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Full text of "National ballad and song. Merry songs and ballads, prior to the year A.D. 1800"




wfrus- 

University of California Berkeley 



flberr? Songs ant> Ballade 



NATIONAL BALLAD AND SONG 



Songs anfc 
Ballafcs 



PRIOR TO THE YEAR A.D. 1800 



EDITED BY 



JOHN S. FARMER 



v.-i DUE I 



PRIVATELY PRINTED FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY 
MDCCCXCVH 



INDEX 

TO VOL. I 

AUTHORS, TITLES, FIRST LINES, REFRAINS, 
AND SOURCES 



AKF.ROYDE (S.) 188 

"All Christians and Lay-Elders too" (SIR JOHN BIR- 

KENHEAD, Bagford Ballads, iii. 57). 118 

"All in a greene meadowe" (Percy Folio MS., c. 

1620-50) 82 

"All you that are disposed now to hear a merry 

jest" (Roxburgh Ballads, iii. 1 66) 89 

"Aminta one Night had occasion to Piss" (Pills 

to Purge Melancholy, 1707) 2O2 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys (Refrain) 5 
Ane Pleasant Garland of Sweet Scented Flowers, 

(1835) 37 *75 277 279 

'As Damon late with Chloe sat" (S. BOLTON, 1720) 228 

"As honest Jacob on a night" (b. 1796} 257 

"As I lay musing all alone" (c. 1707) 189 

"As I lay on my lovely bead" (LAURENCE PRICE, 

c. 1654, Roxburgh Ballads, iii. 226) 105 

"As I sat at my Spinning Wheel " (Pills to Purge 

Melancholy, 1707) 180 

IY SONGS i. 



282929 



vi INDEX 

"As I was riding by the way" (Percy Folio MS., 

c. 1620-50) 71 

"As I was walking I cannot tell where " (Rawlinson 

MS., c. 1610-50) 37 

"As I went o'er yon misty moor" (Pills to Purge 

Melancholy, 1707) 188 

"As I went to Tottnam" (Choyce Drollery, 1666) 109 
"As Lady Jane devoutly wise" (1766, DURFEY THE 

YOUNGER) 251 

"As Oyster Nan stood by her tub" (c. 1705) . . 177 

As she lay sleeping in her bed (Tune) 105 

"As the fryer he went along" (Pills to Purge Me- 
lancholy, 1707) 197 

Auld cripple Dow, The ^Tune) 257 

Ay res by ALFONSO FERRABOSCO (1609) 29 

W. CORKINE (1610) 34 

Bagford Ballads 85, 118 

Bathing Girles, The (Westminster Drollery, 1672) 148 
Bathing Girles, The (Westminster Drollery, 1672) 

(Tune) 163 

Beehive, The (Pills to Piirge Melancholy, 1707) . 206 
Beggar- wench turn'd into a devil (Debauchery Scared, 

Roxburgh Ballads, 1685-8, ii. 101) 160 

BERN (MRS.) , , . . 168 

Behold the man (Tune) 4* 

"Beneath a cool shade" (Mrs. BERN, 1697) ... 168 

BlRKENHEAD (SlR JOHN) Il8 

Bob-Tail'd Lass, The (b. 1800) 275 

BOLTON (SOL.) 228 

Bonnie Dundee (Tune) 263 



INDEX vii 

"Bonny Lass o' Liviston, The" (b. 1796) .... 254 

Boye, Friar and, The 51 

Broze and Butter (*. 1796) 264 

BURNS (R.) 253, 254, 256, 257, 259, 261, 263, 264 

265, 267, 269, 272, 274 

"By the mole on your bubbles" (Musical Miscel- 
lany, 1731) 238 

M Canst thou loue and lie alone" (Melismata,c. 16 1 1) 40 

CAREY, H 228 

"Certain Presbyterian Pair, A," (Musical Miscel- 
lany, 1729) 230 

CHAPPELL, WILLIAM 89, 113, 159, 189 

Choyce Ay rex (PLAYFORD J.) . 157 

Choyce Drollery 109, 113 

Clout the Couldron (Tune) 267 

44 Come hither, good people" (Musical Miscellany \ 1 7 29) 230 
'Come off of my mother. Sirrah' (Refrain) ... 35 

Complements, Marrow of. 159 

CORKINE (W.) 31 

"Country Gentleman came up to town, A" (1685-8, 

Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 101) 160 

Courteous Knight, The (1609, Roxburgh Ballads, 

ii. ai) 31 

Courtiers Good morrow to his llistris, The (c. 1611) 40 

CRIMSALL, RICHARD 89 

Cuddie the Cooper (b. 1796) 263 

Cumberland Lass, The (1674-80) 152 

Cupid's Visions (or Dainty Damsels Dream, LAURENCE 
PRICE, c. 1654, Roxburgh Ballads, Ui. 226) . . 105 



viii INDEX 

Dainty Damsels Dream, The (LAURENCE PRICE, c. 

1654, Roxburgh Ballads, iii. 226) 105 

Dainty ducke I chanced to meet, A (Percy Folio 

MS., c. 1620-50) 84 

Debauchery Scared (1685-8, Roxburgh Ballads, 

ii- 101) 160 

Devonshire Damsels Frollick, The (1685-8, 

Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 136-7) 163 

Deuteromelia (1609) 31 

Dildo, Nashes 14 

Disaster, The sad 251 

DORSET, THE EARL of 157 

Dub'd Knight of the Forked Order, The (1660- 

77, Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 114) 125 

"Duncan Macleerie and Janet his wife" (b. 1796) . 267 

Dunstable, Riding to 135 

DURFEY (T.) 169, 208, 210 

DURFEY THE YOUNGER 251 

Fair Kitty, beautiful and young (Tune) . . . . 251 

FERRABOSCO (ALFONSO) 29 

Forked Order, The Dub'd Knight of the . . . . 125 
" Four and twentieth day of May, The " (Pills to 

Purge Melancholy, 1707) 183 

Four-Legg'd Elder, The (SiR JOHN BIRKENHEAD, 

Bagford Ballads, iii, 57) 118 

Fryar and Boye, The (Percy Folio MS., c. 1620- 

50) 51 

Fryer and the Maid, The 187 

Fumbler, The Old . 167 



INDEX ix 

Gaberlunzie Man, The (JAMES V. SCOTLAND, . 

1542) i 

Gallant Schemers Petition, The (Musical Miscellany, 

'730 238 

Gather your rosebuds (Tune) 118 

Green Grow the Rashes, O (*. 1796) 261 

Gramachree (Tune) 274 

"Gudewife when your gude man's frae harae" 

(* 1796) 256 

HADDINGTON, EARL of 242 

Harleian MS. 103 

Harlot, The high priz'd (or The Penurious Quaker) 216 

"Hee that hath no mistressc" (1610) 34 

Help House of Commons, House oj Peers (Refrain) 1 1 8 
"Her dainty palm I gently prest** (Marrow of Com- 
plements, 1685) 159 

Horrible relation of a dog (or Four legg'd elder) . . 1 1 8 

"I a tender young maid have been courted by 

many" (Pills to Purge Melancholy, 1707) ... 194 
" I am a young Lass of Lynn " ( Pills to Purge Me- 
lancholy, 1707) 199 

I am fallen aivay (Tune) 125 

/ cannot tell what to do (Refrain) 199 

I cannot, winnot, man not buckle too (Refrain) . . 169 
41 1 dreamed my Loue lay in her bed " (Percy 

Folio MS., c. 1620-50) 80 

7 ha'e laid a herrirf in sa't (Tune) 259 

" I have a tenement to let " (Pills to Purge Melan- 
choly, 1719) 218 



x INDEX 

I'll tell you . . . how this knare served me (Refrain) 179 

"I owed ray hostess thirty pounds" (c. 1720) . . 224 

/ pr>ythee now hear me, dear Molly (Refrain) . . 238 
"I Rede you beware o' the Ripples young man" 

(R. BURNS, b. 1796) 253 

"I went to the Alehouse as an honest woman 

should" (1707) 179 

"I will fly into your arms" (c. 1720) 225 

" In a May morninge I mett sweet nursse " (Percy 

Folio MS., c. 1620-50) 77 

"It was a Lady of the North she lov'd a Gentleman" 

(1616, Roxburgh Ballads, iii. 230) ...... 41 

"It was a puritanicall ladd" (Percy Folio MS., c. 

1620-50) 73 

"It was in June" (Westminster Drollery, 1672) . 148 

JAMES V. of Scotland i, 5 

Jenny beguil'd the Webster (Tune) 240 

"Jenny sits up i' the laft" (b. 1796) 265 

Jocky Mac Gill (Tune) 267 

John Anderson my Jo (Tune) 256 

Jolly Beggar, The ( JAMES V. of Scotland, b. 1542). 5 

Jovial Companions, The (Bagford Ballads, i. 88) . 85 
Joviall Pedler, The (1637-9, Roxburgh Ballads, . 

iii. 184) 96 

Kind-hearted Creature, The (1630, Roxburgh Ballads, 

iii. 166-7) 89 

Ladies of London (Tune) 1 60 

Lass o'Liviston (b. 1796) 254 



INDEX xi 

Lass of Lynn's Sorrowful Lamentation, The ( Pills to 

Purge Melancholy, 1707) 199 

Lass with the velvet a se, The (c. 1710) . . . . 214 
Late Dialogue between Captain Low and his friend 

Dick (ROBERTSON OF STRUAN, b. 1749) .... 244 
" Let the world run its course of capricious delight " 

(EARL of HADDINGTON, *. 1735) 242 

LEVERIDGE (R.) 175 

Little o* th'one with f other (Refrain) 137 

14 Lusty Young Smith at his vice stood a filing, " A 

(1705, Pills to Purge Melancholy [1707], U. 198) 175 

Lynn, The Lass of 199 

Maid and a younge man, A {Percy Folio MS., c. 

1620-50) 75 

"Maid, I dare not tell her name. A" (b. 1800). . 279 

Maid of Tottenham, The (Choyce Drollery, 1666). 109 

Maids have you any Cony, Cony skim (Refrain) 96 

Maid's Lesson, The (c. 1710) 212 

Maiden's Delight (1661, Merry Drollery) .... 137 
"Man and a younge maid that loued. A" (Percy 

Folio MS., c. 1620-50} 75 

Man he lay whopping, The (Refrain) 75 

Man's Yard, A (Rawlinson MS., 1600-20) ... 10 

Marrow of Complements 159 

May morninge, In a 77 

Melismata (1611) 40 

Merry Drollery (1661). 41, 80, 116, 133, 135, 137, 

140, 142 

Merry Muses of Caledonia. 253, 254, 256, 257, 259 

261, 263, 264, 266, 267, 269, 272, 274 



xii INDEX 

"Methinks the poor town has been troubled too 

long" (EARL of DORSET, c. 1676) 157 

MILES (A.) 125 

Modern Prophets, The 208 

Modiewark has done me ill, The (b. 1796) .... 272 

Mother bcguil'd the daughter, The (Tune) .... 89 

Musical Miscellany 228, 230, 236, 238 

"My friend thy beauty seemeth good" (Pills to 

Purge Melancholy, 1719) 216 

"My Mistress is a hive of bees in yonder flow'ry 

garden" (Pills to Purge Melancholy, 1707) . . 206 
"My pretty maid fain would I know" (Pills to 

Purge Melancholy, 1707) 204 

My thing is my own (Pills to Purge Melancholy, 

1707) 194 

Nameless Maiden, The (b. 1800) 279 

Narcissus, come kiss us (Rawlinson MS., c. 1610-50) 37 
Nash his Dildo (THOMAS NASH, Rawlinson and 

Petyt MSS. y b. 1601) 13 

NASH (THOMAS) 13 

O for ane and twenty, Tarn (Tune) 272 

O gie my love brose, lasses (Refrain) 264 

O jolly Robin hold thy hande" (Percy Folio MS., 

1620-50) 47 

"O Mither dear I gin to fear" (Orpheus Caledonius, 

1753) 240 

O never went Wimble in Timber more nimble 

(Refrain) 140 

"O wat ye ought of Fisher Meg" (b. 1796) ... 261 



INDEX xiii 

Off a Puritane (Percy Folio MS., c. 1620-50) . . 73 
"Oh mother, Roger with his kisses " (Pills to Purge 

Melancholy, 1707) 186 

Oh.' to Bed to me, to Bed to me (Refrain) ... 152 

Old Fumbler, The (*. 1695) 167 

Old Wanton Lady, The (Dub'd Knight of the fork- 

ed order, 1660-77, Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 114) 125 

"On Wednesday in the afternoon" (*. 1800) . . . 276 

Orpheus Caledonius, see THOMSON (W.) ..... 240 

Our John's Brak Yestreen (*. 1796) 274 

Oyster Nan, As 177 

PACK, MR. . .' 208 

" Pardon, sweete flower of ma chic 3 poesye " (NASH, 

*. 1601) 15 

Patriarch, The (*. 1796) 357 

"Pauky auld carle cam ovir the lee, The" (Gaber- 

lunzie Man, JAMES V. of Scotland, b. 1542) . . i 

Pedler, Joviall, The 96 

Pedlar Proud, The (c. 1750, Roxburgh Ballad, 01.656) 247 
"Peggy in devotion, bred from tender years" (T. 

DURFEY, f.I7IO) 2IO 

Penurious Quaker, The (c. 1719, Pills to Purge 

Melancholy) 216 

Percy Folio MS. (c. 1620-50) . . 26, 47, 49, 51, 71 

73. 75. 77. 80, 82, 84 

Pttyt MS. (b. 1601) 13 

Pills to Purge Melancholy (1707) . . 175, 179, 183, 186 

188, 192, 194, 197, 199, 202, 204, 206 

Pills to Purge Melancholy (1719) . .85, 109, 1 1 8, 152 

157. '69, 171, 177, 180, 208, 210, 216, 218, 220 



xiv INDEX 

PLAYFORD (J.) (Choyce Ayres) 157 

Pleasant Garland, Ane (b. 1800) . . . 275, 277, 279 
"Ploughman he's a bonnie lad, The" (b. 1796) . . 269 
Popular Music of the Olden Time (CHAPPELL) 6, 89 

US' l8 9 

Presbyterian Wedding, The (Musical Miscellany, 1729) 236. 

PRICE (LAURENCE) 105 

PURCELL (HENRY) 167, 169 

Puritan, A (Merry Drollery, 1661) 133 

Puritane, Off" a (Percy Folio MS., 1620-50) ... 73 

Quaker, The Penurious - 216 

Rattle, The (1766) 251 

RAVENSCROFT, THOMAS 40 

Rawlinson MS. (1600-50) lo, 13, 35, 37 

Reed me a ridle : what is this (Rawlinson MS., 

c. 1600-20) 10 

" Riding by the way, As I was " 71 

Riding to London on Dunstable way ( Merry Drollery, 

1661) 135 

ROBERTSON OF STRUAN 244 

Room for a Jovial Tinker : Old Brass to Mend (c. 1616, 

Roxburgh Ballads, Hi. 230) 41 

"Rosebery to his lady says" (b. 1796) 266 

Roxburgh Ballads, 31, 41, 89, 96, 105, 125, 160, 163, 247 

Sad Disaster, The, (DURFEY THE YOUNGER, 1766). 251 

Sally in our Alley (Tune) 228 

School Master's Lesson, The (c. 1720) 225 

Scotch Parson's Daughter, The (T. DURFEY, c. 1710) 210 



INDEX xv 

SHARPS (C. KIRKPATRICK) 275 

"She lay up to the navel bare" (Tune 116) . . . 131 

- She lay all naked in her bed" ( Wit <5r Drollery, 1656) 1 1 6 

SHEELES (J.) 238 

Silent Flute, The (S. BOLTON, 1720) 228 

Sing Boyes, Drink Boyes ^Refrain) 89 

Sing trolly lolly (Refrain) 192 

Sing, Stow the Fryer (Refrain) 197 

"Smug rich and fantastic old Fumbler was known" 

(*. 1695) 6 7 

"So merrily singeth the nightengale" (c. 1750, Rox- 
burgh Ballads, iii. 656) 247 

So old, so old, so wondrous old (Refrain) .... 125 

-Spinning Wheel, As I sat at my" 180 

"Story, strange I will you tell, A" (Choyce Drollery, 

1656) 113 

"Supper is na Ready" (*. 1796) 267 

Surprised Nymph, The (Pills to Purge Melancholy, 1707) 183 

Taylor's faun thro' the bed (Tune) 253 

Tell me mother, pray, now do (Refrain) .... 1 86 
"Tell me, thou source of scandal, Dick" (b. 1740 

ROBERTSON or STRUAN) 244 

Tenement to let, A (Pills to Purge Melancholy, 

17I9)- 2l8 

"That God that dyed for vs all and drank both 

vinegar etc." (Percy Folio MS., 1620-50) ... 51 

Then she sang down a down (Refrain) 31 

"There dwelt a man in Lanrickshire " (*. 1800) . 277 

"There liv'd a Wife in Wnistle-cock-pen " (b. 1796) 259 

"There was a buxom lass" (c. 1710) 214 



xvi INDEX 

"There was a cooper they ca'd him Cuddy (b. 1796) 263 
" There was a jolly beggar, and a begging he was born" 

(JAMES V. of Scotland, b. 1542) . 5 

"There was a jovial! pedler" (1637-9, Roxburgh 

Ballads, iii. 184) 96 

" There was a Lady in this land" (Merry Drollery, 

1661) 142 

"There was a lass in Cumberland" (c. 1674-80) . 152 
" There was an old woman liv'd under a hill " (Pills 

to Purge Melancholy, 1707) 192 

"There was three Birds that built very low" (Merry 

Drollery, 1661) 140 

" There was three Travellers, Travellers three" (c. 1630, 

Bagford Ballads, i. 88) 85 

This "way, that way, which way you will (Refrain) 171 
" Thomas vntyed his points apace " (Percy Folio MS., 

c. 1620-50) 26 

"Thomas you cannott " (Percy Folio MS., c. 1620-50) 26 

THOMSON (W.) \_Orpheus Caledonius~\ 240 

Three Merry Travellers (c. 1630, Bagford Ballads, 

i. 88) 85 

Tinker, The (Merry Drollery, 1661) 142 

To fall down, down, derry down (Refrain) ... 109 
" Tom and William with Ned and Ben " (Roxburgh 

Ballads, ii. 136-7) 163 

" Tom Tinker's my true love, and I am his dear " 

(c. 1698) 171 

" To play upon a viol if a virgin will begin" (c. 1710) 212 
Trooper Watering his Nagg, The (Pills to Purge 

Melancholy, 1707) 192 

Turnep Ground, The (c. 1720) 224 



INDEX xvii 

M Twa ncebour wives sat in the sun " (b. 1796, BURNS) 274 
44 'T was a Lady born of high degree" (1660-77, 

Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 114-5) '25 

*"Twas within a Furlong of Edinborough town" 

(DURFEY, 1697, Pills to Purge Melancholy) . . 169 

"Upon a certain day when Mars and Venus met 

together" (Rawlinson MS., 1610-20) 35 

" Venus, Mars, and Cupid " (Rawlinson MS., 1610- 

*o) 35 

-Wad ye do that " (*. 1796) 256 

Wanton Virgins Frighted, The (Pills to Purge 

Melancholy, 1719) 220 

Westminster Drollery 148 

When first Amyntas su'd for a kiss (Tune) . . 202 
When Phoebus address't himselfe to the West (Percy 

Folio MS., c. 1620-50) 49 

White Thighs (b. 1735) 242 

Who is to marry me (*. 1609) 29 

Willie Steenson (b. 1800) 277 

"Will ye na, can ye na let me be?" (b. 1796) . . 259 

Willing Lover, The (Wit & Drollery, 1661) . . 131 

Wit and Drollery 96, 103, 116, 131 

With a dildo (Refrain) 113 

With a down . . . up and down (Refrain) .... 230 

With a hey ho, hey, derry derry down (Refrain) 41 

With a Humbledum, Grumbledum (Refrain) . . 204 

With a rub... in and out, in and out ho (Refrain) 175 

Without ever a stiver of money (Refrain) .... 85 



xviii INDEX 

" Would you have a young Virgin of fifteen years " 
(T. DURFEY, 1709) 208 

" Yonder comes a courteous Knight " (Roxburgh 

Ballads, ii. 281) 31 

Yorkshire Tale, A (Musical Miscellany, 1/29) . . 230 
" You that delight in a jocular song" (Pills to Purge 

Melancholy, 1719) 220 

Young Man of late, A (Merry Drollery, 1661). . 137 

" Younge and simple though I am" (b. 1609) . . 29 




Songs anb JSallabs 



THE GABERLUNZIE MAN 



[* 1542] 

[Attributed to JAMES V OF SCOTLAND and said to 
celebrate one of his own adventures with 
country girls]. 

The pauky auld carle came ovir the lee ,i y or artful 

Wi' mony good-eens and days to mee, 
Saying, Goodwife, for zour courtesie, 

Will ze lodge a silly poor man? f ra a 

The night was cauld, the carle was wat, 
And down azont the ingle he sat; beyond 

My dochters shoulders he gan to clap, 

And cadgily ranted and sang. cheerfully 



MERRY SONGS 






2 THE GABERLUNZIE MAN 

" O wow !" quo he, " were I as free, 
As first when I saw this countrie, 
How blyth and merry wad I bee! 
become weary And I wad nevir think lang." 

llvel y He grew canty, and she grew fain, 

her old mother But little did her auld minny ken 

What thir slee twa togither were sayn, 



busy 



I'd clothe : 



a little 



open field 



enQuire 



went 



When wooing they were sa thrang. 

"AndO!" quo he, "arm ze were as black, 
As evir the crown of your dadyes hat, 
'Tis I wad lay thee by my back, 

And awa wi' me thou sould gang!" 
"And O!" quoth she, "ann I were as white, 
As evir the snaw lay on the dike, 
gay lid clead me braw, and lady-like, 

And awa with thee lid gang. 

Between the twa was made a plot; 
They raise a wee before the cock, 
And wyliely they shot the lock, 

And fast to the bent are they gane. 
Up the morn the auld wife raise, 
And at her leisure put on her claiths, 
Syne to the servants bed she gaes 

To speir for the silly poor man. 

She gaed to the bed, whair the beggar lay, 
The strae was cauld, he was away; 



THE GABERLUNZIE MAN 



goods 
chest 
stolen 
alone 
loyal; true 



Scho clapt her hands, cry'd " Dulefu' day! 

For some of our geir will be gane." 
Some ran to coffer, and some to kist, 
But nought was stown that could be mist. 
She dancid her lane, cry'd, "Praise be blest! 

I have lodg'd a leal poor man." 

Since naithing's awa, as we can learn, 

The kim's to kirn, and milk to earn; churn 

go to the outer 

Gae butt the house, lass, and waken my bairn, apartment 

,,.,. i i t_ n to the inner 

And bid her come quickly ben. apartment 

The servant gaed where the dochter lay, 
The sheets was cauld, she was away; 
And fast to her goodwife can say, 

"Shes aff with the gaberlunzieman." 



did say 



"O fy gar ride, and fy gar rin, 

And hast ze, find these trailers agen! 

For shee's be burnt, and hee's be slein, 

The wearifou gaberlunzieraan!" 
Some rade upo' horse, some ran a-fit; 
The wife was wood, and out o' her wit; 
She could na gang, nor yet could she sit, 

But ay did curse and did ban. 

Mean-time far hind, out owre the lee, 
Fu' snug in a glen, where nane could see, 
The twa, with kindlie sport and glee, 
Cut frae a new cheese a whang. 



O haste ; cause to 
ride 



troublesome 

a-foot 

mad ; furious 



far hence ; out 
over 



slice 



4 THE GABERLUNZTE MAN 

proving : tasting The prievuig was gude, it pleas'd them baith ; 
To lo'e her for ay he gae her his aith. 
Quo she, "To leave thee I will be laith, 
My winsome gaberlunzieman. 

" O kend my minny I were wi' zou, 
Ill-fardly wad she crook her mou'. 
she'd never trust Sic a poor man sheld nevir trow, 

Aftir the gaberlunzieman." 
"My dear," quo he, " zee're zet owre zonge; 
And hae na leamt the beggar's tonge, 
To follow me frae toun to toun, 

And carrie the gaberlunzie on. 



" Wi' kauk and ked, HI win zour bread, 
And spindles and whorles for them wha need 
Whilk is a gentil trade indeed, 

The gaberlunzie to carrie O! 
111 bow my leg and crook my knee, 
And draw a black clout owre my ee; 
A criple or blind they will cau me, 

While we sail sing and be merry O!" 






bend 
doth; ra g 




THE JOLLY BEGGAR 



set forth 



THE JOLLY BEGGAR 
I*- '542] 

[Attributed to JAMES V OF SCOTLAND: see note 
to preceding song]. 

There was a jolly beggar, and a begging he was born. 

And he took up his quarters into a land 'art town, county farm- 
steading 

And we'll gang nae raair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

He wad neither ly in barn, not yet wad he in byre ; 

But in ahint the ha'door, or else afore the fire. behin d 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving 
Sae late into the night, 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 

Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

The beggar's bed was made at e'en wi' good clean 

straw and hay, 

And in ahint the ha'door, and there the beggar lay. 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright 



6 THE JOLLY BEGGAR 

Up raise the goodman's dochter and for to bar 

the door, 

And there she saw the beggar standin' i' the floor. 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

He took the lassie in his arms, and to the bed he ran, 
cautiously Q hooly, hooly wi' me, sir, ye'll waken our goodman . 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

The beggar was a cunnin' loon, and ne'er a word 

he spake, 

talk Until he got his turn done, syne he began to crack. 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

"Is there ony dogs into this town? maiden, tell 

me true." 
m mydove ey ""* "And what wad ye do wi' them, my hinny and 

my dow?" 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving 
Sae late into the night, 



THE JOLLY BEGGAR 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 



" They'll rive a' my meal pocks, and do me meal bags 

meikle wrang." 

"O dool for the doing o't! are ye the poor man?" 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

Then she took up the meal pocks, and flang 

them o'er the wa'; 

* The deil gae wi' the meal pocks, my maiden- 
head, and a'!" 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

" I took ye for some gentleman, at least the laird 

of Brodie; 

O dool for the doing o't ! arc ye the poor bodic ? " 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 



8 THE JOLLY BEGGAR 

He took the lassie in his arms, and gae her kisses 
three, 

a sliver coin worth . , e 

i3^d. stg. And lour and twenty minder merk to pay the 



wet-nurse wage 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

He took a horn frae his side, and blew baith 

loud and shrill, 
And four and twenty belted knights came skipping 

o'er the hill. 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

And he took out his little knife, loot a' his 
rags duddies fa'; 

And he was the brawest gentleman that was 

amang them a'. 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 

The beggar was a cliver loon, and he lap shoulder 

height : 
such "O, ay for sicken quarters as I gat yesternight!" 



THE JOLLY BEGGAR 

And we'll gang nae mair a roving 

Sae late into the night, 
And we'll gang nae mair a roving, boys, 
Let the moon shine ne'er so bright. 




io A MANS YARD 



A MANS YARD 

[c. 1600-1620] 
\Rawl MS. Poet. 216, If. 94 back]. 

Reed me a ridle: what is this 

You holde in your hand when you pisse? 

It is a kinde of pleasing stinge, 

A pricking and a pleasing thing; 

It is a stiffe shorte fleshly pole, 
That fittes to stopp a maydens hole; 
It is Venus wanton staying wand, 
That ne're had feet, and yet can stand; 

It is a penn with a hole in the toppe, 
To write betwene her two-leued booke; 
It is a thing both dumb and blinde, 
Yet narrowe holies in darke can finde; 

It is a dwarfe in height and length, 
And yet a giannt in his strength; 
It is a bachelours button newly cutt, 
The finest new tobacco pipe; 

It is the Zirus that makes dead vse 
When he did pull on Vulcans shooes; 



A MANS YARD n 

It is a grafte Home on a prettye head, 
A staffe to make a Countesse bedd; 

There is never a Ladye in this land 
But that will take it in her hand; 
The fayrest mayd that ere tooke liffe, 
For loue of this became a weife; 

And every wench, by her owne will, 
Would keepe [it] in her quiuer still. 
When sturdye stormes arise, 
Shall blustering windes appeare: 

I finde ofte tymes dust in ashes heare, 
Live kindled coles of fire. 
With good intent, marke well my minde, 
You shall herein a secrett find. 

\Then follows a kind of rebus: ] 
Oh, my faire misteres, J in; 
I o o W y ur thighes, The X in, 
And put my o o into your o, 
And then my o o shall wag apace, 
Sir, is H in your mistres then 
HI not to deepe, lest if thow o in 
and drowne my o o o in my o 
and driue your o o out of his place 
Owles, Farewell, I wish youi trees may growe 



12 A MANS YARD 

like to your homes which make a famus showe, 
because they are grafted on a fethei bedd 
Therefore, good neighboures, I bid you all adue, 
Foi I haue written nothing but what that is true. 




NASH HIS DILDO 13 



THE MERIE BALLAD OF NASH 
HIS DILDO 

[6. 1601] 

[By THOMAS NASH; Rawlinson MS. Poet. 216, 
leaves 96-106; also Petyt MS. (Inner Tern- 
pk), 538, Vol. 43, f. viii. 295*) hitherto 
unpublished : dedicated in Petyt MS. " To the 
right Honorable the Lord Southampton)"]. 

Pardon, sweete flower of Machles poesye, 
and fairest bud that euer red rose bare, 
although my muse, diuert from deepest care, 
presentes you with a wanton elegie. 

Ne blame my verse of loose inchastitye, 

for paynting forth the thinges that hidden be, 

only induced with varyetye, 

sith most men marke what I in speech descrie. 

Complayntes and prayses every man can write, 
and passion foorth there loue in statly rime; 
but of loues pleasure none did e're indite, 
that have succeeded in this latter time. 

Accept of it, deare loue, in gentle parte, 

and better farr, ere large, shall honor thee. C? r 



14 THE MERIE BALLAD 

NASHES DILDO 

It was the merry moneth of February, 
when younge men in their brauery 
Rose in the morning, before breake of daye, 
to seeke their valentynes soe fresh and gaye. 
With whome they maye consorte in Somers shene, 
and daunce the high degree in our towne greene : 
And allso at Ester, and at Penticost, 
preambulate the fieldes that florish most: 
And goe into some village bordering neere, 
to tast the Cakes & creame and such good cheere, 
To see a playe of strange morality, 
showen by the bachelours of magnaminity, 
Whither our Country Franklins flockmeale swarme, 
and John and Joane come marching arme in arme. 
Even on the Hallowes of that blessed Sainct, 
that doth true lovers with those ioyes acquaint, 
I went, poore pilgrime, to my Ladyes shrine, 
to see if shee would be my valentyne. 
[? woe] But out, alas, she was not to be found, 

for she was shifted to another ground : 
Good Justice Dudgeon, with his crabbed face, 
with bills and staues had scard her from that place : 
And she poore wench, compeld for sanctuary 
to fly into a house of Venery. 
Thither went I, and bouldly made inquire 
if they had hackneys to lett out to hire, 
And what they craud by order of their trade, 



NASH HIS DILDO 15 

to lett me ride a iourney on a iade. 

With that, stept forth a foggy three-chinde dame, 

that vsd to take younge wenches for to tame, 

And askt me, if soothe were my request, 

or only moud a question but in iest? 

u In iest, " quoth I, " that tenne yt as you will, 

I come for game ; therefore giue me my Gill. n 

" If that yt be, " quoth shee, u that you demaunde, 

Then giue me first a godes peny in my hand; 

For in our oratory, siccarly, 

none enters in, to doe his deuory, 

But he must paye his affidavit first, 

and then perhaps lie ease him of his thirst. " 

I, seeing her soe earnest for the box, 

I gaue her her due, and shee the doare vnlockes. 

Nowe I am entered, sweete Venus be my speede ! 

but wheres the female that must doe the deed ? 

Through blind meanders, and through crooked 

wayes, 

She leads me onward, as my author sayes, 
Vntill I came vnto a shady loft 

where Venus bouncing vestures skyrmish fought. m i h V oftj 
And there she sett me in a Lether chayre, 
and brought me forth, of wenches, straight a paire, 
And bad me choose which might content my eye ; 
but she I sought, I could noe waye espye. 
I spake her faire, and wisht her well to fare, 
" but soe yt is, I must haue fresher ware ; 



1 6 THE MERIE BALLAD 

Wherefore, dame baud, soe dainty as you be, 

fetch gentle Mistres Francis vnto me." 

"By Holy dame," quoth shee, "and gods one 

mother 

I well perceaue you are a wyly brother; 
For if there be a morcell of better price, 
youle find yt out, though I be now soe nice. 
As you desire, soe shall you swiue with her ; 
but look, your purse-stringes shall abide yt deere ; 
For he whoole feed on quayles, must lauish crownes, 
and Mistres Fraunces, in her velvett gownes, 
Her ruffe and perriwigge soe fresh as May, 
Cannot be kept for halfe a crowne a daye." 
" Of price, good hostes, wee will not debate, 
although you assize me at the highest rate; 
Onely conduct me to this bonny bell, 
and tenn good gobletes vnto thee I'le tell, 
of gold or siluer, which shall like you best, 
soe much I doe her company request." 
Awaye she went, soe sweete a worde is golde, 
it makes invasion in the strongest holde; 
Loe, here she comes that hath my harte in keeping, 
sing lullaby, my cares and fall a sleeping. 
Sweeping she comes, as she would brush the ground : 
her Ratling silcke my senses doe Confound : 
Awaye I am ravisht: " voyd the chamber straight, 
I must be straight vppon her with my waight." 
"My Tomalyn," quoth she, and then she smiled: 



NASH HIS DILDO 17 

"I, I," quoth I, "soe more men are beguiled 

With sighes and nattering woordes and teares, 

When in your deedes much falshood still apeares." 

"As how, my Tomalyn," blushing she replied, 

"because I in this dauncing should abide? [? school j 

If that be it that breedes thy discontent, 

we will remove the campe incontinent: 

For shelter only, sweete harte, cam I hither, 

and to avoyd the troublesome stormye weather; 

And since the coast is cleare, I will be gonne, 

for, but thy self, true louers I haue none." 

With that she sprungc full lightly to my lippes, 

and about my necke she hugges, she culles, she 

clippes, 

She wanton faynes, and falles vppon the bedd, 
and often tosses to and froe her head; 
She shakes her feete, and waggles with her tongue : 
Oh, whoe is able to forbeare so longe? 
"I come, I come, sweete Ladye, by thy leaue;" 
softely my fingers up theis curtaines heaue, 
And send me happye stealing by degrees, 
first vnto the feete, and then vnto the knees, 
And so ascend vnto her manly thigh 
a pox on lingering, when I come so nighe! 
Smocke, climbe apace, that I may see my ioyes, 
all earthly pleasures seeme to this but toyes, 
Compard be these delightes which I bchould, 
which well might keepe a man from being olde. 

MERRY SONGS i. 2 



1 8 THE MERIE BALLAD 

A prettye rising wombe without a weiine, 
that shinefsl as bright as any christell gemme, 
And beares out like the riseing of a hill, 
at whose decline the[r] runnes a fountayne still, 
That hath her mouth besett with rugged briers, 
resembling much a duskye nett of wires: 
A lusty buttock, barrd with azure vaines, 
whose comely swellinge, when my hand restraines, 
Or harmles checketh with a wanton gripe, 
it makes the fruite thereof too soone be ripe, 
A pleasure pluckt to tymely from his springe 
it is, dyes e're it can enioye the vsed thinge. 

Godes, that ever any thing soe sweete, 
soe suddenly should fade awaye, and fleete! 
Her armes and legges and all were spredd, 
But I was all vnarmed, 

Like one that Quid's cursed hemlocke charmd, 
[Pefyt MS.] [So are my Limm's unwealdlie for the fight,] 

that spent there strength in thought of your delight. 
What shall I doe, to shewe my selfe a man? 
Yt will not be, for ought that beauty cann: 

1 kisse, I clipp, I winck, I feele at will, 
Yet lyes he dead, not feeling good or ill. 

" By Holly dame (quoth she), and wilt not staund ? 
now lett me roule and rub it in my hand! 
[? silly] Perhapps the seely worme hath laboured sore, 

and worked soe that it cann doe noe more: 
Which if it be, as I doe greately dreade, 



NASH HIS DILDO 19 

I wish ten thousand times that I weare dead. 

What ere it be, noe meanes shall lack in mee, 

That maye avayle for his recoverye." 

Which said, she tooke & rowld it on her thighe, 

and looking downe on it, did groane and sighe ; 

She haundled it, and daunced it vpp and downe, 

not ceasing till shee raisd it from [the swoune] ; [/>/>/ MS.] 

And then it flewe on her as it were wood, 

And on her breech laboured and foarn'd a good ; 

He rubd and peirct her euer to the bones, 

digging as deepe as he could digg for stones; 

Now high, now lowe, now stacking shorte and thicke, 

and diving deeper, peircte her to the quicke; 

Now with a girde he would his course rebate, 

then would he take him to a stately gate. 

Playe when he liste, and thrust he nere soe hard, 

poore patient Grissell lyeth at his ward, 

And giues and takes as With and fresh as Maye, 

and ever meetes him in the middle of the wayc. 

On her his eyes continually were fixt; 

with his eye-browes, her melting eyes were mixt, 

which, like the sunne, betwixt two glasses playes, 

from the one to the other casting rebounding rayes. 

She like a starr that, to requite his beames, 

suckes the influence of sweete Phebus streames, 

Imbathes the beames of his discending light 

in the deepest fountaines of the purest light. 

Shee, faire as fairest plannet in the skye, 



20 



THE MERIE BALLAD 



her puritye to noe man doth denye ; 

The verye chamber that includes her shine, 

seemes as the pallace of the gods devine, 

Whoe leades the daye about the Zodiacke, 

and in the even, settes of the ocean lake ; 

Soe feirce and fervent in her radiaunce, 

such flyeing breath she dartes at every glaunce 

pSyt MS.} ge ~ As mi g nt inflame the verry mappe of age, 

and cause pale death him suddenly t'asswage, 
And stand and gaze vppon those orient lampes, 
where Cupid all his ioyes incampes. 

\petyt MS.\ [And sitts and plays with euerie atomic 

That in her Sunne-beames swarme aboundantlie.] 
Thus striking, thus gazeing, we perseuere : 
but nought soe sure that will continue ever : 
"Fleete not soe fast," my ravisht senses cries, 
"sith my Content vppon thy life relyes, 
Which brought so soone from his delightfull seates, 
me, vnawares, of blissefull hope defeates ; 

\petyt MS.} [Togeather lett our equall motions stirr, 

togeather lett vs Hue and dye, my deare;] 
Togeather let vs march with one contente 
and be consum[e]d without languishmente. " 
As she prescribed, soe keepe we clocke and time, 
and euery stroake in order like a chime. 
Soe shee that here preferd me by her pyttye, 
vnto our musicke framd a groaning dyttye : 
" Alas, alas, that lone should be a sinne ! 



NASH HIS DILDO 21 

even now my ioys and sorrows doe beginne ; 

Hould wyde thy lappe, my louely Danae, 

and entertaine this golden showry see, 

That drisling fall[s] into thy treasurye:" 

sweet Aprill flowers not halfe soe pleasaunt be, 

Nor NUus overflowinge Egipt playne, 

as is the balme that all her woombe destreynes. 

"Now, oh now," she trickling moues her lippes, 

and often to and fro she lightly startes and skippes : 

She yerkes her legges, and fresketh with her heeles : 

noe tongue can tell the pleasures that she feeles. 

* I come, I come, sweete death, rocke mee a-sleepe ! 

sleepe, sleepe, desire, intombe me in the deepe ! " 

"Not soe, my deare and dearest," she reply ed: 

" from vs two [? sweete] this pleasure must not glide, 

Vntill the sinnowie Chambers of our blood 

withould themselves from this ncwe prisoned flood ; 

And then we will, that then will come soe soone, 

Dissolued lye, as thoughe our dayes were done. " 

The whilest I speke, my soule is stealing hence, [MS. i] 

and life forsakes his earthly residence : 

14 Staye but one houre, an houre is not soe much, 

nay, half an houre : and if thy haste be such, 

Naye, but a quarter, I will aske noe more, 

that thy departure, which torments me sore, 

May now be lengthened by a litle pawse, 

and take awaye this passions suddaine cause. 

He heares me not; hard harted as he is, 



22 THE MERIE BALLAD 

[? hates] he is the scorne of time, angl hath my blisse: 

Time nere lookes backe ; the riuer nere returnes ; 
a second spring must helpe, or elles I burne : 

\Petyt -vs.] [No, no, the well is dry that should refresh me, 
The glasse is runne of all my destinie: 
Nature, of winter leauneth, nigardize, 
Who, as he ouerbeares the streame with ice 
That man nor beaste maie of their pleasance taste, 
So shutts she up hir conduit all in haste, 
And will not let her Nectar ouerflowe, 
Least mortall man immortall ioyes should knowe. 
Adieu, unconstant loue, to thy disporte; 
Adieu, false mirth, and melodies too shorte ; 
Adieu, faint-hearted instrument of lust, 
That falsely hath betrayde our equale trust.] 
Hensforth I will noe more implore thine ayde, 
Or thee for euer of Cowardice shall vpprayd: 
My little dildoe shall supplye your kinde, 
a youth that is as light as leaues in winde: 
He bendeth not, nor fouldeth any deale, 
but standes as stiffe as he were made of steele; 

\Pet y t A/S.] [And playes at peacock twixt my leggs right blithe 
And doeth my tickling swage with manie a sighe ;] 
And when I will, he doth refresh me well, 
and neuer makes my tender belly swell." 
Poore Priapus, thy kingdom needes must fall, 
eccept thou thrust this weakling to the wall; 
Behould how he vsurpes in bed and bower, 



NASH HIS DILDO 23 

and vndermines thy kingdome euery hower: 

And slyly creepes betwene the barke and tree, 

and suckes the sap while sleepe deteyneth thee: 

He is my Mistres lake at euery sound, 3/?.]~ /lr<x/ 

and soone will tent a deepe intrenched wound; 

He waytes on courtly nimphs that are full coye, 

and bids them scorne the blind alluring boye; 

[He giues yong guirls their gamesome suste- [/v/y/ .vs.] 

nance, 

And euerie gaping mouth his full sufficiance.] 
He fortifyes disdayne with foraigne artes, 
while wantons chast delude all loving hartes. 
If any wight a cruell Mistres serue, 
And in dispaire full deeply pyne and sterue, 
[Curse Eunicke dilldo, sencelesse counterfeit, [/v/y/ MS.] 
Who sooth maie fill, but neuer can begett: 
But if revenge enraged with dispaire, 
That such a dwarf his wellfare should impaire,] 
Would faine this woemans secretary knowe, 
let him attend the markes that I shall showe: 
He is a youth almost two handfulles high; 
straight, round, and plump, and having but one eye, 
Wherein the rheume soe fervently doth raine, 
the Stigian gulfe can scarce his teares conteyne ; 
Running sometymes in thicke congealed glasse, 
where he more like, downe into hell would passe : 
An arme strong guider stedfastly him guides; 
Vpon a chariot of fiue wheeles he rides, 



24 THE MERIE BALLAD 

Attird in white velvet or in silke, 
And norisht with warme water or with milke, 
And often alters pace as waves growe deepe; 
for whoe, in places vnknowne, one pace can keepe ? 
Sometymes he smothly slippeth downe a hill; 
some other tymes, the stones his feete doe kill; 
In clayey wayes he treadeth by and by, 
[? piasheth] and placeth himself and all that standeth by : 
Soe fares this royall rider in his race, 
plunging and sowsing forward in like case, 
Bedasht, bespotted, and beplotted foule 
god giue thee shame, thou foule mishapen owle ! 
But free from greife a ladyes chamberleyne, 
and canst thou not thy tatling tongue refrayne ? 
I tell the beardlesse blabb, beware of stripes, 
and be advisd what thou soe vainely pipst; 
If Illian queene knowe of thy brauery heere, 
thou shouldst be whipt with nettles for thie geere. 
Saint Dennis sheild me from such femall sprightes ! 
regard not, dames, what Cupids poett writes: 
I pen this story onely for my selfe; 
and, giving yt to such an actuall elfe, 
Am quite discoraged in my musery, 
sinse all my store to her seemes misery. 
I am not as was Hercules the stout, 
that to the seauenth lourny could hould out; 
I wantes those hearbes and rootes of Indian soyle, 
that strengthen weary members in their toyle, 



NASH HIS DILDO 25 

Or drugges or electuaryes of newe devises, 
that shame my purse, and tremble at thie prices. 
I paid of both, [the] scott and lott allmost, 
yet looke as lanke and leane as any ghost; 
For that I allwayes had, I payd the wole, 
which, for a poore man, is a princely dole 
what cann be added more to my renowne? 
she lyeth breathlesse; I am taken downe; 
The waves doe swell, the tide climes orethebankes; 
Judge, gentleweomen, doth thisdeseruenothankes? 
And soe, good night vnto you, euery one; 
For loe, our thred is spunne, our playes done. 

[Thus hath my penne prcsum'd to please my friend : 

Oh mighst thou lykewise please Apollo's eye. [P*fyt 
No, Honor brookes no such irapietie, 
Yett Ouid's wanton muse did not offend. 

He is the fountaine whence my streames doe 

flowe 

Forgive me if I speak as I was taught, 
Alike to women utter all I knowe, 
As longing to unlade so bad a fraught. 

My mynde once purg'd of such lascivious witt, 
With purifide words and hallowed verse, 
Ihy praises in large volumes shall rehearse 
That better maie thy grauer view befitt. 

Meanwhile ytt rests, you smile at what I write 
Or for attempting banish me your sight.] 



26 THOMAS YOU CANNOTT 



THOMAS YOU CANNOTT 
[f. 1603-5] 

[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 52 1 of MS. Music 
inCHAPPELl/s Popular Music of 'the Olden Time, 
i. 337 : the words exist only in this MS.]. 

point = a tagged 

lace to fasten the Thomas vntyed his points apace, 

& kindly hee beseeches 
thai shee wold giue him time & space 

ffor to vntye his breeches. 
"Content, Content, Content!" shee cryes. 
he downe wrth his breeches imedyatlye, 
& ouer her belly he Cast his thye. 
But then shee Cryes " Thomas ! you Cannott, you 
Cannott ! 

O Thomas, O Thomas, you Cannott!" 

Thomas, like a liuely ladd, 

lay close downe by her side: 
he had the worst Courage thai euer had man; 

in conscience, the pore ffoole Cryed. 



THOMAS YOU CANNOTT 27 

But then he gott some Courage againe, 

& he crept vpon her belly amaine, 

& thought to haue hitt her in the right vaine; 

But then shee Cryes u Thomas ! you Cannott, you 

Cannott ! 
O Thomas, O Thomas, you Cannott ! " 

This maid was discontented in mind, 

& angry was with Thomas, 
thai he the time soe long had space, 

& cold not p^forme his promise, 
he promised her a thing, 2 handfull att least, 
-which made this maid glad of such a fleast; 
but shee Cold not gett an Inch for a tast, 
wAich made her cry a Thom<w! you Cannott, you 
Cannott! 

O Thomas, O Thomas, you Cannott! 

Thomas went to Venus, the goddesse of loue, 

& hartily he did pray, 
thai this ffaire maid might constant proue 

till he performed what he did say. 
in hart & mind they both wce[r]e content; 
but ere he came att her, his courage was spent, 
which made this maid grow discontent, 
and angry was w/'th Thomas, w/'th Thomas, 

and angry was with Thomas. 

Vulcan & venus, with Mars & Apollo, 
they all 4 swore they wold ayd him; 



28 THOMAS YOU CANNOTT 

Mars lent him his buckler & vulcan h[is hamwer,] 
and downe by her side he laid him. 

[Page 522, a fragment apart from the MS.] 



then 

but all her body qu(?) . . . . 

he tickled her, laid(?) 

& then shee Cryes 

& then shee Cryes f . . Tho[mas] 

This mayd wa 

thai ffortune had lent hi .... 

fTull oft he had beene 

yett neuer cold stop 

he tickeled her tuch 

he made her to tr 

& Thomas was glad he ... 
& then shee cryes " . . . . 
& then shee cryes " .... 




WHO IS TO MARRY ME ? 29 



WHO IS TO MARRY ME? 
[b. 1609] 

[These words arc set to music in Ayres by ALFONSO 
FERRABOSCO, viiij. 

Younge and simple though I am, 
I haue hearde of Cupids name; 
Guesse I can, what thinge it is, 
Men desire when they doe kisse. 
Smoake can neuer burnc, they say; 
But the flame that followes, may. 

I am not so foule or fayre, 

To be proude, or to dispaire; 

Yet my lipps haue oft obseru'd, 

Men that kisse them, presse them hard, 

As glad louers vse to doe 

When there newe met loues they wooe. 

Faithe, 'tis but a foolishe minde; 
Yet me thinkes, a heate I finde, 
Like thirst longing, that doth bide 
Euer one my weaker side, 
Where they say my harte doth moue: 
Venus grante it be not loue 



30 WHO IS TO MARRY ME ? 

If it be, alias what then, 

Were not Women made for men? 

As good 'tis, a thing were past, 

That must needes be done at last, 

Roses that are ouerblowne, 

Growe lesse sweete, then fall alone. 

Yet noe Churle nor silken Gull, 
Shall my maiden blossome pull, 
Who shall not I soone can tell: 
Whoe shall, I would I could as well. 
This I know who ere hee be, 
Loue hee must, or flatter mee. 

Marryed Wyues may take and leaue; 
Where they please, refuse, receaue; 
Wee poore Maydes must not doe soe; 
Wee must answer yea with noe; 
Wee seeme strange, coye, and curste, 
And faine wee would doe, if wee durst. 




THE COURTEOUS KNIGHT 31 



THE COURTEOUS KNIGHT 

[1609] 

\Deuttrotnelia (with music) 1609; cf. "The Baffled 
Knight : or The Ladys Policy " (Rox. Ballads, 
ii. 281)]. 

Yonder comes a courteous Knight, 

Lustily raking over the lay, 
He was well ware of a bonny lass, 

As she came wandering over the way: 
Then she sang down a down, 

Hey down derry. 
Then she sang down a down, 

Hey down derry. 

Jove you speed, fair Lady, he said, 
Amongst the leaves that be so green; 

If I were a King, and wore a Crown, 
Full soon fair Lady, should thou be a Queen. 
Then she sang down a down, &c. 

Also Jove save you, fair Lady, 
Among the Roses that be so red; 

If I have not my will of you, 

Full soon fair Lady, shall I be dead. 

Then she sang down a down, &c. 



32 THE COURTEOUS KNIGHT 

Then he lookt East, then he lookt West, 
He lookt North, so did he South: 

He could not find a privy place, 
For all lay in the Devil's mouth. 

Then she sang down a down, &c. 

If you will carry me gentle Sir, 

A maid unto my father's hall; 
Then you shall have your will of me 

Under purple and under Pall. 

Then she sang down a down, &c. 

He set her upon a steed, 

And himself upon another; 
And all the day he rode her by, 

As tho' they had been sister and brother. 
Then she sang down a down, &c. 

When she came to her fathers hall, 
It was well walled round about; 

She rode in at the wicket gate, 

And shut the four ear'd fool without. 

Then she sang down a down, &c. 

You had me (quoth she) abroad hi the field, 
Among the com, amidst the hay, 

Where you might had your will of me, 
For, in good faith Sir, I ne'er said nay. 
Then she sang down a down, &c. 



THE COURTEOUS KNIGHT 33 

You had me also amid the field, 
Among the rushes that were so brown; 

Where you might had your will of me, 
But you had not the face to lay me down. 
Then she sang down a down, &c. 

He pulTd out his nut-brown sword, 
And wip'd the rust off with his sleeve: 

And said; Joves Curse come to his heart, 
That any Woman would believe. 

Then she sang down a down, &c. 

When you have your own true love, 
A mile or twain out of the Town, 

Spare not for her gay cloathing, 

But lay her body flat on the ground. 

Then she sang down a down, &c. 

"s 




IT SONGS I. 



34 HEE THAT HATH NO MISTRESSE 



HEE THAT HATH NO MISTRESSE 

[1610] 
[From Ayres by W. CORKJNE]. 

Hee that hath no mistresse, 
must not weare a fauor, 
he that wooes a mistris, 
must serue before he haue her, 
he that hath no bedfellow, 
must lie alone, 

And he that hath no Lady, 

must be content with lone, 

and so must I, 

for why alas my loue and I are parted, 

my False Cupid I will haue the whipt, 

and haue thy mother carted. 




VENUS, MARS, AND CUPID 35 



VENUS, MARS, AND CUPID 

[c. 161020] 
[Rawl. MS. Poet. 1335, leaf 31 back]. 

Upon a certaine day, when Mars and Venus met 

together, 
All in a shady bower, wheras she did invite him 

thether ; 
But when as Cupid did espy Mars hit the mark 

so narrow 
He could not abide, but out he cryed 

"Come of[f] of my mother, Sirrah!** 

"Peace, boy!" quoth he, "and give consent, for 

Venus is a woman, 
born to give the world content, and discontent 

to no man. 
Se how I hold her in mine armes," the boy thought 

he had run her through; 

And then cryed the lad, as if he had bin mad, 
" Come of[f] of my mother, Sirrah, Sirrah ! 
Come of[f] of my mother Sirrah ! " 

"I pray the, Cupid, hold thy peace; I will not 
hurt thy mother; 



36 VENUS, MARS, AND CUPID 

Her smiles keep all the world at ease; all dis- 
content is ded. 
If thou will give me leave to draw my golden 

headed arrow, 
He give thee a groat," "all's one for that, 

Come of[f]of my mother, Sirrah, Sirrah! 
Come of[f] of my mother Sirrah!" 

"Peace, boy!" quoth Venus, this is Mars the 

furious god of batle; 
All the heavenly plannets him obey, then cease 

thy needless pratle. 

He is a god, and will comand ; hee'l neither beg 
nor borrow." 

" Be he god or divil, let him be more civill : 

Come of[f] of my mother, Sirrah, Sirrah! 
Come of[f] of my mother Sirrah!" 

She tooke the child, and kist his cheek, saying 

"Mars his rage is over; 
His friends that we all must keep; se, nothing 

thou discover; 
He will not stay to trouble thee, heel go from 

hence to-morrow." 

"I care not, I; let him go by and by, 
Come of[f] of my mother, Sirrah ! 
Come of[f] of my mother, Sirrah !" 



NARCISSUS, COME KISS US! 37 



NARCISSUS, COME KISS US! 

[c. 161050] 
[Rawl. MS. Poet. ; also Ane Pleasant Garden}. 

As I was a walking, I cannot tell where, 
Nor whither, in verse or in prose; 

Nor know I the meaning, altho' they all sate, 
Even, as it were, under my nose. 

But ever and ever the ladies all cried, 

44 Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside. " 

There came in a lad from I cannot tell where, 
With I cannot tell what in his hand; 

It was a fine thing, tho' it had little sense, 
But yet it would lustily stand. 

Then ever and ever the ladies all cried, 

"Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside." 

Some shaked it, some stroked it, some kiss'd it, 
For it looked so lovely indeed, [it's said, 

All loved it as honey, and none were afraid, 
Because of their bodily need. 

Then ever and ever the ladies all cried, 

"Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside." 



38 NARCISSUS, COME KISS US! 

At length he did put his pretty fine toy 

(I cannot tell were 'twas) below, 
Into one of these ladies, I cannot tell why, 

Nor wherefore, that he should do so. 
Then ever and ever the ladies all cried, 
"Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside." 

But when these fair ladies had sported all night, 
And rifled Dame Nature's scant store; 

And pleasured themselves with Venus' delight, 
Till the youth could hardly do more. 

Then ever and ever the ladies all cried, 

" Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside." 

The lad being tired, began to retreat, 
And hang down his head like a flower; 

The ladies the more did desire a new heat, 
But alace! it was out of his power. 

But ever and ever the ladies all cried, 

" Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside." 

When full forty weeks were expired, 

A pitiful story to tell, 
These ladies did get what they little desired, 

For their bellies began for to swell. 
Still ever and ever the ladies all cried, 
" Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside." 

Lucina in pity then sent them her aid, 
To cese them of all their sorrow; 



NARCISSUS, COME KISS US! 39 

But when these fair ladies were once brought to bed, 

They still had the same mind tomorrow. 
And dandling theii babies they rantingly cried, 
M Narcissus, shant miss us, and be by our side ! " 




40 THE COURTIERS GOOD MORROW 



THE COURTIERS GOOD MORROW TO 
HIS MISTRIS 

[1611] 
[From THOMAS RAVENSCROFT'S Melismatd\. 

Canst thou loue, and lie alone, 
Loue is so, loue is so disgraced: 
Pleasure is best, wherein is rest 
In a heart embraced. 

Rise, rise, rise, 

Day-light doe not burn out, 

Bels doe ring, 

And Birdes doe sing, 

Onely I that mourne out. 

Morning Starre doth now appeare, 
Wind is husht, and skies clearer 
Come come away, come come away, 
Canst thou loue and burne out day? 

Rise, rise, rise, rise, 

Day-light doe not burne out, 

Bels doe ring, 

Birds doe sing, 

Onely I that mourne out. 



ROOM FOR A JOVIAL TINKER 41 



ROOM FOR A JOVIAL TINKER: OLD 
BRASS TO MEND 

[c. 1616] 

Here is a Tinker full of mettle, 

The which can mend pot, pan, or Kettle; 

For stopping of holes is his delight, 

His work goes forward day and night. 

If there be any women brave 

Whose Coldrons need of mending have, 

Send for this Tinker nere deny him, 

He'l do your work well if you try him. 

A proof of him Tie forthwith show, 

'Cause you his workmanship may know. 

[Rox. Ballads, iii. 230: cf "The Tinker" from 
Merry Drollery (ibio), p. impost: tune, 
Behold the man &cl 

It was a Lady of the North she lov'd a Gentleman, 
And knew not well what course to take, to use 

him now and than. 
Wherefore she writ a Letter, and seal'd it with 

her hand, 
And bid him be a Tinker, to mend both pot 

and pan, 
With a hey ho, hey, deny deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 



42 ROOM FOR A JOVIAL TINKER 

And when the merry Gentleman the Letter he 

did read, 
He got a budget on his back, and Apron with 

all speed, 
His pretty shears and pincers, so well they did 

agree, 
With a long pike staff upon his back, came tripping 

o're the Lee. 
With a hey ho, hey, deny deny down ; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 

When he came to the Ladye's house, he knocked 

at the gate, 
Then answered this Lady gay, "Who knocketh 

there so late?" 
"Tis I, Madam," the Tinker said, "I work for 

gold and fee: 
If you have any broken pots or pans, come 

bring them all to me." 
With a hey ho, hey, deny deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 

" I am the bravest Tinker that lives beneath the Sun, 
If you have any work to do, you shall have it 

well done; 
I have brasse within my budget, and punching 

under my Apron, 
I'm come unto your Ladyship, and mean to 

mend your Coldron." 



ROOM FOR A JOVIAL TINKER 43 

With a hey ho, hey, derry derry down; with hey 
trey, down down, derry. 

" I prethee," said the Lady gay, " bring now 

thy budget in 
I have store of work for thee to do, if thou 

wilt once begin." 
Now when the Tinker he came in, that did the 

budget bear, 
"God blesse," quoth he, "your Ladyship! God 

save you Madam fair." 
With hey ho, hey, derry derry down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 

But when the Lady knew his face, she then 

began to wink, 
"Hast, lusty Butler!" then quoth she, "to fetch 

the man some drink. 
Give him such meat as we do eat, and drink as 

we do use, 
It is not for a Tinker's Trad good liquor to 

refuse." 
With hey ho, hey, derry derry down; with hey 

trey down down, derry. 

But when that he had eat and drunk, the truth 

of all is so, 
The Lady took him by the sleeve, her work to 

him to show, 



44 ROOM FOR A JOVIAI TINKER 

" Let up thy Tools, Tinker, " quoth she, " and 

see there be none lost, 
And mend my Kettle handsomely, what ere it 

doth me cost." 
With hey ho, hey, derry derry down; with hey 

trey, down down, derry. 

"Your work, Madam, shall be well done, if you 

will pay me for't; 
For every nayl that I do drive, you shall give 

me a mark. 
If I do not drive the nayl to th'head, Tie have 

nothing for my pain, 

And what I do receive of you shall be return'd again. " 
With hey ho, hey, derry derry down; with hey 

trey, down down, derry. 

At last being come into the Room, where he the 

work should do, 
The Lady lay down on the bed, so did the 

Tinker too: 
Although the Tinker knockt amain, the Lady was 

not offended, 
But before that she rose from the bed, her Coldron 

was well mended. 
With hey ho, hey, derry derry down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 



ROOM FOR A JOVIAL TINKER 45 

But when his work was at an end, which he did 

in the dark, 
She put her hand into her purse and gave him 

twenty mark, 
"Heres mony for thy work," said she, "and 

I thank thee for thy pain, 
And when my Coldron mending lacks Tie send 

for thee again." 
With hey ho, hey, deny deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 

The Tinker he was well content for that which 

he had done, 
So took his budget on his back, and quickly he 

was gone. 
Then the Lady to her husband went, " O my dear 

Lord," quoth she, 
I have set the bravest Tinker at work that ever 

you did see." 
With hey ho, hey, derry deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, derry. 

44 No fault at all this Tinker hath, but he takes 

dear for his work, 
That little time that he wrought here it cost me 

twenty mark.* 
"If you had been so wise," quoth he, "for to 

have held your own, 



46 ROOM FOR A JOVIAL TINKER 

Before you set him to this work the price you 

might have known." 
With hey ho, hey, deny deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 

"Pray hold your peace, my Lord," quoth she, 

" and think it not too dear. 
If you cou'd doo't so well 'twould save you 

forty pound a year." 
With that the Lord most lovingly, to make all 

things amends, 
He kindly kist his Lady gay, and so they both 

were friends. 
With hey ho, hey, deny deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, deny. 

You merry Tinkers, every one, that hear this 

new-made Sonnet, 
When as you do a Lady's work be sure you 

think upon it; 
Drive home your nayls to the very head, and 

do your work profoundly, 
And then no doubt your Mistresses will pay you 

for it soundly. 
With hey ho, hey, derry deny down; with hey 

trey, down down, derry. 



O JOLLY ROBIN 47 



O JOLLY ROBIN 

[c. 162050] 
\Ptrcy Folio Manuscript, page 95 of MS.]. 

"O lolly Robin, hold thy hande! 
I am not tyde in Cupids bande; 
I pray thee leaue thy foolinge, heyda! 
by my faith & troth I cannot: heyda, fie! 
what? doe you meane to be soe bold? 
I must cry out! I cannot holde: heyda, fie!" 
" what a deale of doe is here, is here, is here ! ' 
" 1 begin to fainta! 
heyda, fye! oh! oh! oh! oh!" 
"what was thai you sayd? 
heyda! heyda! heyda! heyda! 
you will neuer leaue till I be paide." 

" O lolly Robin, doe thy worst ! 
thou canst not make my belly burst. 
I pray thee leaue thy fooling : heyda ! " 
"by my faith & troth I cannot: heyda, fie! H 
"what? doe you meane to vse me soe? 
I pray thee Robin let me goe: heyda, fye!" 
" what a deale of doe is heere, is heere, is heere ! ' 
" I begin to fainta ! 



48 O JOLLY ROBIN 

heyda, fye! oh! oh! oh! oh! 
"what was thai you sayd? 
heyda! heyda! heyda! heyda! 
you will neuer leaue till I be paide." 




WHEN PHEBUS ADDREST 49 



WHEN PHEBUS ADDREST 
[f. 162050] 

[Percy Folio Manuscript t page 96 of MS.; prob- 
ably the earliest copy known]. 

When Phebus addrest himselfc to the west, 

& set vp his rest below, 
Cynthia agreed in her gliteringe weede 

her bewtie on me to bestow; 
& walking alone, attended by none, 

by chance I hard one crye 
" O doe not, doe not, kill me yett, 

for I am not prepared to dye ! " 

W/'th that I drew neare to see & to heare, 

& strange did appeare such a showe; 
the Moone it was bright, & gaue such a light 

as ffitts not each wight to know: 
a man & a Mayd together were Laid, 

& eu*r the mayd shee did cry, 
" O doe not, doe not, kill me yet, I, 

for I am not resolued to dye ! " 

The youth was rough, he tooke vp her stuffe, 
& to blindmans buffe they did goe; 

MKRRV SONGS I. 4 



50 WHEN PHEBUS \DDREST 

hee kept such a coyle, he gaue her the foyle, 
soe great the broyle it did growe. 

but shee was soe yonge, & he was soe stronge, 
& he left her not till shee did crye, 

"O doe not, doe not, kill me yett, 
for I am not resolued to dye ! " 

wz'th that he gaue ore, & solemplye swore 

he wold kill her noe more that night, 
but badd her adew: full litle he knew 

shee wold tempt him to more delight. 
But when they shold part, it went to her hart, 

& gaue her more cause for to crye, 
"O kill me, kill me, once againe, 

ffor Now I am willing to dye ! " 




FRYAR AND BOYE 51 



FRYAR AND BOYE 
[c. 162050] 

[Percy Folio Manuscript, p. 104 of MS.: the 
completes! copy known]. 

That god that dyed for vs all 
& dranke both vinigar & gall, 

bringe vs out of balle, 
and giue them both good life & longe 
wA/ch listen doe vnto my songe, 

or tend vnto ray talle! 

there dwelt a man in my countrye 
wA/ch in his life had wiues 3, 

a blessing full of loye! 
By the first wife a sonne he had, 
w^/ch was a prettye sturdye ladde, 

a good vnhappy boye. "^," 

His father loued him well, 

but his stepmother neuefr] a deale, 

I tell you as I thinke, 
All things shee thought lost, by the roode, 
to the boy did anye good, 

as either meate or drinke; 



52 FRYAR AND BOYE 

And yet I-wis it was but badde, 
nor halfe enouge therof he hade, 

but euermore the worst; 
And therfore euill might shee fare, 
that did the litle boy such care, 

soe forth as shee durst. 

Vnto the man the wiffe gan say, 

" I wold you wold put this boy awaye, 

& that right soone in haste; 
Trulie he is a cursed ladde! 
I wold some other man him hade 
*>. chasten that wold him better chast." 

Then said the goodman, "dame, not soe, 
I will not lett the yonge boy goe, 

he is but tender of age; 
Hee shall this yeere wz'th me abyde 
till he be growne more strong & tryde 

ffor to win better wage: 

"Wee haue a man, a sturdie lout, 
w&ch keepeth our neate the feilds about, 

& sleepeth all the day, 
Hee shall come home, as god me sheeld, 
and the Boy shall into the feild 

to keepe them if hee may." 

Then sayd the wiffe in verament, 
"husband, therto I giue consent, 



FRYAR AND BOYE 53 

for thai I thinke it neede." 
On the Morrow when it was day, 
the litle boy, went on his way 

vnto the feild w/'th speede. 

Off noe man hee tooke anye care, 
but song " hey ho ! away the Mare ! " 

much mirth he did pursue; 
fforth hee went w/'th might & maine 
vntill he came vnto the plaine, 

where he his dinner drew. 

But when he saw it was soe bad, 
full litle list therto he had, 

but put it from sight, 
Saying he had noe list to tast, 
but thai his hunger still shold last 

till hee came home att Night. 

And as the boy sate on a hill, 
there came an old man him vntill, 

was walking by the way; 
"Sonne," he said, "god thee see!" 
" now welcome, father, may you bee ! " 

the little boy gan say. 

The old man sayd, " I hunger sore ; 
then hast thou any meate in store 
w^/ch thou mightest giue to me ? " 



54 FRYAR AND BOYE 

The child reply ed, "soe god me saue! 
to such poore victualls as I haue, 
right welcome shall you be." 

Of this the old man was full gladd, 
the boy drew forth such as he hadd, 

& sayd "goe to gladlie." 
The old man easie was to please, 
he eate & made himselfe att ease, 

saying, "sonne, god amercye! 

"Sonne," he sayd, " thou hast giuen meate to me, 
& I will giue 3 things to thee, 

what ere thou wilt intreat." 
Then sayd the boy, "tis best, I trow, 
thai yee bestow on me a bowe 

wzth w^'ch I burds may gett." 

"A bow, my sonne, I will thee giue, 
the wfoch shall Last while thou dost liue, 

was neuer bow more fitt! 
ffor if thou shoot therin all day, 
waking or winking, or anye waye, 

the marke thou shalt hitt." 

Now when the bowe in hand he felt, 
& had the arrowes vnder his belt, 

hartilye he laught I-wiss, 
And sayd, " had I a pipe w/th-all, 



FRYAR AND BOYE 55 

tho neuer litle or soe small, 
I then had all my wishe." 

"A pipe, sonne, thou shall haue alsoe, 
w^/ch in true Musicke soe shall goe 

I put thee out of doubt- 
As who thai Hues & shall it heare, 
shall haue noe power to forbeare, 

but laugh & leape about. 

"Now tell me what the 3 d . shalbee; 
for 3 things I will giue to thee 

as I haue sayd before." 
The boy then smiling, answere made, 
"I haue enough for my pore trade, 

I will desire noe more.** 

The old man sayd, "ray troth is plight, 
thou shalt haue all I thee benight; 

say on now, let me see." 
"Att home I haue," the boy replyde, 
* a cruell step dame full of pride, 

who is most curst to mee; 

"when meate my father giues to race, 
shee wishes poyson it might bee, 

and stares me in the face: 
Now when shee gazeth on me soe, 
I wold shee might a rapp let goe 

thai might ring through the place." 



56 FRYAR AND BOYE 

The old man answered then anon, 
"when-ere shee lookes thy face vpon, 

her tayle shall wind the home 
Soe Lowdlye, thai who shold it heare 
shall not be able to forbeare, 

but laugh her vnto scorne. 

" Soe, farwell sonne ! " the old man cryed ; 
" god keepe you, Sir ! " the boy replyed, 

" I take my leaue of thee ! 
God, thai blest of all things, may 
keepe thee save both night & day ! " 

" gramercy, sonne ! " sayd hee. 

When it grew neere vpon the night, 
lacke, well pr<?pared, hied home full right ;- 

itt was his ordinance; 
And as he went his pipe did blow, 
the whilest his cattell on a row 

about him gan to dance; 

Thus to the towne he pipt full trim, 
his skipping beasts did ffollow him 

into his ffathers close. 
He went & put them [up] each one; 
w/wch done, he homewards went anon; 

vnto his fathers hall he gooes. 

His fifather att his supper sate, 
& litle lacke espyed well thatt, 



FRYAR AND BOYE 57 

and said to him anon, 
"father, all day I kept your neate, 
at night I pray you giue me some meate, 

I am hungrye, by Saint lohn! 

" Meateless I haue lyen all the day, 
& kept your beasts, they did not stray; 

My dinner was but ill." 
His (father tooke a Capon winge, 
& at the boy he did it fling, 

bidding him eate his fill. 

This greeued his stepdames hart full sore, 
who lothed the Lack! still more & more; 

shee stared him in the face: 
w/th thai shee let goe such a blast 
thai made the people all agast, 

itt sounded through Me place; 

Each one laught & made good game, 
but the curst wife grew red for shame 

and wisht shee had beene gone. 
"Perdy," the boy sayd, "well I wott 
thai gun was both well charged and shott, 

and might haue broke a stone." 

ffull curstlye shee lookt on him tho; 
thai looke another cracke lett goe 

wA/ch did a thunder rise. 
Quolti the boy, "did you euer see 



58 FRYAR AND POYE 

a woman let her pelletts flee 
More thicke and more at ease? 

" ffye ! " said the boy vnto his dame, 
" temper yowr teltale bum/w, for shame ! " 

w/fczch made her full of sorrow. 
"Dame," said the goodman, "goe thy way, 
for why, I sweare, by night nor day 

thy geere is not to borrow." 

Now afterwards, as you shall heare, 
Vnto the house there came a fryar, 

& lay there all the night. 
The wiffe this fryer loued as a Saint, 
and to him made a great complaint 

of lackes most vile despight. 

"We haue," quoth shee, "wz'thin, I-wis, 
a wiced boy, none shrewder is, 

w/ch doth me mighty care; 
I dare not looke vpon his face, 
or hardly tell my shamefull case, 

soe filthylie I fare; 

"for gods loue meet this boy to-morrow, 
beat him well, & giue him sorrow, 

and make him blind or lame." 
The fryar swore he wold him beat, 
the wiffe prayd him not to forgett, 

the boy did her much shame: 



FRYAR AND BOYE 59 

"Some wiche he is," quoih shee, "I smell." 
44 but, " qwoth the fryar, "He beat him well! 

of thai take you noe care; 
He teach him witchcraft, if I may." 
"O," qwth the wiffe, "doe soe, I pray, 

lay on & doe not spare." 

Early next raorne the boy arose, 
& to the field full soone he goes, 

his cattell for to driue. 
The fryer then vp as early gatt, 
he was afrayd to come to late, 

he ran full fast & blythe. 

But when he came vnto the land, 
he found where litle lacke did stand, 

keeping his beasts alone. 
"Now, boy," he said, "god giue thee shame! 
what hast thou done to thy stepdame? 

tell me forthwith anon! 

" And if thou canst not quitt thee well, 
He beate thee till thy body swell, 
I will not longer byde." 
The boy replyed, "what ayleth thee? 
ray stepdame is as well as thee; 
what needs you thus to Chyde? 

"Come, will you see my arrow flye 
and hitt yon small bird in the eye, 



60 FRYAR AND BOYE 

& other things w/thall? 
S/'r fryer, tho I haue litle witt, 
yett yonder bird I meane to hitt, 

& giue her you I shall." 

There sate a small birde in a bryar: 

"Shoot, shoot, you wagg," then sayd the fryer, 

"for that I long to see." 
lacke hitt the bird vpon the head 
soe right thai shee fell downe for dead, 

noe further cold shee flee. 

ffast to the bush the fryar went, 
laid hold on & vp the bird in hand hee hent, 

much wondering at the chance. 
Meane while lacke tooke his pipe & playd 
soe lowd, the fryar grew mad apaide, 

& fell to skip and dance; 

Now sooner was the pipes sound heard, 
but Bedlam like he bou[n] cet & fared, 

& leapt the bush about; 
The sharpe bryars cacth him by the face, 
and by the breech & other place, 

thai fast the blood ran out; 

It tare his clothes downe to the skirt, 
cowl his cope, his coole, his linen shirt, 

garment & euery other wcedc. 

The thornes this while were rough and thicke, 



FRYAR AND BOYE 61 

& did his priuy members pricke, 
thai fast they gan to bleede. 

lacke, as he piped, laught amonge ; at intcrval3 

the fryar w/th bryars was vildlyc stunge, 

he hopped wonderous hye. 
Att last the fryar held vp his hand, 
& said, " I can noe longer stand ! 

Oh! I shall dancing dye! 

"Gentle lacke, thy pipe hold still, 
& here I vow for goode nor ill 

to doe thee any woe!** 
lacke laug[h]ing, to him thus rcplycd, 
"fryer, sckipp out on the other side, 

thou hast free leaue to goe." 

Out of the bush the fryar then went, 
all Martird, raggd, scratcht & rent, 

& torne on euery side; 
Hardly on him was left a clout 
to wrap his belly round about, 

his harlotrye to hide. 

The thornes had scratcht him by the face, 
the hands, the thighes, & euery place, 

he was all bathed in bloode 
Soe much, thai who the fryar did see, 
for feare of him was faine to flee, 

thinking he had beene woode. 



62 FRYAR AND BOYE 

When to the good wife home he came, 
he made noe bragge for verry shame 

to see his clothes rent all; 
Much sorrow in his hart he had, 
mad & euery man did guesse him made 

when he was in the hall. 

The goodwiffe said, "where hast thou beene? 
sure in some evill place, I weene, 

by sight of thine array." 
"Dame," said he, "I came from thy sonne; 
the devill & he hath me vndone, 

noe man him conquer may." 

w/th thai the goodman he came in, 
made complaint the wiffe sett on her madding pin, 

cryed, "heeres a foule array! 
thy sonne, thai is thy liffe & deere, 
hath almost slaine the holy fryar, 

alas & welaway ! " 

The goodman said, " Benedicitee ! 
what hath the vile boy done to thee? 

now tell me w/thout let." 
"The de\dll him take!" the fryar he sayd, 
"he made me dance, despite my head, 
to gambol among the thornes the hey-to-bee." 

The goodman said vnto him thoe, 

" father ! hadst thou beene murdered soe, 



FRYAR AND BOYE 63 

it had beene deadly sine." 
The fryar to him made this replye, 
" the pipe did sound soe Merrilye 

thai I cold never blin." st p 

Now when it grew to almost night, 
lacke the boy came home full right 

as he was wont to doo; 
But when he came into the hall, 
full soonc his father did him call, 

& bad him come him too: 

"Boy," he said, a comc tell me heare, 
what hast thou done vnto this fryer? 

lye not in any thing.** 
"ffather," he said, "now by my birthe, 
I plaide him but a fitt of Mirth 

& pipet him vp a spring." 

"That pipe," said his father, "wold I heare." 
"now god forbidd!" cryed out the fryar; 

his hands he then did wringe. 
"You shall," the boy said, "by gods grace." 
the ffryar replyed, "woe & alas!" 

making his sorrowes ringe. 

"ffor gods loue!" said the warched fryar, 
w & if you will thai strange pipe heare, 

binde me fast to a post! 
for sure my fortune thus I reade, 



64 FRY AY AND BOYE 

if dance I doe, I am but deade, 
my woe-full life is lost ! " 

Strong ropes they tooke, both sharpe and round, 
& to the post the fryer bounde 

in the middest of the hall. 
All they w^zch att the table sate, 
laughed and made good sport theratt, 

sayinge, " fryer, thou canst not fall ! " 

Then sayd the goodman to the boy, 
" lacke, pipe me vp a merry toye, 

pipe freelye when thou will ! " 
"ffather," the boy said, "verelye 
you shall haue mirth enough e & glee 

till you bidd me bee still." 

With thai his pipe he quicklye sent, 
& pipt, the whilest in verament 

each creature gan to dance; 
Lightly the scikipt & leapt about, 
throwing out yarkuig in their leggs, now in, now out, 

striuing aloft to prance. 

The good man, as in sad dispaire, 
leapt out & through and ore his chayre, 

noe man cold caper hyer; 
Some others leapt quite ore the stockes, 
some start att strawes & fell att blockes, 

some wallowed in the fyer. 



FRYAR AND BOYE 65 

The goodman made himselfe good sportt 
to see them dance in this madd sortt; 

the goodwiffe sate not still, 
But as shee dancet shee looket on lacke, 
& fast her tayle did double each cracke, 

lowd as a water Mill. 

The fryer this while was almost lost, 
he knocket his pate against the post, 

it was his dancing grace; 
The rope rubd him vnder the chinn 
thai the blood ran from his tattered sckin 

in many a Naked place. 

lacke, piping, ran into the street; 
they followed him with nimble ffeet, 

hauing noe power to stay, 
And in their hast they dore did cracke, 
eche tumbling over his ffellows backe 

vnmindfull of their way. 

The Neighbors thai were dwelling by, 
hearing the pipe soe Merrilye, 

came dancing to the gate; 
Some leapt ore dores, some oer the hatch, 
Noe man wold stay to draw the latch 

but thought they came to Late; 

Some sicke or sleeping in their bedd, 
as the by chance lift vp their heade, 

MERRY SONGS I. < 



66 FRYAR AND 3OYE 

were w/th the pipe awaked; 
Straight forth thk, start thorrow dores & kockes, 
some in their shirts, some in their smockes, 

& some starke belly naked. 

When all were gathered round about, 
here was a vild vnrulye rout 

thai dancing in the street, 
Of w^zch, some lame thai cold not goe, 
striuing to leape, did tumble soe 

they dancet on hands & feet. 

lacke tyred with the sport said, "now He rest." 
"doe," quoth his father, "I hold it best, 

thou cloyest me wz'th this cheere; 
I pray thee, boy, now quiett sitt; 
in faith this was the Merryest fitt 

I heard this 7 yeere." 

All those thai dancing thither came, 
laught heartilye & made good game, 

yett some gott many a fall. 
"Thou cursed boy!" cryed out the fryar, 
"heere I doe summon thee to appeare 

beffore the Officiall! 

" Looke thou be there on fryday next ; 
He meet thee then, thou now p*;plext, 

for to ordaine thee sorrow." 
The boy replyed, "I make avowe, 



FRYAR AND BOYE 67 

fryer, Be appeare as soone as thou, 
if fryday were to Morrowe." 

But fryday came, as you shall heare; 
lackes stepdam & the dancing fryar, 

together they were mett, 
And other people a great pace 
flockt to the court to heare eche case: 

the Officiall was sett. 

Much c[i]uill matters were to doo, 
more libells read then one o tow 

both [against priest & clarke;] 
Some there had testaments to proue, 
some women there through wanton loue, 

w^/ch gott strokes in the darke. 

Each Proctor there did plead his case; 
when forth did stepp fryer Topias 

& lackes stepdame alsoe: 
"Sir Officiall," a-lowd said hee, 
"I haue brought a wicked boy to thee, 

hath done me mightye woe; 

"He is a wiche, as I doe feare, 
in Orleance he can find noe peere, 

this of my troth I know." 
"He is a Devill," q*th the wiffe, 
"& almost hath bereaued my liffe!" 

at thai her taile did blow. 



68 FRYAR AND 3OYE 

Soe lowd, the assembly laught theratt, 
& said 'her pistolls cracke was flatt, 

the charge was all amisse.' 
"Dame," quoth the gentle Officiall, 
"proceed & tell me forth thy tale, 

& doe not let for this." 

The wiffe thai feared another cracke, 
stood mute, & neere a word shee spake; 

shame put her in such dread. 
"Ha!" said the fryer right angerlye, 
"knaue! this is all along sill of thee; 

now euill mayst thou speed! " 

The fryer said, "Sir Officiall! 
this wicked boy will vexe vs all 

vnlesse you doe him chast. 
S/r, he hath yett a pipe trulye 
will make you dance & leape full hie 

& breake yowr hart at last." 

The Officiall replyd, "pmlee! 
such a pipe faine wold I see, 

& what mirth it can make." 
" Now god forbidd ! " replyed the fryar, 
"that ere wee shold that vild pipe heare 

ere I my way hence take." 

"Pipe on, lacke!" sayd the officiall, 
"& let me heare thy cuning all." 



FRYAR AND BOYE 69 

lacke blew his pipe full lowde 
That euery man start vp & dancte; 
Proctors & preists, and somners pranct, 

all in thai great crowde; 

Over the deske the officiall ran, 
& hopt vpon the table, then 

straight lumpt vnto the flore. 
The fryer thai danct as fast as hee, 
mett him midway, & dangerouslye 

broke cithers face full sore. 

The register leapt from his pen, 
& hopt into the throng of men, 

his inkhorne in his hande; 
with swinging round about his head, 
some he strucke blind, some almost dead, 

some they cold hardly stand. 

The proctors flung their bills about, 
the goodwiues tayle gaue many a shout, 

pt> fuming all the Mirthe; 
The Somners, as they had beene woode, 
leapt ore the formes & seates a goode, 

& wallowed on the earth. 

Wenches thai for their pennance came, 
& other Meeds of wordlye shame, 

danct euery one as fast; 
Each sett on a merry pin, 



70 FRYAR AND BO YE 

some broke their heads, & some their shin, 
& some their noses brast. 

The officiall thus sore turmayld, 

Halfe swelt wi/A sweat, & almost spoyld, 

cryed to the wanton childe 
'To pipe noe more within that place, 
but stay the sound, euen for gods grace, 

& loue of Mary Milde.' 

lacke sayd, " as you will, it shal be, 
provided I may hence goe free, 

& no man doe me wrong, 
Neither this woman nor this fryer, 
nor any other creature heere." 

he answered him anon, 
"lacke, I to thee my promise plight, 
in thy defence I mean to fight, 

& will oppose thy fone." 

lacke ceast his pipes: then all still stood; 
some laughing hard, some raging woode. 

soe flatted at thai tide 
The Officiall & the Somner, 
the stepdame & the wicked fryer, 

wz'th much Toy, mirth, and pride. 



AS I WAS RIDINGE BY THE WAY 71 



AS I WAS RIDINGE BY THE WAY 
[c. 162050]. 

[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 104 of MS.]. 

As I was ryding by the way, 

a woman prafered me a bagge, 
& 40*7*. cattell more, to stay 

& giue her belly but a swagge. 

A pox on the whore, they were but scrapps 
thai I supposed was single monye; 

the cattell had lice, or else p*rhapps 

I had light and tooke her by the coney. 

I had not further rydd a Myle 

but I mett with a market Maide 
who sunge, the way for to beguile, 

in these same words, and thus shee said: 

44 1 see the Bull dothe Bull the cow; 

& shall I Hue a maiden still? 
I see the bore doth brim the sow; 

& yet there is neuer a lacke for gill." 

I had some hope, & to her spoke, 

"sweet hart, shall I put my flesh in thine? 



72 AS I WAS RIDINGE B\ THE WAY 

"with all my hart, Szr! yowr nose in my arse," 
qwth she, "for to keepe out the winde." 

Shee ryde vpon a tyred mare, 

& to reuenge noe time wrthstoode, 

I bluntlye asket pro to occupye her; 

but first shee wold know wherfore thai was good. 

"It will make thee liuely," I did say, 
" put loy and spiritt in stead of woee. " 

" then occupy my mare, I pray, 
good Sir, for shee can hardly e goe." 

I milder grew, & wold but feele: 

She said she was neuer felt, but kist; 

I was content, & shee said, "weele, 
youst kisse my bum and feele my fist." 

I was red & pale w/th shame & spight 

to be soe answered of the drabb, 
thai I swore, & spurrd, & away did ride, 

& of my wooinge was noe blabbe. 




OFF A PURITANE 



OFF A PURITANE 

[c. 162050] 
[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 182 of MS.]. 

It was a puritanicall ladd 

thai was called Mathyas, 
& he wold goe to Amsterdam 

to speake with Ananyas. 
he had not gone past halfe a mile, 

but he mett his holy sister; 
hee layd his bible vnder her breeche, 

& merylye hee kist her. 

44 Alas ! what wold they wicked say ? " 

qwoth shee, M if they had scene itt ! 
my Buttocckes the lye to lowe: I wisht 

appocrypha were in itt!" 
" but peace, Sweet hart, or ere wee p0;t, 

I speake itt out of pure devotion, 
by yee & nay lie not away 

till thou feele my spiritts motion. " 

The huft & puft with many heaues, 

till thai the both were tyred, 
" alas ! " qzorth shee, " youle spoyle the leaues 

my peticoates all Myred! 



74 OFF A PURITANE 

if wee professors shold bee knowne 

to the English congregation 
eyther att Leyden or Amsterdam, 

itt wold disgrace our nation; 

"But since itt is, thai patt wee must, 

tho I am much vnwilling, 
good brother, lets haue the tother thrust, 

& take thee this fine shilling 
to beare thy charges as thou goes, 

& passage ore the ocean." 
then downe shee Layd, & since tis sayd, 

shee quencht his spirits motion. 




A MAID AND A YOUNGE MAN 75 



A MAID AND A YOUNGE MAN 

[c. 162050] 
[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 197 of MS.]. 

A man and a younge maid thai loued a long time 
were tane in a frenzye ithe Midsomwer prime; 
the maid shee lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 

Thus talking & walking the came to a place 
Inuironed about w/th trees & with grasse, 
The maid shee lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 

He shifted his hand wheras he had placet, 
hee handled her knees instead of her wast, 
The Maid shee lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 

He shifftcd his hand till hee came to her knees, 
he tickeled her, & shee opened her thyhes, 
yett s[t]ill shee lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 



;6 A MAID AND A YOUNGE MAN 

He h ottered & totered, & there was a line 
that drew him on forward ; he went on amaine ; 
yett still shee lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 

He light in a hole ere he was aware! 

the lane itt was streat; he had not gone farr, 

but shee fell a kissing, hye! 

and he lay drooping, hoe, and he lay drooping, hoe. 

"My Billy, my pilly! how now?" q#0th shee; 
" gett vp againe, Billy, if thai thou louest me ; " 
yett still he Lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 

He thought Mickle shame to lye soe longe; 
he gott vp againe & grew very strong; 
the Mayd shee Lay drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 

The trees & the woods did wring about, 
and euery leafe began to showte, 
and there was such drooping, hye; 
the man he lay whopping, hey, the man he lay 
whopping hoe. 



IN A MAY MORNINGE 77 



IN A MAY MORNINGE 

fr. 1620-50] 
\Percy Folio Manuscript, page 383 of MS.]. 

In a may morning I mett sweet nursse 
w/th a babe in her armes, sweetly cold busse. 
I wold to god itt were mine ! I shold be glad ont ! 
ffor it was a merry mumping tiling, who ere was 
dad ont. 

I saluted her kindlye, & to her I sayd, 
" god morrow, sweet honye, and you be a mayd ; 
or if you wold shew to me, I shold be glad ont ; 
or if you wold tell me who is the right dad ont." 

41 The dad of my child, S/r, I doe not well know, 
ffor all thai lay w/th mee refuseth me now 
from one to the other; still I wold be rid ont." 
14 but whosoeuer gott the Child, He be the dad ont." 

M lie take itt in mine armes, & wislye He worke, 
He lay itt the hye way as men come from kirke, 
& eu*rye one thai comes by shall haue a 

. glance or ly 

glegge ont, look 

vntill I haue ffound out a man, the right dad ont." 



78 IN A MAY MORNINGE 

There came a kind Scotchman whose name is not 

knowne, 
sayes hee to this sweet hart, " this babye is mine 

owne; 

come bind it vpon my backe ; lone shall be rid ont ; 
for whosoeu<?r gott the child, He be the dad ont." 

" Now, nay ! now, nay ! " shee sayes, " soe itt may 

not bee! 

your looke & his countenance doe not agree ; 
for had hee beene sike a swayne, I had neere 

been great ont; 
for hee was a blythe young man thai was the 

right dad ont. 

" his lippes like the rubye, his cheekes like the rose, 
he tempthed all ffayre mayds where-euer he goes 
first he did salute mee ; then was I right glad ont ; 
O hee was a blythe younge man thai was the 
right dad ont. 

"He trauell through England & Scottland soe 

wyde, 

& a-ffoote I will ffollow him to be his bryde; 
He bind itt vpon my backe, He not be ryd ont 
vntill I haue found out the man thate the right 

dad ont. 

husse = hush; " He husse itt, He busse itt, lie lapp itt in say; 

say = silk & b 



IN A MAY MORNINGE 79 

He bind itt vpon my backe, lie not be ridde ont 
vntill I haue found out the man Mots the right 
dad ont. 

" And thus to conclude, thoe itt flail to ray Lott 
to ffind a dad ffor my barne thai I cannott ; bairn, child 
if an englishman gett a child, & wold be ridd ont, 
let him bring it to Scot(c]hman, and heele be the 
dad ont." 




8o I DREAMED MY LOUE 



I DREAMED MY LOUE 
[c. 1620-50] 

[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 480 of MS. Also 
a varying version in Merry Drollery, 1661]. 

I dreamed my loue lay in her bedd: 

itt was my Chance to take her: 
her leggs & armes abroad were spredd; 

shee slept; I durst not awake her. 
O pitty itt were, thai one soe faire 

shold Crowne her loue w/th willowe; 
the tresses of her golden haire 

did kisse he[r] louely pillowe. 

Methought her belly was a hill 

much like a mount of pleasure, 
vnder whose height there growes a well; 

the depth no man Can measure, 
about the plefsjant mountaines topp 

there growes a louely thickett, 
wherin 2 beagles trambled, 

& raised a liuely prickett. 

They hunted there wz'th pleasant noyce 
about the pleasant mountaine, 



I DREAMED MY LOUE 81 

till hee by heat was fforct to ffly, 

& skipp into the ffountaine. 
they beagles ffollowed to the brinke, 

& there att him they barked; 
he plunged about, but wold not shrinke; 

his Coming fforth they wayted. 

Then fforth he Came as one halfe lame, 

weere weary, (Taint, and tyred; 
& layd him downe betwixt her leggs, 

as helpe he had required, 
the beagles being reffresht againe, 

my Loue ffrom slecpe bercued; 
shee dreamed shee had me in her arraes, 

& shee was not deceiued. 




MIKKV SO.MOS 1. 



82 ALL IN A GREENE MEADOWE 



ALL IN A GREENE MEADOWE 

[c. 1620-50] 
[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 518 of MS.]. 

All in a greene meadow, a riuer running by, 
I hard a proper maiden both waile, weepe, and crye, 
the teares ffrom her eyes as cleare as any pearle ; 
much did I lament the mourning of the girle: 
shee sighed and sobbed, & to her selfe sayd, 
" alas ! what hap had I to Hue soe long a maid ? 

" Now in this world no Curtesye is knowen, 
& young men are hard harted, w^/ch makes 

me Hue alone; 
the day and time hath beene, if I had still beene 

wise, 
I might haue enioyed my true loue had I not 

beene so npse]; 
but Coyishness, & toyishness, & peeuishness 

such store 
hath brought me to this pensiueness, and many 

maidens [more]. 

" Some dames thai are precise, & heare me thus 

Complaine, 
theyle thinke me fond and Idle, my Creditt much 

wold stapne.] 



ALL IN A GREENE MEADOWE 83 

but lett me ansewre them; the Case might be 

their owne; 

the wisest on the earth, by loue may be orethrowen ; 
ffor Cupid is blinded, and cometh in a Cloud, 
& aimeth att a ragg as soone as att a robe. 

" Sith goddesses come downe to iest with such a boy, 
then hapily poore maidens may tread shoestheir 

awrye. 

Hellen of greece for bewty was the rarest, 
a wonder of the world, & ccrtainlye the ffaircst; 
yett wold shee, nor Cold shec, liue a maiden still. 

MS. torn away 

few or none can carrye 

others all did marry 

oftime thai they haue vsed before 

[Whoever it be] thai come, I will deny no more, 
[be itt light o]r be itt darke, doe he lookc or winke, 
[He let him hit] the marke, if he haue witt but 
for to thinke. 

[Tho silly m]aidens nicely deny itt when its offered, 
[yet I wijsh them wisely to take itt when itts 

proffered; 

[If they be li]ke to Cressus to scorne soc true a freind, 
[Theyle be] glad to receiue poore Charitye in the end. 
. [ti]me gone & time past is not recalld againe ; 
[tjherfore I wish all mayds make hast, lest witii 

me th6 Complaine. 



84 A DAINTY DUCKE 



A DAINTY DUCKE 

[c. 1620-50]. 
[Percy Folio Manuscript, page 487 of MS.]. 

A dainty ducke I Chanced to meete; 

shee wondered what I wold doe, 
& curteously shee did mee greete 

as an honest woman shold doe. 

I asked her if shee wold drinke; 

shee wondered what I wold doe, 
shee answered me with sober winke, 

as an honest woman shold doe. 



I tooke 



[A leaf is gone here in the MS., containing among 
other things perhaps the beginning of " The 
Spanish Lady"\ 




THE JOVIAL COMPANIONS 85 



THE JOVIAL COMPANIONS, 

OR 

THE THREE MERRY TRAVELLORS, 

WHO PAID THEIR SHOT WHERE EVER THEY CAME, 

WITHOUT EVER A STIVER OF MONEY 

[c. 1630] 

[In Bagford Ballads, i. 88; music in Pills to 
Purge Melancholy (1719), vi. 177]. 

There was three Travellers, Travellers three, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

And they wou'd go Travel the North Country, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

They Travelled East, and they Travelled West, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

Where ever they came still they drank of the best, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

At length by good fortune they came to an Inn, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

And they were as Merry as e're they had been, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

A Jolly young Widdow did smilling appear, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

Who drest them a Banquet of delicate cheer, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 



86 THE JOVIAL COMPANIONS 

Both Chicken and sparrow grass she did provide, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down deny, 

You'r Welcome kind Gentlemen, welcome, (she 

cry'd) 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

They called for liquor, both Beer, Ale, and Wine, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

And every thing that was curious and fine, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

They drank to their Hostess a merry full bowl, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

She pledg'd them in love, like a generous Soul, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

The Hostess, her Maid, and Cousin all three, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

They Kist and was merry, as merry cou'd be, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

full Bottles and Glasses replenisht the Board, 
With a hey down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

No liquors was wanting the house cou'd afford, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

When they had been Merry good part of the Day, 
With a hye dow r n, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

They called their Hostess to know what's to pay, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 



THE JOVIAL COMPANIONS 87 

There's Thirty good shilling, and Six pence, (she 
cry'd) 

With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down deny, 
They told her that she should be soon satisfy'd, 

Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

The Handsomest Man of the three up he got, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

He laid her on her Back, and paid her the shot, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

The middlemost Man to her Cousin he went, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

She being handsome, he gave her Content, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

The last Man of all he took up with the Maid, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

And thus the whole shot it was Lovingly paid, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

The Hostess, the Cousin, and Servant, we find, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 

Made Courchies, and thankt them for being so 

kind, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

The Hostess said, welcome kind Gentlemen all, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down derry, 



88 THE JOVIAL COMPANIONS 

If you chance to come this way be pleased to Call, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 

Then taking their Leaves they went merrily out, 
With a hye down, ho down, Lanktre down deny, 

And they're gone for to Travel the Nation about, 
Without ever a stiver of Mony. 




THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 89 



THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE; 

OR 

The prettiest iest that er'e you knew, 
Yet Tie say nothing but what is true; 
I once heard of a cunning Whore, 
But ner'e the like of this before. 

[1630] 

[By R(ICHARD] C[RIMSALL], Pox. Ballads, iii. 166, 
167 ; see CHAPPELL'S Popular Music of the 
Olden Time (1855-59) I. 306, 356, 375; 
tune, The Mother beguiled the Daughter]. 

All you that are disposed now, to hear a merry 

jest, 
By me shall be disclosed how a bonny Lasse 

confest, 
That she had loued one or two, nay, two or 

three and twenty, 
I cannot tell what they did doe, but she had 

Louers plenty. 
Sing Boyes, drink Boyes, why should we not be 

merry? 
Tie tell you of a bonny Lasse, and her Loue 

beyond the Ferry. 



90 THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 

This bonny Lass had caught a clap it seemes 

by some young shauer; 
She being matched] with such mishap, the Ladds 

began to leaue her; 
Though she mist of their company, some one 

made sure bargain: 
But she was lou'd of so many, that it is worth 

regarding, 
Yet she will sing, and alwayes say, " Drink round 

and lets be merry; 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry." 

She now being called to account, for to describe 

aright 
What yo[u]ng man was the Father on't, and her 

owne heart's-delight ; 
But she could not resolue the same, because 

there was so many, 
She knew not's trade, nor yet his name, for she 

was free for any. 
Sing Boyes, drink Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I have a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

Quothe she, " And if it haue a Booke, then 'twas 
the man i'th' Gowne, 



THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 91 

Or other wayes, an't haue a hooke, "'twas the 

Sheephard on the down; 
Or if it haue a whip in's hand, then sure it was 

a carter ; 
Or if it cannot goe nor stand, I thinke 'twas 

drunken Artor. 
Sing Boyes, drink Boyes ! why should we not be 

merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

'And if it haue a new fash 'on, 'twas one came 

out of France ; 
And if it be a Musician, 'twas one taught me 

to dance; 
And if in's hand a needle be, then sure it was 

a Taylor; 
Or if it chance to crosse the Sea, I thinke it 

a was saylor. 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a litle beyond 

the ferry. 

THE SECOND PART, TO THE SAME TUNE 

"And if it haue a Hammer, then sure a Smith 

was he, 
And if it be full of man[n]er, 't was one of good 

degree; 



92 THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 

Or if it haue a shuttle, a Weaver sure was he 

then; 
"And if that it be wise and su[b]tle, 'twas one 

of the Bayliffe's yong-men. 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

"And if it haue a long locke, a Courtier sure 

was he; 
And if it be a prety-cocke, then that t'was 

William he; 
And if it haue a shooe in's hand, it was the 

boone Shoomaker; 
Or if it haue a durty hand, 'twas sure a donghill- 

raker, 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not be 

merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

" And if it haue a Kettle, then sure he was a Tinker; 
And if it be full of mettle, 'twas sure a good 

Ale-drinker ; 
And if that he be Gresie, then sure it was a 

Butcher; 
And if that he be lowsie, then sure it was a 

Botcher. 



THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 93 

Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

" And if in's hand a flower be, a Gardner was 

the man, sure; 
And if it loue to take a Fee, I thinke t'was the 

Pariture : apparitor 

And if it be in a gowne of gray, 'twas one that 

lives i'th' Country: 
And if that it be fresh and gay, 'twas one of 

the common gentry. 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

"And if it have a Pen in's hand, then sure it 

was a Scriu'ner; 
And if i'th' Tauern he loue to stand, then sure 

it was a Vintner; 
And if it haue a drowsie eye, 'twas him that 

they call 'Sleeper'; 
And if with bromes and homes he cry, 'twas 

sure the Chimney-sweeper. 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 



94 THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 

I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 
the ferry. 

"And if in's hand he haue a Funne, then sure 

it was a Baker; 
And if he loue to drinke i'th' Tunne, 'twas then 

the good Ale-maker; 
And if he loue to ride a Horse, I think it was 

an Ostler; 
Or else it was the man o'th' Crosse, that was a 

valiant Wrastler. 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 

"And if it haue a mealy face, 'twas him that 

grin[d]es the come; 
And if a long note be in place, 'tis him that 

windes the home; 
And many more I here might name, which lou'd 

me once most dearely; 
But that indeed it is a shame, for enough is 

shewen hereby. 
Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes, why should we not 

be merry? 
I haue a loue in Lankeshire, and a little beyond 

the ferry. 



THE KIND-HEARTED CREATURE 95 

M Now all the hope I haue is this, my barne must 
haue a Father, 

And I confesse I did amisse, would I had re- 
pented rather. 

Yet ther's a youngman loues me wel, but I could 
nere abide him; 

I know of me hel'e haue no feare, though many 
will deride him." 

Sing Boyes, drinke Boyes! why should we not 
be merry? 

I've told you of a bonny Lasse, and her Loue 
beyond the Ferry.'* 




96 THE JOVIALL PEDLER 



THE JOVIALL PEDLER 

OR 

A MERRY NEW DITTY, WHICH IS BOTH HARM- 
LESSE, PLEASANT, AND WITTY 

[1637-39] 

[Rox. Ballads, iii. 184; mutilated throughout, 
but apparently unique; with other stanzas 
being additions from Wit & J)rolleiy, 1661]. 

There was a Joviall Pedler, and he cryde Cony- 
skins, 

[An]d on his back he had a pack [fujl of points 
and pins, 

[Wjith laces and braces, [an]d other prety things. 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 

Down, deny, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 

But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 

" Maids, have you any Cony, Cony-skins ? " 

"Maids, bring out your Cony-skins," the Pedler 

v doth you pray; 

For then you may have points or pins, be 
they black or gray; 



THE JOVIALL PEDLER 97 

[Two lines are here torn away] 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 

Down, deny, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 

But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 

" Maids, have you any Cony, Cony-skins ? " 

The Pedler to an Ale-house went and call'd for 

beere and ale, 
In midst of all his merriment his purse began to 

faile. 

His laces and braces and all his prety things: 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any Cony, Cony-skins?" 

When he came to pay the shot his heart grew 

very cold, 
For he had broke a black pot, which made his 

Ostesse scold, 
And all his money spent which made him to 

lament, 

Hey down, ho down, with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry, merrily, 
" Maids, have you any Cony, Cony-skins ? " 

The Pedler took his cony-skins, and his Cob- 
web Lawn 

MERRY SONGS I. 7 



98 THE JOVIALL PEDLER 

The Pedler took his points and pins [and] laid 

them there to pawn: 
[His laces] and braces, [Two lines and a half are 

here missing] 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any Cony, Cony-skins?" 

[THE SECOND PART, TO THE SAME TUNE] 

The Pedler he went drunk to bed, and when 

he did awake, 
Then he remembred what he did, it made his 

heart to ake. 

His Ostesse had his ware, and left him very bare. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
" Maids, have you any Cony, Cony-skins ? " 

He to his Ostesse faire did say, and did prevaile 

so farre, 
He got his ware of her again, and took his leave 

of her : 

He took up his pack, and hung it on his back. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 



THE JOVIALL PEDLER 99 

The high-way it was very deep, which sorely 

troubled him, 
Through the water did he creep, and set his 

ware to swim; 

His laces and braces, and all his prety things. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
44 Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ? " 

The Pedler on a hill did get, and laid his ware 

to dry, 
His cony-skins was very wet, which grieved him 

wondrously : 

His laces and braces, and all his prety things. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 

The Pedler he fell fast asleep, and as asleep 

he lay, 
Up the hill a Knave did creep, and stole his 

ware away: 

His laces and braces, and all his prety things. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
M Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ? " 



ioo THE JOVIALL PEDLER 

The Pedler waked from his sleep, [and] found 
his ware was gone, 

[Two lines torn away] 

With an empty pack to shew what he did lack. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, deny', down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
" Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ? " 



There was two lovely Lasses, that in one house 

did dwell, 
The one of them was bon[n]y Kate, the other 

bouncing Nell: 

And either of them both had Cony-skins to sell. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 



Kate brought forth her Cony-skins, from under- 
neath the Staires, 

They were as black as any Jet, and full of silver 
haires : 

The Pedler would have bought them rather than 
his eares. 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 

Down, deny, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 



THE JOVIALL PEDLER 101 

But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 

Nell brought forth hers to sell, one of another view, 
They were as good as good might be, and that 

the Pedler knew, 
The sawcy Jack set down his pack, and set his 

wares to view. 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
" Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ? " 
[A Harl. MS. copy reads ' And forth his wares he 

drewe. Hey down.' It continues thus:] 

[Then he tooke up his Packe againe, and would 

have gon his way, 
Those Maids they cal'd him back againe, and 

pray'd him for to stay; 
And they would show him cunny skins, a white 

one and a grey, 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?"] 

Besse went tripping ore the green, with one poor 

Cony-skin, 
Because shee would not have it scene, or known 

where she had bin, 



102 THE JOVIALL PEDLER 

Slice closely hid the same, untill the Pedlar came. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 

The Maidens of Cam&enue/tbTought forth their skins ; 
But when they came their ware to sell, the Pedler 

had no pins, 

Nor laces, nor braces, nor such prety things. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 

The Maidens have trustefd him] with their 
[Tom off] Cony-skins ; 

And he hath [promis'd, sleek and prim, as one 

who cheats and wins; 
And tells them, he will come again, and give them 

pretty things. 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?" 

[Ere two (score) weekes were gon and past, these 

maids began to say 
Where is this Joviall Pedler that vsde to come 

this way? 



THE JOVIALL PEDLER 103 

I doubt hee hath couzen'd vs and soe is run away. 
Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, deny, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins?"] 

[A " Wit and Drollery" version (1661) reads as 
follows from the point where the HarL MS. 
text u given on page 100] 

"The Pedlar he took up his Pack, and 'gan to 

go his way 
The Maidens call'd him back again, desiring him 

to stay, 
For they would show him cony-skines, a white 

one and a gray. 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
" Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ?" 

" I pray you, fair maids, to take no further care, 
For when that I come back again Fie give you 

ware for ware: 
But you have all at this time that now I can 

well spare.** 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ?" 



io 4 THE JOVIALL PEDLER 

E're forty weeks were gon and past, the maides 

began to say, 
" What's come of this Pedlar, that used here every 

day? 
I fear he hath beguiled us, and run another 

way." 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, deny, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
" Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins ?" 

" But now these fair maides their bellies began 

to swell, 
But were to find the Pedlar, alack ! they could 

not tell, 
Then they wish'd that all fair maides no more 

Coney-skinnes would sell. 

Hey down, ho down! with a hey down, down, 
Down, derry, derry, down, the Pedler never lins, 
But still doth cry, so merry merrily, 
"Maids, have you any cony, cony-skins? 




THE DAINTY DAMSEL'S DREAM 105 



THE DAINTY DAMSEL'S DREAM, 

OR 

CUPID'S VISIONS 

The Maid saw such strange Visions in her sleep, 
When she awak'd it forc'd her for to weep: 
She dreaming lay, and thought her Love lay by, 
But he alas! was not at that time nigh. 
Then list and you shall hear the Damsel's Dream, 
And afterwards what followed the same. 

[' l6 54] 

[By LAURENCE PRICE; Rox. Ballads, iii. 226: 
probably unique; tune, As she lay sleeping 
in her bed]. 

As I lay on my lovely bead, I fell into a dream, 
God Cupid he attended me, and straight upon 

the same, 
The Chamber where I lodged in, me thought, 

was all on fire, 
Then Mars and Jupiter came in, with wrath and 

furious ire 



106 THE DAINTY DAMSEL'S DREAM 

After came Venus with her train of Nimphs most 

fair and bright, 
And prickt my heart in every vain, much like to 

kill me quite; 
I knew no reason why their rage and anger 

should be so, 
"Why then," quoth Venus, "to thy selfe, thou art 

a mortall foe. 

"There is a young man loves thee deer, and 

now is like to dye, 
Because for him thou dost not care; that is the 

reason why, 
That thou art punished so sore, here in thy 

naked bed, 
And if thou wilt not yeeld to love, we mean to 

kill thee dead." 

"Fair Queen," quoth I, "grant me this boon I 

may so happy be, 
For to present him to my view that I the man 

may see: 

And if that I can fancy him, there is no more to do, 
But I will yeeld to be his love, and kisse and 

hug him too." 

With that the flames all quenched was, and all 

the coasts was cleare, 
And then a proper hansom youth did in my 

sight appeare; 



THE DAINTY DAMSEL'S DREAM 107 

Lake young Adonis in his prime this gallant seem'd 

to be, 
Of courage bold, and valour brave, and fortitude 

was he. 

THE SECOND PART, TO THE SAME TUNE 

His face like to an Angel's was, his eyes like 

Starrs did shine, 
In every part from top to toe, he seemed a Saint 

divine, 
His sweet perfumed honied breath did bear so 

rare a smell, 
The richest Odors in the world for s[c]ent it did 

excell. 

With courtely words and compliments he did 

mee kindly greet, 
Crossing my lips ten thousand times with Kisses 

soft and sweet; 
In his right hand a purse of gold he had, and 

did me give, 
And told me I should never want such Coyn 

whilest I did live. 

It ravished my senses all, and set my heart on 

fire, 
His countenance for to behold it made me to 

admire ! 

So that I much desired then to have his company. 
His comely person to imbrace as I in bed did lie. 



io8 THE DAINTY DAMSEL'S DREAM 

His hose and doublet he stript off, and came 

into my bed, 
Saying that he must master be, and have my 

maidenhead ; 
Good lack! how willing then was I his love to 

entertain : 
The thought of action moved me in every limb 

and vain. 

When all my vitals thus were rais'd, and ready 

for the sport, 
Cupid and Venus stole away and so broke up 

the sport, 
Even so departed all the Nimphs, and straight 

upon the same 
I wak'd .and wep[t], because I saw all things was 

but a dream. 

Fie upon dreames, and fond delights, which thus 

disturbs the mind! 
'Tis better far to bee awak'd, and exercise by 

kind. 
When as I dream'd, I had a love, and gold, 

and pleasure store; 
But when I wak'd, I saw none such, which 

makes me grieve the more. 



THE MAID OF TOTTENHAM 109 



THE MAID OF TOTTENHAM 

[1666] 

[From Choyce Drollery (1886), p. 45. Another 
version with music in DURFEY'S PilU etc. 
(1719), iv. 179} 

As I went to Totnam 

Upon a Market-day, 

There met I with a faire maid 

Cloathed all in gray, 

Her journey was to London 

With Buttermilk and Whay, 

To fall down, down, derry down, 

down, down, derry down, 

derry, derry dina. 

God speed faire maid quoth one, 

You are well over-took; 

With that she cast her head aside, 

And gave to him a look. 

She was as full of Leachery 

As letters in a book. 

To fall down, down, derry down, 

down, down, derry down, 

deny, derry dina. 



i io THE MAID OF TOTTENHAM 

And as they walk'd together, 
Even side by side, 
The young man was aware 
That her garter was unty'd, 
For feare that she should lose it, 
Aha, alack he cry'd, 
Oh your garter that hangs down! 
To fall down, down, deny down, 

down, down, deny down, 

deny, deny dina. 

Quoth she [,] I do intreat you 
For to take the pain 
To do so much for me, 
As to tye it up again. 
That will I do sweet heart, quoth he, 
When I come on yonder plain. 
With a down, down, deny down, 

down, down, deny down, 

deny, derry dina. 

And when they came upon the plain 

Upon a pleasant green, 

The fair maid spread her legs abroad. 

The young man fell between, 

Such tying of a Gaiter 

I think was never seen. 

To fall down, down, deny down, 



THE MAID OF TOTTENHAM in 

down, down, deny down, 
deny, deny dina. 

When they had done their businesse, 
And quickly done the deed, 
He gave her kisses plenty, 
And took her up with speed. 
And what they did I know not, 
But they were both agreed. 
To fall down together, down 

down, down, derry down, 

down, down, deny dina. 

She made to him low curtsies 
And thankt him for his paine, 
The young man is to High -gate gone[,] 
The maid to London came 
To sell off her commodity 
She thought it for no shame. 
To fall down together, down 

down, down, deny down, 

down, down, deny dina. 

When she had done her market, 

And all her money told 

To think upon the matter 

It made her heart full cold[:] 

But that which will away, quoth she, 

Is very hard to hold. 



H2 THE MAID OF TOTTENHAM 

To fall down together, down 
down, down, deny down, 
down, down, deny dina. 

This tying of the Garter 
Cost her her Maidenhead, 
Quoth she it is no matter, 
It stood me in small stead, 
But often times it troubled me 
As I lay in my bed. 

To fall down together, down 
down, down, deny down, 
down, down, deny dina. 




"A STORY STRANGE I WILL TELL" 113 



" A STORY STRANGE I WILL YOU TELL" 

[1656] 

[From Choyce Drollery (ELSWORTH), p. 31; see 
CHAPPELL'S Popular Music of the Olden 
Time (1855-59), 235]. 

A Story strange I will you tell, 

But not so strange as true, 
Of a woman that danc'd upon the ropes, 
And so did her husband too. 
With a dildo, dildo, dildo, 

With a dildo, dildo, dee, 

Some say 'twas a man, but it was a woman 
As plain report may see. 

She first clim'd up the Ladder 
For to deceive men's hopes 
And with a long thing in her hand 
She tickled it on the ropes, 
With a dildo, dildo, dildo , 

With a dildo, dildo, dee, 
And to her came Knights and Gentlemen 
Of low and high degree. 

MERRY SONGS I. g 



ii4 "A STORY STRANGE I WILL TELL" 

She jerk'd them backward and foreward 

With a long thing in her hand, 
And all the people that were in the Yard 
She made them for to stand, 
With a dildo, dildo, dildo, 
With a dildo, dildo, dee, 
And to her came Knights and Gentlemen 
Of low and high degree. 

They cast up fleering eyes 

All underneath her cloaths, 
But they could see no thing, 
For she wore linnen hose. 

With a dildo, dildo, dildo, 
With a dildo, dildo, dee, 
And to her came Knights and Gentlemen 
Of low and high degree. 

The Cuckold her husband caper'd 

When his head in the sack was in, 
But grant that we may never fall 
When we dance in the sack of Sin. 
With a dildo, dildo, dildo, 
With a dildo, dildo, dee, 
And to her came Knights and Gentlemen 
Of low and high degree. 

But as they ever danc't 
In faire or rainy weather, 



"A STORY STRANGE I WILL TELL" 115 

I wish they may be hangd i* the rope of Love 
And so be cut down together. 

With a dildo, dildo, dildo, 

With a dildo, dildo, dee, 
And to her came Knights and Gentlemen 

Of low and high degree. 




n6 SHE LAY ALL NAKED IN HER BED 



SHE LAY ALL NAKED IN HER BED 

[1657] 

\Wit and Drollery, 1656, p. 54; Merry Drollery, 
1 66 1, ii. 115. See "She lay up to the 
navel bare," post, p. 131]. 

She lay all naked in her bed, 

And I myself lay by; 
No Vail but Curtains about her spread, 

No covering but I: 
Her head upon her shoulders seeks 

To hang in careless wise, 
All full of blushes was her cheeks, 

And of wishes were her eyes. 

Her blood still fresh into her face, 

As on a message came, 
To say that in another place 

It meant another game; 
Her cherry Lip moyst, plump, and faire, 

Milllions of Kisses crown, 
Which ripe and uncropt dangled there, 

And weigh the branches down. 

Her Breasts, that swell'd so plump and high, 
Bred pleasant pain in me, 



SHE LAY ALL NAKED IN HER BED 117 

For all the world I do defie 

The like felicity; 
Her thighs and belly, soft and fairc, 

To me were only shewn: 
To have seen such meat, and not to have eat, 

Would have angred any stone. 

Her knees lay upward gently bent, 

And all lay hollow under, 
As if on easie terms they ment 

To fall unforc'd asunder; 
Just so the Crypian Queen did lye, 

Expecting in her bower; 
When too long stay, had kept the boy 

Beyond his promis'd hour. 

Dull clown, quoth she, why dost delay 

Such proffered bless to take? 
Canst thou find out no other way 

Similitudes to make? 
Mad with delight I thundering 

Threw my Arms about her, 
But pox upon 't 'twas but a dream. 

And so I lay without her. 




ii8 THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 



THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER: OR A 

HORRIBLE RELATION OF A DOG 

AND AN ELDER'S MAID 

[b. 1657] 

[By SIR JOHN BIRKENHEAD; Bagford Ballads, iii. 
57: "To the Tune of The Lady's Fall, or 
Gather y our Rozebuds; and Fourty other Tunes"; 
music in Pills to Purge Me!anc6ofy(ijig),v. i.]. 

All Christians and Lay-Elders too, 

For Shame amend your Lives; 
I'll tell you of a Dog-trick now, 

Which much concerns you Wives: 
An Elder's Maid near Temple-Bar, 

(Ah! what a Quean was she?) 
Did take an ugly Mastiff Cur, 
Where Christians use to be. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

One Evening late she stept aside, 
Pretending to fetch Eggs; 



THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 119 

And there she made her self a Bride, 

To one that had four Legs: 
Her master heard a Rumblement, 

And wonder she did tarry; 
Not dreaming (without his consent) 
His Dog would ever Marry. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th* Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

Her Master peep'd, but was afraid, 

And hastily did run, 
To fetch a Staff to help his Maid, 

Not knowing what was done: 
He took his Ruling Elders Cane, 
And cry'd out help, help, here; 
For Swash our Mastiff, and poor Jane, 
Are now fight Dog, fight Bear. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th* Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

But when he came he was full sorry, 

For he perceiv'd their Strife; 
That according to the Directory, 

They Two were Dog and Wife; 



120 THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 

Ah! (then said he) thou cruel Quean, 

Why hast thou me beguil'd ? 
I wonder'd Swash was grown so lean, 
Poor Dog! he's almost spoil'd. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

I thought thou hadst no Carnal Sense, 

But what's in our Lasses: 
And could have quench'd thy 'Cupiscence, 

According to the Classes: 
But all the Parish sees it plain, 
Since thou art in this pickle; 
Thou art an Independent Quean, 
And lov'st a Conventicle. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

Alas ! now each Malignant Rogue, 

Will all the World perswade; 
That she that's Spouse unto a Dog, 

May be an Elder's Maid: 
They'll jeer us if abroad we stir, 

Good Master Elder stay; 



THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 121 

Sir, of what Classis is your Cur? 
And then what can we say? 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

They'll many graceless Ballads sing, 

Of a Presbyterian; 
That a Lay Elder is a thing 

Made up half Dog, half Man: 
Out, out, said he, (and smote her down) 

Was Mankind grown so scant? 
There's scarce another Dog i'th' Town, 
Had took the Covenant. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

Then Swash began to look full grim, 

And Jane did thus reply ; 
Sir, you thought nought too good for him, 

You fed your Dog too high: 
'Tis true he took me in the lurch, 

And leap'd into my Arm ; 
But (as I hope to go to Church) 

I did your Dog no harm. 



122 THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 

Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

Then she was brought to Newgate Jail, 

And there was naked stripp'd; 
They whipp'd her till the Cords did fail, 

As Dogs us'd to be whipp'd: 
Poor City-Maids shed many a Tear, 
When she was lash'd and bang'd; 
And had she been a Cavalier, 
Surely she had been hang'd. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help ! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has nowjDrought forth a Whelp. 

Hers was but Fornication found, 

For which she felt the lash: 
But his was Bugg'ry presum'd, 

Therefore they hanged Swash: 
What will become of Bishops then, 

Or Independency? 
For now we find both Dogs and Men 

Stand for Presbytry. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 
Oh now or never help! 



THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 123 

Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

She might have took a Sow-gelder, 

With Synod-men good store, 
But she would have a Lay-Elder, 

With Two Legs and Two more : 
Go tell th* Assembly of Divines, 

Tell Adoniram blue; 
Tell Burgess, Marshall, Case and Vines, 
Tell Now-and-Anon too. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 

Some say she was a Scottish Girl, 

Or else (at least) a Witch; 
But she was born in Colchester, 

Was ever such a Bitch: 
Take heed all Christian Virgins now, 

The Dog-Star now prevails; 
Ladies beware your Monkeys too, 
For Monkeys have long Tails. 
Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 



124 THE FOUR-LEGG'D ELDER 

Bless King and Queen, and send us Peace, 

As we had Seven Years since: 
For we remember no Dog-days, 
While we enjoy'd our Prince: 
Bless sweet Prince Charles, Two Dukes, Three Girls, 

Lord save his Majesty; 
Grant that his Commons, Bishops, Earls, 
May lead such lives as He. 

Help House of Commons, House of Peers, 

Oh now or never help! 
Th' Assembly having sat Four Years, 
Has now brought forth a Whelp. 




THE DUB'D KNIGHT 125 



THE DUB'D KNIGHT OF THE FORKED 
ORDER 

The old wanton Lady, as I will recite, 

And Sen John the Serving-Man, her hearts delight, 

Their doings and actions, if you will attend, 

In Master, they are by a Poet Pen'd: 

The subtilty of women either old or young, 

And what cunning excuses they have with their 

tongue ; 
That will play with their Husbands and laugh 

them to scorn, 
Stroke up there brows and there place a horn. 

[By ABRAHAM MILES; Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 
114-115; tune, I am fallen away}. 

Twas a Lady born, of high degree, 

In her aged days was youthful, yet she, 

So youthful was at three-score years old, 

A young man she esteemed more precious than 

Gold: 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 



u6 THE DUB'D KNIGHT 

This Lady one day in her Parlor did walk, 
Unto her head-serving-man she began to talk; 
She told him his feature was comely and rare, 
Few men that she lookt on might with him 

compare. 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

A Lilly- white hand, fair face, and a nose, 
Hair crisping and curled, his breath like a Rose, 
Streight leg and a foot, and his body tall, 
But that in the middle is the rarest of all. 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

"Madam," he said, "as I am alive, 
Unto an ancient Lady 'tis a present revive; 
It will make them merry, either at night or by day, 
And clear every Vain like the dew of May." 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

" Then note what I say and obey my command, 
For I'le make use of thee, now straight out of 
hand," 



THE DUB'D KNIGHT 127 

The bargain was made unto their own Will, 
The Serving-man had and the Lady her fill: 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
O|d women are willing to play with young Men. 

When the Jig was ended, the Lady threw down 
Unto her good Serving-man seven-score pound; 
She gave this Gold freely, his courage to maintain, 
That he will but Ride in the Saddle again. 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old woman are willing to play with young Men. 

Then the wanton Lady to her Knight she did hye, 

And like to a meretrix she did reply, 

That she was much alter*d, and she had caught 

harm. 
"Why then," quoth the Knight, "Lady, keep 

thy self warm!" 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

"Tie send for a Doctor, thy grief for to find, 
For to ease thy body and troubled mind." 
" I will have no Doctor, my grief for to ease, 
" But only one man, sweet-heart, if you please." 



128 THE DUB'D KNIGHT 

So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

"Let me see this Artist," the Knight did reply. 
"O!" quoth the Lady, "loe here he stands by; 
That can give me cure with a Syrup, that he 
Brought from the Venetian, and from Italy" 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

"How came you acquainted with your man's 

rarity?" 

"Sir, in a sad passion, being ready to dye, 
I dream'd; that his judgement was right, I do 

find; 
And his physick was healthful, to old Women 

kind." 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

"And if by the vertue thou pleasure do find, 
I doubt then by Venus that I am made blind; 
I dream'd I was hunting, and pleasure did see, 
But a Vision mine eyes [in], much troubleth me. 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 



THE DUB'D KNIGHT 129 

"The Deer did run swiftly, and Hounds after 

rang'd, 

And I, like AcUon^ most strangely was chang'd. 
I thought that my lower part seem'd like a Man, 
My head like a Buck, and Horns like a Ram. 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

14 And riding on swiftly, sweet pleasure to find, 
An Oke burst my horns, and his blood made 

me blind. 
The Huntsman did hollow, and great shouts 

did make, 

And forth of my dream I strait did awake. 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 

14 1 told my fair Lady of my dream so strange ; 
Quoth she, 'Tis the better, when thy Life doth 

change; 

For the Forked Order the evil doth expel, 
And being a dub'd Knight, thou needs't not fear 

Hell.'" 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 



MIKRY SONGS I. 



130 THE DUB'D KNIGHT 

From the Poor to the Rich, even to the Ladies Gay, 
Young Women are wanton, old Women will play ; 
And mumble their Husbands, and jeer them to 

scorn, 

And point them a Beaker, and give them a Horn : 
So old, so old, so wondrous old, till three score 

years and ten, 
Old women are willing to play with young Men. 




THE WILLING LOVER 131 



THE WILLING LOVER 
[1661] 

[From Wit 6* Drollery, 1661. Set "She lay all 
naked in her bed", page 116]. 

She lay up to the Navel bare, 

And was a willing Lover; 
Expecting between hope and fear, 

When I would come and cover. 
Her hand beneath my waistband slips, 

To grope in busy wise; 
Which caused a trembling in her lips 

And shivering in her eyes. 

The blood out of her face did go, 

As it on service went, 
To second what was gone before, 

When all its strength was spent. 
Her Cheeks and lips as Coral red, 

Like roses were full blown: 
Which fading straight, the leaves were spread, 

And so the comes down. 

Her breasts then both painting were 
Such comfort wrought between us, 



132 THE WILLING LOVER 

That all the world, I dare to swear, 

Would envy to have seen us. 
Her belly and its provender, 

For me was kept in store; 
Such news to hear and, not to have share, 

Would have made a man a whore. 

Her legs were girt about my waist, 

My hands under her Crupper; 
As who should say, "now break your fast, 

And come again to supper." 
Even as the God of War did knock, 

As any other man will; 
For haste of work at twelve o'clock, 

Kept Vulcan at his Anvil. 

"Mad wag," quoth she, "why dost thou make 

Such haste thyself to rear? 
Cans't thou not know that for thy sake 

The Fair lasts all the year?" 
Quiet and calm as are love's streams 

I threw myself about her. 
But a pox upon true jests and dreams 

I had better have lain without her. 




A PURITAN 133 



A PURITAN 

[1661] 
[From Merry Drollery, fol. 2]. 

A Puritan of late, 
And eke a holy Sister, 
A Catechizing sate, 
And fain he would have kist her 
For his Mate. 

But she a Babe of grace, 
A Child of reformation 
Thought kissing a disgrace, 
A Limbe of prophanation 
In that place. 

He swore by yea and nay 
He would have no denial, 
The spirit would it so, 
She should endure a tryal 
Ere she go. 

Why swear you so, quoth she? 
Indeed, my holy Brother, 
You might have forsworn be 
Had it been to anotherf,] 
Not to me. 



134 A PURITAN 

He laid her on the ground, 
His Spirits fell a ferking, 
Her Zeal was in a sound, 
He edified her Merkin 

Upside down. 

And when their leave they took, 
And parted were asunder 
My Muse did then awake, 
And I turn'd Ballad-monger. 
For their sake. 




RIDING TO DUNSTABLE 135 



RIDING TO DUNSTABLE ISoin original] 

[1661] 
[From Merry Drollery, p. 14} 

Riding to London, on Dunstable way 

I met with a Maid on Midsummer day, 

Her Eyes they did sparkle like Stars in the sky, 

Her face it was fair, and her forehead was high : 

The more I came to her, the more I did view her, 

The better I lik'd her pretty sweet face, 

I could not forbear her, but still I drew near her, 

And then I began to tell her my case: 

Whither walk'st thou, my pretty sweet soul ? 
She modestly answer'd to Hockley-f-tK-hole. 
I ask'd her her business; she had a red cheek, 
She told me she went a poor service to seek; 
I said, it was pitty she should leave the City, 
And settle herself in a Country Town ; 
She said it was certain it was her hard fortune 
To go up a maiden, and so to come down. 

With that I alighted, and to her I stept, 
I took her by th' hand, and this pretty maid wept; 
Sweet[,] weep not, quoth I: I kist her soft lip; 
I wrung her by th' hand, and my finger she nipt; 



136 RIDING TO DUNSTABLE 

So long there I woo'd her, such reasons I shew'd 
That she my speeches could not controul, [her, 
But cursied finely, and got up behind me, 
And back she rode with me to Hockley i' th' 
hole. 

When I came to Hockley at the sign of the 

Cock, 

By [a] lighting I chanced to see her white smock, 
It lay so alluring upon her round knee, 
I call'd for a Chamber immediately; 
I hugg'd her, I tugg'd her, I kist her, I smugg'd her, 
And gently I laid her down on a bed, 
With nodding and pinking, with sighing & 

winking, 
She told me a tale of her Maidenhead. 

While she to me this story did tell, 

I could not forbear, but on her I fell; 

I tasted the pleasure of sweetest delight, 

We took up our lodging, and lay there all night ; 

With soft arms she roul'd me, and oft times 

told me, 

She loved me deerly, even as her own soul: 
But on the next morrow we parted with sorrow, 
And so I lay with her at Hockley i' th' hole. 



MAIDEN'S DELIGHT 137 



MAIDEN'S DELIGHT 

[1661] 
[From Mtrry DrolUry, p. 27]. 

A young man of late, that lackt a mate, 
And courting came unto her, 
With Cap, and Kiss, and sweet Mistris, 
But little could he do her; 
Quoth she, my friend, let kissing end, 
Where with you do me smother, 
And run at Ring with t'other thing; 
A little o' th'one with t'other. 

Too much of ought is good for nought, 
Then leave this idle kissing; 
Your barren suit will yield no fruit 
If the other thing be missing: 
As much as this a man may kiss 
His sister or his mother; 
He that will speed must give with need 
A little o' th'one with t'other. 

Who bids a Guest unto a feast, 

To sit by divers dishes, 

They please their mind untill they find 

Change, please each creature wishes; 



1 3 8 MAIDEN'S DELIGHT 

With beak and bill I have my fill, 
With measure running over; 
The Lovers dish I now do wish, 
A little o' th' t'one with t'other. 

To gull me thus, like Tantalus, 
To make me pine with plenty, 
With shadows store, and nothing more, 
Your substance is so dainty; 
A fruitless tree is like to thee, 
Being but a kissing lover, 
With leaves joyn fruit, or else be mute; 
A little o' th' t'one with t'other. 

Sharp joyn'd with flat, no mirth to that; 
A low note and a higher, 
Where Mean and Base keeps time and place, 
Such musick maids desire: 
All of one string doth loathing bring, 
Change, is true Musicks Mother, 
Then leave my face, and sound the base, 
A little o' th' t'one with t'other. 

The golden mine lies just between 

The high way and the lower; 

He that wants wit that way to hit 

Alas [!] hath little power; 

You'l miss the clout if that you shoot 

Much higher, or much lower: 



MAIDEN'S DELIGHT 139 

Shoot just between, your arrows keen, 
A little o' th' t'one with t'other. 

No smoake desire without a fire, 
No wax without a Writing: 
If right you deal give Deeds to Seal, 
And straight fall to inditing; 
Thus do I take these lines I make, 
As to a faithful Lover, 
In order he'll first write, then seal, 
A little o' th 1 t'one with t'other. 

Thus while she staid the young man plaid 
Not high, but low defending; 
Each stroak he strook so well she took, 
She swore it was past mending; 
Let swaggering boys that think by toyes 
Their Lovers to fetch over, 
Lip-labour save for the maids must have 
A little o' th' t'one with t'other. 




140 THERE WAS THREE BIRDS 



THERE WAS THREE BIRDS 
[1661] 

[From Merry Drollery (1661), p. 139]. 

There was three birds that built very low, 
The first and the second cry'd, have at her toe, 
The third went merrily in and in, in, 
And the third went merrily in; 

O never went Wimble in timber more nimble 
With so little screwing and knocking on't in, 
With so little knocking in. 

There was three birds [that] built on a pin, 
The first and second cry'd, have at her shin, 
The third he went merrily in and in, in, 
The third he went merrily in; 

O never went Wimble in timber more nimble 
With so little screwing and knocking on't in, 
With so little knocking in. 

There was three birds that built on a tree, 
The first and the second cry'd, have at her knee, 
And the third he went merrily in and in, in, 
And the third he went merrily in ; 

O never went Wimble in Timber more nimble 



THERE WAS THREE BIRDS 141 

With so little screwing and knocking on't in, 
With so little knocking in. 

There was three birds that built very high, 
The first and the second cried, have at her thigh, 
The third he went merrily in and in, in, 
The third he went merrily in; 

O never went Wimble in Timber more nimble 
With so litlle screwing and knocking on't in, 
With so little knocking in. 

There was three birds that built on a stump, 
The first and the second cry'd, have at her rump, 
The third he went merrily in and in, in, 
And the third he went merrily in; 

O never went Wimble in Timber more nimble 
With so little screwing, and knocking on't in, 
With so little knocking in. 




142 THE TINKER 



THE TINKER 

[1661] 
[From Merry Drollery, p. 134: see p. 41, ante]. 

There was a Lady in this Land, 

That lov'd a Gentleman, 
And could not have him secretly 

As she would now and then, 
Till she divis'd to dress him like 

A Tinker in Vocation: 
And thus, disguis'd, she bid him say, 

He came to clout her Cauldron. 

His face full fair she smother's black 

That he might not be known, 
A leather Jerkin on his back, 

His breeches rent and torn; 
With speed he passed to the place, 

To knock he did not spare: 
Who's that, quoth the lady['s Porter] then, 

That raps so rashly there. 



THE TINKER 143 

I am a Tinker, then quoth he, 

That worketh for my Fee, 
If you have Vessels for to mend, 

Then bring them unto me: 
For I have brass within my bag, 

And target in my Apron, 
And with my skill I can well clout, 

And mend a broken Cauldron. 

The Porter went into the house 

Where Servants us'd to dine, 
Telling his Lady, at the Gate 

There staid a Tinker fine: 
Quoth he, much Brass he wears about 

And Target in his Apron, 
Saying, that he hath perfect skill 

To mend your broken Cauldron. 

Quoth she, of him we have great need, 

Go Porter, let him in, 
If he be cunning in his Craft 

He shall much money win: 
But wisely wist she who he was, 

Though nothing she did say, 
For in that sort she pointed him 

To come that very day. 

When he before the Lady came, 
Disguised stood he there, 



144 THE TINKER 

He blinked blithly, and did say, 

God save you Mistris fair; 
Thou'rt welcome, Tinker, unto me, 

Thou seem'st a man of skill, 
All broken Vessels for to mend, 

Though they be ne'er so ill; 
I am the best men of my Trade, 

Quoth he, in all this Town 
For any Kettle, Pot, or Pan, 

Or clouting of a Cauldron. 

Quoth she, our Cauldron hath most need 

At it we will begin, 
For it will hold you half an hour 

To trim it out and in: 
But give me first a glass of drink, 

The best that we do use, 
For why[,] it is a Tinkers guise 

No good drink to refuse. 

Then to the Brew-house hyed they fast 

This broken piece to mend, 
He said he would no company, 

His Craft should not be kend, 
But only to your self, he said, 

That must pay me my Fee: 
I am no common Tinker, 

But work most curiously. 



THE TINKER 145 

And I also have made a Vow 

I'll keep it if I may, 
There shall uo mankind see my work, 

That I may stop or stay: 
Then barred he the Brew-house door, 

The place was very dark, 
He cast his Budget from his back, 

And frankly fell to work. 

And whilst he play'd and made her sport 

Their craft the more to hide, 
She with his hammer stroke full hard 

Against the Cauldron side: 
Which made them all to think and say, 

The Tinker wrought apace, 
And so be sure he did indeed, 

But in another place. 

Quoth he, fair Lady, unto her, 

My business I have ended, 
Go quickly now and tell your Lord 

The Cauldron I have mended: 
As for the price that I refer 

Whatsoever he do say, 
Then come again with diligence, 

I would I were away. 

The Lady went unto her Lord 
Where he walkt up and down, 

MERRY SONGS I. 



146 THE TINKER 

Sir, I have with the Tinker been, 
The best in all the Town: 

His work he doth exceeding well, 
Though he be wondrous dear, 

He asks no less than half a mark 
For that he hath done here. 

Quoth he, that Target is full dear, 

I swear by God's good Mother: 
Quoth she, my Lord, I do protest, 

'Tis worth five hundred other; 
He strook it in the special place, 

Where greatest need was found, 
Spending his brass and target both, 

To make it safe and sound. 

Before all Tinkers in the Land, 

That travels up and down, 
Ere they should earn a Groat of mine, 

This man should earn a crown: 
Or were you of his Craft so good, 

And none but I it kend, 
Then would it save me many a Mark, 

Which I am fain to spend. 

The Lady to her Coffer went, 
And took a hundred Mark, 

And gave the Tinker for his pains, 
That did so well his work; 



THE TINKER 147 

Tinker, said she, take here thy fee, 

Sith here you'll not remain, 
But I must have toy Cauldron now 

Once scoured o'er again. 

Then to the former work they went 

No man could them deny; 
The Lady said, good Tinker call 

The next time thou com'st by; 
For why [,] thou dost thy work so well, 

And with so good invention, 
If still thou hold thy hand alike, 

Take here a yearly Pension. 

And ev'ry quarter of the year 

Our Cauldron thou shalt view; 
Nay, by my faith, her Lord gan say, 

I'd rather buy a new; 
Then did the Tinker take his leave 

Both of the Lord and Lady, 
And said, such work as I can do, 

To you I will be ready. 
From all such Tinkers of the trade 

God keep my Wife, I pray, 
That comes to clout her Cauldron so, 

I'll swinge him if I may. 



148 THE BATHING GIRLES 



THE BATHING GIRLES 

[1672] 

[From Westminster Drollery, Part 2, p. 100. Cf. 
''The Devonshire Damsels' Froilick," p. 163. 
" To the common Galliard Tune "]. 

It was mjune, and 'twas on Barnaby Bright too, 
A time when the days are long, and nights are 

short, 

A crew of merry Girles, and that in the night too, 
Resolv'd to wash in a river, and there to sport; 
And there (poore things) they then resolv'd to be 

merry too, 
And with them did bring good store of jun- 

ketting stuffe, 
As Bisket, and Cakes, and Suger, and Syder, and 

Perry too, 
Of each such a quantity, that was more than 

enough. 

But mark what chanc't unto this innocent crew 

then, 

Who thought themselves secure from any eare; 
They knew 'twas dark, that none cou'd take a 

view then, 
And all did seem to be voyd of any feare; 



THE BATHING GIRLES 149 

Then every one uncas'd themselves, both smock & all 
And each expected first who should begin; 
And that they might stay but an houre, they told 

the Clock and all: 
Then all in a Te-he-ing raine did enter in. 

But now comes out the Tale I meant to tell ye, 
For a Crew of Jovial Lads were there before, 
And finding there some viands for their belly, 
They eas'd era then poor hearts of all their store ; 
Then every Lad sate down upon the Grasse there, 
And whisper'd thanks to th' Girls for their good 

Cheare, 

In which they drank a health to every Lass there, 
That then were washing & rinsing without any 

fear. 

And when they had pleas'd (and fill'd) their 

bellies and pallats too, 

They back did come unto the foresaid place, 
And took away their Smocks, and both their 

Wallets too, 
Which brought their good Bubb, and left them in 

pittiful case, 

For presently they all came out to th' larder there 
That it put 'em unto their shifts their Smocks to 

find; 

I think, says one, my shift is a little farder there, 
I, I, sayes another, for yours did lye by mine. 



150 THE BATHING GIRLES 

At last, says one, the Divel a smock is here at all, 
The Devil, a bit of bread, or drop of drink, 
They've took every morsel of our good cheare 

and all 
And nothing but Gowns and Petticoats left, as I 

think, 

At last, says one, if they'd give us our Smocks agen, 
And likewise part of what we hither brought, 
We shall be much oblieg'd, and think 'em 

Gentlemen, 
And by this foolish example be better taught. 

Although in the River they were as merry as 

crickets there, 
'Twixt laughing and fretting their state they did 

condole ; 
And then came one of the Lads from out of the 

thickets there, 
And told 'em hee'd bring ? em their smocks, and 

what was stole; 
They only with Petticoats on, like Jipsies were 

clad then, 
He brought 'em their Smocks, and what he had 

promis'd before; 
They fell to eat, and drink as if they'd been 

mad there, 
And glad they were all, they'd got so much of 

their store. 



THE BATHING GIRLES 151 

And when they all had made a good repast there, 
They put on their cloths, and all resolv'd to be 

gone; 
Then out comes all the ladds in very great hast 

there, 

And every one to the other then was known; 
The girles did then conjure the ladds that were 

there, 
To what had passt their lipps shou'd still be 

seal'd, 
Nay more than that they made 'em all to swear 

there, 
To which they did, that nothing should be 

reveal'd. 

Then each at other did make a pass at kissing 

then, 

And round it went to every one level coile, 
But thinking that at home they might be missing 

then, 

And fear'd that they had stay'd too great a while ; 
Then hand in hand they altogether marcht away, 
And every lad convey 'd his Mistris home, 
Agen they kist, then every Lass her man did 

pray, 
That what had past, no more of that but Mum. 



152 THE CUMBERLAND LASS 



THE CUMBERLAND LASS 

[c. 1674-80] 
[Music in Pills to Purge Melancholy (1719), iv. 133] 

There was a Lass in Cumberland, 

A bonny Lass of high Degree: 
There was a Lass, her Name was Nell, 

The blithest Lass that e'er you see: 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

Her Father lov'd her passing well, 

So did her Brother fancy Nell: 
But all their Loves came short of mine, 

As far as Tweed is from the Tyne, 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

She had five Dollars in a Chest, 

Four of them she gave to me; 
She cut her Mother's Winding-Sheet, 

And all to make a Sark for me, 



THE CUMBERLAND LASS 153 

Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 
The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 

Blith and bonny may she be, 
The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

She pluck'd a Box out of her Purse, 

Of four Gold Rings she gave me three; 
She thought herself no whit the worse, 

She was so very kind to me, 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

If I were Lord of all the North, 

To Bed and Board she should be free, 
For why, she is the bonniest Lass, 

That is in all her own Country, 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

Her Cherry-Cheeks and Ruby Lips, 
Doth with the Damask Rose agree, 

With other Parts which I'll not Name, 
Which are so pleasing unto me: 

Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 
The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 



154 THE CUMBERLAND LASS 

Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed* to me. 

For I have rid both East and West, 

And been in many a strange Country, 
Yet never met with so kind a Lass, 

Compared with Cumberland Nelly. 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me; 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

When I embrace her in my Arms, 

She takes it kind and courteously, 
And hath such pretty winning Charms, 

The like whereof you ne'er did see : 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me; 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

There's not a Lass in Cumberland 

To be compar'd to smiling Nell, 
She hath so soft and white a Hand, 

And something more that I'll not tell, 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 



THE CUMBERLAND LASS 155 

Up to my Chamber I her got, 

There I did treat her courteously, 
I told her, I thought it was her Lot 

To stay all Night and Ug with me, 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

She, pretty Rogue, could not say nay, 

But by consent we did agree, 
That she for a fancy, there should stay, 

And come at night to Bed to me: 
Ohl to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

She made the Bed both broad and wide, 

And with her Hand she smooth'd it down; 
She kiss'd me thrice, and smiling said, 

My Love, I fear thou wilt sleep too soon: 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me: 
Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

Into my Bed I hasted strait, 
And presently she follow'd me, 



156 THE CUMBERLAND LASS 

It was in vain to make her wait, 
For a Bargain must a Bargain be, 

Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 
The Lass that comes to Bed to me; 

Blith and bonny may she be, 

The Lass that comes to Bed to me. 

Then I embrac'd this lovely Lass, 

And strok'd her Wem so bonnily, 
But for the rest we'll let it pass, 

For she afterward sung Lulaby; 
Oh! to Bed to me, to Bed to me, 

The Lass that came to Bed to me, 
Blith and Bonny sure was she, 

The Lass that came to Bed to me. 




"METHINKS THE POOR TOWN ETC." 157 



"METHINKS THE POOR TOWN HAS 
BEEN TROUBLED TOO LONG" 

[c. 1676] 

[By the EARL OF DORSET; music in PLAYFORDS 
Choyce Ay res (1676), also in Pills to Purge 
Melancholy (1719), iii. I/ 3\ 

Me thinks the poor Town has been troubled too long, 
With Phillis and Chloris in every Song; 
By Fools who at once, can both Love and Dispair, 
And will never leave calling them Cruel and Fair : 
Which justly provokes me in Rhime to express, 
The truth that I know of my Bonny black Bess. 

This Bess of my Heart, this Bess of my Soul, 
Has a Skin white as Milk, but Hair black as a Coal ; 
She's plump, yet with ease you may span round 

her Waste, 
But her round swelling Thighs can scarce be em- 

brac'd : 

Her Belly is soft, not a word of the rest, 
But I know what I mean, when I drink to the Best. 

The Plow-man, and Squire, the Erranter Clown, 
At home she subdu'd in her Paragon Gown, 



158 "METHINKS THE POOR TOWN ETC." 

But now she adorns the Boxes and Pit, - 

And the proudest Town Gallants are forc'd to 

submit : 

All Hearts fall a leaping wherever she comes, 
And beat Day and Night, like my Lord s 

Drums; 
But to those who have had my dear Bess in 

their Arms, 

She's gentle and knows how to soften her Charms 
And to every Beauty can add a new Grace, 
Having learn'd how to Lisp, and trip in her pace : 
And with Head on one side, and a languishing Eye, 
To Kill us with looking, as if she would Dye. 



; 




" HER DAINTY PALM ETC." 159 



"HER DAINTY PALM I GENTLY PREST" 

[1685] 
[From The Marrow of Complements}. 

Her dainty palm I gently prest 

And with her lips I play'd; 

My cheek upon her panting breast 

And on her neck I laid: 

And yet we had no sense of wanton lust, 

Nor did we then mistrust. 

With pleasant toil we breathless grew, 

And kiss'd in wanner blood; 

Upon her lips the honey-dew 

Like drops on roses stood: 

And on those flowers play'd I the busy bee, 

Whose sweets were such to me. 

But kissing and embracing we 

So long together lay, 

Her touches all inflamed me 

And I began to stray; 

My hands presumed too far, they were too bold, 

My tongue unwisely told. 



i6o DEBAUCHERY SCARED 



DEBAUCHERY SCARED : 

OR 

THE BEGGAR-WENCH TURN'D INTO 

A DEVIL: TOGETHER WITH THE 

POLLICY OF BUMPKIN; 

GIVING A PLEASANT ACCOUNT OF COMMICAL 

PASSAGES BETWEEN A COUNTRY GENTLEMAN 

AND A London BEGGAR- WENCH 

[1685-88] 

[Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 101 ; tune, Ladies of London]. 

A Country Gentleman came up to town, 

to taste the delights of the City, 
Who had to his Servant a jocular Clown, 

accounted to be very witty: 
His master one night got drunk as a Rat, 

and swore he would turn him away, Sir, 
'Lest he would get him a bit for his Cat, 

and into his Chamber convey her. 

Some jolly Dame he was willing to have, 
and gave to his Bumkin a Guiney, 



DEBAUCHERY SCARED 161 

Who had the wit not to give it, but save 

the far better part of the money; 
To find out a Punck, he walkt in the street, 

and backwards and forwards kept trudging; 
At last a young beggar-wench he did meet, 

who was in great want of a Lodging. 

44 Sweet-heart" (said he), " if thou'lt give thy consent 

to go home and lye with my master, 
Tie give thee half a Crown for thy content, 

and save thee from any disaster." 
It being late, she fearing the watch, 

besides it was very cold weather, 
So that they quickly both made up the match, 

and trug'd to his master together. 

Bumpkin was arch, as he homeward did come, 

he gave her a bout by the way, sir; 
Then to his master he carried her home, 

who in a dark chamber lay, sir: 
He bid her be sure let his master not know, 

by any means, she was a mumper; 
But bid her to rise before daylight, and go, 

or Ad-swounds! he would heartily thump her. 

Bumpkin his Trull to the chamber he led, 
and then to the Bed took his way, sir; 

She quickly undrest, and gropt into the Bed, 
and close to the Gentleman lay, sir; 

MERRY SONGS I. II 



1 62 DEBAUCHERY SCARED 

Eager of Joy, he gave her a kiss, 
and hug'd her with flaming desire; 

The Gentleman swore that she smelt so of Cheese, 
he could not indure to lye by her. 

He bid her get up to a place in the room, 

where a Bottle stood of Rose-water, 
And wash her Face to take away the fume 

then come into Bed again after; 
A bottle of Ink there happen'd to stand, 

and for the Rose-water she took it, 
Pouring a spoonful out into her hand, 

and over her face she did stroak it. 

Then to their joys they eagerly fell, 
till at last it began to be Light, sir; 

Then, looking, he thought her the Devil of Hell, 
and ran out of Bed in a fright, sir: 

Crying, "The Devil, the Devil was there;" 
she, being affrighted, ran after, 

In a tatter'd old smock, crying, "where is he, 
where?" 

which put all the street in a laughter. 




THE DEVONSHIRE FROLLICK 163 



THE DEVONSHIRE DAMSELS' FROLLICK 

BEING AN ACCOUNT OP NINE OR TEN FAIR 
MAIDENS, WHO WENT ONE EVENING LATELY, TO 
WASU THEMSELVES IN A PLEASANT RIVER, WHERE 
THEY WERE DISCOVERED BY SEVERAL YOUNG MEN 
BEING THEIR FAMILIAR ACQUAINTANCES, WHO TOOK 
AWAY THEIR GOWNS AND PETTICOATS, WITH THEIR 
SMOCKS AND WINE AND GOOD CHEARJ LEAVING 
THEM A WHILE IN A MOST MELANCHOLLY CON- 
DITION. 

[1685-88] 

[From Roxburgh Ballads, ii. 136, 137, with music; 
cf. "The Bathing Girles", p. 148 ante\ 

Tom and William with Ned and Ben, 

In all they were about nine or ten; 

Near a trickling River endeavour to see 
a most delicate sight for men; 

Nine young maidens they knew it full well, 

Sarah, Susan, with bonny Nell, 

and all those others whose names are not here, 
intended to wash in a River clear. 



164 THE DEVONSHIRE FROLLICK 

Simon gave out the report 

the rest resolving to see the sport [,] 
The Young [men] freely repairing declaring 

that this is the humours of Venus Court [,J 
In a Bower those Gallants remaine 

seeing the maidens trip o're the plain [:] 
They thought no Body did know their intent 

as merrily over the Fields they went. 

Nell a Bottle of Wine did bring 

with many a delicate dainty thing [,] 
Their Fainting Spirits to nourish and cherish 

when they had been dabling in the Spring [:] 
They supposing no Creature did know 

to the River they merrily goe, 
When they came thither and seeing none near 

then under the bushes they hid their chear. 

Then they stripping of all their cloaths 

their Gowns their Petticoats Shoes and Hose [,] 
Their fine white smickits then stripping and 
skipping [,] 

no Body seeing them they suppose [,] 
Sarah enter'd the River so clear 

and bid them follow they need not fearf,] 
For why the Water is warm they replyed[,] 

then into the River they sweetly glide. 

Finely bathing themselves they lay 

like pretty Fishes they sport and play[,] 



THE DEVONSHIRE FROLLICK 165 

Then let's be merry [,] said Nancy I fancy, 
its seldom that anyone walks this way[.] 

Thus those Females were all in a Quill 
and following on their Pastime still [,] 

All naked in a most dainty trim 

those Maidens like beautiful Swans did swim. 

Whilst they followed on their Game[,] 

out came sweet William and Tom by name, 
They took all their Clothing and left nothing [:] 

Maids was they not Villains and much to 

blame [?] 
Likewise taking their Bottle of Winef,] 

with all their delicate Dainties fine[:] 
Thus they were rifled of all their store, 

was ever poor Maidens so serv'd before. 

From the River those Maidens fair 

Return'd with sorrow and deep despair [;] 
When they seeing, brooding [,] concluding 

that somebody certainly had been there [,] 
With all their Treasure away they run[,] 

Alas[!] said Nelle[,] we are undone, 
Those Villains I wish they were in the Stocks, 

that took our Petticoats Gowns and Smocks. 

Then Sweet Sarah with modest Prue 
they all was in a most fearful Hue[,] 



1 66 THE DEVONSHIRE FROLLICK 

Every Maiden replying and crying 

they did not know what in the world to do [.] 
But what laughing was there with the men 

in bringing their Gowns and Smocks again [,] 
The Maidens were modest & mighty mute[,l 

and gave them fine curtsies and thanks to boot : 




THE OLD FUMBLER 167 



THE OLD FUMBLER 
\b. 1695] 

[A Broadside Song with music, set by HENRY 
PURCELL]. 

Smug, rich and fantastick old Fumbler was known, 
That Wedded a Juicy brisk Girl of the Town; 
Her Face like an Angel, Fair, Plump, and a Maid, 
Her Lute well in Tune too, cou'd he but have plaid : 
But lost was his Skill, let him do what he can, 
She finds him in Bed a weak silly old Man; 
He coughs in her Ear, 'tis in vain to come on, 
Forgive me, my Dear, I'm a silly old Man. 

She laid his dry Hand on her snowy soft Breast, 
And from those white Hills gave a glimpse of the Best ; 
But ah ! what is Age when our Youth's but a Span, 
She found him an Infant instead of a Man, 
Ah! Pardon, he'd cry, that I'm weary so soon, 
You have let down my Base, I'm no longer in Tune ; 
Lay by the dear Instrument, prithee lie still, 
I can play but one Lesson, and that I play 111. 



i68 "BENEATH A COOL SHADE" 



"BENEATH A COOL SHADE" 

[i697] 
[By Mrs. BEHN in Wks.]. 

Beneath a cool shade, where some here have been, 
Convenient for Lovers, most pleasant and green, 
Alexis and Cloris lay pressing soft Flowers, 
With Kissing and Loving they past the dull hours. 
She close in his Arms with her head on his brest, 
And fainting with pleasure ; you guess at the rest : 
She blusht and she sigh'd with a Joy beyond 

measure, 
All ravisht with Billing and dying with Pleasure. 

But while thus in Transports extended they lay, 
A Hansom young Shepherd was passing that way'. 
She saw him and cry'd. . . oh Alexis, betray'd ! 
Oh what have you done . . . you have ruin'd a 

Maid; 

But the Shepherd being modest discreetly past by, 
And left 'em again at their leisure to dy. 
And often they Languish'd with Joy beyond 

measure, 
All Ravisht with Billing and dying with Pleasure. 



"'TWAS WITHIN A FURLONG" 169 



-'TWAS WITHIN A FURLONG OF 
EDINBOROUGH TOWN " 

[1697] 

[Words by T. DURFEY in Pills to Purge Melan- 
choly (1719), i. 327; with music by HENRY 
PURCBLL]. 

Twas within a Furlong of Edinborough Town, 
In the Rosie time of year when the Grass was down ; 
Bonny Jockey Blith and Gay, 
Said to Jenny making Hay, 
Let's sit a little (Dear) and prattle, 

'Tis a sultry Day: 

He long had Courted the Black-Brow'd Maid, 
But Jockey was a Wag and would ne'er consent 

to Wed; 
Which made her pish and phoo, and cry out, it 

will not do, 

I cannot, cannot, cannot, wonnot, monnot Buckle 
too. 

He told her Marriage was grown a meer Joke, 
And that no one Wedded now, but the Scoundrel 
Folk; 

Yet my dear, thou shouldest prevail,' 

But I know not what I ail, 



1 70 "'TWAS WITHIN A FURLONG" 

I shall dream of Clogs, and silly Dogs, 

With Bottles at their Tail; 

But I'll give thee Gloves, and a Bongrace to wear, 
And a pretty Filly-Foal, to ride out and take 

the Air; 
If thou ne'er will pish nor phoo, and cry, it ne'er 

shall do, 
I cannot, cannot, cannot, wonnot, monnot Buckle 

too. 

That you'll give me Trinkets, cry'd she, I believe, 
But ah! what in return must your poor fenny give, 
When my Maiden Treasure's gone, 
I must gang to London Town, 
And Roar, and Rant, and Patch and Paint, 

And Kiss for half a Crown : 
Each Drunken Bully oblige for Pay, 
And earn an hated Living in an odious Fulsom way; 
No, no, it ne'er shall do, for a Wife 1 11 be to you, 
Or I cannot, cannot, cannot, wonnot, monnot 
Buckle too. 




TOM TINKER 171 



TOM TINKER 
(c. 1698] 

[Set Notes; words and music in Pills to Purge 
Melancholy (1719), vi. 205]. 

Tom Tinker's my true love, and I am his Dear, 
And I will go with him his Budget to bear; 
For of all the young Men he has the best luck, 
All the Day he will Fuddle, at Night he will 
This way, that way, which way you will, 
I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

With Hammer on Kettle he tabbers all Day, 

At Night he will tumble on Strumil or Hay ; [,trumii = straw] 

He calls me his Jewel, his delicate Duck, 

And then he will take up my Smicket to 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

Tom Tinker I say was a Jolly stout Lad, 

He tickled young Nancy and made her stark mad ; 

To have a new Rubbers with him on the Grass, 

By reason she knew that he had a good 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 



i;2 TOM TINKER 

There was an old Woman on Crutches she came, 
To lusty Tom Tinker, Tom Tinker by Name; 
And tho' she was Aged near threescore and five, 

She kickt up her Heels and resolved to 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

A beautiful Damsel came out of the West, 
And she was as Jolly and brisk as the best; 
She'd Dance and she'd caper as wild as a Buck, 

And told Tom the Tinker, she would have some 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

A Lady she call'd him her Kettle to mend, 

And she resolved her self to attend ; 

Now as he stood stooping and mending the Brass, 

His Breeches was torn and down hung his 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

Something she saw that pleased her well, 

She call'd in the Tinker and gave him a spell: 

With Pig, Goose and Capon, and good store of suck, 

That he might be willing to give her some 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

He had such a Trade that he turn'd me away, 
Yet as I was going he caus'd me to stay; 



TOM TINKER 173 

So as towards him I was going to pass, 

He gave me a slap in the Face with his 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

I thought in my Heart he had struck off my Nose, 
I gave him as good as he brought I suppose;, 
My Words they were ready and wonderful blunt, 

Quoth I, I had rather been stobb'd in my 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

I met with a Butcher a killing a Calf, 

I then stepp'd to him and cryed out half: 

At his first denial I fell very sick, 

And he said it was all for a touch of his 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

I met with a Fencer a going to School, 

I told him at Fencing he was but a Fool; 

He had but three Rapiers and they were all blunt, 

And told him he should no more play at my 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

I met with a Barber with Razor and Balls, 
He fligger'd and told me for all my brave alls; 
He would have a stroke, and his words they were 

blunt, 
I could not deny him the use of my 



174 TOM TINKER 

This way, that way, which way you will, 

I am sure I say nothing that you can take 111. 

I met with a Fidler a Fidling aloud, 

He told me he had lost the Case of his Croud; 

I being good natur'd as I was wont, 

Told him he should make a Case of my 

This way, and that way, and which way you can, 
For the Fairest of Women will lye with a Man. 




A LUSTY YOUNG SMITH" 175 



"A LUSTY YOUNG SMITH AT HIS VICE 
STOOD A FILING" 

I 1 705] 

[A Broadside Song with music, set by RICHARD 
LEVERIDGE; also words and music in Pills 
to Purge Melancholy (1707), ii. 198} 

A Lusty young Smith at his Vice stood a Filing, 
Rub, nib, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, in 

and out ho; 

When to him a Buxom young Damsel came smiling, 

And ask'd if to Work at her Forge he wou'd go ; 

With a rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, 

in and out ho: 

A match quoth the Smith, so away they went thither, 
Rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, in and 

out ho: 
They strip'd to go to't, 'twas hot Work and hot 

Weather, 

She kindl'd a Fire, and soon made him blow; 
With a rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, 
in and out ho. 

Her Husband she said could scarce raise up his 

Hammer, 
His strength and his Tools were worn out long ago ; 



176 "A LUSTY YOUNG SMITH" 

If she got her Journey-men, could any blame her, 
Look here quoth our Workman, my Tools are not so : 
With a rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, 
in and out ho. 

Red-hot grew his Iron as both did desire, 
And he was too wise not to strike while 'twas so ; 
Quoth she, what I get, I get out of the Fire, 
Then prithee strike home and redouble the blow : 
With a rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, 
in and out ho. 

Six times did his Iron by vigorous heating, 
Grow soft in the Forge in a Minute or so; 
As often 'twas harden'd, still beating and beating, 
But the more it was soften'd it harden'd more slow : 
With a rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, 
in and out ho: 

The Smith then wou'd go, quoth the Dame full 

of sorrow, 

Oh what wou'd I give, cou'd my Cuckold do so ! 

Good Lad with your Hammer come hither to Morrow, 

But pray can't you use it once more e'er you go : 

With a rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, 

in and out ho. 

ifflr 



"AS OYSTER NAN STOOD BY HER TUB" 177 



" AS OYSTER NAN STOOD BY HER TUB 



[A Broadside Song with music; also in Pills to 
Purge Melancholy (1719), v. 107]. 

As Oyster Nan stood by her Tub, 

To shew her vicious Inclination; 
She gave her noblest Parts a Scrub, 

And sigh'd for want of Copulation: 
A Vintner of no little Fame, 

Who excellent Red and White can sell ye, 
Beheld the little dirty Dame, 

As she stood scratching of her Belly. 

Come in, says he, you silly Slut, 

'Tis now a rare convenient Minute; 
I'll lay the Itching of your Scut, 

Except some greedy Devil be in it: 
With that the Flat-capt Fusby smil'd, 

And would have blush'd, but that she cou'd not ; 
Alass! says she, we're soon beguil'd, 

By Men to do those things we shou'd not. 

From Door they went behind the Bar, 
As it's by common Fame reported; 

MERRY SONGS I. 12 



178 "AS OYSTER NAN STOOD BY HER TUB" 

And there upon a Turkey Chair, 
Unseen the loving Couple sported: 

But being call'd by Company, 

As he was taking pains to please her; 

I'm coming, coming Sir, says he, 

My Dear, and so am I, says she, Sir. 

Her Mole-hill Belly swell'd about, 

Into a Mountain quickly after; 
And when the pretty Mouse crept out, 

The Creature caus'd a mighty Laughter: 
And now she has learnt the pleasing Game, 

Altho' much Pain and Shame it cost her; 
She daily ventures at the same, 

And shuts and opens like an Oyster. 




"I WENT TO THE ALEHOUSE" 179 



" I WENT TO THE ALEHOUSE " 

[1707] 

[A Broadside Song; also with music in Pills to 
Purge Melancholy (1707), i. n8J. 

I Went to the Alehouse as an honest Woman shou'd, 
And a Knave follow'd after, as you know Knaves 

wou'd, 

Knaves will be Knaves in every Degree, 
I'll tell you by and by how this Knave serv'd me. 

I call'd for my Pot as an honest Woman shou'd, 
And the Knave drank't up, as you know Knaves 

wou'd, 

Knaves will be Knaves in every Degree, 
I'll tell you by and by how this Knave seiVd me. 

I went into my Bed, as an honest Woman shou'd, 
And the Knave crept into't, as you know Knaves 

wou'd, 

Knaves will be Knaves in every Degree. 
I'll tell you by and by how this Knave serv'd me. 

I proved with Child as an honest Woman shou'd, 
And the Knave ran away, as you know Knaves 

wou'd, 

Knaves will be Knaves in every Degree, 
And thus I have told you how this Knave serv'd me. 



i8o AS I SAT AT MY SPINNING-WHEEL " 



"AS I SAT AT MY SPINNING-WHEEL" 
[1707] 

[Words and music in Pitts to Purge Melancholy 
(1719), iii. 88]. 

As I sat at my Spinning- Wheel, 

A bonny Lad there passed by, 

I kenn'd him round, and I lik'd him weel, 

Geud Feth he had a bonny Eye: 
My Heart new panting, 'gan to feel, 
But still I turn'd my Spinning- Wheel. 

Most gracefully he did appear, 
As he my Presence did draw near, 
And round about my slender Waste 
He clasp'd his Arms, and me embrac'd: 
To kiss my Hand he down did kneel, 
As I sat at my Spinning- Wheel. 

My Milk white Hand he did extol, 
And prais'd my Fingers long and small, 
And said, there was no Lady fair, 
That ever could with me compare: 

Those pleasing Words my Heart did feel, 
But still I turn'd my Spinning- Wheel. 



AS I SAT AT MY SPINNING-WHEEL" 181 

Altho' I seemingly did chide, 
Yet he would never be deny'd, 
But did declare his Love the more, 
Until my Heart was Wounded sore; 
That I my Love cou'd scarce conceal, 
But yet I turn'd my Spinning- Wheel. 

As for my Yarn, my Rock and Reel, 
And after that my Spinning- Wheel, 
He bid me leave them all with Speed 
And gang with him to yonder Mead: 

My panting Heart strange Flames did feel, 
Yet still I tum'd my Spinning- Wheel. 

He stopp'd and gaz'd, and blithly said, 
Now speed the Wheel, my bonny Maid, 
But if thou'st to the Hay-Cock go, 
I'll learn thee better Work I trow, 
Geud Feth, I lik'd him passing weel, 
But still I turn'd my Spinning- Wheel. 

He lowly veil'd his Bonnet oft, 

And sweetly kist my Lips so soft; 

Yet still between each Honey Kiss, 

He urg'd me on to farther Bliss: 
Till I resistless Fire did feel, 
Then let alone my Spinning- Wheel. 

Among the pleasant Cocks of Hay, 
Then with my bonny Lad I lay, 



182 "AS I SAT AT MY SPINNING-WHEEL" 

What Damsel ever could deny, 
A Youth with such a Charming Eye? 
The pleasure I cannot reveal, 
It far surpast the Spinning- Wheel. 




THE SURPRIZ'D NYMPH 183 



THE SURPRIZ'D NYMPH 

[1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), i. 102 J. 

The four and twentieth day of May, 

Of all days in the year; 
A Virgin Lady fresh and gay, 

Did privately appear: 
Hard by a River side got she, 

And did sing loud the rather; 
Cause she was sure, she was secure, 

And had intent to bathe her. 

With glittering, glancing, jealous Eyes, 

She slily looks about; 
To see if any lurking Spies 

Were hid to find her out: 
And being well resolv'd that none, 

Could see her Nakedness, 
She pull'd her Robes off one by one, 

And did her self undress. 

Her purple Mantle fring'd with Gold, 

Her Ivory Hands unpinn'd; 
It wou'd have made a Coward bold, 

Or tempted a Saint to 'a sinn'd: 



1 84 THE SURPRIZ'D NYMPH 

She turn'd about and look'd around, 

Quoth she, I hope I'm safe; 
Then her rosie Petticoat, 

She presently put off. 

The snow white Smock which she had on, 

Transparently to deck her, 
Look'd like Cambrick or Lawn, 

Upon an Alablaster Picture: 
Thro' which Array I did faintly spy 

Her Belly and her Back; 
Her Limbs were straight, and all was white, 

But that which should be Black. 

Into a fluent Stream she leapt, 

She lookt like Venus Glass; 
The Fishes from all Quarters crept, 

To see what Angel 'twas: 
She did so like a Vision look, 

Or Fancy in a Dream; 
'Twas thought the Sun the Skies forsook, 

And dropt into the Stream. 

Each Fish did wish himself a Man, 

About her all was drawn, 
And at the Sight of her began 

To spread abroad their Spawn: 
She turn'd to swim upon her Back, 

And so display'd her Banner; 



THE SURPRIZ'D NYMPH 185 

If Jove had then in Heaven been, 
He would have dropt upon her. 

A Lad that long her Love had been, 

And cou'd obtain no Grace, 
For all her prying lay unseen, 

Hid in t secret place: 
Who had often been repuls'd, 

When he did come to Wooe her; 
Pull'd off his Cloaths, and furiously 

Did run and leap into her. 

She squeak'd, she cry'd, and down she div'd, 

He brought her up again; 
He brought o'er upon the Shore, 

And then and then and then 

As Adam did Old Eve enjoy, 

You may guess what I mean; 
Because she all uncovered lay, 

He cover'd her again. 

With water'd Eyes she pants and crys, 

I'm utterly undone; 
If you will not be wed to me, 

E'er the next Morning Sun: 
He answer'd her he ne'er would stir, 

Out of her Sight till then ; 
We'll both clap Hands in Wedlock Bands, 

Marry, and to't again. 



1 86 "OH MOTHER, ROGER WITH ETC." 



" OH MOTHER, ROGER WITH HIS KISSES " 
[1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), i. 214]. 

Oh Mother, Roger with his Kisses 
Almost stops my Breath, I vow; 

Why does he gripe my Hand to pieces, 
And yet he says he loves me too? 
Tell me, Mother, pray now do ! 
Pray now do, pray now do, 
Tell me, Mother, pray now do, 
Pray now, pray now, pray now do, 
What Roger means when he does so? 
For never stir I long to know. 

Nay more, the naughty Man beside it, 
Something in my Mouth he put; 

I call'd him Beast, and try'd to Bite it, 
But for my Life I cannot do't; 
Tell me, Mother, pray now do! 
Pray now do, pray now do, 
Tell me, Mother, pray now do, 
Pray now, pray now, pray now do, 
What Roger means when he does so? 
For never stir I long to know. 



"OH MOTHER, ROGER WITH ETC." 187 

He sets me in his Lap whole Hours, 

Where I feel I know not what; 
Something I never felt in yours, 
Pray tell me Mother what is that? 
Tell me Mother what is that? 
For never stir I long to know. 




i88 "AS I WENT O'ER YON MISTY MOOR" 



" AS I WENT O'ER YON MISTY MOOR " 
[1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), i. 326; set by AKEROYDE], 

As I went o'er yon misty Moor, 

'Twas on an Evening late, Sir, 
There I met with a welfar'd Lass 

Was spanning of her Gate, Sir; 
I took her by the lilly white Hand, 

And by the Twat I caught her, 
I swear and vow, and tell you true, 

She piss'd in my Hand with Laughter. 

The silly poor Wench she lay so still, 

You'd swear she had been dead, Sir; 
The deel a word but aw she said, but ay, 

And bow'd her Head, Sir; 
Kind Sir, quoth she, you'll kill me here, 

But I'll forgive the Slaughter, 
You make such Motions with your A se, 

You'll split my Sides with Laughter. 



THE FRYER AND THE MAID 189 



THE FRYER AND THE MAID 

[r. 1707] 

[A Broadside Song with music; see CHAPPELL'S 
Popular Music etc. (1855-59), 274]. 

As I lay Musing all alone, 

A merry Tale I thought upon; 

Now listen a while and I will you tell, 

Of a Fryer that lov'd a Bonny Lass well. 

He came to her when she was going to Bed, 

Desiring to have her Maiden-head; 

But she denyed his desire, 

And said that she did fear Hell-fire. 

Tush, tush, quoth the Fryer, thou need'st not doubt, 
If thou wert in Hell, I could sing thee out; 
Why then, quoth the Maid thou shalt have thy 

request, 
The Fryer was as glad as a Fox in his Nest. 

But one thing more I must request, 
More than to sing me out of Hell-fire; 
That is for doing of the thing, 
An Angel of Money you must me bring. 



190 THE FRYER AND THE MAID 

Tush, tush, quoth the Fryer, we two shall agree, 

No Money shall part thee and me; 

Before thy company I will lack, 

I'll pawn the grey Gown off my Back. 

The Maid bethought her on a Wile, 
How she might this Fryer beguile; 
When he was gone, the truth to tell, 
She hung a Cloth before a Well. 

The Fryer came as his bargain was, 

With Money unto his bonny Lass; 

Good morrow, Fair Maid, good morrow quoth she, 

Here is the Money I promis'd thee. 

She thank'd him, and she took the Money, 
Now let's go to't my own dear Honey; 
Nay, stay a while, some respite make, 
If my Master should come he would us take. 

Alas! quoth the Maid, my Master doth come; 
Alas! quoth the Fryer where shall I run; 
Behind yon Cloth run thou, quoth she, 
For there my Master cannot see. 

Behind the Cloth the Fryer went, 

And was in the Well incontinent: 

Alas! quoth he, I'm in the Well, 

No matter quoth she if thou wert in Hell. 



THE FRYER AND THE MAID 191 

Thou saidst thou could sing me out of Hell, 
I prithee sing thy self out of the Well ; 
Sing out, quoth she, with all thy might, 
Or else thou'rt like to sing there all Night. 

The Fryer sang out with a pitiful sound, 
Oh! help me out or I shall be Drown'd; 
She heard him make such pitiful moan, 
She hope him out and bid him go home. 

Quoth the Fryer, I never was serv'd so before, 
Away, quoth the Wench, come here no more; 
The Fryer he wulk'd along the street, 
As if he had been a new wash'd Sheep: 

Sing hey down a deny, and let's be merry, 

And from such Sin ever keep. 




192 THE TROOPER WATERING HIS NAGG 



THE TROOPER WATERING HIS NAGG 

[1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), iii. 55]. 

There was an old Woman liv'd under a Hill, 

Sing Trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
She had good Beer and Ale for to sell, 

Ho, ho, had she so, had she so, had she so; 
She had a Daughter her name was Stss, 

Sing Trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo ; 
She kept her at Home for to welcome her Guest, 

Ho, ho, did she so, did she so, did she so. 

There came a Trooper riding by, 

Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
He call'd for Drink most plentifully, 

Ho, ho, did he so, did he so, did he so; 
When one Pot was out he call'd for another, 

Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
He kiss'd the Daughter before the Mother, 

Ho, ho, did he so, did he so, did he so. 

And when Night came on to Bed they went, 
Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 



THE TROOPER WATERING HIS NAGG 193 

It was with the Mother's own Consent, 
Ho, ho, was it so, was it so, was it so; 

Quoth she, what is this so stiff and warm, 
Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 

Tis Ball my Nag he will do you no harm, 
Ho, ho, wont he so, wont he so, wont he so. 

But what is this hangs under his Chin, 

Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
Tis the Bag he puts his Provender in, 

Ho, ho, is it so, is it so, is it so; 
Quoth he, what is this ? Quoth she, 'tis a Well, 

Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
Where Ball your Nag may drink his fill, 

Ho, ho, may he so, may he so, may he so. 

But what if my Nag should chance to slip in, 

Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
Then catch hold of the Grass that grows on the 
brim, 

Ho, ho, must I so, must I so, must I so; 
But what if the Grass should chance to fail, 

Sing trolly lolly, lolly, lolly, lo; 
Shove him in by the Head, pull him out by the 
Tail, 

Ho, ho, must I so, must I so, must I so. 



MERRY SONGS I. I j 



194 MY THING IS MY OWN 



MY THING IS MY OWN 

[1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), if. 234]. 

I a tender young Maid have been courted by many, 
Of all sorts and Trades as ever was any: 
A spruce Haberdasher first spake me fair, 
But I would have nothing to do with Small ware. 
My Thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A sweet scented Courtier did give me a Kiss, 
And promis'd me Mountains if I would be his, 
But I'll not believe him, for it is too true, 
Some Courtiers do promise much more than they do. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A fine Man of Law did come out of the Strand, 
To plead his own Cause with his Fee in his Hand ; 
He made a brave Motion but that would not do, 
For I did dismiss him, and Nonsuit him too. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 
Next came a young Fellow, a notable Spark, 
(With Green Bag and Inkhorn, a Justices Clark) 



MY THING IS MY OWN 195 

He pull'd out his Warrant to make all appear, 
But I sent him away with a Flea in his Ear. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A Master of Musick came with an intent, 
To give me a Lesson on my Instrument, 
I thank'd him for nothing, but bid him be gone, 
For my little Fiddle should not be plaid on. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

An Usurer came with abundance of Cash, 
But I had no mind to come under his Lash, 
He profer*d me Jewels, and great store of Gold, 
But I would not Mortgage my little Free-hold. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A blunt Lieutenant surpriz'd my Placket, 
And fiercely began to rifle and sack it, 
I mustered my Spirits up and became bold, 
And forc'd my Lieutenant to quit his strong hold. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A Crafty young Bumpkin that was very rich, 
And us'd with his Bargains to go thro' stitch, 
Did tender a Sum, but it would not avail, 
That I should admit him my Tenant in tayl. 



1 96 MY THING IS MY OWN 

My Thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A fine dapper Taylor, with a Yard in his Hand, 
Did profer his Service to be at Command, 
He talk'd of a slit I had above Knee, 
But I'll have no Taylors to stitch it for me. 
My Thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A Gentleman that did talk much of his Grounds, 

His Horses, his Setting-Dogs, and his Grey-hounds, 

Put in for a Course, and us'd all his Art, 

But he mist of the Sport, for Puss would not start. 

My Thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 

Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

A pretty young Squire new come to the Town, 
To empty his Pockets, and so to go down, 
Did profer a kindness, but I would have none, 
The same that he us'd to his Mother's Maid Joan. 
My Thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Yet other young Lasses may do what they will. 

Now here I could reckon a hundred and more, 
Besides all the Gamesters recited before, 
That made their addresses in hopes of a snap 
But as young as I was I understood Trap. 
My thing is my own, and I'll keep it so still, 
Until I be Marryed, say Men what they will. 



"AS THE FRYER HE WENT ALONG" 197 



"AS THE FRYER HE WENT ALONG" 

[1707] 

[Words and music in Pitts to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), iii. 130]. 

As the Fryer he went along, and a poring in his 

Book, 
At last he spy'd a Jolly brown Wench a washing 

of her Buck, 

Sing, Stow the Fryer, stow the Fryer 
Some good Man, and let this fair Maid go. 

The Fryer he pull'd out and a Jolly T d as 

much as he could handle, 
Fair Maid, quoth he, if thou earnest Fire in thy 

A , come light me this same Candle. 

Sing, Stow the Fryer, stow the Fryer 
Some good Man, and let this fair Maid go. 

The Maid she sh - and a Jolly brown T 

out of her Jolly brown Hole, 
Good Sir, quoth she, if you will a Candle light 

come blow me this same Cole. 
Sing, Stow the Fryer, stow the Fryer, 
Some good Man, and let this fair Maid go. 



198 "AS THE FRYER HE WENT ALONG" 

Part of the Sparks flew into the North, and part 
into the South, 

And part of this jolly brown T flew into the 

Fryer's Mouth. 

Sing, Stow the Fryer, stow the Fryer 
Some good Man, and let this fair Maid go. 




THE LASS OF LYNN'S LAMENTATION 199 



THE LASS OF LYNN'S SORROWFUL 

LAMENTATION FOR THE LOSS 

OF HER MAIDEN-HEAD 

[1707] 

[Words and music in Pitt* to Purg Melancholy 
(1707), iii. 131]. 

I am a young Lass of Lynn, 
Who often said thank you too; 

My Belly's now almost to my Chin, 
I cannot tell what to do. 

My being so free and kind, 
Does make my Heart to rue; 

The sad Effects of this I find, 
And cannot tell what to do. 

My Petticoats which I wore, 
And likewise my Aprons too; 

Alass, they are all too short before, 
I cannot tell what to do. 

Was ever young Maid so crost, 

As I who thank'd him too: 
For why, my Maiden-head is lost, 

I cannot tell what to do. 



200 THE LASS OF LYNN'S LAMENTATION 

In sorrowful sort I cry'd, 

And may now for ever rue; 
The Pain lies in my Back and Side, 

I cannot tell what to do. 

Alass I was kind and mild, 

But now the same I rue; 
Having no Father for my Child, 

I cannot tell what to do. 

I took but a Touch in jest, 

Believe me this is true; 
Yet I have proved, I protest, 

And cannot tell what to do. 

He crav'd my Virginity, 

And gave me his own in lieu; 

In this I find I was too kind, 
And cannot tell what to do. 

Each Damsel will me degrade, 
And so will the young Men too; 

I'm neither Widow, Wife, nor Maid, 
I cannot tell what to do. 

A Cradle I must provide, 

A Chair and Posset too; 
Nay, likewise twenty Things beside, 

I cannot tell what to do. 



THE LASS OF LYNN'S LAMENTATION 201 

When I was a Maiden fair, 

Such Sorrows I never knew; 
But now my Heart is full of Care, 

I cannot tell what to do. 

Oh what will become of me, 

My Belly's as big as two; 
Tis with a Two-legg'd Tympany, 

I cannot tell what to do. 

You Lasses that hear my Moan, 

If you will your Joys renew ; 
Besure, while Married, lye alone, [? unmarried] 

Or else you at lenght may rue. 

I came of as good a Race, 

As most is in Lynn's fair Town; 
And cost a great deal bringing up, 

But a little Thing laid me down. 




202 "AMINTA ONE NIGHT, ETC 71 



"AMINTA ONE NIGHT HAD OCCASION 
TO PISS" 

[f. 1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), i. 274; tune, When first Amyntas srf d 
for a Kiss\ 

Aminta one Night had occasion to P ss, 

Joan reach'd her the Pot that stood by her; 
I in the next Chamber could hear it to hiss, 

The Sluice was small, but Stream was strong: 
My Soul was melting, thinking of bliss, 
And raving I lay with desire; 

But nought could be done, 

For alas she P d on, 

Nor car'd for Pangs I sufifer'd long: 

Joan next made hast, 

In the self same Case; 
To fix the Pot dose to her own A : 

Then Floods did come, 

One might have sworn, 
And puff a Whirl-wind flew from her B 

Says Joan^ by these strange Blasts that do rise, 
I guess that the Night will grow windy; 

For when such Showers do fall from the Skies, 
To dear the Air the North-wind blows; 



"AMINTA ONE NIGHT, ETC" 203 

Yc nasty Quean, her Lady replies, 

That Tempest broke out from behind ye; 
And though it was decently kept from my Eyes, 
The troubled Air offends my Nose: 

Says Joan 'ods-heart, 

You have P d a Quart, 

And now you make ado for a F 1 ; 

Tis still your mind, 

To squeeze behind, 
But never fell Shower from me without wind. 




204 "MY PRETTY MAID, ETC.' 



"MY PRETTY MAID, FAIR WOULD 
I KNOW." 

[c. 1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1707), ii. 76]. 

My pretty Maid, fair would I know 
What thing it is will breed Delight, 
That strives to stand, yet cannot go, 
That feeds the Mouth that cannot bite. 
With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 

grumbledum hey. 

With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 
grumbledum hey. 

It is a pretty pricking thing 
A pleasing and a standing thing, 
'Twas the Truncheon Mars did use, 
A Bed-ward bit which Maidens chuse. 
With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 

grumbledum hey. 

With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 
grumbledum hey. 

It is a Shaft of Cupid's cut, 
'Twill serve to Rove, to Prick, to Butt; 
There's never a Maid, but by her will 
Will keep it in her Quiver still. 



"MY PRETTY MAID, ETC." 205 

With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 

grumbledum hey. 
With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 

grumbledum hey. 

Tis a Fryer with a Bald-Head, 
A Staff to beat a Cuckold Dead ; 
It is a Gun that shoots point-blank; 
It hits betwixt a Woman's Flank, 
With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 

grumbledum hey. 

With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 
grumbledum hey. 

It has a Head much like a Mole's, 
And yet it loves to creep in Holes: 
The fairest She that e'er took Life, 
For love of this, became a Wife. 
With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 

grumbledum hey. 

With a Humbledum, Grumbledum, humbledum 
grumbledum hey. 




206 THE BEE-HIVE 

THE BEE-HIVE 

[c. 1707] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
ii- 73]- 



My Mistress is a Hive of Bees in yonder flowry 

Garden, 
To her they come with loaden Thighs, to ease them 

of their Burden: 
As under the Bee-Hive lieth the Wax, and under the 

Wax is Honey, 
So under her Waste her Belly is plac'd, and under 

that her C ny. 

My Mistress is a Mine of Gold, would that it were 

her Pleasure, 
To let me dig within her Mould, and roll among her 

Treasure. 
As under the Moss the Mould doth lye, and under 

the Mould is Mony, 
So under her Waste her Belly is plac'd, and under 

that her C ny. 

My Mistress is a Morn of May, which drops of 

Dew down stilleth, 
Where e'er she goes to sport and play, the Dew 

down sweetly trilleth, 



THE BEE-HIVE 307 

As under the Sun the Mist doth lye, so under 

the Mist it is Sunny, 
So under her Waste her Belly is plac'd, and 

under that her C ny. 

My Mistress is a pleasant Spring, that yieldeth 

store of Water sweet, 
That doth refresh each wither'd thing lies trodden 

under Feet, 
Her Belly is both white and soft, and downy as 

any Bunny, 
That many Gallants wish full oft to play but 

with her C ny. 

My Mistress hath the Magick Sprays, of late she 

takes such wondrous pain, 
That she can pleasing Spirits raise, and also lay 

them down again, 
Such power hath my tripping Doe, my little 

pretty Bunny, 
That many would their Lives forego, to play but 

with her C ny. 




208 "WOULD YOU HAVE ETC. 1 



" WOULD YOU HAVE A YOUNG VIRGIN " 

[1709] 

[Words by T. DURFEY; from Tlie Modern Prophets, 
sung by Mr. PACK, fl. 1700-24; music in 
Pills to Purge Melancholy (1719), i. 132]. 

Would ye have a young Virgin of fifteen Years, 
You must tickle her Fancy with sweets and dears, 
Ever toying, and playing, and sweetly, sweetly, 
Sing a Love Sonnet, and charm her Ears: 
Wittily, prettily, talk her down, 
Chase her, and praise her, if fair or brown, 
Sooth her, and smooth her, 
And teaze her, and please her, 
And touch but her Smicket, and all's your own. 

Do ye fancy a Widow well known in a Man? 
With a front of Assurance come boldly on, 
Let her rest not an Hour, but briskly, briskly, 
Put her in mind how her Time steals on; 
Rattle and prattle although she frown, 
Rowse her, and towse her from Morn to Noon, 
Shew her some Hour y'are able to grapple, 
Then get but her Writings, and all's your own. 



"WOULD YOU HAVE ETC." 209 

Do ye fancy a Punk of a Humour free, 

That's kept by a Fumbler of Quality, 

You must rail at her Keeper, and tell her, tell her 

Pleasure's best Charm is Variety, 
Swear her much fairer than all the Town, 
Try her, and ply her when Cully's gone, 
Dog her, and jog her, 
And meet her, and treat her, 
And kiss with two Guinea's, and all's your own. 




2io THE SCOTCH PARSON'S DAUGHTER 



THE SCOTCH PARSON'S DAUGHTER 

(V. 1710] 

[Words by T. DURFEY ; music in Pills to Purge 
Melancholy (1719), ii. 202]. 

Peggy in Devotion, 

Bred from tender Years; 
From my Loving motion, 

Still was call'd to Prayers: 
I made muckle bustle, 

Love's dear Fort to win; 
But the Kirk Apostle, 

Told her 'twas a Sin. 

Fasting and Repentance, 

And such Whining Cant; 
With the Dooms-day sentence, 

Frighted my young Saint: 
He taught her the Duty, 

Heavenly joys to know; 
I that lik'd her Beauty, 

Taught her those below. 

Nature took my part still, 
Scnce did Reason blind; 



THE SCOTCH PARSON'S DAUGHTER 211 

That for all his Art still, 

She to me inclin'd : 
Strange delight hereafter, 

Did so dull appear; 
She as I had taught her, 

Vow'd to share 'em here. 

Faith 'tis worth your Laughter, 

'Mongst the canting Race; 
Neither Son nor Daughter, 

Ever yet had Grace: 
Peggy on the Sunday, 

With her Daddy vext; 
Came to me on Monday, 

And forgot his Text. 




212 THE MAIDS LESSON 



THE MAIDS LESSON 

BEING INSTRUCTIONS FOR A YOUNG SHE BEGINNER, 
A SPICK AND SPAN NEW SONG 

[c. 1710] 
[A broadside song with music]. 

To play upon a Viol, if a Virgin will begin, 
She first of all must know her Cliff; 

And all the Stops therein: 

She first of all must know her Cliff: and all 
the Stops therein. 

Her Prick she must hold long enough, 

Her backfalls Gently take: 
Her touch must gentle be, not rough, 

She at each stroke must shake. 

Her Body must by no means bend, 

But stick close to her Fiddle, 
Her feet must hold the lower end, 

Her knees must hold the middle. 

She boldly to the Bow must fly, 

As if she'd make it crack, 
Two Fingers on the hair must lye. 

And two upon the Back. 



THE MAIDS LESSON 213 

And when she hath as she woud have, 

She must it gently thrust, 
Up, down, swift, slow, at any rate, 

As she her self doth List. 

And when she once begins to find, 
That she grows something cunning, 

She'l ne'er be quiet in her mind 
Untill she finds it running. 




214 THE LASS WITH THE VELVET A SE 



THE LASS WITH THE VELVET A SE 

[f. 1710] 
[A broadside song with music]. 

There was a buxom Lass 
And she had a Velvet A 



Which made he to Bounce and to vapour 

When E'er she went to sh 

If twas ne'er such a little bit 

O she always wiped it with brown Paper 
With brown Paper 
With brown Paper 
She always wiped it with brown Paper. 

This Lass whose name was Jane 

O she kept her A se so clean, 

That she won the Heart of one Mr. Draper 

He married her outright, 

So she got a Husband by't, 

And all because she wiped her A se 

With brown Paper 

Cho. With brown Paper 

With brown Paper 
And all because she wiped her A se 

With brown Paper. 



THE LASS WITH THE VELVET A SE 215 

Ye Lasses short and tall 

Pray take Example all, 

And learn for the future to use brown paper 

So heres a health to every Lass. 

That mudines her A se, 

Not forgeting good Mrs. Draper 



Cho. 



Good Mrs. Draper, 
Good Mrs. Draper, 
Not forgeting Good Mrs. Draper. 




2i& THE PENURIOUS QUAKER 



THE PENURIOUS QUAKER: 

OR 

THE HIGH PRIZ'D HARLOT 

\. 1719] 

(Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1719), vi. 294]. 

Quaker. My Friend thy Beauty seemeth good 

We Righteous have our failings; 
I'm Flesh and Blood, methinks I cou'd, 
Wert thou but free from Ailings. 

Harlot. Believe me Sir I'm newly broach'd, 

And never have been in yet; 
I vow and swear I ne'er was touch'd, 
By Man 'till this day sennight. 

Quaker. Then prithee Friend, now prithee do. 

Nay, let us not defer it : 
And I'll be kind r<_ thee when Th~.n 
H^M bi<; ;ii- Hvil .Spirit. 

Harlot. I vow I won't, indeed 1 shan't, 
Unless I've Money first, Sir; 
For if I ever trust a Saint, 
I wish I may be curst, Sir. 



THE PENURIOUS QUAKER 217 

Quaker. I cannot like the Wicked say, 

I Love thee and Adore thee, 
And therefore thou wilt make me pay, 
So here is Six ptnce for thee. 

Harlot. Confound you for a stingy TOhfg, 
Do ye think I live by Stealing; 
Farewel you Puritannick Prig, 
I scom to take your Shilling. 






2i8 A TENEMENT TO LET 



A TENEMENT TO LET 

[c. 1719] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy, 
vi. 355-] 

I have a Tenement to Let, 

I hope will please you all, 
And if you'd know the Name of it, 

'Tis called Cunny Hall 

It's seated in a Pleasant Vale, 

Beneath a rising Hill; 
This Tenement is to be Let, 

To whosoe'er I will. 

For Years, for Months, for Weeks or Days, 

I'll let this famous Bow'r; 
Nay rather than a Tennant want, 

I'd let it for an Hour. 

There's round about a pleasant Grove, 

To shade it from the Sun; 
And underneath is Well water 

That pleasantly does run. 

Where if you're hot you may be cool'd, 
If cold you may find heat; 



A TENEMENT TO LET 219 

It is a well contrived Spring, 
Not little nor too great. 

The place is very Dark by Night, 

And so it is by Day; 
But when you once arc enter'd in, 

You cannot lose your way. 

And when you're in, go boldly on, 

As far as e'er you can; 
And if you reach to the House top, 

You'll be where ne'er was Man. 




220 THE WANTON VIRGINS FRIGHTED 



THE WANTON VIRGINS FRIGHTED 

[c. 1719] 

[Words and music in Pills to Purge Melancholy 
(1719), ii. 12]. 

You that delight in a Jocular Song, 

Come listen unto me a while, Sir; 
I will engage you shall not tarry long, 

Before it shall make you to smile, Sir: 
Near to the Town there liv'd an old Man, 

Had three pretty Maids to his Daughters; 
Of whom I will tell such a story anon, 

Will tickle your Fancy with Laughter. 

The old Man had in his Garden a Pond, 

'Twas in very fine Summer Weather; 
The Daughters one Night they were all very fond, 

To go and Bath ir: it together: 
Which thfiy agreed, but happen'd to be. 

O'er heard by ^ Youth in tbe. Hous*-, Sir; 
Who got in the Garden, and climb'd up a Tree, 

And there sate as still as a Mouse, Sir. 

The Branch where he sat it hung over the Pond, 
At each puff of Wind lie did totter; 



THE WANTON VIRGINS FRIGHTED 221 

Pleas'd with the Thoughts lie should sit abscond, 

And see them go into the Water: 
When the Old Man was safe in his Bed, 

The Daughters then to the Pond went, Sir; 
One to the other two laughing she said, 

As high as our Bubbies we'll venture. 

Upon the tender green Grass they sat down, 

They all were of delicate Feature; 
Each pluck'd off her Petticoat, Smock, and Gown, 

No sight it could ever be sweeter: 
Into the Pond then dabling they went, 

So clean that they needed no Washing; 
But they were all so unluckily bent, 

Like Boys they began to be dashing. 

If any body should see us, says one, 

They'd think we were boding of Evil; 
And from the sight of us quickly would run, 

And avoid so many white Devils: 
This put the Youth in a merry Pin, 

He let go his hold thro' his Laughter; 
And as it fell out, he fell tumbling in, 

And scar'd them all out of the Water. 

The old Man by this time a Noise had heard, 
And rose out of Bed in a Fright, Sir; 

And comes to the Door with a Rusty old Sword, 
There stood in a Posture to fight, Sir: 



222 THE WANTON VIRGINS FRIGHTED 

The Daughters they all came tumbling in, 
And over their Dad they did blunder; 

Who cry'd out aloud, Mercy, good Gentlemen, 
And thought they were Thieves came to Plunder. 

The Noise by this time the Neighbours had heard, 

Who came with long Clubs to assist him; 
He told them three bloody Rogues run up Stairs, 

He dar'd by no means to resist them: 
For they were Cloathed all in their Buff, 

He see as they shov'd in their Shoulders; 
And black Bandaleers hung before like a ruff, 

Which made them believe they were Soldiers. 

The Virgins their Cloaths in the Garden had left, 

And Keys of their Trunks in their Pockets; 
To put on the Sheets they were fain to make shift, 

Their Chest they could not unlock it: 
At last ventur'd up these Valiant Men, 

Thus armed with Courage undaunted; 
But took them for Spirits, and run back again, 

And swore that the House it was Haunted. 

As they Retreated the young Man they met, 
Come shivering in at the Door, Sir; 

Who look'd like a Rat with his Cloaths dropping wet, 
No Rogue that was Pump'd could look worser : 

All were amazed to see him come in, 
And ask'd of him what was the Matter? 



THE WANTON VIRGINS FRIGHTED 223 

He told them the Story, and where he had been, 
Which set them all in a Laughter. 

Quoth the old Daddy, I was in a huff, 

And reckon'd to cut them asunder; 
Thinking they had been three Soldiers in Buff, 

That came here to rifle and Plunder: 
But they are my Daughters whom I loved, 

All Frighted from private Diversion; 
Therefore I'll put up my old rusty Sword, 

For why should I be in a Passion. 




224 THE TURNEP GROUND 



THE TURNEP GROUND 

\c. 1720] 

[A broadside song with music]. 

I ow'd my Hostess thirty Pound, 
And how dy'e think I pay'd her, 
I Mett her in my Turnep Ground, 
And gently down I Lay'd her, 

She Op't a Purse as black as Coal, 
To hold my Coin when counted, 
I Satisfied in the hole, 
And Just by Tayl She found it. 

Two stones make Pounds full Twenty Eight 
And stones she had some skill in, 
And if good Flesh bare any rate 
A Yard's worth Forty Shilling, 

If this Coin pass, no Man that lives, 
Shall dun for past Debauches; 
Zounds, Landlords, send but in your Wifes, 
We'll scow'r off all their Notches. 



THE SCHOOL MASTERS LESSON 225 



THE SCHOOL MASTERS LESSON 

[c. 1726] 
[A broadside song with music} 

I will fly into your Arms, 
and Smother you with kisses, 

I will rifle all your Charms, 
and teach you Am'rous blisses, 

For it is my Concern, 

And a means that you should learn, 
the Pranks of other Misses. 

Dont be coy when I invade, 
And kindly yield the Blessing, 

For it is high time your Maidenhead 
Were in my Possession, 

Dont cry out and be a Fool, 

For if that you come to School 
You must peruse your Lesson. 

Open then the Books my dear, 
The Leaves shall be separated, 

All things that comprehensive are, 
Shall soon be penetrated 

Lessons three she had that Night, 

MERRY SONGS I. 15 



226 THE SCHOOL MASTERS LESSON 

Taking pleasure with delight, 

She begg'd for more next Morning. 

Lovely master try again, 

Dont so soon forsake me, 
For to learn I am in Pain 

Till you a Scholar make me, 
Such pretty pretty Things you show 
The more you teach the more I'd know, 

For now the Fit dos take me. 

Never Master pleas'd me more, 

To such great Perfection, 
And of all the schools I'm sure, 

Kind is your Correction, 
For whene'ver you give the same 
Never a Scholar can you blame, 

Tis done with such affection. 

Open then my Leaves so Fair, 
And kindly to me show Sir, 

What knowledge is, how sweet, how rare, 
And what I long to know Sir, 

Cupid tells me very Plain, 

That your learning is not vain, 
But usefull as his Bow Sir. 

When he was departing then, 
She said with kind Expression, 



THE SCHOOL MASTERS LESSON 227 

When will you pray Sir come again, 

And teach me t'other Lesson, 
He reply'd with great delight, 
My dear, I'll come but ev'ry Night, 

And think it as a Blessing. 

Thus each Night he do[e]s repair 

To tell her of her Duty, 
While He's taken in the snare 

Shot to the Heart by Cupid, 
When the School master is Love, 
Then the Scholars kinder prove 

For Love is Km to Beauty. 




228 THE SILENT FLUTE 



THE SILENT FLUTE 

[1720] 

[Broadside song with music: the words by SOL. 
BOLTON to the tune of Sally in our Alley 
(CAREY, c. 1720); in Musical Miscellany, 
1729, iii. 94 and many other collections]. 

As Damon late with Cloe sat, 

They talk'd of am'rous Blisses; 
Kind things he said, which she repaid, 

In pleasing Smiles and Kisses 
With tuneful Tongue of Love he sung; 

She thank'd him for his Ditty, 
But said one Day she heard him say, 

The Flute was mighty pretty. 

Young Damon, who her Meaning knew, 

Took out his Pipe to charm her; 
And while he strove, with wanton Love, 

And sprightly Airs, to warm her; 
She begg'd the Swain to play one Strain, 

In all the softest Measure, 
Whose Killing Sound would sweetly wound, 

And make her dye with Pleasure. 



THE SILENT FLUTE 229 

Eager to do't, he takes the Flute, 

And ev'ry Accent traces, 
Love trickling thro' his Fingers flew, 

And whisper*d melting Graces: 
He did his Part with wond'rous Art, 

Expecting Praises after; 
But she instead of falling dead, 

Burst out into a Laughter. 

Taking the Hint, as Clot meant, 

Said he, My Dear, be easy; 
I have a Flute, which, tho' 'tis mute, 

May play a Tune to please ye: 
Then down he laid the charming Maid, 

He found her kind and willing; 
He play'd again, and tho' each Strain 

Was silent, yet 'twas Killing. 

Fair Cloc soon appro v'd the Tune, 

And vow'd he play'd divinely; 
Let's have it o'er, said she, once more, 

It goes exceeding finely: 
The Flute is good, that's made of Wood, 

And is, I own, the neatest; 
Yet ne'ertheless, I must confess, 

The silent Flute's the sweetest. 



2 3 o A YORKSHIRE TALE 



A YORKSHIRE TALE 

[1729] 
[Words and music in Musical Miscellany > iii. 76]. 

Come hither, good People, both Aged and Young, 
And give your Attention to my merry Song; 
I'll sing you a true one, and not hold you long, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

A Parson there was, and whose Name I cou'd 

tell, 

But suppose I do not, it is full as well, 
Whose Wife did all Yorkshire in Beauty excel, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

Her Texture so perfect, her Eyes black as Sloe, 

Her Hair curling shone, and like Jet it did show, 

Which often denotes 'tis the same Thing below : 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 



A YORKSHIRE TALE 231 

A sprightly young Spark she had smitten so deep, 
Nor Day had he Quiet, nor Night cou'd he sleep, 
Which made him think how, to her Bed he should 

creep. 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, derry, deny, down, up and down, 

deny, derry, down. 

Assistance he wanted, and then did unbend 
His Mind to a Brother, besure a good Friend, 
Who said, fear not Wat, thou shalt compass thy 

End. 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

In Woman's Apparel dress out, and be gay, 
I'll venture my Life on't, 'twill be a sure Way, 
If you condescend but to what I shall say, 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, derry, deny, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

And thus to the Parson's this Couple rode on; 
Dear Doctor, says Frank, here's a Thing to be 

done, 

Which Office perform'd, I shall gratefully own, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, down. 



232 A YORKSHIRE TALE 

This Lady, that long has Love's Passion defy'd, 
And all my Addresses so often deny'd, 
Will now make me happy by being my Bride, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 
deny, derry, deny, down, up and down, 
deny, derry, down. 

'Tis past the Canonical Hour, said he, 

And till the next morning you know it can't be, 

And then I'll attend you, Sir, most readily, 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

Says Frank, I confess, Sir, you are perfectly right ; 
But here lies the Hardship, we can't, while 'tis 

Light, 

Get to the next Town for a Lodging to-night, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, derry, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

Take no care of that, Sir, for thus it shall be, 
The Lady, if she thinks it fit to agree, 
Shall lie with my Dearest, and you lie with me, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 



A YORKSHIRE TALE 233 

You so much oblige me in what you now say, 
I hope in Return I shall find out a Way 
Such generous Kindness with thanks to repay 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, down. 

This being agreed on, both Sides did consent 
To put the Glass round, and the Evening was 

spent 
In Mirth and good Cheer, then to Bed they all 

went, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, down. 

No sooner in Bed then, but with a bold Grace, 
Watt, full of Desire, thus opeu'd the Case, 

Dear Madam, says he, I must then did embrace, 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 
deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 
derry, derry, down. 

Confounded she lay, and not able to speak, 
To think how these Wags had deceiv'd her and 

Dick ; 
But at last she was pleas'd with the Frolick and 

Trick. 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 



234 A YORKSHIRE TALE 

deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 
deny, deny, down. 

He pleas'd her so well, that transported she lay, 
Contriving and plotting for his longer Stay, 
Which thus to her Husband she form'd the next 

Day, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

deny, derry, down. 

This Lady, my Dearest, last Night full of Grief, 

Oft' hugg'd me, and told me, I can't for my Life 

Consent, tho' I've proms'd him to be his Wife, 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, derry, derry, down, up and down, 

derry, derry, down. 

To-monow, said she, and then freely went on, 
Tho' I love him, my Heart tells me I must be 

gone, 

If so the poor Man you know may be undone, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

derry, deny, derry, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, down. 

Now how to prevent this I'll think of a Way 
If I can persuade her some time for to stay, 
And that's a good Office, I'm sure you will say, 



A YORKSHIRE TALE 235 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 
deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 
deny, deny, down. 

Tis so, my dear Creature ; pray do what you can, 
To please her, and bring her to Humour again, 
And I'll do my best to divert the poor Man, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, down. 

The Plot so well taken made both their Hearts 

bound, 

All Night, and all Day too, whenever they found 

Convenience for Pastime, her Pleasure he crown'd, 

With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, down. 

And thus my Friend Watt his full Swing did 

obtain, 
The Wife too in Transport a whole Week did 

reign, 
And the Man, ne'er the worse, had his Mare 

back again, 
With a down, down, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, deny, down, up and down, 

deny, deny, down. 



236 THE PRESBYTERIAN WEDDING 



THE PRESBYTERIAN WEDDING 

Procul 6 procul este Profani ! 
Conclamat Vates totoque absistite Luco. 
VIRGIL. 

[1729] 

[Words and music from Mttsical Miscellany, v. 102]. 

A certain Presbyterian Pair 

Were wedded t'other day; 
And when in Bed the Lambs were laid, 

Their Pastor came to pray. 

But first he bade each Guest depart, 

Nor sacred Rites prophane; 
For carnal Eyes such Mysteries 

Can never entertain. 

Then with a Puritannick Air, 

Unto the Lord he pray'd, 
That he would please to grant Encrease 

To that same man and maid: 

And that the Husbandman might dress 

Full well the Vine his Wife; 
And like a Vine she still might twine 

About him all her Life. 



THE PRESBYTERIAN WEDDING 237 

Sack Posset then he gave them both, 

And said with lifted Eyes, 
Blest of the Lord! with one Accord 

Begin your Enterprize. 

The Bridegroom then drew near his Spouse, 

T'apply Prolifick Balm; 
And while they strove in mutual Love, 

The Parson sung a Psalm. 




238 THE GALLANT SCHEMER'S PETITION 



THE GALLANT SCHEMER'S PETITION 
TO THE HONOURABLE MRS. F - S 



[Words and music from Musical Miscellany, vi. 88; 
set by Mr. J. SHEELES]. 

By the Mole on your Bubbles so round and so white, 
By the Mole on your Neck, where my Arms 

would delight, 

By what-ever Mole else you have got out of sight. 
I pr'ythee now hear me, dear Molly. 

By the Kiss just a starting from off your moist Lips, 
By the delicate up-and-down Jutt of your Hips, 
By the Tip of your Tongue, which all Tongues 
out-tips 

I pr'ythee now hear me, dear Molly. 

By the Down on your Bosom on which my Soul dies, 
By the Thing of all Things which you love as 

your Eyes, 
By the Thoughts you lie down with, and those 

when you rise, 

I pr'ythee now hear me, dear Molly. 



THE GALLANT SCHEMER'S PETITION 230 

By all the soft Pleasures a Virgin can share, 
By the critical Minute no Virgin can bear, 
By the Question I burn for to ask, but don't dare, 
I pr'ythee now hear me, dear Molly. 




240 " O MITHER DEAR, I GIN TO FEAR " 



"O MITHER DEAR, I GIN TO FEAR" 

[1733] 

[Words and music from THOMSON'S Orpheus 
Caledonius, ii. 83 ; tune,/enny beguildthe Webstet\ 

Mither dear, I 'gin to fear, 
Tho' I'm baith good, and bonny, 

1 winna keep; for in my Sleep 
I start and dream of Johny. 

When Johny then comes down the Glen, 

To woo me dinna hinder ; 
But with Content gi' your Consent; 

For we twa ne'er can sinder. 

Better to marry, than miscarry; 

For Shame and Skaith's the Clink o't, 
To thole the Dool, to mount the Stool 

I downa' bide to think o't: 
Sae while 'tis time, I'll shun the Crime, 

That gars poor Epps gae whinging, 
With Hainches fow, and Een sae blew, 

To a' the Bedrals bindging. 

Had Eppy's Apron bidden down, 

The Kirk had ne'er a kend it; 
But when the Word's gane thro' the town 

Alake! how can she mend it? 



"O MITHER DEAR, I GIN TO FEAR" 241 

Now Tarn maun face the Minister, 

And she maun mount the Pillar; 
And that's the way that they maun gae 

For poor Folk has na Siller. 

Now ha'd ye'r Tongue, my Daughter young, 

Reply'd the kindly Mither, 
Get Johny's Hand in haly Band, 

Syne wap ye'r Wealth together. 
I'm o' the mind, if he be kind, 

Ye'll do your part discreetly; 
And prove a Wife, will gar his Life, 

And Barrel run right sweetly. 




MKRRY SONGS I. 1 6 



242 WHITE THIGHS 



WHITE THIGHS 



[Attributed to THOMAS 6th EARL OF HADDINGTON. 
See Note to "The Bobtailed Lass" post, 
P- 



Let the world run its course of capricious delight 

I none of its vanities prize; 
More substantial the joys I experience each night, 

From a touch 'twixt my charmer's white thighs. 

Poets praise Chloe's shape, her complexion, her air, 
Coral lips, pearly teeth, and fine eyes; 

A fig for them all, they can never compare, 
To my charmer's elastic white thighs. 

What care I for Phillis, Maria, and Jane, 
Their beauties may raw one's surprise; 

Let others enjoy them content I remain, 
Sole lord of thy lovely white thighs. 

If aught can entice me, or aught can allure, 

My slumbering passions to rise, 
Or aught kindle up my desires be sure 

'Tis the sight of these snowy white thighs. 



WHITE THIGHS 243 

When I revel, dear love, in thy heavenly charms, 

The joys of the gods I despise; 
Nor envy great Mars, though in Venus' arms, 

Whilst embracing thy beautiful thighs. 

Believe me, my dear, there is nothing on earth, 
Which so fondly so madly I prize, 

As that fountain of bliss, where delight takes its birth, 
Which is placed 'twixt thy parting white thighs. 

Of Ganymede's beauties we oft times have heard, 
And how Jove buggar'd him in the skies; 

No envy have I, nor care I a turd, 
Whilst possessing such exquisite thighs. 

The arse of my love is delightfull to see, 

Its plumpness rejoiceth the eyes; 
Her lily white belly is heaven to me, 

But, ye gods! what are these to her thighs. 




244 A DIALOGUE 



A LATE DIALOGUE BETWEEN CAPTAIN 
LOW AND HIS FRIEND DICK 

[b. 1749] 

[From Poems by ROBERTSON of Struan]. 
LOW. 

Tell me, thou Source of Scandal, Dick, 

Why did my Lord's Relations stick 
And bogle so at Matrimony? 

DICK. 

Because my Lord had but one P k 
To satisfy my Lady's C ny. 

LOW. 

Besides, the little harmless Buck, 
Perhaps has never had the Luck 
In such a Case to have been try'd: 

DICK. 

But she gave Proof that she could f k, 
Or she is damnably bely'd. 

LOW. 

But now that they are join'd in one, 
(As Woman may be join'd to Man) 
They'll eat and drink up all their Store. 



A DIALOGUE 245 

DICK. 

My Lady P n and Lady A n 
Will always patronize a Whore. 

LOW. 

In Charity, I must confess, 
The Ladies they can do no less; 
But who will stickle for the Tool? 

DICK. 

The Governor, who's but an Ass, 
Will never abdicate a Fool. 

LOW. 

'Tis not, they say, this Lad alone, 
Has sav'd a Virgin quite undone, 
And it is thought a Christian Passion: 

DICK. 

Yet I should hardly lose my own, 
To save a Bitch's Reputation. 

LOW. 

But to be strain'd in Marriage-Press 
Is honourable ne'er the less, 
If you will credit holy Writ: 

DICK. 

Tis honourable, I confess, 

But never when the Bed's beshit. 



246 A DIALOGUE 

LOW. 

Thy Poison always makes me mad, 
A Basilisk's is not so bad, 

For all the Legions it has slain. 

DICK. 

Leave off thy Railing, or, by Gad, 

I'll have thee squeez'd like Nevil Payne. 

LOW. 

Were it not, Sir, I plainly view 
Your cursed Tongue will murder you, 
I had myself already done't. 

DICK. 

Thou drunken Sot, go Home and spue, 
And piss a Bed, as thou art wont. 




THE PROUD PEDLAR 247 



THE PROUD PEDLAR 

[' 1750] 
{.Roxburgh Ballads, iii. 656]. 

So merrily singeth the Nightengale, and so mer- 
rily singeth the Jay: 

And so merrily singeth the proud Pedlar as he 
walked along the Highway. 

14 The Bag at my Back is worth Twenty Pounds, 

in Gold and in good Money; 
And I would freely part with it all, for to kiss a 

Night with a Lady." 

The Lady look'd out of her window, and hearing 

the Pedlar sing; 
"Sing on, sing on, thou proud Pedlar, the Song 

that thou didst begin. " 

The Pedlar look'd over his Left shoulder, he 

looked so neat and so trim, 
" I never sung a Song in all my whole Life, but 

I could sing it again. 



248 THE PROUD PEDLAR 

The Bag at my Back is worth Twenty Pounds, 

in Gold and in good Money; 
And I would freely part with it all, for to kiss 

a Night with a Lady. " 

The Lady took the Pedlar's Hand, and through 

the Hall him led, 
Into a large and spacious Room, where Cushions 

and Pillows were laid. 

The Pedlar lay with the Lady all Night, until it 

was Break of Day; 
And then he thought of his Tom Pack, when 

he had no Sport to play. 

" Here's Twenty Pounds, " the Pedlar said, " for 
to buy Gloves, Jewels and Rings, 

So I may have my little Tom Pack, for to get 
me my Living. " 

The Lady took the Pedlar's Pack, and set it 

upon her Knee. 
" If you would give me twice Twenty Pounds, 

you shall have no Pack of me." 

" I will make Grass grow, " the Pedlar said, " and 

where there did grow none; 
And I will stand at the Hall-Gate, till your 

wedded Lord comes home. " 



THE PROUD PEDLAR 249 

At night her own wedded Lord came home, an 

[s]eeing the Pedlar there stand, 
"What dost thou here, thou proud Pedlar? 

Now this of thee I do demand. " 

"Yesterday I made a Feast, for Pedlars thirty- 

and three, 
And wanted a Mortar to pound the Spice, and 

borrow'd one of your Lady. 

"The Mortar was your own Lady's, but the 

Pestle was my own; 
But now she has got my little Tom Pack, and 

I wish the truth was but known. " 

"Come give him his Pack," (Thou proud Pedlar!) 
" What makes you here let him stand ? 

Come, give him his Pack and let him be gone, 
and this of you I do command. " 

" Come, take thy Pack, thou proud Pedlar, come 

take this Pack of thine; 
For never a Pedlar, for thy sake, shall pound 

Spice in a Mortar of mine. " 

"Now this is well juggl'd," the Pedlar said, 

" and it is well juggled of me : 
For now I have got my little Tom Pack, and 

kist all Night with a Lady. 



250 THE PROUD PEDLAR 

By my wanton Tricks I lost this Pack, by my 

Wits I have got it again; 
And if I do live these Five Hundred Years, I 

will never come there again." 




THE SAD DISASTER 251 



THE SAD DISASTER 
[1766] 

[By DURFEY the Younger in The Rattle, p. 53; 
tune, Fair Kitty, beautiful and young, etc.]. 

As Lady Jane, devoutly wise, 

Upon her arm reclin'd ; 
With Yorick's sermons pour'd her eyes, 

Fit food for such a mind, 
A saucy flea came skipping o'er 

Those parts must not be nam'd, 
Which when she rubb'd, still itch'd the more, 

Enrag'd, the fair exclaim'd. 

"Shall this vile reptile boldly dare 

44 My hidden charms to scan, 
44 Which I so long have kept with care 

"From that base tyrant man? 
" Forbid it all ye Gods ! " then flew, 

Like lightning to the bell; 
What sad disaster did ensue, 

I dread, alas! to tell, 

"Here, Betty, quickly bring a light, 
"And help to find him out, 



252 THE SAD DISASTER 

" Make haste, or I shall lose him quite, 
"What is the wench about?" 

Then stooping with an eager eye, 
And breast brimfull of ire, 

The heedless creature went too nigh, 
And set her smock on fire. 




I REDE YOU BEWARE O' THE RIPPLES 253 



I REDE YOU BEWARE O' THE RIPPLES 

[* 1796] 

[BURNS in Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800); 
tune, The Taylor's faun thro' the bed, etc.]. 

I rede you beware o' the ripples, young man, 
I rede you beware o' the ripples, young man ; reit 

Tho' the saddle be saft, ye needna ride aft, 
For fear that the girdin' beguile ye, young man. 

I rede ye beware o' the ripples, young man, 
I rede ye beware o' the ripples, young man; 

Tho' music be pleasure, tak' music in measure, 
Or ye may want win' i' your whistle, young man. 

I rede ye beware o' the ripples, young man, 
I rede ye beware o' the ripples, young man; 

Whate'er ye bestow, do less than ye dow, 
The mair will be thought o' your kindness, 
young man 

I rede ye beware o' the ripples, young man, 
I rede ye beware o' the ripples, young man ; 

Gif you wad be strang, and wish to live lang, 

Dance less wi' your arse to the kipples, young lower parts 
man. 



254 THE LASS O' LIVISTON 



THE LASS O' LIVISTON 

[* 1796] 

[Old song in Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800) 
collected by BURNS]. 

The bonny lass o' Liviston, 

Her name ye ken, her name ye ken ; 

And ay the welcomer ye'll be, 
The farther ben, the farther ben. 

And she has it written in her contract, 
To lie her lane, to lie her lane; 

And I hae written in my contract, 
belly To claw her wame, to claw her wame. 

The bonny lass o' Liviston, 

She's berry brown, she's berry brown; 
An' ye winna true her lovely locks, 

Gae farther down, gae farther down. 
She has a black and a rolling eye, 

And a dimplit chin, and a dimplit chin; 
taste And no to prie her rosy lips, 

Wad be a sin, wad be a sin. 

The bonny lass o' Liviston, 
Cam in to me, cam in to me; 



THE LASS O' LIVISTON 255 

I wat' wi' baith ends o' the busk, 
I made me free, I made me free. 

I laid her feet to my bed -stock, 

Her head to the wa', her head to the wa'; 

And I gied her her wee coat in her teeth, 
Her sark an' a', her sark an* a'. 




256 WAD YE DO THAT? 



WAD YE DO THAT? 
[b. 1796] 

[Old Song from Meiry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800), 
collected by BURNS; tune, John Anderson, 
my jo}. 

Gudewife when your gudeman's frae hame, 

Might I but be sae bauld, 
As come to your bed-chamber, 

When winter nights are cauld; 
As come to your bed-chamber, 

When nights are cauld and wat; 
And lie in your gudeman's stead, 

Wad ye do that? 

Young man an ye should be so kind, 
When our gudeman's frae hame, 

As come to my bed-chamber, 
alone Where I am laid my lane; 

And lie in our gudeman's stead, 
I will tell you what, 

He fucks me five times ilka night, 
Wade ye do that? 



THE PATRIARCH 257 



THE PATRIARCH 
(b. 1796] 

[BURNS in Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800); 
tune, The auld cripple Dow]. 

As honest Jacob on a night, 

Wi' his beloved beauty, 
Was duly laid on wedlock's bed, 

And noddin' at his duty, 

"How lang," she says, "ye fumbling wretch, 

"Will ye be fucking at it? 
" My eldest wean might die of age, 

" Before that ye could get it. 

"Ye pegh, and grane, and groazle there, puff 

"And mak an unco splutter, 

"And I maun lie and thole you here, endure 

"And fient a hair the better." the devil 

Then he, in wrath, put up his graith, 
"The deevil's in the hizzie! 

"I maw yOU as I maw the lave, mow; remainder 

"And night and day I'm busy. 



MIRRY SONGS I. 



258 THE PATRIARCH 

"I've bairned the sen-ant gypsies baith, 

"Forbye your titty Leah; 
"Ye barren jad, ye put me mad, 
, " What mair can I do wi' you ? 

"There's ne'er a maw I've gi'en the lave, 

"But ye hae got a dizzen; 
"And damn'd a ane ye'se get again, 
become dried "Although your cunt should gizzen." 

Then Rachael, calm as ony lamb, 
She claps him on the waulies, 

Quo' she, " Ne'er fash a woman's clash, 
"In trowth, ye maw me braulies. 

"My dear, 'tis true, for mony a maw 
"I'm your ungratefu' debtor 

"But ance again, I dinna ken 
"We'll aiblins happen better." 

Then, honest man! wi' little wark 

He sune forgot his ire; 
The patriarch he coost the sark 

And up and till't like fire!!! 




WILL YE NA, CAN YE NA, LET ME BE 259 



WILL YE NA, CAN YEN A, 
LET ME BE 

[* 1796] 

[Old song in Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800), 
collected by 'BURNS; tune, / hate laid a 
herrirf in sa't]. 

There liv'd a wife in Whistle-cockpen, 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be; 

She brews good yill for gentlemen, 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 

The night blew sair wi' wind and weet, 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be; 

She show'd the traveller ben to sleep, 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 

She saw a sight below his sark, 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be; 

She wadna wanted it for a mark, 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 

She saw a sight aboon his knee, 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be; 

She wadna wanted it, for three, 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 



26o WILL YE NA, CAN YE NA, LET ME BE 

"O whare live ye, and what's your trade?" 
Will ye na ; can ye na, let me be; 

"I am a thresher gude," he said, 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 

"And that's my flail, and workin' graith," 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be; 

"And noble tools," quo' she, "by my faith!" 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 

"I wad gie a browst, the best I hae," 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be: 

"For a gude darge o' graith like thae," 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 

" I wad sell the hair frae off my tail," 
Will ye na, can ye na, let me be; 

"To buy our Andrew siccan a flail," 
And ay she waggit it wantonlie. 




GREEN GROW THE RASHES 261 



GREEN GROW THE RASHES 

I*. 1796] 
[BURNS in Merry Muses of Caledonia (e. 1800)]. 

O wat ye ought o' fisher Meg, 

And how she trow'd the webster, O, 
She loot me see her carrot cunt, 
And sell'd it for a lobster, O. 
Green grow the rashes, O, 

Green grow the rashes, O, 
The lassies they have wimble-bores, 
The widows they hae gashes, O. 

Mistress Mary cow'd her thing, 

Because she wad be gentle, O, 
And span the fleece upon a rock, 
To waft a highland mantle, O. 
Green grow the rashes, O, 

Green grow the rashes, O, 
The lassies they have wimble-bores, 
The widows they hae gashes, O. 

An' heard ye o' the coat o' arms, 
The Lyon brought our lady, O, 



262 GREEN GROW THE RASHES 

The ciest was, couchant, sable cunt, 
The motto, "Ready, ready," O. 
Green grow the rashes, O, 

Green grow the rashes, O, 
The lassies they have wimble-bores, 
The widows they hae gashes, O. 

An' ken ye Leezie Lundie, O, 

The godly Leezie Lundie, O, 
She maws like reek thro' a' the week, 
But finger-fucks on Sunday, O. 
Green grow the rashes, O, 

Green grow the rashes, O, 
The lassies they have wimble-bores, 
The widows they hae gashes, O. 




CUDDIE THE COOPER 263 



CUDDIE THE COOPER 
[b. 1796] 

[From \ferry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800), col- 
lected by BURNS; tune, Bonnie Dundee], 

There was a cooper they ca'd him Cuddy, 

He was the best cooper that ever I saw; 
He cam to girth our landlady's tubbie, 

He bang'd her buttocks again the wa'! 
"Cooper," quo' she, "hae ye ony raony?" 

14 The deevil a penny," quo* Cuddy, " at a' ! " 
She took out her purse, an* she gied him a 
guinea 

For banging her buttocks again the wa'. 




264 BROSE AND BUTTER 



BROSE AND BUTTER 
[b. 1796] 

[An old song from Merry Muses of Caledonia 
(c. 1800), collected by BURNS]. 

Jenny sits up i' the laft, 

Jockie wad fain 'a been at her; 
But there cam a wind out o' the west 
windows Made a' the winnocks to clatter. 

O gie my love brose, lasses, 

O gie my love brose and butter; 
For nane in Carrick wi' him 
Can gie a cunt its supper. 

The laverock lo'es the grass, 

The paitrick lo'es the stibble; 
And hey for the gardener lad 
To gully awa' wi' his dibble. 
O gie my love brose, lasses, 

O gie my love brose and butter; 
For nane in Carrick wi' him 
Can gie a cunt its supper. 

My daddie sent me to the hill 
To pu' my minnie some heather; 



BROSE AND BUTTER 265 

And drive it in your fill, 
Ye're welcome to the leather. 
O gie my love brose, lasses, 

O gie my love brose and butter; 
For nane in Carrick wi' him 
Can gie a cunt its supper. 

The mouse is a merry wee beast, 

The moudiewart wants the e'en ; mole 

And o' for a touch of the thing, 
I had it in my nieve yestreen. 
O gie my love brose, lasses, 

O gie my love brose and butter; 
For nane in Carrick wi' him 
Can gie a cunt its supper. 

We a' were fou yestreen, 

The night shall be its brither; 
And hey, for a rolling pin 
To nail twa wames thegither ! 
O gie my love brose, lasses, 

O gie my love brose and butter; 
For nane in Carrick wi' him 
Can gie a cunt its supper. 



266 SUPPER ISNA READY 



SUPPER ISNA READY 
[b. 1796] 

[From Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800), collected 
by BURNS; tune, Clout the Cauldron]. 

Roseberry to his lady says, 

"My hinny and my succour, 
"O shall we do the thing ye ken? 

" Or shall we tak our supper ? " 

Wi' modest face, sae fu' o' grace, 

Replied the bonny lady, 
"My noble lord, do as ye please, 

"But supper is na ready." 




DUDCAN MACLEERIE 267 



DUNCAN MACLEERIE 

[* '70] 

[An old song from Merry Muses of Caledonia 
(c. 1800), collected by BURNS; tune:/<wv$y 
MacGill\ 

Duncan Macleerie and Janet his wife, 
They gaed to Kilmarnock to buy a new knife; 

But instead of a knife, they coft but a bleerie, bought 
"We're very weel sair'd," quo' Duncan Mac- 
leerie. 

Duncan Macleerie has got a new fiddle, 

It's a' strung wi' hair, and a hole in the middle; 
An' ay when he plays on 't, his wife looks sac 

cheery, 

"Very weel done, Duncan," quo' Janet Mac- 
leerie. 

Duncan he play'd till his bow it grew greasy; 

Janet grew fretfu', and unco uneasy, 
"Hoot," quo' she, "Duncan, ye're unco soon 
weary; 

"Play us a pibroch," quo Janet Macleerie. martial music 



268 DUNCAN MACLEERIE 

Duncan Macleerie play'd on the harp, 
An' Janet Macleerie dancd in her sark ; 

Her sark it was short, her cunt it was hairy, 
"Very weel danc'd, Janet," quo' Duncan Mac- 
leerie. 




THE PLOUGHMAN 269 



THE PLOUGHMAN 
[*. 1796] 

[From Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800), col- 
lected by BURNS]. 

The ploughman he's a bonnie lad, 

His mind is ever true, jo; 
His garters knit below the knee, 
His bonnet it is blue, jo. 
Sing up, wi't a', the ploughman lad, 

And hey the merry ploughman ; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

As walk in* forth upon a day, 

I met a jolly ploughman; 
I tauld him I had lands to plough, 
If he wad but prove true, man. 
Sing up wi't a', the ploughman lad, 

And hey the merry ploughman; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

He says, My dear, tak ye nae fear 
I'll fit ye till a hair, jo; 



270 THE PLOUGHMAN 

I'll cleave it up, and hit it down, 
And water-furrow't fair, jo. 

Sing up wFt a', the ploughman lad, 

And hey the merry ploughman; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

I hae three ousen in my plough, 

Three better ne'er plough'd ground, jo, 
The foremost ox is lang and sma', 
The twa are plump and round, jo. 
Sing up wi't a', the ploughman lad, 

And hey the merry ploughman; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

Then he wi' speed did yoke his plough, 

Which by a gaud was driven, jo! 
But when he wan between the stilts, 
I thought I was in heaven, jo! 

Sing up wi't a', the ploughman lad, 

And hey the merry ploughman; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

But the foremost ox fell in the fur, 

The tither twa did founder; 
The ploughman lad he breathless grew, 

In faith it was nae wonder. 



THE PLOUGHMAN 271 

Sing up wi't a', the ploughman lad, 
And hey the merry ploughman; 

O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

But a fykie risk, below a hill, 

The plough she took a stane, jo, 
Which gart the fire flee frae the sock, 
The ploughman gied a grane, jo. 
Sing up wi't a', the ploughman lad, 
And hey the merry ploughman ; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 

I hae plough'd east, I hae plough'd west, 

In weather foul and fair, jo; 
But the sairest ploughing e'er I plough'd, 
Was ploughing amang hair, jo. 

Sing up wi't a', the ploughman lad, 

And hey the merry ploughman; 
O' a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman. 




272 THE MODIEWARK 



THE MODIEWARK 

\b. 1796] 

[An old song from Merry Muses of Caledonia, 
collected by BURNS (c. 1800); tune, O for 
ane and twenty, Tarn]. 

The modiewark has done me ill, 

And below my apron has biggit a hill ; 
I maun consult some learned clerk 
About this wanton modiewark. 
An', O, the wanton modiewark, 

The weary wanton modiewark, 

I maun consult some learned clerk, 

About this wanton modiewark. 

O first it gat between my taes, 

Out o'er my garter neist it gaes, 
At length it crap below my sark 
The weary wanton modiewark. 
An', O, the wanton modiewark, 

The weary wanton modiewark, 
I maun consult some learned clerk, 
About this wanton modiewark. 

This modiewark, Iho' it be blin', 
If ance its nose you lat it in, 



THE MODIEWARK 273 

Then to the hilts, within a crack, 
It's out o' sight, the modiewark. 
An', O, the wanton modiewark, 
The weary wanton modiewark, 
I maun consult some learned clerk, 
About this wanton modiewark. 

When Marjorie was made a bride, 
An* Willy lay down by her side, 
Syne nocht was heard when a' was dark, 
But kicking at the modiewark. 
An', O, the wanton modiewark, 
The weary wanton modiewark, 
I maun consult some learned clerk, 
About this wanton modiewark. 




MKRRY SONGS I. 18 



274 OUR JOHN'S BRAK YESTREEN 



OUR JOHN'S BRAK YESTREEN 

[b. 1796] 

[BURNS in Merry Muses of Caledonia (c. 1800) ; 
tune, Gramachree]. 

Twa neebour wives sat i' the sun, 

A twinin' at their rocks, 
An' they an argument began, 

An' a' the plea was cocks. 

'Twas whether they were sinnews strang, 

Or whether they were bane, 
An' how they row'd about your thumb, 

An' how they stan't themlane. 

First, Rachie gae her rock a rug, 

An' syne she claw'd her tail, 
" When our Tam draws on his breeks, 

"It waigles like a flail." 

Says Bess, "They're bane, I will maintain, 

" And proof in han' I'll gie, 
" For our John's it brak yestreen, 

"And the margh ran down my thie." 



THE BOB-TAIL'D LASS 275 



THE BOB-TAIL'D LASS 
[*. 1800] 

[From Ane Pleasant Garland of Sweet Scented 
Flowers (1835) " sixty copies printed, selected 
from a Manuscript volume of Miscellaneous 
Papers preserved in the Library of the Faculty 
of Advocates. " They were reprinted by Kirk- 
patrick Sharpe]. 

On Wednesday in the afternoon 

I took a walk in the field, 
It was to bring my courage down, 

But still I was forced to yield: 
For there I met with a bob-tail'd lass, 

But I should have passed her by, 
And I kindly took her by the hand, 

And I lead her into the kye. 

The pettycoat that she had on 

Was made of the blanket blue, 
The smock was as black as charcole, 

Believe me this was true; 
But tempting words, will tempt young birds, 

That from their nest do fly, 



2?t> THE BOB-TAIL'D LASS 

And I'll never believ't was the first time 
That she had been caught in the kye. 

Good council, good council, 

To you, young man, I give, 
Never to take with a bob-tail'd lass 

As long as you've an hour to live. 
You had better take one that is proper and tall, 

Although she be never so poor, 
For I never was so disgraced hi my life 

As I was by this bob-tail'd whoore. 




WILLIE STEENSON 277 



WILLIE STEENSON 

[6. 1800] 
[See Note to "The Bobtailed Lass" p. 275]. 

There dwelt a man in Lanrickshire, 

Ha! Willie Steenson, 
And all his care and hail desyre 

Was prettie Peggie Beenston. 

He courted her fra barn to byre, 

Ha! Willie Steenson, 
But he could ne'er get his desyre 

Of prettie Peggie Beenston. 

O Peggy, quoth he, I'd lay thee down, 

Ha! Willie Steenson, 
If t were not for spoiling of thy new gown, 

My prettie Peggie Beenston. 

My new gown cost thee ne'er a groat, 

Ha! Willie Steenson; 
Sae lay me down and spare it not, 

Says prettie Peggie Beenston. 

But Willie ran hame to fetch the cloak, 
Ha! Willie Steenson, 



278 WILLIE STEENSON 

And by came another and play'd the sport, 
With prettie Peggie Beenston. 

I wish my cloak had been in the fyre, 

Ha! Willie Steenson, 
That ever another got my desyre 

Of prettie Peggie Beenston. 




THE NAMELESS MAIDEN 279 



THE NAMELESS MAIDEN 

[*. 1800] 
[St* Note to - The Bobtailed Lass, " p. 275]. 

A maid, I dare not tell her name; 

For fear I should disgrace her, 
Tempted a young man for to come 

One night for to embrace her. 
When at the door he made a stop, he made a stop, 
Then she lay still, and snoring cry'd, 
The latch will up, the latch will up. 

This young man, hearing of her words, 

PulTd up the latch and entered; 
But in the room unfortunately 

To her mother's bed he ventured. 
When the poor maid was sore afraid, 
And almost dead, and almost dead; 
Then she lay still, and snoring cry'd, 
To the truckle bed, to the truckle bed. 

Unto the truckle bed he went, 

But as this youth was a-going, 
The unlucky cradle stood in his way, 

Which had almost spoil'd his wooing. 



280 THE NAMELESS MAIDEN 

When after this the maid he spy'd, the maid he 
Here she lay still, and snoring cry'd, [spy'd, 
To th'other side, to th'other side. 

Unto the other side he went, 

To show the love he meant her; 
Pull'd off his cloaths courageously, 

And fell to the work he was sent for. 
When the poor maid made no reply, made no reply, 
But she lay still, and snoring cry'd, 
A little too high, a little too high. 

This lusty lover half ashamed, 

Of her gentle admonition, 
He thought to charge her home again, 

As e'er a girl could wish him. 
Why now my love, I'm right I know, I'm right I 
Then she lay still, and snoring cry'd, [know, 
A little too low, a little too low. 

But by mistake, at length this youth 

His business so well 'tended, 
He hit the mark so cunningly, 

He defy'd all the world to mend it. 
Well now, my love, I'm right I swear, I'm right 
Then she lay still, and snoring cry'd, [I swear. 
Oh there! just there! Oh there! just there!