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Full text of "Overseas"

•Jac Jyicmmm Jofixtajaropiuz 
OVERSEAS CLUB&PAn 

Vol VI N970 NOVEM 



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We sailed wherever ship' 

We -founded manu a mi 
Prau God our qreamess mai 

Tnrouafi craven -fears of beina areat*' 

O' CjJennifson. 





Kezlstered for Traasmlssloa to Canada and Newfouadlaad by Magazine Post, 



.OPYRIOHT 



D}uiM.anmwJ(nxtaaCi 
OVERSEAS am&PATi 

Vol VI N970 NOVEM 



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We sa\\cd wherever ship 

We -founded manu a rriW^li^^f^t^fe 
Prau God our area mess maLpnot^ftrf 

Ttirouo+i craven -fears of beina great " 

O* dj/enntfson. 




Registered for Transmission to Canada and Newfoundland by Magazine Peat. 



aPVRIOHT 



ASSETS EXCEED g ^^Ip^.^'sm CLAIMS PAID. 

£3,000.000. ?rv^^^^^ OVER «i 4.000,000. 

By Appointment, 



GENERAL 

ACCIDENT FIRE AND LIFE 
ASSURANCE CORPORATION, LTD. 

ESTABLISHED 1885. 



ALL CLASSES OF INSURANCE BUSINESS 
TRANSACTED. 

The Corporation has Representatives in every civilized 

part of the Globe, who are prepared to look after 

the interests of its f)oiicyholders 

CLAIMS LIBERALLY SETTLED. 



CHIEF OFFICES 

General Buildings, Perth, Scotland. 
General Buildings, Aidwych, London, 

W.C.2 



BRANCH OFFICES 

CANADA — Continental Life Buildings (corner Richmond and Bay 
Streets), Toronto. 

SOUTH AFRICA — General Buildings. Gr«enmarket Square, Cape 
Town ; Commercial Exchange Buildings, Main Street, 
Johannesburg. 

INDIA— 12-14, Church Gate Street, Bombay. 

AUSTRALASIA— 21. Queen Street, Melbourne, 

Also in United States, China, Egypt. Belgium. France, Holland, 
Argentine, Scandinavia and Mexico. 

Directorand General Manager— F. NORIE-MILLER, J.P. 



Advertiser's Announcement. 




Perfection ! 



Here is a delightful little girl, 
in whose clear-eyed healthfulness 
and shapely limbs can surely h^, 
found perfection. It is not sur- 
prising that this lovely little 
maiden — she is 2k years old — -has 
been brought up from birth on 
Glaxo, for Glaxo is, next to healthy 
mother's milk, the most nourishing 
of diets, and the only safe alter- 
native. 
Glaxo is pure milk and nothing 



else — -it is not a patent food. It is 
bacterially pure, free from con- 
tamination, and so modified by the 
Glaxo process that the nourishing 
milk-curd (which in ordinary milk 
forms a hard (;heese-like mass) 
breaks up into tiny particles, easily 
digestible by the youngest baby. 
You cannot go wrong with Glaxo, 
which is, after a healthy mother's 
milk, the perfection of infant diets. 
Ask your Doctor ! 





The Super-Milk 



Builds Bonnie Babies 



)» 



proprietors: Joseph nathan & co., lt 



-{ 



WELLINGION, NEW ZEALAND, 
OSNABURGH ST., LONDON, N.W. 



The larger our advertisement revenue, the more we can spend on 
improving " OVERSEAS." 



Advertisers' Announcements. 




Anchor Line 



Passenger and Freight Services :— 

GLASGOW AND NEW YORK 
GLASGOW AND BOSTON 
GLASGOW, LIVERPOOL AND 

GIBRALTAR, SUEZ, PORT 

SAID, BOMBAY 
GENOA, LEGHORN, NAPLES, 

PALERMO, AND NEW YORK 



ANCHOR LINE (Henderson Bros.) LIMITED 
I J Glasgow . Liverpool . London 

Manchester . Dundee . Londonderry 



CuNARD Line 

Regular Passenger and Freight Services from 

LIVERPOOL LONDON SOUTHAMPTON 
BRISTOL QUEENSTOWN CHERBOURG 
ANTWERP ROTTERDAM HAMBURG & 
D ANTZIG /o UNITED STATES & CANADA 

MEDITERRANEAN to NEW YORK 

Regular Freight Sailings from 
LIVERPOOL LONDON MANCHESTER SWANSEA 
ANTWERP AND ROTTERDAM to FRENCH MEDI- 
TERRANEAN LEVANT AND BLACK SEA PORTS 

SAILINGS to INDIA AUSTRALIA 
NEW ZEALAND JAPAN & CHINA 

LIVERPOOL . . Canard Baildlns. Pier Head 

LONDON. E.C. 2 - - 51, Bishopsgate 
LONDON. S.W. I - 29-31, Cockspur Street 

Offices and Agencies Everywhere M 



Members help the Club by mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to 

Advertisers. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

The views expressed in the Monthly Letter and in all signed articles in "Overseas'" are those 
of the writers and not necessarily those of the Members of the Central Council o' the Over-Seas 

Club and Patriotic League. page 

My Monthly Letter— E. W 31 

Photographic Contest for 1921—22 . . . . . .40 

The Two Aspects of the Empire — Sir Valentine Ghirol . . 41 

Why Australia Wants 15,000,000 Population— Percy Hunter 45 

The Telephone as an Empire Linker — Ernest A. Bryant . . 47 

The Menace of the Nation's Bad Teeth — John E, Ransford . . 49 
Should the Married Woman compete in the Labour Market — 

Hertha Davies .......... 52 

The Royal Arms of the United Kingdom — F. C Yardley . . 55 

The Herring Harvest — A. B. Cooper .... . . 59 

Why?— H.d. V. . 61 

A Day of My Life— Miss E. Herbert 64 

The Great Rift Valley— Professor J. W. Gregory . . . .65 

The Forthcoming British Industries Fair — E. D. W. C. . . 67 

From a Woman's Standpoint — A Wayfarer 69 

The Overseas Home-Maker — The Best Way — Mrs. Ernestine Mills 72 

The Overseas Forum ......... 76 

My Month's Reading — A. St. John Adcock .... 81 

The Month's Cartoons . . . . . . . . .83 

News from Headquarters ........ 88 

Members' Exchange ......... 91 

Overseas Trade Bureau . ....'... 95 

Overseas Employment Bureau ....... 99 

Notes about Our Advertisers ....... 100 



THE 



ANGLO-SOUTH AMERICAN BANK, 



LIMITED. 



Capital and Reserves Exceed £13,000,000. 

Offices in 

ARGENTINA CHILE URUGUAY 

PERU MEXICO U.S.A. 

FRANCE SPAIN 



HEAD OFFICE: 



62, Old Broad Street, London, E.G. 2. 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OFFICE : 

69, MARKET STREET, BRADFORD. 



AFFILIATIONS : 

THE BRITISH BANK OF SOUTH AMERICA, LTD. 

and 

THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF SPANISH AMERICA, LTD. 



Increased advertisement revenue means continued Improvement of 

" OVERSEAS." 



Advertiser's A uuouncement 
I 



-iiiij*. 




Verjndtih 




^ i i ]C. i X J 
-IS 0- -I -4- - - 12 0'- ■ -^ ■- 19 f- ■ - -bO' - 



1 



i| 



a 



\i 



Throughout the world the 
Boulton & Paul Buildings 
are known for reliability. 
Constructed on hygienic 
principles, they are admir- 
ably suited to the needs of 
tropical and semi-tropical 
countries. They are strong, 
rigid, well-built, perfect in 
every detail, and easily 
erected by unskilled labour. 
Promptness ia delivery and 
economy in production are 
matters which receive par- 
ticular attention. 



Steel or Wood Framed 
Portable Buildings 

specially Designed for Export 

The illustration and plan above show B. & P. Portable 
Steel Bungalow. No. 197, specially designed for Tropical 
Countries. The accommodation consists of three 
rooms, each 14 feet by 12 feet wide, and bathroom, etc. 
Verandah all round building with overhang at eaves 
of 3 feet 6 inches. Steel framing inserted in building 
to promote complete rigidity, and the staircases also are 
constructed of steel. Ventilators in ceilings and gables 
are provided, each covered with mosquito-proof gauze, 
also external doors and windows are protected with 
mosquito-proof gauze frames complete. Post us a card 
for further details. 

Manufacturers of Bungalows, Go-Downs, 
Market Buildings, Tea and Rubber Factories, 
Coolie Lines, Light Bridges, Workshops, &c. 





oulton 8rau 



:I-^ 



TEUKGRAMt 



LONDON «>FnCB> 



BOULTON, NORWICH : Chicf OfflCC & WofkS =' '"■^- O"^" VICTOBU ST. 

NORWICH, England i mutique, cektrai londm 

fr. : T.i.phon«i carrui «a«a 



TVL.EPHOME I 

NORWICH 



S61 



Cable Address— Boulton, Norwich, ENGLAND. 
Codes used : — A.B.C. {5th Edn.), Engineering (2nd Edn.), 
Western Union, Bentley's, Lieber's, Marconi, and Private. 

Members regularly corresponding with our advertisers materially help 

" OVERSEAS." 



The Over-Seas Club and Patriotic 


League 


(EMPIRE 


SERVICE) 


Patron: HIS MAJESTY THE KING. 


Vice Patrana-I ^•^■^- The Prince of Wales, K.G. 
vice-Pairons-j^jj j^ jj ,j^^ ^^^^ ^^ Connaught. K.G. 


President: Viscount Northclifie. 


Vice-Presidents : 


Rt. Hon. D. Lloyd George, M.P. 


Rt. Hon. Winston S. ChurchiU, M.P. 


Duke of Devonshire, K.G. 


Rt. Hon. Sir Robert L. Borden. 


Uarquess Curzon of Kedleston, K.G. 
Earl of Liverpool, K.C.M.G. 


Rt. Hon. Andrew Fisher. 


Earl of Meath, K.P. 


Rt. Hon. W. F. Massey. 


Earl of Selbome, K.G., G.C.M.G. 


Rt. Hon. WilUam Hughes. 


Earl Buxton, G.C.M.G. 


Rt. Hon. F. Wrench. 


Viscount Gladstone, G.C.M.G. 


Sir Owen PhiUpps, G.C.M.G. 


Viscount Bryce, O.M. 


Sir Bevan Edwards, K.C.B. 


Viscount Milner, G.C.B., G.C.M.G. 


Sir Robert Baden-Powell, Bt., K.C.B. 


Viscount Harcourt. 


Sir T. Vansittart Bowater. 


Viscount Burnham, C.H. 


Sir John Kirk. 


Viscount Novar. 


General Booth. 


Viscount Long. 


Hon. & Rev. Edward Lyttelton. 


Lord Hardinge of Pen.shurst, G.C.B. 


Sir George R. Parkin, K.C.M.G. 


Lord Islington, G.C.M.G., D.S.O. 


Kennedy Jones, Esq., M.P. 


Lord Denman, G.C.M.G. 


Sir J. M. Stewart, K.C.M.G. 


Lord Morris, K.C.M.G. 


Richard Jebb, Esq. 


Lord Aldenbam. 


Sir E. R. Fremantle, K.C.B. 


Lord Leverhulme. 


W. A. Bulkeley-Evans, Esq., O.B.E. 


H.E. Cardinal Bourne. 


F. W. Hayne, Esq., O.B.E. 


Rt. Hon. A. Bonar Law, M.P. 


Evelyn Wrench, Esq. 


Central 


Council : 


Evelyn Wrench, Esq., Chairman. 


G. C. Hutchinson, Esq. 


W. A. Bulkeley-Evans, Esq., O.B.E., 


Sir Roderick Jones, K.B.E. 


Vice-Chairman. 


W. Maxwell Lyte, Esq. 


Algernon E. Aspinall, Esq., C.M.G. 


E. R. Peacock, Esq. 


Major Cyril Bavin. 


A. E. Perkins, Esq., J.P. 


Sir Ernest Birch, K.C.M.G. 


A. L. Rea, Esq. 


Sir Harry Brittain, K.B.E., M.P. 


The Earl Stanhope, D.S.O 


Lt.-Col. Sir G. McL. Brown, K.B.E. 


Sir Campbell Stuart, K.B.E. 


Capt. Ernest Pescott Day. 


Sir C. J. Tarring, J.P. 


Sir Howard d'Egville, K.B.E. 


Sir John Taverner, K.C.M.G. 


Lady des Voeux. 


Edwin Thompson, Esq. 


G. B. Dodwell, Esq. 


C. F. Truefitt, Esq. 


F. W. Hayne, Esq., O.B.E. (Poutidtt, 


Sydney Walton, Esq., C.B.E. 


Patriotic League). 


Robert Williams, Esq., J.P. 


A. H. HorsfaU, Esq., D.S.O. 




Evelyn Wrench, Esq., ChairrrtaH and 


F. C. Yardley, Esq., Assistant Editor. 


Hon Organiser. 


E. D. W. Chaphn, Esq., Advertising 


Lady des Vceux. Hon. Controller. 


Manai^er. 


C. F. Truefitt, Esq., Hon. Treasurer. 


E. W. Pither, Esq., Financial Secretary. 


Major Cyril Bavin, Hon. Hospitality 
Secretary. 
Solicitor : Ralph S. Bond, Esq. 


F. G. Deverill, Esq., Receptton Secretary. 


Banicers : Messrs. Coutts & Co. 


Auditors : Messrs. E. L 


lyton Bennett, Sons & Co. 


Headquarters General Buildinj 


;s, Aldwyoh, London, W.G. 2. 


Cable Address : "0 


vazeeclub, London." 



ROURNYILLE Cocoa 

J^ SPECIALLY PACKED FOR EXPORT 

See the name "CA.DBURY" on everv D'ece o/ Chocolate. 



"Members trading with our Advertisers materially help " OVERSEAS." 

5 



Advertiser's Announcement. 

A NEW WORLD ATLAS ON 
A NEW PLAN 



THE TIMES 
SURVEY ATLAS 
OF THE WORLD 

Prepared at the Edinburgh Geographical Institute 
under the direction of J. G. Bartholomew, and 

Sebicateb 6t> ^ermi^Sion to §.9)t. t^e ^ing. 



POINTS WORTH NOTING 

The Times Atlas contains 1 1 2 new double-page plates eacb 
measuring 23 " X 18|". 

They contam a representation in mmiature of several 
hundred thousand origmal survey sheets of all parts of the 
world. 

Orographical colouring has been employed throughout for 
the representation of physical relief. 

The Gazetteer Index contains more than two hundred 
thousand references, giving in each case the name of the 
country, the latitude and longitude, and the map and " Grid " 
reference. It contains also a Pronunciation Table and a list 
of the " Lands of the World." 

Write for an illustrated brochure giving full particulars of 
this great work, to The Times (Educational Sales Department), 
Printing House Square, London, England. 

When making purchases, please give "OVERSEAS'" Advertisers' an 
opportunity to quote prices^ 



Advertiser's A }niouucement. 



Magnified 250 times 

to show you how 







** ——" " — ^'^ ••••■- •ws....!.«/:„„«^..^...i;....«.^!....ii«i_>iJ 



AERTEX Cellular Garments guarantee greater comfort In warm 
weather by ensurmg a constant supply of oxygen laden air at 
exactly the right temperature to maintain comfort ; ensuring 
freedom from chills and colds. 

Each of the myriad little cells in the fabric actually holds a 
cushion of air ; every garment is not only a protection against 
chills but a tissue-stimulating air distributor contributing to health. 

For comfort and health, on summer days, and throughout the 
seasons insist on 

AERTEX 

cellular 

UNDERWEAR ior MEN, 
WOMEN and CHILDREN. 
SHIRTS, SHEETINGS, ETC. 

Alwayi look for the AERTEX 
label on all AERTEX goods. 

^ Write for 1922 Catalogue, giving full range and prices of garments, etc. 

The Cellular Clothing Coy. Ltd., Fore Street, London, E.C. 2. 

<p -— J 

^ A selection from List of Depots where I 

AERTEX Cellular Goods may be obtained. 




LONDON :-ROBERT SCOTT, LTD.. 8 Poultry, Cheapside, E.C. I. 
OLIVER BROS.. LTD.. 417 Oxford Street. W. 1. 
BOLTONS. LTD.. 177 Piccadilly. W 1. 



To continually improve " OVERSEAS " we rely largely upon our 
advertisement revenue. 




2. 

3- 



THE OVER-SEAS CLUB AND 
PATRIOTIC LEAGUE. 

(Patron : His Majesty the King.) 
HE Over-Seas Club and Patriotic League is a non-party 
society of British subjects residing in all parts of the 
world. Its underlying motive is to promote the unity of 
British subjects. Its four chief objects are 
I. To draw together in the bond of comradeship British 

people the world over. 

To render individual service to our Empire. 
To maintain the power of the Empire and to hold to its best 
traditions. 
4. To help one another. 

MEMBERS' CREED. 

BELIEVING the British Empire to stand for justice, freedom, order 
and good government, we pledge ourselves, as citizens of the 
British Commonwealth of nations, to maintain the heritage handed 
down to us by our fathers. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

The Headquarters of the Over-Seas Club and Patriotic League are 
situated at General Buildings, Aldwych, London, just opposite 
Australia House, in the very heart of the Metropolis. Here are pro- 
vided most of the amenities of an ordinary Club, including Reading, 
Writing, Lounge, Ladies' and Smoking Rooms, Information Bureau, 
the provision of a postal address, and the forwarding of Members' mail. 
Light refreshments can be obtained. Hours of opening, 9.30 a.m. to 
8 p.m. Closed on Sundays. 




The black square shows the building in which the Over-Seas Club 
Premises are situated. 

Date of Inception August 27th, 1910 

Subscribing Membership, as at 

December 31st, 1920 25.423 

Life Members 4.290 

MEMBERSHIP FEES. 

All fees include " Overseas " and Membership List 
Residents. Entrance. jAnnually. 

Over-Seas (Two years for £1 o o) . . Nil. los. i 

Provinces los. los. 

London (within 20 miles of Charing Cross). £110 £220 
Glasgow & West of Scotland Branch . £1 '*> 

Liverpool, 2, Bold Street . . . . £110 

Members' subscriptions become due on January 1st each year. Sub- 
scriptions received after October ist are carried forward to the 
following year. 

Contributions or Subscriptions should be addressedto The Hon. Organiser, 
Over-Seas Club and Patriotic League, General Buildings, Aldwych, 

London, W.C 2. 



Life. 

£7 70 
£10 10 o 

;^2I O O 




Advertisers' Announcements. 

When Do You Sail? 

jMONG the many matters to be considered by the 
traveller when making preparations for a voyage, long 
or short, the care of baggage is of the first importance. 
The seasoned voyager remembers to cover himself 
against risk of loss, accident, and damage to himself 
and his effects during the journey. Members of the Over-Seas 
Club who contemplate a visit to the Old Country, or who are about 
to return overseas, should get into touch with the Western Australian 
Insurance Company, whose London Office is at 45/47, Cornhill, 
London, E.C. 2, and secure particulars of their Policy, which not 
only provides against loss of baggage, but can be extended to cover 
compensation for death or personal injuries, the result of accidents. 
It is as well not to leave this important matter till too near the time 
of embarkation, and a call on the Company to-day, or a written 
request for particulars may save much annoyance and financial loss 
later. The settled claims of the Western Australian Insurance 
Company to date exceed Two Million Pounds, and the Company 
has numerous Branches and Agencies throughout the world, where 
claims can be promptly dealt with. Be among the wise ones, and 
get in touch noiv. 



The shaving 
service for 
everyman — 
everywhere. 



Men who had never before 
shaved themselves, and men 
who had tried every other 
shaving device ever invented 
have found in the Gillette 
the complete solution of their 
shaving problems, and a razor 
that suits them individually 
and exactly . . The Gillette 
gives efficient, dependable 
service for a lifetime. 




Safety 
Razjor 

NO STROPPING NO HONING 

Sold everywhere. 

Gillette Salety Razor, Ltd., 184-188, Gt. Portlaud St., London, W. i. 

Factories at: Slough, England; llontreal, Canada; Boston, U.S.A. 



Increased advertising revenue makes possible ttie continued improvement 
of " OVERSEAS " generally. 



Advertiser's Announcement, 



f 




BRITISH 
INDUSTRIES FAIR 

LONDON & BIRMINGHAM 

Feb. 27th to March 10th, 1922. 

{Organised bytt.M. Department of Overseas-Trade.) 

A comprehensive exhibit of the Leading British Manufactures is 
here officially presented, In the two principal industrial centres of 
the United Kingdom. 

This unique disolay of Britain's Best Merchandise may be 
inspected by the World's Buyers with the utmost convenience. 
\'alues can be compared, and the most advantageous terms 
secured for all requirements, with the minimum trouble and the 
greatest saving of time. 

LONDON : 

White City, London, W. 

Musical Instruments, Furniture and Basketware, Sports Goods, Toys, etc., 
lewcllery. Silverware, Cutlery, etc., Scientiftc and Photographic Goods, 
Chemicals and Drugs, Stationery and Printing, Fancy Goods, TravelHng 
Kctjuibites, etc., Brushware, Pottery and Glassware, China and Earthen- 
ware, Glass and Glassware, Foodstuffs and Beverages, Boots and Shoes, 
Leather, etc. 

BIRMINGHAM : 

Exhibition Buildings, Castle Bromwich. 

Brassfoundry, Hardware and Ironmongerv, Metals, Construction, Building 
and Decoration, Power, Lighting. Heating, Cooking and \entilatiug, 
Engineering in all Branches, .Agricultural Machinery, ^Iining .\ppliances. 
Motors, Motor Cvcles, Cycle Accessories, Perambulators, Guns, Saddlery 
and Harness, Fishing Tackle, Br^wing and Distilling Appliances. 

Descriptive Booklets and Invitation Tickets may be obtained from 
the nearest British Legation or Trade Commissioner, or on request 
to the Secretary, 35, Old Queen Street, Westminster, London, 
England. 



1 




I 

I*' 



~-i 






-'^^mMf' 



Alembers mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to Advertisers help 
to maintain the advertising revenue. 

10 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



Canadian Government 

Merchant Marine, Ltd. 

" Canada'i Commerce Carriers." 



Operated in connection with 

CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS. 



STEAMSHIP SERVICES 

Between MONTREAL and QUEBEC in Summer; HALIFAX, 
N.S., and ST. JOHN, N.B., in Winter. 

And LONDON. LIVERPOOL. GLASGOW, CARDIFF, 
SWANSEA and NEWPORT, NEWFOUNDLAND. WEST 
INDIES, CUBA. BRITISH GUIANA. SOUTH AMERICA. 
INDIA. EGYPT. STRAITS SETTLEMENTS and JAVA. 

AUo between VANCOUVER, B.C.. and JAPAN. CHINA. JAVA, 
STRAITS SETTLEMENTS. INDIA. AUSTRALIA and 
NEW ZEALAND. 



LIST OF AGENTS. 



UNITED KINGDOM 



THE ORIENT (Joint 
Service with Messrs. 
Alfred Holt & Co.). 



INDIA. EGYPT. 
STRAITS SETTLE- 
MENTS and JAVA 
(Joint Service with 
British India Steam 
Navigation Co., Ltd.). 



CANADA 

AUSTRALIA 
NEW ZEALAND 



and 



The Cunard Steamship Co., Ltd., Llvei- 
pool, London, Cardm, etc. 

Anchor Donaldson Line, Glasgow. 

Butterfield & Swire. Hong Kong, China, 
& Japan. 

Holme, Ringer & Co., Nagasaki. 

Wuriu Shokwai, Moji and Shimonosekl. 

Smith, Bell & Co., The Philippines. 

■Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Calcutta, 
Bombay, Colombo, Karachi. 

Adamson Gilfillan, Singapore. 

Islay, Kerr & Co., Ltd., Penang. 

A. C. Harper cV- Co., Ltd., Port Svvetten- 
ham. 

Maclaine, Watson & Co., Java. 

The English Coaling Co., Ltd., Port Said. 

■Agents of B.I. S.N. Co. at all other ports. 

■ Canadian Government Merchant Marine, 
Ltd.. Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, N.S., 
St. John, N.B., Vancouver, B.C. 

Canadian Government Merchant Marine, 
Ltd., Melbourne and Sydney, Welling- 
ton and Auckland, N.Z. 



R. B. TEAKLE, 

Managet. 

Canadian Govt. Merchant 

Marine, Ltd., 330, St. Jamca 

Street, Montreal. 



Wm. PHILLIPS, 

European Manager. 

Canadian National Rai Iways 

and Canadian Govt. Merchant 

Marine, Ltd., 17—19. Cockspur 

Street, S.W. 1. 






The larger our advertisement revenue, the more we can spend on 
improving " OVERSEAS." 

11 



Advertiser's A nnnuncement. 



A Newspaper 

Every Young Britisher 

Should Read 

THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER" is a 
real, fully-illustrated 12-page ncK-spaper. 
It tells each week the wonderful story of 
the world's adventure ; the striving and achieve- 
ment of mankind ; the infinitely great and the 
infinitely little ; the wonders of science and the 
miracles of nature. 

More than this, it breathes the very spirit of the 
Homeland that you want your children to 
remember and to know. Let them read "The 
Children's Newspaper " each week and it will 
help them to grow up British to the core — 
happy, strong-willed, self-reliant. 

CHILDREN'S 
NEWSPAPER 

Edited by ARTHUR MEE, whose name is known 
to children and lovers of children the world over. 

J 1 

J The Editor of "The Children's Newspaper" is always 
glad to see any interesting photographs that may be sent 
to him from any part of the world, and will pay for all 

that he uses. ■ 



SEND TO-DAY FOR FREE SPECIMEN COPY 

of "The Children's Newspaper," which will be sent, postage 
paid, if you send a postcard, giving your name and address, 
to: — Export Department, Amalgamated Press, Ltd., The 
Fleetway House, Farringdon Street, London, E.C. 4, England. 



Members help the Club by mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to 

Advertisers. 

12 



Adverliscr's A nnuuncemenl. 




Increased advertisement revenue means continued improvement of 

" OVERSEAS." 

13 c 



Advertisers' A )i)ioiiiicenients. 



WRIGHT'S ENGLISH SUITS 
FOR OVERSEAS WEARERS 



F INKS'!" English Woollens woven exclusively i«T 
WRIGHT'S,' tailored in our own workrooms to 
individual measurements sent and the particular 
styles chosen. 

Example of Our Direct 
Trading Value. Tropical 
Solid Worsted Suit 
Craftmanship of the highest qualitv throughout every 
WRIGHT Suit. 

[Perfect fit and absolute satisfaction guaranteed under 
^signed warrant y with every sviit or full money refunded. 



£4:10:0 



LATEST LONDON STYLES 

AND 120 FREE PATTERNS TO EVERY ENQUIRER 

with tape measure and our sclf-wcasurcmcni form. 

PRICES from £3:3:0 to £6:6:0 



mri^ht 



^i^QMBcvNY (OLD HiMi).i:ro 



1, COLONIAL HOUSE 
OLD HIILU STAFFORDSHIRE 



/)// c'.oths [are 
priced per yard 
and any length 
cut and posted 
direct for cash 
at bank or per 
Postal C.O.D. 
Svitciii. 





" The Backbone 
of the Canine 
race." 



SPRATT'S 

"MEAT-FIBRINE" 

DOG CAKES 

are the staple daily diet of 
millions of the world's fittest, 
healthiest do^s. Wherever 
you are your dog should have 
Spratt 's, aiT d he can . Agencies 
everywhere. 

Spratt's Patent Limited 

24 5, Fenchurch Street, E.G. 3 



SULPHATE OF AMf^ONIA. 




THE /DEAL EERT/LI/ER 

FAKMEK8 WHO WAVE 
USED SULPHATE OF 
AMMONIA WILL APPRE- 
CIATE the ADVANTAGES 
TO BE OBTAINED BY 
USING THE '• METRO 
SULPHATE "MANUFAC- 
TURED BY THE SOUTH 
METROPOLITAN GAS 
^ ^ COMPANY. -^ - 

It is boae-dry and does not rot bags. 

It can be readily distributed. It does 

not absorb atmospberio nsoisture. It 

is guaraHteid to contain aji per cent. 

ammonia. 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

For price* and descriptive pamphlet 

apply to — 

(R. B. Department), 

SODTH METROPOLITAN GAS 

COMPANY, 
709, Old Kent Road, London, Bnt|. 
T. A.: "Metrogai, London." 



Members regularly corresponding with our advertisers materially help 

" OVERSEAS." 

u 



Advertisers' A nnoitncemcnts. 



LONDON JOINT CITY AND 

MIDLAND BANK LIMITED 

CHAIRMAN : 

The Right Hon. R. McKENNA 

JOINT MANAGING DIRECTORS: 
S. B. MURRAY F. HYDE E. W. WOOLLEY 



Subsoplbad Capital - S3S(116,816 

Paid-up Capital ... 10.860.566 

Reserve Fund ... 10,860.565 

Deposit* [Jtite 30th, 1921) - 871,322.881 



HEAD OFFICE i 5, THREADNEEDLE STREET, LONDON. E.C 2 

OVER I.SSO OPPICBS IN BNQLAND AND WALES 

OVERSEAS BBAROH: 66 & 66, OLD BBOAO STBEET, LONDON, E.G. 2 

Atlantic Offices: "Aquitanla" " Berengaria " " Mauretania'* 



APPILIATBD BANKS: 

BELFAST BANKING CO., LTD. 

OVER no OFFICES IN IRELAND 

THE CLYDESDALE BANK LTD. 

OVER 1 60 OFFICES IN SCOTLAND 



NATIONAL BANK OF INDIA, LTD. 

BANKERS to Ikt GOVKRSUENT <« BRITISH KAST AWRI9A Mi VGAMDA 

Head Office: 26, BISHOPSGATE, LONDON, E.C. i 
Branches 

Calcutta Amrltsai Mandalay Zanzibar Entebbe '\ 

Bombay Delhi Aden and Kampala [ Uganda 

Madras Tutlcorln Aden Point Mombasas Kenya Jlnja j 

Karachi Cochin (S. India) Colombo Nairobi I Colony, 

Cawnpore Chlttagong Kandy Nakuni /'British Dar-es-Salaam \ Tanganyika 

Lahore Rangoon Newera Ellya Klsumu J E.A, Tanga /Territory. 

SUBSCRIBED CAPITAL 'Z Z Z ... ... ... £4,000.000 

PAID-UP CAPITAL -.......-. £3 000 000 

RESERVE FUND _ ... „. ^ ea'.SOoIoOO 

The Bank conducts erery description of Eastern Banking business. 



THE COLONIAL BANK. 

(i;STAHLISHEIi IN iRA SANCTIONED B^' RuVAL CllAKTIiR AND I \I)I-R 
THE AlIIRIRITV 01- PARLIAMENT.) 

Subscribed Capital £3,000,000 

Paid-Up Capital £900,000 

Reserve Fund £400,000 

Head Office : 29, GRACECHURCtl ST., E.C. 3. 

Branches in LIVERPOOL, MANCHESTER, HULL, HAMBURG (Adolphsplatz 4.] 
NEW YORK, WEST INDIES, BRITISH WEST AFRICA, AND DA.K^r' 

(SENEGAL) AGENCY. 
Shipments of Produce Financed. General Banking Business Conducted. 



Members trading with our Advertisers materially help " OVERSEAS." 

15 



Advertisers' Annoimcemenls. 



Commonvpealtb Bank of Euetralta. 

GaKTRBieea by Ike t^> Hsad Of Km i SYDNEY. 

AuSralUn GoTernmwI. ^B^^m Sir Denuon MiUer. K.CM.a, 

Brmnebes »od Asaneiea W^^^ Governor. 

ihroasK-at AnalralMia. ^V)^^^ Jwne* Kelt Deputy Governor. 

ADVANC Ei made against Approved Seourltlea. BILLS nn(?orla-ed ••nd 

oolleoted. CURRENT ACCOUNTS opened. DRAFTS and LETTERS of 

CREDIT issued. DEPOSITS aooepted for fixed periods. REMlTTANCliS 

cabled or mailed and BANKING BUSINESS of every desorlptlon transioted 

with Australia. 
Bankers to Tbe Qoveromeot o) the Commonwealtb o\ Aastralia, Tbe Qovern- 
meot ot tbe State ot Queensland, Tbe aovernment ot tbe State oi &ontb 

Anstratia, Tbe (iovernmeRt fA tbe State e( Tasmania. 
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT.— Agencies are open at 3,085 Post Offices 
In tbe Commonwealth. Special facilities for the remlttanoe of Settlers' Funds. 

On 31st DECEMBER, 1920. 

Savings Bank Balances £35i3°6t9SS 

General Bank Balances £37,153,311 

Note Issue Department £s8>973<537 

Other items Ai3i5£7^5 

"£j3<.96o.s69 

London Office : I6<4I , New Broad St., E. C, C. A) B. Campiom, Loa'ilon Manager. 
Also at Australia Houses Strand, W C. 



BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES. 



Establlsbed 1817. 



London OfUce : 29, Threadneedle Street, E.C< 2. 

Paicd>up Gapital £4.965,200 

Reserve Fund ... 3,425,000 

Reserve Liability of 
Proppletops ... ... 4.965,200 

£13.355.400 
Affriregrate Assets, 31st 

March, 1921 ...£75,692,488 12s. 6d. 

The London office Issues dratts on demand on Its Head Office and branches In Australia, 
New Zealand, Tasmania, Fiji and Papua, and on Its Correspondents In Tasmania. Makes 
Mail and Cable Transfers. Negotiates and Collects Bills of Exchange. Receives Deposits 
for fixed periods on terms which may be known on application, and conducts every descrip- 
tion of Australasian banking business. H. MELDRUM, Acting Manager. 





WwV 



liCUTBILL, KING & Co. 



n 32, ST. MARY AXE, LONDON, E.G. 3. 

\ I Cables : " Lockett, London." Codes ! Marconi, A.B.C. (jth Edn.), Lieber's, etc. 

SUPPLIERS & SHIPPERS 

of all descriptions of Stores and Materials required by Rail- 
ways, Port Works, Contractors, Ship Owners, Builders, etc. 

■ I OVERSEAS BUYERS desirous of appointing Buying and Shipping 
♦ ♦ Agents in the U.K. are requested to communicate. ♦ ♦ 



FOR EVERYTHING MUSICAL: 

Music, Player-Pianos, Pianos, Organs. Gramophones and Records, String and 
Wind Instruments. Your definite enquiry invited. Catalogues free. Quotations, 
Including delivery to your seaport (and safe packing for export) our specialty. 

Established 1883. Bankers : — London Joint City and Midland Bank, Ltd. 
fSOCK:X^li^Y'>S 84/86, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.3, 
MUSICAL SERVICE, LTD. England, and Nina London Branches. 



When making purchases, please give " OVERSEAS' 
opportunity to quote prices. 

16 



Advertisers an 



Advertisers' Announcements. 



BARCLAYS BANK 

LIMITED. 
Head Office : 54, Lombard St., London, E.G. 3. 



The Bank has close working arrange- 
ments with Agents and Correspondents 
in all the principal towns throughout 
the World. 



Every Dascription of Overseas Busioess Trapsacted. 

CHIEF FOREIGN BRANCH t 

i68, Fenchurch Street, London, E.G. 3. 
WEST END FOREIGN BRANCH i 

I, Pall Mall East, London, S.W. i. 

LIVERPOOL FOREIGN BRANCH 1 

42, Castle Street, Liverpool. 

MANCHESTER FOREIGN BRANCH: 

Comer of Fountain Street and York Street, Manchester. 



LLOYDS BANK 
L IMITED . 

HEAD OFFICE: 71, LOMBARD ST., E.C. 3. 




CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED 


- £70,688,980 


CAPITAL PAID UP - 


- 14,137,796 


RESERVE FUND - 


- 10,000,000 


DEPOSITS, &c 


- 346,397,553 


ADVANCES, &c. - 


- 151,079,173 



AFFILIATED BANKS; 
THE NATIONAL BANK OF SCOTLAND LTD. LONDON AND RIVER PLATE BANK LTD. 

AUXILIARY. 

LLOYDS AND NATIONAL PROVINCIAL FOREIGN BANK LIMITED. 



To continually improve " OVERSEAS " we rely largely wpon our 
advertisement revenue. 

17 



Advprtixcrs' Announcements.. 



For Infants 

an all-important advantage. 

Babies and growing children obtain from Banger's Food the 
great advantages of being reared on pure fresh milk. These 
include healthful natural growth unchecked by the under- 
nourishment which arises from unsuitable food. 



Food 



is always prepared with fresh milk, or milk and water, according 
to the age of the child. 

It is speciallv prepared to adjust the milk to the delicate 
digestion of children and invalids All the great good in milk- 
Nature's all-important food — becomes available with Benger's. 
Benger's Food is sold in Tins by Chemists, etc., everywhere. 
" Be Hirer's FooJ and How to Use it." A little work of authority on the f-ediniJ- of 
infants, invalids, and the aeed, a !ii"st interesting and informative booklet— post free from 

BENGER'S FOOD, LTD. Otter Works, MANCHESTER. 

NewYi rk (U.S.A.), 90, Beekman Street. Syi-NEY (n.s.w.), 117. Pitt Street. 
Depots throughout Canada. 



The All 



British 




THE CAR FOR THE OWNER DRIVER 

A proved Light Car with an 
OVERSEAS reputation for 
Reliability under any conditions. 

The liigh clearance and 
long wheelbase are just 
two features that help to 
make the sTAiNDARD 
LIGHT CAK the Car 
for the OVERSEA h- 
DRIVER. 




AGENTS 

IN ALL COUNTRIES 

OVERSEAS. 



THE STANDARD MOTOR CO., Ltd., Coventry, England. 



When ordering from oUr Advertisers, please mention " OVERSEAS." 

This helps the Club. 

18 



Advertisers* A nnouncemoiis. 



REOISTERED 

LENNARDS 



TRADE MARK 




BOOrS&SHOES, 



A WONDERFUL 
GU INEA SHO E 

Style No. 3705. Brown Leather Oxford 
Sports Shoe with stout red rubber 
sole. Light in weight but strongly 
built. A great Overseas 
favourite. 



LENNARDS Ltd. 

(branches) Bristol, Eng. 




ROBERTS' PATENT BALING PRESS 

Fop Baling WOOL, COTTON, HAY, HIDES, etc.. by HAND, 

HORSE or STEAM-POWER. 

Simple, strong and quick iu operation, easily 
understood and worked by any native. 

30 to 40 bales per hour. 

All sizes of Presses made. 

H. I. ROBERTS, 

42/44, CASTLE ST., LIVERPOOL. 

Telegrams: "Ingenious, Liverpool." 




WILKINSON'S 

"Colonial" Hammenless Ejector 

53, PALL MALL, LONDON, S.W. 



Managing Director: 
T. H. RANDOLPH 




NG 
OUTFITTERS 

SWORD MANUFACTURERS 

FANCY CI METERS for PRESENTATION 



Increased advertising revenue makes possible the continued improvement 
of " OVERSEAS •• generally. 



li) 



A dvertiser's A nnoimcenient. 



ONCE WORN 

ALWAYS WORN 

fF^JS SUPER 

FOOTWEAR 

WARM IN WINTER 

COOL IN SUMMER 

" AERTEX " has long been accepted as 
possessing wonderful hygienic qualities, 
but it has not previously been used for 
Shoe linings. The fabric is 
cellular, and every time the foot 
is put to the ground a current of 
air IS circulated round the foot, 
which is warm in winter and 
coo! in summer, giving a delight- 
ful feeling as of Walking on Air. 
" AERTEX " also prevents the 
staining of hose. 
Made in the following Materials: — 

Tan Willow Calf, Black Box 
Calf, Black Glace 



cn- 



cu^ 



Kid, Patent 
Leather - - - 



45/- 
58/. 




IS 

label 
is on every 
"AERTEX •'- 
'■nod Shoe. 



Also in Dove Grey, 
Dark Grey, Nigger, 
and White Doeskin 

Suede Calf in Grey 
and Copper Shades. 

Oitr Customers who have purchased " AERTEX "-lined shoes 
express their delight jcith the coolness and comfort they afford. 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. k^.-S^ol^^ll 

Take advantage of Post Office Cash on Delivery Purchasing Facilities. 

W. ABBOTT & SONS, LTD. 

(PHIT-EESI), 

121, High Holborn, London, W.C, Englandc 



54, REGENT STREET, W. 1. 



434, STRAND, W.C. 2. 



Members mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to Advertisers help 
to maintain the advertising revenue. 



20 



Advertisers' A nnouncemenis. 



Select your 



HANDKERCHIEF 



Presents — 

Be in plenty of time and save 
your Xmas presents now. We 
suitable for all ages and tastes 



■NOW 



No. 0.507, Ladies' pure 
linen hemstitched hand- 
kerchiefs with hand 
embroidered initial. 
Size about i; 
ins. Per doz. 

Write for samples and 
price list No. 50D, sent 
post free. Delivery 
guaranteed and carriage 
paid on 20/- upwards. 



:i 17/6 



the rush at the last minute by selecting 
have a wonderful range of handkerchiefs 
at prices ranging from 2/3 per dozen to 
£5 each. 

No. 0.41, Gentlemen's 
pure linen handker- 
chiefs with a hand 
embroidered two-letter 
monogram. Size about 
19J ins. Per 
doz. - 

Please place your orders 
early so that full justice 
may be given to the era- 
br'>iHerint^ of tlie Cre.ts, 
Monnjjrams or Initials. 




'; 33/9 



ROBINSON & CLEAVER, Ltd. 

Linen Manufacturers, Belfast, Ireland. 



JOSEPH C. MOUNT & CO. 

146/147, Grosvenor Road, Westminster, LONDON, S.W. 1 

Universal Forwarders^ Foreign Removals^ Tac^ers 
:: and Shippers^ JVareJiousemen and Wharfingers :: 



Packers and Shippers of Motor Cars, 
Lorries, Aeroplanes, Machinery, Furni- 
ture and General Goods. 

Baggage, etc., collected from steamers 
or stations. Re-collected from hotels, 
private houses, etc., delivered to 
steamers, or shipped to the Continent, 
Colonies, America, etc. 

Foreign and Home removals, including 
collection, supply of cases, packing, or, 
if in large quantities, transported by 
lift vans by steamers and/or rail. 



Seven acres of Riverside Docks and 
Warehouses, with the most extensive 
and up-to-date storage accommodation 
in London, with nine cranes lifting up 
to 15 tons. 

Motor Cars, Lorries, Machinery, etc., 
received from abroad, unpacked, 
assembled, stored and/or delivered. 

Special services rendered in connection 
with all exhibitions, for reception of 
exhibits, unpacking and placing upon 

stands. 



Agricultural Machinery, including Trac- 
tors and other material, purchased, 
packed and shipped. 



Packing cases urgently wanted by 
travellers or others constructed and 
delivered by express vans. 

Special Terms for the Packing and Shipping of Settlers' Furniture, Effects, etc. 

Established over a quarter of a Century. 

Telegrams : Telephones : 

" Anticlimax " Churton, London. 6360 Victoria (3 lines) 



The larger our advertisement revenue, the more we can spend on 
improving "OVERSEAS." 

21 



Advertisers' A nnouncements. 



SPALDING 

ATHLETIC GOODS 

are specially manufactured to suit the local require- 
ments of every Climate, and 

ARE FULLY GUARANTEED 

If any Overseas Sportsmen experience difficulty in 

obtaining Spalding Goods from their local dealers, 

they should write to : 

EXPORT DEPT. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., Ltd., 317, High Holborn, LONDON, Eng. 



TELEPHONE : 

Caairil 

89S6. 



ESTABLISHED TELEGRAMS 

iQBi " Holfminiit, 

"""• Fi«iquiM.LoBdo«." 



H. & B. HOFFMAN & SONS, LTD. 

(BRITISH SUBJECTS) 

FURRIERS-SKIN MERCHANTS-TAXIDERMISTS 

27a, FINSBURY SQUARE. LONDON, E.C.2. 

HEARTH RUGS SKINS DRESSED FUR COATS 

MOTOR RUGS & MOUNTED FUR SETS 

FURS RENOVATED AND REMODELLED. 
Wirehonie : 57. Wilson Street, E.G. 2 










Estd. 1873. Telephone : 1542 London Wall. 

GOLDSMITH, 

SILVERSMITH 

AND 

OPTICIAN 



£5-5-0. 



JOHN ELKAN'S " COLONL\L " WATCH. 
Solid Silver Case. Lever Movement. 

Fully Jewelled. Compensated Balance. 

A thoroughly reliable timekeeper, and can be guaranteed 
to go in all climates. 

JOHN ELKAN'S selection of Diamond and 

other Gem rings is the largest in London. 
For Prices & QUALITY they are unequalled. 

Please note only addresses : 

35L, Liverpool St., E.G. 69, Cheapside, E.G. 
70, Leadenhall St., E.G. 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, 

SENT POST FREE. 
No West End Branches. No West End Prices. 




Rl-.DIX'HU SI/li 



Members help the Club by mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to 

Advertisers. 



Advertisers' AiinounccnioUs. 

Illlllllllllllllilllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillli^^ 

MOTOR CARS 
FURNITURE 

Packed and Shipped 

lllirilllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIfllllll 

GERHARD & HEY, Ltd., Shipping Agents. 

LONDON : 

GT. ST. THOMAS APOSTLE (off Cannon Si), E.G. 4. 
T.A. : "Gerhardey." T.N. : Central 3706 (8 lines). 

ALSO LIVERPOOL, MANCHESTER, HULL, SOUTHAMPTON, ETC. 

lllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllH 




r//EPORTABLE GRAMOPHONE /I 

'T'HIS is the compact little gramophone that you 
■^ with you anywhere, and that will stand the s 
travel and weather. Went through the war with distinc 
lion. Plays all makes of records ; clear reproduction 
and rich natural tone. No loose parts ; no 
ready to play immediately opened. 




ECOV 



Leather Cloth . 

-, £6-15-0 

£Ma-0 

Brass Bound Teak 

{/or Overseas) 

£12-12-0 



Compressed Fihre 

£8-15-0 
Solid Cowl.ide 
£12-12-0 



Music Dealers, Stores, etc., all over the 
rid. Or by Parcel Post (Cadi on De 
ery). " Decca ' Book (illustrated) en 
request. 

iDecca" (Dept. 1), 34, 
Worship St., London, E.C.2. 



Proprietors : Bamett 
Samuel & Sons, 

\ Lt - ^ " 

Wc 
t n \ 



imuel & Sons, I 
td., Dulcet 11. 
'orks, Ken- 1 11 
in g t o n, /// . 
o n d n , / // A 
S.W.g. /^* ^ 




Shopping 
Agents. 



\. 






— 'Purchases of every description effected. — 

LADIES' DEPARTMENT. 
Clubs and Sports T^equisites, Presents, Prizes, etc. 

\\J V I- ■ Ml-- n," NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS DESPATCHED REGULARLY 

\ .0- '' „%, V''^ <t *^''' I Reniittances, with I'lill instructions, should accompany all orders, vvliicli 

V^ ' ^'' ^ 1 will liave careful and proiiiiit attention. 

lijnkers: Barclays Bank Limited, 19, l-leet Street, London, E.G. 4. 

Increased advertisement revenue means continued improvement of 

" OVERSEAS." 

23 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



GAMAGES 

The Largest Mail Order 
House in the World 



LONDON'S SMARTEST 

LOUNGE SUIT 

Whatever corner oi the Universe you are 
privileged to be living in, a stylish hand- 
somely naade-to-measure Suit DIRECT 
FROM LONDON is now placed within 
your reach. It comes to your very door 
by the earliest mail after receipt of order 
and measurements. These can be taken 
with the simple form and tape we will 
gladly send you free with the Patterns. 

ALL WOOL INDIGO SERGE 
SMART CHEVIOT TWEEDS 

You may choose at leisure from these fine 
patterns. West-end cut and fit. Fault- 
less Tailoring. Elsewhere you wou 
have to pay 7 to 8 guineas. 
Our huge volume of 
Overseas Trade enables 
to offer the Suit for 



Id 



75/- 



us 



THE FINEST 

VALUE 

TO-DAY 





OUR 
NOTED 

REAL 

SCOTCH Bi-5^ 

BROGUE Brown 

SIJ rk 17 C B^'osue, 
rl U t O Walking 
Uppers, in Black Box or 
leather, soft and pliant yet trustworthy in wea"-, 
Soles of Solid Butt leather. Wear and comfort assured. All 
sizes from 6 to 1 1 . Also in Ladies' sizes, 3 to 7. 
at the same low price. These are the best and cheapest 
Real Brogue Shoes in London to-day. Price per pair 



wear. 



A handsome 
suitable for 
or Golfing 
Tan Willow 



assurea. rtii 

19/11 



GAMAGES, HOLBORN, LONDON, ENGLAND 

Members regularly corresponding with our advertisers materially help 

" OVERSEAS." 

24 



Advevtiscvs' A )inounceriieiits. 



WHITE STAR LINE 

ROYAL y UNITED STATES MAIL STEAMERS 

S.g. MAJESTIC, 56,000 TONS (Building) , 
the Largest Steamer in the World. 



R.M.S. QL KM P/C (Triple Screw) 46,439 Tons. 
Regular Passenger and Freight Sailings from 

SOUTHAMPTON an J CHERBOURG to NEW YORK; 

and from LIVERPOOL and QUEENSTOWN to NEW 
YORK. BOSTON, and PHILADELPHIA ; also from 

LIVERPOOL to SOUTH AFRICA. AUSTRALIA and 
NEW ZEALAND ; from LONDON to NEW ZEALAND : 
from ANTWERP to AUSTRALIA ; and from GENOA 
and NAPLES to BOSTON and NEW YORK. 

WHITE STAR-DOMINION LINE 

Regular Passenger and Freight Sailings from 
LIVERPOOL to QUEBEC and MONTREAL (.Summer) ; 

LIVERPOOL/oHALIFAXar,JPORTLAND.Me.(W',Vi/er). 

Apply to — 
WHITE STAR LINE: LIVERPOOL i SOUTHAMPTON! BRISTOL i 
UNION CHAMBERS. 63. TEMPLE ROW. BIRMINGHAM i AND 
1. COCKSPUR ST.. S.W. 1. AND 38. LEADENHALL ST.. E.G. 3. LONDON. 




For all 
Temperafures 

The qualrty and re- 
liability of "Castroi " 
are not affected by 
climatic and regiona 
extremes. It is a 
proved selling line all 
over the world. Write 
for name ot nearest 
:: Agent. :: 

C. C. WAKEFIELD 

& Co., Ltd., 

Wakefield House, 

Cheapside, 

London, E.G. 2. 




Members trading v/ith our Advertisers materially help " OVERSEAS." 

25 



Advertiser's Anttottncemevt. 






AMERICA 

THE ROYAL MAIL 
STEAM PACKET CO 
18. MOORGATE ST. 
LONDON. E.C.2 

THE PACIFIC STEAM 

NAVIGATION CO. 

GOREE. WATER ST. 

LIVERPOOL 




A\hcn making purchases, please give " OVERSEAS' 
opportunity to quote prices. 

2ti 



Advertisers an 



A dvertisers' A nnoiuiccinents. 



CANADIAN 
PACIFIC 



STEAMERS 



OPERATING OVER 19,400 MILES OF RAIL- 
WAY, the Canadian Pacific has the most 
complete and far-reaching service, not only in 
Canada itself, but also for the United States of 
America and Alaska. 

Regular services of fast passenger and freight 
steamers from Liverpool, London, Southampton, 
Glasgow, Bristol, Antwerp and Havre to Quebec and 
Montreal (summer) and St. John, N.B. (winter), and 
from Vancouver to Japan, Manila and China. 
"Empress of Asia" and "Empress of Russia" are 
the largest and fastest steamers on the Pacific. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 

62-65, CHARING CROSS, S.W. 1; 103, LEADENHALL ST., E.C. .3, 

LONDON. 

Or Local Agents Everywhere. 



WEST AFRICA 

The Gambia, Sierra Leone, Gold 
Coast and Nigeria. 

REGULAR SERVICES FOR PASSENGERS AND CARGO 

to and from 

REGULAR SAILINGS ALSO BETWEEN CANADA AND THE CAPE. 

Jill parliculapi from 

ELDER DEMPSTER AND CO.. Limited. 

COLONIAL HOUSE, WATER STREET, LIVERPOOL. 

4, St. Mary Axe, London, E.C.3. 30, Mosley St., Manchester, 

Hull, Birmingham, Hamburg, Cardiff, &e., &c. 



To continuallyiimprove " OVERSEAS " we rely largely upon our 
advertisement revenue. 



27 



Advci'iisry's .1 iinminccmoii. 



UNION-CASTLE LINE 



TO 



SOUTH AFRICA, 
WEST AND EAST AFRICA, 
ROYAL MAIL SERVICE. 




Serving THE CAPE, NATAL, TRANSVAAL, RHODESIA, 

MOZAMBIQUE COAST, BRITISH EAST AFRICA (Kenya 

Colony), ANGOLA. SOUTH-WEST AFRICA, MAURITIUS, 

Etc. With calls at 

MADEIRA, CANARIES, ASCENSION and 

ST. HELENA. 

For further information apply to the 

Head Office: 3,FeiichurcliStreet, E.C.3. 



When ordering from our Advertisers, please mention " OVERSEAS." 

This helps the Club. 

28 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



The Surest and most con- 
venient way of securing 
British or Foreign Publi- 
cations is to let us mail 
:: them to you 






For over loo years we have sent them to all parts of 
the world. 

The local newspaper of your native home town will 
come as regularly as your favourite British periodical 
or magazine, or the trade paper you need to keep you 
in touch with the doings and developments of British 
industry. 

You save time and postage by ordering from one 
source and the automatic memory of our organisation 
saves disappointment. The best method of obtaining 
this service is to send a deposit to be placed to your 
credit so that we may immediately start sending to 
you, or we will send by return a free copy of our 
« POSTAL PRESS GUIDE " which gives the sub- 
scription rates of over l,ooo publications. 

We have an exceptionally large stock of books on all 
subjects. Any book or publication can be despatched 
by next mail. We also specialise in cheap parcels of 
renovated library books by popular authors. 

W. H. SMITH & SON 

Wholesale 6- Retail Newsagents, Booksellers 6- Stationers 

STRAND HOUSE, LONDON, W.C. 2 

(ENG.) 
Cables : atTTX Codes : 

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OVERSEAS 

A LINK.- OF • EMPIRE 

Founded and Edited by 
EVELYN "WT^MCH 

GENERAL BUUXUNGS • ALDWYCH • LONDON 




Vol. VI. No. 70. 



November, 1921. 




[ The views expressed in the Monthly Letter and in all signed articles 
in " Overseas " are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the 
members of the Central Council of the Over-Seas Club and Patriotic 

League.] 

My Monthly Letter 
By E. w. 

lERY HARD TIMES. — Not in the memory of living 
man has Great Britain suffered from such hard times, 
and the im.mediate outlook is sombre indeed. The 
fact that British industry is only bearing its share of 
the universal unrest and economic chaos caused by the 
aftermath of the world-war is slight consolation to the people of 
these islands who are confronted with unemployment on an 
hitherto undreamt-of scale. 

Even the armchair politicians in the strongholds of Torydom, 
who parrot-like repeat the phrase that all our troubles are due ' ' to 
the British Working-man who will not put his back into his job," 
know that they are only uttering half-truths. For if every British 
worker were ready uncomplainingly to keep his nose to the grind- 
stone for ten hours a day, as some employers would like him to, 
our position would be little better. What is the use of production 
if no one can afford the products of your labour ? And that is 
very much the present state of affairs. 

EXCHANGE PROBLEMS.— Nothing is so dull to the ordinary 
mortal as columns of figures and dissertations on high finance. 
But one does not require to be a Rothschild or a Rockefeller to 
grasp the broad facts of the existing European exchange situation. 
The depreciated currencies of most of Europe mean that the peoples 
of Russia, Germany, Austria, Roumania, Poland, etc., and to a 
lesser degree Italy and France, cannot afford to purchase British 
goods. So, however much the British workman might put his 
back into his job, his efforts could be of little avail till the exchange 
problem is righted. 

Not that I wish to imply that the disastrous strikes and lock-outs 
we have suffered from during the past two years have not added to 
our misfortunes, but they are by no means solely responsible. 

31 



My Monthly 
Letter. 



OVERSEAS 



My Monthly 
Letter. 



As a result, one of the first matters which the Government has 
turned its attention to, with the assistance of the master-minds of 
Lombard Street, has been the institution of a system of credits 
which will enable the countries with depreciated currencies to 
purchase British manufactures. 

SHOULD WAR DEBTS BE CANCELLED ?— The following 
figures, and they are the only ones I will give, show how great are 
the world's debts, caused by the War : — 

The world owes America ;£2, coo, coo, coo, as follows : — 

£ 

Britain ..... 972,000,000 



France 
Italy 
Belgium 
Russia 

Rest of World 
The world owes Great Britain 



Russia 

France 

Italy 

Belgium . 

Serbia 

Other nations 

Dominions 



550,000,000 
325,000,000 
70,000,000 
37,000,000 
46,000,000 
£1,9^7,600,000, as follows 

£ 
561,400,000 

557,000,000 

476,800,000 

103,400,000 

22,100,000 

82,900,000 

144,000,000 



As a result of the economic stagnation caused by Europe's 
inability to trade with us there are many who are openly advocating 
the cancelling of all war debts. Among them is Mr. Winston 
Churchill, who, according to the Sunday Times, feels "that salva- 
tion lies only along the lines of the stabilisation of exchanges by the 
mutual remission of debt. He is even against large reparation 
payments from Germany." 

OUR ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE.— Assuredly we have 
travelled a long way since December, 191 8, when the British public 
was complacently listening to election orations which assured them 
that Germany would pay all the costs of the War, while Great 
Britain would seize all the lucrative trade of the world ! Not so — 
alas ! for the glib words of the election orators — are the affairs of 
this complicated world of ours conducted. 

If Germany or Russia does not prosper- — in other words, cannot 
afford to trade with Great Britain — hundreds of thousands of British 
working men are without a job and threatened with starvation. 
Remarks like these seem platitudinous to-day, but when Mr. 
Norman Angell drew our attention to the interdependence of the 
modern industrial world ten years ago, how few listened to him ! 
DISASTROUS STRIKE POLICY.— The present official unemploy- 

:i2 



OVERSEAS 



ment figure is given at 1,400,000, which is a great improvement on 
the end of June, when the effects of the coal strike were at their 
worst, and it seems small in comparison with the 6,000,000 of 
the United States. One happy augury seems to be emerging from 
the hard times we have been going through. 

The workers as a whole are realising that a policy of continuous 
strikes brings disaster on all of us and that somehow or other the 
price of coal must be reduced so that the cost of production of our 
manufactures can be lessened. Indeed there appears to be a growing 
realisation that employer and employed must pull together if we are 
to find a way out of our industrial difficulties. 

SOME FURTHER REFLECTIONS.—When Parliament re- 
assembles we shall doubtless learn what other methods of lessen- 
ing the unemployment, in addition to the granting of export 
credits, are proposed. Among the suggestions which have been 
advocated are the making of roads on a large scale, urgently 
required as a result of the development of motor transport, the 
extension of electric lighting schemes, and the developm.ent of 
garden cities on a big scale. 

One aspect of the unemployment position in Great Britain which 
is apt to be overlooked is the transformation effected in many 
hitherto importing countries such as Australia, South Africa, 
Canada and India. As a result of the War many of them have 
become self-contained to an extent they never were previously, and 
as a result the British manufacturer is obliged to look elsewhere for 
fresh markets. 

Some economists are seriously 
concerned by the continuous 
export of British capital to foreign 
countries, much of which does 
not necessarily mean extra work 
for British industry. The sugges- 
tion is made, and there is much 
to be said in favour of it, that at 
the present time every proposal 
for investment and every appeal 
to the public for funds, ought to 
be considered in direct relation 
to its effect on the provision of 
employment at home, and, as the 
New Statesman puts it, "those 
investments which promise profit 
to the investor at the cost of 
starving the people of this coun- 
try ought to be ruthlessly sup- 
pressed." 



My Monthly 
Letter. 




UHj't*' 



3;i 



"Will he Accept.''" 
McCutcheon, in the Chicago Trilune, 



OVERSEAS 



My Monthly THE DOWNING STREET CONFERENCE.— Now that the Irish 
Letter. delegates are in London and meeting Mr. Lloyd George and his 

colleagues round the conference table at " No. lo," the less that 
onlookers say about the negotiations the better. But there is not 
a reader of " Overseas " who will not desire to add his prayers to 
those of all of us who desire a permanent solution on a just basis 
of the Irish problem. Let us hope that, when such gigantic issues 
are at stake, there will be a spirit of moderation and give and take 
on both sides, and that out of these fateful discussions will emerge 
the Dominion of Ireland, a sister state in the British Commonwealth 
of Nations. 

THE NATION'S TEETH. — The announcement of the appointment 
by the Ministry of Health, in consultation with the Medical Research 
Council, of the Committee to investigate "the causes of dental 
decay " has come not a moment too soon, for the present state 
of the nation's teeth, as the columns of " Overseas " have often 
pointed out, is nothing short of appalling. An official of the 
Ministry of Health said to a representative of the Daily Express 
recently, " A perfectly healthy set of teeth in a school child is 
practically non-existent ! " 

One of the problems the Committee will have to tackle will be 
the question of the evil effects of excessive sweet-eating by the 
children. This aspect was also referred to by the Ministry of 
Health official already quoted. He said: "When the sugar 
supply was halved during the War, it was found that there was an 
extraordinary improvement in the teeth of school children. One 
of the problems before the Committee just appointed will be the 
relation of diet to bad teeth, and we may have a scientific inquiry 
into the effects of eating sweets." 

ECONOMISING IN HEALTH.— But the whole problem of teeth 
is so closely allied to that of general health that it is difficult to 
see where the Committee will draw the line. What will be their 
attitude towards the cutting off of the free milk supply to expectant 
and nursing mothers as a result of the " Anti-Waste fanatics," 
which had been responsible since its institution for a lowered 
death-rate among babies under one year ? 

Nowhere has useless expenditure by the Government been more 
severely criticised than in the columns of " Overseas," as my 
rea.ders will recollect, and time after time our voice was raised 
Against the expenditure of millions of good money in Russian 
and other wild-cat expeditions. But the nation's health is alto- 
gether another matter. 

What greater obligation can the State have than to ensure that 
every child brought into the world is given a reasonable chance 
of growing into a healthy citizen ? If national prosperity is 
reckoned by man-power, healthy and clean-limbed, what greater 

H 



OVERSEA 



economy could any Government effect than the care of the coming 
generation ? But this is an aspect which most of our Anti-Waste 
newspaper " stunts " seem to overlook. 

THE BRITISH CLIMATE'S LATEST.— No apology is required 
to excuse a reference to the weather, for the British climate has 
surpassed itself to such an extent that our fund of suitable comments 
has long since been exhausted 1 There never has been such weather 
in these old islands — anyhow, not in living memory. First we 
had a phenomenally mild winter, followed by an extraordinarily 
early spring of delightful sunny days ; then came a practically 
rainless summer, with a prolonged heat-wave, concerning which I 
told you in a previous letter. 

At the end of July and in the middle of August we had a few 
days of rain, but much below the average. And all the time we 
said, ' ' Wait till September and October, when we shall pay for this. ' ' 
Indeed, we almost began to pity those unfortunate individuals 
who had put off taking their holidays till late in the year, and 
complimented ourselves on our superior wisdom. 

September came and went in a blaze of sunshine, with only three 

days of rain, and all the while we kept saying to ourselves that 
to-day must be the last day of summer weather. But no, the 

British climate, when bent on establishing fresh records, does not 
do things by halves. Here we are in mid-October, and we have 
literally been bathed in sunshine, and on October 9th London had 

a shade temperature of 82 

degrees, a record which one 

has to go back to 1859 to 

equal 1 As a result every one 

has been wearing summer 

clothes and trying to keep cool, 

with indifferent success. 

Our weather these past six 

weeks has been more like a 

North-American Indian 

summer than anything else I 

can compare it to. The 

amateur meteorologists are 

getting quite excited, and the 

sun-spots and the Gulf Stream 

and other natural phenomena 

are being held responsible. 

Some folks boldly say that the 

British climate is changing, but 

" I hae me doots," and I am 

sure that there are some sur- 
prises in store for us later on. 

35 



My Moothly 
Letter. 




I '■ 



"All Dressed Up and no Place to go: 

Until the collapsed foreign exchanges are repaired 
wc can expect no real improvement in our foreign 
trade. 
" Poy," in the London Evening News. 



OVERSEAS 



My Monthly Anyhow, I know in a few weeks, when the November fogs are upon 
Letter. us, we shall all be regretfully looking back on these wonderful 

early autumn days of continuous sunshine. 

THE FIRST BRITISH-BORN WOMAN M.P.— We can all, whatever 
our politics, unite in extending the heartiest of welcomes to Mrs. 
T. Wintringham, the Independent Liberal candidate, on her election 
by the voters of Louth (Lincolnshire) to the House of Commons. 
However much we may admire the fearless manner in which 
Lady Astor has championed worthy causes since her election, we 
like to feel that British womanhood is now represented at West- 
minster. 

It was not fitting that the only woman M.P. in the British House 
of Commons should be American-born, and Lady Astor, in her 
characteristically generous manner, was among the first who 
hoped for Mrs. Wintringham's return. To the writer, long before 
the Louth election. Lady Astor said that she earnestly hoped that 
Mrs. Wintringham would be elected, as she stood for all the things 
which were worth while. 

Voters, whatever their politics, can whole-heartedly rejoice in 
Mrs. Wintringham's election, because the more M.P.'s of her type 
we can have at Westminster the better. The new M.P. has a 
splendid record of public service. Starting life as a school teacher 
at Grimsby, Mrs. Wintringham has long championed better con- 
ditions for women workers, legal equality of the sexes, fairer 
divorce laws for women, and other good causes. 
THE DRAWBACK OF MAIN ROADS. — Modern civilisation 
has certainly its drawbacks, as all who own houses on our main 
roads, either in town or country, are realising to their sorrow. 
The internal combustion engine has certainly much to answer for ! 
True, the motor enables the great mass of our people to enjoy the 
delights of the countryside, and we can none of us desire to push 
back the hands of the clock of progress in so far as it brings happi- 
ness and opportunities for the enjoyment of fresh air to the workers 
in our large cities. Nevertheless, how often this summer must 
we all have wished that motor traction was less noisy and more 
picturesque ! 

By all means let us welcome the coming of the char-a-banc, but 
surely up and down this land of ours there might be marked off 
great " reserves " into which no motors would be permitted to 
penetrate. Charming bits of English landscape which we will 
not permit Henry Ford — and he is one of the least offenders — the 
great motor lorry, the glaring petrol signs of diverse brands, to 
desecrate. Reserves where pedestrians and push-bicyclists and 
dog owners could wander to their hearts' content without the 
constant nightmare of noisy, rattling, mechanically-driven vehicles 
rushing by. 



OVERSEAS 



Now that every small town in England has its motor bus service 
and that the road transport of goods has been developed to such an 
extent, to say nothing of the private motorists and motor 'cyclists, 
residents on main roads are suffering from a special brand 'of brain 
exhaustion, so many doctors tell us — and no wonder. 

How we are to protect ourselves from on-rushing civilisation in 
the form of the nerve-racking motor bus and lorry is a problem 
which is a very real one just now. What a contrast to the picture 
of Ruskin, accompanying his father and mother, posting leisurely 
along the roads of France and Italy seventy or eighty years ago ! 
ON THEATRE QUEUES.— Since the return of the dark evenings 
with the end of summer-time, there has been much correspondence 
in the press on the subject of the theatre queue. It seems incon- 
ceivable that there are still some who defend this disgraceful 
institution, and yet so it is, for although the majority of letters I 
have read demand its abolition, some play-goers seem to be of a 
very conservative make-up. 

The urgency of the abolition of the queue is all the greater now 
that the prices of all the seats which can be booked in advance have 
gone up. This practically means that the person of moderate 
means who desires to see a good 
play must either pay more than 
he can afford and book in ad- 
vance, wait two or three hours 
in the dismal, draughty sur- 
roundings of the average London 
pit queue on a winter's night, or 
go without. 

From the standpoint of the 
managers, long queues blocking 
up the pavements are good ad- 
vertising, but from the poor 
patient public's point of view, 
there is nothing to be said for 
the queue. How many illnesses, 
I wonder, is the queue respon- 
sible for in the winter, when 
vitality is low, after hours of 
waiting, and when the weary 
play-goer falls a ready victim 
to influenza and cold microbes ? 

If there is any valid reason 
against advance booking for the 
pit and other cheaper seats, I 
have not heard its advocacy, 
nor do I see any good reason 

37 



My Monthly 
Letter. 




B.FFECr ON GIRL'S IN AFTER UFE, _ 

PAniL!ft.RiT> wan Pm^ BREE.O& CONTEnpx 




EFFECT ON SOVb IN AFTER LIFE. - 
TrtE VE«.-V FtEVER-S: 
' NO , not") 
\A Pin! 




What every mother knows about babies is that 
they dread pins. In later life the girl baby grows 
up to understand them. To the boy they always 

remain a mystery. 
Mr. W. K. Haselden, in the London Daily Mirror. 



OVERSEAS 



My Monthly why the doors should not be thrown open, say, one and a half 
Letter. hours before the performance, so that the public could wait in their 

seats. 

A FILM DANGER. — In the columns of " Overseas " the need for 
better and cleaner films has often been advocated. There is one 
aspect of this subject which will especially appeal to those living in 
Asia and Africa, where the extraordinarily difficult problem of the 
relationship of the white man to his coloured brother is very much 
of a reality. I refer to the part which many of the trashy and 
suggestive films can play in lowering the prestige of the white races 
before Asiatic and African eyes. 

If Western civilisation is so much superior to that of the East, it 
must be confessed that coloured patrons of the " movies " should 
be excused if they do not always realise the fact. 
" EAST IS EAST." — The harmful effect of the cinema in the East 
is dealt with by Miss K. F. Gerould in a recent issue of the Atlantic 
Monthly. 

" We have (she wr'tes) a great responsibility on our hands. 

I have heard it said and cor- 
roborated, in unimpeachable 
quarters, that to the movies is 
due a large part of the unrest 
in India. 

" For a decade, the East 
Indian has been gazing upon 
the white man's movie ; and 
it is inevitable that he should 
ask why the people who behave 
that way at home should con- 
sider that they have a divine 
mission to civilise and govern 
other races. 

' ' We can perfectly see that 
to the Hindu and the Moham- 
medan, the Japanese, and the 
South American of Hispano- 
Moorish social tradition, the 
spectacle of the movie-heroine 
who is not only unchaperoned 
but scantily dressed, who more 
or less innocently ' vamps ' 
every man within striking 
radius, who drives her own car 
through the slums at midnight, 
who places herself constantly in 
perilous or unworthy contacts, 

[Photo: Graphic Photo Union. 
A novelty in hats used to advertise the work of 
blind ex-service men. 




OVERS 



yet who is on the whole considered a praiseworthy and My Monthly 
eminently marriageable young woman, is not calculated to 1-etter. 
enhance the reputation of Europe or the United States. 

" Nor do I believe that Charlie Chaplin is destined to spread 
the doctrine of the White Man's Burden very successfully. 
We deal, in these other continents, with peoples to whom 
unnecessary bodily activity is not a dignified thing. You 
cannot possibly explain Charlie Chaplin to them correctly. 
You just cannot. They simply think that official Anglo- 
Saxons are minuetting in the parlour for diplomatic reasons, 
and that Charlie Chaplin is the Anglo-Saxon ' out in the 
pantry.' " 
ROUNDING CAPE HORN. — Mere land-lubbers, like most of us 
who are readers of " Overseas," know very little about navigation 
in sailing ships, accustomed as we are to make our voyages across 
the oceans on modern steamships. The other day I came across 
the following account of an American sailing ship's attempt to 
round Cape Horn and its final triumph, together with the chart, 
which is reproduced on this page. An account like this makes 
one thank one's stars that fate does not expect us to go sailing 
round " the Horn " in a sailing ship ! 

Here is the extract from the Pacific Marine Review, of San 
Francisco : — 

' ' There is a basis of fact in the legend of the Flying Dutch- 
man — the ghost ship that is eternally trying to round Cape 
Horn and for ever being beaten back. The chart shows why 
sailor folk gave 
the cape its bad 
name. Follow 
the course on this 
chart day by day. 
The course is that 
of the sailing ship 
Edward Sew all 
while trying to 
round Cape Horn 
in 1914. It took 
her sixty - seven 
days to get from 
latitude 50 south 
on the east of the 
continent to the 
same parallel on 
the west side. On 
ten previous voy- 
ages the ship had 

"^^ Chart showing the wanderings, lasting 6j days, of the American 
sailing ship Edward Sewall rounding Cape Horn in 1914. 




My Monthly 
Letter. 



OVERSEAS 




made this portion of the voyage in from ten to twenty-three 
days, the average being i6"4 days. The illustration gives the 
course in detail below the S4-degree line. The coastline is 
indicated with no suggestion of the treacherous isles and 
inlets. A glance at the dates showing the vessel's location day 
by day makes the story clear. On April 19th, for instance, 
she was farther east than on March 30th, and so it went. 
Those bare lines are the skeleton of a sea romance — but the 
Sewall made it in the end." E. W. 



Photographic Contest for 1921—22 



(i) Prize of Five Guineas for 




The Wondergat, near Maf eking. It Is a deep 
pool of water situated in an outcrop of dolo- 
mite. It has never been fathomed as there Is 
a very strong under-current. Thirty years ago 
the water was up to the top of the rocks. It 
has since subsided about thirty feet. There 
are several holes like this In the neighbour- 
hood and they are thought to be connected 
with some underground river system. Photo 
sent by Dr. J. E. Mackenzie, Mafeking, Soutli 
Africa. 



the best photograph of a man 
reader of "Overseas" any- 
where. (2J Prize of Five Guineas 
for the best photograph of a 
woman reader of "Overseas" 
anywhere. (3) Prize of Five 
Guineeis for the best photo- 
graph of a boy or girl under 
sixteen reading "Overseas" 
outside the British Empire. 
(4) Prize of Five Guineas for the 
best photograph of a boy or girl 
under sixteen reading " Over- 
seas " in Canada. (5) Ditto in 
Australia. (6) Ditto in South 
Africa. (7) Ditto in New Zea- 
land. (8) Ditto in Newfound- 
land. (9) Prize of Five Guineas 
for the best photograph of a child 
under ten reading "Overseas" 
anywhere. 

All photographs (silver prints) 
should reach us not later than 
Empire Day, May 24th, 1922, 
but we hope that our readers 
will not wait till then but send 
them along at once. 



"WHY I WENT OVERSEAS 
AND WHAT HAPPENED TO 
ME."-~Readers are asked to send 
us articles of 750 to 1,000 words 
describing their reasons for going 
abroad and what happened to them 
when there. 

40 



9 



The Two Aspects of the Empire 

By Sir Valentine Ghirol 





R. CHAMBERLAIN once advised us to "think 
Imperially." The advice is as good now as it was 
then. But if we are to follow it, we must have a clear 
idea of what the British Empire is and what it stands 
for to-day. Not long ago I saw it described on one 
and the same day in two very different ways. One newspaper told 
me it was a great British Commonwealth of free nations, the 
greatest democracy that the world had ever seen. Another re- 
minded me that now that there was no longer an autocrat of all 
the Russias, it was the one Empire left in the world which kept 
scores of millions of human beings under alien rulership. 

The strange thing is that both these statements are true in them- 
selves, but are only part of the whole truth. They represent, as it 
were, the two opposite aspects of the Empire, and it is the task — 
a no easy task — of British statesmen to keep them equally present 
to their mind if they mean to "think Imperially." Britain 
and the British nations that have sprung from her loins and trans- 
planted her faith and her traditions, her language and her institu- 
tions to Canada and Newfoundland, to Australia and New Zealand, 
and with a large admixture of Dutch elements, to South Africa, 
supply the back-bone of a far-flung Empire which stretches to 
every quarter of the globe. These British nations constitute, 
undoubtedly, the greatest and most democratic commonwealth 
that the world has ever seen. 

But, numerically, they form only a small minority of the total 
population of the British Empire, and that small minority is itself 
very unevenly distributed — 45 millions in these islands and barely 
20 millions in the rest of an Empire of some 450 millions, com- 
prising numberless races and creeds and tongues, all remote from 
our own, and all in very different stages of evolution. Whilst 
all the peoples of European stock within the Empire with one 
exception, which, it may be hoped, will soon disappear, govern 
themselves to-day as free democracies, the vast majority that 
are not of European stock, and that amount collectively to 
close upon a quarter of the estimated population of the globe, 
have been hitherto governed, undeniably, on despotic lines, how- 

41 



The Two 

Aspects of 
the Empire. 



OVERSEAS 



The Two ever well-intentioned and beneficent such despotism may have 

Aspects pf been. 

the Empire. j^^ problem before us is the gradual adjustment of these two 
different aspects of the British Empire, the one so essentially 
democratic, the other so largely despotic. It should not be an 
insoluble problem. After all, the relations between Great Britain 
and the other British nations of the Empire have only recently 
reached their present stage of adjustment. Only a generation ago 
we in these islands used to talk in an almost patronising tone of 
the British peoples of the self-governing Dominions as "the 
daughter nations," and instead of a South African Union we had 
an extremely disunited South Africa on the eve of a long and bitter 
struggle between Boer and Briton. To-day the British peoples of 
the Dominions are " sister-nations " who, in addition to their self- 
governing rights, are intimately associated with Great Britain in 
the control of the whole domain of Imperial policy, and it is on this 
basis that the recent conference of Prime Ministers has confirmed 
in peace time and for peace purposes the unity of the Empire, 
which emerged not only unscathed, but immensely fortified 
from four and a half years of frightful war waged in common 
and for a common purpose. Not the least striking feature of that 
conference was the presence of a Prime Minister of South Africa, 
now welded into a self-governing South African Union, in which 
the principles of British freedom have already so far prevailed 
over the old antagonism between Briton and Boer that the dis- 
tinguished statesman who spoke for both alike in London was 
General Smuts, who had fought stubbornly against us in the Boer 
War, and no less whole-heartedly for us in the great World War. 
To adjust the governance of races on a different plane of civilisa- 
tion from our own to the democratic ideals of self-government, 
now firmly embodied in the British Commonwealth of Nations, 
will be a still greater achievement. We are on the way to it in 
India, consciously, deliberately, since the Government of India Act of 
1919 endowed India with parliamentary institutions still doubtless 
rudimentary, but which definitely introduce the chief elements of 
responsible government and have as their declared goal Dominion 
self-government for India within the British Empire. It is apt to 
be regarded as a new and bold experiment — by some as a very rash 
experiment. But we have, in fact, been committed to it for the 
last hundred years, ever since we introduced Western education 
into India and, as the inevitable result of Western education, the 
ideas of liberty and the aspirations towards national self-expression 
which permeate British literature and British history. 

It is, of course, only a small minority of Indians who can be 
expected to rise at once to the great opportunity they have in front 
of them. But that small minority represents the intellectual and 

42 



OVERSEAS 



The Two 
Aspects of 
the Empire. 



"politically-minded" classes, who, thanks to Western education, 
have acquired an almost complete monopoly of all the liberal pro- 
fessions and all the public services except the few branches still 
reserved for men of British birth. Their influence cannot be 
measured by counting heads, and it is upon their influence that we 
must in the long run rely, if the British connection is to be main- 
tained in India otherwise than by the sword — upon which, even 
in the past, we have never alone relied — against the many 
reactionary and revolutionary forces which have been set in 
motion with renewed intensity in India as elsewhere by the great 
wave of world-unrest that has followed the World War. 

Even in the most democratic countries of the West, it is always 
from small minorities that the impulse to progress has at first 
proceeded, until in the end minorities become majorities. It may 
be a longer and more arduous process in India, but there is no 
reason to despair of its accomplishment if other parts of the Empire 
will do their share in overcoming one of the main difficulties, 
viz., the conflict of racial feeling, which is the chief common asset 
to-day of the forces leagued together in India against a " Satanic " 
Government and a " Satanic " civilisation. 

If our Western civilisation, together with the principles of 
democratic governance which are amongst the finest of its fruits, 
is to prevail, not only in India, but ultimately amongst all the 
people of the British Empire who are not of British stock, it must 
be based on ethical and not on racial standards. This is, in fact, 
what the British Empire has undertaken to prove by inviting 
India to become a partner in its Commonwealth of Free Nations, 
and by admitting Indians to represent India at the London Con- 
ference on a footing of equality with the Prime Ministers of all 
the self-governing parts of the Commonwealth. 

More than that, it has given a supremely valuable lead to the whole 
world at a time when the 
racial issue underlies so 
many delicate and even 
dangerous international 
questions. And it is a lead 
which the British Empire, 
compounded as it is of 
an unparalleled mixture 
of Western and Oriental 
peoples, could alone give 
in disproving the shallow 
fallacy that ' ' East is East 
and West is West, and 
never the twain can 
meet." 

'^'^ Waterval Onder, Transval. Photo sent by Mr. M. Liefeldt, 
Native Affairs Denartmenr, Pretoria, South Africa. 




OVERS 






The New Home of the Over-Seas Club. 
Vernon House, Park Place, St. James's Street, London. 
In order to pay off the loan we have arranged in connec- 
tion with its purchase, we still require £23,000. 

44 



^Illlllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllly^ 




A MOUNTAIN TRAMP. 

Photo sent by Mr. J. S. Ridley, Caribbean Petroleum Co., Caracas, 
\enezuela, S. America. This photograph has been awarded 

a prize. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ China and Nigeria iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




Fishing witli Cormorants in Ningpo, China. Photo taken by Mr. A. J. Palmer. Sent by 
Mrs. Susie Palmer, China Inland Mission, Ningpo, China. 




A Hausa Potter. Photo sent by -Mr. \V. E. Dalton Pnrkis, P.O. Jos., Nigeria, \V. Africa. 



i]lllllllll{|||||ll!![lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllll|lllll|||llll||ll||^ 



OVERSEAS 




Why 

Australia 
wants 
15,000,000 



Why Australia Wants 15,000,000 

Population 

By Percy Hunter, Director of Immigration in London 
of the Australian Government 

HE Commonwealth of Australia, with an area equal 
to that of the United States of America, is at the 
present time in the possession of but five millions of 
inhabitants. The latest estimate of the population population, 
of the United States is 105 millions. Yet the proba- 
bilities are that, for its ultimate power of wealth production, 
Australia may be regarded as the peer of the great northern 
republic. This single fact will explain the reason why Australia 
is now in urgent need of more population to develop its resources 
and to secure its safety. 

Judged by all comparative standards, the Commonwealth has done 
excellently well in the past. Its birth-rate is high, and its death-rate 
low. Its rate of natural increase, amounting to 16-34 P^"" i.ooo of 
mean population per annum, so far as accurate statistics are avail- 
able, is the highest in the world. For the decade prior to the War, 
Australia was adding to its numbers to the extent of about 25,000 
per annum by immigration. Its economic position was enviable. 

The total export and import trade per inhabitant in 1914 was 
£Si IDS. 9d. ; in 191 9, ;^39 15s. ; the corresponding figures for 
those years for the United States were £g os. 8d. and £iy 15s. id., 
and for Great Britain, £26 and 1^53 is. 5d. 

By comparison, the economic and vital statistics of Australia 
are satisfactory, but other considerations have now to be taken into 
account. With an area of 2,974,581 square miles, Australia is the 
most sparsely populated of all civilised countries, having a density 
of but I -So persons to the square mile ; the density of Great Britain 
and Ireland is 351-04, and of the United States 35*39, persons to the 
square mile. 

The emptiness of the great southern Commonwealth is thus 
conspicuous. For the Australian nation to retain the whole as 
their exclusive possession, and also to direct its development on the 
lines of the past, a rapid increase in numbers is urgently needed. 

The country has been British territory now for upwards of 130 
years, but it cannot be said to have reached national stature before 
the middle of last century, when the discovery of gold caused a large 
and sudden infiux of people, the majority of whom settled down in 
other avocations than gold mining. Since that time the condi- 
tions, until quite lately, have not been such as to bring home to 
Australians a sense of impending danger to the continued posses- 
sion of their country by reason of the paucity of their numbers. 

45 E 



OVERSEAS 



Why But perception of this risk is now abundantly clear. A world 

Australia movement has set in which will bring the Pacific Ocean into much 

rs^OOO 000 greater political importance than it has ever yet had, and Australia 

Population. '^ ^^^ crown of the Pacific. Its actual production of wealth is great 

enough to demonstrate its inherent possibilities, when the obvious 

capacity for future development is considered. The Commonwealth 

has established itself as a political unity which it is worth while to 

preserve intact, and its present population is too small to ensure 

security of possession. That is the outstanding fact. 

A minimum of fifteen millions of inhabitants is required to cope 
with the problems that the land now presents. Preferably the 
figure should be put at twenty millions. The fertile coastal fringe 
of the east and south could absorb twice that number and provide 
a bountiful subsistence for them. The burdens imposed by the 
exigencies of recent years, which will tax severely the capacity of a 
population of five millions, cou*ld easily be borne by treble that 
number of people in so far as they consist of financial responsibi- 
lities. But it has also to be remembered that the Treaty of Ver- 
sailles, by making the Commonwealth a Mandatory Power, has 
enlarged those responsibilities in a manner without former prece- 
dent, and has imposed upon the Australian nation the duty not 
merely of providing for its own defence, but of administering 
additional territory far exceeding the United Kingdom in area, 
separated from its own shores by considerable tracts of sea, and 
situated at great distances from its present chief centres of popula- 
tion. This trust confers honour upon Australia, and is a tribute 
to its political ability and economic advancement, but for its due 
fulfilment it involves much more than the former primary duty of 
self-defence, and could be better compassed by a nation of twenty 
millions than of five. 

The figures named are far from being the limit of Australia's 
capacity to support a population ; they simply represent what are 
regarded as the country's immediate need. The requisite numbers 
are not on the spot, and must be brought into the Commonwealth 
from overseas. It is to be hoped that the overwhelming majority 
of them will come, like their predecessors, from the mother countries. 
The Federal and State Governments of Australia desire this, and are 
engaged in establishing a joint organisation to promote migration 
and settlement. 

The time is favourable, and the prospects good. Above all, in 
this connection, Australia desires that it shall be its own national 
kindred who will take advantage of the opportunity it offers for 
immigration. The instant wish of those concerned for its welfare, 
when they think of the annual overflow of the United Kingdom, is 
that they should come south and not abandon the Flag. The 
Australian is not a jingo imperialist, but he is strongly opposed 
to the disintegration of the British group of nations. 

46 



OVERSEAS 




The Telephone as an Empire Linker 

By Ernest A. Bryant 

HE day is coming when London may be not only the 
heart of the Empire, but the whispering gallery of 
the world. The medium is to be the telephone. In 
the Homeland we have come of late to regard the 
telephone as an invention of diminished facilities 
offered at higher cost, but experts in the United States have set us 
an example and despatched us a message which, soon or late, is 
bound to be fruitful in result. 

With President Harding at a main switchboard, and members 
of his Cabinet, together with representatives of pretty well every 
people, nation and language, present with him. Colonel Carty, 
Chief of the United States telephones, has engineered a series of 
telephonic conversations over a distance of 5,500 miles. Across 
the continent, from ocean to ocean, from Havana in the Atlantic, 
through Washington and New York, then due west, linking city 
with city, desert with prairie, industrial hives with homes of harvest, 
mountain with lake, and out again to sea from Los Angeles down 
to Catalina in the Pacific — so the messages travelled forth and 
back. 

That constitutes a record, in point of distance and in variety of 
means employed. It embraces a system of land-lines loaded with 
" repeaters " and other apparatus ; it employs lines beneath the 
sea, and utilises wireless where no cable runs. But the message 
was continuous ; it was heard simultaneously by scores of operators 
stationed at as many exchanges strung out across the continent. 

And Colonel Carty, to whose organising faculty the success is 
due, lays it down as a certainty that in due season the extremest 
fringes of the British Empire will be linked together as completely. 
With devices now in use, he says, it is possible for London to speak 
to Cape Town, to Calcutta, to Hong Kong and beyond, and for 
Downing Street to hold vocal intercourse with the chancellery of 
every foreign capital in the world. The prospect is a fascinating 
one, for what Government does to-day, the individual citizen may 
do to-morrow. 

It is beyond hope that we shall ever hear again " the sound of a 
voice that is still," but there seems every possibility that we may 
summon into activity the voice which is muted only by distance. 
In that sense the telephone is infinitely more human than the 
telegraph in the miracle of its achievement. The submarine cable 
can but connect lands ; the telephone brings a speaker at home 
to the ear of his friend far over the sullen sea. If the system were 
already in operation King George would be able daily to converse 

47 



The Tele- 
phone as an 
Empire 
Linker. 



OVERSEAS 




Linker. 



The Tele- with the Heir Apparent during the Prince's tour in India. Present- 
phone as an day equipment, once installed, is already equal to the task of trans- 
T .-lldf mitting human speech 10,000 miles, and that is only a beginning 

of the new efficiency. 

Some years ago, Mr. G. F. Preston, Controller of the London 
telephone system, said to the writer, " England has the best tele- 
graphic system in the world, and we shall not rest content until 
we have as good and efficient a telephone system as the American. ' ' 
At that time we had already installed loading coils at regular 
intervals along the lines, with the result that at a bound we had 
extended by 300 miles the range of our submarine cables for 
telephony, and had newly perfected what is technically termed 
the phantom current, a current borrowed from two existing cables 
and made to act for the transmission of speech as if the cables were 
threefold, so adding 50 per cent, to the capacity of the lines. 

Even then it was possible for 300 towns in Britain to speak to 
Paris, to Belgium, to Switzerland and other European centres. 
Our petty territorial boundaries prevent competition here in Great 
Britain with Colonel Carty's feat ; he has a continent over which to 
operate, whereas our greatest span is from London to Wick, 
which gives us but a beggarly 730 miles. 

The War has crippled developments of our telephone service, and 
economy is so essential as to prevent attempts at spectacular per- 
formances, but the potentialities for this reaching out into the space 
of Empire exist. Whatever the limitations of the business side of our 
British telephones, the technical skill of the men responsible is second 
to none, the imagination and vision of the engineers unexcelled. 

It was not news to these men that they have it in their power, 
finance permitting, to enable Calcutta to exchange greetings with 
London, for Singapore to transmit its local news to St. Stephen's. 
All that America has done our men can equal, given time and 
money. It may not be to-morrow or the next day, but that the 
time will come when the authentic voice of Old England may 
be heard by her sons and daughters in the farthest of British 
possessions is as certain as that this magazine will reach them. 

DR. C. W. SALEEBY'S LECTURE.— The attention of Members is 
particularly drawn to a lecture by Dr. C. W. Saleeby, F.R.S.E., at the 
Essex Hall, Strand, on Friday, November i8th, at 7.30 p.m. Dr. Saleeby 
has recently returned from a tour in the U.S.A. and Canada, where he 
lectured on Eugenics and race culture. He was particularly struck by 
the superb physique of the Canadians, and his lecture, which is entitled 
" Light against Death," will deal with the result of his observations 
during his tour, and will be illustrated by lantern slides. Admission is 
free, and each Member is allowed to bring one friend. As there is sure 
to be a large demand for tickets, early application is advised. Applica- 
tions should be addressed to the Reception Secretary, Over-Seas Club, 
enclosing a stamped addressed envelope. 

48 



OVERSEAS 




The Menace of the Nation's Bad Teeth 

By a Doctor 

"ROM the amount of attention that has been given to The Menace 
the teeth in the past half -century, and the amount of of the ^ 
paper that has been spoilt in describing the various ^''''°° ^ 
methods of preventing their decay, one might fairly 
expect to find a defective mouth a curiosity, and 
every one should be wearing his own teeth. 

Unfortunately, in spite of all this, quite the reverse is the rule. 
False teeth are becoming more and more common, even at quite 
youthful ages, while decayed teeth are looked upon by most as 
just a natural incident of our existence. 

Certainly this should not be so, and one cannot avoid the con- 
clusion that, as a nation, our teeth are decidedly deteriorating. 
Ancient British skulls, belonging to the early inhabitants of these 
islands, show teeth ground down by long usage, right to the level 
of the gums, but still firmly fixed in the jaws, and with still healthy 
roots. Few old men of the present day could exhibit this condi- 
tion, and I do not think those few would be found very near a 
town. Even among children early decay appears to be rather the 
rule than the exception. 

Admitting, then, that our teeth are more liable to be attacked 
by decay at a much earlier age than aforetime, one must not lose 
sight of the fact that dentistry has made remarkable advances in 
recent years, and has, to a considerable extent, discounted this, 
so much so that one is almost tempted to wonder whether we are 
really any worse off. Indeed, we should not be if artificial teeth 
were as efficient as natural ones — those of Nature's own make ; 
but, unfortunately, they are not quite so efficient. 

Truly, they are wonderful triumphs of the dentist's art, but, 
however well made the dentures, it is impossible to masticate the 
food as completely and satisfactorily with them, by reason of the 
lost sensitiveness of the vulcanite or gold-covered gums and, 
moreover, though many dentists may deny it, a plate, covering the 
roof of the mouth, does, to some extent, interfere with the delicacy 
of the taste-sense, so important an aid to good digestion. 

These are the facts we have to face. If we desire to maintain 
a good standard of national health and physique, it is, obviously, 
of the highest importance to seek the cause and remedy without 
further delay. Given that, with modern scientific knowledge, one 
would think it should be surely possible to avoid this early decay 
and preserve our teeth to a ripe old age. There are good grounds 
for believing that this will be the case, sooner or later, but much 
water must flow under the mill before we know all about the 

49 



OVERSEAS 



Teeth, 



The Menace subject, or before we are even in a position to take full advantage 

of the of the knowledge when we get it. 

Nation's Bad Many learned treatises have been written, by experts, on the 
cause of dental decay, but one becomes rather bewildered to find 
that each authority attributes it to a different cause, and one 
begins to wonder which, if any, is right. The fact is, they are 
all right — as far as they, individually, go, but there are so many 
causes, and not one or two alone. 

The main causes appear to be civilisation, parental ignorance 
and neglect, and general carelessness. To particularise more 
minutely, I should say- — defective nutrition of the body from bad 
health, bad living, or poor food ; insufficient use of the teeth ; 
uncleanliness of the mouth ; deficiency of vitamins in the food. 

In the past the teeth of both the Egyptians and the Romans 
compared very unfavourably with those of their less civilised 
contemporary neighbours, as do ours, Man, in the primitive 
state, had less means of rendering his food soft by culinary arts, 
and also of keeping it. He was obliged, therefore, to use his 
teeth vigorously, and his food was more fresh and unspoiled. 
His mode of living was more natural, and made for the production 
of the robust individual. He would not need a tooth-brush. 

Parental ignorance is colossal, and neglect only too common. 
Among the poor one sees over-diluted, stale, or even tinned milk 
and dirty bottles, while the rich are addicted to expensive artificial 
foods, and commonly boil the baby's milk or buy it sterilised. 

General carelessness is more the rule than the exception. A 
hasty scrub, with an uncleaned brush, in the morning, is about 
the most attention the teeth are likely to get from the average 
individual, and he rarely gives a thought to a decayed tooth till 
it begins to ache. By that time the enamel has been penetrated, 
and the mischief is done. 

Fortunately the case is not quite so bad as it looks at first sight, 
and the knowledge of a few useful facts, combined with a little 
common sense, will go quite a long way to combat premature 
dental decay, and assist in preserving our teeth in a healthy condi- 
tion. The attempt should be commenced in infancy. More 
attention should be given to the correct nutrition and general 
development of the child's body. Healthy teeth in a healthy body 
should be the aim of our endeavour. For this, only a very little 
scientific knowledge is necessary, and some common sense, A 
properly nourished, healthy child will usually have properly 
nourished — and, therefore, healthy — teeth. The important thing 
about the food of an infant is that it must contain vitamins. 

Everybody knows now that as the electric spark starts the 
explosion of the petrol in the motor, so vitamins start the digestive 
process in the body ; also that, being unstable bodies, they are 

50 



OVERSEAS 



easily ruined by long cooking or long keeping. Fresh foods, The Menace 
especially if raw like milk, contain them in greater amount than of the 
long-kept ones. Artificially prepared foods may appear to do well Naiion's Bad 
for a time, but, if what I have said be true, where are the vitamins ? ^^ * 

But food is not everything. A child should have a vigorous life 
and a healthy life, in the open air as much as possible. Keeping 
these facts in your mind, you will find your child will soon be able 
to take stronger food than you had believed possible. 

A properly fed, healthy child will, at least, have a chance of 
forming good primary teeth and, if the jaws be well exercised after 
the cutting, by crusts, etc., they will have still more vigorous 
growth. The roots of good primary teeth are more readily absorbed, 
allowing them to fall out easily, at the proper time, and thus giving 
the secondary teeth a far better chance of coming through in a 
natural and healthy condition. A good start is half the battle, 
and an occasional examination, by the dentist, will do the rest. 

Malnutrition, from ill-health, dietetic ignorance, or insufficiency, 
will be certain to show its effect in the teeth. If you would pre- 
serve your teeth you must preserve your health by clean, whole- 
some living, your intelligence governing your desires, and making 
use of the modern knowledge of the rules of health, nowadays so 
freely placed at everybody's disposal. 

All food should be palatable and varied, should contain vitamins, 
and should be well masticated, the latter, not only that it may 
be well crushed and thoroughly mixed with the saliva, but also 
that your teeth may be well and regularly exercised. Any organ 
of the body that is insufficiently used soon commences to degenerate. 
It is quicker to rust out than to wear out. 

There has been some controversy over the "tooth-brush," but 
you may take it that, if you use a good tooth paste, clean your 
teeth well last thing at night, and then thoroughly cleanse the 
brush, you will be doing the right thing. This will be obvious to 
you in the morning. The brush is best cleaned in water running 
strongly, under a tap, and this cleaning should never be omitted. 
It is of special importance when decayed teeth or pyorrhoea are 
present. The brush then becomes infected and would be liable 
to re-infect the mouth with germs whose virulence has been 
increased. Of course, the ideal method would be to let it stand 
in carbolic lotion, or some other antiseptic, or even to boil it ; but 
there are obvious objections. 

It were wise to have the teeth periodically examined by a dentist 
and on the slightest sign of decay in one of them it should be dealt 
with at once. This will greatly prolong the life of the tooth and, 
which is even more important, it will prevent it infecting others, 
and you will save money and health. 

JOHN E. RANSFORD. 

51 



OVERSEAS 



Should the 
Married 
Woman com- 
pete in the 
Labour 
Market ? 




Should the Married Woman compete 
in the Labour Market? 

By Hertha Davies 

HERE is always one section or other of the community 
in disgrace. And this is often due to our habit of 
making sweeping generahsations and then shutting 
our eyes to all those individuals who obstinately 
refuse to fit the mould. " The Modern Young Man 
has no Manners," complains one headline. " Every One tired of 
Work," proclaims another. " What Type of Mother can the Girl 
of To-day make ? " groans a third. 

Just now it is the married woman who is coming in for her share 
of censure, and her crime is the tendency of some of her class to 
take another part in the work of the world than that ascribed to 
her by popular opinion as her whole duty in life. 

I have no statistics of the number of married women who are 
wage earners outside the home, nor do I know of these how many 
are compelled by dire necessity to seek the wherewithal for bread 
and how many are workers from choice and ambition, but I cannot 
help feeling that both are a type to be admired. The first because 
they are putting their shoulders bravely to the wheel in work 
probably uncongenial to them, and the second because they are 
energetic, enthusiastic and competent. While all new movements 
are liable to abuse, it certainly is a healthy sign that the modern 
woman is anxious to enlarge her sphere of usefulness, and not to 
hide all her talents but one in a napkin. 

But whether one admires the individual or not, the question 
whether it is for the highest social good that married women should 
have full opportunity to enter the labour market cannot be so easily 
answered. 

Just at present, while unemployment is so rife, we are all a 
little impatient of any one who adds to its woes by unnecessarily 
claiming "the right to work." But the problem should not be 
considered from what we hope to be a very temporary viewpoint. 
Well -organised schemes of production and distribution, and the 
much-anticipated boom should in time ensure plenty of work for 
every pair of hands and active brain in the kingdom. 

In any case, we tend, perhaps, to be somewhat hypercritical in 
our outcry against the married woman ousting a single woman 
from her job. We might first turn our attention to the number of 
foreigners employed in this country. Again, now that so many 
women are anxious to take up domestic work (I recently had over 
fifty applications in response to an advertisement for a general 
maid), we might argue that the educated woman who does her 

52 



OVERSEAS 



own cooking and dusting is cutting the market for others whose Should the 
only gift and training lie in this direction. Married 

Money begets money, and the woman who earns, spends. Instead Woman com- 
of making her own frocks she will employ some dressmaker, who ?^ u *° * 
in turn will be able to pay her hands. Instead of striving to teach Market ? 
her growing children she will support the local kindergarten. In 
fact, instead of tinkering with a hundred jobs, she will employ 
experts to do them, and herself exploit her own particular talent to 
provide the wherewithal. 

There are many to whom economic arguments have no sig- 
nificance one way or the other, but who are firmly convinced that 
the home and family cannot fail to suffer if the wife-mother 
spends at least eight hours a day away from it. 

And I think all but the most soulless progressionist must agree 
that where there is a young family, or where there is a large family, 
the mother has a ready-made, whole-time job, and it is her duty 
to sacrifice those of her own interests which directly clash with 
those of the beings for whom she is responsible. 

But this is no adequate excuse for cavilling at the principle of 
married women workers. With our usual habit of vague thinking 
we are apt to imagine all married women as perpetually bearing 
and rearing children. Yet if we look round our own circle we can 
see how very far from the truth this is. First, a very large number 
of marriages are childless, and secondly, small families are more 
and more the order of the day. 

Some will say that families would soon increase if women had 
nothing else to do but look after them, as in the good old days. 
In reality the cost of living is primarily responsible for the lowered 
birth-rate. The wife who is able to lay up a little nest egg for the 
future is far more likely to welcome children than she who 
does not know how their barest material wants are to be supplied. 
The keen worker makes the keen mother. It is too often the 
woman ' ' with nothing to do " who is too lazy to ' ' indulge ' ' in 
a family. 

Suppose you allow ten years — fifteen if you like — for the rearing 
of a small family. After that, while the boys and girls are at their 
preparatories and boarding schools, must the mother sit with folded 
hands if she is particularly anxious to practise her gifts in the out- 
side world and, incidentally, help pay for the heavy educational 
expenses ? Ten years — fifteen years — ^is a big lump out of a woman's 
life, but it is not her whole prime, and if she has kept her mind 
bright and sharp and her talents in working trim there should be 
no need to consider herself merely as a " has been ' ' as far as the 
outside world is concerned. 

In thinking of the home, again, people are too apt to confuse 
material comfort with spiritual needs. They forget home is an 

53 




OVERSEAS 



Should the 
Married 
Woman com- 
pete in the 
Labour 
Market? 



atmosphere rather than a house, and that the people mean more 
than the furniture. 

' ' How lovely to be home again, and have lots of hot water and 
a hair mattress 1 " one may exclaim after a stay in a cottage 
perhaps. But a servant or housekeeper who knows her job is 
quite capable of providing constant hot water, recherche meals and 
the comforts of a well-run house. The part the paid worker cannot 
provide is the love and sympathy and home-making spirit which 
the mother usually contributes. A tired, irritable housewife, 
obsessed with Jane's failings, the all-presence of dust, the iniquities 
of the milkman, and the size of the butcher's bill, is not necessarily 
a better home-maker than the woman who comes in from the out- 
side woild, tired maybe, but delighted to be home and full of under- 
standing interest of the experiences of her family, with plenty of 
her own interests to share with them, and, above all, the happy 
knowledge that, by her efforts, the children are getting a far better 
chance in life than would have been possible if her only contribution 
to the finances had been to save Jane's modest wages. 

There are certain geniuses in domestic economy who invent 
and perfect all manner of devices and contrivances, and are able 
to make their homes their careers in a satisfying sense. Their 
brains are always on the alert, and they are literally in their element. 
But one woman's meat is another's poison, and there are a large 
number who find housework stultifying. There is, undeniably, a 
certain sameness about it, a recurrence of the self-same problem, 
a lot of rather undignified trifles to worry over, and a lack of 
intellectual stimulus. 

Either the well-to-do wife has too little to do and kills time 
with bridge and social amusements, or the badly-off wife has 
far too much to do and develops into a drudge, with no time or 
strength to cultivate the higher parts of her. She may become an 
excellent Martha, but the Mary in her dies for lack of cultivation. 

We come back, then, to the fact that the problem is an individual 
one. The mere fact of marriage should not strike at the root of 
liberty. But for the consolation of any male reader of ' ' Overseas ' ' 
who has a vision of coming into an empty hearth and chill slippers, 
it is safe to say that sex characteristics do not change in a lifetime 
or so, and that the habits of generations of little girls who have 
nursed their dolls, dusted their dolls' houses, and given tea parties, 
may give him assurance that, where the claims of home and office 
compete, the home will come first in ninety-nine cases out of a 
hundred. 



There is no more practical way of helping the Empire than 
by persuading your friends to Join the Over-Seas Club. 



54 



OVERSEAS 




The Royal Arms of the United 
Kingdom 

By F. G. Yardley 

HAT ! Is it possible ? Not know the figures of The Royal 

Heraldry ! Of what could your father be thinking ? " ^^s of the 

exclaims Di Vernon with indignant surprise to it°**j 
^ , ^ , , ,■ . ,, ^ , ^ ,. ,,. ^. Kingdom. 

Frank Osbaldistone in Rob Roy." Miss Diana, 

or her creator, whose love and knowledge of 

heraldry have never been equalled by a British novelist with the 

possible exception of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, would be shocked 

beyond measure at the indifference to the " gentle science " 

prevailing at the present day. Outside the College of Heralds few 

people appear to give a thought to it now except the comic artists, 

and the interest of these gentlemen is due less to enthusiasm for 

the subject than to the alluring opportunities it offers for travesty. 

To the average person the language of heraldry is as incoherent 

as the libretto of a musical comedy, and the designer of the 

emblem hanging by its guige from the Over-Seas Club tree would 

probably be frankly astonished if somebody told him that he had 

produced a shield a bouche charged vert, an annulet encircling S 

argent. 

So long as the schoolmaster persists in maintaining that nothing <* 

useful can be usefully taught, and the rest of the community that 
nothing should be taught which is not directly useful in later life, 
heraldry is scarcely likely again to become a popular subject of 
study. It is, however, full of fascinating interest, and a working 
knowledge of its intricacies would at least blunt the edge of a 
Briton's surprise when the " intelligent foreigner " speaks of the 
' ' three leopards ' ' of the arms of England. 

The arms of the Realm of England, as we know the device to-day, 
on the first and fourth quarters of the Royal Arms of the United 
Kingdom, made their first authentic appearance on the second 
Great Seal of Richard I., though Henry II. is said also to have borne 
the same device. The Norman sovereigns of England, William I., 
William II., Henry I, and Stephen were supposed to have borne 
two " leopards " representing Normandy and Maine, while the 
third, adopted by Henry II., is believed by some authorities to 
represent the Duchy of Aquitaine, which was added to Henry's 
realm through his wife Eleanor. 

The regal dignity of the lion in the animal world would naturally 
secure for him a position of corresponding eminence in heraldry. 
From the dawn of the heraldic era, accordingly, the lion is blazoned 
on the shields of sovereigns, princes and nobles ; and after a while, 

56 



The Royal still retaining his original rank, the lordly beast also condescended 

Arms of the to accept service with lesser fry. 

United It was a necessary consequence of his wide popularity that the 

Kingdom. j-^j^ q£ heraldry should be blazoned in various attitudes and 
variously "tinctured," otherwise it would have been impossible 
to distinguish the lions of different shields. A lion walking and 
looking about him the early heralds held to be acting the part of a 
leopard, an animal which they knew on the authority of grave 
travellers to be the offspring of a morganatic alliance between 
the lion and the pard, or panther. Any lion " passant guardant," 
i.e., walking and looking out from the shield, such as the three 
displayed in the English Royal Arms, was decreed to be a leopard, 
or lion leofarde. Old Nicholas Upton, the writer on heraldry, 
protested, it is true, that a lion did not become a leopard " by 
turning his face sidelong," but the men of action, the knights 
and bowmen who fought under lion and leopard banners, laughed 
with amusement or scratched bewildered heads at this pedantry 
from a cathedral close. The English kings' beasts were leopards 
in blazon, in ballad and chronicle, and in the mouths of liegemen 
and enemy. The knight who saw the king's banner fly at Falkirk 
or Cre'cy would declare it bore " gules with three leopards of 
gold," even if the modern armorist prefers to have it "gules, 
three lions passant guardant in pale, or." By Continental peoples, 
even down to the early part of the nineteenth century the British 

. were called "leopards," and Napoleon, exhorting his soldiers, 

exclaimed in one of his orders of the day, " Let us drive these 
leopards into the sea." So it will be seen that the " intelligent 
foreigner " has authority for his leopards. 

Over the origin of the Scottish arms there still hangs a shroud 
of uncertainty. Sir Walter Scott, in "Tales of a Grandfather," 
says that the lion rampant was first assumed by William of Scotland 
(1165 — 1214) : " William, King of Scotland, having chosen for 
his armorial bearing a red lion rampant, acquired the name of 
William the Lion, and his rampant lion still constitutes the arms 
of Scotland." But Holinshead harks back to far remoter times. 
According to his " Chronicles," the double tressure enclosing the 
rampant lion had its origin in the reign of King Achaicus, who 
made a league with Charlemagne, " who did augm.ent his arms 
with a double trace formed with Floure-de-lyces, signifying thereby 
that the lion henceforth should be defended by the ayde of the 
Frenchemen." It behoves us, however, to pause before accepting 
the truth of this tradition. The lively Holinshead was often more 
concerned with the picturesque aspect of his narrative than with 
its strict historical accuracy. He was given to drawing his long 
bow rather taut. The more prosaic Chalmers roundly asserts 
that Achaicus and Charlemagne did not even know of each other's 

66 



OVERSEAS 



The Royal 
Arms of the 
United 
Kingdom. 



existence. It is probable that the rampant lion of Scotland is 
derived from the arms of the ancient Earls of Northumberland 
and Huntingdon, from whom some of the Scottish monarchs were 
descended. 

The origin of the Irish harp forming the third quarter of the 
Royal Arms must be sought back into the enchanted realms of 
legend, romance and fable. It was assigned to Ireland during the 
reign of Henry VIII. According to one tradition an early King of 
Ireland was named David, and this king took for arms the harp 
of Israel's Psalmist. But the idea that King David played upon 
the harp as we know it to-day is a comparatively recent one. 
Medieval artists frequently gave him the psaltery, a horizontal 
stringed instrument, from which was gradually developed our 
modern piano. Another story strips the Irish harp of every vestige 
of romance. It declares the harp, indeed, to be nothing but a 
blunder arising from the triangle invented in the reign of King 
John to distinguish his Irish coins from the English. The triangle 
is supposed to be in allusion to St. Patrick's explanation of the 
Trinity or — more likely — to signify that King John was King of 
England, King of France and " Lord of Ireland." 

When on the death of Elizabeth, James of Scotland came to 
the English throne, the "wisest fool in Christendom" brought 
with him to London a curious assortment of friends, relatives 
and prejudices. He also brought a specimen of unnatural 
history in the shape of one of his Scottish unicorns to face the 
English lion across his shield of 
arms, and ever since then the 
" lion and unicorn " have held 
uninterrupted sway as the royal 
" supporters." 

This unicorn ousted from its 
pride of place the Welsh dra- 
gon, which had performed the 
office of supporter for James 
I.'s five Tudor predecessors. 
As a device the dragon appears 
to have been the standard of 
the West Saxons, and of the 
English previous to the Norman 
Conquest. It was the ensign of 
Cadwallader, the last of the 
British kings, from whom the 
Tudors were believed to be 
descended. Among the Celts it 
was the emblem of sovereignty, 
and, as such, was borne as the 

57 

The Royal Arms of Great Britain and Ireland. 




OVERSEAS 



The Royal sovereign's crest. The Celtic word dragon was equivalent to chief 
^•""so^the or leader, and meant, literally, "fiery meteors." Pen-dragon 
Kin'idom denoted a super-chief or dictator, created in times of danger to 

insure unity of command. Uter and Arthur were each appointed 
Pen-dragon to repel the Saxon invaders. Tennyson's " Idylls " 
have made every one familiar with ' ' the dragon of the Great 
Pendragonship " blazing on Arthur's helmet as he rode forth to 
his last battle, and " making all the night a stream of fire." The 
last " Great Pendragonship " of history was that of Marshal Foch. 
It is often pleaded that while England, Scotland and Ireland 
are all represented upon the British Royal Arms, it is an anomaly 
that Wales should have no recognition. According to Mr. A. C. 
Fox Davies, in an article entitled " Wales and the Royal Arms " 
in the Genealogical Magazine for April, 1901, this plea is based 
upon a faulty conception of the meaning of the Royal Arms. The 
Royal Arms stand, says this high authority, neither for races 
nor nationalities. They indicate neither territory, geographical 
divisions, languages nor religion. The Arms are the personal arms 
of His Majesty the King — personal in so far as they belong to the 
King as the Sovereign for the time being. They indicate and stand 
for his triple sovereignty of England, Scotland and Ireland, origi- 
nally separate sovereignties, and, as such, possessing separate 
armorial rights attached to the sovereignties. The arms indicate 
those sovereignties and not the territories. That Wales formed of 
itself a separate sovereignty distinct from the British Crown has 
not hitherto been admitted. The inclusion of arms for Wales 
would, therefore, mean the definite official recognition of a separate 
sovereignty of Wales, unless the laws and meaning which have 
hitherto governed the Royal Arms are to be ignored. " If that 
comes to pass," concludes Mr. Fox Davies, " armory itself may 
just as well pass away, for, shorn of its symbolism, what would 
armory amount to beyond a meaningless kind of artistic 
decoration ? " 

Whatever the correct answer to the question may be, the average 
Briton is so unlearned in heraldic law and precedent that the 
spectre of calamity called up by Mr. Fox Davies will not, perhaps, 
unduly disturb him. He would, in spite of it, bid heartily welcome, 
not only an emblem of Wales in the Royal Arms, but also representa- 
tion of the Dominions overseas, even if these constituent parts of 
the Empire have not hitherto enjoyed separate sovereignties. 



F " Overseas " offers (1) One prize of one guinea every month for 
the best or most interesting photograph sent in by a Member of the 
Over-Seas Club. (2) One guinea to the boy or girl under 18 years of 
age, the child of a Member, for the best photograph taken by him or her. 



58 




OVERSEAS 

^"^^^^^^"^""^^^ i^^^t l a f*^^*^^ ^'<^-^^tfZ ^>^-^a^— ^><^^w-. ~>g^^- ~Srf'I^r'L ^^ ; 

The Herring Harvest 

By A. B. Cooper 

OWN from the North come the herrings, biUions of The Herring 
them, uncounted and uncountable. Drawn by some "^fvest- 
instinct which the wit of man has never fathomed, 
the vast shoals of the silvery fish make slowly south- 
ward down the east coast of Britain. Yes, down from 
the North they come, solid square miles of them, covering the 
ocean's face with a silver sheen, followed by innumerable foes, 
ensnared in millions by the fishermen, till finally, their numbers 
apparently undiminished, they disappear towards the South. 

The herring fishery commences north of Shetland in July, and, 
along eight hundred miles of coast from Stornoway and Lerwick to 
Hastings, the boats from Wick and Peterhead, and Aberdeen and 
Dundee, and Leith and Whitby, and Scarborough, and Hull, and 
Grimsby, and Yarmouth and Lowestoft sally forth to intercept them. 
They are the reapers of the rich harvest of the sea, which, for 
fertility and productiveness, has no equivalent on land. 

December ist maiks the close of the herring season. But 
during the whole of November the industry has been flagging. 
Lowestoft, the " half-way house," is the culminating point where 
the race for the fish becomes fastest and most furious. The twin 
towns of Yarmouth and Lowestoft are at their busiest in October 
and November, when often as many as a thousand fishing craft leave 
harbour for the fishing grounds in one day ! 

Wherever the herrings are there are the boats, and, just as the 
English boats go north to meet the herrings, so the Scotch boats 
follow them south until they are lost somewhere on the confines of 
Biscay, putting into the port nearest at hand with their catch. 

The herring, in a very real sense, catches itself. Miles of drift 
nets are set, buoyed up by cork-strung cables, and in the countless 
drifting meshes the onmoving masses of herrings are caught and 
entangled by the gills, literally by the million. Drifting is usually 
done in the dark hours, but, of course, there is no set time for haul- 
ing up the nets. Every two hours, or so, perhaps, a haul will be 
made of one of the sections of drift net, to see if things look 
promising. 

The men are admirable judges, and if the first net shows up well, 
over the rollers, hand over hand, every man working at the top of 
his energy, come the endless nets, skilful hands disentangling the 
fish from the meshes and casting them amidships in a shining scaly 
heap. 

The scales of the herring are very loose, as everybody knows, and 
when the crew has been working but a short time every man looks 

59 



OVERSEA 



The Herring like an impersonation of Father Neptune, covered as he is from head 
Harvest. to toe with shining armour. 

But, although a thousand herrings appear in the net to one of any 
other species of fish, yet every big haul of herrings includes haddocks, 
mullet, whiting and gurnard. Sometimes, too, a dog-fish appears 
in the net. It damages the net pretty badly, as a rule, but its 
despatch is hailed with satisfaction on all sides, because it is the 
herrings' most destructive enemy. 

Some of the finest herrings caught come to hand with a half- 
moon shaped bite taken out of their backs which utterly spoils them 
for the market. This, of course, is the foul work of the dog-fish. 
Occasionally, too, a shark is found among the herrings and, needless 
to say, is promptly knocked on the head. But the advent of a shark 
entails too much net mending to please the fishers ! 

Many people have a notion that the herring fleet hugs the shore, 
does not go far afield. Such a notion is wholly wrong, for the 
North Sea fisheries vary commonly from twenty to eighty miles off 
shore, not to speak of the range of eight hundred miles in pursuit 
of the south-bound shoals. 

The earnings of a drifter vary greatly with the season and the 
market price of the moment. Recently, a Lowestoft drifter took 
;£io,240 worth of herrings for the season, and another earned 
£9,800, whilst several others averaged £8,000 apiece. Yarmouth 
did equally well, one of her famous boats bringing in herrings to 
the value of nine or ten thousand pounds, with many other boats 
little behind this high figure. 

The year 191 2 will long be quoted as one of the most prolific 
herring seasons in living memory. The total landings at Yarmouth 
and Lowestoft were over eleven hundred thousand crans. Now, 
a cran is a thousand fish, so the actual number of herrings landed 
at these two ports during the three months of the season totalled 
at least one thousand one hundred millions. Yet in those pre- 
war days these herrings brought only a price of 23s. a cran, 
whereas to-day the fishermen get 45s. 

One of the most remarkable features of the herring fishery is the 
fact that about a thousand Scottish lassies employed by the fishing 
companies follow the fleet from port to port down the coast, halting 
wherever the boats are putting in, and dealing with the fish with a 
celerity and skill which is admirable. Why Scottish girls from 
Aberdeen, and as far north as the Shetlands should be more apt than 
their southern sisters at this work may perhaps be attributed to the 
fact that they are the daughters of fisher-folk to the third and fourth 
generation. They appear to be born to the job. Certainly to watch 
them gutting the herrings and preparing them for transformation 
into the ubiquitous bloater and the tasty kipper is a liberal education 
in what practice can do towards producing perfection ! 

60 



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Photos sent by Miss M. Neil, c/o Bank of Montreal, Montreal, Canada 




Portugal Cove, a typical Newfoundland fishing village. 




La M.uii lit', a beautifully-situated tishing village with only seven families, aliuut forty railes south 
of St. John's, Newfoundland. It is not far from Ferryland, a village founded by Lord Baltimore, 

who also founded Baltimore, Maryland. 



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Photos sent by Miss M. Neil, c/o Bank of Montreal, Montreal, Canada 




Auuther \'iew of La Mauche. On the right are the stages where the fish are put to dry. 





•.S..: 




A Mouiitam ot ^t>i>,ooo tons of Iruu Ore at Bell Iblaiid, Newtoundlaml, where all ihe irun ore of 
the British Empire Steel Corporation comes from. 



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Train ascending Hex River Pass, C.P., South Africa. Photo sent by Mr. C. Rowe, P.O. Box 511, 

Bulawayo, Rhodesia. 




Fruit Boats alongside a British Cruiser at Las Palmas, Grand Canary. Photo sent by .Mr. E. I-'ulf, 

Mess 33, H.M.S. Dtinetlin. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^^^^ 



OVERSEAS 



Why 




URIOUS it is how some incidents in life, wholly 
unimportant, impress themselves indelibly on the 
mind. As vividly as if it had been yestereven do I 
remember a night long years ago when, from the house 
high on the hilltop where I lived, I had, for special 
reason, to go down into the little village nestling in the valley. 
There were no stars in the impenetrable heavens above ; darkness, 
heavy and thick, pressed on the land. Down the rough mountain 
path, carved by winter torrent, cautiously I picked my way, closely 
following my guide as he walked, lantern in hand, a pace or two in 
front. From out the encompassing blackness the shifting circle 
of light thrown by the lantern stood out startlingly sharp and clear, 
and, poor spark as it was, the night, close pressing, unrelenting, had 
no power to swallow it up. Loosened stone and bramble, delicate 
flower with folded petal, and green grass, in eloquent outline stood 
revealed, and in perfect safety step by step might be placed the foot. 
But beyond — ah ! of no avail to strive with straining eyes to 
pierce the gloom. Fast doth the darkness hold its secrets; its 
treasures to dull earthly sight never can be disclosed : another rarer 
sense it is must find the penetrating way. 

And very often has that midnight walk come back to me, preg- 
nant with meaning, lighting up thought, a symbol of man standing 
in his fleeting day by " darkness and the death hour " rounded. 
Only the foreground clear — the bit of life which immediately con- 
cerns, familiar claim and pleasure and duty, mesmerising routine — 
but all the time beyond that, pressing with deadly weight on the 
spirit, impenetrable surrounding mystery. "Why?" All down 
the ages the same unanswered ' ' Why ? ' ' from heart to heart 
has echoed. Why is he here at all, failing, faltering man, with 
his hungry, seeking mind, his poor enslaved will, and his immortal 
soul ? What is the meaning of innocent suffering and of unavoid- 
able sin ? Why do children reap in depravity and degradation what 
their fathers have sown ? Is there no end to oppression, and 
selfishness and greed ? Where does Justice hide behind the intoler- 
able unfairness of the world in which we live ? 

Philosophies old and new have sought to supply us with an 
answer, but the wisdom which they utter rings hollow when the 
flaming sword of anguish pierces the heart. Religion again and 
again has claimed to explain and understand that which by mortal 
mind can never be explained or understood, but its answers have 
failed to reach down to humanity's need. Not by human reason 
can the everlasting counsels be apprehended, not in words'can they 
ever be conveyed. 

One, to my heart well known, told me once of a dream — or was 

61 



Why? 



OVERSEAS 



Why ? it a vision ? — which came to her in a dark time of pain. She fell 

into a light sleep one summer's night after long suffering, and to 
her it seemed she was standing in a large chamber where many 
stood in eager knots and earnestly talked of the present world and 
the world unseen, of the dark problems of sorrow and sin, of the 
mystery of death. Each had some new interpretation to offer, 
some gospel to preach ; each was so sure that his interpretation was 
right, his gospel true — all but a few who with cool logic and clear 
wit held up to ridicule the poor efforts at explanation one by one. 
And her spirit burned within her as she stood in that welter of human 
opinions, and to herself she said, " Not so, not so is the light 
reached," and though not hers was the gift of tongues, and she 
could not speak, it seemed to her as if from a great height she 
looked down on the clamouring Babel. And then all at once she 
was aware that beyond the half -closed door, in the adjoining hall 
a Presence stood, and she hastened thither as she would have 
hastened to an earthly friend. But as she passed the threshold and 
paused before a Figure dimly seen, immense, overshadowing, the 
busy words died down on her lips, and her soul hushed itself in 
awe undreamt, and she sank on her knees and with head thrown 
back gazed up silent into the fathomless eyes. Into those eyes she 
gazed, and her paltry conceptions of infinite love, of the High and 
Holy One who inhabits eternity, fell from her and lay broken at His 
feet. She had deemed her own vision clear side by side with the 
clouded reasonings of the voluble disputers, but in the light incom- 
prehensible which for one instant illumined her heart small indeed 
seemed the difference between the crudest creed and the loftiest 
apprehension compared to the immeasurably outsoaring height of 
the Everlasting Verity. 

" Who fathoms the eternal thought ? Who talks of scheme 
and plan ? 
The Lord is God, He needeth not the poor device of man." 
Like a child standing on the shore stretching out his pail, 
clamouring to hold in that little pail the mighty waters of the 
unplumbed deep, so man from out his circle of light leans out into 
the illimitable dark, and with magnificent arrogance — arrogance 
unthinkable — claims to encompass with his small human mind the 
depths of the counsels of God, the heights of the heavens above, 
the mystery of the ages. Upon that which is infinite and eternal 
he brings to bear a little human brain and rebels at his bewilder- 
ment, rebels when he cannot understand. Understand ? Does 
he dream of touching with his hand the stars, the far distant stars, 
which yet his eyes can reach ? In the depths of his wondering 
eyes mirrored and held they are, though by endless space from his 
feeble clasp removed, and secrets which to the questioning mind 
must ever remain sealed, in the hidden places of the soul are 

62 



OVERSEAS 



apprehended by faculties which as far outreach reason as touch is Wjiy ? 
outstripped by sight. Very wide and wonderful is the Kingdom 
accessible to the conquering human mind, but beyond it the vast 
realms lie whose portals are open only to what is immortal in man, 
and the knowledge gained in those heavenly places by mortal 
speech can never be conveyed. It is the fruit of inmost experience, 
dearly bought and still more dearly prized, and words dipped in 
living flame alone could reveal something of the glory glimpsed in 
those far flights of the soul — the flights " of the alone to the 
Alone." But the blessed certainty, assurance serene and unassail- 
able, which holds the soul that so has seen is a power in the world 
which nothing can overcome ; he who has once looked into the 
Face of Love can nevermore be afraid. Dark still lies the shadow 
of suffering, of sorrow and sin ; deep as ever are the mystery of life, 
the mystery of death — but behind the shadow is Love, and Love 
within the mystery. The mind does not understand, what of that ? 
Little finite mind, how should it understand life and death and God ? 
But the heart hears, and it does not seem hard to leave all the 
unsolved riddles, all the unanswerable Whys, in that Heart which 
in silence to our hearts doth speak. H. d. V. 




An Irrawaddy flotilla steamer slowed down in mid-stream to take on 

board a party of natives who have hailed the steamer on its way to 

Mandalay. Photo sent by Mr. W. M. Gerrard, c/o Messrs. Steel Brothers 

& Co., Bassein, Burma. 

63 



OVERSEAS 



A Day of 
My Life. 




A Day of My Life 

By Miss E. Herbert 

LIVE in a village in the Orange Free State, where the 
daily round and the common tasks go on year in, 
year out, with little or no change. Occasionally, 
however, there is a welcome break in the monotony. 
I went over recently with a party of friends to the 
annual race meeting held at Maseru, the little capital of Basutoland. 
Crowds turned up, fully prepared for a good day's sport and fun. 
We passed vehicles of every imaginable description, to say nothing 
of thousands of natives in their national costume — a red blanket. 
To the native, the Maseru races are what the Derby at Epsom is 
to the Briton. 

It is a truly remarkable sight to see the veld alive with these 
hordes of uncivilised beings, and the wonderful orderliness through- 
out the day was directly due to the authorities forbidding liquor 
of any description to be brought into the country. 

The native women have to be content with viewing the proceed- 
ings from the surrounding hillsides, while their menfolk have all 
the fun below, but they do not resent it, as they are so accustomed 
to be " least " that they take it all as a matter of course. Even 
the prisoners, I am told, are let out for the day, and are also kept 
on the hillsides, away from the crowd. 

Some good horses belonged to European owners, others to the 
different chiefs, while the rag-tag-and-bob-tail of the race were 
owned by the rank and file of the natives. The latter take as keen 
an interest as their white brethren, and their shouts of excitement 
are almost deafening when a race has started. 

The jockeys were mostly native urchins, who ride extraordinarily 
well and are game little fellows. Most of them wore regulation 
costume and looked very smart, but a few rode bare-backed and 
unadorned by an3d:hing save a shirt. 

It was certainly the most amusing feature of the day watching 
them urge their steeds by digging their heels into the horses' 
fianks, their arms going round like windmills, and their shirt tails 
flying in the wind. Though sometimes half a mile behind the 
winner, " nil desperandum " seemed to be their motto, for they 
did not leave off urging and hitting until the goal was reached, 
amidst good-natured jeers from thousands of lips. 

As the day wore on there was a tremendous exodus of horsemen 
and vehicles, and by the time the stately Maluti Mountains were 
bathed in a flood of light cast by the rays of the dying sun there 
was a hushed stillness over hillside and veld, which but a few hours 
before had been teeming with civilised and uncivilised life. 

P.O. Box 99, Ladybrand, O.F.S., South Africa. 

64 





HE simple medieval explanation that all mountains are 
due to upheavals, and all valleys to the sinking of parts 
of the earth's crust proved fallacious as soon as it 
was tested by scientific methods. Critical observation 
showed that ordinary land valleys have been excavated 
by rivers, and that most mountains are the remnants of once wider 
masses, and are still being reduced by the agents which removed 
the surrounding material. Reaction against the older belief led 
to the other extreme of denial that any land valleys have been 
formed by earth movement ; and some geologists even made the 
astounding suggestion that the ocean basins were excavated by ice. 
This view is so incredible that it is now mainly of interest as an 
illustration of the things people will believe in obedience to what 
they regard as logical application of first principles. It is now 
admitted that some land valleys are due to direct earth movements. 
One type of these " tectonic valleys " has been formed by the 
subsidence of the floor between parallel fractures, so that a long 
strip of the earth's crust has sunk, leaving its boundaries as straight 
" scarps." Such valleys are known as rift valleys. 

The longest and most important of the rift valleys is known as 
the Great Rift Valley. It extends from Palestine to South Africa, 
through the Red Sea, the lake chain of South-eastern Abyssinia, 
Lake Rudolf, and Lake Nyasa. African exploration during the 
past thirty years has shown that the Rift Valley is continuous 
from Palestine, except for one short unproved gap, across the whole 
of Eastern tropical Africa. The Upper Nile, as far north as Gondo- 
koro, the Albert Nyanza, and Lake Tanganyika, lie in a western 
branch which is connected through Lake Rukwa to the main 
valley north of Lake Nyasa. Off-branches on the eastern side 
have formed the Gulf of Aden and the valley of the Pangani River ; 
and branches to the west of Tanganyika form the rift valleys of the 
Eastern Congo. In most parts of its course, the structure of the 
Rift Valley has been proved to be due to the subsidence of its floor, 
which has sunk as a paving-stone sinks below the general level of 
the pavement if it has been undermined by water or burrowing 
animals. 



The Great 
Rift Valley. 



65 



OVERSEAS 



The Great The subsidence of the floor of the Rift Valley was accompanied 

Rift Valley. |jy great volcanic eruptions ; and, as for most of its length the 

valley does not intersect fossiliferous rocks, the sequence of the 

volcanic rocks has to be used to decipher its history and determine 

the dates of the different stages in its formation. 

The Great Rift Valley traverses an area which, at the time of 
the deposition of the world's chief coalfields, was part of a great 
continent — Gondwanaland — that extended from Brazil eastward 
across Africa and India to Australia. During the geological era 
which ended with the deposition of the chalk, the world was under- 
going a gradual deformation which led to the slow sinking of parts 
of North-western Africa and of South-western Asia, leaving between 
them a raised tract of highland, which extended from Asia Minor 
to Cape Colony. By the time of the chalk, the collapse of the region 
between Eastern Africa and India formed the western part of the 
Indian Ocean. This great subsidence was accompanied by colossal 
volcanic disturbances ; the lavas ejected covered over 200,000 
square miles in Western India, where they are known as the 
Deccan Traps, as well as large areas in South Arabia and Abyssinia, 
and probably also in the Kenya Colony. The subsidence of the 
Indian Ocean weakened the East African Highlands, and along 
their middle line the country sank between a series of parallel 
fractures and thus formed the first stage in the development of 
the Great Rift Valley. Later earth movements accompanied by 
renewed volcanic disturbances led to the gradual enlargement and 
extension of the Great Rift Valley and its branches. As this valley 
is over 4,000 miles long, and traverses more than half the width 
of the Old World, it was obviously due to some widespread cause 
which affected the three continents of the eastern hemisphere. 
Their dominant earth movements in the last geological era were 
a northward thrust in Europe and a southward thrust in Asia. 
Northern Africa and Southern Europe were thrust northward, 
crumpling Algeria and Southern Europe into the fold mountain 
chains of the Alpine System, including the Atlas, the Pyrenees, and 
the Alps, At the same time, Asia was affected by a southward 
movement which produced the Himalaya and the other fold moun- 
tain chains of the Himalayan system. The Great Rift Valley lies 
along the line between the movement southward to the great 
sunken basin of the Indian Ocean and the segment of the crust 
which in Africa and Europe has been thrust northward. The 
formation of the Rift Valley was completed by a prolonged series 
of movements, and some of them may have happened so recently 
that memories of them may be preserved in the traditions of the 
destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and of many villages in East 
Africa, as beside Tanganyika, by the sudden formation or enlarge- 
ment of the East African lakes. 

6Q 



OVERSEAS 



The Forthcoming 
British Industries Fair 




British 
Industries 

Fair. 



O the many thousands of Over-Seas Club Members in The Forth 
all parts of the world who are doing their utmost to coming 
promote British trade in their particular territory, a 
word concerning the plans for the forthcoming British 
Industries Fair (to be held from February 27th to 
March loth, 1922, simultaneously in London and Birmingham) may 
be of interest. Organised by the Department of Overseas Trade, 
Britain's annual display of her manufactures and industries — the 
trade buyer's opportunity of selecting goods for the ensuing season — 
is a matter of moment to British traders throughout the globe. 

Since its inception in 1915 the British Industries Fair has steadily 
grown until it is to-day the most important national trade fair in 
the world. In fact, one of the great difficulties with which the 
organisers have had to contend has been the lack of adequate 
buildings, for the Fair has developed to such an extent that it has 
been no easy matter to adhere to the policy of housing each section 
under one roof. To those who are familiar with the Continental 
fairs, which are held in innumerable separate buildings scattered 
throughout the length and breadth of a city, the advantages of con- 
centration under one roof v/ill be obvious. For the 1922 Fair it 
has fortunately been possible to secure enough additional accom- 
modation both in London and Birmingham to provide not only for 
the growth of the Fair, but also to enable room to be found for the 
great industries which have hitherto been exhibited at Glasgow. 
Textiles, however, will not be included in the 1922 Fair. 

The London section of the Fair will, as in 1921, be housed in the 
White City, an enormous range of exhibition buildings within a few 
minutes of the centre of London and connected with every part of 
the London area by trains, omnibuses and trams, while the Bir- 
mingham section will be in the great buildings of the easily acces- 
sible Castle Bromwich Aerodrome. Not only are both sections of 
the Fair, in London and Birmingham, in each instance under one 
roof, but it has been found possible to arrange that the various 
trades shall be themselves in separate but adjoining departments, 
with the result that the buyer need not waste time wandering through 
section after section which does not interest him. The grouping of 
exhibitors according to their various trades is of the greatest help 
to the buyer, as he finds, side by side with well-known firms, busi- 
nesses of which he has probably never heard, but which are of equal 
interest. To the trade buyer new sources of supply are as important 
as are new markets for a manufacturer. 

67 



OVERSEAS 



The Forth- Another great advantage enjoyed by the buyer who visits the 

coming p^j^ jg ^i^g £^^,^ ^j^^^ participation in it is confined to manufacturers. 

Industries There is, therefore, no duplication and no confusion caused by 

Fair. finding identical articles unnecessarily repeated at different prices 

on different stands. This does not mean that merchants do'not do 

business in connection with the Fair, for many exhibitors prefer to 

pass orders, particularly those for export, through merchant houses 

who have special facilities for handling them. None the less, from 

the buyer's point of view the Fair has the great advantage that he 

comes into personal contact with the actual producer. 

Moreover, the British Industries Fair is purely a trade fair, and 
not an exhibition. Admittance is restricted to trade buyers, and 
business is not impeded by crowds of sightseers. In organising the 
Fair the Department pays particular attention to the comfort and 
convenience of the overseas buyer. A special Club is provided for 
him, where reading and writing rooms are available, where the 
gratuitous services of interpreters are placed at his disposal, and 
where he may consult specially qualified officers of the Department 
of Overseas Trade, who will be able to assist in indicating the sources 
of supply of any goods required, and to give information regarding 
tariffs, shipping and transport, trade conditions, etc., etc., through- 
out the world. Last, but not perhaps least, he will find in the 
catalogue which is given to him a mine of information, for it is not 
merely a list of exhibitors but a book of reference of considerable 
value. It contains, among other things, a comprehensive index 
translated into seven foreign languages, thus ensuring that prac- 
tically every foreign visitor shall be able to find readily each 
exhibitor of the class of goods which he requires. 

In a word, the function of the British Industries Fair is to bring 
buyer and seller together, and to facilitate business between them 
by every legitimate means. It is obvious that the promotion of a 
successful trade fair cannot be achieved by good organisation alone, 
for the latter is, after all, of minor importance in comparison with 
the quality and price of the goods shown. Much as the organisers 
in London and Birmingham pride themselves on the convenience 
and completeness of their arrangements, they congratulate them- 
selves still more on the support and assistance which they receive 
from British manufacturers. 

Many manufacturers would welcome a visit from the overseas 
buyer to their works, where he may not only see the goods being 
manufactured, but also the facilities for adapting them to the require- 
ments of special markets. 

The Over-Seas Club and Patriotic League in London will be 
pleased to forward correspondence from Members relating to the 
Fair direct to the promoters for special attention. 

E. D. W._^C. 

68 




FR02A A WOPu\N':S 
STANDPOINT 



"^^^^L^C^i^T^ 




THE CENOTAPH. 

The hopes that fall like leaves before the wind, 
The baffling waste, 

And every earthly joy that leaves behind 
A mortal taste. 

The uncompleted end of all things dear, 

The clanging door 
Of death, forever loud with the last fear, 

Haunt them no more. 

Without them the awakening world is dark 

With dust and mire ; 
Yet as they went they flung to us a spark, 

A thread of fire. 

To guide us while beneath the sombre skies 

Faltering we tread. 
Until for us like morning stars shall rise 

The deathless dead. 

Maurice Baring. 

"HOSE of you who live overseas and cannot lay 
flowers on the Cenotaph to our Glorious Dead, will 
like to know that as the months pass the flowers 
and wreaths do not diminish in number. From 300 
to 400 are laid about the base each week. 
I very rarely pass the Cenotaph, either on a week-day or on a 
Sunday, without seeing groups of people reverently moving round 
the spot, the traffic of Whitehall flowing past on either side. In 
spite of its position in one of our great thoroughfares, over and 
above the Cenotaph there reigns a great calm. As the buses go 
by many men salute or raise their hats, and the women cast 
a look at the shrine which means so much to so many of us. 
The Unknown Warrior's grave in Westminster Abbey is like- 
wise kept fragrant with the flowers which are laid there every 
week. 

Great Britain, indeed, is scattered now with shrines. Scarcely 
a village but has erected some form of memorial to those that 
went forth never to return. I have seen many of these shrines, 
and always there are vases of flowers, flowers in pots, or ever- 
greens in humble jam-pots, put there by loving hearts which do not 
forget, 

69 



From a 

Woman's 

Standpoint. 




OVERSEAS 



From a A CAREERS BUREAU. — Not long ago I was speaking to the 

Woman s Editor, and asking if it would not be possible to have a section of 

Standpoint. "Overseas" devoted to "Careers for Women." Time and 
again I have been struck with the need for fresh ideas and a new 
outlook in this matter, and have occasionally and very spasmodi- 
cally referred to enterprises of various kinds that I have come 
across. But I believe a great deal more information is needed, 
and would be useful to many women Members these hard times. 

Will any readers who are interested send me particulars of how 
women are earning their living in various parts of the world, not 
in the old stereotyped way, but especially where originality and 
adaptability have been shown ? 

I come across a number of women obliged to earn or to supple- 
ment their own incomes, and too often through pride, or an un- 
yielding temperament, they will not or cannot adapt themselves to 
altered circumstances. This is, of course, especially the case with 
the elderly woman, who has got into a rut and has the type of 
mind which makes it almost impossible for her to get out of it. 

I have two high-minded, charming gentlewomen in my mind's 
eye, both anxious to be secretary companions, neither of them on 
the right side of forty. They both know that such jobs are few and 
far between, they have both been out of work for some time, and 
yet they seem unable to think of anything else. I have suggested 
to one that she should learn how to clean silver, and build up a 
connection with those who are no longer able to keep a butler 
or very experienced parlourmaid. I know of one woman who 
makes this pay, though I cannot recollect what she charges. 

Several times I have suggested to would-be workers that they 
should learn to wash and iron laces and fine underwear, and go as 
visiting ladies' maid to women who can no longer keep a maid of 
their own. In one case the woman I was trying to help was 
offended ; such work, she thought, was beneath her dignity. 
What I thought I did not say^ — and yet well-to-do women have 
asked me if I did not know of any one who would come to them 
once a week and look after their underclothes. 

On the other hand, an artist friend of mine, who paints portraits 
delightfully which few can afford to-day, remodels coats, and 
finds it tides her over slack times. She says she was born with 
capable hands, and if she can't do one thing she will do another. 
She does not add that she has grit and enterprise. The longer I 
live the more impressed I am with the opportunities for women in 
business, which, with a few exceptions, the educated woman 
scarcely seems to realise. 

WOMEN IN BUSINESS. — A woman's paper issued a supplement 
not long ago giving a list of all the various branches of work in 
which women could find employment, and business as a profession, 

70 



OVERSEAS 



or indeed any branch of it, was never even mentioned. And yet From a 
it is just here that the educated woman with taste and knowledge Woman s 
can find an outlet. Standpomt. 

Take one branch alone, that of window dressing. It is an expert 
job and requires various qualifications of just the kind that one 
would think an educated, artistic woman would possess. And yet 
what are the facts ? Practically all the window dressers in this 
country are men. Why, I do not know. One expert says that boy 
students are trained for three years before they are actually allowed 
to dress a window. They learn design, have their colour sense 
trained, study the art of drapery, and even lighting and architec- 
ture. They must know how clothes should be worn and must 
always keep in the forefront of fashion. To me it is absurd to 
think of boys being trained in this art, for it is an art, instead of 
women, who study clothes and the fashion to a greater or lesser 
degree from the cradle to the grave. 

When one of Self ridge's head men was consulted the other day 
he laid down as essential these four qualifications — " Orderliness, 
proportion, colour, and a knowledge of the use of merchandise. 
These are the four great qualifications which must be possessed 
by a woman who wants to make a career of window decorating." 

Again, there is salesmanship. Who does not know the difference 
between a bad saleswoman and a good saleswoman ? A good 
saleswoman or shop assistant must have good manners and ought 
to have intelligence and as wide an education as possible. 
BUSINESS IDEALS. — Mrs. Prince, founder and president of the 
Store Education College, Boston, where girls from all over the 
States learn salesmanship, declares that ' ' all the education that 
can be got is necessary for efficient salesmanship. More and 
more education is what is needed in all businesses." I am sure 
she is right. But here again the highly educated woman has 
thought business beneath her. This is a point of view with which 
I have no patience nor the slightest sympathy. 

Having spent years of my life doing social work and having been 
in business for two years, I say unhesitatingly that a business 
career gives one quite as many opportunities for helping fellow- 
wayfarers as working with some charitable organisation, and has 
this great advantage, that one can help freely without patronising. 

To my mind, business is quite as ideal as politics, or the medical 
or any other profession. It is not degrading to be a cook because 
some people over-eat, any more than it is degrading for a woman 
to be in business because some people are dishonest and love 
money. All this seems very commonplace and obvious, but there 
still exists in Great Britain a prejudice against a business career 
for a refined and educated woman which should be got rid of. 

A WAYFARER. 

71 



Cookery 
Books and 
Cookery — I. 





Cookery Books and Cookery.— I. 

F the making of cookery books there is no end, and as 
a matter of fact most good cooks compile their own, 
for nothing is so reHable as that Httle scrap-book in 
which one preserves those recipes which have been 
really tried and tested. A good old-fashioned book 
containing a mass of miscellaneous information is "Enquire 
Within," but too much space is devoted to various early Victorian 
odds and ends which, though intensely amusing to read, scarcely 
add to the usefulness of the work. A new book somewhat on the 
same lines is "The Housewife's A.B.C.," which, though not a 
cookery book pure and simple, contains many useful suggestions 
on the theory of cooking, and many practical hints on the details 
of household management, as well as a section on simple remedies 
and first aid.* 

It is easy to collect a mass of recipes for elaborate dishes, to 
write ideal menus, to estimate for wonderfully economical family 
budgets, to publish beautifully got up books on " How I fed my 
Family on a Shilling a Day," or "Tasty Dishes for Sixpence a 
Head." But it usually appears to me that the families who live on 
these elaborate ornamental and inexpensive dishes never have any 
appetites — and under these circumstances it is not difficult to feed 
them economically. We find this kind of thing : — 

" Take two fresh herrings at twopence each " (here follows a 
long description of the ideal appearance of a fresh herring, and the 
importance of dealing at a good fishmonger's). Then we proceed : 
' ' Take out the roes and set them aside for a savoury for late dinner. 
Cut off the heads and stew them for fish stock. Cut the fish in half, 
serve two fillets of the best end on toast with mustard sauce; this 
will serve instead of a meat course for lunch, fish being more 
wholesome than meat. The remainder of the fish serve with sauce 
marinata in a silver dish garnished with parsley and a small portion 
of last week's mushrooms. Any of the fish which remains will 
make nourishing rissoles tor breakfast." The italics are mine, but 
this is really the kind of advice given to young housewives in many 
modern cookery books. All I can say is that if I wanted to make 
two herrings serve for three meals (knowing my family and 

* "The Housewife's A.B.C.," by W. Fales and Janet Hunter. Geo- 
Harrap & Co. 

73 



OVERSEAS 



its appetite) I should advise as follows : — " Carry the fish home Cookery 

yourself, carefully wrapping it in newspaper in which you have Books and 

already placed a small piece of cheese and an onion. Lay the Cookery I. 

parcel in a warm place for a few days. Then take out the fish, fry 

rapidly in a pan in which bacon has been recently cooked. Serve 

tepid in a fireproof dish garnished with balm." Then there really 

would be some left for rissoles the next day. One well-known 

cookery book, which prides itself on its economy, actually gives a 

recipe for a " pretty supper dish " which consists of a cold boiled 

fowl, stuffed with sausage meat and covered with white sauce, and 

declares, " One chicken thus treated will suffice for eight people 

without touching the pinions or the legs." The italics again are 

mine. If one of the eight people had the temerity to attack the legs 

and wings it would upset the author's menus for the rest of the 

week. 

Seriously, I do not think it is worth while to publish books or 
articles of this kind, especially when our national standard of 
simple cookery is so low. The number of households who keep 
skilled cooks to undertake elaborate ornamental dishes is very 
small, and the housewife who does her own cooking is usually too 
busy to attempt them, and let us hope her family have such healthy 
appetites that they do not need so much labour and art expended 
upon their daily meals. Extravagant menus usually appear in 
the kind of periodical which is filled with portraits of actresses and 
society ladies advertising the latest fashions, which set forth the 
pathetic difficulties of the girl who has to contrive to dress on :£200 
a year, or the nice distinctions between the work of the third 
kitchen-maid and the fourth scullery-maid. I believe they are read 
largely in dentists' waiting rooms and small suburban households. 
Even vegetarian cookery books sometimes descend to frivolity. I 
opened one the other day at a paragraph headed " Mock White- 
bait." Why vegetarians, who presumably object to animal food, 
should manufacture "mock cutlets," "mock crab," and even 
" mock goose," has always been a mystery to me. In this case 
the " mock whitebait " were merely strips of vegetable marrow 
fried in oil. 

We might certainly with advantage give a great deal more 
attention to cooking vegetables, which British people usually cook 
carelessly and without any attempt to preserve those natural juices 
which are often the most valuable constituent of green and other 
vegetables. 

An ancient and celebrated recipe begins, " First catch your hare," 
and hints on vegetable cookery might well begin by suggesting that 
the cook is saved a great deal of trouble if the gardener or allotment 
holder will clean the vegetables when and where he gathers them. 
Ask the gardener to keep a sharp knife and a bucket of water, to 

73 



OVERSEAS 



Cookery 
Books and 
Cookery — I. 



trim off all dirty and superfluous leaves at once, to wash roots and 
place them in a separate clean basket. This saves a great deal of 
mess in the scullery or kitchen. The amateur gardener can even 
be persuaded sometimes to shell beans and peas on the ground if 
he is provided with a seat — and perhaps a pipe ! All root vege- 
tables too small or misshapen to peel with ease can be well scrubbed, 
cut up, and boiled in their skins until tender, for vegetable soup. 
Put through a potato strainer the skins remain behind and the pulp 
is ready for use. 

Green vegetables cooked in a steamer retain their juices and 
flavour, which are lost if boiled in the ordinary way. Do not forget 
that all runner or dwarf beans when too old to use make excellent 
winter vegetables if shelled and dried. The haricot beans we buy 
at the grocer's are much harder and require more soaking than 
beans dried slowly in the sun or in a light, dry shed. Simply 
spread them out on trays or paper and turn them occasionally, 
removing any that show signs of mildew. When quite dry and 
hard they can be stored in muslin bags or jars. The green flageolet 
beans, white runners, or little brown Dutch beans make quite a 
change in winter vegetables, and also make excellent soup. Try 
them as a puree as follows — put a quart of flageolets into a sauce and 
with some stock, two small onions, four cloves and a few mixed 
herbs (dried herbs if fresh are not available). When the flageolets 
are soft pound them in a mortar with a slice of bread fried in drip- 
ping, and rub it all through a sieve. Add enough stock to make it 
of the consistency of cream, serve hot. Puree of dried green peas 
or lentils can be made in the same way, using dried mint for the 
peas instead of mixed herbs. 

ERNESTINE MILLS. 



The Best 
Way. 



The Best Way 



[Mrs. Ernestine Mills, who edits our Home-Makers' pages, is 
ready to answer questions or to give any advice for which 

our readers may ask her.] 

Every sender of a " Best Way " tip is entitled 1o nominate a 

friend to receive six free issues of" Overseas." 

A HINT FOR BEEKEEPERS.— The "visibility" with a bee- 
keeper's veil is much increased by sewing in an oblong piece of 
celluloid in front of the eyes. For celluloid use a spoilt photographic 
film, floating sensitised matter off in warm water. — George L. Boag, 
Aguilas, Murcia, Spain. 

TO CLEAN BRASS. — The leaves of the ordinary begonia, crushed in the 
hand to bring out the moisture, will clean brass beautifully. So will 
sorrel, or probably any acid leaf. The brass only needs polishing with a 
dry cloth afterwards.^Miss A. L. Howarth, 80, Park Drive, Port Eliza- 
beth, C.P. 

74 



OVERSEAS 



TO CLEAN WHITE FUR.— Make a paste of powdered starch and cold The Best 
water, smear thickly over the fur. Let it remain on for twenty-four Way. 
hours, then brush and beat it all out, and the fur will be perfectly clean. — 
Mrs. M. C. Carlson, 20, Southgate Avenue, Annapolis, Maryland, U.S.A. 

SPLENDID " RENEWER."— Buy twopennyworth of soap bark, put it 
in a jar and pour over it a pint of boiling water. Steep this for half an 
hour, then strain the water into a clean jar. Lay the garment to be 
cleaned on a table and apply the solution with a brush, rub lightly until 
a lather is seen on the surface of the garment, allow this to dry in and the 
garment will look like new. — Miss K. J. Joynt, Sheen Lodge, Limerick, 
Ireland. 

TO BOIL A CRACKED EGG. — If you have no salt at hand, take the 
damaged egg {i.e., if the film is not broken and the egg " weeping ") and 
strike it firmly on a flat, hard surface, such as the top of the stove, 
making a flattened disc about the size of a halfpenny ; the egg may then 
be safely boiled in either hot or cold water. — Miss Dorothy Birkett, 
" Gilmour," Meyerton, Transvaal, South Africa. 

" THE AUGUST ' OVERSEAS ' has an article on ' Productive Work,' 
by Mrs. Mills, saying where some politicians were horrified at using 
ex-service men for house-cleaning 1 Right at this very moment two 
American ex-service men are putting this house in order for a house- 
wedding of four hundred guests. They do everything — windows, rugs, 
woodwork, pictures, ornaments — and get room after room back in its 
original order like veritable magicians. We would not know what to do 
without them. Now and at house-cleaning time their noiseless efficiency 
is quite restful, even in the midst of the domestic upheaval ! They are 
so proud of their job when it is finished, and they certainly are artists in 
their line. 

' ' The little maid in the same article who will not use a damp duster 
should have a dustless duster^ — an oiled duster which will not let one bit 
of dust get away ! Please tell Mrs. Mills I will tuck in some dustless 
dusters in my box for the Christmas Gift Sale, and they are surely 
splendid." — Miss Anna Irving, 263, Foster Street, Melrose, Mass., U.S.A. 

HOT PINEAPPLE DRINK. — Slice and chop finely a tinned pineapple. 
Pour the juice into a saucepan, make it up to a pint with water, add one 
pound of lump sugar, boil until the syrup is thick, then pour on the 
chopped pineapple. Add the strained juice of two lemons, cover and 
leave until it is cold. Then strain into a glass jug and add two pints of 
boiling water. (Good for children's parties.) 

A GOOD BATTER FOR FRYING FILLETED FISH.— Shake four ounces 
of flour lightly into a quarter of a pint of warm water, add one tablespoon- 
ful of oUve oil, the white of an egg well whisked, and a pinch of salt. 
Blend until quite smooth, and let it stand ten minutes before use. 
TINNED LOBSTERS SERVED HOT. — Melt a quarter of a pound of 
butter or margarine in an enamelled saucepan, empty the tin of lobster 
into it, season with cayenne pepper, salt and lemon juice, until the whole 
is very hot. Mix with bread crumbs until of a consistency to fill scallop 
shells or patty pans, brown in the oven, putting small bits of butter on the 
top, serve hot, garnished with parsley. 

A MEMBER will be glad of suggestions for using small green figs, grown 
out of doors in England, which do not ripen. 

COLD WEATHER DRINK.^Boil some fine maize flour with milk and 
water until it is all well mixed. Then add chocolate powder or cocoa and 
drink hot. It is very warming and nourishing. 

75 



The Over- 
seas Forum. 





Members are invited to correspond with one another. 

ORTH-WHILE WORK FOR "OVERSEAS."- I left 
New Zealand last May on a tour of the world. The 
purpose of my tour was to enlarge my mind. The 
immense importance of such pilgrimages for those with 
the welfare of the British League of Nations at heart 
has impressed me deeply, especially so during my stay 
in the Mother Country. 

Although the complete results of the recent Imperial Conference have 
not been published, every one is, or ought to be, perfectly well aware that 
the relations between the Dominions and the Mother Country are no 
longer those of pre-War days. The children have come to man's estate, 
and have been taken into partnership. And yet there still exists at 
home an astonishing ignorance of the Dominions and their point of 
view, which, if allowed to continue, may some day lead to serious trouble. 
At least 75 per cent, of home-staying Britons still speak of the overseas 
parts of the Empire as "the Colonies," and their inhabitants as 
" Colonials," while the British newspapers, for the most part, are just 
as bad. 

Unhappily, the Empire no longer possesses a Cecil Rhodes. What 
is sorely needed is a public-spirited man, or group of men, with the 




The •' HoRTI-PlOUGH." [Photo: Da, !y Minor. 

A new labour-saving device for digging which is more effective and speedy 

than a spade. By means of the handle a wire cable is wound on a drum, 

and the machine moves forward. 

76 



Zanzibar and Malay States iiiiii 




Prison Island, Zanzibar. Mrs. McLachlan falling off a turtle, Judge Reed trying to save her. 
Photo sent by Mrs. J. McLachlan, c/o National Bank of India, Zanzibar. 




Malay Houses constructed of Trees and Branches tied together with Ratan Canes, and thatched 

with Palm Leaves. The houses are built well above the ground for the sake of coolness and as a 

protection from crocodiles. Photo sent by Mr. S. M. Fo.x, Byram Estates, Nebong Tebal, S.S. 



Hii: 



lilllllllll!lllllll||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||llllllllllllllllll^^ 



Reading ** Overseas 



»» 



f 
* 





.,. —■ . ^..■. ..,.-. -.w-^.-,- 






J 



Photo taken by Mr. W. Blake. Sent by 

Mr. C. W. G. Walker, Las Mines du 

Petrol, St. Aim6, Dept. Oran, Al^'eria. 




Mrs. Wrench at Killacoona, Ballybrack, 
Co. Dublin, Ireland. 




Miss W. M. C. Wood, 1327, Beach Drive, Oak Bay, \'ictoria, B.C., Canada. 



i^lllllllllllllll!l!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllll^ 



OVERSEAS 



Rhodesian vision and the Rhodesian wealth, to endow the public schools 
and universities of the homeland with a system of travelling scholarships, 
enabling as many young men as possible, at the most receptive period of 
their lives, to visit the distant parts of the Empire, and make themselves 
acquainted on the spot with the many and various problems that each 
nation of the Empire is confronted with. Having accomplished this good 
deed he might usefully apply the system of travelling scholarships for 
the benefit also of the young men of the overseas Dominions in order to 
give them an opportunity of becoming acquainted with the thoughts, 
aspirations and traditions of the Mother Country. Such an endowment 
would be of the greatest possible benefit to the British League of Nations, 
and could lead only to happy results. 

To allow the existing mutual ignoiance and indifference to continue 
is unjust and dangerous. If the Em.pire lacks a large-minded philan- 
thropist wealthy and wise enough to launch such an undertaking, I 
would commend the proposal to the serious consideration of the Over- 
Seas Club which is doing great and beneficent work for the Empire in all 
parts of the world. It would be " worth-while " work. 

I will, moreover, back my opinion by willingly subscribing to any fund 
started for the purpose of establishing such travelling scholarships pro- 
vided that the organisation is in the hands of the Over-Seas Club. W. 
Stuart Wilson, Inglewood Place, Wellington, New Zealand. 
A SMOKELESS LONDON.~I joined at Mafeking a few years ago, and 
now I am living at this address. In the July "Overseas" I was 
interested in a note in My Monthly Letter, entitled a " Smokeless 
London." Now I believe that I can do a lot of good to mitigate that 
smoke nuisance. I have a patent, which was taken out by my father 
in 1864, and was protected for fourteen years. It was called "Thomas 
Loftus's Self-acting Smoke Consuming Apparatus," for attaching to 
Lancashire and Cornish Boilers. 

Instead of the foul smoke going up the chimney and contaminating 



The Over- 
seas Forum. 




A snow-plough trying to force its way tlirough a snow-drift on the C.P.R. 
at Schreiber, Northern Ontario, Canada. Photo sent by Mr. Charles 
Haywood, Box 147, S.lirciber P.O., Ontario. 

77 




OVERSEAS 



The Over- the air, etc., it was burned in the furnace, thus being utiHsed and getting 

seas Forum. more heat from the coal, being a benefit to coal consumers and a benefit 

to the public at large. Will you please make it known, and if anybody 

likes to take it up I am willing to correspond, and will make terms as 

to its being used again in England. 

The apparatus was fitted to a' large number of cotton mills and other 
works in both Lancashire and Yorkshire, and in all cases proved entirely 
satisfactory. Will you kindly pass this letter on to any public body, and 
others, who are anxious to get clean and healthy towns. — J. Loftus, 
6, Oak Terrace, Grahamstown, Cape Colony, South Africa. 
AUTHOR OF "HOME, SWEET HOME." — How very many Britishers 
sing " Home, Sweet Home," but know nothing of the author, of his 
life and burial. 

" Home, Sweet Home "was written by John Howard Payne, at Tunis, 
where he was American Vice-Consul, but he had previously been a 
dramatist and actor. In his play " Clari, the Maid of Milan, "the lyric 
" Home, Sweet Home " is found. He died at Tunis and his body was 

buried in the old British burial 
ground, but it was exhumed and 
transported to Washington, where it 
was re-buried. Enclosed is a print 
I have taken of the tombstone 
which is still standing, and is visited 
by very many American and British 
tourists when in Tunis. I hope the 
print and these few lines may be of 
use to your most valuable, valued 
and interesting journal, " Over- 
seas. ' ' — Arthur V. Liley, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Over-Seas Club and 
Patriotic League at Tunis, i. Rue 
Sidi-Zahmoul, Tunis. 
A LOYAL RHODESIAN.— Having 
been a Rhodesian for twenty-one 
years, I may be able to give you in- 
formation that may be of use to 
Members with an idea of turning 
their eyes towards this outpost of 
Empire. I shall always be delighted 
to do this, for, though an Australian 
born, I am a very loyal Rhodesian, 
and a big believer that this country 
has a great future, even a greater 
one than our big Imperialist, Cecil 
Rhodes, ever dreamed. 

Our great need to-day is settlers, 
and as soon as the question is 
tackled in the manner warranted 
by our resources, and facilities 
offered to the right stamp of 
Britishers, the country v/ill prove 
itself. There is an undoubted 
feeling of approaching manhood 
present with us to-day, and, with 
the prospects of becoming self- 
governed, we are buoyantly 
optimistic. 

78 




Tombstone of John Howard Payne, author of 

" Home, Sweet Home," in the old British 

burial ground at Tunis. Photo sent by Mr. 

A. V. Liley, i, Rue Sidi-Zahmoul, Tunis. 



With best wishes for success in your great work, and assuring you The Over- 
of my desire to assist where possible. — A. Tyas, P.O. Box 309, Salisbury, seas Forum. 
South Rhodesia, South Africa. 

SOME POSERS. — On behalf of others interested, I shall be very grateful 
if you can, through the magazine, supply the following information : 
Supposing I am born in Germany or Czecho-Slovakia, or Russia, or any 
other European country, excepting Great Britain or its possessions, of 
British parents, bred and born in England, according to British law I am 
British. 

Does it make any difference whether I was registered with the British 
Consul in the country I was born in, or should parents register their 
children with the British Consul whatever country they may be at the 
time of the birth of their child ? This question often com.es up for dis- 
cussion, but nobody seems to clear up the matter. No. 2 Problem : 
Supposing a British subject in this country takes out his " first papers," 
i.e., intention to become a United States citizen, and after seven years 
neglects to apply for his second or final papers with the oath of allegiance 
to the United States, does he remain a British subject ? Supposing he 
returns to England and does not apply for second papers here, can he 
become a British subject again, or is he neither one nor the other ? 

A case came under my 
observation where a young 
man sailed to England to join 
the Navy, but as he had his 
first papers out here, the British 
would not take him. So he 
went to the American Navy 
recruiting offices, and they 
would not have him because 
he was not an American 
citizen. But ultimately he did 
manage to get in, but how I 
have not learned yet. 

I shall be glad, on behalf of 
self and others, to know the 
nationality law, as described. — 
J. Cliff, 867, Beacon Street, 
Boston, 17, Mass., U.S.A. 

[Perhaps some correspondents 
will write Mr. Cliff direct. 1 
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED 
POLICE.- — The magazine more 
than comes up to my anticipa- 
tions, and, as you requested, it 
will be passed on to my friends, 
and I know it will be highly 
appreciated, especially by mem- 
bers of this detachment. 
While speaking of this detach- 
ment, it may be interesting to 
know that the sergeant, who is 
in charge, was once a Member 
of the most northern post of the 
Over-Seas Club, while he was Master A. B. Moore seated on the post which 
stationed at the Fort McPherson marks the exact centre of the State of Queensland. 
detachment o^ this Force, then ^j^j^ j^ situated in the grounds of the State 

known as the R.N.W.M.P. ^^^^^^^ Blackall, Central Queensland. Photo sent 

79 by Mr. A. B. Moore, H.C.S., Blackall, Queensland, 

Australia. 




o 



RSEAS 



The Over- Fort McPherson, as you know, is in the Arctic circle. There were 

seas Forum, five membeis of the Force there at the time. One, Sergeant FitzGerald, 
has since been lost in a blizzard in that region while en route from 
Dawson to Fort McPherson delivering the mail. The others are now 
scattered over the north-west territories. — L. C. H. Martin, Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police, Weyburn, Sask., Canada. 
FROM NEW HEBRIDES. — Mr. King, our Resident Commissioner, 
came in to our anchorage and offered to take any mail we had on to 
Vila, where there might be a chance to get it away. I took the oppor- 
tunity to send off my note to you, and hope that it will reach you safely. — 
Rev. D. L. Paterson, Abnatari, Malo, New Hebrides. 

Our cnrrespnndenVs letter took manv months to reach us.] 
" AS LONG AS THINGS RUN SMOOTHLY. "--I fully realise what an 
enormous undertaking running a world-wide concern must be. At the 
same time it must give you a tremendous amount of pleasure and interest 
as long as things run smoothly. — Miss E. A. Goodson, Hotel du Lac, 
Vevey, Switzerland. 

[Miss Goodson is quite right. Our work is wonderfully inspiring and, 
after all, the unpleasant things, like when Members fail to renew their 
subscriptions and drop out, act as a contrast to the year in, year out 
splendid record of our world-wide membership. No words can express 
what we feel about their loyalty and help.—E.W.] 

A NOBLE WORK. I wish to 
take this opportunity of saying 
what a noble work the Club is 
doing in the overseas parts of our 
Empire in making Britishers 
think of the interests of their 
fellow - Britishers, whether 
English, Irish, Indian, African, 
or of any other race in the 
Empire. — S. S. Spurling, St. 
George, Bermuda, British West 
Indies. 

SOUTHERN PATAGONIA. ^ I 
have been over thirty-five years 
on this island and Southern 
Patagonia without once going 
to England, and in the old days 
nearly the only Britisher, but 
have always managed to hold 
my own. — John Dicks, Porvenir, 
Tierra del Fuego, Chile, South 
America. 

THINGS QUIET IN QUEENS- 
LAND. — This town has a popu- 
lation of about 18,000, and 
another ; 10,000 in and around 
the villages outside. 

There is a depression just 
now and considerable unem- 
ployment, due to the want of 
capital required to develop 
this great State. — H. Beer, 
Blackall Street, East Ipswich, 

Queensland, Australia. 

"The height of his ambition. A gull on the top 

of a flagstaff. Photo sent by Mrs. A. Hodgins, 
1471, Fairfield Road, Victoria, B.C., Canada. 




MY MONTH S 
READING 



has 



By A. St. John Adcock 

UST as there are born orators, born poets, born 
musicians, so there are born travellers, and Mr. 
Frank Hedges Butler is one of these, and one of the 
best of these, iov he has not only travelled under all 
sorts of conditions in every available vehicle, but he 
known how to write about his experiences in such fashion 




My Month's 
Reading. 



that anybody who will may read his books and enjoy his journeys 
with him. It is one thing to be a good traveller, and altogether 
another thing to make a good book about your travels, and Mr. 
Hedges Butler has made at least three, for " Fifty Years^of Travel 
by Land, Water and Air " is the third of his that I have both read 
and enjoyed. Most men when they sit down to write their recollec- 
tions are ham.pered by the fact that, after a long and busy life, 
they naturally forget more than they remember, but Mr. Butler 
is one of the wise who insure themselves against that by keeping 
diaries, and you may gather from his latest book how invaluable 
that practice has been to him. 

As an author, he owes something to that habit of keeping 
diaries ; as a traveller, he owes something to the circumstance 
that his reading in boyhood about the travels of great explorers 
gave him a desire to see as much as possible of so wonderful a 
world ; but the second paragraph of his book indicates that his 
wanderlust did not result entirely from his early reading : — 

"This desire to make journeys was really an inherited instinct. 
My mother before her marriage travelled extensively with her father, 
William Hedges. There were no guide-books in those days, but they 
kept diaries of the tours they made, and these were passed round the 
family to be read. The Grand Tour in the early part of the nineteenth 
century was to France and Italy. Journeys were made by post-chaise, 
and travellers, who were accompanied by a courier, insured their lives 
and valuables against attack by brigands and highwaymen in Italy. 
It is to my father that I owe my own habit of keeping diaries. Whenever 
I went for a holiday it was expected of me that I should write an account 
daily of places visited and things seen. Because of this practice I can now 
recall that in my boyhood luggage was carried on the top of railway 
carriages, and that to get to Ilfracombe one had to finish the journey 
from Barnstaple by stage coach." 

As his mother, till her marriage, travelled much with her father, 
so you will find from this book that, till her marriage, Mr. Hedges 
Butler's daughter, Vera, travelled much with him, and though the 

81 



OVERSEA 



My Month's chaise may have served him at first in his overland journeyings, 
Reading. j^e discarded it for the motor car when the car was still in its experi- 

mental stages, and took to travel by air as soon as that became 
practicable. You trace the virtue of his diaries in the accounts 
of his visits in the seventies and early eighties to the West Indies, 
South America, France, Spain, Portugal, Palestine, India, Ceylon, 
and later to Morocco, Lapland and East Africa. Without diaries 
one doubts whether he could have given all manner of vivid little 
touches that put so much colour and life into his record. There 
is that graphic description of the araguato, or howling monkey, 
seen in Bolivar, for instance — a description so exact that an 
artist could re-draw the strange creature from it. There is the 
curious story of his search for and discovery in Ceylon " of the 
real wild men, the Veddahs, perhaps the lowest type of human 
beings in the world " ; and, to say nothing of others, the passing 
sketch of a visit to the monastery at Cartuja. 

A very interesting and amusing chapter on the early days of 
motoring will awaken recollections in many who are even less 
than middle-aged. 

" Now that the fortunate owner of a Rolls-Royce can have breakfast 
in London, make concessions in speed in the neighbourhood of suspected 
police traps, and arrive by road at Bournemouth in good time for lunch, 
the comedy and tragedy of the early days of motoring seem far away. 
As a pioneer among motor enthusiasts, I have myself vivid recollections 
of the troubled birth and slow development of a form of transport which 
has now become universal. It was in 1896 that I had my first experience 
with a car. This was a great year for the bicycle, and I remember that 
in the mornings and afternoons the road on the north side of the Serpen- 
tine in Hyde Park was a rendezvous of those who had taken up cycling 
as a pastime and form of exercise. Cyclists also delighted in the afternoon 
to pedal their machines round Battersea Park. With my daughter, 
Vera, who was then at school in Paris, I made a cycle tour in 1896 from 
Aix-les-Bains to Geneva." 

In Paris he experimented with the Peugeot car, which had its 
engine at the back, and visited the Automobile Exhibition orga- 
nised by the Automobile Club of France, where " no English cars 
were shown, as the Act in England had not then been passed to 
allow horseless carriages on the road without a man walking in 
front carrying a red flag." 

" My own first car, which came into my possession in 1897, was a 
Benz, from Mannheim, described on the invoice as a motor velocipede, 
price £120. I bought it from Mr. Harry Hewetson. The early days of 
this extraordinary horseless vehicle puzzled me and every one else. To 
get it started was a work of art. A wheel at the back of the car had to 
be turned ; sometimes one forgot to turn on the petrol or the electricity, 
or the carburetter became flooded. When the car did start, one felt 
quite astonished, and half expected the engine or something to explode. 
Engineers with many letters after their names looked upon motor cars 
as impossible and a sort of toy, although the gas engine was nothing new, 

(Continued on page 87.) 



The Month's Cartoons 




Looks as though They would 
NEVER DO Team Work. 

Reid, in the Evening Mail 
(New York). ' 




Will She ever Make it? 
Hungerford, in the Sun (Pittsburgh). 



I'LL BE DrVO.^CEO 

:INlinZLY, I k-.ANT , 

THE CUSTODY CiF ( 
i T'<e Child, AnD I 
V/ANT ME (V.OEN 
NAME RESTO»rD' 




She wants an Absolute 

Divorce. 

Knox, in the News (Galveston). 




An .American Point of View. 



sa 



The Month's Cartoons 




Unanimous. 

Japan: "My intentions, I as- 
sure you, are entirely Pacific! " 

Uncle Sam : " Sure — so are 
mine ! " 

John Bull : " Same here ! " 

Chcnev, in the Passuip Show 

o 

(London). 




He needs a disarmament 
trimming — but who will begin 
it, and where .' 

From the News-Tiihtiiic 
(Tacoma, W.ash., U.S.A.). 




The " Front " in the Next War. 
Harding, in the Eagle (Brooklyn, 
U.S.A.). 




The Day of Emancipation 
MUST Come. 
Knott, in the News (Dallas, 
U.S.A.). 



84 



The Month's Cartoons 



ss-f '^Es: 



^,*9**«» — ^JSi-wJW'uuro^**^' 




2? 



,'^ 






i 



r ^»^ 



^i^a^ 



^"^***^ 



Sandy McTavish finds a Place to Practise. 

From Life (New York). 
This cartoon will appeal to our Scottish Members — a mere Saxon suggests that 
it will appeal even more to the unfortunate mortals who happened to be born 

south of the Tweed! 



85 



The Month's Cartoons 




" Please send me a gallon of ice cream an' five pounds of choc'lit an' 
two dozen cream puffs an' a box of^honey, an' I want them delivered in time 
for breakfast." ' - - - ^.^^ ^^^ York). 






..I 'i.-^- L"? "/a.M iX^. -^ j\ 



Teacher: "Now tell mc, Willie, where do naughty boys go who don't go to 
church on Sunday ? " 

Willie : " Fishin' ! " S. DelevantCj in Wayside Tales (Chicago). 

86 



(Continued from pa^e 82.) 
and the whole idea, including electric ignition, was foreshadowed in the My Month's 
1 851 Exhibition in an invention shown by a Frenchman, M. Lenoir, Reading, 
whose patents could later be bought for threepence at the Patent Office." 

The chapter goes on to tell of the difficulty of climbing hills in 
those noisy, primitive cars ; the terror their passing inspired in 
horses and countryfolk ; the frequent breakdowns, and the pro- 
vision that had to be made in anticipation of these ; and it is all 
good reading and an excellent history of how the car grew out of 
its infancy, improved, and rose into popularity. 

During the War, Mr. Hedges Butler made a good many business 
visits to France, especially to Reims, and the varied tale of his 
war-time experiences among the indomitable soldiers and civilians 
of our Ally, sometimes under fire exploring the trenches, sometimes 
in strange subterranean places of refuge when the scattered towns 
were enduring bombardment, gives his book some of its most 
poignant and fascinating pages. He is a shrewd observer, and has 
a wonderful eye for the small events that count so effectively in the 
finished picture, as where he says that when he was in Coblenz just 
after the Armistice he found the French hatred of the Germans much 
more pronounced than that of our troops, and adds, ' ' Frenchmen, of 
course, have cause for their bitterness, but beyond this, the British 
temperament is different from that of our Gallic friends. I met one of 
our Tommies with two little German children clinging to his hands." 

I had thought to quote several things from the chapter on " My 
Hundred Balloon Ascents," and from the chapter following, 
" Airships and Aeroplane Flights," the fine appreciation of the 
Wilbur Wrights and their work, but I have no more room. It is 
a delightful book, written with vivacity and charm, and as full of 
information as of entertainment. Mr. Hedges Butler is a true-blue 
Cockney, born within sound of Bow Bells, and as a pioneer of 
motoring, the founder of the Royal Aero Club, as one who has 
done great service in the cause of ballooning and air-flight in 
general, and is the author of some of the best travel-books of our 
generation, his name will be added to that list of notable Londoners 
who, born for the universe, have not narrowed their minds and 
given up to one city the enthusiasms that were meant for mankind. 

SOME BOOKS OF THE MONTH.— General Literature : " Fifty Years 
of Travel by Land, Water and Air," by Frank Hedges Butler, F.R.G.S. 
Illustrated. 21s. (Fisher Unwin.) " From Private to Field-Marshal," 
by Field-Marshal Sir William Robertson. 21s. (Constable.) "Elizabeth 
Inchbald and Her Circle," by S. R. Littlewood. los. 6d. (Daniel 
O'Connor.) " Penny Royal." Essays, by J. B. Morton. 6s. 6d. (Philip 
Allan.) "My Life of Song," by Madame Tetrazzini. 21s. (Cassell.) 
" Last Studies in Criminology," by H. B. Irving. 15s. (CoUins.) 
Fiction : " If Winter Comes," by A. S. M. Hutchinson. 7s. 6d. (Hodder.) 
" One Woman," by Alfred Ollivant. 8s. 6d. (Allen & Unwin.) "The 
Heart of the Desert," by Honore Willsie, 8s. (Thornton Butterworth.) 
" The Secret Victory," by Stephen McKenna. 8s. 6d. (Hutchinson.) 

87 



News from 

Head- 

quarters. 




^_^;^ V^i^^ S\' . \ ;".u 1 1 '», i.K^, ^y--^ 




-^nmm 









"Overseas" Editorial Rooms, 

London. 

UR CHARTER. I have been so busy in connection 
with out purchase of Vernon House that I don't seem 
to have very much fresh news to tell you about our 
movement as a whole except that our petition for the 
granting of a Royal Charter has been forwarded to the 
Privy Council, and we hope to be able to report progress before long. 
WILL 1922 BE OUR BANNER YEAR ?— Our new membership 
this year is not quite as good as I had hoped, the actual total 
enrolled being so far 6,225. But let us forget about past events 
and make up our minds that we are going to celebrate 1922, the 
year in which we take possession of our new home, by making it our 
banner year. I hope that every single reader of " Overseas " v/ill 
lend a hand in the task of doubling our membership. We must 
not rest content till we have turned our present membership into 
50,000. 

OUR RELATIONS WITH THE " LEAGUE OF THE EMPIRE."— 
After a very pleasant association of several years with the League 
of the Empire, which, as you know, especially concentrates its 
energies on educational work, we have decided that it is in the best 
interests of both societies to continue their work as independent 
organisations. I should like to take this opportunity of once more 
wishing Mrs. Ord Marshall, C.B.E., the Hon. Secretary, and her 
co-workers the very best of luck in their splendid efforts for pro- 
moting Imperial unity through the schools and universities. 
OUR DEBT. — Our debt is now £23,000. Please remember that 
every pound contributed means money saved in the interest paid to 
our bankers for the loan. I know we can rely on every Member 
to help us to the best of his ability, and we should like every branch 
to arrange some function this winter in aid of our War Memorial 
Fund so that we may soon reach the £50,000 mark. 
THE OVERSEAS TRADE BUREAU.— All the financial big-wigs 
and leading politicians nowadays seem to be convinced that the 
only way to bring back true prosperity and increase employment is 
to stimulate our export trade. 

Without blowing our own trumpet too loudly, this is just what 
we have been doing through the Overseas Trade Bureau for the past 
five years ! More and more are our Members and those engaged 
in industry overseas realising what a service we are rendering to 
British importers and exporters by means of our Bureau. 

88 



OVERSEAS 



This month you will notice an interesting Hst of some of the 
commercial enquiries we have received. Please remember that no 
trade enquiry is too small to receive attention. Nearly every 
reader of " Overseas " can help in Empire trade. 
OUR ADVERTISERS.- Please don't forget that you can always 
do us a good turn by writing to our advertisers and mentioning 
" Overseas." As our advertising increases we are enabled to 
improve and add to the contents of our magazine. 
GETTING READY AT VERNON HOUSE. Now that we have 
actually acquired possession of Vernon House, Park Place, St. 
James's, S.W., we are hard at work making our plans for its occu- 
pation at the earliest possible moment as the future London premises 
of the Over-Seas Club and the headquarters of our world-wide 
activities. 

Those of you who are householders will realise what a big task 
it is planning out all the details of our future home, and making the 
best possible use of the space available. 

The photograph appearing on page 44 shows the gates by which 
one drives into the courtyard of Vernon House, together with the 
actual building, approaching it from St. James's Street through 
Park Place, but this photograph does not give an adequate idea of 
the size of the building, which runs right through to the Green Park. 

We are all looking forward tremendously to our big move, which 
we expect will take place this side of Christmas. The fact that 
Vernon House has been acquired by the Over-Seas Club and Patriotic 
League has created quite a stir, and we are receiving as a consequence 
a considerable amount of free newspaper publicity. People who 
never took the Over-Seas Club very seriously before are surprised 
at the thought that after art existence of only eleven years we should 
be in a position to acquire one of London's most charming residences 
in the very heart of the most exclusive part of Clubland. 

I want every reader of " Overseas " to help me during the next 
couple of years to put our society in an unassailable position, and 
the two things we require to do are (i) to double our existing 
membership, and (2) to pay off our debt of £23,000 to our bankers, 
so that we can feel that Vernon House and the plot of old London 
on which it is built belong to us for all time absolutely debt free. 

Will every reader of " Overseas " who is prepared to help me to 
clear off our debt let me know what sum he will make himself 
responsible for ? All we require is two hundred friends who will 
provide themselves or collect £100 — surely not a very big task. 
As soon as we have settled all the necessary details entailed in 
removing and reconstruction, and such matters as the lighting and 
heating, I hope with your assistance to tackle the wiping-off of our 
debt in real earnest. 

All donations towards the clearing off of our debt will be acknow- 
ledged in " Overseas." 

^9 



News from 
Head- 
quarters. 



OVERSEAS 



News from OUR TORONTO BRANCH. —We have had some deHghtfully en- 
Head- couraging letters from Toronto, where O.S. affairs had been Ian- 
quarters, guishing for a long time. Our former H.C.S., Mr. T. B. Gleave, 
has been obliged to relinquish his duties owing to the fact that he 
is so often out of the city. But he is very kindly co-operating with 
our new H.C.S., Mr. B. V. Atkinson, c/o Messrs. Price, Waterhouse 
& Co., 802, Royal Bank Building, who is getting into touch with 
those Members who are anxious to put Toronto on the O.S. map. 
We hope all our friends in Toronto will make a point of getting 
into touch with Mr. Atkinson — we believe there are great possi- 
bilities before our movement in that city. 

Now that the prospects of getting the O.S. cause going again 
in Toronto seem so good, we should like to take this opportunity 
of thanking all those kind friends who have helped in the past, 
including Mr. Fane Sewell, Mr. T. B. Gleave and the others. 
O.S. DEBATING SOCIETY.— The Over-Seas Debating Society has 
recommenced its activities at Headquarters, and meetings are being 
held on alternate Tuesdays at 7.0 p.m. 

Any Member who desires to attend debates is requested to 
forward name and address to Mr. D. W. Caddick, c/o Over-Seas 
Club, enclosing 2d. to cover postage. E. W. 

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR. 
[Here is the O.S. Roll of Honour this month, containing the names of a 
number of those kind friends who have rendered conspicuous service to 

our cause. Is your town on the list }} 
LEVUKA, FIJI. — Twenty new Members and renewals from the Levuka 
Branch per Mr. R. W. Robinson, the Hon. Treasurer. Our Members 
at Suva, Fiji, celebrated Empire Day in good style. 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, U.S.A.— Six more new Members from our 
Hon. Corresponding Secretary, Mr. B. L. Twinn, five of whom were 
obtained through the efforts of Mr. Jameson, of 1515, Highland Avenue, 
to whom we are very grateful. Mr. Twinn writes that our local Members 
are aiming at a total of 100, and are hoping to get Club premises later on. 
DAIREN, MANCHURIA.— We were delighted to hear from a very old 
friend in the person of Mr. F. C. Bardens, Hon. Secretary of our Dairen 
Branch, who forwarded nine renewals and six new Members. It is very 
gratifying when old friends prove by their acts that their interest for our 
cause does not wane. 

GIBRALTAR. — Several new Members from our good friend, Mr. W. H. 
Hoare, our Hon. Corresponding Secretary of Gibraltar. Mr. Hoare is 
holiday-making in the South of Spain, and we wish him a very pleasant 
time. 

MULMEIN, BURMA. — A steady flow of new Members comes from our 
Hon. Corresponding Secretary, Mr. C. W. Law. 

MARACAIBO, VENEZUELA, SOUTH AMERICA.— Several Members 
forwarded by H.B.M. Vice-Consul, Mr. J. Robertson. 
MACKAY, NORTH QUEENSLAND.— Four more Members from Mrs. 
E. M. Innes, of Pratpino, Alligator Creek, together with some delightful 
photographs, which we hope to publish. 

BAHIA BLANCA, ARGENTINE.— It is the exception rather than the 
rule to miss Mr. F. B. Tregarthen's hand-writing in our South American 
mail. He never misses an opportunity of sending along new Members. 





Members can have one free insertion in our Members' Exchange 

pages each year. 

DDRESSES CHANGED— Julius Kramer, Poste Restante, Members' 
Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa. — " As I am leav- Exchange. 
ing the country temporarily and do not know when I will 
return, I shall be pleased if you insert a notice to the effect 
that my address will be as above. I am leaving for a holi- 
day and expect to be away some time. I shall also be 
pleased to receive correspondence with a view to obtaining and exchang- 
ing stamps, snaps and interesting literature." 

Frank J. Phillips, 4616^, Central Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.A. 
- — " Would you please draw attention to my change of address in the 
magazine ? " 

D. Macmillan, Keetmanshoop, South West Africa. — " Will you men- 
tion in the ' Overseas ' that I have now removed from Engcobo, Tembu- 
land, to the above address ? " 

C. R. Haines, Pacific Cable Board, Norfolk Island, via Sydney, N.S.W. 
— " Will you kindly have my change of address recorded at Head Office 
and instruct that future copies of ' Overseas,' etc., are to be sent to rny 
new address, which is given above ? I shall also feel grateful if you will 
kindly mention the change in ' Overseas ' when space permits." 

BACK NUMBERS OF " OVERSEAS." —E. K. Waldock, c/o The 
Over-Seas Club, would like to receive the back numbers of " Over- 
seas," Nos. I to 5 and November, 1917, and June, 1918. 

BOOK WANTED. — H. W. Martin, P.O. Box 1071, Ocean Beach, San 
Diego, Calif., U.S.A. — " I am very anxious to obtain copy of book 
written in prose by a dear pal of mine, C. C. Crowther, who died years ago 
when serving in the Burma Imperial Police. The title of this book was 
" The Last Christian," and it was published, I believe, either in Bath or 
Dover. He gave me an autographed copy, but I lent it, with the usual 
result : it was never returned. Could any brother Member kindly help 
me in the matter? " 

CORRESPONDENCE REQUIRED. Miss E. T., c/o Over-Seas Club, 
General Buildings, Aldwych, W.C. 2, would be glad to correspond 
and exchange stamps with Members. 

Miss B. Nankivell, St. George's Lodge, Museum Street, Perth, Western 
Australia. — " I would very much like to correspond with fellow- 
Members." 

Miss R. Pohl, Atholdeni, P.O. Sydenham, Durban, Natal, South Africa. 
— " I would like to correspond with either a lady or gentleman from 
either England, Australia or America, being interested in these coun- 
tries." 

W. Sturgess, Laurengo Marques, Box 358, Portuguese East Africa. — 
" I should like to correspond with Members." 

F. E. Alderman, Northampton, W. Australia. — " I was enrolled last 
year by the Rev. G. P. Stubbs of this place. I should like to correspond 
with the opposite sex in England if you happen to know of any one willing 
to do so. Occupation, accountant. Born Nottingham. Religion, Angli- 
can. Single." 

91 



OVERSEAS 



Members' The Misses Florrie and Ruth Pearse, " Landew," Temuka, S. Canter- 

Exchange bury, New Zealand, would be pleased to hear from Members in all parts 

of the world. " We just pine for correspondents, especially ones who like 
bright and cheery letters. Hobbies, outdoor sports, music and photo- 
graphy." 

" 0. E.," c/o Over-Seas Club. " Young Englishman (20) would like 
to correspond with Members (either sex) in all parts of the world 
except B.W.I. — particularly those residing in oil countries, Canada and 
Australia." 

P. S., c/o " Overseas." — -'A young Overseas Member (21), resident 
master at a school in Eastbourne, wishes to make the acquaintance of 
any fellow-Members in or near Eastbourne." 

M. K. Chelliah, The Nordanal Rubber Estates, Ltd., Muar, Johore, 
Malaya. — "I invite all Members in the universe to write me. I also 
exchange postage stamps, picture postcards from all parts of the world. 
Answers guaranteed by return mail, and there will be no disappoint- 
ment." 

W. R. Jones, Box 22, Auburn, South Australia, would be pleased to 
correspond with a few Members interested in country life. 

STAMP EXCHANGE.— Albert V. Coates, Ituzaingo, 1459, Monte- 
video, Uruguay, wishes to exchange stamps with Members interested 
in stamp collecting. 

S. E. Ridge, River Zander End, Cape Province, South Africa. — " I 
should like to exchange stamps with Members all over the world in return 
for colonial and foreign stamps." 

Stamps for Sale. Selections on approval to responsible collectors at 
not more than half catalogue price. Ten per cent, of all sales is devoted 
to Overseas War Memorial Fund. Write, stating countries interested in 
to C. F. Beck, P.O. Box 44, Premier Mine, Transvaal, South Africa. 

Walter Sheppard, 15, Hilda Street, Hull.—" I would be glad to exchange 
stamps with Members anywhere." 

Jack Conway, 1234, S. Peach Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. " I 
wish to exchange with Members in all countries, Canada and Newfound- 
land included. I will send stamps, postals, or, if desired, back numbers 
of the magazine. As I am only a new enthusiast many collectors who 
have duplicates can help me greatly." 

W. M. Gerrard, c/o Messrs. Steel Bros. & Co., Ltd., Bassein, Burma. 
" It is only after reading the last ' Overseas ' magazine that it has struck 
me how keen Members are on stamps, and to make it more interesting I 
have just received a letter from the school where my boy is at home 
saying, ' I have thirty-four stamps, daddy.' Now most of the corre- 
spondents say they will exchange stamps for stamps received. I am 
afraid I cannot do this, as I am not a collector. I can of course recipro- 
cate in other ways. 

" I will always be a keen Member of the O.S. Club, not for what I can 
get out of it but for what I can put into it, as every ounce of energy applied 
to this Club is for the Empire and the old country." 

J. Cobbold, Paso de Los Toros, F.C.C. del U., Republic of Uruguay, 
South America, would like to exchange stamps from Uruguay and Brazil 
for those of any part of the world, excluding Central Europe. 

Alfred H. W. Brazier, The Tea Gardens, Galleywood, Chelmsford, 
Essex, would be glad to receive foreign stamps from Members, as durmg 
War service (Navy) collection has been neglected. Will forward value 
of stamps received to Memorial Fund. 

'T. H. Newey, Posts and Telegraphs, Daressalaam, Tanganyika Terri- 
tory, East Africa.—" I am desirous of changing stamps from these parts 



OVERSEAS 



for those of all foreign countries or colonies, India and South Africa only Members' 
excepted." Exchange. 

J. H. Hook c/o Singer Sewing Machine Co., P.O. Box 512, Singapore, 
S.S. — " I would like to get into touch with stamp collectors, with whom 
I would exchange stamps of the Dutch East Indies, Straits Settlements, 
Federated Malay States, and Unfederated Malay States." 

Donald F. Smith, c/o Bank of British West Africa, Ltd., Warri, Nigeria, 
W.C. Africa. — "I noted Mr. Boulton's remark in April 'Overseas' to 
the effect that he has had forty-nine replies. In three months I have had 
fifty-one (advertisement in February number), and they are still rolling 
in. Can any one beat that ? I am endeavouring to reply to all in due 
course. This shows what a wide circulation the magazine must have and 
the interest overseas folk take in it." 

Miss C. Cheyne Brady, Pavilion de 1 'Olivine, Rue Titien, Cannes, 
France, would like to hear from Lieut. A. Grey, late of Demobilisation 
Camp, Kantara, Egypt, and also from Sig. V. de Augels, of Malta. 

FARMING.— W. M. Squire, c/o Messrs. W. M. Strachan & Co., Ltd., 
P.O. Box 296, Yokohama, Japan. — ' ' I would like to be put into touch 
with a Member of the Over-Seas Club, well established at farming in either 
New Zealand or British Columbia, with a view to sending out to him my 
two boys at present at school in England. My idea is to send them out 
in order to get a good grounding in farming, and, while doing so, to make 
themselves useful and to a certain extent pay for their keep. Later on 
it is my intention to join them and start a small farm of our own. The 
boys are hefty youngsters, and are both very keen at present on the idea. 
Their ages are 15 and 14 respectively, and the younger of the two is 
already 5 ft. 7 in. I would much like to be put into communication with 
any one interested and take up the matter of terms, etc., with him." 

A gentleman (widower), with two sons aged 17 and 12, latter still at 
school, is anxious for information regarding prospects of ranching or 
farming in Western Canada, capital necessary for starting on m.oderate 
scale, or possibilities of a partnership in an established concern. Replies 
in first instance to Caixa Postal 1251, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

British Columbia, c/o Overseas, General Buildings, Aldwych, W.C. 2. — ■ 
" I contemplate going to British Columbia very soon to engage in mixed 
farming in one of the well-settled districts. 

" I am an experienced farmer, and know Canada well. Am an ex- 
officer, married, and would like to hear of another with some capital to 
come as partner, or come out with object similar to mine, and settle as a 
neighbour for mutual benefi.t." 

FARMS FOR SALE. — Gentleman at present abroad hoping to return 
to England in about a year would like to hear of fruit farm for sale 
on easy terms or partnership. References can be given, and in the case 
of a partnership would be expected. — H. S. C. P., c/o " Overseas." 

For sale in British Columbia. Creston, West Kootenay, B.C. — Fruit 
and Dairy Ranch of 25 acres and 250 acres of mountain and timber land, 
with complete outfit for carrying on. Ranch contains two cottages, 
stables, haybarns, packing and storage sheds. Twelve acres of meadow 
and pasture ; 15 acres orchard just coming into bearing, planted with 
best varieties, about 1,200 apple trees, 500 pear trees, cherries and 
apricots. A wooded bluff of six acres, ideal site for house, one mile from 
town, church, banks, P.O., C.P.R. station. Climate and land produce 
fruit of first quality and colour. No extreme cold. Summers of con- 
tinual sunshine. No noxious pests, no codling moth, canker, fireblight, 
or woolly aphixes. Market close at hand ; excellent shipping organisa- 
tion. Is delightfully situated, fine view and aspect. Valuable water 

9.S 



OVERSEAS 




Members* rights and piped supply. Valuable and practically free grazing and hay- 

Exchange, ing rights close by. Some of the best fishing and shooting. Owner 

retiring on account of age. Particulars can be obtained from Mr. H. 

Green, 93, Forest Hill Road, Torquay, Devon. 

LOST TRAILS.^S. J. Woodhouse, c/o West African Lighterage & 
Transport Co., Ltd., Accra, Gold Coast, W. Africa. — " I should like 
to get in touch with a Member residing in Los Angeles, California, with a 
view of obtaining information of that particular State, and particularly to 
find out if there is any means of obtaining my brother's address, who I 
know resides in that town, but unfortunately we cannot get into communi- 
cation with each other." 

Joseph Vella, 84k, Via Curmi, Hamrun, Malta. — " I wonder if I can 
get into touch with people through the magazine who can claim that 
they are descendants in direct line from Giuseppe Saxo and Teresa Cowin ? 
It is known that in the year 1760 they lived in Sardegna and that they 
had a son named Antonio Saxo-Cowin, who was married in Malta in the 
year 1773." 

LONELINESS. V. L. Bauer, Sitebe Station, P.O. Clarkebury, 
Transkei, South Africa. — " I should like to correspond with Mem- 
bers in England, as this is a very lonely place." 

Mrs. M. Garratt, c/o Don Eduardo Aparicio, Guatemala City, Central 
America. — " There is only one other Member here in Guatemala City I 
believe — Mrs. Mullins — and as I feel very lonely, I should be so glad if 
you would kindly ask some Members to write to me. I should be happy 
to send photographs also from Guatemala." 

PAPERS EXCHANGED.— J. Bland, Hotel Marly, 3rd Street, San 
Francisco, Calif., U.S.A., would be glad to receive newspapers from 
any part of the world, i.e., those printed in English, and would send 
P.P.C.'s in return." 

A. S. V. Tebbitt, Messrs. Kirby, Beard & Co., Ltd., 5, Rue Auber, Paris, 
France. -" Will a Member send me weekly Illustrated London News or 
Graphic in exchange for Monde Illustre? " 

POSTCARDS EXCHANGED.— George C. Phelps, 493, Talbot Avenue, 
Boston 24, Mass., U.S.A., would like to receive good picture cards, 
or small photographs of interesting parish churches, exterior or interior. 
Will reciprocate with similar cards or photos of his own beautiful church, 
or others that may be desired." 

W. A. Roberts, c/o General Manager's Office, Palestine Railways, 
Haifa, Palestine. — " I am desirous of forming a few letter friendships 
here and there over the world. I should be delighted to exchange post- 
cards or current postage stamps in sets. A hobby of mine, too, is the 
collecting of newspapers, and if any ' Overseas ' reader would be good 
enough to send me one or two, any date, any issue, any language, I should 
acknowledge receipt of same with pleasure and thanks, and in return 
satisfy any little wish the sender might care to ask of me." 

PROSPECTS OVERSEAS. -A. Fisher, c/o Messrs. J. Holt & Co. 
(Liverpool), Ltd., Onitsha, River Niger, S. Nigeria, W. Africa. — " If 
any one wishes to know of this part of West Coast I should only be too 
pleased to give them any information." 

SHEEP AND CATTLE FARMING.— Norris Russell, i, Madeira 
Road, Napier, New Zealand. — " I am desirous of corresponding with 
Members in different parts of the world. Would also be willing to give 
any information within my power pertaining to sheep and cattle farming, 
being associated with the same for the last ten years." 

94 





The object of the Overseas Trade Bureau is to develop British Empire 
Trade. The free service of this Department is at the disposal of Members, 
and genuine trade enquiries are welcomed. A number of the enquiries 
dealt with during the past month are printed below. Members 
wishing to avail themselves of the service of the Bureau should send 
their enquiries to The Overseas Trade Bureau, General Buildings, 
Aldwych, London, W.C. 2. 

RITISH TRADE IN BURMA.- As the O.S. Magazine 
devotes considerable space to promoting trade interests 
within the British Empire, observations made by me, a 
commercial man continually travelling, may be of interest 
to your readers. During my travels I meet a good many 
other business men and I make a point of obtaining all the 
information I can on this matter. For example, I was travelling a few 
weeks ago with an engineer who informed me that he was going up 
country to help to erect a big plant at some large mines ; the plant has 
cost many hundreds of thousands of pounds. I asked where the plant 
came from, and he told me U.S.A. 

Again, a big oil company has been putting from twelve to fifteen miles 
of large diameter pipe-line down ; I inquired where the pipes came from, 
and was informed U.S.A. 

There are many hundreds of motor cars in Rangoon and I doubt if 
more than one in thirty is of British make — nearly all from U.S.A. 

The Burmese and Indians are very fond of clocks and watches, but I 
do not see any English makes, all U.S.A. and Swiss. Much tinned and 
bottled provisions come from U.S.A. now. The other day I was shown a 
catalogue of German bicycles costing from £5 to £j home price, whereas 
a British-made bicycle costs out here £17 to ;£22 and even more. 

Lamps and lanterns are sold out here in huge quantities, almost all 
made in U.S.A. I often go in the bazaars, and if there are any British- 
made goods there I cannot find them except cotton and woollen goods ; 
but now there has been a great revival of the home weaving industry, and 
in the houses the people are buying hand-looms as fast as they can be 
made, and they are weaving cotton goods with the express purpose of 
cutting out the British-made article. Yesterday I went to see a new 
hand-loom invented by a Burman. It can weave material, I should say, 
three times as fast as the old style of Burmese loom. He told me he had 
already sold twenty at R220 each. 

Big companies who had their registered offices in Britain have now 
been converted into Indian companies with their registered offices out 
here : this, I think, to save the heavy British income tax. 

Large iron and steel works in India are making extensions to 
enable them to supply the railway material for Indian railways, now 
being supplied from England. Also a big oil company is arranging for a 
tin-plate plant to be erected in India. Tin plate is very largely used out 
East. The Burmese will not believe me when I tell them that if they 
send their sons to England they can study engineering, they think it 
necessary to send their sons to America for an engineering course. The 

9.j 



Overseas 

Trade 

Bureau. 



Overseas impression is that it is only necessary to send students to England if they 

Trade want to become barristers-at-law. 

Bureau* They say the British Government is fine. Quite true, and we 

are paying for the administration of a country for the benefit of other 
countries to trade in. I should like to point out that at the present time 
the fates of nations are moving at a very rapid pace, and that if action is 
not taken at once it will soon be too late, and what is happening in 
Burma is also taking place in India and Africa. Can England afford to 
lose the markets of India and Africa, with nearly one-third of the 
population of this earth ? The British Empire has been built up on her 
foreign trade : when this is lost the Empire must take a back seat. 

Those who travel abroad seem to get a better " bird's-eye " view of the 
situation than those who stay at home. Before the War British 
prestige was being undermined by the German missions. Exactly 
similar things are taking place now. In spite of past experience we still 
go on, wilfully blind. 

TRAVELLER. 

AIRCRAFT. — " I would be pleased if you would inform me for a friend, 
who was a pilot in the Air Services, how he could obtain an aeroplane for 
training purposes, etc. The Government are doing a little here, but it is 
very little." — Enquiry 2080, New Zealand. 

WHOLESALE GROCERIES. —" Wanted to hear of wholesale dealers in 
Australia willing to supply small business in Ceylon with all groceries, in- 
cluding bacon, ham, and cheese." — Enquiry 2081, Ceylon. 
AGENCIES WANTED. — " I am desirous of obtaining agencies of any 
kind and willing to accept good paying commission and salary concerns. 
No reasonable offer refused." — Enquiry 2082, Durham. 
PATENTS. — " I have been looking in vain for an advertisement I used 
to see in the home papers, namely, that of a firm who assists those wish- 
ing to take out patents. It is very difficult to do from this remote corner 
and I shall be exceedingly grateful if you can assist me. I have an idea 
which I believe would be a success and would pay very well if put in 
proper hands. Can you give me the address of an honest firm who do 
this sort of business ? " — Enquiry 2083, China. 

SUN RESISTA FABRICS. —" I should be obliged if you will put me in 
touch with a firm from whom I could purchase fabrics suitable for cur- 
tains and house furnishing, washable, and that will stand the tropical 
sun. I should be grateful for patterns and prices." — Enquiry 2084, 
Trinidad. 

SAMPLE OF ROCK. -" I would be glad to get into touch with a com- 
petent person who could give me his opinion on the samples of rock I am 
posting to you. I am under the impression this rock can yield Portland 
cement." — Enquiry 2085, Madagascar. 

TOOL HOLDER. — " In a recent issue of ' Overseas ' I notice an enquiry 
by a Member who might be interested in a new design of duplex tool 
holder I have brought out. I am already considerably indebted to 
your Trade Bureau and should be glad to extend the sales of this holder. 
I forward you two sample tool holders, the price, with cutters f in. 
square, being 22s. each. A liberal discount will be allowed any firm 
recommended by you, able to dispose of a satisfactory number, or, alter- 
natively, I would dispose of the patents on a royalty basis. The holders 
are manufactured by a well-known firm of London, the cutters set 
locally. Patents have also been obtained in Canada and the U.S.A." — • 
Enquiry 2086, Liverpool. 

OLD COINS.- — " I have in my possession a silver penny halfpenny piece ; 
the date is almost invisible but appears to be 1804 ; also one Georgius III. 
half-crown piece dated 1817, and one Georgius III. sixpenny piece dated 

no 



i8i7- I would be much obliged if you would let me know their value as 
old coins."- — Enquiry 2087, British West Indies. 

[The coins in question are worth no more than the metal which they 
contain unless they are in absolutely unworn condition, as issued from 
the Mint, in which case they might command a very small premium.] 

ORANGES. — " I should be pleased if you would kindly assist me to get 
in touch with firms in England desirous of opening up in this country ; 
also firms wishing to buy oranges during the coming season. At present 
I do business in all the principal towns in Palestine." — Enquiry 2088, 
Haifa, Palestine. 

SOUTH AFRICAN TRADE.— " Member owning coal property in Trans- 
vaal wishes to get in touch with manufacturers willing to start works of 
any kind where cheap coal (excellent steam coal) and cheap unskilled 
labour are available. Site sufficient for erection of factory would be 
given free, and additional ground required could be purchased or leased, 
and contract for supply of coal entered into. Raw materials available : 
wool, skins, and hides, maize, wattle bark, etc., in immediate vicinity. 
Cotton, asbestos, near. Union Government sympathetic to the intro- 
duction of new industries." — Enquiry 2089, Transvaal, S. Africa. 
MINIATURE WAR MEDALS.—" Would you put m.e in touch with a 
firm of makers of miniature war medals. I require the following and 
shall be glad if some firm would send me a quotation : S. Africa, 1899 - 
1902 (King's and Queen's Medals) : Coronation (Edward), bronze ; Coro- 
nation (George), silver ; 1914 — 5 Star ; Victory Medal ; General Ser- 
vice Medal — these three Great V/ar." — Enquiry 2090, S. Africa. 
TORTOISE-SHELL.—" I would be much obliged if you could supply me 
with some information on the question of tortoise-shell. I have some 
very nice shell that I got locally in this colony, and desire to have it made 
up at home into ladies' hair brushes, looking glasses, etc. Could you put 
me in communication with a good house that would do the work ? Prior 
to forwarding the shell I would like to have approximate price fixed for 
the making of the several articles." — Enquiry 2091, Seychelles. 
ENGINEERS. — " I have been approached by two young Englishmen, 
both of whom hold Spanish titles as electrical engineers and are employed 
by a large company out here, for information as to how they can become 
members or associates of the Association of Mechanical or Electrical 
Engineers. Could you let me have the required information ? " — ■ 
Enquiry 2092, Spain. 

ARGENTINE. — " I am anxious to take up a few good agencies in any 
commodity for the Argentine. I am well acquainted with trade condi- 
tions in this part." — Enquiry 2093, London, W.C. 

BADGES. — " A very useful institution has been formed in this city and 
we are desirous of having a badge of membership. Could you put me in 
touch with a firm making these, asking them to quote, per 100, brooches, 
buttons, pendants, as per design enclosed in blue and white or white and 
blue enamel." — Enquiry 2094, South America. 

GRAMOPHONE RECORDS.— " I am enclosing herewith £4 los., and 
should be glad if you would purchase a number of gramophone records 
for me, especially some of the well-known ones by Sir Harry Lauder." — • 
Enquiry 2095, West Falkland. 

TRADE CONDITIONS IN NEW BRUNSWICK.—" I should like to re- 
mark here that we find St. John, and apparently all Eastern Provinces, 
use quantities of goods of all descriptions made in the United States, but 
very little British or Canadian made, and I am sure all British subjects 
would be glad to see more of our own goods on the market. In fact, it is 
rather maddening to be forced to buy goods made in the United States." — 
Enquiry 2096, New Brunswick. 

97 



Overseas 

Trade 

Bureau. 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



Km-KKJE 

The World's Best Car 



yl 'technical Expert's 
Impression of, the 
Post-War Rolls-Royce 

" Having regard to its quality, its 
performance, and to the permanent 
pleasure which it represents, and 
also having regard to the very slight 
depreciation which, in normal times, 
it suffers, the Rolls-Royce does, 1 
think, realise the best motor car 
value for money that has ever been 
offered, and it is because it has such 
a long history, and because it does 
these things that so few rival manu- 
facturers of super-cars have been 
able to assail the Rolls-Royce posi- 
tion with any hope of success." 



Cupt. jr. Gorduii Asian, 
in "Irish Field" Sept. ^rd, 1921. 



ROLLS-ROYCE. LTD.. 15. CONDUIT STREET. LONDON. W. 1. 

Telegrams: Code: 

Rolhead. Reg., London. A.B.C., 5th Edition. 



Members help the Club by mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to 

Advertisers. 

98 



OVERSEAS 







Overseas Employment Bureau 

[The Over-Seas Club and Patriotic league merely acts as a 
medium of introduction, and cannot be held responsible for 
the accuracy of any of the announcements published. — Editor.] 

AM A RHODESIAN, British home born, bachelor, 32, 
strong, tough and healthy, well educated, six years' business 
experience in London, ten years' experience in Rhodesia, 
farming, trading, etc. I would like to hear from any one 
who could offer me a position with good remuneration and 
prospects in any part of the world. I would make a capable 
secretary or representative, having considerable tact and initiative. Have 
held many positions of responsibility with success. Can handle natives 
and quickly acquire languages. Ex-officer. Will travel anywhere and 
undertake any mission requiring tact, secrecy or courage. — E.B. 1055. 
EX-ARMY OFFICER is anxious to obtain post as companion to any one 
travelling round the world. Englishman of good family, age 33. I 
have travelled considerably in the East and I am single. — E.B. 105 d. 
A MEMBER (Scotch, 39, married), just returned from China, long experi- 
ence there with first-class firm, holding executive position, wide know- 
ledge of country and conditions, shipping, etc., desires appointment in 
London or abroad ; salary on commission basis. —EB. 1057. 
YOUNG LADY MEMBER desires position in South Africa as typist. 
Over four years' experience in typing, book-keeping and general office 
work. Excellent testimonials. Able to start beginning of year.- -Apply 
Miss Nightingale, Quthing, Basutoland, South Africa. 
LADY (young), professionally trained teacher of ballroom dancing, 
wishes to obtain engagements to give private lessons, either visiting 
pupils' houses or by other arrangement. Terms moderate. -£ B.105y. 
RANCHER, shortly returning to Rhodesia, desires situation in a mana- 
gerial capacity. Farmer's son, age 34, married. Experience stock, 
crops, implem.ents, ensilage, dairying, incubators and gardening. Good 
native linguist and organiser. References exchanged. — E.B. I06O. 
YOUNG GENTLEMAN of good education and appearance desires posi- 
tion abroad. Ex-lieutenant. Thorough knowledge of office adminis- 
tration and accounts. Certificate Royal Society of Arts for Book-keeping. 
Commercial experience. Knowledge of Hindustani and French. Plenty 
of initiative and common sense, not afraid of hard work. First-class 
credentials. -£./J, 1061. 

MEMBER, now residing in West Indies, desires po.sition as manager of 
estate. Age 32, married. Able to control labour. Energetic, hard- 
working. Canada or America preferred. — E.B. 1062. 
LADY SECRETARY requires post in South Africa or Rhodesia. Expert 
stenographer. Knowledge of French. Seven years' experience. — • 
E.B. )063. 

YOUNG MAN, aged 20, just returned from two yf^ars in Portugal and the 
Azores, with good knowledge of Portuguese and French, desires business 
position in any part of the world. Good references. — E.B. 1064. 
PAPUA.— Member, age 35, single, well educated, at present in Central 
America, desires position in New Guinea or South Seas. Good accoun- 
tant, experienced in transport, shipping, insurance, and general construc- 
tion, store work. Shortly disengaged. — EB.1065. 

LADY MEMBER would give services for a month or six weeks in return 
for expenses and small remuneration. Well educated, travelled, and 
experienced with children. Would accompany any one on a tour, in 
France, speaking French fluently. Reference furnished. — E.B. 1066. 

01) 



Overseas 

Employment 

Bureau. 



1 NOTES ABOUT OUR ADVERTISERS j 

I By the Advertising Manager I 

11 »t>t>« MMM » UM t> m >>»>t M l m il M » H » M t»*««»t ♦♦♦♦»»♦♦»«»«»♦«*«>>♦»■ 






the Star and Garter Magazine 
contributions, revealing a cheery 
all concerned. (Star and Garter 



Notes about [ > miJ9 ^^ SUNDORA ALBUM.— The little album produced by 
our Adver- C.^B£q^[ the Sundora Company, Manor Park, London, E., should 
tisers. «j^B.-^'^l ^^ ^^ ^^^ possession of every one interested in photography. 

The pages are dark brown, gilt-edged, loose-leaf, and the 
prints slip in. It is primarily intended for vest-pocket 
size users, although it is surprising what a number of 
damty pictures are produced when superfluous print is cut away, and 
form a collection worthy of an Album no matter what size camera is in 
use. The cover is in black imitation morocco, and the price is low. 
Overseas enquiries are dealt with by return mail. (Page 107.) 
" PHIT-EESI "—The makers of the well-known " Phit-Eesi " footwear, 
Messrs. W. Abbott & Sons, Ltd., of 121, High Holborn, London, W.C, 
England, have recently organised a special department for the service 
of their rapidly-growing list of overseas customers. Simple self-measure- 
ment instructions enable the firm to fit the purchaser by mail with all the 
facility of a personal visit. " Aertex " lined shoes are a special feature 
of Messrs. Abbott's footwear. A line to the firm will bring full par- 
ticulars. (Page 20.) 

THE STAR AND GARTER MAGAZINE is a bright little monthly 
publication, entirely conducted by the patients of the Star and Garter 
Home for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors. The work of the Star and 
Garter Committee on behalf of service men paralysed by wounds is well 
known to readers of " Overseas." Published from the seaside branch 
of the Home at Sandgate, Kent, 
contains many interesting literary 
atmosphere which does credit to 
announcement on page 116.) 

SETTLERS' EFFECTS.—Messrs. Joseph C. Mount & Co., 146/147, 
Grosvenor Road, Westminster, S.W. i, welcome enquiries from Club 
Members who require expert service in forwarding, foreign removals, 
packing and shipping. Baggage is delivered by this firm to steamers, or 
shipped overseas, while foreign and home removals are conducted. 
Messrs. Mount & Co. offer special terms for the packing and shipping 
of settlers' furniture, effects, etc. Application to the firm in Westminster 
will bring full particulars. (Page 21.) 

WAR MEMORIALS of all kinds are supplied by Messrs. Swanser & Son, 
Art Metal Workers, 52, Great Queen Street, London, W.C. 2. Members 
considering the erection of memorials should write to Messrs. Swanser 
for particulars. (Page 107.) 

ELECTRIC CYCLE LAMP.— Cyclists replacing the unsatisfactory oil 
lamp with the up-to-date Voltalite electric cycle lamp have good reason 
to be satisfied with the change, if one may judge by the batch of testi- 
monials received by Messrs. Ward & Goldstone, of Pendleton, Manchester, 
the makers of " Voltalite." The Voltalite illumination is produced by 
the movement of the cycle, at walking speed and up to thirty miles an 
hour. An illustrated art booklet will be sent on application to the 
firm. (Page 120.) 

SPORTING OUTFITS AND GUNS.— The Wilkinson Sword Co., Ltd., 
53, Pall Mall, London, have now prepared their new 1922 Catalogue, 
which is of interest to the sportsman in all parts of the world. This well- 
known firm supplies explorers' rifles and guns, revolvers, and automatic 
pistols of all calibres, and hunting knives. Overseas sportsmen are 
asked to write direct to the firm for full particulars. (Page 19.) 

100 



Advertiser's Announcemer.t. 



At Home 
or Abroad 

The convenience of the " New 
Perfection " is appreciated 
everywhere. A perfect oil 
cooker incorporating all the 
advantages of the most modern 
cooking appliances, it burns 
refined oil completely without 
a trace of smoke or odour. 
The progress of the cooking 
can be seen through the glass 
door of the oven. 




ISEW-PERFECTIQN 

Oil Cooking Stores 

: ¥oLiS all' OVER THE WORLD ! 

I Overseas readers can obtain these heating and cooking comforts anywhere. J 

PERiFECTJOTS 

Oil Heafers 

Without the dirt and trouble of tindling fires these famous 

heaters give abundant, glowing warmth just when and where 

you want it 

SOME AGENTS IN THE BRITISH EMPIRE. 

INDIA. Standard Oil Co., of New York, Calcutta and Bombay. 
EGYPT. Vacuum Oil Co., Cairo. 

SINGAPORE. Standard Oil Co.. of New York, Singapore. 
MALTA. St. Paul Petroleum Tanks, Ltd., Malta. 
GIBRALTAR. Gibraltar Petroleum Co., Gibraltar. 
SOUTH AFRICA. Vacuum Oil Co., of South Africa. Cape 

HONGKONG. ^Standard Oil Co.. of New York, Hongkong. 
AUSTRALIA. Vacuum Oil Co., Pty. Ltd., Adelaide, etc. 
NEW ZEALAND. Vacuum Oil Co., Pty. Ltd.. AucUand, etc. 

SOLD IN THE U.K. UNDER THE NAME OF "VALOR- 
PERFECTION" BY THE ANGLO-AMERICAN OIL 
CO., LTD., 36, QUEEN ANNE'S GATE, LONDON, S.W. 1 

MADE BY 

The Cleveland Metal Products Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. 




The larger our advertisement revenue, the more we can spend on 
Improving " OVERSEAS." 

101 



Advertisers' A nnouncenieuts.. 




THE 

" Fletcher " 

Gas Cookers 

AND OTHER 

Domestic Labonr-Saving Appliances. 
THE MOST . . 

EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL, 
4nd RELIABLE in the Market. 

Fletcher, Russell 

&. Co., Ltd., Warrington. 

London Shomroomt: 
15 FitHtr St., SoutHatnptan iioto, W.C. 



BUYING AND SHIPPING AGENTS. 

We offer our services to residents abroad for the 
purchase and shipment of any goods they may 
require from Great Britain. 

We are in constant touch with the leading manu- 
facturers, and can secure the lowest possible 
prices and best discounts. 

We are also able to secure for our clients abroad Sole 
Agencies for important British Manufacturers. 

If you have no representatives here it would be to 
your advantage to communicate with us. 

WILLIAMS BROS. & CO. (London), Ltd. 

9. MINCING LANE, LONDON, E.G. 3. 

Telegrams: "BXPORTUKB. LOHDOH." 



TEST 
" LUSTRESSA 
SHAMPOO 



»» 



AT OUR EXPENSE. 

WRITE TO-DAY FOR FREE SAMPLE. 

C A. STOKES & Co., Ltd. 
39 ECLIPSOL WORKS 
BRISTOL . ENGLAND 



1 



REO, TRADE MARK 




Members regularly corresponding with our advertisers materially help 

" OVERSEAS." 

J UL' 



A'lvcrtisers' Aininuvcfjjiriits 



AU STR ALI A 



OPPORTUNITIES for MANUFACTURERS and INVESTORS 



Australia offers Great Opportunities to Britisli 

Manufacturers to establish themselves in the 

Commonwealth. 

Australia can now produce many things which 

she formerly regarded as beyond her industrial 

capacity. 

The history of Australian Manufacturers is one 
of remarkable growth and achievement. 
Australian manufacturing industries produce an 
annual output amounting to £226,000,000. 

THE INVESTOR will find: 
Abundant room for the profitable employment 
of Capital. 

Great primary resources awaiting development. 
Wide scope for Manufacturers. 
A healthy land in a growing country. 
■ ■ ■ ■ 
For full information regarding Australia, apply to the High 
Commissioner, Australia House, Strand, London, W.G.2. 



DOMINION o* 
NEWFOUN DLAND .^i L ABRADOR 

Standing Sentinel at the Gateway to the New World. The Birthplace of our 

Great Overieai Empire and the lint link io the Imperial Chain of 

Aerial Communications. 

■ One Week's journey from England by direct steamer. ■ 



NEWFOUNDLAND and LABRADOR offer unezceUed 
opportunities for PIONEER DEVELOPMENT. 



The Sportsman's Eldorado. 

The Rivers and Lakes abound with 
Salmon and Trout. Fine Snipe, 
Partridge and Caribou Shooting- 
No reserves. 

SPORT LICENCES. 

Caribou Shooting, $50 (;^I0). 
Salmon Fishing, $10 {£2) per rod. 



Forest, Mineral and Farmland 
Wealth. 

Large areas of uncleared arable 
land waiting for development, and 
generous concessions given to 
settlers and others interested in 
establishing new industries. 
Copper, Iron Mines and great Pulp 
and Paper Mills in active operation. 



THE LARGEST DRY DOCK IN BRITISH NORTH AMERICA 
with all modern appliances for temporary or permanent repairs. 

For further information, apply to — 

HIGH (JOMMISSIONEB FOR NEWFOUNDLAND, 53, Victoria Street. London, S.W.I. 



Increased adverliserr.ent revenue means continued improvement ot 

" OVERSEAS." 

:u3 



A dveytiscr' s A nnouncement. 



FOR 

COUNTRY HOUSES, 
BUNGALOWS, FARMS, Etc 

The 2i H.P. size is suitable for a house with an 
installation of 25 to 40 lights, the ?^ H.P. for 35 to 
50 lights, and the 4J H.P. size for a larger number 
I of lights, or where healing 
or domestic electrical ap- 
paratus is used. 



I; LIGHTING ^Np'\ 

'power PLANTS \ 



TYPEW.S. 




operate on 

PETROL, 

ESSENCE, 

PARAFFIN, 

KEROSENE or 

GAS. 

BRITISH 

MADE 

THROUGHOUT. 



in use all over the world for over 12 years, and 
owing to their extreme simpUcity, small fuel consumption and reliability are 
recommended for Home and Export. 
Their strong construction and robust design ensures effective service for years 
without replacements. 

SPECIFICATION. 



re \ ^ 



ENGINE. 

Complete with Governor, spark Plug, Ignition 
Wire, Two Heavy Disc Flywheels, Two Main 
Bearings. Fuel and Water Tank, Silencer, In- 
jector, High Tension Magn-^to, Foundation 
Bolts, Spanners, etc. 

DYNAMO. 

Shunt Wound Dynamo, wound for 25, 35, 50, 70, 

100 or 140 volts, as ordered, suitable for Lighting 

and Charging, complete with Slide Rails. 



1-ngme and Dynamo mounted together on sub- 
stantial hardwood skids ready for bolting down 
to floor. 

SWITCHBOARD. 

Slate Panel having mounted thereon all necessary 

switches, fuses, meters, etc., for efficient control 

of Plant and Battery. 

BATTERY. 

Best English Make ope.i glass b^x type cells. 



Prices and Particulars. | 


Size 


W.S. I 


W.S. 2 


W.S. 3 


Brake Horse-Power 


2M 


3M 


4^ 


Dynamo Watts 


1000 


1500 


2000 


Volts 


, 25/35 


50/70 


50/70 


Size of Battery Recommended | 


(13) 120 Amp. 
hour Cells 


{27) 100 Amp. 
hour Cells 


(27) 120 Amp. 
hour Cells 


Generating Set Complete, as illus- 








trated, with Tanks (Water and 








Fuel), Piping, Foundation Bolts 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. i. 


and Spanners 


100 


120 


144 


Switchboard 


20 


20 


20 


Battery Complete with Acid 


50 15 


74 10 


105 10 


Total 


170 15 


214 10 


269 10 


Shipping Specifications (Appr 


OXIMATE). 






Case. 


CWTS. 


Case. 


CWTS. 


Zt 


lse. 


CWTS. 




Ins. 


Packed. 
I. 


Ins. 


Packed. 


I 


■JS. 


Packkd. 
3. 


Generating Set & 


W.S. 


W.S. 


2. 




W.S. 


Switchboard 


60 X 30 X 31 


7}^ 


70x33x34 


10 


7.-)X- 


56X37 


11% 


Battery (less Acid) 


18 cu. ft. 


6% 


24 cu. ft. 


8 


36 c 


u. ft. 


14 



\ aisii 



We are open to appoint 

FIRST-CLASS Agents in 

districts at HOMH and 

ABROAD where not already 

represented. 




Sectional i ist C/303 giving 
full particulars of Mercure 
Engines on request. En 
close Business Card 
Memo for Trade Terms 




When making purchases, please give ** OVERSEAS' " Advertisers an 
opportunity to quote prices. 

104 



Advevtisey's Annouucewciit. 



Barratts Double Sole" 

Double Wear, Boots-by-Post 

Are honestly worth 40/- even without the double 

sole. The Box Calf uppers are made from 

.picked skins so as to keep the original 

good shape and suppleness, while the 

boots are soled again and again. The 

block toe and back quarters are solid 

leather stiffened. The welts are sewn to 

the solid leather insoles on the hand-sewn 

principle — beautifully flexible and 

smooth inside. The fine proportions 

are not affected by Barratts novel 

idea of the Double Sole. 

Sir E. Shackleton ordered these 
Double Sole Boots for every 
member of the Shackleton- 
Rowett Expedition. 

Style J 




1614 



With Extra "Dri-ped 
I Postage Abroad Extra. 

On Approval 

H, when you get these boots, 
you don't think they are 
worth more than 30;-, or 
they don't fit you, send 
them back. We will return 
your cash immediately. 

24 Fittings. — Sizes are 5, 
6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, in 

three widths : — 4 (medium), 
5 (wide), 6 (extra wide). If 
size is not known, send 
" footshape," got by run- 
ning pencil round stockinged 
foot resting lightly on paper, 
or old boot. 



The 

" Dri-ped " Extra Sole 

This renowned waterproof, 
non-slipping leather keeps out 
all damp, protects the insole, 
and may be removed for repair 
when necessary, without dam- 
agingthe main sole orstraining 
the original sole stitching, the 
welts or the insole. So the 
boot remains wet-proof and 
shapely. The saving is ob- 
vious. It is absolutely the 
most economical boot ever 
made. 

Order Now-This Way.-^ri. ^S 

size, and send 10/- only with Cash on Delivery 
Orders. Where C.O.D. is not available, please send 
cheque or money order for 30/-, plus postage (if 
Overseas), and 1 /- extra if size 1 2. Post your order to 

W.BARRATT & Co., Ltd., 

90, Footshape Works, Northamptor. 

Write for Art-printed Booklet " Footshapes for the Family." — 
Postage 3d. 




' The Super 
• Leather for ■ 
I Soles. Look J 
I fur Jjurp e I 
I " L»iamond " | 
1 Traiie Mark 1 



ffi 



Members trading with our Advertisers materially lielp " OVERSEAS." 

105 



Advertisers' A nnounrements. 



s t y 1 ; s h 

Lounge Suit 
in Smart, 
Hard - wear- 
ing Tweeds, 
Tailored to 
Measure for 

£4 10s. 




Tailoring for Overseas 

Men has been so thoroughly studied and progressively 
improved lor 20 years by Groves & Lindley that they 
absolutely guarantee lo refunJ your cash without demui it 
you are not full ' convinced that the suit or overcoat (its you 
and is full value for the money. 



ONE THIRD AT LEAST 
SAVED ON EVERY SUIT. 

In every quarter of the globe 
where European-style 
Clothes are worn we have 
regular customers who tell 
us that our suits are 30 to bU 
per cent, better than any 
they can get from local tailors 
at 30 to 50 per cent, higher 
prices. 



CUT OUT THE MIDDLE- 
MEN— BUY DIRECT. 

We cut out middle charges 
by purchasing all our cloths 
direct from the makers. Gar- 
ments are cut and tailored 
by our own specially-trainei 
staff and you are charged 
only ONE modest profit. 
Vte invite you to write for — 



>-_. 



Box of 100 Cloth Patterns — Sent Post Free. 

They are representative of all the best British high-grade 
cloths, Scotch Tweeds, Serges. Hu:ldersfield Solid Worsteds, 
West of England Tweeds, Garbicords, etc., etc. Styles Book, 
Self-Measurinj Form, Tape Measure and isU instructions how 
to measure also enclosed. 

All our Cloths are sold by the yard also 
and are largely bought by overseas men for their local tailor to 
make up. Big savings and extra cloth quality are obtained this 
way Note — We guarantee Satisfaction or Cash Refund. 

GRO YES & LINDLEY 

102, THE LION. HUDDERSFIELD, ENGLAND. 



Stylish Single- 
breasted Ascot 
Overcoat, Lined 
Full, Tailored to 
Measure from 




Kre-lusta 
Knitting Silk 

"JUST LIKE SILK" 

ALL BRITISH BRILLIANT COLOURS 

For Jumpers, Coats, Scarves, etc. Wears and washes beautifully. Pattern cards 
free on request. Made in a wide range of magnificent Colours, including Pillar Box 
Red, Gold. Tangerine, Rust, Pink, Peacock, Royal Blue, Saxe Blue, Navy, Jade- 
Green, Cherry, etc., etc. i lb. hanks 7/6, or 25/- per lb. 
Registered and Post Paid. - Trade supplied — Terms on application. 
THE A. T. KREMERS MANUFACTURING CO., LTD., 
16/17, DEVONSHIRE SQUARE, 

BISHOPSGATE, LONDON, E.C.2. 

Wires: — " Keestonica (Ave.) London." 'Phone: Central 6069. 




DALES'sin DUBBIN 



Ple&saal 
Odonr. 



Allow* 
Poliahing. 



Mf 



FAKES BOOTS AINU HARNESS waterproot bs k dnck't back, soft 
^a* velvet and 3 times as durable. Over 40 years' repatation. 
aa UZhlDITIOS HIGHEST AWAkDS FOR SVPhRWRITV. 
Sold In P'orit aa-1 "«ow» r-^^n^^>«. ja Ttim. Mni'iifaptory, Danntabis, BrgUnil. 

When ordering from our Advertisers, please mention " OVERSE.\S." 

This helps the Club. 

lot; 



Advertisers' A yinouiiccmciils 



FREE 




TO AMATEUR | 
PHOTOGRAPHERS. | 

You can save m 
money g 

when buying g 
another M 



I CAMERA 

^Write for Illustrated 
^"Camera Bargains" Cata.- 
g logue. Thousands of high- 
J grade Cameras at half makers' 
m prices. Experienced Packing 
gfor dispatch anywhere. 
gSatisfaction guaranteed.. 

I SANDS HUNTER'S 

m (SMDS HUNTER & CO.. LTD.) 

^ Established in liJA 

M. 37 Bedford Street, 5trand, 
^ London, W.C. a 

^ Telegrams: " Santunter, London." 
M Cables: A. B.C. 5th Edition. 



N€MORIAL 




SWANSER S SON, Art Metal Workers 
52. GREAT QUECN STREET. LONDON. W C. 2. 




Number 7*\ "% Quality 

Socks for Men. 



Are made oF tVie finesV i^vii-e 
Vk-ool mgrairx yam irv 

lfE:RFECT KIT 
PROLONGED ^VEAR 

Comfortable »r» ^11 Cliii-vatcs. 



TKe <j-.aality numbor- is on 
ea.cK siOcK. 



"Wnte for the nanxe of nearest 
agent or postal agent 

TO 

"'oPtDo^lf epics £imitc5r 

\ViGSTDN. N" Leicester 

F.rvqLcu-al 



DEAN & DAWSON, LTD. 

will seen re 
year Steamer accommodation 
or arrange your Tour in 
Britain or on the Continent. 

Passports obtained. 
Foreign Money Exchanged. 

Write to, or call at — 

DEAN & DAWSON'S OFFICE 
84, Piccadilly, London, W.l. 

Branchti in Chief Provincial Tnwnt. 



Gladola Restaurant 

44, South Molton Street. W. 1. 

Mayfair.1417. (C,'<.v,A> «,>«.!' .■?(■. T7lWSUJ/i.<l: ) 

SPECIAL LUNCHEONS, 2/- 

dlso ^ la Carle. 

TEAS. 

Scones. Home-Made Cakes. 

DINNERS. 6 to 9, 
Table D'Hote. 4/- 

or i la Carte. 



AN IDEAL PRESENT 

THE "SUNDORA" ALBUM DE LUXE 



Girdle 



WINE LIST. 

OPEN SUNDAYS 12.45 



p.m 




Mailed 
free. 



Gilt-edg-cd, Loose-leaf, Slip-in for Vest Bocket size; 

nr lari;er s-i^e may be pasted on reverse side of leaf if 

desired, .\ssorted openings. Loose-leaves obtainable. 

Distinctive, tasteful. 



To continually improve 

advertisement revenue 

107 



THE SUNDORA Co., Manor Park, London 
OVERSEAS " we rely largely upon our 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



RUSSIAN FAMINE 

The British Empire Appeal, 
*^ BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE!^^ 

THE WHOLE DUTY OF FIGHTING THE FAMINE is for the present thrown 

on Private Charity. 

TWENTY MILLION PEASANTS 

are maWn? their last effort to maintain life on a diet of cKoppeJ_^rass^^^owdere^ 
bar' anH clay. 

Eye-witnesses state that the rubbish-carts go through the tOA'ns laden with the 
dead bodies of little children. 

THE RUSSIAN FAMINE RELIEF FUND 
IS AT WORK 

in the Samara Province, organising the food supply through the 
agency of the Society of Friends. 

During eighteen months of steady work in Russia this Society has lost only one- 
half of one per cent, of its supplies. Everything is forwarded in sealed trucks. 
which invariably arrive intact. 

All British Relief sent through this Fund will be under the | 
supreme direction of a British Commissioner, whose name , 
will carry conviction, and who will be assisted by British J 
inspectors. Further, Dr. Nansen's ow n Representative^ at 
Moscow to direct the whole Internati onal Relief movement 
is to be a Britisher. 



We, who are busy with relief, know that the Nansen scheme is so'jnd. and the 
Guarantees sufficient. 

Doubts and fears come only from critics who stand aloof. 

BUT WHAT ABOUT FINANCIAL TROUBLES AT HOME? HELP US FOR 
THAT VERY REASON. BLOCKED MARKETS ARE THE CAUSE OF 
THESE TROUBLES. WHAT GREATER BLOCK THAN A DEAD OR 

DYING RUSSIA? 



Donations should be sent at once to the Hon. Treasurer, Russian Famine Relief 
Fund . Fishmongers' Hall, London, E.C.4. 

PRESIDENT . - THE LORD MAYOR OF LONDON. 
CHAIRMAN - - THE RT. HON. THE LORD EMMOTT, G.C.M.G. 



; DELAY NO LONGER, 

L ...____. : 

Issu il by the Imperial War Kelief Fund (registered under tlie War Charities Act, 1916). 

Members mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to Advertisers help 
to maintain the advertising revenue. 

1<'8 



PATENT AUTOMATIC 
WATER AND OIL VINDEBS 

are us*^d by leading Goverruiients, Railway Com- 
panies . Land Companies, Well-boilng Engineers, 
and others. 

A Colonial en- 
gineer writes: 
" Since purchasing the 
Instrument I have se- 
lected 300 sites, most of 
which I have either 
bored upon with our own 
plants or had bored 
by sub-contractors. In 
every instance we have 
been successful." 
Prices of Water Finding 

Instruments are : — 
£60 locating at all 

depths up to 20D ft. 
£76 locating at all 

depths UD to 500 ft. 
£125 locating at all 

depths up to 1,000 ft. 
Prices of Water and 
Oil Finding Instruments 

are:— 
£200 locating at all 

depths up to 3,500 ft. 
£275 locating at all 

depths up to 4,500 fl. 
£875 locating at all 

depths up to 6,000 ft. 
Delivery at Colonial or 
Foreign Seaports, £2 

extra. 
We undertake the loca- 
tion »{ sites and boring 
at lump sum prices under 
guarantee of 
"NO FULL SUPPLY NO PAY." 
Particulars on application to 

Wi MANSFIELD St GO., 

17. Brnnswiok St.. LIVEBPOOL. 

Makers of lVel!-b0ri7:g Plant, Pumps, Wind- 
mills. Oil Engines^ and everything connected 

•with Water Supply and Irrigation. 

Cables : " Mantles, Liverpool.'' Tel. No. 

1392 Bank, 




IRISH LINEN 

AT 

WHOLESALE PRICES 

Sanplei and LItt Pott Pn« 
to %vf part of the World. 



De V. CROSSLEY, 

20, BEDFORD ST., 
BELFAST, IRELAND. 



«■■ a Direct dispatch of small parcels 
I L A Post Paid to any address in the 
I rU United Kingdom. Also per Foreign 
■ ■■" Parcel Post (Under Bond) to any 

part of the world. 

Ceylon & Indian, 2/4. 2/6. 2/10. Chinas, 3/-. 

Darieeling, 3/6 and upwards. Fine Ground 
CoHee. 2/5. Tea Dust, 2/5- 

Remittance witli order. Wholesale terms 
by arrangement. 

BURMAHTEACO.. ^LTex.'!' 

(Trade Referen::es ^iven if required.) 



Advertisers' Announcements. 



OUR 

BREECHES 




are admitted to be 
better than many sold 
at double ti.e price. 

A TRIAL WILL 
CONVINCE you AND 
SAVE YOU 50 % 



CUT TO YOUR SPECIAL MEASURE 

IN BEDFORD CORD 
OR DRILLS 

RIDINQ TWEEDS, 
WHIPCORD8,/fo»t30/- Per Pair. 



/■ 



Send for Patterns and Easy 
Self-Measure Instructions. 



No matter where you are we gfuarantee to fit 
you perfectly, satisfy you, or return your cash. 



BEDFORD RibINC 
BREECHES Co Depth! 

29 Great- TirchficldStre«t 
Oxford St. London. W.i. 



SPECIAL LINES. 

Look at followinji i 
The London Pocket 

Microscope •< - 2/3 

(Of great use to Stamp Collectors). 

Needle Conmass • - 1/9 
Card Float Compass • 2/- 
Planispheres - • 2/- & 3/« 
Watchmaker's 

Glasses - - 2/- & 3/- 
Microscopic Moimting 

Glasses, per doz. > 6d. 
Prisms - - - - 2/6 

Postage on anv of the above : Home, 3d., 
t^oreign, 9d. 

School Microscope, 
1 power - » - 18/6 

Carriage: Home, 1/6, Abroad, 4/6. 
Postal Order must accompany order. 

Write to us whenever you want 

Oymnasiom Ontflts, Clab Ontflts, 

Medals and Badges. 

Lanterns and Lantern Slides, 

or any otlier items of interest to boys. 

J. W. BUTCHER, 

DEPT. 0., 

2 &3.Ladgate drcns Bolldlnfts, 
* London, E.G. 4. • 



Increased adrertlsing revenue makes possible the continued improvement 
of " OVERSEAS " generally. 

109 



.■Ic7i'ci't!sers' A )r,ioi(i!cri)ii)!ts. 




THB 



6i 



ARETHUSA" 

Training Ship and the 
Shaftesbury Homes 

URGENTLY NEED 



£259000 

TO PREVENT CURTAILMENT OF ANY 
BRANCH OF THE SOCIETY'S WORK 

10,000 boys haye been sent to Royal Navy and Msrcanllls Marins. 
9,000 boys have been trained for Civil Bmployinanl and Bmlgratloa. 
1,100 boys and filrls now being maintained. 

Patrons; THEIR MAJESTIES THE KING AND QUEEN 

President: H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES 

Chairman and Treasurer: C. E. MALDEN, ESQ., M.A. 

Deputy Chairman: F. H. CLAYTON, ESQ. 

Chairman of Ship Committee : HOWSON F. DEVITT. ESQ. 

Joint Secretaries : H. BRISTOW WALLEN AND HENR Y G. COPELAND. 

Cheques should be tnade payable to and sent to 

THE SHAFTESBURY HOMES &" ARETHUSA " TRAINING SHIP 

164 SHAFTESBURY AVENI7S, LONDON, W.C.S 



SEVEN WARDS CLOSED 

SOO cases awaiting admission at 

KING'S College Hospital, 

ENGLAND. 

Please send a Contribution. 



STAR'T 



lUSIKTESSS YOUI^SEX^F 



WE supply Fancy Goods, Postcards, Drapery, Tobacconists, Stationery, 
Jewellery, id. to 6d. Bazaar Goods, Toys, Confectionery, Cutlery, etc. 
Sample Cases £5 upwards sent by return. Guide Catalogue, "Success in 
Business," 3d. — H. Michaels & Son, Cromwell House, High Holborn, 

London, W.C., England. 



BIGGEST and BEST 

BMIORATION COLrONISATION OFFICE. 

The Salvation Army has world-wide organisation. Free and disinterested 

advice about Dominions. Cares for passengers. Representatives everywhere. 

Correspondence Invited. Address : Commissioner D. C. Lamb, laa. Queen 

Victoria Street, London, E.G. 4. 

Members help tlie Club by mentioning "OVERSEAS " when writing to 

Advertisers. 

110 



Advevlisers' A inioioicemeuts. 



The Sick Poor 
of the Homeland 

often go from bad to worse because they are 
unable to secure treatment in Hospital, by 
Dispensary, admission into some Conva- 
lescent Home, or necessary surgical 
appliances. 

THE LONDON MEDICAL 
CHARITIES FUND. 

President : 
Col. Sir Raymond Greene, Bart., D.S.O., 

J.P., M.P., 
seeks to bring medicalrelief within the reach 
of all. Over 6,000 letters of recommenda- 
tion to Hospitals, etc., etc., etc., have been 
supplied to needy sick people since the Fund 
was started in igio. 

The benefits have been enormous — 
Medical, Dental, Ophthalmic, Surgical, and 
Convalescent Home Treatment, and Special 
Grants to the needy poor. 

Will you please help this good work which 
has brought health and happiness to thou- 
sands ? Funds are much needed now ? 

Contributions should be addressed 
to Mr. A. C. EVANS, Secretary, London 
Medical Charities Fund, 76, Finsbury 
Pavement, London, E.C.2, England. 



WHAT 

MORAVIAN 
MISSIONS 

STAND FOR : 
The Gospel of our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ, preached 
by life and lip, in humble de- 
pendence upon the Holy Spirit. 

This basis has been (for 189 years) 
and is still being wonderfully blessed, 
so that those who know speak of 

"THE MIRACLE OF 
MORAVIAN MISSIONS." 

Converts outnumlier hoiucj member- 
ship by three to one. 
YET while the Income has remained 
practically stationary, the Expenses 
have greatly increased, and unless 
increased receipts are sent in 

CURTAILMENT MUST FOLLOW '. 



Your prayers (and if possible^ your 
gifts of money, are earnestly pleaded 

for by 
The Rev. EDGAR SWAINSON, 

Sei:retarv. London Association (all British) 
in aid of MoRA\ IAN MISSIONS. 

7, New Court, Lincoln's Inn, 
London, W.C.2. 

I jterature sent free on apjilication. 



THE 

CHURCH of ENGLAND 



From Rock | 

and Tempest. I | WAIFS « STRAYS 

I SOCIETY 

m (Pounded in iSSi by Prebendary Rudolf ) 

M has given Homes to 

M over 25,000 children 

M and now has a family 

g of 4,219 little ones to 

|feed, clothe, 
i shelter & train 



320 Merchant Seamen, men | 
who have run the gauntlet of g 
the fiercest storms, now find B 
themselves in poverty and = 
need your assistance. M 

\ 887 Widows of Seamen and p 
I 1100 Dependent Children | 

; are also wanting help, which g 
I we are compelled to with- m 
I hold because funds are low. m 
\ Will you bring a ray of sun- | 
I shineintotheirlivesbysend- g 
I ing a donation immediately? g 

I THOS. SCOTT. Secretary, | 

I British Merchant Seamen and their ^ 
i Dependents' Fund, ^ 

Tower Building. LIVERPOOL, p 

nil 



WILL YOU HELP? 



= Gi(l( gratefully received by Secrelaryi 

= Rer. W. Fowell Swann, M.A-, 
m Old Town HaU. 

= Kenninston Road, 

^ London. S-E. 1 1. 

M 9k*qutt, etc., croned and payable U» 
= "Waift& Stray t." 



The larger our advertisement revenue, the more we can spend on 
improving " ^VPRSPAS" 



OVERSEAS.' 



Ill 



Advertisers' A nnouncements. 

i THIS SIDE UP 
WITH CARE 



With the CARE that they 
receive in our School, fatherless 
boys and girls are sent into the 
world of business " right side 
up" — that is, placed 

ON THEIR FEET 

with their 

HEADS HELD UP 

This is the Empire's oldest 
Orphanage and has helped 
fatherless boys and girls for 
over 163 years. Please help 
us to carry on the good work ! 

THE 

ORPHAN WORKING SCHOOL 

and 

ALEXANDRA ORPHANAGE, 

Fred. ). Robinson, A.C.I.S., 

Secretary, 
73, Cheapside, London, E.C. 2 



SOCIETT (or the U8IST1NCE of 

LADIES IN REDUCED 
CIRCUMSTANCES. 

(Under Royal Patronage) 



CHRISTMAS will soon be 
here, the season when 
every one wants to make 
every one else happy. Please help 
one lady to forget her troubles by 
sending her a useful present and 
a book or some other unnecessary 
gift ; or will you send us money 
to help us with our Christmas 
gifts? We like each lady to have 
from 30s. to £2 extra at this 
season of the year. 



Hon. Sec, 
EDITH SMALLWOOD. 
Lancaster House, Malvern. 



THE GREAT NATIONAL 
INSTITUTION FOR THE 
RELIEF OF DISTRESS 
AMONGST OUR GALLANT 

SAILORS 

FISHERMEN 

AND THEIR WIDOWS 
AND ORPHANS. 

THE SHIPWRECKED MARINERS' 
SOCIETY which has an Honorary 
Relieving Officer in every Village and 
Town on the Coasts of the United 
Kingdom, NEEDS FUNDS for its 
Work. 

Will You Send a Ck>ntributlon 

to the Secretary — 

G. E. MAUDE. Esq., 

Carlton House, 
Regent Street, 

London, S.W. 1 ? 

Patron : 
H.M. THE KING. 

Bankers : 
I WILLIAMS DEACON'S BANK, Ltd. 



5 ,000 Wounded Soldiers 
and 500 Civilians 

I mostly munition workers) 

have been cared for by the 

PR I NC E ALBERT 
CONVALESCENT HOME 

(formerly the "Grange' Hospital) 
WORTHING 

Patron : H.R.H. Prince Albert. 

President: Col. Sir Raymond Greene, 

Bart., D.S.O., J.P., M.P. 

The Home has always been, and is, quite 
full. 85 disabled soldiers and sailors now 
under treatment. Please help us to benefit 
these to whom so great a debt of gratitude 
is due. 

Funds are greatly needed to secure a 
suitable Recreation Ground immediately 
adjoining the Home. Such a piece of 
vacant ground is now for sale, and can be 
purchased at a reasonable price if funds are 
forthcoming soon. An appeal is made for 
this purpose, and for providing extra com- 
forts for the men, as below. Can you, and 
will you, help ? 

All contributions should be addressed to 
Mr. A. C. Evans, Secretary, at the London 
Office: 
76, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.C. 2, Eng. 

AN OLD-FASHIONED CHRISTMAS 

DINNER— Turkey, plum pudding, etc. — 
will be provided for the Patients if funds 
permit. 



Members regularly corresponding with our advertisers materially help 

•• OVERSEAS." 

112 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



** There is nothing in the world too fine for the 
Mercantile Marine of this Country for the work 
they have done during the present war." — LORD 
JELLICOE. 



An Appeal for the 

Captain Fryatt 
Memorial Fund 

THIS Fund was Instituted In 
August, 1916, to perpetuate 
the memory of that very gallant 
Ofl&cer, Captain Fryatt, of the 
S.S. " Brussels," who so heroically went 
to his doom in the cause of the Allies. 

Its purposes are for the alleviation of suffer- 
ing and distress, primarily due to the War, 
arising amongst the Officers of the Merchant 
Service and their Widows and Orphans. 

Will YOU Help Us 

to carry on the Good Work the 
Fund has already done and is doing ? 

You owe a great deal to the Merchant 
Service and Contributions are Sadly Needed 

They will be thankfully received by the 
■ Honorary Secretary : ■ 

Lieut. T. W. MOORE, C.B.E.. R.N.R. 
The Arcade, Lord Street. Liverpool 



Increased advertisement revenue means continued improvement of 

"OVERSEAS." 



Advertiser's A nnoimcf.ment. 

DR. BARNARDO'S HOMES 

appeal for 

300,000 Half-crowns 



vVUl yo\x Keif 
tki-s LitbU cklU 



f 



or 



H^ji 



Bread and Butter 

for their 
7,280 

children 

who are being trained to 
become good and useful 
citizens of the Empire. 



240.000' 



Will you help the little 
child up the ladder? 



Drafts, Cheques and Orders 
payable " Dr. Barnardo's 
Homes Food Fund " and 
crossed, may be addressed to 
, the Director, Rear-Admiral 

Sir Harry Stileman, 18-26, 
Stepney Causeway, London,. 
E. 1, England. 

[See next page.) 

When making purchases, please give " OVERSEAS' " Advertisers an 
opportunity to quote prices. 

lU 



Advertiser's A nnoimcement. 



OVERSEAS 




Mrs 



Dr. Barnardo's Homes 

(See previous page) 
E take this opportunity of tendering our heartfelt 
thanks to our world-wide circle of friendsfortheir long- 
continued interest intheworK of Dr.Barnardo'sHomes. 
We append below a further list of gifts from oversea 
friends to the Food Fund, which has for its object the 
feeding of the largest family in the world — over 7,000 boys and girls 
who are being trained to become good citizens of the Empire. 
92,330 children in all have been received. 27,355 have been 
emigrated within the Empire : — 
Collected in Hong Kong to endow the " Hong Kong " Bed 

"J. A.," Pahiatua 

Collected in the Federated Malay States to endow the " Kuala 

Lumpur " Bed ..... 

" F. P. W.," Amritsar 

Military Ice and Soda Factory, Dar-es-Salaam 

Oeuvre Anglo-Franco Mauricienne des Orphelins et des 

Mutiles de la Guerre, Port Louis, Mauritius 
Proceeds of Children's Concert, Hankow, China (per 

Hemmings) ....... 

" H. R.," Bloemfontein 

Friends in Calcutta ...... 

" J. M. M.," South Australia 

Contributions by American Citizens of all classes and creeds 
as a token of admiration for Britain's part in the late 
War, per the National Allied Relief Committee, 
London : — 

First gift ..... 

Second gift ..... 

Third gift 

" T. S. F.," Hong Kong 

St. Andrew's Church, Kowloon (collection 

Whiteley, Esq.) .... 
Members of Shanghai Club (collection) 
Donations, per Tne Afii'ertiser^ Adelaide . 
Canteen Committee, H.M.S. Blenheim 
Subscriptions per the Yangtszepoo Lawn Bowls Club 

Shanghai 
Members of Manilla Branch, Over-Seas Club 

Islands. 
" R. G. L.," Mexico 
Offerings at out-of-the-way parts of the Frontier guarded by 

the Kohat-Kurram Field Force (per Rev. T. H. Dixon 
" K. S.," Bombay 
" H. H.," France. 
" R. H. C," U.S.A. 
Misses A. and D. W. 



per W. H 



Philippine 



H. 
R. 
F. 
G. 

A. 
T. 



Hong Kong 



I.," Queensland 

T.," Nicaragua 

G.,"Fiji 

M.,"Fiji 

T. W.," New Hebrides 

H. H.," Suva 



i 

500 
500 

500 

303 
300 

200 

169 

150 

131 
100 



100 
20 

33 
100 

78 
58 
52 
46 








12 

o 





8 
o 

15 
7 

o 



20 
10 

6 
6 

5 
2 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
o 



o 
o 

17 
14 

o 

15 
15 

10 
10 

7 
I 
o 

10 



d. 

o 

o 

2 

O 



8 
o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

2 
O 

8 
I 
o 
o 



20 18 4 



(See previous page) 
11:. 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 

4 
o 
o 
6 
o 
o 
4 



Dr. 

Barnardo's 

Homes. 



A dvertisers ' A nnouncements. 



^'^^^TaltJatton f rmi) 



IN 70 different countries the Salvation Army is waging 
unceasing war against misery, ignorance and destitution. 
Its devoted officers minister to the social and spiritual 
needs of mankind without regard to race, creed or colour. 
They preach the Gospel of hope and faith in 42 languages. 

Criminals, drunkards, outcasts and other unfortunates are 
gathered into the Salvation Armj-'s Shelters and Homes, 
where they are fed, clothed, spiritually regenerated, and set 
on the road to a new life. 

The Salvation Army is one of the greatest purifj-ing forces 
of the age. Its social and spiritual work has raised 
thousands of men and women from a life of vice and crime, 
and by the grace of God made them into respected citizens. 

Help is urgently needed and should be sent to 

GENERAL BRAMWELL BOOTH, 
Queen Victoria Street, London, E.G. 4. 

Cheques should be crossed "Bank of England, Law Courts Branch." 



THE BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY 

STAR AND GARTER HOME 

FOR 

DISABLED SAILORS AND SOLDIERS. 

RICHMOND. SURREY, ENGLAND. 

ESTABLISHED by the British Red Crosi Society, under the 
patronatTe of H.M. the Queen, as a permanent memorial of the 
Great War. On the site of the old Star & Garter Hotel, of 
famous memory, a noble building is being erected to accommodate about 
200 men. To hasten building operations the temporary Hospital in the 
Annexe of the Hotel, opened in January, 1916, for Sailors and Soldiers 
paralysed by wounds, has been moved to the Seaside Branch at 
Sandgate, Kent. 

The Star & Garter Committee appeals to the benevolence of our friends 
and kinsmen overseas on behalf of the Building Fund which, notwith- 
standing the generous support it has received both at home and abroad, 
is in need of further help, in consequence of the enormously increased 
price of labour and materials. 

jJddress all subscriptions to : 

THE SECRETARY. STAR S CARTER COMMITTEE. 

19, Berkeley Street, London, W. 1. 



•K 



When ordering from our Advertisers, please mention " OVERSEAS.' 

This helps the Club. 



116 



Advertiser's A nnoimcement. 




LOST! 
LOST! 



1 



N many popular resorts the town 
crier, with his big bell and his 
long list of treasured articles lost, 
is still a familiar figure. 



Is there no bell-man to sound 
in your ears this poignant cry? 



(( 



LOST in childhood's days, all that 
makes life precious — a mother's care, 
a father's protection, the care^ 
less gaiety of unshadowed youth ! " 

In the shelter of our Home, the orphan, the neglected 
little one, the unwanted child, find again their lost 
treasures of love and laughter. 

If you are willing to share in this beautiful work, we 
will be your almoners. 



Gijts and Enquiries should be addressed to : — 
THE PRINCIPAL (Rev. W. HODSON SMITH), 

NATIONAL CHILDREN'S HOME 

(Founded by Dr. Stephenson)) 

104-122, CITY ROAD, LONDON. E.C. 1. 

Treasurers : 

J. R. BARLOW. Esq.. M.A.. J.P. 
SIR CHARLES C. WAKEFIELD. Bart.. C.B.E. 



To continually improve " OVERSEAS " we rely largely upon our 
advertisement revenue. 



117 



Advertiser's Announcement. 



THE 



CHURCH LADS' BRIGADE 

(Founded 1691 Incorporated 1893) 

HAS NO ENDOWMENT. 



WANTED 
1,000,000 Shinings. 

WILL YOU HELP 

The Church Lads' Brigade to Continue its 
Great Work ABonK Lads for Church and State? 



Patron : H.M. THE KING. 
President : Field-Marshal H.R.H. The Duke 

OF CONNAUGHT, K.G., K.T. 

Vice-Presidents: The Archbishops and Bishops of 
THE Anglican Communion. 

Governor & Commandant : Field-Marshal Lord 
Grenfell, P.C. G.C.B., G.C.M.G. 

Hon. Treasurer: SiR Adrian D. W. Pollock. 
(Chamberlain of the City of London). 

Brigade Chaplain-General and Secretary : 
Rev. Edgar Rogers, O.B.E., M.A. 

General Headquarters : 

Aldwych House, Catherine Street, Aldwych, 

London, W.C. 2. 



FUNDS AREURGENTLY NEEDED 



Members mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to Advertisers lielp 
to maintain the advertising revenue. 

118 



Advertiser's A nnouncement. 



LEST WE FORGET 



I 



the men who gallantly held the positions at 

the front, but lost their positions at home. 

WANT to work, but no one seems able to give me a 
job." This is the heart-breaking remark of thousands of 
maimed and broken ex-Service men who sacnticed posi- 
tions and prospects by responding to "The Call." It is 
true that these men are unemployable in ordinary Workshops 
and Factories, for in these days of keen competition a one- 
armed, or paralysed, or legless man is not a profit-making 
worker ; but, after all, they fought for the Homeland aod lost 
their limbs and powers of action in the service of us all. 

THE LORD ROBERTS 
MEMORIAL WORKSHOPS 

are doors through which these men, who served and suflered, 
can enter the hive of Industry and show that, given the 
chance, they can make their lives as useful to the Nation ai 
they were before the handicap of war's casualties crippled 
their possibilities. In these Workshops — the only Memorial to 
one of our greatest soldiers — these men are traioed in useful 
occupations and provided with permanent employment at 
good wages. Over 2,300 men have already been admitted 
into the Workshops but there is a far greater number whose 
requests to enter have to be refused because money is needed 
for machinery and maintenance. Will you help the Committee 
to help these men ? 

THINK what it meana to bo disabled. Most of the evils that 
afflict human nature j disease, poverty, grief — if they do not 
kill — pass on. But the arinless, the legless, the paralysed 
men — legacies of the war — are maimed for the duration of their 
lives. In the desert places made by the war, 
flowers vdll grow and bloom again covering 
up the scars that disfigured the face of the 
earth, but the human disablement will al- 
ways remain as long as life lasts. Surely the 
least we can do is to give these men that for 
which they crave— an opportunity of retain- 
ing their self-respect by becoming 
self-supporting citisens. 

The goods made by the men are sold by all 
leading retailers. Buy them. 

HELP THE FUND 

also by sending a cheque 
or money order payable 
to the Chairman of the 
Lord Roberts Memorial 
Fund. 



MAJOR GENERAL 
Lord Cheylesmore, 
K.C.M.G.. KCVO.. 
122, BroBipton Road, 
London, SW. 3. 




Increased advertising revenue makes possible the continued improvement J 
of " OVERSEAS " generally. 

119 



A dvertisers' A nnouncements. 



CHILLON COLLEGE 

Uniting Cheltonia English School, Villeneuve, and L'E'cole- Foyer des Pleiades. 



Near MONTREUX 



-SWITZERLAND 



A HIGH-CLASS PUBLIC SCHOOL FOR BOVS ON THE LAKE OF 
GENEVA, CONDUCTED ON ENGLISH PUBLIC SCHOOL LINES WITH 
THE MODERN LANGUAGE FEATURES OF SWISS SCHOOLS. 

SENIOR COLLEGE (13.V to 19 Years).— Altitude 1,300 {eet above sea level, and 
50 feet above the lake, overlooking the famous Chateau de Chillon. Stands in its 
own park containing the playing fields. All games. Bathing and rowing in the lake 
40 yards away. Modern building (1912), running hot and cold water, central heating, 
fating south and ndmirably sheltered- Preparation for English and American Schools 
nnd Universilies Modern Language Finishing Classes, Army Class, Commerce Classes. 
JUNIOR SCHOOL (7 to 13i Years).— Altitude 3,500 feet above sea level, situated 
on Mont Pleiades, overlooking Montreux (3 miles), Vevey (2 miles), and the Lake ; 
50 minutes by mountain railway from Vevey, and d5 minutes from Montreux. 
Wonderful mountain air and sunshine. Private bathing pool, skating rink, tennis, 
sunbaths. scouting, gardening. Buildings modern and specially equipped for a 
sihool South aspect, well sheltered on southern slopes. Electric hea'ino xnd 
trlephone. Kindergarten and Preparatory for Public School Examination", Science. 

The Climate is equable and particularly adapted to growing boys, especially those 
from America. India, China anj the Far East generally, 

HEADMASTER, Rev. F. de W. Lushington, M.A.. Scholar of Clare College. 
Cnmb'-idge, late Headmaster of Dover College, formerly Headmaster of Elstree 
School and Assistant Master at Eton College. 

Author of "Oil Personal Service" .mil other books of addresses to boys. 

Master of the Junior School, W. E. Mocatta, B.A., Keble Colleje, Oxford. 

FRENCH IS THE LANGUAGE OF BOTH SCHOOLS. 
OVERSEAS BOYS. — Entire charge is undertaken of Boys whose parents live Overseas. 



SELF GENERATING 
ELECTRIC CYCLE LAMP. 



mXMASGIFT^S? 



BEST 



CYCLIST. 




All British Made. 

No Oil. No Acid. NoMat;hes. 

A Brilliant Light at No Cost. 

THE PEERLESS VOLTALITE 

produces by the movement of the cycle, at walking speed and up 

to 30 miles an hour, an inexhaustible supply of electricity to 

brilliantly Illuminate head and rear lamps at no cost. Lasts years 

without attention. 

PRICES. 
V2, complete with head lamp 86/- V7, De Luxe head type .42/6 
V6, complete with head and V8, De Luxe head and rear 

Illuminated rear lamp . 40/- type .... 47/6 
Extra for postage, 1/-. 

TO ENSURE SATISFACTION 1-TRMI-V REFUSE SUBSTITUTES 

Extracts from a few unsolicited Testimonials received. 

{Hundreds to select from.) 



C. 11. F., West Croydon, 
Surrey. — " My ' Voltalite 'has 
been running for over three 
years — e\ery day and in a 1 
weathers— and still it responds 
as readily and reliably as on 
the dav it was purcliased and 
titted.'' 

X. S. M. \\., Bendigo, 
\'ictoria, Australia. — " I have 



that ths ' VoltaliU;' Electric 
Cycle Lamp, which 1 i>ur- 
chased from you in the year 
1912, is 'still going strong." 
and does ail you say it will do. 
The Eanip has been in con- 
stant use tor eight years. 
This is a brilliant perform- 
ance, and I w uld not revert 
to oil or carbide lamps, which 



great pleasure in advising you I cannot equal the '\oltalite' 



regard to cheapness, 
cleanliness and convenience.'" 
H. R,, Exeter.— " 1 ride a 
minimum of 40 miles per 
week, all weathers. I have 
had this Generator over 12 
months, and have nothing 
but i>raise for it. 1 am often 
aslced my opinion of it, and 
truthfully say I wouldn't go 
back to oil or gas again,"' 



Send for the Illustrated Art Booklet of the Voltalite, 

0/50, giving full particulars. 

Terms to the tradh on Application. 






Members help the Club by mentioning " OVERSEAS " when writing to 

Advertisers. 



Published by the Over-Seas Club, London. Printers i The Whitef riars Press, Ltd., Tonbrldge 



How does the 

National Institute for the Blind 

Help Blind Folk? 



1. It bears a very heavy financial responsibility for many important 
institutions all over Great Britain for the training and education of the J 
blind, and provides practically all the Braille literature for the whole ^ 
British Empire. | 

2. It maintains the most up-to-date and best-equipped Sjrhool of 
Massage in the country for blind people of both sexes, and takes practical 
steps to help ex-students to build remunerative careers. 

3. It is the sole producer of literature in Moon type for the entire 
English-speaking world. 

4. It has a widely-developed department for the printing and dissemina- 
tion of Braille music, without which blind musicians would be helpless. 

5. It maintains an old-established and far-reaching organisation for 
visiting, assisting, and training the blind in their own homes. 

6. It expends thousands of pounds annually on the relief of needy blind 
persons. 

7. It undertakes the financial responsibility and conduct of Worcester 
College for blind boys, and the newly-established college at Chorley 
Wood for girls with little or no sight. 

8. It cares for the Deaf-Blind — those condemned to life-long darkness 
and silence. 

9. It is responsible for the upkeep of Hoole Bank, Chester, for blind 
persons of good social position who are unable to maintain themselves in 
comfort. 

10. It maintains a home at Clifton for blind women of the poorer 
classes, and a similar home at Brighton ; also a hostel for blind women 
workers in London. 

11 . It carries out much important research work with regard to apparatus 
and materials generally of wide importance to the blind, and the 
manufacture of these. 

12. It maintains the only home in the Empire for blind babies — 
" Sunshine House " at Chorley Wood — and proposes to equip and 
maintain several more " Sunshine Houses. ' 

I The proper discharge of these obligations depends 
entirely upon the generous response of the public. 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND 

Registered under the Blind Persons Act, 1920. 
President: SIR ARTHUR PEARSON. Bart., G.B.E. 
I Chairman: SIR WASHINGTON RANGER, D.C.L. 

X Sec-General: MR. HENRY STAINSBY. 

I Head Office : 224-6-8, GREAT PORTLAND ST.. LONDON. W. i. 



t 




SHIRTS, PYJAMAS & COLLARS. 

The Ideal Wear for Men in all parts of the World. 

LUVISCA " for MEN'S wear is Irresistible— so dressy so durable_ and 
withal, so comfortable, that it has only to be seen to be appreciated. 
"LUVISCA" looks lik; silk, is more durable than silk, and cheaper 
than silk Ask your Outfitter or Stores to show you the newest patterns. 



Look for the •' LUVISCA " TAB on every garment None genuine without 

If any difficulty in obtaining "LUVISCA. 
please write to "LUVISCA" (Dept I). 



"LUVISCA" BLOUSES. DRESSES, 

SPORTS COATS, etc., for Ladies" wear- 
in all newest styles and designs — sold by all 
Drapers and Stores. 



19, Aldermanbury, London, E.C. 2.