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Full text of "National Flower Show of the Society of American Florists and Ornamental Horticulturalists"

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Ex LiBRIS 

The Pennsylvania 
hobticultueal society 



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flower \ho}P 

MARCH 25" TO 
APRIL 2^" 1916 

Convention Hall 

Broad & Allegheny Ave. 



KETTtRUNUS, PHIUOA, 



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bureau of farka 

FRED NUSSBAUMER. SUPT 
ST PAUL. MINN. 



Saint Paul, Minn. September 2nd, I915. 



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King Construction Co. , 
North Tonawanda, N. Y. 



Gentlemen. 

The GreenhcuBea which yoiir Company have construct- 
ed in Come Park thie City are considered the finest range of 
greenhouses in the Country. This is the verdict of Tourists 
and Visitors that come to the peurk from all over the United 
States. In adding my testimonial, which you have not re- 
quested, let me say that you deserve credit for this structure 
the proportional and ornomental design of the whole plant and 
especially the one hundred foot tower is ' exceptionally well 
designed and executed in well balanced workmanship and is 
deeply and gratefully appreciated by 

Yours very truly 




Supt. of Parks. 



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aisABnH 

Booknolll 
Hopewell. New . 
Dtrticillinl t * 



FOURTH NATIONAL 

FLOWER SHOW 

of the 

SOCIETY o/ AMERICAN 

FLORISTS and ORNAMENTAL 

HORTICULTURISTS 

Incorporated by Act of Congress, March 4, 1901 

Co-operating with 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

The American Rose Society 

The American Carnation Society 

Florists' Club of Philadelphia 

American Sweet Pea Society 

American Gladiolus Society 

National Association of Gardeners 

American Dahlia Society 

Chrysanthemum Society of America 

Florists' Telegraph Delivery 




CONVENTION HALL 

BROAD STREET AND ALLEGHENY AVENUE. PHILADELPHIA 

MARCH 25 TO APRIL 2 

1916 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



CO-OPERATING SOCIETIES 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

C. Hartman Kuhn, Phila. . President Henry F. Michell, Phila Vice-President 

Robert Craig. Phila Vice-President Robt. C. Lippincott, Phila. . . . Vice-President 

Wm. Kleinheinz, Ogontz, Pa. . Vice-President S. W. Keith, Phila Treasurer 

David Rust, Phila Secretary 

American Rose Society 

Samuel S. Pennock, Phila President Harry O. May, Summit, N. J Treasurer 

Louis J. Reuter, Westerly, R. I. , Vice-President Benjamin Hammond, Beacon, N. Y. , Secretary 

American Carnation Society 

Joseph H. HiU, Richmond, Ind President A. F. J. Baur, Indianapolis, Ind Secretary 

J. F. Ammann, Edwardsville, III., V. -President F. E. Domer, LaFayette, Ind Treasurer 

Florists' Club of Philadelphia 

George Burton, Phila President David Rust, Phila Secretary 

J. C. Gracey, Phila Vice-President George Craig, Phila Treasurer 

American Sweet Pea Society 

Wm. Gray, Newport, R. I President Harrj^ A. Bunyard, New York Secretary 

G. W. Kerr, Doylestown, Pa. , Vice-President Arthur T. Boddington, New York . . Treasurer 
John H. Pepper, New York .... Recording Secretary 

American Gladiolus Society 

C. P. Fairbanks, Boston, Mass President Henry Youell, Syracuse, N. Y Secretary 

T. A. Havemeyer, New York . . Vice-President A. E. Kimderd, Goshen, Ind Treasurer 

National Association of Gardeners 

W. N. Craig, Brookline, Mass President James Stuart, Majnaroneck, N. Y. . Treasurer 

Theo. Wirth,MhineapoHs,Muin.,F.-P7'm(fe«i M. C. Ebel, Madison, N. J Secretary 

American Dahlia Society 

R. Vincent, Jr., WTiite Marsh, Md. .President J. Harrison Dick, New York Secretary 

F. R. Austin, Tuckerton, N. J Treasurer 

Chrysanthemum Society of America 

Wm. Kleinheinz, Ogontz, Pa President Chas. W. Johnson, Morgan Park, 111. ^Secretary 

W. Vert, Port Washington, N. Y. , V .-President John N. May, Summit, N. J Treasurer 

Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

I. Bertermann, Indianapohs, Ind. . .President W. L. Rock, Kansas City, Mo Treasurer 

W. F. Gude, Washington, D . C. , Vice-President Albert Pochelon, Detroit, Mich. . . . Secretary 

1 521 8 

JEPHqr 



I ^-2/9 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




EVOLUTION OF FLORICULTURE IN 

AMERICA 

HE grand array of Nature's finest products that will be on exhibi- 
tion at Convention Hall from March 25th to April 2nd will give 
flower lovers the opportunity of seeing the very latest development 
of plant life. 

When the Pilgrim Fathers landed on the bleak, barren shores 
of New England they found very little in the way of native flowers. 

They had brought with them a few seeds of Dianthus and other common 
garden flowers and when these seeds had produced bloom the Pilgrims gazed 
upon the entire cultivated floral wealth of America. 

Among the earliest records of the cultivation of flowers in America, are the 
accounts of the voyages made in 1638 and 1663 by John Josselyn. 

In these accounts Mr. Josselyn made special mention of the successful 
cultivation in America of Hollyhocks, Gilly Flowers, Sweet Briars and English 
Roses. 

From this humble beginning, Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture 
have made most marvelous strides, and now in 19 16 the United States far sur- 
passes any other country in the total production of glass-grown flowers. 

This rapid growth has so increased the supply of Decorative Plants, such 
as Palms, Ferns, etc., that the best of them are within the reach of people of 
moderate means. 

This rapid growth could not have been possible without the stimulus and 
organized work of Horticultural Societies. 

Such organizations are now^ doing good work in most of the large cities 
and the smaller suburban towns. The greatest value of these organizations is 
the interest which they establish in Flowers and Ornamental Plants, and the 
spreading broadcast of knowledge of new varieties and latest cultural methods. 

The oldest existing Society in the United States is the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society which was organized in 1827, and has included in its member- 
ship, from the very beginning, many of our foremost citizens. It is taking on 
new vigor and is adding many to its membership. It is working in conjunction 
with the S. A. F. 0. H. and other National Horticultural organizations to make 
the Fourth National Flower Show the greatest Floral Exhibition ever staged 
in this country. 

The first greenhouse in this country was built in Boston about the be- 
ginning of the eighteenth century, and in comparison with the magnificent steel 
and concrete constructions of to-day, with their abundance of light and superb 
heating systems, this original greenhouse was a very crude affair. 

The greenhouses now built by the largest firms engaged in that business 
are in points of stability, beauty and adaption to purpose of growing flowers 
and plants, superior, in a marked degree, to anything of the kind in any other 
country. 

In America we have in Winter the finest Roses, Carnations, Sweet Peas, 
and other popular flowers because of the superior construction of the houses and 
the abundant sunshine, which by the way is lacking on the Continent of Europe. 

A most comprehensive idea of the advance made in this great business 
may be obtained by visiting the great Show to be held in Philadelphia, March 
25th to April 2nd. 




SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS 
AND ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS 




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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS 

OFFICERS FOR 1916 

President 
DANIEL MacRORIE, San Francisco, Cal. 

Vice-President 
R. C. KERR, Houston, Tex. 

Secretary 
JOHN YOUNG, 53 W. 28th St., New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer 
W. F. KASTING, Buffalo, N. Y. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Term Expiring igij 
J. J. Hess, Omaha, Neb. J. A. Peterson, Cincinnati, O. 

Term Expiring igi8 

William R. Nicholson, Framingham, Mass. 

W. J. Keimel, Elmhurst, 111. 

Term Expiring igig 
Angelo J. Rossi, San Francisco, Cal. Charles L. Baum, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Ex-Officio 
Patrick Welch, Boston, Mass. 

DIRECTORS UNDER AFFILIATION 

To Serve One Year 

S. S. Pennock, President American Rose Society 

Joseph H. Hill, President American Carnation Society 

Irwin Bertermann, President Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

Henry Weston, President New York Florists' Club 

George Burton, President Florists' Club of Philadelphia 

Eric James, President Pacific Coast Horticultural Society 

Alex. Henderson, President Chicago Florists' Club 
E. G. Hill, President Florists' Hail Association of America 

The Thirty-second Annual Meeting of the Society of American Florists and Orna- 
mental Horticulturists will be held at Houston, Texas, 
August 15, 16, 17, 1916. 



NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW^ 
COMMITTEE 







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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



NATIONAL 
FLOWER SHOW COMMITTEE 



GEORGE ASMUS, Chairman 
2223 W. Madison Street, Chicago, 111. 

JOHN YOUNG, Secretary 
53 West 28th Street, New York 

WM. F. KASTING, Treasurer 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

THOMAS ROLAND 

Nahant, Mass. 

CHAS. H. TOTTY 

Madison, N. J. 

ADOLPH FARENWALD 

Roslyn, Pa. 

WM. P. CRAIG 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

PATRICK WELCH 

Boston, Mass. 




;' 's?;^i^S.-si&>- «^-is*g^;*1J£^'j^a 



PHILADELPHIA 
LOCAL COMMITTEES 




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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



PHILADELPHIA LOCAL COMMITTEES 



Exhibits 

William Klcinhcinz, Chairman 
Joseph Heacock John Kiilin 

Thomas Logan Thomas Long 

Harry S. Betz Alphonse Pericat 

A. T. Moore 

Publicity 

W. F. Therkildson, Chairman 
W. Percy Mills Chas. Henry Fox 

Theo. F. Pohlig R. H. Diirbin 

Williamson Tate H. W. Webb 

Geo. B. Donnell}^ S. R. Clark 

E. Moren Babcock H. C. Sheppard 
W. F. Greenwood W. Atlee Burpee, Jr. 

Concessions 

Louis Burk, Chairman 
Henry F. Michell Walter P. Stokes 

A. T. Moore 

At Large 

Robert Craig, Chairman 
Louis Burk George Burton 

Lectures 

J. Otto Thilow, Chairman 
Chas. E. Meehan Robert Pj'le 

Printing 

Samuel S. Pennock, Chairman 
Fred J. Michell, Jr. Frank M. Ross 

Lease, Contracts and Hall 

A. Farcnwald, Chairman 



W. P. Craig 
S. S. Pennock 



Louis Burk 
W. F. Kasting 



Trade Tickets 

E. J. Fancourt, Chairman 
Mark P. Mills E. C. Dungan 

David Burpee W. K. Harris 

Alfred Burton 

Admission 

1 John Young P. Welch W. F. Kasting 

of N. F. S. Committee 

and the Committee on Trade Tickets 



Special Premiums 

Wm. P. Craig, Chairman 

Frank Ikiljcock W. F. Therkildson 

Louis Burk 

Information 

Fred Cowjierthwaite, Chairman 
H. F. Michell, 2d Dennis Keohane 

John C. Gracey Harry S. Betz 

John Berger D. B. Edwards 

M. C. Wright L. H. Dudman 

David B. Colflesh Wm. H. Engler 

Anthony Waterer 

Advertising 

Chas. Henry Fox, Chairman 

Montgomery Wright J. Otto Thilow 

Wm. Warner Harper 

and the Committee on Publicity 

Decorations 

John P. Habermehl, Chairman 
William Graham Robert Kift 

Special Features 

Chas. H. Grakelow, Chairman 
Harry S. Evans Fred Co\vperthwaite 

Edward A. Stroud Harry S. Betz 
Hon. W. Freeland Kendrick 

Music 

Leo. Niessen, Chairman- 
and the Committee on Special Features 

Aquariums 

Frankhn Barrett, Chairman 
Dr. Herman Bcrgin Flarrj^ Peters 

W. L. Rosenberger Wm. Peck 

Hiram Parker Robert Schaeffer 

Wm. T. Innes, Jr. 

Nurserymen 

^^'m. ^^'arncr tlarper, Chairman 

Thos. B. ]\Ieehan Adolph AiuUcr 

James Krewson 

Local Executive Committee 

Composed of the Chairmen of Above Com- 
mittees. 
A. Farenwald, Chairman 
A. Z. Niessen, Secretary and Treasurer 



PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL SOGIETT 





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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW ii 



THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 

OFFICERS FOR 1916 

President 
C. HARTMAN KUHN 

Vice-Presidents 
ROBERT CRAIG HENRY F. MICHELL 

WM. KLEINHEINZ ROBT. C. LIPPINCOTT 

Treasurer 
S. W. KEITH 

Executive Council 
JOHN W. PEPPER EDW. A. SCHMIDT 

GEO. C. THOMAS, JR J. OTTO THILOW 

THOS. W. LOGAN DR. ROBT. HUEY 

R. W. MEIRS 

Secretary 
DAVID RUST 



12 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS 

FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

ADOLPH LEWISOHX 
JAjMES BOYD 

COUNTESS OF SANTA EULALIA 
C. HARTMAN KUHN 
GEORGE W. ELKINS 
GEORGE D. WIDENER, Jr. 
GEORGE C. TH0:^1AS, Jr. 
MRS. JOHN WANAMAKER 
JOSEPH E. WIDENER 
MAYOR SMITH 
LOUIS BURK 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 13 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS 

ITS ORGANIZATION 

The Society of American Florists was born at 
Chicago, III., on June 19, 1884. 

Previous to this time there had been no organization of any kind among 
the florists and gardeners of the country, although many of them were identified 
with the various horticultural societies and a few were members of the Nursery- 
men's Association. To a few far-seeing individuals it seemed that the florists 
were numerous enough and their business strong enough to maintain a separate 
national organization of their own. So in response to a call, about thirty or 
forty gentlemen assembled in Chicago on the 19th of June, 1884, and there 
laid the foundations of the Society of American Florists. One of the objects 
sought to be accomplished by organization was some plan for insurance of glass 
houses against injury by hail; indeed, it is doubtful if the Society had material- 
ized for many years had it not been for this impetus. At the Chicago meeting 
a preliminary organization was effected and an executive committee met at 
Pittsburgh, Pa., in February, 1885, where the program and other arrangements 
were prepared for the first annual convention to be held in Cincinnati, O., 
in the following August. 

The Society was incorporated by special act of Congress, March 4, 1901. 

LADIES' SOCIETY OF AMERICAN 

FLORISTS 

The Ladies' Society of American Florists was organized 1907 at Philadel- 
phia, Pa., with a membership of 139. Since then its growth has been steady, 
now numbering from 250 to 275. Its object is to promote sociability among the 
ladies attending the S. A. F. and O. H. conventions. It has proved a benefit 
to its own members, and a valuable asset to the main society. Officers consist 
of president, two vice-presidents, secretary, treasurer, and a board of six (6) 
directors. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF 

AMERICA 

The Chrysanthemum Society of America was organized at Buffalo, N. Y., 
in 1S90, with the following officers: President, John Thorpe; Vice-President, 
Wm. K. Harris; Treasurer, John Lane; Secretary, Edwin Lonsdale. 

Its aim and object is the cultivation and improvement of the Chrysanthe- 
mum. To further this purpose an annual meeting and exhibition is held each 
year in conjunction with one of the FaU Flower Shows, the 19 15 Meeting and 
Exhibition being held at Cleveland, Ohio, November 10, 11,12, 13, and 14, 1915. 

Examining Committees are appointed each year in New York, Boston, 
Philadelphia, Chicago and Cincinnati, to examine new varieties of chrysanthe- 



14 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




For SAFE tree surgery, for methods 
that are scientifically accurate and me- 
chanically perfect, for work that elimin- 
ates experiment, for the service of 
finished experts, for work that endures, 
take the dependable and satisfying course 
and go to Davey Tree Surgeons. 

Wm. Kleinheinz, Supt. of the P. A. B. Widener 
Estate, Ogontz, Pa., writes: "The work done by 
your company on our trees is highly satisfactory." 



John T. Burns, Supt. of the Miss C. A. Bliss Estate, 

New Canaan, Conn., writes : " The work done 

by your men on our trees is absolutely perfect." 

John R. Hegeman, Pres. of the Metropolitan Life 

Insurance Co., New York, writes : " You seem to 

have an unusual body of men in your service. ' 

In our files are hundreds of similarly enthusiastic 
letters. The U. S. Government have officially 
chosen Davey experts as best. Every year adds 
1 0% to 25 % to the cost of saving trees. Have your 
trees examined now. Write today for free exami- 
nation and booklet illustrating Davey Tree Surgery. 



THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT CO., home office, KENT, OHIO 

PHILADELPHIA, 1226 LAND TITLE BLDG., Telephone, Spruce 5996 
NEW YORK, 225 FIFTH AVENUE, Telephone, Madison Square 9546 

(Operating the Davey Institute of Tree Surgery). Accredited representatives available 
from Kansas City to Boston 

Davey Tree Surgeons 




FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 15 

CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA— (Continued) 

mums submitted to them. These committees meet every Saturday during the 
months of October and November, and each variety of chrysanthemum scoring 
85 points is awarded the C. S. A. certificate of merit. By this means the dis- 
semination of undesirable varieties is curtailed, and to this is largely due the 
high standard which the chrysanthemum has attained. 

OFFICERS FOR 1916. 
President, Wm. KJeinheinz, Ogontz, Pa. 
Vice-President, Wm. Vert, Port Washington, L. I., N. Y, 
Treasurer, John N. May, Summit, N. J. 
Secretary, Chas. W. Johnson, 2134 W. iioth Street, Chicago, 111. 

"SCHOOL GARDENING" 

Our country is so large that to nationalize any movement is no small work, 
and to hold the interest of each section in particular work or object is difficult, 
but one effort to stir up common interest certainly meets with a well nigh 
universal appreciation, and that is "School Gardening." 

The florists of this country are in a trade that helps greatly to develop 
beauty all around, and in the efforts made by the Society of American Florists 
and Ornamental Horticulturists to stimulate interest in some practical labor, 
by teaching in our schools a Httle gardening and floriculture, reports come from 
many points which show without question that the effort is having a helpful 
result. 

Schools can never take the place of parental oversight and encouragement. 
In one dark back yard brought to our notice, overshadowed by other buildings, 
two boys came to invite us "to come see our garden." Sure enough, those 
youngsters had dug up a bit of waste ground, planted it, weeded and watered 
the ten or dozen feet square, which looked like an irrigated patch near Denver, 
Colo., so prolific it was, and these lads were pleased. This kind of work aids 
to develop American citizens of character. In many villages and small towns 
improvement societies exist, and these societies are usually excellent supporters 
of the florists' craft, directly and indirectly. By small prizes well distributed 
children are encouraged to keep up the home yards. 

School Gardening has its greatest application in our great cities. School 
Gardening aims to take hold and interest the city boys. At a flower show held 
in New York City in the Museum of Natural History, the school children came 
in classes to view the exhibits. They are children born in congested sections 
of New York, and some of them never had been in the country, and the wonder 
at seeing so many flowers was expressed without reserve. 

In the city of Philadelphia the school garden work is well organized, and 
the back yards of the thousands of little houses reveal a taste and industry 
of great importance to any one. 

A truth full of vitality in the 20th Century is: "He that tilleth his land 
shall be satisfied with bread. Much food is in the tillage of the poor; but there 
is that which is destroyed for want of judgment." — Solomon, King of Israel. 

Benjamin Hammond, 
Chairman School Garden Committee, 
Beacon, Dutchess Co., N. Y. Society American Florists. 



i6 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



ESTABLISHED 1874 



DARDS 



CHOICE FRESH FLOWERS. HARDY 

PLANTS FOR HOUSE DECORATION 

FLORAL DECORATIONS 



HOTELS SUPPLIED ON CONTRACT 

ORDERS EXECUTED IN ALL THE LARGE CITIES 

OF THE UNITED STATES. EUROPE AND 

THE BRITISH COLONIES BY SPECIAL 

CODE TO MY REGULAR 

CORRESPONDENTS 



MADISON AVENUE, N. E. COR. 44TH STREET 

ONE BLOCK FROM GF^ND CENTRAL DEPOT 

TELEPHONES 4025-4026 MURRAY HILL 

REGISTERED CABLE— DARDSFLOR 

NEW YORK 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



17 



PATRONESSES 



Miss Ashhurst 
Mrs. Thomas Ashtoii 
Mrs. C. L. Borie 
Mrs. Edward Biddlc 
Mrs. Robert Pitfield Brown 
Mrs. Matthew Baird 
Miss Harriet Blanchard 
Mrs. Beauveau Borie 
Mrs. George Fales Baker 
Mrs. Edward Bok 
Mrs. Samuel T. Bodine 
Miss Marian Biddle 
Mrs. Andrew Blair 
Mrs. Bradbury Bedell 
Miss Emma Blakiston 
Miss Mary Burnham 
Miss E. Josephine Brazier 
Miss Julia Berwind 
Mrs. Archibald Barklie 
Mrs. William P. Bement 
Mrs. Henry Baltz 
Miss Sophia Cadwalader 
Mrs. Brinton Coxe 
Mrs. J. Gardner Cassatt 
Mrs. Edward Cope 
Mrs. Henry Brinton Coxe 
Mrs. Hampton L. Carson 
Mrs. Cyrus H. K. Curtis 
Mrs. John Cadwalader, Jr. 
Mrs. George M. Chichester 
Mrs. Samuel Chew 
Mrs. A. J. Cassatt 
Mrs. Clyde 

Mrs. Harrison K. Caner 
Mrs. Edward Coles 
Mrs. William M. Camac 
Mrs. William B. Campbell 
Mrs. Edward Crozer 
Mrs. Herbert L. Clark 
Mrs. Isaac H. Clothier, Jr. 
Mrs. George Dallas Dixon 
Mrs. William F. Dreer 
Mrs. A. J. Dallas Dixon 
Mrs. George W. C. Drexel 
Mrs. Charles E. Dana 
Mrs. Francis X. Dercum 
Mrs. Herbert S. Darlington 
Mrs. Charles B. Dudley 
Mrs. WilUam H. Donner 



Mrs. George W. Elkins, Jr. 
Mrs. William M. Elkins 
Mrs. Walter L. Eustis 
Miss Elinor Earle 
Mrs. Thomas Elwyn 
Miss Elizabeth Wilson Fisher 
Miss Adeline Worrell Fisher 
Mrs. George H. Frazier 
Miss Mary L. Fisk 
Mrs. C. Lincoln Furbush 
Mrs. F. M. Fuerstenburg 
Mrs. S. G. Flagg, Jr. 
Mrs. William W. Farr 
Miss Mary K. Gibson 
Mrs. Rodman E. Griscom 
Mrs. J. Howard Gibson 
Mrs. W. A. Glasgow 
Mrs. John Gibbon 
Mrs. Edwin C. Grice 
Mrs. J. Campbell Harris 
Mrs. C. Leland Harrison 
Mrs. John Harrison 
Mrs. Richard H. Harte 
Mrs. W. W. Harper 
Mrs. John J. Henry 
Mrs. Samuel F. Houston 
Mrs. Charles W. Henry 
Mrs. Henry R. Hatfield 
Mrs. J. Norman Henry 
Mrs. George Q. Horwitz 
Mrs. Sydney Hutchinson 
Mrs. Jane H. Haines 
Miss Elanor B. Hopkins 
Mrs. George W. Hodge 
Mrs. Bayard Henry 
Mrs. Austin Heckscher 
Mrs. Maurice Heckscher 
Mrs. Charles E. Ingersoll 
Mrs. Henry LaBarre Jaync 
Mrs. Alba B. Johnson 
Mrs. John S. Jenks, Jr. 
Mrs. S. Lovering Jones 
Mrs. William F. Jenks 
Mrs. Edward M. Jeffries 
Mrs. Morris Jastrow, Jr. 
Miss Hilda Justice 
Miss Augusta Justice 
Miss Margaret Kuhl Kelly 
Mrs, Charles P. Keith 



i8 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



HOTEL WALTON 

BROAD AND LOCUST STREETS. PHILADELPHIA 

OFFICIAL HOTEL HEADQUARTERS 
FOR THE NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE CITY. WITH EVERY MODERN CONVENIENCE 
AND AN UNEQUALLED CUISINE, FORMS A COMBINATION WHICH IS THE ACME 

OF PERFECTION IN HOTEL UFE 

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS FOR CONVENTIONS 



DANCING IN THE EVENINGS 

350 TASTEFULLY FURNISHED ROOMS 
ROOMS, WITHOUT BATH . . . . 
ROOMS. WITH BATH 



$1.50 UP 
$2.00 UP 



WALTON HOTEL CO. 



EUGENE G. MILLER, Manager 



FLORIST 



DECORATOR 



Compliments of 




342 BOYLSTON STREET 



BOSTON. MASS. 



IMPORTER OF ART POTTERIES, CHINA, GLASS, 

BASKETRY AND EXCLUSIVE 

NOVELTIES 



WHOLESALE 



RETAIL 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



19 



PATRONESSES 

Mrs. George W. Kendrick 
Mrs. Lewis Kolb 
Dr. Ida L. Keller 
Mrs. Sydney W. Keith 
Mrs. Edward I. Keffer 
Miss Kate Kelsey 
Mrs. Arthur H. Lea 
Mrs. Joseph S. Leidy 
Mrs. John F. Lewis 
Mrs. Henry Laughlin 
Mrs. J. B. Lippincott 
Mrs. Morris J. Lewis 
Mrs. Francis A. Lewis 
Mrs. Richard M. Lisle 
Mrs. George H. Lea 
Mrs. Theodore J. Lewis 
Mrs. William M. Lycett 
Mrs. Robert LeBoutillier 
Miss Clara Middleton 
Mrs. A. L. Marshall 
Mrs. Robert von Moschzisker 
Mrs. Frederick Morris 
Mrs. Louis C. Madeira 
Mrs. Mary L. Morris 
Mrs. Richard W. Meirs 
Mrs. James P. McNichol 
Mrs. J. Franklin McFadden 
Mrs. George McFadden 
Mrs. Norman McLeod 
Miss Letitia McKim 
Mrs. Thomas R. Neilson 
Mrs. George W. Norris 
Mrs. H. S. Prentiss Nichols 
Miss Violet Oakley 
Mrs. Frederick A. Packard 
Mrs. T. Cuyler Patterson 
Mrs. Francis L. Potts 
Mrs. Louis Rodman Page 
Mrs. Charles A. Potter 
Miss Laura Piatt 
Mrs. George Wharton Pepper 
Miss Elizabeth H. Peale 
Mrs. Eli K. Price 
Mrs. Howard Pancoast 
Mrs. Earl B. Putnam 
Mrs. William B. Potts 
Miss Laura Reeve 
Mrs. B. F. Richardson 
Miss Rosengarten 
Miss Julia Rush 
Mrs. Thomas Robbins 



(Continued) 

Mrs. J. Ridgway Reilly 
Mrs. Charles J. Rhoads 
Mrs. Lewis Somers 
Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson 
Miss Ethel Smith 
Mrs. Otis Skinner 
Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 
Mrs. Thomas B. Smith 
Countess Santa Eulalia 
Mrs. Isaac T. Starr 
Mrs. Robert Sewell 
Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 
Miss Sinkler 

Mrs. W. York Stevenson 
Mrs. Graham Shaw 
Mrs. Alfred Stengle 
Miss Emily K. Smith 
Miss Jessie Wilcox Smith 
Mrs. Edgar F. Smith 
Mrs. E. Hollingsworth Siter 
Mrs. Ralph Strassburger 
Miss E. P. Stewartson 
Mrs. William H. Sayen 
Mrs. William Ellis ScuU 
Mrs. Walter B. Stephenson 
Mrs. George C. Thomas 
Miss Anne Thomson 
Mrs. George F. Tyler 
Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend 
Mrs. Charlemagne Tower 
Mrs. Samuel H. Thomas 
Mrs. Rowland L. Taylor 
Miss Martha G. Thomas 
Mrs. WilHam S. Vare 
Mrs. Van Rensselaer 
Mrs. James D. Winsor 
Mrs. Charles Wheelen 
Mrs. John Wanamaker 
Mrs. Barclay H. Warburton 
Mrs. Joseph E. Widener 
Mrs. George Woodward 
Mrs. Richard D. Wood 
Mrs. Louis C. Washburn 
Mrs. J. William White 
Mrs. C. Stewart Wurts 
Mrs. William T. Wright 
Mrs. G. B. Wilson 
Mrs. J. Edward Woodbridge 
Mrs. Charlton Yarnall 
Mrs. Harold Yarnall 
Mrs. I. Lewis Zeigler 



i 



20 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



THE TEA GARDEN 




JOHN H. HABERMEHL 

DESIGNER OF TEA GARDEN 



LUDWIG J. VOLLERS 

DECORATOR OF TEA GAflDEN 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 21 



THE TEA GARDEN 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mrs. J. Willis Martin, Chairman. 

Miss Ernestine A. Goodman, Secretary, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Charles T. Cresswell, Treasurer, 2122 Locust Street. 

Mrs. R. H. Bayard Bowie, Mrs. G. G. Meade Large, 

Mrs. Charles Davis Clark, Mrs. Randal Morgan, 

Mrs. William J. Clothier, Mrs. Lewis Neilson, 

Mrs. Andrew Wright Crawford, Mrs. John W. Pepper, 

Mrs. William W. Frazier, Mrs. Charles Piatt, 3rd, 

Mrs. H. Frazer Harris, Mrs. Horatio Gates Lloyd. 

ASSOCIATIONS HAVING CHARGE 

Saturday Afternoon, March 25. Flower Market. 

Mrs. G. G. Meade Large, Chairman 
Evening. The Civic Club. Mrs. Wendel Reber, Chairman 

Sunday Afternoon, March 26. Students of the Academy of Fine Arts. 

Miss Elise L. Hopkins, Chairman 

Monday Afternoon, March 27. The Gardeners of Montgomery and Dela- 
ware Counties. Mrs. Horace W. Sellers, Chairman 
Evening. The Country Week. Mrs. E. Boyd Weitzel, Chairman 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 28. The Weeders. 

Mrs. Andrew Wright Crawford, Chairman 
Evening. The New Century Club. Mrs. William B. Campbell, Chairman 

Wednesday Afternoon, March 29. Horticultural Society of Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. John W. Pepper, Chairman 
Evening. The Philomusian Club. Mrs. Walter C. Hancock, Chairman 

Thursday Afternoon, March 30. The Garden Club of Philadelphia. 

Mrs. B. Franklin Pepper, Chairman 
Evening. The Country Week. Mrs. E. Boyd Weitzel, Chairman 

Friday Afternoon, March 31. The Alumni Association of Philadelphia 

High School for Girls. Mrs. Charles D. Clark, Chairman 
Evening. The High School Alumnee. Miss Helen M. Neher, Chairman 

Saturday Afternoon, April i. The School of Horticulture. 

Mrs. Thomas Wistar, Chairman 
Evening. The Country Week. Mrs. Boyd E. Weitzel, Chairman 

Students of the School and Directors of the Country Week will also assist 
at Tea Garden. 

The proceeds will be divided between The Horticultural School for 
Women, Ambler, Pennsylvania, and The Children's Country Week x\ssociation 
of Philadelphia. 

Hardy Perennial Seeds from the garden of Miss Ellen Wilmot, Great Worley, England, for 
sale at the Garden Club Table. 



22 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




School of 
Horticulture 
for Women 

Ambler, Pennsylvania 

18 miles from Ptiladelphia 

Spring Term of regular 2-year 
course begins 

February 14. 1916 

Practical and theoretical train- 
ing in the growing of 

Fruits, Vegetables and 
Flowers 



Simple Carpentry, Bees, Poultry, Preserving, School Gardening, 
Elementary Landscape Gardening 

ELIZABETH LEIGHTON LEE, Director '^^^ demand for trained 

' women to nil positions 

Consultant to the Garden Club along horticultural lines, 

of America is steadily growing. 



WILLIAM F. KASTING CO 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



DEALERS IN FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, CUT FLOWERS 
PLANTS AND BULBS 

COMMISSION BUSINESS 

PRICE LISTS AND CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION 

LONG DISTANCE PHONE • 

BELL 620 SENECA FEDERAL 21-120 



383-387 ELLICOTT STREET 



BUFFALO. N. Y. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 23 

SCHOOL OF HORTICULTURE FOR WOMEN 

MISS ELIZABETH LEIGHTON LEE, Director 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Miss Jane B. Haines, President, Cheltenham, Pa. 

Miss Emma Blakiston, First Vice-President, Fort Washington, Pa. 

Miss Mira L. Dock, Second Vice-President, Fayetteville, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles W. Henry, Third Vice-President, St. Martin's, Pa. 

Miss Hilda Justice, Secretary, W. Clapier St., Germantown, Philadelphia 

Miss E. P. Stewardson, Treasurer, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Mrs. Edward W. Biddle, Carlisle, Pa. 

Miss J. A. Clark, Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 

Mrs. Herbert S. Darlington, Rosemont, Pa. 

Mrs. Norton Downs, Three Tuns, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles B. Dudley, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Eleanor Earle, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Miss Gertrude S. Ely, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Mary L. Fisk, 90 Bayard Lane, Princeton, N. J. 

Mrs. C. Lincoln Furbush, 4300 Locust St., Philadelphia 

Mrs. John Gribbel, Wyncote, Pa. 

Mrs. Edwin C. Grice, 3308 Arch St., Philadelphia. 

Mrs. John J. Henry, St. Martin's, Pa. 

Dr. Ida A. Keller, Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Isaac La Boiteaux, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Elizabeth L. Lee, School of Horticulture. 

Miss Elizabeth H. Peale, Lock Haven, Pa. 

Mrs. Horace W. Sellers, Ardmore, Pa. 

Miss Martha G. Thomas, Whitford, Pa. 

Mrs. Thomas Wistar, 51 E. Penn Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

The School of Horticulture for Women at Ambler, Penna., was founded 
for the purpose of training women in the art and practice of horticulture and 
gardening. Opening in 191 1 with five resident students, the numbers have 
steadily increased and there are now twenty-one full students, while more than 
sixty others have, at various times, availed themselves of the special or short 
courses. 

During this time nine or ten States, besides, Canada and England, have 
been represented among the students, thus although situated in the eastern 
part of Pennsylvania, the School is truly a national institution. 

The students receive two years of training in the growing of fruits, vege- 
tables and flowers, supplemented by lectures and class room work in the under- 
lying theory and sciences, but especial emphasis is laid on the practical work, 
for "practice makes perfect." 

The work now being done by the former students and graduates attests 
the practical character of the training. This includes horticulture and garden- 
ing in various forms, fruit growing, nursery work, floriculture, as well as work 
upon private places and in school gardens. 

The School has no endowment, but is partly self supporting and depends 
on private gift to supplement this. 

A visit to the School will be of much interest. 



24 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



BOBBINK & ATKINS 



« 



World's Choicest Nursery and Green- 
house Products" 



GROVV^N IN AMERICA 




Our Wide and Complete Collection en- 
ables us to execute your orders thor- 
oughly, for Inside as ^vell as Outside 
Decorations 



Roses Evergreens Shade Trees 
Rhododendrons 
Flowering Shrubs 
Herbaceous Perennials 

Bay-Trees and Boxwood 
Palms and Other House Plants 

Our Hybrid Giant-Flowering 

Marshmallow 

Plant Tubs Window Boxes 

English Garden Furniture 
and Rustic Work 

Our Illustrated General Catalog 

mailed upon request, describes these 
products fully. You are invited to 
inspect this material at our Nurseries. 



*' We Plan and Plant Grounds and Gardens Everywhere" 



BOBBINK & ATKINS 

NURSERYMEN, FLORISTS AND PLANTERS 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOW ER SHOW 



LIST OF GUARANTORS 

The names in this Hst are those of members of the Society of American 
Florists and Ornamental Horticulturists whose subscriptions to the Guarantee 
Fund make the National Flower Show possible. The different States repre- 
sented in this list are evidence, if such were required, that the show is truly 
National in its conception, and promoted in the general interest of American 
Horticulture. 



CALIFORNIA 

Daniel MacRorie San Francisco 

Hans Plath San Francisco 

Ant. Zvolanek Lompoc 

E. James Elmhurst 

COLORADO 
J. A. Valentine Denver 

CONNECTICUT 

A. N. Pierson, Inc Cromwell 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
Gude Bros. Co Washington 

ILLINOIS 

W. N. Rudd Morgan Park 

Philip J. Foley Chicago 

Kroeschell Bros. Co Chicago 

Bassett & Washburn Chicago 

Florist Publishing Co Chicago 

Ernst Wienhoeber Co Chicago 

Fred Lautenschlager Chicago 

John C. Moninger Co Chicago 

Emil Buettner Park Ridge 

George Asmus Chicago 

American Florist Co Chicago 

Schiller the Florist Chicago 

Poehlmann Bros. Co Chicago 

C. M. Hamilton Kewanee 

Vaughan's Seed Store Chicago 

A. L. Randall Co Chicago 

INDIANA 

John A. Evans Richmond 

E. G. Hill Co Richmond 

Bertermann Bros. Co Indianapolis 

Baur & Steinkamp Indianapolis 

W. W. Coles Kokomo 



KANSAS 
Chas. P. Mueller Wichita 

MARYLAND 
John Cook Baltimore 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Patrick Welch Boston 

L. Merton Gage Natick 

Harry I. Randall Worcester 

A. N. Cooley Pittsfield 

M. A. Patten Tewksbury 

Thos. Roland Nahant 

S. J. Goddard Framingham 

B. Hammond Tracy Wenham 

W. R. Nicholson Framingham 

W. O. Jahn East Bridgewater 

Horticulture Publishing Co Boston 

W. H. Elliott Brighton 

MICHIGAN 

Philip Breitmeyer Detroit 

Albert Pochelon Detroit 

Chas. H. Plumb Detroit 

MINNESOTA 

Some Florists of Minneapolis 

MISSOURI 

Wm. L. Rock I'lowcr Co Kansas City 

Sam'l Murray Kansas City 

F. J. Fillmore St. Louis 

I'^cd H. j\Ieinhardt St. Louis 

C. A. Kuehn St. Louis 

NEBRASKA 

J. J. Iless : Omaha 



26 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



ELslablished 

1765 



HEWS 



Strong, Red, Porous 




Incorporated 
1904 



POTS 



Strong, Red, Porous 



AND RED EARTHENWARE SPECIALTIES 



Standzird Pots and Saucers, I }/g in. to 24 in. 

Azalea Pots, 4 in. to 14 in. 

Bulb Pans, 6 in. to 1 2 in. 

Fern Pans, 4 in. to 10 in. 

Orchid Pans, 3 in. to 16 in. 

Cyclamen Pots, 6 in. to 8 in. 

Glazed or Painted Ware, if wanted. Special Shapes and Sizes to Order 



Embossed Pots and Saucers, 4 in. to 9 in. 
Hanging Pots, 7 in. to 1 2 in. 
Cut Flower Vases, 6 in. to 16 in. 
Rose Pots, 2 in. to 3 in. 
Carnation Pots, 33^ in. 
Palm Pots, 3 in. to 5 in. 



Oldest and Largest Manufacturers of Flower Pots in the World 

A. H. HEWS & CO., Inc., Cambridge, Mass. 

WAREHOUSES : Cambridge, Mass., and New York, N. Y. 

FLORIST SUPPLY HOUSE 
OF AMERICA 

THE HOUSE OF NOVELTIES 

Kindly call on them when you are in town 
WHOLESALE ONLY 



H. BAYERSDORFER & COMPANY 

PROPRIETORS 

1129 ARCH STREET, PHILADELPHIA 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



27 



LIST OF GUARANTORS— (Continued) 



NEW JERSEY 

Chas. H. Totty Madison 

Hitchings & Co Elizabeth 

Chas. G. Roebhng Trenton 

Julius Roehrs Co Rutherford 

L. B. Coddington Murray Hill 

Bobbink & Atkins Rutherford 

Robert Simpson Clifton 

NEW YORK 

Peter Henderson & Co New York 

Benj. Hammond Beason 

A. S. Burns. Jr Spring Valley 

McHutcliison & Co New York 

A. L. Miller Jamaica 

W. F. Kasting Buffalo 

W. J. Cowee Berlin 

Chas. A. Dards New York 

Jackson & Perkins Co Newark 

Traendly & Schenck New York 

Harry A. Bunyard New York 

The Florists' Exchange New York 

Moore, Hentz & Nash New York 

John Lewis Childs Flowerfield 

Dailledouze Bros Brooklyn 

David Burgevin's Sons Kingston 

F. R. Pierson Tarrytown 

W. H. Siebrecht Chappaqua 

Arthur Cowee Berhn 

S. A. Anderson Buffalo 

Chas. T. Guenther Hamburg 

Lord & Burnham Co Irvington 

John Young & Co New York 



OHIO 

C. E. Critchcll Cincinnati 

H. P. Knoble Cleveland 

Adam Ciraham Cleveland 

Frank A. Friedley Cleveland 

H. Witterstaetter Cincinnati 

C. L. Humphrey Zanesville 

OREGON 

Martin & Forbes Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

H. F. Michell Co. . . Philadelphia 

A. Farenwald Roslyn 

Leo Niessen Co Philadelphia 

Conard & Jones Co West Grove 

S. S. Pennock-Meehan Co Philadelphia 

H. A. Dreer, Inc Philadelphia 

Henry Eichholz WajTiesboro 

S. S. Skidelsky Philadelphia 

W. Atlee Burpee & Co Philadelphia 

Wm. Kleinheinz Ogontz 

Joseph Heacock Co W3Ticote 

John Burton Philadelphia 

Walter P. Stokes Philadelphia 

Alex. B. Scott Sharon Hill 

Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co Pittsburgh 

George Burton Philadelphia 

Alban Harv^ey & Son . . Brandywine Summit 

Harry K. Rohrer Lancaster 

Myers & Samtman Wyndmoor 

Wm. R. Gibson Philadelphia 



Bell Phone-Baring 337 
Plans and Estimates Free Ornamental Trees & Shrubs 



E. /. Day 

Landscape Horticulturist 

3938 Lancaster Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



]. Wm. Colflesh. Jr. C. Benj. Colflesh David E. Colflesh 

J. Wm. Colflesh's Sons 
Florists 

Fifty-third St. and Woodland Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Both Phones 



28 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



LECTURERS 





PROF. E. WHITE 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



ROBERT PYLE 




FRANK N. MYER 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



29 



CONTRIBUTORS OF SPECIAL PRIZES 



Advance Co., The Richmond, Tnd. 

Alphano Humus Co New York, N. Y. 

Ammann, J. I'" Edwardsville, 111. 

Alphine Mfg. Co Madison, N. J. 

Bailey. Banks & Biddle . . . Philadelphia, Pa. 

Balsley, Harry Detroit, Mich. 

Barclay, Hugh B Merion, Pa. 

Bassett & Washburn Chicago, 111. 

Battles, H. H Philadelphia, Pa. 

Baur & Steinkamp Indianapolis, Ind. 

Bayersdorfer, H., & Co. . . .Philadelphia, Pa. 

Berning, H. G St. Louis, Mo. 

Boyd, James Philadelphia, Pa. 

Breitmeyer, Phihp Detroit, Mich. 

Buettner, Emil Park Ridge, 111. 

Burk, Louis Philadelphia, Pa. 

Burki, Fred Gibsonia, Pa. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co. . . .Philadelphia, Pa. 

Burton, Geo Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Caldwell Co., J. E Philadelphia, Pa. 

Campbell, Edw Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conard & Jones Co West Grove, Pa. 

Cook, John Baltimore, Md. 

Cottage Gardens Co Queens, N. Y. 

Countess of Santa Eulalia . . . Ashbourne, Pa. 

Dailledouze, Eugene Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dingee & Conard West Grove, Pa. 

Doemling, Aug Lansdowne, Pa. 

Dorner, F., & Sons Co La Fayette, Ind. 

Dreer, Henry A., Inc Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dunlop, J. H Toronto, Can. 

Elliott, W. H Brighton, Mass. 

Farenwald, A Roslyn, Pa. 

Fisher, Peter EUis, Mass. 

Flore.x Gardens North Wales, Pa. 

Foley Manufacturing Co Chicago, 111. 

Fox, Charles Henry Philadelphia, Pa. 

Franklin, M Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gimbel, Ellis Philadelphia, Pa. 

Goddard, S.J Framingham, Mass. 

Gude Bros. Co Washington, D. C. 

Guttman & Raynor New York, N. Y" 

Habermehl's Sons, J. J Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hammond, Benj Beacon, N. Y. 

Hart, Geo. B Rochester, N. Y. 

Heacock, Joseph W3mcote, Pa. 

Heller, M., S.Park Floral Co.,New Castle,Ind. 

Hess & Swoboda : . . .Omaha, Neb. 

Hews, A. H., & Co Cambridge, Mass. 

Hill Co., E. G Richmond, Ind. 

Jackson & Perkins Co Newark, N. Y. 

Easting, W. F Buffalo, N. Y. 

Kendrick, Hon. W. Freeland Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kerr, R. C Houston, Te.x. 

Krocschell Bros. Co Chicago, III. 

Ladies' Society of .'\merican Florists 

Lautenschlager, F Chicago, 111. 

Lemon, Fred H Richmond, Ind. 

Lenk, W. E Halifax, Mass. 

Lewisohn Adolph Ardsley, N. Y. 

Lord & Burnham Co Irvington, N. Y. 

Mann & Brown Richmond, Va. 

Martin & Forbes Portland, Ore. 

May, H. O Summit, N. J. 

McDonald & Campbell Philadelphia, Pa. 

Michell Co., Henry F Philadelphia 

Michigan Cut Flower E.xc. . . .Detroit, Mich. 

Mortensen, S Southampton, Pa. 

Muller, Henry J Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nicholson, Wm Framingham, Mass. 

Niessen Co., Leo Philadelphia, Pa. 

Penn, Henry Boston, Mass. 

Pennock Bros Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennock-Meehan Co., S. S. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Peterson, J. A., & Sons Cincinnati, O. 

Pierson, A. N., Inc Cromwell, Conn. 

Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pulverized Manure Co Chicago 111. 

Reid, Edward Philadelphia, Pa. 

Renter, L. J., & Son Westerley, R. I. 

Rice & Co., M Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rock, W. L Kansas City, Mo. 

Roland, Thos Nahant, Mass. 

Saunders, Ernest Lewiston, Me. 

SchUng, Max New York, N. Y. 

Scott, Robert, & Son Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Simpson, Robt CHfton, N. J. 

Skidelsky, S. S Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Strouts" Biddeford, Me. 

Sunny Side Gladiolus Gardens Natick, ]\Iass. 

Thomas, Geo. C, Jr Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thompson, J. D., Carnation Co. Joliet, III. 
Toronto Horticultural Society Toronto, Can. 

Totty, C. H Madison, N. J. 

Tracy, B. Hammond Wenham, Mass. 

U. S. Cut Flower Co., The. . . .Elmira, N. Y. 

Vesey, W. J. & S. M Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Vollers, Ludwig Philadelphia, Pa. 

Waban Rose Conservatories. .Natick, Mass. 

Wanamakcr, ]\lrs. John Wyncote, Pa. 

Waterer, Hosea Philadelphia, Pa. 

Welch, Patrick Boston, Mass. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Chas Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Widener, Geo. D., Jr Ogontz, Pa. 

Zandbergen Bros., . . . . Valkenburg, Holland 
Zvolanek, .\nt. C Lompoc, Cal. 



30 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



LECTURERS 




J. OTTO THILOW 




J. HORACE McFARLAND 




MAX SCHLING 

NEW YORK 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 3^ 

LECTURE FEATURES 

EVENING LECTURES— 8 P. M. 

MARCH 25th— W. N. RUDD, Chicago. 

Subject: "Home Grounds." Illustrated. 

MARCH 27th— PROF. E. A. WHITE, Cornell University. 

Subject: "Orchids." Illustrated. 

MARCH 28th— ROBERT PYLE, West Grove, Pa. 

Subject: "Roses." Illustrated. 

MARCH 29th— FRANK N. MEYER, Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 
Subject: "Agricultural Explorations in China." Illustrated. 

MARCH 30th— J. OTTO THILOW, Philadelphia. 

Subject: "Flowers from Snow to Snow." Illustrated. 
Under the Auspices of the Garden Clubs of America. 

MARCH 31st— J. HORACE McFARLAND, President, American Civic 
Association. 
Subject: "Civics for Home and Municipality." Illustrated. 

APRIL 1st— ARTHUR COWEE, Berlin, New York. 

Subject: "Gladioli." Illustrated. 

AFTERNOON LECTURES— 3.30 P. M. 

MARCH 27th— RICHARD ROTHE, Glenside, Pa. 

Subject: "Rock Gardens." Illustrated. 

MARCH 28th— MAX SCHLING, New York. 

Subject: "Flower Arrangement and Color Combination." 

MARCH 30th— MISS CARO MILLER, Bureau of Education, Philadelphia 
Subject: "School Gardening." Illustrated. 

MARCH 30th— RICHARD VINCENT, President, American Dahlia Society. 

Subject: "Dahlias." Illustrated. 

MARCH 31st— MISS ELIZABETH LEIGHTON LEE, Ambler, Pa. 
Subject: "School of Horticulture for Women and Its Work." Illustrated. 

APRIL 1st— E. I. WILDE, State College, Pa. 

Subject: "Bulbs for Summer Bloom." Illustrated. 

THE PORTLAND, OREGON, ROSE CARNIVAL 

will be shown in moving pictures every afternoon following the lectures. 




32 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



LECTURERS 





R. VINCENT, JR. 

WHITE MARSH. MD. 



MISS CARO MILLER 




MISS ELIZABETH LEIGHTON LEE 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLO WER SHOW 33 

THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 

The first of its kind in America, was organized at a meeting held in the hall 
of the Franklin Institute, Seventh Street below Market, on November 24, 1827, 
in response to the following notice in the newspapers: 

Philadelphia, November 20, 1827. 

Those persons desirous to form a Horticultural Society are requested to 
meet at the Franklin Institute, South Seventh Street, on Saturday next at 
12 o'clock precisely. 

(Signed.) James Mease, M. D., George Pepper, Reuben Haines, Charles 
Chauncey, William Davidson, N. Chapman, M. D., John Vaughn, Joseph 
Hopkinson, Horace Binney, and Matthew Carey. 

At the first meeting, Matthew Carey was called to the Chair and James 
Mease, M. D., appointed Secretary. 

After deliberation it was ^^ Resolved, That it is expedient to establish a 
Horticultural Society in the City of Philadelphia for the promotion of this 
highly instructive and interesting science, and that a constitution be framed 
for that purpose." 

The following gentlemen were appointed a Committee to Draft a Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws: Dr. J. Mease, T. Hibbert, Wm. Meredith, A. Parker, and 
M. Brown. 

At the second meeting, held December 14, 1827, at 173 (o. n.) Chestnut 
Street, the constitution and by-laws presented by the Committee were received 
and approved; the annual dues were fixed at five dollars, and life membership 
at fifty dollars. It was also decided to admit honorary life members; those 
applying for this privilege to be of good moral character, and to pay the fee of 
one hundred dollars. 

The third meeting was held June 2, 1828, at 173 Chestnut Street (o. n.). 
An amendment providing for the appointment of a council of twelve members 
was adopted; and the first regular election was held, resulting in the choice of 
the following officers: 



■C) 



President, Horace Binney. 

Vice-Presidents, James Mease, M. D., Matthew Carey, David Landreth, 
Jr., N. Chapman, M. D. 

Treasurer, William Davidson. 

Corresponding Secretary, Samuel Hazard. 

Recording Secretary, David S. Brown. 



34 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

MAX SCHLING 

THE MAN WHO MAKES THE FASHION 

IN FLOWERS IN NEW YORK 

AND STILL HAS TIME TO TAKE PERSONAL CARE OF 
EVERY INCOMING ORDER 



I take this opportunity to thank my esteemed clients for the courtesy they have shown me on 

different occasions. Many have called on me and it was always my aim to show them every 

possible attention. 1 hope all those who will come to New York and have not given me the 

pleasure of a call will do so in the near future. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 35 

THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY— 

(Continued) 

Active Committee, or Council: George Pepper, Nicholas Biddle, Thomas 
Biddle, Robert Patterson, Daniel B. Smith, Moses Brown, M. C. Cope, Thomas 
Astley, David Landreth, Jr., Thomas Hibbert, Thomas Landreth, Joshua 
Longstreth. 

EXHIBITIONS. 

The Society held its first exhibition November 3, 1828, in the hall of the 
American Philosophical Society, Sixth Street below Chestnut; and exhibitions 
were held regularly at the monthly meeting while the Society continued to 
meet in this hall. 

On December 7, 1829, the Council was constituted a Committee to Offer 
Premiums for Competition. On January 4, 1830, the Committee reported to 
the Society, offering premiums amounting to $42.00 for vegetables, and $81.00 
for fruits. 

The Society continued to hold exhibitions annually, in various places. 
They were always highly interesting and instructive and attracted a large 
attendance, and were the means of introducing many new varieties of fruits 
and vegetables now supplied to our markets. 

The twenty-seventh autumnal exhibition was held under a tent in Penn 
Square, the site of the present Municipal Building, September 11 and 12, 1855, 
and the exhibition of 1856 was held at the same place. 

The completion of Horticultural Hall was celebrated by an exhibition, held 
there, opening June 6, 1867. The Society thereafter held its exhibitions in its 
own hall, until the hall was destroyed by fire January 31, 1881. It was rebuilt 
and used by this Society until the second destruction by fire. May 27, 1893, 
when the Chrysanthemum Show was held at the Armory of the State Fencibles, 
Broad Street above Cherry. The 1894 Chrysanthemum Show was held in the 
Academy of Music, 1895, in the Academy of Fine Arts; the 1896 and subse- 
quent exhibitions being held in the present Horticultural Hall. 

This Society is the oldest in the United States devoted to the interests of 
Horticulture, and was organized in the hall of the Franklin Institute, Philadel- 
phia, on March the 24th, 1827. Its objects as set forth in its charter, are to 
promote and encourage Horticulture and create a love and interest for Plants, 
Flowers, Fruits and Vegetables. There are numerous exhibitions held during 
the year, as well as meetings on the third Tuesday of each month, except July 
and August. 

Lectures to the members by the most prominent Horticulturists are given 
in the Hall of the Society at three-thirty in the afternoon of the third Tuesday 
of each month. 



36 



FOURTH XATIOXAL FLOWER SHOW 



BELLE WASHBURN 

THE NEW RED CARNATION WITH AN UNBEATABLE 

RECORD BEHIND IT 

Winner two years in succession of the American Carnation 
Societj^ Silver Medals, 1915 and 1916. Also winner of the S. A. F. 
Silver Medal 1916, besides numerous first prizes and certificates at 
various sho^vs in different parts of the country. This is purely a 
commercial Carnation — very bright clear red, large flow^er, non- 
splitable caljrx, long stem and just as free blooming as Enchantress 
of which it is a seedling. Price $ 1 2.00 per 1 00 or $ 1 00.00 per 1 000. 
Rooted cuttings from sand ; also after April 1 st we can furnish a 
limited number of plants from 2-inch pots ready to plant direct in 
the field or in the bench at the same price as the rooted cuttings. 



BASSETT & WASHBURN 

OFFICE AND STORE 178 N. Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 
GREENHOUSES, HINSDALE, ILL. 



Pennsylvania's Largest Wholesale Cut Flower Growers 
and Florists' Supply House 

220 acres devoted to the culture of Cut Flowers, 10 acres under glass. 
Sales Rooms occupy 17,600 square feet of floor space. 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE PRODUCTION OF ROSES, CAR- 
NATIONS, ORCHIDS, CHRYSANTHEMUMS AND 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSA NANUS 



PITTSBURGH CUT FLOWER CO. 

lie-118 SEVENTH STREET PITTSBURGH, PA. 






F. BURKI, President 



T. P. L ANCHANS, Sectelary \X'. A. CLARKE, TreasuTer 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



37 



THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY— 

(Continued) 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is supported entirely by dues 
from its members, and it is sending out this appeal to all those interested, in the 
hope that it may increase its membership, and, thereby, greatly enlarge its 
sphere of activity, not only in Philadelphia, but through the State, in promoting 
educationally a love and understanding of Horticulture, Floriculture and 
Agriculture. 

LIST OF PRESIDENTS. 

June, 1828 — November, 1828. Horace Binney. 
November, 1828 — November, 1829. Zaccheus Collins. 



IS29- 


-IS3I. 


Joseph R. Ingersoll. 


1867- 


-1883. 


Wm. L. Shaffer. 


I83I- 


-1836. 


George Vaux. 


1884- 


-1886. 


J. E. Mitchell. 


1836- 


-I84I. 


Horace Binney. 


1887- 


-1888. 


Isaac C. Price. 


I84I- 


-1852. 


Caleb Cope. 


1889- 


-1894. 


George W. Childs. 


1852- 


-I85S. 


Robert Patterson. 


1895- 


-1898. 


Clarence H. Clark. 


IS58- 


-1862. 


Matthias W. Baldwin. 


1899- 


-1901. 


James M. Rhodes. 


IS62- 


-1863. 


J. E. Mitchell. 


1902- 


-1908. 


James W. Paul, Jr. 


1863- 


-1864. 


Fairman Rogers. 


1909- 


-1913- 


C. ^. Newbold. 


1864. 




J. E. Mitchell. 


1913- 


-1914. 


Samuel T. Bodine. 


1864- 


-1867. 


D. Rodney King. 


1914- 


- 


C. Hartman Kuhn 



The Main Line Florists 

John J. Connelly Estate 

Retail growers of Cut Flowers 

Blooming, Bedding, Bulbous and 

Decorative Plants. Corsages, 

Baskets, Funeral Designs 

F. T. D Members 

1226 Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
or Rosemont Post Office 



Bell Telephone 



Keystone Telephone 



Komada Brothers 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Wire Designs 

Florists ' Supplies 

Any Wire Design at Short 
Notice 

1 008 Vine Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



38 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



TELEPHONE CONNECTION 

CABLE ADDRESS : SULWARE, NEW YORK 

A. B. C. CODE USED 



MALTUS & WARE 

CUSTOM HOUSE AND 
INSURANCE BROKERS 

GENERAL FORWARDING 
AGENTS 

14 STONE STREET NEW YORK 



PASSPORTS PROCURED 



FOURTH NATIONAL I'LUWER SHOW 39 

SCALE OF POINTS 

BY WHICH PLANT EXHIBITS WILL BE JUDGED 



Excepting exhibits in the Rose Section, which will hi' jiuiged 1)\' ihe scale 
of the American Rose Society. 



No. 1 — Single Specimen Foliage Plants 

Size of Plant 25 

Cultural Perfection 35 

Distinctiveness 15 

Rarity 15 

Form ID 

100 
No. 2 — Single Specimen Flowering Plants 

Size of Plant 20 

Cultural Perfection 35 

Rarity 10 

Floriferousness 15 

Color 10 

Foliage 10 

100 
No. 3 — Group of Foliage Plants 

Size ID 

Distinctiveness 20 

Cultural Perfection 20 

Rarity 10 

Arrangement or Staging 30 

Color Effect 10 

100 
No. 4 — Group of Flowering Plants 

Size of Group 10 

Rarity 10 

Cultural Perfection 15 

Arrangement 35 

(Quality of Flowers 20 

Foliage 10 

100 



40 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




NOW BEING BUILT 

THE NEW HOME OF "KEYSTONE 

QUALITY" FLORISTS' 

SUPPLIES 

WHEN COMPLETED IN JULY, WE WILL HAVE THE LARGEST AND 
FINEST FLORIST SUPPLY HOUSE IN THE WORLD 

M. RICE CO. 

At Present, 1220 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 41 

SECTION A 

PLANTS IN FLOWER 

To be staged Saturday, March 25 

PRIVATE GROWERS 

Class 

1. Acacias, 3 plants, one or more varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

2. Acacia, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

3. Acacia paradoxa, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

4. Amaryllis, hybrid, 12 plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

5. Amaryllis, hybrid, 4 pots, one bulb to each pot. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

6. Anthuriums, 6 plants, not less than three varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00, 

7. Anthurium, specimen. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

8. Azalea Indica, 6 plants in variety, each plant not less than 2^4 feet in 

diameter 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

First Prize offered by Geo. D. Widener, Jr., Ogontz, Pa. 

9. Azalea Indica, specimen, white, not less than 4 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

10. Azalea Indica, specimen, pink or rose, not less than 4 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

11. Azalea Indica, specimen, any other color, not less than 4 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

12. Azaleas any other type, 10 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

13. Begonias, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

14. Boronias, 6 plants, not less than 2 varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

15. Bougainvillea, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 



42 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

PHALAENOPSIS 

AMABILIS and SCHILLERIANA 

SEE OUR MR. D. MacRORIE 
AT THE NATIONAL SHOW 




MacRORIE-McLAREN COmpany 

OFFICE, 452 PHELAN BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
NURSERIES, SAN MATEO. CALIFORNIA 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLC^WER SIKAV 43 

SECTION A — Plants in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

16. Cineraria, hybrids, 6 ])lants, assorted colors. 

r'irst Prize, SiK-er Cuj). Second Prize, Michell Bronze Medal. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

17. Cineraria, hybrids, (> plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00 
t8. Cineraria stellata, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

iq. Cineraria, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $6.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

20. Cyclamen, 12 plants, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

First Prize offered by Wm. F. Kasting, Buffalo, N. Y. 

21. Cyclamen, 6 plants, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $15.00. 

First Prize offered by Bailey, Banks & Biddle, Philadelphia 

2 2. Chorizema, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

23. Ericas, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $6.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

24. Gardenias, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

25. Genista, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 
25a. Genistas, 3 plants. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

The "Lindenhurst Prize," offered by Mrs. John Wanamaker 

26. Geraniums, 6 plants of "Helen Michell" variety, one plant to a pot, not 

over 10 in. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, S 10.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

27. Gerbera Jamesoni, 12 plants in bloom, not less than 6-in. pots. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

28. Heliotrope, 3 plants. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 



44 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



BOSTON WHOLESALE FLORIST 



CUT FLOWERS 



NOVELTIES FURNISHED ON SHORT NOTICE 



PATRICK WELCH 



262 DEVONSHIRE STREET 



BOSTON. MASS. 



TELEPHONES : MAIN H 99 and MAIN 5948 



ALBANY CUT FLOWER 
EXCHANGE 

THOMAS TRACEY, Manager 

611 BROADWAY, ALBANY, N. Y. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



SAVE TIME AND MONEY BY SEND- 
ING YOUR ORDER TO US 



PRICES RIGHT 
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 



THE MONTREAL FLORAL 
EXCHANGE, Ltd. 

140 MANSFIELD ST., MONTREAL 



THE WHOLESALE 

COMMISSION HOUSE 

OF CANADA 



FEATURING THE PRODUCTS 
OF ITS BEST GROWERS 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SMOVV 45 

SECTION A — Plants in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

29. Hydrangeas, French, 6 plants, in 8-in. pots, 6 varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 
Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

30. Hydrangeas, 6 plants, 6 varieties, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $15.00. 
First Prize offered by Adolph Lewisohn, Ardsley, N. Y. 

31. Hydrangeas, 3 plants, 3 varieties, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

32. Hydrangea, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

33. Imantophyllum, 3 plants. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

34. Lilac, 5 plants in 5 varieties, in pots. 

First Prize, $7.50. Second Prize, $5.00. 
Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 

35. Lilac, 6 plants, in 6 varieties, pot grown. 

First Prize, Michell Silver Medal. Second Prize, Michell Bronze Medal. 
Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

36. Lilac, 10 plants, in variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

37. Marguerites, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

38. Marguerite, specimen. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

39. Nemesia Strumosa Suttonii, best 3 pots. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry A. Drear, Inc., Philadelphia 

40. Pansies, display of plants in bloom, covering 25 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

41. Primula Chinensis, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 
Prizes offered by Mrs. Charles Wheeler, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

41a. Primula malacoides, 12 plants. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 
The "Lindenhurst Prize," offered by Mrs. John Wanamaker 



46 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



"RESULTS ARE WHAT COUNT 



>? 



THE HOUSE OF DICKSON HAS SPENT NOT YEARS BUT GENERA- 
TIONS IN HYBRIDIZING ROSES AND THIS SYSTEMATIC 
AND SCIENTIFIC WORK IS NOW SHOWING 

RESULTS 

The Grand Prize of ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS for the 
Best Seedling Rose Elxhibited at the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion was awarded to HUGH DiCKSON, LTD., of Belfast, Ireland, for a 
yellow Rose entered in competition with the whole world. This variety we 
will distribute in I 9 I 7, as we are his exclusive American Agent. 

Our Own Exhibition of Hardy Roses was also awarded a 

GOLD MEDAL at this same Elxposition. 

g g ^ 

Dickson's Novelty Roses, which have received the 
highest awards possible, m Europe, are: 

NELLIE PARKER 

Creamy white, beautifully tinted with pink; flowers large and of perfect form. 

PRINCE CHARMING 

A bedding Rose of superlative excellence; color similar to Madam Herriott but the plant 

is a very much freer grower. 

ULSTER GEM 

A Single Rose; lovely primrose yellow; 6 inches across. The most charmmg Single 

Rose ever introduced, and the eeisiest to grow. 
Piices : May 1st delivery in 4" pots ; $2.50 per plant ; $25.00 per dozen : f. o. b., Madison, New Jersey. 

CLEVELAND 

Deep glowing pink, named in honor of the great Cleveland Ejchibition last fail. 

GORGEOUS 

Truly named on account of its gorgeous colorings of pink, yellow and bronze. 

Prices : Two-year old ; dormant planU ; $1 .50 each ; 4" pot plants, 75 cents per plant ; $7.50 per dozen. 

May 1st delivery. 

^ m % 

The Standard varieties of Roses are described in our catalogue 
which will be mailed on request to interested parties 

CHARLES H. TOTTY 

MADISON, N. J. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 47 

SECTION A — Plants in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

42. Primulas, 12 plants, not less than _] varieties. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

43. Primulas, 6 plants, not less than 2 varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, $3.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

44. Primula obconica gigantea, 6 plants, assorted colors. 

First Prize, Michell Silver Medal. Second Prize, Michel! lironze Medal. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

45*. Rhododendrons, 3 plants, 3 varieties, not less than 4 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

46. Rhododendron, Pink Pearl, i plant. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 
Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 

47. Rhododendron, specimen, any color, not less than 4 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 
Prizes offered by J. J. Habermehl's Sons, Philadelphia 

48. Schizanthus, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

49. Schizanthus, 3 plants. 

First Prize, $12.00. Second Prize, $8.00. 

50. Schizanthus large flowering, 3 plants. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

51. Schizanthus, specimen. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, $3.00. 
First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

52. Spiraea, or Astilbe, 10 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $6.00. 
First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

53. Spiraea, or Astilbe, 5 plants. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

54. Spiraea, or Astilbe, lo-in. pot, Gladstone, pure white. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 

55. Spirtea, or Astilbe, lo-in ])ot, Rubens, pink. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 

56. Spiraea, or Astilbe, lo-in. pot, America, lilac rose. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 
Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 



48 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




KIRKE SYSTEM 

FERTILIZE WHILE WATERING 
OR DESTROY INSECTS 

KIRKE SYSTEM: While you are water- 
ing you distribute Fertilizer, or Destroy 
Insects. 

KIRKE SYSTEM : An ingenious, scien- 
tific method of combining in one 
operation the several others formerly 
attendant upon Fertilizers and Insecti- 
cides for Lawns, Gardens, Shrubbery 
and Foliage. 

KIRKE SYSTEM : The only clean, odor- 
less, positively active, easily handled, practicable, economical and 
efficient method of destroying Insects or Fertilizing, requiring no 
additional labor or experience. 

KIRKE SYSTEM : Abolishes the use of unsanitarj' stable manure, 
so objectionable, because of its disagreeable odors and the great 
abundance of weed-seeds it contains. 

KIRKE SYSTE.M : Abolishes the use of cumbersome hand-pumps, 
hand sprayers, carts and wagons, etc., for distributing Insecticides 
and Fertilizers. 

KIRKE SYSTEM: is w^ithout an experimental feature— it w^ill 
w^ork as w^ell for you as for the thousands all over the country 
w^ho already enjoy its benefits. 

KIRKE SYSTEM sprinkling can, plant food 

Especially Useful for Piazza Plants, House 
Plants, Cemetery Plots and Small Gardens 

For Sale by all Leading SEED HOUSES; if Your Dealer cannot 
Supply You, Notify Us 

KIRKE CHEMICAL COMPANY, INC. 

245-247 ROBINSON STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




"KIRKE SYSTEM" 

ONCE USED 
ALWAYS USED 




PRICES 


Each 
$3.00 


^Doz. 


Doz. 


Kirke Cartridge Container 




Kirke Fertilizer Cartridges 


.30 


$1.60 


$3.00 


Kirke Tobacco Insecticide 


.30 


1.60 


3.00 


Kirke Hot-Hoose Special 


.50 


2.75 


5.00 


Kirke Arsenate of Lead 


.40 


2.30 


4,50 


Kirke Bordeaoz Cartridges 


.30 


1.60 


3.00 


Kirke Angle Worm Destroyer 


1.50 






Kirke Red Ant Destroyer 


.40 


2.30 


4.50 


Kirke Black Ant Destroyer 


.30 


1.60 


3.00 


Kirke Fly Destroyer (Pyxol) 


.40 


2.30 


4.50 


Kirke Snail Destroyer 


.40 


2.30 


4.50 



KIRKE SPRINKUNG CAN PLANT FOOD 
30 Cents per Box (12 Tablets) 
$1.60 per Carton of Six Boxes (72 TableU) 
$3.00 per Carton of Twelve Boxes (144 Tablets) 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 49 

SECTION A — Plants in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

57. Spirsea, or Astilbe, lo-in. pots, Philadelphia, lavender pink. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 
Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 

58. Stocks, Mammoth Beauty, 3 pots in 3 colors. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00, 
Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

59. Flowering plant, any variety, other than above. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $6.00. 
First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

60. Wistaria, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

61. Group of flowering plants and bulbs, covering 200 sq. ft. arranged for effect 

(Orchids excluded). 

First Prize, $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 
First Prize offered by the Alphano Humus Co., New York 

62. Group of blooming plants, intermingled with foliage plants, as a decoration 

to cover a space of 36 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

63. Group of flowering and foliage plants, arranged for effect, to cover 25 sq. 

ft., the stock shown to be produced from 2500 sq. ft. of glass or less, 
and the exhibitor to be a member of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society. 

Prize donated by Hugh B. Barclay, Merion, Pa., $25.00 

64. Group of flowering and foliage plants, covering 20 sq. ft., arranged for 

effect. 

First Prize, the Schling Gold Medal, offered by Max Schling, New York 

65. Collection of hardy perennial plants in flower, covering 100 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

CUT FLOWERS, ETC. 

66. Cornflower, Dreer's Double Blue Annual, bunch of 100 flowers. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

67. Lupines, annual, bunch of 25 spikes each, blue, white and rose. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

68. Mushrooms, best plate. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 
Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 



50 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



JOHN YOUNG GEORGE HILDENBRAND 



THE GROWERS 

IN PENNSYLVANIA AND CONTIGUOUS TERRITORY WOULD 
FIND IT PAY THEM TO MAKE REGULAR SHIP- 

MENTS TO THE NEW YORK MARKET 



THE NEW YORK MARKET 

absorbs and clears its daily arrival of flowers on a highly profit- 
able basis. There is no uncertainty, consequently no loss. 

WE CAN HANDLE THE PRODUCTS 

of a few more growers of Roses, Carnations, and other staples, 
readily disposing of the same through our established con- 
nections, at Top New York Market Prices, which 
average better than the prices in other markets. 

TRIAL SHIPMENTS ARE INVITED 



JOHN YOUNG & CO. 

53 W. 28TH STREET 
NEW YORK 

TELEPHONE, 7362 MADISON SQUARE 



FOURTH NATIONAL M.C)WP:R SHOW 51 

SECTION B 

PALMS AND FOLIAGE PLANTS 
PRIVATE GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Class 

75. Areca lutescens, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

76. Begonia, Rex, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

77. Begonia, Rex, i plant. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, $3.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

78. Cocos Australis or its variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

79. Cocos plumosus, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

80. Cycad, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

81. Crotons, 10 plants, 5 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

82. Crotons, 5 plants, 5 varieties. 

First Prize, $12.00. Second Prize, $8.00. 

83. Croton, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

84. Dracaenas, 5 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

85. Dracaenas, 3 plants, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, $8.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

86. Dracaena, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

87. Kentia Forsteriana, 2 plants. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

88. Kentia Forsteriana, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

89. Kentia Belmoreana, 2 plants. 

First Prize, the McDonald & Campbell Cup, (Value $50.00). 

Second Prize, $25.00. 

First Prize offered by McDonald & Campbell Co., Philadelphia 

90. Kentia Belmoreana, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

91. Nepenthes, 3 plants in variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 



52 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

The Moninger All Steel Frame 

(SAFE AND SURE) 

You who know all the troubles of Greenhouse Construction — 
You who have seen your house sway in the storm — 
You who have lost money because of breakages, repairs, and 
collapse of greenhouses — 

Investigate the most radical development in greenhouse con- 
struction that has ever been accomplished — 

THE MONINGER ALL STEEL FRAME 

(SAFE AND SURE) 

You have been seeking the perfect method of construction. You knew it 

would have to come — eventually. It has come, at last. Find out about it 

today. (Full information on request — and that means your greenhouse 

problems solved safely, economically, surely.) 

JOHN C. MONINGER COMPANY 

807 MARBRIDGE BUILDING 

CHICAGO NEW YORK CITY Cincinnati 



WHEN HOME AGAIN FROM THE FLOWER SHOW. PLEASE THINK THIS OVER 

LIQUID-"NICO-FUME"-PAPER 

40% nicotine, and highly refined. New Style. Sheets 108 square inch. 

Actual grains of nicotine stated on each. Burns freely. Packed in air- 

labels, tight tin cans. 

Are Leaders in the Largest Greenhouses for Spraying, Vaporizing, 

Fumigating against Thrips, Green Fly, 

Black Fly, etc. 

TRY "NICO-FUME" AND BE CONVINCED 

DEALERS WILL SUPPLY YOU ASK FOR "NICO-FUME" 

mmm 

MANUFACTURED BY 

THE KENTUCKY TOBACCO PRODUCT CO. 

Incorporated Louisville, Ky. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 53 

SECTION B — Palms and Foliage Plants. Private Growers — (Con- 
tinued) 

Class 

92. Phoenix Roebelcnii, 3 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

93. Phoenix Roebelcnii, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

94. Phoenix Rupicola, 2 plants. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

95. Phoenix Rupicola, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

96. Phoenix, any other variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00, 

97. Palm, specimen, other than above. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 
97a. Palms, best six specimens, six varieties. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00, 

The "Lindenhurst Prize," offered by Mrs. John Wanamaker 

98. Palms, best six specimens, any variety or varieties. 

First Prize, $100.00. 

Special Prize offered by H. H. Battles, Philadelphia 

99. Bay Trees, 2 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

100. Six foliage plants, exclusive of Palms, not less than 8-in. pots, pans, or 

tubs. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $50.00). Second Prize, $30.00. 

First Prize offered by Bailey, Banks & Biddle, Philadelphia, Pa. 

loi. Specimen foliage plant, other than above. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 
102. Collection of new and rare plants. 
First Prize, Gold Medal and $50.00. Second Prize, Silver Medal and $30.00. 



SECTION C 

FERNS AND SELAGINELLAS 

PRIVATE GROWERS 
To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

no. Adiantum Farleyense, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 
III. Adiantum cuneatum, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 



54 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




Two Views of the Magnificent New Office and Show Room of the Horticaltoral Establishment of 

F. R. PIERSON COMPANY 

TARRYTOWN-ON-HUDSON, NE^V YORK 

THE FINEST FLOWER SHOP IN THE VV^ORLD 

Palatial in all its appointments, representing the very highestltype of modem construction. 

ROSES A SPECIALTY 

We have at Scarborough, New York — where our nurseries are, — one of the largest and best 
equipped rose-growing establishments in the United States, and can deliver flow^ers anywhere 
in New^ York City, Philadelphia, and vicinity, direct from the producer to the consumer. 

LANDSCAPE WORK 

Landscape wrork is a most important feature of our business. We have superior facilities for 
furnishing everything in the horticultural line for the garden or country estates, and are prepared 
to design and carry out the most elaborate plans for planting private estates, either large or small. 
We employ experienced draughtsmen, and will be glad to submit suggestions or plans. 



When out Motoring, Stop and See Us 



Catalogue Mailed on Application 




FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 55 

SECTION C — Ferns and Selaginellas. Private Growers — (Con- 
tinued) 

Class 

112. AdiaiUum, any other variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Seccjnd Prize, $6.00. 

113. Cibotium Schiedei, specimen not less than 10 ft. spread. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

114. Ferns, 6 plants, 6 varieties, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

115. Davallia, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

116. Fern, any other variety, not otherwise specified. 

First Prize,. $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

117. Gleichenia, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

118. Goniophlebium Subauriculatum, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

119. Nephrolepis, four plants, one or more varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Vase. Second Prize, Glass Vase. 

Prizes offered by the Aphine Manfg. Co., Madison, N. J. 

120. Polypodium, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

121. Pteris Rivertoniana, specimen, single plant, or made up of not more than 

three plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry A, Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

122. Selaginellas, three plants. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

123. Stag's Horn Fern, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

124. Tree Fern, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 



SECTION D 

ORCHIDS— PLANTS 

PRIVATE GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

130. Collection covering 50 sq. ft. Arranged for effect, Palms and Ferns per- 
mitted. 

First Prize, $100.00. Second Prize, $75.00. 



56 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 







Dahlia Bulbs 



SPECIAL CHOICE 
COLLECTIONS 

For sale at my stand at the Philadelphia 
Flov/er Show 

GEO. L. STILLMAN 

Daihlia Specialist Westerly, Rhode Island 



THOMAS J. MYERS 



FRANK H. MYERS 



Myers & Co. 

GREENHOUSE BUILDERS 
1006 LINCOLN BUILDING 

Formerly Betz Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



GREENHOUSE BOILERS 

VENTILATING MACHINERY 
IRON FRAME PLANT BENCHES 

GREENHOUSE PAINTING 

LATEST IRON FRAME 
CONSTRUCTION 

mmm 

Bell Phone, Walnut 1944 

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"How to Grow Roses" 

A book of 112 pages, 5 x 8, of which 16 
illustrate leading Roses in natural colors. All the 
necessary instructions which will be of value to 
the amateur are presented in clear, simple and con- 
cise form. Where, when and how to plant. 
Fertilizers, Insecticides, Planting, Pruning, Mulch- 
ing, Winter Protection, with important fists of the 
best Roses for every imaginable place and purpose. 
The Calendar of Operations alone may save you 
the cost of the book. Regular price $1.00, 
postpaid, or complimentary copies will be pre- 
sented Free to our patrons, who request it, when 
sending an order amounting to $5.00 or more. 

See our Exhibit at the Fourth National Flower 
Show and place your order today. 

Catalog on request. 



THE CONARD & JONES COMPANY 

Growers of Best Roses for America 

WEST GROVE, PA. 

Backed by 50 yeeirs' experience. 



Fruit and 
Ornamental Plants 

FREE CATALOG 

Fully Illustrated 

Over 200 Acres of Nursery Stock 
to Choose From 

Planting season opens March 20th 
and lasts but six weeks 



Rakestraw Pyle Company 

Establbhed 1866 
Landscape Service 

Kennett Square, Pa. 



Phone, Woodland 1894 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 57 

SECTION D Orchids— Plants. Private Growers— (Continued) 

Class 

131. Six plants, in variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

132. Three plants, in variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

133. Brasso-Cattleya, or Brasso-Lailia, i plant. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

134. Cattleya Mossiae, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

135. Cattleya Schroderae, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

136. Cattleya, specimen, any other variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

137- Cypripediums, 12 plants, 6 or more varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

138. Cypripedium, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

139. Dendrobiums, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

140. Dendrobium nobile, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

141. Dendrobium Wardianum, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

142. Dendrobium, specimen, any other variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

143. Cattleya, Laelia, or Laelio-Cattleya Hybrid, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

144. Laelia, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

145. Odontoglossum specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

146. Oncidium, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

147. Phalaenopsis, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

148. Vanda, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

149. Vanda, specimen, other than above. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $8.00. 



58 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



Prize Cups, Medals 



Trophi 



les 



A Complete Stock for Immediate Selection 



Makers of Trophies Awarded at the 

National Flower Show 



Designs for Special Prizes Upon Request 



J. E. Caldwell & Co. 

Jewelers — Silversmiths — Stationers 
902 Chestnut Street Philadelphia 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 59 

SECTION E 

BULBS— IN FLOWER 

PRIVATE GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Glass 

160. Bulbs in bloom in pots, or pans, arranged for effect with foliage plants, 

to occupy a table of 50 sc|. ft. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

161. Hyacinths, Lady Derby, pink, 12-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

162. Hyacinths, La Grandesse, white, 12-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

163. Hyacinths, Queen of the Blues, blue, 12-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

164. Single Early Tulips, Golden Queen, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

165. Single Early Tulips, White Hawk, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

166. Single Early Tulips, Sir Thos. Lipton, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

167. Darwin Tulips, Clara Butt, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

168. Darwin Tulips, Pride of Haarlem, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

169. Darwin Tuhps, Mme. Krelage, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

170. Narcissus, Glory of Leiden, 12-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

171. Narcissus Emperor, 12-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

172. Narcissus, Sir Watkin, 12-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

173. Narcissus, Poeticus King Edward, lo-in. pot or pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 

174. Hyacinths, City of Haarlem, yellow, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00, 

175. Hyacinths, La Victoire, pink, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

176. Hyacinths, La Grandesse, white, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 



6o 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



See Our Exhibit at 
Convention Hall 



THE A. T. De La Mare Printing & Publishing Company, Ltd. 
are owners and publishers of the leading trade paper repre- 
senting all the industries which, combined, have made such a 
wonderful success of this, the Fourth National Flower Show 
of the greatest horticultural organization in America. For that 
reason we are 

Thoroughbred Catalogue 
Experts 

in the production of catalogues and all other printed matter required by 
the Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen and Allied Trades. We are now ready 
to make contracts for Fall Bulb, 1916, and Spring, 1917, catalogues. It is 
never too early to begin, especially on your covers. 

Horticultural Books 

We are headquarters for horticultural literature and allied subjects, and 
can supply any book published at advertised prices. Our own productions 
to date are the following 

Carnation Culture, Commercial - - - - $1.50 Landscape Gardening, Practical - . - - $1.50 

Design Book (Floral Designs de Luxe) - $2.50 ^^ ^ ^, ( Ready in April) 

r\ ■ r> < ,t c I- ■ \ en Mushroom Culture ---..----lOc 

Uesign book (tor Solicitors;, new - - - - dUc pi n i <ti i;n 

1 doz.. $4.50; 50 copies. $16.50; 100 copies, $30 ^, n *• '.. ' ' x 

p ., J \/ , LI J ri t-im Plant Propagation (In preparahon) 

rruits and Vegetables under L»lass - - - $D.UU d /-^ i. /-^ • i *i en 

Kose v^ulture, Commercial ------ $|.50 

Gardeners and Florists" Annual (1916) - - 50c Sweet Peat for Profit. - - - . - - -$1.50 
Heather, The, In Lore, Lyric and Lay - $1.00 Violet Culture, Commercial " - - - -$1.50 
House Plants, Success with . - - - - - 50c Water Gardening, The Book of - - - - $2.50 

By mail, postpaid, on receipt of the price. 

All printing done in our own "Sunshine 'Printery," where trade visitors, 
particularly, are heartily welcome 



A.T. DE La Mare 

PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY ltd. 

438 to 448 WEST 37th STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 6i 

SECTION E — Bulbs in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

177. Hyacinths, King of Blues, blue, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5. 00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

178. Darwin Tulips, Calliope, rose, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

179. Darwin Tulips, Farncombe Sanders, red, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

180. Darwin Tulips, Nauticus, rose, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

181. Darwin Tulips, Pride of Haarlem, scarlet, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

182. Darwin Tulips, Suzon, delicate rose, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

183. Darwin Tulips, Wm. Copland, lilac rose, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

184. Single Early Flowering Tulips, Brilliant Star, scarlet, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

185. Single Early Flowering Tulips, Pink Beauty, pink, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

186. Single Early Flowering Tulips, Rising Sun, yellow, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

187. Single Early Flowering Tulips, President Cleveland, pink, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

188. Single Early Flowering Tulips, White Beauty, white, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

189. Double Early Tulips, Golden King, yellow, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5. 00. Second Prize, $3.00 

190. Double Early Tulips, Schoonord, white, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

191. Double Early Tulips, El Toreador, bronze and orange, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

192. Narcissus, King Alfred, yellow, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

193. Narcissus, Madame De Graff, white, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

194. Narcissus, Van Waveren's Giant, yellow, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

195. Narcissus, Olympia, pale yellow, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

196. Narcissus — Nestaz Poetaz, Aspasia, white with yellow-eye, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

197. Narcissus — Nestaz Poetaz, Irene, yellow with orange eye, 12-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 



62 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

The Leo Niessen Company 

WHOLESALE 

FLORISTS 

NORTH-WEST CORNER TWELFTH AND RACE STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA 



BRANCHES 

BALTIMORE, MD. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

5 and 7 W. Centre Street 1 21 4 H Street, N. W. 



VICK'S ASTERS 

FAMOUS THE WORLD OVER 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE ACRES IN ASTERS 
MANY OTHER ACRES IN PERENNIALS AND 

ANNUALS 

VISIT US NEXT SUMMER AND LET US 
SHOW YOU WHAT WE ARE GROWING 



JAMES VICK'S SONS 

ROCHESTER The Flower City 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 63 

SECTION E — Bulbs in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

198. Narcissus — Ncstaz Poetaz, Klondykc, yellow with golden eye, T2-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

199. Lily of the Valley, 14-in. pan. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

200. Easter Lilies, 3 pots, one bulb to pot, not over 8 in. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by Hosea Waterer, Philadelphia 

201. Darwin Tulips, Bartigon, one pot or pan. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

202. Darwin Tulips, Princess Elizabeth, one pot or pan. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

203. Darwin Tulips, Wm. Copland, one pot or pan. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

204. Darwin Tulips, Painted Lady, one pot or pan. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

205. Cottage Tulip, The Fawn, one pot or pan. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

206. Breeder Tulip, Janne D'Alf, one pot or pan. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

Prizes offered by Zandbergen Bros., Valkenburg, near Leiden, Holland 

207. The American Flag, in frame 4 x 6 ft., the design to be composed of Hya- 

cinths, Tulips, or any other bulbs. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

208. Tulips, pan, not over 12-in., of Flamingo. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

209. Tulips, pan, not over 12-in., of Tea Rose. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

210. Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Pink Beauty. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

211. Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Rising Sun. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

212. Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Lucretia. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

213. Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Couronne des Roses. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

214. Double Tulips, 6 pans, 6 varieties, pans not over 10 in. 

First Prize, Silver Cup; Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

215. Single Tulips, 6 pans, not over 10 in. 

First Prize, Silver Cup; Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

216. Collection of 100 Tulips, 4 colors, in 4 vases of 25 each. 

First Prize, Silver Cup; Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

217. Late Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Queen of Brilliants. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 



64 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 65 

SECTION E — Bulbs in Flower. Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

218. Late Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Wm. Copeland. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

219. Late Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Pride of Haarlem. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

220. Late Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Mrs. Farncomb Sanders. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00 

221. Late Tulips, pan, not over 12 in., of Lucifer. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

222. Narcissus, pan, not over 12 in., of Golden Spur. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

223. Narcissus, pan, not over 12 in., of Poetaz Elvira. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

224. Narcissus, pan, not over 12 in., of Emperor. 

Plrst Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

225. Narcissus, pan, not over 12 in., of King Alfred. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

226. Narcissus, single, 6 pans, not over 10 in., 3 varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

227. Narcissus, collection of 100 in 2 vases, 50 Double Von Sion, 50 Single King 

Alfred. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

228. Hyacinths, one pan, not over 12 in., of each; British Queen, white. 

Enchantress, blue. Queen of Pinks, pink. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

229. Hyacinths, 6 pans, not over 10 in., in 6 varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

230. Easter Lilies, 5 pots, not over 8 in., i bulb to a pot. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

231. Lily of the Valley, pan, not over 14 in. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

232. Callas, 2 pots, not over 8 in., white. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

233. Callas, 2 pots, not over 8 in., pure yellow. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

234. Miniature Lawn, to occupy 30 sq. ft., made from greenhouse-grown sod 

produced from Michell's "Top-notch" lawn grass seed mi.xture, and 
to be laid out with two bulb beds of a size to correspond with the 
size of the lawn; the bulb beds may be Hyacinths, Tulips or Daffodils, 
and the bulbs must be in bloom. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

First Prize, Michell Gold Medal and $10.00 in Gold. Second Prize, Michell 

Silver Medal and $5.00 in Gold 



66 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




ORCHIDS 

We are specialists in Orchids. We collect, 
import, export, grow and sell Orchids exclusively. 
If you require large or small quantities, write us. 
Our illustrated cataloo may be had on application. 

LAGER & HURRELL 

ORCHID GROWERS and IMPORTERS 
SUMMIT, N. J. 



Gude Brothers Co. 

Florists 

and Floral Decorators 

Washington, D. C. 



Members of the Florists' Telegraph 
Delivery Association 



Send us your next order for the 

National Capital and vicinity, 

and let us show you how 

w^ell w^e can serve. 



Ed-ward J. Aschmann 



Howard E. Aschmann 



Aschmann Brothers 

Growers of Choice Blooming and 

Foliage Plants for Christmas, 

Easter and Spring. 

Specialties : Begonia Lorraine, Cyclamen, 

Lilies, Azaleas, Hydrangeas, Araucarias, 

Palms, Primula Obconica and 

Bedding Plants. 



Second and Bristol Streets 
and Rising Sun Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




Reports Sketches 

Private Grounds 
\ / Planting Plans 




^ 



William H. Richie 
Clarence A. Keyser 

Landscape Designers 

41 South 15 th Street 
Phila., Pa. 




^ 



E.stimates Furnished 

Supervision 
Civic Development 




^ 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 67 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY 

The American Rose Society was organized at New York, March 13, 1899, 
the officers then elected being as follows: President, Wm. C. Barry, Rochester, 
N. Y.; vice-president, Benjamin Dorrance, Dorranceton, Pa.; secretary, Paul 
M. Pierson, Scarborough, N. Y.; treasurer, John N. May, Summit, N. J. 
Executive Committee: E. G. Hill, Richmond, Ind.; E. G. Asmus, West Hobo- 
ken, N. J.; N. Butterbach, Oceanic, N. J.; Henry A. Siebrecht, New Rochelle, 
N. Y.; Edmund M. Wood, Natick, Mass.; Robert Craig, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Society holds each year an annual exhibition in March and a Summer 
exhibition in June. The first annual exhibition was held at the Eden Musee, 
New York, March 27-29, 1900, and the first Summer exhibition at the same 
place, June 12-14, 1900. A bulletin, the first number of which appeared in 
March, 1900, is published occasionally. 

ITS OBJECT 

First: To increase the general interest in the cultivation and to improve 
the standard of excellence of the Rose for all the people. 

Second: To foster, stimulate and increase the production in every possible 
way of improved varieties of the Rose suitable to our American climate and 
requirements. 

Third: To organize a system of exhibitions at such times and places as 
this Society may from time to time decide on, to offer prizes of money, gold, 
silver and bronze medals, and certificates of merit for meritorious new varieties 
of Roses; also to offer prizes of money, cups, etc., for excellence of exhibits 
made at shows held by this Society. 

It is also proposed that the Society disseminate to its members the latest 
information pertaining to the Rose, recommending new varieties of undoubted 
merit, best methods of culture, how to fight insect and fungoid pests, the proper 
use of manures and other information from the pens of leading experts that, 
especially to amateurs, will be worth many times the cost of membership. 

The Society has three classes of members, viz. : Life, Active and Associate 
members. 

The Associate or Amateurs the Society invites, and that is why it has the 
Associate Members' class. Except voting, this membership entitles one to all 
the privileges of the Society; free admission to shows, and full reports of all 
proceedings as well as cultural articles of importance to Amateurs. 

Benjamin Hammond, 

Secretary 
Beacon, N. Y. 



68 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



BEST WISHES 
FOR SUCCESS 

TO THE OFFICERS AND 
MANAGEMENT OF THE 
NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



GEORGE B. HART 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



, 



FOURTH NATIONAL I'LOW ER SHOW 69 



SECTION F 

i ROSES 

The schedule covering this section is prepared by the American 
Rose Society and includes the annual exhibition 

of this Society 






ROSES IN POTS AND TUBS 
PRIVATE GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Class 

250. Best display of Rose plants any or all classes arranged for effect. To 

cover 100 sq. ft. of space. 

First Prize, $100.00 Second Prize, $50.00. 

251. 6 Climbing or Rambler Roses, 3 or more varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup (Value $50.00). Second Prize, $25.00. 

Silver Cup offered by J. E. Caldwell Co., Philadelphia 

252. Dorothy Perkins, Lady Gay, or Minnehaha, specimen. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $6.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

253. Tausendschon, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

254. Hiawatha, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

255. Excelsa or Crimson Rambler, specimen. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $10.00). Second Prize, $6.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

25O. Mrs. M. H. Walsh or White Dorothy Perkins, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

257. Any other single-flowered variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

258. Any other double or semi-douhle-tlowered \ariely, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

259. 6 plants Hybrid Perpetuals, one or more varieties. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

t)o. 6 plants Dwarf Polyanthas one or more varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value Sio.oo). Second Prize, $6.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 



FOURTH XATIOXAL FLOWER SHOW 



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'm 



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Line Skimiei Sy; 
oi the sort of :r; 
gicnresas Boii^::- 
Bmpee are nang : 
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a littie mote thaz ? 

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rakj dial vLl i : : - 
nor pack thesoiL 

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:".; :: i r.cse. 
zrz PortaHe 
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Freight prepaid East of the 
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Send for Catalog. 



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Supply the Highest Quality Flower 

Seeds for Florists and Private 

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A FEW SEED SPECIALTIES 

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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 71 

SECTION F — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Private 

Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

261. 12 plants Dwarf Polyanthas, one or more varieties. 

First Prize, Gold Watch, (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $12.00. 

First Prize offered by Lord & Burnham Co., Irvington, N. Y. 

262. Best new variety not in commerce. 

American Rose Society Silver Medal. 

263. Best collection of Hybrid Teas in bloom, covering 100 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia 



CUT ROSES 

PRIVATE GROWERS 

To be staged Monday, March 27th 

264. 12 American Beauty. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

265. 12 Mrs. Chas. Russell. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

266. 12 Killarney Brilliant. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, $2.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

267. 12 Killarney, or Double Pink Killarney. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

268. 12 White Killarney, or any Killarney white sport. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

269. 12 Prince d'Arenberg. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

270. 12 Hadley. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, $2.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

271. 12 Mrs. George Shawyer. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

272. 12 Lady Alice Stanley. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, $2.00. 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

273. 12 My Maryland. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

274. 12 Jonkheer J. L. Mock. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 



']2 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



THE HOUSE OF MICHELL 



'^fisr v^^^^ 




Nurseries, Greenhouses and Trial Grounds, Andalusia, Pa. 

ONE OF THE BEST EQUIPPED SEED ESTABLISHMENTS IN 
^ THE UNITED STATES "COME AND SEE" 
Descriptive, well Illustrated Catalogue Free — 240 Pages 

518 MARKET STREET^-™'™lphia^s^^bu^^^^^ 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



73 



SECTION F — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Private 

Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

275. 12 Ophelia. 

276. 12 Sunburst. 

277. 12 Mrs. Aaron Ward. 

278. 12 sprays George Elger. 

279. 12 sprays Cecile Brunner. 



First Prize, 
First Prize, 
First Prize, 
First Prize, 
First Prize, 



l-.oo. Second Prize, $2.00. 

I-. 00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

l-.oo. Second Prize, $2.00. 

l-.Go. Second Prize, $2.00. 

|..oo. Second Prize, $2.00. 



.00. Second Prize, $2.00, 



280. 12 sprays any other Polyantha. 

First Prize, 

281. 12 sprays any single Rose. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $5.00). Second Prize, 

First Prize offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 



)2.00. 



282. 12 Any other disseminated white. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

283. 12 Any other disseminated yellow. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

284. 12 Any other disseminated red. 

First Prize, $4.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

285. 12 Any other disseminated pink. 

First Prize, Silver Medal. Second Prize, Bronze Medal. 

These Medals are offered by the Toronto Horticultural Society, Toronto, Ont., 

Canada 



THE SECRETARY'S PRIZE 

Benjamin Hammond, secretary of the American Rose Society, offers a special 
prize of ten dollars in cash for the prettiest exhibition of Roses, the same to be 
decided by a vote of the lady visitors. 



OPEN TO AMATEURS ONLY 

Special. Best collection of Hybrid Teas, to comprise the following varieties, 
which are suitable for outdoor cultivation: Killarncy, or double 
Pink Killarney, Lady Alice Stanley, My Maryland, Jonkhcer J. L. 
Mock, Ophelia, and Mrs. Aaron Ward. 

Prize, $50.00. 

Offered by George C. Thomas, Jr., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Special. Best collection of climbing Roses, in flower. 

Prize, $50.00. 

Prize offered by George C. Thomas, Jr., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 



74 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



ROSE PLANTS 

Write for Complete 
List of 

THE STANDARD 
AND NEWER ^ 
VARIETIES ^ 

Philadelphia, 1608-1620 Ludlow St. 

New York. 117 West 28th St. 
Baltimore, Franklin and St. Paul Sts. 

Washington, 1216 H St., N.W. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO. 

The Wholesale Florists 
of Philadelphia 




ROBERT CRAIG COMPANY Inc. 

PHILADELPHIA 

PLANTS OF ALL KINDS, INCLUDING THE 
BEST FOR EASTER AND CHRISTMAS 

CROTONS, ROSES, ARECAS AND FERNS. CYCLAMEN, 
BEGONIAS AND COMPLETE COLLECTION OF SPRING 

AND GARDEN PLANTS 

VISITORS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 



MARKET & 49TH STS. 



NORWOOD, PA. 



CATALOGUE MAILED ON REQUEST OR MAY BE HAD AT 
OUR EXHIBIT AT SPACES NOS. 31 AND 32 



FOUKTH NATIONAL ILOWER SHOW 75 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY 

The American Carnalion Society was organized at Philadelphia, Pa., in 
1891, for the purpose of improving the carnation and advancing its po|)ularity. 
I'roni an original enrollment of 49, the membership has grown steadily until at 
the ]~)resent time there are 3S0 members on the roster. 

Meetings are held annually, going from city to city. In connection with 
each convention, an exhibition is held, for the purpose of affording opportunity 
to show the new varieties and comparing them with the standard sorts. The 
public is admitted to these exhibitions free of charge, which has proven a 
strong factor in popularizing the carnation. Cash prizes. Medals and Certifi- 
cates of Merit are awarded at these exhibitions, the society owning dies for 
striking its medals. In 1913 the Fred Dorner Memorial Medal was established, 
a perpetual fund having been raised among the members, to defray the expenses 
each year. The A. C. S. also takes an active part in all the National Flower 
Shows, assisting in making up schedules, raising money and staging and judg- 
ing the carnation exhibits. 

A system of registering all new varieties has been established, which has 
been the means of preventing the duplication of names and of establishing 
priority in the naming of new varieties. Nearly 1500 varieties are listed on 
this register at this time. Close co-operation has also been established with 
the Perpetual Flowering Carnation Society of England, to prevent confusion 
in nomenclature between American and European raised varieties. 



SECTION G 

The schedule covering this section is prepared by the American 

Carnation Society, under whose supervision the 

exhibits will be staged. This section 

will form part of the **Jubilee 

Exhibition" of this Society 



CARNATIONS 

PRIVATE GROWERS 

To be staged Friday, March 31st 

Open to all varieties, seedlings, and standard sorts. 

Class 

300. 25 blooms, white. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by the Countess of Eulalia, Ashbourne, Pa. 

301. 25 blooms, flesh pink, being those shades of flesh or salmon color. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 



76 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



SOLD BY THE SEEDSMEN OF AMERICA 




TRADE MARJ^' 

Hammond's Paint & Slug Shot Works, Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y- 

GOLD MEDAL AWARDED AT PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION 



WINTER - FLOWERING 

SPENCER SWEET 

PEA 

Nearly every Sweet Pea which you 

have seen exhibited, is 

originated by me. 

They bloom every day in the year — 

in Winter as w^ell as 

in Summer. 

ANT. C. ZVOLANEK 

SWEET PEA 
RANCH 

LOMPOC, CALIFORNIA 



White Marsh 
Pulverized Limestone 

Highest Quality 

Is Not Caustic Cannot Burn 

Immediately Available 



The best and most economical form 
of Lime to use. 

Full information as to the most 
economical w^ay to purchase. 



E. J. LAVINO & CO. 

410 Bullitt Bldg. Philadelphia 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 77 

SECTION G — Schedule of the American Carnation Society. 

Private Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

302. 25 blooms, li.t^bt ])ink, being; those shades of pink verging on the true pink 

and not lighter than Gloriusa, nor as dark as Mrs. C. \V. Ward. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

303. 25 blooms, dark pink, being those shades known as dark pink or cerise, 

and not lighter than Mrs. C. W. Ward. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, S4.00. 

304. 25 blooms, red or scarlet, to include all shades generally included in those 

colors. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

305. 25 blooms, crimson, to include all shades of crimson or maroon. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, S4.00. 

306. 25 blooms, variegated. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00, 

Prizes offered by the Countess of Eulalia, Ashbourne, Pa. 

307. 25 blooms, any other color, to include any color decidedly distinct from 

the colors specified above. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, «'54.oo. 

Prizes offered by the Countess of Eulalia, Ashbourne, Pa. 

308. Vase of Carnations, not to exceed 150 blooms. One or more varieties 

may be used. It is intended to give the exhibitor the widest latitude 
in making his display. Decorative greens of any kind, including 
ribbons and other accessories may be used as long as the Carnations 
are the predominant feature. Vase to be supplied by the exhibitor. 
Quality of blooms, artistic arrangement and general effect will be con- 
sidered in making the awards. 

First Prize, $25.00; Second, $15.00; Third, $10.00. 

SPECIAL 

The American Carnation Society's special ''Silver Jubilee Medal" will be 
awarded to each winner of one or more first premiums in the above classes. 



SECTION H 

CLASSES OPEN TO ALL 
PLANTS IN FLOWER 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

320. Lilium auratum, in l)loom, best b pots, not less than 8-in. pots, one bulb 

to a pot. The Michell Silver Medal. 

321. Lilium magnihcum, in bloom, best 6 pots, not less than 7-in. pots, one 

bulb to a pot. The Michell Silver Medal. 



78 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




Less expensive 

than iron. 
Breaks less glass. 



Long Bars our Specialty. Ask for Catalog Number 5 

THE A. T. STEARNS LUMBER COMPANY 



NEPONSET, BOSTON, MASS. 



PuLVERizEb Sheep- Pulverized Cfnrtz 

SHREbbEb C/qTTLE 

n/INURE 

Remember the name — WIZARD BRAND. It stands for the best natural 

fertihzer you can put into your greenhouse or plant field soil and it is just 

as good for lawn, flower or vegetable garden, fruit or field crop. 

Whether you cultivate 100 feet or 100 acres, you ought to know all about 
WIZARD BRAND. Ask for booklet with prices and freight rates on a 

bag or a car load. 

THE PULVERIZED MANURE CO. 

UNION STOCK YARDS CHICAGO, ILL. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 79 

SECTION H— Plants in Flower— (Continued) 

Class 

322. Lily of the Valley, in bloom, best 14-iii. pan, to contain not less than 100 
pips. First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize Michell Silver Medal. 
2,2^. Easter Lilies, best 6 plants, in 8-in. pots, one bulb to a pot. 

First Prize, Michell Gold Medal. Second Prize, Silver Cup. 

324. Geranium Helen Michell, in bloom, best 6 plants, in 6-in. pots, not more 

than one plant to a pot. 
First Prize, Michell Silver Medal. Second Prize, Michell Bronze Medal. 

325. Cyclamen, 6 plants, in 6-in. pots, assorted colors. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

326. Spirtea "America," 6 plants, in 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, Michell Gold Medal. Second Prize, Silver Cup. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

327. Begonias, 12 plants, consisting of one or more of the following varieties: 

Glory of Cincinnati, Melior, Mrs. J. A. Peterson; to be grown in not 
less than 6-in. pots, nor more than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by J. A. Peterson & Sons, Westwood, Cincinnati, O. 



CUT FLOWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 
ORCHIDS 

340. Display and collection of cut Orchids, each species or variety filling one 

vase, arranged for effect. Cut greens of any variety permissible in 
arranging of same. 
First Prize, Gold Medal and $50.00. Second Prize, Silver medal and $35.00, 

341. Flowering stem of Cattleya, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

342. Flowering stem of La;lia, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry J. Muller, Falls Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 

343. Flowering stem of Laelio-Cattleya or Hybrid Cattleya. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

344. Calanthe, si.x stems, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

345. Flowering stem Dendrobium, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

346. Flowering spray Odontoglossum, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

347. Flowering spray Oncidium, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2,00. 



8o 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



FLORIST'S GARDEN HOSE 

Our Ringmeter Garden Hose is made to especially withstand 
the hard usage to which a florist's hose is subjected. Don't confuse 
Ringmeter w^ith any other hose — look for the distinctive trade 
mark — our name 




and the foot apart raised rings that help to take the wear off the 
cover where the hose is dragged. Furnished in continuous length 
up to 500 feet; does aw^ay w^ith leaky couplings. 

Also tw^o other brands continuous length hose — Yankee and 
^Vonderful made with smooth cover; and more than thirty 
brands of w^rapped and multiple-ply garden hose. 




R=0. Li -3 




Bi,ri'del'5tiip 

Breaker5trip 

Cushion 

7™Ply 

6™ Ply 

— 5™Ply 

— 4™PIy 

2nd Ply 

1 " Ply 
^ Tread 



Let your speedometer judge these tires — 
watch it reel off thousands of miles of city 
streets and country roads w^hile you ride on in 
comfort w^ithout fear or thought of tire trouble. 
You will be surprised to see the excess mileage 
pile up, while still these tires of our wonderful 
tempered rubber retain their body, tough- 
ness, elasticity, resiliency and durability — notice 
how they absorb shock. 

For more than three years users have 
been getting more milage than they paid for. 
Profit by their experience — put Quaker 
Tires on Your car. There is a Quaker 
dealer near you. 

QUAKER CITY RUBBER CO. 

MAIN OFFICE AND FACTORY 



T. T. T. (NON-SKID) 

Pat. May. 1913 

Reg. U.'S. Patent Office 

{Note how these sturdy tires are 

built up by hand) 



CHICAGO 



PHILADELPHIA 

BRANCHES 
PITTSBURGH 



NEW YORK 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 8^ 

SECTION H— Orchids— (Continued) 

Class 

348. Flowcrinfi; spray Phahcnopsis, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

349. Flowering spray Vanda, any variety. 

First Prize, I3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

350. Flowering spray of any Orchid, other than above. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

360. Antirrhinum, 12 spikes white. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

361. Antirrhinum, 12 spikes yellow. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

362. Antirrhinum, 12 spikes red. First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

363. Antirrhinum, 12 spikes pink. First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, «S2.oo. 

364. Antirrhinum, 12 spikes, any other color. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

365. Antirrhinum, Michell's Giant Salmon Pink, vase of 50 spikes. 

First Prize, Michell Silver Medal. Second Prize, Michell Bronze Medal. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

366. Bulbous flowers, cut, in vases, not less than 10 varieties, 25 blooms of 

each, best collection. 

First Prize, Silver Cup. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

367. Centaurea Cyanus (Cornflower). Bunch of 100. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

368. Centaurea Imperialis, bunch of 50. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

369. Freesia, 50 sprays. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

370. Lilac, 12 sprays white. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

371. Lilac, 12 sprays lavender. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

372. Lily of the Valley, 100 sprays. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

373. Lupines, 12 spikes. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2. 00. 

374. Marguerites, yellow, bunch of 100. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

375. Marguerites, white, bunch of 100. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

376. Mignonette, 25 spikes. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, §3.00-. 



82 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



Gladiolus Bulbs 

can be easily and satisfactorily devel- 
oped if they are vigorous and healthy. 
To produce such requires some know- 
ledge, not only of soil conditions, but 
other necessary attention such as ferti- 
lizing, cultivating, etc. 
Experience is a great teacher. We 
believe our experience has taught us 
how to produce the strongest bulbs 
possible and of the highest quality. 

Write for Free, illustrated catalogue 
and try our stock. 

ARTHUR COWEE 

Gladiolus Specialist 
MEADOWVALE FARMS BERLIN, N. Y. 



Thomas Roland 

Plant Specialist 



Acacias 


Bougainvilleas 


Amaryllis 


Genistas 


Ardisias 


Heaths 


Begonias 


Hydrangeas 


Crotons 


Oranges 


Camellias 


Orchids 


Cyclamen 


Poinsettias 


Ferns 


Roses, etc. 



Nahant, Mass. 



J.J. riaberruehl s 


bons 


Dieges & Clust 


Florists 




Manufacturers of 

Award Medals Ribbons 


mmm 




Plaques Prizes 


Bellevue-Stratford 




1 rophies Buttons Pins 


Rltz-Carlton 




mmm 


Diamond and Twenty-second Sts. 


Articles in Ribbon, Celluloid 
Brass, Silver, Gold 


ss^ 




mmm 


Philadelphia 




20 John Street, New York 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 83 



SECTION H— Miscellaneous— (Continued) 

Class 

377. Pansies, display of cut blooms covering 20 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

378. Stocks, 12 spikes, white. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second T^rize, $2.00. 

379. Stocks, 12 spikes, pink. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

380. Stocks, 12 spikes, lavender. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

381. Stocks, 12 spikes, any other color. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 

382. Violets, bunch of 100, double. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

383. Violets, bunch of 100, single. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

384. Wallflowers, 12 spikes. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 
Suitable recognition will be made of any flowers other than those enumer- 
ated. 

OPEN TO ALL 

Special. To the Philadelphia exhibitor submitting the most effective floral ar- 
rangement for use as a front cover for the Intaglio Pictorial Section of the Sun- 
day issue of the Public Ledger. The award to be made by the Award Committee 
of the National Flower Show. Points to be considered include: Arrangement 
of design in the proportion of the space of the cover available for illustration, 
with regard to the fact that title goes at top of page outside of dimensions named 
here. Arrangement of colors to offer the best contrast for the purposes of 
photography. Arrangement to include flowers. Fern or decorative foliage and 
bloom of any kind. The actual size available for reproduction of the photo- 
graph resulting from this contest is 16^ inches deep and 133^ inches wide. 
The design offered in competition may be of any size except that this propor- 
tion must be preserved. 

Pictorial Prize offered by The Evening Ledger-Public Ledger. — Silver Plaque 
suitably inscribed with particulars of the award 

OPEN TO PRIVATE GROWERS ONLY 

390. Dinner table decoration. Accessories to be supplied by the exhibitor, 

and not to count in making the award. 

First Prize, Gold Medal. Second Prize, Silver Medal. 

OPEN TO RETAIL FLORISTS ONLY 
To be staged Tuesday, March 28th 

391. Dinner table decoration. Accessories to be supplied by the exhibitor, 

and not to count in making the award. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by the Ladies' Society of American Florists 



84 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



BOOKS AND MAGAZINES FOR 
THE GARDEN LOVER 



Doubleday, Page & Company 

Publishers of 

COUNTRY LIFE IN AMERICA 

and 

THE GARDEN MAGAZINE 

Direct attention to the Special Gardening Numbers of 
these Foremost Periodicals to be seen at their booth. 

Also a very complete Library of Garden Books. 

You are cordially invited to make our Booth your head- 
quarters. 



The attendant is authorized to make some very attractive 

Introductory offers. 

ASK ABOUT THEM 



Doubleday, Page & Company 

Garden City, New York 
Boston Chicago 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 85 

AMERICAN GLADIOLUS SOCIETY 

The American Gladiolus Society was organized at Boston, Mass., May 27, 
igio, with a membership of 75. The object of the Society is to stimulate interest 
in and promote the culture and develoi)mcnt of the Gladiolus; to establish 
a standard nomenclature; to test out new \'arieties and to gi\e them such recog- 
nition as they deserve; to study the diseases of Gladioli and find remedies for 
same; to disseminate information relating to this flower; to seek uniformity 
in awarding prizes at flower shows and to gi\c one exhibition each year. 

SECTION I 

GLADIOLI 

The Schedule covering this Section is prepared by The American 

Gladiolus Society and all exhibits are to be staged 

under its direction and supervision 

SCALE OF POINTS FOR JUDGING GLADIOLI 

Resistance to disease 5 Form of flower 10 

Texture of flower 10 Form of spike 10 

Duration of bloom 10 Stem (length and stiffness) 10 

Size of bloom 10 Number of flowers on spike i :^ 

Color of bloom 15 Vigor (aside from disease resistance) 5 

GLADIOLI. FORCED BLOOMS 

CLASSES OPEN TO ALL 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Class 

400. Collection of large flowering varieties, to occupy 40 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second, $10.00. Third, $5. 00. 

401. Collection of named varieties (not of the Colvillei or Nanus t>pes) to 

occupy 20 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second, $10.00. Third, $5.00. 

402. Collection of Colvillei and Nanus types, to occupy 20 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second, $10.00. Third, S5.00. 

403. Collection 24 spikes, not less than four large flowering varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second, $10.00. Third, vl;5.oo. 

404. Vase, not less than 12 spikes, one variety, large flowering. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second, $5.00. Third, S3. 00. 

405. Single spike, any variety. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, Si. 00. 

406. Vase of var. Mrs. F. Pendleton, Jr., not less than 6 spikes. 

Prize, S5.00 in gold. 
Prize offered by Sunny Side Gladiolus Gardens, Natick, Mass. 



86 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



ADVANCE MATERIALS 

Ventilating Apparatus and Greenhouse 
Fittings — Quality Always 

Deal with us because 

We are a reliable concern 

You get a fair and square transaction 

We guarantee entire satisfaction 

We have but one price to all 

You get dollar for dollar value 

We co-operate 

Ventilating Apparatus to meet any requirements. 
Small or heavy lifts. We will see to it that they 
are operated in a satisfactory manner and the 
right price. Anything in Greenhouse Fittings. 
Write us today. It is going to pay you to get 
acquainted 

ADVANCE CO. RICHMOND, IND. 




THE E. G. HILL COMPANY 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

OUR SPECIALTY—I he Best Novelty Roses 

High Quality Grafted Stock of Standard Varieties 

The Best Grade in Own Root Stock 

A Full Assortment of Florists' Varieties for the 
Cut Flower Trade 

THE E. G. HILL COMPANY 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



87 



SECTION I — Schedule of the American Gladiolus Society — Con- 
tinued 

Class 

407. Vase of var. Dawn (Tracy), 12 spikes. 

Prize 25 bulbs of var. Lo\'eliness. 

Prize offered by B. Hammond Tracy, Wenham, Mass. 

40S. Artistically arranged basket of blooms. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second, $8.00. Third, $5.00. 

409. Dinner table set for four, decorated with Gladioli blooms, any var. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second, $10.00. Third, $5.00. 

410. Centerpiece. First Prize, $5.00. Second, $3.00. Third, $2.00. 

AMATEUR CLASSES 

411. Collection of large-llowering varieties, to occupy 20 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

412. Collection of Colvillei and Nanus types, to occupy 10 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

413. Collection of 12 spikes, not less than four large flowering varieties. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

414. Vase, not less than 6 spikes, one variety, large-flowering. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

415. Single spike, any variety. First Prize, $2.00. Second Prize, $1.00. 

416. Artistically arranged basket of blooms. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

417. Dinner table, set for four, decorated with Gladiolus blooms. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

418. Centerpiece. First Prize, $3.00. Second Prize, $2.00. 



" Welcome to Philadelphia '' 


STANDARD 

THERMOMETERS 


Stop at our exhibit and let us give 


and THERMOSTATS 


you the glad hand personally. 
Yours for plants, bulbs, 


WILL PROTECT YOUR GREENHOUSE 

CROPS FROM DAMAGE BY SUDDEN 

TEMPERATURE CHANGES 


seed. 


The "Standard " is always on the job Day and Night, 
Winter and Summer. Watches while you sleep 


mmm 


STANDARD 


S. S. Skidelsky & Company 


THERMOMETER COMPANY 

BOSTON. MASS. 


1004 Lincoln Building 

Philadelphia, Pa. 


See exhibit at the display quarters of 
Michell's Seed House at the National Flower Show 



88 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 





FIG. 1 
A PLANTING 

OF 

SWEET PEAS 

SUPPORTED 

BY WIRES 

AND BAMBOO 

STAKES 



FIG. 2 

A VIEW 

BETWEEN 

ROWS OF A 

PLANTING OF 

SWEET PEAS 

FOR 

EXHIBITION 

FLOWERS 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 89 



AMERICAN SWEET PEA SOCIETY 

The National Sweet Pea Society of America was organized at New York, 
July 7-8, iQoq, and an exhibition held in the Museum of Natural History. The 
following oflicers were elected: President, Harry Turner, Port Washington, 
N. Y.; vice-president, W. H. Waite; secretary, Harry A. Bunyard, N. Y.; 
treasurer, William Duckham, Madison, N. J. 

Objects of the Society. The objects of the Society are to encourage the 
cultivation and improvement of the Sweet Pea by exhibitions, field tests, con- 
ferences or in any other way the Society shall determine. 

Membership. The membership of the Society consists of two classes, 
namely, life members and annual members. The fee for life membership is 
I25.00. The fee for annual membership is $2.00. 

Privileges op Members. The members of the Society are entitled to 
such reports as are published, and free entry and admission to all exhibitions 
and meetings of the Society. 

At the Boston convention, July 13 and 14, the name was changed to the 
American Sweet Pea Society. 



SECTION J 

SWEET PEAS 

The schedule covering this section is prepared by the American 

Sweet Pea Society, and all exhibits are to be staged 

under its direction and supervision 

SCALE OF POINTS TO GOVERN JUDGES 

Length of Stem 25 

Color 20 

Size 25 

Substance 15 

Number of flowers on a stem 15 

Total 100 



CLASSES OPEN TO ALL EXCEPT AS MENTIONED 

To be staged Wednesday, March 29th 

Class 

425. 25 sprays, pink and white. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

426. 25 sprays, white. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

427. 25 sprays, deep pink or rose. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 



90 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




FIG 3 

THREE SPRAYS 

OF 

SWEET PEAS 

VARIETY 

MRS CUTHBERTSON 

PINK BICOLOR 

EACH WITH 
FIVE FLOWERS 



FIG. 4 

FLAT OF 

SWEET PEA PLANTS 

IN PAPER BOXES 

SUFFICIENT 

TO PLANT A ROW 

100 FEET IN LENGTH 




FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 9£ 

SECTION J — Schedule of American Sweet Pea Society — (Con- 
tinued) 

Class 

428. 25 sprays, light pink. First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $i.oo. 

429. 25 sprays, cream pink or salmon. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

430. 25 sprays, blue or purple. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

431. 25 sprays, red or crimson. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

432. 25 sprays, light lavender. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

433. 25 sprays, dark lavender. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

434- 25 sprays, orange. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

435. 25 sprays, any other color. 

First Prize, $3.00. Second, $2.00. Third, $1.00. 

436. 50 sprays, pink and white. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, S2.00. 

437. 50 sprays, white. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, S2.00. 

43S. 50 sprays, deep pink or rose. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, $2.00. 

439. 50 sprays, light pink. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, $2.00. 

440. 50 sprays, cream pink or salmon. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, $2.00. 

441. 50 sprays, blue or purple. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, $2.00. 

442. 50 sprays, red or crimson. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, $4.00. Third, $2.00. 

443. 50 sprays, light lavender. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, VS4.00. Third, $2.00. 

444. 50 sprays, dark lavender. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, I4.00. Third, $2.00. 

445. 50 sprays, orange. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second, ,$4.00. Third, $2.00. 

446. 50 sprays, any other color. 

iMrsl Prize, $().oo. Second, S4.00. Third, '^2.00. 

Prizes for the Most Successful Exhibitors in the Above Color Classes Offered by 

W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

A first prize to count three points, second prize to counl two poinls, tliini prize lo 
count one point. 

First Prize, W. Atlee Burpee & Company, Silver Cup, value $50.00. 
Second Prize, W. Atlee Burpee & Company, Silver Cup, value S25.00. 
Third Prize, W. Atlee Burpee & Company, Silver Cup, value $10.00. 



92 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



J.Horace McFarland Company 

specialists in Floral Photography, 
Designing, Engraving and Printing 
for Florists, Nursery- 
men and Seedsmen. 



McFarland Publicity Service 

Plans, writes and places Advertis- 
ing; arranges catalogues, booklets 
and follow-ups for the 
horticultural trade. 





GRASSELLI SPRAY 
PRODUCTS 

Grasselli Free Nicotine 

Guaranteed to contain 40Vo of Nicotine 
Suitable for either Spraying or Fumigating 

Sulphate of Nicotine 40% 
Arsenate of Lead-Paste and 

Pov^der 
Lime Sulphur Solution 

THE GRASSELLI CHEMICAL CO. 

NEW YORK BOSTON CLEVELAND 
ST. LOUIS AND CHICAGO 



Write for Free Booklet on 

Supplee 
Cominunity Service 

The nevyr plan of caring for your 
trees, lavv^n and gardens. 

insures greater efficiency and guar- 
antees far greater economy. 

Booklet mailed on request FREE to any 
address 

Norman Supplee 

Professional Nurseryman 

Bulletin Building 5900 Washington Ave. 

Philadelphia 

Phones— Walnut 3438 ; Race 1 676 ; 
Woodland 1894 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWKR SHOW 93 

SECTION J — Schedule of American Sweet Pea Society — (Con- 
tinued) 

Class 

447. Vase of 100 s[)rays, one color, arranged for effect with Sweet Pea or other 

foliage. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second, $7.00. Third, $4.00. 

Cups Offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

Value $10.00 and $5.00, will be awarded to the first and sfCDiid i)ri/,c winners. 

448. Vase of 100 sprays, comliination of two or more colors arranged for effect 

with Sweet Pea or other foliage. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second, $7.00. Third, $4.00. 

Cups Offered by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia 

Value $10.00 and $5.00, will he awarded to the first and second prize winners. 

449. Vase of 100 sprays of new Sweet Pea Sensation. 

First Prize, Michell Silver Medal. Second Prize, Michell Bronze Medal. 

450. Vase of 100 sprays of new Sweet Pea Rose Queen. 

First Prize, Michell Silver Medal. Second Prize, Michell Bronze Medal. 

451. Vase of Sweet Peas without foliage. 

First Prize, Michell Gold Medal. Second Prize, Michell Silver Medal. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia 

452. Display of Sweet Peas, covering 100 sq. ft., quality and effective arrange- 

ment to count. Foliage plants and any foliage may be used. 
First Prize, $100.00 and American Sweet Pea Society's Gold Medal. Second 
Prize, $50.00 and American Sweet Pea Society's Silver Medal. 

453. For the best and largest collection of Winter-flowering Grandiflora and 

Orchid Sweet Peas, all correctly named, 6 to 15 stems to each vase, 
varieties introduced prior to 1916. 

First Prize, $40.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

Prizes offered by Anton C. Zvolanek, Lompoc, Cal. 

OPEN TO PRIVATE GARDENERS ONLY 

454. 6 vases Sweet Peas, 12 sprays to vase, 6 varieties. 

First Prize, $12.00. Second, $8.00. Third, $5.00. 

Offer Cup, by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia, 

RETAIL FLORISTS' EXHIBITS 

455. Table Decoration of Sweet Peas. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

456. Basket of Sweet Peas. First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

457. Bride's bouquet of Sweet Peas. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

458. Corsage bouquet of Sweet Peas. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

The Society's Certificate of Merit will be awarded for new varieties of 
marked improvement over existing varieties. 



94 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




-TOIV 




i^r^^fc 




Used by 22 Florists in Philadelphia 

PRESTIGE, class and an apparent disregard of cost of service 
to your customers will bring you business in larger territory, 
where you can sell flow^ers just as easily as anyone else, if 
you make deliveries promptly and efficiently. Distance and 
large delivery area increases the number of your possible cus- 
tomers, and prompt and high-class service holds them. 

Your delivery equipment must "look, '^e part" and must "stand 

up " and deliver the goods. It must cover many miles over bad 

roads and stand for abusive driving so that its operation and 

maintenance cost vv^ill make the services possible. 

Your loads are light and the unequal proportion of your delivery ex- 
penses must not be charged against a great big heavy equipment. 

These are your conditions which Vim delivery cars are especially 
designed to meet. Ask him who owns a Vim. 

Made in Philadelphia by Vim Motor Truck Co. 

Sold in 442 Cities and Towns in the United States 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 95 

SECTION K 

PLANTS IN FLOWER 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Class 

500. Acacias, collection, 200 sq. ft. 

First Prize, Gold Medal and $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 

501. Acacias, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00- 

502. Acacias, 3 plants, i or more varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

503. Acacia, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by R. C. Kerr, Houston, Tex. 

504. Alocasias and Aroids, 12 plants, not less than 4 varieties. 

First Prize, Gold Watch, (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $15.00. 

First Prize offered by Lord & Burnham Co., Philadelphia. 

505. Anthurium, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

506. Azalea Indica, collection covering 150 sq. ft., arranged for effect. 

First Prize, $100.00. Second Prize, $75.00. 

507. Azalea Indica 12 plants, not less than 6 varieties. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

508. Azalea Indica, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

509. Azalea Mollis, or Pontica, or both, 12 plants, not less than 4 colors. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

510. Bougainvillea, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

511. Cyclamen, 12 plants, not less than 8-in. pots. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $35.00 

First Prize offered by Harry Balsley, Detroit 

512. Cyclamen, display of greatest number of varieties shown by one exhibitor. 

First Prize, $10.00. 

Prize offered by A. H. Hews & Co., Inc., Cambridge, Mass. 

513. Ericas, Epacris, and Boronias, collection 100 sq. ft., arranged for effect. 

First Prize, $75.00. Second Prize, $50.00. 

514. Ericas, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $15.00. 

First Prize offered by Ludwig Vollers, Philadelphia 



96 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



''Suggestions for Effective Planting'' 

^ A catalog in which botanical arrangement is 
superseded for your greater convenience by list- 
ing in groups, those plants best adapted to 
varied uses on the quiet country place, sub- 
urban grounds or for architectural effects. This 
booklet will be sent at your request. 

Rhododendrons, Evergreens, 
Trees, Shrubs and Hardy Plants 

^ "Andorra Grovirn " plants are of the highest 
quality, in wide variety of species and sizes ; Large 
Trees and Evergreens for immediate effect are a 
specialty. 

ANDORRA NURSERIES chestnut hill, phila., pa. 



Wm. Warner Harper, Proprietor 



Box 210 



CHILDS' 

GLADIOLI 

ARE NOTED THE WORLD 
OVER FOR 

Superior Merit 



JOHN LEWIS CHILDS, Inc. 

FLOWERFIELD 

L. I., N. Y. 



John Bader Company 

BEN L. ELLIOTT, OWNER 

1826 RIALTO STREET 

M. S. PITTSBURG, PA. 



WHOLESALE PLANT GROWERS 



When the other fellow does not 

have it, write us. We 

sometimes do. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 97 



SECTION K — Flowering Plants. Commercial Growers — (Con- 
tinued) 

Class 

515. Plowering and foliage, stove and greenhouse plants, arranged for effect, 

200 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 

516. Collection of forced shrubs, herbaceous plants, arranged for effect, trees 

and vines permissible, 200 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $100.00. Second Prize, $75.00. 

517. Genistas, 6 plants, not less than 4 ft. high. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

518. Genistas, 3 plants, not less than 3 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

519. Genista, specimen, not less than 4 ft. in diameter. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

520. Hydrangeas, 150 sq. ft., not less than 6 varieties, arranged for effect. 

First Prize, $100.00. Second Prize, $75.00. 

521. Hydrangeas, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

522. Hydrangea, specimen, not less than 3 ft. diameter. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

523. Lilacs, 20 plants. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

First Prize offered by Gude Bros. Co., Washington, D. C. 

524. Lilacs, 10 plants, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

525. Marguerites, 6 plants, not less than 2 varieties, nor less than 36 in. spread. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

526. Marguerites, 3 plants, not less than 36 in. spread. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

527. Marguerite, specimen, not less than 4 ft. spread. 

First Prize, $8.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

528. Pansies, bed covering 50 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $8.00. 

529. Primula, 24 plants in variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

530. Rhododendrons, collection covering 150 sq. ft., arranged for effect. 

First Prize, $100.00. Second Prize, $75.00. 

531. Rhododendrons, 12 plants, not less than 3 varieties, nor less than 3 ft. 

spread. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

532. Rhododendrons, 6 plants, not less than 3 varieties, nor less than 3 ft. 

spread. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 




98 



FOURTH XATIOXAL FLOWER SHOW 




\^E 



Pierson's 

Plants for All 

Places 



Last summer when you ■walked through your 
friends' gardens you may have noticed some of the 
newer roses, some shrubs that are not generally planted, 
or a few blooming plants that are not found in the average 
garden. These unusual things made that garden distinctive, and 
in memory it remained v/ith you. 

Cromwell Gardens grow plants for all places — the small city lot, the 

grounds around the suburban home, and those that are needed for 

securing effective results on the large estate. Whether your planting 

requirements call for a single plant, or a complete planting, we can meet 

your demands. 

Roses, Flowering Shrubs, Perennials 

An intelligent selection of these important garden plants will lift your 
planting out of the ordinary into a class by itself. 
The experience gained by years of association is 
at your service and we will gladly help you 
to select the varieties that will give satis- 
faction to you. 

Our Handbook of Garden and Green- 
house Plants will be of special value; it lists 
the choice Roses, Shrubs, Perennials and Bed- 
ding Plants. The book has been completely 
revised this year. Write for a ccpy. 




*/ 



A. N. Pierson, Inc. 

Cromwell Gardens 

Cromwell 

Conn. 



P^'\ 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 99 

SECTION K — Flowering Plants. Commercial Growers — (Con- 
tinued) 

Class 

53_^. Rhododendrons, 3 plants, not less than 3 varieties, nor less than 3 ft. 
spread. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

534. Spiriea, or Astiibe, 25 i)lanls, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

535. Spira?a, or Astiibe, 12 plants. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

536. Wistaria, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

537. Metrosideros, 6 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 



SECTION L 

BULBS IN FLOWER 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

550. Callas, 6 plants, one or more varieties. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

551. Lilies, 50 pots, other foliage plants may be introduced. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

552. Lily of the Valley, 20 lo-in. pans. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

553. Narcissus, 20 lo-in. pans, 6 or more varieties. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

554. Tulips, Darwin, 20 lo-in. pans, 10 or more varieties. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

555. Tulips, Early Single, 20 lo-in. pans, 10 or more varieties. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

556. Tulips, Double, 20 lo-in. pans, 10 varieties. 

First Prize, $30.00. Second Prize, $20.00. 

SPECIAL PRIZE FOR DEALERS AND SEEDSMEN 

557. Best display of bulbs, etc., arranged as a Dutch bulb garden, covering 500 

sq. ft. Appropriate accessories permitted. ()uality of bloom, 
artistic arrangement, and general effect to be considered in making 
award. 

First Prize, Gold Medal and $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 



100 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




BROAD AND CHESTNUT STREETS 

d ''PHILADELPHIA'S FINEST AND LARGEST 
RESTAURANT." 

C RENOWNED FROM COAST TO COAST FOR 
THE EXCELLENCE OF ITS CUISINE. 

C ESPECIALLY NOTED FOR OYSTERS, SHELL 
FISH, AND OTHER FOODS OF THE SEA. 



Hires Turner 
Glass Company 

GLASS 

FOR 

GREENHOUSES 



gg 



Hosea Waterer 



Highest Quality 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Washington, D. C. 



Seeds, Bulbs, Plants 

Full Line of 

Fertilizers, Insecticides 

Poultry Supplies 

Tools, Etc. 



107-109 South Seventh St. 
Philadelphia 

Catalog Free 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW loi 

SECTION M 

FERNS AND SELAGINELLAS 
COMMERCIAL GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Class 

560. Cibotium Schiedei, specimen, not less than 12-in. pot or tub. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

561. Ferns, 12 plants, not less than 6 varieties, nor less than lo-in. pots. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

562. Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

563. Nephrolepis, any other variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

564. Collection of Nephrolepis in variety, covering 100 sq. ft. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

565. Stag's Horn Fern, 3 plants in variety. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

566. Tree Fern, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

567. Fern, specimen, any other variety, not otherwise specified, not less than 

lo-in. pot or tub. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

SECTION N 

ORCHIDS— PLANTS 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 
To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

570. Group of plants in variety, covering 100 sq. ft. (Palms and Ferns per- 

mitted), arranged for effect. 

First Prize, Gold Medal and $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 

Prizes offered by Louis Burk, Philadelphia. 

571. Twelve plants, distinct varieties. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

572. Six plants, distinct varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

573. Brasso-Cattleya, or Brasso-L;elia, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

574. Cattleya Mossiae, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 




102 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




How the Eternal Fitness of Things 
Concerns Your Greenhouse 



You are thinking of building a 
greenhouse. Your architect de- 
signs for it a chaste, graceful work 
room; perhaps like this one above. 
It is choice in every way, quite in 
accord with your idea; entirely 
reflective in both beauty and qual- 
ity of everything else you possess. 

Then comes the question of the 
greenhouse that will consistently 
harmonize with it, and at the same 
time meet your individual stand- 



ards. Were you then to look over 
the rather unusual collection of 
photographs of U-Bar houses, here 
in our office, and learn of their 
locations and owners, we are sure 
you would be self convinced that 
the U-Bar greenhouse fully meets 
your standards. 

If it is not possible for you tc 
come to our office, we will gladly 
bring our photographs to you. 
Or send you our catalog. Or both. 



U-BAR GREENHOUSES 

PIERSON U-BAR CO. 

One Madison Ave. New York 




FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWliR SHOW 103 

SECTION N — Orchids. Commercial Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

575. Catlleya Schrodcnc, specimen. 

First Prize, «1|;i5.oo. Second Prize, $10.00. 

57O. Catlleya, specimen, any other variety- 
First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

577. Cypripediums, collection 25 plants in variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

578. Cypripediums, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 
57Q. Dendrobium, 12 plants, in variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

580. Dendrobium nobile, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

581. Dendrobium Wardianum, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

582. Dendrobium, specimen, any other variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

5S3. Cattleya, Laslia, or LseHo-Cattleya Hybrid, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

584. Laelia, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

585. Odontoglossum specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

586. Oncidium specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

58 7. Phalaenopsis, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

588. Vanda, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

589. Hybrid Orchid, raised in America — Gold Medal. 

Any variety, other than above. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 



SECTION O 

PALMS AND FOLIAGE PLANTS 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

600. Areca lutescens, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

601. Bay Trees, 2 plants, pyramidal. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 



I04 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




Is this ASPLENIUM NIDUS AVIS 
Or is it not? 



The Parent Plant 

Wcis sent to us about five years ago. 

What is your opinion? We espe- 
cially draw your attention to this 
plant and invite you to inspect our 
stock both on exhibition at the 
flower show and at our greenhouses, 
and be satisfied that we have found 
a gem, and also be convinced that 
The Bird's Nest Fern can still be 
grown vigorously and healthy and 
without difficulty. 

Prices Furnished on Application. 



William K. Harris 
Florist 

55th St. & Springfield Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Take Car No. 13 on Walnut Street 
for the Greenhouses 



Don't Fail to Visit 

The Tea Garden 

at the 

Flower Show 



Your Orders for 

Atlantic City, N.J. 

will be carefully filled by 

GEORGE H. BERKE 

1505 PACIFIC AVENUE 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



Every Visitor 

should see the 

Aquarium 

Exhibit 

The rare fish ex- 
hibited here are 
from some of the 
most famous collec- 
tions in America 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 105 

SECTION O — Palms and Foliage Plants. Commercial Growers — 

(Continued) 

Class 

602. Bay Trees, 2 plants, standard. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

603. Bay Trees, 2 plants, columnar. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

604. Box Trees, 2 plants, pyramidal. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

605. Box Trees, 2 plants, standard. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

606. Box Trees, 2 plants, bush. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

607. Box Trees, 6 trained plants. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

608. Cocos Australis, or its variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

609. Cocos plumosus, specimen. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

610. Crotons, group covering 100 sq. ft., arranged for effect. 

First Prize, $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 

First Prize offered by Hon. W. Freeland Kendrick, Philadelphia 

611. Cycas, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

612. Dracaena, 12 plants, 6 or more varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

613. Dracaena, specimen, any variety. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

614. Ficus elastica, or variegata, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

615. Ficus pandurata, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

616. Kentia Belmoreana, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

617. Kentia Forsteriana, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

618. Phoenix Roebelenii, 3 plants. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

619. Phoenix Rupicola, specimen. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

620. Phoenix, any other variety. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

621. Palm, specimen, other than above. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

622. Stove and greenhouse plants, distinct, 6 plants. Exclusive of Palms. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 



io6 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 






■mmm-'m£\ 







For Your Lawn and Garden 

Use Alphano — The Odorless, Weedless 

All-In-One Fertility Producer 



T)RIEFLY and pointedly — use it, because 
'-' it contains all the plant foods ; all the 
vitalizing elements ; and all the beneficial 
bacteria necessary for a perfectly balanced, 
fertility producing soil ration. To say it 
still briefer: it is an all-in-one soil builder. 

It is a combination of both the long and 
«hort result producers. Let us explain this 
itatement. The readily soluble chemical 
foods it contains, such as phosphate and 
potash, act as an immediate growth stimu- 
lant. The gradual liberation of its humus 
nitrogen, continues to supply for a long time, 
the most vital elements in 
plant growth. 

The teeming billions of 
nitrogen gathering and soil 




mineral digesting bacteria, which government 
analysis proves it so liberally contains; still 
further continue fertility production. 

Its being odorless; its freedom from weed 
seeds; its velvety black finely granulated 
condition; are all still further facts in its 
favor. 

Put it on your lawn and rake in. Dig 
it around your shrubs, flowers and vege- 
tables. Use it every place and any place 
where you want richer soil and better results. 

Send for Booklet — Lawns and Golf 
Courses — Their Care and Fare. 

$12 a ton in bags. 

$10 a ton in bags by car- 
load. 

$8 a ton in bulk by car- 
load. 



Established 1905 

17-M Battery Place New York City, N. Y. 



^■'■■■■I 



iiHiaiHii 



lis 






FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 107 

SECTION O^Palms and Foliage Plants. Commercial Growers — 

(Continued) 

Class 

623. Yew 'J'rccs, Iruined plants. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

624. Forced shrubs and herbaceous plants, collection covering 200 sc). ft. (trees 

and vines permissible), arranged for effect. 

First Prize, $150.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 

625. Conifers, collection of 25 plants, not less than 12 varieties, in pots or tubs. 

First Prize, $75.00. Second Prize, $50.00. 

626. Japan Maple in foliage, 6 i)lants, not less than 3 feet high. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 



SECTION P 

ROSES 

The schedule covering this section is prepared by the American 
Rose Society and includes the annual exhibition 

of this Society 

THE AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY'S SCALE OF POINTS 

All exhibits of cut flowers will be judged by points in accordance with the 
following official scales: 

Competitive Novelties for 
Classes Certificates, etc. 
Size 15 10 

Color 20 20 

Stem 20 15 

Form 15 15 

Substance • • • 15 10 

Foliage 15 15 

Fragrance (for Novelties Only) 5 

UislincliA'cness 10 

100 100 

RULES FOR JUDGING GROUPS OF ROSE PLANTS 

Size of Group or Collection 20 

Distinctiveness 15 

Cultural Perfection 20 

Number of Varieties 20 

Arrangement and Fffcct 25 

100 



io8 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



DREER'S 

Seeds, Plants and Bulbs 




A BORDER OF DREER'S HARDY PERENNIALS 

OUR SEED DEPARTMENTS offer the very choicest Vege- 
table Seeds, Lawn Grass Seeds, Agricultural Seeds, 

Flower Seeds. 

OUR PLANT AND BULB DEPARTMENTS cover over 300 

acres and 1 acres of greenhouses. Among the many special- 
ties vs^hich we grow in vast quantities are Carinas, Dahlias, 
Ferns, Gladiolus, Palms, Roses, Hardy Perennials, Shrubs, 
Hardy Climbers, Small Fruits, Water Lilies and Aquatics, etc. 

DREER'S GARDEN BOOK fully describes all of the above and is 

Free on application. 

DO NOT FAIL TO VISIT OUR LARGE AND INTERESTING EXHIBIT AT THE 

NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

UCMDV A nDrCD 714-716 Chestnut Street 
ilLllKI A. UKtiEiK PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



T09 



DREER'S 

Select Two-year-old Roses 




HYBRID-TEA ROSE 



Specially Prepared for the Amateur and will give Immediate Effect 

Stock either grown at our own Nurseries, or by noted European Specialists, 
plants potted and stored in cold greenhouses and cold frames during the 
winter. Treated in this manner they develop in a natural way and are 
superior to plants which have been forced in high temperature, or carried 
over in dormant state and are sure to give immediate results. 

We grow the popular Hardy Hybrid-Tea Rose in large variety, listing 239 
of the most select sorts, also choice Hybrid Perpetual, Hardy Climbing 
Roses, etc., all of which are fully described in Dreer's Garden Book, 
together with valuable cultural information. A copy free on application. 

DO NOT FAIL TO VISIT OUR LARGE AND INTERESTING EXHIBIT AT THE 

NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

UrMDV A nOrrO 7I4.7I6 chestnut street 

ntiiiKI A. LIKLEiK Philadelphia, pa. 



no FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SECTION P — Schedule of the American Rose Society — (Con- 
tinued) 

SINGLE SPECIMEN ROSE PLANTS 

Size of Plants 20 

Culfural Perfection 25 

Floriferousness 20 

FoKage 15 

Quality of Bloom 10 

Color of Bloom 10 



100 
ROSES IN POTS AND TUBS 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 
Class 

650. Best display of Rose plants, arranged as a Rose garden, any or all classes, 

covering 500 sq. ft. Appropriate accessories permitted. Artistic 
arrangement and general effect to be considered in making reward. 

First Prize, $500.00. Second Prize, S400.00. Third Prize, $300.00. 

The first prize is offered by Philip Breitmeyer, Detroit, Mich. ; Thos. Roland, 
Nahant, Mass.; Joseph Heacock, Wyncote, Pa.; Robert Scott & Son, Sharon 
Hill, Pa.; Geo. Burton, Chestnut Hill, Pa.; S. Mortensen, Southampton, Pa.; 
Aug. Doemling, Lansdowne, Pa.; Conard & Jones Co., West Grove, Pa.; C. H. 
Totty, Madison, N. J.; L. J. Reuter & Son, Westerly, R. I.; Robt. Simpson, 
Clifton, N. J., and Harrj- O. May, Summit, N. J. 

** The second prize is offered by A. Farenwald, Roslyn, Pa.; The United States 
Cut Flower Co., Elmira, N. Y. ; Emil Buettner, Park Ridge, 111.; J. H. Dunlop, 
Toronto, Can.; Eugene Dailledouze, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Michigan Cut Flower 
Exchange, Detroit, Mich.; Dingee & Conard, West Grove, Pa.; Patrick Welch, 
Boston, Mass.; Martin & Forbes, Portland, Ore.; M. Franklin, Yardley, Pa.; 
Pulverized Manure Co., Chicago, 111.; Lord &jBurnham Co., Irvington, N. Y.; 
Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., and others. 

The third prize is offered by A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn, and others. 

651. Best display of Rose plants, any or all classes, arranged for effect. To 

cover 200 sq. ft. of space. 

First Prize, $200.00. Second Prize, $100.00. 

652. 6 Climbing or Rambler Ro;e;. 3 or more varieties. 

First Prize. $75.00. Second Prize, $40.00. 

653. Dorothj- Perkins, Lady Gay or ZMinnehaha, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

Prizes offered by Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, N. Y. 

654. Tausendschon, specimen. First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

655. Hiawatha, specimen. First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

Prizes offered by Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, N. Y. 

656. Excelsa or Crimson Rambler, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

Prizes offered by Jackson &. Perkins Co., Newark, N. Y. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW jri 

SECTION P — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Com- 
mercial Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

657. Mrs. M. H. Walsh or White Dorothy Perkins, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

658. Any other single-flowered variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

659. Any other double or semi-doubled flowered variety, specimen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $6.00. 

660. 25 plants Hybrid Perpetuals; not less than 6 varieties. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $30.00. 

661. 12 plants Hybrid Perpetuals; not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

First Prize offered by H. G. Berning, St. Louis, Mo. 

662. 25 plants Dwarf Polyanthas, not less than 6 varieties. 

First Prize, the Kroeschell Gold Medal, (Value $50.00). Second Prize, $20.00. 

First Prize offered by Kroeschell Bros. Co., Chicago, 111. 

663. 12 plants Dwarf Polyanthas, not less than 3 varieties. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

664. Best new variety not in commerce. 

American Rose Society Silver Medal 

665. 25 Rose plants in 6-in. pots, not less than 6 varieties, suitable for garden 

planting. 

First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 
First Prize offered by W. H. Elliott, Brighton, Mass. 



CUT ROSES 

To be staged Monday, March 27th 

All Roses with more than two growths (one pinch j will be discjualified, 
excepting in the classes calling for displays, and for 100 or more blooms in a 
vase, when two pinches will be allowed. 

670. 100 American Beauty. 

First Prize, $80.00. Second, $60.00. Third, $40.00. 

First Prize offered by Pennock Bros., Philadelphia 

671. 50 American Beauty. 

First Prize, $40.00. Second, $30.00. Third, $20.00. 

672. 100 Mrs. Charles Russell. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second, $30.00. Third, $20.00. 

673. 50 Mrs. Charles Russell. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $25.00). Second, $15.00. Third $10.00. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, offered by the Waban Rose Conservatories, 

Natick, Mass. 



112 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SECTION P — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Com- 
mercial Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

674. 100 Mrs. George Shawyer. First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $25.00). 

Offered by The Florex Gardens, North Wales, Pa. 

675. 50 Killarney Brilliant. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

676. 50 Killarney Queen. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

677. 50 Killarney, or Double Pink Killarney. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00- 

678. 50 White Killarney, or any Killarney white sport. 

First Prize, S20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

679. 50 Hoosier Beauty. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

680. 50 Prince d'Arenberg. 

First Prize, S20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

681. 50 Hadley. 

Ffrst Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by S. S. Pennock-Meehan Co., Philadelphia 



682. 50 Mrs. George Sha-^'yer. 

683. 50 Lady Alice Stanley. 

684. 50 Radiance. 

685. 50 My ]\Iaryland. 

686. 50 Jonkheer J. L. Mock. 

687. 50 Antoine Rivoire. 

688. 50 Ophelia. 



First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 



First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 
Prizes offered by E. G. Hill Co., Richmond, Ind. 

689. 50 Sunburst. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

690. 50 Mrs. Aaron Ward. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

691. 50 Francis Scott Key. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

692. 50 Any other disseminated red. 

First Prize, Gold Watch, (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize offered by Lord & Burnham Co., Philadelphia 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 113 

SECTION P — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Com- 
mercial Growers— (Continued) 

Class 

693. 50 Any other disseminated pink. 

First Prize, Greenhouse Material (Value $25.00). Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize offered by The Advance Co., Richmond, Ind. 

694. 50 Blooms of any new Rose not in commerce. 

Prize, $25.00. 

Prize offered by The Leo Niessen Co., Philadelphia 

695. 25 American Beauty. 

First Prize, $20.00. Second, $10.00. Third, $5.00. 

696. 25 Mrs. Charles Russell. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

697. 25 Killarney Brilliant. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by Henry Penn, Boston, Mass. 

698. 25 Killarney Queen. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

699. 25 Killarney, or Double Pink Killarney. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

700. 25 White Killarney, or any Killarney white sport. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by Mann & Brown, Richmond, Va. 

701. 25 Prince d'Arenberg. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

702. 25 Hadley. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

Prizes offered by Gude Bros. Co., Washington, D. C. 

703. 25 Mrs. George Shawyer. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by W. L. Rock, Kansas City, Mo. 

704. 25 Lady Alice Stanley. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

705. 25 Radiance. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by Gude Bros. Co., Washington, D. C. 

706. 25 My Maryland. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

707. 25 Jonkheer J. L. Mock. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

708. 25 Antoine Rivoire. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 



114 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SECTION P — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Com- 
mercial Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

709. 25 Ophelia. First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by Hess & Swoboda, Omaha, Neb. 

710. 25 Sunburst. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

711. 25 Mrs. Aaron Ward. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by S. S. Skidelsky, Philadelphia 

712. 25 Any other disseminated white. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

713. 25 Any other disseminated yellow. 

First Prize, Sio.oo. Second Prize, $5.00. 

714. 25 Any other disseminated red. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

715. 25 Any other disseminated pink. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by Edw. Campbell, Philadelphia 

716. 25 Francis Scott Key. 

First Prize, $10.00. Second Prize, $5.00. 

First Prize offered by John Cook, Baltimore, Md. 

717. 50 sprays Cecile Brunner. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

718. 50 sprays George Elger. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

719. 50 sprays any other Polyantha. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

720. 50 sprays Single Roses. 

First Prize, $5.00. Second Prize, $3.00. 

Prizes offered by Henry F. Michell Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

721. 25 American Beauty. 

Prize, the Michell Gold Medal. 

722. 25 Mrs. Charles Russell. 

Prize, the Michell Gold Medal. 

723. 25 Any red Rose. 

Prize, the Michell Gold Medal. 

Sweepstake prize for best vase of 50 Roses of any exhibit entered. 

Prize, Silver Cup, (Valued at $25.00). 

Prize offered by Edward Reid, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sweepstake prize for best vase of 25 Roses of any exhibit entered. 
Prize offered by A. H. Hews & Co., Cambridge, Mass. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW U5 

SECTION P — Schedule of the American Rose Society. Com- 
mercial Growers — (Continued) 

AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES 

FOR NOVELTIES 

A gold medal is offered for the best new Rose not yet disseminated, whether 
of domestic or foreign origin; exhibits are to be judged by the official scale of the 
Society, and no gold medal is to be awarded to any Rose scoring less than 95 
points. 

A silver medal is offered at the same time, and under the same conditions, 
for a novelty scoring not less than 85 points. 

A certificate of merit is to be awarded to all novelties scoring 80 points. 

RETAIL FLORISTS' EXHIBITS 
To be staged Thursday, March 30th 

The most artistic display, with such accessories as the exhibitor may desire. 

Class 

724. Corsage bouquet of Roses. 

First Prize, Silver Cup, (Value $15.00). Second Prize, $10.00. 

First Prize offered by Charles Henry Fox, Philadelphia, Pa. 

725. Bridal bouquet of Roses. First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

First Prize offered by Geo. B. Hart, Rochester, N. Y. 

726. Basket bouquet of Roses. First Prize, $25.00. Second Prize, $15.00. 

First Prize offered by H. Bayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

727. Table Decoration of Roses. First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00 

First Prize offered by M. Rice Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

728. Mantel Decoration of Roses. 

First Prize, $50.00. Second Prize, $25.00. 

729. Best bouquet of Miniature Roses. 

Prize, Leather Traveling Bag, (Value $15.00). 

Offered by M. Heller, South Park Floral Co., New Castle, Ind. 

BEST DISPLAY OF CUT ROSES 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 
To be staged Thursday, March 30th 

730. Best display of cut Roses covering 200 sq. ft. of space, and to contain not 

less than 500 nor more than 1000 blooms. Quality of bloom, artistic 
arrangement and general effect to be considered in making awards. 
Decorative green of any kind, including plants, permitted. 

First Prize, $250. Second, $150. Third, $100. 



ii6 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



SECTION Q 

CARNATIONS 

The schedule covering this section is prepared by The American 
Carnation Society and the exhibits are under its 
supervision, this being the "Jubilee 
Exhibition" of the Society 

THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY'S SCALE OF POINTS 

This scale will be employed in judging new varieties, and in all cases where 
competition is close, to arrive at a decision. 

Color 25 Substance 15 

Size 20 Form 10 

Calyx 5 Fragance 5 

Stem 20 

Total lop 

CARNATIONS 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS 
To be staged Tuesday, March 28th 

Open to all varieties, seedlings and standard sorts. 

Class 

735. Vase 100 blooms white. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by The Leo Niessen Co., Philadelphia 

736. Vase 100 blooms flesh pink, being those shades of flesh or salmon color. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by J. F. Ammann, Edwardsville, III. 

737. Vase 100 blooms light pink, being those shades of pink verging on the true 

pink, not lighter than Gloriosa and not as dark as ]Mrs. C. W. Ward. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by W. J. & M. S. Vesey, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

738. Vase 100 blooms dark pink, being those shades known as dark pink or 

cerise and not lighter than Mrs. C. W. Ward. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, N. Y. 

739. Vase 100 blooms red or scarlet, to include all shades generally included in 

those colors. 

First Prize, S15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, N. Y. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 117 

SECTION Q — Schedule of the American Carnation Society. 

Commercial Growers — (Continued) 

Class 

740. Vase 100 blooms crimson, to include all shades known as crimson or ma- 

roon. First Prize, Si 5.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Wm. Nicholson, Framingham, Mass. 

741. Vase 100 blooms variegated. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Baur & Steinkamp, Indianapolis, Ind. 

742. Vase TOO blooms any other color, to include any color decidedly distinct 

from those speciiied abo\e. 

First Prize, $15.00. Second Prize, $10.00. 

Prizes offered by Bassett & Washburn, Chicago, 111. 

SWEEPSTAKES 

The American Carnation Society's silver medal will be awarded to the 
best vase shown in the above section. The bronze medal will be awarded to 
the second best vase shown. 

Open to all varieties disseminated prior to July, 191 5. Fifty blooms to be 
shown of each variety. 

743. White Wonder. First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by F. Dorner & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 

744. Any other white. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

745. Enchantress Supreme. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by F. Dorner & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 

746. Any other flesh pink. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by F. Dorner & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 

747. Gloriosa. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by F. Dorner & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 

748. Any other light pink. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

749. Mrs. C. W. Ward. 

First Prize, S6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by Fred H. Lemon, Richmond, Ind. 

750. Any other dark pink. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

Prizes offered by Guttman & Raynor, New York 



ii8 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



SECTION Q — Schedule of the American Carnation Society. 

Commercial Growers — (Continued) 
Class 

751. Beacon. First Prize, S6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

752. Any other scarlet. 

First Prize, S6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

753. Pocahontas. 

First Prize, S6.00. Second Prize, $4. 00. 

754. Any other crimson. 

First Prize, S6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

First Prize offered by F. Lautenschlager, Chicago, 111. 

755. Benora. 

First Prize, §6. 00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

756. Any other white variegated. 

First Prize, $6.00. Second Prize, S4.00. 

757. Any yellow or yellow variegated. 

First Prize. S6.00. Second Prize, S4.00. 

758. Any other color, decidedly distinct from the colors specified above. 

First Prize, S6.00. Second Prize, $4.00. 

759. 12 largest Carnation blooms, one or more varieties, to be determined by 

the Kroeschell ^Measuring Card. 

Prize, the Kroeschell Gold Medal (Valued at S50.00). 

Offered by Kroeschell Bros. Co., Chicago, III. 

To be staged Friday, March 31st 

760. Best display of Carnation blooms, covering 150 sq. ft. of space and to 

contain not less than 1000. nor more than 1500 blooms. Decorative 
greens, including plants. wiU be permitted. Quality of blooms, 
artistic arrangement and general effect will be considered in making 
the awards. 

First Prize, S200.00. Second, Si 50.00. Third, Sioo.oo. 

First prize offered by E. G. Hill Co., Richmond, Ind.; W. E. Lenk, Halifax, 
Mass.; "Strouts," Biddeford, Me.; S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Ernest Saunders, Lewiston, Me.; S. J. Goddard, Framingham, Mass.; J. D. 
Thompson Carnation Co., Joliet, 111.; and Peter Fisher, Ellis, Mass. 

Second prize offered by Fred. Burki, Gibsonia, Pa., and others. 



761. Best vase of Carnations, not to exceed 300 blooms. One or more varieties 
may be used. It is intended to give the exhibitor the widest latitude 
in making his display. Decorative greens of any kind including rib- 
bons, or any other accessories may be used as long as the Carnations 
are the predominant feature. Vase to be supplied by the exhibitor. 
Quality of blooms, artistic arrangement and general effect to be con- 
sidered in making the awards. 

First Prize, S50.00. Second, S35.00. Third, S15.00. 

First Prize offered by Eugene Dailledouze, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW i_i9 

SECTION Q— Schedule of the American Carnation Society. 
Commercial Growers — (Continued) 

SPECIAL 

The x'Xmerican Carnation Society's special "SiUer Jubilee" medal will be 
awarded to each winner of one or more first premiums in the foregoing classes. 

RETAIL FLORISTS' EXHIBITS 
To be staged Friday, March 31st 

TABLE DECORATIONS 

Class 

762. Carnations shall be the principal flower used, but any kind of flowers or 

plants, cut or in pots, may be used as accessories. Color harmony, 
adaptability, equality of stock, detail and general effect shall each 
carry equal importance in making the awards. Tables will be sup- 
plied by the management, accessories by the exhibitor. 

$50.00 will be awarded to each table scoring not less than 90 points. 
$40.00 will be awarded to each table scoring not less than 80 points. 
$30.00 will be awarded to each table scoring not less than 70 points. 

Only six entries will be accepted in this class. 

BASKET ARRANGEMENTS 

763. Carnations shall be the principal flower used, but any kind of cut flower 

or foliage may be used as accessories, in the Retailers' Sections, and 
only the regulation display cards as prescribed by the management 
will be permitted on the displays. 

$25.00 will be awarded to each arrangement scoring not less than 90 points. 
$20.00 will be awarded to each arrangement scoring not less than 80 points. 
$15.00 will be awarded to each arrangement scoring not less than 70 points. 

Only six entries will be accepted in this class. 

Immediately following the judging, the secretary will remove the entry 
cards from all the exhibits in classes in the Retailers' Section, and only the regu- 
lation display cards as prescribed by the management will be permitted on the 
displays. 

SECTION R 

AQUATICS 

OPEN TO ALL 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Special. Best display of Aquatics, to cover 100 sq. ft. Exhibitors to furnish 
all accessories. 

Prize: The Foley Silver Cup, (Value $50.00). 

Prize offered by the Foley Manufacturing Co., Chicago, III. 
Grand Prize S. A. F. O. H. Gold Medal 



120 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SECTION R — Aquarium Exhibit — (Continued) 

AQUARIUM EXHIBIT 

To be staged Saturday, March 25th 

Committee 

Franklin Barrett, Chairman 

William T. Innes, Jr. Hiram Parker Harry Peters 

Dr. Herman Burgin Robert Schaeffer William Peck 

Walter Lee Rosentberger 

PRIZES 
Grand Prize. Largest and best exhibit. 
Silver Cup. Most artistically arranged aquarium. 
Ribbon. 2d artistically arranged aquarium. 
Ribbon. 3d artistically arranged aquarium. 
Silver Cup. Most artistically arranged terrarium. 
Ribbon. 2d artistically arranged terrarium. 
Ribbon. 3d artistically arranged terrarium. 



Class LION HEADS 

800. Silver Cup. Best Lion Head, Scaled. 
Ribbon. 2d Lion Head, Scaled. 
Ribbon. 3d Lion Head, Scaled. 

801. Silver Cup. Best Lion Head, Scaleless. 
Ribbon. 2d Lion Head, Scaleless. 
Ribbon. 3d Lion Head, Scaleless. 

GRAND AS 

802. Silver Cup. Best Oranda, Scaled. 
Ribbon. 2d Oranda, Scaled. 
Ribbon. 3d Oranda, Scaled. 

803. Silver Cup. Best Oranda, Scaleless. 
Ribbon. 2d Oranda, Scaleless. 
Ribbon. 3d Oranda, Scaleless. 

CELESTIAL TELESCOPES 

804. Silver Cup. Best Celestial, Scaled. 
Ribbon. 2d Celestial, Scaled. 
Ribbon. 3d Celestial, Scaled. 

TELESCOPES 

805. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Telescope, Veiltail. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 121 

SECTION R— Aquarium Exhibit— (Continued) 

Ql^^^ TELESCOPES— (Continued) 

806. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Telescope, Veiltail. 

807. Silver Cup. Best Black Telescope, Veiltail. 
Riljbon. 2d Black Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Black Telescope, Veiltail. 

808. Silver Cup. Best Calico Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Telescope, Veiltail. 

8og. Silver Cup. Best Blue Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Telescope, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Telescope, Veiltail. 

810. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Telescope, Ribbontail. 

811. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Telescope, Ribbontail. 

812. Silver Cup. Best Black Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Black Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Black Telescope, Ribbontail. 

813. Silver Cup. Best Calico Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Telescope, Ribbontail. 

814. Silver Cup. Best Blue Telescope, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Telescope, Ribbontail 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Telescope, Ribbontail. 

JAPS 

815. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Jap, Veiltail. 

816. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Jap, Veiltail. 

817. Silver Cup. Best Calico Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Jap, Veiltail. 

818. Silver Cup. Best Blue Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Jap, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Jap, Veiltail. 

819. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Jap, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Jap, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Jap, Ribbontail. 



122 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SECTION R — Aquarium Exhibit — (Continued) 

Qg^g JAPS — (Continued) 

820. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Jap. Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Jap. Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Jap. Ribbontail. 

821. Silver Cup. Best Calico Jap, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Jap, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Jap. Ribbontail. 

822. Silver Cup. Best Blue Jap, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Jap, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Jap, Ribbontail. 

ny:\iphs 

823. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Nymph. Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Nymph, Veiltail. 

824. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless N^Tnph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless N\Tnph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless N}Tnph, Veiltail. 

825. Silver Cup. Best Calico Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Nymph. \'eiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Nymph, Veiltail. 

826. Silver Cup. Best Blue Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Nymph. \>iltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Nymph. Veiltail. 

827. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Nymph. Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Nymph, Ribbontail. 

828. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless N>-mph. Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless N^-mph, Ribbontail. 

829. Silver Cup. Best Calico N}-mph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico N^Tnph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Nymph, Ribbontail. 

830. Silver Cup. Best Blue Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Nymph. Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Nymph. Ribbontail. 

TELESCOPE NI'MPHS 

831. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Tel. Nymph, \'eiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Tel. N>Tnph, \'eiltail. 

832. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Tel. NA-mph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Tel. Nymph, ^'eiltail. 



lOliRrii NATIONAL I'l.OVVER SiloW 123 

SECTION R — Aquarium Exhibit — (Continued) 

QY^^^ TELESCOPE NYMPHS— (Continued) 

833. Silver Cup. Best Calico Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 
Rihl^on. 2cl Calico Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 

834. Silver Cup. Best Blue Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Tel. Nymph, Veiltail. 

835. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 

836. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 

837. Silver Cup. Best Calico Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 

838. Silver Cup. Best Blue Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Tel. Nymph, Ribbontail. 

COMETS 

839. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Comet, Veiltail. 

840. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Comet, Veiltail. 

841. Silver Cup. Best Calico Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Calico Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Comet, Veiltail. 

842. Silver Cup. Best Blue Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Comet, Veiltail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Comet, Veiltail. 

843. Silver Cup. Best Scaled Comet, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaled Comet, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaled Comet, Ribbontail. 

844. Silver Cup. Best Scaleless Comet, Ribbonlail. 
Ribbon. 2d Scaleless Comet, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Scaleless Comet, Ribbontail. 

845. Silver Cup. Best Calico Comet, Ril)b()ntail. 
Ribbon. 2(1 Calico Comet, Ribl)onlail. 
Ribbon. 3d Calico Comet, Ribbontail. 

846. SiKer Cup. Best Blue Comet, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 2d Blue Comet, Ribbontail. 
Ribbon. 3d Blue Comet, Riblionlail. 



124 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SECTION R— Aquarium Exhibit— (Continued) 

Ql^.^ TAILLESS JAPS 

847. Silver Cup. Best Tailless Jap. 
Ribbon. 2d Tailless Jap. 
Ribbon. 3d Tailless Jap. 

848. Silver Cup. Four best Lion Heads. 

849. Silver Cup. Four best Orandas. 

850. SUver Cup. Four best Celestials. 

851. Silver Cup. Four best Scaled Telescope Veiltails. 

852. SUver Cup. Four best Scaleless Tel. VeiltaUs. 

853. Silver Cup. Four best Black Telescope Veiltails. 

854. Silver Cup. Four best Calico Telescope Veiltails. 

855. Silver Cup. Four best Blue Telescope \'eiltails. 

856. Silver Cup. Four best Scaled Jap Veiltails. 

857. Silver Cup. Four best Scaleless Jap Veiltails. 

858. Silver Cup. Four best CaUco Jap Veiltails. 

859. Silver Cup. Four best Blue Jap Veiltails. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Telescopes. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Japs. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of N}-mphs. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Comets. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Lion Heads. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Orandas. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Celestials. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Shubunkins. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Wild Fish. 
Silver Cup. Largest and best exhibit of Tropical Fish. 



PRIMA DONNA 

SEE IT GROW IN OUR HOUSES 



THE BEST MONEY-MAKER 

WE HAVE EVER GROWN 



mmmm 



THE FLOREX GARDENS, rose growers 

NORTH WALES, PA. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 125 

SPECIAL CUPS 

1. Silver Cup, presented by Franklin Barrett, for the Fish scoring the highest 

number of points. 

2. Silver Cup, presented by Dr. William Peck, for the best yearling Black 

Telescope. 

3. Silver Cup, presented by Jacob Hope, for the longest tail Comet. 

4. Silver Cup, presented by Jacob Cassel, for the best collection of Blue 

Shubunkins. 

5. Silver Cup, presented by Jacob Cassel, for the best collection of yearling 

Telescopes. 

6. Silver Cup, presented by Cugley & Mullen, for the best arranged 24-inch 

aquarium for house ornamentation. 

7. Silver Cup, presented by Cugley & Mullen, for the best American-bred 

Scaleless Fringetail. 

8. Silver Cup, presented by the Germantown Horticultural Society, for 

aquarium showing best plant life. 

9. Silver Cup, presented by Dr. Herman Burgin, for the best yearling Calico 

Telescope. 

10. Silver Cup, presented by L. J. Staunton, for the best yearling Jap. 



STAGING DAYS 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25 

Classes to be Staged Are 

Plants in Flower — Private Growers. Nos. i to 65 inclusive. 
Cut Flowers — Private Growers. Nos. 66, 67. 

Palms and Foliage Plants — ^Private Growers. Nos. 75 to 102 inclusive. 
Ferns and Selaginellas — Private Growers. Nos. no to 124 inclusive. 
Orchids, Plants— Private Growers. Nos. 130 to 149 inclusive. 
Bulbs, in Flower — Private Growers. Nos. 160 to 234 inclusive. 
Roses in Pots and Tubs — Private Growers. Nos. 250 to 263 inclusive. 
Flowering Plants — Open Classes. Nos. 320 to 327 inclusive. 



126 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

STAGING DAYS— (Continued) 

Cut Flowers — Open Classes. Nos. 340 to 391 inclusive. 

Gladioli. Nos. 400 to 418 inclusive. 

Plants in Flower — Commercial Growers. Nos. 500 to 537 inclusive. 

Bulbs in Flower — Commercial Growers. Nos. 550 to 557. 

Ferns and Selaginellas — Commercial Growers. Nos. 560 to 567. 

Orchids, Plants — Commercial Growers. Nos. 570 to 589. 

Palms and Foliage Plants — Commercial Growers. Nos. 600 to 626. 

Roses in Pots and Tubs — Commercial Growers. Nos. 650 to 665. 

Aquatics — Special Class. 

Aquarium Exhibits — Nos. 800 to 859 inclusive. 



MONDAY, MARCH 27 

Roses, Cut — Private Growers. Nos. 264 to 285 inclusive. 
Roses, Cut^Comraercial Growers. Nos. 670 to 723 inclusive. 



TUESDAY, MARCH 28 

Carnations — Commercial Growers. Nos. 735 to 759 inclusive. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29 

Sweet Peas — Nos. 425 to 458 inclusive. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 30 

Retail Florists' Rose Exhibits. Nos. 724 to 729. 
Display of Cut Roses — Commercial Growers. No. 730. 



FRIDAY, MARCH 31 

Carnations — Private Growers. Nos. 300 to 308 inclusive. 
Display of Carnations — Commercial Growers. Nos. 760 and 761. 
Retail Florists' Carnation Exhibits — Nos. 762 and 763. 



P'OURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 127 



FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

The Florists' Telegraph Delivery is an organized section of the Societ\' of 
American Florists composed of florists in different cities and communities who, 
through their organization, make possible the interchange of orders by wire 
covering the delivery of flowers and floral designs in their respective localities. 
For instance: a person in Philadelphia may desire to have presented at a 
New York address a floral birthday offering. The order is placed with a 
Philadelphia member of the organization, who transfers it to a New York 
member, who makes prompt delivery in accordance with instructions. Dis- 
tance is no object, a New York-San Francisco transaction being equally simple. 
The only additional charge for the service is the actual cost of the telegraphed 
message, and this is kept at the minimum through the use of a telegraph code 
in the possession of all members. 

The members of the organization are all reputable business men, and a 
patron can rely on the fulfilment of an order in a manner as satisfactory as 
though it were to be actually executed by the florist at first hand. 

OFFICERS 

President, Irwin Bertermann, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Vice-President, W. F. Gude, Washington, D. C. 
Treasurer, W. L. Rock, Kansas City, Mo. 
Secretary, Albert Pochelon, Detroit, Mich. 



AMERICAN DAHLIA SOCIETY 

This Society was organized in New York on May lo, 1915, and by the 
close of the year its membership roll carried about 200 names. The objects of 
the Society are : To stimulate interest in, and promote the culture and develop- 
ment of the Dahlia; to establish a standard nomenclature; to test out new 
varieties, and to give them such recognition as they deserve; to study the 
diseases of the Dahlia and find remedies for same, and to disseminate informa- 
tion relating to the flower; to secure uniformity in awarding prizes at flower 
shows, and to give exhibitions where deemed desirable. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
GARDENERS 

This Association has been in existence for some years. In 191 1 it became 
incorporated under the laws of the State of New Jersey, since which time it has 
greatly increased its membership, and is now a strong factor in the aff'airs of 
horticulture and floriculture in this country. The object of the Association is 
to elevate the profession of gardening, to arouse a greater interest in horticulture 
and floriculture, and to develop a closer relationship between the estate owner 
and the gardener. 



128 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



THE FLORISTS' CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA 

This Club was organized on October 5th, 1886. 

For a year previous there had been a temporary organization to prepare 
to entertain members of the Society of American Florists at their Annual 
Convention to be held August, 1886. 

After the Convention, there being quite a sum of money left over, and as 
the meetings of the temporary organization had such a good influence on all 
concerned, the organization was made permanent. In the resolutions pertaining 
to the permanent organization are these words: "This Club as a permanent 
organization is destined to be of great service to the Society of American Florists 
and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society." The first officers were: 

Robert Craig, President, 
Chas. D. Ball, Vice-President, 
Thomas Cartledge, Treasurer, 
Edwin Lonsdale, Secretary. 

The Club decided at its inception not to hold exhibitions or offer prizes, 
leaving these entirely to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. And in 
return for the assistance given, and in recognition of the work of the members 
of the Club, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society provided the Florists' 
Club with a Club Room in the basement of Horticultural Hall. 

The Florists' Club has been a very successful organization and has done 
much to distribute knowledge of Horticultural subjects. As from the start 
of the Club, it has been the custom to have some one prominent in the pro- 
fession to give an essay at each meeting. 

The Club has a membership of 320. The officers for 19 16 are: 

Geo. Burton, President, 

John C. Gracey, Vice-President, 

George Craig, Treasurer, 

David Rust, Secretary. 



California Privet and 

Berberis Thunbergii 

Largest growler in the country. Can supply you with any quantity 

or grade you wish. Stock first class in every particular. 

Do not fail to get my prices, it will pay you. 

C. A. BENNETT, ^^:^X^: Robbinsville, N. J. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



129 




ASPLENUM NIDUS AVIS 



ASPLENUM NIDUS AVIS 

THE BIRD'S NEST FERN 
BY J. W. P. 

One of the most beautiful Ferns adapted to house culture is the Bird's 
Nest Fern, Asplenum nidus avis. The fronds or leaves are produced around 
the center of the plant. Now the center is filled with a fibrous substance re- 
sembling very much a nest through which the young fronds unfold, looking 
as they first appear, like the eggs in the nest. While the plant was brought from 
India as long ago as 1820, it is only in later years that it is grown in quantity 
for the European markets, and still more recently for the American. It is 
now becoming known as one of the best plants for the home, growing well 
vmder adverse conditions and retaining its own peculiar beauty a long time. 
The Bird's Nest Fern can readily be distinguished from all other Ferns by its 
beautiful light green undivided leaves, which on full-grown specimens are from 
two feet to four feet long and from three inches to eight inches broad, making 
an altogether beautiful plant, but one that must be seen to be appreciated. 



130 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



LECTURERS 




ARTHUR COWEE, BERLIN, N. Y. 

SUBJECT: •■GLADIOLI"; APRIL 1. See Page 31 




E. I. WILDE. STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

SUBJECT: "BULBS FOR SUMMER BLOOM": APRIL 1. See Page 31 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



131 




SUNBURST ROSE 



ROSES IN THE LANDSCAPE* 

BY CHARLES DOWNING LAY 

Editor "Landscape Architecture" 

When I tell people that I propose to plant roses near the house or along 
the drives it is often hard to make them see what I mean, for roses are to most 
people objects for personal adornment or for table embellishment. 

* It has been assumed that the rose outdoors is a garden plant only, and in catalogues or 
books treating of landscape effect it is usual to find the statement that the rose is not useful in 
the shrubbery or the border. As a landscape architect in active practice, and treating the rose 
wholly on its merits, Mr. Lay here shows an unsuspected value for it. It may not be amiss to 
say that certain of the newer climbers with persistent foliage form splendid objects in the 
border with but a little training, while the rugosas have also a definite shrub value when 
properly placed. — Editor American Rose Annual. 



132 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

The Hybrid Perpetuals, Teas, and other garden types are indeed of little 
value or interest except in the house, for if the flowers are left outdoors they 
open too fast and too far, and soon wilt and fade in the sun. The growth, too, 
is either puny and thin, or tall and spindling, and the foliage has little beauty. 
They have been so bred for flowers that their appearance as a whole has suffered. 

It is different, however, with the common roses of the thickets, which have 
mostly been neglected by the rosarian and the hybridizer, and which retain 
the simple delicacy of single flowers together with the rugged constitution which 
means thrifty growth and pleasing foliage. These common wild roses can be 
used with other shrubs in any thicket, or they may be planted in masses, each 
variety by itself, or several varieties may be associated in a plantation. They 
fruit abundantly, and the haws are of considerable beauty and interest in the 
winter landscape. This is a matter of great importance, for the shrubbery 
in winter should be as beautiful though less showy than in summer. Indeed, 
I often think our native shrubs are more beautiful in winter, when the brilliant 
luxuriance of full foliage has given place to the more subtle hues of the bare 
branches. These bare branches are full of delicate misty colors when seen 
in mass, and these colors have a wide range, from pale green to rusty greens, 
bronzy reds, and quiet crimson. 

The roses show remarkable variation in height and in habit of growth, 
so that they can be used in many different situations. They are easy to suit 
as to soil, and can be grown along meadow streams, on rocky hillsides, or on 
the sandy beach, often appearing voluntarily where few other plants will live. 

Their use in the landscape is important, for the native varieties are char- 
acteristic of much of our eastern scenery, and when planted in quantities they 
give that appearance of natural wildness which is more and more coming to be 
the ideal in parks and country places. 

The wild roses, as they must continue to be called to distinguish them from 
the hybrids, are found in New England pastures associated with bayberry, red 
cedar, elder, arrow-wood and other shrubs of the fields. Along the coast they 
are commonly found in such desert places as support the beach plum, bayberry, 
goldenrod and beach-grass. They gain from association with these wild 
neighbors. They are especially useful for holding steep and rocky banks, since 
their stolons grow in every direction and form a perfect mass of shoots and roots 
which hold leaves and soil. 

I doubt if any shrub makes as good a cover for birds, winter or summer. 
They are difl&cult for cats to penetrate, and a thicket of Rosa multi flora and R. 
setigera is impassable for man or boy. The rose thicket needs no care when well 
started, except to cut out seedling trees which may appear. In fact, they are 
so thorny that care of the ordinary sort is impossible, and even the most 
Teutonic gardeners will cease in disgust their efforts to mutilate a rose shrub- 
bery'. 

The wild roses cannot be tamed; they will never make good specimens for 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 133 

the lawn, and planted with such sophisticated things as Hydrangea paniculata 
grandiflora they will either succumb or smother the hydrangea. Viburnum, 
barberry, sumac, witch-hazel, hazelnut and other shrubs of the fields they will 
endure and live peaceably with, and sometimes a specimen or two of Forsythia 
is not amiss. 

Along the coast, whether rocky or sandy, Rosa lucida is probably the best. 
Under these hard conditions it may be only a few inches high, but it will bloom, 
hold the falling leaves and the drifting sand, and gradually by its mere presence 
ameliorate the conditions. On the rocks also it may be dwarfed, but it will still 
bloom and prevent washing of soil. 

In wet meadows, Rosa Carolina will probably be best, growing tall and 
strong, and showing its head above the elder, the blackberry and the viburnums. 
The plants can be used in any naturalesque landscape, even close to the house 
or the terrace walls, if the intention be to bring the naturalesque landscape 
to the boundaries of the kept grounds, thus making it appear that a site nat- 
urally adapted for the house was utilized. 

Their season of bloom stretches over a long period, and if native and 
foreign roses are used together the plantation will have color in spots for si.x 
weeks or so. This mixture of varieties has great advantages for the roses, for 
they seem to help each other, the good foliage of one hiding the thinness of its 
neighbor's dress. Such a combination of varieties prevents overdoing the 
rose color which in too large masses is always tiresome in the landscape. 

There are fifty varieties of roses described in the 1900 edition of Bailey's 
"Cyclopedia of American Horticulture," some of them probably being of little 
value. Among the most useful for general landscape planting are the following: 

Rosa hlanda. Height 2 to 4 feet. The earliest to bloom of the native 
species, and the handsomest 'n winter. The branches are smooth, shiny and 
deep red. 

Rosa Carolina. Height i to 8 feet. Prefers swampy and wet ground. 

Rosa cinnamomea. Height 3 to 4 feet. The common Cinnamon rose of 
old gardens. Like the lilac, it outlasts many houses, and is frequently found 
around old cellars growing in the grass. The flower is small, semi-double, pink, 
fragrant. It increases by stolons and can be used with our native wild roses or 
with other shrubs. 

Rosa damascena. Height 3 to 4 feet. The old Damask rose. It is rather 
pleasing with other roses or in the shrubbery where its foliage is not much seen. 
Rather large, double, fragrant flower. 

Rosa humilis. Height 6 inches 6 feet. The common wild rose of the in- 
terior, and the least interesting of the native roses. 

Rosa lucida. Height 4 feet. The common rose of the northeastern coast. 
Pale pink flowers; thick-lustrous leaves, reddish stems and plentiful spines. 

Rosa lucida alba. Height 4 feet. White-flowered form of the above; has 
greenish branches. 



134 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

Rosa muUiflora. Height 15 feet. Forms a roundish dense shrub when 
growTi alone. It vdW climb on trees or other shrubs. It has clusters of small 
white flowers with yellow stamens, a delicious spicy fragrance, and small red 
or orange fruits. It is very spiny, and makes an impenetrable thicket. 

Rosa nitida. Height 2 feet. Called our most beautiful native rose. 
Short stems, covered wdth bright red prickles. Always dwarf. The flowers 
are darker than the other natives. Useful for steep banks, or in the front of a 
bed of other roses. 

Rosa rubiginosa. The Sweetbrier. This should be planted singly, wdth 
other tall roses such as multiflora or setigera, as its foHage is not very good 
although the variety is indispensable because of the fragrance of the new shoots. 

The Lord Penzance Hybrids of the Sweetbrier are charming plants with 
exquisite salmon, pink and coppery single blossoms. These, too, should be 
planted sparingly in every rose thicket. 

Rosa ruhrifolia (R. ferruginea) . Height 6 to 7 feet. Is useful because of 
the reddish tinge of its foliage. It is not a strong grower, and should be planted 
with other roses. The flowers are small, wdth a delicate sort of beauty and an 
unusual pink color. The haws are good. 

Rosa rugosa. Height 6 feet. A trifle exotic in appearance because of its 
rough, dark green, shiny foliage. Stems are thickly covered with gray prickles. 
Flowers large, single, in some seedlings an ugly shade of rose, followed by large 
orange or red haws. The hybrids of this rose are better in flower and foliage 
and look less exotic, particularly Mme Georges Bruant and Arnoldiana. 

Rosa setigera. The Prairie rose. Height 4 to 6 feet. Large single flowers 
in clusters, opening one at a time. Gracefully arching branches. The foliage is 
good, and turns dark bronzy red in the fall. It can be planted with other roses, 
or in masses by itself back of lower roses, such as nitida or even Wichuraiana. 

Rosa Wichuraiana. Trailing over the ground and growing shoots perhaps 
10 to 1 2 feet long. This, unhappily called the " Memorial rose, " has the flower 
and habit of a sublimated dewberry. Its green spiny stems with spiny leaves 
sprawl over the ground and are happier so than when on a support. The 
flowers are pure white with a large circle of yellow stamens and are followed by 
interesting fruit. It will grow over banks, over rocks, hang down on stone walls 
and persists even in the grass. The hybrids of this rose are numerous and 
include many of upright growth, such as W. C. Egan and Lady Duncan, which 
can be planted singly among other roses, though it must not be forgotten that 
these roses when in bloom have as yet a somewhat strange look in wild places 
and are likely to give an over-dressed appearance, especially when used too 
generously (as they have been along railroad embankments). Notable 
among these hybrids are Sargent, called one of the handsomest roses that has 
been raised in the United States. Jennie Dawson is probably the best white. 

The wild rosarian, as he might be called, will be interested in trying some 
of the oriental roses recently established in the Arnold Arboretum. Some of 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 135 

these whicli promise to be most valuable because of their color (especially the 
whites) and habit are 

Rosa caudata. From western China. Pink flowers 2 inches in diameter 
in large clusters; fruit orange-red, i inch long. Perfectly hardy. 

Rosa HelencE. Height 5 to 6 feet. Flowers white, i]4 inches in diameter 
in clusters; fragrant. 

Rosa Hugonis. From Western China. Clear yellow single flowers and 
neat pale foliage.* 

Rosa Jackii. From Korea. Flowers white, 2 inches in diameter, in clus- 
ters; lustrous foliage. 

Rosa miiUibracteata. Innumerable small pink solitary flowers. One of 
the last Chinese roses to bloom. 

Rosa setipoda. Large vigorous shrub with broad, many-flowered clusters 
of dark pink flowers. 

Rosa spinosissima var. altaica. Tall, wide bush. Numerous, large, single, 
white flowers, faintly tinged with yellow. 

It would be difflcult to imagine a more lovely plantation than a long thicket 
of our native roses, bordering a road for instance, beginning with nitida in 
front, then blanda, lucida and lucida alba; these in turn broken by masses of 
multiflora interspersed with setigera, rubiginosa, rubrifolia, etc. The w^hole to 
be backed up by other families of the rose order, such as the native hawthorns, 
plum, flowering cherries and flowering apples. This would not be without some 
bloom from the time of the earliest plum blossom to the last blow of the setigera, 
for probably three months or more; and such a planting can not be surpassed 
in delicacy of autumn and winter beauty. 

* Referred to with much interest elsewhere in the Annual, particularly by Dr. Van Fleet 
and Mr. E. H. Wilson. — Editor American Rose Annual. 



THE VIOLIN RUBBER 

(FICUS PANDURATA) 

BY ROBERT KIFT 

Do you know this uniciue plant? It belongs to the rubber family. Its 
given name is Pandurata, which means "lyre-shaped," its large leaves being al- 
most exactly the shape of a violin. With its dark green foliage strikingly 
marked with white cord-like veins, it is one of the most decorative house plants. 
This city will be afforded an opportunity at the National Flower Show to see 
the grandest collection of plants and cut flowers ever brought together in this 
country. Convention Hall, the largest building in the United States, will be 
taxed to its utmost to house this great display. 



136 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




CYTISUS RACEMOSUS 



FOURTH NATIONAL FL0WP:R SHOW 137 

CYTISUS RACEMOSUS 

THE GOLDEN BROOM 

BY ROBERT KIFT 

This wonderfully beautiful flowering plant, with its clouds of yellow blos- 
soms, is most conspicuous in all groups of Easter plants, at which season it is 
seen in all its glory. Being of rapid growth its pliable branches can be trimmed 
to any form. In its natural bush form with every branch full of flowers, it is 
a golden glow; it can be trimmed to a perfect globe in shape and presents the 
appearance of a gilded ball. The illustration shows a standard form. The 
stem of this plant is allowed to grow to the desired height, the lower shoots 
being removed to provide for a straight center stem; when the desired height is 
reached the end of the shoot is "pinched" or removed, which causes it to 
branch out from the next lower buds. These in turn are "pinched" until finally 
there is a heavy head of branches which are trimmed to a round head and which 
produce quantities of their golden tassel-like blossoms. 

Splendid examples of this beautiful plant will be seen at the great National 
Flower Show, to be held in Convention Hall beginning March 28th and open 
every day and evening until April 2nd. Twenty-five thousand dollars in prizes 
is offered, and florists from all the large Eastern cities will send their best 
plants to compete for the large offerings. 

A MOST MERITORIOUS VINE 

BY ADOLPH MtJLLER 

By far the most superior vine now growing and known is the Evergeen 
Bittersweet {Euonymus vegetus). 

This plant keeps its leaves in perfect green color all through the winter and 
spring months and the summer season, and is most conspicuous in the fall and 
winter months, when its rich dark foliage is covered and decorated as it were 
with many clusters of scarlet berries. This red among the green gives the 
whole plant an effect of rare distinction that no other vine possesses. It is 
indeed a rare plant and one that will receive a world-wide popularity once 
the public can see it in use. 

What to the eye of the traveler can be more beautifully entrancing than to 
see a railroad embankment covered with these vines? Any exposure is right 
for them — either the north, south, west or east. Good subjects to plant against 
are garden walls of brick or stone, trellises, fences, terraces, old trees and any- 
thing a vine can grow upon. 

It is perfectly hardy and without question the most Ijcautiful decorative 
vine ever planted. 



138 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 




EUONYMUS VEGETUS 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



139 




HO OSIER BEAUTY ROSE 



THE AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY— ITS 
AIMS AND PURPOSES 

BY S. S. PENNOCK, President 

This Society was organized in New York under auspicious circumstances 
in March, 1899, with the object of increasing pubUc interest in the Queen of 
Flowers. From the by-laws then adopted are presented the purposes of the 
organization. 

1. To increase Ihe general interest in the cultivation and improve the standard of excel- 
lence of the Rose for all the people. 

2. To foster, stimulate and increase the production in every possible wa}- of imjiroved 
varieties of the Rose, suitable to our American climate and requirements. 

3. To organize a system of exhibitions at such times and places as this society nia>', 
from time to time, decide on; to offer prizes of money, of gold, silver, and bronze medals, and 



140 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

certificates of merit for meritorious new varieties of Roses; also to offer prizes of money, cups, 
etc., for excellence of exhibits made at shows held by the Society. 

It is also proposed that the Societj' disseminate to its members the latest information 
pertaining to the Rose, recommending new varieties of undoubted merit, best methods of 
culture, how to fight insect and fungoid pests, the proper use of manures, and other informa- 
tion from the pens of leading experts that, especially to amateurs, will be worth many times 
the cost of membership. 

Since then the Society has grown and prospered, until today we have a 
membership comprising most of the leaders in rose-growing, both in a pro- 
fessional and an amateur way. 

To help each member, whether professional or amateur, is the aim of the 
Society. We desire to disseminate useful literature, and in every way to pro- 
mote rose-groTving, either under glass or in the open. We seek to provide rose 
information from the pens of the best wTiters in the country — information that 
will cover every phase of the subject. 

We cherish the hope that we can eventually gi\-e our members help of at 
least as much real value as that supplied in England by the National Rose 
Society, which sends out literature that is invaluable to its members. With this 
object in view, we have this year undertaken to publish the annual Bulletin 
with a much broader scope than heretofore, and, of course, at more cost. It is 
planned to make it a reference book of value, as well as to present interesting 
rose reading; to have it, in truth, The American Rose Armual. 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the American Rose Society 
held in Philadelphia during the summer of 19 15, this matter of improving our 
publications was discussed with Mr. J. Horace McFarland, of Harrisburg, Pa., 
who kindly consented to help us, in agreeing for three years to act without com- 
pensation as editor of this Annual. In thus placing the matter in his hands, 
we have had the satisfaction of believing that he would carry the work through 
with ability, giving the commercial and amateur lovers of roses a book of 
interest. 

This first American Rose Annual, succeeding the Annual Bulletins which 
have been so capably handled by our indefatigable Secretary, Mr. Benjamin 
Hammond, is therefore offered as an earnest of the intentions of the American 
Rose Society. 

For a number of years the society has worked mostly on commercial lines, 
and as such it has probably heretofore appealed more strongly to the com- 
mercial man than to the amateur. The commercial rose industry of this 
country is a large industry, and it serves to set most exacting standards of 
rose attainment. Yet the amateur has not been lost sight of. He is a more 
important factor of rose progress each year. Not only does he benefit and 
inspire the commercial man, but he is popularizing the rose as no other means 
can or will. 

It is to the amateur I feel we must look, as the years go by, to increase the 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW ija 

love for and the knowledge of roses. He will spur on the commercial grower 
to bring his productions nearer perfection. The amateur grower is certain to 
influence the cut-flower grower to try more varieties, and to try in the green- 
house those varieties that are doing well in the garden. There are probably 
many garden varieties of roses in existence today which could be to advantage 
forced under glass, if brought to the attention of the commercial grower. 

Commercially, there are too few varieties being forced. The more varie- 
ties we have, the more opportunity there is of placing them before the public. 
How many books would be sold if there were but four or five titles available? 
So it is with roses — the fewer varieties, the fewer sales. People get tired of one 
thing; they want variety; they call for something new. So to the commercial 
man I propose that he broaden out in work with the amateur to increase the 
number of good roses grown and forced; and the selling field will correspond- 
ingly expand. 

The amateur's work, to my mind, is far more fascinating than is the com- 
mercial end. My experience as an amateur in garden roses is very small, but 
it has been a source of great pleasure and recreation to me. Looking around 
among my friends, both amateurs and professionals, I can see the interest in 
garden roses growing. The commercial rosarian is now realizing that the 
garden rose is and will be a tremendous factor in the future of the rose in 
America. 

The American Rose Society, in establishing test-gardens in various parts 
of the United States is thus working out a feature that will become a most 
valuable and far-reaching asset to rose-growing. These test-gardens are now 
firmly established in Washington, in Hartford, at Cornell University (Ithaca, 
N. Y.), and in Minneapolis. 

A committee has been appointed to look after and take charge of each 
garden. The plan is to establish in these test-gardens at least five plants of a 
kind, in the case of Teas, and two of a kind, in the case of Climbers, of every 
known variety that can be obtained, not only from this country, but from for- 
eign countries as well. Accurate records are to be kept as to how they flourish, 
the climatic conditions, the amount of bloom, and whatever statistics as to tem- 
perature, soil, etc., that may be deemed necessary by the committees in charge. 

Anyone contemplating the growing of a certain variety — for instance, in 
the same climate as Washington — might refer to the appropriate test-garden 
reports, and see how that variety had behaved — whether it was hardy, whether 
it was able to stand the hot summer, and so on. These records as summarized 
each year in this Annual, will become invaluable. 

It has been my pleasure to go over three of the four test-gardens already 
established, thus enjoying some of the most pleasant days of my experience, and 
learning more about roses than one would be able to pick up in a month of 
ordinary inspection. I believe I am safe in saying that everyone who visits 
these test-gardens feels that the time has been well spent. 



142 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

Probably we owe more to our ex-President, Mr. Wallace R. Pierson, for 
pushing these test-gardens, than to any other one individual. In encouraging 
this work Mr. Pierson has been far-sighted, and has realized what the gardens 
will mean both to the commercial man and to the amateur. 

Any society or horticultural organization in the United States or Canada 
which holds an annual exhibition of roses can affliate with the American Rose 
Society, and upon afl&liation imder our rules will receive annually one silver and 
two bronze medals, to be offered at local exhibitions. Further, each aflBIiated 
society will receive The American Rose Annual for each one of its members. __ 

These annual shows, as held by the various societies over the country — -^ 
not only by present afl&liated societies, but by those we hope to have afl&liated 
with us in the future — are to my mind likely to prove the greatest advertisers 
for the rose that we can have. So far as I know, wherever a show has once 
been held, it is continued year after year, each being larger and better, with 
more interest taken. 

At a little show held annually at Lansdowne, Pa., last June an old Quaker 
friend of the writer came to him, and after looking the exhibition over, being 
very much interested in the flowers — not only the roses, but the other flowers 
as well — said: " I think that kind of work is good for the community; and when 
the people are busy with flowers, they are out of mischief." We certainly ele- 
vate the standards of our communities when we succeed in creating a love for 
roses; for if a man really loves the rose, he will surely love his neighbors! 

It is surprising to note how many amateurs who attend these small shows 
possess much general information on roses — in fact, far more than the average 
commercial grower, who knows his own varieties very well, but whose knowl- 
edge outside of what he is growing may be limited. 

A rose show, whether it is an amateur show, or whether it is one of the 
large shows fostered by the Society of American Florists, is an education to 
everyone who attends. 

In each succeeding Rose Annual we want to have set forth some of the 
history of the rose, by the leading rosarians of the country; history that wiU be 
interesting in more ways than one; including the experience of both the com- 
mercial and the amateur grower. It is gratifying to know that this first 
American Rose Annual presents thus some papers of permanent value — as, for 
instance, Mr. Wilson's account of the species, Dr. Van Fleet's interesting 
suggestions as to hybridizing, and the story of "Gurney" Hill's rose half- 
century. 

At a meeting of the American Rose Society held in Boston, August 20 
19 14, when Mr. M. H. Walsh was presented with the Hubbard gold medal, 
this same Mr. Hill, in making the presentation, said among other things : — • 

" Now another thought. I hope some day that this medal will go to a man who will take 
up our native species and from some of our best and hardiest Hybrid Teas produce roses which 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 143 

shall be free from what we call black spot, and which will flourish in our American gardens. 
I believe that that can be accomplished. I believe some day it will be done. But, let me tell 
you, someone will have to do it who is disinterested, who is not always looking at the dollar at 
the end of the accomplishment; for up to this date there has been but very little money to any 
man who has raised a rose for the embellishment of our gardens." 



There are a number of enthusiastic breeders of roses working toward these 
ends, and we hope to have in the next few years some very good results; results 
that will revolutionize the garden planting of roses. In addition to those who 
are thus working, we have a number of commercial men making rose history. 

The American Rose Society is organized to serve as a clearing-house for 
rose workers. In its ranks will be found those interested in new varieties, in 
protecting roses from insects and diseases, in knowledge of soils, fertilizing, 
pruning, planting, and cultivating. It is because of these various advantages 
which the American Society now has to offer, that we appeal to each member 
to help rose progress through it, by increasing its membership, by adding to 
its literature, by promoting shows and interchange and by working for rose 
prosperity. We may thus have a Rose Society that will be better, larger and 
more far-reaching, of which it will be a real honor to be a member. 



NOTES ON CROTONS 

Indigenous to East India Islands and China, in their native state only 
those with green and yellow foliage are found. By cross-fertilization in the 
past thirty years more than three hundred distinct named varieties have been 
obtained. Some of these new varieties when first obtained are worth from 
one hundred dollars to five hundred dollars for a single small plant to multi- 
ply for commercial purposes. 

Crotons are more brilliant in coloring than any other species. They are 
grown in green, yellow, red, pink, bronze, crimson, white and all intermediate 
shades and combinations of color. They are beautiful in the conservatory in 
winter and unexcelled for bedding out-of-doors in full sun in summer. They 
are a conspicuous feature of the bedding around Horticultural Hall, Fair- 
mount Park, and in the fine summer beds at Girard College. Crotons should 
not be planted out before the tenth of June, as they require at all times temper- 
ature not lower than 70 degrees at night. 

Plants one to three feet high of the bright red and yellow varieties par- 
ticularly, are largely used at Christmas time for jardiniere and smaller ones for 
window-boxes, hampers and other combinations so popular in the florists' 
shops at the Christmas holidays. The finest collection ever shown in America 
will be at the National Flower Show. 



144 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



GETTING BETTER ROSES* 

Elsewhere in this Annual will be found notes as to the relation of the 
European war to rose-production, and in Dr. Van Fleet's paper on "Possi- 
bilities in the Production of American Garden Roses," Ave are informed that 
136 varieties were imported in one year. Of this number, barely a dozen 
might be expected to show sufficient value in the United States to warrant 
their continued growth. It is not to be understood that this small proportion 
is due to poor quality or to low standards among the foreign hybridizers, but 
rather that it indicates the lack of adaptability to American conditions in most 
of the rose varieties coming from abroad. 

The United States has not been prominent in rose-hybridizing, as may 
be vuiderstood when it is noted that out of 588 varieties of roses listed in the 
1 9 14 Ofi&cial Catalogue of the National Rose Society of England, covering the 
good roses of all the world, but twenty-sLx are of American origin — less than 5 
per cent! 

That roses of American origin are likely to be better adapted to American 
conditions need not be argued. The notable successes scored by the few hy- 
bridizers who have worked in the United States — as A\dtness the Walsh, Van 
Fleet, Hill and Cook productions, for instance — indicate the possibility of 
notable advances, particularly in garden roses, when American rosarians, 
properly encouraged, really get to work. 

The resources now at command in the species collected in west China 
by E. H. Wilson, and the greater knowledge of how desirable rose characters 
may be transmitted, indicate that the present is a most favorable time to pro- 
mote the getting of better roses. The checking of European endeavor, in con- 
sequence of the Great War, adds another inducement to go forward in rose- 
hybridization. 

It is for these reasons that an especial endeavor has been made to gather 
for The American Rose Annual all available information and experience in 
relation to American rose origination. The governing principles are set forth, 
and a carefvil reading of the papers in this section will enable an aspiring hy- 
bridizer of roses to save years of time, for he may have thus at command the 
conclusion of experience. 

In order to indicate the work already done, a list of roses originated by 
hybridization in America is added. This hst is probably far from complete, 
although much effort has been made to make it so. Some capable workers 
seem disinclined to answer letters, and in one case the desired information came 
only after a half-dozen letters and one telegram had been followed up through 
mutual friends. It is intended to carry the hst along from year to year, adding 
to it as may be possible. Let us have American roses for America I 

* Editor's Introduction in the .American Rose Annual. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 145 

THE SWEET PEA— EVERYBODY'S FLOWER 

BY EDWIN JENKINS. 

"The Sweet Pea has a keel that was meant to seek all shores; it has wings 
that were meant to fly to all Continents; it has a standard which is friendly to all 
nations; and it has a fragrance like the universal Gospel, yea, a sweet prophecy 
of welcome everywhere that has been abundantly fulfilled." 

Rkv. W. T. Hutchins. 

Surely the Sweet Pea has a better claim to the title of "Everybody's 
Flower" than any other flower that is grown! What other plant will give us 
such a profusion of flowers, such returns for our love and labor, such airy grace- 
ful blooms of exquisite shades and lovely fragrance? It is a flower of such 
tremendous possibilities in artistic decorative work that it meets the most 
exacting demands liable to be made upon it. It is so inexpensive that the 
poorest may well enjoy its beauties. It is easy to grow. It may be grown in 
a tub or a box in a city yard, or it may be planted alongside a wall, or to hide an 
unsightly fence; and while it loves the full sunshine, it is so accommodating 
that it will tolerate a considerable amount of shade and still do well. Many 
another fine flower, like the Rose and the Carnation, have lost some, or all, of 
their sweet fragrance under the plant breeders' hands, but not so with our 
Sweet Pea, the finest kinds are still Sweet (scented) Peas. 

Many who have seen the wonderful Sweet Peas exhibited in Great Britain 
— stems a foot and a half long, surmounted by four, and often five large flowers 
— have marveled, and wished that such Sweet Peas could be grown here in 
America. The writer believes it quite possible to grow this beautiful flower 
with equal success here on the Eastern coast, but to do so we must accommodate 
our methods to meet the climatic conditions. 

If the seed is sown in October or November, and the plants carried through 
the winter in pots in a cold frame, or a very cool greenhouse, then planted out, 
as soon as the frost is out of the ground, on well prepared soil, given plenty of 
room, well staked and liberally treated in the matter of watering and feeding, 
as well as being disbudded to two or three growths per plant, we should secure 
quantities of fine Sweet Peas until the advent of the hottest weather. The stems 
and blooms produced under these conditions would be as superior to the ordinary 
grown Sweet Peas as are the finest Roses seen in the florists' stores to the com- 
mon garden flower. However, the foregoing methods are not within the reach 
and possibilities of "everybody," and it is as a flower for everybody that we are 
dealing with the Sweet Pea just now. 

CULTURAL DIRECTIONS 
Get your seed from a reliable seedsman — and get the best varieties. The 
best time to sow the seed, to meet the requirements of the average grower, is 



146 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

about the end of February or the beginning of March; and the surest way to 
get a good percentage of germination is to sow the seed about a half-inch deep 
in sand. 

CHIPPING THE SEED. 

Seed of all the reds, crimson or scarlet sorts will germinate quicker and 
more surely if a small piece of the hard seed coat is cut off. Do this with a sharp 
knife on the side opposite the bud or growing point. This chipping enables the 
seed to soak up moisture and may well be practised on all the colors, though it 
is more essential to the colors mentioned. 

In a temperature of fifty-five to sixty degrees, the seed should germinate in 
about a week, and must then be potted in soil, or planted out in boxes to grow 
along in a temperature of about 55 degrees, until weather conditions will allow 
of out-door planting. This out-door planting must be done as early as possible, 
and the plants protected at nights from frost. A good way to protect the 
plants in the row is to nail two boards together, so as to form an inverted V 
and set it over the plants at night until danger from hard frost is past. 

Do not despair of raising good Sweet Peas if you are without a greenhouse, 
or even a cold frame ; much may be accomplished by a Uttle forethought and a 
little ingenuity. Figure 4 on page 90 shows a flat twenty-four inches long 
by twelve inches broad. It takes up but two square feet of room, and may be 
set in a house window. It is easily moved from place to place, holds about one 
hundred plants in paper pots (which are four inches deep) and will give the 
plants plenty of room until they can be planted out. Now, these plants are 
enough to plant a single row one hundred feet in length, or a double row fifty 
feet long, which is as much as many people can handle. Further, they will 
bloom longer and give superior flowers to any that may be planted closer; in 
fact, a good sturdy plant set out in fairly rich soil will fill the space if planted 
two feet apart. 

The question may be asked, why go to this trouble of sowing seed inside 
in sand and transplanting afterwards, when we can sow outside in the open 
ground? The reason is: first, to ensure germination; secondly, to develop a 
healthy, sturdy root system before the plants make much top-growth; and, 
thirdly, because that great teacher, experience, has taught us that it is the 
better method, and the only sure way of getting satisfactory results. 

PREPARATION OF THE SOIL 
The Sweet Pea is not a fussy plant as to the exact nature of the soil, so long 
as it is sweet and wholesome, and contains a good measure of fertility. Septem- 
ber or October are, perhaps, the ideal months for soil preparation, but if your 
ground was not made ready last fall, dig it over as deeply as possible, without 
incorporating too much of the infertile subsoil. This depth seldom exceeds 
one foot. Add a heay>^ dressing of well rotted farm-yard manure, and thor- 
oughly mLx it with the whole mass of soil. Don't put the manure in the bottom, 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 147 

as is sometimes advocated. If you are going to plant only one single or double 
row, dig a space of at least two feet on each side of the centre of the row, and if 
you are going to plant parallel rows, set five feet apart from centres, then you 
will dig and manure the whole space. After the ground is dug, and before it is 
raked, add one pound each of ground boncmeal and air-slaked lime to each 
three square yards of ground. 

PLANTING 

While Sweet Peas may be planted in groups, or in various other ways, yet 
where the main consideration is the production of flowers for house decoration, 
double rows, with the plants set alternately about a foot apart either way, and 
five feet from centre to centre if several rows are planted, will be found to give 
the best results. 

Take all precautions to avoid checking the growth of the plants. Be sure 
that they are always supplied with water while growing in the pots or boxes, 
and select a cloudy day for transplanting to their permanent growing place- 
Do not expose the roots any longer than you can help when planting, and firm 
the soil thoroughly around the plants when they are planted. The importance 
of a firm soil is very often overlooked by beginners. 

SUPPORTS 
Look ahead in this matter of supports and determine what you are going 
to use before you actually need it. Forethought in this, as in most of the other 
affairs of life, will pay a large interest. If you find that two inch wire netting 
six feet high is the only material you can use, get it in place before the plants are 
set out. We prefer good brush to the wire netting, and this may also be placed 
first, and then the plants have something to get hold of right away. Nothing 
so appals the young Sweet Pea plant as to find itself without any visible means 
of support, and to be allowed to sprawl on the ground in a helpless manner. 
Sometimes it is necessary to give the plants a tie to start them up the supports, 
and the enthusiastic grower will not begrudge this little extra work. 

SPECIAL SUPPORTS FOR EXHIBITION PEAS 

The ordinary methods will hardly do if the very finest exhibition flowers 
are the aim of the grower. The method here evolved is to use bamboo canes, 
eight foot long, to each shoot, and to restrict the number of shoots to three or 
four per plant. In using the canes for support, it is necessary to have good firm 
posts at both ends of the rows and to run a wire from end to end, tying the canes 
firmly to the wire (see Figure i, page 88). It is even advisable to use such 
post and wires where brush is used, as it will prevent the brush from swaying 
too much in strong winds. Growing on bamboo canes involves a great deal of 
tying, and cutting away the tendrils — but nothing that is "worth while" is 
accomplished in this world without lots of work. 



148 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

MULCHING AND WATERING 

After the plants have started well into growth and the sun has warmed up 
the soil, a good mulch of strawy litter and half-decayed leaves will be of the 
greatest benefit to them, both in conserving moisture, by cutting off evapora- 
tion, and in keeping the soil from baking and getting too hot. Be liberal in the 
amount of space you cover on either side of the plants with the mulch, but do 
not put it on too heavy, about three inches is enough. Watering must be 
attended to as regularly as the soil appears to be on the dry side; and when it is 
done be sure to be thorough and give a good soaking. Half measures are worse 
than nothing at all. 

FEEDING 

Assuming that the ground has been well manured, as advised in the prepa- 
ration of the soil, no great amount of feeding otherwise will be necessary, except 
that after the plants have been flowering for a week or two and the stems begin 
to show signs of shortening, a little stimulant, such as a light dose of nitrate of 
soda, or a dusting of dried blood well watered in, will be very beneficial ; and as 
a tonic which will brighten up the colors of the flowers, and generally do good, 
a dusting of soft-coal soot about every ten days over the whole soil is well 
worth while. 

PESTS 

About the worst pests that afflicts the Sweet Pea is the fungoid disease 
called "mildew." Fortunately, this does not come until the season is well 
advanced. Good culture, and spraying with an anti-fungoid spray which has 
copper-sulphate as a base, are the best measures to ward it off. There are other 
diseases of a fungoid nature, such as "streak," but the only known way of 
combating them is to try and prevent them by maintaining the health and vigor 
of the plants unimpaired as long as possible. 

Of insect pests, the only one that calls for special mention is "green fly,'' 
or "aphis." This is easily killed by any good nicotine spray. You must keep 
a good look out for this pest, as, owing to its protective coloring, it is liable to 
escape attention and get in lots of damage before it is discovered. 

PICKING THE FLOWERS 

As one of the chief characteristics of the Sweet Pea is that the more you 
pick the more you have, the sprays should be gathered every day as soon as all 
the flowers are developed, and to do this, use a sharp knife and cut them close 
to the base; plucking the stems out by force is rather unkind treament and 
apt to injure the vines. 

SHADING 

A light covering of cheese-cloth, or some other light material, must be 
put over the salmon and orange shades if you would get these most beautiful 
colors at their best, because a very little sunshine bleaches them out completely. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



149 



TWENTY-FOUR OF 

Constance Hinton — White 
R. F. Felton — Lavender 
Don Alvar — Lavender 
Leslie Imber — Bicolor lavender 
Rosabelle — Rose shade 

Scarlet Emperor — Scarlet 
Maud Holmes — Crimson 
Hercules — Pink 
George Herbert — Rose pink 
Lady Evelyn Eyre — ^Light pink 
Dobbies' Cream- — Cream 



King Manoel — Maroon 



THE BEST VARIETIES 

Lady Miller — Cream pink 
Illuminator — Rich cerise pink 
Mrs. Cuthbertson — Pink bicolor 
Royal purple — Purple 
Blue Picotec — Blue and white, 

marbled 
Loyalty — Blue and white, Striped 
Edrom Beauty — Orange salmon 
Robert Sydenham — Orange 
Blue Jacket — Dark blue 
Sincerity — Cerise 
Jesse Cuthbertson (Spencer) — White 

and pink, striped 
Bertrand Deal Improved — Pale 
mauve 



The above list does not include the introductions of 191 6, onl}^ such kinds 
as have been tested and found good. 



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150 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS FOR THE GARDEN 

BY CHAS. H. TOTTY 

Are you foregoing the pleasure of having a showy bed of Chrysanthemum 
flowers in the fall, thinking perhaps that they are too difficult to grow? In 
these few notes we are not going to speak of varieties that will do weU under 
glass, but varieties that can be grown by everyone who has a few feet of space 
at their disposal. 

The culture of the Hardy Chrysanthemums is simple: they will grow in 
any good garden soil and should be set out in the spring about eighteen inches 
apart with twelve inches between the rows. Pinch the plants back, once or 
twice during May or June to keep the plants dwarf, as some varieties are in- 
clined to grow straggly instead of spreading into bush form. If the center 
shoots are pinched out once or twice as suggested, this will cause the plants 
to branch out into bush form. 

Bud selection, which is of such paramount importance in growing green- 
house varieties, does not enter the cultivation of the hardy types at all ; unless 
one wishes particularly large flowers on their varieties. If they do, the plants 
should be disbudded the latter part of July in order to concentrate the strength 
of the plant into the blooms. As a rule Hardy 'Mums are wanted for decorative 
effect in the garden, and the long graceful sprays are much more desirable for 
this work. 

If a choice of sites is available I would suggest a location that has a pro- 
tection of buildings or trees, from the north and west winds. Of course, this is 
not imperative, but it will help furnish an ideal condition. 

The Early Flowering 'Mums have developed so tremendously the past 
few years that unless one has kept close track of them, they would be bewildered 
by the long list of varieties offered by dealers in this type of plant; all of which 
are warranted to give good satisfaction. The place of honor for outdoor 'Mums 
must be given the type known as Early Flowering. August Nonin of Paris, 
France, has done more than anyone else to perfect this type of plant, and today 
we have over one hundred varieties tested under American conditions that are 
guaranteed to flower the last week in September and during October, and give 
a wealth of bloom during this period; something that was impossible, a few 
years ago. Among the best of this type would be the following: 

White: Dorothy; Debutante; Marie Dufour; Petite Jean and Normandie. 

Yellow: Cranfordia: Carrie and Etoile d'Or. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 151 

Fink: Bcaurepairc; Eclcn; Cranford Pink and Miss Burchfell. 

Red mid Bronze: Nellie Blake; Vesuve; A. Barham and Billancourt. 

These Early Flowering 'Mums are duplicates ol' ihe large flowering types; 
otherwise known as greenhouse varieties; only they are dwarfer in habit and 
do not come ciuite as large, save in one or two instances, such as Cranfordia. 
This latter, closely disbudded will make a wonderfully large flower. 

I mention the selection above, so that anyone who has not grown Early 
Flowering 'Mums, need not be bewildered by a large list but can be assured 
of satisfactory results if an)- or all of the above are grown. 

SINGLES 

which are also of comparatively recent introduction are wonderfully effective 
outdoors. It is true a great many of these Singles are not early enough to give 
good satisfaction flowering outdoors, but the following varieties flower in 
splendid condition outdoors from October 15 onwards: 

White: jMrs. Chas. C. Mickle; Gladys Duckham; Mensa and Snowflake. 

Pink: Ivor Grant; Stanley Ven; Mrs. Buckingham and Louise. 

Yellow: Polly Duncan; Golden Mensa and Marion Sutherland. 

Crimson and Bronze: Excelsior; Mrs. Hogben; and Margaret Walker. 

A variety that occupies a class for itself is " Mrs. Francis H. Bergen." This 
is the same type as the Early Flowering but does not come into bloom until the 
last of October, when most of the Early Flowering types are through blooming. 
"Mrs. Bergen," is creamy white with Rose-pink shadings and one of the most 
noteworthy on account of its cast-iron hardiness. Mr. Bergen the originator 
of this varietv told me he had this varietv blooming in his garden until No- 



f, ixx ^.xx^ ^t 



vember 20 in good condition. 



POMPONS 

or the Button T>'pe, is perhaps the best known of the entire 'Mum family, 
and the latest and hardiest of the types, but they are handicapped by the fact 
that they bloom so late that the frost has destroyed all their foliage before the 
flowers develop. These Pompons are the favorite of a great many people and 
the following would be our selection of the very very best varieties. 

Lillian Doty is quite the largest Pompon e\-er sent out. This is a beautiful 
clear pink in color. There is a white sport of this called "White Doty," being 
introduced this year, that is a wonderful acquisition to the Hardy Garden. 

White: W^hiteDoty; Queen of the Whites; Jas. Boone; Waco and Myer's 
Perfection. 



152 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



Pink: Lillian Doty; Donald and Minta. 

Yellow: Jeanette; Wm. Sabey; Golden Climax and Zenobia. 

Crimson and Bronze: Julie Lagrevere ; Urith and Tiber. 

After the plants are through flowering they should be cut down to six or 
eight inches from the ground and let the leaves drift around them. When they 
are well covered with leaves place some dry cedar boughs over the leaves to 
keep them from blowing away. In this way they should come through the 
winter in perfect condition, if they are planted in a dry location. If the plants 
are situated in low ground, where the water will cover the crowns or roots stand 
in water; it would be better to lift the roots in the fall and store them in a 
cold-frame ; cellar or back shed ; as the plants will die if left standing in water 
during the winter. 

In the spring when it is time to set out the plants again, break up the 
clumps into individual plants, and plant in new soil, or a new location. In this 
way you will have even better success the second year. 

The Rose is truly called the "Queen of the Garden," but the Chrysanthe- 
mum still holds its own as "Queen of the Autumn," carrying its message of 
hope and cheer far into the fall when all other flowers are faded and dead! 




JOHN WANAMAKER DAHLIA 



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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



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Courtesy of 

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Harrisburg, Pa. 



AQUATICS 
FOR THE 

AMATEUR 

BY WILLIAM TRICKER 



as "amateurs." 



There has been much dispute as to who or what persons are rightly classed 
Webster says, "One who cultivates a study or art from taste, 
without pursuing it professionally." It has been my privilege to meet many 
such persons who have grown aquatics through taste or love for these most 
enchanting of flowers, and I am proud to say growers in this class have done 
more to popularize these flowers than professionals. 

Some 30 years ago a medical doctor living at Yarmouthport, IVIass., had 
a grand assortment of these flowers, long before such plants were listed in 
catalogues in this country. Another popular man in Springfield, Mass., who 
had a reputation for making the best skates in America, had also a fine col- 
lection of Water Lilies, and later donated a park to the city. Another medical 
doctor, living at Salem, N. C, was the first to grow a Victoria regia outdoors 
without artificial heat. I would also mention such gentlemen as John N. Gerard, 
John McElvery, S. C. Nash, W. W. Lee, and others, but I fail to find as many 
in the field of professionals who have done such work. Many of the worthies 
I have mentioned are still with us, and we are greatly indebted to them for 
what they have done to advance interest in aquatics. 

The persons mentioned are exceptional, it is true, but there are hundreds 
of others, amateurs, interested in their gardens, who are making special study 
of certain plants and flowers until they are successful. To be successful in 
growing any particular plant or plants, some knowledge must be acquired as 



154 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

to their habitat, how and where they grow, climatic condition, etc. All our 
cultivated plants are the progeny of original species, growing in the wild. You 
find Water Lilies, commonly called Pond Lilies, in a wild state all over the 
country, and other species in other lands, all growing under like conditions? 
that is, ponds, where the water is stagnant, or a very slow sluggish stream, 
where there is an accumulation of silt and humus that is continually being 
added to by constant showers. and decaying vegetable matter. Underneath 
there is often a stiff clay, or heavy sub-soil. Such places are usually in the full 
sunshine, seldom, if ever, in shady spots or in the woodland. These simple facts 
will indicate what course to pursue in cultivating these lovely flowers under 
artificial conditions. 

Let us glance at the different species. The native species are Nymphaea 
odorata, and N. tuberosa, of which there are several forms, white and occa- 
sionally pink. Florida has a yellow species, not hardy in the northern States. 
The former are vigorous growers, with rambling root-stock ; the flowers produce 
seeds very freely, and where grown, usually these species take possession of a 
whole pond. The European species are entirely different; the rhizome is thick 
and not of a rambling nature, plants compact and bushy, flowers plentiful, pro- 
ducing little seed, and the hybrids none. These qualifications render the Euro- 
pean varieties, especially the Hybrids, better adapted for general culture by 
the amateur, who can only find room for a small pond, or a few tubs. 

Where space will permit, a pool four, five, or six feet in diameter will prove 
more serviceable than three or four tubs, for tubs are subject to decay, hoops 
will rust, etc., although they answer a good purpose while they last. A concrete 
pool may be constructed by an intelligent laborer, and the size can be regulated 
by each individual want or wish. It may be constructed by excavating the 
ground to the desired depth, and size. If the sides are to be nearly straight, 
make a form of light lumber, the same shape the pool is to be, but twelve inches 
less in size. This placed in the excavation will allow a space of six inches for 
the wall. Before running the concrete, have heavy chicken-wire netting 
arranged, so that when the concrete is set the wire will be in the centre of the 
wall. Such a re-enforced pool will be indestructible, waterproof and frostproof. 

Pools of different shape can be constructed of concrete by using forms, as 
is done in other concrete structures. 

Another form of pool is constructed without forms, and is worth consider- 
ing. Make the excavation with sloping or flaring sides, and on this arrange 
the wire netting, making it secure before applying the concrete. 

As to materials, the following have proved satisfactory: two bags Port- 
land Cement, three barrows of sand, five barrows of gravel or fine broken stone. 
The wall need not be more than four inches thick. Have the work done thor- 
oughly and the re-enforcement carefully attended to. 

For small pools and tubs, the soil may be placed in the bottom, ten to 
twelve inches deep, covered with about an inch of coarse sand. The soil should 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 155 

be rich. Com[)ostcd sods and cow manure is as good as can be desired, but do 
not use the materials fresh. Where such is not to be had, the next best thing 
is good garden soil, with an addition of rotted manure, or sheep manure. 

For large pools, use l^oxes for planting in. I prefer a box three feet by 
three feet by one foot. This will hold nine cubic feet of soil. 

The water supply is no small matter, but any source can be utilized. Before 
planting, have the boxes in place, and water in the pool, not necessarily more 
than six inches over the boxes. This is deep enough to plant in. Allow the 
water to stand a few days before planting, but do not change it; it may ferment 
and a scum form on the surface, but this will settle, or it can be washed off 
with the garden hose. 

After the concrete work is finished, and before the soil or the boxes are put 
in, the pool should be washed out, to carry off all caustic properties of the 
cement, as such is injurious to plant life. 

The planting of Water Lilies should not be attempted before the weather 
is warm and growth is accelerated. This applies to hardy varieties. Tender 
varieties should not be planted before summer weather is assured, about the 
first of June to the middle of the month, according to location, either North 
or South. 

The Nelumbium, or Egyptian Lotus, is a most desirable plant. Do not 
plant early; the weather should correspond with such as recommended for 
tender Nymphaeas. Much failure can be attributed to early planting and the 
roots being chilled. The Nelumbiums require a limited space, but plenty of 
rich soil, or they will take possession of the whole pond. 

The after work and attention of the water garden consists chiefly of filling 
up with water as it evaporates. The plants will be benefited by an occasional 
spraying during hot, dry weather, especially during a drought, when plants are 
likely to be covered with dust. 

It is quite necessary to have a few gold fish in the water, for they will help 
to keep the plants clean as well as to destroy all larvae of mosquitoes. 

The margin of the pond can be planted with subaquatic plants, both hardy 
and tender. There is a large assortment of such plants, suitable for small 
ponds, or lakes, as the case may be. 



LANDSCAPE PLANS ENGINEERING 

LEONARD MORSE NORMAN K. MORSE 

41 SOUTH FIFTEENTH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

PLANTING FORESTRY 



156 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



H 



TWENTY YEARS OF ROSE GROWING IN 

AMERICA 

BY GEORGE H. PETERSON 

When one has a hobby or cherished caUing, it is most gratifying to look 
backward, and from that point forward, re\dewing the progress — ^the advance- 
ment made ^vith the passing of the years. And so, as I bring before me the 
recollections of more than twenty years in which the Rose has been so much to 
me, both as an amateur and professional grower, it is with the keenest pleasure 
that I note its ever-increasing hold upon the people of our country, not only 
those who love the flower itself, but the yearly increasing number who find that 
they can grow Roses, as well as buy them. 

It is quite generally conceded that from the time when 

'■ Homer praised its form of grace, 
Horace its richly tinted face." 

the Rose, in the floral kingdom, has held first place in the heart of mankind; 
and while for many years this countr}^' has led the world in the production of 
forcing Roses, it must be conceded also that we have been far behind European 
countries in the production of garden Roses. During the past decade, however, 
an awakening interest in outdoor Rose growing has been quite apparent, and 
it has been sho'mi that with reasonable preparation and care, we can, at least 
in certain seasons and periods of the year, grow and delight in quite as wonder- 
ful Roses as are grown under the more favorable climatic conditions of European 
countries. 

Doubtless, there are various reasons why this flower has of late taken so 
great a hold upon our hearts and interests, but it must be conceded that the 
chief contributing element is the marvelous development of the class of roses 
known as '"Hybrid Teas," a class which gives us, here in the North, continuous 
bloom from June to October, inclusive. 

Obviously, in an article of such limited length as this must necessarily be, 
I can touch but briefly upon the cultural phase of Rose gro\\-ing, but there are 
several excellent and helpful works on the subject, one of which, at least, the 
beginner should procure. The progressive professional growers of today give 
in their catalogs the most essential cultural points, and usually in simple, easily 
understood language; and while there is no "royal road" to Rose growing, 
yet, if one but starts right, he will be surprised to find how easily good Roses 
may be grown, even, where necessar}^-, within the limits of a city yard. 



^ FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 157 

Dean Hole, in the most delightful and scholarly book on the Rose e\'er 
written, declares that, "To have beautiful Roses in one's garden, one must have 
beautiful Roses in one's heart." Whether or not this is really essential, I am 
not prepared to admit — parenthetically, I must observe that I have seen most 
beautiful Roses growing in the gardens of none-too-pleasant people, — but it is 
at least a beautiful thought to start with. Keep in mind that the flower of our 
affection delights, and does its best, in a somewhat cool, rather moist — not 
heavy rains — atmosphere. Consequently, do not expect as fine Roses during 
the middle of summer as you get in the early summer and in the autumn, 
except, perhaps, during a spell of damp, dark weather. 

While good Roses can be successfully grown in any well-enriched garden 
soil, they will succeed best in a rather heavy, clayish loam, to which add an 
equal combined quantity of stable manure and finely chopped old sods. Thus: 
in making a bed two feet deep, you will have one foot of soil and six inches each 
of sods and manure, preferably cow and horse manure combined. A good 
sprinkling of ground bone, or bone-meal, and air-slaked lime will be helpful, 
but is not necessary. Mix all together very thoroughly from top to bottom — • 
but do not use a sieve. The broken sods will tend to keep the soil open and 
porous. Make bed from fifteen inches to three feet deep, according to your 
purse and the material available. 

Place your Rose bed in the open, or where it will get at least a half day's 
sun, and have it well away from over-hanging trees and shrubbery. 

WHEN TO PLANT 

Differing from the practice in Europe in this respect, most of the Rose 
planting in this country is done in the spring, although under certain conditions 
fall planting has its advantages. I shall assume that you are going to plant 
dormant, field-grown stock, which is almost exclusively used in Europe, and 
which ten years of amateur growing convinced me is unquestionably the best. 
Do not wait until planting time to order, but get your grower's catalog as soon 
as it is issued, if possible, and send in your order for immediate booking. You 
will thus get better plants and get them at the right time to plant, which is 
just as soon as the ground is lit to work, or as soon as the farmer plants early 
potatoes in your vicinity. The Roses will come to you packed in moss, and 
care should be exercised to see that the roots do not get dry. As soon as planting 
is accomplished, the ground should be firmed over the roots with foot pressure, 
and the wood pruned back at least half. A moderate pruning usually yields 
a greater number of blooms, at the expense, however, of size. A close pruning 
yields fewer but larger flowers, and on longer stems. 

When planting is done early, and while the ground is moist, no watering 
will be necessary until plants are started well into growth, or the ground be- 



158 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

comes quite dty. A mulch, or even stirring of surface soil, will aid in keeping 

the soil moist beneath, where moisture is needed. 

BUDDED OR OWN-ROOT ROSES 

The leading, or most successful amateur Rose growers agree, that while 
own-root plants are best in theory, yet, when it comes to results, properly 
budded stock is in every' way superior. Results in growth and bloom are the 
chief things to consider, and, with but few exceptions, own-root Roses, grown 
out of doors, particularly in the north, will not give anywhere near the results 
that budded stock will. The one real objection to budded stock is its liability 
to send up wild suckers from the roots, but this can easily be guarded against, 
and, if planted properly, a very small percentage will sucker. Even this objec- 
tion wiU soon be done away with by the most progressive growers, since they 
are now beginning to bud on a stock which throws up practically no suckers, 
and which infuses wonderful vigor into the cultivated Rose. 

INSECTS AND DISEASES. 

Lack of space prevents my going into detail on this subject, but, usually, 
insects and diseases can be readily overcome, and the intelligent grower of 
today has little to fear from this phase of Rose growing. A good soil, and strong 
vigorous plants to start with will tend to reduce troubles of this nature to a 
minimum. Remember, in both plant and animal Hfe, it is the strong that have 
little to fear and that the weak are usually the first to be attacked and the 
quickest to succumb. 

CLASSES AND VARIETIES. 

I shall here be unable to touch upon more than the two chief classes of 
Roses today — Hybrid Perpetuals and Hybrid Teas. In the former class we get 
Roses of unusual vigor and hardiness. We also get flowers of the largest size, 
and it is in this class that we get the most fragrance — but, unfortunately, much 
cannot be expected in the way of bloom after the main season in June, with a 
few exceptions. 

In the Hybrid Teas we have a class of Roses which give us continuous 
bloom throughout the entire season, and it is this class which has been developed 
so largely during the past fifteen years. 

I doubt if it would be possible to get two rosarians to agree as to " the best " 
Roses. In fact I could not well agree with myself on this subject one year after 
the other, but the following list of one and one-half dozen Hybrid Perpetuals 
and two dozen Hybrid Teas wiU be found exceptionally worthy, and successful 
over a large area, under the varying conditions of soil and climate which are 
found in this vast countrv. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



159 



HYBRID PERPETUALS. 



Baroness Rothschild — Light pink 

Capt. Hayward — Red 

Clio — Blush 

Frau Karl Uruschki — White 

George Arends — Light pink 

George Dickson — Deep crimson 

Hugh Dickson — ^Red 

J. B. Clark— Red 

Magna Charta — Pink 

Madame Gabriel Luizet — Silvery pink 



Margaret Dickinson — -Blush white 

Marshall P. Wilder— Red 

Mrs. John Laing — Pink 

Mrs. R. G. Sharman Crawford — Light 

pink 
Paul Neyron — Pink 
Prince Camille de Rohan — Deepest red 
Suzanne Marie Rodocanachi — Deep 

pink 
Ulrich Brunner — Light red 



HYBRID TEAS. 



Dean Hole — Light pink 

Duchess of Wellington — Deep yellow 

Etoile de France — Red 

Florence Pemberton — Blush white 

General McArthur — Bright red 

Gruss an Teplitz — Red 

Jonkheer J. L. Mock — Pink 

Kaiserin Augusta Victoria — White 

Killarney — Pink 

Lady Alice Stanley — -Pink 

Lady Ashtown — Pink 

La France — Light pink 



Laurent Carle — Red 

Lyon-Rose — Salmon pink 

Mad. Caroline Testout — Pink 

Mad. Jules Bouche — White 

Mad. Ravary — Yellow 

Mad. Segond Weber — Pink 

Mrs. Aaron Ward — ^Yellow 

Mrs. A. R. Waddell— Yellow 

Pharisaer — White 

Radiance — Pink 

Souv. de Gustave Prat — ^Yellow 

Souv. du Pres. Carnot — Blush white 



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FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 








9,000 SQUARE FEET OF GLASS 

BY J. OTTO THILOW 

The effort and time required for the preparation of so great an event as 
the National Flower Show is hardly within the grasp of the average person, 
even though a flower lover. More than a year ago the area of glass, 9000 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



i6i 



^' 




square feet, as shown above, was set apart and consigned to the care and culture 
of plants for this great display of flowers and plants. 

At the nurseries of one of our leading firms can be seen the great array of 
Roses which have reached full growth under the most vigilant care and cod- 
dling to bring them into matured size. Clothed in their garments of glowing 
color, they simply await the day of transfer from their congenial surroundings 
to the display grounds of Convention Hall, that the public may see and com- 
pare the labyrinth of color with that of other flowers on exhibition, proving 
that the newer Roses of latter-day introduction are decked with tones of color 
far beyond even the dream of the most critical. 

One of the most novel and altogether new features of horticultural inter- 
est will be the evolution of the Fern, showing the birth of the Fern spore to its 
fructification and its transformation into the minute growth, followed by its 
development into plants which begin to show their identity, and then into 
specimens of the most beautiful and graceful forms. As an item of educational 
value this will without doubt be a most pleasing feature of the show. 

This firm, upon the first note of the advent of the National Flower Show 
to be held in Philadelphia, made extensive preparations to produce a large 
area of color in flowers growing naturally upon the plants, and to give an effect 
equal or better than one can expect only under the best outdoor conditions and 
with the best care. 



i62 FOURTH XATIOXAL FLOWER SHOW 

ORCHIDS FOR AMATEURS 

BY JOHX E. LAGER. 

Fortunately the days are over when orchids could only be acquired or 
growTL by very few. The price of these plants in late years has reached a point 
where they are within the reach of all. 

This is, to a great extent, the result of more sound knowledge of how to 
treat these plants, for while the slogan went around that orchids were super- 
latively difficult to grow, ^-ery few persons ventured to buy or grow them, hence 
limited numbers only could lind sales. Since the nature of orchids has been 
better understood — in reality it is not different from other plants — the demand 
has increased greatly, larger quantities are imported yearly from the tropics, 
and the prices are low, so low indeed that anyone with a little greenhouse or 
conservatory can afford to grow some. 

The variety of orchids is so great that selections may be made for any pur- 
pose. The amateur who possesses only a very small greenhouse or conservatory, 
a space of a hundred square feet or less, say, can grow a few orchids just as well 
as anything else, as the fundamental principles are the same as with other 
plants — a certain amount of heat, light, water and fresh air, and also a moderate 
shading. 

A frequent and erroneous idea is that orchids require a high temperature, 
and continuous saturation with water. True, there are species requiring a high 
temperature, but they are comparatively few; and as to water, a good rule 
to go by is to treat them like other plants, that is, let the plants drs^ out before 
giving them more water. The time for the maximum amount of water to be 
administered is while the plants are in growth, or while the plants are making 
their new shoots, which time is easily recognized by anyone. After the new 
shoots have completed their growth and the pseudobulbs are finished, the plants 
require less water. 

Fresh air should be admitted on all favorable occasions, A^ithout lowering 
the proper temperature. 

The glass should be moderately shaded throughout the year, except during 
November, December and January, when it may be left clear. In a greenhouse 
where the temperature is maintained at 60 degrees at night and 65 to 70 degrees 
in the daytime, a surprisingly large number of species of orchids may be grown; 
practically all the Cattleyas and a larger number of the Laelias, Oncidiums, 
Dendrobiums, Vandas and other things may be successfully cultivated here. 
If C^-pripediums are added, they should be placed by themselves on a bench, 
for they require more water than most orchids, inasmuch as they are never 
at rest but grow continuously. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 163 

Those mentioned aljove are the most showy and at the same time most 
useful for cut flowers, l)ut there are also other things highly interesting to an 
amateur, things that are odd both in shapes and colors. Stanhopeas are very 
interesting, with their large pendant clusters of flowers, and the several kinds 
of Platychlinis; Peristeria elata (Holy Ghost Orchid); Oncidium Papilio and 
Krameriana, or "Butterfly Orchid"; Aerides and Saccolabiums; Coelogynes, such 
as Dayana and Massangeana, with their large pendant infloresens; also Renan- 
thera Imshootiana, which grows and flowers almost under any treatment and 
I'c wards the cultivator with its very large, many flowered racemes of red; and 
many more. 

If for some reason it is more desirable to have the greenhouse at a tem[)cra- 
ture of say 55 to 58 degrees at night, and 60 to 65 degrees by day, the foHowing 
may be grown: Cattleya Citrina (Tulip Orchid); Lycaste Skinnerii; Coel- 
logyne Cristata; the handsome "Baby Orchid," Odontaglossum Grande; Odon- 
taglossum Citrosmum and pulchellum; the sweetscented Maxillaria lutea-alba; 
several Miltonias, such as Candida, Clowesii, Morelliana, and the handsome 
large Pansy-shaped M. Vexillaria, with pink flowers. Cypripedium Insigne and 
its many handsome varieties may be grown in this house. 

Other things that will do well here are Laelia Anceps and its varieties 
including the albino forms of same ; Dendrobium Nobile and its varieties, and 
the handsome Dendrobium Thyrsiflorum, with its large bunches of primrose- 
colored flowers. 

The potting of all the above is very much the same. They should be potted 
in Osmunda fibre (peat) with a very slight addition of live sphagnum moss, with 
a few lumps of charcoal and crocks worked in here and there, excepting Vandas, 
Aerides and Saccolabiums, which should be potted in one part moss and one 
part peat. The same holds good with the Cypripediums, except that for all 
greenleafed kinds a small part of fibrous loam may be added. 

The kinds of receptacles to be used is immaterial. If pots or pans are used, 
plenty of drainage should be placed in the bottom. If baskets are used, a few 
pieces of crocks in the bottom is sufficient. It is very important that these 
plants should be potted firmly; they wall not thrive if loose in the pots 
or baskets. 

As a parting word, I would say, "grow orchids." They are the most fas- 
cinating plants in creation apart from their beauty, and if you begin to grow 
these plants and watch them as they develop, you will find you have a hobby 
that is equalled by few other things. I would advise all beginners to commence 
with species, and as these are mastered hybrids may be added to the collection, 
the treatment of which in no wise differs from the species, but it opens up the 
entire treasure house of the orchid Kingdom, which in this way is well nigh 
limitless. 



1 64 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

THE GLADIOLUS—" THE PEOPLE'S 

FLOWER" 

BY ISAAC S. HENDRICKSON 

The Rose has its champions by the legion, because everyone loves the Rose 
— as a Rose, but not everyone can grow the Rose with a pleasing degree of suc- 
cess. Any flower we might name has its lover, or lovers, but for a flower for the 
people, the common people as well as the elect — a flower that rivals any other 
as to colors and lasting qualities; a flower that can be grown by the millions 
having small or large gardens; a flower that for ease of culture is supreme; a 
flower that is in reach of short or long purse — the GLADIOLUS is indeed "the 
people's flower." 

The Gladiolus has at last come into its own, and however we pronounce 
the name, the flower itself stands conspicuous at the top of the list as one 
of the most useful, beautiful and satisfying of all our garden flowers; and bloom- 
ing, as it does, during August, when there is a dearth of flowers, makes it doubly 
valuable. Some of the late productions of varieties are really wonderful, and 
as their propagation has become so general among "growers of flowers for sale," 
the finest varieties have become within reach of all. 

AS TO CULTURE 

If you know Gladioli, which term includes the family of varieties, you 
know how simple their culture is ; but for those who are going to try them for 
the first time, a few words of advice may be appropriate. The bulbs may be 
planted anytime after the ground is settled in the spring, and by planting at 
different times, say every fifteen days up to June, a succession of flowers can be 
had from July until frost. The bulbs require twelve to fourteen weeks to come 
into bloom. 

Spade the ground deep, the deeper the better, and if manure is used, let it 
be old and very well incorporated with the soil. Then dig a trench, or furrow, 
and plant the bulbs about four inches apart, either in single or double rows, 
according to the size of the bulbs, and about four to six inches deep, according 
to the character of the soil, whether light or heavy. The rows should be about 
two feet apart, which will permit of easy hoeing, and cutting of the spikes, and 
I presume you will want to cut the spikes, as the Gladiolus is essentially for 
cutting flower. Cut the spike when the first bud shows color, the balance will 
open fine in the house, and show a better color than when left in the sun. 

If preferred, the bulbs can be planted promiscuously among shrubs in the 
hardy border, but they really like a little more "stirring of the earth" than is 
generally possible in a mixed border. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



165 



Almost every seed house now handles Gladiolus bulbs, and they can be 
procured either under name or in mixtures, the mixtures usually being a little 
cheaper. By buying named kinds, you get just the color you want; but if you 
are not particular about this, buy mixtures and enjoy the surprises that await 
you as each bulb unfolds its treasure. The bulbs are not hardy, and should be 
lifted in the fall and kept in a frost-proof cellar for the winter. 

While the Gladiolus originated in Africa, it has now almost become "the 
flower for the people of the world, " as there is hardly a place where it will not 
grow and flower. But to America belongs the credit for the high development 
of the flower at the present time, and while Holland, Germany and England 
have given us some good things, I firmly believe that America leads the world 
in the production of vigorous, healthy Gladioli. Some of the best under names 
are the following: 



Shades of White 
Augusta A 
Blanche A 
Peace A 
White Glory A 
Blue Vista A 



Shades of Yellow 
Canary Bird A 
Schwaben E 
Victory A 
Sulphur King A 
Niagara A 



Shades of Red 
Dazzler A 
Nezinscott A 
Negerf urst E 
Fire King A 
Princeps A 
War A 



Shades of Blue 

Baron Hulot E 
Viola A 



Shades of Pink 
America A 
Cowee's Dawn A 
Tracy's Dawn A 
Fascinator A 
Panama A 
Haley E 
Wild Rose A 
Taconic A 

Variegated 

Mrs. F. Pendleton A 

Scribe A 

Prince of India A 



The letter "A" denotes American production, and the letter "E" European 
production. Every dealer offers you the "best mixture to be had," so I cannot 
give any advice to you in this direction. But if you are fond of the dainty 
Nasturtium colors, be sure to try some "Primuhnus Hybrids mixed," now 
being offered by nearly every seed house. These Hybrids run mostly from 
yellow to orange colors, including some salmon pinks, rosy buffs, creams, etc., 
in short, every conceivable shade of orange and yellow. The stems are long and 
graceful, lending themselves to very artistic decorations where "art shades" 
are desired. These Hybrids arranged in a vase with Baron Hulot (blue) or 
Fire King (red), present a very striking decoration. Try them and you will be 
anxious to enlist in the ever increasing army that is fast making the Gladiolus, 
or "Sword Lily," in reality "the people's flower." 



i66 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

THE GARDEN TO ENJOY 

f 

BY MAURICE FULD 

There is not a soul in this wide, wide world of ours which does not, for the 
ultimate goal in life, reach out for that condition of mind which spells "happi- 
ness." We simply differ as to how best to reach it. 

I claim that the most perfect happiness in life can easily be obtained 
through the pursuit of gardening; and the fact that gardening is more popular 
than ever before is because so many men and women have discovered this very 
secret. Yet I claim that most persons have still to reach the inner sanctum 
in the realm of gardening, where is to be found the joyous thrills which make 
happiness complete. When the great host of gardeners once reach this inner 
sanctum, gardening will no longer be considered a popular fad, but an absolute 
necessity for a complete and perfect life. I assert that this supreme goal will 
be reached, and very soon. 

This prediction I found on facts — facts so unmistakable that even the 
blind can "read the writing on the wall." 

Why is there to-day such a thirst for knowledge of practical gardening? 
What is the cause of that miraculous growth of the Garden Club movement? 
What is it that brings thousands of men and women to theatres to listen to a 
talk on "Practical Gardening" — and, mind you, they pay for admission? 

Do you know that there are three garden clubs in America which are com- 
posed entirely of male members? 

What has made it possible to give successful flower shows, with attendances 
unheard of in the past? 

All this interest is not because we take hold of gardening, but because 
gardening takes hold of us. 

It is my aim in this humble effort, to present a vision to the "blind" — to 
those who do gardening, and those who do gardening but imperfectly — and 
there are very many in this latter category — so as to convince them that there 
is something of infinite value below the surface of our "fad," something 
worth all the struggles of the past; and to inspire them with energy and courage 
to strive on until they, too, sit at that fountain of joy, rest in its refreshing 
presence, and sip, from its unceasing flow, the precious drops of the elixir of life. 

Did you say, dear reader, "Please stop — let me ask you a question?" I 
knew that you were ready for that question long ago, and to prove to you that 
I know it, I'll ask it for you: "It is very well for you to say that there is joy 
in gardening, but how can I, an unexperienced layman, reach the goal you hold 
before my vision?" 

Very well, I will tell you: 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 167 

No one is ever successful in gardening at first. We gain knowledge through 
our failures and mistakes. But with each successful step — naturally, each one 
more successful than the previous one — we begin to realize that we are gradu- 
ally mastering the secrets of nature. We approach the threshold of that stage 
where we become attached to our gardens, attached to each individual little 
plant, which we watch with greater interest, begin to learn its needs and wants, 
and finally its life is an open book to us. 

No real parents were ever taught how to care for their young, because they 
have lived with it every hour, from the moment of its birth, and from its mere 
gestures and appearance can they instantly tell what it needs for its sustenance. 

Here is the whole secret of successful gardening: Just as soon as we really 
live with our plants, we nurse within our hearts an instinctive love through 
which the plant becomes attached to us, so much so that it is part of our life. 
By a single glance we can instantly tell just what it needs, and the fact that 
it responds to our treatment and progresses is the first proof that our attach- 
ment to the plant is not one-sided, but is reciprocated in a much stronger 
measure. 

You must, and will experience this very feeling, and through it comes to 
you the first thrill of joy. No man ever put the truth in sweeter words than 
Dean Hole, when he said: "He who would have beautiful flowers in his garden 
must have beautiful flowers in his heart. He must love them well and always. 
He must not only possess the glowing admiration, the enthusiasm and the 
passion, but the watchfulness, the tenderness and the reverence of love." 

It goes without saying that you must be your own gardener; you must 
do the little things yourself that mean so much to the successful life of a plant. 
A pail of water, the pulling of a few weeds, the gentle stirring of the soil, a little 
better food once in a while. All these things mean so much to your children 
in the garden, for children they are. 

Did you ever notice that some are cjuite misbehaved, at least they don't 
do just as you expect them to do? But for all that, you love them. 

When you have reached the stage when you know your plants, the thrills 
of joy will be frequent. You will find that you can play with your plants, for 
they are playful. They will look for your daily visits with the eagerness of a 
child, they will laugh and chat with you — silently but unmistakably. They 
will be always grateful, and will work for you with a passion that knows no 
limit. 

These are not delusions or mere fancies, dear reader, but everyone of these 
revelations must surely come to you also, if you do your gardening in the right 
way. 

Only recently, while visiting a flower lover I was shown with pride a large 
pot of Lilies of the Valley, which had been in perfect bloom for five weeks and 
were as handsome as ever. When the owner told me that it was the flower she 



1 68 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

loved most, and that there was not a single bell on all the plants with which 
she was not intimately acquainted, I said to her, "Do you know, then, why 
these flowers perform such wonderful work for you?" Instantly, the answer 
came back; "Yes, indeed, their love for me is just as strong as is my love for 
them, and they dislike parting from me just as much as I would dislike to lose 
them." 

While, so far, I have only shown you the pleasing side of gardening, I 
know its pitfalls and disappointments equally well, and I would consider it 
unfair to keep them hidden. But here again, I claim, not all of our failures 
should occur, but they do occur, because there is too little practical guidance 
and help offered to the beginner in gardening by those who know. And this is 
not said with any intent of criticism, but merely to show facts as they are. I 
have discovered that we who know a little — please note that I classify myself 
amongst those accused, but now strive to atone for past errors — have not 
realized how very, very little the beginner knows, and for fear of hurting his 
feelings by telling him things he does know, so that he says "Do you think I 
am devoid of intelligence?" we have invariably made valueless our efforts in 
guiding others. 

It would be much better, to-day, to teach the elementary principles of 
gardening to adults than to children, and I am sure it would bear better fruit. 

To prove that my heart is in the right spot, I will forego the pleasure of 
dwelling further on the sentimental side of gardening — and here, again, I prove 
that I can read the minds of my readers, for they have wished it long ago — and 
now devote the remaining space to the more practical side of the story. 

The garden to be really attractive to its owner must be his or her own 
handiwork, and most of the plants in it must be there on account of individual 
effort. 

Individualism is a wonderful thing. Instantly, upon approach you can 
tell when a garden has been designed with individual critical taste. No doubt 
the most elaborate gardens of to-day are those designed by landscape artists, 
but the individual garden is always the loveliest. There is something about it 
that appeals to the artist's eye. 

What the average gardener is most proud of, is the plant that he can truly 
call his own, and for this reason I am anxious to show him ways by which he 
can enjoy more of such things in his garden. 

Do you love the Hardy Phloxes? "Yes" you say, and so I want to show 
you a way by which you can increase a variety at least a hundredfold in a sea- 
son, from a single clump in your garden, without sacrificing the clump. Go 
to your garden next October, lift the clump which you wish to increase, wash 
every bit of soil from its roots, and cut off the long hairlike roots to within an 
inch of the growing crown. Then set the old plant back again in the ground 
and it will never know that it has been lifted. Next year it will produce the 
same results as in the past. The roots which have been cut from the old plant 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 169 

place on a board and cut them up, like noodles, in pieces about two inches long. 
Then prepare your coldframe, rake and smoothe it. Upon the surface sow 
thickly the cut-up rootlets and cover them with an inch of pure building sand. 
When freezing weather approaches, cover the sand with dry leaves complete 
to the sash, place the sash on the frame, and then forget it all until the next 
March. At that time remove the leaves, but retain the sash, and water the 
sand gently every morning. It will not be long before that sand is alive with 
young phlox plants, which will soon form a perfect green carpet. Just as soon 
as the sun becomes stronger, remove the sash during the day but replace it 
again in the evening. About May ist carefully lift the young plants and set 
them out in the garden, in straight rows about a foot apart, and by the middle 
of July every plant will be in full bloom, but only about 15 inches high. The 
plants will continue to bloom right through to the fall. Then they should be 
lifted and placed in their permanent locations. The following year these plants 
will produce from four to eight healthy shoots, growing to their natural height, 
and at no other time can one see more luxuriant or healthy plants. And what 
is more important of all, every plant will be an exact reproduction of its parent. 

In a single season you have produced more plants than you know what to 
do with, and so you have an excellent opportunity of making some of your 
friends happy. 

Now, would you like to increase some of your choicer Oriental Poppies 
in your garden? I knew you would say "Yes." Well, here is the story: 

Directly after your plant has ceased blooming in July, lift it carefully, 
so as to bring to the surface all of its roots. They are quite different from those 
of the Phloxes, as they are fleshy and more like young horseradish. Cut these 
roots, in lengths of about two inches, up to within an inch of the heavy carrot- 
like root, and plant these pieces directly in the spots where you wish the Poppies 
to grow, about two inches below the surface. By September you will enjoy 
a healthy plant above the ground wherever you have planted a piece of root, 
and the following spring you will have the finest crop of flowers — and, mind 
you, you need not sacrifice the old plant either, for set back into the ground after 
the thin roots have been removed, it will live on and replenish the part which 
you have removed. 

Exactly the same operation can be performed with the lovely Anchusa. 

A single plant of each of the foregoing should produce an increase of from 
ten to twenty-five of a kind. 

Have you a clump of Michaelmas Daisies in your garden? If so, just lift 
it, in April, and you will find that instead of possessing one plant you have 25 
perfect little plants, each one with a perfect set of roots; and if you plant each 
one of these youngsters, allowing them a liberal space, at least two feet each, 
they will give you a veritable cloud of color in the fall. 

Have you ever grown Stocks, and enjoyed looking upon a huge cabbage- 
like plants with the most luxuriant foliage, and until about five minutes before 



170 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



frost no sign of a flower? Of course, you expected flowers in July, and }-ou would 
have had them if you had, just before setting the plants into the garden, broken 
off a little of their hea\^^ roots; in other words, pruned their roots. Try it next 
spring and watch results. 

Is any one of my readers growing a Wistaria which was planted several 
years ago and has never flowered? Were you ever in an audience where the 
speaker asked this question, and did you notice how many held up their hands? 
It is a common occurrence, and yet no literature is found that treats of it. 
Let me teU you how you can get flowers on that plant of yours. Early in April, 
lift your plant entirely from its present location, and before setting it back 
cut back some of every heavy root; in other words, root prune it. The follow- 
ing year you will have flowers. 

Do you grow Dahlias, and fail with them? Be assured you are not the 
only one, but let me suggest to you a novel scheme: WTierever you wish to 
plant a Dahlia, dig a hole fifteen inches square and deep, and fill up to ■v\dthin 
three inches of the surface with small pebbles. Set upon these your tubers, and 
fill in the balance of the hole with more pebbles. Just as soon as the plants 
are up a foot, spray them ever\' other evening after sundown with a fine mist 
of "Death to the WTiite Fly" and also moisten the ground with it. You will 
be amazed at the results. 

I could go on forever in this strain, and perhaps you would not object, but 
the space allotted to me does not permit more. 

So by way of farewell, I hope that my few remarks may have fallen as 
seeds on fertile ground, and may be instrumental in making you a happier 
gardener. 




M 



NIKOTEEN 





Manufactured by NICOTINE MFG. COMPANY, 117 N. Main St., ST. LOUIS, U. S. A. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



171 




POLYANTHA ROSE 



ROSE BREEDING 

BY E. A. WHITE 

Professor of Floriculture, Cornell University 

In his excellent book on "Roses: Their History, Development, and Culti- 
vation," the Rev. Joseph H. Pemberton gives a clear and concise analysis of 
species. In commenting on this table, Mr. Pemberton remarks: ''If we ex- 
amine the table we shall notice two things: (i) the distance removed from the 
original species of the hybrid teas, and (2) that there are many species from 
which little, if any, advance has been made. . . . Does not this fact indi- 
cate the wide field still open to hybridists for the production of new roses?" 

Until within comparatively recent years, little was known regarding the 
laws governing heredity in plants, and much yet remains to be learned. In the 
past, the results which have been attained by hybridists have been largely 



172 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

those of chance. With the re-discoA'ery of the so-caUed ^Mendel's laws in 1900, 
new light was shed on heredity. Since that time hybridists have conducted 
their work on a more scientific basis, and wonderful results have been attained 
with some species of plants. Corn, wheat, tomatoes, and other so-called eco- 
nomic crops have been largely experimented with, and the results to the con- 
suming world have been beneficial in the extreme. 

Less systematic breeding has, however, been done with ornamental plants, 
with which, therefore, there seems a vast field for investigation and experimenta- 
tion. 

There ne^•er was a greater need for breeding work with roses than at the 
present time. People are demanding novelties in all lines of florists' flowers, 
but especially is there a demand for unusual varieties of roses. This is especi- 
ally true regarding those varieties gro"v\Ti under glass, or the "forcing" varieties. 
In this field, the Bride and Bridesmaid held for many years a dominant place; 
but with the coming of KiUarney in its many colors, the older varieties were no 
longer grown. There is probably no more popular rose today than Ophelia; 
yet other varieties are close competitors, and newer types are placed on the 
market each year. The present popularity of the small cluster roses, like Cecile 
Brimner, George Elgar and Baby Tausenschon, shows a changed public opinion 
and the Teas and Hybrid Teas no longer hold non-competitive places in com- 
mercial gro-^ing. 

]Many men have realized the need of systematic breeding in the rose family, 
but few have had the perseverance and determination necessary to get results. 
A few men, however, have given us some desirable varieties of roses, and to 
these men present-day rosarians owe much. There is a demand for species of 
roses adapted to American conditions, and these must necessarily be American- 
bred. The soil and climatic conditions in European coimtries are quite differ- 
ent from those in America, wherefore many of the species originated in Europe 
are imsuited for use in this countr}'. We need strains of American roses which 
correspond to the tj^e of the American carnation. 

More breeding work has been done in America on varieties of hardy roses 
than on the types grown under glass. Rosa Wichnraiana and Rosa rugosa 
have, within recent years, furnished a starting-point for breeding experiments 
which have been a pronoimced success. There is still a demand for improved 
^•arieties in these groups, but there is even a greater demand for improvement 
in those varieties which are "forced'" under glass. 

Breeders of roses certainly have many difficulties to solve. The family is 
a large one, and contains many species. Among these species there already 
exists a large number of hybrids, and the blood is so mixed that it is difficult 
to begin with pure blood of any particular species. 

The science of genetics is based on heredity, and while environment and 
training influence the development of an indi\ddual, heritage or "blood" is 
largely responsible for the traits of character most prominent. Early studies 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 173 

of plant-breeding were based largely on a study of individual plants. It has 
been within recent years that interest has arisen in unit characters in individual 
plants and animals; but with the realization that these characters do occur in 
all individuals to a greater or less degree, and that they are transmitted to off- 
spring in a rather definite ratio, there has arisen a clearer conception of methods 
for reproducing desirable characters in the offspring. 

It has been stated that in breeding roses there is much complexity. There 
are many unit characters which must be transmitted to the offspring, and 
therefore simplicity of action is impossible. Among these unit characters are 
color, fragrance, size of flower, substance of petals, strength of stem, resistance 
to disease, character of foliage, and hardiness. To combine all these desirable 
qualities in one individual, requires most careful selection of parents and 
painstaking breeding which must necessarily extend over a considerable period 
of years. The color factor alone is exceedingly complex, as is shown in a most 
carefully prepared paper on "Heredity of Color in Phlox Drummondii," by Dr. 
A. W. Gilbert, Department of Plant Breeding, at Cornell University and pub- 
lished in the "Journal of Agricultural Research," July 15, 1915. The general 
principles which govern heredity of color in phlox govern color in roses, although 
their application is much more complex in the latter case. 

The rose is, therefore, not an easy plant to breed and get marked improved 
results. The period of "watching and waiting " is a long one. In other words, 
it is a plant of "frequent generations" as are many other species of ornamental 
plants. After the parents have been crossed, it takes a long time for the seed 
pods to mature, and after the seeds have ripened they are difficult to germinate. 
It requires the most careful treatment to get even a fair percentage of germina- 
tion. The blooming period of the offspring does not follow quickly, and the 
hybridist has to wait a long period for results. Even when the work has been 
carried out along modern scientific lines and careful attention has been paid to 
all principles of genetics, the results are often discouraging. 

However, our American men of science are awakening to the possibilities 
which lie in the rose family, and the future of this plant is promising. Plant- 
breeders have found corn and wheat wonderfully plastic under scientific de- 
velopment, and the belief is strong that the rose may, in the near future, be de- 
veloped into tyi^es far superior to those of today. 



The Lectures 

By Men Who Know Will be Interesting 

Don't Fail to Hear Them 



174 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



THE BEST OF THE NEW INTRODUCTIONS 
FOR OUTDOOR ROSE GROWING 

BY GEORGE C. THOMAS, JR.* 

Author of "The Practical Book of Outdoor Rose Growing"! 




RED RADIANCE ROSE 

*It should be noted that Mr. Thomas is devoting the most careful attention to the im- 
partial testing of roses in his extensive private gardens near Philadelphia. His conclusions 
are impartial, and are, therefore, of especial value. No amateur in America is more earnest 
or painstaking in working with the rose. — Editor American Rose Annual. 

fCopyright 1916, by George C. Thomas, Jr. 



FOUR'ni NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 175 

In giving a list of new roses of most promise, one should understand that 
new European \arieties are shipped to America as such small |)lanls that a 
two-years' test is recjuired. Sometimes these weak plants will not do well until 
the third year, and when they winter-kill, duplicates must be tested. For these 
reasons we cannot recommend the growing of new varieties by the average 
amateur. 

During 1915 we have tested all new varieties issued in Europe by [prom- 
inent growers. Owing to foreign conditions, some 1914 varieties did not reach 
us until April, 1915, making the tests less conclusive than usual. Roses of 
1912-1913 have been thoroughly tested; data regarding them is conclusive. 

The color descriptions which follo\v are, in most cases, the introducer's. 

It will be realized that the following descriptions are for the roses as grown 
near Philadelphia. 

VARIETIES INTRODUCED IN 1912 

C. IF. Cowan. (Alex. Dickson.) H. T. Good growth, hardy; good foliage^ 
fine stem; medium size, good form, fair lasting qualities; color "warm car- 
mine cerise," tea-rose perfume; thirty blooms in 1915. 

Freifrau Ida von Schubert. (P. Lambert.) H. T. Good growth, hardy; 
fine foliage, good stem; medium size, fair form, lasts well; color "warm crim- 
son-red," delicious perfume; thirty blooms in 19 15. 

Grange Colombe. (P. Guillot). H. T. Good growth, very hardy; good 
foliage and stem; medium size, form very good, lasts well; color "creamy 
white with salmon-yellow-fawn center," fifty-seven blooms in 1915. 

Louise Catherine Breslau. (Pernet Ducher.) H. T. Good growth, hardy; 
beautiful foliage, lost early, fair stem; medium size, fair form, fair lasting 
qualities; color distinct "coral-red to shrimp-pink, shaded reddish coppery 
orange and chrome-yellow"; thirty-three blooms in 191 5. 

Mrs. David Baillie. (Hugh Dickson.) H. T. Good grow'th, very hardy; 
fair foliage, good stem; spring blooms large, perfect form, lasts well; color 
"madder-carmine"; fifty-two blooms in 1915. 

Mrs. Herbert Hawksworth. (Alex. Dickson.) H. T. Growth good, hardy; 
good foliage and stem; medium to large size, lasts well; color "ecru on milk- 
white, " tea-rose perfume; thirty blooms in 1915. 

Ophelia. (Wm. Paul.) H. T.* Growth good; fine foliage, stem good; 
perfect form, lasts well; color beautiful — "salmon-flesh, shaded wdth rose"; 
twenty-seven blooms in 19 15. 

Sunburst. (Pernet Ducher.) H. T.* A collector's rose. Fair growth, 
not hardy ; beautiful form ; color ' ' cadmium-yellow with yellow-orange center ; ' ' 
thirteen blooms in 191 5. 

*Ophelia is the rose introduced to the commercial trade by the E. G. Hill Co., which is 
having a notable success as a cut-flower variety. Sunburst is also found to be worth while 
forcing. — Editor American Rose Annual. 



176 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

Among the Dwarf Polyanthas may be noted: 
Ellen Poulsen. (Poulsen.) " Dark brilliant pink." 
Rddhdtte. (Poulsen.) "Clear cherry-red." 

VARIETIES INTRODUCED IN 1913 

Elli Hartniann. (Nicola Welter.) H. T. Very good growth, very hardy; 
good foliage and stem; medium size, blooms well, fair form, lasts well, tea 
perfume; color "old golden yellow." 

Killarney Queen. H. T. Sport of the well-known KiUarney; slightly 
brighter, but having some characteristics; thirty-four blooms in 1915. 

Lady Dunleath. (Alex. Dickson.) H. T. Has improved greatly since 
1914. Good growth, hardy; good foliage, fair stem; medium size, blooms 
well, beautiful in bud form, lasts well; color " ivory-cream- white to egg-yolk," 
delicately perfumed. 

Madame Charles Duhreuil. (P. Guillot.) H. T. Strong growth, good 
foliage and stem; medium size, good form, lasts well; color "salmon-rose; 
shaded carmine"; thirty-nine blooms in 1915. 

Madame Edouard Herriot {Daily Mail). (Pernet Ducher.) Pernetiana; 
sometimes listed as a Hybrid Austrian Brier. The greatest novelty; fine 
growth, very hardy; very beautiful foliage, lost early, stem good; medium 
size, good form, lasts weU; color distinct — "coral-red shaded yellow and bright 
rosy scarlet, passing to prawn-red;" twenty-five blooms in 1915. 

Mevrouw Dora Tets. (M. Leenders.) H. T. Collector's rose. Hardy, 
fair growth; fair form, shy bloomer; most distinct shade of " deep velvety crim- 
son." 

Mrs. Forde. (Alex. Dickson.) H. T. Good growth, very hardy; fair 
foliage, good stem; medium to large size, blooms well, good form, lasts well, 
fragrant; color "deep carmine-rose, on delicate rose-pink, clear chrome- 
yellow at base of petals." 

Mrs. T. Eillas. (Pernet Ducher.) H. T. Fair growth, hardy; fair fol- 
iage, good stem; medium size, fair bloomer, beautiful form, lasts well; color 
" chrome-yellow." 

Primerose. (Soupert & Notting.) H. T. Fair growth, hardy; good fol- 
iage and stem; large size, beautiful form, lasts well; color distinct — "melon- 
yellow during summer, early spring and fall having apricot shadings;" ten 
blooms in 1915. 

Queen Mary. (Alex. Dickson.) H. T. A collector's rose. Weak growth; 
beautiful color — "zoned deep bright canary-yellow, crayoned deep pure car- 
mine," very fragrant; eight blooms in 19 15. 

Willowmere. (Pernet Ducher. ) H. T. Fine growth, hardy; fair foliage, 
good stem; medium size, beautiful form, lasts well; color "rich shrimp-pink, 
shaded yellow in center"; twelve blooms in 1915. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 177 

The novelties of 19 14 which promise best are: 

Dolly Varden. (Paul & Son.) H. Rugosa. "Light apricot-pink to 

yellow." 

Cecile Custer s. (M. Leenders.) H. T. "Lilac-rose to deep rose-pink." 
Countess ClanwllUam. (Hugh Dickson.) H. T. "Delicate peach-pink, 

edged with deep cherry-red." 

Frail Bertha Kiese. (Kiese & Co.) H. T. "Pure golden yellow." 
Frau Math. Noehl. (N. Welter.) H. T. "Lemon-yellow." 
Josephine. (Paul & Son.) H. T. "Rosy flesh to salmon-yellow." 
Killarney Brilliant. H. T. Sport of the well-known Kiilarney; much 

darker in color, but having same characteristics. 

Lady Plymouth. (Alex. Dickson.) T. " Deep ivory-cream, faintly flushed." 
Margherita Croze. (Ketten Bros.) H. T. "Carmine-purple, changing 

to purple-rose, shaded deep rose-pink." 

Mrs. Charles Reed. (E. J. Hicks.) H. T. "Pale cream, tinted deep 

peach, to soft golden yellow." 

Urania. (M. H. Walsh.) H. P. "Bright crimson." 

Waltham Scarlet. (Paul & Son.) H. T. "Crimson-scarlet." 

The latest novelties in Climbing Hybrid Teas are Climbing Richmond 

(Alex. Dickson) ; Climbing Madame Melanie Soupert (J. Burrell & Co.) ; and 

Climbing Gruss an Teplitz (Conard & Jones). 

The newest of the other Climbers are Mary Lovett, one of Dr. Van Fleet's 

seedlings, "pearly white;" Walsh's America, "delicate pink shading to white"; 

and Purity, a white climber introduced by Hoopes Bro. & Thomas Co. 

We have tested some few 19 15 roses for six months. Most promising are: 
Jacque Poscher. (Pernet Ducher). H. T. Light yellow. 
Madame Colette Martinet. (Pernet Ducher.) H. T. "Old-gold-yellow, 

shaded orange-yellow." 

In addition, there are two seedlings of Chateau de Clos Vougeot: H cosier 

Beauty (Dorner), H. T.; and Admiral Ward (Pernet Ducher), H. T. We hope 

that the latter will prove as good a dark rose as the well-known Mrs. Aaron 

Ward has proven a yellow. Constance (Pernet Ducher), A. B., has been well 

recommended. 

For two years a number of climbers have been introduced which are 

claimed to be perpetual bloomers. One of these flowered here — Pemberton's 

Moonlight, giving good June bloom and a number of blooms thereafter; but the 

foliage mildews; color here, pure white; single. Pemberton has also intro- 
duced the following as everblooming climbers: Ceres, Galatea and Winter Cheer. 

Paul, Leenders and Lambert catalogue new everblooming climbers, which of 

course are not yet tested. 

There are several new men working on hybridization, but Father George 

Schoener, of Portland, Oregon, is doing splendid work. We trust to see his 

creations on the market. 



178 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



TIME FOR JUDGING 
AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY 

PRIVATE CUT ROSES-Monday, March 27, 2 P. M. 

Messrs: Admiral Aaron Ward, Roslyn, L. I., N. Y. 
Eugene Dailledouze, Flatbush, N. Y. 
Victor Groshens, Roslyn, Pa. 

COMMERCIAL GROWERS— Monday, March 27, 2 P. M. 

Messrs: Emil Buettner, Park Ridge, 111. 

John H. Dunlop, Toronto, Ontario. 
William L. Rock, Kansas City, Mo. 

25 CLASS— Monday, March 27, 2 P. M. 

Messrs: Frank H. Traendley, New York City. 
Fred. Burki, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Robert Craig, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PLANTS— Saturday, March 25, 1 P. M. 

Messrs: Philip Brietmeyer, Detroit, Mich. 
Alex. B. Scott, Sharon Hill, Pa. 
George C. Thomas, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSE DISPLAY AND RETAILERS— Thursday, March 30, 2 P. M. 

Messrs: A. B. Cartledge, Philadelphia, Pa. 
James Forbes, Portland, Oregon. 
W. J. Pahner, Buffalo, N. Y. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



179 



MUSICAL ATTRACTIONS 




HUMMEL 
AND HIS VETERAN CORPS BAND 

SILAS E. HUMMEL, Conductor BERTHA BRINKER D'ALBITES, Contralto 



SATURDAY, MARCH 25TH -AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Orpheus in Der Unterwelt Offenbach 

2. Suite in Four Parts (Atlantis) Safranek 

1. Nocturne and Morning Hymn of Praise. 

2. A Court Function. 

3. The Prince and Aana. 

4. The Destruction of Atlantis. 

3. Selection from Carmen Bizet 

4. Polonaise— Masken Faust 

5. Contralto Solo (Love, Here is My Heart) Silesu 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

6. Popular March, Along the Rocky Road to Dublin Grant 

7. Fantasia (Arabesque) Olker 



i8o FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

8. Czardas' Last Love. (A theme on an old Hungarian Song) . .Brahms 

9. Concert Waltzes, Wedding of the Winds Hall 

10. March, The Glory of the Yankee Navy Sousa 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25TH-EVENING 

1. Overture. Concert in F Kalliwoda 

2. Suite de Ballet (Antony and Cleopatra) Gruenwald 

(a) In the Arbor. (c) Solo Dance. 

(b) Dance of the Nubians. (d) Antony's Victory. 

3. Gems from Tannhaeuser Wagner 

4. American Sketch (Down South) Myddleton 

5. The Merry Lark (A love episode in Flowerland) Bendix 

6. Contralto Solo (Carmena) Wilson 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

7. The Dying Poet Gottschalk 

8. Airs from the Comic Opera (Sweethearts) V. Herbert 

9. Caprice (The Awakening of the Lion) Kontski 

10. March, Stars and Stripes Forever Sousa 



SUNDAY, MARCH 26TH-AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Stabat Mater Rossini 

2. The Dragon Fly Strauss 

3. Gems from the Bohemian Girl Balfe 

4. Hymns sung in the American Churches Beyer 

5. Scenes Pittoresques Massenet 

1. Marche. 3. Angelus. 

2. Air des Fleurs. 4. Fgte Boheme. 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

7. Excerpts from Maritana Wallace 

8. (a) Hearts and Flowers Tobani 

(b) Celebrated Minuet Paderewski 

9. Potpourri, Bouquet of Melodies Meyrelles 

10. March, The Philanthropist Theis 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW i^ 

SUNDAY, MARCH 26TH-EVENING 

1. Overture, Beautiful (lalatea Suppe 

2. Gems from the Popular Comic Operas Arr. by Moses 

Red Hussars, Paul Jones, and Poor Jonathan 

3. Five Characteristic Dances Sarakowski 

1. Hungarian. 4. Slavonic. 

2. Polish. 5. German. 

3. Spanish. 

4. Fantasia, Ein Marchin Bach 

5. Airs from the Red Mill V. Herbert 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

7. A Summer's Night in Norway Willmers 

8. Gloria from Twelfth Mass Mozart 

9. Madschen und der Spule Suppe 

10. March, National Spirit (New) Hummel 

MONDAY, MARCH 27TH-AFTERNOON 

1 . Overture (William Tell) Rossini 

2. Melodies from Faust Gounod 

3. Patrol, The Blue and the Gray Dalby 

4. Gems of Stephen Foster Tobani 

5. Musical Scenes from Switzerland Langey 

1. Rustic Pictures. 3. The Alphorn. 

2. Peasant Dance. 4. The Yodler. 

6. Gems from the Opera, La Traviata Verdi 

7. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

8. Mazurka de Concert, Memories of Vienna Bendix 

9. Medley of Popular Songs Remick 

10. March, The Philanthropist Theis 

MONDAY, MARCH 27TH-EVENING 

1. Overture, Jubel Weber 

2. Tone Pictures from the North and South Bendix 



i82 FOURTH XATIOXAL FLOWER SHOW 

3. Concert Waltzes from The Singing Girl V. Herbert 

4. Wotan's Abschied unci Feuerzauber, Die Walkiire Wagner 

5. Selection from the Comic Opera The Firefly Friml 

6. Contralto Solo (Love, Here is My Heart) Silesii 

Bertha Brixker d'Albites 

7. Suite de Ballet (Coppelia) Leo Delihes 

1. Fanfare et Marche, de la Cloche. 5. Intro, et Valse, de la Poupee. 

2. Valse des Heures. 6. Marche des Guerrieres. 

3. Musique des Automates. 7. Czardas. 

4. L'Hymen. 

8. Characteristic, The Milage Bells La Vore 

9. Dance of the Skeletons Levire 

10. March of the Veteran Corps Harris 



TUESDAY, MARCH 28TH-AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Fest Leutner 

2. Gems from Rigoletto Verdi 

3. (a) Intermezzo, Ariadne Voelker 

(b) Paraphrase, Loreley Nesvadba 

4. Descriptive, \illage Life in Ye Olden Time Le Thier 

Night. The Cock Crows. Sunrise. Astir in the Village. Children 
going to School. The Blacksmith Shop. The May Queen. The 
Maypole Dance. The Curfew Bell Rings. The Village Choir Sings. 
And the Moonlight Lovers get Serenaded. 

5. Original Fantasia, Gypsy Life Le Thier 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brixker d'Albites 

7. Selection, His Honor the Mayor Edwards 

8. Concert Waltzes, Lnder Palms and Flowers Stasny 

9. Gems from the Opera Aida Verdi 

10. March, Our Xavy Gaugler 

TUESDAY, MARCH 28TH-EVENING 

1. Overture, Morning, Xoon and Night in \'^ienna Suppe 

2. Ballet Music from La Reine de Saba Gounod 

3. Airs from the Comic Opera Wonderland Herbert 



FOUirrH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 183 

4. Concert Waltzes (Blue Danube) Strauss 

5. Descriptive, A Day at West Point Bendix 

1. Six A. M. 6. Benny Haven's. 

2. Assembly. 7. Tai)s — Lights Out. 

3. Devotional Exercises. 8. Maestoso Grandioso. 

4. Adjutant's Call. 9. Yankee Doodle. 

5. Dress Parade. 

6. Contralto Solo — Maritana, Gay Gitana Levey 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

7. A Hunt in the Ardennes Marie 

8. (a) Dance of the Bayaderas, from F"eraniors Rubinstein 

(b) Dance of the Hours, from La Gioconda Piinchielli 

9. Fantasia, Hungarian Moses 

10. Popular March Snyder 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29TH -AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Stabat Mater Rossini 

2. Scenes Pittoresque Massenet 

1. Marche. 3. Angelus. 

2. Air de Ballet. 4. Fete Boheme. 

3. Patrol, The Blue and the Gray Dalby 

4. Gems from II Trovatore Verdi 

5. Concert Waltzes, The Skater Waldteufel 

6. Contralto Solo (Love, Here is My Heart) Silesu 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

7. Selection from Samson and Delilah Saint- Saens 

8. Novelette (Chanticleer Cackles) Alford 

9. Before the Footlights Bendix 

10. Popular March, Circus Day in Dixey Gumble 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29TH-EVENING 

1. Overture, Hunting for Luck Suppe 

2. Dance Suite Tschakoff 

1. Sambo's Holiday. 3. Pekoe Dance. 

2. Cossack Revels. 4. Valse Russe. 

3. Selection (Maid Marian) De Koven 

4. Waltzes, On the Beautiful Rhine Keller Bela 



i84 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

5. Contralto Solo (Selected) Silesu 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

6. The Mouse and the Clock Whitney 

7. Airs from the Musical Fantasy Woodland Luders 

8. Intermezzo, Pas des Fleurs L. Delibes 

9. Gems from Amorita Czibulka 

10. March, Washington Grays GrafuUa 

THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH -AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Fra Diavolo Myrelles 

2. Grand Selection (Mefistofele, from A. Boito's Opera) Tohani 

3. Invitation a la Valse Weber 

4. Caprice, Blue Violets Eilenberg 

5. Suite — Espagnole, La Feria Lacome 

1. Los Taros. 3. La Zarzuela. 

2. Serenade, La Reja. 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker d'Albites 

7. Songs of the Nation Lampe 

8. Gems from C. N. von Weber's Opera Previosa Kitschner 

9. Introduction and Bridal Chorus (Lohengrin) Wagner 

10. March, La Fornarinette Valverde 

THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH-EVENING 

1. Overture, Semiramide Rossini 

2. Waltzes "Genee" (From the Soul Kiss) Levi 

3. Reminiscences of Ireland Godfrey 

4. Polonaise, Presidential Sousa 

5. Scenes Descriptive of a Young Man's Call on His Girl Reeves 

Synopsis: The young man goes to see his girl, whistling gaily on the 
way. Arriving at the house, he rings the bell. "Why, how do you do? " 
"Very well, I thank you ; how are you? ' ' Cordially greeting, they indulge 
in a little waltz. More greeting. He sings, " Believe Me, of All Those 
Endearing Charms." An unexpected serenade. The serenaders 
invited in and have a jolly time, including a clog dance on the kitchen 
floor. After they retire, she sings," I Cannot Say Good-bye;" he joins 
in a duet. One more kiss, interrupted by the steeple clock. The old 
man appears; consternation and rapid exit. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 185 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

7. The Dance of the Serpents Boccaasi 

8. Medley of Popular Songs Fiesi 

9. Concert Polonaise Beissig 

10. Gems from Pixley and Lauder's Musical Comedy King Dodo . . Mackie 



FRIDAY, MARCH 31ST-AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Crown Diamonds Auber 

2. Second Mazurka Godard 

3. Selection, The Monks of Malabar De Koven 

4. Spanish Dances Maszkousky 

5. Gems from II Trovatore Verdi 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

7. Ballet music from Faust Gounod 

8. Descriptive Fantasia (A Vision of Salome) Lampe 

9. Concert Waltzes, Wild Roses Childs 

10. Popular Medley of Songs Fiest 

FRIDAY, MARCH 31ST-EVENING 

1. Overture, The Siege of Rochelle Balfe 

2. Grand Selection of Scotch Medodies Godfrey 

3. Concert Waltzes, La Reine de la Mer Sousa 

4. Scene from the Niebelungen Ring Wagner 

5. Patriotic Airs from Two Continents RoUison 

6. Contralto Solo (Love, Here is My Heart) SUesu 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

7. Gems from Simon Boccanegra Verdi 

8. Polonaise (On Mountain Heights) Kiesler 

9. Melodies from the Comic Opera Foxy Quiller De Koven 

10. March, The Occidental Sousa 



i86 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 

SATURDAY, APRIL IST-AFTERNOON 

1. Selection from Maronco's Ballet (Excelsior) Millards 

2. Concert Waltzes (Artist Life) Strauss 

3. Popular Songs Remick 

4. Gems from Tannhaeuser Wagner 

5. Characteristic Suite Gruenivald 

1. Pomposity. 3. Coquetry. 

2. Simplicity. 4. Sincerity. 

6. Contralto Solo (Carmena) Wilson 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

7. American Sketch (Down South) Myddleton 

8. Scene de Procession Volker 

9. Overture, Better Schmall Weber 

10. Ballet Egyptien Luigini 

SATURDAY, APRIL IST-EVENING 

1. Overture, Daughter of the Regiment Donizetti 

2. Selection from Faust Gounod 

3. Humoresque (Aux Trois Suisses Polka) Bonnechope 

4. Airs from Comic Opera (Sweethearts) Herbert 

5. Concert W^altzes, Wilhelmina Hall 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

7. Invocation to Battle (Rienzi) Wagner 

8. Echoes from the Opera Tobani 

9. Gavatine from the Barber of Seville Rossini 

10. Hummel's Military March Giroux 



SUNDAY, APRIL 2ND-AFTERNOON 

1. Overture, Rossini's Stabat Mater Rossini 

2. Selection from Doris Cellier 

3. Popular Largo Hcendel 

4. Gems from the Bohemian Girl Balfe 



FOUKTH NATIONAL I'lJJWKR SHOW 187 

5. Religious Meditation (In the Great Beyond) Brooks 

6. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

7. (a) Musical Scenes from Spain Langey 

(b) Characteristic, On Tiptoe Ilosmer 

(c) Polka Caprice Perlet 

8. Gloria from Twelfth Mass Mozart 

9. Fantasie Arabesque Olker 

10. March, National Spirit Hummel 

SUNDAY, APRIL 2ND-EVENING 

1. Grand Pastoral and Hunting Fantasia (Le Fremersberg) Godfrey 

Synopsis: The Margrave's horn echoed by the mountain is heard 
summoning the huntsmen. The fanfare, heard for the first time in 
the distance, draws nearer, indicating their approach. Signal for the 
hunt to commence. During the rustic scene which follows the horns 
are heard both near and in the distance. Song of the country folk 
(solo with refrain and dance). During dance a storm approaches; wind 
rises, and the peasants' dance becomes more animated. A peal of 
thunder stops the dance. The peasants rush shrieking away to seek 
shelter. The lightning flashes; the storm grows in intensity. At last 
it bursts forth in full fury — rain falls in torrents ; thunder crashes. 
The Margrave, who has been overtaken by the storm, is heard crying 
for help in vain; the noise of the storm drowns his appeal. Overcome 
by weariness, the Margrave falls to the ground. Suddenly he hears 
the Monastery bell and the chant of the monks. Following the sound, 
he finds the Fremersberg. The storm ceases, and the retainers, who 
have been seeking the Margrave, find him in the Monastery, All join 
joyfully in the Te Deum. 

2. Suite de Concert, L' Arlesilum Bizet 

1. Prelude. 3. Adagietto. 

2. Minuetto. 4. Le Carillon. 

3. Selection from Faust Gounod 

4. The Dying Poet Gottscluilk 

5. Hymns Sung in American Churches Beyer 

6. The Flying Artillery Bergenholtz 

7. Contralto Solo (Selected) 

Bertha Brinker D'Albites 

8. Concert Waltzes, Morning Journals Strauss 

9. Ecce Sacerdas Arr. by Harris 

10. March (The Picadore) Soiisa 



^^- 



i88 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



LIST OF JURORS 



Mr. Z. D. Blackistone. . . .Washington, D. C. Mr. 

JSIr. Leonard Barron .... Garden City, N. Y. Mr. 

Mr. E. Beckett Purchase. X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. S. Prestiss Baldv^-in. . . .Cleveland Ohio. Mr. 

Mr. H. A. Bunyard New York. Mr. 

Mr. H. Brou-n Richmond, Va. Mr. 

Mr. Emil Buettner Pare Ridge, 111. Mr. 

Mr. Xicholas Butterbach, New Ro helle,N.Y. :\Ir. 

]Mr. J. Ballentyne Rids^efield, Conn. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. Brock Tuxedo Park, N. Y. Mr. 

Mr. Robert Cameron Cambridge, Mass Mr. 

Mr. Geo. H. Cook Washington, D. C. Mr. 

Mr. W. X. Craig Brookline, Mass. Mr. 

Prof. H. B. Domer Urbana, III. Mr. 

Mr. W. DowTis Chestnut Hill, ]\Iass. Mr. 

Mr. Jno. Dolandson Patchogue, X. Y. ]\Ir. 

Mr. Peter Duff Orange, X. J. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. Duckham Madison, X. J. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. Eccles Oyster Bay, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. John Everitt Glen Cove, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. Falconer Pittsburgh, Pa. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. Fisher Akron, Ohio. Mr. 

Mr. Chas. Feast Baltimore, Md. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. F. Gude Washington, D. C. Mr. 

]Mr. Robt. Graham Baltimore, Md. Mr. 

Mr. C. F. Guenther Hamburg, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. Arthur Herrington Madison, X. J. Mr. 

Mr. Wm. Hertrich San Gabriel, Cahf. Mr. 

Mr. J. F. Huss Hartford, Conn. ]Mr. 

Mr. F. Heeremens Lenox, Mass. Mr. 

Mr. E. Jenkins Lenox, Mass. Mr. 

Mr. J. F. Johnson Glen Cove, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. F. J. KeUer Rochester, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. ^lichael Keller Rochester, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. Edward Kirk Bar Harbor, Maine. Mr. 

Mr. Chas. Knight Oakdale, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. Otto Koenig St. Louis, Mo. Mr. 

:Mr. Wm. F. Kastings Buffalo, X. Y. Mr. 

Mr. A. J. Loveless Lenox. Mass. Mr. 



Fred. ZMeinhardt St. Louis, Mo. 

W. P. :\Iahan Jericho, X. Y. 

Jos. Mills Lakewood, X. J. 

Jas. Macmachan. . .Tuxedo Park, X. Y. 

David ]\Iiller Tuxedo Park, X. Y. 

Geo. Morrison Baltimore, Md. 

Donald McKenzie . Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

D. MacRorie San Francisco, Calif. 

Samuel McClements. . . .Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Geo. T. Moore St. Louis, Mo. 

Samuel Murray Kansas City, Mo. 

Harry Papworth .... Xew Orleans, La. 

P. W. Popp Mamaroneck, X. Y. 

Wm. Plumb Havana, Cuba. 

W. J. Pahner Buffalo, X. Y. 

Edw. Reagen Morristo^^m, X. J. 

Samuel Redstone Philadelphia, Pa. 

Geo. A. Robinson. . .^Montreal, Canada. 

Wm. L. Rock Kansas City, Mo. 

Robt. Scott Buffalo, X. Y. 

Chas. Sandiford Buffalo, N. Y. 

Edw. Sceery Paterson, N. J. 

J. L. Smith Beachbluff, Mass. 

Jas. Stuart Mamaroneck, X. Y. 

F. Traendly New York. 

E. P. Tracy Albany, N. Y. 

Robt. Tyson Convent, N. J. 

A. E. Thatcher Bar Harbor, Me. 

Wm. Turner Mendham, N. J. 

Jos. Tansy Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 

Wm. Vert Port Washington, N. Y. 

Chas. Vick Rochester, N. Y. 

J. Verner Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Ernest Wild Madison, X. J. 

J. S. Wilson Des Moines, Iowa. 

A. H. Wingett Lenox, Mass. 

Theo. Wirth Minneapolis, Minn. 

Henr\' Weston Hempstead, X. Y. 

Robt. Walker Bridgeport, Conn. 



WM. J. BAKER 



DAFFODILS, CALLAS. PANSIES 

LARKSPUR AND SNAPDRAGONS IN VARIETY 
WHOLESALE FLORIST SWEET PEAS AND MIGNONETTE 

Quality the Best 



12 South Mole Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



189 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS 

The following representative firms of the country have reserved liberal space 
in the trade section of this show and are arranging to make attractive exhibits. 



Advance Co., The Richmond, Ind. 

Alphano Humus Co New York 

Andorra Nurseries Philadelphia, Pa. 

Arnold, A. A., Box Co Chicago, 111. 

Bayersdorfer & Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Betz, Harry S Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bobbink & Atkins Rutherford, N. J. 

Buick Motor Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boas, Wm. J., & Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bon Arbor Chemical Co Paterson, N. J. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co. . .Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cloche Co New York 

Coldwell Lawn Mower Co. Newburgh, N. Y. 

Conard & Jones Co West Grove, Pa. 

Cowee, Arthur BerUn, N. Y. 

Craig Co., Robert Philadelphia, Pa. 

Davey Tree E.xpert Co Kent, O. 

Dillon, J. L Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Doubleday, Page & Co. Garden City, N. Y. 

Dreer, Henry A., Inc Philadelphia, Pa. 

Edwards Folding Box Co. .Philadelphia, Pa. 

Evans, John A., Co Richmond, Ind. 

Farquhar, R. & J., & Co Boston, Mass. 

Floral Nurseries Edgely, Pa. 

Florists' Exchange, The New York 

Galloway Terra Cotta Co. . Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gracey, John C Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grakelow, Charles Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gude Bros. Co Washington, D. C. 

Habermehl's Sons Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hammond, Benjamin Beacon, N. Y. 

Harris, W. K., Jr Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harrison's Sons, J. B Berlin, Md. 

Heacock, Joseph, Inc Wyncote, Pa. 

Hitchings & Co Elizabeth, N. J. 

Ideal Power Lawn Mower Co. Lansing, Mich. 

Japanese Floral Perfume Co New York 

Kapteyn, B. D., & Son . Sassenheim, Holland 
King Construction Co. N. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Kirke Chemical Co Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Knight & Struck Co New York 

Kroeschell Bros. Co Chicago, III. 

Kuhn, John Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lager & Hurrell Summit, N. J. 

London Flower Shop Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lord & Burnham Co New York 



Meehan, Thomas, & Sons, 

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Metropohtan Material Co. .Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Michell Co., H. F Philadelphia, Pa. 

Miniature Buildings Co New York 

Moninger, John C, Co Chicago, 111. 

MuUer, Adolph Morristown, Pa. 

National Florists' Corporation . . . New York 

Neidinger, Joseph, Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

New York Stable Manure Co. 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Peacock Dahlia Farms Atco, N. J. 

Pearce, H. V Detroit, Mich. 

Pennock-Meehan Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Lawn Mower Co. Philadelphia 

Peterson, J. A., & Sons Cincinnati, O. 

Pierson, A. N., Inc Cromwell, Conn. 

Pierson, F. R Tarry town, N. Y. 

Randall, A. L., Co Chicago, 111. 

Rice, M. Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Richmond Cedar Works . . . .Richmond, Va. 

Roehrs, Julius Rutherford, N. J. 

Scheepers, John, & Co New York 

Schloss Bros New York 

School of Horticulture for Women, 

Ambler, Pa. 

Skidelsky, S. S., & Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Skinner Irrigation Co., The Troy, O. 

Spencer Heater Co Scranton, Pa. 

Smith, A. W., Co Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stillman, George L Westerly, R. I. 

Strafford Flower Farm Strafford, Pa. 

Supplee-Biddle Hardware Co. . Philadelphia. 

The Pfaltzgrafif Pottery Co York, Pa. 

The Touraine Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Totty, Chas. H Madison, N. J. 

Townsend, S. P., & Co Orange, N. J. 

Tracy, B. Hammond Wenham, IMass. 

Vaughan's Seed Store Chicago, 111. 

Vollers, Ludwig P Philadelphia, Pa. 

Voltax Paint & Varnish Co. . . Philadelphia. 

Waterer, Hosea Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wertheimer Bros New York 

Women's National Agricultural and Horti- 
culture Association New York 

Woodcraft Shops, The . . . Morristown, N. J. 



190 FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



INDEX TO CLASSES 

Page 

Plants in Flower: Private Growers 41 to 49 

Commercial Growers 95 to 99 

Open Classes 77 

Cut Flowers : Private Growers 49 

Open Classes 79, 81 

Cut Flower Arrangement 83 

Palms and Foliage Plants: Private Growers 51. 53 

Commercial Growers 103 to 107 

Ferns and Selaginellas: Private Growers 53, 55 

Commercial Growers loi 

Orchids, Plants: Private Growers 55, 57 

Commercial Growers loi, 103 

Orchids, Cut Flowers: Open Classes 79, 81 

Bulbs in Flower: Private Growers 59 to 65 

Commercial Growers 99 

Dealers and Seedsmen's Special Class 99 

Roses, in Pots and Tubs: Pri\'ate Growers 69, 71 

Commercial Growers 107 to 1 1 1 

Retail Florists' Classes 115 

Roses, Cut: Private Growers 7ii 73 

Amateurs 73 

Commercial Growers in to 115 

Carnations: Private Growers 75, T] 

Commercial Growers 116 to 119 

Retail Florists' Classes 119 

Table Decorations: Private Growers 83 

Retail Florists 83, 89, 115, 119 

Open Classes 85, 87 

Amateur 87 

Gladioli : Open Classes 85, 87 

Amateur Classes 87 

Sweet Peas : Open Classes 89 to 93 

Private Growers 93 

Retail Florists 93 

Aquatics: Open Class 119 

Aquarium Exhibit 120 to 123 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



191 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS 



Page 

AcU'uncc Co., The 86 

Albany Cut Flower Exchange 44 

Alphano Humus Co 106 

Andorra Nurseries 96 

Aschmann Brothers 66 

Bader, John, Co 96 

Baker, Wm. J 188 

Bassett & Washburn 36 

Baycrsdorfer & Co 26 

Bennett, C. A 128 

Berke, Geo. H 104 

Bobbink & Atkins 24 

Burpee & Co., W. Atlee Cover 

Caldwell & Co., J. E 58 

Carbone, P. L 18 

Childs, John Lewis 96 

Coldwell Lawn Mower Co 149 

Colflesh's Sons, J. Wm 27 

Conard & Jones Co 56 

Connelly Estate, John J 37 

Cowee, Arthur 82 

Craig Company, Robert 74 

Dards, C. A 16 

Davey Tree Expert Co 14 

Day, E. J 27 

De La Mare Ptg. & Pub. Co., A. T. . . . 60 

Dieges & Clust 82 

Doubleda}', Page & Co 84 

Dreer, Henry A., Lie loS, 109 

Florex Gardens 124 

FoLtler-Fiske-Rawson Co 70 

Grasselli Chemical Co 92 

Gude Bros. Co 66 

Ilabermehl's Sons 82 

Hammond's Slug-Shot 76 

Harris, W^m. K 104 

Hart, George B 68 

Hews & Co., Inc., A. H 26 

Hill Co., E. G 86 

Hires Turner Glass Co 100 

Ilitchings & Co 64 

Hold Walton 18 

Kasting, W. E 22 

Kentucky Tobacco Product Co., The . . 52 

King Construction Co Cover 

Kirke Chemical Co 48 

Komada Bros 37 

Kugler's 100 



Page 

Lager & Hurrell 66 

Lavino & Co., E. J 76 

Lord & Burnham Co Cover 

MacRorie-McLaren Co 42 

Maltus & Ware 38 

McFarland Publicity Service 92 

Michell Co., H. F 72 

Moninger Co., J. C 52 

Montreal Floral Exchange 44 

Morse, Leonard & Norman K 155 

Myers & Co 56 

Nicotine Mfg. Co 170 

Niessen Co., Leo 62 

Peacock Dahlia Farms 152 

Pennock-Meehan Co., S. S 74 

Pierson, F. R 54 

Pierson, Inc., A. N 98 

Pierson U-Bar Co 102 

Pittsburg Cut Flower Co 36 

Pulverized Manure Co 7^ 

Pyle Co., Rakestraw S^ 

Quaker City Rubber Co 80 

Rice Co.,M ■ ■ 40 

Richie & Keyser 66 

Roland, Thomas 82 

Schiller— The Florist 192 

School of Horticulture for Women 22 

Schling, Max 34" 

Skidelsky, S. S 87 

Skinner Irrigation Co 70 

Standard Thermometer Co 87 

Stearns Lumber Co., A. T -. . . . 78 

Slillman, George L 56 

Supplee, Norman 92 

Totty, C. FI 46 

Vick's Sons, James 62 

Vim Motor Truck Co 94 

Vollax Paint & Varnish Co., The 159 

Watcrcr. Hosea 100 

Welch, P 44 

Young & Co., Inc., John 50 

Zvolanek, A. C 76 



PPHow 



192 



FOURTH NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



SCHILLER, THE FLORIST 

CHICAGO AND SUBURBS 

CONSERVATORIES WITH FLOWERING 
AND FOLIAGE PLANTS 



Three 




-^^Z 


An 


Stores 




^EIjIHI 


All-Night 


Covering 




^fi^i^Bl 


Service 


Every Want 




JKwti 


at 


Delivery 


^^ 


SJII^JHMil^. 


One of Our 


Facilities 




Hk.1^^ 


Three 


Unequalled 


H 


Hm^ 


Stores 



GEORGE ASMUS. GENERAL MANAGER 

HAVE YOUR ORDERS FILLED 

THE BEST AND THE BEST PRICES 



SCHILLER'S 



36 SOUTH WABASH AVE. 2221 WEST MADISON ST. 

4509 BROADWAY 



WM. F. FELL CO.. PRINTERS, COMPLETE SERVICE, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




-tJS 



Is 



1 



To You Who Take Pride in 
Your Possessions 

IN every field of business there is some one concern whose 
prestige puts it head and shoulders above others. Such 
prestige is, without exception, founded on superiority of 
product. In their possession there is a merited pride. 
In many ways such possessions indicate our standing. 
They place us in the minds of our associates. 
Not that a ring from Tiffany's costs any more than one 
from Bunch & Company's: but who is this firm of Bunch? 
Everybody knows Tiffany prestige. 

And .so, when it comes to your greenhouse ; prideful 
possession is a fact not to be ignored. 

Our houses have over half a century's prestige back of them. 
We should be glad to make an appointment with you, or be 
pleased to receive your request for our catalog. 



Franklin Bank Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
CHICAGO 
ROCHESTER 



CLEVELAND 



TORONTO, CANADA 
MONTREAL, CANADA 






Factories 

IRVINGTON, N. Y. 

DES PLAINES. ILL. 

ST. CATHARINES, CANADA 





urpcQ 

Seeds 



Gkdw"^ 



A Few TVords to Our Friends 
After Forty Years 

FOR forty years we have rendered faithful service. For forty years 
we have tried to make each year's service more nearly ideal. 
This untiring effort has built for us not only the World's Largest 
Mail Order Seed Business, but also a world-wade reputation for effi- 
cient service and undisputed leadership. 

Confidence is the one thing that makes possible the commerce of 
the world. It is the greatest factor that enters into a purchase of 
seeds, because you are not buying a finished product, but only the 
means by which your garden may be either a pronounced success or a 
partial failure. When you buy Burpee's Seeds the element of doubt is 
removed so far as is possible by human care. The confidence of many 
thousands of pleased and permanent customers is maintained by the 
Burpee Idea of Quality— first to give rather than get all that is possible. 
More opportune than anything we ourselves may say about 
Burpee's Seeds are the many remarkable things our thousands of cus- 
tomers and friends have said and continue to say about them. 

The Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual 

^^ The Leading American Seed Catalog ' ' for 1916 

is unlike any other. It tells the plain truth about "Seeds That Grow." 
The front cover illustrates in nine colors the greatest novelty in Sweet _ 
Peas — the already famous "Fiery Cross." The back cover shows the 
two famous Burpee Ban^-ams, Golden Bantam Corn and Blue Bantam 
Peas. The colored plates show, painted from nature at Fordhook 
Farms, six other Burpee Specialties in Vegetables, and the finest new 
Burpee Spencers as grown at Floradale, the California home of Sweet 
Peas, and the unique new Gladioli, Fordhook Hybrids. 
This catalog is mailed free. A post card will bring it. 



V 



W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers 

Bb&PEE BUILDINGS, PHILADELPHIA 




3 1827 00015483