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1 



\T 



THE 



NATIONAL ALMANAC 



AND 



ANNUAL RECORD 



^OI& a?"FrlB] ZTEXJLR 



186a 



PHILADELPHIA: 
GEORGE W. CHILDS, 628 & 630 CHESTNUT ST. 

LONDON: N. TRUBNER A CO., 60 PATERNOSTER ROW. 

PARIS: HECTOR BOSSANGB. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA : A. ROMAN A CO. 

1863. 



Entered according to Act of Congrev, in the year 1863, by 
GEORGE W. CUILDS, 

in the Clerk*8 Office of the Dirtriet Gourt of the United States for the Eastern 

District of Pennsylvania. 



XUCTROTTPED BT L. JOHNSON k CO. 
PHILADELPHIA. 



a WiMftTc k aast panms. 



JPdii[alild, 



BY THE PUBLISHER, 

TO 

HON. GEORGE P. SANGER, 

WHO rOK 80 MAXn TEARS OOZfBCCTED 

THE AMERICAN ALMANAC, 

A WORK THAT WILL REMAIN A MONUMENT 0? HW RARE ABILITY AND 

UNTIRING INDUSTRY. 



PREFACE. 



Thk primary object of the publisher of the National Almanac has been to 
make it, as far as possible, a thoroughly accurate, reliable, and ezhaustiye 
authority upon the subjects of which it treats. To this end, every effort has 
been used, and no expense has been spared. Some practical difficulties have 
arisen, necessarily incident to the preparation of this, the initial Tolume of the 
proposed series; but it is confidently expected that they will be wholly oyercome 
in the succeeding yolume for 1864. The arrangements for future publication are 
belieyed to be such as will satisfy, in all respects, the wants of the public. No 
hesitation, howeyer, is felt in referring to the following pages as an earnest of 
what may be accomplished hereafter ; for they contain twice the quantity of mat- 
ter that has been furnished by any similar work ever published in this coimtry. 

In the collection and preparation of this matter, the aim has been to take 
nothing at secondhand, but to resort, whenever it was practicable so to do, to 
the original sources of knowledge. Hence the statistics and statements con- 
nected with the civil, military, and naval service of the country have, to a very 
great extent, been submitted to the examination of official personages for 
revision and correction, so that they may be considered as embodying not only 
the latest information, but as communicating it in a form sanctioned by the 
proper authority. 

In addition to the precaution taken by the publisher to secure reliability in 
this respect, he has also endeavored in like manner to bring the facts down to 
the date of going to press. The statistics of preceding almanacs have generally 
been from six to twelve months behindhand, chiefly because their editors have 
been content to await the tardy publication by Congress of official documents 
and reports; whereas in the present case, upon application to various depart- 
ments of the Government, we have been kindly enabled to avail ourselves of the 
manuscript sources of information. 

The valuable results of the last census (the eighth) have been classified and 
incorporated, so as fully to exhibit the absolute and relative state of the 



6 PREFACE. 

government and people and their progress during the last decade. We have 
also introduced throughout the work a larger variety of topics, and a far 
greater copiousness of treatment, than will be found in any publication of this 
class which has preceded the present. Indeed, the purpose has been to exhibit, 
for immediate use and future reference, a complete representation of the actual 
condition of the Federal Government and the respective States, in their mani- 
fold interests, whether political, social, industrial, agricultural, commercial, 
financial, ecclesiastical, educational, or literary. We hope to present, for each 
year, in the National Almanac a faithful summary and analysis of the elements 
of our national life, and thus to make up a record which will possess the value, 
and merit the permanence, as it will assuredly contain the materials, of 
history. 

On all topics connected with the present state of hostilities, special pains have 
been taken to insure fulness and reliability. Hence we have prepared a minute 
and accurate narrative of facts and events ; and, in order to render the same 
complete, it has been carried back to the origin of the struggle, so that there 
may be found in this and the succeeding numbers of the National Almanac a 
detailed and unbroken diary of the occurrences of the war Arom its outbreak, 
and an obituary record of the officers who have fallen in the contest. 

For the carefully prepared sketch of each of the coins of the TTnited States we 
are indebted to the forthcoming new edition of Bouvier's Law Dictionary. The 
article was prepared for that work by the Hon. J. Ross Snowden, whose former offi- 
cial connection with the National Mint gives assurance of its entire accuracy. Our 
thanks are also due to A. Dallas Bache, LL.D., Joseph Henry, LL.D., Professor 
Gillespie, Professor Copp^e, Hon. James Pollock, LL.D., Pliny Earle, M.D., W. 
Y. McKean, Esq., the heads of the Departments at Washington, the GovemorB 
and Secretaries of the various States, and tt> other contributors and correspond- 
ents, who have kindly furnished aid and extended facilities to us in the pre- 
pnration of the work. We regret that most of the valuable material trans- 
mitted by various officers of the army and navy reached us at a period too late 
for use in this volume. It is, however, duly appreciated, and will be em- 
bodied in our next year's issue. 

The publisher will, at all times, be happy to receive contributions and sug- 
gestions from all who may feel an interest in the undertaking. 

G. W. C. 

PHJIA9SLPHU, January 1, 1868. 



Note. — The National Almanac vrill hereafter be issued about the 15th of December 
of each ycnr. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Cycles, Seasons, Eclipses, Ac 9 

Progress of Astronomy 11 

Calendar: — January, Ac 14-37 

Meteorology .%.... 88-44 

Tide Tables for Coast of United States 45-47 

Coast Surrey .'. 48-50 

Smithsonian Institution ; 50-53 

Insanity, and Hospitals for Insane 54-60 

Iron-Clad War-Vessels , 61-66 

ITiiited States. 

Szecutire Gorernment, Cabinet 67 

Execntire, Legislative, and Judicial Officers of the United States, from the Reyolu- 

tion to the present time 68 

United States 67-71 

Department of State 72-87 

Ministers and Consuls in Foreign Countries 73 

Foreign Ministers and Consuls in the United States 82 

War Department ...^ 88-104 

Army List 90 

Army Pay Table 102 

Navy Department 105-120 

Navy List 107 

Navy Pay Table lOJ^ 

Treasury Department 121-169 

Finances and Resources of the United States 139-147 

United States Mint „ 170-184 

Post-Office Department 185-209 

List of Postmasters in the United States 186 

Interior Department 210-219 

Judiciary, Supreme Court, Ac 220-226 

Congress • 227-232 

Tides and Abstracts of Public Laws 233-267 

Appropriations by Congress for 1862 and 1863 268 

Alphabetical Summary of Excise Tax 269-282 

New Tariff ? 283-301 

Laws relating to Direct and Excise Taxes 301 

Changes in Relative Position of States from 1700 to 1860 302-303 

Growth of the States 304-305 

Progress of Population 306 

Eighth Census of the United States, 1860 307-338 

Condition of Banks in the United States, 1854 to 1862 339 

Prices of Leading Articles in the New York Market, 1855 to 1862.; 340 

IndividTial States. 

Maine 341 

New Hampshire 848 

Vermont 354 

Massachusetts , 361 

Rhode Island 382 

Connecticut .'. • 386 

New York 396 

New Jersey • • 419 

Pennsylvania , 428 

Delaware 445 

7 



8 CONTENTS. 

PAOK 

Maryland •..*....... 448 

Virginia 454 

West Virginia 455 

North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida. 456 

Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas 457 

Arkansas, Tennessee. 458 

Kentucky 459 

Ohio 464 

Michigan ^ 476 

Indiana , 483 

Illinois \ 488 

Missouri 492 

Iowa 497 

Wisconsin 502 

Minnesota 508 

Kapsas 513 

California., 515 

Oregon 521 

Nebraska Territory 526 

Washington Territory 527 

Nevada Territory 528 

Utah Territory 530 

Colorado Territory * 532 

Dakota Territory 533 

New Mexico (including Arizona) 534 

District of Columbia 534 

Army of United States 536 

Record of Important Events of Civil War in United States 587-607 

Noted Mountains, Valleys, Ac, of the Present War 608-612 

Battles of the Present War 613-616 

American Obituaries— 1861 617-625 

American Obituaries — 1862 626-643 

Colleges of United States in 1862 644-649 

Theological Seminaries in the United States 650 

Medical Schools in the United States 654 

Law Schools in the United States 656 

Normal Schools in the United States 656 

Religious Statistics of the World 657-666 

Foreign Oonntries. » 

Reigning Monarchs of the World 667 

States of Europe 668 

Great Britain 669 

France 672 

Russia 674 

Austria 676 

Prussia 676 

List of Books published in the United States— 1862 678-686 

Petroleum Oil > 687 

Bo-called Confederate (}oTeinment. 

Members of Senate and House of Representatives • 689 

State Governments...'. ...^ •* 690 

Finances ^ ^..... * 690 

Confederate Amy..... •••.••••••••••.•.•••..• 690 

Advertisements. 



THE 

NATIONAL ALMANAC AND ANNUAL RECORD 

FOB THE YEAR 

1863,* 

BefDg the latter part of the 87th and the beginning of the 88th yew of the Independence of the 
United States of America ; also, 
The year 0576 of the Julian Period ; 
<* 7371-72 of the Byzantine era; 
** 6623-21 of the Jewish era; 

** 2816 since the foundation of Rome, according to Yarro; 

** 2610 since the beginning of the era of Nabonassar, which has been assigned to Wednesday, 
the 26th of February, of the 3967th year of the Julian Period, corresponding, according 
to the chronologists, to the 747th, and, according to the astronomers, to the 746th year 
before the birth of Christ ; 
" 2630 of the Olympiads, or the third year of the 660th Olympiad, commencing in July, 1861, 
if we fix the era of the Olympiads at 775^ years before Chi-ist, or near the boginning 
of July of the year 3938 of the Julian Period ; 
** 2175 of the Qrecian era, or the era of the Seleucidse ; 
** 1579 of the era of Diocletian. 
The year 1280 of the Mohammedan era, or the era of the Hegira, begins on the 18th of June, 1863. 
The first day of January of the year 1863 is the 2,401,607th day since the commencement of the 
Julian Period. 

OhioiLologioal OjoImu 



Dominical Letter D 

Bpact « 11 

Lonar Cycle or Golden Number 2 



Solar Cycle 24 

Soman Indiction ..„ 6 

Julian Period. 6576 



Seasonsi 

Spring begins Mar. 20, 

Summer " June 21, 

Autumn " Sept. 28, 

Winter " Dec. 22, 



H. 


M. 




9 


21 P.M.' 




6 


64 « 


Mean time at 


8 


9 A.H. 


' Washington. 


2 


4 « 





Moyable Feasts and Pasts for 1863. 



Septuagesima Sunday Feb. 1. 

Ash Wednesday. Feb. 18. 

Palm Sunday Mar. 29. 

Baiter Sonday Apr. 5. 



Ascension Day May 14. 

Whft Sunday May 24. 

Corpus Christi June 4. 

First Sunday of Advent Not. 20. 



Eolipses.t 

There will be four eclipses this year,-^F4wo of the Sun, and two of the Moon. 
I. A Partial Eclipse of the Sun, May 17, visible in Europe, the northern coast of Asia, and the north- 
western part of North America. This eclfxMe is not visible in any of the United States except Minne* 

* Prepared for the National Almanac by George Searle, Professor Naval Academy, Newport, R. I. 

t The times given for the eclipses are the local times of the places referred to, unless otherwise 
stated. 

9 



10 THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. [1863. 

80t8» California, and Oregon. The Une north of which it is Yisible connects the western extremitjr 
of Lake Superior with Los Angeles, on the California coast. This eclipse 

Begins on the Earth generally, Hay 17, 5h. 4m. aji., in longitude (SX3P 4' W. of Washington, and 
latitude 32^ 67' N. 

Ends on the Earth generally. May 17, 7h. 26m. pjf ., in longitude 80^ (X S. of Washington, and latitude 
47° ly N. 

The greatest obscuration ia about 7 digits, and talces place May 18, Ih. 27m. ajc., in longitude 160^ 
18' W. of Washington, and Uititude 60^ 18' N. 

II. A Total Eclipse of the Moon, June 1, partially visible in the Atlantic States. 

The times of this eclipse are as follows >— 

First contact with the Penumbra.. » June 1, 

« « Shadow " 

Beginning of Total Phase ** 

Middle of the Eclipse " 

End of Total Phase •* 

Last contact with the Shadow ** 

** « Penumbra « 

Tor any other place, the times will be obtained by adding its longitude from Washington to the 
above times if it is east, and subtracting it if it be west. But, as the longitudes in common use are 
given in degrees and minutes, we must turn them into time first, — remembering that each degree 
of longitude is equal to four minutes of time, and each minute of longitude equal to four seconds 
of time. 

in. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, November 11, visible in the Antarctic Continent as annular, 
and in the southern eztrnmity of Africa, and the southern coast of Australia, as a partial eclipse. 
This eclipse 

Begins on the Earth generally, November 11, 6h. 14m. a.m., in longitude 67° 68' E. of Washington, 
and latitude 23° 0' S. 

Ends on the Earth generally, November 11, 6h. 60m. p.m., in longitude 167° 13' W. of Washington, 
and latitude 42° SC S. 

Central eclipse at noon, in longitude 19eP 32' B. of Washington, and latitude 80° 33' S. 

lY. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, November 26, visible throughout the United States. 

The times of this eclipse are as follows :— 



H. 


M. 




3 


41.1 P.M.] 






87.8 « 






44.8 « 
17.8 « 
60.8 " 


Mean time at 
Washington. 




67.8 « 




8 


64,6 « 





H. 


M. 





66.4 A.M. 


2 


7.6 " 


8 


47.8 « 


6 


28.0 « 


6 


40.2 " 



Mean time at 
Washington. 



First contact with the Penumbra November 26, 

* « Shadow « 

Middle of the EcUpse ** 

Last contact with the Shadow ** 

« « Penumbra " 

For any other place, the times will be obtained as for the other eclipse of the Moon, above. This 
edlpse will be nearly total, only one^eventieth of the Moon's disc remaining onobscured. 

Horning and Evening Stars. 

Tenus will be evening star till September 26, then morning star for the rest of the year. Mars wHl 
be evening star till September 28, then morning star for the rest of the year. Jupiter will be morn- 
ing star till April 12, then evening star till October 31, then morning star the rest of the year. Saturn 
will be morning star till March 23, then evening star till October 2, then morning star the rest of tha 
year. 

VisiliiUty of Heronry. 

Tills planet wfll be seen most easily for a few days about May 18, in the evening, when it sets about 
Ih. 68m. after the sun. On January 26, the interval between its setting and that of the sun reaches 
a ni^-ir<TT ^«tw of aboQt Ih. 34m., and on September 6 of about Oh. 62m. On February 28, the interval 
between its rising and that of the sun reaches a waTlmnm of about Ih. 12m., and on October 27 
of about Ih. 36m. 



1868.] 



PROGRESS OF ASTRONOMY DURING 1862. 



11 



Bnratioii of Twiligbt 

The fbllowing table exhibits the duration of twilight, morning and eyening. It ii calctttetad Ibr a 
latitode of abont ¥P 20^, bat will answer for all the Northern States. 



Jan. 1. 

11. 

21. 

31. 
Feb. 10. 

20. 
Mar. 2. 

12. 

22. 
April 1. 

11. 

21. 
Hay 1. 



H. M. 



.... 1 



37 
36 
34 
33 
31 
30 
30 
30 
81 
32 
35 
39 
44 



H. M. 

May 11 1 49 

21 54 

31..... 1 69 

June 10 2 3 

20 6 

30 4 

July 10 2 1 

20 1 66 

30 61 

Aug. 9 45 

19 41 

29 37 

Sept. 8 1 34 



H. X. 

Sept. 18 1 31 

28 30 

Oct. 8 30 

18 80 

28 o 31 

Not. '7 82 

17 84 

27 86 

Dec. 7 87 

17 88 

27 1 88 



PROGRESS OF ASTRONOMY DURING THE YEAR 1862. 



The past year has made the following additions to the already very numerous group of minor 

planets : — 

Kame of PUneC Bj whom, where, and when dlaeovered. 

Feronia Saliard, at Gnmbridge, Jao. 29. 

Caytia TntUa, at Cambridge, April 7. 

The first of these was first seen by Br. G. H. F. Peters, at Clinton, New Tork, May 29, 1861, but was 
supposed by him to be Maia (66), which he had been observing a few days before. It was found to be 
new by Mr. Safford's calculations, made subsequently. Its distance from the sun is the least of any 
of the group, — ^being only about 204 millions of miles. 

Two others were also fi>und, on the nights of August 30 and 31, by Tempel, at Marseilles, and 
Luther, at Bilk. 

These new discoveries make the whole number of asteroids now known seventy-five, as follows : — 



1. Ceres. 
2.Pallaa. 

3. Juno. 

4. Testa. 
6. AstrsBft. 

6. Hebe. 

7. Iris. 

8. Flora. 

9. Metis. 

10. Sygeia. 

11. Parthenope. 

12. Victoria. 

13. Egeria. 

14. Irene. 

15. Eunomia. 



16. Psyche. 

17. Thetis. 

18. Melpomene. 

19. Fortuna. 

20. Massllia. 

21. Lutetia. 

22. Calliope. 

23. Thalia. 

24. Themis. 

25. Phocea. 

26. Proserpina. 

27. £uterpe. 

28. Bellona. 

29. Amphitrite. 

30. Urania. 



31. Eupbrosyne. 

32. Pomona. 

33: Polyhymnia. 

34. Circe. 

35. Leucotbea. 

36. Atalanta. 

37. Fides. 

38. Leda. 

39. Lfetitta. 

40. Uarmonia. 

41. Daphne. 

42. Isis. 

43. Ariadne. 

44. Nysa. 

45. Eugenia. 



46. Heetia. 

47. Aglaia. 

48. Doris. 

49. Pales. 

50. Virginia. 

51. Nemausa. 
62. Europa. 

53. Calypso. 

54. Alexandra. 

55. Pandora. 

56. Melete. 

57. Mnemosyne. 

58. Concordia. 

59. Klpis. 

60. DauaS. 



61. Echo. 

62. Erato. 

63. Ausonia. 

64. Angelina. 
66. Cybele. 

66. Maia. 

67. Asia. 

68. Leto. 

69. Hesperia. 

70. Panopea. 

71. Niobe. 

72. Feronla. 

73. Clytia. 
74. 

75. 



Two comets have also been found. 

I. Found by Schmidt, at Athens, Oreece, July 2. This comet was renuurkable for its near iqqparoBch 
to the earth, and its very rapid motion, as seen fhnn it. On July 4 it was distant only 9,300,000 miles, 
-and moved at the extremely rapid rate of about 24<^ a day. It passed the perihelion on the 22d 
or June, at a distance of about 93,000,030 miles frcHn the sun, or ten times its distance from the earth. 

IT. Found by Tnttle, at Cambridge, July 18. This comet became eaaily visible to the naked eye <u 



12 THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. [1863. 

the latter part of Augost, its distance from us on the 30th being about 82,000,000 miles. Its tail was 
10^ or 15° in length. It passed its perihelion on the 23d of August, at a distance almost exactly the 
same as that of the first comet. 

It seems not impossible that this comet is identical with the great comet of 1811, as suggested by 
Professor Seochi, of Rome ; as the elements of its orbit agree tolerably well with those of that interest- 
ing body, whose brilliancy was scarcely surpassed even by our magnificent visitors of 1858 and 1861,— 
which last, by the way, remained Tisible in large telescopes as late as June of the past year. It is not 
improbable that a comet should lose in brilliancy at its successiye returns, — as has been to a marked 
degree the case with the first periodic comet ever discovered,— that of Halley,— which at its earlier 
apparitions, in 1878, 1456, and 1531, presented a magnificent appearance, but at its last retmn, in 1835, 
was hardly more conspicuous than the comet of this year. 

Besides these new-comers, the regular periodical return of Encke's comet took place In the begin- 
ning of the year. This comet is interesting not only as having the shortest period of any known 
(completing its circuit as it does in the space of three years and four months), but also as indicating 
by its movements the existence of a resisting medium, of a very subtle character, in space. It also 
shows well the complete knowledge of the movements of these erratic bodies which is given us by 
the theory of gravitation ; for at the first observation by Dr. Winnecke, of Pulkowa, of this comet, he 
found it within about a minute and a half of the place predicted by Professor Encke, — a quantity 
equal to about one-twentieth of the apparent distfneter of the sun, — and this when it had not been 
visible for three years. 

The number of stars known to be variable in brightness has also been increased this year, and one 
Buch star has been found among those visible to the naked eye. The cause of this phenomenon — 
which has been observed in seventy or eighty stars, most of which are telescopic — has not yet been 
ascertained. Some of them vary slowly and regularly, occupying many days in their periodic changes; 
while others pass through the most surprising variations in a few days, or even hours. In one case^ 
the brightness of the star is increased some two-hundredfold for a few days; after which it subsides 
to its former condition, in which it is scarcely discernible with the most powerful telescope. And, in 
another, the star passes, in a period of about 330 days, from a brilliancy which makes it conspicuously 
visible to the naked eye, to one 5000 times less, and returns to its original state. In others, the varia- 
tion takes place at perfectly regular intervals of time, even to the minute ; in some cases the color varies 
as well as the brightness: in short, there are all varieties. 

Besides these variable stars, we have accounts from Professor D* Arrest, of CSopenhagen, and othwa^ 
of the discovery of several variable nebulss. This phenomenon seems even more unaccountable than 
that of the variable stars; as nebuUe, if consisting, as has been proved in very many cases, of immense 
numbers of stars clustered together at an inconceivable distance from us, would require for their per* 
ceptible variation the variation of not merely seventy or eighty, but of thousands— even of millions— 
of their components. 

A very interesting discovery was made, on the evening of January 31, by Mr. Alvan Clark, of Cam- 
bridge, with his great refractor. This magnificent instrument, being directed, on the first favorable 
evening after its completion, to the star Sirius, showed plainly what had before been suspected to 
exlBt, — ^viz. a faint companion to this, the brightest of all the fixed stars. The reason for the suspicion 
of the existence of this companion was, an apparent circular motion which had been for aome time 
observed in the large star, similar to what is noticed in each of the components of double stars, but 
which could not be easily accounted for in a star apparently single. This companion, however, both 
in its direction and distance from Sirius, probably will explain the movement of the latter, and Is also 
interesting as the first fruit of the largest refiracting telescope in the world. 

It would appear from this discovery that the size of the fixed stars is not necessarily at all in pre- 
portion to their light ; as this email star, whose light is hardly one ten-thousandth part that of Sirius, 
would seem to be large enough to perceptibly affect its movements. 

Another important event of the year ia the publication of another part of the " Durchmusterung" 
of Professor Argelander, Director of the Observatory at Bonn. The completion of this gigantic work 
involves the observing and mapping of all the stars of the northern heavens, as fiu as the 14- iiisgnt> 
tude, which embraces stars twenty times as &int as any visible to the naked eye. In the present 
portion of the work we have the places of 105,075 stars, charted with so g^eat accuracy that a good 
instrument and careful observing would be necessary to detect any error in the positions given. Mr. 
Pogson, Director of the Observatory at Madras, intends, it is understood, to complete this work by 
charting the southern heavens,— thus making, as it would seem, almost all that could be desired in 
the way of celestial maps. 



1863.] 



TABLE OF TIBBS. 



18 



TABLE Bhowing the Bise and Fall of the Tide, in Feet, at yariooB Sea-Forti of the 

United Statee. 

^Trom the " Amerioan EphcmerU and Kantloal Almanac") 




Oh. 
1 
2 
3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 


10 
11 











M 






fe 






5« 

1 




11.2 


4.9 


6.8 


11.3 


4.9 


6.4 


11.2 


4.7 


6.6 


10.6 


4.3 


6.6 


10.0 


3.8 


6.4 


0.2 


3.6 


6.1 


8.8 


3.3 


6.7 


8.6 


33 


6.4 


8.9 


3.6 


6.2 


9.4 


4.0 


6.4 


10.1 


4.6 


6.7 


10.7 


4.8 


(U, 



il 



2.9 

3.0 
2.9 
2.6 
2.3 
2.1 
2.0 
2.0 
2.2 
'2.6 
2.8 
8.0 



o 
J 



iJb 

lA 
1.3 

1.1 
0.9 
0.9 
1.0 
1.1 
1.3 
1.4 



I 



6.2 
6.1 
6.0 
4.6 
4.3 
4.0 
3.8 
3.8 
4.0 
4.3 
4.7 
6.0 



6.0 
6.9 
6.7 
6.3 
4.7 
4.4 
4.2 
4.8 
4.6 
6.0 
6.6 
6.9 






7.8 
7.9 
7.6 
7.1 
6.5 
6.1 
6.8 
6.0 
6.4 
6.9 
7.4 
7.8 



S 

9 

M 



1.6 
1.6 
1.6 
1.4 
1.2 
1.0 
1.0 
LO 
1.1 
1.8 
1.4 
1.6 



4.6 
8.9 
8.7 
3.6 
3.1 
2J 
2.7 
8i) 
8.4 
8.8 
4.0 
4.2 



EXPLANATION OF THE FOLLOWING TABLES. 



The 8iin*8 and moon's rising and setting are calculated for four points, — ^riz. Boston, a point midway 
between New York and Philadelphia, a point midway between Baltimore and Washington, and San 
Francisco. They will serve, however, for other points not diflfering much in latitude, — though for the 
moon's rising and setting we should add as we go west, and subtract as we go east, about one minute 
and a half for every ten degrees of longitude. 

The time of high water is only given for one of the two daily tides; the other will be half-way 
between the two given in the table^ on each side of it. Thus, we have given the morning high tide at 
New Tork, March 7, 9h. 29m.; the evening tide occurs half-way between Oh. 29m. and lOh. 9m., or at 
0h.49m. 

The letters m. and e. In the tables for the rising and setting of the planets, and for the eclipses of the 
satellites of Jupiter, signi^ morning and evening. The fcnmer tables are calculated for New York — 
Philadelphia, or a latitude of 40° 20^, and will be only approximately true elsewhere. 

The times of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites are given for Washington. The columns for sun's 
and moon's southing are also given for Washington : the former is sufficiently accurate for any place 
in the United States ; but to the latter we should add as we go west, and subtract as we go east, about 
one minute and a half for every ten degrees of longitude, as for the rising and setting, above. 

The following signs are used in the column of Phenomena, kc. : — 



Planets. 

The Sun. 

([ The Moon. 

9 Mercury. 

9 Tonus. 

(f Mars. 

% Jupiter. 

^l Saturn. 

(!) Uranus. 

W «•• Neptune. 



Signs of the Zodl\c, Aspkcts, btg. 

<P Aries. 

•3 Cancer. 

:0: Libra. 

l> Caprioomus. 

(5 Coivjnnction. 

D Quadrature. 

S Opposition. 

Q Ascending Node. 

X^ Descending Node« 



14 



JANUABY, 1863. 



PHAS£S OF THE MOON. 

Fnll Moon 4d. lOh. 24in. pjc. 

Laat Quarter 12d. 6h. 58m. ** 

New Moon 19d. lOh. 64m. am. 

FiTBt Quarter 26d. llh. 46m. " 

Apogee ^ 3d. 9h.Ajc. 

Perigee 18d. lib. « 

Apogee 80d. 6h. pjc. 



• 

1 


Week. 


Boston. I 
Sun 


jN.Y.-PhiU. 

1 Sun 

1 
' 1 


Balt-Wuh. 

Sun { 


S. Fr'cisco. 

Sun 

1 

1 


• 

1 


LnOTH OP ] 

1 


DATS. 


u 


















• 






«■ s 


"5 
1 


t 


1 


(2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


• 


1 


a 


41 




1* 






H. M. 


II. M. 


H. M. 


E. M.; 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


a. M. 


H. X. 


H. M. 


O f 


1 


Th. 


7 30 


4 88 


7 23 


4 44 


7 20 


448 


7 17 


4 52 


3.8 


9 8 


21 


28 


23 2 


2 


Frid. 


30 


39 


23 


45 


20 


49 


17 


53 


4.3 


9 


22 


20 


22 67 


3 


Sat. 


30 


40 


24 


46 


20 


50 


17 


64 


4.8 


10 


22 


80 


61 


4 


8no. 


30 


41 


24 


47 


20 


51 


17 


65 


6.2 


11 


23 


31 


45 


5 


Mon. 


30 


42 


24 


48 


20 


52 


17 


66 


5.7 


12 


24 


32 


39 


6 


Tues. 


30 


42 


23 


49 


20 


53 


17 


57 


6.1 


12 


26 


83 


82 


7 


Wed. 


30 


43 


23 


60 


20 


54 


17 


58 


6.6 


13 


27 


84 


24 


8 


Th. 


30 


45 


23 


61 


20 


55 


17 


69 


7.0 


16 


28 


85 


16 


9 


Frid. 


29 


46 


23 


52 


20 


55 


17 


4 59 


7.4 


17 


20 


85 


8 


10 


Sat. 


29 


47 


23 


63 


19 


66 


16 


5 


7.8 


18 


30 


87 


22 


11 


Snn. 


29 


48 


23 


54 


19 


67 


16 


1 


8.2 


19 


31 


38 


21 60 


12 


Mon. 


29 


49 


23 


65 


19 


4 58 


16 


2 


8.6 


20 


32 


80 


41 


13 


Tues. 


28 


60 


22 


66 


19 


5 


16 


3 


9.0 


22 


34 


41 


31 


14 


Wed. 


28 


61 


22 


57 


18 


1 


15 


4 


9.8 


23 


86 


43 


21 


15 


Th. 


27 


62 


22 


58 


18 


2 


15 


6 


0.7 


25 


80 


44 


2110 


16 


Frid. 


27 


64 


21 


4 50 


18 


3 


15 


6 


10.1 


27 


88 


45 


20 69 


17 


Sat. 


26 


66 


21 


5 


17 


4 


14 


7 


10.4 


29 


30 


47 


47 


18 


Snn. 


26 


66 


20 


2 


17 


6 


14 


8 


10.7 


80 


42 


48 


36 


19 


Muu. 


26 


67 


20 


3 


16 


6 


13 


9 


11.0 


31 


43 


60 


28 


ao 


Tues. 


25 


468 


19 


4 


16 


7 


13 


10 


11.3 


33 


45 


61 


20 10 


21 


Wed. 


34 


6 


19 


6 


16 


8 


12 


11 


11.6 


36 


46 


53 


19 57 


22 


Th. 


23 


1 


18 


6 


16 





12 


12 


11.9 


38 


48 


64 


43 


23 


Frid. 


23 


2 


17 


7 


14 


11 


11 


14 


12.1 


30 


60 


67 


» 


21 


Siit. 


22 


3 


17 


9 


13 


12 


10 


15 


12.4 


41 


62 


50 


16 


26 


Snn. 


21 


6 


16 


10 


13 


13 


10 


16 


12.6 


44 


M 


10 


19 1 


26 


Mon. 


20 


6 


16 


11 


12 


14 


9 


17 


12.8 


46 


66 


2 


18 46 


27 


Tues. 


10 


7 


14 


12 


11 


15 


8 


18 


13.1 


48 


68 


4 


90 


28 


Wed. 


18 


8 


14 


13 


11 


16 


8 


19 


13.2 


60 


69 


6 


18 16 


29 


Th. 


18 


10 


13 


15 


10 


17 


7 


20 


13.4 


62 


10 2 


7 


17 60 


80 


Frid. 


17 


11 


12 


16 


9 


19 


6 


22 


13.6 


64 


4 


10 


43 


31 


Sftt 


7 16 


6 12 


7 11 


6 17 


7 8 


5 20l 


17 6 
1 


5 23 


18.7 


66 


10 6 


10 12 


17 28 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






H. M. 8. 






H. M. 8. 


Jan. 1 


I. Disapp. 


8 37 13e. 


Jan. 7 


I. Disapp. 


4 2 12m. 


2 


n. « 


11 3 5'J e. 


8 


I. « 


10 80 34 e. 


8 


I. « 


3 5 31 e. 


10 


n. •* 


1 37 6 m. 


6 


I. ** 


9 33 .55 m. 


10 


I. " 


4 68 62e. 


6 


II. « 


29 SO e. 


12 


I. " 


11 27 16 m. 


7 


m. « 


33 38 m. 


13 


11. *♦ 


2 63 46 e. 


7 


III. Reapp. 


3 4 59 m. 


14 


in. " 


4 31 22m. 



JANUABY, First UOnth. 



15 



Day of 
Month. 


TsNus. 


Mab8. 


Jdhtul 


Satuhit. 


Rises. 


Seta. 


Bises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


1 


H. M. 

7 49 m. 


6 4e. 


H. X. 

5e. 


H. M. 

1 18 m. 


H. X. 

1 16 m. 


H. M. 

24e. 


H. M. 

11 36 e. 


B. M. 

1148 m. 


11 


7 56 m. 


6 26e. 


11 36 m. 


1 4m. 


43 m. 


11 46m. 


10 66 e. 


11 4m. 


21 


7 67 m. 


5 51 e. 


11 10 m. 


51m. 


8 m. 


11 12 m. 


10 17e. 


10 26 m. 



« 


Mooir Run OE Svn. 




Tixx or HiQB Watkb. 






■ 


1 
i 




PHXirOKBirA, 
SUITDATg, HOUDAn, Ac. 


• 

§ 


1. «f 




9 


• 

1 
1 


>* 

• 


i 

g 


• 

I 


|i 




B. M. 


B. X. 


B. K. 


H. X. i 


B. K. 


B. K. 


B. X. 


B. K. 


B. X. 


B. X. 




1 


432 


426 


423 


:4 26i 


9 42 


8 37 


6 21 


1120 


3 43 


436 


CircumeUion, 


2 


526 


6 10 


6 16 


6 17 


10 31 


9 29 


6 13 


morn 


436 


627 


S(ia. gOUN. 




6 14 


6 8 


6 4 


6 6 


11 20 


10 10 


7 3 


13 


5 25 


6 17 




liBSS. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


morn 


11 6 


7 49 


59 


6 11 


7 8 


2d Sundav €tfUr ChrUt- 




631 


6 37 


640 


560 


7 


11 45 


8 29 


1 39 


6 61 


7 43 


[m<u. 




631 


6 36 


a 88 


648 


54 


24 


9 8 


2 19 


7 80 


8 22 


Epifhany, 




732 


7 85 


7 37 


746 


1 80 


1 4 


9 48 


3 1 


8 10 


9 2 






883 


8 86 


8 36 


844 


2 24 


142 


10 26 


3 80 


8 48 


9 40 






086 


86 


9 36 


944 


8 7 


2 21 


11 5 


4 19 


9 27 


10 10 




10 


10 88 


10 88 


10 88 


10 46 


3 60 


3 


11 44 


4 58 


10 


10 58 




;i 


1143 


11 41 


1140 


11 47 


4 36 


3 41 


025 


589 


10 47 


11 89 


ytl Sund, after Epiphafk^, 


12 


mom 


mom 


morn 


mora 


621 


4 29 


1 13 


6 26 


11 85 


27 




U 


61 


48 


046 


52 


6 11 


5 23 


2 7 


7 15 


29 


1 21 


116 C- '2*6 81N. 


14 


2 2 


1 68 


1 66 


2 2 


7 6 


629 


3 13 


8 11 


1 85 


227 




16 


312 


3 7 


8 4 


3 9 


8 2 


7 39 


4 23 


9 22 


245 


887 


h stationary. 


1)6 


421 


4 16 


4 12 


4 16 


3 


8 46 


530 


10 88 


3 51 


444 


'J*D0. 


IT 


624 


6 18 


6 14 


5 17 


10 7 


9 53 


6 37 


11 46 


4 59 


6 51 




18 


620 


6 14 


6 11 


6 16 


11 10 


10 64 


7 38 


49 


6 


6 52 


2d Sund. ajter J^^any. 


ID 


set& 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


10 


11 46 


8 30 


1 40 


6 62 


7 44 




S 


630 


6 42 


644 


6 65 


1 8 


mom 


9 18 


2 29 


7 40 


8 82 


9 and 9 a <r- 6 62S. 


fl 


7 52 


7 64 


7 56 


8 5 


2 1 


34 


10 6 


3 19 


8 28 


020 




22 


4 


9 4 


4 


9 12 


2 52 


1 22 


10 50 


4 4 


9.12 


10 4 




28 


10 12 


10 11 


10 10 


10 17 


8 40 


2 6 


11 34 


448 


9 66 


10 48 




24 


U 18 


11 16 


1116 


11 21 


427 


2 50 


mora 


5 32 


10 40 


11 32 




» 


morn 


mom 


mom 


mom 


6 14 


334 


18 


6 18 


11 26 


morn 


3d Sivnd. after SMphanv, 
<f <5 d. <f 212S: 


26 


022 


10 


17 


23 6 1 


4 20 


1 4 


7 6 


morn 


18 


27 


124 


1 20 


1 17 


1 21 i 6 49 


5 13 


1.67 


7 54 


19 


111 




28 


228 


2 18 


2 15 


2 19 7 37 


6 9 


253 


8 51 


1 15 


2 7 




28 


8 10 


3 13 


3 10 


8 14 


6 26 


7 9 


8 63 


9 61 


2 16 


8 7 


Sd«. S017N. 


ao 


4 10 


4 4 


4 1 


4 4 


! 9 15' 


8 6 


460 


10 40 


3 12 


4 4 


n 


466 


440 


446 


4 48 j 10 3 


9 2 


646 


11 43 


4 8 


6 


9 stationary. 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELUTES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






H. K. 8. 






B. K. 8. 


Jan. 14 


I. Dlsapp. 


6 65 32m. 


Jan. 21 


I. Disapp. 


7 48 60m. 


14 


III. Reapp. 


7 1 46m. 


21 


III. « 


8 29 19m. 


16 


I. Disapp. 


23 54 m. 


21 


III, Reapp. 


10 58 46 m. 


17 


n. « 


4 10 24 m. 


23 


I. Disapp. 


2 17 12 m. 


17 


I. " 


6 52 11 e. 


24 


II. « 


6 43 50 m. 


19 


I. « 


120 34e. 


24 


I. " 


8 45 20e. 


20 


n. « 


6 27 9e. 


26 


I. « 


3 13 62 e. 



16 











PHASES OF THK VOOX. 










F^MooB 






. 3d. ah. ITm. tm. 










LMtQMrtcr 


....~... 


...~..... 


lid. 5h. ZOm^AJU 










N«v]fo(n_ 


......... 




ITd. 9h. 58m. pjl 










TlntQMrter 


— — 


.~— — 


. 2Sd. Th. 2Sm,AM. 










F*rig« 








_ ISd. €h.PJL 










Apogee 


— •••—• 






«*• Mm^^^m ^^1B» A t^^tm 

.-27d. Ih. • 




• 

c 

s 


ii 


f 

Boetao. X.T.-fbOa. 


.BaIt..Waah. 

.1 Sob 

1 


S.Fr'casco. 
Sob 


1 •^''—. 


-ill 
















a 




3 

3L 


: « s i ^ 


1 


2 


Jj 


1 •si asS : 5^ 


3* 

!■ * 






■ 
1 


H.M. 


1 

s. X. .a. ■: B. K. 


ILM. 


I 


<H. K. ' B. X. 


•ILM.' ■.X. ■.«.*■.■."*> ' 




1 


fl^M^A 


•T15 


5 U '7 10.5 IS 


7 7 


,521' 


J * 


524 


0ia9: 9 so 10 8 10 M 17 9 




2 


Xoo. 


1 1^ 


, 15 . 9| 19 


6 


«i 


3 


25 


14J) 10 1. 10 16 16 a 




3 


Tom.* 


1 12 


1 16 < 8 1 a 


5 


23> 


2 


9S 


14J , 4' 13 • 18 : 34 




4' 


Wed. 


1 11 


18 T 


22 


5 


»• 


2 


27! 


1421 • 7* 15 19 16 17 




» 


Th. 


• 10 


19 • • 


23 


4 


26 


1 


28 


143>i 9* 17. 22 15S9 




6 


FHd. 


9 


» 5 


» 


2 


27' 


■7 


29 


14.4 > 11 ' 19 25 1 49 




T 


Sat. 


» 


22 4 


as 


1 


28* 


6 59 


39 


{ 14.4' 14' 22 27 ! 22 




8 


So. 


T 


23 ' 3 


27 


7 


29, 


58 


31 


! I45I' 16* 241 »• 15 3 




9 


Xun., 


5 


ai ; 2 


28 


659 


39) 


57 


32 


145 • 19 i 26 1 31-114 44 




!• 


Tom. 


4 


25 't 


29 


' 58 


31^ 


56 


33 


14^ 21 > 29 3B i S 




11 


WeiL 


3 


27 659 


39 


' ST 


33 


' 55 


35 


145- all 311 a6M4 5 




12 


Th. 


3 


28 58 


32 


. 5« 


34 


54 


36 


145i> 26' 34 38 '134& 




13 


Frid. 


^ •. 


29 57 


33 


55 


35 


53 


37 


145. 29i 96 49'i 25 




14 


Sat. 


6»! 


31 55 34 


53 


». 


51 


38- 


t 14.41 33' 39' 4B :i3 5 




15 


S«- 1 


9* 


32 M* 35 


S3 


37 = 


SO 


39> 


'14.4 35 1 41 : 45 ' 12 44 




16 


MiJQ. 


56 


33 53^ 36 


51 


38 


49' 40< 


143 37: 43; 47 < » 




IT 


Toes. 


So 


34 52 37 


SO 


39 


43< 41 


■143 39 45 49 - 12 i* 




18 


Wed. , 


53; 


36 50 39 


49 


40 


47' 42 


! 142 43 * 49 51 11 42 




19 


Tb. ' 


*2. 


37 49 40 


4^ 


42 


45 


43 


141 4o 51 96 U 21 




a> 


Frid. 


50. 


38 48 41 


46 


« ; 


44 


44 


' 140 4S 53 57 10 50 




21 


Sat. , 


49 


39 46 42 


45 


44 1 


43 


45 


•13.9 SO 56 10 59 ' 38 




22 


So. ' 


47 


41 45 43 


43 


45 > 


42 


46 


, 13.7 ' 54 10 58 11 2 10 M i 




23 


Mod. , , 


45 


42 43 44 


42 


46 : 


41 


47 


13.6 36 U 1 4 9 54 i 


» 


Toiea. 


4t' 


43 42! 46 


40 


47 ; 


39 


48 


' 13.5 10 59 4 1 


SSI 


25 


Wed. 


«■ 


44 49r 47 


» 


48 


38 


49 


13J5 U 1 ' 7 9 ' 9 • 1 


25 


Th. 1 


41- 


46 39* 48 


» 


49 • 


37 


5<) 


13a 5 9 n 


I 847i 


27 


Wtid. [ 


4()- 


41 . 37 49 


36! 


SO 1 


35 51 


13.0 7 13 W 


^ • 251 


2S 


SM. I 


«38 


5 48 638 5 SO 

* 


6 35' 


^".i 


6 34. 5 52. 


i2j$ n 10 u 14 n 16 


.. 8 2 
1 










BCUPS 


BS 01 


' JOT 


TCBTS SAT 


ELUnSL 










Dfcl. 


1 




Tddd 


ke. 


; ^. 


1 

Fhenom. J TimB. 










i 


■. X. 


ai 


■ J 


■. X. 9^ 










JiMB. 1 


!7 ' ILSteppL 


8 


41 e. 


: Feb. 3 1 


IL DbBpBw 10 34 22«. 












» 1 I - 


9 42 


Tm. 


1 4 


L * • U 35 »IB. 












» 1 UL - 




26 


43 e. 


* 


ni. "* ' 4 a I •. 












S ' lll.fteapp. 




255 


Ue. 


I 4 


Ill Kenpp. 6 5136«. 












(0 , LDiBopp. 




4 10 


29 m. 


6 


LDiiM^p. ' 6 3 46IB. 












a EL-^ 




9 17 


25 m. 


7 


U. •* U 51 9IB. 












tt I. « 




10 38 


46 e. 


8 


L '^ , 32 3m. 










7eb. 


2 1. * 




5 7 


8e. 


( 9 : 


L • ! T •25«. 












i 






4 


1 1 


t 







rSBBJXMaSttBMOOL Month. 



17 



Day of 
Month. 


TnruB. 


Mars. 


JUPITBB. 


SATCRir. 

X 


BiBM. 


Bpt«. 


Rlaes. 


Bets. 


HiMS. 


Seta. 


tUwa. 


Seta. 


1 
11 
21 


H. M. 

7 53m. 
7 46m. 
7 35 m. 


H. U. 

6 18e. 

6 42*. 

7 Td. 


H. M. 

10 42 m. 

10 Urn. 

9 56 m. 


H. M. 

38 m. 
2&m. 
flOm. 


B. M. 

11 26^ e. 
lQ4fte. 
10 -de. 


H. M. 

10 30 ra. 
9 52 m. 

12 m. 


H. M. 

9 32e. 
$ 50e. 
8 9e. 


H. v. 

9 42m. 
9 2m. 
8 21m. 



1 

o 


M GOV BiBBB OB Sm. 


1 


Tun or Htob Wa«b. ' 






1 




PmiOMiirA, 

SUHPAT^ H0UDAT8, ftc 


• 


N.Y.- 

Phila. 


it 


Ban 
Fr'dsoo. 


• 

1 
1 


M 

• 


i 




|j 




■. M. 


H. v. 


H. K. 


B. x. 


B. M. 


B. X. 


H. X. 


H. M. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


• 




»34 


5 29 


5 26 


5 28 


10 60 


9 51 


6 35 


mora 


4 67 


5 49 


Septuoffetima Ain<tay. 




6 9 


6 5 


6 8 


6 5 


11 36 


10 38 


7 22 


033 


544 


636 


Purification of B.r.M. 




rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


noru 


11 20 


.8 4 


1 14 


626 


7 18 


9 greatest Hel.lAt.& 




6 28 


28 


6 80 


6 39 


21 


11 59 


843 


1 62 


7 6 


7 57 






7 28 


7 28 


7 80 


7 39 


1 6 


35 


9 19 


230 


7 41 


8 33 






8 31 


8 31 


881 


8 89 


1 50 


112 


9 66 


3 9 


8 18 


9 10 






9 38 


985 


9 84 


9 41 


234 


1 51 


10 36 


348 


8 67 


9 49 


hdC h744N, 




10 48 


10 40 


10 88 


10 44 


820 


2 32 


11 16 


4 30 


088 


10 30 


Sexagetima Sunday. 




11 50 


11 47 


1145 


11 51 


4 8 


3 14 


11 68 


6 12 


10 20 


11 12 


^ greAtest HeL Lat. N. 
9 inf. 6 0. 


10 


mom 


morn 


morn 


mom 


4 59 


4 4 


048 


6 3 


11 10 


2 


u 


58 


064 


51 


56 


5 54 


6 3 


147 


6 67 


9 


1 1 


% stationary. 


12 


2 5 


2 


157 


2 2 


6 51 


6 9 


263 


7 64 


116 


2 7 




U 


3 9 


3 3 


3 


3 5 


7 61 


7 22 


4 6 


9 4 


228 


3 20 




u 


4 


4 1 


3 68 


4 2 


863 


834 


6 18 


10 20 


340 


482 




u 


4 55 


4 50 


4 47 


4 52 


9 53 


938 


622 


11 29 


444 


536 


Quinquaguima Sunday* 


u 


588 


5 34 


632 


6 35 


10 50 


10 37 


7 21 


32 


643 


636 


<^d<l- Q114S. 


17 


seta. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


11 46 


U 27 


8 9 


1 21 


6 33 


7 26 




u 


6 89 


640 


6 41 


6 61 


038 


mom 


8 65 


2 4 


7 17 


8 9 


A$h Wedneidaf. 

9 6^' 96668. 

cf 3aAriBtis:|c(6m2)W. 


19 


7 48 


7 48 


7 49 


7 67 


128 


on 


9 88 


250 


8 


8 62 


90 


859 


8 57 


8 66 


9 8 


2 17 


54 


10 20 


8 83 


8 42 


9 34 


a 


10 6 


19 3 


10 1 


10 7 


8 5 


1 36 


11 2 


4 16 


24 


10 16 




21 


1119 


U 6 


11 4 


11 10 


3 53 


2 18 


1146 


5 


10 8 


11 


la Sunday in Lent. 


tt 


mora 


morn 




mom 


4 42 


3 2 


mom 


6 46 


10 63 


11 45 


^ stationary. 


M 


11 


6 


3 


8 


6 81 


3 47 


31 


636 


11 46 


morn 


St. MaUhiat, 


26 


1 


1 3 


1 


1 4 


620 


4 39 


1 23 


7 23 


mom 


37 




28 


2 2 


1 56 


1 53 


1 56 


7 9 


633 


2 17 


8 15 


89 


1 31 


S (5<I. gOSON. 


sr 


250 


2 44 


2 41 


2 44 


7 67 


6 33 


3 17 


9 14 


1 39 


2 31 


« 


3 32 


327 324 


326 


8 46 


7 31 


4 15 


10 14 


2 37 


3 29 





ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Fhenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Fhenom. 


Time. 






B. K. s. 




» 


B. X. a. 


Wb.ll 


ILDisapp. 


1 8 13m. 


Fab. 18 


n. Disapp. 


8 42 16 m. 


11 


L " 


1 28 4Ze. 


18 


L « 


8 22 fte. 


U 


in. " 


8 21 30e. 


19 


HL « 


19 7 m. 


11 


lU. Keapp. 


10 48 9e. 


19 


III. Roapp. 


2 44 60m. 


13 


I. DIsapp. 


7 67 3m. 


20 


I. Disapp. 


9 60 21m. 


14 


n. « 


2 26 4e. 


21 


n. « 


4 50 He. 


16 


L « 


2 25 20m. 


22 


L " 


418 39 m. 


10 


L " 


8 63 43 e. 


23 


I. « 


10 47 8a. 



18 



MABOfi, 1868. 



PHASES OF THE MOON. 

Fall Moon 6<L 9h. 88m. aji. 

Last Quarter 12d. Ih. 48m. rM. 

New Moon 19d. 9h. 29m. AJC. 

First Quarter 27d. 3h. Mm. <• 

Perigee. KkL Sh. ajc 

Apogee M 27d. 9h. ** 



• 

1 


t 


Boston. 
Sun 


N.Y.-Phila. 

SUD 


Balt.-Wash. 
Son 


S. Fr*ci8CO. 
Sun 


1 


LXHOTH or DATS. 


1^ 
























..* 9 


^ 

1 




r 




1 


1 


1 


• 


s 


• 




1 




it 


0(2 

5* 


• 




H. M. 


II. M. 


H. X. 


H. U. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


R. K. 


o / 


1 


Bwi. 


6 36 


540 


6 35 


6 51 


6 83 


5 62 


6 32 


5 63 


12.6 


11 18 


1110 


1119 


7 80 


2 


Hon. 


3ft 


51 


83 


52 


82 


53 


31 


54 


12.4 


16 


10 


21 


7 17 


3 


Tues. 


83 


62 


31 


63 


80 


54 


29 


66 


12.2 


19 


22 


24 


054 


4 


Wed. 


82 


63 


80 


56 


29 


56 


28 


67 


11.9 


21 


26 


27 


81 


6 


Th. 


30 


54 


28 


56 


27 


67 


26 


68 


11.7 


24 


28 


ao 


6 8 





Frid. 


28 


55 


27 


67 


26 


58 


26 


69 


11.5 


27 


80 


82 


6 44 


7 


Sat 


27 


57 


25 


58 


24 


6 59 


23 


6 


11.2 


80 


33 


85 


6 21 


8 


Baa. 


25 


58 


24 


5 69 


23 


6 


22 


1 


11.0 


83 


36 


87 


468 


9 


1 Mon. 


23 


5 59 


22 


6 


21 


1 


20 


2 


10.7 


86 


38 


40 


84 


10 


Toes. 


21 


6 


20 


1 


20 


2 


19 


3 


10.6 


39 


41 


42 


4 11 


11 


Wed. 


20 


1 


19 


2 


Id 


3 


17 


4 


10.2 


41 


43 


46 


8 47 


12 


Th. 


18 


2 


17 


3 


17 


4 


16 


6 


9.9 


44 


46 


47 


24 


13 


Frid. 


16 


4 


16 


4 


16 


6 


16 


6 


9.7 


48 


48 


60 


3 


14 


Sat. 


15 


5 


14 


6 


14 


6 


14 


7 


9.4 


60 


51 


62 


287 


15 


Bun. 


13 


6 


12 


6 


12 


7 


12 


8 


9.1 


63 


64 


65 


2 13 


16 


Mon. 


U 


7 


11 


7 


11 


8 


11 


9 


8.8 


60 


11 66 


11 67 


1 48 


17 


Tues. 


9 


8 





9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


8.6 


11 69 


12 


12 


25 


18 


Wed. 


8 


9 


8 


10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


8.2 


12 1 


2 


3 


1 2 


19 


Th. 


6 


11 


6 


11 


6 


11 


6 


11 


7.9 


6 


6 


6 


88 


20 


Frid. 


4 


12 


4 


12 


4 


12 


4 


.12 


7.6 


8 


8 


8 


8.14 


21 


Sat. 


3 


18 


3 


13 


3 


13 


8 


13 i 


7-3 


10 


10 


10 


N. 9 


22 


Bnn. 


6 1 


14 


1 


14 


6 1 


14 


1 


14: 


7.0 


18 


13 


13 


83 


23 


Mon. 


5 69 


16 


5 59 


15 


559 


15 


6 59 


15 


6.8 


16 


16 


16 


61 


24 


Tues. 


67 


16 


68 


16 


68 


16 


58 


16 


6.4 


19 


18 


18 


1 29 


25 


Wed. 


66 


17 


56 


17 


56 


17 


56 


17 


6.1 


21 


21 


21 


1 44 


26 


Th. 


M 


18 


64 


18 


65 


18 


56 


18 


6.8 


24 


24 


23 


2 8 


27 


Frid. 


62 


20 


53 


19 


53 


19 


63 


19 


5.6 


28 


26 


26 


81 


28 


Sat. 


50 


21! 


51 


20 


62 


20 


62 


20 


6.2 


31 


29 


28 


264 


29 


Bhh. 


40 


221 


60 


21 


60 


20 


60 


20 


4.9 


33 


31 


80 


8 1$ 


90 


Mon. 


47 


23! 


48 


22 


48 


21 


40 


21 


AA 


86 


84 


83 


841 


31 


Tues. 


5 46 


624 


6 46 


623 


5 47 


622j 


6 47 


621 


4.3 


12^9 


12 37 


12 86 


4 4 



XCIJPSBS OF JUPITER'S SATELUTES. 



D»y. 


Phenam. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


.Time. 


Ftob. 25 
25 
26 
26 
27 
28 

Mar. 1 


IL Disapp. 
I. « 
III. " 
III. Reapp. 
I. Disapp. 

n. « 

L " 


H. K. 8. 

6 16 32m. 
6 15 20 e. 
4 17 26 m. 

6 42 13 m. 
11 43 42 m. 

7 83 82e. 
6 12 Om. 


Mar. 3 


LDisapp. 

I. «* 
111. « 
ni. Reapp. 
LDisapp. 

n. « 


H. K. 1. 

40 24 m. 
8 61 Im. 

7 8 43e. 

8 15 18 m. 
10 89 9m. 

187 6e. 
10 8 6e. 



MABOB, VbiiA' Month. 



19 





Vbwus. 


Mars. 


Jt^ITSB. 


Saturit. 


Mn 






1 




Day c 

Mont 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. . 


1 


H. X. 

7 26m. 


H. M. 

7 25e. 


H. M. 

9 37 m. 


H. V. 

13m. 


a. M. 

9 S2e. 


H. V. 

8 40 m. 


B. x. 
7 36e. 


H. X. 

7 49m. 


11 


7 16 m. 


7 4fte. 


9 18 m. 


3 m. 


8 49 e. 


7 69m. 


6 62e. 


7 8m. 


21 


7 4m. 


8 12». 


9 Om. 


iiese. 


8. 5e. 


7 17 m. 


6 13e. 


81m. 



• 

.a 


Mooir Rises oh S<ts. 


• 

m 

5 


Tixx OF Hiaa Water. 


1 


1 




1 

a 




PaSNOXKITA. 

Sundays, Houdayb, Ac 


a 




1 • 


; 


e 


a 






4> 

© . 


- 


o 

,1 


* J3 


?1 


4 


1 


S 


• 


i 




r a 
»2 ■** 


_ 




H. X. 


a. X. 


H. X. 


a. X. 


a. X. 


a. X. 


R. X. 


a. X. 


a. X. 


a. X. 




1 


4 8 


4 4 


4 1 


4 2 


9 31 


8 28 


6 12 


11 8 


3 34 


4 26 


2d Sunday in ttMt. ' 


2 


4 42 


438 


436 


438 


10 17 


9 19 


6 8 


11 58 


4 25 


6 17 


• 


3 


6 10 


5 8 


5 7 


6 10 


11 1' 


10 5 


6 49 


morn 


5 11 


6 8 


, 


4 


5 37 


5 35 


5 34 


5 36 


11 46 


10 49 


7 30 


44 


5 55 


6 47 


Ointj. 


5 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


morn 


11 29 


8 18 


1 28 


6.35 


7 27 




6 


7 26 


7 25 


7 25 


7 33 


31 


5 


8 49 


1 58 


7 11 


8 3 


• 


7 


8 33 


8 31 


8 30 


8 37 


1 17 


45 


9 29 


2 40 


7 51 


8 43 


h (5 C . h 7 44 N. 
3<2 Sunday in ZmL 


8 


9 41 


938 


9 36 


9 42 


2 6 


1 25 


10 9 


3 22 


8 31 


9 'J8 


9 


10 50 


10 46 


10 43 


10 48 


2 56 


2 9 


10 53 


4 7 


9 15 


10 7 




10 


11 57 


11 52 


U 49 


11 64 


8 50 


2 67 


11 41 


4 55 


10 3 


10 55 


(f (5^'T«iriS|c(2m.7)lL. 
cf c5^'TAtiri>|c(Om.8)S. 


11 


mom 


mom 


morn 


mom 


446 


3 50 


34 


5 49 


10 56 


11 48 


12 


1 


54 


61 


56 


5 44 


4 62 


1 86 


6 46 


11 68 


50 




13 


1 59 


1 53 


1 50 


1 54 


644 


6 1 


2 45 


7 47 


1 7 


1 59 




U 


2 50 


245 


2 42 


2 45 


7 43 


7 12 


3 56 


8 54 


2 18 


3 10 


9 In aphelion. 


15 


3 33 


3 29 


327 


330 


8 40 


8-21 


6 5 


10 7 


3 2r 


4 19 


Uh Sunday in LmU 


16 


4 10 


4 7 


4 5 


4 9 


9 84 


9 21- 


6 6 


11 12 


4 27 


5 19 




17 


4 44 


4 43 


4 41 


444 


10 26 


10 14 


6 68 


8 


5 20 


6 12 


St. JPalride. 


18 


5 15 


5 14 


6 14 


5 18 


11 16 


11 8 


7 47 


57 


6 9 


7 1 


* 


19 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


6 


11 44 


8 28 


1 38 


6 50 


7 42 


St. Joseph, 


20 


7 45 


7 43 


7 42 


7 49 


54 


mora 


9 9 


2 19 


7 31 


8 23 


enters rp. 
$C5C. 9 41SB. 


21 


8 51 


8 48 


8 46 


8 62 


1 43 


25 


9 50 


3 8 


8 12 


9 4 


22 


9 65 


•9 51 


948 


9 53 


2 32 


1 6 


10 32 


4 4 


8 54 


9 46 


FiiKiion Sunday. 


23 


10 56 


10 61 


10 48 


10 52 


3 21 


1 48 


11 17 


4 46 


9 39 


10 31 


h 9 0. 


2i 


11 62 


11 46 


11 43 


11 47 


4 11 


2 33 


morn 


6 31 


10 24 


11 16 


<f 6<L' (f IMN. 


25 


room 


mom 


morn 


mom 


5 1 


3 18 


2 


6 16 


11 IS 


mom 


AnnuncimUon of B. V. M. 


26 


42 


36 


33 


36 


5 50 


4 7 


51 


7 5 


morn 


6 




27 


1 26 


1 21 


1 18 


1 20 ! 


6 38 


6 


1 44 


7 54 


7 


58 




28 


2 5 


2 


1 6T 


1 59 


7 24 


6 57 


2 41 


8 43 


1 8 


1 56 


• 


29 


2 39 


235 


2 33 


2 35 


8 10 


6 52 


3 36 


9 34 


1 58 


2 60 


Ptilm Sundcty. 


90 


3 10 


3 7 


3 6 


3 7 


8 54 


7 48 


4 32 


10 26 


2 54 


3 46 




31 


3 88 


8 36 


336 


3 88 

( 


9 39 


840 


5 24 


11 19 


846 


4 88 


9lnQ. 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATBLLITSS. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Pbe|K»iL 


Time. 






a. X. s. 






a. X. g. 


Mar. 8 


I. Disapp. 


8 5 25 m. 


Mar. 16 


n. Disapp. 


42 65 m. 


10 


I. « 


2 33 50 m. 


16 


I. " 


9 68 53 m. 


11 


n. « 


11 25 44 m. 


17 


I. « 


4 27 19 m. 


11 


I. « 


9 2 9e. 


18 


II. « 


2 43e. 


12 


ni. « 


13 26 e. 


18 


I. « 


10 65 40 e. 


12 


Ui. Reapp, 


2 36 23e. 


19 


in. « 


4 11 8e. 


18 


I. Disapp. 


8 30 32 e. 


19 


lil.Heapp. 


6 38 10 e. 



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a 



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« 


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aalL 


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m 


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9HBk 


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Xun. 


35 


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T 


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32 


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all 


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Th. ' 


30 


34 


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36 


H 


aiiit^ i 


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li 


9mb^ 


25 


38 


13 


Xun. 


23, 


39 


14 


Tubs. I 


221 


4a 


15 


W«L 


29 


41 


16 


Th. 


18 


42 


17 


Frid. 


rrt 


4S 


IS 


SiUL 


13 


44 


19 


9bb^ ' 


U 


45 


2D 


Man. 


12 


48 


a 


Tmb. 


lU 


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22 


Wed.1 


» 


49 


23 


Th. 


7 


50 


^ 


Rid. 1 


« 


51 


^i 


aac 1 


41 


52 


28 1 




3 


53 


27' 


Xun. 


1. 


54 


2» 


Tom , 


5 


55 


2» 


Wad. 


45»i 


58 


30 


Th. 


457 


6 38 



t5 

I 



4fi 
43 
4L 
40 
38 

atr 

35 
33 
32 
30 

2» 

2sr 

25 

24 

22. 

21 

191 

18' 

»j 

Ifit 

14 
12. 
U 

9" 

?i 

5' 

4 

2' 

ll 



a.. M.|'B. M. 

8 24 .7 4fi 

26;| 44 
28 

27. 

2Sii 

29 



30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
^ I 

43 I 

44 t 

45 t 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 

52 ; 

53 I 

8 54,1 



4SL 

39 

37 

38 

34 

33 

31 

30 

28 

27 

25, 

24 

22: 

21 

29| 

181 

17 1 

la 

14 

13| 

III 

I0| 

T) 
81 
5 
3, 



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24 

25i 
tS| 
27' 
28< 
29 ' 

3o; 

311 

32 1 
33> 
34| 
35i 
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37, 
38 
39 
40i 
41> 
42 
43 
44 
45' 
48. 
47 
48 
48, 
48| 
50 
8 5li 



5 



46 

45i 

43 

42. 

40 > 

38' 

37. 

35 

34 

32 

31 

29 

28 

2Bi 

25. 

23[ 

22 

2D| 

19i 

17 

16" 

la. 
13 

12, 
11 
9 

8 
7 

5, 



H. M. 

8 22 
23 
24 
25 
28 
21 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
43 
44 
46 
4S 

4r 

48 

48 
8 4U, 



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3.7i| 

3.4i| 

3.1.1 

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2.5); 

2^1 1 

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1.6) 

1.3 

0.8] 
0.5 1 
8.3) 

Q O.UJi 
(1159.8;' 
I 59.61 1 
I 69.31 1 
I 59.1 , 
I 58.DH 
58.7 I 
I SS.Jt , 
I 58.3i| 

i ^-^ I 

57.DI I 

i 57.7 

I 57.61 
1 57.4, 
I 57.21 13 
,11 57.1; 14 



42 

44| 

47 

51| 

53, 

56{ 

591 
2 
4. 
7 

ID 

13 

16 

18 

21 

24 



31, 

34 

38. 

4D. 

43| 

46i 

50 
??. 

57 : 

1 



a. 
12 



12 
13 



13 



39 
42 
46 
47 
50 
52 
56 
58 



3 

5 

8 

n 

13, 

2S| 

281 

28< 

30 j 

33 

36 '' 

3B| 

41, 

43 

48 

40 

51 

53, 



12 

13 



s. 9. 
12 38 
40 
43 
46 
48 
51 
53 
56 
38 
1 
3 
8 
8 

g 

16 
IS 
29 
23 
25 
28 
aD 
32 
36 
37 
38 

4e 

4S 
45 
48 



42B 
451 
5 14 

5 37j 
8 



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X 



9 

jlO 

10 

11 



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7 
30 

7 52 

8 JA 
36 

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27 

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27 

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KLIF9B €9 JUWSESSeS SAXMULEEMk 



Ifcjf. 


Tttmiiiiii^ 


^rflH^^ 


Ifcjf- 


FuflDOID* 










K ■. & 






H. v. &. 


afcB.2D 


L Steapp. 


5 24 4e. 


Sbi:.29 


XLJKm^p, 


5 53 19 m. 


22 


n. •* 


3 17 SBm. 


29 


L ** 


146 4a. 


22 


L * 


n 52 26 m. 


31 


L •* 


$■ 14 .12111. 


24 


L * 


8 20 33 m. 


iVC 1 


EL * 


7 U 2»a. 


2B 


EL » 


4 35 38e. 


2 


L * 


2 4U36m. 


28 


L * 


a 40 loin. 


3 


EEL * 


8 dim. 


28 


TTT » 


8 8 31a. 


3 


L •*- 


»U 22 a. 


a 


L - 


T17 40a. 


5 

1 


IL " 


ft2»5<im. 



APRIL, Foiurth Month. 



21 



Day of 
Month 




1 


^tf . 


1 




CI > ^w 




YXRUB. 


Mab0. 




SATtmr. 


BiM0. 


Sets. 


Rlsea. 


Sets. 


BlBM. 


Sets. 


Rifles. 


Sets. 


1 
11 
21 


H. M. 

6 63 m. 
6 46 m. 
6 42m. 


H. M. 

8 38e. 
^26 e. 


H. N. 

8 40 m. 
8.24 m. 
8 10 m. 


H. M. 

11 42 e. 
U 33 e. 
11 22o. 


H. M. 

7 16 e. 
6 29e. 
643 e. 


H. v. 

6 32 m. 
6 50 m. 
6 7m. 


B. M. 

6 21e. 
4 38 e. 
B 66 e. 


H. M. 

6 41m. 
6 Om. 
4 19 m. 



• 

5 


MooH RisBB Oft S>n. 


• 


Tna or Hiob Watir. 




s 

1 




1 




pBEiroioirA, 

SUBDATS, H0UDAT8, Ac. 


• 




a . 


6 


• 

a 


• 






t . 


1 


1 


N.Y.- 

Pbila 


il 


4 


S 


1 


• 

S5 


i 




Charl 
ton 


* 




H. v. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. X. 


B. X. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. 


B. X. 


1 

B. K. 




1 


4 6 


4 4 


4 4 


4 8 


10 24 


9 28 


6 12 


mora 


434 


6 26 




2 


431 


4 32 


4 32 


436 


11 10 


10 13 


6 57 


7 


5 19 


6 11 




8 


6 


6 1 


6 2 


6 7 


11 68 


10 57 


7 41 


61 


6 3 


6 66 


Oood Friday. 

9 greatest flel. Lat. 8. 


4 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


mora 


11 38 


8 22 


1 32 


644 


7 86 


6 


8 38 


8 34 


8 32 


8 39 


49 


20 


9 4 


2 14 


7 28 


8 18 


Eiuter Sunday, 


6 


9 48 


9 43 


9 40 


94^ 


1 43 


1 6 


9 60 


3 3 


8 12 


9 4 




7 


10 64 


10 48 


10 46 


10 60 


2 40 


1 64 


10 88 


3 52 


9 


9 52 


(f<5g. cfiaoi^. 


8 


11 63 


11 48 


11 46 


11 49 


3 40 


2 47 


11 31 


4 46 


9 53 


10 46 




9 


mom 


mom 


mom 


mora 


4 39 


3 43 


27 


6 42 


10 49 


11 41 




10 


47 


42 


39 


42 


6 38 


4 44 


1 28 


6 39 


11 50 


42 




11 


1 32 


1 28 


1 26 


1 28 


635 


5 51 


235 


7 38 


57 


1 49 




12 


2 10 


2 7 


2 6 


2 8 


7 29 


6 57 


3 41 


R 39 


2 3 


2 56 


Lout Sunday. 


U 


244 


242 


2 41 


2 44 


8 20 


7 59 


448 


944 


3 6 


3 67 




14 


3 15 


3 14 


3 14 


3 18 


9 10 


8 67 


6 41 


10 44 


4 3 


4 56 




U 


344 


345 


3 46 


3 49 


9 68 


9 47 


6 31 


11 39 


4 63 


6 45 




16 


4 12 


4 14 


4 16 


4 20 


10 46 


10 34 


7 18 


29 


5 40 


6 82 




17 


4 41 


444 


446 


462 


11 34 


11 19 


8 3 


1 13 


6 26 


7 17 


96C- {^4418. 


18 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


23 


11 58 


8 42 


1 61 


7 4 


7 56 




19 


8 41 


8 36 


8 33 


8 38 


1 12 


mora 


9 24 


2 36 


7 46 


8 38 


2d Sunday ajler Batter. 


» 


940 


34 


9 31 


9 36 


2 2 


40 


10 7 


3 20 


8 29 


9 21 


snp. d 0. 9 c5 « • 
9c5-<4'Tinni*(6ni.l)'«r. 


2i 


10 33 


10 27 


10 24 


10 27 


263 


1 28 


10 61 


4 6 


9 13 


10 6 


22 


11 20 


11 14 


11 11 


11 14 


3 42 


2 7 


11 36 


4 50 


9 68 


10 60 


cf c! d. <f310N. 


SS 


mora 


11 65 


11 62 


11 66 


430 


2 62 


mora 


6 36 


10 43 


11 35 


9 (?;^Taori*(lni.9)«. 
SLMark. 


14 





mom 


mom 


mora 


6 17 


3 37 


21 


6 23 


11 SI 


mora 


25 


36 


32 


30 


32 


6 3 


426 


1 9 


7 7 


morn 


28 


36 


1 8 


1 5 


1 3 


1 6 


6 47 


5 16 


1 69 


7 63 


21 


1 13 


Sd Sunday ajUr Eader. 
$ in peribeuon. 


27 


187 


1 35 


1 aA 


1 37 


7 31 


6 8 


2 62 


8 44 


1 14 


2 6 


2B 


2 5 


2 4 


2 3 


2 6 


8 15 


7 2 


346 


9 40 


2 8 


3 




20 


231 


2 31 


2 31 


2 36 


9 


7 66 


4 39 


10 34 


3 1 


3 58 




» 


258 


2 69 


3 


d 5 


9 47 


8 47 


6 81 


11 26 


3 63 


445 


h <5 <r. h7 56N. 





SGLIP8ES OX* JUPIXER'S SAT1SLLITE8. 

• 




Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






B. U. 8. 






B. X. 8. 


Apr. 5 


I. Dlsapp. 


3 39 47 e. 


Apr. 14 


LReajpp. 


2 10 27 e. 


r 


L • 


10 8 16m. 


16 


2 48 24 m. 


8 


n. « 


9 47 13 e. 


16 


I. " 


8 88 53 m. 





I. « 


4 36 42m. 


17 


in. " 


10 22 28 m. 


10 


in. « 


4 6 4m. 


18 


I. " 


3 7 20m. 


10 


I. " 


11 5 10 e. 


19 


n. " 


4 5 56e. 


12 


n. " 


11 4 47 m. 


19 


L « 


9 86 47 e. 


12 


U. Reapp. 


1 30 6e. 


21 


L « 


4 4 18e. 



82 



MAY» 1663. 



PHASES OF THE MOON. 

FuU Moon 3d. 9h. 44m. A.M. 

Last Quarter lOd. 2h. 8m. " 

New Moon - 17d. llh. 40m. « 

Fint Quarter 254. 3h. 39m. P.]f. 

Perigee. ed. Ih. aji. 

Apogee 21d. 9h. pjf. 



• 




Boston. 


N.Y.-PhUa. 


Balt.-Wa8h. 


S. Fr'cisco. 


• 










1 




Sun 


Sun 


Sun 


Sun 


a 

1 


^tUrOTB Of ilATS. 


Sun's Dec 
Nortb. 


















• 








1 


1 


i 




• 


1 




1 


• 
■D 

1 


a 


a 


^1 


it 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. v. 


H. M. H. X. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. X. 


9. M, 


H. M. 


o r 


1 


Frid. 


4 56 


6 69 


6 


6 65 


6 2 


6 62 


5 4 


6 49 


11 67.0 


14 8 


18 66 
13 67 


18 60 


16 1 


2 


Sat. 


56 


7 


4 50 


66 


1 


63 


3 


60 


66.8 


6 


' 62 


19 


S 


Sun. 


63 


1 


67 


67 


6 


64 


2 


61 


66.7 


8 


14 


64 


87 


4 


Mon. 


62 


2 


66 


68 


4 59 


56 


1 


62 


56.6 


10 


2 


66 


16 64 


6 


Tues. 


61 


3 


66 


6 59 


67 


66 


6 


63 


56.6 


12 


4 


13 69 


16 11 


6 


Wed. 


49 


4 


64 


7 


66 


67 


4 69 


54 


66.4 


16 


6 


14 1 


28 


7 


Th. 


48 


6 


53 


1 


65 


68 


68 


66 


56.4 


17 


8 


3 


16 45 


8 


Frid. 


47 


6 


62 


2 


64 


6 59 


67 


66 


66.3 


19 


10 


6 


17 2 


9 


Sat. 


46 


7 


60 


3 


63 


7 


66 


67 


66.2 


21 


13 


7 


18 


10 


Sun. 


46 


8 


49 


4 


62 


1 


65 


58 


66.2 


23 


16 


9 


34 


11 


Mon. 


43 


10 


48 


6 


61 


2 


64 


6 59 


66.2 


27 


17 


11 


17 4a 


12 


Tues. 


42 


11 


47 





60 


3 


63 


7 


66.1 


29 


19 


13 


18 .5 


13 


Wed. 


41 


12 


46 


7 


49 


4 


62 


1 


66.1 


3] 


21 


15 


20 


14 


Th. 


40 


13 


46 


8 


48 


6 


61 


2 


56.1 


33 


28 


17 


85 


16 


Frid. 


39 


14 


44 


9 


47 


6 


60 


3 


56.1 


36 


26 


19 


18 49 


16 


Sat. 


38 


16 


43 


10 


46 


6 


49 


3 


66.1 


37 


27 


2Q 


19 3 


17 


Sun. 


87 


16 


42 


10 


46 


7 


48 


4 


68.1 


39 


28 


n 


17 


18 


Mon. 


36 


17 


42 


11 


45 


8 


48 


6 


66.2 


41 


29 


23 




19 


Tues. 


36 


18 


41 


12 


44 


9 


47 


6 


66.2 


43 


81 


25 


43 


20 


Wed. 


84 


19 


40 


13 


43 


10 


46 


7 


66.3 


46 


38 


27 


19 66 


21 


Th. 


83 


20 


39 


14 


42 


11 


46 


8 


66.3 


47 


86 


29 


20 '9 


22 


Frid. 


83 


21 ' 


38 


15 


42 


12 


46 


9 


66.4 


48 


87 


30 


21 


23 


Sat. 


32 


22 


37 


16 


41 


13 


44 


10 


66.6 


60 


89 


32 


82 


M 


Swk 


81 


23 


37 


17 


40 13 


43 


10 


66.5 


62 


40 


33 


44 


25 


Mon. 


30 


23 


36 


18 


40 


14 


43 


11 


66.6 


63 


42 


34 


20 66 


29 


Tnee. 


30 


24 


36 


18 


39 


15 


42 


12 


66.7 


64 


43 


36 


21 5 


27 


Wed. 


29 


25 


36 


19 


38 


16 


41 


13 


66.8 


66 


44 


38 


IQ 


28 


Th. 


28 


26 


34 


20 


38 


17 i 


41 


14 


67.0 


68 


46 


39 


26 


29 


Frid. 


28 


27 


34 


21 


37 


17 


40 


14 


67.1 


14 69 


47 


40 


35 


30 


Sat. 


27 


28 


33 


22 


37 


18 


40 


15 


57.2 


15 1 


49 


41 


49 


81 


Bun. 


427 


7 29 


4 33 


7 22 


436 


7 19' 


4 40 


7 16 


11 57.3 


16 2 


14 49 


14 43 


21 63 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






H. M. 8. 






H. M. 8. 


Apr. 23 


I. Reapp. 


6 24 23 m. 


Apr. 30 


11. Reapp. 


8 a6m. 


23 


I. « 


10 32 45 OL 


30 


I. « 


26 44e. 


24 


in. " 


2 20 8e. 


May 1 


ni. « 


6 18 6e. 


26 


I. » 


6 1 16m. 


2 


I. « 


6 65 15 m. 


26 


n. « 


6 42 Oe. 


3 


n. « 


9 18 18 e. 


26 


I. " 


11 29 43e. 


4 


I. « 


1 28 44 m. 


28 


I. « 


6 68 15 e. 


5 


I. « 


7 62 18 e. 



MAT, nflb Konth. 



1^ 



Day of 
Month. 


Vbsuh. 


Mam. 


JmnriB. 


SATURir. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets* ■ 


Rises. 


Sets. 


1 
11 
21 


B. X. 

« 43 m. 
60 m. 
7 2m. 


tf. v. 
486. 

10 4e. 

10 17 0. 


B. It. 

7 68m. 

7 4dm. 

. 7 3dm. 


H. M. 

11 10 6. 

10 5de. 
10 41 e. 


B. M. 

4 58 e. 
4 14e. 
3 31e. 


■. v. 
4 25 m. 

3 42 m. 

8 Im. 


■. M. 

8 18 e. 

2 32 e. 
1 52 e. 


H. M. 

8 89 m. 
2 58 m. 
2 18 m. 



• 

5 


Moor Sms oft #M8. 


1 


Tixx of High Watxb. 




s 




1 




Sundays, Houdaii, Ac. 


1 




Balt.- 
Wash. 


4 


• 


• 

in 


s 


i 


Charles- 
ton. 




H. Jf. 


H. M. 


B. X. 


H. X. 


H. M. 


B. X. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


a. X. 


H. K. 




1 


82S 


3 29 


8 31 


837 


10 37 


9 36 


6 19 


mora 


4 41 


6 38 


SU, Philip and JoH^, 


2 


3 57 


4 1 


4 3 


4 9 


11 31 


10 26 


7 9 


20 


5 31 


6 28 


. 


8 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


morn 


11 14 


7 68 


1 8 


6 20 


7 12 


Uh Sunday a/Ur Stuter, 


4 


8 39 


8 84 


8 31 


8 37 


28 


2 


8 46 


1 65 


7 8 


8 


9 in perihelion. 
9 cS S- 913QN. 


5 


9 46 


9 40 


937 


9 42 


1 28 


61 


935 


248 


7 57 


8 49 


6 


10 42 


10 37 


10 34 


10 39 


2 30 


1 45 


10 29 


343 


8 51 


9 43 


7 


11 31 


11 26 


11 23 


11 26 


3 31 


2 38 


11 22 


4 36 


9 44 


10 36 




8 


mom 


mom 


morn 


morn 


430 


3 36 


1& 


5 33 


10 41 


11 33 


9 greatest Hel. Ut N. 





12 


6 


6 


1.0 9 


5 26 


4 32 


1 16 


6 29 


11 88 


030 




K) 


046 


44 


043 


046 


6 18 


5 31 


2 ir. 


7 21 


37 


1 29 


Uh Sundaif qfUr EasUr, 


11 


1 17 


1 16 


1 16 


120 


7 7 


632 


3 10 


8 14 


1 88 


230 




12 


1 47 


1 47 


147 


1 61 


7 66 


730 


4 14 


9 13 


236 


3 28 




13 


2 U 


2 16 


2 17 


222 


8 42 


8 26 


5 10 


10 12 


3 82 


4 24 




U 


243 


240 


248 


254 


930 


9 18 


6 2 


11 6 


424 


5 16 


Aicauion Ikip. 


15 


3 14 


3 18 


3 20 


3 27 


10 17 


10 6 


6 60 





5 12 


6 4 




16 


3 47 


3 62 


3 55 


4 3 


11 6 


10 63 


7 87 


47 


5 60 


6 51 


\ 


17 


seta. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


11 66 


11 36 


8 19 


1 29 


6 41 


7 33 


Sunday <^fter Agtfention, 


18 


8 25 


8 10 


8 16 


8 19 


45 


morn 


9 1 


2 11 


7 28 


8 15 


$c5g. U210N. 

6 grw^test elong. 22 16 E. 

96a. 9446N. 


19 


9 13 


9 8 


9 5 


9 8 


1 35 


17 


944 


2 57 


8 6 


8 68 


20 


9 57 


9 62 


9 49 


9 51 


224 


1 


10 26 


3 39 


8 48 


9 40 


21 


10 35 


10 31 


10 28 


10 30 


3 12 


1 42 


11 9 


4 23 


9 31 


10 23 


<f()<[. cf440N. 

9 (3cGem.:|c(2m.3)W. 


22 


11^ 9 


11 5 


11 3 


11 6 


3 58 


2 25 


11 51 


5 5 


10 13 


11 5 


28 


11 39 


11 36 


11 34 


11 36 


442 


3 7 


morn 


5 47 


10 65 


11 47 




U 


mom 


mom 


morn 


morn 


5 26 


3 40 


33 


6 30 


11 39 


mom 


WMUundayt or JRsnfeooft 


25 





4 


3 


6 


6 9 


4 33 


1 17 


7 14 


morn 


31 




26 


81 


31 


31 


35 


6 52 


5 23 


2 7 


7 69 


29 


1 21 


9 greatest Hel. Lat. N. 


27 


67 


88 


68 


1 3 


7 37 


6 16 


2 59 


8 52 


1 21 


2 13 


h 6<l- h766N. 


28 


1 25 


1 27 


1 28 


133 


8 25 


7 10 


3 54 


9 50 


2 16 


3 8 




29 


1 66 


1 68 


2 


2 6 


; 9 15 


8 6 


4 49 


10 50 


3 11 


4 3 


-Udd' '^646N. 


SO 


2 29 


283 


236 


244 


; 10 11 


9 2 


6 46 


11 61 


4 8 


5 




31 


3 


3 15 


3 18 


3 27 


11 10 


9 68 


6 42 


morn 


5 4 


5 56 


Trinity Sunday. 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



D*y. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






H. X. s. 






H. X. 8. 


May 7 


n. Reapp. 


10 37 2m. 


May 12 


I. Reapp. 


9 46 27 e. 


7 


I. " 


2 20 49 e. 


14 


IL " 


1 13 40 e. 


8 


111. uisapp. 


7 69 48 e. 


14 


I. " 


4 15 Oe. 


8 


Ul.Heapp. 


10 15 40 e. 


15 


in.IM84>p. 


. 11 58 15e. 


9 


L " 


8 49 21 m. 


16 


in. Reapp. 


2 13 15 m. 


10 


n. « 


11 54 49e. 


16 


I. « 


lot 43 33 m. 


11 


I. « 


3 17 62 m. 


18 


II. " 


2 31 31 m. 



it 



JUNO, 1868/ 



PHASES OV THB MOON. 

Fun Moon ^ Id. Oh. 22m. tm, 

liOst QaBrter...M«..«M...>. m....*.. 8d. 8h. 4^b«a.k. 

New Moon 16d. 2h. 28m. ** 

first Quarter 24d. Hi. 28m. ** 

Perigee '3d. 2h. AM, 

Apogee -. 18d. fih. « 



■ J 



I 



I 



Boston. 
Son 



5 
(2 



N.T^Philft. 
Son 



OQ 



Balt.-Wa8h. 
Sun' 



.a 



OQ 



S. Vr'cisco. 
Sun 






5 
& 



I 
I 

ta 



IMKQKB «f J^JSa. 



ta 

I 



ii6 



a"** 2 








H. X. 


H. M. 


H. M.' 


H. X. 


H. X. 


H. M. 


H. X. 


H. M. 


H. K. 


1 


Mon. 


420 


7 29 


4 32 


7 28 


480 


7 19 


440 


7 10 


11 67.6 


2 


Tnes. 


20 


30 


32 


24 


30 


20 


39 


10 


67.6 


8 


Wed: 


26 


81 


31 


24 


36 


21 


30 


17 


67.8 


4 


Th. 


26 


31 


31 


26 


36 


21 


39 


17 


68.0 


6 


FHd. 


24 


32 


31 


20 


34 


22 


38 


18 


68.1 


6 


Sat. 


24 


38 


30 


20 


34 


23 


38 


19 


68.3 


7 


Suir 


24 


34 


30 


27 


31 


23 


38 


19 


68.6 


8- 


Mon. 


28 


84 


30 


28 


84 


24 


38 


20 


68.7 


9 


Tnes. 


23 


36 


30 


28 


83 


24 


37 


20 


68.9 


10 


Wed. 


28 


36 


29 


29 


33 


25 


37 


21 


69.1 


U 


Th. 


23 


30 


29 


29 


33 


25 


37 


21 


69.2 


12 


Frid. 


23 


30 


29 


30 


33 


20 


37 


22 


69.6 


13 


Sat. 


$ 


37 


29 


'80 


33 


20 


37 


22 


69.7 


14 


Sub. 


87 


29 


31 


33 


27 


37 


23 


11 69.9 


16 


Mon. 


28 


38 


29 


31 


33 


27 


37 


23 


0.1 


16 


Tues. 


23 


38 


29 


31 


33 


28 


37 


24 


0.3 


IT 


Wed. 


23 


89 


29 


32 


33 


28 


37 


24 


0.5 


18 


Tb. 


28 


39 


29 


82 


33 


28 


37 


24 


0.7 


19 


Frid. 


28 


89 


30 


32 


33 


28 


37 


24 


0.9 


20 


Sat. 


38 


30 


30 


33 


34 


29 


88 


25 


1J2 


^ 


Shb, 


28 


40 


30 


33 


34 


29 


88 


25 


1.4 


Mon. 


28 


40 


30 


33 


84 


29 


88 


25 


1.6 


23 


Tues. 


24 


40 


30 


83 


84 


29 


38 


26 


1.8 


24 


Wed. 


24 


40 


31 


33 


86 


29 


30 


25 


2.0 


26 


Th. 


24 


40 


31 


33 


86 


30 


39 


20 


2J2 


20 


Frid. 


26 


40 


31 


34 


86 


30 


39 


20 


2.6 


27 


Sat. 


26 


40 


32 


34 


30 


30 


40 


20 


2.7 


28 


8u. 


25 


40 


32 


34 


30 


30 


40 


20 


2.9 


29 


Mon. 


26 


40 


32 


34 


30 


80 


40 


20 


3.1 


80 


Tues. 


420 


7 40 


4 33 


7 34 


437 


7 30 


441 


720 


3.8 



H. X. 

16 8 

4 



6 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

12 

18 

18 

14 

14 

16 

16 

10 

10 

10 

10 

17 

17 

10 

10 

10 

15 

16 

16 

14 

16 14 



14 61 

62 

63 

64 

66 

66 

67 

68 

14 68 

U 



1 

1 

8 

2 

2 

S 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

2 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

18 1 



•14 43 
44 
40 
48 
48 
48 
49 
iO 
61 
68 
IS 
68 
68 
64 
64 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
64 
66 
66 
64 
64 
64 

14 68 



22 2 
10 
18 
86 
82 
88 
44 
iO 

22 86 

23 • 
8 
• 

18 
18 
18 
21 
88 
8ft 
88 
87 
2T 
27 
87 



81 
10 
18 
28 18 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Thne. 






H. X. 8. 






B. K. s. 


May 18 


I. Beapp. 


6 12 Om. 


May 25 


I. Beapp. 


7 24m. 


19 


I. « 


11 40 41e. 


27 


I. ^ 


1 36 Om. 


21 


IL « 


3 60 28 e. 


28 


II. « 


27 24e. 


21 


I. « 


9 16 e. 


28 


I. ** 


8 3 30e. 


23 


111. Dfsapp. 


3 67 Om. 


80 


III. Diaapp. 


7 66 66 m. 


88 


in.Sflapp. 


Oil 10 m. 


80 


in. Beapp. 


10 9 14m. 


88 


L 


87 60 e. 


80 


I. 


2 82 11 e. 


86 


n. " 


6 8 22m. 


Jane 1 


IL " 


. 7 46 22m. 



JTTKlB,'8ixtIi Xk>nth. 



25 



Day of 
Month. 


^r«i. 


1 


%*. 


1 




1 


1 






JUPITXB. 


Saturn. 


Rises. 


dett. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Kises. 


gets.' 


Rises. 


Sets. 


1 
11 
21 


H. K. 

7 20m. 
7 37 m. 
7 56 m. 


H. x: 

10 24 e. 

uasa. 

10 17e. 


H. X. 

7 27 m. 
7.18 m. 
7 10 m. 


B. X. 
10 23 e. 

10. .50. . 

9 45-0.- 


V. X. 

2 44 e. 
2 3e. 
124«. 


H. X. 

2 16 m. 
136m. 
57 m. 


■. X. 

1 8e. 

29e. 
11 61 m. 


H. K. 

1 34 m. 
56 m. 
17 m. 



• 

s 

1 


VLootx RizdEs OB Sits. 


■J 


TixB OF Hiaii Water. 


wt 

* 




.1 

a 




PHSNOXnfA, 
SUNDATIS, HOUDAIB, Ac. 

• ■ 


- 




it 


4 


• 

1 
1 


2 


1^ 


. ^ 


Charles- 
ton. 




H. X. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


'n. X. 


H. X. 


H, M. 


H. X. 


H. K. 


H. X. 


• 


1 


3 59 


4 5 


4 9 


420 


mora 


10'54 


738 


048 


4 


6 52 


^ and h statioDBrV. 
i 6<f' 9 54 N. 


2 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


12 


11 47 


8 31 


1 40 


663f 


745 


8 


928 


18 


9 15 


9 19 


116 


040 


924 


2 36 


7 46 


8 88 




4 


10 8 


10 4 


10 2 


10 6 


2 18 


1 34 


10 18 


3 31 


840 


982 


Qfrput CkHsH. 


5 


10 47 


10 44 


10 42 


10 46 


3 17 


2 28 


11 12 


4 26 


9 34 


10 26 




6 


11 a> 


11 10 


1118 


11 21 


412 


3 18 


2 


5 16 


10 21 


11 16 




T 


11 50 


11 50 


11 50 


1154 


5 4 


4 9 


53 


5 47 


1115 


7 


Ul Skndap after ninity. 


8 


mom 


mom 


mom 


mora 


558 


5 4 


1 48 


6 68 


10 


1 2 




9 


19 


20 


021 


26 


6 41 


6 


244 


7 46 


1 6 


1 58 


(f (greatest HeL Lat. N. 


10 


47 


49 


51 


57 


7 28 


6 57 


3 41 


8 40 


2 3 


255 


Q in aphelion. 


11 


1 16 


1 20 


122 


1 28 


8 15 


7 53 


437 


9 38 


2 69 


3 51 




12 


1 48 


1 58 


156 


2 a 


9 8 


8 50 


534 


10 37 


3 66 


448 


S 6 0' 


13 


223 


2 29 


2 32 


241 


9 52 


9 38 


628 


n 30 


445 


6 37 


9 int ^0. 
2d Sunday ajfer SHnt^. 


U 


a 5 


3n 


3 15 


325 


10 41 


10 29 


7 13 


024 


5 35 


627 


15 


3 53 


4 


4 4 


4 14 


11 31 


11 14 


758 


1 8 


6 20 


7 12 


% stationary. 


16 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


020 


11 66 


840 


1 49 


7 2 


7 54 


■* 


17 


8 36 


8 31 


828 


8 30 


1 8 


mora 


9 20 


2 31 


7 42 


8 34 


, 


18 


9 10 


9 6 


9 4 


9 6 


154 


'0 36 


10 


3 13 


8 22 


9 14 




19 


9 40 


9 37 


9 35 


9 37 


2 39 


1 10 


10 40 


3 53 


9 2 


954 


ff 6 C if 5 60 N. 
9 3 d. $7 6N. 


29 


10 8 


10 6 


10 5 


10 8 


323 


1 56 


11 20 


434 


9 42 


10 84 


a 


10 S5 


10 34 


10 34 


10 37 


4 5 


236 


11 57 


5 11 


10 19 


nil 


3d Sunday after lMni<y. 
[0 enters £3. 


22 


11 


11 Q 


11 


11 4 


448 


3 13 


mora 


5 54 


11 1 


11 68 


28 


1125 


11 27 


1128 


11 33 


5 31 


3 55 


39 


686 


1146 


mora 




ai 


1168 


11 50 


1158 


mom 


6 16 


440 


124 


7 29 


mora 


38 


St. JIahn BUptitt. 


9 


moart^ 


mom 


mora 


4 


7 4 


5 30 


2 14 


8 16 


36 


1 28 


9 stationary. 


9 


024 


28 


30 


038 


754 


628 


3 12 


9 11 


1 34 


2 26 




» 


1 1 


1 6 


1 9 


117 


8 51 


7 28 


4 12 


10 19 


2 34 


3 28 




28 


1 46 


1 61 


154 


2 8 


9 51 


8 83 


5 17 


1128 


3 39 


4 31 


4ihSunda9 (nfler Triniif. 
Str^ Filter and BSutk 


29 


2 37 


244 


248 


2 59 


10 54 


9 37 


6 21 


mora 


443 


5 35 


30 


839 


346 


350 


4 2 


11 68 


10 39 


7 28 


034 


5 45 


6 37 


■ 



JBGU^SS OF JUPIT^'S. SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Fhenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Fhenom. 


Time. 






H. K. 8. 






H. X. a. 


Jane 1 


I. Reapp. 


9 46m. 


Jnne 8 


I. Reapp. 


10 55 13 m. 


8 


L * 


a 20 24 m. 


10 


I. « 


5 28 61m. 


4 


n. " 


9 4 28e. 


11 


11. « 


11 41 37 e. 


J 


L « 


9 58 le. 
11 65 31m. 


11 


L « 


1152 296. 


lU. iilsapp. 
lU. Rea^. 


13 


m. Disapp. 


8 64 39 e. 





2*8 le. 


IS 


III. Reapp. 


6 6 20e. 


6 


L 


426 35 6. 


18 


L 


6 21 6e. 


8 


n. « 


10 22 2dm. 


' 16 


L 

1 


0:46 436. 



26 



jiritY, ises* 



PHASES OF THE MOON. 

Foil MooB ^ Id. Ih. 88m. a 

Last Quarter 7d. 5h. Sim. pjl 

New Bfoon ». » 16d. 6h. 46m. ** 

First Qnarter 23<L 41i. 24m. ** 

Fall Moon 80d. 8h. 26m« A.IC 

Perigee Id. lOh. ui. 

Apogee 16d. Ih. pji. 

Perigee 29d. Sh. « 



• 




Boston. 


N.Y.-Phila. 


Balt.-Wa8h. 


I S. Fr'cisco. 


• 










1 


i 


Sun 


Sun 


Sun 


1 Sun 


1 


LmsfH or oats. 


If 


















• 






^ 

1 


^ 

r 


• 


1 


1 


• 

S 


1 


1 


1 


1 


a 


1 


Hi 


it 


1' 






H. K. 


H. M. 


H. IC. 


q. K. 


1 

H. K. 


H. M. 


B. H. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


H. M. 


H. X. 


o / 


1 


Wed. 


427 


740 


438 


7 33 


1437 
38 


7 30 


4 41 


7 26 


3.5 


15 18 


15 


14 98 


28 9 


2 


Th. 


27 


40 


34 


33 


29 


42 


25 


3.6 


18 


14 59 


61 


4 


3 


Frid. 


28 


40 


34 


33| 


; 38 


29 


42 


25 


8.8 


12 


50 


61 


28 


4 


Sat. 


28 


39 


35 


38 


39 


29 


43 


25 


4.0 


11 


68 


60 


22 66 


5 


Son. 


29 


39 


33 


33 


39 


29 


43 


25 


4.2 


10 


58 


60 


60 


6 


Men. 


29 


39 


36 


32 


40 


29 


44 


25 


4.4 


10 


56 


49 


44 


7 


Tues. 


30 


39 


37 


32 


40 


28 


44 


24 


iA 


9 


65 


48 


38 


8 


Wed. 


31 


38 


87 


32 


41 


28 


45 


24 


4.7 


7 


66 


47 


81 


9 


Til. 


31 


38 


88 


31 


42 


28 


46 


24 


M 


7 


^ 


46 


25 


10 


Frid. 


32 


37 


80 


31 


42 


27 


46 


23 


5.0 


5 


52 


46 


17 


11 


Sat. 


33 


37 


89 


31 


43 


27 


47 


23 


5.1 


4 


52 


44 


10 


12 


San. 


84 


36 


40 


30 


44 


27 


48 


23 


5.3 


2 


60 


43 


22 2 


13 


Mon. 


.34 


86 


41 


30 


44 


26 


48 


22 


5.4 


2 


40 


42 


21 53 


14 


Tiles. 


35 


35 


41 


29 


45 


26 


49 


22 


'5.5 


15 


48 


41 


44 


15 


Wed. 


36 


35 


42 


20 


46 


25 


50 


21 


5.6 


14 59 


47 


89 


35 


16 


Til. 


37 


34 


48 


28 


46 


25 


50 


21 


6.7 


67 


45 


89 


26 


17 


Frid. 


38 


33 


44 


27 


47 


24 


51 


20 


5.8 


55 


43 


I 


16 


18 


Sat. 


39 


33 


45 


27 


48 


23 


51 


00 


6.9 


54 


42 


21 6 


19 


am. 


40 


32 


45 


26 


49 


23 


52 


19 


6.0 


52 


41 


^ 


20 56 


20 


Mon. 


40 


31 


46 


25 


50 


22 


53 


19 


6.0 


51 


89 


82 


44 


21 


Tnes. 


41 


30 


47 


25 


50 


21 


53 


18 


6.1 


49 


88 


81 


82 


22 


Wed. 


42 


30 


48 


24 


51 


21 


64 


18 


6.1 


48 


86 


80 


. 21 


23 


Th. 


43 


29 


49 


23 


62 


20 


55 


17 


6.2 


46 


84 


28 


20 


21 


Frid. 


44 


28 


50 


22 


58 


19 


56 


16 


6.2 


44 


82 


» 


19 56 


25 


Sat. 


46 


27 


50 


21 


64 


18 


67 


16 


6.2 


42 


81 




44 


26 


Son. 


46 


26 


51 


21 


54 


17 


57 


14 


6.2 


40 


80 


23 


31 


27 


Mon. 


47 


25 


52 


20 


55 


16 


58 


13 


6.2 


88 


2B 


21 


17 


28 


Tnes. 


48 


?ii 


53 


19 


56 


161 


4 69 


13 


6.2 


36 


96 


20 


19 4 


29 


Wed. 


49 


23^ 


54 


18 


57 


15 1 


5 


12 


6.2 


34 


24 


18 


18 50 


30 


Th. 


50 


22 


55 


17 


58 


14. 


1 


11 


6.1 


82 


22 


16 


36 


81 


Frid. 


4 51 


7 21! 

1 


4 56 


7 16 


4d9i 

1 


7 13; 


5 2 


7 10 


6.1 


14 30 


14 20 


14 14 


18 21 



ECLIPSES OF JTTPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Fhenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






H. K. 8. 






H. K. a.. 


June 15 


n. Reapp. 


69 39 e. 


Jane 22 


n. Disapp. 


114 81e. 


17 


L « 


7 18 21 m. 


22 


I. Reapp. 


2 44 15 6. 
8 36 526. 


19 


I. « 


8 47 Om. 


22 


U. « 


19 


n. « 


2 18 49 m. 


24 


L " 


9 12 64 m. 


20 


ni. IMsapp. 


T 53 59e. 


26 


n. Disapp. 


2 33 51 m. 


20 


I. Rcapp. 


8 15 38 e. 


26 


I. Reapp. 


8 41 34 m. 


20 


III. - 


19 4 61 e. 


26 


11. " 


4 66 4m. 



^ 



JXTIiT4>8e«r«i|ti» Month. 



■V 



Day of 
Month. 




1 




1 








VSSnTB. 






BATlnuT. 


Rises. 


.r. ' .. 
>Se^. 




..Sets." 


RiMB. 


SetD. 


RiMS. 


Sets. 


1 
U 
21 


B. K. 

8 13 m. 
8 29 m. 
8 41m. 


.8. lb 

10 4e. 

9 49 e. 
9 29 e. 


7 3 m. 
6 55 m. 
6 47 m. 


B. X. .. 

9 25e. 
9 3e. 
8 40 e. 


JL.X 

48 e. 

12e. 

11 38 m. 


18 m. 
11 86 e. 
10 59 e. 


E. X. 

11 14 m. 
10 88 m. 
10 Im. 


B. X. 

11 84 e. 
10 66 e. 
10 17 e. 





MoQv, ^Ui|«s iUL Sits. 


• 


Tna or ffios 'If Avat 




1 

O 

t 




1 

a 

1 




Pbbboxbba, 

SURSATS, HOUBATS, Ac. 


1 


'•i 


-1 


^1 


• 

1 


>< 

• 

2 


i 

g 


• 

1 


|i 




B. X. B. X 


B. X., 


B. X. 


B. X. 


H. X. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


B. X.. 




1 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


morn 


11 35 


8 19 


1 20 


641 


7 33 


9 greatest Hel. Ut, 8. 


2 


8 41 


8 38 


8 36 


8 39 


1 


27 


9 11 


222 


7 33 


8 26 


VUHatumofB.r,M. 
in apogee. 


3 


9 18 


9 16 


9 16 


9 19 


1 59 


1 19 


10 3 


3 13 


8 25 


9 17 


4 


9 51 


9 50 


9 50 


9 54 


2 56 


2 8 


10 52 


4 6 


9 14 


10 6 




5 


10 21 


10 21 


lU 22 


10 26 


3 47 


2 55 


11 39 


4 53 


10 1 


10 53 


Uh Sunday a/ter Trinity. 


6 


10 50 


10 52 


10 53 


10 58 


4 37 


' 3 42 


26 


540 


10 48 


11 40 




7 


11 20 


11 23 


11 25 


11 31 


5 25 


4 32 


lid 


6 29 


11 38 


030 


Q greatest elong. 21 2 W. 


8 


11 52 


11 56 


11 59 


morn 


6 13 


5 26 


2 10 


7 17 


32 


124 




9 


mom 


mom 


morn 


6 


7 1 


6 2i 


3 8 


8 7 


130 


2 22 




1? 


26 


31 


34 


043 


7 40 


7 23 


4 7 


9 5 


2 29 


3 21 




ll 


1 5 


111 


1 15 


1 24 


8 38 


8 21 


5 5 


10 7 


3 27 


4 19 


%ue. 


12 


1 49 


1 55 


1 59 


2 9 


9 27 


9 14 


5 58 


11 3 


4 20 


5 12 


6th Sunday after Trinity. 


13 


2 36 


243 


2 47 


2 67 


10 16 


10 5 


649 


11 58 


5 11 


6 3 


5 (5 <[. S 133N. 


U 


328 


3 35 


3 39 


3 50 


11 6 


10 52 


7 36 


46 


5 58 


6 50 


Q r) <[ . fi 51 N. 


15 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


11 52 


11 82 


8 16 


1 26 


638 


7 30 




16 


7 44 


7 41 


7 39 


7 41 


37 


morn 


8 55 


2 4 


7 17 


8 9 




17 


8 13 


8 11 


8 10 


8 12 


1 21 


11 


9 33 


245 


7 55 


8 47 




18 


8 30 


8 38 


8 37 


8 40 


2 4 


49 


10 10 


3 23 


8 32 


9 24 


cf 6 <t- <r6 29N; 


10 


9 6 


9 6 


9 5 


9 9 


2 47 


1 26 


10 47 


4 1 


9 9 


10 I 


Ith Sunday after Trinity » 


20 


9 ao 


931 


9 32 


9 37 


3 29 


2 3 


11 26 


4 40 


948 


10 40 


9 6 c. ^sseX 


21 


9 67 


9 50 


10 


10 5 


413 


242 


morn 


5 19 


10 27 


11 19 


1^(5 a. 'ii58N. 


22 


10 26 


10 20 


10 31 


10 37 


4 59 


321 


5 


6 4 


11 11 


mom 


23 


10 68 


11 8 


11 ^ 


11 14 


5 47 


4 5 


49 


6 51 


morn 


3 




21 


11 37 


11 43 


11 46 


11 56 


6 39 


4 57 


141 


7 43 


3 


55 


^ in perihelicm. 


25 


mom 


mora 


morn 


morn 


7 34 


5 57 


2 41 


8 47 


1 3 


1 55 


<S(. James. 


26 


25 


031 


35 


46 


8 35 


7 6 


3 49 


10 


2 11 


3 3 


Bih Sunday after JPrinity, 


27 


1 20 


1 27 


131 


1 43 


9 37 


8 14 


4 58 


11 11 


3 20 


4 12 


9 (5 T Leonis. 


28 


2 26 


2 32 


236 


248 


10 40 


9 21 


6 5 


morn 


427 


5 19 




20 


3 38 


3 44 


3 47 


3 59 


1141 


10 25 


7 9 


20 


5 31 


6 23 




30 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


mom 


11 21 


8 5 


115 


627 


7 19 




31 


7 48 


7 47 


7 46 


7 49 


39 


Oil 


8 55 


2 4 


7 17 


8 9 


. 





ICLIFSSS OF JUPmWS f^KTSUUPSESL 




Day. 


Phe;D.om. 


• 

Time. 


Daj. 


Phenom. .- 


Timev 


Jane 27 
27 
28 
20 
20 
29 
. July 1 


ni.^s^p. 

m. Reapp. 
n. Disapp. 
I.R«SPP. 

I. « 


B. X. 8. 

10 10 12 e. 

11 52 51 e. 
2 2 56m. 

, 3 52 5 e. 
4 38 50e. 
6 14 8 e. 
11 7 80m. 


July 3 
3 
3 
6 
6 
5 
6 


11. Disapp. 

I. Reapp. 

n. " 

I. « 

Hi. Disapp. 
lU.llcapp. 

II. Disapp'. 


B. X. 8. 

5 11.24m. 

6 36'lOm. 

7 33 18 m. 
4 48m.- 
a 51 40 m. 
a 58 m. 
6 29 38 e. 



^ 



Atjotnyf , 1808. 



J— I. 



PHASES OF THB MOON. 

last Qnarter ^ 6d. 41i. STin. ajl 

New Moon ^ 14d. 8h. Mm. « 

First Quarter 22d. Ih. Urn. « 

Full Moon ..»» *. 28A. 3h. 46m. PJI. 

Apogee ~ Ud. 5h. P.M. 

Perigee '. 27d. 4h. ajc 





1 


Boston. 
Sim 


N.T-Phila. 
Sun 


BalU-WfiBh. 
Sun 


S.Fr'cisco. 
Sun 


1 


LmOVH OF 9AT8. 




















9 






1 


^ 

1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


• 


a' 


a 


41 




1^ 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. K. 


H. V. 


H. K. 


H. K. 


B. H. 


H. K. 


H. X. 


a. X. 


ff. x. 


B. X. 


O f 


1 


Sat 


492 


7 19 


4 57 


7 15 


5 


7 12 


5 3 


7 9 


6.1 


14 27 


14 18 


14 12 


18 .6 


2 


Mn. 


58 


18 


68 


14 


1 


11 


4 


8 


6.0 


25 


16 


10 


17 51 


3 


Mod. 


54 


IT 


4 69 


12 


1 


10 


4 


8 


5.9 


28 


18 


9 


85 


4 


Tims. 


55 


16 


& 


11 


2 


9 


6 


7 


5.8 


21 


U 


7 


90 


6 


Wed. 


56 


18 


1 


10 


3 


8 


5 


6 


5.7 


19 


9 


5 


17 4 


6 


TU. 


57 


13 


2 


9 


4 


6 


6 


4 


5.6 


16 


7 


2 


16 17 


7 


Frid. 


58 


12 


3 


8 


5 


5 


7 


3 


5.5 


14 


5 


14 


SI 


8 


Sat. 


4 50 


11 


4 


7 


6 


4 


8 


2 


6^ 


12 


8 


13 58 


16 14 


9 


Son. 


5 


10 


5 


5 


7 


3 


9 


1 


6.3 


10 


14 


66 


15 87 


10 


Mun. 


1 


8 


5 


4 


8 


2 


10 


7 


5.1 


. 7 


13 60 


64 


SO 


11 


Tues. 


2 


7 


6 


3 


9 


7 1 


11 


6 59 


6.0 


5 


67 


52 


S 


IS 


Wed- 


8 


6 


7 


2 


10 


6 69 


12 


67 


4.8 


14 8 


65 


40 


15 4 


18 


Th. 


5 


4 


8 


7 


11 


68 


18 


56 


4.7 


13 50 


62 


48 


14 46 


14 


Frid. 


6 


8 


9 


69 


12 


67 


14 


65 


4.5 


57 


60 


45 


27 


15 


Sat. 


7 


2 


10 


68 


12 


66 


14 


53 


4.3 


56 


48 


43 


14 


18 


Son. 


8 


7 


11 


60 


13 


64 


16 


62 


4.1 


52 


46 


41 


13 60 


17 


Men. 


9 


6 58 


. 12 


65 


14 


63 


16 


51 


3.9 


49 


48 


30 


31 


18 


Toes. 


10 


67 


13 


63 


15 


61 


17 


49 


3.7 


47 


40 


36 


13 12 


19 


Wed. 


11 


55 


14 


52 


16 


60 


18 


48 


3.5 


44 


88 


84 


12 52 


20 


Th. 


12 


54 


15 


51 


17 


49 


19 


47 


3.2 


42 


86 


32 


33 


21 


Frid. 


X8 


62 


16 


49 


18 


47 


20 


45 


3.0 


39 


88 


20 


12X3 


22 


Sat. 


14 


61 


17 


48 


19 


46 


21 


44 


2.7 


37 


31 


27 


11 53 


28 


Sn|i. 


15 


49 


18 


46 


20 


44 


22 


42 


2.5 


84 


28 


24 


33 


24 


Mon. 


16 


48 


19 


45 


21 


43 


23 


41 


2.2 


82 


26 


22 


11 12 


25 


Xvm. 


17 


46 


20 


43 


22 


42 


24 


40 


2.0 


20 


28 


20 


10 62 


26 


Wed. 


18 


44 


21 


42 


23 


40 


25 


89 


1.7 


28 


21 


IT 


31 


27 


Th. 


19 


48 


22 


40 


24 


89 


28 


38 


1.4 


24 


18 


lA 


10 10 


28 


Frid. 


20 


41 


23 


39 


24 


87 


28 


S6 


1.1 


21 


16 


13 


049 


29 


Sat. 


22 


39 


24 


37 


26 


36 


27 


35 


0.8 


17 


13 


U 


28 


80 


Su. 


28 


88 


25 


35 


26 


34 


27 


33 


05 


15 


10 


8 


« 


81 


Mod. 


5 24 


686 


526 


634 


527 


6 38 


5 28 


6 32 


0.2 


13 12 


18 8 


18 6 


845 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time: 


Day. 


PhoBom. 


Ttihe. 






B. X. B. 






B. X, 9. 


jur 6 


LBeapp. 


6 33 27 e. 


July 12 


ill. SjiBKpp. 


7-60 46 to. 


6 


n. « 


8 51 22e. 


12 


m. Reapp. 


9 59 17 m. 


8- 


L « 


1 2 Oe. 


13 


I. 


8:28 4e. 


10 


L « 


7 30 47 m. 


13 


n. Disapp. 


9 7 lOe. 


10 


II. Disapp. 


7 48 57 m. 


13 


n.Beapp. 


11 28 36e. 


10 


II.Reapp. 


10 10 32 m. 


15. 


L " 


2 66 44 e. 


12 


L *^ 


169 25m. 


17 


L « 


25 26 m. 



ATJG081^, Sslith Hkmth. 



Day of 

Month. 


Ybhub. 


lias. 




Satukh. 


UflM. 


Seta. 


KlMB. 


Bets. 


Rises. 


SeU. 


Blses. 


Bets. 


1 

11 
21 


H. X. 

8 49 m. 
8 62m. 
8 46 m. 


K X. 

9 56. 
8 366. 

8 4e. 


H. X. 

6 41m. 
6 34 m. 
6 26 m. 


H. X. 

8 15 e. 
7 51 e. 
7 28 6. 


■. K. 

11 Om. 

10 28 m. 

9 66 m. 


H. X. 

10 18 e. 

9 42 e. 
9 6e. 


W. X. 
9 23 m. 

8 48 m. 

8 14 m. 


H. X. 

9 37 e. 
8 596. 
8226. 



e 
o 



I 



Moon 



oa Sifs. 



i 






it 



I 

d 

I 



Tlxtf or HiQH Wavbl 



2 



04 



Phihoxiiia, 

SUBDAIB, HbLBMIS, tc. 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 
10 
U 
12 
13 
U 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
28 
23 
21 
£ 
26 

2r 

2B 
29 

ao 

31 



H. X. 


H. X 


H. X. 


H. X. 


B. X. 


H. X. 


H. K. 


fl. X. 


H. X. 


H. X. 


820 


8 20 


8 20 


8 24 


134 


58 


9 42 


2 55 


8 4 


8 56 


8 61 


8 52 


8 63 


8 58 


226 


1 44 


10 28 


341 


8 60 


942 


9a 


9 24 


926 


9 32 


3 17 


230 


11 14 


4 28 


9 36 


10 28 


963 


9 57 


9 69 


10 7 


4 6 


3 18 


11 67 


5 11 


10 19 


11 11 


^0 27 


10 32 


10 85 


10 43 


4 56 


4 2 


46 


6 1 


11 8 





^1 4 


11 10 


11 13 


11 22 


5 45 


4 55 


1 39 


6 49 


1 


53 


11 47 


11 63 


11 67 


mom 


6 34 


5 52 


2 36 


7 39 


68 


1 50 


mora 


morn 


morn 


6 


7 24 


6 52 


3 85 


8 34 


1 68 


2 50 


038 


30 


43 


53 


8 13 


7 61 


435 


936 


2 57 


3 49 


1 24 


1 30 


1 34 


1 44 


9 2 


8 49 


6 33 


10 36 


3 55 


4 47 


218 


2 24 


2 27 


2 37 


9 49 


9 37 


6 21 


11 28 


443 


5 35 


3 16 


3 21 


3 24 


3 34 


10 35 


10 24 


7 8 


18 


5 30 


622 


4U 


4 19 


4 21 


430 


11 20 


11 7 


7 51 


1 1 


6 13 


7 6 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


3 


1143 


8 27 


187 


6 49 


741 


7 10 


7 10 


7 10 


7 13 


47 


mom 


9 3 


2 13 


7 25 


8 17 


736 


7 37 


7 87 


7 41 


1 20 


19 


939 


2 52 


8 1 


8 53 


8 2 


8 4 


8 5 


8 10 


2 12 


55 


10 17 


3 30 


8 39 


931 


8 80 


8 83 


8 35 


8 41 


2 57 


133 


10 67 


4 11 


9 19 


10 11 


9 1 


6 


9 7 


9 14 


344 


2 18 


11 38 


4 52 


10 


10 52 


937 


43 


9 45 


•9 53 


434 


254 


mom 


538 


10 46 


11 38 


10 20 


10 26 


10 80 


10 40 


5 27 


340 


24 


6 30 


11 39 


mom 


U 10 


11 16 


11 20 


.11 32 


624 


4 33 


1 17 


726 


mom 


sr 


morn 


morn 


morn 


morn 


7 23 


587 


2 21 


8 29 


043 


1 35 


10 


16 


20 


82 


8 23 


6 47 


3 31 


9 45 


1 63 


245 


1 17 


1 23 


1 26 


1 87 


923 


8 


444 


10 56 


3 6 


3 58 


230 


2 35 


2 38 


240 


10 21 


8 


5 52 


morn 


4 14 


5 6 


346 


3 50 


8 62 


4 3 


1117 


10 8 


6 52 


1 


6 14 


6 6 


6 2 


6 4 


5 5 


5 15 


morn 


11 2 


7 46 


56 


6 8 


7 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


12 


11 48 


8 32 


1 41 


6 54 


7 46 


7 18 


720 


7 21 


7 26 


1 4 


082 


9 16 


2 27 


7 38 


8 30 


7 51 


764 


7 56 


8 3 


1 55 


1 16 


10 


3 13 


8 22 


9 14 



<f cJ « teonis * (7m.6) W. 
9th SundayafUr THnity. 
9 sup. (3 0. 
9 greatest Hel. Lat. N. 

Tran^fiifumtion, 



IWt, Sunday after nrinOy. 
St. Lavntnce. 



Aitumption ofB. K Jf. 
Wih. Sunday after Trinity. 
9 6h' i 614 8. 



U'- 



a. 



b7 0N. 
'S 4 81 N. 



Q <5 0- Leonis :|c (9nL 6)1. 
9 at greatest brilliancy. 
12th Sunday after Trinity. 
St. Bartholomew. 



Oiny- 



13th Sunday after lWn%. 
h 6'?Virg.5|c(8m.8)W. 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






Hi X. s. 






H. X. 8. 


July 17 


II.]>i8app. 


10 26 26 m. 


July 21 


n. Roapp. 


2 6 46m. 


17 


n.ReA|». 


47 42e. 


22 


I. Reapp. 


4 51 22e. 


19 


I. « 


8 54 3m. 


24 


I. « 


11 20 3m. 


19 


m.Disapp. 


11 49 55 m. 


24 


IT. Disapp. 


1 3 51 e. 


19 


m. Rsftpp. 


1 57 40e. 


24 


II. Reapp. 


3 24 48 6. 


20 


I. 


10 22 43e. 


26 


L 


6 48 42m. 


20 


II.Disapp. 


11 44 396. 


26 


m. Disapp. 


8 49 42e. 



30 



BJBPi'JCMBSS, iftad. 



PHASES or THB MOON. 



Last Qmrter... 
New Mnon....... 

Fint QMffter... 
WvSl Moon........ 



.. 4d. Sh. 11II.FJL 
.. ISA. llh. Sim. • 
.. 20d. 8h. 26m. ajl 
.. 27d. Oh. 54III. <* 



Apoc[oo ... 
Perigee....... 



..... 21d. 3fa. 



• 

.e 
§ 


1 

• 

i 


Boston. 1 

! Sw 1 

t \ 


N.T^Phik. 
Snn 


Bdi/WmbJ 1 S. Pr'eiKo. 
Sou Son 


■ 

1 

s 


Itfra 


nw; 


Bjen. 


u 


t.» 
















• 






* if 


1 


^ 

1 


1 

Pi 


i 


i 

X 


• 


• 

1 

9i 


• 


1 


• 

••5 




1 

1 


SI 


^4 


00 






H. K. 


H. M . 


H. K. 


H. M . 


R. M. 


R. M. 


's. M . 


H. X.! 


H. V. 


R. M. 


R. K 


H. K. 


/ 


1 


Tnes. 


5 25 


634 


5 27 


6 32 


5 28 


6 31 


5 29 


6 30< 


11 59.9t 


13 9 


13 5 


13 3 


8 23 


2 


Wed. 


26 


33 


28 


31 


29 


30 


30 


29 


59.6 


7 


3 


13 1 


8 1 


3 


Th. 


27 


31 


29 


29 


30 


28 


31 


27 


59.3 


4 


13 


12 68 


739 


4 


Frid. 


28 


29 


30 


28 


31 


26 


32 


25 


58.9 


13 1 


12 68 


66 


7 17 


5 


Sat. 


29 


28 


31 


26 


32 


25 


33 


24 


58.6 


12 59 


65 


63 


655 


6 


8MB. 


33 


TTi 


32 


24 


33 


23 


34 


22 


68.3 


66 


52 


60 


83 


7 


Mun. 


31 


24 


33 


23 


33 


22 


35 


21 


58.0 


53 


M 


i9 


6 10 


8 


Tnes. 


32 


22 


34 


21 


34 


20 


35 


19 


57.6 


50 


47 


46 


648 


9 


Wed. 


33 


21 


34 


19 


Xi 


19 


36 


17 


57.3 


48 


45 


44 


25 


10 


Th. 


31 


19 


35 


18 


36 


17 


37 


IG 


56.9 


45 


43 


41 


5 2 


" 


Frid. 


35 


17 


36 


16 


37 


15 


38 


14 


56.6 


42 


40 


8S 


440 


!l2 


Sat. 


36 


15 


87 


14' 


38 


14 


39 


13 


56.2 


89 


37 


SO 


4 17 


13 


8«n. 


37 


14 


38 


131 


39 


12 


40 


12 


55.9 


37 


n 


33 


354 


14 


Mun. 


38 


12 


39 


11 


40 


11 


41 


11 


55.5 


34 


31 


ai 


U 


Toes. 


40 


10 


40 


9 


41 


9 


42 


«i 


55J2 


30 


29 


28 


3 8 


16 


Wed. 


41 


8 


41 


8 


42 


7 


43 


7! 


&4.8 


27 


2T 


S5 


244 


17 


Th. 


42 


7 


42 


6 


43 


6 


44 


6! 


M.5 


25 


t4 


23 


221 


18 


Frid. 


43 


5 


43 


4 


43 


4 


44 


4| 


54.1 


22' 


21 


21 


1 68 


19 Sat. 


44 


3 


44 


3 


41 


2 


45 


2 


53.8 


19. 


19 


18 


36 


20 SU. 


45 


1 


45 


6 1 


45 1 


45 


6 1 


• 53.4 


16 


16 


16 


1 11 


21 


Men. 


46 


6 


40 


5 59 


46|5 59 


46 


5 59 


63.1 


14 


13 


13 


48 


22 


Tiiea. 


47 


5 5S 


47 


58 


47' 58 


47 


58 


62.7 


11 


11 


11 


25 


23 Wed. 


48 


56 


48 


56 


48f 56 


48 


56 


62.4 


8 


8 


\ 8 


N 1 


24 Th. 


, 49 


54 


49 


54 


49! M 


49 


&4 


52.0 


6 


5 


6 


S22 


25 


Frid. 


1 ^ 


62 


50 


53 


50 


53 


50 


53 


51.7 


2 


S 


8 


46 


26 


Sat. 


' 51 


51 


51 


51 


51 


51 


51 


61 


51.4 


12 


12 


12 


1 9 


27 


8«n. 


, 52 


49 


52 


49 


52 


50 


52 


60 


61.0 


11 57 


11 57 


11 68 


32 


28 


Mun. 


M 


47 


63 


48 


53 


4S 


53 


48 


60.7 


53 


K 


65 


1 66 


29 


Toes. 


55 


4^ 


54 


46 


54 


46 


54 


46 


50.3 


50 


62 


621 


2 19 


ao 


Wed. 


5 56 


5 44 


5 55 


5 44 


5 55 


5 45 


6 55 


5 45 


11 50.0 


11 48 


11 i9 


11 50 


248 



BCUPSES OF JUPITER'S SATKLUCIS. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


IMy. 


PheiMm. 


TIoml 






H. K. 8. 






R. K. S. 


July 26 


lU. Keapp. 


5 56 42 e. 


Axig. 2 


I. Reapp. 


7 43 20m. 


28 I. 


17 21 m. 


2 ni.lMMpp. 


7 4866e. 


28 


II. IMsapp. 


2 22 2m. 


2 > III. Beapp. 


9 55 11 e. 


28 


II. Beapp. 


4 42 60 m. 


4=1. 


212 Om. 


29 


I. •* 


646 Oe. 


4 ;n. ** 


7 19 49 m. 


31 


I. " 


1 14 42e. 


5 11. 


8 40 38e. 


31 


n. IMnapp. 


8 41 lie. 


7 1. 


S 9 20e. 


SI 


II. Reapp. 


ft 1 49e. 


7 n. « 


888 42 a. 



1 



SEPTVMBSaLt Kinth Uonth. 



81 



Vus 


Venus. 


IVIars. 


1 

Jdpiter. 


Satvbx. 


Day ( 
Mont 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. ! 

1 


Rises. 


Sets. 


1 


H. M. 

8 28 m. 


H. M. 

7 21e. 


B. M. 

6 19 m. 


H. X. 

7 le. 


B. X. 

9 22 m. 


B. M. ; 
8 28e. 


B. M. 

7 38 m. 


B. X. 

7 42e. 


U 


7 54m. 


6 35 e. 


6 12 m. 


G 36 e. 


8 52 m. 


7 52e. 


7 5 m. 


7 5e. 


21 


6 59 m. 


5 46e. 


&. 5m. 


6 Ue. 


8 23 m. 


7 18 e. 


6 31m. 


6 29 e. 



• 


Moon SXSM OK tats. 


1 


Tlxz or Hiaa Water. 




1 




1 

e 






PBENOXENA, 
SVNBATS, HOUDATB, &C. 


• 




1 A 




• 


• 






t 


o 


o 


'•is 




1 


^ 


>* 


.5 




1§ 




Q 


& 


Sg 


^1 


S 


a 


* • 


£ 


I 


fi ** 






B. M. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


U. X. 


B. M. 


11. X. 


B. X. 


# 


1 


8 25 


8 29 


8 32 


8 40 


2 46 


2 


10 44 


3 58 


9 6 


9 58 




2 


9 3 


9 8 


9 11 


9 19 


3 37 


2 47 


11 31 


4 45 


9 53 


10 45 




3 


9 44 


9 50 


9 54 


10 3 


•4 27 


3 33 


17 


5 31 


10 39 


11 31 




4 


10 30 


10 36 


10 40 


10 50 


5 18 


424 


1 8 


6 22 


11 30 


22 




5 


11 19 


11 25 


11 29 


11 40 


6 8 


5 20 


2 4 


7 12 


26 


1 18 


9c5h. $3 41S. 


G 


mom 


mom 


mom 


morn 


6 57 


6 19 


3 3 


8 3 


1 25 


2 17 


lUk Sunday a/Ur Trinity. 


7 


12 


18 


022 


32 


7 45 


7 17 


4 1 


8 5^ 


2 23 


3 15 




8 


1 8 


1 18 


116 


1 26 


8 31 


8 14 


4 58 


10 


3 20 


4 12 


NaHvityqfB.r.M, 


9 


2 6 


2 10 


2 13 


223 


9 10 


9 4 


5 48 


10 61 


4 10 


5 2 




10 


3 5 


3 8 


3 10 


3 19 


10 1 


9 50 


6 34 


11 42 


4 66 


5 48 




11 


4 5 


4 7 


4 S 


4 17 


10 44 


10 33 


7 17 


28 


5 89 


6 31 




12 


5 5 


5 6 


5 7 


5 16 


11 27 


11 13 


7 67 


1 7 


6 19 


7 11 




13 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


11 


11 50 


8 at 


1 44 


6 66 


7 48 


lUIt Sunday after Trinity. 


14 


6 a4 


6 37 


6 39 


6 45 


50 


mom 


9 10 


2 20 


7 32 


8 24 


h t <i' h 6 89N. 


15 


7 5 


7 9 


7 11 


7 17 


1 42 


26 


9 51 


3 4 


8 13 


9 5 


$ greatest elong. 26 28 X. 


16 


7 40 


7 46 


7 48 


7 56 


2 32 


1 7 


10 33 


3 47 


8 66 


9 47 


% 6 d' ^ 3 51 N. 
\6h- ?U20S. 


17 


8 20 


8 26 


8 29 


8 39 


3 24 


1 49 


11 19 


4 33 


9 41 


10 33 


18 


9 8 


9 14 


9 18 


9 29 


4 19 


2 35 


morn 


5 22 


10 30 


11 22 


S a0. 


19 


10 3 


10 9 


10 13 


10 24 


5 16 


3 24 


8 


6 18 


11 26 


morn 




a> 


11 5 


11 11 


11 15 


11 26 


6 14 


4 20 


1 4 


7 16 


mora 


18 


16(A Sunday after Trinity. 


31 


mom 


mom 


morn 


mom 


7 12 


5 25 


2 9 


8 17 


31 


1 23 


St. Matthew. 


22 


14 


19 


22 


33 


8 9 


635 


3 19 


9 29 


1 41 


233 




23 


1 26 


1 30 


1 32 


1 43 


9 4 


7 45 


4 29 


10 37 


2 61 


343 


enters ^. 
9<5cf- ?109 8. 


24 


2 39 


2 42 


2 44 


2 55 


9 58 


8 50 


5 34 


11 37 


3 56 


448 


To 


3 53 


3 55 


3 56 


4 6 


10 50 


9 45 


6 29 


mom 


4 51 


543 




26 


5 6 


5 6 


5 6 


5 14 


11 42 


10 37 


7 21 


32 


6 43 


' 6 35 




27 


rises. 


rises 


rises 


rises. 


mom 


11 24 


8 8 


1 18 


6 30 


7 22 


170k Sunday after Trinity. 


28 


6 21 


6 25 


6 27 


6 33 


32 


6 


8 50 


1 59 


7 12 


8 4 


i'sL^-^*®- 


29 


6 57 


7 2 


7 5 


7 13 


1 24 


50 


9 34 


2 46 


7 56 


8 48 


ao 


7 38 


7 44 


7 47 


7 55 


2 16 


1 34 


10 18 


3 31 


8 40 


9 32 





/ 



SGLIPSES OF JUPITER'S 8AT£l4LITi;S. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






B. X. s. 






B. X. 8. 


Aug. 9 


I. Reapp. 
IILStepp. 


9 37 58 m. 


Aug. 16 


I. Recmp. 
in. Imapp. 


11 32 85 m. 


9 


11 48 14re. 


17 


3 47 3m. 


10 


in. Reapp. 


1 63 47 m. 


17 


III. Reapp. 


5 51 64 m. 


11 


I. 


4 6 38m. 


18 


I. 


6 1 15 m. 


11 


n. •* 


9 56 40 m. 


18 


II. •* 


S3 22 e. 


12 


I. « 


10 35 16 e. 


20 


I. 


29 52m. 


14 


I. « 


5 3 58e. 


21 


I. * 


5 58 54e. 


14 


II. « 


11 15 28 e. 


22 


n « 


162 4 m. 



8S 



OOTOBBB, 1868. 



PHASES 0¥ THB MOON. 

Last Quarter 4d. Sh. ISnL pjl 

Now Moon ...«•»..... 12d. lli. 34iii. ** 

First Quarter IM. 2h. 68m. « 

FuU Moon 26d, Oh. 47in. « 

Apogee 6d. Oh. ajc. 

Perigee 20d. 4iL pjl 



• 


i 


Boston. 
Sun 


N.T.rPhihk 
Sun 


Bait-Wash. 

Sun 


S.Fr'daco. 
Sun 


1 


inwB or Btais. 


i . 


s 


















1 


























• 






"8 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


• 


1 


d 

& 


a 




a 


1* 

OQ 






H. H. 


H. H. 


H. K. 


H. m. 


H. M. 


H. H. 


H. K. 


B. X. 


H. K. 


H. X. 


H. K. 


8. X. 


O / 


1 


Th. 


5 57 


6 42 


5 66 


543 


5 56 


5 43 


6 66 


644 


1140.7 


11 45 


1147 


1147 


3 6 


3 


FricL 


&8 


40 


67 


41 


56 


42 


66 


43 


40.4 


42 


44 


46 


29 


3 


Sat. 


5 S9 


88 


68 


89 


67 


40 


&I 


41 


40.1 


39 


41 


43 


8 62 


4 


Su. 


6 


87 


5 69 


38 


68 


38 


67 


39 


48.8 


37 


39 


40 


4 16 


6 


Mon. 


1 


85 


6 


36 


5 59 


37 


68 


38 


48.5 


34 


36 


88 


4 ao 


6 


Tues. 


2 


33 


1 


35 


6 


35 


5 69 


36 


48.2 


31 


34 


35 


6 2 


7 


Wed. 


3 


32 


2 


33 


1 


34 


6 


36 


47.9 


29 


31 


83 


25i 


8 


Th. 


5 


30 


3 


31 


2 


32 


1 


83 


47.6 


25 


29 


80 


6 48' 


9 


Frid. 


6 


28 


4 


30 


8 


81 


2 


32 


47.3 


22 


26 


28 


6 U* 


10 


Sat. 


r 


27 


5 


28 


4 


29 


3 


30 


47.1 


20 


23 


26 


84 


U 


Sail. 


8 


25 


6 


27 


6 


28 


4 


20 


46.8 


17 


21 


23 


6 67 


12 


Men. 


9 


23 


7 


25 


6 


26 


6 


27 


46.6 


14 


18 


90 


7 li^ 


IB 


Tues. 


10 


22 


8 


24 


7 


25 


6 


26 


46.3 


12 


16 


18 


7 42 


14 


Wed. 


11 


20 


9 


22 


8 


23 


7 


24 


46.1 


9 


13 


16 


8 4 


1^ 


Th. 


13 


18 


10 


21 


9 


22 


8 


23 


46.9 


5 


U 


13 


37 


16 


Frid. 


14 


17 


12 


19 


10 


20 


8 


22 


46.7 


8 


7 


10 


840 


17 


Sat. 


15 


15 


13 


18 


11 


19 


9 


21 


46.5 


11 


6 


8 


9 11 


18 


Bob. 


16 


14 


14 


16 


12 


18 


10 


20 


46.3 


10 68 


2 


6 


33 


19 


Men. 


17 


12 


15 


15 


18 


16 


11 


18 


46.1 


66 


11 


3 


9 65 


» 


Tues. 


19 


11 


16 


14 


14 


15 


12 


17 


44.9 


62 


10 66 


U 1 


10 16 


21 


Wed. 


20 


9 


17 


12 


15 


13 


13 


15 


44.7 


40 


65 


10 58 


88 


22 


Th. 


21 


8 


18 


10 


16 


12 


14 


14 


44.6 


47 


62 


66 


10 6» 


23 


Frid. 


22 


6 


19 


9 


18 


11 


16 


13 


44.4 


44 


60 


53 


11 20 


24 


Sat. 


23 


5 


20 


8 


19 


9 


17 


11 


44.3 


42 


48 


60 


11 41 


25 


Shh. 


25 


3 


21 


6 


20 


8 


18 


10 


44.2 


88 


45 


48 


12 2 


26 


Men. 


26 


2 


23 


5 


21 


7 


19 


9 


44.1 


36 


42 


46 


23 


27 


Tues. 


27 


6 


24 


4 


. 22 


6 


20 


8 


44.0 


33 


40 


44 


12 43 


28 


Wed. 


28 


4 59 


25 


2 


23 


4 


21 


6 


43.9 


31 


87 


41 


13 4 


29 


Th. 


30 


68 


26 


1 


24 


8 


22 


6 


43.8 


28 


35 


SO 


24 


30 


Frid. 


31 


56 


27 


6 


25 


2 


23 


4 


43.8 


25 


33 


37 


13 43 


31 


Sat. 


6 32 


4 55 


628 


4 59 


6 26 


5 1 


6 24 


6 3 


11 43.7 


10 23 


10 31 


10 35 


14 3 



ECLIPSES OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 






H. K. 8. 






H. H. 8. 


Ang. 23 


I. Beapp. 
111. sTsapp. 


1 27 He. 


Aug. 29 


n. Beapp. 


4 28 30 m. 


24 


7 46 47 m. 


30 


I. Beapp. 


3 21 46 e. 


24 


ni. Beapp. 


9 49 56 m. 


81 


m.Disapp. 


1144 45 m. 


25 


I. 


7 66 51 m. 


81 


ni.Bei9p. 


1 48 13e. 


26 


n. " 


3 9 56e. 


Sept. 1 


I. ** 


960 26m. 


27 


L «« 


224 28m. 


1 


n. - 


5 46 18 e. 


28 


L « 


8 68 9e. 


3 


I. " 


4 19 Im. 



1 



OCTOBSB, T«rtli .]fw«h. 



88 



Day of 
Month. 


Tbhub. 


Hau. 


JTuttnE. 


SATinui. 


Blaeik 


.'S6t8. 


Rises. 


S6t8. 


Rli66. 


S6t8. 


Ria6S. 


SeU. 


1 

U 
21 


H. X. 

6 48 m. 
4 42 m. 
3 52 m. 


H. X. 

4 55e. 
4106. 
3306. 


H. X. 

5 68 m. 
5 52 m. 
5 46m. 


H. X. 

6 46e. 
6 226. 
4 666. 


H. X. 

7 65 m. 
6 57 m. 


H. K. 

6446. 

.9 106. 

5.37 6. 


B. K. 

5 58 m. 
5 24m. 
4 51m. 


B. X. 

5 526. 

6 176. 
4396. 



e 
o 

o 



Hoox Rxsis Oft Sks. 



I 



'-.2 



1^ 






■ 



I 



TtxB or HMB WAttt. 



it 



A 



I 



PsuroxBVA, 
SmiVAn^ HouDAfs, Ac. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

'7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

U 

15 

16 

17 

18 

10 

2D 

21 

22 

23 

3i 

25 

26 

27 

SB 

29 

3D 

31 



liSi 


H. X. 


R, X. 


B. X. 


8 ao 


8 83 


842 


912 


018 


22 


933 


10 5 


ion 


10 16 


10 26 


10 60 


11 6 


11 8 


11 20 


1166 


mom 


mom 


morn 


morn 


6^ 


4 


14 


064 


1 


1 


1 63 


1 66 


1 58 


2 7 


2 63 


2 66 


2 56 


3 4 


863 


354 


364 


4 


4 66 


465 


4 56 


5 3 


6 


5 68 


5 57 


6 4 


a6te. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


6 20 


6 25 


628 


687 


7 6 


7 11 


7 15 


7 26 


7 59 


8 6 


8 


8 20 





9 6 


10 


921 


10 6 


10 12 


10 15 


10 26 


U 16 


11 21 


11 24 


11 84 


mom 


mom 


morn 


mom 


027 


036 


32 


42 


188 


1 40 


141 


1 50 


240 


2 40 


2 40 


2 57 


860 


368 


3 68 


4 5 


6 8 


6 6 


6 6 


6 12 


6 16 


6 13 


6 11 


6 17 


ri066. 


riM6 


rises 


rises. 


6 14 


620 


6 24 


634 


7 2 


7 8 


7 12 


7 22 


764 


8 


8 4 


8 14 


840 


8 55 


8 68 


81 



B. X. 
8 8 
3 59 
449 

5 38 
625 
7 11 

7 55 

8 SO 

9 22 
10 6 

10 51 

11 37 

27 

1 19 

2 14 

3 11 

4 10 

6 7 

6 4 
658 

7 51 
842 
9 32 

10 28 

tl 18 

mom 

4 

56 

1 48 
230 
330 



B. X. 


B. X. 


220 


11 4 


8 6 


11 50 


3 55 


30 


4 47 


181 


6 42 


2 26 


687 


321 


7 31 


4 15 


823 


5 7 


9 10 


6 54 


956 


6 40 

7 23 


10 30 


11 20 


8 4 


morn 


846 


045 


9 29 


10 17 


183 


11 6 


222 


U 58 


8 14 


mom 


4 It 

5 14 


65 


1 58 


6 10 


3 3 


7 24 


4 8 


8 24 


5 8 


19 


6 3 


10 11 


6 55 


10 59 


7 43 


11 42 


826 


26 


9 10 


1 10 


054 


1 56 


10 89 


2 40 


11 24 



B. 

4 
5 
5 



K 

18 

4 

53 



B. X. 

9 26 



10 
11 



12 
1 



642 

7 30 

8 10 

9 14 
10 8 

10 68 

11 49 
84 
1 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 10 

11 8 
mom 

5 



1163 




14 

65 

41 

80 

20 

12 



6 

8 

7 



68 
35 
21 
7 
58 



4 38 



48 

49f 



29 

16 

2 

46 

6 26 

7 8 

7 51 

8 89 
281 

10 20 

11 17 
mom 

20 



1 
2 



26 
80 

3 30 

4 25 

5 17 

6 5 

6 48 

7 82 

8 16 
1 

9 46 



X. 

18 
4 
11 58 



a. 



45 
40 
35 



329 



4 
5 
5 



21 

8 

54 



6 87 



7 
8 



18 




8 48 
981 

10 20 

11 12 
room 

9 



12 
17 
22 
22 
17 
9 

6 57 

7 40 

8 24 

9 8 
9 58 

10 38 



1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 



statlottAry. 

(5 0. drc5 0. 

I8< A Sbmdap ajler TrimHiff, 



9 (5 <(• $268. . 
VMi Sunday aJter JHwUf. 

'3|c5 a. i;818K. 



stationary. 
iUh Sunday ajtet Drfnity, 
9 stetlonarr. 
g in pedhelion. 
i dh' $0408. 



21ie Sunday afUr^ IHMtv . 
Q greatest elong; 18 25 W. 

<Sb. Sbmmt and Aide, 
greatest BaL Lat. M. 



BOUPSBA OP JUPnSB^S BATSLUVni. 



DV 


Phenom. 


Timis. 


D^y. 


Pheaom. 


TtaM* 


Sept. 4 

6 
7 
7 
8 
8 


LReapp. 

n. « 

I. •* 
ill. Disapp. 
m. Reapp. 
I. 

n. " 


B. X. 8. 

10 47 43 6. 

7 4 45m. 
6 16 196. 

8 43 426. 
5 46 816. 

11 44 57 m. 
8 22 296. 


Sept. 10 
12 
12 
18 
14 
14 
15 


LB-pp 

n. « 
I. " 

m. Disapp. 
ULBeapp. 
I. •* 


B. X. 8. 

6 18 38m. 
42 14m. 
40 48 m. 

7 10 486. 
7 48 146. 
45 246. 
130 286. 



rK0V!SIKS:^!lS«3. 



FHASea OF THE MOON. 



LMtdBirMr....- 


f- 1^' ^ 






Full Moon _ 


^- •■«- 


<H «. 













«»< 


4M 
















ID 11 










s 


























































































































































































































s 




































































































































































































































IS 


































































































































































































































t?1 












r 




















































































































sst 




























au 


i u 


tm 








1 Ul 


ttM 




U«^ 




em 


»BB 


zi as 



«v. 


Fbmn. 


mn. 


MT- 


PhMom. 


Ttan 


■B»pt, 16 

30 
3t 


li. " 

II.Raip,. 


laMWe. 

11 « g s. 




li " 
ni. " 


B. M.>. 

lUltm 

UMM*. 
»4a Im. 



1 



Novmns9(nBv«dk<][onfh« 





YxNua. 


• ^iU.' 


YOftXKE. > 


SATuair. 


Month. 


- -- 




. ] 




Rifles. 


< SiBtfl. 


RtoM. 


Beta. 


BiMfl. 


i 

■etit 


Blsefl. 


Bets. 


1 


H. M. 

8 19 m. 


n. u. 
8 Ue. 


■. K. 

6 40 m. 


H. ir.- • 
4846. 


B. V. ■ 

6 26.m. 


H. V. 

6 Oe. 


" ' 1 
4 16 m. 


H. K. 

8 60e. 


11 


3 6 m. 


42 66«. ' 


.« 86 m. 


4Ue. 


6 67 m. 


4 27e. 


f 40 m. 


8 23e. 


21 


8 2m. 


..2l.40«., 


6 80 m. 


. .8 ^9.®-.. 


6 20 m. 


3 580. 


8 Om. 


2 46e. 



• 


vo9»'itam «i» Mf8. 


1 


Tim or Hiaa Waseb. ' 


1 




1 




PBnroiaar A|L 

SUBAAn, HOIOAW, Ac. ' 

— 


|- 




\ii 


4 


• 

d 


• 


1 




|j 




H. ir. 


«. v.* 


a. M. 


B. -X. 


B. V. 


«. M. 


ta. K. 


6. te. 


to. «L 


ll.'ll. 


. 




945 


60 


9 63 


16 8 


418 


8 26 


9^ 


6 2» 


10 31 


U23 


AttSndt, [Aatmn&. 




10 43 


10 4r 


10 49 


10 68 


6 4 


;4U 


66 


6 10 


HIT 


9 


8 


1141 


1144 


11 46 


11 66 


549 


6 


1 44 


664 


6 


68 


'■ . » 


4 


mflfin 


mors 


moTW 


mom 


6 83 


6 50 


280 


7 38 


068 


1 60 


1 • 




0^ 


04» 


43 


62 


r 16 


-6 41' 


Z 26 


8 23 


1 47 


289 


$ at greatest briUiitfcy; 




1^ 


140^ 


1 41 


1 40 


•T 68 
•8 42 


•7 86^ 


420 


91j9 


242 


384 


.la* • 




2» 


239^ 


2 30 


2 46 


^8 28 


6 10 


10 12F 


3 32 


424 


$ C5 <[. 9 368M. 




846 


8 39 


8 38 


846 


9 28 


i) 16 


6 


11 6 


422 


6 14 


28d Amdap afUr THhitf. 





445 


448 


4 42 


440 


^17 


10 6- 


640 


11 68 


6 11 


6 8 


5 c5tf. V112N. • ■ 
(f 3 <( . (f 2 34 N. 


10 


h 66 


6 62 


6 60 


6 67 


n 8 


10 64' 


7 88 


048 


6 


6 62 


n 


Mta. 


■eta. 


setflL 


sets. 


!l 


11 42 


8 26 


1 36 


648 


7 40 


12 


6 61 


6 67 


6 1 


6 12 


mom* 


9 18 


2 24 


7 35 


8 27- 


. ' ' 


18 


661 


8 67 


7 


7 U 


« 


29 


10 6 


3 18 


8 27 


9 19 


d'U- ^OUJUi*^ ^ 


U 


7 6« 


8 2 


8 6 


8 16 


8 69 


1 21 


10 68 


4 12 


9 20 


10 12 


f 


16 


9 » 


9 11 


9 14 


925 


2 14* 


1140 


5 3 


10 11 


11 3 


24M AMuiay^/farfWk^; 


M 


10 1^ 


10 22 


10 94< 


10 86 


4 66 


3 6 


mom 


5 68 


11 6 


11 57 


. ,' ! 


17 


11 2» 


11 82 


11 33 


11 42 


648 


3 60 


48 


6 61 


mom 


mora 




18 


mom 


mom 


mom 


mom 


638 


4 67 


141 


7 48 


3 


66 


•• • * ' 


19 


039 


40 


041 


060 


7 28 


6 67 


2 41 


837 


1 3 


1 66 


. - < 


20 


1 43 


1 48 


1 48 


1 66 


8 17 


6 66 


8 39 


9 80 


2 1 


2 63 


.1 ••• 


21 


253 


266 


264 


8 1 


9 6 


7 64 


438 


10 40 


3 


3 62 


Pre»entaHonqfAr.M. 


23 


4 4 


4 1 


3 69 


4 6 


966 


8 68 


537 


1186 


3 69 


4fil 


2btk Sunda^Jter fHki««^ 

9 6h^?0 6fr». 


23 


6 9 


6 6 


6 3 


6 8 


10 47 

11 to 


9 44 


6 28. 


mom 


460 


6 42 


24 


612 


6 7 


6 4 


^ 6 8 


K) 84 


7 18 


20 


540 


6 32 


$(54yfrgiiiis. 


25 


rieee. 


riwi 


rises 


rises. 


taom 


11 21 


8 6 


1 16 


627 


7 19 


. • 


28 


644 


6 60 


6 54 


6 6 


30 


4 


8 48 


•1 67 


7 10 


8 2 


§ C. S 227-II.- 


27 


688 


644 


6 48 


6 69 


1 21 


47 


9 31 


243 


7 63 


8 46 


^ • ^ .1: •' 


28 


734 


739 


7 42 


' 7 63 


■2 10 


1 30 


10 14 


3 27 


8 36 


9 28 


• 


29 


8 80 


886 


8 88 


' 8 48 


2 58 


2 18 


10 67 


4 11 


19 


10 11 


Advent Shtnday. 


80^ 


929 


988 


9 36 


9 M 


843 


2 64 


ll 88 


•4 52 

L 


10 


10 62 


St.Andreit, • / 



i^cur^sa p? mjxjf»,*» #ai9WXis* 



rv- 



8«pt.29 
30. 



PheBooi. 



LResyp. 
n«Ee*))^ 



TiBIA. 



B. M. 8. 
6 28 21«. 

4 9 48m. 



Tlie satellites of Jupiter are faiTisible 
daring the montiii or Obt^ber and No^ 
T«rabef , Jupiter bdkig Doo near the sun. 

Dec. 2 ILDIsapp. I 8 j|8 Om. 



DV- 



Dec. 2 
2 
3 
4 
6 
.6 
7 



PhewHn. 



in. Dimppi. 

m. Relipp. 
II. Disapp« 
I. * 
I. « 
IL " 
I. «. 



Tini^,. 



B. K. 8. 

8 26 ^e. 
6 22 46 e. 

1 3 66m. 

2 66 24 m. 

9 94 66e. 
2 20 45e. 
8 13 21 e. 



r 



86 



s>ao» 



«*:^r>*: 



PHASES OF THS MOON. 

hut Qnartor ^ 8d. 7b. dm. 

Slem MooA .....o*..... ->*^ lOd. 8h. Urn. pjf. 

Fint Quarter 17d. 6h. 88m. a.m. 

full Mova • - f .«. 24<L Ob. 42in. P.1C 

, ,11 I t ...< 



Perigee.' ; .^.........t...^ '. ltd. Ob. Kx. 

Apogee...... 28d. M. 






I 



1 

•9 



Boston. 
Son 

.; t t 






N.T.-Pbi]a. 
Sun ' 



I i 



Balt-Wasb. 
■' Son ' 






S.Fr'ciflco. 



I 



I 



I 

a 



..IipmniMiAtii. :' 



^1 



OQ 



3 

4 

( 

6 

7 

10 
11 
12 
18 
14 

U 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
28 
28 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
.81 





H. K. 


H. M. 


Tmm. 


Tja 


4 28 


Wed 


28 


Th. 


12 


28 


Vrid. 


13 


28 


BM. 


14 


27 


Su. 


15 


27 


Moiu 


16 


27 


Zvas. 


17 


27 


Wed. 


16 


27 


Tb. 


.w 


27 


Frid. 


20 


27 


Sat. 


20 


27 


8«k 


XL 


27 


Mod. 


22 


28 


XMBk 


28 


26 


Wed. 


23 


28 


Tb. 


24 


20 


Frid. 


26 


20 


Sat. 


26 


20 


8UU 


26 


80 


Moo. 


26 


80 


XMBk 


27 


81 


W^l 


2r 


81 


Tb. 


38 


82 


Frid. 


28 


32 


Sit. . 


20 


. 88 


Swi. 


20 


34 


Mod. 


20 


35 


Taes. 


20 


35 


Wed. 


80 


36 


Tb. 


780 


4.87 



B. K. 

7 4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

14 

15 

16 

17 



H. «. 
14 85 
^ 84 
84 
34 
34 
.34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
84 
86 
86 
171 85 
18 36 



10 
10 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 
22 



23 

23 

7 23 



86 
86 

37 

371 

88 

80 

30 

40 



22i 40 
41 



42 

43 

4 44 



H. V.^ v.! 


H. v. 


'•f* 


«• v. 


H. x. 


; H. x« 


llLM. 


.7 


4 38 


6 56 


441 


U49.2 


9 18, 


9 81 


989 


1 


38 


67 


42 


49.6 


17 


20i 


87 


2 


38 


58 


42 


60.0 


,16 


28 


St 


3 


38 


6 59 


42 


60.4 


16 


27 


4 


37 


7 


41 


60J 


18 


98. 




5 


37 


1 


41 


61.2 


12 


». 


89 


. 6 


87 


. 2 


^1 


61.7 


11 


26 


^ 


7 


87 


3 


41 


62.1 


.10 


24 


80 


7 


87 


3 


41 


66.5 


9 


28 


80 


8 


38 


4 


42 


68.0 


8 


22 


80 





38 


6 


42 


63.6 


7 


21 


29 


10 


9H 


6 


42 


63.9 


7 


% 


28 


11 


88 


7 


42 


64.4 


. 6 


V 


11 


38 


7 


42 


64.9 


6 


1^ 


n 


12 


39 


» 


43 


65^ 


6 


19 


27 


13 


39 


9 


43 


65.8 


6 


IS 


2ft 


13 


39 


9 


43 


66.3 


6 


18 


2ft 


14 


40 


10 


. 44 


66J 


4 


18 


28 


15 


40 


11 


44 


67^ 


4 


17 


26 


15 


40 


11 


44 


67.8 


4 


17 


« 


16 


41 


12 


45 


68.3 


4 


17 


26 


16 


41 


12 


45 


68.8 


4 


17 


96 


17 


42 


13 


46 


69.3 


4' 


17 


36 


17 


42 


13 


46 


1169.8 


4 


18 


26 


18 


43 


14 


47 


0.3 


4 


18 


26 


. 18 


44 


14 


48 


0.8 


4 


18 


a^ 


18 


44 


14 


48 


1.3 


6 


18 


S 


10 


45 


16 


49 


1.8 


6 


18 


26 


19 


46 


16 


50 


2.3 


6 


19 


37 


10 


47 


15 


61 


2.8 


6 


20 


28 


7 10 


447 


7 15 


4 61 


3.3 


9 7 


9 21 


928 



21 417 

21 67 
82 6 

U 
38 
39 
86 
4S 
4» 

22 66 

23 
» 

M 
1« 
1ft 
22 

24 
3ft 
37 
27 
27 
27 
2G 
2i 
23 
21 
18 
16 
11 
23 7 



BCLIPSBS OF JVFITBB'S SATBLLmiB. 



D»y. 


Pbenom. 


Tfane.- 


Bay. 


Pbenom. 


Time. 






■. X. 8. 






H. X. 8. 


Sec 9 


LDiMwp. 


10 21 51m. 


Dec. 14 


LBlBapfi. 


6 47 8a. 


9 


in. « 


7 24 306. 


16 


I. * 


16 886. 


9 


ill. fteapp. 


9 20 25 6. 


16 


in, " 


U 22 206. 


10 


ILDisapp. 


3 87 83 m. 


17 


IILReapp^ 


118 2m. 
6 11 Im. 


11 


L 


4 60 14 m. 


17 


n.X>itaM). 


12 


I. " 


11 18 44 e. 


18 


I. ** 


6 44 Om. 


13 


IL « 


4 64 176. 


30 


I. "' 


112 29 m. 



^ 



DI0mBXB,.Tiralttk IBMifiL 



8? 





Ybtus. 


Mau. 


Jupimu 




Rifles. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Eta-. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


1 
11 


H. M. 

8 dm. 
8 16 m. 
8 aim. 


B. K. 

2 26e. 
2Ue. 

3 8«. 


B. M. 

5 26m. 

6 22 m. 
6 19m. 


B. X. 

8 80e. 
8 lie. 
2 64e. 


B. X. 

6 Im. 

4 aam. 

4 2m. 


B. M. 

8 19e. 
2 46* 
2 12e. 


B. X. 

2 81m. 
1 A6m. 

1 aom. 


B. X. 

2 9e. 
1826. 
64e^ 



■ 

5 


Moan Bum om fliH. 


j 


Ton or Hios Wasib. 




B 

O 

1 




i 




Pbmumma, 
floMDAn, HouMiB, ke, 

• 


' Boston. 

_ _ _ 1 


Kg 




4 


• 


• 


i 


1 


|i 


B. X. 


H. X. 


B. X. 


to. X. 


B. X. 


B. K. 


B. X. 


B. X. 


B. X. 




1 


10 2» 


K) 89 


19 82 


10 41 


4 37 


884 


18 


6 82 


10 40 


11 88 


9 sap. <5 Gi 


3 


1196 


11 28 


11 39 


U8r 


6 10 


4 17 


1 1 


6 15 


11 28 


15 






mom 


mom 


morn 


mom' 


6 62 


6 6 


1 49 


50 


on 


1 8 


6 In aphelion. 
1/c5«*Wb.*(8m.T)W. 




036 


036 


026 


84 


635 


554 


238 


7 41 


1 


1 52 




1 36 


1 25 


125 


1 38 


tl8 


646 


3 30 


828 


1 52 


244 


' 




239 


327 


226 


288 


8 5 


7 43 


426 


9 39 


2 48 


840 


34 SMtdap iff Ad/MHiL 




386 


888 


880 


836 


864 


889 


628 


10 26 


346 


437 


9 6 4. 9 616K. , 




4 4B 


4 89 


487 


4 43 


9 47 


934 


6 18 


11 25 


440 


632 


9 greatest eiong. 46 40 W. 
} c3itVirg.3f:(8m.7)B. 




6fiO 


645 


642 


6 47 


10 44 


10 30 


7 14 


025 


5 36 


6 28 


10 


6 56 


6 49 


646 


6 51 


1145 


11 26 


8 9 


119 


6 31 


7 23 


U 


sets: 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


046 


mom 


9 1 


2 11 


7 28 


8 15 




13 


6 50 


6 55 


658 


7 10 


148 


17 


9 53 


8 6 


8 15 


9 7 


, 


U 


8 6 


8 9 


8 11 


822 


346 


1 9 


10 44 


868 


9 6 


68 


9dami4af4ifA4vinL 
9 in periheUoo. 


u 


9 18 


921 


9 23 


9 38 


842 


2 


11 35 


440 


9 67 


10 49 


16 


10 30 


10 81 


10 32 


10 41 


4 35 


2 51 


morn 


5 38 


10 46 


1138 


S S0. 


16 


11 40 


11 40 


11 40 


11 48 


526 


340 


024 


6 29 


11 38 


mom 




n 


mom 


morn 


morn 


mom 


6 15 


4 32 


1 16 


7 18 


mora 


030 




u 


048 


47 


46 


54 


7 4 


528 


2 12 


8 10 


84 


1 26 


' 


19 


1 66 


1 56 


1 52 


1 50 


7 53 


628 


8 12 


10 


184 


336 




20 


8 1 


3 58 


2 56 


3 2 


8 43 


7 27 


4 11 


10 11 


238 


826 


4ih Sunday ^rAdvvlU, 


& 


4 4 


4 


3 58 


4 2 


933 


826 


6 9 


11 10 


3 81 


423 


' 


22 


6 4 


4 50 


4 56 


5 


10 24 


920 


6 4 


mom 


426 


5 18 


enters td*< 


23 


5 60 


6 54 


5 51 


5 55 


11 14 


10 12 


666 


5 


5 18 


6 10 


1 


21 


6 61 


6 45 


6 42 


645 


mom 


11 1 


7 45 


55 


6 7 


650 


Ckrimiuu, 


» 


nseSk 


rtses 


rises 


• vises. 


4 


1X48 


827 


137 


649 


7 41 


« 


638 


037 


630 


640 


062 


022 


9 6 


2 16 


7 28 


830 


SLStq^hen. 


27 


7 30 


7 24 


7 26 


735 


130 


1 3 


9 47 


3 


8 9 


9 1 


lie Simd. ajUr Chrittmat, 


28 


8 18 


8 21 


8 28 


8 31 


228 


1 42 


10 26 


839 


848 


940 


Mnocentt, [St. Jdkn. 


29 


916 


9 18 


9 19 


927 


8 6 


320 


11 4 


4 18 


926 


10 18 


80 


10 14 


10 15 


10 16 


10 28 


848 


1160 


11 48 


4 67 


10 6 


10 67 


- r 


n 

— 


1118 


11 13 


11 13 


1130 


489 


888 


022 


686 


10 44 


1186 


in perigee. 


. 




....,-. .,-'j -.-'. 


i 1 1 1 1 





IKJiifPStB OV JtJtTPSBfB SATILLITIS. 



Day. 


Phenom. 


Time. 


Say. 


Phenom. 


Timo. 






H. X. S. 






B. X. 9. 


Dec. 20 


II. Pisapp. 


7 27 41 e. 


Dec. 27 


I. Disapp. 


8 6 12m. 


21 


I. « 


7 40 53e. 


27 


n. " 


10 55e. 


28 


I. ** 


2 9 22e. 


28 


I. « 


984 84 e. 


94 


m. «' 


8 21 3m. 


80 


I. « 


4 8 2e. 


34 


nLReam. 


6 16 13m. 


81 


in. " 


7 IS 64m. 


If 


ILPiaaop. 
I. ^^ 


8 44 30m. 
8 37 43 m. 


31 
81 


ni. Reapp. 
n. Disapp. 


9U46m. 
11 17 80m. 






r 



S8 



'T* 



METEOBOLOalr. 



[1863. 



Oomparison of One Tear with SeTenL 

BT JAIRS JL. KIBKPAnUOK, AJf. 

Ths yalne of a series cf obsenrations on the 

weather depends, among other things, on the 

length of time over which it extends. Vhe ph»> 

Bomena dftsetved daring a single day ara of hot 

littl» value when c<nnpared with tfaqse^f a whole 

months 9o '^the obsertrations for aat. jtat will 

give bot'A llifi^.t ldea«f th« oUmaieofa place, 

compared with what might be obtained by com- 
bining the results obtained for a series of years. 

9^ gr«at«r the laogth. of time during which tha. 

obseryations are continued, the more valuable 

#ill the results become, and the mnrer will iftey 

Ifpproach' to^'thw constants, or fixed quantities, 

ijBpnNBtingt^ •jhwtwH? climate of the place at 

^hich they are taken. It is only by a lon^oon- 

1|nued series of observations that the mean or 

sverageteaperaturaof any place can be obtained; 

ijnd it is by a comparison of the corresponding 

IJBmperatnre of any 'particulsr time with the 

ifiean temperature that we may perceive the 

iimffint iof deviation above or t>elow the usual 

4egree. So with the pressure of the atmosphere, 

the qukutil^ of rai<^ the nolstUEV in the air, «nd 
^11 the. other elements which unite to nMke up 
what Is gfenerany known as *'the weaflier/' To 
illoBtrate this sul^ect, the two tables which follow 
sre given. The first contains an abstract of the 
c|bservatIons made at Philadelphia for one year, 
11861; atkd'the other, the results of the obsorvai' 
lions made at the same place for eleven years and 
4 quarter. The latter may be said to be an ap- 
liroach to the constants referred to above; the 
Averages altering but little as new years are added, 

I By referenoe to these tables, It will be seen that 
1^ temperature of the spring of 1861 was almost 
identical with that of the same season for more than 
^even years ; while the summec was a little colder, 
^d the winter and frtttitmn a little warmer, than 
ijhe average for thoee seaions fbr the whole |»eitod. 
The observations were tak^ at ^e hours of 



est degree for each day, and that headed *'Mean 
^«^^y range," the average diiTerence of tempera- 
ture between two successive days. There la no 
doubt but that the healthinestfior^tinhealthineaa 
of a climaf e depends, hx some meaauije, ipon the 
btiddennasa asid extent of the dafly chhtogee of 
(temperature indicated in the twolasl^Deotioned 
columns. It will be seen that there is a more 
equable temperature throughout the whole day 
Ja .vintfir than in. either of the other seaacniB, 
while the daily range, or change of temperature 
tMA day to day, is Jess in tlM •ii]Illlle^ thaiuin 
any other season. 

If the barometric observations are camjMo-edyit 
will Iff interesting t» notice that the hourly re- 
sults ibr 1861 are almost identical with thoee £>r 
the whole period, wlUle those of the months diiler 
constflerably. It will also be obeervefl that the 
barometer la lowest in the month of Jnne; that 
it then rises, at flmfc slowly, and aftwward# 
quickly, until September, when it deeebndi until 
Kovember; It then rises until January, when it 
reaches its maximum or greatest he^g^t, an4 
finally liUlsj at first quickly and afterwards slowly, 
until JFune; thus showing tWo welMeflHed mnxlf 
ma, In January and September, and two minima^ 
in June and November. Other peculiarities of ik^ 
pressure of the atmosphere wight ^ noticed, cQd 
time and space permit : let it tsullce to call atr 
tentioil to the remarkable cloneneas of th« aven^bf 
of the 9 F.3f. observations to the gsneral average 
|br the months, seasons, aiid years! This Is eti* 
dent not o^ly for the whole period, bat ai>pear« 
also in the observations for one year. 

The quantity of sky oovnred with ctt^nds J« 
estimated by the eye at the homrs M observation. 

By comparing the two tables, it wl)l be seen 
thaft the quantity of rain which fell in 1861 wlia 
about ly^ inches more than the average '^Vf'^^vA ; 
and' hy examining ffae amount indicated fer the 



1 AJC, ^ f.k., and 9 P.1C, bei^anse it,ha«.been pevecal' sensonti, it will be seen that the excess 



i>und that the arithmetical mean of the resnltf 
ao found is very near what it would be if the 

fervations ware WbU oontiiiaoasly ^thtbngh the - 
te twenty-four hours. 
By comparing the hourly averages of tempera- 
ture of 1861 with those for fte' Wlihle ^1^ it 
will be seen that at 9 vm. they are identical, but 
in 1861 the tempemture at 7 a.m. was five-tenths 
of a degree higher, and at 2 p.m. seven-tenths of 
a degree lower, than usual. The averasre tem- 
perature for the year lfi61 was less than half a 
degree highar than for the whole period. 

The column tader Temperature, headed ^'Range,'* 
■hows the differenoe between the'hiihest and 
lowest temperfitnre attained in <?a^h,'month. The 
eolnmn pesde^ **^verage Oscillatioa** sbows the 



avenge i^£^reuce between the highest and low- 1 very remarkable. 



eecurred in the spring and autumn, wlUle ^e 
quantity registercMl daring the summer laontXia 
was ledl thati asuaL 

The F<»oe of Tapor and the Relative WwiMfij f. 
are calculated from obeorvations of the different 
•teovevstivaa indieated by two thermometers, one 
of which is kept dry, while the other is constantly 
wet. It will be seen that the former Increadea 
very regularly \dth the temperature, while the 
latter, indicating the quantity of moisture in the 
air as compared with entire saturation, appears, 
BO far as the months are concerned, to follow no 
fixed law. 

. fbe regnlarity of the wlndSyand the cofrespond- 
ettce of the oolnmiM in the two tables ijidicating 
the general direction ftx»Di wl^ch they blow, are 



UETEOBacoanuL aMiiiTAXicam;roB I86I. 



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TIDE TABXM'WftAOOAW.df '^VmD STATES. 



45 



Tide TablM for tlie Obast of the United Btatei. 
Pbbpaeis from tBK CoAsx SuRYEX Qmsktatiovb bt A. D. Bachb, SunHxnmnNDiT. 



By flie aid of the following tables, the tii^e and 
he^t of tbe tide at the places nained can be ap> 
proximately ascertidhed. To obtain the 'lime of 
hig^ water on a particular day, add the number of 
hours and'minutes given in tiie second cohmm of 
the tabib to the time of moDn*s transit or iouthlu| 
on tlHil day, obtained in the astronimiical^ part of 
the atananac; the sum will be the time required. 

On the Pacifle cdast, and on the western coast of 
the peninsula of Florida, thehelgbts and times of 
the morning and afternoon tides difTer (^nsiden^ 
My; tiie ayerage differences of two consecutive 
hig^ waters on the Pacific coast being about one 



foot, and of low waters two feet. (It is conakler»> 
bly more in Puget's Sound.) On the west coast of 
Florida these diiferences are only about half aa 
much. Rules and tables for the allowance to be 
made for these diflton^cev are given in the anniiil 
reports of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, 
but would be too long for in ser ti on in this pkww. 
.. .in the Onlf of Mexico^ west of Oqm San Bias; 
the tides -ebb and flow as a rule but. onoe in tweoh 
ty4bar hoars; being greatest when thtf mocm's d»> 
(dtnation is greatest, and SAaDest when the moon's 
declination is nothing. The heijg^ts of the tides on 
that part of the coast are given in table n. 



Tabsi No. I. 



9on. 



I.M 



OOABt FROM POBVLAKD TO NSW YORK. 

Hanniweirs Point,' Kennebec Biver, Me.««...., 

Portlnnd,Me 

Portamoath, N.H 

Newbnryport^ Haas..^ 

Rockpoit, Mass. .....^ 

g^fm , Ifass.y ..., 

Boston Li|^t» Biaas... ^ «; 

Boston, Buss 

Flymosth, Mass....'...-. «...«.. 

Wellfleet, Mass. 

Provinoetown, Mass..: « 

JKOUODSOyy JBift w B*»»>»^*«»e»>**»*<*a«eeeeee»^ »»•»»♦• # ■#■ ■*•••••>•*• *' 

Nantucket, tfass 

Hyannis, Mass «. 

Bdgartown, Mass. « *. 

Hofane^ Hole^ Mass*., ».. m- 

Thrpanlin Cove, Mass. .,.. 

Wood's Hole, north side, M»m 

Wood's H(de, south side, Mtas ,... 

Menemsba Blgtat, jfa ss.«... «.».»««».. .—mm ».«.«— .«».«....«« 

Quick's Hole, north side, Mfus ;.;.......; 

Quick's Hole, south side, Mfuss ^ «.. 

Cutt^nkjMaas 

Kettle Cove, Mass... , .,. 

Biid Uand Light, JiEass 

New Bedford entrance (Dnmpling Rock), Mass. 

Newport, R.I.~.. >•••• •*«. 

Point Judith, BX 

RoA Island, ILL ~ «.. 

mOuuMik Point, p '- *>^ i^.x. .•.•.......«.•........«.••••. ••••••• 

Bandy Hook, N.T....^ 

Newiroik,N.Y. ...i.,-. ..... 



fiUMOZr RzviR. 



Cobb's Ferry, N.T. 
Tkrrytown, N.Y.... 



Mean 

interval between 

time of moon's 

- transit and 

timeof 

h^^' water.' 




H. 

11 

11 

11 

11 

10 

U 

II 

11 

U 

11 

11 

11 

12 

12 

12 

11 

8 

T 

» 

T 

T 

7 

T 

T 



1ft 



22 
W 
18 
12 
Si 
10 

22 
•ft& 
24 
22 
Iff 
43 
4 
«» 
84 
46- 
81 
86 

4a 

48 
0» 
67 
46 
82 
86 
20 
Hi 







67 



Rise aad lUL 



lesL 
9.8 

9j0 

0.1 

lOlS 

lOii 

10.9 

11.8 

11.4 

18.2 

10.8 

6.8 

8.6 

8.0 

2.6 

1.8 

2.6 

4.7 

2.0 

8.9 

4j8 

Ji 

6X> 
6S 
4.6 
4.6 
8.7 
8i> 
2.4 
6.6 
54 



44 
4» 



Feet 

7jO 

%Ji 

7.2 

6.0 

7.1 

7.6 

8.1 

84 

OX)* 

0.2 

7.7 

24 

24 

14 

1.6 

14 

14 

8.1 

1.2 

14 

2.9 

?4 

2.9 

8.7 

84 

2.8 

8a 

2-6 
2*0 
14 
4.0 
84 



2J 
2.7 



-/ 
y 

f 

f 
i 



M 



Tabu No. I.— OontiBiied. 



VWU 



Tu'dImicIlNi Foint, IT.7. 

.W«rt PKiliit. K.Y 

J^MighkMpii*, N.Y, ..»« ,.. k... 

Stuyve«Rut, N,Y - , 

Cagtleton. N.Y , 

€hre«iibuflli, NT. 



Bise and fiOl. 






Lone ISLAMD SOUNO. 



• f •••«•*•• W«h*«*«fr««««l**«««^«aa^« 



Watch HUl, B.I 

StoninctoQ, Oobb 

littleMI IiiMd, X.Y. 
Nvw uondoBf OcHBii....... 

New Haven, jOonn...;.... 

Qysteir P^« 1^I*« N.V. *<. «•«*••.•■■.••••« ..*. 

Sand's Point. LJ.. NT „. i. 

Tbrog^Neck, N.Y. ^.^.......t '.. 



OuB dt NxY Jkbsol 



Mean / 


interval between 


time of 


moon's 


transit and 


time of 


hi^watv. 


H. 


x. 


10 


^ 


u 


2 


M 


M 


1 


a* 


3 


38 


4 


20 


6 


S 






OoW ^UK I^let, N.J. v.... 

Gape Sb^y laipUng^ N.J. ....... ~....«..>...< 

ItBLAwtu Bat aki> Rnm. 



jwiawMPe JUuskKwaws^ ami.«b..«...«.*»**.....«ia*« 

Higbeeli, Okm Maj^ N.J. ..«..........m.......&«.. 

ISgK Island I4l^t. If.J. «....M,....*«......«k.». 

AKanoB V niiveiii Jjei»>Mi«»«»»»«^»«««««««i>i i.....^^. 

PauaJpyniai Pa.. .»**••....*.*..••.... A«««*«..^a** 

C«MAn4KJi lAt ▲» KttSM. ' 

Old P«M»t Oomlbrt, Ta. ^...m. ^.. 

Point Lookout. MdL............. 

An n a p otis. M d ..... ..«»««.« .««».«»>»»««»»« 

Bixtkip tiigfat. Md..«.M........*..«...>a.«M*. 

Baltimore. Md. .».......« .^^. 

Washingtan, ]>.C. .^....................m.. 

Jamea luver (City FointX Tib.......,.^. 

T^jpahanttoclr, Ta.^».......«..........iM. 



OOtft ov NOBXK A2I9 SootR CttflmA, 9iamA» 
ijpVUBma. 

Beanlbrt, N.Cl ^ ^ ~ 

jhuq nw^4i| i^^u*« ••%••••«*•«••«.• ^a« ***•••«•••*• •••••k*«*«««« ••»«•• 

pomii ▼mwp^ ibVj^** ••»*»••••••••••«•••••••••••*•••••••••••*• •*••••#• 

Wilmington. N.C. 

Geor^stown eBtraofi^ ShC«» ....«>• m.. ........... 

Bull'&Uand Bay, &CL ^ ^ « 



9 

9 

9 

9 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 



T 

a 



a 
a 

9 

. 9 
11 



12 
IT 
19 
19 
Sft 
14 
19 
13 




7 
38 
28 
16 
11 
7 
13 
22 
20 




19 




33 

4 
62 
63 
44 



17 
58 

4 
8 
89 
10 
37 
54 
8 



7 
7 
7 

7 

9 

7 
7 



19 

6 

59 

16 



«j9 



4.6 

6^2 
7.0 
.6^9 
63 
63 



33 
13 
1.0 
13 
1.S 
3.4 
33 
314 
13 



33 

63 
63 

3Jt 
4.7 
6.7 



33 
33 
6J. 
63 
ft3 

5a 



23 
OJT 
03 
03 
03 
23 
23 
33 
13 



13 
23 
83 

33 
23 

a? 
9a 



im.) 



TIDE TABlMWn O4A0i WijItntD STATES. 



4r 



Mean 

intomtl betwMB 

time of moon's 

transit and 

time of 
big^ water. 



••••«•*••» 



Charleston (Cuetom-honAe wharf), S.O. .^v.... 

8L Helena Sound, S.C- „.; 

Vort Mlasid (Savannah entrance), Qa. « 

Bftvamiah (dry-doek wharf), Ga.....* 

Bobojr Idgfatbouae, €kL........ , „ 

8t. Simon's, Oa ,. ........^ 

fort Clinch, yia.«.« ^ , 

St. John's RiTer, Fla.. „ 

St. Angustine, Fla. 

Ciiite Florida, Fla * 

|3mlQ A^JFy JTltt* •••••«#*M**M«**t**«*«**«**««»^f ■*••••■•**!»• #•*••• 

Key West, Fla. « ,.- «•• •• ♦— 

TortugHs, Fla„ i 

Charlotte Harbor, Fla ^ 

Tiuupa fiay (Egmont Key), Fia» 

Oednr Keys (0epot Key), Fla. ...^ ,. — 

BL Mark's, Wa ^ 

WssTBBN Coast. 

8aa IMego, Gal .- 

San Pedro, 0*1 

Caylees Harbor, Gal «....^...~ 

San Lnis Obispo^ Gal. 

Mmitaroy, Gal. , .....m..* 

Sooth Varallone. Gal . 

San Francisco (North beachX Gal 

Hare Island (San Francisco Bay), Gal 

Bmiieia, « • 

lUYenswood, « <* 

Bodega, Gal.,« - 

Hnmboldt Bav, Gal....: 

Pbrt Orfbrd, Or , 

Astoria, Or,....; f 

Nee-oh Harbor, W.T, 4 ;« 

FWt X0WU8hflfld,.W.!rw>k..^.M.<..M<..*.....vMl>«a.....«..t. 

St«iUcoom, W.T „ 

8eiui-ah-moo Bay, W,T ,.:,. 





9.0 
7.4 
8j0 
T.6 
7.8 
BJSi 
6.7 
5.5 
4.9 
IJB 
2^ 
SjO 

\i 

n 



6j0 

4L7 

4.8 
4.8 
<j4 

4J) 
6.2 
5.1 
7^ 
47 
fi.6 
BJ» 
7.4 
7.4 
.5.6 
11.1 
6.6 



t 



4.4 

6.« 
bA 
.4 
.4 

8.6 
1.2 
1.3 
0.6 
0.0 
0:9 
«B 

la 

1.6 

1.4 



2A 
2.8 
2.4 
2J5 
M 
2.8 
4.1 
8.7 
4.0 
2.7 
8.6 
3.7 
4.6 
4.8 

4ja: 

7.2 
4.8 



Tabu No. H. 
BiSB Ain> Fau at 8sv£]lai, Stations ov the Ouu of Mexico. 



Stations. 



St. George's Islaiid, Fla j.... 

Penaaeola, Fia...» v....^..... .* 

Fort llorg»«,'Mobile Bay, Ala. « 

(kt Island; M$88 , 

Soatbwest Pass, La..... .^ 

We Demiftre. La 

lotrane^ to uike Caleaal«ii« La. .« 

^Teston, Seocaa...i. ^ «,.......»..•*.«* 

AraiuBs Pass^ Texas..).>*****^*» ..4.m.^..^.».*.. 

Brnxoi Santiago. Texas 



Mean rise and fall of tides. 



Mean, 



1.1 

1.0 

1.0 

13 

1.1. 

1.4 

L9 
1.1 
1.1 
0,9 



At 

Moon's greatest 

declination'. 



^eet. 
L8 
lA 
1.6 
1.9 
1.4 
2.2 
2^ 
L.0 
L.8 
1.2 



t 



. At 
Moon's least 
declination. 



Veat. 
0J6 
0.4 
0.4 
y).6 
0.6 
0.T 
1.7 
0.8 
0.6 
0.5 



i» 



TBS NATIQIUJt AlilUNACi 



imft 



TEE 00A8T BUEVEY. 



Thb impmtuice to a great commercial nation, 
whose domain borders on two Tast oceans, oi snch 
an institutioii as the United States Coast Survey, 
the ol^ect of which is the prodoction of accnrate 
charts of oar (kr-rsadiing coasts and nameroiis 
harbors, cannot fittil to be appreciated bjr every in- 
telligeftt mind. Oar Atlantic sea-board is one of 
the most dangeroos in the world; the Florida Ree6 
are .known by repate eren to the .backwoodsman; 
the Pacific Ocean rolls its thundering surf against 
forbidding, unbroken shores, in warning against 
daagens as yet scarcely discovered. The annual 
loss to the country by marine disasters is not less 
than ftom fifteen to twenty milUons of dollars, 
without mentioning the loss of life,— not to be mea- 
sured by any economical estimate. 

To diminish the risks of navigation, and partly 
to roUeve commerce from tiie tax imposed upon 
it by such losses, the Coast Survey has been in- 
atitoted. In connection with an eificient system 
ni Ught-honses anil beacons, accurate charts, with 
fall sailing-ditectiQas and notes of dangers, are 
among the foremost mean$ to that end. 

Other maritime* imtions, such as England and 
France, have long been engaged in a similar worl^; 
and the former, not content with snrveying her 
own, coasts and thpse of her dependenciiss, has for 
jean. prosecuted Snrveys in all the seas to which 
her commerce extends. 

Althoui^ the attention of the United States 
Government had easly been directed to the sul^ect 
under consideration* the work was not fiurly com- 
menced until 1832. It was then. taken up under 
the siq>erintendenoeof Professor V. B. Hassler, and 
by him continued until his death In 1843, at which 
tima the completed surveys wer^ couQirised be- 
tween Narragansett Bay and Cape Henl<q[>en, and 
the publication of charts had Just been commenced. 
His snccessor. Professor Alexander Dallas Bache, 
so impressed the QoTemment with a sense of the 
importance of prosecuting the work on an enlaiged 
scale, that it was soon put in <^ration on the coasts 
of all the Atlantic and Oulf States, and, upon the 
acquiiltion of Texas and California, was imme- 
diately extended to those, regions. Under the 
energetic direction of Professor Bache, the surveys 
have been prosecuted successfully to the present 
day, as rapidly as the means provided by Congress 
from year to year would permit. At present the 
Atlantic coast is about three*qtkarters done, and 
-the dulf coast one-third done; while on the Pacific 
coast, bat lately commenced, all the most essential 
information has been obtained and published, and 
a mora cpmpletei survey is in vigoqous progress. 

The whole w^rk is under the administtative 
direction of the Treasury Department. Upon the 
flnperlntendent (evolves the duty of planning its 
operatfons, for the scientiAc accuracy ai which he 
is responsible. The corps df Assistants is composed 
irf three ciasscsf— civiUao*, and army and navy 



officers. Kany of the dvilians baTB been trained 
in the Survey, entering as aids, and rising up by 
experience and merit to superior grades: these 
are called upon for dutjtf every kind. The officers 
of the army and navy are detailed for temix>rary 
service, upon application to the Heads of their De- 
partments, — the navy officers being put in cliarge 
of hydrognqiiiie vessels) and Uie army oOeers eus- 
ployed either in the office or in the land surveys. 

This organization thus arails itself of the spare 
forces of the military and naval service of the 
Country; and yet when they are called upon for 
their proper professional servicefi the work Is not 
entirely suspended, but is cootinned, on a reduced 
scale, by the nucleus cf civilians. 

The operations of the Coast Surrey are divided 
info three branches, — ^the geodetic, topographic, 
and hydrographic surveys. The geodetic survegr 
accurately determinea the relative posttiens on the 
surfoqe of the earth of a gr o a t number cf promi- 
nent points, by a system of triangnlatian and 
observations cf the true meridian lines, and of 
latitude and longitude. In these <^>erations the 
true qtheroidal figure of the earth ^ust he taken 
into-aoeottnt> and the most refined methods of 
practical science and astronomy are brouc^t into 
requisition. For such a sketch of these operf tlooa 
as would b^ intelligible to the general reader our 
pages. aiford. no. jroom;..bnt it may be said- thstt 
American science is acknowledged to have Im- 
prtjved tm former methods in nearly every depart- 
ment; and In the detetmlnation of longitude by 
means of the electric telegraph the Coast Survey 
has taken and kept the lead of all similar undsr- 
takingB< The positions fixed by the triangnlatloii 
form the groundwoiic of the topographic surrey 
which delineates the diore-Une of the coasts, bays^ 
and rivers, the shape and heights of hills, roads, 
houses, woods, .marshes* and fields^n short, all 
notevNMthy foatores of the country. This is done 
by means of an In st r ument called the pbnwiatte, 
with which a reduced drawing lh>m nature is made 
on a map on which the triangnlation pc^ts have 
been previously laid down In their true relative 
positions, according to the scale used, serving as 
checks against the accumulation of small errors. 
These topographical maps are generally amde on a 
scale of one ten-thousandth, or about six inches to 
the mile. 

Next in order, and based upon the points and 
shore-lines fUrnished by the triangnlation and topo- 
graphy, comes the hydrographic survey, which, by 
a thorough. system of ssttadlngii, delineates tha 
hidden eenflgniation of the s e a b ottom, diacover a 
channds, shoals, and rocks, assigns fhelr true po- 
sitions, and ShtKWS the depth of water and character 
of the bottom over the whole extent of the chart. 

JU.tbA.depthof i[atervarieawith tha tide^^ 
tha soundings are reforred to amnge or mean lam 
wafers for wMcb purpose observations of the tides 



1865.] 



THK COAST SUttVEY. 



'49 



are kept up simtilttneonsly w!th the sonndfngi. 
Obserrationg upon the direction and v<i*Iocity of the 
tidal currents are also made, and the resnlts noted 
6n the charts; and in a like manuefr the efTect of 
prerailinj; winds upon the water*Ievel is made n 
subject of iuTestigation. ' 

' In order to he ahle t^ predict the tides at any 
required time, an extensive system of ohserrations 
bas been organized for the purpose of ascertaining 
the complicated laws which govern the tides of our 
seaa. A self-registering tide-gauge is mnoh used, 
by which a continuous curve representing the suc- 
cessive changes in the height of water is traced on 
paper moved bj clock-work, bj a pencil actuated 
by the rising and falling of a float in a vertical box 
io which the tide has free access. These inves- 
tigations have already resulted in the publication 
of tide-tables, from which the mariner is enabled 
to infer the stage of the tide, at any given time, for 
all the principal ports of the United States. 

Observations of the direction and force of the 
earth's magnetisni are also made at many points, 
and repeated from time to time, by which means 
not only is the variation of the compass obtained, 
60 essential to navigation, but also tlie laws of the 
changes to which it is subject are ascertained. 

A hydrographic survey of our coast would be in- 
complete without the investigation of the Gulf 
Stream, that remarkable ocean-current which 
divides the waters adjacent to our Atlantic coast 
from tlie wide ocean beyond. Accordingly, qbser- 
vations of its limits, velocity, and the temperature 
of its differept warm and cold bands, at all depths, 
have been organized by Professor Bache, and the 
results published ft'om time to time. 

In the Coast Survey Office at Washington the 
fesnlts of all the various operations <^t the work 
Are combined to produce those splendid charts, 
which are the safeguard of the mariner and the 
admiration of the savan. Here the computations 
<^ the geodetical and astronomical observations 
are made and reduced; drawings from the topo- 
graphic and hydrographic surveys combined and 
prepared, from which the charts intended for publi- 
cation are engraved on copper in the best style of 
art. The reductions to the scale of pnblicatioil are 
made by means of photography, a process which 
Itts been brought to great perfection in the office, 
''here it has almost entirely superseded' the slow 
and Uboriona process of reduction by hand, having 
at the same time the advantage of involving no 
chances df error.' Of the engraved plates, copies 
are taken by the electrotyiw process, from which 
the charts are printed, while the originaLs are pre- 
sen-ed. 

Besides separate charts of all harbors and an- 
dtoragesj on various scales suited to the circum- 
stances of the case, from 1 : 5000 (or about one Ibot 
■to the mile) to 1 : 60,000 (or about one inch to the 
mile), the plan of publication embraces a con- 
tiiiuoua KT\e» of coast-charts on a scale of 1 : 80,000 
(or aboat eight inches to ten miles), each containing 



ftftont forty-five miles of eoMt-Une, and covering 
the Atlantic and Gulf coest flrom Bassamaquodtty 
Bay to the Rio Grande, With one hundred and 
fourteen sheets. In addition to these, there are 
in progress a series of general coast (or off-thar^ 
charts, on a scale of 1 : 400,000 (or about one imsk 
to six miles), extending from one principal head, 
land to another, — as one from Gi^ Hv ^ Oape 
Henry, another from Cape Henry to Cape Hat- 
teras, Ac. These serve for coastwise navigation; 
while the former direct the mariner bow to enter 
bays and harbors and to avoid dangers near the 
shore. 

All these charts are generally puUidied in two 
stages : first, in a preliminary form, as soon as the 
most important features are mapped, as ontHnes of 
shore and depth of water, in order to supply the 
most immediate wants of navigation; and subao- 
quently in a finished form, when all the topo- 
g^phical features of the land, as well as the con- 
figuration of the se^bottom, are represented to the 
eye in a complete and perspicuous manner. Of 
these finished charts there have already been 
published ninety-six sheets, and of the preliminary 
charts eighty-one, besides upwards of one hinidr«d 
and seventy minor hydrographic sketches, and 
diagrams representing results Of explorations, ex- 
periments, apparatus, Ac. 

The progress of the Coast Survey from year to 
year is communicated to Congress in the annttil 
reports of the Superintendent. These reports con- 
tain, as an appendix, the preliminary maps, charts, 
and sketches produced during the year, and valuable 
scientific discussions of various sutiJects connects 
with the Survey, such as tides, terrestrial mag- 
netism, and of new methods developed by the pef^ 
sons engaged in the work. With wise Ifberatlty, 
Congress has printed large editions of these for 
general diffusion ; and they are to be found in all 
public libraries, as well as in the hands of many 
individuals interested in navigation orsdenee. 

The indication of the most appropriate sites llsr 
light-houses, beacons, and buoys is among the most 
direct advantages derived fhnn the Coast Survey. 
The Superintendent is also a member of the present 
efficient Light-House Board; and to htm is eoni- 
mitted the examination of localities for new Ugjlit- 
houses, which the wants of our increasing com- 
merce in newly-opened regions continually callfof. 

An enumeration of the most important discoveries 
and developments made by the Coast Surrey up to 
the present time would be out of place here.' It 
will suffice to state that the recognized organs of 
all our commercial communities, our Boards of 
Trade and Chambers of Commerce, oar Boards dt 
Under>mters and Shipmasters* Associations, have 
often and emphatically borne testimony to the 
value and success of the work. 

The practical advantages derived fhrni the CoMt 
Survey are not, however, confined to the ooiBf 
mercial interests of the nation. In the platining 
of the military defouees of the seorooast, and Hbm 



80 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAO. 



[isei. 



•ohictkm'or sHeA flir naty-yardB, all the esMntJal 
ikcts liud figures are ftimi«hed by the surreyor. 
That no coast can be effectlTely attacked, defended, 
or blockaded, wHhont accurate maps and charts, 
needs no demonstration. The serTices of the Coast 
Survey have at all stages of Its progress been called 
into frequent requisition by the naval and military 
departments of the Ghnremment ; but never at any 
period have lltoee services proved of more vital 
importance than at the iM'esent, when the operar 
tlons of the navy idong our extensive seaboard, 



Mid the movements of oar -armies in the Uttond 
regions, are based upon, and in many c as es guided 
by, the intimate knowl^lge of the country acquired 
by the officers of the Coast Survey; whence it has 
resulted that scarcely an expedition of any mag- 
nitude has started, by sea or land, without being 
accompanied by one or more of those <^cers; and 
thus the institution has 'proved itself not only 
efficient in promoting the pursuits of peace, hot 
also of eminent service in the prosecatioii of the 
war for the Uhion. 



TEE BKITHBOHXAH DTSTITUTIOV. 



At Genoa, in Italy, on the 27th day of June, 
1829, an Englishman died, who had attracted little 
notice during his life beyond the scientific circles 
of Europe, but who, by an act of wise and iar- 
, sighted munificence, was destined to be known to 
the world and to the remotest posterity as one of 
the most efficient benefactors of his race. This 
was James Smithson, the founder of the Insti- 
tution which bears his name. By a clause in his 
will, equally simple in terms and comprehensive 
in import, be bequeathed tiie whole of a larg^ 
f&atate, inherited from his fiEither, the first Duke of 
Northumberland, *' to the United States of Ame- 
rica, to found at Washington, under the name of 
the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for 
the increase and diffusion of knowledge among 
men.'* 

In proceeding to give a brief account of the dis- 
position made of this legacy, it is but just to pre- 
mise that, from such scanty memorials of his life 
as curiosity or gratitude has been able to recover, 
Smithson is shown to have been a man endowed 
not only with a spirit of the most indefatigable 
■•And sagacious research in many branches of natural 
science, but with those moral and social qualities 
which secure the esteem of equals and the fidelity 
of dependants. This is manifested by the feeling 
and considerate manner in which his death was 
uoticed by the President of the Royal Society of 
London, of which body Smithson became an asso- 
ciate about the year 1790, by his friendly relations 
and corre^nndence with Davy, lUack, Wollaston, 
and other distinguished savants, and by the care 
with which in his will he provides for the rea^ 
•onable claims of relatives and domestics, whose 
attachment and services he thus commemorates 
and rewards. His birth was illegitimate, as is tes- 
tified by his own hand : indeed, he bore at college 
the name of Macie, which M'as that of his mother. 
who was herself ** heiress of the Hungerfords of 
Andley, and niece ot Charles the Proud, Duke of 
AMperaat." This circumstance may have given 
poiiit to th» sentiment found among bis fugitive 
.jne|Dora]ida>-^< Though the bast, blood of England 
flows in my veins, this avails me nothing ; the nama 



of Smithson shall survive in the memory of men 
when the titles of the Northumberlands and Per- 
cys are extinct or forgotten." He lived unmarried, 
and was thus enabled more fully to embrace the 
spirit of another of his occasional apothegms : — 
**The man of science is of no country: the world 
is his country, and all men his countrymen." 
Much of his life was passed in different cities of 
Europe, and in excursions macie with a view to 
scientific investigation and the increase of human 
knowledge. The fruits of his various labors are 
extant in communications to the Transactions ol 
the Ro3'al Society, and the Annals of Pbiloeophjr, 
besides a collection of manuscripts more or less 
complete. As a proof of his skill in the analysis 
of minute quantities, in which he ft said by Pre- 
sident Gilbert to have been the rival of Wollttston, 
it has been often mentioned that, on one occasioiu 
observing a tear about to fitll fVom a lady's eyelid, 
he succeeded in securing a portion of it, and, sub 
mitting this to delicate re-agents, contrived to rea- 
der the evanescent tribute to feeling a tribute also 
to science, by resolving it into Its component in- 
gredients. Engaged during life in the advancement 
of knowledge, and cheered by the converse of his 
most enlightened cotemporaries, Smithson could 
well afford to dispense with those social distinctions 
and engagements which, though the usual appan- 
age of wealth and pedigree, would have trenched 
too largely on the time devoted to more uselUl 
pursuits. 

The death (tf a nephew, on which the legacy was 
conditioned, having occurred in 1835, and the Qo- 
vemment of the United States having been notified 
of its interest, the late Hon. Richard Rush was 
sent as commissioner to assert the claim, the pro- 
ceeds of which, after the delay of a technical 
cliancery suit, were deposited, to the amount ot 
$515,169, in the Mint at Philadelphia, on the 1st 
of September, 1838. There arose now the im- 
portant and somewhat embarrassing question, tn 
what fbrm and by moans of what organisation the 
purposes of the trust thus accepted by the United 
States could be best fhlflUed. Many and diver- 
sified were the schemes submitted to Congroa^ 



(18€|. 



THB »MIX;PIB0KIAN. lOTTEBUiTION. 



;6i 



.irhkh.|}iiiiA ittetf ioffolmd Ib a iHseiiipioiH nilMr 
imfiuuiUar to the hallB of legislation, ot th* moni- 
iM instromeDtalities by which luiowledge is, 
or tbKHigh which it anay l>e» increaBed and dif- 
Attied A greal national library, sohools of agri- 
cuUure» iaititutes of learning, phMM of iastroctioii 
mate or leas ^Midflc or complex, Satm^ tha stifle 
of debates, resumed fjrom time to time, and aai- 
aated by no little of the wannth. of partisanship, 
tbnmgh aiwiiod of seven yearft(1889-46)k Popalar 
edncation, naturally a £eiTorite idea witli many, 
van from the first pronounced, by the competent 
Mthority oi the venerable ex-President Adsms, 
excluded fhmi the Arid of competition : the legacy 
ia tx the benefit of men everywhere; its benefi- 
ciaries can be limited to no nation and no dMS. 
It seems finally to have been recognized that con- 
cessious must be made on all sides, and even that 
a hr^ portion of discretionary poww must be 
deleg;ated to the administrative body by which the 
afiain uf the Institution were to be conducted. 
Hence, after declaring the principal to be lent in 
perpetuity to the treasury of the United States, at 
aii interest of 6 per cent., providing for a suitable 
l>uildmg(to be paid for out of the interest accrued 
dnce 1S88) with rooms or. halls adapted to the 
"reception and arrangement, upon a liberal scale, 
of ol^'ects of natural history, including a geological 
and mineralogical cabinet, a chemical laboratory, 
R library, a gallery of art, and the necessary lee- 
^ tvre-rooms," the act of incorporation, approved 
Augoflt 10, 1846, gives authority to the Board of 
Begenta to make such disposal of any portion of 
the annually accruing interest, not required tbr 
ttw ennmerated purposes, "as they shall deem 
lest suited fm the promotion of the purpose of the 
testator." The corporation itself, or the Establish- 
ment^as-it is termed in confbnnity with the lan- 
Koageof the bequest, is to consist of the President 
and Tice-President of the United States, the Secre- 
taries of State, of the Treasury, of War, and of 
the Navy, the Postmaster-Qeneral, tlie Attomey- 
Qeneral, the ChieMustlce, the Commissioner of 
the Patoi^Office, and the Mayor of the city of 
Washington, during their respective terms of 
office, with sqcb. other persons as they may elect 
lioQorary members. The Board of Regents, to 
which is confided the current business of the In- 
■titutioD, is c<MnpoBed of the Vice-President and 
Chief-Justice of the United States, the Mayor of 
Washington, three members of the Senate and 
three of the House of Representatives, together 
^th six persons other than members of Congress, 
two of whom shall be residents of Washington, 
lot of the others no two shall be from the same 
State. This Board is to be organized by tho ap- 
poiatment of one of their number as clKincellor 
UMl presiduig officer, and by the election of " a 
nitabls person of Secretary of said Institution," 
who, as principal executive agent, is to take charge 
<^ the building an«) property, fiilftl the duties of 
lilmulaQ aod keej^r of the museum, and is em- 



powsDsd, with the«onieiit of thti Boitraof Regeatt, 
to employ assistants. 

The building, which is to be the repository of all 
objects of art or of curious or scientiflc research 
belonging to the United States, and which mmj he 
in the dty of Washington, was designed on a scale ' 
commensurate rather wlUi this proqioetive desti- 
wiXiaa than with the amount of the ftind or the 
strictly proper purposes (tf the trust. Commenceil 
in 1849, its entire eompletion was protracted 
through several years, with aView mainly to tlvs 
active employmefit at the fund in the interval and 
consequent augmentation of capital : so that,thoii|^ 
the building, for which the expensive Lombards 
Ven^ian stylo was adopted, coet, in the end, with 
its various accommodatjoos, some $325^000, an 
addition of €140^000 to the permanent principal 
was effected by this judicioas delay. In the mean 
time the Institution had been thoroughly organized 
for action, as early as tho year 1847, by the election 
of a Secretary and the ad(^tion of a ** Programme 
of Organisation," or geuenil scltemeof operations. 
The choice of Secretary had fallen rritki great 
unanimity on Professor Josepii Henry, of the Col- 
lege of New Jei-sey, well known for his origliuil 
researches in science, and of whom it Is but Just 
to say that the renown, success, and usefulness uf 
the Institution are in large measure duo to his 
wise counsels, judicious maaag^uent, and un- 
wearied exertions. Of those Miiose assistance it 
soou became expedient for him to avail himself. 
Professor Spencer F. Baird, in the line of natural 
history, ftc, and William J. Rhees, chief clerk, nmy 
be mentioned as having rendered services meriting 
distinct acknowledgment. The Board of Regents 
have uniformly accorded a liberal and enlightened 
support to the views and efforts of the Secretary ; 
nor can it be invidious to cite the distinguislied 
names of Chief-Justice Taney, Hon. Jas. A. Pearce, 
Professor A. D. Bache, General Totten, and the 
late President Pelton, of Camlnridge, as among 
those who have constantly evinced a zealous in- 
terest for tho welfare of the Institution^ The pre- 
sent Board, besides those who are members 4x 
officio, consists of Hons. J. A. Pearce,- W. P. Fes- 
senden, L. Ti-umbull, of the Senate, S. CoUaXrE. 
>fcPherson, S. S. Cox, of the House, W. B. Astor, 
of New Tork, W. h. Dayton, ai New Jersey, Geo. 
E. Badger, of North Carolina^ T. P. Woolsey, of 
Connecticut, Alex. D. Bache and Joseph G. Totten, 
of Washington^ B.C. 

In the Programme, a paper framed by the Secre- 
tary upon consultation with persons of known 
judgment and experience, and adopted by the 
Regents aa a guide for future procedure, the fiict 
is recognized that beyond the local and subsidiary 
objects specifically provided by Congress there 
lies a vast field for ** active operations,*' in the con- 
duct of which much may be done by direel means 
for tho increase anddifltesioti of knowledge among 
men; As the benefit is for all, so the.whele circle 
of sciences is open for aatitation. Xo iaeretse 



S2 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



knowledge, whieb can only meftn a gubeCutHv 
addition to the sum of that already exisllng, no 
means seem so avidlable as to enconrage, facilitate, 
and direct the researches of ingenions minds; to 
difltase knowledge, no instmment is so effective 
and fkr-reaching as the press, llirough this two- 
fold instrumentality—- keying in view, however, a 
strict economy of means^ and resigning therefore 
to other institutions whatever can be as well 
effected through their agency— the Smithsonian 
Institution aims to carry out the generous pur- 
poses of the donor, by supplying a more energetic 
Btlmuhis and effectual lUd to research and explo- 
ration, and by affording the means of more direct 
and extended communication than were otherwise 
attainable. What has been accomplished in the 
practical application of such maxims oan be taWy 
known only by an examination of the annual 
reports. We can only here notion the finct that 
the services of the Institution in behalf of every 
department of science have been received with 
emphatic acknowledgment by the learned of all 
countries, that its publications are everywhere 
eagerly sought for, and that its coK>peration is 
constantly solicited for enterprises looking to the 
advancement of knowledge. These it is in the 
habit of promoting by a gratuitous distribution 
of the instruments and directions for the conduct 
of researches, by the often laborious and expensive 
reduction of observations and calculations, and, 
when occasion justifies or requires it, by a contri- 
bution of the necessary ftinds. It is certain that 
within the fourteen years which have elapsed since 
the adoption of the system of active (derations, 
more information has been acquired and material 
collected by its agency for elucidating the natural 
history and geography of our own country, espe- 
cially the western portion of it, for illustrating its 
clhnatology, geology, mineralogy, botany, and 
archaeology, than was effected by all other means 
during the whole previous period of the national 
existence. And these labors acquire additional 
importance firom the circumstance that, from its 
prominence before the scientific world, the Insti- 
tution is brought into direct relationship with all 
analogous enterprises prosecuted elsewhere,— en- 
terprises sealously promoted by all enlightened 
Ctovemments, and directed to the solution of some 
of the most difficult and important problems of 
physical science. 

The Publications of the Institution consist of— 
1. The Smithsonian CbntribtUions to Knowledge; 
a series of quarto volumes, ample in size and ele- 
gantly produced, containing original memoirs or 
treatises upon scientific subjects, all of which have 
been submitted, before being accepted, to the judg^ 
ment of able men and pronounced upon as far> 
nishing some positive addition to the fiicts or well- 
assured foundation for the theories of science. 
These volumes, of which the thirteenth is now 
ready for the press, are distributed gratuitously 
among all the important libraries and learned 



societies of Hie world» and tha estiiiMiiloB in wMoh 
the wwk is everywhere held abnndantly warrants 
what is olaimed for it,— ^at "ii; in the changes of 
policy and vieissitndes ai ibrtane^ all other me- 
morials were lost, this alone would form an im* 
perishable moDument of the wisdom and liberality 
of Smithson and of the fitithfblness of those wbo 
first administersd his trust." 2. Annual RtporUi 
submitted by the Seeretary to the Regents, coa»- 
prlsing ttie proceedings of the Institution, and 
incidentally an account of the progress of scimce 
conveyed in such a form as in a hig^ degree to 
interest and reward popular attention. & Smith- 
gcnian MitceUanuHu OoUeclUm»; an occasional 
series, comprising metecwologioal and physical 
tables, treatises on sul^ects of practical or sdentifio 
interest, and manuals for the collecUon and pre- 
servation of oldects of natural history, as well ae 
of methods for various physical observations. 

A branch of the operations rapidly increasing 
in activity and importance Is that which IkUs 
under the head of Exchanffe$t the Smithsonian In- 
stitution having voluntarily become the principal 
medium of literary and scientific commnnicatioa 
between the learned associations and cultivators 
of science in our own and other countries. The 
development which this system has acquired is 
such, we are informed, as to weigh heavily on the 
resources both of time and money ; but the &ct of 
such development affords gratlQring evidence of 
the commanding position of the establishment, and 
indicates one of the literary wants of the age for 
which an enlightened management will scarcely 
fifcil to make provision. 

The 8cienti/lc correspondence ot the Institution 
is also one of the burdens which, although cheer- 
fully accepted, levies no small tax on the time of 
the Secretary. Scarcely a day passes In* which Iris 
attention is not solicited and information asked in 
respect to the most varied questions in the ph3rrical 
and natural sciences, names of specimens of plants^ 
minerals, and insects, lists of books and apparatus, 
I as well as in behalf of discoveries and inventionB, 
many of which, of course, are only surprising or 
practicable in the eyes of the correspondents. It 
seems to be no unusual thing with the Secretary 
to have to deal with the tri-section of the angle or 
the quadrature of the circle, to re-vlndicate the 
Newtonian theory of gravitation, or demolish some 
new system of the universe. 

The act of incorporation provided, as has been 
seen, for the formation of a library, museum, gal- 
lery of art, laboratory, Ac; and these requirements, 
since they are to be satisfied '* on a liberal scale,** 
could not fail to press heavily on an Income which, 
whatever may be the popular conception about it, 
is really narrow in reference to the claims to which 
it Is subject. The maintenance of a large public 
building, and the accommodation and care of books 
and specimens of natural history, must needs in 
themselves be no slight burden to so limited a 
revenue. Still more inadequate must It have 



186».] 



THE SMITHSONIAN IMBTTTUTIDK. 



6fr, 



proTod, bad not the active operations, as they are 
styled, which mig^t at lirst seem to threaten an 
unfriendly competition with other interests, been 
fimnd in the event a moat profitable anxUiary to 
alL Thus the Library is especially rich in what 
was most desirable, — ^in complete sets of the trans- 
actions aaid annals of scientiilc bodies, obtained, 
as many of them can only now be obtained, 
through voluntary offerhig, whether in retnm for 
the publications or in acknowledgment of the 
BMre general services of the Institution. In like 
Bianner, the Museum, which already has few 
rivals, especially as regards American zoology, 
Ji indebted for most of the material which con- 
stitntes its distinctive value tg expeditions and 
researches ofmducted under the auspices of the 
loBtitntion or fiicilitated by the various resources 
at Its command. The Gallery of Art exhibits the 
(^nration of the same influences in numerous 
testimonials from personages of the highest rank 
sad reputation in Europe, which worthily repre- 
sent the wealth as well as liberality of the donors. 
It should be added that as the Librar}' is designed 
to be rather i resource fbr the wants of students 
than an indiseriraiinate collection of books, so the 
Ifnseum is composed, as fur as possible, of ^ ob« 



Jects of a special character, or of such as may lend 
to the discovery of new truths or serve to verity 
or disprove existing or supposed generalizations." 
With this vitfw, cvnd to promote a taste for the 
study of natural objects, vast numbers of duplicate 
specimens have been collected and are freely dis- 
tributed, after being classified and labelled, to 
eolleges and museums both at home and abroad. 
And as the Institution gladly avails itself of the 
services of distinguished nataralists and others.— 
services which have been always rendered with 
unhesitating liberality, — so it endeavors to repay 
the obligation by committing to their hands any 
specimens or series or works which may be useitil 
in the prosecution of their respective investi- 
gations. One leading old^^ of the system, indeed, 
is declared to be that of interesting the greatest 
number' of individuals in the operations of the 
Institution, and of spreading its influence as 
widely as possible. Thus penetrated by the spirit 
of activity and progress, each department is found 
to adapt, itself happily to every other, discrepancies 
disappear, and the result, which mi§^t beforehand 
have appeared precarious to many, may assuredly 
to-day challenge the most scrutinizing criticism 
in the confidence of unequivocal success. 



Ofloers of the SmithBonian Institatlon. 
Mbm Bua ex officio. 



Abraham Lincoln, Ftes, United Statee. 
Hannibal Hamlin, Ftee-iVn. Unikd States. 
iruiiam H. Seward, Seentary qf State, 
Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of Treasury. 
Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary qf War. 
Gideon Welles, Secretary of t?ie Navy. 



Montgomery Blair, PbOnuuttr-Qeneral. 
Edward Bates, Attomey-Oeneral. 
Roger B. Taney, (M^-Jtutice qf the V. 8. 
D. P. Holloway, O&wuniuioner cf PaienU. 
Richard Wallach, Mayor of the CSty of Waeh. 



Board or RzozinM. 



itMtnibfl TT*mHn, Yico-Pres. United States. 
Boger B. Taney, ChiefJnstice of the U. States. 
Bkhard Wallacb, Mayor City of Washington. 
James A. Pearce, member of U. S. Senate. 
W. p. Feasenden, ** " 

L Trumbull, « « 

B. CbUhx, member House of Representatives. 
B.MePherson, ** ** 



S. S. Cox, member House of Representatiyes. 
W. B. Astor, citizen of New York. 
W. L. Dayton, citizen of New Jersey^ 
George E. Badger, citizen of North Carolina. 
T. D. Woolsey, citizen of Connecticut. 
Alexander D. Bache, citizen of Washington. 
James G. Totten, ** " 



OFrionui. 
Abraham Lincoln, ex officio Presiding Qfllcer of the InstitaUon. 
Roger B. Taney, Chancellor of the Institution. 
Joseph Henry, Secretary of the Institution. 
Spencer F. Baird, Assistant Secretary. 
W. W. Seaton, Treasurer. 
William J. Rhees, Chief Clerk. 



James A. Pearce. 



Bsqjamin Silliman, Conn. 



Executive Oomm^tn, 
A. D. Bache. 

Honorary Msmberi. 
A. B. Longstreet, Miss. 



Joseph G. Totten. 



Caleb B. Smith, Ind. 



51 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1866. 



IH8ANITT, AND HOSPITALS FOB TEE INSANE. 
(Prepared fx the National Almanac bj Pumr Eaus, DID.) 



Trb able Superintendent of the Censns, J. C. G. 
Kennedy, Eiq., has famished ns, in adrance of 
publication by the Ctovemment, with the num- 



bers which form the basis of the subjoined table 
of the insane and the idiotic in the several States 
and Territoriesi according to the Census of 1860. 



8TA,TI8. 



Xalne 

New Hampshire. 

Termont 

Massachusetts ... 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North. Carolina... 
South Carolina... 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana..... 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Nliuois 

Missouri 

Arkansas 

Michigan 

Texas , 

Iowa 

Wisconsin 

California 

Minnesota 

Kansas 

Oregon 



Total in States. 



TmUTOBRS. 

Dakota 

Nebraska 

New Mexico 

Utah 

Washington 

District of Columbia... 



Total in Territories. 
AggngBie 



Free. 



704 
606 
693 

2,106 
288 
281 

M17 
589 

2,766 

60 

646 

1,121 
607 
299 
447 
20 
225 
236< 
132 

• 612 
590 

2,293 

1,086 

663 

760 

82 

251 

112 

201 

283 

466 

25 

10 

23 



23,338 



5 
28 
16 

3 

204 



IN8AVB. 



255 



23,593 



Slave. 



14 
68 
63 
18 
44 
6 
32 
86 
37 
28 
33 



20 
6 



18 



406 



406 



Tbtal. 



704 
606 
693 

2,105 
288 
281 

4,817 
689 

2,766 

60 

660 

1,179 
660 
317 
401 
26 
257 
272 
169 
640 
623 

2,298 

1,036 
683 
770 
87 
251 
125 
201 



466 
26 
10 
23 



23,744 



6 
28 
15 

3 
204 



255 



23,999 



IBIOVS. 



Free. 



17,210 



1 

8 

40 

6 

27 



76 



17,286 



Slave. 



668 




336 




263 




712 




101 




226 




2,814 
865 






1,842 
67 






243 


68 


1,066 


214 


739 


241 


282 


121 


641 


183 


62 


16 


403 


134 


193 


76 


148 


104 


782 


149 


908 


165 


1,788 


•••■.■.■a 


007 




688 




447 


«3 


162 


24 


383 




164 


87 


289 




267 


«••••••«• 


42 




81 




17 




15 





1,679 



«••••«••• 



Total. 



1,679 



658 
336 
283 
712 
101 
226 

2,314 
365 

1,842 

«r 

306 

1,279 

980 

403 

724 

68 

637 

200 

247 

881 

1,068 

1,788 

907 

588 

510 

1T6 

383 

201 

280 

267 

42 

31 

17 

18 



18,789 



1 

8 

40 
5 



27 



76 



18,866 



Formerly it was not the custom to include the 
numbers of the insane and the idiotic in the de- 
cennial enumeration of the people of the United 
States : but when the census for 1840 was ordered, 
directions were given— 4it the suprgestion, if we 
have been correctly informed, nf the late Dr. 
Jamea Maodonald, of New York— that the num- 



bers of these two classes of persons should be re- 
turned. 

There are, and probably always will be, nume- 
rous obstacles to the acquisition of an accurate 
ccnRiis of persons of either defective or disordered 
mental faculties. It is unnecessary in this place 
particularly to speciCjr these obstacles. Most uf 



1868<] 



INSANITY^ ^KD HOSPITALS FOB THE INSANE. 



55 



them will be obfions upon a moment's reflection. 
But the influence exerted by them, together with 
the ftct that both the insane and the idiotic were 
included together, no spedflcation of the numbers 
of each, respectirely, being made, was such that 
in reference to these persons the census of 1840 
was so incomplete and so iHaceorate as to be worse 
than uaeleas: it led to error. The two subse- 
quent ones are undoubtedly for more nearly acou- 
nte. Upon looking over the foregoing table, how- 
ever, it spears to us that some errors have arisen 
from a want of observance of the true dilTerence 
between iaaanity and idiocy. According to the 
technical, medical definition, an idiot is a person 
whose mental faculties have been, /rom birth, of 
every low grade; while aa insane person is one 
in whom those Jbcultles haTo become disordered 
or impaired subsequently to the time of birth. 

JPeraons of naturally iair, or even superior, men- 
tal fiu:nlties, may have those fiiculties so lar im- 
paired by disease that they rank but little if any 
higher in the scale of intellect than idiots. Their 
disorder is then, properly speaking, imbecility, 
dementia, or amentia, and not idiocy. This true dis- 
crimination, as has been before hinted, we believe 
to have been overlooked by some of the oiUcers 
who took the last census. It will be observed 
that in Vermont the number of idiots is reported 
•8 but a minute fraction more than one-third as 
large as the number of the insane, while in Michi- 
gan the number of idiots is about thirty-three per 
centum greater than that of the insane. In other 
words, while in Vermont there is but one idiot to 
ikrte ituaneper§oru, in Blichigaa there are /(nM\ 
Why ahoold idiocy be four times as frequent, in 
relatioii to insanity, in Michigan •> it is in Vei> 
montr In latitude, climate, race, and the habits 
sad customs of the people, ttiere is no very great 
diflerenoe. In short, we know of no agent or in- 
fhience whence sudi a discrepancy could arise ; 
and hence we dofobt its actual existence, preferring 
to beliere that it is merely made apparent by a 
want of adherence, by the marshals of the Census, 
to the distinction which wo have mentioned. 

It is not our intention, however, to enter at 

length into a discussion of either this question or 

some others suggested by the table. Our purpose 

is, taking that table as a text fi-om which we may 

widely depart, to lay before our readers some in- 

forraatkm in r^ard to Insanity, the insane, and the 

hospitals for their treatment, which we trust will 

he both intaresting and usefoL To say nothing 

of idiots, the census, as we have perceired, imparts 

to us the knowledge, startling, indeed, to any one 

Whose attentioa may never before have been 

dhreeted to the sutffeet, that within the territory 

of the United States there were, in 1860, twunty- 

fovr thonaand petsons alllicted with a disorder 

which, in most cases, debars them from social in- 

teteoorse, destrdys their power of useftalness to 

thehr feHow-men, renders them a burden to either 

their friends or the public, and, more than this. 



and worse than all the other conssquences, divestt 
them of the healthy use of those mental focultios 
which are the prerogatives of man alone, and 
which, to him, are the greatest blessing conferred 
by the erer^loTing Father and Creator of the 
human race. 

Among the first suggestions which, in a reflset- 
ing mind, would follow the knowledge of this sadly 
important foot, are the following. Whence comtt 
this disorder r What are its causes! What is tho 
proper method of its treatment 7 By what mea- 
sures can it be prevented? To these propositions 
we propose to address ourselves, not, perhaps, very 
systematically, but with the endeavor that it shall 
be in a manner by which the present state of 
knowledge in regard to them may be foirly ex- 
pressed. 

The word " Insanity," although derivatively a 
broadly comprehensive generic term, adaptable 
to unsoundness of either body or mind, and per- 
haps of any other thing whatsoever, has become 
specific by usage, signifying unsoundness of niod. 
idone. Of all the terms in use having the same 
signification, it is the best, being brief; express! ve^ 
and not unpleasant to the ear. '^Craainess" is 
rude and hardi, and is more properly applicable 
to material substances than to the mind. *' Lu* 
nacy" — a word originating in an unenlightened 
age, when it was supposed tliat mental disorders 
were produced through the agency of the moon-^. 
i-..:i:o98es, philologically, an untruth; and *" mad- 
ness" is extensively employed synonymously with 
*' anger." We would reject the three. The term 
" mental alienation" is better than either of the 
last preceding three, but it laclu brevity; and 
" mental disease" is open to one serious ol)jection. 
It conveys the idea of diteau of the mind. Now, 
the word " mind," in its common acceptation, is 
synonymous with '* soul," or the spiritual element 
of man. But it is difficult to believe that this ele- 
ment can be di9ea$td. Its nature is such as to 
elevate it above the sphere of that pronepess to 
decay and to destruction which is implied by the 
word "disease." Hence we would say "mental 
disorder," in preference to " mental disease." 

We assume, therefore, that insanity is not a dis- 
ease of the mind, but that it is the sequence or 
effect of a disease or a diseased action of the brain, 
the organ through which the operations of the 
mind are manifested. The manifestations of mind 
are disordered, perverted, ituanej because the mo* 
terial organ has lost its power of developing them 
in the normal or healthful condition. If, in a mill 
propelled by water, a few cogs in the primary 
gearing be destroyed, the machinery will act 
irregularly ,>-<nsane2y, if we may use the term in 
this connection,— although the water which is the 
moving power is still as pure and ruua with a. 
current as strong and as equable as ever. , 

The bodily disease of which insanity is a conse*. 
quence may be in the brain, or in some other in^ 
ternal organ, as, for example, tho liver; and tha^ 



se 



THB KATIOKAIi ALHANAO. 



[1868. 



brain acts disorderty throagh sympathy with that 
other diseased organ, the principle being the same 
as in a case of severe headache produced by a dis* 
ordered stomach. When the disease is in the 
brain, if it is organic, that is, if a portion of the brain 
had been destroyed or permanently changed in its 
condition, the' inisanity is incurable, because the 
disease of the brain cannot be cured. But if the 
disease of the brain be merely /unctionol, simply 
a diseased aetion of the organ, the insanity is gene- 
rally curable. If the disease be in the lirer, and 
the discMrdered action of the brain arise from sym- 
pathy iirith that organ, then the insanity will be 
cured by whatever will cure the disease of the 
liver, and the disease of the liver will be cured' by 
the same medicines which would cure it if there 
were no insanity. All these facts, and many others 
of alike character, are additional proofii that in- 
sanity is not a disease of the spiritual element. 

Whence comes insanity? He who should an- 
swer this question by saying, "It is the product of 
ctvilisation," would not thereby &11 into a serious 
error. Oertain it Is that among the aborigines of 
America, as well as among other savage races and 
people, the disorder is exceedingly rare, although 
liot absolutely unknown. And it is no less cer- 
tain that, as a general rule, as a people advance 
d^ough the several intermediate stages between 
barbarism and civilization, mental disorders be- 
come more and more frequent am<mg them, appa- 
rently keeping pace with that advance, and reach- 
ing their maximum only when that people have 
attained the highest point of enlightenment. 

Agreeably to the well-known law of physiology 
that the more an organ is healtfafVilly used the more 
it becomes developed, the avouge brain of the 
civilized man has become larger than that of the 
savage, and, having thus lost its natural relative 
proportion to the body, and being called more 
frequently and energetically into action, its power 
is more. likely to be used to exhaustion, and hence 
it is more liable to disease. The manifold artifi- 
cial habits and customs of civilization tend to in- 
crease this liability, until the enlightened man 
beholds, as it were, the chasm of insanity yawning 
before him at every hour and at every step. 

But, with this general liability produced by the 
cultivation of all the concomitants of civilized life, 
what, if any, are the particular agencies which, 
more than others, operate in the production of in- 
sanity ? To this proposition it may first be an- 
swered that. Inasmuch as insanity is almost uni- 
formly a disorder connected with bodily debility, 
a fact apparently never learned until within the 
last half-century, it necessarily follows that all 
customs, habits, occupations, or other agencies 
whatsoever which exhaust the power of the brain 
and nerves, bringing the body to a weakened con- 
dition, may thus become the origin of mental dis- 
order. Socb influences are, indeed, the ramified 
jfoot from which insanity actually springs. And 
dTllised life is fUU of them. Intellectaal pursuits 



an more likely to pr»dnce eaduraitUm «hd d»bili4y( 
than manual occupations, not alone becausa tha 
brain is more active in the former than in tha lat- 
t«r, but also because there is less of tiiat phyaicaL 
exercise which is necessary to preserve the vigor> 
of body without which severe or. protracted men-, 
tal labor cannot safely be prosecuted* Of ™<^n^iial 
employments, those of a sedentary kind and thoaa 
in which thje laborer is suljeeted to unwholesamo* 
air are more likely to produce it than those in 
which there is free exercise id a pure atmosphere.- 

It is not, however, the regular employments of • 
mankind which ure the most prolific causes of in- 
sanity. It is rather those habits, customs, and ' 
pther influences which minister to his appetites, 
stimulate his passions, and most poworAilly ope- 
rate upon his sentiments. These, more than any 
thing else, either exhaust' or depress the vital or • 
nervous energy. Intemperance of all kinds, do- 
bancbery, self-abuse, all high popular excttemettts, 
whatsoever may be the subject,— ^hese exctt^ and 
exhaust the nervous energy;- and grief, anxiety, 
troubles, difilculties, and disappointments greatly 
depress it. To these influences, then, we may 
rightAiIly look as among the most powerftiUy ex-« 
citing causes of the disorder in question. 

Now, although the alleged causes of insanity, aa 
published in the reports coming l^om the hoc^tala 
for the insane, cannot be relied upon as eatiraly 
accurate, or, perhaps, as very nearly accorate, on 
account of the frequent difficulty of positively 
ascertaining the cause, in individual caaes, yet 
they may be regarded as approximations towards 
the truth. As an evidence, therefore, ot the peal- * 
tion we have taken, we quote, from Dr; Kirkbrlde's 
Report o/ the Pennsylvania Hoq»ital for the In- 
sane, the ten causes to which are assigned the 
largest numbers of the caseg which have been 
treated at that institution. They areas follows: — 



111 health of various kinds ..^ 601 

Intemperance ....-«..„... 243 

Mental anxiety «.,..«. 237 

Grief, loss of friends, SiC. ^ 193 

Puerperal state ., - 152 

Loss of property 140 

Religious excitement 137 

Domestic difficulties „.... 87 

Disappointed affection 57 

Masturbation 50 

The whole number of cases to which canaea ova 
assigned in the report is 2220; and 1897, or About 
six-sevenths of the whole, are placed under the 
ten heads above mentioned. It will ba peieeivad 
that the largest number (601) are atMbatad to 
" ill health." It may be assnmed as an undovbted 
truth that in a large proportion «f these oases 
the ** ill health" orlginaited in some of the ssTend 
debilitating influenoes t» which, in the other mom 
in the table, the mental disorder is direqtly a«< 
signed. The ill health w«s merely the aatacadsat 
of the insanity, an intermediate condition betwvsa 



1863.] 



INSANITY, AKD HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE. 



5T 



tbo cftOM of the menUl disorder and that disorder 
itMl£ 

Wo shall now copy from the *' History and Sta- 
tistics of the Bloomingdale Asylnm,*' New York, 
the ten causes most prominent by their nnmbers, 
omitting that of " jtvlnry from fulls,** which Is ac- 
cidental, not of constant operation. As the table 
is much more minnto In detiiil than that of Dr. 
Klrkbriilc, wo have also grouped together the 
cases attributed to various diseased conditions of 
the body, aud placed them all under the general 
tsm^Ul health." 

lU health • 237 

Pecaniary difflcultiee 133 

Intemperanco 117 

Poerperal state 09 

Rdi^oaa excitement 93 

Domestic trouble 06 

Death of relatfTCfl ~. 43 

DfaMppointed affection.......... ».. 3S 

Mastnrbatlou S7 

Application to study ..,. 30 

The whole number of cases reported in th(< work 
framwhidi we quote la 1186; and 802, or nearly 
fcur-flfths of them, are included under the ten 
ftregoing hesulL 

The next authority to which we refer is the re- 
port of Dr. Bemis, of the Massachusetts State Hos- 
pital at Worcester. The number of cases to which 
causes are here assigned is 3107. Ttio ten having 
the higheat nmnbera are subjoined. 

Ill health Mo 

Domestic tnmble ;....... 418 

Bdigloiis excitement ».. 280 

Masturbation 270 

Intemperance 104 

Puerperal 141 

Pfcuniary trouble 140 

Disappointment In lore 116 

Excessive labor. 79 

Death of relatives 72 

The number assigned to these ten causes Is 2310, 
or more than two-thirds of the whole. 

Now, it is a remarkable fact, remarkable even to 
eae who for many years has been conversant with 
the snt()oct of insanity, that of the ten oxuiwa taken 
from each of the authorities mcntionod, nine are 
actually identical in the three. The tenth is, from 
the PenneylTanIa Hospital, "mental anxiety;'* 
from the Bloomingdale Asylum, ** application to 
study ;** and, firom the Bfassachusotts State Hos- 
pital, **excesrfve labor.** TMe discrepancy may 
arise from the pooltloa of fhe several hospitals, os 
we Shan soon mention in connection with another 
dissimilarity. Although nine of the causes are 
the aaae in the throe txtbles, their relative num- 
bers are MNsewbat different. Thus, the proper- 
tion of cases anigned to pecaniary dilBcnlties is 
much larger at the Pennsylvania Hospital and 
ths Bloomingdale Asylum than at the Hospital at 



"Worcester. The first two InstttutlonB are near 
the two principal cities in the oountry, and re- 
ceive from them a very large proportion of their 
patients, while the last Is near the centre of a 
State, and the largest part of Its patients are de- 
rived from the agricultural and other laborioua 
classes of the population. 

But, to return to our main point, it will be seen 
that all the causn mentioned In the three fore- 
going;^ tables are such as exhaust, debilitate, or de- 
pfesis the vital or nervous energy. 

Before leaving this part of our subject, it ts 
important to remark that he who attempts 
tiioroughly to investigate the sources of mental 
disorder at the present day will soon become con- 
vinced that, to a large extent, its Ibnndatlon is 
laid in early life, by the fhnlty or pemteloua prae- 
tices too often followed in the education and the 
rearing of the young. The stimulating drinks of 
the table, the late hours, the exeltementa of so- 
ciety and of popular assemblies, In all of which 
here more than In any other country they are iur 
dulgod, the confinement and the hothouse fbroing- 
of the brain in the studies of the 8ehool,'and the 
neglect to promote pineal exeretoe to the degree 
necessary fbr that development of the body which 
will enable It to maintain a healthy equHibdum 
with the mind,— all these aeslst in creating a ner- 
vous Irritability and a generally abnormal condi- 
tion of the body which greatly expose the indi- 
vidual to attacks of bodily disease and of mental 
disorder. The brain is brought Into such a state 
that a slight exciting cause, either phjrsical, intel- 
lectual, or moral, may drive it Into that di s e a se d 
action the effect of which is insaitlty. 

"^Vhat Is the proper method of treatment in Bien- 
tal disorders? Let not our sensitive reader fsar, 
from the announcement of this propositton, that 
we are about to lead him Info the unsavory at- 
mosphere of dVugs and medfelnes, of pille and pow- 
ders. VTe shall deal in generals alone, not in de. 
tails; and we treat the sultiect even thns taar 
rather for the purpose of oorreoting some errors 
which have gained a credence somewhat exten- 
sive, than for any other object whatever. 

Experience has proved, beyond the necessity of 
a frirther discussion of the subject, that the me- 
thod of treating the Iniane which presents the 
greatest hope aud probability of their restoration 
is that which is pursued in the modem hospitals 
expressly erected for the purpose. This being 
asmmed, the great Importance of those institu- 
tions becomes at once apparent; and hence we 
propose briefly to treat of their origin, as well aa 
of their plan of treatment. 

Until within the last hundred years, the treat- 
ment of the insane, even in civilized countries, 
was perhapa generally more barbarous and less 
calculated to effect their restoration than it was 
among the Bgyt^tians two thousand years ago. 
The pubUe receptacles Ibr them were either Jails 
or buildings equally strong, where they were con- 



58 



THS NATIOKAJit ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



lined in oella, and a large propwlion of them were 
cither fettered, manacled, or chained to the wall 
or the floor. Since the year 1792, however, a revo- 
lutiuB has taken place upon this subject, which, 
in the extent of good wbich. it, has accomplished, 
the remarkable amelioration of the condition of 
the recipients of its benefits, scarcely has a paral- 
lel in the history of philanthropic beneficence. 
This change was begun, in the yew Just mentionod, 
by Dr. Pinel, in Paris, Vrance, and by William 
Tuke, of York, England. The former released 
from their chains a Iwrge number of insane per> 
sons in the Bicdtre Hospital, and through the ex- 
ertions of the latter a hoq;>ital for the mild and 
enli^tened treatment of persons suiTering from 
mental disorder was erected at York. Since that 
period the system has been adopted in nearly all 
the European nations. 

8o fiir as we are inlbrmed, the first specific legis- 
lative provision for the curative treatment oi the 
iiteane In a public establishment in this country 
was in the year 1751, when the charter of the 
Pennsylvania Hospital was granted, expressly pro- 
viding that persons with mental disorder should be 
received. For nearly three-quarters of a century 
n part of that hospital was devoted to them, and 
in 1843 the remaining inmates of that class were 
transferred to a separate branch erected for tlio 
special purpose, and called the "Pennsylvania 
Hospital for the Insane." 

The first distinct establishment for the insane 
in the then British colonies In America was at Wil- 
liamsburg, Tirginia. It was opened before tho 
Revolutionary War, daring that war was vacated 
and occupied as barracks, was afterwards recon- 
verted to Its originid purpose, and still remains in 
qiMration. 

The " Asylum for the Relief of Persons deprived 
of the Use of their Reason," near Frankford, and 
now within the city limits of Philadelphia, Pa., 
was the first hospital of ItM kind erected in this 
country after a knowledge of the labors of Piuel, 
Tuke, and their coa4Jutors had crossed the Atlan- j 
tic. The founders of that hospital were guided by | 
the same spirit which stimulated their fellow-phil- ; 
anthroplsts in Europe, and adopted the same en- ' 
lightened general principles of treatment. Tho 
establishment was opened for the reception of pi- 
tlents in 1817. Since that time a widely dissemi- 
nated interest in the Insane has been aroused, the 
number of our hospitals has been constantly and, 
at periods, rapidly augmenting, their architecture 
has been remarkably improved, their internal ar- 
rangements made more convenient, their com- 
forts Increased, their means and focilities for treat- 
ment greatly enlarged, and the treatment itself so 
fiitr mitigated in austerity that the use of the old 
methods of mechanical bodily restraint and coer- 
cion has been almost wholly abolished. In the 
table on the next page, the iHincipal hospitals for 
tho insane in the United States are arrang^ in the 
chronological order of their opening thus prevent- 



ing any necessity for entering into further details 
in regard to their establishment. 

A hospital at Austin, Texas, was in progress of 
construction in 1S57, and Dr. J. C. Perr}' had been 
appointed as its superintendent. Wc have no 
more recent information in regard to it.* 

The whole number of patients remaining in tho 
hospitiils at the time of the last received accounts 
is 10,859. Hence the capacity of the present pub- 
lic institutions of the country may be stated at 
eleven thousand. There arc several private estab- 
lishments for the treatment of the Insane, but, 
being comparatively small, their aggregate means 
of accommodation, would not essentially increase 
that number. 

The number of insane persons in the country 
being, according to tho census, about twenty-four 
thousand, it appears that there are accummoda- 
tlons in the hospitals for less than one-half of 
them. No less than thirteen thousand arc do- 
barred -from the henefits of thoae establishment^^ 
and must bo otherwise provided for. W^hcro luo 
they ? A largo number are in the poor^ioiisct) of 
counties and towns, some are in prbuiis, nitd 
doubtless many remain with their relatives or 
friends. We have tho evidence, only too abun- 
dant, that a number, fiu* from inconsiderable, iii-o 
still sut^Jected to tho privations and severftfeii tf 
cells, cellars, hovels, strait-jackets, manacles, nii<l 
other means of coercion and restraint, such n^*, 
with the present state of knowledge of the pro|K'r 
treatment of insane persons, should only be known 
OS the abolished barbarisms of a by-gone time. 

Notwithstanding, then, the wond<u'fnl progress 
in the foundation of hospitala within the last thirty 
years, there yet remains abundant necoseity fix* 
more of them. The field for active philanthropy 
is still broad in this direction. The opportunity 
for the exercise of liberality, either individual or 
by the commonwealth, — a liberality certain of 
achieving a benefit commeusiirate with the de- 
sires of the donor,— continues open. That thuro 
may be generous hearts with willing hands to' 
seize it, must be the prayer of every lover of hia 
race. 

The treatment of patients at the hospitals for 
the insane Is composed of two classes of curative 
agents, and hence is said to consist of tho mrd^oft 
and the iKora2 treatment. The medical treatment 

♦ Since the above was written, we have received 
fronvthe Hon. A.J. Hamilton a letter, from which 
the following is an extract ;— 

>*iVoeemfter 22, 18(12. 
«♦•••••♦ The Insane 
Asylum of Texas, at Austin, has been open for 
about two years. The present superintendent Is 
Dr. J. M. Stoiner. There are some sixty patients. 
Besides the usual appropriations by the Legisla* 
ture for its support, It has an endowBient of 
twenty-five leagues of land (110,700 acres), wbldi 
will in the ftitnre prove amply competent for the 
building and sup|M>rt of a inaguiflcent institution, 
worthy of our great State." 



1S68.] 



INSANITY AN0 ROSPITALB FOR 9HB IN8ANE. 



59 



Titla. 



Xutem Xiunatic Asylom 

Friends' A8ylaiii(*) 

McLean Anylnm 

Bloomiasdale Asylam 

Retreat for tho lusoae. 

Sastern Lunatic Asylum 

dtatc Lunatic Asylum 

Western Lunatic Asylum..... 

Lmatic Hospital 

Maryland Uo«pital(i>) — 

Insmte Dept. Pbila. Uo«i>.(o).. 

Asylum for the Insane 

Central Lunatic Asylum. 

Bdetcm City Lnuatic Asylum. 
Mk York City Lunatio Asylnm 

iMMe UoflpUaL 

Hospital /or tbe Iukuiu 

Peim. Hospital fjr the Insane 

Asylum for the Insane 

Mount Rope Institution 

I«natic Asylnm ....<......... 

Lmiatiic A«ylum..... 

Sutler HoepitaJl for Insane... 

Lunatic Asylum 

Insane Asylum 

Hospital for the Insane 

Lmatic Hospital....^ 

Hotintal for th« Insane.., 

Lonatic Asylum 

Insane Asylum 

Longvlew Asyluni(«) 

Lunatic Hospital 

Western Lunatio Asylum...... 

Lanatio Asylum 

17, S. Gor't Uoep. for Insane.. 
Northern Lunatic Asylum.... 
Southern Lunatic Asylum.... 

Bri^ittm Hall 

KingpB cdk Lnnatic Asylum.... 

Iiisana Asylum.....* 

Western Penn. Hospital 

Lnnatic Hospital 

Asylum for Insane Conricts.. 

Asylum for the Insane... 

Hospital for the Insane 

Haq»ital for the Insane........ 

Hospital for the Insana 



LossttoB. 



Williamsburg . 
Philadelphia... 

Somerville 

New York 

Hartford... 

Lexington....... 

Columbia 

Staunton 

Worcester 

Baltimore 

Philadelphia.. 
Brattloboro.... 

Columbus 

South Boston.. 

New York 

Augusta 

near Nashville 
Philadelphia... 

Concord 

Baltimore 

MiUedgeriQe.. 

Pi'ovidehoe 

Treutou 

Jackson 

Indianapolis... 

Itarrisburg 

JadcsonvlUe ... 

Jfulton 

Stockton 

Mill Creek 

'Taunton 

Hopklnsville... 

Jackson. 

n. W^asbiugtou 

Ncwbnrgh 

Dayton • 

Canandaigna... 

Flatbush 

Raleigh 

Pittsburg 

Northampton.. 

Auburn 

Kalamazoo 

Bfadison 

Tnacaloosa..... 
Mt. Pleasant... 



Bute. 



Va 

Penn.. 
Mass.. 
N.Y... 
Conn.. 

S.fc'* 

Va 

Mass.. 

Md 

Penn.. 

Vt 

Ohio... 
Mass.. 
N.Y... 
Maine 
Tcnn.. 
Penn.. 
N.H... 

Md 

Oa 

N.Y... 
n.^. ... 

.^ 9V m ... 

La 

Ind.... 
Penn.. 

Ill 

Mo 

Cal 

Ohio... 
Mass.. 

Ky 

Miss... 
D. C... 
Oliio... 
Ohlc. 
N.Y... 
N.Y... 
ri.v.. .. 
Penn.. 
Mass.. 
N.Y... 
Mich.. 
Wis... 
Ala.... 
Iowa.. 



Poanda* 

UOD, 



State~. 
Corp ... 
Corp ... 
Corp... 
Corp... 
State... 
State... 
Stiite... 
State... 
State M. 
Pauper 
State... 
State... 
Pauper 
Pauper 
State... 

Corp ... 

State ... 

Mixed.. 

State ... 

State... 

Corp ... 

State.. 

State.. 

State.. 

State.. 

State... 

State .. 

State 

Co. Fr. 

state. 

State... 

U. Q..... 

State ... 

State.. 

Corp... 

Pauper 

State.. 

Mixed. 

State.. 

State. 

State. 

State.. 

State.. 

State., 



Date 
of 

lag. 



1817 
1S18 
1821 
1824 
1824 
1828 
1828 
1883 
1884 

1836 
1838 
1839 
1830 
1840 
1640 
1842 
1842 
1842 
1842 
1843 
1847 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1868 
18M 
1864 
1866 
1866 
1856 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1868 
1868 
1869 
1860 
1860 
1861 



Preaeal SnperintBaSmii 

Pltjrilcian. 



Paiicnu 

at latest 

dSMl. 



Dr. John M. Oalt 

Dr. J. H. Worthington.... 

Dr. John E. Tyler... 

Dr. D. Tilden Brown 

Dr. John 8. Butler , 

Dr. W. 8. Chipley 4 

Dr. J. W. Parker ,.. 

Dr. Francis T. Strlhling. 

Dr. Merrick Bemis 

Dr. John Fonerden 

Dr. 8. W. Butler 

Dr. William II. RockwelL. 

Dr. R. Hills - 

Dr. Clement A. Walker.... 

Dr. Moses H. Panney 

Dr. Henry M. Harlow 

Dr. W. A. Cheatham 

Dr. Tliomas 8. KirkLride.. 

Dr. Jesse P. Bancroft 

Dr. William II. Stokis..... 

Dr. Thomas F. Oreen 

Dr. John P. (fray... 

Dr. Isasc Bay ^ 

Dr. U. A. Buttolph........... 

Dr. J. D. Barkdull. 

Dr. J. II. Woodburn 

Dr. John Curwen 

Dr. Andrew MeFarland.... 

Dr. T. B. H. Smith 

Dr. W. P. Tilden.... ......... 

Dr. 0. M. Largdon. 

Dr. George C. 8. Choate.... 

Dr. F. O. Montgomery 

Dr. Robert Kelle 

Dr. Charles H. Nicl:ols. 

Dr. 0. 0. Kendrick 

Dr. Richard Gundi}' 

Drs. G. Cook A J. B. Chapln 
Dr. Edward R. Chapin...... 

Dr. Edward C. Fisher. 

Dr. Joseph A. Beed 

Dr. William II. Prince 

Dr. Charles £. Tan Anden 

Dr. £. H. Van Deueen 

Dr. J. P. Clement 

Dr. James P. Bryce 

Dr. R. J. Patterson 



257 
62 
188 
161 
226 
237 

lua 

379 
37{> 
106 
62» 
438 
262 
241 
764 
2bt 
UB 
266 
188 
lOT 

2T 
682 
186 
334 
157 
300 
280 
281 
171 
416 
867 
411 
138 
106 
107 
141 
169 

40 
880 
147 
110 
882 

61 
10» 

loa 

140 



consists 4n the adminlstrationB of medieinest<as in 
other diseases. And here it is important to ob- 
senre that there is no specific medicine for the 
) «r insanity. In eaoh casesncfa medical reme- 
are employed as are Indicated by the bodily 
tynptMtm, precisely as in other forms of corporeal 
disease. The moml treatment consists of the 
w h olsso Bi e discipline of a well-reg^tated house- 
hold, regnlar hours for food and for sleep, manual 
employmentSy reading, lectures, sod other intellec- 
tual ezovises and entertainments, and various 
nereatlons and amusements, both within-^loors 



(•) This title is generally used, for brevity ; the 
res] one is ** Asylnm for Persons deprived of tho 
Use of their Reason." 

(^) The Maryland Hospital was a mixed institu- 
tion, having only a department for the insane, 
notil about the year 1846. 



and without. The great object of this treatment 
is to procure a healthful exercise of the body, to 
abstraet the mind from its delusions, to win back 
the patient to the regular and useful habits and 
practices of his fomer life. So inip<x'tant is this 
branch of treatment that, other things being 
equal, that hospital will be the best which pos. 
Besses and keeps in operation the most elaborate 
means of pursuing it. And so extensive have 
these weans become^ in some of the hospitals, that, . 
what with libraries, museums, newspapers, lec- 
tures, musical instruments, horses and carriages, 

(") We have no information in regard to the 
exact time at which this '* Department" was es- 
tablished, but it was near the period at which it 
is here placed. 

(A) This was called " Tlie Ilaniilton County Ln- 
uatic Asylum'* until the year 1860. 



60 



THS NATIONAL ALMANAa 



[1868. 



bowling-alleys, billiard-tables, ftc, even a sane 
man to whom a somewhat retired situation is not 
distasteful may there find plentiful resources for 
the leading of a comfortable, pleasant, and intel- 
lectual life: 

Header, call not sucU places ** mad-houses." 
Coi^ure up no fonciful visions of dungeons, whips, 
and. fetters in connection with them I Throw 
aside the names, the pr^udices, and the errors of 
the past! Forgive, even if you cannot forget, the 
cxuelties which once were practised in the recep- 
tacles for the unfortunate insane,— receptacles 
which from the very practice of those cruelties, 
and hence on account of the officers and em- 
ployees, might properly have been called " mad- 
l^ousee," rather than because the persons confined 
therein were su£Eering from mental disorder ! The 
hospitals are now under a goTOrnment widely dif- 
f(»rent, in principles as well as in practice, fi'om 
that of those receptacles. Of their superintend- 
ents it may be said — and we speak from a per- 
flonal acquaintance with thirty of them, and fi'om 
much knowledge, by correspondence and other- 
vise, with most of the others — ^that, as a whole, 
they are a highly respectable class of intellectual, 
well-educated physicians, kind in dispositipn, and 
ambitions to bring their hospitals, each and all, 
to the highest point of perfection in erery thing 
which will promote the cure of their patiients, 
with the maximum of the comforts and ameMties 
of life, and the minimum of every thing which 
carries pain either to the body or the mind of a 
ftllow-being.' Perhaps we cannot more briefly 
^d fully express our opinion of the usefulness of 
these establishments, aside from the great ques- 
tion of the cure of their patients, than by the 
statement of our belief that, were all their in- 
mates transferred this day to their homes and the 
other places whence they came, the amount of re- 
straint, coercion, and severity which, upon any day 
a week hence, would be resorted to In the man- 
agement of them, would be fifty-fold greater than 
It Is toHlay In the hospitals, and that in the 
course of a year the number of suicides would be 
ten times m large as it would have been bad they 
remained where they now are. 

Inasninch as every person is liable to an attack 
of insanity, it Is desirable that all should know 
by what means^lt may be avoided. Science has 
furnished no preventive, and the measures which 
aM best calculated te act as such are those which 
characterize a life governed by prudence, modeniF 
tlon, a good judgment, and sound common sense. 
It is rational to conclude that the most certain 



method of preventing the attack of any disease is 
topreser^'e one's self from the influence of the 
causes of that disease. He who would evade the 
intermittent fever must not expose himself to the 
malaria whence the intermittent originates. We 
have seen that the sources of insanity are in the 
customs, habits, and other influences of civilised 
lif^. The necessary inference is, that if we would 
escape insanity we must lead a life aa near to na* 
ture as is possible amid all the surrounding arti' 
ficialities of civilization. It has been shown that, 
descending more nearly to particulars, the i^ 
proximate causes of the disorder are those acts or 
agents which exhaust or depress the nervous 
power, and consequently debilitate the whole 8y»> 
tem. The man, then, who would secure immo!- 
nity A*om insanity must either wholly avoid those 
acts or agents, or preserve a constant watcfaftiK 
ness to prevent himself from being sutjected to 
their operation to the extent of exhaustion or 
great depression. He must be moderate in all 
things, curbing his appetites and passions, shield* 
ing himself as &r as possible, ftom the manifold 
causes of bodily disease, remembering that nature 
has been kindly mindful of her children in sup>. 
plying them with an exhaustless Icrantain of tho 
purest 4rink, without either fermentation or di»> 
tillation, making neither gold nor power nor 
fkme his god, mistaking neither nervous excite- 
ment for religion, nor high political agitation tat 
a healthftil preserver of ^ood government; tem^ 
perlng his grief by a prudent Judgment, and ooa- 
verting his disappointments into counsellors of 
wisdom ; .accepting all the blessings, whether phy- 
sical, intellectual, or moral, which a bountiAiL 
Providence has bestowed upon him, and wisely 
using them **as not abusing*' them. 

A few words upon one specific point of this sub- 
ject, and we shall have finished. Sle^ Is tho 
great recuperative agent of nervous power, the ra» 
generator of vital vigor, and coosequentty ono of 
the surest' preventives of mental disorder. Per- 
haps it may be truthfhlly asserted that so long as 
a person obtains suflScient sleep he will not be- 
come insMie. Well has the poet written of It ^— 

" Tired nature's sweet reatorer, balmy sleep I" 

And no less truthfully, though sonewfaat more 
queerly and ludicrously, has the Simple Bancdio 
Panza exclaimed, **Blmsed be the man who Unt 
invented sleep I it covereth a man all over, Uke « 
cloak;'' and the honest squire might have added, 
"It preserveth the mind firam inonnity, as the 
cloak presenreth the body from ooUL'* 



lo8B.j 



IBOf^OLilJ) . WARtYmnWf 



91 



IBON-OLAD WAfi-VES8IX8. 



(^epared for the National 

XUBOPXAir as well as American antlioritles ao- 
e<>rd to Robert L. Steyens, of New Jersey, the credit 
of patting the nndeveloped idea of iron>clad ships, 
suggested by his fltther half a century ago, and 
urged by Paixhan ten yean after, hato practica- 
ble shape, by means of his experiments, caleuhk 
tiona, and rare mechanical ingenuity. The Stevens 
Battery was designed and partially completed be- 
fore the art of fighting armored Tesseb had been 
tested, in a rade way, at Klnbmrn ; and the action 
at Hampton Roads in March, 1802, which- marks 
as distinct an era in history as gnnpowder itself 
not only revolutionized naval warforo at a stroke, 
but, as it will appear, indicated the direction of 
ftulher improvement. 

The subject may be considered under the heads 
of Armor, which will necessarily include some 
account of ordnance and its probable prepress, 
and the Structure of Ships. As it will, of course, 
be impossible within the limits of this paper to 
enter into the details of fact and argument which 
a subject of such importance and novelty really 
demands, it is but just to state that the author is 
preparing a more complete and fully illustrated 
account (to be published by Van Nostrand, of New 
York) of the experiments and practice, the best 
professional opinion, and the results of his own 
recent observations, here and in Burope. 

Abmob. 

1st. Thickneu required. — This is obviously a 
question of the power of ordnance. However 
American ingenuity may have provided against 
fntbabU hard hits, the English have certainly 
hammered out of innumerable targets not only an 
approximate law, but a tolerably uniform measure 
of resistance. . The upshot of numerous experi- 
ments ia that the best solid armor (in distinction 
from armor that is laminated, or composed of 
strata of thin plates), backed with 18 inches of hard 
wood, laid on the skin of the ship, is proof against 
their own most formidable service gun, the 68- 
pdr. smooth-bore with 16 lbs. of powder at short 
range, — aaj 200 yards. But English experimental 
guna-Tby ^^ ^® most powerful ever fobricated — 
have pioved, within a few months, the inadequacy 
of such protection against the service ordnance 
of a future not distant; and British and French 
authorities are at this moment extremely solicit- 
ous as to the safety of their costly vessels already 
clad in this manner, and perplexed as to the 
method of plating their partially-constructed 
fleets. This brings us to— 

Modem heavy ordnance: its results and im- 
provement. — The Armstrong gun is a series of 
tubes turned without and within, and shrunk 
over one another. The tubes are thus formed. 
A WToogfat-iron bar is wound into a close coil, 



Almanac by A. L. Holut.) 

which is hammered on end and thus welded into 
a ring. The required number oi rings are tangued, 
grooved, and then welded, end to end, by the 
pressure of a screw. Thexwrtof oneof the tmbes 
that forms the breech-^iece is forged solid (aa^ 
in ease of breech-loaders, bored outX to give the 
gun longitudinal strength. The Armstrong "80O> 
pdx.** has 11 feet length and 10^ inches diameter 
of bore, 38 inches maximum diameter, and weig^ 
VH^ tons. The Mersey Iron-Works guns are 
forged from wrought Iron, either solid, like steam* 
boat^hafts, or holler, by laying up staves in the 
form of a barrel and welding tatyers of curved 
plates upon them until the whole mass Is united. 
Only a few of these guns have been fabricated. 
The most remarkable are, let, the HorsftiU smooth* 
bored 270-pdr., forged solid, and of 18 inches bore, 
44 inches maximum diameter, and 24 tons weight; 
2d. The Alfred Ril!e gun, lately in the Great Exhi- 
bition, has a 10-inch bore, and was foi^ged hollow; 
Sd. The 12-inch smooth-bore, now in the Brooklyn 
Navy-Yard, is very light, but has fired a double 
224-lb. shot with 45 pounds of powder. If hooped 
on the principle adopted by Blakely and to be 
mentioned Airther on, it would make a much more 
formidable gun than any of our cast-iron pieces. 
Biskely has constructed for Russia two 184nch 
smooth-bore guns, 15 feet long and 47 inches in 
maximum diameter, of cast iron hooped with steeL 
The 15-Inch Rodman smooth-bore casMron gun, 
now at Fortress Monroe, is 4 feet in maximimi din- 
meter and 16 feet long. It was cast hollow, and 
cooled fi*om the inside to prevent unequal oon> 
traction and initial rupturing strain. The Dahl- 
gren 15-inch guns on the Mtm^^m are bettor 
shaped, and about 4 feet shortw. Krupp, of Prussia^ 
forges cast-steel guns of 9 inches bore firom Ingote 
of 20 tons weight. 

The lO^^nch Armstrong gun has ttkrewn n 
spherical 150-lb. shot, with 50 pounds of powder, 
through a 5^inch plate and its 9-inch teak back* 
ing, at 200 yards, and one out of four shots, with 
the same charge, through the standard or Warrior 
target, viz.: a 4)^inch solid plate, 18 inches of 
teak, and ^ineh iron lining. The Horsfiill 18-inch 
gun has sent a spherical 2704b. shot with 74 lbs. 
of powder entirely through the Warrior- target 
ai 200 yards, maldng an irregular hole about two 
feet in diameter. The same charge at 800 yards 
did not make a clean breech. A 7-inch Armstrong 
gun, rifled on Whitworth's plan, has, with 23 lbs. 
of powder, driven a 130-lb. ** homogeneous metal" 
(low cast-steel) shell, holding a bursting-charge of 
three pounds of powder, through the same target, 
exploding it in the backing; and more recently 
it has thrown a 150-lb. shell through a 6^-inch 
plate, backing and all, bursting it in what repre- 
sented the ship beyond. Sxperiments en 



68 



THB IfATlOKAL ALMANAa 



[186a 



Ing 16- inch «ftefb against targets are now in pro- 
gress at Washington. The Blahielj gnus have 
rarely been tried against iron protection, on 
account of official jealousy and other unworthy 
reasons. 

The practical question, as may be inferred from 
the foregoing results, and as establiriied by all 
others, is, What gun will stand the most powder? 
Now, the destnictiro effect of prqjectiles' is mot 
proportionate direettyto their weigfatand diameter, 
bnt to the tquaret of their Velocities, fot ax" 
ample, the 150-lb. shot above mentioned, driven 
with 60 lbs. of powder at 1770 feet per second, 
has nearly twice the destruetlre eflbet upon strik- 
ing, and neaiiy four times as much upon passing 
its whole bulk through, an iron plate, as the 42&-IU 
shot drif en Ci*om the 16-iBch gun with the same 
powder but at only 800 liset velocity. The strains 
to which heavy guns are subjected aro->lst. The 
statical pressure of the powder^gas. To meet 
this, there must be uniform tensile strength; 
that is, not only tenacity, bnt homogeneity in the 
gun-metaL 2d, The percussive fbrce of the ^m 
and the prq|ectile, to be resisted by hardness of 
the bore. Oast iron is obviously insufficient in 
tenacity; bronze, in hardness, if not in strength ; 
and wrought iron forged in large masses, in homo- 
geneity, if not in resistance to compression. 3d, 
But there is another most important condition 
of strain. The explosion of the powder is so 
instantaneous that, supposing the gun to be a 
series of concentric tubes, the exterior tubes do 
not have time to act before the inner ones are 
strained beyond endurance. To meet this oob- 
dition, it was proposed by Treadwell of Masssr 
ehttsetts, and is sucoeasf ully practised by Blakely, 
and, after him, Whitworth of England, and, pai^ 
tially, by Parrott of New York, to hoop an inner 
tube with rings having a successively higher ini- 
tial tension. The inner tube is therefore under 
eompression, and the outer ring under a consider- 
able tension, when the gun is at rest, bnt all parts 
of a mass of any thickness are str^ned and at 
work simultaneottsly and alike when the gun is 
undo* Are. This promises to be an essential prinr 
dpie in the fiibrication of large guns. A fourth 
cause of strain is the enlargement of the innw 
part of a gun by the heat of frequent successive 
explosions. -The perfect remedy for this and many 
other canses of failure would be perfect elasticity. 
Out steel is obviously superior to other gun- 
metals not only in this quality, but in tenacity 
and hardness. On the whole, it would appear 
that the constantly improving and increasing 
production of steel in large masses, and the me- 
chanical perfection of the method of hooping re- 
ferred to, will shortly multiply service ordnanee 
which shall be at least equal to the European 
experimental guns described. It is i^ainst such 
Ardaance, then, that we have to protect our war- 
•vesaels. The comparative merits of rifles and 
«mooth>boreB, and of large and small calibres ii^itli 



a given strain on the gun, and of wrought iron 
employed to a certain extent on Armstrong's 
plan, and of bronze hoops to equalize expansion 
by heat, and of various improvements in fabrica- 
tion, are subjects of interest, but not of primary 
importance to our present inquiry. 

The practicability of increasing the velocity of 
the shot witbont augmenting the strain on the 
gun, by means of an elastig cushion, as of air, 
around the cartridge, and of accelerating charges 
by means of compressed powder, Ac, can only be 
mentioned here as additional, eleniffnts of pcomise 
in the perfection of ordnance. All these subjects 
will be mwe fully discussed in the forthcoming 
work referred to. 

The armor, of European vessels consists, in 
nearly all cases, of 4^inch solid plates an<i 19 
inches wood backing. The Minotaur class of 
English ships will be plated with dj^ inches of 
solid iron on 9 inches of wood. The Roanoke and 
New Ironndes (American) have 4^inch solid 
armor backed by 24 to 30 inches of oak. This 
protection, then, although a tolerable match for 
the best cast-iron ordnance, of which the 6S-pdr^ 
measured by powder burned and work done, is a 
foir representative (excepting the 15-inch Ck>lum- 
biod, which can hardly be called a tried service 
gun as yet), is probably no better than a wooden 
wall against the new ordnance that it may soon 
have to cope with. The Monitor class of vessels, 
however, have 10, 11, and 24 inches of iron armor; 
but it is laminated armor ; and ifyia brings us to 
another stage of our inquiry. 

2d. Solid and laminated plates compared. — In 
Europe, laminated armor has been altogether 
abandoned, even as a matter of fUrther experi- 
ment, partly because direct trials have proved 
it inferior, and partly because all experiments 
have seemed to establish the law that the resist- 
ance of plates is as the square of their thickness'; 
for example, that one 4-inch plate fs twice as 
strong as two 2-inch plates. The direct trial waA 
the complete penetration of an 8-inch target, and 
the serious indentation and fracture of a 10-inch 
target (|t>otb composed of layers of good plates, 
generally % inch thick) stayed together every 8 
inches) by a 68-pdr. smooth-bore and a 100-pdr. 
rifle at 200 yards, guns against which 4j^inc& 
solid plates are proof. But there was no wood 
behind the laminated targets. To what extert^ 
backing would have modified the result, the expe- 
rimenters themselves do not pretend to know ; yet 
they are satisfied without undertaking fbrtliei* 
trials. It is nowhere urged that wood backing 
adds to the strength of the plate before It in any 
important degree. Its use can only be to distri- 
bute and soften the blow on the structure l>ehincty 
— ^the ribs «f the vesseL 

On the contrary, the more recent experimenta 
in America, ofiidal and otherwise, indicate the 
superiority of laminated armor. A target' 6V^ 
inches thick, composed of ^nch and lialf-in^ 



1868:] 



Ilte]l4S£A0 WAR-VBSSIXS. 



68 



plates, wM bnt sitglitly indented by A T2t>-p<xind 
shot and 10 pounds of powder^ Bnt It shonld be 
obserred that Ameiican experiments are made 
with heavy shot at velocities which are necesea- 
rfly low, becauBo the gnns will not stand the 
extraordinary charges required to give heavy shot 
a high velocity. A laminated plate, with'its con- 
siderable range of elasticity, has time eneugh to 
Iwnd and spring, if hit by a slow ball, howev«r 
heavy. But a mpid ball allows no ehanee for the 
operation of el:isticity. A cannon-ball thrown 
against a copper caldron, for instance, by hand, 
will greatly indent it, and rebound; bnt a pistol- 
shot will pass through without springing or bulg- 
ing it. Again, the best solid forged plates tried in 
England are undoubtedly superior to those usu- 
ally tested here ; for, although American iron is 
naturally batter than English, it cannot be equally 
well worked by onr lighter machinery. In fact, 
the fractures of many of our thick plates exhibit 
brittleness and hardness not observed in the best 
Snglish, although the tensile strength of the 
former may be higher. The resistance of either 
laminated or solid plates to punching in a mor 
chine is directly as the area fVactured, that is to 
say, as the total thickness. It is, therefore, as- 
Btimed by some that their resistance to shot is the 
same. The resistance does appear to be as the 
fractured area; but that area is not the same with 
solid and laminated plates of equal aggregate 
thickness. In the fbrmer the shot-hole is conical, 
about the size of the shot in front, say 8 inches, 
bnt flrom 20 to 30 inches on the back ; while the 
bole made in the latter by the same ball is more 
nearly cylindrical, and hence its area of fracture 
ii much less. It is also obBerv«d that a rolled 
solid plate, though of equally good material^ does 
not stand shot as well as a forged solid plate of 
equal thickness, because, as the strata composing 
the former are not thoroughly welded to each 
r/Oter, however homogeneous they may be indivi- 
dually, the rolled plate is in fact a series of thin 
plates, and is fractured like a laminated target. 
Finally, since it was the utmost work of a 1604b. 
shot, with 50 pounds of powder and nearly 1805 fB«t 
velocity, to punch the best4J^lnch solid armor, 
while the 8 inches of laminated armor above 
mentioned did not stand a 68-pdr. with 16 pounds 
of powder and less than 1600 Ibet velocity, the 
dllTerence in resistance is quite sufficient to esta- 
blish the superiority of the sdild plate and leave 
a large mar^n for possible defects in the quality 
of the other. Still, our present knowiedge of the 
subject is fkr from satlsfeetory. Further experi- 
ments, with uniform conditions, are very neces- 
sary. The cost of laminated armor is less than 
half that of thick plates. But its best feature is 
the strength it imparts to the vessel, and the 
Ikcility with which it can be put on. A serisB of 
thin plates, breaking joints and bolted through 
the backing, not only fitf ten each other, bnt are 
In eflbet a eontdmens girder; whUsi thick plattt 



impart no saoli strength t» tiM Mf^» help to 
each other, bat are aetm^ly weafcstted by the boH« 
holes through which they ore held in |daca. 

8d. VerticeA and Imdined Armor^^Tho general 
conclusion from experiments here and abroad is 
that a given thickness ef iron measured on the 
line of fire oflTers equal resistaace to shut, as they 
average, whather it is vertical or inelined. In 
England, a 3^-lnch solid plate set at an angle of 
4BP was more ii^^ired by eUmffOted lOO^fiound shot 
than a 4)^ncfa soHd vertical plate, both phttea 
being of equal weight for the same vntf ca) height. 
In America, a 6^nch laminated vertical targe* 
was indented about fonr times as deepty by a 126- 
ponnd tj^frieal shot asa^-tneh laaninated plate 
at an angle of 27^. Konnd diot are certaiidy 
glanced by inclined armor, which has only to 
change the direction of the prQ^tile, instead of 
stopping it. But- flat-headed bolts are not glanced 
except when the armor lies at an Impracticably 
flat angle. In Europe, inelined protaotlon is wholly 
abandoned for the sides of vessels, on aoeonnt of 
its cost, inconvenience, and waste at room in sea- 
going ships especially ; and it Is intended to oon- 
stmct some of Capt. Coles's cupolas or tnrrets 
with vertical sides. 

Sleel ^rmor.^It was at first sniq>osed that high 
tensile strength and hardness would be as im- 
portant elements in armor as in other stmotnres 
designed to resist percussion and strain ; and the 
term <* steel-«lad" ships was at once adc^ted in 
popuhtr literature. In 1^61, all the British iron 
and steel makers were invited to provide targets 
of th«»ir various products, for tesit. Cest steel, 
puddled steel, homogeneeus metal, Bessemer steel, 
and hard and soft irons d many qualities, wore 
fired at by 68 and lOO pounders, with the uniform 
result that the dMhage to the target was sub- 
stantially in proportion to its hardness. Co))p«r, 
however, was too soft. It was funnd that to avoid 
crumbling due to brittleness on the one hand, 
and eOty punching due to extreme softness on the 
othnr, a ttmghi duetiU iron, though not necessarily 
of the highest tensile strength, was the best me- 
dium td resist shot. Softness is a necessary ele- 
ment ; bnt a hardness could bo obtained without 
brittleness, it would, of course, be desirable. 1 1 ia 
possible that d very low Bessemer steel, or ratlier 
iren, may yet be cheaply adapted to the service; 
but at present all steel and hard iron are inade- 
quate. 

TatE Structuius of Wab-Vessbu. 

Ist S^aeed-'Ranu. Although Stevens so fully 
^preciated the importance of high speed ten 
years ago as to put above 8000 horse-power in a 
war^vessel which with 4000 would have run as fast 
as any other war-vessel, no one else, either here 
or abroad, seems to have appreciated the immense 
importanoe of this 8ul\|ect, at least until Ericsson 
designed the Puritan and the JDktator, Indeed, 
if the choice lay between speod and protection, ift 



64 



THS NATIONAL ALM JiNitO. 



[1868. 



iB by no ihmiiib certain that * fleet wooden Tessol 
with emgineB and bmlen well below water would 
not whip a alow and danuiy ironclad vrith nerer 
ao thick armor. Soperior epeed guarantees, Ist, 
choice of position, ability to attack the enemy's 
weak side, and to mn out of range when over- 
powwed ; 2d, power a« a nun, to disable any vessel 
which cannot tnm and sail as rapidly; 3d, ability 
to run past forts almost without risk of being hit 
at all, at ordinary ranges, and to pass rapidly out 
of range of any slow Tessels intended for harbor- 
defence. Indeed, the difficulty of hitting a high- 
aided ftigate— a most distinct mark— going at six 
or eight miles an hour, is so great that the admi- 
rals no longer fear to attack stone forts. But an 
engine of war&re almost as little appreciated as 
the high speed which is its absolute condition, is 
the Ram. Two opposite and grave errors appear 
to prevail as to this class of vessels. 1st. The 
heads of slow-going iron-dads are loaded down 
with mighty prows of quadruple plates, when every 
European vessel, at least, every one that they are 
intewled to punch, is several knots faster. 2d. In 
England, especially^ the fistthers gravely discuss 
the possibility of making a ship strong enough to 
act as a ram withoutgoing to pieces, — -just as if 
it was going to be fired out ot a gun 1 It is a 
notorious ftct that light-timbered wooden river- 
boats have frequently run into heavy sealing 
vessels, and into wharves, cutting chasms below 
water which no practicable pumping-power could 
counteract, without being themselves put in a 
sinking condition, and without damage to their 
machinery. The necessity of speed is to oatcft the 
enemy: a very slow movement will then disable 
him. dd. It is urged that one ram, however iiut, 
cannot sink a vessel, because even a slow ship can 
keep her broadside away from another's prow, 
and hence that there must be two or more fost 
rams for each vessel of the enemy. Of course, a 
very angular blow would be glanced; but the 
enemy's «cr«i0 is a more vulnerable point than his 
side. If he presents his stem, in trying to shield 
his side, his locomotive powers may be disabled, 
and then he may be disposed of at the ram's 
leisure. But great focility in turning is also a 
feature of primary importance in all vessels 
designed to run down others. The most con- 
venient means of aocompllshlng this is the use 
of an independent screw-propeller under each 
quarter. By backing one and driving the other 
ahead, the vessel is turned rapidly on her centre 
or heel, while a vessel with a single screw cannot 
change its direction without greatly shifting Its 
position. This division oT power also prevents 
the liability to disaster firom the possible JUlnre 
of one-half of the'drlving machinery. And since 
one screw cannot be of sufficient diameter to 
propel a vessel of light draft at a high speed, two 
•crews enable the power to be doubled with the 
same draft. This excellent feature was well un- 
derstood by Stevens, and adopted in his battery. ! 



2d. Armor and Amumumt-'fUhe prtnciplea and 
structure of the new ordnance, and the thickness 
of armor to withstand such ordnance, have already 
been mentioned. One gun of given weight, and 
the armor necessaiy to protect both it and the 
machinery and men that M'ork it, may be called a 
unit' of power : the smallest vessel must carry 
this. The increase of power-^the multiplication 
of these nnita— would appear to depend simply 
on the carrying-capacity of the vessel. A certain 
speed is also necessary; and this would also seem 
to depend solely on the weight of engines and 
boilers that the vessel can sustain. Now, carry- 
ing-capacity is entirely a question of size. By 
doubling all the lineal dimensions of a vessel of 
given fiMrm, her capacity is increased eight-fold ; 
that is to say, she can carry eight times as much 
weight of engines, boilers, armor, and guns. 
Meanwhile, her resistance is only quadrupled, so 
that to propel each ton of her weight requires 
but half the power necessary to propel each ton 
of the weight of a vessel of half the dimensions. 
Largo dimensions, then, are an element of the 
greatest practicable power and speed. The objec- 
tion to large vessels is their draft of water, which 
limits their use for harbor-work. Hence there 
must be a class of small vessels to cope onlj' with 
the game doss of enemies. 

But the efficiency of war-vessels need not depend 
solely on their siae. Indeed, a small vessel pro- 
vided with the improvements to be nientioned 
would perhaps conquer a largo vessel without 
them. 1st. Two or three times the locomotive 
power now developed may be obtained by the use 
of improved boilers and machinery occupying the 
same space and employing the same amount of 
the vessel's buoyancy. This is to be accomplished 
by carrying very much higher steam-pressure, 
employing simple snrfoce<ondensers, and main- 
taining a mucli higher rate of combustion and 
vaporization, in accordance with the principles 
already tested in the best commercial-marine 
practice. 2d. At least five and perhaps ten times 
the work can be got out of a given armament by 
loading and manoeuvring it foster, through the 
direct action of steam machinery. This sul^ect is 
receiving special attention in America. Ericsson's 
and Coles's revolving gun-turrets> to make all the 
guns available on both sides of the ship or in any 
direction, dispense with half the armament neces- 
sary in the old broadside system. A rotating 
battery, designed by Mr. Julius King, of New 
Jersey, in which two or more guns are loading 
below deck while another in the same revolving 
fhune, and covered by a shot-proof hood, may be 
trained, elevated, and fired above deck; Mr. £. A. 
Stevens's plan of elevating and lowering, by hy- 
draulic machinery, the turn-table on which the 
gun-oarrlage Is fixed, so that the gun can be fired 
above deck, and loaded and protected, except at 
the moment of firing, below a shot-proof stnio- 
ture; and espeolally Mr. Stevma'a arrangement 



1868.] 



laON^OLAD WAB<>yBflBSLS« 



65 



for lottdkig and looftUng gnna imj^lj by atmfi» 
steam machinery, — tbete and other inventionB in 
this direction (to bo illustrated in detail in the 
fiirtlicoming w(H-k referred to) are Tartly increae- 
ing the power of small batteries. 3d. The oo»> 
cmlntion of armor practlcaUe in other respects 
ii espedally feasiblo if tha armament of small 
batteries can be made Tery powerful. We have 
observed that any armor that a 6000-ton ■hip-nny 
the Warrior — can carry from end to end is not 
proof against modem ordnance. But she could 
esrry a Monitor turret six feet thick; and it is 
probable that many years irill eh^se before ord- 
nance will be made to snuMsb or pierce such pro* 
taction. It must be remembered that many ct 
the difficulties that menace the ordnance^naker^- 
fer instance, the unequal expansion of the metal 
by the heat of the explosion-~are not encountered 
by the maker of armor. There must, of course^ be 
a streak of armor at and extending a little below 
the water-line of any vessel, to prevent the en- 
trance of water through shot-holes there, and the 
consequent sinking of the vessel. Bulkheads alone 
might not save her, as she is liable to be pierced 
in all her compartments. But there is no import- 
ant reason for plating a ship ten or fifteen feet 
out of water from end to end, if she has a shot- 
proof deck <U the water-line. She must have such 
a deck somewhere, so that, while its position at the 
water-line adds no extra weight, it prevents, in 
connection with the armor below it, the entrance 
of water and shot to the vital parts of the struc- 
ture. AU the great expanse of inferior or useless 
armor thus dispensed with may be added to 
thickoi the turret, or short casemate, or small 
battery, whatever it may be, and so make it in- 
vulnerable. In the Moniiort this is accomplished 
by dispensing with the whole upper part of the 
hull, except 12 to 24 inches above the water-line. 
It may be that such vessels will prove sea-worthy : 
they are certainly well adapted to harbor-defence, 
always providing that they have great speed. 
Another plan is to omit a wide streak of armor 
between the water-line and the battery which 
may begin say 6 feet above water. Shot-proof 
pasaages leading from the parts below water to 
the battery would, of course, be required. Thus 
the thickness of the parts really needing protection 
could be more than doubled; and, since the vessel 
would be as high out of water as an ordinary sea- 
going steamer, she would be equally sea-worthy. 
The manner in which some of these principles of 
construction have been carried out will be noticed 
in a brief 

Jkieription of Prominent Iron-Clad Vasds, 

classified with reference to their protection. Ist. 
The Minotaur class (English, 3 vessels), 6G21 tons, 
390 feet long, 40 guns ; the Royal Oak class (Eng- 
lish, 6 vesselsX 4045 tons, 277 feet long, 32 guns; 
the raUant class (English, 2 vessels), 4003 tons, 
275 &et long, 30 guns ; and Xa Gloire class (French, 



U Tassels), 2fiT ftot kng, M gum, ar* plutod ftwi^ 
stem to stem, from main deck to 4 or 6 fi»et below 
water. 2d. The Ifew Jbromida (AaMricaD), 3260 
tons, 240 fset long, 16 guns; Che JehiOe* (JSngUBh)^ 
6089 tons, S80 ftet long^ 26 guns; the lixvorite 
(English), 2168 tons, 220 liMt long, 8 guns; the 
JBnterpriu (SngUah), 980 tons, 180 feet long, 4 
guns; and the So{/irino and JOiaaentA {Irmch), 
about 270 feet long, 26 catemate gons^ are all 
pUted from stem to stem for 3 to 6 feet above and 
the SMDM faelaw water, besides whi^h the sides are 
plated to the upper dsek amidships, forming 
central batteries or rasemates which have plated 
bnlUieads at their endsw The AckOle^s casflmnto 
occupies 200 feet of her length amidshjpS) and tha 
Nevf Jr^ntidti^i 170 feet. 3d. The Warrior and 
Black Prince (J^ngUshX 6038 tons, 380 feet long. 
26 protected gnna, have casemates 200 feet lonfib 
plated firam the vpper deck to 5 feet below water, 
but they have no ansor at the water-line forward 
and aft. AU the aboTO vessels carry the usuU 
broadside guns. 4th. Ships with revolving turrets. 
The Boanok€ (American), 266 feet long, has S 
turrets of 21 feet diameter inside, 9 feet height, 
and 11 inches thickness, carrying 6 164nch guns. 
Of the two seargoing "Monitors,^* the Puritan 
is 340 feet long, 2 feet out of water, and carries 2 
turrets 24 inches thick, and 4 15-inch guns ; the 
Dictator is 320 feet long, and carries 1 turret 
and 2 15-inch guns. The smaller ^^MonUort,* 
some 18 in number, carry 1 turret, like the Boa- 
nok^Sf with 2 guns, and are about 200 feet long. 
The JRoyal Sovereign and Prince Albert (English), 
230 feet long, are to carry respectiToly 5 and 6 
turrets or cupolas on CSaptain Coles's plan. The 
guns, two in each turret, were intended to be 
100-pdr. Armstrong rifled breech-loaders. AU the 
vessels of the 4th class are completely plated 
from tlie upper deck to 4 or 5 feet below water, 
and from stem to stem, but are not as high out 
of water as the casemated ships; the hulls of the 
smaller **Monitonf* are but 12 to 18 inches out of 
water in action. The Stevene Battery^ 420 feet 
long, is of the 2d class as to the disposition of her 
armor. Her casemate is inclined, however, at an 
angle of 27^; her guns are upon the top of it, 
instead of within it, and are to be protected. The 
iron-clad vessels on the Western rivers are of great 
beam and Ught draft. Their armor is usually 
inclined at about 45<^, and is of the 2d class as to 
disposition. 

CbncIiMtons.— 1st. The greater part of the naval 
armor now completed and constructing is not 
proof against various kinds of modern experi- 
mental guns. 2d. While in America the official 
theory of progress in naval armament appears to 
be the superiority of cast-iron guns, small charges, 
and heavy shot at low velocities, the notorious 
fact upon which improvement proceeds in Europe 
is the superiority of steel guns, high charges, and 
light shot at excessive velocities. 3d. But the 
Americans were greatly in advance of the Euro> 



66 



THS NATXOHAL ALMAHAa 



[I86t. 



paiiii 1b ftll til* HipotntmsDta of horiiontol shell- 
ftring at wooden walla; fixm whidi it may be in- 
ferred that ikaj will not be behind thorn in fight- 
ing iron-dads, when {he test comes, If Europeans 
shonld erer foree that issue. 4th. Altboag^ the 
difflcntties in fabricating strong gnns are more 
nnmeroQS and serioiM than those eoooimteTed b j 
the iron-clad-ship bnilder, the present state and 
rapid improremeat of axperimentai ccdneaoe 
shoQld instruct us to prepare owr Tessels fer 
bearler blows than bare yet been struck, and to 
aroid the costly mistakes of the SngUsh and 
French, who, Anding a certain protection proof 
against terviee guns, constmoted naTies o^y in 
time to ilttd them completely vulnerable before 
the new dais of gnns whidi their enemies can at 
any tbne put into theeerrice. 6th. Since the slaeof 
Tvssels, upon which alone depends thdr ability to 
carry ooer aU the heavy armor thus rende r ed in- 
dispensable, is limited by the depth of harbors, 
the conetntnUiitn ot armor— a perfectly fbaaible 



qratem for aea-going aa well aa bacbor 
would appear to be absolutely necessary. 0th* 
High speed, to Im attained chiefly by means of 
imprtrred steam machinery, and acoonqMaled by 
power of rapid turning, is essential to choice of 
position, to decreasing the risk of being hit by tha 
shot of an enemy, e^»eeially Ihun his forts, and 
particularly in enabling a yeassl to operate aa m 
ram. 7th. The oomparatiTe merits of aoUd and 
laminated armor can only Im certainly decided 
after Author experiments, although the former, 
as adopted 1^ Eunqieaas, is superior as for as tlia 
foots inform us. 8th. But in the situation of 
apnnor— the chief consideration of aU-^e Ame- 
ricana are certainly in adTanoe, altfaou^ tha 
princ^^ of making a small battery at the sama 
time invulnerable and as elfecttre aa an ordinary 
large battery is nowhere oompletdy carried oat. 
Indeed, this is the principle, as Ikr as we can now 
determine, upon which protection will be flaally 
triumphant against attwk. 



1868.] EXECUTIVE O&VUKlMJtvn 09 TKB TmiTSD STATES. 



w 



THE UNITED STATES. 



TBI existence of the United States of America 
as a separate and independent nation nsually 
dates from July 4, 1776, when the second Conti- 
nental Congress passed the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, dissolTing all connection with Great 
Britain. The colonies, however, were virtnally 
nnder their own government from the time of the 
meeting of the second Continental Congress, May 
10, 1775, which hody continued Ita sittings during 
the greater part of the Revolutionary War, and 
had the general direction of »irair8. The powers 
of this Congress were not defined, — ^there was no 
settled form of government ; but, their authority 
being of a revolutionary or provisional character, 
they exercised such as the necessities of the times 
required. The Revolutionary Govebnmsnt con- 
tinued until the Confederation was organized, the 
articles for which were adopted by the Congress 
as early as November 15, 1777, but were not finally 
ratified by all the Colonies until March 1, 1781. 
On the following day (March 2, 1781) Congress 
sflsembled under the Confederation. The Con- 
7EDE&ATX GovBBinCKNT vnB Intended to be pei> 
petual ; but it was soon found to be so defective, 
ineffident, and even powerless, that a convention 



of delegates was called to meet at Philadelphia on 
the 14th of May, 1787, ** for the sole and express 
purpose of revising the Articles of OonfBderatitm, 
and reporting such alterations and provisions 
therein as shall readet the federal Coustitutiou 
adequate to the exigencies of the Qovernmeut 
and the preservation of the Union." The Com- 
sfiTunoNAL GovxRincKKT was the result of the 
deliberations of this convention ; for they adopted, 
on the 17th of September, 1787, that great and 
wise charter known as the Constitution of the 
United States. Eleven of the States having rati- 
fied this Constitutian, Congress, on the 17th of 
September, 1788, resolved that it should go into 
operation on Wednesday, the 4th day of March, 
1789. 

It is under this Oovernment-^-so just, so wise, 
and so beneficent — that the people of the United 
States have lived for the last seventy-three years, 
accomplishing a growth, a prosperity, and a power 
without a parallel in the annals of history, pro- 
gressing, without check or abatement, in all that 
gives greatness and happiness to a people, until 
the outbreak of the present unhappy rebellion. 



I. XSXSGUTrVlQ GOVERNMENT. 

The nineteenth Presidential term of four years since the establishment of the Government of the 
United States, under the Constitution adopted March 1, 1789, began on the 4th day of March, 1861, 

and it will expire on the 4th of March, 1865. 

8alai7. 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, of Illinois, Psesidint $26,000 

John G. NicoUy, Private Secretary 2,500 

William O. Stoddard, Private SecreUuy to Mign Bitentt 1,600 

HANNIBAL HAMLIN, of Maine, Viob-Pbesidbot 8j0OO 



THE CABINET. 

The following are the principal officers hi the Executive Department of the Government, who form 

the CU>inet, and hold thoh: ofBlces at the will of the President. 

BaUry. 

WiLUAM H. 8ewabi>, New York, Secretary of State 18,000 

Salmon P. Chase, Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury 8,000 

EDwnr M. Stanton, Pennsylvania, Secretary of War 8,000 

OxDBON Welles, Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy 8,000 

John P. Usher, Indiana, Secretary of the Interior 8,000 

HoNTOOMXST BLAia, Maryland, Putnuuter-CfenenU - 8,000 

Edwabd Bates, Missouri, Attormy-General 8,000 



68 



THE KATIONAL ;/U«BUirAO. 



[1868. 



PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE, AND JUDICIAL OFFICERS OF 
THE UNITED STATES FROM THE REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT 
TIME. 

I. UNDEE THE REVOLUTIONARY GOVERNMENT. 
Presidents of the Continental Cotigr ess from 1774 to 1789. 



Name. 


State. 


Date of Ap- 
pointment. 


• 

1 

n 

1723 
1737 
1723 
1745 
1732 
1734 


-i 

Q 

1775 
1793 
1792 
1829 
1796 
1817 
1783 


Name. 


State. 


Date of Ap- 
pointment. 


• 

1740 

1744 
1732 
1738 

1748 


1 


Peyton Randolph.. 

Jonn Hancock 

Henry Laurens 

John Jay 

8amU Huntington. 
Thomas McKean... 


Va. 

Mass. 

S. C. 

N. Y. 

Ck)nn. 

Del. 

Md. 


Sept. 5, 1774 
May 24, 1776 
Nov.l, 1777 
Dec. 10, 1778 
Sept. 28, 1779 
July 10, 1781 
Nov. 5, 1781 


Elias Boudinot 

Thomas Mifflin 

Rich'd Henry Lee.. 
Nathaniel Gorham. 

Arthur St. Clair 

Cyrus Griffin 


N.J. 

Penn. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Peun. 

Va. 

V — ^11— 


Nov. 4, 1782 
Nov. 3, 1783 
Nov. 30, 1786 
June 6, 1786 
Feb. 2, 1787 
Jan. 22, 1788 


1824 
1800 
1704 
1796 
1818 
1810 


John Hanson 


1 





II. UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 
Presidents of the United States, 



Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


1 

1732 
1736 
1743 
1761 
1759 
1767 
1767 
1782 


5 

1799 
1826 
1826 
1837 
1831 
1848 
1845 
1862 


Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


s 

1773 
1790 
1705 
1784 
1800 
1804 
1791 
1809 




George Washington- 
John Adams 


Va. 

Mass. 

Va. 

Va. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Tenn. 

N. Y. 


1789-1797 
1797-1801 
1801-1809 
1809-1817 
1817-1825 
1825-1829 
1829-1837 
1837-1841 


William H. Harrison 
John Tyler 


Ohio. 

Va. 

Tenn. 

La. 

N.Y. 

N.H. 

Penn. 

111. 


1841-1841 
1841-1845 
1845-1849 
1849-1850 
1860-1853 
1853-1857 
1857-1861 
1861- 


1841 
IROS 


Thomas Jefferson 

James Madison 


James K. Polk 

Zachary Taylor 

Millard Fillmore 

Franklin Pierce 

James Buchanan 

Abraham Lincoln 


1849 
1860 


James Monroe 




Johu Quincy Adams. 

Andrew Jackson 

Martin Van Buren.... 





Vice-Presidents, 



Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


1 

1735 


• 

lS2ft 


Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


• 

1780 
1790 
1792 
1800 
1786 
1821 
1800 


•2 
5 


John Adams 


Mass. 

Va. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

S.C. 

N.Y. 


1789-1797 
1797-1801 
1801-1806 
1805-1812 
1813-1814 
1817-1825 
1825-1832 
1833-1837 


Richard M.Johnson.. 
John Tvler- 


Ky. 

Va. 

Penn. 

N.Y. 

Ala. 

Ky. 

Me. 


1837-1841 
1841-1841 
1846-1849 
1849-1860 
1853-1853 
1867-1861 
1861- 


1850 


Thomas Jefferson 


■*■" "" — - 
1743 182fil 


1862 


Aaron Burr. 

Georee Clinton 


1766 
1739 
1744 
1774 
1782 
1782 


18361 

1812 j 

1814! 

1825 

1850 

18621 


George M.Dallas 

Millard Fillmore 

William R.King 

John 0. Breckinridge 
Hannibal Hamlin 




Elbrldgc Gerry 

Daniel D. Tompkins.. 

John C. Calhoun 

Martin Van Buren.... 


1858 



Secretariet of State, 



Name. 



Thomas Jefferson..... 
Edmund Randolph... 
Timothy Pickering... 

John Marshall 

James Madison. 

Robert Smith 

James Monroe 

John Quincy Adams.. 

Henry Clay 

Martin Van Buren.... 
Edward Livingston... 

Louis McLane. 

John Forsyth 



State. 



Va. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Va. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

La. 

Del. 

Ga. 



Term of 
Service. 



1789-1794 
1794-1795 
1795-1800 
1800-1801 
1801-1809 
1809-1811 
1811-1817 
1817-1825 
1825-1829 
1829-1831 
1831-1833 
1833-1835 
1836-1841 



a 



1743 

1745 
1765 
1751 



-3 



1826 
1813 
1829 
1836 
1837 



1759 1831 
1767 1848 
1777! 18.12 
1782 1862 
1764 1836 
1786,1857 
1780 1841 



Name. 



7«*««* ••• 



-I 



Daniel Webster. 
Hugh S. Legare 

Abel P.Upshur. 

John C.Calhonn 

James Buchanan 

John M.Clayton 

Daniel Webster. 

Edward Everett 

William L. Marcy 

Lewis Cass ^ 

Jeremiah S. Black.... 
William H. Seward... 



State. 



Mass. 
S.C. 
Va. 
8.0. 

Penn. 

Del. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

.Mich. 

Penn. 

N.Y. 



Term of 
Service. 



1841-1843 
184a-1843 
1843-1844 
1844-1846 
1845-1849 
1849-1850 
1850-1852 
1852-1853 
1853-1857 
1867-1861 
1861-1861 
1861- 



,1794 
1786 
1782 
1810 
1801 



s 



1852 
1843 
1844 
1860 

1856 
1852 



1860 



im.] 



OFFICBRS 09 THE UNITED STATES. 



69 



Secretarie» of the Treatnry, 



Kame. 



Alexander Hamilton 

Oliver Wolcott 

Samuel Dexter 

Alliert Gallatin 

George W. Campbell. 
Alexander J. Dallas.. 
William H. Crawford 

Richard Rush 

Samuel D. lugham... 

U>DJ8 McLane 

William J. Duano 

BogerB. Taney.. 

Levi Woodbury. 



State. 



N.Y. 

Conn. 

Mass. 

Penn. 

Tenn. 

Penn. 

Ga. 

Penn. 

Penn. 

Del. 

Penn. 

Md. 

N. H. 



Term of 
Service. 



1789-1796 
1796-1801 
1801-1802 
1802-1814 
1814-1814 
1814-1817 
1817-1825 
1826-1829 
1829-1831 
1831-1833 
1833-1833 
1833-1834 
1834-1841 



fi 


•2 


& 


S 


1767 


1804 


1759 


1833 


1761 


1816 


1761 


1849 


1768 


1848 


1760 


1817 


1772 


1834 


1780 


1860 


1779 


1860 


1786 


1887 


1780 




1777 




1789 


issi 



Name. 



Thomas £wing 

Walter Forward.... 

John C.Spencer 

George M. Bibb 

Robert J. Walker.. 
Wm. M. Meredith... 

Thomas Corwin 

James Gnthrie 

UoweUCobb 

Philip F. Thomas... 

John A. Dix 

Salmon P. Chase.... 



State. 



Ohio. 

Penn. 

N.Y. 

Ky. 

Miss. 

Penn. 

Ohio. 

Ky. 

Ga. 

Md. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 



Term of 
Service. 



1841-1841 
1841-1843 
1843-1844 
1844-1845 
1846-1849 
1849-1860 
1860-1863 
1853-1857 
1857-1860 
1860-1861 
1861-1861 
1861- 



I 



1789 
1786 
1787 
1784 
1801 



1794 
1793 
1815 
1810 
1798 
1808 



1 



1852 
1865 



Seeretariet of War, 



Name. 



Henry Knox 

Timothy Pickering... 

John McHenry 

Samuel Dexter.. 

Soger Griswold. 

Henry Dearborn........ 

William Enstis 

John Armstrong 

James Monroe 

William H. Crawford 

George Oraham 

John C. Calhonn 

James Barbonr 

Pater B. Porter. 

John H. Eaton 



State. 



Mass. 

Penn. 

Md. 

Mass. 

Conn. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

Ga. 

Va. 

S.C. 

Va. 

N.Y. 

Tenn. 



Term of 
Service. 


a 

1 

1750 
1745 


i 
s 

1806 
1829 


1789-1795 
1795-1795 
1796-1800 


1800-1800 
1801-1801 
1801-1809 
1809-1813 
1813-1814 
1814-1815 
1815-1816 
1817-1817 
1817-1825 
1825-1828 
1828-1829 
1829-1831 


1761 
1762 
1751 
1754 
1759 
1759 
1772 
1758 
1782 
1776 
1773 
1790 


1816 
1812 
1829 
1825 
1843 
1831 
1834 
1826 
1850 
1842 
1844 
1856 



Name. 



Benjamin F. Butler... 

Joel R. Poinsett 

John Bell 

John G. Spencer 

James M. Porter 

William Wilkins 

William L. Marcy 

George W. Crawford.. 
Charles M. Conrad.... 

Jefferson Davis.. 

John B.Floyd 

Joseph Holt 

Simon Cameron 

£<lwin M. Stanton.... 



State. 



Mich. 
N.Y. 

S. C. 

Teun. 

N.Y. 

Penn. 

Penn. 

N.Y. 

Ga. 

La. 

Miss. 

Va. 

Ky. 

Penn. 

Penn. 



Term of 
Service. 



1831-1837 
1837-1837 
1837-1841 
1841-1841 
1841-1843 
1843-1844 
1844-1846 
1845-1849 
1849-1850 
1850-1853 
1853-1867 
1857-1860 
1860-1861 
1861-1862 
1862- 



i 



1782 



1779 
1797 

1787 



1780 

1798 

1807 

1808 

1805 

18071... 

1799.... 






1860 
1861 

1865 



1865 



Secretaries of the Navy. 



Name. 



George Cabot. 

Benjamin Stoddert... 

Robert Smith 

Jacob Crowninshield 

Paul Hamilton 

William Jones 

B. W. Crowninshield.. 

Smith Thompson 

John Rodgers 

Saniael L. Southard.. 

John Branch 

I^vi Woodbury 

Mahlon Dickerson 

James R.Paulding... 



State. 



Mass. 

Md. 

Md. 

Mass. 

S.C. 

Penn. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 



N.J. 
N.C. 
N. H. 
N.J. 
N.Y. 



Term of 
Service. 


1761 


1823 


1798-1798 
1798-1801 


1801-1805 

isav-isoQ 

1809-1813 
1813-1814 


1767 


1842 
1816 


1814r-1818 
1818-1823 
1823-1823 
1823-1829 
1829-1831 
1831-1834 
1834-1838 
1838-1841 


1774 
1767 
1765 
1787 
1782 
1789 
1769 
1779 


1861 
1843 
1838 
1842 

1861 
1853 
1860 



Name. 



George E. Badger^.... 

Abel P.Upshnr.. 

David Henshaw 

Thomas W. Gilmer... 

John Y.Mason 

George Bancroft 

John Y. Mason 

William B. Preston... 
William A. Graham. 

John P. Kennedy 

James C. Dobbin 

Isaac Toucey- 

Gideon Welles. 



State. 



N.C. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Va. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Va. 

Va. 

N.C. 

Md. 

N.C. 

Conn. 

Conn. 



Term of 
Service. 



1841-1841 
1841-1843 
1843-1844 
1844-1844 
1844-1845 
1846-1846 
1846-1849 
1849-1850 
1850-1852 
1852-1853 
1868-1867 
1867-1861 
1861- 



1795 
1790 
1791 



1795 
1800 
1796 



i 



j •«• ••• 

1844 
1862 
1844 
1869 



1800 
1795 
1814 
1798 
1802 



1859 



1867 



Pottmastere- General. 



Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service.. 


1 

1748 
1746 
1760 


i 

5 

1818 
1829 
1815 


Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


1 

1767 
1766 
1785 


Died. 


Stmnel Osffood 


Mass. 
Penn. 
Ga. 


1789-1791 
1791-1796 
179fr-1801 


Gideon Granger. 

Return J.Meigs, Jr.... 
John McLean. 


Conn. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 


1801-1814 
1814-1823 
1823-1829 


1822 


Thnothy Pickering... 
JowphBabershmm... 


1825 
1881 



70 



THE NATIONAL AIiHANAC. 



[1868. 



Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


• 

1786 
1789 
1787 
1787 


i 

1835 
1856 


Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


• 

1810 
1790 


Died. 


WillUm T. Barry ...... 

ilmna Keiidlill 


Ky. 

Conn. 
N.Y. 

Tenn. 
Vt. 


1S29-1835 
1835-1840 
1840-1841 
1841-1841 
1841-1845 
1845-1849 
1849-1850 


Nathan K. Hall.. 

Samnel D. Hubbard.. 

James Campbell 

Aaron V. Brown. 

Joseob Holt 


N.Y. 

Conn. 

Peun. 

Tenn. 

Ky. 


1850-1862 
1852-1853 
1853-1857 
1857-1860 
1860-1860 
1860-1861 
1861- 


18«1 
186ft 


JohnM.NUes. 

Francis Granger 

Chas. A. Wickliffe 




1807 


1860 






Horatio Kinc 




i^a^e tioonson 

Jacob Collanier 


1792 




Montgomery Blair.... 


Md. 




«••••• 



Attomeyt' Oeneral. 



Name. 



Edmund Randolph... 

William Bradford 

Charles Lee 

Levi Lincoln 

Robert Smith 

John Breckinridge... 

Ciesar A.Rodney 

William Pinkney 

Richard Rush 

William Wirt 

John M.Berrien 

Roger B. Taney 

Beigamin F. Butler... 
Felix Omndy. 



State. 



Va. 

Penn. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Md. 

Ky. 

Del. 

Md. 

Penn. 

Va. 

Oa. 

Md- 

N.Y. 

Tenn. 



Termor 
Service. 



1789-1704 
1794^1798 
1795-1801 
1801-1806 
1805-1805 
1805-1807 
1807-1811 
1811-1814 
1814-1817 
1817-1829 
1829-1831 
1831-1833 
1833-1838 
1838-1840 



• 


i 


Q 




n 


Q 


•••••• 


1813 


1766 


1706 


1767 


1815 


1749 


1820 


1757 


1842 




1806 


•••••• 


1824 


1765 


1823 


17f^0 1860 


1772 


1S34 


1781 


1856 


1777 




•••••• 


1860 


1770 


1840 



Name. 



Henry D. Oilpin 

John J. Crittenden... 

Hugh 8. Legare 

John Nelson... 

John Y. Mason 

Nathan OifTord. 

Isaac Toncey. 

Reverdy Johnson...... 

John J. Crittenden... 

Caleb Cnshing 

Jeremiah S. Black.... 
Kdwin M. Stanton..... 
Edward Bates 



State. 



Penn. 
Ky. 

S.C. 

Md. 

Va. 

Me. 

Conn. 

Md. 

Ky. 

Mass. 

Penn. 

Penn. 

Mo. 



Termed 
Service. 



1840-1841 
1841-1841 
1841-1848 
184.3-1846 
1846-1846 
1846-1848 
1848-1849 
1849-1850 
1850-1853 
1853-1887 
1857-1860 
1860-1861 
1861- 



i 



1801 
1786 
17»7 
1791 
11706 
1813 
1708 
ITM 
1786 
1800 
1810 



1791 



■8 

A 
1860 

1843 
1860 
1860 



• • • ••« 



Secretaries of the Inferior, 



Name. 



Thomas Ewing 

T. M. T. McKennan... 
Alex'r H. II. Stuart.. 



State. 



Ohio. 
Penn. 
Va. 



Term of 
Service. 



1849-1850 
1850-1850 
1850-1853 






1789 



1 
o 



1852 



Name. 



Robert McClelland... 

Jacob Thompson 

Caleb B. Smith* 



State. 



Mich. 
Miss. 
Ind. 



Term of 
Service. 



1853-1857 
1857-1861 

1861-1862 

» - 






1810 
1808 



-% 
O 



•Bnceeeitod by Hon. John P. Uihor, oT Indlaaa. 
Chief JitBtieet of the Supreme Court of the United States, 



Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Service. 


1 

1745 
1752 


A 

1829 
1800 
1807 


Name. 


State. 


Term of 
Serrice. 


• 

1755 


Died. 


John Jay 

John Rutledge 

Oliver Ellsworth 


N.Y. 

S.C. 
Conn. 


1789-1795 
1796-1795 
17WV-1801 


John Marshall 


Va. 

Md. 


1801-1836 
18aJ- 


^1836 


Roger B.Taney 


1777 


1.::::: 



Speakers of the House of Representatives. 



Name. 



F. A. Mnhlenbnrgh— 
Jonathan Trumbull... 
F. A. Muhlenburgh~. 

Jonathan Dayton 

Theodore Sedgwick... 

Nathnniul Macon 

Joseph B. Vamum... 

Henry Clay 

Langdon Cheevea~.... 
Henry Clay 



State. 



Penn. 

Conn. 

Penn. 

N.J. 

Mass. 

N.C. 

Mass. 

S.C. 
Ky. 



Term of 
Service. 



1789-1791 
1791-1793 
1793-1795 
1795-1799 
1799-1801 
1801-1807 
1807-1811 
1811-1814 
1814-1816 
1815-1820 



• 


"S 


A 


s 


1760 


1801 


1740 


1809 


1750 


1801 


1756 


1821 


1748 


1813 


1757 


1837 


1760 


1821 


1777 


1862 


1776 


1857 


1777 


18621 



Name. 



John W. Taylor. 

Philip P. Barbour..... 

Henry Clay 

John W. Taylor 

Andrew Ste^ensou.... 

James K. Polk 

Robert M. T. Hunter 

JohnWliite 

Jolin Vf. Jones 



State. 



N.Y. 

Va. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

Tenn. 

Tenn. 

Va. 

Ky. 

Va. 



Term of 
Service. 



1820-1821 
1821-1823 
1823-1825 
1825-1827 
1827-1834 
1834-1835 
1836-1830 
1839-1841 
1841-1843 
1843-1846 



e 



1784 
1779 
1777 
1784 
1784 
1797 
1795 
1809 
1805 
180e 




1849 



OFFICHBS OF THE UKITID KEATES. 
'ptaktrt of At Homtt of Rtprtttntatnm. — C«ntiinitd. 



Hkolo. 


stilt.. 


£S? 


1 


i 


Nu... 


Sli>t. 


Term of 


II 




tod. 

Mum. 


1$4'-1SW 




|NsU,M,TP.B«.kt... 
[OsliwtuA.Orott 


IL 


lSe!-18W 
1§81-18« 




g*«.aw,-«.™p.. 


ym 




ISi» 


^.''^:!:::::::::::. 



THE CONGRESSES OF 


THE UNITED STATES. 




Tin... 


WhtniWd, 


■nn^ 


Wfamhrid. 




New Toik 2 


xvni.D«.i,i!Ks.ioMu.s,isst 














































¥:J?:g^^i.^,?iS=:^gS 
















do. 






XXTin.D«.4,l8<g,toM«'*i^ M» 








































ilKiss 













































72 



THE HATiaNAL ALUAVaC. 



[1868. 



L DEFABTHEHT OP STATE. 

(Corrected at the Department of State, Not. 1863.) 
Namei and OfflOM. Whence appointed. Compenaaiion. 

WILLIAM H. S£WARD, SSCBRAET OF SffAXB. , New York .$8,000 

FuDBRiCK W. Sewaad, AstUtatU Secretary qf State New York 8^000 

WauAM HcNTEH, Chi^ CUrk Rhode Island 2^200 

Okokqk £. Bakxb, Disbursing CfUrk. New York 2,000 

John A. Jones, Superintendent qf SteUisties Illinois 2,000 

Alezandbb H. Dsrkick, Diplomatic Bureau Pennsylvania 1,800 

Robert S. Chilton, " " New York 1,800 

Jambs 8. McKis, " " Maryland 1,800 

Robert S. Chew, CkmnUar Bureau Virginia. 1,800 

Okoboi J. Abbot, " " ~ New Hampshire; , 1,800 

WiLLiAK HoGAN, Translator .....New York 1,800 

Ferdinand Jefferson, Clerk of Rolls District of Golnmhia ;.... 1,000 

George J. Bartlk, Clerk of Commissions and Pardons Virginia. 1,600 

Thomas L. Forrest, Passport Gerk Illinois .^. 1,400 



The Depturtment of State is organized in the 
following manner : — 

27^ Dijdomatie Branch has charge of all cor- 
reflpondenoe between the Department and diplo- 
matic agents of the United States abroad, and 
those of foreign powers accredited to this Govem- 
ment, as well as the consular representatives of 
such powers in the United States. The bureau is 
in three diyisions, each having a principal clerk 
with assistants. The first division embraces the 
following countries: — England, France, Russia, 
Netherlands, China, and all insular and colonial 
dependencies, and the corresponding l^ations. 
The second, Spain, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, 
Sweden and Norway, Prussia, Portugal, Italy, 
Rome, Switzerland, Turkey, Japan, Barbary 
States, Siam, and all insular and colonial depend- 
encies, and the corresponding legations. The 
third, all the Spanish-American States; the Sand- 
wich Islands; Hayti, Dominica, and any other 
States of the Western hemisphere not a colonial 
dependency, also all their legations. 

I^e Consular Branch has charge of the corre- 
spondence, &c. between the Department and the 
consuls, vice<;onsuls, and commercial agents of 
the United States abroad. It consists of two divi- 
sions; the first of which has charge of the coun- 
tries named in the first and second divisions of 
the diplomatic bureau, and the other of those 
named in the third division of the said bureau. 

J%e Disbursing Agent has charge of all matters 
connected with accounts relating to any ftmd dis- 
bursed by the Department. 

The TranskUorf in addition to his regular duties, 
records the commissions of foreign consuls and 
yice-consuls, when not in English, upon which 
exequaturs are issued. 

The Clerk qf Appointments and Commissions 
makes out and records commissions, letters of 
appointment, nominations to the Senate, exequa- 
turs, and records, when in English, the com- 
missions upon which the latter are issued. He 



also prepares and records pardons aad renaJaslons, 
and registers and files the papers on which they 
axe founded. Has charge of the seal of the United 
States. 

The Clerk of BoUs and Archives has charge at 
the enrolled acts and resolutions of Congress as 
they are receired from the President; prepares 
authenticated copies thereof, and superintends 
their publication; writes and answer&Ietters con- 
nected therewith; keeps files of letters received; 
is the custodian of old archives, Ac. 

The CUrk qf AvihenticaHons has charge of the 
seal of the Department, and prepares and attaches 
certificates to papers presented for authentication; 
records all letters from the Department other 
than diplomatic and consular ; has charge of Terri- 
torial business. 

TRe Rissport Clerk makes out and records pas^ 
ports, and files the papers on which they are 
granted. 

!77ic Superintendent qf Statistics^ prepares the 
annual report, required to be communicated to 
Congress within sixty days after the commeoco* 
ment of each ordinary session, of all changes and 
modifications in the commercial system of other 
nations, and all other commercial information 
communicated to the Department by consular 
and diplomatic agents of the government abroad, 
or contained in the official publications of other 
goTemments, which. the Secretary of State may 
deem snlflciently important. 

Note. — ^By an Act of Congress, approved Sep- 
tember 15, 1780, it was enacted that the Execntire 
Department of the government, denominated the 
Department of Foreign Affairs, should thereafter 
be denominated the Department of State, and the 
principal officer therein be called the Secretary 
of State. At that period the salary of the Secre- 
tary was I3S00 per annum; that of the Chief 
Clerk, $800 per annum; those of the other clerks, 
1500 per annum. 



1868.] 



STATE DBPABTMBNT. 



73 



INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS. 

Qy tHe Act of Congress of August 18, 1866, *<To regulate the Diplomatic and Consular Systems of 
the United States/' the Ministers and other Diplomatic Agents of the United States in foreign 
countries are paid by salaries, and the outfit is abolished. 

MiNiMBW AMD DiPioMAno Aohtps oy TBS Unitzd Statu ih FoBixaN CoCHfBXtt. 
(Corrected at the Department of State, Not. 1, 1862.) 
Envoy 8 Exiraordinary, and Mint»ter» Plenipotentiary, 



Name. 


Sste or Ap- 
pointment. 


Balary. 


FAMign Comitiy 
to which ap- 
pointed. 


CapitiJ. 


State from wMeh 
appointed. 


Charles Francis Adams... 


18«l 
1862 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 


$17,600 
12,000 
17,600 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
10,000 
10,000 


Great Britain.. 
Russia........... 


Ixmdon 


Massaohnsetts.' 


Simon Cw-merrtTi .,,,,, .,^-.,. 


St. Petersburg... 
Paris 


PennsylvAnia. 
New Jersey. 
Illinois. 


William L. Dayton 


France. » 


Gnstavufl Koemer.... 


Spain 


Madrid 


Norman B. Judd 


Prussia 


Berlin 


Illinois. 


J. Lothrop Motley ........... 

GfHmm P. Mimh ttr.-- 


Austria 


Tienna. 


MassachttsettM. 


Italy 


lAirin........... 


Vfimmtit. 


AtiflAtt Ri»*1{n<H&tnA....- 


China. 


Pekin ,.,>, 

Mexicok-.t. ..».••... 


Mnimirh iiflftttii. 


ThfHnas Corwin 


Mexico 

Bnusil « 


Ohio 


James W&taon Webb...... 


Rio Jaoeira 

Santiairo............. 


New York 


iniomafl H. Nelson 


Chili 


TndiAtiA.. 


Christopher Robinson 


Peru 


Tiima 


Rhode Island 







3fin istert Resident. 



Kaire. 


Date of Ap* 
pointment. 


SalaTT-. 


Foreign Coantry 

to irhioh ap- 

poiated. 


Capital. 


State from whioh 
appointed. 


Jani«M K. TTftrrev 


1861 
(( 

a 

C( 

«< 

<( 
i( 

(( 
«« 
u 
u 
c( 

1862 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1862 
1861 


$7,500 
7,600 
7,600 
7,600 

7,600 

7,600 
7,500 
. 7,600 
7,600 
7,600 
7,600 
7,600 
7.600 
7,600 
7,fiO0 
7,600 
7,600 
7,600 


Pnrtiimil 


Iii8bon.< 


Pennsylyania. 
Connecticut 


Henry 8. Sanford.~ 


Belsium 


Brussels.. 


Jainn 8- Pilc« , 


Netuerlands... 

Denmark 

/ Sweden and 
( Norway 

Switzerland.... 

Pontif. States. 

Turkey 


The Hague. 

Copenhagen 

Stockholm 


Maine. 


Brsdford R. Wood 


New Tork 


Jacob a HaMemaQ...» 


Pennsylyania. 
N. Hampeliire. 
New York. 


Georse O. Foeflr 


Berue , 


R. M. Blatchrord 


Rome 


Edward Joy Morris.. 

Robert H. Pruyn.. 


Constantinople... 
Yedo 


Pennsylyania. 
New York. 


Japan 


Andrew B. Dickinson. .... 


Nicaragua •••»». 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala..... 

Honduras 

New Oranada. 

Venezuela 

Ecuador 

Argen. Confed. 
Boliyia 


Nicarftgnaf ••. 


u 


Charles N. Kiotte 


Guatemala 


Texas. 


Elisha O. Crosby 


New York. 


Jan. R. Partridflre 


Comayagua. 

Bogota 

Ooracas 


Maryland. 
Kentucky. 
New YorlL 


Allan A. Burton .«... 

Erastua D. Culyer.... 


Frederick Hassanrek 


Quito 


Ohio. 


Robert G. Kirk > 




Ohio. 


Dayid K. Garter 


JUft JrftZo»«ao» ••»•••••• 


Ohio. 









Commistionere. 



Kame. 



Thoouw J. Dryer 

Charles A. Wasbburne.«» 



Date of Ap- 
pointment. 



1861 



::53z: 



SaUiy. 



$7,600 
7,600 



Foreign Coantry 

to which M>* 

pointed. 



Hawaiian Ms. 
ParaguaoTv'.*** 



Capital. 



Honolulu 

Aaoi]cion..i;j..>.. 



State from which 
appointed. 



California. 
California. 



74 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[lattl. 



Seeretariea of Legation. 



NaiiM. 



Date of Ap- 
polntmenu 



Charles L. Wilson. 


1861 


Bayard Taylor 

William S. Pennington ... 
Horatio J. Perrv 


18«2 
1861 


fPoat never filled.) 




AiLron (}oodricli ....«•»■■•*•• 


M 


<'Po8t never filled.). 




M M M 




i( M M 




U U U 




Hermann Kreiamann..... 
Georse W. LiDuitt 


W 

1866 


fPost never filled.). 




Green Clay , -. 

(Post never filled-)- «•••• 

John P. Brown... , 

S. Wells Williams.. 


1862 
1868 


William H. Corwin 


1861 


^oet never filled.) 


M U U 


MM (( 


MM M 


••••••»•• 


i: U M 


M U M 


U U M 


U U U 




MM U 




tl U M 





Salary. 



$2,625 
1,800 
2,626 
1,800 
1,500 
1,600 
1,500 
1,600 

1,600 

1,800 
1,800 
1,500 
1,500 
1,600 
3,000 
3,000 
1,800 
1,500 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,800 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 



Fordga Coubtiy 
to wiiich ap- 
pointed. 



England 

Rasaiaw 

France 

Sl>aiu 

Portugal 

Belgium 

Netherlands.... 

Denmark 

f Sweden and 
\ Norway.... 

Prussia 

Austria 

Switzerland.... 

Italy 

Pontit States. 

Turkey 

China. 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Guatemala 

New Grenada.. 

Venezuela 

Ecuador 

Brazil 

Argen. Confed. 

Chili 

Peru 

Bolivia 



Capital. 



London 

St, Peterahofg^. 

Paris. 

Madrid. 

Lisbon. 

Brussels 

The Hague. 
Copenhagen. 

Stockholm. 

Berlin 

Vienna 

Berne. 

Turin 

Borne. 

Constantinople.. 

Pekin. 

Mexico.. 

Nicaragua. 

Guatemala. 

Bogota. 

Caracas. 

Quito. 

Kio de Janeiro. 

Parana. 

Santiago. 

Lima. 

La Paz. 



State from wltleb 
■ppotuted. 



Illinois. 
New York. 
New Jersey. 
N. Hampshire. 

Minnesota. 



Illinois. 
Rhode Island. 

Kentucky. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 



Attutant Secretarte» of Ltgntion. 



\ Name. 


Date of Ap. 
poiatment. 


Salary. 


Foreign country 

to which ap. 

pointed. 




BUteftemwMell 
■^pointed. 


Beniamin Moran 


1857 
1861 


1,500 
1,500 


Enflrlaud 


London.... 


Pennsylrania. 
New Jersey. ' 


W* L. Dayton* Jr.- 


France...... 


Paris ^...„ 









Consult and Commercial Agente. 
(C, Consul; V.C., Tice-Consul; C.A., Commerdal Agent.) 



Hhme. 



BiraLAin>. 

Freeman H. Morse C. 

Thomas H. Dudley C. 

James W. Marshidl .....C. 

Henry W. Lord C. 

John Britton .C. 

Zebina Eastman C. 

Charles D. CIeveland..X!. 
Joseph H. BreCbesney..C. 

Thomas W. Fox C. 

Ajxrcd Fox.... ..v.C 



Date of Ap- 
pointment. 



1861 



« 

u 
(( 

u 
a 



1862 
1823 
1866 



Salary. 



|T,600 
7,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

i 1,600 
1,600 
l,60e 
Fees 
Fees 



Foreign Conatry 

to which ap. 

potmad. 



Great Britain. 

England , 

u 



u 
u 

M 
« 

it 



City. 



London 

Liverpool 

Leeds 

Manchester.... 
Southampton , 

Bristol 

Cardiff. 

Newcastle 

*Plymouth .... 

« |*Falmouth 



Stale from which 
appointed. 



Maine. 

Now Jersey. 

Pennsylvania. 

Michigan. 

New York. 

Ulinois. 

Pennsylvania. 

Illinois. 

England. 



M 



* At liberty to transact business. Those not thus marked are not. 
t Oompensation, C1600 per annum under act of Aog. 2, 186L 



166S.] 



6TATB PBPAUTMl^rT. 
Oon$ul$ and Cfommereial Agenti (Con tinned). 



75 



Kame. 


D4te of Ap- 
pointmenu 


Balaiy. 


Foreicn Country 

to which 4p* 

pointed. 


Capital. 


State rH>mwhleh 
appointed. 


SCOTLAIVS. 




• 






' t 




1862 

1861 
tt 


8,000 
2,000 
Fees 


Scotland......... 


Glamrow 


Kentucky. 


Hneh 8mlth C, 


(( 


Dundee •••• 


« ... 


•Leith -. 


Ikidisasa. 


Ibelaivd. 




John Yonng C. 

Edwin G. £ii8tmAn......C. 


u 

1862 

1861 
(( 

1862 


2,000 
2,000 
Fees 
Fees . 
Fees 


TrritalMf 


Belfost 


TniUiLtifL. 


u 


Gork 




Henry B. Hammond....G. 


« 

tt 


*Dublin 


Mftflna^hnrifittfi 


William B. West C. 


•Galway 


IKTificonAin. 


Alexander Henderson .0. 


u ' 

.a......... 


*Londonderry.... 


Pennsylvania. ' 


China. 












Horace N. Congar C. 

East Indies. 


1861 


98,600 


rhinfl. --.. 


Hong-Kong 


New Jersey. 








Nathl P. Jaootw, Comml- 
Gen'l British India. 


1862 
1858 
1861 
1850 


5,000 
2,500 
Fees 
Fees 


East ladies^... 

a 

•••• 

M 


Gakratta ,..., 


Michigan. 
California. 


John P. (ySalliTan.. C. 


SiDsapore... 


George W. Healey ...V.C. 
John Black CJL. 


^Bombay 


Ma«flAAhnHAttfl. . 


•Ceylon 


Ceylon. 

1 


AUSTBAJJA. 










William Blanchard......C. 

Xdward LeaTenworth..C. 


1861 

u 


4,000 
Fees 


Anstralia 


Melbourne 

Sidney, N.S.W.... 


Diet. Columbia. . 
New York. 


Tasxaria. 








- 




Dnncan HcPherson..y.C. 


u 


Fees 


Tasmania. 


*Hobart Town... 




Kiw ZsAiJkiiD. 












Geo. H. LeaTenvortlLX. 


1859 


1,000 


New Zealand*. 


*Bay of Islands.. 


New York. 


Ib and nkab Scropb Ann 
Africa. 

Thomas Shank]and.....X2» 
ThomiM McDowell C. 


1862 
u 
ti 

1884 
1862 


2,600 

1,000 
Fees 


Biu^e and 
1 Aftiea 

u 
ti 

it 
it 


Port Louis. 

Gane Town 


New York. 
New Jersey. 
Massaohnsetta. 


Horatio J. Spragtie......G. 

William Winthrop ,..,X. 
Georges QenutL. C. 

Ionian Islands. 


Gibraltar .....M. ... 


St. Helena......... 


Pennsylyanla. 










AbmwS. York . . .. C 


1853 


JfO0fl^ 


Ionian Islands. 


Zante 


Zante. 


NOBTH AVBRICA. 










• 


Joshna R. Oiddings, Con- 
ml^eneral British N. 


1861 
tt 

tt 

1862 
1842 

1861 
It 

tt 

u 


4,000 
2,000 
1.600 
tl,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees 


North America 

a 
t< 
a 
a 

^u 
a 
tt 
a 


Rff Antl^AAl -.-«».-«_.. 


Ohio. 


Mortimer M. Jackson.. C. 

Jay H. gOierman ..C. 

ConTers 0. Leach ;..0. 

Bei^amin H. Norton...O. 

James Q. Howard 0. 

Thos. Fltman .0. 

Chas. S. Ogden C. 

Allen Francis. ..«.•...•. ...G. 


Halifax, N.S.;.... 

Prince Ed. Is 

•St. John, N.F— . 

•Picton, N.S. 

*St. John, N.Bi... 
•Gasp6Ba8in,G.B 
Ouebec 


Wisconsin. 

Vermont. 

Maryland. 

Massachusetts. 

Ohio. 

IMst. Golumbia.| 

PennsylTanla. 

Illinois. 


Victoria, V.I 


Wbst iNmu. 












John T. Neal ...G. 

Bamnel Whiting. .G. 

John E. Newport ..G. 

Edward Trowbridge ...G. 

George Hogg .«..jOL 

Charles H. Allen XI. 


tt 

« 


2,000 
2,000 
2<000 

ti^ooo 

1,600 

-1.600 


West Indies.... 
« 

■ if 

u 

it 


Kingston, Jam... 

Nassau, N.P 

Tttrk's Island 

BBrbadoes 

Is. of Trinidad... 
Bermuda 


Kansas. 
Minnesota. ' 
PenneyWstiift. ^ 
Gonnecttent. ' 
PennsylTanla. -i 
New York. 









76 



THE KATIONAL ALMANAC. 
Contda and Commercial Ag9ni$ (Continued). 



[1868. 



Name. 



N. D. Keneaster C.A. 

Bmile B. Deliale C.A. 

South America. 
Theodore D. Edwards >i.C. 

FALKLAKD JSLMfW. 

W. H. Smiley... .......G.A. 

Anwu. 
Daniel R. B. Upton ...^Jd 

BUBSIA. 

Wm. B. Phelps.. .C. 

John P. Hatterscheidt.C 

Timothy G. Smith C. 

Henry B. Stacy C. 

Perry McB. CoIlins...C.A. 

A. SchwartE G. 

Edmund Brandt G. 

Reynold Frenckell ......& 

Fbenoh DOMiaiONS. 

John Bigelow G. 

James 0. Putnam .G. 

George W. Van H<M*ne.G. 

Clarendon DaTisson G. 

Thaddens Hyatt G. 

James Lesley ..jC. 

Jas. de la Montagnie ...G. 

Geo. P. Van Wyck G. 

Thos. P. Smith-r C. 

Willitfm Slade C. 

Wbst Indiss. 
Andrew G. Carothers.V.C. 

U. U . fl 



AfRICA'. 



AllBRICA. 



C. 



Samuel E. Fabens G. 

George Hughes C.A. 

« 

Spanish Dounions. 

Ebenezer S. Eggleston.C. 

A. M. Hancock > ...G. 

John A. Little G. 

Henry B. Robinson G.] 

John Horand C. 

George Kent G. 

Manuel Barcena Xi. 

Tfilliam L. Giro ...v .G. 

Dani^ Evans C. 

Richard G. Hannah......<bc 

John Cnnningham .C. 

Cuba. 

BobtW.Shnfeldt, G.Gen. 
Lncini H. Chandler .....C. 
Willtenk H. Rnstell .....G. 
lUlllftF. Wallace .C. 



Date of Ap- 
pointment. 



1861 



1850 



1858 



1862 
1861 

« 
c< 

1884 
1882 
1850 



1861 
tf 

(( 

u 

u 

■ it 
It 

1862 

H 

1861 



1862 
<« 



H 



1867 
1850 



1861 
(( 

1863 
1852 

1861 

(( 

1853 

1862 

u 

1850 



1861 
tf 

tt 

it 



8alu7. 



't$l,500 
Fees 



2,000 



1*000 



Fees 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
tl,500 
Vees 
Fees 
Fees 



5,000 
0,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
11,600 
Fees 
1,500 
1,500 



I 



Fees 
tl,500 



ti,500 



Fees 
Fees 



1,500 

1,500 

tl,500 

tl,500 

Fees 

tl,500 

Fees 

Fees 

+1,500 

tl,500 

Fees 



6,000 
2,500 
2«500 
2,500 



Foreign Country 
t* whieh ap- 
pointed. 



u 
u 



Sonth America 



Falkland Isls. 



Africa. 



Russia.. 
Russia.. 



K 
tt 
tt 
f( 
tt 
U 



Yt. Dominions. 

u 
« 
tt 
<t 
tt 
u 
tt 
ti 
it 



West Indies.. 



Africa. 



Amraioa. 
* tt 



Sp. Dominions. 

w 
«< 
ff 
ft 
u 
u 
« 

(( 

u 



City. 



Antigua 

*St. Christopher. 



Demarara.v....«M. 
*Port Stanley.... 



*BathniBt. 



St. Petersburg... 

Moscow 

Odessa 

Revel ........;.. 

Amoor Rivw 

•Riga 

^Archangel 
«Helsingfori 



&•»••••«• 



Paris 

Havre 

Marseilles. 

Bordeaux 

La Rochelle 

Ju^OuB ••••••d« •«••»••• 

*Bayonne « 

Napon. Vendue.... 

»ic* .- 



«Onadaloupe . 
Martinique... 



Algiers. 



*Cayenne 

•St Pierre, Mique- 



•••••••a 



Cadiz... 

Malaga m. 

Barcelona 

Port Malum ........ 

Jienia....«4........a 

Valencia..*... 

♦Vigo 

*Altcante . 
BUbao..... 
Santander 
•Seville... 



* 



State from which 
appointed. 



Virginia. 

St. Christopher. 



Kentvcky. 
Rhode Island. 
New York. 



IllinoiB. 
Kansas. 
Vermont. 

CUifbmla. 
RoBsia. 

a 

Finland. 



New York. 
{( 

Iowa. 
Missouri. * 
Kansas. 
Pennsylvania. 
New York. 
New Jersey. 
Maseiachuaetttu 
Ohio. 



Dist. Columbia. 



Ohio. 



Massachnaetta. 



Michigan. 
Kentndcy. 
Massachuaetta. 
Pennsylvania. 

Spain. 
Maine. 
Spain. 

C( 

Illinois. 

Indiana. 

Spain. 



Cuba Havana...^..,...... New YorlK. 

** iMatanaas Virginia. 

*' Trinidad de Cuba. Missouri. 

'* iSt.Jago do Cnba-lNew York. 



1868.] 



6TAIB BBPARTMENT, 
ContU* and Commercial Agenf (Gontinned). 



77 



Fame. 



Porto Rico. 

John J. Hyde C. 

James & Gallaher C. 

OniiB Spasish Islands. 

Wm. H. Dabney G. 

Charles Griswold C. 

PwiuoDBsi DoMnaoirs. 

Chaa. A. Manro .G. 

Henry W. Dimaa G. 

George Tru« G. 

Charles W. Dabney G. 

C. 

W. p. Jones G. 

Abraham Hanson .G. 

R. Cunningham.... Y.GJl. 

f . de Asis Belard.....GJL. 

G. 

BcLaiUK. 

A W. Crawford .C. 

Marcus J» LeTMon......C. 

G. 

Nethebjjutos. 

George £. Wias. G. 

Francis J. Klauser G. 

Imrael 8. IMehl G. 

Henry Sawyer G. 

Stephen Higginaon, Jr.G. 

Cliarles Key G. 

Richard £. Mor8e.....G.A. 

Dahish Doxiniohs. 

L A. Hecksher .G. 

Chas. L. Bernays G. 

Ed. H. Perkina .G. 

Wm. Harsh .G. 

John T. Edgar .G. 

SwxDXH AJTD Norway. 

B.F.Teflt. C. 

J. P. M. Epping G. 

Olol E. Dreutzer G. 

Qui J. Kraby G. 

R. Barton Dinzey G.A. 

Prussia. 

William H. Vesey G. 

Charles J. SundelL G. 

G. 

Austria. 

C. 

Richard HUdreth .G. 

W.D. Howells .C. 

Saxobt. 
Alrin M. Mothershead.C. 
Wm. 0. Campbell Q- 



J>ate of Ap- 
pointment. 



1862 
1837 



1868 
1866 



1861 
1862 
1861 
1846 

1856 

u 

1862 
1862 



1860 



1861 
u 



u 
u 
u 

1858 
1860 
1858 
1861 



1859 
1862 

M 

1861 



1862 

1861 
1862 

1860 



1861 
it 

u 



u 

1861 
a 



u 

1862 




92,000 
1,500 



JTOOS 
JbOOo 



tl,500 

1,500 

1,500 

760 

750 

irees 

tl,500 

Fees 

1,000 

Fees 

It 



2,600 
Fees 



2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
tl,500 



Fees 
1,600 
760 
Fees 
4,000 



\ 



Fees 

1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
Fees 



2,500 
1,000 
Fees 



1,500 

2,000 

tl,500 



1,500 
Fees 



Foreign Country 
to whtoh ap- 
pointed. 



City. 



Porto Bioo.... 

Sp. Islands.... 
«■ 



Por. Dominions 

« 
u 



u 
u 

M 



« 



Belgium 

u 
a 



Netherlands ... 

4( 
M 
M 
«( 
U 

u 



Denmark 

u 

u ^ 

u 

•«• • • • ■ 

w 

f Sweden and 

(Norway 

<( 

u 

u 

« 



Proflflift. 

a 
Austria 

(I 

Saxony. 



San Jnan. 
Ponce 



^eneriffe. 
•Manilla... 



Lisbon t. 

Oporto 

Fanchal 

•Fayal, Azores. 
f*Santiago,Cape 

1 de Verde 

*)tfozamblqne.... 

*Macao 

*Bissao 

Paul de 

Loanda 

Thomfi 

Mozambique 



State from whloh 
appointed. 



/•St. 

I ^ 
•8t.Tl 



Antwerp.. 

Ghent 

Liege 



Rotterdam....... 

Amsterdam 

Batayia^Java.... 

Paramaribo 

Padang 

St. Martin 

Guracoa, WJ... 



Copenhagen. 

Elsinore 

•Santa Gnu.. 

•Altona 

St. Thomas. « 



•Stockholm...... 

*Qottenburg.... 

•Bergen 

•Poragrund- 

•St Bartholomew 



A1x-la-Chapelle., 

•Stettin 

•Cologne...... 



Gopnecticat. 

Pennsylvania. 



Rhode Island. 
New York. 



New York. 

Ohio. 
Massadrasetts. 

New York. 

Illinois. 
Wisconsin. '' 



St. Thom6. 



F«nnsylTan!a. 
Belgium. 



Muyland. 
Ohio. 
G^fomia. 
Massachusetts* 

New York. 
Iowa. 



Denmark. 

Missouri. 
Pennsylvania. 
Dist. Columbia. 
Tennessee. 



Maine. 

South Carolina 

WIsoonsiR. 

u 

St. Thomas. 



New York. 
lUinois. 



Yienna , 

Trieste 

Venice. 



Leipsic 

•Dresden.. 



New York. 
Ohio. 



Indiana. 
New York. 



78 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 
f^tHtuh and Oommer^al A^enU (Ofuhtamaibd)* 



[1868. 



Kaine. 


Date of Ap 
pointinest. 


anary. 


Foreln Coaatri 

to which ap. 

pointed. 


OUgr* 


State from Yhidh 
appointad. 


DuoHT Aaxb MiwiNQur 

HlLDBUROHAUUN. 












Louis Lindner C 


1851 


Fees 


rSazeMeinin- 


' Sounelmrg ......... 


Gennaoy. 


Batabu. 












B. 0. IHincan .G. 

Franklin Webster .a 


1882 
1881 
1882 
1848 


Fees 
Fees 


Bayaria.. 

« 


Bhenish Bavaria. 
Munich 


South ChroUBR. 
Hlinoisu 


Chas. G. Wheeler .a 


<< 


Nuremberg 

Augsbuxif... ...... . 


Missouri. 


Charles Obermi^er......G. 


w 


Bfet. CblomhkL 


WUBKlfBUSO. 












1881 


1,000 


Wnrtembnrg.. 


Stuttgard^. 


Keatacky. 


Hissn Sarvsvadt, Hnss 
Gas8u» Nassau, axb 

HlSSK HOMBOVSe. 

WUUaaW,]|[iiTi>lu....a 


« 


Fees 


f Hesse Barm- 
Btadt, Hesse 
CMsel, Nas- 
sau, A Hesse 

[Hombourg.> 




mdiigRB. 


Hanotxb. 












latmoU Lockwood.....C. 
Brunswick. 


1862 


Fees 


HanoTer 


•Hmwtp^ ,..„.... 


NevToEk. 












WnUam W. Murphy ....C 


w 


Fees 


Brunswig..... 


•Brunswick^. 


Mii'lit^.i 


BAStRK. 












B. 0-, Dancan 


u 


Fees 


Baden .» 


GnkBTuha 


<*o^hOwuHva. 


MRCKLRNRVRe ScaWRRIH 

AMienRMBVRa SmRim. 






Aogost Bicker ....C. 


« 


Fees 


Mecklenbm^.. 


^Bnwwte •••«•*«•• 


I'^MMtjfhaRin 


QLRSKRimO. 












ILaOritaner T.C. 


« 


Fees 


Oidenbnrg.. 


(HdMibarg 


Bist.ColnUR. 


HAHSRAnO AK» F)UR 

Cmis. 
W m. W . Mnrphy.jC. Ctan. 

Henry B(Mrasteln..^»X. 
Janes H. Andnson ,^JD. 


i8ia 

u 
u 


III 


/BanseaticA 

1 Freeaties. 

tf 

« 


Hamburg 


MichicRik 

BGsBourL 

Ohiow 












ARgwft U WoUr .JD. 

^MrtVBRtiis Cosby JO. 

J. B. ItelamK C. 


18tt 


iij 


^wnseriRBid MM 

tf 

tf 


eZuridk.......M... 


Kentadqr. 
Fenn^tvRaiRk 


ItAKZ. 








. 




T. B. lAwrence....C. Gen. 

BaWd H. Wheeler C. 

WUIiam T. Rice ..C. 

Andrew J. SteTens^^.«.C. 

Geo. W. HoIIey .0. 

Lttigi Monti ..C. 

F. W. Beha ~.V.C. 

C. 


« 
tt 

tf 
tt 

« 
U 
tf 

u 
a 
a 


Fess 

1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
tl,500 
1,500 


Itrfy 

tf 

tt 

tf 

tf 
tf 


Floraioe.... .... 

Leii^hom . 

Ks^les ............... 

Palenao 

Messina 

*Carrara. 


Minachnetts. 

Iowa. 

MamaAuRstta, 

[owa. 

NewToik. 

MnnnsrhimettS- 


tf 1 


Kentucky. 




I' ( 


New Tack. 


A. J. de Zeyk. C. 


tf ^^^ ' 


ERranto...M........ 


Iowa. 


FuRinoAX. SxAnSk 












W.J.StlUman .C. 

LadiBiattsrrjhasi .C. 

H. J. Bastings C. 


1861 

tf 

1862 


Fees ] 

1*1,500 
Fees 


Puatit states.. < 

tf i 
tf 4 


^Ancona...... ' 

^KaTBIHM^ 


XassacftuRBttR. 

rexas. 

Nawlbi^ 



iBes.] 



8TATB DBPA&T^ftBNT. 

ChtMili and (hnmtreial Affenit (GontlniMd). 



79 



Name. 



Turkish Dobonioits. 

& W. Ouddard C. Gen. 

Jolius Bing m.G. 

Jeremiah A. Johnson—O. 

Fraaklin Olcott X). 

Qeo. W. Palmer .G. 

J. J. Barclay. ...» ~C. 

C. 
booh J. Smithexa C. , 

FlrecL Wippermana~..uG. 

Egtpt. 
Wm. S. Thayer ....C. Gen. 

Obxbcb. 
Qeorge G. Baker C. 

BAKB.UtT BTATIS. 

Jeese H. McMath C. 

WUIiam Porter .0. 

Amoe Ptary C. 

Jada S. Levy..* C.A. 

Africa. 

Abraham Hanson.... GJk. 
Henry May.............^.O.A. 

DoHxnoirs of thi Suxaah 

OP MOSCAX. 
Wbl S. SpMT .0. 

BO&KXO. 

c. 

Japan. 

Geo S. Fisher C. 

John G. Walsh... G. 

SlAV. 

Aaron J. 'WesterTelt...G. 

Gbhta. 

Olirer H. Perry .G. 

George P. Seward .C. 

William H. Carpenter..C. 

Arthur B. Bradford G. 

WOlie P. Biangum, Jr.X3. 
W^m. BirecK.«»««« •^••••^•••.>^> 
C. D. WiUiams....~.»VA 

Hawabah Islasbs. 

Alfred Galdwell ...G. 

Samnel Long -G. 

Thomas Spencer .........G. 

FunroiT Ain> Navioa- 

XOM ISLAKM. 

Id. V. Gwdner — ...aA. 



Date of Ap- 
polauaeoL 



1801 

u 

1858 

isai 

ti 

1859 

u 

1862 



C( 



1861 



1812 
1861 
1862 
18S2 



1862 
« 



1861 



1862 
1859 
1866 



1861 



1855 
1861 

« 
tt 

1860 
XB61 



tt 

u 
1862 




3^000 
2,000 
2,000 
11*600 
1,500 
1,000 

JTGOS 

tl,500 



jrees 



3,500 



1,000 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
Fees 



1,000 
tl,500 



1,000 



3,000 
8,000 
Fees 



Fees 



4,000 

4,000 

8.500. 

3,000 

3,000 

Fees 

Fees 



4,000 
3,000 
Fees 



1,000 



Foreign Coantry 

to wliieh ap- 

pointed. 



Turkish Doms. 



u 
a 
<t 
u 

€t 

U 
<i 



Moldavia.... 



Egypt. 



\Jr A OvCO#*«««******* 



Barbary States, 
it 



Afirica. 

u 



Citj. 



Gonstantinople. 

Smyrna 

Beirut 

Jerusalem 

•Candia 

•Cyprus 

•Trebizond. ...... 

Sclo 



•Galatea. 



Alexandria.. 



•Athens , 



Tangier. 
Tripoli. 



•Tetuan 



•Uonroyia. 
Gaboon 



f Dom. of Sul 
1 tan of Muscat 



Borneo 

Japan. 

(( 

u 



siam... ...■••.•.... 



China 

u 
tf 
t( 
u 
« 



Hawaiian Isls. 

u 



/Friendly and 
t Navlgat. Is.. 



•Zanzibar. 



•Bnmi. 



Kanagawa.. 
Nagasaki..... 
•HakodadL.. 



Bangkok,. 



Canton 

Shanghai.., 
Foo-Choo... 

Amoy 

Ningpo 

•Swatow.M. 
•Hankow... 



Honolulu. 
Lahaina.. 
*Hilo » 



State from which 
appointed. 



Maine. 

Bist. Columbia. 

Rhoda Island. 

New York. 
New York. 
Virginia. 

Delaware. 



INst. Cdlumbfa. 



New York. 



Ohio. 



Ohio. 
Louisiana. 
Rhoda lBhm4. 
Morocco. 



Wisconsin. 
GoDueotiout. 



Tenneatee. 



•Apia... 



.•Wu«. 



Califamia. 
Maine. 



New York. 



New York, 
w 

i( 

Pennsylrania. 
North Carolina. 
Massachusetta. 
United States. 



Virginia. 
lUinois. 



Mflinehawttab 



80 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 
GontuU and Commercial Agents (Continued)* 



[1868. 



Nam«. 



SocuTT Islands. 
Joseph Vandor Y.C. 

FiUBS IBLANBS. 

Bdwin F. Bunnell.. ..C.A. 

HATn AND San DoinNao. 

Benj. F. WMdden, Comr. 
A Consal General........ 

A. 

Tfm. G. W. Janfer A. 

Arthur Folsom A. 

James De Long A. 

C.A. 

Mexico. 

Mark H.Dunnell G. 

Lewis 8. Ely .C. 

Marcus Otterbourg C. 

Franklin Chase .C. 

Leonard Pierce, Jr C. 

J. H. Mansfield C. 

J. W. Maney C. 

B. H. Bh>od. v..a 

C. 
Bichard L. Robertson. ..C. 

C. 

WiUiam L. Baker C. 

Raymon J. y Patrullo..C. 

Bushrod Lott C. 

BoUin C. M. Hoyt .G. 

G. 

C. 

Robert Haley .C. 

Martin Metcalf. C. 

J. C. Daris ..C. 

James Smith. ..^ .G. 

F. B. Elmer G. 

Nicaragua. 
B. Squire Cotreil G.A. 

J. T. Howard C. 

GosTA Rica. 
Marquis L. Hine G. 

GnATXMALA. 



Honduras. 

C. 
William G. Burchard.G.A. 
George Raymond G.A. 

Sav Salvador. 
Noah L. Wilson .G. 

Nkw Granada. 

Alexander R. McKee...G. 

nnaneto W. Rice.. ....G. 

Warren G. Foster G. 

Wm.A. Chapman .G. 



Date of Ap< 
pointment. 



1862 



it 
1861 

u 

1862. 



1852 
« 

u 

1860 
1861 

(t 



« 
u 

M 
«< 



Salaty. 



1,000 
1,000 

|T,500 

2,000 

1,600 

1,000 

+1,500 

fl^SOO 



1861 


8,000 


1862 


2,000 


1861 


1,000 


1848 


tl,600 


1861 


1,000 


1862 


. tl,500 


«< 


500 


{( 


Fees 


1861 


Fees 


t( 


Fees 


w 


Fees 


(( 


Fees 


(( 


Fees 


1862 


tl,600 


t( 


Fees 


u 


Fees 


u 


'Fees 


1861 


tl,600 


1862 


Fees 


1869 


Fees 


1860 


Fees 


1862 


tl,500 


1861 


2,000 


1862 


2,000 



Fees 

Fees 

1,000 
Fees 
+ 

tl,600 



8,600 

2»600 

600 

«00 



Foreign Countij 

to which ap- 

pointed. 



Society Islands 



Fe(()ee Islands. 



CHaytl ASan 
\ Domingo... 

M 
U 

u 
u 
« 



Mexico . 

u 
u 



u 
« 



(I 



« 



u 
u 
u 
« 
« 
it 
u 
u 
u 



Nioarsgua. 



« 



GostaBica. 



Guatemala. 



Honduras . 



u 



San Salyador... 



New Granada. 

w 

u 
u 



CItj. 



•Tahiti. 



•Lanthala.. 



HayU 

Port au Prince... 

St. Domingo 

*Gape Ha^ien... 

*Aux Gayes 

•Saint Marc 



Btnte from wtaleb 
^pointed. 



Vera Crua 

Acapulco 

Mexico. 

Tampico 

Matamoras. 

Tabasco 

Paso del Norte... 

Monterey 

Campeachy 

•Mazatlan 

•San Bias 

•GUaymaS 

•Merida A SisaL. 

•Tehuantepec 

•Minatitlmi 

•Laguna 

•Ghihuahua. 

•Manzanilla 

•A guas Calientes 

•Za^tecwi 

•Saltillo 

•La Paz 

rSan Juan del 
-< Norte, & Pun ta 

(Arenas 

San Juan ddlSur. 



•San Joi^. 



Wisconsin. 



Calilbmis. 



N. Hampshire. 

Vferylaiid. 

lUinoii. 

Ohio. 



Maine. 

CaUfi>rnia. 
Wisconsin. 
Maine. 
Texas. 

Pennsylvania. 
Florida. 
New York. 
Galifomia. 

Maryland. 
New York. 
Pennsylvania. 
Massachnaetts 

Ohio. 

California. 
Michigan. 
Texas. 

Missonrf. 



New York. 
Pennsylvania. 



Guatemala . 



•OmoaftTruxillo 
f •Comayagua k 
X Tecucigalpa. 

•Belize 

•La Union 

Panama. 

AspinwaU.^........ 

•Garthagena 

•SabanUia 



New York. 

New York. 
Pennsylvania. 



Indiana. 



Kentucky. 
California. 
Connecticut. 
BabanilUL 



1888.] 



STATS DEPARTMSKT. 



81 



Conmlt and Commercial Agentt (Oonoluded). 



Num. 



C. 

0. 

John Capela, Jr G. 

Nicolas DaniM C. 

Sngmo M. Uribe C.A. 

YBHXinXLi. 

EUas Wampola. .T.G. 

BidMcd A. EdM G. 

C. 
Charles A. Soehr .a 

SCUAOOK. 

G. 

Beaux. 

James Monroe C. 

HuMnas Adamson, Jr...G. 

G. 
Thomas V. Wi]8on......XL 

Wm. H^Srans G. 

G. 
Charles F. De yiTaldl...G. 
Benjamin Llndsey .G. 

Ubuovat. 
Hiram Tuttle .G. 

AlOSV. CoirVIDXEATXOir. 

tt« aV« {XftAPvIr •»••»■•••••••• • V* 

William H. Smiley. — 0. 
Bepjamin 'Dpt(»......GJL. 

PAKAeUAT. 

Louis Bamberger. 0. 

Chiix. 

James Churchman G. 

James H. Trumbull.... G. 
Charlss G. Greene. C 

Pkbu. 

J<din K. LoTeJoy.........G. 

Chaa. F. Wlnsiow. C. 

Benison Oard .G. 

JohnT. LABSing ».C. 

XUhnlk Mix »..— ...«««maX 

BoufU. 

0. 



D«te of sp' 
poinunent. 



1861 
1808 
1854 
1859 



1862 
n 
a 
u 



u 



laei 

« 
a 

M 

u 
u 



1862 



1861 
1850 

1858 



1855 



1861 
1860 



1861 

1862 
u 

1866 
1850 



M 



Salary. 



Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 



$1,500 
tl,600 

JTcvB 

Fees 



750 



6,000 
2,000 
1,000 

ti.ooo 

l/XX) 
1,000 
1,500 
1,600 



I 



ti,ooo 



2,000 

JTOvs 

Fees 



Fees 



8,000 

1,000 
Fees 



8,500 
500 
600 



Fees 



600 



Foralgii Oonatry 

to whioh up- 

pointed 



New Granada^. 



M 

a 
u 
u 



Yeneinela 

i( 

(( 

u 

Ecuador... 
BrazU 

«< "]]" 

to 
M 
tf 

** 

«< !!!!!! 

Uruguay... 



Argentine Cob. 



Paraguay, 
GhiU 

Pern. « 

ti 

u 

M 

••••••• 

BoliYla.... 



Olty. 



*Santa Martha... 
^Bogota..... 

AtirDO •••••••••••fa* 

*iUo Hacha. 

Medellin. 



Laguayra , 

*A&raoaibo 

•Puerto Gabella. 
•Cindad Bolivar. 



Guayaquil. 



Rio de Janeiro . 
Pemambuoow«. • 

•Para 

•Bahia 

•Maranhimi 

•Rio Ora&de.... 

•Santos 

•St. Catharine's.. 



•Montevideo....... 



Bueoos Ayres. 
•Rio Negro.... 
•Rosario.... 



•Asondon, 



Yalparaiso.... 
•Talcahuano. 
•Goquimbo.... 



Callao....... 

•Payta , 

•TumbesL. 

•Arlca 

•Lambayeque. 



GobUft.. 



Btate from vUA 
lypoinfd. 



Wisconsin. 

Rio Hacha. 
Medellin. 



Penn^lvania. 
Bist. Columbia. 

PennsylTania. 



Ohio. 

PenasylTaaia. 

Ohio. 

Pennsylvania. 

Ohio. 

Kansas. 
Massachusetts. 



Wisconsin. 



North CaroUna. 
Rhode Island. 
New Tork. 



New York. 



Califomi*. 
Illinois. 
Rhode Island. 



Iowa. 

Massachusetts. 
New York. 

M 
« 



s& 



TH£ K JkTIOlTAL AXMANAC. 



tises. 



DIPLOMATIC OOBPS. 

Li»t of tbreign JHpUmaiie Rtipretentatives accredited to the Chvemrnent €f (he UniUd Stales, and of 

ihtix Secretaries and AttachU. 



0BS4T BBIT.&IN. 

Th« Right Honorable Lord Lyons, Envoy Extra- 
ordinary and Ministei' Plenipotentiary. ' 

Honorable William Stuart, Secretary of Lega- 
tion. 

William Douglas Irvine, Esq., Secretary of Le- 
gation. 

• Henry Percy Anderson, Esq., Clerk in the Secre- 
tary of State's Office, Attache to the Legation. 

William Brodie, Esq., First Attach^. 

Frederick R. Warre, Esq., Second Attach^. 

Ernest Clay, Esq., Attach^. 

Honorable Edmund Monson, Attach^ and Pri- 
Tate Secretary. 

George Sheffield, Etfq., Attach6. 

6eoige F. B. Jeaner, Esq., Attach^ 

Frakcx. 

Mr. Henry Mercier, EnToy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary. 
' TiscountTreilhard, First Secretary of Legation. 

Mr. C. yte. de Beaumont, Second Secretary. 

Mr. Dqjftirdin, Chancellor. 

Russia. 
. Mr. Edward de Stoeckl, Envoy Extraardinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

Mr. Waldemar de Bodisco, First Secretary of 
Ii^;ation. 

NXTHnUJlM. 
Mr. Roest yan Umburg, EnToy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

Spain. 

Seflor Don Gabriel Garcia y Tassara, Enroy Ex-' 
traordlnary and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

SeBor Don Mariano del Prado, First Secretary of 
Legation. 

Seflor Don Carlos Yillalba, Second Secretary of 
Legation. 

SeBor Don Thomas Moreno, Attach^. 

SeBor Don Francisco de Barreyro, Private Se- 
cretary. 

POBTVOAL. 

The Commander J. C. de Figaniere 6 MozSo, En- 
voy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. 
Senhor d*Omellas Yasconcelloe, Attach^. ^ 

Senhor Gnilherme Joaquin de Figaniere, Private 
Secretary. 

Prussia. 
Baron Oerolt, Envoy Extraordinary and Minis- 
ter Plenipotentiary. 
Baron Grabow, Secretary of Legation. 
Alexandre Gau, Chancellor of the Legation. 



SWXDXN. 

Edward, Count Piper, Minister Resident. 

DmrMABK. 
Mr. W. R. RaaslOU; Chargd d' Affaires. 

ITALT. 

The Chevalier Bertinatti, Minister Rerideut. 

Belgium. 

Mr. Blondeel van Cuelebroeck, Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. 
Mr. Alfred Berghmans, Secretary of Legation. 

Austria. 
Hie Chevalier HOlsonaan, Minister Resident. 

BKElCKir. 

Mr. Rudolph Schleiden, Ifinister Resident. 
Johannes RSsIng, Attach6. 

Mexico. 

Seflor Matias Romero^ Charg6 d'Affairei^ 

Don Mariano Degollado, Clerk. 

Sefior Don Jesus Ellobar y Annendaris, Attach 

GUATXXALA AHD SAIiVAIMMt. 

Seflor Antonio Jo86 de Yrissail, Minister Plent- 

potentiary. 

CoBTA Rica, Nicaragua, anb Honduras. 

Seflor Luis Molina, Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotsntiary. 

New Granada. 

General Pedro Alc&ntara Herran, Envoy Extra- 
ordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

Seflor Rafiiel Pombo, Secretary of Legation. 

SefiiN* Josft Marcelino Hurtadq, Envoy Extra- 
ordinary and Ifinister Plenipotentiary, and Con- 
missioner under the Convention of UKh Hepttln- 
ber, 1867. 

BRAfiL. 

The Counsellor Seflor Miguel Maria Lisbon, En- 
voy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

Seflor Lionel M. d'Alencar, Secretary of Legap 
tion. 

Seflor Bei^lianin Torrelo de Barros, Attacbfft. 

Chuj. 
Sellor F. S. Asta-Boruaga, Charge d AlGdres. 

Peru. 
Seflor Frederick L. Barreda, Minister Resident. 



.1^.] 



SXA.X£ D£JE»4Jl£MJ^NX. 



SS 



LIST OF FORSiaN CONSULS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

(Carcfullj corrected ttom the record of their exequatur* in the Department of State, Norember, 1882.) 

C.Q.,QnuulrGeneral; y.G.Q^ruxQmsul-General; COmml; V.C, Fice-Owwd; V.C.A.. ViceC&nndar 

Agent; C.A., Cotuular Agent. 

Oreat BuTAiir. 



Edmund MoUyneuz... G SavannHh. 

W. Mure C New Orleaos. 

Arthar T. Lynn.....M««..~..«..C .Galyeston. 

Robert Bancb G. Charleston, 

John Edward Wilkins C Chicago. 

William Lane Booker C San Francisco. 

Ghas. £. K. Kortright C Philadelphia. 

Dennis Dooohoe C. Buffalo. 

Edward M. Archibald C New York. 

Charles Tulin... G Mobile. 

Oeprg« Hoore G Richmond. 

Francis Lousaula ^ C. Boston. 

Henry J. Murray G. Portland. 

F.Beml G. Baltimore. 

FbAircx. 

Alphonae de la Forest ...C... ...Mobile. 

Pascal Schisano y.C Norfolk. 

Jnles Lombard XLA. Monterey. 

FaoTel Qoiiraad.....y.C. k C.A. Newport. 

Alfred Paul C..> Richmond. 

Edward P. Le Prohon CJl Portland. 

FemandoTJ. Moreno ..V.G........Key West. 

C F. F. Marquis de Mon< 

tbolon aa New York. 

Jules E. Sanchard C. ^Boston. 

F. C. A. L. de la Forest.......C JPhiladelphia. 

Albert F. Gautier C J3an Fnuicisco. 

M. de Belligny * C .Charleston. 

M. le Gomte de M^an G New Orleans. 

J. J. Perrin ....> .dA ...... ..LonisYille. 

Mr. Albertier V.C Baltimore. 

Anguste R. d'£lpeux....V.G.A .Chicago. 

Lton Schisano C.A Norfolk. 

Nicolas Gaspard Porte. ..T.C.A Mobile. 

Henri Levaaaeur Y.C.A St. Louis. 

Anaand Peugnet. ..Y.C Cincinnati. 

Russia. 

E. Johns C ...New Orleans. 

J. R. Wilder Y.C Savannah. 

J. E. Mvrrell —Y.C- Mobile. 

Robert B.Storer .....Y.C. ...... Boston. ' 

J.8.HaTiland ...Y.C Phfladclpliia. 

Joe. Leland ^^ Y.C Charleston. 

Attgustas Kohler... .^.Y.G Baltimoro. 

Ferdinand Wolff. Y.C.. ...... Galveston. 

Jeaa Nottbeck Y.C »New York* 

Martin Klinkow8troem....Y.C San Francisco. 

Baron Charles von der 
Osten-Sackeu... G.G .New York. 

Spain. 

Don Tomas A. Deblols Y.C .Portland, Me. 

D. Pablo CbacoD CX} Philadelphia. 

F.Moreno Y.C Pensacola. 

J. A Pizarro Y.C Baltimore. 

A O. Vega .0..»....Boflton. 

Joaqnin Mmtos Satrus* 

tegiii C San Francisco. 

Tincente Antonio de Lar* 

nAaga O.......X}harlestoQ. 

Duncan Robertson..... Y.C J^orfolk* 

Robert B. Betts YX; St. Lonls. 

Joaq^n Garcia Miraada......jC....M..Mflbilo. 



LuisLopoBde Arcey NoeL.Y.G- Boston. 

Vincente Cabells C Key West. 

Antonio F.y Stagna YX) New Orleaiw. 

Francisco M. R. de Mon- 

^cadft Y.C .Savannah. 

Beigamin Theron .Y.C .Galveston. 

Don Carlos Ramean de la 

v^nica... ...................... M. •(^.••.....Philadelphia* 

Don Aureliano Yinyais. C Charleston. 

Robt. 0. Treadwell Y.C Portsmoath, 

N H 

Don Antonio Maria deCea Y.C New York. 

Camilo Martin Y.C...."....8an Fmnciseo. 

Enrique do Aina G Portland, Me. 

Pd&tuoal. 

William H. Allen V.C St. Angnstino. 

Jule Pescay V.C Pensacola. 

Joe6 A. Sintas Y.C .Wilmington, 

N.C. 

C. Le Baron »...Y.C Mobile. 

John Searle. G San Francisco. 

E. S. Sayres Y.C .Philadelphia. 

Archibald Foster Y.G JBoston. 

Thomas Riberio dos San- 

los. ........................ .,,,iy,u„,,„.,ji6v York. 

L. E. Amslnck YXJ New York. 

Eugene Esdra Y.C. Charleston. 

R. G. dos Santos Y.C... .....Norfolk. 

C. Oliver O'Donnell Y.C........Baltlmore. 

Job6 J. Martin Y.G.......J3avannah. 

Antonio Joe6 da Silva Y.G........New Orleans. 

Nethkrlaxds. 

M.Myers C .Norfolk. 

Oliver Cllara Y.C Key West. 

Jan Jacob van Wanroy C Mobile. 

F. R. Toewater „ C .St. Louis. 

Amed6e Conturid...,M G New Orleans. 

R. C.Bnrlage C.G New York. 

Florant Moline C Cincinnati. 

G. K. Zeigler G Philadelphia. 

Claas Yocke : .C. Baltimore. 

Nicholans Ausl^n Y.C.^ Keokuk, Iowa. 

Johan P. Yoswinkel Dor-l^ fWiscon., Mich. 

selen J ( Minn. 

F. AuKU8tusHir8ch...„.M.."C Boston. 

Daniel Leseuie C Cliarleston. 

GarlEpping Y.C Savannah. 

J. E. Zimmerman....»....Y.C.G New York. 

I. de Bniyn Kupa... ..Y.C Charleston. 

I. de Fremcry G......-8au Francisca 

BSLGIVX. , 

Thomas A. Deblois. ....C J^nrtlaad. 

Hippolyte Mali V.C J^'ew York. 

Wm. G. Porter V.C Apaaacbioo]«.t 

Wra. O'DriscoU C Savannah. 

G. 0. Gorter % ..O... Baltimore. 

Charles Hunt ~ C St. Louis, Mo^ 

H. E. LasceUes ..Y.C JSastport, Me. 

Emile Otto Netting *»'.. C Richmond. 

J.G.Bates C....... .Boston. % 

James F. Meline J..l..'...C.ll'.... .Cincinnati. 

H. W. P. Mali - C.G...:....New York, 

Duncan Robertson..., C Norfolk. 



84 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[IM. 



IT. V. H. ▼ooirb6M........M....C<».. •••Mobile. 

J. f. Henrotin ,„ .C. .CliiCAtfo. 

Oliver (KHara C Key Wert. 

Jules May G .San Trandsco. 

Joseph Deynuodt G........New Orleaiw. 

Gnstave I;!. Matile- V.C Philadelphia. 

Auipiste Noblooe Y.C New Orleans, 

John B. A. Maase. — C........OreettBay,Wia- 

coiuiii. 

a E. Stewart C GharlMtoii. 

D. U. Klaeuer .C Galteaton. 

Laareut I>e Give C.......JUlanta» Qa. 

G. XL 8ttiinitaon.................X... — .PhlladelpUa. 

SWRUBLAlfl). 

L. P. do Loxa C :Sew York. 

T. C. Kuhn C Galveston. 

A. E. Bundelier ............C.......£t. Louis. 

John Hitz ..-. C.G .TTashinsTton* 

DJC. 

Jean Zulanf. C Xonisville. 

Adrien Iselin > y.C New York. 

A. Piaget .0 New Orleans. 

Alexis de Stoats Y.C San Francisco. 

Henri Meyer C Charleston. 

Adolphe Korradi G Philadelphia. 

Charles Domini G .Detroit. 

P. J. Wildberger. Y.C Philadelphia. 

Emile L*hn!lier Y.C Detroit. 

Henri Hentsch C San Francisco. 

Coustaut Rilliet> G Highland, lU. 

Abraham Felder. Y.C Highland, HI. 



ACSTBIA. 



Jean B. Eimer......^,., 

Jean finile Dmnont.... 

H. W. Knthmann......... 

Andrew Low 

J. IS. \vriuit. 

8. M. Wain.. »».—, 

Samnel J. (Sower 

Charlea Loosey , 

Jnlins Kanflnann.. 

F. D. Kremelberg , 

Xdward W. de Yoas 

B. C. Aiueelrodt 

Oiarles F. Loosey 

Xdward T. Hardy.... — 



• ■••••« * w ••• •*••' 

....Y.G 

• ••• V v^A •••••• 

....YXJ 

»•••••• •%/•«*•••• 

• ■ • • Y B^^ • • • • ••• 

»• ••• T •\/»«««* •• 

.••••UalT** 



• ■ ■ •^^♦•••••« 



.New Orleans. 

.Jiobilew 

.XSiarleston. 

.Savannah. 

.Apalachicola. 

..Philadelphia. 

.ilan Francisco. 

.New York. 

.CkdvestoB. 

.•Baltimore. 

.Boston. 

.Blchmond. 

.St. Lonis. 

New York. 

Norfolk. 



WmtmiBato. 

G. F. Adas C........CincinnatL 

X. C. Angefarodt .....C........St. Louis. 

John Smidt G... Loaisrille. 

Ghriatiao Honold..... G........New Orleans. 

Friedridi Frank ..C ».£an Frandaco. 

O. F. Adas G ..Cincinnati. 

X. C. Angelrodt G.. St. Loois. 

ivemer Dresel...................C........BaltimQre. 

Lndwigvon Banmbach G Jftllwaukie. 

W. L. Klderlen C Pbiladelphin. 

Bobert Barib - Y.C....^...Bt. Loois. 

Leopold Bierwirth .XS.G New York. 



Aacnst Eggers ..........C GfndnnatL 

JnlTos Sampson .« G Mobile. 

F. A. Holfinann ............C XSiicago. 

X. G. Angelrodt...*........M....G St. Lonis. 

C. F. Hagedom G Philadelphia. 

'VHedrich Kuhna. C New York. ' 



FMedrich Kniine.... — ........C.......jreiw York. 



£. G. Angelrodt .G... 

Friedrich Knhne Y.G... 

a F. Adae - G 

Oumrnma. 



— New York. 
....St. Lonis. 

JJewYork. 
....CIndnnntL 



V. X. i^yw noes...... ......... 

Jnlins Frederich.. 
G. F. Adae 

E. G. Angelrodt... 

J. W. Schmidt 

Theodore Schwartx 

Heinrich Mnller 

C. F. Hagedom 

Gerhard Jansen 
Henry Hanssmann. 

Emil Spangenberg 

Richard Thiele 

F. A. Hirsch 
Charles Bulling....... 



... . ..... ... 



...................... 



.....v........Gbarlefltoii. 

C ...Galveston. 

C .Qncinnati. 

..C.G New Yoric. 

.....G LouisviUe* 

G. ...... .Savnunak. 

G... .....Philad^pUaf 

. V.v<....u..Iiew Yonc. 

G. — ...San Frandaoo. 
....V'........«BtiwanKfau 

....C New Orleans. 

.Y.C........St. Louiik 

G........BoBton. 

..C.~.....Baltiaiore. 



EuBCKfRAxn OF Hessi-Casseu 

Theodor Wagner ~....C........Galvestoii« 

Ernst Angelirodt.............H...C........8t. I^Nito. 

Carl Adae G. Cincinnati. 

Richard Thiele M......C.......J<ew Orleaa^ 

Friedrich Knhne. C........New York. 

Robert Berth YX3 .St. Looia. 

Werner Dreael X!........Baltimorei. 

G. F. Hagedom G .PUIadeli]^ 



Havotbe. 



X. Uhrlanb 

Adolph Meier 

Theodor Schwartx 
Charles BoUman.... 
Julius Frededch.... 

Otto Frank 

C. F. Adae 

Augustus Rdchard. 
G. H. H. Papendick. 

A. Rettberg 

K. H. MuUw 

d. C. Baurmeister... 

Carl C. Schtfttler 

A. G. Wilmans 

F. A. Hirsch 

Adolph Gosling 

G. W. Henuings 



«■••«•• •••e^ 



•■aa««ae» 



>««•••••••' 



G.......Ja]timcra. 

••aa4«a«v««*aaa«*D«a A^J(119* 

....G.......XouisTllle. 

...... ..0. ...... .Pfttsbnrg. 

. ...0... .....Galveston. 

.....«..C«...... jan Frandacob 

.........G .Cincinnati. 

C.......>New Orleana. 

.. . .....G. ... M. Jftuwankla. 

C........CIeveland, 

. ... ...G....M..SaTannah. 

....... .C. . .M.jCharleston. 

C Jhiladelphl*. 

a*»*aaaa^^aa*«*«««aXLU 1% AUJ^AWa 

. C Boston. 

CXl........New York. 

— YXJ. — .Jlew York. 



MiCKLSirBinM-StBXLm. 

FIrJedrich Knhne. ......G.....Jfew Yoik. 

G. F. Adae G .Cincinnati. 

MscKumumG-ScHwianr. 

'inihdm Prehn C....~.Jfew Orleans* 

Herman Schnltx G Galveston. 

J. de Framery... C .San Franciscow 

James F. MeMne................C.......X?indnnatL 

X. G. Angelrodt .........G ....St. Ixmis. 

F. J. H. fiaiji8...................G ...Philadelphia. 

£• C. Angelrodt •.... ..•••..C........ot« Lonis. 

Lndwigvon BanmhacJi C Milwankie. 

Wm A. HifBRn.. ■■.■»■»»■*■»'.»■■ ■■■■w... Hostont 

Robt. Bartli..........M........Y.G .St. Louis. 

Friedridi Kii]in0....~... .0..*.....New York. • 



W^'] 



STATE PEPARTMENT. 



85 



JBA]>a. 



Johavn W. Schmidt ....CO New York. 

JacsubH. £iiiier Y.C... New Orletuui. 

C. F. Hagedorn C Philadelpliia. 

C. F. Adae *. C Cincinnati. 

E. 0. Angelr/odt C........St. Louiu. 

H. Cimer C New Orleans. 

heopvid Schmidt Y.C. Jlew Yorlc. 

Emil Spaugenberg ..C. Milwnukie. 

Werner Dread Baltimore. 

John Smidt ,„., Louisville. 

Bobti Barth T.C J&t. Louis. 



SWEDIK Ain> NoawAT. 
nuneta H. Wilman TX!... Sarannah. 

DuBCan Robertson »...y.C. Norfolk. 

James Dempaey T.C AlexandriaTa. 

Ambrose Lanfear.. «...y.C Now Orleans. 

Asa F. Tift V.C Key West. 

'James P. Meltne. .Y<C .Cincinnati. 

Reynold Westfeldt T.C Mobile. 

Bifirard S. Sayres. TX) Philadolphin. 

C. B. Hftbtoht C New York. 

Barth<!iM Bchlesinger YjO BoHtou. 

Gabriel Bjomson Y.C ibr Wisconsin. 

Oeo. G. Johnson ^..^ ...San Francisco. 

Theodore Borup Y.C St. Paul. 

C Otto Witte > Y.O Charleston. 

Limit Lybecker Y.C St. Lonia. 

Qerhard LajTSon YX3 Cbicago.- 

Beunswick Aim Lvitkbuiio. 

JaUvs Samson C .Mobile. 

HF. Hagedorn ; ...C ..Philadelphia. 

Adolph Rettberg G Cleveland. 

F. A. Hoffman ^.^..C Chicago. 

James Wenz ..C for Minnesota. 

E. C. Angelrodt..... ....C St. Louis. 

Herman Beckurts...... .C.......Xor Kentucky. 

Jacob Bdiahler C Milwankie. 

Robert Barth m Y.C.. .St. Louis. 

Oarl Schmidt : C Cincinnati. 

DSNMAKX. 

P. K. Dickenaon. Y.C Wilmington, 

N.C. 

Gea H. Thacher C Boston. 

James Dempsey ......Y.C Alexandria, Ya. 

W. H. Ladson Y.O Charleston. 

H. Frellsen C New Orleans. 

J. F. Meline Y.C ...Cincinnati. 

John £. Schnetze ...Y.C St. Louis. 

Robt. B. Searing Y.C Mobile. 

Harold Dollner .C .^New York. 

Geo. P. Hansen V.C Chicago. 

G. O'Hara Taaffe G San Francisco. 

Emit C. Hammer Y.C Boston. 

Theodore Borup.. ..Y.C St. Paul. 

« . o. ^xi i&x ■ • . . . ..................v.\y. ..••... jjHiiiiiiore. 

s. B. sayres. ..........•..*•...». v.o... rniiafleiphia 

J. G. Kondrnp Y.C Washington, 

D.G. 

Rzcss, Pbxitce or, or trb Sekior Linb. 
IHedricb Kohne G New York. 

Bt088, Priiccs or, or thk Jukior Like. 
FrMiieh Knhne...... G..^....New York. 



SAITADOIt. 

Royal Phelps CO.- 



....!rew York. 
....Can Ivaiicisoow 
Manuel Echverria. New York. 

P&USSIA. 

LndMfig Braiin8.........~.....,.C Baltimore. 

K. C. Angelrodt... XX Mt. Louis. 

J. W.Schmidt.. CJOt New York. 

Geo. Hnssey YX; New Bedford^ 

J. W. Jocknseh G. Oalvestou. 

Julius von Borcies..............C........LotdsviUe. 

C. F. Adae C .Cincinnati. 

W. H. Trappmann. G. Charleston. 

H. Hanamanp... «,.«.««,«. G San FranolMMh 

Emil Spangenberg C Milwaukie. 

C. SchOttler G.. ...... Philadelphia. 

Edwardvoader Heydt C New York. 

F. A, Hirsch C .Boston. 

A. Reichard.... G New Orleans. 

F. N. Hudtwalcker C Savannah. 

Bobt. Barth ••....... Y.C .St. Lotds. 

NA88AV. 

A.Wltzlfiber C ..San Fraxidsco. 

F. W. Freuderth^ C New Orleans. 

£. C. Angelrodt C St. Louis. 

C F. Adae G Cincinnati. 

F. Moureau. ^ C JNew Shraunfelii^ 

Texas. 

Robert Barth....... Y.C St. Louis. 

Friedrich Kuhne C New York. 

L. Ton Baombaeh C... Milwaakid. ' 

Saxont. 

Charles I. Gazenoye Y.C Boston. 

F. L. Brauns • CO Baltimore. 

G. F. Adae C Cincinnati.' 

F. Borcherdt G ibr Wisconsin. 

Julius Kauffnmn C .Galveston. 

Werner ]>resel G Baltimore. 

L T. Plate C Philadelphia* 

Johann W. Schmidt. .C.G New Yoric. 

£. 0. Angelrodt G.G St. Louis. 

Robert Barth ...» C... St. Louis. 

Charles H. Pandorf... .0 New Orleans. 

Herman Michels G San Francisoo^ 

Theodor Schwartz G Louisville. 

HE88B DABMSTAST. 

C. F. Adae ^ C. .Cincinnati. 

John Smidt C Louisville. 

G. F. Hagedorn G.G.'. Philadelphia. 

E. G. Angelrodt.. CXI .St Loois. 

F. W. Keutgen G New York. 

Emil Spangenberg ...C Milwankie. 

Werner Bres^ C Baltimore. 

Gustav Ziel G San Francisco. 

August Reichard C New Orleans. 

J. W. Jockusch Y.C .Galveston. 

^bert Barth..... G St. Louis. 

SAXE-CoSUlta AND GOTHA. 

Francis A. Hofftnann C Chicago. 

E. C. Angelrodt C St. Louis. 

August Eggers C Cincinnati. 

C. P. Hagedorn C Philadelphia. 

Friedrich Knhne .C J^ew York. 



Bremen. 

F. Rodewald .C .New Orleans. 

A. Scbumachw.... G.G Baltimore. 



86 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[tsm. 



£. de Toes C Richmond. 

Johannes Wolff. .C St. Louis. 

fl. A. H. Range > C. Indianola, 

Texas. 

C. A. C. Dnisenburg C........San Francisco. 

J. L. H. Thiermann G diarleston. 

Jnliiu Kauffman G........GalTe8ton. 

Theophiliu Plate..... C. — ..Philadelphia. 

F. A. Ilirsch G Boston. 

Heinrich Mnller ~.... G........SaTaniiah. 

A. \s m i>6icii.. ••.•••••.••••••.. Y.l.'.««.....ney iVest. 

Gnstay Schwab...............„..G........New York. 



ScHAVXBUBO-LlPPX. 

flodfrej Snjdacker.............C Xlhicago. 

A:rHALT-DESSAU. 

Friedricb Knhne C. New York. 

fkAHKyoav4>ir-XHK-MAia. 

F.Wyimann C Jf ew York. 

a F. Adae C OncinimtL' 

F. A. Reuse G St. Louis. 

F. A. Hoffmann ~ G Chicago. 

X, C. Wilmanns C........Milwankle. 

John H. IIaijes..................C....~..PbiladdphJa. 

SCHWiAZBUBO SOODKBSBAnSZSI. 

'Friedrlch Knhne .C. New York. 

LiPPK, PuifCiPALiTT or. 
Friedrich Kohne C .New York. 

Hambubo 

F. Rodcwald .G .Baltimore. 

A. Schumacher G.G Baltimore. 

H. Ludlam G .Richmond. 

J. W. Jockusch G GalTeston. 

Henry Runge G Indianola, 

Texas. 

Hrary A. Schroeder.> G.. 3lobile. 

j». TT . TT eicn.. •.........«■•... V .v^a. ...... ivey tt em. 

J. F. Meline ..G........Ginci|inati. 

G. Lorenz G Philadelphia. 

J. N. Hndtwalcher C Savannah. 

diaries Kock G New Orleans. 

F. A. Hirsch C Boston. : 

Charles Witte G Charleston. 

Gnstar Ziel C San Francisco. 

H. B. Kuhardt C ...New York. 

SCHWARXBrBO BUDOLSTADT. 

Friedrich Knhne G JHew York. 

Batabia. 

G. H. Siemon G New York. 

John Smidt G Louisrille. 

C. F. Adae G Cincimiati. 

E. G. Angelrodt G St. Louis. 

Jacob H. Eimer _ C New Orleans. 

"Werner Bresel G~ Baltimore. _ 

C. F. Hagedom C.G Philadelphia. 

L. von Banmbcfh G ADlwaukie. 

Robert Barth V.C- St. Louis. 

TURKBT. 

Joseph Jasigi C Boston. 

J. H. Smith C New York. 

G«oi|^ Porter G Baltimore. 

TcacAMY, 
' B.TBtg!iafttTi .C;. New York. 



Don Ofo^raecluao 
Satrustegni...... 



Paxxa. 
M. de 

SABmaoA. 



Nicholas Reggio 

C. A. Williamson 

E. L. Trenholro 

Manuel RaTeoa.. 

V. Sartori 

L. A. Jean Baptiste Paris.. 

Joseph Lanata 

Eusebio Joe6 Goraei 

Duncan Robertson.. ...^.. 
Giuseppe Bertinatti... ... .. 

William Pinknej 

Beigamin Davidson... 

Giuseppe Yalerio 

Luigi 0. TowQsIey. 



B • • •« ■#•« ■ • 



• V m\J •••»* 

.V.G.... 
.V.G.... 
. V.G.... 
....G.... 

■ • • m\j • * •• 



.Am Frandseow 



.Boston. 
...Baltimore. 
...CSiarleston. 
...Galveston. 
...Philadelphia. 
...St. Louis. 
...Cincinaatl. 
.. Jfew Orleans. 
...Key West. 
...Norfolk. , 

...New York. 
...New Orleans. 
...San Francisco. 
...New Y'ork. 
...Mobile. 



PomncAL Btaks. 

Henry Perret ........V.G. 

ti m. D. penao.. »«».... «>..»... V .vy.... 



yew OrleaiUL. 
Norfi>]k. 
,..V.C .......Savannah. 

...V.C......JBoston. 

G........New Orleans. 

.C.G -New York. 

T.C.....-.Cincinnati. 

George Allen V.C -Philad^phia. 

BasilT. Elder -«.,....T.G Baltimore. 

Edward Mottet Y.G Charleston. 



Samuel Wri^t .-., 

Nicholas Reggio -. 

Charles J. Daron «. 

Luigi B.Binsse.. 
J. F. Meline...... 



••••••• 



Two Sicnns. 



Ira CUsbe 

B. D. Potter -..^ 

0. Wolff- - 

A. G. Rhodes 

Nicholas -Reggio 

Jdtin H. Homes 

Louis de Oonteneni 

Wm. Pinkney. .......—. 

G. G. Michels .\ 

Wm. A. Darling ^.^. 

Leone Schisano 

Daniel GrOning ~... 

John G. Barelli 

D. Giuseppe Anfiira..... 
Sebastiano Dacorsi 



•••*■»••• V a^^** 



..VX3 

..V.C 

..V.C — 

..vxx.... 

'«• V s^^aaaai 

• • * ffV^***** 

vr 

• • * axy •• • •• 

• • V A/*«a*- 

• ••V/«^Vaaa«* 



Gbcsce. 

Nicholas "Benachi ......G.... 

Demetrius Botassis V.G.... 

Demetrius N. BotassiB.. G.... 

Charles W. Dabney.- C 



District of Co- 
lumbia. 
...New Haven, Ct. 
...Providenoa. 
.-Mobfle. 
...Baltimore. 
—Bofton. 
...Charleston. 
...PhihKlelphia. • 
...New York. 
-.Key West. 
...Savannah. 
...San Francisco.. 
.. .Norfolk. 
...RichmoncL 
...New Orleans. 
...New York. 
.-New York. 



..New Orleans. 
..New York- 
..New Y'ork. 
..Boston. 



G. S. Oldfiold.. 



Wm.G.Dnn]ap 



Hawaoan In.AKM. 

T.C Baltimore. 

Olympia A 



Schuyler Livingston 
Henry A. Pierce 



.lv.C- 



tha 
Ports of Pa- 
get Sound. 

.C.G ..New York. 

....G. ....... Boston. 

Charles E. Hitchcock ..,......C«H.^.-San Francisco. 

Geo. T. Allan C... ibr Oregon. 



Mehcax States. 

P. J. MaraUaBO......~...-..Y.C..«.»Jtt. LovIb. 

Carlos L. Le Baron — ......V.C Mobila. 

Mairael Armendair.... .0 JXcw Bfexica 



1868.] 



STAf B DBPARTMEKT. 



8? 



Seflor Don Jos6 Antonio 

Don Felix Merino V.C 

Don Juan Ilerbst ^.V.G 

tt In* c« jSftrrou •••••••••••••••▼ ^xj ••»••■< 

Fnuicisco Montaner. TX) 

FtnQcisco Moreno ,...Y.C...... 

gT' ^^« y v/UG«tto*« •••••••■••• •• * v^^******! 

Don Ffancisco Riband .CO 

Joee Mngarrieta O 

Ricardo Ramlres T.C 

C. M. Trevino C 



Mignel Zaragojea C. 



Jo86 Maria Duran.^ CO.. 



..Baltimore. 

.Philadelpliia. 

.Pittsburgh. 

.Boston. 

.San Francisco. 

..Charleston. 

..Pensacola. 

.New York. 

.New Orleans. 

.San Franoisoo. 

..Franklin, N.M. 

..ftrownsriile, 

Texas. 
.Ctalreston. 
..8an Antonio d« 

Bexar. 
.New York. 



EOTTAMR. 

8eth Bryant .0 Boston. 

James H. Gansten .C .Washington, 

D.C. 

Edward P. Sweetser C Philadelphia. 

Cleniente Ballen T.C San Francisco. 

Aaron H. Palmer.. CO .Washington, 

J>Xi. 

Daniel Wolflf. C San Francisco. 

James Gardette ~ G .New Orleans. 

OregOTio DomingnesB. G New York. 

Paraguay. 
Sicbard MuIIowny G........Kew York. 

Nsw OatlTASA. 

Jo86 Maria Oaitan....... C.G New York. 

John E. Beylle .....0 New Orleans. 

Robert A. ^sher 0..w....,Ba]timore. 

Jus6 M. R. de Porras G JPhiladelphla. 

(%den H. Burro ws G San Francisco. 

Jus6 0. BIboa V.C J(ew York. 



J. F. Strohm 
8. 0. Whitney. 

Geo. B. Dieter 

Wm. O. Bon ton.. 
F. LBarreda 



••••••••• •••••« •••• 



Juan 0. de Las Casas 



URUaUAT. 

V. w. Blansony •.•.•.•....••..•. v.v>.. 
u. li. Ijowden..... ............. v.c<.. 

Frederick A. Stokea-i. T.C.. 

Thomas P. Hamilton <C>. 

Charles Soule, Jr V.C. 



TiNEZUILA. 

C Baltimore.' 

0. ...... .Boston. 

New Orleans. 

.,.....C ..Philadelphia. 

CO ^r the United 

States. 
C New York. 



P. Momdondo O. 

Jus6 E. Snyder V.O.. 

Juan F.Cabot V.C. 

Jorge F. Darby... CO... 



....Mobile. 
....Charleston. 

Galveston. 

Sfl^n Francisco. 

Salem and Boa* 

ton. 
Baltimore. 
New Orleans. 
.. JJew York. 
...Philadelphia. 
...New York. 



••*•••• J 



Brazil. 

James W. Zacharie C Louisiana and 

Alabama. 

COriffln V.C. New London, 

Oonn. 

John W. Anderson..... V.C...,...8ayannah. 

Oea 8. Wardwell V.C...-..Providence, 

I*F. de Ffganiere V.C New York. 

1^ S. 8ajm0............^.....«.y.C»...«.Phi]ad«lpbUib 



C QUyer O'Donnell V.C. Baltimore. 

A. de Carralho P. de An- 
oraQe.. •••....•••«•*•<.,.. I. ,.,iF.v'........Catifomia. 

Louis H. F. de Aguiar......C.O... for the United 

States. 

Andreas P. Walls V.C New Orleans. 

A. T. Klckhoelbr. V.O........ Washington, 

D.C. 

W. H. Jndah V.C Pensacola. 

Engenlo Esdra V.C Charleston: ' 

Heman K.Baldwin V.C Richmond. 

Archibald Foster.... ....C 3oeton. 

' Edwin E. Herts.. V.CA........8avannah. 

Oscar G. Parsley..... V.C, Wilmington, 

Nicaragua. 

Royal Phelps C.Q New York. 

Oliver CDonell C Baltimore. 

E. J. Oemec C New Orleans. 

HoirouRAS. 
Wm. Vineent Wells CO ........for Califomiai 

OoatA Rkja. ' 

Royal Fnoipff CO Jfew YopI^ 

Patrick GnHit....................C......Boaton. 

S. M. Wain C J'biladelphia. - 

Sam'l H. Greene C San Francisco. 

Joe6 Mitchel C New Orleans. 

E. J. Gomez .C. Key West. 

GUATEMAUL. 

Bariolomfi Blanco.. C.Q New York. 

Patrick Grant C. Boston. 

& M. Wain »......«.~.«....C.....to Jhiladelfiiicu ' 

Sam*l JI. Greene ..*... Cm San Franciscou 

E. J.Gomez .........C New Orleans. 

CBUft. 

Richard B.Fitzgerald C Baltimora. 

F. V. Gleeman.. C .Philadelphia.' 

C B. Polhemus C. San Francisco.' 

•Pedro P. Ortiz V.C JJJew York. • 

, Aroektini! Conpederatzon. 

S. Livingston , C New York. ,,' 

F. H. Horner C Boston. 

Motte A. Pringle. C Charleetoii. * 

C IL Stewart... «....«.«.C Baltimore. 

Joa§ Coatas y Pujol....*..,....C...r...PhiUklelphia, ^ 



JnanydeOsma. .«..»».C........WaBhlikgton, 

D.C. 

Felipe N. Casado C New York. 

Samuel J. Christian Philadelphia. 

Santiago C Bello C Boston. 

Richard B. Fitzgerald. C........Baltimore. 

A. A. Cajjr C .Charleston. 

N. Fejerina C San Francisco. 

LCBECX. 

Friedrich Kirchoff. C .New Orleans. 

D. H. Klaenor C Galvestou. 

F. A. Schumacher C New York. 

Herman Ton KapfT. C Baltimore. 

J. H. Halves........... C. Philadelphia* 

Johann L. H. Thiermann — C Charleston. 

Henry C Lauterbach C. Boston. 

0. E. Kunhardt C New York. 

C. F. Mebuis 0. San Atuiciaea 

Gflorg* H. GarJJoh8*.>..,...^...C«..«.JC2lnctoBftli..i . t 



88 THE NATIOHAL ALMABTAC. [186S. 

n. WAil DEPABTKEHI. 

(Corrected at the War bepartment, November 10, 1862.) 
Kamei and Offlcea. Whence appointed. Compeneatlon. 

BDWIN M. STANTON, Secrxtaat of Wa» Pennsylvania - |8,000 

P. H. Watmk, JLsHttant Seerttary <ff Wkr ^ INftrict of Oolnmlila 3«000 

JoBN TucXKR, <* ** ..., » Pennsylvania 8,000 

C. P. WoLCOTT, ** " Ohio. 8,000 

Jomr PoTTB, Chi^ Clerk ....^ District of Oolnmbia. 2,200 

The following bureaos are attached to the War Department at Washington. 

Adfjukmt-GenerdPs CffieeJ^ln this office are kept all the records which refer to the personnel of 
the army, the rolls, Ac. It is here where all military commlsaioiis are HUtde out. The Judg&'AdTO* 
cate General is also connected with it. 

Oommanding-GeneraPs Office, — 

The other bnreans consist d—The QuarteruaiUr'OeneraV$ Qfiee; the Poiym uHv r-^tmeraVt Office; 
the Oommiuary-GtneraPs Office; the Surffetm-OeneraPt Office; tkM Engineer Office; the HipographiecA 
Bureau; and the Ordnance Bureau. 

Mi\}.-Gen. Hk5RT W. Hallmk, Oommander^n^C^i^ qf (Ae ^rmy, Oalifcrnia ~f&,84M) 

Brig.-Oen. LoBXirzo Tbomab, Ad{jutant-G€neral J>elaware ^. 3^594 

OoL Edwaad D. Towhsbks, Auistant Adjutant-Qtnerai Massachusetts 2,532 

liaj.jAMK8B.FBT, " « minolB 1,0M 

MiO. RoBKET WiLUAMS, « « VlrginU 1,966 

M%J. Thomas M. Tikcbnt, " « Ohio 1,066 

Hi\J. Samuxl Bbxck, '< ** Massachusetts 1,060 

Jambs L. Addison, CM^ (ZerJe Adjutant-GeneroTs Bureau. Maryland l^oo 

Col. Jos. Holt, Judge'Advocate General Kentucky 2,632 

Hi^. Lbtx G. Tcbheb, Deputy Judge- Advocate Mew York 1,050 

Brig.*Oen. Moittoombbt G. Mbios, (^uartenoMuier-GeneraL Penni^lvania............ 3,604 

Uent-Col. Ebenezbb S. Siblet, Bqmty Quartermatter-Generai JHIchigan ^244 

Capt. Alxxandcb J. Pbbxt, Asnsiant Quartemuuter. .'...........Connecticat 2,632 

Capt.BBiUAMXirC.CABi>, " " Kansas 2.632 

William A. OoROOir, Chi^ Clerk Quartemuuter't Bureau Pennsylvania 1,800 

Gen. Joseph G. Totten, C^i^ Engineer...... .Connecticut 3,60^ 

Capt. John J>. Kvktz, Assistant Engineer District of Colnmbia 1,950 

F. N. Babbabin, C9ii^ CUrk qf Engineer Bureau New Jersey..... 1,800 

CoL Stephen H. Long, CJii^ Topographical Engineer New Hampahire 8,694 

Ua^. I. C WOODBUPF, Assistant Tupographical Engineer New Jersey „ 2,244 

Gbobob Thomson, Chief CUrk Bureau i^ Top. Engineers ......Marylaad .....*.., 1^800 

Brig.^Gen. Wm. A. Hammond, Surgeon-General Maryland 3,694 

Dr. R. C Wood, Assistant SurgeonrGeneral at St. Louis Bhode Island 2,632 

Dr. Jas. R. Smith, Asststanl SurgeonrGeneral District of Colombia. 1,956 

Dr. Robbetb Babxboiaw, AstistatU Smrgem ^ kneral Maryland » 1,664 

Dr. C. H. Aldbn, Astidant Surgeon-General .........PennsyhFania l,86i 

Richmond Johnson, Cht^ Clerk Surgeon-GeneraVs Bureau District of Colnmbia 1,800 

Brig.-Gen. James W. Riplbt, Chief of Ordnance. ......Connecticut ^. 9^594 

Lient.-Col. Wiluam Matnadob, Assistant ....District of Colombia 2,244 

Capt. J. G. Benton, " New Hampshire 1,554 

Capt. G. T. Balch, « Ohio 1,554 

Chablbs W. Mobbib, Ch^f Clerk of Ordnance Bureau Pennsylvania « 1.800 

Yacant. Paynuuter-General 2,740 

MiO. Cabet H. Fbt, Acting raymaster-Oeneral Kentocky 2,740 

Maj. J. Ledtabd Hodqe, Additional PayvMster District of Colombia ^ ^740 

Edmdnd H. Bbookb, Cliief Clerk of Paymaeter-GenerdPs JBi»reati~. Maryland 1,800 

Col. JosBPH P. Taylor, Oammissary-General qf Aibsistenee Kentocky 2,^82 

Bfi^. A. E. Sbibas, AssHlani Oommissary-General New Jersey.. 1,05^ 

Mig. M. D. L. Simpson, Second Atsiitant New York 1,055 

'*^xuiAM H. WASfOV, Chiif CUrk C^mmitsar$f»QeiierQPt BiirsoiUu^MaMci at Ooinmbla,.... .....,».. ijaoa 



1863.] 



WAB BSPABXMSaiT. 



89 



MHJTART ACADEMY, WEST POINT, N.T. 

Intpedor, 
BuBvet BrigiuUeMlmeral Joseph 0. Totten, Colonel of ISDgliMai. 



Odoml Alexftndflr EL Bowmftiif 

DennJa H. Mahan, LLJ)^ 

iBt liaaU WmUun P. CnighUl, 

WiUiam H. C. Bartlett, LUS^ 

OtpUln George IL Mendell, 

Albert E. Church, LL.D., 

lat Uest. JttBJus B. Wheeler, 

Isk Ueat. Alfired T. Smith, 

Ut lieat. William A. Elderkin, 

Ut Lieat. John W. Barlow, 

bt Lient. James M. Whittemore, 

Robert W. Weir, N.A., 

1st Lieat. Robert L. Eastman, 

Hyacinth R. Agnel, 

1st Ueat. Samuel A. Foster, 

Rer. John W. French, ]).D., 

Captain Edward R. Hopkins, 

Henry L. Kondrick, A.M., 

Captain Lorenfco Lorain, 

Patrice de Janon, 

Lt-Col. Henry B. CUtz, 

Captain William P. Chambllss, 
Captain Joseph N. 6. Whistler, 
Captain Edward R. Hopkins, 
1st Ueat. George W. Dresser, 
Brrt. 2d Lieut. James H. Rollins, 
Captain Henry A. Smalley, 
Captain F. A. Baries, 
Captain Stephen T. Ben^t, 
AntooA Lorentx, 



Academic Staff. 

Ub^ Corps of Engineers, SuperinUndrnty vtUMoealrank^fCtitmA 

and Oornvtiandani qf^mt, 
FrpftmfT </ CivQ. and MUUary Eiiffineerinff, 
Engineers, AwittafU Prtffesmr. 

JPrqfeuor qf Naivral and Emperintmtal J^Ootcpk^. 
Top. Engineers, Astistant Ptofator. 

Profutor qf Mathematics. 
Top. Engineer*, Assistant Prqfessar. 

8th Infontry, ^ 

Ist Artillery, / 

Top. Engineen, f ^^*^ ^uHtatU Prqfeuon. 

Ordnance, J 

Professor of Drawing. 
6th Infiuitry, Assistant Prqfesser. 

Pirqfessor of the Fimch Langtuxgt. 
6th Infontry, Assistant Prqfusor, 

Chaplain and Prqfessor qf Ethics and English Studiet. 
8d Inbntry, Assistant Professor. 

Prqfuaor of Chemistry, Mineralogyf and Geology. 
dd Artillery, Assistant Professor. 

Professor qf the S^Hinish Language. 

M^|. 12th Infiuitry, Oomd^t qf Oadets, and Instructor ArtiUerp, 

Oavatryf and Infantry Tactics. 

Assistant Instructor of Qzvalry. 

Assistant Instructor qf Infantry Jhelics. 

Assistant Instructor of Infantry Ihetics. 

Assistant Instructor of Artillery Tactics. 

Astistant Instructor qf It^fiintry Tnicttcs. 

AssistoTtt Instructor of Infantry Tactics. 

Assistant Instructor qf Infantry Todies, 

Instructor qf Ordnance and Ounnery. 

Sword-Mdster. 



5th Cavalry, 
8d Ihlkntry, 
8d Infantry, 
4th ArHUery, 
4th Artillery, 
2d Artillery, 
16th Infkntry, 
Ordnance, 



MiUl^ry Stciff. 
Oqytain Edward G. Boynton, lltb Infiuitry, Adjutant and Quartermaster. 

1st Uent William P. CraighiU, Bnglneefs, Treasurer. 

Engene H. AtMdie, lf.D J^rffeon. 

Albert Hartsuff, M.D Assistant Surgeon. 



The United States Military Academy was 
Ibnnded by Act of Congress in 1802, and was 
originally but the station of the Engineer corps. 
By that act the number of cadets was limited to 
tfli, and the whole number of engineer oflScers 
and cadets to twenty. In 1812, the corps of Pro- 
fflssors was increased, and the number of cadets 
lUsd not to exceed two hundred and fifty. In 
1817, under the superintendency of Colonel Thayer, 
it roKhed a point of great mefiiilness and vigor. 
Ib 1843) the number of cadets was apportioned to 



equal the number of representatires and Relegates 
in Congress, so that each Congressional and Terri- 
torial district, and the District of ColumbiA, shall 
hare one cadet. Prom this number there are 
Hhont forty graduates yearly, who are entitled to 
receive commissions in the army as second lieu* 
tenants : and, if there be no vacancies, they are 
attached (with full pay and duty) as supemmn»> 
rary offlcer8,—brevet second lleutenant8,^to be 
promoted as vacanoies occur. 



'90 



THE KATiOKAL ALMANAC. 



(IMS. 



Lm or Ofrcsm or tbi Abut or tbi Usttted BrAna. 
▲II •Seen tern* mi tlili Be(tgt«r aregndnatcfl of th* MUlUij Aoftdeny, txctpt thoM to «%om 



thli mMt [•] to amzed. 



Hfuue, naky %md date of com- 
mimion. 



QumuL ornciBs. 

M<nfor-Genermt4. 

Oea B. McClellan, 14 Mfty, 1861..... 

John C. Fremunt,* U May, 1S61 

Henry W. Halleck, 19 August, 18dl, 

Com maading Army 

John £. Wool,* 10 Mi^, 18e2L 

BrigadieT'OeneraU. 

William 8. Harney,* 14 Jane, 1858.. 
Edwin V. Sumner • le March, 1801, 

H. O. bvt. 31 May, 1862, M. G. 

▼ol. 4 July, 1862 

Irnn McDowell, 14 May, 1861, M. O. 

Tol. 14 March, 1862 

Robert Anderson, 15 May, 1861 

WiUIam S. Kosecran% 16 May, 1861, 

M. 0. vol. 21 March, 1862 

Philip St. O. Cooke, 12 Sox. 1861 

John Pope, 14 July, 1862, M. G. roL. 

21 March, 1862. 

JoMph Hooker, 4 Jnly, 1862, M. G. 

▼ol. 20 t^ept. 1862 



AIWUTAVT-0UrKaAI.'8 DKPARniSXT. 

At^tUant-Cfeneral. 

BriffadieT'GtneraL 

Loreoio Thomao, 3 Aug. 1861......... 

A i i i tt a n i AtHjutanU-General. 

(Monelt. 

Mward D, Towniend, 8 Ang. 1861.. 

Don Ciurloa Buell, 17 Jnly, 1862, M. 

0. Tol. 21 March, 1862 



LumUnant-Cbloneli. 

William A. Nichols, 3 Aug. UB61..... 
Seth Williama, 17 July, 1862; B. G. 

▼oL 23 Sept. 186L 

Julius P. Garesch^, 17 July, 1862.... 
Bichard C Drum,* 17 Jnly, 1862..... 

Majors. 

James B. Fry, 22 April, 1862, A. D. 
C. (col.) 14 Nov. 1861 



Ooorge L. Hartsufl; 17 July, 1802, B. 

O. vol. 16 April, 1862 

Nathaniel II. McLean, 17 July, 1862. 
John C. Kelton, 17 July, 1862, A. D. 

C. (col.) 4 Jan. 180^ 

R. Williams, 17 July, 186C2, Col. vol. 
William D. Whipple. 17 July, 1862, 

A. D. C. (1. C.) 10 F»'b. 1862. 

Chauncey McKeevcT, 17 July, 1862. 
AIlM»rt y. Oolbtirn, 17 July. 1862. A. 

D. C. (1. c.) 28 Sept. 1861 

George D. RurkIsm, 17 July, 1862, A. 

D. C (colj 28 June, 18fl2. 

Thomas M. \incent, 17 July, 1862.. 
- - - r.I»" 



La. 



Ohia 
Ky. 

Ohio. 
Va. 

Ky. 

Mass. 



Oliver D. Greene, 17 July 

Samuel Breck, 17 July, 1862. 

John P. Sherbumo,* 17 Jnly, 1802.. 



Del. 

Mast. 

Ohio. 

Pa. 

Me. 

Cuba. 
Pa. 

ni. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

Pa. 
Va. 

N.Y. 
Md. 

Vt. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

N.H. 





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.s 


o a 


& 


< 


Pa. 


OhIa 


AJC. 


Cat. 


N.Y. 


Cal. 


N.Y. 


N.Y. 



La. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 
Ky.' 

Ohio. 
Va. 

ni. 

Cal. 



DeL 

Mass. 

Ind. 

Pa. 

Me. 
DeL 
Pta. 

m. 

Mich. 
Ohio. 

Pa. 
Va. 

N.Y. 

Md. 

Vt. 

N.Y. 
Ohio. 
N.Y. 



rmnk, and date of 

mission. 




JUXlOE-ADTOCATS'a DEPA&mKMT. 

Jmiffe-AdvocaU GtmrdL 

Ool. Joseph Bolt, 3 Sept. 1802.. 

Judgt'AdvoeaU &f the Army. 
Vacant. 

Major, 
Levi C. Turner,* 31 July, 1862.^..... 

IK8PECT0R-OKXIIUL*8 DCPAKTXXXT. 

Ifi^^tctort-General. 

Cblond*. 

Randolph B. Marcy, 9 Aug. 186L.... 

Deloe B. Sacket, 1 Oct. 1861 

Henry Van Rensselaer, 12 Nov. 1801. 

Astistant ItupeetorM-CeneraL 

Majort. 

Nelson U. Davis, 12 Nov. 1801 

James Totten, 12 Nov. 1861 

John Bofcrd, 12 Nov. 1861, &4}.voL 

27 July, 1862 

Roger Jones, 12 Nov. 1861 

Absalom Baird, 12 Nov. 1801, B. G. 

vol.28 AprU, 1862. 



Kj. 



•MVAL omen or nn axmt. 

Major, 

Albert J. Myer,* 27 J1m^ IBOft....... 

QUABTERXASTtE^S DBPABTSU.XT. 

QuarUrmatiUT-GtntraL 

Briffadier-GeiHral. 

Bfontgomery C. Meigs, 16 May, 1801. 

Auiitanl QuariermaOert-^enarQl. 

Ootoneii. 

Charles Thomas,* 1 Aug. 1850 

Daniel D. Tompkins, ^Deo.l8M... 
Thonaa Swords, 3 Avg. 1801... 



»■•#••••• 



i^epMty iiuarlermattert'OmiraL 

LieiUeiHin^CblomeU. 

George H. Crosman, 22 Dec. 1850... 

David U. Vinton. 3 Aug. 1801.... 

fibenezer S. Sibley, 3 Aug. 1801, Col. 

Int. 12 June. 1801 

• Edwin B. Babbitt, 3 Aug. 1801 



N.H. 



I QuartcrmaiUrt. 

Majort, 

I Osborne Croes, 24 July, 1847 

i Robert E. Clary, 17 .May. 1861, A. D. 
' C,(coU 5 Julv, 1862 

Morris S. Mllier, 17 May, 1861 

Alex. Montgomery, 17 May, 1801.... 

Bobart AUeo, 17 May, 1/861, Bvt. 
A. D. C. (col.) 11 July, 1802 



Hast. 

N.Y. 

N.Y- 



Maas. 
Pa. 

Ky. 
D.C. 

Pa. 



N.Y. 



Ga. 



Pa. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 



Maai. 

R.I. 

Mich. 
Coan. 



Md. 

Mass. 
N.Y. 



Ohio. 



Ky. 



N.X- 



BlasB. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 



Mass. 
Ta. 

IlL 

D.a 

Pa. 



N.Y. 



Pa. 



Pa. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 



RX 

Mich. 
Ind. 



Md. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

Ra. 

Ind. 



1863.] 



WAR DEPARTlAfiNT. 

List or Opncras or the Abxt.— Gontinoed. 



91 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



James Belger,* 3 Ang. 1861, Bvt. A. 

D.C.(col.) 11 Jnly, 1862 

Junes L Donaldson, 3 Aug. 1861, L. 

C.bvt. 14 May, 1862 

Unf^on C. Easton, 3 Aug. 1861...... 

JiutiiD McKinstry, 3 Ang. 1861, Bvt. 

Stpwart Van Vliet, 3 Ang. 1861 

Dtaniel H. Rnckfer,* 3 Aug. 1861, Bvt. 

A. D. C. (col.) 28 Sept. 1862 

Sofns Ingalls, 12 Jan. 1862, A. D. C. 

(L c.) 28 Sept. 1861 ^,...4. 

MUUary Storekeeptrt, 

Benben iL Potter * 23 Mar. 1848.... 
8. H. Montgomery,* 14 Mar. 1867.... 
Lawrence Taliaferro.* 14 Mar. 1857. 

WnUam H. GiU,*12 Jnne, W58 

Jame0 C. McCarty,* 14 Jnne, 1858... 

Dantet 0. Thomas,* 15 Aug. 1861 

Charles A. Alligood,* 19 8ept.l861.. 

G. W. Martin,* 21 Jnly, 1862 

John F. Rodgers * 21 July, 1862. 

6. A. Hull,* 21 July, 1968..... 

gUBOBTSirCB vepakhukt. 
OmmUsary Gen, of Subsisttnce. 

Colonel. 
Jo8<9h P. Taylor,* 29 Sept. 180L.... 

Atsittant Com. Gen. qf Sub. 
LUuUnant-CoUmd. 



Anoi B. Baton, 29 Sept. 1861 

Comvmittariea qf ^ibtUUnce, 
Majort. 

Alexander E. Shiras, 11 May, 1861.. 
Charles L. Kilbnm, 11 May, 1901... 
Marcos D. L. Simpson, 1 Jnly, 1861. 
Henry F. Clarke, 3 Aug. 1861, A. D. 

C. (col.) , 

WiUiam W. Bnrns, 3 Ang. 1861, B. 

O. vol 

Amos Beekwith, 29 Sept. 1861, A. D. 

C.(col.) 



■KMCAl XttPABTXIHT. 

Ifyrgeon^Gtneralt 
wWi the rank of Brig General, 

Wm. A. Hammond,* 25 April, 1862. 

Anient Surgeon-Generaly 

vith the rank of Cblond. 

Robert C. Wood,* 14 Jnne, 1862.-... 

Medieal Impector^General^ 

with tlu rank of Colonel. 

Thomas F. Perley,* 1 July, 1862...... 

Medieal Intpectori, 
wtk the rank of Z4eut.-0)loneL 

John M. (3uyler,* 11 June, 1862 

Riehard K.CooUdge,« 11 June, 1862. 
Charles C. Keeney,* 11 Juno, 1862.. 



• 


3 


a 


a 

"9 3 


1 


< 


N.Y. 


Army. 


Md. 


Md. 


Mo. 


Mo. 


N.Y. 


Mich. 


N.Y. 


N.Y. 


N-J. 


Mich. 


Me. 


Me. 


N.J. 


Texas. 


Pa. 


Ark. 


Va. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


Ohio. 


Tenn. 


Tenn. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


Ck)nn. 


N.Y. 


N.Y. 


Ky. 



Ky. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 
Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

OUo. 

Vt. 



Md* 



fix 



Me. 



Ga. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 



Ky. 

N.Y. 

NX 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 

Vt. 



Md. 



BX 



FU. 



Qa. 
N.Y. 

Mich. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



Edward P. VoUum,* 11 June, 1862.. 
George H. Lyman,* 11 Jnne, 1862... 
William H. Hnssey,* 14 June, 1862. 

George T. Allen,* 14 June, 1862 

Lewis Humphreys,* ao June, 1862.. 

Surgeons* 
with the rank of Major. 

Richard S. Satterlee,* 13 July, 1832. 
Charles S. Tripler,* 7 July, 1838..... 

Charies McDbugall,* 7 Jnly, 1838.... 

Burton Randall,* 7 July, 1838........ 

Adam N. McLaren,* 30 June, 1839.. 
Joseph J. B. Wright,* 26 Mar. 1844.. 

Madison Mills,* 16 Feb. 1847 

Eugene H. Abadie,* 24 July, 1853... 

Charles McCormick,* 7 Dec. 1853 

Charles H. Laub,* 17 Oct. 18M 

Joeiah Simpson,*- 12 Aug. 1855 

William J. Sloan,* 20 Dec. 1856 

William S. King,* 29 Aug. 1856 

James Simons,* 29 Aug. 1856 

Joseph K. Barnes,* 29 Aug. 1856.... 

Levi H. Holden,* 23 April, 1860 

Robert Murray,* 23 June, 1860 

John F. Head,* 6 Sept. 1860. 

Le^is A. Edwards,* 19 Feb. 1861.... 
John F. Hammond,* 25 Feb. 1861... 

Elisha J. Baily,* 15 May, 1861 

George E. Cooper,* 21 May, 1861 

Ebenezer Swift,* 21 May, 186L 

Glover Perin,* 21 May, 1861 

P. G. S. Ten Broeck,* 21 May, 1861... 

John Campbell,* 31 May, 1861 

John E. Summers,* 21 May, 1861.... 

Charles H. Oane,* 21 May, 1861 

Thomas A. McParlin,*21 May, 1861. 
Joseph B. Brown,* 4 Jnly, 1861...... 

Alex. B. Hasson,* 17 Aug. 1861 

Jonathan Letterman,* 16 Apr. 1862. 
Robert 0. Abbott,* 16 April, 1862... 
Thomas M. Getty,* 16 April, 1862... 
David L. Magmder,* 16 April 1862. 
John J. Milhau,* 16 April, 1862..^. 
Horace R. Wirtz,* 16 April, 1862.... 

Charles Page,* 16 April, 1862 

Charles Sutherland,* 16 April, 1862. 

Basil Norrls,* 16 April, 1862. 

John Moore,* 12 May, 1862 

Andrew K. Smith,* 11 June, 1862... 
R. H. Alexander,* 11 June, 1862..... 
Joseph R. Smith,* 11 June, 1862..... 
James T. Ghiselin, 14 June, 1862.... 

John F. Randolph, 27 Aug. 1862 

George Taylor, 27 Aug. 1862. 

George Hammond, 27 Aug. 1862..... 
Bernard J. D. Irwin, 16 Sept. 1862.. 

PAT nXPARTHXNT. 

Paymaster- General^ 
with Die rank of Colonel. 

VimiDt. 

Dnnity J^ymaeter-GenvnUf 
¥fwi the rank of Ideut-OoUmel. 

George H. Ringgold, 28 May, 1862.. 




N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

Md. 

Scot'd. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Fr'ce. 

D.C. 

D.C. 

NJ. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

S.C. 

Pa. 

RJ. 

Md. 

Mass. 

D.O. 

S.C. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Mass. 

Ohio. 

Me. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

R.I. 

Md. 

N.Y. 

Md. 

Pa, 

Pa. 

Md. 

Md. 

Fr'ce. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Pa. 

Md. 

Ind. 

Conn. 

lud.T. 

N.Y, 

Md. 

Va. 

Md. 

Md. 

Irel'd. 



Md. 



Micb. 

N.Y. 

Ind. . 

Md. 

S.C. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

D.C. 

D.C. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

8.C. 

Pa. 

R.I. 

Md. 

MaM. 

D.C. 

s.a 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

N.Y.. 

Va. 

Mass. 

Md. 

Mich. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Va. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Pa. 

Md. 

Ind. 

Conn. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

Md. 

La. 

Md. 

Md. 

N.Y. 



D.C.* 



92 



THE NAXIOKAL ALMAJ^AC. 

TfiST OF Officebs of the Armt.— Continued. 



[1863. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



with the rank of Major. 

Thomas J.lioslie, 27 Nov. 1815 

Hiram Leonard,* 2 March, 1848 

F. A. Cunningham,* 2 March, 1849. 

Natlian W. Brown,* 5 Sept. 1849 

Benjamin W. Brice, 9 Feb. 1852. 

Cary H. Fry, 7 Feb. 1853 

Bei^amin Alyord, 22 June, 1854, 

Bvt. B. G vol. 15 April, 1862.... 
Franklin £. Hunt, 2 March, 1856.... 
Henry Prince, 23 May, 1855i, Bvt. 

B. G. vol. 28 April, 1862 

Samuel Woods, 24 Dec. 1856, Bvt.... 

Daniel McCIure, 23 Oct. 1858. 

Thomas M. Wiuston,*5 April, 1860. 
Augustus H. Seward, 27 March, 1861. 

Bnia Cameron,* 1 May, 1861 

Robert A. Kinzie,* 2 May, 1861 

George L. Febiger,*3 May, 1861...... 

William S. Wallace,* 15 May, 1861.. 

David Taggart,* 30 May, 1861... 

Adam D. Steuart,* 31 May, 1861..... 

Henry C. Pratt, 14 Jun«^ 1861 

Simeon Francis * 3 Aug. 1861 

John A. Whitall,* 8 Aug. 1861. 

Simeon Smith,* 29 Aug. 1861 

Charles T. Lamed,* 30 Aug. 1861.... 
Jewe W. Fell,* 30 June, 1862 



CORPS OF BNOINEEltS. 

Colonel. 

Joseph G. Totten, 7 Dec. 1838, B. O. 
bvt. 29 March, 1847 

LietUenanf-CMmds. 
Sylvanus Thayer, 7 July, 1838, Col. 

bvt. 3 March, 1833 

Ren6 £. De Russv, 7 Dec. 1838, Bvt. 

Richard Delafleld, 6 Aug. 186L 

Henry Brewerton, 6 Aug. 1861 

Alexander H. Bowman, 5 Jan. 1857, 

Supt. M. A. with local rank of 

Col 

John G. Barnard, 13 Dec. 1858, Bvt. 

B. G. vol, 23 Sept. 1861 

George W. CuUum, 6 Aug. 1861, M. 

G. vol. 1 Nov. 1862 

Henry W. Benham, 6 Aug. 1861 

Daniel P. Woodbury, 6 Aug. 1861, B. 

G. vol. 19 March, 1862 

Zealous B. Tower, 6 Aug. 1861, Bvt. 

B. G. voL 23 Nov. 1862. 

Horatio G. Wright, 6 Aug. 1861, B. 

G. vol. 14 Sept. 1861 

John Newton, 6 Aug. 1861, B. G. vol. 

23 Sept. 1861 

CORPS OF VOPOQRAPHICAL XSQUnaM. 

CbUmd.' 
StisdMn 0. J/>ng,* 9 Sept. 1801 






Engl'd 

Vt. 

S.C. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

Ky. 

Vt. 
NJ. 

Me. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

IlL 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Mass. 



a* 



D.C. 
N.Y. 
Mich. 
Pa. 



Conn. 



Mass. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 



Pa. 


Pa. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


N.Y. 
Conn. 


Pa. 

Conn. 


N.H. 


N.H. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Conn. 


Conn. 


V 


Va. 



N.H. 



Pa. 
N.Y. 

Ohio. 
N.Y. 
Ohio. 
Ky. 

Vt. 
NJ. 

Mo. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Kaas, 

Del. 

lU. 

Pa. 

Ma 

Mass. 

Or. 

D.C. 

Minn. 

Mo. 

IlL 



Conn. 



Mass. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



lA,euUnantr()olUmeU. 

Hartman Bache, 6 Aug. 1861 

James D. Graham, 6 Aug. 1861 

Thomas J. Gram, Sept. 1861, A. D. 
C. (col.) 25 Sept. 1861 



L*««*****» •••••• 



N.H. 



MajdTi, 

Andrew A. Humphreys, 6 Aiig.1861, 

B. G. vol. 28 April, 1862. 

John N. Macomb, 6 Aug. 1861, A. D. 

C.rcol.)15 May, 1862. 

James H. Simpson, 6 Aug. 1861, Col. 

vol „ 

Jiorenso Sltgreavee, 6 Aug. 1861...,. 

Israel C. Woodruff, 6 Aug. 1862 

George Thom, Sept. 1861, A. D.C. 

(coL) 16 Nov. 1861 

Amiel W. Whipple, 9 Sept. 1861, B. 

G. vol. 14 April, 1862 

George G. Meade, 18 June, 1862, B» 

Q. VOL 31 Ang.1861 



ORDNANCE DXVARTKBNT. 

Brigadier-General. 
James W. Ripley, 3 Aug. 1861 

OHondt. 

Henry K. Craig,* 10 July, 1851 

John Symington, 3 Aug. 186L 

Lieutenant-Oolonels. 

George D. Ramsay, 3 Aug. 1861 

William Maynadier, 3 Aug. 186L.... 

Majon. 

William A. Thornton, 2S May, 1861. 
Robt. H. K. Whiteley, 3 Aug. 1861... 

Peter V. Hafner, 8 Aug. 1861-« 

Robt. A. Walnwright, 3 Aug. 1861... 

Military SUtrektepert. 

James S. Abeel,* 6 Jan. 1838 

James R. Hanlmm,* 23 July, 1888.. 
Edward Ingersoll,* 24 May, 1841, 

P.M. Springfield Armory 

Wm. R. Shoemaker,* 3 Aug. 1841... 
John B. Butler,* 30 June, lf47, P.M. 

Allegheny Arsenal 

Theo. J. Eckerson,* 16 Sept. 1853... 
Benj. H. Qilbreth,* 11 May, 1861.... 
Edward N. Stebbins,* 10 Juae, 1861, 

P.M. Washington Arsenal 

John C. Vaughan,* 7 Aug. 1861 

Epfa. D. Ellsworth,* 16 Nov. 1861.... 

Charles Wllfcins,* 3 Feb. 1862 

Julian Moliuard,* 3 Feb. 1862 

Henry A. Brigham,* 6 Mar. 1862 ... 
John Jamison,* 14 Jnly, 1862. 

FIRST REQIMRNT OF CAYALRT. 

Coilond, 
Geoi^ A H. Blake,* 15 Feb. 18<KL. 



o 
pq 



Pa. 
Va. 

N.H. 



Pa. 

N.Y. 

N-r. 
Fa. 

N.J. 

N.H. 

Moss. 
Spain. 



Conn. 



Pa. 
Md. 



Va. 
Md. 



N.Y. 

Md. 
D.C. 
Mass. 



Pa. 
Sng. 



Pa. 

N.Y. 
N.Y. 
Me. 

N.Y. 

S.C. 
N.Y. 

Fr»co. 
Mass. 
Md. 



P». 



n 



Pa. - 
Va. 

NH.. 



D.C. 

N.Y. 

N-r. 
Pa. 

N.H. 

Mass.* 
D.C. 



Conn> 



Pa. 

Bid. 



D.C. 
D.C. 



N.Y. 

Del. 

D.C, 

Mass. 



N.Y. 
Md. 

Mass. 
lU. 

Pa. 

WJC. 

Me. 

Pa. 

Pa. 
-N.Y. 
Mass. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 
Md. 



Pau 



1808.] 



WAR DBPARTMI^BrT. 

Xjst op Offxcibb or tbk ARwr.— Oonlflmied. 



98 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



Lieutaumt-Ooiond. ' 
WDIiflm N. Orier, 15 Feb. 18^2 

Aadnv J. Smith, 13 Maj, 1861, B. 

O.toL 17 March, 18«2 

Wiahisgton L. ElUott,* 6 Not. 1861, 

B. G. vol. 11 June, 1862^ 

llbert 0. Brackett, 17 Jnly, 1802, 

Col.ToL 

noons RMDiKirT or catalet. 

Oolonel, 

Thamu J. Wood, 12 Nov. 1861, B. O. 
YOl 

Lieutenant-X)olonel. 
fiwch Steeii,* 28 Sept. 1861 

Mc{jort, 

John V. DaTidson, 14 Nov. 1861, B. 

O.Tol.3 Feb. 1862 

Alfred Pieasooton, 16 Feb. 1862, B. 

0. vol. 16 Jnly, 1862 „ 

Ottrles J. Whiting, 17 July, 1862».. 

THIU RIGIMBNT Or CATAI.RT 

Oolona. 
Kmhill S. Hows,* 28 Sept. 186L.» 

LteiUenant-Oolond. 
<3>arlM F. Bull; 10 June, 1861... 

Majori, 

Nuiin 8. Roberts, 13 May, 1861^ 
LC. bTt. 24 Not. 1847, B. O. vol. 

^ 1« July, 1862 

Thohns DttDcan,* 10 June, 1861 

Ww. W. B. Newby, 17 July, 1862... 

ioutTH BiamRT or catalrt. 

Ootond. 

John Sedgwick, 25 April, 1861, M. 
O.Yol.4July, 1862 

laeutenant'Cblond. 
Jtam Oakes, 12 Nov. 1861 

Mqjori. 
tannel D. Stnrgis, 3 May, 1861, B. 

^ O.Tol. 10 Aug. 1861 

Geoin Stonemaa, 9 May, 1861, B. 

G. vol 13 Aug. 1861 

«™d W. Johnson, 17 July, 1862, 

B.O. vol. 11 Oct. 1861 

row EMQUXT or CAYALRT. 

Colonel. 
Q««|e n. Tliomas, 3 May, 1861, M. 
0. vol. 25 April, 1862 

iMtttenant-Oolonel. 

Uwwncc P. Graham,* 1 Oct. 1861, 
BO.Tol.3lAujr.l861 



I 



Pa. 

I 

Pa. 
Pa. 
N.Y. 



Ky. 
Ky. 

Va. 



Mass. 


D.O. 


Mo. 


Me. 


Pa. 


Mo. 


• 

Vt. 
111. 
Va. 


Idwa. 

111. 

lU. 



Conn. 


Conn 


Pa. 


Pa. 


PR. 


PR. 


N.T. 


N.Y. 


Ky. 


Ky. 



Va. 



Va. 



1, 

•MS j 

s. 



Pa. 

Pa. 
Pa. 
Ind. 



Ky. 

Mo. 

Va. 



Va 



Va. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



Innls N. Palmer, 25 April, 1861, B. 

0. vol. 28 Sept. 1861 

Joseph H. Whittlesey, 12 Nov. 1861. 
Eugene A. Carr, 17 Jnly, 1862, B.O. 

voL 7 March, 1862 



SIXTH RKGnmtT or CAYAIRT. 

CbUmd, 

David Hunter, 14 May^ 1861, M. G. 
vol. 13 Aug. 1861 



I 



N.Y. 
N.Y. 

N.Y. 



Lieutenant-CbUnd. 

William H. Emory, 14 May, 1861, B. 
Q. vol. 17 March, 1861 

Mc^jon. 

Edward H. Wright,* 14 May, 1861, 
A. D. G. (col.) 15 Jan. 1862. 

James H. Carleton,* 7 Sept. 1861, 
Bvt. 23 Feb. 1847, B. G. vol. 28 
April, 18«2 

Lawrence A. Williams, 7 Sept. 1861. 

FIRST rxoimbut or artillbrt. 

Oolonel. 

Justin Dimlck, 26 Oct. 1861 

LieuUnant-Cblond, 
George Nauman, 23 Jnly, 186L 

Majon. 

Israel Vogdes. 14 May, 186L.......... 

Lewis G. Arnold. 15 May, 1861, Bvt. 
13 Sept. 1847, B. G. vol. 24 Jan. 



1862 



SEOOHB RBaneHT or artilurt. 

QUoneL 

William W. Morris, 1 Nov. 1861, B. 
G. Bvt. June, 1862 ;...„..«.. 

Hevtemtnt-OeHoML, 
Horace Brooks, 26 Oct. 1861, Bvt.... 

Majcvt. 

Bennett H. HIU, 28 Aug. 186L. 

WiUlam H. French, 26 Oct. 1861, 
Bvt. 20 Aug. 1847, B. G. vol. 28 
Sept. 1861 



D.O. 



Md. 



NJ. 



Me. 

D.C. 



Conn. 



Pa. 



Pa. 



NJ. 



third REOnfSNT OF ARTILUCRT. 

(XUmd. 
William Oatee, 13 Oct. 1845. 

LieMtenaWt'CtiiQnd, 
Martin Burke,* 28 Aug. 1861 

Majan, 

Henrv S. Burton. 14 May, 1861 

Joseph A. Haflkin, 20 Feb. 1862. A> 
D. C. (1. c.) 26 June, 1862 



N.Y. 

Mass. 

D.a 

Md. 



Md. 

N.Y. 
N.t. 






N.Y. 
N.Y. 

N.Y. 



IlL 



Md. 



NJ. 



Me. 

n.c. 



Vt 
Pa. 
PR. 



N.Y. 
Mass. 

D.C. 
D.O. 



DA 

Vt. 

NT. 



94 



THE NikTIOffA^ ALMAlfAG. 

Ian Of OFncna or thb ABvr.-'-Cointiaiifd* 



£1868. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



FOURTH REOIMlSirF OF ABTILLEBT. 

Charles S. Merchant, 28 Ang.1861.. 

LietUenant-OolaneL 
Frtincia 0. Wyse, 1 Not. 1861 

Joseph Roberts, 3 Sept. 1801 

Edward O. C. Ord, 21 Nov. 1861, M. 
G. vol. 2 May, 1862 

nvra iu»iMxirr of aatiu.ekt. 

Qilond. 

Harvey Brown, 14 May, 1861, B. G. 
bvt. 23 Nov. 1861 

Ideutenani^Cblonel. 

Thomas W. Sherman, 14 May, 1861, 
B. G. VOL 17 May, 1861 

Majors. 

William F. Barry, 14 May, 1861, B. 

G. vol. 20 Aug. 1861 

Henry J. Hunt, 14 May, 1861, B.G. 

vol. 8 Sept. 1862 

Francis N. Clarke, 5 Aug. 1862 

FmST E£OIHENT OF nTFANXST. 

Colonel. 
Carlos A. Waite,* 5 June, 1860, Bvt 

LieuUnant^Ooiotul. 
Seth Eastman, 9 Sept. 1861 

M<njors, 

John T. Sprague,* 14 May, 1861 

Maurice Maloney, 16 Sept. 1862 

SECOND REGIMENT OF INFAITTRT. 

Cblonel. 
Sidney Burbank, 16 Sept. 1862. 

Lieutenant-Oulond. 
George W. Patten, 7 June, 1862...... 

Majors, 

Arthur T. Lee,* 26 Oct. 1861 

John C. Robinson,* 20 Feb. 1862, B. 
G. vol. 28 April, 1862 

THIRD REGOIEXT OF IITFAirTRr. 

CSolonel. 
William Hoffman, 25 April, 1882.... 

Lieutenant-Cblond. 
William Chapman, 20 Feb. 1862 

Majors. 

William E. Prince,* 23 Nov. 1861... 
Thonaas Hendrickson, 27 June, 1862. 



e 



N.Y. 
Md. 

Del. 
Md. 



N-r. 



fij. 



N.Y. 

Ohio. 
N.Y. 



N.Y. 
Me. 



Mass. 
Irel'd. 



■§■1 



N.Y. 

Md. 

Del. 
D.O. 



Mass. 


Mass. 


R.I. 


RJ. 


Pa. 


Pa. 


N.Y. 


N.Y. 



N.Y. 

Md. 



Mass. 

Pa. 



Njr. 



R.I. 



N.Y. 

Ohio. 
N.Y. 



N.Y. 
Me. 



Mass. 
Army. 



N.Y. 

Md. 

Mass. 
Army. 



Name, rank, and date of oom- 
mission. 



FOURTH REGIMSHT OF IHVAHf RT. 

CbUmd. 

Silas Casey, 9 Oct. 1861, B. G. vol. 31 
Aug. 1862 

LietUenant-Oolonel. 
R. C. Buchanan, 9 Sept. 1861, Bvt... 

Mc^jort. 

Deloeier Davidson,* 1 Nov. 1861 

Henry M. Judah, 90 June, 1862 

FIFTH BEQIlBlfT OF XNFANTRT. 

Cblonel. 
Gustavus Loomis, 9 Mar. 1851 

Ideutenant-OoUmel. 
Thos. L. Alexander, 31 July, 1861... 

Mijijors. 

R. S. Granger, 9 Sept. 1861, B.G. vol. 
Charles D. Jon^n, 27. Fab. 1862^.. 

BaCCTH RXOIMEirr OF INFAHTBT. 

Colonel. 
Hannibal Day, 7 June, 1862. 

JAeutenamt^Motul* 
Daniel P. Whiting, 15 Feb. 1862...... 

Miyort. 

Henry W. Wessells, 6 June, 1861, 

B. G. vol. 25 April, 1861 

George .W. Wallace,* 10 Jaft. 1862... 

BKYSirTH REOIMKlfT OF IirFANTKT. 

Cblond. 

John J. Abercrombie, 25 Feb. 1661, 
B. G. vol. 81 Aug. 1861...... 

IdeuUnant'Oalonel. 
Albemarle Cady, 6 June, 1861 

Majors. 

Granville 0. Haller,* 25 Sept. 186L. 
Henry D. Wallen, 25 Nov. 1861 



EtOHTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRT. 

OoUmd. 
Pitcaim Morriscm,* 6 June, 1861.... 

lAeuUnant-Oc^^md. 

Gabriel R. Paul, 25 April, 1862, B. 
G. vol. 5 Sept. 1862 

Majors. 

Alfred Sully, 15 March, 1862, B. G. 

vol. 26 Sept. 1862 , 

David A. Russell, 9 Aug. 1862. 



a 






RJ. 
Md. 



D.O. 
Md 



RJ. 



D.C. 
N.Y. 



Vt. 
Va. 



Ohio. 



Vt. 
Ky. 

Ohio. 



Vt. 
N.Y. 



Conn. 
Pa. 



Vt. 
N.Y. 



Conn. 
Pa. 



Tenn. 
N.H. 



Pa. 
Ga. 



T«in. 
N.H. 



Pa. 
Fla. 



N.Y. 



Mo. 



Pa. 

N.Y. 



N.T. 



Mo. 



Pa. 
N.Y. 



166a] 



WJUl J>WAB,TMmi(T. 



d6 



Lnt Of Orfic 



ow tarn Aaior^^'Ooiitiniied. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
imaalion. 



KnreH BiaDciiiT of ikfantbt. 

CbUmd. 

George Wright, 3 March, 1866, B. 6. 
Tol. 28 Sept. 1861 

LieuUnant-OaiofuL 
Oileb C. Sibley, 9 Oct..l861 

Majort. 

Hennr W. Wharton,* 9 Sept. ISfll, 

Col. Td 

Andrew W. Bowman, 7 June, 1862.. 

nXTH KBGIMBNY OP IKFANTBT. 

CkiUmel, 
IMmnnd B. Alexander, 3 Mur. 1866. 

Lieutmant-OoUmd. 

WJniam S. Ketchnm, 1 Not. 1861, 
B.G. Tol. 3 Feb. 1862 

Majort, 

Charles 8. Lovell,* 14 May, 1861 

Jalins Hayden,* 16 Feb. 1862 

ILETIirTH RXOIHBNT OP XNPA9TRT. 

Ool(md. 

Erasmns D. Keyes, 14 May, 1861, B. 
0. bTt. 81 May, 1862, M. O. ¥oL 
4 July, 1862 

JAeutenaiUi-OoUmd, 

Sdmnnd Shriyer, 14 May, 1861, A. 
D.C. (col.) 18 May, 1862. 

Majort. 

Delancy Floyd Jones, 14 May, 1861. 
Fnderick Steele, 14 May, 1861, B. 

Q. Tol. 29 Jan. 1862...... 

Jonathan W. Gordon,* 14 May, 1861. 

TWBPVH BBGDCENT OP INPANTBT. 

Ooiond, 

WQliam B. Franklin, 14 May, 1861, 
B. O. bvt. 30 May, 1861^ M. G. 
ToL4 July, 1862 

Lieutenant-OolUmd. 

Daniel Batterfield, 14 May, 1861, B. 
O.ToLT Sept. 1861 

Majcrt, 

Henry B. Clitz, 14 May, 1861 

Richard S. Smith, 14 May, 1861 

Luther B. Bmen,* 14 May, 1861 

THiETmna BEonraNT op iirPANtRT. 

CUtmd, 

^niliam T. Sherman, 14 May, 1861, 
M.G. Tol. 1 May, 1802 

LteuUnantr-OcAonA. 
Ihuk T. D. Reeye, 16 Sept. 1862 



a 

I 



vt. 

Mass. 



D.a 

Pa. 



Ky. 



Conn. 



Maas. 
N.T. 



Blass. 



Pa. 



N.Y. 

N.Y. 
Pa. 



Pa. 



N.T. 



N.T. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 



Ohio. 

N.T. 






Vt. 
Mass. 



Abk 
Pa. 



Ky. 



Conn. 



Army. 
Fla. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



Majors. 

Christopher C. Angur, 14 May, 1861, 
M. G. vol. 12 Not. 1861 

Samuel W.Crawford,* 14 May, 1861, 
B. G. Tol. 25 April, 1862. 

Daniel Chase,* 26 Oct. 1861 



FOURTSENTB REGIMENT OP INPAICTBT. 

Oolond, 

Charles P. Stone, 14 May, 1861, B. 
G. Tol. 17 May, 1861 



LimUnantr-Ooioml. 

John F. Reynolds, 14 May, 1861, B. 
G.Tol. 29 Aug. 1861 

Majon. 

George Sykes, 14 May, 1861, B. G. 

Tol. 28 Sept. 1861 - 

Grotins R. Giddings,* 14 May, 1861. 
William WUliams,* 14 May, 1861 ... 



Me. 



N.T. 



N.Y. 

N.T. 

Ind. 



Pa. 



N.T. 



Mich. 

N.T. 

Ohio. 



Ohio. 
N.T. 



PIRRINTU RIOIIfENT OP INPARTRT. 

OoUmd. 

FitE-John Porter, 14 May, 1861, B. 
G. bvt. 27 June, 1862, M. G. vol. 
4 July, 1862 

LteutenarU'CbUmd. 
John P. Sanderson,* 14 May, 1861... 

Majort. 

John H. King,* 14 May, 1861 

WilUam H. Sidell, 14 May, 1861 

John R. Edie,* 14 May, 186L 



SIXUXNTH BXailClNT OF DTPANTBT. 

(Mond. 

Andrew Porter,* 14 May, 1861, B.O. 
Tol. 17 May, 1862 



Lieuienant-Cblond. 
James Y. Bomford, 10 Jan. 1862..... 

Ma^jort. 

Franklin F. Flint, 14 May, 1861 

Adam J. Slemmer, 14 May, 186] — 
Sidney Coolidge,* 14 May, 1861 



8XTXNTEXNTB BVaniRKT OF DiPAHTBT. 

Oolond. 

Samuel P. Heintzelman, 14 May, 
1861, B. G. bvt. 31 May, 1862, 
M. G. Tol. 4 July, 1862 

Lieutenant- CbUmel. 
James D. Greene,* 14 May, 1861 

Mayors. 

Abner Doubleday, 14 May, 1861, B. 

G. Tol. 8 Feb. 1862 

William H. Wood, 14 May, 1861...... 

George L. Andrews,* 14 May, 1861.. 



I 



N.T. 

Pa. 
Conn. 

# 



Pa. 



Md. 

Ohio. 
Pa. 



N.H. 
Pa. 



Mich. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 



Pa. 
N.Y. 



N.H. 

Pa. 

Mass. 



Pa. 



Mass. 



N.Y. 

Mass. 

RX 



•2 



a' 



Mich. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 



DjC. 



Pa. 



Md. 

Ohio. 

Pa. 



D.C. 
Pa. 



Mich. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 



Pa. 
D.C. 



Mass. 
Pa. 



Pa. 

Mass. 



N.Y. 

Mas» 

Mo. 



96 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 
Lm OP OmoiBS or vhs ABiiT.F-Ooneliided. 



[1868. 



RsTiua> ntOK Acnvx Sk&yics. 



Name, tank, and date of oom- 
miMion. 




1 


Appointed 
from. 


Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 


• 

a 

1 


Appointed 
from. 


nOHTUHTH MtaSXESn QW nFAN TBT. 

CUoimZ. 
Henry B. CarTington,^ 14 Hay, 1861. 


Conn. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 
Ohio. 

Ohia 


Ohio. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 
Ohio. 

Ohio. 


KnmMtXTB RBonreNT of nrrAicnT. 

Edward R. 8. Canby, 14 May, 1861, 
B. G. vol. 31 Marcli. 1862 


Ky. 

N.Y. 

Me. 
Pa. 
N.Y. 


Ind. 


Lieuletumt'CbUmd. 
Oliver L. Shepherd, 14 Uay, 1861... 

Majors, 

Fred. Townsend,* 14 May, 1861 

James N. Caldwell, 27 Feb. 1882..... 

William T. H. Brooks, 12 Mar. 1862, 

B. G. Tol. 28 Sent. 186L 


LieutenatU-CbloneL 
Edward A. King,* 14 May, 1861..... 

Majors, 

Stephen D. Carpenter, 14 May, 1861. 
Samuel K. Dawson, 14 May, 1861... 
George L. waiard,* 19 Feb. 1862.... 


Ohio. 

Me. 
Pa. 
Army. 









Name, rank, regiment or corps, and 
date of retirement. 



On their own application after 
fijrtjf or mors conteetUive years 
of tvnoiot. 

General officer, 

Winfleld Scott, U.aA., Lieutenant 
Oeneral commanding the army, 
I Nor. 1861 



CbUmeU. 

Wnilam Whistler, 4th Infkntry, 9 

Oct. 1861 

John L. Gardner, 2d artillery, 1 

Not. 1861 

Clement A. Flnley, surgeon-general, 

14 April, 1862 

T. P. Andrews, deputy paynmster- 

general, lieoL-col 



Miyor. 

Giles Porter, 4th artillery, 3 Sept. 
1861 



Jbr incapacity ^ resuUinpfrom long 
andfaithful service^/rom wounds 
or ityuries reotittd^fram disease 
eontraeted, or from ea^poturt in the 
line of duly. 

OoUmels, 

John J. Abert, top. engineers, 9 

Sept. 1861 

Sylvester Churchill, Insp. genU, bvt. 

brig, gen'l. 25 Sept. 1861 

Bei\|amin L. £. Boiinevitle, 3d in- 

fkntry, 9 Sept. 1861 

Washington Seawell, 6th in&ntry, 

20 Feb. 1862 

Benjamin L. Beall, 1st cavalry, 16 

Feb. 1862 





I 



Va. 

Md. 
Mass. 
Ohio. 
IrelU 

N.Y. 



ll 



Md. 

Vt. 

Fr'ce. 

Va. 

D.C. 



Va. 

NW.T. 
Mass. 

Ohio. 
D.C. 

N.Y. 



D.a 

Vt. 
N.Y. 

Va. 
D.C. 



Name, rank, regiment or oorps* and 
date of retirement. 



John S. Simonson, 3d cavalry, 28 
Sept. 1861 

Henry L. Scott, inspector-general, 
30 Oct. 1861 



Lieulenant'Ooiotids, 

Thompson Morris, 4th infhntry, 9 
Sept. 1861 

George Andrews, 6th inlhntry, 16 
Feb. 1862. 

Gonvemenr Morris, 1st infkntry, 9 
Sept. 1861 



Majors. 

Edgar S. Hawkins, 2d fnlkntry, 26 
Oct. 1861 

Joseph R. Smith, 7th infontry, bvt. 
ft. col.. 26 Sept. 1861 

Nathaniel C. Macrae, 3d infiintry, 

26 Sept. 1861 

Campbell Graham, top. engineers, 9 

Sept. 1861 

Edmund Underwood, 18th in&ntry, 

16 Feb. 1862 

Daniel T. Chandler, 6th in&ntry, 

27 Feb. 1862 

William Austine, 8d artillery, 20 

Feb. 1862 

William n. Gordon, 8th infantry, 

15 March, 1862 

Howard Stansbury, t<q|>. engineers, 

28 Sept. 1861 

Llewellyn Jones, 1st cavalry, 1 Nov. 

1861 

Washington I. Newton, 2d cavalry, 

26 Oct. 1861 

Christopher S. Lovell, 3d infiintry, 

23 Nov. 1861 

John W. T. Gardiner, 2d cavalry, 

14 Nov. 1861« 

Henry B. Jndd, 4th artillery, 21 

Nov. 1861 



I 



Pa. 
NX}. 

Ohio. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

Va. 

Pa. 

D.C. 

Conn. 

Va. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

D.C. 

S.O. 

Me. 

Conn. 



•8 

ll 



Ind. 
N.C. 

Ohio. 

B.C. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Vm. 

Va. 

Pla. 

B.C. 

Conn. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Vm. 

8ja 

Me. 

Oonn. 



1868.] 



WAB PEPABTMBNT. 

AimRKMCAL AlDH-DI-GAlfP. 



97 



Kame^ rank, and date of coin> 
mioakMi. 



Cbloneb. 

Ibomas M. Key,* 19 Aug. 1861...... 

Tbomas J. Cram, 25 Sept. 1881 

HeDry J. Hunt, 28 Sept. 1861 

Dniiel H. Backer,* 28 Sept. 1861... 

Henry F. Clarke, 28 Sept. 1861 

James B. Fry, 14 Not. 1861 

George Thorn, 16 Nor. 1861 

Richard D. Cutts,* 16 Nor. 1861..... 

John S. Clark,* 18 Not. 1861 

Charles F. HaTelock,* 23 Not. 1861. 
Joseph C. McKibben,* 29 Nov. 1861. 

Amos Beckwith, 1 Jan. 1862. 

John C. Kelton, 4 Jan. 1862 

Edward H. Wright,* 15 Jan. 1862... 

Wilson Shaffer,* 30 Jan. 1862 

Daniel K McCallum,* 11 Feb. 1862. 

Robert AHen, 19 Feb. 1862 

John T. D. Daboia, 19 Feb. 1862 

Lswis B. Parsons,* 19 Feb. 1862 

Goatave P.OInseret,* 10 Mar. 1862.. 
WUHam F. Reynoldis, 31 Mar. 1862.. 

Albert Tracy,* 31 Mar. 1862. 

Anselme Albert* 31 Mar. 1862...... 

John T. Fiala,* 31 Mar. 1862.... 

Robert N. Hudson,* 31 Mar. 1868... 

Charles Zagonyi,* 81 Mar. 1862 

Philip Figyelraesy,* 31 Mar. 1862... 
Norton P. Chipman,* 17 Apr. 1862L. 

Herman Hanpt,* 27 Apr. 1862. 

TV>*m M y J. Haines, 1 May, 18^ 

James B. McPherson, 1 May, 1862.. 

John W. Turner, 3 May, 1862 

Clarke B. Lagon,* 3 M^, 1862 ...... 

W. B. Hmyer,*3 May, 1862 

John Riggin, Jr.,* 3 May, 1862. 

George P. Hirie,* 7 May, 1862 ^ 

iohn N. Macomb, 16 May, 1862 

EdffiOBd SbriTer, 18 May, 1862 

Philip Dawn,* 26 May, 1862....«..... 

Ames B. Jones,* 31 May, 18631....... 

Daniel T. Tan Buren, 1 June, 1862.. 

William Myers, 14' Jnne, 1862 

George D. Rnggles, 28 June, 1862... 
Loois H. Marshall, 30 Jnne, 1862... 

Speed Bntler * 30 June, 1862 

Chris. A. Morgan,* 30 Jnne, 1862.... 

Roliert E. Oary, 5 July, 1862 

Edward O. Beckwith, 5 July, 1862. 

James Belger.* 11 July, 1862 

Samael B. Hdabird, 11 July, 1B62. 
James B. Fesaendeo,* 16 Jolyi 1862. 

LieutenarU-CbUmdi. 

Rnfiu IngaIIs» 28 Sept. 186L 

William Hays, 28 Sept. 1861 



I 



Ky. 
N.n. 

Ohio. 

NJ. 

Pa. 

lU. 

N.H. 

D.C. 

N.T. 

Eng. 

Pa. 

Vt, 

Pa. 

NJ. 

Pa. 

Seot'd 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Fr*ce 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Hnn'y 

Hun*y 

Ind. 

Hun'y 

Hun'y 

Ohio. 



k!h. 

Ohio. 
N.Y. 

m. 

Ky. 

Mo. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Pnis'a 

N.H. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

lU. 

Ohio. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Conn. 



Mo. 
Va. 



u 



Ohio. 

N.H. 

Ohio. 

Mich. 

Pa. 

111. 

N.H. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

Eng. 

Cal. 

Vt. 

Pa. 

HJ. 

lU. 

N.Y. 

Ind. 

N.Y. 

Mo. 

Italy. 

Ohio. 

Me. 

Mo. 

Mow 

Ind. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Iowa. 

Pa. 

n.h: 

Ohio. 

111. 

111. 

Mo. 

Mo. 

CaL 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

N.H. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Md. 

lU. 

Ohio. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

Army. 

Conn. 

Me. 



Me. 
Tenn. 



Name, rank, and date of eom- 



George W. Getty, 28 Sept. 1861 

Barton S. Alexander, 28 Sept.l86U. 

James A. Hardie, 28 Sept. 1861 

Nelson B. Sweitxer, 28 Sept. 1861... 
Edw. McK. Hudson, 28 Sept. 1861... 
Albert V. Colbum, 28 Sept. 1861.... 
Paul Von Badowits,*30 Sept, 1861. 
WiUiam D. Whipple, 10 Feb. 1862... 
Augustus Scbroer,* 31 Mar. 1862... 

John Pilsen,* 31 Mar. 1862. 

James W. Savage,* 31 Mar. 1862.... 

Alfred Vf. EUet,* 28 April, 1862 

Joseph F. Conrad, 6 May, 1862. 

Ambrose Thompson,* 19 May, 1862. 

J. B. Kinsman,* 24 June, ISeST. 

Joseph A. Ilaskin, 26 June, 18(0.... 
Isaac C. Elaton, Jr.,* 9 July, 1862... 
Frederick Myers, 16 July, 1862..^... 
J. B. Frothlngham,* 16 July, 1862.. 

Majon, 

William P. Jones,* 20 Sept. 1861.... 
H. Von Hammerstein,* 20 Sept.1861. 
Henry Z. Hayner,* 1 Nov. 1861 

C. J. Von Hermann,* 6 Not. 1861 
DelaTan D. Perkins, 18 Not. 1861... 
William H. Ludlow,* 18 Not. 1861.. 

John J. Key,* 5 Mar. 1862. 

A. H. Gillespie,* 20 Mar. 1862.... 
Richard M. Corwine,* 31 Mar. 1862. 

Thomas J. Weed,* 31 Mar. 1862 

Augustus Hain,* 11 Apr. 1862 

Champion Vaughan,* 11 Apr. 1802L. 
Clinton H. Meneely,* 11 Apr. 1862.. 

T. J. McKenney,* 17 Apr. 1862 

V. Van Antwerp,* 19 Apr. 1862 

D. Henry Bnrtnete,* 22 Apr. 1862... 
A. Oarlason Warberg,* 24 Apr. 1862. 
Addison S. Norton,* 1 May, 1862..... 
Ernest Von Vegesack,* 8 May, 1862. 
DaTid C. Houston, 16 May, 1862.... 
Ernest F. Hoffman,* 81 May, 1862... 

Burr Porter,* 2 June, 1862: 

Silas Ramsay,* 12 June, 1862. 

Franss Kappner,* 14 June, 1862 

Leonidas Haskell,* 16 June, 1862... 

Edward Detsey,* 16 June, 1862 

William Painter,* 16 June, 1862..... 
Charles H. BrightlT, 17 June, 1862. 
James F. Meline,* 30 Jnne, 1862..... 

Louis H. Pelouze, 3 July, 1862. 

J. Lyman Van Buren,* 7 July, 1862. 

James C. Biddle,*8 July, 1862. 

Joseph 0. Willard,*l& July, 1862... 
James M. Sanderson,* 15 July, 1862. 



I 



B.C. 

Ky. 

NT. 

Fa. 

Conn. 

Vt. 

Pru8*a 

N.Y. 

Pru8*a 

Boh*a 

N.H. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Me. 

N.Y. 

Ind. 

Conn. 

Maaa. 



N.Y. 

Germ. 

N.Y. 

Pms'a 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

NT. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

Prus'a 

S.C. 

N.Y. 

lU. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Swed. 

N.Y. 

Swed. 

N.Y, 

Prus'a 

N.Y. 

Md. 

Prus'a 

Hun'y 

Mass. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Vt. 

Md. 



Ky. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Conn. 

Vt. 

D.O. 

N.Y. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Mass: 

N.Y. 

Ind. 

Cobb. 

Ohio. 



Conn. 

DX). 

N.Y. 

Conn. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Ind. 

CU. 

Ohio. 

Kana. 

Pms'B 

Kans. 

N.Y. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

N.Y. 

Swed* 

in. 

Swed. 

N.Y. 

Prus'lk 

N.Y. 

111. 

Mo. 

N.Y. 

Cal. 

III. 

Pa. 

I>.C. 

Plu 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

D.O. 

N.Y. 



98 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 

IlMFITAL CHAPLAXHI. 



[IMS. 



Kaino and data of appointmeiit. 



Vincent Psleo,* 81 Mar. 1862 X.T. 

Nathaniel Wait,* 31 Hay, 1862 Irel'd. 

Charles J. Boweo,* 31 May, 1862.... . R.I. 
Henry 0. Henries,* 31 May, 1862 ... Me. 

Henry Hopkins,* 31 May, 1862 ; Mass. 

John A. Bowman,* 31 Biay. 1862 ... Ohio. 

John 0. Butler,* 31 May, 1882. iMd. 

William Y. Brown.* 31 May, 1862... iOhia 

John C. Smith,* 81 May, 1862 i Md. 

Biohard V. Dodge,* 81 May, 1862 ... lU. 
William Uolman,*8l May, 1861..... Ky. 

John V. Dodse,* 31 May, 1862. I N.Y. 

Jame.i G. Blenmond,* 2 June, 1862.. , R.I. 

Charles M. Blake.* 4 June, 1862 Me. . 

Joseph M. Drirer,* 4 June, 1862..... Mass. 

Horatio Foote,* 4 June, 1862 Mass. 

Bzekiel Fulsom.* 4 June, 1862. N.II. 

George Q. Qoss,*4Jnne, 1862 Me. 

James H. MoAu-land,* 4 June, 1802. : Pa. 
Lemnel Q. Olmstead,* 4 June, 1862.. ! N.T. 

James A. Paige,* 4 June, 1862. Mass. 

W. W. Winchester,* 6 June, 186^... , N.Y. 
Supbea S. Morrill,* 6 June, 1862... |Vt. 
Ohauneey B. Thomw,* 6 June, 1862. ; Mast. 

John F. Wright,* 6 June. 1862. N.a 

Cuthbert U. Powell,* U June, 1802. Va. 
Robert McMurdy,* 11 June, 1802... | Pa. 

Rudolph Doehn,* 11 Jnne, 1862 lOerv. 

Samuel L. Adair,* 13 June, 1861.... i 

Francis B. Boyle,* 13 Jnne, 1862 Md. 

Matthew F. McQrath,* 13 June,1862. ! IreFd. 

F. W. Brauns,* 13 June, 1862 Germ. 

Thomas T. Devan,* 13 June, 1802... , N.Y. 
James B. Merwin,* 13 Jnne, 1862... N.Y. 

James Means,* 18 June. 1862 N.li 

N. B. Northmp,* 13 June, 1862 IConn. 

Robert S. Vinton,* 13 June, 1862... Md. 
Frederick H. Wines,* 14 Jnne, 1862. ! Pa. 
OMirge A. Uakin,* 14 June, 1862... jMd. 

Franels D. Udd,* 14 Jnne, 1862 Me. 

John Prondat,* 20 June, 1862 !n.Y. 

Richaid Mc A. Bear.* 20 June, 1862. i Pa. 

J. P. Hammond,* 20 Jnne, 1862 ; Md. 

John A. Jerome,* 20 Jnne, 1862 '■ Mass. 

Bdward 0. Dunning.* 23 June, 1862. ; Conn. 
Isaac 8. Ketchnm,* 23 June, 1862... • N.Y. 

M. Schuyler,* 2) June, 1862. ;N.Y. 

John F. Cowan,* 23 June, 1862 I*a. 



h 






Ta. 
Pa. 
Md. 
Me. 



N.Y. 

D.a 

Pa. 

DX}. 

Va. 

Ky. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 



111. 

III. 

D.C. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Ma 

Mass. 

lU. 

Mass. 

Ohio. 

D.a 

Ky. 

Mo. 

Kans. 

D.C. 

D.C. 

Md. 

N.Y. 

lU. 



D.C. 

Md. 

Mo. 

Md. 

Pa. 

NJ. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Mo. 

Ma 

Ma 



Name and date of appointment. 



Samuel Pettlgrew,* 28 June, 1862.. 

Burr Baldwin,* 23 Jnne, 1862. 

Charles Spear,* 23 Jnne, 1862 

T. B. McFalls,* 23 June, 1862 

Robert McCune,* 23 June, 1862 

Chss. A. WUliams,* 23 Jane, 1862... 
Kdmund B. Tuttle,* 23 June, 1862... 

James BlarshaU,* 23 Jnne, 186S 

James A. Brown,* 27 June, 1663.... 

Fred. T. Brown,* 1 July, 1862 

Robert Lowry.* 1 July, 1862 

J. HiU Rouse,* 2 July. 1862. 

Auguntus £dely,* 4 July, 1862 

Wm. n. ChapniAn,*4 July.l862L.... 

Wm. U. Padduck.*5 Jnly,1862 

Wm. C. Whltcomb,* 6 July, 1862 ... 

James H. Parks,* 6 July. 1862. 

Theo. W. Simpson,* 7 July, 1862..... 

John Thrnsh,* 7 July, 1862.. 

John W. HooTer,* 7 July. 1862 

)lansfl«ld French,* 10 July, 1862 ... 
Thomas 8. Thomas,* 11 July, 1862L. 
Leeds K. Berridge,* 11 July, 1862.. 

Henry Snyder,* 11 July, 1862 

Clark Skinner,* 11 July, 1802 

Isaac Mcllvaine,*!! July, 1862 

William V. Daniels,* 14 July. 1862.. 

James I. Ferree,* 14 July, 1862 

Nathaniel CKUender.*14 July, 1662. 

J. B. Hyndshaw,* 16 July, 1862 

William W. Meech,* 15 July, 1862. 
Galus M. Blodgett,* 16 July, 1862... 
Joseph W. Binhe,* 16 July. 1862... 

Eli Strowbridge.* 16 July, 1862 

8. Y. McMasters,* 16 July, 1862 

Francis A. McNeall,* 18 July, 1862. 
BefvJamin H. Crever,* 24 July, 1862. 

John Lanahan,* 24 July, 1862. 

Wm. G. Raymond,* 25 July, 1862... 

Edward D. Ne»l,*ao July, 1862. 

Alexander McUod.* 28 Jul/, 1861. 

James Bruehl,*28 July, 186(2 

Darld W. Tolford.* 29 July, 1861... 
William W. Beeee,*29 July, 1862... 
Arthur G. Thomas.* 80 July, 1862... 
Thomas G. Carver,* 3t July, 1862... 
Chas. W. Dennison.* 81 July, 1862... 



D.a 

Ohio. 
Iowa. 
lU. 
K.Y. 

Pa. 

ixa 

N.Y. 




QiicBAi, AHP Statf OrncBU of U. 8. VoiviiTKna. 



Name, rank, and date of oom- 



MaijoT'Oeneralt. 

Nathaniel P. Banks,* 16 May, 186t. 

John A. Dix,* 16 May, 1861 

Benjamin F. Butler,* 16 May, 1861. 

Datid Hunter, IS Aug. 1861 

Idwin D. Morgan,* 28 Sept. 1861 ... 
Kthan A. Hltrhr-ik. 10 Vob. 1W2... 



1 


h 
ll 

•< 


Mam. 


Mam. 


N.H. 


N.T. 


N.H. 


Masa 


D.C, 


lU. 


Mam. 


N.Y. 


Tt. 


Ma 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



Ulysses 8. Grant, 16 Feb. 1861. 

Irrin McDowell, 14 March. 1862 

Ambrose E. Bnradde, 18 Mar. 1861 
Don Carlos Bnell, 21 March, 1861... 

John Pwe, 21 March, 1862 

Samuel R. Curtis, 21 March, 1862 ... 
Frnns Sigel,* 21 March. 1801 




1868.} 



WAB PBPARTMBHT. 



99 



OiirnuL A]n> Statt OmcESS.— Continaed. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
miflsion. 



Mnjor-Generali. 

John A. McClernand,* 21 Mar. 1862 

Ltwto WaUace « 21 March, 1862 

William 8. Roeecrana, 21 Mar. 1862. 
Omtbj M. Mitchel, 11 April, 1862.. 

QhMioa M. Clay,* 11 April, 1862 

George H. Thomas, 25 April, 1862... 
Qeorce Cadwalader,* 25 April, 1862. 
John G. Foster, 28 April, 1862. 



o 



o, 26 April, 1862.. 



John G. Farke, 26 April, 1862 
WiUism T. Sherman, 1 May, 1862... 

Edward O. O. Ord, 2 May, 1862 

Edvln V. Somner,* 4 JiUy, 1862L.... 
Sam'l P. Heintselman, 4 July, 1862. 

Inamns D. Keyea, 4 July, 1862 

ntx John Porter, 4 July, 1862. 

WiUiam B. Franklin, 4 July, 1862... 

Philip Kearny,* 4 July, 1862 

Joseph Hooker, 4 July, 1862 

Sarins U. Oouch, 4 July, 1862 

larael B. Richardson, 4 July, 1862... 

Henry W. Slocum, 4 July, 1862 

John J. Peck, 4 July, 1862 

Oearge W. Morell, 4 July, 1862 

William F. Smith, 4 July, 1862. 

John Sedgwick, 4 July, 1862 

Alex. McD. McOook,l7 Jnly, 1862.. 

WiUiam Nelson « 17 July, 1862 

Thoa. L. Crittenden,* 17 July, 1862.. 
Horatio G. Wright, 18 July, 1862.... 
Robert G. Skenck, 20 Aug. 1862. 



Stephen A. Uurlbnt, 17 Sept. 1862... 
Schnyler Hamilton. 17 Sept. 1862... 

Gordon Granger, 17 Sept. 1862. 

J. D. Cox, 6 Oct. 1862 

Jsaus B. McPherson, 8 Oct. 1862... 
LoTsll H. Rousseau, 8 Oct. 1862..... 
Christopher 0. Augur, 14 Nov. 1862. 

Brigadier-Generals. 

Andrew Porter,* 17 May, 1861 

Chariee P. Stone, 17 May, 1861 

Thoa. W. Sherman, 17 May, 1861.. 
George A. McCall, 17 May, 1861.... 
Wm. R. Montgomery, 17 May, 1861. 

John W. Phelps. 17 ftlay, 1861 

Charles S. Hamilton, 17 May, 1861.. 

Roftis King, 17 May, 1861 

B. M. Prentiss,* 17 May, 1861 

Benjamin F. Kelley,* 17 May, 1861. 

A. 8. Williams,* 17 May, 1861 

James Cooper,* 17 May, 1861 

James B. Ricketts, 21 July, 1861 

0. B. WUlcox, 21 Jnly, 1861 

Michael Corcoran, 21 July, 1861 

Henry H. Lockwood, 8 Aug. 1861... 

Louis Blenker,* 9 Aug. 1861 

James I. Wadsworth,* 9 Aug. 1861.. 
John n. Martindale, 9 Aug. 1861 ... 
Samnel D. Sturgia, 10 Aug. 186L.... 

George Stoneman, 13 Aug. 1861 

Jamea W. Denrer,* 14 Aug. 1861.... 

Egbert L. Yiele, 17 Aug. 1861. 

Jamea Shielda, 19 Aug. 186L 

John F. Reynolda, 20 Aug. 1861 



Ky. 

Ind. 

Ohio. 

Ky. 

Ky. 

Va. 

Pa. 

N.H. 

Va. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 

Md. 

Mass. 

Pa. 

MaM. 

HM, 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

Vt. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Vt. 

Conn. 

Ohio. 

Ky. 

^^- 
Conn. 

I Ohio. 

S.C. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Cans. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 



Pa. 

R.L 

Pa. 

NJ. 

Vt. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

N.H. 

Conn, 

Md. 

N.Y. 

Mich. 

Irel'd. 

Del. 

Germ. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Ta. 

N.Y. 

Irel'd. 

Pa. 






HI. 

Ind. 

(mo. 

N.Y. 

Ky. 

Va. 

Pa. 

N.H. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Me. 

D.C. 

Pa. 

NJf. 

CaL 



Mich. 
N.Y. 

N.Y. 
N.Y. 

Vt. 
Conn. 
Ohio. 
Ky. 

Conn. 

Ohio. 

III. 

Conn. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Mich. 



Pa. 

D.C. 

RJ. 

Pa. 

N.J. 

Vt. 

Wis. 

Wis. 

111. 

Va. 

Mich. 

Md. 

N.Y. 

Mich. 

N.Y. 

Del. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Cal. 

N.Y. 

Cal. 

Pa. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



L •••••• 



•••• •• •■ 



WiUiam F. Barry, 20 Aug. 1861 

John J. Abercrombie, 31 Aug. 1861. 

Silas Casey, 31 Aug. 1861 

L. P. Graham,* 31 Aug. 1861.... 

George G. Meade, 31 Aug. 1861 

Abram Duryee • 31 Aug. 1861. 

Oliver 0. Howard, 3 Sept. 1861 

Eleazer Paine, 3 Sept. 1861 

Daniel B. Sickles,* 3 Sept. 1861 

Charles D. Jameson,* 8 Sept. 1861.. 

Ebeneser Dumont,* 3 Sept. 186L.... 

Robert H. Mllroy,* 3 Sept. 1861 

WiUis A. Gonnan,* 7 Sept. 1861 

Daniel Butterfleld,* 7 Sept. 1861 

W.T. Ward,* 18 Sept. 1861 

John G. Barnard, 23 Sept. 1861 

Innis N. PaJmer, 23 Sept. 1861 

I Seth WUIiams, 23 Sept. 1861 

John Newton, 23 Sept. 1861 

Winfield S. Hancock, 28 Sept. 1861. 

Randolph B. Marcy, 23 Sept. 1861.. 

George Wright, 28 Sept. 1861 

Thomas Williama, 28 Sept. 1861..... 

George Syke^ 28 Sept. 1861. 

William W. Bums, 28 Sept. 1861.... 

William H. French, 28 Sept. 1861... 

Wm. T. 11. Brooks, 28 Sept. 1861 

John M. Brannan, 28 Sept. 1861..... 

John P. Hatch, 28 Sept. 1861 

David S. Stanley, 28 Sept. 1F61 

Isaac I. Stevens, 28 Sept. 1861 

Wm. K. Strong,* 28 Sept. 1861 

i Albin Schoepf,* 30 Sept. 1861 

James 8. Negley ♦ 1 Oct. 1861 

Thomas J. Wood, 11 Oct. 1861 

Richard W. Johnson, 11 Oct. 1861.. 

A. Von Steinwehr,* 12 Oct. 1861 

Joseph B. Plummer, 22 Oct. 1861.... 

George W. Cullum, 1 Nov. 1861 

Jeremiah T. Boyle, 9 Nov. 1861 

Julius H. Stahel,* 12 Nov. 1861 

George W. Morgan,* 12 Nov. 1861... 

JohnM.Schofield,21 Nov. 1861. N.Y. 

Thomas J. ^IcKean, 21 Nov. 1861... Pa. 

Zealous B. Tower, 23 Nov. 1861 Mass. 

Jefferson C. Davis,* 18 Dec. 1861 Ind. 

John M. Palmer,* 20 Dec. 1861 Ky. 

James H. Garfield,* 11 Jan. 1862.... Ohio. 

j Lewis G. Arnold, 24 Jan. 1862. N.J. 

■ Frederick Steele. 29 Jan. 1862. N.Y. 

; William S. Ketchum, 3 Feb. 1862... Conn. 
! Abner Doubleday, 3 Feb. 1862. N.Y. 

John W. Davidson, 3 Feb. 1862 Va. 

! Napoleon J. T. Dana, 3 Feb. 1F.62 ... Me. 
; David D. Bimey,*3 Feb.1862 Ala. 

Thos. Francis Meagher,* 3 Feb.1862. Irel'd. 

: Henry M. Naglee, 4 Feb. 1862 Pa. 

j James G. Spears,* 5 March, 1862..... Tenn. 

I Eugene A. Carr, 7 March, 1862 N.Y, 

I Thomas A. Davies, 7 March, 1862... N^.Y. 

: Daniel Tyler, 13 ftlarch, 18€^. Conn. 

William H. Emory, 17 March, 1862. Md. 

! Andrew J. Smith, 17 March, 1862... Pa. 

I Marsena R. Patrick, 17 March, 1862. N.Y. 

Isaac F. Quinby, 17 March, 1862..... N.J. 

Hiram J. Barry,* 17 March, 1862 ... Ma» 



N.Y. 

Tenn. 

R.I. 

Va. 

Spain. 

N.Y. 

Me. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Me. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ky. 

N.Y. 

Ky. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

Me. 

Va. 

Pa, 

Mass. 

Vt. 

N.Y. 

Md. 

Ohio. 

Md. 

Ohio. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

Hung. 

Pa. 

Ky. 

Ky. 

Germ. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 



ll 



Hung. 



N.Y. 

Tenn. 

R.I. 

Va. 

D.C. 

N.Y. 

Me. 

111. 

N.Y. 

Me. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Minn. 

NY. 

Ky. 

Mass, 

N.Y. 

Me. 

Va. 

Pa. 

Mass. 

Vt. 

Mich. 

Md. 

Ohio. 

D.C. 

Ohio. 

Ind. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

W.T 

'N.Y. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Ky. 

^?; 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Ohio. 

HI. 

Iowa, 

Mass. 

Ind. 

111. 

Ohio. 

Njr. 

N.Y. 

Conn. 

N.Y. 

Va. 

Minn. 

Pa. 

N.Y 

Pa. 

Tenn. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Conn. 

Md. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Me. 



100 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 

OxNK&AL AND Stafv OrFiCBftS.— OoQtinued. 



£1668. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
miMlon. 



Orris S. Perrj,* 17 March, 1862 

Daniel P. Woodbury, 19 March, 1862. 
Henry M. Judah, 21 March, 1862 ... 
Richard J. Oglesby,* 21 March, 1862. 

John Cook,* 21 March, 1862. 

John McArthnr,* 21 March, 1862... 
Jacob G. Lauman,* 21 March, 1862. 
H. P. Van aeve,* 21 March, 1862... 
John A. Logan,* 21 March, 1862..... 

Speed B. Fry,* 21 March, 1862. 

Alexander Asboth,* 21 March, 1882. 

James Craig,* 21 March, 1862 

Mahlon D. Manson,* 24 March, 1862. 
Edw'd R. 8. Canby, 31 March, 1862.. 
OrenTiUe M. Dodge,*31 March, 1862. 
Robert B. Mitchell,* 8 AprU, 1862... 

James O. Blunt,* 8 April, 1862 

P. E. Patterson,* 11 April, 1862 

Amiel W. Whipple, 14 April, 1862... 

OuTier Orover, 14 April, 1862. 

George L. HartsuiT, 15 April, 1862... 

Rufus Saxton, 15 April, 1862 

B«i\iamin Alvord, 15 April, 1862..... 
Napoleon B. Bnford, 15 April, 1862.. 

William S. Smith, 15 April, 1862 

Nathan Kimball,* 15 April, 1862..... 

(diaries Oevens,* 15 April, 1862 

James H. Van Alen,* 15 April, 1862.. 

Carl Schurz,* 15 April, 1862 

Sam'l W. Crawford,* 25 April, 18ti2. 
Henry W. Wesselts, 25 April, 186-2.. 

MUo k Hascall, 25 April, 1862. 

Jieonard F. Rosa,* 25 April, 1862..... 

John W. Geary,* 25 April, 1862 

Alfred H. Terry,* 25 April, 1862 

A. A. Humphreys, 28 April, 1862.... 
James H. Oarleton,* 28 April, 1862.. 

Absalom Baird, 28 April, 186^ 

John C. Robinson,* 28 April, 1862... 
Truman Seymour, 2S April, 1862..... 
Quincy A. Gillmore, 23 April, 1862.. 
George D. Bayard, 28 April, 1862..... 

Henry Prince, 28 April, 1862 

Abraham S. Piatt,* 28 April, 1862... 
Thos. T. Crittenden,* 28 April, 1862. 

Max. Weber,* 28 April, 1862. 

P. A. Hackelman,* 28 April, 1862... 

Jer. C. SuUivan,* 28 April, 1862 

AWIn P. Hovey,*28 April, 1862 

James C. Teatch,* 28 April, 1862 ... 
William P. Benton,* 2S April, 1862. 

Henry Bohlen,*28 April, 1862. 

John C. Caldwell,* 2S April, 1S62... 
Isaac P. Rodman,* 23 April, 1862... 

Neal Dow,* 28 April, 1862 

George S. Greene, 28 April, 1862..... 

Samuel P. Carter,* 1 May, 1862 

John Gibbon, 2 May, 1862 

George W. Taylor,* May, 1862..... 



I 



Conn. 

N.H. 

Md. 

Ky. 

lU. 

Scot. 

Md. 



•2 

ll 



111. 



Pa. 

Ohio. 

Ky. 

Mass. 

Ohio. 

Me. 

Pa. 

Mass. 

Me. 

N.Y. 

Mass. 

Vt. 

Ky. 

Ohio. 
Ind. 

N.Y. 



Pa. 

Conn. 

N.Y. 

111. 

Pa. 

Conn. 

Pa. 

Me. 

Pa, 

N.Y. 

Vt. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Me. 

Ohio. 

Ala. 

■•••••••I 

Ind. 



Ind. 

Ind. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Vt. 

R.I. 

Me. 

R.I. 

Tenn. 

Pa. 

NJ. 



Conn. 

N.H. 

N.Y. 

Mich. 

111. 

111. 

Iowa. 

Minn. 

111. 

Ky. 



Mo. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Iowa. 

Kans. 

Kans. 

l^a. 

Mass. 

Me. 

Mich. 

Mass. 

Vt. 

III. 

Ohio. 

Ind. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 



Pa. 

Conn. 

Ind. 

111. 

Pa. 

Conn. 

D.C. 

Me. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

Vt. 

Ohio. 

N.J. 

Me. 

Ohio. 

Ind. 

N.Y. 

Ind. 



Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Pa. 

Me. 

R.I. 

Me. 

N.Y. 

Tenn. 

N.C. 

N-T. 



Name, rank, and date of com- 
mission. 



Erastus B. Tyler,* 14 May, 1862 

Charles Griffin. 9 June, 1862. 

George II. Gordon, 9 Juno, 1862 

James M. Tuttle,* 9 June. 1862 

Julius W^hite,* 9 Juna^ 1862 

Peter J. Ost^rhaus,* 9 June. 1862... 
S. G. Burbridge,* 9 June, 1862........ 

W. L. Mliott,* 11 June, 18(}2 

Albion P. Howe, 11 June, 1862 

Greeu Ciay Smith,* U June, 1862... 
Wm. B. CanipbeU, 30 June, 1862..... 
PhUip H. Sheridan, 1 July, 1862..... 
George F. Shepley, 18 July, 1862.... 

John Buford, 27 July, 1862 

Frank P. Blair, Jr., 7 Aug .1862. 

Richard Busteed, 7 Aug. 1862^ 

John R. Kenly, 22 Aug. 1862 

John P. Slough, 25 Aug. 1862 

Godft-ey Weitzel, 29 Aug. 1862 

Gabriel R. Paul, 5 Sept. 1862 

Charles E. Hovey, 5 Sept. 1862. 

Herman Haupt, 5 Sept. 1862 

George Crook, 7 Sept. 1862 

Joseph B. Carr, 7 Sept. 1862. 

Thomas L. Kane, 7 Sept. 1862 

Nelson Taylor, 7 Sept. 1862 

Gersham Mott,7 Sept. 1862.. 

J. G. Reynolds, 7 Sept. 1862. 

Charles C. Gilbert, 9 Sept. 1862 

Calvin £. Pratt, 10 Sept. 1862 

James Nagle, 10 Sept. 1862 

Edward Ferrero, 10 Sept. 1862. 

Henry J. Hunt, 15 Sept. 1862 

Francis L. Vinton, 19 Sept. 1862..... 
Gustavus A. Smith, 19 Sept. 1862... 
Francis C. Barlow. 19 Sept. 1862..... 

Mason Brayman, 24 Sept. 1862 

N. J. Jackson, 24 Sept. 1862. 

George W. Getty, 25 Sent. 1862 

Alfred Sully, 26 Sept. 1862 

G. K. Warren, 26 Sept. 1862. 

Wm. W. Averell, 26 Sept. 1862 

Robert Oowdin, 26 Sept. 1862 

Alexander Hays, 29 Sept. 1862....... 

H. H. Sibley, 29 Sept. 1862 

Francis B. Spinola, 1 Oct. 1862. 

John H. H. Ward, 4 Oct. 1862 

John M. Thayer, 4 Oct. 1862. 

J. J. Bartlett, 4 Oct. 1862 

Solomon Meredith, 6 Oct. 1862. 

James Bowen. 11 Oct. 1862 

Gustave P. Cluseret, 14 Oct. 1862.... 
Eliakim P. Scammon, 15 Oct. 1862.. 

Robert S. Granger, 20 Oct. 1862. 

Joseph R. West, 25 Oct. 1862. 

Joseph W. Revere, 25 Oct. 1862 

Alfred W. Ellet, 1 Nov. 1862. 

E. H. Stoughton, 6 Nov. 1862 

George L. Andrews, 10 Nov. 1862... 



d 



N.Y. 

Ohio. 



Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Prus. 

Ky. 

Pa. 

Me. 



Tenn. 
Ohio. 



Ky. 



IrelU 

Md. 

Ohio. 

Obia 

Mo. 

Vt. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

Conn. 

NJ. 

Ky. 

Ohio. 

Mass. 

Pa. 

Spain. 

Mich. 

Me. 

N.Y. 
N.Y. 



D.G. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Vt. 

Pa. 

Mich. 



N.Y. 

Mass. 

N.Y. 

N.C. 

N.Y. 

Frc'e. 

Me. 

Ohio. 



•2 






Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Maao. 

Iowa. 

IlL 

Mo. 

Ky. 

Pa. 

Me. 

Ky. 

Teoa. 

Ohio. 

Me. 

111. 

Mo. 

N.Y. 

Md. 

C0I.T. 

Ohio. 

Mo. 

111. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 

Pft. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

N.J. 

Ind. 

Ohio. 

N.Y. 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

U.SJL 

N.Y. 

111. 

N.Y. 

IlL 

Mo. 

DX). 

Pa. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

Masd. 

Pa. 

Min. 

N.Y. 

N.Y. 

W.T. 

N.Y. 

IwL 

N.Y. 

Va. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 



Pa. IIU. 



1868.] 



WAR BflPAMMENT. 



101 



GxirXRAI AB8BU0T OF THK MlUTU FOROB OV VBB UHISSD STA^fSSf AOOORSINO TA VHK IiAIBf RRDBim 

BBCEiyEO AT TBI OTTICK OF TBI ADJUTAOT-OsITKBAI.. 



Soga 



StAXBS A2n> TSBRITORIES. 



Maine ^ 

New Hampshire 

MaasacbdBettB 

Termont , 

Rhode Island 

Oonnecticnt ^ 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylynnia 

Delaware 

Haryland 

Tirsinia.. » 

"Sorth Carolina , 

Sooth Garolina 

Georgia 

Florida , 

Alabama...... 

Looisiana 

Mlttiasippi 

Tennessee 

Kentacky 

Ohio 

Mieliig^ii 

Indiana. 

Illinois M.... 

WlwoQsin 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Arkansas 

T^xas 

CklifNnia 

Minnesota 

Oregon 

Wariiington Ten-itory... 

Nebraska Territory 

Kansas Territory 

Territory of Utah 

Territory of N. Mexico. 
District of Colombia 



9t 

IS 



s 



1866 
1854 
1860 
1848 
1860 
1860 
1860 
1862 
1858 
182r 
1838 
1860 
1845 
1856 
1860 
1845 
1851 
1859 
1838 
1840 
1862 
1868 
1868 
1832 
1866 
1865 



1854 
1859 
1847 
1857 
1860 



a 

O 



13 
11 
10 
12 
6 
8 
81 



4 
22 
82 
28 
20 
89 

8 
82 
10 
15 
26 
43 



81 
81 



15 



10 
15 
18 

8 



52 
202 
47 
61 
42 
46 
657 



8 

68 

761 

183 

185 

91 

14 

142 

129 

70 

79 

145 



194 
110 



8 



17 

89 

45 

126 

81 



o^ 



86 
119 
120 
2U 
117 

27 
144 



71 
644 
860 
657 
686 
624 

05 
775 
542 
802 
859 
1,165 



151 

ftiUt 

ooo 



215 



4 

179 

248 

11 

60 



IS 



208 
895 
403 
801 
87 
124 
1^279 



864 
1,763 
4,017 
3,449 
1,909 
4t'i96 

506 
1.883 
2,105 

848 
2.644 
8,517 



642 
2,154 



904 



67 
911 
940 
176 

36 



as 

l§ 



804 
1,227 

580 
1,088 

202 

200 
2,011 



447 
2,397 
6,670 
4,267 
2,599 
6,050 

620 
2,832 
2,792 

825 
8,607 
4,870 



1,018 
2,861 



1442 



88 

1,139 

1,248 

830 

185 



S" • 



'is 



73,248 
32,811 

160,612 
22,827 
18,330 
61,430 

407,602 



8.782 
44,467 
137,486 
75,181 
33,473 
78,649 
11,502 
73,830 
88,532 
85,259 
67,646 
84,109 



106,552 

61,052 



60,179 



117.959 
46,611 
18,518 

207,400 
24,805 



^ 



73,662 
33.638 

161,192 
23,916 
18.541 
61.680 

499.618 
81,984 

350,000 

9,220 

46,864 

143,156 
79,448 
86,072 
78,60» 
12,122 
76,662 
91,824 

lym 

884»79 
279,809 
109,670 

63,918 
257,4^0. 

61,822. 

118,047 
47,750 
19,766r 

207.780 
24,990 



1863 



Oraod aggragate. 



1852 



•*•«•«••< 



2 
3* 



48 



10 



28 



235 
185* 



286 

"226' 



2,686 



7,976 



2,82;f 

"moi 



488 



3,402 



9^16 



36,794 



60,U0 



2,226,870 



8,246^198 



ABMORIES AND ARSEXAUU 



Armories and arsenals. 


S^te. 


Postofflce. 


Commanding officers. 


KennelMc arsenal 


Maine ^ 

Massachusetts.. 


Augusta 




SDriiiisfleld annorv.. 


Sprfnarfleld... 


Bvt. MaJ. A. B. Dyer. 
Gapt. T.J. Rodman. 


WiLteriown Arsenftl .*•• 


it 


Watertown 


Ch&mDlAin arsoiiAl. •.•... ••.••••• 


Vermont 

New York 


Verirennes 


H'aterrliet arsenal...... 


West Troy 


Maj. W. A. Thornton. 
Maj. R. n. K. Whiteley. 
Col. J. Symington. 
M^. T. T. S. Laidley. 


N4?w York anM^na1.......r.r..t-T> 


(( 


New York 


Allpfhanv ars4^nAl.rr....-Tr--r"- 


Pennsvlvania 


Pittsburg 


FraiikfiH^ arsenal ............•••• 


u 


Bridesburg 


pikesvilie arsenal 


Maryland 


Pikesville 




Viuhjnffton iLrsfiTiAl 


District of Oolnmbia. 
Virginia 


Washinffton 


Lt.-Col. G. D. Ramsay. 
Ist Lt. T. Q. Baylor. 
Cant. F. D. Callender. 


Fort Monroe arsenal 


Old Point Comfort 

St. Louis 

Leavenworth .....•.••...•.. 


St. I^nia araanal 


Missouri 


l^Mv^ni'Ai'th arsenal. ....irfft-T 


Kansas 


Oapt. J. McNutt. 


Untmil AFWinftl - .....•.•••...•..••i 


Michigan 

Cnlilbraia , 


Dearbomvllle 


1bwiUi<A ^nMnRl.. •••■rrtttsttr 


Benioia .*t...v«*«»»»»M. 


Qapt J. McAllister. 









102 THE NATIONAL ALMAKAO. [1868. 

Table of Fay, Subdatenoe, Etc, allowed Ij Law to the Offioetf of the Army. 



Bank Ain> CLASsmcAnoir of OrnoKRS. 



Cfenercd Officers. 

Lieutenant-General 

Aideshde-camp and Military Secre*) 

tary to Lieutenant-Genenil, each... j 

Major-Oeneral 

Senior Aide-de-camp to Oen.-ln-0hie£. 
Aide-de-camp, in addition to pay, &c. \ 

of Lieutenant J 

Brigadier-Oeneral 

Aide-de-camp, in addition to pay, Ac. \ 

of Lieutenant j 

Ad^utafU-OenerdFs Department. 

A4jatant-General — Brigadier-General. 
Assistant AcQutant-General— C(rioneI.. 
Aasifltant AcQutant^neral — Lt.-Gol... 
Anistant A4Jatant4(eneral — ^9i^}or ... 

Jndge-Adrocate-Oeneral — Colonel 

Jadge-AdTocate>-Mi^or 

" «* (Division)— Major 

Ifupector-OeneraVi Department. 

Inspector-General— Ciolonel 

Assistant Inspector^eneral — Msylor... 

Signal Department. 
Signal OiBcer^—Mt^or 

Q^artervMuler't Department. 

QofiTtermaster-Qeneral — ^Brig.-Gen 

Assistant Quartermaster^en. — Ool. ... 
Btpnty Qaart«rmaster-Gen. — LL-CoI... 

Quartermaster— M^Jor. 

Assistant QnartennMter— Captain 

Subtislenee Department. 

Oommissary-Gen. of Subsistence— Col. 
Assistant Commissary-Gen. of Sub- ) 

sistenca— Lieut.-Colonel J 

Commissary of Subsistence— Mi^or.... 
CommifUMtry of Subsistence — Captain.. 
Assistant Commissary of Subsiatence, ) 

in addition to pay, ko. of Lieut.... / 

Medical Department. 

gurgeon-G eneral — Brigadier-General... 

Burgeons often years' service 

Surgeons of less than ten years' service 
Asst. Surgeons of ten years' service... 
Asst. Surgeons of five years' service... 
Assistant Surgeons of less than five ) 
jears^ service / 

Pmy Departmmt, 

Va7master43<eiieTal, |3740 per aahnm. 

Deputy Paymaster-General 

Pi^ymMter 



Pat. 


• 

1 




% c. 

270 00 


80 00 


220 00 


80 00 


24 00 


124 00 


20 00 


124 00 


110 00 


05 00 


80 00 


110 00 


80 00 


80 00 


110 00 


80 00 


80 00 


124 00 


110 00 


06 00 


80 00 


70 00 


110 00 


05 00 


80 00 


70 00 


20 00 


124 00 


80 00 


80 00 


70 00 


70 00 


53 33 


0600 


80 00 



Subsist vicB. 




40 
5 

15 

4 

12 



12 
6 
5 

4 

6 

4 
4 



6 
4 



12 
6 
6 

4 
4 



6 
5 

4 

4 



12 
8 
4 

8 

4 



6 

•A 



% c. 
300 00 

45 00 

135 00 
36 00 



108 00 



108 00 
64 00 
45 00 
36 00 

54 00 

36 00 
86 00 



54 00 
36 00 



86 00 



108 00 
54 00 
46 00 
86 00 
86 00 



54 00 

45 00 

36 00 
36 00 



108 00 
72 00 
36 00 
72 00 
86 00 

86 00 



46 00 
86 00 



SSBTAMTS. 



4 
2 

4 

2 



3 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 



2 
2 



8 
2 
2 
2 
1 



2 
2 



.? 



3 
2 
2 
1 
1 



2 
2 



I c. 

00 00 

45 00 

00 00 
47 00 



67 50 



67 60 
47 00 
47 00 
47 00 

47 00 
47 00 
47 00 



47 00 
47 00 



47 00 



07 00 
47 00 
47 00 
47 00 
28 60 



47 00 

47 00 

47 00 
23 60 



67 60 
47 00 
47 00 
23 60 
23 50 

23 50 



47 00 
47 00 





>> 


w^ 


5 


a • 


O >f 


^l 


r^ 


1 


H 


$ C. 


720 00 


170 00 


446 00 


163 00 


24 00 


200 50 


11* 


200 60 


211 00 


187 00 


168 00 


211 00 


168 00 


163 00 


211 00 


163 00 


168 00 


200 60 


211 00 


187 00 


168 00 


120 60 


211 00 


187 00 


163 00 


120 60 


11* 


209 60 


190 00 


163 00 


165 60 


120 50 


112 88 


288 88 


187 00 


168 00 



FOKAOB 

TURNIBBSD 

FOB HOBSBS. 



ft for 
forage 

2 

7 

4 

2 
5 
2 



5 
5 

4 
4 

6 

4 
4 



5 

4 



5 
5 

4 
4 
S 



5 

4 

4 
3 



5 

4 
4 
8 
8 

2 



$50. 

2 

6 
2 

2 

4 
2 



4 
8 
8 
2 

2 

2 
8 



ii 



2 
8 



2 



4 
2 

8 
8 
8 



a 

a 

2 

a 



4 
2 

a 
a 
a 

a 



a 
a 



1868.] 



WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Table of Fay, Snbiiituioei Forage, Eto.— Oontiiiiied. 



lOS 



Bin Ain> CLAflsmcAnov or OmosBS. 



Cifieers of the Corps qf EnffituerSf 
Oontt of Topographical Bngineertf 
and Orinanot D^Mirtment. 

Cblef of Ordnance, BrigadierOenend.. 

Cblonel 

liieuteiuuiWiSoloneL 

Mf\)or 

Captain 

?int Uentenant 

Second Lieutenant 

Brevet Second £iientenant....M 

OsfieerM of Mounted Dragoontf Oaffalry^ 
Riflemen, and Light Artillery. 

Colonel 

lieutenant-Colonel 

MilJor 

Captain 

Yint Lieutenant 

Second Lientenitnt 

BreTet Second Lientenant....... 

AdUatant / in addition to pay \ 

B^j*! Or. Master ( of Lieutenant... J 

Offiart of Artillery and Infantry. 

Colonel 

Uentenant-Oolonel 

MajiM- 

captain 

first Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

Brevet Second lieutenant 

Ai^otant, In addition to pay, Ac. of Lt. 

Beg^ 'Quartermaster, in addition to ~ 

pay, Ac. of Lleutenant..:<. 

MUiiary Storekeq^ert, 

Attacbed to the Quartcrraaster^s I>e- 
partment ; at armories, and at ar- 
senals of construction ; the store- 
keeper at Watertovrn Arsenal, and 
storekeepers of ordnance serving 
In Oregon, California, and Nevr 
Uezioo, $1400 per annum. 

At all other arsenals, $1040 per annum. 

Chaplains , 



} 



Pat. 



I 



% e. 

124 00 
110 00 
95 00 
80 00 
TO 00 
68 83 
63 83 
63 83 



110 00 
05 00 
80 00 
70 00 
63 33 
53 83 
63 83 

10 00 



96 00 
80 00 
70 00 
60 00 
50 00 
46 00 
46 00 
10 00 

10 00 



100 00 



SUBnSTBXOB. 



I! 



12 
6 
5 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



6 
5 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



6 
6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



k S 



$ c. 

108 00 
54 00 
46 00 
86 00 
86 00 
86 00 
86 00 
86 00 



64 00 
46 00 
86 00 
86 00 
86 00 
86 00 
86 00 



64 00 
46 00 
86 00 
86 00 
36 00 
36 00 
80 00 



18 00 



SOTAim. 



n 



8 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1% 

11 
H 



47 
47 



c. 
60 
00 
00 
47 00 
28 50 
28 60 
28 60 
28 60 



47 00 
47 00 
47 00 
23 50 
23 50 
23 50 
23 50 



45 00 

46 00 
45 00 
22 50 
22 50 
22 60 
82 60 






% e. 

209 60 
211 00 
187 00 
163 00 
129 60 
112 88 
112 88 
112 83 



211 00 
187 00 
163 00 
120 50 
112 83 
112 83 
112 88 



10 00 



194 00 
170 00 
151 
118 
108 
103 60 
103 60 
10 00 

10 00 



00 
50 
50 



118 00 



FOBAOB 

VmUCXSED 

roB Hobos. 



I 

I 



6 
5 
4 
4 
8 
2 
2 
2 



6 

4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 



4 
8 
8 



2 
8 



4 
2 
8 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



2 
2 
2 



2 

a 



Paymaster's clerks, $700 per an nam, and one ration (76 cents) per day when on dnty. 

The ofllscr in command of a company is allowed $10 per month for the responsibility of 
Nothing, arms, and accoutrements. — Act 2 March, 1827, Sec. 2. 

* Subaltern officers, employed on the General Staff, and receiving increased pay therefor, are 
act entitled to the additional or fourth ration provided by the Act of 2 March, 1827, Sec. 2. 

Every rommlssioned officer below the rank of Brigadier-General receives one additional ration per 
day for every ftve years' service.— Act 5 July, 1836, Sec. 12, and 7 Jaly, 1838, Sec. 9. 

Torsge is eommoied only when the OoTemment cannot ftimidi it in kind, and then at $8 per 
■oath for each horse aetaallj kept by the officer. 



I 



104 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



Konthly Pay of Hon-oommiasioiied OiBfwn, PriTataii 9uk 



CAVALRY. 



8erge«Dt-M^or ..».. fZl 00 

QmrteniiastoHaergBUit..... 21 00 

Chlif Bugler ~ - 21 00 

lintSergeuit 20 00 

Sngeant - 17 00 



Corporal $14 00 

Bugler .............4.. 13 00 

Farrier and Blacksmith ~... 15 00 

Private IS 00 



ORDNANCE. 



Bergemnt ~. $34 00 

Omporal 20 00 



PriTate, first da 
Private, second cHaas . 



$17 00 
IS 00 



ARTILLERY AND INFANTRY. 



geiKeant-ll^Jor........ ~...... $21 00 

Qniurtennaster-Sargeant...... 17 00 

First Sergeant 20 00 

Seigeant ~ » ~. 17 QO 

Ooiporal ~ .♦. 13 00 



Artificer, artillery.... ^..m............. $15 00 

PriTate 13 00 

Principal Musieian 21 00 

Muaidan 12 00 



&APPERS» BfINERS» AND P0NT0NIER8. 



SerBaaat... ~ $34 00 

Oorponl 20 00 

Prtrate, flrat daaa -.. 17 00 



Private^ second class $13 00 

Musician 12 00 



BRIGADE BANDS. 



Four Of the Band. ^ 34 00 

Sight of the Band.....^ 17 00 



Drom-Mi^r...^ 
Four of the Band ... 



»•••*••••••*••«•••*••••••«• 



!•••••••••■•••••••■••••••• 



$17 00 
20 00 



Xedkal Cadets (and 1 ration per day)....... $90 00 

Hoepital Stewards. ..... SO 00 

Master Wagoners (3 Aug. 1861).. . ... 17 00 



Miatroii8...M......«.M.*....M.....« .........MM. $6 00 

Female Nurses, per day and (1 i«tiim)40 osnta. 
Wagoners (3 Aug. 18Q1)........m........m. ...... 14 00 



IS} cents per month is to be retained firam the pay of Mch enUsted man of the army, for the sup- 
port of the <* Soldier's Home." 

$S per month Is allowed for r»«Blistment, and $1 per month additkmal to each snheequent period 
«f Ato years' senrioe^ provided the enlistmoit is made within one month after the ezpiiatibn of each 



It would be impossible to give all the changes and modifications of army-pay in this place. There 
is scarcely a year since the adc^tion of the Constitution in which some change has not been made. 
A IJBW statistics, however, wiU enable us to link the dilTerent periods together. By the Act of Con- 
gress of April 80^ 1700^ the following were the amounts received by offleers >-a lieutenant-colonel 
eommanding, $00 per month, with rations and $12 for forage; a mi^or, $10, vrith 4 rations and $10 
for forage; a captain, $90, with 8 rations; a lieutenant, $22; with 2 rations; a sergeant, $5; a corporal, 
$4, and a private, $3; mMMxnnmissioned officers and privates drawing ene ration from the oommis- 
sary. In 1702, slight changes were made; the pay of a mi^or-general was fixed at $106 per month, 
and that of a brigadier, at $10L The pay was slightly increased in 1806. In 1810, it was enacted that 
men on Iktigne duty (forttftcatkms, surveys, cutting roads, ke.) fi»r not less than ten days should re- 
ceive fifteen cents a day additional, and an extra gill of spirits. In 1838) it was enacted that all 
officers should receive an additional ration for every five years of service ; and the pay of the privates 
was fixed at $8 a month. In 1867, the pay of every commissioned officer, Inclading military store* 
keeper, was increased by $20 a month. The changes since will be found in the foregoing tables. 



1868.] 



NAVY DEPARTMENT. 



105 



m. VAVT BEFAETMEKT. 

(Oometed at iha Nary Depcurtment, December 1, 1881.) 
QBGANXZATIOir 07 TBI KaTT DZPAKTimT. 



Sterdarft Office.— The Secretary of the Vmry 
hu chaxgo of eTery thing connected with the 
ntral establishment, and the execution of laws 
ralatiDg thereto, under the general direction of the 
President. All instructions to commanders of 
tqnadrons and commanders of yessels, all orders 
of officers, commissions oi officers, both In the 
nary and marine corps, appointments of oommis- 
tioned and warrant officers, orders Ibr the enlist* 
ment and discharge of seamen, emanate fhnn the 
Secretary's office. All the duties of the different 
boreans are performed under the authority of the 
Secretary, and their orders are considered as ema- 
nating from him. He has a general superlntend- 
eDcc of the marine corps, and all the orders of the 
commandant of that corps should be i^roTed by 
him. 

J^e Bureau of Nav^'Tardf and Doekt has 
charge of all the navy-yards, docks, and wharves, 
hoOdings, and machinery, in navy-yards, and every 
thing immediately connected with them. It Is 
abo charged with the management of the Naval 
Aiylam. 

ne Bureau of Construction and Repair has 
charge of the building and repairs of all vessels of 
var, and purchase of material. 

The Bureau of Provisiont and Ckihing eon- 
tnets for aU provisions for the use of the navy, 
and clothing. 



The Bureau q/ Ordnance has charge of aU ord- 
nance and ordnance stores, the mannfacture or 
purchase of cannon, guns, powder, shot, shells, 
Ac, and the equipment of vessels of war, with 
every thing connected therewith. 

The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery manages 
every thing relating to medicines and medical 
stores, treatment of sick and wounded, and ma- 
nagement of hospitals. 

The Bureau of Steam Engineering, formerly at- 
tached to the Bureau of Oonstraction, Equipment, 
and Repair, has been, in consequence of the great 
increase of the Navy, made an independent bnreaii, 
and the £ngineer-in-Chief made its head. The sn- 
perintendence of the construction of all marine 
steam-engines for naval vessels, and the decislcn 
upon plans for their construction, belong to this 
bureau. 

J9ie Bureau of Bijuipment and BeeruUing is 
another new bureau organized in consequence Of 
the great addition made to the naval force. It 
has the charge of the recruiting-stations for sea- 
men, and of the fUmishing them with the neces- 
sary equipments. 

7%e Bureau of Navigation is a new bnreati. 
The Naval Observatory and Hydrographfcal Offl^ 
are under the charge of this bureau. It famishes 
▼sssels with maps, charts,'chronometers, te*, tog»> 
ther with such books as are allowed to ships of war. 



XUUVflVA OffUUU Of IBM DXBAMttBBIT, 

Hamea and Offloes. Whence appointed. 

GIDEON WELLES, Secretary Connecticut 

GcsTATXis T. Fox, Assistant Secretary Massachusetts.... 

WiLUAM Faxon, C%k^ Clerk Connecticut 

Joseph Sxith, Chi^ qf Bureau of Tards and Docks Massachusetts.... 



OoinpeBMtlai. 

$8,000 

4^000 

2,200 

3,600 



^auAM J. KziLSR, Civil Engineer ** * « New York 2,000 

JoHH W. Bron AUG H, Cftf^f CTcrfc ** ** District of Goltmbla 1,800 

Aimuw H. Foots, Chi^ of Bureau qf Equipment and J^eeru^tf^. ..Connecticut 8,600 

8. Hemuqum, (7/ii</ Cterfc « «« « New York 1,200 

Chaxus Herrt Davis, CTii^ of Bureau cf Navigation Massachusetts '. 8,600 

C. E. Graves, Cferfc »' « Vermont I,4b0 

JoHx A. Dahlqhen, Chief of Bureau ^f Ordnance, Pennsylvania 3,600 

HorsT A. Wise, ^«n'<fan< « « ..» New York 8,000 

CHiRua C. BuRB, CTer* « « Connecticut 1,400 

JoRx LisTHALL, Chief of Bureau cf ObiM^iMffofi and Btpair Pennsylvania 8,500 

A. B. Farwbli, C%t>/ Cfer* « « « Maine 1,800 

BrajAimi F. Isherwood, Chief cf Bureau of Steam Engineering. ..^tm York 8.800 

Edward B. Neallt, CWty CTerfc « « Iowa ....1,800 

Bo&Ano OuneR, Chi^ of Bureau (f Provisions and Clothing. Mahie 8,600 

Tbqmab Fulrbrown, C%»<f Cterib «* « Maine 1,800 

WouAM Whxlan, Chitf of Bureau cf Medicine and Surgery Pennsylvania ^^600 

^BDOAS J. HoEWin, .issiitofrt «< « « ..........Maryland. 9jBM 



106 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[186^. 



NAVAL ACADEMY, NEWPORT, R.L 

Superintendent. 

Commodore George S. Blake, U.S.N. 

Academic Staff. 

Lieut. Commander Edward SimiMon, Commandant of Midshipmen, Instrucfy>r qf Seanuiruhipy Naval 

Ounnery, and NoiwU Tactict. 
Liout. Commander Stephen B. Lnce, ABsistant to Commandant of Midshipmen, Inttruelor of Sea- 
manship and Naval Tactics. 
Lieut. Commander Edmund O.Matthews, Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen, Instructor of Naval 

Gunnery and Field Artillery. 
Lieut. Commander Edward P. Lull, Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen, in charge qf Ship 

CbnstittUion. 
Lieut. Commander Robert L. Phjrthian, Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen, in charge qf l^ip 

Santee. 

Assistaat to Commandant of Midshipmen. 

Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen. 

Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen. 

Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen, Instructor iff In- 
fantry Tactics. 

Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen. 

Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen. 

Assistant to Commandant of Midshipmen. 

Proftswr of Astronomy f Navigation^ and Surveying. 

Professor and Assistant of Mathematics. 

Professor and A$sistant of Mathematics. 

Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy, 

Professor of Ethics and English J^udies. 

Professor of the French Language. 

Professor of the Spanish Language, 

Professor of Drawing. 

Assistant Professor of EthUa and English Studies, 

Assistant Professor of the French Language. 

Assistant Professor qf Ethics and English Studies. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematict. 

Assistant L&nrarianf Assistant InHructor qf Mathanaties and 
En^ish Studies. 

Assi^nt Professor qf Mathematics, 

Assistant Prqfessor qf Mathematics, 

Assistant Prqfessor qf Ethics and English Studies, 

Assistant Prqfusor qf Ethics and English Studies. 

Assistant Professor of Wiics and English Studies. 

AssistatU Prqfessor of Ethics and English Studies. 

Chaplain^ and Assist. Professor of EtJiics and English Studies. 

Sword-Master. 



Lieutenant Francis B. Blake, 
Lieutenant Alfred T. Mahan, 
Lieutenant Theodore F. Kane, 
Lieutenant Joseph D. Marvin, 

Lieutenant Simeon P. Gillett, 

Lieutenant Thomas L. Swann, 

Lieutenant William T. Sampson, 

John H. C. Coffin, 

Mark H. Beecher, 

William H. Willcox, 

Augustus W. Smith, 

Joseph E. Nourse, 

Arsdne N. Girault, 

Edward A. Roget, 

Edward Seager, 

Thomas Kamey, 

Leopold y. DoYilliers, 

Thomas G. Forde, 

Augustus L. Smith, 

Charles J. White, 

John A. Dayenport, 

George Searle, 
George A. Osborne, 
Httiry S. Mackintosh, 
Isaac B. Barber, 
William W. Fay, 
Joseph E. Diclcson, 
William A. Hitchcock, 
Justin Bonnafous, 



Officers not attached to the Academic Staff. 



James C. Palmer, 
Horace M. Hieskell, 
Mason Noble, 
David F, Ricketts, 
Richard M. Chase, 
BJctiard Swann, 



Surgeon. 

Paymaster, 

Chaplain. 

Assistant Surgeon. 

Secretary, 

Cbmmittary, 



Edward Sparks, Storekeeper. 
Owen D. Robb, Clerk to the SuperintendenL 

Theophilus L, Dunn, Clerk to the SuperintendenL 
Charles L. Harris, Clerk to the Commandant </ 

Midshipmen. 
Joeeidi H. Havens. CUrk to tlte PUymaster. 



1863.] 



NAVY DKPARTM^NT. 



107 



"Svrj 
TffERE has been In the past history of the navy 
no little confusion in regard to the rank of eom- 
maaders of squadronu. The Continental Con- 
gress OD the 15th Not. 1776, provided for the fol- 
lowing grades above the rank of captain : admiral 
to rank as a general; yice-admiral to rank as a 
tientenant-general; rear-admiral as a mt^or-ge- 
oeral; and commodore as a brigadier-general. 
Aft^ the reorganization of the navy under 
the Constitution, these ranks were abolished. 
Captains were the highest in rank of the Ame- 
rican naviil officers, though a practice had grown 
up without legal authority of bestowing the title 
of commodore on a captain commanding a squad- 
ron. Serious difficulties had grown out of this, 
in conseqnence of admirals of foreign squadrons 
refusing to give more than a captain's salute to 
our commodores, and in one or two instances 
duels tiad followed. Captain Shnbrick, on sailing 
upon the Paraguay expedition, and Captain 
Preuch Forest, now an officer of the Rebel navy, 
when in command of the Brazil Squadron, both 
took the title and adopted the insignia of admi- 
rals, by hoisting *' the wide flag at the fore.'' 
Hiis course had no legal warrant, and was re- 
buked in both instances by the Navy Department. 
In 1856, the rank of Flag Officer, bestowed on 
the captain commanding a squadron, wag created 
bj Congress, to obviate the difficulty heretofore 
experienced. 

On the 16th of July, 1862, the bill providing lor 
changes in the rank, Ac. of the officers of the 
navy passed both Houses of Congress, and bo* 
came a law. This law provides that '^ the Active 
lists of line officers of the United States navy 
■hall be divided into nine grades, taking rank 
Mcording to the date of their commission In each 
Snde as follows : — 

I. Rear-Admirals. 
II. Commodores, 
ni. Captains. 
lY. Commanders. 
Y. Lieutenant-Commanders. 
YI. Lieutenants. 
Yn. Masters. 
YIII. Ensigns. 
IX Midshipmen," 

and, further, **that the relative rank between 
officers of the navy and the army shall be as 
fcllows, real rank only to be considered : — 

Rear-Admirals to rank with Major-Generals. 

Commodores " with Brigadier-Generals. 

Captains «« with Colonels. 

Commanders <* with Lieutenant-Colonels, 

lieut. Com'drs « with Majors. 

Lieutenants ** with Captains. 

Masters <« with First Lieutenants. 

KiMigns <« with Second Lieutenants." 

An Advisory Board was appointed to assign the 
Mw ranlu to the officers of the navy, and this 
Board reported In August, 1869^ and their report i 



was sanctioned by the President. This report 
was as follows :— 

Those marked with a star were not recom- 
mended for promotion by the Advisory Board. 

Rear-Admirals. — Active List (4). 

David G. Farragut, Samuel F. Dupont, 

L. M. €k>ldsborough, Andrew H. Foote. 

RbabtAdvibals^— iSeftred List (9). 

Charles Stewart, 5 Francis H. Gregory, 

William B. Shubrick, Elie A. E. Lavalletts^ 
Joseph Smith, Silas H. Stringham, 

George W. Storer, Samuel L. Breese, 

Hiram Paulding. 

AcTiiro BsA&-Ai>]nRAi.s (5). 

Chartes Wilkes, Charles H. Bell, 

Theodorus Bailey, Samuel P. Lee, 

6. David D. Porter. 

GoMMODORKS.— Active List (16). 

Henry Eagle. Henry K. lloff, 

G. J. Yan Brunt, 10 Charles H. Davis» 
WiUiani M. Gleody, Henry H. Bell, 
George S. Blake, William Smith, 

6 Andrew A. Ilarwood, John W. Livingston^ 
Cadwalader Ringgold, Henry K. Thatcher, 
Henry W. Morris, 16 William D. Porter, 
James L. Lardnor, John S. Missroon. 

OoKUOtKmxa.—JUtired Liri (16). 

John D. Sloat, Joshua R. Sands, 

William Mervine, 10 Joseph R. Jarvis, 
Thomas Crabbe, G. J. Pendergrast, 

Thomas A. Conover, William C. Nicholson. 

5 John C. Long, Joseph B. Hull, , 
William J. McCIuney, John Kelly, 

J. B. Montgomery, 16 Williiun H. Gardner, 
C. K. Stribling, T. Aloysius Dornin. 

CAVTAiV8,~-Aetive List (39). 

Thomas 0. Selfridge,* 20 Stephen C. Rowan, 
Andrew K. Long,* Guert Gansevoort, 

Francis B. Ellison,* Charles Green, 
Thomas T. Craven,* Melancton Smithy 

6 Robert B. Hitchcock, Cicero Price, 
Joseph Lanman, 2b J. R. Goldsborough, ' 
Thomas Turner, Charles S. Boggs, 
Charles H. Poor, Augustus H. Kilty, 
Timothy A. Hunt, Theodore P. Green, 

10 Sylvanus W. Godon, Percival Drayton, 
James S. Palmer, 80 Joseph F. Green, 
William Radford, John DeCamp, 

Samuel F. Hazard, Charles W. Pickering^ 

John M. Berrien, William M. Walker, 

16 Alfred Taylor, John A. Winslow, 

John P. Gillis, 85 Henry Waike, 

James P. McKInstry, Thornton A. Jenkini^ 
Oliver S. Glisson, John Rodgers, 

John A. Dahlgren, John B. Marchand, 

William Rogers Taylor. 

Ckttaiks.— Retired List (22). 

Lawrence Kearny,* Robert Ritchie, 
Charles S. McCauley,* William W. McKean, 

John H. Aulick,* Charles Lowndes, 

James Armstrong,* 16 John Marston, 

6 William Ramsay,* Henry A. Adams, 

William Inman,* William S. Walker, 

John S. Chauncey,* George F. Pearson, 

Stephen B. Wilson,* John S. Nicholas, 

James Glynn, 20 John Pope, 

10 Frederick En^^ Levin M. Powell, 

John Rndd^ Hugh Y. Purvianoa. 



108 



THB NATIONAL ALMAKAO. 



CKrTAnts^—JUtened Lid (10). 

William D. Salter, Stephen Champlto, 

William K. Latimer, Lewis K. Simonda, 
Cfaarlea Boarmiui, Ok»u- Bullua, 

William Jameaaon, Amaaa l*Aiue, 

6 John U. Uraham, 10 Jamea M. Uilliaa. 



flamael Lockwood,* 
John Colhuoii,* 
BezvJ. J. Totten,* 
J. Findlaj Schenck,* 
6 George A. Prentiaa,* 
John a Oirter * 
Simon B. liiaaell,^ 
Samuel Swartwont,* 
John J. Glasson,* 

10 Richard W. Meade,* 
Alexander Olbaon,* 
Bei^. More Dove,* 
Bei\j. F. Sandfl, 
Uenrj Frencli,* 

15 Henry S. Stellwagen, 
Daniel B. Ridgely, 
Charles Steedman, 
Jamea Alden, 
AngustoB L.CaMy 

SO Rogier Perry,* 
Alex. M. Pennock, 
George F. Kmrnona, 
Edward Mlddleton, 
Gustovus H. Scott, 

25 Darid McDougal, 
John J. Almy, 
Tunis A. M. CmTen, 
Jamea H. Strong, 
Jamea M. FmHey, 

ao A. S. Baldwin,* 
Thos. M. Braaher,* 
Enoch G. Parrott, 
Wm. B. Renshaw, 
Lonia C. Sartori, 

S5 Bdmand Lanier,* 
Fabiua Stanly,* 
Jaa. F. Armstrong, 
William A. Parker. 
Wm. Ronckendorff, 

40 Wm. S. LeKoy, 
Maxwell Woodhull, 
Roger N. Stembel, 
Geo. ColTocoreasia, 
J. R. M. Mullany, 

45 Hatthiaa C. Marin,* 



■Active LiH (90). 

a B. P. Rodgera, 
James C. M illiamson, 
Albert G. Clary, 
NaiHileon Cullina, 

fiO John L. Worden, 
Heuiy A. Wise, 
Reed Werden, 
Wm. H. Macomb, 
S. I>. Trendiard, 

56 A. Daris llarreU, 
Alexander Murray, 
£dward Donaldson, 
Thomas II. iSteTena, 
Thos. U. Patterson, 

00 Francis Key Murray, 
John C. Howell, 
Daniel Ammen, 
Henry Rokindo, 
Kdward T. Nidiols, 

06 George W. Rodgera, 
Robert H. Wyman, 
Edward A. Barnett, 
Nathaniel G. Bryant, 
George B. Balch, 

70 Jona. M. Wainwright, 
Foxhall A. Parker, 
John Guest, 
D. McN. Falrfiix, 
John M. B. Clltz, 

76 George H. Cooper, 
Andrew Bryson, 
John Downes, 
Andrew J. Drake, 
James H. Spotts, 

80 James M. Duncan. 
John P. Bankhead, 
J. W. A. Kicholson, 
Thomas G. Corbln, 
John C. Beaumont, 

86 Chas. H. B. Caldwell, 
Henry K. Davenport, 
N. B. Harrison, 
Albert N. Smith, 
John C. Febiger, 

90 H. S. Newcomb. 



Coiiif ANDEB8.— ^a'rerf Lift (7). 

T. Darah Shaw, Robert Handy, 

William 8. Ogden, 6 Edwanl M. Yard, 
Edward R. Thompson, Orerton Oair, 
Francis S. Haggerty. 

ComiAiineBa.— jRejerred Liit (ll)* 



John J. Tonng, 
Ed. W. Carpender, 
Henry Brat^ 
KliMha Peck, 
5 Chas. UL Jackson* 



James M. Wfttaoo, 
Peter Tumor. 
James F. Miller, 
Stephen Decntur, 
10 Cliarlea Hunter, 



William Reynolds. 
LncTRTAirr OoioiAirpEBft.— ^ceive List (144). 



Pierce Crosby, 
J. B. Cmlghton, 
Aaron K. Hufl^et, 
Abner Read, 
5A]ez.aBUnd, 



George M. Ransom, 
Wm. F. Splcer, 
S. Nlcholflon, 
Wm. E. Hopkku, 
lOPaulShhrlqr. 



H. N. T. Arnold, 
Thomas Pattison, 
Richmond Aulick, 
William N. JefTcrs, 

16 Edward Simpson, 
l\ illiam G. Temple, 
Samuel P. Garter, 
Thomas S. Phelps, 
John Madigan, Jr., 

20 Leonard Paulding, 
George A. Stevens^ 
Edward Barrett, 
Homer C. Blake^ 
Clark H. Wells, 

36 8. P. Quackenbnsh, 
Earl English, 
Joseph M. Bradford, 
Reigart B. Lowry, 
D. A. McDermut, 

80 William W. Low, 
Richard L. Law, 
John H. Upshur, 
Samuel R. Franklin, 
William D. Whiting, 

85 8. I^dyard Phelpa, 
William Mitchell, 
Francis A. Roe, 
WUliam Gibson, 
J. C. P. DeKraflt, 

40 John K. Hart, 
Oscar 0. Badger, 
Thomas C. Harria, 
Stephen B. Luce, 
John L. Davis, 

46 Alex. A. Semmea, 
James S. Thornton, 
M. Patterson Jones, 
Watson Smith. 
Joaeph £. Dellaven, 

60 William T. Truxtun, 
Greenleaf Cflley, 
Samuel Magaw, 
MintamCWest, 
William M. Gamble^ 

66 Jonathan Young, 
William K. Mayo, 
James K. Jouett, 
T. Scott Fillebrown, 
Edward C. Grafton, 

00 Milton Haxton, 
George W. Young, 
John H. Russell, 
Edward K. Stone, 
Dawson Pbenix, 

06 Robert F. R. Lewis, 
Andrew W. Johnson, 
Robert W. Scott, 
Walter W. Queen, 
Edmund W. Henry, 

70 Ralph Chandler, 
P. C. Johnson, Jr., 
John Watters, 
K. Randolph Breeea^ 
Lewis A. Kimberly, 

76 S. L. Brecse, 
George U. Morris, 
Bancroft Gherardi, 



[186a. 

Daniel L. BraJna, 
L. II* Kewman, 
80 Charles W. Flusaer* 
A. B. Cumniings, 
George E. Belknap^ 

E. P. Williams. 
David B. Harmony, 

86 William Owin, 
John J. Corn well, 
James P. Foster, 
Henry WILson, 
A. £. K. Benham, 
00 W. McGunnegle, 
John Irwin, 
Joseph S. tkerrett, 
James A. Greer, 
Charles H. Greene, 
95 Francis R. Baker, 
Itllas K. Owen, 
Aaron W. Weaver, 
Austin Pendero-aat, 
William P. McCann, 

100 James Stillwell, 
James H. Oillis, 
Wm. £. Fitxliugh, 
Trevett Abbot. 
Chas. H. Cnshman, 

106 Oscar F. Stanton, 
H. A. Adnms Jr., 
George Brown, 
Bushrod B. Taylor, 
Robert L. May, 

110 James W. Shirk, 
James G. Maxwell, 
Henry Erben, 
Edward P. MrCreft, 
John G. Walker, 

U5 John G. Mitchell, 

F. M. Ramsay, 
R.W. Meade. Jr., 
M. C. Campbell, 
Robert Boyd, Jr. 

120 Chaa. C. Carpenter,. 
Wm. A.Kir klaody 
Wm. H. Dana, 
Edward K. Potter, 
George Bacon, 

125 J. C. Chaplin, 
L. A. Beardslee, 
Chas. A. Babcock, 
Chas. E. Fleming, 
Thoe. O. Selfridge, 

180 Joaeph N. Miller, 
Alfred Hopkina, 
Montgomery Sicard, 
S. 0. Mathewa, 
T. McK. Buchanan, 

186 Edward P. Lull, 
Edward Lea, 
Alex. F. Crosman, 
Chas. S. Norton, 
George A. Bigelow, 

140 Robert F. Bradford, 
RoMft L. Phvthian, 
Augustus P. Cooke, 
Le Roy Fitch, 
T. H. Eastman. 



luvrEyxvn.— Active LiH (104). 

George W. Doty • John P. Hall,* 

Robert B. IMelf* Fmncis G. Dallas,* 

Egbert niompeon,* Joseph P. Fyfle.* 

Bayse N. Westcott,* Charles £. Hawley,< 

5 W. Winder PoUock,* 10 Rush R. Wallace, 



1863.] 

Chester Hatfield, 
Chas. J. McDoagal, 
George H. Perkins, 
George M. Blodgett, 

15 Weld N. Allen, 
Nathaniel Green, 
Francis B. Rake, 
Henry D. Todd, 
James H. Pritchett, 

W Edward Terry, 
Francis M. Bunce, 
Byron Wilson, 
Henry B. Seely, 
Frederick V. McNair, 

.25John W.Kelly, 
Arthur R. Tates, 
(^k Merchant, 
Henry W. Miller, 
John Adams Howell, 

90 Allen V. Reed, 
George Dewey, 
ChArles L. Franklin, 
George B. White, 
Joshua Bishop, 

35 Henry L. Howison, 
Henry Martin Blue, 
Albert Kautz, 
Alfred T. Mahan, 
George C. Remey, 

40 Alex. S. Mackenzie, 
Norman H. Farqahar, 
Samuel D. Qreene, 



NAYT DBPARTKBKT. 



Theodore F. Kane, 
Beatty P. Smith. 

45 C. M. Schoomnaker, 
Roderick I'rentiss, 
Roderick S. McCook, 
Gilbert C. Wiltse, 
Thomas S. Spencer, 

50 Moues S. Stuyvesant, 
Joseph D. Marvin, 
James (/Kane, 
Simeon P. Gillet, 
Thomas L. Swann, 

55 Sullivan D. Ames, 
J. C. Watson, 
Henry B. Robeson, 
Antoine R. McNair, 
Win. Henry Barton, 

60 Samuel F. Brown, 
Henry DeH. Manley, 
William Whitehead, 
Edward A. Walker, 
Winfield S. Schley, 

65 Silas Casey, Jr., 
Wm. T. Sampson, 
A. T. SneU, 
Wm. F. Stewart, 
George P. Ryan, 

70 George M. Bache, 
Adolphus Dexter, 
Lloyd Phenix, 
Thomas C. Bowen, 
Tecumseh Steece, 



75 B. J. CromweU, 
G. W. Hayword, 
Charles E. McKay, 
John W. Philip, 
Henry F. Picking, 

80 Frederick Rodgers, 
F. 0. Davenport, 
Horace E. Mullan, 
John Weidman, 
John F. McGlensey, 

85 S. Backus, 

Wm. B. Cushing, 
Samuel W. Preston, 
Boswell H. Lamson, 
Horean Forrest, 



100 

90 Edwin T. Brower, 
Herbert B. Tyson, 
Louis Kempff, 
N. W. Thomas, 
Rufus K. Duer, 

05 John H. Rowland, 
Smith W. Nichols, 
George W. Sumner, 
James P. Robertson, 

F. J. Higginson, 
100 John McFarland, 

A. N. MitcheU, 

G. W. Zimmerman, 
8. A. McCarty, 
Henry C. Tallman. 



1Jxirna(AJiTB.Setired List (6). 

Xdwin J. De Haven, Matthew G. Perry, 
James A. Doyle, 5 Chas. S. McDonong^ 

George WeUa, W. P. Bucknor. 

LzxunirAMTS.— -ISeierved List (17). 



Frank EUenr, 
Jonathan W. Swift, 
Junius J. Boyle, 
George R.Gray, 
6 Bernard J. Moeller, 
George M. White, 
George L. Selden, 
Edward C. Bowers, 
John 



Dominick Lynch, 
10 Charles Thomas, 
Wm. B. Whitings 
Samuel R. Knox, 
Francis Lowry, 
Thomas Brownell, 
15 M. B. Woolsey, 
S. Chase Barney, 
F. Abbott. 



Pay of the "Svtj of the United States. 

NoRs.— All officers, while at sea or attached to a sealing vessel, dull be allowed one ration. 

No rations shall be allowed to any offlcen of the navy on the retired list. 

The pay of all naval officers appointed by virtue of an act entitled " An act to provide for the tempo- 
rary increase of the navy," approved July 24, 1861, shall be the same as that of officers of a Uke grade 
in the regular navy. (See act July 16, 1862.) 



RuK Ai>icmAl.s {Aiiive LU£), Per annum. 

When at sea ^,000 

When on shore duty 4^000 

(hi leave or waiting orders 8,000 

On Retired List 2,000 

OnmoDOKss {AdUve List). 

When at sea 4,000 

When on shore duty v* ^^^ 

On leave or waiting orders 2,400 

On Retired Litt 1,800 

CiPTAnre {Active List). 

When at sea. 3,500 

When on shore duty 2,800 

On leave or waiting orders 2,100 

On ReCind List 1,600 

Cowamns {Active List). 

When at sea 2,800 

When on shore duty 2,240 

On leave or waiting orders 1,680 

On Rdirtd List 1,400 

Iaoteivaiit Com m Ain>EB8 {Active List), 

When at sea. 2,343 

When on shore duty 1,875 

On leave or waiting orders 1,500 

On Retired List 1,300 

lizuTENAirrs {Active List). 

When at sea 1,875 

When on shore duty 1,600 

On leave or waiting orders 1,200 

On Retired List 1,000 



BlASfXBS {Active Lia£). Per annum. 

When at sea ^.500 

When on shore duty..... , 1,200 

On leave or waiting orders 960 

On Retired List 800 

Ensigns {Active List), 

When at sea ...., 1,200 

When on shore duty 960 

On leave or waiting orders 768 

On Retired List 500 

MiDSHiPHEir 500 

Fleet Surobons 3,300 

SUBaBONS — 

On duty at sea — 

For first five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,200 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,400 

For third five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,600 

For fourth five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 1^800 

For twenty years and upwards after 

date of commission 8,000 

On other duty — 

For first five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,000 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,200 



110 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



SuBAiOHS (Oontinued). Per annum. 

For third five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon $2,400 

For fourth five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,600 

For twenty years and upwards after 

date of commission 2,800 

On leave or waiting orders — 

For ftrst five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 1,600 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 1,800 

For third fire years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 1,900 

For fourth five years after date of com- 
mission as surgeon 2,100 

For twenty years and upwards after 
date of commission. 2^00 

BcnUD 8UB0E0NS— 

Surgeons ranking with commanders... 1^00 

i^nrgeons ranking with lieutenants 1,000 

Rribbd Pass£B awd Assisiant SmaEOna — 

Passed 860 

Assistant 650 

Passxd Assistant Surosons — 

On duty at sea 1,500 

On otherduty 1,400 

On leave or waiting orders 1,100 

AansTAifT Surgeons — 

On duty at sea 1,260 

On other duty 1,050 

On leave or waiting orders 800 

Paymasters — 

On duty at sea — 
For first five years after date of com- 
mission 2,000 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission 2,400 

For third five years after date of com- 
mission 2,600 

For fourth five years after date of com- 
mission 2,900 

For twenty years and upwards after 

date of commission. 3,100 

On other duty — 
For first five years after date of com- 
mission 1,800 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission 2,100 

For third five years after date of com- 
mission 2,400 

For fourth five years after date of com- 
mission 2,600 

For twenty years and upwards after 

date of commission 2,800 

On leave or waiting orders — 
For first five years after date of com- 
mission 1,400 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission 1,600 

For third five years after date of com- 
mission 1,800 

For fourth five years after date of com< 

mission 2,000 

For twenty years and upwards after 

date of commission 2,250 

Patmasters Rstxred [Under acts of Aug. 3 
and Dec. 21, 1861 1— 

Ranking with commanders 1,100 

Ranking with lieutenants. 1,000 

AsasTANT Paymasters — 
On duty at sea — 
First five years after date of commission 1,300 



Per axmnm. 
Assistant Patmasrhs (Continued). 

After five yean from date oi commis- 
sion .$1,500 

On other duty — 
First five years alter date of commis- 
sion 1,000 

After five years from date of commis- 
sion 1,200 

On leave or waiting orders — 
First five years after date of commission 800 
After five years from date of commis- 
sion 1,000 

Chaplains— To be paid as lieutenants. 
PBonssoRS OF Mathematics — * 

On duty 1,800 

On leave or waiting orders 000 

BoATswAi.NS, Gunners, Oarpentsbs, and 
Sailmaxsrs — 
On duty at sea — 
For first three years* sea-service from 

date of appointment* 1,000 

For second three years' searservice 

from date of appointment I,lfi0 

For third three years' sea-service from 

date of appointment 1,280 

For fourth three years' sea-service 

from date of appointment 1,350 

For twelve years' sea-service and up- 
wards 1,450 

On other duty — 
For first three years' sea-service after 

date of appointment 800 

¥oT second three years* sea-service 

after date of appointment 000 

For third three years' sea-service after 

date of appointment 1,000 

For fourth three years* sea-service 

after dateof appointment 1,100 

For twelve years' seiMorvice and up- 
wards - 1,300 

On leave or waiting orders — 
For first three years' sea-service after 

date of appointment 600 

For second three years' searservice 

after date of appointment 700 

For third three years' seaservice afteor 

date of appointment 800 

For fourth three years' searservioe 

after date of appointment 000 

For twelve years' sea-service and up- 
wards 1,000 

Chiep Engineers— 
On duty — 
For first five years after date of com- 
mission. 1,800 

For second five years after date of com- 

mission 2,200 

For third five years after date of com- 

mission 2,450 

After fifteen years firom date of comr 

mission 2fiM 

On leave or waiting orders — 
For first five years after date of com- 
mission 1,200 

For second five years after date of com- 
mission 1,300 

For third five years alter date of con»> 

mission 1,400 

After fifteen years frxxm date of com- 
mission 1,500 

First Assistant Enoineebs — 

On duty « i,2fi0 



• Act of July 16, 1863. 



1868.] 



NAVY DBPABTMS5T. 



Ill 



Per anDQm. 

First Assistant EiroiwiBBS (Continued). 

Od leave or waiting orders. $000 

Sioo!n> Assistant Emoinesrs — 

On duty 1»000 

On leave or waiting orders. 760 

fnin Assistant Enginbxbs — 

On duty 750 

On leave or waiting orders 600 

Xatt AeiNTS, commissions not to exceed.... 3,000 

Navt Aqknt at San Francisco 4,000 

TnroRA&T Navt Aocnts 

Natal Storbkekprrs 

OflScers of the navy on foreign stations 1,!K)0 

QfOIHUR-IN-CHIKF 8,000 

Xatu Oonstbuctors 2,600 

Natal Oonstructobs, when not on duty 1,800 

SiCRRARDU to commanders of squadrons..... 1,500 

Clues to commanders of squadrons and 

commanders of vessels 500 

At navy yards Boston and New York. 1,200 

At navy yard Washington 1,200 

At navy yards Portsmouth, N.Hn and 

Philadelphia 1,200 

At navy yard Mare Island 1,500 

Fust Clbrks to commandants — 

At Boston and New York 1,200 

At Washington 1,200 

At PorUmonth and Philadelphia. 1,200 

At Mare Island 1,500 

Bbcoxb Clrrxs to commandants — 

At Boston and Mew York 060 

At Washington OGO 

Clerks— 

To paymasters in ships-of-tbe-line 700 

To paymasters in frigates 500 

To paymasters in smaller vessels than 

afrigate 400 

To paymasters at navy yards 500 

Tkhosi— Per month. 

In 8hipsK)f-the-line $15 

In frigates 40 

In sloops 90 

In sm^dler vessela. m. 24 

Arxorebs— ' 

In ships-of-tho-line 30 

In frigates... 25 

In sloops 20 

HiTrs— 

Master's (acting) 40 

BoaUwain's 25 

Gunner's 25 



Per month. 
BIatks (Continued). 

Carpenter's .$25 

Sailmaker's ^ 20 

Armorer's 20 

Master-at-Arms. 25 

Ship's Corporals 20 

Coxswains 24 

Quartermasters 24 

QCARTEBrOuXNERS 20 

Captains — 

Of forecastle 24 

Of tops 20 

Of afterguard 20 

Of hold 20 

COOPBRS 20 

Painters 20 

Stswards — 

Sh^'s 90 

Officer's 20 

Surgeon's, where ship's complement is 

400 and over 40 

Surgeon's, where ship's complement is 

200 and under 400 33 

Surgeon's, where ship's complement is 

under 200 25 

Paymaster's, where complement is 240 

and over 83 

Assistant paymaster's, where comple- 

ment is 100 and over 33 

Assistant jKivmaster's, where comple- 
ment is under 100 30 

NUBSSS— 

Where complement is less than 200, one 

nurse t 14 

Where complement is over 200, two 

nurses, each 14 

Coox»— 

Ship's 24 

Officer's 20 

Masters of ths Band 20 

Mc8ia\N8 — 

First class 15 

Second class 12 

Seamen 18 

Ordinary Seamen. 14 

Landsmen 12 

Bora Sand 

Firemen — 

First class 30 

Second class 25 

COAL-HXAVKRS 18 



VES8ELS-0F-WAE OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY, NOVEMBER, 1862. 

The following table shows the name, class, number of guns, tonnage, and position, of each veitsel in 
the navy, on the 1st of November, 1862. 

Side- Wheel Steamers, 



Name. 



AlabanuL^ 

AogTuta 

Alfred Robb 

Ascatney. 

Afftwam 

Bienville «.... 

Ooneraangh 

CimmeroDe 

CiMUMCtL'Ut 



■ 

a 


s 





o 


8 


H 


1,281 


8 


1,310 


4 


225 


8 


074 


8 


074 


10 


1,558 


8 


055 


10 


860 


5 


1,800 



Present Location. 



8. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Western Flotilla 
B'ld'ftNewburyp'rt 
Building, Portland 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Supply Steamer 



Name. 



Coeur de Lion..... 

Com. Morris 

Commodore Hull 
Com.McDonough 

Com. Perry 

Com. Barney 

Clifton 

Clara Bolsen 

Chenango 



i 


s 





Q 


O 
2 


H 


60 


4 


532 


3 


376 


6 


582 


4 


513 


4 


513 


6 


802 


• •• 


1,000 


8 


974 



Present Location. 



Potomac Flotilla 
Building, New York 
Fitting, New York 
Fitting, New York 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
Western Flotilla 
Building, New York 



112 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 
Side- Wheel Sleamen.—Continmtd. 



[1868. 



N 



Ghicopee. . 

Calhoun 

De Soto 

Delaware.. 

I>ragon 

Darlington 

£IIen....~ — ....... 

SUis 

EUa. 

Ekitaw. 

Wart Henry... 

Florida » 

Geneaee............. 

Hetzel 

Hnnchlwick-~ ..... 

Harriet Lan& 

I. N. Seymoar.... 

loflco......... 

James Adger 

Jacob Bell 

John P. Jackson. 
Jno. L. Lockwood 
Judge Turrence.. 

King Fbilip . 

Keystone State.. 
Kensington 

Wcli^Ean 

Miaaianppi 

Uercury 

Mt. Washington. 

Maratanza 

Miami 

Mahaska. 

Morse 

Magnolia , 

Mattat)esett 

Mingo 



Metacomet. 

Mendota.... 



a 

9 

O 



8 
4 

3 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
8 
6 
9 
4 
2 
4 
3 
4 
2 
8 
9 
3 
6 
2 



9 
3 
8 
1 
12 
2 

6 
7 

6 
2 
3 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 



I 






974 
508 

1,000 
357 
118 
300 
3U 
100 
230 
974 
519 

1,261 
803 
20O 
617 

1,100 
619 
133 
974 

1,151 
229 

m 

180 
600 
500 
1,364 
1,062 
074 
582 
1,692 
187 
500 
786 
730 
832 
513 
813 
974 
974 
974 
974 
974 



Bnilding, Borton 

W.Onlf Sqnadnm 
Potomac Flotilla 
Potomac Flotilla 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Sqoadnm 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
Potomac Flotilla 
Bld^g. Baltimore 
E.0nlf Sqoadnm 
S. Atlan. Sqnadnm 
X. Atlan. Squadron 
y . Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
W.6nlf Sqnadnm 
W.Onlf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
B'kfe, Baltimore 
S. Atlan. Sqnadrm 
Potomac Flotilla 
W.Onlf Squadron 
N. Atlan. Sqnadnm 
Western Flotilla 
Potomac Flotilla 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W.Gulf Sqnadnm 
Boildiog, Newark 
On thelidLcs 
W.Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Potomac Flotilla 
N . Atlan. Sqnadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadroa 
N. Atlan. Sqnadnm 
£. Gulf Squadron 
Building, Boston 
Bid'g, BordentowB 
Building, Boston 
Building, N. York 
Building, Brooklyn 



Name. 



Mackzoaur 

0. M. Pettit .._... 

Octorara 

Otsego... ... ........ 

Pulaski 

Port Royal 

Paul Jonea. 

PhiladelpliJa...... 

xisDicr ••«••«»••« ••• 

Pontine. 

Pontoosne 

Quaker City 

Rhode Island 

Saginaivr 

Saranac. — 

Susquehanna ..... 

Satellite 

Santiago de Cuba 

Somerset 

Stepfrfttg-Stones.. 
State of Georgia. 
Shawslieen. .... . .. 

Sebago 

Sonthfiekl 

Sonoma........... 



Shammrk 

Tacony .... 

Thomas Freeborn 

Tioga 

Tennessee.... 

Tallapoosa 

Underwriter 

Tixen .............. 

Water-mtch. — 

Wyandank 

Westfleid 

W. 6. Putnam.... 
wateree... ... ..• ..< 

Wyalusing: 

Yankee 

Young America 



S 
O 



8 

2 
6 
8 
1 
8 
6 

2 
8 
8 
9 
7 
3 
9 
17 
2 
• 
10 
1 
9 
2 
6 
4 
6 
8 
8 
8 
2 
6 
ft 
8 
4 
2 
3 
2 
6 
2 
8 
8 
3 
1 



a 



974 
165 
829 
974 



805 
863 

500 
! 90O 

974 

974 
1,600 
1,617 

453 
1,446 
2,459 

217 
1,567 

521 



1,2M 
180 
832 
751 
955 
974 
974 
974 
260 
819 

1,275 
0r4 
341 
300 
378 



891 
140 
974 
974 



Present Location. 



173 



BiiildfB& N. York 
S. Atlaa. Squadnm 
W. Ind. Sqnadron 
Buildins, N. York 
Coast of Braail 
E.Gnlf SqaadxM 
S. Atlan. Sqandron 
N. Atlan. Sqaadran 
8. Atlan. SqfvadroD 
Bld*g.Fltiladelplifa 
Building, Portlaiid 
S. Aflaa. Squadron 
Su|ip.St«aa.G.Sq. 
San Fiaacisco 
PaciftcSqaadnm 
iW.GulfSqvMdzva 
' Potomae FkiCilla 
West Indica 
£. Gulf SFquadroa 
Potomac Flotilla 
N. Atlan. Sqvadraa 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Sqnadnm 
W. Ind. Sqnadnm 
Bnd'g.Portsmoath 
BuiidiD^ N. York 
Bld-g^ Philadelphte 
Potomac Flocaia 
W. Ind. Sqnadran 
W. Gulf Squadron 
Bnilding. Koaton 
I N. Atlan. Sqnadnm 
( New Yoik 
I S. Atlan. S qn a dn m 
■ Potomac Flotilla 
< W. Gnlf Sqnadron 
N. Atlan. Sqnadron 
md^g. Cheater, Pa. 
Bld'g,PfailadelpUa 
' Potomac Flotilla 
' X. Atlan. Sqnadron 



Serew-SteamerB. 



Name. 



ADej^ny , 

Anacostia . ... 

Aroostook...... 

A. C. Powell 

Albatroea . ....... 

Kvtiklyn ^^.... 

ColMudo...... ... 

Canandaigua..» .. 
Crusader... ...... 

Cambridga..* .. .. 

Chippewa..^^ .. 
Choeura...... 

Oayuga.....^. . 

Coxritnck ........ 

Oofaaasat ..^^..•. 
Dacotah.^^... 
Dawn............. 

Bayligfat 



s 



(3 

o 


Present Location. 


O 


H 




6 


989 


Recefy. Ship, Bait. 


2 


217 


Potomac Flotilla 


4 


507 


West Indies 


1 


65 


N. Atlan. Squadron 


4 


378 


W.Gulf Squadron 


21 


2,070 


W.Gulf Squadron 


48 


3,435 


Rep'g. Portsmouth 


9 


1,396 


S. Atlan. Sqnadron 


6 


M5 


X. Atlan. Squadron 


5 


858 




4 


507 


Mediterranean. 


4 


507 


N. A tlan. Sqnadron 


1 


144 


N. Atlan. Squadron 


6 


507 


W.Gulf Squadron 


5 


103 


Potomac Flotilla. 


2 


100 


X. Atlan. Squadron 


6 


907 


Special Serrice. 


3 


301 


S. Atlan. Sqnadnm 


4 


682 


N. Athm. Squadron 




E. B. Hale.~.. 
Franklin — .... 



Flag 

Hartford..... .. 

Huntsville — .... 

Henry Brinker.. 

Honsatonic'. . 

Huron 

Iroquois.....^... 
Isaac Smith...... 

Itasca 

J(^n Hancock... 
Juniata.. ...... .m^ 

Kearsarge. 
Kanawha.. 
Kennebec 

Kineo 

Katahdin.. 



7«»« ••• ••• 



Present Location. 



S. Atlan. Sqnadron 
L'nfin., Portsmotith 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
E. Gulf Sqnadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Sqnadron 
>ew York 
S. Atlan. Sqnadnm 
W. Gnlf Sqnadnm 
Qrdin'y.Mare Island 
Bld'g, Philadelphia 
On Special Berriea 
W. Gulf Sqnadnm 
W. Gulf Sqnadnm 
W. Gulf Sqnadnm 
W. Gulf Sqnadnm 



1868.] 



S«fe»- Steamers. — ConHnned. 



118 



Name. 



Lmcaster 

Leslie 

Iraiemiia 

Uduwanna 

MinneMta 

Mohawk 

Hohicaii 

Mystic 

Marblehead....... 

Massnchiuetta.... 

Merccdita 

Mootgonery ...... 

Monticelk) 

MoBDt Vernon... 

Madgie 

MoQODgahelA..... 

Memphis... 

Munmee 

Niagara 

Norwich 

New London 

Nanagaiisekt 

Xtpelc 

Oneida 

OBipee 

Ottawa 

Owasco 

l^waee 

Peaaacola 

Pocahontas 

Powhatan 

Piiaceton 

Pemblaa........... 

PeaobMot... 

■^aoia....M.M...*M 

Peaguin 

P«toQMka......... 

Prtroon 






22 

2 
4 
9 

48 
7 
6 
4 
4 
5 
7 
5 
7 
3 
2 
9 
4 
4 

34 
6 
5 
6 
4 
9 
9 
4 
4 
9 

24 
5 

11 
8 
4 
4 
4 
6 
5 
5 



d 



2,362 
100 
295 

1,633 

3,307 
459 
994 
451 
507 

1,156 
776 
787 
655 
625 
218 

1,378 
791 
693 

4,682 
431 
221 
800 
593 

1,032 

1^240 
607 
607 

1^9 

2,158 
694 

2,415 
900 
607 
607 
507 
389 
287 
183 



Present Location. 



Pacific Squadron 
Potomac Flotilla 
N. Atlan. Squadrob 
Building, New York 
Boston 

S. Atlan. Squadron 
Special Service 
New York 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Snpp. Steam.At. Sq. 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
N. Atlau. 8quadro9 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
B^d's, PhlladelpbU 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Building, New York 
Repairing, Boston 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
Pacific Squadron 
B'ld'g, Portsmouth 
W. Gulf Squadron 
B'ld'fi:, Portsmouth 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Skiuadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. squadron 
ReceiY'gShip.Phila 
W. Gulf Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadfon 
W.Gulf Squadron 
B. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
8. Atlan. Squadron 



Name. 



Pequot , 

Richmond 

Resolute 

Reliance 

Rescue 

R. B.Cujler 

San Jacinto 

Seminole 

Sumter. 

Sciota 

Seneca..... 

Sagamoro....M 

South Carolina... 
Stars and Stripes 

Shenandoah 

Sachem ............ 

Sacramento 

Stettin 

Tuscarora 

Tahoma 

Ticonderoga.,....<i 

Teaser 

Unadilla 

Uncas 

Valley aty 

Victoria 

Wabash 

Wyandotte 

Wyoming 

Wachusett 

Wlssahickon 

Winona 

Wamsutta 

Western World.. 

Whitehead 

Yantic 

Young RQver...., 
Zouave..., 



a 



i 





o 


S 


4 


593 


26 


1,929 


1 


90 


1 


90 


1 


111 


8 


1,202 


12 


1,446 


5 


801 


4 


460 


4 


507 


4 


507 


4 


507 


6 


1,165 


5 


407 


9 


1,378 


5 


197 


9 


1,367 


4 


600 


10 


997 


4 


507 


9 


1,633 


2 


90 


4 


507 


3 


192 


6 


190 


3 


264 


48 


8,274 


4 


458 


6 


997 


9 


1,032 


4 


607 


4 


607 


6 


270 


5 


441 


1 


136 


4 


693 


5 


418 


1 


127 



Present Location. 



Building. Boston 
W. Gulf Squadron 
Potomac Flotilla 
Potomac Flotilla 
8. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
E. Gulf Squadron 
Rep'g, New York 
8. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
E. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
E. Gulf Squadron 
B'ld'g, Philadelphia 
W. Gulf Squadron 
Bid'g, Portsmouth 
S. A. Squadron 
On Special Service 
E. Gulf Squadron 
Building, N.York 
Potomac Flotilla 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Sqnadrwi 
East Indies 
West Indies 
8. Atlan. Squadroa' 
W.Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
8. Atlan. Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
B'ld'g. Philadelphia 
£. Gulf Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 



Iron-Clad Steamers. 



Name. 



Agamenticus-.-. 

Benton 

Baron DeKaJb.... 

QjilLcothe 

Qiickasaw 

CtokUl 

OuQaache 

Gincionati .... 

Owoadalet. 

Caoonicoa..... 

C^wba-« 

tt«t»tor. 

Ouderimrg. 

Btiex. 

*rtport.-« 

flaleaa. 

Indianola...^ 

Kickapoo 

Keokak......^..... 

UusTllle .......... 

J^xlngton .- 



• 

a 


a 


s 


o 


O 

4 


H 


1,564 


16 


1,000 


13 


512 


2 


303 


4 


970 


2 


844 


2 


844 


13 


612 


13 


612 


13 


512 


2 


1,034 


2 


1,034 


2 


3,038 


10 


5,000 


7 


1,000 


8 


700 





788 


2 


442 


4 


970 


2 


677 


13 


468 


7 


600 


2 


844 



Present Location* 



B'ld'g, Portsmouth 
Western Flotilla 
Weatern FlotilU 
B'ld'g, Cincinnati 
BUd'g, St. Louto 
B'ld'g, Brooklyn 
B'ld'g, Jersey City 
Western Flotilla 
Western Flotilla 
Western Flotilla 
Building, Boston 
Building Cincinnati 
B'ld'g, New York 
B'ld'g, New York 
Western Flotilla 
Western FlotiUa 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
B'ld'g, Cincinnati 
B'ld'g, St. Louis 
B'ld'g, New York 
Western Fkytilla 
Western Flotilla 
B'ld'g, Chester, Pa. 



Name. 



8 



Monitor 

Mound City. 

Marietta 

Milwaukee 

Montauk 

Manhattan. 

Mahopac 

Manayunk 

Monadnock 

Miantonomoh..... 

Nantucket 

Nahant 

Neosho 

New Ironsides.... 

Ozark 

Osage 

Onondaga 

Patapsco.. 

Passaic 

Puritan 

Pittsburgh 

Roanoke 

Sandusky 



• 


• 

s 


ptf 


p 


2 


H 


776 


13 


512 


2 


479 


4 
2 


970 


2 


1,034 


2 


1,034 


2 


1,034 


4 


1,564 


4 


1,564 


2 


844 


2 


844 


2 


523 


18 


3,486 


2 


578 


2 


523 


4 


1,250 


2 


844 


2 


844 


4 


8,266 


13 


512 


6 


8,435 


2 


479 



Present Location. 



N. Atlan. Squadron 
Western Flotilhi 
B'ld'g, Pittsburg 
B'ld'g, St. Louis 
B'ld'g, Brooklyn 
B'ld'g, New York 
B'ld'g, New York 
B'ld'g, Brown8T.,Pa. 
Building, Boston 
B'ld'g, New York 
Building, Boston 
Building, Boston 
B'ld'g, St. Louis 
On Special Service 
B'ld'g, Mound City 
B'ld'g, St. Louis 
B'ld'g, New York 
B'ld'g, Wilmington 
Building, Brooklyn 
B'ld'g, Now York 
Western FlotiUa 
Rep'g, N«w York 
B'ld'ft Fittsbnzg 



114 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 
Iron- Clad Steamert, — OonUnaed. 



[1868. 



Name, 



Sangftmon 

Tuscumbia. 

Tippecanot 

Tonawanda 



m 

a 


■ 

s 


p 


o 


O 
. 2 


H 


844 


3 


666 


2 


1,034 


4 


1,564 



Present Location. 

B'ld'g, Chester, Pa. 
B'ld'g, Cincinnati 
B'Id'g, Cincinnati 
B'ld'g, Philadelphia 

' - - - ■ 



Name. 



Tecumseh..., 
Winnebago. 
Weebawken 



s 

o 



2 

4 
2 



1,034 
970 
844 



Present Locatioii. 



B'ld'g, New York 
Bld'g, St. Louis 
Bld'g; Jetwj Gitjr 



Steam OunboatB and Ramt. 



Name. 



Choctaw 

Conestoga 

General Brugg ... 
Gen.Sterl'glYice 
General PiUow... 
Kosciusko (ram). 
Lafayette (ram).. 



i 


• 





o 


O 
8 


H 


1,000 


9 


612 


2 


700 


2 


400 


2 


600 


4 


800 


8 


1,000 



Present Location. 



Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 



Flotilhi 
Flotilla 
FlotUla 
notilla 
Flotilla 
Flotilla 
Flotilla 



Name. 



Little Rebel(ram) 

Lioness, do... 

Monarch, do 

Q.oftheWest,do. 
Switzerland, do... 
A.0.T7ler,gQnb. 



• 


^ 


P 


o 


P 


Q 


o 

3 


H 


160 


4 


600 


6 


1,000 


6 


1,000 


4 


600 


9 


600 



Present Location. 



Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 
Western 



FlotillA 
yiotflla 
Flotilla 
FlotUU 
Flotnia 
Flotilla 



Sailii^- VesBeU — Ships-of-the-Lin^ and Frigates, 



Name. 



Alabama. 

Brandywine..... 
Independence .. 
Now Orleans.... 
N<Mrth Carolina. 
Ohio 



• 

s 


i 


p 


o 


o 

84 


H 


2,633 


60 


1,726 


60 


2,257 


84 


2,806 


84 


2,633 


84 


2,757 



Present Location. 



S. A. Squadron 
8tore-S., Hamp. Rds 
Rec.-S., Mare Island 
Stocks, Sack'ts liar. 
Rec.-S., New York 
Rec.-Ship, Boston 



Name. 



Potomac 

Sabine 

Santee 

St. Lawrence.... 

Vermont ..m 

Virginia 



• 


^ 


P 


g 


P 


A 


60 


H 


1,728 


60 


1,726 


60 


1,726 


60 


1,726 


84 


2,683 


84 


2,633 



Present Location. 



Pensacola 
Special Service 
Naval Academy 
E. Gulf Squadron 
Store-S., Port Rojal 
On the stocks 



Sloope of War, 



Name. 



Constitution . 
Constellation 

Cyane 

Dale 

Decatur 

Falmouth 

Fredonia , 

Granite 

Jamestown .., 
John Adams. 
Macedonian .. 



■ 

s 


a 


p 


p 


o 

60 


H 


1,607 


22 


1,452 


18 


792 


15 


566 


10 


566 


2 


703 


2 


800 


1 


75 


22 


985 


18 


700 


22 


1,341 



Present Location. 



School-S., Newport 
Mediterranean 
Pacific Squadron 
E. Gulf Squadron 
Ordin'ry, Marelsrd 
Store-S., Aspinwall 
Store-Ship, Callao 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
East Indies 
Practici^S., N.Acad. 
Instruc-S., Boston 



Name. 



Marion 

Portsmouth .... 

Preble 

Saratoga 

Savannah 

St. Marpr's 

St. Loms 

Tandalia.. ....... 

Tiucennes 

Warren 



• 

m 


^ 


P 


3 


P 


R 


O 
16 


H 


666 


17 


1,022 


10 


606 


18 


882 


24 


1,726 


22 


968 


18 


700 


20 


783 


18 


700 


2 


691 



Present Loeatioa. 



Instrw-8., Newport 
W. Gulf Sqnadran 
W. Gulf 8qaadn>n 
Coast of Africa 
Inptr.-S-, New York 
Pacific Squadron 
Special Service 
S. Atlan. Fqnadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
Store-Ship, Pi 



Mortar Fleet. 



Name. 



Arietta 

Adolph Tlugel 

C. P. Williams.... 

Dan Smith 

George Mangum. 

Henry Janes 

Horace Beals 

JoAnGrlinth 

Matthew Yass ar 

Maria A.Wood... 

i V ' — . ■ 



• 

s 

p 
o 

3 


a5 

1 


199 


3 


269 


3 


210 


3 


149 


3 


274 


3 


261 


3 


296 


3 


246 


3 


182 


2 


344 



Present Location. 



Botomac 
Potomac 
S. Atlan. 
Potomac 
Potomac 
W. Gulf 
W. Gulf 
W. «lnlf 
Potomac 
W. Gulf 



FlotilU 

Flotilla 

Squadron 

FlotilU 

Flotilhi 

Squadron 

Squadron 

Squadron 

Flotilla 

Squadron 



Name. 



Noi-lblk Packet.. 

Oliver H. Lee. 

Orvetta 

Para 

Racer 

Sophronia 

Sarah Bruen 

T. A. Ward 

William Bacon... 



s 

p 
o 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



I 



849 
199 
171 
190 
262 
217 
283 
284 
183 



Present Loeatloii. 



S. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Jamea Riv. FloUUa 
Potomac Flotilla 
W. Gnlf Squadaon 
Potomac Fwtilla 
Potomao Flotilla 



1868.] 



KAYY DBPASTMBNT. 



115 



S^ip^t Brxgtf Barkt, and Sckoonera, 



Name. 



Arthnr..^ 

A^H<Mighton 

America (yacht). 
ItaiBbridgeCbrig). 

Braziliera. 

Ben Morgan 

'B(diio(bng) 

Beam^ard. 

Charies Phelps.... 

Chotaok s 

Coarier.. 

Coryphetw (y'c't). 

Dart 

Eugenia. 

£thau Allen 

Pear Not 

Femandina — . .. 

Gem of the Sea... 

Gemsbok 

0. W. Blunt 

Ina 

J.aKuhn 

James L. Davis... 



a 
a 
O 



6 
2 



c 



368 
554 
320 



Present Location. 



e 


259 


6 


540 


«• 


407 


2 


196 


1 


101 


1 


363 


1 


53 


3 


554 


1 


100 


1 


94 


1 


150 


7 


556 


6 


1,012 


6 


297 


4 


371 


7 


622 


1 


121 


1 


134 


9 


895 


5 


888 


4 


461 



E. Oolf Squadron 
W. Oulf tfquadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
AqrinwaU 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Ord.-S.,Hamp.R'dB 
W. Gulf Squadron 
B. Gulf Squadron 
Coal-S.,Hamp.R'ds 
Potomac Flotilla 
Store-9., Port Royal 
W.Gulf Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
Guards., Key West 
E. Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
8. Atlan. Squadron 
£. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
8. Atlan. Squadron 
Special Service 
W.Gulf Squadron 
E. Gulf Squadron 



Name. 



Jas. S. Chambers. 

Kittatinny 

Kingfisher 

Midnight.. 

Morning Light... 

Nightingale 

National Guard.. 

Onward 

Perry (brig) 

Pampero -.... 

Pursuit 

Baohel Seaman.... 

Release 

Relief 

Roman 

Roebuck... 

Restless 

Supply 

Shepherd Knapp. 

Samuel Rotan 

Sea-Foam 

Sam Houston 

William Badger... 
Wm. G. Anderson 
Wanderer..... 



e 


« 1 


a 


o 


O 
5 


H 


401 


4 


421 


5 


450 


5 


886 


8 


937 


4 


1,000 


4 


1,046 


8 


874 


9 


280 


4 


1,875 


6 


603 


2 


308 


2 


827 


2 


468 


1 


350 


4 


455 


4 


265 


4 


547 


8 


838 


2 


212 


3 


264 


1 


66 


1 


334 


7 


598 


4 


800 



Present Location. 



E. Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
K. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
Special Service 
E. Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
E. Gulf Squadron 
Mortar Schooner 
Mediterraaean 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
Grdn'ce-V.,H.R'di 
E. Gulf Squadron 
S. Atlan. Squadron 
W. Gulf Squadron 
8. Atlan. Squadron 
£. Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
N. Atlan. Squadron 
W.Gulf Squadron 
B. Gulf Squadron 



Oonditdon of ISaYj Oct 16» 1862. 
Iron -Clad VeueU Building. 



TOBI. 

1. Agamenticafl.. 1,564 

2. OiilUcothe — 803 

3. Chickaoaw. — 970 
4.0atakm 844 

5. Ounanche 844 

6. Gaaonicus 1,084 

7. Oatawte *... 1,084 

8. Dictator 3,033 

9. Dnndertmri; .. 5,090 

10.IndiaiK»U. 442 

ILKaokak ^. 677 

13. Kiekapoo ..^.. 970 

ULebigh 844 

14.H«rfetta 479 

ILMAwMride. — 970 

Ifi^liontMk. 844 

17. Manhattan ..>. 1^4 
ULMiitaoiiac. 1»034 

19. Maaajmnk — 1,034 

20. Monailnofik ... 1,564 



Oana. Whore buildinc. 

4 Portsmouth, N.U. 

2 Cincinnati. 

4 St. Louis. 

2 Brooklyn. 

2 Jersey City. 

2 Boston. 

2 Cincinnati. 

2 New York. 

10 N.T., Webb's Ram. 

2 CincinnatL 

2 New York. 

4 St. Louis. 

2 Chester. 

2 Pittsburg. 

4 St. Louis. 

2 Brooklyn. 

2 New York. 

2 N0wYork. 

2 Brownville, Pa. 

4 Boston Navy-Yard. 



Names. Toos. Qaas. 

21. Miantonomoh 1,664 4 

22. Nantucket 844 2 

23. Nahant 844 2 

24. Neosho 523 2 

25. Oneota 565 4 

26. Osage 523 2 

27. Ozark 578 2 

28. Patapsco 844 2 

29. Passaic 844 2 

80. Puritan 3,265 4 

31. Sandusky .. 479 2 

32. Sangamon 844 2 

33. Saugus..... 844 4 

34. Tecumseh 1,034 2 

35. Tuseumbia 565 3 

86. Tippecanoe 1,034 2 

37. Tonawaiida.... 1,564 4 

38. Winnebago ,.„ 970 4 
39.Weehawken... 844 2 



Where bnildlns. 
TSem. York Navy-Yai^d. 
Boston. 
Boston. 
St. Louis. 
CincinnatL 
Now York. 
St. Louis. 
Wilmington. 
Brooklyn. 
New York. 
Pittsburg. 
Chester. 

Wilmington, Del. 
New York. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Philadelphia. 
St. Louis. 
Jersey City. 



Wooden VeBBels Building, 



Tons. 

1. Ascutney 974 

2.Agawam 974 

3. Chenango 974 

4. Chicoped 974 

5.Entaw 974 

6. Iosco 974 

7.Janiata 1,240 

8. Lackawanna .. 1,533 

9. Lenapee 974 

10. Monongahela. . 1^8 
ILMattabesett... 074 

12. Manmee 593 

18.MiBgoe 974 

14.Maanaoit 974 

15. Mataeomet.... 974 
16.MaodoCa. 974 



Oaos. Where baUding. 
8 Newburyport. 
Portland, Me. 
New York. 
Boston. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Philadelphia. 
New York. 
New York. 
Philadelphia. 
Boston. 

New York Navy-Yard. 
Bordentown, HJ. 
Boston. 
New York. 
Brooklyn. 



8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
8 
9 
8 
4 
8 
8 
8 
8 



Kamee. Tom. 

17. Mackinaw 974 

IS.Ossipee 1,240 

19. Otsego 974 

20. Pequot 593 

21. Puntoosuc 974 

22. Pontiac 974 

23. Shenandoah... 1,378 

24. Sacramento ... 1,867 

25. Sassacus 974 

26. Shamrock 074 

27. Tacony 974 

28. Tallapoosa 974 

29. Wateree 974 

30. Wyalusing .... 974 
81.Yantic 693 



Gone. Where bnlldlag. 

8 New York Navy-Yatd. 

9 Portsmouth. 
8 New York. 

4 Boston Navy-Yard. 

8 Portland, Me. 

8 Philadelphia. 

9 Philadelphia. 
9 Portsmouth. 
8 Portsmouth. 

8 New York Navy-Yard. 

8 Philadelphia N. Yard. 

8 Boston Navy-Yard. 

8 Chester, Pa. 

8 Phihidelphia. 

4 PhiladaliihiaN.Tard. 



n 



116 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[186S. 



Oar Fleet AotiTeiy Omisingt 



A year and a half ago we had about 40 men-of- 
war on active eervice, England had 214, and France 
about 116. Lord Paget stated iu Parliament bdbre 
the Easter recess at the late session, tliat the Ad- 
miralty proposed to keep 200 vessels of the Royal 
Navy on active duty, of which about 160 would be 
leruising abroad. From the figures appended, It 
will be obeerved that we have now over 50 men-of- 
war in commission on squadrons more than Eng- 
land. There ai-e over 40,000 men attached to this 
fleet, of which a larger portion is composed of 
mailed craft than any other Power can show. 
Besides over 20 iron-clad ships afloat and serving 
well, there are 37 building, and 31 wooden ships 
also, being 68 in all, or about the sum total of o«r 
naval force in January, 1861. 

WEST GULF SQUADBON. 
Vessels. Tons. Ouns. Description. 

1. Arthur 654 6 

2. A. Houghton.. 326 2 

3. Albatross 378 4 

4. Brooklyn 2,070 24 



6. Bohio 196 2 

6. Cayuga* 507 6 

7. Clifton 892 6 

8. Corypheus— ... 100 1 

9. Be Soto 1,600 9 

10. Bart 94 1 

11. Fear Not. 1,012 6 

12. Hartford. 1,990 26 

13. Housatonic .... 1,240 9 

14. Henry Janes.. 261 3 

.15. Hatteras 1,100 3 

18. Harriet Land. 619 4 

17. Horace Seals. 296 3 

18. Itasca 507 4 

19. J. C. Kuhn 888 5 

20. John Griffith.. 246 3 

21. J. P. Jackson;. 777 6 
22 Kittatinny 421 4 

23. Kanawha 507 4 

24. Kennebec 507 4 

25. Kineo. 507 4 

26. Katahdin 507 4 

27. Kensington ... 1,052 3 

28. Mississippi 1,€92 12 

29. Montgomery.. 787 5 

30. Morning Light 937 8 

31. M. A. Wood.... 344 2 

32. Miami -. 730 7 

33. New London... 221 5 

34. Nightingale... 1,000 4 
36. Oneida 1,032 9 

36. Owasco 507 4 

37. Oliver H. Lee.. 199 3 
38.0rvetta 171 3 

•39. Pembina. 607 4 

40. Pensacola 2,158 24 

41. Pocahontas.... 694 5 

42. Portsmouth ... 1,022 17 

43. Proble (hospi- 

tal ship) 666 10 

44. Panola 507 4 

45. Pampero 1,375 4 

46. Richmond 1,929 26 

47. Relief 468 2 

48. R^R.Cuyler-. 1,202 8 

49. Susquehanna 
(ordered home). 2,450 17 



Bark. 

Bark. 

Screw steamer. 

Screw sloop. 

Brig. 

Screw steamer. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Yacht. 

Side-wheel Steamer. 

Schooner. 

Ship. 

Screw sloop. 

Screw sloop. 

Mortar schooner. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Side^wheel steamer. 

Mortar boat. 

Screw steamer. 

Bark. 

Mortar schooner. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Ship. 

Screw steamer. 

Screw steamer. 

Screw steamer. 

Screw steamer. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Screw steamer. 

Ship. 

Mortar schooner. * 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Screw steamer. 

Mortar boat. 

Screw sloop. 

Screw steamer. 

Mortar schooner. 

Mortar schooner. 

Screw steamer. 

Screw sloop. 

Screw steamer. 

Sloop. 

Sloop. 

Screw steamer. 

Ship. 

Screw sloop. 

Storeship. 

Screw steamer. 

Side-wheel steamer. 



Yessels. Tons. Oims. Description. 

60. Sciota 507 4 Screw steamer. 

61. Sarah Bruen... 233 3 

62. Sachem 197 5 

63. Sea-Foam 264 3 

54. Sam Houston. 66 1 

65. Tennessee 1,275 6 

56. Tincennes 700 18 

67. Winona 507 4 

68. Wm.Q.Ander- 

suo 693 7 

59. Wostfield 891 6 



Mortar schooner. 

Screw steamer. 

Brig. 

Schooner. 

Side-wheel idoanipr. 

SIuop. 

Screw steamer 



Bark. 

$ide-wheel steamer. 



WEST iin)a:s. 

Tons. Onns. 



Vessels. 

I.Aroostook 507 4 

2. Bacotah 997 6 

3. Octorara 829 6 

4. Sant.de Cuba... 1,567 10 

5. Sonoma 955 6 

6. Supply 547 4 

7. Tioga 819 6 

8.Wachusott 1,032 9 



BeserlptTon. 



Screw steamer. 
Screw sloop. 
Side-wheel steamer. 
Side-wheel steamer. 
Side-wheel steamer. 
Store-ship. 
Side-wheel steamer. 
Screw sloop. 



EAST TSTDIA SQtADBOIT. 
Vessels. Tons. Oans. Description. 

1. Jamestown ..... 986 22 Sloop. 

2. Roebuck 456 4 Bark. 

3. Wyoming 997 6 Screw sloop. 



Vessels. 

1. CHiippewa 507 

2. Tuscarora. 1,000 

3. Kearsarge 1,000 

4. Constellation... 1,452 

6. St. Louis 1,000 

6. Release 327 



XEDITERBANBAV. 
Tons. Gons. Descriptloa. 
4 Screw steamer. 
10 Steamer. 
8 Steamer. , 
22 Sloop. 
22 Sloop. 
2 Stora bark. 



PACIFIC SQUADKON. 
Yesaals. T«ns. Oaas. DMCiIption. 



1. Cyane 792 18 

2. Lancaster 2,362 22 

3. Narragansett ... 809 6 

4. Saranao 1,446 9 

6. St. Marys 068 22 



Sloop. 

Screw bIoc^. 
Screw sloop. 
Side-wbed 
Sloop. 



SOUTH ATLAirnO BLOCKADINQ SQUANLOIT^' 
Vessels. Tons. Oans. . DeMriptfosi. 

I.Alabama 1,261 8 Sid«-whael 

2. America........ — 

3. Augusta.. 1,810 

4. Braeiliera...... 640 

6. Bienville........ 1,658 

6. Canandaigoa.. 1,396 
T. Cimmerune ... 860 
8. C. P. Williams 210 
0. Conemaugh ... 955 



10. Dan Smith 149 

11. Dawn 391 

12. Darlington 300 

13. Ellen 341 

14. E.B.Hale 192 

15. Flambeau 900 

16. Florida 1,261 

17. Flng 963 

18. Fernandina ... 297 

19. Gomsbok 622 

20. Geo. Mangum. 274 

21. G. W. Blunt ... 121 



— Yacht. 

8 Side-wheel steamer. 

6 Bark. 

10 Side-wheel staamer. 

Screw sloop. 
10 Side-wheel steamer. 

3 Mortar boat. 

8 Side-wheel steamer. 
3 Mortar boat. 

3 Screw steamer. 

1 Steamer. 

4 Side-wheel steamer. 
4 Screw steamer. 

2 Screw steamer. 

9 Side-wheel steamer. 
9 Screw steamer. 

6 Bark. 

7 Bark. 

3 Mortar boat. 
1 Schooner. 



• Farter's Mortar PlotUla,. which was situated in various phices on Sept. 1, is now relufbrdng this fleets 



1368.] 



NAVY DBPARTMBHT. 



Ill 



Toot. 

82. Hope 13i 

23. Hottsatooic.... 1,210 
2i Huron 607 

25. laaac Smith... 469 

26. James Adger.. 1,151 
2(.Ke78t'e State.. 1,364 
28.Madgie 218 

29. Marblehead ... 507 

30. Mercedita 776 

31. Mercury 187 

32. Memphis 791 

SlMdaight 386 

34. Mohawk 459 

35. Norfk Packet 349 
31 Norwich. ..i.... 431 

37. Ottawa 507 

38.0.M.Pettit ... 165 

39. Para 190 

40. Pawnee 1,289 

41. Powhatan 2,415 

4aPatroon 183 

43.PUnter 300 

44.PaulJones 863 

45.Potoniska 287 

41 Quaker City... 1,600 

47. Rescne Ill 

48.Re3tlea8 265 

49. Relief 468 

50. Sumter. 460 

5L Seneca ^. 507 

52. S. Carolina 1,166 

53. StkVf^d Knapp 888 

5i8ebago 832 

55. Stettin 600 

filUaadilla 407 

57. Uncas. 192 

58.y«adalia 788 

59. Wabash 3,274 

eo. Warasatta 270 

6L Water-Witch.. 378 
«2. West. World... 441 

83. Wiflsafajckoa... 507 



Ctama. OeMrlptko. 

1 Schooner. 

Screw steamer. 

4 Screw steamer. 

9 Screw steamer. 

9 Side-wheel steamer. 

9 Side-wheel steamer. 

2 Screw steamer. 
4 Screw steamer. 
7 Screw steamer. 

2 Side-wheel steamer. 

4 Screw steamer. 

5 Bark. 

7 Screw steamer. 

8 Mortar boat. 

6 Screw steamer. 

4 Screw steamer. 

2 Side-wheel steamer. 

8 Mortar boat. 

Screw sloop. 
11 Screw steamer. 

5 Screw steamer. 

2 Side-wheel steamer. 

6 Side-wheel steamw. 

5 Screw steamer. 

9 Side-wheel steamer. 

1 Screw steamer. 
4 Bark. 

2 Stor^ship. 

4 Screw steamer. 

4 Screw steamer* 

6 Screw steamer. 

8 Ship. 

9 8id»-wheel steamer. 

4 Screw steamer. 
'4 Screw steamer. 

3 Screw steamer. 
20 Sloop. 

48 Screw frigate. 

5 Screw steamer. • 

3 Side-wheol steamer. 

6 Screw steamer. 

4 Screw steamer. 



XOKTB ATLAin^IG BU>CKASINO 8QVAPR0K. 



YowU. Tons. 

L Arietta 199 

IBnadywiae.. 1,726 
a Ben Morgan.. 407 
4. Goaneeticiit ... 1,800 

&.Oolambia 503 

1 Com. Hall 376 

7. Chas. Fhelps.. 362 

8. Colorado 3,435 

9. Cambridge S58 

10. Owes «.. 144 

ItChocnra 507 

12.Gmaader. 6i5 

13. Com. Perry.... 613 

14. Com. Barney.. 513 

15.Coha8set 100 

1«. Daylight « 632 

17. Delaware 357 

18. Bacotah .... 997 

19. Galena 738 

20.Qene9ee 803 

2l.0ianite 75 

2iH.Brinker 108 

23.Hetzel 300 

Ji Uanchback ... 517 
«-J-N.Seymorar 183 
«.John ULock- 

^ wood 180 

w-Jnniata 1,240 



Oqbs. Descriptloa. 

3 Mortar schooner. 

— Store ship. 

— Ordnance ship. 

5 Side-wheel steamer. 

3 Screw steamer. 

6 Sido-wheeliteamer. 
1 Store ship. 

48 Screw frigate. 

5 Screw steamer. 

1 Screw steamer* 

4 Screw steamer. 

6 Screw steamer. 

4 Side-wheel steamer. 

4 Side-wheel steamer. 

2 Screw steamer, 
4 Screw steamer. 

3 Side-wheel steamer. 
6 Screw sloop. 

6 Iron-clad steamer. 

4 Screw steamer. 
1 Sloop of war. 

1 Screw steamer. 

2 Side-wheel steamer. 
4 Side-wheel steamer. 
2 Side-wheel steamer. 

9 Side-wheel steamer. 

9 Screw sloop. 



YSMSlS. 


Tons. Oaas. Deieriptiea« 


28. Louisiana 


295 


4 


Screw steamer. 


29. MonticeUo 


655 


7 


Screw steamer. 


30. Mt. Vernon.,.. 


625 


3 


Screw steHmer. 


31- Mahaska. 


882 


6 


Side-wheel steamer. 


32. Morse 


613 


2 


Side-wheel stesmier. 


33. Minnesota 


8^307 48 


Screw frigate. 


34. Monitor 


776 


2 


Iron-clad steamer. 


85. Miami 


730 


7 


Side-wheel steamer. 




786 


6 


Side-wheel steamer. 


37. Mystic 


451 


4 


Screw steamer. 


38. M. Yassar 


182 


8 


Mortar schooner. 


39. Montauk 


844 


2 


Iron-clad steamer. 


40. N. IroAsidfifl.. 


3,486 18 


IroD-clad steamer. 


41.0toipee 


1,240 


9 


?crew sloop. 


42. Passaic 


844 


2 


Iron-clad steamer. 


43. Penobscot 


607 


4 


Screw steamer. 


44. Philadelphia... 


600 


-m. 


Side-whed steamer. 


45. Roman 


350 


1 


Ordnance vessel. 


46. Rhode Island.. 


1,617 


7 


Side-wheel steamer. 


47. Racer 


262 


8 


Mortar schooner. 


48. San Jacinto... 


1,445 12 


Screw steamer. 


49. Shawsheen .... 


180 


2 


Side-wheel steamer. 


50. Stepp. Stones. 

51. Sophronia 


226 


1 


Side-wheel steamer. 


217 


8 


Mortar schooner. 


62. S. of Georgia.. 1,204 


9 


Side-wheel steamer. 


63. Southfield ...... 


751 


4 


Side-wheel steamer. 


64. T. A. Ward 


284 


8 


Mortar schooner. 


65. Underwriter... 


341 


4 


Side-wheel steamer. 


66. VaUey City.... 


190 


6 


Screw steamer. 


67. Victoria .« 


264 


8 


Screw steamer. 


58. Wm. Badger... 


334 


1 


Ship. 


59. Whitehead .... 


1.% 


1 


Screw steamer. 


60. W.G.Pkitnam. 


149 


2 


Side-wheel steamier. 


61. Wyandotte ... 


458 


4 


Screw steamer. 


62. Wm. Bacon.... 


183 


8 


Mortar schooner. 


63. Young Amer.. 


173 


1 


Side-wl^eel steamer. 


64. Young Rover. 


418 


6 


Screw bark. 


66. Zouave 


127 


1 


Screw steamer. 


WESTSRB 


r FLOTILLA. 


YesMlt. 


Teas. 


QuDB. Description. 


1. Abraham 


800 


-.- 


Transport. 


2. Alfred Robb... 


225 


4 


Steamer. 


3. Beuton 


1,000 16 


Iron-clad steamer. 


4. Baron de Kalb 


612 IS 


Iron-clad steamer. 


6. Brilliant 


226 


2 


S.W. Gunboat. 


6. Blackhawk.... 


_ 


8 


Stern-wheeL 


7. Clara Dolsen.. 


1,000 


.. 


Steamboat. 


8. Choctaw 


1,000 


8 


Steamboat. 


O.Cairo 


612 13 


Iron-clad steamer. 


10. Cincinnati...... 


612 13 


Iron-clad steamer. 


11. Caronddet 


612 18 


Iron-clad steamer. 


12. Conostoga 


612 


9 


Wooden gunboat. 


13. Catawba.. 


l/)34 


2 


Iron-clad. 


14. Chiilicothe..... 


303 


2 


Iron-clad. 


15. Cricket 


.^ 


6 


Stem-wheeL 


16. Chickttmw...... 


970 


4 


Irpn-iclad. 


17. Dahlia 


60 


1 


Tug. 


18. Daisy 


50 


1 


Tug. 


19. Essex 


1,000 


7 


Iron-clad steamer. 


20. Eas^ort 


700 


8 


Iron-clad steamer. 


21. Fairphhy 


800 


6 


8.W. wooden gunboat 


22. Fern 


50 


1 


Tug. 

Stern-wheel. 


23. Forest Rose ... 


203 


6 


24. Gen. Bragg 


700 


2 


Ram and gunboat. 


26. Gen.Xyon 


1,200 


__ 


Transport. 


26. Gen. S. Price... 


400 


2 


Ram and gnnboat. 


27. Gen. Pillow .... 


600 


2 


Ram and gunboats 


28. Great Western 


800 


— 


Transport. 


29. Glide 


137 


6 


Stern-wheel. 


80. Hyacinth 


60 


1 


Tug. 


81. Indlanola ...... 


442 


2 


Iron-clad. 


82. Ivy 


50 


1 


Tug. 



118 



THE NATIONAL ALMAKAC. 



[1868. 



Torn. Oatii. ])eMrl|»tl«D. 

88. JudgttTorrence QOO — Side-wheel Bteamer. 

84. Juliet 167 2 Side-wheel gnnboat. 

86. Kentucky 800 — Transport. 

86. Kosciusko 800 4 Ram. 

87. Kickapoo 970 4 Iron-clad. 

88. Lafayette 1,000 8 Ram. 

89. Laurel ~. 60 1 Tug. 

40. Louisyille 468 13 Iron-clad steamer. 

41. Lexington..... 600 7 Iron-clad steamer. 

42. Lilly 60 1 Tug. 

48. Little Rebel... 160 8 Ram. 

44. Lioness 600 4 Ram. 

45. Linden — Stem wheel. 

46. Marmora 207 2 S.W. wooden gunboat. 

47. Mound City... 612 13 Iron-dad steamer. 

48. Monarch 1,000 6 Ram. 

40. Mignonette.... 60 1 Tug. 

fiO. Mistletoe 60 1 Tug. 

61. Myrtle 80 1 Tug. 

62. Marietto 470 2 Iron-clad. 

68.Milwaukie 070 4 Iron-clad. 

64. Manayunk 1,034 2 Iron-clad. 

66. Neosho 623 2 Iron-clad. 

66. New Era 167 6 Side-wheel gunboat. 

67. New National 1,000 — Transport. 

68. Oneota 666 4 Iron-clad. 

69. Osage 623 2 Iron-clad. 

60. Osark 678 2 Iron-clad. 

61. Pansy 60 1 Tug. 

62. Pittsburg 612 13 Iron-clad steamer. 

63. Queen of the 

West 1,000 6 Ram. 

64. Ratler 166 6 Stem«whed. 

66. Red Rover 1,000 — Hospital ship. 

66. Romeo 176 6 Side- wheel gunboat. 

67. Sandusky 470 2 Iron-chid. 

68. Silver Lake ... 212 6 Stem-wheel. 
60. Springfield — 6 Stem-wheel. - 

70. Signal 190 2 6.W. wooden gunboat. 

71. Sovereign 800 — Commissary boat. 

72. St. Clafr 203 2 S.W. wooden gunboat. 

73. Switzerland... 600 4 Ram. 

74. Thistle 60 1 Tug. 

76. Tyler 600 9 Steamer. 

76. Tnscumbia..... 666 8 Iron-clad. 

77. Tippecanoe ... 1,034 2 Iron-clad. 

78. Winnebago ... 970 4 Iron-clad. 

79. W. H. Brown.. 800 — Transport. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
T«Hdi. Tons. Oani. Dcierfptlsii. 

1. Bermuda 800 8 Screw steamer. 

2. Columbia 603 3 Screw steamer. 

8. Circassian' 1,760 9 Screw steamer. 

4. Eureka 60 1 Screw steamer. 

6. Hend. Hudson 600 4 Side-wheel steamer. 

6.Ladona 700 6 Screw steamer. 

vuiuavQ, 
Teiida. Tofax. Quni. Description. 

I.Osceola 974 8 Side-wheel steamer. 

2. Patuxet 974 8 Side-wheel steamer. 

8. Winooeka 974 8 Side-wheel steamer. 

EAST OULT SQUADBON. 
Yeueli. Tons. Guns. Description. 

I.Amanda 868 6 Bark. 

2. Beauregard.... 101 1 Schooner. 



V4 

8. Dale.. 6M 16 

4. Ethaa Allen.- 666 7 

6. Eugenia 160 1 

6. Fort Henry ... 619 6 

7. Oem of the Sea 371 4 

8. Huntsville 817 4 

9. Jas. L. Davis .. 461 4 

10. J. S. Chambers 401 6 

11. Magnolia 843 8 

12. Perry 280 9 

13. Penguin 389 6 

14 Port Royal 806 8 

16. Pursuit 603 6 

16. Roebuck 465 4 

17. San Jacinto... 1,446 12 

18. Sagamore 607 4 

19. Somerset 621 6 

20. Samuel Rotan 212 2 

21. Stars and 

Stripes 407 6 

22. St. Lawrence.. 1,726 60 

23. Tahoma 607 4 

24. Wanderer 300 4 



Sloop of war. • 

Bark. 

Schooner. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Bark. 

Screw steamer. 

Bark. 

Bark. 

Side-wheel Bteaimer. 

Brig. 

Screw steamer. 

Side-wbeel steamer. 

Bark. 

Bark. 

Screw steamer. 

Screw steamer. 

Side-wheel steamer. 

Schooner. 

Screw steamer. 
Frigate. 
Screw steamer. 
Schooner. 



POTOKAO FLOTILLA. 



VcMels. Tons. 

1. Adolph Hugel 260 

2. Anacostia c 217 

3. Chotank 68 

4. GoBur de Lion. 60 
6. Currituck..... 193 

6. Dan Smith..... 149 

7. Dragon 118 

S.Ella 280 

O.Eureka 60 

10. Geo. Manghan 274 

11. Jacob Bell 220 

12. King PhQip ... 600 
13.Lestie 100 

14. Mt. WaBh'gt*n 600 

15. Resolute 00 

16. Reliance 90 

17. Satellite 217 

18. T. Freeborn ... 269 
Xv* xoftocr •••••«•• ••• w 

20. Wyandank. 809 

21. Yankee 828 



Oana. DcacriptkNi. 

8 Mortar boat. 

2 Screw steamer. 

1 Schoonor. 

2 Bteamer. 

6 Screw steamer. 

8 Mortar schooner. 

1 Side-wheel atmuMr. 

2 Steamer. 

1 Screw steamer. 

8 Mortar schooner. - 

8 Side-wheel steiunBr. 

— Side-wheel steamer. 

2 Screw steamer. 

— Side-wheel steanier. 
1 Screw steamer. 

1 Screw ateamer. 

2 Side-wheel steamer. 
2 Side-wheel steamer. 
2 Screw steamer. 

2 Side-wheel ateamer. 

8 Side-wheel steamer. 



nmuBmBOir or the actits nxsT. 

No. of 

Potomac Flotilla. 21 

East Gulf Squadron 24 

Western Flotilla 79 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron 66 

South Atlantic Blockading Squadron 63 

West Indies g 

East Indies 3 

Mediterranean ........................m. 6 

Pacific 6 

WestGnlf Squadron 59 

Special Service 9 

Coast of Africa 1 

Miscellaneons, Ac « 9 

Total in 1862 ,"352 

Total in January, 1861 •«.... 41 



Increase. 



Sll 



Ides,] 



NAVY DBPARTKBHT. 



119 



VkTAL FOROB AT TBB BATK 07 TBI LAMT ANNUAL 
&SFOBT or TH£ SKOEKTA&T OV TH£ NAVT. 



Description. 



Old navy - 

Purchased vessels 

New vessels completed and 
viider coustraction....^.... 



ToUl. 



No. 



76 
136 

52 



264 



Qtins. 



1,783 
518 

256 



2,557 



Tons. 



106,271 
71,297 

41,448 



218,016 



PRE8KXT NATAL rORCB. 



Description. 


No. 

74 
180 

50 

123 

427 

103 


(Juns. 


Tons. 


(Md navy 


1,001 

688 

280 
669 


100,008 


Pnrcbased vessels... 


86,910 


Transferred from War and 
Treasury Departments.... 

New vessels completed and 
under construction. 


32»828 
120,290 


Tbtal 


3,268 


340,036 


Increase since last reported. 


711 


122,020 



ABnXD 8INCX THE TOURTH 07 MARCH, 1861 

{SoBclMtivt of thMt Unty 



Tons. 

86,910 

32,828 

120,290 

240,028 



By purchase 

By transfer 

By coDstructioii. 



No. 

180 

50 

123 

353 


Gnns. 


688 
230 
659 


1,577 



ADDBP BT CONSTRUCTION. 



. fc 

Description 


No. 

13 
27 
39 
12 
32 

123 


Guns. 


Tons. 


2d class screw sloop»-of-war. 


116 

108 

296 

65 

74 


16,396 
14,033 


Hd^whAfil ininboiitfl.*....**** 


36,337 


Armored wooden vessels..... 


20,893 
32,631 








650 


120,290 



DbON-CLAO. NAVY. 



Description. 


No. 

8 
20 

4 

10 
12 

54 


Guns. 


Tons. 


Seaboard. 

Armored wooden vessels..... 
Armored iron vessels.... 


56 
42 

9 

122 
32 


19,006 
22,611 

1,888 

6,284 
10,020 


Wutem rivers. 

Armored wooden vessels 

Armored wooden vessels 

traosTd from War Dep't.. 

Armored iron Tessels. ........ 




Total 


261 


69,808 



■ATT OH WWnBN WATIIS. 



Description. 



Armored vessels^ 

Wooden gunboats 

'JYansports and ordnance 

steamers 

Rams..» »- 

Armed tugs 



Total. 



No. 



26 
18 

10 

5 

13 



72 



Gnns. 



261 
79 

2 
24 
13 



87» 



Tons.. 



59,808 
6,880 

9,000. 
11,200 
650 



87,038 



When the vessels now under construction are 
completed, the navy will consist of— 

8TIAM-VZ88KUU 



Description. 



Screw frigates 

Screw sloops, Ist class 

Screw sloops, 2d class 

Screw gunboats (new) 

Iron-dad vessels 

Side-wheel frigates 

Side-wheel gunboats (new).. 

Side-wheel gunboats (old 
navy) * 

Screw steamers (purchased) 

Side-wheel steamers (pur- 
chased) 4 

Suiuw steamers (old navy)~. 

Gunboats, Iransports, Ac. 
transferred from other 
departments 



Total. 



No. 

5 


Gnns. 


228 


6 


133 


21 


16T 


27 


108 


64 


261 


4 


49 


39 


296 


5 


11 


63 


215 


63 


250 


6 


27 


40 
323 


108 


1,858 



Tons. 

18,272' 
11,956 
23,992 
14,088 

Ov,CMJo 

8,003 
86,367 

3,190 
23^490 

88,617 
2,690 



26,644 
266^61 



BAILING-V1SSKL8. 



Description. 



Ships-of-the-line 

Frigates 

Sloops-of-war 

Brigs 

Ships, including store and 

receiving vessels 

Sdiooners 

Barks 

Yachts 



Total. 



No. 
6 


Guns. 


504 


6 


300 


16 


289 


4 


20 


23 


139 


29 


69 


18 


92 


2 

104 


2 


1,415 



Tons. 

16,004 

10,237 

14,305 

900 

18,087 

5,821 

8,432 

200 

74,076 



BXCAFXTULATION. 



Description. 


No. 

104 
323 

427 


Guns. 


Tons. 


Sailing-vessels 

Steam- vessels. 


1,415 
1,853 

3,268 


74,176 
265,861 






Total 


340,030 



na 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1868. 



LOSSES BT SHIPWRVCK A!n» IN BATTLE. 

Steamer R. 6. Forbes, 3 gnns, 329 tons, wrecked 
labmary, 1860^ coast of North Carolina, 
"frigate CSongress, 50 guns, 1,867 tons, in action 
with Merrimac, March 8, 1862. 

Sloop-of-war Cumberland, 24 gnns, 1,726 tons, I» 
action with Merrimac, March 8, 1862. 

Steamer WhitehaU, 4 guns, 323 tons, at Old Point, 
March 0, 1862, by fire. 

Mortar schooner M. J. Carlton, 3 guns, 178 tons, 
attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 19, 
1862. 

Steamer Tamna,9 guns,l,300 tons, in action With 
rebel gunboats below New Orleans, April 24, 1862. 



Mortar schooner Sidney C. Jones, 8 gims, 245 
tons, grounded below Ticksbnrg, and bnmed to 
prevent &lling into the hands of the enemy. 

Steamer Island Belle, 2 guns, 123 tons, grounded 
in Appomattox River. June, 1862^ and bnmed to 
prevent foiling into the hands of the enemy. 

Screw sloop Adirondack, 9 guns, 1,240 tons, 
wrecked near Abaco, August 2S, 1862. 

Steamer Henry Andrew, 3 guns, 177 tons, 
wrecked in a gale near Cape Henry, August 24, 
1862. 

Steam ram Sumter, 2 guns, 400 tons, grounded 
in Mississippi River and abandoned. Total, 112 
gnns and 7908 tons. 



Marine GorpSi 

The Marine Corps has the organization of a brigade. It is suttlect to the laws and regnhitJkxiis of the 
Navy, except when detached for service with the Army by the order of the President of the tJnited 
States. The head-quarters of the corps are at Washington. 

All commissioned officers in the Marine Corps are entitled to one additional rs.tion for erery five 
years' service. The pay and subsistence allowed for each servant to staff-officers is $23 50 per month. 

AH commissioned officers of the Bfarine Corps below the grade of Migor are entitled to an allowance 
of $10 per month for responsibility of clothing, arms, and accoutrements, when commanding guards 
of vessels in commission the complement of the guard of which is forty men or upward, and at the 
several naval stations on shore. Commutation for forage is only allowed when the Government cannot 
furnish it in kind. 



Name. 



John Harbis. 



Cfeneral Staff. 

John C. Cash , 

Wm. B. Slack , 

Aug. S. Nicholson .. 
W. A. T. Maddox.... 
James Wiley , 

OoUmd, 
William Dulany 



LieuUnarUrOoUrndt. 

Ward Marston 

John 6. Reynolds 

Jacob Zeilin 

Addison Garland 

Josiah Watson 

Isaac T. Doughty 




Colonel Commandant. 



Paymaster, with rank of Mnjor 

Quartermaster, with rank of Migor 

Acyutant and Inspector, with rank of Me^or.... 
Assistant Quartermaster, with rank of Captain. 
Assistant Quartermaster, with rank of Captain. 



Colonel 



Lieutenant-Colonel , 
Lieutenant-Colonel . 



Mf^or 

Major 

Mi^or 

Migor I New York. 



State from which 
appointed^ 



Pennsylvania.. 



Pennsylvania. 
NewJersey.... 

New York. 

Maryland.. 

Indiana 



Virginia. 



Massachusetts.. 
New York. 



Pennsylvania... 

Missouri 

Bist. Columbia.. 



Salary. 



$3,186 



2,154 
2,154 
2.154 
1,752 
1,752 



2,520 



2,230 60 
2,230 50 



2,010 
2,010 
2,010 
2,010 



There are in the corps, besides the above officers, twenty Captains, whose compensation is $1428 each, 
thirty First Lieutenants, whose compensation is $1308 each, and twenty-nine Second^Lieutenauts* 
whose compensation is $1248 each. The number of non*commis8ioned <^cers, mu0iciaxiB7and privates 
belonging to the corps is about 1650. 



1868.] 



TKKdfiirBT DEPARSMSRT. 



121 



lY. TSEASTTST BEFABTMMI. 

OFEIGEBS ATTACHED TO TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
(Oorraetod mt the Tresiiiry Department, Koyember 1, 18R.) 



SALMON" P. CHASE, Sxcrrakt of Trisa- 

SURT 

George Ilarrington, Astitiemt Secretary,.,, 

John F. Hartley, CMef Clerk^ ad.int 

S.M. McKean, IHsburting CUrk 

Richard Ela, Clerk 

\faiiam H. West, Clerk 

WmUm Handy, Clerk 

John N. Lovctjoy, AppointmfeiU derk 

SenniB J. Toobey, CUrk 



Bobert W. Taylor, Fibst Comptrollsr. 

Wm. Hemphill Jones, Cfiief Clerk 

James M. Ontts, Second Comptroller.. 
J(rim H. Houston, Chief Clerk 



ISioiiwB L. Smith, First Auditor «•...... 

David W. Mahon, Cki^ CUrk 

Ezra B. French, Second Auditor. 

Ferdinand Andrews, Chief Clerk 

Robert J. Atkinflon, Third AimiTOR. 

Delano T. anitl^ Ohi^ Clark ^.... 

Hobart Berrian, Fourth Auditor.*........... 

W. W. Danenhower, Cliief Clerk „... 

John C. TJuderwood, Fifth Auditor 

Thomas M. Smith, Chief CUrk 

Gnoa Adaau, Sixth Audrob, \ 

For the P. O. Department, j 

John P. ShaiTetts, Chief CUrk 

Robert Leech, Solicitor for Sixth Auditor, 



Francis B. Spinner, Treasurer 

WUiiam B. Randolph, Chi^ Clerk. 



Assistant Treasurcrs amd Clerks. 

Ezra lancoln, BoHon 

John J. Cisco, Jfeto York 

Jacob Rossell, " dU^tf Clerk 

Archibald Mclntyre, Philadelphia -... 

Benjamin Ferrar, St. Louie 

Cnrtis Coolldgo, " Cferk 

D. W. Cheeseman, San JVanct«eo 



Lucius S. Chittenden, Rsoismt. 
John A. Qraham, Chief CUrk,,.. 



Edward Jordan, Soucitor 

B. F. Pleasants, Chief CUrk 

Nathan Sai^ent, CoMMissioiriR of Customs. 
Thomas Feran, Chi^ Clerk...,<^ 

Bureau of Construction. 

Enoinseb. 

Ammi B. Tonng, Suprrtisino Architect... 
8. M. Clark, Chiif (Xerk 

United States Coast Surtbt. 

AJez. D. Bache, Superintendent 

Kdmnnd Btont, ^rst Astittant 

F. H. Gerdss, Second AuittarU 

C 0. Boutelle, Third Assistant 

H. L. Whiting, Jn>urth AssisUmt 



$9,000 
4,000 
2,200 
2,000 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 



3,500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 

8,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
8,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 

3,000 

2,000 



8,000 
2,000 



4,000 
6,000 
3,600 
2,000 
4,000 
1,200 
4,500 

8,000 
2,000 

3,600 
2,000 

8^000 
2|000 



3,000 
2,600 



6,000 
8,600 
2,600 
2,300 
2,100 



John Farley, f\fth Assistant 

C. P. Patterson, Hydrography Inspector.. 

B. A. Gottld, EeOra Observer 

Bepj. Pierce, " « ^ 

George McCoy, Chi^f Engraver. 

George Mathiot, EUclrotypiat „ 

Samnel Heiu, Disbursing Agent 



$2,000 
2,82& 
1,600 

i,6oa 

2,000 
2,000 
2,500 



Detailed to Coast Survey from Navy Depart- 

vent. 

Com. B. F. Sands, Pacific Coast. 

Lient. Com. Thos. 8. Phelps, Steamer Cbrwin. 

A. D. Bache, Sup't. Weights and Measdrrs. 

J. Saxton, Assistant and Jbreman 2,600 

Depaaiicsnx of Internal RRmnn. 

George S. Boutwell, Commissioner 4^000 1 

Chas. F. Esteem Chi^ CUrk ..................^ 1,800 



UNITED STATES MINTS. 
Mint at Philadelphia. 



James Pollock, Director 

Archibald Mclntyre, Treasurer 

Jacob R. Eckfeldt, Assayer 

James C. Booth, Mdier and Bejlner. 

LoMris R. Broomall, CfttV/ Cbt'ncr , 

James B. Longacre, Engraver .., 



AssAT Office at New York. 

George F. Dunning, Superintendent 

John J. Cisco, Treasurer.* 

Juhn Torrey, Assayer , 

Edward N. Kent, MelUr and R^ner. , 

Andrew Mason, Assistant Assayer 

Geo. W. Edelman, Treasurer Chi^Cterk.., 

Branch Mint at San Francisco. 

Robert J. Stevens, Suferi h t endbn t 

D. W. Cheeseman, Treasurer^ 

Walter S. Deuio, MelUr and Refiner 

Conrad Wiegand, Assayer 

William Schmolz, Coiner , 



3,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



8,600 

3,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,600 



4,600 
4y60O 

3,000 
8,000 
3,000 



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD. 



*4i* No compensation allowed to the members 
of this Board. 

S. P. Chase, Secretary of Treasury ^ ex.oiT. 

I'RESIDENT. 

Wm. B. Shnbrick, Rear-Admiral^ TT.SJ^.^ 

Chait^nan. 
Jos. G. Tottea. Brig. Oen., Cftief Engineer 

Corps U»S.A, 
Hartman Bache, Lt.'Cnl., Corps. Top. Eng. 
A. D. Buche, Supt. Coast Survey. 
Joseph Henry, Secretary Smithsonian Inst. 
Vacancy. 

Secretary. 

Secretary. 

Beiu. U. Keyser, Chi^ CUrk 2,000 



* Also Assistant Treasurer. 



122 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[186S. 



OaoAicnsAnoN of thb TasAauRT BEPARnoHT. 



Stcrttary^i 0#oc.— The Secretary of the Trea- 
sury is charged with the general superrision of 
the ilacal transactions of the goTomment, and the 
execution of the laws concerning commerce and 
navigation; the survey of the coast; the light- 
house establishment; the marine hospitals of the 
United States, and the construction of certain 
public buildings fbr custom-houses and other pur- 
poses, and the signing, stamping, and issuing of 
treasury notes, bonds, Ac 

The Firtt OomptrtMer prescribes the mode of 
keeping and rendering accounts tur the civil and 
diplomatic service, as well as the public lands, and 
revises and certifies the balances arising thereon. 

The Second Cbmptroller prescribes the mode of 
keeping and rendering the accounts of the Army, 
Navy, and Indian departments of the public ser- 
vice, and revises and certifies the balances arising 
thereon. 

l%e Cbmmutioner qf the Chutoms prescribes the 
mode of keeping and rendering the acooonts of 
the customs revenue and disbursements, and for 
the building and repairing custom-houses, Ac, and 
revises and certifies the balances arising thereon. 

The Cbmmissioner qf Internal Revenue superin- 
tends the collection of the excise and other internal 
taxes, prescribes the mode of keeping and render- 
ing account of the revenues and disbursements con- 
nected therewith, decides upon the interpretation 
of the provisions of the tax law, approves or dis- 
approves of the appointment of deputy collectors 
and assistant assessors, and pronounces upon the 
BuflBiclency of the bonds of the collectors and their 
deputies. 

The First Auditor receives and adjusts the 
aecounts of the customs revenue and disburse- 
ments, appropriations and expenditures on account 
of the civil list and under private acts of Congress, 
and reports the balances to the Commissioner of 
the Customs and the First Comptroller, re- 
spectively, for their decision thereon. 

The Second AudUor receives and a(!(|u8ts all 
accounts relating to the pay, clothing, and recruit- 
ing of the army, as well as the armories, arsenals, 
and ordnance, and all accounts relating to the 
Ifldlan Department, and reports the balances to 
the Second Comptroller for his decision thereon. 

TJu Third Auditor receives and adjusts all ac- 
counts for subsistence of the army, fortifications, 
military academy, military roads, and the quarter- 
master's department, pension claims arising from 
military services previous to 1810, and for horses 
and other property lost in the military service, 
and reports the balances to the Second Comp- 
troller for his decision thereon. 

■ T/iS Fourth Auditor atJIJusts all accounts for the 
service of the Navy Department, and reports the 
balances to the Second Comptroller for his decision 
thereon. 

'Th€ Fifth Auditor adjusts all accounts for diplo- 



matic and similar services performed under the 
direction of the State Department, and reports 
the balances to the First Comptroller lor his de- 
cision thereon. 

J%« Sixth Auditor «4Ji>sts all accounts arising 
from the service of the Post-OflSce Department. 
His decisions are final, unless an appeal be 
taken in twelve months to the First Comi»- 
troUer. He superintends the collection of all 
debts due the Post-Office Department, and eU 
penalties imposed on postmasters and mail-eott- 
tractors for failing to do their duty; he directs 
suits and legal proceedings, civil and criminal, and 
takes legal measures to enforce the prompt pay- 
ment of moneys due to the department, instmct- 
ing attorneys, marshals, and clerks relative there- 
to; and receives returns firom each term of the 
United States courts of the condition and progr cei 
of such suits and legal proceedings; has charge of 
all lands and other property assigned to the United 
States in payment of debts due the Poet4>Aoe 
Department, md has power to sell and dispoee of 
the same tat the benefit of the United States. 

The Treasurer receives and keeps the nuxieya 
of the United States in his own office and that oC 
the depositories, and pays out the same upon war- 
rants drawn by the Secretary of the Treasury, 
countersigned by the First Comptroller, and upon 
warrants drawn by the Postmaster^eneral, and 
countersigned by the Sixth Auditor, and recorded 
by the Register. He also holds public moneys 
advanced by warrant to disbursing officers, and 
pays out the same upon their checks. 

The Register keeps the accounts of public re- 
ceipts and expenditures; receives the returns and 
makes out the official statement of commerce and 
navigation of the Unitdd States; and receives 
from the First Comptroller and Coramiasioner of 
Customs all accounts and vouchers decided by 
them, and is charged by law wi th their safe-keepf ng. 

The Soiieitor superintends all civil suits com- 
menced by the United States {except those ariting 
in the Post-Office Department), and instructs the 
United States attorneys, marshals, and clerks in 
all matters relating to them and their results. 
He receives returns ih>m each term of the United 
States courts, showing the progress and condition 
of such suits; has superintendence of the collec- 
tion of outstanding direct and internal duties; 
has charge of all lands and other property assigned, 
set off, or conveyed to the United States in payment 
of debts, all trusts created for use of the United 
States in payment of debts, power to sell and dis- 
pose of lands so assigned, Ac, and power to release 
lands when payment is made in money. 

United SbaUs (hasA Survey.— The Coast Surrey 
Office is charged with the superintendence of the 
survey of the coast of the United States, and its 
Superintendent is the Superintendent of Weights 
and Measures. 



1868.] 



miMOUr . JISPABTMBNT. 



128 



BETENT7E CUTTEB SXBTICE. 



CapUiai. 



John A. Webster... 
Williaia A. Howard 

Qreen Walden 

Henrjr B. Nones 

Douglas Ottinger... 

Tbomas Sands 

Francis Martin 

Stephen Cornell 

William C. Pease... 

George Clark 

John Fannce 



Stat*. 



Md. 

Me. 

Me. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Md. 

N.Y. 

R.I. 

Mass. 



Va. 

Mass. 



Date of Com- 


Compen 


miMlon. 


MtlOD. 


Not. 22,1819 


$1,800 


April 20, 1861 


1,800 


Nov. 21,1838 


1,800 


Dec. 14,1838 


1,800 


Dec. 28,1846 


1,800 


June 7,1861 


1,800 


Oct. 1, 1861 


1,800 


Dec. 3, 1862 


1,800 


Oct. 6, 1863 


1,800 


Aug. 14,1864 


1,800 


Mar. 8, 1866 


1,800 



CapUins. 



Jno. 8. 8. Chaddock 
John A. Webster, Jr 

John Carson v 

Amasa L. Hyde 

George K. SUcer..... 

Gilbert Knapp 

John McGowan 

D. C. Constable 

John M. Jones 

John Mason 

Thomas M. Dungan 



State. 



Mass. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Conn. 

Md. 

Wis. 

NJ. 

N.Y. 

N.C. 

D.C. 

Md. 



Dat« of QoiD- 
mia«iOB. 



Aug. 

July 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

May 

Aug. 

May 

July 

July 

July 



19, 1866 
27,1860 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
3, 1861 

12. 1861 

16. 1862 
1,1862 
2,1862 
3,1862 



Coi 



■aUoB. 



$1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
l,fOO 
1300 
1,800 
1,800 



No. of Captains, 22. 

There are also attached to the ReTenne Serrice 16 First lilentenants, whose annoal compeBSStloa 
is $1400; 16 Second LJeutenants, compensation fl200 per annum; and 19 Third lieutenants, com- 
pensation $800 per annum. 

LIGHT-HOUSE INSPECTORS. 
Appointed in conformity with the act of Congress of August 31, 1862, which proTides that ** an offlcer 
cf the army or navy be assigned to each district as a light^house inspector, sutjject to and under 
the ordera of the Light-House Board, who shall reoeiTe for such service the same pay that he would 
be entitled to by law for the performance of duty in the regular line of his profession, and no other, 
except the legal allowance per mile when travelling under orders connected with his duties." 



Districts. 



1st 
2d 

Sd 

I 4th 
6th 
0th 

8th 

0th 

loth 

Udi 

12tb 




Oapt. John Marston,) 
U.S.A / 

Capt. John Rudd 

Capt. Hugh Y. Pur- \ 
viance j 



Commodore J. R.\ 

Sands j 

Com. W. H. Gardner... 



Navy 

Navy 

Navy 
Navy 



Commander Jas, 
Watson 



M.) 



Navy 
Navy 



Where Bom. 



Massachusetts. 

New York. 

Rhode Island.. 



Now York.. 
Maryland .... 



Navy Virginia. 



Geographical limits of the Districts. 



i 



From N.E. boundary of Maine to Hamptoa 
Harbor, N.H. 
From Hampton Harbor, N JI., to Gooseberry 

Point, Mass. 
' From Gooseberry Point, Mass., to 8qnan In- 
let, N J., and Hudson River and Lake 
Ohamplain. 
From Squan Inlet, N.J., to Metompkin Inlet, 

Va., and Delaware Bay. 
( From Metompkin Inlet. Va., to New River In- 
< let, N.C.,includlng Chesapeake Bay and tri- 
(^ butai'iee, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. 
From New Uiver Inlet, N.C.^ to Mosquito In- 
let, Florida. 
From Moeonito Inlet to Egmont Key, Florida. 
From St. Mark's, Fla., to W. extremity of 

Lake Pontchartrafn. La. 
From Mouths of Mississippi, inclusive, to the 
Rio Grande, Texas. 
rOn Lakes Erie and Ontario, with 8t.Law- 
\ rence and Niagara Rivers. 
On Lakes St. Clair, Huron, Michigan, Superior, 
and their tributaries. 

f Pacific Coast, California, Oregon and Wash- 
( iugton. 



Under the charge of these inspectors there are 467 light-bouses, light-ships, and beacons, of which 
128 are on the New England coast, 81 on the Atlantic coast of the Middle States, 91 on the Atlantic 
coast of the Southern Statu, 66 on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, 16 on the Pacific coast, and 101 
OB the Lakes and their tributary rivers. The Superintendents of these light-houses are the Collectors 
of the districts in which they are situated. Bach light-house has a keeper, and the more important 
ones, one or more assistants. The compensation of the keepers ranges fh>m $300 to $1000, except on 
the lakes, where, navigation being obstructed for half the year, their compensation ranges from $100 

tD$M). 

(For Steamboat Inspectors, see p. 157.) 



12t 



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1S«8.] TABASVAY BEI>AKT3lSirt. 1^9 

Aneison and Oolleotors of Internal SeTennei in the United 8tatei« 

Mainc 
DiBti. ABSMiMi. Cdleeton. 

1. Nsthaniel G. Marshall, Portland NathanM J. Miller, Portland. 

2. HaimibtfrBelcher, Farmington a Jesse S. Lyibrd, Lewiston. 

3. George W. WUcox,6ardiiier.. Peter V. Sanborn, Keadfield. 

4. Oeoige P.fiewall, Oldtown Aaron A. Wing, Bangor. 

& Nathaniel A. Joy, Ellswarth «.....«. John West, Franklin. 

Nkw Haitpsbibs. 

L Qeorge M. Herring, Farmington James M. Lovering, Exeter. 

2. Herman Foster, Manchester John Kimball, Concord. 

3. BoUvar Lovell, Paper Mill Village, C^ieshire Co. J)aniel P. Wheeler, Qrford. 

TiBXONT. 

L wnUam G. Kittredm, Fairharen Joseph Poland, Montpelier. 

2. Thomas E. Powefs, Woodstock........./. ......George A. Merrill, St. Jobnfbuy. 

Sw Henzy C. Adams, Alhsrgfa Springs Carlos Baxter, Burlington. 

Mabsacuubjevtb. 

L Charles G. Davis, Piymoath Walter C. Dnrfee, FbU BItot. 

2L BUas S. Beala, North Weymouth........ ....Charles P. Hunting^ton, Mflton. 

3. James Bitchie, Boston James W. Stone, Boston. 

4. OtisCIapp» Boston .John Sargent, Boston. 

& Amos Noyes, Newbtiryport ., ..J. Yincent Browne, Salem. 

6l Chailes HndBon, Lexington. .* Qeorge Cogswell, Haverhill. 

7. 0. G. Esty, Framingfaam.. ...... — » John Nesmith, LowelL 

5. Ivers Phillips, Worcester. Adin Thayer, Worcester. 

9. Amasa Norcrois, Fitchborg ...«...«. Daniel W. Alvord, Gmenfleld. 

Id a N. Emerson, Pittsfleld. £. R. Tinker, North Adams. 

Rhodk Island. '" 

1. Thomas G. Tamer, Providence. L. B. Frieae, Providence. 

2. William A. Pierce, Johnston.......... ...William D. Brayton, Warwick. 

CONNBCTICUT. 

1. Alphonso G. Crosby, BiOckviUei..,...,.^ Mark Howard, Hartford. 

2. John B. Wright, Clinton John Woodruff, New Haven. 

a Jesse 8. Ely, Norwich Ezra Dean, Woodstock. 

4. Beuben BoCkwell, Colebrook David F. Hollister, Bridgeport. 

New York. 

L Btenry W. Eastman, Boslyn, Queens Go. George F. Carman. Patchogne, SulTolk Go. 

2L John Williams, Brooklvn A. M. Wood, Brooklyn. 

3. William £. Bobinson, Brooklyn « Henry C. Bowen, Brooklyn. 

4. Pierce G. Van Wyck, New York .John Mack, New York. 

6. George F. Bellows, New Yorki....; Joseph Hoxie, New York. 

fll jQim F. deveUnd, New York WUliamOrton, New York. 

7. George F. Steinbrenner, New York Marshall B. Blake, New York. 

8. Anthony J. Bleecker, New York....... Geoi^ P. Putnam, New York. 

9. Homer Franklin, Now York.* .....4. »....*.£dgar Ketchum, New York. 

10. H. M. Dewoy, Mount BLi8Co,'We8tche8ter Oo.....'AIvan Hyatt, Sing Sing. 

11. James G. Cortis, Cochecton, Sullivan Co..,^...j..Jo^n G. Wilkius, Middletown. 

12. James Mackin, Fishkill Landing: Joshua T. Waterman, Hudson. 

13. Frederick Cooke, Catskill William Masten, Kingston. 

14. John G. Treadwell, Albany ^Theodore Townsend, Albany. 

15. Philip H. Neher, Granville, Washington Co Gideon Reynolds, Troy. 

16. Lawrence Myers, Plattsburgh Walter A. Faxon, Cheetertown, Warren Go. 

17. Uriah D. Meeker, Mialone .Erasmus D. Brooks, Potsdam. 

18. Oe<vge T. Hanford, Schenectady James H. Burr, GloversviUe, Fulton Co. 

10. Hascall Bamsford, Norwicb, Chenango Co.«.j.4.George W. Ernst, Comterstown. 

'29. Nelson J. Beach, Watson, Lewus Co „.Mo..,«.Lawrence L. Merry, Ilion, Herkimer Co. 

21. Cluurles M. Dennison, Rome : Thomas R. Walker, Utica. 

22. Lsonard Ames, Mexico, Oswego Co ^....Ba^h H. Avery, Wampsville, Madison Co. 

23. William Candee, Syracuse .., Alfred Wilkinson, Syracuse. 

U, Joeeph W.Gatss, Ontario, Wayne Go William A. Halsey, Port Byron, OayiigH Oo. 

25. Lewis Peck, Phelps ..Myron H. (^ark, Canandalgua. 

28l Atfrad'Well*, Ifhaea :....;.....Simon 0. Hitnfacock, Binghamton. 

9 



(}$0 tHB NATIOHAI^ ALMAKAC. [1868. 

Niw TOBX.— Continned. 
Diiti. • Ammm, OoUeoUm. 

27. John J. Nicks, £Imira..'. .......Seymonr F. Benton, Gamine. 

28. John W. Graves, Medina, Orleans Co John Tan Yooirhies, Jr., Bomestet. 

29. James P. Murphy, Lockport. John B. Halsted, Gasttlc^ Wyoming Co. 

SO. Otis F. Presbrey^BnffUo ^Philip Dorsheteiflr, BoffiUo. 

81. H. S. Woodmfr, Franklinville, Cattaraugos Oo-JdUton Smith, Mayville, Chavtaoqua €e« 

82. S. P. Gilbert, New YJwek Sheridan Shook, New Toxk. 

Niw Jntanr. 

1. J. G. Sparks, Carpenter's Land'g, GloncMter Ca^WilUam S. Sharp, Salem, Salem Oo^ 

2. Geo. W. Cowperthwait, Tom's Kiver, Ocean Ga.Stephen B. Smitbi Pennington, Herc«r Co. 

3. Robert Rusling, Hackettstown, Wairen Oo Elston Mandi, Plainfield. 

4. Nathaniel Lane, Paterson Engene Ayres, Monistown. 

6. George A. Halsey, Newark ; Baiuel BlL Wilson, KewarlE. 

pENNSTLTAlfU. 

1. Washington KeMliyFhiladelphia.^...... ^Jespec.Hacding, Pfailadelphiik 

2. Thomas W. Sweney,fhtladelphia......^....»......John.H,.I>iehli Philadel|khi«. 

a J. Fletcher Budd, Philadelphia. William J. Wainwright, Philadelphia. 

4. Delos P. Southworth, Philadelphia.. .....^....John M. Riley, Philadelphia. 

5. Edwin T. Chase, Philadelphia John W. Cowell, Doylestown. 

6. Siunnel McHoee, iilentown David Newport, NendsfcowiL 

7. Thomas W. Che^mey, West Cheater William Baker, West Cheater. 

8. Alexander P. Jutton, Beading. Diller.Lnther, Beading. 

9. James K. Alexander, Lancastev. Alexander ILfiood, Lancaster. 

10. John Early, Palmyrat, Lebanon Oo „. Jamea A. Inneaa, PottsviUe. 

11. Samnel Oliver, Easioii, Northampton Ga Edgar. T. Voater, Manch Cattuik» OariKm Ock 

12. William Jessup, Montrose, Susquehanaai Co....jrosephH. Scran ton, Scranton, LnsemeCkk 

13. Benjamin P. Fortner, jOatawissa, Colombia Go..H. Lawrence Scott, Towanda^ Bcadtird Oa. 

14. Daniel Kendig, MMwetown Adam K. JUinestack, Harrisbiizg. 

15. Horace Bonham, York...... i, ....« ^LeviKanffmam, Mechaniesbiuqg. 

10. Robert G. Harper, Gettysburg. Edward ScuU, Somerset. 

17. Thomas P. Campbell, Huntingdon Samnel J. Royer, Johnstown. 

18. George Boal, Boalsburg, Centre Co George Bubb, MontourTille, Lycoming Cio. 

19. Daniel Livingston, Curweneville, Clearfield Ca J«hn W. Douglass, Erie. 

20. Joseph H. Lenbai-t^ Meadville .William F. Clark, Meroer. 

21. D. W. Shryock, Greensburg Jasper M. Thompson, Uniontown. 

22. Henry A. Weaver, Pittsburg. John Shed, Pittsburg. 

23. Samuel Marks, Butler David N. White, Alleghany. 

24. Samuel DaTenport, Beaver David SiAkey, Newcwtte. 

DsuiTfUe. 
1. John P. HcLc!iu>, Wilmington Charles H. B. Day, Dover. 

MARTLAim. 

1. George W. Russum, Denton, Caroline Co.. 

2. John W. Webster, Ihomas Run, Harford Co... J^amea L.lUdgQly, Baltimore. 

3. William E. Beale, Baltimore. ...JPeter.G. Saomein, Baltimore. 

4. Elias Davis, Boonsborongph Frederick Schley, Frederick. 

5. William Welling, Clarksvitte, Hoyrard Oa George W. Dawson, PotletfviUek MbntgomanrCq. 

Dismox OF'lOpiuMBU. 
1. Peter M. Pearson, Washington Saylea J. Bowen, Washington. 

1. John Parkinson, Cameron, Marshall Ga 

2. A. G. Leonard, Parkwaburg 

Kbntuokt. 

1. Charles 8. Todd, Owensboro*, Daviess Oo....>....€toQrgeB. Blakey, Rttssellvllle. 

2. William M. Spencer, Greensburg, Greene Co.... 

8. Edgar Needham, Louisville ...PMttp Speed, Louisville. 

4. Richard Apperaon, Mount Steitbig. 

Mmoiw. 

1. Thf^phfle PaptB4St.Loulfl..^. ». $amuel fi. Oa(diMr« StLonaia. 

2. Daniel Q. Gale, Washington, Franklin Co........ 

8. Joaeph A. Hfiy, Ja Qvwg^ Lewis Oo...*.,....*....0. $. Wilkinsoi^ St. Joaeph> BiM^iMBfU'Oiv . 



i^ ] . ^ nsAauBx dsfamvbw. 181 

Omo. 

Dtati^ i iMpM W . Colladlan. . 

1. durlflf R. Votdioh;, OiiiciDiiftti.«.....M..»»..M...ThoiilM &ooii«r, Cfncinnati. • • 
1 James PdUad, Olncinnati .........^ ^ Reuben M. W. Tkylor, Ciocinnatt. 

5. Wiliiam Minar^ Lpbanoo....*.^ ^.....^ John L. Martin, Iteyton. 

4 Junes Walker, Bellefontaine, Logan Oa F. M. Wright, Urhana, Champaign Go. 

6. Qeorge W. Beery, Upper Sandoaky. Shelby Taylor, Lima. 

6. DaTid Sanders, Wilmington, OUnton Oa 

7. Inao IL Banott, Spring Valley^ Oraane Ga.....A. P. Stone, Colnmbna. 

8. C 8. Hamilton, Maryvrillej TJnuui Co..MM..,*....l8aac Ranney, Delaware, Delaware Co. 

9. Lather A. Hall, Tiffin, Seneca Co John F. Dewey, Norwalk, Huron Co. 

10. E. Graham, Perrysbni^, Wood Coi ~. 8. A. Raymond, Toledo. 

IL Daniel BIcfarland, Portamonth John Campbell, Ironton, Lawrence Co. 

11 Charles F. Shaeffer, Lancaster ».«•.. ~...v Nathan Denny, Cii^TiUak ' 

13. Beqjamin Grant, Moont Yemon, Knox Co Albert A. Guthrie, Zaneerille. 

li Aaron Pardee, Wadawortli, Medina Co M. B. Gates, Elyria, Lorain Go. 

U. Israel R. Waters. Marietta, Nash Co Eliaklm H. Moore, Athens, Athens Go. 

19. J. H. BamhiU, New Philad'a^ Tnacarawas Co...Charles J. Albright, Camiulds^ Guerniay OOk 

17. Joseph O. McCleary, Wanrenton, Jefferson Co. Joseph B. Arter, New Lisbon, Gdamhiana Go. 

18. John E. Hurlbnt, davaland...... Ricbard C. Parsons, aeveland. 

19. Horace T. Beeb<^ Ravenna, Portage Co. Hency Fassett, Ashtabula, Aahtebnla Go. 

iHSLkNA. 

L James 0. Hutchinson, Tincennes Horace B. Shepherd, Tincennes. 

2. Thomas 0. Ston^tei^Gbrydon, HandssB Ca....Henry Gxawftid, . New Albany. 

3. Wm. F. Browning, Bloomiagton, Monroe Co.... John S. 8. Hunter, Bloomington, Monroe Go. 
i W. y. Kyger, Brookrine, Franklin Go ,James L. Yater, Aurora, Dearbmm Go. 

S. John Yaryan, Richmond, Wayne Go Saihnel W. Harlan, Mnncie, Delaware Go. 

t Wm. A. Bradshawv IndianapoMs, Marten Oa....Iheodortt P.Hanithoy. IndlawapoMs, Ifrtuwrni 

7. James Farrington, Terre Haute Jcim O. Grain, RockviUe. 

& Josq>h Patter, Delphi, Garrtdl Go n,..John L. Smith, Stockwell, Tippecanoe Go. 

9. DaTid Tumar, Crown Point, Lake Go John F. Dodds, Logaiisport, Cass Go. 

10. James 8. Frazer, Wanuw, Koadnsko Go .Warren H. Withen, Fort Wavne^ AUanCow • 

IL Wbiboni R. Pierce, Anderson, Madison Go Dewitt G. Chipman, Noblesyille^ Hamilton Ca 

ILUITQIS. 

1. Philip Wadsworth, Chicago George Schneider, Chicago. 

i Dnnean Fergnaon, Bocfclbrd. ...» Wait Salcott, Rockford. 

3. Lester H. RobinBan» M(HTison, Whitesides Co.. .Henry A. Mix, Oregon, Ogle Cq. 

i William D. ttsmlerson, Aledo^ Mercer Co.. Beth 0. Sherman, QuIwDy. 

S. Thomas C. Moore, Peoria..» John H. Bryant, Princeton. 

^ Bri L. Waterman, Ottawa Lewis Ellsworth, Napierville, Du Page Co. 

7. Qeorge W. RiTea, Paris, Edgar Go W. T. Cunningham, Danyille, YermiUion Go. 

8. Peter Folsom, Bloomington, McLean Ca Turner R. King, Springfield. 

9. Amos C. Babcock, Canton, Fulton Co William G. Green, Petersbnrg, Menard Co. 

10. John Moses, Winchester, Scott Co Jediah F. Alexander, GreeuTille, Bond Go. 

IL Peter Smith, Sumner, Lawrence Go. Robert D. Noleman, Centralia, Maripn Co. 

U John Scheil, Bellerffle. Willard C. Fhigg, Moro, Madison Oo. 

13. DeWtttO. Barbonr, Tamaroa, Perry Co Daniel G. Hay, Cairo. 



MKQVUir. 



.u 



1- Joseph R. Bennet, Detroit. L. G. Berry, Detroit. 

1 Elisha J. Honse, Paw Paw, Yan Buren Ca Alexander H. Morrison, St. Joseph, Berrien Go. 

3. Whitney Jones, Lansing, Ingham Go Jra Mayhew, Albion, Calhoun Ca 

i Alonio Sessions, Ionia, Ionia Co Aaron B. Turner, Grand Rapids, Kent Co. 

6. Luther Stanley, Birmingham, OaUand Go Dexter Mussey, Romeo, Macomb Co. 

0- Vnmsend Nortii, Yassar, Tuscola Go. Samuel N. Warren, Flint, Genesee Go. 

Wucoirsnr. 

L Charies A. Bronson, Milwankie Thomas J. Emerson, Racine. 

2. SsTid Atwood, Madison Edwin R. Wadsworth, Madison. 

8. Bemaid W. Brisbois, Prairie du Chien J. H. Warren, Albany, Green Co. 

4. Onia Hatch, Oakfleld Centre, Fond du Lao Co. James H. Babcock, Beaver Dam, Dodge Co. 
& Oeorge Gary, Oshkoeh, Winnebago Co Horace Meriam, Berlin, Marquette Co. 

0. Jamsi B. Gray, Hudson, St. Croix Co WiUiam T. Price, Black River Falls, Jackson Go. 

Iowa. 

1- R. M. Pickel, Mount Pleasant, Henry G0.........J. G. Walker, Fort liadison, Lee Oo. 

2. Pliny Fay, Muscatine, Muscatine Co...... .George W. Eells, Davenport, Scott Go, 

3- JasBsT. Jamtt, Dnbnque... Levi Fuller, West Union, Fayette Co. 



I 



:ie2 rPH« NATIOKAL ALMA VAC. fld6i. 

lowA-^-Otetintted. 



4. 0. H. Jerome, lowii City, Jdhneon Oo. William F. Oowlte, Oelmleoflft, MiluiAa Co. 

5. John N. Dewey^ Dee McdDes, Polk Ca Horace Srerett, Cootieil Blvffi, PottRwalQiiii* On. 

6. Deloa Arnold, Manhalltown, alarshall Co. 8. B. Hewitt, Eagle OroTe, Wrigfat Co. 

HunfisoiA. 

1. George W. Baker, Rocbeater, Qlniatead Co. Jolni Nonrla Rail, MaakAto, BI«m Su4I Ool 

2. H. 0. 0. Morrltoo, St. Paul VtMnaaa O. Jdnea^ Anoka, Anokn Ox 

Kakvas. 
Janea F. Legate, Lawrence John Bpeer, Lawrence. 

Cautouu. 

1. Caleb T. Fay, Saa Frandtco .WlUlm T. Piatcb, San FtaBdacaL 

2. Bicbard 8a>Tage, flant* Cms, SsntA Ckua Ca F. B. Mnrdock, Ban Joa6» Santa Gtars Co. 

S. T. Campbell, Mokelnrane UHl, GalaTeraa Ca.... John Sedgwick, Sonom, Tuolumne Cb. 

4. J. M. A-very, Saemmento. ....A. A. Delxnw, Folaom, SaeimmenCo Co. 

ft. W. A. Ellawm, Petaloma, Sonoma Co .Charlea Maltby, of Tolo Ca PjO., Sacnmaoto. 

0»iQ02r. 
Thomaa Fraaert Porfkiid.................w..« Xawranoe W. Coe, BallM. 



Jampii H. Borbank, Falb aty ...... — .Jamea Sweat, NetoadBft Gttj. 

DAKOTA TBknonT. 
Joaafk LaBarge^ BBc FotnU. 



•a*e**««»«aeft»« 



ToMTOftT or Nbw Mszxoo. 

Charlea Bliukner, Santa Fe. 

Utah TnuToaT. 
Jeaaa 0. LltUe, Great Salt Lake aty Robert T. Burton, Great Salt Ukt Qtj. 



CoLaaABo TnuTOST. 
Daai^ Witter, DeaTer.....M...............^ Qeoige W. Brown, Denrer. 

ViTAnA TnuuTOET. 
Warren Wairea, Canon City Jamea S. Dilley, Caraon City. 

WASHnraTOW Tsbbrost. 
J. Q. Sparka, Walla WalUu H. A. Ooldaboronih, Olympla. 



im».] 



TBHASURY 1>]SPARTMEVT. 



1SS< 



BEYEVUE AHD EXPSniTUEE. 

^tAvaaait or Di7Txxb» Bxtx^vis, asd Pubuc ExFENoiTUBsa Dinuiro va ftacAL Txae nscrn 

JUITK aO, 186L 



The reoe^tf into the treasiiry during the fiacal 
year ending June 30| 1661, were a« Allows: 

from cQstpms, tiz, : 

Daring the quarter ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1800 $16,119,831 22 

Daring the quarter ending De- 
cember 31, 1860 8,174,167 60 

DoriiK the quarter ending 
March 31, 1861 9,772,574 CT 

During the quarter ending 
Jane 30, 1861. 5,515,552 16 

TMal customa $39,582,125 64 

Vrom nlee of public lands 870,658 54 

Ih»m miscellaneous and incidental 

soorces '. 892,199 6i 

Ikonloanimderactof June22,1860 7,022,000 00 
from loan under act of !February 8, 

1861 16,339,966 40 

Imn trespBury notes issued under 

act of June 22, i860, as iwthor- 

ixed bj act of March 2, 1861....^ 2)274,093 34 
From treasury notes issued under 

■et of December 17, 1860.^ 10,010,900 00 

From treasury notes issued under 

act of February 8, 1861, as au- 
thorized by act of March 2, 1861 6,214,750 00 

Total loans and treasury notes. 41,861,709 74 

Total receipt.. 83,206,693 56 

Balance .in the treasury on 
Jaly 1, I860..... u 3,629,206 71 

Total meana............ ....,.•• $86,835,900 27 

Tlk« expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1861, were as'foUows : 

imsLATivx, sxxcimvs, jxtucux., etc. 



Tor Congress, including books 

For executive 

Fwjadjctery 

Pot goTomment in the Territories 
For offlcers of the mint and 

branches and assay office in New 

York 

For assistant treasurers and their 

clerks 

For sapenrising and local inspec- 

tori,Ac 

For sorreyora^eneral and their 

derks.... 



$2,819,930 13' 

1,882,357 37 

964,824 70 

171,112 50 



93,300 00 

86,286 83 

81,550 97 

106.886 75 



Total dTll list $6,156,199 25 



roBiiair dribooitbsx. 

For sdaries of mialiten.............. $295,340 45 

For salaries of secretaries and assist- 

sot lecretaries at legation 81,721 71 

For alarles of consuls^........ 256,133 60 

For nlaries <k secretaries of lega- 



tion to China and Turkey as In- 
terpreters ', 

For salaries of interpreters to con- 
suls in China 

For interpreters, guards, and other 
expenses of the comolntes in tke 
Turkish dominions 

For intwcourse with the Bacrbary 
powers 

Fot contingent expenses of all the 
missions abroad 

For contingent expenses of foreign 
intercourse....' 

For loss, by exchange, on drafts of 
coQsuls and commercial agents... 

For office rent of those consuls who 
are not allowed to trade 

For purchase of blank books, sta* 
tionerjf Ac-, for consuls 

For reUef and protection of Ameri- 
can seamen 

For expenses in acknowledging the 
serrices of masters and crews of 
foreign Tessels In rescuing Ameri- 
can citizens from shipwreck 

For compensation of commissioner 
to China and consols at the fire 
ports..,~ 

For contingent expenses of the 
commissioner in Cmna. 

For salary of the commissioner of 
claims in China 

For the cost of a prison-ship at 
Canton, in China 

For bringing home from foreign 
countries persons charged with 
crimes, Ac 

For bringing from Batavia 24 sea- 
men ofihip ** Staghotind*' charged 
with mutiny 

For expenses relative to suitable 
acknowledgments to be made to 
British naval authorities in Ja' 
maica ; - 

For carrying into effect the con- 
vention between United States 
and Paraguay 

For prosecution Of work, including 
pay of commissioner, per first 
article of reciprocity treaty with 
Great Britain 

For compensation of commissioner, 
Ac. to ac^ust claims of citizens 
of ITnited States against New 
Grenada 

For compensation of commissioner, 
Ac, to mn and mark the bound- 
ary between United States and 
British possessions bounding on 
Washington Territory 

For expenses attendant upon the 
execution of the neutrality act.. 

For awards under the 15th article 
of treaty between United States 
and Mexico 

For settlement of accounts of Ed- 
ward Ely deceased, late consul 
at Bombay 



$8,000 CD 


6,609 88 


8,019 27 


8,600 00 


68,610 IB 


T0,nO89 


10,13» 75 


61,913 S4 


30,008 68 


196)28171 



1,197 2B 



4,884 9 


807 90 


901 88 


4,756 08 


6,684 0t 


9,792 00 


8,000 00 


^096 97 


15,000 00 


1,000 60 



110,000 60 
416 52 

2,805 22 

1,832 49 



11» 



THX TSAtWSAL ALMANAC. 



Vor expenm Incurred bj Oiaries 
J. Helm, ooofliil-genenu at 



74«tt 



Vtom whkh dadoct exooM of re- 
psymento sboTe expenditvree 
voder esodry KpptopAUabg...^, 



90,892 64 



Total foreign fntercootM .....,^. $1^42,973 41 



Vor mint eetabliibment ^ 

Ves eontlngent expenaea under the 

act Ibr the safe^EeeiMng of the 

rgaMJcrerenne....^ ^. 

Yor compensation to peraone de- 
fignated to receive and keep the 
public rerenne^......^...^ 

7or oompenaation to special agents 
to examine books, Ac^ in the 
■eretal depoeitories 

7or building vaults as additional 
■eeovritj to the public funds In 
6d d^Meitorie* ^.. 

Yer'expenses of en&;raving« Ac, 
treasury notes and certificates 
of stock «» 

7or snrvev of theOnlf and Atlantic 
;0oastaf the United States 

Vor survey of the western coast of 
the United States 

Wb9 «wey of the Florida reefs and 
keys .'......—. 

ToK fmA and quarters of the offi- 
cers of the army serving on the 
coast survey 

Tor publishing observations made 
in the progress of the surrey of 
the coast of the United States. .. 

Vor pay and rations of engineers of 
steamers used in the coast survey 

7or repairs of vessels uaedin the 

Tor completing the works of the 
explonng expedition ..^... 

Vor repladng the works of the 

exploring expedition destroyed 

' by flre^ 

Yor payment for horses and other 
property lost or destroyed in the 
mllkasy service of the United 
States ^^ 

7or claims not otherwise provided 
for ^ 

Wvf camnses at the Smithsonian 
Institution, per act of August 
10,1846 „ ., .T..... 

7or mall services performed for the 
-cevecai departments of govern- 
ment/ per l2th section act of 
March 8, 1847.. 

Vor further compensation to the 
Post Office Department fur maQ 
eenrices performed for the two 
houses of Oongress, Ac, per act 

Jror supplying deficiencies In the 
revenues of the Post Office De- 
pcituient...., 

7or transportation of mails between 
the United States and ibreign 
coaatries... 



47641135 


82,052 87 


8,486 73 


247970 


665 00 


14,840 73 


206,700 00 


108,000 00 


38,000 00 



4,000 00 



6,000 00 


9,00000 


10,000 00 


3,677 62 


676 88 


29,615 80 


^88 63 


80,910 14 


200,000 00 


250,000 00 


4,064,234 44 


857,620 04 



For transportation of mails on 
Puget's Sound, W. T.... .......... 

For trausportation'of mails between 
San Francisco, Calilbmia, and 

for semi-monthly mail, by sea, be- 
tween Washington and 
VBrritories and Caliiniiia..... 
For carrying the mails lh» Hew 
York, via Panama, to San firaik- 

Cisco ^ ^..... 

For continuation of the Treunry 

building ....................^ 

For building post-offices, conrt- 
hooses, Ac, including purchase 

of sites...., 

For reimbursing the Territory of 
Utah for expenses incmred ia 
suppressmg Indian hostilitien is 

said Territoiy in 186S.. ...... 

For expenses of niiiBwiinj^iiis Im 
bringtag to the seat of govern- 
ment the votes of the semid 
States for President and Yic»- 

President 

For expenses of collectiiq( the re- 
venue from cQstoms 

For repayment te importers the 
excess of depeeitv for unascer- 
tained duties 

For debentures or ifarawbsMcks, bocun- 
ties or a]iowaince9......M....M..«.M« 

For reftindlng duties under act to 

extend the warefaooeing ^rsteai. 

Foi- debenturee and other charges^ 

per act of October 16^ 1887 

For salaries of special examineni 
of drugs and medicines.......^..... 

For additional compeneatioii tacofr- 
Iect<Hi, naval officers, Ac»......... 

For support and m ainteu ance ef 
ngnx* nouaes, ■c..m*.....m. ...•«•.•..« 

For building ligbt* libnM e , Ac, and 
tor b»ftcons» buojrs^ Ac.....m.m.... 

For life-boats, compeneatien of 
keepers of stations, Ac............ 

For marine haqAtal estahlhdbaMttta 
For building- marine hospital^ in- 
cluding repairs........ 

For building custom-houses, in- 
cluding repairs 

Wor expwses of collecting the 
revenue ftom sales of public 

lands.... ; 

For survey of the public lands...... 

F(H* survey of public and privmto 

land clauns in Oalifomia 

For re-survey of lands In States 

where the crfBces aie closed...;. .. 

For rejpairing unfinished rerurds of 

public and private smvejs... .-....- 

For services of special cound, Ac, 

in defending the tttte to puUic - 

property in California....... ^ 

For rent of ittrre ytM B -geu e i a Pa 

oflices, Ac...... 

For repayment' for inids' emy 

neously sold 

For indemnity for 
sold to individuals ....... 

For two and three {Mr.ccBtaas to 

the State of Alabama ..>. 

For two and three per centnm to 
the State of Mississippi ^ 



•7,684 66 

76' 



236^219 99 
81fk71l96 

d4Ml«t6 
681612 29 

IMMiO 
S,884»764 46 

7«4|676 2S 

•10416 42 

V>46«6 

8^26 67 

4^900 09 

9,669 87 

706)664 17 

100^667 91 

21,317 08 

ao^is u 

12;4tf 04 
064,63145 

an,7S4 80 
186,266 U 

60/K8 94 

2/)00 00 

0,616 81 

njBH 04 
12,229 17 
08,766 09 
48,876 48 
7,007 48 
1^068 U 



»».] 



ZaEAISl^RV IXEiPAATMSNX. 



I8fi 



For two and thsea perxsntiim to 
tti^SlAto of MiMomrL..»^^..«...*^ 

For Area per centum to the State 
of niiiiols ..«M....^.^..M..*.i*.....*.»* 

For Avo-per centum to the State of 



For ftvo per oentnm to the State 

01 Arfcanwaw »»«»««.«»«»«««».«««»»«»»«»«•»» 
F9r tve per centum to the State of . 

Michi|^ 

For five per centtun to the Stote of 

Hinneeoto ~ 

For nrnning and marking boundary 

line between the United Stotes 

For sarrer of the eastern boun- 
dary of Oalflbmia. ..^ 

for removing Co coast of Africa the 
captured Africans ^...... 

For m^pression of the slKtv tnde. 

?or expenaee of taking the eighth 
oenaue ^.......„.,„.,„», 

For rent of rooms for United Stotes 
courts ^M. 

For Pactent Office bnildingi............ 

For alteration and zcpdra of buUdi' 
ings in Washington,, improve- 
ment of grounds, Ac' 

For compensation of public gar-' 
Seaer, gat^^koepers, laborav, 
watchmen, Ac .....,....,..,....,...„.a,.,. 

For compensation of auxiliary 
guard and 20 pblieetten 

F«»F fighting the Capitol, Presi* 
dent^s Hottse, Ac., with gas.....^. 

Fer fiiel, Ac, for President's House 

For refurnishing the President's 
Honse .*. 

For collection of agricultural sta- 
tistics • .........•■«« 

For drawing to illoatrato rq^t.of 
Oonunissioner of Patente 

Fm* asylum for insane of District 
of CMumUay and army and navy 
of Uidted fttotea ~~ 

For (Mumbla Institoto for- deaf; 
dttmbv awl. blind of the District.. 
of Oolnmbi*.. - 

For penitentiary In the District of 
Columbia 

For PMkMDao nod Xastern Branch 
bridges, compensation of draw- 
keepers, kc 

For patent fbnd. ~..,»*m.>. 

For works of art for- tlie ornament 
of the Qmitol »^..,.».,.. ■ 

For aaalTses of 88 specimens of 
iron, duferent' Tocallttes of soils 
and coal and ores.. .'..'..'..v.;-.....;;:.. 

For expensee of-iwcUnff.Mid dia- 
tributing the Qoqgressiouajl Jqw> 
nals anddocomente 

For presenration of colleettous of 
e x pi win g expeditions 

For snp|^Mt,*Ae., of transient pan- 
pars in Washington Infirmary*.. 

For support, Ac, of insane paapers 
of the IMstriot of Gdumbia and 
of the United 



For relief of sundry indiTlduals.... 
For sundry items 



C14,7fl8 42 
SB9 76 

6^Na[81 

8,816 88 

...Sfi6& II 

MOOOO 

87^1 19 

146,600 67 
171,040 07 

9U,eU 00 

16,000 00 
12,080 00 

7^782 84 

24^821 74 

40,186 10 

47/>67 60 
1,800 00 

7,917 70 

60,000 00 

6,000 00 

68,843 00 

6,586 20 
19,501 76 



17,389 89 
277,861 00 

.6,050.jOO 



6^984 80 

i2,6b0 00 
4,000 00 
6^000 00 



Vetnl nlmllaoeoap^ 



l#j.*«a.M*A'***. 



80,000 00 

874,687 11 

12,997 07 

116,888,090 68 



mron vsi DiBiniMr or thi ammm dirlb** 



For In<Aan department $2,009,927 7^ 

For pension, mfUtary 876,493 91- 

For pension, naval 161,401 66 

For relief oi sundry indiTiduaisw.. 22,199 42 

Total under the Interior De* 

partment.. $8,760,022 T2 



For army proper 
For Military Academy 



uimn TH> raaicnoir or tkx was DtPASTMsiif . 

$17,979,006 84 

178,167 92 

For arming and equipping militia.. 18^686 60 

For armories, arsenals, Ac 1,662,811 81 

For. fortifications and other works 

of defence Ifi0»jn2 91 

For construction of roads, bridges, 

Ac 76,87T 71 

For improTement of rirers, harbors. 

For extension of the Capitol of tlie 

United States 484,848 10 

For domeof theCfcpttbl 164,999 80 

For extension- of the General Post- 

OIBce buildii^^.. ,<,..<.»*...m... 86^900 00 , 

For Washington aqueduct.^ 261,470 6^. 

For relief of sttfidry Indltlduals 

andmiscellaneons 90,681 87^ 



I t-im 



From which deduct repayments on 
account of pay of militia and 
volunteers...... 



$83,041,981 8(^. 



60;880 8$ 



Total under the War Depart- 
ment $22,981,160 44 

VNnmi THi niiLECTioN or tbb natt depastxest. 



For pay and subsistence, tnclnding 
medicines, Ac 

For " increase, repairs, armament, 
and equ4pment<tfM^«»».«»...k..k*\t.v.. 

fpr. Qrdn«A<;e« Ac,.„.«,*«.««*..».»>.»... 

For fnel... 



Forhb-mp....;.. 

Fot contingent expenses.;.....* 

For navy yards 

For magazines........* 

For hospitals 

For Naval Academy 

For six steam fHgates 

For five sloopa-of>war 

tor seven steam screw sloops and 

one side-wheel steamer 

For seven steam sloopsK)f-war, 

second class«. ..« 

For miurine corps, inclnding,marine 

barracks <...!.........< 

For relief of sundry individuals 

and miscellaneotts..-.-.v.'..~ 



$6,434,604 15 

2,669,489 07 ' 

474^6 96 

616^180 12 

188,476 03. 

69,8016 07 ^ 

121,409 11 

63,821 85 

62,220 65 

66,603 49 

192,791 06 

128,24f 95 

. 63»010 24 

25,681 00 

640,570 16 

166411 29 



Total under the Navy Depart- 
ment .,« — .. $12,428>677 09 , 



PUBUb 

F(H* interest on public debt, in- 
cluding treasury notes .....^.- $4^000,173 76\ 

For redemption oif tJnited States , 

stock of 1846 1,000 OO *• 

For payment to creditors of Texas, 
per act of September 9, 1880 TSyfOS m^l 



186 THB ITATtOKAL AlMANAC; [1889: 



lor refmbutMnunt of trtwmry 
notes laraed per acta prior to De- 
cember 23, 1857, paid in specie... $450 OQ 

for pajment of treasury notes 
issned per act of December 23, 
1867 IT^/WO 00 

For i>ajment of treasury notes 
issued per act of December 17, 
1800 68,350 00 



For payment of treimry nolM 
itsned per act of March 2, U6L... $68a;06O 00 

Total public debt.........^........ $TOj2gl,881 (0 

Total expenditures |84^8,8M « 

Balance in the Treasury July 
1,1861 $2,257,006 80 



r. 



STATnBlCT SHOIWINO TfiB AMOVNT OF PUBUC D<Bt OF TBI UlOnCD SfAnS OIT DBCKYBIE 1, 1862. 

Amount of oreinhraft - ».....» .'. ^........ — ..... $UK181/M6 A 

Vonr per cent. Temporary Loan 88^688,106 46 

Ifre par cent. Temporary Loan '. 42,4354$i 85 

Suspended Requiaitians. 4^354,701 22 

FMt-dne Tireasury Notes 907,800 00 



immediate i<iaDiiivies». ..«..<*».....«««.....».«.»»♦»..«. «*.t«» »«.«»»*»«»«««»»«*«»»««»«»«»«»..«»#..».».*« .^i4H,pwtiB8o ja 

Old PubUc Debt 70,104,«6& 01 

8even-«nd-three-tenths per cent, three-year Bonds....^ 140,000,000 00 

Two-year six per cent. Bonds 2,693,700 00 

United States Notes ^^^ — 218,200,000 00 

Twenty year six per cent. Bonds 60^000,000 00 

Oregon War Debt, six per cent 878,450 00 

Ftre-Twenty Tear Bonds, six per cent , 22,07^650 00 

CMrtiilcates of Indebtedness 84,834,141 66 



$727,512,766 80 



BXOBP^S AHD XlPJUnilUUB, Aft BcmUTBD fOR THB Tbab BITDIirO JtrxE 30, 1864. 

JUoeipts. 

fromoostoms $70,000,000 00 

From lands 4 26^000 00 

Fhmi miscellaneons sources *. 8,000,000 00 

From internal duties 160,000,000 00 



Aggregate 4223,026,000 00 

Xbq>endituret. 

BMance of former appropriations estimated to be unexpended July 1, 1863... ........4200^000,000 00 

For ciril serrice, ftreign intercourse, and miscellaneoosu 26i/Ml/ao 06 

For Interior Department, Indians, and Pensions lOJMxijSn 01 

For the War Department. 738,820,146 80 

For the Navy Department • 68,267,266 01 

For Interest on Pnblic Debt 83,518,800 60 

Principal of PubUc Debt « „ . 19,384,804 16 



$1/W6,418^188 66 
Of this amount of $1,006,413,183 66, it may be safely estimated that there will remain 

undrawn on the 80th June, 1864, the sum of...... ......4260,000,000 00 



Aggregate for the year 4846,418,188 86 

Sha estimated receipts, as before stated, f» that year are placed at $228,025^000 00 



Xi$MHK$ to be provided for by loans the sum of..^-.....!....* •.«...rvrn^.. ...»...«. ........46B8^S8$,'t8$ .66 






ij. TUASDHT rftOH CmOHBf ] 



c LuRie, Am Loim Aim TuutmT N 



lOT. 

■niL XithiDI, DUCT T it.., 



, »K01I 1T8B TO 18«1 iHClVaiVB. 



Tu.. 




„„„.,„4 


siiBirLui, 


ARnpHl. 


Vn^l^mM 


TMIIKr.tMC 








KinlUiDtoDi. 




TnUUtrHon. 












14.300,473 
3,662.014 


^«^ 








ipa8.9U 














4,6*3,012 


lj)e7,701 


















33^766 




6,S2^!1« 
7,048,114 


362,800 








^^ 


"liBM 








676.491 


83,641 


8a».«82 












ll,«l 


7,762,883 


308,67* 








:7»a3e 

1,543,820 






» 




HOC 














i^Bsa^j 


ifli.J2e 








lara 




Z8T,0HI 


86,828 




....^ 




1W4 




HH,1B> 


487^27 




128|81& 




IMS 






«6,W8 
4««,1«3 

•4-,e3» 




48,8X8 




M08 


%m 




uu 






44j,262 












K',»n 


6M;64e 




iiiS'ni 




wa 




IS 


1,040,288 




8J00 
12,987.000 




IM 




8,sai 






28,164,436 
23,377 «2 




U1& 




e3«,j» 






85^284,321 




IIU 




(W8,3*4 






V94,48a 




1»1T 










T84.643 




UU 




I^B.BIS 






8.786 




ins 




^Sl^ 










1R30 




137.MI 






3,010324 


20,6B1.4M 


isa 




BS^T 






6^0,324 


W,67M04 














20,232^18 
20,640,686 






4t,(iS0 
40,866 
















iobioM 


1B26 




28,10* 






















^S 






22,613 
IBOTI 








1928 














28,836 








tiSS,. 

■ 28,628^1 












ISU 




i;,4M 




















36,4aa,o«T 


^ 




































1,0W 








60,828.708 






















12,718,821 












Sesisii 


SM 












M8lw 


























umf^a 


















"n»M 










\,8i7;m 
































•IMT 










liwikieii 




•IM 










2l*J3,ieo 














20,076,816 




















is,3;3 

1,060 




































ISM 










200 




•un 










S.O00 














23,117,«00 




•law 










28,287,600 




n^ 




i;iM-jiftt 


s 




20,776,800 
41861^710 

ii2>;«»i4ffl 


, 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 







mBlAIIISTBB 


TnuTAunarlaN 


anAHB Exm«,utBtu 


TOTU TOBSUI, UOH 






Tan. 


DiU. 


hHwrU. 


B>l»ru. 


Tnuc. 




t7V4«».4ja 


|62,!!«y»0 


$30,217,107 


601,1*6 






81,Htl^0W 






n« 


SM&a^flM 


si.ioo.om 


28,109,672 


*I10,7«* 


ITM 


7^,«» 


HfimoM 


>6,a96,in 


•38^8 




s^tSSI? 


M^fie.HS 


47,069.472 


T47,0«t 




swawTi 


31,436,181 


eifiMfm 


831,000 




S1,WI,47I) 


76,879,408 




B7B,SU 


ITM 


^^t» 


SS,6S1,7M 




806,818 


179» 


TS,40SM<) 


70,080,1*3 




980,400 


i«ao 


^n^ 


W4!6i,7« 


To,»n,7»o 


972,408 


ISOl 


B3.DSB,0M 


111,3«3J11 


M,116,B2& 


»«,67T 


isoa 


80,713,631 


7«,S33,8M 


72,486,180 


»8!^10* 




T^WMBB 


H,MS,ue 


56,800,083 


Mtl472 


18M 


vmiM 


36.000,000 


77.800,074 


1,041,404 




8a,aia,i» 


130,600,000 


06,688/ffil 


1,140,8«» 


IBM 


76,7ra,no 


IW.410,000 


101.688,988 


i.a>B,n8 


1807 


«»^e,3g8 


1B8*»,000 




i,28a*« 


i8oa 


•^19^ 


66,900,000 


22,430,960 


l,24!y*8 


IBM 


ei,0M4i« 


l»,MO.0O0 


62,aoa,23s 


1,S6*J»1 


isio 


M,17S,al7 


(6.400,000 


Ba;eoi,97a 


1,*2*,784 


isn 


*g,00lsBS7 


63.400,000 


81,316,833 


i;aum 


MU 


U,9».I37 






i^.mn 


IBIS 


M^MI^SH 


anoosiooo 




>,1S,e» 




81,«7,84« 


12,066,000 




1468,210 




•e,l(33,BW 


113,041,274 




l,3«e.l28 


iBia 


m,Mj.i>33 


147,103,000 




i,37a.ffl» 










1,809,012 




un,4ea.e33 


121, 60JW0 




i^isa 






BJ, 26fl00 




1,280,761 


IBM 


(H,0!6,6M 


74,460.000 




1,280,187 


iS3i 


aWAin 


62.666,7M 




1,298.968 


U22 


(B,M«,e7s 


B3,241M1 




1,324.000 


iszs 


lKlfl7S,87J 


nA7o,ae7 




1,38<W« 


lS2t 


«>,a»,i77 


8ftMe.00T 




1,389,183 


18K 


83,188,432 


06440flJ8 




1,*2>413 


1S2B 


SflS^OM 


84,»T4,47T 




1,BS4,!B1 


ven 


7S,BBJ,3S7 






1,82^608 


s 


UAI1,U3 






BS3S 


1S30 

issi 


4B,Mb,tOS 
3BJ3S,18I 






S 




a*s^m 










7,001,032 








ISM 


4.T«^ 








ISU 


88^ 










an,«8s 
i,ej8,z!3 






S'Z 


1838 


4,8»7.«0 






VMHAM 




11,083,787 






VM^n 


1«« 


»,1J6,0TT 






aiw.i« 












1S« 










ists 










ISli 


3^T(S,1B8 






^11*^ 


IBM 


1B,T«0.MS 








18i7 


iS.mAsa 








late 








JJU^ 


18H> 


M,W8,S3« 








1861 


«2,Ha,3W 






SimISo 




U,181,«e3 










e7,34>^e:8 










47,212.a»8 










3<»,1»«8,I31 








18M 


sa,M3,«oa 

So«0,38« 






iS&S^ 


18M 
ISM 


44,910.777 
M,7M,8M 






tM 


1S«0 


«4,TeO,I03 






SSiS 


uaa 


511>2^t 






6,111,186 



t For lb* jeu mdiBg Jan* J 



im.-\ 



.msAmmv DcrARtHSKt. 



130 



FINANCES AND BBSOUBCES OF THE UNITED STATES 

. - - - • • " • • • • f 

OOXPAIIBD WITH TH08S OV 

GREAT BRITAIN IN C0RRB8P0NDING CONDITIONS. 

, .. . « 

iMBBACtHG — Anntud IiiteMit, Atetage S4te of IntereeC, and Amonnt of Pnbllc Debt outstanding on 
Ist ^idy, 1802.— Pnblic ]>ebt» Dwded and nnfonded, on 7th Maicli, 1801; Payments on accuiint of 

.Old Debt by the present Secretary; Arerage Increase jier diem to July 1, 1862; Rebellion JBxpenses.^ 
— Pexmaaent (Twenty-year) Loans of the present Secretary sold nnder the par of six per cent, to 
Ju\y-1, Vffl2t compared with Old Loans sold at dlaconnt, reduced to equivalent of par Six Per Cents. 

* —National Debt of Prance, England, and United States^— Increase of Britfsh Debt, at oertaia pe- 
riods. — Prico of Stocks; Oid United States, New United States, and British GoYemment Stocks com- 
pared.— Preminm on Gold; the period of the Southern Rebellion compared with that of the British 
War with Bonaparte and the. United States.— British Army, Navy, and Ordnance Xxpentes fn the 
last four years d war wtth Bonaparte and the United States.— Income and Kxpenditnre of British 
Government in the last four years of war with Bonaparte and the United States, eomipared with 
Income and Bxpendltnre of the United States.— Yaluatlon of Real and Personal Property according 
to Census of 1850 and 1800, with the rate of increase.— Property of the United States during TIffy' 
Tears^ with oorTCsponding taMe of property in Great Britain send Ireland.— Products of Chipitil and 
Labor in United States In the yettrs 1839, 1840, and 1850. 

<Freparsd Car Ike Nstional AlnuuM bj Dr. WUUua Blder, of tlie Ti—motj DcpMtineat) 



TIKANO]BS.^-TlSLB 5o. 1. 
Axmual TBCtmBttf AynAcn RAn of IiCTKBisf , and Axouht of Pubuo Dm ouTSTAHmaio 

JiTLT 1, 1862. 



Debt 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Annual Interest. 


Old Debt outstanding 

« K 

Post-due Treasurr Notes .» 


6 per cent. 
6 •* 
7^12 


$80,488,000 

29,212,956 

493,460 

$60,189,406 

10,409,000 

2,740,700 

• 60,000,000 

18,974,060 

878,460 

48,748,000 

$121,760,100 

122,860,780 

14,016,804 

42,820,124 

150,000,000 

$451,466,868 

$511,546,274 


$1,524,160 
1,752,777 
Interest stopped. 

$3,276,927' 


1 
Old Debt unredeemed ........... .M...* 


Loan under act of February 8, 1861..; 


6 per cent. 
6 •* 
6 « 
6 ." 
6 « 
6 •* 

7.3 per cent. 
4 " 
6 « 




Two-year Treasury Notes.......... 




Twenty-year Bonds 

6-20-year Bonds m....m 




OrefpNi Wftr Debt 


■ 


Csrtifleates of Indebtedness 




Amount of New Debt at 6 per cent. 

Three-year 7-aO per cent. Bonds 

Pour per cent. Temporary Loan 


7,'805:006 

8,968,835 

660,630 




2,141,006 . 


United States Demand Notes 


' No interest. 








IMbt created since March 7, 1861... 


$18,97«,083 


Total outstanding on July 1, 1862 




$22,2(^2,010 









Avenge rate of Interest on old outstanding Debt.. 5.489 per eent. 

Arersge rate of Interest on Debt created fh>m March 7, 1861, till July 1, 1862 4.2 ** 

NoiB^— Vbr Loan of Noyeraber 14, 1862, see Table No. 6. 



140 



THE VAtmJXAh ALKAlf A€. 



[ifiaa. 



XINANCSS.*-TiJU No. f^ 
Punic DiBT, nTVBKD AMD mmnrDKo, on March 7, 1861.->PAT]airT8 ov Aoooum or Old Dm bt 

PBUEKT SXCBXTA&T.— AtsBAOB ISCEKASK FIK SIXM TO JCLT 1, 18(KS.— BjDELUOir BXPDraii. 



Funded Debt on March 7^ 1861 160,606,1156 

Xnarory Notes oatetanding... ~.... ^ 16,462,711 



Total old Debt on March 7, 1861 , 



$76,1691,607 



Ihe present Secretary has paid on account of principal of old funded Debt $ 1,000 

** « « « « on principal of Treasury Notes 16,068,276 

Intenst upon $16,1961,060 Old Treasury Notes ^ 4^16,684 

Add Interest upon Old Treasury Notes received in payment of public dues, not 
ascertained, say «. 40,000 



Tiotal payment on account of old Debt redeemed.^ ^..; $2D,824,M6 

Total Interest paid on old Debt unredeemed.. ..-<«■ «. 4^860,280 



Total paid by present Secretary on account of old Debt $25,104481 

• . ' I • 

Debt created since March 7, 1861 (see Table No. 1). ^ $461,466,868 

Less paid by present Secretary on account of old Debt $26,104,181 

BalanceinTreasury July 1, 1862. 7,177,828 82,372,009 

From March 7, 1861, to July 1, 1862. 480 days ) $410,064,860 

Rebellion Expenses, awraged jw dim tm $878/)08 

NoTK.— It is here assumed that the receipts from Cnatoms, Lanfls, and miflcellaneons sources exactly 
meet the ordinary expenditures of the Oovernment. The difficulty of separating the peace expenses at 
the War and Navy departments from their totals reported makes it necessary to estimate tbam. The 
ordinary rerenue of the period was in Ihct leas than the ordinary expenditure. 



FINANCES.— Tabu No^ 3, 

FptiUHSin (Twxrtt-Tiax) IiOaks or the nxsnrT Sbobxtast sold uinsB thb pab or 

Six Poi Ct»t. to Jtfttl, 1862. 



Loans. 


Bate. 


Am*t. stock 
issued. 


Price. 


Amount of 
Discount. 


DisoonnC 
percent. 


April 2, lofflL....**.**. •••..». ..»«••.•••«»•*..•« 

May 25, 1861 „ 


6 per cent. 
6 " 

6 « 


$3/)99,Q00 
7^0,000 

10,409,000 
60,000,000 

60,400,000 
$122,860,760 


04 to par, 
86 to 98 


1,266,636 
6,838,768 

$6,696,404 

4,226,420 

$10,821,824 


6J96 
14.66 




12, 


Julj 17, 1861 




IQSI 




••••«••••••• 




Total Twenty-vear loans.. 


10J91 


Treasury Bonds (short) sold below the 
par of 6 per cent, by the present 
Secretary :— Three-year 7-30 bonds 


• 


344 


- 


«#•■•«■•••«• 




Totid discounted Loans of present 
Secretary reduced to equiralent of 
6 per cent, bonds at par 


$18ak289,7d0 


vt.bA 









nam] 



Tabus No. 8.— Oontinued. 
Old Loahb bold ax Dnoomnp kbduokd to iQuxTAism or Pab Six Pkb Conn. 



141 



When. 


• 

Term. 


Rate. 


Stocks iBBued 


Price. 


Amount of 
Discount. 


Discount 
per cent. 


1799 ftnd 1800... t.... 


10 years. 
12 years. 

u 

M 

9 " 
9 months 
20 years. 


8 per cent. 
6 « 
6 « 

6 * 

7 «• 
6 " 
6 " 


$6,481,700 
18,109,377 
8,498,581 
16,661,818 
8,856^960 
9,746,746 
8,006,000 




$1,120,686 
2,173,125 
998,583 
8,110,306 
684,205 
461,701 
762,499 

$9,211,105 


17J89 


tebraary 8, 1813 

Angnst 2, 1813 

Maroh 2k 1814....;. 


88 

88.26 

80.14 

96.27"" 
90^ 


12. 
11.76 
19 86 


Fffbniary 24 1815 


6jB 


March S, 1815 

February 2^ 1861 


4.78 
9.62 


Total old Loans 


175,860,181 


av.l2Ji5 











December, 1860, and January, 1861, 1 year Treasury Notes $6,272,700 at U and 12 per cent per amnwu 
« « *• -. " « 3,283,600 at 11, 1014, 1(^ and 1<^ *" 

*«•*"« 384,600 at 7 @ 9% and 1(^ «« 

inttlttigt'GA th6M Tfisasury Notes stopped by Secretary Chase in rebruary, 1862. 



FINANCES.— Tabls No. 4. 



NAI30HAL DiBT 07 ENGLAin), Framoe, ahb ihs Ushxd Staxis. 



Nation. 


Population. 


Total Debt. 


Debt to 

each 

person. 


Annual 
interest. 


An.int'rst 
to each 
person* 


British(« »), March 81, 1861 

VrenchC'L ., 1861 ,.., 


29,334,788 
36,000.000 
83,556,150 
23,687,916 

4,049,600 

8,305,925 

7,666,206 

8,696,804 

14,819,425 

31,429,891 

22,900,000 


$3,917,946,918 

2^000,000 

^646,274 

6^1,646,214 

76,000,000 
81,638,825 
46,036,123 
1^,884^ 
, Paid off. 
76,169,667 
70,169,667 


$183.56 
61J28 
15.24 
Sl.60 

18.76 
16.86 

6.87 
14.81 


$127,965,701 

110,000,000 

22,252,010 

22,262/)10 


$4.86 
SdOfi 


United StatcsC, •X ^^7 1.^862 

Loyal 8tate8(/,^>, '^ « ..... 

United States, 1791 


0.66 
0.94 


•* « 1800 






« « 1812 






« •• 18i6 ....A 


* 


. 


« « 1836 






« « March 7, 1861 


2.42 
8.82 






Loval States. 1861 • 













■ ?or Increase of British debt since 1775, see Table No. 5. 

*11ie aTerage value of the pound sterling or sorereign at the TJnited States Mint is $4.84.8; the nkir 
•orerdgn, $4.86.3. 

* Tnereaae of French debt £»■ year ending January 1, 1857, $115,000,000. The exact increase In the 
iMt if» yean-Bot aMOrtained, but the data Jn^Gk»rtA St teast $6(X>,000,^^ 

'The population in 1862 obtained by Tucker'a rald^*-3 per cent, per amuim added to nnmbar glTOA 
in the last Census Report. 

«nie total population giren In all instances, — slares being treated as wealth-producers and wealtii- 
consumers. 

/The Loyal States (West Tirginia included) had in 1860 a population of 22,328,133. 

9 The State debts of the Loyal States in 1860 are stated at 166^ millions in the aggregate. The inta- 
rat aTerages 6}^ per cent per annum. 



142 



THB HATI09AL ALMAlTilO. 



[1MB. 



nVAMOBk— Taiu NOb ft. 



Jmcbmjuu or Bbrxsh Dm nr GBtAor Pmosi. 



Piriod. 




ins to 17 
170a to 
1811 to 18 
1776 to 
1811 to 1812. 

•18U(^ 

1814 

181fi(/). 

1816 

186S 



■•*>•*—• 



DBSt. 



Pounds. 



1983to83L8 

247J to 637.6 

678.2 to 861 J) 

196.8 to 861 jO 

678.2 to 706.2 

788.1 

81S.1 

861.0 

845.9 

(*)77iai 

(08081 



No. of 



8 

9 
4 
40 
1 
1 
1 
1 



•.••t« ■••».« 



••••••••■••c 



muioiuof 

Pounds. 



106 

2893 

182J 

784.2 

2U> 

81J8 

26j6 

47.9 



mAan. 



808,000,000 
l,482i0QQ,00O 
884,762,000- 
8»-86^000,000 
m,62^00O 
89fll,Vni0M 
121,000^000 
281,000^000 



*•• ••« •«• ■•• ••• ••• 



•»«««■■«*«»»■•• O* *M M9«4«#«Atf«A^ 



March 81, 1861, Ponded DeM.. £788,976,887 

VT.A..^^ f Exchequer BUlt.. 18,089,000 
Unftinded | ^ ^^^^ 8,600,000 

Pounds ftorUnc... 806,664,887 

$4.86.8 



Debt, MMch 81, 1861, Dollars, 8,917,946,918 



latoreBt per Minum of 

PnndeddiM. £86,014^ 

Unftmded 400,067 



£20,814,148 
$4JMJ 

DoUan, 127,966,701 



• IngUtad at war wtth tTnltod States July, 1774, till Norembsr, 1782 ; with Trance, February, 1778, till 
Jaauarj, 1782; with Spain, April, 1780, till Ainuanr, 1788; with Holland, December, 1780^ till Sep- 
tember, 178& 

.' * With lUroliatiODitry France, Febraary, 1796, till March, 1802. 

; • W)tli BooAparto, April, 1806, tiU June 19, 1816; with the United States, June, 181S, tffl De> 
cembec^iai4. ... • 

. * Of theso.fiirtj yeai» Bngiiad was eofagedin foreign wan twunty-niue yeara. 

* • In 1818 X&c^nd raised in taxes 68.7 mOllons pounds, and 81.2 millions In loans, equal to 7SD 
BdHiotts of dollars Hie amount paid and expended within the year was 516 nlllion doUan. Ths 
.Increase of the United States debt in 480 days-ending July 1, 1863~was 436}^ miUlonsr-an aTeiage 
of 331 millions a year, without income ttom taxes beyond the current expenditures of a time of pesos. 
,11ie expenditure of Buchanan's Ust year was 60 million doUan. 

/In 1816 the Exchequer bills Issued and ontstaadiac amonnlsd to 41^ mimeM, aqval to 200 Bll» 
IISM of dollars, ih addition to the 281 millions of psnaaB4iit1b«liiC 

« Crimean War, 1864 tUl 1866. , 

* The lowest point touched since 1816. 
< The highest since 1826. 



(TttUSVA Y BSPA&TBfBHT. 



143 



FIKANCIUI.-tTa9U NO.A 
Puci OF Stocks^-Old UimBD Statu,, Niw UinrxD Statu, anb Brituh Ooternmint Stocks; 

COXFABED. 



United states Stocks prior to 
.. Mank 4,1861.. . 



IBQOr B&^. million IrfMa lold 

at 82.7 

'1809, 0- p«r centQ. price^mr- 

reot 92 

IMM^ 6 per cents, price-cur- 
rent...... 88 

1808» 6 per eents. price-cur- 
rent 101 

1809, 6 per cents, pribe-cur- 
rent 103 

1814) Angnst, suspension of 
q)ecie payments. 

1814^ 15^ millions sold...... 80.14 

]815|. January, 6 per cents, 
price-current 78@80 

1815, February, after news 

of peace... ».. 102 

UlS^ March, 6 per oonts. sold 
at , 96.27 

1815, Jane to December spe- 
cie 109@122J 

1816k ^nlf 6*8 price-curtent 98 

1816,.0'sprice-cun'ent 99 

1817j &a price-current 1 

1818^ Resumption of specie 
payments. 

1861, February, 8 millions 
Loanaold. 90.48 



Ayerage subscription-price of 
•74iBi]]toiisof United States ioaiiB 
•old between 1799 and 1861, re- 
dnced to equivalent of 6 per 
cents., issued to subscribers at 
12.66 per c(»it. below par. 



United States Stocks since 
March 4, 1861. 

I I iihii . I I. I I I iiii I I.... I I 

1861, May, Loans sold .... UM 

1861, July, " .... 8^.32 

1861, Marcta, oW^ffs price- 

current.. .M.|. •••.».•.. 9{^ 

1861, June, (Ad 9» price- 
current,,. 84 

186}, September, old 6^8 

price-current 89^92 

1861, (>otober„old 6'* price- 
. current 9U4(g^9^ 

18QI, November, old 6^8 

price-curront 93U^95^ 

1861, December, old B's 
.t price-cucrent. 89 ^ 93^ 

1861, December SM), suspeu- 
sion of specie payments. 

1862, Blarch, old 6^8 price- 
current 921^(^95 

1862, April, old C's price- 
current 92U @ 98 

18Q2, May 12, old 6*8 price- . . 

current 105V 

1862, March 1, 7-30'8 

1862, Mfty 7, " ...... 103] 

1862, May 13, « 105 

1862, May 24, « 10^4 

1862, May 29, Gold at 103] 

1862, June 13, ft's coup's. 107W 
1862, June 27, " IO65J 
1862, July 3, «' 99 

1862, July 26 ♦' 100 

1862» August 18, « 101^ 
1862, September 3, ** 99 

1862, October 20, " 104 
1882, November 14, Loan of 
$13,618,000 in U.S. Bonds, 
at 7.30 per cent interest, — 
redeemable in two years 
from October 1, 18(82,— 
sold, $9,605,000 at 103.10 
to 104.12; $4,108,000 at 
10B.10 at 1O3j05. Above 
30siflUoBS oflfered at rates 
traok par to 4^ premium. 
This loan exhausts the 
Secretary's authority to 
issue 7.3u*i,^^1V)tal amlit 
issued 140 millions. 

! 

1, . I — i-i 



Average subscription-price 
ot^all bonds (181 millions) sold 
by Mr. Chase below par, re- 
duced to equivaleRt of 6 per. 
cents, ai 6.94 per cent, belov 
par. 



British Government 
JStDcks. 



lidOt to 1746, 3. pw^ cents. 

never below 89 

1737, 3 per cents- ;.. 107 

1745, (during Rebellion) ^ 70 

1740, (Slnking-ftind^inereosed) 100 
1760, 9 nriUtons- of 3 per 

cents consolidated. ' 
1763 to 1766, Consols 80 @ 90 

1781, (Close of the Amo'ican 
War) .,..- 64 

1782, Consols 90 

1797, (Failure of Treaty with 

. JBrauce) .» ^9^ 

1797 to 1822, Suspensiou of 
specie payments. 

1811, Bank of England notea 
discount per cent.. 1M^ 

1812, Bank of England notes 
discount per cent. .'. SS 

1812, Septembw to December, 
Bank of ISngland notes 
aiscount per cent 2S 

1812^ December, to March, 
1813, Bank of England 
noted) discount per cent. 2^ 

1814, Bank of England notes 
discount per cent 23 

1818, Bank of England notes 
discount per cent 10 

1819, Bank of England notes 
discount per cent '0 

1820, Bank of England notes par 

1863, Consols IQl 

1853, End of the year. Coo- * 

sols 905^ 

186i, Con8ols(CrimeaD War), 8&V2 
1866, « " 861^ 

1869, " :... 98>5 

1861, February to May, C.^ 

sola 92 

1861, August to S^tember, 
Consols. 90@ 93 

1802, May 16, Consols 9.3}^ 

1862, October 19, CoiiBoU«... ~ 



f^jUU^U^ti^^^^^^t^i^^^tm 



mr ^t m . wi 



144 



T9E JUmOMAh AJUCjUI^O. 



[1808. 



; 



PBnmnc or Gold.— The Pxriod of thb SonrBSSN Bebiluon compared with thai of tem 
British War with Bonaparte and the United States. 



Price of Gold at J/ondon.(«) 



Price of Ooild at New York. 



I»ate. 



1809. 

i8io:.: 

1811 

18l2.._ 

1812, S<^tember to De- 
cember 

1812, December to March, 
18ia 

0814 

1815: : :............; 

1816. 

1818 

1819, Febmary 

1820. 



per oz.Troy. 



£ g. d, 
4 19 10 
4 6 
4 17 1 
6 14 

6 8 



6 10 
6 1 
4 12 9 
4 00 
4 16 
4 3 





8 



3 17 lOJ^ 



Above Mint 
price. (*) 



14U per cent. 
30 



38^ 




« 

M 

(C 
U' 
(C 

** 



« The Bank of England required by Parliament to 
redeem its notea, from February 1 to October 1, 1820, at 
81 ahllUnoB per ounce, standard gold; from October 1, 
1820, to O^ober 1, 1821, at 79«. 6d. ; from October 1, 1821, 
to May'l, 1823, at 77«. 10^. (Mint price); after May 1, 
1823, in coin if required. 

A Or, pcnr^ent. premium in exchange for Bank of Eng- 
land notes. 

« Or, per cent, premium in exchange for Legal-tender 
United States notes. 



Data. 



1862, June 6 

** June 24 

« Julys 

« July 18 

« July 21 

«« July 26 

" July 30 

** Augustl 

." August 9. ...,»... 

" September 1~... 

** Septembers 

•* September 15... 

. ." September 24... 

** September 29... 

" Octobers 

** October 10 

.« October 12. 

* October 14 

« October 15.. 

*« October 16........ 

« October 18.:. 

« October 20.. .u... 

•* November 1 

" November 6..... 

•* November 10.... 

** November 15.... 

«* November 20.... 

*' November 26.... 

1863, January 16 



Pr«ittfmij(^ 



mCNAKCES.— Xabu No. 8. 

BsmBH Armt, Navy, and Ordnance Expenses in the la* Four Tears of War with 

Bonaparte and the United States. 



Tear. 


Poaads sterling. 


DdUart. 


1811 , 


62,859,025 
66,616,677 
71,316,435 
71,686^707 


267,053,488 


1812 ..:. ♦. 


275,321,651 


1813 


846.811,828 


1814 


348,612,66e 




• ' . ■ ■ ■• 



Army, Nayy, and Ordnance Expenses of the Unlt^ States 

for 4S0 days, ending July 1, 1862 i $410,084,859 (tftblaNo.2.) 

Average for i year.. •.......•«.............•........•••...*...... .«•.••... wX4|«mv,aav 



im:] 



ffif^A^tlY ly^MMMEMt. 



145 



FINANC^a^-TABtB No. 0. 
iKooxB AjTD ExrunnTOU or BBmss.CtoviEiaairt nr ih« lar Tout TiAif 

BOKAPARTB Ain> THK UnTED ST/.TX8. 



ov Wa» wm 



Income. 


Xxpendltnra. 


Tear. 


ReyeBue flnm Taxes. 


Ftam Loans andEx- 
chequer Billfl be- 
yond the amount 
redeemed in the 
year. 


Totid. 


KxdnalfV of Pub- 
lic Debt aoooont. 


1811 « 

1812- 

1«14 


J566,U3,646". . 

66,067,860 
. 68,7^,363 

7143^,&03 

(«) £270,004,261 


£19,148,058 
34,799,007 
S9,640,2R2 
84,598,008 

(») £118,138,636 


£84,817,408 

99,828,647 

108,388,645 

105,098,106 

£388,282,706 


£83,735,228 

88,767,324 

106,943,787 




107,832,290 







,« Nearly 70 per.cent. of total income. 

* A fraction less than 30 per cent, of total inficme. 



0f AVfes IsooKB AHA Bsnim*«n, Atiemb Tiae or vaa Rcmuoir, 

RSDUCID TO POUITDS STXBUHO. 

Esrenne flrom Customs, Lands, and MiBceUan^us, estimated ~ £12,888,000 

Loans m^plied tp expenses of tlis year...... ,.«......» v •••««• .«.««•••« 64^638,086 



IMal, esMmaled 



£76,971,686 



* BBSOURCfiS.--TABLi No. 10. 

PiosirCTB or Oapisal Am JUnoft m nm Vwam BfAOB. 



Tears. 


Population. 

1 


Yaluation. 


Increase 
of popu- 
lation 
per cent. 


Increase 

of THloa- 

tion per 

cent. 


Amount 
to each- 
person. 


Increase 
percent* 

per 
capita. 


W30(«).... 


17,090,458 
28,191,876 
81,429,891 


|]«068^184,786 
2^004,108;084 
3,807,703,864 


• •• •••••• ••• 

86.87 
35.62 


90/) 


$09.28 

86.41 

121.18 


88.74 


MM(c)^ — ";!!.;..!.; 


40.18 



' looordlng to ProfiBSSfnr Tucker. 

* Compiled from Census of 1850. 

•Bitimated approximately.— The ralues of the chief agricultural products of 1869 are not giiren la 
tbe Preliminary Report of the Census of 1860 *, but the increase of quantities orer those of 1840 lBid|i 
''tM a probable increase of market ralues of 90 per cent. 

10 



^46 



.THS NATIONAL AWA3SA0. 



ivm. 



]UaOURCB8/-TAiU No. ii; 

jual urn PntaoviL Pbopi&vt or tbx Uvmn SiAin nuioro "Fmt Tiiti^ vmi ooBUsroiaMM 
Tabu or Pbitats Pbopibtt in Ouat BBirAiv akd Ibelaito dt vm FniOD 182^-1838. 



Team 


Population. 


Taluation of 
Keol and Per- 
sonal Estate. 


Increase 
of popu- 
lation 
percent. 


Increase 
of valua- 
tion per 
cent. 


Anumnt 
to each 
person. 


Increase 

percent 

per capita. 


Tsio^j.!..,.. 


7,239,814 
9,638,131 
12,806,020 
17,060,468 
23,191,876 
31«42B301 

24,190,077 

14,360,438 

8,238,015 


$1,882,000,000 
1,882,000,000 
3,764,000,000 
3,764,000,000 
6»174,d40,828 

14,126,523,676 

12,244,623,876 

10,362,523,676 

7,052,173,848 


••••••••a 

33.13 
33.40 
32.67 
3537 
35.52 

334.00 
84.12 
36.52 


r 

100. 

64. 
1283 

650.0 
275.5 
1283 


$260 
106 
202 
220 
206 
449 




ItwUf'lw .«...*.• »M.. ... ... 


"Hm 


18MW * .'... 




Increase last 50 years 
M tt 20 " 

(( M 10 U 


90JD9 
68J» 

72.7 
104. 
68j06 









• Valuation estimated.— The direct tax-assessments of 1798 and 1S18 affording a basis. 

• Valuation estipiaM.— Great depreeiation of market valaea heUtved to ba aqual to Ike Increase of 
property. 

• Valuation estimated.— A year of high market prices following fire years of great Industrial and 
oommtoroiid prosperity. • - 

• Valuation estImated.-^The revuTtfou tuflSST, and continued depression nntll 1842, held tHe 
prices of 1840 at an aggregate amanat am low as that of 1830. 

• and / Compiled from the Census Reports of the respectiye years. 



Uamn KnraDOii or GBiAf Bin aim ard Ibilaiidw— Pbiyiii Pbovibit. 



Tears.(0 


Pqpiilatlen.' 


Talntttkm. 


Increase 

of pran- 

\SSon 

per cent. 


Increase 
of vain*-' 
tion per 
cent. 


Amount 
to each 

person. 


Inerease 

percent 

per capita. 


1 ' 

182Sr») ., 

loOOJ[y •••••.••^••••■•••»> 


21,193,488 
24,304,799 


$10,698,600,000 
17,180,468,400 


"*14.S 


'eS.ii 


$60039 
70736 


... «•• •#• 

m 



r Thiff period the nearest ih Iridnstrial conditions and ralue of capital to those of the yaan 186O-180O 
in the tJnited Btates. 
* Estimate of Joseph Lowe,— " Present State of England." 
< Pabto Febrer,— >*T^ixation, Berenne, and Power of the British Brnpire.** 



fil r. 



ma.] 



^fRKAMUMY ^ DCMmnCflflC 



ut 



ItB80UItCES.--TABU No. 12. 

Tiuunov or Bin. axo Psbsonal Pboksut in wa Lotal Fbu Siatis; xa tbi Lotaii Sxjlti BvAns; 
u TBI Eebkl Statbs; Ain> iif thk AooaMATc; AocoBDiBa 10 XBi Cnrsus BvoBis or 1860 akd 

I860y WISH *HS RA«B or IirOBSASI. 

9^ The Tftlae of the slftveB dedveted, thej being treated here as proteoen <uid ooomunert of wealth. 



E 

s 

>4 



vs» 



Loyal free States. 



Loyal BlATe States.. 

Len Talne of darea at Saoo 
each 



Jjjjtl Stately....... 



••« ••• •••*••«•• 



IM) 



Rebel States. 

Len Talaa of slaTes at $800 
t§fh 



woneQ 06a«es«........ ....*.... .....b 

cUaTeS.«*a..»*..4..mv*taM.^*».*«.*«.t. 

IMal Censiui valuation, 1850... 



Loysl Free States.. 



Loyal Slave J9jb»te9 

Leas value of slaves at $500 

each......M« f'^ 



Loyal States^ 



#••4 a^e •••••• e****^ ••#••• 



Rebel States. 

Leas vahM of slaves at $600 
each 



United State*. 
Slaves.... 



Total Census valuation in 1860, 
ilavea included 



T6tal 
Popiilat'n. 



13,586,107 

2,880,016 

305/)10 

16,gS4422 
7,267,754 
2,809,758 

28,191,876 



.dt204,768 



19^,851 

3^088,282 

482,680 

22^,133 
0,101,768 
8,470,121 

31»429,891 



8,962,801 



Yalnatioa. 


Increase 
of popur 

latlon 
percent. 


Increase 
of valua- 
tion per 
cent. 


AmotiBt' 
to each 
person. 


$4,168,575,029 






1306 

S45 
297 

m 

266 

484 

431 

477 

880 
440 




• 




603,174,967 
118,503,000 


574,071,957 


4,728,247.686 




• 




«••••••«•••• 


■ 


2,289,029,642 
842,927,400 


1.446,102,242 
6,174^^ 




41.62 


124.62 

182J04 
126.44 

180.76 
128.79 


961,430,400 


$7,186,780,228 


9,325,945,381 


1,574,812,628 
241,340,000 


22Ji 


1,333,472,628 


32.08 
40.22 


6,202,166,167 
1,735,060,500 


23.5 


3,467,166,667 
14,126,623,076 


25.25 
36.52 

23.34 


1,976,400,600 


$16,102J»4,176 





Increase 
percent. 

per 
eapita. 



68.T 



76. 
60JI 



02. 
68.8 



u» 



SSB HATIOIIAL'AIdCAHAC. 



[IMir. 



DfPOKTB AID EZPOKTB. 

SoMMAKT Statemeht Or TBE Yauts OF O00D8, Wabes. axo Merchaxhisc; Ihtobrd mo t«l 
UaiTED Statxs DCKora tbe Tk&» txwm^ Jcas 30^ IMO, vxmi Act of Maxch 3, 1857. 



MZBCHA^nnSB VSZB OF DCTT. 

In'm*'', VMbk, ot all kiBd«..~........Hi^ 

Argols, or cmdto tartar 

Articles ilnported fhnn British pro- 

rinces under reciprocity treaty 

Articles ot all kinds for use of United 

States 

Artielest the prodnee of the United 

States, brongfat back .- 

Articles for the library of Congress... 
Articles imported ttx seminaries of 

learaini^ Ac... 

Articles in a crade state, used in dye- 
ing or tanning ~. 

Bark,Pemrian.. *.. 

-Berries, nnts, Ac, used in dyeing or 

composing dyes. 

Bbmnth 

Bitter apples ^....< 

Bolting cloths 

Bone black 

Bone, burnt 

Bone diist....M«»*~ 

Brass, old ; 

Bullion — 

Gold 

Sflrer ~ - 

Bnrr stones, nnmannfiictnied. 

Gsbinets of coins, medals, Ac 

Coffee and tea, from their place of 
pmluetion, in certain Tessels — 

Coffee - 

Tea 

Coto— 

Gold 

Sflrer 

Copper— 

For sheathing Tessels ~. 

In bars or pigs 

. Old 

Ofo 

Cotton, nnmannfkctured 

Dragon's blood ~. 

Byewoods, in sticks. 

Effects, personal 4nd household 

Effects, personal, of emigrants and 
ethers^ including wearing apparel 

Und tools of trade 

Effects, household, of persons or fiimi- 
lies arriving in the United States- 
Effects, "personal and household, uf 
citixens of the United States dyiijg 

abroad 

Felt, adhesire, for sheathing vessels... 

Flax, nnmAnu&ctured 

Glass, old, and fit only to be re-mann- 

lactnred 

llair, of the alpaca, goat, or other Hke 

animals 

Ivory, uitmannfactured 

Jiinsfwl (not embradug flaxseed)..^.. 
Uadder— 

Boot .- 

Ground or prepared 

Hannres — 

Guano 

Other substances expressly used 

for manure 

Maps and charts 



' 3IodelA of inventions and improve- 

iiicuLs of the arts 

168^1 Oils nnd prodncts of American Ihli- 



9121,730 j 



15,856^321 

993 

1,991,075 
560 

34,928 

356,650 
158,192 

27,686 

4,033 

3,317 

57,809 

2,168 

36,125 

17,525 

27,156 

3,302;374 

902,395 

42,643 

447 



15,721,476 
6,307,736 

25^360,596 
2,748,933 

67,146 

793,165 

105,653 

1,357,059 

61,096 

57 

675,179 

57A13 



143,645 
41,869 



2,685 

14,579 

171,906 

522 

757 

835,067 

2,073,750 

71,591 
728,833 

370,478 

54 

5,918 



Oils, specmaeeti, whale, and 
other fish . 

Other prodncts of fisheriesL 

iJiApiok. and oaiciun.. ..•.•.«.m.m>».«.. 

Paintings and statuary 

Palm leaf, unmann&ctured...r........ 

Plaster of Paris, nnmaonfiictiired.:... 

Platina, nnnuurafiictiircd 

Rags of every material, except wooL. 
R^^ns and reeds, nnmanofiictured... 
Seeds, trees, shrubs, bnlbs, plants, and 
roots, not otherwise provided for... 
Sheathing metal, not of iron, ungal- 

vanised. . 

Shingle bolts and stave bolts 

Silk, raw or reeled, from the cocoon .. 
Specimens of natnnl blstovy, Ac...... 

Kn— 

Bars 

Blocks 

Pl0i 

Wool, unmannfiicfnred, not over 20 

cents per pound...... .... ....... 

All other artidec. 



12MS9 
44,359 
57,4U 

455,067 
60,593 
89,243 
56.824 

904342 

122,053 

27)0,043 

14A,T» 

5,915 

1414,590 

11,652 

205,939 

494,150 

. S87«331 

4,663,100 

72,274 



Total $88,925,834 



183,631 

437 

19,423 

7,Ul 

12,289 

106 

1,887 

«I,57§ 

35o,:»;u 

10*2,985 
25,U7 
41,416 

29,338 

33 

111,581 

1.018 

19,620 

23 

1,999 

2M 

10.332 

352 



MBBCSAimSB PAZOB 

Acids- 
Acetic, benaoic^ borafdc, dferic, 
muriatic, Ac 

Acetous, dhrosrtr^ nitric, Ae... 

Alum 

Arrowroot 

Barilla - 

Bark— 

Qidlla. 

Of all kinds, not otherwise pro- 
vided for 

Beer, ale, and porter-^' 

In caBks.....»..............M..«..^. 

In bottles 

Black lead pencils 

Boots and shoes other Aan l eitf h er ... 

Borax, refined 

Brass, and mannfactiues of braas — 

Pins, in iMcks or otherwise. 

Wire 

Manufactures oX, not specified.. 
Breadstuffs— 

Barley 

Indian cum and com meal 

Oats 

Oatmeal 

Rye 

Wheat 

Wheat flour ........................ 

Brimstone — 

Crude. 

Rolled 

Bristles 

Brushes and bro(Mns.. 

Butter .*.... 

Battons— 

Metal 



22,322 

1^ 



4,761 



1868.] 



TRSAftUBY .J>BFABTHiarir/ 



140 



Botton«— 

All other buttons and button 

monlds $428^13 

Onq>hor, crude 8,647 

Ckodles— 

Spermaceti 214 

Stearine „• 2,131 

Wax,.., « - 4,456 

Cheese ., 118,600 

Cblorido of lime or bleaching powder.. 219,475 
Qocbs and watches — 

Chronometers, box or ship's, 

and parts thereof 2,607 

Clocks, and parts thawL 82,673 

Watches, and parts thereof.. . ... IfiiAfitii 

Watch mater! al8,aud unfinished 

parts of watches^. »... 60,196 

dothing— 

Articles of wear 1,109,668 

Ready made ,...,., 201,389 

Cori 863,689, 

Oxhineal , 396,719 

Cocoa : 239,947 

Copper, and manulacturea of capper — 

Copper liottoms 1,126 

Vails and spikes » 392 

Wire 602 

Uanu&ctnres o^ not specified.. 11,492 
Cordage — 

Tarred and cables. 66,480 

Untarred 96,033 

8cio€S : 513 

twine 39,671 

Cotton.manu&ctures of cotton.plain — 

Cords, galloons, gimps 24,139 

Hatters* plush, of cotton and 

. «ilk 39,900 

Hosiery and articles made on 

frames 3,822,761 

Piece goods 705,156 

Thread, twist, yarn 1,380,119 

Telvets 186,545 

Mannfiictures of, not siMsciflod.. 2,632,176 
Cottons bleached, printed, painted, or 
dyed- 
Piece goods, wholly of cotton... 14,947,744 
All other maim&ctnres wholly 

of cotton 929,108 

Daguerreotype plates 39 

Boaaand toys of all kinds 4<M,614 

SngraTiniBB or plates. 69,811 

Xztracts and dccoctiona of logwood, 

Ac. not othehwise provided for 12,676 

Extract of madder 368,931 

Extract of indigo 1J67 

Pcathers and flowers,, artificial and 

omantental » 606,285 

lUh, dried, smoked, or pickled — 

Dried or smoked 120,462 

Herrings « 28,286 

Mackerel 605 

Salmon 1,110 

All otlwr 6,262 

In oil, sardines and nil other ... 228,097 
IlaXy nmunfiictureit of flax — 

Hosiery and articles made on 

fmuKi! 14,944 

lineiiH, bleached or unbleached 6,861,230 

Mannfactnres of^ not specified.. 956,401 

Tow of flax (codilla) 4,961 

yiaxseed 195 

Tloor cloths, patent, pointed, Ac 7,523 

Vmita, green, ripe, or dried— 

Cmrrants , .186,904 



•AA.*«*a«»A 



Fruits, green, ripe, oi^ dried— 

jLiaTes.. ....••.•••......•..• ...•«••.•*••.* 

Figs M......~......M. 

Lemons 

Limes „. 

Ofangea „. 

Prunes ^ 

Raisins. 

Other gree^ ripe, or dried 

Preserved m sugar, brandy, or 

molasses .t.. 

Furs — 

Dressed on the skin 

Undressed on the dcin 

Hatters*, ftirs, dressed or un> 

dressed, not on the skin... 

Mannfiictures of fur 

Qlaas, and mannfiicturea of 

Botttes 

Demijohns 

Crystals for watclies 

Painted or colored glass 

Polished pUte glass 

PorceUlu 

Silvered glass ». 

Ware, cut 

Ware, plain * 

Window glass, broad, crowB, 

and cylinder 

Manufiifitnres of, not specified.. 

OI«xi«ra* diamonds ^ 

Glue 

Qold and silver^ mannfiictures oi— 
Epaulets, galloons, lacM,. tas- 
sels, tresses, wings, Ap 

Gems, set 

Gems, not set ,. r. 

Gold and silTcr leaf. .;. 

Jewelry, real or imitatioiui of... 

silver plated metal » 

Silver pkited wire. 

Manufactures ot^ not specified.. 

Grass cloth ..., , 

Onma«- ' 

Arabic, Barbary, copal, Ac 

All other gums and rsfinsln a 

crudei state «.....«.• 

Gunny bags .•...,v<*«— 

Qnnqy cloth. ^... 

Gunpowder...,^....,.., ,«....^.,.„...«.. 

Gutta perch^77 

Manufactures of. ,.... 

Unmanufactured .*....«* 

Ilaiiw 

• Mannfiictures of. ,., 

Unmannfiictured 

Angola, Thibet, and all other 
goats' hair, or mohair-^ 

Piece goods , 

Unmanufiictured .,.., 

Hats and honpots— 

Of strayv'orother vegetable vub* 

stances 

Of hair, whalebone, or other 
material nut otherwise pro- 
vided for 

Hemp, and manufactures of hemp- 
Burlaps 

Cotton baling. 

Sail dn^k, Russia, Holland, and 

ravens.. 

Manufiictures not specified.^.... 
Vnmauufiictured 



161,891 
246,740 
216,908 

10,170 
481,641 

61,048 

1«,481 

1,«16,02S 

138,670 

89;248 

140,6er 
107/)68 

062,360 
60,964 

23,861 

80,480 

22,164 

62,518 

022,390 

9,567 

186,136 

104,654 

69,880 

024,675 

122,166 

626 

.24,398 



67,112. 

6,494' 

791,314 

62,834 

372,587 

2,738 

29,216 

44,490 

10,275 

254,860 

142,342 

280,433 

1^50,273 

7,686 

133 
TfiU: 

86,830 
287,83^ 



514,821 
163 



l,127,060r 



53,441 

63,216 
21,992 

W40: 

263/191 



190 



THS llAtI(M7AL ALMAITAC. 



pMS. 



»••«••«• 



Hemp, and mairafiietiirfea of 
Tow of.cortilto — .. 

India rabber-r- 

Hana&ctnred .............. — ...... 

Unnmopfactured 

Ittdlgo. — ... ~..... 

Hoik, and ink fowdtn. 

IroQ, Iron and sted, steel, maual!sko> 
': . tnrp» of— 

Anchors, and parte thereof...... 

t An\il8, «ad parts thereof. . 

Bar iron 

T ' Cables, chain .....* 

C . Cutlery. 

Fire<arRM not specified 

f Hoop iron — 

•' Mnakete and rifles 

Nails, q>ikea, tacks, ke ^ 

Needles « 

Old and scrap 

Iwiroad 

Saws, mill, crass-out, and pit... 

Sheet iron 

SdoHums....... 

Steel, cast, shear, and Oerman.. 
AH other. 

Wire, cap or bonnet 

Other numnfiutarBs of iron not 
specified 

Mannfiietnres of steel, all other 

iTory, mannfiftctnres of 

Ivory black.......... 

Jnte, Sisal grass, coir, Ac 

I«06S^ Ac- 
Braids of cotton 

Embroideries of cotton, Hnen, 
silk, and wool 

Insertings of oottoa 

of thread 

Laces of oottoa 

of thread ......<... 

Trimmings of cotton 

£ahl 

Lasting and mohair cloth Cmt bnttoni 

and ihoes.. #....«. .<..... 

Lead, and maaofiiotiires of l e a d • 

Bar, pig, sheet, and <dd 

' Pipes ..44,^.^s4u.,^,*,,4,4.*.* 

Shot 

Mann&etnres of, not specified.. 
I«Ulier,and maoniujinresoflealther— 

Boote and shoes 

Gloves <..... 

Hspanned leather, or skins of 
all kivds 

Skins, tanned and dressed 

Skivers- > 

Tanned^ beadf sole, and upper 
leather 

ManufiKtittw d( aot specified.. 
I^Qorice— 

Paste.... 

Root 

Machinery, i&teaded only for the 
manuikcture of flax and lioen goods 
Marble — 

HannfiMtares of 

UnmannflwtiirBd 

Miathematical faiatnunents.... 

Matting. GbiMse-or other, of flags, 
'jtttfl^Ac 



$15,063 
97,456 

S2,fl67 

1,004,382 

605,766 

36,954 



5,174 

41,089 

3,767,173 

138,447 

1,524,467 

317,595 

381,157 

12,205 

52,407 

909,506 

60,254 

923,987 

2,100,460 

553,561 

4,651 

728,404 

16,030 

1,355,607 

1,026,975 

9,743 

1,975,305 

1,077,550 

7,930 

110 

1,003,741 

84^04 

1,829,387 

3,940 

640 

231,523 

229,693 

48,165 

19 

86,084 

1,821,681 
680 

4,807 
621 

60^7 

1,664,083 

110,738 

953,534 

40,824 

964,492 

368.004 

339,4.38 
47,025 

2^600 

27,506 

207,998 

11,269 

300/)12 



Meats and vegetabU 

Bacon;. « 

Beef 

Ham » V 

Pork 

Potat4Ma 

Meats, game, poultry, and veg^ 
tables, in caiis or otherwiasw. 

Molasses : «.,... 

Musical instnuneota............... 

Nuts- 
Almonds ^ 

Cocoanuts. .'. 

Nuts not otherwise wovided for 
Oil and bone of foreign fidiing— 

Spermaceti 

Wliale and other firii .............. 

Whalebone 

OD— 



Castor V....... 



»»V^kMkV..M'< 



.......... 



Essential, ex p r e sse d , or rolatiie 

Henipseed and w ^w ee e dt 

Linseed................. 

Neatsfoot and other animal ..... 

(Nive OH, in eashs^.u.. 

• in bottlee 

Palm and eoeoauut 

On-clothof aU kinds 

Opium 

rants, painters' oelors^ ke, — 

Litharge................... 

Ochre, dry ....m. 

Painters* colors 

Paris white. 

Red lead 

Sugar of lead. 

Water colers.....*... ...••....m. 

White lead 

Whiting 

Paints not specified. 

PAper, and nianufiictures of paper, Ac. 

Blank bookif 

Boxes, paper 

Boxes, fiiney 

Cards, playing 

Paper hangings 

Papier BiacM, articles and 
wares of 

Sheathing paper 

Writing paper 

Paper, ana nianulkctares of 
paper not qMcified 

PiuThment 

Pens, metallic 

Pewter- 
Old 

Manufactures of, not specified.. 
Printed books, niagarines, Ac — 

InEngHeh. 

In other languages... 

Newsnapers, illustrated .......... 

Periodicals 

Quicksilver 

Raw hides and skins 

Saddlery, common, tinned, or Japanned 
Plated, brass, or polished 

steel 

Salt „. 



Saltpeti 

Crude «, 

Refined, or partially refined 

SOk, and manufactures of silk — 

Caps, bonnets, and hats. 

*»088 BIIBi«.<<«..««<4..««.M« %•*••.. M«i 



S343 

1,449 

7,693 

161 

i,2n 

76,500 
2,440,636 

238,118 

28,767 

142,122 

403 

25,354 

6^345 

91,938 
218,326 

30,923 

123«538 

164 

89,377 

301,403 

654,559 

9;2i4 

866,438 

5,659 
19,99 

9%na 

9,1«6 

30,284 
11,427 
10,767 
81^7 
22,469 

12401 
18,078 
1«,649 
16,323 
101,209 

10,802 

''4B9 
208,86» 

183,201 

1,299 
66,122 

1,072 

1,067 

497,102 
148,805 

47,372 

6,286,081 

86,841 

112,496 
1,067,771 

1,183,3U 
37,130 

M,2R3 

27;U6 



1868/1 



.VKAiAOBY ]IBBAB7JtJBlRr« 



isi 



and mamiflKtnmi of 
Hosiery, sod articles made on 

AMoes f344ta65 

Piece goods. 17,338,461 

Piece goods of silk and wonted 1,500,857 

Baw iSk «. 67,378 

Sewing silk 121,371 

Twist 34,717 

Jfaanfiictxires not specified 2;935,600 

of an kinds 68,700 

perfumed 38,882 

Other than perfluned^ 63,270 

Soda. ash. 1,156,191 

DDflSk t arlfi ..■■■«.«. mil iiijin- T — ' — --— 4d^^4o 

goda, aal 104^093 

asia ....^...^............. — ..... 139,622 

Cinnamon .•.••■•.•..•..••«..»**.«.m.* 14,oiv 

Oores 36^601 

r»,lErouvd..*.M...».... ..•••»•« 674 

dried, green, ripe, pre* 

senred, or pickled..... 62,887 

17,666 

NntoMgB 194,551 

F^pper^Uack 362,666 

red. <.....>.... 8,200 

Pimento 156,946 

fwcign distilled — 

ly 1,728,209 

From gndn 1,197,675 

Firom other materials 214,773 

129,965 

- 6,714 

2M03,166 

Omdy ^ ~. 1^823 

Loaf and other refined..*......... • 22^2 

Syrap of sugarcane 12,671 

White, clayed, or i>owdered...... 46,990 

adphato of batytes. . 30,937 

Salptete of ^ninine 968 

ndkiw 8,287 

Tea and coffee fkvm {ilaces other Oian 
Oat of their prodnctlon, and not 
touted by law or treaty stipvla* 

CoiKso «..^....M..... ~. 6,316 

Tea ^. 125,244 

lOfiustares of ttn— 

FoiL njem. 

Plates and sheete........ ..-. 8,230,441 

Mannfactnrss not ^woified 29,634 

Cigan .. .. ....♦ 2,683,014 

Bnnff .' 4,707 

Maanlhetvred^otlMr than cigars 

and annff ««^.....^. 88,400 

Unmamiftctared 1,10^848 

Ifwhrillss, parasols,' and snn-shades, 

«f alk and «ottoa . 40,107 

▼srdigris. « 28,142 

mtziol— 

Ittne or Boman (sulphate of 

copper) 12,896 

Green (sniphata of iron, cop- 

peras^*... 20,080 

White(snlphateof Ktnc). 431 

Oa of (sniphnric acid) 886 

Wares, China, *e»— 

Cheoyeal, earthen, or pottery, 
of a eapadty exceeding ten 

gallona 11,486 

Cmns^ earthen, porcebdn, and 



Wares, China, 4c^- 

Britannia.. 

Gilt or plated. 

Japanned 

Win«^ in cask»^ 

Austria, and other of Oennany 

fini^gnndy 

Claret 

Fayal and other Azores 

Madeira 

Port 

Sherry and^Lucar.t ». 

Sicily and other Mediterranean 

Teneriffe and other Canary 

Bed wiues, not enumerated...... 

"White wines, not ennnierated... 
Wine, in bottles — 

Bniignn^y .....*....*..•.> 

Champagne 

Claret ». 

Port 

Sherry 

AU other. 

Woad or pastel 

Wood, manufactures of— 

Cabinet and household ftnuitun 

Cedar 

Bbony 

Granadilla 

Mi»*»08~y 

Boss 

Satin - : 

Willow 

Other manulhctures of. „ 

Wood, nnmannikctured — 

» Cedar 

Box 

Ebony • 

GranadOta 

tiignnm-TitsB 

Mahogany ~ 

Bose 

Satin 

All other cabinet woods, un- 
mannftctored 

Fire-wood 

. WiUow" 

Other, notspedfled. 

Baik of Jthe cork tree-^ 

Mauu&ctnres of. 

Ox'ks ~. 

TJnmanulhctnrBd 

Wool and wonted, manufSeu^tures of— 

Bafases, bindings, and bookings.. 

BUmkets 

OarpetiQg,^vlz : Auhnsson, Bnu- 
sels,aiixony, treble-ingrained, 
Turkey, Venetian, and other 
ingrained, not specified, Wil- 
ton 

Flannds 

Hosieiy, and articles made on 
frames , :.. 

Piece goods of wool, including 
wool and cotton 

Piece goods of worsted, incind- . 
ing worsted and cotton 

Shawls of wool, wool and cot- 
ton, sillc, and silk and cotton 

Woollen and worsted yam 

Manufactures of wool or worst- 
ed, not specified. 



84^ 
S^ 

104,956 

3,864 

922,306 

82. 

60,85r 

166,126 

948,329 

42,562 

1,321 

809,410 

824,907 

8,999 
828J64 

643 

13,071 

7,244 

847,256 

Tsaf 

48,196 

1,829 

171. 

66 

11,305 

6,931 

1,183 

87,671" 

233,418 




3»T24' 

^' 

110 

164,112 

25,225 

138,781 
1,251,638 



1,746,049 
186,445 

701,942 , 

8,541,2n 

12,40S(,450 ; 

1,966,149 
461,656 ' 

3|^184 ' 



^s^ 



THS NATIONAIi AXMAXAe. 



[ISffiL 



Wool and wontod— 

Unmanuikctnreda not otherwise 

provided for ,.. 

Zioc, nianufiuitiires of— 

Nails. 

Pigs 

Sheets 

Spelter 

Hannfisustares of^ not q)ecifled.. 
TaloAof merchandise not enumerated 
in the preceding abstract — 

Paying duty at 4 per cent 

8 per cent 

12 per cent 



$134,648 

2,01S 

5,241 

838,688 

242,265 

1,843 



$1,722,506 

274,627 

14,421 



Valne (^mcrchandfaaiwtaiMimBiKiMil 
in the preceding ahstractrr<> 

Paying duty at 16 per cent ....... $2,449,888 

19 per cent....... 140,932 

24 per cent 1,360,676 

30 per cent 46,147 



Total yalne of merchandise 

paying duties $197,672^301 

Total vuue of merchandise 

free of duty $88,925,834 



Total Talue of imports...... $286;&98,IU' 



DCPOBTS UHBES TARIFF OF MABOH 2, ISei; 

BinouBT STAtnaHT or tbx Talus of Goods. Wares, Ain> Mxeghahdisb iMVOsfO mo TBI ITHRtt 
Staxis j>iJBiNa xujB Xmjlb. endino Juxe 30, 1861, umuni An or Mamb % IWl. 



XSBCEAlfDXSE FRXB Or DITTT. 

Adds, acetic, acetous, benzoic, bora/* 

^eic, mqriatic, sulphuric, and pyro- 

ligneous, and all acids used for che- 

mieal and manufiicturing purposes, 

not specified. $6,176 

Animals of aUldnds. .: 6,742 

Antimony, crude, or regulus of 7,172 

Arsenic... ....'....;....!.. 1,781 

Argols, or crude tartar 56,821 

ArtickiB firom British provinces, under 

reciprocity treaty. .,« 4,191,204 

the produce of the iTnited States, 

brought back 386,069 

Imported Tor seminaries of learn- 
ing. 12,807 

in a crude state, used in dyeing 

or tanning 81,938 

Bark, Pamvian... 136 

Barilla 14,698 

Berries, nuts, and vegetables, Ac, used 

In dyeing and composing dyes 63,569 

Bismuth 962 

Bitiar apples 172 

BoltinsMloths... 6,926 

Bone-Mack * » 63 

Bone^ burnt 

Brimstone^ crude 187,i 

Bullion, Gold 4D,908 

Silver 112,498 

Burrstonee, unmanufitctured. 11,026 

CMUnets of coins, medals, Ac 146 

Camphor, -crude.. 67 

Chalk 8,488 

Cochineal 43,706 

Cocoa 79,323 

Cocoanuts 12,587 

Coffee and tea, firom their place of pro- 
duction, in certain vessels— 

Coffee. 4,840,506 

j^n 1,544,303 

Coin,Goid.*.7..*!.'."!!!*.'.*!!'.!!!!!!!!*.'.*.*..*!;!!!!!!! 13,588,052 

SUver 283,866 

Cotton, unmanuflictured. 6,472 

Cork-tree bark, unmanulbctured 7,783 

Cream of tartar.. 1^,354 

l^ewood, in sticks 85,660 

mery, lump 4,102 

pulverized 1,261 

Bslncta of indigo. 366 

oruadder 96,9^26 



Extracts and decoctions of logwood and 
other 4yewood, not specified*. 

Felt, adhesive, for sheathing vessels.... 

Ginger root ^.. 

Gums, Arabic, Barbary, East India, Jed* 

da, Senegal, tragacanth, bei^a* 

min or benzoin, and myrrh.... 

all other gums and resins in a 

crude state, not specified........ 

Gutta-percha, unnumulactured. 

Grindstones, rough or unfinished. , 

Garden-seed, and all other seeds for 
agricultural, horticultural, medici- 
nal, and manu&cturing purpoees, 
not specified , 

Hair of all kinds, uncleaned and un- 
manu&ctured, and all long hone 
hair used for weaving, cleaned or 
uncleaned, drawn or undrawn 

Household effects, old, and in use of 
persons arriving froin foreign ooun- 
tries, for use, and not for sate 

Indiarrubl>er, unmanufactured....... 

Indigo 

Ivory, unmanufactured............ .i,.. 

Junk, okl, and oakum..,.., , 

Lastings, mohair cloth, silk tviat, or 
other cloth, for shoes, buttons, Ac..., 

UquociceiToot 

Lac sulphur M... 

Madder, ground or prepared 

root ,.. 

India, or Mui^jeet 

Marine coral, unmaau£Eictured.....M 

Ma^ and charts «. 

Machinffly, imjMrted, for the mano- 
facture of flax and linen only.......... 

Oils and products of .American flidk> 
eries — 
Oils, spermaceti, whale, and other 
nsn........................«f«.B^.«4...t 

Other products of fisheries 

Paintings and statuary, the produc^km 
of American artists 

Palm-lea^ unmanufactured. *.... 

Personal and household fleets, not 
merchandise, of citizens of United 
States dying abroad................. • 

Plaster of I^iris, unground. 

Plantains, pineapples, and bananas..^. 

Platfna, unmanu&ctured. ,„.. 

RaQi of whatever material, except wool 



. $645 

810 
H003 

$7,660 

2Jt85 
2(406 
$,607 



61,721 



2B413 



$13,827 

206,878 

160,13$ 

14,966 

3,896 

22,218 

• 664 

166 

174,646 

806 

7,903 

4,628 

2,190 

1,M0 



221,260 
90,336 

11,264 
26,340 



7,366 

0,161 

63,462 

10«88O 

^26,670 



l^tt.] 



TdaKAWEY OBPABTHBNS. 



153 



Ratans and neidByXmamaahctand, 

Saltpetre, or nitrate of Boda or potash, 

' waen cnide. < 

Sheathing metal or yellow metal. 

8heUae.^ 

Soda^aah. 

Shingle bolts and stave bolts. 

Silk, i-aw, or as reeled from the cocoon... 
l^pecimcuB of natural history, botany, and 

mineralogy. 

Steres fcM* hogsheads, pipes, or caakv....^. 
Stoneware, not ornamented, abore the 

Capacity often gallons. 

SalMtaneea expressly naed Ibr manures— 

gvano 

other substances 

Tbi, in pigs, bars, and blocka 

fteea, shrubs, bulbs, pUmts, and roots, 

not specified. 

Tswiog ivparel In. nse, mad personal 
effects, toolB of tiadfi, Ac, of persons 

uriving in the United States. ~.. 

Yoad or psstel , 

Wood, unmannfactnred — 

' cedar 

Hgnnm-TitsB .* 

lancewood ^ 

ebony > 

OC7Z**M^**A»s ■••»•••••#•• ••••■•^•••••a ••••••••• ••to 

granadilla. „..^,..., 

mahogany.— ..»......» «••....• 

roBe*. ...................... •..■^wr....t««9f #««.«. 

all cabinet 

All olhar articles 



$5;iS7 

8M,956 

7,910 

48,674 

254,824 
4,771 

296,828 

460 
94 

4,971 

79,844 
5 

184,348 

26,933 



3,849 
1,978 

mm 

1,761 

90 

1,193 

43ft 

4,111 

41,219 

24«680 

1,667 

128a>91 



Total.- „ $28,644,128 

MXRCHAireiaB PAYINO 8PB0IFI0 DCTIKS. 

Wool, and manniactnres of wool : — 
vmnann&ctured : valued between 
18 cents and 24 cents per pound... 1,377 

rained above 24 cts. per pound 1,748 

Cloths 299,043 

Shawls 66,637 

XraufiKtures of wool, wholly or in part 

of wool, not specified 15,164 

Woollen and worsted yarn : — 

rained at 50 cents and not over $1 

per pound 5,076 

valued at over $1 per pound 14,252 

Clothing:— 

ready-made 1,367 

articles of wear 9,302 

Blankets:— 

vatned at not over 28 cents per 

pound..-. 86,994 

vvned. between 28 cts. and 40 cts. 

per pound. •. . 2,301 

valued over 4Q cents per pound 116 

Oupsts and carpeting : — 

Wilton, Saxony, Aubusson, Axmln- 
sler, patent veh'ct, Tournay vel- 
vet, and tapestry carpets and car- 
peting; Brussels carpets, wrought 
on the Jacqnard machine, and all 
medallion or whole carpets, valued 
at fl 25 or n nder, jjer square yard, 1,113 

overfl 25 per square yard 7,250 

Brussels and tapestry Brussels car- 
pets and carpeting,printed on the 

warp or otherwise 1,446 

Trebl^4ngrain and worsted-chain. 
Yenetian carpets and carpeting... 409 



Manufbctnrea of cotton« aot blMahad, 

Golorad, stained, painted, or printed :•— 

not over 140 threads to the aq«are 

inch, counting warp and filling... $479 
over 140 and not over 200 threads to 
the square inch, including warp 

and filling «... 1,106 

over 200 threads to Uie square indi. 

Including warp and filling. 108 

Bleached:— 
not over 100 threads per square inch, 
counting warp and filling, and 
weighing over 6 ounces per square 

yard- 1,747 

not oT«rl40 threads per square inch, 

counting warp and ttUiag..... 4,826 

over 140 and not over 200 threads per 
square indi, ^xninting warp and 

filling. ^ 8,634 

over 200 threads per square inch, 

counting warp and filling 1,852 

Printed, pahited» colored, oi-etauMd>.*< 

not over 100 threads per sq. inch, 

counting warp and flUing, and 

weighing over 6 ok. per sq. yerd, 660 

not over 140 threads per square inch, 

counting warp and filling 69^274 

> over 140 and not over 200 threads 
per square inch, counting warp . 

and filling 6,771 

over 200 threads per square inch, 

' counting warp and filling «... 249 

Hemp, and manu&ctwee of hemp, jute, 
and coir : — 
Manilla, and other hemps of India, 619,018 
Jute, Sisal grass, sun iiemp, coir, 
and other vegetable snbstaiicee 
not specified, used for cordage..... 6,834 
Gables, cordage, and yanis>>- 

all other cordage, nntarred ...*.. 7 

other yarn , „,.. 184 

seines - 12 

Cotton bagging, or ether manufiictures. 
not specified, suitfible ior uses qf cot.* 
ton bagging, valued at over 10 oenta 

per square yard , 471 

Flax :— 

. unmanufactured ,. 17,809 

tow of, 4,066 

Manufactures of glass :— 

rough plate, cylinder, or broad win- 
dow glass, not above 10 by 15 in., 6,662^, 
above 10 by 16 incheB,and not above 

16 by 24 inches ^ 6,424 

above 16 by 24 inches, aiMl not above 

24 by 30 inches 1,968 

above 24 bsr 30 inches, and not over 

X pound in weight ner square foot, 2,788 
crown, plate, or polished, and all 
other window glass, not above 10 

by 15 inches........ 164 

above 10 by 15 inches, and not above 

10 by 24 inches.: 8,507 

, above 16 by 24 inches, and not above 

24 by 30 inches 840 

above 24 by 30 inches 6,999 

in sheets or tables, without refer- 
ence to size or form J..*.* 26,967 

Iron, and manufitctures of iron:— 

pig iron .....* 63,929 

vessels of cast iron ..^..^ 313 

cast iron butts and hinges ,»..«« 246 : 

hollow ware, glased or tinned.,..^... 820 

old Scrap iron 6k446 



164 



9HB NAtrOKAL ALMANAC. 



[less. 



Iron* and mMiiilhotiirw of Iron N-^ * 

bar Iron, rolled or hanmenid 1106,068 

nUlroMl Iron, not aborv IncbM 

high- 02,226 

boiler-plate 2,961 

band ircNi. 3,761 

hoop Iron ^ 12,942 

slit rode 6filb 

wire, not orer Winch ia diameter, 
nor lees than No. 16 wire-gauge... 2^60 

above No. 26 1,142 

rolled or hammered iron, not aped- 

fled. 16.900 

'sheet iron, smooth or pol&riied....^. 2,784 
common or black, not thinner 

than Na 26 wire-gauge... 1,712 

thinner than No. 99, and not thin- 
ner than No. 26 wire-gange 2,682 

thinner than No. 26 460 

mill irons and mill cranks of wro*t 

iron 2,117 

wrought iron Ibr shipe, locomotfree. 
locomodre tire, or parts of, and 
Bteam-en|rines, or psorts of, weigh- 
ing earti 26 ponads or more.^ 26,060 

iron cables or chains, or parts of..... 6,899 

anvils 8,644 

aochora, and parts of. 664 

wrought board nails, spikes, rivets, 

and bolta 182 

bed eerews ~. , 6 

wroQght hinges.. 48 

trace chains, halter chains, aad 
fence chains, made of wira or 
rods:~- 

^ inch or over in diameter 822 

under ^ inch and not Under ^ 

ineh ia diameter ISO 

ander % inch in diameter, and not 

under No.9 wlre^nge 407 

blscksmiths* hammers aad sledges, 34 

horseshoe nails 8,720 

■team, gas, and water tubes aad 

flues, of wronght Iron 4,043 

nuts and washers of wrou^t iron, 

punched «... 1,460 

wood scnws, 2 Inches and over in 

leuffth. 148 

unmr 2 inches in length 1,826 

malleable iron, in castings, not spe- 

dfled 1,862 

flteel, aad manufacturos of steel; — 
in ii^jotfl, bare, sheets, or wire, not 
less than W ineh in diameteV, 
valued at 7 cents per pound or- 

less^ 62,687 

valued over 7 cents, and not above 

11 cents per pound 64,480 

wire, lees than W Inch in diameter^ 
nor less than No. 16 wire-gauge... 9,024 

I«M than No. 16 wir^^uge 14,781 

Gf oes cnt saws 3 

mill, pit, and drag saws, not over 9 

inches wide 13 

skates, costing 20 cents or 1ms, per 

pair 822 

Pewter, when .old, and fit only to be re* 

manufsctnred 241 

Lead, and mannfhctnres of lead ^-~ 

In pigs aad bare. 4,483 

old scrap lead... 1,708 

Copper, aad BManlhetures of copper, 
wnen old, aad fli onl j to be remann- 

.*.»»wiMm.,..*, ^. 9;2eo 



»»««e«ee«e ■«••»••« 



■ ••••••••• e**«««««ee 



ZIbc, spelter, or teuteoegne, aad 
flu:tnres of :— > 

In blocks <Mr pigs 

in sheets ...i..... 

Spirits, foreign distilled:— 

brandy , m.................... 

ttom grain 

AtMn other materials 

cordials. 

arrack, absynthe, Kirscbenwasser, 

ratafla, etc., not spedflcd 

Bay rum. 

Beer, ale, and porter :— 

in casks 

1& bottles 

Sugar:— 

Muscovado, or browa..., 

white and claysd...........M.**.M. 

loaf and other reflned....M 

syrup ef Bugar-«ane 

Molasses.... 

Salt:— 

in bulk «.. 

in bags ...w. 

Meats, hams 

Vish, dried, smoked, or pickled >— 

herrings...... .....#........«............• 

all other not specified, not In bUs^ 
Breadstufliii barley. .......,....^..^. 

AnOaSvO0w**«»b»k%»ee««ee»*««*e»«»»»^»««»bbe*v«b*«»e«»e 

Rloe, cleaned.**... 

Cheese. 

Urd 

Itempeeed «. 

Paints, dried, or ground in oil :— 

white lead . , 

oxide of sine 

red lead..*.......».*«...«.«M..*...MM...*..« 

litharge 

sugar of lead 

chromate and bichromate of pofssh, 

whiting. 

Paris white 

Oohres and ochrey earths not ^ecifled, 

when dry 

Oil, rape-seed 

Alum 

Copperss, green vitriol, or sulphate of 

bxm 

Bleaching powders 

Borax, roflned 

Tallow 

Candles and tapers :— 

wax 

stearine 

3l>ium •.... «— 
orphine and its salts. 

Uauorice paste or Juice 

yin«gar. 

Pipeclay 

Honey 

Bituminous coal 

All other coal 

Spices : — 

Cayenne pepper 

*' " ground. 

pimento 

nutmegs 

Fruits:— 



88408 

6M08 

S,VS 

l,tl9 

2,47» 

8,6a 

16^422 



68^B8f 

26,n» 

8^019 

81 

S71 

6 



8;eio 

14,228 
116 

11,788 
8,637 
2,284 

ao2 

14 
1.276 
1,880 



prunes., 
plums. 



i;iu 

667 

M70 

864 

22,782 

6,280 

166 

S14 

21 

86 

17,T66 

4,060 

816 

1,<»^ 

40,006 

Sll,821 

80 

667 

14 

13,134 

61 

11 



sultana, muscat^ and bloom ral- 
iins,ui 



■ins, ia boxes or J«rt. 



8,018 



1868.J 



TBMiSVMX IIBPAB7MBHT. 



Froito: — 

all otlier ratolns -... $105 

Nuts:— 

almonds 12,300 

shelled almonds «.m>. 1,142 

all natfl not used for dyeing, no( 
specified ..»...........,»».. 26,908 

CSgars:— 

▼alned at $5 or under per M.......;..* £^640 

▼alned at oref |5, and not oTer HO, 

per M , ~, ^ 25,878 

Talned at over |10 per M 107,170 

Snnff.. 146 

Cl^, nnwrooght....... ...«....»....* V)06 



1. 



Total |13,720,«18 

MKBCBAKDBB 9AJISB A» TAMnOM VOtBi, 

Wool, and manu&ctnres of , wool and 
worsted: — 

nnmanufactnred, less tHan 18 centtf 
per pound 

delaines, CSashmere, and barege de- 
laines, wholly or in part of wool« 
and all other gray or uncolored 
goods of similar description v.. 

Imnting m..... 

mannfiictures not specified 

flannels, above 80 cents per square 

yard ».« 

colored, printed, or stained 

woollen and worsted yarns, or yams 
for carpets, valued under 50 cents 
per pound, and not exceeding in 

fineness No. 14. 

exceeding No. 14 

endless belts for paper, and blanket* 
ing for printing-machines. 

hats of wool.' .' 

flocksj'waste, or shoddy 

Xaaufoctures of cotton :^> 

plain woven cotton goods, not speci- 
fiedj ;.. 

cotton goods of every description* 
over 16 cents the square yard.. ....^ 

spool, and other thread .'... 

ail manullActures wholly of cotton, 
bleached, unbleaclied, printed, 
painted, or dyed, not specified..... 

laces J...,...',... 

inserting 

trimming laces ~.... 

braids. 

cords, gimps, and galloons 

laces, colored... 

tBk, and manu&ctures of silk : — 

silk In the gum, not more advanced 
than singles, tram, and organzlne 

in manufacture 

valued not over $1 per square yard, 
valued at over $1 per square yafd, 

velvets, or velvets of v>*hich silk Is 
the component material of chief 
value :— 
valued at $3 or under per square 

yard 

over $3 per square yard 

ribbons, galloons, braids, fringes, 
laces, tassels, buttons, button- 
cloths, and trimmings 71,304 

floss :... 203 

twist^'ftnd twiat composed of mohair 
and sak * 1|897 



16,677 



1,136 

41,734 

110,(^ 

6 

327 



430 
4j017- 

11,478 
223 

47,182 



61,024 

48,870 
80,043 



81,631 

7,130 

660 

1,713 

6408 

16,660 

346. 



29,082 
116,461 
869,364 



6,485 
18,338 



Bilk, and nuuiaffwtiirea of 8flk>*<- 

fleving sUk io th» g«m, or puriflad, 
mannlactnree not spaoiflad..^ 

HaDofiictnres of flax :— 



thread. 



»••••••««■••«•«••«*•■••••••••••«•••*••«»• 



»••••••• vaftst****** 



twine and packthread.. 

nanulkctures oi; not spacifiad. 
linens, brown or bleached : — 

vaload at 30 canta or luider per 
square yardi........... 

vali^ad over 30 cents per sq. yard, 
drills, coatings, brown Holland, clay 

Uneqa, docks, damwskw, Ac, valMd 

over 80 canfta per ai|Mu e yard...... 

lawns, valncd at 30 cents or under 

per square yard......*.................. 

burlaps, valued at 30 ceata or under 

iheetinga, brown and white.......... 

all other manniactures of hemp not 

specified 

Manufiicturea of fiax, Jnte. or hsapq^ >- 
manufiicturas of flax, jute, or hemp, 

or of which flax, jute. «r hemp 

shall . b« the material of chi^ 

value : — 

valued at 30 coats or under par 
square yard.... « 

yalued over 90 cents per square 
yarc... ........«...«»...». ..«.»«.».»M«..» 

jute goods .«••*.».«....»... 

manufitoturea of Siaal graaa not spe* 

cified.*.... M..M«* .....M...M. 

Glass, and mannfactnrea of glass >- 

bottles «.....„......,...«.....••.•....». 

crystals for watches 
painted or colwed... 
porcelain and Bohemian.,...,.......^ 

silvered or gilded......»«.>>.««........M»» 

paintipgs on glass or glasses........... 

ware,plain...............................».. 

plates or disks, unwrougbt, lior op* 
tical. instruments ^..m.. 

manufactures not s^(Bcified......«»,M. 

Wares, China, Ac. ; — 

China and porcelain ware,... *.... 

brown earthen and common stone 
war^. ^ 

all other earthen, stone, or crockery,, 
Manufactures of copper not specified.... 
Manu&ctures of iron, steel, and iron and 
steel :— . 

castings not specified*.... ...... ......••.» 

manu&ctures oi^ not specined..».«. 

steel in any fiurm not q>eeified....M.» 

needles. m..m....*..m 

cutlery „ ,.,., «..,...... 

muskets, rifles, and other fir#-arms, 

side-arms .......** 

manufactures of steel not sp^fiedt 
Manufactures of gold and silver: — 

epaulets, galloons, laces, tassds, 
wings, tresses, Ac ..m. 

gems, set 

not set..... 

jewelry, real, or imitations of......^. 

gold and silver leaf........... ,.... 

silver-plated metal ^ 

Lead, manufactures o^ not 
Manu&ctures of tin : — 

tin foil , 

in plates or sheets.*..... 



16& 



16,477 
U0,681 

87,092 

611 

Sl,089 



86,846 
61,028 



2,718 

8421 

6,080 
1,971 
1,662 



>*.. 



818 

1468: 

8,870 
18 

14,726 

1,676 

4,028 

6,230 

11,014 

; 606 

078 

2,870 

2,881 
e,02» 

71,620 

4,617 

1604M: 

8»668 



88 

68,768 
41,080 

«. 28,666 
73.068 

876^) 
26,230 
70,097 



23,282 
676 
3,136 
7,608 
4^462 
691 
6,297 

3,005 
461,890 



1S6. 



TBM KATIOirAL 



[laoa 



Mauafactores of tin >~* 

Tttrne du, in plates or sheeto $2,460 

manafactnres not apecifled 909 

Manufactures of brass : — 

old, and fit only to be re-mann&o- 

tured 3,301 

manufitctures not apecified 9,492 

Saddlery : — 

common, tinned, bnmished,' or Ja« 

panned, not specified 2,806 

8llver-|4ated, brass, or bras8*plated, 

not specified 6,687 

Japanned ware of all kinds not specified, 1,075 

Plated and gilt ware of all kinds 1,489 

Slates, and mannfactnres of slates 6,907 

Marble, manuftctures of. 1,131 

Clocks and watches :— 

chronometers, box or ship's, and 

parts of. 474 

docks, and parts of.....» 3,855 

watches, and parts of. 97,012 

KirB>— 

dressed on the skin 20,270 

undressed on the skin 26^205 

hatters' furs, dressed or undressed, 

not on the skin 101,450 

caps, hats, muffs, and tippets 971 

manufSietures of, not specifled 1,358 

- 'hatters* plush, of silk and cotton, 

cotton the material of ohief value, 3,538 
Haiir, and manufaotures of hair >-~ 

hair cloth and hair seatings. 4,427 

manufactnrea of hair not specified... 859 

of the alpaca, goat, or other like ani- 
mals, unmann&ctured, less than 

18 cents per pound 28,224 

hair pencils............ 143 

manufaotures of goats' hair or mo- 
hair not specified 27,069 

hair of all kinds, cleaned but un- 
manufactured, not specified 6,632 

human hair, cleaned or prepared for 

use ..- 888 

bracelets, braids, diains, curls, or 

ringleUofhair ^ 7,542 

Hats and bonnets:—- 

of straw, or other Tegetable sub- 

etanoes 42,226 

of hair, whalebone, or 'other mate- 
rial not otherwise provided for.... 1,090 
Leather, and manufiietttres of leather : — 

skins, tanned and dressed. 9,61$ 

tanned Mlfiklns 39,008 

upper, idl other 12,706 

tanned bend and s<4e.... 2,500 

Japanned, patent, or enamelled 

leather or skins of all kinds 9,889 

mannfaetures of leather not other- 
wise provided for...i...i< 97,355 

CXmiposition of glass or paste for use by 
Jewellers : — 

not set 4 1 520 

Bet 48 

Clothing, except wool :— 

ready-made ^ 6,876 

articles of wear 79,179 

Caps, gloves, mitts, Ac, made on ftames, 

not otherwise provided for 77,887 

MannflM^nres In part of cotton, silk, 
wool or worsted, or flax, not others 

wise provided Ibr. 610,48T 

Articles worn by men, women, or chil- 
drei^ made wmdly or in part by hand, 
not otherwise provided for 6,030 



Articles embroidered with gold, silver, 

or other metal $3,209 

Embroideries of cotton, linen, silk, wool, 

or worsted, not q»eeified..^ 74,155 

Thread laces 8,479 

Oil, and bofne of foreign fishing: — 

whale and other fish 3,816 

OU:— 

essential, •expressed, or volatile, not 

speoified. 28,603 

palm, eeal, and cocoflHint 52,564 

olive salad oil, in casks 2,271 

in bottles 40,830 

olive oil, other than salad, in eaafcs, 4,409 
Oil-Cloths for floors, stamped, iradnted, 
or printed, over M oente per sq«are 

yard, and all other oilndoth 101 

Paper, and mannHwrtngea of paper, Ac >* 

blank books 711 

boxes, paper... 840 

boxes, fkncy...... 491 

cards, playing .' 1,422 

pape^ hangings 265 

papier macli^, articles and wares of, 178 

writing paper 11,306 

paper, and manufibctores of paper, 

not specified 9i,089 

Pens, metallte. 8,190 

Sealing wax 3 

Ink and ink powders 9,067 

Lead pencils 8,440 

Engravings or plates 14^410 

Printed books, Ac. : — 

books T5,123 

periodicals and pamphlets 666 

newspapers and books, illustrated, 4,693 
PrultB:— 

oranges 141,018 

lemons 71^96 

limes 254 

oHves 291 

green, ripe, or dried, not otherwise 

provided for 4,728 

preserved in brandy, sugar, or nK>> 
lasses, not otherwise provided 

for.,.; « 1^ 

Vegetables: — 

yams 14 

vegetables not otherwise provided 

for., 18^795 

prepared Tegetables, meats, fish, 
poultry, and game, in cans or 

otherwise. 3,816 

Fish, sardines, anchovies, and all other 

fish preserved in oil 8,527 

Brooms and brashes of all kinds 11,191 

Buttons and button moulds of all kinds, 17,130 

Carriages, and parts of. « 378 

Dolls and toys of all kinds 22,359 

Combs of all kinds 1,467 

Manufiictures of bone, shell, horn, ivory, 

or vegetable ivory....... 1,783 

Mats of cocoanut and China, and other 
floor matting, and mats of flags, Jute, 

or grass 2,412 

Baskets and other articles of grass, oeier, 
palm-leaf, straw, Ac, not otherwise 

provided for 5,030 

Flats, braids, plaits, sparterre, and wil- 
low .squares for making hats and bon> 

nets 42,618 

Parasols, snn8badBs,'and umbrellas 2,611 

Feathers and flowers, artlflctsi and or- 
natnental, and parts of.; 17,760 



186a.] 



T|i£4fi|URT . jyE^AlS^Mmf- 



137 



Feather beds. feat)«en Jbr bfldi,.«iul 

' dDwiu of all kinds 

Mannfiicttires of Indiarrtibber: — 

shoes and boots.......... ...........>. 

mauufactures of, not specified......... 

braces, suspenders, webbing, Ac, 
vrholly or in partof ladii^rubber, 

not specified. 

Tobaoco:— 

anmannfactared, Va leaf. 

all other, niannfoctured ttiid un- 

mannfaictared..^..... 

Arrowroot.... 

4^oflcoiace«».. ..•.•....»..•*«••.•« ..« ••• •••...•••••. 

Oatmeal «. 

Gapers, pickles, and sauces of all kinds, 

not specified 

Sal soda «... 

Gsrb. soda. « 

Distilled spirits not specified.... 

Wiues, in xuisks ^ 

in bottles ~. .« 

^ces, ginger, ground, preserved, or 

pickled 

&np, perflnnied 

other than perfumed....^ » 

dtutt copal..... ...^M.... • ■ 

Plaster of Paris :— ; 

ground 

calcined 

Tsmlsh of all kinds-..^ ~«.... » 

Adds: — 

citric ^ 

nitric 

9»ilits:— 

dry or ground in oil, not specified... 



62 
6,770 



19,272 

8,2S8 

1,175 

4,176 

422 



8,824 
12,090 
22,867 
443 
47,145 
^102 

"6,279 

2,617 

6,851 

21,898 

1,479 

do 

671 
1,116 

1,925 
04 

26,1U 



>.••••••«»• •••••«»«• • — •»»»■— 



Paints, water coloxs. 
Black lead, or plumbago. 

Sal ammonia 

Garb, ammonia 

Wood, unmanufiictured, fire-wood......... 

Mannfiictnres of wood : — 

ebony 

mahogany 

cabinet and household farnitnre..... 

other manuftctures of wood 

boards, planks, staves, laths, scant- 
ling, &c 

osier or willow, prepared for bndcot- 

makers* use. 

Sulphate of barytea i. 

Manoflictures of the bark of the cork 

tree, oorks 

Raw Udes and skins. ; ,, 

White Titriol, or sulphate of zinc 

Talne ef merchandise not eiimBeniited 
in the preceding abstract v^ 
Paying duty at 5 per cent. 

u 10 



%2jm 

U,8I5 

629 

8,742 

48 

48 

4,109 

l,i00 

11,460 

98 

1,000 
711 

69,961 

434,712 

428 



it 

M 

M 
M 
U 



M 
U 

a 
t( 
u 



n 

229,676 

16 " . ,.... 26,818 

20 «* 119,724 

26 ** 11,460 

80 " 71,388 

40 *« . ..... 6 



«*••«*#••■• 



Total ytAne of mevchasidlse paying 
ad valorem duties......* 6,78T,8lil 

Total ralne of xnerehaadise paying 
specific duties.... 18;720,61i8 

Tot«l ralue of merchandise free of 
duty ^ 28,644428 

Total value of Imports 840,062,018 



SUPERYISINO INSPflCIORS OF STEAMBOATS, AND THEIB BISTRIGTS. 
Salary, $1600 each, and travelUog-expenses. 

1. All waters and rivers of Pacific coast, a^d all the tribatatries theretp..*.*. Wm* Burnett, 

San Francisco. 

1. Waters of Atlantic coast, rivers and tributaries between Passamaqnoddy 

Bay and Gape CflMrles « «. Thomas B. Btlllman, 

New York. 
8. Waters of Atlantic and Gulf eoasts, south of Gape Gharles^ to and in- 
cluding Pascagonla River, with river, and tributaries.... * James N. Hnller, 

Baltimorv^ i 
4. Mississippi Rirer and Its western tributaries to Alton, and Gulf coast west 

of Mississippi to Rio Grande John J. Witslg, 

St. Loots. 
6. Upper Mississippi River and its tributaries from and including Alton 

and the Red River ef the North... Charles L. StephensoB^ 

Galena, Illinois. 

6. Gulf coast from the Pascagoula to the Bfississippi River, the latter vrith 

its eastern tributaries to the month of Ohio, and the Ohio and its tri- 
butaries to Madison v.. .». John Shallcross, 

Louisville. 

7. The Ohio River firom and including Madison B. M. Shield, 

Cincinnata. 

8. AH the waters of the lakes norih and west of Lake Erie, with their rivmrs 

and tributaries «.».«.... Alfred Guthrie, 

Chicago. 
0, An the waters of Lakes'Erie, Ontario, Champlain, and George, with River 

St. Lawrence and their tributaries Asaph L. Bemls, 

Buffalo. 

Besides these, there are eighteen local inspectors of steamboatJiulls, and the same number <^ 
(nqiectors of steamboat-boilers, residing at the principal sea, river, and lake ports, and receiving a 
compensation ranging fl!t>m $200 to $2000. The entire compensation of these local inspectors amounts 
to |3n,200. 



158 



tmr WAsnoMAL almamac 



fl863. 




T4UBOT 



voi 



UM0MK 



2M;n(MU 








4M;ziMa7 



5Hn7,ai7 

872,«Ki,9W 

627;n9,966 
814;Z7Mn 

1,000^230,639 

1,111^IM70 

MT,833,106 

X,\\Hfi2Afil2 
l;3MvMM«t 
V07,ffi6|338 



pncepcr 

poaofl 






25,455^273,427 



1&2 

llJ* 
U^ 
9>^ 
12^ 
10j» 
lOJ 
10i> 
9^ 
9.1 

11.1 
12LS 
1«J 
US 
14S 
Iftt 

&» 

las 

&i 

«l2 
&1 
&9 
TJt 

IIU 

IS 

M 

ILS 

12L1 

&• 

9^ 
8J4 
9^ 
12^ 
11.70 
IIjM 
latf 

iijor 



I' 



I 

It 
If 



I 



I 

I 



^4 



mjsm 

122,923 



110,517 
120,327 
1444C3 
12MM' 
119^1 






101,009 

100,706 
134,715 
118,021 

144,427 
109,403 

128,M1 
127,009 
lOfiijfiOO 
119,738 
07,797 
106421 



64,332 
61,016 

64403 



f. 4,412;912 





4,762406 







]%07Ma» 



^1^ 



30ga44ao 

9vS88,3S6 



I444«;r79 

19g(K7J536 
1749^308 

i6,9as;^6 

n,2M423 
17,970435 
1^743;4S1 
97,701421 
06401,021 
87,472461 



21,^16,661 
S8^V0tf 



77467,301 
74^667JB52 



38,30fisWl 



i4oi,Ki74f;o 



* Sine iBoiitlM, to Jane 30. f Tear ending Jme 30. 

t Beride theae, there were exported, <lt ffee, ia 1866, 19,774 tarrde; in 1866, 81,038 t«m^; tn 1857, 
74,309 iMBTele; in 1866, 49,283 bwr^; fai 1869, 09JM6 fawrde; fai 1800,77jB7 twrrele; and in 1661, 
60/06 barrek. Of tobacco, then were exported, in 1855, tMside tbe abore^ 1231Z bala and. 10066 
caMo; in 1866^ 17,772 bale* and 0;»4caM»; in 1857, 14,432 bale* and 6,031 caaee; in 1868. 12,610 bales 
and 4,641 caaee; in 1869, 19,051 balca and 7486 caaee; in 1800, 17^7 bales and 15,035 cases; and in 
186L 19y450 bales and iM^^ omm. The tafaM of cotton exported in 1809 was $191,806,556; hi 166L 
f34i05M63; aad«irthe41]reafs»62/i06,885^4w The vdne of the lice exported in 1800 was «2iiB7J90; 
in Un, $1,382478; and far the 41 jeara, $B9,23IMW- Tobacco^ in 1800^ rafaie^ $15u9OOL50i Uk U(B1, 
M764^730;andfarth«4Iy«arB,$36M»;nT. — ,— r— 



TBEASDRY DBPABTUXNT. 



wia, Pumiuicuo Uuniruniu o* 



P^™. 


JilTio30,18M 


;rsa 


sss 


izsja 


n.i.rt.^ '"^ 


P,0S7.WB 

m.411 

■ffig 

S.S5S. 

wafim 

s 

m 

3^ Ml 

ai;8«i 

244,207 
49,318 

tJMMH 

si 


»I,T37.Y3l" 

i»8,Tia 

l,Z33,5a» 

642,901 
2MJ» 

£,3aMai 

lllJKS 

1^,362 

*!k: 

iM»,aH 

T6^ 

«4B^a 

6M,8T6 
»l),S*0 
2fia,B3« 

z,S4>,i9a 
u,4a3,Mi 

■«:S 
,,,S:S 

gS! 

,M 

2,a»7,14» 

aiS?^ 

"tffi 

19«J)3t 

■n^Mt 
i«>,mi 


ifl.78B,0S9 

e»,M7 
se»,2»3 

6W2». 
IBllM* 

iSSio 

161,«H 

Sis 

Sid 

1dBJ»0 

■as 
ss 

2,5i;tj»9 

191.«W\&&S 

■« 

SCI1,CIT4 
164,048 


ia,110,82I 

7aa,f^ 








143,2» 
161^47 

I,B7B,778 

MS 
SS 

183.49) 


ITood- 








All mmtifiutuna of WK^Jl _ 




Jfcr3lSti==::::::::::: 


PsoDDcn or loncDUDU 




mm. : _.... 




?«k,t£wiA..- 

Hu»uid bacon ,._. 










28.417 


T^£i!.-i::- 


"■r - - — 




jtj8III«l,......™_.^-^..-™..™_ 








"*^^°^ 








«|«iirimd 


■■801.B» 
li,00«,OSS 

D3,2»S 




"iSg 









160 



THB KATIOITAL ALMANAC. 



4;i86^ 



■ »» « 1 1 



Pbodugts. 



■•••• •«■ 



MAHiTVAcnjBM (OoDtbrafld). 

8|ilriU from molnaaes. 

Spiiiu from other materlaL. 

Molaaaei 

TittQ^r » 

BMr, ale, porteTf elder, in caiika. 

Beer, ale, porter, cider, in boCtlel 

linaeed oil — 

Spirits ef turpentine. ~ 

Bcpiuehold fornitnre 

Carriagee and porta, and railroad cars and 

parts 

Hats of fnr or silk..... 

Hats of palm leaf. 

Saddlery 

nnmks and Talises 

Adamaotine and other candlea 

Beap 

Snair. 

Tobacco, numofhctured ~ ».... 

Qnnpowder 

Leather 

Leather, boots and shoeSk 

Gables and cordogeL 

Salt 

Lead 

Iron — 

5? 

Bar.. 

Nails 

Castings „... 

Other uiannfiKtnres of. 

Copper and brass, and mann&ctnres of. 

Drugs and medicines.. 

Cotton goodiH^ 

Printed or colored 

White, other than duclc 

Duck 

All other maniifnctures of. 

Henip— 

Thread 

Bags 

Cloth ^.... 

Other mannfiictures of. 

Wearing apparel 

Earthen and stone ware 

Combe and buttons 

Bnxnns and bmshes of all kinds. 

Billiard tables and apparatus 

Umbrellas, parasols, nud sunsbados 

Morocco and other leather not sold by the 

pound 

Fire engines ^....•..... 

Printing presses and type 

Musical instruments. 

Books and maps.. 

Baper and stationery 

Paints and rarnish 

Jewelry, real and imitation.. 

Other manufactures of gold and silver, and 

gold leaf...... 

Glass .* 

Tin 

Pewter and lead , 

Marble and stone. • 

Brick lime and ctmeni 

India rubber shoes 

^dto rubber, other than shoeo... 

Lard oil ^. 

Oilcake 



»«»— « »»«».. ...♦»»«..»«» 



TearoBdlBg 


TavewUag 


Tearonding 


TearondlBe 


June ao, IBM 


June 80,1869 


June 30, 1860 


JaneS0,18«i 


92JS0i 


•JtK 


$2,593 


S24A7 


476,722 


273,676 


811,696 


807,M4 


l,207,eoi 


760,889 


080,644 


fiUiJSM 


249^432 


188,746 


210,100 


608485 


ll&y883 


I*»?S 


85,302 


80488 


24,336 


86,166 


41,308 


88,263 


88/M8 


66jSlb 


81,871 


80,870 


80,883 


22,661 


22,9)8 


18,004 


48,82S 


34404 


26,700 


27,083 


1,089,283 


1,806,086 


1,016,280 


1402,?S7 


982,489 


1,007,107 


1,079414 


888,040 


777,021 


666,600 


810,978 


478,080 


03474 


146,226 


118,770 


106,613 


83,361 


71,478 


08,832 


•0,444 


66,280 


68^70 


71,882 


61,400 


69y441 


42463 


60,184 


40,023 


628,690 


671,760 


908^600 


068,048 


a05,7M 


I 460,216 


404^406 


456,048 


10,109 


68,090 


11,364 


17;708 


2,400,116 


8,334,401 


8,372,1074 


2,748,888 


365,173 


871,603 


467,772 


847,108 


606,680 


499,718 


• 674,800 


666b308 


063,906 


820476 


782,626 


770,8T8 


212,840 


320,436 


246^73 


886;274 


102,660 


212,710 


120,717 


144,040 


48,119 


28,676 


60^440 


6,241 


24,087 


21,213 


10448 


35,820 


26J082 


48,228 


88.267 


16,411 


166,762 


188,223 


188.764 


270,064 


464,416 


128,659 


282,848 


76,760 


4,069,628 


6417,346 


6474.040 


6,536,676 


1,966,223 


1.048,2« 


1,661422 


2,376,080 


681,278 


796,006 


1415^466 


1440,488 


2,060,194 


2,320.890 


3,356,440 


3^6,088 


1,608,136 


1,302,881 


1,403,506 


1,076^060 


183,889 


216.866 


882,069 


300,608 


1,800,286 


4,477.006 


6,792,762 


4,364t8» 


1,326 


444 


430 


80 


11,349 


6,430 


4,783 


400 




006 


813 


•■••#• ••• ••• 


7Mi7 


12,090 


21.838 


80,084 


210,695 


470,613 


625,176 


40S.664 


86,788 


47,361 


66,086 




46,849 


46,007 


23,946 


88,703 


49,163 


44,638 


61377 


08.860 


8,791 


12,004 


16,679 


8,910 


6,339 


4,837 


4.862 


i,2n 


18,090 


*^'if* 


19,011 


7,607 


7,320 


8,218 


0,948 


7,940 


106,498 


68,868 


157,124 


106^ 
16^4 


00,276 


16U01 


.129,663 


200,774 


819,068 


378,268 


860^880 


229,991 


299,867 


286.798 


347,916 


181,217 


186,068 


223,800 


8MK023 


28,819 


68«868 


24,669 


48,740 


26,886 


36,947 


140497 


tajsn 


214,608 


262,316 


277,948 


394,781 


24,186 


89,280 


80,064 


80,220 


27^27 


28,782 


46,081 


80^684 


U6,931 


52,006 


88,826 


^608 


107,448 


146,821 


18S;0I6 


Vs^!^ 


00,008 


80,073 


i,mo^ ' 


8|jF88 


l«4t6,801 


i4w,»n 


1M.001 



TREASUBT DEPARTMENT. 



1^ 



n™,™. 


izs^s, 


SSS 


j<iD««a,ie£ 


JunslollSlS 




S,*H.7BS 




T*CI,TBS 

t8,<a3,sTs 

30,1(13,173 
l,3«I.tM 


fl,4W 

17^248 
ItliSMW 
IV'l.'^SO 

fl31,4M 




«p|d-l-lv«l™IbO« 






Rtw pTodneg..... ^.„^.....^ „ 







n W DOHBHC PKOHHa, ftl. D 



lal.tOI^SOTHDI 



Jt 

,1 
i1 



! 



Hpsiii 



ll 




' liii illll I 



iiiLi 



FiPiiiri 



ill 



pm 



mm 



i 



I'-'pW'isMi -I- IP|l|l|l||l lll| ' 



i 



I 



Hit II 




TBS HAIIOKAL ALHAHAC. 



ll|M||S|M8'|p| ISS3||E.|5|||pi||*«|p I 



IIP|'||Pn|l|ll*|pi^li'|nillPII 



liilliniilPFUBI 



piiii|P|i|P|ipip|ji||i 



1*11? 11 is MS !H n I ip|si3 1 [J i n 



i 



II I IS 



|ili|!iP 





















ii ill] 1 



i 



I; 



ill 



,1 






lllliilll IJillllllilliJllllllli 



tB6&] TREABrKY DfiPARTMEITD. 165 

STATomtT sxHiBnnro thx Cokumen or saoh Svavb ntbM Jult 1, 1860, vo Jmn 80, 1861. 



STATES. 



Maine ^... 

Mew Hampshire 

Yermont 

MwMachoBettB..... 

Khode Island 

Connecticut.. 

New York. 

New Jersey 

Pennsylrauia 

Delaware 

MarylaiKl 

District of Columbia 

Virginia. 

North Carolina. 

Soath Carolina 

Georgia 

Alabama 

Florida., 

Looisiaaa 

Texas 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Illittots 

WiMonsin... 

California 

Or^on 

Total ..„ 



VALUB OF EXPOKTS. 



VALUE OP 
IMPORTS. 



Doimno. 



Tqtal. 



$i,320»125 

e,i62 

244,667 

13,092,442 

24»,57T 

413,636 

143,568,833 

46,067 

0,903,070 

100,553 

12,949,625 

"8^760,624 

400,669 
5,455,581 

311,540 
8,472,001 

628,808 
6,8^357 
1,195,352 

683,195 

836,762 
3,522,343 

785,832 
10,418,412 

121,273 



228,69U,480 



nrntuuf. 



Totol. 



«|07,334 

"664,416 

2,580,294 

6,720 

7,684 

**iio,(m 

'*"mO,718 



8,970 
88,664 



■ ••#*••••••«• 



1,739,015 



20,646,427 



Total domestic 
and foreign. 



H527,459 

6,162 

809,073 

16,572,736 

255,297 

421,320 

158,606,518 

46,067 

10,013,097 

100,558 

13,240,343 

"sjeojm 

400,669 
5,455,581 

311,540 
8,472,001 

637,778 
6,911,921 
1,195,352 

683,195 

330,752 
8,522,343 

785,832 
12,157,427 

121,273 



249,344,913 



Total. 



$1,932,005 

20,887 

8,459,811 

46,399,844 

543,652 

763,309 

237,402,726 

5,510 

12,628,318 

1.004 

9,449405 

1,285 

791.90T 

170,428 

806,480 

176,328 

868,357 

166,051 

11,960,869 

225.714 

245,606 

656,718 

77,348 

8,230 

8,606,506 

5,130 



335,650,153 



STATES. 



Maine 

New Kimpflfaire ,.. 

TennoDt 

Massachusetts 

Rlioda Island. 

Connecticut ..' 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pvonsylvania 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

North Carolina. 

8onth Carolina. 

Georgia.. 

Alabama 

Florida 

lAiuisiana 

Texas. 

Oiiio 

MicluKan 

IHinora 

'Wisconsin ..< 

OBliCimia 

Oregon 

Total 



TONNAGE CLEABED FROM THE UNITED STATES, YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1861. 



AMKEICAN VE88JBL8. 



Number. 



937 

6 

150 

1,137 

52 

68 

6,386 

28 

877 

""92" 

136 

76 

26 

72 

300 

104 

14 

229 

661 

365 

90 

313 

17 



11,079 



Tons. 



230,517 

2,003 

7,747 

341,465 

11,202 

13,024 

3,102,162 

7,898 

145,319 

3,057 

147,632 



30,787 

23,228 

37,213 

10,429 

62,009 

67,762 

67,711 

7,306 

37,412 

111,114 

138,424 

48.610 

240,891 

14,391 



4,889,313 



FOBUOir VK88ELS. 



Number. 



667 

88 

261 

2,825 

90 

64 

5,452 

15 

178 

2 

192 

*""45 

28 

63 

12 

19 

27 

26 

10 

242 

274 

45 

21 

108 

2 



10,686 



Tons. 



04,357 

3,415 

20,589 

451,301 

13,047 

9,000 

1,309,693 

2,251 

42,248 

620 

61,226 



13,532 
5,976 

15,762 
5,124 

12,785 
2,910 
9,224 
4,031 

25,249 
103,003 

11,999 
5,C53 

38,164 
383 



2,262,042 



Total. 



Niunber. 



1,504 

44 

411 

3,962 

142 

122 

10,838 

43 

608 

16 

669 

"137" 
164 
128 

88 

91 
327 
130 

24 
471 
935 
410 
111 
421 

19 



21,665 



Tons. 



324,874 

5,418 

28,336 

792,766 

24,849 

22,024 

4,411,855 

10,149 

187,567 

3,577 

208,858 



44,319 

29,204 

62,975 

15,553 

64,794 

60,672 

76,935 

11,337 

62,661 

214,117 

150,423 

54,263 

279,055 

14,774 



7,151,365 



166 



THB NATIONAL AtBfANAO. 
mmniHtt nu Ooiamci or bacb SiAVB^-ContiniMd. 



IMSw] 



STATES. 



Maine. ^ 

New Hampshire 

Vermout 

Hoasachnsetta 

Rhode Island 

ConuectiCttt 

New York. k 

New Jeney 

PennsylnuiU 

Delaware 

Maryland. 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

North Otfolina. 

South Carolina. 

G<H>rgia. 

AlalMUiia 

Florida 

LoiiiMlaiia 

Texas 

Olilo 

Michigan 

Ililuoto 

Califvirnta 

Oregon ...~ 

ToUK 



TONNAOS SNTSRBD INTO THB UNITED STATES, TSAR Slfl^INO 

JUNK 80, 1861. 



▲MSUCAH 



Number. 



478 

A 

193 

1,383 

73 

109 

«,071 

1 

468 

4 

434 

1 

141 

88 

00 

11 

53 

242 

88 

7 

314 

574 

158 

95 

212 

11 



11,261 



Tons. 



161,204 

2,099 

10,193 

448,349 
16,439 
23,807 

134 

158,558 

779 

109,555 

188 

82,144 

13,274 

34,297 

8,508 

48,950 

47,063 

58,724 

2.744 

82,498 

140,301 

70,485 

50,437 

162,121 

7,122 

5,023,917 



Number. 



538 


98,321 


48 


8,540 


261 


21,884 


2,825 


4£2,221 


108 


16,678 


88 


11,359 


6,808 


1,317,497 


20 


2,f23 


175 


40,181 



180 

2 

45 

21 

87 

17 

28 

29 

29 

13 

241 

208 

43 

27 

120 

2 



10.709 



Tons. 



55,655 

281 

13,894 

4,3(3 
22,074 

8,168 
23,f98 

2,882 
10,260 

5,707 
24,781 
21,140 
12,138 

8,080 

43,481 

383 



TOTAU 



Number. 



1,018 

45 

454 

4,1«8 

179 

17T 

11,877 

21 

848 

4 

614 

8 

188 

109 

127 

28 

80 

271 

115 

20 

565 

780 

9n 

122 



18 



2,217,584 21,980 



Tona. 



2&4,&2» 

5,t^ 

82,071 

898,670 

S5,lia 

84,966 

4,588,083 

2,75T 

196,787 



22»,iia 

S9» 
96,686 
17,637 
68,371 
16,C84 
f7,«546 
60,526 
68.996 
8,461 
87,229 
161,441 

68,617 

205,802 
7.606 



7,241,471 



PiMAOBS Off SriAMsnt Lnm ahd NincBB op Pabibnoim cauid 

DDSUro TBS Ybae 1882. 



BiTwuM Siimofs ABB Awnirs 



Namos of Steamship Lines. 



Lifsrpool, New York, and Philadelphia. 

Hamburg. Southampton, and New York....... 

Liverpool, Quebec, and Portland , 

Cunard Steamers, New York Line....: 

Cunard Steamers, no*(ton Line 

Bremen, Southampton, and New York 

Auclior line, Glasgow, Qnebec, and Portland. 

On>at Eastern 

Inegular-Staamers 



ToUIInl862 

Total in 1861 

Increase In 1882 orer 1861. 



55 
26 
53 
27 
27 
15 
21 
2 
10 



238 



1 



6 



10,881 
3,682 
4,611 
2,853 
2,880 
2,347 
1.061 
796 
38 



28,619 



28,958 






56 

26 
49 

26 
26 
18 
24 
3 
9 



234 



^1 
II 



K& 



18,454 

7,411 
10,014 
2,T«8 
1,948 
4,298 
8,748 
1,867 
896 



50,407 



40^1 



110 
62 

102 
58 
53 
81 
46 
5 
19 



470 



11,093 
14,828 

6,636 
41206 
6,6U 
4,797 
2,153 
433 

78,826 



€9,307 



9,619 



1863.] 



TKBASURY DEPARTMENT. 



167 



Srtanaxr SHOwiira tbb Nvkiibk afd Class or Tsasus Bmur, and *■> ToitirAOB Trtntior, nr 
rax ScTEKAL States anb Tsnuioaus or ths UinTSD States, rsoic 1816 to 1861 xwcivsiyE. 



TXABS. 



1815 

1816 

18W 

ISIS 

181» „., 

1820 

1821 

1822 

1823 

1824 

1825 

1826 

1827 

1828 

18J& 

1830 

1831 

1832 

1883 

1834 

1835 

1836 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 „.. 

1841 

1842 

1843 

1844 

1S46 

1846 , 

1M7 

1M8 

m9 

1850.^. 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

18o6.« 

1857 

185g 

1850 

1860 

1861 





CLASS or TESC 


i 






% 






t 




B 


s 




s 


& 


6 


s 


i 


s 


t 


136 


224 


681 


76 


122 


781 


M 


86 


559 


53 


85 


428 


53 


82 


473 


21 


60 


301 


43 


89 


247 


64 


131 


260 


55 


127 


260 


56 


156 


377 


56 


197 


538 


71 


187 


482 


55 


153 


464 


73 


108 


474 


44 


68 


485 


25 


56 


403 


72 


95 


416 


132 


143 


568 


144 


160 


625 


98 


94 


497 


25 


50 


301 


93 


65 


444 


67 


72 


507 


66 


79 


501 


83 


89 


439 


97 


109 


378 


114 


101 


310 


116 


91 


273 


58 


34 


138 


73 


47 


204 


124 


87 


322 


100 


164 


576 


151 


168 


689 


254 


174 


701 


198 


148 


623 


247 


X17 


547 


211 


65 


522 


255 


79 


584 


269 


95 


681 


394 


112 


661 


381 


126 


605 


306 


103 


594 


251 


58 


604 


122 


46 


431 


89 


28 


297 


110 


36 


872 


110 


38 


360 



274 
424 
394 
332 
243 
152 
127 
168 
165 
166 
168 
227 
241 
196 
.146 
116 
94 
122 
185 
180 
100 
164 
168 
153 
122 
224 
157 
404 
173 
279 
842 
855 
392 
547 
370 
290 
326 
267 
894 
886 
669 
479 
258 
400 
284 
269 
371 



15 

26 

85 

45 

88 

33 

43 

87 

84 

100 

65 

68 

80 

124 

185 

90 

125 

64 

78 

137 

79 

163 

163 

225 

198 

175 

208 

159 

233 

259 

271 

281 

253 

221 

268 

226 

172 

264 

264 



1^6 
1,403 
1,073 
898 
851 
584 
606 
623 
622 
781 

QQi. 

1,012 
951 

786 

637 

711 

1,065 

1,188 

937 

606 

890 

949 

889 

858 

872 

760 

1,021 

482 

766 

1,038 

1,420 

1^98 

1,861 

1,547 

1,360 

1,367 

1,444 

1,710 

1,774 

2.034 

1,703 

1,334 

1,225 

870 

1,071 

1,143 



total toh- 

NAOB. 



154,624 80 

131,668 04 

86,393 87 

82,421 20 

79,817 86 

47,784 01 

55,866 01 

75,346 98 

75,007 5T 

90,939 00 

114,997 25 

126,488 85 

104,342 07 

93,375 68 

77,096 65 

6&094 24 

85,962 68 

144,539 16 

161.626 86 
118,330 37 

46^238 52 

113.627 49 
12^987 22 
113,135 44 
120,989 84 
118,309 23 
118,893 71 
129,083 64 

43,617 77 
103.537 29 
146^018 02 
188,203 03 
243.732 67 
818,075 64 
25&577 47 
272,218 54 
298,203 60 

351,4^ 41 
425,571 49 
53&616 01 
588,450 04 
469,393 73 
878,804 70 
242,286 09 
156^601 83 
212,892 48 
233,194 85 



The amount of registered and enrolled tonnage sold to foreigners In 1861 is stated to be 26,649.68 tous; 
being 35 ships and barks, brigs, 24 schooners, 2 sloops, and 6 steamers. Amount condemned as nn- 
seaworthy, 7,964.76 tons ; being 15 ships, 3 brigs, 15 schooners, 3 sloops, and 3 steamers. The amount 
liMt at sea was 59,567.89 tons ; being 69 ships, 31 brigs, 33 schooners, 8 sloops, and 3 steamera. The 
net increase of tonnage for the year 1861 was 185,944.37 tons. 



168 



THB VATIOKAL AUf AKAC. 



[1868. 



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al 

o >• 



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55.30 sow 



f-i i-« f-Ti-TrH r-rt-r«"f-»»^»-t f-TiMf-J rCp4"«-J"i^r* »-Ii-J"»4"i^»4^a« ef e€c€ e€6CcCel e< of H 



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1«63.] 



TREASURY DEl>ARTMElf9. 



169 



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2 SP S» 



170 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAa 



[laea 



Uiiitod StotM Wnt. 

[Oorraetad at Um United BteiM Mint, PhiUdclphlft, Vonmbu 1, 18ta.1 



1. The United States Mint i» located in Phila- 
delphia, and was established by the act of April 
2» 1792 (Stat, at Large, vol. i. p. 246). The flnt re- 
gular coinage of centa vr^ in 1798; of lilTer eolaiii 
in 1794; and of gold coins, in 1790. 

2. Ibe officers of the mint are a Director, a Tre»> 
surer, an Assayer, a Melter and Refiner, a Chief 
Goiner, and an Engraver. These officers are ap- 
pointed by the President of the United States, by 
and with the advice and consent of the Senate. 
(Act of Jan. 18, 1837, sect. 1. Stat, at Urge, roL ▼. 
p 136.) 

3. The general duties of these officers are pre- 
scribed by the second section of the abovecited act. 

4. Besides the principal mint, which is located at 
Philadelphia, the United States have branch mints 
at the following-named places: New Orleans, La.; 
Charlotte, N.C.; Dahlonega, Oa.; San Francisco, 
OaI. ; and an Assay Office, for melting and refining 
gold and silver, at the city of New Toric. 

5. The coinage of the several branch mints ere 
designated by a letter on the reverse side of the 
pieces. Those struck at New Orleans have on the 
reverse the letter 0; Oahlonegaf D; (Charlotte, C; 
San Francisco, S. The coiusge of the mint at 
Philadelphia may be known from the others by 
the absence of any letter-mark. 

Mint op trx UinriD Statu, 

Phii4U>slpbia, June, 1862. 

As a genera] rsfdy to Inquiries respecting the 
terms on which gdd bullion is received at the Mint 
for coinage, I have to state that gold is received In 
its various forms, whether native or manufactured. 
Of in foreign coin; but it is expected to be free 
from the earthy matters in which it is naturally 
found. The ordinary rule is, not to receive a less 
quantity than will amount to one hundred dollars; 
and in no case should the weight be less than five 
ounces (Troy or Apotllecaries' weight). 

The bullion is to be sent or delivered to the 
treasurer of the Mint, who weighs it in the pre- 
sence of the deipoAtQT or his agent, and gives a 
formal receipt therefor; which receipt, although It 
expresses no value, is a negotiable paper, and may 
be transferred by end(»w»iient The metal is then 
thcn-oughly mixed by melting. There is always ao 
unavoidable loss in that operation. An assay Is 
next made to determine the fineness, which is ex* 
pressed in thousandth parts. When this is known, 
with the weight after melting, we have the data 
for calculating the value. The standard of valua- 
tion Is, that 25 8-10 grains of gold, 900 thousandths 
(or nine-tenths) fine, are equal to one dollar; and 
whatever the fineness may be, it is brought to that 
standard by a calculation, and the value fixed ac- 
cordingly. As we use ounces and hundredths of 
an ounce In welg^ng bullion, the simplest terms 



of expression are 63.76 ounces, standard to 1000 
doUars; or 43 to 800 dollars. This is the rate at 
which our gold coins are minted. But in receiving 
gold bullion, there are in some cases small charges 
for refining, toughening, Ac, and for aeparatlo^ 
the silver, when that is requisite. There is also * 
uniform deduction of one-half of one per cent, tot 
coinage. 

Whenever silver is contained in gold boUioa 
offered, the value of it is added to the value of th* 
gold, provided it shall amount to one dollar 
upwards, after deducting the cost of parting. 

When the valuation is completed, w^^ich is 
ally on the day after the receipt of the bullion, a 
statement of the whde transaction is made by fill- 
ing up a blank fin-m, which is handed to the depo- 
sitor or his agent, and the proceeds paid at the tarn* 
time, if there are Treasury funds on hand, as Is 
ordinarily the case; when there is not, there Is a 
delay of a few days. At payment, the depositor (or 
his agent) surrenders the Mint receipt, with lils 
endorsement, and keeps the statement 

The foregoing is applicaMe to cases of deposit 
far coinage: but the depositor has an option of 
having his gold cast into bars or ingots of eithor 
pure metal or of standard fineness, as he may pre- 
fer, with a stamp upon the saaie designating ita 
weight and fineness; in which case he p^s a 
charge of six cents per hundred dollars. Instead of 
the one-4ialf of one per cent, charged for coinage^ 

Gold from Jewellers* shops, containing solder, la 
expected to be refined by fluxing with nitre hefbra 
it is offered at the Mint. 

The officers of the Mint cannot assume aoj 
agency for the owners of bullion, either in deposit- 
ing the same, or in collecting and rotuming tba 
proceeds. Parties at a distance who have no bual- 
ness connections in the city may avail thesnselvea 
of the agency of any of the express companies. 

The following are the regulations of the Mint in 
relation to the purchase of silVM- bnllioa fbr coin- 
age, the receipt of copper eents of the United States 
(O. S.) In exchange for cents of the new lasne, and 
the exchange of new cents for the gold and silver 
coins of the United States:— 

The Mint price of silver, heretofore 121 cents. Is 
now raised to 122^ cents per ounce of stantlsrd 
fineness, nie silver offered for purchaae wfll be 
weighed, melted, and assayed as usual, and the 
standard weight determined therefrom In ounces 
Troy to the one-hundredth part of an ounce. The 
receipt given at the first weighing mnst be pre^ 
sented by the seller, or his order. 

This direction will apply to the Mint at Pliila- 
delphia and the Assny Office at New York. 

The silver pnrchasod tbr coinage will be paid fisr 
in the silver c<rins of the United States, of less de- 
nomination than flie dollar. 



1803.] 



JBlSABVKY i>bpartment. 



ITl 



Fur the infonnation of the pabllc, it may be stated 
tkit, acoonfing to the abore rate of purehaie, the 
yield cf Tariom claaaes of cdn or bullion will be 

aboQtasfijUowB: — 

Fire-franc pieces. 08.0 cents each. 

Mexican and South American 

Mars. 106.3 « 

Old Spanish doUan. 106.1 ** 

fiefolotionary or ** hammered" 

ddlan (often mistaken for the 

true Spanish dollar) 101.2 " 

HatfdoUars of the U. S. coined 

before 183T : 62.2 « 

Tbe same since 1837 to the last 

dumgeafstandardinlSfiS. 62.6 <* 

flianish quarters. 23.6 ** 

" eighths 10.9 « 

" Buteenths 6.0 « 

Uexican <inarter8 26.3 ** 

• 

Qurtei^Uars are proportionally less prodnotiye 
of premiom, while dimes and halMimea, coined 
before 1837, hare lost rather mcn-e by wear, on an 
«T«nge, than the preminm would make up ; those 



coined since 1887 to 1863 will ayenige a premium 
of Are per eent on their nonttal malna. 

Qerman crowns 112.6 cents each. 

Swedish, Danish, and Norw^;ian 

crowns. 111^4 ** 

Old French crowns „. 118.0 <« 

German florins. 41.7 ** 

Prussian and Uanorerian ttialers 71.9 ** 
Fine silver, 136>^ cents per ounce. American plate, 

usual manufiicture, 120 to 122 cents per ounce. 

Genuine British plate, 12&j8 cents per ounce: 

The old copper cents of the United States are re- 
ceived at their nominal value, in even sums of five 
doHara and upwards, and cents of new issues given 
in exchange tiberefbr ; but no fractional part of that 
amount will be taken. 

Cents of the new issue will be given in exchange 
for atny of the gold or silver ocdns of the United 
States, or United -States legal tender notes. 

The reasonable expenses of tranqxntation of the 
new cents, in sums of twenty dollars and upwards, 
to any pohit accessible by railroad and steamboat, 
^vill be paid by the Mint Jamm Poixock, 

Director €^Vu Mint. 



ornoos of rax idRT at PHiLAniumiA. 



Salary. 

JmaPoUock, Dtrecfaw *5,600 

iichilaki Uclntyre, Treasurer. 2^ 

I«aiiR.BroomaU, CAfti^Cbiner 2,000 

J«obK.Eckfeldt, Atsayer. 2,000 

JMieBB.LQngacre, Engraver 2^000 



fialaiy. 

Jiunes G. Booth, MeUer and E^ner !^000 

W. £. Dubois, AtHaiant Auayer.. 1,600 

II. R. liinderman, Cki^ Clerk to Director...,, 1,800 
Robert Patterson, CM^ Clerk to Treofurer^. 1,800 



OFncEBS or thi bbancb at ban nuscisco. 



Salary. 

Bobert J.Stevens, Superintendents H&OO 

I).W.Cheeseman, Treasurer, 4,600 

Connd Wiegand, ^May«r 3^000 



William Schmolz, Cbiner. 8,000 

W. L. Denio, Mtlter and E^finer 3,600 



Salaty. 

<}Mrge F. Dunning, Superintendent $3^600 

John Torrey, Assayer .,.. 8,000 

Edward N. Kent, MeUer and E^ner. v 3,000 



AS8AT OmCEf nw TO&K. 

Salary. 

, AssUtant MeUer and E^ner 2,000 

Andrew Mason, Assistant Assayer.. 2^000 



SnxA&T Ezbhiit or thb Ck>ixAOX or tbk Mint and Bbahohsb^ to tu Gumi or m Txak unnra 

Jmrx 30, 1862. 



Untk 



I*k«tileJphl». 

8MPr»uei«co 

»«w Urieau (to Jan. 31, 1861).. . 

n"! f**^ (to Maieh 81 , 1861) ... . 
0«liloo«|» (t» FM. j8, 1861) 

Att7 0aM,Xtwlork 

To4al 



ft 

8| 
* 8 

BO 

a 



1798 
1864 
1838 
1838 
1888 
1864 



i. 

O 

o 



•404,928,878 36 

144.632.156 81 

40,381,615 00 

5.048,641 50 

6.121.819 60 

199,779,779 60 



9780^799,993 17 



•131,399.568 48 



3 


1 


•97.786,589 88 

2,375,582 71 

99,880,037 IS 


•2,788,473 66 








1,899,409 78 







•2,763,47856 



•Mxmm coof A«B. 



Pleoei. 



719.171,542 

18,264.739 

94,900,006 

1,206,964 

l,361,ia0 

8S,r 



828,959,874 



Yalm. 



•S05.417,M1 77 

146,807,689 59 

70,271,652 18 

5,048,641 60 

6,121,919 00 

131,179,176 >S 



•864,947,000 90 



m 



TBE HilTIOKAL ALMANAO. 



[1868. 



OoorAAB ov «■■ lint «v m Unm Bfusu, noit 17M; nraunxiw fBi OiocAw •» vm 
Unm noM mi CoMMsirciifBVT or thxik OriftAnoM ur 1886, ^09 or ihs Abut Orn 



Tmti. 


Gold. 


SitTnt. 


Copper. 


WhOLS CdlWAGt. 


Value. 


V«lu«. 


Value. 


No. of Piecee. 


Valve. 


1703-95 


171,485.00 


$370,663.90 


$11,373.00 


I'S**!? 


$453,641.80 


1796 


102,737^0 


79.077.60 


10,8^40 


1,219,370 


192,120.40 


1797 


103,422:50 


12,501^ 


9,510.34 


1,005,16} 


125,624.99 


1798 


905,6iaoa 


8»U9U» 


9,797.00 


1,868,941 


646,696.00 


1799 


213,285 jOO 


423,516jOO 


9^106.68 


1,36^681 


M5,90&6$ 


1800 


SITJOOiW 


224,296iM) 


29,379.40 


8^337,979 


671,83&A0 


1801 


43U70.00 


74,766.00 


13,028.37 


1,671.800 


510,056.37 


4808 


428410i00 


66,84&jOO 


34,422.83 


3,615,869 


616.075.83 


180S 


258,377.50 


87ai8J» 


25,203.03 


2.780,830 


870,60«.68 


1804 


258,642.50 


100 340.50 


12,844.94 


8,046,889 


«1.897J94 


1805 


170^57.50 


149,388.50 


13,483.48 


8,960,361 


888,S38j48 


1806 


321,505.00 


471,819.00 


5,960.00 


1,815,409 


8014)84X)0 


1807 


417,496.06 


807,448.76 


9,653.21 


2,731,345 


1,041,506.06 


1806 


284,666.00 


684,SOOjOO 


13,090.00 


8,935,888 


98Z055.00 


1809 


l99JBa&M 


707^6X)0 


8,001.53 


9,861,834 


884,762.63 


. 1810 


501,435.00 


688,773.50 


15,660.00 


3,066,418 


1,165.888^0 


1811 


497,935.00 


608,840.00 


2,495.95 


1,649,570 


l,108,74OJ06 


1813 


290,435.00 


814.029.50 


10,766j00 


9,761,646 


1,116,919100 


1818 


477,14X00 


690.951.60 


4,180jOO 


1,755,881 


M69,2i640 


1814 


77,270.00 


661,687.60 


3,578,30 


1,833,859 


642,636J0 


X8U 


3475.00 


17,308.00 




09,867 


90,483.00 


1816 




28,575.75 


n,2oo,a2 


8,888.135 


66,786lS7 


1817 




607,783.50 


30,484,00 


5,iri3,967 


647,967 J» 


1818 


242^94 V.06 


1,070,454JW 


31,07aOO 


5,537.084 


1,345,064.60 


1819 


25S,615.00 


1.140,000.00 


26,710.00 


5,074,723 


1.425,336.00 


1830 


1^19,039i)0 


601,680.70 


44.075.50 


6,492.509 


l,8a,786.90 


1821 


• 189;)25.00 


825.702.45 


3,890.00 


3,139.249 


1,018,977.45 


1822 


88,980.00 


805,800.60 


90,733.89 


3,813,788 


Ol5,60».fl0 


182S 


72,425.00 


895,550.00 




2,166.486 


Oe7,076JO6 


1824 


93,200.00 


U52,4nj» 


ii'oaoioo 


4,786,894 


l,866,9B7ilO 


1825 


150,385.00 


1,564,583.00 


14,926.00 


6478,760 


l,736JB4.00 


1826 


92,245.00 


2.002,090.00 


16,344.25 


6,774.434 


2,llo!e7V.3S 


1827 


IZhbO&M 


2,860,200jOO 


23,557 Jk2 


9,007,845 


3,024,342.32 


1828 


140,145.00 


1,575,600.00 


25,680.34 


6,196,853 


1,741.381.34 


1809 


296.717 JO 


1,994,578.00 


16^580.00 


7,674,501 


33)6,875Ji0 


1830 


6I3,105UM 


2,406,400X0 


17,115U)0 


8,357491 


3.928,473.60 


1831 


714,270.00 


8,175,600.00 


33,608.60 


11.792.284 


1832 


798,135.00 


2,570.000.00 


23,620.00 


9,128,387 


t,4Ol,O66J0O 


1833 


978,553.00 


2,750.000.00 


38,160jOO 


10,307,790 


87C6LnOiOO 


1834 


8,95L27v).00 


3,415,002.00 


19,151.00 


11,C37,C43 


7,38S.423J» 


1835 


2,186.175.00 


3.443,003.00 


30,4^0.00 


15,096342 


6,668,€67iW 


1836 


4,135,700J)0 


3,606,100.00 


23,100.00 


13,719.333 


7,7C4,930jOO 


1887 


1,118 335.00 


2,090,010.00 


66.583.00 


13,010,721 


3.299,898.00 


1838 


1,809.565.00 


2,815,250jOO 


6a|702XK) 


15.780,311 


4,178.543 jOO 


1839 


1,375,700.00 


2,008.630.00 


81,28a61 


11,811,591 


3,506,688.61 


1840 


1,630.802.00 


1,712,178.00 


24,Gf7.00 


10,658,240 


8,427,007.50 


1641 


1,102,197.50 


1,115,875.00 


15,073.67 


8,811.068 


8,233.046.17 


1842 


1,833170.50 


2,325,750.00 


28,833.90 


11,743,153 


4,182.764^ 


1843 


8,302,787.60 


8,723,250^)0 


91,288.90 


4,040,583 


ii,9a,8ao.To 


1644 


5,428,230.00 


2,235,550XN> 


93,087 J&2 


9,051,834 


7,687,767.53 


1845 


3,756.447.50 


1,873,900.00 


88,94SiH 


1,806.196 


6,668,506.54 


1846 


4,034,177.50 


2,558,580.00 


41,208.00 


10,133.515 


6,633,966^0 


1847 


90,221,385.00 


2,374,450.06 


61,836.69 


15,392,3U 


8S,657,6nX0 


1848 


3.775,512.50 


2,040,050jOO 


64.167.99 


12,649,790 


6.870.790^ 


1840 


0,007.761.50 


2,114.950.00 


41,064.33 


12,666,659 


1U64 005.63 


1850 


31,981,7.38.50 


1,866.1WjOO 


44^467.50 


14,588.220 


33,892.306.00 


1851 


62.611432.50 


774307.00 


00^.43 


23,701,958 


63,488.524JS 


1852 


56.8W,1S7.50 


090,410.X 


SO.C30.O4 


32.064.019 


57.896.23M4 


1853 


55 213.006.91 


9 077,571.00 


e7.o:>o.78 


76,484j063 


64,858,537.78 


1854 


52,004,595.47 


8.619.270.00 


43.G38<36 


44 645.011 


60.7A6J0S.83 


1855 


52.705.467.20 


3,501,245.00 


16.030.79 


16,997,807 


56.8UL732.00 


1856 


53,313.3'».S5 


5,190,f70.17 


27.106.78 


33.87^,966 


64.M7142J9 


1857» 


25.183.138.68 


l.f01 644.46 


C3,510.48 


19,410,547 


86.818.893.60 


1863+ 
1850f 


62,689,800.29 


8.238,287.77 


234,00040 


66.491,655 


61.3&7,0$8.06 


80,409,053.70 


6,833.681.47 


307,000X10 


63,650,.'i22 


87.660,665.17 


18601 
18614- 


2S,U7,38S.S5 


8,250.flB5.M 


842400JOO 


97a01,586 


27,030,018.61 


80.708.400.64 


2.8.^3.706.94 


101,660j00 


23,724,713 


83,603,7e7.£6 


Total. 


069,116.400.68 


128,159,481.97 


2,647,473,56 


800,662.475 


799933,368.14 



• for the six mootha ending Jane 80, 1857. 



t For the year ending June 90. 



«ie 













1, 


iiii|i| 




< 


1 IS i 

i 3 


IP ill 


1 III 


1 


1 ill 


1 


Hi 


1 Pill 


i 


- ^" s 


l"ll 


1 ill 


\ 


1 =1 1 




Iplii 


s itiituv, 

1 IIPS 


c s 

i i 


3 siss a 


#111 


1 ^iP 


1 ^ 


1 ii 


^ 


1 nn 




i^. 





174 



THK NATrOirAL ALMAKAC. 



flt&fiMxm or Dxponrt at tbs Ifiinr or tbx Unnxo Svay», t&b Bbarcr Mint, Sah Vrakceboo, asb 
Assay Owtvse, N£W York, saRHCO tax Fisoal Ybab smdiko Jonj: 3i>, 1862. 



Description of Bullion. 


Mint U. 8.. 
PhUadelphia. 


Branoh Mint, 
San Franciaco. 


Assay Office, 
New York. 


Total. 


nnld— Fine Bsrfl. i.^^^.......... ■..•.... ....... . 


$24,172,886 33 

1,435.880 46 

336,302 24 

75,973 04 

199,846 38 

16,112 33 






$24.172385 33 


TT 8 Bullion « 


$15,764,262 96 


$13,786,439 83 

4.836 00 

233.244 00 

9,685.280 UO 

985,112 00 

$24,694,911 83 


30.976.603 24 


TAH»AllArfl* ftftrfl .L 


391,138 24 




309.217 04 


Foreiflm Ck>iu.««.«*»»«..«*.»««*>.««-« •• 


4^400 00 
333.960 00 


9,933^526 38 


Foreign Bullion 


1.33^184 33 


Tot&I Gold .»,,.,.,tt..r.t"TT— T--t-t— T- r- 


$26,287,009 77 


$16,136,622 96 


$67,118,644 56 






fiilver^piiiA Bnre.. 


$1,620,143 36 
37,202 19 
.18,334 31 
75,804 18 
77.aB05 
6,839 87 




$958 00 

62055 00 

244.816 00 

.«n,604 00 

9r2,019 04 

180.500 00 


$1,621,101 36 


jAwellera* Bars • •• 




99.257 19 


IT. 8. Bullion 


$749,114 14 


1.032.264 45 


fAreim Ooin 


109,406 18 


• 


1,049,302 09 


Foreign Bullion 




187330 87 


Totftl Silye* 


$1,865,606 96 


$749,114 14 


$1,493,952 04 


$4,098,673 14 






Total Gold and Silver 


$28,142,616 73 


$16,885,737 10 


$26,188.863 87 


$71,217,217 70 


Leu Re-4epoaita at diflTerent Inititutione (Gold $24,172,885 33^ SUrer $1,621,101 36) -.. 


$25,793,986 69 










$45,423^1 01 



Statxkbnv or ths CoiirAOE at tbx Mnrr or thx UNim States, tbs Bxavob llnrT, Saxt F&ancdoo, Ain» 
Assay Otfiok, Nxw Yobk, suuNa thi Fiscal Ysab xmpiko Juirs 30, 1862.* 



Denominatiott. 


Mint of the U.S., Phi- 
ladelphia. 


Branch Mint. Ban 
Francisco. 


Assay Office, 
New Yorli. 


TotaL 


Gold. 

Double eagles 

1EAr1«fl ..., 


Pieces. 

1,052,375 

79,299 

639.432 

5,785 

1,213,249 

l,799.2'i9 


Value. 

$21,047,500 00 

792.990 00 

3,197,160 00 

17.355 00 

3,133.122 50 

1,799.259 00 

49,421 61 


Pieces. 

760.000 
18.000 
18.000 

"'"ioi'ooe 


Value. 

$16^200.000 00 

180.000 00 

90.000 00 


Value. 


Pieces. 

1.812.375 

97,299 

657,432 

5,785 

1.283.249 

1.799,259 


Value. 

$96,247,569 00 

972.990 09 

3,287.169 09 

17,366 00 

3,208,122 59 

. 1.799.259 09 

16,144,190 00 




Haif-eaKlas.. .......... 




ThrAA«dollAirL .*. 




Qnarter-eagles. 


75,000 00 












$16,094,768 44 








Total Gold 


4.829,399 


$30,036,808 11 


826.000 


$15,545,000 00 


$16,094,768 44 


5,655,300 


$61,676,576 55 






SilTor. 
















Doll&n...^ 


1,750 
2,391350 
2.803.750 
1,364.650 
2,352,550 
608.550 


$1,750 00 

1,195.675 00 

700,937 50 

136,455 00 

117,627 50 

18,256 50 

1,797 79 


1,179.500 
120.000 
219,500 


589.750 00 
30.000 00 
21,950 00 




1.750 
3,570.850 
2.923,750 
1.584.050 
2.352360 
608,560 


$1,790 00 


Half-dollarii 




1.786.426 09 


Quarter-dollan 

Dimes 




730.937 60 




168.406 09 


HAlfwlimM ,..„ 




117.62r 60 


Three-cents •• 






18La$ 60 


Bars 


•■•«•••••••• 


1.278 65 


$415,603 57 


418^689 01 


Total Silirer....M.».. 


9,522.500 


$2,172,489 29 


1,519^000 


$642.978 66 


415,603 67 


11,041,600 


$3,231,081 61 


Gents 


11,600.000 


116,000 00 








11,600,000 


$116^000 00 












Total coinage.... 


25,951,899 


$32,274,088 00 


2345,000 


$16,187,978 65 


$16,510,372 01 


28,296.899 


$66^023.658 06 



* The branoh mints at Charlotte, N.C.. Dahlonega. Qs., and New Orleans. La., being in the disloyal States, 
coinage and deposits of precious metals for account of the GoTemment of the United States were disoontiiiued 
in them in the spring of 1861. 



1863.] 



TEBABtmY DBPART^MBHT. 



176 



BTATman op OolD Ain> BrL7aL ov I>oifX8nc PiuwireTtoif mp obi m ^ Af nr* Mnn* of Tm tTimnB 
States, Brakch Miirr Bait Fbanguoo, akd Assat Oppxcb Nkw Tobk, vuximo vbb Fuoai Year 

SNDIKG JUNS 30, 1862. 



Description of Bullion. 



Gold— California ^ 

Colorado • 

North Carolina 

Georgia. 

Washington Territory 

Vermont 

Nevada * 

New Mexico 

Ariiona 

Santa Fe 

Virginia. 

Sooth Carolina 

Oregon 

Parted from Silver 

Total Gold 

SQver— Lake Superior. 

Nevada 

California. ..~~ 

Ariiona 

Parte d from Domestic Gold 

Total Sflver ^ 

IMal Gold and Silver of Domes. Produo. 



Mint of the U.S. 
Philadelphia. 



$244,259 81 

l,122,a3S BO 

81 38 

135 40 

2U70 



68.664 66 



$1,435390 45 



$12,597 38 
3,618 37 



22,118 56 



$38,334 31 



$1,474,224 76 



Braneh Mint, 
San iVaaciBoo. 



$14,029,759 95 
680 00 






13.000 00 










888,000 00 
822,823 01 


$15,754,362 96 




$655,211 23 




93,902 91 


$749,114 14 



$16,503,377 10 



Assay Office, 

New York. 



$12,580,647 83 

912.403 OU 

2,232 UO 

1.469 00 

'3,'293"(Hi 

4(»,846 00 

1.283 00 

391 00 

260 00 

316 00 

2,065 00 

205 00 

241,029 00 



$13,786,439 83 



$8,769 00 

98,617 00 

6,2B4eO 

105 00 

129,101 00 



$244,816 00 



$14,061,255 83 



Total. 



$26,854,667 59 

2.035.416 50 

2,.<)13 38 

1,604 40 

215 70 

3.293 00 

53,846 00 

1,283 00 

39100 

260 00 

316 00 

2.065 00 

888,2(15 00 

1,132.716 67 



$30,976,093 24 



$21,366 38 

757,416 60 

8,224 00 

105 00 

245,122 47 



$1,032,264 45 



$32;008;8S7 69 



ScuuKT ExHiBrr of ¥Hi Ektire Dxposrrsr or Dokestto Gold at trb Uiotsd States Mint aiid 

Branohes, to Juki 90, 1862. 



\ 



Mist. 


Parted from 
silver. 


Virginia. 


V. Carolina. 


S. Carolioa. 


Georgia. 


Alabama. 


Tennessee. 


Califtrmla. 


PkHtdelphia. 
&Fruciaco. 


$68,864 66 
822.823 Ol 


$1,538,485 41 


$4,440,906 29 


$540,467 00 


$2,486,089 72 


$55,036 76 


$86,403 88 


$290,505,676 12 

144.197,754 15 

2X,2.'»6.24088 

87.321 01 

1,236,016 60 

129,863,657 05 


lh»0M«ant. 




74100 

4,520,730 79 

99,58519 

62,029 07 


"V«,2iT6o 

460,628 34 

811.242 81 

24,519 29 


41,241 00 


77,94868 


2,888 12 


n&ikxte.... 






Dthtonega... 






4,310,45961 
121,338 28 


69,629 92 
6,720 62 


42,119 75 


AatyOSoe. 


241,029 00 


20,320 00 






Total 


$1,132,716 67 


$1,558,805 41 


$9,113,994 34 


$1,352,969 44 


$6,909,128 61 


$196,330 83 


$81,406 75 


$528,145,665 91 



Hint. 


Colorado. 


Utah. 


Arizona. 


Nebraska 


N. Mexico. 


Oregon. 


Nevada. 


Other 

sources. 


Total. 


nilaMpHk. 

8. rrtnciaeo. 


$2,07«,678 eS 

«W00 

S,4S7a0 


$1;507 96 


$8,048 37 


$1,402 01 


$48,67200 


$63,625 16 
888.000 00 


$13,00066 


$41,670 70 


$241,858,532 67 

145.922,257 16 

22,404.998 74 

6.068,576 14 

6.117.913 95 


Nov nri^na. 










7,29000 


ChttlMte.... 














DahlMiega... 


67,768 84 
2,614,494 00 


14614 

78,414 00 












95100 
32,821 00 


Amj Offlee. 


18,452 00 




8,267 00 


11,833 00 


40,846 00 


133,133.730 31 






Total 


$4,75S,0«9 67 


$80,067 10 


$21,60037 


$1,402 01 


$tt,92909 


$963,46616 


«$lt3,64600 


$82,782 70 


$564,606,002 97 



176 



THB 9ATI09AL ALMAHAO* 



[IBM. 



BPAinn AX* IfKfiftAW Dokub 
nspiMiTss AT TUK MiMT OT Tsi UaxTiD BsMxm, roft ]tftCHA]i«c ioft THB Nsw Cekt, to Jvim 30, 1660. 



1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 , 

Total. 



$78,295 

68,644 

ni,&f9 

18*2,330 



8440,858 



188,148 
64,472 

100,080 
51,630 



8340,830 



816,602 
32.085 
41,030 
84,106 



8114,182 



TalmbyTU*. 



fl28,04S 
165,201 
288^W 
2S8g06S 



1814^0 



fiiATSMnrr or tbk Amouitt or Tluonon or Tat SrAxnB Aire ltaiCA9 Dollab ruBCHAsiD at trb 
MiBT or TAB Umrbo Btatbi, THB Bbaxch Mxht, Kbw Oblbabb, abb Absat OmcB, liBir TOBK, TO 
JUBI 80, 1863. 



Tean. 


U. 8. MlDt, 
PhilBdelpliiB. 


Brmnch Mint, Hew 
Orleans, to 31 Jan. *61. 


AeaarOfllce, 
Mew York. 


TMal. 




8174,488 00 

826,033 00 

165,115 00 

58,353 74 

86,672 05 

20,585 95 


$1,800 00 

17,355 00 

19,825 00 

9,075 00 

5,680 00 


$112,502 00 

147,458 00 

110,564 00 

62,072 00 

10,474 00 

11,401 00 


$288J847 00 


1858 

IgflO 


490341 00 
295^504 00 
121^900 74 

62,726 Oft 
81,966 96 












$781,141 74 


$58,295 00 


$154,466 00 


$1,288,905 74 



IMUB UMWai T BB AT TBI URIBB BTAlBi MlXT B 
GBHTB or TBB NBW iBKOMt 10 JUBB 80^ 1802. 
Tear. ▼■iMtyTtfa. 

1857 $16k60S 

1868 81*404 

185$.........^.... 47,286 

1860 -.. ~ 87,500 

18;Jl 96,245 

1862 63,865 

Total : $281,351 



IilBt Of Modal Diet of a Poblio Oharftotor in the Xlnt of the TTnited 8t«t«% 
^rvm wki^ MtedidM ufUl betirudc,althe omneMd r<Ua^J^ $oektie$ a>^ 

BRONZE MEDALS, 

(Pajm«ai to be wuM lo C«la t Ualtol Butoa >•••■.) 



1 

a 

8 

4 
5 

6 

7 

8 

9 



Medal Die*. 



NATIONAL HSDALS. 
Armg. 

WAsmitoroy before Botton..... 

MAJOBrQatMAL Oates, for Sa- 
ratoga. 

Gxxbral Moboan, for Cowpeni 

JoHB Baobb Howabb, fbr dow 

OoLovn. William Wabhibotob, 
for Cowpent 

00L09BL Obobob Cboohab, for 
flandiiflky 

Major-Gbubbal Habbibob, for 
the Thamee 

GoTKBBOB Isaac Bbblbt, for 
the Thainefl 

Majob-Gbxbbal flcorr. fbr Chip- 
pewa and Niagara. 



8tM. 


Piloci 


42 


1 
83 00 


84 
85 
28 


200 
200 
900 


28 


200 


40 


200 


40 


200 


40 


200 


40 


2 00 i: 



10 

u 

12 
U 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



M«dalDi««. 



MAJOB<3BBBBAI.aAXBBa,for Fort 

Erie. ~ 

Major-Obhbbai. Fobtbb, for 

Chinwwa, Niagara, and Erie.. 
BIajobObbbbal Bbowb, for 

Chippewa, Niagpwa. and Brie.. 
Bbigaukb-Qehebal Uillbk, for 

Chippewa, Nlaffun, and Brie.. 

BBiaAniB»08BBBAL RiPIXT, for 

Chiniewa, Niagara, and Brie.. 
Ma/obObkbbal Macomb, for 

Battle of Plattetnug 

Maiob^xbebal Jacksoh, for 

Battle of New Orleans 

MAJOB-GBBDl«LTATLOR,for Pttlo 

Alto and Reeaca de la Palnia.. 

Major-Gkhbbal Tatlor, for 

Monterey 



8lM. 


rnca. 


40 


$2 00 


40 


200 


40 


260 


40 


200 


40 


260 


40 


200 


40 


200 


40 


200 


40 


206 



lees.] 



TRfiASUBY DEPARTHBNI^ 



177 



Xdst of Medal Dies of a Fublio CSuuraoter in the Hint of fhe United States. 

(CoBtjuned.) 



No. 

19 
20 



Medal Dies. 



21 

:22 



23 
21 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
» 

n 

82 
33 
34 

35 

88 

sr 

88 

89 



Major-Oen£Kal Taylor, for 
BiienA Vista 

Major-Genxral Scott, for Vera 
Cruz, Cerro Gordo, €k>ntr6nui, 
SanAntonio,and Chnmbiuco, 
MoUno del Rey, CSiapaltepec.. 

Navy. 

JoHK Paul Joifzs, for Serapis... 

CAPTAnr Tbom AS Tbuxvon, for 
the Action with the French 
Frigate L'lnsnrgeute 

Captain Hull, for Capture of 
the Guerriere 

Captaik Jacob Jones, for Cap- 
ture of the Frolic 

Captain Dkoatub, for CApture 
of the Macedonian « 

Captain Bainbridos, for Cap- 
ture of the Java 

Captain Lawrence, for Capture 
of the Peacock 

Captain BumRows, tat Captare 
<tf tlie Boxer 

Lieutenant AfcGALL, for Cap- 
ture of the Boxer 

Captain Psrrt, for Capture of 
the British Fleet on Udce Erie 

Captain Bixion, for Capture of 
the British Fleet on LalEe Erie 

Captain Warrington, for Cap- 
ture of the Epervier 

Captain Bi^kbi.t, for Capture 
of the Reindeer 

Captain MacOonouoh, for Cap- 
ture of the British Fleet on 
lAke Cbamplain -. 

Captain Hexlet, for Capture 
of the British Fleet on Lake 
Cbamplain 

Lbutinant Gassin, fbr Ci4>ture 
of the British Fleet on Lake 
Qiamplain 

Captain Biddle, for Capture of 
the Penguin 

Captain Stewart, for Capture 
of the Gyane and Levant..*.. 

MISCELLANEOtrS NATIONAL. 

Kbscux of Ofpicers and Crew of 
the n.8. Brio Somerb 



Sixe. 



56 

66 

86 

35 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



40 

40 
40 
40 



Price. 



$3 00 

800 
250 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



40 2 00 



2 00 

200 
200 
200 



No. 



36 200 



40 

41 
42 

48 
44 

45 



46 
47 
43 

49 
50 
61 
62 
63 
64 
66 
66 
67 
58 



50 

60 
61 

62 



68 

64 



65 



66 
67 
68 
69 
70 



Hed»l Dies. 



Captain Inoraham , for the Res- 
cue of Martin Kozta 

Shtpwreck Medal 

U.S. Coast Suryet, for Oal- 
buitry and Humanity 

Japanesb Ebebasst Medal 

Br. Frederick Rose, for Skill 
and Humanity 

Allegiance Msdal. 

PRESIDENTIAL MEDALS. 

Thokas Jepfbrson 

James Madison 

Jambs Monrob 

John Quinct Adams 

Andrew Jackson 

Martin Tan Burxn. 

John Ttlbr 

Jambs K.Polk 

Zacbart Taylor 

Millard Fillmorb 

Franklin Pierce 

James Buchanan 

Abraham Lincoln 



Size. 



SUB-NATIONAL MEDALS. 

Captain Pbrrt (State of Penn. 
sylvania,) for the Capture of 
the British Fleet,on Lake Erie 

Pbnnstlvania Volunteers, Ac- 
tion on Lake Jbie 

Majo»Oenbbal Scott (Com- 
monwealth of Virginia) 

MISCELLANEOUS AMERICAN. 

Colonel Armstrong, for De- 
struction of the Indian Vil- 
lage of Kittanning ;. 

Indian Peace Mkdau 

Captains Gbxiohton, Low, and 
Stoupfer, Wreck of Steamer 
San Francisco 

Dr. Hosack 

WASHINGTON MEDALS. 

Prbsimnct BxLINQUISHBDm*.... 

The Cabinet Medal 

Time Increases His Fame 

Commencement of Cabinet 

Small Head of Washington.. 



64 

40 

21 
48 

48 
18 



47 

40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
48 
48 



Prioe. 



40 
40 
56 



27 

27 



47 
21 



25 
37 
16 
12 
11 



13 60 

200 

1 OO 

2 50 

800 

25 



2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



50 

00 
00 
OO 
00 
00 
2 00 
200 
00 
00 
00 
2 50 
2 50 



2 
2 
2 



200 
20a 

80O 



1 60 

150 



250 
26 



1 50 
200 
60 
26 
26 



Note.— The diameter of the Medals is expressed by numbers, each of which indicates the sixteenth 
rf an inch. 



FINE QOLD MEDALS, 

(Pajment to be made in Gold Coin.) 



Medal Diei. 



Time Ixcbe.\se8 His Fame 

Commencement op Cabinet 

ItocBLE Head— Washington and Jackson 

BisouB Head 

(Bbt op Gold Proof Coins of the year 1862... S43 00) 

12 




178 



THB KATIOKAL ALHAKAC. 



[186a 



FINS SILVER MEDALS. 

(Pftyvcnt to be mtdc la OoM «r Silver Cela.) 



OAnnrrr Mioal 

Pb£sid£kct KeuxauiaasD 

Allsouxci Mkdal ^ ~ 

Tuia lircR&iuupi Ui8 ¥amm ^ 

OoMMKaiOBMBVT Of CaBIKBT.^ 

Double IIead— Washimoton amp Jackbok ..; 

8I90LB HXAD « 

<8rr or Siltkk axd C£xt l>Roor Coins of the year 1802 .43 00} 



SIse. I Priec. 



37 


f3 00 


25 


3 00 


IS 


1 12 


16 


75 


12 


S5 


10 


25 


10 


20 



OOIVB. 



dm. 



(Latin, centum.) The one>baii<)redth part of a 
dpllar. A coin of the United States, weighing 
•erenty-two gnUne, and compoeed of eigfaty-eigfat 
per centum of copper, and tweWe of nickel. Act 
^Rb. 21, 1857, <fcf. 4. {Su Vol. 11, Statutes at 
Large^ pp. 163, 164.) 

Previone to the Act of Congroaa Jnet cited, the 
cent wae compoeed wholly of copper. By the Act 
of April 2, 1792 (Stat, at Lar., vol. 1, p. 218), the 
weight of the cent waa fixed at eleven penny- 
vcightB, or 26i grains; the half-cent in propor- 
tion. Afterwards, namely, on the Uth of Janu- 
ary, 170S, it was reduced to 208 grains; the half- 
cent in proportion (Stat, at Lar., vol. 1, p. 293). 
In 1796 (Jan. 26), by the proclamation of Presi- 
dent Washington, who was empowered by law to 
do so (Act of March 3, 1796, sect. 8, SUt. at Lar., 
▼ol. 1, p. 4M)), the cent was reduced in weight to 
108 grains; the half-cent in proportion. It re- 
mained at this weight until the passage of the Act 
of Feb. 21, 1857. The same act directs that the 
coinage of half-cents shall cease. The first issue 
of cents Ax>m the national mint was in 1703, and 
has been continued erery year since, except 1815. 
But in 1791 and 1T92 some experimental pieces 
were struck, among which were the so called 
Washington cents of these years, now so mnch 
•ought fur by collectors of coins. 

IlAur-CBirt. 

A copper coin of the United States. This coin 
was authorized by resolution of Congress, passed 
July 0, 1785, as follows .—" Resolved, That the 
smallest coin be of copper, of which two hundred 
shall pass fbr one dollar." It was first issued 
under the act of the 2d of April, 1792, by which 
act the weight of the coin was fixed at 104 grains. 
In 1796, It was reduced, by the proclamation of 
President Washington, under a law of that year, 
to 94 grains; at which rate it was continued to be 
coined until the passage of the act of Feb. 21, 1857, 
by which it was directed that the coinage of the 
half-cent shall cease. The first halfcents were 
iMved in 1798, tlM last in lasr. 



Ddo. 



(Latin, Deetmy ten.) A silTer edn of the rnited 
States ; ralne of ten cents, or one-tenth of the dol- 
lar. The act of 1702 provided for the ooioago td 
^ Dismes, each to be of the value of one-tenth of a 
dollar, or unit, and to contain thlrty-aevan grams 
and two.«lxteenth parts of a grain of pare, or &>rty- 
one grains and tfareo*fifth parts of a grain of stand* 
ard silver" (vie.: 892.4 thousandths fine). See 
Act of April 2, 1792, sect. 9 (Stat, at Iju^ voU 1, 
p, 2A8.) Dimes were first regularly isaved from 
the mint in 1796. The standard flneiicss ce* 
malned unchanged until 18S7, when ft was al- 
tered to nine-tenths,— -nine parts to be of pure 
silver, and one of copper, the dime to wei^ 
forty-one and one-fourth grains. Act of Jan. 1^ 
1837, Sections 8 and (SUt. at Lar., voL «, p. 137). 
The act of 1883 provided " That fhrni and aftsr the 
first day of June, eighteen hundred and fitty-two 
[three], the weight of the half-dollar, or piece of 
fifty cents, shall be one hundred and niuety-two 
grains, and the quarternlollar, dime, and haif- 
dimo shall be, respectively, one-hali; one-fifth, and 
one-tenth of the weight of said halMoIlar.'* (Act 
of Feb. 21, 1853, sees. 1 and 2, Stat at Lar., vol. 
10, p. 160.) The weight of the dime coined siaos 
the passage of the last-dted act, consequently, is 
38.4 grains; and by the same act it la made a legal 
tender in payment of debts lor all sums not ax« 
caeding five dollars. 

HAir-Dixs. 

A silver coin of the United States, of the rains 
of five^ents, or the one-twentieth part of a doIUr. 
It weighs nineteen grains and two-tenths uf s 
grain ; equal to four-hundredths of an oance Troy, 
and is of the fineness of nine hundred thonsandths; 
nine hundred parts being pure silver, and one bna- 
dred {larts copper. The fluoness of the coin is pre- 
scribed by the 8th section of the genera] mint law, 
passed Jan. 18, 1887 (Statutes at Lai^, vol 5. p. 
137). The weight of the coin Is fixed by the lit 
section of the act of Feb. 21« 1858 (Stat, at Lar., 
vol« 10, p. 100). The second seeUoB of this Isst- 
cHed act directs that silver coins lasaad in ca«. 



fB6».] 



"'rttBA^ltftY • l^BPARTMBNT. 



179 



fonnity to that act shall be a legal tender in pay- 
ment of debts for all snms not exceeding fire dol- 
lan. This proTision applies to the halfdoUar, and 
all niver coins below that denomination. The first 
eeinage of halMimes was in 1793. A few half 
** dismce,'' with a likenees of Mrs. Washing^n, the 
wife of the President, upon the obverse of the coin, 
were issned In 1792, but they were not of the regu- 
lar coinage. 

DOLI.AB. 

(Erom German Thcder.) 1. The money unit of 
the United States. Established uadA the Confede^ 
ration by resolution of OongMes, July 6, 1786. 
This was originally represented by a silver piece 
only; the coinage of which was authorized by the 
act of Congress of Aug. 8, 1786. The same act also 
established a decimal system of coinage and ac- 
connts (Laws of the United States, Bioren ADuane, 
vol. I, p. 646). But the coinage was not efTected 
until after the passage of the act of April 2, 1702, 
establishing a mint (Stat.- at Lar., vol. 1, p. 246), 
and the first coinage of dollars commenced In 
1794. The law last cited provided for the coinage 
of <* dollars or units, each to be of the value of a 
Spanish milled dollar, as the same was then cur- 
reat, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one 
gndna and four-sixteenth parts of a grain of pure 
rilver,or four hundred and sixteen grains of stand- 
ard aflver." 

2. The Spanish dollar known to onr legislation, 
was the dollar coined in Spanish America, north 
and south, which was "abundant in our currency, 
ifl contradistinction to the dollar coined in Spain, 
which was rarely seen in the United States. The 
intrinsic value of the two coins was the same; but, 
as a general (not invariable) distinction, the Ame- 
rican coinage bore piUarf^ and the Spanish an 
eecatcheon or shield: all kin^ bore the royal 
effigy. 

3. The nvQUd dollar^ so called, is in contradis- 
tinction to the irregular, misshapen coinage nick- 
named cob, which a century ago was executed In 
the Spanish- American provinces ; chiefly Mexican. 
By the use of a milling ifiachine the pieces were 
ftgored on the edge, and assumed a true circular 
fenn. The pillar dollar and the milled dollar 
were in effect the same in value, and, in general 
terms, the same coin ; though there are pillar dol- 
lars (" cobs") which are not milled, and there are 
milled dollars (of Spain proper) which have no 
pillars. 

4. The weight and fineness of the Spanish milled 
and pillar dollars is eight and one-half pieces to a 
Otstilian mark, or 417} ? grains '^yoy. The limitar 
tionof 415 grains in our law of 1806, April 10 (Stat, 
at Lar., vol. 2, p. 374), wa« to meet the loss by wear. 
The legal finen^s of these dollars was ten dinoros, 
twenty graoos, equal to 902j thousandths; the 
actual fineness was somewhat variable, and always 
below. The Spanish dollar and all other foreign 
coins are ruled out by the act of Congress of Fob. 
fl,1867 (Stat, at Lar., 1856-7, p. 163), they behig no 



longer a legal tender, fiut the statements herein 
given are useflil for the sake of comparison ; more- 
over, many contracts still in existence provide for 
payment (of ground-rents, for example) in Spanish 
milled or pillar dollars. The following terms, or 
their equivalent, are - frequently used in agree- 
ments made about the close of the last and the 
beginning of the present centnry : ** silver milled 
dollars, each dollar weighing 17 dwt. and 6 grain* 
at least.'* This was equal to 414 grains. Th9 
standard fineness of United States silver coin from 
1792 to 1836 was 1485 paits fine silver in 1664. 
Consequently, a piece or coin of 414 grains should 
contain 369]^ grains pure silver. The market 
price of silver, based on the mint price, is now 
122^ cents in gold per ounce of 480 grains 
standard, t.e. nine-tenths fine. This is equiva- 
lent to 122^ cents for 432 grains of pure silver. 
Then by the rule of proportion, fis 432 is to 122}^, 
so Is 3(^]^ to (say) $1.04iVu; which is conse> 
quently the value of the silver dollar referred to^ 
" each dollar weighing 17 dwt. and 6 grains at 
least." 

5. By the act of January 18, 1887, Sect. 8 (Stat, 
at Lar., vol. 5, p. 137), the standard weight and 
fineness of the dollar of the United States was 
fixed as follows : " of one thousand parts by weight, 
nine hundred shall be of pure metal, and one hun^ 
dred of alloy," the alloy to consist of copper; and 
it was fhrther provided that the weight of the 
silver dollar 'shall be four hundred and twelve and 
a half grains (412^X. 

6. The weight of the silver dollar has not been 
changed by subsequent legislation ; but the pro- 
portionate weight of the lower denomination of 
silver coins has been diminished by the act of Feb. 
21, 1863 (Stat, at Lar., 1852-3, p. 160). By this act 
the half-ilollar (and the lower coins in proportion) 
is reduced in weight 14^ grains below the pre- 
vious coinage ; so that the silver dollar which was 
embraced in this act weighs 28J^ grains more 
than two half-dollars. The silver dollar has, con- 
sequently, ceased to be current in the United 
States ; but it continues to be coined to supply the 
demands of the West India trade and a local d«* 
mand for cabinets, kc. 

7. By the act of March 3, 1849, a gold dollar waa 
authorized to be coined at the mint of the United 
States and the several branches thereof^ conform- 
ably in all respects to the standard of gold coins 
now established by law, except that on the rer 
verse of the piece the figure of the eagle shall be 
omitted. It is of the weight of 25.8 grains, and of 
the fineness of nine hundred thousandths. 

8. Tlie dollar of gold or of silver is a legal tender 
in the payment of debts tcany amount. 

Half-Douar. 

A silver coin of the United States, of the value 
of fifty cents. 

1. The act of Congress of April 2, 1792 (Sect. 9) 
provided for the coinage of halMoUan, each to be 



180 



XHB NATIOHAL ALMANAC. 



t}m^ 



«f hftlT the TAlna of the dolUr or oiiit, and to con- 
Uin one Uundred aad oigbty-flTe gnioB and ton- 
■Ixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or two hundred 
and eight gratnd of Htandard silver (Stat, at Lar., 
Tol. 1, p. 318). Under this law the fineness of the 
fUver coins of the United States was 892.4 thou- 
sandths of pure silver. 

2. The weight and fineness of the silver coins 
were somewhat changed by the act of January 18, 
1837 (SUt. at Lar., vol. 6, p. 137), the weight of 
the half-dollar being by thU act fixed at 20<^ 
grains, and the flnaness at 900 thousandths ; con- 
forming, in respect to fineness, with the coinage 
of France and most other nations. 

3. The weight of the half-dollar was reduced by 
the act of February 21, 18&3 (SUt. at Lar, vol. 10, 
p. 160), to 102 grains, at which rate it continues to 
be issued, — the standard fineness remaining the 
same. 

4. The half-dollars coined under the acts of 1702 
and 1837 (1 and 2, as above) are a legal tender at 
their nominal value In payment of debts to any 
amount. Those coined since the passage of the 
act of February 21, 1863, are a legal tender in pay- 
ment of debts for all sums not exceeding five dol- 
lars (sect. 2). The silver coins struck in the year 
1853, under this last-cited act, may be distin- 
glUshad from the others of that year by the arrow- 
heads on the right and left of the date of the piece. 
Xn 1864, and subsequent years, the arrow-heads 
•re omitted. 

QUAKTIft-DoiULV. 

A silver coin of the United States, of the yalue 
of twentytflve cents. 

2. Previous to the act of Feb. 21, 1863, c. 70 (SUt. 
•t Lar., ToL 10, p. 100), the weight of the quarter- 
dollar was one hundred and three and one^ighth 
(rains; but the coins struck since the passage of 
that act are of the weight of ninety-six grains. 
The fineness was not altered by the act cited ; of 
one thoosaad parts, nlna hundred are pore silver 
•ad one handred alkqr. Quarter-dollars issued 
befora Febmary, 1863, are a logal Under to any 
«Boant ; thoae oolnad since thi^ period are a legal 
tender in paymsnt of debU for sums not axceed- 
ing five doUari. 

Vide HALf-DoiXAi,-— in which tha change in the 
veigfct of aUver coins is more folly noticed. 

Eagle. 

A gold coin of the United Sutes, of the value of 
teo doUara. It weighs two hundred and fifty- 
•Ight grains, of standard fineness ; that Is to s^, 
of o«e thousand parU by weight, nine hundred 
iriiall be of pure metal and one hundred of alloy, 
the alloy consisting of silver and copper. (For pro- 
portion of alloy In gold coins of the United SUtes 
flinee 1863, sea article Halt-Saalb.) For all sums 
whaUrer the eagle is a legal tender of payment 
Ibrtendolhirs. (Act of Jan. 18, 1837, sect. 10^ SUt. 
^ter^Tol 6, p. 138.) 



Poinu Xaau. 



A gold cala of the United 8tatas,of tka «al«a of 
tvanty dollara or units. It is so eailad toeatiae il 
is twice tha ▼alue of the eagle, and oonae%ncotly 
weighs five hundred and sixteen graina of 
ard fln«Deas, nainely, nine hundred 
fine. It is a legal tender for twenty doUan 
amount. (Aetof Marok3, 1840, 8«at.nt 
0, p. 307.) The double eagle is the 
issued in the United Rates, and of greater 
than any now issued In any odker coontky, 
tlie oban of JtB/mm, which, howarer, partaken 
of the eharaotsr of a bar of gold tiuuinooitt. 
first iasoa of the donble oaglaeraa nHle te 
FSrfeKAOU; Halp*Sm>U. 




A gold coin of the United SUtes, of the rulne of 
five dollars. Tlie weight of the piece la one huu- 
drod and twenty-nine grains of standard finenesf, 
namely, nine hundred thousandths of pure gold, 
and one hundred of alloy of silver and copiior** 
** provided that the silver do not exceed one-half 
of the whole alloy." (Act of Jan. 18, 1837, Stat, at 
Lar., vol. 6, p. 130.) As the proportion of sitrer 
and copper Is not fixed by law further tb^n to 
prescribe that the silver therein shall not exceed 
fifty In every thousand parU, the proportion wss 
made the subject of a special instruction by Hr. 
Snowden, the late Director of the Mint, as follows:— 

" As it is highly imporUpt to secure uniformity 
In our gold coinage, all deposits of native guH or 
gold not previously refined, sliould be as8a3-«d fjf 
silver, without exception, and refined to from 990 
to 003, say averaging 001 as near as may be. 
When any of the deposiU prove tu be 990, or finer, 
they should be reserved to be mixed with the re- 
fined gold. The gold coin of the Mint and its 
branches wUl then be nearly thus: gold, 900; sil- 
ver, S', copper, 02; and thus a greater uniformity 
of color will be attained than was heretofore sc- 
complished.** 

The instructions on this point were prescribed 
by the Director in September, 1863. Uint J^trngK- 
Ut; **LutruetM7U rdativt to the Butineu q/'ti^ 
ifinC p. 14. 

For all sums whatever the half-eagle is a legal 
tender of payment of five dollars. (Sect. 10, act cff 
Congress above cited, p. 138.) The first issues of thVi 
coin at the Mint of the United SUtea were in 1795. 

QrAftTKR-CAOLI. 

A gold coin of the United SUtes, of the value of 
two dollars and fifty cents. 

2. It weighs sixty-four and a half graJiit. Qf 
one thousand parte by weight, nine hnndred Afe 
of pure metal, and one hundred of alloy, Ths 
quarter-eagle Is a legal tender, according to Its 
nominal value, for any sum whatever. (Act of 
Jan. 18, 1837, sees. 8 and 10, SUt. at hv^fiA-lh 
p. 134.) Fftife IUv-Eagu. 



M«80 



TRBA&tTEY DfiPAUYHXllT. 



181 



Coin. • 

TkA tiirefr^lUtr piece waa anttoriatid by the Tth 
sect, of tlie act of Feb. 21, 1863 (Slat, at Lar., voL 
It). It is ef the same ftnen^ as the other gold ooina 
of the United Statea. The weight of the coin is 77.4 
gnini. The derices upon this coin, and the gc^d 
doliar aLM>, are not authoritatiTely fixed by act of 
Congress, as is the case with all the other g(rid coins 
of the United States ; and hence greater latitude 
was allowed to the Treasury department and the 
fiOcers of the Mint iu fixing these devices. The 
•k«rje of the piece presents an ideal head, em- 
Uematlc of America, enclosed within the national 
legend; on the revtrte Is a wteath composed of 
wheat, cotton, corn, and tobacco, the staple pro- 
dnctions oi the United States; within the wreath 
the Talue and date of the coin are given. It is a 
beautiful coin; but the demand for it never has 
been great, owing chiefly to the fact that it does 
not harmonize with the customs of our people, 
sad never was a fovorite with our banks and 
moneyed institutions, because they prefer to pay 
in snms of five and ten or one hundred dollars. 
People are accustomed to use the eagle, and the 
half and quarter eagle, in like manner as they are 
iamiliar itrith the dollar, the half and the quarter 
dollar. 

The three-dollar piece is a legal tender In pay- 
ments of any amount. 

, . . LaoAL TnrpiR Coins. 

1. All the gold coins of the United States, ac- 
cording to their nominal value, fbr all snms what- 
ever. 

2. Tb^ silver dolhu- of the United States is a 
legal tender for all sums whatever. 

3. The silver coins below the denomination of the 
dollar, coined prior to 1864, are a legal tender hi 
payment of any sum whatever. 

4. Tlie silver coins below the dollar, of the date 
of 13&4 and of subsequent years, are a legal tender 
in sums not exceeding five dollars. 

5. The three-cent silver coins of the date of 1861, 
1852, and 1893 are a tender in sums not exceeding 
thirty cents. Those of subsequent dates are a 
tender in sums not exceeding five dollars. 

6. The cent is not a legal tender. 

T. The laws at one time in force making certain 
foreign coins a legal tender were repealed by the 
set of Feb. 21, 1857, sect. 3 (Stat, at Lar., vol. 11, 
p. ItZ.) No foreign coins are now a legal tender. 

8. by recent legislation, treasury notes have 
been issued which are a legal tender for all debts, 
public and private, except duties on imports and 
interest on the public debt. (Act of Congress of 
May 23, 18fl2.) 

9. A postage currency has also been authorized, 
which is receivable in payment of all dues to the 
United States less than five dollars. They are not, 
however, a legal tender in payment of private 
debta. (Act of Congress, approved July 17, 1862.) 



Goins issued by the authority of a foretgn gov- 
ernment. 

1. There were several acts of Congress passed 
which rendered certain foreign gold and silver 
coins a legal tender in payment of debts uiwn 
certain prescribed conditions as to fineness and 
weight. In making a report in 1884 on this sub- 
ject, the late Director of the Mint, Mr. Snowden, 
suggested that there was no propriety or necessity 
for legalizing the circuhition of the coins of other 
countries, and that in no other nation, except in 
the case of some colonies, was this mixture of cui^ 
rencies admitted by law, either on the score of 
courtesy or convenience; and he recommended 
that if the laws which legalise foreign coins should 
be repealed, that it would be proper to require an 
annual assay report upon the weight and fine- 
ness of such foreign coins as frequently reach our 
shores, with a view to settle and determine their 
marketable value. (Ex. Doc. No. 68, 33d Cong., 
1st Session.) This suggestion was subsequently 
repeated, and finally led to the passage of the act 
of Feb. 21, 1857 (Stat, at Lar., vol. 11, p. 163), the 
third section of which is as follows : — ^That all for. 
mer acts authorizing the currency of foreign gold 
or silver coins, and declaring the same a legal 
tender In payment for debts, are repealed; but tt 
shall be the duty of the Director of the Mint to 
cause assays to be made firom time to time of such 
foreign coins as may be known to our commerce, 
to determihe their average weight, fineness, and 
value, and to embrace in his annual report a state- 
ment of the results thereof. The following state- 
ment accompanies the last annual report of the 
Director of the Mint, and was made in purjuance 
of the law above cfted. 

A Statement of the WtfgM, Knmegf, and Valm (f 
Foreign Cfold and Silv^ Ooint. 

SXPLANATOBJ RKMARKS. (See pp. 182-2.) 

The first column embraces the names of the 
countries where the coins are issned. The second 
contains the names of the coins only, the principal 
denominations being given. The other sizes are 
proportional, and, when this is not the case, the 
deriatiott is stated. * 

The third column expresses the weight (tf a sin- 
gle piece in fractions of the troy ounce, carried to 
the thousandth and, in a few cases, to the ten- 
thousandth of an ounce. This method is prefera- 
ble to expressing the weight in grains for commer- 
cial purposes, and corresponds better with the 
terms of the Mint. It may be readily transferred 
to weight in grains by the following rule ; remove 
the decimal point ; from one-half deduct four per 
cent., and the remainder will be grains. 

The fourth oolumn expresses the fineness in 
thousandths, ».«. the number of parts of pure gold 
or silver in one thousand parts of the coin. 

The fifth and sixth columns of the first table 



182 



nn VATIOMAL ALMAIUC. 



[1868. 



of foUt In th» ftflli ii 
■bowu th« raloe, •• compared with the l^gil eon- 
tent or amount of fine gold in onr coin. In the 
■ixth ij tbown the value m paid at the Mint after 
the uniform deduction of one-half of one per cent- 
The former is the value for any other purpoaes 



taken to he af tkfd TOlM of OM hmdnDd cent« : the 

mil-cela of the Aaoree ahall be deemed and takes 
to be of the value of eightj-Chree and one-third 
centa; the maro-banco of Hamburg shall be deemed 
and taken to be of the value of thirty-five ceou; 
the rouble of fiuMJa shall be deemed aud talteo 



than re-coinage, aud especially for the purpose of ' to be of the value of seTtnty>five cents ; the rupee 
comparison; the latter is the value in exchange ; of British India shall be deemed and taken to be 
for our coins at the Mint. j of the value of forty-four and one-half cente ; aod 

For the silver there is no fixed legal valuation, I all former lam inconsistent herewith are h^ebj 
the law providing for shifting the price according repealed. (Act of March 3, 1843, c. 92.) 



to the conditions ctf demand and supply. The 
present price of standard silver is 122J4 ^^^''^^ P^ 
ounce, at which rate the values in the fifth column 
of the second table are calculated. 

2. The pieces commonly known as the quarter* 
eighth, and sixteenth of the Spanish pillar dollar, 
and of the Mexican dollar, are receivable at the 
lyeasory of the United States and its several 
ofllces, and at the several post-offlcea and laud 
offlces, at the rates of valuation following, that is 
to say : the fourth of a d<41ar, or piece of two reals, 
aft twenty cents; the eighth of a dollar, or piece 
of one real, at ten cents ; and the sixteenth of a 
dollar, or half-real, at five cents. (Act of Feb. 21* 
1857, sect. 1.) 



The following further enactment has been mads 
on this subject :— That in all computations at tbt 
custom-housea, the foreign coins and moneys of 
account herein specified sliall be estimated as t^ 
lows, to wit : The specie dollar of Sweden and 
Norway at one hundred and six cents. The spe> 
cie dollar of Denmark at one hundred and five 
cents. The thaler of Prussia and of the northein 
states of Germany, at sixty >nlne centa. The florin 
of the southern states of Germany, at forty cents. 
The florin of the Austrian empire and of the dty 
of Augsburg, at forty-eight and one4ialf cents. 
The lira Vif the Lombardo-Venetian kingdom, and 
the lira of Tuscany, at sixteen cents. The fhuK 
of France and of Belgium, and the lira of Sardinis, 



Ifie ralue of foreign numtif of aooount a< (A« I <^t eighteen cents dx mills. The dneat of Naples, 



duUfm^houia <tftht United Stata. 

S. In the computation of the value of puch 
moneys of account, the thaler of Prussia shall be 
deemed and taken to be of the value of sixty-elght 
and one-half cents ; the mil-reis of Portugal shal 1 be 
deemed and taken to be of the value of one hundred 
and twelve cents; the rixnloUar of Bremen shall 
be deemed and taken to be of the value of seventy* 
eight and three.4iuarter cents; the thaler of 
Bremen, of seventy-two grotes, shall be deemed 
and taken to be of the value of seventy-one cents ; 
that the mil-rela of Madeira ahall be deemed and 



I at eighty cents. Ihe ounce of Sicily, at two dol- 
lars and forty cents. The pound of the British 
province* of Nova Scotia, New Bronawick, New- 
foundland, and Gana^ at four dollara. And all 
laws Inconsistent with this act are herel^ rs- 
pealed. (Act of May 22, 184A.) 

4. It is reqjBired that aU foreign gold and sUver 
coins whidi shall be received in payment fat 
money* doe to the United State* *haU h* sent to 
the Mint, u»d be ooined anew in oonfbrmlty to th* 
act e*taWi*hlng a mint and regulating the ooinsef 
the United State*. (Act of Feb. 9, 1708, sect. &) 



186a] 



TBSA8TTRY DKPARTMBNT. 



38S 



Valus op Tokbok Gold Ass Silyib Oodi^ ih mi Mmxt or nn TJmm Btaym. 
Prepared by the Director of the United States Mint, September, 1862. 

GOLD COINS. 



Country. 



AwitnUia 

Do. 

Anstrm 

Do. 

Do 

Belgium 

BoKria 

Brazil >... 

Centml America ... 
Chili 

Do....- 

Denmark 

£cmdor 

Kokand 

Do. 

fiance. 

Do. 

Gennany, north 

Do. 

Da 

Da south...... 

Greece 

Hindostan 

Italy 

Japan 

Mexi«oV.r.'.V.V.7.'..*!! 

Da :.. 

Kaplm. 

Netherlands 

VewGreuada 

Da 

Do. 

Peru..- 

Portugal 

Pnusia. 

Borne 

Rnasia 

Spain 

Da 

Sveden 

Tunis 

Turkey 

Tuscany 



Denomination. 



Weight. 



Pound of 1852 

SoTereign, 1856-^. -......-.. 

Ducat 

Sovereign , -. 

New union crown (assumed).^. 

Twenty-flvo fraucs 

Doubloon 

Twenty milreis. 

Two escudos....- 

Old doubloon 

Ten pesos 

Ten thaler -. 

Four escudos - 

Pound or aovoreigii, new..- 

Pound or sovereign, average... 

Twenty francs, new 

Twenty francs, average 

Ten thaler 

Ten thaler, Prussian .,...., 

Krone (crown). ^...« 

Ducat « 

Twenty drachma 

Mohur y 

Twenty lire 

Old cobang 

New cobang «... 

Doubloon, average....... 

Doubloon, now 

Six dncati, new 

Ten guilders 

Old doubloon, Bogota 

Old doubloon, Popayan 

Ten pesos, new 

Old doubloon 

Gold crown 

New union crown (assumed)... 

21^ scudi, new 

Five roubles 

100 reals 

80 reals 

Ducat 

25 piastres 

lOOpiasti-es 

Sequin 



Ot.dee. 
0.281 
0.256.5 
•0.112 
0.363 
0.357 
0.254 
0.867 
0.675 
0.209 
0.867 
0.492 
0.427 
0.438 
0.266.7 
0.256 
0.207.5 
0.207 
0.427 
0427 
0.367 
0.112 
0.185 
0.374 
0.207 
0.362 
0.289 
0.867.6 
0.867.5 
0.246 
0.215 
0.868 
0.867 
0.525 
0.867 
0.308 
0.857 
0.140 
0.210 
0.268 
0.215 
0.111 
0.161 
0.231 
0.112 



Fineness. 



ThoM, 
916.6 
016 
086 
900 
900 
89» 
870 

863.5 
870 
900 
895; 
' 844 
916.6 
916.6 
899.6 
899 
896 
908 
900 
086 
900 
016 



668 

572 

866 

870i> 

996 

870 

858 

891.6 

868 

912 

900 

900 

916 

896 

869.6 

976 

900 

916 

999 



Value. 



$5 
4 
2 

6 
4 

16 

10 
3 

16 
9 
7 
7 
4 
4 
3 
3 
7 
7 
6 
2 
3 
7 
3 
4 
3 

16 

16 

5 

8 

15 

15 

9 
15 

5 

6 

2 

3 

4 

3 

2 

2 

4 

2 



32.37 
86.58 
28J» 
7&85 
64.19 
72.08 
69.26 
90.57 
68.76 
69.26 
1536 
90.01 
65.46 
86.34 
84.48 
85.83 
84.69 
90.01 

Vim 

64.20 

28.28 

44,19 

08.18 

84.26 

44. 

67.6 

62.98 

61.06 

0443 

99.66 

61.06 

37.76 

67.51 

65.67 

80.66 

64.19 

6047 

97.64 

96.39 

86.44 

23.72 

99.54 

36.03 

31.29 



Value after 
deduction. 



16 29.T1 
4 88.16 
2 27.04 
6 71.96 
6 60.87 
4 69^67 
15 5146 
85.12 
66.91 
6147 



10 

8 

15 



10.78 



7 
7 
4 
4 
3 



86.06 
61.6» 
83.91 
82.06 
83.91 



3 82.77 



7 
7 
6 
2 
3 
7 
3 
4 
3 



5 

3 
15 
16 

9 
15 

6 



3 
4 
3 
2 



86.06 
93.09 
60.S» 
27.14 
42.47 
04.64 
82.34 
41.8 
56.8 
16 45.22 
15 53.25 
01.91 
97.57 
63.26 
30.07 
62.68 
47.90 
77.76 
6 60.87 
2 69.17 
96.66 
93.91 
84.51 
22.61 
2 98.06 
4 34.76 
2 30.14 



SILVER COINS. 



Country. 


Denomination. 


Weight 


Fineness. 


Value. 


• 

Austria...... 


Old rix dnllar 


Oz.dec. 
0.902 
0.836 
0.461 
0.596 
0.803 
0.643 
0.482 
0.820 
0.150 
0.866 
0.864 
0.891 
0.927 
0.182Ji 


Thoiu, 
883 
902 
833 
900 
897 
903.6 
667 
918.5 
926 
850 
908 
900.6 
877 
924.6 


$1 02.27 


Do 


Oldscndo 


1 02.64 


Do. —.•.«•.•..••••..... 


Florin before 1868 


61.14 


Do 


New union dollar 


73.01 


BeUanm 


Five francs 


98.04 


Bolrria 


New dollar 

Half dollar 


79.07 


Da ..w.. 


39.22 


Brazil 


Double milreis 


1 0263 


Canada 


Twentv cents 


18,87 


Central America 


Dollar 


1 00.19 


Chill 


Old dollar 


1 06.79 




New dollar. 


9817 


Denmark 


Two riffsdaler. 


1 10.65 


England 


Shilling, new 


22.96 



18t 



ZHS KA1I09AL ALXAVAC. 



[im. 




Dollar nflSSr 
OU 



OUL 



Da 



DoOor c4 1S5» 

Half4i>airlSa5-*». 
Tbai«r W«br« 1S57 ^. 
New 




OLdec 
0178 
OlSQO 



«l7» 



QAU 

OuSM 



OTIS 



T59 



22.41 
96iW 
73Lfl7 



<1j66 
41jK 



sn 



TSt 



fljsex 

iUtt 
liigs 






ist 



0j$86 



1 
1 



1 08L5I 
1 lOutt 



1 06.M 
T9L44 



38.^ 
CL4i 



loeos 



1863.] 



BO&T^FFICB BSPAMMinrT. 



IgS 



V. PCWT-OmOE DEPABTKEOT. 

(Corrected at the Post-Offlee Departmeiit, Nor. 1, 1809.) 

Kamoi and Offloa*. Whence appointed. Balaiy. 

HoxTOOXEaY BiaiB, J\>9tnuuter'€feneral Maryland $8,000 

Alezandib W. IUin>ALL, Firtt AssiatarU Postmatter-Oeneral „ Wisconsin 3,000 

OcoftGB W. McLbu.^, Second AniUatU PattmatUr-GtMral ...Massachnsetts 8,000 

AuxANDKB N. ZsvKLT, Third Astittant fbOmaster-General..., Jforth Carolina ,. 3,000 

WixJiAM A. Bbtan, Chi^ Clerks Inspection Office , Virginia 2 200 

Clerks, 

St. Joh» B. L. Skinner, Principal Clerk, Appointment Office N«w York... 1,800 

£8EN L. GmLDS, Principal Clerk, Contract Office «„ New Hampahir« «. 1,800 

C. F. McDonald, Principal CUrk, Finance Office ; Uassachnsetto 1,800 

BOBiET K. Scott, Principal Clerk, Inspection Office Pennsylvania 1,800 

Heikt a. Bukb, Topographer Oonnectlcut 1,800 

Jamu S. Halldwbll, Disbursing CUrk and SupH of P,0, Building. Maryland. 2,000 

Oboanization of ths Post-Otfick Dbpaktmxnt. 



Th9 management of the Poet-Office Department 
Is assigned by the Constitution and laws to the 
Postmaster-General. 

The Appointment Office, at the head of which 
is the First Assistant Postmaster-Oeneral, attends 
to the establishment and discontinuance of post- 
offlces, changes of sites and names, appointment 
and remoral of postmasters, and route and local 
aj^nts, and the givhig of instructions to post- 
masto^ It proTides them with marking and 
nting stamps and letter-balances. It provides 
blanks and stationery for the use of the depart- 
ment; and superintends the several agencies estar 
blished for supplybig postmasters with blanks. 
It has the supervision of the ocean-mail steam- 
ship lines, and of the foreign and international 
postal arrangements. 

The Omtract Office, at the head of which is the 
Second Assistant Postmaster-General, arranges 
the laaXL service, and places the same under con- 
tract; corresponds and acts respecting the trips, 
conveyance, departures and arrivals on all the 
routes, the course of the mail between the differ- 
ent sections of the country, the points of distri- 
bution, and the regulations for the government 
of the domestic mail service. It prepares the 
advertisements, receives the bids, and takes 
charge of the annual and occasional mail-lettings, 
the adjustment and execution of the contracts ; 
applications for the establishment or alteration of 
mail arrangement, arid the appointment of mail 
messengers. All claims for transportation service 
not under contract are to be recognized by the 
Contract Office, as authority for the proper credits, 
at the Auditor's Office. Postmasters at the ends 
of routes receive from it the statement of mail 
arrangements prescribed for the respective routes. 
It reports weekly to the Auditor all contracts 
executed, and all orders affecting accounts for 
mail traasp<ntation; prepares the statistical ex- 
hibits of the mail service, and the reports of the 
mail lettings, giving a statement of each bid; 
also of the contracts made, the new service origi- 



nated, the curtailments ordered, and the additional 
allowances granted within the year. 

The Pinance Office, the head of which is the 
Third Assistant Poetmaster-Qeneral, supervises 
the financial business of the department, not de- 
volved by law upon the Auditor, embraclDg 
accounts with the dn^ offices and other deposi- 
taries of the department, the issuing of warrants 
and drafts in payment of balances reported by 
the Auditor to be due to mail contractors and 
other persons, the supervision of the accounts of 
officers under order to deposit their qnmterly 
balances at designated points, and the superin- 
tendence of the rendition by postmasters of their 
quarterly returns of postages. It has charge of 
the dead-letter office, of the issuing of postage- 
stamps and stamped envelopes for the prepay- 
ment of postage, and of the accounts connected 
therewith. 

To the Third Assistant Postmaster-Qeneral all 
postmasters should direct their quarterly returns 
of postage; those at draft offices, their letters re- 
porting quarterly the net proceeds of thehr offices; 
and those at depositing offices, their certificates 
of deposit ; to him should also be directed the 
weekly and monthly returns ef the deporitaries 
of the department, as well as all appUcationi 
and receipts for postage stamps and stamped 
envelopes, and for dead letters. 

To the Inspection Office, the head of which is 
the Chief Clerk, is assigned the duty of receiving 
and examining the registers of the arrivals and 
departures of the mails, certificates of the service 
of route agents, and reports of mail fkilures; of 
noting the delinquencies of contractors, and pre- 
paring cases thereon for the action of the Post- 
master-General ; fiimishing blanks for mail re- 
gisters, and reports of mail &ilnres; providing 
and sending out mail-bags and mail-locks and 
keys; the suppression of all cases of mail de- 
predation, of violation of law by private ex- 
presses, or by the forging or illegal nte of 
postage-stamps. 



186 



THB NATIONAL ALMAKAO. 



[1868. 



nr non Towa* or thk UwrncD Srisv wbbs *hs OniRinAnov sz( 

(Correeted ai ilw Pwfe-Offloe DtpmrUatni, HoTcmber 90, USX.] 



Town. 
Maine. 



Postmaster. 



CompcnMitioB. 



AuburiL M Silvester Oakes... — >... 

AuguBta J. A. Bicknell 

Bangur Jiisoii Weeks....^ ........ 

Bath , Cbarlee T. GreenleaC.... 

Belfast Hiram Chase 

Biddeford L. 0. Cowan 

BruBtwick.............B. O. Deunlson 

Bucksport.....,.^ A* L. SkJnuer 

OUaia D. B. Barnard 

Kutport C. 0. NcMton 

ElUworth L. B. Jordan 

Gardiner John Berry — 

gallowell ThouiaaHovcy 
onlton - L. O. Putnam 

Lewiston ...J. P. Fctwendon 

Uachias William Ingiee 

New Gaatle Joseph Brown. 

Portland Andrew T. Dole — 

Bichmond J. T. Robinson 

Eockland M. C. Andrews 

8ioo .J. M. Beering. 

Sooth Berwick. Dennis Ferguson 

I^omaston ,...£. tV". Robiuson 

Waldoborongh Luther Webb 

Waterville C. R. McFadden.. 

Winthrop Charles Morrill , 

Wiscaaset .J. W. Taggart 

Yvmonth...^ ....0. B. Pratt 

New Hamptkin, 

Glaremont G. 0. Eastman 

Concord Robert N. Coming. 

|>0Ter Nathaniel Low, Jr 

Exeter W. B. Morrill , 

Franklin ^ James Colbnm 

Great Falls John S. Haines, Jr 

Hanorer Israel O. Dewey... 

Kaene Thos. E. Hatch 

Laeonia Joseph £. Odlin. «... 

Lebanon £. J. Dnrant. 

Manchester D. J. Clarke 

miford Edward Lorejojr. 

Kashoa Alvln Beard. 

liew Market ..»«.»«. ...J. F. OarlaiMt. ........ ...... 

Newport Mrs. S. M. Watkina 

Portamonth Jos. P. Morse 

VermouL * 

BradiSMd.«. George Pridwrd. 

Brattleborough... Daniel Kellogg, Jr 

Bnrlington. George G. Ben<Mlict 

Oaatleton William 3Ionlton 

Tairharen ....Harris Whipple -. 

Island Pond J. W. Davis 

Mlddlebary .Juntos CeM> 

Montpelier J. G. French.. 

Northfteid Roswoll Dewey 

North Thetfurd W. W. Barnes 

Bntland ..- M. O. Ererte 

flalnt Albaoa.. Myron Bark 

gnint Johjiabary...«.BmerBon HalL........ . 

Jpriagfiald.... ....F. W. Porter 

vergennes .,.« G. W. Grandey............ 

Watorbury ..N.'K. Brown 

Windsor A. G. Hatch..... 

Woodstock M...L. 0. GrBena............MM. 



$600 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1,202 

1,842 

1,364 

646 

2,000 

1,1&3 

908 

1.275 

870 

558 

1,903 

514 

577 

2,000 

560 

1,440 

1,253 

518 

898 

512 

1,030 

504 

■574 

520 



1,181 

2,000 
1.402 
1,084 
516 
1,228 



Town. 



Postnmtcr. 



IBOO. 



vOBpcnsatfos. 



' MoMMO^Inuau. 
Adams W. 0. Famsworth... 



1,427 
693 
564 

2,000 
utf4 

2,000 
dOI» 
514 

2,000 



507 

1,700 

2,000 

608 

505 

597 

901 

1,909 

655 

500 

1,668 

1,160 

1,084 

676 

639 

548 

T54 

876 



556 



Amesbory David Batchelder.. $686 

Amherst L. M. Boltwood. 1.047 

Andorer Samoel Raymond........ L33t 

Attleboroogh. N. C. Lather 520 

Barre A. T. Wilson. 006 

Beverly T. A. Morgan 747 

Blackstone S. H. Benson 637 

Boston J.Q. Palfrey ., 2,000 

Bridgewater ..Lewis Holmes 717 

Cambridge George M. Osgood 1,971 

Oambridgeport John McDoflle.......... — 1^321 

Canton B. C. Wood 506 

Charlestown ..William H. De Coeta..... 1,991 

Chelsea H. P. Bnrrill 1,(j6S 

Chio<H>ee .....J. C. Havens 1,244 

Chicopee Falls Albert McFarland... 513 

Clinton £. K. Giblis 915 

Concord AU»ert .Stacey 587 

Danvers .................8. D. Shattuck.....^^..^ 574 

Dedham A. B.Galacia 788 

East Cambridge. X. K. Noble 1,081 

East Hampton J. H. BardwelL 635 

Fair Haven J. T. Butrick.; 560 

Fall lUver Edwin Shaw 2,000 

FItchborg T. K. W«re 1^ 

Foxboroof^ ..J. £. Carpenter 5» 

Gloocester W. H. Hankell 1,378 

Great Barrington....j8aac Seeley 928 

Greenfield .Lewis Merriam... 1,528 

Groton Jonetion .G. IL Brown. 758 

Haverhill B. P.Hill ~. 1,983 

Holyoke Aaa 0. Colby - 1,250 

Jamaica Plain .M. T. Robinson 5fl 

Lawrence George S, Sferrill 2f0i 

Lee Nathan Gibha. Ml 

Lenox jGeorge Wells.. ............. 518 

Leowinater.............Charles H. Colbnm...^ 608 

Lowell John A. Goodwin 2,008 

Lvnn George H. Chase 2,008 

Maiden Edward W.Green 590 

Marblehead 8. P. Hathaway, Jr S48 

Marlbonmgli .HoUis Loring. ..«. 578 

Medfurd ~ .George Harvey 708 

Mid<Ueboroa|^ — ...A. L. Tinkham ^ 808 

Milford Adam Hunt 1^ 

Millbury 8. Famsworth, Jr rSS 

Monson Elmer B. Mile* 508 

Nantocket Andrew Wlutne\' 1,538 

Natick .George W. Pierre M8 

New Bedford... C. W. Chanmaa '2fi9^ 

Newburyport N. A. Moulton 2^000 

Newton Samuel Oiism 508 

North Adame Edwin Rogers IfiUt 

Northampton L. W. Joy ^JQOO 

North Bridgewater. Jleory French....... 8St 

North Brookfleld......W. U. Beecher 518 

Palmer Cyrus Knox 608 

Pittsfleld Henry Cfaickering 2,008 

Plymonth ....ChartevA. 8. Perkins... 1,13^ 

Provincetown J.N. Bovly 831 

Quincy .George L. GiU... 801 

Roxbury John Backup 2,008 

Salem Jno. Chapharan 2;O0D 

Sandwich Frederic S. Pope 848 

Shelbnme Falls Alfred Bowen.. r 611 

South Danv«rs..„....Filch Poole............ 878 

Sooth Hadley .G. M. Smith 808 

Sooth Reading ..Samuel JBUngmnn STS 

Springfield William Stowe ^008 

Stockbridge Nathaniel A. Waters S85 



1083.] 



POST-OFFICB BSFABTM^irT. 



187 



Tftanton ~> J. T&. Wflhar S2»Q00 

TVarc Addison Sanford. 750 

Walthjua Newell Sherman 1,092 

Warren J. F. Hitchcock 571 

Wehster » A. E.Day ^ 764 

Westbonmgh Josiah Childs 5A5 

Westfield Jasper R. Rand 1,461 

WTllianistown C. R.Taft « 639 

Winchendon ^Edwin S. Merrill 746 

Ifobum ^Nathan .Wyman. 847 

Iforcestor John M. Earle 2,000 

Shade lOand. 

Bristol > Thomas J. Thurston 966 

Sfest Greenwich Bowen Vanghan 636 

Kewport Thomas' Gc^vshall 2,000 

l^wtncket C. £.Chickering. 1,606 

Ph>Tidence W. G. Simmons >. 2,000 

Warren .George II. Siirgcns. 668 

Weaterley JE. B. Pendleton _. 948 

Woonsocket Falls ...John Bumham 1,209 

OomueUeut. 

AnsMiia George Bristol 773 

Bridgeport ^...F. W. Smith, Jr 2,000 

Bristol S. M. SntliC 639 

Baabnry Edward A. Brown 1,401 

Pcrbj ^.C. Naramore 1,155 

lUr HaTen Smith G. Tuttle... 636 

Hartford S. S. Oeveland 2,000 

Litchfield Rlverins Marsh 753 

Heriden Asahel II. Curtis 848 

IGddletown A.B.Calef. 2,000 

ETaiigatudE L. S.Spencer ^ 590 

Hew Britain ...Walter Gladden. 1,513 

|iew;HaTeh N. D.^rry 2,000 

Sew London......... .. J. W. ^n^leston. 2;000 

Kew Milford JBenry Merwin 597 

Korwalk Charles Olmstead 1,139 

iTorwich n. H. Starkweather 2,000 

Sockrflle Andrew W. Tracy 730 

Stamford T.J. Daskam 1,3^ 

Btonington ...: Franklin Williams 686 

Stratford C. B. Curtis ..- 607 

ThompsoDTille -John Houston 624 

Wallingford J. B. Pomeroy 606 

Waterhary Calvin H. Carter. 2,000 

West Killingly .Sylranus Gleason 578 

West Heriden George W. Rogers. 1,428 

Westport B. M. Lees '557 

West Wittsted William G. Coe 883 

WHlimantic James Walden 743 

Wolcottrille JoBtiph F. Calhoun 508 

New York. 

Adams Nelson Green 588 

Addison — John N. Brown 536 

Albany Geoige Dawson 2,000 

Albion C. A. Harriugton..*.....^ 1,481 

Austerdam Almarin Young.... 915 

A&bara William. Allen 2,000 

Bftllstoci.. Moses L. Williams 1,086 

Batavia George Bowen. 1,749 

Bath G. S. Ellas 1,154 

BioghamtoD .William Stuart .^ l,i)23 

BoooeTille .....J. M. LewU 024 

Bruckport James W. Adams 962 

Brwiklyn O. B. Lincoln...,...* 2,000 

Buffalo A. M. Clapp 2,000 

Camden .,- Albert BIckford 642 

CaatUoharie -A. N. Van Alstine 623 

Canaodaigna A. G. Murray 1,860 

Caaastoto .V. P. Chapman 628 



CMrtoa S. P. Remington 

dlio 'Vliieeot. Zebnloa Converse. 

Cai-iham ...;« Bugene West. 

CatskilT. Egbert Linehurgh 

Gaaenovia ...Seneea Lake. 

Cherry Talley William HalL 

Clifton Springs A. J. IlAnna 

Clinton M. S. Wood........... 

Clvde James Oiapmaa 

Cohoes I.W. Chesebro «...,.. 

Cald Spring .'.Henry Jaycox 

Cooperstowu E. S. Coffin.. 

Coruii^ C H. Tbompaon 

Cortland Village H. A; Jarvis 

Ct^xsaekie..^. Samuel King. 

Cuba V Maniiu J. Green. 

Baosville O. B. Maxwell 

Delhi G. B.Ca&non 

Deposit Lucius P. Allen............ 

Dunkirk ..<i R.L. Carey » 

East Randolph Enoch Boidrldga 

Ellenville., Albert Corbin. 

Elmlra D. F. Pkkertng 

Flushing Charles Lerer.............. 

Fort Edward D. S.CarfiwelL 

Fort-Plain Alfred C*tfy. 

Fredonia Willard McKlnaCry...... 

Fnlton A: C. Livingston.. ~. 

Geneseo .Alanson .Lapham 

Geneva William Johnson 

Glen's Falls. J. L. Kenwortiiy......... 

Gloversvilltf. E. L. Btirton 

Goshen Charles T. Jaduon 

Gouveroeur S. B. Viin Dune. 

Greenpoint Charles McCartieu........ 

Greenwich ......Moses WThite.......^....... 

Haerlem .W. E. Pabor. 

Hamilton G. F. Burr 

Havanna. Charles' Hacris....... 

Homer ........Xleo. J. J. Barber......... 

Homellsvillo E.G. Dnrfy 

Hudson J. O. P»len 

Ithaca John H. Selkrog. 

Jamaica .Charles Welling.... 

Jamestown... R.V.CnuninghAm 

Johnstown ...William B. (^mrie 

Jordan W. C. Rodgers 

Keeseville Willis Mould 

Kingston C. S. Clay 

Laasingburgh .........E. P. Pickett 

Le Roy David R. Bacon.. 

Lima Ira Godfrey 

Little Falls W\ M.Dorr 

Lockport Isaac Marsh. 

Lowville. :..A. K. Hodden 

Lyons^,. >... John Hano 

Malone Calvin Skinner >. 

Middlotown J. B. Hallock « 

Mohawk C. Dev^ndorf. 

Monticello John Waller, Jr 

Morrisania James Byfield 

Mount Morris. Philo Thomson............ 

Newark Ellas W. Ford- 

Newburgh .Eara Farringtoii., 

New Rochellfl Albert Badean ,.... 

New York Abram Wakeman,.,,,... 

Niagara Falls W. F. Evans 

Norwich ....Harmon Bennett 

Ogdensbnrgh. Robert Atchesen.. 

Clean R, L. Page 

Oneida Ephraim Beck ,... 

Oswego Henry Fitshugb 

0?W ;....-.... James Van- Horn 



•**«••»•*•■••«•• 



• ••»»••••• 



«•%•*•••••*• 



$500 
961 
512 
1,170 
1,009 
532 
662 

ym 

1,134 
012 

1,0T2 

1,201 
948 
6M 
668 

1«322 
701 
6«1 

1,3]B 
514 
532 

2,000 

1,5M 
796 
807 

I4>tf 

l>2a4 
838 

2,000 

1,298 
684 
898 
001 
681 
622 
948 
964 
079 
641 
772 

2,000 

1,766 
676 

1,U7 
567 
606 
714 

1,448 
967 

1,276 
762 

1,879 

2,067 
716 

1,264 
997 

1,867 
682 

648 

676 

740 

2,000 

613 

2.000 

1,101 

1,046 

2,000 

760 

010 

B,«0 



168 



THF KATIONAfc ALWAWAC. 



[lett. 



Ow^ga CbaclMr Stebbina %l^l 

Oxford - Jamm W. UloTttr 6fiO 

PHlniyn W. H. Southwicji ~. 1,0*5 

PeekKkilL Ifnrkaliah B. Straog ... 1,320 

IVn'n Yan jeUbert ^herer. ~. 1,521 

P(irry Janon Lathrop 011 

PhclM R. Bl. Oreen 836 

Plattsbarg Levi Plett l,»l 

Port Cheater ^JSU Curtia 630 

Port Jerrla A. B. Uoodal« 7S4 

Potwkun. .John U. Ho|rfdns... * 1^134 

PoiiKhkMpaie A. Van Kleeck 2,000 

PuhMfci .John B. Wataon 620 

Hhhieback Juho M. Keaao....^ 66i 

RiichMtar ...8, W. Updike 2^000 

Home K. H.BheUejr..... 2,000 

Kondout ...Renaaelaer Acly 1,343 

BouM'a Pi>Int T. H. aingaby 612 

flag IlArbor P. R. Jennlnca 74i 

Salem JlrchibaldBobertNA.... 626 

Saratoga Springa ....M, M. Potter 2,000 

Sttugertlva T.S. Bavea T7*i 

Schenectady ..J.W. Veeder 2,000 

Seneca lUla laaitc Fuller l.Mu 

Sing Sing , Renben Qnimby. I,li6 

Skanaatelea Horace Ilaien 776 

Suipenaioo Bridge.. .W. H. Wallace 2,206 

Sracnae ,.,.l>atr)ct IL Agan 2,000 
rrytown , ..Jmnee S. See 787 

Trov , ThdmM Clowes.. 2,000 

Unfoo Springa ,;. Jf . C. Simuna. M2 

Utica ,... fCftarlei^lL Hopkins...... 8,000 

Warsaw /,%f<h M.'Oatea 807 

Waterluo .....;:...WflltauaKnox , 1,133 

WatertowB Leri Smith 1,802 

Watkins JL M. HillermaQ 624 

Waverly ..,M'illiam PoUeys. „ 686 

•Wetfdspurt C. C. Adams........ , 620 

WvllsviUe L P. Phillips 680 

WeMtfleld Byron UaU .,....„ m 806 

West Point Uary Berard 1,021 

White Hall » U. U. Winter ,.., , 1,1C8 

White Plains .Bmory Palmer , 662 

WliitMtowu ..Whiting Smith....,, &2J 

Williiim^burg .Joliii S. Allen 2,jODU 

Yuukivs — .. — William U. Post.... 1,364 

Yorkville WUIIaU) P^ase. ..,„..,.„ 96j 



, Ptnnsjflvania. 

Alleghany Samuel Riddle....,,...,.. 

AUentuwu Jilghman Good..', ,, 

Altoona ,<.^Gcorge W. Pat ton...,,... 

Ashland Uaoiilton Adama....... 

Beaver Miss U. J. Andera<)nt.>« 

BeJford ......WilUam Riser „, 

'Bellefonte ..Wjlliani Cookf...,, , 

Bethlehem Robi^rt Pcysert ,,,,.. 

Bloomsbnrg Paleni>n John ,«..,„. 

Bristol Mathiin Tyler 

Brookville. A. P. Heichhold 

llruwnsville .8. 8. Suowdon 

Ikichanan .Dsiniel Wenke 

Ckln 8. C. Williamson 

Gannonsburg. .., George A. Kirk 

Ckrbondala ......1). N. lAthro(>e 

Carliale ...jOeorge Ziun 

H%ambersburg .John W. Deal 

• Cheater ....••«.„ .Y. S. Walter 

' Oo»tesvlIIe ..«. ,*.. Martha F. Gordon.^.^.. 

.■ Qolnmbia ^Mrs. Mary J. Fry 

I Banville A.F. RuHsell 

I MMton ^ Charles C. Jennings..... 

Brie Jowph M. Storrett 



2,000 

1.405 

1,030 

680 

613 

63D 

782 

1,:J»S 

Sin 

617 

610 

6S5 

6eo 

922 

030 

811 

1,710 

i,ote 

676 
1,114 
1,174 
2,090 
2,006 



Prankford Wm. W. Axo 

Franklin .Mrs. 8. Webber 

Germautown Hillory Krickbaom..... 

Gettysburg David A. Bnehler 

Greensbnrg Hnsh Artera 

Ilarrisburg O. W. Bergner 

Hollidaysbnrg James Bingham 

Honeedale JUlph I* Briggs.^ 

Huntingdon .George A. Steel 

Indiana .......R. C. Taylor ^.. 

Jersey Shore .Yhoinaa Calvert, Jr 

Johnstown Isaac B. Chandler 

Kensington (Qfllce diacontiBoed). 

Kittaning.... .J. £. 8levenaoa.> «. 

Ijinuaster John J. Cocbnui 

I^banon Mrs. G. Bibighaoa........ 

Lewisbnrg O. W. Forrest „ 

Lcwistown AunnalComftrt 

liockhavon.. .A. M. Coe 

Manayunk William Dawson...^,... 

Maoch Chnnk...>.....Jane F. Righter... 

Meadville .Cliuton Cullnm. 

5Iechanic8burg George W. Wilson....... 

Mercer William D. Bell 

Middletown Walter H. Kendig 

. Milttm ^....George Lawrence. 

MinerKvillo Thomas T. Davia 

Montrose .D. R. Lathrop 

Muncy Euoa Uawley .« 

Kew Castle David Bmery 

Norristown ^..,...Robert Iredell 

PiiiladeIphla..,....»...C. A. Walborn 

Phoenlxville David Suen 

Pittalinrg .8. T.Ton Bonnhorat..... 

Pittston James Searle...... 

Port Uichniond........Thoiniia R, Fort...^*....^ 

PottHtown .......Henry Mintser „ 

Pottsvillu Margaret Sillyman 

Reading ...Jacob Knabb 

Rising Sun William Goodwin 

Saint Clair Samuel Mateer 

Schuylkill Haven.... Abram Savior 

Scranton Douglas H. Jay.....^.... : 

Shippensbnrg S. W.Cnrrlden.. ....,.«... 

Snnbury , ., George M. Reno..*........ 

Tamaqni^ ,.•.. .....M. P. Fowler... ........m.* 

TitnsviUfi L. M.BloomfleM 

Towmida.. .••,.*.««. ..m8« W. Alvara....M..*«..M. 
x^^^y ...fl... ...... ..........w. MMm ^jfran V. >..■». <#...—.». . 

UniontowQ m...mJ. H. Springer...... h*...* 

Warren , Christian Smith, Jr...... 

Washington James McDermott. 

WestChesdir J^ranklln Taylor 

Wilkosbarre 8. M. Barton 

Willianisport John R.Campbell... ...... 

York A. J.Frey »...» : 

Xcvf Jenty, 

Atlantic City Lewis Reed.. 

Belvidero Henry Y. Harris...... 

Borden town James Fur man 

Bridgoton 6«orge W. Johnson.. 

Burlington .Jacob Laumaster 

Osmden Ssnniel Andrews 

Dover Maria B.Losey 

Elisabeth .......Jacob 0. Crane 

BliMbethport Xuther T. Hand... 

Flemington Nathaniel 0. Smith. 

Freehold ....J. H. Rossell 

Hoboken Peter M. Reynolds.., 

Jersey City Henry A. Greene 

Laaibertsville, .^.Jocoli 8ervl«. 

Long Branch... John Slocuni 



$7S8 



••««•«••# 



••••«•■#«•«« •«• 



1^.] 



?08T^QS¥j:C|l J>M»AWUfSfeS. 



189 



Tovvu PiMtMsater. 

Hurristotrn A. A. Vanco ,....$1*400 

.Muiiut Holly J. F. LunmHstpr 012 

Newark David Price 2,000 

New Brunswick John T. Jenkins 2,000 

Newton • Oakley B. Pellet 778 

Orange Charles E. MitchelU.^. Oa4 

Fatersou Daiius Wells 2,000 

Plunfield ....^ K. M. Dunn 798 

^Dceton .JohnT. Kobinson 1,377 

..Rahway Charles C. IXofT. 547 

.Salem ^.....^...W. B. Robertson 693 

fiomervllle Culvur Barcalow 525 

Trenton .Joshua Jones 2,000 

Delaware, 

'Dover Jno.H. Bateman 618 

Newark .Jonathan Dronnen 5lO 

New Castle Edward Challenger 687 

Wilmington A. II. Qrimsbaw 2,000 

Marjfland. 

jbinapolis ........fhontas Ireland 

Baltimore William H. Pprnell... 

Cfaestertown ..John W. CoIIfna 

Camberland George A. HofllDilin... 

iSastOD William T. Hardesty. 

Zlkton James McKinsey 

Idlicott*! Mills.. James McOowan '. 

Anmlttalnirg Robert Crooks 

'xtcderick «. W. D. Jenks 

iHsgentowii John Schleigh 

;B&Tre de Qreyce Seth H. Hopper.. 

'But Deposit »J)av!dWay 

RossTiUe Richai-d Steele 



1,329 

2,000 

627 

1,581 

622 

849 

681 

613 

2,000 

1,082 

771 

851 

678 

putrid qf Columbia, 

4eorgetewB Henry Addison. 1,579 

WtshingtoD City. Lewie Clephane 2,000 

Virginia^ 

Hexaadria... W. Di Massey 1,987 

Cbarlestown ^.. ...... John. Reed .^ 

'darksburg Cyrus Vance.... 

Ibrederickeburg.......Jione. 

lbrtinsburg.........~Xloorge R. Wlsong....*.... 

]lorga&town.......~...none « 628 

'Jfbrfolk^.^ none. 

<M Point Conilbrt...A.lexandex Crane 1,065 

Fsrkecsburg .......... James M. Boreman...w. ■ 

Fertemouth none. 

Wheeling ^.....Archibald W.CampbelL..2,O0D 

S&rth Cbrolina. 

AsheTine....~ none^ 

^Idaboro ......nnue. . 

Newbera ........ John Dibble 

Ztooitiancu 
New Orleans none. 

Kentucky. 

Berdstdwn T. C Mattingly ffTt 

"^wling Oreen .Isaac D. McQoodwIn 2,728 

CwingtoA ~ Hamilton Cummings..:. 2,000 

CyathianA i Huther Vanhook 670 

Dan\iU« W.R. Orear 1,821 

RlizabetbtowB .Samuel L. Ilodger. -. 509 

trankfort W. A. Oaines 2,000 

Georgetown R. M. Chambers 7t>4 

Harrodeburg Samuel Wingflekl 884 

fteudereon John McBrlde 746 

IbpkiMTiUe John M. LamlxHn 870 

, Lebanon Orson Ames 544 

.bzingtoA.......-......tjrinaa B. Todd... 2,000 



OoBpamtlMi. 



Towa. 

Louisville Jno. J. Speed. 

Maysville J. M. Stockton Ij 

Mount Sterling.. Beqjamin P.Drake 5($8 

Newport William Andrews 1,178 

Oweusboro Jesse Moore 607 

Paducah CT. Bronson 1,6^ 

Paris Selby Ulleston :... 1,^ 

RussellvlUe JJ. ll. Finley 686 

Shelbyville William Standeford 

Versailles .'.... Leonldas B. Peters. 613 

Winchester J. W. taughlln 600 

Tenneesee. 

Memphis ...none.. 1,5C0 

Nashville A. V. S. Undsley 1,900 

Miitouri. 

Boouvllle..... M.f...T)iomAS M. Campbell..., 

Cbillicothe ...« Benjamin Berry... 

Columbia* ,..M^. Ann Oentry 

Fulton , J. D. Snedocor 

Qlasgow ....^.. .Frank -W. Dlgges.. 

Hannibal ...T...Beix)^m!n F. Colt 

Independence .........Porter ^cClanaliap 

Jefferson City A. P. Richardson...'. 

Kansas ..Francis Foster..., 

Lexington ^......Jc^n B. Alexander.....^. 

Louisiana D. F. Birantlinger 

St Charles F. S. Cunnin^^ham.....!.. 

St. Joseph John L. Bittioger.. 

St. Louis ~ Peter L. Foy.. ; ,.., 

Springfield .....,»Bei\jamln Kite 

Westport Sela Hudson 

Weston -.,, S, J), jfulton 

Ohio, 
Akron .R. S. Etkins 



^,082 

675 

886 

699 

'660 

1,7C6 

993 

1,79'4 

1,436 

l,iJ12 

62S 

803 

•2,t)00 

2,C0O 

641 

669 

693 



.J«in)bC^all. 



Aahland 

Atbens D. nr. Clayton. 

Bcllefontaine W. Bf.I(!ven 

Bellevue ...H. P.Smith 

Cambridge ;...Wiltutm McDonaTd... 

Ctiuton W. K. Hillcr 

Cbillicothe '. "nieodoro Sfaerer 

Cincinnati John C^ Baum 

Circleville C. B. Mfison 

Cleveland Edwfn Cowles.; '.. 

Clyde Joel B. Fellows 

(Dolumbns John Qraham 

Conneant D. C. Allen 

Cuyahoga Falts. J*. 0. Somers 

I>aytoB 7W. F. Comly ,. 

Denanee ..C. W, Evans 

Delaware Abraham Tliompeon. 

Kafon ; W. D. Qnimi 

flyria J. Strong, Jr 
Inley J.D. RothchlW :... 

Fremont..- '. iH- R- Shomo..-. 

Gallon H.C.On'hart.........;.. 

Gallipolis..... J. Diouillard 

Oambier.v. '.;....'.'.Jofteph Leonard. 

Oranvllle... H. w. nowc. ..... 

Qreenileld ...R. C. Kinkhead 

Ilkmilton Tf.Tf. Blatr..: 

Hillsboro... W. R. Smith : 

ITndson Moses Messer. 

Ironton ...; J. M. Anilin;;. 

Kraton .- Augnstns Traeger..;.. 

Lftucaster C, M. I^ Wiseman 

Lebanon - Hirnm Yeo 

Lima C.J»armenter 

London...^... James S. Ilnme 



1,25S 

698 
. 7^1 



661 
542 

1,03d 

a^ode 

1,217 

2,000 
679 

1,608 
621 
530 

2,000 
624 

t,Mi 
5(3 
W7 
P86 

1,1??> 
546 

'626 
540 
7fel 
834 

1,6C8 
679 
553 

m 

542 

1,188 
9(7J 
728 
518 



19a 



TBE NATIOlirAL ALMANAC. 



[ises. 



Town. 



Postbuter. 



Compensation. 



Mansfield d. H. Kling $1,690 

Biarietta SalaBoe worth— 1,159 

Medina C. E. Bostwick 535 

Miamigyille Mrs. Jane Adams.. 927 

Middletewn C. H. Brock 601 

Mount Vernon. .C. S. Pyle 1,343 

Newark GB. Griffin 1,540 

Kew Lisbon John Robertson.... 547 

New Philadelphia ...Richard Powleson 530 

Norwalk J. S. Coe 1,048 

OberUn ....G. F. H. Stevens 1,511 

Oxford S. C. Richey 

PainesTille M. M. Seymour 1,298 

Piqna .....A.J. Roe - 1|^5 

Pomeroy George Lee -... 586 

Portsmouth John Row 1,446 

Rayenna .Ransom A. QJllette 950 

Ripley Henry Biehn 648 

Baleni , J. B. Webb 1,261 

Sandusky - T. C. McEwen 1,885 

Sidney George Murray....'...:.... 783 

Springfield Richard R(%era 2,000 

SteubenvlUe G. B. Filson , 1,676 

Tiffin Williiim Gallup 1,320 

Toledo - Edward P. Bassett 2,000 

Troy G. W.Bull ...: 955 

Upper Sandusky Wm. McCandllsh 600 

Urbana. ,.......Newton Ambrose. , 1,144 

Warren ,....C. M. Patch 1,479 

Washington C.IL......Edgar Plumb 515 

WellsTiUe Miss M. J.Craine ». 555 

Wilmington .W. J. Marble 6» 

Wooeter Enos Foreman 1,323 

Xenia .William Lewis 1,431 

Yellow Springs James E. Gross i' 661 

aSadesTille Penrod Batemtui 2,000 

Indiana, 

Anderson W. H. H. Lewis. » 479 

Attica George Wilson 645 

Aurora Henry Walker 608 

Bloomington W. M. Tate 839 

Cambridge J. A. Smith 520 

CrawfonuTlUe Stephen Ingersoll........ 052 

Delphi Xewis Jordan 618 

Bdinburg James P. Wolfe 654 

Blkhardt R. K.Mann : 723 

Byansyille James H. McKeely 1,885 

Fort Wayne Moses Brake, Jr 1,905 

Itenklin Ephraim Jeflfrey 1,516 

Ooehen William B. Taylor, 788 

Greencastle C. W. Brown B9$ 

Qreensburg J. J. Haselrigg 67( 

Huntington .William Bickle 700 

Indianapolis Ji. A. Conner 2,000 

Jeffersonyille. T. J. Downs 888 

K<dEomo.... « .T.C. Philips 528 

La Fayett« James P. Luse 2,000 

Laporte George B. Roberts. 1,588 

Lawrenceburg .......JTohn Ferris.... 750 

Logansport William Wilson. 1,360 

Madison Victor King 1,874 

Michigan City C. S. Winship 8M 

Muncie Robert Richey 690 

New Albany .John M. Wilson 2,078 

Peru Henry G. Fetter. 798 

Plymouth 0. H. P. Bailey ,. 608 

Princeton C. A. Slayback 508 

Bichmoud Achilles Williams. 2,000 

ghelbyviUe John &Campbell 699 

Sooth Bend £. R. Farnam 1,225 

Terre Haute J. 0. Jones 2,170 

Thomtown........ James Johnson.. 510 



Town. Pottmuter. Cempen at fcm. 

Valparaisa M. A. Salisbury... $774 

Vlncennes H. M.Smith 1,798 

Wabash L. B. HuflTman 723 

Warsaw P. L.Runyan 625 

JUinoii. 

Alton Joshua G. Lamb. 1,955 

Atlanta Willis G. Whiteburst.« 535 

Aurora ;.. .George S. Bungs 1,671 

Bellville Sharon Tyndale 1,134 

Belvidere Xucius Fuller 058 

Bloomington James Allin, Jr 2,021 

Cairo David T. Linegar 2,000 

Canton Chris. Bidamon 687 

Carlinville H. M. Kimball 662 

Centralia Robert D. Noleman 738 

Champaign J. W. Scraggs 1,014 

Charleston David C. Ambler 675 

Chicago John L. Scripps... 2,000 

Clinton I. N.Coltrin.... 652 

Damille Enoch Kingsbury 616 

Decatur John Ryan - 1,77« 

Dixon James L. Camp 1,223 

Elgin ...4 George B. Raymond 1,083 

Freeport./..... C. K. Jndson 2,000 

Galena -...WarrenW. Huntingdon 1,998 

Oalesburg Clark E. Carr 1,961 

Galva George R. Wiley 676 

Geneseo ..Jas. M. Allan 881 

Henry Jno. A.Warren 758 

Hillsboro Jas. C. Mears 626 

Jacksonville J. D. Strong 1,745 

Jerseyville J. H. Buffington 1,604 

Joliet Joseph L. Braden........ 1,791 

Kankakee Depot Daniel S. Parker 1,005 

Kewaunee Rufus Mental 816 

Kn6xvUle Albert Pierce 5J^ 

Lacon C. M. Bonham. 84^ 

Lane Depot Caleb B. Boyce 677 

La Salle E. B. Mason :. 1,19S 

Lebanon BeT\}amin Hypes 668 

Lincoln John S. MetcalC 674 

Litchfield Louis D. Pahner. 631 

Lockport C. D. Holcomb 862 

Macomb Joseph E. Wyne 738 

Mattoon Joseph W. Bradj 7S0 

Mendota Jacob Augustine 098 

Moline William Kerns. TT5 

Monmouth William H.Pierce I.IS 

Morrison Aaron C. Jackaon 72D 

Morris E. B. Hanna 1,106 

Mount Carrol R. J. Tompkins 518 

Ottawa C. B. King 2,000 

Paris Mrs. H. J. Magner. 996 

Pekin .Hezekiah Naylor 1,01^ 

Peoria. .George C. Bestor 2,000 

Peru Samuel G. Smith 884 

Polo , Hamilton Norton 685 

Pontiac William Gagan M3 

Princeton James H. Smith 1,102 

Quincy Abraham Jonas. 2,000 

Bockford Melancthon Smith l,12t 

Rock Island Calvin Truesdeil 1,373 

Salem J. C. Scott 562 

Shelbyville. C. B. Woodward. 64S 

Springfield .John Armstrong... 2,000 

Sterling L. K. Hawthorne 1,090 

Sycamore .Chauncey Ellwood 708 

Urbana Samuel M. Noel 512 

Warsaw < Charles Hay ^ 685 

Waukegan James Y.Coryr. 906 

Woodstock A. E.Smith eU 



1803.] 



posT'Onrcs bbparzmbht. 



191 



Mieh^lan. 

Adrian ChArles Redfleld $2,015 

Albion C. W. Dalryniple 613 

Ann Arbor Jolin J. Thompson 1,989 

Battle Creek T. W. Hall 1,545 

Cold Water J). B. Purinton 1,263 

Detroit William A- Howard 1,999 

Dowagiac W. H. Campbell 695 

Bfcst Saginaw ..D. W.C. Gage 983 

Rint W. O'Dononghue 1,221 

QaudRapida N. L. Avery 2,000 

H»Doock Charles Uembeck 693 

Hillsdale Samuel Russell 1,166 

Hoogbton E. F. Douglass 799 

Undsou Jackson M. Wood 628 

loDia Edward Stevenson 688 

iKkaon Amos Root 1,907 

Jenesville „« R. 8. Varnnm.....*. 830 

KkUniazoo James A. Walter 2,047 

I««ng Bph. Longyear 1,986 

wnhali Seth Lewis 1,808 

Jfciiroe P. M. Wlnans 1^000 

National ~ Beiy. T. Rogers 962 

flilM Francis Quinn 1,830 

Owasw Daniel I^on 614 

Ikw Paw...„ — ......BUslia J. House. 663 

Poatiac D. C. Bucklaud -. 1,180 

fort Huron Martin 8. Glllett 1,073 

fiaginaw Jay Smith 649 

Jtergia." P. H. Buck ; 684 

Tecumseh W. Anderson 604 

Three Rivers James E. Relsey 656 

ipiilanti R. W. Vanfossen 1,380 

WUeonsin. 

Appleton George M. Robinson.. 

Ja»boo Samuel Hartley 

J»y.« Dam Orlando S. Phelps 

^"Oit Lucius Q. Fisher. 

Jwlin M. L. Kimball 

^umbns J'vauk Uuggins......... 

J^van Charles Smith 

load da Lac U^ohn C. Lewis • 

ween Bay D. M. Whitney 

JtawTille J. M. Burgess 

fM«lia Michael J)?auk 

!* Crowe Leonard Lottridge 

J^liwn E. W. Keyes 

Janitowoc... Charles Essliuger , 

Jilwaakie John LockMood. 

Jweral Point John Hoilingshead... 

Jooroe Edmund Bartlet 

Sjl»ko8h Charles Hall 

PlatteviUe James Kelly 

Jwtage aty S. E. Dnna 

JnurieduChien Frederick J. Miller.... 

**«'"« « John Tapley 

^^ ~ Jehdoiah Bowen 

WJeboygan J. J. Brown 

gparta David McBride 

Jatertown Jacob Jusseu 

Jaukesba O.Z.Olin 

wTwte Water Hannibal L. Rann. 



670 
656 
786 

1,172 
753 
687 
766 

1,640 
791 

2,000 

1,304 

1,627 

2,000 
663 

2,000 
825 
732 

1,686 
548 

1,088 
628 

2,028 
961 
927 
689 

1,134 
797 
993 



Iowa. 

Barlingtoa James F. Abraham 2,000 

Udar Rapids J. G. Davenport 833 

J'oton F. N. HolM-ay 742 

Cwincil Blttfb W. W. Maynard 806 

S*J«nport Oiarles H. Kldridge..... 2,000 

{J» aofnes John Toesdale 1,800 

{•Wtt - 0. C. Bates 680 

^onque Edward C.David 2,000 



Tewa. 

Fairfield J. F. Crawlbrd i735 

Fort Madison.. BeniHlIct Hugcl 683. 

Independence C.H...Jiicob Kich 622 

Iowa City I.R. IIaits(x-k 1,612 

Keokuk James Huwell 2,000 

Lyons George M. Davis.. 979l 

McGregor Willard A. Benton 966 

Marion Wm. Downing 611 

Mt. Pleasant .Goo. W. Edwards 1,021 

Muscatine - John Mahin 1,809 

Newton Cyrus True 607 

Oskalooea Charles Beardsley 901 

Ottnmwa Jesse W. Norrls 83i 

Washington A. R. Wickersham 860i 

Minne$otcL 

Chatfleld Samuel McLarty 760 

Faribault James Gibson 6H 

Hastings W. H. Skinner 828 

Minneapolis David Morgan 1,036 

Red Wing M. Sorin 736 

Rochester J, A. Leonard 648 

St. Anthony's Falls.!). Heaton 790 

St. Paul Charles L. Nichols 2.000 

Stillwater A. Van Yoorhees. 787 

Winona C. H. Blanchard ., 1^21 

Kanttu. 

Atchison John A. Martin 1,120 

Lawrence Josiah Miller 1,107 

Leavenworth City.. ..D. R. Anthony 2,000 

Topeka.... S. H. Fletcher 64^ 

Califcnmia. 

Benicia John W. Jones 716 

Big Oak Flat ..Nelson T. Cody 872 

Columbia M. B.Fisher 1,147 

Downieville .A. J. McKinsey «.... hbi 

Folsom City W. W. Dresser 687 

Grass Valley M.S.Norton 1,072 

La Porte John Freeman 937 

Los Angelos William G. Still 823 

Marysville T. J. McCormick 1,800 

Michigan Bluff. JPrederick S. Washeim.. 607 

Mokelnmne Hill U.M. Couch 69? 

Nevada City ..L^win P. Bean 1,511 

Petaluma G. B. Williams 89$ 

Placerville W. H. Rogers 1,234 

Sacramento City .George Rowland 2,000 

San Francisco «.S. H. Parker 2,000 

San Joa6 .S. M. Cutler 1,212 

Santa Clara Samuel Henderson^ 664 

Shasta T. O. Elliott 725 

Sonora ...A. W. Faxon 874 

Stockton CO. Burton 1,841 

Weaverville... Lewis Wellendorf. 688 

Yreka A.Curtis M. Pyle 1,348 

Oregon, 

Jacksonville 8. E. Haines 708 

Portland Herman W. Davis. 1,187 

Salem J. T. Hamilton 784 

Nebraska. 

Fort Kearney C. T. Holloway 636 

Nebraska City J. J. Hoclistetter 814 

Omaha aty ....G. R. Smith 1,307 

New Mexioo. 
Santa F6 Augustine Hunt.......... 568 

Utah. 
Salt Lake City .T. B. H. Stenhonse VU 



193 



THB HATKNIAL ALMAKAa 



[IMt. 



DenrprCity fiMnnel 8. Onrtft.-. 



MuuuUui Clty.^ Bdvrin IL Brova......... 


1741 


NttadA. 




Tirgioia QSXj .,»^..JLjra»A B. Boftb~^~...- 


723 

• 


WuMrngtom Tkr* 






604 



tolte 



The VotMMxm Department aleo employe 21 
Bpfeial AgemU in the different State* aad Teni* 
torles, who have a general snpenrision of the Unee, 
and fee that the cuntracton and poetmaet«« per- 
form their doty fiathfbllj, watch fbr and detect 
tobbeti of tile maiU, and perfbm in cencral the 
dtttiee of a detectiTO poUoe force with refBrence 



to fl«Oft» 



There are alio 88 Xfoeal Ajf^wAt in the eerriee of 
the department,— eome of them Innpectors of 
maJl-(M^ agents for the rapenrisiun of the nuum- 
Ihctore of pust«g<e stampft« printing uf blanks, Ic ; 
others, sUtioned at imDortant points to attend to 
the transfers of the nuillt and render aasistanw to 
the special agentsi Their salaries vary, — those In 
the more important and responsible posftioiis re- 
oeiring from flOOO to $1500, and the others smaller 
sums ranging from flOO to $000. 

There are also Jtewfe Agents emidoyed on all 
the important railroad aad steamboat lhie«, to 
take charge of the mails, and, in SMoe Instances, 
to assort and make np the way^maHs. The nam* 
ber of these, October 1, 1801, was 330, and their 
compensation nsoally from $000 to $800 per 
annum. 



By conreotlons entered Into with Pmssla in 1862 aad In I860, closed mails are made vp ia thii 
•oontry in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Portland, Detroit, and Chicago, and sent by the dMerent 
tines of steanen to Aachen (Aiz4a<1iapeUeX Pmssla, contsining letters for any part of the contl- 
oent of Europe^ the Torkish Empire, and the East Indies. These mails are opened for the first time 
at Aachen, and distriboted to the speediest lines of transmission fbr thdr l es p e c t l ve dastlnafioas AU 
letters sent by this mode should be directed ** by Praaiton closed maO.** TIm single weight of letten is 
^ ot. The postage In Bnrope is osoally fhm 30 to 40 cts., to Asia or AlHoa fhjm 88 to 70 eta. 

Closed mails are also sent to the West Indies far Mexico^ and to Califbmto fbr British Oolomhiaaad 

Cuma MuL Aoootnnr. 



vunard ilne>»« «•••«•«•«>«• 

Oanadlan line 

Oemian Uoyd line..... 

CMway line .m.... 

Havre line 

Hamburg line 

MIseellaneoos line...... 

Tanderbllt Ilne....~.... 

Kcrth Atlantic Steam- 
ship Oompanv... 

Wsst India maus..«..«.. 



(hmea. 
65,755i 

0/t67 
14,582 

1.264 
14,026i 

8,737i 
14»420 

0,150 

8»670 



133,7744 



Ounca. 

82,018i 
1^6^ 
7,622 
8,1664 

17,278 
8,607* 

18,821 
3,4884 

0,904 



140,5724 



Oitnctg. 

40,6374 

7561 

211 

626i 

404 

11 

43 

17* 



42,058i 



9<u 


11 


Otmeu. 


Oaaces. 


34,0M 


0,810 


145 


3,607 


118 


643 


66e4 


60 


664 


008 


21 


334 




1,070 




005 


••• »•••■• 


404 




7487 


26,000* 


24,328* 



I 



s 



II 



Ounces. 

3,9801 

4* 

1684 

1254 

018 

620* 
S764 

034 



I" 



^4l2^ 



•1SI 

M4 

474 

sro 

00 
4011 
142 

101 



8,0224 



|1 
If 



Oameer. 
689* 
751 
411 
61 
Kl 
6* 
46* 
10 

10 



824* 



NnrspAPBi. 



Canard tine 

Canadian line 

German Uoyd line 

Oalway line.. 

Havre line 

Hamburg line 

Miscellaneous line..... 

Tanderbllt line 

North Atlantic Steam 
ship Company. 

aOHU sve see •■•••e »»•••< 



Number. 


Number. 


Number. 


Number. 


Number. 


Number. 


Number. 


13,943 
2,503 
4,770 
418 
44)61 
1,607 
8,080 
2,182 

1,147 


45,973 
686 

7313 

2,262 
16,100 

5,563 
14,342 

6,910 

4,342 


286,612 

872 

12 

2,010 

10 

11 

3 


118,161 

870 

38 

2,770 

103 

17 


25,171 
0,138 
1,613 

215 
2,003 

280 
8,618 
1,066 

1,005 
4,076 


1,301 


20,176 

706 

070 

26 

1,046 

63 

801 

1,560 

90 


07 


115 
64 

100 
76 

125 




7 












36,670 


108,901 


200,437 


121,478 


60;288 


2,024 


88,666 



Number. 



«70 
57 
68 
5 
25 
12 
66 
20 



1,126 



>c»n M Pun-Orri 



POBT<OVriOE DIPAKTHKin: 
t, Kimn or PofT-Roum, Am BmHui and 













Affiono 


tun tor 




No. or 

PoM- 


Eil<'nl nf 


"oVtiir 


Eipc-nrlitiirM 
















tu Miloi"' 


DciMrtiBviil. 


D«l»ltH.ut. 


Compen, or 
I^JMDiutera. 


o™Zm^1, 


I7M 


iS 


1,87S 


wr,eM 


sss 


(3,168 


122,081 








180.621) 


30,112 




ISOG 


»3 




]fflo,SW 


213.M4 


69.243 


128^11+4 




!,&&« 


31,078 




377.357 




2^036 




£.100 






48.-S98B 


149,438 


327,8K 


MIS 


Sow 


43.T48 


1,043JK3 




.MlJOl 


487.771 




a,MO 


48,873 


Ml,-Si 


80tJ22 


2Ki.»i4 


621,670 


1617 


3,148 








303.916 


689.189 




3,618 








34^429 


ee4>u 




4,000 


67,(*« 




1.117,881 


376.828 


717,881 


1S» 


4,600 


72.4M 


,111,827 




362,295 


782, I2e 




4,«S0 


TMOS 






lt37JI99 


816,081 


UB 






!l 17^490 


1)187^672 


866,299 


788,818 




41043 


64*» 


,130.11) 


i;iiB;906 


sa>,m 






W8S 


si,seo 


,i9:,:68 


1,1 8S ,018 








1I,«T 




,s»e,62s 
















l!3W712 


447 JW 




IM 




imIsm 


:»24!«83 


1,468,948 


488411 






7,830 


105.3B8 


.«SB,flli 


,CS».M5 


biSM9 




193 


sjm 




.7i>y.4i8 


,782.132 






im 


8,«8« 


isina 

16.480 




)93S,m 


9B6|234 
036,028 




ISJl 


flaw 


OMM 




2.268,171 


718,481 




IBM 


10.127 


iMie 




£830.414 


820,288 






i?,«o 


18,018 




a,9io,«» 


807,317 






»,I70 


12,IH 




2,7S7,aS0 


946,418 




1838 


IIJWI 


18,2M 




3,8*1,768 


812,8ra 






IIJOT 


41,212 


















4,43o;i>ai 






isa 


1W80 


33,B» 




4,03e,s3a 






IHO 


13.4«8 


SS.739 




4,718,230 






1IU 


ia,7i8 


48,733 




4;4lr9;6a 
fi,87*,7B2 








14103 


44,887 




4.29W13 






IMS 


i-iiiss 






4,320,732 






?S 




»,ei8 




4,«4.2II7 
3,BTB,S70 






•IMf 


1«.T4« 


«3.20S 
6S,7«i 




4,328.§60 
4,479.040 






18SD 


18.417 


^^ 




6.212,0M 
6.Z78.402 


\ 




■isa 


a).90i 


*!T;743 




7,ioe.*» 

7,982,967 






iw 


W,410 


alios 




8,877 *!4 
B,«I8,342 








2B,6M 


239,842 




10,106.288 






^^ 




245,801 




ll,l>08,06a 
12,722.470 






1K» 

•IMt 


M4M 


280)062 
240,M4 




IB,7S4!<»8 
18,170,808 






2SS 




140,399 


sSiiaw 


lS.iioa.7S9 






niw 


18,078 


w«,oia 


8.2B9.B» 


11,128.384 







n ondsr the Ibw of HUcb B, IHt. Ikcwfnni 



THE HATIONAL ALUANAO.. 



Tuu C9 Mao-Shttci in 



^ oUm BUrtM, liin«tl of Mag divided unoog 


beSmUB 


It Ii nombered, thoug 
D which each portion of 


.tsr- 


SiUMunTMU- 


1 
1 


1 

III 


11 

P 


II 

1 


1 


i 

P 


1 

1 
1 




JVflu. 

1 

i.aM 

10,368 

Iffi 

■s 

,!S 
B! 

iS 


XiUl. 

04 

108 
»S 

w 

48 

M 

r2!! 

»8 
40 

137,351 

laSo 

4J,«)0 


JKlU. 

701,184 
80^270 

lBI,07i 
1,130,812 


JHfcl. 


,1 

m,e64 

848,740 

T»3,«2 
1,732,176 
100^900 

i,i«a,i8fl 

3,08^462 


MOa. 

m 

102 

i 

lOO 

»5 
08 

M 

18 

«1 

™™6« 
2M,a20 


I07,wi 

l&tM 
4fi8,115 


SsEE 


18,120 

iT,«a 


Kiss-EE 


08.862 

68,040 

""nim 

7(,aia 

]36,4t0 
164,200 




^8W 
U6,1W 

21^180 
MM* 

aMJOBe 

122,587 
*60^ 

86,K» 

ss 

le.ozr 

»3M3 












^^== 


3«,«(I8 

1,M»,IS2 

311,030 

"iiajai 


1.070,023 
i;W270 
3,182,400 
080,180 

48V71 






s=,,..::...z. 


2I,30I> 
A660 

10^ 




sss?- 


8I«,M0 
37,468 










■■"iMW 








ToW.,^ 

Bonla ud loal 
.8.1. ..d n»a 


l«O^W 


18,852,S32 


10,066,783 


1,830^018 


23,118,923 


..._...... 


6,300.*&4 
606376 





■ Ths Bdtliwn, WIImlnBtoii and Phlluletplila fullmd 1. Dnder ■ lUrf Uod Munlw. 
t Ihl. tuclnda il«uiib«l-«iilce tntm Loulirllle tu dnciaD&U. 



POSISOF^tOB DSPARTHBHT. 



Suns. 


1 
1 


1 


1 

i 


if 

N 
ill 


1 


1 

1 


1 
1 
1 






2,1 69,111 

saoMS 


S*6,l(» 
Iflt&MB 
Ml ,702 

i.a«viTz 


302,868 
48,9S4 

69[06e 
101.048 

67 [408 
232,338 
•M«,HO 

OT,m 


1 w 

] 8(1 






Kortb oiitoiB. 

tmlh CudUu. 












Ml^lpp] 


















»«.016 


"■""°' 


V«,IM 


l.J21,8W 


W01,0B3 


M,m,7u 




Boite iDd loal 













ts from Nan Otluoa to UobOe, AU. 





N0d*.r. 


A«o».U 


BwDlwof m™w-l«ton wntm.1 for dellw; 


10,IIM 


SSMt'w 






"W^M 


1,214 




*,TS2» 




U(ee& 


'sEss iTssiir" ~"^ '"""" -^"T " •* 


■■■■m 


-i;si»- 
















ConteBli of lettm wnt oat:— 
Bnii of ncmiigii. dnifla and letter, of credit, bondi tnd oolea of huid, 


|a,4S8,Meoo 




800 

297 










1 [H )T- J T 









SsS« 



S |S S8 ■ 



pll^S|l|IS|55S-5rfl2-"lrf \ 



Is s s ss ssssss s 



gSSB''Si3i*S9''SISSaBS55S«l"='=' 




1S63.] 



POST-OFFICB BBPARTMEN¥. 



m 



Statxmxnt of RsTEirux ASS £xpKin>iTUBi8 or THB PosT-OFnci DBPABsmNv FOR NiHi YKAB8, nunc 

1853 10 1861, vxwLVtPn, kKh BsiocAXxs FOE 1868 ahd 1863. 



- 


Years. 


1853 , - 


1854- 




1855- 


1866 » 


1857 


1858 




••**•*•#•• •••'*••«••••••••••••••••«•••• ft 


186L - -- 


1862. 




^WSfc«. ««—«.»»»«>» 





Ezpenditares. 



$7,982,756 59 
8,577,424 12 
0,968,342 29 
10,407,868 18 
11,507,670 16 
12,721,636 56 
14,964,493 83 
14,874.772 89 
13,/B06,759 11 
14,056,535 28 
12,528,000 00 



RevenueB. 



$5,940,724 70 
6,955^6 22 
7,362,136 18 
7,620,821 66 
8,053,961 76 
8,186,792 86 
7,068,484 07 
9,218,067 40 
0,049,296 40 

10,388,934 60 
0,383,000 00 



DeflciencieB. 



$2,012,031 89 
1,621,837 90 
2,626,206 16 
2,787,046 52 
8,463,718 40 
4,534,843 70 
6,096,009 26 
5,666,705 49 
4,597^462 71 
4,666,600 63 
8,145,000 00 



Total OpsaATXosrs of Arpoamajn Offios foe the Ybae Essmo Jusz 80, 1861, abeahoxd bt SrAfii. 



States aed Tee* 

SnOEIBS. 



AlalMuna.. 

ArkraiBas 

Gdifornia 

Oolondo Terr..... 

Oonnecticiit 

DtkotaTerr 

Delaware- 

DUt.ofOolambia 

Florida. 

Oeoif^ 

niinofa 

Indiana. 

Kentocky 

KaiiMS 

Loaidana 

Maine.. 

Harylaod 

Maanchnaetta. ... 

Michigan 

Minnaanto 

MiMiasipid 

Miflsoari 

Nebvaska Terr... 

Nerada Terr. 

New Hampahire. 

New Jersey. 

New Mexico Terr 

New York 

NortiiCandina... 

Ohio 

Oregmi 

PenosylTania 

Shode laUnd..... 
Boath Oarolina... 

Heoneaaoe 

Vezaa. 

Utah 

Termont. ..•..•.•«•• 

Tirgioia 

Washington Terr 
Wisconsin 



I 



29 

48 

32 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

11 

29 

61 

61 

54 

44 

81 

14 

4 

13 

7 

18 
88 
31 
OS 
12 



3 
O 

4 
10 
46 
38 

7 
68 

3 
14 
42 
50 
11 

4 
77 
17 
85 

1,060 



1 

a 
o 



46 
39 
15 



2 

1 
20 
67 
34 
39 
40 
56 

9 
17 

6 
12 

4 
18 
26 
41 
59 

6 



1 

8 

3 

21 

34 

47 

6 

29 

, 1 

65 

52 

43 

6 

2 

70 

5 

26 

072 



•a 

5 c 



t 



7 

16 
2 



1 

1 

5 

5 

19 

14 

8 

17 

8 

2 

2 

7 

2 

10 

1 

15 

27 

1 



8 
6 

11 
2 

19 
1 
8 

18 

12 



1 

20 

1 

9 

276 




4 

7 



1 

1 
8 
2 

12 
8 
4 

IB 
2 
1 



6 
X 

8 

1 

8 

19 



6 

4 

9 

1 

10 



2 

13 
8 



1 

12 

1 

6 



•8 



to 



116 
121 

59 
2 

37 
4 

11 
2 

37 
185 
227 
258 
173 
171 

73 

45 

68 

62 

39 
136 

83 

94 
240 

21 
1 

31 

82 

3 

206 

117 

363 

20 

241 

8 

36 

171 

142 

7 

37 
264 
6 
140 t 

4^028 



1 

a 
& 



8 

9 

66 

2 

129 



15 

2 

4 

7 

343 

250 

190 

58 

28 

8 

98 

71 

187 

150 

63 

8 

98 

10 

1 

115 

84 

1 

815 

10 

414 

9 

426 

17 

2 

23 

11 

1 

107 

70 

1 

188 

4,040 



10 

4 
1 



2 
1 
1 
4 

15 
9 
7 

16 
1 
8 

11 
3 
3 

10 
8 
5 

20 



2 
6 



15 

4 
20 



16 



3 

6 

12 



4 
20 



6 
261 



216 
237 
176 
6 
173 
6 

82 
8 

78 
247 
689 
621 
472 
802 
146 

94 
189 
168 
242 
842 
208 
194 
537 

49 

2 

152 

137 

11 

1^063 

217 

893 

44 
799 

30 
123 
818 
270 

26 
165 
611 

80 
854 

10,638 




876 

730 

873 

23 

877 

•■ 7 

71 

- 4 

174 

893 

1,474 

1,260 

061 

000 

236 

388 

772 

418 

636 

795 

465 

666 

1,128 

103 

2 

880 

451 

22 

8,518 

1.183 

i;934 

97 

2,385 

91 

634 

1,020 

923 

67 

416 

1,781 

84 

OOT 

28,586 



i 






8 

8 

18 

14 



1 

8 

8 

12 

31 

13 



8 

8 

5 

15 

5 

34 
17 
4 
8 

2 



10 
10 



60 

7 

82 
2 

87 
4 

4 
6 

4 



7 
15 



15 



u 

If 

Il 



m 

788 

866 

28 

868 

7 

70 

8 

171 

881 

1.4a 

1,847 

062 

898 

884 



767 

418 

602 

778 

461 

668 

1,114 

101 

2 

$70 

441 

28 

2,464 

1,178 

1,908 

06 

2,348 

87 

630 

1,014 

010 

57 

400 

1,766 

64 

898 

88,168 



198 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC* [1868. 

Statkmbiit or vme Postal Rxckpts abb 



.JJL, 



States akd Tksritoiuxs. 



Main».« 

New H«ia|Mhire ~ 

Vermont 

MaMMhttfletts 

Bhod« Ldand 

Conneotiout. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Fenneylvania. 

Delaware .... 

MaryUnd....... 

Diatriet of Ck>luinbU.... 

Virginia «..• 

North CaroUna. 

South -Carolina. 

Oeorgia »... 

Florida » 

Alabama 

Miaaisaippi 

Texaa 

Xentuoky 

Hichigan 

Wisconsin 

Louisiana. ..„ 

Tennesaee-.M 

Missouri ., 

niittoia ,' 

Ohio 

Indiana ~ 

Arkansas , 

Iowa. 

^California 

Oregon 

Minnesota. 

New Mexico, 

Utah 

Nebraska. 

Washington 

Kanaas 

Colorado 

Dakota « 

Add misoellaneovt items...... 

Deduct miscellaneous items 

Add receipts on account of emolu- 
ments, ibc 

2>«d«et excess of receipts. 



& 

« 

o 
a. 

1-3 



$13,477 63 

8,767 41 

3,595 59 

56,333 64 

4,127 27 

9,207 80 

191379 63 

12.750 39 

54,194 12 

1,548 67 

14,701 82 

5,567 35 

11,104 38 

3.080 67 

7,039 06 

6,335 15 

991 40 

7,409 33 

5,639 52 

7,504 61 

8,029 59 

14,361 44 

16,327 55 

25,641 03 

5,025 67 

17.629 88 

30,488 95 

28,471 64 

14.069 94 

2,990 96 

9,409 91 

35,680 63 

2,990 58 

4,736 44 

70185 

2,538 99 

795 06 

1,426 55 

3,428 19 

255 33 

33 47 



$645.288 99 
1,209 15 



$646,498 14 



$14,184 09 

11,034 56 

13.240 89 

27,444 17 

3,723 68 

17,037 12 

80,168 42 

11,376 70 

42.111 39 

2.172 91 

9,866 31 

3.064 74 

20,558 14 

9,570 08 

5,814 24 

14,256 44 

1,751 88 

11.956 20 

10,608 11 

9.019 72 

13,981 36 

17.429 10 

17,946 59 

11,745 20 

I2,ai8 56 

18,098 17 

40.419 06 

44,548 02 

28.540 72 

5.629 91 

15,711 11 

14.554 53 

1,995 72 

6,122 29 

237 12 

366 65 

054 96 

411 91 

2,824 04 

66 01 

937 



$671,605 22 
396 »4 


$671,209 2S 





$446 70 

217 30 
121 85 

1,008 60 
116 45 
208 80 

2;679 10 

231 45 
2,044 35 

62 40 
441 40 
310 50 
714 70 
444 45 
330 40 
871 40 

65 15 
667 90 

232 95 

218 15 
388 00 
587 50 
705 25 
615 15 
524 95 
657 35 

1,301 60 

1.722 55 

862 65 

72 46 

425 25 

448 96 

960 

168 90 

305 

235 

17 35 

7 95 

56 65 

40 

20 



$19,306 10 


45 


$19,305 65 



s 

I 

I 



$146,908 46 

96.439 07 

95.783 53 

569.917 41 

62,24122 

181.889 23 

1,460.965 89 

121.745 23 

632.220 78 

118,400 48 

149.271 83 

40.920 95 

191.031 94 

59.974 63 

67,518 02 

123,783 41 

15,724 33 

11(U» 43 

71.816 63 

86.702 98 

136.453 98 

156.814 80 

160.478 03 

I58,30g87 

118.023 51 

195.504 04 

412,604 00 

474,606 79 

195.080 32 

38,184 46 

121.751 27 

280.706 23 

13.172 67 

86.376 87 

3.242 13 

2,729 T9 

8^105 72 

2,ir79 28 

26,972 05 

161 27 

137 96 



$6,808,907 79 
"1»,U6'36 



$6^864.79143 



I 
I 



$176,011 88 
in.4fia34 
ltt.741 86 
664,608 82 

71K9I7 62 
206^862 95 
1.7S8^tMBD4 
146,103 77 
790.87U61 
122;ia4 46 
174.28136 

40,883 54 
a23^«0 16 

78^83 

85jin72 
144,761 40 

18^532 76 
180^291 86 

88,Sir7 2l 
lQakM5 46 
158.882 93 

1>6^|«B7 42 
19flyBUI25 

iaiy6»59 

23i,aa»44 

484»71S61 

6lMiOOO 

238^053 63 

46^077 81 

147.197 54 

281,400 34 

1Z40»47 

46.4M60 

iL84 15 

6.89 18 

93B 09 

4385 69 

33.880 93 

483 01 

181 UO 



$8,180,108 10 

liaJoTi 



$8,13t.$I7 25 



• • ••«•••*• • • ••»#ee 



NoTB.— The following items of revenue are not embraced in the abore statement, vis. :— 

Beceipts on account of emoluments .*. $94,363 45 

Miacellaneons receipts 3.834 82 

Receipts on Itocount of fines SO Oi 

Total $98.418 y 

Excess of expenditures over receipts '. $3,721 ,6?ff ^ 

Add amount paid fbr iCoreign mails and expenses of Oovernment mail agents $766.^1 37 

Boute agento... ^ .^ < 842.776 68 

Bopply of special oftoes and mail messengers » 269.368 13 

jBhip. s^amboat, and wa/ letters 12,007 06 

Amount oarried ftorward $1,390,672 18 $3,721,633 37 



1668.] POBI-OFEICE DBPAKZMEHT. 

Kim t i i U KM rm tbi Fucti Yiui iin>ii<a Juki 30, ISttl. 





? 


i 

1 
i 

i 


siiHi 


f 
1 


t 

r 


1 


ftSS" 


si 

M 

^1 
„^„ 

'!:SS 

^i 

III 

i| 


Sf. 

si 
si 
si 

mm 

ss 

N 

sz 

Si! 
S5 
SS 
SS 


'III 

Si 
Si 

11 

«s 
■sss 

III 


S!S 
SfflS 

stss 

Si 

ass 
'iiisi 

gSJS 

as 


t!7.«7M 


Sl^M 


l^u 


Sl^OMM 








ifi! 




Si 




ss~ 


21,118 1» 












U^SM 


iiiSi'M 


















"7^% 


«I,13J.»MW 


•nss 


HIS^H 


"■•Wit 


•^'SSS^ 


S98RM9 71 
















(WHIST IS 


»1.1W.M<»1 


$S.«3.1!3 47, 


».m.m 88 




M,W7,0[0 M 


l»s6,«ien 












Lcawaw 






















t3,KI,6B ST 








Hin drpndUkiiw ind iruiia If 



200 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[18«3. 



.StATEXBITT BXHIBITIXO THB ReCXIFTS Ain> EXPENDITURXS OF THE POST-OFFICK DlPARTmRT, UHDKB TSOB 

sKYERAt Heads, for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1861. 



Receipts. 


Third quarter 
I860. 


Fourtb quarter 
18tH). 


First quarter 
1861. 


Second quarter 
186L 


Total under 
each bead. 


Letter-postage 

Newspapers and pampb- 
lets 


$159,182 10 

153,406 19 

5,320 20 

1,768,527 81 

30,496 76 

37,492 91 

226'75 


$151,800 58 

146,293 44 

5,630 81 

1,786»907 74 

18,524 42 

30,481 92 

250 

2,710 40 


$179,512 77 

• 

146,424 12 

5,009 90 

1,792,210 25 

36^347 16 

38,362 83 

7 60 

723 41 


$166,002 69 

126,086 68 

3,344 76 

1,617,146 68 

H196 18 

86,796 96 

10 00 

174 17 


$646^408 14 

671,209 28 

19,306 66 

0,864^791 43 

94,563 46 

149,073 62 
20 00 


Registered letters 

Stamps sold 

Receipts on account of 
emolument 


Receipts on account of 

letter-carriers 

nnes 


Miscellaneous receipts.. 


8,834 82 




$2,154,052 71 


$2,146,301 90 


$2,196,587 93 


$1,851,753 86 


$8,349,296 40 



Amount due from the United Fta^Hi to the United Kingdom on account of postages for 

the first, second, third, and fourth quarters, 1860 $109^808 07 

Amount due from the United States to France on acrount of postages for the fourth 

quarter, 1859, and first, second, and third quarters, 1860 88,878 43 

Amount doe from the United States to Hamburg on account of postages for the third 

and fourth quarters, I860, and first and second quarters, 1861 16,749 6^ 

Amount due from the United States to Bremen on account of postages for the third and 

fourth quarters, 1860, and first and second quartets, 1861.. 18^3 W^ 



Expenditures. 



Compensation to post- 
masters 

' Ship, steamboat, and 
. way letters.. 

Transportation of the 
mafls. 

Interest account, act 
Februarr 15, 1860 

Wrapping-paper 

OfSce-ftirniture. 

Advertising. 

Mail-bags.... 

Blanks 

Mail locks, keys, Ac 

Mail depredations and 
special agenta 

Clerks for offices 

Postage stamps and en- 
velopes... 

Bead letters 

Payments to letter-car- 
riers' 

Miscellaneous payments 

Miscellaneous, account 
British mails. 

Misrollaneoas, account 

• French moils. 



Third quarter 
1860. 



$641,452 82 

3,526 96 

2,512,355 78 

4,402 86 

25.518 08 

719 32 

6,718 70 
16,626 85 
37,516 9S 

1,182 70 

16,737 60 
229,967 00 

23,147 77 
499 

37.492 91 
61,233 27 

46,030 39 



$3,653,633 98 



Fourtb quarter 
1860. 



$646,611 43 

8,324 66 

2,891,798 94 

196 25 

8,989 20 

712 43 

16^205 29 

14.780 60 

14.158 01 

3,543 94 

11.393 80 
200,195 31 

23,762 11 



39,431 92 
128,981 32 



24,440 59 



$4,087,525 79 



First quarter 
186L 



$668,327 69 

2,638 72 

1,858,213 24 

60 87 

8,187 60 

198 14 

11,641 02 

18,284 14 

12,943 02 

896 00 

0,828 41 
245,396 88 

33,793 24 



36,362 83 
63,449 34 

39,696 88 



$2,999,759 57 



Second quarter 

im 



$668,766 20 

2,616 72 

1,910,906 92 

39 86 

8,226 08 

647 66 

6,186 79 

17325 03 

15,242 17 

8,028 60 

10,877 41 
211,646 12 

12,060 68 
448 

86,795 96 
37,782 68 

34^ 60 



•••••••• 



$2,865,839 77 



Total under 
each bead. 



$2,614^57 U 

12,007 06 

0,173,278 88 

4,699 64 
60,920 96 

2,177 56 
40,758 70 
06^906 U 
70,850 18 

8,660 14 

^947,806 31 

92,772 79 
9 48 

149,073 62 
f2Tl,446 61 

txaojun 82 



$13,666,769 tl 



« $25,297 63 of this sum was allowed by the Postmaster-General to postmasters in OalifoRiia and 

Oregon, in pursuance of the 4th and 5th sections of the act of July 27, 1854. 
f $58,074 26 of this sum was allowed by the Poetmaster-Oeneral to like postmasters under tho maa» act 
t Tn payment of halanoet, including premium on exdiatufe^ ascertained to be due tann the iMUtd 

.States, on account of postages, to foreign ffovemments, as folfows : — 

.' To the United Kingdom, on account of the second, third, and fourth quarters, 1860 .4720,607 63 

i To the kingdom of Fraooe, on ftcconnt of the flntt, second, and fourth quarters, 1860. ^ 24,440 iO 



1868.] 



POg^lM&WDCE I>BFAR'nii8KT. 



201 



PofftAOX Stamps aks Postasx EirtEtjOpxa astrxD akd boij) nr ths Tsak ramnfa Jum ao, 1881. 



Kind. 



Ou»<eaX ~ 

Three-cent 

Tiv^<»nt 

Ten-cent 

Twefv^e-oent 

■Ttrenty-four-oent.~ 

U'Uirty-cent 

Nine^-cent 

Stamfid Bntxlopxs. 

IhieeHsent note size.. 

Three-cent letter size 

Teixent " " 

Six-cent officiaL.. 

Onenoent letter size 

FouiHsent letter size. 

I1»ree-oent note size, ruled... 
Three-cent letter size^ riided. 



iliDoant. 



63JS93y79Z 

161^,05$ 

677,200 

a,92S,eM 

1,053,900 

650,600 

840,000 

24^280 



471,8(0 

16,655,450 

131,750 

40,450 

1,534,2S0 

35,000 

106,950 

6^646,350 



Kind. 



SxAXPiD Eimxopss. 

One-cent letter size, rqled.....» 
Fonr-cmt letter size, ruled r.. 

Whole nnmber of stamps 

Valm. 

Whfde number of stamped en- 

relopes 

Valu 

Total amount for 1861 

T6tal value iaroed in I860..... 

Decreaaeln 1861 

Cost of envelopes and of their 

distribution in 1861....^ 

Postage stamps and stamped 

envelopes sold in 1861 

Amonnt used in prepurment 

of postage and canoeUed in 

1861 

In poeaesBion of purchasers 

June 80, UBOl......... 



Amount. 



V310,750 

35,000 

211,788,51^ 

16,908,522 60 

26,027,300 

$781,711 13 

16,690,233 73 

$6,870,316 10 

$180,082 46 

$47,366 68 

$6^64,791 48 

$8,469,622 06 
406,lfl9 88 



A SOftPLUfl OF EMOLVintNTS A9D CDMHISSIOICB ACCKUBD AT THB FOLLOTTINO POST-OFPIOSS) AFTIE nSDUCTIIlO 

Tu Maximum CoMPXXSATtozr of $2000 pbr AinruM of thb Postmastebs, Ain> thb nsousakt Incidxmtal 
Exnssss OF xiu OmcMB, ninuKo xbb J^sbcal Tjbab wnino Junx 30, 1861, txz. :— 



G»..., $887 71 

Alexandria, Ya. 177 59 

Albany, N.T.. 2;210 66 

Austin, Texas 27 85 

Augusta, Maine 87 56 

Alexandria, La.~ 76 15 

Alton, in 888 94 

Ann Arbor, Mich 11 07 

Baltimore, Md 36 60 

Hoston, Mass. 14,800 98 

Brooklyn, N.Y 2,042 81 

BnflWo, N.Y 8,594 99 

Bridgeport, Conn........ 4 19 

Bath. Maine 85 91 

Bingihamton, N.Y- 41 01 

Blo'.mington, III 1 19 

Cblambns, Ga. 4 76 

01eeelaDd,'0hla. ^ 24)12 4$ 

Columbus, Ohio 61 98 

Chicago. IlL 8,043 04 

Charleston, S.C 845 22 

Oocinnati, Ohio 8,339 11 

Oiho, 111 287 71 

Cblms, Maine. 37 71 

Covington, Ky. 147 97 

•Cknibiidge, Mass. 4 66 

Oiambersburg, Pa. 



. 34 65 

Detroit, Mich..: 7,793 57 

Uavtoa, Ohia 860 00 

.>II|waakle, Wis 821 71 

Mniicliester. N.H 148 63 

.Miulison, Wis 823 49 

MUdletoirn« Conn 2 69 

New Bedford, Mass 328 45 

NewBifc, VJ 748 31 

NasbTflle, Tenn 1,688 67 

New York, N.Y 89,469 03 

Norfolk. Ta 41 61 

New Orleans, La. 6,060 83 

Norwich, Conn. 47 15 



Newburg, N.Y $421 84 

Nashua, N.H 191 80 

New Brunswkk, N.J.. 63 43 

New Haven, Conn 1,230 68 

vMwego^ M.x ...... ..M...I 2Sio lo 

Ottawa, 111 44 56 

OM P. Comlbrt, ya...r. 128 88 

Portland, Me 1,871 57 

Philadelphfah Pa 11,069 26 

Petersburg, Va ....4..... 406 87 

Providence. R.I 601 63 

Pittsburg, Pa 2,763 12 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y 306 10 

Pottaville^ Pa Bl 03 

Paterson, NJ 21 97 

Richmond, Va. 2,166 04 

Rochester, N.Y 875 91 

Raleigh, N.O..... 38$ 08 

Rome, N.Y 11 01 

Richmond, Ind 59 91 

Dubuque, Iowa...—... . 79 ^9 

Des Moines, Iowa 14 21 

Erie, Pa 100 47 

£Tansville,Ind 135 82 

fort Wayne, Ind 2U 63 

Frankfort, Ky 41 66 

Frederick, Md. 83 69 

<3alveBtoa, Ttezas. 806 79 

Grand Rapids, Mich... 85 40 

Hartford, Conn 843 03 

Hainsburg, Pa.....:..:. 1,587 67 

HttdBOB, N.Y....: 87 42 

Hagerstown, Md 121 29 

Indlftnapotls, Ind 2,257 87 

Jersey City, N.J 950 11 

JeiTerson City, Mo..... 614 16 

Keokuk, Iowa. 86 42 

Kensington, Pa 189 41 

Kalamazoo. Mich. 235 47 

LonisrUIe, Ky 8,908 78 



Lowell, libss. 

Lewistowu, Me 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lockport, N.Y 

Lynchburig, Ya.. 

Montgomery, Ala 

Mobile, Ala. ^ 

Macon, Qa 

Memphis, Tenn 

Savannah, Ga.........^ 

St. Louis, Mo 

Syracuse, N.Y 

Salem, Mass 

Springfield, Mass 

Springfield, III 

San Francisco, Cal...... 

Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 

8audui>ky, Ohio 

Schenectady, N.Y 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

MC1IWA9 AJA*ftaft«««a ••••«••« 

San Antonio, Texas.^ 

Toledo. Ohio 

jcroy, ^.x...... ..•••»•».•. 

Trenton, N J — 

Terre Haute, Ind 

Utica, N.Y 

Yicksbui^g, Miss .., 

Washington, D.C 

Worcester, Mass. 

Wilmington, Bel 

Wilmington, N.C 

WiUiamsburg, N.Y 

Watertown, N.Y 

White Horse. N J 

Zjanesville^ Ohio 



$99 20 
48 to 

6118 

40 2$ 

20 00 

1,626 9$ 

6$ 84 

424.66 

2,011 60 

8U 27 

16,162 37 

160 99 

15 01 

601 67 

985 70 

9,137 27 

4 64 

12 72 

97 06 

582 10 

U67 

119 04 

3,009 11 

76 86 

163 48 

137 20 

296 96 

128 05 

5,111 29 

773 38 

14,016 78 

60 08 

665 49 

232 

188 68 

108 89 



Total. 



.$244,404 20 



202 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1868. 



Svismunt ov Lmsu A2n> Newspapibs, with thb sktikai. PosvAan, oomrBTSD bt VABions Xans 

OF OCBAN SUAMIBS DUBINO IHB FISCAL YlAK UTOZNa JUMS 80, 1861. 



Names of Lines. 


Offices. 


Letters. 


News- 
papers. 


Postage 
on letters 
receired. 


Postage 

on letters 

sent. 


Total 
postages. 


New York and California, via 
AspinwaU 


New Ybrk...... 

Boston. 

Philadelphia.. 

Balttmore 

Washington... 

Chicago 

Cincinnati^... 
GhfU'leston .... 
New Orleans.. 
Savannah 

New Orleans.. 


732,156 

4,191 

60,101 

17,521 

10,646 

86,629 

10,306 

1,080 

26 

652 

616 


2,466^1 

9,800 

27?,636 

43,513 

45,592 

55,926 

3446 

3,942 


142,876 60 


$51,011 58 

498 19 

8,829 77 

1.026 61 

711 80 

1,798 76 

1,096 21 

106 06 


$93,888 06 
498 19 


• 


1,672 77 
947 89 
644 91 

2,012 49 


6,002 64 
1,974 40 

1,256 71 
3,81126 
1,098 21 




13 64 

2 60 

13 82 


118 70 
2 io 


New York and California, via 
TehiiftnteDec 


980 


72 67 

68 84 


86 89 

58 84 










Total 


863,921 


2,891,885 


48,084 62 


59,711 29 


107,796 91 






Add newspaper postage, at one 
cent 










28,918 86 












• 


l\ital Doetaees.....<....k..... 


136,714 7« 




New Orleans.. 


21,782 


4,060 


2,648 69 


1,646 1» 


New Orleans and Vent Gmz~.... 


4,888 88 


Add newspaper postage, at two 
cents. 










81 % 
















Total Dostasrefl r,, »,..., 


4,370 06 




Various offices 


689,098 


204,172 


84^089 84 


29,880 17 


West India Islands 


63,929 61 

44)83 44 


Add newspaper postage, at two 
cents „ 














Total Dostains 


68/n2 95 




Various offices 


64,611 


68,849 


3,780 66 


6,877 18 


pA.niLnia anil MexiC0.,.TT,T 


10,107 73 




Add newspaper postsge, at four 






•••■••••••■^«*« 




2,753 96 














Total postages 


12,861 69 
















AeKreeate total postaees. 


221,960 48 















AxouNT OF Postages ox Mails Exohanokd bbtwibit thb Unitbd Statis ahs BBmsH FaonaoB 

DimiNO THB Fiscal Ybab bbdhcg Junb 30, 1861. 



Amount on unpaid received. «. 
Amount on paid received 



Amount on unpaid sent 
Amount on paid sent .... 



$29,086 88 
58,853 36 

31,743 08 
67,218 19 



$87,939 23 
98,961 27 



Total , 186,900 50 



Amount collected in the United States 96^304 07 

Amount coUected in the British lurovlnces * , 90,596 4S 



Balance in fitvor of the United States. 



6,707 61 



1863.] 



POBT^nXOB DEPAETMSm 



20S 



Lnms Am KurspAms bioiivbd ami> nm bt Oowur SRAnmg w ahd runt CFrcat BsitAiir Ain> 
iBKLAm, PEimu, Vbaitoi^ Biuiuii; Bmanr, ajid HAmirM ur vin Yiak 1861. 



Lotion and Now*- 
papora. 


Canard 
Lino. 


Canadian 
Lino. 


.1 

si 


Lino. 




1^ 


1^ 


1^ 


ml 


1 


BftiTiSH Mails. 
TiOttara TMialvad.......... 


M6b713 
964.076 


82^696 
100.144 


31.120 
170,728 


10,299 
48,353 


76^436 

130.534 

44.758 

193.757 


12J87 
39.096 

73;786 


162.194 

171,074 

66.223 

216,817 


100.460 


27.966 

55.159 
17.817 
6R,8i2 


1,707.439 

1.591.644 

806,364 

1.936.962 


Lotton sent 


Nowipapors recoivod... 
2Is»gD«neni sont.... 




Pbvssian Mails. 
Letters xve^vod 


194.4SS 
200.294 

13,070 
45^616 


38.295 

4.610 

2,789 

664 


40.968 
23.554 

4.397 
7,794 


7,061 

11,407 

722 

3,359 


43.994 

53,630 

6,285 

10^100 


6.621 

10,970 

785 

6^476 


40.990 

59,526 

3,380 

14,942 


26.310 

as.747 

2.955 
6.990 


17.991 

21.718 

1,700 

4,342 


414.608 

462.456 

86.093 

109,608 


Letters sent 


Newspapers reeolTod... 
KsvuiaDera aont. ........ 




Fbutoh Mails. 

i^ttnn ^MMii vmI. . ■■■•■■■• 


8B3.642 

360.216 

84.137 

106.602 


127.014 

12.116 

23.095 

3,876 


30.ttl 

52.002 

6.504 

24.508 


6.6R2 

13.582 

1,883 

4.971 


51.652 
76^045 
12,056 
36,630 


8^272 
31.137 

2.333 
16.008 


99,U» 

70382 

8.336 

81^329 


SB;687 


S74B2 

80.295 

6.117 

12^110 


163,366 
806,406 




newspapers reoeired... 
Vowsoaxiefa aont.. 




Bblgiah Mails. 
Letters reeeiTod..... 


10,937 

10,929 

6,749 

1.SD1 


3,090 

186 

^171 

59 


766 

1,591 

811 

124 


819 

416 

377 

33 


1.481 

1.938 

1,137 

140 


264 

767 

232 

72 


2,003 
2.172 
1.719 


1.097 

858 

775 

68 


660 

751 

618 

87 


90.597 
1.879 


Letters sent 


Bevsnaoers aont......... 




Bbbxsk Mails. 
Letters r«eeiTed 






133,916 

147.528 

12,788 

49,800 






■ ••••••• 




















Mewspapera rooeived... 




























BAmmoua Mails. 
Letters reoeiTod 






»•«•««•*• 


••*«••••• 




10S.07S 

184.320 

87,667 


•*••••••• 





• ••MM** 




Letters sent.. 




Newspapers reeoired... 
Bewspapers sent 




•••••••■• 




•••••«••• 














.:;...;;] 





wan BT OcBAir Snuxnui vo QtauLt BmAXtr JkHs CttUtrD, FHahcb, Fritssia, 
BnxouM, BKimir, ahb Hambusa. 



5g 

BaiTWHlfAnA. 

SeeeiMd. 

Unpaid 

Uopaid die- t 

triboied ( 

Paid 

Paid dii- } 

triboted 5** 

Total. 

Sent. 

p«ld 

Paid die- { 

iribnted 5" 
Uapaid. 

Total 



$58,051 4S 
66,370 67 
69,200 06 
45,98118 



190,645 34 



650 25 

113,605 12 

80.068 67 

194,413 04 



816,760 T4 
42,787 77 
14,948 71 
33,006 97 






104,807 19 



n,898 80 
7,908 66 

39.801 48 



•3,908 18 
6,481 76 
2,249 34 
8,713 64 



14,686 82 



490 59 

16,813 08 

9,754 St 

36,907 84 



« 

a 

? 

"a 
o 



•2,044 80 
5,090 90 
1,118 70 
2,904 48 



11,061 38 



S 52 
5,481 14 
3,065 08 

8,618 60 



8 

> 



•4.874 47 
6,847 69 
3,107 36 
4,648 40 



18,877 65 



907 18 
21,700 87 
12,729 82 

34.687 33 



J 

I 



•544 14 

1,191 80 
471 52 
844 73 



2.962 37 



66 02 
6,646 67 
4,117 06 

9,818 67 



3 



•8,014 07 

16,970 73 

5,866 47 

9.866 88 



89,096 54 



336 00 
96,&8&S8 
14,610 06 

41,800 64 



•8,779 84 
4.031 46 
1,866 63 
8,190 84 



11,888 76 



96 84 

11,620 71 

5,S62 90 

17.170 01 




•1,837 83 

3,606 66 

900 84 

1,758 04 



6,784 36 



64 98 
8,988 66 
4.604 18 

13,487 67 



i 



•96,700 96 

Ul,396 31 

68,885 43 

103,838 69 



410,690 81 



1.740 86 
331.678 68 
143,346 80 

375,754 36 



204 



MB NATIOKAL ALMANAC' 



[1863. 



Amoant ncelTed finr nnpaid letteca.*.......* ** — *.».*. 1887^936 80 

Amount of paid letteri dlstrilrated 172^94 01 

Amount of paid letters sent 288,414 00 

Amount of unpaid letters sent ~ 142,340 30 

Amount collected in the United States 471,410 80 

Amount collected in the United Kingdom ^ » 314,804 81 

Total : $780,274 07 

Bxoeas collected in the United Statee $1MM»46 06 



Pbuhux 
Maxu. 



Unpaid 

Vopald dU* 
tribated 

P«id 

PftlldU- I 
triba«ed I " 



Total. 



SenL 



Paid 

Paid dli- { 
tributadr*** 
Uopaid 



Total. 



I 



I 



tll,86S 27 

98,773 06 

ft,Ml 65 

9,46S0(> 



$50,889 88 



18,8M89 
40,179 88 



tn.oes 77 



e 
m 



81.871 19 
MOBO 

708 80 
1,889 61 



81.780 58 

T,98r 17 

799 00 

8,039 49 



89,351 IS 



78^ 57 

niu 



81,440 91 



13.546 19 



6,644 17 
l,f7S06 



87,317 28 



e 
a 



I 



8382 96 

1,372 76 
172 80 
359 50 



82,188 00 



1,8^31 
1,637 30 



83,46T 61 



I 



82,149 12 

8,401 61 

906 31 

2,186 06 



13,642 99 



129 11 
7,983 27 
8,176 46 



16,238 84 



i 

3 



9 

m 



8290 40 

1/)63 41 

127 20 

806 40 



81.746 41 



2,640 47 
746 26 



83,386 73 



i 



81.783 19 

8,110 97 

768 30 

2,019 68 



12,683 14 



9.466 66 
8,609 TB 



18,086 42 



> 



81,286 49 

4,648 38 

566 40 

1,333 36 



87,704 64 



4,666 39 
8,497 38 



88,063 75 



1^ 

I! 



0015 66 

410 50 
894 83 



85,471 93 



8,789 64 
2,887 78 



86.626 88 



I 



9,696 86 
19,96188 



124,« 



8129 U 

fs,8a>n 

68,106 19 



I4i;n2 or 



Amount of unpaid poetc^e collected on letters received and distributed. 

Amount of prepaid postage on letters received 

Amount of postage prepaid on letters sent ~ 

Amount of postage unpaid on letters sent..,*. ^......«< .....<<. 



l05/)05 63 
2d,057 68 
73^1188 
08,100 10 



Amount collected in United States on letters received and sent. 
Amount collected in Frasda 



X^UvotI •••••••••••fsf •>••«*»••••••«•• «9« 



••a •«e«cooa«»«*atf*i>«*»c •%••«««•••««••••••«•*•«•♦••«•••• ••^•••••fvi*«»*0* 



108^17 51 
97,767 87 



Excess collected in the United States |70!,7fiO 04 



Fsncv 

Maiui. 



BaeatMi. 

OapaUL 

Unpaid dia- I 

tifbuled ) 

Paid 

Paid dti- ) 

tribttttd 5" 

Total. 



BmL 



?aid 
aid dia- I 
•ributod $•"• 
Unpaid ....M.. 

Total 



o 


a 


818,148 12 


84,189 16 


17,286 11 


7,972 27 


11,072 91 


8,346 81 


16.834 72 


6,760 36 


858,341 88 


822,106 80 


82B6 40 
21,016 21 




1,109 91 


29.266 61 


888 68 



856.619 It I 81.962 69 



i 

I 



84,996 97 
2,996 09 
1,476 97 
2,106 66 



88,676 69 



8137 10 
6,759 81 
6,164 18 



12,886 69 



I 



i-9 

*4 



02 

2,156 74 

873 59 

1,50168 



86,688 87 



856 46 
3.964 60 
4.170 20 



t8191 66 



1 






8i.4»ra» 

1,922 69 
1,064 90 
1,874 68 



86,846 01 



878 90 
2,970 36 
2.008 26 



86.661 61 



$218 M 
644 64 

171 14 
401 76 



81,481 87 



819 96 
2,329 48 
2,612 80 



a 



I 



9a^ 

382 86 

128 76 
267 09 



49 81,89» 



8806 68 



81 88 
1,196 28 
1,067 62 



i 

1*9 



56 

2,808 87 

876 88 

1,862 76 



86,972 96 



8108 71 
6,569 61 
6.491 21 






XtO 



81.108 86 

1,361 10 

791 92, 

966 62 



•4,132 60 



$4122 

2,448 77 
8,332 11 



i 



$94,64146 
37,521 V 
19.688 18 
82,083 91 



113,924 39 



84,868 26 $2,986 TSi 11,161 48t$4322 16 



61,964 72 
64,436 51 

166»4699t 



1868.] 



POffl^OlVICE PBPABTMBWX. 



aea 



Amoant of unpaid pootage collected on letten reeeired uoA dirtribnted fOS^QS 36 

Amount of prepaid postage on letten reoeiyed...................^......^ 51,766 04 

Amoont of postage prepaid on letten sent ^ 52,034 35 

Amount of postage unpaid on letten sent ~ 54,486 57 

Amount collected in the United States 114,202 70 

Amount collected in France 106,191 61 



Total 



$220^9M 81 



coUected in the United States » $8/)ll 09 



Capald dis- 
trfbated 

T»i& 

Paiddi*- ) 
irikated ('" 



Total. 



TM 

r«iddi*-{ 
tribucd)*" 
rnpAid. 



i 

s 



«n ST 

843 07 



tS,Ml 76 



s 



•isodr 

us 64 
SIOSO 
Mi 4» 



681160 



3. 

S3 



•4ltt 
7183 



•SDiU 



I 



•M41 
1161 
1148 

M84 



686M 



3 
I 



•3tl4 
88 19 

msr 
117 n 



$989 32 



a 

a 
I 



$1161 
18 18 
M38 

37 54 



$68 68 



i 



4 



$118 87 

104 48 
lfi8 47 

105 78 



$540 71 



3 



$66 08 
44 83 

105 17 
83 85 



$296 82 






$43 36 

39 54 
67 33 

40 50 



$178 30 



I 



$1,088 7& 
944 4V 

1,850 6$ 
I.6S5 71 



$5,629 il 



$888 33 

8,187,83 



$35 65 
34 37 



$134 73 

297 54 



$39 68 

73 63 



$168 15 
357 08 



$57 51 
146 35 



$178 47 
10 



$79 11 
178 66 



$70 30 
183 57 



04 



$58 83 



$433 37 



$113 83 



$535 18 



$308 76 



$587 57 



$268 66 



$303 77 



$1,6511$ 

8,706 88 



$5.868 6$ 



Amount of unpaid postage otdlected on letten received and distributed.........^ ....... C^043 22 

Amount of prepaid postage ton letten recelTed ....m.............. ............ 8^486 29 

Amount ofpostage pr^Mdd on letten sent « 1,661 73 

Amount of postage unpaid on letten sent 3,706 86 

Amount collected in the United States 8^ 96 

Amount c<41ected in Belgium 7,198 15 



Ttotal $10,888 10 



collected in Belgium :.. $8,498 20 



BmnsMAiu 


Unpaid. 


tribnted. 


raid. 


Paid dls- 
tribotad. 


Total. 


Bmn. 


Paid. 


Paid di*. 
«ftrib«tsd. 


Unpaid. 


Total. 


Br Qenaaa 

IJifdLlM.. 


$ 


$ 


$ 
1,483 10 


$ 

4,01164 


$ 
17,329 98 


Bt 0«maa 
UojdUaa.. 

TotaL 


$ 
8800 


$ 
14,417 77 


$ 
5,857 54 


$ 
19.713 81 


Tocal 


S,2T0 73 


9,515 53 


1,433 10 


4,011 04 


17,289 88; 


88 00 


14,417 77 


5,25r64 


19,718 n 


imamut r»- 


11,788 00 




6,448 74 








14,455 77 




5,357 74 








1 









AmooBt oollaotad in the United States $26,242 01 

Amount ooUacted in Bremen « 10,701 28 



Total 



..$86^943 29 



eolleetadln theUntted StOftoi... — $15,640 78 



206 



THB NATIONAL Alilf AKAO. 



[1968. 



Hails 
Bbcsttsb. 


Unpaid. 


Unpaid 

dto- 
tributed. 


PaM. 


Paid dlf 

ti^ibuted. 


Total. 


Hambcbs 
Mails Sskt. 


Paid. 


Paiddls. 

tributed. 


Unpdd. 


Total. 




S 
2,439 19 


T.194 66 


S 
l,fi0198 


8,0M21 


9 ; 

14.1T1 91 


Hamb'gLine.. 
Total.'. 

Amount sent.. 


9 

21 S5 


$ 

20,781 74 


S 
•,835 96 


9 

t7,0»M 


Total. 


2,429 19 


7,194 58 


1,50193 


8,046 21 


14*171 91 


2135 


20,781,74 


6,335 95 


27.089 04 


AmMmt re- ; 
oeived».... 


9,623 T7 




4.54d 14 






20,758 09 




6.885 95 

















Amount collected in the United States .^ $30,376 86 

Amount collected in Hamburg m........ ............ ......... 10,884 09 

Total * *. $41,260 05 

Excess collected in the United States $19,402 77 



RATES OF DOMESTIC POSTAGE. 

Letters^ for each half-ounce, prepaid, 3 cents; 
«xceptiug those passing fW>m anj State or Terri- 
tory east of the Rocky Mouiitcrins to any State or 
Territory west of the Rocky Mountains, and 
those passing from any State or Territory west 
of the Rocky Mountains to any State or Territory 
«a8t of said mountains, which are 10 cts. the half- 
ounce. All letters must be prepaid by stamps, 
or enclosed in stamp envelopes, or they will not 
be forwarded. 

lYatuient NetospaperSj Periodicaltt Circulargy 
4§e^ t6 any part of the United States, not weigh- 
ing oTer 3 ounces, 1 cent each, and 1 cent for 
each additional ounce, prepayment required. 

Maps, engravings, lithographs, or photographic 
prints, on rollers or in paper covers; books, 
bound or unbound; phonographic paper, and 
letter envelopes, not exceeding four pounds, 1 
cent an ounce under 1,500 miles, and 2 cents an 
ounce over 1600 miles. 

Cards, blank, or printed blanks, in packages 
weighing at least 8 ounces, and seeds or cuttings, 
tn packages not exceeding 8 ounces, 1 cent an 
ounce under 1600 miles, and 2 cents an ounce 
over 1500 miles. 

Newspapers and PariodicalSy not exceeding 1^ 
ounces in weight, when paid quarterly in advance 
and circulated in the State where published — 
Daily, per quarter, 2^; six times per we^, 
19^; tri-weekly,9^; semi-weekly, 6^; weekly, 
^; semi-monthly, 1^; monthly, %. News- 
papers and periodicals, when wei^ng over 1^ 
ounces and not exceeding 3 ounces, double the 
above rates, to any part of the United States. 

Small newspapers, published monthly, or 
oftener, and pamphlets not containing more than 
16 octavo pages, in packages of 8 ounces or over, 
^ cent per ounce. 

Weekly newspapers, within the county where 
published, yVec. ^ 

Quarterly payments, in advance^ may be made 
either where published or received. 



RATES OF LETTER POSTAGE TO FOREIGN 
COUNTRIES. 

To England, Ireland, and Scotland (flrom Cali- 
fornia, Or^on, and Washington excepted^ 
2^cta.}4ofz. From California, Oregon, or Wash- 
ington, 29 cts. ^ ok. 

To France fluid Algeria, by French mails, 15 cts. % 
oz., 30 cts. "^ oz. 

To German States, by Prussian closed mail, 30 
cts. ^,oz. : — by French mail, 21 cts. ^ ok., 42 
cts. ^ oz.:— by Bremen mail (except Bre- 
men), 16 cts. ^ oz.: — ^by Hamburg nudl (ex- 
cept Hamburg and Luxemburg), 16 cts. }<^ox. 

To %emen, by Bremen mail, 10 cts. ^ as. 

To Hamburg, by Hamburg mall, 10 cts. ^ ot. 

To Luxemburg, by Hamburg mail, 22 cts. ^ ok. 

To Holland and the Netherlands, bj Frenek inail, 
21 ots. ^ OB., 42 cts. ^ oz. 

To Austria and its States, by Prussian olosed maO, 
30 cts. ^ OB. :— by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 
15 cts. li oz. :— by French mail, 21 cts. 3^ oz., 
42 cts. }/^ oz. 

To Rus8i8^ by Prussian closed mail, 87 cts. ^ oz. :— 
by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 29 cts. H <^ • — 
by French mail, 30 cts. % oz., 60 cts. ^ oz. 

To Prussia, by Prussian closed mall, SO cts. ^ oz.: 
•—by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 16 cts. ^ OS. : 
—by French mail, 21 cts. ^ oz., 42 cts. ^ oz. 

To Sardinian States, by Prussian closed mail, 42 
cts. 14 oz. r'-^by French mall, 21 cts. >^ oz., 42 
cts. 14 oz. :— by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 23 
cts. }4 oz. 

To Belgium, by U.S and Belgium closed mail, 2r 
ets. )^oz. 

To Lombardy, by Prussian closed mail, 42 cts. >^ 
oz. : — ^by French mail, 21 cents ^ oa., 42 cts. 
^ oz. :— by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 15 cts.. 
i^oz. 

To Parma and Modena, by Pmssian closed mail, 
42 cts. ^ oz.>~by French mail, 21 ota.^ oz., 
42 cts. ^ oz. :— by Bremen or Hambai^ nuO, 
2&ctfl.H<n. 

To Papal States, by Prussian closed mail, 41 cts. 
^ oz.— jjrgwid;— ^y French mail, 27 cti. ^ 



1868J 



POdT-OlfFftiB BEPAETMBNT. 



20T 



OB^ 64 ets. ^ OS. :— by Bremen or Hamburg 
madlj 28 cts. ^ ok. 

To Tuscany, by Prussian' closed mail, 42 cts. 3^ ox. : 
—by French mail, 21 cts. ^ oz., 42 cts. ^ oz. :— 
by B^men or Hamburg, 28 cts. ^ oz. 

To the Two Sicilies, by Prussian closed mail, 49 
cts. ^ oz.— prepaid : — ^by Prench mail, 30 cts. 
^ OK., 60 cts. ^ oz. : — ^by Bremen or Hamburg 
mail, 22 cts. "^ oz.— prepaid. 

To Spain, by French misdl, 21 cts. ^ oz., 42 cts. ^ oz. 
—prepaid: — ^by British mail, via Southamp- 
ton, U.S. postage of 21 or 6 cts. ]^ oz.— prepaid. 

To Portugal, by French mail, 21 cts. ^ oz., 42 cts. 
^ oz.—prqMUd : — by British mail, via South- 
ampton, 45 cts. ^ oz., 33 cts. l^ oz.— prepaid. 

To Denmark, by Prussian closed mall, 35 cts. )^ oz. : 
by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 20 cts. ^ oz. : — 
by French mall, 27 cts. 3^ oz., 54 cts. ^ oz. 

To Sweden, by Prussian closed mail, 42 cts. ^ oz. : 
— ^bj Aremen or Hamburg mail, 33 cts. ^oz. : 
— by French mail, 33 cts. ^ oz., 66 cts. ^ oz. 

To Norway, by Prussian closed mail, 46 cts. ^ oz. : 
— ^by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 38 cts. 3^ oz. : 
— by French mail, 33 cts. ^ oz., 66 ets. l^ oz. 

To West India Islands (not British), except Caba, 
Turk's laland, and Garthagena, 34 cts. }^ oz. 
when distance from mailing office is under 
2500 miles, and 44 cts. ^ oz. when distance 
exceeds 2500 mUee^-prqpaid. 

To Cuba and Turk's Island, 10 cts. 3^ oz. when 
distance does not exceed 2500 miles, and 20 
cte. over 2500 miles. 

TO Canada, New Brunswick, Cape Breton, Prince 
Edward's Island, and Newfoundland, 10 cte. 
3^ oz. when distance is not over 8000 miles 
fixnn line of crossing, and 16 cts. }^ oz. if dis- 
tance exceeds 3000 miles. 

To Nora Scotia, same rstea, prepayment required. 

To Aspinwall and Panama, New Grenada, 10 cts. 
34 OS. irtien distance does not exceed 2G00 
miles, and 30 cts. if tbe distance exeeds 2500 
mi]e»*<^mgNtu2. 

To Msxioo^ 10 cents }i^oz,oa letters tent by tea, 
and 3 cents }i^ ofz.otk letten reoei»ed from 
IIe»ico « prtp aifment required, 

T» Bogota, Carthi^ena, and BnenaTenttna, New 
Oreaada, 18 cts. ^ cti.-'-prqKiid. 

Tia Jfeaador, Bolivia, and Chili, 84 cts. 3^ oz.--j»re- 

Tl» Per% 98 ots< 34 o&r*j>rq»ici 

TO West Indies (British), 10 cts. 34 oz. if distance 
Anaaot eoEoeed 2500 miles, and 30 cts. 34 oz. 
if distance exceeds 2500 miles-*^>n$pa«'(^ 

Sb flaiMiirieb Islands, New South Wales, and 
CSiina, by mail to San Francisco^ thence by 
privato ship, 10 cts. 34 oz.—prqMid. 

ToTnriceiy in Bnrope, and Turkish Islands in the 
JfeditemuMsn, except Adriuiq|>le, Candlo, 
OoBstantinopls^ Dardanelles, Gidata, Ilnnaila, 
loAiaa Islands, Janina, Latakia, Rhodes, Bust- 
dndE, SHoniea, Sophia, Talteha, Varna, and 
Zante, by Prussian closed mail, 34 os. 80 cts'.'— 



jprepaitf:— by Bremen or Hamburg mall, 34 oz. 
82 cts. : — ^by open mail, via London, by Am. 
packet, 34 OZ- 21 eta.— prepaid : — by open mall, 
via London, by British packet, 34 oz.5 cte.— pre- 
paid:— hy French mail, via Austria, 3^ oz. 21 
cts., 34 oz* ^ cts* 

To Adrianople, Beirftt, Canea, Constantinople, all 
parts of Egypt (prepaid^ Oalatz, Greece, Ibra- 
ila, Ionian Islands, Ithaca, Jaffa, Janina, 
Jerusalem, Lamica, Latakia, Rhodes, Rust- 
chnk, Salonica, Samsoun, Solo, Syria (gene- 
rally prepaid)f Scutari {prepaid, Smyrna, 
Trebizond, Tripoli in Syria, Tultcha, Tunis, 
Tarna, Zante {prepaid)^ and in general the 
Turkish Empire in Asia and Afi-ica, by French 
mall, 3^ oz. 30 cts., 34 ^z. 60 cts. 

To Alexandria, by Prussian closed mail, 34 oz. 38 
cts. : — ^by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 34 oz. 30 
cts. : — by open mail, via England, by American 
packet, 34 oz. 21 ctB.— prepaid : — ^l)y open mail, 
via England, by British packet, 34 oz. 6 cts. 
—prepaid. 

To Alexandretta, same rates, except by Prussian 
dosed mail, which is for 34 oz. 40 ets.— ^pre* 
paid. 

To the Canary Islands, via England, 3^ oz. 33 cts., 
}/^oz.4& cis.— prepaid. 

To Slam, 34 oz. 45 tia.—prq^id. 

To East Indies, open mail, via London, by Ameriean 
packet, 34 oz. 21 cts.— jnypatd .*— by Britlsb 
packet, 34 oz. 6 qIb.— prepaid : — by Prussian 
closed mcdljVta Trieste, 34 os. 70 eAa,— prepaid: 
--by Prussian closed mail, via Trieste, to Eng- 
lish Possessions, 34 oz. 88 c\a.— prepaid : — 
by Bremen at Hamburg mail, via Marseilles 
and Suez, 3i oz.40 cts., 34 oz. 72 ti».— prepaid: 
— ^by Bremen or Hamburg mail, eta Trieste, 34 
OK. 64 cUi.— prepaid : — ^by French mail, 3i oz." 
30 cts., 34 OK. 60 ets.— ^tfpaid. 

To Hong-Kong, via England, by American packet, 
21 cts. 34 OZ.— j>repatd.' — ^by British packet, 5 
cts. 34 0%.— prepaid: — ^by French mall, % oz. 

50 cts., 34 oz. 60 cts.— j^repotdf.* — ^by Bremen 
or Hambui^ mail, 34 oz. 80 e\%.— prepaid : — 
by Prussian closed mail, 34*oz. 38 cts.— jpre- 
paid. 

To China (except Hong-Kong), via Southampton, 
34 oz. 45 cts.— j)rcpatel, via Marseilles, 3^ oz. 

51 cts., 34 oz. 57 c\a.— prepaid : — ^by Bremen 
and Hambui^, via Trieste, ^ oz. 55 cts.— ^e- 
paid: — via Suez, 3^ oz. 40 cts., 34 oz. 72 cts. — 
prepaid .•—by French mail, 3i oz. 30 cte., 34 ok. 
60 ctM.— prepaid. 

To Cape de Yerde Islands, via England, 3^ oz. 29 
cts., 34 oz. 37 cts.— :2»repau2;— by French mail, 
via Bordeaux and Lisbon, 3^ oz. 30 cts., 34 oz. 
60 ciM.— prepaid. 

To Cape of Good Hope, via England, by American, 
packet, 34oz. 21 cts.— ^epatd.*— by British 
packet, 34 oz. 5 cts.— ;prcpau2. 

To Mauritius, British mail, via Southampton and 
India, 34 oz. 83 c^a*— prepaid :—via Marseilles 



^08 



^HB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



^lem-. 



and Suez, J^ oz. 99 eta., )^ os. 46 cta.—^tpaid : 
— ^French mail, ^ oz. 30 cts^ ]/^oz.GO eta.— Re- 
paid. 

!Co Hayti, via England, }^ oz. 83 cta.-^}repaid. 

To Hayti, direct, ^ oz. 34 do.— prepaid^ 

To Nicaragua, Yucatan, Surinam, &c., ^ oz. 34 
eta.— prepaid. 

To Rio de Janeiro and Brazil generally, }^ oz. 45 
ct8.^pr«patd. 

To Buenos Ayres, via England, ^ oz. 45 cts.— ^e- 
paid: — via French mail from Bordeau:$:, J<^ oz. 
80 cts., }^ oz. €0 cts.— :prepat<2. 

. NOTB. — In all cases where the word prepaid is 
not added, the prepayment of the postage is 
optional with the sender. 



Where the r^eipt« are between HOO. aod $JlOO m 

any quarter, 50,per ct. ; between $400 and $2400 in 
any quarter, 40 per ct. ; on any sum over $2400 per 
quarter, 15 per ct.; on the amount of letters and 
packets received for distribution at general distri- 
bution offices, 12^ per ct.; on newspaper postagea, 
in all cases, 50 per ct. No postmaster can receive 
more than $500 commissions per quarter; but 
they may also receive box-rents to an amount not 
exceeding $2000 per annum. The postmasters at 
New York, Washington, and New Orleans receive 
a special allowance for extra labor, and those post- 
offices where the appointment is made by the 
President and which have a fixed salary of 
$2000 per annum, besides part of the receipts fi-om 
boxes, are allowed such number of clerks as may 
be necessary for the business of the office, whose 
compensation is drawn from the receipts of the 
office independent of the commissions of the i>ost-. 
master. 

To postmasters- wliose compensation does not 
exceed $500 In anyone quarter, one cent is allowed 
for the delivery of each free letter or document 
not addressed to themselves. On the postage of 
letters received on the Canada frontier to be sent 
into British America, a commission of 3}^ per ct. 
is allowed ; and on the postage of letters received 
from Canada tor distribution, 7 per ct. 

Postmasters who are required to keep a register 
of the arrital and departure of the malls are 
allowed ten cents fbr each monthly return made 
to the Postmaster-General. For the delivery of 
every newspaper not chargeable with postage, J 
of a cent is allowed. To distributing and sepa. 
rating offices where the pay and emoluments are 
insufficient, additional allowances are made to de- 
fray actual and necessary expenses. 



MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS RELATIVE 
TO POSTAGE. 

By act of Congress, July 24, 1801, all prepaid 
letters to soldiers in any regiment in the service 
of the United States, and directed to them at a 
point where they have been stationed, may be for- 
warded, whenever practicable, to any other point to 
which they may have been ordered, withoutfiirther 
charge thereon ; by an act passed July 22, 1861, 
private soldiers, and by act of Jan. 21, 1862, jailors 
and marines were permitted to send letters to their 
fiunilies and frriends without prepayment of post* 
af^e, the words " soldier's" or " sailor's letter,'' with 
the name of the officer, being endorsed on the 
envelope by the captain or lieutenant of the com- 
pany to which such soldiers, sailors or marines 
belonged. 

By a lawpassed January 21, 1862, the Postmaster- 
General was authorized to return all dead letters, 
except those containing circnlars and other worth- 
less matter, to their writers, whenever their names 
could be ascertained, charging for all valuable 
letters treble, and for others double, the ordinary 
rate of postage. 

By a law passed April 16, 1862, the Postmaster- 
General was authorized to establish branch post- 
offices In cities, and to require prepayment by 
stiunp of one ceflt for every letter deposited for 
mailing, and to collect one cent for delivery of every 
letter sent to said branch office for delivery; but 
no letter should be sent from the principal office 
to a branch office for delivery contrary to the 
request of the party to whom the same may be 
addressed. 

COMPENSATION OP POSTMASTERi 

The following conuniuslons are allowed to post, 
masters : — 

On the postage collected at their respective 
offices, not exceeding $100 in any one gtiartery 60 
per ct.; and if the mails come regularly at the 
office between. 9 p.m. And 5 a.m., 70 per ot. 

* Public documents are those printed by the (tt?der of either house ctf Congress, and pttblisMions cr 
books procured or purchased by Congress or either House for the use of the members. 



THE FRANKING PRIVILEGE 

The franking privilege oiqwrtains to the Miow. 
Ing peCBOBs to the eattent flpecifledb— 

The President of the United States, the ez<eFrasi> 
dents, the Vioer'FMtidenftB, the ex*Tiee>Fr«Bltaftti^ 
except such as have toMUd it by tiemioa, Mvs. 
Harrison and Mat* Polk have the priTilagv in its 
fullest extBot. 

Members of Oangrass and delegates firam Veni. 
twics, from thhrty days before the rnmiifcaw ■■iimI 
of each Congress (<.«. thirty days previous to the 
4th ot March in the odd yean) xutUiiie Aiat Mos^ 
day in December after the expiration, cf their Cerais 
of office, the Socvetary of the SenatoiaadthftGlerk 
of the House during their terms ot 
lAay send and receive free lettess <Mr . 
exceeding two ounces in weight, and public doco* 
ments* not exceeding three poonds in wei gh t. 

The Governor of any State nmy send free thi 
laws, records, and documents of the I«|^alat«re to 
the Qoiremors of other States. The 



lie).] 



•I^Ofif-Oftiea bEPARTMEi^T. 



209 



and AaBbteat SMretarieci of fHfc IJepflcrtiaeiite, the 
Attamejr-General, the Pofltmaater-Qeneial and hi« 
unatants, the Cknnptrollers, Auditors, Treasurer, 
Blister and Solicitor of the Treasury, the Com- 
vaasionim of the .cUiferent offices and bureaus, 
Cbie& of Bureaos in the War, Nayy, and Interior 
Departments, the Oeneral-in-Chief and Adjutant- 
General, and the Superintendent of ^ the Coast 
Sorrey and ' his assistants, may send and receive 
f^ an lett^n aad packages tipon ofllGii^ business, 
but not their private letters or papers. 

The diief cl^lts' in all the Departments may 
send free public official letters and documents. 

Deputy-pofltmactBfB may tend fiw all such 
Utters and packages as i*elate excluslTely to the 
bosiness of their respective offices; and those 
wboae coxni>ensatiQn did not exceed $200 for the 
jMT ending Jane 30, 1846, may also send free 
through the mails letters written by themselves, 
and receive free all written commnnieations on 
tbeir own priya,te business, not weighing over half 
an o^nce, bat not transient newspapers, handbills, 
or circulars. 

£xchaQge newspapers, magazines, and periodi- 
cals between editors pass free. The publisherb of 
weekly newspapers may send to each actual sub. 
ecriber in the county where their papers are printed 
maA published, one copy free ^m postage. 

The postage must be prepaid by postage-stamps 
on all letters mailed at one office in the United 



States and addressed to another office in the United 
States, except an free letter g and on duly certified 
soldiers' or saHors' letters, written by them, bat 
not including letters written by commissioned 
officers. The postage on such certified soldiers' or 
sailors' letters must be collected at the office of 
delivery. The postage on letters written to soldiai* 
or sailors must be prepaid at the maUiog<offloe, at 
heretofore. 

Postmasters at or near any camp or point occu- 
pied by the United States forces will m^u^ ^^ 
out prepayment of postage, any letter written 
by a soldier in the sehriee of the United States, 
and certified to be such by the m^jor or action 
major of the regiment to which the writer is 
attached, or by any acting field or staff officer in 
th^ stfrvice of the United States. At hospttall 
or detached posts, this eertificate may be made by 
the chaplain or surgeon stationed thereat. 

The envelope should have plainly stamped or 
written on its &x» the certificate " soldier's letter" 
signed in writing by one of the officers aforesaid, 
describing his regiment by its number and its 
State, or his official positioii. 

Prepaid letters to soldiers in any regiment in 
the service of the United States, and directed to 
them at a point where they have been st^tion9d, 
may be forwarded, whenever practicable, to any 
other point to which they may have been ordered, 
without further charge therew for fonrording. 



From the Annual Beport of the Fostmastei-Qenertklr 1862. 



revenue of the Department for this 
fiscal year, including the standing Treasury credit 
for free mail matter, and a small amount a^qpro- 
priated for the relief of individuals, was $9,012,- 
849 13. The expenditares for the same year 
aaoimted to $11,12&,314 13. The regular postal 
revenue for 1862 is only $4,947,650 less than it 
ww-fcr the liacal year 1861, during a tege part 
«f lAieh year revmtte was paid in from sll the 
of the Union. This fact shows a targe 
in the correspondence of the loyal Statesl 
While the revenues have been so nearly sus- 
tained at the highest standard, the expenses have 
hmm Ui)gely redaead. For the preceding year the 
expeaditnre wa» $2^481,394 98 great6'r than last 
year. The IbUmriiig comparison of 'figures is in- 
teresting:— 
Kxpendltnre for I860, for sendee In 

aU the States...... ...v.;ft4,8T4,n2 89 

Bevenoe for the sune year 9,218,067 40 



»Bficiency « $5,666,705 49 

Bxpenditnres far 1861 (service inter- 
rupted In 1861) 13,606,759 11 

Craarevenae'fiMrlSei (servfoe ltlt»f- 

n9tedittl861) 9,049,296 40 



I>efideDcy ^ $4^7,462 71 



Expenditures for 1862 $11,126,364 1$ 

Revenues for 1862 „,»i...^.,„,,„ 9,012,549 $6 

■ ■ ■■ t 

Deficiency ^ $2,112,814 67 

Beduction of expenditares as oobh 

pared with 1860 ........* 8»74fl^40$ 

Reduction of expenditures as coup 

pared with 1861.....M..,. 2,481,894 

The whole number of post-offices in the United 
States remaining established on the 30th of June, 
1862, was 28,876, of which there were in Htxe loyal 
States and districts 19,973, and in the insurrec- 
tionary States and districts there were 8902. The 
net increase in the established offices over ^st 
ye&r was 121. The number of cases acted upon 
by the appointment office during the year waa 

7786. 

The total postage accrued on the United States 
and European mails during the year amounts to 
$1,144,095 52, being a reduction trom the amount 
of the previous year of $217,940 88. Of the total 
amountcollected, the excess collected in the United 
States was $212,607 36v which constitutes the bar 
lance paid to the several foreign departments, the 
cost of exchanges being paid by the Unitiad States. 
The Postmaster-General objects to the cost as Itt- 
equitable, and proposes, if possible, to relieve the 
Department from tills burden. 



14 



1 



.210 



THS KATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[jies. 



VI. IHTEBIOB BBPABTMEVT. 

ExEcunvs Officers of ths Dspabtmknt. 
lOorrecttd at the Department of the Interior, December 1, 1882.] 



Name of Officer. 



Bbcretart'b Ofhce. 
JOHN P. USHER. 



.Watton J. Smith. 
Peter Lammond.. 

L. B. Brady 

A. S. H. White.... 
'James Wiles 



Indian Officr. 



, William P. Dole. 
. Charles £. Mix.., 



PlNSION OFFICB. 

Jo». H. Barrett , 

Wm. Helmick , 



t Land Officb. 

**' James M. Edmunds.. 
Jos. S. Wilson 



Jnlias N. Granger . 



Patent Office.* 



' David P. Holloway. 

John L. Hayes 

I T. C. Theakei* 

S.IL Hodges... ..»w.. 

J. J. Coombs 

Hervey Baldwin 

Titian J. Peale 

William B. Taylor... 

f. F. James 
homas Antisell 

6. £. Dories..... , 

O.O. Page 

.H. P. K. Peck - 

W. B. Jillflon 



* AGRICULTURAL DSPARIV 
MSBLT. 



i Itaac Newton «... 

Kichard C. McCormick. 

Koyston Betts , 

James S.Orinnell 

•a W. Wetherill 



Census Ofhcs. 

Jos. C. G. Kennedy... 

Hallet Kilbonm 

M. B. Brown 



Suppression African 
Slays-Trade. 

George C. Whiting 

Public BuiLDraas. 

' Bei\}. B. French 

J Nathan Darling 

Public Printing, 
John D. Defrees 



Office. 



Secretary 

Assistant Secretary.. 

Chief Clerk 

Disbursing Clerk 



u 
(( 



Sup't. Document Room... 



Com'r. Indian Affairs. 
Chief Clerk 



Com'r. of Pensions. 
Chief Clerk 



Com'r. Gen. Land Office... 

Chief Clerk 

Recorder 



Com'r. of Patents. 

Chief Clerk 

Chief Exaihiner... 



(( 



Examiner. 



(I 

(( 
(( 

K 

(( 

(i 



{librarian . 



Commissioner 

Chief Clerk 

Disbursing Clerk 

Statistical Clerk 

Ph.D., M.D., Chemist. 



Superintendent .... 

Chief Clerk 

Disbursing Clerk.. 



Superintendent. 



Commissioner 

Captain Capitol Police.... 



Superintendent , 



Where bom. 



Massachusetts ... 



Indiana 

New York 

Ohio 

New Hamp^ire. 
Ohio 



New Hiampshire. 
Connecticut 



Vermont. 
Ohio 



New York 

Dist. Columbia. 
New York 



• ••••••««•■ 



Ohio 

Maine.... 

Pennsylvania 

Vermont 

Maine 

Pennsylvania..... 



Massachusetts.... 

Ireland 

New Hampshire. 
Massachusetts.... 

New York 

Rhode Island 



New Jersey 

New York 

Virginia 

Massachusetts.... 
Pennsylvania*..... 



Pennsylvania..... 

New York 

Illinois , 



Virginia. 



New Hampshire. 
New York 



Tennessee. 



Whence appointed. 



jinuiana.. ..»..«•.■• 



Indiana. 

New York 

Ohio 

New Hampshire. 
New York ......... 



■I BIHl\Jso •••••••••• •••• 

Dist. Columbia... 



Ohio. 
Ohio. 



Michigan.. 

Dist. Golnmlua. 
New Yotk 



Indiana. 

New Hampshire. 

Ohio 

Vermont. 

Dist. Columbia... 

Tennessee 

Pennsylvania..... 
Dist. Oolmnbia... 

Illinois 

New York 

New Hampshire. 
Dist. Columbia... 

Ohio 

Rhode Island 



Pennsylvania...., 

New York 

Bfaryland 

Masaetchnsetts. . .. 
Indiana. 



PsnMgrlTMii«M..^ 
Indiana. ••••..•, .«•. 
Illinois ..„...., 



Virginia. 



Dist. Columbia. 



Indiana.. ..M ... •••., 



3,000 
2,200 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1^ 



8,000 
2,000 



3/X» 
2,000 



8,000 
2,000 
2^ 



4,500 

2,600 
3,000 
8,000 
3,000 
2,500 
2^ 
VKO 
V» 

2,fi00 

i,no 



8^ 

2^ 

1,000 



SfiOs 

2,000 
^000 



2,000 



2,000 
1,740 



8^ 



* la addition to the list of Chief Examiners, and Examinors of Patents, here giren, titers 
Assistant Examiners* at a salary of $1800 each. 



1«6S.] 



IVTMB10& ]>BPJLRTMnfT. 



211 



To the Buperrisida maAmimtfimmft of tb* In* 
tericHT Department are committed tbe following 
blanches of the public service : — 

1st. The Public Lands. — Its head Is the Com- 
mlsloner of the Qeneral Land Office. The Land 
Bureau is charged with the- surrey, management, 
and sale of the public domain, the revision of 
TIrginia military bounty-land claims, and the 
issuing of scrip in lieu thereof. 

2d. Penaicnt. — ^Ihe commissioner is charged 
with the examination and a4Jadication of all 
elates arifl&ng under the vartoos and numerous 
laws passed by Congress granting bounty^land or 
pensions for the military or naval service in the 
Sevolutionary and subsequent wars. 

3d. 2%e Indian Office — ^has charge of all matters 
connected with the Indians. 

4th. ITie Dxtenf Cffiee — is charged with the per- 
fbrmance of all ''acts and things touching and 
respecting the granting and issuing of patents 
for new and useful discoveries, inventions, and 
improvements." 

5th. 3%« Ikforlmmt of AgriaMuaret organized 
In 1862, and which is charged witii the collection 
of statistics concerning agriculture, the eschange^ 
collection, and distribution of seeds, plants, and 



oottlngs, ibm p»t0wa tlwi' of an agricultural re- 
port, and the publicatkHi oi iBtettigenoe of in- 
terest and value to those engaged in the cultiva- 
tion of the soil. 

There is also an office for the suppreeslon of 
the African 8Iave-Trade, and one for the Ooaints- 
sioner of Public Buildings; and the superintend- 
ency of Public Printing is a Bureau of this De 
partment. 

The Department of th« Intailor baa, bealdea<ha 
supervision of the accounts of the United States 
marshals and aMonieys, the clertu of the United 
States courts, the management of the lead and 
other mines of the United States; the afTairs df 
the penitentiary of the United States in the Dis- 
trict of Ck)lumbia; the taking and returning of 
the censuses of the United Stately and of SKqier- 
vising and directing the acts of the Commissioner 
of Public Buildings; the management of the 
hospital for the insane of the army and navy and 
of the District of Columbia, and the oonstmctipn 
of the three wagon-roads leading to the Pacific 
ooast; the. charge of publications transmitted to 
the Department under the laws relating to cojn^- 
rightsj records, indexes, titles, ike. 



8PEiBiwTittW!Tr» am) AoiKf b or Ikmab Aifaxbs. 



Kane of OfBoer. 



Deke E. Bill Agent. 

De Witt O. Leach... « 
Hoses M. Davis ^ 

Kqkxibbh SuPSBtNT»n>* 
vrcT. 

dark W. Thompson 

Abel L. Foeter~.....agent. 

Geo. 7. Townsend....phys. 
Lnfher B. Webb..~Agent. 

Vespasian Smith phys. 

Thos. J. GalbraitlLAgent. 

J. L. Wakefield .phys. 

St. A. D. Balcombe,agent. 

i^KOLkL SuFKummv 

KHCT. 

Hianrisim B. Branch.. 

John Loree- agent. 

Onamns BL Iridi... "*■ 
Austin Bockwell...engin. 
John P. Baker agent. 

Wm. l>Bily...Gh]ef engin. 
B. f . Loahbangh.... Jigent. 

Hugh Roseburg..~«ngin. 
Charles B, Keith .~ Agent. 
Fielding Johnaom... ** 



B. Abbott.. « 

W. W. Ross « 

John A. Burbank.. << 



Oflioe. 



New York Agency.. 
Michigan Agency... 
Qreen Bay Agency. 



Superintendent 

Agency for the Chippe- ) 
was of Mississippi.... r 



t« 



Agency ibr the Chippe- \ 
was of Iiake Superior. / 

<( M 

Agency for the Sioux, Min 
Winnebago Agency.. 



Superintendent 

Upper Platte Agency. 
Omaha AgMwy 



u 



Ottoeand Missouri Agen. 
Pawnee Agency 



(( 



Eackapoo Agency. 
Delaware Agency. 



Shawnee & Wyandott Ag- 

Pottawatomie Agency 

Great Nemaha Agency.... 



Where emplojed. 



EllioottvUle, N.T... 

Detroit, Mich 

Portage City, Wis.. 



St. Panl^ Minn 

Fort Ripley, Minn .... 



Bayfield, Wis 

Bayfield, *< 

Yellow Medicine, Min 



..*••«•». .4 



« 



M 



Winnebago 



St. Joseph, Mo 

Fort Laramie, N.T.... 
Decatnr^Burt Cov,N.T- 



Dennison, Gaga Co., 
N.T 

Genoa, Monroe Co., 
N.T 

Pawnee Agency 

Muscotah, Kan.....~... 

Quindaro, Atchinson 
Co.,Kan.^ 

Lexington«'Kan.....jt. 

St. Mary's Mission, K. 

Nohart, Brown Oo.,K. 



Wlience appdnted. 



New York. , 

MiddganJ 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota.^ 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

OoDnectiout ... »» 

a 

Mlsiourt»«»»>««*«.^ 

Indiana.^ 

Nebraska. 

lUinois mm.. 

Nebraska. 

Pennsylvania 

Kansas 

M 
(t 
M \^^^^ 

Nebraska. 



Oompen* 
■utiiim. 



$i,oio 

1,500 
1,000 



2,000 

1,600 
1,500 

1,500 

1,9Q0 

1,500 
1,000 
1,500 



24100 

1,600 
1,600 
1,200 

1,500 
1,200 

1,600 
1,200 
1,600 

1,600 
16dO 
l,6dO 
1,600 



312 



THl NATIONAL ALHAKAO. 
Smper iw it m dmU and AgtHU 9f Jiirftei j tf h toifci ' O otttlaMeJL 



[im. 



KdM or OiBMr. 



Henry W. MartiA..jig«nt. 

H. W. Pamsworth. ** 
C^iutaytu A.Golton. ** " 



OIBoe. 



Sac and fox Agency « 



Kansas Agency 

Oiags BiTer Agency ....... 



sircT. 

William Or, Ooffln............ 

Peter P. Sldor Magent 

J, Harlan « 

George A. Cutler " 

George C. Snow....„. *« 

Isaac C(4«iBan. *< 

KdwinH.Garruth.. *< 

Dakota Supkrintxitd- 
urcr. 

William Jayne 

Samuel N. Latta.... agent. 
Walter A. Burleigh. " 
John B. Hoffman.... " 
H. W. Reed « 

OOLOBADO SUPKUNf Ein>- 
INCT. 

J<An Brans 

Samuel G. CoUey. ..Agent. 
LaFt^ette Head... 



Sapevintendent .... 
Neosho Agency.... 
Cherokee Agency. 
Creek Agency. 



Seminole Agency.. 

Choctaw and Ohlckasai 

Wichita Agency. 



Where smpl^yed. 



Greenwood, Franklin 

Co., Kan 

Council Grove, Kan... 
PaolBy Uckins Co., K< 



LeaTSDWorth Oity* 



4( 



Niw Mkxico Supumr- 
uimavcT. 

James L. Collins 

<V. MazwelL «.jagent. 

Xovi J. Keithly*..^ *" 
Jos6 A. Manainares. " 

John Ward., « 

RamoniLuna. " 

(Lorenab Labadis... << 

Utah BvpnannnD^ 

BirCT. 

James D. Doty.. 

Fred W. Hatch agent. 

Lnther Mannzer.... " 

NiTAiiA Snpni]i*iii]>- 

. SHOT. 

Jiunes W. Nye d. 

Jacob T. Lockhart.Agent 

OAUPOMLL SUEttORaD-. 
SHOT. 

Oeoi^ M. HsDSon 

' J. F. H. Wenfeworth... 
N. £. Han8on..superyi8or. 



J. 8. Welton .phys. 

J. G. Alezander..jsiuper'r. 
Theo. Boschuttc.Jnper'r. 

R. T. Hayes phys. 

A. W. Baker .saper'r. 

William Hxley.... «* 

SI. W. Smith , « 
ames Short ' *< 

' JohnB.(SBik.Jab.AfQpt. 



Got. and ex officio Snpt... 
Upp«r Missouri Agency.. 
Yaneton Sioox Agency ... 

Fooea Agency 

Blackfeet Agency 



Got. and ex oflldo Snpt.. 
Upper Arkansas Agency.. 
Conejos Agency 



Superitatendent «.... 

Utah Agency m.m.... 

Apa«he Agenc7.^*.t..... 

Abiquin Agency 

Puebla Agency 

Navajoe Agency i... 

Tueson Agency....*.*..... 



WheBM appdntea. 



Kansas. 



« 



Taneton, D.T. 

Fort Randall, D.T... 
Yanotoo, D.T......... 

Ponea, DJTt ».k.. 

Yaneton, D.T. 



A^BUTOTy U«^L«*e «••••«••••• 

Fort Wise, C.T 



Indianaw....*..*^ 

Kansas....— ...»»».« 
Illinois 

Indiana...... 



Hlfncis 

Nebraska. 

PeiiBsylnaifa.. 
Maw York^.^. 
Iowa .............. 



Colorado Ter'y. 

a 

New Mexico.... 



• •##4 ft eb ••«•••••• 



Superintendent 

Utah Superintehdencj. 



Got. and ex officio Snpt.. 
NeTada Superintendent.. 



6npt*g agt. Northern dist. 

- Sapt'g.ait.-Seathem diet. 

Klamath Agency » 



(( 



••••••••••«• 



California Agency. 
T^OB Agency 



Colorado Desert Sub-Ag... 

Fresno Agency ^. 

Mendocino ReserTC «... 

Bound Valley Beserre.... 



Santa Ft. 

Utah Agency....... 

Apache Agency.... 

Abiquin Agency.. 

Puebla Agency 

Navajoe Agency... 
Tueson Agency 



Salt liSke City. 



Fort Bridger, U.T.. 



Carson City. 



San Franciioa... 



Klamafh Aflsney^.... 

Wakell Resenre. 

Nome Lackee Bes..... 

Tejoa Beserre 

« 



Agency ... 
Fresno Agency...... 

MendodnoT 
Beservation. 



*( 



••«..«.»..«•• 



Hew Mexico...*.. 

u 
■« 

M 

« 



•f .... 



Wisconsin, 
Michigan .. 



New York. 



Califonris. 

44 



...... 4ft. 



14 


•••••«••»•« 


41 






••«««• 4»««* 


4( 






••••••••••« 


(( 






••••••••••a 


44 






•*•••••»••• 


44 




14 


»•••••«•••• 




*••*••«•••« 


Illinois . 


• ••e«ftv««*«»« 



OinipM- 



i,9oe 

1,500 
1,600 



12jOQO 
1,600 
1,500 
l,fiOO 
1,500 

1,600 
1,600 



2,600 
1,100 
1.&Q0 
1,600 
1,600 



2,500 
1,500 
1,500 



SjOOO 
1,510 
1^560 
1,560 
1^550 

1,500 



2.000 

1,500 
IgOOO 



2.000 
1,000 



IJBO 

1,000 

iSo 

1JD0 

IJBOO 
1M^.» 



nnnHaoE QRrAKTMEim- 



2l»r. 



Wd, B. B«etor - 

Williim l^if^ agent 

Thvmu L. Fitch. '-'PhjK 



B.^ezoD or TMlH Ag.. 



K™B| 



On. H, Abbott.... inlxgt. 
Ana C. Badg«n.«iit~iiKt. 



TmatllU SuNAgnbc;-., 



I. Hile.. 



'Baaj A.Wetater. " 

A.A.B«icnj«l " 

i. H. Wllbw, Sapt. £un 

Sr, Tllbiulsiw ~..pb} 

JuM A. Umlienli.pb) 
Wulsj B. Qoine1L.ueDt. 
C. O.Fi«itt. -..ptijii. 



fiqunla Aftuef- 



Oljnipii, W.I. 

Fort iDwiueod. ...... 

Taklnu AgAucy . 



Perc^g Amcj.... 

TUtbcad Agency 

Paget'! ficmnd Ageoc; 






Pngot'i Sonnd Ag... 







».«. 


g™»w. 


in««ivi.^ 


°zc: 


. - 

ThwiH Cuddy-. 

SsrS.'iSK; 
iViSfc: 

a-CTuZMidt. 

£. Olddlngb 


SSS*' 


HHBofaudHLuKHirl... 
ImudWtawDrin.... 


WIDImh Cddilj.. 




Jooo 


1. 
































l««einro5i"CLi7'. 
BaO^eCitV 


Ru— ^'Nebi^du. 


E;™w:mX::::: 

B^^ R. Fm'"""' 


DUh.'!?!!^ 





Becsrdai of Lund ntlea, Bt Lonlg, Ho, J- B. Helm. Bi>UlT,t>Oa. 



connled Ibr rwpectlTely hI Ihelr olBcee. 1 
•\to ™ch «B»borta«i to cbaiga fur thsLr 
la (be losHoD of mlUUiy tand-narra 
— ■ - to be p«W bj Iha holdai 
Ite ( VHat wutut, M 



I OMcra mmnt, TS centa ; in tl>«era wamnt, 
a-, i-m^ixtinmot,tlMi aod ■ nmmt for 

iiceed I25DQ per uiDnia, the uctmi Is paid Into 
Jie treuniT. An liJowAoet of Ki per dloa W 
oade tbem fbr mperlntaiulfBg pllllte Htw, and' 
n the cafle of rfcelven, oiLlcage giobif to Knd r«^ 
.uming from depoalting tb* publlo mobeys »■ 



214 



TH& NATIONAL ALHAFAO. 



[1860. 



Bobert D. McDongal..... 

Edmund Browning 

WiUiam F. Elkin 

G«orgo W. Boardman.^ 

Jatnes Lindaay.. » 

John^R. Blaine 

Ua jr» ireiiow8i«>«*««««*'««« •••••• 

J. O. Petenoo 

John W. Driggs 

Stephen F. l^eige. 

Daniel H. Ball 

Mwgan Bates 

Stewart GoodrelL 

Frank Street. 

Charles B. Richards 

Wm. U. Bigelow 

Andrew B. Jaclcson 

Michael Field 

Stephen H. Alban. 

Oeoi^ A. Metzger 

F. W. Bartlett 

Qiibert B. Porter ...... 

James M. Ross 

Xm» jkt* jwmiiroz**— •••—•>•♦••••»> 

A. J. Snyder 

0* A. Mwdock...., 

S. T. Mye 

Henry W. Briggs 

OranTiUe M. sHck: 
T. C. McGlure. 

J. H. Welch 

Dana S. King ... 

Abner Tibbetts.» 

F. A. Renz. «. 

Luke Marvin 

Z. Harlow Morse 

W. A. Starkweather.. 

John Kelly 

A. A. Denny. 

Joseph M. Fletcher... 
Fnuudhi G. Adams... 

Asahel Low , 

Jonathan C. Burnett. 
Bobert McBratney ... 
Edward B. Taylor..... 
Bichard F. Barrett... 

Royal Back 

Floris Tan Renth...... 

J. Houghton 

J. M. Allen. 

0. T. Rice 



mey... 



Where empb^ed. 



Chilioothe, Ohio 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

Springfield, Illinois 

Booneville, Missouri 

Ironton, Missouri ,. 

Calhoun 

Springfield, Missouri 

Detroit, Michigan 

Bast Saginaw, Michigan 

Ionia, Michigan 

Marquette, Michigan 

Traverse City, Michigan 

Fort Des Moines, Iowa 

Council Bluflfs, Iowa 

Fort Doc^, Iowa 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Meuasha, Wisconsin 

Falls of St. Croix, Wisconsin... 

Stevens's Point, Wisconsin 

La Crosse, Wisconsin 

Bayfield. Wisconsin 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

San Francisco, California 

Los Angeles, California. 

Marysville, California. 

Humboldt, Oeilifornia 

Stockton, California 

Visalia, California 

Taylor's Falls, Minnesota. 

St. Cloud, Minnesota. 

Winnebago City, Minnesota.... 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

St. Peter, Minnesota 

Henderson, Minnesota 

Du Luth, Minnesota 

Otter Tail City, Minnesota...... 

Oregon City^ Oregon 

Roseburg, Oregon 

Olympia, Washington Ter 

Vancouver, Maryland 

Topeka, Kansas 

Atchison, Kansas 

Humboldt, Kansas 

Junction City, Kansas ,.. 

Omaha City, N.T., Ohio 

Brownsville, Nebraska 

ITebraska City, Nebraska. 

Dakota City, Maryland.^....... 

Santa F6, New Mexka........... 

Vwmilion, Dakota 

Nevada 



Beoeiven. 



•••••••«« 



James Rowe 

Wm. Boaz 

George N. Black ^ 

John S. McFarland... 

OanroU R. Peck. 

Willis Holland 

Wm. B. Farmer... 

H. K. Sanger.............. 

Charles K. Robinson..... 

John C. Dexter... 

Alexander CampbeIL~« 

Reuben Goodrich 

John G. Weeks... 

D. C. Bloomer 

Charles Pomeroy......... 

J. P. Edie 

Francis A. Ryan 

Bei\|. W. Reynolds 

Alnutnson Eaton 

Milton Barlow 

Asaph Whittlesey 

H. Chiy Williams 

R. H. Waller 

Lewis Sperry 

James Compton. 

William H. Pratt 

George B. Havens. 

George M.Gerrish. 

Lucas K. Stannard 

Charles A. Oilman 

H. W. Holley 

Charles B.Jordan. 

John Kern 

Roswell H. Pendergast. 

Sidney Luce 

James B. Mills 

W. T. Mattock 

Geoige B. Briggs 

Joseph Cushman 

Samuel W. Brown. 

Charles B. Liaes^ m. 

Ira H. Smith.... 

C. W. Adams m. 

Samuel D. Houston 

B. M. Tumbull 

S. R. Jamison 

F. Stewart 

A. H. Jackson 

John Greiner 

M. Wilkinson...... 

C. Noteware 



Wheaee i^p^ied. 



Ohio. 

Indiana. 



MisMMuL 

M 



Michigan. 

u 
<( 

« 

Iowa. 



Iowa. 
Wiscoaaio. 

« 

u 
m 
U 

Oalifomia. 

u 
« 

M 
« 
M 



U 

u 
m 

M 



Oregon. 

Washington Tar. 
Dlinoda. 



«< 
Hllnoli. 



Tami( 
Ohio. 



Agikts to Pat Army Ain> Navt Peksions. 

The compensation of pension-agents Is two per cent, on the amount disbursed Ibr panalona, provided 
tiiat no agent shall receive over flOOO In oonmtesIoBB. 



Name. 


Place. 


Name. 


Place. 


Tacant «. 


littte Rock, Ark. 
Fort Gibeon, Ark. 
Mobne, Ala. 
Tuscaloosa, Ata. 
Huntsvllle, Ala. 
Hartford, Conn. 
San Francisco. Cal. 
Washington, D.C. 


Diodatus Wrieht 


Albany, N.T. 
New York, N.T. 


Thomas Lanigan 

Uoyd Bowers 


Alnheus Fobes 


Philemon Dickinson 

William G. Broadlbot 

R. C. Pearson 


Trenton, N.J. 


Munroe Donoho 


Fayetteville, N.G. 


William H. Moore 


MiN-gantown, N.G. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 


Ouy R. Phelps 

Royal H.Waller 


Henry C. Dorden 

AuflTUst Thieme 


Q%orgb W. Riffss 


'■ William T. Matlock. 


Oregon City, Oregoa. 



1888.] 



INTERIOR DKPARTMENT. 

Agents to Pat A&xt axb Natt Pensions.— Continued. 



215 



Name. 


Place. 


Name. 


Plaee. 


Arthur M. Seed 


JackflonTiUe, Fla. 
Tallahassee. Via. 
Savannah, ua. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Madison, Ind. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 
foringfleld^Ui. 
Chicago, 111. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
Louisville, Ky. 
New Orleans, La. 
Augusta, Me. 
Portland, Me. 
Boston, Mass. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Jackson, Miss. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Concord, N.H. 
Portsmouth, N.H. 


Erastus Ponlaon.. .......... 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Fa. 
Providence, R.I. 
Charleston, S.C. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Jonesboro*, Tenn. 
. Jaclcsou, Tenn. 
Rutland, Yt. 
St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Richmond, Ya. 
Wheeling, Ya. 


fnncis H; Vlagg ...... — 

Tacant 


La&yette Markle.- 

Henrv C. Hudson 


William P. Pishback 

HarlcTilton 


Benjamin J. Hirst 

Dead 


SolomoB D. Bayless 


Isaac I^ewfs 




James W. Bovden 


Yacant ........................ 


Peter Meyers 

Edward F. Gallagher 

Vacant 

Charles F. Potter 


John B. Reynold 

Edward C. Reddington... 

Morris D. Newman 

Nathaniel C. Arthur 

Jeremiah B. S^by^ Jr 

John D. Biles m»* 

De Witt C. Cooley 


Henry Willis.... 


Milwaukie^ Wis. 


Inac 0. Barnes. 


Yancouver, W.T. 


John Clark 


St. PauL Mln. 


Tacant 

Horatio Wood 


AffenU thai pay only 
Navy Bennom, 

A. E. Bfaxwell 

Elisha Pendleton. 




Alexander 0. Noyee 

Albert H. Hoyt 


Pensaoola, Fla. 
Norfolk, Ya. 



PuBUo Lands. 



Thz public lands that have Itelonged, and now 
belong, to the Oencr^ Government are situated, — 
1st. Within the limits of the United States, as de- 
fined by the treaty of 1783, and are embraced by 
the States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wis- 
consin, and Minnesota, all of which have been formed 
oat of the Northwestern Territory, as conveyed with 
certain reservations to the United States by New 
Torle in 1781, by Virginia in 1784, by Massachu- 
setts in 1785, and by Connecticut in 1786; aUo tlio 
bods within the boundaries of the States of Mis- 
sissippi and Alabama north of 31^ North latitude, 
as conveyed to the United States by Georgia in 
1802. 21 Within the Territories of Orleans and 
lioaiaiaDa, as acquired from France by the treaty 
<^ 1803) inchiding the portion of the States of Ala- 
bama and Mississippi south of Sl^'; the whole of 
Loaislana, Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Ore- 
gon, and the territories of Colorado, Nebraska, 
Dakota, and Washington. '3d. Within the State 
of Florida, as obtained from Spain by the treaty 
of 1819. 4th. In New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, and 
California, as acquired from Mexico by the treaty 
oflM8. 5th. The*" Gadsden Purchase" of 23,161,000 
acres wmth of the Gila River, from Mexico in 1854. 
''Of the 3,250,000 square miles which con- 
stitute the territorial extent of the Union, the 
poblic lands embrace an area of 2,265,625 square 
miles, or 1,450,000,000 of acres, being more than 
two-thirds of our geogn^hical extent, and nearly 
three thnes as large as the United States at the 
ratification of the definitive treaty of peace in 
1783 with Great Britain. This domain extends 
from the northern line of Texas, the Gulf of 
Mexico, reaching to the Atlantic Ocean, north- 
westerly to the Canada line bordering upon the 
great lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior, 



extending westward to the Pacific Ocean, with 
Puget's Sound on the north, the Mediterranean 
sea of our extreme northwestern possessions. 

*' It includes fifteen sovereignties, known as the 
' Land States,' and an extent of territory sufficient 
fwr thirty-two additional, each equal to the great 
central land State of Ohio. 

<' It embraces soils capable of abundant yield of 
the rich productions of the tropics, of sugar, 
cotton, rice, tobacco, com, and the grape, the 
vintage, now a staple, particularly so of California; 
of the great cereals, wheat and corn, in the West- 
ern, Northwestern, and Pacific States, and in that 
vast interior region firom the valley of the Missis- 
sippi River to the Rocky Mountains; and thence 
to the chain formed by the Sierra Nevada and 
Cascades, the eastern wall of the Pacific slope, 
every variety of soil is found revealing its wealth. 

" Instead of a dreary waste, as this was once 
supposed to be, the millions of buffalo, elk, doer, 
mountain-sheep, the primitive inhabitants of the 
soil, fed by the hand of nature, attest its capacity 
for the abundant support of a dense population 
through the skilful toil of the agriculturist. 

^Not only is the yield of food for man in this 
region abundant, but it holds in its bosom the 
precious metals of gold, silver, with cinnabar, the 
useftil metals of htm, lead, copper, interspersed 
with immense belts or strata of that propulsive 
element coal, the source of riches and power, and 
now the indispensable agent not only for domestic 
purposes of life, but in the machine-shop, the 
steam-car, and steam-vessel, quickening the ad- 
vance of civilization and the permanent settlement 
of the country, and being the agent of active 
and constant intercommtwication with every part 
of the republic. 



216 



TAB NAXIOfirU. ALXAJf AC. 



[i86a 



"Hot A yen- had Hapspd from the ddhdtiTe 
tresty of peace in 1783, befere the Congress cX 
the Oonfederation took tha faiitiatrre fbr cstaUisb- 
faig a ■Tttem ftr tha tfapoaal of the tkcB exuting 
Weatern lands; and on the aOCh May, 1785, the 
requisite ordinance fcr that jHu p o a e was paaaed, 
\fj wliidi the Board of Tiinsiiij mm aotfaonxed 
to dispose of the sarrcyed lands in the If estem 
territory, commencing sales at Neir York or Fhi- 
laddphia^ with power to a^joom to any part of 
the United States. 

**Neariy aU beyond the prsaent westam BmitB 
of the States of Pennsylrania, Maryland, Virginia, 
Vorth and Sooth Carolina, and Georgia, was a 
wildemeoi, trarersed only by the Molnlian In- 
dians, the Vchees, Chendbeea, Cheraws, and the 
.Algonqirin fiunily, extending fttm tha thirty-Afth 
parallel to the norfli of the great lakes, into Ga- 



« After the adoption of the Oooatltiitiba of the 
United States, Congress^ on the 2d September, 
17W, tra nai fe ir ed to the Tiinswij Department 
ti^ dnty cf the disposal of the pnblic lands, the 
patents fcr the same to be prepared by flie State 
Department. 

«In 1812 the Oeneral Land Office was created, 
•hd by the law of 4th Jnly, 1830, and other acts, 
the Commissioner c/t the General Land Office, 
under the direction of the Secretary of the In- 
terior and President of the United States, is 
dothed with the power of 'stqperrision and con- 
trol,' in regard to the 'execntive dntiesi* then 
'prescribed* or whidi might thereafter <be pre- 
scribed by law, appqtaining to the sorreying and 
Bile of the public lands of the United States, or 
hi any wise respecting such pnblic lands, and, 
also, soch as relate to prirate claims of huids, and 
tike issuing of patents Ibr all grants of land under 
the authority of tiie gotemment of the United 
States.' 

"InuneAately after the hun^^nration of Ftesi- 
dent Wadiington, he laid belbre Congress a report 
fttim the Secretary of War acknowIedgiDg the 
Indian ri^t of occupancy, and recognizing the 
principle of acquiring their claims by purchase 
lot specific consideration, accor di ng to the *prtic- 
tice of the late English colonies and goremment 
in purchasing the Indian claims,* tiie mie in that 
respect laid down in the proclamation of 7th Octo- 
ber, 1703, by the King of Great Britain, inter- 
dicting purchasee of land by priirato individnals 
ftmi the Indians, and declaring that, *if at any 
time any of the said In^Kans should be inclined to 
diqwse of said lands,' the same *sball be pnr- 
daaed only* for the crown, the ultimate dominion 
and sorereignty being hdd to reside in the dis- 
corerer coioniadng upon the continent. 

"In accordance witii this principle, beginning 
with die treaty of 17M, at OreenriUe, the Indian 
mie has been extingnkhed b7 the United States 
fhan the great lakes to flie Natches setdement, in 
•a fbs States east of fiie Mariirfppi , leering, how- 



its of triba^ lodi ai 
Brothertown, or MoiM^ns, indiridoal Oeeka and 
Choctaws, Fott a watopnei» Mianrii^ and othcn^ 
who hare hesn inreslc^ by act of Caagrssa «r 
treaty, with aOodial titles. Besides this, the In- 
dian nsnfinict has been eztinguidied in the tier of 
States west of Oe SfisBfssippi, eicteading ftvat Oe 
Gulf of Mexico to the northern Kne of lova^ 
nearly oae third cf Dakota Tcrxitosy, half of 
one-toith of Ndxaska, in 
■t and west of &e 
baring been made there for the cottce n ira' 
tion and setflement of the Indians In home re- 
servations of limited extent. In CaliCxnia the 
Indiana hare not been recognized as holding any 
wpeta&c tracts of c onn t t j, bat have been edteded 
and transferred to reae r ra t ien s sat apart for flMir 
protection. 

''In the larger part of Kew Mexico the great 
body of the Indians are purdy nomadic, excepting 
those claiming jwicMst with i 
and the tribes of the IcariDoa, Mescakroa, 
Ines, Gil*>Apaches, Pimoa, and 
which limited reaerrations are 
the Utahs no treaties for the extinction of the In- 
dian title hare been made^ 

**Oar snrreying system b^an in the tract of 
country in (Hiio known as the Old Seren Ba^ea. 
The sorreys were run and established from the 
Ohio Birer, as a base-Iine, northward and w«s(- 
ward, each towndiip, six mflea sqnare, being titen, 
as at the present, laid off into thirty-six aection i 
or square miles. As the surveys progrcMSi.d,Tsrioai 
improTements were introduced to secure regular- 
ity and convenience of description, hj the esta- 
blisbment of bas el ines, meridians, and standard 
parallels, through certain permanent natural 
pdnti^ the mouths of rirers, such as the Great 
Miami, Ohio^ Arkansas, St. Francis; and more 
recently the summits of mountains, a« Mount 
Diablo^ San Bernardino, Humbddt in Califomil^ 
the isolated peak 2I0feet high on the bank of the Bio 
Grande, in New Mexico, each of these mountain- 
tops ororlooking an immense area, and aB oon- 
stituting monuments and witneas^Msts to endure 
for an time. On these baselines are mailced what 
are denominated the ranges of towndilpa east or 
west of the prindpal meridian, corresponding to 
longitude, whilst the townahip-numhen, north 
and BOnth, indicate distances from the lianrlinn 
corresponding to latitude. 

*^This great sunreying net-vror<c has extended 
from State to State and Territory to Territory, 
hatfway across the continent in the directiosi cf 
the Fadllc, whilst, starting from the shores of tiie 
w este r n ocean, the surreys are rapidly adrand^ 
eastward over the surihoe of CaUfomia, OrsgDn, 
and Washington, and westerly crossing the Snowy 
Mountains and the Cascades, eventually to be in- 
terlodced and united with those now 
west from the 'valley of the MlaslBS^ipi." 

The whde amount of pnblie lands add 



1863.] 



imSRIOR OBPARTMBNV* 



217 



Jkd wider land gnuits to fieptmalber 80, ISfSl^ vnm 
309,877,944 aeres, and the amount atiU ramoiniiiff 
ansold was estimated at 1,060^622^66 acres. The 
whole amount enrreyed to September 30^ 1861, waa 
440,9(n,04O acres, of wbieh about 60 numoM of 
acres twd not jFet been sold* The whole qiiautUy 
sold for cash up to that date was 152441,062 acrei^ 
and 247,246,102 acres had been ^iapomA of on pri- 
vate etoims, bonntyJaad warraot<^ rallcoad and 
svnunp-tend grantSf ice 

lUlLROAO GftAlfTS. 

Under the acta of Congress of 1856 and 1857, 
girants were made to eight States to aid in the 



oopstnictiOB of 45 xaflroads. Under these acta 
the following quantities of land had been certified 
to the railroads, to September 30, 1861 :-< 

Acres. 

Iowa 2,431,541 

Wisconsin 211,063 

Minnesota 890,776 

Michigan.. 1,593,727 

Florida..... 1,769,160 

Alabama 1,868,275 

Mississippi 171,550 

Louisiana. 1,072,406 



Total 9,99MW 



SwAMr LAUD Ctauan. 



Bt the acts of Congress of March 2, 1849, Sep- 
tember 28, 1650, Match 2, 1865» March 3, 1867, and 
March 12, 1860^ huigo qnantitiea of swamp and 
orerflowed lands faaTo been granted to seTeral of 
the States,-—* measnre which has been fruitful of 
trouble to the Geoeial Government. The first 
■wiMip-lftni! cjant was made to Louisiana to aid 
bar in eonstmcting the necessary levees and 
dodns akng the Mississippi and other rivers to 
prevent the overflow of her rich bottom-lands. 
In 1860 the grant was made general, by special 
daalgBation to Arkansas, and tiie declaration that 
the pforialoiis and ben^ts ol the act upon each 
of the other States of the Union in which such 
swamp and OTsrflowed lands were aitnated. Un- 
dsr this and snbseqaent acta, Louisiana^ Arknnaaa, 
Jlarida, Alabama, Misaiaaippi, Missouri, Iowa« 



Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio,Indfana, IIII- 
noia, California, and Oregon, have claimed lands to 
the amount of 57,895,577 acres, and their clnlmS 
have been approved for 44,481,004 acres, of which 
32^34,826 acres had been duly patented prior to 
September 30, 1861. In addition to these claims, 
it was found that lands had been 4old or bounty- 
land warrants located on lands claimed by the 
States as swamp lands; and patents hod been 
granted for other lands in lien of these to the 
amount of 185,246 acres, and claims for 301,430 
acres more were under examination, and the UiL 
Government had paid iu cash $276,126 60 as in- 
demnity for the loss of the States from the aale 
of theae lands, and claims for |142,438 more were 
undergoing examination. 



MoxTABT Booim Laio) Cladcs. 



Military bonnty4and vVttfrants have been 1^ 
aned to the soldiers of the War of the Revohitloo, 
and thdr hOn; to the soldiers of the War of 1812; 
ipedfying ftrst the Canadian volunteers of that 
war,anid subsequently all who served Jn it; and to 
fte soldiers of the Mexican War. The Commis* 
aioner of the General Land Office, in his reix>rt of 
December, 18^1, gives the followbig account of the 
grants made for military bountiea by the Govem- 
aent, which explains the alluaions sometimes 
made to the military districts of Ohio. 

The United States assumed the military land 
ebligations of Yii^nia, and, according to the 
terms of cession, what is known as the Virginia 
mHiiaty distriet in Ohio was set apart and ap- 
propriated for the satisfihction of warrants issued 
by that State for services in the OMittnental line. 
This district c o mp i' l fles an area of 31,709,848 acres, 
sttvate northwest of the rtter Ohio» between the 
Little IDfunl and Scioto RlTers* It embraces in 
whole or In part the conntfes of Adams, Brovm, 
Clermont, Clinton, Fayette, Highland, Bfadlson, 
Union, Harfon, I>elaware, Franklin, Pickaway, 
Soes, Pike, Scioto, Hamilton, Warren, Green, 
<3ark, Oiampa^, Logan, and Hardin, and "^r- 
ginla military land warrants to flie extent of some 
SjSroflOa acres h«r6 been located fherete; leaving 



a reaiduom of soon 40,000 access whieh is the pro- 
perty of the Uni|ed States, havinir been gnwted 
to the General Government by the State of Viiv 
ginia, December 9, 1862) as one of the considera- 
tions and .conditions of and for the passage of the 
scrip act of Angvst 81, 1852, by which all war- 
rants fairiy and juatly iasaed and aUowe4 by the 
anthorltiee of the State of Vuqgioia prior to March 
1, 1862, can be eonmnted hito scrip, and the latter 
satisfied by location upon any of the public lands ' 
of the United States entilect -to sale at private 
entry. 

Tbe act of 8d March, 1866»in regard to Vh-ginia 
Continental line warrants, which had been entered 
in the Virginia military district, Ohio, allowed 
untn 3d March, 1867, within which the claimants 
were permitted to <*iMke and return their snr- 
vcrys and warranty or certified copies of warrants^ . 
to the General Land Ofiice," such returns being 
the basis indispensably prereqnisite to the i«s«e 
of patents. 

Under the scrip laws of 1862, embraced in th^ 
tn e g c to g, scrip has been issued for the year end- 
faig^ aoth September, 1861, in virtne of said actp 
Ibr 80,028 acres,-4naking, with the quantity here- 
tolbre Issaed, a total SUB of 988,064 aqrea. There 
aranpwpondlng.lMlbn tbeUmdOfloe c)fiim»e4«al 



218 



THK NATIONAL, AliMANAO. 



[186a 



to 153,866 acres incomplete as to proof; and yet to 
be perfected before scrip can issue. 

From a carellil examinatioa. it Is estimated that 
all outstanding Virginia warrants, liable to com- 
mutation into scrip, will not exceed 100,000 acres. 
This estimate comprises warrants In the Tirglnia 
register's office, uncalled for, undrawn j warrants 
located in Kentucky and Ohio, aud lost by inter- 
ference with senior claims; duplicate warrants, 
and the balance of 10 per cent, yet due' upon war- 
rants commuted into scrip under act of 3d March, 
1836, which had been satisfied only to the extent 
of 00 per cent., by reason .of the limitation in the 
land appropriation by that act. 

In dealhig liberally with the earlier obllgatioos 
contracted by Virginia and assumed by the Federal 
Government, the United States were not unmind- 
fhl (tf the claims of the officers and soldiers who 
entered her own service during the American Re- 
volution. 

We And, therefore, that, by the act of Septem- 
ber 16, 1776, Congress promised certain gratuities 
in land to the officers and soldiers serving upon 
their establishment in the Revolutionary War, and 
by the act ci June 1, 1706, appropriated a tmtt 
of land known as the "United States MUitary Dig- 
trict, Ohio,'^ of about 4,000 square mUes, or 2,500,000 
acres, embracing within its limits, in whole or in 
part, the counties of Tuscarawas, Guernsey., Mus- 
kingum, Monroe, Coshocton, Holmes, Knox, lick- 
ing, Franklin, and Delaware. 

The land-warrants granted by the ITnited States 
under the act above mentioneiSi were located ex- 
clusively in this military district until after the 
passage of the scrip act of May 30, 1830, by which 
the Revolutionary warrants, issued either by the 
General Government or by the cqpmonwealth of 
Virginia, could be exchanged fsnt scrip, and the 
same located either In Ohio, Indiana, or Illinois. 

The United States military warrants could also 
be located in the said district up to July Z, 1832, 
when it was provided by an act of Coi^ress that 
all the vacant lands therein should be made sub- 
Ject to private sale, and the same were disposed 
of accordingly. 

Since that time these United States warrants 
could either be converted into scrip, under the said 
act of May 30, 1830, or the same could be located 



upon any of the pobUe landi ral^ect to sale at 
private entry, as the parties in interest might pre- 
fer. The right to locate, under act of 28d June, 1860, 
however, expires, by limitation of law, June 22, 
1863, and no warrant of this class has been issued 
since June 25, 1868, the further issae thereof 
being then interdicted. 

By the provisions of the act of M^y 6, 1812, » 
quantity of land, not exceeding 6^000,000 of acres, 
was directed to be surveyed, reserved, and set 
apart for the purpose of satisfying the land boun- 
ties promised by the acts of December 21, ISll, 
and January 11, 1812,-2,000,000 acres to be sur- 
veyed in the then Territory of Michigan, 2,000,000 
in the lUineis Territory, and 2,000,000 in the Ter- 
ritory of Louisiana, between the river St. Francis 
and the river Aricansaa. 

By the subsequent act of Congress aK»ioved 
April 20, 1816, it was deolared that so muck of the 
act of May 6, 1812, as directed that 2,000,1000 acres 
should be surveyed, Ac, in the Territory of Michi- 
gan should be repealed, and that in lien tfaersof 
1,500,000 acres should be laid off in the IlUnois 
Territory, and 600,000 acres in the Miasoui Tar- 
ritory north of the river MissourL The great 
mass of warrants issued for that service has been 
satisfied, under a lottery system, by locations in 
Illinois, Arkansas, and Bilssonri. The issoe of 
such warrants, however, ceased 25th June, 1858; 
by Umitation, in the act of 8th February, 1664, 
and even the right to locate them expiree 22d 
June, 1868, that being the limitation fixed by the 
aforesaid act of 22d June, 1860. 

The aggregate bounty-land liabilities already 
satisfied by the United States, from the commence- 
ment <tf operations to aOth September, 1861, are 

as foUows:— 

Acna. 
For Revolutionary services, located tracts, 

and scrip 8,200,613 

War with Grtot Britain 4,860,180 

Canadian volunteers 72,780 

Actually located prior and up to 30th 
Sept., 1861, utader Mexican bounty- 
land act of 1847, and the other acts of 
1850, 1862, 1856 61,138,970 

Total ..64,262,453 



Pbiyatx LiKp Claims. 



In lands acquired by pnrehase or conquest firom 
other nations, the grants of the Government to 
individuals constitute a class of private land 
claims which, owing to informality, uncertainty 
of boundaries, and in some cases attempted^fivnds, 
have been Tery flrultfiil in litigation. 

The principle adopted by the Government has 
been that a well-Authenticated and clearly^defined 
title from a former government was to be re- 
spected, and upon the presentation of such title 
a patent is always issued to the claimant; but 



where the boundaries, aa is often the case, are 
loosely defined and comprise a much lai^ger ter* 
ritory than that granted, or where the metes and 
bounds are of uncertain position, and eqpecially 
where there is ground for presumption of fhtnd, 
a severe scrutiny is instituted. 

Since the Act of Congress of September 4, 1841, 
laige quantities of land have been claimed on pre- 
emption, i.e. as having been settled and improved 
by persons before they were surveyed <»* came 
into market; and, these persons having thereby 



DfTBBIOR DEPABTUBirr. ~ 



wbo ii (be hwd oT a fUnilJ, or utiD bu uniTed 
Bt [hn >g« of t^eDt^HHio jenn, or hfia [i«rfonnsd 
■ETTln in Iba utiijf or utt, ud la ■ dti»n of thi 
Dnfled sum or ituin b&re Bled hli declHniliinj 



EB1« or glien aid sod comfort to Its soemlu, 
■Ml, fnnn HDd aller tbe lit of JU11U17, IMS, b* 
mmiBd to enter m. qoHrter-ffectloti (100 kth) af 

ih Hmj h«™ slreadj flloi »pr*-«npt1on ctaJm, 
« lUch li enl^ect to prframpllon, at tt 26 per 
■n; g M acrM of iiB»ppmi ri« t H l landeat C M 



nlthulDD, wd not. eillwr UncOj or indlrntlT, 
for tbfl DBB or boDofit of mDj other penoD or per- 
•juwlioiiLNHver;UHlapoaffltlDgtheendav]t,«Dd 



pijiit thi (Sin of ten doUan to tbo niMno 

recfldver^ ucb ponou ihaU be idlowed to enter tho 
UDd apecUod; bat do cortiflcate orpMent [ali- 
gned fbr the Und aatll Oto yara thnn the dnte 

time be Improred ud not nUenUed (It unnot bn 
luksn tat debt). At BDj time wlthtii two ;nn ' 
after the oiplratlon of aaJd five je&n, tha person 
making the en(i7, or, Ln a«e of bii or her dfAtb, 
fala widow or heiraf maj, on proof b^ twa wlt- 
ba or ebe ba« cnttlrated or hppnn«d 




T„ 


Acreg. 


DoUin. 


y-ra. 


ACCH. 


SoUna. 




1 IS M 

30 TOM 

07 M 

ai 

OS 13 

HI 01 

aosi 


J Mil 

2E 3SO0 

.23 04 

M«4 

«sn 

87 U 

MOO 
73 00 
44 SO 
FI8 04 

87 37 
KM 00 


ISM 

1MB 


44 41 
00 40 

wot 


!»Sg 






a,sai^M7 4» 

t^O,OUM 
UJtSMIN 




MS. 










M08. _.... 

sg " 


JJg- 


ff^l^g 






^4^07 08 








low 





ia,901i^ 74 





TH TBE lIXOBBET-QEIEaAL 



32fr 



THK HATIOITAL ALMANAC. 



119B^ 



JTTBIOIABT. 

OmCXBS OV THE JUDICIABT. 
Oorreetod at the Ollloe of the ▲tlornej-Oencral of tbe United BtalM Des. 10, Utt. 



Naaet end Ollicera. 



<( 



BurKMMM ComiT or tbs Vwismd 
States. 

BagK B. Taaej ....Chief Jostice 

Jemea M. Wbjim, Aaaoc. Jostioe. 

John Catron, 

Samuel Nebon, 

Robert C. Grier, 

Nathaa CliUbrd, 

Noah H. Swerae, 

Samnel H. MUler, 

David Davis, 

William T. Carroll Clerk 

J. S. Blaok Reporter. 



«c 



u 
(( 



u 



Beildence. 



Baltimore.... 
Savannah ..... 

Nashville 

Cooperstown.. 
Philadelphia. 
Portland...... 

Columbiu.... 

Kebknk 

Bloomington. 
Washington .. 
Washington.. 



Where Ixm. 



Maryland........... 

Georgia 

Tirginia. 

New York. 

Penneylvania...... 

New Hampshire.. 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania... ... 



appoliited. 



Maryland.. 

Georgia. 

Tennessee 

New York 

Peonsylnmia.......... 

Maine ...«..*.•..••...... 

Ohio.......... 

Iowa... 

Illinois .... 

District of Colombia 
Pennaylvaidii.... 



Compeft- 
aatioiL 



ISjBOO 
tjKO 
6,000 
0,000 
flyOOO 
(MNM) 
6t000 
6,000 
&000 
Pees. 
1,300 



The Supreme Court Is held in the dty of Washington, and has one twssion annually, c oiniiwrncln g on 
the first Monday of December. 



Cntoinf CooBCi. 

The United States are divided into the following nine Judicial Cbrcuits, in each of which a drcolt 
court is held twice every year, for each State within the circuit, by a Justice of tbe Supreme Court, 
aaslgBed to the circuit, and by the District Judge of the State or district in which the court sits. 



Cixcnit. 




Presiding Jod^s. 


1ft 


Msine^ Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island 

Connecticut^ New York, and Termont 

New Jersey and Pennsylnmla. 

Delaware^ Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. 

South Chrolina, Georgia, Alahama, Mtsslsslppl, and Florida 
IiDoisiftna, Texas, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee...... 

Ohio and Indiana...... 


Judge Clifford. 
Judge Nelson. 
Judge Gner. 
Chie^Jnstiee Tansy. 
Judge Wajno. 
Judge Catron. 
Judge Swarae. 
Judge Basis. 


2d 


8d 


A4%^ 




flth ^. ^ 


7th - 


8th 


Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Minnesota 


VvU w... ....... ......... 



P&AflB Ain> Tnfxs of Housna no OBCUiff Oount. 



Place. 


Times. 


Place. 


Times. 


Minn. 

XtnrtimnA 


April 28, and September 28. 

Mays. 
Octobers. 

May 15 and October 16. 

4th Tuesday In April.' 
8d Tuesday in September. 


Tkrmoivt. 
Windsor 


4th Tuesday in July. 
8d Tuesday in OctoMr. 

Jsnelfik 




Rutland 


Niw Hampshibb. 

Portsmouth 

Iheter t 


RbodB ItRAim. 
Newnort... 


MAflSAimusnn. 


Providence.' 

NbwYobx. 

Northern District 

Albany 

flanwwlalgoa.... 


November 15. 


GDMSBOnCUT. 

New Haven 

BM'UUia ........... 


SdTuesJnOctAndSdTnesJnMay. 
Tussday after 8d Mon. in Jane. 



ttttj 



JUmCSAET. 



asi 



■^■■l' 



Place. 




NswTo&x. 
SauOietnJ)iitfieL 
New York 



Pbahsi ltahia. 

JBatttm JH^ricL 

Philadelphia.;.... 

mtkm IHtirict 

Pittsbtirg. 

Williaiiiq;xirt...... 

Nxw Jbbjbxt. 
Trenton 



Wilmingion 

Mamylaxd. 
Baltimore...., 



Tntamu. 
Wiilem JHsirict. 
Iiewialrarig 

HnsouBi. 
Xatttm JHttrick 

dC iioniSw...*M.... 



Eauiem Districe, 

KnozTJlle 

MiddU DitirieL 
Nathrilla....... 



1st M(«d. In Apr. and 8d Mopd. 
in Oct., and a special term for 
criminal cases Itnd suits in 
equity on last Mond. in Peb. 



1st Monday in April and Oct. 

3d Monday in May and Nor. 
8d Monday in June and Sept. 

41li Tnes. in March andB^pt. 

8d Tn^. in June and October. 

1st. Monday in J^pr. and Nor. 

Ist Monday in August. 

IstMondJnApr.; ipedallnOct. 









8d Monday in May, and 4th 
Monday in Norcanber. 

Sd Monday in April, and 1st 
Monday in OetoW. 



TxiniiBSix. 
Jackson. 

KXRTUOKT. 

CrOtington 

LouisTille 

Frankfort 

Paduoah 



Omo. 
SouthemXHtiriet, 

Cincinnati 

NorthemDiitrieL 
CKervekusd. 



Tbne* 



Inbmna. 
Indianapolis . 



Ili;inoxb. 
SoutharnlHarieL 

Springfield 

NorthemDUtrict. 
Chicago 

MiCmoAzr. 
Detroit 



loiTA. 
DesMoinet. 

Caumbku. 
NorthemDiririti, 
San Francisco. 
SouihemDitbrict, 
Los Aagilesk 



;LsI Msoiay fan April nod Ost. 

ad Monday In Jan. iiid Scot 
4th Monday in April and d«pti 
8d Monday in May and Oct. 
Twiee a year when jadg* «|^ 

pcdnts. 



8d Tuesday in April and Oot 
9d Tuesday in JUy and Not« 
8d Monday in May and Nor. 

Ist Mond^r In Jan. and Jmiei 

1st MondaT In July, and 8d 
Monday in December. 

8d Monday in June, and 2d 
M<mday in October. 

ad Tuesday in May and Nor. 

1 

I 

Isl Mondagr In Jon. and July. 
Ist Monday in Xatdi and Sspl. 



BiSniOT COUETB 07 TBI UlOnD SXAXEB. 



Oflieors. 



MAim. 

Aabor Ware, Jndga 

Oeoras F. Talbot, Attorney 
Charles dark, Marshal 

Nsw Hampsbibk. 
MattlMfvr Harvey, JudfS*... 
Cfcai'Iss W. Rand, Attorney 
Joeob H. Sla, IteilMl...... 



Beaidenco. 



PortlABd. 

Mactdas.....!..*.. 
Auburn. ..«»....» 

Hopklnton .««.• 
iMtleton ......... 

Bodiester •.*»•». 



"Whence ap- 
pdnted. ' 



■ !■■ AiBfci ■■; 



Company 
satik)^. 



Ibdna 



.. .. .«««• V9*9 



M 
« 



«••«• •*««••••• 



Kewgawpshira 



« 



18/000 

aoOAfees. 



aWAibee. 



Times and Places of bod- 
ing District Courts. 



Bath, Ist Tnes. in Sept.; 
Portland, Ist Tnes. in 
Feb. uid Dee.; Bangor, 
4th Tues. in June. 

Portamonth, 3d Toss, in 
March and Sept.; Sz*- 
ter, 4kl Tom. in Jsqp 
and Dec. 



SS& 



THE NA^IOKAX* ALMANAC. 



[laas. 



OfBGon. 



MA88ACHU8XTT8. 

Peleg Spragiie, Judge. 

Rkbaid H. Daaa, Jr., Atfy 
John S. Keyes, Bianihal 

OovNionouT. 
Wm. D. SblpmaQ, Judge.... 
Iliram Willey, Attorney.... 
•David H. Carr, Marshal ..... 

VERMOirT. 

David A. Smalley, Judge... 

George Howe, Attorney 

C. G. P. Baldwiii, Macahal.. 

Rhobs Islarb. 

John PltBian, Judge 

Wingate Hayes, Attomev.. 
Albert Sandford, Mamhal... 

New Torx. 

Norlhem Distriet. 

N. K.Hall, Judge 

Wttliam A. Bart, Attorney 
A. B. Bickinaon. Marshal... 



Southern Dittrict. 

Samuel R.Bett8, Judge 

S. Belafteld Smith, Attorney 
Bobert Murray, Marshal... 

PnmsYLTAnA. 

Ecutem Dutrict. 

JiQim OMlwalader, Judge ... 
iSeprge A. Coffey, Attorney 
William Millward, Marshal 

WaUm District. 

Wilson MeCandless, Judge. 
Robert B. Oarnahan, Att"y. 
Alex. Mttrdock, Marshal.... 



Niw JotUT. 

Richard 8. Field, Judge 

A. J. Keasby, Attorney 

panfyj^ Beacon,Manihal... 

BSLAWARS. 

Waiard HalU Judge 

Edward a Bradford, Att'y. 
JameeC. Aiken, Marshal... 

Martlanb. 

William r. Giles, Judge 

-WtHiam Price, Attorney.... 
<Wiiab. BoBiftat, Manhal.«. 

... 4 



Residenoe. 



Boston... 

u 

Concord.. 



Hartford 

New London.... 
New Haven 



Burlington .. 
Brattleboro*. 
Bradford ..... 



Providence ...... 



Buflklo... 
Potsdam. 



New York. 

a 

U 

........ 

PhihideliiUa^... 
Pittsburg 

u ^^_ 

Washington 

Princeton ........ 

Newark 



WDnlngtoa..... 



Baltfmore. 






Whence ap- 
pointed. 



MMMchnsetts.. 



Connecticut..... 



ft 



Vermont , 

M 
M 






Bhode Island. 

it 



New York. 



u 



New York.. 



u 
u 



Pennsylvania'. 



Pennsylvania.. 



New Jersey..., 
it 



« 



Delaware. 



4C 

a 



tfuyland. ....... 



Compen- 
sation. 


$2,000 
200 A feat. 

CI 


2,000 

aooftitak 

It 


2,000 


2»000 

200Afeee. 
tt 




2,760 

200 ft fees, 
ti 


8,760 

200Afl9ee. 
« 




3,000 

200 & fees. 

« 


2,600 
200ftfees. 


%ooo 

200 A feet. 

u 


2.000 
aoOAfeee. 


3,000 
200Afbes. 

M 



Times and Places of hold- 
ing District Courts. 



Boston, Sd Toes. In Man. 
4th Tues. in June, M 
Tues. in Sept, and lit 
Tues. in Dec 

New Haven, 4th Tues. in 
Feb. and Aug.; Hart- 
ford, 4tb Tiias. tn May 
and Nov. 

Rutland, 6tb Oet; Wfaft- 
sor, Mond. after 4th 
TuM. in July. 



Newport 2d Tues. in May 
and 8d Tues. in Oct; 
Providence, 1st Toes, in 
F^. and Anfl^ 



Albany, dd Tues. in Jan.; 
Utica, 2d Tnea.m July; 
Rochester, 3d Tues. in 
May; Auburn, Sd Tues. 
In August; BnfliUo,2d 
TnesJn Nov.— One term 
annually in the conalgr 
of St. Lawrence, Clin- 
ton, or ntmklin, as the 

- judge may direct 



New York, Ist 
each month. 



Tues. in 



Philadelphia, Sd Mond. in 
Feb., May, August, and 
November. 



Pittsburg, 1st Mon Jn May 
and Sd Mon.ln Oct.; Wtt> 
liamsport, Sd Mond. In 
June and Ist MonJnOct 



TrentoniSd Tties. in Jan., 
April*, June, and Sept 



Wilfnlngton, 2d Tn«. of 
Jan., April, Jnna^ and 
September. 



Baltimore, let Tues. la 
March, Jnne,8«p^afli 
DafiamliBr. 



im,] 






1288 



OOlccra. 



DiSniCT OP GOLUXBIA. 

James DoBlop, Chief Judge 
Jfea. a Sf onell, Asso. Judge 
WinJfJtferrick,Aa80,Judie 
EdimrdCCarrington, Att^y 
Ward H. Lamon, Maiahal.. 

Eutem DistricL 



-i Judge 

-t Attorney . 
-, Marsbal.. 



Western DistrieL 

John J. JackflOB, Judge 

B. H. Smith, Attorn^' 

Edwnrd M. Nurton^Marahal 

NoBTH Carolina. 

» Judge 

> Attorney. 

— — , Marshal 



FUHUDA. 

Northern District. 

nOip Fraser, Ju<i^e 

SatsOtem IHstriet. 

Wniiam llarvin, Judge 

Tbos. Jeff. Boynton, Att'y.. 
James C. Clapp, Marshal.... 

Alabama. 

N.andS.I>isbricU, 

6. W. lAoe, Judge... ; 

—^Attorney. 

1 Marshal 



MlSSOVBt. 

Eastern District. 

Sanniei Treat, Judge 

Vbl W. Sd wards, Att'y 

David A. Rawling8» Marshal 

mstem District. 

Ifeotwrt W. WeUB, Judge — 
■Bobert J. Lackey, Attorney 
Xhanas Wallace, MarsbaL. 



Beeidenca 



Qeoigetown..... 



u 



Washington. 



Paikersburg..... 



Wheelmg. 



Key West , 

u 



HnntsviUe. 



Whence ap- 
pointed. 



PJgt^nmWa.. 



Blinois« 



Virginia... 



Tiri^ia.. 



Florida; 



u 



St Louis 

u 

u 



»«•«»««« 



SaHem DittrieL • 

Omally If. Trigg, Judge 

J' M. Fleming, Attorney.... 
E McSannel, Marshal 

Middle District* 

Cbually F. Trigg, Judge..... 

John Trimble, Attorney 

E. R. Glascock, Marshal.,.. 

Western District. 

Cboally F. Trigg, Judge 

— ^— — , Attorney. ,.. 

— — f Marshal 



Jefliurion City .w 

M 



« 



Missouri 

- 1( 



Missouri 



Compen- 
sation. 



200A 



Vir0Utift..«.~..... 



2,760 
20OA 



2,800 
aoOAfees. 



2,fi00 
aoo&fees. 



8,000 
200 A fees. 



2,760 

200 A 



2,500 

200 A fees, 
tt 



2^500 
200ftfees. 



2,600 
200 Afees. 

\ 

2,600 ' 
200 A fees. 



2,600 
SiOOAfees. 



Times and Places of hold- 
ing nstriet Courts. 



Clarksburg, March 21, 
and August 24; Wheel- 
ing, April 6, and 6e|^ 
temlMrO. 



Key West, Ist Monday in 
May and Notvember. 



St. Louis, 8d Monday fn 
. February, May, and No- 
vember. 



Jefferson City,lst Monday 
in March and geptem- 
bw. 



Nashym<v 3d Monday in 
April and October.^ 



Jackson, Ist Monday bi 
April aod October^ 



THE NATtOlTAL ALMANAC. 
raiBDf vuvuBw^'HxnniinMiL 



pw. 



Olieaii. 



Kbittcfckt. 
Bbwd Ballard, Jodge......... 

James Harlan, Attorney .» 
H. C. McDowell, Marahal... 



Ohio. 

SouOurn JHslrieL 

Hamph' V H. ^Titt, Jn^ 

ftamen Ball, Attorney 

Alox C. Sands, BfarsHid ..., 

Northern DUtrid. 

Hiram V. Willson, Judge... 
Bobert T. Paine, Attorney.. 
Earl BiU, Marshal 

ImXANA. 

Caleb B. Smith, Jndge 

John Hanna, Attorney 

David G. Boae, Marshal 

lunroxs. 

aovthem DittrkL 

Samuel H. Treat, Jr., Jndge 
Lawrence Weldon, Attorney 
David L. Phillips, Marshal. 

Northern Diilriet, 

Thomas Dmmmond, Judge 
Edwin C. Lamed, Attorney 
Jas. Russell Jones, Marshal 

MiOHiaAir. 

Boss Wilkins, Judge 

Alfred Russell, Attorney... 
Cbarles Dickey, Marshal..,. 

WiscoHSDr. 
Andrew Q. Miller, Judge ... 
John B. D. Ooggswell, Att'y 
Darius XL Jacxson, Marshal 

Iowa. 
James M. Lots, Judge... ..f. 
Wm. H. F. Ourley, Attome^r 
Herbert M. Ho3de^ Marshal 



GAUfOBSU. 

Northtm Diitrkt, i 

Ocden Ho Jfti ia n , Judge. •.!. 
tfm. H. Sharp. Attorney.!.. 
0. W. Band, Mardial., 



Residence. 



LonisTine .... 
Franklbrt.M. 
Louisville.... 



Whence a^ 
pointed. 



Kantnclty. 



OaBipe»- 
sation. 



$2,500 
200ftfee8. 



f 



SteobanvilleL.. 
Cincinnati 

Cleveland...... 

M 

• »••••! 

- u 

Indiamupolis.... 
Green Castle... 
LapOTte 

Springfield...... 

Clinton. 

** 

Chicaga. 

- « 

Detroit 

M 

MMiaon... 

Milwankie....^. 

M 

Madl8oa....««.M 

Keokuk 

Davenpert 

DesMoibM 



Sim Trabciseo.. 



Oliio *.»... 

u 

Ohio 

^u ^ 

u 

Indiana^. 

u 

a 

minds... 

M 

« 

Hlinob... 
« 

M 

(I 

Wiiooiutn.n. 

« 

M 

.... 

I 

Iowa...* I 

tt 



OaUfmila 



2JSfiO 
200Albcs. 



^AOO 
^OOftfeee. 



2,500 

u 



2,600 
200 A fees. 



(( 



2,600 
200ftfiBes. 



2,600 
200 & fees. 



SJWD 
200 A fees. 



2,600 

200 A fees. 



Times and nacesorhold> 
ing District Courts. 



6,000 
200*lb6s. 



C(|v!ngton,2d Honlp Jan. 
and Sept4 LoaisviIIe,40i 
Mon. in April and S^pL; 
Frankfort, 4d Mon. Hi 
May and Get.; Padb» 
cah, twice a year when 
Judge appoints. 



OneinnatiySd 
April sod 



pril sod Oetetker. 



Cleveland, ^ Tneeday in 
July and November. 



Indianapolis, 8d Monday 
in May and November. 



Springfield, Ist Monday 
in January and Jime. 



CSdcago, Ist Monday ii 
July and 3d Monday in 



Detroit, 3d Menday ift 
June and 9d Monday 
in October* 



MOwmiUek Ist Uomk/f 
in January; MadiMO, 
let Mondagr in July. 



Dubofoey Sd Ti—iay in 
Apdl and Oct; Dss- 
moines, 2d Tuelidfln^ in 
Nov. ; Keokuk, 3d Toes' 
day in March and Sep* 
tegtiber. 



San Franclscojlst Bloaidav 
tn June and Deesmbcb 



IMS.] 



JVDIGUBT* ' 
PifPUqT Oonnw^— Copttaiwj. 



988 



OffiOMW. 



Caupornia. 

Vletcber H. Haiglit, Jadge. 

B. C. Whiting, Attorney .«. 
Ban. D. Barrows, Marahal . 

GutCUlT OOUBT or TBI 
UmXSB 8f AR8. 

Matthew ^aU MeAlliiter, 
Judge. 

MnnmofA. 
Bcnaselaer B. Nclaon^ndge 
George A. Nonrse, Attorney 
Ghariea Baton, Manhal...^. 

(tauwoir. 
Matthew P. Deady, Judge.. 
Edward W. McOraw, Att*y 
Wnu EL BMinett, ManhaL. 

KAHSAfl. 

Aidiibald Williams, Jndge. 
Kobert Croaier, Attomev... 
J. L. VLcDomeUf Marsfaal..M 

Nkw Mszxoo. 
KIrby Benedict, CihlefJus- 

tice 

Sidney A. Habbell, Asso. 

Justice. 

Joseph O. Knapp, Asse. 

Justice....* * •• 

T. D. Wheaton, Attorney... 

Abraham CafleoT, ManhaL. 

UVAH. 

J.V.KiaDqr, ChieMostioe 

C. B. Waita, AaaocUte Jus- 
tice 

Tbos. J. Drake, Asso. Jnritloe 

Hosea Stoat, Attorney 

Issac L. GIbbs, Marshal... 

WASRDroTOir. 
C. C. Hewitt, ChiefJusttce 
James E. Wyche, Associate 

BUidbert''p. oiiphiuiti As^ 

tifffntr Justice 

John J. McQilvra, Attorney 
Wat. Hnntincdon, Marshal 

NBBftASKA. 

W.P.Kellogg, Chie^lnstloe 
Jos. B. Streeter, Associate 

Justice 

WmJ.Lockwood, Associate 

Jnatica •«•• 

Bavid L. GoQIer, Attorney.. 
Fhineas W. Hitchcoclc, Mar- 



Bealdenca^ 



Los Angeles. 



SanfhndMO. 



St^Panl, 



■ ■ avee ••••*•••••• ••••ea«« 



Winchester, 

Portland. 

Salem... 



Topeka ». 

Leavenworth ... 
Topeka 



Albnqverqne 
Santa F« 



Fort Union • 

Femandex de 

Taos 

Santa F6 



Gr'tSaltLakeCity 



u 
u 
u 
w 



Whence ap- 
pointed. 



OalifiNmla 

M 

M 



OiBjbmia 



Minnesota. 



Orsgon 
^Or^n. 



nilnois .... 
Kansas.... 

u 



niinois^ 

New Mexico , 
Wiseonsin.... 



Compeii* 
sanon. 



$8,000 
20OAfees; 



New Mexico. 



Nebraska Terr. 
Pennsylvania... 



Olympia..... 
yaDeouTer. . 



Whatcom ... 

Olympia 

Olympia .... 



Bikota City....M 
Omaha 



Utah Territory.. 

Washington Ter. 

MieUgan 

Penasylraaia... 
Illinois 



Illinois 

Pennsytvanla... 
Ndnraska Tarr. 

15 



MOO 



2,000 



2,600 
200*iiMS. 

u 



2,000' 
200 A fees. 



1,800 
1300 
1,800 
S60A 

1,800 

1,800 
1,800 
250* 

M 

2,000 
2,000 



Times and Places of hold- 
ing Uatrict Oonrts. 



Monterey, 1st Monday in 
June; Los Angeles, 1st 
Monday in December. 



Pfevston, 1st Monday In 
Jnne; St Paul, Ut 
Monday in OetobA. 



Salain, 2d MondijiaMa|r 
and September. 



2,000 
250 



&fess. 



2,000 
2,000 

2,000 ' 

2fi0ftlbSB. 



fi2S 



THE NAilOdlAt ALMANAC. 

DmnacT Ooubts.— Conttniied. 



iiWSL 



Offiotn. 



OOLOBASO. 

Bmj. F. Hall, ChlefJnstice 

Obarles Lee Armoor, Asbo- 
ciateJtutice '...». 

Alien A. Bradford, Ajbbo- 
eiate Justice *. 

Bam. S. Brown, Attorney*. 

A. Cameron Hunt, Mar- 
shal 

Dakota. 

niileinonBli88,ChieMnstioe 

Joseph L. Williams, Ass^ 
ciate Justice 

Lorenzo P. ^iTilliston, Asso- 
ciate Jostice 

Wm. E. Oleason, Attorney. 

George M. PInney, Marshal 

NiTAJkA. 

C(eo. Turner, ChiefJnsttce.. 
CkvrdonN.MottfAsso.Jnstice 
Horatio Jones,ABSo. Justice 
BeqJ. B. Banker, Attorney. 
Warren Wasson, Marshal*. 

BisnacT or Ooluiibll 

Criminal Court. 

Thomas H. Crawlbrd, Judge 

Orpharu^ Court 

William F. Purcell, Judge.. 
Z. C. Bobbins, Reg. at Wills 



Kflsidence. 



Denrer City. 
v.... 



Denver City. 



T^CtOD.. 



Tancton 

u 



Carson City. 



Carson City, 
it 



Washington 



Washington ..... 



Wlienceai 
pointed. 



ffew Tark.M. 
Miuyland.... 



Pennsylrania... 
Colorado Terr... 



Ohio...... 

Tennessee... 

Pennsylirania... 

Maryland 

Colorado Terr.. 

Ohio 

California 

Missouri 

New Hampshire 
Missouri 



Pennsylvania... 



Dist. Columbia.. 



Ocanpen- 
sation. 



11,800 

1,800 

1,800 
260 ft fees. 



1,800 

1300 

1,800 
250ftfess. 

u 



1,800 

1,800 

1,800 

260Aftes. 
u 



Times and Fbtcesof hold- 
ing District Ooorts. 



2,600 



Fees. 



Canr-JusnoiB or Tibuxobiu. 



Territories. 

■ ■ I t 

Nebraska 

Dakota 

Colorado 

New Mexico « 

Utah 

Nerada #•.., 

Washington f 



Justices. 



Wiinam P. Kellogg ..... 

Philemon Bliss 

Benjamin F. Hall 

Kirby Benedict 

J. F. Kinney 

OecMmTumer,,. 

C. C. Hewitt 

OoiTBTor Olado. 



Baridenca. 



Salary. 



Omaha City 

Tancton 

Denver City 

Albuquerque 

Great Salt Lake City 

■Carson Talley 

Tancouver 



$2,000 
2,000 
2,500 
2,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



Offloers. 


Residence. 


Where bom. 


Whence ap- 
pointed. 


Obmpen. 
sation. 


Bdward J. Lorlng, Judge 

Jiunev Hughes, Judge .....f..... ■••••« 


Washington .... 

••• 

« 

. ... 

<t 

... 

M 

... 

... 
U 

• •• 


Massachuwtts'.. 


Massachusetts.. 

Indiana 

Pennsylvania... 

Missouri 

Dist. Columbia.. 
Missouri 


4.000 


Joseoh Casey, Judse 

Charles Gibson, Solicitor .<................. 


Maiyland ........ 

Ylrslnia. 


4,000 

8,500 
8,500 
2,500 
8,000 


J. D. McPheraon, Solicitof 


ft 


Richard Bates, Deputy Solicitor.. 

Samuel H. Huntington, Clerk 




Connecticut....: 


Cbnnectf cut ..... 



1868.} 



OONeBBSS. 



227 



OOirOBESS. 



TBI legblattre power gnmtod by the Gonstitu- 
tion of the United States is vested in a Congress, 
which consists of a Senate and House of Repre- 
aentatives. Tbe Congress must meet at least onco 
in every jear, which meeting most be on the first 
Hondaj in December, unless they by law appoint 
f different day. 

The Senate of the United States is composed of 
two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legis- 
lature thereof for six years. At their first meet- 
ing under the Constitatioii, the Senators were 
diTided into three classes, so that the terms of 
one-third of the Senators might expire every 
Mcond year. By this means one-third of the Se- 
nate ia renewed btennialty. No person can be a 
Senator who is xaadiec thirty years of age» nor 
nnleeg he has been nine years a citizen of the 
United States, and when elected an inhabitant 
of the State for which he is chosen. When 
ncandei happen in any State, temporary appoint- 
ments may be made (if the Legislature be not in 
aenoD) by the Execative of the State, until the 
next meeting of the Legislature. The Vice-Pr^ 
lident of the United States is President oT the 
Senate, bat has no vote unless they be equally 
diiided. The Sekiate Is required to choose also a 
pRddent pro tempore, who presides in the absence 
of the Yice-President or when the latter shall 
ezmiM the office of President. 

The House of Representatives is composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people 
of the several States.- Ho person can be a Repre- 
Mntative who is under twenty-five years of age^ 
nor unless he has been seven years a citizen of 
the United States, and, when elected, an inhabit- 
ant of the State for which he Is chosen. Repre- 
Rntatives are api>ortloned among the several 
Btatea according to fheir respective numbers, 
which numbers are ascertained by an actual enu- 
ueiation, or census, of all the inhabitants, made 
vitUn every term of ten years. When by this 
means the whole number of free persons is ascer- 
tained, excluding Indians not taxed, there is added 
to mch number three-fifths of iJl other persons, 
and the aggregate thus found is the represent- 
ative popahktion. By the law of 23d of May, 1850, 
luuier which the existing apportionment of Re- 
presentatives was made, it was enacted that the 
number of Representatives in Congress should be 
23(^ that the representative population determined 
by the census of that year. Viz. 21,767,673, should 
be divided by said number 283, and that the quo- 
tient 10 found should be the ratio of representa- 
tion lur the several StAtea. The ratio thus ascer- 
tained was 03,423; and upon this basis the 238 
R<1)reflentatives were apportioned among the 
Kveral States, one Bepresentetive for every dis- 
trict containing that number of persona; but each 
State must have at least one Representative. 
Several new States having been admitted into 



the Union ainoe the eao^tmenf of the law of 1860, 
the number of Representatives is now 230, — Min- 
nesota being allowed two, Oregon and """itft each 
one, and California being allowed two additional 
by special enactments. The apportionment under 
the Census of 1860, made by act of Congress of 
March 4, 1862, increases the number of Repre- 
sentatives to 241, the distribution of which among 
the several States will be seen by reference to the 
table relating to that subject. 

Besides Senatqrs and Representatives, there ia 
a clzss of .members ol Congress, called Delegatee, 
who sit in the House and represent the organized 
Territories of the United States. These Delegates 
may present sul^eets for legislation and adufaresi 
the House, but, not representing States, they have 
no votes. In the present Congress there are seven, 
—one each from the Territories of Washington, 
New Mexico^ Utah, Nebraska, Colorado, Nenktaj 
and Dakota. 

Under the law of August X6, 185^ the compen- 
sation of a Senator, Representative, or Delegate 
in Congress is $6000 for each Congress, at the rate 
of $3000 per annum, and mileage at the rate <tf 
$8 for every twenty miles of estimated distance 
by the most usual road from his place of residence 
to the seat of Congress, at the commencement and 
at the end of every session; but this mileage is 
allowed for two sessions only In each Congress. 
The compensation of the SpeeUcer of the House is 
double that of a Representative, and the President 
pro tempore of the Senate, when there is no. Vice- 
President, is entitled to the compensation allowed 
by law to the Yice-President, $8000 per annum. 

The times, places, and manner of holding eleo* 
tions for Senators and Representatives are pre. 
scribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; 
but Congress may at any thne by law alter such 
regulations, or moke new ones^ except as to the 
places of choosing Senators. No Senator or Re- 
presentative can, during the time for which he 
waa elected, be appointed to any civO olHoe under 
authority of the United States, which shall have 
been created or the emoluments of which shall 
have been increased during such time; and no 
person holding any office under the United States 
shall be a member of either House during his 
continuance in office. 

The period usually termed ''a Congress," in 
legislative language, continues for two years; as, 
for example, from the 4th of March, 1861, until 
the 3d of March, 1863, at which latter time the 
term of the Representatives to the Thirty-Seventh 
Congress expires, and the term of the new House 
of Representatives begins. Congresses ahmys 
commence and expire in years terminating with 
odd numbers ; as 1780-91, which was the term of 
the First Congress, or 1861-63, the toem of the 
Thirty-Seventh Congress, or 18Q&-d6, the tern of 
the Thirty-Eighth Congress. 



^228 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



(180S. 



Thirtj-Serentk Omgreii.— Third BeMlon. 

THE SENATE. 

(The tputB Oenotethe ezplntkn «f the t«nu of the Beoston.] 

HAimiBAL Hamuh, of Maine, President ex qficio. 



Jobs W. Foknxt, of PennsylTania, Secretary. 



Mabama. 



Arkantat, 



1866 
18€7 

1865 
1807 



Mimuioia, 



Oaitfmmia, 

Milton S. Latham, Bacramento, 1863 

Jamea A. McDongall, Saa Franctaoo, 



1867 



CbnnteUcut, 



Jamea Dixon, 
U&yette S. Foster, 



Hartfiurd, 
Norwidi, 



DdavHire, 



James A. Bayard, 
WOlard Saulsbory, 



Wilmington, 
Georgetown, 



W. A. Bichardflon, 
Lyman Trumbnll, 



David Tnrpie^ 
Henry 8. Lane, 



James W. Grimes, 
James Harlan, 



James H. Lane, 
Bomoel a Pomaroy, 



JPt&rtda. 
Georgia, 

lOinoit, 

Qalncy, 
Alton, 

Indiana. 

GrawsfbrdsviUe^ 

Icwa. 

Burlington, 
Mt. Pleasant, 

Kanuu. 

Lawrence, 
Atchison, 



Henry M. Rice, 
M. S. Wilkinson, 



8t. null, 

Mankato^ 



Miuiteippi' 



Miueuri, 



Robert Wilson, 
J. B. Henderson, 



St. Joseph, 
Lonisiana, 



Kentucky. 



LaEams W. Powell, 
Garrett Davis, 



Hondenon, 
Paris, 



LouMana. 

Lot M. Morrfll, Angoatiw 

WilUam P. Fessenden, Portland, 

Maryland. 
Anthony Kennedy, Baltimore. 

Thomas H. Hicks,« Cambridge. 

Mattochtuette. 

Charles Snmner, Boston, 

Henry Wilson, Natick, 

MicMffan. 

Zaehary Chandler, Detroit, 

>bM.~ 



Jacob If. Howard, 



Detroit, 



1863 
1867 



1869 
1866 



1868 
1867 

1865 
1867 

1865 

1867 



1868 
1867 



1866 
1867 



1866 
1807 



1866 
1867 



1666 

1867 

1860 
1866 



1868 



1869 
1866 



1860 
1866 



Aho Edmpehirt, 



John P. Hale, 
Daniel dark. 



Dover, 
Mancliastar, 



NewJertey, 
James W. Wall, Burlington, 

John C. Ten Eyck, Mount H<dly, 



New York, 



Preston King, 
Ira Harris, 



Ogdensbuii^ 
Albany, 



North Qirdlina, 



OMo. 



Benjamin F. Wade^ 
John Sberman, 



Jefferson. 
Mansfidd, 



Oregon, 



Bei^amin F. Haidiog, 
G. W. Nesmith, 



David Wilmot, 
Edgar Cowan, 



Penfuylvania, 

Towanda, 
Greensbiug, 

Skodeldemd. 



Samuel G. Arnold, 
Henry B. Anthony, 



Providence, 
Providence^ 



Sovih OsaroUmtL 



Andrew Johnson, 



Solomon Foot, 
Jacob CoUamer, 



Waitman T. Wi]l«y, 
John S. Carlisle, 



Tmneisee. 

Greenville, 

VermonL 

Rutland, 
Woodstock, 

Virginia, 



dsrksburg; 
Witcontin, 



James R. Doollttle, 
Timothy 0. Howe, 



Radn 
Green 



iBay. 



* Appointed by Governor, nntil election by the Legislature. 



188S 
1866 



186S 
1866 

1868 
1867 



1866 
1861 



1863 
1866 



1868 
1887 



1865 
1887 

186S 
1867 



1866 
1867 



1863 

1867 



1863 
1866 



1866 
1867 

1S8S 
1866 

1863 
186» 

1863 
1667 



18fl3 

1866 



1863 
1861 



186a.] 



CONGRESS. 



229 



H0U8B OF RKFBE8ENTATITES. 



Galvsha a. Gbow, Speaker. 



Maine, 



1. John N. Goodwin, 

2. Thomas A. D. V 
& S. C. Feflsendeo, 

4. Anson P. MorriU, 

5. John H. Rice, 

6. Frededck A. Pike^ 



oden, 



South Berwick. 

Auburn. 

Rockland. 

Readfield. 

Foxcroft. 

Calais. 



JBfev SBnai^fikire, 

t Gflman Marston, Exeter, 

2. Kdward H. Rollins, Concord. 

Z, Thomas M. Edwards, Keene. 



VermmU, 



1. E. P. Walton, 

2. Jostin S. MorriU, 
8. Portus Baxter, 



Montpelier. 
Strafford. 
Derby line. 



MduadmaeUg. 



1. Thomas D. Eliot, 

2. Junes BufSnton, 

3. Benjamin F. Thmnas, 

4. Alexander H, Rice, 
i. Samuel Hooper, 

& John B. Alley, 

7. Daniel W. Gooch, 

8. Charles R. Train, 

9. Amasa Walker, 
10. Charles Delano, 
II Heniy L. Dawes. 



New Bedford. 
Fall River. 
West Roxbory. 
Boston. 



u 



Lynn. 
Melrose. 
Framingham. 
North Brookfield. 
Northampton. 
North Adams. 



Shode Aland, 

1. William P. Sheffield, Newport. 

1 0. H. Browne, Providence. 



ConneeHcui, 



1. Ihrif^t Loomis, 

2. James B. English, 
8l Alfred A. Bumtunn. 
4. George G. Woodnm, 



BockviUe. 
Now Haven. 
Windham. 
Litchfield. 



iVew York, 



1. Edward H. Smith, 

2. Moses F. Odell, 

3 Benjamin Wood, 
4. James E. Kerrigan, 
9. WUliam Wall, 
0. Fr«d«rick A. Conkling, 

7. Eiyah Ward, 

8. laaac C. Delavlaine, 
0. Edward Haight, 

10. C. H. Van V^dk, 

11. John B. Steele, 

12. Stqiben Baker, 

13. Abraham B. Clin, 

14. Erastns Coming, 

15. James B. McKean, 

16. William A. Wheeler, 

17. Socrates N. Sherman, 
IS. Chauncey Tibbard, 

19. Richard Franchot, 

20. Roscoe Conkling, 

21. R. Holland Duell, 

22. William E. Unsing, 
28. Ambrose W. Clark, 
24. Charles B. Sedgwick, 



Smithtown. 
Brooklyn. 
N«w York. 

Brooklyn, E. D. 

New York, 
o 

M 

Westchester. 

Bloomingburg. 

Kingston. 

Poughke^xde. 

Troy. 

Albany. 

Saratc^ Springs. 

Malone. 

Ogdensbnrgh. 

Schenectady. 

Morris, Otsego co. 

Utica. 

Cortland VilUige. 

Chittenango. 

Watertown. 

Syracuse. 



25. Theodore M. Pomeroy, 

26. Jacob P. Chamberlain, 

27. Alexander S. Diven, 

28. Robt.B.VanYalkenbwrKli, 

29. Alfred Ely, 

30. Augustus Frank, 

31. Burt Yan Horn, 

32. Elbridge 0. Spaulding^ 
83. Reuben E. Feuton, 



Auburn. 

Seneca Falls. 

Elmira. 

Bath. 

Rochester. 

Warsaw. 

Newfime. 

Buffalo. 

Firewsburg. 



NewJertejf, 



1. John T. Nixon, 

2. John L. N. Stratton, 
8. William O. Steele, 
4. George T. Cobb, 

6. Nehemiah Perry, 



Bridgeton. 
Mount Holly. 
Somerville. 
Morristown. 
Newark. 



AiMuyhNMiio. 



1. William E. Lehman, 

2. Charles J. Biddle, 
8. John P. Yerree, 

4. William D. Kelley, 
6. W. Morris Davis, 

6. John Hickman, 

7. J. D. Stiles, 

8. Sydenham £. Ancona, 

9. Thaddeus Stevens, 

10. John W. Killinger, 

11. James H. Campoell, 

12. Hendrick B. Wright, 

13. Philip Johnson^ 

14. Galusha A. Grow, 
16. James T. Hale, 

16. Joseph Bailey, 

17. Edward McPhersOD, 

18. Samuel S. Blafr, 

19. John Covode, 

20. Jesse Lazear, 

21. James K. Moorhead, 

22. Robert McKnight, 

23. John W. Wallace, 

24. John Patton, 

25. EUJah Babbitt, 



Philadelphia. 

u 
l« 

M 

Mflestown, PhJladiL 

West Chester. 

AUentown. 

Reading. 

Lancaster. 

Lebanon. 

Pottsville. 

Wilkesbarre. 

Easton. 

Glenwood. 

Bellefonte. 

Newport. 

Gettysburg. 

Hollidaysburg. 

Lockport Station. 

Waynesborg. 

Pittsburg. 

u 

Newcastle. 

Curwensville. 

Erie. 



Delaware. 
1. George F. Fisher, Dov«r. 



Maryland. 



1. John W. Crisfield, 

2. Edwin H. Webster, 

3. Cornelius L. L. Lewy, 

4. Henry May, 

5. Francis ThobuA 

6. Charles B. Calvert, 



Princess Anne. 
Bel Air. 

Baltimore. 

tt 

Frankrllle. 
HyattsTills. 



Virginia, 



1. Joseph Segar, 

2. 

8. 

4. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 



FortTMS Monroe. 



S80 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



10. 

11. 
12, 

13. 

1. 
2. 
S. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
6. 
6. 

L 
2. 
d. 
4. 
6. 

e. 

7. 
8. 

1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 

5. 
6. 
7. 

1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 
6. 

1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 



William G. Brown, 
Jacob B. Blair, 
K. V. Whaley, 



Kingwood. 

Parkersbarg. 

Oereda 



North Oirolina, 



SnUh QiroUna. 



^GtorgicL. 



Alabama, 



Uiuiuippi. 



iMuitiawi, 
Bei|}amtn F. Flanden,* 
MiduMl Hahii,* 



Ohio, 



1. Oeorge H. Pendleton, 

2. John A. Gnrley, 

8. C. L. Vallandigham, 
4. William AUen, 
6. James M . Ashley, 

6. Cliilton A. White, 

7. Richard A. Harrison, 

8. Samuel Shellabarger, 

9. Warren P. Koble, 

10. Carey A. Trimble, 

11. Valentine B. Ilorton, 

12. Samuel S. Cox, 

13. Samuel T. Worcester, 

14. Harrison O. Blake, 
16. Robert H. Nugon, 

16. WiUiam P. Cutler, 

17. James R. Morris, 
19. Sidney Edgerton, 

19. Albert G. Riddle, 

20. John Hutchins, 

21. John A. Bingham, 



Cincinnati. 



tt 



Dayton. 
Chreenyffle. 

Toledo. 

Georgetown. 

London. 

Springfield. 

Tiffin. 

Chilioothe. 

Pomeroy. 

Columbus. 

Ndrwjdk. 

Medina. 

Newcomerstown. 

Constitution. 

Woodsflfeld. 

Tallmadge. 

Clereland. 

Warren. 

Cadiz. 



Kentucky, 
1. Samuel L. Casey, Caseyville. 



2. George H. Teaman, 
8. Henry Orider, 

4. Aaron Harding, 

5. Charles A. Wickliffe, 

6. Georgo W. Dunlap, 

7. Robert Mallory, 

8. John J. Crittenden, 

9. William H. Wadsworth, 
10. John W.Mendes, 



Owensboro'. 

Bowling Green. 

Greensburg. 

Bardstown. 

Lancaster. 

La Grange. 

Frankfort. 

Maysville. 

Covington. 



Tenneuee, 



1. 

2. Horace Maynard, KboztUIb. 

3. 

4. Andrew J. CleBifliiti^ Lidhyetta. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 

Indiana. 



1. J<^n Law, 

2. James A. CniYens, 

3. W. McKee Dunn, 

4. William S. Holman, 
6. George W. Julian, 

6. Albert G. Porter, 

7. Daniel W. Voorheea, 

8. Albert S. White, 

9. Schuyler Colfax, 

10. William MitcheQ, 

11. John P. C. Shanks, 



Evansrflle. 

Hardinaburg. 

Madison. 

Aurora. 

Centreville. 

IndianapoHi. 

T4rre Haute. 

StockwelL 

South Bend. 

KendallviUe. 

Jay Court-Bonsa 



lUinoit. 

1. Elihu B. Washburne, 

2. Isaac N. Arnold, 

3. Owen Lovcjoy, 

4. William Kellogg, 

5. WiUiam A. Richardson, 

6. Anthony L. Knapp, 

7. James C. Robinson, 

8. Philip B. Fonlke, 

9. William J Allen, 



Galena. 

Chicago. 

Princeton. 

Canton. 

Qnincy. 

Jerseyville. 

Marshall. 

BeUeville. 

Marion. 



MiuourL 



1. Francis P. Blair, Jr., 

2. James S. Rollins, 

3. WiUiam A. Hall, 

4. EUjah H. Norton, 

5. Thomas L. Price, 

6. John S. Phelps, 

7. John W. Noell, 



St. Louis. 
Columbia. 
Hunts viUe. 
Platte City. 
Jeffereon City. 
SpringfiekL 
P^rryTilte. 



Michigan, 

1. Bradley F. Granger, Ana Arbor. 

2. Fernando C. Beaman, Adrian. 

3. Francis W. KeUogg, Grand Rapids. 

4. R. £. Trowbridge, BirminghanL 



1. 
2. 

1. 

1. 
2. 



Arkantat, 

Florida. 

Ttxax, 

Jowa. 



1. James F. Wilson, Fairfield. 

2. William Vandevcr, Dubuque. 



•Elected by authority of the Military Goremor of Louisiana, December, 1862. 



1863.] 



COK01tBSS. 



mt 



1. John F. Potter, East Trofk 

2. Walter D. Mclndoe, 

3. A. Scott Sloan, Beaver Dam. 

California. 

1. Timotby G. Phelps, Redwood Oity. 

2. Aaron A. Sacsent, Nevada. 

3. Frederick F. Jbow. San Frandaoo. 

JHnnuota. 

1. Cyma Aldrich, Minneapolis. 

2. William Wiadom, Winona. 

Oreffo%, 
1. George K. Shield Salem. 

Kantat. 
L Martin F. Conway* Iiawrenco. 



John S. Watts, 



DELEGATES. 

New Mexico. 

Santa F6. 



John M. Berohlsel, Great Salt Lake CStj. 

WathtngtoH, ' 
William H. Wallace, Steilac9om. 

IftbgnuSea. 



Samnd O. Dailey, 



John B. B. Todd, 



Hiram P. Bennett, 



John -Cradlebavglh, 



Pam, Mefaama oo. 



DdkUa. 



FortBandalL 



CWorado. 



Ponver. 



Neoadcu 



Carson Oity. 



Non.^The compensatlcm of each Senator and Representative is f8000 for each Congress (two jwri^ 
dedncting lor absence, and $8 fiiir ettery t#eDty ihiies of estimated distance from the place' of 'residence 
to the seat of Congress, allowed yearly. The thifxl Session of ThirtyrSeveoth Congress commences 
Monday, Dec. 1, ISeS. 

REPRBSENT ATITE8 DT C0NGBS8S AOCDRDIKG 10 THE NEW CENSUS OF 1860. 



Akbama... 6 

Arkunsas «... 8 

California ^ 8 

Connecticut : .^ 4 

Delaware.! 1 

Florida 1 

Georgia 7 

IlUnois 14 

Indiana^ 11 

Iowa «^..* M 6 

Kentucky 

Looiaiana 5 

Maine 5 

Maryland 6 

Maasachnsetts 10 

Miasiadppi 5 



Missouri ^ „^ 

juicQigan.*. *•*. .••«*.•*•*..•*....••.......»••»••«• •.«.^«B..te ,fi 

Minnesota «««.•« 2 

New llampshlte.^.....« ..; l«...j...;. '8 

New Jervej 5 

New York : : 81 

North Carolina , «. 7 

Ohio 19 

Oregon. ........•« «. ,..«...w..«. 1 

Pennsylvania ..,, 24 

Rhode Island , .«..« .:. 2 

South Carolina..... 4 

Tennessee , ^ 

Texas .,...., 4 

Tirginia 11 

vennont ..♦.m»»»<»» ..»«..»..»... •».»•»«....».•...«>■*>*<» B 
Wisconsin „ 6 



Total Representatives ^....^..241 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

The HooM of Representatives of the United States is composed of members elected by districts, with 
a term of two years. Tbe nnmber apportioned to the States has variM at each decennial .census, as 
ahown by tbe table. 



Censoh 


Date of 
apportionment. 

1 


Whole No. of 
Representativee.' 


iUfctia 


1790 „ 


By Constitution. 
April 14, J792 
January 14, 1802 
December 21, Mil 
March 7, 1822 
May 22, 1832 
June 25, 1842 
July 80, 1862 
March, 4, 1862 


66 

m 

141 
181 

283 
241 


1 to ' 

" 83,000 


1800 

1810 


«« 88,000 •• 

** 85,000 


^^Af*'**** •••••« v*«*««ae ••*•»•«••■*•••*•#> 


*« 40,000 
« 47,700 


IWO ^ 

1860 


« 70,680 
« 93,423 


1860 


« 124,188 



m 



IHE NATIOKAI* ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



Xemben-Eleot to tk« Thirty-Eighth OoB^eas, so &r u Eleotiou ven held in 1862i 



mVSM or 9BPRSSENTATIYES. 



DiLAWABK. 

WttUam H. Templa. 
Illinois. 



1. 

2. 
8. 
4. 
ft. 

7. 

1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 
6. 
0. 

1. 
3. 
8. 



1. 
2. 
8. 

4. 
6. 

1. 
2. 
<• 

1. 

.2. 

8. 

2. 
8. 
4. 
k. 

1. 

1. 

2. 

8. 

4. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
18. 
14. 
16. 
16. 



N. Arnold. 
John F. Fftmswortli. 
JfiUhn B.Washbnnie. 
ChM. M. Harrii. 
Owen LoTejoy. 
Jmm O. Norton. 
John B. Jfiden. 



DUt. 

8. John T. Bttiart. 
0. Lewis W. Bofls. 

10. A. L. Knapp. 

11. J. C Bobtntoa. 

12. Wm. R. MorriMm. 
]& Wm. J. Allen. 

At large, Jaa. G. Allen. 



IHBUNA. 



John Law. 
James A. Gravena. 
H. W. Harrington. 
Wm. S. Holman. 
Geo. W. Julian. 
Sbeneaer Domont. 

J. F. Wilson. 
Hiram Price. 
Wm. B. Allison. 



7. Daniel W. Voorhees. 

8. OoodloTe 8. Orth. 

9. Schuyler Colfox. 

10. J. K. Edgtortotf. 

11. James F. MoBowelL 

Iowa. 

4. J. B. Orlnnell. ' 
6. John A. Kasson. 
6. A. W. Hubbard. 



Kaivsas. 
A. C. Wilder. 

MA8SACBU8RTS. 

Thomas D. Eliot. 6. Daniel W. Ckxxsh. 



7. G^otfge' 8. BontweO. 

8. John D. Baldwin. 
9: Wm. B. Washburn. 

10. Henry L. Dawes. 

Mains. 

4. John H. Bice. 
6. Frederick A. Pike. 



OakflsAmes, 
Alexander H. Woe, 
Ssmnel Hooper. 
John B. All^. 

L. D. M. Sweet. 
Sidney Perham. 
James G. Blaine. 

MlORIOAN. 

Fernando C. Beaman. 4. Francis W. Kellogg. 
Charles TJpeon. 5. Aug. C. Baldwin. 

J. W. Longyear. 6. John Moore. 

MlMOPM. 



6. Austin A. King. 

7. BeoJamin Iioan. 

8. Willifun A. HalL 

9. James S. Bollins. 



Frands P. Biair^ Jr. 
Henry T. Blow. 
John W. Noell, 
8. H. Boyd. 
J.W.McClurg. 

MlNNlSOfA. 

William Windom. 2. ^;natin8L.DonnellyJ 

Nur ToKK. 



Henry G.. Stebbins. 
Martin Kalbfleisch. 
Moses F. Odell. 
Ben. Wood. 
Fernando Wood. 
Eliiah Ward. 
J. W. Ofaandler, 
James Brooks. 
Anson Herrick. 
Wm. Radford. 
Charles H. Winfleld. 
Homer A. Nelson- 
John B. Steele. 
Srastus Corning. 
John A. Qrisw^d. 
Orhmdo KeUogg. 



17. CtAyin T. Hnlburd, 

18. James M. Marvin. 

19. Samuel F. Miller. 

20. Ambrose W. GtSdPk. 

21. Francis Kernao. 

22. De Witt C. Little- 

John. 

23. Thomas T. Davis. 

24. Theod. M. Pomeroy. 
26. Daniel Morris. 

26. OUes W. Hotchkiss. 

27. B3.Vanyalkenbnrg. 

28. Freeman Clarke. 

29. Augustus Frank. 

80. John B. Chinson. 

81. Beuben B. Fenton. 



Niw JnkSET. 

Dirt. Dlit. 

1. John F. Starr. 4. Andrew J. BogerL 

2. Qeorge Middleton. 6. Nehemiah Peny. 
8. Wm. G. Steele. 



Omo. 

1. G. H. Pendleton. 11. 

2. Alex. Long. 12. 

3. Robert G. Schenek. 13.. 

4. J. F. McKinney. 14. 
6. Francis G. Le Blond. 19. 

6. Chilton A. White. 1ft. 

7. Samuel S. Cox. 17. 

8. Wm. Johnston. 18. 

9. Warren P. N6hle. 19. 
10. Jas. M. Ashley. 



Wells A. Hntchins. 
Wm. B. FtaMJk. 
JohsCFNciU. 
George Bliss. 
Jas. B. Morris. 
J.W.WIiltai 
Bphraim B. BcMey. 
Buliis P. Spankttng. 
J. A. QaiAeM. 



Onoov. 
John B. McBride. 



L 8md«m« J. BandftU. 
2. Chas. (^NeiL 
8. Leonard Myers.! 
4. Wm. D. Kelley, 

6. M. Bnaseli Thayer^ 
;6*JohnD.8lfles. 

7. John M. BroomaU. 

8. Syden. E. Ancona. 

9. Xbaddeus Stevens. 

10. Myer Stronse. 

11. Philip Johnson. 

12. Ghas. Deniaon. 



WUOONSIN. 

1. James 8. Brown. 4. Ghas. A. EldrMga. 



13. H.M. Tracy. 

14. Wm. B. Muler. 

15. Joseph Bidley. 

16. A. H. Ooffrotn. 

17. Arch. McAllister. 

18. James T. Hale. 

19. Glenni W. ScoftekL 
. i2Q. Amos Myecs. 

21. John L. Dawson. 

22. J. K. Moorebesd. 
28. ThoB. Williams. 

-24. JcsaeLasaar. 



8. Ithamar G. Sloan. 
8. AmasaCobb. 



6. Exra Wheeler. 
6. Luther HaachetL} 



TsaanoaT 9» Nbbaska. 
SaoMMl e. Daaley^ delesat*. 



toyal StaU* in which Members of Ckmgnu an <• 
be deeted^ and the lottoi time of hoifdit^ Ms 
ekiUion. 

Vermont, first Tuesday in September, 1863. 

New Hampshire, second Tuesday in March, 1883. 

Bhode Island, first Wednesday in April, ** 

Connecticut, first Mondny in April, •• 

Maryland, first Wednesday in November, ** 

Kentucky, first Monday in August, * 

California, first Tliursday in September, ** 

Tirginia, fourth Thursday in May, ■ 



It is expected that electiomr fcr m«mbera of 
Congress will also be held in North GaroUna, Tei^ 
nessee, Louisiana, and in such of the other asoedsd 
States as mfty be reoavered, either tai wfaMila or ia 
part, to the Union. 



* Contested by Wm. Cullen. 
X Oontested by G. W. Carrig«n. 



f Contested by John Kline. 
I Since deoeas e d. Yaoanoy. 



i«ett.j 



ABSli%k(fr or VVBUC LAWS. 



^a 



TITLES AND ABSTSAOTS OF THE P1TBLI0 LAWS 
"Pissa AT «a Sboosb SnsxoH or vmi sev h OcmoRns, Ain> at thb Vim Aii» Saoon Bbbiioiis of 

TBK 37XB CONOUBB8. 

[Compiled from the <* Statutes at Large." The omitted chapters are private acts.} ^ 

SnOMD SBSSION OV THS aOTH GONORBSS. 



N0.I. OBAF.I.-m^Aj|«ftoat«AorMelAeMtM«^ 
»«uiiryiVb<MaiMi>br4ilfteri^ir|MWu. ThePreelr 
dent maj catnw to De ittaed treaaury note* of not 
lea than $50, at 6 per cent. Interest, payable one 
yeas after date» and receivable tear public dues, to 
■a amosnt not exceeding at any time $U),OOOjOOO( 
interest to CNMne after maturi^ at the expiratioa 
at 00 days' notice of readiness to redeem. JNew 
notes may be issued ia place of those redeemed, 
within the above limit» until Jan. 1, 1863, the 
Secretary of ttie Treasury to publidi a monthly 
statement of the amount issued, redeemed, aud 
outstanding. fl&,000 are appropriated for eJG- 
penses. (Deo. 17, 1860.) 

No. 2. Chap. JJ. -*Ati Act to amend the fourth 
aoBliem ^ the Act for the Adniuiim of Ortgon 
into the UhioHf toot to extend the time for ukc^. 
ing SaU S^^nge and eonHgwiut Lands in Oreffon, 
The time is extended to three yean after the date 
of the act. (I>ec. 17, 1860.) 

No. a. CbaP, m.— ^n Act moMng Approprior 
tiontfor thk FaymiaU. <jf IwaaXid and tither iVf»- 
nam for the Tear ending /unedO, 186(2. 91,082,000 
are appropriated. (Dec. 21, 1860.) 

No. 4. Chap.Y. — An Act making AppropriaOont 
for the Sispjport of the Military Aeadem^for the 
Tear ending June 30, 1862. fl85,607 are appro* 
priated. (Jan. 5, 1861.) 

No. 5. Chap. XI. — An Actto contifiue in force an 
Act thereiH mentioned, relating to the JRort of 
Baltimore, The act passed March 17, 1800, entitled 
** An Act declaring the assent of Congress to cer* 
taia acta of the States of Maryland and Gtoorgla,'* so 
fiu- as it relates to the State of Maryland, is revived 
and continued in force until Bifarch S, 1871 ; but 
the duty sl^l not be levied on any vessel more 
than once in any month. (Jan. 19, 1861.) 

No. 6. Chap. XIX.— ^n Act to authorize the In- 
ttUution of a Suit against the United States to 
test the TiUe to Lots Nos. 5 and in the Ho^itcU 
Square in San IP^andsco. (Jan. 26, 1861.) 

Na 7. Chap. XX,— An Act for the. Admission of 
Kansas into the Union. The State of Kansas U 
deelareff to be one of the United States, and ad- 
mitted lato the Union on an equal footing with the 
origtnal States, in all respects whatew, under the 
(3onatitation adopted in convention at Wyandotte, 
July 9, 18S9, and ratified by vote of the people, Oct. 
4, 1850. Ito boundaries are defined as follows: 
** Beginning at a point on the western boundary 
of the State of Missouri, where the 87th parallel 
of north latitude crosses the same ; thence west 
on said parallel to the 25tii meridian of longitude 



west from Wasliington ; thence north on said ^lerj^ 
dian to the<IOth patallel of latitiuie; ttMuce ea«t 
on said parallel to the western boundary of the 
State of Missouri; tiieoce south with the western 
boundary of said Stata to the place of beginning.*' 
The treaty rights of the Indians within the State, 
and the authority of the General Ctovwnment 
with regard to theiii» are to be preserved. la lien 
of the propositions and dainu. contained in the 
ordinance oi said Constittttion of the people of 
Kansas, or in the resolutions attached thereto, 
the following are offered for their acceptance 
or r^ection : 1st. That sections 16 and 36 of pub* 
He lands in every townsi^ip, or their equivalents, 
sliaU be granted to the Stata for the use of schools. 
2d. That 72 sections of land shall be set af^t 
esclnsively for a State university. 3d. That. 10 
sections sliall be .granted for the erection or cpu»> 
pletion of public buildings at the seat of govern- 
ment. 4th. That all salt springs within said State, 
not exceeding 12 in ni^ber, the right whereof ^ 
not now or shall not hereafter be a4)udged to ba 
vested in any individuals, to be selected witkia 
one year, tha^ be granted to (Eiaid State for iU use, 
with 6 sectiona of land adjoining or. as eontiguoqa 
as may be jto each. 6th. That 6 pee oent.of ttie 
net proceeds of all sales of public lands in said 
State shall be paid to the State, for maldng public 
roads and internal improvements^ or for other 
purposes, as the Legislature shall direct. Tha 
foregdag prapeaitiona are on the oomUtion that 
the people of Kansas shall provide by an ordl" 
nance, irrevocable wittaMt the consent of the 
United States, that said State lAiall never interfere 
with the primary disposal of the soil within the 
same by the United States, or with any regulatlona 
Congress may find necessary for securing the title 
in said soil to bona fide purchasers. 6th. And that 
the BAid State shall never tax the laada or the. 
property of the United States in said State. The 
State is constitutod a judicial district of the United 
States, the district court to have the like powers 
and Jnriedictloti with that of Minnesota^ and- thq 
dintrict juc^ to hold two regular tenna of the 
court antiually at the seat of government, to €om« 
mence on the second Mondays of April and October^ 
(Jan. 29, 1861.) 

No. 8^ CRkf.XXV.-^AnActtaatMt9H»ethe&sk 
tension and Use of a Brandi of the AUaeandria, 
Loudon, and Hdmp^ire JRailroad toithin the 
City of Georgetown. (Feb, 6, 1861.) , 

No. 9. Chap. XXIX.^^n Act to a^uthorize a 
Loan. The President may borrow, before July 1) 



234 



THE NATIONAIi AIiMASTAO. 



^1868.; 



1861, on certfflcates of not less than $1000, with or 
without coupons, a anm not exceeding $25,000,000, 
at not more than 6 "per cent, interest, payable at 
any period from 10 to 20 years, for current de- 
mands upon the treasury, and for the redemption 
of treasury notes. The residue of the loan author- 
ised by act of June 22, 1860, or so much thereof 
as is necessary, shall be applied to the redemp* 
tion of the treasury notes issued under the act of 
Dec. 17, 1880; and the Secretary of the Trewory 
may exchange at par bonds of the United States 
authorized by said act of June 22, 1800, for the 
said treasury notes and their accrued interest. 
$20,000 are appropriated for expenses. (Feb. 8, 
1861.) 

No. 10. Chap. XXX.— -4n Act to protfid« for a 
Superintendent of Indian Affairtfor Wukin0on 
J^rritory and Additional Agents. Washington 
Territory is made a separate 8uperiBtend<Hicy, a 
superintendent to be appointed at a salary of 
$2S0O, and three additional agents at $1600 each. 
(Feb. 8, 1861.) 

• No. 11. (5hap. XXXin.— >ln Act to thange the 
Name qf fht Schooner ** Augusta" to «*CM<meJ 
Cbo*." (Feb. 13, 1861.) 

No. 12. Chap. XXXVU^An Act to extend the 
Bight of Appeal from Decisions of Circuit Courts 
to the Supreme Court af the United States. In 
copyright and patent cases, a writ of eiTor or 
appeal from all Judgments and decrees of any 
circuit court shall lie, at thl> instance of either 
party, to the Supreme Court, without regard to 
the sum or value in controrersy in the actimi. 
(Feb. 18, 1861.) 
■ No. 18. CoA^. XXXYlTl^An Act making fur^ 

Iher Provision in rOoHon to Oonaolidated Land 
Offices. The compensation of registers at «uoh 
oiHces is increased by authorizing them to charge 
such fees for transcripts or other record infocma* 
tton MB are permitted in the local courts; the 
whole compensation not to exceed $3000 per 
annum, and any excess to be paid into the United 
Btetes treasury. The Secretary of the Interior 
may make a reasonable allowance for office-rent, 
and at his discretion sanction the employment of 
clerks. (Feb. 18, 186L) 

No. 14. Chap. XLIL— jin Act to supply Xhh 
JUneneies in th» Appropriations for the Semiceqf 
Ihe Fiscal Tear ending June 30, 186L $2,256^1.87 
are appropriated. (Feb. 19, 1861.) 

No. 15. Chap. XIAY,— An AU making Appro- 
priatimsfor the UgisUUive, Executive^ and Judir 
oial EoDpensa <tf the Govemmeatfor the Tear end- 
ing June 30, 1862. $6,720^71.72 are appropriated. 
(Feb. 20, 1861.) 

No. 16. Chap. XLV^An Act to carry into effect 
Omventions between the United States and the Re- 
ptMiesqfjyeuf Gh-anada and Costa Bica. A com- 
missioner shall be appointed to determine, con- 
jointly with a commissioner from New Clranadis 
the amount of claims of citizens of the United 
Statea against New Granada, undoi; the con- 



vention of Sept. 10, 1857. Tbo sums awarded to 
claimants shall be assumed and paid by the Qovem- 
ment of the United States, the 'latter becoming 
thereby the creditor of the Ciovernment .of New 
Qranada. Similar provision is made for a com- 
jnission to determine claims against Costa Bica^ 
under the convention of July 2, 1800, except m 
te mode of payment, which is not declared. (Feb. 
20, 1861.) 

No.ir. Cb^. XMX.— An A«< makimg Appro- 
priations for the Naval Service for the Ttar sm^ 
ing June 80, 1862. $12,790,676.11 are appropriated. 
Tbe third section of tibe general appropriatiaii act 
of June 23, 1860, is r^ealed, except the prelaw 
bltion of the pvrehaee of patented fireann% which 
is oonttnned in force. The Secretary of the Nary 
is anthorlaed to procure the constmetioo of seven 
steam screw eloop»of-war of the eeceod class, for 
which $1,200,000 are appropriated in addition to 
the amount above given. (Feb. 21* 1861.) 

No. 18. Chap. ItYLr-^An Act to r^nd to tht 
Territory of Utah ^u, Eatpenses incurred in ss^ 
pressing Indian Sostilities in tiie Tear 1853b 
$53,512.20 are appropriated. (Feb. 27^ 1861.) 

No. 19. Obap, LYIL^An Act estabHshing cer- 
tain J^ut Routes, NnmerDua new routes are 
establiidied. The Poetinaster4eneral may pro- 
cure and Aimish etamped letter sheets, oombiniitg 
in one both a sheet and envelope, and adopt sock 
other improvements in relation to poatage-etamps 
and stamped.anvelopea as may from time to tints 
be deemed advisable. Maps, engravings, Utho> 
graphs, or photographic prints, on rollers or in 
paper covers, books, bound or unbound, phono* 
graphic jMiper, and latter envelopes, in packages 
not exceeding four pounds; cu-ds, blank or 
printed; blanks, in packages weighing at least 
eight oua<;es; and seeds or cuttings, in packages 
not exceeding eight ounces, shall be deemed mail- 
able matter, and charged with postage at the rate 
of one cent an ounce or fraction of an ounce, for 
distances under 1500 miles, and double for longer 
distances. Provision is made for a daily overland 
mail between the Missouri River and California, 
which is superseded by a subsequent enactment. 
(Seeposty No. 29, p. 235.) Ailer said daily overland 
mail has gone into operation, the postage between 
any State or Territory east of the Rocky Moun- 
tains, and any State or Territory on the Pacific, 
on each newspaper or other article of printed 
matter, not exceeding three ounces, shall be 
one cent, and for every additional ounce, or 
fraction of an ounce, one cent additional. The 
rate of letter postage shall be ten cents per half 
ounce. 

Na 20. Chap. LVm.— An Act making Appro- 
priations for the Consular and Diplomatic Ex- 
penses of the Government for the Tear endinf 
June 30,- 1862. $1,036,562 are appropriated. The 
office of consul-general at Simoda is abolished- 
(Feb. 28, 1861.) 

No. 21. CiHAP. LUC—An Ad to provide a tempo- 



1863.] 



ABSTRACT OV PUBLIC LAWS. 



236 



rury GmMmmeHtfar the Territory itf OoiandB, 
Tlie Territory of Colorado is estoblishyed within 
tbe following limits: ** Commencing on the 87th 
parallel of north latitude, whwe the 26tb meridian 
of longitude west firom Washington crosses tho 
same; thanco north on said meridian to thailst 
psrallei of north latitude; theuoe along said 
pandlel wvst to the 82d meridian of longitude 
west from Washington; thence south on said 
meridiaa to the norttwm Una of New Mexico; 
tiunce along the d7th parallel of north latitude to 
the place of beginniing;" with the usual officers 
ami powers of a territorial govemment. (Feb. 28) 
1861.) 

No. 28. Obap. LX. — An Act to amend an Act 
iuppkmentmy to an Act approved March S, 1865, 
to oiyanixe an hutitiUion far the Imane cf tht 
Army and Navy artd nif the District ef CMumiia 
in the aaid IHttriet, approved Feb. 7, 1867. The 
regulations for the admission oS insane persons, 
resident in the District, are modified. (Feb.^ 
18fll.) 

No. 23. Chap. ^XL>-~An Act in Relation to the 
Bnial Service. The Postmaster-Oeneral may dis- 
continue the postal sorice on any route or part 
of a route on which, from any cause, it cannot, in 
his opinion, bo safely continued, or the postal 
revenue collected, or the postal laws maintained. 
(Feb. 28, 1861.) 

No. 24. Crap. LXyin.^^n Act to provide for 
the Ftiyment of outetanding Treasury Notes, to 
OMthorixe a Loan, to regulate and fix the Dutieson 
Jmportty and for other I'urpoeee. The President 
ki authorised to borrow, at any time within twelve 
months, a sum not exceeding $10,000,000, at not 
more than 6 per cent, interest^ to be implied only 
to the payment of appropriations made by law 
and the balance of treasury notes now outstand- 
ing, but no part to the service of the present fiscal 
year. The stock for said loan shall be redeemable 
within 10 years, with three months' notice from 
the United States, or within 20 years without 
notice, and shall not be sold at less than par ; and 
if the bids are not satis&ctory, treasury notes <tf 
not less than $60 may be issued for all or any part 
of the loan until June 30, 1862, redeemable at any 
time within two years, and to cease to bear interest 
after being called in. $20,000 are apin*opriated for 
expenses. 

Yarioos changes are made in the duties on im- 
ports. (8ee New Tariii; p. 283.) The annual sta- 
tistical accounts of the commerce of the United 
States shall hereafter include the quantity as w^ 
ss the ralue at the several articles of foreign com- 
merce, and a separate statement of the commerce 
of the British ProTinoes under the Reciprocity 
Treaty. A drawback shall be allowed on^reign 
hemp manufactured into cordage In the United 
States and exported therefrom, equal in amount 
to the duty paid on the same, less 10 per c^nt. of 
the amount of drawback. Duties to be levied iipon 
goods according to their true market value shall 



be estimated and collected upon such value in tixe 
principal markets of the country whence imported 
upon the day of actual shipment. When goods of 
the same kind but of different values are invoiced 
at an average price, and not otherwise provided 
for, the duty shall be assessed upon the whole 
invoice at the rate to which the highest valued 
goods are snl^ect. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 26. Chap. LXIX.>-^n Act to provide for 
bringing up the Arrtaragu q^ Work qf the Land 
Office at (Mympiaf Washington Territory. (March 
2,1861.) 

No. 26. CBAr.hXX.-— An Act to provide for tfte 
FUyment qf JEaqpenses incurred by the Territories 
qf Woihington and Oregon in the Suppression of 
Indian Hostilitiet therein, in tiu Years 1865 and 
1866. $2,801,000 are appropriated, for which 6 per 
cent, bonds may be issued of a denomination not 
lees than $60, redeemable in 20 years, the pay- 
ments to be received in full of all claims. (March 
2, 1861.) 

No. 27. Chap. LXXI^— ui» Act m/okiing Appro- 
priations for the POyvMHt qf Expense* incurred 
in the Suppression qf Indian Hostilities in the 
State of California. . $100,000 are appropriated 
for expenses Incurred by the State in 1864^ '66, '66^ 
'68, and '60, the acceptance of which shall cour 
stitute a full discharge of all claims. (March 2^ 
1861.) 

No. 28. Chap. LXXII.— -An Ace nuiking Appro* 
priaiums for the ^pport qf the Army for the 
Year ending June 30^ 1862. $16,802,948.41 are ap- 
propriated. (March 2, 1861.) 

lo. 20. Chap. LXXni^An Act making Ap- 
propriations for the Service q^ the I'iost Office 
Ikpartment during the Fiscal Year ending June 
30, 1802. $10,276^1.23 are appropriated. The 
Psstmaster<€kaieral is directed to discontinue the 
route fh>m Bt. Louis and Memphis to Sah Fran- 
cisco, from July 1, 1861, and to require the oon- 
tractors to transport the entire letter mail 6 times 
a week on the central routes from some point on 
the Missouri River connected with the £a8t to 
Placerville, California, in 20 days' time 8 mouths 
in the year and in 23 days the remaining 4 montha^ 
and also to deliver the entire mails tri-weelUy to 
Denver City and' to Oreat Salt I^ake City ; also to 
carry the residue of all mail matter in a pmod 
not exceeding 36 days, with the privilege of send- 
ing the latter by sea semi-monthly from New York 
to San Francisco in 26 days, and the public docu- 
ments In 86 days; also, until the completion of 
the overland telegraph, to run a pony express i^ 
10 days for 8 months and 12 days for 4 months, 
carrying for the Government, free of charge, 6 
pounds of mail matter, with the privilege of 
charging the public $1 per half-ounce. The con- 
tractors fthaU receive $1,000,000 per annum, and 
the contract expire July 1, 1864. Should the 
present contractors refuse to accept these terms, 
the Postmaster-General shall annul their contract 
and advertisa for bids. (March 3^ 1861.) 



236 



THIS NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1868. 



No. 80. Obap. LXXIV.— -4» A<A for the ROirf 
qf certain CMpptvoay Ottawa^ and I^Mawatomie 
Indians. The Secretary of the Interior is directed 
to inquire and report to the next Mssion of Con- 
gress what amount, if any, is due to such Indians 
in the State of Michigan, under Tarious treaties. 
(Uarch 2, 1861.) 

No. 31. Cnxp.JiXXy.^ An Aet declaring the 
Value of the new Silver Florin of Austria. Its 
Talue is fixed at 46.19 tU. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 82. Chap. LXXVI.— ^n Act making Ap- 
propriations to supply a D^iency in the Appro- 
priations for the OompUHon of the Geological 
Survey of Oregon and Washington Territories. 
$10,659.20 are appropriated. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 33. Chap. LXXVII.— win Act authorizing 
the Secretary of the Treasury to issue a Register to 
the Schooner Perseverance, of Ogdensburgh^ Stale 
qfNew York. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 34. Chap. LXXTIII.-^^n Act to provide 
for the Completion of the Military Roads from 
Fort Union to Santa Fi^ and from Taos to Santa 
FS^ New Mexico* $36,000 are appropriated for the 
former, and $16,000 Ibr the latter. (March 2, 
1861.) 

No. 35. Chap. LXXIX.— ^n Act donating to 
fke States of Minnesota and Oregon certain Lands 
reserved by Congress for the Territories qf Minne- 
tota and Oregon for University Purposes. (March 
2, 1861.) 

No. 36. Chap. LXXX.~^n Aet to remove the 
XFnited States Arsenal from the City of St. Louis, 
and to provide for the Sale of the Lands on whidk 
the same is located. The Secretary of War is di- 
rected to remove the arsenal to Jefferson Barracks^ 
St. Louis county. Mo., and to cause the present 
site to be laid off into lots and sold. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. ST. CbAP. LXXXI.— ^n Aet to amend the 
Provisions of the 66th Section qf '^An Act to re- 
gulate the QiUeetion of Duties on Imports and 
Tonnage^" approved March 2, 1799. Collectors of 
ports are required to take possession of unreported 
Yoreign goods found on board vessels after the 
expiration of certain periods from the time they 
should hare been reported. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 38. Chap. LXXXIL— ^n Aet legalising 
certain Entries qf Lands on Leavenworth Mand, 
in the State of Missouri. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 39. Crap. LXXXTII.— ^n Aet to organise 
the Territory of Nevada. The Territory of N^ 
vada is established, with the following boundaries: 
"Beginning at the point of intersection of the 42d 
degree of north latitude with the 89th degree of 
longitude west fVom Washington ; thence running 
south on the line of said 3Qth degree of west loii» 
gitude, until it intersects the northern bonndaiy 
line of the Territory of New Mexico; thence due 
west to the dividing ridge separating the waters 
of Carson Yalloy from those that How into the 
Pacific ; thence on said dividing ridge northwardly 
to the 4l8t degree of north latitude ; thence due 
north to the sonthem ItonndAry Uae of the -Btote 



of Oregon ; thence due east to the plaoe of begin- 
ning ;" and with the usual officers and powers of 
a territorial government : Promdedf That ao much 
of the Territory as is within the present limits of 
the State of California, shall not be loduded 
within this Territory until the State of Oaliforaia 
sliall assent to the same by an act ixrevocabls 
without the consent of the U nited States. (Bfarch 
2, 1861.) 

No. 40. Cbap.- LXXXIY^^n Act making 
Appropr i ations for sundry Civil Expetuee of the 
Qovemment for the Year ending June 80^ 1862^ 
$3^716,148.68 are appropriated. All purchases and 
contracts for supplies or services, except for per* 
sonal services, shall be made after advertising for 
proposals, when the public exigencies will permit; 
othenrwise they may be made in open market. 
No contract or purchase shall hereafter be nude 
unless authorized by law or under an adequate 
appropriation, except in the War and Navy D»> 
pid'tments, in which such contract or pnichase^ 
however, shall not exceed the necessities of the 
current year. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 41. Chap. ULXXY.— ^» Act making Ap 
propriations for the current and contingent £»• 
pensee of the Indian Departmentf and for fid- 
JUling I^aty Stipulations witii various Indian 
Tribes^ for the Year ending June 30^ 18G2. 
$2,718,744.01 are appropriated. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 42. Chap. LXXX VI.—.in Act to provide a 
temporary Oovemment for the Territory qf Da- 
kota^ and to create the Office of Surveyor-Genend 
therein. The Territory of Dakota is estabUsbed, 
with the usual officers, powers, and privileges oC 
a territorial government, and with the following 
boundaries : ** Commencing at a point in the main 
channel of the Red River of the North, where the 
49th degree of north latitude croases the same; 
thence up the main channel of the same, and 
along the boundary of the State of Minnesota, to 
Big Stone Lake ; thence along the boundary line 
of the said State of Minnesota to the Iowa line; 
thence along the boundary line of the State of 
Iowa to the pciat of intersection of the Big Sioux 
and Missouri Rivers ; thence up the Missouri River, 
and along the boundary line of the Territoiy of 
NebiBska, to the mouth of the Niobrara or Ron* 
Bing Water River; thence following up the same, 
in the middle of the main channel thereof to the 
mouth of the Keha Paha or Turtle HiU River; 
thence up tiie said river to the 43d parallel of 
north latitude; thence due west to the preseot 
boundary of the Territory of Washingtoa; thence 
along the boundary line of Washington Territoiy 
to the 40th degree of north latitude ; thence east, 
alcmg said 49th degree of north latitude, to the 
place of beginning." The river in said Territoiy 
heretofore known as the "River aux Jacques,'' ur 
<* James River," shall hereafter be called the Da- 
kota River. A portion of the Territorial of Utah 
and Washington is attached to Nebrasluu (March 
3,1861.) 



1868.] 



ABSTRACT OF PUBLIC LAWS. 



287 



Ko.48. Obap. LXXX Vli^-^n AH to amend an 
Act, approved F^. 6, 1869, entitled ** An Act pro- 
fridingfor keeping and dittrUmKng aU PubUe Do- 
ettm^ntgf and far other IhirpowM" Yarioiu new 
regulations are made. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 44. CnAP.LXXXyilI.^An Act in Addition 
to** An Act to promote the Pirogrta of the Ue^ul 
Arts.** AfMayitB and depositions required in 
caaee pending in the Patent Office may be taken 
before any justice of the peace or other officer 
authorised by law to take depoeitione to be noed 
in the State or United States Conrte; and the 
derk of any dntrict or territorial court of the 
United States may issue subpcenas for any wit< 
neases required in such cases residing within the 
district or Territory; but no witness sIuUl be r^ 
qaired to go more than 40 mUes to give his depo* 
ritioa, or to diseloee any secret invention made or 
owned by him, or be deemed guilty of contempt 
ftr noa-attendanoe unless his fees for travel and 
attendance are tendered to him at the time of the 
serrioe of tiie subpoena. To secure greater uni- 
formity in the grant and reAisal of letters-patent, 
three competent examiner84nfchief shall be ap- 
p<Hnted, at a salary of $9000 each, who, on the 
written petition of the applicant, shall revise Bad 
determine upon the validity of decisions by ex- 
aminers adverse to the grant of letters-patent, and 
of their decisions in interference cases, and, when 
required by the Commissioner, in applications for 
the extension of patents, &c. ; from their decisions 
appeals may be taken to the Oommissioner of 
intents in person, upon payment of ttie prescribed 
fee. No appeal shall be allowed to the examiners- 
iB-ehief from the deoistons of the primsry ex- 
aminers, except in interference cases, until alter 
the application shall have been twice rejected. 

The Oommissioner of Patents may restore mo- 
dels belonging to rejected applications, and all 
models accompanying applications for designs; 
the latter may be dispensed with when the design 
can be sufBciently represented by a drawing. 
He may require all papers filed in the Patent 
Office, when not properly written, to be printed 
at the cost of the parties filing them; and ibr 
gross misconduct he may refuse to recognize any 
party as a patent-agent, either generally or in any 
particular case ; but his reasons therefor shall be 
duly recorded and subject to the approval of the 
President. No money paid as a fee shall hereafter 
be withdrawn or refunded, nor shall the fee paid 
on filing a caveat be considered a part of the sum 
required to be paid on filing a subsequent applica- 
tion for a patent for the same invention. In all 
cases where the description and specification of 
additional improvements might heretofore be an- 
nexed to letters-patent, independent patents must 
hereafter be applied for. 

All laws discriminating between the Inhabit- 
ants of the United States and those of other 
countries, which shall not discriminate against 
the inhabitants of the United States, are repealed ; 



and, instead of the existing' ratas^ the foUowtaig 
are established: On filing each caveat, $10; on 
filing each original application for a patent, ex- 
cept for a design, $16; on issuing each oxigiaal 
patent, $20; on every fl^peal from the examiners- 
in-chief to the ONami0sioner,$9O; on every sfpli- 
cation for the re-issue of a patent, $80; on every 
application for the extensipn of a patent, $60, imd 
ffiO in addition on the granting of every extension; 
on filing each disclaimer, $10; for certified copies 
of patents and other papers, 10 cents per hundred 
words; for recording every assignment, agree- 
ment, power of attorney, and other p^[>ers of 300 
words or under, $1; over 800 and under 1000 
words, $2; over 1000 words, $3; for copies of 
drawings, the reasonable cost of making the 
same. 

A patent for a design nay be issued to any 
citixen or citisens, or alien or aliens having re- 
sided one year in the United States and taken 
the oath of Intention to become a citisen or citi- 
lens, for the term of 3}^ 7, or 14 years, as the 
applicant may elect In his spplioation: the fea 
for the term of 8^ yean shall be $10, for 7 yean 
$15, and for 14 years $30 ; and patentees of designs 
shall be entitled to an extenidon of 7 years, in the 
same manner as now fMcovided for letters-patent. 

All applications for patents shall be completed 
and prepared for examination within two years 
from the time of filing the petition, unless a 
longer delay shall be shown to have been unavoid- 
able. Ail patents hereafter granted shall remain 
In ftnee for tbe tenn of 17 years from the date of 
issue; ahd all extension of such patents is hereby 
prohibited, (itaich 2^ ISfiL) 

PUBUO MMOLDDONa. 
[The asBlian enlllad aie prtvale rasobitloos.) 

No. 1.--J1 Reteiiawn autheriting the Skentarjf 
of the Treaturg to permit the Ownenqfthe Steam- 
boat »J6hn CFremonftoehiangetMeNameqfthe 
tametothatof^Horieon.*' (Jan. 10, ISei.) 

No. ^^^Mni Re$6kMon authorieing the Store' 
tary of the Treatury to e^ange the Name of the 
Schooner ** Spring HOT to that ^ the *' United 
Slatei.'' (Jan. 19, 186L) 

No. 5.-*^ aeeehdion anOkarieing Ue»d» T.A.M. 
Onmeny United States Naeg^ to recede certain 
Marki ofDHtinetton tendered him kg the ;9pa$»ish 
G over n m ent far eenleee rendered hg him to Seamen 
of a^nteh veeed **BdSkk,^ wredced in Jnne, 1860. 
(Teb.l8,18«l.) 

No. 0.~JMii< SeeeHution giving the Aeeent of 
Omgreee to certain Aatepaeeei,ortohepaeeed, 5y 
the LegiOataree of the Stotee qf Arkamae, Laid- 
eianOfandnaatfCrangUooqfthemfinSelaHonto 
the *^Rafff* t^BedRieer,, and for other Parpoeee. 
Assent is given to any such acts having for their 
object the improvement of the navigation of 
Bed River by the reoioval of the <'Raft" there- 
fltmi; upon the completion whereof by any com- 
psoiy iDOOtpsrated ta the pocpose, snoh company 



288 



'^HE KATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[186^. 



may ehai^ speefBed rates of tdll for a period of 
80 yean ftom March 9, 1860; but the tJnited 
States may take possession of the work at any 
time after the expiration of 10 years, by paying 
to the company the amoont of expenditure, with 
7 per cent, interest. (Feb. 21, 1861.) 

No. 11.— Jb»n< Se$oiuHon to quil TiOe to Lands 
in the Stale <tf Soium, Tbe title to certain tracts 
along the Des Moines Rirer, above the mouth of 
th« ]{acco<m Fork, improperly certified by the 
I>epartment of the Interior as part of a grant io 
the State of Iowa in 1846^ and now held by Itana 
Jtde pnrchasers, is relinqnished to the State of 
Iowa. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 12. — A lUtohttion for the Appointment of Se- 
ffents of the Smithsonian InUitution. Willhtm L. 
Dayton is appointed in place of Richard Rnsh, 
deceased ; William B. Astor In place of Gideon 
Hawley, whose term has expired ; and Conielitu 
C. Felton is reappointed. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 13. — Joint ResoUtHon to amend the C&nttitU' 
Hon of the Vnitea States. The following is pro- 
posed to the Legislatures of the several States as 
an amendment to the Gonstltation of the United 
States, which, when ratified by three-fonrths of 
said Legislatures, shall be valid, to all intents and 
purposes, as part of the said Constitution, viz. : 

"Article Thirteen. 
*'No amendment shall be made to the Cbnstltu- 
tion which will authorize or dve to Congress the 



power to abolish or Interfere, withfn any State, 
wKh the domestic Institutions thereof including 
that of persons held to labor or service by the 
laws of said State." (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 14.—^ ResdttttUm avthorixing the Issue of 
the Same Qtiota of Arms to the State of Califw- 
nia for the Tears 1850 <md 1851 as teas issued to 
that SUztefbr the Tear 1852. (Maich 2, 1861.) 

No. 15.— it Reseiution to correct certain Errors 
in an Act entitled " An Act to provide for the /hy- 
ment of Outstanding Treasury Notes, to authorise 
a Loan, to regulate and fx the Duties on UnportSf 
and for other Purposes,^ approeod March 2, 1861. 
Certain errors in the tariff regulations in regard 
to unmanufactured wool, woollen shawls, and 
goods in. warehouse, are corrected. (March 2; 
1861.) 

No. 16. — Joint HesohitioH authorising Cbmmo- 
dore H. Ptrndding to receive a Sword awarded to 
him hy the RqnttHe of Ntearagua, (Max«h 2, 
1861.) 

No. 17. — A ResctuHon authorising Cbptain Wit- 
Ham L. Hudson, of the United States Navy, to ac- 
cept a Diamond Brooch for his Wife, presented to 
her by the Emperor of Russia. (March 2, 1861.) 

No. 18. — A Resolution authorizing W. JT. Smi- 
ley, United States Cbmmercial Agent at the Milk- 
land Islands, to receive a Telescope tendered him 
hy the Belgian Government for services rendered to 
a Belgian Seaman unreeked in 1858. (March 2, 1861.) 



FIRST (EXTRA) SESSION OF THE 97TH CONORXSS. 



Na 1. Chap. L— A» Act to r^und and r e mit 
the Duties on Arms imported hy States. Duties are 
remitted on all arms Imported between May 1, 
1861, and January 1, 1862, in good ftith, for the 
use of the troops of any State aiding to suppress 
the existing insurrection. (July 10, 1861.) 

No. 2. CoAr.TL^-An Act to provide far the I^y- 
ment of the Militia and Voiunteers oaOed into the 
Service of the UnOed States, from the time they 
were called into Service to the 20th day of June, 
1861. 15,760,000 are appropriated. (July 13, 1861.) 

No. 3. Chap. IJI.^An Act further to provide 
for the OoUeetion of Duties on Imports, and far 
other Punposes. Whenever It shall become im- 
piaeticable, by reason of insurrection, to execute 
the revenue laws and collect the duties on imports 
at any port of entry in any collection district, 
such duties may be c<^ected at any port of de- 
livery in such dlstriot, aurveyon to have all the 
powers and obligatloni of ooUecton ; or, if that is 
impracticable, the caataohliottse for the district 
may be established in any secure place on land or 
at sea, such naval or military foce being employed 
as may be necessary. When the duties cannot be 
effectually collected in any district by either of 
these modes, the Prasident may close the port or 
-parte of entry in such district, giring notice 
thereof by proelamatlni; and any veosel having 



on board any articles snl^jeet to ' 
to enter any «adi port, shall be forfirited, with 
every thing on board, to the United States. The 
President may, by proclanation, under qwcifled 
circnmstancee, declare the inhabitaata of any 
State or part of a State to be in a atate of insur- 
rection; and thereupon all commercial interooorie 
between the same and the rest of the United 
States shall cease, and all goods, Ac, coming from 
or proceeding to such State or section ahaU be for* 
felted to the United States; but the President 
may license and permit commercial intercourse 
so far as he may think most conducive to the 
public good, under such rules and regulations as 
may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Trea- 
sury. From and after fifteen days after the issuing 
of the said proclamation, any vessel belonging in 
whole or in part to any citizen or inhabitant of 
said State or part of a State in insurrection, fimnd 
at sea or in any port of the rest of the United StatM, 
shall be forfeited to the United States; bnt foi^ 
feitures and penalties may be mitigated or re- 
mitted in the discretion of the Secretary of ths 
Treasury. Proceedings on seizures for IbrfbiturM 
may be pursued in any court of the VnitMl 
States in any district into which ^e property k> 
seized may be takoi and proceedinga instituted. 
(July 18» 1861.) 



1863.] 



ABSTRAOT OF FITBCIO. LA^. 



28ff 



No. 4. Chap. PTr^An Act to pnvOie for tke 

Appointment of AuistarU JRaynutders in the Navy^ 
The grade of assistant pAymaster in the Navy is 
established, not to exceed 36 in number, candidates 
to be between 21 and 26 years of age, and the pay 
f(H- the first five years to be $1800 on sea dnty, 
$1000 on other duty, and 1800 while waiting 
orders. No oommanding oiBcer shall hereafter be 
required to perform the duties of paymaster or 
asButant paymaster. Within six months after the 
expiration of the present insurrection, the corps 
of paymasters and assistant paymasters sAiall be 
reduced to the numbo: of 75 in the whole. (July 
17,1861.) 

Nq. 5. Chap. V. — An Act to authorize a Na- 
tional Loan^ and for other Pwrpotet. The Secre- 
tary of the Treasury may borrow within twelve 
moDths a sun not exceeding $250,000,000, issuing 
therefor, at his discretion, coupon or registered 
bonds at not more than 7 per cent, interest, re- 
deemable after 20 years ; or treasury notes of not 
lea than $60, payable three years .after di^e, at 
T^ per cent. ; or, in exchange for coin, or for sala- 
ries or other dues, treasury notes of not less than 
no, either without interest and payable on de- 
m&nd (the whole amount of such notes not to 
exceed $50,000,000), or bearing interest at ZAb per 
cent., payable in one year, and exchangeable for 
treasury notes for $50 and upwards. Any portion 
of said loan, not exceeding $100,000,000, may be 
initiated in any foreign country, payable in the 
United States or at any designated place In Sur 
rope. Treasury notes under $50 may be re-isstied 
iintil Decembei* 31, 1861. Treasury notes of any 
of thedmominations authorized may be issued in 
exchange for coin or for public dues, at not more 
than six per cent, interest, payable at any time 
i>ot exceeding twelve months, and to wa amount 
not exceeding at any time $20,000,000; $200,000 
sre appropriated for expenses under this act. 
(Jolyl7,18(Jl.) 

Na 6. Cbap. YI.— ^n Act making addtHonal 
-^PpnpriaUoM for the Support of the Army for 
^ Fitta Tear ending June 30, 1862, and Appro- 
pi'iatmt of Arrearages far the Fiscal Tear ending 
Jvne 30, 1861. ^72^284,813.87 are appropriated 
for 1882, and $7,801,584.43 for 1861. (July 17, 1861.) 

Ko. 7. Chap. VII.— -^» Act to aUcr and regulate 
*^^atyBatton. (July 18, 1861.) 

No. 8. Chap. Ym.—An Act making additional 
^PpnpriaUonsfn' the ITaval Sermce for the Tear 
«»»<% June 30, 1862, and Appropriatums of 
Amarages for the Tear aiding June 80, 1861. 
$25,910,886.29 are iH)propriated for 1862, and 
^^,200 for 1861. "No patented article con- 
nected: with marine engines shall be hereafter 
pnrchaaed or attached to, or used in connection 
«'ith,any steam vessel of war, until the same shall 
tiave been aobnntted to and oi9cialIy recommended 
i» writing for purchase and use by a competent 
Ixmd of naval engineers." (July 18, 1861.) 

No. 9. Cbap. IX— ^it Act to authortte the JBm- 



phyment of VoUmteers to aid Im m^fiatktg the 
Laws and protecting Puhlic iVopoty. Certain^ 
of the forts, arsenals, cn8tom<houses, navy-yards, 
and otiier prq^rty of the United States having 
been sdzed, Ac, by organised bodies of men in 
several of the States, and a conspiracy having 
been entered into to overthrow the Qovemment 
of the United States, the President is authiNrized 
to acc^t the services of volunteers, not exceeding 
500,000 in number, for the purpose of repelling 
invasion, suppressing insurrection^ enforcing th« 
laws, and preserving and protecting the public 
property, for a term of not more than three years 
nor less than six months, but to be disbanded 
at the end of the war. Before accepting the ser* 
vices of additional volunteers, the President shall, 
from time to time, issue his proclamation, stating 
the number desired, either as cavalry, infiuitry, or 
artillery, and apportioning them equally, as far aa 
practicable, among the States designated. Th» 
volunteers shall be organiaed as in the regular 
service, the cavalry and artillery not to exceed 
one company of each to every regiment of in" 
fiuitry. (For details.of army oigan^tion, as now 
established, see United States Army, p. 88.) The 
President may appoint, by and with the advice and 
consent of the Senate, not racM'e than six m%|or- 
generals and eighteen brigadier^nerals, who may 
be selected fhim the line or staff of the regular 
army, and may retain their rank therein. (See No. 
17, 2d Session, chap, cxxxfii.) The President may 
also commission field, staff, and company ofiicers 
of volunteers oflEiaring their services, in case the 
authorities of the States to which they belong re- 
ftisa or omit to do so. The pay and allowances of 
ofiicem and privates, of volunteers shall, in all 
respects, be the same as in the regular service^ 
with certain Q>eeial provisions adapted to the pr»* 
sent exigency. Tolunteers honiwably discharged 
after two years' service, or at the end of the war, 
shall receive $100 each in addition to all other 
pay and allowances; thoea wounded or otherwise 
disabled in the service shall be entitled to the 
benefits conforred on persons disabled in the 
regular service; and the widow or heirs of such 
as die or are killed in service shall receive, in 
addition to all arrears of pay and allowances, $100. 
A chaplain shall be allowed to eaeh regiment, apr* 
pointed by the colonel on the vote of the fiield and 
company ofOcers, who must be a regular ordained 
minister of a Christian denomination, and who 
shall report to the colonel at the end of each 
quarter the moral and religions oondlti<m of the 
regiment, and such suggestions as may conduce 
to the social happiness and moral improvement of 
the troops. The general commanding a separate 
department or a detached army may appoint a 
board or commission oi not less than three nor 
more than five afltoers, to examine into the 
capacity or 'Conduct of any commissioned oiilcer 
of volunteers who may be reported to them; and 
if their report is adverse^ tjid approved by the 



246 



THS KATIDVAIi AIMASAC, 



[Ittt. 



FMMUMt, tte «K ii ii i ilwl < ili of «i^ enter rinU to 
iracmted; bat no officer can sit on mulb. boud 
whose raok cr promotion would in aaj way be 
affected by its proeoedkigs, and two members at 
least, if practicable, shall be of equal rank with 
the officer ezamtnecL Vacancies in ooaqMUiy 
oilioss, up to captain, shall be filled by vote of tiie 
men of the eompany, and vacancies above raptsin 
ihall be liAed by the votes of the commissioned 
officers of the regiment. (See No. 64.) All letters 
trritten 1^ soidinti in aetnal service may be trsns* 
mitted tiircingfa the mailB wtflumt pre^iaynmnt 
of postage. The Secretary of War may introdnco 
among the virfunteer forcee' the system of allot- 
ment tfekets, or some eqalvalent system, by wMdi 
tte fnnfly of the volnnteer may draw sndi per* 
lion of his pay a* he m^y request. (July 22,1861.) 

No. 10. CtfAP. X/-»j1» Ad mOhoriMimg the Buy 
Tftarp (/ the Tnmmrif to remit Fiuu and IkmOf 
tuM xnmmA w» ctriaSn Oua. The fines and 
penalties refinred to are snch as have been vn- 
avoidably incnned by owners er masters of vessels 
in oonseqnenoe of the in torrupU on of enstosn- 
hovse buriness at anypott stnee December l^lflfia 
(Jaly 24, 1861.) 

No. 11. Ohap. Xlr^An Jet tnaking addSUontd 
AppnpriaUont Jbr eertain CMl Eiqtekaet tf Ute 
TOooertmtnt far Ott Tear endSihg^ Jwu db, 186^ 
(Ond AfpropriatUme of Afrtaragu far the Tear 
ending June 30, 1861. $616,000 are appropriated 
fir 1862, and $8400 ftnrl86L (Jnly 24, ISA.) 

No. 12. CKjLr.Xn^AnABtinRdatimtofar- 
wxrding SoUtlenf Lttterg. PMpaid Mtess toaol- 
dfen may be forwaMled, without ftarthsr charge, 
io any point to which snch soUien may have 
been ordered, from thattn^riileh the Istten wmns 
directed. (Jnly 24» 1861.) 

No. 13. OBKr.XIXL^An.J€iiorrmridefarthe 
temp&rary Inereaat^ef the Navy, Vor and during 
the pr e se n t insurrsetlMi, the Secsetsry of the 
Navy may hir^ purchase, or contiact finr, and 
Itomhih and ann in the most eflldeot manner, 
such vessels as may be necessary fiir the temporaiy 
Increase of the navy; appointeents of acting 
Heotenants and other acting naval officers m ad e 
or whidi may be made by him fir the sama.pur- 
poee, are ratified, and the rate of oompcnsation 
iMowed is legaUaed and approved; and $3,000^)00 
are appropriated to carry into efieot this act» to 
su p pr ess pfiaey, and to render mote affective the 
closing of. the ports of the tesutgenta. (Jn|y 2A, 
1861.) 

No.14. CEM^.XPf^AMAetfartheBdi^qf 
Uu WSdowt amdOrfkana tf the Qfieert, Stamen, 
and Mxrinee ef the Vhttei StaUa SlMtp-ef-wxr 
JUiMiia^andfor eOur Purpaeee^ The 80th of June, 
1861, dudl be deemed and taken to be the day oa. 
which- the Levant fimadered at sea, and from 
which shall comuMBce Hie pensions dne to the 
widows and orphans of tluwe en board, wMkr 
existing laws. Bie nsstest rdattvss of those so 
iost shall KBOei«»»iiBa aqnel to tuselve nurnths* 



psy^of sadi fiss p M Bd p a— nB,iH ^aomaH'M tiw 
pay dneat the date of their loss. (Joly 2I» ISGl.) 

No. 1& Chap. XY^-.^ Act fw Oie BelUf ^ 
eertmm Mneieiams and Soldier* $lationed at Fut 
iSmnter, in South CkroUniO. %LUSO are apfic«yn- 
ated as remuneiation Ibr losses of private proper^ 
incurred fai the removal from Fort Moultrie to 
Jlort Sumter on the evening of Beoember 26, USO. 
(Jnly«,186L) 

NouUL OBAr.XVh—AnActfortheSeUef^ 
the Ohio and ether Volnnteer** The proper 4»- 
buialng officers are anthoriaed to p^y to the M 
days' volttnteers from Ohio, and those of aiqr other 
State simHariy situated, compensation for the time 
between titfir organisation and acceptance as am- 
psBies by theOovemon of their Statea and their 
being swom int» the service of the United Stately 
(July 24» 1861.) 

Now 17. CKAr.JCVTL—AuAainaddUiontoOn 
f^Aet to oMthariei the Smjplt^/ment of VplunUtn to 
mid in et^ereing the Law* and protecting PuUie 
l^Y9erty»''«»pr«eed.jMly22,1861. The fresidejit 
may accept the sorvices of volunteers, either fe 
cavaby, infimtry, or artillery, in such nuraben, 
not exceeding 500,000, «s the exigencies of the 
aerviee may in hlsopinion demand, to be mnstned 
into the service ''during the war;'^ and be may 
i^ipoiirt, by and with the advice and ooaseot of 
the Senate^ sndi number of m^r-generals and 
bfigadi e r - ge ner als isr the command of the volon- 
teer fbroes as may la his Jn^^pient be reqoind 
te.Oair orgMiMtion. (See 2d gesaian, chsp. 
oxxxiiL) (July 26, 1861.) 

Na UL Chap. XVUL-^An Aet to r^vnd JhAUs 
on Amu imported bif Statu. The Secretary of the 
Treasury m^y refund duties paid on arms im- 
ported by States, under the oooditiona and ssl^ 
to the limitetion of the act of Jnly 10, 1861 
(July 25, 1861.> 

Not 19. Obap. ZIX<-iln w4ct/or the better Or- 
gamtation of the Marine Corps. The oorpe shall 
eonatot of 03 ap^ified commissioned officers (see 
list of Officers of Marines,p. 120), 574 non-commie- 
sioned offiows and musicians, and 2500 prlT&tet. 
The commissioned officers af^inted under thii 
act shall be between 20 and 25 yearn of aee. (Ju(7 
25,186L) 

No. 20. Chap. XX^—An Aet relaiivo tothtiU- 
WMUt Marine, toJLs the Compeneation of the Qfk- 
Oics theret^t ouii for oOter Pwrpotee, The cob»- 
pensation cX the officers of the revenue cutters 
shall be at the following rates: Captains, llSOO 
per annum ; let lieutenants, $1400; 2d lientensoti, 
$1200; 3d lieutenanta, $900. Leave of abeepce or 
waiting orders pay: Captains^ $1200; 1st Uea- 
teoants, $1000; 2d lieutenants, $800; 2d lieu- 
tenants, $700. (July 25, 1861.) 

No. 21. Chap. XSJLr^An Act to indemn^ Ou 
State* for JBgepefuUturt* incurred by them in Ik- 
fence iff the United Slate*. The Secretary of th* 
Treasury is directed to pay to the Governor of 
any Stat% or to his authorised ^^cents, tlm ex- 



IMS.] 



ABBTUMTt OF FI?BLIC LAWS. 



241 



r pmfttAj ifc fuwl hymA Blato ftr earoll- 
iag,8«lMistiii^ clothingytapplTiiig, arming, eqnfp> 
pf ng, paying, and teanflporting its troops employed 
la aiding to sappress the present insurrection 
i^ainat the United States, to be settled npon pro- 
per foodMN, tc (Jnly 87, IMl.) 
• VtK S2. CBAT. XXTL^An Act makimff addi- 
Hemal j^propnaiionM for the Lqfislatne, Exeenh 
Uee, and JudidtU Bipmae* nfthe OottemmaUfor 
Vte Thar oMU^JIme 30,1882, and Appropriatiom 
^ ArrtBoragtM for Ms Tear atdmg June 90, 1861. 
^90,072 10 are appropriated ftnr 18«2; and 17,981 80 
i)rl881. (Jvly 27, 1861.) 

No. 2S. Ghat. XXIIL— ^h Act to prtmidt pur 
Xkt Ptipmeni qfihe B)U» organised hythe Vkited 
audes far Me CECy ^f BaUimoret and to enable the 
Mini to fitmiek moff (Told Cbtiu, and to prtnide 
far the Man*ifiutureor Pur^OMtf^f Keld SKgnaU, 
IIOQ^OOO are appropriated for the malntenuice of 
the said police, until dismissed from service by the 
United States; $40,000 for tarnishing small gold 
coins for the public service; and $5000 tor field 
signals. (Jnly 2 7, 1861. ) 

Na %L Gkaf. AJLiv.— J» Act to inereate the 
pnaad MUUar^ EdablishmeHt itfthe Vkited States, 
the act provides for the addition to the regular 
army of nine r^ments of infkntry , one of cavalry, 
and one of artillery (see United States Army, p. 
88.) for service during the existing insurrection 
and rebellion ; and, within one year after the con- 
stitotional anthorily of the Government of the 
United States shall be re-established, the military 
establishment may be rednoed to a number not 
exceeding 26,000 men, nnless otherwise ordered 
byObngreas. (Jnly 20, 1861.) 

No. 25. Chaf. XXY .— An Ael to provide for the 
Si^ipreseion ofBebdUou against and Beeitiatux 
to the Laws of the VnUed States, and to amend the 
Ad entitled "An Act to provide for oaUing forth 
the Militia to execute the Laws of the Vhion^" 
dc^ passed Feb, 28, 1706. Whenever, by reason 
of unlawful combinations, Ac, it shall, in the Judg- 
ment of the President <^the United States, become 
impracticable to enforce, by the ordinary course 
d judicial proceedings, the laws of the United 
States within any State or Territory, he may call 
forth the ntilitia of any or all the States, and em- 
ploy such parts of the land and naval forces as he 
may deem necessary to enforce the lUtbful execu- 
tion of the laws, or to suppress such ^belliou. 
Whenever, in his Judgment, it may be necessary 
to use anch military force, the President shall 
forthwith, by proclamation, command the in- 
surgents to disperse within a limited time. The 
service of the militia so called forth shall not ex- 
tend beyond sixty days after the commencement 
of the next regular session of Congress, unless 
Oongress shall expressly provide by law therefor. 
Coorts-nurtial for the trial of militia shall be* 
composed of militia officers only. 

United Statas marshals and their deputies shall 
teve tha hum powers in executing the laws of 



«M United States as slMiMh nd thefr depottai 
have in executing the laws of the rsspectiva 
States. (July 29, 1861.) 

Naao. CBA9.7aiVlLr-AnActamihoriMinp»e 
.Appointment qf an Assistant Sarelary <tf Ms 
JViwy, and fating the Sabuy qfthe same, and far 
other Pnrposes, Such an ofllcer shall be appointed, 
at a salary of $4000. Bight additional derte shidl 
be appointed In the Navy Department, at a salary 
of $1200 each. (J nly 81, 1861.) 

No. 27. CBA^.TLXyra^AnAetmaUnganAp^ 
propriation to pap the Baepenses of transporting 
and ddivering Arms and MtuUtionsof mtr to the 
Lojfol atisens of the States f^fwkidi the Inhabit^ 
ants now are or heree^fter mag he in Bebellion 
against the Government qfthe Vkited Aatos, and 
to provide fbr the Bag^enu qf organising them M» 
Ormpaniest JBattottont, BegimesUSy or otherwise, 
for their own Protection against dmnestte FMaue, 
hunrreetion. Invasion, or BebeOion. $^000,000 
are appropriated. (July SI, 1861.) 

No. 28. CBAT.XXlX^AnAetnuMng an Ap- 
propriation Jbr the I^trchase qf Arms for the Fol- 
unteers and Begular IVoqpt qf the Vnited States. 
$10,000,000 are appropriated. (Jnly 81, 186L) 

No. 29. CRkf. XXX.— .4n Act p rovi d ing a Oow^ 
mission to eaeamine and report as to the CbstpensA- 
tionqfaM Offieert qfthe Government, and for other 
J^rposes. ABoardofCbmmissioneniisorganiaed, 
to be composed tsi two memlMrs of the Senate^ 
three members of the House of Representatives, 
one officer of the navy, and one officer of the nrmy, 
to examine and report, by bill or otherwise, at 
the next session of Oongress: ** First, a fUr and 
Just compensation for each officer of the Govem- 
ment; second, sudi provision of law as will rsgo* 
late the expenditure of all indefinite and contin- 
gent appropriations. Including those for the courts 
of the United States; third, regulations for the 
more economical collection of the revenue ; fourth, 
what officers or employments, if any, may be dia> 
pensed with without detriment to the public ser> 
vice.** (July 81, 1861.) 

No. 90. CteAP. XXXI.->ilii Act to inertase the 
Medical Corps qfthe Navy. The corps shall con- 
sist of 80 surgeons, and 120 passed and other as- 
sistant surgeons. (Jnly SI, 1861.) 

No. 31. Chap. XXXn.— uln Ad in addition to 
an Act entttled **An Act farther to provide for the 
(hOeettonqf Ihities on Imports, emd for other Jhtr-- 
poses," approved JnXy 18, 1861. The power of tha 
President to declare the inhabitants of any Stets^ 
or any part thereoC in a state of insorreetion, 
shall extend to and include the inhabitants of any 
State, or part thereof^ where such inrarrection 
against the United States ritall be found by him 
at any tbne to exist. (July 31, 1861.) 

No. 82. Cbap. XXXniw— An Ael to d^ne wsd 
punisk certain Oantpiraeies, If two or more 
persons within any State w Territory of the 
United States shall conspire together to over- 
throw or (0 pnt down or to destroy by force tha 



16 



m 



^m^ NATioKAii alma:nac. 



[laea 



GoTemment of the United State*; or to lery war 
against or to c^iMse by force the authority of the 
Oovemment; or by force to prevent, hinder, or 
delay the execution of any law of the United 
States; or by force to seize, take, or poeaees any 
property ai the United States, against the will or 
contrary to the anthMity of the United States; 
or by force, or intimidation, or threat to prevent 
any person from accepting or holding any oflSce, 
or trust, or place of confidence under the United 
States; each and every person so offending shall 
be guilty of a high crime, and, upon conviction in 
any United States court having jurisdiction there- 
of; shall be punished by a fine of not less than 
1500 and not more than $5000; or by imprison- 
ment, with or without hard labor, as the court 
shall determine, for a period not less than six 
months nor greater than six years, or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. (July 31, 1861.) 

Na 33. Chap. XXXIY.— ^n Act authorizing the 
aeeretary qf War to reinibune ValunUert for Ex- 
penseMincurredinemployit^ Regimental and other 
Sonde, and for other Purposes. The SecreUry 
f3if War is directed to refund to volunteers under 
ithe proclamation of April 15, 1861, the sums ex- 
panded by them for bands, at a rate not exceeding 
that allowed to those under the prqplamation of 
May 3, 1861. 

The President may accept the service of volun- 
teers, under the act of July 22, 1861, without pre- 
vious proclamation, and in such numbers from 
any State or States as, in his discretion, the public 
service may require. (July 31, 1861.) 

No. 34. Chap. XXXV.— ^n Act to increase the 
Cbntuiar Bqtretentation qf the United States 
during the present Insurrection. The President 
may i^point consuls at any foreign ports where 
he may deem it advisable, for the purpose of pre- 
venting piracy, at a compensation not exceeding 
|1500 per annum; and he may increase the com- 
pensation of any consuls in foreign ports, if he 
«duill deem it necessary, with the same limitation; 
tx>th the new oflBces and increased compensation 
to cease with the re-establishment of internal 
peace. (Aug. 2, 1861.) 

Na 35. Chap. XXXVI.— win Act to amend an 
Act entitled ^An Act supplementary to the Act 
entitled *An Act providing for a Naval Peace Esta- 
blishment, and for other Purposes,' passed March 
27, 1804." The amendment authorizes the Pre- 
sident to select the superintendents of navy yards 
or heads of bureaus either from the captains or 
commanders of the navy. (Aug. 2, 1861.) 

Ho. 36. Chap. XXXVII.— >1» Act concerning 
the Attorney-General and the Attorneys and Mar- 
shals of the several Districts. The Attoriiey-Oe- 
nersd is charged with the general superintendence 
and direction of the attorneys and marshaU of 
,all the districts in the United States and Territo- 
.ries, who are to report to him as he shall direct. 
lie may employ such attorneys and counsellors 
, to aduiist the district attorneys as he may deem 



neccwnry, st^olating the amomt of their oon** 

pensatioh. (Aug. 2, 1861.) 

No. 37. Chap. XXXYHI.— ^» Act to provide 
for the Qmstruction of one or more armored Ships 
emd Hooting Batteries, and for other I\irpo$es. A 
board of three naval offices shall be appointed 
by the Secretary of the Navy to investigate plans 
and specifications for such structures, and upon 
a fovorable repwt shall cause one or more to be 
built, for which $1,500,000 are appropriated. (Aug. 
3^ 1861.) 

No. 38. Chap. XXXIX.— ^n ./ice to amend ^'.ia 
Act to prohibit the Sale ofS^rituous lAquars and 
hdoxsicaiing J>rinks in the JHstriet of CU«ca»Ma, >s 
certain Oases.** Violations of said act (see No. 42) 
shall be punished by a fine of $20 or imprisonment 
for 30 days. (Aug. 3, 1861.) 

No. 30. Chap. XL.— An Act to provide for the 
Purchase of Arms, Ordnance, and Ordnance 
Stores. $10,000,000 are appropriated for their 
purchase and manufiEicture. (Aug. 3, 1861.) 

No. 40. Chap. XLI.— .in Act to suspend in part 
the Operation qf an Act entitled *'An Act relating 
to Revenue Gutters and Steamers.** The act is 
suspended so far as to allow the Secretary of the 
Treasury to apply a part of the appropriation fox 
the collection of the revenue to the charter or 
purchase of vessels for the revenue service, pro- 
vided such appropriation shall not thereby be 
exceeded. (Aug. 3, 1861.) 

No. 41. Chap. XLII.— An Act providing far Ike 
better Organisation of the Military EttabUdunemL 
An Assistant Secretary of War shall be appointed, 
at a salary of $3000. The act provides for addi- 
tional officers in several departments of the re- 
gular army ; for three new companies of engineer 
soldiers ; for a corps of not more than 50 medical 
cadets, between the ages of 18 and 23, who have 
read medicine two years and attended at least one 
course of lectures, to enlist for one year, to act 
as dressers in the general hospitals said as am- 
bulance-attendants in the field, and to have the 
same rank and pay as military cadets at West 
Point ; for the employment of female nurses in 
the military hospitals, &c. The extra {Miy, bounty, 
and premium allowed in certain cases by act of 
July 5, 1838, are abolished. 

Commissioned officers of the army, navy, or 
marine corps, who have served for 40 years, may, 
at their own request, be placed by the President 
upon the retired list; and commissioned officers 
who have become incapable of performing their 
duties shall be retired; but <^ should the brevet 
Lieutenant-General be retired under this act, it 
shall be without reduction In his current pay, 
subsistence, or allowances." There shall not be 
upon the retired list at any one time more than 
seven per cent, of the whole number of ofBcerH of 
tbearmy,asflxedby1aw. A board of commissioned 
officers shall ftom time to time be assembled by 
the Secretary of War or of the Navy, as the esse 
may be, to examine the nature and occasion of 



1863.] 



ABSTRACi: 01* PUBLIC LAWS. 



248 



the diaabtlity of ofilcera, upon the reraH of wMdi 
inyestigation shall depend to a defined extent the 
subsequent standing and emolnment allowed to 
those retired. (Aug. 3, 1861.) 

No. 42. Chap. XLIV.-<^n Act to prokSbU thi 
Sale of S^r&uous and Intoxicating Drinkt tn tht 
JXHrict of OaltmibiOy in certain Ocues. Snchsaleto 
soldiers or Tolnnteers in the service of the United 
States is prohibited. (See No. 38.) (Ang. S, 1861.) 

No. 43. Chap. XLV. — An Act to provide inereaged 
Revenue from IntportSfto pay Interest on the JhMic 
t>dit, and. for oOter Purposes. The duties on cer- 
tain articles are modified or increased. (See New 
Tarifl; p. 283.) On all articles manufactured 
wholly of materials imported, a drawback shall 
tie allowed when exported equal to the duty paid 
ou such materials, 10 per cent, on the amount 
of all drawbacks being retained for the United 
States. All goods designed for consumption in the 
United States must hereafter be withdrawn from 
the public store or bonded warehouse, or the du- 
ties thereon paid, in three months after the same 
are deposited, or they may be withdrawn at any 
time within two years on the payment of the legal 
duties with 25 per cent, added; and goods de- 
signed fi>r exportation may be withdrawn at any 
time b^bre the expiration of three years; draw- 
back, less one per cent., to be allowed on all mer^ 
chandise exported within three years after pay- 
ment of da^. 

A direct tax of $20,000,()0a is annually laid upon 
the United States, apportioned as foUows :»Main6, 
$120,826; New Hampshire, $218,406 66; Vermont, 
$211,068; Massachusetts, $824,581 33; Rhode Is- 
land, $116^963 66; Connecticut, $308,214; New 
York, $2,603,913 66; New Jersey, $450,134; Penn- 
^iTania, $1,946,719 33; Delaware, $74,683 83; 
Uaryland, $436,823 33; Yirginia, $937,550 66; 
North OtroUna, $576,194 66; South CaroUua, 
$363,670 66; Georgia, $584,367 S3; Alabama, 
$520,313 38; Mississippi, $413^084 66; Louisiana, 
$38&,886 66; Ohio, 1,667,089 83; Kentucky, $713,- 
60523; Tennessee, $660,498; Indiana, $904,875 33; 
lUiBois, $1,146,551 33; Biissonri, $761,127 83; Kan- 
sas, $71,743 33; Arkansas, $261,886; Michigan, 
$501,768 33; Florida, $77,522 66; Texas, $355,106 66; 
Iowa, $452,088; Wisconsin, $519,688 66; Califoi^ 
nia» $2i>4,538 66; Minnesota, $108,524; Oregon, 
$36,140 66; Territory of New Mexico, $62,648; 
Utah, $26,982; Washington, $7,766 83; Nebraska, 
$19^2; Nevada, $4,592 68; Colorado, $22,905 33; 
Dakota, $3»241 33; District of Columbia, $40,437 33. 
The President may, for the purposes of this act, 
divide the States and Territories into convenient 
collection districts, and, on or after the second 
Tuesday in February, 1862, appoint an assessor 
and a collector for each, and each assessor shall 
divide his district into a convenient number of 
assessment districts and appoint for each an assist- 
aut assessor. The tax shall be laid on the value 
on April 1, 1862, of all lands and lots of ground, 
with their improvements and dwelUng-houaes, 



except those belonging to th9 United States or 
any State, and such as are by the existing laws 
of the State in which they are situated permtir 
nently or specially exempted from taxation, and 
homesteads to the value of $500. Owners or 
superintendents shall be required to ftimish 
written lists of property, or disclose the same 
to enable the officers to make lists. The pnnishp 
ment on conviction for making a lalse or fraudu- 
lent list or disclosure shall be a fine of not mors 
than $500; and the assessor may thereupon make 
a valuation of such property, from which thers 
shall be no appeal. Twmity-five days shall be 
allowed, with due notice, for appeals in writing 
to the assesfeor after the completion of the Usts 
in any collection district. The assessors of each 
State shall constitute a board, to revise and a4jtist 
lists and valuations, and appcntion the tax to each 
county and district, at such time as shall be 
directed by the Secretary of the Treasury. The 
assessments and apportionments so made shall 
remain in full force for the yearly collection <ii 
this tax, until altered, modified, or abolished by 
law; and the annual amount of tax, if unpaidi 
shall remain a lien, for two years after it shaU 
become due, on the property assessed, which may 
be sold for such tax if sufficient personal ^ecta 
are not found, subject to redemption within two 
years from the date of sale. 

From and after the first day of January next, 
there shall be collected a tax of 3 per cent, on 
the excess of the income of every person residing 
in the United States above $800, from whatever 
source derived, and of 5 per cent, on incomes de- 
rived by citlsens residing abroad ttom property in 
the United States, except that, in all cases, upon 
such portion as is derived from interest on securip 
ties <tf the United States the tax shall be 1}^ per 
cent.; such tax to be levied upon incomes for the 
year next preceding the time for assessing it ; and 
all national. State, or local taxes upon the property 
troia. which such income is derived to be deducted 
in estimating said income. The President is au- 
thorized for the purposes of this tax to appoint one 
principal assessor and one principal collector in 
each of the States and Territories and in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, who may appoint assistants, Ac. 
The tax shall be due and payable on the SOth day 
of June, 1862, and provisions are made for its en- 
forcement. 

Should any of the people of any State, Ac. be 
in rebellion at the time this act goes into opera- 
tion, the President shall in^)ceed to execute its 
provisions so soon as the authority of the United 
States is re-establidied therein, collecting the sums 
due with 6 per cent, interest. Any State, Ac. may 
assume and collect, in its own way and manner, 
and pay into the Treasury of the United States, 
its quota of the direct tax hereby levied; in 
which case no United States officers shall be ap- 
pointed in such State under this act, in Hon of tlie 
compensation to whom 16 per dent, shall be ds- 



244 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[laea 



ducted from the proportion of the tax ectoally 
paid on or before the last day of June in each 
year, and 10 per cent, from that paid on or before 
the last day of September ; and the quota of any 
State may be satisfied in xrhole or in part by the 
release of any claim of such State against the 
United States; but on defoult of any State so 
undertaking in any year, the Secretary of the 
Treasury may procure the collection of the tax 
by liis own officers. 

For the purposes of this act, the office of Com- 
missioner of Taxes is created in the Treasury De- 
partment. (See 2d Session, Gbap.;cxix.) (Aug. 5, 
1861.) 

No. 43. Chap. XLVI^^An Jet tuppUmentary 
to an Act entiOed " An Act to authorue a National 
Loant and far oHhtr Purpotes." The Secretary of 
the Treasury may issue bonds at 6 per cent., in 
sums of not less than $500, jwyable after 20 years, 
and exchangeable for treasury notes at 7 ^ per 
cent., issued under the act of July 17, 1861, at the 
option of the holder of such notes, the whole 
amount of the bonds not to exceed the whole 
amount of such notes. Treasury notes shall be 
iigned by the Treasurer of the United States and 
countersigned by the Register of the Treasury, 
or by such other officer of the Treasury Depart- 
ment for each as the Secretary of the Treasury 
may designate; and no such notes shall require 
the seal of the Department. The lowest deno- 
mination of treasury notes shall be $6 instead 
of $10. $100,000 additional are appropriated Ibr 
expenses. Treasury notes of a less denomination 
than $60 shall be receivable in payment of public 
dues. The act of Aug. % 1846, is so fiur suspended 
as to allow the Secretary of the Treasury to de< 
posit money obtained from loans in such solvent 
specie-paying banks as he may select. For any 
portion of the 7 per cent, bonds authorized by the 
act to which this Is supplementary, the Secretary 
of the Treasury may issue bonds at 6 per cent, 
payable not moace than 20 yean from date. (Aug. 
6, 1861.) 

Na 44. Chap. XL VII.— ^» Act ttgaplementary 
to an Act etttUkd *^An Act to inatau the pruent 
MOOary MstabliMhmimt qf the United Statas," ap- 
proved Jidjf 29, 1861. The aqitpointment of addi- 
tional aides-de-camp is authorized, as may be 
recommended by the lieutenant-general or any 
mi^or-general of the regular army commanding 
forces in the field. (Aug. 6, 1861.) 

No. 46. Chap. XLYIII. — An Act mpplementaiy 
to an Act entiHed**An Act toproUet the Oomnurot 
of the United StaUt and ptmisft the CHme of 
JPIraey.** Any vessel or boat which shall be built, 
purchased, fitted out in whole or in part, or held 
fur the purpose of being employed in the commis- 
sion of any piratical aggression, Ac. shall be liable 
to be captured upon the high seas, or in any port 
or place in the United States, whether the same 
shall have actually sailed upon any piratical expe- 
dition or eommitted or attempted any act of piracy, 



or not, and adjudged and coBdemiicd to tiMi via of 
the United States and of the captun, or of the 
United States alone if seized by a collector, 8nr> 
veyor, or marshal, in the manner now provided hf 
law. The President may instruct the oommanden 
of public armed vessels, and authorize the eomr 
manders of any other armed vessels saOiag andsr 
the authority of letters of mazqne and reprisal 
granted by Congress, or of any other suitaUto 
vessels, to subdue and seise any muh. vesael or 
boat, bjmI if found upon the high seas to bring It 
into any port of the United States; and the ooi- 
lectors and surveyors of ports and United States 
marshals are required to seize any and all suA 
vessels or boats, and cause the aame to be duly 
proceeded against. (Aug. 6y 1861.) 

No. 46. Chap. XLIX^— .4fli Aat tot^duee 0mm- 
kur Feet far Veude running to or between Itortiffm 
Portt. American vessels so running regularly by 
weekly or monthly trips, or otherwise^ shall not 
be required to pay fees to ooosnlz for mora than 
four trips in a year. (Aug. 5, 1861.) 

No. 47. Chap. h^An Aat avthorixle^ addiiiotml 
EnUstuunU in the Navy qf the UnHed Statee. Ite 
Secretary of the Navy may canse to be odlsted fan 
the navy, for the term of three yeara or dnriag 
the war, such number of able seamen, wdinary 
aeamen, and boya, aa he may Judge aeceaaary and 
proper. (Aug. 6. ISdL) 

No. 48. Cbllp. m.'^An Act making fitrther Ap- 
pr<gpriaiionfor the Supportt^the Naval Service for 
the Year ending June 80, 1862, oiul far other iW- 
potee, $462,000 are appropriated for naval purposes; 
$20,000,000 for collecting, drilling, and organising 
five hundred thousand volunteers; and $7000 for 
repairs to Fort Abercrombie. (Aug. 6, 1661.) 

No. 40. Chap. LII.-^An Act making Appropria- 
tien to pay the Expend* if (he Bweati^aing 0am- 
mitteee cf tke Wnue of liepretentativea and Senate 
ajppotfitad the Firet Seesion of the 27 th Cbe^ms, 
and </ the Oommitaian avtharited to e m am: ine and 
rtport at to the QmpeneaJtion qf ail QffUert </ £i^ 
OwemmenL $10,000 are apiat>priated as part of 
the contingent expenses of the Houee of B^it- 
sentatlves. (Aug. 6, 1861.) 

No. 60. Chap. Lni.— ^n Ati authorieing tkt 
{hnttruction (^ TwOve tmeOl Side-Wheel Steatnert. 
$1,200,000 are appropriated ibr the purpose. (Aug. 
6, 1861.) 

No. 61. CkiAP. LPf^^An Act making Appro- 
priation far Fartificatione and other PierpoeeL 
$100,000 are appropriated for contlngeDcies of 
llMrtifications. and $6000 for improving the grounds 
around the Washington Infirmary, used aa an anny 
hospital. 

Any commissioned offloer of the army, navy, or 
marine corps, who, having tendered his resigna- 
tion, shall, prior to due notice of the aoopptanoe 
of the same by the proper authority, and withoet 
leave, quit his post or proper duties with tlw in- 
tent to remain permanently absent tfaarefrom, shaD 
be registered as a deaarter, and poniahed'aa aoch. 



286d.] 



ABSia&CT or PUBLIO liAVS. 



fi46 



HoggtagMft jwnririiiiMmt In theaipyis ibty 

Na 62. Gbap. LV^— .^ ^c< <» fvtaiMm to thg 
Office qf Attameg ^ Iht Untied Statu fur (Ae 
AtMern JDiabriet qf New York, The udd attorney 
■hall be paid a aalaiy of 10000 per aanitiii, datiDg 
faan Apnk ^ 1801, and offloe^zpenaee as datar- 
■daed by Uie fleoratacy of tlia InteruHf. (Aug. 6, 
1861.) 

No. 68. Ohap. JjYl.'^An Act to punish certaiH 
OrimaaffaiiutthAlMiiedSlateB* Aaypervoneon- 
vioted of xecruitlDg soldton or nllon in any Btate 
or Torriiory to engage is aimed hoetility againit 
tte United States, or opentag a recniitiog etatloa 
Ibr such pnrpoee, ehall be fined from $200 to 
flOOO^ and be inipriBoned from one to five yean. 
Any person bo enlisting ihall be fined $100, and 
impriaoned from one to three yean. (Aug. 6, 
ISffL) 

Na 64. Cbap. LYII.— An Mi to pramoie the 
J^fideudf qf fhe JEngineer and Topographical 
Engineer Oarpt, ami for cOur Purport, An in- 
miMo of the corpe named, and the appointment 
of two additional inqpectoni'general, are provided 
for. (See United Statee Army, p. 88.) Vacanciee 
heieelker oocnrring among the commissioned offi- 
oen of the vdnnteer regiments shall be filled by 
fhe Goramors of the Statee reepectiTely, in the 
same manner as original appointments. (See No. 0.) 
TiM si^erintendents of national armories shall 
hePBafler be appointed from officers of the Ord- 
nance Department. (Ang. 6^ 1861.) 

No. 66. Chaf. LYUI.-'An Act to auHhoriMe an 
MermeeintheCbrpeqfAigineertand JbpograjM- 
eal Engineen, Thia is, as fiur as it goes, a repeti- 
tkm of tba preeeding act. (Ang. 0, 1861.) 

No. 66. Chap. hLX.-^An Act to provide for 
holding Oie JKitrid and OircuU CourU in Judicial 
Didriett during a temporary Vacancif qf the 
Judgeih^. The duties of the vacant judgeship, 
in aoy Mate where there are two judicial districts, 
may be performed by the Judge of the other die* 
triot, either in the district or circuit court, during 
Am oontiniiBaoe of such vacancy.. (Aug. 6^ 1861.) 
No. 67. Ohap. LX.~A» Ad to conJiMoate Pro- 
perfg naed fbr JSngurreetionary liirpoees. During 
the praaeBt or any ftitore inanrreotion, after the 
nqniaito prockunatien by the Preaident, any pro* 
party need, or intended or suffered by the owner 
to be used, in aidii^, abetting, or promoting anoh 
insoneetion or reaiatance to the laws| is declared 
to be lawfsl anbject of prise and capture wherever 
found; and it ahall be the duty of the Preaident 
or the United Statea to eaaae the same to be 
seised, oonflacated, and condemned. Such priaea 
and captore may be condemned in any district or 
drcnit court having Jnrisdiction of ttie amount, 
or in admiralty in any diatrlot in which the same 
may be aeixod, or into which th«y may be taken 
and pnceedlnga first institttted. 

Any person daimed to be h^A to service w 
labor ander Ike law «f aay State, who ahaU be 



reqjHired or permitted fay the peaon to whom 
such labor or service is claimed to be dne^ or bj 
his lawful agent, to take up arms against the 
United States, or to work or be employed . . » 
in any military or naval service wbatsoevei^ 
against the Qovemment and lawful authority of 
the United Statea, in every auch case the claim to 
Buch labor ahall be Ibrlbitedi and the fiict of such 
emplqjnnent is niade a bar to the subsequent 
enfivcement of such claim. (Ang. 6, 1861.) 

No. 68. Ohap. LXI.^Afi Act rdative to AjapeaU 
to the Supreme Cburt of the United Statei. In aU 
cases of appeal to the Supreme Court by both 
parties, a transcript of the reoord filed in the 
Supreme Court by either party may be uaed on 
bothappeala. The United Statea District Attoroey 
in any district in California may transcribe and 
certify to the Supreme Court the records of the 
court in his own district, in all appealed land 
cases in which the United States is a party; and 
records so certified shall be as valid as if certified 
by the clerk of the proper district court. (Aug. 0^ 
1861.) 

No. 60. Chap. JJLXl^—An Act to creaJte a Metro- 
politan JPoiioe Didrict of the District of OaumbiOf 
and to establish a FbUce ther^or. Such district 
and police are eatabliahed, and $60,000 additional 
to an existing balance appropriated. (Aug. 6^ 1861.) 
No. 60. Chap. LXIIL-~^» Act to increase the 
Pay of the Privates in the Regular Army and iti' 
the Volunteers in the Service of the United States, 
and for other Purposes. The pay of privates shall 
be $13 per month for three years, and until other- 
wise fixed by law. The provisions of the act '< for 
the relief of the Ohio and other volunteers" (see 
No. 16) are extended to all volunteers, fin: what* 
ever term* 

"All the aets, proclamations, and orders of the 
President of the United States after the 4th of 
March, 1861, reelecting the army and navy of the 
United States, and calling out or relating to the 
militia or volunteers from the States, are hereby 
approved and in all respects l^;alized and made 
valid, to the same intent and with Hit same effect 
as if they had been issued and done under the 
previous express authority and direction of the 
Congress of the United States.'* (Aug. 6, 1801.) 

No. 6L Chap. USjy.r-An Act requiring an 
Oath qf AUegiancej and to support the Oonstitu- 
tion qf the United States, to be administered to 
certain Persons in the (XvU Service qf the United 
States. The heads of the several departments 
shall cause such an oath to be administered to 
every person emplc^ed in their several depart* 
ments; and all who ntaaa to take such oath shall 
be immediately dismissed^ and those violating it 
shall be sultfect to all the pains and penalties of 
peijury. (Aug. 6, 1861.) 

No. 62. Chap. LXV.^An Act eaqOanatory qf 
an Act entitled "An Act conoeming the Attorney' 
General and the Attomsys and Marauds qf the 
isesral JKrtHiBte." (See Na $7.) Said act shall 



246 



THB NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1868. 



■ot te aajrimy aflbeC tli» SoHeilor of th» TrMtvy* 
(Aug. 6^ 1861.) 

No. es. Chip. hXTLr^An Act to provide for 
Ute Bepatn of the Long Bridge acro$$ the Bitomae 
Biver. 920,000 ai« spproprtatcd. (Aug. 6^ 1861.) 

No. 64. Chap. LXYXI.-— ^n Act amthoriging the 
SBeretarjfofWartopaifOieVoluiUeerM whojunder 
the Qmmand of Chariee W. White, and hy Order 
qf Brigadier-Oenerai T. A. Morris, enliUed to 
froteet the BaOroad Bridget and other Property, 
in the yieinOg of OaJOand, AlUghang OamUg, 
Margkmd. (Ang. 6, 186L) 



Vc'L-Joimt BeeebiUon oMAariwtntg the Ap- 
pointment of EaMminerg to examine a Steam 
Floating Batterg at BaMten, New Jereeg. The 
Beeretacy may appabai a boaid to azaoiine the 



how soon it can be oompleted, and the expedient 
thenoi;aB4 npori tfaeraonfcr the 
ofCongnflB. (July 34^ 1861.) 

Na 2^A JSnoiMfuw rdaUve to the 
of the Bubutrg of oO NatUme to be haidcA im 
London in the rear VUa. $200Oar»i 
to enable the rmrirtwit to take each 
shall eeem to him beet to ftcilitate a fvoiper repT»- 
sentatloB of the faufaiitxte] interaete of the United 
State at tiia add ashiUtloii. (July 27, 1861.) 
• Na 3y— A Semiution reputting the lYesident 
^ the United Satee to reeomunend a Bag qf 
PitbUe BumHiation, Muting, and Prager. (Aug. 
6, 1861.) 

No. 6w—A BoKitttUm amihorieing an Mnamina- 
tion of Jame^s JPnffeetike for BifixA Onmon. 
(Aug. 6^ 1861.) 



8IG0ND (VIB8T BEGULAB) SESSION 0? THE 37TH 00N6BESS. 



Ka 1. Chap. l.i—An Act to further promote the 
I^gHcieneg qf the Navy. Any officer whose name 
shall haye been borne on the Naral Register 45 
years, or who shall be 02 years old, shall be 
retired from active service, bnt may be assigned to 
shore du^. The President may, by and with the 
advice and consent of the Senate, detail <^cerB 
from the retired list for the command of squadrons 
and single ships, as he may believe that the good 
of the service requires; and snch officers may be 
restored to the active list if upon the recommendar 
tion of the President they shall receive a vote of 
thanks from Congress for their services and gal- 
lantry in action against an enemy, and not other- 
wise. The President may select any officer firom 
the grades of captain or commander, and assign 
him to the command of a squadron with the rank 
and title of "flag officer." (Dec. 21, 1861.) 

No. 2. Chap. II. — An Act to increau the Duties 
on Tea, Cbffee, and Sugar. (See New Tariff, p. 283.) 
(Dec. ii, 1861.) 

No. 3. Chap. III.— .4n Act rdative to Courts- 
Martial in the Army. In time of war the com- 
mander of a division or separate brigade may 
vppcAni general ooarts-martial, and act npon thefr 
sentences as allowed and restrained in the 66th 
and 89th Articles of War to commanders of armies 
and departments; but sentences extending to loss 
of life or dismission of a commissioned officer shall 
require the confirmation of the general command- 
ing the army to which the division or brigade 
belongs. (Dec. 24, 1861.) 

No. 4. Chap. Vf.—An Act toprooidefor Attot- 
ment Certificates among the VAvnteer Forces. The 
President shall appoint, for each State having 
volunteers in the United States service, not ex- 
ceeding three persons to visit the voinnteers from 
their respective States and procure their aliot- 
ments of their pay to their ftmllies or friends, 
duly certifled in wiittngaiid attested, upon. wMdi 



the several paymasters shall, at eadi 
ment to troops, give drafts payable in ttie dtj of 
New York, to the order of tlra persona to wlion 
such allotments may be made. Such commisaiouf is 
shall receive no pay or emolnments from tfaa 
United States. The lien upon soldien* pay aHowe^ 
to sutlers by act of June 12, 1868, is repealed; «iid 
all regulations giving sutlers rights and prHiiegw 
beyond the rules and artleles of war are ateogated. 
(See No. 43.) (Dec. 24^ 1861.) 

No. 5. Crap.T. — An Aotmakingan A pp e nyt ie t- 
tionfor Ounboats on the Western Bivert. $l,mMI,QOt 
are appropriated. (Dec. 94, 1861.) 

No. 6. Chap. YI. — An Act nuiking 
tionsfor the J^iyment of Invalid and athar 
sUms of the United States forthe Tear en d ing > 
30, 1863. $1,460,600 are appropriated. (Jeui. 8^ 
1862.) 

No. 7. Chap. Tin.— An Act to promote flha ^- 
fciency of ffu Dead-Letter Cffiee. Tha PicMfanaster- 
Oeneral may return all dead letters, except tlwaa 
containing circulars and other wortMaaa auittar, 
to their writers, whenever their namea caa Im ■•- 
certained ; all valuable letters to be chargad tr^rtde^ 
and all others double, the ordinary rate 
He may employ addltfamal ctorlcs fiir the 
im>vided he is satisfied that the reoeipta fcr • 
letter postage will amount to aoflleient Cir 
compensation, and shall report the reaolta to *^ 
next session of Congress. (Jan. 21, 1802.) 

No. 8. Chap. IXr— An Act in rOatum to tta 
Letters of Sailors and Marines in the Service of 
the United States. The aet authorisiiig aoldiafrB to 
send letters through the mall without pr^pa^yrwtent 
of postage Is extended to sailon and inariiM« in 
the actual serrioe of the United Btatea. (Jan. 
21, 1862.) 

No. 9. Chap. X.— An Aet to OMthariae tibe Ptr-- 
stdent to appoint two additioneA AaaiMtmnt A^. 
cretariea ef WSn^ 



1868.] 



AB8TRA07 09 PUBLIC XiAWS. 



247 



Ibr one year, at a Bslarj of 18000 each. (Jan. 2^ 
1802.) 

No. 10. Ohap. XI. — An Att amending the Pro- 
virions of the second Section of the Act of Jan, 24, 
1957, enfiyrting the Attendance of WUneeses before 
Cbmmittees of either House of Obngress. The te»* 
timony of any such wltnets riiall not be used as 
evidence in any criminal proceeding against him 
in any court of justice, but no official paper or 
HBCord produced by h!m shall be included within 
this privilege ; and no such witness shall hereafter 
be allowed to refuse to testify to any fbet or to 
produce any paper on the ground that he might 
thereby be disgraced or oflierwise rendered in- 
fiimons. (Jan. 24^ 1862.) 

No. 11. Chap. XII. — An Act auffioriting an /n- 
atase of the Clerical Force in the War and Ifavjf 
Departments. (Jan. 27, 1862.) 

No. 12. Chap. XnJ.—An Act to provide for the 
Protection of Overland Emigrants to Odifomia^ 
Oregon, and Washington Territories. $25,000 are 
appropriated, to be expended at the discretion of 
the Secretary of War. (Jan. 27, 1862.) 

No. 13. Chap. XIY.— w4n Act to pay the Egpenses 
t/the Special Cbmmittee of the Bouse (^ Repfresenta- 
txses, appointed July 8, 1861, to ascertain and re- 
part in regard to Oomtraxts with any Department 
of iktQoiuTWSMnAfor Prodtions, Supplies, Trans- 
portation, <£e. $1(^000 are appropriated. (Jan. 
31,1862.) 

No. 14. Chap. XV. ^An Act to authoriJte (he 
President qfthe United States in certain Oases to 
take Possession ofBaUroad and Telegraph Lines, 
and for other Purposes. The President may, when 
la his judgment the public safety may require it, 
take posseasion of any or all the tel^;raph and 
railroad lines in the United States^ and every 
thing belonging to them; prescribe rules and 
regulations for holding, using, and maintaining 
them ; extend, repair, and complete them, in the 
manner most conducive to the safety and interest 
of the Ooremment; and place their officers, 
agents, and employees under military control, so 
that they shall be considered as a poet road and a 
part of the military establishment of the United 
States. Three commissioners shall be appointed 
to anoooo damages or determine the compensation 
to which any railroad or telegraph company may 
become entitled in consequence of such seizure, 
and their award shall be submitted to Congress 
far their action. The transportation of troops, 
munitions of war, Ac. throughout the United 
States aliidl be under the immediate supervision 
and control of the Secretary of War Mud his au- 
thorized agenta. The provisions of this act, so fsx 
aa relates to the (grating and using said railroads 
and telegrapha, shall not be in force any longer 
than is neoeaaary Ibr the suppression of this re> 
beilion. (Jan. 81, 1862.) 

ITo* 16* Chap. Xyil.n-^n Act making Appro- 
priaJtUms for the Omsular and Diplomatic Ex- 
petuaqfthe CfocensmesUfer tki Tear ending Jueu 



80,lMa, MMl sOdrnma JlppMpvieitimu /ar «• 
Jtor ending June 90, 1862. «l,168,f70jlO an ap- 
propriated for 1803, and $80,llMt tot 1802^ 

No. 10. Oaxp.Xym^AnAetetvthorisiugtks 
Secretary qfthe interior to strike from the Pmsion 
BaOs the JTasnes qf sueh Persons as have taken 
up Arms agaimst the O ovem wun t, or who may 
have in emy manner encouraged the MeMs, (Veb. 
4,'1862.) 

No. 17. Obap. XIX.^j4» Act making Aippir^- 
prMionsM the Support of the MiUtary Academy 
fir the Tear ending June 90, 1868. $150^211 am 
appropriated. (Feb. 10, 1862.) 

No. 18. Chap. XX^-^An Act to authoriee an 
additional Muueqf VkOed Skdes IMu, The Se- 
cretary of the Treasury may Issaa $10,000,000 in 
demand notes of not leaa than $6, te addition to 
the $60,060,000, and aa part of the $260^000,000 
loan authorised by the acta of July 17 and Aug. 
6,1861. (7eb. 12, 1862.) 

No. 19. Chap. XXI.— ^Iti Act outhorisiTtg the 
Detail of Naval Officers far the Service qfthe War 
Department. Three competent naval ofltcera may 
be detailed for the inspection of tranaport-veaael% 
Ac. (Feb. 12, 1862.) 

No. 20. Chap. XXn^-^fn Act making an Ap- 
propriation far ih/e Purdwse qf Cbtton and 1^ 
bacoo Seed for general Distribution. $8000 are 
^propriated for ootton-eeed and $1000 for tobacctn 
seed, the former to be procured from places where 
cotton is grown as Ihr north aa practicable. (Feb, 
10, 1862.) 

No. 21. OiAf.XXIII.-^An Act to authorise the 
Qmstruction of Twenty iTonrCtad Steam Ounboate, 
$10,000,000 are appropriated. (Feb. 13, 1862.) 

No. 22. CBAT.XXiy^-AnActtoamendanAet 
enticed " An Act to reguUUe Trade and Intercourse 
with the Indian SYibes, and to preserve I\aee on 
Vie Fhmtiers," approved June 30, 1884. The pro- 
visions against the sale at spirituous liquors 
to Indians are made mere stringent. (Feb. 18^ 
1862.) 

No. 28. C^AP. XXV.-^An Act making an Ap* 
pnprioHon for completing theDefenees qf Wash- 
ington, and far other Purposes. $160,000 are ap- 
propriated for completing the defenoea of Wash- 
ington. The law providing for the diaohai^ of 
minora enUated without the oonseot of their pa^ 
renhi or guardians is repealed. Hereafter no per- 
son under the age of 18 shall be mustered into the 
service of the United States, and the oath of en- 
Ustment taken by the recruit shall be conclusive 
aa to his age. No volunteera or militia shall be 
mustered into the service on coadlttona limiting 
their service to any State or Territory, beyond the 
number of 10,000 in BUaaonri and 4600 in Marykind 
heretofore authorised by the Preaident or Secre- 
tary of War. (Feb. 13^ 1862.) 

No. 24. Chap. XXVn.---^» Act to prohibU the 
** Ooolie Trad^* by American OUitens in American 
VesseU. Every vesael engaged in such trade sfaalt 
be UaMa to ba aaiiad at aaa orinportaad fur- 



248 



TBM NATZOVAL AliliAKAO. 



{isn 



[t tttA ptntM MUBtffiMd thente riMtt be 
IMMt to » flae not exoMdin^ laoeOi and U im- 
prisonad not eseaedlng one year. The laws of 
Veb. 2S, 1847, and March a» 1840, relating to the 
earrlage of panengen in merchant-veiaels, are 
axtended to all American TeaseUi and their mas- 
ien carrying passengers between Coreign ports. 
(Feb. 19, 1862.) 

No. 25. Chap. XXVIII.— uin Act ntdking Ap- 
frapriaUam for Iht Cbnttructionf f^re$ervaiionj 
mud Bqmin nf osrtom WarHfioalbUmt ami sMsr 
nMbt 9if D^m» far Me Ttar tMiimg Junnt 30, 
1868, a$»d additimua Afpropriatimu far tiu 
Vur mii»i0 Jwte 90, 1888. HfildOfiOO are appro- 
priated for 1888, |8,a8&,<XM> for 1860^ ud 176(^000 
ftr 1882-88. <Feb. 00, 1882.) 

lio.28. CaAT.XXOLn-An Act making an Ap- 
propriaUm ta mmminaU Me IhOUc BuOditiffa. 
WOO are ^>proprii^ed tor illnminating the public 
bnildings on Washington's birthday. (Feb. 20^ 
188a,) 

No. 91. OmjkB, XXXr-'At^ Act to amOiariae m 
atanfs ^ Afpropriatiotu for the I^iymerUxtf no- 
Mssayy Mtpmdiimtt in the Service qf the United 
Statee for Indian Affiiire. The act provides for 
the settlement of the aooonnts of Bei^aniin 
DftTls, late Snperintendent of Indian AflHirs in 
Utah, and payment to him of |i balance of 10,73040. 
(Feb. 22, 1882.) 

No. 2a. Chap. XXXL-^^n Aetvkoking Appro- 
pHntiomforiho Signal Servio^qf the United Stata 
Army. $66,060 are appropriated. (Feb. 22^ 1862.) 

No. 20. GiUP. XXXU^— Jin Act making addi- 
UomalAppropriatiomfortheSiigfportiiftheArmj/ 
JhrUic Tear tnding June aO,l»ei. $208^302^488.77 
■re appropriated. (Feb. 26, 1862.) 

No. 80. Chav. XXXin^.in Act to authorite the 
A$ne nf United State* JMee, andfortheJledemp- 
tion or Funding thereqft and for I^tndi$ig the 
floating D^ qfihe UnitoA States. The Secretary 
of the Treasury may issne $160,000,000 of United 
States notes, not bearing interest, payable to 
bearer, in denominations nf not lass than $6. 
$•0^000,000 shaU be in lien of thedeoand traasnry 
notes anthoriied by act of July 17, 1861, for which 
demand notes the notes herein provided for shall 
be snbstitated as rapidly as praoticabla, and the 
anonnt of both kinds together shall at na thne 
Mceed$UO/)00,000. The notes harain anthorisad 
shaU be receivable for aU dnes to tha United 
States except duties on imports, and for all de- 
mands against the United States except interest 
npon .bonds and notes, wUdi shall ba paid in 
«oin. With these exceptions, they shall be a kgal 
tender in payment of all debts, pnblie and private, 
within the United States; and they may be re- 
issued. Holders may receive in exchange for 
them, in sums of $50 or some mfiltiple of $50, 6 per 
cent, bonds, redeemable at the pleasure of the 
United Statee at any time after five years, and 
payable 20 years ftom date; and, for the pnrpoee 
af funding the tusaannr natat nDd.flontii« debt 



of tha Unitadfitai^tha Saenst«i7 oCtknTkeaaasy 

may issue such bonds to an amonnt not exceeding 
$600,000^000^ HemaydtqioaeorthamatanytiBe, 
at their market valne^ for coin and for treasor j 
and United States notee; ^'and all stocks, boadSf 
and other securities of the United Statea, held 
by individuals, corporations, or associations with* 
in the United States, shall be exempt frc»i 
taxation by or under State authority .'^ $300,000 
are appropriated for expenses. The Secretary of 
the Treasury, or any Assistant Treasurer or an* 
thoriaed depositaryi may receive United States 
notes on deposit from any persim or persons, or 
any corporation, for not lass than 30 days, in snms 
of not less than $100, in exchange for certificates 
of deposit at 6 per cent, interest, such interest to 
cease at tha pleasure of the Secretary of the 
Treasury: such deposits may be withdrawn at 
any time after ten days' notice, and their aggre- 
gate shall at no time exceed $26,000,000 (i4k' 
creased to $50,000,000 by act of March^ 17). 

AU duties on imported goods shall be paid in 
coin, or in notes heretofore authorized and re> 
celvable for public dues; and the coin so paid 
shall be set apart as a special ibnd, and applied 
as follows : — ^Ist. To the payment in coin of the 
interest on the bonds and notes of the United 
States. 2d. To the purchase or payment of one 
per cent, of the entire debt of the United States 
in each fiscal year alter July 1, 1862, which is to 
be set apart as a sinking fund, and the interest 
of which shall in like manner be applied to the 
purchase or payment of the public debt as the 
Secretary of the Treasury shall from time to time 
direct. 3d. The residue thereof to be paid into 
the Treasury of the United States. (Feb. 2S^ 
1862.) 

No. SL Chap. XXXIT.— Jn Act making Ap- 
prcpriaUonefor sundry Civil Saepensee of the Go- 
vernment for the Tear ending June 30, 1863, and 
additional Apprcpriations for the Tear ending 
June 30, 1862. $1,756,083.00 are appropriated for 
1863» and $143^737.05 for 1862. (March 1, 1862.) 

No. 32. CBAF.XXXY^An Act to authorise the 
Secretary qfthe Treasury to issue Certificates qf 
Indebtedness to PuJblic Creditor*. He may caoaa 
to be issued to any public creditor who may be 
desirous to receive the same^ in satiataction of 
audited and settled demands sgainst the United 
States, certificates for the whole amount due, or 
parts thereof; not less than $1000, payable in one 
year from date, or earlier, at 6 per cant, interest. 
(March 1, 1862.) 

No. 83. CfiAP. XXXTI.--Jif Act fixing Ou 
Number qf the House qf JUpresentativee from a nd 
after March 3, 1863. Aiter that date the nnmber 
shall be 241; and the eight additional members 
shall be assigned one each to Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
Kentucky, Illinois, Iowa, Minneeota, Vermont, 
and Rhode Island. (March 4, 1862.) 

No. 34. Chaf. XXXVIL^^n Act to provide 
for the 4iyN»'^«icii< qf ofUU io mul Olerkt in iJ*e 



^2 



ABSTBAOT- Or PUBLIC luLWS. 



649 



^ <flk€r PwrpoHt, (Maxeh 6> 1802.) 

Ko. 2b. Chap. XXXTin.-^^n ^fl< requiring 
an Oath of AUeffiance and to Wfpdrt Hie OmtH*- 
hOion tffthe VMUd SUUa to be adminitUnd to 
Meuten of American Vtudt ckaring for Jbreigu 
or other Bortt during Me prueni SebeOion. 
(ttsreh 6, 1862.) 

No. 38. CBAP.XXXIX.~^n^c<(9>{^lVie0^y 
JSapulatume wth Banover, $44,947.06 are appro* 
printed to enable the Preaident to fUfil the ttipii* 
lationa in tiie 3d and 4th articles-of the treaty <tf 
Rot. 6, 1861. (March 13, 1862.) 

tto. 37. Ohap. XL^—An Act to make an add^ 
HmoI Article qf Wer» *' AU effleerffer pereons fai 
ttie military or naral eerrioe of the United Statet 
■re profalbfted- from mnployinit any of the tones 
vnder their respectire eommands fto theptttpoee 
of retnmfng ftigitiTee from aerriee or labor, who 
nay liave escaped fttnn any personis to 'whom each 
aerriee or labor is claimed to be dne; and any 
oAoer who shall be fbnnd gnilty by a conrt-mar' 
Ual of Tiolatincr thia article shall be diamiaaed 
from the eeervice.'* (March 13, 1862.) 

No. 38. Cbat, Xll:-^An Act making Apprtgpri' 
atioiufor the LegidaUw, SteaUivey and Judicial 
Macpentes of the €fovemment for the Tear ending 
June 30, 1863, and additional Appropriations fbr 
the Tear ending June 30, 1862. $6,781,021.74 are 
appropriated Ibr 1868, and $283,626^ fbr 1862. The 
P^^dent shall appoint an Aaaiatant Secretary of 
the Interior, at a salary of $3006. (March 14, 1862.) 

No. 30. Chap. 'XSJIl.'^An Act for a Joint Cbm- 
mission fur the Presertation of the Atlan^ Pidt^ 
cries. The Preaident may appoint a commissioner, 
to meet such cominisatoner as may be appointed 
hj .Oraat Britain, and one by France, and $3000 
are appropriated. (March 15, 18^) 

No. 40. Chap. XUT.~-.4n Act to amend ^'An 
Act to inearporate the CbQKmbt'a ^mtituUonfor As 
htstrtuHon of the Deaf and Dumb and thi Mind," 
and to maJbe Appropriations forihe Bei^fUtheret^, 
$13,400 are iq>proprJated. (Mardi 15, 1862.) 

No. 41. CHAP. XL'V.—An Act to authotiu (he 
J^grdiase of Ooin, and for o0ur Purpotes, The 
Secretary of the Treasury may pnrohaae coin with 
any of the bonds or notes of the United States an^ 
thorixed by law, at such rates and upon anch terma 
as he may deem most adtrantageoaa to the pnUic 
Interest; and mayissne oertilicates of indebted- 
ness, such as are anthorlced by act of March Ij 
1802, to anch creditors as may deaire to receive 
the same, In discharge of checks drawn by dis- 
bursing officers npon sums placed to their credit 
on the books of the Tteasnrer, as well as in di8« 
charge of andited and settied acconnts. The de- 
mand notes anthorlzed by the acts of July 17, 
1861, and Teb. 12, 1862, shall be lawfhl mmiey 
and *a legal tender, in like manner as the notes 
anthorixed by act of ?eb. 25, 1862. (March 17, 
1862.) 

Ko. 42. COAP. XLXl.'^An ' Ati tuthariting 



jnostUMo isamin MsM^fmdHomef OMm» agmUm 
the UnlUi ataies far Lands etUd bg Oieltkwahis^ 
the Las Orm^^fos and La Jfama CfrantSt m the 
suae qf Louisiana, (Mahdi 17, 1862.) 

No. 43. CteAV. XLYIL—An Actio provide for 
tfu Appointment of SuUereinihe VcHunteer Service, 
and to d^^ their Duties, Prorision is made as to 
the list of articles to be aold by sntlers^ frosa whicb 
all inteticating liquors are to be exdnded, and as 
to the regnlatien of pricea bythe olBcera cf bri- 
gadea or r^^fanente. A antler shall be -sdeoted 
by the co&wuaaioned eAeeva of > each regidMnt, 
anl no peieon ahaU be sutler finr more than one 
re^ment. No totler ahaU sell to an eniiated man 
on credit in any month to a sum exceeding- ona* 
iburth of his numthly pay, ner be- allowed a lien 
on more than one-sixth ef the monthly pay of 
officers or prirates^ which may be detected by 
the paymaster. No sutler shall flum out of 
naderlet the Imalneaaof sutiing or the privileges 
granted by hia appointment ; nor shall any oS<eir 
recede money or othMr preselbts from a antler,' or 
be in any way interested in his bnstneaa: (Maipeh 
19,1862.) 

No. 44. Chap. XLYin.~-.4A Ad to provide far 
the Appointment qf Obrks in the Oiffke of ihsAS" 
eistant Treattaner ai Boelon^to fimiheir aaktrise, 
and provide far the Absence i^ihe Assistant Treor 
surer, and far other Purposes. (Much 1&, 1868.) 

Na45. Chap. XLIX.«-~>>1« Act to secure to the 
X)gieers and Men «b6tuallg emploged in the ff^fCtm 
DepoMrtmcHli or Department qf Missouri^ their jRiss 
Bousdiest and Ansien. Such pay» btmnties, and 
pension are secured to those whose senrlees hava 
been heretolbre accepted, and who were aotnaUy. 
employed in the military serrlce 1^ the generals 
commanding the departments, whetiier mastered' 
in or not, as they wouM hsTS been entitled to had 
they been mnstwed in. (March 26, 1862.) 

No. 46. Chap. h.-^An Act tofaeiUtaU Judicial 
Proceedings in Adjudications upon captured Pto^ 
pertg, aM far ifte better Admiivistration ef the 
Law if Prise. Prise eommiasionen shall take 
the cvstody of captured property bvonght Inttt 
tfaefr district; and if any is fcfmd to be peviahlng 
or perishable, or deteriorating in valne^ the conri 
may order an interidcntory eale thereof by till* 
United States Marshal) the diaposltion of the pro- 
ceeds to 8#alt the result of the adjddication. Tha 
commisrioners shall receive frem the price mastep 
all the papers and doonmetfts, and at once proceed 
to take testimonyi and the eonrC shall then 
promptly and without nnnecebsary delay proeeed 
to hearing and acljudication. All reasonable and 
prt^er charges, eosts of counsel, Ac, shall be paid 
out of the proceeds of sale, or by the dahnant in 
whole or in part, as the court may direct, where 
the property is restored and there is no sale. 
(March 126» 1862.) 

No. 47. Crap. hJ.-^An Act in addition to an 
Act to r^nd aiad r^emit>the Jetties en Arms 
imported by States, apprOikd JiOg 10^ ISA. • Thi 



n 



250 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[18«3. 



time Ibr which such rtfmisBion may be made Is 
extended to January 1, 1862. (April 2, 1862.) 

No. 48. Chap. LII. — An Act to provide for the 
equitable Settlement of the Accounts of the Officers 
and Orews of the Frigate Congress and other 
VesseU. (April 2, 1862.) 

No. 49. Chap. LIII.— ^» Act to prohibit the 
Allowance or Payment of F^ntions to the Children 
of Officers and Soldierf of the War of the Revo- 
httion. No claim for a pension, or for an increase 
of penirion, shall hereafter be allowed in ftiYor of 
the children or descendants of any such officer or 
soldier, or of his widow, when he or she died 
without haTing Mtablished a claim to a pension. 
(April % 1862.) 

No. 50. Cbap. LIV.--.4n Adtfor the SdeoH of 
certain Persons held to Service or Labor in ffte 
District of Ooitanhia. ^'AU persons held to ser* 
Tice or labor within the District of Oolnmbia by 
reason of African descent are hereby discharged 
and freed of and from all claim to such serrioe or 
labor; and from and after the passage of this act 
neither slavery nor involuntary servitade, except 
for crime, whereof the party shall be duly con- 
victed, shall hereafter exist in said District." All 
loyal persons holding claims i^inst persons dis- 
charged by this act may, withhi 00 days from its 
passage^ bat not thereafter, present sudi claims in 
writing to the commissioners hereinafter men- 
tioned. Three commissioners shall be appointed, 
residents of the District of Colmnbia, any two of 
y/Aiom shall haye power to act, to investigate the 
validity and appraise and apportion the valve in 
money of snch claims ; bnt the entire sum so ap* 
praised and apportioned shall not exceed in (be 
aggregate an amount equal to $300 for each person 
shown to have been so held by lawful claim ; and 
no claim shall be allowed for any slave or slaves 
brought into said District alter the passage of this 
act, nor for any claimed by persons who have in 
any manner aided or sustained the rebellion 
against the Ckrremment of the United States. 
The commissioners shall within nine months 
deposit a fbll and final report of their procesdiogv 
and awards with the Secretary of the Treasury, 
who shall cause the amounts apportioned to be 
paid firom the Treasury of the United States, ex- 
cept in the case of conflicting claims^ in which 
60 days are allowed for filing a biQ in equity. 
11,000,000 are appropriated for the purposes of this 
act, and $100,000 for the colonisEation of such free 
persons of AJMcan descent now residing in said 
District, or liberated by this act, as may desire to 
emigrate to the Republics of Hayti or Liberia, or 
snch other country beyond the limits of the 
United States as the President may determine, at 
a rate not exceeding $100 for each emigrant. 
(April 16, 1862.) 

No. 51. Chap. LV. — An Act to reorganize and 
inertOM the JEffideney qf the Medical Department 
of the Army. (See United States Army.) April 16, 
1662.) 



No. 52. Chap. LVT.— ^n Act to atOhori^e m 
Postmaster' OeneraH to establish Branch Ihtt 
Offices in Cities. He may establish one or more 
branch offices in any city or place which may 
require such additional accommodations ; and one 
cent extra postage may be chained for every letter 
deposited in any branch office to be forwarded by 
mail from the principal office, to be prepaid by 
stamp, and one cent for every letter delivered at 
any branch office, to be paid on deltvery; bat no 
letter shall be sent fh>m the principal office to a 
branch office for delivery contrary to the reufwct 
of the party to whom the same may be addrraeeA. 
The expense of sndi branch service shall sot 
exceed the receipts on account thereof (April it, 
1862.) 

No. 58. Chap. LTU.— ^n Act makinff addi' 
tkmal Appropriation* for the Nawd Service far 
the Year ending June 80^ 1862. $19,88e,aM am 
appropriated, including $18,000,000 for IiqimM 
steam vessels ot war, and $783,294 for tlM oonpis- 
tion of the Stevens Battery at Hoboken, N.J., its 
payment to be contingent upon the sncoeas of said 
vessel as an iron-clad, sealing warnitoamer, and 
the mtmey not to be expended imless the Seeretary 
of the Navy is of oplnioti that the same wiD seem* 
to the public service an efficient steam battny. 
(April 17, 1862.) 

No. 54. <3hap. Lyin.-^» Act nuOkimg Appro- 
priations for the StrtriM of Ms A«£-Q^ee DepiuU 
mtemt during the Fitad Tear ending June ao^ 186S. 
$12,374,800 are appropriated. The preforanee i» 
quired for American ovar ibrelgn stemnstalps la 
forwarding ocean mails in certain cases is dbe* 
lished. (April 17, 1862.) 

No. 65. (3BAP. IdX^An Aet to esteftiu* a 
Branch Mnt ^ <Ae UniML ataJtu at Deumr^ ta 
the Territory of Oolorodo. $75,000 are appm^ni- 
ated for the purpose, and for costs of "¥**«?tinMiiMm 
tillJnne30,1868. (April 21, 1862.) 

No. 56. Chap. LXIIL— An Act rOaUng Is 
Highways in the County qf Wa^vington and IKs- 
trict <if Oblumbia, (Hay 8, 1862.) 

No. 67. C^iAP. LXTL— -An Act to amatd an 
AdteniiUed *<An Ac^ to provide inareoMed Ateenat 
from Imports, to pay TnUrest on the PubUc Ifebt, 
and for other Purposes," approned Aaig, 6, 18SL 
The time for the presentation and settieaaent of 
the claims of States for expenses incurred In nd*. 
ing, fitting out, and finrwarding troops^ as am oflbK 
for taxes, at an abatement of 15 per cent., is «x* 
tended frota. June 30 to July 80, 1868. (Bfay VL, 
1862.) 

No. 58. Chap. LXTII.->An Act to ettaUisk • 
Part of Entry in the OoUeetian Distrietitf Bea^fmt^ 
South CtiraUna. A port of entry and delivery la 
established at or near Hilton Head, to be called 
the port of Port Royal. (May 18. 1862.) 

No. 69. Cbap. LXIXv— An Act to proHde /or 
the Deficiency in the Appropriation far the Af 
of the Two arid Three Tears' Volunteers, and tim 
Qffiioers ami Mv^actuaUy emptied tn iAs H^ 



1863.] 



ABSTRAOlt OF PUBLIC LAWS. 



251 



JOgpartmeHt $30,100,000 are appropriated ibr flie 
year ending Jane 30, 1862. (May 14, 1862.) 

Now 60. Chap. h^X,—An Act to facilitate the 
Ihseharge qf Enbisted Afm for Physical DieaJbaity. 
Xhe medical inspector-general or any medical in- 
spector may discliarge from serrioe^ by oertificAte 
d penenal inspecticm, any soldier or enlifted 
man^ with his consent, in the permanent hospitals^ 
lalKWiag under any physical disability which 
raAkea it disadvantageons to the serrice that he 
be tvtaiiied ttiereln; such discharge to be without 
pc^odioe to claims for pay due at the date thereof. 
(M^ 14, 1802.) 

No. 61. Obap. IXXJ^—An Act to regulate the 
JHtoie of holding the Qmrtt qf the United Slates 
far the ZHsMet of Keatucky, and for other Pur- 
jmer. (May 16, 1862.) 

No. 62. Chap. LXXII.-~^n Act to eitabli^ a 
JkfoHmeHb of AgrieuUwrt. ^ There is hereby 
etlabllalMd at the seat of government of the 
United States a Department of Agriculture, the 
general designs aUd duties of which shall be to 
aequre and to diffuse among the people of the 
lAdted States useful information on sulbgiects con- 
nected with agriculture in the most general and 
oompnbensiTe sense of that word, and to procure, 
propagate, and ^dtetribute among tiie people new 
and ndnable seeds and plants.'* The head of the 
Bepsrtment iihall be a ^ Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture^'* with a salary of $3000 per annum, whose 
doty it shall be ''to acquire and preserve in his De- 
partment «U information conconing agriculture 
iridch fas can obtain by means of books and oor- 
reapondenoa, and by practical and scientific ezpe- 
liments (aocurate records of which experiments 
shall be kept in his office), by the collection of 
statisties, and by any other appropriate means 
within his power; to collect, as he may be able, 
new and Talnable seeds and plants; to test, by 
cultivation, the value of such of them as may 
reqpiiiBsnch tests; to propagate such of them as 
may be worthy of propagation, and to distribute 
them among agriculturists." He shall make 
ammal r eport s , 'and special reports as required, 
have charge of all the property of the agricul- 
tnial division of the Patent Office, and appoint a 
chief clerk at a salary of $2000, and such other 
enipl<9<ees as Congress may direct. (May 15, 
IMS:) 

Not. 63. Chap. LXXIII.— ^n Act to incorporate 
the Wiuhington and Oeorgetown Railroad Oom- 
IMf^f. (Hay 17, 1862.) 

No. 64. Chap. LXXV. — An Act to secure H&mer 
staadm to actual Settlert on the Public Domain. 
Any loyal person who is the head of a family, or 
is 21 yean old, and is a citizen of the United 
States^ or has legally declared his intention to 
become such, or any minor who has served not 
leas than fourteen days in the army or navy during 
the war, shall, from and after January 1, 1863, be 
imtHled to alter one quarter -section or a less 
qaaoMtj of s u rv e y e d and unappropriated public 



lands, upon which he or die may have filed a pre* 
emption claim, or which may at the time be 
subject to pre-emption at $1.25 or less per acre; or 
80 acres or less of such lands, at $2.50 per acre, to 
be located in a body; and any person owning and 
residiog on land may enter other land lying con- 
tiguous, sufficient to make the whole land held by 
him or her 160 acres. Affidavit must be made by 
the applicant before the register or receiver of the 
land office in which he or she is about to make 
such entry, ** that he or she is the head of a &mily, 
or is 21 years or more of age, or shall have per- 
formed service in the army or navy of the United 
States, and that he has never borne arms against 
the Government of the United States or given aid 
and comfort to its enemies, and that such applica- 
tion is made ibr his or her exclusive use and 
benefit, and that said entry is made for the pur- 
pose of actual settlement and cultivation, and not, 
either directly or indirectly, for the use or benefit 
of any other person or persons whomsoever;" and 
upon filing the said affidavit with the register or 
receiver, and on payment of $10, he or she shall 
thereupon be permitted to enter the quantity of 
land specified. But no cerUficato shall be given or 
patent issued therefor until the expiration of five 
years from the date of such entry, when, or at 
any time within two years thereafter, upon proof 
by the person making such entry, or by his widow, 
or his or her heirs or devisee, that he, she, or they 
have resided upon or cultivated such land for five 
years immediately succeeding the time of filing 
the affidavit aforesaid, that no part of such land 
has been alienated, and that he has borne true 
allegiance to the Government of the United States, 
then he, she, or they shall be entitled to a patent, 
if at that time a citizen of the United States. The 
rights of minor children of deceased settlers under 
this act are secured. " No lands acquired under 
the provisions of this act shall in any event become 
liable to the satisfaction of any debt or debts con- 
tracted prior to the issuing of the patent therefor." 
The land shall revert to the Government at any 
time before the expiration of the five years afore- 
said, upon proof that the person filing the affidavit 
has actually changed his or her residence, or 
abandoned the land for more than six months at 
any time. No individual shall be permitted to 
acquire title to more than one quarter-section 
under the provisions of this act. Registers and 
receivers of land offices shall receive the same 
compensation for lands entered under this act as 
under previous laws, one-half to be paid by the 
person making the application at the time of so 
doing, and the other half on the issuing of the 
certificate by the person receiving it. Nothing in 
this act shall be so construed as to impair or inter- 
fere with existing pre-emption rights, persons 
holding which shall be entitled to all its privileges. 
Persons making entries under this act may obtain 
a patent for their land at any time before the ex- 
piration of five years by paying the minimum 



253 



THS NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[186^ 



price thorefor, or the price to ^vhieh it may have 

graduated. (May 20, 1862.) 

No. 65. Chap. LXXYI.— .in Ad making Ap- 
prcpriatioru to reimburse the Cbntingent Ihmd of 
the Office of the Secretary of the Treasury^ includ- 
ing Compensation of additional Clerks tofio may 
be employed according to the Exigencies qf the 
Public Service, and for temporary CUrkSjfor the 
current Fiscal Year and for the Tear ending 
June 30, 1863, and to provide for the EmpJjoyment 
of additional Clerks in the Office of the Assistant 
Treasurer at iS. Zouis. S163,6&0 are appropriated. 
(May 20, 1862.) 

No. 66. Chap. LXXYII.— uin Act to provide for 
the Public Instruction qf Youth in Primary 
Schools ihrougJiotU tfte County of Washington, in 
the District qf Columbiaj without the Limits of the 
Cities qf Washington and Georgetoum. (May 20, 
1862.) 

No. 67. Chap. LXXVm.— u4n Act prescribing 
the Qualification qf IZeetors in the Cities qf Wash- 
ington and Georgetown, in the District of Columbia. 
An otith of allegiance and of preyioua loyalty is 
prescribed for any person offering to vote and 
challenged for disloyalty. (May 20, 1862.) 

No. 68. Chap. LXXIX.— -in Act to provide for 
the Codification and Revision of the Laws of the 
District of Columbia. Three persons shall be ap- 
pointed by the President and Senate for the pur- 
pose, who shall render a final report to Congress 
on or before the first Monday of December next. 
(May 20, 1862.) 

No. 60. Chap. LXXX.— .in Act to authorize the 
Appointmmt af Medical Store- keepers and Chap- 
lains qf Hospitals. (May 20, 1862.) 

No. 70. Chap. LXXXI. — An Act supplem>entary 
to an Act approved July 13, 1861, entitled "An Act 
to provide for the Collection qf Duties on Impttrts^ 
and for other Purposes." Tlie Secretary is further 
authorized to refuse a clearance to any vessel or 
other vehicle laden with goods, Ac, destined for a 
Ibreign or domestic port, ifsthero is satisfactory 
reason to believe that such goods, &c., or any part 
thereof, are actually intended for ports or places in 
possession or under control of insurgents against 
the United States; and any such vessel or vehicle 
departing or attempting to depart without being 
duly cleared or permitted shall be forfeited with 
all on board. In granting a permit or clearance, 
any collector may, in his discretion, require a bond, 
in a penalty equal to the full value of the cargo, 
that the said cargo shall be delivered at its pro- 
fessed destination, and that no part thereof shall 
he used for the benefit of any person or parties in 
insurrection against the United States. The Sec- 
i-etary of the Treasury may prohibit and prevent 
the transportation In any vessel, or upon any rail- 
road, turnpike, or other means of ti'ansportation 
within tlie United States, of any goods, &c, of 
whatever character and ostensible destination, in 
all ca8e.s where there is satisfactory reason to be- 
lieve that they ar« intended for any place in the 



po wo — l on ot mider fhe control of insiiirgMitt 
against the United States, or that Uiere is immi- 
nent danger of their &Uing into the possemion or 
under the codtrol of such insurgents ; and henny 
require security against such disposition of goods, 
Ac. He may estal^lish aU such rules and r^giiUttioiis 
as may be necessary to carry into effect tfaepu^ 
poses of this act. (May 20, 1862.) 

No. 71. Chap. LXXXn.->.in Aet to astlharite 
the Corporation of Georgetown, in the Dittriti qf 
OBlvmbia, to lay and oaUect a Water Tax, and fat 
other Purposes, (May 21, 1862.) 

No. 72. Chap. LXXXin.— ^n Act prwidu^ 
far the BdttcoHon qf Colored ChOdreik in Me OOUm 
nf Washington and Georgetown, District qfCbhtm-' 
bia, and for other Purposes. The maoldptf ao^ 
thorities of Washington and Geoi^etown riiall sst 
apart 10 per cent, of the taxes received from psp- 
sons of color in said cities, Ibr the pupose «f ia^ 
tiating a system of primary schools liw ths 6dM»- 
tion of colored children. The trustees of pvUie 
schools shall have custody of the mon^ dsriveA 
from this and other sources for said olijeet, as « 
separate ftind, and shall provide the requisite 
rooms and teachers. (See CSutp. cli.) 

AU persons d color in the District of Ootombia^ 
or in the corporate limits of the cities of Wasb> 
ington and Oeoxgetown, shall be amenable to tbm 
same laws and i^dOnances, be tried fbr offisDOes ia 
the same manner, and if convicted shall be lliMa 
to the same penalty or pojuahment, and no oUier, 
as in the case of free white persons; and aU sots 
or iHurts of acts inc<Niflistent wi^ this act are r^ 
pealed. (May 21, 1862.) 

No. 73. CaAr.l^SXXiy^AnAottoprwideJbt 
the SetfUment qf the Accounts ^f John A. »nifk. 
Clerk qf the Circuit Court attd Criminal Omrt ijf 
Uie District qf Columbia. (May 20^ 1862.) 

No. 74» Chap. hXXXY^An Act to avmmd as 
Act entitled "An Act making A p prcpriaiiotu for 
the Service of tlte Post-Office DepaHmeut dsarv^ 
the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1863," o pp o w w d 
April n,19G!L The appropriation of S8800 in said 
act for additional clwks in the deifd-letter olBoa ia 
made chargeable to the Post-Offlce defldency ap- 
propriation for 1862. (May 26, 1862.) 

No. 75. Chap. LXXXYI.— Am Act to reduae tkt 
Expenses qf the Survey and Sale of the J^MSe 
Lands in tite United States. The fees and 
of surveyors, registers, and receivars are 
lated with reference to the ol^ect stated. Ibe 
Territories of Utah and Colorado shall constitato 
one surveying district, under <duu>ge of the Sar- 
veyor-General of ColcHiudo ; and the survaying dis- 
trict of Nevada shall be united to that of Califorma. 
The privilege of settlement upon ansurveyod 
lands is extended to California, and the pre-eni|^> 
tiou claimant is in all cases required to file his 
declaratory statement witliin three montha fiuat 
the date of the receipt at the district land ottos 
of the approved plat of the township embraoiag 
such pre-^ptio^ settlament ; but the i^rqvisioBS 



1863.] 



ABSTRACT OF PUBLIC LAWS. 



^53 



of this act shall not be held to aathorize the pre* 
emption and Bettlement of mineral lands. Any 
township of land not mineral or reserved may be 
surveyed when the settlers thereon shall file an 
application therefor, and deposit in a proper United 
States depository a sum sufficient to pay for the 
survey; prorided such township is within the 
range of the regular progress of the public sur- 
veys, Ac. (May 30, 1862.) 

No. 76. Chap. XC— Jin Act for tkt Survey of 
Grants or Ciainu of Land. All claims or grants 
of laud in any of the States or Territories of the 
United States, derived from any foreign country 
or QoYernment, shall be surveyed upon the appli- 
cation and at the expense of ihe parties claiming 
or owning the same ; but the yalidity of the title 
to such lands shall not in any way be affected 
thereby, the survey serving oidy as primd facie 
endenoe of the true location of the land claimed 
or granted ; nor shall any such grant be deemed 
incomplete for the want of a survey or patent 
when the land granted may be ascertained with- 
oot a survey or patent. (June 2, 1862.) 

No. 77. Chap. XCl.—An Act to aUow the State 
qf Qil\for7Ua an additional Representative in th4 
9ith Congress. Such additional representative is 
allowed inasmuch as the State appears to be en- 
titled thereto by the census of 1860, which was 
the first census of the State ever reliably taken, 
and ss three representatives have been duly 
elected under such supposition, and as direct 
taxes have been apportioned to and paid by said 
State under the census of 1860. (June 2, 1862.) 

No. 78. Chap. XCII. — An Act aibclisking certain 
CbUedion Districts and reducing Cbmpensation of 
Officers qf Customs in Calif omia. The collection 
districts of Monterey, San Biego, Sacramento, So- 
noma, San Joaquin, and San Pedro are abolished, 
and the same attached to the collection district 
of Saa Francisco; and there shall be an inspector 
appointed at each of the following places : Mon- 
terey, San Biego, Sacramento, Benicia, Stockton, 
and San Pedro. The salaries of the oflBcers at San 
Traoclaco are reduced. (June 2, 1862.) 

No. 79. Chap. XCIII.— -4n Act to prevent and 
punish Fraud on the Fiirt of Officers intrusted 
with the making of Contracts for the Government. 
The Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, 
and the Secretary of the Interior shall cause and 
require every contract made by them or by their 
oflicers to be reduced to writing and signed by the 
contracting parties, a copy of which shall be filed 
by the (Xfflcer making and signing it in the " Re- 
turns Office" to be established in the Bepartment 
of the Interior, as soon as possible after the con- 
tract is made, and within 30 days, together with 
all bids, offers, and proposals to him made by per- 
sons to obtain the Kune, and also a copy of any 
advertisement he may have published inviting 
bids, offers, or proposals for the same; all to be 
attached together by a ribbon and seal, and num- 
bered, and the cc^y of contract having aflBxed an 



affidavit by the person making the return that ft 
is an exact copy, that the contract was made with- 
out benefit or advantage to himself or allowing 
such benefit or advantage corruptly to the other 
party, and that the papers accompanying include 
all those relating to the said contract. Falsely 
swearing to such affidavit shall subject him, on 
conviction, to all the pains and penalties of per- 
jury; and every fidlure to make return as re- 
quired, if not unavoidable, shall be a misdemeanor 
punishable by a fine of not '.less than $100 or more 
than $500, and imprisonment for not more than 
six months. The Secretary of the Interior shall 
immediately provide a suitable apartment in his 
Bepartment, to be called the "Returns Office," 
within which to file the returns required by this 
act, and appoint a clerk for the same at a salary 
of $1200, who shall file all returns made to said 
office so that the same shall be of easy access, 
filing all returns made by the same officer in 
the same place, numbering them as they are made 
in numerical order. He shall keep an index-book 
of said returns, to be submitted to any person 
desiring to inspect it; and he shall also ftirnish 
certified copies of said returns to any person pay- 
ing for such copies at the rate of five cents tar 
every hundred words, which shall be evidence in 
all prosecutions under this act. The Secretaries 
aforesaid shall furnish every officer authorized by 
them to make contracts on behalf of the Govern- 
ment with a printed letter of instructions con- 
formable to this act, with blank forms of con- 
tracts, Ac. (June 2, 1862.) 

No. 80. Chap. XCIV.— ^n Act to estaUish a 
Land Office in Colorado Territory, and for other 
Purposes. All lands belonging to the United 
States to which the Indian title has ,been or shall 
be extinguished, shall be sul\ject to the operations 
of the pre-emption act of Sept. 4, 1841 ; but when 
unsurveyed lands are claimed by pre-emption, 
notice of the specific tracts claimed shall be filed 
within six months after the survey has been made 
in the field; and all right to such tracts shall be 
forfeited on failure to file such notice, or to pay 
for the same within twelve months after filing it. 
A new land district is established for all the 
lands in the Territory of Colorado to which the 
Indian title is or shall be established. The gri^ 
duation act of 1854 is repealed. (June 2, 1862.) 

No. 81. Chap. XOY.— An Act to establish certain 
Post SouteSf and for other Purposes. (June 2, 
18C2.) 

No. 82. Chap. XCYI.— .<4n Act to authorise the 
President of the United States to appoint Diploma- 
tic Representatives to the Republics of Hayti and 
Liberia^ respectively. Each of such represents^ 
tives shall be accredited as Commissioner and 
Cousul-General, with compensation according to 
the act of August 18, 1856; but the annual com- 
pensation of the representative at Liberia shall 
not exceed $1000. (June 5, 1862). 
No. 83. CKAP.XCyn.— An Act supplemental to 



254 



THE NATIONAL ALMANAC. 



[1863. 



'^An Ad granting iht Bight qf Way to the State 
of Miuourit and a Portion ofVu Public Lands to 
aid in the Cbnttruction qf certain Railroad* in 
said Statey" approved June 10, 1852. The time for 
the completion of tlie road *' from the city of St, 
Louis to such point on the western boundary of 
said State as may be designated by the authority 
of said State,*' is extended for ten years from June 
10, 1862; at the end of wliich time, if the road 
shall not be completed, the said lands shall revert 
to the United States. (June 5, 1862.) 

No. 84. Chap. XC\UI.—An Act for the CkH- 
lection qfdired Taxes in Insurrectionary Districts 
within the United StaieSy and for other Purposes, 
When the act of Aug. 5, 1861, <* to provide in- 
creased revenue from imports," Ac levying direct 
taxes, cannot be peaceably executed in any State 
or Territory or any part tnereof by reason of in* 
surrection therein, the said tax, and, in addition, a 
pen^ty of 50 per cent, of such tax, shall be charged 
proportionally upon all parcels and lots of ground 
in the same, except such as are legally exempt, 
according to the last assessment and valuation in 
such State or Territory previous to Jan. 1, 1861, 
or. if that cannot be procured, a valuation made 
for the purposes of this act ; and after proclamation 
by the President, on or before the first day of July 
next, declaring in vhat States and parts of States 
said insurrection exists, the said direct tax and 
penalty shall become a lien on the said lots or 
parcels of ground, without any other proceeding 
whatever. The title to every such piece or parcel 
of land on which the tax shall not be paid within 
CO days after the tax commissioners hereinafter 
named have fixed the amount, shall vest in the 
United States or in the purchasers after sale, in 
fee simple, discharged from all prior claims what- 
soever. 

Three tax commissioners may be appointed for 
each State in insurrection, at a salary of $3000 
each per annum, who shall enter upon their duties 
whenever the military authority of the United 
States sh^l be established throughout any parish 
or district or county of the same, and open one or 
more offices for the transaction of business. They 
shall advertise for sale, in a local newspaper, or, 
if that cannot be done, in a newspaper in the city 
of Washington, for at least four weeks, all lands 
in such district on which the taxes shall remain 
unpaid; and at the time appointed they shall 
cause the same to be sold to the highest bidder 
£>r a sum not less than the taxes, penalty, and 
costSi and 10 per cent, per annum interest on said 
tax, payable in coin, treasury notes, or certificates 
of indebtedness against the United States ; strik- 
ing them off* to the United States at that sum if 
no person shall bid the same or a higher sum. 
But the owner of any such lot of ground, or any 
loyal person having a valid lien upon or interest 
in the same, may, within 60 d:iys after said sale, 
redeem it upon appearing in person before the 
commissioners, taking an oath of allegiance, and 



paying said tax and penalty, with 15 per -cent 
interest from the date of the above-mentioned 
proclamation, and the expenses of sale and sub- 
sequent proceedings. Such lands belonging to a 
minor, a person of unsound mind, Ac, may bo 
redeemed within two years. If the original owner 
shall at any time within one year prove to the 
satisfaction of the commissioners, or, if they have 
ceased to act, of the district court, that he has not 
taken part in the insurrection since the passage 
of this act, and has been unable by reason c/t snoh 
insurrection to pay the tax or redeem the lend 
within the time above prescribed, he shall be 
allowed further time, not exceeding two yean, to 
redeem; but the United States or the purchaser 
may contest the claim. The commissioners may 
lease lands struck off to the United States as aUrre 
provided, under specified conditions ; or they may 
sell them, under the direction of Uie Prerident, 
like other public lands of the United States, and 
any purchaser serving in the army, navy, or m»> 
rine, on paying one-fourth part of the purchase- 
money, may have the term of three years In wfaleli 
to pay the remainder. The right of pre-emptloii in 
portions of such lands set apart for the pui^xMS ie 
secm'ed to heads of families residing in the State 
or district where situated, and not the oiwnexB of 
any other lands. 

One-fourth of the proceeds of such sales or leases 
shall be paid to the Governor of tiie State wiMre 
the lands are situated, when the insurrection shall 
be put down, and the people shall elect a loyal 
legislature and State officers, for the purpose of 
reimbursing the loyal citizens of said State, or 
such other purpose as said State may direct; sad 
another fourth as a fund to aid in the colonizatioB 
from said State of any free person of African 
descent who may desire to remove to Hayti, 
Liboia, or any other tropical state or colony. 
(June 7, 1862.) 

No. 85. Chap. XCIX.— ^n Act to ineorporaie th€ 
Mount Olivet Cemetery Cbmpany, in the JHstrUt 
qf Columbia. (June 10, 1862.) 

No. 85. Chap. GI.— .in Act to protect the iVo* 
perty of Indians toho have adopted the Bahiit 
qf civilized Life. Any Indian, belonging to any 
band or tribe under treaty with the United Statei^ 
who, desirous to adopt the habits of civilised life, 
shall have had a portion of the lands of his tribe 
allotted to him in severalty, shall be protected 
therein by the agent and superintendent of such 
tribe, by deducting any damage done by other 
members of the tribe from the payment next 
thereafter to be made, and payinfp it over to the 
injured party; and in case the trespasser is e 
chief or head-man, he shall, in addition, be sue- 
pcndod from his functions and emoluments ftir 
three months, or lees, in the discretion of the 
superintendent. (June 14, 1862.) 

No. 87. Chap. Cll. — An Act providing for tht 
Srlection of Jurors to serve in the several fbur:s 
in the District qf Columbia, (June 10, 18C2.; 



1863.] 



ABSTRACT OF PUBLIC LAWS. 



255 



Cutua qf Challenge and prucribing an additional 
Oath/or Grand and JPetii Jurora in United States 
Courts. The causes of challenge defined, and oath 
prescribed, relate to participation in or aiding and 
abetting in any manner any insurrection and 
^rebellion against the United States. (June 17, 
1862.) 

No. 89. Chap. Ciy.->^» Act making Pnvitum 
for raising Property qf the United Slates sunk in 
Ute Waters tJtereqf. The Secretary of the MaTy 
may contract tor the raising of any vessels, their 
armamanta, stores, and equipments^ belonging to 
the United States, and sunk in the waters thereot 
1100,000 are appropriated. (June 17, 1862.) 

Mo. 00. Chap. CY. —An Act to authorise the So- 
crdarjf of the Treasury to change the Names qf 
ttrtain VesseU, (June 17, 1862.) 

Mo. 91. Chap. CYUL^^n Act to direct the Sir 
ortiaryiif the Treasury to issue American Registers 
to certain Vessels, (June 18, 1862.) 

Mo. 02. Chap. CIX.— .in Act providing that the 
Officers qf Volunlars shaU be paid on the Pay Soils 
qf the Meginunts or Companies to which Viey her 
long, Connpany officers shall be so paid except 
when on detached service without troops, oc on 
Isave of absence. (June 18, 1862.) 

No. 93. Chap. GX. — An Act making Appropria^ 
tsensfar Utatal Service on Post Routes establisJted 
at the pretent Session qf Oangreas, $160,000 an 
impropriated. (June 18, 1862.) 

No. 94. Chap. GXI.— ^n Act to secure Freedom 
to aU Ikraons mthin the Jiarritcries qftite United 
States, " From and after the passage of tlys act 
there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary 
scrrituda in any of the Territories of the United 
States now eziating, or which may at any time 
heresller be fonned or acquired by the United 
States^ otherwise than in punishment of crimes 
whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.'* 
(Juno 18, 1802.) 

So. 96. Chap. CXO^-An Act to change the Lo- 
cation qf the Port of Entry for the Puget Sound 
CbOeetUm XHstricL It is changed from Port Town- 
sand to Port Angek». (June 10, 1862.) 

No. 9& Chap. CXYI.^^n Act to change the 
Ihrt ^ Entry far the District qf Brunswick^ Geor- 
gia. It ia chai^;ed from Darien to Brunswick, but 
a deputy collector shall be appointed to reside at 
Darien, to exercise such powers as the Secretary 
of the Treasury may prescribe. (June 20, 1862.) 
No. 97. Chap. CXIX.— ^n Act to provide Inter- 
not Rtvemte to support the Government and to pay 
Interest on the Public DAt. (See £xcise Tax, p. 
000.) (July 1, 1862.) 

No. 96. Chap. CXX.— ^n Act to aid in the Con- 
struction qf a Railroad and Telegraph Line from 
the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to 
secure to the Oovemment the Use qf Vie same for 
Piitaif Military, and other Purposes. Walter S. 
Burgess, William P. Blodget, Bei\|amin4I. Cheever, 
Charles Foedlck Fletcher, of Rhode Island; Au- 



gustus fir»wst«r« Henry P. -Hwvmi, Gornelins 8. 
Bushnell, Henry Hammond, of Cotinectictit ; Isaac 
Sherman, Dean Richmond, Royal Phelps, William 
H. Ferry, Henry A. Paddock, Lewis J. Stancliff, 
Charles A. Secor, Samuel R. Campbell, Alfred £. 
Tilton, idhn Anderson, Asariah Boody, John S. 
Kennedy, H. Carver, Joseph Field, Beojamin F. 
Camp, Orville W. Childs, Alexander J. Bergen, 
Ben. Holliday, D. N. Barney, S. De Witt Bloodgood, 
William H. Grant, Thomas W. Olcott, Samuel B. 
Ruggles, James B. Wilson, of New York ; Ephralm 
Blardi, Charles M. Harkw, of New Jersey ; John 
Edgar Thompson, Benjamin Haywood, Joseph H« 
Scranton, Joseph Harrison, George W. Cass, John 
H. Bryant, Daniel J. Morell, Thomas M. Howe, 
William F. Johnston, Robert Finney, John A. 
Gr^n, £. R. Myre, Charles F. Wells, Junior, of 
Pennsylvania; Noah L. Wilson, Amasa Stone, 
William H. Clement, S. S. L'Hommedieu, John 
Brough, William Dennison, Jacob Blickinsderfer, 
of Ohio; William SI. McPherson, R. W. Wella, 
Willard P. Hall, Armstrong Beatty, John Corby, 
of Missouri ; S. J. Hensley, Peter Donahue, C. P. 
Huntington, T. D. Judah, James Bailey, James T. 
Ryan, Charles Hosmer, Charles Marsh, D. 0. Mills, 
Samuel Bell, Louis McLane, George W. Mowe, 
Charles McLaughlin, Timothy Dame, John R. 
Robinson, of California; John Atchison and John 
D. Winters, of the Territory of Nevada; John D. 
Campbell, R. N. Rice, Charles A. Trowbridge, and 
Ransom Gardner, Charles W. Penny, Charles T. 
Gorbam, William McConnell, of Michigan; Wil- 
liam F. Coolbaugh, Lucius H. Langworthy, Hugh 
T. Raid, Hoyt Sherman, Lyman Cook, Samuel R. 
Curtis, Lewis A. Thomas, Piatt Smith, of Iowa ; 
William B. Ogden, Charles G. Hammond, Henry 
Farnum, Amos C. Babcock, W. Seldon Gale, Ne- 
hemiah Bushnell, and Lorenzo Bull,' of Illinois; 
William H. Swift, Samuel T.Dana, John Bertram, 
Franklin S. Stevens, Edward R. Tinker, of Massa- 
chnsetts ; Franklin Gorin, Iiaban J. Bradford, and 
John T. Levis, of Kentucky; James Dunning, 
John M. Wood, Edwin Noyes, Joseph Eaton, of 
Maine ; Henry H. Baxter, George W. Collamer, 
Henry Keyes, Thomas H. Canfield, of Termont; 
William S. Ladd, A. M. Berry, Beigamin F. Hard- 
ing, of Oregon ; William Bunn,Junior, JohnCatlin, 
Levi Sterling, John Thompson, Elihn L. Phillips, 
Walter D. Mclndoe, T. B. Stoddard, £. H. Brod- 
head, A. H. Virgin, of Wisconsin ; Charles Paine, 
Thomas A. Morris, David C. Branham, Samuel 
Hanna, Jonas Yotaw, Jesse L. Williams, Isaac 0. 
Elston, of Indiana; Thomas Swan, Chauncoy 
Brooks, Edward WUkins, of Maryland; Francis 
R. £. Cornell, David Blakely, A. D. Seward, Henry 
A. Swift, Dwight Woodbury, John McKusick, 
John R. Jones, of Minnesota ; Joseph A. Gilmove, 
Charles W. Woodman, of Now Hampshire ; W. H. 
Grimes, J. C. Stone, Chester Thomas, John Kerr, 
Werter R. Davis, Luthor C Challiss« Josiah Miller, 
of Kansas; Gilbert C. Mouell, and Angnstiis 
Kouutz, T. M. Marquette, William H. Taylor, Alvic 



256 



THB STATIONAl^ ALMANAC 



[t88& 



0aiiBd«ri^ of NMrnuika; John "Rrm^t of Oolonido; 
together witli Ave commiisioners to b« appointed 
by the Secretary of the Interior, and all pwsonB 
who shall or may be associated with them, and 
their snccesBorg, are created a body politic and 
corporate, by the name of "The Union Pacific 
Bailroad Company," with power to locate, con- 
struct, and maintain a continuous railroad and 
telegraph ftom a point on the lOOtb meridian of 
longitude west Arom Oreenwich, between the south 
margin of the valley of the Republican River and 
the north margin of the valley of the Platte River, 
in the Territory of Nebraska, to the western 
boundary of Nevada Terrltcry. The ci^iltal stodc 
shall consist of 100,000 shares of $1000 each, to be 
subscribed tar and held in not more than 200 
shares by any one person. The corporators shall 
be called the Board of Ck>mmiBsk>ner8 of the Union 
Pacific Railroad and Telegraph Company, and -25 
shall constitute a quorum. Their first meeting 
shall be held at Chicago. 8o soon as two thou- 
sand shares shall be subscribed, and $10 per 
^lare actually paid, a meeting of the subscribers 
shall be convened, who shall elect not less than 
thirteen directors, each of whom shall be a bona 
Jde owner of at least five shares; and two 
directors shall be appointed by the President 
of the United States, who shall not be stock* 
holders. 

The right of way through the public lands is 
granted to the company, to the extent of 20O feet 
on each side, Including all necessary grounds for 
stations, Ac, together with the right to take from 
the public lands ac^acent any materials needed 
for construction; and the United States shall ex- 
tinguish as rapidly as may be the Indian title to 
the lands required. Every alternate section of 
land Is also granted to the company, to the num- 
ber of five per mile, and witliln the limit of 
ten miles, on each side of the road, not otherwise 
disposed of at the time the line of the road is 
definitely fixed,~«all mineral lands being reserved, 
excepting the timber they may contain. When- 
ever commissioners appointed for the purpose 
shall, after ' inspection, report to the President 
that 40 consecutive miles of such road are com- 
pleted in all respects equal to a first-class raUroad, 
the rails and all the other iron used to be Ame- 
rican manufkcture of the best quality, patents 
shall issue for the said lands to that extent; and 
so for each 40 miles completed. The Secretary of 
the Treasury shall also issue to the company 
$16,000 per mile in 6 per cent, bonds, payable in 
80 years, on this completion of each 40 miles, to 
secure the repajntnent of the principal and inte- 
rest of which, they shall constitute a first mortgage 
upon the whole line of the railroad and telegraph 
and all their appurtenances; and, in default of 
payment of any part when required, the Secretary 
of the Treasury may take possession of the whole 
of the road and remaining lands of the company 
for the benefit of the United States. These grants 



•re made on ooodMofr tlMt tte oompMiy *riMU 
pay said bonds at maturity, and shall keep said 
railroad and telegraph in repair and use, and that 
the government shall at all times have the pre* 
ference in the use of the same, at rates of com* 
pensation not exceeding those paid by privalv 
parties; and all such compensation AaXi be up' 
plied to the payment of said bonds and interest 
until the whole amount bf paid. 

Said company shall file their assent to thJe asl^' 
under their seal, in the Department of the Interioc; 
within one year from Its passage, and shall mm- 
plete said railroad and telegraph before July t^ 
1874; and within two years they shall dwiipiafs 
the general route of said road, as near as vuky b% 
and file a map of the same in the Department «f 
the Interior. The p<rfnt of commencement fdiall 
be fixed by the President of the United 8tat« 
alter actual surveys, and the Mne shall run thence 
westerly upon the most direct, central, and ptae- 
ticiU)le route, to connect with the line irf tbe Qtaf 
tral Pacific Railread Compuiy of California. 

The same terms and conditions are granted te 
the Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western RaitaiMd 
Company, for oonstructingandlroad and tdegraph 
line ft-om the Missouri River, at the moutlk at ihe 
Kansas, to the point of comnencemmt ofthePaetti 
Railroad; to the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railnatf 
Company, for a Une of 100 mfles to connect wiCh 
the former; and to the Central Pacifle Bafl rorf 
Company of California, from a point at or near 
San Francisco, or the navigable water* of flke 
Sacramento ■ River, to the eastern booadaiy ef 
Califoniia. The flrs^named Company shall ooos- 
plete 100 miles of its road from the Kansaa Rleir 
within two years alter filing tiielr asaant to Oft 
act, and 100 miles per year thereafter till tte 
whole is done; and the lastvamed ehaH eompiete 
50 miles within two years, and 60 mliea pei 
thereiAer. Alter the completion of their 
thity or either of them may unite with ttw UaioB 
Pacific Railroad Company in flnlriiinif tha Hue to 
California; and the Hannibal and St. Joseph Rail- 
road, the Pacific Railroad Company of Mtsaovrl, 
and the Union Padfic Railroad Company, or eitkar 
of thein, may unite with the Kansas Company In 
constructing its line, all upon the aboremei^ 
tioned terms. Either the Union Compaajr er tb» 
California Company (in the former case wrilli Ike 
consent of the State of California) may conOnve 
its line on the route of the other. In omo Ita &mm 
shall be first finished, until the roads connect. 

For the most difficult and mottntalmma paste 
of thsToad the bonds Issued shall be trebta, and 
for the intermediate section between tbe Rocky 
and Sierra Nevada MountiUns double, tbe i 
above specified, and on the completion of 
miles; but the whole amount issued Aall net 
exceed $50,000,000. The track upon the entto* 
line of railroad and branches shall be of imiftrm 
width, and fhey shall all be operated as om 
nected, continuous line. The Union Fadfle 



lawL] 



A3STilAe7'O9'P0BUO hJiWS. 



25T 



»» 



•t thft i»t* of 
itt tiM flnt two years imd IW voBm per 
r, » fltngle nilroAd and telegraph 
liiM from eome point on the western boundary of 
Iflnm, to bo fixed by tbe President, connecting 
VIA tk» main line on the 100th mertdian; and 

le to Siou City wfatfn^ 
-ttMrsi^hall be a railroad oomj^ted through. 
Iowa to that point All or any of 
aa ndlmad eompaoies named and assenting to 
ityCons themselTes into one oiMuolidated 
VtorUkta is made far ftrfiiiture to the 
Qbttsd States of the roadS) or so hinch m may be 
uumplotwl, te ease of fidlnre to comply with the 
tanne «C ibm aat, or to oemplete tbe whole by 
My 1,1870; and V per oent. of the bonds tor the 
•astern and western ends of the roads, and U per 
oMtoftk^reinaiAder, shall be reserved as » gna- 
laatesw WhmMVier the net earnings of the entfare 
raad and telegraph shall exceed 10 per cent sf the 
osrt, esclasiveof the 5per cent, to be psld to the 
Vaited-Slataa, Oongreas may ledaee the rates (rf 
tee, if nnreaoonaWe In amo«nt, and fix the same 
^Inr. Thwooaspaniss shall make annual reports 
tatha Becretary of the ftsasary. (July 1, 1882.) 
Ho. 99. Chaf. OXXL-^^is Act duutgimff Ms 
^ t%e Jtmerieamkuat aekooner **Cknrtit 
mmMjff &vpfy :' ( Jnly l, 1802.) 
-KskUOL CHAf. OXXIL^An Act ckangimg the 
Jtmm^tkB AmeHtcmhmU Schoom» '*2ba» Dy«g^ 
m»katt^*IMIpklnJ' (J«lyl,18l&) 
Hb.101. O^tx.CSJOXLr^AmAcltopronUkfar 
€fmmlndiam Jftaiin OtkamatB 
(Jiriy 1, 1868.) 
liOLltt. CBAf.CXXIY^-^AnAetfortkeSditf 
«fWia£amB.JMkl4mdather$, (July 1, 1802:) 

JfotlOa. Cbap. CXX¥.p-^n Actio ineorporate 
(be OmaHUmm SocUtf ixmilrtfarm Jwetmik Of^tmS^ 
envtmtBii0nel4(fCUumhta. (Joly 1, 1882.) 

H«L lOi. Chap. GXXYL^Am Aet to prntiA and 
p t wu i t tke Prateli»^ I^)l9gmmiy{nthe IkrritaHa 
•fibs OWtad AslBS ami sOer fkuu, and ditap* 
I mmd ammtMing oatain Aatt 6/ the Ltgi^ 
^ Uu Ifemitersr <{f maJu The 
F, ai defined, in a Tntitory or othM> 
vttUn the exclaaiv^e Jnrfsdietion of th« 
United -Btatea, eiiaU be punished by a fine not 
exieeedin|;S500, and by imprisonQient for a term not 
exeeediag five years. Certain epedfledotdinanees, 
aad all other acts of the legisUtire assembly of 
the Tecfitocy of Utah, ace disapproTed and an> 
•nlled-aiyfiv as they establish, proteet, or eonnte- 
aaaoe * Ae pr ac t ic e of poIygMn^', evaaiTely ealltfd 
opirttnal marriage^ howerer disguised by legal or 
scrfemnlties, saeraments, ceremonies^ 
other contrivances." No corpo> 
fbr religious or charitable 
porposso shall acquire or hold real estate in any 
Territory of a greater trIuo than $60,000, Mid any 
exe«os ahan be Ibrfisited to the United States; 
but existing Testod ri|^ta shaU not be Impaired. 

(j«Jiri,iM>.) 



17 



Ko.aOfi. QXXra^'-'AmAtiiapmfUefifrad^ 
dttUmtd Medieal Officen qfthe roUmiatr Senriee, 
(/i»|y % 1882.) 

No. 100. CoAr.CXXYUI^^AnAcHojntacribB 
<M Oath qfqghe,amd for ether J\trpo$e». Here- 
after every person elected or appohrted to any 
<rflloe of honor or profit under the government of 
the United States, either fai the civil, military, or 
naval departments of the public service^ except 
the President, shall take and subscribe the follow- 
ing oath or aflirmation:— ^I, A. B., do solemnly 
swear (or affirm) that I have never voluntarily 
borne arms againet the United States since I have 
beea a citiien thereof; that I have Toluntarily 
given no aid, countenance, connad, or encourage* 
ment to persons engaged in armed hostility there- 
to; that I have neither sought, nor accepted, nw 
attempted to exercise the lunctions of any ofllce- 
whatever, under any authority or pretended an« 
thori^ in hostility to the United States; that I 
have not yielded a voluntary support to any pre* 
tended government, authority, power, or oonsti- 
tntien withhi the United States, hostfie or inimical 
thereto. And I do farther swear <or affirm) that^' 
to the best of my knowledge and abiUty, I vriU 
siqyport and defend theConstitatkm of the United 
Statesagainst all enemies, foreign and domestic; 
that I will bear trtie fldth and allegiance to th» 
same; that I take this obligation freely, without 
any mental reservntioii or pnrpose of evasion ; and 
that I will well and folthftilly discharge the duties 
of the office on which I am about to enter, so 
help ms Ood." Said oath, so taken and signed, 
shall be preserved among the files of the court, 
home of Congress, or Department to which ths 
said oflloe may appertain ; and any person foisely 
taking it shall be guilty of pei^uty, and, hi addt* 
tion to the penalties new prescribed for that 
oflence, shall bedsprlved of hisoffiosand rendered 
incapable fcwenrSr after of hoMilig any ofllee ot 
place under the United States. ( Jaly 2, 1882.) 

No. 101. GSAP. GXJOX^An. AH to esteUisfc a 
LandDiatrkt m the TetrUorv ^Nevada, umdfar 
other Ptarpetet. (July 2, 1882.) 

No. 108. Ohak CXJOL-*An Ad dswsh'jy 
PiMkLaaedtto As anwrsl Aofes omI abrtfories 
vMdkma9sm»ridt<Mefft9/orthitBem^itfAgfri' 
emUu^ cmd the Meditmte Arte, An aSEMmnt of 
pnbUe land is gnnted toeach State, for the pup* 
poaesof this act, equid to aO,tN)0 acres iir each 
SeoBtsr and BepresentsitiTe in Congress to which 
such State is entitled under the apportionment 
of lao^tobeseleoted fttxn the public Uufd with* 
In -the Stale sul^ett to sale at fl^ per acre^ 
if there be anflldent,.and if not, then the Stats 
to receive land scrip for the requisite amount; 
said scrip to be Md by the State, and the proceeds 
applied to the uses prescribed in this act, and no 
other. In no case shall ai^ State locate its land 
scrip under this aet^ in any other State or Terri- 
tory, but its assignees msy locate it upon any 
naapproprlatsdfautd of the United States sul^^ 



m 



THIS NATIOl^AL AtMAKAG. 



[1863 



to entry At $1:25 or legs per ftor*, pf ovided that 
not more than one million acres shall be located 
)n any one of the States; and no snch location 
shall be .made before one year -Arom the passage 
of this act. All expenses incurred nnder this act 
shall be paid by the respectiye States, and all 
moneys derived from the sale of said lands or land 
scrip shall be Invested in suitable stocks yielding 
not less than 5 per cent, upon their par Tslue, to 
remain a perpetual fund, *^ the interest of which 
shall be inviolably appropriated ... to the endow- 
ment, support, and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without 
ti;kclnding other scientiflc and classical studies, 
and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the 
legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and prac- 
tical education o)" the industrial classes in the 
several pBrsnits and professions in life.'* The 
grant shall be made on the following conditions : 
1st. If any portion of the ftind shall in any way 
b6 diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by the 
dtate, so that the capital of the ftind shall remain 
Ibrever undiminished, except that a sum not ex- 
ceeding 10 per cent, of it may be expended for the 
purchase of Isjids for sites or experimental &rms; 
imd the annual interest shall be reg^ilarly applied 
to the purposes prescribed. 2d. *<No portion of 
ndd ftind, or of the interest, shall be applied, 
directly or indirectly, under any pretence what* 
aver, to the purchase, ereotion, ' preservation, or 
repair of any building or buildings." 8d% Any 
State accepting the provisions of this act shall 
provide, within five years at least, not less than 
one college as aforessdd, or the grant to such State 
i^hall cease, and it shall pay orer to the United 
States the amount received of any lands pre* 
viously sold; and the title to purchasers under the 
State shall be valid. 4th. An annual report shall 
be made regarding the progress of each college, 
Ac, one copy of which shall be sent to an the 
other colleges, and one copy to the Secretary of 
the Interior. . . . 6th. '*N0 State while in a con- 
Ction of insurrection against the Qovemmeht of 
the United States shall be entitled to the benefits 
Of this act. 7th. No State shaU be entitled to the 
benefits of this act unless it shall sxpfess its 
acceptance thereof by its legislature within two 
years from the ^te of its approval by the Pre* 
Ndent." The Ckivemors of the States to which 
scrip shall be issued shAll report annually to 
Congress all sales made thereof, the amount 
received, and ilie appropriation made of the pro* 
ceeds. ( July 2» 1S62.) 

No. 109. Cbap. CXXXm.'^An Act making 
AppropriationM far the Sufport q^ iht Army far 
the Year ending Jmu 30, 1868, and addiUonai 
Appropriatiatts far the Tear ehdimg Jimt 80, 1862; 
and far tAher I^rpotet, $687,418,346.66 are ap* 
propriated Ibr 1868, and $868^000 fiur 1862. The 



President Biiall not appoliit more thaa 40 nu^oc* 
generals, nor more than 200 brigadier-generals; 
and all acts authorising a greater nomber ars 
repealed. 

No. 110. Chap. CXXIY.— ^n Ad to remgmm 
tAe Navg Jkgpartmml qf the United States. The 
following bureaus are established, and provision 
made for their orgimization and maintenance: 
1, of Yards and Docks ; 2, of Equipment and Ra- 
cmiting; 3, of Navigation; 4, of Ordnance; 5, ai 
Construction and Repair; 6, of Steiam Eng^necs^ 
ing; 7, of Provisions and Clothing; 8, of Median* 
and Surgery. The chiefii of tine bureaus shall ra- 
ceive a salary of $8600, unless otherwise hereto* 
fore provided for by law, hold their odioes for four 
years, and have the franking-prlvUege. (July 5^ 
1862.) 

No. 111. Chap. CXXXY.— ^n Act makii^ Ap- 
prcpriationi for the current and tontil^fent JB^ 
pentee itf the Indian I>epartmentf and/orf^fiXUmg 
Treaty Stipulations with various Indian DrOntg, 
for the Tear ending June 80, 1868. $2,063406^ 
are appropriated. (July 6, 1862.) 

No. 112. Chap. CXXXYDI^Am Act to grct^ 
Vie Right of Pre-emption to SftfUn on eertaitn Lois 
in Wisconsin, (July 11, 1802.) 

No. 113. CHA9,CXJOaX^AnActinSaMtim 
to the PM^](fflce Department. The time Ibced fot 
the limitation of suits against the suretSea of 
pbetmastees. shall not be considered as nuiniii^ 
in any State declared to be in insurrectiMk, durii^ 
the time snch insurrectiiHi Jhall oontinoe. A^y 
oath required of those employed in ttie postal 
service in such States may be taken before oitj 
ofiicer, dVil or military, holding a mmmisaion 
under the United States. (July 11, 1868.) 

No. 114. CBAt. CXL^--An Act to earnf into I^ 
feet the Treaty between the VMted Slatet amd her 
Britannic MqjeOyfor the Suppression qf the Afri- 
can Staoc'Trade* The President and Scnato are 
anthoriaed to appoint a judge, and also an arid* 
trator, to reside at New Tcu'k, adso at Sienm Leans 
aAd at the Cape of Good Hope, for the psnpo— 
of said treaty; the judges to be paid at tiie xaSe 
of $2600 per annum, and tiie arbitrator at If e« 
York of $1000, and those at Sierra Laoae ani 
the Cape of Good Hupe of $2000. (July U, 
1862.) 

No. 116. Chap. CXLI.— ^» Act for the BOS^f 
qf the Widows and Orphans q^ the Qfieer^ 
Seamen, and Marinu q^ the V^Ued States tttifs 
**(hiMberlana^and**Qn^fress." The widow* ■■! 
children, or, when there are none, the p areut a «t 
the brothers and sisters, of those lost in tha ** ( 
berland" and ** Congress** shall reoetTa a 
equal to twelve months' pay of their said 
relations, in addition to the pay due at the 
of the loss of said vessels. (July 11, 1SQ2.) 

No. 116. Chap. CXLU.— .^ uic< to otcMorise «a 
additioMd Issue of United States ybtes, andfkr 
other Purposes. The Secretary of the Tk^asmy 
may issue, in addition to the amounts 



M«.3 



AfietRA<nr oir txmhie iaws. 



SS6 



cQiftorltfed, $t5(M)00,0i0O' of ITiilted StatM hoCm, 
wlthoQt interest, payable to bearer at the Trea^ 
ittty of the United States, and of such denomina;- 
tions as he may deem expedient f bat no note 
ihAll t>e issued for the Pactional part of a dollar, 
aiid n6t more than $35,000,000 shall be of lower 
8enominafionB than $5. Such notes shall be a 
legal tender, and recelyable Ibr all dnee to and 
kemimds against the United States except duties 
la imports, and Interest; and they may be ex- 
changed, in sums of $60 or wome multiple thereof; 
l&r B per eeilt. bonds. The amount of temporary 
deposits of United States notes which may be 
received for periods of not less than 90 days, at 
not more than 5 per cent, interest, is increased 
Ib|i00;000,000; and $60,000,000 of the notes au- 
tbprised hj this act shall be reserved and only 
ilksd Tor the payment of such deposits. Certificates 
U deposit and of indebtedness may be received 
dn the same terms as United States notes in ex* 
change fx bonds. $300,000 are appropriated for 
expenses. (July 11, 1862.) 

Na 117. Chap. CXLin.^-4ji Act making 
jMkKT AppropriaUamfor sundry CfivU JBxpentei 
^the Government for the Tear ending Jtme^ 
WS3i,<md addiHonal Appropriationa for the Tear 
mding June 30, I8d2. $006,606 are appropriated 
«^}M3, and $100,544.68 Ibr 1862. (July 11, 1862.) 
. lfo.'il8. Chap. CXLlV^An Act making Ap 
'prmriaiiaru for Ike Fttyment of the Bounty atir 
(fiariudlnf fke sixth Section qfanAet entiOed "An 
Act to outhoriM the Emplojfmeni qf Volunteen to 
Hd di enfmving the Laws and prUecting PuUie 
iVqpeWy," approwd Jtdy 22, 1861, and for other 
Purpo$eM» $6,028,000 are appropriated, including 
$9)00 fiyr expenses of the committee on disloyal 
amployees of the Ck>vemment. (July 11, 1862.) 
'Mo. 110. Chap. CXLy^—An Act to amend an 
Act enHOed *'AnAet to diwide the State qfHUnois 
tmto two Judicici Dittrictc," approved tib. 18, 
1855. Ihe counties of Hancock and UcDonoug^ 
•re transferred from the northern to the southern 
district. (July 11, 1862.) 

No. 120. Chap. CXLYI.— -^n Act concerning 
certain Xtonds hereiqfore granted to the State qf 
kMoti. (July 11, 1862.) 

Ko*. 1^. Chap. CXLTEI.— jln Act to abolish 
mrtainj^rts^ Ddivery in the Mississippi VaOey, 
C|i0 porta of delivery i^boUBhed ar« Hannibal, Mo., 
)|irtr¥**ft" «od Columbus, Ky., Chattanooga and 
Kjf^ojLffll^eiy Tmn., Tuscumbia»- Ala., and Sbreva- 
9o0»lA. (July 11. 1862.) 
^ lio^USL QskAX.GXJ^^mi.-^AnActfortheEsUk' 
tiishment^ iff certain National Arsenals. $300,000 
fu0 ap|iro|irlated to sstaUish arsenala for thedepc^ 
Jit and re|iair of arms and other munitions of war 
at Columtms, O., at Indianapolis, Ind., an^ on Eock 
jalaad, lU. (July 11, 1862.) 

Vq. 123. Chap. CXIJX.— ^n Ad to change the 
J'kicei^hoUUng the Circuit and District Cburts qf 
ih^ VniUd States for the Districtof West Tennessee. 
Thf^ sImU ha h^ in the town of Huntinfldon, 



OuTon county, instead of the town of Jacksoo. 
(July 11, 1802.) 

No. 124. Crap. CI«.— ^n Act to authorise the 
Secretary qfthe Treasury to <qipoint a Deputy Cbi> 
Uetorqfthe (Sultoms at CMncoteague Island, in ttte 
gtaUqf Virginia. (July 11, 1862.) 

No. 125. CRAS.GlSL^An AH relating to SOtocia 
fbr the Education of Odortd Children tn the Citia 
of Waihin^on and Qeorgetownt in the District qf 
Odlumbta. A qiedal board of trustees for sudk 
schools is created. (July 11, 1862.) 

No. 126. Chap. CLIV.— ^n Act to ismend on 
Act entitled ** An Act to aid in the QmstructUm ^ 
a Baikroad and Tdegraph Line from the Missouri 
Biver to the Pac^ Ooeany and to secure to Vu €k^ 
vemment the Use qfthe same fir l^tstaiy MUUaryf 
and other Purposes/* approved Jtdy 2, 1862. Xfa« 
first meeting shall be held at Bryan Hall, Chicago 
on the first Tuesday in September aezt (Jnlf 
1^1862.) 

No. 127. QRkP.CLy.—AnAiitsupflementa$yt$ 
the *^Act for the Bdease qf certain JPltnasu hdd to 
Service or Labor in the, District qf Columbia,** api 
proved April 16t, 1862. Certain regulations ari 
made as to modes of procedure. Persons held td 
service under the laws of any State, who havis 
been or shall be employed in the District ci Colanih 
bia, with the consent of the person to whom such 
labor is claimed to be due, at any time after AprI) 
16, 1862, are declared fi-ee. In all judicial procee<|- 
iogs in the District of Columbia there shall be 
no exclusion of any witness on account of ooloi;,. 
(July 12, 1862.) 

No. 128. CBAr.CLTL^AnActrdaUngiolh»4 
fUnds qf several Indian JYiba invested by th$ 
Oovemment in certain State Bonds abstracted from 
the Custody qf the late Secretary qf the JnUriat, 
There shall be entered on the books <tf the Trea» 
sury Department, in lieu of said bonds, $423,990.2$ 
to the credit of the Delawares, $66,735 to the Iowa% 
and $160,686.76 to the confederate bands of the Ka% 
kasUas, Peorias, Piankeshaws, and Weas,on whicli 
interest shall be paid semi-annuidly at the rate ol 
6 per cent, per annum; and $50,066.64 are appror 
priated for interest due to July 1, 1862. (July 1^ 
1862.) 

No. 129. Chap. CLVH^—Uji Adt to provide fet 
the quitting ^certain Land Titles in the late disf 
puted Territory in the State qf MainCy and fof 
other Iktrposes. $57,340 are appropriated as coni» 
pensation to certain parties for land and timbsf 
lost, in the Saton Grant and Plymouth township^ 
under the provisions of the treaty of 1842 and tho 
diplomatic arrangement of 1882. (July 12, 1862.) 

Naiao. Chap. CLVIII.— ^n -4c* <oiMwide /or 
the FUyment </ Fines and PtnaUies eoUeded by 
or paid the Justices qfthe Peace in the District qf 
Ooiumbia under the AatsqfOmgreuapproved Augk 
8 and 5, 1861, and for oUier Purposes. (July 1^ 
1862.) 

Na lai. e Chap. ChXX^An Act far the Beli^ 
qfthe Register qf th4 Lamd Qfim ol K nsami lt , 



>t60 



THl NATIOVAIi • Al^lf AJf A0^. 



[l«tt. 



IMidiM, tmd for $(her PitrpoMi, (Jiily 12, 
1862.) 

No. IM. Chap. <5LX.— j4» ^cr /or i?eli<f i» tA« 
Land Claim in Ocili/bmia, known at the Claim 
^fFrandaba Sbbfranet to a Trad qfLand known 
as " Sat^jon de SantajRita*' The decrees of the 
diatriet court in fbyor <^ Uie daimant are oon- 
flrmed. (July 12, 1862.) 

. No. 18S. Chap. CLXI.— -An Act eotifirming a 
Zand Claim in the SUOe of lowa^ and for (dher 
Purposes. The grant of lands made in 1846 tor 
the improTement of the Bes Moines River is ex- 
landed so as to include the alternate sections lying 
within five miles of said rirer, between the Rae> 
«oon Tork and the northern boundary of the StatA, 
or their eqniTalent when heretofore dispose^ of; 
•ad a portion of them may be applied to the con- 
■tnietion of the Keokuk, Fort Bes Moines and 
Minnesota Raihroad. (July 12, 1862.) 

No. 134. Chap. CLXIIl.—An Act inereasinff 
Umporarify the Duties on JmportSt and far <Uher 
furpotet, (See " New TariiT," p. 283.) The time for 

Cymeni of duties on goods in public store or 
nded warehouse is extended to one year; and 
Qiej may remain in wacehquse alter piQrment of 
duties, at the expense and risk of the owners. 
Vessels of war of any nation which may recipro- 
flate the privil^e may purchase supplies from the 
public warehouses in the ports of the United 
States duty free. (July 14, 1862.) 

Na 185. Chap. CLXIT.— ^n Act making Appro- 
priations^ for the Havdl Service for the Fear 
mding June 30, 1863, and for other JPurpiues. 
$42,741^6^42 are ^propriated. . Hereafter, when 
fMsible, none but officers of the navy shall b0 
finidoyed in making contiracts for the charter of 
fwsels and the purchase of additional steam* ves? 
■els, and they shall receiTe.no extra compensation 
fbr such service; and when any other person or 
persons are^so employed, the codipensation shall 
Bot ezieeed l&OOO for all contracts for purchases or 
dharters in any one year made under the provisions 
CC this act Fpom and alter Sept 1, 1862, the spirit 
•ation in the navy of the United States shall for* 
#ver cea^,£re CjamtP per day being allowed in lieu 
thereof; and thereafter no distilled liquors shall 
be admitted on board of Tessela of ivar, except as 
medical istores, upon the order and under the con- 
trol, of the medical officers of such vessels, and to 
be Qsed only for medical purposes. Chaplains in 
fb^ nov^ihaUbe not less than 21 nor more than 35 
jears oC age at the time of their appointment. 
She President may annually appoint ten acting 
Hiidshipmen for education at the Naval Academy, 
irho shall be selected from the soim of jofficertr or 
ioldiers, or of officers or men in the naval or ma- 
rine service, who have distinguished themselves in 
ttie servioe of the United States. (July 14, 1662.) 

No. 136. Chap. CLXY^An Act for the Bai^ 
q^ iVe^mptorf on the Home Reservation <^ the 
"Wnnebagosst ^ t-he Blue Earth Region, in the 

(July 14 18«2v) 



No.t8T. Cnkv. (XX^^-^An-Jetio grmd f^si^ 
tions. Pensicms are granted to pereom diaaUei 
by wounds reoeived or by diseaseoontracted In tbv 
military or naval sorvice of the United ■ StatsA 
alter Blareh 4, 1861, as follows for the highest di«» 
ability, and a pnqportionate amount for an ftnferiar 
disability. In the army, whether Mgnlar or 
volunteer, UeutenanlrColonel, and all officers cff m 
higher rank, $30 per month ; mi^or, f25 ; captaiB^ 
$20 ; first lieutenaAt, $17; second lieutenanti^Iif 
non-commissioned, mnsicians, and privates, (8. SI 
the n|ivy: captain, commimder, surgeon, pay* 
master, and chief engineer, ranking vritti 
mander by law, lidutenant commandlnc, 
master comman^i^, $30 per month; Usnt^nuit,' 
surgeon, paymaster, and cldef engineer, nnldng 
with lieutenant by law, and pftssed aasistaaitf 
surgeon, $25.; professor of mathematics maste t^ 
assistant surgeon, aaristant paymaster, and obs^ 
lain, $20; first aaslstant engineer and pilots, $15; 
passed midshipman, midshipman, captain's and 
paymaster's clerk, second and third assistant eik> 
gineer, master's mate, and all waritait otteen; 
$10 ; all othdrs, $8« In t^ase of tike ^toath of an^ 
of tiie pwsons designated from wounds reeelv«i 
or disease contracted in service, his vrifo or «hib> 
firen, or other near relations dependent upon hitt 
for support, shall reoeive the pension to vrUdi ba 
would have bden entitled, under prescribed rsgiH 
lations and restrictions. An agent or «ttenMy 
may charge $5 tor making out and forwarfingA 
claim to the Pension Office and tiie reqnWta ecr> 
respondence, and flJSO Ah: each affldsrfit where «A> 
ditionaltratimonylsreqtdred; and fcraDyfaigta« 
charge or aittempt at extortion he shall bedeeoset 
i^lty of a hi^ misdemeanor, punieiiable by ftab 
or imprisonment, or both. Civil enrgeoiiB naay 
be appointed to make the biennial examkiations 
required by law, the foes for which Mid Ifce requi- 
site certificate shalT be $1.50. The eoBunksiofiar 
shall ftirnish applicants, when desired, all neoe»> 
sary printed instructions and forma. The pnK 
visions of the act are extended to the jtOotB, 
gineers, sailors, and crews upon gunboats and ' 
vessels who have not been regularly mvastiered ints 
service; but no person receiving peusum or bonn^ 
under the proivisicHis of this act shall recaiv« eiUker 
pension or. bounty for any ofber setil et in the 
present war. The Secreta^ of the Intettar abaft 
appoint a special agent to taaist in tfae detectiA 
of frauda against the pttiaion laws. (July 14, 1M&) 

No. 138. Cbap. CLXXIL—An Act estaUisk^ 
certain Post Moods, The bridge eonstmetfaig 
aeross the Ohio BiVer at Stenbenvllle, OUo^ fl 
declared to be a lawfiil stmctnr^ and, witb the 
HolUday's Cove Railroad, a publfc; highway and 
post road, under certain prescribed refiiilatioM 
designed to prevent obstruction to navigatiaB; 
and, under the same regulations, any other raft- 
road company or companies may boild a brtdgs 
across said river, above the month of the Hg 
Sandy, with tba same privilfligMk Ut^ 14 1881) 



ia»] 



ABS^BAOI OF fUBXilC hAMS. 



SBt 



Jd wHUtd **An Adk fo pmhihil the OaU (^ tpi- 
witttotu^ lAqwfn nnd intoaOoatinff JDrinkt in the 
BiMtrki pf (Mumhia in certain CaMs," approved 
Jtiug. 6, 1861. The proTirion» against the sale of 
■neh liqnoni to aoldien or Tolctnteers aro made 
wore stringent. (July 14» 1862.) 

Mo. 140. Chap. GLXIX.--^f» AA to fwrther 
pnvidA far the OoUectian of the Mevenue upon 
tlt^ Northern, Northeastern, and Norihvettem 
Jhrmtier, and Jbr other Piurpou9>. (July 14» 1862.) 
. Ho. 141. Chap. CLXX.— ^n Act in relation fb 
Oe JSleetion qf BepreeentaHvei to Cbngrtu by tin- 
fie Ditbrkie. All BepresentatiTeB shall be elected 
\tj single districts composed of contiguous terri- 
kny, except in the elections for the 38th Congress 
ta CaUfinmia and Illinois^ in the latter of which 
the additionoal Bepresentative may be elected by 
t|M» State at large. (July 14, 1862.) 

No. 142* Chap. GLXXI.— ^n Act to establith 
§tUtitioiua wHwt Eouiea. (July li, 1862.) 

Ko. 148. Cbap. CLXXII.— ^n Act coneeminff 
ike Cburte qfthe United States in and for the Dis- 
trUiiif Michigan. In addition to tiie courts now 
provided by law in sud district, a general term 
of the Cbrcnit Conrt shall be held annually at 
Hetroit en the second Monday of Febmary. (Jnly 

14,1«68.) 

. lie. 144. Chap. GLXXIII.— ^n Actio extend the 
iaritorialLi'mUsof the Tarritory of Nevada, The 
•Alition is comprised within the following limits : 
«.Beginniikg at the point of intersection of the 42d 
4ig)ree of north latitude with the 88th degree of 
lOBgitode west from Washington; thence running 
Math, on the said 38th degree of west longitude 
Stttil it intersects the nortliem boundary line of 
Hew MezSoo; thence due west to the 39th degree 
cC longUude west from Wadilngton ; thence with 
Hud 39tii degree north to the intersection 'of the 
mid 4M degree of north tatitudei; thence east 
with the said 42d degree of north latitude to the 
^lace of Iwginning." (July 14, 1862.) 

No. 146. Chap. CLXXIV.— -4n Act for changing 
the Place for holding the September Term of the 
JKstrict Cburt of the United States in the District 
of Maine. It shall hereafter be held at Bath, in* 
stewlof Wiscasset. (July 14, 1862.) 

No. 146. Chap. CLXXYr-^in AiA repeating the 
Law roqutring Bonds qf Paymasters and Assist 
ant Bsgmasters to be approved by the Jiidge or 
Attorney €^ the District ^ tolUch such PoBymatter 
or AMsidaMt Psiymaster shaU reside. The Secre- 
tary of the Navy may accept any bond ti-om such 
«fllcor whieh be may deem satisCactory and suffi- 
cieot. (Jnly 14, 1862.)- 

No.147. Ctur.ChXXVJI.^An Acttoauthorise 
the Seerttarynfthe Navy to accept ffte TtUetoLeague 
bland, in the Ddawctre Bwer, for NosoaSL Pur- 
poses. He may accept such title ftmn the city of 
Pbiladeli^ii% if deemed desirable for the public 
iacarfjots by a board of officers to be i^pointed by 
lrt» ft^r the purposes Imt, beftirs teporting, Mid 



board shall examine the harbor of New tondoa, 
Conn., and the waters of Narrngansett B«y,'with ' 
relbrence to their capacity and fitness ftst ViSm^ 
establishment of a naral d^pot and nary-yard in 
preference to said League Island. (Jirfy 16, 1862.)> 

No. 148. CffikP. CL2CXTIII.— ^rt Adtto oiUkJtnM 
the Act ofMarth S, 1837, entitted **An Ad tfipfiih 
mentary to the Act entitted *An Ad to amend iht' 
Judicial System of the mitedStctttls:^ The terH> 
torlal limits of several circuit courts are modtfle4 ' 
(See JiTDicuBT, p. 220.) (July 16, 1861) 

No. 149. ' Chap. CLXXIX.— i4fi Act to extend the 
Provisions of the Act of Aug. 4, 186^ entitled Mii' 
Act to grant the Right of Way to aU Salt and 
Plank Roads, rfc.,** far the Term ofjtve Tears, and 
to amend the same. The right of way through th#' 
public lands, fat all rail and plank roads and' tuni> 
pikes, is extended for five years from Aug. 4, 1862L 
(July 16, 1862.) 

No. 160. Cbap. CLXXX.~>tft Aet ti j)r e uai< t 
Members iff Cbngress aiid Officers ^theGoMh^ 
tnent of the United Slates from taking dbnsidei^ 
tionforprocurif^ Cbntracts, Office, orPfJajbe,f^om' 
the United Slates, and far other Pufposes. Any 
member of Congress or officer of the Oevemment- 
who shall, directly or Indirectly, receive or agree to ■ 
receive any valuaUe consideration whatsoever for 
procuring, aiding to procure, or giving any con- 
tract, office, or place from any department or offi- 
cer of the Government, for or to any person ot 
persons whatM)ever, and thie person or irarsons who 
shall, ditectly or indirectly, offer or agree to gtvo' 
such consideration, and any member of Cohgresv 
who shall receive or f^pree to receive any inuAk 
consideration for his action on any matter Mbughl' 
before him in his official capacity, shall be liilblo 
to indictment as for a misdemeanor, and puMA* 
able by a line not exceeding $10,000 and im|Ai^oia> 
ment in the penitentiary not exceeding two'^ean;' 
and any such contract or agreemtot may, at fho 
option of the President, be absolttte1y'uu& ahd 
void; and any member of Congress 'or officer bf 
the United States Convicted of such an offimeo' 
shall, moreover, be disqualified from holding an;f 
office of honor, profit, or trust under the* Oovenp* 
ment of the United States. (July 16, 1862.)' 

No. 151. Chap. CLXXXT.— Jn Act to amendan 
Act entitled *< An Act to crecOe a JHettopoUtan fbUos . 
District of A« DiOirtd of CoMmbia, and i^ eda^ 
hUsh a PoUee ther^or," approved AprU 6, 1B61. 
(July 16^ 1862.) 

No. 152. Chap. CLXXXIIw— ^n Act making • 
supplemental ApprttpriaHons for sundry CVtoH 
Hxpenses of the Government for the Teat ending 
June 30, 1868, andfbr the Tiar endinsg June 30^ 
1862, andfoi^othcr Purposes. $589|438 lire appro 
prlated for 1863^ and 179,066.49 for 1862. (Jnl^ 
16,1862.) 

No. 168. Chap. CIiXXXni.>-^ft Act to ^tiM^ ' 
and equdlite the Orade of Line Offieeri of ihe fMited ■ 
Slates Navy. (See Navt BsPABTHEBrr,' p. 116<) 

(Jiii9»t6»i«n.) 



2BS 



Xlifi ' NATIlONAL> Ai;MASAa 



No. 164. CKtf. GL3;XXIY.*.-ulf» u4£< to oMmd 
imAetMiOled "iln ^ct io/«rtA«r j?roifiofe the Miff^ 
eimey cf the ^Nav^" approved Dea, 21, 1861. ** ThH 
boon at labor and the rate of wagoB of tho em- 
j^iogrees is the nayy-yaords ehaU confisrm, ae nearly 
m ii eonaisteat with the public intereat, witb those 
of pciTate eatablialmieiits in the immediate vicif 
nitj«f the reapeative yards.'' (July 16, 1862.) 

. No. 156i Obap. CSjXXXy.—An Mt iran^erHnff 
the MBtem Otmboat Fleet from the Wur to the 
Nany Department, (July 16, 1868.) . 

. 1(0. IM. Chaf. CaiXXXYL-xjln Mt to wbu>ge 
the Lake Superior Land IHeMct, to the State of 
Mchiffon, (July 16, 1862.) 

^ No. 157. GoAP. OLXXXyjL-^An Act to impoee 
an addUinnal Duty on Sugar* produced in the 
United &ale$. . A duty of iHie cent per pound 
ahall be levied on all aagart produced directly 
from the ragarK»ne, in addition to the dntiea 
IflB^oaad by the act to -proride internal sevenue, 
i^iroTed Jnly 1, 1862; and within States or 
parta of Statea in intnrrectton the dntiea may be 
coUsoted inauch manner and by svch officers as 
the PreaideDt may direct. The proyiaicms of thia 
act .shall not apply to angar manufoctnred from 
aarghnm. (July 16, 1862.) 

Nq.168. CaAr.CUXXXVjn^AnJUtoptmith 
the .firaudulent Sale or Uke qf Pottage Stamps, 
The removal of. the cancelling or de&cing marks 
than postage stamps or stamped envelopes) with 
intent to nae them a second time, or the wUfnl 
nsing, buying, selling^ or offering for sale of anch 
washed or'ieatorad stamps, is declared to be a 
fslony punishable by imprisonment not exceeding 
tluree years, or by fine not exceeding $1000, or by 
both; one-half of such flne to be paid to Ihe iA> 
foamer. (Jnly 16^ 1862.) 

. Na IM. Chap. CLXXXiXr^AnAiA in relation 
to the Cbmpeteney <tf Witneeeee, and for oUur Par* 
poeee* The laws of the State in which the court 
is held .shall be the mles of decision as to the 
oompetaocy of witnesses in the courts of the 
United States^ in trials at common law, in eqnity 
and admii-alty. The provision of the act of Sept. 
9i, 1780, raquirin&in cases punishable with death, 
twelve petit jurors to be summoned firom the 
county where the offence was committed, is re- 
pealed. (July 16, 1862.) 

. Jfo. leOi Chap. CXC.^^n Acit prohibiting ihe 
On^lnemmd ef BarwonMin the MiUtary Service of 
the United States in the Flenitentiary offfie DiHrict 
ef OHnmbiOf exoepi as a Punishment for certain 
OHmcf, and iodisdiarge therefrom certain Qmvict* 
bg Senienoe ^ CburU-Martiaif and for other fWr- 
poses. No person convicted upon the decision of a 
eonrt4iiartM shaU be confined in the penitentiary 
of the Diatiiot of Columbiat or in any penitentlvy 
of the United States, uidess the offence of which 
be has been convicted would by some atatute of 
the United States or at common law, auliject him 
to anch puniahment. (Jnly 16, 1862.) 
No. 161. Chap. CXOy<-~.i» Act 4o ngaprtu k^. 



simnaUmf ii> pmltik Tmamm emd JUbfOioni to 
seise and oot^ueate the Property ofXebeU, andJor_ 
other Purposes. Svery peraon who ahall herealtac. 
be convicted of the cxime of treason agaioat tha. 
United States shall suffer death, or be insprisoi»rd 
for not less than five years, and fined not leaa tbaiv- 
|io,000, and all his slaves, if any, shall be deciaredl 
tnei said fine shall be levied and collected ouu 
any or lUl of the property, real and peraonal^ ex^ 
eluding slaves, of which the person so oonvictieif^ 
was the owner at the time of committing thesajdj 
crime, any sale or conveyance to the contrary 
notwithstanding. If any person shall boKeaftef 
incite or eqgage in, any rebellion or InsurrectiQii.. 
against the United States, or give aid and com-! 
fort thereto,, and be convicted thereof he aball on' 
conviction be. punished hj imprisonment not. 
exceeding ten years,, or by a fine not exceeding 
$10,000, or by both, and by the liberation of a4' 
his slaves if any he have. Any person gniltj at 
either of the offences described in tb^s act ^ball 
be forever incapable and disqualified .to hold aigr 
ofilce under the United States. ,. 

.To insure the, speedy termination of the jjx^nt 
rebellion, it shall be the duty, of the President .of 
the United States to cause the seizure of all tha 
eatf^te and property, of whatever kind* oi tba 
persons hereinafter named, and apply the saxn^ 
and the proceeds thereof to the supper^ of the 
aragr of the United States: that is to say': Ist, of 
any person hereafter acting as an officer of ths 
anpay or navy of the rebels in arms against the 
Government of the United States: 2d, of any 
person .bereafter acting as president, vid^-presl- 
dent, member of congress, Judge of any courts 
cabinet officer, foreign minister, commissioner, or 
coQsnl of the so-called Confisderate States of Ame- 
rica ; 3d, of any person acting as governor of a 
State, member of a convention pr legislature, or 
Judge of any court of any of the so-called Con- 
federate Statea of America; 4th, of aoy peraon 
who, having held an office of honor, trust, or profit 
in the United States, shall hereafter hold an office 
in the so^salled Confederate States of America; 
5th, of any person hereafter holding any oiB/» oc 
agency under the government of the so-called 
Confederate States of America, or under aoy of 
the several Statea of the said confederacy, or the 
laws thereof^ whether such office or agency be 
national, State, or municipal in its name or 
character: Provided, That the perscHia thirdly, 
fourthly* and fifthly above described shall have 
accepted their appc^tment or election alncse ths 
date of Uie pretended ordinance of aeoeaalon (it 
the State, or shall haTe taken an oath of aliegiaocf 
to, (Mr to support the constitution ot, the ao-caHad 
Confederate States;