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tOITOKIAI. INDEX— I'AfJK 16.1. 

BUYERS' DIRECTORY— PAGE 147. 

ADVERTISINf; INDEX- PAGE ISI. 



GnadianMachinery 

^^^ Manufacturing News -^ 

A weekly newspaper covering in a practical manner the mechanical, power, foundry and allied fields. 
Published by The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg and London, Eng. 



r" 



Vol. XVIII— No. 23 



Publication Office: Toronto, December 6, 1917 



Subscription Price 
S3. 00 per Year 




Reduce 
Cost of 
Power 

W/c to 

30% 



Use of Chapman 
Double Ball Bear- 
ings means a sav- 
ing in oil, a saving 
in labor of oiling 
and general atten- 
tion required in Babbit- 
ted shaftings - and they 
are thoroughly dust- 
proof. 






man 

Double Ball 



;-:- / 



■ * /.- 







Are you running your shafting on plain 
bearings? There's an opportunity 
awaiting you to save 7 5' 7 of friction loss 
f you are — this opportunity is found 
in Chapman Double Ball Bearings. 
Records show that Chapman Double 
Ball Bearings save 15"^, to 30' , oj 
power. 

They require lubrication no more than 
once a year — think of the saving in 
time and lubricants effected. 

Send for the full story of their efficiency. 

Chapman Double Ball 
Bearing Co. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

339-351 Sorauren Avenue 
TORONTO - - ONTARIO 

Transmission Ball Bearing Co., 1050 Military Road, 
Buffalo,! N.Y. 



C.\ N \ h I A N M \ t II 1 \ 1. IM 



SMALL TOOLS 



bAiuip NOur Tool Room With 

PRATT & WHITNEY 

Interchangeable Cutter Counterbores 

and get the ri^ht com- 
bination at once. 

llC)Ll)l'.K.C"UTri-;i< and (,lll)l'. 

W'itli this (•(Uiihinal imi vuii (•;mi 
iiiiincdintcly iiiiikc the rii;li1 com 
liiii.-it iiiii Ini- (-vi'vv (•(luiitcrliiii iiil; 
J,, I,. 

HOLDERS 

I'jid i<i' liuldcr is inillc(l lu re 
(■(•i\c the di-i\iiiu iiii;- (iF llii' cuttci'. 
and tlicrc is also a hole and sd 
screw t(i accdininiidatc the sliaiil< 
111' the L;indcs. 

GL IDES 

Arc <il' li.n-ilciu'd tool .<t('el. They arc 
held in place liy means of a set .-^crew in 
die holdci' cn.iiaging a A'^-slot in the shank 
of die !iuiil(-. 

CUTTERS 

Tan he furnished of eidici- c.irhon or 
hi.>ih-s])ee(l steel. 

Tlie shani< of the guide passes Ihvouuh 

PROMPT SERVICE ^'^^ '^^'® ^" '^"^' ''"'^^r and the shinddei' 

hetween the guide and its shank keej)* tiie 
is assured al our nearest cutler in place. Tutters can he shar])- 

store where P. & W. Small ,,„pj ,,„ (1,^. f.^^.^ .,„j ^j^^ jj^j^, j^ ^- \^. 

Tools are carried in stock. , , „ ■ . ,, i , f. . t 

Place your order there to-day. J'Ushed further in the hole after grinding. 

Jlolders, Cutter.s and rUiides are furn- 
ished in a wide range of sizes. 

I»RATT& WHITNEY CO 

of Canada, Limited 

Works: DUNDAS, ONTARIO 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER i 

72.'? Drummond Bldg. 1002 C.P.R. Bldg. 1205 McArthur Bldg. B.C. Equipment Co. , 



L 




December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




ACME 
BOLT CUTTERS 

All Standard Sizes from 
V^inch to 6-inch Capacity 




Supplied w itli Leadscrew Attachment for Stay Bolts or other work reqiiiriiiK 

special Accuracy of Pitch. 

WRITE US FOR FULL DETAILS ON ANY MACHINE OR MACHINES 
IN WHICH YOU ARE INTERESTED 

The John Bertram & Sons Company 

Limited 

DUNDAS, ONTARIO, CANADA 

MONTREAL TORONTO VANCOUVER WINNIPEG 

723 Drummond Bldg. 1002 C.P.R. Bldg. 609 Bank of Ottawa Bldg. 1205 Mc Arthur Bldg. 



m 




If any advcrliscmrht interests you, tear it out noiv and place with letters to be answered. 



CA N A P 1 A N M AC II 1 N KK Y 



Volume XVIII. 



Tho Pu tfi 



isnors 



la^< 



TORONTO 



December 6, 1917 






ANNOUNCEMENT! 



P 




Last Year's Annual 
Number contained 
432 pages — over 
350 advertisers. 



AS our Annual Re\iew and 
-^~^ Directory Number will be even 
larger than last year's record-breaker 
forms must close earlier than on 
former Annual Numbers. 

Many firms already have received proofs of 
their advertisements and some have gone to 
press. Do not procrastinate. Send in your space 
reservation, copy for your advertisement, the 
necessary cuts and a list of principal headings 
under which you would like to be classified. 

Kindly send cuts by mail. Many advertisers 
were left out of last year's Annual Number 
simply because cuts were not received in time. 

From a buyers' standpoint our 1918 Annual 
Number will be the most complete and valuable 
directory ever placed in their hands. It will be 
issued just at the commencement of a period of 
very heavy buying and will naturally influence 
a tremendous volume of business. 

CANADIAN MACHINERY 



143-153 University Avenue, 



Toronto, Canada 



I 'i^smiisggsmiiissjissss;;;^^ 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E ]{ Y 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 




Volun\o Will. 



BRAND 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

AND 

TWIST DRILLS 



"DOUBLE WACO" Quality 

Specially Adapted for Munition Work 

"TURTLE" BRAND 

High Class Tool Steel, Files, etc., of all descriptions. 

ESTABLISHED 1870 

W ATKINS & C 

Reliance Steel Works 
SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



TRADE MARK- 

WACO 



For particulars apply to our 

Sole Representatives for Canada 



GEO. A. MARSHALL & CO. 

70 Lombard Street Toronto, Ontario 



Ij what you need is not advertised, conBidt our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917 



C A N A D I A N M A CUT N E K Y 




The 

BRIDGEFORD 
LATHE 

50-Point Carbon Steel Crucible Forg- 
ings and a Cut h Inch Deep - 

Tliis is a riiut;li lurning jol) in which 1 " stock is taken off 
the diameter. Fdrgin.ii i.s 12' in length and lias three 
diameters — the smallest 5", the largest 6V2". Cut is V-i" 
deep, feed is 0.054" per revolution. Time, <> hours. 

This is l)ut one of the ,jol)s the Crucihle 8teel Forge Com- 
pany, Cleveland, Ohio, handles on the Bridgeford Lathe. 
It is typical, liowever, of the work put u]i to the 
"Bridgeford." 

Bridgeford Lathes are heavy duty machines. |)o\vcrfu!. 
efficient, economical — the kind of machines you need if 
you have heavy turning of any kind. 

The Bridgeford line includes lathes from 26" to 60" 
swing — each machine a time saver. 

Ask for details. 



BRIDGEFORD MACHINE TOOL WORKS 

151 WINTON ROAD ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



C A N A DI A N M A (• II I N K K Y 



Volunu- Will. 



It's a Long Stride to 

Cincinnati Acme Efficiency 

You soo it in tho jxivat shops of the world; in tliosc wondcirully oii^iinizcd sliops 
where niaehine is jiitted auainst machine, where t-eononiy ever ,i;nards against tlic 
slightest increase in established produetioji eost. wlicrc cniciciu-y in every sense is 
deinanckMl and obtained — not just desired. It is in these great sliops Ihat ( 'inciiinali 
Acme Tun-ct T-athcs and Sci-ew Marliincs liave wdii tlicir laurels. 

Turret Lathes in four sizes, 14" to 20" swing; Screw Machines 
in five sizes, 's" to ^4" capacity and 11" to 20" swing. 

The average machine may be jroo'l 
enou^rh for tho averaRC shop — but is it 
Kood enoujrh for yours ? At least write 
for Cincinnati Acme Catalog and decide 
with the facts before you. 

The Acme Machine Tool Co. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. 

Code Word: ACME 

CANADIAN AGENTS: RUDEL-BELNAP 
MACHINE CO., MONTREAL. TORONTO 





18 Forming Turret Lathe 



2i" X 11 ' Screw Machine 




We guarantee shipment 

within 24 hours of 

receipt of order 



"Extra" 

"Special" 

"High ^ 

Speed" 



Tool Steels 



Made in 
Sweden 
from selected 
Dannemora Ore 



We also carry in stock 
Solid and Hollow Drill 
Steel. Die Blocks. "SIS- 
CO" Welding Wire, Drill 
Rod and Swedish Iron. 




.Swedish Steel &, Importing Co., Ltd. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



James McKay Company 

Pittsburgh, Penna., U.S.A. 



Manufacturers of 



Shell Forgings 

We have the Equipment and Experience and 
can execute orders for 

Nose Sockets Base Plates 
Adapter Plates 

for any size shells. Can execute orders 
promptly. 

SPECIAL FORGINGS— We can make any forg- 
ings that can be made under Drop Hammers. 

CHAINS AND ACCESSORY FORGINGS-We 
have a complete line. 

ADDRESS OUR REPRESENTATIVE: 

JOHN A. BUCHANAN 

King Edward Hote!, TORONTO 



// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



MALLEABLE CASTINGS 

Capacity 
Two Thousand Five Hundred Tons per Month 

Our Prices, Quality and Delivery 

are Right 

Send Us Your Inquiries. 
THE PRATT & LETCHWORTH COMPANY, Limited 

P.O. BOX 1630, MONTREAL 
Works: BRANTFORD, ONTARIO 



Air Chucks for 6" Shells 
in Stock 



General Machine Work 
of All Kinds 



Gear Cutting, Etc. 



Hyde Engineering 
Works 

27 William St., Montreal 

P.O. Box 1185 
Telephones: M. 1899 & M.2527 



70 Holden- Morgans in One Plant 

Another firm would not accept a contract until assured they 

could get HOLDEN-MORGANS. 

That's the reputation they have. How 
about your requirements ? We can 

give 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

on 6" shell machines. 




THE A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO. 

W. FRONT ST. (Limited) TORONTO 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to he answered. 



(' A N A 1> I A N \l A (• II 1 \ i: i; V 



Voliimo XVUl. 




Clutch Is Bel 

A Part 



Follow the 
Arrow to 
the Snyder 
Drill Press 



A Dtuililc .lohiison Friction 
Chitfh is iiictujioratod in the 
nost of "icai's indicated In' 
tile allow. 

.Johnson Friction Clutclics 
arc compactly constructed 
and arc mechanically de- 
signed to meet the require- 
ments as a tapping device 
on all tyi^es of drill ]ircsses. 
Machines equipped with a 
Johnson Friction Clutch do 
not need any dtlier tapping 
device. 




CLUTCH Willi P-JLLEY 
MOUNTED ON HUB. 



Courtesy of J. E. Snyder & Son. Worce.ster. Mass. 



Consult Our Engineering: Department for a Solution 

to Your Problems 

There are a great many little problems that confront the machine tool designer. Why not 
consult our engineers and get the benefit of their years of experience in all Inaiiches of 
clutch application. This service is entirely free and is opcii Ui all without any obliga- 
tion now or later. 

Write for a copy of our vel'ow data sheets and latest booklet. "Clutches 
ns Applied in Machine Huildinc." 1o-Ha>. 






V iiiia.ia: Williams & Wilson, Ltd., 320 St. James St., Montreal : Can. Fairbank^-Mon-^e Co., Ltd.. ToronK 
England: The Efandem Co.,' 159 Gt. Portland St., London, W., Sole Agents Briti.-^h Isles. 
Australia: Edwin Wood, Pty., Hardware Chambers, 231 Elizabeth St., Melbourne, Victoria. 

If what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



Det ember 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C 111 N E K Y 



We will Fill Your Requirements 




Send Us Your Inquiries 



Air Compressor Evidence 

The greatest evidence of the vahie of any article is the 
demand for it after investigation and trial. Below are foui' 
carhjads of onr Cdinpressors which fills one order to a large 
concern in Canada. Onr line of couqjressors is very large. 

Write Hi and t.\plaiti your re<j'.ii' tint nti 



The Jenckes Machine Company, Limited 



WORKS: 
Sherbrooke. Oue, 



CANADIAN SALES OFFICES: 

Sherbrooke. Montreal- St. Catharines, Toronto 

Cobalt. South Porcupine, Vancouver. 



WORKS: 
St. Catharines, Onf. 





// any advertisement intej-ests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



10 



C.\ N A IM A N M A (MI 1 X ]■: K Y 



Volume XVITT. 



Mm 



Adv't. No. 9 



T ie furd-Smitb MacbiiLC Coigpacv 



o 



MILLER series! 



( 



OUR UNIVERSAL MILLERS 

In this issue \\cco\cr our I ni\ t. rs;il M ilk is onU . ("-onipactncss and simplicity of 
ilcsi^n luuc been strictK adlKicii to. All (he points of cxcxllcncc and accuracy of 
our Plain Millers arc cnibodicil in our I'nivcrsal Machines, with all the new 
ad\antaijes that a Lhiiversal Miller allows one to have. 




Ourbest workmanship and material are as heretofore placed on these machines. 
Purchasing Agent, Manager, Superintendent or Tool Room Foreman, allow 
us to send you our Bulletin so you can learn further the details of these machines. 

// icjH pay you in the end. 

The Ford -Smith Machine Company, Limited 

HAMILTON ONTARIO CANADA 



If \Bhai you need U not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



11 



WHY A "B. B.?" 




Experience has proved 
that 

B.B. PRESSES 

quaHfy for 

Economy 

Durability 

Speed 




The Brown, Boggs Co., 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, ONT., CANADA 



■^i 



'"^, 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



!-• 



( ■ \ \ \ 1 1 ! \ \ \i \ ( M I \ r I; ^■ 



Volume will. 




f/ DIAMOND 

I ANDIS NORTON 

All sizes, lincst qualitw awaiting xoiir coniinand, stones 

'"FHAT SUIT" 

cither uiimoinited or niounteJ in our improved 
(any >rvle) CAST STKEL MOUNTING; 

GUARANTKKD lO BRING RESULTS. 

"MADE IN CANADA" 

Tl fHEEL^ ] RiJEING ' ^01x (o. 



88 WEST PITT STREET 



WINDSOR, ONTARIO 




Works: LONGUEUIL, QUE. 



Armstrong, Whitworth 
of Canada Limited 

Standard Sizes of 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

Carried in Stock 

CARBON AND ALLOY STEELS 
Shop Tools, Gauges, etc. 

HEAD OFFICE: 298-300 St. James St.. Montreal 

Dominion BankBldg., TORONTO 
Branches: 27 King William Street, HAMILTON 
McArthur Biag., WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Coal 
Coke 
Iron Ore 



pig Iron 

"Pictorial foundry & malleable 




M.ide by The Canadian Furnace Co. 
Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada. 

f1.A.HANNA&.C0. 

Sales Agents, CLEVELAND 

Canadian Office : 

703 C.P.R. Bldg., Toronto 



If u-hat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N M A C 1 1 1 N E R Y 



13 




LeBLOND 

Heavy Duty Milling 
Machines 

Plain or Universal Types — 
Cone or Gear Drive. All commer- 
cial sizes No to No. 5. 

Adapted for the Heaviest 
Manufacturing or the most exact- 
ing tool room service. A suitable 
Range and Capacity for eveiy class 
of milling. 

Patent Self-Aligning Arbor Supports — 
Hardened Steel Spindle Bearings — 
Double-Friction Back Gears — and the 
simplest type of right-hand control, con- 
tribute to an increased production and 
longer life as a precision machine. 

The R. K. LeBlond Machine 
Tool Company 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S A. 



URANIUM 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 
Improving High Speed Steel 

When high speed steel was first pnuhiced it was so niucli better than cari.ion 
steel then in use that people thought it perfect. With tlie addition of Uranium 
to high speed steel, however, the combination was found td be stronger, tougher. . ■,- 
held its cutting edge longer, especially on the liigher speeds, and was more.-."v 
ductile than plain tungsten .*teel. "•■ ■ 

Pve]ieated orders have sh.jw u wh.it ]>e<iplc think of Uranium Steel. 

Consult your steel maker or wri(c us. 

STANDARD ALLOYS COMPANY 

FORBES AND MEYRAN AVES. 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA. 



If a.ny advertisement interests you, tear it out uoiv and place with Irttrrs to be ansivcred. 



14 



CA N A 1> I A X M A (Ml 1 N K K V 



Volunu' Will 



^ Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company ^ 

^ -Limited -^ 

New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada 




4,000 TON STEAM HYDRAULIC FORGING PRESS FOR MARINE AND OTHER HEAVY FORCINGS. 

The product of a modem steam-hydraulic press is dens er and more homogeneous than can be obtained with the steam 
hammer, due to the effect of the blow of the latter not penetrating to the centre, in contradistinction to the uniform knead- 
ing effect of the press; while the amount of work that can be done by the latter at one time with little variation in tem- 
perature, strongly tends toward a better product. The greater uniformity and reliability of steam hydraulic forgings 
make their use imperative wherever high-class products are required. 

T 



lT^'W^'^^'^'^«»S^W»8SgSi$^«^SSS'SSJ^S$!Jj^^ 



December 6, 1917. CANADIAN MACHINERY 15 



17 Years in the Service 
of Our Customers 

You, as a user of TOOL STEEL, are vitally 
concerned with the Company manufacturing that 
steel. Obviously, for on it necessarily depend 
the quality of the Steel and the Service you 
receive. 

THE VULCAN CRUCIBLE STEEL COMPANY was estab- 
lished in 1900 and has enjoyed a steady, normal growth — -the 
result of satisfied customers. The personnel consists of 
experienced, executive and practical men who have worked 
together for years. The equipment of the plant is modern 
and complete, and assures you of prompt, dependable service. 
Natural gas, oil and electricity for melting; steam and elec- 
tricity for mill driving, etc. 

This Company has always conscientiously cared for the needs 
of its customers . In view of the conditions that have pre- 
vailed during the last two years, this is certainly a record of 
which to be proud. 

These are some of the points that make relations with 
our customers so pleasant, and which are making the 
bonds of friendship and good-will stronger every day. 

VULCAN CRUCIBLE STEEL COMPANY 

MAKERS OF WOLFRAM HIGH SPEED STEEL 
ALIQUIPPA Established 1900 PA., U.S.A. 

REPRESENTED IN CANADA BY 
Messrs. Norton, Callard (k Company, Montreal, Que. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I'l' 

If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



16 r A N A 1> 1 A N M A (' i! I N i: K >' VoU.m.- XVIII. 



For Export and Import 



Iron — Steel — Metals 

Machinery, Raw Products and Manufactured 

Goods 



A. G. KIDSTON CEi. CO. 

witli oflices in 

LONDON GLASGOW MONTREAL NEW YORK 

AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND SOUTH AFRICA 

and connections all over the civilized world, have exceptional 
advantages for the marketing of Canadian and other products. 
Enquiries invited and promptly handled. 

Manager for Canada and U.S.A.: 
C. E. GAUSDEN, 17 ST. JOHN STREET. MONTREAL 

Cables: "KIDCO," Montreal 



"ULTRA CAPITAL" HIGH SPEED STEEL 

Balfour's Tool Steel 

"CAPITAL" HIGH SPEED TWIST DRILLS 



MANUFACTURED BY 

Arthur Balfour & Co., Limited 

Dannemora Steel Works, 

Sheffield, England. 

The Eagle & Globe Steel Company, Limited 

Head Office and Warehouse, Canada and U.S. 128 Craig Street West, Montreal 

Ontario Office and Warehouse 36 Colborne Street, Toronto 

Winnipeg Stock Dominion Equipment & Supply Co. Limited 

Vancouver Stock Frank Darling & Co. 

W. A. BRADBURY, Agent, 128 Craig Street West, Montreal 



// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A J) 1 A N M AC 11 1 N K I! Y 



17 



OUR GOVERNMENT will spend a minimum of 
$350,000,000 for Destroyers— wfien these are built 
the American Navy will lead the world in boats of this type 
and the submarine is doomed. Nothmg but the best 
materials will enter into the construction of these vessels. 
This is also true of 

8tiDeri( 




The Nationally Knowi! 
First Qjality 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

The greatest vigilance is observed in every detail of its manufacture — we 
spare no expense to insure the highest quahty in every bai. No better 
all purpose High Speed Steel has as yet been produced. 
It's best for all machine uJor^. 

VANADIUM-ALLOYS STEEL CO. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. Worlts at LATROBE, PA. 



U. S. S. IVaninglon, torpedo 
boat destroyer, the type of ves- 
sel that safely escorted Major 
Qeneral Pershing and his staff 
to England. 

This is ihe type thai is not) aiding 
the British and French nalfies In 
wiping out the submarine menace. 
They are doing great worl^ in lessen^ 
ing the effectiveness of the sul>marine 
war/are. 

PuMcd br tlw Censor 




If inieresied in Hijh Speed Sieel and you care lo receive our pniucd maucr ot iDtervaU. «end us your name and address lor our mailing list. 

If any udvL'rIisevii i:t lult-resls you, tcui it oat iidiu a, id iHai.:f wi. U'llcrs lo bi c.,is.vcicd. 



18 t' A N A n I A N M A (■ i I 1 N K K V Volume XVIII. 



One of the 

Steels of the Century 

Centurion High-Speed 

Made from the BEST Materials 

Iron, Tungsten, Chrome, Vanadium 

I Melted by the BEST Process 

The Crucible Furnace Method 

Handled by the BEST Workmen 

Melters, Forgemen, Annealers, Metallurgists 

CONSEQUENTLY 

Will do the BEST Work 

Quality Delivery Service 

We have a catalog waiting for you. Write for it. 

THE CENTURY STEEL CO. OF AMERICA 

MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH-GRADE CRUCIBLE STEELS 

Grneral Office and Works ; Sales Offices : 

POUGHKEEPSIE, 120 BROADWAY, 

N.Y. NEW YORK 



If what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



19 




20 



C AN A 1> 1 A N \l A ( II 1 N1,CRY 



V..|uinr Will. 



aurar 

UT/iES 






Whni Sidney -for -Service 

Lathes go into a plant, 

^^ ^ Production begins to climb up to new 

^^^jC, "peaks". Ask any "Sidney" Oper- 

f^ ator — read the facts in Bulletin No. 30. 

Walch Production climb out of Sidney-for-Service Lathes 
Get in touch with a Canadian Agent now 

The Sidney Tool Co. - Sidney, Ohio 



R t'prcsenli't! in Canada by 



Foss & Hill Machinery Co. 
bPS Montreal, Que. 

H. W. Petrie, Limited 
Toronto, Ont. 




For Turning, Facing and Milling the thread on Gas 
Check Plugs for 6-inch High Explosive Shells. 



THE BANFIELD 
PLUG MILLER 

Patented in Canada and United States 



THIS machine is especially desip^ned for 
Hnishinp: base " plug's; turnin^r the out- 
side diameter, finishinji' the face with 
any camber desired, and milling the thread, 
all in one chuckinii', the complete plu^ bein;; 
finished in six minutes by unskilkd labor. 

'\'hi' machine is equipped with i|uicl< draw-in collet. 
Drive puJIey 18" :; G". with bronze bush having cui 
jaw clutch for turning and facinjj. Worm gear 
100 to 1 ratic. with cut jaw clutch for milling. 
cJriven by 10"xlij" flanged pulley. The milling 
cutter is driven by an 8"x2i-" flanged pulley. Tool 
po.st carriage is equipped with power feed (two 
speeds) having automatic stop. • Power feed pump 
with relief valve driven from worm shaft (all drive? 
direct from main line shaft). Rigidly built, simple 
.'.nd economical to uperate. 

Weight 1.800 lbs. 
Fnr 18 pdi., 1.5 and 60 pdr. Hiph Explosive ShelU. 
Can furnish machine.'^ of same type, but somewhai 
lighter in construction. Particulars on request. These 
machines are tooled up for finishing plain machined 
' . r bevel led plugs, if desired. 

Write for prices and deliveries. 

Prompt Shipment 

BUILT EXCLUSIVELY BY 

Edwin J. Banfield 

STAIR BUILDING, TORONTO, ONT. 



/; what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. CANADIAN M A C li I N E Px Y - ^ " ' 21 





Help Win the War 

USE 






I 




The Hardest, 
ncrease J^ |^ Toughest, 

Your M M Fastest Cut- 

D J .• I I tinq Metal 

rroduction ■ ■ t> 

Rno wn 





We shall be glad to 
send Demonstrator 
to show you how 
you can increase your production 
by using 

STELLITE 



Deloro Smelting & Refining Company, Limited 

Head Office and Works: DELORO, Ont. 
Toronto, 200 King St. W. Montreal, 31 5 Craig St. W. 






// any advertisemen.t interests you, tear it o^it now and place with letters to be answered. 



CANAHIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XVIII. 




HAMIL 



INSTALL the most modern machinery in 
your plant to meet the new conditions of 
to-day. Vou get it in Hamilton Lathes. 

We arc living in the greatest speed-up, cut- 
the-cost-of-production period of modern 
times. War time conditions demand speed 
and economy in the machine shop as well as in 
other institutions of commerce. Shops every- 
where are now producing more work with the 
same force of men than before the war. The 
war has created a demand for the utmost 
efficiency and brought out the resourcefulness 
of the country in new machinery. 

Hamilton Lathes represent the conditions in 
the machine shop and the spirit of the times 
with their speed, durability and accuracy. 

Write now for Bulletins — yours for asking. 

The Hamilton Machine Tool Co. 

HAMILTON, OHIO 

Sole^ Agents for Ontario: 

H.'.W. PETRIE, Limited - T TORONTO, ONT. 







Speeds 







>■; ■'-" ■■ \ ■ ..■:.■'■ , *'-■'■ 



fV ... . . -,. - 

j^->-^;', ""A 












jj£i ^ 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Roelofson 6-in. Banding Machine 

Y 



OU couldn't imagine a more 
sturdy, compact, serviceable ma- 
chine than this! A glance at the 
illustration Avill show jou for yourself. 
It has been used in Canadian munition 
plants since the munition business 
started, and is still giving absolute sat- 
isfaction. It's the machine you need if 
you make shells. 

Look over the following outstanding 
features of its construction: 



Integral (en bloc) construction assures 
j)erfect rigidity, permanent accuracy 
and desirable compactness. 

Cliuckiug with spring collet chuck in- 
sures accurate and speedy checking. 

Graduated feed dial, two cutting tools, 
and ample belt power insure output of 
accurate work in least possible time. 

Machines are built for 15, 18, 60-pdr. 
and 6" shells. 



Roelofson Machine CBi, Tool Co., Ltd. 

Head Office: 1501 Royal Bank Building, Toronto, Canada 
Works and Warehouse: Gait, Ont., Canada 



Immediate 
Delivery 

To shell plants 
changing over 
from the manu- 
facture of the 
larger sizes to 6" 
shells, u r abil- 
ity to make im- 
mediate delivery 
should be of espe- 
cial interest. 

And remember 
that the Roelof- 
son is one of the 
few banding ma- 
chines that have 
stood up from the 
first of the muni- 
tion game and 
are still doing 
duty. 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



24 



CAN \ |i 1 \ N M A (' II I N i: IM 



Volumo XVI II 




No Overhanging Table On 
TheWhitcomb-Blaisdell Widened Planer 

A groat variety of jjlaiicr work calls for uimsual width bo- 
twoeii the liousings, with Itnt little height iiiulei' the cross- 
rail. 

This is the woik IKv the widened pattern planer, rather 
than a standard iiiachine. The foriiiei' is er.siei' {<> hamUc 
. and capable of higher speeds. 

The \Vliitc(iinl)-Blaisdell Widened Planei" has been develop- 
ed to till this need. Not a makeshift, bnilt over from the 
standard size; but thorongh and eomjilete in design. 

For instance the nsnal practice is to widen the bed and 
table without spreading the tracks thus causing overhang 
to the table. Whitcomb-Blaisdell design, however, widens 
the tracks as well. This is typical of Whitcond)-Blaisdell 
construction throughout. Every detail for ])roduction is 
built int(( these planers. 

Write for the Whitcomb-Blaisdell 
Planer Book. Read all the details. 



' '■ Fr om 14 to 30' ^ 

^ SWING hIi 



WHITCOMB-BLAISDELL 

MACHINE TOOL CO. 

WORCESTER, MASS., U.S.A. 



PLAN'Efe? 
I WiUJL ^ 



// what you need is not advertised, consiilt our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



25 



jiimiiiiilllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilliilliiillllllHIHllliililllillim^ 




A CASE OF NO CHOICE 

WIIP]N you buy a lathe — milling machine — or what not — ■ 
VdU have a wide ticld with which t(» ac(Hiaiiit yourself. 

One lathe is l)est for small work, another for largX'. This niillei- 
possesses an exclusive feature rendering- it most efficient for one 
purpose, that one for another. And so on. 

To buy intelligently you must be familiar with the individual 
eharaeteristies of a considerable mnnber of similar machines. 

The selection of i'(iui])ment for the comm(»n run of chucked work 
- — whether castings, foi'gings, or second-opei'ation l)ar work — is 
rendered easv bv reason of the fact that there is one machine 
which stands'ont" above all others, with a 30(V; to 500'^^ production 
advantage. 

That's the "NEW BKITAIN" .MULTIPLE SPINDLE AUTO- 
MATIC. 

There's no choice! 



The WewBrkainMachinG Compaitjr 



Axi-toTO.a."tic 

Screw axid CliLiiclt.in.6 




C o X1.XVO o -t iOTxit, 



// 0111/ advciti-icmrnt i)iteycsls i/OH, tear it out non- and place with Inters to l)e answered. 



26 



C A N A D 1 A N M A C II I N K R Y 



Volume XVIII. 




^5EaSJiBy555IR5;^ 



E 



LOOK — Lodge and Shipley Engine Lathes 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 
Sl/K 

14"xo'()rS'Bcd. 

DouMc Back Cjcars 
and Ouick (^han^c 
Cjcar \\{)\. 

If you can use tins size latlu-, 
write for specifications and 
prices. Reiiieniber tlicsc are 
tlie higliest i]uality tools manufactured. 

GARLOCK- WALKER MACHINERY CO., LTD. 

32 FRONT STREET WEST, TORONTO, ONT. 




"EVERYTHING IN MACHINERY' 



I lUi iiji Hi i!-L iLk lUi Hi : 



l.Y»^1rr.^1f*lr«(1^«vltl*1^rWly.^1r«1l?»1^Wlr»1lrw^ 



fSjZjQl 3ll3E3E^ 



im^iSSiSr 



CISCO NEW 24" — THE LATHE WITH THE PULL 



UPPER PULL PIN TWO 
CHANGES PLACED AT 
NEUTRAL THROWS OUT 
ALL FEED GEARS 



REVERSE PLATE 
FOR RIGHT AND 
LEFT THREADS 



LEVER FOR SLIDING 
BACK GEAR 



RIGID CARRIAGE VkTITH 
LONG BEARINGS AND 
WIDE BRIDGE 



LARGE TAILSTOCK 

SPINDLE-ECCENTRIC 

CLAMP 



HEAD CONE DIAMETERS 
I2"-15 "is" WITH 5 FACE 



LARGE CAPACITY 
STEADY REST 




LOV/ER PULL piN \ >^ 

TWO CHANGES ^^ 

^^^^MBLER HANDLE 
GIVING U CHANGES 



NON-INTERFERING DEVICE 

CANNOT ENGAGE FEED 

AND HALF NUT AT SAME TIME 



FULL SWING REST 



ALL THREADS AND 
F^EDS OBTAINED 
WITHOUT STOPPING 
LATHE 



THREADS 1 TO 24 
FEEDS 4 TO 92 



WORM AND WORMWHEEL 
RUN IN OIL 



APRON DOUBLE PLATE 
TYPE BACK SUPPORT 
TO STUDS 



LEAD SCREW ADJUSTMENT 
MADE AT THIS END 



AMPLE OILING PROVISION 
AT ALL POINTS 
PROTECTED HOLES 



'^AikJWilliamj for'circoUr and price'on'the best 24-inch_lathe built, equallto'any 30-inch. 

THE CINCINNATI IRON & STEEL CO., Cincinnati, U.S.A., 14-in., 16-in., 18-in., and 24-in. Lathes 



// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers Hated under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



27 



The 



Fairley Davidson Steel Co., Inc. 

SPECIALISTS 



Hot Working Steels 
High Strength Steels 
High Speed Steel 
Tool and Die Steels 
Magnet Steels 
Non-Changeable Die Steel 



Brand Name : 
"Xtof" and "Precision" 
"Hehtemnd" 
RUSHITOFF No. 6 
"Fondwot" and "Giant" 
Tungsten or Chrome 
Nugget "B" oil hardening 



CHROME VANADIUM, oil hardening or case hardening 

CHROME NICKEL, oil hardening or case hardening 

Steam Hammer Forgings to Sketch 

We guarantee to supply the correct steel at once, eliminating costly 

experiments 

We carry a complete stocl: at our New York Warehouse, 124 Maiden Lane, 

New York City 

Canadian Agents: 

THE FACTORY SUPPLY AND STEEL COMPANY 

149 Craig Street West. Montreal, Canada 
We carry a complete stock at our Montreal Warehouse 



DOUBLE 



MUSHET 

High Speed Steel 

Carbon Steel 

Gauge Steel 

Alloy Steels 



SOLE MAKERS 

Samuel Osborn & Co. Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD 




Twist Dr/7/s and 
Reamers^ Milling 
Cutters and Slit- 
ting Saws 



Sam'l Osborn (Canada) 

Limited 

Head Office and Works: Montreal, P.Q. 

Branch Office: Toronto, Ontario 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



28 



(\\ N A l» I A N M \ (' II 1 N K K Y 



Volume XVIII. 




1^-^ 




Boring 6" Shells 



Wl 



ith 



I'tM'ft'ctly lu't'iinili- boriiiK mihI far Krcaler 
fpocd Ko (ntn your nhop tlu' <l»y you open 
llic (lour to a )l('pt>ui*n SiriKl*' l^ar HoriuK 
I.atht' of rlKitl liuild. No lalhc in your 
'\uiV Of any whop other than a Hepburn 
I.nthi- in it« I'quiil on fi" shell work. Write 
for Km record. 



Your old lathe ivhuilt by uit will 
HDctcnt as new for all lathe work 
for piirticulnra. 



Hepburn Lathes 




John T. Hepburn, Limited 



18-60 Van Home Street 



Toronto, Ontario 



Where 

Shall We Send It? 



Kvery Tuiii knuiii Mmu ^limilil Iniw ilii- 
lumklet. 

There are 40 pages full of pood intVnination 
on tool room <;riiiilin.si — flitters, rc-aniors. 
drills, taps and dies, lathe and planer tool*. 
It'.s yours for the a.^king. Just send us your 
address and a copy of this valuable little 
booklet will be mailed FREE of charge with- 
out any fil)ligation to you. 

Norton Company 

Worcester, Mass. 

ALUNDUM AND CRYSTOLON PLANTS: 
CHIPPAWA. ONT. NIAGARA FALLS -N.Y. 

Canadian AKt^nU: The Canadian P'airbanks-Morge Co.. Ltd.. 
Montreal. Toronto. Ottawa, St. John. N.B. ; Winnipeg. Cal- 
gary. Saskatoon. Vancouver. Victoria : F. H. Andrews & 
Son. Quebec. Que. 

Use coupon, letter or postcard. Ask for Booklet 835-D 1 




Kuc. U. S. Pat. Offic 



TEST PRESSES 

For Applying Internal Pressure 
Physical Test to Shells 

BANDING PRESSES 

For Pressing in Copper Rotat- 
ing Bands on Shells. 



\orton Company, Worcester, Mass. 
Please mail my copy of Booklet 83.5-D to the follow- 
ing address: 

Name 

St. &No 

City or Town 



Detroit, Michigan 

Designers and Builders of High Speed Hydraulic and 

Special Machinery for all Purposes 

Complete Hydraulic Installations 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd., Sales Representatives for 

Canada 
R. E. Ellis EnKineering Co., 621 Washington Blvd.. Chicago. 111., 
Sales Representatives. For Great Britain and Continent, address 
Gaston E. Marbaix, Coronation House. 4 Lloyds Ave., London, 
E.C.. England. 

illMIIIII|j|llllllllllllllllllllll!lll!lll1llllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllll'|i|!lllt|[|ll!l!M 



i2:H:niiiiiiiii!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiii;i[iiiii!iiiiiiiiiinii!i!ii^ 



IZZT:'JT1:\ZT1J::L'::^T-^'1-^ I Metalwood Manufacturing Co. | 



If what you "ecd is ,iot advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1911 



C A N A I) I A N M A C i 1 1 N E K Y 



•29 



DEED- 

Worcester 




OMPANY 



Mass.U.SA 




BETTER WORK— MORE CONVENIENTLY 

THROUGHOUT THE YEARS THAT "REED" LATHES H^VE BEEN 
BUILT, THE IDEA OF ITS SPONSORS HAS BEEN TO MAKE IT ONE 
OF THE BEST TOOlS MONEY GOULD BUY. 

ITS REPUTATION BEARS TESTIMONY OF THE ATTAINMENT 
OF THIS IDEAL. 

A FEW OF VARIOUS SIZES CAN BE HAD AT ONCE. 



CANADIAN FAIRBANKS-MORSE CO., LIMITED 

MANNING, MAXWELL & MOORE, INC. 

ALLIED MACHINERY CO. Or AMERICA 

FENWICK FRERES 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



80 



CA N A IM A X M AC IIINER Y 



Volume XVIII. 



'M'-yiy^iA^^t^'^*"'etniklaf'ia'.'i)'^\afj\-:.'Trt^<3t»» 




Rumor 

casting a 

reflection 

on a Norton 

Grinder 

proven 

to be false. 

Read these 
letters. 



Norton Grinding Co. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Cinadian Sellinc AKents: The CANADIAN FAIRBANKS- 
MORSE COMPANY. Limited. St. John. Quebec, Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton. Windsor, Winnipeg, Saska- 
toon. Caleary, Vancouver, Victoria. 

If what you need ie not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and jvrite advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



31 





'osjr. 



'r,wjSy4orA 



on it^s nor for sa 




vo- 



We heard that The Enterprise Company of 
Columbia, Ohio, wished to dispose of an 18 x 96 
Norton Grinding Machine which they had in- 
stalled some years before. The abnormal demand 
for Nortons, new or used, led ns to communicate 
with the Messrs. Motch & Merryweather, our 
Cleveland .selling agent.-^, asking that they investi- 
gate this rumor and if possible buy the macliine 
at once and hold pending our orders. 



Read the two letters on the opposite page — from 
the lower one it would seem, the rumor that The 
Enterprise Co. wished to sell was not well founded. 

But the ])uinl we wish to Ining out from their 
letter i.s the opinion they have of the Norton 
Grinder — '"the best tool in our shop." Certainly 
you could ask for no broader endorsement of a 
machine tool. 



NORTON GRINDING COMPANY 



Worcester, Mass. 



CANADIAN SELLING AGENTS : 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Company, Limited 

St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Windsor, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria 



// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



r .\ NA I) I .\ N M AC II I N i: i; v 



Vdlurno XVIII. 



The "GUN^' TAP 



M 



NSIl^ II IS I \l I I l> nil-. SIIKAK (I I ri.N(. lAI'." 
The ruttiii); ihIkos nt the point are trround nt nn im>rle to 

the axis t>iee illu.stration. K>. This enables the Tap to cut 

with a shearint: action ai\il the an^le dellecls the chips, so 

th.1t they curl out ami ahead of the Tap and do not break 

up and collect in the flutes. 

EASE OK CUTTING. 
.Note the hook on the cuttinj: edi;e (G). This, combined 

with the shear-cuttini; action, makes the "Gun" Tap the 

easiest cutting Tap on the market. 

On especially toU);h jobs — throURh layers of material of 

varyinir hardness it cuts hole after hole with perfect ease. 

stkkn(;th. 

The flutes of the "(Jun" Tap arc less in number ami 
shallower than those of the ordinary Tap — therefore, in 
itself is almost as stronx as solid stock. Couple with this 
it* easy-cuttinii qualities and you hive a Tap that practi- 
cally never breaks. 

WELLS BROS. CO. of Canada, Limited 

GALT. ONTARIO 

'Snic* Asond : 
THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS MORSE COMPANY. LIMITED. 

Montrrwl, Toronto. V'«nc<iuvrr. Winnipcit. S*. John. CalK/iry . 



''It Shears 



ff 



I'KODl'CTION. 

In number of holes tapped in a (jriven 
lime the "Gun" Tap excels, not only \w- 
lause of the easy-cuttinjr qualities and 
strenjrth already described, but because 
there is no lost time due to removing 
broken Taps or frequently backing out 
the Tap from deep holes to clean col- 
lected chips from the flutes. 

i'here will 



be a tremendous saving; in 
>oiir tappini^ costs if you lei the "(Inn' 



Tap do your work 

Send today for the illustratii 
which jroos into details 
repKirkable Tap. 



liullctiii 
rcKardinK this 

Thri-. 



t.'^ 




Exnctiv the wny chips arc produced 



AS A CHAIN 



is only as strong as its weakest link, so a file 
can only lie as good as the steel from wliich it 
is made. 

The steel from which all P. II. Files are made is 
IU:ST CLAY CRUCIBLE CAST STEEL 
only. That is one point of superiority which 




TRADE MARK 



QUALIl Y FILES 

have over all other tile-; maile in Canada. 
We will tell you others later. 

PORT HOPE FILE MFG. CO., 
LIMITED 

Port Hope, Ontario 

"Askyoar jobber" (23.) 



U. S. Electric 
Drills and Grinders 

Save T'ime, Labor and Money 

They can be at- 
tached to any lamp 
socket. 

For drilling in 
metal they are su- 
perior to any other 
kind of portable 
drill. Cost 50% less 
to run than air 
drills. 




3 SIZES 
3-16 in.. W.G.T.. 6 lbs. 
Vt in., W.G.T. 9 lbs 
%in.. W.G.T. 12 lbs. 

All motors wound for 
110 or 220 volts. 
Direct or alternatin;: 
current. 

Try a few of our 
Electric Drills and 
Grinders and you'll 
send us an order for 
more. Our guaran- 
tee protects you. 




%" and Hi 

Universal Motor 

DRILL. 



For Sale By 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 



.Montreal, St. John, 



N.B.. Toronto, 
VancooTer 



Winnipeg, Caljary, 



THE UNITED STATES ELECTRICAL TOOL CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



// uhat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



33 





WS^S^^f^^^^^^^Sf^^^^^^^^K§ "^^m 






If You Change Markings Often, Use 

CHAMPION HOLDERS 



(Patented* 




Steel Lettering 
Die and Stamp 
Catalogue 
on rcQuest 



MATTHEWS' Improved 
Champion Steel Hold- 
ers and Interchange- 
able Grooved Type were 
developed to simplify, and to 
economize the cost of inter- 
changealjle marking. Holders 
are made with .•spring attach- 
ment, which, combined with 
grooved tj'pe, keeps letters or 
figures securely in place, and 
insures accurate, straight line 
marking. 

Three styles of holders, and 
three types of letters and 
figures. 

Matthews' mai'king de\'ices are 
the best that skill, 67 year.s' 
experience and modern equip- 
ment can produce. Matthews' 
deliveries are prompt and Mat- 
thews' prices are right. Any 
device you may require from a 
small rubber stamp to a steel 
stamp for marking shells. Send 
Matthews a trial order. 



Jas. H. Matthews & Company, ^°'^^^ ^'^^i'yfl^^l^^'tLfhss^^" ^•^■^' 

Distributors for Canada: Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Company, Ltd. 
St. John, Quebec. Montreal. Ottawa. Toronto. Hamilton, Windsor. Winnipeg, Saskatoon. Calgary Vancouver, Victoria 



McDougali Shapers 

These are up-to-date Shapers, 
designed for modern shop 
production. 

They are plain in design, yet 
embody all essential features 
necessary for efficient work. 

Every adjustment is conveni- 
ent for the operator and fine 
for the most accurate work. 

Let us have your inquiry. 

The R. McDougali Company 
Limited 

Manufacturers 
GALT, ONTARIO, CANADA 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Company, Limited 
Sales Agents 




34 



C A N \ l» 1 \ N M A (' II 1 N i: K Y 



Volumo Win. 



^ -'-i^^UmLMi S^^Mii^Mii;^Sim^ "sMg 




"'"■""""iiii iiiiiiiiiiimiiin 



X 



GRATON& KNIGHT 

standardized Series 

LEATHER BELTING 



^^^^n^T 



V 



^■t^i 



iiJU^C^ 



:ri--^i 



A Belting Catechism 

Ultal arr (lio A(l\ milages of l.tather as belting? 

Leather is the staiitliird belting material. When properly tan- 
ned for belting its surface will grip the pulley in the most 
effective manner. Gooil leather belting is economical ami 
reliable, it will tran.Kmit power with 98'''^ efficiency. 
How can leather belting be made uniform? 

The manufacturer mu.«t lir.-it set up definite standards of 
quality and strictly adhere to them. As he cannot secure 
belting leather in the open market of uniform tiuality, he 
must tan his own hides. He must tan them in sufficient 
quantity to en.ible him to select for each belt, pieces up to 
his standard. These pieces must be uniform in weight, stretch. 
texture, and quality. 

Why should belts be rigidly graded? 

.-^ belt is no stronger than its poorest part. The i|uality o( 
leather varies, and unless each belt is carefully graded, dis- 
similar qualities get into the same belt. Rigid grading js 
uniformity. Grading should be done by expert judges of belt 
leather quality, according to fixed standards. 
\\ hy is there such confusion in leather belting grades? 

Because many belt makers have not stanilardized their belts, 
but give the buyer any kind of belt he demands. The result 
is chaotic. 

What is Standardized Leather Belting? 

Simply belting that is standardized to meet the needs of the 
different classes of power transmission — instead of being made 
to meet theoretical specifications. Transmission re(iuirements 
can be classified into a comparatively few groups, and there 
is a standardized belt to fit each one. Standardization can 
be applied to belting just as to any other type of machine 
part or product. It is common sense in belting. ^ 

How does Standardized Leather Belting help the belt buyer? 
It insures the selection of the proper belt required to speed 
up machines, to maintain production, to reduce operating ex- 
penses, which cannot be accomplished unless the belt user 
gets the maximum power through his belts. Standardized 
leather belting effects this for him and enables him to know 
that he is getting the right brand for highest efficiency and 
greatest economy maximum service from every belt and 
every drive. 

How does it work? 

Let a Graton & Knight representative make an analysis of 
your belting requirements. Then get the standardized belt 
for your work, ordering your belting by work to be done 
rather than by specification. There is no obligation — there 
may be a great saving for you. 

The Graton & Knight Mfg. Company 

Oak Leather Tanners, Makers of Leather Betting, Lace Leather, 
Leather Packings and Sundries 

WORCESTER, MASS., U.S.A. 

Canadian Representatives : The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited. 
St. John. Montreal. Ottawa. Toronto, Hamilton, Quebec, Calgary, Edmonton. 
Vancouver. Windsor, Winnipeg:, Victoria. 



GRATON 



Spartan Leather Belting on dry 

grinders. Hoover Steel Ball Co., 

Ann Arbor. Mich. 



KNIGHT 






December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N M A C II I N E R Y 



35 





Mi 





















C 


■^ 


D 








____ 






^B 




k 






L 


I 














^ 




^ 


Mgg' ^ U S^^^tI 








^^B 










.^^ 


M 





FACTS 

S K F will save power, 
lubricant, time, trouble 
and expense. Send for 
the S K F Transmission 
Catalog. 



SE B E SALES AGENTS : 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

St. John, Quebec. Montreal. Ottawa. Toronto. Hamilton, 
Windsor. Winnipeg. Saskatoon. Calgary. Vancouver. Victoria 



CANADIAN SKF" COMPANY 
Limited, Toronto, Ont. 



36 



# 



(• \ \ \ I' 1 A N M AT 11 1 \ 



i; V 



• "^jLy'Sj-—! J 



r^.- 



^jj^ 



:z) 








Fairbanks-Morse 

Machine Shop Supplies 



( k\ (.land Drills mean Moles. 

Norton Wheels mean Grinding Service. 

^ ale 1 loists mean Pound Feet. 

Such considerations determined the 
selection of the lines we handle. 

C-leveland Drills and Reamers; Mac-It 
Set Screws; Wells' Taps and Dies; 
Wells' Gauges; Brown & Sharpe Mill- 
ing Cutters, Machine Tools, Micromet- 
ers; Yale & Towne Chain Blocks, Trav- 
elling Cranes and Trolleys; D. & W. 
Magnetic Chucks; Union Lathe 
Chucks; Williams' Tool Holders; Reed 
Vises; Buffalo Forges; Buffalo Blowers; 
Matthews' Dies; Universal Hack Saws; 
Keystone Ratchets, Drills and Reamers. 

Send for your copy of the F.M. Book, 
our new i,ooo page general catalogue. 




^RlS (g^s^^SlDI^^iS^ 



St. John Quebec Montreal Ottawa Toronto Hamilton Windsor 

Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary Vancouver Victoria 




December 6, 1917. 



611 



Canada Stove 8 Foundry Coy. 

Plant and Product m 

iV^lo ^Laurent, Moni^l 





Times hk,- the present have produced many contrasts, and few indeed are the factories 
whose prodiicl.s are not contrilnitori/ to the arts of both peace and war. That the greater 
portion of this plant's activlti/ s]iouId he devoted to developing the manufacture of peace-time 
products is a pleas-ing feature at this time. linviiKj in vicir the economic necessity of main- 
taining stapli lines of indiisfni in active rcaili nexs for the return of peace. 



RAPID development of plants has 
been a notable feature of manufac- 
turing activities throujihout the 
Dominion durinir the past three years, 
but with few exceptions such expansion 
has resulted from the urgency of war 
requirements — directly or indirectly — 
rather than a marl<ed extension in staple 
manufacturing-. Domestic enterprise, 
even on a normal basis, has suffered ex- 
tensively through the high cost of raw 
materials and the difficulty of obtaining 
such, except under restricted conditions. 
One of the few exceptions to these con- 
ditions is the plant of the Canada Stove 
and Foundry Company, Ltd., Ville St. 
Laurent, near Montreal. This company 
was incorporated in May, 1916, as suc- 
cessors to the Canadi Stove and Furni- 
ture Company, the latter having- been or- 
g a n i z e d in 1905. 
Steady pro,arress was 
made by that com- 
pany until 1913, by 
which time the out- 
put had attained 
comparatively large 
dimensions, and the 
factory occupied a 
floor space of 50,000 
sq. ft. The rapid 
growth of the busi- 
ness, however, dur- 
ing the next three 
years' necessitated 
the bixilding of ex- 
tensive additions, and 
in the summer of 
1916 the two storey 
mounting room, the 
warehouse and foun- 
dry were extended; 
later in the same 
year a four-storey 
building was erected 
for the manufacture 
of shells, and a stor- 
age warehouse. 

An entirely new 



departure was decided on at this 
time, viz., that of enr.melling sheet 
steel goods and cast iron hollow 
ware, and a suitible building was 
erected for this pu.poe on the prop- 
erty facing the main offices; these latter 
also being remodeled darin':r the same 
period. The present floor space avail- 
able for manufacturing purposes is about 
200,000 sq. ft., and together with the ad- 
joining property covers an area of 10 
^cres. The plant is ideally situated, be- 
ing located about 7 miles from the city 
of Montreal, and adjacent to the main 
line of the G.T.R,, with spur connections 
to both the C.P.R. and the C.N.R. 

Foundry 

The foundry has a length of 300 ft. 
and a width of 150 ft. and with the ex- 




VIEW IN ONE OF THE FOUR BAYS OF THE FOUNDRY 



ception of a small section used for heavy 
pit work, the floor is constructed of con- 
crete, this being considered an efficiency 
feature where light work predominates. 
The greater volume of work is connect- 
ed with the manufacture of stoves and 
ranges, but considerable jobbing is also 
done; facilities having been installed to 
handle individual castings of about 3 
tons in weight. A 66 in. Whiting cupola, 
with a capacity of over 30 tons per day, 
is located in a wing about midway of 
the shop length; a Piqua pressure blow- 
er being installed to supply the neces- 
sary blast. For small plate-moulding 
work, 50 lb. ladles are provided, and for 
the larger work several ladles ranging 
from 200 lbs. to about 4,000 lbs. are em- 
ployed, these latter being transported 
about the shop by a 
monorail system, 
louring is continu- 
ous for about three 
hours each day. 

The bulk of the 
light work is per- 
formed in moulding 
machines; the equip- 
ment consisting of 2 
Pridmore rockover 
machines, 3 Arcades, 
2 Webb and 3 Daven- 
port power air 
squeezers, and 2 
Adam's hand 
squeezers. For the 
bakiiig of cores there 
has been installed 
one large Whiting 
and four small Mil- 
lett core ovens. The 
foundry is well light- 
ed, and heated by a 
forced hot air sys- 
tem with overhead 
piping, installed by 
the Canadian Sirocco 
Co. The remainder 



612 



< \ \ \ l» 1 \ N \l \ (• II 1 \ I IM 



Volume XVIII. 



of the fttctury i« heattti by meun» y." 
steam coiU. 

Mill l>r|>artmrnl 
For thi« I'leaniiit: of tlu- i:i>iinK'> 1' 
Sly steel mills art- iiistiilloii. ll.f.-. r.iii;: 
iiiK from the Ittrue siie of 4 ft. i«|u;ir. 
and ;>0 in. Iohr. to the smull »i«o of IS 
.n, (lia. »iui 3 ft. lontr. Kaoh mill i> 
04)uit>po>l with Sly liust arrostor*. in.Hur 
inK the niuxinuiiii tiejrree of cleanlnu>> 
po.s.iible 111 thi.s ilu.Hty ili-partmeiit. l-oi 
the Unrvr rustiitt:.'', anil those that iirt- 
too delicate to place in the tumblinK 
mill.4. u .taiid blnstintr e<]Uipment ha.^ 
been providt-.! A,;>',.inin»f the mill room 
is the ittove Iv department into 

which the r.. .ire taken from tlie 

clcanini; room and store«l in suitably nr- 
ran{:«d bins so that the pait- ;ir.. .t ill 
times easily accessible. 

BficienI Slock Record Sy.sleni 

On the first tloor of the >iovi' mount- 
ing department is the steel stock ami 
cuttintr room, the former so arran»;ed 
and manaRetl that it is po.-isible to deter 
mine at any time, by reference to the 
stock sheets, the amount of material thai 
i.< on hand and the exact number of 
stoves that could be made from the 
available supply. This system extends 
throufrhout the entire plant, so that when 
an order is placed for a larpe number of 
.-.•toves, a few minutes chcckinjr of the 
different stock sheets advises the super- 
intendent or his chief clerk just what is 
required to fill the order. Steps are im- 
mediately tjiken on the receipt of an or- 
der to arrange the production of the 
foundry and the purchase of the neces- 
.<ary stock and other accessory supplies, 
so that no department is handicapped 
IhrouRh delay in receiving materials. 

The more important machines in the 
cutting department are a Brown BoRprs 
8 ft, power squaring^ shear; a 42-in. 
double crank consolidated power press 
for body making and heavy formed 
work; one Michigan and one Excelsior 
power press; an automatic top grindin'.; 
machine made by the Excelsior Tool Co.; 




M M'llININC WKl'.MtlMKN T I OK .<.M\I,I. .-^TOVK T.MflS 



a special vertical inside grinding ma 
chine for work on stove parts; and a 
number of smaller tools such as foot 
shears, harnd folders, and presses, to- 
gether with all the other necessary shop 
equipment for the rapid and economic 
production of sheet metal operations. 
One section of the second floor is set 
apart for the nickeling of the numerous 
ornamental parts now found on nearly 
every make of cast iron or steel range 
or heater. 

Nickeling and Polishing 

The nickeling equipment is of the most 
modern type, a prominent feature being a 
Hanson and Van Winkle dynamo of 1,000 
ampere capacity; all wiring is contained 
in conduits throughout. The polishing 
room, adjoining the nickeling depart- 
ment, contains 10 Hanson and Van 
Winkle polishing machines, driven from 
:t shaft located below the floor; each ma- 
chine is fitted with an exhaust head, and 
a Sheldon fan is employed to remove the 




^TEW IN ONE OF THE MACHINE MOULDING SECTIONS. 



dust from these machines. The blacking 
of the different cast iron stove parts i.> 
also performed on this floor, as is the 
wrapping and crating before going to the 
.-hipping department. 

Gas Stove Mounting 

The entire third floor is reserved for 
the gas stove department; one section is 
provided with the necessary pipe thread- 
ing machines, presses and drills re- 
quired for the diff'ercnt parts and the 
main portion of the room is used for ths 
mounting of the various makes of stoves. 
An interesting fjature in connection 
with this department is the drilling of 
the small holes in the various gas burn- 
ers by means of multiple drill heads, as 
many as 72 holes being drilled in one 
type of burner at a sdngle setting. The 
presses and multiple drill heads were 
supplied by the Michigan Press Co. of 
Ypsilanti. 

All finished material for all makes of 
gas stoves is kept on this floor, the op- 
eration of this department being gov- 
erned by the checking system already 
referred to. Four concentration points 
on this floor govern the supply and dis- 
tribution of all material — the sheet metal 
stock room, the rough castings depart- 
ment, the general stores department, and 
the finished material stores. Daily re- 
cords are kept of stock and orders so as 
to avoid the possibility of misunder- 
standing between the heads of the dif- 
ferent departments. 

The average output of stoves, ranges 
and heaters is about 100 per day, while 
the number of gas stoves turned out each 
day ranges from .50 to 7.5. The japanninj; 
room is equipped with an oil burning 
oven, maintained at a heat of about 3.50 
deg. F. The interior of many of the gas 
stove ovens are given a coat of alum- 
inum, sprayed on. 

Like most of the large metal working 
establishments in Canada, this plant has 
been engaged in the manufacture of 
shells, having been working on the 4..5 in. 
size for upwards of two years. The out 
put to date has been upwards of 250,000 
shells. 



December 6, IS)!"! 



C A NA DT A N M A c II ! X !•: U Y 



613 




\IE\V OK PART OK THE GAS STOVE MOUNTING DEPARTMENT, 



Enamelling Department 

The art of enamelling, or the fusion of 
(luartz and chemical compounds to form 
a hard vitreous surface on metallic ob- 
jects, either for the purpose of decora- 
tion or utility, is ja'adually assuming in- 
creased importance in the industrial de- 
velopments of the country. Additional 
enterprise in this direction is the most 
recent departure of this firm. 

The enamelling' plant, located directly 
opposite the main offices, is of brick con- 
struction, 120 ft. by 60 ft., and is of single 
floor construction, with the exception 
of the front section of two floors, the 
upper one being used for chemical stor- 
age and decalcomania work. The ground 
floor is divided into three sections — one 
containing the smelting furnace and the 
grinding mills, a pickling department, 
containing acid baths for cleaning the 
sheet steel articles, and also a steam 
heated drying kiln, while the greater 
portion of the ground floor is reserved 
for the actual operations of enamelling 
the work. 

Three oil-fired furnaces are installed, 
two being adapted for sheet work, while 
the third and largest is constructed to 
, handle cast iron hollow ware. Of the 
two former, one is open hearth and the 
other muffled type. The fuel is kept in 
a 800-gal. tank adjacent to the building, 
and is supplied from the main 10,000- 
gal. reservoir provided for the opera- 
tions of the furnaces in the shell ma- 
chining department. Oil is delivered to 
the burners by means of a small centri- 
fugal pump, and air for blast and com- 
bustion is supplied at a pressure of 
about 70 lbs. per sq. in. The other equip- 
ment of the shop consists of the various 
receptacles for holding the solutions and 
the necessary facilities for handling and 
transporting the work to and from the 
kilns and furnaces. 

Preparing the I'^it 

The art of enamelling, like other pro- 
cesses of a similar nature, involves con- 
siderable knowledge of what are known 
as trade secrets, many of which are only 
attainable by actual experience and con- 



tinual practice. The general features of 
the work, however, will be gathered 
from the following description: 

The necessary compounds, such as the 
sedimentary rock and chemicals, are re- 
ceived in the form of shale or powder, 
and are first mixed and smelted in an oil- 
fired furnace, the proper proportions of 
the compound being determined by the 
particular formula in use. The furnace 
is divided into two sections — one reserved 
for colored and the other for white mix- 
tures. The furnace is heated to about 
1,600 deg. F., care being taken to avoid 
over-heating. When the heated mass of 
materials begins to bubble, the furnace 
is immediately tapped and the charge 
run out into a bath of cold water; in- 
stantaneous cooling is a very important 
factor, and to achieve this the frit, as 
the product is termed at this point, is al- 
lowed to flow out in a very fine stream 
and a current of cold water is played 
upon the molten substance as it falls into 
the bath, which is also kept cold by a 
continual overflow from the wooden tank 
beneath the pouring spouts. The sudden 
vitrifaction of the frit facilitates the 
operation of grinding to the desired de- 



gree of fineness, the calcined substance 
having a glassy appearance and being 
easily broken into smaller particles. 

Grinding the Mixture 

After the material is removed from 
the cooling bath, it is allowed to dry be- 
fore being placed in the mills for grind- 
ing. In addition to the chemicals that 
are united in the fusing process, others 
are added preparatory to grinding. Two 
tumbling mills, 3 ft. dia. by 4 ft. long, 
and one about 2 ft. by 40 in. long, are 
pi-ovided for this purpose, the two larger 
being for wet mixtures and the smaller 
for dry mixtures. The mills are made 
with sheet steel bodies and cast iron 
ends, and are lined with a substantial 
layer of porcelain. The door is similarly 
lined, and when placed in position the 
inner wall coincides with the remainder 
of the cylinder, thus forming an undis- 
turbed surface for the movement of the 
revolving mixture. 

One of the very important require- 
ments in connection with the preparation 
of the chemicals and various ingredients 
used in the art of enamelling is that 
every facility be adopted and the great- 
est care exercised to exclude the pre- 
sence of foreign matter which would 
have a detrimental effect upon the ulti- 
mate results. The friction and impact 
required to grind any substance to 
powder entail the use of grinding 
mediums which must be much harder 
than the material being ground. Flint 
stones are generally used for the grind- 
ing of enamelling powders, as the wear 
upon them from the continual tumbling 
is imperceptible, and thus assures the 
powdered material being practically free 
from any substance other than those 
placed in the mill. Extreme care and 
cleanliness must be exercised in the pre- 
paration of the materials and their sub- 
sequent use in the enamelling process; 
and to eliminate trouble at a future 
stage of the work special attention is 
given to all these elementary factors. 

After the charge in a mill has been 
ground to the desired grade of fineness, 
generally requiring from 5 to 6 hours, 
every particle of the powder, together 




VIEW OK NICKEI, PLATING DEP.'^RTMENT SHOWING VATS AND DYNAMO 



614 



(\\ N \ l> I \ N M \ (• II I N i: 



Volume Will. 



with the flint stones, U removed from th<? 
interior, and tho cylinder is thorou^jiily 
cleansed, while every stone is bru<!i' .1 
with a wire brush and wushed octOT 
hein»r iittain pla.rd in the mill. Thi» 
pructice is not only ndopted when the 
proportions of the different formula* 
vnry, but also when one hiivinK the ixnol 
proportions of the mixture, just pn- 
viously irround. is to In? pi. 
mill. Strict adherence to t! 
;- > u nu.Mmi. t >r- 

■led formula; it 
.(l>u .1^1-. .1- .1 pu.-iUM- check on subsc- 
MUenl op<T:ition». 

Knanu'llini; .-^htfl S(mk 

.\ (H'culmr i-h;»r;tctenstic in the en- 
amellinvr of metnl is thiit the process is 

■'•«httt varietl for sheet work and 
•..:s. due to the difference in the 
» iu-m.cal reliction. For operations on 
sheet work the mixture is prepared in 
the form of a wet solution, into which 
the part.s arc dipped; while the process 
for castinirs retiuires the application of 
the enamel in a powdered st.ite distri- 
buted evenly upon the surface of the 
work. The prim-iry essential in the 
enamellin;r of sheet metal is the selection 
and preparation of the material. 

.\fter the sheet iron has been cut and 
formed into the shape desired, the pieces 
are thorouirhly cleansed in an acid bath 
and then well washed in hot and cold 
water, beinjr aftervvards immersed in a 
-special solution and a$rain washed in 
water to destroy further action of the 
acids. All trace of moisture is entirely 
removed by placing the treated work in 
a dryinp kiln, after which it is ready to 
receive the pround coat. In the general 
run of sheet steel work that is subjected 
to the enamelling- process, particularly 
the class of work that is handled in this 
plant, the entire surface of the work is 
treated with a ground coat, this invari- 
ably being of a dark blue color. The 
enamel is in the form of a creamy solu 
tion contained in galvanized sheet stee! 






IWll (II' lilK lUKNAl"i:s l.Ni TIIK KN AMEI.I.ING DEPARTMENT 



tanks, into which the work is dipped and 
swung with a peculiar movement so as 
to insure an evenly distributed coating 
over the complete surface of the work. 
TliTs is a very important detail, and the 
girls employed become very expert in the 
manipulation of the different shapes and 
sizes they are called upon to handle. 

Drying and Burning 

.\fter being arranged in rack trucks — 
the pieces being kept separate — they are 
moved into the drying kiln to remove all 
traces of moisture; when thoroughly 
dry, the work is ready for baking. Spe- 
cial facilities are provided at the front 
of the furnace for handlin.g the work. 
The pieces are placed on bars provided 
with sharp prongs, so that only the points 
are in contact with the material; this 
method avoids serious marking of the 
under surface and also prevents distor- 
tion of the work. Several pieces are 
placed on this rack and the whole run 
into the furnace, which is kept at a tem- 




.■^MELTIKi, 



■ GRINDING MILLS. NOTE TANK INTO WHICH 
MOLTEN FRIT IS RUN. 



peratuie of between !,.')()() and 1,600 
deg. F. 

Baking or burning, which constitutes 
the fusing of the enamel coating, occu- 
pies about one or two minutes, and when 
the work is taken out it i.s immediately 
removed and placed on a flat plate to 
retain the shape while cooling. When 
cold, the same sequence of operations is 
again followed for the succeeding coats. 
The general practice in this plant is to 
give the work one ground, one inter- 
mediate and one finishing coat; this gives 
a fairly flexible surface; a thicker 
enamel is liable to develop cracks. 

For embossed work, such as lettering 
or ornamental designs, the plant is equip 
ped with a spraying outfit, this being 
the only method that will insure equal 
distribution of the enamel solution. When 
work of this character is dipped the 
solution gathers about the raised im- 
pressions and destroys their prominence 
owing to the inability of the solution to 
drain freely from the irregular portions. 

Process for Cast Iron 

The method of enamelling cast iron 
differs to some extent from that used in 
coating sheet material. The application 
of the ground coat is accomplished in a 
similar manner, the piece being swabbed 
with a thin solution and then dried, after 
which the article is placed in the furnace 
and heated to a cherry red, when the 
work is removed from the fire chamber 
and sprinkled evenly over the entire sur- 
fact with finely powdered enamel and 
again placed in the furnace, allowing the 
powder to fuse and spread evenly over 
the surface; this process is continued 
until the desired coating is obtained. The 
surface of the iron must be perfectly 
clean and free from corrosion, as the 
chemical action of the rust will not allow 
the enamel to set properly, a blemish 
:'ppearing wherever rusting has oc- 
curred. 

In the preparation of the various 
formula the company have given special 
attention to those for cast iron hollow 
ware subjected to chemical reaction dur- 
ing the boiling or cooking of fruits and 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C II I X K 11 Y 



615 



vegetables that contain a larjre percent- 
age of acid. Enamel work of this charac- 
ter must withstand the severest acid test 
before it is permitted to leave the fac- 
tory. 

Ornamental Work 

Floral and other ornamental designs 
for the decoration of signs, stove panels, 
etc., are included in the work of the 
enamelling department. Meyercord's 
process of enamel decalcomania is the 
method used in putting on the various 
designs; after being transferred to the 
previously enamelled surface, the articles 
are again baked in the furnace and the 
color design is burnt in and becomes 
part of the enamel coating. 

The range of product manufactured by 
this firm includes wood burning cook 
stoves, cast iron and steel stoves and 
ranges for wood, coal and gas, and 
in addition specializes in numerous 
items of cast iron house and factory 
equipment, much of which is now being 
treated in the new enamelling depart- 
ment. 

Owing to the semi-isolated position of 
the plant, special provision has been 
made for fire protection; in addition to 
a well trained fire-fighting- force, the en- 
tire factory is equipped with a sprinkler 
system. Shop welfare and first aid de- 
partments are also features of the plant 
management. The executive consists of 
E. Panneton, managing director; J. A. 
St. GermTin, secretary-treasurer; F. 
Lauer, general superintendent; and 
Chas. Watt, superintendent of the shell 
department. 

® ■ 

WAR SERVICE BOARD FOR U. S. 
FOUNDRY INDUSTRY 

IN order to maintain proper contact be- 
tween the foundry industry and those de- 
partments of the United States Govern- 
ment which purchase castings a war ser- 
vice board of five members has been or- 
ganized by the American Foundrymen's 
Association, the members being: R. A. 
Bull, chairman, Duquesne Steel Foundry 
Co., Pittsburgh; J. C. Haswell. Dayton 
Malleable Iron Co., Dayton, O.; G. H. 
Clame'r, Ajax Metal Co., Philadelphia; 
H. D. Miles, Buffalo Foundry & Machine 
Co., Buffalo, and C. C. Smith, Union Steei 
Castings Co., Pittsburgh. 

The personnel of this board is repre- 
sentative of every branch of the foundry 
industry, including gray iron, steel, 
malleable iron and non-ferrous metals. 
Furthermore, its members are affiliated 
with the leading organizations of casting 
manufacturers of the United States, as 
follows: American Foundrymen's Asso- 
ciation, National Founders' Association, 
American Institute of Metals, Am- 
erican Malleable Casting Association, 
and the Steel Founders' Society. 

In view of the tremendous task under- 
taken by this board, numerous sub-com- 
mittees undoubtedly will be appointed to 
represent the various lines of each 
branch of the industry. A survey of the 
foundry trade of the country undoubtedly 
will be made to ascertain the class of 



work for which each shop is best adapt- 
ed. The establishment of an office in 
Washington is being considered. 

® • ■■ •/ 

COAL FAMINE THREATENS 
SWITZERLAND 

THE shortage of fuel threatens to de- 
velop into famine in some neutral coun- 
tries, and the danger is being met in two 
ways, viz., by stringent official restric- 
tions as to the uses of fuel, direct or in- 
direct, and an increased exploitation of 
existing home supplies. Switzerland ha..; 
perhaps felt the inconvenience more than 
most other countries, and the Govern- 
ment of the Canton of Zurich, for one, 
has just issued fresh restrictions. Pri- 
vate houses must not be heated, unless 
the temperature for three consecutive 
days has been below 10 deg. C. and on 
days when it has been only 5 deg. C. 
the previous evening. The temperature 
in residences, schools, offices and work- 
shops is not to exceed 16 deg. C, in 
shops not above 14 deg. C, and in bed- 
rooms not above 12 deg. C. Hot water 
appliances must only be used once a 
week and school baths only once a 
month. Other public baths may in the 
meantime be kept open except on Mon- 
days and Tuesdays. In cafes, restaur 
ants, etc., there must be no heating from 
10 p.m. to 10 a.m., and no hot food must 
be served after 9 p.m. All offices are to 
close at 5 p.m. and museums, libraries, 
etc., must not be warmed at all. The 
schools are to save 35 per cent., churches 
and chapels 50 per cent., cafes and res- 
taurants 35 per cent., shops and public 
buildings 25 per cent., elsewhere accord- 
ing to circumstances from 20 per cent, 
to 40 per cent, of the quantities of fuel 
hitherto used. In four-roomed resi- 
dences onlv one. room must be heated, in 
larger residences only two. On the other 
hand endeavors have quite recently been 
started to explo't possible deposits of 
coal, lin-nite, and even petroleum, but 
this work is still in its first stages. Bor- 
ings for coal ai-e t'lking place in Wallis 
and Jura, at Herdern. etc.; lignite de- 
posits h-'ve been t^ken in hand at Grond- 
iseril. Ufhusen and Zell: lignite has also 
been come unon at Fosytal. Some for- 
eign canitil is interested in this wo''k, 
as. for instance, in the International De 
velonment A='=ociated Mines Comnanv 
at Sitten. for the exnloitition of the Wal- 
lis deposits, whp'-e some anthric'to. 
though not of the best quality, has been 
found. 

@ 

GOVERNiMFMT CONTROLS BRITISH 

GUIANA BAUXITE 
THE British Government is now taking 
a very firm stand with regard to the ex- 
ploitation of the imnortant bauxite dis- 
coveries in Brit'sh Guiana, and is deter- 
mined that the first ell on this mineral, 
the source of aluminum, shall be reserv- 
ed for the Emnire. The British Empire 
Producers' Organization has already 
pointed out that no further anplications 
for bauxite I-inds in Br'tish Guiana are 
to be granted till after the war. But it 
appears that the Government have gone 
further than this. A portion of the 



bauxite won by holders licensed before 
the above regulation came into force ha.-; 
to be placed at the disposal of the Brit- 
ish Government at a certain price. The 
British Government, moreover, reserves 
the right to limit the export to countries 
other than British, and at its discretion 
to prohibit export altogether. Practice, 
moreover, has followed principle, and a 
large export shipment to a foreign coun- 
try of British Guiana bauxite won by a 
company in which foreign interests are 
partly represented was recently, it is 
stated, held up. Such evidence of a de- 
termination to conserve in future the 
mineral wealth of the Empire for the 
Empire is highly encouraging. 

© 

TUNGSTEN PRODUCTION IN ENG- 
LAND 

THE manufacture of pure tung.sten 
from its ores has now become an 
established industry of Great Britain, 
as since the inception of the war its pro- 
duction has been attempted by local firm.< 
and is being achieved on a scale which 
should render the country independent of 
the German product for all time and ma- 
terially aid the tool steel and allied in- 
dustries in retaining the markets of the 
world for high-speed steel. 

In describing a plant and the pro- 
cesses involved, a recent number of 
Engineering says: When the war broke 
out the site of the works was waste 
ground, with the exception of a small 
building and a chimney; since the sum- 
mer of 1914 a large group of buildings, 
has been erected on a six-acre site. These 
are filled with complicated mechanical 
appliances, the work-people have been 
trained to new and varied duties, and an 
uninterrupted output has been maintain- 
ed. Extensive railway sidings are laid, 
but at present motor lorries are em- 
ployed for the despatch of the finished 
product to the works of consumers, 
whose urgent need of tungsten makes the 
inevitable delay of railway transport 
serious. The company, it may be said, 
has not overlooked the comforts of the 
workpeople, both men and women, some 
of the processes being carried out by 
girls. Messrooms for the convenience of 
both have been provided. All the build- 
ings are lofty and well ventilated and 
lighted, and none of the processes, nor 
any of the work, can be described as in 
any way unhealthy. A notable point is 
the absence of dust, although the pro- 
cesses are such as to give rise to large 
quantities; all plant producing it is en- 
closed. A repair shop is included amon,:; 
the buildings, consisting of a smithy and 
engineers' and joiners' shops, and a large 
block of offices facing the main road ac- 
commodates the management. 

All the processes are arranged on the 
ground floor level, but some of them ex- 
tend upwards as well, and are reached 
from several floors. Taking the pro- 
cesses in their order, the trucks bringinv, 
the ore, soda and other requisites are run 
alongside a staging in the warehouse, ar- 
ranged at a convenient height for un- 
loading, the wagons being handled by the 



616 



I" A N \ !• I \ \ \i \ (• II I \ i; i; V 



Volume XVIII. 



conipauy't loocniotive cran«. The oru is 
received broken into small cubes, which 
wouki rtMiilily pass jhrouch sm inch 
mesh; it cortsisUi of lunjrsten oxulo and 
waste muteriiil. and it h:i» to pnas 
throuKh fi»jht opt>rntioii>. each carried 
out in a lieparHte department of the 
work*. C)f these en:ht operation* .■iix are 
necessary to isolate or separate the 
tunirsten oxide from the other const i- 
tuentM of the ore and the re- 
nuiininc two operations to remove the 
oxyvren, lo as to obtain the pure metal. 
Some ores contain tin or bismuth of suf- 
rtcient \'«lue to be reeovere^l, and this is 
effected by magnetic separators, wolfram 
beinjr slightly mairnetic. The first step 
is to «ample and assay the ore. which 
then is loade^l into small trucks and 
ele%"ated lo a .series of bin.s some 60 ft, 
above floor level. Parcels of ore requir- 
ing different methods of treatment are 
kept separate. Krom the bins the ore 
passes to (H'indinK' machines, and themi 
to calcinini; furnaces, magnetic separa 
tors or fine f^rindini; mills, as its com- 
position may require. 

Only wolfnim, finely ground and ready 
for treatment, passes forward to the rc- 
i:ular process; and impure or mixed ores, 
which cannot be improveil by mechanical 
or mairnctic methods, go to a special de- 
partment referred to later. The pure 
wolfram thus obtained is conveyed in 
trucks to bins placed over mixinp ma- 
chines, adjacent to a supply of soda. The 
finely ^ound ore and the soda, in accur- 
atelv weiched proportions determined by 
analysis in the laboratory, are then fed 
into double-arm mixers, and the mixed 
product is discharged into trucks for 
conveyance to the melting furnaces, in 
which is performed operation two in the 
works department "B." 

Scheelite, that variety of ore eonsistinp: 
of tungsten, calcium and oxyiaren, also 
known as calcium tuii<rstate, as well as 
mixed wolfram-tin slimes, tin residue 
mixed with small quantities of tungsten 
ore and residues of other sorts, are 
treated in a separate plant, so that im- 
pure sodium tungrstate may be isolated 
and purified before being passed on to 
the main process. 

The next building contains a series of 
hand-fired reverberatory furnaces of 
special design, into which the ground ore 
and soda are fed and heated to a tem- 
perature of about 1,000 deg. C. and sub- 
jected to constant rabbling. The fur- 
naces just mentioned are designed to 
economize floor space; they are fed on 
one side with ore and are stoked from 
the opposite side. Flues below the floor 
connect the furnaces with a centrally- 
placed chimney, 150 ft. in height and 9 
ft. in diameter. Ore mixtures are care- 
fully selected, so far as the restricted 
supply permits, to yield a uniform fur- 
nace product, and the charge is drawn 
into slag pots, which are wheeled to a 
convenient point for handling by an over- 
head electric travelling crane. These 
pots, when cool, are raised and tipped, 
the charge coming away in a solid lump, 
which is easily broken up by hammers to 
a size suitable for feeding a jaw breaker. 



in which the lumps are reduced to about 
1-in. cubes. The melt produced is a 
ureal contniiit to the fine powiler fed into 
the furnaces, .\fter havinir been broken 
up it has to be finely ground in order that 
it may hv acteil upon by tJie chemicals, 
these processes forming the third opera- 
tion, carried out in department "C" The 
material is handleil by an overhead 
crane, and the main shafting is run un- 
der the fioor to give the crane a free 
passage. 

In the fourth process, in the "D" do- 
imrtment or building, the finely ground 
melt is placed in a number of steam- 
heated circular vats, in which the tung- 
state of soda, which is soluble, due to the 
soda, is extracted from the ground fur- 
nace melt. Mixers urv provided in the 
vats, and the solution of sodium 
tungstate, carrying in .suspension finely 
divided oxides of iron, manganese, lime 
and silica, is forced through filter 
presses. The resulting solution thus 
clarified conUiins essentially sodium 
tungstate, the purity of which depends 
upon the absence of sulphur, arsenic and 
other elements, which form soluble coni- 
pounds with soda. Tin oxide, which oc- 
curs in many of the ores, under correct 
working conditions does not become 
.soluble, and remains in the filter cake. 
The steam required for the "D" depart- 
ment is obtained from an adjoining 
boiler-house, containing two Lancashire 
boilers. 

In the "E" department the fifth pro- 
cess is effected in a series of special vats 
on a raised platform. The tungstate of 
soda is treated with hydrochloric acid, 
which is elevated by compressed air, and 
results in the tungstate of soda being 
broken up into tungstic acid (WO ) 
and sodium chloride, which remains in 
solution. The solution, with the WO in 
suspension, is conveyed to another series 
of vats, in which it is washed by decan- 
tation, to rid it of the soda salts. As 
much water as possible has to be got rid 
of, and after the final wash the WO is 
brought to a creamy consistency by the 
surplus water being syphoned off. This 
cream is then conveyed to a number of 
centrifugal machines, in which the WO 
collects along the inner face as a thick, 
deep chrome-yellow paste. It is dug out 
with wooden spades and finally dried in 
a series of bottom-heated stoves. This 
drying process is the sixth, and is effect- 
ed in the "F" department. The chemical 
processes may now be described as com- 
pleted, as all that remains to be done is 
to obtain the pure metal from the oxide, 
which is an ordinary metallurgical opera- 
tion, invoKnng only heat and the pre- 
sence of a suitable reducing agent, such 
as carbon, hydrocarbons, hydrogen, zinc, 
aluminum or others. 

The seventh process, in the "G" de- 
partment, is effected in a large roomy 
building containing a number of soe- 
cially designed furnaces. The yellow 
paste is passed into the end of each fur- 
nace and raised to a high temperature to 
effect reduction, and the metal is thus 
obtained. The output of these furnaces 



is a black material, which is conveyed 
into the last, the eighth of the 
scries of buildings, where is is ground to 
a powder, washed, dried and poured into 
tin cases about 1 cub. ft. each in size, 
contJiining 200 lb., and finally, after 
soldering, packed in wooden boxes or 
metiil containers, ready for iDiivcyaiur 
to the consumers. 

© 

riUK LOSSES DUKlNt; (KrrOBEK 

Til 10 losses by fire in the United SUites 
and Canada during the month of October, 
compiled from the records of the New 
York Journal of Commerce, reached a 
total of $26 ..'584, 4 .'iO, as compared with 
$17,701, ,'575 in October last year and 
:i-14,46.''>,8.50 for the same month in 1915. 
The unusually heavy October losses 
addiii to the already serious lire record 
thus far this year brings the total up to 
$221,002,31.'') for the first ten months of 
1917, as compared with $189,481,220 for 
the same months in 191(1 and $140,754,- 
2.'')0 in 1915. The losses of October this 
year were increased by the large grain 
.-torehouse fire in Brooklyn involving 
$2,000,000 and the railroad dock fire at 
Baltimore involving $3,!300,000, but aside 
from these there was an unusual number 
of fires resulting in losses anywhere be- 
tween $200,000 and $750,000. The fol- 
lowing table gives a comparison of the 
losses by months for the first ten months 
of this year with those of 1916 and 1915, 
together with the losses for the balance 
of those years: 





1916. 


1916. 


1917. 


.Inn. . . 


...$ 20.060.600 


$ 21.423,3.50 


$ 36,431.770 


l'Ol>. . . 


. . 13.081,250 


24.770.770 


29,587.660 


March 


... 18.786,400 


38,680,250 


17,523.000 


April , . 


... lg,180,3.'>0 


12 681,050 


18,597,225 


May .. 


.. 11,388,1.50 


15,973,500 


24,968,800 


June . . 


. .. 10,893.9.50 


12,247,500 


16,513,270 


July .. 


. . . 9,006,800 


23,013,800 


IG.143,050 


Auk. ■ . 


. .. 10,067.100 


10.74.5,000 


21.751,100 


Sept. . . 


... 14,823.500 


12.244,625 


14.101,450 


Oct. . . . 


... 14.465,860 


17,701.375 


26.884.460 



Total ten 

mos. ...$140,754,250 $189,481,220 $«21.002,315 

Nov 21.204.850 19.898.450 

Dec 20,877.100 22.063,325 



Total for 

year ....$182,836,200 $231,442,996 

Many Big Fires 

During October this year there were 
some 270 fires, ea-;h causing an estimated 
property damage of $10,000 or over. 
This compares with 193 such fires in 
September, 211 in July, and 211 in 
August. The number of fires causing a 
loss of $10,000 or over since January 1, 
this year, reaches a total of 2,574. The 
October fires of $10,000 and over are 
classified according to their deatructive- 
ness and show the following results: 

Number 
Estimated loss— of fires. 

$ 10.000 to $ 20,000 88 

20,000 to 30.000 63 

30,000 to 50.000 26 

50,000 to 75.000 27 

75,000 to 100,000 19 

100,000 to 200,000 28 

200,000 and over 29 

Total 270 

Fire underwriters are looking forward 
with some uneasiness to their annual 
statements for the year 1917, as between 
the abnormally heavy fire losses and the 
serious drop in security values many 
will show depleted surpluses. 



December 6, 1917. 



617 



The Economical Use of Grinding Wheels in the Foundry 

By W. T. Montague** 

Next to a prvper utidcrstanding of the yriinliiuj ivlicrl us a citttuty tool, the author 
points out the necessity of giving careful consideration to the castings to be ground, specialhi 
referring to their size and shape, the physical properties of the metal and the amount of 
grinding to be done. Weight and rigiditij of machines, solidity of foundations'^, and suit- 
ability of bearings anil lubricating arrangements are points of particular interest. 



THE modern grindixig- wheel plays 
an extremely important part in 
the metal-working- industries. Its 
sreat usefulness begins in the foundry 
just as soon as the newly-poured cast- 
ings have become sufficiently cool to be 
removed to the cleaning floor. It is used 
in the alloy steel industry to remove 
seams, blisters and flaws from billets, 
prior to rolling them into commercial 
shapes. Large numbers are used later 
on to grind the various metal parts that 
ai-e fashioned into machine tools, auto- 
mobiles, aeroplanes, locomotives, war 
munitions and the multitude of steel 
tools that are also employed in cutting 
metals. 

Realizing that the grinding wheel is 
practically indispensable to 'the foundry- 
man, it is fair to assume that he is vit- 
ally interested in those factors that con- 
tribute to the economical use of this cut- 
ting tool. Although widespread pub- 
licity has been resorted to by some of 
the grinding wheel manufacturers, in 
order to demonstrate the methods of 
using and caring for grinding wheels to 
obtain maximum service at minimum 
cost, yet tsere are evidences that there is 
much to be learned in this direction. 

To develop the modern grinding wheel 
into a tool of usefulness and dependabil- 
ity, has been the abra.sive manufacturer's 
problem, but the problem is not solved 
when the wheel is produced. The grind- 
ing wheel maker must go further than 
this. He must educate the user so that 
he can take advantage of all the qualities 
that science and skill have put into the 
wheel. 
Analysis of the Grinding Wheel Problem 

The development of this paper will 
rest upon the following analysis of fac- 
tors that will contribute to the economi- 
cal use of grinding wheels in the foun- 
dry, if they are understood and taken 
into consideration: 

1. — A thorough understanding of the 
grinding wheel as a cutting tool is the 
first essential. 

2. — The castings to be ground must be 
carefully considered with special refer- 
ence to their siae and shape, the physical 
properties of the metal, and the amount 
of grinding to be done. 

3._The condition of the grinding ma- 
chines must be satisfactory. This refers 
to weight and rigidity, solid foundations, 
adequate bearings and proper lubrica- 
tion. 



•Read before the annual meeting of the 
American Foundrymen's Association. Boston, Sep- 
tember. 1917. 

••With the Norton Co.. Worcester. Mass. 



4. — The speed of the grinding wheel 
is of the utmost importance and must be 
held within certain limits if proper cut- 
ting action and economy in wheel con- 
sumption are to be obtained. 

5. — The personal factor must be taken 
into consideration and allowances made 
for it. 

6. — Adequate records of wheel con- 
sumption should be kept and if condi- 
tions warrant, industry and economy on 
the part of the workmen should be pro- 
perly rewarded. 

7. — The use of the gi'inding wheel 
should be made safe by proper protec- 
tion devices. 

The first portion of this paper will 
deal with the proven theories of cutting 
action. They will be gone into quite 
fully, as it is believed the information 
will be available to foundrymen who 
may be using grinding wheels. 

It is a well-known fact that the 
amount of work one gets out of a ma- 
chine, engine or tool, is often directly 
proportional to one's knowledge and 
understanding of that machine, engine 
or tool, granting, of course, that the 
tool is not defective or unsuited to the 
operation in the first place. This is par- 
tilcularly true of the grinding wheel, 
which is an aggregation of minute cut- 
ting tools bonded together so they can 
withstand the high rotative speed neces- 
sary to rapidly remove large quantities 
of metal. 

The composition of the vitrified grind- 
ing wheel, which type is almost always 
used for snagging castings, is as simple 
as its manufacture is complex. It is 
made of abrasive grain, clay bond and 
water. Subsequent burning in a kiln 
and heat treatment vitrifies the bond and 
produces that quality termed "hardness." 
The selection of abrasive material is 
almost entirely dependent upon the na- 
ture of the metal to be ground. There 
have been developed for cutting the 
metals used in castings to-day, two 
principal kinds of artificial abrasive — 
the aluminous group and the carbide of 
silicon group. Included m the former 
are alundum, aloxite, boro-carbone. 
adamite, and the like, and in the latter 
group crvs^'olon, carborundum, carbolite, 
etc. Without going into the reasons 
therefore, we will simply state that 
experience has shown that for materials 
of high tensile strength, the aluminous 
abrasives prove the most efficient. This 
means that the various kinds of steel, 
wrought iron and annealed malleable 
iron, automatically call for an abrasive 
such as alundum. On the other hand, 



erystolon is chosen for oast iron, in- 
cluding gray and chilled iron, unanneal- 
ed malleable iron, brass, bronze, alumi- 
num and copper, which are materials of 
comparatively low tensile strength. This 
distinction is clear cut and quite easy 
to remember. 

The Question of Grain Size 

The question of what size of grain to 
use is not difiicult to settle. The size of 
the wheel, amount of material to be re- 
moved, and the nature of the metal 
usually determine this very readily. 
Finish is seldom a consideration and so 
very coarse grits are used. 

How hard to bond a grinding wheel is 
a point not so readily determined. The 
influencing factors are many, including: 

1 — Physical properties of the metal to be 
p: round. 

2 — Shape and condition of the surface to be 
presented to the face of the grinding 
wheel. 

3 — Speed of the grinding wheel. 

4 — Condition of the grinding machine as to 
rigidity and steadiness of spindle. 

5 — Method of applying the work, that is, whe- 
ther mechanically or entirely by hand. 

In trying to serve our customers and 
meet their requirements, we are con- 
tinually reminded that the question of 
what constitutes a "grade" or the de- 
gree of hardness of a grinding wheel is 
not fully understood. Grade is the word 
used to designate relative hardness of 
any given grinding wheel. By hardness, 
we do not in this instance refer to the 
hardness of the abrasive, which is fixed 
throughout any one wheel. We refer to 
the strength of the bond in retaining its 
grip on :'he cutting grains of the wheel. 
If the bond is of insufficient strength to 
hold the cutting particles in the face of 
the wheel until they have become dulled 
and worn from the cutting process, then 
we call the wheel too soft. On the con- 
trary, an excessively "hard" wheel is 
one "where the bond retains the grit long 
after it has become dulled and is there- 
fore practically useless. The word 
"hardness" might almost be called a 
misnomer and perhaps the somewhat 
more clumsy phrase, "resistance to dis- 
integration," ought to be substituted. 

This resistance to disintegration, or 
grade, is actually determined by measur- 
ing another separate property of the 
wheel, namely, the resistance of the 
bond to the penetration of a hardened 
steel tool. However, it is known that 
each of these properties is a function of 
the other and to measure the force of 
resistance to disintegration in grindinT 
wheels has been impossible on a com- 
mercial scale up to this time. 



618 



r A \ A i> 1 A N \i A (' 11 1 N i: i; v 



Volume Will. 



The belief ia cjuite common thnt it 
tfrade is an exact value. A Rrmle is not 
an exact or a dolinile point in the scale 
of hanlnesi. It i« « ninse between 
limits anil all wheels which test within 
this ranice carry the same K'r«>le letter. 

One way to measure the strenjrth of 
the bom) is to revoK-* a frrinilin^ wheel 
at incretisinjr 8p.>eil» until it bursts. 
KnowinK the burstinfr speoti, the centri- 
fugal force nci-c>>!iry to cause the bond 
to break down .-iin be readily calculated. 

In order to olit;iin this data n lot of 
wheels were speeded up to a point where 
the fiber stres.s, due to centrifuiral fon-e. 
exc.'eded the s.r»«nirth of the bond and 
breakafre occurred. All of these wheels 
were of the same site, with the same 
jrrit. but of diffen^nt decrees of hani- 
ness. The praile J broke when the stress 
was lt>."«0 pounds per square inch, the 
crade K at 17S0 pounds per si|unre inch, 
and so on. Therefore, one mipht infer 
that all frrade J wheels would burst 
w-hen this same stress was reached. 
Not an Kxact Value 

Now let us see what reall\ hap- 
pens when sevenU wheels of sup- 
posedly the same jrrade are tested. 
We find that those that have been 
determined to be of prade J hard- 
ness will burst at stresses ranging from 
1600 to 1700 pounds per square incli, 
prade M at from 1880 to 1790 pounds per 
square inch and so on. In other words, 
a prade represents a ranpe of values be- 
tween definite limits. An understanding 
of this point is most essential to the 
users of grinding wheels and will explain 
many seeming variations in grinding 
wheel action and life. 

Assume a certain snagging operation 
is being performed, whereby all the fac- 
tors combine to bring a pressure against 



have a longer life than one not so con- 
stituted. This last wheel will not bo 
bonded strong enough to withstand iho 
grinding forces; iiml will wear away 

KIC. 1. CHIPS I'RO.M WORK GUOUND WITH 

AN UNSIMTAIII.E WHEEL UNDER 

I.M PROPER CONDITIONS. 



<iuitc rapidly, in fad, much more rapidly 
than the difference in -strength or hard- 
ness would seem to warrant. This point 
has been developed in detail because an 
understanding of it will eliminate many 
questions arising between the wheel 
manufacturer and the wheel consumer. 
It is needless to say that there is a 
close limit to the allowable variation and 
the manufacturer who best keeps within 
these limits, deserves the greatest con- 
fidence of the consumer. 

The old idea of grinding considered it 
as a wearing down of the metal by rub- 
bing or friction. This is now our under- 
standing of the lapping process and 
modern grinding has progressed far be- 
yond this point. However, if a wheel 
is bonded too hard for the work at hand, 



action is similar to that of a sloel mill- 
ing cutter. On the face of the wheel are 
millions of cutting teeth at work every 
niiTiule. and, although these teeth are 



ieee/vo -a •a/oic^d Q'^oi^sfCoNSunco py Sharp CaTmGft>iw30fNiWLrD/>ESS£DiVn££L. 

C'CuTTII>lC?Poi,\Ti BiblNNlMO TO DULL D-0lA2£DConOiTiON-LES5BiT£ AND FRICTION. 
E'LOAOINO -lNCR£Ai£ IN FRiCTiON BUT NO UiEFUL WORX DONE. 
i 


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o y .£ J .f J- t / S \ 

Tirj£ in Minutes \ 



FIG. 3. POWER CONSUMPTION UNDER DIFFERENT WHEEL CONDITIONS. 



the grain on the face of the wheel which 
causes a stress of a particular nature 
to be set up. Bear in mind that this is a 
tangential or peripheral stress, so to 
speak, not a stress due to centrifugal 
force. The wheel whose bond has a 
strength of sufficient magnitude will 



or if the wheel is too fine or composed 
of an inferior abrasive, the metal is 
actually rubbed or burned off, as shown 
in Fig. 1. 

The modern grinding wheel of correct 
specifications for the work produces 
chips like those shown in Fig. 2. Its 




KIG. 2. A .MODERN GRINDING WHEKL OK 

CORRECT SPECII'ICATION I'RODUCES REAL 

CHIPS LIKE A MACHINE CUTTER. 



not as large nor as strong as the teeth 
of a steel cutter, and cannot cut as ileep. 
they are capable of working at a much 
greater speed. 

In order for a wheel to cut fast and 
free, it is necessary for it to wear — that 
is, for the bond to release those grains 
that have become dulled and useless. 
From this it is seen that the grain, which 
has to the greatest degree the physical 
property of hardness (we refer to 
mineralogical hardness), combined with 
sharpness, is the mo.st efTicienit and will 
do the greatest am>yunt of useful work 
before dulling. It is these very quali- 
ties that make alundum superior to the 
softer and more impure abrasive, emery, 
which dulls very rapidly under cutting 
pressures. 

A set of experiments recently was 
carried out, showing how the condition 
of the face of a grinding wheel affect.^ 
its cutting action, its ability to remove 
metal and the power consumed in doina' 
this. The results are shown in Fis. :5. 
which represents the curve traced by the 
stylus of a Westinghouse graphic watt- 
meter connected to a motor-driven grind- 
ing machine. Section A of the curve 
shows the no-load power. Then a bar of 
steel was applied to the wheel under a 
given pressure and th'.s pressure was 
held constant throughout the tests. What 
happened? First, the power consump- 
tion climbed abruptly as the sharp cut- 
ting grain bit deeply into the metal. 
After two minutes of this rapid cutting, 
we reached the glazing point and the line 
C resulted. At D we were working with 
a wheel, the cutting points of which wero 
nearly all worn down flat. The power 
consumption was low because there was 
practically no useful work being done. 
The smooth grain simply rubbed and 
.slipped over the bar. At E. the steel 
be"-an to heat up and e-et sticky, so that 
particles began to load and smear into 
the Dores of the wheel face. These res- 
pective conditions of the grains are illus- 
trated diagramatically from left to right 
above the curve. The nower now climhed 
ap'ain. but still practically no useful work 
was being done. At F, or even before 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN -M A C II I N E R Y 



619 



<his point was reached, the wheel should 
have been dressed or resharpened. This 
aptly illustrates the folly of using a 
wheel that is too hard or dense to cut 
freely without resorting to continual 
dressing. 

Action of an Ideal Wheel 

The action of the ideal wheel is pic- 
tured in Fig. 4. This shows that the 
glazing period is no sooner entered upon, 
than the bond suddenly gives way and 
releases the dulled teeth. New and sharp 
grains take their place and the cutting is 
resumed at very nearly the initial rate. 
A wheel of the correct gi-ain and grade 
for i.he operation at hand can oftentimes 
be dressed by the additional application 
of pressure on the part of the operator, 
or by presenting the very sharpest fins on 
a casting to the wheel face under in- 
creased pressure. This means that use- 
ful work is being performed while 
sharpening the wheel, with practically no 
lost time or wear of dresser cutters. It 
is this condition that all should aim for 
in selecting snagging wheels and the 
workmen should be educated to this kind 
of grinding. 

Some think that in order to make a 
wheel cut, you must force it exceedingly 
hard. Tliis is not true, if the wheel is 
not excessively hard or fine for the work. 
A wheel of the correct grain and grade 
will cut faster if you do not force it too 
hai-d. If these points are clearly under- 
stood, it will enable you to direct the 
grinding end of your business intelligent- 
ly. Failure to grasp the essentials will 
prove disastrous to economy. 

The next factor of importance to econ- 
omy in the use of the grinding wheel in 
the foundry is a knowledge of the effect 
of the physical properties of the metal to 
be ground. To say that a wheel is de- 
sired for malleable iron may not be 
enough. This expression sometimes 
covers the annealed malleable and some- 
times the white iron before it has been 
annealed. If the iron is of the an- 
nealed variety, then alundum or an alum- 
inous abrasive should be employed, but 
if the iron has not been annealed, then 
by all means use crystolon or some car- 
bide of silicon abrasive. Furthermore, 
the white iron castings usually require 
wheels of much greater hardness than 
the annealed castings and this is readilv 
understood when the difference in hard- 
ness, density and structure of these 
metals is known. 

It is a common saying that the harder 
the metal, the softer should be the 
grinding wheel. Strictly speaking, this 
applies only to precision grinding, cer- 
tainly not to the snagging of castings. 
Let us consider manganese steel, which, 
as everyone knows, can be machined 
economically only with abrasives. This 
mat-erial offers a hip-h resistance to pene- 
tration and hence slightly finer grits are 
usually employed for snagging castings 
made of manganese steel than would be 
used for ordinary carbon steel. Coarser 
grits would require more manual effort 
than could be expected from the ordinary 
workman. 



Soft, stringy materials generally call 
for comparatively coarse grits and medi- 
um hard grades. Dense, brittle materials 
require slightly finer grains and harder 
gi'ades, sometimes one or both. 

The following table may illustrate thi.5 
to a little better advantage: 

Metal Grade of Wheel 

Manganese Steel Cast- 16-Q or R Alundum 

inKs Vitrified 

Carbon Steel CastinKs 10-U Alundum Vitri- 
fied 
Brass Castings 24-Q Crysti.lon Vitri- 

fied 
Chilled Iron Castings 16, 20 or 21-S. T or U 
Crystolon Vitrified 

It is no doubt well understood that the 
harder the fins and the sharper the con- 
tact, the harder must be the grinding 
wheel. This is necessarry to counteract 
the dressing and tearing action of the 
projecting metal. 

Grinding Steel Castings 

In grinding steel castings, the break- 
ing-off of gates and risers often leaves a 
very large volume of metal to be ground 
away. As the arc of contact thus in- 
creases there are increased loading tend- 
encies, and sometimes a heavy, black oil 
is daubed on the metal, to keep the 
wheel open and thus reduce dressing. 
After much experimenting, a specially 
treated or filled wheel has been develop- 
ed that automatically lubricates the cut- 
ting grains and often greatly lengthens 
the life of the wheel because of reduced 
dressing. This filling is not thrown out 
by centrifugal force; it increases the life 
of the wheel and many times causes 
faster cutting action because of the lub- 
rication. In instances where the grind- 
ing is of a very rough, heavy nature, this 
special treated wheel shows up to very 
good advantage and it would not be 
economical to use anything else. 



to pieces by the percussion set up by the 
castings on the face of the wheel. 

A test conducted by an extensive user 
of grinding wheels for the purpose of 
determining whether or not it pays to 
install concrete foundations under the 
grinding machines may iterest you. This 
test was conducted with wheels of the 
same size and same grain and grade on 
the very same machines and indentieal 
castings. One set of machines was 
mounted on concrete or solid foundations 
and the other on wood or shaky founda- 
tion. The results were as follows: 

Average life of wheels on wood floor, days 113 

Average life of wheels on concrete floor. 

days 188 

Increase in life due to solid foundation, per 
cent 6n 

Average saving a month per wheel on con- 
crete floor i 2.00 

Average yearly saving per wheel 24.00 

Where many wheels are used, this sav- 
ing is a decidedly large and important 
consideration. In this case, the concrete 
foundation paid for itself inside of two 
months and the saving in wheels will go 
on indefinitely. As it was, several hun- 
dred dollars were saved by this company 
the first year that concrete foundations 
were used. 

Loose and insecure mooring is also 
detrimental to the life of the grinding 
wheel. Don't wait until the machine be- 
gins walking around the foundry floor 
before remedying matters. 

Similar figures could be produced to 
show the saving effected by keeping 
bearings in good condition. Excessive 
radial play and end play destroy the 
wheel rapidly. Many times complaints 
received to the effect that grinding 
wheels are not standing up as they form- 
erly did can be traced directly to bearing 
troubles. The introduction of harder 
grades, as for example, from grade S to 



s 








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o / 2 3 ^ S 6 7 

Tine IN Minutes 









I'-IG. 4. ACTION OF AN IDEAL WHEEL. 



We now come to the third factor which 
has an important bearing on grinding 
wheel economy, namely, the condition of 
the grinding machine. Economy cannot 
be expected if the machines are light and 
shaky, or if the foundations are not solid. 
A grinding wheel that vibrates or jumps 
from any of these causes is soon pounded 



grade U, only partially remedies matters 
because the speed of cutting is sacrificed 
and the operator has to put forth greater 
effort to do the same amount of work. 

Grinding Large Castings 

In the case of the medium-sized or 
large steel foundry grinding quite a 



620 



CA N A IM \ N \l A r II 1 N K 1! V 



Volume XVIIl. 



vanei) of ijiiuntr*. it is important to 
havf the frrimlin*; machinp.t properly »r- 
lanfred and Kroup*-.!, so the work may Ih< 
ground with a minimum amount of 
handling. 

Kxtr«>moly lartr»> oajitinps that must b«' 
Kround in place should U' gono over with 
\vhe<>l» mounTe>l on umall portable elec- 
tric, pneumatic or flexihle shaft prind- 
ing machme.s In the case of the electric 
machines, all that is ne«sled is a con- 
venient lamp socket or a wal", terminal. 

Next .should come .i hattery of swills- 
frame prindinK machines to handle the 
nuilium heavy castings such as drawbars, 
locomotive wheels and other sLmilnr 
heavy caslintrs that cannot readily be 
handled. These machines should l>e lo- 
cat<sl where prompt crane .service i.s to 
be had. Then finally, the smaller cnst- 
inijs that could be easily handled .should 
be RTound on floor stands conveniently 
:irranjretl. 

The prop«>r frn>upintr of machines, 
sepreRstion of caslinpa, and prompt 
crane .service will make for general effi- 
ciency in the cleaninp operation. This 
should b<> looked out for by a man of 
pood judfrment. who could also tell where 
to jjrind and where to chip. Much valu- 
able time is lost in trying to chip off 
tins that could bo pround off in a fraction 
of the time and with much le.ss effort. 

A table showinp the horsepower re- 
quired to drive various sizes of bench 
and floor stands mipht prove of some 
help at this point. The values shown 
in this table were measured under actual 
service conditions and may. therefore. 
be considered reliable puides in the .sel- 
ection of motors. The table follows: 



minute before beinp packed that pener- 
ate.s a centrifugal stress many times in 
exces.s of the stres.s pn>v«ilinp under the 
rooommended operatinp speed. In the 
cage of tlie Norton Co., this tested factor 



peripheral speed is 5500 surface feet per 
minute, and it cuts and wears satLsfactor- 
ily. If the revolutions remain the same, 
lit 11 inches diameter, tlie surface speed 
is reduced to 3500 feet. What is the 




KIG. 



RELATION OF LIKE OK WHEEL TO .SPEED. 



of safety runs from 2Vi to 3%. This, 
then, is the first limiting factor to wheel 
speed. 

Furthermore, it has been shown there 
is no appreciable gain from faster 
speeds, at least not enough gain to offset 
certain drawbacks. It should be further 
remembered that the grinding wheel is 
desigmed to operate at approximately the 



No. of 
MAchine. hangers 

\ Norton Bench 12 

Belt-Driven 

1*4* R«n*om Bench 2 

Direct-Connected 

1>-" Norton Floor g 

Belt-Driven 

2" Norton Floor n 

Belt-Driven 

l<rx72" Norton 2 

Cylindrical 



Net Size of 
Friction Total H.P. motor Wheels 

H.P. H.P. consumed H.P. used in test 

1.08 1.87 0.81 2 2-10 x •% at 

5000 S. F. P. M. 
0.75 3.00 2.25 3 2-12 x 1>4 at 

5000 S. F. P. M. 
0.95 3.88 2.93 4 2-16 x 1% at 

6000 S. F. P. M. 
1.30 4.75 3.45 5 2-24 x 2'A at 

5000 S. F. P. M. 
2.50 10.00 7.50 10 1-18 X 2 at 

to 5000 .S. F. P. M. 

.1.00 



Much has been said and written about 
proper operatijig speeds for grinding 
wheels, but perhaps some important 
phases of this subject have not yet been 
niade thoroughly clear. Generally speak- 
ing, the correct speed ranges for the 
grinding wheels used in snagging cast- 
ings lie between 5000 and 6000 surface 
feet per minute. This is fairly well 
established and quite generally accepted 
by the manufacturers of grinding wheels. 
This range was determined partly by 
long years of experience and partly by 
physical laws and the desire for an 
adequate factor of safety. The engineer 
building bridges, steel structures, ma- 
chines and what not, recognizes the nec- 
essity for an adequate factor of safety 
and makes due allowance for it. Similar- 
ly, the engineer in making grinding wheels 
sees the great necessity for a factor of 
safety in operating speed. All snagging 
wheels made by reliable manufacturers 
are subjected to a speed test the last 



recommended speeds and any appre- 
ciable deviation calls for adjustments 
that are not always easy to make or 
conductive to efficiency. 

Keep .Surface Speed Constant 

It Is now common knowledge that it is 
necessary to keep the speed of the grind- 
ing wheel approximately within the 
recommended range if its productive 
capabilities are to be maintained. It has 
been demonstrated that if a wheel's speed 
is allowed to fall to a very low level, or 
if it is speeded up beyond a certain point, 
in both cases reduced cutting ability for 
the same amount of effort expended is 
the result. In the case of a sub-normal 
wheel speed, not only does the produc- 
tive capacity fall off, but also, there is 
excessive wheel wear. 

To illustrate this point, let us consider 
the case of an 18-inch wheel, 10 grade U 
alundum. used for snagging steel cast- 
ings. At 1175 revolutions per minute its 



result ? Every cutting gi-ain on the face 
of a revolving grinding wheel has a defin- 
ite amount of energy stored up in it. It 
is the expenditure of this energy that 
enables the grain to do useful work and 
remove metal. Now the energy available 
varies as the square of the surface speed. 
Therefore, at 11 inches diameter, the cut- 
ting grains have only 40 per cent, of the 
energy that they had at 18 inches diam- 
eter and they cannot be expected, there- 
fore, to grind as rapidly. Also, because 
of the decreased energy stored up in each 
grain of abrasive, it is less capable of 
withstanding the resistance offered by 
the steel and hence is more readily torn 
from its setting. This, then, explains 
the difficulty that will be encountered in 
attempting to grind at very low surface 
speed. 

On the other hand, if this same 10 
grade U alundum wheel was givijig satis- 
faction at 5500 surface feet per minute, 
and an attempt were made to speed it 
up to 7000 surface feet, no greater produc- 
tion would be realized. This is due to 
the glazing effect resulting from the in- 
creased duty imposed on each abrasive 
grain. 

Keeping a fairly constant surface 
speed by increasing the revolutions as the 
wheel wears down, is the proper pro- 
cedure for maximum cutting ability with 
minimum wear. This relation of life of 
wheel to speed is perhaps more clearly 
indicated in Fig. 5, representing actual 
results of tests conducted in a large foun- 
dry. The curves show the rate of de- 
crease in wheel life as the surface speed 
drops off. The continuous straight line 
is for a wheel lasting 150 hours, wearing 
uniformly from 18 inches to 9 inches in 
diameter. Surface speed at the start was 
5400 surface feet per minute, and, the 
revolutions per minute being maintained 
constant at 9 inches diameter, the sur- 



December 6, 1917. 



C A .\ A D 1 A IS .M A C 1 1 1 iN E R Y 



321 



face speed was reduced to 2700 feet 
At 5400 surface feet per minute and 
full diameter, all of the wheels tested 
start off at a 200 or 250-hour pace. How- 
ever, before the speed has been reduced 
300 surface feet, we notice a change in 
the slope of the curve indicating reduced 
life. At 4000 surface feet per minute, 
13 inches diameter, the falling off is most 
pronounced and instead of obtaining 150 
hours of wheel life, it ranges all the way 
from 100 to 135 hours. Had these wheels 
been speeded up at 15 inches diameter 
and again at 12 inches, the 150 hours life 
would have been more nearly attained. 

What Excessively Hard Wheels Lead to 

When a user of grinding wheels wishes 
to avoid the trouble of maintaining fairly 
constant surface speed, he invariably 
tries to keep his wheel life up by using 
wheels of excessively hard grade. The 
immediate effect of this is increased 
power consumption and decreased speed 
of cutting, neither of which are desired. 
Fig. 6 shows that regardless of speed, 
successively harder grades require more 
and more power to remove the same 
amount of material. 

It is, therefore, quite evident from the 
foregoing that economy in wheel life 
comes from maintaining fairly constant 
surface speed as the diameters of the 
wheels are reduced. This can be brought 
about by using variable speed motors, or 
having machines running at graded 
speeds, to which the worn wheels are 
shifted at given sizes. 

The next point that requires careful 
consideration is the personal factor en- 
tering into the use of snagging wheels. 
No two men will get the same life or 
production from a grinding wheel, even 
though the work and conditions are 
identical. If the foundry is large and 
there is a constant duplication of work 
so that the piece rate can be used, then 
it is safe to say that harder wheels must 
be used than where day rate compensa- 



ing the castings, and still others think 
they must remove a quarter of an inch 
of abrasive in dressing, where a sixteenth 
of an inch would be ample. All of these 
factors have their effect, and must be 
allowed for. It is, therefore, important 
that some kind of a record should be 
kept, showing just how each grinder uses 
his wheels. Many times the grinding 
wheel manufacturer is blamed unjustly 
for apparent variations in wheel life and 
hardness. In some of these instances the 
true causes can be attributed to the oper- 
ation of this personal factor. For in- 
stance, if a wheel should happen to be 
on the soft side of grade S and it should 
get into the hands of a grinder who was 
very hard on grinding wheels, a certain 
life and production would be obtained. 
Now, in the same lot of wheels, there 
might be one that varied slightly the 
other way or toward the hard side of 
grade S. Suppose that this was used by 
a man who was more careful in using his 
wheel. It is evident the wheel would last 
very much longer under these conditions 
and hence from a very slight and permis- 
sible variation in hardness of wheel we 
get a result that would indicate a wide 
variation, if the personal factor is not 
considered. This is not idle speculation. 
It is stated from observation of actual 
cases. 

Where there is a constant duplication 
of work and the piece-rate is used, there 
is a very simple but serviceable method 
for computing the relative efficiency of 
various grinding wheels and operators. 
The operator's earnings on a given class 
of work per dollar cost of wheel may be 
considered, under these circumstances, as 
a very fair means of determining the 
efficiency of the particular wheel used. 
To encourage operators to use their 
wheels economically, a bonus or premium 
is sometimes paid for all earnings in ex- 
cess of a given figure. This works out 
very satisfactorily and means that the 



from snagging wheels that are interest- 
ing: 



Life 
Houra 
127 
1571/j 



Weight of 

Castings 

Pounds 

26,543 

27,043 



Average 

Per Hour 

Pounds 

208 

172 



4 

3 

1 
1 

/ 


A/f r O/tiNoma iio/ii£Pow£/f pen Cubic Inch of Mctal ftenoveo 
PR£iiuRE OF Bar aoainst Wheel Constant at 46.b Lbs per sq Inch 
















































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N P Q 

Grade ORfiARONESi of Wheel 



FIG 6. RELATION OF HARDNESS TO POWER CONSUMPTION. 



tion is in force. However, the ideal con- 
dition that permits the wheelmaker to 
specify a free-cutting wheel, is where 
there is a premium paid for maximum 
production with minimum wheel wear. 

Some men work the corners of the 
wheel hard, others are abusive in apply- 



competent grinder is rewarded for his 
competency. It also invariably means 
that free-cutting wheels will be used and 
hence maximum production is obtained. 

Records on Snagging Castings 

Here are some actual figures obtained 



If no records were kept, the wheel with 
longer life and slightly greater total 
tonnage would undoubtedly have been 
picked as the more economical to use. 
However, the wheel with 127 hours life 
produced 2OV2 per cent, more castings a 
day and the profit on this increased pro- 
duction more than offset the slightly in- 
creased abrasive cost. 

Another large consumer of snagging 
wheels keeps a tabular record on printed 
cards of the following: Datej pieces 
ground; weight, pounds; hours of grind- 
ing; earnings; and wheel loss on diam- 
eter. These figures permit the calcula- 
tion of the abrasive cost per ton of cast- 
ings ground, and the earnings per ton 
of eastings ground. Manifestly, it is 
desirable to keep the abrasive cost as 
low as is consistent with satisfactory 
earnings per ton. Keeping such records 
as these makes it easy to pick out the 
correct grinding wheel, and enables the 
foundryman to tell just what each of 
his grinders are doing. He can also 
tell what the wheel manufacturer is send- 
ing him without guesswork or resorting 
to hearsay evidence from a few of the 
operators. This is decidedly practical 
and works for economy. It is time large 
foundrymen paid more attention to this 
phase of manufacturing cost, for nowhere 
is it easier to save or lose large sums 
than in the cleaning operations where 
grinding wheels are used. 

Here is an example which shows that 
it is worth while to keep adequate grind- 
ing records. A certain large producer of 
draw-bars was using a hard wheel, 10-W 
alundum. It had fairly long life and 
turned out a large number of bars be- 
fore it was used up. On the other hand, 
the grinders were continually complain- 
ing that they had to work too hard and 
dress too often. Finally the grinding 
wheelmakers were called into consulta- 
tion and a test carried out with several 
different grains and grades of wheel. 
The result was the choosing of a 10-U 
alundum wheel, one grade softer than the 
W. The complaints ceased as soon as 
this wheel was put into general use in 
the foundry, and although the wheels 
were used up faster, the production was 
greatly increased and the overhead cor- 
respondingly reduced. A brief analysis 
of this will show up the facts to better 
advantage: 

Hard Whpel. Soft Wheel. 

in-W 10-U 

Alundunj Alundum 

Grinding cost per ton ground $0-49 JO.Fi.t 

Total number pieces ground ISOO ROO 

Pieces ground per hour .... 8 10.2 

The use of the softer wheel increased 
grinding cost 12 per cent., but increased 
production 27 per cent, and lowered over- 
head charges because of the increased 
tonnage turned out in the same time 
with the same equipment. 

Every foundryman who operates a 
foundry of any size should try and work 
out a system that would apply to his par- 



622 



(• A N A i> 1 A N \i A r II I \ i: U V 



Volume XVllI. 



ticular condition*. Let him consult U>e 
whcelmakor if nocossary ami tako ad- 
vanta»;e of whatovor oxpcrionc* hi< has 
acquired in handling many similar prob- 
lems. It does not cost very much to in- 
vestipate. but it is decide«lly expensive 
to continue oprratini; year after year 
with inefficient and wasteful methods of 
snajririnir and cleaninit. 

Make Vimr Wln-iK Safe 

A d:»cii.-.S!Oj> of Kri'idiiiK wheel econ- 
omy would hardly bo complete without 
.some mention, at least, of the necessity 
of makint: the use of tliis tool safe. It 
is not economy to allow the work to jfet 
jammetl in U>t\v<»ett. the wheel jind the 
rest, btvause the wheel un<louhtedly 
would he broken. This is preventpil by 
keeping the rests adjusted close up to 
the face of the wheel. It is not economy 
to haw one or more prinders tjoinR to 
the hospital every little while to have a 
foreijrn body removed from the eye. Thi.^ 
can be prevented by supplying an ap- 
proved type of trlass poKirle. mnkinir the 
men wear them while prindinc. Much 
trouble also has been caused from flyinfr 
pieces of chilled iron dresser cutters, 
which break in the dressinsr operation. 
This can be eliminated by usinc hooded 
dressors. State laws are beeinninir to 
call for closer attention to such features. 

.\part from the humanitarian side of 
this question, it is undoubtedly more 
economical to employ safeguards where 
rapidly revolvine prindinp wheels are 
ui^d than to trust to chance that there 
will be no accidents. The cleaninu of 
cast'nps is heavy and wearinp work at 
best, and the least that the foundryman 
can do is to make the workintr condition 
as safe and bearable as possible. 



^ 

LITTLE KNOWN FACTS 
GKINDINt; 



AHOLT 



WHEN selecting a wheel for grinding it 
is important that the grain size in the 
■wheel should be considered, so that suffi- 
cient room will be allowed between the 
grains held in the bond to allow the 
chips, which will be removed in the 
grinding operation, to escape and be 
freed from theigrinding wheel. If the 
wheel is of just the "proper grade and 
grain the face will always remain free- 
cutting and clear, retaining none of the 
metal particles as they are ground off 
the article, .\ccording to Howard W. 
Dunbar, in Grits and Grinds, the many 
varieties of materials which are now be- 
ing finished in the grinding machine re- 
quire considerable attention to be paid to 
this point. 

The method of grinding employing the 
face or periphery of the wheel offers the 
least trouble or difficulty from this 
source; but with machines where the 
grinding is done on the rim of a cup or 
cylinder wheel it is not only necessary 
that the wheel grains be of such a size 
as permit room for the chips but also 
that the work itself be of such a form 
that the chips can free themselves as 
they pass by open spaces in the work. 



This, of course, relates more particular- 
ly to the crindink; of castings or parts 
of irregular shape. 

In a machine grinding with the peri- 
phery of the wheel the line of contiict 
is .so »mall that chips are less liable to 
bo contiMcd in the crevices between the 
jrruins. But on certain kinds of mater- 
ial, particularly those of a soft nature, 
the wheel is apt to take up little particles 
of the material, and linally crowil them 
in between the grains in the face of the 
wheel, which c;iuses a great ileal of heat, 
due to the increased friction of the wheel 
performing its grinding operation. Fur- 
thermore, they cause scratches in the 
work, the wheel acts hard and is very in- 
efficient. 

The grinding wheel can easily be com- 
pared to the milling machine in many 
respects. Deep cuts on the milling ma- 
chine were not possible until milling cut- 
ters were made with coarse teeth to al- 
low room for chips. Similarly, deep cuts 
in heavy rourhing operations in the 
grinding machine are not possible un- 
less there is room for the chips to free 
themselves and be carried away from 
the point of contact of wheel with work. 
We should, therefore, when deciding up- 
on the method of grinding, and when 
selecting a wheel, remember that the 
more and larger the chips we remove, 
the more room we must provide for 
them. 

® 

PRECAUTIONS NECESSARY FOR 

THE MAINTENANCE OF CRANE 

RAILWAYS 

Outside crane runways seem to be less 
rigid than inside runways, possibly be- 
cause of the fact that the building itself 
provides some support and thus gives 
more rigidity to the columns or uprights. 
Outside runways are also exposed to all 
conditions of weather, and for this reason 
as well as because of the constant strains 
and vibrations, they should receive care- 
ful inspection. In case defective mem- 
bers are observed they should be immedi- 
ately replaced or repaired. Any corrosion 
or rusting that is observed should be 
checked by scraping or cleaning off rust 
and applying a proper protective coat- 
ing. Runaways that have been in ser- 
vice for a number of years often sway 
quite noticeably, and sometimes to such 
an extent that the additional stresses 
thus produced are dangerous. If this 
condition exists repairs should be made 
or reinforcements should be applied, suffi- 
cient to restore the runway to its origin- 
al strength and rigidity. 

Effective safety inspection would pre- 
vent many of these dangerous conditions, 
and it should be thorough, regular, and 
careful. The inspector should not only 
submit recommendations for the safe- 
guarding of the machines, which is one 
of his special duties, but he should also 
consider the Possible failure of weak 
crane structures, spreading or creeping 
rails and columns, uneven settling of 
column foundations, and any other 
trouble that might disturb the proper 
alignment of runway tracks. 



CANADA'S TK.\;)K U.VLANCE WITH 

INllEI) SPATES 
STATISTICS of Aniaric:i'K foreign 
trade, issued recently by the Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, make 
known Canada's trade relations with the 
I'liiteil States to the end of September, 
I'.Hl. Canada's "unfavorable balance" 
in these markets has assumed the im- 
pressive total of $310,1(;i,1(;G. 

The August trade figures of the two 
neighbor countries showed th;it Canada 
was adding to this "unfavorable bal- 
ance" at the rate of nearly .'iCi million dol- 
lars monthly. A substanti:il reduction 
from this extreme rate occurred during 
September, however. Canada cut her 
imports from 71 millions in August to 
,').3 million-s in September, and increased 
her exports from 34 millions in August 
to 37 millions in September. 

In Second Place 

Canada had climbed into second place 
on Uncle Sam's customers' list durinir 
August, but during September Canada 
was in her usual third place. The Unitea 
Kingdom bought a total of 131 millions, 
and France 76 millions, a.gainst the Do- 
minion's 53 millions. Exports to Canada 
constituted 11. G per cent, of America's 
foreign trade for September; 13.6 per 
cent, for the nine months of 1917. Of 
the total imports of the United States 
from foreign countries during Septem- 
ber, 1.'').7 per cent, came from Canada, 
and during the 9 months of 1917 16.7 
per cent. This proportion will be in- 
creased now that Uncle Sam has gone to 
Canada for war supplies. 

The reduction in the total of the U. S. 
imports to the Dominion of 17% millions 
between September and Au-just may be 
accounted largely due to the effect of the 
embargo on e.xports, at the direction of 
the President. Exports of .53 million 
dollars' worth of American goods to 
Canada compare with exports of 90 mil- 
lion dollars' worth in May and 94 million 
dollars' worth in June. 

Dominion Trade in U. S. 

The following table will illustrate 
Canada's trade position in the United 
States at the end of September and at 
the end- of nine months of the calendar 
year. The figures drawn up give a 
synopsis of .America's trade with the 
world, the trade done with Canada, and 
the relation which the Canadian figures 
bear to those of all nations combined: 

All Nations Canada '■' 

Sept.. 1917. SeDt.. 1917. Can. 

Exports $ 467.00.5,947 $.'53,860,425 U.S. 

Imports 236.196.898 37.187.671 15.7 

$ 701.202.845 $91.048 098 12.9 

Sept.. 1916. Sept.. 1916. 

Exports S 514.924.134 $52,148,637 10.1 

Imports 164.038.614 22.649.345 13.8 





$ 678.962.748 


$ 74.797.982 


11.1 




9 mos. end. 


9 mos. end. 






Sept.. 1917. 


Sept.. 1917. 




Exports . . 


$4,616,621,558 


$629,238,531 


13.6 


Imports . . 


2.282,794.503 


289.077.365 


12.7 




$6,899,416,061 


$918,315,896 


13.3 




9 mos. end. 


9 mos. end. 






Sept.. 1916. 


Sept.. 1916. 




Exports . . . 


$3,950,426,079 


$427,102,449 


10.8 


Imports 


1,831,174,668 


260.794,840 


14.2 




$5,781,600,747 


$687,897,289 


11.8 



December 6, 1917. 



623 



EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE 

Embracing the Further Discussion of Previously Published Articles, Inquiries for 
General Information, Observations and Suggestions — Your Co-operation is invited 



DOEvS A PISTON STOP AT RE- 
VERSAL? 

By R. Hamilton 

CONSIDERABLE interest has ap- 
parently been shown by many 
readers in the question, does 
a piston ato,p at reversal? This 
is one of those mechanical conun- 
drums that, in itself, has little or 
no bearing: on the actual operation 
of an engine, but one that will awaken 
the deepest curiosity in the majority of 
engineers or mechanics, once they are 
fairly confronted with the problem. An 
impromptu reply to this query would 
invariably be, that the piston does stop 
at each end of the stroke; but after a 
little study of the linkage involved, to- 
gether with the underlying principles of 
geometry, many are forced to take a 
neutral stand regarding its proper solu- 
tion. In the opinion of the writer there 
are reasonably two answers to the ques- 
tion; that is, theoretically — with ab- 
solutely no lost motion in the various 
connections — the piston does not stop 
at either end; practically, the piston 
does make an infinitesimal stop, owing 
to the fact that it is impossible to make 
a fit of two moving parts that will be 
entirely free from lost motion. This 
looseness, even though imperceptible, is 
nevertheless present. 

On the basis of a theoretical solution, 
we must realize that if a stop is made 
it will be when the engine is on either 
of the dead-centers; that is, when the 
center of the crank, the center of the 
crank-pin and the center of the cross- 
head pin are in the same straight line. 
We know that this condition exists dur- 
ing each revolution of the crank; so the 
question now is, how long are these three 
centers in the same straight line ? 
The geometrical definition of a line is 
that it has only one dimension, that of 
length. Therefore, if it has no thickness 
and the crank is in motion, there can be 
no stop on the line. The two extreme 
positions on this line constitutes the 
points Jcnown as the dead-centers of 
the engine. Again we are faced with 
the definition that a point indicates pos- 
ition only; it has neither length, breadth 
or thickness. As the circle described by 
the crank-p'n is not a straight line, it is 
a logical conclusion that no portion of 
it is a straight line; so that it is quite 
obvious that, on the forward stroke the 
maximum distance between the center 
of the crank and that of the cross-head 
is not attained until the dead center is 
reached, when the action of the cross- 
head, and other reciprocating parts, is 
imT-ed'ately reversed. 

A factor that should be thoroughly 
understood in the study of this problem, 
is that of the relative motion of the 
crank and cross-head pins. The uniform 



motion of the fly-wheel causes the crank- 
pin to pass through similar circumferen- 
tial distances in the same period of time. 
When this rotary motion of the crank 
is converted — by means of the crank 
and connecting rod — into the recipro- 
cating movement of the cross-head and 
piston, the action of the cycles are uni- 
form, but each cycle of the reciprocating 
parts consists of a gradual accelerat- 
ing and retarding motion, occurring 
twice in each revolution of the crank. 
By referring to the sketch it will be 
seen that the crank-pin circle is divided 
into a certain number of equal parts, 
illustrating the uniform action of the 
crank-pin. If the reciprocating motion 
were obtained by means of a slotted link, 
the corresponding positions of the cross- 
head or piston would be indicated by the 
points on the horizontal diameter de- 
rived from the vertical projection of the 
points on the crank-pin circle. How- 



as on the forward end the opposite ac- 
tion evidently takes place, with the ob- 
vious result, that for the same arc 
traversed by the crank at either end, the 
speed of the reciprocating parts would 
be greater at the forward end, as indi- 
cated in the lengths 0-1 and 11-12 on tne 
graduated cross-head traverse line. 

In order to form a triangle we know 
that the sum of two of the sides must 
be greater than the length of the third 
side. With the exception of the "dead- 
center" positions, this condition always 
exists in the constantly changing posi- 
tions of the moving parts under dis- 
cussion; therefore the solution of the 
"stop" query may rest on these facts. 
A skeleton diagram of the linkage ap- 
proaching the forward "dead-center" is 
shown at B; 1 representing the crank- 
pin. Until the point 1 coincides with 
the straight line H-J, the triangle is still 
existent, and the length H-I-J must be 




tr-»i 



ILLUSTRATING REMARK.S liY R. HAMILTON WITH REFKRENCE TU REVERSAL OK 

ENGINE PISTON. 



ever, with the general practice of using 
a connecting rod, as here shown, there 
is a slight variation in the acceleration 
at either end, due to the angularity of 
the connecting rod. This is clear from 
the arcs X-B and C-D. The graduations 
on the line 0-12, to the right, represent 
the horizontal movement and position 
of the cross-head for the corresponding 
positions of the crank-pin. 

The position of the cross-head can be 
readily determined when the crank is at 
any point in its path of travel. By us- 
ing the length of the connecting rod as 
a radius and striking an arc from the 
center of the crank-pin to the horizontal 
diameter, this intersection will be the 
relative position of the cross-head be- 
tween its e.xtreme points of travel. The 
variation in the retarding or accelerat- 
ing motion of the reciprocating parts 
may be better understood by referring 
to sketches D and E. When the crank- 
pin is approaching the back end dead- 
center, the crank and the connecting rod 
are overlapping, and the arcs that would 
be described by their outer ends would 
be tangent in the same direction, where- 



greater than H-J; but, as a line has no 
magnitude, the time required for the 
crank-pin to pass over or through it 
must be nil — therefore no stop is pos- 
sible (theoretically). Diagram C is an 
exaggerated skeleton sketch of the 
center line of the crank nearing a 
"dead-center;" E-F-G forms a right 
triangle, E-G being the hypotenuse, so 
that the latter must exceed the length 
E-F until it is in a direct line with it. 
Some of our readers might advance their 
arguments as to how long it takes the 
crank-pin to pass this "line." 

@ 

MAGNESITE BRICKS NOW PRODUC- 
ED IN BRITAIN 

By T. J. 

IX THE search for highly refractory 
materials to resist the intense heat of 
the steel furnace the valuable properties 
of maa'nesia claimed early attention, and 
fire-bricks made of calcined magnesite 
look very high rank. The supply of 
mn'nesite, an impure cirbonate of mag- 
nesia, the raw substance employed, was 
largely in the hands of foreigners, and 



t>24 



C.\ N \ I' I \ N M \ (• II 1 N 1 IM 



VoUimi- XVI 11. 



at the outbrrak ut wur Brittiih steel muii 
ufucturtTs fuund thiit stocks of tht'St* 
bricks were bocomin»; rxhaustol :inil 
irices rinint; to an alarmiiit; extent. In 
these riroun\slancc.n the (.lovornment 
conimuniletTeJ the mwirnesitc, ami steps 
were taken to rvinihite the trade in th)» 
material. 

The best bricks from the continent 
were made of substances found in Styria, 
and entirely in Austrian hands, but very 
excellent inutjnesite i.< obuimed from 
Greece, nnd firstnite bricks are now be 
injr made in Knirland from the mac- 
nesite procured from Greece and the 
Levant. In some respects the Kntrlish 
bricks are superior to those hitherto ob- 
Uiine«l ubrtiad, but difflculties have aris 
en, owinir to a tendency to •spall" or be 
come chipped at the surface. This may 
be due to unequal contraction of the 
components of the brick, or to some de- 
fect in calcination. The Austrian bricks 
contained a larKcr percentage of iron in 
combination with the magnesia than 
those made from the Grecian mattnesitc. 
which is relatively much more pure, and 
it was hoped that by addinp a sufficient 
amount of an iron compound to the raw 
material Rood results would be obtained. 
This has not hitherto been found to 
answer, but experiments are beinR made 
which already (rive promise of Rood re- 
sults. Some kinds of bricks made from 
fireclay and pure silica show much the 
same defect in use as those prepared 
from the Grecian maj:nesite. 

-^ 

(;OVEKN.MENT INSPECTION Ol 
AIRPLANES 

SPEAKING on this subject in the presi- 
dential address delivered before the In- 
stitution of Automobile EnRineers, Lon- 
don, Oct. 10. 1917, Lieut.-Col. R. K. Bap;- 
nall-Wild succeeded in conveying to his 
hearers some idea of the magnitude of 
the task of properly inspecting every in- 
dividual part entering into the construc- 
tion of the machine and the necessity for 
a huge corps of skilled and meticulous 
inspectors, the better to serve the mu- 
tual interests of the manufacturers and 
Government. To quote the concluding 
remarks of the address: 

"Inspection is essential to obtain effi- 
cient output. It is the only method 
whereby the directors of a company can 
ascertain the quality of the firm's out- 
put; it is their only safeguard thai 
money, time and material are not being 
wasted in production of scrap; it is a 
check on their purchasing department; it 
is a check on their design and draw in jr 
office; it is even a check on their chief en- 
gineer to whom the inspection branch is 
responsible. Facts will always speak 
and the inspection department can at any 
moment produce figures showing rejec- 
tions at any stage from the purchased 
raw material to the completed and fin- 
ished article. 

"It has been suggested that a full Gov- 
ernment system of inspection is but a 
duplication of work. For a long time I 
have had available a record showing re- 
jections by the firm and rejections by 
me. These figures, of course, also give 
the percentage rejections on the total 



uulput. and they must surely be of vital 
invpurtance. not only from the outpiii 
point of view, but liiiancially. .\ little 
more money sjient on inspection not only 
increu.Hes iliviilemls but brings in mon- 
order.s. The better the article, having 
due regarti to cost, the greater it.s popu- 
larity with the purchaser. 

"The inspector, as a rule, is nobody's 
friend. This is not always his fault, it 
is a fault of the whole system; he should 
be encourageil to be human. He must 
not be on unduly intimate social term.-i 
with the production statf. but he must be 
capable of ilealing with them with tact 
and cordiality. 1 am cerUiin that if 
more attention were paiil and more en- 
couragement given to the class of man 
emi)loyed by firms for this purpose, 
much better results would be obtained." 

.Some idea of the thoroughness of the 
inspection, the minute attention given to 
every detail and the continuous check on 
every operation may be gained from a 
perusal of the three inspection forms ap- 
pended, relating to the cylinder, piston 
and crankshaft of the rotary engine, 
which formed part of the presidential 
address. 

Cylinder 

Ideal Firm's Inspection Procedure, 
with Reference to the Manufacture of a 
Cylinder for a Rotary Engine.— 1. It is 
given that the specification for the mate- 
rial is mild steel. 0.4 to 0.5 carbon, to 
conform to R.A.F. Specification 29a. 

2. The main contractor orders rough - 
machined stampings from the sub-con- 
tractor X (whose method of manufacture 
the main contractor has approved). 
These stampings are to be supplied in the 
annealed condition, and samples of the 
test pieces from the bar material of 
which the stampings are made to be 
supplied. 

3. Sub-contractor X orders approved 
material from sub-contractor Y. who is a 
steel manufacturer, and quotes approxi- 
mate analysis which he considers desir- 
able to meet the conditions required in 
the manufacture of commercial stamp- 
ings, and which will be in accordance 
with specification 29a. He also asks for a 
copy of a test certificate of the material 
taken at some approved test-house. 

4. The stampings made by sub-contrac- 
tor X are delivered to the main contrac- 
tor, who arranges the machining of the 
stampings through various operations, 
until the cylinder is completed and ready 
for fitting to the engine. The inspection 
arranged for by an ideal firm in their 
own works, and in agreement with the 
sub-contractors in their works, would 
probably be as follows: — 

(A) Steel Manufacturer Y. — The 
casts of the steel which the contractors 
propose to supply are analysed; each 
ingot of the steel is examined, and an 
inspector decides the amount of crop- 
ping necessary from each end. The 
cropped ingot is then passed through to 
the rolling mills, where it is hammered 
and rolled into suitable bars. Insnection 
of the bars is made for roakes, pipes or 
seams, and all defective material is re- 
jected. 

During the manufacttire inspector.? 



check :ind record the tompcralures of 
rolling and working. A sample tieat 
piece is cut from the bar and forged 
down to the ruling dimension of the sliell 
of the cylinder stamping. This test 
piece is then normalised, and tests are 
carried out at :m approved teat house; 
if all the bars arc made from one cast, 
pi'obably one or two lest pieces only will 
be taken. A copy of the certificate will 
bo forwarded to contractor X, with pos- 
sibly some spare test pieces; the bars 
will then be delivered to the atamiK-r. 

(H) The stftmper X, on receipt of 
material with certificate, will immediate- 
ly put in hand the stamping of the cylin- 
der shells; inspectors will arrange to 
check temperatures of working through- 
out the whole process. 

On completion each cylinder shell will 
then he annealed, the temperatures be- 
ing carefully chocked and each stamping 
Hrinelled. A sample of the material will 
ho hammered down to the ruling dimen- 
sion of the shell, and will be annealeil 
at the same time as the stam])ing. This 
sample piece will then be machined as 
a test piece and Brinell and tensile tests 
taken. The Brinell numbers of all 
stampings should conform to a definite 
range, based on the test pieces, and, pro- 
viding the tensile figures of the test 
pieces are satisfactory, the stampings 
will be approved. 

The stampings will then be passed to 
the rough-machining shop, and the .skin 
removed, care being taken to retain the 
identity numbers. After inspection for 
surface flaws and general dimensions 
they will be passed for delivery to the 
main contractors. In the main contrac- 
tor's works the stampings will then be 
passed to the various machines for the 
remaining operations, inspection taking 
place between each operation as per the 
following schedule: — 

(1) Rough turn on outside to chuck 
jaws, rough drill or bore, and face end. 

(2) Rough counterbore working bar- 
rel, rough turn outside to chuck jaw-, 
face end, rough bore valve-seat diameter, 
bore working barrel, finish int«mal-(on- 
cd head. rouTh form outside taper. 

(3) Rough bore and recess for valve 
thread, rough turn outside diameters, 
face to overall length, form top angular 
face. 

(4) Mill flat for sparking plug bo.->. 
(•">) Rough form fins. 

(6) Anneal and sand blast. 

(71 Turn tops of fins, finish form 
first nine fins, finish tops of first nine 
fin.-<, and polish same. 

(8) Drill hole for sparking-plug boss. 

(9) Chamber hole, and weld in spark- 
ing-plug boss. 

(10) Finish bore working barrel, 
chamber mouth of bore. 

(11) Form diameter at crank-ca.^e 
end, face shoulder and form grinding 
recess, form remainder of fins, finish 
valve-thread recess, poli.sh remaining 
fins. 

(12) Cut valve thread. 

(l.S) Slot-mill keyway casteliations. 

(14) Drill oil holes. 

(15) Grind crank-case registpr. 

(16) Grind working bore. 



December 6. 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



625 



(17) Balance cylinder. 

Before final finishing: the cylinders will 
be annealed to remove machining 
stresses. Final machining will be carried 
(lut in order to bring the cylinders with- 
in the standard weight limits and in ad- 
dition to adjust the centre mass of the 
lylinder to the right position. 

Inspection will be carried out on the 
finished cylinder for all final dimensions, 
weight and centre of mass. The inspec- 
Mon as arranged by a Government de- 
partment, assuming that they have no 
.ontrol, or are not aware of the con- 
tractor's inspection, will be as follows: — 

(a) The ingot from which the bars 
I will be made at the steel manufacturer's 
j would be inspected, and particulars of 
i ingot and analysis of the cast taken. 
' During the rolling of the material the 

temperatures of the rolling will be taken 
occasionally. The complete bars will be 
submitted for inspection, and will be 
checked for dimensions in accordance 
with the international standards or par- 
ticulars of the order. One test piece for 
I'very 20 bars will be taken, and after 
working down will be normalised and a 
test carried out. Each bar will then be 
Rrinelled, and if within a satisfactory 
agreement the bars will be passed on the 
results of the test piece, and a certificate 
and release note issued. 

(b) On receipt of stampings the ma- 
ferial will be inspected and checked 
against the release note. The operations 
on the stamping will be periodically in- 
spected, the temperatures being checked 
from time to time. The samples of the 
material will be taken, and after work- 
ing down to ruling dimensions will be 
heat-treated with the stampings by a 
test piece representing each batch of 
stampings. The stampings will then be 
inspected for dimensions in order to en- 
sure that sufficient material is available 
to allow for cleaning up. Each stamp- 
ing will then be Brinelled, and if the test 
piece is satisfactory, and the Brinells are 
reasonably consistent, the stamping will 
be passed after general inspection for 
flaws, etc. 

(c) On receipt at the main contrac- 
tor's the stampings will be checked by 
the release note, and released to the 
machine shops. No further inspection 
will be carried out beyond the transfer- 
•■nce on the stamping number. The fin- 
ished cylinder can be identified with an 
individual stamping. The finished cylin- 

y der will be inspected for all dimensions, 
weight and centre of mass, and if satis- 
factory will be stamped and approved. 

The action which a Government In- 
spection Department would probably 
take with the ideal firms would be as fol- 
lows: — 

(a) The checking of the analysis of 
the cast will be taken, periodic checking 
of the firm's own inspection would be 
made a? regards rolling temperatures, 
working, etc. The test pieces would be 
pulled and material passed as usual 
procedures. 

(b) At the stamper's periodic check- 
ing would be made of working tempera- 
tures, and a check test of the heat 
ment made periodically at random, and 



Brinell report for each stamping exam- 
ined. 

Cylinders will be selectively examined 
for flaws and general dimensions, and 
finally accepted and released to the main 
contractor. 

The main contractor's inspection fix- 
tures would be examined, periodic selec- 
tive check testing be made between oper- 
ations, and also of the finally finished 
article. Should any defects be discover- 
ed the whole of the batch concerned 
would be examined, otherwise only sel- 
ective examinations would be made. 

On final erection of the cylinders into 
the engine, check examination will be 
made to see that the various fits are 
satisfactory, and should any of these 
points show discrepancies, a detailed ex- 
amination will be made of all stock in 
stores. All spares, unless erected in the 
engines at the main contractors, would 
be examined in detail for the dimensions 
aff'ecting the fit. functioning, or the 
strength of the part. 

System of Production of Cast Aluminum 
Piston 

Material — Aluminum Alloy, to Specifi- 
cation of L. 8. — When casting, three test 
pieces are cast for every eight pistons. 
The pistons are numbered when taken 
from the sand, and the test pieces, re- 
moved in the fettling shop, are sent to 
the experimental departments for tensile 
test and chemical analysis. If these 
tests are satisfactory and approved by 
the A.I.D., the pistons are released and 
pass into the foundry view'-room. Here 
they are inspected for blow-holes, and 
the inside diameter of the barrel calli- 
pered for size; the correctness of posi- 
tion of the gudgeon-pin hole is also test- 
ed on the surface table. If approved 
they pass from this room into the cast- 
ing store. 

The store issues them to the machine 
shop on a machining order, and in this 
shop they go through the following oper- 
ations: — 

(1) Rough machining outside, both on 
sides and crown. Viewed at site of lathe 
for blow-holes, etc. 

(2) Finishing turning on sides and 
crown, leaving only enough metal for 
grinding operation. 

(.3) Bored at mouth and faced down 
to correct depth from inside crown. 

(4) Rough drilling of gudgeon-pin 
hole to 1 in., and facing bosses inside. 

(.5) Cutting and rolling two ring 
grooves and scraper ring groove. 

(6) Drilling hole for set pin. 

Thev now pass into the grinding shop 
for— " 

(7) Grinding true to size on the out- 
side diameter, and return to the machine 
shop for the following operations:— 

(8) Fini.shing facing and rolling 
crown. 

(9) Milling oil groove. 

(10) Finishing boring gudgeon-pin 
hole, and then into the machine shop 
test-room, where 

(11) They are tested under 10 lb. 
per square inch water pressure. 

At this point they again return to the 
machine shop for — 



(12) Burnishing gudgeon-pin hole. 

(13) Drilling drain holes around 
scraper-ring groove. 

(14) Number rolled on. 

After all operations from the second 
to the fourteenth they are taken to the 
section view-table for inspection, and 
finally are weighed, have the weight 
stamped on them, and then are — 

(15) Polished on crown. 

This completes the machine shop oper- 
ations, and they pass into the final view- 
room before going into the finished store, 
accompanied with view note. This view 
note bears the chief inspector's stamp, 
without which the pistons would not be 
inspected in the final view-room. 

The finishing store then issues them 
to the erecting shop, where they are fit- 
ted to the connecting rods, etc.. the oper- 
ations being: — 

(16) Rings fitted on and lapped. 

(17) Assembling with connecting 
rods. 

They are then finally viewed, tested 
for correct weight, and passed on to the 
charge hand, who again inspects them 
generally all over before he allows them 
to be assembled in an engine. 

After assembling in the engine they 
pass on with the engine to the test 
bench, and then to the stripping shop, 
where they are very carefully examined 
for scoring and wear on rings, etc., and 
the gudgeons pins removed and replaced 
before they are again assembled with 
the engine for the final test. If this 
test is satisfactory the engine then passes 
on the despatch shop for despatch. 

Engine Crankshaft 

Material — Forged Steel, to Specifica- 
tion K. 1. — The crankshafts are stamped 
in Sheffield, have test pieces cut from the 
ends of the shaft, and are tested there 
before being approved and released by 
the A.I.D. for despatch to contractors. 

They are issued by the stores at the 
contractors to the machine shop, on a 
machining order, where they go through 
the following operations: — 

(1) Centre shaft. 

(2) Saw off' test pieces and stamiJ 
number in the presence of the A.I.D. 

(.3) Re-centre. 

(4) Rough-turn journals, ends_ of 
shaft and faces of webs, leaving enough 
metal for grinding. 

Viewed' at View-table No. 1 

(5) Number re-stamped on side of web. 

(6) Milling sides of webs for locating 
purposes. 

Viewed at section view table 1. 

(7) Milling sides of webs parallel. 

(8) Turning crank-pins and facing 
webs for grinding. 

Viewed at section view-table 1. 

(9) Form mill radius at crank-pin 
and journal ends. 

(10) Grind radius. 

Viewed in main view-room. 

(11) Drilling and tapping holes 
through crank-pin. 

(12) Drilling through centre of crank- 
shaft. 

Viewed in main view-room. 

(13) Hand tap crank-pins for oil 
plugs. 



Cl'H 



(' \ N A h I \ N M \ ( II ! \ K l; V 



Volume XVIir, 



UJi Turn journaU and tuptr shaft 
for Kriniling. 

(IS» Turn chamfer on raitius uiij com 
• nsiile end* of hole through .shaft. 

Viewed in main view-room 
(ll>> lirindini; two end* of shaft foi 
locntini; pur|io.ies. 

(17) GrindinK pinn and faces of webs. 

Viewe«i at section viow-tiible i. 

«IH> Number transferred to chamfer 
on radius. 

(191 Grindint: Jovirnals, taper end of 
.-huft and faces of web*. 

Viewed at section view-tsible 2. 

(20) Orindin; edges and radius of 
webu. 

Viewed at itection view-table 2. 

(21) Milliiii: castellntions. 

(22) Mlllini; kcyway on taper end of 
shaft. 

(23) Pillinf; castellations to tit irauRe. 

(24) MillinK drivinir nlot at end of 
shaft 

(25) Fraxint; webs. 

Viewed in main view-room. 
<26) Screw thread.s cut on both ends. 
Viewed in main view-room. 

(27) Drilling holes for balance 
weiRhts. 

(28) Drilling; and countersinkini; oil 
holes in crankpins and journals. 

Finally viewed all over in main view- 
loom and component number stamped 
on. 

The crankshafts now pas.s into the 
finished store on a view note, from 
whence they arc issued to the erecting 
shop, where they undergo the followin;: 
operations: — 

(29) Tapping and plugging oil holes iii 
journal ends. 

(30) Plugs removed, oil holes drilled 
through them, replaced, and set pins in- 
serted in ends of these oil holes. 

(31) Balance-weights fitted. 
Viewed for balance on section view 

table 3, and numbered as viewed. 

Oil-ways tested under pressure of 200 
lb. per square inch with lubricating oil. 
Stamped with viewer's number. 

(32) Key fitted to key way in taper 
end. 

Viewed for the taper and keyway at 
vice. 

(33) Main ball races fitted. 

(34) Bevel gear and locking nut fit- 
ted. 

(35) Taper gear and ball I'ace and 
locking nut fitted. Final viewing, length 
between housings of journal bearings 
gauged, and fitting of taper gear tested. 
Stamped with view mark. 

(36) Split pin hole for castle nut at 
taper gear end of shaft drilled, also hole 
in sleeve nut drilled. 

(37) Journals stoned for removal of 
fray.s, etc. 

(38) Journals bedded in crank-case 
bearings. 

Viewed at w^ork bench, and stamped. 

(39) Fitting connecting rods to pins 
and stamping recognition numbers on 
webs and connecting rods. 

Viewed at bench for play in connecting 
rods. 
This completes the actual operations 
of production on the crankshafts, and 



tlu-y pu.ss on to the erectors' ch^r^e hanil 
for a.sst'nibling in an eiigine. This charge 
iiaiid agaiTi uenerally inspects the whole 
shaft before allowing it to be assembleil 
in an enjrine. 

The engine then passes on to the tesl 
bench for u three hours' trial, aftn 
which it is stripped in the stripping 
shop, and the crankshaft minutely exam- 
ined before reassembly, after which it 
undergoes the final running test on the 
test bench, and if satisfactory is senl (< 
the despatch shop for despatch 

M \( IIIM\(, A I.,\U(;K I'OMl'NK.S.SOK 

ui;i) 

l!v I). S. Mann 
IN taking up the manufacture of a 
line of compressors in a shop which 
had previously been devoted to the 
pro<luction of smaller machinery it was 
found necessary to get out the first ma- 
chine as there were no other shops in 
the town capable of handling the work, 
and it was absolutely impossible to ob- 
tain new tools in time. The largest 
lathe with which the shop was c(|uippc<l 
was a 32 in. and the headstock was block- 
ed up with the two se:s of raising blocks. 
As the work was only boring and fac- 
ing, which was comparatively light work, 
the extreme height of the headstock did 
not interfere with taking good, heavy 
cuts. 

The tailstock and carriage were remov- 
ed and the bed clamped directly to the 
ways, resting on metal pieces, bringing 
the center to the desired height. The 
boring bar screwed on the spindle and 
was provided with a travelling head car- 




TEMPORARY ARR.«iXGE-M f;N T I OK M.XClllM.NG CO.MPRESSOR BED ON ]..\IHK. 
NOTE BLOCKS UNDER HEADSTOCK. 



rying the boring tools. The travel of 
this head wa.s controlled by a screw ly- 
ing in a slot milled the entire length of 
the bar. The outer end of this screw 
carried a gear which engaged with a 
small pinion which rotated freely in the 
center, supporting the outer end of the 
bar. This pinion was milled on the end 
of a piece which extended back into the 
center and a hole was drilled both 
through the pinion shank and the center 
proper. When a pin was inserted 
through this hole the pinion was held 



to a central flange. A crude universal 
joint was arranged on each end of the 
bar from the radial which allowed suffi- 
cient range to drill several holes at the 
one setting. The drill was fed by the 
handwheel shown at the end. The dis- 
tance from the center of the drill to the 
center of the pipe was, of course, 'the 
radius of the stud circle. In spite of this 
rather crude method of doing this work, 
it was completed in good time and with 
perfect satisfaction. 
Needless to say, machinery was pur- 



s a.ionary and .he rotation of the bor- 
ing bar about the center caused the gear 
on the end of the screw to also turn niid 
thus move the boring head. To stop the 
feed, it was only necessary to remove the 
pin when '.he pinion in the cpntor wouM 
liirri freely. 

It being impossible to provide any ex- 
ternal support for the center, a casting 
was made which extended across the bed J 
and was held to same by studs, the cast- 
ing being provi<led with screw.s whereby 
it could be adjusted ver:ically to secure 
alignment with the boring bar. It was, 
of course, necessary to drill the holes foi- 
these stU('s after the bod was lined up 
mi tlie hithe but this was a small matter 
with an electric drill. After boring out 
the bed for the crosshead the end was 
faced with the facing head shown at the* 
inner end of the bar. 

Af;er getting the machine on the lathe, 
the actual boring and facing time was 
practically no longer than what it after- 
ward was on a regular borin'r mill. Of 
course, it was rather awkward to line up 
properly and the operator wa.^ at a slight 
disadvantage due to the height of the 
work. 

I'nique Portable Drill 

The cylinder was fastened to the bed 
by studs placed horizontally and the 
most logical machine for doing this work 
was, of course, a horizontal drill press, 
as the extreme weight of the casting 
made it practically impossible to place it 
on end in a pit and there was also no pit 
available at the time. An old black- 
smith's drill head was obtained and 
mounted on the three-inch pipe attached 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



627 



chased to handle the above work in a 
more efficient and modern manner after 
the success of the first machine was as- 
sured, which was directly after being 
placed on the market, but the methods 
used only go to show the versatility of 
modern machine tools and operators as 
well. 




UNIQUE APPLICATION OF BLACKSMITH'S 
DRILLING MACHINE DRIVEN BY UNIVER- 
SAL SHAFT FROM RADIAL DRILL SPINDLE. 

® 

MISCELLANEOUS CARD RECORDS 

By B. Orion. 

THE accompanying card records do not 
represent the practice of any one firm nor 
are they connected in any particular 
sequence, but show different forms which 
the writer has seen used with success. No. 
1 shows a time card which was used in a 
small shop in which there was absolutely 
no system whatever except what the fore- 
man carried either in his head or private 
notebook. All estimates were based on 
guesswork, and in an endeavor to get some 
kind of cost on the main parts which went 
into engines, he used this card and filed 



5yabol .CA^. . H 

Date .'f.T.'?. .~.^^ Machine :io 

name of I'art j^'^XK?/! 

operation ... ZV«? .•?.'?/:<?<?('.'?... . 



P. .'A. 

6 



Tine atart . .<?.'.'?^ . . . Time Finish i^:'??. 

aapaed Tloe fi.:Q^,~ .^. 

Avora^e' Jime per PleOQ . . . /: PA >' a 

Operator's race per Hr. '^P, f^ coat per .iece^»^o 

Operator Hf''MQ'7. ReiMrlts iC:S/'.<'f/?'.':^: 

n/T/T /^./-ffi". Tffi.^P/?.- 



get out or return patterns. In this way 
the index was always kept up to date and 
there no patterns lying aixjund, there 
being a place for each, and each in its 



Name of Part C J I. 

Wood..„.*<^ 

Rack ...A 

Number Core Boxes 
Number Used Per Er 
Other Sizes Used on 


.. Metat 
..Tier - 

3 


.a 


,-i._ 


,_ Part No 
...HP. 
..StitK. 


A34.. 

"i-S 

7.- 






































PATTERN REX;ORD 





\ 

\0^(0 Book No 




HP 


T 


No, |hp| T 


Nr. 


Mu,.,.i c .-r 


10 




:i« 






A.,, „«M ^ <^ . 


15 


Y 


1 


so 






M,.„», ...,-'&. Tt 


20 






60 






iji.,. ,.., ' / o . IS 


25 






HO 






T.,d,„, '\b a A- 


30 






100 






UsI tBKlB* uicd on 


35 








1 


1 


( 











FIG. 6. 

place. Should the patterns be taken out 
for purposes of repair and later returned, 
a record was kept on the reverse side. 

A similar card, No. 5, was used in the 
tool room for jig storage. This contained 



59 1 Cvlln4«r HO-^1 1 




















A 


Z5 


10j£. 






40 


IICO 




r. 


50 


ir.o.-. 






















































_ 







all information pertinent to that particu- 
lar piece and came in useful when taking 
inventory as no jig or fixture was allowed 
to be placed on the shelves until a card 
was made out for same. When a jig be 
came obsolete it was not destroyed for 



Nos. 6 and 7 were used in the drafting 
room as a record of tracings. They were 
filed according to both part and drawing 
number. In looking up a tracing number 



Part No ., A. 3. ^ Jig No 

BinNo A ShtlINo 

OptraUon M.^UnHJ ISoa-V^-^ 

T.MofJ'a "Tipy 

j.,M.d. 2>.- 7-\-: 16 B,. "^.^ 


...3 




oyvn,. 




Total MJI..1.I OA . . .^'1^ 1 






Tower mfg, co. iic record 




Sktich Over 1 



Draw Uo. 1096 Book Ilo. EWte 7 


-3-13 


'jontGnta 


vart V.o. 


■lontants 


rurt :;o. 




A.I*) 








A41 




, 










^iiTieraedea 1 Od.Sl .SupereeO'l bv 


-«SSea TOlvo olSo to .' - Si?-!!; 




(lojilrta to stoVrorim 10-19-14 79td 











reference was almost always made to the 
part number. The costs on the card were 
supposed to be average and often came 
in useful when the question of redesigning 
or new methods of manufacture came up. 



SYMBOL 5 T 


WHEHC 


piecEs 


USED 


„??« 




C^r^ Cke«.* 


-'"- 


"SPJx^ 










„....„.,....„ 1© 


- 






»-»«■- 








O-SM r 












JTMBV 






.,...„„..„, T**-. 


O-B"- 








„„„, Bou,t.„TXV\. 5+t.lCa. 


::::: 




. SH--^ 






^n.n* \.o5- 










1 


"••.-■--r 






.„...„"„ "^l.4i 


.-1«H - 






<-IO«p 




1. 






WM. 


-,„.. 


























FIG. 9. 

No. 8 was used in the toolroom to locate 
the prints for handing out to the work- 
man. A man called for print for part BSD. 



PURCHASE COST CARD 
«^' Lutv iC».+CJ'<l. ... 


^''"ToKrv&ftfV KVt«.Co rig tta- m Sbt b~rtM 




FROM WHOM FVRCKASED 


UK 


DW. 


IM 


0.1. 


FOB. 


..TO>\T\k«T> 


Vtl^ 


7JJ-I0 


7V 


(prrf-<j 


'=»V+- 




1 






-™,^_l 



'■■•-' QUOTATION RECORD 

ARTICLE Xgn»ii'oA C.c.»\s. _ _- 


-" i ■■ •■^" "■:'■• •■:-■ "" ,„:'•■■;;, •-...: -■ .: ■"',;.,. 


*''K''.j ; 


-B.W. Kt.-VK Co ^3 .«iif '■- a-, r, „ ^,.-,„ ^ 1 
















: 1 




























- 


- 
































































































































^ 






_ 






^_ 




^^^ 


^^ 



FIG. 1. 



FIG. 2. 



FIG. 3. 



them according to symbol. The card was 
used only on those particular jobs on 
which he desired costs. To keep a record 
of purchases Nos. 2 and 3 were used in 
different instances. 

A card index, containing card No. 4 
was maintained in a certain pattern vault 
and only one man was allowed to either 



some time and the card was then trans- 
ferred to the obsolete file. When the jig 
was finally destroyed, the card was sent to 
the office in order that the proper charge 
could be made. Where there was any pos- 
sible chance for confusion a freehand 
sketch of the jig was made on the back of 
the card. 



Turning to card 39, shows that size B is a 
40 H.P. and the print number is 1138. 

A similar drafting room record is shown 
in No. 9. In this case the drawings were 
filed in large envelopes or folios. This is 
very similar to No. 6 except that there the 
prints were filed according to number 
only. 



628 



CAN \ I ' 1 \ 



N \1 \ (' 11 I NERY 



\olunu' Will. 



IM> THK Ul«. IHI\(.S. LINK. I UK IIU. 
I.IFK 

By Jamos K. I'ooloy 

TUK only iliffcrvnct* botwifii iniiii 
ttiiil aiiiiiiul is ii*m«n thinks, nn 
Hiiininl IS Kuuloil by instinrt. It is 
Uvnusr of this fiu-t that imiii culls him- 
!t«lf N su|H'rtor l>t>ini;. His suporiority. 
however, must bo jutlKvtl by that of which 
he thinks: thr wny ho thinks; aiut whiit 
his thou>;hts really amount to. Since 
the ilnwn of time, from the lu-KinninK of 
the worlifs history, from Noah's time 
and Flood, frxmi tV-sjir's day down to tiiis, 
nmn has made hut very little elTort to de- 
velop his thinking powers, has ^rlven hut 
little attention to real, cenuine construc- 
tive thinking- 
Man as a rule acts after he thinks; and 
th.it the depth and reach of his thinking 
has been feeble and of little extent i.-s 
proven by the necessity (at least to him) 
of the constijnt repetition of wars and up- 
heavals of revolutionary character. And 
because of this, because these thinps have 
been repeated over and over n^ain, their 
uselossness and futility, the little Knined 
by destruction instead of construction; 
while the tipress still exists in woman, the 
wolf in man. there is little to distinguish 
man as beint: above the prade of animal. 
or in b«inp a superior actor on the world's 
staire. 

When we .<ay man is crude and is low 
on the scale of progress, and are asked 
to explain how and why, we can, in a man- 
ner, anticipate this same question by re- 
ferrinsr back to those who existed and took 
their turn at life a thousand years ago. 
The plain truth is that with all our 
vauntinps of intellectual superiority, and 
the little we have achieved and pro- 
cressed, we still border on the pale of 
crudity. Insanitary practices that still 
exist, and neplect of that in which we are 
deeply calloused must, to a future race, 
stamp ns as untutored, abnormal and 
crude, even as those who slew their pame 
with japped stones and roasted it on 
spikes are to us now. We call this an en- 
liphtened ape, but our methods and re- 
finements are no whit hipher than those 
in the dark apes. Our fears are just as 
stronp, our superstitions and ipnorance 
just as deep; we are still as quick to quake 
before each thunder-clap or new celestial 
phenomenon as did our forbears in days 
of old. 

The World Waits Not 
The world propounds a new problem 
every hour. No waitinp, no pettinp ready 
or takinp our time method, is poinp to put 
any of us in a class fitted to probe and dis- 
sect with any depree of success in the 
solution of these. If we persist in moving 
at our old pait we will never rise from our 
condition, never enter the new era that 
is only waitinp to materialize when our 
enerpizing forces are put into play. We 
are carelessly neglecting, putting off and 
leaving for some future generation of 
men and women to do that which we 
could readily do ourselves in the present 
day. 

Out of the distant past we have slowly 
evolved — but all too slowly. Under a mis- 
conception we have dreamed of an Eldor- 
ado, a sweet by and by, a land flowing with 



milk and honey, which wo would fall heirs 
10 when we shed this mortal coil. The fact 
IS, tJ>e city of the blessed with its street.s 
of Kolden pavement ami its crowns of 
nlory could be easily broUKhl down to us 
and establisheil un.lor a wise and select 
administration right here now if we 
would quit cheating ourselves with these 
uncultured notions, con\c right <lown to 
business and get busy. There should be 
no mis-spent years, no wasted lives, no 
moral weakness, no down-in-the-gutter 
type of human being. Kvery man should 
ho strong; every woman should be strong; 
every child should be strong; there should 
be no re.servation required on this earth 
for a weakling or a pigmy. 

That we can become a higher and 
greater type; that our refinements and 
accomplishments can be surpassed beyond 
all that we at present can conceive; that 
we can ntUiin to a stjite of unrivalling 
wealth and grandeur is no idle or delu- 
sive boast. And all it requires of us is 
persistent and energetic action on the 
part of every human being. No delayable, 
no-lay ing-aside-and-wai ting-awhile kind 
of motion; but instead a vitalizing, con- 
stant perseverance, that gathers in, and 
gathers abundantly what we incessantly 
and determinedly must strive for. The 
earth should be a hive, and everyone a 
positive, strenuous beo-ing. 

The Fruits of Labor 

No labor should be too large, no task too 
small, no distance too great to compass, no 
depth too low to explore. Out of the 
bowels of the earth, out of the sea and air, 
could we bring untold treasures and sub- 
stance, if we only would begin to stir up 
our energy. There is no plant or flower 
but would disclose its secret; no mineral 
or quartz but would yield forth its value; 
no sweeping wind, no atmospheric element 
but would extend and render its health 
and wealth to us striving mortals. Are 
you willing and wakeful to the splendor 
of these possibilities? Are you willing to 
move in all this grand assembly of earth's 
products? Are you willing to sharpen 
the edge of your intellect? Are you will- 
ing to plunge forward with powerful 
momentum? Are you willing to pass your 
hand through the shower of sparks that 
flit and fly from the anvil of life, forging 
a link to the chain of this steady movement 
from the morn's first ray to the evening's 
glow? Can you stand unpropped, un- 
swayed by useless strifes and turmoils? 
Can you shoulder a load, solve a burden, 
bridge the gulf of ignoble pursuits and 
low aims? Have you the forwardness, 
the straightwayness to ends that are 
primed with vigor and push? If this be 
you, then come. Step forward where an, 
as yet uninhabited, arena awaits you. 
Come where your faith is worthy of your 
steel. Come unto your own. Unmindful 
of your comfort, your sleep or your meals. 
Make your existence worthy of the flesh 
that adorns you. Ascend a mountain 
peak, grasp a cloud, place guide-posts 
along aerial pathways, and become a satel- 
lite in the firmament of the heavens. 

Awake to-day to your unfathomable 
possibilities. Feel the great stir within 

blood and sinew, in vein and ligament 



Walk daily t'orlh with constructive zeal 
— with constructive ideas — with inde- 
structible calm. Over and over again re- 
peat to yourself, that youth is nothing, 
that old age is nothing, that only live 
human activity is of consequontial mo- 
ment. Set your face towards the broad 
sunlight of unquenchable energetic fires, 
and do the big things and live the big life. 
Under the vast dome of sky over the 
wide expanse of earth— no matter where 
you are, move onward and forward in 
some great human endeavoi-. lie punc- 
tual to the second in your labor unswerv- 
able, unconquerable and bristling with ac- 
tivity. Be zealous and unafraid! Wholly 
determined! Wholly invincible and ener- 
getic! Be a real, live human being, high 
in your aims, high in the service that 
calls you. Be of that faith which never 
wavers, falters nor halts. Be above the 
common order that shuns and shirks. 
Bowl down that which obtrudes. Stand 
firm where others weaken. Upheave the 
dens of darkness. Be a glittering light in 
unceasing action, a being of heroic mould. 

® 

DUTCH shipbuilders are required to give 
details not only of all ship construction 
.ind repair, but of the ultimate destina- 
tion of the vessels. The shipibuilder or 
owner receiving German iron and steel 
must sign a contract, valid for five years 
after the war, that he will not sell any 
ship without giving Germany the right 
of refusal, and that during five years 
• ifter the war he will not aliow his ships 
to be employed, directly or indirectly, 
for the benefit of Germany's present 
enemies. The Dutch Government Iron 
and Steel Committee has advised build- 
ers and owners not to accept these last 
two conditions. 

© 

WHEN selecting a cooling liquid the 
matters which have to be considered are 
the nature of the material to be cut and 
the kind of tool used, the effect of the 
lubricant, its freedom from liability to 
uum and clog pipes, and, as important as 
either, its cost when a large establish- 
ment is concerned. But this is a relative 
matter, since if a costly oil or mixture 
be selected it may well prove more econ- 
omical than a cheaper one if an eflicient 
recovery plant is installed. 



® 

A TANK steamer is building in a ship- 
yard on the Delaware whose engine- 
room, says The Marine Journal, will 
present the novelty of having no recipro- 
cating machinery of any kind. The pro- 
pelling engine will consist of a low and 
a high-pressure turbine geared to a single 
propeller, a surface condenser with a 
centrifugal pump driven by a turbine, 
two centrifugal hot-well pumps also 
driven by a turbine, and a rotary oil 
pump for the turbine and gears, driven 
from the main gears. This is the first 
instance, adds the journal, where rotary 
machinery has been used throughout a 
ship, which marks an epoc in shipbuild- 
ing history. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



629 







The constitution of industrial enterprise is largely depart- 
mental — "spokes in a wheel." This series of articles has for its 
object the featuring in a racy, interesting and instructive fash- 
ion, the training, experience and achievement of those who 
to-day are transmitting, effectively, energy in their capacity as 
"spokes in the wheels" of our metal-working establishm.ents. 



WILLIAM JAMES McSHANE 

NOT the least prominent of those 
sections of the Dominion affected 
by the industrial activity of the 
past three years is the province of New 
Brunswick. While affected to a con- 
siderable degree by the demand for 
munitions, the urgency-inspired devel- 
opment of shipbuilding has, to a greater 
degree perhaps, been responsible for the 
present state of activity in this particu- 
lar section of the busy East. When the 
influence of agricultural and allied inter- 
ests in a generally prosperous district 
are considered, the ultimate demands on 
establishments doing a general engin- 
eering business are both large and 
varied. Considerable interest, therefore, 
attaches to the personality of the subject 
of these remarks, whose lifetime associ- 
ation with a leading New Brunswick 
engineering firm has resulted in his 
reaching a responsible and trusted posi- 
tion therewith. 

Canadian born of Canadian parents, 
William James McShane first saw the 
light in St. John, in the year 1865, and 
to-day, after 35 years in the service of 
T. McAvity & Sons, discharges the 
duties of chief draftsman and pattern- 
making superintendent. While much of 
Mr. McShane's success is no doubt due 
to the guiding influence and tuition of 
his father who held the position before 
him, it is no disparagement to his par- 
ent to remark that the developments of 
recent years have brought greatly in- 
creased responsibilities and demanded a 
degree of judgment and resource large- 
ly exceeding the old days when our 
Spoke w-as absorbing the rudiments of 
his lifework. 

The day schools of St. John were his 
source of knowledge until the start of 
his apprenticeship with McAvitys in 
1883, at the age of, eighteen. The 
regular 5-year period of training was 
gone through by Mr. McShane, and the 
fact that this formative period of his 
life was spent under the supervision of 
his father has doubtless been a matter 
of mutual benefit to our Spoke and his 



employers on many occasions since. 
Doubtless Mr. McShane reasoned that a 
part of the country which was good 
enough for a firm like McAvity (they 
had been established almost half a cen- 




WILLIAM JAMES McSHANE. 

tury when he joined them) was quite 
good enough for him, and the determina- 
tion to do well whatever came to his 
hand accounts for his following the ex- 
ample of his employers and becoming 
also, so far as lay in his power, long 
established. 

The name of McAvity is a household 
word in the Maritimes, as will be gath- 
ered from the nature of their business. 
Established in 1837, they developed with 
the country, operating the Vulcan Iron 
Works and a separate plant devoted to 
brass work, producing plumbers', steam 
fitters' and engineers' supplies while 
recently a machine shop of considerable 
size has been rendered necessary to 
meet their requirements. The wide field 



of activity open to a studious, resource- 
ful and energetic person in the position 
filled by our Spoke is apparent, and that 
Mr. McShane fully availed himself of 
the opportunities offered is evidenced 
by the numerous inventions, etc., in the 
various lines produced by McAvity. 
Numerous types of valves, fittings, 
electric railway semaphores and cor- 
poration specialties are the fruit of his 
efforts or bear the impress of his influ- 
ence in some form or other. 

The close attention to work necessary 
to insure such a record may account for 
the comparatively small amount of 
traveling done by Mr. McShane but the 
requirements of his position did not 
prevent him from following the advice 
contained in the old saying about "all 
work and no play, etc.," and his record 
in rowing matches and similar sports is 
evidence of his physical as well as men- 
tal ability. 

Our Spoke is of the Liberal persuasion 
in politics, is Roman Catholic in creed, 
and beyond being a Knight of Colambus 
has few society affiliations. His belief 
in the value of temperance is well 
seconded by his efforts for the cause, 
and he acknowledges that much of his 
success has been due to his close ties 
with the Father Matthews Temperance 
Society. He has been bereaved through 
the death of his wife, and resides at 27 
Duke St., St. John. N.B. 

In speaking of his career, Mr. Mc- 
Shane attributes most of his success to 
having "acquired practical experience, at 
the same time developing the ability to 
back it up by the study of technical 
books and journals, the former to keep 
the rudiments of knowledge always 
fresh, and the latter to maintain close 
touch with recent developments in pro- 
ducts and equipment, and acquire a 
knowledge of the methods and devices 
employed by others." 

^ 

TENDENCY IN MACHINE TOOL 
DEVELOPMENT 

THE effectiveness of any specific ma- 
chine in the modern industrial estab- 
lishment is measured by its ability 
to do work for which it is intendel with 
the greatest possible economy, while 
features of permanency and adherence 
to standard and approved design may be 
of secondary importance, according to 
Joseph Homer in an article in a recent 
number of "Engineering." 

Various occurrences and movements 
of magnitude may contribute to render 
excellent machine tools antiquated in the 
sense of being no longer sources of pro- 
fit, and this long before they manifest 
marked signs of wear. Conditions arise 
which result from changed views re- 
specting methods of tooling. Others are 
caused directly by the advent of new in- 
dustries. Both are largely responsible 
for many alterations in the designs of 
the later machine tools. Both have been 
extremely active during recent years. 
Each aspect would offer a tempting field 
for a more extensive treatment than can 
be ventured on in connection with the 



680 



r.\ \ A It I \ N M A ( II 1 \ i: 



^■ 



Volump Will. 



present subject. Always tlii- problim 
for soluuon comrs l>«i-k to ihm of the 
nintive co»t of ihr work ilone on ma- 
chitu's of lUtTervnt kinds. Onp of the 
teachinirt of thf niuchinr shop of to il:iy 
is thnt of "other ways" ot !•■ ■ — - like 
r*«uIi.H M;>iiAk-i-rs hnve 1 1 ircp* 

»t thiMr ...■.., — i .,i, :,,.,.. >,.s, n 

•nuch w i-tion of tool>i 

anri ■■■ ■ ,..,„ ,,,,.,:. - - : - 

*n. y thfir • 

ha- ^. .. . : ;iniul bro.i :.r :iiT;.iiii'i. 
Thry h.«vr Irnrnrd to nhnnilon tho niir- 
row irroovo.^ of use und custom and to 
adopt n<ethoJ4 of toolini; which could 
not havo bren cntcrtniniM) when iiltonta- 
tivp* Were limited as compared with 
tho»(> which are now nvail:ililo 

Itand Work Suprr»cded 
Thus there are now sevemi diverse 
way» of producing cylindrical forms or 
plane surfaces of irrc>rular outlines — 
thfl protiuction of which Onco entailed 
much teriioUt) correction by hand work 
and templet. Such are now machined 
rsiadih,- with a .-iutliciently close approach 
to accuracy, and with uniformity, in any 
number of pieces. The milling and the 
RTindinir machines have chanced practice 
profoundly, and have taken vast quanti- 
ties of work away from other tools, per- 
forniin? ft. if not always with finer re- 
sults, >-et with more rapidity than the 
rival machines were capable of accom- 
plfthinsr. Output is multiplied by the 
employment of multi-spindle machines, 
as drills, borinp machines and some tur- 
ret lathes, in which from four to half a 
dozen spindles are carried. It is also in- 
creased by the proupine of several tools 
in some modified designs of common 
lathes, and in many box tools in turret 
lathes, in vertical borincr and turnins 
mills carrying several tools, in crank and 
cam turnine and crrindin? machines, and 
so on. In the selection of machines and 
methods immemorial practice does not 
count, but the ultimate results rather 
are \'isualized. and methods are sub- 
ordinated to them. Times are carefully 
collated, with the object of savins min- 
utes or even seconds. The expense of 
fixtures, and even the high cost of addi- 
tional machines, are brouTht into their 
true perspective instead of being allowed 
to bar the way to the real economies of 
production. These changes are revolu- 
tionary in character, and they would im- 
press the mind more powerfully than 
they do but for the fact that they are 
growing familiar to the generation that 
is being trained in them. But the older 
men. who witness the inevitable displace- 
ment of handicraft in which they were 
trained and exercised, marvel at the 
banishment of individual initiative in 
machine-tool methods by the automatic 
and semi-automatic systems, the cards, 
and the routing methods. 

Influence of >'ew Industries 

Changes which arise directly out of 
the advent of new indusf-ies are even 
more prominent than are those that are 
consequent on divergent views of me- 
thods of tooling. The growth of new 



mnnufacture.s in ii market already 
crowde«t with rival (irm.i compel* a keen 
inspection of methotls which ulTord some 
ihintr more than a merely iiilerestintj; 
study in alternative wuys. Their adop- 
tion, or nccleot, in their ultimate results 
may involve success, or logs, or even tot.'il 
failure. Not only are ilitTerences in times 
occupied by nperutions in question, but 
limits or deirrees of inaccuracy are in- 
volveit. Sometimes the nttninment of the 
results desireil will entail ;i larger ex- 
penditure of time, in others less, per- 
hap» very much loss. But the ultimate 
issue is the thinir that matters. The con- 
ditions that are imposed, the results to 
be achieved, control the methods to be 
adopted. 

The newer industries which are exer- 
cising most influence in controllinir the 
work of the machine shop are chiefly 
those that are concerned with the manu- 
facture of all kinds of internal-combus- 
tion engines, the manufacture of steam 
turbines, that of electrical machinery, 
and, now partly overshadowing these, of 
munitions of war, which includes 
mechanisms of many kinds made in vast 
(lUintities, many articles being ordered 
bv the hundred thousand. For each of 
these nriny highly specialized tools, 
many absolutely unique designs of ma- 
chines are employed in addition to large 
numbers of modified types of the kinds 
that are regularly standardized. The 
problems which have been exercising thf 
manufacturers of motor engines ant! 
V hides and aeroplane details have had 
to be faced under greater difficulties by 
the firms who have been engaged in 
munition work. 

Single Purpose Results 

One of the remarkable phases of the 
solution of the problem is the enormous 
development of what are termed the 
"single-purpose" machines, or those 
which are specialized to the last degree. 
Many of these only perform one opera- 
tion, some include two or more opera- 
tions which are identical or allied in 
character. Equally striking has been the 
effect of the extensive employment of 
fixtures and of jigs. and. again, the gen- 
eral use of the tools of high-speed steel. 
The influences which these three modern 
movements have on an accelerated out- 
put, and, in consequence, on the services 
of the machine tools, may be noted 
briefly. 

The single purpose machines are big 
developments of an earlier movement. 
Their growth has been immensely quick- 
ened . and favored by the intensive pro- 
duction of munitions. The problem of 
how to secure the most rapid output has 
been the paramount one, and any tools, 
however novel in design and without 
precedent, that might help to gain this 
end have been welcomed. These ma- 
chines are justifying their existence, be- 
cause thev increase output by sub- 
division of tasks, and becau=e thev en- 
able the large contingent of unskilled 
and semi-trained labor which the war 
has attracted to the shops to be utilized. 
This movement, which, though not new, 



has ill its swift growth assumed the 
aspect of a novel phenomenon, is greatly 
oxeriMsing the judgment of those who 
have to accommodate shop arrangements 
to changed conditions. One might enum- 
erate more than a hundred new designs 
of this class, the products of the last 
three years, for dealing with nuiniLions 
alone, to perform only one or two, or a 
few, related tasks. 

The influence which these single-pur- 
pose tools are exercising will not cease 
with the termination of the war. The 
question ot the position which they maj.' 
occupy in the future is of less import- 
ance than that of the retention or the 
aliiindonment of the system of which 
Ihey are an essential clement. Many of 
these machines, and others, embodiments 
of the same methods, might be readily 
enlisted in new services in the intensive 
industrial war that must supervene. 
They are essential if the dilution of labor 
is to be retained. The principal machines 
the work of which has been encroached 
on by the single-purpose machines are 
the lathes, followed closely by that of the 
drills. A few observations on the firstj 
named will show why the single-purpose 
machines are, in the opinion of many 
competent judges, to be preferred to the 
more complicated general-purpose de- 
signs. 

Unskilled Labor Unsuitable 

.4t the commencement of the war there 
arose a huge demand for common turret 
lathes-, which the supply was inadequate 
to meet. It was rightly believed that the 
possession of these would enable an im- 
mense output to be secured. But two re- 
quirements are essential if the best re- 
sults are to be secured from such lathes 
— a supply of skilled tool makers and 
tool setters, and operators who have ac- 
quired some experience in their working. 
The supply of each of these require- 
ments proving insufficient for the abnor- 
mal demands made afforded the oppor- 
tunity and emphasized the necessity for 
the introduction of the single-purpose 
machines. These are vastly cheaper to 
produce than turret lathes are, and thev 
exact the minimum amount of tool set- 
ting, and can be operated by new atten- 
dants after a very little instruction. 

Although turret lathes are automatic 
or semi-automatic in their movements, 
an operator who is neglectful or insuffi- 
ciently experienced may easily allow 
tools to become slightly displaced or 
damaged, and by continuing to use them 
while in these conditions spoil a con- 
siderable volume of work before the 
g-dugers detect the fact. Especially is 
this the case with the more elaborated 
boxes of tools that are fitted with slides, 
setting-up ■ screws, tightening screws, 
and often with multiple tools. The more 
numerous these fittings are, the more 
liable is trouble to result when a neglect- 
ful, inattentive or half-trained man is in 
charge. Another fact to be observed is 
that the time spent in preparing and set- 
ting up batteries of tools and the fixtures 
or boxes in which they are held is a large 
item, since manv trials may have to be 
(Continued on page 633.) 



December 6, 1917. 



6S1 



PROGRESS IN NEW EQUIPMENT 

A Record of New and Improved Machinery and Accessories for the Machine, 
Pattern, Boiler and Blacksmith Shops, Planing Mill, Foundry and Power Plant 



NEW DESIGN TOOL ROOM LATHE 

IN the tool room lathe illustrated in 
the accompanying engxavings the 
Davis Machine Tool Co., Rochester, 
N.Y., have incorporated refinements in 
design and construction which make it 
particularly capable of meeting the re- 
quirements of a modern tool room where 
accuracy, convenience, power and sim- 
plicity are demanded. 

The headstock design involves the use 
of a heavy one-piece casting, having 
solid boxes with front and rear walls 
brought up to the centre line of the 
spindle, thus tying the whole head to- 
gether in a most substantial manner. 
Gear guards are made to be integral 
with the head and form a cover for the 
cone which makes a safety device in 
conformity with the laws of most States. 
In the top of the gear guard is mounted 
a brake for stopping rotation of spihdle, 
a device much appreciated by skilled 
operators. 

The spindle made from high grade 
crucible steel is turned all over and 
ground to micrometer size, and runs in 
heavy phosphor bronze boxes scraped to 
fit and to accurate alignment. Large oil 
pockets are cored in the walls under the 
centre of each bearing, and the oil is dis- 
tributed from them by rings, thus fur- 
nishing a constant and even lubrication. 

Front spindle bearing is tapered, and 
wear is taken up by drawing spindle 
into taper. The rear bearing is keyed to 
and slides on spindle, and is adjusted by 
a collar on the end which draws same 
into taper bronze box. End thrust is 
taken by hardened steel washers and 
S. K. F. self-aligning ball bearings. A 
1% in. hole is bored entire length of 




TOOL ROOM LATHE H.-WING HEAD WITH INTEGRAL GEAR GUARDS AND BACK GEARS 

ARRANGED BELOW SPINDLE. 




REAR VIEW OF LATHE SHOWING THREE-POINT SUPPORT, 
TAPER ATTACHMENT, AND CLEAN APPEARANCE 



spindle with front end bored to No. 8 
Jarno taper. 

The back gears are placed under the 
head stock at the front end of the 
spindle. This arrangement applies the 
drive from the cone through the gears 
without the long eccentric shaft and quill 
used on all cone-driven lathes, thus elim- 
inating all torsional strains. Back gears 
are brought into mesh by a handle placed 
at the front of the lathe, making it un- 
necessary for the opera- 
tor to reach over the cone 
as in the old construction. 
The carriage has a 
bearing on the ways of 
19% in., with a cross 
bridge of 6 in. wide, all 
surfaces being accurately 
scraped to bearings by 
surface plates. Compound 
rest swivel base is grad- 
uated and provided with 
four clamping bolts for 
lacking some in position. 
This construction permits 
very heavy cuts to be 
taken without and deflec- 
tion in the rest. Full 
length taper gibs are pro- 
vided in both cross and 
compound slides with end 
screw and adjustment for 
taking up wear. 

A double plate type of 
apron is used with two 
bearing supports for all 
shafts. Rack pinion 



stud can be withdrawn when lathe 
is used for screw-cutting. A cen- 
tral oil pocket is arranged to lubricate 
all bearings from one point. Longi- 
tudinal and cross feeds are controlled 
from apron and both can be instantly 
released under heaviest cuts, and an in- 
terlocking' gear is provided to prevent 
both the feed and the half nut being en- 
gaged at the same time. Feeds are ob- 
tained through an independent feed rod 
and the quick change gear box, without 
the use of lead screw. They are 36 in 
number and vary from 4V2 to 240. Feed 
rod can be locked in or out by means of 
clutch placed next to the gear box. 

Screw-cutting equipment provides for 
a range of threads from 1% to 80 per 
in., including llVa, instantly obtained 
through the quick change gear box. 
Thirty-six leads regularly supplied, but 
others can be cut by changing gears on 
the quadrant. Lead screw is made fron. 
machinery steel 1% in. diameter, turned 
all over, and is guaranteed for accui-acy; 
the maximum error allowed being .001 
in. in 12 in. All gears in gear box are 
cut from solid bar stock on a gear 
shaper. 

Reverse mechanism for the carriage 
is operated by lever, placed at right 
hand of apron, which controls a sliding 
clutch under head stock giving right or 
left hand travel to the carriage through 
a set of accurately planed bevel gears. 
This arrangement .permits spindle al- 
ways to run forward, and thus doubles. 



6SS 



(■ A N A l> I A N M \ (' II 1 \ 1' IM 



Volume XVIil. 



the number of spindle »p«r\fai by driving Principul dimensions are: Swinn ovor 

both pulleys on countershaft in mmo bod, H\ in.; over ciirriiiifi'. S'4 in.; bi-- 

direction. I)upl>i-:iu- or .ihouKler work tween centres, 27 'ii in.; size of tool, Mi 

can be perfomieti by meanit of i«utoni:itic in. x 1^ in.; floor space, '-'8 in. x (5 ft.; 

stop and adjusliible collars. not weijrht, 1.4ri0 lbs. 




"•; <s 



;^'iy 





--. 


1 





>/ 



SBLTnON OK HKAD SHOWINC ll.M'K GKAR.-i I'NnKR FRONT END OK SPINni.K. AND 

arr.\n(;e.ment ok bevei»s kor feed reverse. 



To fncilit:ite correct aliRnment, u foot 
is placed in the centre of the right lej: 
so as to carry the lathe on a three-point 
support, the outer ends of this leg beinR 
supplied with adjustini; bolts, which can 
be screwed down till they just touch the 
floor without taking; any of the weight. 
Regular equipment with 5 ft. 6 in. bed 
consists of large and small face plates, 
compound and steady rests, one set of 
round centres, double friction counter- 
shaft and necessary wrenches. Special 
equipment of usual description can be 
furnished, including motor drive, taper 
attachment, relieving device, etc. 




UNIVERSAL wood-boring MACHINE. 



UNIVERSAL WOOU-BOKING 
MACHINE 

THE universal vertical and horizontal 
wood-boring machine shown in the ac- 
companying engraving is the product of 
the Oliver Machinery Co., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. It is designed to meet the 
requirements of pattern-making and 
other wood-working shops, being adapt- 
able to heavy boring work, as well as to 
a variety of jobs such as drilling holes 
in metals and doing the work of a rout- 
crk, shaper, buzz planer, when equipped 
with the proper cutters. 

The column is a single casting about 
8 ft. high, bolted to a sole 
plate and fitted with both 
horizontal and vertical 
spindles, each capable of 
drilling holes 3 in. dia. and 
under. The vertical spindle 
is 1% in. dia. and slides in 
a sleeve formed by the pro- 
jecting end of the driving 
pulley, which ends are 
fitted with ball .bearings. 
The tool end of the spindle 
is bored to receive a % in. 
straight shank tool or may, 
when specified, be thread- 
ed to receive a 3-jawed 
chuck. The upper end of 
the spindle is connected 
through a thrust bearing 
and link to the lever arm 
which is operated by either 
foot ti-eadle or hand pull 
to feed the tool to the 
work. The vertical travel 
of the spindle is 12 in.; its 
pulley dimensions .5 in. by 
4V2 in., and speed 3.000 rev. 
per min. when adapted for 
single speed only. 

The horizontal s.pindle 
and ball bearing arrange- 
ment is similar to the ver- 
tical, but is supported by 
means of a bracket attach- 
ed to the column at a 
height of 16 in. above 



the Uible top, with the tiii)lc ul 
its lowest position. It is driven by u 
pulley l ',ii in. by 4 in. at a speed of 3,- 
000 K.r.M. if supplied with one speeii 
only, and has a forward travel of 7 in. 
Lontrollcd by a foot treadle and coiled 
spring which latter returns it to normal 
position. 

The IS in. by 30 in. Uible has vertical 
adjustment of 17 in. obtained by hand 
wheel and feed screw. It is pivoted on 
both ends of a curved slide arranged at 
right angles to the pivots, the amount 
of tilt in either direction being such that 
the table can be inclined up to 10 deg. 
to or from the column and 30 deg. cross- 
wise, the angle of setting being read 
from the graduated .scale on the rockers. 

Two types of this machine are sup- 
plied — single speed and four speed — 
which (iifTer only in respect to the coun- 
tershaft arrangement and both types 
may be furnished with from 3 to .') h.p. 
motor drive as the work demands. Stan- 
ilard etpiipment consisting of five 6 in. 
twist bits of sizes, Vt in., % in., '/4 in., 
% in., and % in. is supplied with every 
machine. The single speed machine oc 
cupies 70 in. by 38 in. floor space and 
weighs 2,000 pounds; the four speed belt 
driven machine occupies 73 in. by 38 in. 
floor space and weighs 2,300 pounds. 



RATCHET TAP WRENCH 

THE accompanying engraving illustrates 
a ratchet tap wrench which has recently 
been placed on the market by the Moss- 
Ochs Co., Cleveland, O. It is made in 
two sizes: No. 1, from to Vi in.; No. 2, 
from V* in. to % in. 

The device is of strong and substan- 
tial construction and consists of a chuck 
mounted on a shank provided with a 
double acting ratchet. The T-handle fit- 
ted to the upper part of the shaak i.'; 
held centrally by means of a dog which 
automatically fits in a flat milled on the 
handle. When required for use in cor- 
ners and other difficult or awkward situ- 
ations, the handle slides to either end 
which action, combined with the ratchet 




ratchet TAP WRENCH WITH SLIDIN'; 
T-HANDLE. 

movement, removes considerable worry 
from the operator, avoids to a great ex- 
tent the breakage of small taps, and en- 
ables more accurate work to be produc- 
ed. 

The ratchet is immediately adjustable 
for right or left action by simply turn- 



December 6, 1917. 

ins the milled sleeve shown above the 
chuck. All chuck and ratchet parts are 
carefully hardened while the workman- 
.*hip throughout is of a high grade. 
® 

I'KOHIBITED IMPORTS INTO SOUTB 
AFRICA 

W. J. EGAN, Canadian Trade Commis- 
sioner in South Africa, has notified the 
Department of the deletion of certain 
articles from the list of goods heretofore 
forbidden from being imported into 
South Africa. 

The amended list, therefore, of pro- 
hibited imports at present is as follows: 
— ^^Adding machines, advertising matter, 
automobiles for town use, unless requir- 
ed by medical practitioners or for other 
urgent purposes, books, canned food, 
cigars, clocks, clothing, condiments, con- 
fectionery, cutlery, cutting machinery, 
films, furniture, furniture polish, garden 
appliances, hops, jewellery (imitation), 
motorcycles, novelties, oil-cloth, oint- 
ment, phonograph goods, photographic 
goods, pictures, pianos, playing cards, 
printed matter, sauerkraut, scouring 
powder, shoe polish, slates, sporting fire- 
arms and ammunitions, sporting ap- 
purtenances, toilet requisites, tobacco, 
leys, vacuum flasks, watches. 

© 

-MACHINE SHOP RESPONSIBLE FOR 

MARINE ENGINEERING 

PROGRESS 

DESPITE the marked advantages of 
hydraulic and electrical transmission 
systems for ship propulsion, the use of 
mechanical gearing seems destined to 
become the most widespread on the all 
important grounds of economy and gen- 
eral applicability. The reasons for such 
a belief were advanced by Alexander 
Cleghom in his presidential address to 
the Institution of Engineers and Ship- 
builders in Scotland when he reviewed 
the main features of progress in marine 
propelling machinery during the past 
ten years. 

Generally speaking, the recipi-ocating 
engine about a decade ago had given 
place to the direct turbine for warchip. 
fast liner, and Channel types; had com 
promised with it for vessels of the inter- 
mediate class; and had refused to re- 
cognize it as having any claims on 
that extensive class comprising the low- 
speed types. But even under these con- 
ditions the solution to the problem of 
achieving the general applicability of 
the turbine had come into view through 
mechanical gearing. Ten years ago this 
was in little more than its embryonic 
stage; about three years later it had 
reached the experimental stage; then 
followed rapidly its promotion to the 
proposal lists and the stage of tentative 
application by the more courageous. 
Now it occunies the proud position of 
the standard type, demonstrating its 
universal application by the rapid dis- 
placement of the direct coupled turbine, 
the combination system and the reci- 
procator from the respective positions 
in which they had established them- 
selves. Its superiority over all these 
types, in the essentials of economy, 
weight, and space, is unquestioned, and 



C A N A I) I A N M A C H I N E R Y - 



its reliability is at least as certain. 

Concurrently the growth of the rival 
methods of hydraulic and electric trans- 
mission is seen, but while each of these 
systems has its particular advantages 
over the geared type, neither can meet 
it on the all important grounds of econ- 
omy and general applicability. The 
mechanical system at present makes the 
pace and that pace at present seems 
likely to be rather too severe for the 
other forms. 

But gearing in its rapid advance has 
hardly halted at the single spur ami 
pinion drive. The double arrangement 
is now coming largely into use and this 
apparently minor development is ob- 
viously the special demand of the slow 
speed ship wherein the reduction ratio 
for suitable revolutions of the screw is 
very large, though its utility is not con- 
fined to the low power, low revolution 
equipment. There has also been a mark- 
ed revival in the marine use of super- 
heated steam. Thus the latest achieve- 
ment of this period of restless progress 
in steam-propelling machinery is the 
superheated-geared-turbine equipment, 
transcending its forerunners in practic- 
ally all respects and marking an epoch 
of advance without equal in marine 
engineering history. 

© 

TENDENCY IN MACHINE TOOL 
DEVELOPMENT 
(Continued from page 630.) 
made before everything is quite ship- 
shape. This contrasts strongly with the 
simplicity of the equipment of the single- 
purpose machines. 

Another aspect which concerns turret- 
lathe work that may not be neglected 
when comparisons are being made is 
this: In order that the lathe shall be 
worked at its fullest efficiency all the 
tools must complete their performances 
in a single cycle, or often, in smal! 
pieces, two cycles may be worked off in 
one revolution of the turret. But in 
making up combinations of tools, the 
speed is set by that of the operation 
which occupies the longest period, and 
the others lag. The multiple-spindle 
automatics are machines of general 
utility which have been ipressed very 
largely into the service of shell work by 
the employment of special adaptations 
of tools. They labor under the same 
kind of disability which affects the or- 
dinary turret lathes, namely, that the 
length of the major operation sets the 
pace for the others. Because of these 
facts the single-purpose machines have 
often been preferred to the turret lathes, 
even though some re-chucking and re- 
setting are entailed. 

And thus, since every single item in a 
piece of work — a motor part, an engine 
detail, a shell section — may be the sub- 
ject of alternative treatment, the indivi- 
dual selection of methods must uHi- 
nntely be determined bv the character 
of the machine tools which happen to be 
already available, or which can be ob- 
tained with the lenst del^y; or. if the 
choice is not limited, bv those which are 
most adiintable to the class of labor to 
be obtained and to the production of a 
maximum output. 



633 




"Well, I'd be ashamed if I had as bald 
a head as you. Look at my head of 
hair!" "I just want to ask you one ques- 
tion." "Yes?" "Did you ever see grass 
growing on a busy street?" 



Pat, who is "somewhere in France," 
had just received a letter from ould 
Ireland. Being unable to read, he called 
in the aid of the chaplain, who readily 
agreed to decipher it for him. 

But Pat was not wholly happy. 
Drawing closer to the reverend gentle- 
man, and lowering his voice to a whisper, 
he said: 

"I hope it's not angry ye'll be, sorr, 
but as the matter is of a very private 
nature, do you moind puttin' your 
fingers in your ears, sorr, whilst you are 
reading it out?" 



When Slapdash Jones went home for 
the holidays the first thing his mother 
took out of the trunk was an overcoat, 
and on it was pinned a pawnbroker's 
ticket he had inadvertently omitted to 
remove. 

"Halloa! Ha, ha!" cried Slapdash. 
"They must have forgotten to take this 
off at the Smith dance when I left it in 
the cloak room. Eh — what?" 

A moment later his mother took out 
his evening trousers. Unluckily, they, 
too, bore a ticket. 

"Why, Slapdash, dear," she exclaimed, 
"you surely didn't leave these in the 
cloakroom, too?" 



An officer, far from popular with his 
men, coming to camp one evening, was 
almost drowned in a river swollen by 
recent heavy rains. He was rescued by 
a private in his own regiment. The 
officer was duly grateful, and asked his 
preserver how he could reward him. 

"The best way, sir," said the soldier. 
"is to say nothing about it." 

"But why?" asked the astonished 
officer. 

"Because, sir," was the reply, "if the 
other fellows knew I'd pulled you out, 
thev'd chuck me in." 



A penitent-looking man was on trial 
for vagrancy and disturbance of the 
peace. The judge seemed inclined to be 
lenient with him. 

"What was the prisoner doing when 
you arrested him?" he said to the 
policeman. 

"He was having a very heated argu- 
ment with a cab driver, your honor?" 

"But that doesn't prove that he was 
the worse for liquor," the judge said. 
"Many sober people have arguments 
with cab drivers." 

"So they do, your honor," said the 
policeman, "but in this case there was 
no cab driver." 



634 



V .\ N A It I \ N M A (' 11 1 \ i: i; ^ 



Vi.himc XVIII. 



The Mac Lean Publishing Company 



I i\iim> 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 



JOHN UAYNK MAll.KAN 
II. T. IIUNTKR • 
H. V. TVRUEU. 



• rri>»i(lent 

Vicc-I'rr«idpnt 

Gvnpriil Manacor 



ri HI isHhi;^ oV 



(ANADiAN Machinery 

*- Manufacturing News 

A wetkljr newapapcr devoted to the machinery niul mnnufnc- 
turinE intorcati. 

PETER BAIN. ME., Editor. B. G. NEWTON. Mnnncer. 

Aisociate Editor! 

A. G. wkiu«;tek J M. wn^oN J. h. rodcers a. v. dlirr 



OfTie<' of riiblicition. I4S-1.13 ITnivernity Avrnuc. Toronto, Ont. 



Vol .\\ 111. 



ni:cr.\iHi:K 6. v.n: 



.\m. •_':< 



OIR I'KKSENT AM) 1 ITIKE DITY 

FIN.VL reports coming to hand as these lines arc 
written indicate that aRain, as on previous occasions, 
the Dominion has done what was expected of it, and, 
havinp assured the twofold success of the Victory Loan, 
may now turn to other than financial efforts with renewed 
enerxy and eorrespondintr but long looked for success. 

Beyond all question, the ultimate fate of every indi- 
vidual is hourly approachinpr final decision. Where the 
lives of nations are measured in thousands of years, of 
empires in hundreds of years, the months niarkintr the 
duration of the present war are as days and weeks of 
battle as minutes. Viewed in retrospect in the yet dis- 
tant future, the efforts now put forth by many of us will 
assume their true proportions in the struggle, and that, 
which in these few fleeting days seems worthy of admira- 
tion, may then well receive little more than scant acknow- 
ledgment at the hands of historians. 

Much stress is laid by present-day economists on the 
necessity of being prepared for the era of reconstruction 
following the war, but these are all based on hypotheses 
of a more or less personal nature, and influenced entirely 
by the side of the opposing forces to which the theorist 
is allied. It is presumed, no doubt rightly, that industrial 
activity will continue unabated till desolation and destruc- 
tion are replaced by habitation and production, but, — that 
w^hich is destroyed in a day» cannot always be replaced in 
a day, and what is more to be considered, as the war with 
its tremendous expense drags on, is, — the cost of the war 
will not cease when the last gun is fired. 

When the most recent German war loan was floated it 
was observed that the amount of money necessary annu- 
ally to pay the interest on the cost of the war to Ger- 
many, up to that time, would require four times the amount 
ordinarily raised in peace time by taxation of the people. 
Presuming then that Germany was preparing to carry out 
a program of reconstnaction, is the German nation going to 
increase an already enormous cost of existence by assum- 
ing further obligations for the benefit of those whom she 
had overrun and pillaged? Why is it that circumstantial 
reports from generally reliable sources continue to give 
information regarding the systematic removal of indus- 
trial assets, — plant, machinery, raw materials, yes and 
human beings, too? Can this be the conduct of a nation 



whom we may ngnin compete willi in tlie world's markets 
without soiling our hands? Can wo, least of all, again 
trade with this aggri'nation of monsters and handl'.-, 
utilixc, and perhaps eat the product of their country? 

No! Not so long as an unredeemed Victory Bond 
ninnins in the possession of self-respecting Canadian 
workmen will the memory of present events permit such 
happenings, tireat as will be the benefit to our country 
through the splendiil efforts of all in making the loan a 
success, its effects on our national and individual policies 
in the future will l>v still greater, less spectacular, but 
more lasting, a constant reminder and incentive to each 
one of us that the best and only the best of what is in us 
must be given freely to justify the unparalleled safety and 
immunity in which we go about our business. 

Kfliciency, that oft-(iuoted word worn threadbare in its 
meaning through misuse and overuse, must become the 
motto of each bondholder. Production, not profits must 
know no limits if our nation is to become an Apollo and 
carry its share of the world's burden in years to come. 
Credit sufficient to restore civilization to some semblance 
of its former self must be given and accepted freely by 
all, and the manner in which labor plays its part during 
the next decade or two will in large measure determine 
tlie rapidity and thoroughness of the world's recovery. 

The necessity for proper government control of Victory 
Loan bonds will therefore be evident, in view of the num- 
ber and disposition of individual subscribers, and the 
efforts of uniirincipled parties to pull off profits through 
unscrupulous market manipulation cannot be too strongly 
condemned, especially in the interests of future loans. The 
faith of the small investor must remain unshaken always, 
and if such an undesirable development is permitted to 
occur, and small investors, who have been argued into 
buying by the assurance that they cj-n get their money 
back at any time, find that they have been deceived, it 
will mean that many new investors will receive such a 
bad opinion of government bonds that they will not buy 
again. 

The remedy is easy, — a prohibition of the sale of bonds 
under a certain fixed minimum. This regulation could be 
enforced as a war measure and it would work no hard- 
ship to anyone, except perhaps the unpatriotic few who 
are declining to buy now in the expectation that they can 
pick up the issue at bargain levels a little later on. 

^@ 

SHIPnilLDIXG ACTIVITIES INADEQUATE TO THE 
EMERGENCY 

A LATE wire from Washington, D.C., covering the 
first annual report of the United States Federal 
Shipping Board, indicates that the present powers of 
the latter are totally inadequate to meet the existing ocean 
freight service emergency arising from German submar- 
ine activity. Additional powers, it is claimed, are necessary, 
so that control may be had of ocean freight rates, and the 
regulation and supervision of shipping generally. The 
Board declares that not the least of the problems confront- 
ing it is the threefold one of getting, keeping and training 
men for their respective tasks and duties. 

Vessel tonnage of mammoth quantity is under con- 
struction and on order on or near every waterway, lake 
and ocean coast of the United States and Canada, yet 
there is little doubt that the work as a whole is not 
marked by that progress which is so desirable, because so 
urgent. The frank statement by the Shipping Board of 
its inability to cope with the situation without extended 
powers is in no sense a confession of weakness, rather is 
it a warning, originating from expert conviction to those 
whom it serves, that measures more drastic be enacted 
and become operative without delay. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



635 



' Jlii^lt!^l'^l'i^'liL!jlty.¥-L!.'l'i«BI'i^Miyi|'A^i|i^^ 






i 



INDUSTRIAL NOTABILITIES 

ViCTOll GARNET CURRY, direftor and vice-president, Canadian Car & 
Foundry Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. ; director, Canadian Steel Foundries Co., 
Jjtd., Montreal; director, Pratt & Letchworth Co., Ltd., Brantford, Ont., 
was born at Amherst, N.S., Sept. 8, 1882. son of Senator N. Currv, LL.D., and 
Mary (Hall) Curry. 

After receiving his education at Rothesay Collegiate School and Royal 




\ 



:^ 



CAPTAIN VICTOR GARNET CURRY. 



Military College, Kingston, he started with Rhodes, Curry & Co., Ltd., Amherst, 
1901, this companv being amalgamated with the Canadian Car & Foundry 
Co. in 1909. 

Capt. Curry joined the Victoria Rifles as lieutenant, 1910, and was pro- 
moted captain, 1913. He went overseas with the 14th P>att. (First Contingent) 
l)eing second in command of No. 3 Company R.INLR., and was invalided home 
.July, 1915. 

Motoring, yachting, fishing and shooting are his princijial recreations ; he 
is also a member of the Engineers' Club and the Country Club. His societv 
affiliation i.s A.F. & A.M. 

In polities. Capt. Curry is Conservative and in religion Episcopalian. He 
married Maude Chapman, daughter of David T. Cliaimian, Sept. 14, 1905, and 
resides at 581 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Que. 

— Phuto courtesy International Press. 



giri«ffl«v»>8;ih8rit)8viftaiaflf5?ir)«itaririavii>8arr»it«flri»rtt 



'^?T.|T7^IFaiB^lFrTl!7^lt7rtli7^lr?TflffrtlTTSIff^lt7r,liyri!frair7^IFr.l?7^ 



6;i6 



Vohinif Win. 



SELECTED MARKET QUOTATIONS 



Being a record of pncM current i 
into thr manufacture of mechanic 



I'll. IKUN 



Grrj «.r»v IMtuba>«k U. 

Uk* Saprrtor. «hanMl. ChK 

c««u 

SlaniUnI tow pStm. PhllwWI- 
phia 

He— I ro rf. I*r'- 
H»ir. Valk) ' 

Oo**rnmcnt p[u-«». 

MontreAl TurvnUi 
HaroilWn ... &0 00 

Vic1t*ria 50 00 

FIMSIICll IKll.S AND STKEL 



Per lb. to L«rTv nuyrr*. C* 

Iron h«r«. b**c. Tur%>nto & 

SIrrI h«r». hue. Toronto. ... h 
Sml ban. 3 In. to 4 in. 

htLTT i 

Storl ban, 4 In. and Ufwr 



nU 

ii 
&0 



Iron K«r. Im.« Montrral. . S Si 

St'- ■ Montreal . & St 

R<-- r.. haM- & 24 

St.^. ...-,. 7 50 

Krltncyt lr\>n .' r»0 

N'orwajr irxm 1 1 00 

Tlrr «tr«-l & 50 

Sprins *U*\ 7 00 

Ran.) ^<rr>. No. 10 nUKC 5 75 

Oh. ' ' - plat*. S 16 In. IS 20 

Oh. r plat«. H in. IS 00 

.*iu . g 60 

lt<^..-nirr r.-*il«. heavy, at mill .... 

Sl«»l K«r». rilt.'bursh '2 90 

Tank pUt«-.. ri>; ;'uri,-h 'S 25 

Structural nhii- irich *S 00 

St(vl hoop<, )' . . S 60 

F.O.n.. T. ■'■ houM 

St»»l bar» 6 aO 

Small chaprs 6 75 

K.O.B. ChleWD WarahouM 

Steel t)ar» 4 10 

Structural ahapes 4 20 

Plate« 4 4S 

*Go%'ernment prices. 
FREIGHT RATES 

Pitt^bunrh to Following Point..* 

Per 100 lbs,. 

C.L. L.C.L. 

.Montreal 28.1 S1.5 

St John. N.B SS.l 45.5 

Halirax SB.l 45.5 

Toronto 18.9 22.1 

Guelph 18.9 22.1 

London 18.9 22.1 

Windsor 18.9 22.1 

WinniiH^ 64.9 85.1 

METALS 

Montreal Toronto 

Lake copper S.13 DO S32 00 

Electro copper 32 00 32 00 

Castin^j. copper ... 32 00 31 00 

Tin 72 00 80 00 

Spelter 10 50 10 50 

Lead 9 50 8 50 

.Antimony I" 00 18 00 

.Aluminum 60 00 62 00 

Prices per 100 lbs. 
PL.\TES 

Montrea; Toronto 

Plates. 1^ to Hi S13 00 $12 00 

Heads 13 30 12 30 

Tank plates, 3-16 in. 13 10 12 10 

WROUGHT PIPE 

Effective July 5, 1917. 

Black Galvanized 
Standard Buttweld 

Sii* Per 100 feet 

's in $5 00 $6 50 

H and ^ in 5 12 7 16 

'.4 in 6 46 8 03 

% i" 8 17 10 29 

\,, \n 12 07 15 22 

!*» >n 16 33 20 59 

1^5 in 19 53 24 61 

- in 26 27 33 12 

-» in 42 12 52 94 

', in. . : 55 08 69 23 

'^t in <^^..„...., 69 92 86 94 

* te r... 82 84 103 00 



-^'->iiiiard l,«pweMl 

S9 W 35 71 

4a 88 54 11 

57 S« 70 76 

71 7« m 70 

S5 OS I0« 28 

• . '" »« 5! 121 XH 

'-> In MS 50 141 S4 

6 in 145 90 183 36 

T In 190 40 -JSS 00 

* L In 200 00 250 00 

S In 230 40 2S8 00 

* In 276 00 S45 00 

10 Lin ....256 00 320 00 

'•> In ,12'.> 60 412 00 

I'ricM — Ontario, Qurbrr and 
Maritime Pro^inre* 

WROUGHT .MI-I'l.ES 

4" and under, 45*;;. 

IMi' and lamer. 40'?r. 

4' and under, running thread 
25%. 

Standard couplinira, 4" and under 
.15rr. 

4^4" and lanter, 16%. 
OLD MATERIAL 

Kealera" Buyins Prices. 

Montreal Toronto 

Copper. liBht $19 00 $19 00 

Copper, crucible .... 22 .iO 21 50 

Copper. hea\'>- ?2 50 21 50 

Copper wire 22 50 2150 

N*o. 1 machine com- 
position 21 00 20 50 

New brass cuttines. 16 00 17 00 

No. 1 brass turninKs 15 00 15 75 

LiKht brass 11 00 10 00 

.Medium brass 15 00 14 00 

Hea\T brass 16 00 16 00 

Heavy meltinK steel. 21 00 20 50 

Steel turning 12 00 8 00 

Shell turnings 12 00 12 00 

Boiler plate 23 00 18 00 

Axles, wrought iron. 30 00 24 00 

Rails 26 00 20 50 

No. 1 machine cast 

iron 25 00 25 00 

.Malleable scrap ... 21 00 20 00 

Pipe, wrought 15 00 9 00 

Car wheels, iron 26 00 25 00 

Steel axles 32 00 30 00 

.Mach shop turn'gs. 8 50 8 SO 

Cast borings 15 00 8 60 

Stove plate 19 00 19 00 

Scrap zinc 5 00 6 50 

Heavy lead 6 00 7 00 

lea lead 5 00 5 75 

.\Iuminum 28 00 25 00 

BOLTS. NUTS AND SCREWS 

Per Cent 
Carriage bolts, %" and less. 10 
Carriage bolts 7-16 and up. net 

Coach and lag screws 25 

Stove bolts 55 

Plate washers List plus 20 

Elevator bolts 5 

.Machine Iwlts, 7-16 and over net 
Machine bolts, % and less. . 10 

Blank bolts net 

Bolt ends net 

Machine screws, fl. and rd. 

hd., steel 27 '/. 

Machine screws, o. and fil. 

hd., .steel lo 

-Machine screws, fl. and rd. hd., 

brass add 20 

Machine screws, o. and fil. hd.. 

brass add 25 

Nuts, square blank add $1 50 

Nuts, square, tapped add 1 75 

.S'uts. hex. blank add 1 75 

Nuts, hex. tapped add 2 00 

Copper rivets and burrs, list 

plus 30 

Burrs only list plus 50 

Iron rivets and burrs 15 

Boiler rivets, base %-in. and 

larger $8 50 

Structural rivets, as above. . 8 40 



11 raw and finished material 
al and general engineering 

W.Hxl nrrewi.. lint, lirljtht,.. 72'... 

Wmnl acreWK. O. A K.. britfhl 67 Uj 

Wood •crew», (Inl, brasn... 37' 

WtH»d scrowH, O. £ H.. bruits. . ;»:.'' 

WotMUcrewi, Hat, brohir 27' 

Wood Rcrvwa, O. & R., bronxe 2.'. 

MILLED PRODUCTS 

Per cent. 

Set ftcn'wa 26 

E<i. A Hex. Head Cap Screws.. 20 

Rd. A Fil Head Can Screws., net 
Flat % But. Hd. Cap Screws 

Plu« net 

Fin. & Si.nii-lin. nutu up to 1 in. 25 
Fin. uTuI Henil-nn. nuts, over 1 

In., up to I'.j in 20 

Fin. and semi-fln. nuts over 1'^. 

in., up to 2 in plus 10 

StudK net 

Taper pins 40 

Coupling bolts, plus 10 

Planer head bolts, without fil- 
let, list plus 10 

Pinner head bolts, with fillet, 

list plus 10 and 10 

Pinner head bolt nuts, same as 

finished nuts. 

Planer bolt washers net 

Hollow set screwTt list plus 20 

Collar screws list plus 80, 10 

Thumb screws 20 

Thumb nuts 6,-> 

Patch bolts add 40, 10 

Cold pressed nuts to IVj in... 

add $4 50 
Cold pressed nuts over l</i in. 

add ?7 00 

BILLETS 

Per gross ton 

Bessemer billets $47 50 

Open-hearth billets 47 50 

O.H. sheet bars 51 00 

Forging billets 60 00 

Wire rods .^7 00 

Government prices. 
F.O.B. Pittsburgh. 

NAILS AND SPIKES 

Wire nails $5 50 .$5 4.t 

Cut nails 5 70 5 80 

Miscellaneous wire nails 60% 

Spikes. % in. and larger $7 50 

Spikes, 14 and 5-16 in S 00 

MISCELLANEOUS 

St.lder, strictly u 36 

Solder, guaranteed 38'^ 

Babbitt metals 18 to 70 

Soldering coppers, lb 53 

Lead wool, per lb 15 

Putty, 100-lb. drums 4 75 

White lead, pure, cwt 16 55 

Red fi-y lead, 100-lb. kegs, per 

cwt 16 25 

Glue, English 3.*? 

Tarred slater's paper, roll.. 95 
Gasoline, per gal., bulk.... 31',i 

Benzine, per gal., bulk .30'o 

Pure turpentine, single bbls., 

gal 78 

Linseed oil, raw, single bbls. 1 42 
Linseed oil, boiled, single 

* bbls 1 4.-, 

Plaster of Pi.ris. per bbl 2 50 

Sandpaper, B. & A list plus 20 

Emery cloth list plus 33 1-3 

Borax, crystal 15 

Sal Soda 03^4 

Sulphur, rolls 05 

Sulphur, commercial 04'^ 

Rosin "D." per lb 03 

Rosin "G," per lb 031; 

Borax crystal and granular. . 15 
Wood alcohol, per gallon.. 2 15 
Whiting, plain, per 100 lbs. 2 20 



entering 
products. 



ROPE AND PACKINee 

Drilling cables. Mnnilii tl 

Plumbers' oakum, pi.r lb. ... OH 

Packing. .Hiiuini- braided 0.11 

I'm-lilng, No. I Italian 40 

Packing. No. 2 Italian K 

Pure .M.'tnilii rope 39 

British Mjiiiilji Rope 33 

New /.t'aland Hemp 33 

Trnnsmissiiin rope, Manila... 4.'i 

Cotton Kopi . Vi-ln. and up. . . 17 

POLISHED DRILL ROD 

Discount oir list, Montreal and 
Toronto ,i,.i 

CARBON DRILLS AND 
RFAMKRS 

Per C«.nt. 
S.S, drills, wire sizes up to 61 30 
S.S. drills, wire sizes. No. 63 

to 80 net 

Standard drills to V/j In 80 

Standntd drills, over 1',^ in... 30 

3-fluted drills, plus 10 

Jobbers' and letter sizes. ... 20 

Bit stock 25 

Ratchet drills 16 

S.S. drills for wood 30 

Wood boring brace drills 25 

Electricians' bits 30 

Sockets 40 

Sleeves 40 

Taper pin reamers net 

Drills and countersinks 

list plus 30 

Bridge reamers 52'., 

Centre reamers 10 * 

Chucking reamers net 

Hand reamers 10 

COLD ROLLED SHAFTING 

At mill ,.. list plus M'r 

At warehouse list plus 50' '. 

Di.scoun(s off new list. Warehouse 
price at Montreal and Toronto 

IRON PIPE FITTINGS 

Canadian malleable, A, add 3596 ; 
B and C, plus 257^ : cast iron, net : 
standard bushings, 25% ; header.^. 
GO; flanged unions, 5; malleable 
bushings, 30 ; nipples. 45 ; malleable 
lipped unions. -10. 

SHEETS 

Montreal Toronto 

Sheets, black. No. 28. $9 50 $ 9 00 

Sheets, black. No. 10.12 00 12 00 
Canada plates, dull, 52 

sheets 12 00 12 00 

Canada plates, all 

bright 12 50 12 50 

.\pollo brand, 10^4 oz. 

galvanized 12 25 12 09 

Queen's Head. 28 

B.W.G 11 76 10 75 

Fleur-de-Lis, 28 B.W. 

G 11 76 10 75 

Gorbal's Best, No. 28.12 00 10 25 
Colborne Crown, No. 

28 11 25 10 00 

Premier. No. 28 U.S. 13 75 9 70 

Premier, 10% oz 13 86 10 00 

Zinc sheets 20 00 20 00 

PROOF COIL CHAIN. 
B 

Vi in $12 00 

5-16 in 11 60 

% in 11 15 

7-16 in 10 90 

M: in 10 70 

9-16 in 10 70 

% in 10 50 

V4 in 10 40 

',i in '.". 10 25 

1 inch '..';■..-... 10 10 

Extra for B.B. Chain 1 20 

Extra for B.B.B. Chain 1 80 



December 6, 1911 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



637 



ELECTRIC WELD COIL 
CHAIN B.B. 

', in $15 50 

■(-16 in 11 70 



■4 in 8 

.1-16 in 7 

% in 6 

7-16 in 6 

'/4 in G 

% in 6 

Vi in 6 

Prices per 100 lbs. 



FILES AND RASPS. 

Per Cent. 

Globe 50 

Vulcan 50 

P.H. and Imperial 50 

Nicholson 40 

Black Diamond 40 

.1. Barton Smith. Eagle 50 

McClelland. Globe 50 

Delta Files 37>i 

Disston 50 

Whitman & Barnes 50 

COAL AND COKE. 

Solvay Foundry Coke 

Connelsville Foundry Coke 

Steam Lump Coal 

Best Slack 

Net ton f.o.b. Toronto. 



Size. 
I in 


BOILER 


TUBES. 

Seam- Lap- 
less welded 
.$36 00 .$ 


l'-4 in. 






40 00 






43 00 36 00 


1^ in 






43 00 36 00 


■> in 






50 00 36 00 


2i,i in. 
2 'A in. 






53 00 38 00 






55 00 42 00 


:'. in 






64 00 50 00 


sy4 in. 
SVj in. 
4 in 






58 00 






77 00 60 00 
90 00 75 00 


Price 


i per 100 feet, Montreal 
and Toronto. 



OILS AND COMPOUNDS. 

Castor oil, per lb 50 

Royalite, per pal., bulk 16 

Palacine 19 

Machine oil. per pal. . . ; 26VL' 



Black oil, per gal 15 

Cylinder oil. Capital 45i/i 

Cylinder oil. Acme SS'/o 

Standard cutting compound, 

per lb 06 

Lard oil, per gal 2 50 

Union thread cutting oil 

antiseptic 88 

Acme cutting oil. antiseptic. 37 Vj 

Imperial quenching oil 39 V^ 

Petroleum fuel oil 12^/2 

BELTING— NO. 1 OAK- 
TANNED. 

Extra heavy, single and 

double SO-S'/r 

Standard 407c 

Cut leather lacing, No. 1.... 1 iJ-'i 
Leather in sides 1 75 

TAPES, 

Chesterman Metallic. 50 ft $2 00 

Lufktn Metallic. 603. 50 ft 2 00 

Admiral Steel Tape. 50 ft 2 75 

Admiral Steel Tape, 100 ft 4 45 

Major Jun. Steel Tape. 50 ft. 3 50 

Rival Steel Tape. 50 ft 2 75 

Rival Steel Tape. 100 ft 4 45 

Reliable Jun. Steel Tape. 50 ft. 3 50 

WASTE. 
White. Cents per lb. 

\XX Extra 20 

Peerless 20 

Grand 19 

Superior 19 

X L C R 18 

Atlas 18 

X Empire 18 

Ideal 1" 

X press 16 

Colored. 

Lion 14 Vi; 

Standard 13 

No. 1 13 

Popular ll'h 

Keen 10 'j 

WOOL PACKING. 

Arrow 25 

Axle 20 

Anvil 15 

Anchor 1 1 



WASHED WIPERS. 

Select White 12 

Mixed colored 10 

Dark colored 09 

This list subject to trade discount 
for quantity. 

RUBBER BELTING. 

Standard 40% 

Best grades 20% 

ANODES. 

Nickel 50 to .54 

Cobalt 1.75 to 2.00 

Copper 44 to .46 

Tin 49 to .56 

Zinc 23 to .25 

Prices Per Lb. 

COPPER PRODUCTS. 

Montreal Toronto 

Bars, !/•> to 2 in 55 00 53 00 

Copper wire. list plus 10. 

Plain sheets, 14 oz., 14 

x2S in.. 14x60 in... 5.-. 00 53 50 

Copper sheet, tinned. 

14x60, 14 oz 60 00 54 25 

Copper sheet, plan- 
ished. 14x60 base... 64 00 60 00 

Braziers', in sheets, 6 

.X 4 base 55 00 52 00 

BRASS. 

Brass rods, base Vi; i". to 1 

in. rod 5.i 

Brass sheets. 8 in. wide. 20 

oz 60 

Brass tubing, seamless 67 

Copper tubing, seamless 58 

PLATING SUPPLIES. 

Polishing wheels, felt. . 3 25 
Polishing wheels, bull- 
neck 2 00 

Emery in kegs. American 07 

Pumice, ground 06 

Emery glue 15 to 20 

Tripoli composition .... 06 to 09 

Crocus composition .... 08 to 10 

Emery composition 08 to 09 



Rouge, silver 35 to 50 

Rouge, powder 30 to 35 

Prices Per Lb. 

LEAD SHEETS. 

Montreal Toronto 

Sheets. 3 lbs. sq. ft.. $18 00 $18 00 
Sheets. 3V. lbs. sq. 

ft 18 00 18 00 

Sheets. 4 to 6 lbs. 

sq. ft 17 50 17 50 

Cut sheets, \i>c per lb. extra. 

Cut sheets to size, Ic per lb. extra. 

PLATING CHEMICALS. 

Acid, boracic $ .15 

Acid, hydrochloric 05 

Acid, hydrofluoric 14'! 

Acid, nitric 10 

Acid, sulphuric 05 

Ammonia, aqua 08 

Ammonium carbonate 15 

Ammonium, chloride 11 

Ammonium hydrosulphuret. . .40 

Ammonium sulphate 07 

Arsenic, white 12 

Copper, carbonate, anhy 35 

Copper, sulphate 17 

Cobalt, sulphate 70 

Iron perchloride 20 

Lead acetate 16 

Nickel ammonium sulphate . . 12 

Nickel carbonate 35 

Nickel sulphate 15 

Potassium carbonate 75 

Potassium sulphide (substi- 
tute) 20 

Silver chloride (per oz.l 65 

Silver nitrate (per oz.) 55 

Sodium bisulphite 10 

Sodium carbonate crystals. . .05 
Sodium cyanide. 127-130%... .41 

Sodium hydrate 04 

Sodium hyposulphite, per 100 

lbs 5.00 

Sodium phosphate 14 

Tin chloride 60 

Zinc chloride 60 

Zinc sulphate 09 

Prices per lb. unless otherwise 
stated. 



Market Condition and Tendency 



Success of Victorij Loan will benefit Canadian industries, 
shell orders to he placed. Steel and metul markets quiet. 



Moi 



THE astonishiug success of the Victory Loan will be a source 
of gratification to the country at large and will a.ssure a 
continuance of prosperity. Canadian industries will benefit 
through the expenditure of this vast sum of money as it will be all 
spent in Canada. The munitions industry will Ijenefit to a greater 
degree perhaps than any other, as a con.siderable proportion will 
be appropriated for the manufacture of shells. Already arrange- 
ments have been made to place large orders for shrapnel, 4.5-inch 
and 6-inch shells, which will keep a number of plants actively em- 
ployed for several months. As a result of these shell order.s. 
another period of activity in the machine tool business may be 
looked for. The iron and steel trade is rather quiet just now due 
to tlie difficulty that is being experienced in obtaining material for 
any purpose other than that required in the production of war 
equipment. As a result private consumers are handicapped in 
their manufacturing operations and output is being restricted. 
The steel mills on the other hand have all the business that they 
can take care of and are enjoying great prosperity. Prices of steel 
products are holding firm with the sole exception of galvanized 
sheets which have declined. Prices of pig-iron are unchanged. In 
the States the shortage of pig-iron is becoming serious as it is cur- 
tailing the output of steel. The situation in the scrap metal 
market is unchanged. There is a fair demand for iron and steel 
scrap but copper and other non-ferrous metals are dull. Tin is still 
very scarce although some relief is looked for in the near future. 



MONTREAL, Dec. 3, 1917.— The 
exceptional success of the Vic- 
tory Loan has been the out- 
standing feature of the past week, 
and this latest indication of the 
people's optimism promises well 
for the activity that will be ex- 
pressed in the distribution of the loan to 
the many requirements of the Govern- 
ment for the successful prosecution of 
the war during the next six months. The 
near approach of the final closing of 
navigation is demonstrated in the added 
pressure that is being felt by the vari- 
ous railroads, and already some con- 
gestion is being shown in certain direc- 
tions. Plants that have received orders 
for 75mm. shell are actively engaged in 
rearranging their equipment to manu- 
facture this new type, and it is expected 
that operations will be in full swing 
early in the New Year. 
Pig Iron 
The shortage in pig iron is becoming 
serious in the United States owing to 
the enormous demands that are made on 
the furnaces and the heavy require- 
ments of the government; it would not 
be surprising to see this situation more 
acute dn the very near future. The 
congestion of the railroads has delayed 
the delivery of coke and other raw ma- 
terials with the result that production 
has been somewhat hampered. The sit- 
uation here is virtually unchanged with 



638 



I- \ N \ in \ N \i A » II I N i: i; V 



Volume Will. 



de«ler« report:- . n.ii 

liltlf muU'hit' :r il pur- 

posos. Vory liti.. i a:i.i i .>n y >: 1 on the 
market and prict-a iiuotisl aro nominnl. 

Sirfl 

No outstaiulinK >lov< ii;m 

takrn place to alter thr . mc of 

the steel iiituation ami iimm; i.>n,s that 
exist at the i'r<».-iit time are more or 
IcM of an arl'lu-uil i*h!iri».-!.>r owinc to 
the uncertain inl1vn-iu-i- l)Kit ilominaten 
the entir>> markoi. The onlrolline fac- 
tor i« tin- at'.i'.tiile of the Amoriciin Gov- 
ernment in cor- th llio rfpulal- 
inir of aale an<i n. and the sub- 
sequent distrihulii'!'. i<i nearly nil classes 
of steel. The priority of war require- 
ments is one of the chief features in the 
present acute position of the steel mar- 
ket, as it is practically impo.^.-jible for 
manufacturers to obtain material unless 
a loiaranfee is piven that the steel is to 
be used for essential war purposes. 

With the increasinp demands that will 
likely be made for certain phases of the 
war proRramme. it is anticipated that 
the domestic situation will become fur- 
ther disorganized. The progress of steel 
shipbuildinf; in Canada has suffered to a 
larfre extent by the inability to secure 
sufficient plate to carry out the work that 
had been planned in this connection. The 
increasing activity in this direction in 
the States makes it additionally difficult 
for plate consumers here to acquire ma- 
terial for their prospect we needs and this 
branch of industrial enterprise is feel- 
inp the effect of abnormal conditions 
more than any other. The acute condi- 
tion at the present time is intensified by 
the difficulty that the trade is experienc- 
ing in the delivery of material owinp to 
the lack of transportation facilities, the 
railroads being unable to cope with ex- 
isting requirements. 

With the approach of the new year 
some are looking forward to a revision 
of the prices that have recently been 
fixed by the government, but the general 
opinion seems to be that as the trade is 
just beginning to adapt itself to the ne-vv 
conditions, it is not thought that any 
changes now contemplated -will seriously 
affect the quotations that are the ruling 
factor in general trading. Some con- 
sideration may be given to certain de- 
tails to relieve the pressure in certain 
directions, but it is not expected that 
the general tone of the market will un- 
dergo any marked change with the com- 
ing of the Xew Year. Dealers here are 
still governing their operations by de- 
velopments at Washington, but with the 
exception that steel shipments are 
harder to obtain from the States, the 
situation is unchanged and prices are 
well maintained; quotations being the 
same as given last week. 

Metals 

The general market in respect to 
metals is unchanged but recent develop- 
ments have given a new tone to the sit- 
uation. In an effort to better control 
the distribution of certain metals, the 
American Government have placed new 
regulations on the ixnportation, to avoid 



;iii\ii>inL; Hi ii speculative nature and so 
insure a^ninst the possibility of accumu- 
lation of surplus stocks. The feature 
of the week is the position of tin, which 
i> still occupying the attention of the 
■ i-ade owing to the marked scarcity that 
ims resulted from the inability io secure 
shipping p«'rmits. Copper is quiet bul 
incren.<ied sales have been reported by 
small dealers. Spelter is unsettled with 
users awaiting government action. Leail 
is quiet and unchanged. Antimony \a 
quiet but stronger. Aluminum is in les.-s 
demand but firm. 

Copper. — With the exception of the 
slight increase in activity that has de- 
veloped out of the recent concession of 
the Government in connection with the 
."i per cent, commission allowed to deal- 
ers on small transactions, no feature has 
ari.sen to change the general tone of the 
situation, and the market in copper is 
practically nil, trading being virtually 
in the hands of the government. Recent 
regulations are being strictly adhered to. 
but, outside of the demands that are 
made for war necessities, producers 
claim thev have very little metal avail- 
able for domestic consumers. The hope 
is entertained in some quarters that this 
condition w-ill be relieved early in the 
New Year, but apparently nothing bas 
as yet been done that would encourage 
the trade in this connection. 

If war requirements are as large as 
reported, little relief can be expected by 
the consumer for some time, but with 
production proceeding at the present 
rate, some arrangement will likely be 
possible whereby the general trade will 
be more freely supplied with much need- 
ed metal. The local market is at pres- 
ent very strong and dealers report a 
difficulty in obtaining supplies. Quota- 
tions are unchanged but the market has 
a stronger tendency; lake and electro 
are quoted at 33 and castings at 32 cents 
per lb. 

Tin. — This metal is retaining the 
center of interest in the metal situation 
owing to its abnormally strong position 
due to the pronounced scarcity in the 
States. The conditions in the United 
States have become so acute that the 
Government have commenced to com- 
mandeer all available supplies in ware- 
houses, and this action is expected to 
proceed further. The result, as intend- 
ed, has been to relieve the immediate 
need, but the ultimate effect will be to 
deplete the available supply for future 
requirements. Unless conditions as they 
exist at the present time show early 
signs of improvement, the situation will 
take on a very serious aspect and one 
that may well assume alarming propor- 
tions. Recent action taken by the Am- 
erican Government to regulate the Im- 
portation of material, and require a lic- 
ense to this effect, will avoid the possi- 
bility of metal being hoarded for specu- 
lative purposes. 

The American position of tin is very 
strong, the market being controlled by 
the highest quotations in the history of 
the trade. This week's market is one 
cent higher than that of last week, the 



current quotiition being 81 cents per lb. 
Dealers here report a very strong mar- 
ket bul, owing to considerable stock of 
metiil, the situation has not been marked 
by the tension that characterizes the 
American market. Tin here has ad- 
vanced one cent during the week and' 
can be had for 72 cents per lb., to regu- 
lar customers of the dealers. 

Spelter. — In anticipation of early ac- 
tion being taken by the American Gov- 
ernment regarding the fixing of prices, 
the trade in speller has been quiet. Both 
producers and consumers are anxiously 
awaiting the next step of the regulating 
committee so as to be in a position to- 
base their future operations on the 
changes that will be put in force. The- 
present market is a little (|uiet but con- 
tinues relatively firm. I^ocal dealers are^ 
quoting 10% cents on a steady but un- 
eventful market. 

Lead. — The situation in lead is un- 
certain and present activity is not pro- 
nounced. Consumers are not directly 
interested in the present situation as 
many are very well covered for their 
immediate requirements. Local condi- 
tions have taken on a better outloolc 
owing to the developments in shrapnel 
shell orders, but so far no increase in 
activity has developed in connection with 
the sale of lead. Dealers continue to- 
quote 9 '4 cents per lb. 

Antimony. — No increase in the de- 
mand has been noted in this metal but 
considerable int-^rest has been created 
by the recent action of the American 
Government in controlling the importa- 
tion of antimony and kindred alloys by 
means of the license system. One out- 
come of this latest move has been the 
noticeable decline in the offerings, the 
tendency being to see what the develop- 
ments will be before disposing of further 
metal. With the present quotation so 
close to the actual cost of producing the 
metal, sellers are taking advantage of 
every opportunity to put the market on 
a stronger footing. New York quota- 
tions show an advance of % cents on- 
the week. Dealers here report a firm 
market with unchanged prices, but an 
undertone of strength. Current prices 
are maintained at 17 cents per lb. 

Machine Tools and Supplies 

Considerable improvement has de- 
veloped in the macbrne tool market ow- 
ing to the impetus that has been given 
by the renewal of munitions activity, 
and this is expected to be additionally 
pronounced in the near future, as pros- 
pects for more shell orders are very 
bright. "The volume of inquiry for gen- 
eral equipment is not heavy but of suffi- 
cient importance to maintain the inter- 
est of dealers. Activity in the States is 
on the increase and this is making it in- 
creasingly difficult to obtain delivery of 
machinery from American concerns, ow- 
ing to the urgent requirements for their 
own government purposes. The recent 
demand for all classes of supplies has 
shown an increase of late due to the re- 
ne-wal of activity in munitions manufac- 
ture. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A .\ A D I A N MACHINERY 



■^39 



Scrap 

The market is in an unsettled condi- 
tion owing to the conflicting reports that 
ai-e current as to early future prospects. 
While some anticipate a weaker condi- 
tion, others look for a stronger market, 
the natural outcome being an unchanged 
position for most lines of scrap and old 
materials. Local prices are firm and un- 
changed. 



Toronto 

TORONTO, Ont, Dec. 4.— The re- 
markable success of the Victory Loan 
will be gratifying to Canadians as well 
as to our Allies, not only because it 
shows a determination to "carry on" 
with the war, but also by reason of the 
benefit that will accrue to Canadian in- 
dustries in tke form of orders for war 
supplies. The munitions industry in 
particular will benefit by the success cf 
the war loan, as a considerable propor- 
tion of the money will be appropriated 
for the manufacture of shell. Already 
arrangements have been made to distri- 
bute substantial orders for shrapnel, 
4.5-inch and 6-ijich shell, which will keep 
many plants actively employed for sev- 
eral months. 

Steel 
The iron and steel market is some- 
what dull, the siituation being practically 
unchanged. Business is on the a.uiet 
side owing to the difficulty that is being 
experienced in obtaining steel for any 
purpose other than for war equipment 
and munitions, etc. Judging from the 
number of inquiries received by local 
merchants, there is little doubt but that 
business would be brisk if all the ma- 
terial that is required could be obtained; 
this apiplies to imported steel as well as 
domestic material. The inquiries cover 
a variety of lines and come for the most 
part from manufacturers who are suffer- 
ing from the shortage of steel. Manu- 
facturing operations are being restricted 
on this account, which is creating a 
scarcity in a number of articles required 
for evei-y day use. Manufacturers should 
place their orders for iron and stee! 
goods required in their business well 
ahead of time and not allow stocks to be- 
come depleted before ordering fresh 
supplies, by this means avoiding delays 
in deliveries. 

From all accounts the outlook for the 
steel companies is very favorable, the 
volume of orders on hand being as large 
as at any previous time. Production 
continues on a favorable basis, and a 
continuation of open weather will help 
considerably towards this end. Munition 
orders will continue to be an important 
factor in the steel trade, and will account 
for a considerable proportion of the out- 
put during the next six months. 

Prices of steel pi-oducts, with few ex- 
cerptions, are holding firm, there being 
no changes to announce this week except 
in galvanized sheets, which have de- 
clined about 50c per 100 lbs. It is likely 
that there will be a further decline in 
prices of the lighter gauges of black 
sheets, although they are unchanged in 
the meantime. In the primary market 
inquiries for black sheets are heavy and 



manufacturers are making every effort 
to take care of their regular customers. 
Large requirements by the Government 
have made it necessary for producers to 
supply only consumers who are engaged 
in the manufacture of essentials. 

Chicago warehouse prices are down, 
steel bars being- now quoted at 4.10c; 
structural shapes, 4.20c, and plates, 
4.45c. The steel market in the United 
States has been more active in the past 
week than at any time since prices were 
fixed, with some increase in private de- 
mand in nearly all lines and with many 
large Government contracts reported. It 
is believed that the unfilled tonnage 
statement for November will not show 
nearly as much of a decrease as the pre- 
vious one. . . 
Pig Irort 

There has be-fitl no change in the do- 
mestic pig iron market this week, but the 
situation in the States is becoming more 
serious owing to the scarcity of fuel and 
labor. The shortage of fuel at the blast 
furnaces in the Pittsburgh district con- 
tinues to be extremely acute and has 
resulted in an additional number of 
stacks being banked. The shortage of 
coke is curtailing the output of pig iron 



CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
PURCHASING COM- 
MISSION 

The following gentlemen consti- 
tute the War Purchasing Commis- 
sion appointed by the Canadian 
Government: Hormidas Laporte, 
Montreal, chairman; George F. 
Gait. Winnipeg; William P. Gundy, 
Toronto. Thomas Hillier is secre- 
tary, and the Commission head- 
quarters are at Ottawa. 



and in turn the production of steel. 
Steel companies in the United States 
have been buying low phosphorus iron 
recently in Canada, and notwithstanding 
the recent embargo placed on shipments 
by the Dominion Government, the metal 
has been released; but hereafter licenses 
will have to be secured to obtain Can- 
adian material. On the other hand, the 
United States furnaces are in receipt of 
heavy inciuiries from Canada for basic 
and Bessemer iron. 

Scrap 

The market for iron and steel scrap is 
fairly active at unchanged prices, which 
are holding firm. The supply of these 
materials is, however, none too heavy, 
which is keeping the market firm. Prices 
of copper and other non-ferrous metal 
scraps are weak and demand light. 
Machine Tools 

Business in the machine tool trade is 
gradually becoming more active and the 
outlook is brighter than it has been for 
some time. That further shell orders 
will be placed in Canada is assured by 
the announcement that the Imperial 
Munitions Board has received instruc- 
tions from the British Government to 
issue contracts for shrapnel, 4.5-inch and 



6-inch shell to all Canadian firms equip- 
ped to produce these sizes. The volume 
of these contracts, it is understood, will 
keep the plants actively engaged until 
well into the new year. This is all en- 
tirely new business, and is, therefore, 
additional to those contracts now being 
executed. New equipment will be re- 
quired in a number of plants to increase 
production and also to replace worn-out 
tools. Canadian machine tool builders 
will benefit by this new business and an- 
other spell of activity is assured. Owing 
to the increasing activity in the United 
States, deliveries of machinery from 
across the line are becoming more back- 
ward, some classes of equipment being 
very difficult to obtain. 

Supplies 

The market for machine shop supplies 
is steady and prices are holding firm, al- 
though there are fewer changes being 
made now than formerly. A very fair 
demand is reported by dealers, who are 
looking for increased business from 
munition plants. 

Metals 

There is no material change in the sit- 
uation in the metal markets and prices, 
generally are holding firm at last 
week's levels. There is no change in the 
tin situation although some relief is- 
expected shortly, in which case prices 
will probably decline. The copper sit- 
uation is gradually being cleared up al- 
though there has recently been some 
confusion in the trade in the States in 
regard to jobbers' re-sale prices. The 
Sub-Committee, Washington, has made 
suggestions as to the fixed differentials 
between the various grades of spelter 
but did not make any suggestions in re- 
gard to the base price. The lead market 
is quiet and unchanged, as is also the 
antimony market. An improvement in- 
the position of both these metals is look- 
ed for when the shrapnel contracts are 
placed. 

Copper. — -There is some confusion in 
the primary market over the resale price 
for jobbers but the situation is gradually- 
being straightened out. The producers 
wU\ supply copper after Jan. 1 at the 
established price of 23V2C a pound which 
may be distributed in small lots to the 
smaller consumers at 24.675c per pound. 
The dealers propose to sell copper which 
they hold and wh''ch costs them more 
than 23V2C at an advance over the 
original cost to them. It is figured that 
after January the smaller consumers 
may look for a price which must not 
exceed 23%c a pound plus 5% commis- 
sion. About that time it is expected that 
the hiPih priced copper will have disap- 
peared. The local price is unchanged 
and market quiet. Lake and electrolytic 
are quoted at 32c and castings at 31c 
per pound. 

Tin. — An improvement in the tin sit- 
uation in New York is expected shortly 
as the Sub-Committee on tin, at Wash- 
ington, has been given power to control 
the distribution of tin in the United 
States and has taken steps to supervise 
tin importations. The U.S. Navy_ De- 
partment has commandeered all tin in 



640 



\ N \ I' I \ N M A (• II 1 N K K V 



VoUinu> XVIll. 



Nfw York Mnrrhou*^*. The Navy !>»•• 
iwrtmnrt artion \v«» prompKsi by the 
intense conipt-tition for tin, which hu.i 
resulttHi in forvinir up the price within 
H month from r>4 ccnt.t to 80 cenlst » 
pounil. Tin cnnnot In- luuiijlit on tiie 
open mArkft. bt'causr uf iiritish export 
r«strictioni<, ami it is said that timis 
havinir Kovemmenl contract* requirinK 
the use of tin. incluilintr th»>i- manufnc- 
turini; tinned foo<l« for export to the 
AlliM. will be in serious straits unless 
some action is promptly taken to 
remedy the situation. Local price firm 
and unchantfitl at SOc jier pound. 

Speller.— The differentials for the 
U.S. Government priivs between prime 
Western and the itrndes .\. and B. have 
been fixed at nn advance of V»c to *3C 
for brass. 2e for erade B. and He to SVjc 
for jrrade A. The base price or the 
price of prime Western however h.-js not 
b»en established. The market is dull 
and quotations unchanffed at IC-ic per 
pound. 

IjeMd. — Prices are unchanped althous'.! 
ther« is a sliehtly easier tone to tho 
market which is quiet. The position of 
lead will likely improve with the placing 
of further shrapnel contracts. Lead is 
iltioted at 8Sc per pound. 

.\nlimo:-.v. — 'V\\o market is showinc 
more sigms of lift duo to heavier buv'nir 
and the position of antimonv has im- 
proved. The price is unchancred at 18i- 
per pound. 

.\Iuminnm. — The market is firmer and 
deaVrs .nro expectinRT hicher prices. 
There is no scarcitv of metal on the 
outside market. Quotations are un- 
changed at 62c per pound. 



Sydney 

SYDNEY. N.S.. Nov. 20.— The Victory 
Loan campaign closed with great succes.^ 
at the works of the Dominion Iron & 
Steel Co. A toUl sum of $420,000 was 
subscribed by ■'^.845 workmen. As there 
are not more than 4,800 workmen at the 
steel ■works altogether, and as among 
these there are included a great many 
men of alien enemy nationality, the 
nnmber of subscribers reflects great 
credit on the rank and file generally, 
because the total of $420,000 did not in- 
clude any really large subscriptions. 

The contribution of the coal-workers 
has not been so generous as that of the 
steelworkers, this being to some extent 
due to the scattered nature of the collier- 
ies and the difficulty of arranging so 
eflfective a campaign as was made at the 
steel works. The Coal Company's men 
will probably contribute between S280,- 
000 and $300,000 gi\'ing a combined total 
of not less than $700,000. to which has 
to be added $3,000,000 subscribed by the 
Dominion Steel Corporation, and credited 
Tialf to Nova Scotia and half to Mon- 
treal. 

Mine Workers Seek Further Wages 
Increase 

As was feared the Amalgamated 
Mine Workers of Nova Scotia have made 
a demand for a wage increase upon the 
operators in the Sydney District that is 
c-i'e impossible of fulfillment. The A. 



M. W . has uskcd an increase ranging 
from u minimum to ;!0 per cent, to 75 
p<>r wnl. advance on existing rates. As 
such an iidvimce on top of the Inoreases 
given during the past two years is 
manifestly out of the question, it is 
probable the failure to agree will result 
in the appointment of a Conciliation 
Hoard. 

The coal production of the Dominion 
Coal Company for November fell to 
280,000 tons, the lowest during the win- 
peri ml. 

The local tribunals are considering 
the application of the Dominion Steel 
Corporation for the exemption of its 
employees from military service on the 
ground of the national importance of 
their occupation in the production and 
transportation of coal and steel. It is 
expected that very general exemptions 
will be granted, as both the steel and 
coal companies are producing the majoi 
portion of their output to the direct 



MARKET 



LKTTKR 
MENT 



DEVELOP- 



The attention of metal working 
plant executives is directed to the 
enlargement of the scope and use- 
fulness of our Market Letter De- 
partment. In New Y'ork and Pitts- 
burgh, expert correspondents have 
been engaged, and are already 
furnishing each week concise re- 
ports of production activities, price 
movements, etc., within the terri- 
tory served by each of these im- 
portant centres. During the next 
few weeks, further additions will 
be made to the number of our 
I'nited States correspondents, em- 
bracing other industrial centres, 
and enlarging thereby the scope 
of the meantime service being ren- 
dered. 



order of the Imperial Munitions Board. 

The season of navigation just closed 
has seen the smallest shipment of Nova 
Scotia coal to the Upper Provinces in 
the past 25 years. From a pre-war 
normal shipment of 2,000,000 tons to the 
St. Lawrence market, the Dominion Coal 
Co. export this year has fallen to 50,- 
000 tons. 



Washington 



WASHINGTON, D.C., Dec. 2.— The 
fact that the Germans destroyed more 
British .ships in the first ten months of 
unrestricted U-boat w^arfare than Great 
Britain or any other nation has ever 
built in a full year has just been made 
knowTi. The revelation was made when 
Chairman Edward N. Hurley, of the 
United States Shipping Board, made pub- 
li':' a letter he had written to Senator 
Gilbert M. Hitchcock, of Nebraska, on 
the subject. The Germans have sunk in 
ten months something over 900 British 
vessels of more than 3,000,000 tons dead- 
weight. 



Chairman Hurley said the greatest 
shipbuilding feat ever accompliBhed was 
that of England in liU;i, when (588 ves- 
sels of 2,8i»8,221) tons were completed, 
•liiivin in I'JKi, Mr. Hurley said, built 
forty-three ships of l!l2,i)i);{ tons. This 
was the biggest tonnage finished by any 
nation except (!reat Britain. The Am- 
erican prograinnio, unless held up, will 
produce (>,OOl),llOl) tons by the end of 
ims. About .'),00(),000 tons will be com- 
pleted in 1918, thus surpassing Great 
Britain's best effort by about a million 
tons. 

The United States now has available 
for trans-Atlantic service 582 ships of a 
total of :!, 721,800) tons, including oil- 
tankers and former German and Austrian 
vessels. German and .'\ustrian ships 
operated by the Shipping Board number 
lO.'i, of 688,900 tons. American citizens 
hold eleven more of these ships, totalling 
i;;i,91.') tons, making the aggregate Am- 
erican holding of enemy vessels 752,87.''< 
Ions. 

New Yard Activities 

In reply to questions rcganiing the ac- 
tivities of new shipyards, Mr. Hurley said 
all of them that have contracts now have 
the ground cleared and will have their 
buildings and ways completed early ii 
1918. The new yard at Hog Island, Pa., 
must deliver fifty ships before November 
1. 1918, he said, and the Port Newark 
yard must finish seven in June. The new 
Bristol P»int plant must have four ships 
reidy for service in May. 

"Have any British, French, Norwegian, 
Italian or Dutch authorities yet assert- 
f(i that they are now building new ships 
as fast as the submarines are destroy- 
irm them?" Chairman Hurley was asked. 
The reply was an emphatic "No." It will 
be up to the United States, he indicated, 
to produce new ships faster than the 
(iermans sink them, providing losses are 
not pulled down by the Allied navies. 

A table has been compiled by the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation showing 
the vessels under contract and pending 
contract, and vessels which have been 
requisitioned by the Fleet Corporation. 
The figures are: Wood vessels, 375; total 
deadweight capacity, 1,330,900 tons; 
composite vessels, 58.207,000 tons; steel, 
451 vessels; 3,186,400 tons; total con- 
tracted for. 884 vessels; total deadweight 
capacity, 4.724,300 tons; contracts pend- 
ing, 99; tonnage, 610,000; total requisi- 
tioned (all types), 426; tonnage, 3.029,- 
.508 tons. Grand total. 1,409 vessels; 
total deadweight capacity, 8.363,808 tons. 
This total includes requisitioned vessels 
completed and released — 33 vessels; 2.57,- 
575 tons. 

Conservation of Coal 

Canadian manufacturers will be in- 
terested in the news that Canada must 
place herself upon the same basis as the 
United States with reference to the con- 
servation of coal. This has been made 
plain to the Dominion Government by 
the United States Fuel Administration. 
In an official communication to the Can- 
adian Fuel Controller, Dr. Harry A. Gar- 
field, Fuel Administrator, pointed out 
that Canada would be expected to resort 
to the same measures to save coal as are 
being adopted in the United States. Dr. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A Dl A X .M A (' H 1 NER Y 



641 



Garfield points out that an intensive 
campaign is being- carried on in this 
country for fuel economy. It is suggest- 
ed that Canada conduct a similar cam- 
paign for the limitation of the uses of 
coal and the co-operation of the United 
States Goveiuiment in such a campaign 
is offered. Most of the Canadian coal 
supply is derived from the United States, 
and the Fuel Administration has under- 
taken to give Canada a pro rata share of 
the United States' supply on the same 
basis as the various States of the Union. 
The Fuel .4dministration, however, de- 
mands that Canada safeguard this supply 
by conservation measures in line with 
those undertaken in the United States. 

The Banking .Situation 

The daily commerce report of the 
Department of Commei-ce publishes a 
report taken from the London "Statist" 
of November .3, presenting its customary 
annual review of the intemational bank- 
ing situation, giving, among other data, 
a statement comprising those banking 
institutions whose deposits and current 
accounts exceeded £20,000,000 at the 
close of 1916. Eighty-four instiutions 
are listed and in this list are three Can- 
adian institutions. Twenty-fourth on 
the list is the bank of Montreal with de- 
posits and current accounts of £60,214,- 
000. The Canadian Bank of Commerce 
is thirty-eighth, with £6,417,000, while 
the Royal Bank of Canada is forty- 
fourth, with £40,141,000. 

Carbons for electricity may no longer 
be exported from France to the United 
States and allied countries without spe- 
cial license. A consular report from 
Paris says that the permits for such ex- 
portation which formerly modified the 
embargo of December, 1914, affecting 
these articles has been withdrawn bv a 
ministerial decrease. Special applica- 
tions must now be made for permission 
to export these goods to any country. 

Xavy Dept. Specifications 

The Bureau of Supplies and Accounts 
of the Navy Department has issued 
notice of proposed purchases of various 
materials, as follows: 

Schedule 1581, motor generators for 
various navy yards; schedule 1572, fif- 
teen navigational, sounding, motor driven 
machines for the Brooklyn yard; 
schedule 1580 six portable ventilating 
sets for Portsmouth yard; schedule 
1582. five lathes, engine, high-duty, uni- 
versal, 12-inch, 5-foot bed, for the 
Annapolis naval academy. 

The Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, 
the Navy's purchasing organization, has 
evidence that at least one commodity has 
been deliberately held for abnormally 
high prices. In the case of tin, the 
navy has commandeered 1,000 tons 
stowed in New York warehouse, but has 
turned over to the American Steel and 
Iron Institute the question of further 
adjustment of prices and supply. The 
navy had sufficient tin, through fore- 
sighted purchases last spring, to supply 
its own needs, but there was a prospect 
that if more tin were not given con- 
tractors, the navy destroyer program 



would actually be halted for want ot' 
machinery in which tin was used dir- 
ectly or as an alloy. One New York 
concern — a Dutch house — had a big sup- 
ply of tin, from which the navy drew 800 
tons. The manager, manifestly, was 
holding for high prices, for he did not 
even know what to charge when asked 
for a quotation. He informed the de- 
partment he would have to consult his 
home office. This waiting on high prices 
was undertaken in the face of the fact 
that Holland would have no market here 
if the British had not permitted her to 
ship the goods in. Tools intended for 
South America have been seized because 
of the pressing need for them here. 

The United States Tariff Commission 
anounce that it will hold hearings in 
the near future for the purpose of re- 
ceiving information and suggestions from 
representatives of industry and com- 
merce and labor and foreign trade on 
war disturbances and the plans for re- 
ad.iustment to peace times, which are 
being considered. 

President Wilson has issued a procla- 
mation under the authority of an act of 
Congress of October 6, 1917. forbidding 
the importation into the United States 
or its territorial possessions, from Great 
iBriitain, her colonies, possessions and 
protectorates, and from a long list of 
other countries, of various commodities, 
except under license granted by the 
War Trade Board in accordance wuh 
the regulations. The list of commo- 
dities includes vanadium, vanadium ore, 
nickel and nickel ore, chrome and chrome 
ore, titanium and titanium ore, etc., or 
any ferro-alloy or chemical extracted 
therefrom. 



New York 

NEW YORK, Dec. 1. — The United 
States Government is obligated to pay 
$;:!,000,000 for merchant ships, ordnance 
and ammunition. A little more than 
one half of this amount is for big guns 
and projectiles and a little less than 
half is for cargo boats. The official I'e- 
port of the United States Shipping 
Board issued last Monday shows that 
the Emergency Fleet Corporation has 
entered into contracts for 1,310 boats of 
various tonnages for which it will pay 
approximately $1,360,000,000 and con- 
tracts for 99 additional boats of an 
aggregate capacity of 610,000 tons are 
under negotiations which when placed 
will make the total obligations of the 
corporation $1,465,000,000 including the 
ships commandeered as well as those to 
be built and those already under con- 
struction or delivered. 

Shipbuilding Steel Requirements 

The building of the 1,409 boats, in- 
cluding 33 ships already completed and 
released, will require almost 2,300,000 
tons of steel plates and shapes. The 
Navy Dep't is also building- or having 
built battleships, cruisers, torpedo boat 
destroyers and other war craft that will 
require 450,000 tons of plates and 
shapes, or a grand total of 2,750,000 



tons of .steel to carry out the full pro- 
gram of the Shipping Board. 

The 451 ships of steel construction of 
■">, 186,400 tons deadweight will require 
1,062,000 tons of steel, and the 426 ships 
of 3,029,508 tons capacity requisitioned 
require 1,009,508 tons of steel to build. 
The composite and wooden ships that 
are under contract require scarcely more 
than 25,000 tons of steel. Since the re- 
port, some of the 99 ships under negoti- 
ation have been placed under contract. 
These 99 boats will require 204,000 tons 
of steel. 

The Submarine Boat Co. has taken 
additional orders from the government 
for 100 five thousand ton ships, making 
a total of 150 cargo boats to be built at 
Port Newark. The United States Steel 
Corp. has appropriated approximately 
•$18,000,000 for its Southern subsidiary 
plants, half of which will be used in the 
construction of the Chickasaw Ship- 
building plant at Mobile and the other 
$9,000,000 will be expended for exten- 
sions to and the equipment of the Ensley 
plant of the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Rail- 
road Co., made necessary to roll plates 
and .shapes for the ships to be con- 
structed at Mobile. It is estimated that 
about 10,000 tons of structural steel will 
be required for shipways, power plant, 
boiler, machine, metal, joinery and forge 
shops as well as for storehouses and 
office buildings at Mobile. Extensions at 
the Ensley plant will require between 
8,000 and 10,000 tons of shapes. 

The Steel Corpoi-ation originally ap- 
propriated only $6,000,000 for the" Fed- 
eral Shipbuilding plant in the Hacken- 
sack Meadows, but an additional $2,000.- 
000 was appropriated about ten days ago 
and probably several more millions will 
be called for before construction and 
equipment there are completed. 

Munitions Orders and Expenditures 

The U.S. Ordnance Bureau has dis- 
tributed additional orders for 1,250,000 
shells which will require approximately 
106,000 tons of steel rounds and forg- 
ings. The American Brake Shoe & 
Foundy Co. will manufacture 750,000 
155 mm. shells and Westinghouse Elec- 
tric & Manufacturing Co. and the Mc- 
Myler-Interstate Co., of Cleveland, will 
manufacture 500,000 200 mm. shells. 
The Bureau is now distributing orders, 
also, for the machining of 900,000 240 
mm. projectiles. It is understood that 
a large proportion of this business will 
go to the American Car & Foundry Co. 
and to the American Brake Shoe & 
Foundry Co. 

Contracts for the forging of 2,150,000 
shells have already been allotted among 
twelve steel companies and forge shops. 
Since the U.S. entered the war, it is 
estimated that the Ordnance Depart- 
ment has awarded contracts for 60,- 
000,000 shells of various sizes and it is 
expected that contracts for 30,000,000 
additional shells will be placed as soon 
as manufacturing capacity is prepared 
to execute the work for the Government. 
The War Industries Board has allotted 
orders for 50,000 tons of steel plates in- 



642 



CA N A 1> I \ N M \ (• 11 1 N i: i; V 



Volume XVIII, 



cludinjr 22.000 tun* for Italy, and 30.000 
tons of ste*! ihr«t«. of wliiih lO.iXH) 
ton* are for export to Kr«ni-o »n.l Italx. 
Railroad r«|uipmrnt »h.>ps have al.-io 
plairod orilrni for .lO.lXtO tons of titev\ 
for the ronatrui-tion of cam and loco- 
motives for U.S. road*. 



Pittsbiirirh 
piTT.<;BrR(;u. r.i . n,^ j.~The 

finished steel market h:i« heen decidedly 
more active in the month just closed 
than in October. There has been si 
larvrer volump of spe<-itic;itions Btrainst 
old conlmcts and soniewh.it more new 
buyinjr. The new huyini; is iis n rule 
limited by the ubility of mills to miike 
e«rly deliveries. Some of them can take 
on no new business .it .ill. while none 
can fake on niore than limited tonnagres. 

Sheet* Active 

Easily tlie most active branch of the 
pcneral finished steel trade has been the 
sheet market. It Is estimated that the 
independent mills booked about 140,000 
tons, in blue annealed, black and pralvan- 
ized. Of this perhaps one-fourth was 
Government business, although no spe- 
cific tijnires are obtainable. The book- 
ing? were about one-half (rreater than a 
month's output, deliveries running all 
the way from prompt to first half 1918. 
In all cases, so far as can b« learned, 
the Government prices prevailed, on the 
basis of -J. 25c for blue annealed, 5c for 
black and 6.25c for palvanized. The 
Government prices, however, do not ne- 
cessarily apply to exports for peace 
purposes. Next in point of activity has 
been wire products, .\ctivity in these 
lines was due chiefly to the simple cir- 
cumstance that mills were less sold up, 
and buyers less well covered, than was 
the case with most other products, par- 
ticularly the heavy rolled steel materials. 

Market Tone Improved 

There has been a further improve- 
ment in the general tone of the market. 
This doubtless arises in large part from 
the better financial situation and out- 
look, which is improved although not 
perfect. Some close observers date the 
inception of the improvement from the 
time Secretary McAdoo made his state- 
ment, early in November, that the Gov- 
ernment's war ex^)enditures would be 
much less than had been reported, or 
say about ten billion for the fiscal year. 
Some of the stiffening, however, is at- 
tributable to the further curtailment in 
iron and steel production that has oc- 
curred in the past three weeks, due to 
shortage of coke and coal, this being al- 
most entirely a reflection of the traffic 
congestion, particularly in the Pitts- 
burgh district. 

Pig Iron Unobtainable 

Except for occasional odd lots of 
foundry iron which furnaces consent to 
sell to needy and regular customers, no 
pig iron can be bought in this district. 



Reports from the east show a fairly 
iarse volume of busines.s, and evidently 
the eastern districts are not suffering 
from coke shortage a.s much as the Pitts- 
burgh and valley districts, and the Chi- 
cago di.itrict. The majority of mer- 
chant furnaces have been losing produc- 
tion, having to bank for longer' or short- 
er periods on account of not receiving 
sufficient coke. One Shonango valley in- 
terest, with three stJicks. had to bank 
two of them this morning. The steel 
works are suffering as much, as to their 
blast furnaces, as the merchant stacks. 
The Carnegie Steel Co. has been oper- 
ating only -18 of its 59 blast furnaces, 
this being due entirely to traffic conges- 
tion, as it makes all its coke itself. 

W. P. Snyder & Company, who com- 
pute monthly the average price obtain- 
ed for Bessemer and basic iron at val- 
ley furnaces, including all sales of 1,000 
tons or over, report November averages 
at $.36.30 for Bessemer and J.'SS for 
basic, these being the set prices, and 
the same averages obtained for October, 
but while the total tonnage used in the 
October computations was about 100,000 
tons, the November computations in- 
cluded only a very small tonnage. 

Government Buying 

The Government continues to allot 
large tonnages of steel, but details are 
withheld. The placing of shell steel bus- 
iness continues and additional allotments 
are being made of ship steel. A signifi- 
cant item is that while no public an- 
nouncement has been forthcoming, the 
steel trade learns that a fresh canvass 
has been made of the plate situation, to 
determine the feasibility of placing or- 
ders for freight cars to relieve the rail- 
roads. It has been found that on ac- 
count of the large increases in plate 
rolling capacity due to new construction, 
it will be possible to take care of the 
shipbuilding programme as being speed- 
ed up further, and still leave a consider- 
able tonnage of plates for steel car 
building. It seems to be the intention 
to place some large orders, first for loco- 
motives and then for cars, on behalf of 
the domestic roads, the filling of the 
orders to be speeded up under the Gov- 
ernment's priority authority. The Rus- 
sian situation makes it necessary to de- 
fer the filling of orders tentatively 
placed for Russian account, and this re- 
leases some locomotive and ear-building 
capacity. 

The Railroad Pool 

Of much more immediate importance 
than the prospective placing of equip- 
ment orders for early delivery to the 
railroads is the agreement reached one 
week ago to-day to pool all the rail- 
roads east of Chicago. The operation 
of the pool is placed in the hands of 
seven railroad officials, known as the 
General Operating Committee of the 
Eastern Railroads. The committee 
reached Pittsburgh on Tuesday and 
opened offices in three rooms in the 
Union Arcade (where these letters are 
written). Wednesday it issued half a 
dozen orders to the railroads of sweep- 
ing significance. Next day, Thanksgiv- 



ing Itay. it kept at work. Friday it mov- 
ed into larger quarters, ten rooms, ami 
today, Saturday, it worked to 7..'!0 p.m., 
to resume work Sumlay morning at 111 
o'clock. 

The early orders issued were directed 
chiefly to clearing the congestion in the 
Pittsburgh district, all through tralfic 
east ami west being embargoed and or- 
dered to iiroeeed by lines north or south 
of Pittsburgh. The I'cnnsylvania's 
"Broaiiway Limited," the crack 20-hour 
train between New York and Chicago, 
was ordered discontinued. The "Fast 
Freight" lines were ordered iliseonlinu- 
cd and put on regular freight schedules. 
Various other measures were taken. 

These strenuous measures taken to re- 
lieve the situation in the "Pittsburgh 
gateway" may result in congestion else- 
where, but the significant thing is that 
it has been the congestion in the Pitts- 
burgh district that has been the chief 
factor in curtailing iron and steel pro- 
duction below the physical capacity of 
furnaces and mills. The coke shortage 
has been almost entirel.v of Connells- 
ville coke, and the major part of the 
Connellsville coke production should 
pass to or through the Pittsburgh dis- 
trict. As to coal shortage, this has been 
felt chiefly by steel mills in the Youngs- 
town district, and mo.st of the coal for 
those mills must pass through the Pitts- 
burgh district. 

Presumably the measures being tak- 
en by the General Operating Committee 
will have important results, and if there 
are results they will be chiefly by way 
of the congestion in the Pittsburgh dis- 
trict being relieved, and larger produc- 
tion of pig iron and steel should result 
very shortly. 

• a— 

EXPORTING TO THE ORIENT 

THE Manitoba Rolling Mills Co., Win- 
nipeg, recently secured a large order 
from the Orient for iron and steel bars. 
This is required for repair and upkeep 
of railway equipment, as well as in ship- 
yards and engineering trades of China 
and Japan. This is the start of what 
will probably develop into a large ex- 
port business between Western Canada 
and the Orient. The Manitoba Rolling 
Mill Co. have only been operating for 
the last eighteen months, and during 
that time their output has increased un- 
til to-day it approximates 2,000 tons per 
month of finished product. This com- 
pany is rolling high quality bar iron 
and steel, rolling the steel from new 
electric steel billets. They are supply- 
ing considerable tonnage to be used in 
connection with wooden shipbuilding in 
Canada, for the upkeep of railway roll- 
ing equipment and engineering trades, 
as well as for use in the manufacture 
of agricultural implements. They have 
also disposed of large tonnages of rein- 
forcing steel used in the construction of 
grain elevators and general building 
work. Further tonnages are shipped 
through wholesale hardware and black- 
smith supply jobbers for general farm 
and blacksmith purposes. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A 1) 1 A N M A C U I N E R Y 



69 



,l,j,l,,l,lll,l,llllll,lll,|{|{|<ll|{|llll{||{l|{|l|lll|l|l|{|lllllll|l|l|l|||||||l|||||{|||!|||||||||{|illl^^ 




THE Fast!! 



Radials in Stock 



2-6-fL BERTRAM, speed-box drive, | 

tapping attachment. g 

1 -5-ft. REED PRENTICE, speed-box | 

drive, tapping attachment. NEW 1 

1-4-ft. BERTRAM, plain. | 

1— 3-ft. DRESES MUELLER, cone | 

drive. 1 

\-2'4-k. FOSDICK, heavy duty, | 

speed-box drive, tapping attachment. = 

NEW. I 



'ia.TOOLCO.Cli 



Prices and Full Particulars on 
Request. 



STREET = 



I A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., Limited "'^^^^ronto 

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^ijir WHY? 

First: Because in our Extractor, 
we use a steel of different an- 
alysis than that in the taps 
themselves. Second: Because it is 
not tempered the same, for taps 
have to be left exceedingly hard 
in order to maintain their cut- 
tinij edge and they are there- 
fore brittle. Third: Because the 
Fingers of our Extractors are 
further from the axis of the tap 
than is any solid portion of the 
tap itself and they thus have a 
greater leverage in their favor; 
and Fourth: Because they are 
shaped to fit the grooves of the 
tap, using, therefore, the great- 
est amount of material. 

Write for particulars of 60- 
day trial offer. 




THE WALTON COMPANY 

HARTFORD, CONN. 




H^Ba ^^te Boiler I > 

EM 



Rave 8 to 20% of fuel — and increa.'=e the 
efficiency of your plant. The Morehead 
System takes condensation from steam 
lines and returns it to the boilers as pure, 
HOT feed water. Better service from 
steam lines — actually increases efficiency 

of steam heated 
m a c h i n e r y . 
M any users 
report that steam 
heated equipment 
is made to pro- 
duce 50% ,£;rcater 
volume. Ask us 
to send literature. 

CANADIAN MOREHEAD MFG. COMPANY 

Dept. "L" WOODSTOCK, ONT. 




If any advertisemevt interests you, fear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



70 



Volum,' Will. 



INDUSTRIAL \ CONSTRUCTION NEWS 

Establishment or Enlargement o( Factories, Mills. Power Plants. Etc.; Construc- 
lion of Railways. Bridges. Etc.; Municipal Undertakings; Mining News 



1 NulM I RIN(J 

l'opp«r l"li». Onl— Thp fiin;iilinn 
Copper Co. are having plons propnrvil 
for $10,000 onc-storcy brick machino 
.•ihop. 

.Amhrntl, N.S. — The IntiTiuitionnl En- 
j;im>t>rinK Co. contemplato the erection 
of a $-1,000 aitilition to their mouUlinR 
5hop. 

.\rnprior. t)nt. — It is reportetl that 
M. J. l>'BrHM». of Renfrew. conlemplBles 
e»Uibli!<hinjr an industry here in the 
.spring. 

St. .Vnlhony. N.B. — The forge shop 
owned by Philip Melanson was com- 
pletely desUo>-p<l by tire with a loss of 
S25.0O0. 

Toronto. — The ClulT Ammunition Co. 
has taken out a permit to build a steel 
store house at 27 Atlantic avenue, to 
cost $20,000. 

Toronto, Ont. — The Dunlop Tire uml 
Rubber Co. have been prranted a perm i I 
10 build an addition to the power hou.-^e 
on Booth Ave., to cost $5..'i00. 

SL Mary's. Ont.— W. W. Porter. De- 
troit, is lookinjr for a site at St. M:iry".*. 
where he proposes to build a plant for 
the manufacture of farm tractors. 

Strathroy. Ont.— The St. .\ndrew'.s 
Wire Works of Canada. Ltd.. has se- 
cured a building at Strathroy, Ont.. 
which it will remodel and equip for the 
manufi»cture of wire products, etc. G. M. 
HaMane is local manairer. 

Brant ford. — Fire destroyed the brass 
foundry of Charles Lake, 46 West 
Street, at an early hour on November 
30. The cause of the fire is unknown. 
The foundry, a frame and brick building. 
was burned to the ground. 

Paris. Ont. — A bad fire occurred at 
the McFarlane Engineering Works here 
on Nov. 27, when damage to the amount 
of $5,000 was done. A large building 
was nearly destroyed, besides a con- 
siderable amount of machinery, electric 
motor, etc.. being damaged. 

Niagara Falls, Ont. — The building a: 
Niagara Falls, jointly occupied by the 
Davis-Bournonville Co. and the Davis 
Acetylene Co., has been taken over by 
the former company and will be oper- 
ated exclusively for the manufacture of 
oxy-acetylene apparatus for the Cana- 
dian trade. 

Trenton. Ont. — An explosion at the 
British Chemical Co. plant here did con- 
siderable damage last Friday. The ex- 
plosion occurred in a small separate 
building known as the "solvent recovery" 
department. WTiat the cause was has 
not yet been ascertained, but it was 
probably due to chemicals forming an 
explosive compound. 

Cobalt. Ont. — It is understood that 
plans are now under way for the de- 
velopment of electric power at Big Bend 



Kall» to supply CowRunda ami the now 
district of Matchewan. The Big Bend 
Falls are capiiblo of devclopinK between 
.■),000 and 6.000 hor.sp-power, which 
would undoubtedly supply all the power 
that Ctowgandn will requiiv for .-icvoral 
years and take rare of any mines dc- 
vclcipini: in tln' .Matchewan district. 

Hntckville. Out.— The chief engincci 
of the Ontario Hydro-Electric Commis- 
sion has informed the local utilities com- 
mission that Brockville will soon be 
linked up with the Ontario systems 
through the transmission of 10,000 horse 
power from the Cc<lar Rapiils Transmis- 
sion Co.. which at present is developing 
and supplying from sixty thousand to 
eighty thousand horse power to alum- 
inum and other works at Masscna, X.Y. 

Port .Vrlhur, Ont, — Tt was announced 
recently that tlio property of the Conley 
Frog & Switch Works, Port .\rthur, has 
been sold to the Terminal Land Co. This 
was the property on which the Conley 
company commenced the construction of 
a factory before the war and later ceas- 
ed operations pending less troubled 
times. J. R. Smith, president of the 
Terminal Land Co., stated that import- 
tant developments are planned on this 
property. It is understood Mr. Smith 
has acquired certain machinery with 
which he intends to equip the plant. 

Niagara Falls, Ont.— Excellent pro- 
gress is now being made on the Chip- 
pawa Hydro-electric Power Canal, and 
the preliminary work has got well under 
way. The construction railway which 
will carry away the material excavated 
has been completed from the Whirlpool 
to the power-house, and the rest of the 
line is being pushed forward. At the 
present time operations are being cen- 
tred on the erection of a concrete bridge 
for the Niagara, St. Catharines & Tor- 
onto Railway tracks at Stamford. This 
is only one of about thirty bridges which 
will have to be built. The engineers are 
filline in a great many ravines around 
the Niagara River with the earth taken 
out in excavating the canal. 



GENERAL 

Quebec, Que.— The J. B. Drolet Co. 
will build a factory here to cost $20,000j 

Orillia.— Fire on Nov. 2.5 destroyed 
the Carss Mackinaw Go's, factory, the 
total loss being estimated at $40,000. 

Montreal, Que.— The A. R. Whittall 
Can Co. will build an extension to thei: 
factory at a cost of $2.5,000. 

Port Arthur. Ont.— The Saskatchewan 
Co-operative Elevator Co. will construct 
a new elevator on the Port Arthui" 
north and waterfront at a cost of 
$4.50,000. It is to be ready to handle 
the crop of 1918. The unloading capacity 
will be twelve cars per hour and ship; 



|)ing capacity to the boats -t.i.OOO bush- 
els per hour. The Canadian Northern 
Elevator "B" will be rebuilt during the 
winter at a cost of $500,000. 



MUNICIPAL 

l.i'thhridge, .Mta. The ("ity Wouncil 
contemplate the installation of power 
plant equipment costing $6.'!.000. 

Sarnia. Ont. — The Sarnia Gas Co. is 
notifying all industrial users that the 
supply will be shut off on December 15, 
The supply from the Tilbury and Dover 
fields is rapidly diminishing, and before 
long citizens as well as manufacturers 
may have to revert to coal and woo<l. 
The coal situation here at present is not 
encouraging. 

Toronto. — Tenders, addressed to the 
Secretary-Treasurer, Board of Educa- 
tion, will be received until December lo, 
for all trades in the erection of a new 
12-room school building, annex, at Queen 
Alexandra public school. Specifications 
may be seen and all information obtain- 
ed at the office of the Superintendent of 
Buildings, 155 College Street. 

Montreal. Que. — The Board of Control 
has resolved to cancel the contract 
awarded to the Cook Construction Co.. 
in July, 191.S, for the enlargement of the 
city aqueduct at a cost of .$2,2,'?2,000. 
The work is less than one-half com- 
pleted. Both parties agreed to arbitrate 
their claims and counter-claims which, 
as originally submitted, amounted to one 
million and three quarters on each side. 

Toronto, Ont. — President S. A. Arm- 
strong, of the Canadian N'u-Fuel Co., has 
submitted proposals to the Board of 
Control for utilizing the city garbage 
and refuse in the manufacture of fuei 
and other products. One proposal is 
that the city operate its own plant on a 
royalty basis and the other is to have 
the plant operated by the company, the 
city to furnish the garbage and other 
concessions to be the subject of an 
agreement. It was exolained that cans 
and iron would be taken care of by a 
melting furnace, rags and cloth would 
be sterilized in an automatic laundry, 
all bottles would be washed and steriliz- 
ed, broken glass will be ground and sold 
back to the glass manufacturers, gi-ease 
would be extracted from free garbage, 
and the balance of the garbage manu- 
factured into Oakoal. 



PERSONAL 

B. J. Lanigan. secretary-treasurer of 
the Calgary Iron Works, was married 
recently to Miss Winnifred Colgan. 

Captain George L. Magann. son of 
George P. Magann, railway supplies con- 
tractor, who resides on Dowling avenue. 
Toronto, has been wounded. He w.-is 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A 1) I A N MAC li I N E K ^' 



71 




SIZES 



3/" 



TO 6' AT A U.S. ARSENAL 



THI8 illustrates only one of the groups 
of (ieoinetrie Collapsing Taps that have 
gone into United States Arsenals and 
Navy Yards to bear out the reputation that 
attaches to all CTeometric Thread Cutting 
Tools. 

These taps are equipped with the roughing 
and finishing attachment, a feature of 
G^eometric Taps that are required for close 
work. 

A micrometer scale adjusts them for a tight 
Of loose thread. Because of the adjustable 



feature, Geometric Taps always produce;- 
accurate threads, no matter how often the- 
chasers have been ground. 
When ground beyond further use, the chas- 
ers may be replaced, while the ta]) remains 
as good as new. 

Chasers recede automatically when the re- 
quired depth of thread is reached. 
Geometric Collapsing Taps can be fitted to 
Screw Machine or Turret Lathe, also live 
spindle. 

AVliy not put your tapping proposition up 
to a Geometric? 



THE GEOMETRIC TOOL COMPANY 



NEW HAVEN 



CONNECTICUT 



Canadian Agents: 

Williams «?c Wilson, Ltd., Montreal. The A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Lttl., Toronto, Winnipeg, St. John, N.B. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



J| 



C.\ N A I) 1 A N M AC II 1 N K IJ V 



Volume Win. 



HAWK D 
CHROME 

VANADIUM 
ST£E 




Shell Forging 

Production 

WITHOUT AN EQUAL FOR 
BOTH FIRST AND 
SECOND OPERATION 
PUNCHES. 

Comes to you beat-treated 

and ready for use. 

It does not stick to the 

work. 

There are many cases where 

each punch has turned out 

over 2.000 shells. 

It means more shells, per 

machine per day. 

STEEL OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 

Hawkridge Brothers 
Company 

303 Congress St., BOSTON, MASS. 
U. S. A. 



THE IRON WORICS 

LIMITED 
Saccessors to '• - 

Owen Sound iron 
Works 

Owen Sound, j 
Ont. 



Ensineers 

Boiler- 
makers 

Founders 

Machinists 



formerly an olllcer in the r2th Battery, 
of which Col, l.oonnrti of London wni! 
tin- olliccr ronimunilin);. 

Walirr C. TiMiitlt', of Toronto, pre.ii- 
.iiMt of tho Imprriiil Oil Co.. hns boon 
lU'fti'd prt'.tidcnt of the Standard Oil 
To. Mr. To:nfli> was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, in 1S7S. Ho was uppoiiitod prosi- 
>lont of tho Imporial Oil Co. in 1918, 
And prosidonl of tho International Pf- 
iroloum Co. in 1915. 

l-'licht-Liout. Lloyd M. Archibald, 
Royal Klyintr Corps, No. 100 Squadron, 
Franco, is now a prisoner of war in 
(Jorniany. Ho was formorly reported 
niissintr since Oct. -4. He went ovor- 
soas in October, 1916, coniplotintr his 
traininir with the R. F. C. in Knjrland. 
For a tinio ho was a niirht pilot, patrol- 
linjr tho North Soa, and about tho Isl of 
October this year left for Franco, where 
he was a pilot, bonibinjr at nijrht. Ho is 
twonty-four years old, was born in Nova 
Scotia, but was educated in Toronto, ami 
before enlistinjr w-as a coast to coast 
traveller with the Dart Union Co., Tor- 
onto. 



TRADE GOSSIP 

Mcl.ain System. Inc., 906 Goldsmith 
HuililitiK', Milwaukee, Wis., has changed 
its name to the McLain-Carter Furnace 
Co. Oil fired open-hearth and metal 
nieltinir furnaces will be the company's 
specialties. 

Hritish MaRnoto Output. — .MthouKh 
before the outbreali of the war the out- 
put of British maprnetos was not more 
than 100 a week, since the war no fewer 
than 16.'),000 majjnetos are said to have 
been produced in Great Britain. 

TuHRsten Situation Unchanged. — Con- 
ditions in the tungsten market are not 
materially altered. Europe continues to 
be a buyer in the South American mar- 
ket, and is offering high prices. Wolfram- 
ite ranges betiveen $23 to $26 as to 
grade. Scheelite continues firm at $26. 
Foss Machinery and Supply Co. — The 
firm of Foss & Hill Machinery Co., of 
Montreal, has been dissolved. Geo. F. 
Foss has bought out the interests of 
Mr. Hill who has been associated with 
the firm for the past 12 years. The 
new company will be known as the Foss 
^lachinery & Supply Co. 

The Calgary Iron Works, Calgary, 
have completed a contract for shells and 
are now engaged upon the production of 
parts for the "Bull" tractors. These 
parts include wheels, gears, pinions, 
pistons, etc., such as are used on the 
larger sizes of oil, gas and steam trac- 
tors. 

To Fi.x Price of Silver. — Negotiations 
are proceeding in London between Great 
Britain and the United States with a 
view to fixing the price of silver for the 
year, according to .-Andrew Bonar Law, 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, who made 
an announcement to this effect in the 
House of Commons recently. He said 
he thought it possible an agreement 
would be reached. 

Dominion Customs Revenue. — Customs 
receipts for the eight months of the 
fiscal year closing Nov. P,0 aggregate 
$115,324,907, as compared with $94,728,- 



997 for the corresponding period last 
year, an increase of $20,595,909. For 
Novi'nibor alone receipts wore $12,949,- 
(il2, an increase of $746,092, as compared 
with November, 1916. 

Now Metal From Nelson, B.C. — A 
Scottish scientist has discovered a new 
metal which is believed to belong to the 
platinum group. It is called by him 
canadium. He has obtained a few grams 
per ton in the pure state by treatment 
of certain rocks found in Nelson, B.C. 
There is some anticipation that the new 
metal will find industrial uses, especially 
hy jewelers. 

HIanUot Insurance Expired. — On Doc. 
2 at midnight all marine insurance of 
the blanket nature became void, but 
many companies continue to insure their 
boats by the trip. Many companies 
carry their own insurance, and these 
may operate until the ice closes the loek.i 
at the Soo. Vessel men, made optimistic 
by the unusually mild weather, are hop- 
ing for one or more round trips yet. The 
majority, however, of the small boats 
are now in winter quarters. 

Two Vessels Launched at Poison's. — 
Two steel fishery protection vessels were 
launched at the Poison Iron Works, To- 
ronto, on November 27. Although no in- 
vitations were issued, a large number of 
persons were present to witness the 
ceremony, which took place v;ithout any 
misha,p. The engines and boilers are 
ready to be fitted up immediately, and 
it is anticipated the boats will be able toi 
pass down the St. Lawrence before navi- 
gation closes. The vessels were not 
named, but are numbered T.R. 15 and 
T.R. 16 respectively. 

New Zealand Wants (iuicksilver.— ■ 
The New Zealand Government has offer- 
ed a bonus of 8 cents per pound for the 
first 100,000 pounds of retorted quicK- 
silver that the mines of New Zealand 
produce, under the; condition that at 
least one half of the quantity is pro- 
duced on or before March 31, 1920, and 
the remaining half before March 31, 
1921. It is reported that there are sev- 
eral rich deposits in the Dominion of 
Canada, but that little has been done as. 
yet for lack of fufficient capital. 

Freight Service Over Quebec Bridge. 
— The service of the car ferry steamer 
Leonard between Quebec and Levis was 
suspended on Monday, and freight cars 
will run over the Quebec bridge, which 
will greatly expedite shipments. It is 
stated that the steamer Leonard may 
be sold for service in the Straits of 
Canso. It is also announced that within 
two weeks passenger trains will be run- 
ning over the bridge, and Canadian 
Government railroad schedules from 
Montreal eastward will be changed in 
consequence. 

Economy in Tin-Plate. — Manufactur- 
ers of food products are warned by the 
Food Controller for Canada that the use 
of tin-plate must be curtailed in every 
possible way. So serious is the situa- 
tion that the United States has prohibit- 
ed exportation, except under license. No 
export licenses will be granted for uses 
other than for the manufacture of food- 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MA C II I N E R Y 



73 




v^^. 







THE RIGHT TOOLS 

when you need them most. 

ILLINOIS TOOLS 

denote a progress in tool making that keeps pace 
with the increased demands upcn your machines. 

Canadian Representative: 
Allan B. Wearing, C. P. R. Bldg., Toronto, Ont. 





ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS. CHICAGO, U.S. A. 



74 



CAN VIM \ N \i A (' II I N r i; ^■ 



Vohinio XVIU. 



Prompt Deliveries 

on Cnuge*, Tools, DioR, Jiits 
and Fixtures. 

Special Machinery 

CUT GEARS 

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Normac Machine Co. 

55 Vin* Str«««. St. C«lh«rinvB. Oat. 



BERTRAMS LIMITED 

Kngin*et« 
Scicnne.. EDINBURGH 

PAPER MILL MACHINERY 

• nd 

MACHINE TOOLS lor IRON WORKERS 

Cataloguat offered to Purchlltrra. 



a 



OVENS 



a 

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2 SBUDfllDf and TarnLOilnp Ot^iu hoatM « 

5 ' bj G»». Crctncitj. Str«m or Co»l. „ 

n \Vrit« tot Bookl.u ^ 

ti Brantford Ofta A Raok Cs.. Ltd. 

■ i;rnnlfor«l. CanaiLl. 

■ uanBDBnBDMnHnanBa*nH □■'.:■ 



A Salesman Always 
on the Job 

IT is the constant dropping that wear* 
the stone away. It is the constant 
knocking at the door of attention and 
favor that in the end gives you ready 
access to the good-will of buyers of your 
merchandise. 

Yon ca.n keep up a constant knocking^ — • 
bid for attention, a reminder of yourself, 
a spokesman of your message — this by 
using regularly 

The FARMER'S 

MAGAZINE 

N* man whose customers and should-be 
euitomers are farmers should be absent 
from their attention. Their will and pur- 
pose to buy may mature at any time. The 
nlesman on the spot stands the best 
ehance to get the order. 
All this Tou know, but — do you live up to 
the behest of your knowledge t 
Let us tell you more about The Farmer's 
Magazine in a special letter. 

yj. — Objectionable adiertUing not 
accepted. Both editorial and adter- 
tiMno columnt are ologelu censored 
to keep them cl^an and decent. 

PablUhmd by 

The MacLean Publishing Co., Limited 

143'153 UniTertitr Avenae, Toronto, Ontario 



I'oiitainors. exci-pl on satisfactory evi- 
.lonce thitt tho philo will bo used in such 
It way as to fill tho military iiooiis of thi' 
.Mliivi. Troforonco will bo jrivoii to ap- 
plications that have to do with war food 
i-mitracts. 

.'>luiiiloHH Sl4'ol .MiikiiiK SliM'pt'd. — Ir. 
MOW of tho ililUoultio.s in jtoltinvr sup- 
plies of forroi-hromo in Groat Hritain. 
tho mniuifaoturo of stainless stool for 
(Utiory jiurposos has boon prohibited by 
a rojriilation rocontly issued to maiiu 
facturors, acconliiijr to U, S, Consul 
.lohn M. SavaKo at ShonU'ld, Kn^'iand. 
Tho roirulation goos on to state that fcr- 
roohromo must only l>o used in connoi-- 
lion with high speed oruciblo carbon 
stool and alloy stool and in tho case of 
tho lattor only whcro a )n-iority certifi- 
cate or other pormit number has beor 
obtained which will warrant tho manu- 
facturo of tho stool in iiuoslion. 

New Concern Develops Hematite 
Mines. — Tho prcvailintr high prices of 
henintito iron ore of good quality has 
slimulatod this class of mining in On- 
tario and Quebec. Ono of the companies 
recently incorporated in Canada is the 
Canadian Union Iron Minos Corporation, 
Montreal, with a capital stock of $1,000,- 
000, which intends opening deposits near 
Sutton, Que., where hematite iron ore 
has been uncovered analyzing 68 per 
cent. meUillic iron. This company has 
already commenced operations at an- 
other mine near Perth, Ont., from which, 
it is said, there were several thousand 
tons of iron ore taken a few years ago. 

Urges .Survey of Power in Canada. — 
At the Dominion Conservation Commis- 
sion annual meeting in Ottawa on Nov. 
28, A. B. White, C.E., read a paper urg- 
ing that nothing be done to alienate 
power rights on the St. Lawrence Jlivcr 
until a comprehensive survey had been 
made. Sir John Kennedy, consulting en- 
gineer of the Montreal Harbor Com- 
mission, believed that a scheme of de- 
velopment should be agreed upon by an 
engineering commission and then handed 
over to a joint commission, such as the 
International Waterways Commission. 
He favored Government development. 
R. A, Ross, a Hydro-Electric engineer, 
from Montreal, agreed, and also advo- 
cated a scientific survey of the whole of 
Canada's power and undeveloped energy. 

Lake Steamers for Overseas Trade. — 
An important part of the work of the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries at 
present is concerned with the transfer 
of steamers formerly employed in trad- 
ing on the Great Lakes to the overseas 
trade. Some of the larger lake steamers 
had to be taken through the canals in 
two sections. It was announced recent- 
ly by an official of the department that 
ten steamers hitherto employed in trad- 
ing on the lakes have already gone or 
are going to the overseas trade. One 
steamer, of full canal size, built at the 
Poison Iron Works, Toronto, for Nor- 
wegian interests, is going out in a few 
days and another large steamer, built 
by the Thor Iron Works, also of Tor- 
onto, has been sold to France, and will 
be readv for ocean service shortly. 

To Cut Down Non-Essential Trades 



in V. Sw— The United States Govern- 
ment's first move toward curtailing non- 
ossontial industries during tho war was 
made on Sunday when tho fuel adminis- 
tration sent to coal producers a proforred 
list of consumers to serve as a tniile in 
tilling orders. Tho list osiUiblishoK pro 
forontial shipment for (lovornmont or- 
ders of railway fuel, household rociuire- 
inents, public utilities, stool plants, coke 
ovens an<l munition plants. F;icing a 
loal shorUiKo of fifty million tons for the 
country, the fuel adminis;tration is de- 
tcrniine<l that a radical slo^p was neces- 
sary if essential industries and public 
utilities were to bo kept running. It 
turned down suggestions that a list of 
non-essential industries and i)ul)lic utili 
ties whore coal should be denied and 
established instead the i)re<'erontial list 
as less likely to injure the banking' 
•irodit of concerns which it is considered 
certain will suffer. 



TENDERS 

Toronto, Ont. — Tenders will bo receiv- 
ed, addressed to the Chairman, Board of 
Control, City Hall, Toronto, up to .lan- 
uary 15, 1918, for the construction of a 
drainage system (wrought iron pipe) 
for the Don Bridge, Bloor Street Via- 
duct. Specifications and forms of ten- 
der may be obtained upon application at 
the Bloor Street Viaduct Field Office, 89 
Castle Frank Road. 

Ottawa, Ont. — Tenders will be re- 
ceived until D|ccmber 17 for the electric 
conduits, outlaid and fittings required in 
the reconstru<ilion of the Parliament 
Building. All tenders to be based on the 
supplying and delivering on the site of 
the quantities of the schedule of ma- 
teri^il for electric conduit, outlets and 
fittings, in strict conformity with the 
specifications and the samples submitted 
and to the satisfaction of the architect. 
Deliveries to commence so far as pos- 
sible immediately after the signing of 
contract and to continue as directed in 
such quantities as to ensure complete 
delivery by March 1, 1918. The schedule 
of material, specification and any other 
information required can be obtained at 
the office of the P. Lyall & Sons Con- 
struction Co., Ottawa. 



CONTRACTS 

Brantford, Ont. — The Roelofson Ele- 
vator Co., of Gait, have been awarded 
the contract for a freight elevator by 
the Kitchen Overall & Shirt Co. of this 
city. 

Toronto. — The Board of Education has 
awarded a contract to the Johnson Tem- 
perature Regulating Co., Toronto, for 
heat regulators at Perth Avenue school 
annex. 

Toronto, Ont. — The Dominion Sewer 
Pipe Co., of Swansea, has been award- 
ed, by the Board of Control, the con- 
tract for the ensuing year's supply of 
sewer pipe. The National Iron Works 
will supply the cast iron pipe. 

Toronto, Ont. — The Hanover Portland 
Cement Co. has been awarded, by the 
Board of Control, the contract for snp- 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



75 



plying' the city with cement next year. 
Their tender was $2.45 a bag, with a 
discount of five cents a bag' for prompt 
payment. 



MARINE 



Montreal. — The 7,000-ton steamer 
Porsang-er, the largest ocean going ves- 
.<e! constructed' in Canada, and built for 
a Norwegian concern, was launched 
from the shipbuilding slip of the Cana- 
dian Vickers Ltd., last Thursday. 

Esquimau, B.C.— The Victoria Whal- 
ing Co.'s steamer Gray, which has been 
on the ways of Yarrows, Ltd., Esquim- 
alt, for the past three weeks, was plac- 
ed in commission on Nov. 22, and will at 
once be placed in service for a cruise 
to the West Coast Whaling stations. The 
damage which the Gray sustained when 
it ran on the reef at Cape Calvert about 
a month ago has been completely re- 
paired, and the job took practically a 
week less than was at first expected. 



BUILDINGS 

Toronto. — Tenders recently received 
by the Board of Education for the con- 
struction of Perth Avenue school annex 
amounted to $92,432 as compared with 
an estimate of $55,000. Tenders will be 
called again for the ornamental ironwork 
as only one firm submitted a bid. 

Toronto, Ont. — It is understood that 
the T. Eaton Co. will not proceed with 
the work in connection with the propos- 
ed store at the corner of Yonge and Coi 
lege Streets. It is said that the contract 
with the Dominion Bridge Co. for the 
steel work has been cancelled. 



INCORPORATIONS 

Laval Chemical Co. has been incor- 
porated at Ottawa by C. F. Laurion, J. 
C. V. Roy and J. A. Guy to manufacture 
chemicals, alcohol, soap, etc. The com- 
pany is capitalized at $100,000 and the 
head office is at Montreal. 

Ottawa Paper Box Co. has been in- 
corporated at Ottawa with a capital of 
$150,000 to manufacture pulp products, 
boxes, etc., at Ottawa, the incorporators 
are A. C. Fleming, W. S. Mackenzie and 
J. E. McVeigh, all of Ottawa. 

Eagle Smelting & Refining Works, 
Ltd., have been incorporated at Ottawa 
by Peter Bercovitch, E. Lafontaine and 
N. Gordon, all of Montreal, to manufac- 
ture, smelt, refine babbitt, solder, brass, 
lead and zinc etc. The company is cap- 
italized at $40,000 and the head office is 
in Montreal. 



CATALOGUES 

. Bennis Machine Stoker is the title of 
a catalogue, on cheap steam and ma- 
chine firing, issued by Ed. Bennis & 
Co., Little Hulton, Bolton, England. 
The introduction to the catalogue deals 
w^ith cheap steam and smokeless chimney 
followed by a description covering the 
construction and operation of the 
"Bennis" patent machine stoker fitted 
with patent pneumatic gear and self 
clearing compressed air furnace. Views 



Subscriptions Invited 
From Friends Abroad 

Canadian Machinery and Manufactur- 
ing News is published weekly. Rep- 
resenting, as it does, the industrial 
life and activities of Canada, it should 
prove of very considerable value to 
those who wish to buy Canadian pro- 
ducts, and to those who may wish to 
sell in Canada. 

As a technical journal it compares very favor- 
ably, we think, with any other high class publica- 
tion, and will be found to be well worth the 
subscription price, and more. 

If you are favorably impressed with this num- 
ber, we think you will find other issues equally 
interesting. Canadian Machinery contains from 
one hundred and twelve to one hundred and 
seventy-eight pages — fifty-two issues in the year. 
We invite subscriptions from our friends abroad, 
and attach a coupon for the sake of convenience. 

Subscription Order Form 



To the Publishers, ^ '.. " . . . '" . 

CANADIAN MACHINERY, 

143 University Ave., ■ ■• 

Toronto, Canada. 

(tentlemen, — 

You may enter our subscription to CANADIAN ^MACHIN- 
KRY for one year, and until ordered discontinued, to be sent to 
address below. We enclose money order covering same. 



Yours truly, 



Name 



Full address 



Citv 



Countv. 



The subscription price to Great Britain and her colonies is 
12s. 6d. United States, $3.50, other countries 16/- per year. 



76 



( \ N A h I \ \ M \ (' II I \ i; i; V 



Deeenilior i;. 1017. 



=KJBO= 

Saves Dollars 




Puro Pays for Itself 

Ten Jro't luTc to mt*. ;c«rs to get back llie 
.Muj>l] inTrctnivnt yuii bare tied up in I'uro 

n^u:l'lTl. 1)! — 

Y' tt once — not only 6ii yonr 
»*: 1 tbc increased efTiciency 

of 11. 

Men I* i i u''-i' < c!fan. Xo danper of 
drCillT Rrrm* Inrkinc in its s^arklinK bubble. 
Writr u*— tfl! how many men. how many de- 
partment*, ami wtf'll till y-^' '■ ■■" nv-i; 'h^ 
cv*t will be lo 

** PURO -FY** 



ni-c iihown of tl»e vurious piirls. ami also 
of instnllutions. The applicutiun of thv 
liciinis stoker under various types of 
boiler is shown by means of reprotluetion 
from sectional ilrawiuKs which show the 
(renernl arrangement of the stoker and 
furnace in each ease. The catalogue also 
eontains reports of two boiler tests with 
I<<-nnis machine stoekers installed. 

Air Squeezers. — Itulletin distributed 
by the Berkshire Mf^'. Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio, illustrates and describes the Berk- 
shire air siiueezer operated by hand or 
power. The machine is illustrated in 
various operatinjr positions. The Berk- 
.-ihire vibrators, (lask fittings and power 
rotary riddle are also mentioned in thi.-; 
Inilletin. 

.Vir Washer. — The Carrier .Mr Condi- 
tioninir Co. of America, Buffalo, N.Y., 
has issued a folder entitled "Look In- 
side for Details" which is so made that 
it shows the actual construction both 
inside and outside of the carrier air 
washer. The folder also states the prin- 
i ip:il features of this air washer. 

Katchct^ and Wrenches. — The Key- 
stone Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y., have is- 
sued a catalogue and price list No. 2') 
dealinji with an interesting line of 
ratchet drills, socket wrenches, tap 
wrenches and stud drivers, adjustable 
wrenches, taper sleeves, steel sockets, 
drilling posts, etc. The catalogue is 
fully illustrated. 

Tumblers and Dust Arresters is the 
title of a new cataloj:ue No. 132 issued 
by the Whiting Foundry Equipment 
Co., Harvey, 111. The catalo.a;ue con- 
tains a detailed description covering the 
construction of one class of tumbler and 
briefly refers to other types. Dry and 
water cinder mills and dust arresters 
are also mentioned at some length. The 
catalogue is fully illustrated and con- 
tains tables of dimensions covering the 
products described. 



Mialion contained in this volume which 
will prove of very great value to those 
interested in the motor industry and 
trade. 



YOUR WATER SUPPLY 

Puro Sinilary Drinliig Fountain Ccmpany 
147 University Me., Toronto, Cinadi 



'Barnes-Made' 

Springs 

are anusual in 
service and wear. 




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experience, unsur- 
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worknaanship. 

A trial will convince yon that 
"Barnes-Made" Springs are the 
best buy. 

established 1»Z 

THE WALL\CE BARNES COMPANY 

218 South St.. Bristol. Ct.. U.S.A. 
ManTrs of "Bames-made" Product* 

Sp«Tn<»,Scre*. MjMilunc Products Cold RollcJ Steel And Wire 



BOOK REVIEW 

Motor. Marine and Aircraft Red Book, 

1917. — 439 pages and numerous illustra- 
tions. Publi.shed by the Technical Pub- 
lishing Co., London, England. Price 
.5/6, ($1.40). This is the seventh edition 
of a year book published under a new 
name more in keeping with its extended 
field. This volume contains an abund- 
ance of information pertaining to motor 
cars and their manufacturers, motor 
cycles, commercial and agricultural 
motors, marine motors, aircraft, etc., 
together with full information relating 
to the legislation necessitated by the 
war as affecting motor, aircraft and 
allied industries. The information has 
been collected and made easily access- 
ible concerning internal combustion en- 
gines, steam engines and electric motors. 
Special attention has also been paid to 
the use of motors in agriculture and 
horticulture, and in the municipal and 
public services. The book contains nine 
sections and a dictionary of technical 
terms in five languages, the latter being 
introduced to further the interests of 
the export trade. It is not possible to 
give particulars of all important infor- 



1& 

B.C. SI'IU'CK l't)K AlKI'LANKS 

'i'ho survi'y of tlie forcsl resources of 
British Columbia, upon wliicli the Com- 
mission of Conservation has been en- 
gaged for tlio past four years, has 
proved of striking immediate value in 
the prosecution of the war. The Im- 
perial Munitions Board, which has de- 
finitely taken ii\ hand tlie organization 
of airplane manufai'ture, found itself in 
ininu'diate need of large (|uantilies of 
airplane spruce, and the Commission 
was able, as a result of its survey, to 
furnish the board with specific informa- 
tion as to the location and ownership of 
all the large bodies of spruce in British 
Columbia suitable for that purpose. The 
fact that this information had previous- 
ly been collected enabled the Munitions 
Board to take up without delay the mat- 
ter of securing the necessary supplies of 
this vitally important material. 

Steps are being taken to increase the 
production of airplane spruce bejp)nd all 
limits previously thought possible. 

This is but another example of the 
vital importance of Canada's natural re- 
sources in winning the war. Many ex- 
perts hold that the best prospect for 
definitely and overwhelmingly maintain- 
ing the supremacy of the allies is in 
connection with the war in the air. This 
involves the manufacture of many thous- 
ands of airplanes, toward which the most 
intense efforts of the Allies are being 
directed. The most suitable species of 
wood for this purpose is Sitka or silver 
spruce, of which gi-eat quantities are to 
be found on the Pacific coast of North 
America. Canada's share of this timber 
is very large, and is considered so im- 
portant in the prosecution of the war 
that its export, except under license, has 
recently been prohibited by the Govern- 
ment to all destinations abroad other 
than the United Kingdom, British pos- 
sessions and protectorates. 

© 

MINERAL CONSERVATION ADVO- 
CATED 

AT the annual meeting of the Domin- 
ion Commission of Conser-vation held in 
Ottawa last week Sir Clifford Sifton 
stated that: "No serious attempt has 
been made to grapple with the problem 
of preventing the serious and irrepar- 
able waste which is constantly going 
on in the mining of our coal areas. Pro- 
vision for inspection to prevent the loss 
of human life has been made by the 
provinces; but the permanent waste of 
very large quantities of valuable coal 
still goes on." 

The war has stimulated mineral pro- 
duction in many lines, including copper, 
nickel, asbestos, zinc, silver, lead, 
chromite, cobalt, pig iron and graphite. 

"The establishment at Shawinigan 
Falls of an electrolytic process for re- 
covering metallic magnesium from 
magnesite has greatly stimulated the 
production of this mineral. Magnesium 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A 1 ) I A X .M A CHIN E R Y 



77 



is used in connection with the war for 
the manufacture of star shells and 
flares, and as an alloy with aluminum 
in the manufacture of aeroplane parts. 

© 

( ANADA'S TRADE GROWS RAPIDLY 

AN increase of approximately $27.3,000,- 
000 for the first seven months of the 
fiscal year ending with October, as com- 
pared with a similar period last year, 
is shown in the trade statement for Octo- 
ber, just issued. For the seven months 
ihe trade in the Dominion totalled .$1,- 
■'i86, 616,258, as compared with $1,.313,- 
189,951 last year. For the month of 
October alone, Canada's trade amounted 
fo $2.38,834,321. In October, 1918, it 
ajTjrregated $164,330,179. 

Exports of domestic goods for the 
seven months were to the value of $922,- 
195,134, as compared with $622,049,481 
last year. These figures include coin 
and bullion. Imports for the seven- 
month period amounted to $636,749,263. 
During the seven-month period last year 
imports aggregated $483,132,928. Duti- 
able goods were to the value of $346,- 
108,703, on which the customs collections 
amounted to $102,106,365. Free goods 
imported were to the value of $281,992,- 
l»97. During the same period in 1916. 
dutiable goods worth $204,530,818 were 
brou,ght into Canada, and $82,177,312 
was collected in customs duties. Free 
iioods importations were valued at $207,- 
630,667. 

Manufactured goods to the value of 
$420,380,372 were exported, a big in- 
crease as compared with last year, when 
domestic manufactures to the value of 
$219,461,054 were shipped out of the 
country. 

Agricultural products hold second 
place in value at .$.306,159,775, as com- 
pared with $233,448,260 last year. Ani- 
mals and their products to the value of 
$101,681,970 were exported as against 
$67,101,478 for the seven-month period 
last year. 

@ 

COAL-GAS IN AUTOMOBILES NOT 
TO BE RESTRICTED 

THE British Minister of Munitions has 
informed the Automobile Association 
that so long as the gas is conveyed in 
bags, at or slightly above atmospheric 
pressure, and is not compressed in steel 
cylinders, it is not considered that at the 
present time there is any need on general 
grounds' of restricting the use of coal- 
gas for motor purposes, though should 
motorists use coal-gas on any consider- 
able scale it may, in the interests of 
national requirements, become neces- 
sary at some future time to impose cer- 
tain restrictions on its use. 

© 

TURNING BRASS GRAY 

BRASS is turned gray by using a solu- 
tion of Vz ounce of potassium sulphide 
in 1 gallon of water applied when the 
work is cold. If the brass is heated to 
a temperature of 100 deg. F. the color 
begins to darken and at 180 deg. F. 
it changes to black. 



PATENT 
ATTORNEYS 



Scandinavia 
Belting 




RESEARCH BUREAU 

REPORTS BY EXPERTS ON SCIENTIFIC, "ECH- 

NICAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT. 

SPECIAL RESEARCHES ARRANGED. 

PATENTS. TRADE MARKS, ETC. 



HANBURY A. BUDDEN 
?12 DRUMMOND Bl_DG.. MONTREAL 



Cable Address 
"BREVE"^" 



PATENTS 



TRADEMARKS 
AND DESIGNS 



PROCURED IN ALL COUNTRIES 
Special Attention given to Patent Litigation 
Pamphlet sent free on application. 

RIDOUT & MAYBEE 59 Yonge street 
TORONTO. CANADA 



n 



PoBTABlIPlAiiftr' 
"DRAW CUT SHAPtRS 
''SPKIAl DRAW tUT R R SMAPtRS"^ 
''FINISMtO MACMINt KEYS'' 

fSTATIONflRTS.PaRTABLtKtTWAYCUTTtHS'l 
ISPCCIAL LOCOMOTIVE CYLINOERPLANtRSl 



orricc ""WORKS; MUSKCGON nimji u s a 




After tne war 
What? 



Few can predict — yet all can prepare! 
Our present prosperity rests in part on 
an artificial basis which peace must re- 
move. Now is the time to consolidate 
your position by regulating your expendi- 
tures—by husbanding the surplus — and by 
investing to the limit in Canadian War 
Loans, that help so much to maintain 
present prosperity. 

Tte National Service Board 
or Canada 



This space is donated by 
MacKinnon, Holmes &?Co.. Liniitca 




You will wonder 
alt its great pull- 
ing strength ; as 
year after year 
goes by, at its 
all-'round e n - 
during goodness. 
Edges treated to 
res ist shif-ters, 
this — the ori- 
ginal solid wov- 
en cotton belt — costs you 
less in the first place and 
ever after. Used in m i.-= 
places that leather is 
used. 



Put a -stop to your 
belting trouble. 
Send for our 
(monthly Beltii ,' 
Book TO-DAY. 
Free. 




Federal Engineering Company 
Limited 

172 John St., Toronto 




Write for complete information on 
Atlas Arbor Presses. All sizes for all 
purposes. 

ATLAS PRESS CO. 

330 N. Park St. 
Kalamazoo, Mich., U.S.A. 



CA N A I' I A N M A (• 11 1 N V. U" V 



Volume XVIII. 



LASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



Katr* (pavitklr in adranrrt: Two rrnta prr word first Iniirrlton: onr rent prr word BUb- 

.•<«'i]»*'<^i inarrtlnn*. (Vunf (\\r wonU whrn \*»\ number \n rrqiilrrd. Knrh llicurr counts 
a<t unr wui<(. .Miiilntum urilrr (1.00. Dl.ipln) rtilrH un applttulton. 



SECTION 




FOR SALE 



S'« 



COMPRKS^ORS FOR SALE — VERY 

TV- v-f...n.i »j.t«mr, 81 St. Peter St.. 
v^mWc. eSSm 

yOH SAI>. Nh.w ONE TtTRBO WING 

hlowrr. twrUr-inch . one Mii*\in hydrnulic 
ttcmprr mruUtor. No. 4 : on<' trn-inch air cylln- 
i|*r and twtv-w»y val\r for ulr chuck . one No. 3. 
♦wx> No S Ac-nr aulomfttic utram rnninc*. all 
nrw. Uarir«in« . makr \>u\ RrHniu'<- Machine 
Company. Toronto* (.c-4m) 

*rHREE TONS roll* ROI.I.KP STRII' STEEL. 
' tlrawinic qualitr ^* u idt*. 0<;s thick. Dillon 
Manufacturtnjr Co., Ovhawa. olm 

PUNCHING MACHINE — POWERFUL BELT- 

drivm ircaivd multiple punchinR machine : 
.'apAblr of punch inn 30 holr^ \'' dia. nt 2^" 
pitch throuirh \" platr : distance between hous- 
■n>:» 6' 0"; hnvintf two bod plates, one 2A lonR, 
fitt.-d w itii adjustable screw-driven plate carriage 
for ferdinc plates to punch, and one 26' lonK- 
Tilted with plain plate carriajre. which is operated 
(■> hand-p*>wer draw winch : mnchine has larjc*^ 
■ -iuip»nent. Jncludintr punches' and bolsters, for 
■ ._.". 's'. \' and "\,~. and one rack of lixed 
punches and tK->lster» U-32" at IVi" pitch: made 
by Huina. Donald A Wilson : f.o.b. GlasRow. 
WiUmm C. Wilson ft Co.. 21 Camden Street. 
Toronto. c28m 



i;»OR SALE ONE INGERSOLL-RAND 

Compn*sjior with receiver. Displacement 61 
cubic feet per minute. In (rood shape. $300.00. 
Perfection Stove Co.. Ltd.. Sarnia, Ont. 

HOISTING ENGINE— NEW. 
I ANK i«" X zr "MEAD-MORRISON" DOUBLK 
cylinder. >inRle drum, first motion hoi^tinR 
enjrine. reversible, drum is 30" diameter and 70' 
lonjr between flanges : is grooved for wire rope 
f diamoter. Rope capacity in single coil 600' 
!>'. but flanires will allow of four or five layers. 
I. Mathe*on & Co.. Ltd.. New Glascow. N.S. 

(c24mt 

pOR SALE CHEAP— 16" SHAPER : 24x24x6 
planer ; two heavy dut>* rouRhine lathes for 
r>' ehells : 1 Hall No. 6 cut-off machine: 1 2-ton 
heavy Morris chain block — all guaranteed and 
in first class condition. Dominion Machinery 
Co.. Toronto. c24m 



FOR SALE 

in Manitolia, one of the best EquipiKtl 
Fimndries in Western Canada for Gray Iron 
•inil Brass Casting. Also Machine Shop, 
Pattern Shop and Blacksmith Shop ^3 fires.) 

Write for particulars to 
Box 355 CANADIAN MACHINERY ic23mi 



MANUFACTURERS' 
OPPORTUNITY 

A responsible American Concern desires 
to arrange with a reliable Canadian Ma- 
chinery Manufacturer for the production 
in quantities of a small Marine Motor, for 
the Canadian and Export Trade. A mod- 
em equipment, w^ith knowledge of econo- 
mical production of interchangeable ma- 
chinery and parts, and good shipping 
facilities essential. To such party a ver>' 
favDrat>Ie. if not continuous, contract is 
offered. Address Box 353. Canadian 
Machinery, fc22m) 



AGENTS WANTED 

i CANADIAN AGENI-S WANTED KOK GOOD 
^ chuck, capecially adapted for use in munition 
planla. Box 349. Canadian Machinery. c28m 

IV' ANTED LIVE REPRESENTATIVE TO 

^' bundle Rood specialty; one who hasn't too 
many inms in the fire Apply Box 348, Cana- 
dian Machinery, ntating lines you now represent 
and the ground you are prepared to cover. 

c23m 

\I'ANTED^BY STEEL WORKS IN PENNSYL- 
'' vania. United State.s. producing exclusively 
rrucible cast steel, principally high .npeed steel, 
n representative in Cnnudn who i» thoroughly 
familiar with the tool steel business and will 
devote his entire attention to same. Reply 
Box 354. Canadian Machinery. c24m 



T^ANTED PARTY TO TAKE OVER CANA- 
dian and European patents of good paying 
machine. The machine, which co»t-s les.-i than 
thousand dollars to build, is in daily operation in 
Pittsburgh ste^?! mill, with a saving of thirty 
dollars per day. Apply to Box 356, Canadian 
Machiner>'. ( c2r>m ) 



SPECIAL MACHINERY 

TT. C. THOMAS. GENERAL MACHINE SHOP. 

■^ tools. jiKB and machine repairs. 301 Kinff 

AIR St. W., Toronto. Telephone Adelaide 3886. tf 



M' 



\ ANUFACTURERS— WE CAN UNDERTAKE 
work to any ipeciflcation — munition produc- 
tion eiiuipment or otherwise. Write W. H. 
SumbMng Machinery Co.. 7 St. Mary St.. Toronto 

T ET OUR MACHINE SHOP HANDLE YOUK 
overflow. We have a well equipped shop and 
can handle turret lathe, engine lathe, shaper. 
drill, screw machine work, a-** well as fitting. We 
will gladly quote you prices. Webber Bros. Ma- 
chine Co.. Dupont St., Toronto. (c26m t 



WANTED 

IVTANTED — SECOND-HAND CUPOLA AND 
other foundry equipment. State full par- 



ticulars and price. 



Box 346, Canadian Machinery. 
c21m 



WANTED— A GOOD, HEAVY. POWERFUL. 

single purpose lathe for 4.5 shells. Send 
fullest particulars and best price at once. Box 
359. Canadian Machinery. (c24ml 

WANTED — COMPLETE BOLT AND NUT 
machinery to manufacture sizes Vi-inch 
diameter and up. Advise offerings in either 
.'^econd-hand or new. Box 360, Canadian Machin- 
ery. Toronto. (c2m) 



WANTED— VERTICAL MILLING MACHINE 
with table not less than 26" x 10". minimum 
distance centre of spindle to face of column 14". 
Reply, giving full particulars, price and where 
machine can be inspected. Box 352. Canadian 
Machinery. c21m 



Flat Braiders For Sale 

Twenty-five — 53 Spindles, No. 1 Make 

New England Butt Co. and R.I. Braid- 
ers in perfect working condition. 
Write for particulars. Greenwood 
Braiding Co., Greenwood, R.I. (c2.'^m) 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



\ I KCHANICAL AND CONSTRUCTION EN- 
'' *■ gineer denires change; twenty years* general 
experience; specialty .steam power pliinta ; knowl- 
eiik'"' pulverized coal. Box 343. Canadian Machin- 
ery. c21m 



/jRADUATE MALE NURSE. AGE 32. HAVE 
established hospitals for three large manufac- 
turing concerns. Familiar with social service, 
accident prevention and modern methods of em- 
ploying. At present employed. I.eHs than $2,400 
not considered. Box 336, Canadian Machinery. 

cl6m 



rjENERAL SUPERINTENDENT DESIRES 
^^ position ^years of machine shop and tool- 
room experience, efficient production methods, as 
well as extensive experience with various sizes 
of sheila. Box 350. Canadian Machinery. 

c22m 



PRACTICAL WORKS MANAGER AND ME- 
chanical expert with years of experience in 
Scotland and Canada, a specialist in marine en- 
;f ines and winches, open for engagement ; best of 
references. Apply Box 351, Canadian Machinery 

C23m 



/jENERAL SUPERINTENDENT, WITH PRAC- 
tical shop as well as efficient production ex- 
perience, desires change. One having consider- 
able munition experience, principally shells of 
various sizes. Box 358. Canadian Machinery. 

{c25m) 



FOR SALE 



2 — IG" X 5' Reed Lathes, elevating rest. 

1 — 16" X 6' Reed Engine Lathe, plain rest. 

1—16" X 6' Reed Engine Lathe, R. and F. 

1—18" X 8' Davis Engine Lathe, D.B.G. 

1-18" X 8' Porter Engine Lathe. 

1—22" X 10' Nicholson & Waterman En- 
gine Lathe. 

1 — No. 3 Brown & Sharpe Automatic Gear 
Cutter. 

1 — 30" old-style Brainerd Automatic Gear 
Cutter. 

1— .V X 48" Pratt & Whitney Plain 
Grinder. 

1 -No. 3 Lees-Bradner Thread Miller. 

1 - l.'i" Jungst Shaper. 

2 — 24" X 24" X 6' Powell Standard Planers. 

2—30" X 30" X 8' Powell Standard Planers. 

Brownell Machinery Co. 
Providence, R. I. 



I Det-ember 6, 191'; 



( ' A X A I) I A X M A C II I N E R Y 



70 



Are You Thinking of Building? 

We have for Immediate Shipment 

A STEEL BUILDING 120 'x 300' IN TWO BAYS 

With Runways for Cranes 

If you want a Factory, Erecting Shop, Forge Shop or 
Structural Shop, it is here waiting for you. Ask us for 
further particulars. 



MACHINE TOOLS 



PLANERS 



66 X 66 X 20' Canada Tool Works, 
two heads. 
52 X 52 X 16 Canada Tool Works, 

one head. 
36 X 42 X 12 Cincinnati, two heads. 
36 X 36 X 12 McDougal, three heads. 

SHAPERS 
14, 16 and 20" Smith & Mills. 
16, 20 and 24" Kelly. 
20 and 24" Gould & Eberhardt 

DRILLS 
15", 20", 25", 26", 28" and 34" Barnes. 
24, 26, 28 and 30" Sibley. ■ 
6 ft. Bertram Radial. 
5 ft. Reed Prentice. 
2Vi ft. Fosdick Heavy Duty. 

MILLERS 

3H and 2H LeBlond Univ 



No. 2 and No. 3 Cincinnati Univ. 
No. 2 Ford-Smith Plain. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

10 ft. Niles Vertical Boring Mill, two 

swivel heads. 
Bertram Horizontal Bormg Mill, 4" 

spindle. 
No. 4 and 23 Niles Bulldozers. 
Berque Automatic Multiple Punch 
—Capacity 18—% holes takes 26 ft. 

plates. 
42" Bertram Car Wheel Boring 
Machine, hub facing attachment. 

CUT-OFF MACHINES 
4 — 6" Williams. 
1—6" Hall. 
1—4" Hall. 
2— 3V2" Davis. 
1— 3y2"Hurlbut Rogers. 



The A. R. Williams Machinery, Co., Limited 

64-66 Front Street E. - TORONTO 




COMPLETE SHRAPNEL PLANT 

Can be seen in Operation, comprising 
Lathes, Turrets, Presses, etc., in- 
cluding the following: — 

7 — 16" McDougal Engine Lathes 
11 — No. 2 Warner & Swasey Turrets 
15— C. M. C. Turning Lathes 
4 — Davis Turret Lathes 
SIX INCH SHELL MACHINERY 
2 — Nearly New Hercules Rough 
Turning Lathes, with Oil Pan 
and Pump. Used one month. 
4.5 SHELL MACHINES 
No. 6 Hall Cut-off Machme 
Norwood Propting Machine 



MISCELLANEOUS 

2—25" Foote-Burte Drills 

2 — 18" X 8 Rhan Larmon Lathes, 

Double Back Geared, Quick 

Change Gear 
1 — 16" Shaper with Vice and 

Countershaft 
1 — 16" Crawford Tool Room Lathe, 

Quick Change Gear, Oil Pan 

and Pump, Taper Attachment, 

Draw-in Collet. 

The above is only a part of our 
stock. Let us know your require- 
ments. 



DOMINION MACHINERY CO. 

110 Church Street, TORONTO Warehouse: 14 Darling Ave. 



Your Ad in this Section 



will get the attention of the busy men. They find grouped here a big 
list of equipment for immediate shipment, and they use it as a catalogue 
when they need any. Will they see your list? 



PETRIE'S LIST 

of 

New and Used Machine Tools 

In Stock for Immediate Delivery 

TURRET LATHES AND SCREW 
MACHINES 

16" X 5%' Pratt & Whitney, D.B.G. (3) 

16" X 61/'' MacGregor, D.B.G. (2). 

16' X 6' Pratt & Whitney. E.G. 

18" X 10' Libby (2). 

20" X 10' Bridgeport. B.G. 

22" X 8' Pratt & Whitney. B.G. 

22" X 8' Martin, single purpose (2). 

24" X 8' Lodge & Shipley. 

26" X 8' Fay & Scott, B.G. 

2" X 24" Stevens Screw Machines. 
No. 2 Warner & Swasey. plain head. 
No. 6 Warner & Swasey, friction head. 

ENGINE LATHES 
6" X 30" Dalton. E.G., bench. 
13" X 6' Filsmith, D.B.G., comp. rest. 
14" X 6' Lodge & Shipley, taper attach- 
ment. 
16" X 6' Sebastian, B.G., comp. rest (S). 
16" X 8' McDougall, B.G., comp. rest (I). 
16" X 8' Porter, B.G., comp. rest. 
18" X 10' Putnam, back geared. 
20" X 8' Fifield, B.G., plain rest. 
21" X 8' Bawden, heavy duty (4). 
22" X 8' Pond, B.C., plain rest. 
24" X 11' Pond, B.G., comp. rest. 
26" X 14' Glcason, D.B.G. 
30" X 10' Ames, B.G.. plain rest. 
31" X 16' Fifield, back geared. 

DRILLS 
14" Excelsior, sliding head, lever feed (6). 
15" Avey, high-speed, ball-bearing. 
16" Barr, sliding head, lever feed. 
20" Barnes, 3-3pindle, lever feed (2). 
20" Baker, tapping attachment. 
24" Foote-Burt, heavy duty. 
24" Kerkhoff, back geared, power feed. 
26" Prentice, back geared, power feed. 
32" Cincinnati, heavy duty. 
40" Bickford, back geared. 
46" Allfree, back geared, power feed. 
No. 10a Baush, 16-spindle. 
D-1 Colburn, back geared, heavy duty. 

GRINDERS 
10" X 30" Landis, universal. 
No. 1 Cincinnati, universal. '.. 

No. 2 Landis, universal. 
No. 2 Sellers, universal. 
No. 3 Modern, universal. 
No. 3 La Salle, plain and surface. 
No. 190 Wells, cutter and reamer (2). 
24" Barnes, wet tool. 
2Vi" Yankee, twist drill (3). 
IRON PLANERS 
20" X 20" X 6' Bertram (2). 
24" X 24" X 6V2' Bertram. 
25" X 25" X 12' Lodge & Davis. 
36" X 36" X 10' Pond, two heads 
40" X 40" X 12' New Haven, power feed, 
72" X 72" X 11' Canada, power feed. 
MILLING MACHINES 

Bertram, plain. 

Brown & Sharpe, power feed, plain. 

No. 2 Cincinnati, universal, cone type. 

No. 2 Ford-Smith, plain. 

No. 4 Fox, universal. 

SHAPERS 

16" Petrie. back geared (2). 

16" Canada Mach. Corp., back geared. 

16" Cincinnati, back geared (3). 
24" Gould & Eberhardt. back geared. 
30" Morton, back geared, draw cut. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

6" and 12" Racine Hack Saws. 

4" and 6' Robertson Hack Saws. 

4\'-y' Martin Cutting-off Machine. 

No'. 2 Grant Rotary Riveting Hammer. 

No. 4A High Speed Riveting Hammer. 

%" Garvin Vertical Tapping Machine. 

No. 31/2 Greenerd Arbor Press. 

No. 180 Brown-Boggs Power Presses (2). 

No. 18 Can. Hanson & Van Winkle Power 
Press. 

No. 3 Goldie & MeCulloch Hydraulic Band- 
ing Press. 

Bertram Single-end Punch and Shear. 

No. 3 Dundas Double-end Punch and Shear. 

1500-lb. Toledo Drop Hammer. 

450-lb. Williams Drop Hammer. 

H. W. PETRIE, LTD. 

FRONT STREET WEST, TORONTO 



(• A N A !• 1 A N M A f II 1 N i: i; V 



Vohiim- Win. 



RIVERSIDE 
Machinery Depot 

He OuM >;. cr> I'ovl Uf/rir.i 

NKW MACMINK TOOLS 

For lfnntwJiiit0 Dmlivtry 



USED MACHINERY 



;-^■.^ f \ I'oUci Jli JiAn^.an Awlomntjc L»Ihi . 
I— «>»- CfilVi Anti^ittc Sctrw Uaehillc, m ■ 

tor Jd'rn. 
; N 1 r -^r FO.H. Htn.» Scnw Mucliin. 
K.O.n. Hand Sorrw Machini'*. 
F.O.'H. Han-l Scrrw Machiiv 
t - * SwaM-y Turret Latbca witn 

■ Ir .-li-L.-k*- ... 

«— It" Wamfr ft S»afcT TtUTtt Lathott. 
;-f Clrrrlanl .\iilomatR; Screw Machinn, ile 

err. ffrd. 
1-S \' ClfTfland .VutomaUc Scr*w Sfachlno. 

MIU.IN''. M V.-mXBS AND r.RINnEUS 
1— N'a t ■ in .Milling Machine. 

1-Xo. 1 Mitlinc Xrni-hine. 

I— Nol 1 - --i^e Plain Milltne MacJlinp- 

I-Xo. 1 ij. -.^j Plain Milling Mtehin(^ 
;— Xa 13 Tot- k Whilnrj 'Lincoln Type Mi" 

'.-.7 M-.->---r, 

■ V 'a\z .-in! Drilling ^Cnchino^. 

Machines. 

' 'T. 

i— s , . -: i.i I i iiivor«iI Oi^nfler. 

1— Nn. K .Motrm Plain OHnder. 

1— Xa H MMem Plain Grinder. 

1— Xa. 1 tjindia InUmal Orinler. 

1— Xo. : W. * yx. Surface r.rinder. 

1— Xo. J W. * M. Surface Grinder. 

nnrLL presse.s 

1— S' Mneller Plain Radial Drill, nld type. 
l_ll- Bame« B.O.. P.F. Drill Pre<.». 
- - -_:.. i|p ^ rtTerh.ang Henry & Wright Hish 
-1 DrBl. 
•• Fox Hich Siv^ Drills. 
.... '.:.• Fax High Rwwd Drills, 
i— l&-4pindle Xatco Drill. 

STIAPEUS .*.XD PLANERS 

1— IS" HenlcT Oeartd Shaper. 
1— .w I 36 J 10' Xcw Haren Planer. -S.H. 
1— "^ T r: I P' rinnnnali Planer. SM. 
1-16 I 16 X 5' Hendey Planer. S.H. 

PRESSES .AND HAMXfERS 
1— Waterhnn- Farrell O.B.I. Press, geartd. 
1— Nn. in PerVins Drawing Press. 
3— Vr. 2-\v Pliss "Wiring Pr*>&«es. 
I-Sm-lh. B. * S. Roll Boatd Hammer, 
l-jm.is. p. * w Roll Roaivl Hammer. 
I— ISMh. Bradley Strap Hammer. 

Ara COMPRESSORS 

1—9 T 11 Chicago Pnetimatic BeltHlriren .\ir 

Ctimprtiwor. 
1—8 -^ 8 .Fairhanks-Morse Belt-driven .\ir Com 

pressor. 
1—8 J 8 Rardner Single BelWriien Air Com- 

1—8x8 T'ninn Steam Pump Co. Belt.<lriTen Air 

CompressoT. " 
I— ft T fi We«ttinehoir5e Steam Air Compressor. 
1—6 T fi Ingersoll-Rand Beh-driren .\ir Compre.- 
Mr. - - 
We also carry a large assortment of Steam 
Enc^ne*^ .ste;»«> Pimrn^ and Electrical Equip- 
ment of. all kinds. We are in iKe market to 
pnrcha-so machine tools, large and small. 



RIVERSIDE MACHINERY DEPOT 

- 17-29 St. Aubin Avenue 
DETROIT. MICH. 



Good Used 
Equipment 

rriiM'liiiK (raiios. 

'_'(>-loii I!^^)WniIl^: Trolley, ri-toii 

7.UX., riG^:" ga. (now). 
•_'0-ton Shnw, 56' 3" span, 110 V.D.C. 
10-ton Ciise, r)8' 3' spun, 220 V.D.C. 
JO-ton Box, 49' spnn. 220 V.D.C. 

Tunrlu's and Shoars. 

.■^iotrle 48" tht., cap. 3 x IVi ', Pro 

vulence. 
Sintrlc (■)■ tht., cap. % x %", Clevc 

laiiil. 
.Sinjrlo \W' tht., cap. ?i x Vi" 

(hand) now Doty. 
Sinirlo. i' ■ tht., cap. 1 x 1", belted (3). 
SinKlc, 27 tht., cap. % x %", belted. 
.Siniilo. 32" tht, cap. 1 x 1", belted. 
Oonble IS" tht. cap. % x %" 

Fischer. 
Double, Queen Citv, 12' thts., cap. 

%" X %■. 
Double 12" blades, bar shear, cap. 2" 

sq., crucible. 
Univ. Plate Shear, 18" blades, cap. 

*4 ', Cleveland belted. 
Univ. Plato Shear. 26" blades, cap. 

V2". Lewis belted. 
Guillotine Shear, cap. 2%" sq., 

belted. Perkins No. 6. 
Guillotine Shear, No. O. H. & J., d 

and 7" blades (2). 
Guillotine Shear, Fisher, 21" blade, 

can- 8 X 2". 
Squaring Machine 120", cap. 3 16". 



Miscellaneous. 

Bolt Cutter, Acme 2", Class .\, 

sinerle head, dies. 
Borinsr Mill, 10' Niles, Vertical, 2 

heads. 
Foreinsr and Unsettine Machine, 

IV2" Acme, with dies. 
Foreine: and Upsetting Machine, 

21,2" Ajax. 
Hammer, 80-lb. Bradley, Cushion 

Helve. 
Hammer. 3.5-lb. Maeerowan & Fini- 

can (Perfect), belted. 
Rotary Planer, 36" Cleveland, motor 

driven. 
Rotarv Planer. 60" Cleveland, motor 

nO cy.. 440 V. 
Milling- Machine, No. 24 Osterlein 

Universal. 
Pine Machine, 8" E. C. & B. 
Pipe Machine, No. 11 Jarecki. 

GOOD CONDITION. 
PROMPT SHIPMENT. 



McDoy-Brandl Mactiinery Co. 

216-18 Penn Ave. 
PITTSBURGH, P^. 



Complete 18-pr. Shrapnel 
Plant for Sale 

PRINCIPAL ITKMS AS FOLLOWS: 

1 -Cut t Inn off Mnchiiic. with IB" three jnwwl 

chuck. 
1 -I,«thp, 3" RwiiiR. 8' bM. 
1 - Air Chuck, Itoiiblp Km! Uoimh Tiiniln« 

I.nlhr. 
1 SliiuU- Kn.l Itoimh TiimliiK Lnthr. 
i -Sinulf Knd I.ftthe. for Im5«" rmuihlns. 
1 -SiiiKlc Kiiil Hasp Kncina Mnchtiir. 
1 Iioiililo ICnil Tool Qrlndcr. 
1 -Jmokpn Orlndor. 

;;-Horln(r Muchlnoji, C..M.C.. with tiinct.s. 
'J— t'.M.C. I.ntlii'S, rqulppo)! for iiattnit mut tnp 

I>lnC- 
\--Tl" Pftvls Turret L»thp. 
1— .Ic»flti'» Copper Itniul Lathe. 
1— (littholt Lathe, with 15" threc-jftttwl ihuck. 
1— Lo-SwluK Lnthe for tumluu prortlcs. 
1-Tnol Grinder. 24" wheel. 
1— Lnthe, 14" awinji. C bod. 
2-ronI Smith Shell Orimlent. coinpUtP. 
1—17" I-ellloiid Lathe, equipped for wnvy urooTe. 
1— hrlll I'rcss, flttwl for wcrewiiiK iu siickets. 
I-IG" SwinK Acme Turret Lathe, for luminn 

<iix;ket.H, I\lte<! with air chuck, 
1— Double End Painting Machiuc, «ilh U h.])- 

motor. 
1— Jenckcfl Air-operated C^PPP"* Bftiid l*reM. 
1—3 in*. C'nnndtnn Ocneml Eluctiic Motor. 

cMiupleto Willi starting box. 
1—30 H.I'. WeHtinRhou-He Motor, 5G0 volts, com- 

plc'le with stnrtinB box. 
1—10 Mi*. Cnna-iian General Klectric Motor. 

2.200 volts, complete witli starting box. 
1— Wcstinghouse 40 II.T. Induct i-m Moior, 550 

voU.i. complete with starting box. 
1— Nosing Press, fur nasing shells. 
1—6 H.l*. Canadian General Electric Motor for 

snmc. 
I— Hoskin-s Pyrometer. 
1— Nose Furnace. 
1— Tumpcring Furnace. 

Jenckes Machine Co., Ltd. 

Sherbrooke, Que. 



The 

same firms — 

time after time 



.-(■iiiliii.u, ill (.'opy for tliis .■auction i.-^ one 
of the most convincing proofs of its 
wdi-lli In anyone with machinery or 
iii.u-hiiir Av)\) equi]>meiit to (li.-^jjoso 

(if. 

'I'hese firms Icnow a good tiling wlien 
I hey see it — they haw- le<-.nieu by 
ii-ing thi.s section just wlial it can do 
for tliem. 

'I'l'v it yourself! That laihe. drill nv 
whatever it is, descrilre it fully and 
-end in your copy to-day foi' ne.xt 
week's issue. You'll find ihal the 
frequent lise of this section will help 
you di.-i)0se of efiui]unent you have 
mitgrown — get what you want iu a 
hurry, whether it be men or equip- 
ment. 

Canadian Machinery 

Classified Advertising Section 

143 University Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



If what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers Hated under proper heading. 



December 6, IDn 



C i\ N A 1) 1 A N -M A C II I N E R Y 



81 



FOR SALE 




Large Blanking Press 

76" between housings, 8" shaft, 
3>4" stroke, 8'4" die 'space. 

Very good condition and for immediate delivery. 

RIVERSIDE MACHINERY DEPOT 



17-29 St. Aubin Ave. 



DETROIT, MICH. 



M>//////WWWW//WW/WWW//W//WM////////W// W///M/^^^^^ 



FOR SALE 



1 — 60-ton Watson-Stillman Hydraulic Press, complete 
with four plunger automatic variable belt pump. 
$750.00. 

1 — Boring Lathe, 32" swing, length over all 19' 6". 
appro.ximate weight 9 tons. $2750.00. 

1 — Turning Lathe, 32" swing, length over all 15' 10", 
approximate weight 8% tons. $2750.00. 

1 — Murchey semi-automatic, double-head Nipple and 
Pipe Threading Machine with countershaft capa- 
city Vs to %". $410.00. 

1 — Murchey semi-automatic, double-head Nipple and 
Pipe Threading Machine with countershaft capa- 
city ^2 to 2". $690.00. 

1 — Hall semi-automatic, double-head Nipple and Pipe 

Threading Machine with countershaft capacitv 

1/2 to r. $640.00. 
1 — Hall double-head, semi-automatic Nipple and Pipe 

Threading Machine with countershaft capacity 

1^2 to 4". $1000.00. 
20— Spicer Steel Trucks, 28 x 90", weight 400 lbs., 

capacity 21/2 tons. Each $25.00. 
■ 2 — 24" Hoefer Stationary Head Drills, steel gears 

throughout, ball thrust bearings, 3 step cone. 

$1.59.00. 

Shafting, Belting, Hangers, etc. 

; GREENFIELD CONDUIT CO., LTD. 

• 331 KING ST.. TORONTO, ONT. 



' ^//////■/'/■//////,y,////,,/////y////////////////y///,,/^, ///,„/////////// / ///////./////////////////////. 



^ 100 

NEW LATHES 

Here at McCabe's 

for Immediate Shipmen 



These "High Duty" New 
Lathes will be installed in your 
shop with understanding there 
is nothing better built in 
workmanship — power and 
convenience in handling. 



— IS-ft. Bed 



"< 



All-steel 
Quick- 
change 
Gear-box 

3-step 
Cone— 
Doub e 4 
Back- 
Gears 



(Get Bulletins 
with complete 
specifications.) 



''McCabe'' Double 
Spindle Lathe 

2G-48-in. SAVING; 12-ft,, 22-ft. and 2-i-ft. P.ed- 
iii .=tock. 

So many other Tools in Stock — you will 
have to get our latest Bulletia 283 — just 
issued — to get complete list of everything. 

J. J. McCabe 

149 BROADWAY - NEW YORK 



2r,-in 


Swin.n;- 


-18-ft 


26 " 


'• 


16" 


2G "' 


a 


14" 


2fi " 


it 


14" 


24 " 


li 


18" 


24 " 


a 


16" 


24 " 


:t 


14" 


24 " 


iC 


12 " 


21 " 


a 


12" 


21"- 


•• 


10 " 


IS " 


i( 


12 " 


IS." 


a 


10" 


18 " 


u 


8" 


16 " 


u 


10" 


K; " 


>t 


8" 


16 " 




6" 



If any advertiscmevt interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to he answered. 



82 



(' \ N \ I» I A N \I \ (■ II I N i: K Y 



Pec-fiiiber fi, 1917. 



USED MACHINERY 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



IIKII I IS(. MA« IIIN»:!i. 

JO- Uxia* • D«»i.. S M.. B i;.. I'.K '•' 
JS lUmlllon I'Utn KaJUil. tapping «ttii(h- '*" 

m*nt- I&" 

4 M>Kll«r l-Un lUdutl It* 

K"ur No )l« lUkrr llravjr Puty. If 

I^plnJir R.vkrord. IS" 
4-«ptnd;« Htvkfunl 

l-«pin4r.«- Wafthburn, with p^^wrr frrd. 20" 

4-<plndW Allrn. il' 

No 11 I'rmtt * Whilnrr. 10 apindlM. «- 

i;KAR Cl'TTKBS. 24— 
M" X T' G. * R. tpur iir»r< 

No. S I«- B. A S . ipur gr.ni. S2" 
No. 19 B A S,. tpur r««ra. 

JO* I 9' « * K. (pur and brtrl iioin. St^ 

S<* X ?- C. A E.. •I'ur and b*\-rl ffrars. 86" 
S*- Walcolt- tpur gran. 

No I Schuchantt * Srhatic C»ar Hobbcr. 24" 

GRINDERS. II- 

No. I Cincinnati I'nivrmal Tool nnd Cutter. 36" 

No. 14 Cincinnati Cuttrr and Tool. 39" 
No. J Wooda Tool and CutUr. 

Brainard Cutter. No. 

Lrland I'nivcrpjil. with i>owrr fe*d. No. 

No. Z Landi<i I'nix-rruil. No. 

No. 6-A Diamond I'nivpraal. No. 
10' \ ii' Ijindi> Plain (n»wl. 



LATHES. 



vith chuck. 
C.R. 



X &' I.cBIond. 
X 6' Rock ford, 
X 6' Rockfonl 
z 8' Uradfont. 
X t' BnidfonI, 
X 8' Ixxlur A 

taper ntlAchmrnt. 
X 14' lllaiKdrll. C.R. 
X 12' Nr«- Haven. C.R. 

27'j" X II UkIkc a Shiplfy. •elective 
Keare<l hend. QCC. 18" chuck, fitted. 
27" X 12' Ueed-Prentice, uenred hend. 
• inirle pulley drive. 
X 12' Schumacher A Iloye. 

ted. 
X 18' Schumacher A Boye. 
X 20' American. T.H.G. 
PLANERS. 
6' American, one hend. 
8' Pease, one head. 
12' Rockford. 4 heads. 
14' Sellers, one head. 
12' New Haven, one head. 
SCREW MACHINES. 

1 Warner A Swnsey. plain hend. 

2 P. A W.. friction hend. 

2 Foster, plain head. A.C. nnd W.K. 

3 Pratt A Whitney. B.C.. double friction 
head. A. C. and W.F. 



C.R.. 

C.R. 
Tool Co., 

C.R 

C.R.. taper attachment. 

Shipley, pat. hentl. C.R., 



chuck, flt* 
T.B.G.. Q.C.G. 



-iloDs A Oliver, plain hi-iitl, A.C. and 



24" 

26" 
36" 
36" 
39" 



No. 3 llii 

W.K. 

No. 4 Pearson, friction hend, A.C. and W.K. 
No. fi Foster, seared friction head, A.C, P.F. 

to turret slide, and P.K. to cross slide. 

1 %" Gridley, 4-Bpindle automatic. 
3 %" Gridley. 1-spinille automntic. 

TURRET LATHES. 
No. 2 Foster-Kimball, plain hend. 
No. 22 Garvin, plain bond. 
16" IiodKe A Davis, buck Ke«red. 
16" Wnrner A Swnsey. friction hend. 

2 X 24" J. A L.. cone. hend. 

24" Gisholt, 4V4" spindle hole, taper attach' 
ment. 

No. 3-A Warner A SwnHey, bar nttnohroent. 
PUNCHES AND PRESSES. 

No. 2 Rockford, O.B.L 

No. 3 LoabboUKh-Jordan. O.B.I. 

No. 4 Rockford. O.H.I. 

No. 741., BIJKH, sir. side. Kenrcd. 

Blake A Johnson Embossing. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

I" Nutter A Barnes Cuttinic-off Machine. 

6" X 48" P. A W. Thread Miller. 

No. 3 Cincinnati Vertical Millintr Machine. 

20 H.P. Nash 2-cylinder Vertical Gns Enfrine. 

6 H.P. Knirbanks-Morse HorizontJil Gas fin- 
Bine. 



Stocker-Rumely-Wachs Company, 



117-121 N. Jefferson St.. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




ADDRESS 



MODERN BRICK 
FACTORY BUILDING 



14,000 SQUARE FEET OF FLOOR SPACE 

Saw tooth construction; total of 2'/^ acres of 
ground located on railroad in prosperous 
central Ontario city. Ideal for munition 
factory. Considerable amount of shafting, 
motors, etc., in good condition. 

BOX 357, CANADIAN MACHINERY, for terms 



If tchat you need is not advertised, consJilt our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



n<-t:ember 6, 1917 



C A N A 1) J A X M A C II I X E R Y 



83 



MACHINE TOOLS— At Your Command 



BOHI'XG .MACBlNiBS^VeTtital. 

2—32" Bullards. 1 turret head. 

2—37* Baush. 2 heads. 

l—rr Billiard, 2 heads. 

I— tt" Bausch ; 2 swivel heads ; quick-chau^e. 

1—42" Bollard, two swivel heads. 

2—10' Niles, 2 swivel heads. 

BORrNG MAOHLNES-Horizontal. 

1—2%" bar, Niles. 

I— No. 2 Barrett. 5" bar. 

I— Beaman & Smith, 7" spindle. 

I— Barrett, 8" bar. 

BIJLI^DOZBRS. 

l-^No. 2 Williams & White. 16" stioke. 

L— No. 4 Ajax, 30" stroke. 

I— No. 9 Williams & White, belt drive. 

1— No. 12 Ajax, single pulley drive. 

3~JNo. 23 Williams & White, belt drive. 

L— 'No. 2fi Williams & White, belt drive. 

I— No. L~9-U Williams & Whi'Ie, aiianged for motor 
drive. 

CRANES— Traveliii<4. 

I— ft-tou Chisholm & Moore, 13^' span, hand power. 

i— 10-ton Elfctric. 47' span. 25' lift, 3 motors. 

1— lO-ton Toledo, 3 motors, 30' fipan. 

I--l«-toii Whiting. 48' 8" .<q>an. 

I— 10-toii Wliiting. 3 motors. 24' sitan. 
CRANES— LocamotiTe. 

3— 10-15-tou MoJIyler Broad (ratiire Steam Locomo- 
tive, 60' boom, biicket, 3 dnims. 

t— 15-ton Browning. 8-wheel, 38' boom. 

1' — ^15-ton Bix>'n"n Hoist Locomotive. 36' boom, 
bucket, 8 wheels. 

1— 50-ton Orton & Steinbrenner. -steam locomotive 
8-wheel. double drum, 37' boom, bucket. • 

I— aO-ton Brown HoiSt. 8 wheel. 40' lxK)m. bucket. 

[-- a9-S&-ton Industrial. 8 wheel. 50' boom, bucket. 

I — 25-36-ton [Myler, 8 wheel, 70' boom, bucket. 
(TTTING-OFF MAOHTNBS. 

I— NEW A^s" Davis. 
ao— Davis. 4"^". 
W-A^" Williams. 

2— NEW 6" Davis. 

DRITvLlNG M.AjOHINBS— UadiaL 

3 — NEW 3' Mueller, speed box drive; Januaiy del. 

3— 'NEW 3' American, Sensitive, tapping attach- 
ment. 

2—4' Mueller, plain, speed box drive. 

I— 4Mi' Full Universal, cone drive. 

1— NEW 5' Western Plain, wiili motor. 

3 — 'NE-W 5' Mueller, speed box tlrive; Januaiy del. 

2—6' Re«e<J-Prentice, latest type, belt driven: Janu- 
ary del. 

1— 'NBW 6' Triumph, motor drive; January del. 
DRILLING MACHTNES— Heavy Duty. 

2— D-2 Colbum Heavy Dutj'. 2W cap., arranged fur 
motor drive. 

ij— Foote-Burt Heavy Duty. ?^" capacity. 

I— No. 3aO Raker, single pulley drive, late type : 

arranged for motor drive. 
10— 'Moline Hule Hogs, heavy dntv. 2^" cap. 
DRIIjLING MAIOHINBS-Sliding Head. 

2— NEfW 25" Cleveland, high dutv. 

5-NEW 28" .Si'bley. 

2-^NBW 30" Sibley. 

*— NEW 34" Barnes: December deliver;-. 

DRIW.ING MACHINES— Multiple Spindle. 

L— 4-spindle 20" Bam&s. all geared. 

1— No. 5 Fox, l?-spindle. 1" capacity. 

2— 6-spindle RockfoM : Economy t\T>e. 

GEAR CDTTrNG MACHINES. 

S— No. 3 Brown & Sharpe Aiito Gear Cutter, spur 

I— No. a.i NenA-ark. 2%" x 8" capacity. 

1— 3fi" Newark. 

1— 3G" Whiton. for spur gears. 

2—%" X 9" Gould & Eberbardt. new type, spur 
gears. 

I— NEW 6" Standaixl Gear Cutter, spur. 

1—15" Glea-i^on Bevel Gear E*laner. 

2—20" Grant-Lees Gear Hobber, bevel spur and 
spiral attachment. 

1—^" Becker-Brain a nl. 

1—28" Rhemania Ge;>r Hobber. spur and wonn 
gears. 

2~NBW 3ft" FLither. solid pattera. 

3—36" Felbms Gear Shapers. 

1— NEW 37" Gleafion Gear Bevel Planer; Feb. de- 
livery. 

1-J72^ Gould & Eberhai-dt. spur and bevel. 
GRINDBRS-Universal for Cutters. Drills, 
Reamers, Etc. 

5— NEW No. 190 Wells. 

2— No. 1 Cincinnati. 

1-NRW Gisholt Universal. 

1— XRW Prpqnier. Universal. 

l_Xi:w Wi.Iraai-th & Monnan. style B.K. 

l_\f.-\V Walker No. 1. outfit R. 

1-NEW Walker No. 2. outfit K, capacity 5"x2fi". 

2— NEW No 2 Oesterlein Univereal. 

■^XBW LeRlond. 

GRIND EKS^Tvlindrical. Plain- 

3-^EW 8" X 30" Modem Self-contained. 

2— NEW 12" X 31" Modem Self-containeirl, 

4—12" \ 3t7' -MfKlem Self-contained. 

3—12" X 42" Lanilis Self-contained. 

5—12" X 48" Modem Self-contained. 

1—12 X 66" Landis. 



1— NE(W 16" X 48" Laudis. crauk shaft. 
1—12 X 96" Springrfield. 

GRINDERS— Cylindrical, Univei-sal 
2— NBW No. 2 Rath. 9" x 20", 
1— NEW No. 2 Walker; »" x 26". 
1— NEW lii^ (10" X 36" Ba'Ih.) 
1— NEW Thompson 10 x 36". 
1—12 X 36" Cincinnati. 
1— No. 4 Cincinnati; capacity 12 x 72". 

GRTNDEitS— Internal 
1— No. 24 BtTant. 
1— No. 70 Heald. 
l~No. 75 Heald. 

GRINDERS— Disc. 
l—NBW No. 4 Gardner, including disc pres.s, 23" 

disc. 
3— No. 14 Be3ley, including ring, wheel, chucks. 
l—NBW No. 17 Gardner. 30^' disc. 

GRINDERS— Cylindrical. 
1— No 60 Heald. single pulley drive. 

GUINDBRS^Surface. 
4— NEW No. 1 La Salle Plain, with Micro. Adj. 
1— NE?W No. 1'^ Walker's, complete. 
3— XBW No. 2 Reid (Same as B. & S.). 
1—3' Pratt & \Vbitney Vertical, "Magnetic Chuck. 
12— CaiTigus tM>e, mag. chuck. 

HALNrMBRS-iBoard Lift Drop. 
3— 30i>-lb. Williams. 

1— No. 4 .standard .Machinery Co., 400-lb. 
1— E. W. Bliss. 800-lb. 
1-1500-lb. Toledo. 
l-SOW-lli. Williams & White. 

HAMMERS Steam Forgiug. 

1— GdO-Iit. Niles. single frame. 

1— !50n-]b. Kiles. 

2 — .'^WO-ib. Chambersburg Steam Drop Hammers. 

2— 6000-lb. Chambersburg Steam Drop Hammei-s. 

1— 70(»-lb. :Morgan Special Double Stand. 

KEYSEATBRS. 
l-'No. 1 Catlin. 
1— No. 2 'Mitts & Merrill. 
1— Colbum 4". capacity 42" stroke. 
1— No. 2 Knowles. 60" stroke. 

LATHES- Manufacturing, not Screw Cutting 
2— NEW No. 3 Harding Brothers. Bench Lathes. 
1—16" X 6' Prentiss, geared head, quick-change, 

tai>er attach. 
70— NEW Simplex 16" x 8'. 
14~Reed-Prentice Shell Lathes for 4" or 18-lb. 

American Shells. 

LATHES-Er^ne. 
!i-N(BW 15" X 6' Rockford, 
1— NBW 14" X 6' Hendey. Gearetl Head. 
3— NBW 16" X 6' Cleveland Tool Room Lathes. 

complete equipment 
1— NEW 17" X 8' National Quick Change. Double 

Back Geara. 
10—17" X fi' LeBIond. heavy duty, auto. tyi>e. not 

screw cutting. 
12— NEW 17" X 8' LeBIond Pan Bed, Quick Change 

Geai-s. 
1—13 X 8 Prentiss, geared head, taper attac^iment, 

quick change. 
3—20 X 8 Iriidge & Shipley, quick change, tinut 

on ways. 
l—NBW 2ir." X 10' Cleveland Geared Head. 
2—20" X 10' Lodge & Shipley, quick change. 
Ift-NBW yi" X 10' Porter. S.B.G. 
7— "21" X 10' Putn-im. oil pan and pump. 
1— 'NEW 24" X 10' American, high duty, quick 

change. 
2—24" X 10 Lodge & Shipley, quick change. 
1—21" X 10' Schumacher & Boye. quick change. 

taper attachment. 
1— NEW 26" X 48" x 12' McPabe Double Snindle. 
l—NBW 2fi" X 48" X ?r ^IcCabe Double Snindle. 
1— NEW 26" X 14' Bridgefoni pattern, geared head. 

heavy i>attem 
3—27" X 12' Bridgefoni Heavy Duty, plain turning. 

2 carriages. mf>tor driven. 
l—NBW J-'" X 14' American Double Back Geared, 

O'lick Chnnce. 
1-30" \- 14' Lodge & Sbipley Single Pulley Drive. 

Quick Chnnge. 
]— NEW 3r'xl2' Pittsbui-g Pattern. 
1- 3P" X 13' P'»tnam. face plate drive. 
1— .3R" X 17' pond, triple geared, quick-change. 
G— 40" X 16' Pitt.sbui-g. quick change, gear, face 

I)late drive. 
l—NBW 42" X 24' Triple Geared. Houston. Stan- 
wool. He-ivy Duty. 
]—~A" X ?4' Prentiss. 
1—54" X 22' Worcester. Trii)le Geared. 
]__Kft<- V ]S' R" Dndpe Lathe. Verv Heavy. 
l—XFAV r^" X 46 Pittnam Trinle Geared. Face 

Plate Drive. S-.step Cone: 6V2" belt; Oct. del. 
1—84" X 18' Special Rorinc Lathe. 

LATHES— Turret. 
8— NEW 21" Gi.sholt H-21. 
2—21" Gisholt, 18" chuck, quick traveise, tajwi 

attiiehment. 
5—2 X 24 Jones & Lamson. 
l—NBW 18" Libby. 

3—21" Libbey, Universal Facing Head, 3-jaw chii-'k. 
18— 6A Potter & JoTinson. 
1—24" Rrown & Sbarpe Vertical, chucking mach. 



1— No. 21 New Britain, arranged for motor drive; 

almost new. 
MILLING MACHINBS-Knee Type. Universal. 
1— No. 2 Kempsmith, Vertical Attachment. 
1— No. 2 Kempsmith 13" Dividing Head. 
1— No. H4 Cincinnati. 
1-^N'EW No. 2 Rockford High Power. 
2— NBW No. 2 Garvin. 
1— No. 2 LoBIond. 

2— NEW No. 3 Cincinnati High Power; Jan. del. 
1— No. 5-H LeRlond Heavy Duty ; almost new. 
1— No. 25 Oesterlein. 
1— NEW No. 34 Oesterlein Heavy Duty; latest type. 

MILLING MACHINES— Knee Type, Plain. 
1— No. Cincinnati. 

l—NBW No. 2B Brown & Shai-pe. hravv tyiie. 
1-NEnV No. 2 Rockforxl. 
2 — No. 2 Cincinnati. 

1— No. 3 Cincinnati, single inilley drive. 
1— No. 3 LeBIond. 
1— NEW No. 3 Cineinnati. 

2— No. 3 Kempsmith. 

I— No. 15 Garvin. ..- j 

•MILLING MACHINBS-'Duplex; -" "^ v 
1— No. %<i Van Norman; almost new. ^ . 

l~No. 2 Garvin Spiral. 

^^LLING MACHINBS—Hand. 
l^No. 1 Rickett. 
3— NBW No. 2 Pratt & Whitney. 
2— NBW No. 3 Garrin. 
10— NEW Becker, table 20" x 5H". 

'MILLING MACHINES— Vei-tical 
1— Ni>. 2 Cincinnati, latest typi' with cijctdar 

t.ible; as good as new. 
1— No. 2 Pratt & Whitney. 
l-'No. 3 Cincinnati Heavy Duty. 

1 —No. 3 Ingeraoll. 

:i— NEW No. 5 B. Becker; Rotaiy Table. 

1— New'lon Vertical, Continuous. Motor Driven, for 

shell work. 

MILLING M.\ CHINES— Planer Type. 
1— No. 2 Reaman & Smith. 
1— Inwisol! Slab 16" x 48" capacitv. 
1— NEW 17" X 5' E\Tion Planer Type. 
1—30" X 30" X 8* Ingersoll No. ^3, Single Spindle 

with Motor. 

iMIUI^ING MACHINES— Lincoln Type. 
2- BrJEgs type, high duty. 
3— NBW No. 4 Steriing. 
11— No. 7 Becker. 

PLANERS. 
S— XfJW 24" X 24" X 6' Powell. Single Head. 
l—iB" X 8' Dftricb & Harvey, open side. 
1— "J!" X 10' Gtay. 1 head. 
1— 3^" X 36" X 10' American : 2 Heads. 
1—36" X 36" X 14' Pond : one head. 
1—3^" Rotarv Planer, Motor Driven. 
l_.Tf," X 36" X 8' Gray: One Head. 
1—1™' X %" X 14' American, 2 heads. 
1_K>" X 42" X 14' Butler, high speed. 3 heads; 

almost new. 
1-^.1^' V 4«" s 12' Seott: Heavy Type; Milling At- 

tnchment. on Rail 
l_fi"" X fi-y X IP' Ret's: 2 Heads. 
1— fp" X f^" X ?T Pond: 3 Heads 
1—6-^" V 62" X 20' Canada Tool Works Planer: 2 

Wpa'ls. 
1— 72" X 60" X 11' Smith Globe- 2 Swivel K.^-ad- 

PONCH AND SHEARS. 
l_\Vaterbur^■-Farrell Alligator Sheai-s can. 31^". 
l^Pincinnati Gap Shears, 17" gap. 78" bl.ide. H" 

f^oacity. 
1— \(). 411-G Tnl.«lu .S<inaring Sheai-s. capacity 97'. 

w-icht V^.eco lbs 
l—.'-'ipvel'-nd Punching Shear, 36" throat, capacity 

1" X ^". 
l—iPt-Qvidenc" Sitt-am-diiveii Punch. 48" throat, cap. 

3" thronf^b TiA": almost new. 

SCREW MACHINBS—Hand. 
3^-No. Brovra & Sbarpe. 
1—1" Pierce. 
10— NEW No. 2 Owens Kent, wire feed, automatic 

chuck. 1 1/16" capacity. 
l^-2C" Cincinnati Acme, friction geared head. 

SCREW M.VCHINBS— Automatic 
-T—XKW %" Cleveland. Model A. 
3— l^-i" Clevpland. Moi.'l B, full auto. 
2— NBW IV Gridley Mult. Spindle. Belt Dnv.n 
10_ia.4" Gridley. mult, spindle; goo<l as new. 
5— 2H" Gridley, mult, spindle, arranged for motor 

drive. 
20—314" Gridley. single .spindle. 
4-^4>4" Gridley. single spindle. 
2— No. Rrown & Rharpe. 
2— No. 1 Brown & Shai-pe. 
1— No. 2 Brown & ShaiT>e. 
9— No % National Acme. nmlt. spindle. 2Vi cap. 

SHAPBRS. 
l—NBW 16" Springfield. 
1— '16" ^Mo'or Driven Rockford. 
5— NBW Barker 21". 
2— NEi\V 24" Milwaukee. 
■7_XBW 24" Potter &. Johnson Universal RotaiT 

Table. 
1—25" Springfield. 

2 y^' Morton Draw Cut. 



W. F. DAVIS MACHINE TOOL COMPANY 



CHICAGO. ILL. 
549 Washington Blvd. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Union Central Life BIdg. Leader News BIdg. 

WRITE OR WIRE OUR NEAREST OFFICE FOR QUOTATIONS 
THIS IS ONLY A PARTIAL LIST OF AVAILABLE MACHINES 



NEW YORK CITY 
Singer Bldg. 



// avy advertisement interests you, tear it out noio and place with letters to be answered. 



M 



(• A N A 1> 1 A N M \ (• II 1 N i: l; V 



Vohmu' Will. 



Special Machinery, Gears, Jigs, Fixtures, Punches and Dies, 
Small Tools, Screw Machine Products, Gauges, Etc. 



J 



®MS'S2^(ST W®ISIE 




FECIAL 

MACHINERY 



MANUFACTURING PUNCHES 

I'as. .lies, I'ixtures - any Spicial 
Mnchinory you may neeil — is our 
business. Equipped as wt arc to do 

your work ricrht and promptly. 

probably the cost will be less than 

..■>u expect. Write. 



Brown Engineering- Corporation 

LIMITED. TORONTO 
4IS-419 King St.. W. Tel. Add. 425 




CANADA 



F. W. McCLEAN cS: SON 

CONSULTING AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

NIAGARA FALLS ONTARIO 

Hcsipners and Builders of Special and Automatic Ma- 
chinery. Experimental and Metal Pattern Work. 
Electric Weldinp Machinery. Wire Forming Machinery. 



WELLAND MOTOR & MACHINE CO. 

WELLAND. ONT. f 
Builders of Special Mac)i!nery. 
JIGS, GAUGES AND SPEfilllipiO^^ 

General Macbine Shop Work of eil;0«tseripl^iw»». 
BUt SubmUted on all Claaaea of Cprilract Work. 



I i lit<lil.l.U lililil.l.lil!lil,Uililll:l:li{ 



Ifi 



SERVICE" 



At This Period "Service" is our 

MOTTO 

With our well equipped Tool Dept. 
we are in a position to give you im- 
mediate Service on all kinds of 
Tools, Gauges, Jigs, Fixtures, Dies, 
General Machine Work. 

Equipment Overhauling 

We also make Metal Stampings, 
Brass and Aluminum Castings. 

ELECTRO-PLATING. 

Monarch Brass Mfg. 

Co,, Limited. 



TORONTO 1 



= 71 Browns Ave. 

^EIIi:illiHJll:l!I!lll!IIUIIIll!l:|{|1lllll!l;lll!llilll|ll||jli|i|lll|l|l|l|l|ill|||!|i||||||^ 

// urhal you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Direc 



We will .-how here from time to lime some 
machines we build that you may judge our capa- 
bilities in this line. 




Balance Rail and Keyframe Boring 
Machine 

Manufactured Solely By 

TORONTO TOOL CO., 

TORONTO, ONT. 

5 1 6 Richmond St., West Phone Adel. 1181 



tory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



8S 



c^ 




Special Machinery, Jigs, Fixtures, Punches and Dies, Small 
Tools, Screw Machine Products, Gauges, Forgings, Etc. 






Homer & Wilson 

Stamping & Tool Works 

WE MAKE THE TOOLS 

AND 

PRODUCE THE STAMPINGS 

Let us quote on your requirements. 




1-3-5 Lancaster Street 
Hamilton, Ontario 





We 
Cut 
Gears 

Rawhide, 
Steel, Iron, 
Brass. 

We Make Grinder Heads, Power Hack Saws, 
Friction Pulleys, Index Heads. 

We cut racks any width, any pitch, to 8 feet in length. 
DESIGN AND BUILD SPECIAL MACHINERY 

WINNIPEG GEAR & ENGINEERING Co. 

197-199 PRINCESS ST., WINNIPEG 



What Can You Save? 

By Using Parts Made in the 
Punch Press 

Look over your standard parts, Mr. Manufacturer, and see what parts 

can be made (or could be made by slight change in design) by this 

process. 

You will be surprised at the saving you can effect. 

We make Blanking, Perforating, Drawing, Forming and all classes of 

dies and tools for plain or difficult stamping to suit the production 

required. 

A Battery of presses is also available at our plant to manufacture parts 

for you with the understanding that you pay only for good parts made. 

Our facilities ensure prompt deliveries at right prices. 






S^iS*t2 



r'^: 






^'^Mr'' 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



86 



(• V N A 1" 1 \ \ \i \ (■ II 1 N i: i; Y 



Volume Will. 



Spedol Machinery, Jigt, Fixtures, Punches and Dies, Small 

Tools, Screw Machine Products, Gauges, Forgings, Etc. 



mrmmm 



GEARS 

HAMILTON 

GEAR&MAGHINECO 




Cor. Concord 
& Vin Home 



TORONTO 



Consult 
these firms 



ACCURACY IN CUTTING makes SILENT 
POWER 



Shell Manufacturers 

Who expect New Shell 
Orders either from Canada 
or the United States, may 
need some of their shell 
equipment overhauled and 
repaired or rebuilt. We 
can handle it completely, 
satisfactorily and 
promptly. 

NOW IS THE TIME. 

The 

Preston Machinery Co., Ltd. 

PRESTON :-: ONTARIO, CANADA 



If ymi arc tuo liiisy, or 
if Vdiii- |)laiit is not equip- 
ped t(i handle all ])art.s of 
your contracts, let these 
linns help you. 

( 'onsult them b e f o r e 
placing 3'^our order. They 
a r e fully equi]:)ped for 
handling the work they 
specify — gears, small 
stani])ings, screw machine 
products, jigs, fine tools, 
etc. 

These firms have confidence 
in their ability to help you, else 
tlu'v wouldn't advertise their 
services. You'll find the reason 
for their confidence if you place 
\iiin' ]iroblems before them. 

And if you have the facili- 
ties for doing work of this sort, 
advertise it. When a probable 
user of your .services looks over 
tile list here, have your mes- 
sage where he will see it. 

Tvate cards and further par- 
ticulars on application. 



Canadian Machinery 

Contract Work Section 
143-153 University Ave., TORONTO 



// u-hat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 191' 



C A N A I) 1 A N yi A C 11 1 N E R Y 



87 



WHITMAN 



BARNES 



Twist Drills 

and 

Reamers 



Special 
High Grade 
Drop Forgings 




Screw and Drop 

Forged Wrenches 

Hammers 



Cotters 
Chisels: 

Punches, Etc.! 

i 



Users recognize *'W&B*' Tool Quality, backed by 64 Years* Uninterrupted Experience. If your Jobbers 
and Dealers cannot supply, write us and we will see that you are supplied. Send for Catalog No. 90. 

THE WHITMAN & BARNES MFG. CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1854 
CANADIAN OFFICE AND FACTORY /. /. ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 



YOU'LL FIND WHAT YOU WANT 

In the Classified Advertising Section of Canadian Machinery. Watch it each week 

for all kinds of new and used machinery. 

YOU MAY WANT WHAT YOU FIND. 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be ansivcred. 



S8 



t" \ N \ i« 1 \ N M \ r II 1 N r. i; V 



Volume XVIII. 



INDUSTRIAL CARS 

of the rit?ht kind for your work, and 

BELT HOISTS 

to rnovp them rapidly 

Reduce Overhead Charges 

That i^ wliy s«) many Cimadian Factories ari' lioin;; 
tHjuippinl by us with Holt Hoists ami siuall cars — 
IWaiiso ihcy rotUico oiioratinj" expenses, and liandlc 
materials much quicker than hy the older metlioiis 




Made with one. two, threi' or more Drums. 
m» lT<luir«d. and with any diameter Drum. 





We make cars to suit you and your work 

\\\' make thcni w ith wood body or steel 
l")od>- of ain si/.e or shajH' desired, and 
for handlinij aiu' kind of material, hot 
f)r cold, li^lit or heav\', wet or dry. 
1 et us send you photographs of special 
cars we ha\e made for others. They 
will interest yon. 

Oui- ('.\]>ci'ts arc at yoiii- .scfviro. ffoc of 
chartic til holp yon design ('(luipiiiciit 
whereby you can handle your materials, 
of whatever soi't, more (piiekly and at a 
t,M'eatly reduced co.st, and .so Reduce Your 
Overhead. 



Marsh & Henthorn, Limited, Belleville, Ontario 




Photo shows two of our Band Turning Machines in one of the largest shell shops in Canada. 

These machines are built for turning bands on 8", 9.2" and 12" shells. They are giving^ perfect satisfaction in several of the largest 9.2" 
shops in Canada. Let us put you in touch with some of them. Write for full particulars and price. 

Bennett Ave. ^Vardcil King Limited Malsonneuve, P.Q. 



// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and lorite advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



S9 



FUSE HOLE GAUGES 




Manufacturing and inspection fuse hole 
gauges for all size shells. A surplus 
stock enables us to ship immediately. 

Windsor Machine & Tool Works 

Windsor, Ontario 



Mining Machinery 

Parts 





Two-key Tappet 



Shoes and Dies, Tappets, 

Bosses, Cams and 

Stamp Heads 

Also Manufacturers of Lining 
Plates for Ball and Tube Mills 
Concaves and Heads for Gyra- 
tory Crushers. 

Machine Moulded Gears 

Any size up to 18 feet in diameter. 
No patterns needed. 

Send Us Your Specifications, 
We Do the Rest. Write— 

Hull Iron & Steel Foundries, Limited 

HULL, P.Q. 



Stamp Head 



r ~ " 

I 

t 
I 

V 




D 

k'^ 


1 

1 

1 

^ ■ 

1 
1 

i 




^ ^^,^-,. .,- ^^!^^^^^ 



// any advertisement interests you. tear it out now and place with letters to be ansivered. 



w 



CA N A 1> 1 \ N M A (• II 1 N l! IJ Y 



Volume Will. 



Ox>'Acet\leno V^'lding* and Cxitting 



,^ 




Strength and Neatness in 
Manufacturing and Repairing 

This illiistrntioii shows a Pre.«t-0-Lite ope: 
ali>r wcliliug parts in the factory of tlic 
Packard Motor Car To., where neatness ami 
strensitli are essential. 

Tlie l*rest-0-I,ite I'roecss of oxy-aeetyleii' 
welding has i^een adopted as standard pra( 
tiee in tiiousands of factories, mine-. 
machine shops and shiphuildinu plants. Ijotli 
in Can.'ida and the States. In the production 
end. this process restdts in inereiv^ed strength 
with reduced weiiilit in vital parts, while 
effecting suhstantial savings in cost of mate- 
d and labor. 



J^ 




PROCESS 



is not limited to production work. Its value in repairing 
is uniTentally acknowledged. Worn and broken metal parts 
are quickly reclaimed and put back into useful service. 
avoidinK costly tie-ups and dela>'s. The actual saving on 
one Prest-O-Lite repair often more than pays for the entire 
welding outfit- 

The Prest-0-Lite Process employs both gases (acetylene and 
oxygen) in portable cylinders. Pre&t-O-Lite Dissolved Acety- 
lene (ready to uset is backed by Prest-O-Lite Ser\'ice. which 
in-tures prompt exchange of full cylinders for empty ones. 
Provides do'. purified gas. insuring better welda, quicker 
work and lower operating cost. 

Manufacturers. Mining and Production Engineers will find 
our welding literature full of valuable data and helpful sug- 
gestions. It may help you to reduce your costs and improve 
your methods. Write for it to-day. 

Address Dept. C-107. 

THE PREST-0-LlTE CO.. INC. 

CANADIAN GENERAL OFFICES: 

Prest-O-Lite Building 

Cor. Elm Street and Centre Avenue 

TORONTO 

Direct Factory Branches: Toronto. Ont: Montreal. Que.; 

Merritton. Ont.: Winnipeg. Man. 
Canadian Plants: Toronto. Ont.: Merritton. Ont.: 

St. Boniface. Man.: Shawinigan Falls. Que. 



y 



Worlds Largest Makers of Dissolved Acetylerte 




Overhead 

Trolley 

Systems 



mTi' in\ahi:iMc in 
li^lit Work I'dUiidrirs 
I'lr (Irlixi'iint; nuill- 
ni iiicliil, follcclini;; 
.mil dcli\(')'inii' ra^l- 
\\\ii~. and (listriliut- 
inii lla.-^k.-- ;unl supplier, eli'. 

Any point in foundry or shop is ea.-^il\ rr.ichcd, 
even remote corners. Extensions naililv nindc. 
Sa\c lalior. time and lloor space. 
Siinl fur Ciildldf/ Xii. 111. 

Complete Foundry Equipments 
Cranes of all kinds 



kvi:iui;i4l 



FOUNDRYEQUIPMENTCQ 

HARVEY- ILL. U.S. A. 




Thread Accuracy 

Are you siitisfied with vour 
threads? Are they all you desire? 
Do you wish to get better re.sult5? 

That last question interests us vitally. 
Our Self-Opening Automatic Die Head 
will chase your troubles. Its quick 
release feature not only insures the 
cuttinjr of the thread to a given point 
every time, but permits cutting right 
to the shoulder vifhere required. 

Our booklet will tell you about other 
features. 

Eastern Machine Screw Corp. 



H&G 



New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. = 

i 1 1 1 1 |:|in'lllllirPIIIII!lll!llll|i|i|l!ll!|i!lll|l|l|i|i|l|ll'llllll|l|tli|ll!l'HIIII'Hin'^ 



// what you need is not advertised, 4onsult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



91 



INGOTS 

Brass, Bronze and Composition 

Any Alloy According to Your Formula 




ffNIFORMITY 



ALSO 

INGOT-COPPER 

99.9% PURE 
For High-Grade Castings 

Wire or Write for Prices 
We are Purchasers of Copper Bearing Material 

BROWN'S COPPER & BRASS ROLLING 

MILLS, LIMITED 



NEW TORONTO, 



CANADA 



Near Toronto 



// any advertisement interests yoii, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



92 



I'A N \ l> I A N \1 \ (' II 1 N K 1{ Y 



Volume XVni. 



Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting 






nrr of onr o( I.* Air l.igutJr Swirt>'» (Anmlinn rnrlurir 

Arol* Irnc, 



for niitiiufnrliirint: Ojiyifrn nnd DLtNolvetl 



What that word "Service" means to you 



Tho Oxy-Acctylcno proioss, U< ho the moans of saviiij; 
you money, time anil litbor, must be supported by an 
efficient service for jrnses (Oxypen ami Dissolved Acety- 
lene). t)n this nione depend the -jucress or failure of 
the process when applied to your industry. Neither 
effort nor money expenditure has been, or is being, 
sparxil to Rive the word "Service" its true and distinct 
definition, so that you may derive ALL the benefits 
from the process when applied in conjunction with 
■■.\.L.S." apparatus and ".\.L.S." service. 

Oar flucccuft 15 your bcjit 

The Pionecrt of the 

Procrfts throughout 

the world 



Wlu'ii in the marktl for ()xy-.\i-etyk'ne apparatus, before 
makint; a final decision, ask for particulars of our service 
which is worth many times more to you than the value 
of any apparatus you can buy. HeinK the pioneers of 
the process throuKhout the world from the time of its 
inception, our advice is invaluable to you and puards you 
aprainst possible disappointment — and it is free for the 
asking. We shall be pleased to give you ALL particulars 
as to how you may benefit by the process. 

Kuarante« of satisfaction. 



L'AIR LIQUIDE SOCIETY 



Manufacturer! of Oxyftn 
Dissolved Acetyleneand all 
requisites for the Process 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



CANADIAN FACTORIES: 
WINNIPEG 



HALIFAX : Under Construction 



COMMERCIAL ACETYLENE IS USED IN 
LARGEST SHIPBUILDING PLANTS 




Illustration shows Commer- 
cial Acetylene cutting ship 
plates in one of the largest 
shipbuilding plants in Can- 
ada. We guarantee both 
quantity ar>d quality of Com- 
mercial Acetylene. Write 
our nearest office about your 
supply. 

MAIN OFFICE: 

80 Broadway, New York 

BRANCHES: 

ATLANTA, GA. 
AURORA, ILL. 
BOSTON. MASS. 
BOUND BROOK, N.J. 
EAST DEERPIELD, MASS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
MOBERLY, MO. 
W. BERKELEY, CALIF. 



COMMERCIAL ACETYLENE WELDING CO., INC. 

18 TORONTO STREET, TORONTO 



/;■ ichat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



93 




ftt!£ 



-. -^--iv-^^I 




In ;i [.hint inaii iif;icturing steel office furnitui.' ih-' In-. 
Wintield Spot Wtlders effected such a savinjj that sev 
eral additional Winfields have since been installed. 



'tiuiL- are 7'» simt-welds uti one side of this ranKC body, 
and they were formed in less time than 15 rivets could 
have been inserted and hammered down. 



The Winfield Way y Makes Good 
on Stoves and Office Furniture 



A ND the "Winfield Way" will 
make good for you. too, — no 
matter whether you weld sheets, 
tubes, angle irons, or what not — as 
it has made good for a host of sat- 
isfied customers. 



Winfield Welders are made to 
make good! Their construction 
and design have been perfected by 
exhaust less experimentation. 
Their operation is simple; they 
consume little power, heat rapidly 
and uniformly and perform their 
work quickly and economically. 




Tlie rniige of work possilile with a Winfield Welder can only 
be realized when you understand that we are able to offer a 
machine for eA-ery conceivable sort of metal spot or butt welding. 

Whether you operate a small job shop where the work varies hi 
form and shape, or a large shoj) where much duplication work 
is necessary, there is a Winfield Welder for you — ready to 
point (he way to untold savings of time and labor. 

Send for booklet "Electric Welding by the Winfield Way" 



The Winfield Electric 
Welding Machine Co. 

Warren, Ohio 

Canadian Office : 
31 Ottawa Bank BIdg., Montreal, Que. 



If any adi'ertisement intetesta you tear it out vow and place with htfcrs to he answered. 



'.>4 



C A N A !• 1 A N \1 A (• II 1 N K K Y 



Volume XVIIT. 



Mr. Bruce's Counsel 

iM ( UK Ai I ^ \n'i,iii). mr. hkuck'S 

COL.NSIJ- iiuiN be said to rcccMiiiiKiul (hat busi- 
iKss imii sliDiiKl read e\fr\ wfck. 11 1 1'. 1 INANCIAL 
POS 1 ()l CANADA, (t) iiitoriii thcnischcs concerning 
current t\cnts in the realm of ('anailian business and 
public affairs. 

Iraitk 1 . Muituii. \'ice-Presiden( of the International 
I iine Recording ('oinpany. of (Canada, w rote the lol- 
lowini: letter to the publishers of Till'' POS'i^ 

Altonlion. Editor: 

Rofontlv wo sont vou a subscription coverinvr the delivery of 
THE FINANCIAI, POST to each of our Sales Apents and Sales- 
men throut;hout Canada. This was prompted by the fact that, 
in our opinion, your paper is the best barometer in Canada of 
what is poinp on in the different industries from one ocean to the 
other in this country. Your paper contains information invalu- 
able to any traveling representative of any firm. 

(Sipned) F. E. MUTTON. 
Dated Oct. 12, 1917. 

IN effect, TIIF, FINANCIAL POST rei>re.sents a Current EveiiLs Clul), 
met weekly for the con«iderntion and .study of current affairs in Canada 
in relation to if.solf and the world at lars;e. It represents the assembly of 
many, many suqia.^sincly well-informed contributors who discuss intelli- 
gently, lucidly and proportionately, Canada's public and business affair.-^. 
No more stimulating and worth-while paper is published in Canada for 
the man who wantf: to be able to talk confidently, at the club, luncheon, 
board meeting, business council, puVilic meetings, alx)ut Canadian public 
affairs. 

THE price, .S.I, is nothinjr to the man who really wants to 
know. Three dollars spent for knowledEe that multiplies a 
man's power and pleasure and satisfaction i.s a .small, small sum 
to pay. We make our appeal for subscriptions to men who really 
want to know and who will take time each week-end to read 
profitably. 

// you are wiUing to give this time, prove 
it by signing and mailing the coupon below 

The Financial Post 

of Canada 



Talk Current Events 



1917 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED, 
143-153 University Ave., Toronto. 

Send me THE FINANCIAL POST. I will remit year's subscription, $3.00, on 
receipt of bill. 

' ' Name 

' With 

(Name of firm, etc.) 
[cm] Address 



A I'lilK hv II. AdHlnffton Rnirr, Author of 

"Tlir Itiflillr of l'rrii<innlily." **rsycho- 

Utsy nnit I'nrrnllumil," Ktc. 



W 



HAT do you know nbout the dolnKS in 
thin Kr<'nt worltl wherein wc live 7 

On you try to form n renlly intelligent 
nnil woU-considcred opinion rcRnrdinit 
eventrt the world over? 

r)n you over diHCUHH their wiKnificnnce 
with friends nnd neiKhhnrH? 

If ii'^lted whiit you thiiil< of nny pnr- 
ticuljir event, ynu nre perhnpn rcndy with 
nn answer. I« your (inawcr anything but 
n «nnp judgment, determined by prejudice 
rather thnn l)y rcii»oninK nnnlysls 7 

I put these nuestiona not to be disnprree- 
nblc. but becnuso, if neceBftnry. I want to 
spur you to appreciate. *^hc value that 
there is in dlscusRion of current events. 

Many people, fortunately, appreciate its 
value instinctively. Perhnrs you are one 
of these. Many others arc bc-Kinninp: to 
appreciate it. 

This is shown by the Ktowinpr popu- 
larity of clubs and classes on current 
events. 

Only a few years aro such clubs and 
cl.'i.Asea were almost unheard of. To-day 
most of our hiprKer cities have half a dozen 
of them or more. 

In one city — Boston— a talented woman 
of my acquaintance draws an income of 
thousands of dollars a year from her lead- 
ership of current events classes. 

Other men and women have similarly 
discovered that interest in current events 
is increasing so t ipidly that they can well 
afford to orRanize classes like those con- 
ducted by the Roston woman. 

Still, there remain many people thou- 
sands of people — who never discuss cur- 
rent events. Many thousands more dis- 
cuss only such events as come under the 
headinKS of "crime." "the theatre," and 
"sports." 

These are the people I want to reach. 
They are the people I want to rouse to 
recognition of the practical helpfulness 
they will find in discussion of current 
events in Reneral. 

Current events clubs and classes might 
well be orjjanized in every neiprbborhood, 
with weekly meetings to take up the out- 
standing happenings in international af- 
fairs, national politics, literature, art. 
music, science and industry. 

Regular attendance at. and active par- 
ticipation in. these meetings will prove 
to be an education in itself. 

Tt will enlarge the mental horizon and 
l)roaden the moral sympathies. By dis- 
ciplining the mind to active thought it 
will raise the level of workaday efficiency. 

It will make for a more alert, a more 
conscientious citizenship. It will give zest 
and color to a life which perhaps has 
hitherto been pathetically drab. 

Unsuspected powers will be awakened 
With a better grasp on the realities of 
life, the whole personality will expand. 

One evening a week is certainly not too 
much to give to a discussion of the day- 
to-day developments in our wonderful 
world. 

It may mean doing without an evening 
at cards or at the musical comedy, or at 
the dance hall. But this, after all. is 
not a terrible sacrifice. 

And from the occasional talk over cur- 
rent events will come more profit than 
could possibly come from any number of 
evenings spent in card-playing, dancing, or 
listening to musical comedies. — Reprinted 
from the Toronto Daily Star. 



December 6, IQl'? 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



95 




The wonderful advancement 

and the superiority of the Davis- 

Bournonville apparatus can be proven 

to you by practical demonstration, at 

your own works if you so desire. 

Davis-Bournonville apparatus leads the world in range, 
efficiency, and number of plants in successful daily use. 
Write us for prices and demonstrations. 

Carter Welding Co. of Toronto, Limited 







Mechanical 
Drawing 

By Ervin Kenison, S.B. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of TechnoIoEv 

176 pp., U<> illus. Cloth binding. Gives a 
course of practical instruction in the art of 
Mechanical Drawing, based on methods that 
have stood the test of years of experience. 
IncUides orthographic, isoinetric and obHque 
projections, shade lines, intersections and 
developments, leltering, etc., with abundant 
exercises and plates. 

Price, S1,00 

MacLean Publishing Co. 

Technical Book Dept. 
143-153 University Ave,, Toronto 



•co«e««*^ 




BRASS 

Castings 



The coupling of expert work with unexcelled equipment 
enables us to produce on a large scale Brass Castings of any 
size or alloy. 

Our prices, too, are most reasonable; for our large purchases 
direct from the smelters command their every price favor. 

For better Brass Castings at a money saving, send your orders 
to us. We promise that our work will please you. 

The St. Lawrence Welding Company, Ltd., Montreal, P.Q. 

Manufacturers of Steel Tanks. Air Receivers, Welded Tanks, Etc. Electric Welders. Oxy- Acetylene Welders. Boiler Repairs. 

Lead Burning: and Brass Foundry Work. 

Office: 138 Inspector Street Works: 39 Olier Street Telephone: Office, Main 5779. Manager's Res.. Westmount 3483 



// any advertificmeut interests you, tear it out vow and place with letters to be answereif. 



96 



r A N A ni A N M A Oil 1 X K K V 



Volume XV4II. 



MACLEAN'S 



jor DECEMBER 



MACLEANS MAGAZINE GETS BETTER ALL THE TIME 



Snipers and Sniping — by a Sniper 

A^NlI'l'.lv is l);u'k in Canada — a star siii|ur, who has 154 marks on bis rifle, every mark 
incaninsj; a German life. Most of ns know absolutely nothing of the work of the sniper, 
but tlio story — a rcmarkalile one — is told in the Christmas (December) MACLEAN'S by the 
cliampiou sniper of the (^anadian Expeditionary Forces. This man was buried by a shell- 
explosion, was dug out by two comrades, and he has lived to tell us his wonderful story, in 
MACLEAN'S. It's worth 15c to get this story alone. 



(( 



?) 



Politics From Within 

— Leacock, of Course 

TRUST Leacock to see a chance for his witty and humorous 
pen. He deals with the humorous phases of electioneering in 
C«::ada in his usual vein. 

Why Laurier sent Troops 
to South Africa 

THI-S contribution, bj- Col. John Bayne Maclean, goes back- 
ward many years — to the time of the South African War 
in 1899-1900. That was when Canada first took up arms for 
the Empire. Politics, of a high order, was back of the decision 
to send Canadian troops to the .\ntipodes. It is "inside" history. 

Oppenheim — Allenson — 
McBeth — Mumford 

ALONG instalment of Oppenheim's absorbing story, The 
Pawns Count, is given in the December MACLEAN'S. A 
short story, by A. C. Allenson is seasonable. Madge McBeth 
contributes a complete novelette. The Man Who Wasn't. And 
Ethel Watts Mumford. teller of delightful tales, delicately told, 
gives us the first of a series of short stories — Love and the Lock- 
smith. 

The Usual Popular Departments 

THE Business Outlook. The Nation's Business, Women and 
Their Work, and the Review of Reviews— all are present in 
strong way in the December M.A.CLEAN'S. 

At All Nev^^s-Stands 

15c. 



Gadsby's Story of the 
Union Government 

GADSBY is saturated with Ottawa knowledge — much of it of 
the iiKsidc variety. He pokes about, talks with big men; 
and big men, and lesser ones, talk with Gadsby. Useful sort 
of man, is Gadsby. What he hears and learns he writes about 
for MACLEAN'S; and in this story of his about the new Union 
Government, he reveals the undercurrents on the movement that 
developed into negotiations, and which finally resulted in a 
Union Government. Gadsby adds interesting biographical in- 
formation to his brilliant study. 

Robt. W. Service is back 
ag:ain 

BACK in MACLEAN'S, that is— in body, he is still in Flanders — 
where the fighting grows uglier all the time. Service has 
taken time to write verse for MACLEAN'S. You know well the 
virility of his style, and the gripping, human character of his 
verse. It is about life and men in the trenches he writes — 
about our boys far from us. It is worth something to see our 
boys as Service sees them. Read "The Shape at the Wheel" in 
the December MACLEAN'S. 

Arthur Stringer Avrites a 
Beautiful Christmas Poem 

STRINGER is a wonderful man — wonderfully versatile, won- 
derfully human. He is a master of the short-story and of 
the detective and mystery type of story; and he can ciimb the 
heights of literary endeavor, as he has in this passing sweet 
poem — Christmas Bells in War-time. Y'our heart is tender these 
times of horrible slaughter and of heroic achievement, and you'll 
be grateful to Stringer for putting beautifully your innermost 
thoughts and feelings. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



97 



There is a half -century of 
experience back of every 
G. & B. Installation 



it 
it I 

n 
It 
1 



THE Ix'iiefit of this long experience, wliicli 
iiicludes a thorough worlving knowledge of 
fuels, combustion and heat-treating methods 
is yours, whether you iiistal one Gilbert and 
Barker furnace or a hundred. 

This should mean a great deal to you if you 
contemplate installing furnaces. 

Gilbert and Barker furnaces are known for 
their dependability, wherever they are used. 
The exi^erimental stage in their construction 
has been long passed. Year in and year out 
they give unequalled service to their users. It 
will pay you to investigate them. Our Engin- 
eering Department will gladly advise you. 



AVe are now making delivery 
from f^tock on the smaller 
furnaces. All are made for 
either eas or oil fuel or can 






lie furnished with combina- 
tion gas or oil burners. Cata- 
log 24 gives more details. 
You'll find it interesting. 



In (iill)ert & Barker Furnaces, heat loss from 
radiation is cut dovm to the minimum. Heavy 
walls and the high quality of the fire hrick used 
retain the maximum amount of heat. 

Linings are made of the very best grade of 
Penn.sylvania Fire Brick, Hard Baked. 

None but the best grade materials used through- 
out. 

Repairs, when necessary, are readily made without 
distiu'bing the general construction. 

We make both Gas and Fuel Oil Burning Heat 

Treating Furnaces in more than 100 standard 
types. 

These are some of the many good reasons why you 
should investigate. Get catalog 24 now. 



Gilbert & Barker Mfg. Co, 

f WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Canadian Agents: 

Williams & Wilson, Montreal, Que. 

James De Von, 227 Davenport Road, Toronto, Ont. 



// any advi riisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



M 



r AN A 1' 1 A N M A (■ 11 I N K K Y 



Volume XVIII. 



One of the 120 

BELLEVUE 
FURNACES 



Thir-. <'iir -cini iiiuillr «ii-ii;li. I>_1ip| lirm- 

inn, nwH'-liar<l('iiinj; nixl ainu'iiliu};. Wv- 
l\'«'tt»<l o>iiil>ii<liiiii ]>ivrluiU's tlu' foriniilioii 
iif oxidizing oU'iiu-iils. Tiio (liiino, not 
vi.<il>lo in lite nuillli'. tlcu's not toiiH' in 
lontiirt will> llio iiiji.ii.il rnirliinlly wi 
■ MiiKlin); jMX'^siMi'. 

A riMuarkiiMt' fncl (•(■i>n>inii/.iT. fur it lu'iils 
up rapidly anil hold* liwit lonj; aftor 
i'nrners are shut olV. IVllovno illnsfratcd 
lalalos^ne gives full i)aitii'ulaiN. 

Writ,: 

RcprvtrtitatiTeft in Canndii : 
H. W. Peine, Limited, Toronto. Canada 

Bellevue Industrial Furnace Co. 

703 Bellevue Ave. - Detroit, Mich. 

JLI.R'S C. HINZ. Proi. 




The Oven Equipment & Manufacturing Company 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

"CRAWFORD SECTIONAL" OVENS 

Heated with our Enclosed Flame Gas Burners, or Electricity 

FOR BAKING JAPANS AND OTHER FINISHES ON METAL. 

Ovens carried in stock and built to meet requirements of manufacturers. 
Builders of All-Steel Oven Trucks with Roller Bearings. 

Canadian Representatives: The A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY COMPANY, Ltd. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



How Many of Your 
Shells Are Being 
Rejected 




Water Jacket for Nosing Furnace 

This STEEL jacket holds a large amount of water, 
which keeps the body of shell cold, and permits of 
proper heating of the nose for nosing operations. 
Being made of steel, it stands contraction and expan- 
sion — not possible with cast iron. 
It is indestructible and fool-proof. Made for all sizes of shells. 
We can make this jacket to any special dimensions, with any 
desired attachments. No patterns are required — specifications all that 
are necessary. 

Tested and Guaranteed. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 



Canadian Welding Works, Ltd., 



51 IWontfort 
Street 



Montreal, P.Q. 



// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A I) I A X M A C IT T N E K Y 



ilG 



99 




Annealing and 
Tempering 
Furnaces installed 
in the plant of the 
Canadian Vickers, 
Limited, Montreal. 



ii 



MeDOl" 



The installation of "Mecol" furnaces shown here is but one 
instance where a quality furnace was chosen to give 
maximum production. The furnace you may require is the 
one we desire to give you complete and full information 
about. Write us. 

Mechanical Engineering Co. 

Limited 
THREE RIVERS QUE. CANADA 





THE 

Efficient 

Heat- 
Treatment 
of Steel 



Electric, Gas, and 
Oil Furnaces 



[CANADIAN HOSKINS, LIMITED 



I Pyrometers and Chromel Alloy 
WALKERVILLE ONTARIO 



WILLIAMS' 

"AGRIPPA" 

Tool Holders 

"THE HOLDERS THAT HOLD" 




The Tlu-eading Tool with 
lockable spring head will 
do roughing, fini.«hing and 
threading at one setting df 
tlie tool ])ost. 





// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



«H) 



\ \ \ i> 1 \ \ M \ (' II I \ i: iv V 



Volume XVIIl. 



Outlast and Outlift 

%Any Other Hoist 



E 



Steel Hoists 
Never Break" 

Ranninir from 1 ton to 2i), Wright Hoists 
arc steel and malleable iron in every 
working and load-liftinK part. 
And the WriRht Hand Chain pulled from 
any angle cannot foul or catch. 




\ \\'k\ i1;i\ llciisl^ ;ni' liidkcii. inatci-inls ;iii(l iii;icliiiics 

iii'c (l.iiiiaut'd. (iinc i.s wasted, iikhicv i.s Idst, men ai'e 

.^(ri«>n.><ly injui-ed— all liecause this or tliat man in (•liarj;e 

did not know tlia) cast iron lor t he woikinj;' and hiad-lifting 

jiarts of a hoist is iievei' icliahle. 

On tlie other hand, you ])rohal)ly know as well as W(> that 
the working- and load-snstainin.u ]tarts of a hoist iiuist l)e 
strongest malleable iron and strongest steel — or danger is 
ever present. 

Knowing this beforehand, to yon doubly rogretable would 
be a sei'ious hoisting accident in your plant. 




Do not pay Ex- 
porionce in money 
and regret for 
knowledge that is 
already yours. In- 
stead, u.=e Wright high- 
speed steel hoists that 
never break; that outlast 
and ovitlift any other hoLst. 

/(■ /';(■ r(itaIo(/ue to-daij. 

Wright Mfg. Co. 

LISBON, OHIO 

Canadian Agents: 

A. R. Williams Machinery Co. 
Limited 

Toronto. St. John. N.B.. Winnipeg. 
Vancouver 




JIII fiiiiilMN||;ii|Hi||i 



High Speed Steel Hoists 



Decembei- 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C 11 1 N P: R Y 



101 



DEPENDABILITY 

Has Made 

HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE 

THE MOST POPULAR BABBITT METAL 
IN THE DOMINION 

Manufactured by 

THE CANADA METAL CO., LTD. 

HamJiion, Montreal, TORONTO, Winnipeg, Vancouver 




IT FLOWS 
FREELY 

IT WILL 
NOT CRACK 

IT IS COPPER 
COATED 

IT IS COPPER 
HARDENED 



BOND ADJUSTABLE SKATE SHARPENER 




Suitable for 8-inch Emery Wheels 

Babbitted and Reamed Bearings 

Unnecessary to Remove Skates from Boots 

Write for full information 

Canadian Bond Hanger & Coupiirg Co., Ltd. 

Alexandria, Ontario 




Safety First 



A 

Principle 
1^ That Ap- 
lies Full 
Force to the 



BERNARD 
FRICTIONAL 



Discard dangerous tt^i-hj 

clutches that are a ^LiU 1 V^il 

constant danger to 

life and limlj of the workmen engaged in their 
vicinity. A safe, simple and reliable substitute 
will be* found in the Bernaril Friction Clutch — 
use it and j-ou will be applying the good axiom 
"Safety Fir.st" in your shop. 

You can see by the illustration how com- 
pletely the mechanism is made non- 
dangerous by the protecting cast shield. 
Accessible at side for adjusting. Can be 
used in combination with pulley sprocket 
or gears. 

Write for full particulars. 

The A. Bernard Industrial Co. 

Manufacturers of High Grade 
Power Transmission Appliances 

Office and Works: FORTIERVILLE, Que., Can. 




Jones & Glassco (Reg'd) 

ENGINEERS 

MONTREAL AND TORONTO 

Specialists in 

POWER TRANSMISSION CHAINS ' 

CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 

"RENOLD" 

Patent Silent and Bash Roller Chains 

"MORSE" 

Rocker Joint Silent Chains 

Chain Drives from % H.P. to 5000 H.P. in successful 

operation 

Write for particulars to 

Head Office: Branch Office: 

St. Nicholas Building 1204 Traders Bank Baildine 

MONTREAL TORONTO 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to he answered. 



102 



C A N \ IM \ N M A (■ II I N i: K V 



Volume XVIII. 



r 



StajjjMl 



WMS^ 




In a slioji .-iucli as tliis. tlic iiiacliiiiists ii-p nniiiy 

Starrett Tools. _ Willi nur reputation tor tiiif 

j)rerision tools, we could not muster up courage to put 

our name on a hack saw that is second to any olitaiti- 

able. We know that 

Starrett Hack Saws Are Unexcelled 
Just As Starrett Tools Are Unexcelled 

We make them in our own shops; in the same plant with Starrett Tools. \\\- 
know what steel they are made of. We know what they will do, for we test 
saws all tlie time under known conditions. With us it is test, test, test — to 
find out just what constitutes the best saw for this work or for that. 

There is no question about the ciuality of Starrett Hack .Saws. The only 
question is what numbered saw you should recommend, and this question is 
easily answered by referring to page 208 of our Catalog No. ■21M.\, wliicli 
sliMW- what -aw to u-e for any particular work. 



The L. S. Starrett Co. 

The World's Greatest Toolmakers 
ATHOL, MASS. 

NEW YORK LONDON CHICAGO 



*^sr* 



42-748 




y 



Cut Quicker-Last Lougcr 



' «r ■ liiUMjMffr 



I December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



103 




A Man's Jo 

Erecting cast-iron hangers i^ 
a man's job — and what is 
more, it doesn't take much of a 
hanger to require two or three 
men to get it into position. 

A • • Pioneer " Pressed Steel 
Hanger weighs only one-third 
as much as a cast-irpn hanger; 
it has greater strehgth and 
costs no more; it can be 
erected by one man easily. 

Why not, therefore, u^ 
"Pioneer" Hangers? 



Have you ia copy 
of our new booklet 
"Transmis sion 
Data"? It is worth 
studying. Mailed 
promptly for the 
asking. 



Standard Pressed Steel Company 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 
Sole Distributors for Ontario: H. W. Petrie, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



:04 



CANADIAN M A t' !I 1 N KU Y 



Volume XVI ri. 



:i»i:iii'hij[m 






SATISFACTION 



© 




AMACOL 
ADAMUS 



TENAXAS 
ATLAS 



DURASTIC 
MASCOT 



TIN-TOUGHENED 
W. E. W. BABBITT 



These Babbitts are the result of years of experience and have a world-wide reputation for 

uniformity and reliability. 

No Shock Too Severe No Load Too Heavy No Speed Too Great 

ATLAS METAL & ALLOYS COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED, MONTREAL 

Sales Agents: 

The Canadian B. K. Morton Co., Limited 



MONTREAL: 49 Common Street. 



TORONTO: 86 Richmond Street East. 



Philadelphia GEAR Works 

VINE STREET PHILADELPHIA, P.A. 

Spur. Bevel, Spiral, Herringbone and Intermittent 

GEARS and PINIONS 

\i ade in all kinds of Metals, Rawhide and Fibre 



BEVEL 
GEARS 



SOCKET WHEELS 

MADE TO ORDER 
DISTRIBITORS OF 

DIAMOND CHAINS 

For Power Transmission, Machinery 
and Motor Trucks* Motor-Cycles and 
Bicycles. 

We ship eears to all parts of Canada. 
Write us when you want eood gears, 
Eood service, good prices. 

Get our Catalogue: "All About Gears" 





^ Gt ip pgp^^cXl Juae er-^ 



The Cost of Delay 

IF a thing is worth having, it is v»-orth 
having now. The present nionieut is 
worth more to all of us than all the 
to-morrows in the calendar. 
Vjixfh dav vou put off sending for the 
••Clipper" Belt Lacer for 20 days' trial, 
you are running the risk of an expen- 
sive shut-down. 

Three minutes is the maxinunn time 
required to lace a broken belt with the 
■•Clipper" Belt Lacer. 

Clipper Belt Lacer Company 

976 Front Avenue Grand Rapids, Mich. 



// -what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



105 



Clean Out Shells 




For light grinding, polishing, drilling — for 
cleaning out shells of all sizes — the Strand 
is the machine you need. 

Drop a card for catalog to-day. 



Clean out the interior wall or base of any siee 
shell and retouch the rough spots 

with this 

"STRAND*' 

Flexible Shaft Machine. Freely flexible to a 

certain radius, where it automatically forms a 

stop, it positively prevents accidental short 

bends. Shell factories throughout Canada use 

it with great success. 

Three-speed countershaft and belts prevent 

overloading of the motor. 

Simply remove the detachable handle and 

wheel, and drill chuck can be attached quickly 

and easily. 

The Strand Flexible Shaft with metal casing 

outwears any other shaft and gives none of the 

trouble common to ordinary flexible shafts. 

R.E.T.Pringle, Limited 

Manufacturers' Agents 
OFFICES : 

Tyrrell Bldg., 95 King St. East, Toronto 

401 New Birks Bldg.. MONTREAL. QUE. 
3402 Osier Ave.. VANCOUVER. B.C. 



PRACTICALITY 

AFTER fifteen years' study 
of the Miner's and Lum- 
berman's wants, we know just 
what is and what is not re- 
quired in tools for them. 

Practicality has been the key- 
note of our organization. Ex- 
perience has aided us in elim- 
inating all unnecessary parts 
and in perfecting the design 
of our tools. 

The use of best material and 
finest workmanship enable us 
to manufacture tools that are 
unexcelled. 

We make a complete line. 

Write us for prices. 

J. W. GUMMING ^ SON, LTD. 



NEW GLASGOW, 



CANADA 



Wood or Steel, let Cummings make it. 




Circulating Pumps 

Eliminate the separate relief valve and its necessary 
piping by installing the Roper Circulating Oil Pump. 
But, you say, why install a new system when the present 
is good enough? This "good enough" _ article may 
appear to be giving satisfaction, but, is it giving the best 
to be obtained. Can you speed up without any fear? 
With a Roper you need not have any fear of any kind. 
The oil flows from it in a steady, even stream, and there 
you can speed up to full capacity and let her go feeling 
confident. 

Inquire. You will get valuable information anyway. 

C. F. ROPER & CO. 

Hopedale : Mass. : U.S.A. 



// interealed, tear out this page and keep t«ith letters to be answered. 



106 



C.\ N A I> 1 A N \I A (• II 1 N i; i; V 



Volumo XVIII. 



W^Bt_. 




"T»r 





CURTIS, St. Louis, U.S.A. 



\ii; < uMriiLsSiiius — Aiu imi.sr.-s - 'ikollkvs and 

TKOl.l.KV SY.STB.MS— SAM> HLASTS -I'NKI'MATIC AND 
IIVDKO I'NKU.MATIC KI.KVATOUS ,IIH AND TKAVELINO 
' UANtS. 

Wo h«vo Kpooinlir.oil for ovor -- vcars on piioiiiniitio iimchiuory. 
Wo have lii'volopeil thv simple air i-ylindiT into a straight lino 
motor with womlorful speed control nml cicpendability capable 
of the n-iJest application to hoisting problems. 

Our new rontrolknl'Splash oiling system with regiilntable sight 
feed cylinder oiling is something entirely new in air compressor 
iesign. 

rontl»lrlr riiltiloKit und ili^crlptUr rlr^-iiliirN i>n "iir rntirt* tliic 
riirnlhlirtl nil rr<HM*st. 

Curtis Pneumatic Machinery Co. 



1585 Kienlen Avenue 
New York Office 



St. Louis, U.S.A. 
532F Hudson Terminal 




mi 




CANADIAN MADE 



CANADIAN MADE 



Electric and Hand Traveling Cranes 




Single Girder Electric 
Hoist Crane, Type 
D-15S. 1 Ton to 10 
Tons. 

Made also double gird- 
er design. 



Northern Crane Works, Limited 

- Walkerville, Ontario, Canada 



Type D Electric Hoists 
— M; to 10 Tons. 

Air Hoirts, Trolleys 
and Tracks. 



Type Xo. 20 
Air Il.'ist. 



// urhat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



107 





No. 138 
Single Cutter Turner 




No. 139 
Multiple Cutter Turner 





No. 149 
Rear Forming Tool Holder 



No. 143 
Knurling Tool 



Bar Equipment 



TlieM' are mil}' fdur of the many standard IodIh 
tliat .'^ulistantiate the ehiini of the designer that the 
l-li Univer-al Tnrret Lathe is the liiggest pro- 
dncer of liar work of its class and size. 

Ncite the rigidity of the Single Cutter Turner, 
and in connection herewith consider the effect of 
rigidity on production, also the time-.*aving 
eftV'cted Ijy the graduated dial in setting the tool. 

The Multiple Cutter Tui-ner is the big- time-saver on 
lighter work. As shown in the cut, it can carry four 
cutters and a drill for simultaneous operations, but on 
special order it can be equipped to carry six cutters and 
a drill, making seven cutting tools in all. 

THE COMBINATION OF FOSTER MACHINE 
AND FOSTER TOOLS— MAXIMUM PRODUCTION. 

Please note, however, that this applies to all of the 
general machines built by 



FOSTER MACHINE COMPANY 

Elkhart, Indiana 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



108 



CA N A n 1 A N M AC U INEU Y 



Volunu- XVIII. 



HIGH SPEED 
HAMMERS 

For Hijfh Speed Work 
FLAIURES: 




Economy ia floor 

spmo. rliminAii ' 
»<ui;t and a . . 
•uteoU savinc 
from 15''„ to 20' 
on any class of 
work. TJio life .It" 

t'o ■> .1r' 1!:.' i< i.t.i,- 
ti'Mi'v i:;. !.■;;;;;:,■ ., , 
!>' ''>|ilior b r o n s I' 
I'lisiunRs are used 
throughout. 

No rivelinu too in- 
tricate for us; no 
rivctinjr which our 
mnohine cannot nc 
complish. 

Send for our High 
Speed Hammer 
Book. 

THE HIGH SPEED HAMMER CO. 

Rochester. N.Y. 

S«le« .\gentt : The A K. Williams Machinery Company, 

! inutfj. rnroiiio. i_>nlari(' 




-'t.:^e 



iV^e.^^" -,5 one ^- , ^-vVv 



ues an<i ^ 
us to g^^' 



*"P"''tuactWe 



.e 



a^' 



/etv 



d P^o'' 



.Apt 



setv 



\ce. \ 



. T)oTnVtvVo^ Co U^^^^ 



\ 






n 



ERIE" STEAM FORGING 

HAMMERS 

are not ordinary 
hammering mach- 
ines. They are 
Hammers of 
exceptional 
merit. Inves- 
tigate and sat- 
isfy yourself. 

A bulletin for 
the ask- 
ing. 




ERIE FOUNDRY COMPANY 

ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA, U. S. A. 





















0^ 










ELMES 

18" Stroke Hydraulic Pump 

for maximum pre.ssures and capacities, for 250 
horse-power motor — a pump designed to meet 
the demand for a high-pressure outfit of large 
capacity, and one able to withstand the severe 
usage of present-day practice.- 

Other designs for all pressures and 
capacities. 

Charles F. Elmes Engineering 
Works 

217iNo. Morgan Street CHICAGO, ILL. 



If what you need is not advertUed, cotisuH our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed utider proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



109 



Consolidated Presses 



appeal to discriminating users because of the massive 
construction of all working parts, the generous crank 
shaft bearings, the increased diameter of crank pins, 
liberal crank cheeks, long and carefully fitted slide bear- 
ings, abnormally large connection screws, powerful 
gearing, and above all, the skill and care exercised in 
their construction. 

rhese are features which should be considered when 
purchasing. 



Consolidated Press Company 

HASTINGS LARGEST EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS OF POWER PRESSES IN U.SA. MICHIGAN 

Canadian Representatives: A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., Limited, Toronto, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver 




Her Sure Touch 




Her deep-rooted desire 
to do thoroughly what- 
ever work is expected 
of her maizes 

WOMAN 

ideally fitted for operating 
the Grant 

Silent 
Riveter 

Instead of nerve-racking, 
hammer-like blows : with this 
Grant Rotary Rivet Spinning.' 
Machine there is absolute 
quiet. Noiseless twin rolls, 
revolving independently of 
each other, roll heads on the 
rivets under pressure. One 
rivet every second, and never 
a bent shank, whether rivets 
are soft brass or hard steel. 
Heads finished perfectly 
smooth, show no mark of the 
riveting tool. 

Thousands of articles now 
being riveted on Grant 
Noiseless Riveters. Write. 

GRANT 

Mfg. and Machine Co. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN., 
U.S.A. 



PRESSES 



Pumps 
and 
Accumu- 
lators 

FOR ALL 
PURPOSES 

Made in 
Canada 



NOSING PRESS 

WILLIAM R. PERRIN, Limited 

TORONTO 




// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



110 



(' A N A i> I \ \ M A CHIN i; i; v 



Vohimo Win. 



Bilton 



G 



jisiM 



ear 






lor \ Diir shop — it t\ ct\ workinij liour 
must (.ii.li\ (.r a piwii'tcnniiuil (]iiaiiiii\ 
(>t output Ix'Noud the oniinar) ; 
It the cuttiiii; ot spur ami hc\cl tx<-'^i''^. 
laps and torni work must be ahsohiteU 
accurate. 

In the iie\er-\ arying service of Bilton 
Clear Millers \-ou will realize satisfac- 
tion w holl\- unusual. 
I he cutter of a liilton Gear Miller is 
actually removing metal 90% of the 
time. And while on its return stroke 



Millers 



lifted clear of the work, the indexing is 
done automatically. 
Moreover, aiu angle from the hori- 
zontal to an angle of 90 degrees is 
accurateh milled. 

l^'or ,i{iitirii///crri estimate of Bilton 
CJear .Miller performance on your 
output, send us blue i')rints of your 
work. Or send a few blanks for us to 
finish, in which case we can show you 
the quality of Bilton work as well as 
positive proof of time saved. 



Also Manufacturers of — 
Plain Horizontal Millers 
Automatic Millers 
Plain and Ball Bearing 
Bench and Column Drills 
Riveting Machines 
Milling Cutters 

Catalog 30 on request 



The Bilton Machine 
Tool Co. 

Sacceeding The Standard Mfg. Company 

Housatonic Ave., Bridgeport 
Conn., U.S.A. 

Foreign Agents : 

Alfred Herbert, Limited 

M. Mett Elngineering Company 

Chas. Churchill Company, Limited 




// what you yieed 13 not (idvertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



111 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out 7ioiv and place with letters to be answered. 



112 



CAN. A I' 1 A N M H' II 1 N l" U Y 



Voluiii.' XVIIT. 



If it is a Question of Efficiency 

Thero ate Inthes tlint will give you nil grndcs of ellii-iencv. 
l?ut \vr iiilorprot olVu-ioiu\v to luoim iiighosl speed niul ijiialilv 
iif proiiik'tioii toeriluT wilii lowest possible cost, Tiiose fea- 
tures aro embodied in the making ami with lliein are 
,1-. .. ; ,N..i ji raujie of work tJiat registers from coarse to the 
N luvcjitipnte. If this doesn't meet your require- 

ni. : - \M linve sueh a line that we can easily supply your 

Hardinge Bros. 




Inc. 



1770 Berteau. 
Avenue, 

CHICAGO 
ILL, U.S.A. 




No. 2-A— With "Bar Equipment." 



Two Cuts at One Time 

The ability to face, undercut or neck with the 
square turret while boring or turning with the 
hollow-hexagon turret contributes largely to the 
time-saving and economical output of the 

Universal Hollow-Hexagon 
Turret Lathes 

Separate feed shaft-*, each with ten individual feeds, operate the 
carriage and turret .«addle independently, and provide the exact 
feed required for each. 

And to this great advantage are added the other e.ssentials for 
rapid and accurate production — excess power, extreme rigidity, 
great adaptability, and a power rapid traverse that. saves time 
and conserves the energy of the operator. 

Without obligation, ask us to show the 
saving on one of your typical jobs. Send 
blueprints with rough and finished samples. 

THE WARNER & SWASEY CO., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agent. : A. R. Williams Machinery Company. St. John, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver; Williams & Wilson, Montreal, 
Benson Bros., Sydney and Melbourne, Australia; A. Asher Smith, Sydney, Australia 




No. 2-A — With "Chucking Equipment.' 



_^^ ;/ ,chat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



113 



L3|4 "^ I "13 Tin Heavy Duty Manufacturing 



Lathe — 20'lnch Sv\^mg 




A Heavy Simplified Lathe for Rapid Production Work 

Designed and built especially for Machining High Explosive and Shrapnel Shells up to and including 
8-inch. Used and Endorsed by many of the Largest and Most Successful Shell Manufacturers. 



HEADSTOCK 



All Headstock journals are 
provided with well lubri- 
eated. renewable bronze bearings. Altemat4 
heat treated steel and bronze washers take the 
end thrust and a simple adjustment is provided 
to take up wear. All gears are covered with 
neat and substantial cast iron guards that may 
be quickly removed when desired. 



B F D ^^^ ^^^ ^ ^^ deep construction and 
__ width to give the greatest rigidity undT 

heavy cuts. The shears are made extremely mas- 
sive and the bed walls extra thick, providing the 
necessary mass of metal to absorb the vibration 
and shocks incident to heavy turning at high 
speeds. Heavy box girths tie the front and rear 
walls of the bed together at close intervals. Im- 
proved type wide angle V on front shear to take 
thrust of cutting tool. The rear bearing of car- 
riage on bed is flat instead of V-shaped. At the 
rear of the bed planed pads are provided for 
attaching Taper and Foi-ming Attachments. 



Swing over bed 20 in. 

Swing over carriage 11 in. 

Length of Bed Standard 8 ft. 

Distance between centres 8 ft. bed 40 in. 

Width of bed overall I914 in. 

Height from floor to centres 40 in. 

Dimensions of front spindle bearing.. 

4 15/16 in. X 6% in. 

Dimensions of rear spindle bearing. 4 in. x by^ in. 

Diameter Nose of spindle 4 in. 



DESCRIPTION 

CARRIAGE "^^^ bridge is very wide and 
extraordinarily deep ; it 
will not spring under the heaviest cuts. The car- 
riage is gibbed to the bed at the rear on the 
outside and will not lift under any conditions. 

APRON '^'^^ apron is of heavy double plate 
type affording a support or bear- 
ing to both ends of all shafts. Apron is tongued 
and grooved to the carriage, also bolted and 
dowelled. The feed friction has a greatly in- 
creased diameter and will pull the heaviest feeds 
and cuts without slipping. For engaging the 
friction a hand wheel several inches in diameter 
is provided and seats the friction firmly with 
very small effort on the part of the operator. 
All studs in apron revolve and simple but ade- 
tiuate oil in? facilities are provided. 

FEEDS Positive Gear drive through head- 
stock spindle, steel gears in gear 
box, three rates of feed are provided for through 
sliding key type. Feeds per revolution of spindie 
being U in., 1-16 in. and 1-32 in. All gears in 
the feed train are fully guarded. 



DIMENSIONS 

Hole through spindle 1 5/16 in. 

Diameter Tailstock spindle 3% in. 

Travel of Tailstock spindle 6 in. 

Morse Taper — Centers No. "> 

Width of Tool Slide 12 in. 

Diameter of Headstock Cones. 11 in. and 14 in. 

Belt Width 6 in. 

Number of Feed Changes 3 

Feeds per Revolution of Spindle 

^s in., I IB in.. 1, 32 in. 



TAILSTOCK The tailstock U a mas- 
sive castmg. rigidly 
braced internally, and is provided with a long 
nose, making it unnecessary to extend the tail- 
stock spindle for ordinary work. It ia clamped 
to the bed by four large locking bolts operated 
at the top of the barrel. A simple binder locks 
the tailstock spindle in correct alignment ; this 
clamp is located at the extreme front end, where 
it grips the spindle with the utmost rigidity 
and absolutely does away with distortion of any 
kind. The screw is unusually large to resist any 
buckling tendency. Suitable screws are provided 
for setting over for Taper Work. 



£^QUIPMENT Unless otherwise speci- 

^ fied Lathes are furnish- 

ed with 8 ft. bed, one driving plate, hand cross 
feed, heavy duty plain rest, necessary wrenches, 
and two-speed tight and loose countershaft. Form- 
ing attachment, turret tool post, hand or power 
feed bed turret, oil pan, pump, and connections 
can be furnished as e.\'tras when desired. 



Speed of Countershaft 110 R.P.M. 

Size of Tight and Loose Pulleys.. 16 in. x 6^ in. 

Ratio of Back Gearing 6.7 to 1 

Face of Back Gears 2% in. and 2^4 in. 

Len^ith of Carriage Bearing 30 in. 

Width of Carriage Bridge 12 in. 

Number of Spindle Speeds with Two-Speed 

Countershaft S 

Wei^'ht— Approximately. S ft. Bed 5.300 lbs. 



Immediate Deliveries. Telegraph or write for Prices and Further Particulars 

H. W. PETRIE of Montreal, Ltd., Montreal, Que, 



// ayiy advertisement interests you, tear it ottt now and place with letters to be answered. 



114 



r.\ N \ i> I \ \ \i \ (• I! 1 N i: i; Y 



Volume XVIII. 





'4-Jn- Vertical Tapper 



Tool Room 
Precision 

Nicest accuracy in the making of 
your tools is a road to profit that 
your better judgment will not 
overlook. It means speed in your 
shop as well as work far within a 
liair's breadth of al>.-=olute perfec- 
lion. 



Without — Impossible ! 

I .<ei> pause to consider llic inrrt'iisi'd sjici'd, tlio lu'l- 
ti'ivd wiirk. the fmvcr lajis l)roki>n. 'riu'ir (•iiiiHusiiinr;, 
in sonliniciil, arc at all times the same: "WilliDiil 
iiiil'ossible!'' 

Rickert-Shafer 
Tappers 

are doiiiu wiirk that hopelessly hroke other tappet's. 
Kiekert-Shafer Taplx't-s will do yoiu' work at a con- 
stant speed tin oilier laiiper can attain and iiold. 
Hickert-Shafer Tappers lieiiiud your output will earn 
you many times tiieir i-osi. 11'/-//, .\(f]\' fur tli'i 
rcmon-irhy details. 

Rickert-Shafer Company, Erie, Pa., U. S. A. 

This is Our Address— How Can We Serve You? 




Mulliner Quick Change Lathe 



is guaranteed to bore and turn true within .001 inch. 
Still it is rugged enough to stand long and heavy strain. 
Its quick change mechanism provides 37 different threads 
and feeds. -■Accurately cut gears of special tumbler-gear 
design ensure smooth and quiet engagements. 



Wrlle for additional fads. 



Both front and rear journals are self-adjusting and also 
adjustable independent of each other. 
The headstock spindle is special carbon hammered cru- 
cible steel. 

Mulliner Lathe illustrated features the ring self-oiling 
system and is equipped with all tool-room attachments. 



Mulliner-Enlund Tool Co., Inc., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Quebec Representatives. Foss & HiU Machinery Co.. IVIontreal Ontario Representatives. H. W. Pelrie. Ltd.. Toronto 



If what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



115 



MACHINE-POWER 

AS AN AID TO MAN-POWER 

is being used more and more as the labor shortage becomes acute and the demands for 

production greater. 

The continued use of GRIDLEY AUTOMATICS has proved their value as modern 

machine tools wiiich produce duplicate parts, up to 5" diameter, rapidly, economically 

and accurately. 

They are meeting the test — greater pro- 
duction. 

Our quotations on your blue prints or 
samples will show you how Gridleys 
can aid vou. 
GRIDLEY Multiple Spindle Automatic 

Screw Machines, capacities up to 2%" 

Chuck. 

GRIDLEY Single Spindle Automatic 

Tui-ret Lathe, capacities up to 5" chuck. 

The National Acme Company, Cleveland, Ohio 

New England Plant Windsor, Vermont BRANCH OFFICES: Canadian Plant Montreal, P.Q. 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO, DETROIT, ATLANTA, SAN: FRANCISCO. Representativ .5 n Foreign Countries. 

Makers of Gridley Single and Multiple '^Spindle Automatics at Windsor,' Vermont ; 
and Acme Automatics, Threading Dies and Screw,;Machine Products at Cleveland. Ohio. 




OBTAIN THE BEST RESULTS 

From Cutters and Tools Kept Sharp on 

GARVIN No. 3 UNIVERSAL 

CUTTER AND SURFACE GRINDERS 

d Simple Light Running Accurate 

The spindle is hardened and ground and supported out 
close to the wheel by an extended bearing, and carefully 
protected from emery. 

The knee and the yoke carried on the knee both have a 
large range of adjustment. On the knee yoke or carriage is 
mounted the swiveling table, which has a quick, sensitive 
movement by rack and pinion operated from end or side. 

On this table is mounted the index head, and all the at- 
tachments are held in this head. 

An outfit of emery wheels, mandrels, bushings, wrenches, 
etc., is supplied with the machine. 

Machine is designer? to keep its original factory accuracy. 

CAPACITY : CUTTERS, 14 in. x 6 in. ; SURFACES. 9i in. x 6 in. 

For Further Information {''J'^^,^'i'\js%im 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERIES 

Send for Complete Catalog 
MANUFACTURED BY 

THE GARVIN MACHINE COMPANY 




GARVIN No. 3, Universal Cutter and 

Surface Grinder. 

Dse Code — Banish. 



Spring and Varick Streets 



[Visitors Welcome] 



50 Years New York City 



// any adx'ertiscment interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



116 



(• A N A lU A N M A r 11 I \ i: K Y 



Volume XVI II. 



WE CAN NOW MAKE DELIVERIES 




THE TAFT-PEIRCE THREAD' MILLER 

t!' L 

Completes a Thread in One Revolution 



This machine is designed for threixdin.2, 
operations where quality, accuracy and speed 
are essentials. It is strong, rigid, rapid and 
easily handled. The thread is milled with a 
multiple cutter the same length as the sec- 
tion to be threaded. Threads, external or 
internal, can be started at any predetermined 
point on the circumference of the work and 
completed at a single revolution of the work 



spindle. The Taft-Peirce Thread Miller is 
admirably adapted for threading rifle barrels 
and similar parts. One operator can attend 
two or more machines. 

A\'e.<hall lie glad to show what the Taft-Peirce 
Thread Miller can do for you. Send u.s any 
piece or pieces on which you desire estimates. 
We can make deliveries promptly. Complete 
specifications, etc., sent on request. 




O) O) m S) o o ko ^0 RoL.M SoAo 



New York, Woolworth Building 



Detroit, Majestic Building 



// what you need »« not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A A A D IAN M A C I i 1 N E II Y 

CARTRIDGE 



117 

■ill 



MACHINERY 

Waterbury Farrel 

Standard 
Machines 




^[inidard Loading Machine in Government Arsenal 



The Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Machine Co., of Waterl)ury, Cunn., U.8.A, 
lias ap[)(iiiite(l iiic to Ix' tlic sole nianufactiircr for export of their entire line of 
Cartridge and Shot Shell-Making Machinery. Proposals and Estimates cover- 
ing complete plants or separate units, required for export will be furnished on 
renuest. 

FREDERICK S. BLACKALL, Woolworth Tower, New York, U.S.A. 



118 



<• A N A 11 I \ \ \l A (■ II 1 N 1" i; Y 



Volume XVIIl. 




No. 2B PLAIN MILLER 

Intensive Production requires machines of exceptional strength and durabih'ty. 
I'he 2-B Fox Plain Miller is a single pulley constant drive machine. Bronze 
bearings are used throughout, and hardened steel gears insure long life. 



Table size "^ 


8 4 ■ 


X 37 


Longitudinal Movement 


25 '/z' 


^'e^tical Movement ' 




UVi" 


Taper in spindle 


No. 9 B&S 


Transverse Movement 




8'/i- 


Weight, net 


1,075 lbs. 



We build UNIVERSAL MILLERS, dividing heads, vises, MULTIPLE 
SPINDLE DRILLING MACHINES, Pipe Cutters and Wood Trimmers. 

IF rite to-day for full information. 

THE FOX MACHINE COMPANY 



1047 West Ganson Street, JACKSON, MICH. 



Formerly o/° Grand Rapids, Mich. 



// v:hat i/ou need is not advertised, connult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



119 




The surface of the piece 
is absolutely unmarred. 
Because after the cut, 
the cutter is automatic- 
ally brought to a stand- 
still — the work returns 
under it while the 
spindle is stationary. 



Cincinnati Automatic Millers 

for Manufacturing 

RIFLE AND MACHINE GUN COMPONENTS 

and similar parts 

They have the intermittent 
feeding feature, which has 
proven so successful on our 
earlier machines, with this 
addition — after the cut is 
taken the spindle is stopped 
automatically so that the 
work returns beneath it 
while the cutter is stationary 
— no danger of marring the surface of the work because of a revolving cutter. 

Consider too, the advantage of this from the standpoint of safety. The operator 
removes the finished piece and chucks a new one while the cutter is stationary. 
He can't get caught by a swiftly revolving although idle cutter. After he chucks 
the new piece, he moves one lever — and immediately both the spindle and feed 
."-— «=> - « movements start again. 

This is one improvement on the Cincinnati 
Automatic. There are others equally vital. 
Do you wonder this new machine has already 
made a place for itself in the esteem of a 
number of big munitions shops? 

For manufacturing parts in quantities it offers 
exceptional advantages. ,^ 

i 

f ' 

Bulletin containing details wiU he sent yon 
upon request. 

The Cincinnati Milling Machine Co. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



.2{> 



CA N A 1' 1 A N M A r II 1 N 1' K V 



Volume XVI 1! 



K empsmlt H 

UNIVERSAL 
MILLING MACHINES 

Kvorv Koiii)»iiiiili Milliiif! Miicliinc "f 
» ' lotl willi a slotted 

«l . ilrivc of arl'or ami 

for |Mi.«mvt' liriw <>i face iiiilliii!; cutter in 
. ill . T ilircclion. 

ry tnadiiiio is oiinipped wiili dir.- 
|>..,i iiU'i kiM'il Kvorhanjiiiig arm uliicli 
iii-uii - |..i>iii\c ali.unmiMil of arlior ami 
1m. rill- liar ami nl:=o prevoiil>< the cutler 
li iiiu poumled out of line under cut. 

Kempsmitli machines are heavy, wiih 
weiiihf well dislrihuteil and their accuracy 
i-! jiu.iranleed within very close liniit.-^. 
Srnd for lUuisfyatcd Catalogue. 

Kempsmith Manufacturing Co. 

MILWAUKEE. WIS., U.S.A. 

AGENTS: 

Folk Sl HiU Machinery Co., Montrral. 

Gvnfral Supply Company, Toronto and Ottawa. 

Canadian W^ttprn Foundry & Supply Co., Cnlgnry, Alto, 




CARTING A BARREL TO 
CARRY A CUPFUL 



Figuratively. YES — ii' 
you are putting ?mall 
work up to your big 
milling machine. Tt 
cannot do it profitaMy. 
Small work costs you 
twice too much without 
n 



U.S. 

MILLER 

in your shop. A 
little machine 
of great strength 
and big capa- 
city : it d o e .s 
quickly and ac- 
curately work 
that no .other 
miller of it? size 
(-111 t/uifh. 



WRITE FOK 
CATALOGUE. 



United States Machine Tool Company 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S A. 




Sterling Engine 
Works 

Successors to the 
DOTY ENGINE WORKS 

Expert Engineers, Machinists 
and Boiler Makers 

Gasoline Engines, Steam Eng'ines an«i 
Boilers, new and second-hand. Castings in 
iron or brass. Forgings. Machine a*il 
Boiler repairs. Cold Rolled Shaftings. 

CUT GEARS 

We have the only automatic Gear-Cutting 
Machine in Western Canada. We special- 
ize in this work. Also in Marine and Hoist- 
ing En.eines, Contractors' Equipment. 
Dredge Work, Dippers, etc. 

Estimates gladly given 
on big or small orders. 

Works and Office : Foot of Water Street 

Phone : Main 9543 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 



// what you need is vot advertised, eonsnlt our Buyers' Directory and urite advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6. 1917. 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



J21 



The Cleveland Milling Machine Co. 



PLAIN VISE 




HAS been designed with as much care and fore- 
thouyrht as we have given oui' milling machines, 
cutters, and other products. There are good fea- 
tures in all vises, and bad features in some. When de- 
sig'ning- this vise, we took into consideration all the 
difficulties encountered, because of the shortcomings and 
faulty construction of vises which had come to our 
attention, and have endeavored, to the best of our 
ability, to eliminate these objectionable features. 

It is a fact that the milling machine vise in many 
instances is expected to take the place of a jig, or fix- 
ture, and becomes quite an efficient addition to the mill- 
ing machine, especially when used in pairs, so that one 
vise can be loaded or unloaded while the cutters are 
working on the piece, or pieces to be milled, in the other 
vise. Realizing this, we have made the tongue slot, on 
all vises, an exact distance from the face of the solid 
jaw. This feature is taken care of by efficient jigs for 
milling these slots. 

All milling machine vises should be made as low as 
possible, without sacrificing strength and the facilities 
for clamping. This we have accomplished by having a 
cast, and machine finished flange on all four edg-es of 
the vise, thus allowing it to be clamped in any position 
on the table. 

The jaws are of steel and can readily be removed 
for occasionally increasing the range, or inserting 
special jaws for holding pieces of irregular shape. 

The ways of the vise are solid, giving the base 
greater strength, and the construction of block and 
gibbs such that they wipe the ways free of chips and 
foreign matter. 

The movable jaw is made of ample thickness to allow 
for as large a diameter of screw as is consistent with 



the height of the vise. Tongue slots are milled at right 
angles to each other, so that the vise can be held paral- 
lel, or at right angles with the spindle. 

It is also a fact that nearly all vises break diagonally 
from the corner of the solid jaw to the base, or on a 
diagonal line from the screw bearing to the base. We 
find that in casting these bases, this part of the vise 
has hitherto been solid, and has contained a larger 
amount of metal; the shrinkage, therefore, being 
g'reater at both ends, causes the metal there to be 
spongy and as this is where the greatest amount of 
stress comes, the castings usually break at these points. 
To overcome this trouble, we have set cores in both ends, 
as shown in sectional view below. These cores allow an 
even distribution of metal all around, eliminating 
shrinkage, and makes for stronger construction through- 
out. 

The movable jaw is gibbed around the outside. This 
design eliminates the objectionable feature of having 
slots cut in the base of the vise for clamping the gibbs 
directly underneath. These gibbs, however, do not 
interfere in any way with the clamping of the vise onto 
the milling machine table. 

Depth of jaws. IVs". 

Width of jaws, 6". 

Open with steel jaws, 4%", 

Open without steel jaws, 5%". 

The regular equipment furnished with this vise is as 
follows: 

One pair of clamps and bolts. 

One crank handle. 

Hardened and ground tongues. 

Since the demand for this vise has been very great. 
we have arranged to keep them in stock, for immediate 
delivery. 



PRICE ON APPLICATION 




Cutters carried in stock by our agents: 
Dale-Brewster Machinery Company. Inc., 
.747 W. Washinffton Bldg:., 

Chicago. 111. fl^t^ . 3"^ 

New Yiirk Office. .30 Church Street. New York City. 



D. Nast Machinery Company, 

Bourse Bldg-., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

4 East German Street. 

Baltimore, Md. 



The Cleveland Milling Machine Co. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
Milling Cutters Milling Machines Relieving Machines 





// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



(■ A N A 1> 1 A N M A (■ II 1 N K 1{ V 



Volume will. 



BECKER 

Hi^h Power 
Vertical Miller 



MODEL AB. 



F»tr hiy;h-speed work deinaiidiui; 
groat precision, this machine is 
earnestly rcconnui'ndcd to y<iu T'lr 
tlie fdllowint:: reasons: 

It has extraordinary rigidity. 

It requires 1 3 to 12 less power 
than other millers of correspond 
ing sizes. 

It has the famed Becker patented 
roller feed and positively non-slip- 
ping belt drive. 

It holds an unbeaten record for 
output speed. 

This excellent niaflniu' is offered 
for 

Early Delivery 




Write or Wire for Full Information to 



Becker Milling Machine Co., "o Jto^'n 



E PARK, 

, MASS., U.S.A. 



// •j:hat you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed iiiider proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



123 



Gorton Gutting-Off Machine 

Maintains a Feed of 1 Inch or More per Minute 

Understand that it maintains this feed cutting the toughest stock. Ordinary stock it cuts ■ 
at the great rate of 2" feed per minute. " " ■ 

Any metal in round 1" to 41/2", in squares 1" to Sy_^", or in any other shape that comes | 

within a 4I/2" cii'cle, it cuts day in and day out faster than any other machine. We can ; 

send you the names of largest rolling mills, locomotive works, navy yards and engine ■ 

builders using our machines. ' ; 

Gorton Cutting-off Machines, in material and workmanshij), equal the finest built lathe 
or miller 



Blade is chrome vanadium 
manganese steel, heat treat- 
ed. The 10 cutters are high- 
est grade high-speed steel. 
Narrow Cutters cut out the 
metal in the centre of the 
cut; Wide Cutters clean out 
the corners. 

Write for complete specifi- 
cations. 



GEORGE GORTON 
MACHINE CO. 



Main Gear, 
Pinion Bearing 
and Drum Bear- 
ings Run in Oil 






RACINE, WISCONSIN, 
U. S. A. 




,<,***■ 

^ 



FRONT VIEW OF GORTON No. 2-D HEAVY-DUTY 
CUTTING-OFF MACHINE 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



l-.M 



\ \ \ 1> I A N M A (' II 1 N i: i; Y 



Volume XV HI. 




A Forbes Cuts Right 

rp I IKI.ADS (.lit with a l'\)rbcs are 

1 threads cut ri^ht. It the class of 

work Noii arc doinjj: deinaiuis accuracy 

anil most work does — you need a 

I'orhes. 

It is till- only iiini-liiiH' oii the market with 
i-('cc(liiiti' i^cai' wiiii-li can-ics the dies on to 
the pijx'. Instead of tiitiiin^ tin heavy 
length of pipe in the (Ues, it turns the eoni- 
liaratively li.uht (Ues around tlu' pipe. 'Phe 
steel is a<l.iustahle to conipeiisate l'<ii- weai'. 

A |H,\vcrful, cciiiiiiMcl nuKliine — saves labor Iwcausc 
it can lie carrieil riiiht lo ihv ioli. Hoes away willi 
the old stock and die metliod 

Further particulars should interest you. We will jjladly 
send them. 

The Curtis & Curtis Company 

Garden Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 




A Favorite- -- 

Blount Pattern-makers' Lathe 

FAST AND ACCURATE— Equipped with 
set over swivel tailstock and carriage, and 
outside face plate and tripod. Built in 16" 
swing with beds 6 or 8 feet in length. Spindle 
is made of high carbon steel, is hollow and 
fitted with Morse Taper and runs on self-oiling 
bronze bearings. 

Our cataloK Kives a full description of this strong and 
highly etTicient machine, also our other quality speed 
lathes and grinders. Give us your address. 

J. G. BLOUNT COMPANY 

EVERETT, MASS, U.S.A. 



THE "SAMSON'MRAILWAY CAR MOVER 



Cut shows 

position of 

mover before 

mOTioK car. 




Every railway siding should be supplied with one of these 
tools. Takes the place of fifteen men and puta the heaviest 
loaded car just where you wanj it. It will pay for itself in 30 
days. 

It is one of the most simple and powerful devices for moving 
cars by hand. 

It is provided with Never-Slip Spurs, which is the most .'Jn- 
portant feature on a Car Mover. 

Soecial attention given to export orders. 

Dillon Manufacturing Company 

Oshawa, Ontario 



Eastern Salew Agent 
Alexander Gibb 
3 St. Nicholaa St.. Montreal. Que. 



Western Sales Agent 

D. Philip 

138 Portage Ave., Winnipeg. Man. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



125 



PULLEY 18 « 8; 



LOW TO HIGH SPEED 
SHIFT WHILE CUTTING 



SET TOOL BLOCKS 

TO SUIT LENGTH 

OF CUT SHELL 




QUICK 
POWER RETURN 
FOR SADDLES 

MECH L FEED 



CUTTING-OFF 
MACHINES 

Cuts both ends at once 

except 8 in. and 9 in. sizes which 
cut one end only 

Forcings load in one" end and dis- 
charge out the other when cut 

A Girl can operate it 

6 — 4.5" Machines in 
Stock 

The 

Wm. Kennedy & Sons, 

Limited 
Owen Sound 



HALL 



Pipe Threading Machinery 

AND 

Shell Cutting-off Machines 

This illustration shows the new No. 8 Hall 
Gear Box Driven Pipe Lathe. Regular 
Capacity 2i/>" to 8" inclusive. 

The last word in Pipe Machine 
Construction 

Let us give you full particulars of this 
machine which is only one of a large num- 
ber having capacity y^' to 18" ]>ipe. 

Write us for catalog and prices on : 

Pipe Threading Machines Nipple Threading Machines 

Roller I'ipe Cutters 

or 

Cutting-off Machine for shells or bar stock. 

Any capacity [/g " to 18". 

John H. Hall & Sons, Ltd. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA 

EUROPEAN AGENTS : 
Universal Machinery Corporation, Limited, London 



Made in 
Canada 



Capacity 

2'/2" to 5" 

inclusive 




If interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



us 



(' A N A 1> 1 A N \I \ (■ II I N K K V 



Volume XVIII. 



Equipment for the 

Standard Dumore 

Grinder 




EQUIPMENT A 

(.leneral 'I'ool Iumhh use. 
Iiu'Iiul«'s hiuh-speed iii- 
tiTual spimllc. Keadi. 
:? inclu's: speed. SO.Odn 
IM'.M.: iiiutnr spindlt 

speed, \om) k.p.:m. 




EQUIPMENT B 

\) V V p Jiitciual Work, 
10-iiK'h extciisidii arm. 
Speed. lO.OOO R.P.M. 




EQUIPMENT C 

Button Die Grinder. 
Speed, 50,000 R.P.M. 



AnofltetDumoi^ 
Junioi^ ^1^ 



.■^pin.iir Si)«m1. ;;o.ooo U.P.M. 
Kmch of arm. :>^'j incht-n. 
Itcnoh of rxtrnnion. 'Z inchv* 
Nft wclirhl. b lb». Gr.>(.r* 
wciKht. 12 Ibii. tl-iuipmrnt : 
Six rlantic onirry wheel*. 10 
ft. cord. HtUichmcnt pluic 
and ow 




^ 



''*^***«. 



The Dumore .Junior (Jrinder has been designed to meet the 
requirements of the manufacturer who desires a light 
iiriiidcr which will do accurate work, yet who does not 
wish to invest in a larger and more expensive tool. Invalu- 
able for the accurate grinding of tools, dies and gages— eau 
be quickly attached to lathes or other machine shop eqnii',- 
ments. The 

DUMORE 

PORTABLE ELECTRIC 

GRINDER 

is l)uilt in tlie same conscientious manner, and embodies 
the same special features as the larger Dumore Grinders. 
The armature is dynamically l)alanced. and the spindle 
operates at 20,000 R.P.M. Friction is reduced to minimum 
by using high-grade Ball Bearings. This scientific con- 
struction has entirely eliminated vibration, and any work 
ground with the Dumore Junior will be found accurate and 
free from chatter marks. 

Like all other Dumore jiroducts, this new grinder is sold 
on its merits. Write to-day for descriptive literature. 

\\T* •¥?! j.'/^ 1717 Dumore Bldgf., 

Wisconsin Llectric Lo., racine. wis 

Sold in England by Canadian-American Machinery Co., Limited, 
8 Bouverie St., London, E.C., England 



If what you need is not advertised^ consult our Buyers' Directory and ivrite advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



127 



We are not Playing 

Checkers 

Every man-jack of us at the Carborundum plant is working like 
the proverbial beaver, for never before has there been such 
a demand for Carborundum and Aloxite Products. 
We are doing our level best to meet this big demand — 
enlarging our plants, increasing our forces, speeding up pro- 
duction — we are even building a big 20,000 horse power 
furnace plant in Canada in our efforts to keep up with things. 
We have a definite service to perform for we are helping to 
produce the necessities of war. 

Carborundum and Aloxite 
Products are Doing Their Bit 

They are grinding shrapnel shells, high-explosive shells, rifle barrels and 
parts — grinding bayonets and sabers. They are grinding a hundred and 
one different parts of the aeroplane and the auto truck, the machine gun 
and the field gun. They are shaping armor plate and grinding car wheels; 
grinding plowshares, and the tools of the metal-working trades of the world. 
They are grinding torpedo tubes and torpedoes, -grinding submarine engine 
bases; beveling the lenses of periscopes and buffing the soles of the army 
shoes and grinding the shears for the pocket kits of the "Sammies." 
They are doing a thousand and one war tasks quicker and better than they 
have ever been done before. 

Carborundum and Aloxite products are surely doing their bit, but with it all we haven 't 
neglected for one instant our regular patrons^ we are doing all in our power to keep up 
with the pace; to keep up to the standards of Carborundum service. 

The Carborundum Company 



NEW YORK 



Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

CHICAGO BOSTON PHILADELPHIA CLEVELAND 

MILWAUKEE PITTSBURGH GRAND RAPIDS 



CINCINNATI 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



128 



C A N A n 1 A N M AC 11 1 N K K V 



Volume XVI II. 



Watch a Capable 
Mechanic Test a File 



See hini p.iss his thumb over 
the teeth. 

By instinct, he knows, at once, 
whether a file will do its work. 

He senses, at once, the quality of 
the steel — its balance — and the 
sharp-edged teeth. 

He makes no mistakes in buying 
— and his choice every time will 
be for "Famous Five" Files. 

Be influenced by his judgment 
and specify "Famous Five" Files 
when ordering. 

They are: 





WE BUILD 
THEM BY 
HUNDREDS 

Standardized Pro- 
duction enables us to 
offer this powerful 
Waterbury (;rinder at such a low price. 
It grinds rapidly and accurately, all 
flat surfaces, dies, punches, planer, 
lathe, and other tools. Has adjustable 
table and tool rest with large radius of 
travel. Rigid, 3-point table supports 
giving great steadiness. A reliable, 
practical grinding outfit. 




^v aterbory. Conn. 



Tel. Main 6755 



Jos. Bickerstaff, Mgr. 



<^ 



.N^ 



S> 



-^ 



^si^wm oil 



645 East King Street 

TORONTO 



"% 
*'<> 



You have tried the rest. Now 
use the best for screw cutting 
and threading. 



Our standard is uniformity at 
all times and a guarantee of 
quality with every barrel of 
oil produced. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION 



If what you need ia not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed i(7tder proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



129 




The 




For General Tool Room Work 

This (irindcr is furnished with attachments 
for grinding- all kinds of milling cutters, 
reamers, counterbores, and other machine 
shop tools. 

It is also suitable for cylindrical, internal and 
flat work which frequently turns up in the 
making of tools and jigs. 

These attachments are all very simple in de- 
sign and easily adjusted upon the machine, 
being graduated so that any desired angle can 
l)e at once obtained. 

The whole machine is thoroughly well built, 
well finished and will be found a dependable, 
convenient grinder. 

Greenfield Machine Company 

GREENFIELD, MASS., U.S.A. 



DON'T be governed by World-Wide Reputations and 
Previous Records in selecting your next Cutting-Oflf 
Equipment. The NEW IMPROVED PEERLESS High 
Speed Heavy Duty Metal Cutting Saw has completely 
revolutionized and upset all metal cutting standards. 

This statement is based entirely upon the reports 
and repeated orders received from concerns that had 
heretofore used tools such as referred to. 




To induce investigation we will gladly ship one for 
a comparative test. If you do not consider it the best 
and most profitable tool you have ever purchased, you 
are under no obligations to keep it, and we will stand 
the freight charges both ways. 

Would you like to see a list of large manufacturers 
that are continually repeating their orders? We have 
it ready for you. 



PEERLESS MACHINE CO. 



1607 Racine St. 
RACINE. WIS.. U.S.A. 



THE IMPROVED 

TAYLOR-NEWBOLD 




INSERTED TOOTH COLD SAW 

W RITE KOR BULLETIN T-S 

Tabor Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, U.S.A. 



// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be anxwered. 



130 



CANADIAN M \ (■ II 1 N K \l Y 



Volume XVIII. 



Known the World 

Over 

Admitted to be 

Superior 



The Racine for Scientific 
Metal Cutting 

Oenionstrati' llic miIuc nt' ilii> machiiic in your own <liiip, on 
your own work. Our conrulcMu-i' in (lie ability of this 
nuu'liinc is such thai we will send it to you on trial. This 
will give you ample opimrtunity to j?tiiily the niaehino Inmi 
close quarters; to verify our statements regarding siini)lo 
ronstruelion and operation, aei-maey and speed, features 
that stamp our machine in a class l>y itself. 

W'l' invite your inipiiries for full iuiciiiiialiiiii ami inslaila- 
lion 

RacineTool& Machine Co. 

Racine, Wis., U.S.A. 




£< i 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 HI mil iTiiii 

I J. E. WING 

I TOOL ROOM 

I SURFACE GRINDER 



Grinding Wheel Dressers 





is extra strong ^ 

in every part, ^ 

easily adjusted, ^ 

and unbeat- E 

able for = 

fast and ac- E 

curate tool '=. 

room work. Use it = 

for 10 minutes and E 

you'll know the advan- E 

tage of its rigid = 

jrrinding- surface — its = 

rigid construction — 

throughout. Is equip- E 

ped with large tray E 

and water pot com- = 

bined. = 

PUT YOUR SPECIAL = 

MACHINERY = 

WANTS UP TO US. § 

We are experts E 

on special de- E 

signs and guar- g 

_ antee satisfac- = 

J --■ ■-- , .. — tion. = 

I J. E. Wing &lSon, Hamilton, Canada | 

^IIUIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 1111111:11 llllllllllllllllll:l:l|:i:liil 

If what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 




We are specialists 
in O rinding Wheel 
Dressers and c a n 
I'ecorameud the 
best types for any 
particular needs. 

( )nr Dressers are: 

Diamo-Carbo 
Desmond Huntingdon, 3 

sizes 
Sherman Corrugated, 2 

sizes 
Norton Zig-Zag, 2 sizes 
Magazine 
Diamonds 

We can promptly sup- 
ply your needs from our 
stock. 

The 

Canadian Desmond - Stephan 
Manufacturing Company 

HAIVIILTON, ONTARIO 

Alfred Herbert, Ltd., Coventry, Eng.. 
Agent for Great Britain. 




December 6, 1917 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



131 





CLEVELAND RIVETING, CHIPPING, CALKING AND BEADING HAMMERS 

MOST POWERFUL AND EFFICIENT AIR TOOLS [ON THEJIMARKET 

Cleveland Pocket - in - Head 
Riveters are made in 15 
styles, with Outside and In- 
side latch, and have driving 
capacities of 'i-in. to I'/i-in. 

rivets in Boilers, Tanks, fe 4 

Stacks, etc. *^ "^ 

The New Cleveland Pocket-in-Head Riveter is shorter ovjr all, hits a harder blow, uses less air in operation; has 
higher speed w ith less recoil than any riveter on the mark ?t. Let lis prove it in your shop. 

CLEVELAND CHIPPING HAMMERS 

are made in 19 styles and sizes to suit all classes 
of work. They are ideal tools for foundries, as 
they have high-speed, no recoil, and are practically 
dust-proof. 

CLEVELAND WOOD-BORING MACHINES 

FOR BUILDING WOOD CARGO SHIPS, Etc. 
The Cleveland No. 20W Wood Boring Machine illustrated, is a light-weight, high-speed 
motor with a capacity of 2-in. in wood; it is very compact and easily handled by one man. 
We make four sizes, covering a range in wood from 1 inch to 4 inches. We also manu- 
facture 61 types and sizes of Air Drills for Metal Drilling, Reaming, Tapping, etc. 

IN STOCK: Riveting and Chipping Hammers, Air Drills, Wood Drills, Sand Rammers, 
Bowes Air Hose Couplings, Rivet Sets, etc. 

Write for Latest Catalog No. 14. 
Address all inquiries to , 

CLEVELAND PNEUMATIC TOOL CO. OF CANADA, Limited 

84 CHESTNUT STREET, - TORONTO, ONT. 






Stow Shell Grinders 
Increase Production 

Suspended 
Pedestal 
Mounted 
on Truck 

Any Size 
Any Current 

Immediate 
Shipment 




Stow Manufacturing Co. 

Binghamton, New York, U.S.A. 
Oldest Portable Tool Manufacturers in America 



Carry Your Grinder to the Work 
Not Your Work to the Grinder 

Portable Electric 
GRINDER 

Equipped with Universal Motor 

for Operating on Direct or 

Alternating Current 

110 TO 250 VOLTS 
[Licensed Under Burke Universal Motor Patent.) 





No. 6 Grinder-Wheel 4" x %" x V2" 
ATTACH TO ANY LAMP SOCKET 

Thor Portable Electric Grinder is equipped through- 
out with ball and roller bearings, and has a specially 
constructed motor, insuring speed, power, ease of 
operation and increased capacity. 

IT RUNS AT 4,500 R.P.M. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool 
Company 

Office: 334 St. James Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 

Toronto: 32 Front St. W.; Winnipeg: 123 Bannaty ne Ave. E.; 
Vancouver: 1 142 Homer Street 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out 7iow and place ivith letters to be answered. 



132 



CANADIAN M \ (' II 1 N l". K Y 



Volume win. 




If xhat you. need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers tisttd under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MA C H I N 1<: R Y 



13?. 







.„..«K-;-'^-H5.^r&-"^' 



'H^"^' (or a Sa"-""- 










10,000 New Yankee Drill Grinders 

ARE SAVING 

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

FOR THEIR USERS 

Catalog No. 107 describes 100 styles and 
sizes of New Yankee Drill Grinders. Also 
W. & M. Surface Grinders and Universal 
Cutter and Tool Grinders. It's free. Sign 
and mail coupon now. 

WILMARTH & MORMAN CO. 

' 1200 Monroe Ave.. N.W., Grand Rapids, Michigan, U. S. A. 
Also Manufacturers of Surface and Universal Grinders 



Wilmarth & Merman Co., 
1200 Monroe Ave. N. W. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Gentlemen: 

Please mail Catalog No. 107 and advise 
regarding New Yankee to meet our require- 
ments. 

Our drills range from to 

Name 



Firm 

Address Prov. 



STERLING 

HACK SAWS 

Are known the world over 
for their efficient cut- 
ting quality which 




insures conomy and 
satisfaction. 



You will 
lOMke no mis- 
take in Imj'ing "Ster- 
ing" Blades for the- fol- 
lowing reasons: 

1st — They are made of the very be.st 
quality of steel rolled by any mill in th(> 
world. 

2nd — The best mechanical construction which 
has been acquired by many year.s of experience. 
-Special heat treatment which goes to make the 

efficiency both for maximum quality and uniformity. 
.1 U'ln] irill convince yon. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works 

BUFFALO, N. Y., U.S.A. 



// avy advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters tn be answered. 



134 



C.\ N \ I> 1 \ \ M \ (' 1! 1 N 1" i; Y 



V.ilumo WllT 



AnUnbeatableCombination 




An Unbeatable Combination 

Are you a manufacturer of metal products, where 
accuracy, speed, production and economy count, and 
which require constant cutting-ofT of stock. 

Here's The Combination You Are 
Looking For 

The V. S. W. No. 5 High Speed Hack Saw 
Machine equipped with a VICTOR blade is unbeatable 
when it comes to increased production, and a minimum 
amount of power blade breakage and consumption. 

Why? 

An actual machine and blade operated by one of 
your own men in you own shop will be the most 
conv'incing demonstration we can make. 

Let us send you one V. S. VV. machine on a thirty 
days' trial, with enough VICTOR blades to show 
you why. 




iSv^WoRKS ds-Hamilton.G\nam 



VICTOR 



I 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



1S5 




' M 



'^^.asSa. 






' ** 1' 






m 



New York Shipbuilding; Co 
A Star Blade User 



T Ii e New York Shii)buildiiig 
(_V)ui]>any is one of the big fac- 
tors that is helping to put our 
new navy and merchant marine 
on the war map. And in doing it, 
Star Haclv Saw Blades are play- 
ing their important part. 
The tremendous stress of ship 
production is carried back to 
every tool in the yard shops, and 
Star Blades are used for the 
most o])vious reason that they 
prove more efficient. 
Here's still another proof of Star Blade betteruess that ought to inipre 
man who uses a hack saw. 

^\lien you are looking for the most efficient saw, play safe and follow 
coiun'rns with millions in production at stake who have spent thousand 
out the facts. Do as they do and you will standardize on 

STAR HACK 5AW BLADES 




ss every 



the big 
s to find 



CLE 



( )r make the tests yourself — for speed, for eii- 

ilurance or for low cutting cost and you cannot 

help coming to the same conclusions if you 

make a thorough test. 

The Star wa.s the first modern hack saw Ijlade 

and for thirty years its distinctly better cpiality 

has kept it the largest selling blade. 

This greater efficiency and endurance of Star 

J:51ades is no accident but the result of hundreds 

of thousands of tests of steel composition, of 

tempering, of relative dimensions and of shape 

and setting of teeth. 

Then the staudard.s set for Star Blades has lieen 

Manufactured By 

IVISON BROS. Inc. M 

MIDDLETOWN, NEW YORK 



uiiifonidy attained m production at every stage 
b}' special automatic machinery which gauges 
to the finest limits that make the smallest varia- 
tion a mechanical impossibility. At the same 
time this special machinery gives u.s an enor- 
mous quantity production at a minimum 
factory cost. 

If you are not satisfied with your present metal 
cutting results, have any reason to believe they 
can be improved or have any special cutting 
problems, write our Engineering Department, 
280 River St., Millers Falls. We are at your 
service, regardless of what blades you are using. 
Sole Disfribufors 

ILLER5 FALLS CO. 

MILLERS FALL5. MASS. 



■-*-^/>/V»v^/^»-,.V*,.: .' 



»-> >- K>v».^ -^V K 




136 



CAN A l> 1 A N M A (' II 1 N i: i; >■ 



Voluim- X.V11I 



FITCHBURG 
SIX-TWENTY 



Gi' 



%f fe^ 




Bulk Doesn't 
Make a Grinder 



aiiv molt' iliaii luilk iiiak('> a iiian. 

Kotli wntcli ami dock tell linic liiii i.-n'i llic lilll 
Wiiti-li nliiKi.-t always llie iimhc nlialilc? 

Hulkicr Macliiiios cannot liiind nmrc accurately lliaii 
tills c()iiii)acl Fitclilairu, Six-Twenty. Uiilkicr Ma 
cliiiu's fall licliiml when il <-()nic,- In speed. 

Occuiiyinji much le.s.s liodi- s|>aif, ileuiandinti cou 
sidcralilc le.^s elTort, Fitcliluir^^ Six-Twenty best 
tirinds all work within its ran>2;e — and its range 
aihuits a !>i,<i iHM-centage of nil Straight and Taper 
work. 

The travel of the tahle is within control of a single 
lever, and may be started 'or slopped at any ])art of its 
stroke, ^'^arial)le tahle dwell and automatic cros.-,- 
feed with positive stop facilitate duplicate grinding. 

\\ rite us to-day for all the facts and illustrated catalog- 

Fitchburg Grinding Machine Co. 

76 Winter Street Fitchburg, Mass. 




Cat shows Chuck on nosint: operation. This is one of over twn 
hundred in this Canadian plant. 

This chuck is built on the duplicate part system. It is 
simple, effective and fool-proof. 

It grips the shell in a predetermined position. The jaws 
will not slip on the shell. It has shell interior and 
exterior adjustable stops. 

A trial on one of your lathes will convince jou that this is 
THE chuck for shell work. 



A Big Efficiency Unit 
in Your Shell Plant 

A. J. LAVOIE'S 

LOW PRESSURE 

Compressed Air Chuck 

This chuck can be applied to any make of lathe, without 
alteration to the machine, and will increase proiluction 
from 25% to 75%. It grips and relea.ses the shell while 
in motion — no need to stop your machine. 

It is a single unit combination attached to the face plate 
of lathe, supported by an additional heavy duty bearing, 
thus making a heavy duty lathe out of a light machine. 
A small lever operates the chuck, ^^'ill operate with a 
pressure of 60 lbs. per sq. in. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Montreal General Tool Co. 

673-5»^Notre Dame Street, Maisonneuve, Montreal, P.Q. 

Also manufacturers of shell tools, and special machine attachments of all 
kinds made to order. 



// tvhat yon need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



137 



t^W^^^tM^m^^^^^JP^:4ifi.^''^^'^^''.^,^^t:2h^ri^^^^^ 



.%l%^: 



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JP' 



■C- J4''i^ Ot 



,;j. ,.^v,f '"^J^ 



SELF-OPENING and ADJUSTABLE DIE HEADS 



The Die Heads that have made good on every threading 
operation, and which are constantly meeting the demand where 
Die Heads are required for accurate thread-cutting. 

In purchasing "MODERN" Die Heads you have the 
assurance that you are getting tools of "quality," mechanically 
perfect in design and construction and uniformly efficient in 
all sizes. S^ 

Illustration shows an installation of 
"MODERN" Die Heads threading Shell Ogives, 
where the requirements are precision and large 
production. 

Complete information regarding the use of 
"MODERN" Self-Opening Die Heads upon 
request. 

MODERN TOOL COMPANY 

Main Office and Works: 
Slate and Peach Sts. - Erie. Pa.. U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents: 
Rudel-Belnap. - Toronto— Montreal 

F. WESLEY PARKER 

Resident Engineer and 

Export Agent. 

2 Rector Street. New York 




// any advertisemeyit interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



138 



C.\ N A 1) 1 A N M A (• II I N 1-: i: V 



Volume XVIII. 



Handle 75-M/M Shells 
Just Once 

Two Mun lu'\ Tai>s on your Inllio f(iiii|tlt'tely I'mish this .<lioll so tlini win ii it 
coniesi olT tlio iiitu*nin«> liiere is no inoiv liaiitilinu or ro-si/.iiii; to do Tluii rmc 

Murchey Tap Them 

15y using Muivlioy (.'oilnpsiiif; ami AiljustivMc Taps, vnii -avc iwi> minutes or 
more on evcrj* 75-nim. Slioll. Fijrurc tiial in dollars lor yourself! 

Pmctioally all the larm' plants of the United Stales are lininii nji wiili rollapsimi; 
Taps to tiiread the nose o( this shell. No minnte nnisl Ke kmiwiniily wasted. 

Mnnhey riia-^enj are quiekly adjusted to compensate for wear, and Mim hex 
.\djustahle Taps .<orvc as long as ten solid Taps. 

WKITF AT ONCE FOR ALL I'AKTICII.ARS. 

Murchey Machine & Tool Company 

75 Porter Street, Detroit, Mich. 

The Coats Machine Tool Company, Ltd., Caxton House, Westminster, London, S. W., 

England, Glasgow. Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Fenwick I'reres & Company, 

1.") Rue Fenelon, Paris, France 




Lightning Deliveries 

— That is Murchey Service 



Jacobs 



iMRf^OVED 



Winner 

By Sheer Merit 

Jacobs Improved Drill Chucks 
are recognized as the STAND- 
ARD the world over. Once 
tried — always used. 

Trj' them and see for yourself. 

MADE BY 

The Jacobs 
Manufacturing Co. 

Hartford, Cono., U.S.A. 



Drill Chuck 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



139 



EVERY MINUTE 
EVERY DAY 



PRODUCTION SPEEDED 



/^^'>''>'^ .r/>>» 




M. E. C. THREE JAW HINGED COLLET CHUCKS 

with steel body ai-e almost everlasting. Not one complicated part 
to get out of order. Grip firm and positive, their simple air valve 
control greatly facilitates the quick insertion or withdrawal of work. 



IiLslead of wa.sted minutes clnu-king wiili 
slow haiul-operated chut'k.s, do the same 
work in seconds, and do it better, with 
M. E. C. Three Jaw Chucks — compres.sed 
air operated. 

M. E. C. Chucks 

Air Operated 

are 100';'^, efficient wherever rapid manufac- 
turing and absolute accuracy are the demands. 

Know what great helps to speed production 
M. E. C. Chucks and Air Cylinders have proved 
themselves. Write to-day for our catalogue 
and 30-day free trial plan. 



Manufacturers Equipment Company 

175-179 North Jefferson St., CHICAGO, ILL. , 

CANADIAN AGENTS: J. R. Stone Tool ana Supply Co., Detroit, Mich. 
New York: J. R. Stone Tool and Supply Co., 30 Church St. 



A Convenience — that brings — Economy 



Miiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



I I 



Cut No. 109 Unit 


Mm 


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1 


1 




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ECONOMY i.'^ the great thing to-day. It 
applies to every neces.'^ity ; in the shop ti> 
time, IaV)or and materials — it means quicker 
and greater production with less effort and cost. 
Production is increased when machines are lubri- 
cated properly; upkeep and labor is reduced and 
time saved. 

Oil, therefore, is a necessity that should be protected by 
modern storage and handling facilities so that waste, 
careless handling, evaporation and deterioration of oil 
will be stopped, and the danger of interruption to pro- 
duction by fire, removed. 

Ideal provision for the economical Storage and Distri- 
bution of Oil is embodied in the 




The Bowser System can l)e added to wjienever 
more storage capacity is required. It is con- 
venient, economical and fire-proof. Write 
for illustrated bulletin — to-day. 



Oil Storage System 

It is designed and built for any oil storage or distribut- 
ing requirement, large or small, hand or power operated. 
It is durable, accurate and safe; promotes efficiency, 
suggests cleanliness, lightens labor, and saves oil and 
money. 
Every Shop Needs It. 



S. F. Bowser & Co., Inc. 



TORONTO, 

Sales OfTices in 
All Centers 



ONTARIO, CANADA 1 



Representatives 
Everywhere 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iii!n:iiiiiiiiii|iiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiii:iii:^iii;ii'!iiH^ 

// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



140 



CAN \ 1' I A \ M \ »• 11 I \ i: i; V 



Voliimo Will. 




Every Butterfield Tap comes to 
you ready for long, hard service. 

It is made by expert workmen — 
from the finest materials obtain- 
able — and thoroughly tested be- 
fore shipment. 

For the tap that is uniformly de- 
pendable in service — specify 
Butterfield. 



Butterfield&Cc, Inc. 

Rock Island :: Quebec 

Toronto Office: 

1505 Trader. Bank Building i Phone Main 1382 

H. A. HARRISON, Manager 



CjiKaIoc No. is con- 
taining th« complete 
linvof Buttcrfialrf Toolfl 
■waitR your requent. 




RnCLD 



// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



141 



Hannifin 

Air Chuck 




"Each Operator Averaged 10 
More Shells per Day" 



111 hi.s report tu plant uwuer the works inan.- 
a.tier quoted ix'c-oiniiieM(leil disposal of all 
reiniiiniii.n f-crcw-operateil liox chucks. 

His report was made tliree months after a 
partial chan.ue to Hannifin Air Chucking. 

Six weeks later every lathe in the plant ■wa- 
equi]>peil with Hannifin Air Operat-.l 
Chucks. 

At this time Hannifin Air Operated Man- 
drels were also installed. 

The plant in question i.s producing 6-inch 
shells. 

It is nothin.tj; unusual for Hannifin Air 
( )perated Chucking and Clamping Equip- 



ment to add an extra day in time saved to 
each week. 

In many of the largest plants in this country 
and Canada, Hannifin Air Operated Equip- 
ment has increased output from 20 to SO per 
cent. In a nuniher of plants it has actually 

ihiillilcd output. 

If yijur work requires (piick luiudliuu and 
rigid never-slip grip, for you to do without 
Hannifin Air Operated Chucking and Clamp- 
ing E([uipnient L-; to do without |>riilits within 
your reach. 

Haij yon would II kf our cKtnhif/. 



HANNIFIN MFG. COMPANY, Chicago, U.S.A. 

LOCAL REPRESENTATIVES: C. C. Firmin. Detroit; Carl Naumann. Syracuse: R. E. Ellis EngineerinK Company, Chicago. 111. 
FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVES : A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Ltd., Toronto, Can. ; Coats Machine Tool Company, Ltd.. Caxton 
House. Westminster. London. Glasgow and Newcastle-on-Tyne ; Fenwick PVeres & Company, 1500 Rue Fenelon, Paris, France; 
Iznosskoff, Suckau & Co.. Petrograd. Moscow, Ekaterinberg and Odessa, Russia. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters tu he aiisivered. 



142 



CAN A Dl A N M A (' II 1 N K \l V 



Volume XVm. 



iHINTS ^BUYERS 

Sar... 



BRISTOL'S 




ELECTRIC PYROMEIERS 

FOR EVERY SERVICE 

ftrintor* Kt*vi»rtlintf Pyromrtrr fur- 
ni*hrtl with iintrntcil frKti<wlr»» 
smoktMl chnrt rvennlinK i»yi»U'm. 
Mptfially \Tilui*l>Ir ftT pn-cfssti* n- 
i)uirini{ contlnuou* bent irvntmont. 
SimpHcfty of c-inntructmn nnd ruK- 
k;tMlni*!i<i niaki' them liU'nl shop py- 
r.<motont. The ONLY pynnTioUT 
r luiptH^I with W«<Aton mllli-volt- 
tiu'liT movement. 
Write for llullrtin 1-305. 

THE BRISTOL CO. 

WATERbURY.CONN..U.S.A. 



TJlOl'SANDS (if Dollars arc savi'd 
evory year by »iur clients, because 
wo have exjn'rfs who xire trained to 
make exhaustive tests of all the ma- 
terial you are jnirchasinu;. whether raw 
material or finished ]n'oducts. 

CANADIAN INSPECTION AND TESTING 
LABORATORIES, LIMITED 

Head Office and Main Laboratories— MONTREAL 

Branch Offices and Laboratories: 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. EDMONTON. VANCOUVER. 

NEW GLASGOW 



Cushman Chucks 




Lathe Chucks, Drill 
Chucks, Portable 
Face Plate Jaws. 

Let us send you our catalog. 



The Cushman 
Chuck Co. 

Hartford, Conn.. 
U.S.A. 



SKINNER 
DRILL 
PRESS 
VISE 




A HiiliMniitinL (liirntili- icm ^^i^Hll uii) ,i;iy fur jiscif in shtirt 
oi-.ItT In ;in.v nin<"liino shop. Four hIzch t»> ju'i-onimoilate a 
u lili* r.itijcf of work. Try one iiml ynu*II Iniy nmro. 

I' r) III I'll n^ittiT [irdniplly iniillirl on miiii-st. 

THE SKINNER CHUCK COMPANY 

Now Y< rk Office, London Office Snn Frnncisco Office 

94 Rrndc Strret 149 Qutrn Victoria St. Rinlto BIUk 

Flic tor y 11 nd Mjiin Ofl iti-. New Britain, Conn . U S. A. 




PRESSES 

FOR 
CUTTING 
FORMING 
DRAWING 
PUNCHING 
STAMPING 
EMBOSSING 
and COINING 
BAR and SHEET METAL 

Ferracute Machine Co. 

Bridgeton, N. Jersey, U.S.A. 



MSIEELIiNii 



meroRpMrqiRONMroRKi 



FOR EVERY 
PURPOSE 



PHitiMm 



ihnMj<Qi»t^jnaUflOaffx'nWB 



IsRECElVERS 

JJ3KE STACKS 

^WS& HOPPERS 




WE MANUFACTURE RIVETS of every 
description, 34 inch. dia. and smaller 

PARMENTER & BULLOCH CO., LTD. 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 



December 6, 1917 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



145 



Ttte HURLBUT-ROGERS 
CUTTING-OFF MACHINE 



The Triirlbiit-RfiBere Cullinc-OfT and rrntcr- 

HiK Murlimt- IS a Iji;: pimhu-tr because 

lliirp aie TWO TOOLS instead of one, 

woikiiig in the same cut. 

VEItY POWERFUL, RIGID AND AC- 

ri RATE. 

Pays its cost in savings effected in very 

few monttls. 

ASK FOR FCLL DETTAILS. 

The Hurlbut Rogers Machinery Co. 

So. Sudbury, Mass. 

FOREIGN AGENTS: England. Chas. 
Churchill & Co.. Ltd., London. Manchester, 
Glasgow and Newcastle-on-T>'ne. 
H. W. PETRjIB, TORONTO, CANADA. 



astian 




Catalog ? 

THE SEBASTIAN LATHE COMPANY 



—The Standard, 
Medium - Priced 
Tool for over 30 
years is offered in 
either Geared 

Head, Motor 
Drive, Cone Head, 
Quick Change or 
Plain Change 
Gear. 

As a Money-Sav- 
ing Tool you 
should investi- 
gate its merits 
before purchasing 
a lathe. 



158 Culvert Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. 



THE DOMIMiON CENTRAL 
"^ DRAWING OFFICE 



Do you have any rushed designs or 
tracings to mal<e ? Why not have 
same done by e.xperts of 

The Dominion Central 
Drawing Office 

You don't require to keep .i draughtsman 

when you find out how cheaply and how 

quickly it can be done by us. 

Are your draughtsmen in difTicuIties or doubt? 

Our experts can help them. 

Consult us and save both time and money. 

We specialize in all branches of Engineering. 

from Machine Tools to Bridt^es or Dockyards. 

The Dominion Central Drawing Office 
200 McGill Bldg., Phone M. 2332, Montreal 



Locomotives 
Marine 

Engines 
Tanks 
Hoists 
Bridges 
Boilers 
Winches 



Gardner Disc Grinder 



Gardner Diso 
Grinders are made 
In all sizes, tj pea 
and combinaiioas. 
We can success- 
fully mee-, any 
disc grinding 
problem in exist- 
ence. Largest 
builders of Disc 
Granding machin- 
ery in ttie world. 

Gardner 
Machine Co. 

The Disc Grin<Jin« 

Authorities 
Beloit,Wi8.U.S.A, 

Canadian Arents: Can. 

Fairbanks-Morse Co. 
Toronto — Montreal 




You want Tool Holders that have made goo*^ 
ARMSTRONG TOOL HOLDERS 



Won The 



GRAND PRIZE 

THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE AWARD AT THE PANAMA- 
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION. 



THEY ALWAYS 
MAKE GOOD 

Write for Catalog. 



^ Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 



••Th« Tool Holdor PaopU" 
306 N. Fr.nci.co A»«.. CHICAGO. U.S. A 






Industrial Cars and Portable Steel Track 
Hammant Steel Car & Engineering Works 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 



WllHINSON&KOMPASS 

TORONTO HAMILTON WINNIPEG 

IRON AND STEEL 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

MILL SUPPLIES 
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 

WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



WE CAN SELL 



Your second-hand machinery. 

Let us tell you about the results 
from condensed ads in 

CANADIAN MACHINERY 

Classified Advertising Section 



If any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



M 



(' \ \ \ |. 1 \ \ \l \ (• II 1 \ I IM' 



Voliim.' Will. . 



Metal Testing 


W 


Instruments 


> 


TVie Bvinell Meter- 

for ticteimininp the luininess 
of metab; and metal product*. 

The Crichsen Machine 

for testing metnl sheets 
und strips 

— ' WIUTEFVnV.CfltTAlOGUES-' 

Hennx-mAilolz.lMadi5onAveJUf. 




NORTON JACKS 

FOR ALL KINDS OF HEAVY LIFTING 

Sciul lor complete caialomic sliowinu 

50 styles 10 to 1(K* tons capacity. 

V:,X A. O. NORTON. Limited 

CoAticook, Prov, Qurhec, Cnnada 




//c//usloqIas 

Resistal reinforced lenses for all trades 
and occupations. 

THE STRONG. KENNARD & NUTT CO. 
511 Schofield BldK. Cli-vel«nd. Ohio 



Shell Cutters and Tools 

Cutl^nt fini^^h ground absolutely concentric, as 
well as accurate in dimensions and form by 
precision methods, and the use of special 
KrindinfT fixtures, insure good shells and more 
of them. 

We produce such cutters, and of temper and 
RtrenRth equal to any high-speed cutters that 
can be produced to your design. 
Send us your enquiry. 

Quick DeliTeries. 
We can also undertake a limited amount of 
special high-grade machine work. 

The Blashill Wire Machinery Company, 
Limited 

182 Shearers Street, Montreal 



£! ! nmri I iTiini m 1 1 n in i i.i i:i;i:i ixiri i iJ :i:i.i.u:i:i:n:iii;i:i:i;i;i;i;iiiiiiiiiii;iii;iii:i:ij^ 




Fairbanks 
Hammers 

25 to 300 lbs. 

Belt or Motor Drive 

These Hammers Embody a 
Design and Workmanship that 
are Unsurpassed. 

Send for Catalog 

UNITED HAMMER CO. 



Oliver Building Boston. Mass 

fTii iiu:i:iiii:i:i.i:i:i:u:ixi:m:i:i:i:i:i i:i 1 iuiii:i:ixu:i:ij.i:u:i.u 

// what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' 



Cut Boring Expenses 

Al' I I \l . TK.S rS iiiidcr trviiin circumstance-. 
li.iM- pnixcii thai horin^ expenses may be 
.ut m h.dt in usinntlu- I)i.\()\ I'ATENT 
IU)KlN('i IC )()!.. License to make this tool 
m.i\ he punlia'-ed outiiulil. (let in tniuli witll me. 

C. L. DIXON 

278 Old Orchard Ave., N.O.G., Montreal, Que. 




Castings 



Brass, Gunmetal, MauK-anese Bronze. Delta Metal, 
Xickol .\lloys. Aluminum, etc. 

MARINE ENGINE BEARINGS. 
MACHINE WORK AND ELECTRO PLATING. 

United Brass & Lead, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 



Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting Apparatus 
Carter Welding Co., %ZUrl Toronto 

For Davts-Bournonville Oxy- Acetylene 

Apparatus 

General Office and Factory, Jersey City, N.J. 

Canadian Factory, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Snles Offices: Xew York. Boston, Philadelphia. Pitta- 
buigh, Cleveland. Cincinnati. Chjciiyo. De- 
troit, St- Louis, San Francisco. Seattle. 



^^ 





GEARS AND GEAR CUTTING 
SPROCKETS AND CHAINS 

in stock and to order, any size from ono 
(luarter inch to six-foot in diameter, any 
material. Estimates and gear advice cheer- 
fully furnished. 

151 Pearl St. 
Boston. Mass. 



Grant Gear Works, Inc., 



G. B. GRANT 



U.S.A. 




THE WIRE IS PERFECTLY STRAIGHT 



M.\TIC WIRE STK.\I(iirn;MNG A.XD CUTTING MAI HINI- 
whether it's %" rtianirter ..r onl.v .020" wire, hard or 8oft wire, 
highlv iiolished or rough stock. 

Ma.v «e semi J ou catologrue C? 

The F. B. SHUSTER COMPANY, New Haven, Cein. 

Fur.uerly John A,U tc Son. Kstal.lishe.l ISM^ 
.\l»o makers of Riveting .Maehines, Sprue Cutters. Cotter 1 in 
Maehines. ete. 



Directory and write advrrtisern listed under proper heading. 



December 6, lOl' 



r A N A 1 ) TAN MACHINERY 



i4o 



''THISTLE *'BRAND RUBBER BELTING 



"Maintenance o£ 
Quality" 

is our motto, and our ex- 
perience in the manufac- 
ture of belting since the 
year 1856 should be in- 
valuable to you. Let us 
tell you all about this 
friction faced belting. 
The price will appeal 
to you. 

Write to-day. 

J. c. McLaren belting 

CO.. LTD. 

TIR8NT0. MONTREAL. WINNIPEG 




Milling Attachment 

and Compound Table 

For the Die Slaker. Repair Shop. Pattern Maker or 
Garage; will perform more th^in 90% of the jobs that 
tome up. 

For any Drill Pre-':s 

14" to 42" swine. 

IJig Economy — IViz 

Cotivenience — SmaJl 

Price. It relieves 

your large millers. 

comes in handy 

s p o tting castings. 

milling entis of bo?ises. and many 

n-her odd jobs. Cuts all kinds of 

keyseats perfectly; mills deep 

grooTes, slots and cams. We also 

make cylinder reamers for rebori- 

Foni car, and a reliable air com 

pres.'^or— all at special factorj' prices, 

Write for circulars to-day. 

Hinckley Machine Works, TuJi^oPs'' 




PRESSES-ALL TYPES 

Press Attachments, Automatic. 
Metal and Wire Forming Machines. 
Tumblers — Large Line. 
Burnishing- Machines. Grinders. 
Special Machines. 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 





^itUiniRJBISJgLaXtfEMJMSSBSRljeiliEl^jai^EERy 



~160 Bay=St^r='TOTOTito. 

Tests of Metals, Fuels, Oils, Water, Etc. 
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO ALL SHELL MATERIALS 



SENT ON TRIAL 



Hand or Breast 
Drills, 12 sizes, 
sizes fitte<l with 
% to !' 
cap. Ball bear- 
ing through- 
ont. L. a r 
screw feed. 




We malie complete line 
of Portable Electric 
Drills and Grinders for 
all purposes. Especially 
built to withstand hard 
usage. For all currents 
and voltages. 

Catalog? 



Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

New York Office: 50 Church Street 



PRECISION TOOLS AND 
EQUIPMENT 

Johansson Standard and Shop Gages 
Nose Reamers and Sizing 
Taps for 6" Hr. Mark XI L Shells 
Magnetic Chucks 
Bench Lathes Surface Grinders 



Send us your inquiries. 



Let us quote 



H. E. STREETER 

23 New, Birks Building, Montreal, P.Q. 



PULLEYS 

ALL WOOD— COMBINATION-IRON— STEEL 

Every pulley fully guaranteed. 
Write for interesting printed matter. 

The Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Ltd. 



Montreal 



Factory : Aurora, Ont. 



Toronto 



LANDIS MACHINE CO., INC. 

WAYNESBORO, PENNA. 

Manufacturers of BOLT and PIPE 
THREADING MACHINERY 

Exclusive Canadian Agents : 

Williams & Wilson. MONTREAL, CAN. 

Write for Catalogue No. 22 




wmm 



Zenith Coal & Steel Products 

Limited 

SERVICE and QUALITY 

IN 

HIGH SPEED STEEL, CARBON STEEL, 
COLD ROLLED and MACHINERY STEEL 

HACK SAWi BLADES 
DRILLS, REAMERS, COAL and COKE 

1410 Royal Bank Building, Toronto 
402 McGill Building, Montreal 



WWiii 



Allen Safety Set Screws 

(U.S. Patent. June 7. I910I 

TliL- process by which these screws are made increases their streugtii 
over 30cf). Allen Screws nre guaranteed. 






SET SCRR\^' 

United States Standard and V Threads carried in stock. 
Sizes from 1-4" to iv^" \n .li;iiii. t'"ata]op and samples free. 

THE ALLEN MFG. CO., INC. 

O.VPSCTIBW 13S SHELDON ST.. HARTFORD, CONN.. U.S.A. 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



146 



CA N A 1>1 AN MAC 11 1 N K li V 



Volume XVIIT. 



<i 



FROST KING" 



the Mechanic's 
Friend 



The most exartinc me<rhnnics find in "Frost Kins" their 
ideal of babbitts. 

Used in Canailn's liircest ami moat clllcient jihuits 
b»'oaus>' of its sploiuliil pt'rforniaiu-f uiulor heavy ihity. 
FruMi King i.s an all-rouiul babbitt and has wido use for 
all classes of stationary on^ri^cs, traction rollinK mills, 
plnnini; mills, .saw mills, pulp machinory, oto. 

I'sf it for >otir nio-l rviiclini; roquirenient.-;. 

HOYT METAL COMPANY 



EASTERN AVE. .nd LEWIS ST.. 
N»«r York. N.Y. London. En 



TORONTO. CANADA 
I . St. Loui*. Mo. 




jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



IIIIIIIIIIIMimhIllllllllill 



EfT«ctiw. comfortable eye protectors for chipping, lathe 
work, trrindinff, roll ins. cupola and furnace work, pouring, 
temperinfT. cement bumini; and packinfc. electric weldinK. 
acetylene cutttnc, quarr>'inir. laboratory work, truck and 
engine drivinfc. military service, and every kind of indus- 
trial work 




Albex Eye Protector, with headband, price $1.25 per pair, 
or $9.60 per dozen. includinR steel cases. This RORi^le for 
drivers, machinists and grinders is also the standard mili- 
tary iro(nrle. Nearly 100.000 were in the U.S. army service 
in 1916. the War Department purchasing 50.000. The large 
1917 purchases by the United States and British Govern- 
ments for truck driving, field work, munition making, etc.. 
cannot be stated at this time. 

Full particulars for Canada from Toronto Office, 
and for Great Britain from London Office. 

T. A. WILLSON & CO., Inc.. Factory in Reading. Pa.. U.S.A. 

"One p.nir or twenty thousand per day." 



Chicago 
Mailers BIdg. 



^Iil|lllilll'1llli:il1lll.llll 



San Francisco 
Head Bids. 

Iil:i:ill!n.i;ii|[|ilililil!l!lil 



Toronto London 

!:! Scott St. 9 Hatton tiarden 



llllll^ 




First Cost of Lamps is forgotten when 
you know 

LACO NITRO LAMP gives more ubht ' 

Saves 30v to 50% of the Current Neeoeo 

Even a trifle higher price is offset by the great .saving 
in current consumed for 1000 candle power for 10(X) 
hours. 

ASK YOUR DEALER. 

CANADIAN LACO-PHILIPS COMPANY, LTD 

stocks Available at Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg, Vanoouve' 




CUT YOUR SHOP COSTS 

Nobody would think of putting 16-inch lathe work on a 30-inch lathe, then 
why leave small parts on a large Milling Machine ? 

A Steptoe Hand Miller or small power feed can be handled quickly and will 
cut your production cost. You will have less money invested in your Milling 
Machines and have more machines to do the work. 

That same principle applied to your small planer work will cut the cost of 
planer work. 

A Steptoe Shaper will do the work faster because it can be handled quicker. 

The John Steptoe Company, ciNciNNAxiroHfe: u.s.a. 

Canadian Representatives: Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont. 




If what you need is not advertised, consult our Buyers' Directory and write advertisers listed under proper heading. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A J) I A N M A C Tl I N K R Y 



147 




Jf what you want is not here, write us. and we will tell you where to eet it. Let us BUggest that you consult also 

the advertisers' index facing the inside back cover, after having secured advertisers' names from this directory. The 

information you desire may be found in the advertising pages. This department is maintained for the benefit and 

convenience of our readers. The insertion of our advertisers' names under proper headings is gladly undertaken, but 
does not become part of an advertising contract. 

ililiiiliiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiilililiiililiiililililililiiiiilililiiililililiiii:iililililililii:iiiM 



ABRASIVE MATERIALS 

Aikertbead Hard^Ya^e Co., Toronto, Ont 

Bailer Co., Ltd.. J. R.. .Montreal. Que. 

Canadian Tairbauks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Can. B. K. Morton, Montreal. Que. 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N,Y. 

Thf r,,:,. F. F:..-.- Mdi\. ^ Supiily Co., .Monlreal. 

Ford-.Smith Mach. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Gardner Machine Co., Eeloit, \\u. 

Norton Co.. Worcester. Maas. 

Petrie, Ltd., H, VT.. Toronto. Ont. 

IMik- of -Montreal, Ltd., H. W., Montreal. Que. 

ACETYLENE 

Carter Welding Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Commercial Acetylene Welding Co., Inc., Toronto 
L'Air Liquide Society, Montreal, Toronto 
Prest-O-Llte Co.. Inc., Toronto, Ont. 

ACETYLENE GENERATORS 

Commercial Acetylene Welding Co., Inc.. Toronto 
L'Air Liquide Society, Montreal, Toronto 
Prc9t-0-Lite Co., Inc., Toronto. Ont. 

ACCUMULATORS. HYDRAULIC 
Caualian F;iiioaul\-s-Morse Co., -Montreal 
Charles F. Elmes Eng. Works, Chicago 
Garlook-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York 
Smart-Turner .Mach. Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 
William U. Perrin. LJd.. Toronto 

ADAPTER PLATES 
Jas. McK.iy Co., Pittsbuigh, Pa. 

AIR RECEIVERS 
Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co., Sherbrooke. Que. 
The Jenckes .Mach. Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke. Que. 
MacKinnon. Holmes Co.. Sherbrooke, Que. 
SI. Lawrence Welding Co., Montreal, Que. 

AIR WASHERS 
Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kitchener, Ont, 
Sheldons. Ltd., Gait, Ont. 
Sturteiant Co., B, F„ Gait, Ont. 

ALUMINUM 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

ALLOY, STEEL 

Can. B. K. Morton. Toronto, Montreal 
H, A. Drury Co.. Ltd.. .Montreal 
Hawkridge B'-os. Co., Boston, Mass. 
Osbom {Canada), Ltd.. Sam'l. Montreal. Que. 
Standard Alloys Company, Pittsburgh. Pa, 
Vanadium Alloys Steel Co.. Pittsburg, Pa. 
Vulcan Crucible Steel Co.. Aliquippa, Pa, 

ARBORS 

Canadian Fail tanta^Morse Co.. Montreal 
CleTeland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland 
Oarlock- Walker .Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 
Moise Twist Drill & LMach. Co.. New Bedford, Mass. 
Petrie. Lid.. H. W., Toronto. Ont. 
Petri.- nf .Montreal. I.tl,. H. W, . Montreal, Que. 
Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dimdas, Ont. 

AUTOGENOUS WELDING AND CUTTING 

PLANTS 
Carter Welding Co., Toronto. Ont. 
L'Air Liquide Society, Montreal. Toronto 
Prest-O-Lilc Co., Inc., Toronto. Ont- 
8t Lawrence Welding Co.. Montreal, Que. 

AUTOMATIC MACHINERY 
Bairn -Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Garlock-U'alker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Gardner, Robt., & Son, Montreal. 
MoClean & Son. F. W., Niagara Falls. Ont 
Riverside Machinery Depot, Detroit, Mich. 
Petrie, Md., H. W.. Toronto. Ont 
Petrie of Mr.nlreal. Ltd., H. W. , Montreal. Que. 
Pratt & Whilney Co., Dnnd.as. Ont. 
Roelotson Machine & Tool Co., Toronto, Can. 
A. n. Williams JIachy. Co., Toronto 

BABBITT METAL 
Aikenhead Hartlware Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Baxter & Co.. Ltd., .1. R.. Montreal, Que. 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal 
Canada Metal Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
Can. B. K. Morton. Toronto. Montreal 
The Goo. F. Fow .Mchy. & Supply Co. . Montreal. 
Hoyt Metal <to, . Toronto 
Magnolia Metal Co.. Montreal 
Petrie. Ltd., H. W.. Toronto. Ont 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co.. Hamilton 
Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton, Ont 

BALL BEARINGS 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal 
Can a K F Co.. Toronto. Onrt. 
Chapman Double Ball Bearing Company. Toront 

BARRELS. STEEL SHOP 
Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
CleTeland Wire Spring Co.. Cleveland 

BASE FACING MACHINES 

Victoria Foundry Co., Ottawa. Ont 



BARS. BORING 

Charles F, Elmes Eng. Works. Chicago, 111. 

.Monarch Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. Ont 

Nilerl-Bement-Pond Co., New York 
BASE PLATES 

.Tas. McKay Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
BELT LACERS 

Clipper Belt Lacer Co., Grand UapiiJs, Mich. 
BELT DRESSING AND CEMENT 

Ha.iter i Co., Ltd., J. It., Montreal, Que. 
BELT LACING LEATHER 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

Tlie Ceo. F. I''os.~ .Mrhy, & Supply Co., Montreal. 
• Graton & Knight Mfg, Co,, Worcester, Masa, 
BELTING. BALATA 

Baiter Co., Ltd., J. R.. Montreal, Que, 

Can. B. K. Morion. Toronto. Montreal 

Federal Engineering Co., Toronto. Ont 
BELTING, CHAIN 

Caiiatlian Fairbanks-Moree Co., Montreal 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.. Toronto. Ont, 

Jones & Glassco, Montreal, Que. 

.Morse Chain Co.. Ithaca. N.Y. 

Petrie, Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto, Ont 

Petrie of .Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., Montreal. Que. 

Whitney Mfg. Co,, Hartford, Conn. 
BELTING. CONVEYOR 

Gootlvear Tire & Rubber Co.. Toronto, Ont 
BELTING, LEATHBtR 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal 

Can. B. K. -Morton. Toronto, Montreal 

Graton & Knight Mfg. Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Jones & Glassco, ^Iontreal_ 

McLaren, J. C. Belting Ct>.. Montreal, Que. 

.Morse Chain Co., Ithaca, N.Y. 

Petrie. Ltd.. H, W,. Ton.nlo. Ont. 

Peine of .Montreal. Ltd., H. W., .Montreal. Que. 

Standard Machy. & Supplies, Ltd., Montreal. Que. 
BELTING. STITCHED COTTON DUCK 

Baxter & Co.. Ltd., J. R.. Montreal. Que. 

Bennett. W. P.. 61 Montford 31.. Montreal. Qua. 

Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Federal Engineering Co., Toronto, Ont 

Petrie, Ltd,. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

Petrie of .Montreal. Ltd.. H. W,, -Montreal, Que, 
BENCH LEGS, STEEL 

New Britain Mach. Co.. New Britain. Conn. 
BENCH DRAWERS, FRICTIONLESS 

.New Britain Mach. Co.. New Britain, Conn. 
BENDING MACHINERY 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dimdas 

Bertrams, Limited, Edinburgh. Scotland 

Brown-Boggs Cl.. Ltd., Hamilton, Can. 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener. Canada 

Ferracute Mach. Co., Bridgeton, N.J. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

Charles F. Elmes Eng. Works, Chicago 

Jardine. A. B., & Co., Hespeler, Ont 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin. Ohio 

Niles-Bement.Pond Co.. New York 

Petrie, Ltd,, H. W., Toronto. Ont 

Petrie of .Montreal. Ltd,. H. W. . Montreal, Que. 

Steel Bending Brake Works. Chatham, Ont. 

Toledo -Machine & Tool Co., Toledo, Ohio, 
BILLET MARKERS 

.Matthews & Co,. Jas. H., Pittsburgh, Pa, 
BINS, STEEL 

The Jenckes Mach. Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke. Que. 

MacKinnon, Holmes Co., Sherbrooke 

Toronto Iron Works. Ltd., Toronto. Ont 
BLASTING MACHINES, SHOT AND 
STEEL GRIT 

Gray .Mfg. & Mach. Co., Toronto, Ont 

n. S, Silica Co., Chicago, lU. 
BLOWERS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont. 

Sheldons. Ltd., Gait. Ont 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Onit, 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W. . Toronto, Ont 

It. E. T. Pringlc. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Riverside Machinery Depot. Detroit, Mich, 

Sturtevant Co., E. F,. Gait. Ont 
BLOW PIPES AND REGULATORS 

Carter Welding Co.. Toronto. Ont 

L'Air Liquide Society, Montreal, Toronto 

Pre«t-0-I.ite Co.. Inc., Toronto, Ont 
BLUE PRINTING 

Dominion Central Drawing Office, McGill Bldg., 
Mcmtreal. Que, 
BLUE PRINTING MACHINERY 

Mulbner-EnUmd Tool Co., Syracuse, N.T. 
BOARTZ 

Geo. A. Joyce Co., Ltd.. New York. N.T. 
BOILERS 

The Jenckes .Mach. Co,, Ltd.. Shertirooke, Que, 

MacKinnon, Holmes Co.. Sherbrooke 

Marsh & nenlhom. Ltd.. Belleville. Ont. 

Petrie, Ltd., H, W., Toronto, Ont 



Petrie of -Montreal, Ltd., H. W., Montreal. Que. 
Rirerside Machmery Depot, Detroit, Micta, 
Sterling Engine Works, Winnipeg. .Man. 

BOLT CUTTERS AND NUT TAPERS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont 
Canada -Machinery Corp., Gait. Ont, 
Landis Machine Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Wells Brothers Co. of Canada, Gait, Ont 

BOLTS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 
Oumming & Son, J, W., New Glasgow, Canada 
Gait Machine Screw Co., Gait, Ont. 
London Bolt & Hinge Works, Lon<lon, Ont, 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton, Ont. 

BOLT AND NUT MACHINERY 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Dujjdas 
Canada .Machineiy Coi*p., Gait, Ont 
Garlock-Walker .Machinery Co.. Toronto. OnL 
'.iardner A: .Son. Robt. Montieal. 
Landis Machine Co., Waj-nesboro, Pa, 
National Machinery Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 
Petrie, Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 
Petrie of -Montreal, LM., H, W., -Montreal,. Que. 
Riverside Machinery Depot. Detroit .Mich. 
A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto 

BOLT THREADING MACHINERY 
Landis .Machine Co,. Waynesboro, Pa. 
Victor Tool Co., Waynesboro. Pa, 

BORING MACHINES, PNEUMATIC 

CYLINDER 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal 
Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co., Sherbrooke, Que. 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 
Petrie, Ltd.. H, W,. Toronto. Ont 
Peine of Montreal, Ltd,. H. W., -Montreal. Que. 
Stow Mfg. Co.. Binghampton. N.Y. 

BORING MACHINES, UPRIGHT AND 

HORIZONTAL 
John Bertram & Sons Co.. Dundas 
Canada Maihinery Corp. Gait. Ont 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Onjt 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York 
Petrie of Montreal, Ltd,, H. W.. Montreal, Que, 
Roelofson Machine & Tool Co., Toronto. Ont 
Riverside Machinery Depot, Detroit, Mich. 
Slow Mfg. Co., Binghampton, N.Y. 

BORING MACHINES, STOVE AND COAL 
Cumming & Son, J. W,, New Glasgow. Canada 

BORING AND TURNING MILLS 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas 
Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 
Tlir i5eo, F, Frs."! .Mchy. & Supply Co.. .Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York 
Petrie, Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 
Peine of Monlre.al. Ltd,, H. W., Montreal. Que. 
R. E. T. Pringle, Ltd., Toronto, Ont, 

BOXES, STEEL SHOP AND TOTE 
Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland 
New Britain Mach, Co,, New Britain, Conn. 

BRAKES 
Brown. Boggs & Co., Hamilton, Can. 

BRASS AND COPPER BARS, RODS 

AND SHEETS 
Brown's Copper & Brass RoUmg Mills, New 
Toronto 

BRASS FOUNDERS 

St Lawrence Welding Co., Montreal, Que, 
BRASS WORKING MACHINERY 

Foster Machine Co.. Elkhart, Ind. 
Garlock-Walker .Machinery Co.. Toronto. Out 
Warner &. Swa.sey Co., Cleveland 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York 
Petrie. LM,. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 
Petrie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W, , Montreal. Que. 
Prest-O-Lite Co.. Inc.. Toronto, Ont 
Riverside Machinery Depot. Detroit. Mich. 
A. R. Williams Machy. Co., T:ronto 

BRIDGES, RAILWAY AND HIGHWAY 
The Jenckes .Mach. Co.. Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 
MacKinnon, Holmes Co.. Sherbrooke 

BRONZE RODS AND SHEETS 
Brown's Copper & Brass Rolling Mills, New 
Toronto 

BRONZE, NAVAL 

Roran's Copper & Brass Rolling .Mills, NeiV 
Toronto. Onl, 

BUBBLERS 
Puro Sanitary Dk'g Fountain Co.. Hatdenvjllc 
Mass. 

BUFFING AND POLISHING MACHINERY 
Ford-Smith Mach. Co. Hamilton. Ont, 
Foss & Hill Machy. Co., Montreal 
Garlock-Wtlker Machinery Co., Toronto. Onl 
New Britain Machine Co., New Britain, C<mB. 



148 



C A N A 1) 1 A N M A C H 1 N E R Y 



Voliimo Win. 



\ Y. 
N.J 
Cftn. 

u.o. Ont 



BLtkirra. CLAM aUKLU CRAB. DUMr 

Nottit.Ti Cwn «ort». Lid. \V»H.r.lUt. 0ml- 
\Sbitu4 t'wuttvlfT L^^uimvat Co. llftr«»j. 1.1. 
Ul'LLDUZKKS 

J.>lia llci'.ima ik i*..u» (.%>-. l)ji>J«». 

m Kvms ..II AMI .SAllKAl l.AS 

, , . ^, . » ■ ...». t'nL 

...... t<-!.it-. i Uf» *•'. ■">•* l'«""- *>*'• 

IILKKIM. KhAMKKS 

w.ll. lit • i^. "< <«u»l«. 0»lt. Oni. 

Ill KK5. IKON AMI iiirrtK 

I ASADA SIt.VKK 

li™.o. i.vi-t * " »- •'>'»'"< """• ^ ' 
T««witc. I'nt 
CANNfcKS- MACIIIvrRY 

Him. t « 
►'•rrac-il* W. 
Btowu. I*.**-' • 
r.-w. u I.i:« ' ■ 1 ■: 

I AKS. IM)l 8TKIAL 

,t. . 1. . I. Uor».Co. l.M. MoolrMl 

,~. u. .\v. l.tJ.. t(hrrtr.K.ki. >Ju«. 
• II.U«nllt. Odl 

i»ll. Onl. 
Mlponil Ca. lUrrtj. 111. 

, ^„ , I. 'llY 

M.-. .^ M ■■■■■ l-l''- »•■»■■"»'. O"'- 

CAR MOVKRS 

Pill.* MJl Co.. Orti»««. OnL 

CAKTRiniiK MAKINC MACHINKRT 

B\«ck»ll. Kml. S.. Woolworth Tower. -Stw York 

u.iv. (o, y. w ii„ .k:.vii N ^ 

iTMtO lUt Co. Inc. Toronto. OnL 
CASTINGS. AI.IMINIM. UKA9S. 
RRONZ(~ COPTER 

Cum»irj k S.T. J. W . N« Oliwow. Cin^ll. 

.li»iu>l»r HfCk. Ltd.. OltiWi. ^ ^ „ 

TV, j,i.f»« M.,!i >'o . Lia.. Shtrtirookt, Qje. 
.'. .iimi-. .;. .VUii. 
. MoiitiYiil. Que. 

Ti rLi .A " . ' o. naailton. 

CASllM S. I.KAY IKON 

B«ratrJ lucluiinkl Co.. Tht A.. ForlenUlt. gut. 

Brown. U<«n Co.. LM.. UamUton. Cknada. 

C»c StMl FoiindriM. Ltd.. Montrell, Que. 

^■.t.aoJcr KlK*. Ltd.. Olt*w». 

■ ,,-■■■- .t S.Ml, K.>1.\.. .\l.ill!r.'.>l. 

Hull Iron & 8t*tl FoundrlM. Ltd.. HuU. QutbM. 

Tht JtnckM Mtch. Co.. Ltd.. Shtilirooke. Qu». 

Wm Ktnnfdj 4 Sons, Ltd.. Owtn Sound. 

VI-,-.', .1 11,„-1. n, I.:.l.. It.IKvilIe. On:. 

V:i.i,*»il!t Koiinlrj Co.. PleMlsTOIe, Qut. 

Shf:.'.^35. Limite*!. Gill. Ont, 

•i-,:',,i; K..;n, U rk-. \Vm[i,i*(!. Man. 

W,"\iil \l.uh. Jk IViiiln,-. 1. 1.1.. WtUand, Out. 
CASTINGS. STEEL CHROME 
AND MANGANESE STEEL 

C»n. Sttfl FoundriM. Ltd.. Montrt«l. Que. 

DoainloD 8l««l Foondrr Co., Ltd., H»mUto«. <^« 

Hull Iron 4 3t«tl FoundriM. Ltd.. Hull. Quebec. 

Wm. KenntJj 4 Soni, Ltd., Owen Sound. 
CASTINGS. MALLEABLE 

Cin Steel Foundrie*. Ltd.. Montrekl, Que. 

Cuniin;ng 4 Son. J. W.. New Glasgow, Cin»d». 
CASTINGS. NICKEL STEEL 

Hull Iron 4 Steel Foundries. Ltd., Hull. Que. 
CEMENT MACHINERY 

Cknsditn Klirt«uk»-Mors« Co.. Ud., Mootreal. 

Girdner, RobL. 4 Son, Montreal. 

IV.r.e. l.M,. H. \V.. Toron:o. Ont. 
CENTERING MACHINES 

Victoria FoundrT Co., Ottawa. Ont 
CENTRE REAMERS 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co., Dundas. 

Gardner. Robt-, 4 Son. Montreal. 

Hurlbut. Kogen UactL Co.. South Sudburr. Maaa. 

NiIesBement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Pra;t 4 Whitnej Co.. Dundaa, Ont. 

\Ve:i« Bros. Co. o! Canada. Gait. Ont. 
CHAIN BLOCKS 

Aikenbead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

Canadian FairbankB *l.on« Co., Ltd., Montnal. 

Fold Chain Block A Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ttie (loo. F. F.-.SS .Mch.v. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Garlock-Walkar Uachj. Co., Toronto, Ont 

I'etne, Lt.I.. II. \V.. Toron.o. Ont- 

Pelrie of Monlreal, LU.. H. W. . Montreal. Que. 

Wright Mfg. Co.. Lisbon. Ohio. 
CHAIN DRFVES 

J. r.^-^ .V t;:a5sco. Montreal. Que. 
CBEinSTB 

Can. Inspection & Testing Lab.. Mon'.real. Que. 

The Jenckes Mach. Co.. Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Toronto Testing Laboratory, Ltd., Toronto. 
CHESTS. TOOL 

Bmhrcc. Ira. 281 Emerald St. N.. Hamilton. Ont 

Union Tool Cheat Works. Rocfaeater, N.Y. 
CHUCKS, AERO, AUTOMATIC 

Girrin Machine Co.. New York- 

Hannifln Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 
CHUCKS. AIR 

Hannifin Mfg. Co.. Chicago. 111. 

Manufacturers Equipment Co., Chicago, HI. 
CHUCKS, COLLET 

HanniHn Mfg. Co.. Chicago. HI. 

Man"'art'jr^r^ Eqnipment Co., Chicago, HI. 
CHUCKS. DRILL. LATHE 
ANT) UNIVERSAL 

Alkenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co.. Dundal, Ont 

Can. Blower 4 For^e Co., Kit<iiener, Canada. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ird.. MontreaL 
Cushnan Chuck Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
Fo«s 4 Hill Mach; Co.. Montreal. 
Oaidner, Bobt, 4 Boa. Uontreal. 



Uarlock Walker Machlnerr CV, TorooUi, Ont 

liauniHu U(g I'm., Chioagv., HI. 

ti«r\l,n«# lii.« , i!hic«au. 111. 

Ja.tH« .Vllg ( o.. llarlioiO. C.«B 

Krr 4 ()uu.l»ln. Itraalforxt 

Uanufaclureia Equipment Co., Cbloago, 111. 

Mu.lem Tool Co., £rla. Pa. 

M..i>r Tui.l Onll 4 McJi Co.. .New lleilfonl. .Maw. 

IM,ir. 1.1,1 . II. \V . T,>r..ii;.i. Ont. 

IMiic i.t .M.tilivjl III. II. W . Mouli.nl. Qu.. 

.Skinner Chuck Co.. New llritala. Conk. 

I>. K Whil.iu Machine Co., New Iaw.Ioo. Conn. 4 

CHUCKS. DHll.l.. AUTOMATIC 
AND KKYI.KSS 

Vikmliri.l M«r.lwKie Co . T.,r,mto. Ont. 

Can Itloarr 4 l-'orge Co.. Kitchener, Canada. 

Wbittirr Mfg. I'o . Hartford. Conn. 
CHUCKS. FRICTION AND TAP 

Vt.-tor To.,1 Co.. \V«)-ur»boro. Pa. 

Weill llrxu. Co of Canada. Gait, Ont 
CHUCKS. MAGNETIC 

II. E Slrerlrr. 43 New Ilirka IlKlg.. Montreal. 
CHUCKS. RING WHEEL 

FonUSmllh Mach Co. Hamilton. Ont 

ilanlnrr Machine Co., Uelolt, Wli. 
CHUCKS, SPLIT 

Kirrll Lathe ,t Grinder Co., Brighton, Maia. 
CHUCKIN(; MACHINES 

iJaryln Machine Co.. New York. 

New Britain Machine <^o,. New Britain, Conn. 

Nilee-Bemrnl r.ind Co.. New York. 

Itocloftoii .Machine 4 T.kiI Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Warner 4 Hwasey Co.. Clereland. O, 
CLOCKS, WATCHMAN. PORTABLE 

Har^llnl:e llr,» . Inc.. Chicago. III. 
CLUTCHES. CHAIN 

.1. 1,,-. ,v i:'.,.-,-... M..ntr,„i. g,i,' 

CLUTCHES. FRICTION AND PULLEY 

BemanI Industrial Co., A.. ForllerTlIIe. Que. 
Johnson .Machine Co., Carlyle, Manchester, Conn. 
.Ii'll.-. *\: t.ln.^.','. Mnntr.'.nl. Qu.' 
PmlllTe Clutch 4 Pulley Works. Ltd., Toronto. 

COAL HANDLING MACHINFRY 

\:„T-li .V ll.'nlhoni, 1.1.1., Il.-ll, vill,-. Ill, I. 

MacKlnnnn. Holme« A Co.. Sherbrooke. Que. 

Northern Crane Works. T.t.I.. Walkerrllle. Ont 

\\'hitinB Foundry rqulpmcnt Co.. Harrey, 111. 
rnil.INC MACHINERY, WIRE 
AND SPRING 

31,', -PIT A H.irtlpT, Inc.. Worcester, Mass. 
COKE AND COAL 

ITsrna * Co.. M. A.. CleTeland. O. 

Zenith Sleel A Coal Products. Montreal, 



Que. 
Alexandria, Ont. 
Ont 



COLLARS 

Can. Bond TTantter A Cplg. Co., 
COLLFCTORS. PVUMATir 

Cnn. B!.^wer A Fonre Co.. Kitchener, 
Sheldon". Limited, nalt. Ont. 
Stnrtetant Co.. B. F,. GaTt. Ont 
COI I FTS 
Becker Mnilnif Machine Co.. Boston. Maaa. 
Hannlfln Mfg. Co.. Chlcaio. HI. 
HnHinire Bmrt.. Inc.. Chicago. Til. 
Manufnchirers" Fq'iipment Co.. Chicairo. HI. 
Birett Lathe A Grinder Co.. Boston. MiM. 

COMPOSITION INr:nT 

Itr,in-n'!i Coi.por .t Brass Rolling Mills, New To. 
rnn'o Ont. 
COMpBrqqr>»9. AIR 

Can. TncersolVBand Oo.. SberbrooVe. Que. 

CleTeland Pne.imatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 

Curtis rneomatlr MachT. Co.. Sf Louis. Mo. 

OarlocV-WsTker Machinerr Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

HinckleT Machine Co.. HInokleT. 111. 

The Jenckes Mach. Co.. Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

p^f-l.. T .^ II \v To-'-n-" '^•'' 

Peine of Montre.nl. LU.. H. W.. Montreal. Que. 

Birer^i'le Machinerr Depot. Detroit. Mich. 

^nui-t T-imer M«chine Co.. Hainilton Ont. 

Tsvlnr Inolmmml Co., Rochester. NT. 

covTmrT WORK 

Wetland Motr,r fc Machine Co.. WelLind, Ont. 
povi-DrtT T fi>« »vr> STARTERS, 
EI FCTRir MOTORS 

Ppt,-ie. T,''t . IT- \v . Toron'o. Ont. 

A. R. Williams Mschy. Co.. Toronto. 
CONTROI.I ING INITRITwrVTS 

TaTlor In.stmment Co.. Rochester. N.T. 
CONVFRTFRS STi^vT. S' ID»:-B' OW 

Whiting Foundry Equipment Co.. Haprey. HI. 
COPING MACHINES 

Can. Blower A Forge Co.. Kitchener. Ont 
John Bertram A 3nna Co.. T>"nda.s. 

Niles-Bemen^-Pond Co.. New York. 

COPPER. BUS BAR, SHEET 

Hrown"? Copper & Bra.ss Rolling Mills, X,m 
Toronto. Ont. 
COUNTPRBORl^S AND COITVTPWSINKS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Clark Eqninment Co.. Buchanan. Mich. 

nereland Twist Lrill Co.. Clereland. 

Morse Tirist Orill & Mch. Co.. New Bedford. Ma-s.s. 

Pratt A Whitner Co.. Dundas. Ont 
COtlNT'^WRHAFTS 

Biird Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Faster Machine Co.. Elkhart. Ind. 

StrtW >ffg Co , Binellampton, N.Y. 
COTTPtlNCS. FWICTIOV 

Bernard Industrial Co., The A.. Fortierrille, Que. 
COUPTINC.a PIATN AND pi >^viRt p 

Can. Bond Hanger A Ople. Co.. Alexandria. Ont 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto. 

Oardner. Robt.. A Ron. Montreal. 

Tn'IeT,enden^ Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago, Til. 
CRANFS. TOCOMOTIV^- 

Northern Crane Works. WalkerOle. 
CRANES. GANT"Y 

Noribern Crane Works. Walkerrllle. 

Smart-Turner Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Whiting Fonndry Equipment "^o.. Harrey. HI. 



CRANES, GOLIATH AND PNLUMATIC 

,N,,ill,rtu Ciaue \V(>ik.%, VN alkelTlllr. 
Wliitiiia 1-ouuUry t.q,iipuent Co.. ilarrey. 111. 
CRANES, TKAVKl.l.lNG, Kl.l'.CIKlC 
AND HAND POWEK 
luriLs i'uriimatlc Machy. Co., St Luula, Ua 
Dutuliilou Bridge Co.. .\luulleal. 
liri>l>uiii. Juliu T., Lt.t, Toronto. Ont 
Nllea Iteiiiriil I'olid Co.. New iork. 
.NurJieni Crane VVorka, Walkerrllle. 
CRANES, POKTAIU.K 

Alkeuh.ail llanlwate Co.. Toronto, Ont 
.\orllu-m Crane Works. WalkerTllIe. 
Wlutliig Foundry Kquilimeut Cu., Harrey, 111. 
CRIMPS, LEATIIEK 

Gruluu .^ Kiilghl Mfg. Co., Worcester, Maaa. 
CUPOLAS 

Can. Blower 4 Foigo Co.. Kitchener, Unt 
NurtUem Ci'anu Worka, WalkcrvUle. 
I'll,,,. 1,1.1 . II. W.. T,„un.ii. Out 
Shehlons. 1.1,1., Gait, Ont 

Wliitiug l-'uuntlry Kquipmenl Co., HaiTey. 111. 
CUPOLA BLAST (lAIKiES & BLOWERS 

SheMims. Lid.. Gnll. Ont 
CUTTER (;KINDEKS AND ATTACHMENTS 
Ciiicinuali .Milllug Mactilue Co.. ('inclniiali. 
GarUK:l< U'alk.'r .Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 
Garnn .Machiui' C'o. . New Voik. 
Monarch Brass .Mfg. Co.. Toronlu. Out. 
Norton Grin, ling Co.. Worcester. Maaa. 
IVliif „f .Moi.lnal. 1,11.. 11. W.. .Moutr.nl, Quv. 
Pnitl & Whitno' Co.. Dundaa, Ont 
CUTTERS. FLUE 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto 
CUTTERS, PIPE (SEE PIPE CUTTERS) 
CUTTERS. MILLING 
Becker >lllllng Machine Co.. Boeton. Mass. 
Bull,,ll,M .V Co.. lliH-k Islau,!, Que. 
Cana.lian Fairbanka-^lorae Co., Lui.. Montreal. 
Cleveland Milling Mach. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Cleveland Twist IJrill Co.. Clcvelanil. 
Tl„- (;,'o. F. I',™ .Mcliy. .t Siiiiply Co., Montieal. 
Garvin .Machine Co., New York. 
Illinois Tool Works, Chicago, 111, 
Morse Twist Drill .4 .\lch. Co.. New Be.lfo,il. .Mais. 
Oahom (Canada), Ltd., Sam'I, Montreal, Que. 
I'.tiie, I,t,l.. 11. W.. Toi,iu,o, onl. 
Pctrie of i.Moulieal. I,t,l.. II. \V.. .Montreal, Quo. 
Pratt 4 Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 
Tabor Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Whitney Mfg. Co. Hartford. Conn. 
CUTTING COMPOUND AND CUTTINl; Oil. 
Cataract Relluing A Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Elm Cutting Oil Co.. Toronto. 
Racine Tool & .Machine Co.. Racine, Wis. 
CUTTIN(;-OFF MACHINES 

Armstrong Ilroa. Tool Co.. Chicago. 
John Bertram A Sons Co., Dundas. 
Canadian Fairbank9-.Morse Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 
Curtis & Curtis Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
The U,<>. F. Fttn .M'hy. k .Sni.ply Co.. Moulnal. 
Gait & Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 
Garvin Machine Co.. New York. 
Hurlbut. Rogers Machy. Co.. South Sudbury, Maaa 
John H. Hall A Sons, Brentford. Ont. 
Wra. Kennedy A Sons. Owen Sound. Ont 
Niles-Bemenl-Poml Co., New York, N.Y. 
Peerless Machine Co., Racine, Wis. 
I'eti-ie. Ltd., II. W.. Toron:o, Onl. 
Petric of Montreal, Ltd., H. W.. Montreal. Que. 
Preat-O-Llte Co.. Inc. Toronto. Ont 
Racine Tool A Machine Co., Racine, Wis. 
Stan,iard Mchv. & SuTtplies. Ltd.. .Montreal. Que. 
Tabor Mfg. Co.. PhUadelphia, Pa. 
CYLINDERS, AIR 

Manufacturers Equipment Co., Chicago. III. 
CYLINDERS. AUTOMATIC REBORING JIGS 
AND REAMERS 

Hinckley Machine Co.. Hinckley, HI. 
CUTTING AND WELDING PLANTS 

Prest-O-Lite Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Onrt. 
DAMPER REGULATORS 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd., Mootreal. 
DERRICKS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 
Dominion Bridge Co., Montreal. 
Marsh & Hcnthoni, Ltd., Belleville, Ont. 
Winnipeg Gear A Engr. Co.. Wlpnipeg, Man. 
DIAMONDS, BLACK AND ROUGH 

Geo. A. Joyce Co., Ltd.. New York. 
DIAMOND TOOLS 
Geo. A. Joyce Co., Ltd., New York. 
Wheel Trueing Tool Co., Windsor, Ont 
DIES, BRASS PRINTING, EMBOSSING 
AND LETTERING 

Matthews. Jas. H., A Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
DIES AND DIE STOCKS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont. 
BanflelJ. W. H.. 4 Son. Toronto. 
Butterfield A Co., Rock Island, Que. 
Brown. Boggs Co.. Hamilton. Ont 
Canadian Fairbanka-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
The fico. F. FoAs Mcliy. .t Supply Co.. Montreal. 
Gardner. Robt, A Son. Montreal. 
A. B. Jardine 4 Co., Hespeler, Ont 
Landis Machine Co.. Waynesboro, Pa. 
Modem Tool Co. Erie, Pa. 

.Morse Twist Drill A -Mch. Co.. New Bedford. Mass. 
Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 
Pctrie nf Montreal. Ul. H. W., Montreal. Que. 
Pratt A Whitney Co. Dundas. Ont. 
Rickert-Shafer Co., Erie, Pa. 
Standard Machy. A SiiPTiIies. Ltd.. Montreal. 
Wells B-others of Canaoa. Gait. Ont 
DIES FOR BIT BRACE USE 

B,ilt,rfi,l.i .^ C,,.. Rock Island, Que. 
Wells Brothers Co. of Canada. Oalt. Ont. 
DIES. NOSING 

Marsh A Henthom, Ltd.. Belleville, Ont 
DIES, PIPE THREADING 

BiltteifiiM ,^r Ci.. li.vk Island. Que. 
Landis Machine Co.. Waynesboro. Pa. 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C 11 I N E R Y 



149 



Accurate Quantity Production 

CAN BE OBTAINED 
THROUGH THE USE OF 

''MORSE" DRILLS 

AND NOW IS THE TLME TO ORDER WHEN 
RAPIDITY OF ACCURATE PRODUCTION IS 
THE GREAT NEED OF EVERY MANUFAC- 
TURER. 

CATALOG ON REQUEST. 




MORSE TWIST DRILL & MACHINE CO. 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS., U.S.A. 



' V.^\^-w^Vn ^i^ llr-^ir^ 




We ;ire also prepared to 
furnish steel plate to 
20" wide — for prompt 
delivery. 




Quick 
Deliveries 



We have recently increased the 
capacity of our plant and can 
guarantee quick delivery on cast- 
ings weighing anywhere from 
100 lbs. to 50,000 lbs. 



Quality and 
Economy 



Open Hearth 
Products 

Machinery Castings 
(if all kinds, Motor 
Frames, etc., for elec- 
trical trade. Pedestal 
a n d Miscellaneous 
Bridge Work, Rolling 
Milfand Blast Fur- 
nace Castings. Gears 
and Gear Blanks. 




DOMINION STEEL FOUNDRY COMPANY, Limited 

HAMILTON . . ONTARIO 



// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



150 



C A N A 1> 1 A N M A C n I N E R Y 



Volume XVIII. 






DIE 8INKKU 

UKttr Uillin* M«AIb« Cj.. BoMca. ■•»• 
Utma Ml '- ' *- .. , „ 

1M,« ,,( > . MmiIi»«1. Q«». 

rr»:t Jk v> '•• *»"■ 

DIKS ►••IK MAI MI^^S 



DIK .SI N KIN 

oii:2i. SKI I 



.. OllL 

\VUC 



^. Nrtt lUrai. Cunn. 

ii^^' • lUrro 

la^ lUatfr ^ ».■». I ». 

Lah - ■ iinf^tK'rv. r* 

y"' Ptltult. Mich. 

\N, . > (.UII. Ont. 

DIES 1 ■ K ^^ ;.. vS . . \ . i > 

«.:;• iiv,.i»r« > .<- .< «.«ii«i«. i)»U. Ont 
DIKJI SIIKKT MKTAI, WOKMNU 

Out. 
\^ , .; Co.. T^rua'.o. OnL 

bisi - ' u 

,)r. Uf«. Co.. WowMUr. Um> 

DIKS. SlKkW AND THRKAD 

1, ' ,v 1 i: A I.'.' 1 Q"'- 

Linhi Mi.'i n<- Oo . \V»mr»bor», l'». 

SJt^l' Efi*. I'*- 

Uuv A Tool Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

>'t!: - V .X, ClfTrluid, Ohio. 

Vrf, X \^ ■ ■: ^ Co . l»iin li.*. Ont. 

SV»11« llrrthcrt Co. of 0»niJt. Otlt. OnL 
DRAFT. M^:CHA^■|CAL 

W. H H«nllrl.l & Soiu. ToMnto. 

Buntrfrl.l 4 Co.. K.Tk I«Un.l. Que. 

C»B. mow»r ft K.inst Co.. Kitchfnfr. OnL 

A. B. JiPtinf ft Co., Ho^rtlfr. OnL 

Prmll ft Whitney Co., PunJu. OnU 

Bh»Man«. l.t.l.. Ollt. Ont. 

fltiirlrnnt Co., B. F.. Gilt. OnL 
DRAWINGS 

l>.rmnvn Crnlril Dravins 0(ll«. McOlll BUlj.. 

DISCS. I.EATnFR 

Ont.^ ft Kn.ilT Mfc Co.. Monrr»»l. 
DRFSSFRS. GRINDING AND EMERY 
WHEEI. 

Cin. r>«miioii1.."!tnih»n Mft. Co., Htmlllon. OnL 

FoM4<tni:h Miih. Co.. Himllton. OnL 
DRILL PRFSSES 

Aan^rm Tool Works. .\»ror«. In<l. 

W. F. ft John BirnM Co.. RocWord. 

C^n. Bl0Tr«r A Foire Co.. Kltihratr, OnL 

''•ni.1i MiPhlnrrr Com.. 0«H. OnL 

•n,-- i;..> K. F.I*' M.-'n. ,<: S.im.lv Co.. M,>nlroal. 

Oirlryk-WtUer Michinfrr Co.. Toronto. OnL 

Oirrin Michine Co.. New York. 

KDw-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Pftrif. I.l.t.. n. W.. Torino. Ont. 

rcrif of Montn-al. Ltd.. IT. W.. Montn.n1, Que. 

RlTfi»M» M«chlneiT Depot. Detroit. Mteh. 

SlindtM M«rtiy. * Sutrrlies. Ltd.. Montreil. 

rtMw Mfr To Hmc'iiTrntnn. \ Y. 

rnlted ."iti:** SUch. Tool Co., ClndnniU, O. 

A. R. WiUi»n» llichinery Co.. Toronto. 
DRILLING MACHINES. BENCH 

Baton Mich. Tool Ca, Bri.lseport, Conn. 

Minin Michine Co., OrecnfleM. Ml91. 
DRILLING MACHINES. GANG 

Bimei. W. F. ft John, Co., Bockford, 111. 

Bilton .Mich. Tool Co., Bridjeport, Conn. 

Cinidk Michinery Corp.. Gilt, OnL 

SUier Mfg. Co.. Sllem, Ohio 
DRILLING MACHINES. LOCOMOTIVE 
AND MULTIPLE SPINDLE 

John Ber-.nm ft Soni Co.. Dundas. 

Bilton Mich. Tool Co., Bridgeport. Conn. 

Otn. Blower ft Forge Co.. Kitchener, OnL 

Cinidi Michinerr Corp.. Gilc, OnL 

Cisidiin FairiMnkS'Morse Co., MontreiL 

Cindnniti Pulley Michj. Co., Cincinniti. Ohio. 

T!u <:*■.. F. Ki>4s Mch>. & S'ip7ily i'o., Montreal. 

Fox Machine Co., Jackson, Mich 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. OnL 

Garrin Machine Co., New York. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co., Hespeler, OnL 

National-Acme Co, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Nilea-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Petrie. l.t.l.. H. W.. Torono. OnL 

r,.ri. of M.-,•^.^l^ Lr.l. H. W.. .Montreal. Que. 

Rockfonl Drilling Mich. Co.. Bockford, IlL 
DRILLING MACHINES. 
RADIAL AND TURRET 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundaa. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., MontreaL 

Canidi Machinery Corp., Gait, OnL 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto. OnL 

Henry ft Wrisht Mfg. Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

Nlles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Pftrip. Ltd.. H. W.. Toron-.-.. "nt. 
DRILLING MACHINES, SENSITIVE 

Aikpnhead Hardware Co., Toronto, OnL 

Bnton Mach. Tool Co., Bridgeport. Conn. 

W. r. ft John Barnes Co., Bockford, IlL 

Canadian Fairfcanfcs-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Qalt. OnL 

De Mooy Machine Co.. Clereland. Ohla 

Th-. Guv F. FiA= Mohv. & .Siiiplr Co., Montre,il. 

Qarlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. OnL 

Henry ft Wright Mfg. Co., Hirrford. Conn, 

D. McKenne Michinery Co., Gnelph. ObL 

NDes-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. OnL 

^tow Mfe. Co.. BinghaniTiton. NT. 

Cnltei States ifach. Tool Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 
DRILLING MACHINES. UPRIGHT 
AND HORIZONTAL 

Atnora Tool Works, Anrora, Ind. 



John BrrtraJB ft Bona Co., Diindai. 

Can. llUtwet ft l''i»nc« i'o., Kliclienir, OnL 

l.>ani.ti .Mii^nnrry I'oriv, ilalt, i>nl. 

Ctnciuiiitl ruIlrT Mictiy. Co.. Cmnnnltl. Ohio 

Oarlo.! \> ilker Uictitnery Co., Tim«to, OnL 

A. It Janllne A Ov) , llMpclir, OnL 

II Ucl>mt«aU ( o., (la<L 

Nt>«« lUmrntl'trnd *V . New York. 

I'rtiic. 1,1.1. 11. W . T,.i,m:.\ OiiL 

IVlii.-.il \l..iilr<<il. 1.1.1. , II W.. .Monlrral. Qu.', 

ItocklonI Drlllluc Mach. Co., UookfonI, III. 

HUtrr Mf( Ctv, !<alrin, Ohio. 

A. It. Wtllliu'* Machinery Co.. Toronto. 
DRILLING l-USTS 

Alkrnhrid Uanlwarv Co., Toronto, OnL 

Kryitonc .Mfg. Co.. Iluffalo. N.Y. 

.Silrrr Mfg lo.. 8alrm, Ohio 
DRILLS. BENCH 

Alkrntiri.l llar\lwarT Co.. Tor\>ii(o, Out. 

W. F, ft John llinio Co.. Ilocktorvl, 111. 

Can. Ulowrr ft Foive Co.. Kttchi'nrr, OnL 

Canadian Falrhank^-.Morae Co, Montreal. 

CInclnnaU Pulley Micliy. Co., Chiclniiitl. Ohio. 

Tin- <i... F. l■'.•^.- M.h\. A .Sii^.h I',.. M.inlr.:il, 

Oarlo.-k. Walker Madilnrry Co., Tor^into, OnL 

Uilleia Falla Co.. Mlllen Falls. Mau. 

IVtric ..f .M..nlr>.al, l.t.l.. 11, W,. M..lilr<,:il. Qii.-. 

t'ratt & Wliltjipy To., liiinda^. Onl. 

I'mtcl Stiles Klrctriril Tool Co.. Cincinniti, 
DRILLS. BLACKSMITH AND BIT STOCK 

Alkrnhrid llinlirirv Co.. Ton>iito, OnL 

Can. ItloWfr ft Forge *'o,. Kitchener, OnL 

Cleieland Twinl Drill Co.. Clereland. 

Thv l!,s.. l-'. |.-,w. M,-li>. & Sun.l.v Co.. .Monlro.ll. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Ilcspeler. OnL 

MorMe Tnisl Drill ft .Mdi. Co., New Bc<lford. .Mass. 

IVtrii-. l.t.l.. II. W., Toronlo. OnL 

IVtrli- i>f .Monln-al. Ltd.. H. W.. Montix-al, Que. 

Wilkinvin ft Konipnu. Hamilton, OnL 
DRILLS. CENTRE 

Aikenhead llanlware Co., Toronto. OnL 

Clefeland Twiil Drill Co., Clevelm.l. 

Morse Twist Drill ft ilachine Co., New Bedfotd. 
DRILLS. ELECTRIC AND PORTABLE 

Aikenhold Hanlwire Co., Toronto, OnL 

Can. Blower ft Forge Co., Kitchener, OnL 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Th,' i;..., F. l",r,s .M.-h.v. & .Siinily Co., .Monln-al, 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago. 

Niles-Bement'Pond Co., New York. 

Prtrio, Ltl., 11. \V., Toron'o. Ont. 

Prmt-O-Llte Co., Inc., Toronto. OnL 

Stow Mfg. Co.. Binghamton. N.Y. 

I'nitwl Stales Electrical Tool Co., Cincinnati. 

A. R. Williams .Machinery Co.. Toronto. 

Wilkin-ion ft Komp.-is,s. Hamilton, OnL 
DRILLS, HIGH SPEED 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. OnL 

Atkina & Co., Wm., Sheffield. Eng. 

Clendand Twlsl Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Canadian Fairhanks-Morsc Co., Montreal. 
■ Clark Equipment Co.. Buchanan. Mich. 

Can. B. K. Morton, Toronto, Montreal. 

H. A. Dniry Co., Montreal. 

Eagle & Globe Steel Co., Montreal, Que. 

The Gto. F. F(w.s .Mcliv. & .Siinilv Co., Montreal. 

Marshall ft Co., Geo. A., Toronto. OnL 

McKenna Brothers. Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Morse Tivist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedforrl. .Ma-ss. 

Osbom (Canada). Ltd., Sam'l. Montreal. Que. 

W. F. & John Barnes Co., Bockford, III. 

Petrie. Lt.l., H. W.. Toronlo. OnL 

Petrie of Mnnlre.il. Ltd., H. W., -Montreal, Que. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas, OnL 

Standard Machy. ft Supplies. Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 
DRILLS. MULTIPLE SPINDLE 

Henry ft Wright Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Nileti-Bcment-rond Co., New York. 

Garlock-Wfllkpr Machinerv Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas. OnL 

DRILLS. OIL TUBE 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 
Morse Tivist Drill ft .Mch. Co., New Bedford, Mass. 
DRILLS. PNEUMATIC 

Can. Ingtreoll-Rand Co., Montreal, Que. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 
The Jenckes Mach. Co., Ltd.. Sherbrooke, Que. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

DRILLS. PNEUJIATIC CORNER 

Can. IiiRt'isoll-Itand Co.. Montreal. Que. 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, ObL 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago, 111. 
DRILLS, RATCHET AND HAND 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toron'o. Ont. 

Armstrong Bro-S. Tool Co., Chicago. Ill- 
Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener. OnL 

Canadian Fairbanks-Mone Co., .Montreal. 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Garlock-Walker Macbinerv Co., Toronto, Ont. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Hespeler, OnL 

Millers Falls Co., Millers Falls, Ma-ss. 

Monie Twist Drill & .Mch. Co.. New Bedford, JIass. 

Petrie, Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. OnL 

Petrie of -Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., Montreal. Que. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. OnL 
DRILLS. ROCK 

C.in. InRt-r=f>l!-Rflnd Co.. Montreal. Que. 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto. 

The Ceo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

The Jenckes Mach. Co.. Ltd.. Sherbrooke, Que. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
DRILLS. TRACK 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 

Clark Equipment Co.. Buchanan. Mich. 

The Geo. F. Fow Mchy. ft .Supply Co.. .Montreal. 

Morse Twist Drill ft Mach. Co.. New Bedford. 
DRILLS. TWIST 

Atkins ft Co., Wm., Sheffield. Eng. 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, OnL 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 



Anuitrong, Whltworth of Canada, Ltd., Uootraal. 

lllltlrllUM .V til.. Uiii'k Inl.ilJil, Que. 

Laiiaviiiu I'aU'baiiKit .Vlorne Co., Montreal. 

C«U. 1.. K. .Mill loll. 'i'OKIIltO, .MouUfil, 

Clara tvliliplni'lll Co.. KiicnNnuu, .Micll. 

CJevolaud T»l;it Dull Co., Cleveiand. 

Moiiiv rvtmt IMlll .V .McJi. <to.. .New ltt\lfor\l. Main. 

Dabum (Cauaila), Ltd., SaJU'l, Montreal, Qui. 

IMue, I.I.I. , 11. \\., Toionio, iiiii. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co., Duudaa, UuL 

Whllmau ft lliniia MIg. Cu,, SL Catliarluea. OnL 

\\ itl.lii'.i<ll tV- Kii11l|ittn.^. lluuiilluii, Unu 

DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

I'liio SaiiHaiy Dk g. l''uuntain Co., llaydenvUle 

DRYING APPLIANCES 

Itiiiil Midline Co., Bridgeport, Cuiu- 

Sheliloni, Ltd., Ualt, OuL 
DUMP CABS 

('niinliiiii l''alrt>anki-.Mor8e Co., Montreal. 

The Jenckes .Madi. Co.. Ltd.. Sherbrooke, Que. 

MHcKiinitin, ilohnea ft Co., Sherbrooke. Qua. 
DUST SEPARATORS 

Can, Ulowrr & I'orgo Co., Kitchener, OnL 

ShelduliH, Ll.l,, tlllt, OnL 
.Sturl.uiut Co., 11. F.. Oalt. OnL 
DUST ARRESTERS (FOR TUMBLING 
MILLS) 

NortJiem Crane Worki, WalkervUle. 

Slieliliins, Ltd., Gait, UnL 

Sturtevant Co., B, F., Gait, OnL 

Wliiting Foiniilr>' l<>]iiipment Co., Harvey, lU, 
DYNAMOS AND ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLIES 

Canadian l''ali'bankti.i.Morsc Co., Montreal. 

I.uiica.shirc Dyiiaruo ft .Motor Co., Ltd., TorontA 
Petrie of .Montreal. LUl.. li, W., .Montreal, Que. 

Standard A<achy. ft Siippliea, Ltd., Montreal, Qua. 

I'rlii.- of .Monlieal, I/td., II. W.. .Monlaul, Qm. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co., Dundas. OnL 

A. It. WilUauis Macliy. Co.. Toronto. 
ELEVATOR ENCLOSURES 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Co., Uamilton, OnL 
ELEVATORS AND BUCKETS 

Curtis Pnetiiuutic Madly. Co., SL Loui.s, Mo. 

Whiting li'oiindry Equipment Co., Harvey, 111. 
ELEVATING AND CONVEYING 
MACHINERY 

Can. .Matthews Gravity Carrier Co., Toronto, Ont. 

.\I,ii>h ,<; ll.ullii.ni. Ltd.. llilleville. OnL 
EMERY GRINDERS (PNEUMATIC) 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto. 

Stow .\lfg. Co., Binghamton. N.Y, 
EMERY AND EMERY WHEELS 

Foss & Hill Machy. Co., Montreal. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 

Canadian Fairbanke^Morse Co., Montreal. 

Fonl-Smilh Mach. Co.. Hamilton. OnL 

Francis ft Co., Hartford, Conn, 

Norton Co.. Worcester, Mass. 

Petrie, Ltd., H. A'.. Toronto, OnL 

Petrie of .Montreal. LUl., H. W., Montreal, Que. 

Standard Machy. ft Supplies. Ltd., Montreal, Qua. 

Wilkinson kt Kompaas, Hamilton, OnL 
ENGINES, BALANCED VALVE 

Tlie Jenckes Mach. Co.. Ltil.. Sherbrooke. Quo. 

P)essi.sville Foundry Co., Plessisville, Que. 
ENGINES, STEAM, GAS. GASOLINE 

Canadian Fairbanks-iMorse Co., Montreal. 

Johnson Mach. Co., Carlyle, Manchester, Conn. 

I'etrie. Ltd., II. V,'.. Toronto, OnL 

Riverside Machinery Depot, Detroit, Mich. 

Stilling Encini. Works. Winnipeg, Man. 
ENGINES. HORIZONTAL 
AND VERTICAL 

The Jenckes Mach. Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, QtM. 

Johnson Mach. Co., Carlyle, Manchester, Coon. 

I'etrie. Ltd., H. W., Toronto. OnL 

P., trie of .Montreal, Ltd., H. W., Montreal, Que. 

Sheldons, Ltd., Gilt, Ont. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Toronto. 
ENGRAVERS 

Pritchar^l- Andrews Co., Ottawa. 
ESCUTCHEON PINS 

Parmentcr ft Bulloch Co., Oananoque, OnL 
EXHAUST HEADS AND HOODS 

Can. Blower ft Forge Co., Kitchener, OnL 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., MontreaL 

Sheldons. Ltd.. GaU, Ont. 
EXHAUSTERS 

Can. Blower & Foige Co.. Kitchener, OnL 

Petrie. Ltd.. H, W,, Toronto, OnL 

Sheldons, Ltd., GaU. Ont. 

Sturtevant Co., B. P.. Gait. ObL 
FANS 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, OnL 

.Sheldons. Ltd., Gait. OnL 

T'lp Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton. 
FAUCETS 

Puro Sanitary Dk'g, Fountain Co., Haydenvllle, 

FENCE. IRON AND FACTORY 

Canada Wire .^- Iron Goods Co.. Hamilton, <!)nrt- 
FER RO-TUNGSTEN 

Van.nrliiim-Allovs Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
FILES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. OnL 

Atkins ft Co.. Wm.. Sheffield. Eng. 

Can. B. K. Morton Co.. Toronto. OnL 

Delta File Works, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Ma; ihall ft Co.. Geo. A.. Toronto. OnL 

Nicholson File Co.. Port Hope. OnL 

Oshom (Canadal. Ltd.. Sam'l. Montreal. Que. 

Port Hope File Mfg. Co.. Port Hope. Ont. 

S'an-lird Machv. ft Supplies, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Willrinsnn .^- Komnass. Hamilton. OnL 

FIT TNG MACHINES 

VoVili. X- Wecfhmok Mfg. Co., Hartford. Conn. 
FILTERS. OIL 

Ttow^rr i^- Cn , Tnc, . S. F. , Torouto. OnL 
FILTERS. WATER 

W. B. Scaife ft Sons. PitLsburgh, Pa. 



I 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN M A C H I K E R Y 



151 



"WHITNEY" 

KEY -SEAT CUTTERS 

For the Woodruff System of Keying 

GET OUR PRICES 




Either carbon or high-speed steel. 
Material the best obtainable. 
Unsurpassed in efficiency and durability. 
Centred at both ends. 
Unsurpassed in accuracy and rinish. 
' Large quantities carried in stock. 



The Whitney Mfg. Co., 



Hartford 
Conn. 



Chains, Keys and Cutters, Hand Milling Machines 



SmiiimiiiiiiiK.iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii iiiniiiitiiriiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirriiDiiiiinininn iipiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiiitiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ 

I I , I 

HENRY & WRIGHT 

Drilling Machines 



A tremendous 
increase in the 
understandini; 
of drilling for 
manufacturing 
alwaysfollows 
the use of all 




Class K. 
Number 5 



The Henry & Wright Mfg. Co. | 

, Hartford, Conn. J 




RHODES 

Vertical and Horizontal Shaper 

Gives Maximum Efficiency 

at Minimum Cost 

Dou'l (l<i yiivir .sliaping and ?luttinf;\ ti"il-niak- 
ing, die-making, modeling and other flasi^es of 
light work on big and expensively-operated 
machine.* when all this work can be done more 
accnrately. ijuicker and cheaper liy far, with 
the RHODES Machine. Being introduced all 
o\-er tJie world nn their co.^t-cntting merit.'^. 

They will increase your profits. Look 
into tlie matter. Write for description 
of various types — do it now. 

The Rhodes Mfg. Co. 

Hartford, Conn., U.S.A. 



TtiiiMiirMiimiiiniirniiMimiiinitHiimiiiniinniniiiiiiiniiiiiinuHitiMnunMiiTMiiiinniiiinirniiiiiiiniimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiir ^^^^^^^^HH^^l^^^H^^H^BHl^^l^^^^^lB^ 

// any advertisement interests you, tear it out now and place with letters to be answered. 



152 



CAN A DI A N .M A (M 1 1 N K RY 



Vohini.' Will. 



»IKI. t:MAl'K>t 

V >u>ja >« ; < X .: : ^<b 0&. HwiliuB. «iai. 
KIKK KXTlM.t l-^ltl US 

mtsi Aiii 

S.iuii< K< •ml. Ohio 

»IMI l'l..\lt..l 

I ui. si<r: KuusJfiM. Lid. MoairMl. Qu* 
I I \ Tl III >. 



KIIMIIIK >ll K I llllllMi MACniNKKV 

rtj.s r !«ii(>r 

D.8. MlKB . lU 

lUKiiK-. II V N I "KTABLB 

A ' i - - 1 ■ Tv<raoto. OdI. 

. Kltcii«««r, Oantilt 
.h. !••- 

f<iKi.i\..> iMMN- \vn .\crESS0RY 

J.. M.Ki. . i-.-i.; ,-t, I-. 
coKiii.M.^. iiKiir. Ai riiMonii.K 

AMI I.O( <>M(ITI« K 

C»n. hilhvr* A .S|^no#f, t.t.! . WclUn.l. OnL 
CuBKiu * ^'.•o. J. \V.. .V'rw Ulucow. OanaiU 
IH^n t >'%* \ >•■}< <'■ . »'«Ilifmllr, OnL 
J». M K>. . I • •Vil. !•» 

:te««l >o .>.' • >n« '.a I I.I.. tuinllton. Ont 
>Vlu'.«!«ii It lUr.™ Mft to , SI l'«lJi«nn<». Onl 
«L';:»nv. .V <•.• . J. II |lr.>li!)ii. NY. 
»(IK<;l><. IIAMMKKS. BKI.T-IIKIVKN 
Bl». E. VV.. Ca. Hroo»lTB. NT. 
« r mu t 1'.-. J. H . llr.»U)ti. N.Y. 
K<IK(ilN(i ll.\M.MEK>. STKAM OR AIK 
Erie KoiiD>!r< Oo-. Cn*. P»- 
Mlr. !!«»fn r.>r 1 Co.. N«w York. N.T. 
rOKOlM. M.\l HINEKV 

Jotaa Itrr.rvm A e4ons l.a. Diintlu. 

Blu*. K \N.. C»x. Bnx>klrn. N.T. 

Brown. B<xx* Co.. olil.. HamUloo. CanvU. 

Bnt ►"cuD.lrT Co . Krt«. r». 

OarlockWilkir Machlnfr; lo . Toronto. OnU 

.Sulonal ll»chln»r7 Co. TiHin. Ohio. 
Vri'*^ T • ' M W . ToriMito. Out. 

• ' U. VV.. .Montreal. Qui-. 
Ki'i;.,- I M 

-Kh. Pa. 
.. ^ w innilKi:. Man. 
KlKl. OIL SYSTEMS 

0:.tyrt t Barker MU Co. SpriniAdd. Maas. 
FKKTION LEATHERS 

Ora!on * Knight Mfs. Co.. Montreal. 
PfKNACES. A.SNEAM.NG. ETC. 

B«llerue In.Uii>'.nal Furnace Cc. Detroit, Mich. 

Can. Hmkint. Lt.1.. WaJkerrille. Ont. 

OUhert ft Barker Mfe. Co.. Springfield. Mam. 

Mechanical Enffineerinc Co.. Montreal. 

RockT»e:i Cc . W. 9., New York. NT. 

Tat«-Jon« A Co.. Leetadale, Pa. 

Whltirc Ko-nJrj E<l!iii<mrnt Co.. Harrej. 111. 
Fl'RNACES. BLAST 

Tor-^cto Iron Works. Lt.l.. Toronto. 
FURNACES, BRASS. MALLEABLE 

Whi'ir.E Ko'-in.lrr Kqiiipment Co.. Harrey. 111. 
FURNACES. HEAT TREATING 
HARDENING AND TEMPERING 

BelleTue Industrial Furnace Co.. Detroit, Mich. 

Can. Hwkins. LUl. Walkenille, OnL 

ODbert & Barker Mfj. Co., Springfield. Maao. 

Tate-Jnne!< A Co.. I.,eetada1e. Pa. 
PURNACES. FORGING 

Ca.n H«k-.ni. Ltd.. Walkerrille. Ont. 

Oi!'-- * P.ark'r Mfc Co.. Sprinefleld. MaM. 
FURNACES FOR BAKING, BLUING. 
DRYING. ENAMELING. JAPANNING 
AND LACQUERING 

Can. Hoeklna, Ltd., Walkerrille, Ont. 

Oren Eqtiirment A Mfj. Co., New Haren, Conn 
FUSE BOXES, STEEL 

Pnrr.r.inr FcTv? * ■'?tr:. Co.. Walkerrille, Ont 
FUSE CAP MACHINERY 

yoble A Wes-.brook .Mfc Co., Hartford, Coon. 

H. F. T. Princle. Ltd.. Toronto. 
GALVANIZING MACHINERY 

Erit Foun-Jrr Co., Erie. Pa. 
GANG PLANER TOOLS 

.\nD5tmnff Bro^ Tool Co.. Chicago. 
GASKKTS. LEATHER, ETC. 

Or»t-ti A Knirh; .Mfe, Co.. Montreal. 
GAS BLOWERS AND EXHAUSTERS 

Can. Blazer A Fonre Co.. Kitchener, Ont. 

Sh»'!--~-. T.irr.'tM. Gait. Ont. 
GAUGES, MERCURY COLtmN. DRAFT 

CharlM F. Elme« Eng. Works. Chicago, 
GAUGES, HYDRAULIC 

Tavlor Instniment Co.. Rochester, N,T. 
GAUGES. STAN-DARD 

Brown Engineering Corp., Toronto, Ont. 

Can, Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Oarrin ^fschine Co., New York. 

Illinois Tool Works, Chicago, IB, 

Horse Twist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedforri, Mm^ 

Norm.is Machine Co.. St. Catharines. Ont. 

Oabom (Canada). Ltd., Sam'l, Montreal, Que. 

Peck. Stow A Wilcol Co.. Southington. Conn. 

Pratt A Whitney Co.. Hartford. Conn, 

Torrqjto Tool Works, Toronto, Ont. 

Wells Brothers Co, of Canada. Gaft. OnL 

Worth Enrneering Co., Toronto. Ont 
GEAR BLANKS 

Can. Sf»el Fonndries. LM.. Montreal, Que. 
GEAR-CUTTING MACHINERY 

BCton Mach. Tool Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Dominion Machinery Co., Tortmto. 

0«rlo,-k-Wiilker Machinery C^i.. Toronto, Ont 

Hamilton Dear A Machine Co., Toronto. 

HimofT Mach. Co.. '^nc Astoria, L.L, New York 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

Pe-rie of Jfontr^al, Ltd., H. W., Montreal. Que. 



Tile tliuart Turner Marhmr Co . llaiullt.m 

U. k \\ liiuat .\lactitiit lu, .Saw Lutliloii. Conn. 

A It Wltliattu Alafli> It.. Tonmlu. 

GKAK IIUUUING MACHINES 

lliui.n Ma.'li r<. . 11). . .tM.'.ia. I.. I.. Krw Tork. 
GKAK Tl'UNINi; MACIIINtZS, BEVEL 

liM,l«elv>t\l Aiacli, r.Kii Wuika. Uoclicwlai, N.T. 
UEAKS. CUT. MOKTISK, ANM.E. WORM 

llatlii .^ (.1.. I.t.l.. J K . .M.uilrral. Que. 

iUi\luet, Kutil.. A Son. Mimtraal. 

(Iiaul dear \Vuik<. lUotuo, Mau. 

llamllliMi liear A Mactiliie Co., Toronto. 

Hull Iron A Steel Fuundilea, LUl., Hull, Que. 

Illinolt Tool Works, Chicago, 111. 

The Jenckrs Macb. Co., l.ul., Shallirooka, Qua 

J. ill.' .V IJIrtN^.-... M.^iitr, :U. 

Waa Kenne\ly A 8ona, Ltd., Owen Sound. OnL 

PhiUdrlphla dear Worki. I'hlla.lflphla. fa. 

The Smart Turner Machine Co . liainllton. 

•*t,r'!rii; Kiit.iU' \\ '!^^^. WiniiliMi;. .Man. 

Winiii|>rg Hear A Kngr. Ca, Wuntpef, Man. 
GEARS, RAWHIDE 

Hamilton dear A Machine Co.. Toronto. 

Oanlart, llobL, A Son, ,Montreal. 

Ilrant dear Works, Botrtt^n. .Maaa. 

J. .11.. ,v <:i.i«-.-... M. 1,11,., I. 

Philadelphia dear Works. Philadelphia, Pa 
A. It Wllllanis Machy. Co., Toronto. 
Winnipeg dear A Enar. Co.. Wlnnlt^^. Man, 

GENKRATORS, ELECTRIC 

Can. Kalrhank^^-Mone Co.. .Montreal. 

KIni CiiMiiii; oil <•„.. T.ir.uit... <lnl. 

I.anca4hlre Urnamo A Motor Co., Toronta 

IVl-lc. I.I.I. . H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

r, rl. ,.f MMiilr.nl., Lid.. II. W.. Montrenl, Qur. 

Slorteeant Co., B. F., Oalt, OnL 

A H Wllllaou Machy. Co., Toronto, 
GERMAN SILVER 

Itn.wirs Cpp. r .V BuLSR IloIIing Mills, Neit 
T.'ronlo. Out. 
GLASSES. SAFETY 

."Strong. Kennanl A Null Co. Clefeland, Ohio. 

WilNon A Co.. Inc.. T. A.. Reading. Pa. 
GRAIN FOR POLISHING 

N'.rton Co.. Worcester. Majs. 
GRAPHITE 

Alkenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 

st.inilnr-l MschT. A Suppli..'^ I.td . .Montreal, Que, 
GLOVES, LEATHER AND RUBBER 

Hickorr Steel. Grip Olore Co., Ohlc^to. Til. 
GLOVES, STEEL GRIP, SAND BLAST 

Hickory Steel Orip Olore Co., Chicago, 111, 

GRAVITY CARRIERS 

Can Matthews Orarity Carrier Co.. Toronto. Ont, 

GREASES (SEE LUBRICANTS) 
GRINDER ATTACHMENTS 

Rirelt Lathe A Grinder C<i.. Boston. Mass. 

Wilmar'h A Morman. Orand Rapids. Mich, 
GRINDERS, AUTOMATIC KNIFE 

W. II. Banrteld A Son. Toronto. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Oalt, Ont 

Thr C,(n. F. F.Ts.<i Mchv. ,t .Supply Co.. Montr.'.ll. 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont, 
GRINDERS, CENTRE COLUMN, PEDESTAL 
AND BENCH 

Blake A .Tohnson Co.. Waterbury. Conn. 

Can. Bond Hanger A Cplg. Co., Alexandria, Ont. 

Canada Machinery C^rp.. Oalt. Ont. 

Clereland PneiiTnatic Tool Co, of Canada. Toronto. 

Ford. Smith Maeh. Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Tho don. F. Fof^.; Mchy. ,^ Siii>ply Co.. Montreal. 

Oarlo^-k- Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

Nilea-Bement-Pond Co., New Tork, 

Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa- 
Morse Twist Drill A Mch. Co.. New Re^lforil, Mav. 

New Britain Machine Co.. .Vew Britain, Conn. 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Onf. 

Petrir of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W.. .Montreal. Que. 

Stow Mfg. Co.. Binghamton. N.T. 

Hnited States Flectricsl Too! Co., Cincinnati, O. 
GRrVDERS, CUTTER 

Brown A Sharpe Mfg. Co,, Prt*Tld«Bce, H-I. 

Thf (■„... I'. Fr^s Mrhy. ,<; .Sunplv C.X.Montreal. 

Oreenfleld Machine Co., Qreenfleld. Mass. 

T.eBlond Mach. Tool Co., R. K., CinclnnaH, O. 

Norton Grinding Co., Worcwrter, Mass. 

Pratt A Whitney Co., Diindaa. Ont 

Wilmarth A Morman. Grand Rapids, Mich. 
GRINDERS. DIE AND CHASER 

r.Andis Machine Co., Wayne*t»ro, Pa. 

Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa. 

Nntional-Acme Co., Clereland, Ohio. 
GRINDERS, DISK 

.Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 

Ford-Smith Mart. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Gardner Machine Co., Belott, Wis. 
GRINDERS, DRILL 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

The d<.>. F. Fr.^^ Mrhy. & Supply I'o., Montreal. 

Garrin Machine Co., New York. 

T'nited States Electrical Tool Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Wilmarth A Morman, Grand lUpids, Midi. 
GRINDERS, CYLINDER, INTERNAL 

Brown A Sharpe Mfg. Co., ProTidence, R.I, 

Fitchburg Grinding Uach. Co., Fitchbnrg, Utm. 

Till? i;..... F. Fos.5 Moby. & Siii.ply I'o.. .Montreal. 

Greenfield Machine Co.. Greenfield, Ma«. 

Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa. 

Norton Grinding Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Rirett Lathe A Grinder Co,, Brighton, Mass. 
GRINDERS, NAIL DIE 
GRINDERS, PNEUMATIC 

Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co.. Montreal, Que. 

CleTeland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto, 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago, IH. 
GRINDERS, PORTABLE, ELECTRIC, 
HAND, TOOL POST, FLOOR AND BENCH 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Brown A Sharps Mfg. Co,, PraridaBee, K.L 

Can. Bond Hanger A Cplg. 0«„ AlcuadrU, Ont 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio 



I ui.l dmitli Maob. Co., llamlllou, UaL 

ri., i;... 1' 1..^. vtii.i. ,v ^Mi|,l.l^ r.> .m,.uij..i1 

o.altl Alia. A Alacuiua C41.. Uil.lgeiMirl. 00«s. 

ilatlock \N alker Macbiuery Co., Toisuio, Oul. 

direuuel.t .Madiiue Co , tlrri-ullald, Maaa. 

lii.telNUidrut I'lieiiniatlc Tool Co, Chloafu. 

.\uiU>u Co., \\ uraosler, Maaa. 

IVtlle. 1,1.1,, II. U., l,„,.iil„. Iliil, 

I'l'iil. ..I .M.iiiiivnl, I.I.I . II. «., .M.intreiil. Qui, 

I'ulleil Stalea KlciitrlaaJ Tool i'v., Cmaluuatl, u. 

A, U. Wtlllaina .Macli;. Co., Toronto. 

^^ilk 1 ,\. K iii|..iM. llamillou, tliil 

<;kindki(s, uadial 

llirrtt Lathe A drinder Co , Brigbtuu. UtmL 
dKINDEKS, TOOL AND IIOI.UKIt 

Armatruiig llroa. Tool Co., Chicago, 

w. F, A John llamas Co,, Uuckfoni, 111 

Blake A Johiiaon Co., Wat«r1iury, Conn. 

Illuunt. J. d., A Co., ISterelt, Maaa. 

UrowM A Sharps Mfg. Co., Prorldencs. R.I. 

Feid .Sinilh .Marhln.' Co.. Ilanulioii iliil, 

Oreenllrl.l Machine Co., GreenOeld, MaM, 

.NatlonalAcma Co., Clerelanil, Ohio. 

I'.ii. ..( M..iili,.iil. I.M , 11, w,. ,Mo„t,.,.a|. Que. 

Tabor ,Mfg. Co., Phila.lalphia, Pa. 

Wing A Son, J, K..' llamUtoo, OnL 

GRINDERS. UNIVERSAL, PLAIN 

Fitchburg Grinding .Machine Co., Fitchburg Maaa. 
Modem Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 
Wllmarlh A .Monnan, Grand Raplda, Mich 
GRINDERS, VERTICAL 8URFACK 
Brown A Shanio Idfg. Co., Proyldence, R I, 
Can. Falrlianks-Monio Co., Montreal. 
Pnalt A Whitney C« , Dundaa, Ont 
H. E. Slreeler, K3 New Ilirk.s Itllu . .Montreal Qui 
Wilmarth A Monnan. Grand Raplda, Mich. 
Wing A Son, J. E.. Hamilton, Ont 

(;rindin(; and polishing 
machines, portami.e, pneumatic 
and spring frame 

Can. Falrbanka-Moras Co., Montreal. 

Cincinnati Kl.clrieal Tool Co.. Cincinnati Ohio 

FonI .Smith Mach Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Garrlner. ItobL, A Son. Montreal. 

darrin Machine Co.. New Tork. 

darlock-Walker .Machinery Co., Toronto Ont 

Greenfield .Machine Co., Greenfield, Maaa. 

Hall A .Sons, John IL, Branlford, 

1-eBlond Mach, Tool Co., K. K., Cincinnati. 

NUeaBement-Pond Co., New York. 

I^tnc. M.I,. II. W.. Toronlo. Unt 

IViie of .\l,,i,li-,,il, 1,1,1,. II. w.. .Montreal, Que. 

Wilmarth A Morman. Orand Rapids, Mich. 

Stow .Mfg. Co, BInghampton. N.T. 

GRINDING WHEELS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, OnL 

Baiter Co, Ltd., J, R,, Montreal, Que. 

Can. FairbanksJloise Co., Montreal. 

Can, B, K. Morton, Toronto, Montreal. 

Carbonindura Co., Niagara Falle. 

Pord-Smith Mach Cc , Hamilton, Ont 

Tlic (;..., 1- F,..i4 .Miliv. & Sui.ply Ce, , .M.jntreaL 

Francis A Co., Hartford, Conn, 

•Vorton Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Petri... Ll.l,. il. W,. Toi.mtu, Ont. 
GUARDS, WINDOW AND MACHINE 

Canada Wire A Iron Goods Co., EamUtaii 0»t. 

Ford-Smitli Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

New Britain Mach, Co., New Britain, Oona. 

Sto^y .Mfg. Co.. HinRhamplon. .\,y, 
HACK SAW BLADES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

Baiter Co., Ltd., J. R., Montreal, Que. 

Diamond Saw A Slamplnf Works, Buffalo N T. 

Ford-.Smith ,Machme Co,, Hamilton, Ont 

w'.'; '•'",; f.- ';!"^- "<='"■ * Siil'Ply Co.. Mon're.il. 

Millers Falls Co., Millets Falls, Mass. 

Osbom (Canada, Ltd., Sam'l. Montreal, Qua. 

H. W. Petrie, Ltd., Montreal. 

Racine Tool A Machine Co.. Racine, Wla 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Standard Machy. A Supplies. Ltd., Montreal Qua 

Victor Saw Works, lytd., Hamilton, Canada. 

Wilkinson A Knrapass. Hamilton. Ont. 

Zenith Coal A Steel Products, Montreal, Qna. 
HACK SAW FRAMES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Garvin .Machine (3o., New Tork City, 

Millera Falls Co., Millera Falls, Mass. 

Vic-nr .Saw Works. Hamilton. Ont. 

Wilkinson A Kompass. Hamilton. Ont 
HAMMERS, AIR 

Erie Foundry Co., Erie, Pa. 
HAMMERS, DROP AND BELT-DRIVEN 

B«audr7 A Co., Boston, Mass. 

Bliss, E. W„ Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 

Brown, Bogga Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Canada. 

Canadian Billings A Spencer, Ltd., WeUand. 

Canada Machinery Corp., GaJt. OnL 

Erie Foundry Co., Erie, Ps. 

High Speed Hammer Co., Rochester, N,T. 

A, B, Jardine A Co., Hespeler, oinL 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Plessisville Foundry l.'o., I'lessisville. Que. 

Toledo Machine A Tool Co., Toleda 

United Hammer Co,, Boston, Mass. 
HAMMERS, HELVE POWER 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, 0»t 

West Tire Setter Co., Rodheater, N,T. 
HAMMERS, POWER 

Beaudry A Co., Boston, Mass. 

Erie Foundry Co., Erie, Pa- 
United Hammer Co., Boston, MaM. 
HAMMERS. CHIPPING. CAULKING. 
PNEUMATIC 

Can. Iiici-iv..lI-Itan.l c.i. . Montreal. Oi..- 

Clereland Pneumatic Tool Ca of Camaoa, ^motsk 

Gsriock-Walker Machinery Co,, Toronto, Ont 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chlngo, m 
HAMMERS, MARKING 

Matthews. Jas. H. A Co.. Plttsbur»k. Pa. 



f 



I 
1 



I 'i-eember 6. 1917. 



C A N A I A -N xM A G 1 ] I N E R Y 



15a- 



For the Reason the 
Wood is Steamed and 
Bent with the Grain 

RICH 

Drills are Forged 
and Twisted Hot 



-<^>aaiti.; 



fis- 



The high-speed tool steel in !;ii h 
Forged Drills, Reamers and Bit- 
remains as strong as the solid bar. 
Forged — instead of milled — the 
line grain of the steel is not ent 
an<l weakened. Conseqnentiy, 
extra tongh work at highest speed 
is ordinary work to Rich Forged 
Tools. They never hnrn or himl. 

Til lasting service yon will finil 
that Ricli Forged Tools arc as 
diH'ercnt from ordinary milled 
tools as solid oak furnitnre is dif- 
ferent from glitter and glne. But 
tlie surface difference to tlie 
average man is not discernahle. 
Therefore, wlien buying Drills, 
Reamers and ISits, know for cer- 
tain that each is stamped: Ricli 
Tool Company. 

Machinery 
and Supplies 

Everything in eijuipment for new plants, fac- 
tories and mills is obtainable from us. Our 
special service department will give your en- 
quiry careful thought and make suggestions 
without charge Write us for your new equip- 
ment and supplies. 

Standard Machinery & Supplies 
Limited 



260 St. JAMES ST., 



MONTREAL 



WESTERN REPRESENTATIVE: 
Wm. W. Hicks. 567 Banning St.. Winnipeg, Man. 




From the 

SMALLEST 

to the 

LARGEST 

in Ball Bearing 

Sensitive Drilling 

Machines 




WHATEVER YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

as to size, if you want to get the machine most 
suitable to your work, get the 



dm^ 



The widest line in sizes, — the greatest variety in 
styles: — higher speeds, together with extreme 
simplicity and convenience, enable you to 
specialize to best advantage. 



GOOD DELIVERIES 



WRITE US AT ONCE 



THE CINCINNATI PULLEY MACHINERY CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. U.S.A. 



// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



154 



C A N A n 1 A N M A C II I N E R Y 



Volume XVIIU 



HAMMERS. MUTt>R-DRIVKN 

HAMMKK8. NAIL MACHINE 

t ui'.fl lUmnit; <\v . luwton. MaM- 

IIAM»IKKS. 8TKAM 
J.An Itrrt.-ftm A l<«u Cd., fhtatSAA 
t'Anilt Ut ixinerf IVVT.. Otit, Opt. 

tn« K-uuirj iVv. tint. !'• 

Si;.« iiftct! I r>oa i\». .Nt» Yoit 

HAMl ir«TM»'K8 OK PADS 

H -I ' - - i)l,>fl« ^'a . »':i i-i<o. lU. 

UANl.t.US. Sll \t 1 
H*iM M »>■■.. ii» I Oonn. 

Cac. Ii.t-. I Htnt* ^ Aluuitlrla, Ont 



- K F 



il. 



I '■ \\ , MiHitrral. Que. 
!*Kr. I>M fnmol MlMl IV . rh<lt>lrlphl>. I'a. 

HAKOKNINU AND TKMl'KRISfi 
H.>:a. llrnsAn A . 1 ll».lti>'n Aip . New York. 
t>»ty-^ ir»n».1»^ l.t-1 . ?»»ail. M.MitrfaJ. Qu». 

BARDNKSS TESTINC INSTRUMENTS 

II r M tviM A . 1 MbllKlO Ak.. -New Yorit. 
Ri»r> iMlrumnil A Utf- Co., New York. 

BRATRRS 

So«.f» A S.'n< Co. \Tm. n. ntubunch, r« 

(••.■-••r>«nt l\\. n K. Hill. tint. 
HEATINC AND VENTILATING 
KM;INKKR3 

I'm I!'..>wrr A F(irf» On.. Kllchrnrr. Ont 

«ir'..'..'i»i. l,-.l.. Oalt. Ont 

BEAT (:Ar(:E.<i. hardening 

AND ANNEALINi; 

Holi, Hfrman .\ . I .\(t-ltKin ATf . Nrw York. 

eb.^iT lutrumrnt A Uff Co., N«w Tork. 
BIGH SPEED TOOL METAL 

P«ior\> :^mrtl:n< A R«flnln< Co.. Torooto. Ont 

BINGE MACHINERY 

Palnl Mtchinc Co., BrMfvport, ConB. 

Ill.n^u Tool Work!, Chicago. 111. 
BINGES 

Loodoo Bolt A Blnta Worki, London. Ont 

BOBS 

nilnoU Tool Workl. Chiouo. 111. 

0>t>om (Cuiidt), Ltd., Sia'l, Montreal. Qut. 

rrm;t A WhitntT Ca, Oundai. Ont 
HOBS. MILLING 

r • • ': ,1 C,i , K,<-k l.-;,ind, Quo. 
HOISTING AND CONVEYING 
MACHINERY 

Can- Mattlinn Grarity Carrier Co.. Torcoto, Ont 

Jesc^ea ^adt Ca, 8heitirooke, Que. 

J.',(< Jt Ola.vco. .Montreal. 

Uanb A Henthom, BelleTille. Ont 

Korthem Crane Worki. Walkerrille. Ont 

To -0 of Montnal I.t.i.. H. W., Montrcil, Que. 

WtLitinf Foundry EQuipment Co.. Harrey, lU. 
BOISTS, CHAIN AND PNEUMATIC 

r.,r., Iiiitr...)! R,in.l To., Montrtal. Quo. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Ford Cliain Block * Mf».. PhUadelphia. Pa. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago, lU. 

Jenckea Madi. Ca, Sherbrooke, Que. 

Man^h A Henthora. lielleriUe, Ont 

Northern Crane Workj. Walkerrille, Ont 

WTuting Foundry Equipnen: Co., Harrey, in. 

Wricfat Mf(. Co., LKboa, Ohio. 
BOISTS, ELECTRIC 

nie Jenckej Mach. Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Kennedy A Sons, Owen Sound. Ont 

Northern Crane Works, Walkerrille, Ont 

Winnipeg Gear A Engms Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
HOLDERS, STEEL DIE FOR MARKING 

M,i-ih 4 Utnthom, Lt.i.. Belletille. Ont. 

Matthews. Jaa. H.. A Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
B0PPER8 

Jenckes Mach. Ca, Ltd., SheitiTooke, Que. 

Toronto Iron Worka. Ltd., Toronto, Ont 

HOSE, PNEUMATIC 

CleTeland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto, 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto. Ont 

GoM.vtar Tirt & Rubber Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago, 111. 

Weill Bros. Co. of Canada. Gait. Ont 
HYDRAULIC MACHINERY 

Char'.fe F. Elmes Eng. Worka, Chicago. 

Gar'.ock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

Metalwo*! Mfg. Co.. Detroit, Mich. 

NilM-BementPond Co.. New York. 

William R- Penin. Ltd., Toronto. 

Pe-.r.e. L'd. . H. W., Toronto. Ont- 

Wert Tire Setter Co.. Rochester, N.Y. 
INDICATORS, SPEED 

Aikenhea,! Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Brown A Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Proridence. R.I. 

L. 9- Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 
INDEX CENTRES 

Fre.1 C. Dickow. Chicago. HI. 

Rarrin Machine Co.. New York. 
INDICATING INSTRUMENTS 

Taylor In-irtniment Co., Rochester, N.T. 
INGOT METAL 

Ero^rn'5 Copper jb Brass Rolling Mills. New To- 
r:.n-^->. Ont, 

mON ORE 

Hanna A Co., M. A., CleTeland, O. 
JACKS 

Aikcnhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

Can. Fai*anks-Mor3e Co.. Montreal. 

Northern Crane Works, Walkerrffle. 

Norton, A. O.. Coaticook. Que. 

P»trie. I.-d.. H. W.. Toronto, Ont 
JACKS. HYDRAULIC 

Chir1« F- Elnie^ T^e. Worka, Chicaga. 
JACKS, PNEL^MATIC 

Northen Crane Works, Walkerrille. 



JACKS. PIT AND TRACK 

vau. ^airt.«Da> klktrs* io. Moutrral 

StTltieni Iran* Work*. \\aia«ifllle. 
JAWS, KACK PLATE 

I'uahman i.tiiick lo. Ilartfonl. Ctuin. 

Nainner t'huca Co. New Urllaln, C«I1M. 
JIGS. TUOI.S, ETC. 

Ht„«u Knt,Miirriutg t'orp., Toronto, Out 

lUMBrr A U tl»on, Uauilllon, Unl, 

lUlm^a Tool Motki. Chicago. III. 

.\t>niia« .Mat^iini- i'o . i»4l. t'Atliarturi, ilul. 

Oabom U'anadai. Ltd.. Sam'l. Jtluulreal. Qua. 

T>'rx*nto T,>oI C«v , Toronto. Ont 
KEY BEATERS 

Gar!i<h-\\a!krr .Maclilnrry Co., Toronto, Ont, 

tiamn Maclitne C(v, .\rw York. 

Morion Mfg Co.. Muikrgon llelghu, Mich. 

.\. It Williams Macliy, Co., Toronto. 
KEYS, MACHINE 

Wlutnrj .Mfg. Ca. Ilartfurd, Conn. 
KILNS 

Can. Illowrr A Forge Co., Kltclirnrr, Ont 

Tile Jrnckrs Mach. Co, Ltd., Mhrrbrooke, Que. 

Shrldona, l.lmllnl, Oalt. Ont 

LAnEI.S AND TAGS 

.Mitlho««. }Mt. II. A Co. Plllitlnirgh, Pa. 
LAIIOHATOKIKS, INSPECTION 
AND TESTINt; (SEE CHEMISTS) 
LADLES, FOUNDRY 

.Norlheni liatie \\..tk.^. Walkrrrllle. 

Whiting Foundry Kqnipincnl Co. Ilarrry, III. 
LAG SCREW GIMLET POINTERS 

National .Machy. Co., TilTIn, Ohio. 
LAMPS, INCANDESCENT AND NITROGEN 

Can \^cn riiilip-. Co.. Toronto. Onl. 
LAMPS, TUNGSTEN (Vacuum and Gaa Filled) 

Can. I.nco l'liihi>< Co., Toronto, Ont 
LATHES, BENCH 

II. F. Streeter. New Blrka BIdg.. Montreal, Que. 
LATHES, CHUCKNG 

,\cme Mactiine TiH>l Co. Cincinnati, Ohio, 
LATHE CHUCKS (SEE CHUCKS) 
LATHE DOGS AND ATTACHMENTS 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 

Curtis A Curtis Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hendey Machine Co., Torrington. Conn. 

Rlrelt Lathe & Grinder Co., Boston, Mass. 

Williann A Co.. J. II.. Brooklj-n, N.Y. 

Winnipeg Gear A Engmg Co., \VinnIp*Ti, Man. 
LATHES, AXLE 

Kn.lgftor\i Mach. Tool Works, Rochester, N.Y. 
LATHES. PRECISION. BENCH 

W. F. A John names Co.. Kockford. 

Blount, J. O.. A Co.. Eierett Masa. 

Can Fairbanks-.Morse Co., .Montreal. 

Tlie Co. V. V,^i Mchy. & .Suin>Iy Co., Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronio, Out. 

natdinge Bras.. Chicago, 111. 

New Britain Mach. Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Pratt A Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 

Rirelt Lathe * Grinder Co., Boston, Mass. 
LATHES, BAND TURNING 

The Jenckes Mach. Co, Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que, 

Roelnfson Machine A Tool Co., Toronto, Ont 

Warden King Co., Montreal, Que. 
LATHES, BRASS 

Acme ilachinc Tool Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ilarxiinge Bros., Inc., Chicago, 111. 
LATHES. ENGINE 

Acme Machine Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

John Bertram A Sons C^., Dundas. 

Bridgi^onl .Mach. Tool Works, Rochester, N.Y. 

Canada .Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Cincinnati Iron & Steel Co.. Cincinnati. Ohla 

The Geo. F. I-'oks Mcliy. k SMnily Co., -Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Out, 

Garrin Machine Co., New York. 

Hamilton Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ohio. 

Himoff .Mach. Co., Inc., Astoria, L,I,. New York 

.MoCabe. J. J., New York, N.Y. 

R. McDougall Co.. Gait 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W., Toronto, Ont 

Rirett Lathe & Grinder Co., Boston, Mass 

Rirenide Machinery Depot, Detroit, Mich. 

Standard Machy. & Supplies, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Sebastian Lathe Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Whitcomb-Blaisdell Mach. Tool Co.. Worcester 
Ma.ss. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Toronto, 
LATHES, JOURNAL TRUEING 

Bridgeford Mach. Tool Works. Rochester, N.Y. 

McCabe, J. J.. New York, N.Y. 
LATHES, PATTERNMAKERS' 

J. G. Blount Co., Ererctt, Mass. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

The Gen. F. Fcfis -Mch.v. & Sutjply Ca, Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co., Toronto, Ont 

The Jenckes Mach. Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que, 

MoCabe, J. J.. New York, N.Y, 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

Petrie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., .Montreal. Que. 
LATHES, SINGLE PURPOSE 

Bertram, John. & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Can Fairbanks-Morse Co,, Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co., Toronto, Ont 

Gray Mfg. & Mach. Co., Toronto, Ont 

Hepburn. John T., Ltd,, Toronto, 

HimofF Mach. Co., Inc., Astoria. L.I., New York. 

The Jenckes Mach. Co., Ltd.. Sherbrooke, Que. 

McCabe. J. J.. New York, N.Y, 

F'lessbjVLlle Fdy.. PlessLsville, Que. 

Roelofson Mach. & Tool Co.. Toronio, Can. 
LATHES. SCREW CUTTING 

Bertram. John. & Sons Co.. Dundas, Ont 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait, Ont 

Tlie Geo. F. Fo>ss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Foster Machine Co., Elkhart. Ind. 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co., Toronto, Ont 

Hardinge Bros., Inc., Chicago, IlL 

Hepburn, John T., Ltd,. Toronto. 

McCabe, J. J.. New York, N.Y. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 



I, Que, 
N.Y. 



Petrie. Ltd . II. W,. Toronio, Ont 
IllTcIt Lathe A Unmlrr Co,, Boaton, Maaa. 
Itiremlde Machinery lle|>ot, Uetroil, Mich. 
Whilcomb lllaLvlell Mach, Tool Co., WorceaUr. 

Maaa. 
A. It Willlaina .Machy, Ca, Toronto. 
LATHES. SPINNING 

UU»«. 10 W,. Co. llrooklin. NY. 
FrriBCute .Mach. Co., lln.lgelon, N.J. 
McCalie. J. J.. New Vork, NY. 

LATHES, TURRET AND HAND 

Acme Machine Tool Co.. i'iuciunatt, Ohio, 

John Bcrlraui A Sons Co., l)unda.s. 

Blount. J. <!., A Co, K>erett, .Ma.v 

Bronn A Sharpe .Mfg. Co., Prorldcnce, 11,1. 

Can. Falrbanka-.Montu Co., Montreal. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

■nie Ge... K, !■•,«.< Mchy. A Sulkily C... .Moulreal. 

Foster .Machine Co., Klkhart, Ind, 

Garlock Walker ,Machy. Co., Toronto, Ont 

HarvlluKe Itn)-*., Inc.. Chicago. Ill, 

Il.pbum. John T,, Ltd., Toronto, Ont 

ntmolT .Mach. Co.. Inc., Astoria. I..I.. .New York. 

Tlie Jenckes Mach. Co.. Ltd.. Sherbrooke, Qua. 

R. K. LcBlond Mach. Tool Co, CiuclnnaU, Ohl». 

MoCabe, J, J,, New York, N.Y. 

Mulllner-Knlund Tool Co.. .Sviscujie. N.Y. 

National-Acme Co., Clereland, Ohio, 

New Britain Machine Co., .Ni-ir Britain. Conn. 

Niles-Ilnnent-Pond Co., New York. 

Pratt A Whitney Co., Dunila.s, Ont 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, 

Rlvelt I.nlhe A Grinder Co.. Boston. .Mass 

Rirerside Machinery Depot. Detroit, Mich. 

SlAndarxI Machy. A -Supplies, Lt.l., .Montreal. Qua. 

Wanier A Hwasey f'o., CleTeland, O. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Toronto. 
LEAD BURNING 

St. Lawrence Welding Co., Montreal, Qua. 
LEATHER STRAPPING 

Graton A Knight .Mfg. Co., Worcester, Maaa. 
LIFTS. PNEUMATIC 

Whiting Foun<lry Equipment Co,, Harrey, Ul. 
LINK BELTING 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Jones & Classco. Montreal. 

Morse Chain (>i., Ithaca. 

LINOLEUM MILL MACHINERY 

Bertrams. Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland. 
LIQUID AIR 
Carter Welding Co., Toronto, Ont 
L'Air Liquide Society, Montreal, Toronto. 
Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc., Toronto. Ont 

LOCKERS, STEEL WARDROBE 
AND STEEL MATERIAL 

Canada Wire A Iron Goods Co., Hamilton, OmU 
LUBRICANTS 

Cataract Refining A Mfg. Co., Torooto. 
LUBRICATORS 

Roper. C. F., A Co.. Tlopedale, Utsa. 
Trahem Pump Co., Btxtkford, 111. 
MACHINERY DEALERS 

Baird .Machy. Co., W. J., Detroit, Mich. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Dickow. Fred C, Chicago, 111. 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co., Toronto, Ont, 

Tlie Geo. F. Fr»« .Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal. 

Petrie, Lid., H. W., Toronto. Ont 

Petrie of .Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., .Montreal, Que, 

Standard Machy, A Supjilies. Ltd.. Montreal. Qua. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
MACHINERY GUARDS (SEE GUARDS) 
MACHINERY REPAIRS 

Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc.. Toronto. Ont 

fiterlinc Encine %yiirks. Winnipeg. Man, 

Sumbline Mach. Co.. W. H.. Toronto, Ont 
MACHINISTS' SCALES, SMALL 
TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Frank H. Scott, Montreal. 

J. H. Williams A Co,, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
MACHINISTS 

Wellanl Motor & Machine Co., Welland. Ont- 
MANDRELS 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

CleTeland Twist Drill Co., CleTeland, 

Hannifin Mfg. Ca, Chicago, 111. 

A. B. Jardine A Co., Heapeler, Ont 

Manufacturers Kquip. Co., Chicago, PI, 

Monarch Bra.ss Mfg. Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Morse Twist Drill & Mch. Ca. New Bedford. Man. 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. \V.. Toronto. Ont 

Pratt A Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 
MARKING DEVICES 

Pritchard-Andrews Co, of Canada. Ottawa, Ont 

Matthews. Jas. H.. & Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
MARKING MACHINERY 

Brown. Boggs Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

The Geo. F. Ff« Mcliy. & Snirjily Ca, MontxeaL 

Martin Machine Co., Greenfield, Maas. 

Noble & Westbrook Mfg. Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

Perrin. Wm. R.. Toronto. 
MEASURING MACHINES 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dunda.s. Ont 
MEASURING TAPES AND RULES 

James Chesterman & Co.. Ltd., Sheffield. Bng. 
METALLURGISTS 

Can. Inspection & Tasting Lab.. Montreal. Que. 

Toronto Testing Laboratory. Ltd., Toronto. 
METERS. METAL TESTING 

Holz. Herman A., 1 Madison Atc., New York. 
METALS 

Brown'.s Copper & Biaw Rolling MilU. N»w 
Toronto. Ont 

Can. B. K. Morton. Toronto. tMontreal. 

Dom. Iron A Wrecking Co.. Ltd., Montreal, Qua, 

Standard Machy. A Supplies. Ltd., Montreal, Qua, 
METERS. OIL, WATER 

Bowser A- Co.. Inc.. S. F.. Toronto. Ont 
MILL MACHINERY 

Alexander Fleck. Ltd.. Ottawa. 
MILLING MACHINES, AUTOMATIC 

Bilton Mach. Tool Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 



mil 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN .M A C II I N E R Y 



155 



The Plant 
Behind 




156 



MltOJNU ATTACHMKNTS 

bKtar jai.l.!< M. •■ !.♦ iV ll.auu UlJ» 
John bcrvt— • '■■■'■(* 

Btwn A . -nor. 

CaaaJa 11 1 
Cinci-i* .-luuiU. 

fin^: 'lit. 

roi > . 

lltrJ.'t. 

ll«lKle7 Vu .u. 

Mmi-*>» \ ■ WU. 

Ni:*- . 

l-r: tltJT4l, Qilr 

l'i»:: A , . i-. . ..L 

Tif: 1\mvt Vi.f t. h^ ^.«Ki«<4ri, ILI. 

MILUNG MArilINK!*. HAND 
lUMUK* I ■. 111. 

iBI'.fJ .-<'• ClDdilDlU. Obia 

rr»l! * . ■- llnl. 

\Vh:toey Vlf* ^ ■. ii«r...r.i. I'cnn- 

mii.i.im; machines, hokizontal 
and vkkticm 

BruwD A - 
John Hrf 

C3*Trtt^ ' ■ .r 1 .' » .ririUliI, Ktlin> 

Caci t . liftlt. iint. 

Kcxr' > llamillon. DDL 

rii V > "•!■■)" *'»'-. MouihmI 

foi sa«c! Mich. 

OArKwfe-\\> Toronto, OnL 

iJo^-lr. A NY. 

IU-: 111. 

Kfti kw. \Vi». 

TV K - . CindnoaU. Ohio 

* .^ .NfW VoriL 
\v.. Tor\iiito. Ont. 

I.t.l.. H. \V.. .Montreal, Quo 

I :• .1 .• > Co. Pumlai. Ont. 

KHfril.ta .M«ch;n<Tj I>.ihi1. Dftroit. MIrh. 

Stfptii*'. Thp John Co . Cindnnati, Ohia 

L'ofted Stairs Mich. T^xi! Co.. Cincinnati. ohi.» 

WhttnfT Mffi. Co.. llanfool. Conn. 

.\. K. Wi'.liJim* .Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
MILLING MACHINES. PLAIN, 
BENCH AND UNIVERSAL 

llecafr .Millinc Machine Co., Boaton, Maja. 

Bliton Mach. Tool Co., Hridffvport. Conn. 

Btuwn A Sha:^>« Mfg. Co.. I*roriJence. 

Canada Macliinrry Con^. Gait, Ont. 

Cmannatt ililling Machine Co.. Cincinnati 

Fonl-Smith Mach. Co., Hamilton. OnU 

The i:.-\ K. K,«. Mohv. & Stinily Co.. Montxoal. 

Fox Machine Co., Jackson, Mich. 

Garlock-Walker Machincnr Co., Toronto. Ont 

Oarrin Machine Co., New York. 

Goolaj & Edlund, Cortland, N.T. 

Hanlinfe BrosL, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Hefidej Uacfaine Co.. Torhngton. 

KeinpxBiith Mfg. Co.. Milwaukee. Wia. 

R. K. LsBlond Mach. Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio 

NllnBement-rond Co.. New York. 

Pctrio. Ld.. H. W.. roionto. lint- 

Pratt & \Vhi:ncT Ca, Oundas, Ont 

Sl«ptoe. The John Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

A. R. Williams .Machy. Co., Toronto. 
MILLING MACHINES. PROFILE 

Brown & Sharps Mfg. Ca. ProTidence. 

Can. Fairbanka-Morse Cc. Montreal. 

The Gt-o F. F(«i .Mchy. & Supply Co., Montrv«l 

OATlock-Walker Machlnerr Co.. Toronto, Unt 

GaiTin Machine Co.. New Tort. 

I'elrie. L.I. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

Pratt & Whimcj Co.. Dundas. Ont 

KiTerside MachineiT Depot Detroit, Mich. 
MILLING TOOLS 

Aikeohead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont, 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. ProTidence. 

Fotd-Soiith Mach. Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Geometric Tool Co., New Haren, Conn. 

Kempamith Mfg. Co., .Milwaukee. Wis. 

Tahor Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
MINE CARS 

Can. Fairhanks-Morse Co., Montreal, 

Cummings A Son. J. W.. New Glasgow, Canada. 

'enckea Mach. Co., Sherbrooke, Que. 

«facKinnon, Holmes Co., Sherbrooke 

Marsh & Henthoni, Bellerille, Ont 

Uodem Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dunda3, Ont 

Sheldons. Ud.. Gait. Ont 
MINING MACHINERY 

Can. Fairbanka-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Clereland Pneumatic Tool Co of Canada, Toronto 

Jenckes Mach. Co., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Pflnp. L:d.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

I'etric of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., Montreal, Que. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Toronto. 
MITTENS 

Hickory Steel-Grip Glore Co.. Chicago, M. 
MORTISING MACHINES 

CaDa.1a Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Garloclq-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

New Pritain Mach. Co., New Britain, Conn. 
MOTORS. ELECTRIC 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Elm ''iittinc Oil Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

Lancashire Dynamo & Motor Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Petrie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W.. Montreal,, Que. 

A. R. Williams MachT. Co., Toronto. 
MOTORS. PNKUMATIC 

Clereland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto. 

Garlork-WaJker Machinery Co.. Toronti, Ont 
MfLTIPLE INDEX CENTRES 

Garrifl Mschine Co V#w York. 
MUNITION MACHINERT 

Pe-rie of Mon'real. Ltd., H. W., .Montreal, Que. 
MVNTZ METAL 

Pominion Central DrawinK Office. McGill Bldg.. 
Montreal. Que. 
NAIL MACHINERY 

Eleeps & Hartley, Inc., Worcester, Man. 



C.\ N .\ I) 1 .\ N .M .\ (MI I N \:R V 



NAMK rl.ATKS. UKONZB, ETCHED 
AMI MIA.MI'KII 

Mallhawi, JaA II.. A Co., I'lllabui«h. Pa. 

^la. Uaf\l Ali.lrew* t'o., UttAwa, L^An. 
NU'KKI. MII.VKK 

lli>...i, . 1..,.,,, .\ 11,,;^. ll.Jlinii .Mill., .\.i. 
■r..i....I... ihil 
NIPPLE 1IU1.UEU8 

t'uitu * lulu* to. llthl«r|-ort, t'otiii. 
NII'PI.K TIIKKADING MACHINES 
John H Hall A f>uii>. Ltd., Ilraulluid. Out 
1.AU.1U Mak-iilue Co., \\ Ajncktwru, Pa. 

nitko(;kn 

CAiter Welding Co.. Toronto. Out. 

L ,lir t.iaul.lr fiuciet). MontirAt, Toronto. 
Nt>8K Sm KKTS 

J«' .\l.lv->> 1 ... l'iit.^l.iiivh. I'a. 
NUTS. 8hMI-FINI8H AND FINISHED 

Caiia<iian U. K. Muiluo. Toronto. Montreal. 

Uall .Maobm* llcrvw to., tuit, t'tit. 

.Natlonal-ACMC Lo.. Clereland. Ohio. 

\\ ilkiiiM.n .V Koni].ji^%. ll.uuillon. Ont. 
NUT IIUKRINb MACHINES 

.National .Machy. Co., Tlllln, O, 

I'.lni- ol .MonlK-.il. 1.1.1. , II. W,. .Moiilreiil, Que. 
NUT MACHINU (HOT) 

Nailonal .Machy. Co.. Tlllln. O. 

P. :ii. ot M,,nln-iil. 1.1.1.. H. \V.. .Moulival, Que. 
Nl'T FACING. AND BOLT SHAVING 
MACHINES 

Itamii .Marhliic Co.. .New York. 

Nailonal Machy. Co.. Tiffin. O. 

Victor To«l Co.. Waynesboro. Pa. 
(UT TAPPERS 

John Bertima A Soiu Co., Dundta. 

Canala liAchiMiT Con'.. Gait Ont 

Qamn Machine Co.. .New York. 

UnvnAald Tap h Die Oori>. . Greenfield, .Maaa. 

Hall. J. H . & Son, Ilrantfonl, Ont 

.\, It, Janline & Co., llwpelcr. 

I.an.lis .Machine Co., Waynestmto. Pa. 

Nalional .Macliy. Co.. Tiffin, O. 

Pellie of .Montnnl. Ltd., II. W., .Monlnnl. Que. 
OIL, DRAWING 

Klin rutting Oil Co., Toronto, Ont 
OIL SEPARATORS 

Can. Fairbanks-.Morse Co., Montreal. 

Sheldons, Ltd., Oalt. Ont 

Smart-Turner .Machine Co.. Tlie, Hamilton. 
OIL STONES 

Aikenhead Harxlware Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Carttoninilum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Norton Co.. Worcester. Mb.s.s. 
OIL STORAGE SYSTEMS 

Itow^er .^- Co.. Inc.. S. F.. Toronto. Ont. 
OSCILLATING VALVE GRINDERS 
(PNEITMATIC) 

Clevel.'ind Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 
OVENS FOR BAKING. BLUING, DRYING, 
ENAMELING. JAPANNING AND 
LACQIIERING 

Brantford O'cn ,<; Rack Co., Brantford. Ont 

Oven Equipment & Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 

Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Harvey, 111. 
OVEN TRUCKS. STEEL 

Brantford Oven & Rack Co.. Brantford, Ont 

MacKinnon, Holmes & Co.. Sherbrooke, Que, 

Oven Equipment A Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn, 

Whiting Fniindry Equipment Co.. Harvey, 111, 
OVENS FOR DRYING, TEMPER AND 
UNDER TRUCKS 

Brantford Oven & Rack Co., Brantford. Ont 

Oven Equipment & Mfg. Co.. New Haven, Conn, 
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING AND 
CUTTING 

Can. Welding Works. Montreal, Que. 

Carter Welding Co., Toronto. Ont. 

Prcst-0-Lite Co., Inc., Toronto, Ont. 

St, r.aWience Weldinff Co.. Montreal, Que. 
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING AND 
CUTTING PLANT 

Carter Welding Co.. Toronto. Ont 

L'Air Liquide Society, .Montreal, Toronto. 

Prest-n-Lite Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Ont 
OXYGEN (SEE ACETYLENE! 

L'Air l.iqnide Society. Montreal. Que. 
PACKINGS. ASBESTOS 

Bennett. W. P.. 51 Montford St.. Montreal. Que. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland. 

New Britain Mach. Co.. New Britain. Conn. 
PACKINGS. LEATHER. HYDRAULICS, 
ETC. 

Graton & Knight Mfg. Co.. Worcester. Mass 

William R. Perrin. Ltd., Toronto. 

Petrie. T.-'l . TT. \V.. Toronto. Ont 
PAPER MILL MACHINERY 

Bertrams, Ltd.. Edinhurjrh. Scotland. 

MacKinnon. Holmes & Co., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Stiirtevant To.. B. F.. Oalt. Ont. 
PATTERN SHOP EOUIPM»^NT 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Fott Machine Co.. .Tacfcsnn. Mich. 
'Garlnek-Wsllter Machinery Co., Toronto. Ont. 
PATENT SOLICITORS 

Btidden. Hanbury. A., Montreal. 

Fetherstonhaiigh & Co.. Ottawa. 

Marion & Marion. Montreal. 

Ri'lout St Maybee. Toronto. 
PATTFRNS 

Winnipeg Gear S: Kntrr. Co.. Winnipeg. Man 
PFRFOPATPD MPTAT.S AND 
ORNAMENTAL IRON GOODS 

Cfln.^da Wire & Iron Goods Co.. Hamilton. 
PIG IRON 

Hanna & Co.. M. A.. Cleveland. O. 

Steel Co of Canada. Ltd., TTsmilton. Ont. 
PIPF CUTTING AND THREADING 
MACHINES 

Butterfleld & Co.. Bock Island. Que. 

Can Fairbsnks-SfoTse Co.. Montreal, 

Curtis & Curtis Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Poss A- TTill Machv. Co.. Montreal. 

Fni Machine Co., Jackson. Mich. 



Volume .Win. 



(lirloi'k Walkfr Mictiliirrr Co., Toronto. Ont. 

tJBOiu .Muchinr (.0.. .New York. 

Joiiii II. ilail A duu9, ilrauUord. 

A II. Janlliie A Co.. llMpfler, Unt. 

l.itiiilia M«ihine Co., VNft>Ufrtburu, I'a. 

I(. .MolhMigall Co.. OaiU 

IV lilt-. L.U.. II. W.. i'i».)iit<i, Otit. 

Wills HroR. Co. of Canaila, Qalt. Ont 

Uilllnms Tool Co.. Erie. I'a. 

A It. Wlllinnw Machy. Co.. Toronto, 
ril'l-; KIVICIKD STKKL 

Tin- J.nok.NS Maoli. Co.. LUI. Slu-rbrooke. Qu« 

r<irimt*> Irnu Woiks, I,t«l.. Toronto. 
I'll'K CUTTKKS. KOl.l.lNt; 

Ciirtlii & Curtis Co.. Hrltlarport. Coub. 

John 11. Hall & Sous. Ltd., Urantford. OnL 

I'tlii.- i>f .\l..iittval. 1,M., H. \V., M-.utri-iiJ. Qn,-, 

Wells HroH. i'o, of Oanaiia. Hull, i»ni. 
ri.ANKK JACKS 

Anii.'*tr..iik: Mil)'*. Tool Co., Chicatf". 
I'l.ANKUS. STANDARD AND KOTARY 

)ubn Itertrnm & tiona Co.. l>iiii<laa. 

Canada .Machinrry Corii., Ualt, OnU 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Muntn-al. 

Thv (i.-M. K. r.w.-* Mtliy. A: Hiipply Co.. Moiili.^-il. 

OanlniT, Iluhl.. & 8on, Montreal. 

(Jnrliick-Wttlkrr .Machlnt'ry Co., Toronltt, Ont. 

Onrvln Mucliiiip Cr New York. 

lUmilton Muchin*, inol Co., Hamilton. Ohla 

Morton MTtf. Co.. .Muskvicon Ili-ight«, Mich. 

Nlh-ft-lU'UKTit-1'ond l"o., .New York. 

IMiif ul .Nhinliciil. LL.I.. II. W.. Monlruftl, Qti.-. 

I'.trir. 1-td.. M. W., Tonnito. Ont. 

Whilcomb niaiwU'l] Mach. Tool Co., Woroeatar. 
Mn»H. 
PLANINC; AND SHAPING MACHINERY 

Canada -MAcliiiifry Corp.. tJalt, Ont. 

Can. I-'Birbanks-.Monif Co.. Mtuitnal. 

TIw Cm*. !■'. K.K^iN Mchy. & Siii.ply Co.. MontJ«Ml. 

Garlook-Walkcr Machinery Co.. Toronto. Onu 

Garvin Mochine Co.. New York. 

Hamilton .Machine Tool Co.. Hamilton. OWo. 

Nilrs Hcmcnt-l'ond Co.. New York. 

I'.tnc. I.hl . H. W.. ToHHiln. Ont. 

IMur iif M.tuln-.il. Ltd.. H. W.. Montreal, Quf. 

Uiverside Muchinerr Depot. Detroit, tdicik. 

Stcptoe, The John Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

A. R. WiJHanw Machy. Co., Toronto. 
PLANING MILL EXHAUSTERS 

Can. llluwcr & Forge Co., Kitchener, 0«. 

.ShfMons, Ltd.. Oalt. Ont. 

Nilen Itcmcnt I'ond Co., New York. 
PLIERS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Canadinn IlilliiiBs & Spencer, Ltd., Welland. 

I'l ck Stiiu \- Witrox Co., Soiitliington. Conn 
PRESSES. ARBOR 

Atlaa Press Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Hannifln .Mfg. Co.. Chica«o. IlL 

Wetalwood Mfn. Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
PRESSES, BROACHING. FORGING 
AND FLANGING 

AtJa-s Press Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

E. W. Bliss Co.. llrooklyn. N.Y. 

Ferracute Machine Co., IJridgeton, N.J. 

Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit, Mich. 

To]o<lo Marhine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 
PRESSES, CAM. TOGGLE. EYELET 

Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Bliw) Co.. K. W.. Bronkljii, N.Y. 

Consnli<latod Press Co.. Hastings. Mich, 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co., Toledo. 
PRESSES FOR SHELLS 

A tlas Press Co, . Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Bliss Co., E, W., Brookl>-n. N.Y. 

Charles F. Elmes Eng. Worlu. Chicago. 

Ferrarute Machine Co.. Bridgeton. N.J. 

Th.- Gee. F. V^<^ Mchy. & Suj-ply Co.. Montrt-al 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Onu 

Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit, Mich. 

William R. I'errin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Petrie. Ltd.. II. W.. Toronto. Ont. 

Pttrie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W.. Montreal, Que. 

West Tire Setter Co.. Rochester, N.Y. 
PRESSES, FILTER 

William R. Perrin, Ltd.. Toronto. 

PRESSES, DROP AND FORGING 

W. H. Banfleld & Son. Toronro. 
E. W. Bliss Co., BrookliTi. N.Y. 
Brown. Boggs Co., Ltd., IT ami! ton, Canada- 
Charles F. Elmes Eng. Works. Chicago. 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Erie Fo\indry Co.. Erie. Pa. , 

Nil es - Bern en t -Pond Co. . New York. 
■William R. Perrin. Ltd., Toronto. 
Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toroiito. Ont. 
Petrie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., Montreal, Qu.-. 
Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 

PRESSES. HYDRAULIC 

John Bertram & Son* Co.. Dundas. 

Charles F. Elmes Eng. Works, Chicago. 

Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Standard .Machy. & Supplies. Ltd.. MontrwU, Qua. 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 

Petrie of Montreal. Ltd., H. W.. Montreal. Qne. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toleflo. 

West Tire Setter Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Toronto. 

PRESSES. POWER 

Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

E, W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 

BroT^Ti. F.ofTcs Co.. Ltd.. Fimilton, Ouudft. 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Out. 

Can. Fairbante'-Morw Co, , Montreal. 

Consolidated Press Co., Haatlngs, Mich, 

Charles F. Elmes Eng. Worka, Chicago. 

Ferracute Machine Co., Bridgeton. N.J. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, OnU 

William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Petrie. Ltd . IT. W.. Tormito. Ont. 

Pe-rie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W., Montreal, Que. 

RiTpfside Machinery Depot, Detroit. Mich. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co., Toledo. 

A. R. Williama Machy. Co., Toronto. 



} 



\ 



i 



I 'icember 6, 1917 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



157 



Silver's 20" Swing Drills 

ARE NOTED FOR THEIR 

ACCURACY, STRENGTH AND 

SPEED 



Over 400 arc used l.y 

Till' Willys-Ovcrlaiid Motor Co.. ToUmIo. Ohiu. ■ 

and 
The Curtis Airplaiic Motor Corp., ]>utfalu. .\.Y. 

The^e Hrois KN'()\\' tlieir quality. Whetlier you need 
1 drill or oOO, it will pav vou to use a SILVER. 



s 20-inch 



¥___A /^ii4- I ^"' New Catalog No. 63, covering Silver' 
UUSL V/UL • 3„j 25-inch Drills, Post Drills, Etc. 

Send for it and our attractive prices. 

The Silver Mfg. Co. S Salem, Ohio 




12,000 R. P. M. 

and No Vibration 

No Friction 

That is the top speed of ."> speed changes.- For drillino- up to '-'t/lQ" 
it is maintained with ea.se and perfect safety. At lower .speed, 
capacity for soft materials is %". Also Iniilt for V-V' and %" capa- 
city with maxinnmi .-pecds of 5,000 r.p.m. and 'i.oOO r.p.m. 
respec lively. 

Demco 

Ball-Bearin.u-tlirdUtihout Drilling Machines are Imilt in 1, 2, 3, 4 
and 6-sjiindlo ty])es, c(im])lete with lower countershaft. \'crtically 
adjustable quill hracket insures permanently true ali.unment of 
the drill. Belt adjuster and automatic take-up maintain the hcit 
•at constant uniform tension. 

Demco will speed your iiut[)ut and lengthen the life of your drills. 
Nothing equal or better regardless of price. Write to-daij fur 
BuUetinif. 

The DeMooy Machine Company 

Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 




// interested, tear out this page and keep with letters to be answered. 



158 



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N.J. 


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MontTVAl. Qu«. 
. I.t*l . Toronto. 
l-:.i.. .Montreal, Que. 
' '.I . Hamilton. 

. T.'mnlo. 
II I I'll 



t-o.. 



A 



Conn. 
. KorU.rTill*. Qu«. 
' \^.. Torxieilo. Ont. 
'■•I. I.t.1.. II. \V.. .Montnal. Quo. 
» riiny WorkJ, Ltd., ToiYinto. 

PILLEV MACniNERY.^ 
DRILLING AND TAPPING 

Can. Pairtiaski-Mors* Ca, Montml. 
wJv.''kVJ. '""."f-^ ^r^'A f°- "»<^n«0. Ohio. 

pumpsI'Tir"' '*"•"■ °^'- **■"- 

PUMPS. CENTRIFUGAL 

J?.°r"ml ^"'';: I?'- * ■■"•• Toronto, Ont 
Can. Blo»»r A Korif Ca. Kltebcntr. OnL 
l.n. lr,t,p...ll-K,in.l !•,>.. M..ntrt-al. Que. 
Pftnf. Lld;^ II. W.. Toroolo. Onu 
Pratt * niiltoe7 Ca. Dundas. Ont. 
^ddons. Ltd.. Oalt. Ont. 
|mart-Tuni<T .\lach. Co.. Hamilton. 
StarlCTant Co., B. F.. Oalt OnL 
PUMPS. FUEL OIL 

t!^L*i>S^- ^'"^■J ^- Toronto. OnL 
».V2l'™ '^™P ^°- Rookford. III. 
PUMPS. HIGH PRESSURE 

William R. Ftnin. Ltd.. Toronto. 
»..?.*'^'"'^™"' ■^'•'*- Co., Hamilton. 
PU.MPS. ALL KINDS 

cii.'"R^o!^? J Condtnstr Cc. Fitchbnr,, MaM. 
cSrii P n* "^"K "^^ Kitchens, OnL 
mfiV.» D ?""? ^'. ^°^- Chicago. 
Wniiam R. Ptmn. Ltd.. Toronto. 

T™ i.Tv'--'' ■ '.', "■■ Toronto, Ont. 

Smart Tornfr Mich. Co., Hamilton. 
Di-u^ .l;!!?" .MachT. Co.. Toronto. 
PIMPS. HYDRAULIC 

K,*AT-.^p°^^* Condaijer Co., Fitchburg, Mas, 

MfUlwood Mfg. Co., Detroit, Mich. 

^art-Turner Mach. Co., HamUton. 

William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 
PUMPS. LUBRICANT, OIL 

R^!i^'a.'°?""^,*' ^^raiM Co., Detroit. Mich. 

IS^/^ £°-^''"=-;,S F.' Toronto, oit 

Roper, C. F.. Co.. Hopedale. Mass. 
t>»V2^"^ ^"^^ Co.. Rockford. m. 
PUMP LEATHERS 

Can B.K Morton. Toronto, Montreal 

Graton & Kmght Mfg. Co.. Worerater, Mass. 
PUMPS. ROTARY. POWER DRIVEN 

Bowwr i Co., Inc., S. F., Toronto, OnL 

Trahem Pump Co., Rockford, m. 
PUNCHES A.VD DIES 

?■ !?■ S'^^'i? * Sons, Toronto, 

fc. w. Biiij Co., Brooklyn. N.T 

r^^i,,^'^^ S°r^' '-"•■ Hamilton, Canada. 

rt^,, " t; \ ^?.'^' '^■- Kitchener, CtoL 

rf^T'■^^'£^„*^°•• Bridgelon, N.J. 

Can. FaiiJ.nks-.Morse Co., MontreaL 

Gardner RobL, & Son, Montreal. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Hespeler. OnL 

Mulluier-Enlund Tool Co. . STricuse V T 

Petrie, Ltd H. W.. Toronfo,^^' '^■^■ 

P™« * Wh?4,'^^>'^"Aj^i "■• Montreal, Qu.. 

Toledo Mach-Jie i Tool Co.. Toledo 
PUNCHES. POWER 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co.. Dundas. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brookljn, N,T. 

ci^IJ; ?."*?• ^°- i-"- Hamilton, Canada. 
Canada Maehmerj Corp., Gait. Ont 

P^i:',;'^. ^^J^- Hastinis. M ch. 

Ndes-Bement-Pond Co., Xew Toft 

^4^°'-'''^r MACHINES. HORIZONTAL 

Bertrams. Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland. 

r ^ ^^^"^ Corp.. Gait, Ont. 
E W. Bin. Co.. Brookljn. N.T. 
Btown^ Boggg Co.. Ltd., Hamflton Can.d. 
N£e.-B.ment-Pood Co., .V.w Tort"' '-''°"" 
W. A. Whitney M£i. Ca, Eockford, m. 



C.\ .N .\ n I .\ \ M .\ CIT I NKR Y 



ITKIKYING AND SOFTKNINC 
An-AKATl'S 

Hoait. « H.uii Co. \Vm II. I'llHhurgh, Pa. 
l-VltO.MKTEKli 

llrilc.iic Iii.liulrlal Piimaiv Oo . IVtnilt, .Midi. 
' »u, ll.aikllll. Ltd.. WalkcrrlUe, llHL 
Moll. Ilrmian .\., 1 .\l«,1i„.ii .\,e., .N>w York. 
Hhorr liiatninirtil A .Mfii Co . .New York Clly 
II K. Strrelor. .New lljik> IlMil,. .Mniitieal. Que 
Tay)or In«liuniriit Co., Koclirtiler, N,Y. 
Th»Uit lii.lruuieni Co., I'lilladelphla, I'a. 
glARTKKINC MACHINES 

.1 'liti Itritinin A Solii v\. , lltindai. 
NUrw llrinriil I'luul I'o,, New York. 
I(AILIN(;, IKON AND URASS 
(SEE CI'AHDSi 
KAIL IIENDEKS 

.Nilec. Hfiucni r.ui.l Co.. New York. 
RAILROAD TOOLS 
C«u. Kairlianka.Morae Ca, Montreal. 
Ciimmliig A Son, J. W., New Glaagaw, Caiiadv 
.NUealleineul-PoDd Co.. New York. 
RAILS. STEEL 

Cumiuliii; A Son, J. W., New Olascow, Canada. 
RATCHETS 

Keystone .Mfg. Co., BulTalo, NY, 
RAW HIDE PINIONS (SEE (iEAKS) 
REAMER EI.l'TINt; MACHINES 

tJamn .Machine Co., .New York. 
REAMERS, ADJUUSTAIILE 

Can. l''airtiank4..Monie Co.. .Montreal. 
Clefeland Twl>l Drill Co.. Clercland. 
.Morv T^^l•il Dnll A .Mch. I\\. .New licdford. Mum. 
o.»bom (Canada), Ltd., Saml, Montn-al, Que. 
Pratt A Whitney Co,, Dundas. OoL 
Standanl .Macliy. A Supplie.i. Ltd.. .Montreal, Que. 
11 E. Streeter. .New llirks IlKIg.. .Montreal. Que. 
«hi;min A Hnme.i .Mfg. Co., .St. Catharines, OnL 
REAMERS, BRIDGE, EXPANDING 
AND HIGH SPEED 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, 
nuttertlelil A Co., Rock Wand, Que, 
Can, Fairtianks-.Morso Co., Montreal. 
Clark Kquipment Co.. Buchanan. .Mich. 
Clcreland Twist Drill Co., Cleieland. 
Illinois Tool Works, Chicago, 111. 
Morw Twist Drill A Mch. Co.. .New Cclford, Mass. 
McKenna Brothers. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Osbom (Canada). I,t.l.. Sam'I, ilontrcal. Que. 
Pratt ,^ Whitney Co., Dundas. Ont, 
REAMERS. PIPE. CYLINDER 
AND LOCOMOTIVE 

Butterfleld A Co., Rock Island, Que. 
Can. Fairbanks-.Mors« Co., Montreal. 
ClcTcIand Twist Drill Co.. Clereland. 
Morse Twist Drill A .Mch. Co., New Bedford, Mass. 
Petrie. Ltd.. H. \V., Toronto, Ont. 
Pratt 4 Whitney Co.. Dundas, OnL 
REAMERS, STEEL TAPER 
AND SELF-FEEDING 
Butterfleld A Co.. Rock Island, Que, 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 
Clark Equipment Co., Buchanan. .Mich. 
Clefeland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 
Illinois Too! Works, Chicago, 111. 
A. B, Jardine * Co., Hespeler, Ont 
Morse Twist Drill A -Mch. Co., New Bedford, Mass. 
Petrie. r.t^l.. H. W.. Tnmnto. Ont. 
Pratt A Whitney Co., Dunrias. Ont 
REAMING MACHINES, PNEUMATIC 

Clereland Pneumatic Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont 
RECORDING INSTRUMENTS 
Bristol Co.. Waterbury, Conn. 
Ta.vlor Instniment Co.. Rochester, N.T, 
REGULATORS, PRESSURE, 
TEMPERATURE 

Can. Fairhanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Tiylnr In.strument Co., Rochester, N.T. 
RESPIRATORS 

.Stronc, Kennarl A Nutt Co., Clercland, Ohio. 
RIVET MACHINES 
Biiton Mach. Tool Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Can. Blower A Forge Co.. Kitchener. (JnL 
Grant Mfg. A Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
National Machinery Co.. Tiffin. O. 
RIVETS. TUBULAR. BIFURCATED 
Parmenter A Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 
Stpel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. Harailton. OnL 
RIVETS. IRON. COPPER AND BRASS 
.\ikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, OnL 
Parmenter A Bulloch Co.. Gananoque. 
S'eel Co, of Canada. Ltd.. Hamilton. Ot 
RIVETERS, PNEUMATIC, HYDRAULIC, 
HAMMER, COMPRESSION 

Can. Fairbank-s-Morse Co., Montreal. 
Can. InEpr!oll-Rand Co.. Montreal. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. OnL 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago. 111. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York 
I'ftrio T.td . H W.. Tnrwnto. Ont. 
RIVETING MACHINES. ELASTIC 
ROTARY BLOW 

Grant Mfg. & Machine Co.. Bn'dgeport. Conn. 
High-Speed Hammer Co.. Rochester. N.T. 
F. B Shiister Co.. New Haven, Conn. 
ROLLER CHAINS 

.Triii.-.i i r,l.i«=<-r,, Montrrnl. 

BOLLS. BENDING AND STRAIGHTENING 

John Bertram A Sons Co.. Dundas 

Brown. BoRBS Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Canada. 

Canaia Machinery Corp., Gait. Ont 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York 

Toledo Machine A Tool Co., Toledo, O 
ROLLS. CRUSHING 

The Jenckes Mach. Co.. Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que 
RUBBER MILL MACHINERY 

Bertrams, Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland 
RULES 

Brown A Sharpe Mfg Co., Providence 

James fTiesterman A Cr,.. Ltd.. ShetTield Eng 

L. a. fltarrett Co.. Athol. Mass. 



Volume XVIII. 

SAFETY APPLIANCES 

strong. Kiuuonl A Null Co., Cleveland, Ohlu. 
SAFETY APPLIANCE GOGGLES 

T. A. Wilson. Itea.llug, I'a. 
SAND HI.ASTS 

i;urll« Pneumatic .MacJilnrry Co,, at Luula M*. 
„ . .VV.^ll"''""' ■^'"''''- "■"■• ''''!• SheilMoolie, (Ju.. 
SANDING MACHINES 

Clinnda .Mnehlueiy Coi-|i.. (InU. Ont 
SAW MILL MACHINERY 
Can. Fairbniiks-.Mume Co.. Montreal. 
Canada .Mncliinery Corp., Gall, OnL 
Oanlner, Kohl., A .Sou. .Montreal 
Curtis I'neumnllc .MacUy. Co.. 8t Louis. Ua 
Peine, 1.1.1 . II \v.. Toronto. Out 
IMiiv of M,,ntiv»l Ll.l., II. \v,. .M..ntr.iil, Que. 
A. It. Wllllama .\lnchy. Co.. Toronto 
SAWS, CIRCULAR METAL 

Hunter Saw A .Machine Co, Plltsliuig Pa, 
.Napier Saw Works, Siiringlleld, .\lu.i.» 
Tnhor Mfg, Ca, Philii.leli.hla. Pa 
SAWS, HACK (SEE HACK SAWS) 
SAWS, INSERTED TOOTH 

llunter .Saw A .M,.li. Co., Plltsburgh. Pa. 
Napier Saw Works, Siiniiglleld. Mass. 
Tabnr Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
SAWS. BAND AND COPINtJ 

Napier Saw Works. Sprliigfleld, .Masi. 
SCLEROSCOPES 

Shore Inslnimcnt A Mfg. Co., New York City 
11. E. SlriH-ter, New Birks Bldg., Montreal, Qua. 
SCREW MACHINE PARTS 

Johnson .Mach. Co., Carlyle, .Manchester, Conn. 
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 
C.alt .Machine Screw Co., Oalt Ont 
Knsleni Mach. Screw Corp., New Haven, Conn. 
SCREW MACHINES. HAND. AUTOMATIC 
Brown A Sharpe .Mfg. Co., Providence, B.I, 
Can. Falrbanks-.Mor3e Co., Montreal. 
Faster Machine Co., Elkhart, Ind, 
Garlock-Walker Machy. Co,, Ltd., Toronto, Ont 
Garvin .Machine Co.. New York 
Himoll .Macli, Co., Inc., Astoria, I..1., New York. 
A. B. Janline A Co., Hespeler 
New Britain ,Machine (,'o,. New Britain, Conn. 
Petrie. Lid.. II. W.. Toronto. Ont. 
Petrie of -Montreal,, Ltl,, II. W., .Montreal, Que. 
Pratt A Whitney Co., Dundas, OnL 
Rivett Lathe & Grinder Co., Brighton, Maai. 
Warner A Swasey Co, Cleveland, O. 
A. R. Williama Machy. Co., Toronto 
SCREW MACHINES. AUTOMATIC, 
MULTIPLE SPINDLE 

New Britain Machine Co.. New Britain, Conn. 
Riverside .Machinery Depot, Detroit, Mich, 
SCREWS 

Can. B. K. Morton, Toronto, Montreal 
Gait Machine Screw Co.. Gait, Ont 
National-Acme Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton, OnL 
Wilkin-son A Kompass, Hamilton, OnL 

SCREW PLATES 

Butterfleld A Co., Bock Island, Que. 
A. B. Jardine A Co., Hespeler 
.Morse Twist Drill A Mch. Co., New Be<irord, Maan 
Wells Bros, Co. of Canada, Oalt, Ont 
Wilkinson & Kompa.ss, Hamilton, Ont 
SCREW SLOTTERS 

Garvin Machine Co., N»w York 
Pratt A Whitney Co,, Dundas, Ont 

SECOND-HAND MACHINERY 

Davis Machine Tool Co.. W. F.. New York 

Dominion Machinery Co.. Toronto 

Till- G.o. r. Fr«3 .Mdiv. A Siii^jly Co., Montreal. 

Hill, Clarke A Co., Chicago, 111. 

MoCabe. J. J., New York, N.T. 

New York Machinery Exchange, New Tork 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 

Riverside Machinery Depot. Detroit Mich. 

.Strelinger Co., Chas, A.. Detroit, Mich. 

Stocker-Rumely-Wachs. Chicago, 111. 
SET SCREWS. SAFETY 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Allen .Mfg. Co., Hartford. Conn. 

Wilkinson & Kompa.ss. Hamilton. Ont 
SHANKS. STRAIGHT AND TAPER 

Jacobs Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 
SHAPERS 

John Bertram A Sons Co., Dundas 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont. 

The Geo. F. Fob.s Mdiy. A .Snpplv Co., Montj-eaL 

Gardner. RobL, A Son, Montreal 

Hendey Machine Co., Torrington, Conn. 

Hamilton Mach. Tool Ca, Hamilton, Ohio 

Petrie. Ltd., H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 

Petrie of Montreal. Ltd.. H. W. . Montreal, Que. 

Rhodes Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Steptoe Co.. John, Cincinnati, Ohio 
SHAFTING 

Can, Bond Hanger A Coup. Co., Alexandria, Ont, 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal 

Can. Drawn St<?el (3o., Hamilton, OnL 

Garlock-Walker .Machy. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 

The Jenckes .Mach. Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Qu«- 

Jnnfs A: Glas-co. Montreal. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New Tork 

Petrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 

Pratt A Whitney Co., Dundas, OnL 

Sterlins Enirir.e Works. Winnipeg, .Man. 

Strelinger Co., Chas, A., Detroit, Mich, 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto 

Wilkinson A Knmpass. Hamilton, Ont. 
SHAFTS. FLEXIBLE 

Stow Mfg Co., Binghampton, N,T. 
SHARPENING STONES 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 

Norton Co., Worcester. Mass. 
SHAVINGS. SEPARATOR 

Can. Blower A Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 
Sheldons, Ltd., Gait, OnL ;' 



December 6, 1917. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



159 




// any advertisement interests you, tear it oil now and place with letters to be answered. 



160 



C A N A n I A N MACHINE R Y 



VoUim.- XVIII. 



SUKAKIM: MAt-HINK& ANGLE IRON. 
BAK AMI CATE 

tUrtxiBU. 1 f 

C^OAtU ill 

A. tt J«r>'. . ' 

MiMlcomrr?. .•>■'. -.:i jl (\> . Kr^ntiitm. S.nifnMl. 

.SU» B»mcti' I'.r.l Co.. New Tort 
Toll*!.. U, h.!.. A Tv»l IV.. TvJxIo 
8HKAKS. I-OWKK 
Jo^B Itcc'.rtm A Sou* Col. Uundu 



nil 






• Ou.. li:i.Ut;.Ji. N.J 

• ■y, TlBia. Ohio. 
Co.. New Y.':k 
'^ . T\»a«i;o. Onl. 

K.I 11 \V M.«,IJT»1. Qiif 
'•' ' ■ .1 Tool Co.. ToIkIo 

SllKAK.^i. INH I MATIC 

TaJ«!o JUir.l'.n. A Tool Co.. Tolcds. Ohio. 
SIIKAKit. Sgl'AKINi; 
Urm. Koat A Co.. Htmllloo. Cu«d> 

SHKhrr MtrTAi. working tools 

in.-i M«i-;i v.r .-. . lirr.!^. ,vvt. r..iiii. 
UlUi. K. \V.. Co.. DrooU^m. NT 
Brasn. Uocai A Co., UubUIoo. Cuitdi 

'V^-l Sum .\ \\ il.Mi. S.MithlllJtOti. l\»iiii. 

S:e»I llrninx Hr«>» Workf. I,t.l . Ch«Ul«in. OnL 
SHKET MKTAI. STAMPINGS 

Dc«lnlao Vctf * 8U< Co . Willifrrtlle. OnL 
SHELL HANDING MACHINES. 

arnRAULic 

1; "" Mj.li.v C... .M.>ii(r\»l. g,jc 

Oirloot Wilktr Uuibj. Oa. bid.. Toroolo. OoL 
Th» Jmckra Uach. Co. Ltd.. Sherbrook*. Our 
Mtu:wcK>l ilfj. c<x, Dttjolt. Mich. 
Ptmn LiJ.. W. R.. T>i>n>Bto. Ont 
Wot Tirr ,'<rllrr Co., Ro^ctUr. M T 
SHELL dTTERS 

Ul«-*ill Wirr Marti) C.i., Moiiln i! Que 

SBKLL PAINTING MACniNES 
te. Blonr A Poi»» Ca. Kltehratr. Ont 
Bbtldim. Ltd.. OalU OdL 

SHELL RIVETERS 

Or«oi Mff A M.e*ilBe Co.. Bridgfport. Com 
Hlih SrrM Hammer Co.. RoclieiUr. N T. 
SHELL TOOLS 

HU«k;lI Win- M.v-'i\ c... M.>ntrval Qiip 

Mif>h & Ufnthfrn. Ltd.. ll,llo>-ill5. Ont. 
SHRAPNEL SHELL MARKER 

Brown. Bom A C^a. Hunllton. Ctntdi 

N«t>l« A Wntbrosk Mf». Co.. Hirtfotd. Oonn 
SIDE TOOLS 

AnHtmv Bro«. Tool Co.. ChlMio. 

B«it*r * Co.. Ltd . J. R.. MontirkJ. Qu«. 

0»B. B. K. Morton. Toronto. Montrv&l 
SIGNS. ENAMEL 

Strooj. K«in»rd A Nutt Co.. Cleielkod. Ohio 
SILENT CHAINS 

J"-— .<. <;:.i^. .. Montreal. 
SILVER SOLDER 

0«o. H. L««« A Co.. Htmflton, Ont. 
SKATE SHARPENERS 

C«o. BcB.i Umjer 4 Cjill. Co.. Aljjtandrit. Ont 
SLEDGES 

Aikenhead Hiniware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

WMtruB A BtrnM Mfg. Co.. St Catharines. Ont 

\\isi:.-n .t K imriv^. Uimilton, Ont 
BLOTTERS 

Garrin Machine Co.. New Tort 

National-Acme Co.. Clerelaod. Ohio. 

.NileaBemenl -Pond Ca. New Tork 

Rhodea Mf£. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
SMOKESTACKS 

fta Jencko Mach. Co.. Ltd.. Sherbrooke. Que. 

MacKinnoB. Holmea Co.. Sherbrooke. Que 

M.-^h i- ll.nUmm. LW.. BcUerille. Ont 
30CKET8 

BrerwD A fiharpe Mfg. Co.. ProTidence. 

Clark E:quicrment Co.. Buchanan, Mich. 

CleTtland Twrst Drill Co.. Cleieland. 

Kentone Ufg. Co.. Buffalo. N.T. 

Modem Tool Co.. Brie. Pa. 

MorM Twi^t Drill A Mch Co., New Bedford. Mass 

J. H. WUHams & Co.. Brookl.™. N.T. 
SOCKET HEAD CAP SCREWS 

Allen Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
SOLDERING IRONS 

Aikenhead Hardirare Co., Toronto. Ont 

Prrat-OLite Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Ont. 

Brown. Bogga & Co.. Hamilton. Canada 
SOLDERS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Tallman Brass i Metal Co.. Hamilton. 
SPECIAL MACHrNERY 

Balrd Machine Co.. Bridgeport Conn. 

Banfleld. W. H.. & Sons, Toronto. 

Bertram. John. & Sons Co.. Dundas. 

BUn. E. W. Co., Brxxjkljn. N.Y. 

Brown. Hoggs A. Co., Hamilton, Canada 

Krn-.vn Engineering Corp., Toronto. Ont 

Can. Fairbanks^orse Co.. Montreal. 

Oharlea F. Elmes Eng. Works. Chicago. 

Ferrarate Mach. Co., Bridgeton, N.J. 

Oarlock-Walker JIachy. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 

Garrin Machine Co.. New Tork. 

Ooolej 4 Edlund. Inc. . Courtland. N T 

Qnnt Mfg. & Machy. Co.. Bridgeport Conn. 

Graj Mfg. & Mach. Co.. Toronto. Ont 

John H. Hall & Sons. Btantfotd. 

Himoff Mach. Co.. Inc.. Astoria. L.I.. New York 

Illinois Tool Works. Chicago. 111. 

A. B. Jardine 4 Co.. Hespeler. Ont 

Hie Jcnckea Mach. Co.. Ltd.. Sherbrooke. Que 

MoClean & Son. F. W.. Niagara Falls. Ont 

National Acme Co.. Clereland. Ohio. 

p. McKenzie llachinerj Co.. Gnelph. Ont 

MuUiner & Enlund Tool Co., Snacuse N T 

Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc.. Toronto. Ont 

Rhodes Mfg. Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

Rirerside Machinery Depot, Detroit Mich. 



aion<«r A UartJri, Inc., Woirwler. Max. 
tuuart Tunier Machine Co.. llainltl.m t»Dt 
T C, M Mff Co . llamaon. N.J. 
Victoria I-oundry Co.. Ottawa. Out 

.W."'.;'."" ' ^'■"■" * -M».-lllMr «■,... WVllail.l. 1)1,1 

VMUIam It Parrln. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Wlnnlp.* Oear A Kngr. Co. \Vlnnl|.<«. Man 
SPEED KKDICING (;EAKS 

J.'u,. ,\ i;i,.,-,. M..„,i,.,i 
■iPUINCS. MACHINERY 

.»» \V»Har» Co.. Ilrlilol. Cimn 

v^n Hl<»l Koun.1rl*i. Lul.. Montreal, Que. 

I leielan.l Win. Spring Co. Clcieland. 

lu> .SiMl,. i.t.i . (i„«i,,h. Ont 
SPRING COILING AND WINDING 
MACHINERY 

Balnl Machine Co. Ilriilfeport Conn 

Oarrm .\Urhliie 4\... New York 

.Slrfi.<T A llartlfT. Inc . Wonx-sler. Maa. 
SPRING MAKING MACHINERY 
(AUTO.MATICi 

IlalM .Machine Co.. Brldgrnort. Conn. 

Mlfn«T .^ lUrtli-T. Inc. WoremUr. MaJa. 
SPIRAL CONVEYORS 

Can. MalLbewi Orarltj Carrier Co.. Toronto, Ont. 
SPROCKETS. CHAIN 

Grant Gear Works. Doiton. Mass. 

Joii,, ,V lil.is-,-,,. .M,,ntr,.Al. 

Mora* Chain Co.. Ithaca, N.Y. 
PhUadelphla Gear Worka. Philadelphia. Pa. 
SOLDER 

Jobborn. Geo. A., Hamilton, Ont 

J,.ii. . iV ill.iv^M. Mniitnjil 
SPROCKET WHEELS. CAST 

Pemn. Wtn. R.. Toronto. 
STAIRS. IKON 

Canada Wire A Iron Qooda Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
STAMPINGS 
DUlon .Mfg. Co. Oshawa, Ont 
Oom. Forge A Stamping Co.. WalkerriUe. Ont 
Homer A WlI.<on. Hamilton. Ont 
STAMPING MACHINERY 
BliM Co.. E. W.. Urooklm. N V 
Brown. Boggi A Co.. Hamilton, Canada 
Canada Machlnerr Corp.. Gait, Ont 
Ferracute .Mach. Co., Bridgton. N.J. 
Noble A Westbrook .Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
STAMPS. STEEL ALPHABET. FIGURES 
Matthews. Jas. H. A Co.. Hartford, Coiu. 
Noble A Westbrook Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
Pritchard-Andrews Co.. Ottawa. Can. 
STAPLE MACHINES 

Sleeper A Hartley. Inc. Worcester. Mas.... 
STEAM SEPARATORS AND TRAPS 
Can. Fairbanks-.Morse Co., Montreal. 
Can. Morehead Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont 
Peine. Ltd.. 11. W,. Toronto, Ont. 
Sheldons. Ltd.. Gait. Ont 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co.. Hamilton. 
Sturteiant Co.. B. F.. Gait, Ont 
STEEL ALLOY (SEE ALLOY STEEL! 
STEEL BENDING BRAKES 

Steel Rending Brake Works. Ltd.. Chatham. Ont. 
STEEL FOR AXES, PLOWS. SAWS. 
DRILLS. ETC. 

Colonial Steel Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
STEEL. CARBON. FERRO-TUNGSTEN 
Can. B. K. Morton. Toronto. Montreal. 
Colonial Steel Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Latrobe Electric Steel Co.. Latrobe. Pa. 
Osborn (Canada). Ltd., Sam'l. Montreal, Que. 
Vana.litim-Alloys Steel Co., Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Vulcnn Crucible Steel Co.. Aliquippa. Pa. 
Zenith Coal A Steel Products. Montreal, Que. 
STEEL. COLD ROLLED 
Can. Drawn Steel Co.. Hamilton. Ont 
Union Drawn Steel Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 
STEEL DRUMS 

Smart-Turner Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 
STEEL PRESSURE BLOWERS 
Can. Blower A Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 
Can. Fairbflnks-Morse Co., Montreal. 
Sheldons. Ltd., Gait Ont 
Sturterant Co., B, F.. Gait, Ont 
STEEL, HIGH SPEED 
Armstrong Whitworth of Canada, Ltd,, Montreal 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 
Can. B. K. Morion. Toronto, Montreal. 
Century Steel Co. of America. New York 
(3olonial Steel Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
H. A. Dniry Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 
Bade A CJlohe Steel Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Fairley Daridson Steel Co,. New York, N.Y. 
Hawkridge Bros. Co., Boston, Mass. 
Latrobe Electric Steel Co.. Latrolje. Pa. 
.Marshall & Co.. Geo. A.. Toronto. Ont. 
Osbom (Canada), Ltd., Sam'l, Montreal, Que. 
I'etrie, Ltd . H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 
Standanl Alloys Company. Pitt.sburph. Pa. 
Vanadium-Alloys Steel Co., Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Vulcan Crucible Steel Co.. Aliquippa. Pa.; repre- 
sented in Canada by Norton, Callard A Co.. 
Montreal. Que. 
Zenith Coal A Steel Products. Montreal. Que. 
STEELS. HIGH STRENGTH, HOT-WORK- 
ING. DIE. MAGNET 

Fairley David-son Steel Co., New York, N.Y 
STEEL, VANADIUM 
Dnny, H. A., Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Standard Alloys Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Vanadium-Alloys Steel Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Vulcan Crucible Steel Co.. Aliquippa. Pa. 
STELLITE, HIGH-SPEED TOOL METAL 

Deloro Smelting A Refining Co., Toronto, Ont. 
STOCK RACKS FOR BARS, 
PIPING, ETC. 

New Britain Machine Co., Nerw Britain, Conn. 
STOCKS. PIPE 
Butterfield A Co.. Rock Island. Que. 
W. lis Bros. Co. of Canarla, GaU, Ont. 
STOOLS. STEEL. SHOP 
New Britain .Machine Co., New Britain. Conn. 



STRAIGHTENING MACHINERY 

llalr\l .MacJuiiery Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
llertrainn, Ltd.. EMIiibiirgh, Hcoilaud. 
SWITCHES. RAILWAY 

Cjui. HIrrI l-'.iundrles. LM,. Moutreal. 
TACK (DOUBLE POINTI MACHINES 
Sleeper A Hartley. Inc.. Worctwler, MaM. 
TANKS. GASOLINE AND OIL 

llow.ser A Co.. Inc.. .S. K.. Tun.nlo. Ont. 
Dominion Forge A .Stamping Co.. Walkerrllle. 
The JruckM Madi. Co.. LUl.. Sherbrooke. Que. 
.MacKlnnun, llnlinea A Co.. Sherliriioke. Qua. 
.St l.Hwrrnce Welding Co.. Montreal. Que. 
TANKS. STEEL. WATER PRESSURE 
ll.n\..-r * Co.. Inr . 8 K,. ToMiiito. Ont 
Can Welding Worka. Montreal, Qua. 
Jenckei Machlna Co.. Shcrbrouka. (Jut. 
MacKlnnun. Uolmea Co.. Sherbrooka. 
S! l.iiin.iice WeUlIng Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Toronto Iron Works. Ltd.. Toronto. 
TANK WAGONS 
Jenckes Mach, Co.. Sherbrooke. Que. 
MacKinnon. Holmes Co.. Sherbrooke. 
St l.anrence Welillng Co., Montreal, Qa«. 
Toronto Iron Works. Ltd., Toronto. 
TAPES. MEASURING 

Jamra <'bestimiiin & Co.. l.lil,, .SheffleM. Eng. 
TAPPING MACHINES (PENUMATIC) 

tTlcTelnn.l I'miiniiilic Tool Co, of Can.. Toronto. 
TAPPING MACHINES AND 
ATTACHMENTS 
Bertram, John. A Sons Co.. Dundaa. 
Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 
Garrin Machine Co.. New York. 
The Geometric Tool Co.. New HlTea. 
J. II. Hall A Sons. Brantford, Ont 
A, B. Jartlino A Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Landis .Machine Co.. Wayneslwro. Pa. 
Manufacturers Equipment Co.. Chicago. III. 
Modem Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 
Miirchey Machine A Tool Co., Detroit 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York 
I'ltrie, Ltd,. 11. W.. Toronto. Ont. 
IMrle of .Montreal. Ltd.. II. W,, Montreal. Que. 
RIckcrt-Shater Co., Erie, Pa. 
L. .S. Starrett Co.. Athol. Mass. 
Whitney Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
TAPS, ADJUSTABLE 
Baiter Co.. Ltd.. J. B., Montreal, Que. 
Butterli.-ld .t l-<i.. R,jck Islnii.l. Que. 
Geometric Tool Co.. New Haren. 
.Manufacturers Equipment Co.. Chicago. HI. 
Murchey Machine A Tool Co.. Detroit 
National-Acme Co.. Clereland. Ohio. 
Osbom (Canada). Ltd.. Sam'l. (Montreal, Que. 
TAPS, COLLAPSIBLE 
Butt. rti. 1.1 .^ Co., Knek Island. Que 
Geometric Tool Co., New Haven. 
.Manufacturers Equipment Co., Cblcaco, Dl. 
Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa. 
.Murchey .Machine A Tool Co.. Detroit 
Osbom (Canada). Ltd.. Sam'l, Montreal, Qua. 
Victor Tool Co.. Waynesboro. Pa. 
TAPS. DIES AND WRENCHES 
ButterfleM & Co.. Rock Island. Que. 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 
Till 11,.,.. p. F(»w .\lcliy. & Supply Co., Moutl-cal. 
Geometric Tool Co., New Haven. 
A. B. Jar^line & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Landis Machine Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Morse Twist Drill A .\Ich. Co.. New Bedford. Maaa 
Murchey Machine A Tool Co.. Detroit 
Osbom (Canada), Ltd., Sam'l, Montreal. Qn. 
I'.lric. Llfl.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont. 
Pratt A Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
L. 9. Starrett Co.. Athol. .Mass. 
Wells Bros. Co. of Canada. Oalt. Onl. 
TAP EXTENSIONS 

Allen Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
TESTING INSTRUMENTS 
METALLURGICAL 
Hob, Ilemi,in .\ , 1 .Madison .\ve.. New York, 
Shore Instmment & Mfg. Co.. New York City 
THERMOMETERS. ALL KINDS 
Taylor Instmment Co.. Rocheafer, N.T. 
Bellevue Industrial Furnace Co., Detroit, Uteb 
TESTING LABORATORIES 
Can. Inspection A Testing Lab.. Montreal. Que 
Toronto Testing Laboratory. Toronto. 
THREAD-CUTTING MACHINES 
Can. Faii'banks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Curtis & Curtis Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Garlock-Walker Machy. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. OnL 
Geometric Tool Co.. New Haven. 
Landis Machine Co., Waynesboro, Pa, 
National-Acme Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 
National Machv. Co., Tiffin. t"i|iio. 
Petrie, Llfl,, H, W., Toronto. Ont 
Pratt A Whitney Co.. Dundaa. Ont 
Wells Eros. Co. of Canada. GaU. Ont. 
THREADING TOOLS 
Landla Machine Co.. Waynesboro. Pa. 
Pratt, A Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
Rivett Lathe & Grinder Co.. Brighton, klaaa. 
THREAD MILLING MACHINES 
Cr.iy .Mfg. & Mach. Co.. Toronto, Ont 
Taft-I'eircf Co.. X™ York, N.Y. 
TINSMITHS' TOOLS 
Brown, Boggs A Co.. Hamilton, Can. 
Peck, Stow .t Wilcox. Soiithington. Conn. 
TIRE SETTING MACHINES. HYDRAULIC 
William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 
West Tire Setter Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 
TOOL CASES 

Embree. Ira. Ml Emerald St. N.. Hamilton, Ont 
Union Tool Chest Works. Rochester. N.T. 
TOOL HOLDERS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 
Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 
Can. B. K. Morton, Toronto, Montreal, 
Deloro Smelting A Refining Co., Toronto, Ont 
Modem Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 
Pratt A Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
Williams A Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N,Y. 



December 6, 1917. 



C A N A D I A N .M A C II I N E R Y 



161 



MAKE NAILS! NOT NOISE! 

We offer the trade new types of 

WIRE NAIL MACHINES 

QUIET IN OPERATION: WITH VERY HIGH OUTPUT; ALL PARTS ACCES- 
SIBLE: DECREASED MAINTENANCE COSTS: GREAT CAPACITY: OCCUPYING 
SMALL FLOOR SPACE. 

Smoothly running machines, with balanced mechanical motions and no rotating 
cams. Built in 5 sizes, handling wire f«*«m No. 17 to %" diam. 

PRACTICALLY NOISELESS IN OPERATION 

Sleeper & Hartley, Inc., Worcester, Mass. 

CANADIAN BRANCH, COATICOOK, P.Q. 

London, England. F. A. Perry. 63 Queen Victoria Street. E.C. 4. Paris, France, Edgar Bloxham, 12 Rue du Delta. 




TOOL POSTS, LATHE 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 
TOOL ROOM PARTITIONS 

Canada Wire & lion Goods Co.. Hamiltoo. 
TOOL STEEL 

Atkins & Co., Vim., Sheffield. Eng. 

ArmslToag. Whitworth. Ltd. of Canada, Montreal. 

Caa. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal, 

Can. B. K. Morton. Toronto. Montreal. 

Colonial Steel Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ueloro Smelting & Refining Co., Toronto, Ont 

H. A. Drury Co., Montreal. 

Eagle & Globe S;eel Co.. Montreal. Que. 

Hawkridge Bros. Co., Boston, Alass. 

Latrbbe Electric Steel Co., Latrobe, Pa. 

.Marshall & I'o., (;..(j. A. Toion'... Oir 

Oribom (Canadal, Ltd., Sam'l, Montreal, Que. 

H. W. Petrie, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Sleeper & Hartley, Inc.. Worcester. Mass. 

Swedish Steel & Importing Co., Montreal, Que. 

Vanadium-Alloya Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vulcan Crucible Steel Co., Aliquippa. Pa. 
TOOLS. ELECTRIC 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago, 111. 

Ston .Mfg. Co., Binghamton. N.T. 

A. R, Williams .Machinery Co., Toronto. 

United States Elec. Tool Co., Cincinnati, O. 
TOOLS. PNEUMATIC 

C,iE. Ingtrsall-It;iiid Co.. .Montreal. Que. 

Cleveland Pueumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto. 

Curtis Pneumatic .Machinery Co., St. Louis. Mo. 

Garlock-Walker .Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

Independent Pneiunatic Tool Co.. Chicago. 111. 
TOOLS, LATHE, PLANER. SLOTTER 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 
T001.S, SCREW MACHINE 

Foster .Machine Tool Co,. Elkhart, Ind. 
TORCHES. STEEL 

Armstrong. Whitworth of Canada. Ltd . Montreal. 

Prest-O-Lite Co.. Inc., Toronto, Ont. 

TRACK SYSTEMS 

Dillon Mfg. Co.. Oshawa, Ont 

Northern Crane Works, Walkerville. 

Whiting Foundry Equipment Co.. Harvey, 111. 
TRANSMISSION MACHINERY 

American I'ulley Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto. 

Can. Bond Hanger & Cplg. Co. . Alexandria, Ont. 

Can. Fairbanks-.Morse Co., Montreal. 

Can, Drawn Steel Co., Hamilton. Ont 

Hamilton Gear & Machine Co., Toronto. 

Amei & c;i;issf,j, Montreal 

.Morse Chain Co., Ithaca, N.Y. 

ivtiii-, I.t.l , H. \V.. Toronto, Ont 

The Smart-Turner .Machine Co., Hamilton. 
TRANSMISSION ROPE 

.lonrs & Glawro. MnulTial. Qiu . 
TRANSMISSION TOWERS 

Curtis Pneumatic Machinery Co.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Northern Crane Works. Walkerville. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton. 
TROLLEYS 

Wright Mfg. Co., Lisbon. Ohio. 
TRUCKS. FACTORY. FREIGHT. ETC. 

Canada Machinery Coip., Gait. Ont. 

Chapman Double Ball Bearing Co.. Toronto. 

Whiting Fonnlrv Equipm.nt Co.. Harvey, 111. 
TRUCKS. LUMBER AND KILN 

Sheldons, Ltd., Gait, Ont. 

Northern Crane Works, Walkerville. 

TUSrNG, SEAMLESS. BRASS & COPPER 

Standard Tube & Fence Co., Woodstock. Ont 
TUBING COILERS, FLEXIBLE METAL 

Sleeper & Hartley. Inc.. Worcester. Mass, 
TUMBLING BARRELS 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Northern Crane Works. Walkerville. 

Whitinc Foundn' Equipment Co.. Harvey. 111. 
TUNGSTEN FILAMENT COILING 
MACHINERY 

Sleeper & Hartley. Inc.. Worcester. Mass. 
TURNBUCKLES 

Canadian Billings & Spencer. Ltd.. Welland, 
TURNTABLES 

Whitinc Foundry Equipment Co.. Harvey. 111. 
TURRET MACHINES 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto. Ont. 



New Britain Machine Co., New Britain, Conn. 

I'etrie, Llil.. H. U'.. Toionto, Ont. 

Pratt & Whitney. Hartford, Conn. 

Riverside Mactunery Depot, Detroit, .Mich. 

Warner & Swasey. Cleveland. O. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 
TURBINE WATER WHEELS 

Jeuckes Mach. Co., Sherbrooke. Que. 

Wm. Kennedy & Sons. LtiL. Uwen Souud. Ont. 
UPSETTING AND BENDING 
MACHINERY 

rohn Bertram & Sons Co.. Dundas 

Brown, Boggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Canada. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler, Ont 

National .Machy. Co., Tiffin, O. 

Canada .Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Niles-Bement-i'ond Co.. New York. 

Jenckes Mach. Co.. Sherbrooke, Que. 

I'ctnt, l.iil., H. W.. Toionlo, Ont. 

retrii' of Mr.utieal. Ltd.. H. W.. .Mnutn.al. Qiu-. 

A. R. Williams .Machy. Co., Toronto. 

VACUUM PUMPS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton, Ont 
VALVE LEATHERS 

Can. B- K. .Morton. Toronto. Montreal. 

Graton & Knight Mfg. Co., -Montreal. 
VALVE GRINDERS (PNEUMATIC) 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Cauada. Toronto 
VALVES. FOOT 

Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton, Ont 
VALVES. HYDRAULIC 

Charles F. Elmes Eng. Works, Chicago, 111, 

Metalwood Mfg, Co., Detroit. Mich. 
VALVES. BACK PRESSURE, STEAM 

Sheldons, Limited, Gait. Ont. 
VENTILATING APPARATUS 

Brantford Oven & Rack Co., Brantford, Ont. 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Sheldons, Limite<l. Gait. Ont. 

I'etrie. Ltd.. H. W.. Toronto. Ont 

Sturtevant Co., B. F., Gait. Ont 

A. R. Williams .Machy. Co., Toronto. ' 
VISES. AIR OPERATED 

Hannifin .Mfg Co.. Chicago. lU, 
VISE STANDS, PORTABLE 

New Britain Machine Co., New Britain, Conn. 
VISES, BENCH 

.\ikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Becker .Milling Machine Co., Boston, Mass. 

Cleveland -Milling .Machine Co. 

The Geo. F. F»« Mcby. & Supply Co.. 'Montreal. 

New Britain Machine Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Petrie, Ltd . H. W. . Toiontt). Ont. 

Petrie of .Montreal. Ltd., H. W.. .Montreal. Out. 
VISES. PIPE 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont. 

Butterfield & Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Wells Bros. Co. of Can.ida. Gait, Ont 

.T. H. Williams Sc Co.. Brooklyn. N.T, 
VISES, PLANER AND SHAPER 

.\ikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

Skinner Chuck Co.. New Britain. Conn. 
WASHER MACHINES 

N'alional Machv. Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 
WASHERS 

Barnes. Wallace. Co.. Bristol. Conn. 

Dillon Mfg. Co.. Oshawa. Ont 

Graton A- Knight Mfg. Co.. Worcester, Mass. 

London Bolt & Hinge Works. London, Ont. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton. Ont. 

W;1!-in«oTi K: Knmna^s. Hamiltnn. Ont. 
WATER PURIFYING AND SOFTENING 
APPARATUS 

Wra. B. Scaife & Sons Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
WATER CINDER MILLS 

Whiting Foundrv Equipment Co.. Harvey. 111. 
WATER JACKETS 

Can. Weldin-r Works. Montreal. Que. 
WATER TOWERS 

The .Tenckes .Mach. Co.. Ltd.. .Sherbrooke, Que. 

Toronto Iron Works, Ltd., Toronto. 
WATER WHEELS 

The .Tenckes Mach. Co., Ltd.. Sherbrooke. Que. 

Wm. Kpnnedy & Sons. Ltd.. Owen Sound. Ont. 

Sleeper & Hartley. Inc. Worcester. Mass. 
WELDING, ELECTRIC. SPOT. BUTT. ETC. 

=lr T awrpnce Welding Co,, Montreal. Que. 
WELDING MASKS 

Strong, Kennaid & Nutt Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 



WELDERS. ELECTRIC, SPOT. 
BUTT. ETC, 

National Electric Welder Co., Warren, O. 

Tabor Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thomson Electric Weldine Co., Lynn, Mast. 

W infield Electric Welding Mach. Co.. Warren, 
Ohio. 
WELDING. WORK AND SUPPLIES 
{Autogenous and Oxy- Acetylene) see OXY- 
ACETYLENE 
WINCHES 

John H. Hall & Sons. Brantford. 

Kennedy & Son. Wm.. Owen Sound, Ont 

.Maish & Hiuthoni, Ltd.. Belleville, Ont 

Northern Crane Works. Walkerville. 
WIRE COILING AND POINTING 
MACHINERY 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport. Conn. 

F. B. Shuster Co., New Haven, Conn. 

Sleeper & Hartley. Inc.. Worcester, .Mass. 
WIRE CLOTH AND PERFORATED 
METALS 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Co., Hamilton. 
WIRE FORMING AND 
STAMPING MACHINERY 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Brown. Boggs Co.. Ltd., Hamilton. Canada. 

Mi^lean & Son. F. W.. Niagara Falls, Ont 

F. B. Shuster Co., New Haven, Conn. 
WIRE NAILS 

Parmenter & Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont 
WIRE NAIL MACHINERY 

National Machy. Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 

Sleeiier & Hartley. Inc.. Worcester. Mass. 

A. R. Williams Machv. Co.. Toronto. 
WIRE STEEL. BRASS. COPPER. BRONZE 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., HamUton, Ont 
WIRE RAILS 

.Sleeper & Hartley. Inc.. Worcester, Mass. 
WOOD BORING MACHINES 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto. Ont. 

Pi.frie. Ltd.. If. W.. Toionlo Ont. 

Pftrie of .Montreal. Ltd.. H. W. . Montreal. Qu.-. 
WIRE STRAIGHTENERS AND CUTTERS 

Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Brown. Boggs Co., Ltd.. Hamilton. Canada. 

F. B. Shuster Co., New Haven. Conn. 

Sleeper & Hartley, Inc., W'orcester, Mass. 
WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Can. Incersoll-Rand Co.. Sherbrooke. Que. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co. Toronto. Ont. 

New Britain Machine Co., New Britain, Conn. 

H. W. Petrie. Toronto. 

Petrie. Ltd , H. W., Toronto. Ort. 

P.trie of .M.iotreal. Ltd.. H. W., Moutieal. Que. 

Silver Mfe. Co.. Salem, Ohio. 

A H Willinms Machy. Co., Toronto. 
WOOD LATHES 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Oliver Machv. Co.. Grand Rapids. Mich. 
WORKS STANDS, POHTABLE 

New Brit.Tin Mach. Co.. New Britain, Conn. 
WRENCHES 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 111. 

Butterfield & Co.. Rock Island. Que. 

Canadian Billings & Spencer. Ltd., Welland. 

Keystone Mfg. Co.. Buffalo. N.Y. 

Wells Bros, of Canada. Gait, Ont. 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co.. St Catharines. Ont 
WRENCHES, AUTOMOBILE NARROW 
JAW AND MONKEY 

Bemis & Call Hdwe. & Tool Co.. Springfield. Mass. 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co . St Catharines. Ont 
WRENCHES. PIPE. MONKEY. TAP 

Aikenhead Haplware Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

Bemis & Call Hdwe. & Tool Co.. Springfield. .Mass. 

Peck. Stow & WiIro\ Co , Sonthiiigton. Conn. 

Wells Bras, of Canada. Gait. Ont 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co.. St Catharines. Ont 
WRENCHES. RATCHET AND BASIN 

Bemis & Call Hdwe. & Tool Co.. Springfield, Mass, 

Keystone .Mfg. Co.. Buffalo, N.T. 

Whitman & Barnes .Mfg. Co., St Catharines, Ont 
WRENCHES. SOCKET 

Allen Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 



16li 



C A N A 1> 1 A \ M A (,■ 11 1 .\ i; K V 



Volume XVIII. 




No. i^Oi. I'l.iii) i'rccision HcikIi L.illic 



The extreme of tool-room accuracy 

RIVETT LATHE & GRINDER CO. 

Brighton District of Boston Massachusetts 




Qre^jron^sti 

We are in an excellent position to give quick delivery on high grade 
castings up to 10,000 lbs. in weight. Send your Blue Prints for quotations. 

Our up-to-date Pattern Shop can handle your Pattern Work expeditiously and well. 

Welland Machine (^ Foundries, Ltd., Welland, Ontario 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS— Continued from page 164 



Racine Tool & ^fachine Co lOO 

Reed-Prentice Co i9 

Rhodes Mfe. Co. 151 

Rickert-Shafer Co IM 

Ridoiit & Maybee 77 

Riterside ilachy. Depot 90. Si 

Rirctt Lathe & Grinder Co 152 

Roelofson Machine & Tool Oo 3 

Roper & Co.. C. F. ItS 



S 



Sebastian Lathe Co 143 

Stouster Co.. F. R m 

Sidney Tool Co. 20 

Silver ilfg. Co 157 

Skinner Chuck Co IC 

Sleeper & Hartley. Inc. IM 

Standard AUojs Co 13 



Staiiilan'. Macby. & Supplies, Ltd. 153 

SuiidarJ Pressed Steel Co IdS 

Standard Tube & Pence Co 87 

Starrett Co.. L. S 102 

Steel Co. of Canada 3 

Steptoc. Jcftin. Co. M6 

Sterling Engine Works 130 

Stocker-Rumley-Wachs Co. S2 

St. Lawrence Welding Co 95 

Stow ilfg. Co 131 

Streeter. H. E 146 

Strong. Kennard & Xutt Co., The.. 1« 
Swedish Crucible Steel Co. of Can. 143 
Swedish Steel &. Imr>orting Co 6 



Tabor Mfg. Co 129 

Taft-Pierce Mfg. Co ....116 

Toronto Iron Works 142 

Toronto Testing Laboratory, Ltd 145 



Toropto Tool Co W 



United Hammer Co 114 

United States Electrical Co 32 

United States .Mach. Tool KO 



Vanadium-.\lloyB Steel 17 

Victor .Saw Works 134 

Vnlcau Crucible Steel Co. 15 

W 

Walton Co.. The C9 

Warner & Swasey 112 

Welland Machine & Foundries. Ltd. 162 

Welland Motor & Machine Co SI 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada 22 



Wheel Tnicins Tool Co 12 

Whitcomb-Blaisdell Mach. Tool Co.. M 
Whiting Foimdry -Equipment Co.. 90 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co f7 

Whitney -Mfg. Co ISl 

Wilkinson & Kompass 143 

Williams, A. R.. Machinery Co. 7. 69, 79 

Williams & Co., J. H P9 

Willson & Co., T. A 146 

Wilmai-th & Morman Co 133 

Windsor Mach. & Tool Works 89 

Winfield Electric Welding .Mach. Co. SO 

Wing & Son. J. E 130 

Winnipeg Gear & Engineering Co. 85 

Wisconsin Electric Co. 12fi 

Wright Mfg. Co 100 



Zenith Coal & Steel Products Co... 145 



tii 



163 



jt>*as)s«i3ai5S«w«i>sai)«a[>saBss(sasaia«ia«t«ai««s«i>^ 



i 



i THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, Pres. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-pres. H. V. TYRRELL, Gen. Man. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 

AND MANUFACTURING NEWS 

A weekly neivspaper devoted to the viacliincry and iiianufacturing interests. 



Vol. XVIII. TORONTO, DECEMBER 6, 1917 No. 23 

EDITORIAL CONTENTS 



Publishers of Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post. MacLean's MaRazine. Farmer's Magazine. 

Canadian Grocer, Dry Goods Review. Men*s Wear Review. Printer and Publisher. Bookseller and 

Stationer. Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News. The Power House. The Sanitary Engineer, 
Canadian Foundryman, Marine Engineering of Canada. 

Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto ; Atabek. London. Eng. 

PUBLISHED 1887. 



@^ADiAN Machinery 

"" Manufactur ng News 

PETER BAIN, M.E., Editor. B. G. NEWTON. Manager. 

Associate Editors: A. G. WEBSTER. J. M. WILSON. J. H. RODGERS, 

A. V. BURR. ^ j 

Eastern Representative : E. M. Pattison ; Ontario Representative : S. S. 

Moore ; Toronto and Hamilton Representative : M. H. Woods. f^- "^ ■ 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

CANADA — Montreal, Southam Building. 128 Bleury Street, Telephone 1004 ; Toronto, 143-163 University Ave., Tele- 
phone Main 7324 ; Winnipeg, 1207 Union Trust Building. Telephone Main 3449. 

GREAT BRITAIN— LONDON. The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.G., E. J. Dodd, 
Director. Telephone Central 12960. Cable address: Atabek, London, England. 

UNITED STATES— New York, R. R. Huestis. Room 620, HI Broadway, N.Y., Telephone Rector 8971; Boston, C. L. 
Morton, Room 733. Old South Building. Telephone Main 1204. A. H. Byrne, Room 900, Lytton Bldg., 14 
E. Jakson Street. Chicaijo, Phone Harrison 1147. 
^ SUBSCRIPTION PRICE — Canada, Great Britain, Scuth Africa and the West Indies, $3.00 a year; United atates, 

$3.50 a year: other countries, $4.00 a year; Single Copies. 15 cents. Invariably in advance. 



CANADA STOVE & FOUNDRY CO., PLANT AND PRODUCT 611-615 

GENERAL 615-616 

War Service Board for U.S. Foundry Industry Coal Famine Threatens Switzer- 
land. .. .Government Controls British Guiana Bauxite Tungsten Production in 

England. .. .Fire Losses During October. 

THE ECONOMICAL USE OF GRINDING WHEELS IN THE FOUNDRY 617-622 

GENERAL 622 

Little Known Facts About Grinding, . . .Precautions Necessary for the Maintenance of 
Crane Runways. . , .Canada's Trade Balance With United States. 

EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE 623-621 

I Does a Piston Stop at Reversal? ... .Magnesite Bricks Now Produced in Britain. 

GOVERNMENT INSPECTION OF AIRPLANES 624-626 

GENERAL 626-628 

Machining a Large Compressor Bed. . . .Miscellaneous Card Records. . . .Do the Big 
Things, Live the Big Life. 

SPOKES IN INDUSTRY'S WHEEL 629 

William James McShane. 

TENDENCY IN MACHINE TOOL DEVELOPMENT 629-630 

PROGRESS IN NEW EQUIPMENT 631-633 

New Design Tool Room Lathe. .. .Universal Wood-Boring Machine. .. .Ratchet Tap 
Wrench. 

GENERAL 633 

Prohibited Imports Into South Africa. .. .Machine Shop Responsible for Marine En- 
gineering Progress. .. .Screenings. {§ 

EDITORIAL 634 

Our Present and Future Duty. .. .Shipbuilding Activities Inadequate to the Emerg- 
ency. 

INDUSTRIAL NOTABILITIES 635 

Captain Victor Garnet Curry 

I SELECTED MARKET QUOTATIONS 636-637 

I THE GENERAL MARKET CONDITION AND TENDENCY 637-642 

|j Summary Montreal Letter. .. .Toronto Letter Washington Letter New 

5 York Letter .... Pittsburgh Letter. 

i INDUSTRIAL AND CONSTRUCTION NEWS (Advtg. Section) 66 



164 



r.\ N A I> 1 A N M A (' II 1 \ !■; U Y 



Volume XVIII. 



Built To Cope With Modern Ways 



To inei't with tlio (Kinaiuls o[ tlio day suc- 
cessrully the Crank Sliapor must be a 
luacliino that can take caro of a variety of 
work with the least adjustment. 

THE 

HENDEY 

CRANK SHAPER 

ila.-' been carefully studied in every 
liclail of its design in order to furnish 
a shaper equal to all present-day needs. 

Write for complete description of thin 
profit-making machine. 

Hendey Machine Co. 

TORRINGTON, CONN. U.S.A. 

Canadian AsmU : A. K. Williams Machinery Co.. 
Toronto. Ont. ; A. K. Williams Machinro' Co.. 260 
rrincffts St.. Winniprr, Man.; A. K. Williams 
Machinery Co., VancouvLr; A. R. Williams Machin- 
ery Co.. St. John. N.B.: Williams & Wilson. Montreal. 



I'ro.Hs Itvii McehnniHin is oinTJilod iit riul of cr>Mi-* 

ritil in nil it.i ii<ljiiiliiH-ntrt. Diiil with iiulirni.u 

contritlh iiiiKtunt i>f frod. whii-h cim ho varutl 

whili* iniuliiiH- it ill inolinn. FwmI can br 

[ttjirtr<l. Btoppwl or 

r»'v»Tr*»'iI w h i I c In 

iiiotinn. 




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



A 

Ao&c Machine Tool C<x 5 

AUtn Mfg. Co. 115 

Annstrous Broe. Tool Co 143 

Annstroog, WhitvoFth of Canada... 12 

AUas Press Co. „ 77 

Atkins. \Vm., A Co.. l,td 4 

B 

Bainl Machine Co I£ 

Banfleld. E. J 20 

Banfield, W. H.. & Sons 8S 

Bania», Wallace. Co- 76 

Becker MilUns Mach. Co 122 

BelleTue Industrial t^imace Co. SB 

Bernard Industrial Co.. A llA 

Benam. Jotin, & Sons Co., Ltd 1 

Bertrams. Ltd 7* 

BUlon .Mach. Tool Co. UO 

Blackall, Fred S. U7 

Blake & Johnson 12S 

Blashill Wire Machinery Co. 144 

Blount, J. S 12» 

Bowser & Co., Inc., S. F 139 

BranUotd Oien & Back Co. 74 

Bridgefonl Mach. & Tool Works... 5 

Brist^ Company 1^ 

Brownell Mach;. Co. 78 

Brown. Boe^ Co 11 

Brown's Copper & Brass Boiling 

Mills sa 

Brown Engineering Corpv M 

Budden, Hanbuiy A 77 

Botterfleld & Co., Inc. 140 

C 

Canada 'Machinery Corporation 

Outside back corcr 

Canada Metal Co loa 

Can. B. K. Morton Co. IW 

Can. Blower & Forge Co 

Inside back cover 
Can. Bond Hanger & Coupling Co... lOd 

Can. Fairbanks-Moise Co 3S 

Can. Desmond-Stephan Mfg. Co.... 130 

Can. Ingeisoll-Rand Co 9 

Can. Hoskins, Ltd 98 

Can. Inspection & Testing Labora- 
tories, Ltd 142 

Can. Laoo-PhilijB Co., Ltd. 146 

Can. .Morehead Mfg. Co 69 

Can. S K F Co., Ltd 35 

Can. Welding Worts 98 

Carborundum Co. ..." 12? 

Carlyle, Johnson Mach. Co. 8 



Carter Welding Co 95 

Century Steel Co. of .\merica 18 

Chapman Double Ball Bearing Co. 

Front cover 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co. 145 

CiDcinna:! Iron & Steel Co 26 

Cincinnati .Milling Mach. Co. 119 

Cincinnati Pulley Machj*. Co 153 

Clark Equipment Co 155 

Classilled Advertising 76 

Cleveland .Muling .Mach. Co 121 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co 13a 

Clipper Belt Lacer Co 101 

Commercial Acetylene Welding Co. 92 

Consolidated Press Co. 109 

Cummings & Son, J. W 106 

Curtis & Curtis Co...; m 

Curtis Pneumatic Mach. Co 106 

Cushman Chuck Co 142 



Daris-Boumonville Co 144 

Davis Machine Tool Co., W. F 83 

Deloro Smelting & Refining Co 21 

De Jlooy Machine Co 167 



Diamond Saw & Stanvping Works.. 

Dillon Mfg. Co 

Diion, C. L 

Dominion Central Drawing Office. 
Dominion Forge & Stamping Co.. 
Dominion Steel Foundry Co 



133 
124 
144 
143 



Eagle & Globe Steel Co 16 

Eastern Mach. Screw Corp 90 

Ebn Cutting Oil Co 1:3 

Elmes Engr. Works, Charles F 108 

Erie Foundry Co 106 



FairleyDavidson Steel Co ZT 

Federal Engineering Co., Ltd. 77 

Ferracote Machine Co 142 

Fetherstonhaugh & Co 77 

Fitchburg Grinding & Mach. Co.... 136 

Ford-Smith -Mach. Co 10 

Foster Machine Co 107 

FoK Mach. & Supply Co., Geo. F. 

Inside back cover 
Fox Mach. Co. 118 



G 



Garxlner Machine Co 113 



Garlixrk Walker Madiy. Co.. 

GaiTin .Machine Co 

Geometric Tool Co 

Gilbert & Barker Mfg. Co. 
Gorton .Machine Co., Geo... 

Gram Gear Works, luc 

Grant Mfg. & .Machine Co.. 
Graton & Knight .\lfg. Co.. 

GreenfleUl Conduit C'o 

Greenfield iMachinc Co 



, 26 

, U5 

71 

. 97 

123 

H4 

1C8 

a 

. 81 

129 



U 



Hall &Sons, Ltd., John U 

Hamilton Gear ic Machine Co... 
Hamilton Machine Tool Works... 
Uammant Steel Car & Eog'r'g Wh 

Hanna & Co.. M. A 

Hannifin Mtg. Co 

HaiTlmge Bros 

Hawkridge Bros. 

HeniJey Machine Co. 

Hcniy & VVnght iMfg. Co 

Hepbuni, John T 

High Speed Hammer Co 

Hinckley IMach. Works 

Hclz, Herman A- 

Homer & Wilson 

Hoyt Metal Co 

Hull Iron & Steel Co 

Hurlbut'Kogers MachineO' Co 

Hyde Engineering Works 



. 125 
. 86 

, aj 

. 143 
12 
, 141 
, 112 
. 72 
, IM 

. m 

28 

106 

. 145 

, 144 

86 
, 146 



I 



Illinois Tool Works 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. 
Iron Works. The 



Jacobs Mfg. Co 

Jenckee Mach. Co 9, 

Johnson Machine Co., Carlyle 

Jones & Olassco 



Kempsmith Alfg. Co 

Kennedy, Wm., & Sons.. 

Kidston Co., A. G 

King, Ltd., Warden 



126 



L'.\ir Liquide Society.. 
Landis .Machine Co 



, 92 
145 



LcHlond Mnch. Tool Co 13 

M 

.MacKinnon Holmes Co...-. 77 

.Manufacturers Equipment Co. 139 

Mai-sh & Henthoin, Ltd 8S 

Matthews, Jas. H.. & Co 33 

MoCabc, J. J 81 

.McClean & Son M 

.VlCOoy-Brandt Machy. Co S"! 

.MoDougall Co., Ltd.. B 33 

.McKay Co.. Jas u 

.McLaren, J. C, Belting Co. 115 

.Mechanical Engineering Co 9d 

Metalwood Mfg. Co 28 

MUlcrs Falls Co 136 

.\lodem Tool Co 137 

Monarch Brass Mfg. Co U 

.Montreal General Tool Co, 136 

.Morton Mfg, Co 77 

Morse TwUt Drill &. Mach. Co... 149 

.Mulliner-Edlund Tool Co 114 

.Murchey Machine & Tool 0». 138 



Napier Saw Works, Inc 132 

-National Acme Co 115 

N'ew Britain Machine Co 25 

.Nicholson File 128 

Xiles-Bemcnt-Pond Inside front covet 

Normac Machine Co 74 

Northern Crane Works 106 

Norton, A. 144 

-Norton Co 28 

.Norton Grinding Co 39. 31 

Nova .Scotia Steel & Coal Oo. 14 

O 

Osbom (CJauadal, Ltd., Sam'l 27 

Oven Equiinnent & Mfg. C«. 9S 



Parmenter & BuUodh Co 142 

Peerless iMachine Co. 129 

Periin, Wm. R 109 

Petrie, H. W., Ltd 79 

Petrie of '.Montreal, Ltd., H. W.... 113 

Philadelphia Gear Works UM 

Plessissville Foundry Co Ill 

Port Hope File Mfg Co 32 

Positive Clutch & PuUey Works.... 145 

Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc. » 

Pratt & Letchworth Co 7 

Pratt & Whitney Inside troat cover 

Preston Machinery Co 66 

Latrobe Electric Steel Co 19' 

Pringle, R. E. T U5 

Pnro Sanitary Drink'g Fountain Co. 7fi 



Continued on page 162 



C A N A 1) I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



li^ 







= 


Jfflp^ 




i For Quick Heats 




c 


= A i^ddci rivet liii\uf iiiusl he dependable 

= — it -should stand u)i innlci- Imnl service 

S :ni(l jii\c (juick heats. 

= Ovn' No. i)'27> forge lias securely riveted. 

= heavy steel-plate lire pan mounted on well 

rsr lii'accd -'i" tiihe steel legs. Heavy round 

= luyere disli'ihufes heat to liest ailvaiitage. 

ss Hlowoi' — higli speed — hall hearing — 

= silent. 

= Catalog \,,. ISC-IC, tells all ahnul 

= ('aiiadiaii I'^orges — write for a copv. 

1 Canadian Blower & Forge Co. 

= LIIVIITED 

= KITCHENER, ONT. 


1 


— 


r 


1 


^ 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!; 



MACHINE TOOLS, WOODWORKING 
MACHINERY, SMALL TOOLS AND 

MILL SUPPLIES 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 



Get our STOCK LIST and send us your INQUIRIES, 



The Geo. F. Foss Machinery & Supply Co. 

Successors to The Foss & Hill Machinery Co. 
305 ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL 



(• A N A !• 1 A N M A f II I \ 1. U ^■ 





Special 
Turret Lathe 



For Boring and 
Profiling 6 -in, 
H, E. Shells 



Particulai' attcutinu lias been paid in tlic dcsipi of this 
niachiiie to ensure rapid production on siiell work. It 
eniliodios all the best prineiples, too, for the maintenance 
of accuraey. 

AVith its speed and accuracy it represents a combination 
that works foi- the best method of economy in ])i'odnction. 

We can offer a few of these machines fn|- pn iiii|it shi]imciit, 
subject to prioi- sale. 

Detailed specitications, photo^i^aphs and i)i-ices sent on 
request. 

CANADA MAGH IN ERY CO R PO RATI N 

. - .. . ■ , ;-.-.....,... ■^. ,i 

' LIMITED 

GALT ONTARIO CANADA 

Toronto Office and Showrooms at Brock Avenue Subway