Cochrane, formerly belonged to ]March Gold, 
Limited, and was sold for the benefit of the bondholders when that company 
went into bankruptcy in 1933. 

March Gold had sunk the main shaft to the 425 -foot level, sunk a winze 
from 425 feet to 675 feet, and opened up four levels. In 1926 a 150-ton mill was 
installed ; it was operated until the mine was shut down in 1932, during which time 
production totalled 81,023,759. Milling was resumed bv Marbuan Gold in 
July, 1934. 

The following is taken from the report of the mine manager for the year 
ending December 31, 1934: — 

Production 

Drv tons treated 25,715 

Mint returns .5113,484.06 

Average value per ton ounces 0. 135 

Recovery per ton milled S4. 41 

Ore broken in stopes tons 23,007 

Ore broken in development tons 4,170 

Ore hoisted tons 26,787 

Waste hoisted tons 5,305 

Tonnage milled in 1934 was obtained from the Xos. 3, 5, and 6 vein workings on the 170-> 
300-, 475-, 800-, and 1,0.50-foot levels. 

Development 

Feet 

Drifting 1,478 

Crosscuts 371 

Raises 517 

Winze 380 

Total 2,746 

cu. ft. 

Stations 24,838 

Sumps 3,125 

Total 27,963 

No. 1 winze was completed in November to the 1,050-foot level. Stations were cut on the 
800-, 925-, and 1,050-foot levels, and crosscuts started toward the No. 5 vein on the 800-foot 
level and the No. 3 structure on the 925- and 1,050-foot levels. The 405 sublevel was driven 
west for approximately 600 feet. Indicated stope extensions were prospected by a series of raises. 

Milling 

The mill treated 25,712 tons during the year at a cost of -51.177 per ton. 

Percentage of total possible running time 89. 5 

Tons treated per day 152 

Tons treated per 24 hours running time 170 

Average mill heads (figured at $20.67 j S2. 59 

Average mill tails SO. 21 

I Tonnage milled in 1934 was obtained from abandoned stopes and lateral extensions in the 
Nos. 3, 5, and 6 veins on the 170-, 300-, and 425-foot levels. 



126 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Mill Record 



Month 


Tons 
milled 


Daily 

'average, 

tons 


Heads 
per ton 


Tails 
per ton 


Total value, 

heads 

and tails 


Bullion 


Premium 


July 

August 

September. . . . 

October 

November .... 
December 


4,356 
4,889 
4,492 
4,331 
4,625 
4,707 


150 
157 
149 
139 
154 
151 


$3.03 
2.41 
3.01 
2.64 
2.22 
2.30 


$0,203 
.205 
.220 
.230 
.190 
.190 


$13,198.68 
11,782.49 
13,520.92 
11,433.84 
10,267.50 
10,826. 10 


$9,418.76 
12,971.75 
13,294.24 
11,863.23 
10,174.70 
10,782.22 


$6,259.31 
8,439.24 
8,606. 00 
7.779.31 
6,620.45 
7,274.85 


Total 


27,400 


150 


$2.59 


$0.21 


$71,029.53 


$68,504.90 


$44,979. 16 



N.B.— All values are figured on gold at $20.67. 

Ore Reserves 

There are no positive ore reserves in the mine at present. Possible ore can be calculated 
in the Nos. 603 east and 505 east stopes on the basis of past production in these sections and 
check-sampling results obtained. 



Level 


Tons 


Assay value 


Total value 


Back of stope to 475-foot (No. 3 vein) 

550- and 475-foot (No. 5 vein) 


8,093 
3,775 


$7.80 
4.86 


$63,125.40 
18,346.50 






Total 


11,867 


$6.85 


$81,471 90 







N.B.— All values are figured on gold at $20.67. 

Broken Ore 





Tons 


Assay value 


Total value 


No. 5 vein 


12,375 


$3.75 


$46,439.72 







N.B. — All values are figured on gold at $20.67. 

Operating Costs 



Month 


Mining 


Milling 


Development 


Total 


July 

August 

September 


$2,859 
2.543 
3.384 
3.319 
2.666 
2.833 


$1,274 
1.142 
1 . 053 
1.333 
1.102 
1.155 


$1,289 
1.647 
1.577 
1.808 
1.571 
1.539 


$5,422 
5.332 
6 014 


October 


6 460 


November.' 


5 339 


December 


5.527 


Average cost per ton 


$2,934 


$1,177 


$1,572 


$5,682 







Drifting per foot $13. 32 

Raising per foot 1 1 . 67 

Sinking and stations per foot 78. 30 

Plant 

The mill machinery and general equipment were overhauled and placed in operation. 
The mine pump was placed on the 1,050-foot level. The hoist was installed on the 475-foot 
level. Cars, cages, drill machines, and accessory equipment and supplies were purchased. 

General 

The main haulageway on the 475-foot level was retimbered and widened, and the existing 
16-pound rail was replaced by 20-pound rail. Crosscuts were started on the 800-, 925-, and 
1,050- foot levels toward the Nos. 5 and 3 structures. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 127 

Martin Bird Syndicate 

The Martin Bird Syndicate owns 9 claims in Hearst township, district of 
Timiskaming. The officers and directors are: S. J. Bird, president; G. O'Meara, 
secretary-treasurer; Dr. R. Armstrong, J. Martin, and D. Lough, directors. 
John Campbell was mine manager. 

During 1934 a shaft was sunk 125 feet, and about 358 feet of lateral work 
was completed. Operations ceased in November. 

Matachewan Consolidated Mines, Limited 

Matachewan Consolidated Mines, Limited, owns 21 claims, comprising 840 
acres, in Powell and Cairo townships, district of Timiskaming. The authorized 
capital is 3,000,000 shares of no par value, of which 1,200,000 shares are issued to 
the Matachewan Canadian Gold, Limited, shareholders. The balance of the 
stock is optioned to Ventures, Limited, and Sudbury Basin Mines, Limited, to 
be taken up as money is expended on development. The officers and directors 
of the company are: Thayer Lindsley, president; H. H. Sutherland, vice- 
president; H. Whittingham, secretary-treasurer; W. J. Boland and Jos. Errington, 
directors. Ernest Craig is manager, and Thos. L*. Wells is superintendent. 
The head office is at 25 King Street West, Toronto. The mine address is Elk 
Lake. 

During the year a 100-ton mill was built and put into operation. In 
November 4,680 tons were milled, from which 679.39 fine ounces of gold and 
99.49 ounces of silver were recovered. The following development work was 
done: raising, 478 feet; drifting, 1,780 feet; crosscutting, 703 feet; box-holing, 
318 feet. The ore stoped amounted to 121,620 feet, or 6,081 tons. 

An average of 56 men was employed during 1934. 

Miller Independence Mines (1924), Limited 

Miller Independence Mines (1924), Limited, successor to Miller Inde- 
pendence Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,500,000 shares of -SI par value, of 
which 3,100,000 shares are issued. 

The officers and directors are: F. L. Smith, Nantucket, Mass., president and 
treasurer; George McSherry, vice-president; D. E. Gushing, secretary; W. M. 
Byers, F. A. Robinson, and Angus Smith, directors. M. W. Hotchkin, con- 
sulting engineer, resigned at the end of the year. The head office is at 39 New 
Bank of Toronto Building, London, Ont. The mine office is at Boston Creek. 

In 1932 the company acquired the property of the Allied Gold Mines, 
Limited, for 1,000,000 shares. The property consists of 560 acres in Pacaud 
township, district of Timiskaming. 

The property was reopened in February, 1934, and shut down again in 
August. During the period of operation 185 feet of crosscutting and 1,049 feet 
of drifting were done on the 100-foot level. An inclined winze was sunk to a 
depth of 221 feet below the 100-foot level. After the underground work was 
stopped 400 feet of diamond-drilling was done from surface. 

An average of 21 men was employed. 

Minto Gold Mines, Limited 

Minto Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1930, with an authorized 
capitalization of 8,000 shares of no par value. The officers and directors were: 



128 Department of Mines No. 4 

John Knox, Jr., president; M. E. Knox, secretary-treasurer; A. Dorfman and 
J. Ingram, directors. 

The property was formerly owned by Cooper Gold Mines, Limited, from 
whom it was leased and later purchased. It includes the Minto, Jubilee, and 
Cooper mines, all of which are located in township 29, range 23, in the Michi- 
picoten area, district of Algoma. 

Underground operations at the Minto mine were suspended in ]May, 1934. 
During the period of operation in 1934 a total of 10,243 tons of ore was mined 
and milled, of which 3,412 tons was obtained from the 1st level, 1,560 tons from 
the 2nd level, and 5,271 tons from the 3rd level. No development work was 
done. Later in the year a total of 1,035 feet of diamond-drilling was done from 
surface. 

Following the suspension of underground operations at the^Minto mine, the 
mining plant was transferred to the Jubilee mine, where underground work was 
started late in July. Stoping was commenced on the 3rd level, from which 
11,946 tons of ore was obtained. This ore was given a preliminary crushing and 
transported by truck to the 80-ton cyanide mill at the Minto mine, where it 
was milled. 

The plant included a 720-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand electric-driven com- 
pressor, and an electric hoist. 

An average of 42 men was employed throughout the year under^the direction 
of John Knox, Jr. The mine address is Wawa. 

Moffatt-Hall Mines, Limited 

Moffatt-Hall ]Mines, Limited, has a capitalization of $5,000,000, in shares 
of SI par value. The officers are: L. R. Moflfatt, president; and C. F. Tuer, 
Haileybury, secretary-treasurer. The mine office is at Swastika. The company 
owns 15 claims in Lebel township, district of Timiskaming. 

In February, 1934, the property was leased to Hugh Jardine, who carried 
on operations until September 21, with an average force of 18 men. During 
this period a total of 3,178 tons of ore was hoisted and shipped. i 

On September 21 the Bidgood Kirkland Gold Mines, Limited, took over the 
lease on the property. From September 21 to the end of the year the latter 
company hoisted and milled 5,298 tons of ore. The total value of the ore milled 
during the year was $87,084.08. 

The following development work was done by the Bidgood Kirkland Gold 

Mines, Limited: — 

Feet 

Raising 310 

Drifting 70 

Winze-sinking 16 

Diamond-drilling • 643 

Munro Croesus Mines, Limited 

Munro Croesus Mines, Limited, owns 160 acres in Munro township, district 
of Cochrane, 12 miles east of Matheson. The authorized capital is 40,000 shares 
of $1 par value. The officers of the company are: Robert Coffey, president; 
J. E. Grant, Haileybury, vice-president and general manager; L. A. Lillico, 
secretary-treasurer. 

During the latter part of 1934 the mill treated 205 tons, of which 25 tons 
was taken from the old surface dump. The value recovered was $10,351.76. 
The property was closed in December, 1934. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 129 

Naybob Gold Mines, Limited 

Xaybob Gold Mines, Limited, was formed in 1932 to take over the property 
of Harden Gold ]Mines, Limited, in Ogden township, district of Cochrane. It is 
capitalized at 3,500,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and directors are: 
R. J. Xaylor, Rochester, N.Y., president and manager; Richard X. Clarke, 
vice-president; H. J. Haddleton, secretary-treasurer; Geo. E. Beggs, John G. 
Jones, Sherman J. Le Pard, and Jos. Montgomery, directors. The executive 
office is at 808 Genesee "\"alley Trust Building, Rochester, X.Y. 

During 1934 the mine was kept pumped out until December, when under- 
ground work was started on the 300- and 700-foot levels. 

Work on the 700-foot level is being confined to Xo. 703 vein. This is the 
most southerly vein of a group of three, which strike roughly southeast and dip 
to the southwest at about 55 degrees. On the 300-foot level a crosscut is being 
driven south to intersect the same vein. 

About 44 men are employed. The mine address is Timmins. 

Neville Canadian Gold Mines, Limited 

Xeville Canadian Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in February, 1934, 
with an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The 
officers and directors were: E. H. Dickenson, president; R. R. Brown, vice- 
president; W. G. Caulfield, secretary-treasurer; T. M. Mungovan and Paul 
Fisher, directors. The head office is at 710 Concourse Building, Toronto. 

The property acquired by this company consists of a group of 9 claims in 
Churchill and Macmurchy townships, in the West Shiningtree area, district of 
Sudbury. It is about 23 miles by road from Westree station on the Canadian 
Xational railway, and v.-as formerly known as the Wasapika-Ribble property. 

Former operators sank a 2-compartment vertical shaft to a reported depth 
of 300 feet, with levels at 100, 200, and 300 feet, on which a total of 730 feet of 
lateral work is believed to have been accomplished. 

Work was started on August 4 and suspended on December 15, 1934. A 
new headframe was erected, and the old buildings on the property, including a 
power-house, blacksmith shop, assay office, dry-house, bunk-house, cook-house, 
and office, were repaired. The old steam plant, including two boilers, totalling 
81 horse-power, an 8- by 10-inch Jenckes hoist, and a 350-cubic-foot Ingersoll- 
Rand steam compressor, was overhauled and put in shape for use. The mine 
had been dewatered to the 100-foot level when operations were suspended. 

About 14 men were employed under the direction of G. F. Milne. 

North Shores Gold Mines, Limited 

X'^orth Shores Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in Xovember, 1933, 
with an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The 
officers and directors were: R. X. Palmer, president; E. E. Watts, vice-president; 
W. G. Bennett, secretary-treasurer; J. A. Ross and L. P. Wood, directors. The 
executive office is at 44 Victoria Street, Toronto. 

The property held by this company consists of 600 acres located about 
33^ miles south of Schreiber, on the main line of the Canadian Pacific railway, 
district of Thunder Bay. 

When this property was taken over it had a 500-foot adit, from which some 
stoping had been done on a narrow high-grade vein. Underground work was 
started by this company in April, 1934, and during the balance of the year the 



130 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



old adit was driven an additional 400 feet. A second adit was started ISO feet 
below the first, and driven in 400 feet from the portal. 

In July, equipment was taken into the property for a 25-ton amalgamation 
mill and construction started. ^Milling was started on November 10, and a 
total of 602 tons of ore was treated during 1934. The ore was obtained from 
stoping from the 1st level adit. The mill was erected on the shore of Lake 
Superior at a point about half a mile distant, and 400 feet below, the 1st level 
adit. The ore was transported to the mill by truck. 

The mill equipment included a 19- by 24-inch jaw-crusher, 10- by 14-inch 
jaw-crusher, 2 Kennedy Nutt mills, ball mill, Akins classifier, Wilfley table, 
D. vS. A. flotation cell, corduroy-blanket tables, and amalgamation plates. 

A power plant was erected, and the equipment installed included a 75 
k.v.a. generator, driven by a 104 h.p. Diesel engine, and a 1,052-cubic-foot 
Ingersoll-Rand compressor, driven by a 240 h.p. Diesel engine. 

An average of 27 men was employed under the direction of R. N. Palmer. 
The mine address is Schreiber. 

Northern Empire Mines Company, Limited 

The Northern Empire Mines Company, Limited, was incorporated in 1932. 
with an authorized capitalization of 10,000 shares of SIO par value, which was 
increased in 1933 to 500,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and directors 
are: Fred Searls, Jr., president; H. E. Dodge, secretary-treasurer; G. B. Agnew 
and D. E. Thomas, vice-presidents; Carroll Searls and A. Douglas, directors. 
The executive office is at 14 Wall vStreet, New York. The mine address is 
Empire. 

The property of this company is located at Empire, on the Port Arthur- 
Long Lac branch of the Canadian National Railways, district of Thunder Bay 

The development work accomplished during 1934 on the various levels, 
was as follows: — 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 


150-foot 


feet 


feet 


feet 
190 


300-foot 


1,260 
1,006 


63 
133 


143 


450-foot 


79 






Total 


2,266 


196 


412 



Shaft-sinking was in progress at the end of the year, by which time the 
2^compartment shaft had been sunk an additional 107 feet, giving it a total depth 
of 609 feet, and a station had been cut at the 600-foot level. 

The 125-ton mill was completed and put in operation on jMarch 13, 1934. 
A total of 22,507 tons of ore was treated during 1934, which was obtained from 
cut-and-fill stoping on the 150-, 300-, and 450-foot levels. 

The equipment installed in the mill included a 9- by 12-inch jaw-crusher, 
30 gravity stamps, amalgamation plates, an 8- by LS-foot Dorr classifier, a 4- by 
7-foot Hardinge ball mill, a Denver vSub-A flotation unit, a 16- by S-foot Dorr 
thickener, a 6- by 3-foot Dorr filter. Later in the year cyanide equipment was 
added, which included an 8- by 8-foot thickener, a 4- by 4-foot ball mill, Akins 
classifier, three 8-foot Denver agitators, and Merrill-Crowe continuous pre- 
cipitation equipment. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 131 

An average of 83 men was employed, of whom 46 were underground. R. J. 
Hendricks was in charge of operations; P. E. Corrin was mine captain; and 
J. M. Cartan succeeded H. D. Hunt as mill superintendent. 

O'Connell Gold Mines, Limited 

O'Connell Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of no par 
value, of which 1,200,000 shares are issued. In 1934 the officers and directors 
were: J. J. Hollinger, president and manager; G. B. O'Connell, vice-president; 
A. G. Plaxton, secretary-treasurer; R. O. Wheatley, director. The head office 
is at 100 Adelaide Street West, Toronto. 

The company owns 180 acres in Powell township, Matachewan area, district 
of Timiskaming. In 1934 a plant was installed consisting of a new semi-Diesel 
oil compressor of 350-cubic-foot capacity, a single-drum hoist, and a 60 h.p. 
boiler. During June and July a shaft was sunk 50 feet. 

An average of 20 men was employed. The mine address is Elk Lake. 

Orecana Trusts, Limited 

The head office of Orecana Trusts, Limited, is at 1689 Board of Trade 
Building, Chicago. R. C. Orton is president. 

Kozak Property 

The company took over the Kozak property, which is located in township 
28, range 26, district of Algoma, in 1933. It is less than a mile west of South 
Goudreau station on the Algoma Central railway. 

A 6- by 8-foot vertical shaft was started late in 1933. L^nderground 
operations were suspended in the spring of 1934. The shaft was sunk to a depth 
of 110 feet, and a level established at 100 feet, where a small amount of lateral 
work was accomplished. 

The plant used included a gasoline compressor and an air hoist. R. Tallack 

was in charge. 

Michael -Boyle Property 

The company took over the Michael-Boyle property, located in township 
27, range 25, district of Algoma, and started operations in March, 1934. There 
is a 5-mile road from mileage 171}^ on the Algoma Central railway to the 
property. 

Previous operators had driven an adit for a distance of 300 feet, from which 
they did 200 feet of drifting. A shaft had been put down to a depth of 45 feet. 

LTnderground work was started in April and suspended in July, 1934. The 
adit was driven an additional 33 feet, and 367 feet of drifting was accomplished, 
using a gasoline compressor. Surface work was done for the rest of the year. 
An average of 14 men was employed under the direction of J. A. S. Roussac. 

Pamour Porcupine Mines, Limited 

Pamour Porcupine Mines, Limited, was incorporated in March, 1934. It 
has a capitalization of 3,500,000 shares. The officers and directors are: G. H. 
Rainville, president; R. M. Macauley, vice-president; A. Lafontaine, secretary- 
treasurer; M. Kendall, W. Meen, A. D 'Amour, P. Gelines, directors. The head 
office of the company is at 221 Notre Dame vStreet West, Montreal. 

The holdings of Pamour Porcupine Mines, Limited, are an amalgamation of 
the properties of La Palme Porcupine Mines Company, Limited, the Three 



132 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Nations Mining Company, Limited (which has recently been held by private 
interests), and Porcupine Grande Gold Mines, Limited. The company is 
controlled and operated by the Quebec Gold Mining Corporation, which held an 
option on 2,000,000 shares of the company when it was incorporated. The 
holdings consist of 20 claims, all in the northeast quarter of Whitney township, 
district of Cochrane. The claims lie about 7 miles northeast of the Dome mine. 
The mine address is South Porcupine. 

Work was started on the property in May, 1934. Diamond-drilling was 
commenced in June. During the year 5,966 feet of drilling was done, all from 
surface, making a total of 12,536 feet of diamond-drilling done on the property 
to the end of 1934. 

Underground work was started in October. Prior to this time the shaft- 
sinking had amounted to 200 feet, plus the sump, and the following additional 
underground w^ork had been done: — 



Crosscutting . 

Drifting 

Raising 

Winze 




200-foot level 

feet 

637 

737 

100 

33 



During 1934 underground work was confined to the 200-foot level, 97 feet 
of crosscutting being done, and 523 feet of drifting. 

At the end of the year there were 34 men employed at the mine. About 
half this number were employed underground, 7 at diamond-drilling, and the 
rest on surface. C. D. Stevenson is mine manager. 

Parkhill Gold Mines, Limited 

Parkhill Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1929, with an authorized 
capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and directors are : 
Sir Thomas Tait, president; G. F. Elderkin, vice-president; G. F. Racine, 
secretary-treasurer; G. M. McKee, Chas. Adams, and Dr. C. A. Peters, directors. 
The executive office is at 1835 Beaver Hall Building, Montreal, Que. The mine 
office is at Wawa. The property is located in township 29, range 23, in the Michi- 
picoten area, district of Algoma. 

During 1934, the 2-compartment 40-degree shaft was sunk an additional 
276 feet to a total depth of 1,253 feet on the incline, and levels, the 8th and 
9th, were established at 1,000 and 1,200 feet. Development footages accom- 
plished on the various levels during 1934 were as follows: — 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 


1st 


feet 


feet 


feet 
108 


3rd 


232 
608 






4th 


106 


124 


5th 


156 


6th 


43 

1,051 

1,413 

368 


73 
168 
207 
104 


113 


7th 


245 


8th 


355 


9th 








Total 


3,715 


658 


1,101 







1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 133 

A total of 19,455 tons of ore was obtained from the mine during 1934, of 
which 15,170 tons was from stoping and the balance from development. vStoping 
was done by open-stoping methods on all levels from the 3rd to the 8th, inclusive, 
though the major production was from the 7th and Sth levels. 

The cyanide mill was operated for 318 days during 1934, and treated a total 
of 19,431 tons of ore. 

An average of 96 men was employed, of whom 62 were underground. R. E. 
Barrett was in charge. 

Paymaster Consolidated Mines, Limited 

Paymaster Consolidated Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1930 and has 
an authorized capitalization of 9,000,000 shares of SI par value. The head office 
is at 204 McKinnon Building, Toronto. The officers and directors are: A. S. 
Fuller, president; E. H. Walker, vice-president and managing director; E. L. 
O'Reilly, secretary- treasurer; Chas. E. Cook, H. D. Rothwell, A. W. Hodgetts, 
C. J. O'Brien, directors. 

The principal holdings of this company total about 1,600 acres. The 
properties are situated in Tisdale township, district of Cochrane, south and 
west of the Dome mine, the two properties being contiguous. Pavmaster 
Consolidated Mines' holdings include property formerly held or controlled by 
the following companies: West Dome Mines, Limited; Dome Lake Mining and 
Milling Company, Limited; Standard Gold Mines, Limited; McLean Gold 
Mines, Limited; Consolidated West Dome Lake Mines, Limited; Premier 
Paymaster Mines, Limited; Bison Gold Mines, Limited: West Dome Lake 
Gold Mines, Limited; L'nited Mineral Lands Company, Limited. 

Paymaster Consolidated Mines have numbered the various shafts on their 
property from west to east. The following is a list with their depths and the 
approximate amount of development work done from each shaft: — 



Shaft Depth 



Lateral 
workings 



feet 

No. 1 (old Paymaster) : 80 

No. 2 " " 813 



No. 3 " " 

No. 4 (old United Mineral) 

No. 5 (old Dome Lake) 

No. 6 (old West Dome or Heinze) . 



400 

253 

1,097 

456 



feet 

] 

\ 19,202 

J 

1,545 

23,537 

6.946 



From the 1,050-foot level of Xo. 5 shaft, a winze has been sunk, and levels 
have been established at 1,200 and 1,325 feet. 

There are two mills on the property, the old West Dome Lake cyanide mill 
of 150-tons capacity, not in use, and the former L'nited Mineral Lands mill of 
470 to 500 tons capacity, now in use. 

Mining operations were started by the Paymaster Consolidated in November, 
1933, in the No. 6 shaft area. By July, 1934, the No. 5 shaft workings were 
pumped out, and work was also started in this area. 

In September, 1934, the ore reserves of the company were stated to include: 
in the No. 6 shaft area above the 400-foot level, indicated and probable, 35,000 
tons, averaging 811 per ton; in the No. 5 shaft area, in the old workings above 
the 1,050-foot level, indicated, about 10,000 tons, averaging 89 per ton; surface 



134 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



dump, 6,000 tons of low-grade ore. Former production at various times since 
1915, from these two shafts, totalled 81,114,821. Past production from the old 
Paymaster section totalled S384,647. 

Milling operations were started by Paymaster Consolidated on September 
24, 1934. During the remainder of the year there were treated 13,824 tons of 
ore, derived from the following sources: from surface dump, 6,786 tons; from 
Xo. 5 shaft, 514 tons; from No. 6 shaft, 6,524 tons. From this tonnage production 
amounted to S77,949.08. 

Feed from the surface dump was stopped in December for the winter months. 
Tonnage was then stepped up from the Xos. 5 and 6 shafts. At the end of 
December the mill was handling about 140 tons per day, about 20 per cent, of 
which was coming from Xo. 5 shaft and 80 per cent, from Xo. 6 shaft. The ore 
from these shafts is hauled by trucks to the mill. 

During 1934 Xo. 6 shaft, inclined at 62 degrees, was deepened 125 feet, from 
331 feet to 456 feet, and the following additional underground work and dia- 
mond-drilling was done : — 





Drifting 


Cross- 
cutting 


Raising 


Diamond- 
driUing 


From Xo. 6 shaft 


feet 
2,037 


feet 
368 

28 


feet 

287 

21 


feet 
1,271 


From No. 5 shaft 


1,055 


From surface 




602 




1 






Total 


2,037 


396 


308 


2,928 



An average of 72 men per month was employed at the mine during 1934. 
Of this number 56.3 per cent, were employed underground; 25.9 per cent, on 
surface; 10.9 per cent, in the mill; and 6.9 per cent, in general construction work. 

Chas. Cook is mine manager. The mill superintendent is D. Robinson. 
The mine superintendent during 1934 was G. R. ^McLaren, who resigned in 
January, 1935. His successor has not yet been named. The mine address is 
South Porcupine. 

Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Limited 

The property of the Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Limited, is located in the 
Pickle Lake-Crow River area, in the district of Kenora, Patricia portion. There 
are 59 claims in the group, comprising approximately 2,300 acres. The property 
lies about 6 miles east of that of Central Patricia Gold Mines, Limited. The 
mining camp is situated on claims Pa. 74() and 747. Transportation to the mine 
in summer is from Hudson or Collins on the Canadian Xational railway, by air 
route, or from Hudson by water. Scows starting from Hudson pass through 
Lac Seul and are taken across into Lake St. Joseph by means of Root river and a 
marine railway. These scows are then taken across Lake St. Joseph to a point 
about 20 miles from the mine, from which point supplies are delivered to the 
mine either by tractor or plane. Winter transportation starts from Savant 
Lake on the Canadian Xational railway, a distance of about 115 miles from the 
mine, and is entirely by tractor train except for supplies taken in by air from 
Hudson. 

The company is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. It was 
incorporated January 8, 1934, and purchased propert}' from Xorthern Aerial 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



135 



Canada Golds, Limited. The latter company had previously taken over the 
property from Northern Aerial Minerals Exploration, Limited. 

The officers and directors are: J. E. Hammell, president; A. L. vSmith, 
vice-president; Robert Fennell, secretary-treasurer; G. A. Cavin, assistant 
secretary-treasurer; Mrs. Eola Hammell, director. The mine manager is Alex. 
G. Hattie. The head office is at 1406 Concourse Building, Toronto. The mine 
address is Pickle Lake, via vSioux Lookout. 

Work was first done on the property in 1928. It was then dormant until 
1933, when a steam plant, consistmg of two 60 h.p. locomotive-type boilers, was 
installed. Other equipment included an 800-cubic-foot Canadian Ingersoll- 
Rand compressor, an S}4- by 10-inch Canadian Ingersoll-Rand reversible steam 
hoist, and drill sharpener. 

Shaft-sinking was commenced in September, 1933, and the same fall was 
carried to a vertical depth of 380 feet, with stations cut at the 125-, 250-, and 
375-foot levels. The shaft has three compartments. Underground develop- 
ment has been carried on continuously since the shaft was finished. Up to 
November 30, 1934, the following underground work had been accomplished: — • 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 


Raising 


12.5-foot 

250-foot 


feet 

614 

1,179 

1,378 


feet 

80 

185 

264 


feet 
1 1701 
35 


375-foot 






Total 


3,171 


529 


205 



^From the 2nd to the 1st level. 

Buildings on the property include a power-house, 125-ton mill, steel head- 
frame, blacksmith shop and steel sharpening shop, assay office, mine office, 
refinery, pump-house, switch-house, change-house, 3 warehouses, bunk-house, 
cookery, and residences. The average number of men employed at the mine 
during 1934 was 53. 



Porcupine Peninsular Gold Mines, Limited 

Porcupine Peninsular Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in July, 1921 . 
The following year the holdings of the company, along with those of Porcupine 
Night Hawk Mines, Limited, Night Hawk Lake Mining Company, Limited, and 
Callinan-McKay Exploration Company, Limited, were merged into Night 
Hawk Peninsular Mines, Limited. In 1933, the assets of the Night Hawk 
Peninsular Mines were transferred to Porcupine Peninsular Mines, Limited. 

The officers and directors of Porcupine Peninsular Mines, Limited, are: 
J. Albert McKay, Pittsburgh, Pa., president; J. H. Black, Toronto, vice- 
president; J. Ingram, Toronto, secretary-treasurer; J. R. Dodsworth, Jr., 
Pittsburgh, and G. A. Grover, Toronto, directors. 

The company has an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par 
value, of which 1,100,000 were issued in December, 1933. The head office is at 
80 King Street West, Toronto. The mine address is Connaught. 

The mine is located 10 miles from Connaught on the T. and N.O. railway, 
in the townships of Cody and Macklem, district of Cochrane. 

Late in 1933, Anglo-Huronian, Limited, took an option on an unstated 
number of treasury shares, the shares to be received in return for work to be done 



136 Department of Mines No. 4 

on the property. ^Management of the propert}' was taken over by Anglo- 
Huronian, who commenced a diamond-drilling campaign, which continued to 
the end of December, 1934. Over 30,000 feet of diamond-drilHng was completed. 
No drifting or crosscutting was done at the property by Anglo-Huronian. In 
past years the main shaft had been sunk to 440 feet, with levels at 80, 180, 300, 
and 425 feet. A winze had also been sunk from the 425-foot level, and from it 
levels opened at 525 and 625 feet. 

On the property there is a 200-ton mill, which produced bullion valued at 
$566,885 from 1924 to 1926. The property was inactive except for pumping 
operations from 1926 until 1933. 

During 1934, Robert E. Dye, manager at the Mpond property of Anglo- 
Huronian, supervised drilhng operations at the Porcupine Peninsular. 

Ramore Gold Mining Company, Limited 

The property of the Ramore Gold Mining Company, Limited, consists of a 
block of 20 claims in the township of Playfair, district of Cochrane, about two 
miles southwest of Ramore. Work on the property has been carried on since 
July, 1933. The present company was incorporated in September, 1934. The 
capitaHzation is 2,000,000 shares of §1 par value, of which 800,000 shares have 
been issued. 

The officers and directors are : C. W. Anderson, president; H. R. Grant, 
secretary-treasurer; H. X. \'an Camp, Dr. S. Eyelyn and Alex. C. Smith, 
directors. W. V. Hocken is mine manager. The head office address is Room 
314, C.P.R. Building, Toronto. The mine address is Ramore. 

Numerous test pits have been dug, and a shaft has been sunk to a depth 
of 60 feet. 

An average of 10 men was employed. 

Red Crest Gold Mines, Limited 

Red Crest Gold Mines, Limited, has an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 
shares of no par value. It was incorporated in May, 1934, with a Dominion 
charter. Officers and directors are: Horace G. Young, president; W. S. Lightball, 
vice-president; C. G. Macartney, secretary-treasurer. The head office is at 
1002 McGill Building, Montreal, Que. 

The property, located in Todd township. Red Lake area, district of Kenora, 
Patricia portion, was formerly known as the Rowan Discovery. 

The following paragraph from M. E. Hurst's "Preliminary Report of 

Developments in the Red Lake Area during 1934," indicates the work being 

done since the formation of the company: — 

On the Red Crest property-, formerly known as the Rowan Discovery, considerable trench- 
ing and diamond-drilUng have been done along a fracture zone that strikes in a northwesterly 
direction along a greenstone-granodiorite contact. Several quartz veins having, in places, a 
combined width of 20 feet, occur within this zone. Exploration to date is said to have indicated 
an ore shoot 222 feet in length containing 0.65 ounces gold over an average width of 5.1 feet. 
The auriferous portions of the vein matter appear to be intimately associated with narrow, fine- 
grained diorite dikes that intersect both greenstone and granodiorite. A mining plant is now 
being assembled on the property. 

Financial difficulties resulted in operations being suspended late in the year, 
before the proposed shaft was started. J. M. Wilson was manager at the 
property during 1934. The mine office is at Golden Arm, Red Lake. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 137 

Red Lake Gold Shore Mines, Limited 

Red Lake Gold Shore Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 5,000,000 shares of 
no par value. The officers and directors are: Charles E. St. Paul, president; 
Dr. Robt. W. Breuls, vice-president; Harry A. Newman, secretar3'-treasurer ; 
Charles W. Gallagher, and Ira E. Hough, directors. The executive office is at 
244 Bay Street, Toronto. The mine office is at Red Lake. 

The property consists of about 1,100 acres and, as the name implies, is 
located on the shore of Red lake, Kenora district, Patricia portion. It is 
adjacent on the west side to the property of Howey Gold Mines, Limited. 
Mclntyre-Porcupine Gold Mines, Limited, holds ground adjacent on the south 
side. The property was staked in the early Red Lake rush and considerable 
surface work was done then, but it was not until 1934 that a mining plant was 
installed, consisting of 2 locomotive-type boilers, 60 horse-power each, one 
3-drill steam-driven compressor, a reversible steam hoist, air receiver, and 
pumping equipment. An office, combined cookery and bunk-house, manager's 
residence, pump-house, dry-house, hoist-house, boiler-house, blacksmith shop, 
shaft-house, and a 13,000-gallon water-tank have also been erected. 

A shaft has been sunk to 187 feet, and 130 feet of crosscutting to the vein 
completed. On December 18, 45 feet of drifting on the vein had been accom- 
plished. ^I. L. Bouzan is manager in charge at the propertv. 

Richelieu Gold Mines, Limited 

Richelieu Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in May, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and 
directors were: A. B. Stodart, president; G. C. Ames, secretary-treasurer; W. J. 
McDonough, W. R. Parker, R. Spreckels, and H. R. Drummond-Hay, directors. 
The head office is at 350 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property acquired by this company consists of a group of 15 claims in 
the Thunder Bay district, located on the northeast arm of Sturgeon lake, about 
10 miles southeast of Savant Lake station on the main line of the Canadian 
National railway. It is about 4 miles northeast of the St. Anthony mine. The 
mine address is Savant Lake. 

Surface work was started in May, and early in December, 1934, the sinking 
of a 2-compartment vertical shaft was undertaken. By the end of the year the 
shaft had reached a depth of 115 feet. 

The plant installed included a 70 h.p. boiler, 600-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand 
steam compressor, and an 8- by 6-inch Ingersoll-Rand hoist. Buildings erected 
included a power-house, hoist-house, blacksmith shop, powder-house, office, bunk- 
house, and cook-house. 

J. G. Harkness was in charge of operations. 

Roche Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited 

Roche Long Lac Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in May, 1934, 
with an authorized capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of SI par value. The 
officers and directors were: John R. Rea, president; P. J. Roche, vice-president; 
W. H. Beatty, secretary-treasurer; P. J. Graham, director. The executive office 
is at 200 Sterling Tower, Toronto. 

This company acquired 57 claims in the eastern end of the Little Long Lac 
area. Thunder Bav district, in 1934. In the fall a 2-compartment vertical shaft 



138 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



was put down to a depth of 115 feet. Underground work was then suspended 
in favour of diamond-drilHng. 

The plant used included a 20 h.p. boiler, a small steam hoist, and a 220- 
cubic-foot gasoline compressor. 

The mine address is Hardrock. 

St. Anthony Gold Mines, Limited 

St. Anthony Gold ]Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1921. The 
authorized capitalization %vas increased from 3,000,000 to 3,300,000 shares of 
$1 par value in March, 1934. The officers and directors were: H. P. Bellingham, 
president; R. F. Taylor, vice-president; T. S. Giles, secretary; R. F. Cairns, 
treasurer; D. K. E. Fisher and D. M. Bellingham, directors. The head office is 
at 159 Bay Street, Toronto. The mine address is Savant Lake. 

The property of the company is located at Sturgeon lake, 12 miles south of 
Savant Lake station on the main line of the Canadian National railway, in 
Thunder Bay district. 

The 125-ton cyanide mill was completed and put in operation on May 12, 
1934. Power is supplied by the company's hydro-electric plant, which is located 
about 8 miles from the mine. 

Underground work was started in June for the first time since 1929. The 
development work accomplished up to the time operations were suspended in 
1929 was as follows: — 



Level 



Drifting 



Cirosscutting 



100-foot. . 
150-foot. . 
250-foot. . 
350-foot. . 
500-foot. . 

Total 



feet 
1,060 
950 
745 
1,037 
185 



feet 
695 
385 
185 
200 



3,977 



1,465 



This work was done from a vertical 2-compartment shaft from surface to 
the 150-foot level, a vertical 2-compartment winze from the 150- to the 350-foot 
level, and another similar winze from the 350- to the 500-foot level. vSome 
stoping had been done on the first four levels, and the ore treated by amalgama- 
tion. It is believed that there were about 50,000 tons of tailings left from this 
work, which could be re-treated at a profit in the new mill. 

During 1934 the mine was dewatered to the 350-foot level only. No lateral 
work was undertaken. The ore in an old shrinkage stope on the 100-foot level 
was pulled, and some stoping done on the 150- and 250-foot levels. 

Up to the end of the year the mill had treated a total of 21,618 tons, of which 
about 4,800 tons came from underground and the balance from the old tailings 
and ore dumps. 

The steam hoist on surface was converted to electricity, and an electric 
hoist obtained for No. 1 winze. An 800-cubic-foot electric compressor was 
installed. 

New buildings completed during the year included the hydro-electric plant, 
dry-house, refinery, assay office, and 2 bunk-houses. 

During the year H. A. Darling, L. Weldon, and R. P. Teare were successively 
in charge of operations. An average of 70 men was employed. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 193 4 139 

Sakoose Gold Mines, Limited 

Sakoose Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in June, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of SI par value. The officers and 
directors were: A. H. Acres, president; M. J. ^Slaloney, vice-president; D. 
McGrory, secretary-treasurer; M. S. Shulman, director. The head oifice is at 
231 St. James Street West, Montreal, Que. 

The property acquired by this company includes the old Sakoose mine, 
which is located about 6 miles south of Dyment, on the main line of the Canadian 
Pacific railway west of Fort William, district of Kenora. 

In July work was started to dewater and sample the old workings, which 
are located on claim H.W. 416, and completed in October. In September 
diamond-drilling was started from surface and a total of 3,000 feet accomplished. 
The old workings were permitted to flood, and a new 2-compartment shaft was 
started at a point about 500 feet southwest of the old No. 1 shaft. By the end 
of the year the new shaft had been sunk to a depth of 30 feet and a plant was 
being installed, which included a 45 h.p. boiler, a 480-cubic-foot Sullivan steam 
compressor, and a 9- by 12-inch Jenckes hoist. Buildings erected during the 
year consisted of a power-house, blacksmith shop, office, bunk-house, cook-house, 
manager's residence, and powder-house. D. H. Traynor was in charge of 
operations, succeeding W. C. Hood. The mine address is Dyment. 

Saundary Syndicate 

The Saundary Sj^ndicate suspended work at the old Headlight mine, located 
2 miles west of Mine Centre, district of Rainy River, at the beginning of 
February, 1934. About 30 tons of ore was mined on the 50-foot level, of which 
13 tons was milled. 

Three men were employed under the direction of A. E. Saunders. 

Selected Canadian Golds, Limited 

Selected Canadian Golds, Limited, was incorporated in March, 1932, with 
an authorized capitalization of 10,000 preferred shares of SlOO par value, and 
15,000 common shares of no par value. The officers and directors were: D. M. 
Hogarth, president; G. G. Blackstock, secretary-treasurer; Halstead Lindsley, 
R. Livermore, W. T. ^IcEachern, Quincy Shaw, and C. D. MacAlpine, directors. 
The head office is at the Bank of Commerce Building, Toronto. 

In the summer of 1934 the company obtained an option on the old Sultana 
mine, located about 7 miles southeast of Kenora, in the Lake of the Woods area, 
district of Kenora. Work was started on October 1 to dewater and sample the 
old workings, following which diamond-drilling was started from underground. 

Between 1891 and 1906 previous operators sank an SO-degree, 8- by 15-foot 
shaft to a vertical depth of 560 feet, and established eight levels, on which they 
did a total of 1,535 feet of lateral work. Stoping was done on all levels except 
the 8th. A 30-stamp mill was operated, and a production of between 8700,000 
and 81,000,000 obtained during the period of operation. 

Between October 1, 1934, and the end of the year the company accomplished 
1,809 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 90 feet of lateral work was done on the 
4th level, and 147 feet on the 7th level, for drill locations. 

The plant used included two of the old 100 h.p. boilers, the old 700-cubic- 
foot steam compressor, and a new 9- by 11-inch Ingersoll-Rand steam hoist. 

About 20 men were employed under the direction of Cameron McDonald. 



140 Department of Mines No. 4 

Sinclair Mines Syndicate 

The Sinclair Mines Syndicate holds a group of 16 mining claims in township 
23, range 10, district of Algoma. It is about 8 miles east of vSearchmont station 
on the Algoma Central railway. 

During the early part of 1934 a 2-compartment vertical shaft was sunk to a 
depth of 50 feet, and 50 feet of drifting done at that level. The plant used 
included a 220-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand gasoline compressor and a gasoline 
hoist. Buildings consisted of a bunk-house, cook-house, blacksmith shop, and 
powder-house. 

Dr. Alexander vSinclair, Sault vSte. Marie, was manager of the svndicate. 



S. B. Smith 

In 1933 vS. B. Smith acquired the Van Sickle property, claim S.S.M. 301, 
located in township 29, range 23, in the Michipicoten area, district of Algoma. 
It adjoins the Parkhill property on the east side. 

Operations were commenced in April, 1934, and a 2-compartment, 45-degree 
shaft was started in May. By the end of the year the shaft was at a depth of 
140 feet on the incline, and a level had been established at 119 feet. A total of 
430 feet of drifting and 119 feet of raising was accomplished on this level. 

A 15-ton mill was constructed during the year. The equipment included a 
Telsmith crusher, Kennedy-Nutt mill, Wilfley table, and amalgamation plates. 
It was operated only a few hours at a time in October for the equivalent of about 
four days continuous operation. 

The mining plant installed included a 175-cubic-foot electric compressor and 
a small electric hoist. Electric power was obtained from the High Falls plant 
of the Great Lakes Power Company. Buildings erected included a power-house, 
blacksmith shop, bunk-house, cook-house, manager's residence, and powder- 
house. 

An average of 22 men was employed under the direction of J. C. Canfield. 
The mine address is Wawa. 



South VermilHon Gold Mines, Limited 

South Vermillion Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in April, 1934, 
with a capitalization of 1,500,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and 
directors were: A. Pacitto, president; A. B- Broadley, vice-president; ]M. F. 
Burrows, secretary-treasurer; F. J. McFarlane and G. McLaughlin, directors. 
The head office is at 21 King Street East, Toronto. 

The property held by this company consists of a group of three claims 
located on Bad Vermilion lake, about 3 miles southwest of Mine Centre, Rainy 
River district. 

Work was commenced on April 16, and shortly afterwards a 7- by 12-foot 
vertical shaft was started. During the rest of the year a headframe, power- 
house, blacksmith shop, powder magazine, and office were constructed. A 50 
h.p. boiler and a 125-cubic-foot steam compressor were installed but not used. 
By the end of the year the shaft had reached a depth of 40 feet, and sinking was 
still in progress with hand-steel and windlass. 

About 10 men were employed under the direction of A. Pacitto. The mine 
address is Mine Centre. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 141 

Stanley Gold Mines, Limited 

Stanle}^ Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1933, with an authorized 
capitalization of 300,000 shares of SI par value. Stanley E. Siscoe was president. 
The head office is at 231 St. James Street West, Montreal, Que. 

The property is located in township 29, range 23, in the Michipicoten area, 
district of Algoma. It is about 5 miles by road from Wawa station on the 
Algoma Central railway. 

Operations were continued throughout 1934. In January a mining plant 
was installed, and the electric power line was completed. Shaft-sinking was 
started in February. The 7- by 12-foot shaft, which had been sunk to a depth 
of 30 feet by hand-steel in 1933, was put down to a depth of 300 feet. Levels 
were established at 123 and 256 feet. The shaft has an inclination of 33 degrees 
to the 1st level, and one of 47 degrees from there to the bottom. 

To the end of 1934 a total of 1,425 feet of drifting and 168 feet of crosscutting, 
had been accomplished. Operations ceased the end of December. 

The plant included 2 electric compressors having a total capacity of 750 
cubic feet, a 10- by 12-inch steam or air hoist, and a 48 h.p. boiler. Buildings 
erected during the year included an assay office and manager's residence. 

An average of 23 men was employed, of whom 8 were underground. O. H. 
Adams was in charge of operations. 

Stellar Gold Mines, Limited 

Stellar Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in ^Manitoba in July, 1934, 
with an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of no par value. The 
officers and directors were: C. H. Miles, president; W. H. Laverty, vice- 
president; S. E. Fairs, secretary; and W. J. Hoover, director. The executive 
office is in Winnipeg. 

A group of claims was acquired near Mine Centre in Rainy River district, 
and in September a 3-compartment shaft was started. Operations were sus- 
pended in October after sinking 68 feet. 

The plant used consisted of a 15 h.p. vertical boiler, a 5- by 7-foot steam 
hoist, and a 310-cubic-foot GD gasoline compressor. 

Straw Lake Beach Gold Mines Syndicate, Limited 

Straw Lake Beach Gold Mines Syndicate, Limited, was formed in August, 
1934, with an authorized capital of 115,000 shares of no par value. The officers 
and directors were: W. E. Segsworth, president; E- J. Kerswill, secretary- 
treasurer; R. J. Jowsey, J. D. Conover, L. L. Steindler, and J. A. Gairdner, 
directors. The head office is at 67 Yonge Street, Toronto. The mine address 
is Emo. 

This syndicate acquired a group of 9 claims at Straw lake, district of Kenora, 
which is 35 miles north of Fort Frances by air. It is 70 miles by winter road from 
Emo, which is 20 miles west of Fort Frances on the Canadian National railway. 

Following surface work, a 2-compartment vertical shaft was started late in 
October, 1934, and sunk to a depth of 105 feet. A level was established at 100 
feet, on which 187 feet of drifting was accomplished by the end of the year. 

The plant installed included a 310-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand gasoline 
compressor and a gasoline hoist. Buildings erected consisted of a power-house, 
blacksmith shop, office, bunk-house, cook-house, and stable. 

Frank Carnegie was in charge of operations. 



142 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Swayze-Huycke Gold Mines, Limited 

Swayze-Huycke Gold IMines, Limited, was incorporated in 1933 with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and 
directors were: \V. L. Doyle, president; F. G. Huycke, vice-president; A. B. 
Drake, secretary-treasurer; L. Guertin, W. C. Ryckman, and C. H. Martin, 
directors. The head office is at 372 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property of this company includes a group of 6 claims located in 
Cunningham township, in the vSwayze area, district of Sudbury. It is 17 miles 
by road from Sultan on the main line of the Canadian Pacific railway. 

A mining plant was installed in March, 1934, and shaft-sinking started. 
Operations were suspended in ]May, recommenced in July, and again suspended 
in vSeptember. The 2-compartment vertical shaft was sunk to a depth of 150 
feet and a level established at 125 feet. When operations were suspended in 
vSeptember about 31 feet of drifting and 100 feet of crosscutting had been 
accomplished on this level. 

The plant used included a 310-cubic-foot CP compressor, driven by a 50 
h.p. Diesel engine, and an 8- by 10-inch air hoist. Buildings constructed 
included a power-house, blacksmith shop, powder-house, office, cook-house, and 
two bunk-houses. 

An average of about 8 men was employed under the direction of W. 
McChntock. 

Sylvanite Gold Mines, Limited 

Sylvanite Gold Mines, Limited, has an authorized capital of 3,300,000 
shares of 81 par value. The officers and directors of the company are: Edward 
L. Koons, president; William L. Marcy, vice-president; W. S. Walton, secretary; 
Clark L. Ingham, treasurer; Welles \'. ]Moot, managing director; C. E. Rodgers, 
general manager; Alfred H. vSharpe and Harry Yates, directors. The head 
office is at Kirkland Lake, and the executive office is at 300 Erie County Bank 
Building, Buffalo, X.Y. 

The property is situated in the township of Teck, district of Timiskaming. 
An average of 263 men was employed during the year. 

The following is taken from the general manager's report for the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1935: — 



Production 

Tons Milled and Yearly Production* for Fiscal Years Exdixg M.\rch 31 









Average recovery, 


Year 


Tons 


Production 


Troy ounces 
per ton 


1930 


75,408 


8690,400. 14 


0.44 


1931 


83,034 


837,013.97 


.49 


1932 


94,276 


948,926.13' 


.49 


1933 


96,140 


912,377.15' 


.40 


1934 


98,311 


1,558,912.87' 


.52 


1935 


124,956 


1,584,817.392 


.41 



'Included eNchange on bullion. 

-Including e.xchange on bullion, after bullion tax is deducted, 
year ending March 31, 1935, was S31.32 per ounce. 



Average price received for 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



143 



Mining 





Ore broken 


Waste broken 




Year 


In 
stopes 


From 
develop- 
ment 


Total 


Hoisted 

to 
surface 


Used 

for 

backfill 


Total 


Total ore 

and waste 

broken 


1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 


80,678 
66,130 
54,423 
93,883 


27,417 
37,467 
31,971 
37,161 


108,095 

103,597 

86,394 

131,044 


6,658 
21,774 
25,457 
11,812 


16,369 
5,347 
5,838 

10,623 


22,937 
27,121 
31,295 
22,435 


131,032 
130,718 
117,689 
153,479 



Some 3,328 feet of work was done through ore, in drift and subdrift work. 

Ore Reserves. — Broken reserves at the end of the year amounted to 82,990 tons, 
almost exactly equal to the amount shown at the beginning of the period. 

Operating Costs 



This was 



Total 
cost 



Cost per ton 
ore milled 



1931: 

Development and exploration 

Mining 

Milling 

General charges 

Administrative charges 

Total 

1932: 

Development and exploration 

Mining 

Milling 

General charges 

Administrative charges 

Total 

1933: 

Development and exploration 

Mining 

Milling 

General charges 

Administrative charges 

Total 

1934: 

Development and exploration 

Alining 

Milling 

General charges 

Administrative charges 

Total 

1935: 

Development and exploration 

Mining 

Milling 

General charges 

Administrative charges 

Total 



$212,792.08 

267,376. 14 

106,575.54 

34,187.94 

21,213.75 



$2,563 

3.220 

1.283 

.412 

.255 



$642,145.45 



$184,936.28 

285.365.41 

112,630.68 

49.478.61 

24,594.16 



$7,733 



$1 . 962 

3.026 

1.194 

.525 

.261 



$657.005. 14 



$227,278.95 

249,907.58 

105,168.81 

48,907.65 

23,437.97 



$6,968 



$2,364 

2.599 

1.094 

.509 

.244 



$654,700.96 



$235,067.63 

217,517.25 

111,849.51 

48,073.77 

34,774.84 



$6,810 



52.391 

2.213 

1.138 

.489 

.353 



$647,283.00 



$242,173.47 

263,644.48 

151,620.64 

44,840.04 

39,000.00 



5.584 



$1,938 

2.109 

1.213 

.359 

.312 



$741,278.63 



$5,931 



144 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



By study of the above yearly figures it will be noted that the average operating cost, 1931 to 
1935. inclusive, was $7,023, or §1.092 above 1935, with a reduction of 0.653 cents per ton in 1935 
as against 1934. 

Development and Exploration 



Class of work 



Year ending 
March 31, 
I 1933 



Year ending 

March 31, 

1934 



Year ending 

Alarch 31, 

1935 



Total from 

beginning of 

operations to 

]\Iarch 31, 1935 



Drifting 

Crosscutting. . . . 

Raising 

Sublevel drifting . 
Box-hole raising. 

Winzing 

Shaft-sinking. . . 



feet 
6,681 
4,201 
3,029 
1,436 
1,179 



feet 
4,399.5 
2,347 
2.464.5 
1,473.5 

429 
97.5 

612 



feet 
8,985 
2,688 
1.905. 
1,268. 

352 



feet 

48,390.5 

24,825.5 

13,738.5 

9,290.5 

6,644.5 

97.5 

5,654 



Total . 



16,526 



11,823 



15,199 



108,641 



Per cent, of crosscutting 
to total of crosscutting 
and drifting 



38.7 



34.8 



23.2 



34 



Shaft stations and sump 
excavations 



cu. ft. 
5,610 



cu. ft. 
19,140 



cu. ft. 
840 



cu. ft. 
205,858 



Diamond-drilling . 



feet 
11,945 



feet 
6,713 



feet 
15,952 



feet 
77,026 



No. 2 Shaft. — The greatest volume of exploration and development work done during the 
year was in the area north of the shaft, although a considerable amount was completed in the 
medium- to low-grade sections of the south vein system. 

Mining operations were conducted on 15 of the 28 levels established at this shaft. The 
scope extended from 250 to 3,600 feet. The greatest concentration of effort was, however, 
immediately below, on, and extending to several levels above the 875- and 2,500-foot horizons. 
From these chief bases an extensive horizontal area was profitably explored. This work continued 
to confirm what past history has indicated, namely, that ore occurrences in your mine are 
widespread and are not confined to main veins or definite zones. 

Sloping and development to an increasing degree was done along contacts of sediment with 
porphyry, or altogether in sedimentary formation near the porphyry. General results here were 
such as to indicate that these ore bodies can be regarded as important producers when the area is 
more fully developed. Veins occurring in porphyry are, nevertheless, still the chief source of 
production. 

At). 4 Shaft. — From this section 29.1 per cent, of total mill feed for the year was obtained. 
A iair tonnage of known ore remains, and further exploration of the more favourable ground is 
planned. This includes upper-level areas of Sylvanite's original claim, L. 2,227, and the recently 
purchased Rose Fraction, or claim L. 11.398. 

Mill Addition 

The mill increase to 350 tons per day, mentioned in the last annual report, was put in effect 
August, 1934. Since that time capacity has been further increased to about 400 tons, with 
continued satisfactory operation. Milling equipment was installed with a view particularly to 
fine grinding, and treatment of the lower-grade ore, made profitable bj' the increased price of gold. 

Additional Buildings and Equipment 

Exclusive of the mill enlargement, this includes the purchase of certain experimental units 
in the mill, a fireproof addition to the refinery, a building addition to the assay office, and the 
installation of a dust-collecting system. An addition was also made to the miners' change-house. 

Summary 

Tonnage milled for the year represented an increase of 26,645, or 27.1 per cent, over that 
treated in 1934, while tons of broken reserves were not decreased. 

Production, after deduction of bullion tax, was slightly in excess of 1934; operating costs 
were reduced 65.3 cents per ton milled, milling costs were 7.5 cents higher. This last is chiefly 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 145 

due to the fact that an abnormal amount of mill alteration and experimental work was charged to 
operation. 

As mentioned above, mill capacity was increased chiefly to handle ore of lower grade than 
that treated during past years. In consequence it is planned to develop to a greater extent than 
previously the low- to medium-grade ore now indicated, the tonnage of which appears to be highly 
important in lengthening the life of your mine. 

Diamond-drill and other exploration carried on during the year in large volume in both 
igneous and sedimentary formation, indicated extensive and promising areas. Development of 
these will be continued. It is further confidently expected that the mining of such ore, coupled 
with a continued and comprehensive programme of exploration in large and favourable sections 
as yet but slightly prospected, will lead to other important sources of ore. 

Talisman Gold Mines, Limited 

Talisman Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 81,000,000, in shares of SI 
par value. The property consists of 242 acres in Guibord township, district of 
Cochrane, situated about 13 miles east of Matheson, and is part of the property 
formerly known as the Gardner Guibord. The officers and directors are: 
James E. Grant, Haileybury, president; Hugh Mclntyre, vice-president; J. W. 
Beilby, secretary-treasurer; R. J- Lillico, B. H. L. Symmes, and R. G. Meech, 
directors. The head office is at 364 Bay Street, Toronto. 

During 1934 the following development w^ork was done in the old shaft, 
which was sunk some years ago to 100 feet, with stations at 60 feet and 100 
feet: crosscutting, 694 feet; raising, 30 feet; drifting, 374 feet. An average of 
19 men was employed. 

The plant consisted of two 60 h.p. return tube boilers, a 500-cubic-foot 
steam compressor, and a 6- by 8-inch steam hoist. The mine was closed down 
in the early fall of 1934. 

Tashota Goldfields, Limited 

Tashota Goldfields, Limited, was incorporated in November, 1932. It has 
an authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers 
and directors are: H. H. Vaughan, Montreal, president; Thomas iVrnold, 
Montreal, vice-president; P. W. Ogden, Montreal, secretary-treasurer; W. A. 
Eden, R. J. Stokes, J. C. Rogers, J. A. Lindsay, and J. A. Griffith, directors. 
The head office is at Tashota. 

The property is located 16 miles south of Tashota on the transcontinental 
line of the C.N.R., in the Onaman Lake area, district of Thunder Bay. This 
property was formerly owned by the Tashota Gold Mines, Limited. 

The property has been worked intermittently since 1928, when shaft- 
sinking was first started. When operations were begun again in April, 1934, a 
total of 1,700 feet of lateral work had been done on the 100- and 200-foot levels, 
and the shaft was down 230 feet. Since then the shaft has been sunk to 366 
feet, and a 3rd level is now being developed at the 325-foot horizon. Total later 
work done underground to December 11, 1934, has been reported to be 2,483 
feet, divided as follows: on the 100-foot level, station and crosscutting 80 feet, 
drifting 430 feet; on the 200-foot level, station and crosscutting 326 feet, drifting 
1,647 feet. J. D. Gumming is superintendent in charge of operations. 

Teck-Hughes Gold Mines, Limited 

Teck-Hughes Gold Mines, Limited, has an authorized capital of 5,000,000 
shares of $1 par value, of which 4,807,144 shares are issued. The officers and 
directors are: Albert W. Johnston, chairman of the board; D. L. H. Forbes, 
president and general manager; George C. ^Miller, vice-president; Conrad E- 
Wettlaufer, secretary; K. P. Emmons, treasurer; P. Nugent Tapley, assistai^c- 
treasurer; J. W. Stephenson, assistant-secretary: John F. Lash, William W. 



146 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Reilley, John F. Thompson, and H. C. McCloskey, directors. R. J. Henry is 
general superintendent. The head office is at Kirkland Lake, and the executive 
office is at 25 King Street West, Toronto. An average of 738 men was em- 
ploved during 1934 at the mine in Teck township, district of Timiskaming. 

The following is an extract from the president's report for the 12 months 
ending August 31, 1934: — 

During the fiscal year ended August 31 last, the tonnage of ore treated was practically 
the same as during the two previous years. The price of gold and its realizable value per ounce 
to your company (after deducting the new bullion tax levied by the Dominion Government) 
fluctuated between the limits of $30. .50 per ounce at the beginning of the fiscal year to a peak of 
$34.80 per ounce during the earh' part of March, and was approximately $30.80 at the end of 
the period. The average for the bullion sold during the fiscal year was .$32,394 per ounce. The 
average cost of producing gold increased from $11.04 to $15.04 per ounce. 

The estimate of gold in "positive ore" decreased from 37.5,495 ounces at August 31, 1933, 
to 323,088 ounces at August 31, 1934, although the total footage of drifting increased during 
the period from 9,974.5 lineal feet to 11,163.5 lineal feet. The tonnage of ore produced from 
development decreased from 29,151 tons in the previous year to 21,749 tons. 

At September 1 last, the mine ore tonnage to be milled during the current fiscal year was 
placed upon a reduced basis of approximately 1,050 tons per day, instead of approximately 
1,300 tons per day during the previous year. Re-treatment of tailings which were sorted out 
and saved several years ago has been commenced and will partly offset this reduction of mine 
ore tonnage. 

]Mine workings within the ore zone were deepened from 5,074 feet to 5,735 feet, a vertical 
distance of 661 feet, which figure compares with 463 feet during the previous fiscal year. Taken 
as a whole and compared with the new level development results of other recent years, the new 
levels that were opened up during the year below the 40th show a diminution in both average 
grade and total tonnage per level, although results on the 45th level seem to indicate a return 
to better ore conditions. It now seems probable that the limit of depth for profitable mining 
will be reached sometime within the next three years. New ore in addition to that from deep 
levels is lieing developed in the older portions of the mine, where mining had ceased to be pro- 
fitable under former conditions. 

^^'hile decreasing earnings from gold production may be expected, present indications are 
that the Teck-Hughes mine can be profitably operated for several years to come. There is 
also the possibility of more favourable ore discoveries than were disclosed during the last year. 

Liquid assets, consisting of cash. Dominion of Canada bonds, and gold bullion, amounted 
to $3,572,734.52 at August 31, which compares with $3,898,468.76 at the end of the previous 
fiscal year. The decrease in liquid assets is more than accounted for by the investment of over 
$800,000 in the capital stock and bonds of Lamaque Gold Mines, Limited. Your company 
owns 70.8 per cent, of the capital stock of Lamaque Gold IMines, Limited, and all of its issued 
first mortgage bonds. The financing of the Lamaque enterprise is now being done entirely 
through the purchase of its bonds by j'our company. Mining and construction work to develop 
and equip the Lamaque mine for a capacity of 450 tons per da}^ is planned for completion before 
the end of next October, while 225 tons per day of this capacity is expected to be available by 
the end of next June. 

The following is taken from the general superintendent's report for the 
fiscal year ending August 31, 1934: — 

During this period 474,700 tons of ore were treated. The recovery of bullion and precipitate 
was the equivalent of 181,453.51 troy ounces of fine gold, which realized $5,877,973.88. After 
the addition of other income the gross revenue was .$5, 983, .525. 03, or $12.60 per ton of ore milled. 

Including the sum of $253,005.96 charged for depreciation on buildings and fixed plant, the 
total operating cost was $2,730,010.72, or $5.75 per ton. After making provision of .$224,016.30 
for taxes, and adding $19,104.50, a profit derived from the sale of bonds, the surplus was 
$3,048,602.51. Following is an analysis of operating costs: — 



Total cost 



Cost per ton 
of ore treated 



Cost per ounce 
of gold produced 



Development and exploration . 

Mining 

Milling 

General expense 

Examination of new properties 
Depreciation 

Total 



$442,813.22 

1,-322,603. 21 

457,355.19 

229,881 . 44 

24,351.70 

253,005.96 



50.93 
2.79 
.96 
.49 
.05 
.53 



$2.44 
7.29 
2.52 
1.27 
.13 
1.39 



.$2,730,010.72 



$15.04 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



147 



At the end of the fiscal year the deepest working was the No. 3 winze, at a vertical depth 
of 0,735 feet. Lateral development on the block of levels from 35 to 40 was practicalh* complete 
by the end of January, 1934, and the total length of ore found amounted to 2,596 feet, with an 
estimated average grade of 10.01 dwt. per ton. The block from 40 to 45 was partially developed 
on September 1, and the total length of ore found up to that time was 1,505 feet, with an estimated 
average grade of 8.91 dwt. per ton. 

Classified under the usual headings the year's development was as follows: — 

Feet 

Drifting . 11,167. 5 

Crosscutting 3,529 

Raising 5,862.5 

Winzing 1,391.2 

Total development 21,950. 2 

Diamond-drill exploration amounted to 12,179.8 feet. Ore produced from development 
amounted to 21,749 tons. 

The technical estimate of "positive ore" reserve at September 1 is as follows: — 





Tons 


Gold content 

in 
troy ounces 


Average grade 

in pennyweights 

per ton 


Broken ore 

Blocked ore 


302,520 
460,843 


114,599 

208,489 


7.58 
9.05 


Total 


763,363 


323,088 


S 46 







Teddy Bear Valley Mines, Limited 

Teddy Bear Valley Mines, Limited, has a capitalization of §10,000,000, in 
shares of 81 par value, 5,000,000 of which are outstanding. The company was 
formed to take over the properties held by the Teddy Bear \'allev Syndicate and 
Abitibi ]Mines, Limited. 

The property consists of 1,500 acres in Holloway and Harker townships, 
district of Cochrane. Finances for development are furnished by the Teddy 
Bear Valley Syndicate. The syndicate has an office at 503 Royal Bank Building, 
Toronto. C. Ellwood Hoffmann is managing director. 

During 1934 a shaft was sunk 300 feet and stations were cut at the 150- and 
275-foot levels. On the 150-foot level, 400 feet of crosscutting and 200 feet of 
drifting were done, and a station was cut on the 275-foot level. 

The equipment consists of a 100 h.p. locomotive-type boiler, a 10- by 12-inch 
steam hoist, and a 16- by 24-inch straight-line compressor of about 400-cubic-foot 
capacity. 

An average of 20 men was employed. Edward H. Orser is consulting 
engineer at the property, and H. Smeaton is superintendent. The mine address 
is Lightning River. 

Toburn Gold Mines, Limited 

Toburn Gold Mines, Limited, has a capitalization of 2,000,000 shares of SI 
par value. The officers and directors are : H. A. Guess, president; R. F. Goodwin, 
vice-president; G. A. Brockington, secretary; Charles Earl, assistant secretary; 
J. C. Emison, treasurer; E. C. Corson, assistant treasurer; \V. J. Boland and 
James ]Moore, directors; F. G. Hamrick, comptroller and auditor. The New 
York office is at 120 Broadwav, and the Toronto office at 217 Bav vStreet, in care 
of W. J. Boland. 

The mine is in Teck township, district of Timiskaming. During 1934 an 
average of 127 men was employed. M. W. Hotchkin, Kirkland Lake, is 
superintendent. 



148 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



The following is an extract from the president's report to the shareholders 
for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Surface exploration consisted of some trenching on Nos. 6 and 7 veins, the area believed 
to contain the north break. Sufficient encouragement was met to justify underground work 
in 1935. 

Underground exploration activities at Toburn for 1934 consisted of 1,030 feet of diamond- 
drilling. Almost all the drill-holes were short, north or south horizontal holes put out in an 
effort to locate parallel vein structures. 

Total development work done during the year 1934 amounted to 6,289 feet, all of which 
w^as above the 1,018-foot level. This development consisted of 3,030 feet of drifting, 1,067 
feet of sublevel drifting, 1,043 feet of crosscutting, 60S feet of raising, 481 feet of box-holing, 
and 60 feet of slashing. Of this total, approximately 1,980 feet was done on ore, breaking 5,775 
tons, which was sent to the mill. Approximately 91 per cent, of the development work was 
confined to the 542-, 667-, 792-, 893-, and 1,018-foot levels. Work done on the 1,029-foot sublevel 
is included in the total for the 1,018-foot level. 

The more noteworthy results of the 1934 development were:^ 

1. Locating the 911-drift ore shoot on the 893-foot level, which is believed to be a branch 
of the 1,024-drift vein, which, in turn, is most likely the upward extension of the 1,215- and 
the 1,325-drift veins. This identifies two inclined vein structures dipping approximately 53° 
S. W. of the dike fault, one above the other, i.e. the 672-904 vein structure and the 911-1,325 
vein structure. 

2. Locating ore on the nearly vertical No. 11 vein structure at the A 100-foot level, 542- 
foot level, and 667-foot level, both east and west of the dike fault, intermediate between the 
A 100- and 542-foot levels. 

3. Locating ore on the Xo. 7 vein structure above the A 200-foot level, which has good 
poss bilities for extensions both downward and eastward. 

Production figures for 1934 compared with those of the year 1933 are: — 



Year 


Tons milled 


Average ounces 
gold per ton 


Ounces fine 
gold produced 


Percentage 
mill recovery 


1933 


36,913 
36,230 


0.659 

.583 


23,020 
20,401 


94.7 


1934 


96.6 







The estimated ore reserves broken and unbroken at December 31, 1933, were 50,200 tons, 
averaging 0.66 ounces gold per ton, and at December 31, 1934, were 60,550 tons, averaging 
0.63 ounces gold per ton. 

This means that 46,580 tons of new ore, averaging 0.56 ounces gold per ton, were found 
and opened up by the exploration and development of 1934. 

Earnings for the vear 1934, after deducting administration and taxes, but before deduction 
of $182,101.04 depreciation and depletion, were $315,811.27. 

Tom Johnson-Nipigon Mines, Limited 

Tom Johnson-Nipigon Mines, Limited, was incorpori^ted in 1931. The 
name of the company was changed from Kirkland Divide Gold Mines, Limited, 
to its present name in 193-4. It has a capitalization of 2.000,000 shares of SI 
par value. The officers and directors are: P. H. Crawshaw, president; J. R. 
Scott, vice-president; M. O. Inglis, secretary-treasurer; Thos. Johnson and 
H. S. Shannon, directors. The head office is 1005 Bank of Hamilton Building, 
Toronto. The mine office is at Empire. 

The companv owns 6 claims in the Kowkash area and 11 claims adjoining 
the propertv of Northern Empire :\Iines on the west, in the Beardmore area, 
Thunder Bay district. The company also holds 300,000 shares in Nipsona 
Mines, Limited, a subsidiary of Tom Johnson-Nipigon Mines, which company 
was formed in 1934 to obtain control of 4 claims adjacent to those of the parent 
company. Some surface trenching and diamond-drilling has been done on the 
Kowkash property. 

On the Beardmore claims surface work is reported to have shown one of the 
Northern Empire veins extending 234 feet northwest of the boundary, where it 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 149 

averages 8 to 10 inches in width. At this point it is cut by a dike. West of the 
dike it has been traced another 125 feet, where its width ranges from 6 to 8 
inches. Good values are said to have been obtained from this vein. 

Sidney Muskin is the engineer in charge at the Beardmore property. 

Vermilion Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

VermiHon Lake Gold Mines, Limited, incorporated in 1932, has an author- 
ized capitalization of 15,000 shares of no par value. The officers and directors 
are: Dr. H. K. Mitchell, president; H. Dix Rogers, vice-president; J. C. Stewart, 
secretarv-treasurer; John E. Clark and J. Bennett, directors. The head office 
is at 1005 Lumsden Building, Toronto. The mine address is Northpines. 

The property consists of about 480 acres at Big VermiHon Lake, 7 miles 
from Hudson, on the Canadian National railway, district of Kenora, Patricia 
portion. 

A considerable amount of surface w^ork, trenching, and test-pitting has been 
done on the property. In September, 1934, control of operations was acquired 
bv the Reward Mining Company, Limited, of British Columbia, on the basis of 
the Reward Mining Company receiving 8 per cent, of the net earnings. The 
companv planned to diamond-drill the property during the first months of 1935. 

Wawa Goldfields, Limited 

Wawa Goldfields, Limited, was incorporated in 1933. The authorized 
capitalization was increased from 1,500,000 to 2,500,000 shares of $1 par value 
in November, 1934. The officers and directors were: A. P. Earle, president; 
H. H. Racine, vice-president; P. C. Dings, G. S. Payne, and L. Beauregard, 
directors. The head office is at 616 Canada Cement Building, Montreal. 

The property includes a group of 4 claims in township 29, range 23, in the 
Michipicoten area, district of Algoma. The mine address is Wawa. 

During 1934 a total of 90 feet of drifting, and 209 feet of crosscutting was 
done on the 50-foot level. This work was done during May, June, and July. 
Some surface work was then done until November, when operations were 
suspended. A 375-cubic-foot Diesel compressor was used. 

An average of 14 men was employed from May until November. A. C. 
Melkman was in charge of operations. 

Wells Longlac Mines, Limited 

Wells Longlac Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1934 with an authorized 
capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and directors 
were: A. J. Felton, president; A. W. Burt, vice-president; F. E. Forrester, 
secretary-treasurer; E. C. McCracken and Chas. Palmer, directors. The head 
office is at 347 Bay Street, Toronto. 

During 1934 this company took an option on the Stagee property, which 
adjoins the old Foley mine, in the Mine Centre area, district of Rainy River. 
Underground exploration was started in November, and by the end of the year 
a 2-compartment shaft had been sunk to a depth of 108 feet, and 20 feet of drifting 
had been accomplished on the 100-foot level. 

The plant used consisted of a 20 h.p. boiler, a 5- by 7-inch steam hoist, and a 
310-cubic-foot gasoline compressor. A. S. Dawson is mine manager. The mine 
address is Mine Centre. 



150 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



The company owns a group of 15 claims in the Magnet Lake section of the 
Little Long Lac area, on which surface work and diamond-drilling was performed 
during the year. 

Wendigo Gold Mines, Limited 

Wendigo Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in October, 1933, with an 
authorized capitalization of 2,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and 
directors were: H. D. Tudor, president; H. G. Young, vice-president; H. R. 
Tudhope, secretary-treasurer; A. J. Bolton and W. G. Cameron, directors. 
The head office is at 701 Dominion Bank Building, Toronto. 

The property of this company is located at Witch bay, on the Lake of the 
Woods, district of Kenora, and is 22 miles southeast of Kenora. 

The plant installed included a 100 h.p. boiler, a 375-cubic-foot Ingersoll- 
Rand steam compressor, two o25-cubic-foot IngersoU-Rand steam compressors, 
and an 8^- by 10-inch Ingersoll-Rand hoist. Buildings erected during the year 
included an office, blacksmith shop, dry-house, and assay office. 

During 1934, the 2-compartment SO-degree shaft was sunk 399 feet to a 
total depth of 516 feet. Levels were established at 200, 350, and 500 feet. 

A total of 1,000 feet of diamond-drilling was done from underground during 
the year. 

The lateral work accomplished during 1934, and the total done to the end 
oj 1934, on the various levels, was as follows: — 



Level 


Drifting 


Crosscutting 




1934 


Total 


1934 


Total 


.50-foot 


feet 


feet 
114 
65 
290 
815 
225 
590 


feet 


feet 


60-foot 








100-foot 


225 
815 
225 
590 






200-foot 


160 
55 
50 


160 


350-foot 


55 


500-foot 


50 






Total 


1,885 


2,099 


265 


265 







The work on the 60-foot level was done from the old No. 2 shaft, which 
has a depth of 100 feet and connects with the main shaft workings at that horizon. 

An average of 44 men was employed, of whom 12 were underground. C. L. 
Spencer was in charge of operations. The mine address is Kenora. 



West Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited 

West Red Lake Gold Mines, Limited, is capitalized at 3,000,000 shares of 
$1 par value. The officers and directors were: G. B. Hughes, president; A. J. 
Doane, vice-president; W. E. Robinson, secretary-treasurer; J. E. Streight, A. 
Cockeram, and M. R. Howey, directors. The executive office is at 609 
Continental Life Building, Toronto. 

The property consists of 27 claims in four groups located in the townships 
of Todd and Ball in the Pipestone Bay section of the Red Lake area, Kenora 
district, Patricia portion. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 151 

The main group consists of 9 claims, totalling approximately 375 acres. 
The mining plant is on claim Xo. 10,057, approximately 21 miles west of the 
Howev gold mine. 

The mining plant and camps were erected in ]May and June, 1934. Buildings 
include a boiler-house, 45 by 35 feet; blacksmith shop, 16 by 22 feet; dry-house, 
16 by 20 feet; warehouse, 12 by 14 feet; and powder magazine, 18 by 20 feet. 
The plant equipment includes two 60 h.p. locomotive-type boilers, a 7- by 
10-inch double-acting reversible hoist, a 400-cubic-foot vertical-type compressor, 
and a Ko. 2 Gardner Denver steel sharpener. 

In July a 2-compartment shaft, 11 by 6^ feet outside measurement, was 
started. This shaft was sunk to a depth of 205 feet, a level was established at 
the 200-foot horizon, and 95 feet of crosscutting and 298 feet of drifting was 
done. Work was discontinued at the property during the latter part of 
October, 1934. A. H. Honsberger was manager in charge of operations. 

Witch Bay Gold Mines, Limited 

Witch Bay Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in July, 1934, with an 
authorized capitalization of 50,000 shares of 81 par value. The officers and 
directors were: Henry Martin, president; H. G. Young, vice-president and 
managing director; H. R. Tudhope, secretary-treasurer; H. D. Tudor and A. J. 
Bolton, directors. The head oflfice is at 357 Bay Street, Toronto. 

The property of this company consists of two groups of claims adjoining 
the Wendigo mine on the east and west at Witch bay, on the Lake of the Woods, 
District of Kenora. 

Work was started in August and suspended in December, 1934. During 
that period an old 30-foot shaft on the east group was cleaned out and sunk an 
additional 15 feet. Some surface trenching was also done. 

The plant installed included a 60 h.p. boiler, a 4- by 6-inch hoist, and a 
gasoline compressor. F. ^I. Passow was in charge of operations. The mine- 
office address is Kenora. 

Wright-Hargreaves Mines, Limited 

Wright-Hargreaves Mines, Limited, has an authorized capital of 5,500,000 
shares of no par value. The officers and directors of the company are: Oliver 
Cabana, Jr., president; W. H. Wright, vice-president; Gerard F. Miller, 
treasurer; E. L. Miller, secretary and managing director; James Y. ^Murdoch 
and Oliver G. Donaldson, directors. The head office is at Fort Erie. The mine 
address is Kirkland Lake. 

M. W. Summerhayes is general manager, and 440 men were employed 
during the year at the mine in Teck township, district of Timiskaming. 

The following is taken from the general manager's report for the fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1934:^ 

During this period 3:30,7-11 tons of ore were treated, containing 207,655 ounces fine gold and 
40,915 ounces of fine silver. There was realized from the marketing of this bullion, S6,797,57S.S1. 

The average grade of the ore going to the mill, at §20.67 per ounce, was 0.66 ounces, or 
S13.6S per ton, with a recovery of 0.63 ounces, or S13.07 per ton, an extraction of 95.51 per cent. 



152 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Analysis of Operating Costs 



Development, exploration, and pumping 

Stoping 

Transporting ore (hoisting, etc.) 

Milling charges 

Marketing bullion 

General surface charges 

Stock transfer and registrar charges 

Insurance, silicosis, workmen's compensation, property 
taxes, miscellaneous 

General and undistributed charges (storehouse, hospital, 
maintain misc. mine buildings, mine management and 
administration, interest and exchange, legal expenses, 
miscellaneous) 

Depreciation buildings and equipment 

Provision for taxes (exclusive of bullion tax) 

Provision for depletion of mining properties. 

Amount written off, shaft No. 4 

Total 



Total 



5357,223.79 

748,532.05 

275,119.27 

459,090.54 

32,060. 15 

37.453.38 

13,685.70 

83,026.89 



125,792.04 
274,762.70 



52,406,746.51 
275,000.00 
182,111.00 
170,299.62 



Cost per ton 
milled 

$1,080 
2.263 
.832 
1.388 
.097 
.113 
.041 

.251 



.380 
.831 



.276 
,831 
551 
.515 



5,034,157. 13 



$9. 173 



Summary of Development and Explor.-\tion 
August 31, 1934 





Drifting 


Shaft- 
sinking 


Cross- 
cutting 


Raising 


Total 
footage 


Diamond- 
drilling 


Excava- 
tion 


August 31, 1933 

Fiscal year 


feet 
119,464 
17,162 


feet 
10,681 


feet 
42,492 
5,618 


feet 

7,987 

1,191 


180,624 
23,971 


feet 

87.805 

16,586 


cu. ft. 
364,938 
33,230 








August 31, 1934 


136,626 


10,681 


48,110 


9,178 


204,595 


104,391 


398,168 



Production Record, 1921-1934 
(Based on gold at $20.67 per ounce) 



Year 


Tons 
milled 


Value 
per ton 


Gross 
value 


Recovery 
per ton 


Bullion T-.- -J J 
produced Dividends 


1921 (8 mos.) . . 1 36.081 


$13.96 
12.49 
10.48 
14.16 
14.49 
15.66 
11.77 
8.36 
10.29 
12.20 
11.73 
12.85 
13.56 
13.68 


$503,302 
827,447 
830,992 
1,194,217 
2,148,554 
2,400,795 
2,455,460 
2,144,002 
1,938,552 
2,687,828 
3,124,533 
3,796,295 
2,623,456 
4,525,150 


$13.00 

11.52 

9.52 

12.89 

12.93 

14.02 

10.51 

7.20 

9.25 


$468,665 i 


1922 


66,181 


762,752 $412,500 
754,978 206,250 
1,088,725 206.2.50 
1,913,401 550.000 
2,1.50,844 893.7.50 
2,151,916 1.237,.500 
1,845,923 825,000 
1,741,872 


1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 


79,242 
84,487 
147,939 
153,-392 
209,164 
256,331 
188,238 
220,430 
266,352 
295,525 
193,441 
330,741 


1930 

1931 


11.03 
10.93 


2,431,896 275,000 
•^.912.308 S'^5.000 


1932 

1933(8mos.)i.. 
1934 


12.00 3,.546,903 1,100.000 
12.63 2,443,760 .5.50,000^ 
13.07 1 4,321,945 2,750,000 


Total 


2,-527,544 


$12.34 


$31,200,583 


$11.29 


$28,535,888 $9,831,250 



'In 1933, the fiscal year closing changed from December 31 to August 31. 
^April and July dividends only. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



153 



AIiLLiNG Statistics 
September 1, 1933, to August 31. 1934 

Ore milled tons 

Average value per ton 

Gross value $4,525,149.92 

Loss in tailings 203,205.31 



Net value recovered $4 

Average tons milled per day 

Per cent, of possible running time 

Tons 100 per cent, running time 

Solution precipitated tons 

Solution precipitated per ton of ore tons 

\'alue per ton in tailings 

Per cent, extraction 

Cyanide consumed per ton of ore (K.C.N.) lbs. 

Zinc consumed per ton of ore ounces 

Zinc consumed per ton of solution ounces 

Lime consumed per ton of ore lbs. 

Steel consumed per ton of ore, ball mills lbs. 

Steel consumed per ton of ore, tube mills lbs. 

Cost of flotation reagents consumed per ton of ore 

Average value of pregnant solution 

Average h.p. consumed per day 

Average h.p. consumed per ton milled 

Power cost per h.p. consumed 

N.B — All values at S20.67 per ounce. 



330,741 
$13.68 



,321,944.61 

906. 14 

97.11 

933 

1,173,048 

3.55 

$0,614 

95.51 

0.497 

1.544 

0.436 

2.814 

2.52 

2.80 

$0,033 

$3.68 

2,451 

2.70 

$58.96 



Ore Reserves Estimate 



Tons 


Ounces 


Grade 


Valuei 


On hand August 31, 1933 

Developed in fiscal year 


998,061 
517,884 


0.67 
.60 


$13.75 
12.44 


$13,726,809 
6,441,538 


Milled in fiscal year 


1,515,945 
330,741 


0.64 
.66 


$13.30 
13.68 


$20,168,347 
4,525,150 


Ore reserves, August 31, 1934 


1,185,204 


0.64 


$13.20 


$15,643,197 



'Calculated at $20.67 per ounce. 

Addition's to Plant, Buildings, and Equipment 
September 1, 1933, to August 31, 1934 

Mill structure and equipment $216,946. 99 

Shops and equipment 12,872. 55 

Power-house and electrical equipment 6,947. 42 

Assay office, building and equipment 14,630.88 

General surface and buildings 9,902. 68 

No. 4 shaft and hoist-house 8,038. 80 

Sprinkler svstem 30,665. 45 

New tailings line 12,364. 90 

L'nderground equipment 12,940.46 

Total $325,310. 13 



Development 

There were 517,884 tons of new ore developed, having an average grade of 0.60 ounces, or 
$12.44 per ton at $20.67 per ounce. A considerable quantity of this consists of low-grade ore 
actually developed in other years but which, due to the increased price for gold, can now be 
included in the reserves. After deducting 330,741 tons milled, there were 187,143 tons added 
to our reserves. Some 17,162 feet of drifting was done, of which 8,052 feet, or 47 per cent, 
was on ore. 

A diamond-drill hole has intersected the north vein at the 4,500-foot horizon, showing the 
usual excellent structures and mineralization. 



154 Department of Mines No. 4 

It is planned during the present fiscal year to prepare for a new interior shaft for developing 
the mine below the present Isottom. This will consist of the necessary hoisting station and 
ore and waste passes to connect with No. 3 shaft and the upper portion of the shaft above the 
3.900-foot level. 

Milling 

During the early months of the period under review, the mill alterations were completed 
and the full benefits of the various changes on the per cent, of extraction obtained. The pilot 
mill indicated a possible extraction of 96.2 per cent. This percentage was obtained in May 
last and has been bettered each succeeding month since that time. 

General 

A complete sprinkler system has been installed in the mill and shops, covering the most 
important fire hazards. This should reduce to a minimum the chances for a fire. 

The finer grinding in the mill has introduced more base metals into our bullion, making a 
regulus carrying high gold values as a by-product. This is hard and expensive to reduce satis- 
factorily, and the bullion shipped is not easy to check with the mint. We have, in the last few 
weeks, worked out what appears to be a new refining process which will eliminate this trouble. 
If the further experiments in a larger way prove satisfactory, we propose to make the necessary 
changes in our refinery equipment to put this process into use. 

Young-Davidson Mines, Limited 

The officers and directors of Young-Davidson Mines, Limited, are: Gideon 
Grant, president; C. G. Knott, vice-president; F. M. McKay, secretary-treasurer; 
Jacob A. Davidson, A. Calvin Ross, Colin M. McLean, directors. The 
capitalization is §3,000,000, in shares of SI par value. 

The company owns a property in Powell township, district of Timiskaming, 
which is being operated under agreement by the Hollinger Consolidated Gold 
Mines, Limited. An account of the work done on the property appears on page 
102 of this report. The mine address is Elk Lake. 

Young-Shannon Gold Mines, Limited 

Young-Shannon Gold Mines, Limited, was incorporated in 1932, with an 
authorized capitalization of 3,000,000 shares of $1 par value. The officers and 
directors were: C. T. Young, president; S. J. Defoe, secretary; W. C. Hufif, 
treasurer; and A. J. Bolton, director. The head office is at 1 Toronto Street, 
Toronto. 

The property of this company includes a group of 9 mining claims in Chester 
township, district of Sudbury. There is a 22-mile road from Makwa station on 
the Canadian National railway. 

In June a 2-compartment vertical shaft was started on a small island in 
Clam lake. B}^ the end of the year the shaft had been sunk to a depth of 100 
feet, and 50 feet of drifting and 50 feet of crosscutting accomplished at that 
level. A total of 3,000 feet of diamond-drilling was done during the year. 
5;^ * The plant installed included a 45 h.p. boiler, an 8- by 12-inch steam hoist, 
and a 220-cubic-foot GD gasoline compressor. Buildings erected included a 
power-house, blacksmith shop, bunk-house, and powder-house. 

An average of 12 men was employed throughout the year. C. T. Young 
was in charge of operations, with A. Taylor as mine captain. The mine address 
is Gogama. 

GRAPHITE 

Black Donald Graphite Company, Limited 

The officers of the Black Donald Graphite Company, Limited, are: 
R. F. Bunting, president and manager; W. B. Bunting, vice-president; R. A. 
Telfer, secretary-treasurer. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 155 

The mine in Brougham township, Renfrew county, operated 90 days 
during 1934, and the refinery 144 days. About 2,000 tons of ore was hoisted 
and milled. 

The company reports that owing to improvement in market conditions 
stocks of refined graphite on hand have been somewhat reduced. 

An average of 28 men was employed during the period of operation. The 
mine address is Calabogie. 

GYPSUM 
Canadian Gypsum Company, Limited 

The Canadian Gypsum Company, Limited, has a capitalization of $300,000, 
divided into 3,000 shares of $100 par value. The officers and directors of the 
company are: S. L. Avery, president; R. G. Bear, secre tary- treasurer ; O. M. 
Knode, C. F. Henning, Otis Wack, and J. E. MacLeish, directors. The head 
office is at 1221 Bay Street, Toronto. The head office officials are: B. S. Barns, 
agent and comptroller, and F. B. Gibbs, manager. Otis Wack, Windsor, N.S., 
is director of operations. 

The company operates a gypsum mine and plant near Hagersville, in Oneida 
township, Haldimand county. All commercial gypsum products are produced at 
the plant, which includes a mill, wall board and block manufacturing buildings. 
During 1934 some 17,046 tons of rock were hoisted. An average of 30 men was 
employed. W. E. Allen, Hagersville, is superintendent. 

The company also operates a quarry and lime plant at Guelph; a large 
gypsum quarry at Windsor, N.S. ; a gypsum mill at Hillsborough, N.B. ; a gypsum 
calcining mill at lona. Cape Breton; and a winter gypsum storage depot at 
Deep Brook, N.S. 

Associated with the company is the Gypsum Packet Company, Limited, 
operating four 7,000-ton freight and passenger steamers between Nova Scotia 
and United States ports. 

Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, Canada, Limited 

Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, Canada, Limited, has a capitalization of 
2,000,000 shares of no par value. The officers are: R. E. Haire, president and 
manager; S. H. J. Reid, secretary-treasurer; W. E. Armstrong, Henry Cockshutt 
H. J. Haire, Jas. R. Inksater, G. H. Kranenberg, J. E. McConnell, R. S. 
McCurdy, N. L. Nathanson, W. C. Pitfield, and John F. Cameron, directors. 
The head office is at Paris, Ont. 

The mine and mill at Caledonia, Seneca township, Haldimand county, was 
operated throughout the year. L. V. Robinson was superintendent, employing 
an average of 110 men. 

There were hoisted 21,744 tons of rock. Of this, some 1,432 tons were sold 
and the rest was manufactured into landplaster, stucco, Paristone, Gyproc, dry 
Insulex, gypsum lath, and other building products. 

In addition to the Caledonia mine, the company operates gypsum plants 
at Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, and Calgary. 

Lime plants are situated at Beachville, Elora, Hespeler, Milton, Limehouse, 
and Puslinch, Ont., and at St. Mark and Joliette, Que. 

Quarries are operated at Mabou, N.S. ; Gypsumville, Man.; and Salmon 
River, B.C. The alabastine plant is at Paris, Ont. 



156 Department of Mines No. 4 

MOLYBDENITE 

Phoenix Molybdenite Corporation, Limited 

The Phoenix Molybdenite Corporation, Limited, has a capitaHzation of 
$1,000,000, in shares of $1 par value. The officers and directors are: F. L. 
Stinson, president and manager; E. A. Dempster, vice-president; W. G. Chipp, 
secretary-treasurer; John Thompson and George Joynt, directors. The head 
office is at 316 Excelsior Life Building, Toronto. The mine address is R.R. 2, 
Ashdad. 

The mine in Bagot township, Renfrew county, was operated from April to 
October, 1934. 

A blacksmith shop, transformer station, and mill were erected. The mill 
went into operation on August 15, and during the remaining period of operation 
treated about 200 tons of ore from surface, with a recovery of 3,300 pounds of 
concentrates. 

At the end of September there were 31 men employed at the property. 



NICKEL AND COPPER 

Cuniptau Mines, Limited 

Cuniptau Mines, Limited, has an authorized capital of 3,000,000 shares of 
$1 par value. The property consists of 62 claims in vStrathy township, district 
of Nipissing, two miles north of Timagami. The officers of the company are: 
B. W. Watkins, president; E. P. Muntz, vice-president; W. G. Watkins, 
secretary-treasurer. J. W. Morrison is consulting engineer, and S. S. W. Cole, 
mine manager. The head office is at 465 Bay vStreet, Toronto. The mine 
address is Goward. 

To the end of January, 1935, the following work had been done. A 
2-compartment shaft was sunk to a depth of 240 feet, with levels at 100 and 
225 feet. Drifting and crosscutting amounted to 1,372 feet, and 55 feet of 
raising was done. A 50-ton blast furnace is being put into operation with the 
intention of treating the green ore. 

An average of 40 men was employed. 

Falconbridge Nickel Mines, Limited 

The officers and directors of Falconbridge Nickel Mines, Limited, are: 
Thayer Lindsley, president; Halstead Lindsley and J. G. Hardy, vice-presidents; 
N. F. Parkinson, secretary-treasurer; W. vS. Morlock, director. The authorized 
capital is 5,000,000 shares of no par value. The head office is at 25 King Street 
West, Toronto. 

The company operates a nickel-copper property in vSudbury district. Ernest 
Craig is general superintendent; J. R. Gill, smelter superintendent; Angus 
MacDonnell, underground superintendent; and R. C. Mott, concentrator 
superintendent. During 1934 an average of 436 men was employed, of whom 
124 were underground. The mine address is Falconbridge. 

The following is taken from the report of the general superintendent for the 
year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Such interruptions as were experienced to continued operation of mine and reduction plants 
were entirely due to necessary periodic repairs to blast furnace and settler. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 157 

Mine Development 

Development footages attained during the year and combined over all levels, distribute 
as tabulated below : — 

Drifting and crosscutting feet 4,054 

Raising feet 1,122 

Stope entrances feet 130 

Box-holes 7 

Diamond test drilling feet 2,597 

Diamond-drilling (surface) feet 405 

Station-cutting cu. ft. 6,700 

Shaft-sinking feet 546 

All development work during the j'ear was carried out within the area in which ore reserves 
were computed in 1933, with the exception of the east drive on the 500-foot level. 

Of the total 4,054 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 2,577 feet was driven east on the 500- 
foot level. This work served to open up the eastern ore bodies and to provide a connection with 
No. 5 shaft. Intensive faulting, encountered in some sections, reduced the ore possibilities 
at this horizon. One body, however, extending for 500 feet and disclosing fair widths, was opened 
up, while the last 1,100 feet of the drive was in ore of widths varying between 10 and 40 feet but 
of a grade considerably reduced by the presence of large amounts of quartz. The limits of this 
body have not j'et been reached. 

On the 750-foot level an advance of 610 feet west disclosed 575 feet of good ore. The east 
drive was continued for 233 feet with ore to 120 feet, at which point the main fault was en- 
countered. 

Xo. oSlv'ft. — Preparation for sinking a 5-compartment shaft at a location some 2,400 feet 
east from the present working shaft was made early in the summer. This shaft is 13 feet 4 
inches by 19 feet 6 inches, outside timber, and will be continued to a depth of 1,500 feet. 

The depth of overburden having been established at 100 feet by means of an electrical 
survey and checked by one bore-hole, excavation of the shaft was commenced in June. Sinking 
through the overburden was accomplished by excavating inside a steel plate shield, the excava- 
tion being followed by timber sets spaced at 3-foot centres and closely lagged. After reaching 
bed rock, in order to seal off the water and quicksand encountered there and also to reinforce 
the shaft through the sand, a concrete lining was poured inside the timber and continued to 
surface. Permanent steel sets were started in September, and a total depth of 546 feet from 
surface had been reached by the end of the year. A station was cut at the 500-foot level, where 
connection was made with the east drift. 

Ore Reserves 

Ore reserves, computed as at December 31, 1934, are tabulated hereunder: — 

Tons 

Ore reserves as at December 31, 1933 2,817,884 

Plus new ore added 1934 460,000 

Total 3,277,884 

Less: drawn during 1934 317,646 

Total ore reserves (averaging 2.04 per cent, nickel and 0.90 

per cent, copper), December 31, 1934 2,960,238 

Mining 

The results of mining activities during the ^-ear are set out in the following table: — 

Broken Ore in Stopes 

Tons 

Balance December 31, 1933 408,780 

Broken during 1934 386,051 

Total "9i-831 

Less: hoisted from stopes during 1934 285,089 

Broken ore reserves December 31, 1934 509,742 

Ore Hoisted 

From stopes, 1934 285,089 

From development, 1934 1^'0§'^ 

From concentrating dump, 1934 18,472 

Total ore to crushing plant, 1934 317.646 



158 Department of Mines No. 4 

Crushing, Sorting, and Transportation 

From 317,646 tons of ore delivered to the crushing plant, 44,116 tons, or 13.9 per cent., 
of waste was eliminated by sorting and discarded. The balance, amounting to 273,530 tons, was 
transported over the aerial tramway to the treatment plant bins. 

The entire reduction plant was in operation 337.46 days during the year. Periodic repair 
campaigns, necessary in the one-unit plant, account for the whole of lost operating time. Results 
of operation tabulate as below: — 

Short tons 

Total ore treated 272,923 

Matte produced : 9,271 . 4 

Nickel in matte produced 5,202. 6 

Copper in matte produced 2,450. 8 

Metals per ton of ore : Pounds 

Nickel 41 

Copper 19. 90 

Metallurgical losses per ton of ore : 

Nickel 2.88 

Copper 1 . 64 

Construction 

With the exception of temporary installations of equipment to facilitate the sinking of 
No. 5 shaft, practically no additions or alterations to the plant were undertaken during the year. 

Housing facilities were further increased during the year, and an up-to-date sewage disposal 
system was installed. Sewerage and water sj'stems were also extended to provide adequate 
service and fire protection throughout plant and townsite. 

The following is an extract from the report of the consulting metallurgist 
for the year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Mill and Smelter 

The mill and smelter operated throughout the year with only the normal interruptions 
for repairs. The excellent overall metallurgical recovery was slightly improved. 

Refinery 

The refinery, w'hich is located in Norway, operated very steadily throughout the year, 
although with a little less than normal capacity during the first few months due to adjustment 
of new equipment. A certain amount of additions and alterations took place, more to improve 
and stabilize operating conditions than to increase capacity, although this at the end of the 
year was very ample for 6,000 short tons annually and some months exceeded this rate. 

Custom matte was received regularly, from February, at the increased rate of 1,000 long 
tons nickel annually. The plant for separation of precious metals was finished during the year 
and is gradually coming into routine. Research work and experiments are going on to further 
improve the recovery and high quality of the metals, and some small further progress has been 
made. 

For the 3'ear 1934, the amount of metals in matte received from the smelter, the refinery 
production, the metals in process, and the metals in matte on hand at the end of the year is set 
out in the following table: — 



Nickel 



Copper 



I lbs. 

Metals in Falconbridge matte received, less refining losses j 9,924,129 

Produced in marketable form during the year 9,508,939 

Metals in process of refining at end of year 1,953,277 

Metals in matte on hand at end of year I 1,355,139 



lbs. 

4,626.535 

4,633,235 

402,976 

604,058 



International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited 

The officers of the International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited, are: 
Charles Ha3^den, chairman of the board; Robert C. Stanley, president ; John 
F. Thompson, vice-president; Paul D. Merica and John C. Nicholls, assistants 
to the president; James L. Ashle}', secretary-treasurer. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 159 

The directors whose term expires in 1935 are: James L. Ashley, John 
F. Dulles, Reg. Halladay, Charles Hayden, J. W. McConnell, R. S. McLaughlin, 
Britton Osier, J. A. Richardson, Robt. C. Stanley', Andrew V. Stout, John F. 
Thompson, and Rt. Hon. Lord Weir of Eastwood. 

The directors whose term expires in 1936 are: John P. Bickell, Hon. H. 
Cockshutt, Wm. X. Cromwell, D. Owen Evans, Sir Harry McGowan, R. H. 
McMaster, Wm. W. Alein, Rt. Hon. Lord Melchett, Paul D. ^vlerica, Sir Robert 
L. Mond, Thomas Morrison, Seward Prosser, and Grant B. Shipley. 

The executive office is at 67 Wall Street, New York City, and the general 
offices of the mining and smelting division are at Copper Cliff, Ont. 

This company and subsidiary companies operate hydro-electric power 
plants at High Falls, Big Eddy, Wabageshik, and Nairn Falls, Ont.; nickel- 
copper mines in Sudbury district, Ont. ; smelters at Copper Cliff and Coniston, 
Ont.; refineries at Port Colborne, Ont., Acton, England, and Clydach, Wales; 
rolling mills at Birmingham, England, Huntington, W. Va., and Glasgow, 
Scotland; a colliery at Pontardawe, Wales; and a foundry at Bayonne, N.J. 

The authorized capital of this company consists of 827,679,900 of preferred 
shares of SlOO and 85 par value, and 15,000,000 shares of common stock of no 
par value. 

The following information is extracted from the annual report of the 
company covering the year ending December 31, 1934: — • 

General 

The improvement in your company's business mentioned in the annual report for 1933 
continued through 1934, with the result that the report submitted herewith is the most satis- 
factory since that for 1929, which was the peak j-ear in the history of the nickel industry. 

Sales of nickel, copper, rolling-mill products, and precious metals, details of which appear 
in the Sales section, substantially increased. Quoted prices for nickel, with the exception of a 
lower sterling price, remained unchanged. However, though still low, the average price received 
for copper was 5 per cent, in excess of that obtained in 1933. 

Operations throughout the year, conducted on an increased scale and at a uniform rate, 
afforded your management opportunity to cut costs of production to the lowest figures obtaining 
since your plants were reconstructed and the Frood mine fully developed. The expanded 
operations called for additions to pay-rolls and decreased unemployment in the various localities 
in which your operations are conducted. 

The financial statements are submitted for convenience in United States dollars. As in 
the previous year sales outside of Canada and the United States were based on sterling. It 
will be noted that a net profit of .SlS,4S7,-478.80 was reaUzed after all charges, including pro- 
vision of .§.5,321,131.52 for depreciation, mine depletion, and other reserves. After paying 
S1,933,S98.75 of preferred dividends there remained S16,o53,.5S0.0.5, equal to SI. 13 per share on 
the common stock. The year closed with your company in a strong cash position. 

There follows a resume of vour company's diversified activities during the year ended 
December 31, 1934. 

Sales 

Your company's sales of nickel in all forms, including nickel in alloys, amounted to 91,459,554 
pounds, compared with 74,356,969 pounds in 1933, an increase of 23 per cent. 

Sales of nickel in products of the Port Colborne, Canada, and Clydach, Wales, refineries 
amounted to 73,964,621 pounds, compared with 61,353,495 pounds in 1933, an increase of 21 
per cent. Sales of nickel in products of the Copper Chff smelter amounted to 1,357,008 pounds. 
Sales of nickel in products of the rolling mills at Birmingham, England, Glasgow, Scotland, and 
Huntington, W.Va, and of the foundry at Bayonne, X.J., totalled 16,137,925 pounds, compared 
with 13,003,474 pounds, an increase of 24 per cent. 

The estimated world's consumption of nickel in all forms was 122,000,000 pounds, compared 
with 96.000,000 pounds in 1933 and 57,000,000 pounds in 1932. 

Sales of Monel metal, a product made direct from Creighton ore, totalled 10,763,821 pounds, 
compared with 9,101,219 pounds in 1933, an increase of 18 per cent.; sales of pure rolled nickel 
were 7,469,914 pounds, compared with 6,287,991 pounds in 1933, an increase of 19 per cent. 

Copper sales, inclusive of copper in sulphate produced in Wales, increased from 113,682,312 
pounds to 194,870,682 pounds, or 71 per cent. 

Gold sales were 74,375 ounces, compared with 21,355 ounces in 1933; silver sales were 
1,006,808 ounces, compared with 876,303 ounces; and sales of the platinum metals were 124,424 
ounces, compared with 77,198 ounces. Sales of selenium were 73,516 pounds, and sales of 
tellurium 1,110 pounds. 



160 Department of Mines No. 4 

Mines 

Throughout 1934 ore was mined continuously from the Frood and Creighton mines, the 
total tonnage shipped amounting to 2,690,814 tons, of which the Frood mine contributed 1,868,186 
tons and the Creighton mine 822,628 tons. 

At the Frood mine exploratory work was restricted to the lower levels, and ordinary develop- 
ment work was regulated to conform with ore requirements. During 1934 the advance of shafts, 
drifts and crosscuts, raises, winzes, and box-holes amounted to 19,937 feet, thus bringing the 
total development work in this mine to 31.7 miles. Twenty new stopes and 5 pillar stopes were 
brought into production. There are now available for production in the Frood mine 83 stopes 
and 13 pillar stopes. The average output of a stope is 140 tons daily and that of a pillar 60 
tons daily. Costs of development work and mining were satisfactory, and the mine is in splendid 
condition to supply smelter requirements. 

The advance made at the Creighton mine in 1934, inclusive of shafts, drifts and crosscuts, 
raises, winzes, and box-holes totalled 8,694 feet. In order to mine efficiently the large reserves 
of proven ore in the lower levels a new shaft is being sunk. Work is progressing on the shaft- 
sinking and on the erection of the necessary surface plant, and it is estimated that this project 
will be completed early in 1937. 

Smelters 

The concentrator was operated at a uniform rate throughout the year and treated 1,843,146 
tons of ore, the greatest tonnage thus far handled. As the result of certain rearrangement of 
equipment and with the completion of some minor installations the available capacity in the 
grinding and flotation sections is 8,000 tons per day. This capacity can be readily increased 
to 11,000 tons per day should demand call for increased quantities of nickel. Experimental 
work is being continued actively- with reference to mechanical details of operations and chemical 
features of flotation. 

The Copper Cliff smelter produced 92,174 tons of bessemer matte and 97,611 tons of blister 
copper. Three reverberatory furnaces were in operation throughout the year. The installation 
of additional converters, mentioned last year, has been completed, which not only adds to plant 
capacity but from a metallurgical standpoint balances adequately the copper and nickel smelting 
operations. From the standpoint of efficiency the performance of the reverberatory furnaces 
and converters was good, and greater daily tonnages were smelted than at any time heretofore. 

For the Orford separation process one blast furnace was used throughout the year and a 
second for seven months. A marked reduction in the amount of coke and nitre cake used per 
ton of bessemer matte smelted resulted in a reduction of costs. 

At the Coniston smelter three blast furnaces were in operation up to April 1, and four there- 
after. During the year 840,980 tons of ore were smelted and 59,732 tons of bessemer matte 
produced. This smelter in common with your other plants in the Sudbury district is in splendid 
physical condition and is operating satisfactorily from the standpoint of tonnage and cost of 
production. 

Hydro-Electric Plants 

All of your four hydro-electric plants were in use throughout the year. Through systematic 
maintenance of storage dams, water capacity has been materially increased. The concrete 
dam at Nairn Falls was partially reconstructed and the station generally overhauled. All 
power-plant equipment is maintained in excellent condition and the stations are furnishing a 
large quantity of electric power with little or no interruption in this important service. 

Refineries 

Port Colhorne Refinery. — Six electrolytic circuits were in continuous operation during the 
year and a seventh was in use from April to August, inclusive. The total output of nickel, 
inclusive of nickel in oxide, was 70,974,850 pounds. Particular attention has been paid to plant 
research, which has resulted in numerous efficiencies in process operations. The resulting 
savings, together with improvements in handling materials, have enabled your management 
to show satisfactory costs. There has been little change in labour conditions at this refinery. 
Increased output and a steady rate of operations have resulted in the maintenance of a fairly 
constant number of employees. 

Ontario Refining Company, Limited. — As a result of increased nickel production there was 
a corresponding increase in the tonnage of blister copper received from the Copper Cliff smelter, 
which rose from approximately 6,500 tons per month at the beginning of the year to 9,000 tons 
per month during the last quarter. Refined copper production amounted to 95,558 tons, com- 
pared with 58,098 tons in 1933. Shipments from the refinery were 97,292 tons in 1934. com- 
pared with 53,678 tons in 1933. 

Selenium and tellurium are now regularly produced as by-products in addition to by-product 
gold, silver, and platinum metals. A plant for refining tellurium was constructed during the 
year and was started in October, 1934. Plant research throughout the refinery has resulted 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 161 

not only in operating economies but has further improved the quality of your ORC brand of 
refined copper. 

Your company's stock interest in the Ontario Refining Company, Limited, was increased 
from 67.79 per cent, to 90 per cent, during the year and may be further increased, as referred 
to in the annual report for 1931, upon termination of the copper purchase contract therein men- 
tioned. In the event that all of the remaining outstanding stock is purchased in 1935 a cash 
expenditure of approximately $1,100,000 is indicated. 

Ore Reserves 

Proven ore reserves on December 31, 1934, were 204,399,463 tons. In the ordinary course 
of mining operations 2,720,779 tons were added to reserves. 

Outlook 

A programme of mine development and plant construction and rehabilitation, begun in 
1926 and concluded in 1929. entailed expenditures in excess of $50,000,000. Coincident with 
the completion of this extensive work the current world trade collapse started and has lasted 
with varying severity since that time. 

It is, however, gratifying to report that your company's business apparently turned the 
corner of depression during the spring of 1932 and since then has improved gradually to such 
an extent that the net profits in 1934 are, with one exception, the greatest in your company's 
history. Furthermore, it should be noted that 1934 was the first period in which your modernized 
plants were operated at a rate of capacity sufficient to demonstrate the economies which the 
large capital expenditures have made possible. 

The year closed with all of your properties in first-class condition and with your sales and 
technical departments thoroughly organized and staffed to manage efficiently a growing business. 
Hence, barring major disturbances, 1935 should continue to show improvement in quality of 
output, lower costs of production, and from present indications increasing sales of your company's 
diversified products. 

Employees 

The total number of employees at the year-end was 9,154, distributed as follows: Canada 
5,474, Great Britain 2,507, United States 1,122, other countries 51. Employees on December 
31, 1933, numbered 8,297. The increase, amounting to 10 per cent., is due to the increased 
scale of operations. 

It is gratifying to report that there was a further decline in the accident rate in the mining 
division, the number of compensation accidents per 1,000 shifts worked in 1934 being 0.206, 
compared with 0.259 in 1933. 

During 1934 an average of 1,663 men was employed at Copper Cliff, 426 
at Coniston, 1,529 at Frood, and 752 at Creighton. Of these, an average of 
1,208 men was employed underground at Frood, and 514 at Creighton. 

Donald MacAskill is general manager; R. D. Parker, general superintendent; 
H. J. ]Mutz, superintendent of mines; vS. J. Kidder, superintendent of the 
Creighton mine; F. J. Eager, superintendent of the Frood mine. 



RADIUM 
Canada Radium Mines, Limited 

Canada Radium Mines, Limited, has a capitalization of 2,500,000 shares of 
SI par value, of which 1,400,000 shares have been issued. The property consists 
of 750 acres in Cardiff township, Haliburton county. The officers and directors 
are: K. W. Wright, president; Geo. F. McCandless, vice-president; A. M. 
Barry, secretary- treasurer; Frank Austin, managing director; E. W. Austin, 
superintendent; Geo. A. Arthur and John G. Cole, directors. H. L. McClelland 
is consulting engineer. The head office is at 244 Bay Street, Toronto. The 
mine address is Cheddar. 

The shaft has been sunk to a depth of 375 feet, with levels at 125, 250, and 
365 feet. Approximately 700 feet of lateral work has been completed. 

About 15 men are employed at the mine. 



162 Department of Mines No. 4 

SILVER AND COBALT 
Cain and Taylor 

The Beaver mine in Coleman township, district of Timiskaming, was 
operated from January 2 to June 9, 1934, by the owners, C. E. Cain and W. D. 
Taylor. 

From 35 tons of ore hoisted and shipped, there were recovered 58,620 fine 
ounces of silver, having a value of $24,598. An average of 12 men was employed. 

Cobalt Properties, Limited 

Cobalt Properties, Limited, is capitalized at $25,000, in shares of SI par 
value. The officers are: Ambrose Murphy, president; Arthur Brocklebank, 
managing director; T. Wainwright, vice-president; H. E. Tomney, secretary- 
treasurer; Agnes Reid, director. The head office is at Cobalt. 

The company owns the following properties in the township of Coleman, 
district of Timiskaming: Coniagas, Mining Corporation, Right of Way, 
McKinley-Darragh-Savage, and Cobalt Townsite. 

During 1934, shipments of 102 tons of ore, containing 221,345 ounces of 
silver, w^ere made. About 50 men were employed during the year. 

George Martin 

George Martin of Cobalt operated the Crown Reserve mine in Coleman 
township, district of Timiskaming, under lease during part of 1934, employing 
8 men. 

Shipments of 7,568 pounds of silver-cobalt ore and 1,124 ounces of bullion 
were made. 

Mining Corporation of Canada, Limited 

The properties of the ^Mining Corporation of Canada, Limited, in Coleman 
township, district of Timiskaming, were leased from January 1 to September 
12. The operation bv the lessees yielded 49,789 ounces of silver, valued at 
$24,615. 

The mines were sold to Cobalt Properties, Limited, in September. 

Nipissing Mining Company, Limited 

Nipissing Mines Company, Limited, has a capital of 1,200,000 shares of 
$5 par value. The directors of the company are : E. P. Earle, president and 
treasurer; Alexander Fasken, vice-president and secretary; Richard T. Greene, 
Dr. F. R. Bennetto, C. W. Nichols, Halstead Lindsley, and Hugh Park, directors. 
The head office is at the Excelsior Life Building, Toronto, and the New York 
office is at 165 Broadway. 

The operating company is the Nipissing Alining Company, Limited, with 
a capital of 2,500 shares of $100 par value. The officers and directors of the 
company are: Alexander Fasken, president and secretary; E. P. Earle, vice- 
president and treasurer; Richard T. Greene, C. W. Nichols, Dr. F. R. 
Bennetto, Halstead Lindsley, and Hugh Park, directors. Hugh Park is general 
manager. 

The mine in Coleman township, district of Timiskaming, was reopened in 
July, 1934. and operated until the end of the year, with an average force of 21 
men. 



1935 



Mines of Ontario in 1934 



163 



The following is an extract from the report of the general manager for the 
fiscal year ending December 31, 1934: — 

Operations at the Cobalt property were more extensive than in 1933. There was marked 
improvement in the price of silver and in the market demand for ores and residues containing 
cobalt and other minerals. This condition permitted the reopening of one of the shafts, to 
extract several hundred tons of cobalt ore. Shipments of residue amounted to 600 tons, as con- 
trasted with no sales in 1933. 

The clean-up of the fire area at the low-grade mill produced 575 tons of medium-grade silver 
ore, which was shipped direct to smelters. It is probable that some further tonnage from this 
source will be procured. Leasers working in various sections of the property obtained fair results, 
in which the company shared to a substantial extent. 

The following shipments were made during the year: — 





Tons 


Ounces silver 


Bullion 


21.56 
573.37 
131.19 
605.81 
360.40 


628,608.30 

103,267.32 

161,971.27 

43,335.63 


Clean-up 


Leasers' ore 


Residue 


Cobalt ore 






Total 


1,692.33 


937,182.52 





The approximate value of shipments was $425,000. 

There was a gratifying material increase in the price of silver, the year starting at 44 J^ 
cents and ending at 54^4 cents, the average for 1934 being 47.973 cents, an increase of 131:4 cents, 
or 38 per cent, over 1933. There have been further increases since 1934, present quotations 
being around 75 cents. The following table shows the fluctuations in the price of silver during 
the 5 preceding years:— 





Average 


High 


Low 


Spread 


1934 


cents 
47.973 
34.727 
27.892 
28.701 
38. 154 


cents 
55.75 
45 
31 

37.25 
46.875 


cents 

41.75 

24.5 

24.25 

25.75 

30.75 


cents 
14 


1933 

1932 

1931 

1930 


20.5 
6.75 
11.5 
16.13 



It is doubtful whether any considerable amount of silver remains in the old workings which 
would be profitable for the company to extract at present or even higher prices. If silver continues 
at about the present level there may be some inducement to carry on further exploration work in 
the search for new veins, though such exploration work could not be expected to be as profitable 
as the portions already explored and from which the major part of past production was 
derived. 

M. J. O'Brien, Limited 

Cross Lake Mine 

The Cross Lake mine in Coleman township, district of Timiskaming, is 
owned and operated by M. J. O'Brien, Limited. J. G. Dickenson is general 
manager, and W. A. O'Flynn is manager. About 103 men are employed. The 
mine address is Cobalt. 

The following development work was done in 1934: drifting and cross- 
cutting, 4,257 feet; raising, 637 feet; sinking, 11 feet. 

The following table shows the ore hoisted and milled in 1934 : — 

Tons 

Total tons broken 43,316 

Ore hoisted 22,794 

Waste hoisted 14,790 

Ore milled 30,755 

Custom ore milled 301 



164 Department of Mines No. 4 

The silver recovered amounted to 1,088,993 ounces, of which 26,086 ounces 
was from custom ore. There were shipped: — 

Cobalt lbs. 54,873 

Copper lbs. 24,745 

Lead lbs. 7,789 

Gold ounces 4. 531 

Miller Lake O'Brien Mine 

The Miller Lake O'Brien mine, Nicol township, district of Timiskaming, 
is owned and operated by M. J. O'Brien, Limited. J. G. Dickenson is general 
manager and H. G. Kennedy is manager. The mine address is O'Brien. The 
average number of men employed was 83. 

The 1934 report is as follows: — 

Feet 

Drifting 2,734 

Crosscutting 386 

Raising 126 

Sinking 41 

Tons 

Ore stoped 10,246 

Ore and waste broken 21,484 

Ore hoisted 21,680 

Waste hoisted 6,514 

Peterson Cobalt Mines, Limited 

The property of Peterson Cobalt Mines, Limited, in Coleman township, 
district of Timiskaming, was not operated in 1933, but a short lease was given to 
Frank Barnet. Ore picked from the dump yielded S165.52 in silver. 

C. W. Price 

The Foster mine in Coleman township, district of Timiskaming, was 
operated under lease by C. W. Price, who employed 2 men. Shipments of ore 
and concentrates yielded 6,037 ounces of silver, having a value of S3. 088. 59. 

Sandoe and Moyle 

The Temiskaming mine in Coleman township, district of Timiskaming, was 
leased to Richard Sandoe and H. Moyle. 

Some 9 tons of ore shipped to the Temiskaming Testing Laboratories for 
treatment yielded 25,488 ounces of silver. 

Smith Cobalt Mines, Limited 

The property of Smith Cobalt Mines, Limited, is in Coleman township, 
district of Timiskaming, east of Cross lake. A shaft had been sunk by the 
Mining Corporation to a depth of 410 feet, and 1,100 feet of lateral work had 
been done. 

The new company started dewatering the workings in May, 1934, and to 
the end of the year the following work was done: drifting, 60 feet; raising, 25 
feet; and winze-sinking, 66 feet. Operations ceased on December 31, 1934. An 
average of 13 men was employed. 

The officers are: W. H. vSmith, president; A. A. Amos, vice-president; Col. 
E- F. Armstrong, vice-president; A. Kelso Roberts, secretary-treasurer. The 
company is capitalized at 4,000,000 shares of SI par value, of which 2,100,000 
are issued. The executive office is at 320 Bav Street, Toronto. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 165 

A. Wood 

The Dominion Reduction property in Coleman township, district of 
Timiskaming, was leased to A. Wood, Cobalt, in 1934. 

Ore shipped to Deloro, Xoranda, and the O'Brien mill at Cobalt, yielded 
11,490 ounces of silver. 

TALC 

Canada Talc Company, Limited 

The mine and mill of the Canada Talc Company, Limited, in Hastings 
county, were operated throughout the year. The officers and directors of the 
company are: W. S. Morden, president; Roy Taylor, secretary; E. S. James, 
director. 

The ore was mined from the 3rd and 8th levels. A total of 7,237 tons was 
hoisted, and 7,337 tons were milled. On the 4th level, 450 feet of drifting was 
done to open up new veins. 

Roy Taylor, Madoc, is manager, employing an average of 17 men in the 
mine and 11 in the mill. 

Geo. H. Gillespie Company, Limited 

The officers and directors of the Geo. H. Gillespie Company, Limited, are: 
Geo. H. Gillespie, president; M. H. Ludwig, secretary-treasurer; Alexander 
Longwell, director. 

The Henderson mine in Huntingdon township, Hastings county, was 
operated throughout the year. vSome 6,667 tons of ore were hoisted and treated 
at the Gillespie mill. 

Geo. H. Gillespie, Madoc, is manager. Eight men were employed at the 
mine and 10 at the mill. 

METALLURGICAL WORKS 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Limited 

During 1934 only one blast furnace of this corporation, located at Sault 
Ste. Marie, was operated. Xo. 4 furnace was in blast from January 1 to June 15, 
and from October 16 to November 23. It produced a total of 68,904 tons of 
iron. 

Jas. H. Bell was blast furnace superintendent. 

Canadian Furnace Company, Limited 

The Canadian Furnace Company, Limited, at Port Colborne, operated 
the furnace from July to December, 1934. 

The production for the year was as follows : — 

Gross tons 

Pig iron .\ 38,980 

Spiegeleisen 6,541 

Total 45,521 

The officers of the company are: Frank B. Baird, Buffalo, N.Y., president; 
Richard C. Yates, Port Colborne, vice-president and manager; Frederick C. 
Slee, Buffalo, N.Y., secretary. W. J. Higgins, Port Colborne, is superintendent. 



166 Department of Mines No. 4 

Canadian Industries, Limited 

During 1934, the sulphuric acid plant, located at Copper ClifT, was in 
continuous operation. 

There are three 50-ton-per-day units, which manufacture acid from the 
converter gases produced at the smelter of the International Nickel Company. 
All three units were in operation throughout the year. The nitre cake plant, 
which has an estimated capacity of 72,000 tons per annum, was operated at 
about 60 per cent, of capacity. In this plant sodium sulphate is treated with 
sulphuric acid to produce nitre cake, which is used in the Orford process of 
separating nickel from copper. 

An average of 52 men was employed. G. G. Vincent was succeeded by 
H. Jordan as works manager. 

Deloro Smelting and Refining Company, Limited 

The plant at Deloro operated throughout the year. The silver output for 
the vear amounted to approximately 2,728,300 ounces. 

The officers of the company are: M. J. O'Brien, chairman of the board; 
J. A. O'Brien, president; vS. F. Kirkpatrick, vice-president and managing 
director; F. A. Baptv, secretary-treasurer. vS. B. Wright is general manager, 
and R. A. Elliott is superintendent. 

International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited 

The refmerv at Port Colborne was operated continuously throughout the 
year. An account of the operations appears on page 160 of this report. 

Ontario Refining Company, Limited 

The copper refinery of this company, situated at Copper Cliff, was operated 
continuouslv during 1934. Operations were gradually increased from about 55 
per cent, of the rated capacity of the plant, as at the end of 1933, to about 85 per 
cent, at the end of 1934. 

A wide variety of electrolytic copper shapes was produced, with an 
increasing volume of end-poured cakes, bars, and billets, made by the patented 
process of which this company is the only licensee in Canada. By-product 
departments were expanded, and a tellurium recovery plant was completed and 
put in operation in October. Gold, silver, platinum metals, selenium, and 
tellurium are now regularly produced as by-products. 

The refinery operated chiefly on blister copper from the Copper Cliff" smelter 
of the International Nickel Company, although gold ores and gold-bearing slags 
and mattes were also treated. 

The distribution of products extended to most European countries, with the 
largest volume going to the United Kingdom. No copper has been shipped to 
the United States since a 4-cent-per-pound tariff was placed on foreign copper in 
June, 1932. 

An average of 462 men was employed, in comparison with 236 men during 
1933. F. Benard was plant manager. 

Steel Company of Canada, Limited 

The Steel Company of Canada, Limited, operated "A" furnace for 44 days, 
with a production of 12,679 gross tons of pig iron, and "B" furnace for 278 days, 
with a production of 151,072 gross tons. 



1935 Mines of Ontario in 1934 167 

The average number of men employed was 85. R. A. Gillies is blast furnace 
superintendent. 

The officers of the company are: Charles S. Wilcox, chairman of the board; 
R. H. McMaster, president; H. M. Jaquays and H. T. Diplock, vice-presidents; 
H. H. Champ, vice-president and treasurer; H. S. Alexander, secretary; S. E. 
Le Brocq, comptroller. 



MINING ACCIDENTS IN 1934 

Chief Inspector of Mines, D. G. Sinclair, Toronto; Inspectors, R. H. Cleland, Timmins; 
D. F. Cooper, Sudbury; E. C. Keeley, Kirkland Lake; A. R. Webster, Toronto 



Accidents during 1934 

During the year 1934 at the mines, metallurgical works, quarries, and 
clay, sand, and gravel pits regulated by Tlie Mining Aci, there were 1,945 acci- 
dents to employees reported to the Department of Mines up to January 16, 
1935. Thirty-three fatalities arising out of 32 separate accidents were reported. 

These returns represent an increase of 407 in the total number of accidents, 
and an increase of 8 in the number of fatalities recorded. 

The report shows a fatality rate of 1.61 per thousand men employed, which 
is 1.14 per thousand lower than the average for the past twenty-five years. 

There were 93 non-fatal accidents per thousand men employed, which is a 
decrease of 2 per thousand from the rate of 1933. 

The percentage of non-fatal accidents followed by infection decreased from 
7.3 in 1933 to 7.1 in 1934. 

Fatal Accidents 

A comparison of fatal accidents for the past five years is given in the 
following table : — 



Distribution 



1930 



1931 



Mines, underground 

Mines, surface 

Metallurgical works 

Quarries 

Clay, sand, and gravel pits. 



30 
3 

11 
4 
6 



21 
8 
1 
2 
4 



1932 



17 

1 
1 
4 



1933 



20 
1 
1 


9 



1934 



22 
2 

5 
1 
2 



Total . 



54 



36 



23 



24 



32 



Bv months the fatal accidents occurred as follows: 



Month 



No. 


No. 


accidents 


men killed 


3 


4 


4 


4 


1 


1 








3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


7 


7 


2 


2 



January. . 
February . . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September . 
October . . . 
November . 
December. 



Total. 



32 



33 



Classifying the fatalities according to industries gives the following: 

Gold mines 18 

Nickel mines 7 

Silver mines 

Talc mines 

Metallurgical works 5 

Quarries 1 

Sand, gravel, and clay pits 2 

Total 33 



[168] 



1935 



Mining Accidents in 1934 



169 



ANALYSIS OF FATALITIES AT MINES, 1930-1934 



Cause 



Fall of ground 

Run of ore or rock 

Shaft accidents 

Explosives 

Miscellaneous, underground 
Surface 



1930 



per cent, 
45.6 
8.6 
8.6 
8.6 
20 
8.6 



1931 



per cent. 
31 

3.5 
17.2 

6.9 
13.8 
27.6 



1932 



per cent. 
21 
5.3 
15.8 
31.6 
26.3 



1933 



per cent. 
23 

9 

9 

9 
45 

5 



1934 



per cent. 
24 



20 
32 

8 



TABLE OF FATAL ACCIDENTS IN MINES, METALLURGICAL WORKS, QUARRIES, 
AND GRAVEL, SAND, AND CLAY PITS, 1910-1934 



Year 


Persons 

killed at 

metallurgical 

works and 

mines 


Persons 

employed at 

metallurgical 

works and 

producing 

mines 


Persons 

employed at 

non-producing 

mines 

(estimated) 


Total 

persons 

employed 


Fatal 
accidents 
per 1,000 
employed 


1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 


48 
49 
43 
64 
58 
22 
51 
36 
32 
39 
29 
24 
30 
30 
40 
42 
32 
33 
85 
55 
56 
37 
25 
25 
33 


10,862 
12,543 
13,108 
14,293 
14,361 
13,114 
14,624 
16,791 
14,726 
11,926 
10,486 
8,436 
9,500 
10,500 
11,000 
11,500 
11,500 
13,311 
15,787 
17.145 
18,217 
17,820 
14,378 
15,080 
19,302 


2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
1,849 
317 
447 
431 
804 
1,254 


12,862 
14,543 
15,108 
16,293 
15,861 
14,614 
16,624 
17,791 
15,226 
12,926 
11,486 
9,436 
11,000 
12,000 
12,500 
13,000 
13,000 
15,311 
17,787 
18,994 
18,534 
18,267 
14,809 
15,884 
20,556 


3.73 

3.37 

2.84 

3.93 

3.6 

1.51 

3.07 

2.02 

2.1 

3 


1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 


2.61 

2.54 

2.72 

2.5 

3.2 

3.23 

2.46 

2.1 

4.76 

2.89 

3.02 

2.03 

1.69 

1.57 

1.61 



The comparative fatality rate per thousand men employed at mines, metal- 
lurgical works, quarries, and clay, sand, and gravel pits is as follows: — 



Men 
employed 



No. 
killed 



Rate per 
thousand 



Mines 

Metallurgical works 

Quarries 

Clay, sand, and gravel pits 

Total 



14,755 

3,892 

1,096 

813 



20,556 



33 



1.69 

1.28 

.91 

2.46 



1.61 



The occupation and nationality of the men killed at mines, metallurgical 
works, and clay, sand, and gravel pits are set out in the following table: — 



170 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Occupation 


< 


J3 

pa 


c 


.2 

5 
X 


c 
.2 

1— 1 


> 


.3 

3 

'►4 


c 

.2 
'be 

1 
o 




rt 

1 


Block-holer 












1 








1 
1 
1 


Cage-tender 




1 














Chiite-blaster 








1 










Driller 


1 


1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 




i 

2 








4 


Drill helper 












5 


Engine operator 














1 


Labourer 




1 








1 


1 




7 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
n 


Pipefitter 










Rigger's helper 






















1 
1 














Shaft inspector 
















Shift boss 




1 
1 
1 

2 














Shop helper 


















Switchman 


















Trammer 






2 










1 
















Total 


1 


17 


5 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1 33 



The ages of the men killed are as follows :- 



17-20 


21-25 


26-30 


31-35 


36-40 41-45 46-50 


Over 50 


Total 


3 ! 6 


4 


13 


3 


2 1 


1 


33 



Non-fatal Accidents 

The causes of non-fatal accidents at mines are shown in the following 



table : 



Cause 




Under- 
ground 



Total 



Fall of persons 

Falling objects 

Tramming 

Hand tools 

Flying objects, sledging, etc 

Rock or ore at chute 

Fall of rock or ore. scaling, drilling, etc. 

Fall of rock or ore at face 

Crushed between tw- o objects 

Handling rock or ore 

Nails or splinters 

Strain while lifting 

Running into or striking objects 

Drilling machines 

Machinery 

Explosives 

Fall down shaft, winze, or stope 

Burns 

Cage, skip, or bucket 

Air or rock blast 

Poisoning from cyanide 

Electricity 

Explosion from carbide 

Gas 

Unclassified 



26 



21 
14 

7 



37 
3 



16 



Total . 



7 
4 
1 
1 
11 

400 



143 

147 

121 

50 

99 

115 

109 

108 

64 

72 

37 

40 

45 

44 

7 

27 

25 

4 

17 

11 



1,285 



245 

200 

125 

125 

117 

115 

109 

108 

90 

72 

58 

54 

52 

44 

44 

30 

25 

20 

17 

11 

7 

4 

1 

1 

11 

1,685 



1935 



Mining Accidents in 1934 



171 



The causes of non-fatal accidents at metallurgical works were 
P' ailing objects 



Fall of persons 

Burned by slag, matte, or scrap. 
Crushed between two objects. . . 

Cranes, ladles, hooks 

Burns 

Machinery 

Flying objects, sledging, etc 

Transportation 



23 

19 

18 

10 

7 

5 

4 

3 

3 



Hand tools 

Strain while lifting 

Gas 

Nails of splinters 

Burns by acid 

Running into or striking objects . 



Total 108 



The causes of non-fatal accidents at quarries were: 



Handhng material 

Flying objects, sledging, etc. . 

Fall (if persons 

Falling objects 

Hand tools 

Machinery 

Transportation 

Derricks, cranes, etc 

Crushed between two objects. 



22 
12 
11 

8 
7 
6 
6 
4 



Explosives 

Fall of rock 

Running into or striking objects . 

Strain while lifting 

Nails or splinters 

Unclassified 



Total. 



The causes of non-fatal accidents at clay, sand, and gravel pits were: — 



Fall of persons 

Falling objects 

Fall of material 

Crushed between two objects. 

Machinery 

Hand tools 



Transportation. . . 
Strain while lifting . 
Unclassified 



Total. 



4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 

98 



22 



Infection 

Records show that infection followed in 136 cases out of a total of 1,913 
accidents: — 



Location 



Alines, underground 

Mines, surface 

Metallurgical works 

Quarries 

Clay, sand, and gravel pits 

Total 



No. of 
accidents 



1,285 

400 

108 

98 

22 



1,913 



Accidents 

followed by 

infection 



92 

36 

3 

5 



136 



Per cent, 
infection 



7.1 
9 

2.8 
5.1 



7.1 



Accidents from Explosives 





Non-fatal 


Fatal 


Total 


Cause 


No. of 
acci- 
dents 


Men 
injured 


No. of 
acci- 
dents 


Men 
killed 


No. of 
acci- 
dents 


Men 
killed or 
injured 


Returned too soon to blast 






2 
2 
1 


3 

2 

1 


2 
5 
1 
4 

1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
6 


3 


Delayed too long blasting 


3 


5 


7 


Unexplained blast 


1 


Drilled into explosive 


4 

1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
6 


9 
1 
1 
5 
4 
2 
6 


9 


Concussion from blast 






1 


Cap exploded while crimping 

Walked into blast 






1 






5 


Premature blast 






4 


Explosion while tamping 






2 


Struck by rock from blast 






6 












Total 23 1 33 


5 


6 


28 


39 



172 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



Electric Accidents 

The following table shows the fatal accidents due to the use of electricity 
at mines, metallurgical works, and quarries during the last ten years :^ — 



1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 1 Total 


3 




2 


1 




6 








1 12 






: 1 1 


The following table shows the total number of non-fatal electric accidents 
during the last ten years: — 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 I Total 


6 


5 


10 


4 


14 


10 


7 


3 


4 


4 1 67 



Mine Fires 

Goodfish Mining Company, Limited 

A gas explosion and tire occurred underground in the No. 3 shaft workings 
of the Goodfish Mining Company, Limited, about 3.40 p.m., on August 27. 

No work had been done at this shaft from 1923 until the summer of 1934, 
and the workings had remained filled with water during that time. The prin- 
cipal work done at this location had consisted of sinking an inclined shaft on 
the vein, dipping from 'do to 90 degrees, to the 200-foot level, where some drift- 
ing had been done to the east and west and two crosscuts run to the north. 
From a crosscut directly north of the shaft a vertical winze had been sunk 
to the 350-foot level, and a small amount of drifting and crosscutting had been 
done at this horizon. 

'During 1934 work was again undertaken, with a view to exploring this 
property further. At the time of the accident the water had been pumped 
down to the 200-foot level and a small amount of driving had been done there. 
An attempt was being made to dewater the vertical winze below the 200-foot 
level, and an air lift had been rigged for this purpose. The air jet in this lift 
had apparently become blocked, and the three men underground were attempc- 
ing to overcome this difficulty when the outbreak of gas was encountered. 
One man, Hugh Armstrong, was standing on the first landing below the 200-foot 
level in the winze, and his two fellow workmen were at the collar of the winze 
when the rush of gas occurred. All the men were carrying carbide lamps, 
and immediate ignition of the gas took place. The men were all thrown about 
and lost their hats and lamps in the explosion, but were able to reach the foot 
of the main shaft and climb to surface. Armstrong was the most extensively 
injured, his face and hands being quite severely burned. 

The fire evidently burned itself out quickly, and no ignition of the winze 
timbers occurred. Work was held up at the property until the following day, 
when an examination of the workings was made by a crew equipped with gas 
masks, safety lamps, and canaries. During this inspection all air lines in the 
mine were opened, and on the return of the exploration party to surface the 
compressor was started and the workings were thoroughly blown out. On the 
resumpcion of operations on the morning of August 29 a further rush of gas was 
encountered, but as no open lights were in use, no further ignition of the gas 
occurred. 



1935 M ining Accidents in 1934 173 

Hollinger Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited 

An overheated, wood-lined brake shoe on a haulage locomotive operating 
on the 1,850-foot level at the Hollinger mine, on the morning of February 7, was 
the cause of the calling out of the rescue equipment and rescue teams. 

By the time the teams and equipment were assembled at No. 11 shaft 
the source of the trouble had been located and it was found unnecessary to 
bring them into operation. 

Smoke from the heated brake shoe spread over the level for about 600 feet. 

Spontaneous Combustion in Carbide Refuse 

A fire occurred in the shaft-house of the Paymaster Consolidated Mines, 
Limited, on the afternoon of February 10, due, apparently, to the spontaneous 
combustion of acetylene generated in the spent carbide container into which 
the miners had been accustomed to dump the refuse from their lamps on coming 
to surface. A great deal of difficulty was experienced in extinguishing the 
flames, as neither pyrene, water, nor sand seemed to have any effect, and it was 
only after calling out the fire brigade from South Porcupine that success was 
attained through the use of "foamite." 

In seeking an explanation of the cause of the fire the Shawinigan Chemicals, 
Limited, manufacturers of carbide, were consulted and replied as follows: — 

The fire at the Paymaster mine is the first of this nature which has come to our notice, 
although from experience at the carbide works, we can readily understand the cause. 

The formation of acetylene by slacking carbide with water liberates a great deal of heat. 
When carbide lumps are used the reaction is comparatively slow and the heat escapes, but when 
water comes in contact with very fine particles of carbide, the reaction is almost instantaneous, 
and if there is a quantity of slacked lime or carbide present, this serves to hold the heat and a 
temperature well above the ignition point of acetylene is easily reached. The safe handling 
of siftings from commercial sizes constitutes one of the difficulties of carbide manufacture, and 
fires are prevented by keeping the siftings or fines at a safe distance from water. 

The process of screening partially used carbide naturally permits small particles of carbide 
to pass with the lime, and from your description of the circumstances, we are sure that the water 
dripping on this carbide eventually produced enough heat to ignite the acetylene. 

The operation of screening damp, partially used carbide will also produce some acetylene, 
but as this will not ignite unless present in air to a greater extent than 3 per cent., it is generally 
safe unless water is actually present. We believe, then, that if the screenings are kept dry there 
is no danger of spontaneous combustion. The amount of phosphorus compounds in carbide is 
not sufficient to cause any trouble. 

From the above it will be seen that it is possible for a very nasty situation 
to arise in the ordinary treatment of such waste material about a mine, and 
it is recommended that procedure along the following lines be followed to avert 
a recurrence of such a situation: — 

Underground 

1. Miners should scatter waste carbide in the rock pile when recharging 
their lamps; it will slowly slack there and cause no dangerous condition. 

2. Waste carbide should not be dumped into old powder boxes, etc., at 
eating places or stations unless these are especially provided for the purpose and 
are located in dry places away from other inflammable materials and are 
regularly taken to surface for disposal. 

3. Waste carbide should not be transported in any shaft or on any train or 
truck unless covered by some waterproof material. 

4. Waste carbide should not be transported in any shaft with open-flame 
lamps. 



174 Department of Mines No. 4 

Surface 

Waste carbide brought to the surface in miners' lamps should be dumped 
into a suitable, hooded metal container, preferably located away from the shaft- 
head, and this container should be emptied at frequent, regular intervals. 

Prosecutions 

A charge was laid against John Campbell, manager of the ]Martin Bird 
Syndicate, for operating contrary to Subsection 27, Section 163, oi The Mining 
Act, in that a gasoline pump was operated in a shaft at that property. 

A plea of "guilty" was entered before Magistrate Atkinson at Kirkland 
Lake on June 14, and a fine of 8100 and costs was imposed. 

A charge was laid against the vSwayze Huycke Gold Mines, Limited, for 
operating contrary to Subsection 110, Section 163, of The Mining Act in that 
sinking operations were conducted at that property with a hoist equipped with 
a foot brake. 

A plea of "guilty" was entered by the company, and the case was disposed 
of without court proceedings. A fine of slOO was imposed. 

Summary of Rope Tests, 1934 

The following is a summary of the tests made in the Wire Rope Testing 
Laboratories of the Department of Mines during 1934: — 

Tests for Ontario mines under Act 326 

Special informative tests for mines 6 

Tests for wire-rope manufacturers 15 

Tests for other manufacturers 6 

Tests for mines out'^ide Ontario 7 

Other tests 7 

Total 367 



CLASSES FOR PROSPECTORS, 1934-35 

By E. M. Burwash 



General Summary 

Prospectors' classes were held as usual during the winter 1934-35, except 
that the number of places visited for this purpose was reduced to 10, as com- 
pared with a maximum of 15 in recent years. To effect this, several places of 
some importance in former years had to be omitted, especially Fort Frances, 
vSioux Lookout, Sudbury, and Porcupine. The attendance secured was uni- 
formly good, especially at two places which had not been recently visited. 
Marmora, visited for the first time, supplied a class of 70, and Kapuskasing, 
last visited seven years ago, had a class of 163. At Port Arthur and Fort 
William also, the revival of interest and activity in mining matters, due to the 
recent discoveries and excitement in the Little Long Lac and Sturgeon River 
areas, resulted in a registration of 78 at Port Arthur and 152 at Fort William. 
Other places that have been visited regularly for the last few vears show a 
decline in attendance, which may be attributed to two causes: (1) Most of 
the men locally resident have already had the course, in many cases more than 
once; and (2) more men are at work in the woods than of recent years. This 
statement applies to Sault Ste. Marie, Kenora, Haileybury, Kirkland Lake, and 
Toronto. At Ottawa, on the other hand, where classes have been regularly 
held for the preceding seven years, a steady increase in attendance was con- 
tinued this year, with an enrollment of 56, compared with 44 last year. 

Analysis of Class Attendance 

The following table gives detailed information as to the work of the classes 
for prospectors in the various localities in which they were held. 

TABLE OF ATTENDANCE, 1934-1935 



Place 


Dates 


Mineralogy' 


Geology- 


Total 


Regis- 
tration 


Average 
attendance 


Total 
attendance 


Average 
attendance 


student 
periods 


Ottawa 

Marmora 

Sault Ste. Marie.. 

Toronto 

Port Arthur 

Fort William 

Kenora 

Haileybury 

Kirkland Lake. . . 
Kapuskasing 


1934 

Nov. 22-30 

Dec. 3-11 

Dec. 13-21 

1935 

Jan. 3-11 

Jan. 14-22 

Jan. 24-Feb. 1. 

Feb. 4-12 

Feb. 14-22 

Feb. 25-Mar. 5. 
Mar. 7-15 


56 
70 
53 

355 

78 
152 
28 
54 
75 
163 


42 

39.63 

31.375 

247 

59.5 
111.75 

11.5 

32.125 

40.375 
115.75 


213 

306 

96 

1,085 
193 
319 
47 
96 
233 
{') 


42.6 
61.2 
19.2 

217 
38.6 
68.8 
11.75 
19.2 
58.125 


549 
623 
347 

3,061 
659 

1,213 
139 
353 
556 
926 








Total 




1,984 


60.35 


2,289 




7,816 









'Eight afternoons. 
-Five evenings. 
'Omitted. 



INDEX, PART I 

Note. — All places referred to are in Ontario, unless otherwise designated. 



A PAGE 

Abitibi Mines, Ltd 147 

Abrasive Co. of Canada, Ltd 27 

Accidents, mining, rept. on 168-174 

Ace Exploration and Holding Co. Ltd. 44 

Acetate of lime, lime for 39 

Acetvlene. See Carbide refuse. 

Acid'plants 58, 60, 166 

Ackerman, C. H 10.5 

Acme Gold Mines, Ltd., dividends. . . .15, 16 

Acreage tax, revenue 48 

Acres, A. H 139 

Actinolite. 

Mine, manager and address 59 

Statistics 2,3 

Actinolite, Ont , actinolite 59 

Acton, England. 

Platinum metals refinery 159 

Adams, Chas 132 

Adams, L. W 55, 95 

Adams, O. H 141 

Adams, Robt. F 63 

Addington co. See Centreville. 

A. E. Jupp Construction Co 66 

Africa. See Transvaal. 
Afton gold m. 

Operations 85 

Optioned to Consolidated Mg. and 

vSmelting Co 55, 85 

Afton tp. 

Gold Mg. See Afton gold m. 

Agnew, George B 130 

Agnew, W.N 86 

Agriculture, lime consumption 39 

Aikens, W. J 82 

Aird, H. R 99 

Akehurst, J. F. R 55, 88, 94 

Albastine plant, Paris 155 

Aladdin Cobalt Co., Ltd., dividends. . . 22 

Alcanada Mining Corpn., Ltd 43 

Alexander, H. vS 167 

Alexander, J. A 50 

Algold Alines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 67, 68 

Incorporated 43 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 54 

Algoma district. 

See also Deroche tp. ; Sault Ste. Marie. 
Gold mg. See Gold Lands Synd.; 
Goudreau g. area; Michael-Boyle 
g. m.; Michipicoten g. area; Sin- 
clair Mines Synd. 

Mining lands, sales and leases 48 

Algoma Steel Corpn., Ltd. 

M3diager and address 58 

Incorporated 43, 44 

Operations 27, 28, 165 

Silica brick quarry 61 



p.'^r.E 

Algoma Summit Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 68 

Incorporated 44 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 54 

Production 11 

Alkali, lime for 39 

Allan, J. C 78 

Allen, Innis P 89 

Allen, J. B 98 

Allen, W. E 60, 155 

Allied Gold Mines, Ltd 127 

Alsbach, Clarence 54, 68 

Alsbach Gold Mining Co., Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 68 

Alanager and address 54 

Amalgamated Gold Fields Corpn., Ltd. 
See also Blue Quartz g. m. 

Capital; officers 68, 69 

Production 10, 13 

Amalgamated Mills and Mines, Ltd 43 

American Cyanamid Co 62, 63 

Ames, G. C 71 

Amherstburg, salt 62 

Amity Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Ammonia; ammonium sulphate 29 

Amos, A. A 164 

Ampleford, D. A 114 

Ampleford, L 65 

Ancaster, limestone quarry 64 

Ancaster tp. See Hamilton. 
Anderdon tp. 

Lime quarry ; limestone 63 

Anderson, A.J 54 

Anderson, C. F 64 

Anderson, C. W 136 

Anderson, H. B 108 

Anderson, H. M 121 

Anderson, J. F 55, 99 

Anderson and Son, J. G 60, 61 

Anglo-Huronian, Ltd. 
See also Vipond g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 69, 70 

Dividends 15, 16 

Option on Porcupine Peninsular g. m. 135 

Profit tax 51 

Ankerite gold m. 

See also Buffalo Ankerite g. m. 

Production (1926-30) 12 

Appeals to Mining Court 49 

Appleby, Thos. A 65 

Ardeen Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Moss g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 70, 71 

Argonaut gold m., production 10, 14 

A. R. L. Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Armstrong, E. F 164 

Armstrong, Hugh 172 



[176] 



1935 



Index, Part I 



177 



PAGE 

Armstrong, R 127 

Armstrong, T. B 116 

Armstrong, W. E 155 

Armstrong, W. G 121 

Arnold, Thos 145 

Arsenic. 

Industry 30, 59 

production and value 2,3 

from silver ores 21 

Arthur, Geo. A 161 

Artificial gas. See Gas, coal. 

Artificial stone 38 

Asbestos. See Actinolite. 

Ashley, James L 158, 159 

Ashley gold m. 

See also Ashley Gold Mg. Corpn. 

Manager and address 54 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 71 

Production 10, 14 

Ashley Gold Mining Corpn., Ltd. 
See also Ashley g. m. 

Capital; officers 71 

Operated by Mining Corpn. of Can.. 54 
Ashmore tp. 

Gold mg. See Hard Rock Gold Mines. 

Assay fees 48 

Assay office. 

See Provincial Assay Office. 

Associated Mine Managers, Ltd 43 

Atigo Gold Mining Co., Ltd 43 

Atigogama lake. 

Gold mg. See Dikdik g.m. 

Atlas Securities Co., Ltd 44 

Atnel Mines, Ltd 43 

Austin, E. W 161 

Austin, Frank 58, 161 

Austin Rouyn Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Australia, gold production (1930-34) ... 18 

Avery, S. L 155 

Avocalon Mining Syndicate, Ltd 44 

B 

Babcock, Howard 95 

Bache. Jules 89 

Bad Vermilion lake. 

Gold mg. See South Vermillion Gold 
Mines. 
Bag bay, Shoal 1. 

Gold mg. See Cedar Island, Mikado 
g. mines. 

Bagot tp., molybdenite 156 

Bailes, F. J.. .' 72 

Bains, B. S 63 

Baird, D. S 55,99 

Baird, Frank B 165 

Baldeck, Alphonse J 74 

Ball tp. 

Goldmg. 5ef Cole Gold Mines; West 
Red Lake Gold Mines. 

Ballantyne Long Lac ]Mines, Ltd 44 

Banbury, Robert S 77 

Bancroft, mica 61 

Bankfield Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital ; officers ; operations 72 

Incorporated 44 

Mine manager and address 54 

Banner Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Bannockburn tp. 

Gold mg. See Ashley g. m. 



PAGE 

Bapty, F. A 166 

Barite. 

Industry and statistics 3, 31 

iMines and managers listed 59 

Barnes, Co., Ltd., Wm. R 66 

Barnet, Frank 164 

Barns, B. S 155 

Barr, Walter J 60 

Barrett, R. E 56, 133 

Barry, A. M 161 

Barry, P. A., and Cooper, W. D. 

Lessees, Mclntyre Birch L. g. claims 86, IIS 
Barry-Hollinger gold m. 

Manager and address 54 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 72 

Production 10, 14, 72 

Barry-Hollinger Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Barry-Hollinger g. m. 

Capital; officers 72 

Barton, A. A 56, 115 

Barytes Products, Ltd 59 

Base metals. 

See also Copper; Lead; Nickel; Zinc. 

Values increased 1 

Bastard tp. See Delta. 

Bathurst, T. W 72 

Bathurst tp. 

Feldspar 60 

Granite quarry 65 

Bathurst Feldspar Mines, Ltd 60 

Bathurst Gold Mines, Ltd 54 

Capital; officers; operations 72, 73 

Incorporated 43 

Production 11 

Bathurst Mines, Ltd 72 

Bayham tp., natural gas 33 

Bayonne, N. J., foundry 159 

Beach ville. 

Lime quarry and plant 62, 63, 155 

Stone quarry 63 

Bear, R. G 155 

Beardmore area. 

See also Beardmore g. m.; TomJohn- 
son-Nipigon Mines. 

Mclntyre g. claims 118 

Beardmore gold m. 

Manager and address 56 

Alill, capacity 8 

Operations. See Northern Empire 
Alines. 

Beatty, Sir E. W 85 

Beatty, W. H 137 

Beatty tp. 

Gold mg. See Blue Quartz g. m. 

Beauregard, L 1^9 

Beaver silver m 19 

Manager and address 58 

Operations 162 

Beaver Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends -'2 

Beckett, W.J 76, 96 

Beggs, George E 1-9 

Beilbv, J. W 145 

Bell, Harrv 02 

Bell, James H 56, 165 

Bell, Wilson 100 

Belleville. 

Assay office _ 52 

Cement plant 37, 62 

Bellew, H. C 59 



178 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Bellingham, D. M 138 

Bellingham, H. P 138 

Belmont tp., trap rock 65 

Belmore Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Belorrain Klines, Ltd 43 

Belvea, Gordon 97 

Benard, F 59, 166 

Benedict, P. C 55, 94 

Bennett, J 149 

Bennett, W. G 129 

Bennett, Dr. W. H 108 

Bennetto, Dr. F. R 162 

Bentinck tp. See Durham. 

Benzol, from coking industry 29 

Bertie tp. See Ridgewav. 

Bessey and Co., Ltd., X." R 44 

Betz, Jacob 124 

Bexlev tp. See Coboconk. 

Bickeh, J. P 117, 1.59 

Bidgood gold m. 

See also Bidgood Kirkland Gold :Mine5. 

Manager and address 54 

^lill, capacity 8 

Production 10, 14 

Bidgood Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Bidgood g. m. ; MofFatt-Hall 
g._m. 

Capital; officers; operations 73 

Work by, on Moffatt-Hall g. m 128 

Biederman, Albert G 63 

Big Divide Gold Alines, Ltd 44 

Big Eddy, water power 156 

Big Vermilion lake. 

Gold mg. See Vermilion Lake Gold 
Alines. 

Bigstone Bay Gold Alines, Ltd 44 

B ill ie, Charles V 65 

Billie, F. R 65 

Bilmac Gold Alines, Ltd 43 

Birch Bay Gold Alines, Ltd 44 

Birch Lake area. 

Alclntvre-Porcupine claims 86, 118 

Bird, S.J 56, 127 

Birks, R. T 103 

Birmingham, England 156 

Bishop, A. L 83 

Bismuth. 

Production and value 2, 3, 5 

from silver ores 21 

Bison Gold Alines, Ltd 133 

Black, J. H 69, 135 

Black, S. W 107 

Black Donald Graphite Co., Ltd. 

Alanager and address 60 

Operations 1,54, 155 

Sales, value of 32 

Blackstock, Geo. G 82, 139 

Blanshard tp. See St. Alarys. 

Blast furnaces 28 58 165 

Blaylock, S. J 85 

Blocks, building 38 

Blomfield, A. AI [,] 110 

Blue-prints, number sold 49 

Blue Diamond Coal Co 118 

Blue Eagle Gold Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Blue Quartz gold m. 

See also Amalgamated Gold Fields 
Corpn. 

Alanager and address ,54 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 68, 69 



PAGE 

Blue Quartz gold m. — Continued 

Production 10, 13 

Bob Tough Gold Alines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 73 

Aline manager and address 54 

Bobjo Alines, Ltd 124 

Bob's Lake mica m 61 

Boland, W. J 127, 145 

Bolduc, J. P 50 

Bolender Bros 63 

Bolton, A.J 150, 151, 154 

Bonter, J. W 63 

Bonter Alarble and Calcium Co 63 

Bonuses. See Dividends and Bonuses. 

Boring permits, revenue 48 

Boston Creek area. See Pacaud tp. 

Bothwell oil field 34 

Bouchard Clericy Gold Alines, Ltd. ... 44 

Boundary Lake Alining Co., Ltd 43 

Bourbeau Lake Chibougamau Alines, 

Ltd 44 

Bourget Springs 61 

Bourgie, J. B 63 

Bourlamaque tp.. Que 91 

Bousquet Gold Alines, Ltd. 

Anglo-Huronian option 69 

Capital; operations 74 

Aline manager and address 54 

Officers 69, 74 

Bouzan, ALL 57, 137 

Boyd, T. R 61 

Boyles Brothers Drilling (Eastern), Ltd. 44 

Bramor Alining (Ontario), Ltd 44 

Brant, F. A 54. 68 

Brant co. 

See Brantford; Onondaga tp.; Paris. 

Brantford, sand and gravel 66 

Brass used in cement industry 38 

Brassaw, Howard 56, 108 

Brennan and Kenty Bros. Prospecting 

Co., Ltd 44 

Brennan David gold claims 55 

See also Hislop g. m. 

Breuls, Robert W 137 

Brick (common, face, and fancy). 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 41 

Brick, cement, production 38 

Brick, sand-lime. See Sand-lime brick. 

Brick, sewer, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Brick, silica. See Silica brick. 

Brigham. A. F 57, 100 

Brine. See Salt. 

British America Nickel Corpn 24 

British Canadian Alines, Ltd 55, 94 

See also Foley Syndicate. 
British Columbia. 

See Salmon River; \'ancouver. 

British Guiana Goldfields, Ltd 44 

British United Natural Gas, Ltd 43 

Britt, feldspar 60 

Brittain, T 113 

Broadley, A. E 140 

Brockington, G. A 147 

Brocklebank, Arthur 58, 162 

Brooke, Lionel 54, 74 

Brooke tp., petroleum 34 

Brougham tp. 

See Black Donald Graphite Co. 

Brown, R. R 129 

Brown, Wm 63 

Bruce, Hon. R. R 85 



1935 



Index, Part I 



179 



PAGE 

Bruce co. See Kincardine. 
Bruce-Matachewan Gold Syndicate, 

Ltd.. 43 

Bruell Gold Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Brunner Mond, Canada, Ltd. 

Lime quarry 63 

Limestone quarry 63 

Salt for chemical plant 34, 62 

Bryce, Robert A 116 

Brj'den, Douglas 54, 72 

Buchanan, E. M 82 

Bucke tp. See Haileybury. 

Budd, E. G 73 

Buffalo Ankerite gold m. 

See also Ankerite g. m. ; BuffaloAnker- 
ite Gold Mines. 

Manager and address 54 

Mill, capacity 8, 74 

Operations 74-76 

Production 10, 12, 74 

Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Buffalo Ankerite g. m. 

Capital ; officers 74 

Dividends 15, 16 

Marbuan mill operated by 12 

Profit tax 51 

Buffalo Mines, Ltd., dividends 22, 23 

Building blocks, production 38 

Building industry. 

Improvement in 37, 40 

Wages index 36 

Building materials. See Structural ma- 
terials. 

Building permits, statistics 36 

Building stone. 
See also Stone. 

Statistics 40 

Building tile. 
See Structural tile. 

Building Products, Ltd 65 

Building Services, Ltd 59 

Bullion, receipts of crude, by Ottawa 
Mint from Ontario mines (1930- 

1934) 17 

Bullion, silver, for U.S. Treasury 19 

Bunting, R. F '. 60, 154 

Bunting, W. B 154 

Burd, Carl 65 

Bureau of Mines, Ontario 4 

Burial vaults, cement 38 

Burk, Lome 78 

Burke, T. A 110 

Bur-Ley Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd. . . 44 

Burmas, Ltd 44 

Burnett, Frederick 89 

Burns, Tommy. See Tommy Burns 
g. m. 

Burrows, M. F 140 

Burt, A. W 149 

Burwash, E. M. 

Report by, on Classes for Prospectors 175 

Burwash tp., feldspar 60 

Burwash Yellowknife :Mines, Ltd 44 

Business construction contracts 36 

Business transactions, mining recorders' 49 

Butler, granite quarry 65 

Butt. H. A 98 

Byers, W. M 127 

Bvrne, J. C 98 

Byrne, J. J 98, 114 

Byrne, N. W 73 



C P.'VGE 

Cabana, Oliver, Jr 151 

Cable-testing fees 48 

Cable tests. See Rope tests. 

Cain, C. E 58, 162 

Cairns, R. F 138 

Cairo tp. 

See Matachewan Consolidated g. m. 
Calabogie. 

See Black Donald Graphite Co. 

Calcium carbide, lime for 29 

See also Carbide refuse. 

Calcium molvbdate, production 27, 28 

Calder, John M 97 

Calder-Bousquet Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Caldwell pyrite mine 60 

Caledonia. 

See Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, 
Canada. 

Caledonia tp., mineral water 61 

Calgary, Alta., gj-psum plant 155 

California, L^.S.A. 

Gold production (1930-34) 18 

Callin, Richard 56, 114 

Callinan-McKay Exploration Co 135 

Calvin, C. C 89 

Camden tp. See Centreville. 

Cameron, John F 155 

Cameron, W. G 150 

Cameron, W. M 63 

Cameron isld.. Shoal 1 92 

Campbell, John 127, 174 

Campbell. L. A 8.5 

Campbell Sandstone Quarries, Ltd. ... 65 
Canada. 

Building permits, value of 36 

Gold production. IS 

Canada and Dominion Sugar Co 63 

Canada Cement Co. 

Limestone quarry 63 

Plants listed 37, 62 

Canada Crushed Stone Co 63 

Canada Lime Co 63 

Canada Nighthawk IMines, Ltd 31, 59 

Canada Talc Co. 

Mine manager and address 62 

Officers; operations 165 

Canadel gold claim 84 

Canadian Radium Mines, Ltd. 

Manager and address 58 

Operations 161 

Canadian Reserve (Larder Lake) mill . 8 
Canadian Associated Goldfields. 

Production 14 

Canadian Atlas Steels, Ltd. __ 27 

Canadian Carborundum Co 27, 28 

Canadian Coalfields, Ltd 118 

Canadian Commodity Exchange 19 

Canadian Copper Co., dividends 26 

Canadian Dredging Co 66 

Canadian Electro Castings, Ltd 27 

Canadian Furnace Co. 

Manager and address 58 

Officers; operations 27, 28, 165 

Canadian Gold and ^Metals Mining Co., 

Ltd 44 

Canadian Gold Refining Co., Ltd 43 

Canadian Gypsum Co., Ltd. 

Lime quarry 63 

Mine manager and address 60 

Officers; capital; operations 155 

Production 32 



180 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Canadian Industries, Ltd. 

Salt operators 34, 35, 62 

Sulphuric acid plant 58, 60, 166 

Canadian Kirkland Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 76, 77 

Mine manager and address 54 

Canadian Leviathan Exploration Co., 

Ltd 44 

Canadian Mint, Royal 17 

Canadian Pyrites, Ltd 60 

Canadian Reserve Mines, Ltd. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Canadian Slate Mines, Ltd 43 

Canador Mining, Ltd 44 

Canamerican Corpn., Ltd 44 

Canfield, J. C 57, 140 

Canusa gold m. 

See also Canusa Gold Mines. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 77 

Production 13 

Canusa Gold Mines, Ltd. 

See also Canusa g. m. 

Capital ; officers 77 

^line manager and address 54 

Canusa Mining and Exploration Co., 

Ltd 77 

Capital. 

Invested in gold mining 15 

in nickel-copper mining 25 

in silver mining 22, 23 

Of mining companies incorporated in 

Ontario 42-47 

Carbide refuse, combustion of. 

Notes; rules for prevention 173, 174 

Cardiff tp., radium 161 

Cardiff Waters, Ltd 43 

Cardinal Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Care, A. J. P 59 

Carew, F. J 76 

Carleton co. 

See also Gloucester, Nepean tps.; 
Ottawa. 

Sandstone 65 

Carlsbad, Ltd 61 

Carlsbad Springs 61 

Carnegie, Frank 57, 141 

Cartan, J. M 131 

Carter, R. J 115 

Casev tp. 

Silver shipments (1908-1922) 20 

Casey Cobalt Silver Mg. Co., Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Casey Summit gold m. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine address 54 

Operations 77, 78 

Production 11 

Casey Summit Gold Mines, Ltd. 

See also Casey Summit g. m. 

Capital; officers 77 

Casselman, limestone quarry 64 

Castle-Trethewav Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends '. 22, 23 

Casual fees, revenue 48 

Casummit Lake area. 

Gold mg. See Casey Summit g. m.; 
Mclntvre Birch Lake g. m. 

Caulfield, W. G 129 

Caustic soda, for coking industry 29 

Cavin, G. A 135 



PAGE 

Cedar Island gold m. 

Manager and address 55 

Operations 107 

Cement products. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 37, 38 

Centennial Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 78 

Mine address 54 

Central Canada Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 78, 79 

Mine address 54 

Production 11 

Central Malartic Alines, Ltd 44 

Central Patricia Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 79-81 

Mill, tonnage, present and proposed. 8 

Mine manager and address 54 

Production 11, 79 

Central Porcupine Alines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 81, 82 

Mine manager and address 54 

Central Porphyry Contacts, Ltd 45 

Centralac Mining Co., Ltd 44 

Centreville, limestone 64 

Ceramic industry, report on. See Mont- 
gomery, R. J. 
Certificates of record and performance 

of work 49 

Chalmers, Miss M 63 

Chalmers Lime Works 63 

Champ, H. H 167 

Champion Reef gold m. 
See Westree g. m. 

Chandler, CM 103 

Chaplin, Hon. J. D 106 

Chappie-Mammoth Gold Alines, Ltd.. . 45 

Charette and Son, vS 60 

Chatham, lime 63 

Chatham tp. 

See Wallaceburg. 

Chemical fees 48 

Chemical industries, lime consumption . 39 
Chemical laboratories. 

See Provincial Assay Office. 
Chemical plants. 
See Acid plants. 

Cherry, W. S 103 

Chester tp. 

See Young-Shannon Gold Mines. 

Chieftain Gold Alines, Ltd 45 

Childs, H. H 95 

Chipp, W. G 124, 156 

Christie, Chas. R 63 

Chromite. 

See also Chromium Alg. and Smelting 
Corpn. 

Industry 29 

Production 2,3,5 

Chromium. 

Industry and statistics. See Chromite. 
Mine. See Chromium Alg. and Smelt- 
ing Corpn. 

Chromium Alloy Co., Ltd 67 

Chromium Alining and Smelting Corpn., 
Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 29, 67 

Incorporated 43 

Aline manager and address 54 

Churchill tp. 

See Churchill Alg. and Alilling Co.; 
Neville Canadian Gold Alines. 



1935 



Index, Part I 



181 



PAGE 

Churchill Mining and Milling Co.. Ltd. 

Capital: officers; operations 82 

Mill, proposed, capacity 8 

Mine address 54 

Cinder bricks and blocks 38 

Cinder consumption, cement works. ... 38 

Cintorico Gold Mines, Ltd ^o 

Cities of Ontario, building permits .... 36 

Citv of Cobalt silver m 23 

City of Cobalt Mining Co., Ltd. 

Dividends 23 

Claims, mining, statistics 48-51 

Clam lake. 

See Young-Shannon Gold Mines. 
Clarence tp. See Bourget Springs. 

Clark, John E 149 

Clark Gold Mines, Ltd 42 

Clarke, Richard X 129 

Classes for prospectors, report by E. 'Si. 

Burwash 175 

Clay products. 

Industry and statistics 40, 41 

production 2-4 

increase 1 

Cleland, R. H 168 

Clifton g. m., production (1922-1924). . 13 
Cline. See Huddlestone and Cline. 
Clydach, Wales. 

Nickel refinery 156 

Coal, for coking industry 29 

Coal gas, statistics 29 

Cobalt I mineral). 

Demand for, increased 19, 163 

Industrv and statistics 2, 3, 5, 19-23 

:^Iines 19, 58 

reports 162-165 

Cobalt, Ont. 

See also Temiskaming Testing Labo- 
ratories. 

Silver. 

see also Cobalt silver area. 

mines and managers listed 58 

Cobalt silver area. 

Cobalt mg 19 

see also Cobalt (mineral). 

Mines. See Coleman tp. 

Revival in mining 20 

Silver shipments 19, 20 

Cobalt Central Mines Co., Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Cobalt Comet Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Cobalt Lake silver m 23 

Cobalt Lake Mining Co., Ltd. 

Dividend? 23 

Cobalt Properties, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 162 

Mine manager and address 58 

Profit tax 51 

Cobalt Silver Queen, Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Cobalt Townsite silver m 23 

See also Cobalt Properties, Ltd. 
Cobalt Townsite Mg. Co., Ltd. 

Dividends 23 

Cobnor Silver Mines, Ltd 42 

Coboconk, lime 63 

Cochenour-Willans gold m. 

Employees 101 

Operations 103 

Optioned to Hollinger Consol 55, 103 



PAGE 

Cochrane district. 

See also Beatty, Cody, Coulson, Gar- 
rison, Guibord, Harker, Hislop, 
HoUoway, Macklem, Munro, Plaj'- 
fair tps. ; Porcupine g. area. 

Mining lands, revenue 48 

Cockeram, Alan H 79, 122, 150 

Cockerill, G 105, 110 

Cockshutt, A 122 

Cockshutt, Hon. H 1.59 

Cockshutt, Henry 155 

Cody tp. 

Gold mg. ^ee Gold Island g. m.; Por- 
cupine Peninsular Gold Mines. 

CofFev, Robert 128 

Coghill, J. M 50 

Cohen, Louis 79 

Coke industry 27-29 

Coldwater Crushed Stone, Ltd 63 

Cole, A. A 51 

Cole, Cicily 83 

Cole. John G 161 

Cole, J. Y., Jr 54, 83 

Cole, S. S. W 58, 156 

Cole Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 83 

Mine manager and address 54 

Coleman mining division. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Coleman tp. 

Cobalt mg. See Cobalt (mineral). 
vSilver mg. .SV^' Beaver s. m. ; Cobalt 
Properties; Cross Lake, Crown Re- 
serv'e. Dominion Reduction, Foster 
s. mines; Mining Corpn. ; Xipissing 
s. m. ; Peterson Cobalt Alines; 
Smith Cobalt Mines; Temiskaming 
s. m. 
Collierv, Welsh, owned bv International 

Xickel Co ' 159 

CoUingwood, limestone quarry 64 

Collins, chromium near 67 

Combustion. See Spontaneous combus- 
tion. 

Companies Act, The 42 

Company, mining, incorporations 42-47 

Concordia Gold Mining Co., Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 83 

Incorporated 43 

Mine manager and address 54 

Cone, Russell 55, 94 

Coniagas silver tn. 

See Cobalt Properties, Ltd. 

Coniagas Mines, Ltd., dividends 22 

Coniaurum gold m. 

See also Coniaurum Mines; Goldale 
shaft 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 54 

Operations 84-86 

Production 10, 12 

Coniaurum Mines, Ltd. 
See also Coniaurum g. m. 

Capital ; officers S3 

Dividends 15, 16 

Profit tax 51 

Coniston. 

Acid plant 60 

Smelter (nickel-copper) 59, 159 

labour employed 161 

ConneU, F. M 79 



182 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Connell, W. H 79, 122 

Connell Mining and Exploration Co. . . . 122 

Connolly talc m 62 

Conover, J. D 141 

Consolidated Chibougamau Goldfields, 

Ltd 42 

Consolidated Mg. and Smelting Co. of 
Canada, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 85, 86 

ISlines optioned 55 

Consolidated Sand and Gravel, Ltd. ... 66 
Consolidated West Dome Lake Mines, 

Ltd 133 

Construction contracts, statistics 36 

Cook, C. E 57, 133, 134 

Cook, W.J 115 

Cooper, D. F 67. 168 

Cooper, George 97 

Cooper, W. D., and Barry, P. A. 

Mclntyre Birch L. g. claims, lessees. . 55, 86 

Cooper gold m 128 

See also Minto Gold Mines. 

Cooper Gold Mines, Limited 128 

Copings, sewer, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Copper. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 5, 24-26 

production and value 2, 3, 5, 24, 25 

from silver ores 21 

Mines. 

see also Cuniptau Mines; Falcon- 
bridge Nickel Mines; Internat. 
Nickel Co. of Canada. 

managers and addresses 58 

profit tax 51 

reports 156-161 

Refinery 24 

see also Ontario Refining Co. 

precious metals from 11, 25, 26 

statistics 2, 24-26 

Copper Cliff. 

Acid plants 32, 58, 60, 166 

Nickel-copper. See Internat. Nickel 
Co. of Canada. 

Refinery (copper) 24, 25, 59 

see also Ontario Refining Co. 

Smelter (nickel-copper) 24, 59, 159 

Corbet, J. M. R 123 

Corkill, E. T 108 

Corner, Austin A 65 

Cornucopia shaft. See Cedar Island g. m. 
Corporation Management and Execu- 
tors, Ltd 87 

Corrin, P 131 

Corson, E. C 147 

Coulson tp. 

See Coulson Consolidated Gold Mines. 

Coulson Consolidated Gold IMines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations. 

Mine manager and address. 

Countryman, Gordon 

Courtright, salt 

Cowie, Geo. S 

Cowley, Mrs. K 

Cox. G. E 



86 
55 
61 
62 
61 
66 
. ...62,63 

Craig, Ernest 58, 61, 127, 156 

Craig, R. M 

Craig, T. H 

Craig Gold IMines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 

Incorporated 

IMine manager and address 



64 
60 

86 
45 
55 



PAGE 

Craine, J. L 65 

Grannie, Robt 64 

Crawshaw, P. H 148 

Creighton nickel m. 

Labour employed 161 

Manager and address 59 

Operations 160 

Cripple Creek Mining and Milling Co., 

Ltd 45 

Croesus g. m. See Munro Croesus g. m. 

Cromwell, William N 159 

Cross, J. G 55,92 

Cross lake. 

See Cross Lake s. m.; Smith Cobalt 
Mines. 
Cross Lake silver m. 

Manager and address 58 

Operations 163 

Crossroads Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Crow, H. C 69 

Crow River area. 

See Central Patricia Gold Mines; 
Pickle L.-Crow R. area. 

Crown Reserve silver m oS, 162 

Crown Reserve Mining Co., Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Culvert pipe, cement 38 

Cummings, J. D 57, 145 

Cummings, M. N 65 

Cuniptau Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 156 

Mine manager and address 58 

Cunningham tp. 

See Swa3'ze-Huycke Gold Mines. 

Gushing, D. E 127 

Custom assaying 52 

Custom Smelters of Canada, Ltd 43 

Cyanamid, lime for 39 



D 



Dakota, U.S.A. See S. Dakota. 

Dalton, J. A 109 

Damascus gold m. 

See also Duport Mining Co. 

ISIine manager and address 55 

Operations 92 

D'Amour, A 131 

Dark, Samuel J 93 

Darling, H. A 138 

Darwin, R. A 87 

Darwin Gold IMines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 87 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Davidson, Jacob A 154 

Davidson gold m., production 13 

Davis, Norman R 108 

Dawn tp., petroleum 34 

Dawson, A. E HO 

Dawson, A. S 57, 149 

Day, James E 87, 106, 108 

Day, T. J 1Q6 

Deacon, Thos. R 77 

Deagle, Fred 78 

Deagle, Lloyd 78 

Decewsville, limestone quarry 63 

Decewsville Crushed Stone, Ltd 63 

Declute gas field 33 

Deep Brook, N.S., gypsum mill 155 

Defoe, S. J 154 



1935 



Index, Part I 



183 



PAGE 

Delhi (Temagami) Gold ^Nlines, Ltd... . 45 
Delnite Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 87, 88 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Deloro. See Deloro Smelting and Re- 
fining Co. 
Deloro tp. 

Gold mg. 5'ee Buffalo Ankerite g. m.; 
Excello Alines; Jones Porter g. m.; 
La Roche g. m.; McLaren-Porcu- 
pine Gold Mines; Marbuan g. m. 
Deloro Smelting and Refining Co., Ltd. 

Arsenic production 31 

Manager and address 59 

Operations; silver production 19, 166 

Delta, lime 63 

De Luca, Luigi 88 

Dempster, E. A 156 

Deneault, F 61 

Denman, R. 67 

Dennis, Geo. H 63 

Dennis, W. R .■ 124 

Dent tp. 

Gold mg. See Hudson Patricia Gold 
Alines. 
Department of Highways. 

Limestone quarries 64 

Sand and gravel production 39 

Department of Mines, Ontario, created 4 
Department of Northern Development. 

Gravel and sand production 39 

Road construction, Hudson 80 

De Pencier, H. P 55, 89 

Deroche tp., silica brick 61 

De Santis, Peter 55, 88 

De Santis gold m. 

Alanager and address 55 

Operations 89 

Production 13 

De Santis Gold Mg. Co., Ltd. 
See also De vSantis g. m. 

Capital ; officers 88 

Deschenes, Que., refinerv 24 

Dewart, D. R ." 92 

De Wolf, A 64 

Diamond-drilling operations 5, 6 

Diatomite. 

Industry 31 

producers listed 59 

production and value 2, 3 

Diatomite Products, Ltd 59 

Dibblee Construction Co 64 

Dickenson, E. H 129 

Dickenson, J. G 163, 164 

Dickson, George 52 

Digbv \'et gold claim 81 

Dignam, B. A. R 105 

Dignam gold claims 81 

Dikdik gold m. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, proposed, capacity 8 

Operations 123 

Production 11 

Dikdik E.xploration Co., Ltd. 
See McMartin, J. Bruce. 

Dimbarr Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Dime Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Dings, P. C 149 

Diplock. H. T 167 

Disputes, mg. divisions, statistics 49 



PAGE 

Dividends and bonuses. 

Gold mines 5,15,16 

Metal mines 5 

Nickel-copper mines 5, 25, 26 

Silver-cobalt mines 5, 22, 23 

Dixon, R 50 

Dixon Pencil Co. 

Canadian graphite process 32 

Doane, A. J 150 

Doane, George 55, 93 

Dodge, H. E 130 

Dodsworth, J. R., Jr 135 

Dome gold m. 

See also Dome Alines, Ltd. 

Alanager and address 55 

Alill, capacity 8 

Operations 89-91 

Production 10, 12 

Dome tp. See Howey g. m. 

Dome Lake Alg. and Alilling Co., Ltd. . 133 

Dome Alines Co., Ltd 15 

Dome Alines, Ltd. 
See also Dome g. m. 

Dividends 15, 16 

Officers; financial statement 89, 90 

Profit tax 51 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics 1, 36, 38 

Dominion Diatomite, Ltd 59 

Dominion Explorers, Ltd 45 

Dominion Foundries and Steel, Ltd. ... 27 
Dominion Alines and Quarries, Ltd.. . . 61 

Dominion Reduction silver m 19 

Lessee; production 58, 165 

Dominion Rock Products, Ltd 63 

Dominion Royalty Corpn., Ltd 43 

Dominion Salt Co., Ltd 62 

Donaldson, Oliver G 151 

Donaldson, Samuel 64 

Dorfman, Andre 69 

Doughertv, Hugh 92 

Dougherty, J. E 92 

Dougherti* Syndicate 92 

Douglas, Archibald 130 

Douro tp. See Lakefield. 
Dover tp. 

Natural gas 33 

Petroleum 34 

Dow, E. Y 54,77 

Downing, C. E 63 

Dowsett, C. W 91 

Doyle, W. L 142 

Drain pipe, cement 38 

Drain tile, statistics 2, 3, 38, 41 

Drake, A. B 142 

Drake, C.C 77 

Draughting Office, report 53 

Dredging, sand and gravel. 

Operators listed 66 

Output and value 39 

Roj-alties and licenses 48 

Drilling. 

See Boring permits; Diamond-drilling. 

Drummond silver m 19 

Drummond-Hay, H. R 137 

Dry-press bricks, statistics 41 

Du Bois, P 77 

Duft'erin Paving and Crushed Stone Co. 64 

Duguid, E 96 

Dulles, John F 159 

Dumbrille, J. C 55, 99 

Duncan, Herbert 99 



184 



Department of Mines 



No. -t 



PAGE 

Dundas, limestone quarry 63 

Dunlop, A. C 62 

Dunn, George 56, 124 

Dunwich tp., petroleum 34 

Duport ^Mining Co., Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 92 

Mine manager and address 55 

Production 11 

Durham, sand and gravel 66 

Durham Stone and Sand Co 66 

Durkee, C. A 123 

Dutton, petroleum 34 

Dve, Robert 54, 57, 69. 136 

Dyer, W. S. 

Notes by, on refractory clay 40, 41 

Dyment, gold mg. near 139 

Dysart tp. See Haliburton. 



Eager, F. J 5S, 161 

Earl, Charles 147 

Earle, A. P 149 

Earle, E. P 162 

East Flamborough tp. See Waterdown. 

East Lamaque Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

East Xeebish island, quartzite 61 

Eby tp. 

Gold mg. See Lucky Kirkland Gold 
Mines. 

Eden, W. A 145 

Edgar Irvine Co., quarry 64 

Edgecreek Consolidated Gold Svnd., 

Ltd '.... 45 

Edgelake Gold Mining Co., Ltd 45 

Ed. Hargreaves Kirkland Gold Mines. 

Capital; officers; operations 92 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Edwalt Corporation, Ltd 45 

Edwards gold m. 

See also Gold Lands Synd. of Algoma. 

Manager and address 55 

Operations 95, 96 

Eganville, lime 63 

El-Bonanza Mining Corpn., Ltd 45 

Elderkin, C. F 132 

Eldon tp., limestone 63 

Eldorado Gold Mines, Ltd 30 

Electric accidents 172 

Electrolytic copper refining. 
See Ontario Refining Co. 

Electro-Metallurgical Co. of Canada. 27 
Elgin CO. See Bayham, Dunwich, Mala- 

hide tps. 
Elk Lake. See Ashley g. m.; Young- 
Davidson g. m. 

Ellen Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Ellice tp., peat 61 

Elliott, R. A 166 

Elma tp., peat 61 

Elora, lime 63, 155 

Elzevir tp., actinolite 59 

Embossed brick, production 41 

Emerv, V. H 109 

Emison, J. C 147 

Emmons, K. P 145 

Empire. See XorthernEmpire Mines Co. 

Employment, increase in 1, 7 

See also Labour statistics. 



PAGE 

Enamelled brick, production 41 

Engineering construction contracts. 

\'alue of 36 

England. See Acton; Birmingham; 
London. 

Englebright, W. H 114 

Ennis, R. J 56, 117 

Enniskillen tp., petroleum 34 

Ensign Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Eramosa tp., lime 63 

Erie Canadian Mines, Ltd S7 

Errington, Jos 72, 99, 106, 115, 127 

Esquesing tp. 

See Limehouse; Milton. 
Essex CO. 

See also Amherstburg; Anderdon tp. 

Sand and gravel 66 

Etobicoke tp., sand and gravel 66 

Evans, A. Kelly 103 

Evans, D. Owen 159 

Evelyn, S 136 

Eves, C 65 

Excello Mines, Ltd 55 

Capital; officers; operations 92, 93 

Exchange, commodity. 

See Canadian Commodity Exchange. 

Exchange, monetary 17 

Exchange adjustments, compensation. 

See Exchange equalization. 
Exchange equalization. 

EiTect of, on mining industry 1, 6 

Gold mines 1, 2, 4, 10, 11. IS 

Notes and corrections 17, IS 

Exchange premium on gold. 5t't' Ex- 
change equalization. 

Exolon Company, Ltd 27 

Expenditures, mining 48 

Explosives, accidents due to 171 

Exton, W'm., Jr S3 



Face brick, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Fahrenholtz, P 114 

Fairlie, M. F 71, 121 

Fairs, S. E 141 

Falconbridge Nickel Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 26 

Mine manager and address 58 

Officers; operations 156-158 

Profit tax 51 

Quarry 61 

Refinery 158 

Smelter 59 

Fancy brick, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Fasken, Alexander S9, 162 

Fatalities. See Accidents, mining. 
Favel. See Howey g. m. 
Federated IMining Corpn. Ltd. 

See also New York Porcupine g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 93 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Fees, recording, etc., revenue 4S-51 

Feine, George R 74, 125 

Feldspar. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 31 

Mines and managers listed 60 

Felton, A.J 149 

Fennell, Robert 86, 135 



1935 



Index, Part I 



185 



Ferguson gold m. page 

Optioned to Golden Star Consol .... 55, 97 

Ore from dump 97 

Ferreri, Biagio 88 

Ferro-alloys. 

Producers; statistics 27, 28 

Ferro-chrome 29 

Fertilizer, lime for 39 

Finance Department, purchases bullion 17 

Finch tp., marble 64 

Fire-clay blocks, production 41 

Fire-clay deposits. 

Northern Ont., notes by W. S. Dyer.40, 41 

Fireproof tile, production 41 

Fires in mines 172, 1 73 

Hazard, reduction of. See Carbide 
refuse. 

Fisher, D. K. E 138 

Fisher, Paul 129 

Fitzgerald, F. G 96 

Fleming, John 61 

Fleming, S. E 78 

Fletcher, L. K 124 

Floor tile, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Flower pots, production 41 

Flower station. See Caldwell pyrite m. 

Flue linings, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Fluorspar. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 32 

Mines and managers listed 60 

Flux, limestone for 27 

"Foamite" 173 

Foley O'Brien Corpn., Ltd. 

Capital; oflficers; operations 93, 94 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Foley O'Brien, Ltd 93 

Foley Syndicate. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 55 

Operations 94 

Production 11 

Foot, G. A 123 

Forbes, D. L. H 145 

Forest permits 49 

Forrester, F. E 149 

Fort Frances mg. division. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Fort Hope Consolidated Gold INIines, 

Ltd 45 

Fort William. 

Classes for prospectors 175 

Trap, quarry 65 

Foster, R. R 64, 66 

Foster silver m. 

Manager and address 58 

Operations 164 

Foster Cobalt Mining Co., Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Four Nations Consol. Gold Mines, Ltd. 55 

Capital; officers; operations 94, 95 

Fox, E. D 117 

Fox Lake Gold Syndicate. 

Mine manager and address 55 

Officers; operations 95 

Franklin Gold Mining Co., Ltd 45 

Eraser, F. C 123 

Eraser tp., feldspar 60 

Free assays 52 

Friel, Jos. V 88 

Fritzsche, K. W 56, 123 

Frohberg, M. H 55, 87 



PAGE 

Frohe, Ferdinand 108 

Frontenac co. See Kingston tp. ; Lough- 
borough Mg. Co.; Verona. 

Frontenac Floor and Wall Tile Co 31, 60 

Frontier Red Lake Gold Mines, Ltd.. . 45 
Frood nickel m. 

Blister copper from ore 24 

Labour employed 161 

Manager and address 58 

Operations 160 

Fuller, A. S 133 

Fuller, sand and gravel 66 

Fuller Gravel, Ltd 66 

Furness Mines, Ltd 92 

Futterer, Edward 55, 103 

G 

Gage, F. H 73 

Gairdner, J. A 141 

Gale Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Gallagher, C. W 137 

Gallagher, J.J 152 

Gallagher, Raymond 63 

Gallagher Lime and Stone Co., plant. . 63 

Gardner, John J 92 

Gardner Guibord gold m 57 

See also Talisman Gold Mines. 

Gardner Silver Mines, Ltd 45 

Garrison tp. 

Gold mg. See McKenzie g. claims. 

Gas, coal, statistics 29 

Gas, natural. See Natural gas. 
Gauthier tp. 

Gold mg. See Four Nations Consol. 

Gold Mines; Kirkland Consol. Gold 
Mines. 

Geddes, F. H 82 

Gelines, P 131 

General Electric Co., mica mg 61 

General Mining and Development, Ltd. 45 

General Ventures Mining Corpn., Ltd. . 45 

George H. Gillespie Co 35, 62, 165 

Georgetown, sandstone quarry 65 

Geraldton. See Little Long Lac g. m. 

German Exploration Co., Ltd 43 

Gibbs, F. B 155 

Gibson, Clifford 78 

Gilbertson, Gordon 63 

Giles, T. S 138 

Gilgreer Mines, Ltd 69 

Gill, J. R 59, 156 

Gillespie, Geo. H 62 

Gillespie Co., Geo. H. 

Manager and address 62 

Operations 165 

Production 35 

Gillies, Alex 55, 95 

Gillies, R. A . .59, 167 

Gillies Lake-Porcupine Gold Mines. 

iNlill, proposed, capacity 8 

Ginn, H. G 50 

Giustini, Giuseppe 88 

Glasgow, Scotland, rolling mills 159 

Glass industry. 

Lime consumption 39 

Nepheline syenite for 31 

Glass Manufacturers' Federation 31 

Gleeson, E. P 73 

Glendenning, H. G 59 

Glenelg tp., lime 63 



186 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Globe, A. R 54, 67 

Gloucester tp. 

Limestone quarr j' 64 

Mineral water. See Carlsbad Springs. 

Sand and gravel 66 

Goderich, salt 62 

Goderich Matachewan Gold Mines, Ltd. 45 

Goderich vSalt Co 35, 62 

Godfrev, A 110 

Goetz, E. P 89 

Gold. 

Industry and statistics 1^18 

labour statistics 7, 9 

milling, lime consumption 39 

plants, capacity 8 

premium on exchange. See Ex- 
change equalization. 

prices 17, 146 

increased, effect of 1,7 

production and value 2, 3, 5, 9-13 

from nickel-copper ores. ... 11, 25, 159 

from refineries 26 

increases 1,7 

world IS 

Mines 

see also Algoma, Cochrane dists. ; 
Hastings co.; Kenora dist.; Pa- 
tricia portion; Rainy River, Sud- 
bury, Thunder Bay, Timiskam- 
ing dists. 

accidents; fires in 168 

dividends paid by 5, 15, 16 

managers and addresses 54-57 

profit tax 51 

reports 67-154 

Ores, revenue from treatment of. 
see Temiskaming Testing Labora- 
tories. 

Gold standard, abandoned by U.S 17 

Gold Centre :Mines, Ltd 81 

Gold Eagle Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 95 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Gold Hill gold m. 

Production (1927, 1928) 14 

Gold Island gold m. 

Employees 101 

Optioned to Hollinger 103 

Gold Lands Syndicate of Algoma. 

Capital; officers; operations 95, 96 

Mine manager and address 55 

Gold Range Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 96 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Gold Reef gold m., production (1915-17) 13 

Gold Valley Mines, Ltd 45 

Goldale shaft, Coniaurum g. m. 

Central Porcupine g. m. worked from 82 

Goldcrest Mines, Ltd 45 

Golden Arm Mines, Ltd 45 

Golden Arrow Mining Co., Ltd 45 

Golden Gate Mining Co., Ltd 55 

See also Lucky Cross g. m. 

Capital ; officers ; operations 9() 

Incorporated 45 

Golden Spur Syndicate, Ltd 45 

Golden Star gold m. 

See also Golden Star Consol. Mines. 

Mill, capacity 8 



PAGE 

Golden Star gold m. — Continued 

Operations 97 

Production 11 

Golden Star Consolidated Mines, Ltd.. 55 
See also Golden Star g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations. 96, 97 

Incorporated 45 

Golden Summit Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 97 

Mine manager and address 55 

Goldfinders, Ltd 45 

Goldsborough, C. B 123 

Goodall tp. 

Gold mg. See Hudson Patricia Gold 
IVIines. 

Goodelle, G. G 103 

Goodfish Gold Mines, Ltd 97 

Goodfish ^Mining Co., Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations. 97 

Fire underground 172 

]Mine manager and address. 59 

Goodings, K. M. 66 

Goodwin, E. M. C 64 

Goodwin, R. F 147 

Goodwin Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Gordon, A. B 99, 114, 115 

Gosark Golds, Ltd 45 

Goudreau Gold area. 

Gold mg. See Algood Mines; Algoma 
Summit Gold Mines; Kozak g. m. 

Gow, James ...;.... 64 

Gowdy, Wm. . 63 

Gowganda mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Gowganda silver area. 

See also Miller Lake O'Brien s. m. 

Silver shipments 20 

Grace gold mine. 

See also Darwin Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Mine manager and address. 55 

Operations 87 

Graham, P. J . . 137 

Graham, R 109 

Graham, S.N : 109 

Graham Bousquet Gold Mines, Ltd.. . . 45 
Granite. 

Operators listed 65 

Statistics 2, 3, 40 

Grant, Sir A. Hamilton 69 

Grant, Gideon 154 

Grant, H. R 136 

Grant, Jas. E .56, 128, 145 

Graphite. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 32 

Mg. See Black Donald Graphite Co. 

Grattan, F 64 

Grattan tp. See Eganville. 
Gravel. See Sand and gravel. 

Grav, J. J 67, 68, 116 

Gray, M. D 98, 114 

Great Bear 1., pitchblende 30 

Great Lakes, sand and gravel 39, 66 

Greater Canada Mines Corpn., Ltd.. . . 45 

Green, W. F 53 

Green, W. J 114 

Greene, Dr. E. H "... 72 

Greene, Richard T 162 

Greenlaw tp. 

Gold mg. See Greenlaw Gold Mines. 

Greenlaw Gold Mines, Ltd 55 

Capital; officers; operations 98 



1935 



Index, Part I 



187 



PAGE 

Greenshields, C. G 70 

Gregnon, limestone 63 

Grenfell tp. 

Gold mg. See Alsbach Gold Mg. Co. ; 
Four Nations Consol. Gold Mines; 
Golden Summit Mines; Kirkland 
Consol. Mines. 

Grenon, Jas 64 

Grey co. 

See Durham; Glenelg tp.; Owen 
Sound; Sullivan tp. 
Grierson Sturgeon River Mines, Ltd. . . 45 

Griffith, J. A 145 

Groundhog Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Grover, G. A 135 

Guelph, lime quarry and plant 63, 155 

Guelph tp. 

See also Guelph. 

Limestone 64 

Guertin, L 142 

Guess, H. A 147 

Guibord tp. 

Gold mg. See Talisman Gold Mines. 

Gunter, Judson A 60 

Gurd, Chas. and Co 61 

Gypsum. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 32 

Mg. See Canadian Gypsum Co.; 
Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, 
Canada. 
Gypsum, Lime and Alabastine, Canada, 
Ltd. 

Gypsum mg 60, 155 

production 2, 3, 32 

Lime plants and quarry 63 

Limestone quarries 64 

Gypsum Packet Co 155 

Gypsumville, Man., limestone quarry. . 155 

H 

Haddleton, H.J 129 

Hadley's Chatham, Ltd 66 

Hagersville. 

Gypsum. See Canadian Gypsum Co. 

Limestone 64 

Hagersville Contracting Co 63 

Hagersville Quarries, Ltd 64 

Haight, Ingersoll E 93 

Haight, J. C 109 

Haileybury. 

Limestone quarries 64 

Prospectors' classes at 175 

Haines, G. S 86 

Haire, H.J 155 

Haire, R. E 155 

Halcrow tp. 

Gold mg. See Halcrow-Swayze Mines. 
Halcrow-Swayze Mines, Ltd. 

Capital ; officers ; operations 98 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 55 

Haldimand co. 

See also Decewsville ; Oneida, Seneca, 
Walpole tps. 

Natural gas 33 

Haldimand Quarries and Construction, 

Ltd _ 54 

Haliburton, limestone 63 

Haliburton co. 

5ee Cardiff tp.; Haliburton. 



PAGE 

Halite. See Salt. 

Hall, J. B 65 

Halladay, Reginald 1.59 

Halliday, Fred 64 

Halton CO. 

See also Esquesing, Nassagaweya tps. 

Sandstone quarries 65 

Hamilton. 

Iron industry 27, 28, 58 

Lime plant 63 

Hamilton, F. H 69 

Hamilton, Patrick 88 

Hammell, Mrs. Eola 135 

Hammell, J. E 103, 155 

Hamrick, F. G 147 

Hannam, A. V .55, 96 

Harbour Brick Co 66 

Hard Rock Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 98, 99 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address .55 

Hard Rock Svndicate 99 

Hardy, J. Gordon 156 

Hargreaves, Eric .54, 71 

Hargreaves Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ed. See Ed. Hargreaves Kirkland 
Gold Mines. 
Harker tp. 

Gold mg. See Teddy Bear Valley 
Mines. 

Harkness, J. G 57, 1.37 

Harkness, R. B. 

See Natural Gas Commissioner. 
Harkness-Hays Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital ; officers ; operations 99 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

Harkness-Hays Gold Mining Co., Ltd. 99 

Harlake Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Harris, G. H 89 

Harris, P.J 55 

Harris, Sam 94 

Harrison and Co., Ltd., W. F 45 

Hart, R. S 67 

Harwood Lake Mines, Ltd 45 

Hastings co. 

See also Actinolite ; Huntingdon, Ma- 
doc, Marmora, Rawdon. Thurlow, 
Tudor tps. 

Gold (1866-1909) 9 

Hattie, Alex 57, 135 

Hawkesbury, limestone quarry near. . . 64 

Hawkins, J.J 86 

Hayden, Charles 1.58, 159 

Hayden gold m. 

See also Naybob Gold Mines. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, capacity 8 

treats ore from De Santis g. m. . . . 13, 89 

Operations 129 

Production 13 

Hayden Gold Mines, Ltd 129 

See also Hayden g. m. 
Haydite. 

Production and value 2, 3, 41 

for cement products 38 

Headlight gold m. 

Manager and address 57 

Work suspended 139 

Hearst tp. 

Gold mg. See Martin Bird Synd. 



188 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Heavy clay products 41 

Heidenreich, L. H 124 

Heinze shaft. See Paymaster gold m. 

Henderson talc m 62, 165 

Hendricks, Robert J 57, 131 

Hendry, F. W 68 

Henniger, M. G 64 

Henning, C. F 154 

Henry, R. J 57, 145 

Henvey tp., feldspar 60 

Hepburn, B. R 105 

Herbert, A. L ^ 73 

Hershman, Charles L 54, 56, 76, 125 

Hervey, Brig. -Gen. C. L 96 

Hespeler, lime plant 63, 155 

Hetherington, J. R 114 

Heyson tp. See Howey g. m. 

Higgins, W. J 58, 165 

High Falls 159 

Highways, increase in construction. ... 40 
Highways, Dept. of. 
See Dept. of Highways. 

Hilder deposit (fire-clay) 40 

Hill, H 63 

Hillsborough, N. B., gypsum 155 

Hillside Gold IMines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 99 

Incorporated 45 

Aline manager and address 55 

Hinde, James H 66 

Hinde Bros 66 

Hislop gold m 55 

Employees 101 

Operations 102 

Hislop tp. 

Gold mg. See also Hislop g. m. 

by Mclntvre Porcupine 118 

Hitchcock, C. H 74 

Hocken, W. V 57, 136 

Hodgetts, A. W 133 

Hodgson, J. C 85 

Hoffmann, C. EUwood 147 

Hogarth, D. M 83, 139 

Holden, John B 100 

Holland, H. E 50 

Hollinger, J. J 56, 131 

Hollinger gold m. 

See also Hollinger Consol. Gold Mines. 

Fire, underground 173 

Manager and address 55 

Mill, capacity 8, 102 

Operations 101-103 

Production 10,12 

Hollinger Consolidated Gold ]\ lines, Ltd. 
See also Hollinger g. m.; Young-Da- 
vidson g. m. 
Capital; officers; financial statement. 100 

Dividends 15, 16 

Mines owned and under option 55 

Profit tax 51 

Hollinger Gold Mines, Ltd 15 

Hollow building blocks 38 

HoUoway tp. 

Gold mg. See Teddy Bear Valley 
Mines. 

Holt, Sir Herbert 85 

Honsberger, A. H 151 

Hood, W. C 139 

Hook, O. M 60 

Hoover, W. J 57, 141 

Hore, R. E 86 



PAGE 

Horne, Frank E 93 

Home, William 65 

Horseshoe Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 103 

Mine manager and address 55 

Horton tp. 

Limestone. See Renfrew. 

Horwood, Eric 92 

Hotchkin, IM. W 57, 127, 147 

Hough, Ira E 137 

Howard Holdings, Ltd 43 

Howe, J. P 64 

Howells, E. M 114 

Howes, G. A 116 

Howey, M. R 150 

Howey gold m. 

See also Howey Gold Mines. 

Manager and address 55 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 103-105 

Production 11 

Howey Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Howey g. m. 

Capital; officers 103 

Dividends 15, 16 

Financial statement 104, 105 

Profit tax 51 

Howry Creek area. 

See Bousquet Gold Mines. 
H. R. 944, 1,001-02 gold claims. 

See Delnite Mines. 

Huddlestone and Cline, gold production 13 
Hudson. 

Route from to Pickle L.-CrowR. area 134 

Hudson Bay silver m 19 

Hudson Bay Mines, Ltd., dividends. . . 22 
Hudson Patricia Gold INIines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 105, 106 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 55 

HufT, W. C 154 

Hughes, G. B 150 

Hughes gold m., production (1926) .... 13 
Humberstone tp. See Port Colborne. 

Hummel, Wm. L 61 

Hunt, Jessie L 97 

Hunt, Melvin G 97 

Hunter, J 64 

Huntingdon tp. See Fuller; Henderson 
talc m. 

Huntington, W. Va., nickel mill 159 

Hurd, Ralph 56, 108 

Hurd, W. E 124 

Huron co. See Goderich. 

Huronian Mining and Finance Co 69 

Hurst, M. E 83, 136 

Hussey, \V. J 123 

Hutchinson, F. L 68 

Hutchinson, R. A 68 

Huycke, F. G 142 

H. W. 416 gold claim. See Sakoose 

Gold Mines. 
Hybla. 

Feldspar 60 

Quartz 61 

Hyde, B. vS 60 

Hvdrated lime. 

Plants listed 62, 63 

Production and value 2, 3, 39 

Hydro-electric plants. 

Owned bv Internat. Nickel Co 159 



1935 



Index, Part I 



189 



I PAGE 

Imperial Oil Refineries, Ltd 34 

Ince, Geo. H 5o, 106, 107 

Incorporations of mg. companies 41-47 

Industrial conditions improved 1, 30 

Industrial construction contracts. 

\^alue of 36 

Inez, Ltd 43 

Infection, incidence of 171 

Infusorial earth. 
See Diatomite. 

Ingham, Clark L 87, 142 

Inglis, AI. 148 

Ingram, J 69, 128, 135 

Inksater, Jas. R 155 

Innerkip Lime and Stone Co 63 

Innerkip Quarries, Ltd 64 

Insecticides. See Arsenic. 
Inspectors of Mines. 

Reports on Mines of Ontario 67-167 

Reports on Mining Accidents 168-174 

Inspiration Gold Mines, Ltd 69 

Interlac Gold, Ltd 45 

International Xickel Co. 

Dividends (1906-192S) 26 

International Nickel Co. of Can., Ltd. 

Dividends 26, 27 

Mines, managers and addresses 58 

Operations 24-26, 158-161 

Ore reserves 161 

Profit tax 51 

Rare metals, production 26 

Refineries. 

see also Ontario Refining Co. 

Port Colborne 24-26, 58, 159-161 

Smelters. 

Coniston 24, 59, 160 

Copper Cliff 24, 59, 160 

lona, petroleum 34 

lona, N. S., gypsum mill 155 

Iridium, production 26 

Iron and steel industrv 27, 28 

Blast furnaces ' 28, 58, 165 

Lime consumption 39 

Statistics 4, 5, 27, 28 

Iron pyrites. 

Industry and statistics 3, 32 

Mine and manager 60 

Irvine Co., Ltd., Edgar 64 

Irwin and Co., Ltd., William 44 



Jackpine-Sturgeon Gold Synd., Ltd. . . 43 
Jackson-Manion gold m. 

See also J-M Consolidated Mines. 

Manager and address 55 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 106 

Jackson Manion Mines, Ltd. 
See J-M Consolidated Mines. 

James, E. S 165 

James Kirkland Mines, Ltd 45 

Jamieson, A 114 

Jamieson, J. A 63 

Jamieson Lime Co 63 

Jaquays, H. M 167 

Jardine, Hugh 54, 77, 128 

Jaroba Sturgeon Gold Mines, Ltd 45 

Jellicoe Gold Mining Co., Ltd 45 



PAGE 

J-iM Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 
See also Jackson-Manion g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 106 

Mill, capacity 8 

Production 11 

Johnson, H 107 

Johnson, Thos 148 

Johnston, Albert \V 145 

Johnston, Robert 113 

Johnston, Strachan 117 

Joliette, Que., lime plant 155 

Jomac Gold Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Jones, John G 129 

Jones Porter gold m. 

Manager and address 54 

Operations 83 

Jones Porter Mines, Ltd 83 

Jordan, E 58, 166 

Joseph, Henrv 85 

Jowsey, R. J.'. 124, 141 

Joynt, George 156 

Jubilee gold m. 

See also Minto Goll Mines. 

Manager and address 56 

Operations 128 

Jupp Construction Co., A. E 66 



K 



Kaplan, Max 94 

Kapuskasing. 

Classes for prospectors 175 

Karl Springer Exploration Co., Ltd.. . . 43 
Kashabowie. See Moss g. m. 

Kawinogan Gold, Ltd 43 

Keeley, E. C 67, 168 

Keeley silver m 69 

Keeley Extension silver m 69 

Keeley Silver ^Slines, Ltd 69 

Dividends 22 

Kellv-Evans, A. See Evans, A. Kellv. 

Kem'p, C. H 96 

Kendall, M 131 

Kendall, W. B 103 

Kendrick, H '. 77 

Kennedv, A. C 83 

KennedV, C. S 77 

Kennedy, H. G 58, 164 

Kennedy, Wm., and Sons, Ltd 27 

Kennett, R. J 93 

Kenning, A. F 93 

Kenogami lake. 

Gold mg. See Four Nations Consol. 
Gold Mines. 

Kenogamisis Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Kenora, classes for prospectors 175 

Kenora district. 

See also Patricia portion. 

Gold mg. See Dyment; Lake of the 
Woods area; Straw 1. 

^Mining lands, sales and leases 48 

Kenora mining div., recorder's rept. . . .49, 50 
Kenora Prospectors and Miners, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 106, 107 

Mine managers and addresses 55 

Kent, W. C 61 

Kent CO. 

See Bothwell oil field; Chatham: 
Dover tp. ; Thamesville; Tilbury E. 
tp.; Wallaceburg. 



190 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Kenty Brothers. See Brennan and Ken- 
ty Bros. Prospecting Co. 

Kenty Gold Mines, Ltd 56 

Capital; officers; operations 107, 108 

Kerr, Benjamin, Jr '. . 97 

Kerr Lake Mines, Ltd 23 

Kerr Lake Mining Co., Ltd., dividends 22 

Kerswill, E. J 141 

Kert-MacDonald Red Lake Gold 

Mines, Ltd 45 

Key Properties, Ltd 43 

Kevroc Gold Mining Co., Ltd 45 

Kidder, S. J 58, 161 

Killarnev, quartzite quarry 61 

Killeen, Kevin 108 

Killer, Fred 94 

Killoran-Horne Mines, Ltd 45 

Kincardine, salt 62 

Kincardine Salt, Ltd 35, 62 

Kinch, Wm. H 93 

Kinghorn Sturgeon Mines, Ltd 45 

Kingsland, N. W 122 

Kingston. 

Feldspar plant 31, 60 

Penitentiary, limestone quarry 64 

Kingston tp. See Kingston. 

Kinkel, Edward G 74, 124 

Kinkel, Revere P 73, 74, 125 

Kinsella, Nicholas 86 

Kirby Co., The T. Sidney 64 

Kirkfield Crushed Stone, Ltd 64 

Kirkland Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 108 

Incorporated 45 

Mine manager and address 56 

Kirkland Divide Gold Mines, Ltd 148 

Kirkland Gateway gold m. 

Alill, capacity 8 

Production 14 

Kirkland Gateway Gold Mines. Ltd.. . . 96 
Kirkland Gold Belt Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 108 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 56 

Kirkland Lake. 

See also Kirkland Lake gold area. 

Classes for prospectors 175 

Kirkland Lake gold area. 

Dividends 16 

Exchange equalization 10, 11, 18 

Gold production 9, 11 

and silver 10, 11, 14 

Labour statistics 9 

Mills, capacity 8 

Mines. 

see also Lebel, Teck tps. 

producing 7, 10 

Ore, average value 7 

Kirkland Lake gold m. 

See also Kirkland Lake Gold Mg. Co. 

Manager and address 55 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 109 

Production 10, 14, 109 

Kirkland Lake Gold Mining Co., Ltd. 
See also Kirkland Lake g. m. 

Capital; officers 108, 109 

Dividends 15, 16 

Profit tax 51 

Kirkland Securities, Ltd 110 

Kirkpatrick, G. C 116 



PAGE 

Kirkpatrick, S. F 166 

Kirmacjue Gold IMines, Ltd 45 

Kitchen, J. H 70 

Kitchigami gold m. See Centennial 
Gold Mines. 

Kitley tp., limestone 64 

K. L. Exploration Co., Ltd 43 

Knapp, E. B 114 

Knode, O. M 155 

Knott, C. G 154 

Knox, John 55, 100 

Knox, John, Jr 56, 128 

Knox, Marion E 128 

Knox, W. R 67,82 

Knox vSturgeon River Mines, Ltd 43 

Knutson, Fred 89 

Knutson, Martin 76, 93 

Knutson, Oscar 54, 73 

Kobler, Henry 74, 125 

Koch Dane IT Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Koons, Edward L 87, 142 

Korson, Harry 73 

Kowkash area. 

Gold mg. See New "7ork Porcupine 
g.m. ; Tom Johnson-Nipigon Mines. 
Kowkash mining div., recorder's rept. . .49, 50 

Koza, Harry 73 

Kozak gold m 56 

Operations 131 

Kozak Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Kranenbcrg, G. H 155 

K. R. L. 9,681 gold claim 77 

See also Casey Summit g. m. 



Labour statistics 2 

Cement 2,38 

Chromite; clay products 2 

Diamond-drilling 5 

Feldspar; fluorspar 2 

Gold 2, 7, 9 

Graphite 2 

Gvpsum 2, 32 

Lime 2,39 

Mica; natural gas 2 

Nickel-copper mines, smelters and re- 
fineries 2, 24, 25 

Petroleum, crude; quartz and quart- 
zite 2 

Salt 2,35 

Silica brick 2 

Silver-cobalt mines, smelters and re- 
fineries 2 

Structural materials 2 

Talc 2,35 

Wages index, building trades 36 

Lac Development, Ltd 46 

Lac-Teck Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Ladoucer, A. A 83 

La Fond Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Lafontaine, A 131 

Laird, H. W 69 

"Lake" iron ore imported 4 

Lake Caswell Miues. Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 109, 110 

Incorporated 46 

Mine manager and address 56 

Lake Erie, sand and gravel dredging. . . 66 
Lake Huron. 

Quartzite quarry 61 



1935 



Index, Part I 



191 



PAGE 

Lake Nipigon 

Prospecting activity east of 1, 7 

see also Little Long Lac, Sturgeon 
R. g. areas. 
Lake of the Woods area. 

Gold mg. See Regina g. m.: Shoal 1.; 
Sultana g. m.; Witch bay. 

Revival of mg 1 

Lake Rowan Gold Mines, Ltd 42 

Lake St. John Co., Ltd 46 

Lake St. John Quarrj- Co., Ltd 64 

Lake Shore gold m. 

See also Lake Shore Mines. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, capacitv 8 

Operations 110-113 

Production 10, 14 

Lake Shore ^Nlines, Ltd. 
See also Lake Shore g. m. 

Capital; officers 110 

Dividends 15, 16 

Profit tax 51 

Lake Superior. 

Sand and gravel dredging 66 

Silver. See Silver islet. 

Lakefield, cement plant 37, 62 

Lakeland Gold, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 113 

Incorporated 46 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 56 

Lakeside-Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations. . . .'. . 113, 114 

Mine manager and address 56 

Lamb ton co. 

See also Brooke, Dawn, Enniskillen, 
Moore, Plympton, Sarnia tps. 

Salt 35 

Lamport, W. A 103 

Lanark co. 

See Bathurst, N. Burgess, Ramsaj' tps. 
Land sales. See Mining lands. 

Lang, H. H 87 

Langford, Richard W 108 

Langmuir Longlac Gold Mines, Ltd. . . 46 

Langton, Thos 63 

Lapa Cadillac Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

La Palme Porcupine Mines Co 131 

Larder Lake mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Larkin, Ida 97 

La Roche gold m. 

See also Delnite Mines. 

Mine manager and address 55 

Operations 87, 88 

La Roche Mines, Ltd 87 

La Rose IMines, Ltd., dividends 22 

Lash, John F 145 

Laundrv tubs, cement 38 

Lauper, R. A 63 

Lavallee, P. A 105 

Lavertv, W. H 141 

Law, R. E 65 

Law Construction Co 64 

Lawrence, Frederick 68 

Lawton, N. 54, 71 

Layden. L. J 110 

L. B. United Mines, Ltd 46 

Lead. 

Production and value 2, 3, 5 

from silver ores 21 



PAGE 

Leader Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Leasa, Wm 61 

Leases, mining, statistics 48 

Lebel tp. 

Gold mg. See Bidgood g. m.; Ed. 
Hargreaves Kirkland Gold Mines; 
Kirkland Gold Belt Mines; Lake- 
side-Kirkland Gold Alines; Alof- 
fatt-Hall g. m. 

Lebel Oro Mines, Ltd 56 

See also Long Lake g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 114 

Le Brocq, S. E 167 

Lee A. J 61 

Lee, Dwight B 89 

Lee, W. W., and Son 61 

Lee Gold Mines, Ltd 56 

Capital; officers; operations 114 

Leeds co. 

See also Delta; Kitley tp. 

Granite quarrv 65 

Legate, J. H.. . .' 63 

Lemmen, H 86 

Lennox and Addington co. 
Limestone. See Centreville. 

Leo, Clarence 125 

Le Pard, Sherman J 129 

Leslie, Norval 78 

Le Sueur, R. V 109 

Letters, mining divisions 49 

Lewis, W. H 78 

Ley, William 53 

Licenses. 

Of occupation 48 

Miners' 48-51 

Sand and gravel 48 

Lieberman, D 82 

Lightball, W. S 136 

Lillico, L. A 128 

Lillico, R. L 145 

Lime. 

For coking industrv 29 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 38, 39 

Operators listed 62, 63 

Limehouse, lime 63, 155 

Limestone. 

Operators listed 63-65 

Statistics 2, 3, 40 

flux 27 

Limestone Products Co 64 

Lincoln co. See Niagara tp. 

Lindsav, J. A 145 

Lindsley, Halstead 83, 139, 156, 162 

Lindslev, I. A 106 

Lindsley, Thayer. S3, 85, 92, 106, 115, 127, 156 

Lionite Abrasives, Ltd 27 

Little Long Lac area. 

Gold mg. See Bankfield Gold Mines; 
Hard Rock Gold Mines; Little 
Long Lac g. m. ; MacLeod-Cock- 
shutt Gold Mines; Roche Long Lac 
Gold Mines; Wells Longlac Mines. 
Little Long Lac gold m. 

See also Little Long Lac Gold Mines. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 115 

Production 11 

Little Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Little Long Lac g. m. 
Capital; officers 114, 115 



192 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 
Little Turtle lake. 

Gold mg. See Saundary Synd. 

Livermore, R 139 

Load-bearing tile, production 41 

Lochalsh. See Gold Lands Synd. 

Loesch, Gustave R 74, 125 

Logan, Harry 65 

Lois Lake Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

London, Eng. 

Canadian gold marketed in 17 

Long Lac Inlet Mines, Ltd 43 

Long Lake gold m. 

See also Lebel Oro Mines. 

Mill, proposed 8 

Operations 114 

Production 11 

Longacre Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd.. . 46 

Longlac Adair Mines, Ltd 46 

Longlac Lagoon Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Longwell, Alexander 83, 165 

Lorrain Trout Lake Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 22 

Lough, D 127 

Loughborough Mining Co., Ltd 61 

Lucky Cross gold m. 

See also Golden Gate Mg. Co. ; Lucky 
Cross Leasing Synd. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 96 

Production 14 

Lucky Cross Leasing Syndicate 56 

See also Lucky Cross g. m. 

Capital: officers; operations 115, 116 

Lucky Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers: operations 116 

Incorporated 46 

Mine manager and address 56 

Ludwig, ^L H 165 

Lumbers, J. H 103 

Lymburner, L. C 64 

Lythmore. See Gypsum, Lime and Ala- 
bastine, Canada. 

M 

Mabou, N. S., limestone quarrv 155 

MacAlpine, C. D. H '. . .72, 82, 139 

McAndrew, J. A 67 

Macandrevv Red Lake Gold Mines, Ltd. 46 

McArthur, T. A 50 

Macartney, C. G 136 

MacAskill, Donald 161 

Macassa gold m. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 116, 117 

Production 10, 14, 116 

L'nderground connection Kirkland 

Lake g. m 109 

Macassa Mines, Ltd. 
See also Macassa g. m. 

Capital; officers 116 

Dividends 15, 16 

McAulev, N.J 50 

Macauley, R. M 131 

McCandless, George F 161 

McCarthy- Webb gold m. 

See also Algoma Summit Gold Mines. 

Manager and address 54 

McCarthv-Webb-Goudreau Mines, Ltd. 68 

McClelland, H. L 82, 161 



P.\GE 

McClintock, W 142 

ZMcCloskey, H. C 82, 103, 146 

AlcConnell, J. E 155 

IVIcConnell, J. W 159 

McCracken, E. C 149 

McCurdy, R. S 155 

McDonald, Cameron 139 

Macdonald, L. A 115 

MacDonald, P 60, 61 

Macdonald, Peter 59 

:MacDonald, S. L 56, 116 

INIacDonnell, Angus 156 

McDonough, W.J 137 

:\lcDougald, W. L 100 

^IcDougall, Mai. -Gen. Alex 93 

McDougall, D. H 117 

AIcDougall tp., granite quarrv 65 

:vIcEachern, W. T ' 139 

:\IcFarlane, F. J 140 

ISIacFarlane Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd. 46 

MacFetridge, C. K 62, 63 

McGowan, Sir Harry 159 

^McGregor, C. F 50 

:McGregor, J. G 56, 124 

McGrory, D 139 

McHarg, Norrie and 65 

:\Iachin, I. M 106 

Mclnernev, J.J 70 

Mclnnes, J. A 83 

r^lclntyre, Hugh 145 

Mclntyre Birch Lake gold m 55, 86 

IMcIntyre-Porcupine gold m. 

See also Alclntyre-Porcupine Mines. 

Alanager and address 56 

Mill, capacitv 8 

Operations." 118-121 

Production 10, 12, 118 

INIcIntyre-Porcupine ]\Iines, Ltd. 
See also Mclntyre-Porcupine g. m. 

Capital; officers 117 

Dividends 15, 16 

Profit tax 51 

Macjoe Sturgeon Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

McKav, F. M 154 

.McKav, J. Albert 135 

IMcKee, Geo. M 132 

]\IcKellar-Longworth gold m. 

See also Xorth Shores Gold Mines. 

Mill, capacity 8 

McKenna, D 86 

McKenzie, J. W 54, 72 

INIcKenzie gold claims. 

Operations 85 

Optioned to Consol. Mg. and Smelt- 
ing Co 55, 85 

McKenzie is., Red 1. 

Gold mg. See Gold Eagle Gold 
Mines; Martin-^McXeeley g. m. 
McKenzie Red Lake Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers: operations 121, 122 

Mill, proposed, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 56 

Mackey Point g. m. 

Operations 85 

Optioned to Consol. Mg. and Smelt- 
ing Co 55, 85 

McKim tp. See Frood nickel m. 
r\IcKinley-Darragh-Savage silver m.. . . 19 

See also Cobalt Properties. 
McKinley-Darragh-Savage Mines of 

Cobalt, Ltd., dividends 22 



1935 



Index, Part I 



193 



PAGE 

McKinnon, Donald 72 

IVIcKinnon tp. 

Gold mg. See Bob Tough Gold Mines. 

Mackle, W. F 122 

Macklem, F. P 59 

Macklem tp. 

Gold mg. See Porcupine Peninsular 
Gold IMines. 

McKnight, W'eslev 68 

McLaren, G. R 134 

McLaren, J. M 122 

Gold production 10 

McLaren, Robt. D 122 

McLaren, \V. M 122 

McLaren-Porcupine Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 122 

Incorporated 43 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 56 

Production 10 ,14 

McLaughlin, G 140 

IMcLaughlin, R. S 85, 159 

McLean, A. B., and Sons 66 

McLean, B. L 76 

McLean, Cohn M 154 

McLean Building Revie-u: 36 

McLean Gold Mines, Ltd 133 

MacLeish, J. E 155 

McLellan, Donald 68 

MacLeod, F. G 122 

MacLeod-Cockshutt Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 122, 123 

Mine manager and address 56 

Mc:Martin, Allen A 100 

McMartin, T. Bruce 56, 123 

See also Dikdik g. m. 

McMaster, R. H 159, 167 

McMillan, E. V 99 

IMcMillan, G. E 99 

IMcMillan Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 123, 124 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 56 

Production 11 

Macmurchy tp. 

Gold mg. See Neville Canadian Gold 
IMines; Westree g. m. 

McNab, A.J 93 

McNeil Longlac Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

McNeill, W. K. 

Report bv, on Assav Offices 52, 53 

McPherson! W. B 74, 76, 98, 114 

McQuaig Red Lake Gold Mines, Ltd. . . 46 

McRae, \V. L 64 

McSherrv, George 127 

MacVichie, J. A 55, 92 

:McVittie tp. 

Gold mg. See Kirkland Consol. 
Mines. 

IVIcWatters Gold Mines, Ltd 69 

IVIadoc. 

Limestone quarrv 64 

Talcmg 35,62 

IVIadoc tp. 

See also Madoc. 

Fluorspar 32, 60 

Slate quarry 40, 65 

Magnet Lake area. 

Gold mg. See Bankfield Gold Mines; 
Wells Longlac IMines. 
:Magnet Lake Gold Mines, Ltd 46 



PAGE 

ISIaguire, W. S 88 

Magwell Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd. . . 46 

Mahood and Co., Ltd., Grant 46 

Maisonville tp. 

Gold mg. See Golden Summit Mines; 
Lakeland Gold, Ltd. 

]\Ialahide tp., sand and gravel 66 

Maiden tp. See Amherstburg. 

Maloney, M. J 139 

Manganese ferro-alloys 28 

Manitario Investments & Exploration, 

Ltd 46 

Manitoba. 

See also Winnipeg. 

Diamond-drilling 5, 6 

Gypsum quarry 155 

Manitoba and Eastern Mines, Ltd 56 

Capital; officers; operations 124 

Incorporated 42 

IVIanitou Gold, Ltd 46 

^lanitoulin dist. See Killarnev. 

Manley Gold :Mines, Ltd 46 

Manley Quebec Gold IMines, Ltd 46 

Alaple Leaf Mines, Ltd. 

Option on Casey Summit g. m 77 

Maple ^Mountain s. area. 

Production ( 1909-30) 20 

Maps revenue from sale of 48, 50 

Marble. 

See also Limestone. 

Operators listed 63, 65 

Statistics 40 

Marbuan gold m. 

See also Marbuan Gold Mines; IMarch 
g. m. 

Mill, capacity 8 

operated by Buffalo Ankerite 12 

Production. .' 10, 12 

Marbuan Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Marbuan g. m. 

Officers; capital; operations 124-126 

March gold m. 

See also IMarbuan g. m. ; March Gold, 
Ltd. 

Manager and address 56 

Production 12 

March Gold, Ltd. 

See also Marbuan Gold Mines; March 

g. m. 
Taken over bv Marbuan Gold ISIines 125 

Marcy, William' L 87, 142 

Marcy, William L., Jr 95 

Margo Mines, Ltd 43 

IMarkus quarry 64 

Marmora, classes for prospectors 175 

Marmora tp. 
See also Deloro. 

Limestone 63 

Marth, J.J 68 

Martin, A. G 61 

Martin, C. H 142 

Martin, Ernest HO 

Martin, George. 

Operations: Crown Reserve s. m. . . . 162 

Martin, Henrv 151 

Martin, J 127 

Martin, R 123 

Martin Bird Syndicate. 

Mine manager and address 56 

Officers; operations 127 

Prosecution 174 



194 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Martin-McNeeley gold m. 

See also McKenzie Red Lake Gold 
Mines. 

Mine manager and address 56 

Operations 121, 122 

Martin's Siding, diatomite 59 

Mason, Bruce 113 

Matachewan gold area. 

Exchange equalization 10, 11 

Mills, capacity 8 

Mines 7, 10 

see also 'Bannockhurn, Cairo, Powell 
tps. 

Ore, average value 7 

Production 10, 11, 14 

Matachewan Canadian Gold, Ltd 127 

Matachewan Consolidated gold m. 

Alanager and address 56 

Alill capacity 8 

Operations 127 

Production 10, 14 

Matachewan Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 
See also Matachewan Consol. g. m. 

Capital ; officers 127 

Mat-a-Lac Gold Svndicate, Ltd 43 

Matheson, Dr. J. j 97 

Matheson District Gold Mines, Ltd.. . 46 

Mattagami r., fire clav 40, 41 

Matthews, A. C ." 109 

Matthews, W. J 92 

Maulson, Frank E 89 

Maw, F. J 67 

May-Spiers Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Medonte tp., limestone 63 

Meech, R. G 145 

Meen, W 131 

Mein, Wm. W 159 

Melchett, Rt. Hon. Lord 159 

Melkman, A. C 57, 149 

Merica, Paul D 158, 159 

Merrick, J. G 67, 82 

Metal mines. 

See also next ref. 

Dividends paid 5 

Metallic minerals. 

Industry and statistics 1-30 

production and value 2-5 

increase 1 

Mines. 

listed 54-58 

reports. See Cobalt (mineral); 
Chromite; Copper; Gold; Molyb- 
denite; Nickel; Radium; vSilver. 
Metallurgical works. 

See also Refineries; Smelters. 

Accidents in 168-174 

Lime consumption 39 

Listed 58, 59 

Operations 165-167 

Metals Development Co., Ltd 105 

Methuen tp. 

Nepheline syenite 31, 61 

Trap quarry 65 

Mexico. 

Gold production (1930-1934) IS 

Mica. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 33 

Mines and managers listed 61 

Michael-Boyle g. m 56 

Operations 131 

Michie, A 63 



PAGE 

Michipicoten gold area. 

Gold mg. See also Township 29, 
ranges 22 and 2.'^. 

Mills, capacity 8 

Michipicoten Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Middle Bay Mines, Ltd 46 

Middlesex co. See Mosa tp. 

Middleton, J. X 64 

Mid-Tyrrell Gold, Ltd 46 

Mikado gold m. 

Manager and address 55 

Operations 107 

Miles, C. H 141 

Mill lake, McDougall tp. 

Granite quarry 65 

Millar Mineral Exploration Co., Ltd. . . 46 

Miller, A. R 70 

Miller, Edward Lang 151 

Miller, G. M 123 

Miller, George C 89, 145 

Miller, Gerard F 151 

Miller, H. C 96 

Miller, M. M 63 

Miller, R. E 114 

Miller, Theodore G 97 

Miller, W. N 50 

Miller Independence Mines (1924), Ltd. 56 

Capital; officers; operations 127 

Miller Lake O'Brien silver m. 

See also O'Brien, M. J., Ltd. 

Manager and address 58 

Operations 164 

Profit tax 51 

IMillerton Gold Mines, Ltd 15 

Millman, H. A 71 

Millward, M. F 109, 110 

Milne, G. F 129 

Milton, lime plant 63, 155 

Mine rentals, revenue 48 

Mine Centre. 

Gold mg. See Foley Synd. ; Golden 
Star g. m.; Saundary Synd.; South 
Vermillion Gold Alines; Stagee 
g. m.; Stellar Gold Mines. 

Mine Seekers and Developers, Ltd 46 

Minefinders, Ltd. 

Fire-clay deposits 40, 41 

Minemakers, Ltd 43 

Mineral industry. 

Production and value 1-5 

metallic, increase in value 1 

Review, statistical, by A. C. Young. 1-53 
Mineral oil. 

See Petroleum. 
Mineral waters. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 33 

Springs and managers listed 61 

Miners' licenses and permits. 

Statistics 48-51 

Mines Department, Ontario, created., . 4 

Mines of Ontario. 

Listed, and managers 54-58 

Reports on, by Inspectors of Mines . . 67-167 

Mining accidents, rept. on 168-174 

Mining claims, statistics 6, 48, 51 

Mining company incorporations 41-47 

Mining divisions. 

Claims recorded in 49, 50 

Revenue derived from 49, 50 

Summary of business transacted .... 49 
Alining expenditure 48 



1935 



Index, Part I 



195 



Alining lands. page 

Leases, statistics 48, 49 

Sales, statistics 48-51 

Alining recorders. 

Mining land sales 48 

Statement of monies remitted 50 

Alining revenue and expenditure 48-51 

Alining Act of Ontario 52 

Prosecutions under 174 

Mining Claims Alart, Ltd 43 

Mining Corporation of Canada. 

See also Ashley g. m. ; Cobalt Proper- 
ties; Smith Cobalt Mines. 

Dividends 22, 23 

Operations 19, 162, 164 

Profit tax 51 

Alining Court, appeals to 49 

Alining Tax Act 51 

Alinnesota, U.S., iron ore imported from 4 

Alint, Royal Canadian 17 

Alint Ore Mines, Ltd. 

See J-M Consol. Mines. 
Alinto gold m. 

See also Minto Gold Mines 

Alanager and address 56 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 128 

Production 11 

Minto Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Minto g. m. 

Anglo-Huronian interest 69 

Capital ; officers ; operations 127, 128 

Misener, Scott 67 

Mispickel. See Arsenic. 

Alissinaibi r., fire clay 40 

Mitchell, H. K 149 

Mitchell. R. F 54, 68, 82 

AI. J. O'Brien, Ltd. See O'Brien, Al. J., 
Ltd. 

AIoflFatt, L. R 128 

Aloflfatt, T 64 

AIoffatt-Hall gold m. 

Aline manager and address 54 

Operations 73, 128 

Production 10, 14 

AlofFatt-Hall Mines, Ltd. 
See also Moffatt-Hall g. m. 

Capital; officers 128 

Molybdenite. 

Alg. See Phoenix Alolybdenite 
Corpn. 

Production 3, 5 

Alonarch Mines, Ltd 46 

Mond, Sir Robert L 159 

Mond Nickel Co 26, 27 

Monel metal 159 

Alonetary Metals, Ltd 46 

Alongowin tp. 

Gold mg. See Fox L. Gold Synd.; 
McMillan Gold Alines. 

Alontague, F. F 78 

Montgomery, Jos 82, 129 

Montgomery, R. J 66 

Montreal, Que. 

Gypsum plant 155 

Pig iron, price 27 

Alontreal River mg. division. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Alontreal River silver area. 

Production (1909-1923) 20 

Alontreal Trust Co 66 

Aloore, James 147 



PAGE 

Moore tp., petroleum 34 

Mooshla Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Moot, Welles V 87, 142 

Morden, W. S 165 

Morin, D. M 72, 115 

Morlock, W. S 115, 156 

Morris, George W 108 

Morris, Stanley 63 

Morris Kirkland Mines, Ltd 108 

Morrisette tp. 

Gold mg. See Goodfish Alg. Co. 

Morrison, J. W 156 

Morrison, Thomas 159 

Morrison, William 31, 61 

Morse, Geo. F 64 

Mortmain companies licensed 42 

Mosa tp., petroleum 34 

Mosher, I. E 55, 97 

Mosher Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd.. . . 46 
Moss gold m. 

See also Ardeen Gold Mines. 

Alanager and address 54 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 70 

Production 11 

Moss tp. See Moss g. m. 

Moss Gold Mines, Ltd 70 

See also Moss g. m. 

Mott, R. C 156 

Moulthorp, C 63 

Mount Dennis, sand-lime brick 66 

Mountain 1., nepheline syenite 31 

Moyle, H 58, 164 

Mud Lake, Que. 

Mclntyre claims at 118 

Mungovan, T. M 124, 129 

Munro Croesus gold m. 

See also Munro Croesus Mines. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, capacity 8 

Production 10, 13 

Munro Croesus Mines, Ltd. 
See also Munro Croesus g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 128 

Muntz, E. P 156 

Alurdoch, G. C 83 

Murdoch, James Y 100, 151 

Murphy, Ambrose 162 

Murr, Leon 73 

Alurray-Algoma Mg. Co., Ltd 43 

Murwood Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Aluskin, Sidney 57, 149 

Muskoka district. See Alartin's Siding. 

Muskoka Diatomite, Ltd 59 

Muskoka Falls, diatomite 59 

Aluton-Champagne Gold Mines, Ltd. . . 46 
Mutz, H. J 161 

N 

Nairn Falls 159 

Nassagawej'a tp. 

Limestone quarry 64 

Sandstone quarry 65 

Nathanson, N. L 155 

National Sand and Alaterial Co 66 

Natural gas. 

Industry, notes by Commissioner ... 33 

Production and value 2,3,33 

increases 33 

Revenue from leases and permits .... 48 



196 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Natural Gas Commissioner 33, 48 

Naybob Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Harden g. m. 

Capital; officers; operations 129 

Incorporated 46 

Mine manager and address. . 56 

Navlor, R. J 56, 129 

Neda Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Neebing tp. See Fort William; Sault 
Ste. Marie. 

Neelands, R. J 115 

NeiUy, Balmer 117 

Nepean tp. 

Limestone 64 

Sand and gravel 66 

Nepheline svenite 31, 61 

Nepheline Co., Ltd 31 

Incorporated 43, 46 

Xeswoba Mines, Ltd 46 

Net Lake Timagami Mines, Ltd 46 

Neukom, Geo 77 

Neville Canadian Gold Mines, Ltd 56 

Capital; officers; operations 129 

Incorporated 43 

New Goudreau Mines, Ltd 67 

New Guinea, gold production IS 

New York, U. S. 

Funds, graph showing fluctuations in 

buying rate of 17 

New York Porcupine gold m. 

See also New York Porcupine Mines. 

Manager and address 55 

Operations 93 

Production 13 

New York Porcupine Mines, Ltd. 
See also New York Porcupine g. m. 

Acquired by Federated Mg. Corpn... 93 

Ore treated by Buffalo Ankerite 12 

New Zealand, gold production IS 

Newall, H 66 

Newfoundland South Coast Svndicate, 

Ltd 43 

Newman, Harry A ._. 137 

Newrav gold m., production (1917, 

1918) 12 

Nezah Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Niagara bar, sand and gravel 66 

Niagara tp., limestone 63 

Niagara Falls. 

Chromite ore shipped to 67 

Iron industry 27 

Lime kilns 62 

Niagara Falls, N. Y., ferro-chrome . ... 29 
Nichol tp. See Flora. 

Nicholls, John C 15S 

Nichols, C. W 162 

Nichols, Joseph 73 

Nickel. 

Industry and statistics 1-3, 5, 24-26 

production and value 2, 3, 5, 24, 25 

from silver ores 21 

increase 1, 24 

Mines. 

see also Cuniptau Mines; Falcon- 
bridge Nickel Mines; Internat. 
Nickel Co. of Canada. 

accidents in 168 

dividends paid by 5, 25, 26 

managers and addresses 58 

profit tax 51 

reports 156-161 



PAGE 

Nickel — Continued 
Refineries. 

see also Clydach; Norway; Port 
Colborne. 

precious metals from 11, 25, 26 

statistics 2, 24-26 

Smelters. See Smelters. 

Nickel Hill Syndicate 20 

Nickel Holdings Corpn 26 

Nicol tp. 

Silver mg. See Miller Lake O'Brien 
s. m. 

Nielsen, A. M 99 

Night Hawk lake. 

Gold mg. See Gold Island g. m. ; 
Porcupine Peninsular g. m. 

Night Hawk Lake Mining Co 135 

Night Hawk Peninsular gold m. 

Production (1924-1927) 12 

Night Hawk Peninsular Mines, Ltd.. . . 135 

Nipigon, Lake, staking east of 1 

Nipissing district 

See also Sabine, Strathy tps. 

Mining lands, leases and sales 48 

Nipissing silver m. 

See also Nipissing Mines Co. ; Nipis- 
sing Mg. Co. 

Alanager and address 58 

Production 163 

Nipissing Mines Co., Ltd 
See also Nipissing Mg. Co. 

Capital; directors 162 

Dividends 23 

Nipissing Mining Co., Ltd. 
See also Nipissing s. m. 

Capital; directors 162 

Dividends 23 

Operations 162, 163 

Nipsona Mines, Ltd 46, 148 

Non-fatal accidents, details 171, 172 

Non-metallic minerals. 

Industry and statistics 2-4, 21, 30, 41 

production and value 2-4, 21, 30 

increase 1 

jNIines, quarries, and works. 

see also Graphite; Gvpsum; Talc. 

listed .' 59-62 

Noranda, Que. 

See also Noranda Mines. 

Ore shipped to, cobalt 19 

gold 13 

Noranda Mines, Ltd. 

Limestone operators 64 

Norbell Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Norco Thompson JNIines, Ltd 46 

Nordic Sturgeon Gold IMines, Ltd 46 

Norfolk CO. See Water ford. 

Norontic Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Norrie and McHarg 65 

North Bay, draughting office 53 

North Burgess tp., barite 59 

North Cayuga tp. See Decewsville. 

North Oxford tp., limestone quarry.. . . 64 

North Shores Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 129, 130 

]\Iill, capacity 8 

IMinc manager and address 56 

North Tiblemont Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

North West Territories, diamond-drill- 
ing 6 

North Whitney Gold Syndicate, Ltd. . . 46 



1935 



Index, Part I 



197 



PAGE 

Northcrown gold m. 

Production (1920, 1921) 12 

Northern Aerial Canada Golds, Ltd. . . 134 
Northern Aerial ^Minerals Exploration, 

Ltd 135 

Northern Development, Dept. of. 

Road construction, Hudson 80 

Sand and gravel production 39 

Northern Empire Mines Co., Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 130, 131 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 56 

Production 11 

Northern Mining Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Northern Quebec Prospectors, Ltd 46 

Northern TurnbuU gold m. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Production 10, 13 

Northway, John A 103 

Northwestern Ontario. 

See also Kenora dist. ; Patricia por- 
tion; Rainy R., Thunder Bay dists. 

Cobalt production 21 

Gold mg 7 

exchange equalization 11, IS 

labour statistics 9 

ore, average value 7 

production 9, 11 

and silver 11 

Norton, A. W 65 

Norway. 

Falconbridge nickel-copper refinery. . 158 
Nova Scotia. See Deep Brook; lona; 
Mabou; Windsor. 

Nu Sigma Gold Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Nugold Mines, Ltd 46 

O 

Oakes, Harry 110 

Obonga Lake area. 

Chromite mining 29, 54, 67 

O'Brien, C. J 133 

O'Brien, J. A 166 

O'Brien. M.J 166 

O'Brien, M. J., Ltd. 

See also Cross Lake s. m.; Miller 
Lake O'Brien s. m.; O'Brien s. m. 

Operations 163, 164 

Profit tax 51 

O'Brien silver m., profit tax 51 

O'Connell, G. B 131 

O'Connell Gold IMines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 131 

Mine manager and address 56 

Occupation, licenses of 48 

Oceania, gold production (1930-1934). . 18 

O'Flvnn, W. A 58, 163 

Ogden, P. \V 145 

Ogden tp. 

Gold mg. See De Santis g. m. ; Xay- 
bob Gold Klines. 

Oil, for coking industry 29 

Oil, mineral. See Petroleum 

Oil gas, for coking industry 29 

Oil Springs, petroleum 34 

Oklend Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Olds, R. E 77 

O'Leary Malartic Mines, Ltd. 

Optioned to ]\lclntyre 118 

Oliver, John T 95 



PAGE 

Oliver Severn Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

O'Meara, Gerald D 115, 127 

Onakawana lignite field 40 

Onaman Lake area. 

Gold mg. See Tashota Goldfields. 
Oneida tp. See Hagersville; Lythmore. 

Onondaga tp., petroleum 34 

Ontario co. See Whitby tp. 

Ontario gold production, percentage of 

Canadian output 18 

Ontario Chemical Minerals, Ltd 43 

Ontario Department of Mines, created 4 
Ontario Kirkland gold m. 

Production (1922) 14 

Ontario Refining Co., Ltd 2, 24 

Manager and address 59 

Operations 160, 166 

Ontario Reformatory, limestone quarry 64 

Ontario Rock Co 65 

Ontario Slate Mines, Ltd 40 

Quarry 65 

Orecana, Ltd 43 

Orecana Trusts, Ltd. 

Edwards g. m., option 96 

Mines and address 56 

Operations 131 

O'Reilly. E. L 133 

Orford process plant. Copper Cliff. . . .24, 160 

Orillia, iron industry 27 

Orlllia tp., limestone quarry 64 

Ornamental brick, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Ornamental Stone Products 64 

O'Rourke, M. F 50 

Orser, Edward H 57, 147 

Orser, S. H 64 

Orton, R. C 131 

Osier, Britton 159 

Osier. F. G 85 

Osmium, production 26 

Ottawa. 

See also Royal Canadian Mint. 

Classes for prospectors 175 

Otter Lake Gold Syndicate, Ltd 46 

Owen Sound. 

Iron industry 27 

Lime pit 63 

Limestone quarry 64 

Oxford CO. See Beachville; X. Oxford 
tp. 

P 

Pa. 746-7 gold claims. 

See Pickle Crow Gold Mines. 

Pacaud tp. 

Gold Alg. See Barr\--Hollinger g. m. ; 
Miller Independence Mines. 

Pacitto, A 57, 140 

Pain. S. A 96, 115 

Painkiller Lake. See Blue Quartz g. m. 

Palladium. 

Production and value (1930-1934) ... 26 

Palmer, Chas 149 

Palmer, R. X 56, 129, 130 

Pamour Porcupine Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 131, 132 

Incorporated 42 

]Mine manager and address 56 

Paper. See Pulp and paper industry. 

Paris. 

Alabastine plant 155 

Sand and gravel 66 



198 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Park, A. P 59 

Park. Hugh 58, 162 

Parker, A. G 69 

Parker, R. D 161 

Parker, W. R 137 

Parkhill gold m. 

Manager and address 56 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 132, 133 

Production 11 

Parkhill Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Parkhill g. m. 

Capital; officers 132 

Profit tax 51 

Parkinson, N. F 156 

Parmac Porcupine Mines, Ltd 81 

Parry Sound district. See Henvey, Mc- 
Dougall, Perry tps. 

Parry Sound mg. division 50 

Parsons, C. S 78 

Passon, F. M 151 

Patricia gold m. 

See also Barry-Hollinger g. m. 

Production (1918) 14 

Patricia portion of Kenora. 

Gold mg. See Bathurst Gold Mines; 
Casummit L. area; Central Patricia 
Gold Mines; Pickle Crow Gold 
Mines; Red Lake g. area; Vermilion 
Lake Gold Mines; Woman Lake 
area. 

Mills, capacity S 

Mining lands, sales and leases 48 

Patricia Participators, Ltd 46 

Patterson, John P 72 

Patterson, R. L 123 

Paulore Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Paymaster gold m. 

See also Paymaster Consolidated 
Mines. 

Fire in carbide refuse 173 

Manager and address 57 

Operations 133, 134 

Production 1(1, 12 

Paymaster Consolidated Mines, Ltd. 
See also Paymaster g. m. 

Capital; officers 133 

Mill, capacity 8, 133 

Payne, Gordon 149 

Payne, Lewis 69 

Payore Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Pearl, H. L 86 

Pearl lake 84 

Peat industry 2, 3, 34 

Producers listed 61 

Peel CO., sandstone 65 

Pembroke. 

Municipal limestone quarry 64 

Pencil-leads, graphite for 32 

Penhorwood tp., barite 59 

Penitentiary, Kingston, limestone 

quarry 64 

Penn-Canadian Mines, Ltd., dividends 23 

Pentz, F. E 114 

Permits. See Boring permits; Building 
permits; Forest perrnits; Miners' 
licenses and permits. 

Perrin. John D 116 

Perron, A. J 97 

Perry tp., diatomite 59 

Ferryman, A. M 60 



P.'VGE 

Pershing Gold Syndicate, Ltd 43 

Perth CO. See St. Marys. 
Peterborough co. 

See Belmont tp.; Lakefield; Methuen 
tp. 

Peters, C. A 132 

Peterson Cobalt Mines, Ltd 58 

Operations 164 

Peterson Lake Silver-Cobalt Mg. Co., 

Ltd., dividends 23 

Petroleum. 

Industry, notes by Commissioner. . . 34 

Production and value 2, 3, 34 

Petrolia, petroleum 34 

Pfeiffer, Geo. F 108- 

Phoenix Molybdenite Corpn., Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 156 

Mine manager and address 57 

Pickle Crow Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 134, 135 

Incorporated 46 

Mill, proposed 8 

Mine manager and address 57 

Road construction 80 

Pickle Lake-Crow River area. 

See Crow R. area; Pickle Crow Gold 
Mines. 
Pig iron 

See also Iron and steel industry. 

Prices at Montreal 27 

Pigments from uranium 30 

Pike Consolidated Gold, Ltd 46 

Pilgrim Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Piper, M. L 96 

Pipestone bav, Red 1. 
See Ball, Todd tps. 

Pirson, John 64 

Pit operators. See Sand and gravel. 

Pitchblende 30 

Pitfield, W. C 155 

Platinum metals. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 5, 24-26 

production and value 2, 3, 5, 26 

increase 1 

Plator Longlac Gold Mines, Ltd 46 

Plaxton, A. G 131 

Play fair tp. 

Gold mg. See Ramore Gold Mining 
Co. 

Playfair Iron Mines, Ltd 43 

Plumbago. See Graphite. 

Plympton tp., petroleum 34 

Poles, cement 38 

Pollard, F. A 113 

Pontardawe, Wales 159 

Pope, Thos 113 

Porcupine, South. See South Porcupine. 
Porcupine gold area. 

Barite. See Canada Night Hawk 
Mines. 

Dividends 16 

Exchange equalization 10, 11, 18 

Gold production 9 

and silver 10-12 

Labour statistics 9 

Mills, capacity 8 

Mines. 

see also Deloro, Ogden, Shaw, Tis- 
dale, Whitney tps. 

ore, average value 7 

producing 7, 10, 12 



1935 



Index, Part I 



PAGE 
Porcupine mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Porcupine Crown gold m., production. . 12 
Porcupine Crown Mines, Ltd., divi- 
dends 15, 16 

Porcupine Grande Gold Mines, Ltd.. . . 132 
Porcupine Night Hawk Mines, Ltd. . . . 135 

Porcupine Ores and Metals, Ltd 46 

Porcupine Peninsular Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 135, 136 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 57 

Porcupine Pet gold m. 

Production (1914, 1915) 13 

Porcupine United gold m. 

Production (1929-1931) 13 

Porcupine Watborn Gold Mines, Ltd . . 46 
Porphyry Hill gold m. 

Production (1913-1915) 13 

Port Arthur, classes for prospectors... 175 
Port Arthur mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Port Colborne. 

Cement plant 37, 62 

Iron blast furnace 28, 58, 165 

Nickel refinery 24, 25, 58, 160 

Port Franks, salt 35 

Port Hope, radium plant 30 

Porteous, Henry M 116 

Portland cement. 

See also Cement products. 

Industry 37 

operators 62 

production and value 2, 3, 37 

for cement products 38 

Portland tp. 

Granite quarry 65 

Limestone quarry 64 

Portsmouth, limestone quarry 64 

Posts and poles, cement 38 

Pottery industry, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Powell tp. See Matachewan Consol. 
g. m.; O'Connell Gold Mines; 
Young-Davidson g. m. 
Premium on exchange. 

See Exchange equalization. 

Premier Paymaster Mines, Ltd 133 

Prescott CO. See Caledonia tp. 

Pressed brick, production 41 

Presswood and Gibbs 65 

Prest, F 88 

Preston gold m., production (1914) .... 13 
Price, C. W 58, 164 

See also Foster s. m. 

Pringle, John 54, 83 

Prosecutions 174 

Prospecting activity. 

Increase in 1 

Statistics 6, 48, 51 

Prospectors, classes for 175 

Prospectors Airways Co., Ltd 69 

Prosser, Seward 159 

Provincial Assay Office, report 51, 52 

Pulp and paper industry. 

Lime consumption 39 

Puslinch, lime plant 155 

Puslinch tp. 

See also Puslinch. 

Limestone 63 

Puslinch Quarry, Ltd 63, 64 



Pyke Salvage Co 

Pyrite. See Iron pyrites. 



199 



PAGE 
66 



Q 
Quarries. 

Accidents in 168-174 

Listed 62-66 

Quartz and quartzite. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 34 

Quarries listed 61 

Quebec. 

See also Deschenes; Joliette; Mon- 
treal; Noranda; St. Mark. 

Diamond-drilling 5, 6 

Quebec Eureka Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Quebec Gold Mining Corpn 132 

Quebec Viking Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Queen Lebel gold m. 

See also Lakeside-Kirkland Gold 
Mines. 

Manager and address 56 

Queen Lebel Gold Mines, Ltd 113 

See also Lakeside-Kirkland Gold 
Mines. 

Queen Lebel Gold Mining Co., Ltd. ... 113 

Incorporated 47 

Queenston Quarries, Ltd 63, 64 

Quicklime. 

Plants listed 62, 63 

Production and value 2, 3, 39 

for cement products 38 

Quinn, F. P 73 

Quinn, G. W 121 

R 

Racine, G. F 132 

Racine, H. H 149 

Radium 30. 58, 161 

Rahill Red Lake Mining Co.. Ltd 47 

Rahn Lake Mines Corpn., Ltd 43 

Rainy River district. 

Gold mg. See Mine Centre; Sapawe 
L. area. 

mills, capacity 8 

Lands, sales and leases 48 

Rainville. G. H 131 

Raleigh, tp. 

See also Chatham. 

Natural gas 33 

Petroleum 34 

Rama tp., limestone 64 

Ramore area. See Playfair tp. 
Ramore Gold Mining Co. 

Capital; officers; operations 136 

Incorporated 47 

Mine manager and address 57 

Ramsay tp., lime 63 

Raney, Fraser 77 

Rankin, John 1 100 

Ratcliffe, E. B 54, 73 

Rattray, J. H 79 

Raven River Mines, Ltd 47 

Rawdon tp., limestone 64 

Raymond Tiblemont Gold Mines, Ltd. 47 

Rayner Construction, Ltd 64 

Rea, John R 137 

Rea, T. H 83,99 

Rea gold m., production (1913-1914) . . 12 
Rea Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 15, 16 



200 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Recorders. See Mining recorders. 

Recording fees, revenue 48, 49 

Red lake. 

See AIcKenzie is. ; Pipestone bav. 
Red Crest Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 136 

Incorporated 42 

Mine manager and address 57 

Red Lake gold area. 

See also Cochenour-Willans g. m.; 
Howey g. m.; Red 1.; Red Lake 
Gold Shore Mines. 

Mclntyre-Porcupine claims 118 

Red Lake mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Red Lake Gold Shore Alines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 137 

Mine manager and address 57 

Redington, John 54, 83 

Refineries. 
Cobalt. 

see Deloro Smeltingand Refining Co. 
Copper. 

see also Ontario Refining Co. 

precious metals from 11, 25, 26 

statistics 2, 24-26 

Gold. See Ontario Refining Co. 

Listed 59 

Nickel. 

see also Clydach; Norway: Port 
Colborne. 

precious metals from 11, 25, 26 

statistics 2, 24-26 

Platinum, precious metals. 

see Acton; Ontario Refining Co. 
Silver. 

see also Deloro Smelting and Re- 
fining Co. 

sale of bullion bv 19 

statistics " 2, 19, 21 

Reformatory, Ontario, limestone quarry 64 
Refractorv clavs. 

Northern Oiit., notes by W. S. Dyer. . 40, 41 

Regina gold m 55, 103 

Reid, Agnes 162 

Reid, Fraser D 77, 103, 121 

Reid, S. H. J 155 

Reilley, William W 146 

Reliance Gold Mining Co 42 

Rendix gold claim 88 

Renfrew. 

Feldspar 60 

Lime 63 

Molybdenum. See Phoenix Molyb- 
denite Corpn. 
Renfrew co. 

See Bagot, Brougham tps.; Eganville; 
Fraser tp.; Pembroke; Renfrew; 
Wilber force tp. 

Rennick, A 115 

Rentals, revenue 48 

Residential construction contracts .... 36 
Retort coal gas. See Gas, coal. 

Revenue, mining 48-51 

Reward Mining Co 149 

Rhodesia, Southern. 

Gold production (1930-1934) 18 

Rhodium, production 26 

Richardson, J. A 159 

Richelieu Gold Alines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 137 



PAGE 

Richelieu Gold Mines, Ltd. — Continued 

Incorporated 47 

Mine manager and address 57 

Richland Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Richmond Development Co., Ltd 47 

Rickaby tp. 

Gold mg. See Dikdik g. m. 

Rickard Ramore Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Ridgeley gold claims. 

Anglo-Huronian interest 69 

Ridgeway, limestone quarry 65 

Riggs, Thomas 116 

Right of Way silver m. 

See Cobalt Properties. 

Right of Way Mines, Ltd., dividends. . 23 

Right of Wav Mining Co., dividends. . 23 

Rilev, Jas. E 85 

Ritchie, A 86 

Robb, Walter B 108 

Roberts, A. Kelso 164 

Robinson, D 134 

Robinson, F. A 127 

Robinson, J. H 63 

Robinson, John B 89 

Robinson, L. V 60, 155 

Robinson, T. F 63, 64 

Robinson, W. E 150 

Rocdor Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Roche, P.J 137 

Roche Long Lac Gold Mines, Ltd 57 

Capital; officers; operations 137, 138 

Incorporated 47 

Rockwood Lime Co 63 

Rodgers, C. E 57, 142 

Roe, Stephen 61 

Rogers, H. Dix 149 

Rogers, J. C 145 

Ronaldson. J. V 96 

Ronaldson, T. S 96 

Roof slabs. See Haydite. 

Roofing tile, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Rook, W. G 94 

Rope tests 174 

Fees for, revenue 48 

Rose, E. H 71 

Ross, A. Calvin 154 

Ross, James A 129 

Rothwell, H. D 133 

Rothwell, T. E 53 

Roussac, J. A. vS 131 

Routly, H. T 64 

Rouyn Reward Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Rowan Discovery gold claim. 
See also Red Crest Gold mines. 

Manager and address 57 

Operations 136 

Royal Canadian Mint 17 

Royalties. 

Sand and gravel 48 

Timmins and Tisdale tp., on gold. . . . 103 

Rovce, Geo 87 

Rudhard, J. W 108 

Ruel, Gerald 122 

Rupert's Land Gold Syndicate, Ltd. ... 47 
Russell CO. 

See Bourget Springs; Russell tp. 

Russell tp., limestone 63 

Russia, gold production 18 

Ruthenium, production 26 

Rutherford tp. See Killarnev. 

Rvckman, W. C '. 142 



1935 



Index, Part I 



201 



S PAGE 

Sabine tp., feldspar 60 

St. Anthony gold m. 

Manager and address 57 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 138 

Production 11 

St. Anthony Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also St. Anthony g. m. 

Capital; officers 138 

St. Charles, Dr. W. P 110 

St. Clair r., sand and gravel 66 

St. Lawrence r., sand and gravel 66 

St. Mark, Que., lime plant 155 

St. Marys. 

Cement works 37, 62 

Limestone quarry 64 

St. Marys Cement Co 37 

St. Marv's Crushed Stone, Ltd 64 

St. Paul', Chas. E 95, 137 

Sakoose Gold IMines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 139 

Incorporated 42 

Mine manager and address 57 

Salkeld, CD 54, 55, 69, 86 

Salmon, H. H 64 

Salmon River, B.C., 

Limestone plant 155 

Salt. 

Industry and statistics 2,3, 34, 35 

Operators, listed 62 

Salter, W. R 105 

Sand and gravel. 
See also Dredging. 

Accidents in pits 168-174 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 39 

cement products, consumption. ... 38 

Operators listed 66 

Royalties; licenses 48 

Sand-lime brick. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 40 

lime consumption 39 

Plants and managers 66 

Sandoe, Richard 58, 164 

Sandstone. 

Operators listed 65 

Production 2, 40 

Sandwich, salt 62 

Sapawe Lake area. 

Gold mg. See Central Canada Mines. 
Sarnia tp. 

Petroleum 34 

Salt 62 

Saskatchewan. 

Diamond-drilling 6 

Sault Ste. IMarie. 

Iron industry 27, 28, 58, 165 

Prospectors' classes 175 

Sault Ste. Marie mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Saundary Syndicate. 

Mill, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 57 

Operations 139 

Production 11 

Saunders, A. E 57, 139 

Savage, James 88 

Saxton, Stanlev 56, 122 

Scadding Gold Mines, Ltd. 47 

Scarborough, sand-lime brick 66 

Schmelzle, George 56, 113 

Schram, Robert 77 



PAGE 

Schreiber. 

Gold mg. near. See Gold Range 
Mines; Harkness-Hays Gold Mines; 
North Shores Gold Alines. 
Schreiber Pyramid Gold Mines, Ltd. . . 47 

Schulze, Theodore 88 

Schumacher. 

See Coniaurum g. m., Mclntyre- 
Porcupine g. m. 

Schumacher gold m 12 

Schumacher Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 15 

Scott, H. L 65 

Scott, J. R 148 

Scott, R. P 78 

Scottish-Ontario gold m. 

See also Canusa g. m. 

Production (1927, 1928) 13 

Seal Harbor Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Searchmont, gold mg. near 140 

Searls, Carroll 93, 130 

Searls, Fred, Jr 130 

Securitv Gold Mines, Ltd 43 

Segsworth, W. E 141 

Selected Canadian Golds, Ltd 57 

Capital; officers; operations 139 

Selenium. 

Internat. Nickel Co., sales 159 

Production statistics 2, 3, 5, 25 

Seneca tp. See Caledonia. 
Seneca-Superior Silver Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 23 

Serson, John R 92 

Sesekinika. 

See Kirkland Consol. ]\lines. 

Sewer brick, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Sewer copings, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Sewer pipe, statistics 2, 3, 38, 41 

Shaft accidents 169 

Shane, George R 63 

Shannon, H. S 148 

Sharpe, Alfred H 142 

vShaw, John W 56, 121, 122 

Shaw, Quincy 139 

Shaw tp. 

Gold mg. See Excello ]\Iines, Ltd. 
Shawinigan Chemicals, Ltd. 

Notes on carbide 173 

Shawkey Gold ]\ lining Co., Ltd 47 

Sheppard, W. J 117 

vShipley, Grant B 159 

Shoal lake, Kenora dist. 

Gold mg. See Damascus g. m. ; Ken- 
ora Prospectors and Miners. 

Shulman, M. S 139 

Shunsby, Martin J 98, 114 

Sigma Alines, Ltd 91 

Silica brick. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 34 

Operators listed 61 

Silica sand 41 

Silicon ferro-alloys 28 

Silver. 

Industry and statistics. . .2, 3, 5, 10, 19-23 

price 19, 163 

production and value 2, 3, 5, 19-21 

from gold ores 10, 17, 19 

from nickel-copper ores. . .25, 26, 159 

Mines. 

see also Cobalt, Gowganda s. areas, 
accidents in 168 



202 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 
Silver — Contin ued 
Mines — Continited. 

dividends paid by 5, 22, 23 

managers and addresses 58 

profit tax 51 

reports 162-165 

Nationalization by U.S 19 

Ores, revenue from treatment of ... . 48 
Refineries. 

see also Deloro Smelting and Re- 
fining Co. 

sale of bullion by 19 

statistics ' 2, 19, 21 

Silver islet, silver production 20 

Silverstone Black Marble Quarries .... 65 
Simcoe co. 

See IMedonte tp.; Orillia tp. 

Simons, H.J 73 

Simpson, W. J 55, 97 

Sinclair, Dr. Alex 57, 140 

Sinclair, D. G 67, 168 

Sinclair Mines, Ltd 47 

Sinclair Mines Syndicate. 

Mine manager and address 57 

Operations 140 

Sin-Mac Lines, Ltd 66 

Siscoe, Stanlev E 141 

Sixt, Wm. M.' 109 

Skead tp. See Telluride g. m. 
Skinner tp. 

Gold mg. See Bathurst Gold Mines. 

Slaght, Arthur G 116 

Slate. 

Market for 40 

Production and value 2, 3, 40 

Quarry 65 

Slee, Frederick C 165 

Slingsby, E. 68 

Smeaton, H 147 

Smelters. 

Nickel-copper. 

see also Coniston; Copper Cliff; Fal- 
conbridge Nickel Klines. 

lime consumption 39 

listed 59 

statistics 2. 24, 25 

Silver. 

see also Deloro Smelting and Refin- 
ing Co. 

sale of bullion by 19 

statistics 2, 19, 21 

Smith, A. L 135 

Smith, Alex. C 136 

Smith, Angus 127 

Smith, Bernard E 117 

Smith, C. G 78 

Smith. F. L 127 

Smith, Harold 78 

Smith, J. D. C 50 

Smith, M. C 108 

Smith, P 73 

Smith, R. Home 69 

Smith, R. M 64 

Smith, S. B 57 

\'an Sickle g. m., operations 140 

Smith, Thos. K 93 

Smith, W. H 164 

Smith and Co., Canada, Ltd., C. Morri- 
son 47 

Smith Cobalt Mines, Ltd 58 

Capital; officers; operations 164 



PAGE 

Smvth, W. A 66 

Smvth, \V. T 64 

Smythe, Ltd., C 64 

Snelgrove, H. P 74 

Snider tp. See Copper Cliff 

Soapstone, industry and statistics 3 

Soft-mud brick, .statistics 41 

Sol-D'Or Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Incorporated 47 

Production 11 

Soliague, L 116 

South Africa. 

Gold production (1930-1934) 18 

South Dakota. U.S. 

Gold production (1930-1934) 18 

South Dumfries tp. See Paris. 
South Lorrain tp. 

See also Keeley s. m. 

Silver shipments 20 

South AIcKenzie Island Mines, Ltd.. . . 47 
South Porcupine. 

See Buffalo Ankerite, Dome, Mar- 
buan. Paymaster g. mines. 

South Porcupine Mines. Ltd 43 

South Vermillion Gold ]Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 140 

Incorporated 47 

Mine manager and address 57 

Southern Rhodesia. 

Gold production (1930-1934) 18 

Southwestern Ontario. 

See Natural gas; Petroleum; Salt. 
Soviet, The. 

Gold production (1930-1934) 18 

Spar. See Feldspar. 

Speiss residues 21 

Spence, J., gold production 13 

Spence, W. H 62 

Spence Lake Diatomite, Ltd 59 

vSpencer, C. L 57, 150 

Spiegeleisen, production 28, 165 

Spontaneous combustion in carbide. 

Notes, rules for prevention 173, 174 

Spreckels. R 137 

Spring \'ale, sand and gravel 66 

Springbrook Sturgeon Gold Mines, Ltd. 47 
Springer gold claim. 

See Central Patricia Gold Mines. 
Springer Sturgeon Gold Mines, Ltd. ... 43 
S.S.M. 301 gold claim. 

See Van Sickle g. m. 
S.S.M. 4,925 gold claim. 

See Hillside Gold Mines. 

Stabell Lake Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Stagee gold m. 

Mine manager and address 57 

Operations 149 

Optioned to Wells Longlac Mines. .57, 149 

Stamford, iron industry 27 

Stamford tp., limestone quarry 64, 65 

Standard Gold Mines, Ltd 133 

Standard Minerals of Canada, Ltd. ... 47 
Stanley, Robt. C 158, 159 

Notes bv. on copper production 24 

Stanley Gold Mines, Ltd 57 

Capital; operations 141 

Starke, Robert 83 

vStatistical review, mineral industry 

(1934), by A. C. Young 1-53 

Steel industry. 

See Iron and steel industrv. 



1935 



Index, Part I 



203 



PAGE 

Steel Company of Canada. 

Manager and address 59 

Officers; operations 28, 166 

Steindler, L. L 141 

Stellar Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 141 

Mine manager and address 57 

Stephens, J 63 

Stephenson, J. W 145 

Sterling Exploration Co., Ltd 44, 47 

Stern, Morton F 89 

Stevens, Frank G 54, 82 

Stevens, J. H 73 

Stevenson, CD 56, 132 

Stevenson, J. G. A 55, 86 

Stewart, C. H. E 56, 123 

Stewart, J. C 149 

Stewart Bros 61 

Stiff-mud brick, statistics 41 

Stillar-Temagami Gold Mines, Ltd. ... 47 

Stinson, F. L 57, 156 

Stinson, T. H 72 

Stokes, R.J 145 

Stoklosar, Charles A 60 

Stone. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 40 

Operators listed 63-65 

Stout, Andrew V 1.59 

Strathy tp. 

Copper mg. See Cuniptau Alines. 

Gold mg. See Manitoba and Eastern 
Mines. 

Rare metals 26 

Strathy Basin Mines, Ltd 47 

Strathy Explorers, Ltd 44 

Straw lake. 

Gold mg. See Straw Lake Beach 
Gold Mines. 
Straw Lake Beach Gold Mines Synd. 

Capital; officers; operations 141 

Incorporated 44 

Mine manager and address 57 

Straight, J. E 150 

Strong, Horace F 98 

Structural materials. 

See also Clay products. 

Industry and statistics 2-4, 36-40 

production, increased value 1 

Operators and managers listed 62-66 

Structural tile, statistics 2, 3, 41 

Stucco, cement 38 

Sturgeon Aurora Mines, Ltd 44 

Sturgeon Bridge Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Sturgeon Lake area. 

Gold mg. 5ee Richelieu Gold Mines: 
St. Anthony g. m. 

Sturgeon River area, gold "rush" 7 

Sturgeon River Gold Basin Synd., Ltd. 44 
Sturgeon River Gold Mines, Ltd 7 

Incorporated 47 

Sudbury district. 

Barite mg. See Penhorwood tp. 

Feldspar mg. See Burwash tp. 

Gold mills, capacity 8 

Gold mg. See Afton g. m.; Bob 
Tough Gold Mines; Bousquet Gold 
Mines; Long Lake g. m.; Mon- 
gowin tp. ; Swayze area ; W. Shining- 
tree area; Young-Shannon Gold 
Mines. 

Mining lands, sales and leases 48 



PAGE 

Sudbury district — Continued 
Nickel-copper. 

industry 24-26 

mining. See Falconbridge Xickel 
]Mines; International Xickel Co. 
of Canada. 
Platinum metals. See Platinum metals. 

Sudbury mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Sudbury Basin Mines, Ltd. 

Matachewan Consol. stock option. . . 127 

Sugar industrv, lime consumption 39 

Sullivan, F. j' 56, 109, 110 

Sullivan, J. E 71 

Sullivan tp., lime 62 

Sulphur, production 2,3 

Sulphur fumes. 

Sulphuric acid extracted from 32 

Sulphuric acid. 

Amt. used in coking industry 29 

Industrv and statistics 3, 32 

Plant for 60, 166 

Sultana gold m. 

Operations 139 

Optioned to Selected Canadian 

Golds 57, 139 

Summerhayes, M. \V 57, 151 

Summit lake. 

See Casey Summit g. m. 

Superior Alloys, Ltd 27 

Supreme Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Sutherland, H. H 127 

Sutton, L. V 86 

Swayze gold area, Sudbury dist. 

See Greenlaw Gold Mines; Halcrow 
Swayze Mines; Kenty Gold Mines; 
Lee Gold Alines; Swayze-Huycke 
Gold IMines. 

Swayze tp. 

Gold mg. See Kenty Gold Mines. 

Swayze Gold Field, Ltd 47 

Swayze-Huycke Gold Mines, Ltd 57 

Capital; officers; operations 142 

Prosecution 174 

Sweet-Sturgeon Syndicate, Ltd 44 

Sydenham tp. See Owen Sound. 

Sylvanite gold m. 

See also Sylvanite Gold I\Iines. 

Manager and address 57 

Mill, capacity 8, 144 

Operations 142-145 

Production 10, 14, 142 

Sylvanite Gold Mines, Ltd. 

See also Erie Canadian Mines; Syl- 
vanite g. m. 

Capital; officers 142 

Dividends 15, 16 

Option on Delnite shares 87 

Profit tax 51 

Symmes, B. L. H 145 

T 

Tait, Sir Thomas 132 

Talc. 

Industry and statistics 2, 3, 35 

increase 36 

Mines. 

accidents 168 

listed 62 

reports 165 



204 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Talisman Gold IMines, Ltd 57 

Capital; officers; operations 145 

Tallack, R 131 

Tamarac Gold Mining Co., Ltd 47 

Tanneries, lime consumption 39 

Tapley, P. Nugent 145 

Tar, from coking industry 29 

Tarentorus tp. See Sault Ste. Marie. 

Tashota Gold :\lines. Ltd 145 

Tashota Goldfields, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 145 

Mill, proposed, capacity 8 

Mine manager and address 57 

Tasmania, gold production 18 

Tasmijopen IMining Co., Ltd 44 

Taxes, mining, revenue 48, 51 

Tavlor, A 154 

Tavlor, Charles 106 

Tavlor, Nelson S 95 

Tavlor, R. F 138 

Tavlor, Roy 62, 165 

Tavlor, W. A 68 

Tavlor, W. D 58, 162 

T. B. 3,326 gold claim. 

See Gold Range Mines. 
T. B. 3,327, 3,354 gold claims. 

See Harkness-Havs Gold Mines. 
T. B. 9,985 gold claim. 

See Hard Rock Gold Mines. 
T. B. 10,213 gold claim. 

See Bankfield Gold Mines. 
T. B. 11,071 gold claim. 
See McMartin, J. Bruce. 

Teare, R. P 57, 138 

Teck tp. 

Gold mg. See Canadian Kirkland 
Mines; Kirkland Lake, Lake Shore, 
Lucky Cross, Macassa, Sylvanite, 
Teck-Hughes, Tobuni, Wright-Har- 
greaves g. mines. 
Teck-Hughes gold m. 

See also Teck-Hughes Gold Mines. 
Kirkland Lake g. m. connected with. 109 

Manager and address 57 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 146, 147 

Production 10, 14, 146 

Teck-Hughes Gold Mines, Ltd. 
See also Teck-Hughes g. m. 

Capital; officers 145, 146 

Dividends 15, 16 

Profit tax 51 

Teddj- Bear Valley Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; operations 147 

Mine manager and address 57 

Teddy Bear Valley Syndicate 147 

Tees Transit Co 66 

Telfer, R. A 154 

Telluride gold m., production 14 

Tellurium. 

International Nickel Co., sales 159 

Production, statistics 2, 3, 5 

Temagami Development Co., Ltd 44 

Temiskaming silver m. 

Lessees and address 58 

Operations 164 

Temiskaming and Hudson Bay Mining 

Co., Ltd., dividends 23 

Temiskaming Alines Co., Ltd 118 

Temiskaming Mining Co., Lti.div, 

dends 23 



PAGE 

Temiskaming Testing Laboratories. 

Fees collected 48 

Operations: financial statement 51, 52 

Terra Cotta Quarries, Ltd 65 

Terry, S. D 68 

Tests on rope 174 

Tetreault, J. L. A 105 

Thames river. 

Sand and gravel 66 

Thamesville, petroleum 34 

Thomas, David E 130 

Thomson, D. M 55, 106 

Thomson, R. G. 108 

Thompson, C. N 97 

Thompson, J. M 55, 106 

Thompson, John 156 

Thompson, John F 146, 158, 159 

Thompson, R. E 73 

Thornber, B 113 

Thorold, iron industry 27 

Three Nations [Mining Co., Ltd 132 

Thunder Bay district. 

See also Fort William; Sault Ste. 
Marie. 

Chromite. See Obonga Lake area. 

Gold mg. See Beardmore area; Dik- 
dik g. m.; Kowkash area; Little 
Long Lac area; Moss g. m.; Schrei- 
ber; Sturgeon Lake area; Tashota 
Goldfields. 
mills, capacity 8 

[Mining lands, sales and leases 48 

Thunder Bay Gold IMines, Ltd 47 

Thurlow tp. 

See also Belleville. 

Limestone 64 

Tiblemont Central Gold Mines, Ltd. ... 47 

Tiedt, Henry J 73, 74, 125 

Tilbury East tp., petroleum 34 

Tile production 2, 3, 41 

Timagami Forest Reserve. 

Gold mg. See Afton g. m. 

Timagami Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Timiskaming district. 

See also Haileybury. 

Barite mg 59 

Cobalt mg. See Cobalt (mineral). 

Copper. See Cross Lake s. m. 

Gold mg. See Bannockburn, Eby, 
Gauthier, Grenfell, Hearst, Lebel, 
xVlcMttie, [Maisonville, Morrisette, 
Pacaud, Powell, Skead, Teck tps. 

Mining lands, sales and leases 48 

Silver mg. See Coleman, Nicol tps. 
Timiskaming mining div. 

Recorder's report 49, 50 

Timmins, Jules R 100 

Timmins, Leo. H 100 

Timmins, Noah A 100 

Timmins, Ont. 

Gold mg. See HoUinger g. m.; La 
Roche Mines; Vipond g. m. 

Taxes paid to, bv Hollinger 103 

Timms, A. R 113 

Tionaga, barite deposit 31, 59 

Tisdale tp. 

Gold mg. See Canusa, Coniaurum, 
Dome, Hollinger, Mclntyre-Porcu- 
pine, New York Porcupine, Pay- 
master, Vipond g. mines. 

Taxes paid to, by Hollinger 103 



1935 



Index, Part I 



205 



PAGE 

Toburn gold m. 

5ce a/i'o Toburn Gold Klines; Tough- 
Oakes Burnside g. m. 

Manager and address 57 

• Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 148 

Production 10, 14, 148 

Toburn Gold Mines, Ltd. 

See also Toburn, Tough-Oakes Burn- 
side g. mines. 

Capital; officers 147 

Dividends 15, 16 

Profit tax 51 

Todd, E. W 56, 110 

Todd tp. 

Gold mg. See Red Crest Gold Mines; 
West Red Lake Gold Mines. 

Tolman, J. D 71 

Tom Johnson-Nipigon Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 148, 149 

IMine manager and address 57 

Tommv Burns g. m., production (1917) 13 

Tomney, H. E .162 

Toronto. 

Building permits 36 

Classes for prospectors 175 

^Mining claims recorded 50 

Provincial Assay Office 52, 53 

Sand-lime brick industry 40, 66 

Toronto Brick Co 66 

Tough, George 76 

Tough, R. R 73 

Tough-Oakes Burnside gold m. 

See also Toburn g. m. ; Tough-Oakes 
Gold Mines. 

Production 14 

Tough-Oakes Gold Mines, Ltd. 

See also Tough-Oakes Burnside g. m. 

Dividends 15, 16 

Townsend tp. See Waterford. 
Township 11, Sudbury. 

Gold mg. See Bousquet Gold Mines. 
Township 23, range 10, Algoma. 

See Sinclair IMines Synd. 
Township 27, range 25, Algoma. 

See Michael-Boyle g. m. 
Township 27, range 29, Algoma. 

See Algoma Summit Gold IMines. 
Township 28, range 26, Algoma. 

See Algood Mines; Kozak g. m. 
Township 29, range 22, Algoma. 

See Centennial Gold INlines. 
Township 29, range 23, Algoma. 

See Grace g. m. ; Hillside Gold Mines: 
Mackey Point g. m.; IMinto Gold 
Mines; Parkhill g. m. ; Stanley Gold 
Mines; Van Sickle g. m.; Wawa 
Goldfields 
Township 48, range 27, Algoma. 

See Gold Lands Synd. 
Township 69, Sudbury. 

Gold mg. See Long Lake g. m. 
Townsite silver m. 

See Cobalt Townsite s. m. 

Trafalgar Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Trafford, C. E 71 

Trail, B.C., cobalt ores shipped to 19 

Trans-Canada ^Mining Corpn., Ltd.. . . 44 
Transvaal. 

Gold, grade decrease 7 

production (1930-1934) 18 



PAGE 

Trap rock. 

Operators 65 

Statistics 2, 3, 40 

Traynor, D. H 57, 139 

Treatment of ores, revenue 48 

Tretheway, F. L 107 

Tretheway Silver Cobalt Mines, Ltd. 

Dividends 23 

Trident Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Trout Creek g. m., production (1931) . . 14 

T. Sidney Kirby Co 64 

Tubs, laundrv, cement 38 

Tuck, Dr. J. A 69 

Tudhope, H. R 150, 151 

Tudhope, J. B 103, 117 

Tudor, H. D 150, 151 

Tudor tp. 

Gold mg. See Craig Gold ISlines. 

Tuer, C. F 128 

Turk, Eric 69 

Turner, H. R. M 92, 93 

Tylac Sturgeon Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Tyrrell, J. B 108 

Tyx, C. C 108 

U 

UUmann, John G 93 

Underground accidents 168, 170 

L'nderground fires 172, 173 

L'nited Algoma Mines, Ltd 87 

United Mineral Lands Co., Ltd 133 

L'nited States. 

See also Exchange equalization; ]Min- 
nesota; New York; S. Dakota; 
Wisconsin. 

Gold production (1930-1934) 18 

Gold standard abandoned 17 

Silver, nationalization 19 

Universal Exploration Syndicate, Ltd. 44 
L'nwrought IMetal Sales Act. 

Record books for 48 

Uranium 30 

U.S.S.R. See Russia. 

V 

Valora Gold Exploration Co., Ltd 47 

Van Camp, H.N 136 

Vancouver, B.C., gypsum plant 155 

Van Der Voort, M. C 67 

Vanguard Long Lac refines. Ltd 47 

Van Home, A. D 69 

Van Norstrand, H. L 99 

Vanquelin-Sifton Lake Mines, Ltd. ... 44 
A'an Sickle gold m. 

Manager and address 57 

Operations 140 

Vaughan, H. H 145 

Velma Gold ^Mining Synd., Ltd 44 

Ventures, Ltd. 

See also Coniaurum Mines. 

Matachewan Consol. stock held by. . 127 
Vermilion Lake Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 149 

Mine manager and address 57 

Verona, granite near 65 

Vetter, L. J 96 

Victoria co. 

See also Coboconk; Eldon tp. 

Limestone 65 



206 



Department of Mines 



No. 4 



PAGE 

Vimy Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

Vincent, G. G 60, 166 

Vipond gold m. 

See also Anglo-Huronian; Vipond 
Consol. Mines. 

Manager and address 54 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 69, 70 

Production 10, 12, 69 

Vipond Consolidated ^Mines, Ltd. 
See also Vipond g. m. 

Bought bv Anglo-Huronian 12, 69 

Dividends 15, 16 

W 

Wabageshik, power plant 159 

Wack, Otis 155 

Wages. 

See also Labour statistics. 

Average yearly, gold mg 9 

Building trades, index 36 

Wainwright, Thos. A 162 

Waite, J. H. C 72 

Walker, G. C 62 

Walker, J. G 65 

Walker Bros.. Ltd 65 

Walker Salt Corpn., Ltd 35 

Incorporated 44 

Wallaceburg, lime 63 

Wallaceburg Sand and Gravel Co 66 

Wallbridge Estate 60 

Walpole tp. 

See also Spring Vale. 

Limestone 63, 64 

Walter, H. W 59 

Walton, W. S 87, 99, 109, 142 

Wanapitei Basin Mines, Ltd 47 

Wanup, mica 61 

Warren, Jas. J 85 

Warwick tp., salt 62 

Warwick Pure Salt Co 35, 62 

Warwick Salt Corpn., Ltd 62 

Wasapika-Ribble gold m 56 

Operations 129 

Water, mineral. See Mineral waters. 
Water power. See Hydro-electric plants. 

'^'aterdown, sand and gravel 66 

Waterford, sand and gravel 66 

Waterford Sand and Gravel Co 66 

Waterloo tp. See Hespeler; Preston. 

Waters, H. W 94 

Watkins, B. W 156 

Watkins, Walter G 156 

Watson, J. G 71 

Watson, J. P 71 

Watts, Ernest E 129 

Waugh. S. A 92 

Wawa. See Centennial Gold Alines; 
Grace g. m.; Hillside Gold Mines; 
Jubilee, Minto, Parkhill, Van Sickle 
g. mines; Wawa Goldfields. 
Wawa Goldfields, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 149 

Mine manager and address 57 

Weaver (Minerals), Ltd 59 

Webster, A. R 67, 168 

Webster, G. B 79, 122 

Weimar, Matthew 86 

Weir, Rt. Hon. Lord 159 

Welch, John 64 



P.\GE 

Weldon, L 138 

Weldon, Roy 108 

Welland, iron industry 27 

WeUand co. 

See Humberstone tp.; Niagara Falls; 
Ridgeway; Stamford tp.; Welland 
ship canal. 
Welland ship canal. 

Limestone quarry 65 

Welland Electric Steel Foundry 27 

Wellington co. 

See Elora; Guelph, Puslinch tps. 
Wells, oil. See Petroleum. 

Wells, Thos. L 56, 127 

Wells Longlac Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 149, 1.50 

Incorporated 47 

Mine manager and address 57 

Wende, Albert HO 

Wendigo Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 150 

Mine manager and address 57 

Wentworth co. 

See Dundas; Hamilton; Waterdown. 

Weppler, Henry 63 

Wessels, D. D 77 

West, C. W 65 

West Australia, gold production 18 

West Dome Lake gold m. 

Production (1915-1930) 12 

West Dome Lake Gold :\Iines, Ltd. . . . 133 

West Dome :\Iines, Ltd 133 

West Flamborough tp. See Dundas. 

West Oxford tp. See Beachville. 

West Red Lake Gold :\Iines, Ltd 57 

Capital; officers; operations 1-50, 151 

Incorporated 47 

West Shiningtree area. 

See also Churchill, Macmurchy tps. 

Mills, capacitv 8 

West Side Long Lac Alines, Ltd 47 

Western Canada Flour Mills Co. 

Salt operators 62 

Western vSalt Co 62 

Westervelt. J. W 95 

Westree gold m. 

See also Lake Caswell Alines. 

Manager and address .56 

Operations 110 

Wettlaufer, Conrad E 145 

Wettlaufer Lorrain vSilver Alines, Ltd. 

Dividends 23 

Wheatley, R. 131 

Whitby tp., sand and gravel 66 

White, Geo. S 86 

White, H. G 70 

White Rock Alining Co., Ltd. 

Production 14 

Whitfield, H. S 73 

Whitney tp. 

Gold mg. See Canusa g. m.; Pamour 
Porcupine Alines. 

Whittingham, H S3, 127 

WTiolesale prices index 1 , 36 

Wilberforce tp., lime 63 

Wilcox, Charles S 167 

Wildor Gold Alines, Ltd 47 

Willford and Co., R. F 65 

WilHam Irwin and Co., Ltd 44 

Williams, A. D 53 

Williams, B. J 64 



1935 



Index, Part I 



207 



PAGE 
108 

70 



lliams, R. M 

lliams, \V. A 

lliamson, E. M 94 

lliamson, R. S 77 

lliamson, W. R. M 77 

lliamson Mines, Ltd 47 

His, Harvey M 92 

Uisville. 

See Bousquet Gold Mines. 

Imac Trusts, Ltd 44. 47 

Ison, J. A 77 

Ison, J. M 57, 136 



Ison, W. J. B 85 

Ison, W. P 13 

Iton Gold Mines, Ltd 47 

nchester tp., peat 61 

ndigokan Lake Gold Mines, Ltd. ... 47 

ndmill Point Crushed Stone Co 65 

ndsor, N.S., gypsum plant 155 

nnipeg, INIan., gypsum plant 155 

re-cut brick, production 41 

re rope testing 174 

sconsin, U.S. 

Iron ore imports from 4 

Wishart, A. A 78 

Witch bay. Lake of the Woods. 

See Wendigo Gold Mines ; Witch Bay 
Gold Zvlines. 

Witch Bay Gold Mines. Ltd 57 

Capital; officers; operations 151 

Incorporated 47 

Witkon, B 62 

Wolf lake. 

Gold mg See Lakeland Gold, Ltd. 
Woman Lake area. 

Gold mg. See Hudson Patricia Gold 
Mines; Jackson-AIanion g. m. 

Woman River Gold Mines, Ltd 44 

Wood, A 57, 165 

Wood, C. Lindley 59 

Wood, E. B 114 

\\'ood, H. K 72 

Wood, L. P 74, 129 



47 
66 
18 
82 
82 
161 

Wright, S. B 59. 166 

Wright, W. H 110, 151 

Wright and Co 61 



Woodhouse, Ltd., H 

Woolatt Fuel and Supply Co. 

World production of gold 

Wright. D. G. H 

Wright, E. Ward 

Wright, Kenneth W 



PAGE 

W'right-Hargreaves gold m. 

See also Wright-Hargreaves Mines. 

Manager and address 57 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 151-154 

Production 10, 14. 152 

Wright-Hargreaves Mines, Ltd. 
See also Wright-Hargreaves g. m. 

Capital; officers 151 

Dividends 15, 16, 152 

Profit tax 51 

Wynman, M. D 113 



Y. 104 gold claim. See Mackey Point 
g. m. 

Yarrow tp., barite 31, 59 

Yates, Harry 88, 142 

Yates, Richard C 165 

Yellow :\Ietal Syndicate, Ltd 44 

Yellowknife Gold IMines, Ltd 47 

Yeoell, W. J 98 

York CO. See Etobicoke, York tps. 
York tp. 

See also Toronto. 

Sand and gravel 66 

York Investments, Ltd 47 

York Sandstone Brick Co 66 

Young, C. T 57, 154 

Young, H. G 150, 151 

Young, Horace G 136 

Young- Davidson gold m. 

See also Young-Davidson ]Mines. 

Manager and address 57 

Mill, capacity 8 

Operations 102 

Optioned to Hollinger 154 

Production 10, 14 

Young-Davidson Mines, Ltd. 
See also Young- Davidson g. m. 

Capital; officers 154 

Young-Shannon Gold Mines, Ltd. 

Capital; officers; operations 154 

Mine manager and address 57 

Z 

Zinc, production 3, 

Zirconium manganese silicon 28 

Zuck, C. W 92 

Zuck, Floyd J 92 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES 



ONTARIO 



1934 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER NO. 5, 1935 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Piinted and Published bv T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, 1935- 



To The Honourable Herbert Alexander Bruce, 

A Colonel in the Royal Army Medical Corps, etc., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Hoxour: 

The undersigned begs respectfulh* to present to Your Honour the 
Annual Report of the Inspector of Legal Offices for the year ending 31st 
December, 1934. 

A. W. Roebuck, 

Attorney General and 
Minister of Labour . 

Toronto, March 21st, 193-^ 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Inspector of Legal Offices 
Ontario, 1934 



Parliament Buildings, 
Toronto, Ontario. 

The Honourable Herbekt Alexander Bruce, 

A Colonel in the Royal Army Medical Corps, etc., etc., 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

Sir:— 

I have the honour to present my report as Inspector of Legal Offices for 
the year ending December 31st, 1934. 

In the year 1934 I inspected a large number of the Legal Offices in the 
Counties and Districts, and it is expected that I shall be able to visit the 
remainder in 1935. 

The Department sustained a great loss in the death of Mr. W. W. Ellis, 
the Senior Assistant Inspector. Mr. Ellis entered the Civil Service in 1897 
as an official in the Game and Fisheries Department. He was transferred to 
the Division Courts in 1905. In 1920 he was appointed Inspector of Division 
Courts. Upon the consolidation of the Legal Offices in 1925 he was appointed 
an Assistant to the Inspector. In 1927 he was given the title of Senior Assistant 
Inspector. His death will prove a very great loss to the Civil Service of the 
Province of Ontario in general, and to my own office in particular. 

The late Mr. Ellis and Mr. H. A. Locke, Assistant Inspector, visited 
nearly two hundred Division Court Offices during the year. The number of 
suits entered during 1934, exclusive of transcripts of judgments and judgment 
summonses, was 57,819, and the amount of claims sued for aggregated 
$3,219,249.08. The total monies paid into court during the year amounted 
to $1,127,749.82, while the total amount paid out amounted to $1,169,537.90. 
Monies remaining in court at the beginning of the year amounted to $56,801.93. 
The surplus fees collected and paid to the Honourable the Provincial Treasurer 
by Division Court Clerks and Bailiffs amounted to $23,328.42. Monies remain- 
ing unclaimed for a period of six years and paid to the Provincial Treasurer, 
as provided by Section 37 of The Division Courts Act, amounted to $275.35. 

My office maintains a careful inspection, and by an elaborate system of 
returns keeps in touch with all the offices throughout the year. I wish to 

[5] 



REPORT OF No. 5 



state that the Court officials show remarkable courtesy and efficiency through- 
out the Province. 

The Government has adopted a policy of amalgamating the office of 
Sheriff with the office of Clerk of the County Court, and these amalgamations 
are gradually being proceeded with. This is in line somewhat with the report 
of the Gregory Commission, which pointed out the serious position that many 
Sheriffs were finding themselves in in this Province. 

A reorganization of the Magistrate system took place, by which the 
Province was divided into eighteen Districts, with from two to four Magistrates 
in each District, each Magistrate having provincial jurisdiction and travelling 
about in the District. The number of Magistrates was, therefore, reduced 
from one hundred and forty-two and nine Deputies to fifty-six and seven 
Deputies. 

Mr. H. R. Poison, Assistant Inspector, has devoted his time during the 
year to the Magistrates and the officials connected with their courts. In connec- 
tion with these it might be pointed out that prior to August 17th, 1934, there 
were four methods of remunerating ^Magistrates, namel}', (a) salary paid by 
the Province, (b) salary paid b\^ the municipality, (c) salaries paid by both 
Province and municipality, and (d) remunerated by fees. As stated above, 
a complete reorganization took place on the date referred to, by which all 
^Magistrates, with the exception of those in the six cities excluded from the 
magistrate scheme, namely, Windsor, London, Brantford, Hamilton, Toronto 
and Ottawa, are paid their salaries by the Treasurer of the Province of Ontario. 
At the present time the Magistrates appointed to the above six cities are 
paid their salaries by the municipality. 

Formerly we had in the employ of the Province and the municipalities 
a considerable number of Magistrates who devoted only part of their time to 
magisterial duties. The reorganization, however, completely revolutionized 
this, and now all Magistrates in the Province of Ontario, whether in cities or 
districts, devote their entire time to magisterial duties. 

Another reform carried out in connection with the reorganization was the 
appointment of official Justices of the Peace, available to every police court 
in the Province. Heretofore it was a common practice for ^Magistrates to 
listen to the complaint, take the information, and issue the summons against 
the defendant, and undoubtedly this had a great influence in some cases on 
the final disposition of the case. It is now a strict rule of the Department 
that the work of taking the information, and the issuing of the summons, etc., 
is entirely completed by the Justices of the Peace, and our ^Magistrates, there- 
fore, have no prior knowledge of the case before going on the Bench to adjudicate. 

Every Magistrate in the Province of Ontario has now provincial jurisdiction, 
and, irrespective of his local position, may hear a case in any part of the 
Province. This gives the Department an opportunity to transfer Magistrates 
either within their own district or from one district to another, when it is 
thought advisable and for the benefit of the service. 

We have once again to report a slight falling off in the fines for 1934, 
which amounted to $89,421.00, as compared with $91,449.00 in 1933. This can 
again be attributed to a lesser tourist traffic during last j^ear. 

Mr. W. A. James, the Auditor, visited a great number of the offices during 
1934. I am pleased to state that practically no discrepancies were found by 
him. Any that have been found have, of course, been made up. 

The revenue collected by this office for the year 1934 from the public 
offices under my supervision amounted to $344,699.98, made up as follows: — 



INSPECTOR. OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



1934 

Magistrates' Fines $ 89,421.00 

Magistrates' Fees 45,029.10 

(The above amounts represent monies for fines and 

fees actually received by me and do not include fines 

and fees paid direct to the Inspectors under the L.C.A.) 

Local Registrars, S.C.O., County Court and District Court 

Clerks, and Surrogate Registrars 107,300.47 

Crown Attorneys' and Clerks of the Peace Fees 30,872.66 

Crown Attorneys' Estreats and Fines 2,365.15 

Sheriffs' Fees 20,011.00 

Registrars of Deeds and Local Masters of Titles 26,230.69 

Division Court Clerks and BaiUffs 23,437.88 

Miscellaneous 32.03 

TOTAL $344,699.98 

The total from all offices increased by the sum of $29,591.50. This is 
a much more satisfactory'^ state of affairs than last year. In 1933 the decrease 
amounted to $94,129.02. 

I wish again to state that the officials throughout the Province are carrying 
on excellently and are giving service to the public. I wish to thank my Assistant 
Inspectors, the Auditor and the staff for the way in which they have carried 
on their duties throughout the year. 

Mr. J. W. Mallon, K.C., Registrar of Deeds for East and West York, 
and a former Inspector, prepared a paper setting forth the fees that are charge- 
able under The Registry Act. This paper was read at the last Annual Meeting 
of the Registrars, and, as the paper is a very valuable one, I am including 
the Schedule in this year's report. 

I attach hereto the schedules and statements with reference to the office, 
which should be of interest: 

1. Statements — Osgoode Hall Offices (Surrogate Clerk, Administrative 

Branch, Appellate Division and Master's Office). 

2. Financial Statement of judicial offices, namel}^, Sheriffs, Surrogate 

Judges, Local Masters, S.C.O., Crown Attorneys, Clerks of the 
Peace, Local Registrars, County and District Court Clerks, and 
Surrogate Registrars. 

3. Statement respecting Commuted Crown Attorneys. 

4. Financial statement respecting Land Titles Offices. 

5. Financial statement respecting Division Courts. 

6. Financial statement respecting Registrars of Deeds. 

7. Financial statement respecting Magistrates. 
7(a). Financial statement respecting Magistrates. 

8. List of Justices of the Peace. 

9. Statistical Report of Juvenile Courts. 

10. Appointments. 

11. Observations by Inspector. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

W. W. Denison, 

Inspector of Legal Offices. 



Statements 

OSGOODE HALL OFFICES 

(a) Surrogate Clerk. 

(b) Administrative Branch. 

(c) Appellate Division. 

{d^ 'Master, Supreme Court. 



10 REPORT OF No. 5 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR YEAR 1934— SURROGATE CLERK'S OFFICE 

1. Number of Notices of Application for Probate and Administration and Certificates 

Issued 11,401 

2. Number of Notices of Application for Guardianship Received and Certificates 

Issued 58 

3. Number of Caveats Filed 113 

4. Number of Searches in Office Paid for other than Ijy Surrogate Registrars 254 

5. Number of Deeds of Election Filed 'i 

6. Total Number of Supreme Court Orders Filed 17 

7. Total Fees for 1934 $6,347.00 



REPORT OF THE BUSINESS OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING WITH THE 31st OF DECEMBER, 1934— 

SENIOR REGISTRAR'S BRANCH 

Number of Writs of Summons issued (of which 70 were concurrent Writs) 4,054 

Actions entered in procedure book, commenced by writs issued during the j-ear 1934 1,376 

Actions entered in procedure book, transferred from county court during 1934 87 

Actions entered in procedure book, commenced by writ during previous years 70 

Actions entered in procedure book otherwise than by writs 12& 

Praecipe orders issued 151 

Records passed 861 

Writs of execution, Fi. Fa., issued 1,208 

Writs of execution, renewals, alias and pluries 301 

Special writs (habeas corpus, etc.) issued 16 

Actions entered for trial with jury 188 

Actions entered for trial without jury 508 

Amount of jury fees paid City Treasurer $531.00 

Court orders 6,000 

^Mechanics' lien orders entered 196 

Attorney-General orders entered 127 

Fiats entered 1,043 

Deed polls entered and filed 159 

Judgments without trial , 94 

Judgments after trial 255 

Judgments in chambers 173 

Judgments by default, mortgage actions 1,646 

Judgments by default, ordinary actions 211 

Judgments in mechanic's liens 31 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1922 1 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1926 1 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1928 1 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1929 2 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1930 5 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1931 36 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1932 181 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1933 771 

Judgments in respect of writs issued, year 1934 1,869 

Interlocutory judgments signed 5 

Total judgments entered 2,921 

Amount recovered on judgments, exclusive of co.sts $251,549,358.37 

Amount of taxed costs (including disbursements on judgments of all kinds) $132,515.43 

Fees paid in law stamps in Senior Registrar's Office $38,700.0.5 

Fees paid in law stamps, Appellate Division $1,892.40 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



11 



REPORT, 1934— SUPREME COURT OF ONTARIO, APPELLATE DIVISION 

TWO COURTS 

Number of appeals heard bj- both Courts 

Number of motions heard by both Courts 

Appeals abandoned 

Convictions quashed 



583 

104 

9 

8 



Allowed Dismissed Varied 



Total 



Appeals from County and Division Courts. 

Appeals from Trial or Single Judges 

Criminal Appeals 

Liquor Control Act 

Official Arbitrators 

Ontario Municipal and Railway Board 

Assistant Masters 

Judgments Written 



54 
43 
19 



55 



175 



92 

108 

44 



65 



314 



12 



28 



152 

160 

64 

1 

9 



132 



517 



ANNUAL RETURN OF FEES COLLECTED IN LAW STAMPS, MASTER'S OFFICE, 

IN CONNECTION WITH REFERENCES FOR YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31st, 1934 

Master and Assistant Master (References) $ 872.40 

Assistant Master: 

Mechanics' Liens 369.75 

Mortgage References 8,604.20 

$ 9,846.35 

Registrars' Fees (Bankruptcy) $ 12,901.70 

Official Receivers' Fees 1,691.00 

Z 14,592.70 



Financial Statement 

Sheriffs. 

Surrogate Judges. 

Local Masters, S.C.O. 

Crown Attorneys and Clerks of the Peace. 

Local Registrars, S.C.O. 

County Court Clerks. 

Surrogate Registrars. 



13 



14 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salary 

paid 

by 

Province 


Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Algoma: 
Sault Ste. 


Sheriff 


C. M. Macreath 

Frederick Stone 


$ c. 
3,261.88 


$ c. 

950.00 

1,000.00 


$ c. 
4,211.88 


Marie 


Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 






Ho 








do T. M. Hall 1 


124.20 
4,273.13 




124.20 




f 
Drown Attorney 1 
Clerk of the Peace ] 

Local Registrar 


W. G. Atkin (a) 

do 


343.00 


4,616.13 




J. L. O'Flvnn 


527.63 




527.63 




do 








T. J. Foster 


4,321.18 


735.00 


5,056.18 




District Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Brant: 

Brantford 


J. W. Westbrook (b).. 

J. H. H. Day, Dep 

A. D. Hardv 


2,556.59 
565.78 




2,556.59 




do (Acting)... 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 




565.78 




1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W. M. Charlton 

do 


4,727.27 




4,727.27 










H. J. Wallace 


7,247.79 


851.50 


8,099.29 




County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 




do 








Bruce: 

Walker ton 


John Rowland (c) 

H. A. McGilhvray 

W. G. Owens 


3,103.41 
458.68 




3,103.41 




do 




458.68 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

[ 

Local Registrar | 

County Court Clerk ■{ 
Surrogate Registrar.. 

I 

Sheriff 


J. W. Freeborn 


4,604.13 




4,604.13 




do 








R. E. Clapp (d) 


3,696.10 


517.85 


4,213.95 




do 






do 










J. W. Freelwrn, Act'g 
H. A. McGillivray 

S. Crooks 


51.22 
1,277.57 

8,990.11 




51.22 






1,277.57 


Cakleton: 
Ottawa 




8,990.11 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


E. L. Dalev 


1,000.00 






F. A. Magee 


690.50 
7,051.00 
3,615.73 


690.50 




Local Registrar 


do 




7,051.00 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

County Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


J. A. Ritchie 




3,615.73 




do 








C. L. Bray 


14,721.90 




14,721.90 




do 






Cochrane: 
Cochrane 


J. D. Mackay 


3,993.81 


1,143.00 
1,000.00 


5,136.81 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


J. B. T. Caron 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


S. A. Caldbick 


9,455.73 




9,455.73 




do 








W. L. Warrell 


3,543.75 


588.00 


4,131.75 




District Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Dufferin: 
Orangeville 


H. Endacott 


1,952.39 




1,952.39 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


W. T. Robb 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


R. D. Evans 


Commuted 


at $1,270.00 


per annum 




do ... 






J. A. V. Preston 

do 


2,220.71 


661.50 


2,882.21 




County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 






do 















(a) W. G, 
(6) J. W. 



Atkin dismissed as and from 14th Nov., 1934; .1. L. O'Flynn appointed loth Nov., 1934. 
Westbrook died 2oth Oct., 1934. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



15 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR 


YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1934 


Total 
office 
disburse- 
ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 
amount 
paid to 

Province 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

Masters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 
collected 
in Law- 
Stamps 
for the 
Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 
1,276.70 


$ c. 
2,935.18 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,935.18 
1,000.00 


S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Algoma 
















17.10 










124.20 
3,916.13 




124.20 
3,874.73 








700 00 


41.40 




















60 00 


467.63 




467.63 






















706.90 


4,349.28 


524.62 


3,824.66 




988.65 


929.00 


























590.80 


1,965.79 
537.73 




1,965.79 

537.73 

1,000.00 








Brant 


28.05 
























171.40 








85 00 


4,642.27 


321.14 


4,321.13 


















3,618.20 


4,481.09 


590.54 


3,890.55 




2,180.90 


2,836.25 
























1 062 66 


2,040.75 
91.27 




2,040.75 

91.27 

1,000.00 








Bruce 


367 41 






























68.00 








275.00 


4,329.13 


164.57 


4,164.56 


















942.50 


3,271.45 


54.29 


3,217.16 




1,127.80 


1,579.40 




























51.22 
996.47 

4,653.66 


25.61 
154.47 

676.83 


25.61 
842.00 

3.976.83 
1,000.00 
490.50 
4,027.00 
3,048.76 




2.10 
386.10 






281.10 




535.60 




4,336 45 




Carleton 












200 00 


490.50 
4,754.00 
3,048.76 












2,297.00 
566 97 


727.00 






























3,909.91 


10,811.99 


5,680.80 


5,131.19 




4,000.50 


7,704.00 










2,057 34 


3,079.47 




3,079.47 
1,000.00 








Cochrane 




















15.70 








1,560.00 


7,895.73 


1,947.87 


5,947.86 
















832.00 


3,299.75 


59.95 


3,239.80 




630.10 


363.05 


























744 44 


1,207.95 




1,207.95 
1,000.00 








Dufferin 




















88.50 






































211.40 


2,670.81 




2,670.81 




495.90 


629.35 





























(c) John Rowland superannuated from Sth Oct.. 19:«; H. A. McGillivray appointed 9th Oct., 1934. 

(d) R. E. Clapp disn isscd a.s and from Sth Oct., 1934; H. A. McOillivray app. iateJ Gth Oct., 1934, with a 
salary fcr 'in bined offices of S4.000.00 per annum. 



16 



REPORT OF 



Xo. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salarj- 
paid 

Province 


Total 
; earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Elgin: 

St Thomas 


Sheriff 


P. S. D. Harding 

D. C. Ross 


S c 
3,069.45 


$ 


$ c. 
3,069.45 




Surrogate Judge 


l.OOO.OC 




Local Master 


C. F. Maxwell 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


E. \A'. Haines 


4,007.13 




4,007.13 




do 








I. D. Cameron 


5,718.58 


661. 5C 


6,380.08 




do 






do 








Essex: 


C. N. Anderson (a)... 

A. A. MacKinnon 

C. G. Fletcher 


6,194.84 

930.81 

1,039.11 




6,194.84 
930 81 




do (Acting)... 
do 








1,039 11 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

do 


J. J. Coughlin . . 


1,000.00 






A. W. McNally (6).... 
F. A. Landriau 


482.70 

345.85 

Commuted 


482.70 






345 85 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


J. S. Allan, K.C 


at $6,000.00 


per annum 




do 






A. A. MacKinnon 

do 


14,808.02 


661.50 


15,469.52 




do 








Frontenac: 

Ivingston 


R. F. Vair 


3,541.97 




3,541 97 


Surrogate Judge 


H. A. LaveU 


1,000.00 






Local ^Master 


J. B. Walkem, K.C... 

T. J. Rigney, K.C 

do 


325.00 
4,455.89 


325 00 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 




4,455 89 










C. H. Wood .. 


2,730.30 


661.50 


3,391.80 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff .. . 


do 






H. E. Richardson 

Wm. Breese 


3,529.65 
3,768.40 




3.529 65 


Grey: 

Owen Sound 




3,768.40 




Surrogate Judge 


G. W. Morlev 


1,000.00 






Local ^Master 


do 








Crown Attorney \ 

Clerk of the Peace... 

do 

do ^ 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


\\. D. Henry, K.C.(c) 
do 


5,389.08 




5,389.08 










J. F. P. Birnie 


1,088.14 




1,088.14 




do 








T. J. Rutherford 

do 


7,068.24 


735.00 


7,803.24 




do 








Haldimaxd : | 
Cavuga 


W. S. Hudspeth 


2,494.79 




2,494.79 




Surrogate Judge 


W. S. West 


1,000.00 






do 








3rown Attorney 

Z^lerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


H. Arrell, K.C 


4,138.28 




4,138.28 




do 






J. C. Eccles 


3,079.90 


600.00 


3,679.90 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








H Alton: 
Milton 


G. 0. Brown 


2,502.52 




2,502.52 






W. N. Munro 


1,000.00 








do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W. I. Dick, K.C 

do 


3,932.10 




3,932.10 










r. M. MacKenzie 

do 


3,784.01 


441.00 


4,225.01 


( 


County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 




« 


do 



















(a) C. N. Anderson superannuated as and from 2nd Oct., 1934; A. A. MacKinnon appointed pro tern until 
appointment of C. G. Fletcher. 9th Oct., 1934. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



17 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, lQ34r-Continued 


Total 
office 
disburse- 
ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


iStatutory 
amount 
paid to 
Province 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

Masters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 
collected 
in Law- 
Stamps 
for the 
Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 
702.45 


$ c. 
2,367.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,367.00 
1,000.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Elgin 


























1,003.05 


3,004.08 




3,004.08 






















1,375.00 


5,005.08 


852.54 


4,152.54 




1,519.10 


2,352.50 


























3 590 53 


2,604.31 
243.00 
350.64 




2,604.31 








Essex 


687.81 


243.00 










688.47 


350.64 

1,000.00 

252.67 

332.00 






















230.03 


252.67 
332.00 












13.85 








































5,894.50 


9,575.02 


4,567.52 


5,007.50 




3,' 56.50 


5,604.05 


























856 20 


2,685.77 




2,685.77 

1,000.00 

310.00 

3,373.43 








Frontenac 














15.00 


310.00 
3,373.43 












1,082.46 






















557.50 


2,834.30 




2,834.30 




760.10 
















1,240.00 


2,289.65 
2,657.11 




2,289.65 

2,657.11 
1,000.00 




1,122.30 


2,242.90 




1,111.29 






Grey 


















190.40 








1,212.87 


4,176.21 


504.54 


3,671.67 
















207.00 


881.14 


24.13 


857.01 





















1,197.10 


6,606.14 


1,895.53 


4,710.61 




1,312.00 


2,393.50 


























672.85 


1,821.94 




1,821.94 
1,000.00 








Haldimand 




















22.30 








843.70 


3,294.58 




3,294.58 




















599.85 


3,080.05 


16.00 


3,064.05 




951.60 


1,355.25 


























1,072.46 


1,430.06 




1,430.06 
1,000.00 








Halton 




















51.50 








790.47 


3,141.63 




3,141.63 




















606.85 


3,618.16 


159.08 


3,459.08 




1,290.90 


2,606.25 











































(6) A. W. McNally died 18th June, 1934; F. A. Landriau appointed 25th Sept., 1934. 

(c) W. D. Henry dismissed as of the 1.5th Oct., 19.34; J. F. P. Birnie appointed 16th Oct.. 1934. 



18 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 


Countv or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salary 

paid 

by 

Province 


Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Hastings : 
Belleville 


Sheriff 


G. H. Stokes (a) 

J. D. O'Flvnn 


S c. 

3,611.51 

727.44 


$ c. 


S c. 
3 611 51 




do 




727 44 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


G. E. Deroche 


1,000.00 






W. C. Mikel, K.C 

B. C. Donnan, K.C... 
do 


431.60 
8,106.11 


431 60 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar | 
County Court Clerk. 1 
Surrogate Registrar.) 

1 

i 
Sheriff 




8,106 11 










J. A. Kerr (6) 


5,004.01 


718.06 


5,722.07 




do 






do 










J. D. O'Flvnn .. . 


822.25 




822.25 




do 








do 








Hurox: 

Goderich 


C. G. Middleton (c)... 
T. M. Costello 


3,796.65 




3,796.65 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


1,000.00 




do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


D. E. Holmes 


5,973.37 




5,973.37 




do 








R. Johnston 


7,634.36 


795.00 


8,429.36 




County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Kenora : 

Kenora 


L. D. MacCaUum 

W. A. Dowler 


2,027.49 


979.98 
1,000.00 


3,007.47 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 




do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


H. P. Cooke, K.C 

do 


Commuted 


at $1,976.00 


per annum 




E. Appleton 


2,037.15 


686.00 


2,723.15 




District Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar,... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Kent: 

Chatham 


E. W. Hardev 


4,401.15 




4,401.15 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


LMah McFadden 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


H. D. Smith, K.C 

do 


9,813.60 




9,813.60 








D. E. Douglas 


7,346.38 


661.50 


8,007.88 




County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Lambton: 
Sarnia 


A. J. Johnston 


3,153.20 




3,153.20 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


A. E. Tavlor 


1,000.00 






do ' ... 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W. S. Haney 


6,123.95 




6,123.95 




do 








Alex. Saunders 


5,436.00 


661.50 


6,097.50 




Countv Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








LanaR,k : 

Perth 


J. H. Ebbs (d) 


2,048.40 
58.96 




2,048.40 




do 


J. S. L. McNeelv 

F. W. Wilson ..." 




58.96 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Ma.ster 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar .... 


C. H. McKimm (e).... 
do 


3,178.49 




3,178.49 










J. S. L. McNeely 

do 


3,372.43 


496.14 


3,868.57 




do 

















(a) G. H. Stokes dismissed as of 22nd Oct., 1934; J. D. O'Flynn appointed. 

(6) J. A. Kerr dismissed as of 22nd Oct., 1934; J. D. O'Flynn appointed to combined offices at a salary of 
$4,000.00 per annuni. 

(c) C. G. Middleton dismissed as of 31st Dec, 1934; R. Johnston appointed to combined offic es at a salary of 
$3,500.00 per annum. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



19 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1934:— Continued 


Total 
office 
disburse- 
ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 
amount 
paid to 

Province 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

Masters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 

1,573.30 

337 01 


$ c. 

2,038.21 

390.43 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,038.21 

390.43 
1,000.00 

429.10 
5,313.37 


$ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


Hastings 
























2 50 


429.10 
6,626.74 












1,479.37 


1,313.37 


















1,344.35 


4,377.72 


683.53 


3,694.19 




1,804.30 


2,543.70 
























269 32 


552.93 


219.60 


333.33 




190.80 


259.75 


























1,195.07 


2,601.58 




2,601.58 
1,000.00 








Huron 




















108.10 








1,004 21 


4,i 69.16 


484.58 


4,484.58 


















1,901.80 


6,527.56 


1,824.81 


4,702.75 




1,909.50 


2,751.25 


























78.18 


2,929.29 




2,929.29 
1,000.00 


1 




Kenora 




















8.00 






































75.00 


2,648.15 




2,648.15 




321.40 


288.50 




























1,738.05 


2,663.10 




2,663.10 
1,000.00 








Kent 




















120.10 








1,950.00 


7,863.60 


1,931.80 


5,931.80 


















1,954.95 


6,052.93 


1,397.64 


4,655.29 




2,165.40 


3,042.75 


























599.92 


2,553.28 




2,553.28 
1,000.00 








Laml)ton 





















66.94 








1,318.62 


4,805.33 


402.67 


4,402.67 


















1,150.00 


4,947.50 


823.75 


4,123.75 




1,750.90 


2,435.75 


























755.92 


1,292.48 
32.96 




1,292.48 

32.96 

1,000.00 








Lanark 


26.00 






























33.20 








556.42 


2,622.07 




2,622.07 




















480.00 


3,388.57 


102.10 


3,286.47 




1,444.70 


2,461.10 












































(d) J. H. Ebbs dismissed 15th Dec, 1934; J. S. L. McNeely appointed to combined oflSces at a salary of 
$3,500.00 per annum. 

(e) C. H. McKimm dismissed as of 31st Dec, 1934; W. W. Pollock appointed 1st Jan., 1935. 



20 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salary 
paid 

by 
Province 


Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Leeds and 
Grentv'Ille : 


Sheriff 


W. J. Manahan (a).... 
A.J. Traill 


$ c. 

2,220.19 

86.80 

841.11 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2.220.19 


Brockville. . 


do (Acting)... 
do 




86.80 




A. E. Baker 




841.11 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


M. B. Tudhope 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


H. Atkinson 


5,340.09 




5,340.09 




do 








A. E. Baker 


6,620.70 


562.00 


7,182.70 




do 






do 








Lexxox and 
Addixgton : 


C. W. Vandervoort... 
J. E. Madden 


1,684.54 




1,684.54 


Napanee 


Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


K.S.Ham 


3,546.02 




3,546.02 




do 








W. P. Deroche 


2,186.43 


588.00 


2,774.43 




do 






do 








Lincoln: 

St. Catharines 


F. J. Graves ... 


4,151.39 




4,151.39 




Surrogate Judge 

Local IVIaster 


J. S. Campbell. .. 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local R egistrar 


E. H. Lancaster . 


4,315.05 




4,315.05 




do ... 








E. J. Lovelace 


7,249.40 


661.50 


7,910.90 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar ... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Manitoulin: 
Gore Bav 


J. H. Fell 


628.72 
293.70 
364.90 


610.97 

240.28 

310.32 

1,000.00 


1,239.69 




do 


A. E. Graham 


533.98 




do (Acting)... 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


W. F. McRae 


675.22 




A. B. Currey 






■ do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W. F. McRae 


2,725.80 


250.00 


2,975.80 




do 






C. C. Piatt 


617.75 


818.80 


1,436.55 




District Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Middlesex: 
London 


D. A. Graham 


7,163.32 




7,163.32 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


Joseph Wearing 


1,300.00 






Judge A. A. Ingram... 
A. M. Judd (b) 


237.80 
Commuted 


237.80 




Crown Attorne}' J 
Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar . . 


at S5,000.00 


per annum 




do 






W. F. Newton 


4,725.54 




4,725.54 




do 








E.Weld 


18,258.25 


490.00 


18,748.25 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Muskoka: 

Bracebridge ... 


J. G. Mvers (c) 


1,266.70 
247.63 


1,068.01 

132.57 

1,000.00 


2,334.71 




do 


C. S. Salmon 


380.20 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


A. A. Mahaffy 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


Thos. Johnson 


1,932.68 


245.00 


2,177.68 




do 






C. S. Salmon 


1,069.90 
405.10 


473.62 


1,542.72 




District Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar... 


do 


405.10 




do 







(a) W. J. Manahan dismissed 9th Oct., 
per annum. 

(6) A. M. Judd suspended; N. F. New 



1934; A. E. Baker appointed to combined offices at a salary of $4,000.00 
ton appointed pro tern 14th Aug., 1934. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



21 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1934:— Contitiued 



Total 
office i 
disburse- 
ments 1 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutorj' 
amoimt 
paid to 

Pro^^nce 


1 

Net 
income 

of 
officer 

i 


Amount of 

fees earned 

l)y Local 

blasters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Cro^Ti 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Judge 


County or 
District 


S c. 

1,219.27 

25.40 


$ c. 

1,010.92 

61.20 

475.85 


$ c.j 


S c. 
1,010.92 


S c. 


$ c. 


S c. 


Leeds and 




61.20 








Gren^'ille 


365.26 


475.85 












1,000.00 
















88.30 








908.12 


4,431.97 


215.98 


4,215.99 


















1 937 90i 5-244 80l 


536.52 


4,708.28 




1,687.20 


2,885.25 




























383.39 


1,301.15 




1,301.15 
1,000.00 








Lennox and 












Addington 








78.00 








331 65 


3,214.37 




3,214.37 




















473.43 


2,301.00 




2,301.00 




617.60 


1,022.50 




























1,431.06 


2,720.33 




2,720.33 
1,000.00 








Lincoln 


















232.50 








1,676.00 


3,238.06 




3,238.06 




















1.824.10 


6,086.80 


1,428.12 


4,658.68 




1,558.90 


3,067.25 


























143.07 


1,096.62 
533.98 
670.22 




1.096.62 
533.98 
335.11 

1,000.00 










INIanitoulin 














5.00 


335.11 


































500 00 


2,475.80 




2,475.80 
























1,436.55 




1,436.55 




150.20 


266.75 




























2,251.16 


4,912.16 




4,912.16 

1,300.00 

237.80 








Middlesex 
















237.80 








































725.25 


4,000.29 


1,227.54 


2,772.75 




















6,782.50 


11,965.75 


6,719.18 


5,246.57 




4,556.60 


8,675.00 


























575.33 


1,759.38 
344.9C 




1 1,759.38 

169.66 

1,000.00 








Muskoka 


35.24 


175.30 












.. 






















237.80 


1,939.85 




1,939.88 






















16.33 


l,526.3c 
392.01 




1,526.3S 
208.2a 





323.5C 

168.0C 


269.30 
114.3C 




13.0S 




183.78 













(c) J. G. Myers resigned; C. S. Salmon appointed to combined offices 22nd Oct., 1934, at a salary of §2,000.00 
per annum. 



22 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salary 

paid 

by 

Province 


Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Nipissing: 
North Bay 


Sheriff (Acting) 


T. E. McKee (a) 

T. J. Bourke 


•f c. 

2,100.68 

387.24 


$ c. 

317.00 

196.00 

1,000.00 


$ c. 
2,417.68 


do 


583.24 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


T F. Battle 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


T. E. McKee 


3,739.23 


246.25 


3,985.48 




do 






T. J. Bourke 


2,440.45 


450.00 


2,890.45 




District Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Norfolk: 


A. C. Pratt 


1,810.43 




1,810.43 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master . . 


A. T. Boles 


1,000.00 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W. E. Kelly, K.C 

do 


Commuted 


at 13,400.00 


per annum 




C. S. Buck 


5,001.21 


661.50 


5,662.71 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








NORTHUMBER- 


J. F. B. Belford 


3,473.96 




3,473.96 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


L V O'Connor 


1,000.00 




Cobourg 


do 






Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


F. D. Boggs, K.C 

do 


4,826.97 




4,826.97 










J. T. Field . 


6,196.65 


750.00 


6,946.65 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff (Acting) 


do 






do 








Ontario: 
Whitby 


MissM.G.Brawley(6) 
J. E. Thompson 


3,766.56 




3,766.56 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


1,000.00 






Judge Robt. Ruddv.. 
A. C. Hall (c) 


179.00 
4,156.45 


179.00 




f 
Crown Attorney 1 
Clerk of the Peace | 

Local Registrar 




4,156.45 




do 








G. D. Conant, K.C... 
do 


1,336.40 




1,336.40 










H. Bascom 


5,971.54 


661.50 


6,633.04 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Oxford: 


Wm. McGhee 


2,618.26 




2,618.26 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


F E. Perrin 


1,000.00 






W. T. McMullen, K.C. 

R.N. Ball, K.C 

do 


70.47 
4,038.24 


70.47 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 




4,038.24 










P. McDonald 


7,716.25 


661.56 


8,377.81 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








Parry Sound: 
Parry Sound., , 


J. E. Armstrong 

J. B. Moon 


1,711.99 


735.00 
1,000.00 


2,446.99 


Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W.L.Haight,K.C.(d) 
do 


Commuted 


at $1,700.00 


per annum 




F. Tasker 


1,866.13 


600.00 


2,466.13 




District Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar.... 


do 






do 



















(a) T. E. McKee acted as Sheriff from Jan. 1st to 30th Oct., 1934; T. J. Bourke appointed to coniljined offices 
ith a salary of $3,200.00 per annum. 

(fa) Miss Brawley's fees were limited to $1,500.00 per annum from 1st Nov., 1934. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



23 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 19S4:~ConHmml 



Total 
office 
disburse- 
ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 

amount 

paid to 

Province 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

Masters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 
1,347.37 


$ c. 

1,070.31 

319.03 


S c. 

535.15 

52.07 


$ c. 

535.16 

266.96 

1,000.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Nipissing 


264.21 
























40.00 








901.18 


3,084.30 




3,084.30 




















523.30 


2,367.15 


52.08 


2,315.07 




600.30 


621.50 


























735.50 


1,074.93 




1,074.93 
1,000.00 








Norfolk 




















69.65 






































1,161.97 


4,500.74 


600.37 


3,900.37 




922.90 


1,352.50 


























1,892.55 


1,581.41 




1,581.41 
1,000.00 








Northumber- 












land and 








166.80 








1,407.10 


3,419.87 




3,419.87 




















972.00 


5,974.65 


1,337.32 


4,637.33 




1,941.20 


2,775.50 


























1,297.62 


2,468.94 


36.00 


2,432.94 

1,000.00 

179.00 

3,259.23 








Ontario 














179.00 
3,518.48 












637.97 


259.25 




















267.26 


1,069.14 


34.57 


1,034.57 




















1,118.52 


5,514.52 


1,107.26 


4,407.26 




2,231.40 


2,086.75 


























1,026.20 


1,592.06 




1,592.06 

1,000.00 

70.47 

2,863.40 








Oxford 
















70.47 
2,863.40 












1,174.84 
























2,527.00 


5,850.81 


1,275.41 


4,575.40 




2,163.50 


3,179.50 


























1,161.97 


1,285.02 




1,285.02 
1,000.00 








Parry 
Sound 


















33.60 






































47.18 


2,418.95 




2,418.95 




318.90 


638.55 













































(c) A. C. Hall dismissed 2nd Oct., 1934; G. D. Conant appointed same date. 
W) W. L. Haight died 21st Feb., 19.3.5. 



24 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 



Peel: 

Brampton. 



Perth: 
Stratford. 



Office 



Peterborough 
Peterborough. 



Sheriff 

do 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar, 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 
Clerk of the Peace 

do (Acting) ■ 

do 

do 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar.. 



Officer 



N. Henderson (a).. 
F. S. Hutchinson.. 
T. H. Grout 

do 

A. G. Davis, K.C. 

do 

J. R. Fallis 

do .... 

do 



M. F. Irvine 

J. L. Killoran 

do 

J. C. Makins, K.C. (6) 

do 

E. G. Thompson... 

John Murray 

W. E. Goodwin 

F. H. Thomp.son..., 

do 

do 



Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 



2,922.07 
87.10 



2,853.93 



3,074.54 



3,243.97 



Salar\^ 

paid 

by 

Province 



I c, 



1,000.00 



577.50 



1,000.00 



Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 



2,922.07 
87.10 



2,853.93 
3^652^04 



3,243.97 



Commuted 



at $3,760.00 



Prescott and 
Russell: 
L'Orignal. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace... 
Local Registrar 
County Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar 
do 

Sheriff 



Prince 
Edward: 
Picton. 



do 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace... 
Local Registrar 
County Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar 

do 



F. J. A. Hall (c) 

S. L. Smoke 

O. A. Langlev, K.C... 
y. J. McElderrv, K.C. 

do '. 

G. J. Sherry, K.C 

do 

do 

F. J. A. Hall 



1,V32.00 

295.31 

2,888.67 

6,424.33 



661.55 



3,406.72 



417.30 
4,560.73 



E. A. Johnson id). 

A. Landriault 

A. Constantineau.. 

do 

C. W. A. Marion.. 

do 

Jos. Belanger 

do 

do 

A. Landriault 



Sheriff D 



Raiky River: 
Fort Frances. 



do 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace... 
Local Registrar 
County Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar 

do 



Sheriff 

do 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 

District Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar .. 



J. Barker ie) 

E. Bowerman. . 
H. McLean 

do 

Walmslev 

do 
A. Norman (/). 

do 

do 

E. Bowerman... 



Alex. Thompson {g).. 

W. P. Pilkey .■ 

R. Bvers 

do ■ 

L. Croome 

do 

P. Pilkev 

do : 

do 



5,694.81 

649^66 

1,500.90 
598.25 



3,353.47 



2,599.20 



284.50 

1,037.58 
271.05 



1,000.00 



per annum 



1,S^.32.00 
295.31 

2,888.67 
7,085.88 



3,406.72 



417.30 
4,560.73 



584.49 6,279.30 
" 649^66 



1,000.00 



661.50 



1,740.13 



1,845.65 
"31474 



W. 



1,580.26 
191.37 



2,150.84 



1,487.30 



1,000.00 



577.50 



1,500.90 
598.25 



3,353.47 
3^26070 



284.50 

1,037.58 
271.05 



1,740.13 
2.423^15 



905.24 

125.06 

1,000.00 



250.00 

mm 



314.74 

2,475.50 
316.43 



2,400.84 

i;955!io 



(a) X. Henderson superannuated 30th Oct., 1934; F. S. Hutchinson appointed same date. 

(b) J. C. Makins resigned 9th April, 1934; E. G. Thompson appointed 10th April, 1934, and acted until 16th 
June, when John Murray was appointed. Mr. Murray was dismissed 17th July, the date W. E. Goodwin was appointed. 

(c) F. J. A. Hall appointed to combined offices of Sheriff and Local Registrar 16th Nov., 1934, at a salary of 
$2,000.00; Mr. Sherry dismissed from 15th Nov., 1934. . 

(d) E. A. Johnson dismissed 9th Oct , 1934, the date A. Landriault was appointed to combined offices at a 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



25 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1934 Continued 


Total 

office 

disljurse- 

ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 
amount 
paid to 

Province 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

Masters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 

collected 

in Law 

Stamps 

for the 

Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 
786.54 


$ c. 

2,135.53 

46.65 


S c. 


$ c. 

2,135.53 

46.65 

1,000.00 


•8 c. 


$ c. 


S c. 


Peel 


40.45 






























122.50 








555.00 


2,298.93 




2,298.93 




















566.18 


3,085.86 


17.17 


3,068.69 




456.24 


1,505.84 


























1,594.23 


1,649.74 




1,649.74 
1,000.00 








Perth 




















187.50 






































473.5'' 


1,358.42 

294.64 

2,873.92 

5,195.88 


268.25 


1,090.17 

294.64 

2.346.55 

4.247.94 










.67 










14.75 


527.37 
947.94 










1.890.00 




2,302.80 


2,560.70 


























1,254.30 


2,152.42 


51.11 


2.101.31 

i.nnn.oo 

417.30 
4,015.87 








Peter- 














417.30 
4,031.75 












528.98 


15.88 




















988.77 


5,290.53 


995.26 


4,295.27 




2,209.60 


2,767.00 


























531.23 


118.43 

1,065.67 
501.90 


51.12 


67.31 

1,065.67 

501.90 

1,000.00 










435.33 








Prescott 


96.35 










and 












Russell 








50.81 








1,157.32 


2,196.15 




2.196.15 




















1,139.80 


2,120.90 




2,120.90 




727.40 


862.00 






















1 




350.00 










f0 40l 7 4 7.t^ 




66.85 


970.73 
231.16 




970.73 

231.16 

1,000.00 








Prince 


39.89 










Edward 




















50.10 










1,740.13 




1,740.13 














582.00 


1,841.15 




1,841.15 




5 2.95 


635.75 




























130.00 


184.74 

2,153.85 
174.28 




184.74 

2,153.85 

174.28 

1,000.00 




61.10 


65.75 




321.65 






Rainv River 


142.15 































18.90 








71.78 


2,329.06 




2,329.06 




















854.85 


1,100.25 




1,100.25 




183.60 


120 75 






























(e) D. J. Barker superannuated 30th Oct., 1934; A. E. Bowerman appointed same date. 

(/) R. A. Norman dismissed 30th Oct., 1934; A. E. Bowerman appointed to combined offices at S3,.i00.00 
per annum. 

(g) A. Thompson dismissed 16th Oct., 1934; W. P. Pilkey appointed same date to combined offices at $2,300.00 
per annum. 



26 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salarj' 

paid 

bv 

Province 


Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Renfrew: 


Sheriff 


Alex. Morris 


S c. 
2,965.88 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,965.88 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Alaster 


J. T. Mulcahv 


1,000.00 






do " 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


H. B. Johnson, K.C... 
do 


4,888.19 




4,888.19 










J. M. Beatty 


3,043.85 


588.00 


3,631.85 




County Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


do 






do 








SiMCOE : 


W. M. Dinwoody (a). 
F. O. Evans 


1,910.03 
192.24 
759.33 




1,910.03 




do (Acting).., 
do 




192.24 




E. C. Drury 




759.33 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


D. Holmes 


1,000.00 






F. G. Evans, K.C 

do 


133.80 
5,115.76 


133.80 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar f 
County Court Clerk \ 

do i 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

do (Acting)... 

do 




5,115.76 




do 








John MacKay (6) 

do 


2,215.35 


640.30 


2,855.65 




E. C. Drury 


771.11 
1,000.00 
3,249.33 
1,235.18 

2,998.33 




771.11 




E. A. Little (c) .. .. 




1,000.00 




F. G. Evans . . . 




3,249.33 




J. H. Mitchell 




1,235.18 


Stormont, 
Dtjndas and 


Sheriff 


J. F. Ault 




2,998.33 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


F. T. Costello .. .. 


1,000.00 




Cornwall 


do . . 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


J. G. Harkness, K.C... 
do 


Commuted 


at $2,830.00 


per annum 




A. I. Macdonell 


5,730.95 


735.00 


6,465.95 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar.... 

Sheriff . .. 


do 






do 








Sudbxjry: 
Sudburv 


A. J. Manlev 


4,414.42 


1,107.24 
1,000.00 


5,521.66 




Surrogate Judge 


E. Proulx 






Local Master 


do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


E. D. Wilkins, K.C... 
do 


Commuted 


at $5,000.00 


per annum 




A. H. Beath 


3,922.03 


600.00 


4,522.03 




District Court Clerk.. 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff . 


do 






do 








Temi.skaming: 
Hailevburv 


Geo. Caldbick 


4,379.15 


1,000.00 
1,000.00 


5,379.15 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


H. Hartman 






do 








Crown Attorney [ 
Clerk of the Peace \ 

do (Acting) [ 
Local Registrar f 
District Court Clerk] 
Surrogate Registrar ] 

do [ 

Sheriff . 


F. L. Smilev, K.C. (d) 
do 


855.96 


50.00 


905.96 




E. E. Pearlman 


4,227.59 
3,250.25 


142.91 
540.00 


4,370.50 




T. J. Meagher (e) 

do . ... 


3,790.25 




do .. .. 










Wm. Thuerck . ... 








Thunder Bay: 
Port Arthur 


N. Edmeston 


5,651.22 


1,400.00 
1,000.00 


7,051.22 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Alaster . 


M J Kenny 






do 








Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


W.F.Langworthy,K.C 
do 


3,672.12 


237.50 


3,909.62 




Neil Campbell 


6,405.20 


600.00 


7,005.20 




District Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar... 


do . .. 






do 









(a) W. M. Dinwoody dismissed 31st Aug., 1934; F. G. Evans acted until appointment of E. C. Drury, 2nd 
Oct., 1934. 

(6) John McKay dismissed as of date of appointment of E. C. Drury to combined offices at $3,750.00 per annum. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



27 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 19M— Continued 



Total 
office 
disburse- 
ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 
amount 
paid to 
Province 


Net • 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

l)y Local 

blasters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c 
392.78 


$ c 
2,573.10 


$ c 



$ c 
2,573.1C 
1,000.0C 


$ c 



$ c 


$ c 























49.20 








918.54 


3,969.65 




3,969.65 




















384.00 


3,247.85 


49.57 


3,198.28 




946.30 


1,490.75 


























1.214.20 


695.83 
132.22 
252.14 




695.83 
66.11 

252.14 
1,000.00 

133.80 
4,040.84 










60.02 


66.11 










507.19 
























133.80 
4,081.68 












1,034.08 


40.84 




















420.00 


2,435.65 


12.13 


2,423.52 




















231.20 


539.91 

780.00 

2,337.33 

982.18 

2,446.67 




539.91 

745.82 

1,168.66 

938.80 

2,446.67 
1,000.00 










220.00 


34.18 

1,168.67 

43.38 




377.10 

1,302.10 

394.65 


737.25 

2,451.75 

723.50 




912.00 






253.00 






551.66 




Stormont 




















164.10 




















Glengarry 
















869.97 


5,595.98 


1,147.99 


4,447.99 




1,782.90 


2,080.75 


























1,664.08 


3,857.58 


278.79 


3,578.79 
1,000.00 








Sudbury 
















55.60 






































1,605.70 


2,916.33 




2,916.33 




584.50 


509.60 




























1,534.33 


3,844.82 




3,844.82 
1,000.00 








Temis- 












kaming 








30.30 






335.00 


570.96 




570.96 




















990.00 


3,380.50 
3,035.25 


215.37 

7.05 


3,165.13 
3,028.20 










755.00 




1,074.70 


546.70 










































3,865.87 


3,185.35 




3,185.35 
1,000.00 








Thunder 












Bay 








76.80 






1,008.00 


2,901.62 




2,901.62 




















1,219.52 


5,785.68 


1,242.84 


4,542.84 




60.00 


120.85 
















1 











(<-) E. A. Little died 23rd Feb., 1934; F. G. Evans acted until date of appointment of J. H. Mitchell on 2n(l 
Oct., 19.34. 

(rf) F. L. Smiley resigned 16th April, 1934; E. E. Pearlman appointed pro tern 17th April, 1934. 

(e) T. J. Meagher dismissed 1.5th Dec, 1934; Wm. Thuerck appointed that date, but did not actually assume 
duties until 1st Jan., 1935. 



28 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 


Office 


Officer 


Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 


Salary 

paid 

by 

Pro^dnce 


Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 


Victoria: 
Lindsay 


Sheriff (Acting) 


H. H. McFadden 

J A. McGibbon 


$ c. 
1,751.67 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,751.67 




Surrogate Judge 


1,000.00 




Local Master 


do 








I^rown Attornej- 

Z;ierk of the Peace 

Local Registrar f 

County Court Clerk J 

Surrogate Registrar ] 

do i 

Sheriff 


J. E. Anderson, K.C.. 

do 


3,464.30 




3,464.30 








Miss M. C. Sootheran 
do (Acting)... 


1,116.10 


287.32 


1,403.42 




W. W. Staples (a) 

J. Forman 


1,029.00 
923.70 

3,889.86 


274.65 
211.84 


1,303.65 
1,135.54 


Waterloo: 
Ivit chener 


W A Kribs 


3,889.86 




Surrogate Judge 


E. W. Clement 


1,000.00 




Local Master 


J J A Weir 


972.90 
7,693.59 


972 90 




Crown Attorney f 
Clerk of the Peace \ 

do 
Local Registrar [ 
County Court C erk -j 

d6 [ 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


D.S.Bowlbv,K.C.(fe) 
do 




7,693 59 










W. P. Clement 


Commuted 
3,713.37 


at $;B,500.00 
661.50 


per annum 
4,374.87 




C. C. Hahn (c) 




do 






E. H. Scully 


1,401.21 
5,668.59 

4,221.67 




1,401.21 

5,668.59 

4,221.67 




do " 




Wellaxd : 
Welland 


V. L. Davidson . 






Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


L B. C. Livingstone 


1,000.00 




do 








Crown Attorney 


T. D. Cowper, K.C.... 
do 


5,357.80 




5,357.80 




Clerk of the Peace 






Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar... 

Sheriff 


J. E. Cohoe 


9,940.10 


800.00 


10,740.10 




do 






do 








Wellington: 
Guelph 


G. H. Dickson (d) 

R. L. MacKinnon 


3,372.88 




3,372.88 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master f 
Local Registrar 
County Court Clerk ^ 
Surrogate Registrar 
do (Acting) i 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Sheriff 


1,000.00 






L W. C;r,etz (e) 


233.00 
6,687.11 


233.00 




do 

do 


272.00 


6,959.11 




do 










J. M. Kearns, K.C 

do 


381.60 
Commuted 


24.50 
at S3,450.00 


406.10 
per annum 




do 




Went worth: 
Hamilton 


Leeming Carr (f) 

H. A. Burrell . ". 


3,126.00 
2,795.50 
2,437.87 




3,126.00 




do (Acting)... 
do 




2,795.50 




J. ^^ . Lawrason 




2,437.87 




Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 


H. Carpenter 


1,000.00 






Judge (i. C. Thomson 

G. W. BaUard, K.C... 

do 


604.10 
Commuted 


604.10 




Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

Local Registrar 


at $5,600.00 


per annum 




G. T. Inch 


19,121.23 


735.00 


19,856.23 




County Court Clerk... 
Surrogate Registrar... 


do 






do 



















(o) W. W. Staples appointed 5th April, 1934; di.sinissed 11th Sept., 1934, the date J. Forman was appointed. 
(6) D. S. Bowlby dismissed as of 7th IS'ov., 1934, the date W. P. Clement was appointed, 
(c) C. C. Hahn dismissed 30th Oct., 1934; E. H. Scully appointed to combined offices at a salary of $4,000.00 
per annum from 1st Nov., 1934. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



29 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 19S4— Continued 



Total 
office 
disburse- 
ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 
amount 
paid to 

Province 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

jNIasters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 

collected 

in Law 

Stamps 

for the 

Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 
167.95 


$ c. 
1,583.72 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1.583.72 
1,000.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 






















31.00 








847.00 


2,617.30 




2,617.30 




















417.00 


986.42 




986.42 




376.65 


581.00 












476.36 


827.29 
772.84 

1,777.23 




827.29 
772.84 

1.777.23 

1,000.00 

972.90 

5,289.80 




256.10 
201.10 


356.00 
379.75 




362.70 








2,112.63 






Waterloo 
















972.90 
6,579.59 












1,114.00 


1,289.79 




































744.24 


3,630.63 


601.41 


3,029.22 




















345.50 


1,055.71 
4,577.51 

2,261.56 


389.05 
638.76 


666.66 
3,938.75 

2,261.56 
1,000.00 




4%. 00 
2,000.20 


511.25 
3,695.50 




1,091.08 
1,960.11 




Welland 




















617.90 








1,391.65 


3,966.15 




3,966.15 




















2,642.80 


8,097.30 


3,237.57 


4,859.73 




3,486.95 


3,120.50 


























865.35 


2,507.53 




2,507.53 

1,000.00 

224.00 

4,370.88 








Wellington 












9.00 


224.00 
5,608.43 












1,350.68 


1,237.55 




2,160.80 


2,937.50 


























99.78 


306.32 


153.16 


153.16 




134.50 


185.50 


























2,249.52 


876.48 

1,539.61 

828.45 




876.48 
1.499.68 

789.17 
1,000.00 

604.10 








Wentworth 


1,255.89 


39.93 
39.22 










1,609.42 






















604.10 








































4,811.71 


15,044.52 


9,490.07 


5,554.45 




7,690.20 


8,481.50 











































(d) G. H. Dickson dismissed 31st Deo., 1934. 

(e) L. W. Goetz resigned 12th Nov., 1934: J. M. Kearns acted for remainder of year. 

(/) L. Carr died 6th June, 1934; R. W. Burrell, Deputy, acted to date of appointment of J. W. Lawrason, 
nth Sept., 1934. 



30 REPORT OF 


No. 5 


RETURN OF FEES AND EMOLUMENTS OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS THROUGHOUT 



County or 
District 



Office 



Officer 



Amount 

earned 

in 

1934 



Salary 

paid 

by 

Pro^^nce 



Total 
earnings 
and 
salary 
in all 
offices 



York: 

Toronto. 



Sheriflf (York) 

do fYork) 

do (Toronto) 

do (Toronto) 
Surrogate Judge 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace 

County Court Clerk... 

d6 
Surrogate Registrar... 

do (Acting)... 

do 



A. McCowan (a) 

A. M. Gorrie 

do 

do 

James Parker 

J. Tytler 

D. O'Connor 

W. T. J. Lee 

A. J. Jackson 

F. M. Field 

I. M. Macdonell 

T. H. Barton 

A. E. Honeywell 

J. W. McFadden, K.C 

H. E. Irwin, K.C 

H. E. Irwin (Actg).. 
A. S. Winchester (b). 
J. E. Thompson (c) 
I. A. Humphries 
A. S. Winchester 



$ c. 

20,332.31 

2,759.85 

36,946.36 

4,558.78 



20,332.31 
2,759.85 

36,946.36 
4,558.78 



Commuted 

20,146.55 

30,177.80 

7,053.30 

26,599.45 

15,882.40 



1,600.00 
1.600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1.600.00 
at $6,500.00 



per annum 

20,146.55 

30,177.80 

7,053.30 

26,599.45 

15,882.40 



(a) A. MtCowan superannuated 15th Nov., 1934: 
(6) A. S. Winchester appointed 23rd Oct., 1934. 



A. M. Gorrie appointed Kith Nov., 1934. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



31 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1934— CondWed 


Total 

office 

disl)urse- 

ments 


Net 

earnings 

of 

office 


Statutory 
amount 
paid to 
Pro^^nce 


Net 
income 

of 
officer 


Amount of 

fees earned 

by Local 

i\Ia.?ters 

during 

the year 


Fees 
collected 
in Law- 
Stamps 
for the 
Crown 


Fees 
collected 
in Law- 
Stamps 
for the 

Judge 


County or 
District 


$ c. 
14,221.14 


$ c. 

6,111.17 

702.28 

13,933.17 

919.13 


$ c. 
387.32 
355.72 
9,000.27 
572.57 


$ c. 
5,723.85 

346.56 
4,932.90 

346.56 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


York 


2,057.57 










23,013.19 










3,639.65 


















































































































































6,199.85 


13,946.70 

22,115.21 

5,075.36 

21,050.80 


4,973.35 
19,367.27 

4,224.68 
14,895.72 


8,973.35 

2,747.94 

850.68 

6.155.08 






• 




8,062.59 










1,977.94 










5,548.65 




13,907.90 


27,300.35 










3,741.92 


12,140.48 


12,140.48 






83,880.00 


16,371.25 













(r) J. E. Thompson dismissed 2nd Aug., 1934: I. A. Humphries acted until appointment of A. S. Winchester, 
18th Dec. 1934, to combined oflBees at a salary of $4,500.00 per annum. 



Statement Respecting Commuted Crown 

Attorneys 



33 



34 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



COMMUTED CROWN ATTORNEYS, 1934 



County or 
District 

and 
Address 



Name 



Gross 
Earnings 



Salarj- 

paid 

by 

Province 



Allowance 

in 
addition 
to salary 
for office 
expenses 



Disburse- 
ments 
approved 
where no 
allowance 
made 



Total 
salary and 
allowance 
for dis- 
burse- 
ments 



Dufferin: 
Orangeville. 

Essex : 

Windsor 



Kenora: 
Kenora. 



Middlesex: 
London... 



Norfolk: 
Simcoe... 



Parry Sound: 
Parry Sound. 

Perth: 

Stratford 



Stormoxt, 
DrxDAS and 

Glexgarry: 
Cornwall 



Sudbury: 
Sudburv, 



Waterloo: 
Ivitchener. 



Wellington: 
Guelph 



Wextworth : 
Hamilton.... 



York: 
Toronto. 



R. D. Evans 

J. S. Man 

H. P. Cooke 

A. M. Judd (a).... 

W. E. KeUy 

W. L. Haight 

J. C. Makins (b).. 

J. G. Harkness 

E. D. Wilkins 

W. P. Clement t 

J. M. Kearns 

G. W. BaUard 

J. W. McFadden. 



$ c 
633.28 



7,355.91 

386.65 

3,418.33 

1,584.66 

28.50 

435.19 

714.54 
2,870.87 

532.00 
2,402.15 
4,591.10 
1,743.60 



$ c. 
1,270.00 



6,000.00 
1,970.00 
5,000.00 
3,400.00 
1,700.00 
3,760.00 

2,830.00 
5,000.00 
3,500.00 
3,450.00 
5,600.00 
6,500.00 



$ c 
130.00 



150.00 
1,000.00 
650.00 
300.00 
750.00 

400.00 



750.00 



$ c 



2,339.92 



15.00 



2,266.88 

78.06 

2.00 

1,453.52 

*400.00 



$ c. 
1,400.00 



8,339.92 
2,120.00 
6,000.00 
4,050.00 
2,000.00 
4,525.00 

3,230.00 
7,266.88 



4,202.00 
7,053.52 



(a) A. M. Judd resigned as of 13th Aug., 1934. He would therefore receive proportionate 
part of .?5,000.00 salary. 

(b) J. C. Makins resigned as of 31st March, 1934. He would therefore receive proportionate 
part of $3,760.00 salarv. 

(t) W. P. Clement appointed 15th Nov., 1934. 

(*) In addition to these disbursements, the salaries of the staff are paid direct by the 
Province. 

Note: — The salaries shown are gross and do not show Government cut. 



Statement Respecting Registrars of Deeds 



[35] 



36 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



STATEMENT SHOWING EARNINGS, DISBURSEMENTS, NET INCOMES, ETC., OF 

THE SUMS PAYABLE UNDER SEC 



No. 



Registry Division 



AMiere office 
situate 



Registrar 



Gross 
earnings 



2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 
17 
18 



19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 

42 
43 
44 

45 
46 
47 

48 
49 



Algoma 

do 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

do 

Cochrane 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham East 

Durham West 

Elgin 

Essex 

Fort William 

Frontenac and Kingston 

Glengarry 

do " 

Grenville 

Grey, North 

Gre}', South 

Haldimand 

do 

do 

Haliburton 

do 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

do 

do 

Lanark, North 

Lanark, South 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

London 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex, East and North 

Middlesex, West 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland, East 

Northumberland, West 

Ontario 

Ottawa 

do 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

do 

Perth, North 

Perth, South 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 

Prescott.. 



Sault Ste. ]\Iarie. 

do 

Brantford 

Walkerton 

Ottawa 

do 

Cochrane 

Orange\'ille 

Morrisburg 

Port Hope 

Bowmanville 

St. Thomas 

Sandwich 

Fort William 

Ivingston 

Alexandria 

do 

Prescott 

Owen Sound 

Durham 

Cayuga 



do 

do 
Minden 

do 

Milton 

Belleville 

Goderich 

Kenora 

Chatham 

Sarnia 

do 

do 

Almonte 

Perth 

Brockville 

Napanee 

St. Catharines. 

London 

Gore Bay 

London 

Glencoe 

Bracebridge 

North Bay 

Simcoe 

Colborne 

Cobourg 

Whitby 

Ottawa 

do 

Woodstock 

Parry Sound 

Brampton 

do 

Stratford 

St. Mary's 

Peterborough... 

Port Arthur 

L'Orignal 



H. J. Moorhouse (a) 

E. L. DeCourcy* 

Alex. Graham 

W. H. McFarlane 

A. E. Hunt (b) 

T. V. Flanagan 

J. A. Clermont* 

F. J. Patterson 

F. S. Broder 

R. H. Hodgson 

Geo. Weekes 

J. H. Coyne 

T. E. Green (c) 

C. H. Jackson 

W.J. Gibson 

J. A. McRae (d) 

S. O'Connor 

W. S. Johnston 

G. P. Creighton 

J. Nelson Purdue 

Miss E. Wadel, Dy. Act'g. 

W. R. Jackson (e) 

R. F. Miller 

D. C. Brown (/j 

E. E. McElwain 

Geo. Hillmer 

R. J. S. Dewar 

A. H. Neeb (g) 

Mrs. E. A. Cunningham 

J. B. Clark 

R. E. LeSueur {h) 

J. B. Palmer 

J. T. Fuller 

H. C. Bowland 

Jas. Armour 

A. W. Gray 

G. S. Reid 

W. D. Fairbrother 

W. F. Hungerford 

C. C. Piatt 

Miss M. V. Walker 

R. Dunlop 

C. E. Lount 

G. R. Bradv* 

W. M. McGuire 

A. G. Willoughl)v 

H. McCullough." 

Jas. Moore 

J. T. Moxlev (i) 

R. D. Bray.". 

W. L. MacWhinnie 

J. H. Tully 

F. J. Jackson (j) 

F. S. Hutchinson 

Dr. M. Steele 

G. D. L. Rice 

W. F. Morrow 

G. W. Dunn 

H. M. Moonev 



S c. 
2,295.10 
♦403.50 
4,201.55 
5,825.90 
3,310.76 
2,012.21 

♦ 11.672.41 

2,029.45 

1,476.80 

1,350.30 

1,697.25 

♦5,575.44 

20,234.65 

♦5,008.85 

4,634.30 

1,437.15 

327.70 

1,599.30 

3,764.66 

2,819.95 

1,074.40 

807.60 

1,090.45 

848.11 

174.78 

4,146.60 

6,246.60 

5,505.10 

♦3,640.85 

7,470.85 

5,705.04 

721.00 

446.35 

1,164.20 

1,502.20 

3,712.40 

2,583.40 

6,692.11 

5,330.15 

♦ tl,o64.10 

5,518.25 

1,599.30 

♦3,929.95 

♦4,561.29 

5,156.45 

2,460.70 

1,272.85 

7,202.55 

5,957.00 

1,541.00 

5,565.30 

1,673.75 

4,064.35 

240.95 

3,807.70 

1,583.60 

4,929.70 

♦4,165.94 

2,475.35 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



37 



REGISTRARS OF DEEDS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1934, AND 
TION 101 OF THE REGISTRY ACT 





Net 
income 


Percentage 

under 
Section 101 


Net for 
registrar 


Instruments 




Disburse- 
ments 


Number 
registered 


Number 
uncopied 


Number 
copied 
but not 

compared 


No. 


$ c. 
966.25 


$ c. 

1,328.85 

+ 

3,196.05 

3,244.90 

1,354.53 

1,300.92 

4,565.46 

1,504.45 

811.80 

650.30 

997.25 

3,570.44 

15,362.37 

2,860.20 

3,374.30 

853.82 

211.05 

957.10 

2,292.44 

2,075.00 

795.92 

414.38 

636.63 

726.11 

146.78 

2,849.60 

3,396.60 

3,434.81 

2,649.00 

4,140.85 

2,661.35 

444.60 

135.75 

864.20 

1,002.20 

2,649.08 

2,082.40 

2,520.57 

3,042.15 

703.10 

3,549.60 

849.30 

2,807.70 

** 

3,206.45 
1,860.70 

572.85 
2,286.55 
2,857.45 

945.15 
3,493.30 
1,121.25 
2,142.85 
28.95 
2,790.80 

883.60 
3,604.80 
2,838.54 
1,739.35 


$ c. 


S c. 
1,328.85 


739 
119 

1649 

2077 
957 
674 
45 
685 
542 
478 
589 

2054 

6041 
736 

1596 
420 
129 
576 

2309 
857 
386 
281 
382 
278 
63 

1237 

2076 

2016 
153 

2698 

2009 
241 
179 
417 
507 

1182 
802 

2262 

1953 
349 

1867 
552 
879 
533 

1824 
720 
459 

2460 

2246 
590 

2124 
540 

1414 
99 

1349 
558 

1498 
783 
836 






1 


579.53 










1,005.50 


98.02 
122.45 


3,098.03 

3,122.45 

1,354.53 

1,300.92 

4,565.46 

1.504.45 

811.80 

650.30 

997.25 

3,249.34 

5,436.23 

2,860.20 

3,187.15 

853.82 

211.05 

957.10 

2,292.44 

2,075.00 

795.92 

414.38 

636.63 

726.11 

146.78 

2,849.60 

3,198.30 

3,217.40 

2,649.00 

3,570.42 

2,459.94 

250.00 

135.75 

864.20 

1,002.20 

2,649.08 

2,082.40 

2,520.57 

3,021.07 

703.10 

3,274.80 

849.30 

2,807.70 






? 


2,581.00 






3 


1,956.23 


72 


72 


4 


711.29 






7,106.95 








5 


525.00 








6 


665.00 








7 


700.00 








8 


700.00 








q 


2,005.00 


200.64 
9,926.14 






10 


4,872.28 


119 
101 




11 


2,148.65 


523 


1? 


1.260.00 


187.15 


13 


583.33 






14 


116.65 










642.20 








15 


1,472.22 








16 


744.95 








17 


278.48 








18 


393.22 










453.82 










122.00 








19 


28.00 










1,297.00 








?0 


2,850.00 


198.30 
217.41 


5 




21 


2,070.29 




?? 


991.85 






?3 


3,330.00 


570.43 
201.41 
194.60 






?A 


3,043.69 
276.40 
310.60 


63 
21 


69 
39 


25 


300.00 






2 


^6 


500.00 






91 


1,063.32 








28 


501.00 








?9 


4,171.54 








30 


2,288.00 


21.08 






81 


861.00 






3? 


1,968.65 


274.80 






33 


750.00 






34 


1,122.25 








35 


5,588.75 








36 


1,950.00 


103.23 


3,103.22 

1,860.70 

572.85 

2,286.55 

2,529.55 

871.52 

3,246.65 

1,121.25 

2,142.85 

28.95 

2,790.80 

883.60 

3.302.40 

2,838.54: 

1,739.35 






37 


600.00 






38 


700.00 








39 


4,916.00 




195 
321 




40 


3,100.00 
595.85 


327.45 

73.63 

246.65 


1925 
172 


41 


2,072.00 




42 


552.50 






43 


1,921.50 




63 


63 


44 


212.00 






1,016.90! 




1 


5 


45 


700.00 




46 


1,324.90 
1,327.40 


302.40 


4 


26 


47 

48 


736.001 








49 



38 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



STATEMENT SHOWING EARNINGS, DISBURSEMENTS, NET INCOMES, ETC., OF 

THE SUMS PAYABLE UNDER SEC 



No. 


Registry Division 


Where office 
situate 


Registrar 


Gross 
earnings 


50 


Prince Edward 


Picton 


J. H. Holmes 


$ c. 
2,061.15 


51 


Rainy River 


Fort Frances 


W. J. Keating (fc) 


♦453.30 




do 


do 


W. H. Elliott 


♦982.48 




do 


do 


N. L. Croome 


♦2,805.48 


52 




Pembroke 


R. A. CampbeU (l) 


1,523.70 




do 


do 


Geo. Campbell 


1,918.20 


53 


Russell 


Russell 


J. A. Gamble 


1,931.25 


•^A 


Simcoe 


Barrie 


R. J. Sanderson (w) 


7,803.08 




do 


do 


Geo. Vickers 


2,114.46 


55 


Stormont 


Cornwall 


J. C. Alguire 


3,788.35 


56 


Sudbury 


Sudburv 


M. Brunette 


♦5,224.25 


57 


Temiskaming 


Hailevbury 


L. H. Ferguson* 


♦8,245.35 


58 


Toronto 


Toronto 


Wm. Bennett (n), Dv. Act.l 
W. J. C. McCrea, Dy. Act./ 
D. McQuarrie 






do 


do 


47,870.93 


59 


Victoria 


Lindsay 


3,294.75 


60 


Waterloo 


Kitchener 


0. S. Eby 


9,931.10 


61 


Welland 


Welland 


E. E. Eraser 


11.236.03 


62 


Wellington North 


Arthur 


Jas. Tucker 


1,919.25 


63 


Wellington, South & Centre. 
Wen t worth 


Guelph 


C. L. Nelles 


4,208.40 


64 


Hamilton 


R. K. Hope (o) 


17,081.15 


65 


York East and West 


Toronto 


J. W. Mallon 


25,100.62 


66 


York North 


Newmarket 


R. L. Boag 


3,805.05 













(a) H. J. Moorhouse dismissed 31st Oct., 1934; E. L. DeCourcy appointed to combined 
offices at $2,500.00 per annum. 

(6) A. E. Hunt dismissed 28th Aug., 1934; T. V. Flanagan appointed same date. 

(c) T. E. Green appointed 10th Oct., 1934; he was Acting Registrar previously. 

(d) J. A. McRae dismissed 22nd Oct., 1934; S. O'Connor appointed same date. 

(e) W. R. Jackson appointed 17th April, 1934; dismissed 31st Aug., 1934; F. R. Miller 
appointed 7th Sept.; Miss Wadel, Deputy, acted in the intervals. 

(J) D. C. Brown dismissed 22nd Oct., 1934; E. E. McElwain appointed same date. 

(g) A. H. Neeb dismissed 31st Dec, 1934; Miss L. Macpherson appointed pro tern as and 
from 1st Jan., 1935. 

(A) R. E. LeSueur dismissed 16th Oct., 1934; J. B. Palmer appointed same date, and acted 
until the 30th Nov.; J. T. Fuller appointed 30th Nov., 1934. 

(i) J. T. Moxley dismissed 25th Oct., 1934; R. D. Bray appointed same date. 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



39 



REGISTRARS OF DEEDS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1934, AND 
TION 101 OF THE REGISTRY ACT 





_ Net 
income 


Percentage 

under 
Section 101 


Net for 
registrar 


Instruments 




Disburse- 
ments 


Number 
registered 


Number 
uncopied 


Number 
copied 
but not 

compared 


No. 


• S c. 
313 55 


$ c. 
1,747.60 

155.80 

765.48 
2,001.23 

611.70 
1.594.20 
1,231.25 
4,775.31 
1,334.41 
2,262.75 
3,839.90 
1,159.33 

tt 
2,216.75 
5,693.54 
4,888.54 
1,219.05 
2,759.40 
4,136.67 
10,644.92 
2,685.05 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,747.60 

155.80 

765.48 
2,001.23 

611.70 
1,594.20 
1,231.25 
3,738.93 

990.23 
2,262.75 
3,419.95 


673 
11 






50 


297 50 








51 


217 00 










804 25 












912 00 




523 

684 

746 
2623 

710 
1347 

437 
28 

17601 
1085 
3389 
3561 
729 
1489 
6404 
9046 
1370 






5^ 


324 00 










700 00 








53 


3 027 77 


1,036.38 
344.18 






54 


780 05 








1,525.60 
1,384.35 
7,086.02 

53,540.65 

1,078.00 

4,237.56 

6,347.49 

700 20 






55 


419.95 






56 






57 










58 




2,216.75 
4.346.77 
3,944.27 
1,219.05 
2,759.40 
3,568.33 
4,964.49 
2,685.05 






59 


1,346.77 
944.27 






60 






61 






6? 


1,449.00 
12,944.48 
14 455 70 








68 


568.34 
5,680.43 






64 


1205 




65 


1,120.00 




66 











(7) F. J. Jackson dismissed 30th Oct., 1934; F. S. Hutchin.son appointed same date. 

(k) W. J. Keating died 28th Feb., 1934; N. L. Croome acted until appointment of W. H. 
Elliott, 5th Apr., 1934; Mr. Elliott dismissed 31st Aug., 1934; N. L. Croome acted from that 
to end of vear. Mr. Croome received the permanent appointment 7th Nov., 1934. 

(l) R. A. Campbell died 26th June, 1934; Geo. Campbell, Deputy, acted for remainder of 
year. He received appointment 29th Nov., 1934. 

(m) R. J. Sanderson dismissed 2nd Oct., 1934; Geo. Vickers appointed same date. 

(n) Wm. Bennett died 18th Oct., 1934; W. J. C. McCrea acting. 

(0) R. K. Hope resigned as and from 31st Dec, 1934; W. H. Lovering appointed 1st Jan., 1935. 

(*) Officer and staff paid direct by Provincial Treasurer. 

(t) Salarv of $600.00 included. 
(**) Deficit of $1,027.46. 
(tt) Deficit of $5,669.72. 

J Deficit of .S176.03. 

♦ Land Title»s fees included. 



Statements Respecting Land Titles Offices 



41] 



42 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



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INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



43 



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44 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



STATEMENT RE LOCAL MASTERS OF 





AJgoma 


Coch- 
rane 


Elgin 


Fort 
William 


Kenora 


Mani- 
toulin 


1. No. of applications for registration 
received 










1 
1 




2. No. of applications for registration 
entered 












3. No. of applications for registration 
pending 












4. No. of applications for registration 
returned unentered 












, 


5. No. of special applications received 


25 

19 
6 

59 
54 

4 


6 
6 




60 

55 

5 

31 

31 






6. No. of special applications com- 
pleted 








7. No. of special applications pending 









8. No. of freehold patents received.. 


146 
138 

8 




203 

185 

23 

1 
2 
2 


4 


9. No. of freehold patents entered . 




4 


10. No. of freehold patents in course of 
entry 






11. No. of freehold patents returned 
unentered 








12. No. of mining or other lease patents 
received 


1 
1 
4 










13. No. of mining or other lease patents 
entered 










14. No. of mining or other lease patents 
in course of entrv 










15. No. of mining or other lease patents 
returned unentered 












16. Orders-in-Council granting land... 














17. Orders-in-Council entered 














18. Lands certificates on hand awaiting 
delivery 


10 
49 


73 
129 




1 
30 


8 

177 
2 




19. Lands certificates delivered to 
Patentees 




4 


20. Office copies of leases delivered. .. 






21. Office copies of leases undelivered 




1 

1034 

1097 

64 

6 • 

$ c. 

1,300.69 

11,672.41 








22. No. of transfers registered . . .. 


145 
112 

24 
1 

$ c. 

111.70 

1,448.65 




191 
158 

18 


328 

207 

38 


4 


23. No. of instruments registered 

24. No. of transmission applications.... 

25. No. of sales preceding applications 


13 
2 


2 

1 


26. Total amount of assurance fees 
collected 


$ c. 


$ c. 

48.03 

2,114.50 


$ c. 

657.87 

3,268.40 


$ c. 


27. Total fees earned 


48.70 


31.30 


Total assurance fees paid 
during the year in all 
offices .■. $4,884.16 





INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



45 



TITLES, 


PROVINCE OF 


ONTARIO, 1934 












Muskoka 


Nipis- 
sing 


Ottawa 


Parry 
Sound 


Port 
Arthur 


Rainy 
River 


Sudbury 


Temi.s- 
kaming 


Toronto 


Whitby 






3 
4 




1 
1 


6 
6 










1 










3 






































2 




1 
1 


37 

28 

9 

29 

29 


15 

14 

1 

30 

30 

1 


29 
29 


1 

1 
























17 


26 
26 




24 
23 

1 


183 
183 


112 
109 

3 






17 
































47 
47 






6 




20 


97 
























5 
1 




20 


97 




















































2 

2 

10 

102 

88 

9 

714 

1080 

45 

2 

$ c. 
1,679.65 
8,217.04 


























1 

25 

38 

9 

335 

382 

41 

1 

$ c. 

113.96 

3,122.60 


56 




1 

28 
5 
1 

88 
124 

11 


24 

29 


9 

174 

19 

1 

490 

364 

43 

3 

$ c. 

203.35 

4,049.70 






17 


23 


























194 
126 


158 

231 

41 


267 

76 

36 

2 

$ c. 

48.68 

2,717.66 


357 

254 

22 

3 

$ c. 
39.10 

2,792.28 


1819 
4061 

288 
29 

S c. 

289.25 

22,061.85 


1 










$ c. 
33.36 


$ c. 

42.58 

1,723.87 


$ c. 

315.94 

1,689.25 


$ c. 


1,368.70 


9.10 



Statement Respecting Division Courts 



47 



48 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 





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INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



49 



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50 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 





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INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES FOR 1934 



51 



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52 



REPORT OF 



No. 5 



si- 

— C 

5 £ 


^ 












































§ 








Bailiff's 
Returns 
of Emolu- 
ments 


(M »-< oi O t^ 
C: eO(M0O 'l- 


C501C00O OOiOiMOiOCOiO Oi-ei-OCD 

t--; q q q X c q q go q r^ q lo (N co o x (n lo c^ 
ei (N — ' oi CO o r-' c x' x' T)^ ^ t-^ o ^' c; cd -.d x id 
c-H — .^.-.to liexcocecoxX'Mre (Mt^xcDce 
caiM'-i ea — ei— 1— 'CO 


('lerk's 
Returns 
of Emolu- 
ments 


-• lo o Tf< o lo c o o c o lO o o lo lo o c c lo c^ lo t- c; i-e o L-e 

"oocqt^Oi— ;rciooiMOt>;0 c-^c^'MOt^ — ce lexoooe 

'^ ■* ■* ci cd c ^ id :c id cd ci c^' -.d — ' o x -^' x rd -^ -s. ■£ '>\ c^' o 

rei--2C^C:t^-*<N.-i-*(NC C^iC-fOiOtCCOCO — t^rc-* — 

iSsiCLei-Hi— ( loc^rC'-H i— i -^ .— i M"— i reoc^c^'* 
—' m" 


Surplus 

Fees 

payable 

to the 

Hon. 

the 

Provincial 

Treasurer 


^ 
















































Balance 
of Cash 

in 
Court 


% c. 

30.11 

147.63 


C: 










id 
iM 












CO 

lO 

id 

(M 


cd 

(N 




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(M 


Total 

amount of 

Suitors' 

Money 

paid out 

of Court 


- t^ x; b-- lo iM_ c^_ lo (N — _ q CO cc x c^_ i>. c^> Tt< c -* q x) ^ ro ti< w oo 
id td CD CD CD t--^ id Tt< x' id id 00 id m rd id id c x' id t^ o -^ id o6 o 
--HcceeoTfc^ccocic^icDio ic^qxc^c^x^Mcit^ cooim — t^ 

^ lo o X t^ i> x_^q_c^__ai cmx OTjic^rtco^TrcDrt o(N'*X'- 

cTce re—''-'' -T ,-h~— ".-T c^" 


Total 

amount of 

Suitors' 

Money 

paid into 

('ourt 


% C. 

9,461.26 

4,021.10 

836.70 

730.66 

638.94 

3,827.23 

1,035..55 

1,204.25 

928.11 

.50.00 

265.30 

8.58..36 

1,555.86 
422.27 
283.72 
125.29 
33t).54 
480.00 
430.10 
695.00 
177.87 

1,408.17 

11,613..54 

1,425.40 

818.79 

2,188..55 


Balance 
of Cash 
in Court 
from the 
previous 
year 


$ c. 
85.58 
33.37 


lO Ci 

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cdx 

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1— ( 


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t- CO 

ce_q 
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CO 
LO 


Amovmt of 
claims 

entered, 
exclusive of 
Transcripts 

of Judg- 
ments and 
Judgment 
summonses 


^■^icc^i.ecc-^-^xc^iiO'^x c^_cct^iocDcoa5i.oo i— ic^icicst^ 
ci c: id re X t^ r^ cd X -r i-^ -^ ci cd t^ c^ t--' '^ ^ — ' t-' -h tj^ t^' t}h cd 

— l^iCi-T-^C:'— iL-tX^iO— l:--:0-^T}HceCC:cDiO C<)OXC<3(M 

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x"cfi-HC<r'-rx"''-<~id' i-T — " Tf" c^"— ' re''7fc^'~cox 

■— CO 


No. of suits 
entered in 

Court, 
exclusive of 
Transcripts 
of Judg- 
ments and 
Judgment 
summonses 


Csit^.-HCC^l'^t^t^r^"* — r^ -^GOt-iOCOTTOOCO Ot^cOCOTti 
-* — C^-*re!M'*<0'M — r-ii-H ^T-H ,--i,-i,-iiCt}<,-( cDl>iciO — 


No. 
of 
Divi- 
sions 


— (McO'*i-ecDt^xciC'-i'M '-HC^cO'ti-ecDi-xci i-Hc^ce-'j^i.-e 


Name of County, 

United 

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