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Full text of "National year book"


















4 

















Gc 

973.3406 
S6aay 
1911 

1633350 



M.L. 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 




ALLEN, 




COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRA^^^^ 



3 1833 00824 6545 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/nationalyearbook1911sons 



MOSES GREELEY PARKER 

President General 



NATIONAL YEAR BOOK 

1911 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 



OF THE 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



CONTAINING LIST OF THE GENERAL OFFICERS AND OF 
NATIONAL COMMITTEES FOR 1911; NATIONAL CHARTER; 
CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS; OFFICERS OF STATE 
SOCIETIES AND LOCAL CHAPTERS; PROCEEDINGS OF 
LOUISVILLE CONGRESS, MAY i TO 3, iQu; RECORDS OF 
MEMBERS ENROLLED FROM MAY i, 1910, TO APRIL 30, 1911. 



I 



COMPILED BY 

A. HOWARD CLARK 
Secretary General and Registrar General 



PEESS OF JUDD & DETWEILER, INC., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



1633350 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 



Sons of the American Revolution 

ORGANIZED APRIL 30. 1889 
INCORPORATED BY ACT OF CONGRESS JUNE 9. 1906 



GENERAL OFFICERS 
Elected at the Annual Congress, May 3, 1911 



President General: 
Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., Lowell, Mass. 

Vice-Presidents General: 

Joseph G. Butler, Jr., Youngstown, Ohio. 
Gen. Irving HalE, Denver, Colo. 
R. C. Ballard Thruston, Louisville, Ky. 
George O. Dix, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Commander John H. Moore. U. S. N., 1/55 P St. N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary General and Registrar General: 

A. Howard Clark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer General: 
John H. Burroughs, 15 William St., New York City. 

Historian General: 
David L. PiErson, East Orange, N. J. 

Chaplain General: 
Rev. John Timothy Stone, D. D., Chicago, 111. 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



TRUSTEES FOR STATE SOCIETIES, Elected May 3, 1911. 

The General Officers, together with one member from each State So- 
ciety, constitute the Board of Trustees of the National Society. The 
following Trustees have been elected for the several State Socirties to 
serve until the next election at the Boston Congress: Alabama, Maj. 
William Frye Tebbetts, Mobile; Arizona, J. L. B. Alexander, Phoenix; 
Arkansas, Frank W. Rawles, Little Rock; California, Seabury C. Mas- 
tick, 2 Rector St., New York City; Colorado, Wardner Williams, Den- 
ver; Connecticut, Lewis B. Curtis, Bridgeport; Delaware, Col. George 
A. Elliott, Equitable Building, Wilmington; District of Columbia, Col. 
Wm. B. Thompson, Munsey Building, Washington; Florida, John H. 
Cross, Pensacola; France, Gen. Horace Porter, New York City; Ha- 
waii, Dr. Chas. Bryant Cooper, Honolulu; Idaho, Col. M. W. Wood, 
U. S. A., Boise; Illinois, John D. Vandercook, 230 No. Park Ave., 
Austin Station, Chicago; Indiana, William J. Brown, Ind. Stove Co., 
Indianapolis; Iowa, Elmer M. Wentworth, Des Moines; Kansas, John 
M. Meade, Topeka; Kentucky, George Twyman Wood, 430 W. Main 
St., Louisville; Louisiana, Edward Rightor, New Orleans; Maine, Dr. 
Seth C. Gordon, Portland; Maryland, Hon. Henry Stockbridge, 75 
Gunther Building, Baltimore; Massachusetts, Edwin S. Crandon, Even- 
ing Transcript, Boston; Michigan, Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, Pasadena 
Apts., Detroit; Minnesota, Ellis J. Westlake, Minneapolis; Mississippi, 
Judge Gordon Garland Lyell, Jackson; Missouri, Linn Paine, 3705 Lin- 
dell Ave., St. Louis ; Montana, Henry C. Arnold, Helena ; Nebraska, 
Pressly J. Barr, 5015 California St., Omaha; Nevada, Robert Martin 
Price, Reno; New Hampshire, William F. Whitcher, Woodsville; New 
Jersey, Andrew W. Bray, 196 Market St., Newark; New Mexico, 
Amasa B. McGaffey, Albuquerque; New York (Empire State Society), 
Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, Peekskill; North Carolina, R. L. M. Bon- 
ner, Aurora; North Dakota, Hon. B. F. Spalding, Bismarck; Ohio, 
William S. Walbridge, Toledo ; Oklahoma, Col. Arthur H. Price, Okla- 
homa City; Oregon, D. W. Wakefield, Portland; Pennsylvania, Col. 
R. W. Guthrie, 434 Diamond St., Pittsburgh ; Rhode Island, Henry V. A. 
Joslin, Providence; South Carolina, Paul Trapier Hayne, Greenville; 
South Dakota, R. J. Wells, Sioux Falls; Tennessee, L. R. Eastman, 
Nashville; Texas, W. G. Bell, Austin; Utah, Gordon Lines Hutchins, 
Salt Lake City; Vermont, William T. Dewey,* Montpelier; Virginia, 
Judge L. L. Lewis, Richmond; Washington. Overton G. Ellis, Tacoma; 
Wisconsin, Kossuth Kent Kennan, 1017 Wells Building, Milwaukee; 
Wyoming, Henry Benjamin Patten, Cheyenne. 



*Williain T. Dewey. Ex- Vice-President General, died May 20, 1911. 



BIOGRAPHIES O^ GENEJRAI. OFFICERS. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. 



MOSES GREELEY PARKER, M. D., 
President General. 

Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., elected President General at the Louis- 
ville Congress, was born in Dracut, Mass., October 12, 1842, the son of 
Theodore and Hannah (Greeley) Parker. He inherited from both 
branches of his family ancestry of the best old New England stock. 
Deacon Thomas Parker, upon one side, carhe to this country in 1635 ; 
Andrew Greeley, on the other, settled in Salisbury about five years 
later. In the list of descendants from these two men are such well- 
known names as Theodore Parker, the great preacher and reformer, 
and Horace Greeley, the famous editor. 

Dr. Parker's great-grandfathers, Kendall Parker and Joseph Greeley, 
were two of the Minute Men who tramped to Lexington on the early 
morning of April 19, 1775 ; his grandfather, Peter Parker, served in the 
Continental Army. 

Dr. Parker was educated in the district schools of his native town, 
at the Howe School, in Billerica, and at Phillips Academy, in Andover. 
He taught in the district schools of New Hampshire for three years, 
and then pursued medical studies at the Long Island College Hospital 
Medical School, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and at the Harvard Medical 
School. He was graduated from the latter in 1864 with the degree of 
M. D. In the Civil War he was assistant surgeon, serving in the field 
and hospital. August 9, 1864, he was assigned to the i8th Army Corps 
Base Hospital, where he had charge of the ist Division, and as officer 
of the day he had the honor of receiving President Lincoln, General 
Grant, and others. He was honorably discharged from the service 
May 24, 1865. 

Settling down to the practice of medicine at Lowell, he soon stood 
in the front rank of the medical profession in Middlesex County. He 
has always served upon the medical staff of St. John's Hospital, but 
after a time desired to specialize in certain branches of his profession, 
and, closing his office, spent the years 1873-1874 studying in London, 
Paris, Florence, Rome, and Vienna. Returning once more to Lowell, 
he opened a free dispensary and gave his expert services to the poorer 
classes of the city, although his private practice very soon assumed large 
proportions. 

In 1876 he was elected president of the Lowell Medical Journal Soci- 
ety and a member of the International Congress of Ophthalmologj, at 
New York. He invented a thermo-cautery that year and not long 
afterward patented an improvement in the process of producing and 
maintaining a high degree of heat by hydro-carbon. He became a 
member of the American Medical Association and received from the 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics' Association a diploma for an 
incandescent cautery. 



6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

It was during this period that the doctor became interested in the 
practical uses of photography. He was the first to photograph the 
tubercular bacillus from Dr. E. W. Cushing's microscopical specimens, 
making lantern slides which were shown by the latter before various 
medical societies ; and in 1886 he was the first to show, by photography, 
the rotary motion in the fire of lightning. In the year following he 
was a member of the International Medical Congress, and in 1898-1899 
he served as president of the Middlesex North District Medical Society. 

Dr. Parker's early interest in electricity naturally made him one of 
the interested audience that gathered in 1878 when Prof. Alexander 
Graham Bell first exhibited his great telephonic invention in Lowell. 
He was quick to appreciate its importance and estimate its possibilities, 
and in the following year was made a director in several licensed com- 
panies, which with his assistance were, in 1883, combined into the great 
telephone organization of today, the New England Telephone Company. 
From that day until the present time he has served as a director and 
member of the executive committee, and has taken a personal and im- 
portant part in the successful management of that corporation. 

Dr. Parker has served as treasurer of the Shaw Stocking Company ; 
director of the Aroostook Tel. Co., the Knox Tel. Co., the Granville 
Tel. Co.; trustee of the Lowell General Hospital since 1898; physician 
at the i\Iinistry-at-Large for 10 years; president and treasurer of the 
Ayer Home ; president of the Lowell Day Nursery Association ; trustee 
of the Howe School, in Billerica; delegate to the National Arbitration 
and Peace Congress in 1907; member of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science ; Vice-President General and member of 
the Executive Committee of the National Society, Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution ; twice President of the Massachusetts Sons of the 
American Revolution ; president of the Parker Historical and Genea- 
logical Association ; member of the Loyal Legion, the Bostonian Soci- 
ety, the Bunker Hill Monument Association, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the Order of Colonial Governors, the Lincoln Farm Association, 
the National Geographic Society, the Boston Chamber of Commerce, 
Ancient York Lodge, A. F. and A. iM. 

JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR., 

Vice-President General. 

Joseph Green Butler, Jr., elected Vice-President General at the 
Louisville Congress, was born near Temperance Furnace, Mercer 
County, Pennsylvania, December 21, 1840, son of Joseph Green and 
Temperance (Orwig) Butler. He became a member of the Ohio Soci- 
ety on January 12, 1899, as great-grandson of Thomas Butler, who 
served as private in Capt. John Patterson's Company of the Second 
Pennsylvania Regiment, commanded by Col. Walter Stewart, in 1779. 
Other ancestors in the Revolution were Gottfried Orwig, member of 
the "Old Men's Company" of Germans; Joseph Green, a member of the 
Committee of Public Safety of Buffalo Township, Northumberland 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OEEICERS. 7 

County, Pennsylvania, and Col. Samuel Miles, of the Pennsylvania 
Rifle Regiment. 

Mr. Butler was educated in the public schools of Niles, Ohio, and 
has been engaged in the iron and steel business for half a century. He 
became a resident of Youngstown, Ohio, in 1863. He has taken an 
active interest in the work of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
particularly in the encouragement of historical study by pupils of the 
public schools and colleges in Ohio. 

He was instrumental in organizing the Nathan Hale Chapter at 
Youngstown, and served three years as its President. On April 19, 
1910, he was elected Pregident of the Ohio Society. 

He is at present particularly interested in the preservation of the 
ancestral home of the family of George Washington at Sulgrave, 
England. 

GENERAL IRVING HALE, 

Vice-President General. 

Irving Hale is a great-great-grandson of Col. John Hale, who was 
a surgeon on the staff of Colonel Prescott, and, with his son David, 
served at the battle of Bunker Hill. 

He was born at North Bloomfield, New York, August 28, 1861, and 
came to Colorado with his parents with wagon and team across the 
plains in 1865. His father, Horace M. Hale, was President of the 
University of Colorado from 1887 to 1892 and one of the most dis- 
tinguished educators and men of letters of the West. Irving Hale 
graduated from the Denver high school with the highest honors of his 
class in 1877. 

He graduated from the U. S. Military Academy June 14, 1884, with 
the highest record in scholarship to this date — 2,070.4 out of a possible 
2,075 points. He served in the corps of engineers, 1884-1890, and in 
1888-1889 as instructor in engineering at West Point. 

On June 14, 1887, he married Miss Mary Virginia King, daughter of 
Lieut. Col. W. R. King, U. S. Engineers. 

In 1889 he obtained leave of absence and superintended the construc- 
tion of the first successful electric railway in Denver. In 1890 he re- 
signed from the Army, and since 1893 has been manager of the Rocky 
Mountain district of the General Electric Company. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War he was appointed 
Colonel of the First Colorado Infantry, U. S. Volunteers. For gal- 
lantry and valuable engineering service in the campaign against and 
the capture of Manila, August 13, 1898, he was promoted to Brigadier 
General, U. S. Volunteers. General Hale commanded the Second 
Brigade, Second Division, Eighth Army Corps, in the Philippine Insur- 
rection, participating in twenty-eight engagements, in one of which he 
was slightly wounded. He was recommended by General Arthur to be 
Major General by brevet, U. S. Volunteers, for distinguished gallantry 
throughout the campaign, and especially at Calumpit. On the muster- 
out of the volunteers, he returned with his old regiment to Colorado,. 



8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

and was honorably discharged from the volunteer service October i, 
1899. 

In 1897 he became a member of the Colorado Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution, and for three years vi^as its President and 
for several years a Vice-President. 

General Hale is a member of many distinguished societies and clubs, 
and was honored with the degree of Electrical Engineer from the Colo- 
rado School of Mines and LL.D. from the University of Colorado. He 
is not only an accomplished and versatile writer on subjects of his 
profession in scientific and military circles, but a conspicuous figure in 
every movement to advance and upbuild the interests of the great West. 

1 , R. C. BALLARD THRUSTON, 

' Vice-President General. 

R. C. Ballard Thruston, elected Vice-President General at the To- 
ledo Congress and re-elected at the Louisville Congress, was born in 
Louisville, Ky., November 6, 1858; son of Andrew Jackson Ballard and 
his wife, Frances Ann Thruston, of that city. He occupies the unique 
position of being descended from those who fought on both sides in 
the Revolutionary War, one of his ancestors being an officer (not a 
Tory) in the British Army, stationed at Fort Pitt at the time of his 
marriage, and after the war was over he returned to England, where 
he died upon his estate. Six other ancestors fought in the Revolution- 
ary War on the side of the Colonists, one of whom, at the age of 
eleven years and seven months, fought in his father's command in the 
battle of Perth Amboy, N. J. 

He graduated at the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University 
with the class of 1880, and after a post-graduate course of one year, 
first engaged in business in Louisville, but soon abandoned that life for 
one of scientific pursuits. In 1882 accepted a position on the Kentucky 
Geological Survey as Metallurgist and Assistant Geologist. Resigned 
in 1887 to engage in private work. In 1889 accepted a position as 
superintendent of the Land Bureau of the Kentucky Union Land Com- 
pany. In 1895 became manager of the Big Stone Gap Iron Co. Nearly 
all of his time since 1882 has been devoted to geology, mine engineer- 
ing, and metallurgy, especially that of fuels. 

At his mother's request, in 1885 added her name of Thruston to that 
which he had previously borne. 

He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science; American Forestry Association; local historical, scientific, 
and social societies, and at present Governor of the Society of the 
Colonial Wars in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Became a member 
of the Kentucky Society of the Sons of the American Revolution Janu- 
ary 17, 1890, and has always taken a great interest in historical, patri- 
otic, and philanthropic subjects. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. 9 

GEORGE OSCAR DIX, 

Vice-President General. 

George Oscar Dix was born near Terre Haute, in Vigo County, 
Indiana, May 26, 1874. His ancestors were among the pioneers of the 
Wabash country, having emigrated to what is now the State of Indiana 
shortly after the Revolutionary War. William Thomas, one of his 
Revolutionary ancestors, took a large grant of land in Vigo County. 
This land is still in the family. Mr. Dix graduated from the Indiana 
Law School in 1898, since which time he has been practicing his pro- 
fession in Terre Haute.- He served as President of the Indiana Soci- 
ety, S. A. R., for the year 1910-1911. 

COMMANDER JOHN H. MOORE, U. S. NAVY, RETIRED, 
Vice-President General. 

John Henry Moore, elected Vice-President General at the Toledo 
Congress and re-elected at Louisville, was born at Buffalo, N. Y., Feb- 
ruary 18, 1849. He is a member of the District of Columbia Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution as lineal descendant of private 
Josiah Moore, Lieut. Joseph Moore, Jr., private John Middlebrook, and 
Lieut. Ephraim Middlebrook, of the Connecticut Militia, and of private 
John Nichols and Capt. Daniel Dewey, of the Massachusetts Militia. 
His ancestor, Thomas Moore, came from England in the ship Mary and 
John in 1630 and settled at Dorchester, Mass. 

On June 30, 1865, he entered the United States Naval Academy as a 
midshipman and graduated in June, 1869. Cruised in Europe, China, 
Japan, South America, and West Indies, during which time he cruised 
around the world twice ; promoted from grade to grade and on June 30, 
1899, was retired upon his own application as a Commander. 

In July, 1879, he organized the Navy Mutual Aid Association, which 
up to the present date has paid nearly one million and a half dollars to 
the widows of naval officers. From 1889 to 1892 was on leave from the 
United States Navy and represented the Hotchkiss Ordnance Company 
(Limited) of London in this country and South America. 

On March 9, 1898, ordered Executive Officer U. S. S. Columbia, 
attached to the Flying Squadron, Commodore W. S. Schley, U. S. N. 
On May 6 the Columbia was detached from the Flying Squadron and 
attached to the North Patrol Squadron, Commodore J. H. Howell, 
U. S. N., and was engaged in patrolling the eastern coast. On June 26 
the Columbia was detached from the Northern Patrol Squadron, pro- 
ceeded to Key West, and joined the North Atlantic Fleet, Rear Admiral 
W. T. Sampson, U. S. N., and formed part of the squadron blockading 
Santiago de Cuba, and was present July 14, 1898, when that city capitu- 
lated to the combined army and naval forces of the United States. On 
July 21, left Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in the expedition of General Miles, 
U. S. A., to reduce Porto Rico, and was present at the capture of Guan- 
ica, Porto Rico, July 25, and remained on the coast of Porto Rico until 



lO SONS OF the: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

after the armistice was agreed upon, and on August i6, 1898, sailed for 
the United States. 

Upon retirement from the Navy, in 1899, Commander Moore settled 
in Washington, D. C, and entered the banking business. In 1903 was 
elected president of the Army and Navy Club ; in 1904, president of the 
Bankers' Association of the District of Columbia; in 1906, president of 
the District of Columbia Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. He has been active in the work of the National Society and 
for four years was a member of its Executive Committee, and has been 
Chairman of the Committee on Information for Aliens since its organi- 
zation in 1907. 

A. HOWARD CLARK, 

Secretary General and Registrar General. 

A. Howard Clark became a member of the District of Columbia 
Society at its organization, was elected Assistant Registrar May 5, 
1890, and was one of its Secretaries from 1891 to 1893. He was Secre- 
tary General of the National Society in 1892, and has been Registrar 
General since 1893. Since 1904 he has also served as Secretary General. 

He was born in Boston April 13, 1850. His ancestors in the Revolu- 
tion were Enoch Clark, Enoch Hall, Capt. Thomas Jenner Carnes, and 
Maj. Edward Carnes, of the Massachusetts INIilitia and Continental 
Army. 

Mr. Clark was in the class of 1881 at Wesleyan University, Aliddle- 
town. Conn., and that university gave him the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts in 1906. 

He engaged in mercantile business in New York city from 1867 to 
1875 ; in 1879 was assistant on the United States Fish Commission and 
later expert on the Tenth Census. Since 1881 he has been connected 
with the Smithsonian Institution as Curator of the Division of History 
in the National Museum and as editor of the publications of the Insti- 
tution. In 1883 he served on the Executive Staff of the United States 
Commission at the International Fisheries Exposition in London, and 
was United States Expert Commissioner to the Paris Exposition of 
1889, by appointment of President Cleveland, when he was honored by 
order of President Carnot with the decoration of Officier du Merite 
Agricole. He was a member of the International Geographical Con- 
gress at Paris in 1889. 

He is herald of the Baronial Order of Runnymede (descendants of 
sureties of the Magna Charta), Archivist General of the National Soci- 
ety of Americans of Royal Descent, member of the Society of May- 
flower Descendants, the Society of Colonial Wars, and from 1889 to 
1908 was Secretary of the American Historical Association. 

JOHN HARRIS BURROUGHS, 

Treasurer General. 

John Harris Burroughs was born at Trenton, N. J., April 17, 1849, 
son of Charles Burroughs, who served as mayor of Trenton for fifteen 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. II 

consecutive years — from 1832 until 1847 — who was also judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas for Mercer County, N. J., for sixteen years. 
John Burroughs, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
active in the Revolutionary War from the latter part of 1776 until 
the surrender of Cornwallis at the battle of Yorktown in 1781. Mr. 
Burroughs is descended from John Burroughs, who settled in New- 
town, Long Island, in 1653, with other English colonists. In the 
capacity of treasurer, vice-president, and president, he has served the 
Union League Club, Brooklyn, N. Y., in which city he has resided since 
1865. He is President of the Empire State Society, S. A. R. He 
has associated with him "his son, Harris S. Burroughs, dealing in com- 
mercial paper and bank stocks in New York city, in which business 
Mr. Burroughs has been engaged since 1874. 

He was elected Treasurer General at the Baltimore Congress in 1909 
and re-elected at the Toledo Congress and again at the Louisville 
Congress. 

DAVID L. PIERSON, 

Historian General. 

David Lawrence PiErson^ elected Historian General at the Toledo 
Congress and re-elected at Louisville, was born at Orange, N. J., Feb- 
ruary 3, 1865, son of Samuel Dodd Pierson and Louisa Mann. He is 
a direct descendant of Thomas Pierson, brother of the Rev. Abraham 
Pierson, who came to the banks of the Passaic River and settled the 
town of Newark, in 1666, with a company of Connecticut people who 
made the last stand for Church and State, one and inseparable, in the 
Colonies. 

His ancestor from whom he claims membership in the Sons of the 
American Revolution is Caleb Pierson, a private in the Second New 
Jersey Rifle Corps. 

yir. Pierson is chairman of the local History Committee of the New 
England Society, Orange ; Historian for seven years of Orange Chap- 
ter, S. A. R. ; Historian of Battery A (N. G. N. J.) Veteran Associa- 
tion ; honorary member of Uzal Dodd Post, G. A. R., and other veteran 
associations ; member of Hope Lodge, F. and A. M. He is also Presi- 
dent of the Old Burying Ground Association of Orange, and was 
instrumental in having the cemetery reclaimed and beautified after sixty 
years of neglect. He also formed the Revolutionary Monument Asso- 
ciation, which resulted in the placing of the Dispatch Rider statue in 
the cemetery to the memory of the men and women who assisted in 
establishing American independence. 

He is also interested in many patriotic enterprises in his community 
and it was through his efforts that Flag Day was publicly observed in 
the community, and has also started a movement for the placing of flag 
poles in the public parks in Essex County, N. J. He is the city editor 
of a local paper at East Orange. 



12 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

JOHN TIMOTHY STONE, D. D., 
Chaplain General. 

Rev. John Timothy Stone, D. D., elected Chaplain General at the 
Toledo Congress in 1910 and re-elected at Louisville, was born in 
Maynard, Mass., a small suburb of Boston, in 1868. He is a son of 
Rev. Timothy Dwight Porter Stone, a Congregational minister of New- 
England. His mother was Susan Margaret Dickinson, of Waterford, 
N. Y. His grandfather was Rev. Timothy Stone, of Cornwall, Conn., 
and his great-grandfather was Rev. Timothy Stone, of Goshen, Conn. 
He is the sixth in a direct line of ministers on his paternal side. He 
becatie a member of the Maryland Society in 1908 as descendant of 
Timothy Dickinson, who served as private in the Massachusetts Militia 
and Continental troops, and upon his removal to Chicago was trans- 
ferred to the Illinois Society. 

Dr. Stone's early training was in Albany, N. Y., where he graduated 
from the high school in 1886. He graduated from Amherst College, 
class of 1891, as class orator and prominent in athletic interests. He 
studied theology in Auburn, N. Y., at the Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, graduating in 1894. 

His first charge was the Olivet Presbyterian Church, of Utica, where 
he remained a little less than three years, leaving this work to accept 
the call of the Presbyterian Church, of Cortland, N. Y. In 1900 he 
succeeded Rev. Dr. Maltbie D. Babcock as pastor of the Brown Memo- 
rial Presbyterian Church, of Baltimore, where he remained until the 
spring of 1909, leaving there to accept the repeated call of the Fourth 
Presbyterian Church, on the North Side of Chicago. 

He was first given the degree of Doctor of Divinity by the University 
of Maryland, and later by his alma mater, Amherst, in June, 1909. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES, 1911. 



Standing Committees. 

Executive Committee: 

Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., President General, Chairman, 

Lowell, Mass. 
William Allen Marble, 890 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Col. Isaac F. Mack, Sandusky, Ohio. 
Lewis Beers Curtis, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Elmer M. Wentworth, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston, Louisville, Ky. 
Edwin S. Crandon, Evening Transcript, Boston, Mass. 



NATIONAI, COMMITTEES. I3 

Committee on Auditing and Finance: 

William A. De Caindry, Chairman, 914 17th St., Washington, 

D. C. 
Charles Montraville Green, M. D., 78 Marlborough St., Boston, 

Mass. 
Hon. Charles Dean Kimball, 398 Broadway, Providence, R. I. 
Henry C. Sherwood, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Thomas W. Williams, East Orange, N. J. 
Albert M. Henry, 1201 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 
Frank B. Steele, 658 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Committee on Credentials: 

Waldo E. Boardman, D. M. D., Chairman, 419 Boylston St., 

Boston, Mass. 
Louis A. Bowman, 30 N. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
Walter Hill Crockett, Montpelier, Vt. 
Albert D. Spangler, 72 S St., Washington, D. C. 
B. A. Thaxter, 443 nth St., Portland, Ore. 
Linn Paine, Mermod, Jaccard & King Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Leslie B. Sulgrove, Helena, Mont. 

Memorial Committee: 

Prof. Arthur B. Bibbins, Chairman, 2600 Maryland Ave., 

Baltimore, Md. 
Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. A. (retired), Lowell, Mass. 
Joseph G. Butler, Jr., Youngstown, Ohio. 
W. W. Stephenson, Harrodsburg, Ky. 
J. Staunton Moore, 2209 E. Broad St., Richmond, Va. 
Walter Kendall Watkins, 47 Hillside Ave., Maiden, Mass. 
William O. Junkins, M. D., Portsmouth, N. H. 

Committee on Organization: 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chair man, 1755 P St., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. C. Ballard Thruston, Louisville, Ky. 
Col. R. W. Guthrie, 434 Diamond St., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Amedee B. Cole, 3705 Lindell Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
John H. Cross, Pensacola, Fla. 
John W. Faxon, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Robert Tripp Bonner, Aurora, N. C. 

Committee on Education : 

Col. Charles Lyman, Chairman, Treasury Dept., Washington, 

D. C. 
Elmer M. Wentworth, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Prof. William K. Wickes, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Rev. Joseph A. Vance, 1448 E. 53d St., Chicago, 111. 
Seymour C. Loomis, New Haven, Conn. 
George H. Barbour, Detroit, Mich. 
William Whipple Kirbj% 1239 Downing St., Denver, Colo. 



14 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Special Committees. 

Committee on Prevention of the Desecration of the Flag: 

W. V. Cox, Chairman, Second National Bank, Washington, D. C. 

Henry W. Samson, 2423 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D. C. 

Louis Annin Ames, Fulton and William Sts., New York, N. Y. 

Archie Lee Talbot, Lewiston, Maine. 

Dr. George C. F. Williams, Hartford, Conn. 

Fay Hempstead, Little Rock, Ark. 

William H. Pullen, Jackson, Miss. 

Committee on Information for Aliens : 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman, 1755 P St., 

Washington, D. C. 
Col. Charles Lyman, Treasury Dept., Washington, D. C. 
A. Howrard Clark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Committee on Pension and Muster Rolls: 

Col. Gilbert C. Kniffin, Chairman, U. S. Pension Bureau, 

Washington, D. C. 
Zebina Moses, 1536 i6th St., Washington, D. C. 
Luther Atwood, 8 Sagamore St., Lynn, Mass. 
Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A., Boise, Idaho. 
Maj. George W. Hyde, 225 E. Balto. St., Baltimore, Md. 
Col. Oscar H. Condit, East Orange, N. J. 
Maj. Edgar B. Tolman, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Committee on Investment of Permanent Fund: 

Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., President General, Chairman, 

Lowell, Mass. 
John H. Burroughs, Treasurer General, 15 William St., New 

York, N. Y. 
Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, Peekskill, N. Y. 

Committee on National Parks: 

Edward Hagaman Hall, Chairman, Tribune Bldg., New York, 

N. Y. 
George Curtis Sterling, Montclair, N. J. 
Clarence P. Wynne, 62,7 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Capt. Gordon Lines Hutchins, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Hon. Stephen C. Bragaw, Washington, N. C. 
Col. Lewis B. Morrow, 710 Franklin St., Wilmington, Del. 
George S. Klock, Albuquerque, New Mex. 

Press Committee: 

A. Howard Clark, Chairman, Smithsonian Institution, 

Washington, D. C. 
Edwin S. Crandon, Evening Transcript, Boston, Mass. 
William E. Curtis, Home Life Bldg., Washington, D. C. 
David L. Pierson, East Orange, N. J. 
Orville Dwight Baldwin, 1000 Green St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PRESIDENTS GENERAL. 15 

Hon. Merrill Moores, Law Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hon. Charles Keith, Princeton, Minn. 

Committee on Jefferson Memorial: 

Rear Admiral Geo. W. Baird, U. S. N. (retired), Chairman, 

1505 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D. C. 
George Tully Vaughan, M. D., 1718 I St., Washington, D. C. 
Caleb Clarke Magruder, Jr., Commercial Bank Bldg., 

Washington, D. C. 

Committee on Xaval Records: 

Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman, 1755 P St., 

Washington, D. C. 
Charles West Stewart, Navy Dept, Washington, D. C. 
Hon. George A. Loud, x\u Sable, Mich. 



PRESIDENTS GENERAL, 1889 TO 191 1. 

Lucius P. Deming, of Connecticut. Elected April 30, 1889. 

Dr. William Seward Webb, of Vermont. Elected April 30, 1890; 

re-elected 1891. 
Col. a. S. Hubbard, Past President of California Society; enrolled in 

list of Presidents General by vote of Congress, April 30, 1890. 
Gen. Horace Porter, LL. D., of New York. Elected April 30, 1892; 

re-elected 1893, 1894, 1895, and 1896. 
Gen. Albert M. Winn, Past President of California Society; enrolled 

in list of Presidents General by vote of Congress, April 30, 1892. 

Died August 26, 1883. 
Hon. Edwin ShEpard Barrett, of Massachusetts. Elected April 30, 

1897; re-elected 1898. Died December 21, 1898. 
Hon. Franklin Murphy, of New Jersey. Succeeded to office on death 

of Hon. Edwin Shepard Barrett, 1898; elected May 2, 1899. 
Cen. Joseph C. Breckinridge, U. S. A., of Washington, D. C, Elected 

May I, 1900.' 
Hon. Walter Seth Logan, of New York. Elected May i, 1901. Died 

July 19, 1906. 
Hon. Edwin Warfield, of Maryland. Elected May i, 1902. 
'Gen. Edwin S. GreelEy, of Connecticut. Elected May i, 1903. 
Hon. James Denton Hancock, of Pennsylvania. Elected June 16, 1904. 
Gen. Francis Henry ApplETon, of Massachusetts. Elected May 3, 1905. 
Hon. Cornelius Amory Pugsley, of New York. Elected May i, 1906. 
Nelson A. ^^IcClary, of Illinois. Elected June 4, 1907. 
Hon. Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland. Elected May i, 1908. 
Hon. Morris B. Beardsley, of Connecticut. Elected May i, 1909. 
William Allen Marble, of New York. Elected May 3, 1910. 
Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., of Massachusetts. Elected May 3, 191 1. 



l6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



NATIONAL CHARTER. 



[Public — No. 214.] 



H. R. 15332. 
FIFTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; 

At the First Session, 

Begun and held at the City of Washington on Monday, the fourth day 
of December, one thousand nine hundred and five. 



AN ACT 



To Incorporate the National Society oe the Sons of the American. 

Revolution. 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That Francis Henry 
Appleton, of Massachusetts; Lucius P. Deming, of Connecticut; William 
Seward Webb, of Vermont; Horace Porter, of New York; Joseph C. 
Breckinridge, of Washington, District of Columbia ; Franklin Murphy, 
of New Jersey; Walter S. Logan, of New York; Edwin Warfield, of 
Maryland ; Edwin S. Greeley, of Connecticut ; James D. Hancock, of 
Pennsylvania; Morris B. Beardsley, of Connecticut; John C. Lewis, of 
Kentucky; Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland; Nelson A. McClary, of 
Illinois; A. Howard Clark, of Washington, District of Columbia; Isaac 
W. Birdseye, of Connecticut; William K. Wickes, of New York; J. W, 
Atwood, of Ohio ; J. W. Whiting, of Alabama ; Ricardo E. Miner, of 
Arizona ; Joseph M. Hill, of Arkansas ; Alexander G. Eells, of Cali- 
fornia ; Clarkson N. Guyer, of Colorado ; Jonathan Trumbull, of Con- 
necticut ; Thomas F. Bayard, of Delaware; William H. Bayly, of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia; William S. Keyser, of Florida; Charles 
M. Cooke, of Hawaii ; Inman H. Fowler, of Indiana ; Eugene Secor, of 
Iowa ; John M. Meade, of Kansas ; Peter F. Pescud, of Louisiana ; 
Waldo Pettengill, of Maine: James D. Iglehart, of Maryland; Moses G. 
Parker, of Massachusetts; Rufus W. Clark, of Michigan; James C. 
Haynes, of Minnesota; Ashley Cabell, of Missouri; Ogden A. South- 
mayd, of Montana ; Amos Field, of Nebraska ; Daniel C. Roberts, of 



NATIONAL CHARTER. 17 

New Hampshire; J.Franklin Fort, of New Jersey; William A. Marble, 
of New York; Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio; Henry H. Edwards, of Okla- 
homa ; Thomas M. Anderson, of Oregon ; William L. Jones, of Penn- 
sylvania ; John E. Studley, of Rhode Island ; Theodore G. Carter, of 
South Dakota; J. A. Cartwright, of Tennessee; I. M. Standifer, of 
Texas ; Fred A. Hale, of Utah ; Henry D. Holton, of Vermont ; Luns- 
ford L. Lewis, of Virginia ; Cornelius H. Hanford, of Washington ; 
J. Franklin Pierce, of Wisconsin; Trueman G. Avery, of New York; 
William W. J. Warren, of New York; Henry V. A. Joslin, of Rhode 
Island ; John Paul Earnest, of Washington, District of Columbia ; A. S. 
Hubbard, of California, and all such other persons as may from time to 
time be associated with them, and their successors, are hereby consti- 
tuted a body corporate and politic, in the city of Washington, in the 
District of Columbia, by the name of the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

Sec. 2. That the purposes and objects of said corporation are de- 
clared to be patriotic, historical, and educational, and shall include those 
intended or designed to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by 
their services or sacrifices during the war of the American Revolution, 
achieved the independence of the American people ; to unite and pro- 
mote fellowship among their descendants ; to inspire them and the com- 
munity at large with a more profound reverence for the principles of 
the government founded by our forefathers; to encourage historical 
research in relation to the American Revolution ; to acquire and pre- 
serve the records of the individual services of the patriots of the war, 
as well as documents, relics, and landmarks ; to mark the scenes of the 
Revolution by appropriate memorials; to celebrate the anniversaries of 
the prominent events of the war and of the Revolutionary period; to 
foster true patriotism ; to maintain and extend the institutions of 
American freedom, and to carry out the purposes expressed in the pre- 
amble to the Constitution of our country and the injunctions of Wash- 
ington in his farewell address to the American people. 

Sec. 3. That said corporation shall have power to receive, purchase, 
hold, sell, and convey real and personal estate, so far only as may be 
necessary or convenient for its lawful purposes, to an amount not ex- 
ceeding at any one time in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars ; 
to sue and be sued, complain and defend in any court; to adopt a com- 
mon seal, and to alter the same at pleasure ; to make and adopt a con- 
stitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations for admission, government, 
suspension, and expulsion of its members, and from time to time to 
alter and repeal such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations, and 
to adopt others in their places ; to provide for the election of its officers 
and to define their duties ; to provide for State Societies or Chapters 
with rules for their conduct, and to regtilate and provide for the man- 
agement, safe-keeping, and protection of its property and funds ; 
Provided always, That such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regula- 
tions be not inconsistent with the laws of the United States or any 
of the States thereof. 

2 — SR 



l8 SONS of THE AMERICx^N REVOLUTION. 

Sec. 4. That the property and affairs of said corporation shall be 
managed by not more than sixty nor less than forty trustees, who shall 
be elected annually at such time as shall be fixed in the by-laws, and at 
least one trustee shall be elected annually from a list of nominees to be 
made by each of the State Societies and submitted to this Society at 
least thirty days before the annual meeting, in accordance with general 
provisions regulating such nominations as may be adopted by this 
Society. 

Sec. 5. That the first meeting of this corporation shall be held on a 
call issued by any fifteen of the above-named corporators by a written 
notice signed by them, stating the time and place of meeting, addressed 
to each of the corporators personally named herein and deposited in 
the post-office at least five days before the day of meeting. 

Sec 6. That this charter shall take effect upon its being accepted by a 
majority vote of the corporators named herein who shall be present at 
said meeting, or at any other meeting specialh' called for that purpose ; 
and notice of such acceptance shall be given by said corporation by 
causing a certificate to that effect signed by its President and Secretary 
to be filed in the office of the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 7. That Congress reserves the right to alter, amend, or repeal 
this act. 

J. G. Cannon, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
Chas. W. Fairbanks, 
Vice-President of the United States 

and President of the Senate. 
Approved, June 9, 1906. 

Theodore RooseveIvT. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF 

The National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution 

(Adopted at the Denver Congress, June 3, 1907; amended at Toledo 
Congress, May 2, 1910, and at Loiiisznile Congress, May 2, 1911) 



Article I. — Name. 

The name of this organization shall be "The National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution." 

Article II. — Purposes and Objects. 

The purposes and objects of this Society are declared to be patriotic, 
historical, and educational, and shall include those intended or designed 
to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by their services or sacrifices 
during the war of the American Revolution, achieved the independence 
of the American people ; to unite and promote fellowship among their 
descendants ; to inspire them and the community at large with a more 
profound reverence for the principles of the Government founded by 
our forefathers ; to encourage historical research in relation to the 
American Revolution; to acquire and preserve the records of the indi- 
vidual services of the patriots of the war, as well as documents, relics, 
and landmarks ; to mark the scenes of the Revolution by appropriate 
memorials; to celebrate the anniversaries of the prominent events of the 
war and of the Revolutionary period; to foster true patriotism; to 
maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom, and to carry 
out the purposes expressed in the preamble of the Constitution of our 
country and the injunctions of Washington in his farewell address to 
the American people. 

Article III. — Membership. 

Section i. Any man shall be eligible to membership in the Society 
who, being of the age of twenty-one years or over, and a citizen of good 
repute in the community, is the lineal descendant of an ancestor who 
was at all times unfailing in his loyalty to, and rendered active service 
in, the cause of American Independence, either as an officer, soldier, 
seaman, marine, militiaman or minute man, in the armed forces of the 
Continental Congress, or of any one of the several Colonies or States, 
or as a signer of the Declaration of Independence ; or as a member of a 
Committee of Safety or Correspondence ; or as a member of any Con- 

(19) 



20 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

tinental, Provincial, or Colonial Congress or Legislature; or as a 
recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts of 
resistance to the authority of Great Britain. 

Section 2. No one shall be entitled to membership in any State 
Society who has previously been a member of any other State Society 
and dropped for the non-payment of dues, until the indebtedness of 
such individual to the first Society shall have been adjusted. 

Section 3. Applications for membership shall be made to any State 
Society, in duplicate, upon blank forms prescribed by the Board of 
Trustees, and shall in each case set forth the name, occupation and 
residence of the applicant, line of descent, and the name, residence and 
services of his ancestor or ancestors in the Revolution, from whom he 
derives eligibility. 

The applicant shall make oath that the statements of his application 
are true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

Upon the approval of an application by the State Society, to which it 
is made, one copy shall be transmitted to the Registrar General of the 
National Society, who shall examine further the eligibility of the appli- 
cant. If satisfied that the member is not eligible, he shall return the 
application for correction. 

Until the State Society shall satisfy the Registrar General of the 
eligibility of such applicant, his name shall not be placed on the roll of 
membership. 

Section 4. The official designation of the members of The National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution shall be "Compatriots." 

Article IV. — National and State Societies. 

Section i. The National Society shall embrace all the members of the 
State Societies of the Sons of the American Revolution now existing or 
which may hereafter be established under this Constitution. 

Section 2. Whenever in any State or Territory in which a State 
Society does not exist, or in which a State Society has become inactive, 
or failed for two years to pay its annual dues to the National Society, 
fifteen or more persons duly qualified for membership in this Society 
may associate themselves as a State Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, and organize in accordance with this Constitution, they 
may be admitted by the Board of Trustees to the National Society as 

"The Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and shall 

thereafter have exclusive local jurisdiction in the State or Territory or 
in the District in which they are organized, subject to the provisions of 
this Constitution, but this provision shall not be construed so as to 
exclude the admission of candidates residing in other States. 

Section 3. Each State Society shall judge of the qualifications of its 
members and of those proposed for membership, subject to the provis- 
ions of this Constitution, and shall regulate all matters pertaining to its 
own affairs. It shall have authority to establish local Chapters within its 
own jurisdiction, and to endow the Chapters with such power as it may 



NATIONAL CONSTITUTION. 21 

deem proper, not inconsistent with the charter of the National Society 
or with this Constitution. It shall have authority, after due notice and 
impartial trial, to expel any member who, by conduct unbecoming a 
gentleman, shall render himself unworthy to remain a member of the 
Society. 

Section 4. Each State Society shall submit to the Annual Congress of 
the National Society a report, setting forth by name the additions, 
transfers and deaths, and any other changes in the membership and the 
progress of the State Society during the preceding year, and making 
such suggestions as it shall deem proper for the promotion of the 
objects of the National Society. 

Section 5. Whenever a member in good standing in his Society shall 
change his residence from the jurisdiction of the State Society of which 
he is a member to that of another, he shall be entitled, if he so elects, 
to a certificate of honorable demission from his own State Society, in 
order that he may be transferred to the State Society to whose juris- 
diction he shall have changed his residence ; provided, that his member- 
ship shall continue in the former until he shall have been elected a mem- 
ber of the latter. 

Each State Society shall, however, retain full control of the admis- 
sion of members by transfer. 

Section 6. Whenever the word "State" occurs in this Constitution, it 
shall be held to include within its meaning the District of Columbia and 
the Territories of the United States. 

Section 7. A Society may be formed in any foreign country bv fifteen 
or more persons who are eligible to membership under this Constitution, 
which shall bear the same relation to the National organization as the 
State Society, subject to the provisions of this Constitution. 

Article V. — Officers and Trustees. 

Section i. The General Officers of the National Society shall be a 
President General, five Vice-Presidents General, the order of seniority 
among whom shall be determined by lot at the time of their election, 
a Secretary General, Treasurer General, Registrar General, Historian 
General, and Chaplain General, who shall be elected by ballot by a vote 
of a majority of the members present and entitled to vote at the 
annual meeting of the Congress of the National Society, and shall hold 
office for one year and until their successors shall be elected. 

Section 2. The General Officers provided for in section i, together 
with one member from each State Society, shall constitute the Board of 
Trustees of the National Society. Such Trustee from each of the 
several State Societies shall be elected annually at the Congress of the 
National Society, upon the nomination, or from a list of nominees, to be 
made by each of the State Societies and submitted to the National 
Society by the filing thereof with the Secretary of the National Society 
at least thirty days before the meeting of the Annual Congress of the 
National Society. And in the event that any one or more of the State 



22 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOEUTION. 

Societies shall omit or neglect to make such nomination or submit said 
list of nominees, by the time herein required, then the President of the 
State Society so in default, shall, virtute officii, be chosen as and become 
the representative of his State Society upon said Board. 

Section 3. The Board of Trustees shall have charge of, and be 
charged with the care and custody of all property belonging to the 
National Society, and to that end shall be vested with the powers con- 
ferred by section 3 of the Act of Incorporation of the National Society : 
Provided, however, That it shall not have the power to sell, convey, or 
in any wise encumber any real estate belonging to the Society without 
the assent of three-fourths of the members of said Board. The Board 
of Trustees shall also have authority to adopt and promulgate the 
By-Laws of the National Society, to prescribe the duties of the General 
Officers, to provide the seal, to designate and make regulations for the 
issue of the insignia, and to transact the general business of the National 
Society during the intervals between the sessions of the Congress. 

Meetings of the Board of Trustees may be held at the call of the 
President General, or in case of his absence or inability, at the call of 
the Senior Vice-President General, certified by the Secretary General. 
Meetings shall be called at the request of seven members. At such 
meetings seven shall constitute a quorum. 

Section 4. An executive committee of seven, consisting of the Presi- 
dent General as chairman, and six members to be nominated by him and 
approved by the Board of Trustees, shall, in the interim between the 
meetings of the Board, transact such business as may be delegated to it 
by a Congress of the Society or the Board of Trustees. 

Article VI. — Dues. 

Each State Society shall pay annually to the Treasurer General, to 
defray the expenses of the National Society, fifty cents for each active 
member thereof, unless intermitted by the National Congress. 

All such dues shall be paid on or before the first day of April in each 
year for the ensuing year, in order to secure representation in the 
Congress of the National Society. 

Article VII. — Meetings and Elections. 

Section i. The Annual Congress of the National Society for the 
election of the General Officers and for the transaction of business shall 
be held on the third Monday of May in each year. The place of such 
meeting shall be designated by the Board of Trustees. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the Congress may be called by the 
President General, and shall be called by him when directed so to do by 
the Board of Trustees, or whenever requested in writing so to do by at 
least five State Societies, on giving thirty days' notice, specifying the 
time and place of such meeting and the business to be transacted. 

Section 3. The following shall be members of all such annual or 
special meetings of the Congress, and shall be entitled to vote therein : 



NATIONAL CONSTITUTION. 23 

(1) All the General Officers and the ex-Presidents General of the 
National Society. 

(2) The members of the Board of Trustees and the President or 
Senior Vice-President of each State Society. 

(3) One delegate at large from each State Society. 

(4) One delegate from every fifty members of the Society within a 
State and for a fraction of twenty-five or over. 

Section 4. After the adjournment of the Eighteenth Annual Con- 
gress of this Society, State Societies shall be represented at meetings of 
the National Society only by members of their own State Society, either 
duly elected, or who in the absence of regularly elected delegates, may 
be chosen by the regulafly elected attending delegates of such State 
Society from the members of such State Society who may be present 
at any meeting of the National Society. 

Article VIII. — Permanent Fund. 

Section i. There shall be created and maintained a Permanent Fund 
of the Society, the income or interest from which shall be covered into 
the general treasury of the Society and available for the general pur- 
poses of the Society, but the principal of which shall be maintained in- 
tact, and shall only be used or diminished upon the unanimous recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee, approved by the Board of 
Trustees, and ratified by a four-fifths vote of the delegates present at 
the annual or special Congress to which such recommendation of the 
Executive Committee shall be reported. 

Section 2. The Permanent Fund shall be composed of all legacies or 
donations to the Society, where no other application of the funds is 
designated by the testator or donor, all commissions received from the 
sales of badges, rosettes and ribbon, and such sum or sums as may from 
time to time by the Executive Committee be transferred to such fund 
from the general funds of the Society. 

Section 3. The permanent fund shall be invested in securities author- 
ized to be held by Savings Banks in Massachusetts, Connecticut, or 
New York, and any premium paid in purchasing such securities shall be 
repaid from the first income received. 

Article IX. — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be altered or amended at any meeting of the 
Congress of the National Society, provided that sixty days' notice of 
the proposed alterations or amendments, which shall first have been 
recommended by a State Society, or by a prior Congress, or by the 
Board of Trustees, or by the Executive Committee of the National 
Society, shall be sent by the Secretary General to the President of each 
State Society. 

A vote of two-thirds of those present shall be necessary to their 
adoption. 

Article X. 

This Constitution shall take effect upon its adoption. 



BY-LAWS 

OF 

The National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution 

(Adopted at Denver Congress, June 3, 1907) 



Article I. — Election of Officers. 

All nominations of General Officers shall be made from the floor, and 
the election shall be by ballot. A majority shall elect. The nomina- 
tions may be acted upon directly or may be referred to a committee to 
examine and report. 

Article II. — Officers. 

The duties of the General Officers shall be such as usually appertain 
to their offices, and they shall have such other duties as are hereinafter 
imposed or shall be delegated to them by an annual Congress or by the 
Board of Trustees. 

They shall report at the annual meeting, and at such other times as 
they may be required to do so by the Board of Trustees. 

Article III. — President General. 

Section i. The President General, in addition to his general duties, 
shall be ex oMcio chairman of the Board of Trustees, and of the Execu- 
tive Committee, and a member of every other Committee. 

Section 2. At each annual meeting he shall appoint the following 
standing committees : 

Committee on Auditing and Finance. 
Committee on Credentials. 
Memorial Committee. 
Committee on Organization. 
Committee on Education. 

The duties of the above committees shall be such as usually pertain to 
committees of like character, and such as may be defined by the Board 
of Trustees. 

(24) 



NATIONAL BY-LAWS. 2$ 

Article IV. — Vice-Presidents General. 

Section i. In the absence of the President General, the Senior Vice- 
President General present shall preside at the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. In the prolonged absence or inability to act of the Presi- 
dent General, the executive authority shall be vested in the Vice-Presi- 
dents General in order of precedence. 

Article V. — Secretary General. 

The Secretary General, in addition to his general duties, shall have 
charge of the seal, and give due notice of all meetings of the National 
Society or Board of Trustees. He shall give due notice to all General 
Officers and State Societies of all votes, orders and proceedings affect- 
ing or appertaining to their duties. He shall distribute all pamphlets, 
circulars, rosettes, and supplies, as directed by the Board of Trustees. 

Article VI. — Treasurer General. 

Section i. The Treasurer General shall collect and receive the funds 
and securities of the National Society. He shall deposit the same to the 
credit of the "Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and 
shall draw them thence for the use of the National Society, as directed 
by it or by the Board of Trustees, upon the order of the President 
General, countersigned by the Secretary General. His accounts shall be 
audited by a committee to be appointed at the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. He shall give bond for the safe custody and application of 
the funds, the cost of such bond to be borne by the National Society. 

Article VII. — Registrar General. 

The Registrar General shall keep a register of the names and dates of 
the election, resignation or death of all members of the several State 
Societies, and shall have the care and custody of all duplicate applica- 
tions for membership. He shall issue upon the requisition of the Secre- 
tary or Registrar of the several State Societies certificates of member- 
ship and insignia to every member entitled thereto, through such Secre- 
tary or Registrar. 

Article VIII.— Historian General. 

The Historian General shall have the custody of all the historical and 
biographical collections of which the National Society may become pos- 
sessed and shall catalogue and arrange the same, and shall place the 
same in a fireproof repository for preservation. 

Article IX. — Chaplain General. 

The Chaplain General shall be a regularly ordained minister, and shall 
open and close all general meetings of the National Society with the 
services usual and proper on such occasions. 



26 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Article X. — State Societies. 

Every State Society shall — 

(i) Notify the Secretary General of the election and appointment of 
all officers, nominees for Board of Trustees, and delegates. 

(2) Pay to the Treasurer General on the first day of March or 
within thirty days thereafter, the sum of fifty cents for each active 
member thereof. 

(3) Transmit to the Registrar General duplicate applications of all 
accepted members, and notify him of the resignation or death of all 
members thereof. 

Article XL — Board of Trustees. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall prepare and carry out plans 
for promoting the objects and growth of the Society; shall generally 
superintend its interests, and shall execute such other duties as shall be 
committed to it at any meeting of the National Society. It shall have 
charge of the printing of the Diploma and the manufacturing of the 
Insignia, and shall determine the price at which the same shall be issued. 

Section 2. It shall have the authority to admit or reorganize as a 
State Society any association of fifteen or more persons duly qualified 
for membership in the Society. 

Section 3. It shall have power to fill any vacancy occurring among 
the General Officers, and an officer so elected shall act until the follow- 
ing annual election and until his successor shall be elected. 

Section 4. It shall have authority to make, alter, and amend the By- 
Laws as hereinafter provided. 

Section 5. The President General may call meetings of the Board of 
Trustees at any time he may deem necessary, and shall call such meet- 
ings upon the written request of any five members thereof, provided 
that of any meeting, other than such as may be called during the session 
or immediately upon the adjournment of an annual or special Congress 
of the National Society, not less than five days' notice of the time and 
place of such meeting shall be given. 

Article XI I. — Executive Committee. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee may be called at any time by 
the President General, and such meeting shall be called upon the written 
request of three members thereof. It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to exercise the powers and perform the duties committed to 
it by any annual or special Congress or by the Board of Trustees; to 
control and supervise all arrangements for the holding of the annual or 
any special Congress, and the social and other functions connected there- 
with ; it shall, upon the request of the proper committee of the National 
Society or of the Board of Trustees, assist in the organization of new 
State Societies, and increasing the membership of weak State Societies, 
and for these purposes may incur its necessary expenses, limited to such 



NATIONAL BY-LAWS. 2/ 

amounts as may be in the Treasury unappropriated, and not required 
for the current expenses of the National Society during the year. 

Article XI II.— Seal. 

The seal of the Society shall be two and three-eighths of an inch in 
diameter, charged with the figure of a minute man, grasping a musket 
in his right hand, and surrounded by a constellation of thirteen stars, 
who shall be depicted in the habit of a husbandman of the period of the 
American Revolution, and as in the act of deserting the plough for the 
service of his country ; the whole encircled by a band three-eighths of 
an inch wide, within which shall appear the legend, "National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, organized April 30, 1889." 

Article XIV. — Certificates. 

All members of this Society, wherever admitted, shall be entitled to 
a certificate of membership duly attested by the President General, 
Secretary General, and Registrar General, countersigned by the Presi- 
dent, Secretary, and Registrar of the State Society to which such mem- 
ber shall have been admitted. 

Article XV. — Insignia. 

The insignia of the Society shall comprise (i) a cross surmounted 
by an eagle in gold, (2) a rosette. 

Section i. The cross shall be of silver, with four arms, covered with 
white enamel and eight gold points, same size as a Chevalier's Cross of 
the Legion of Honor of France, with a gold medallion in the center 
bearing on the obverse a bust of Washington in profile, and on the 
reverse the figure of a minute man, surrounded by a ribbon enameled 
blue, with the motto "Libertas et Patria" on the obverse, and the legend 
"Sons of the American Revolution" on the reverse, both in letters of 
gold. The cross shall be surmounted by an eagle in gold and the whole 
decoration suspended from a ring of gold by a ribbon of deep blue, with 
white and buff edges, and may be worn by any member of the Society 
on ceremonial occasicms only, and shall be carried on the left breast, or 
at the collar if an officer or Past President General of the National 
Society, or the President, active or past, of a State Society. 

Section 2. The rosette shall be seven-sixteenths of an inch in diam- 
eter, of usual pattern, displaying the colors of the Society — blue, white, 
and buff — and may be worn by all members at discretion in the upper 
left-hand buttonhole of the coat. 

Article XVI. — Indebtedness. 

No debts shall be contracted on behalf of the National Society. 
Every obligation for the payment of money, except checks drawn 
against deposits, executed in the name or on behalf of the National 
Society shall be null and void. 



28 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Article XVII. — Order of Business of the Annual Congress. 

1. Calling the Congress to order by the President General. 

2. Opening prayer by the Chaplain General. 

3. Appointment of a Committee on Credentials. 

4. Remarks by the President General on condition and needs of the 
Society. 

5. Report of Committee on Credentials. 

6. Reading of minutes of the last Congress. 

7. Report of Board of Trustees. 

8. Reports of General Officers. 

9. Reports of standing committees. 

10. Reports of special committees. 

11. Reports of State Societies. 

12. Old and unfinished business. 

13. New business, including election of officers and Trustees. 

14. Adjournment. 

15. Provided, That for a special purpose the Congress may, by a vote 
of two-thirds of those present and voting, suspend the above order of 
business. 

Article XVIII. — Amendments. 

These By-Laws may be altered or amended by a vote of three-fourths 
of the members present at any meeting of the Board of Trustees, notice 
thereof having been given at a previous meeting. 



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30 SONS OF" THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



OFFICERS OF STATE SOCIETIES AND CHAPTERS. 



ALABAMA SOCIETY. 

30 Members. 

Organized June 2~, 1903. Admitted into National Societj^ November 
18, 1903. 

Officers elected May 10, 1909. 

President, Wm. Frye Tebbetts, 32 Concepcion St Mobile 

Vice-President, Myron Titus Sprague, 107 Rapier St Mobile 

Vice-President, Charles H. Shawhan, 104 Dauphin St Mobile 

Vice-President, Robert Leroy Douglass, 54 St. Francis St Mobile 

Secretary-Treasurer, Alfred Edgar White Mobile 

Registrar, Dr. Wm. H. Gates, 59 No. Concepcion St Mobile 



ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

51 Members. 
Organized June 13, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, iii. 

President, Howard S. Reed Phcenix 

Vice-President, Dr. Mark A. Rodgers Tucson 

Secretary, Clay F. Leonard Phoenix 

Treasurer, Lloyd B. Christy Phoenix 

Registrar, Prosper P. Parker Phoenix 

Historian, Dr. Charles A. Van der Veer Phoenix 

Chaplain. Rev. J. W. Atwood Phoenix 



ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 

29 Members. 

Organized April 29, 1889. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Frank W. Rawles Little Rock 

Vice-President, Frank W. Tucker Little Rock 

Secretary-Registrar, Fay Hempstead Little Rock 

Treasurer, Philander Keep Roots Little Rock 

Chaplain, Arthur E. Woodward Little Rock 



STATE SOCIRTIES. 3I 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

431 Members. 

Instituted October 22, 1875, as Sons of Revolutionary Sires. Con- 
•stitution adopted August 7, 1876. Name changed to Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution March 22, 1890. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected April 19, 191 1. 

President, O. D. Baldwin, 1000 Green St San Francisco 

Senior Vice-President, A. J. Vining, 2134 Pine St San Francisco 

Junior Vice-Pres., H. C. Capwell, 12th and Washington Sts. .. .Oakland 

Secretary, Edwin Bonnell, 376 Sutter St San Francisco 

Registrar, Col. A. S. Hubbard, 2135 Sutter St San Francisco 

Treasurer, Col. C. S. Scott, 21 17 Hyde St San Francisco 

Marshal, F. W. Gushing, U. S. Custom House Oakland 

Historian, T. A. Perkins, Mills Building San Francisco 

Chapter Officers. 

LOS ANGELES CHAPTER. 

President, Gen. J. G. Chandler, 120 South Grand Ave. ; Vice-President, 
Dr. Norman Bridge, Temple Auditorium ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
H. R. Warren, 545 Douglas Building. 

SAN DIEGO CHAPTER, NO. 2. 

President, W. J. Mossholder, First Nat'l Bank Bldg. ; Vice-Presi- 
dents, A. E. Dodson, Franklin P. Reed; Treasurer, John P. Burt; 
Marshal, Charles A. Josslyn; Historian, E. M. Burbeck; Chaplain, Dr. 
A. Judson Gray; Secretary, John R. Berry. 



COLORADO SOCIETY. 

257 Members. 

Organized July 4, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Gen. John Chase, 923 Corona St Denver 

Vice-President, Floyd D. Hylton Fort Collins 

Vice-President, Victor E. Keyes Greeley 

Vice-President, E. W. Milligan, 1346 Clayton St Denver 

Vice-President, Wardner Williams, Equitable Building Denver 

Vice-President, Wendell B. Price Colorado Springs 

Secretary and Registrar, W. W. Kirby, 205 Colburn Bldg Denver 

Treasurer, Walter D. Wynkoop, Colorado Telephone Co Denver 

Historian, E. V. Dunklee, University of Colorado Boulder 

Chaplain, Rev. Jesse Penney Martin, 3144 Humboldt St Denver 



32 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Chapter Officers. 

COLORADO SPRINGS CHAPTER. ORGANIZED APRIL 2."], I908. 

President, Arthur Cornforth; First Vice-President, James P. Barnes; 
Second Vice-President, S. L. Caldwell; Chaplain, Fred S. Tucker; 
Secretary, O. E. Collins; Treasurer, L. H. Gowdy; Historian, Lucius 
H. Rouse; Registrar, Merton E. Stubbs. 

GREELEY CHAPTER. ORGANIZED JUNE 6, I908. 

President, Col. C. A. White ; Vice-President, J. T. Jacobs ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, C. E. Littell. 

DENVER CHAPTER. ORGANIZED FEBRUARY 22, IQOQ. 

President, Frank McLaughlin; Vice-President, John T. Holbrook; 
Secretary, James S. Hadley ; Treasurer, W. D. Wynkoop ; Historian, 
Sidney E. Bennett; Chaplain, Rev. Elmer E. Higley. 

FORT COLLINS CHAPTER. ORGANIZED APRIL 15, IQII. 

President, G. C. McCormick; Vice-President, Orlando Flower; Sec- 
retary and Registrar, W. H. Russel; Treasurer, W. R. Fuller; His- 
torian, L. M. Taylor. 



CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

1,103 Members. 

Organized April 2, 1889. Annual meeting May 10, to commemorate 
the capture of Fort Ticonderoga by a Connecticut expedition. 

Officers elected May 10, 191 1. 

President, Dr. George C. F. Williams Hartford 

Vice-President, Isaac W. Brooks Torrington 

Secretary, Charles G. Stone, P. O. Box 847 Hartford 

Treasurer, Henry C. Sherwood Bridgeport 

Registrar, Frederick Bostwick, 144 Grove St New Haven 

Historian, George F. Burgess New Haven 

Chaplain, Rev. John De Peu Bridgeport 

Necrologist, Capt. Henry R. Jones New Hartford 

Chapter Officers. 

GENERAL DAVID HUMPHREYS BRANCH, NO. I, NEW HAVEN. 

President, William S. Wells; Vice-President, Gen. Edward E. Bradley; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Judge Ernest C. Simpson; Chaplain, Rev. 
A. P. Stokes ; Historian, George F. Burgess. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 33 

CAPTAIN JOHN COUCH BRANCH, NO. 2, MERIDEN. 

President, H. Wales Lines ; Vice-President, Walter Hubbard ; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, Geo. M. Curtis; Historian, Judge J. P. Piatt; 
Chaplain, Rev. W. S. Perkins. 

GENERAL SILLIMAN BRANCH, NO. 3, BRIDGEPORT. ORGANIZED 1893. 

President, O. H. Brothwell ; Vice-President, Edw. J.. Morgan ; Secre- 
tary, F. A. Doolittle; Registrar, W. A. Barnes; Treasurer, Geo. C. 
Peet ; Historian, Dr. N. E. Wordin ; Chaplain, Rev. John De Peu. 

ISRAEL PUTNAM BRANCH, NO. 4, NORWICH. 

Secretary, Henry F. Parker. 

NORWALK BRANCH, NO. 5. 

Secretary, Charles A. Quintard. 

NATHAN HALE BRANCH, NO. 6, NEW LONDON. 

President, P. Leroy Harwood ; Secretary, Carl J. Viets ; Treasurer, 
Alfred Coit. 

THE COLONEL JEREMIAH W.\DS WORTH BRANCH, NO. 7, HARTFORD. 

President, Dr. George C. F. Williams ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Charles G. Stone; Historian, Frank B. Gay; Chaplain, Rev. William De 
Loss Love, D. D. 



DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

45 Members. 

Organized January 29, 1889. Annual meeting December 7, to com- 
memorate the ratificJttion of tlie Federal Constitution by Delaware. 

Officers elected April 19, 191 1. 

President, Col, George A. Elliott, Equitable Bldg Wilmington 

Vice-President, Thomas F. Bayard, 115 Dupont Bldg Wilmington 

Vice-President, James H. Hughes Dover 

Vice-President, Edwin C. Marshall Lewes 

Secretary-Treas., Col. Lewis B. Morrow, 710 Franklin St. . .Wilmington 

Registrar-Historian, George W. Marshall, M. D Milford 

Chaplain, Rev. Joseph Brown Turner Dover 

3— SR 



34 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIOX. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

(Washington, D. C.) 
490 IMembers. 
Organized April 19. 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Col. William B. Thompson, Munsey Bldg Washington 

Vice-President, W. V. Cox, Second National Bank Washington 

Vice-President, Wallace D. McClean, Union Trust Bldg. . .Washington 

Vice-President, Col. Gilbert C. Kniffin, Pension Office Washington 

Secretary, Paul Brockett, Smithsonian Institution Washington 

Treasurer, Philip F. Larner, 918 F St. N. W Washington 

Registrar, Albert D. Spangler, ']2 S St. N. W Washington 

Assistant Registrar, John E. Fenwick Kensington, Md. 

Historian, Prof. Selden M. Ely, 50 S St. N. W Washington 

Librarian, Charles W. Stewart, Navy Dept Washington 

Chaplain, Rev. Thomas S. Childs, D. D Chevy Chase. Md. 



FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

35 Members. 

Organized March 14, 1896. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate the birthday of Washington. 

Officers elected April 21, 1911. 

President. John H. Cross Pensacola 

Vice-President, Frank "B. Bruce Pensacola 

Secretary, R. E. Lee Cresap Pensacola 

Treasurer-Registrar, F. F. Bingham Pensacola 

Chaplain, Right Rev. E. G. Weed Pensacola 



SOCIETY IN FRANCE. 

15 Members. 

Organized in Paris. France. September 16, 1897. 

Officers. 

President, General Horace Porter, 277 Madison Ave New York 

Vice-President, Gaston de Sahune de la Fayette Paris 

Treasurer, J. D. Stickney Paris 

Registrar, Col. Charles Chaille-Long Washington, D. C. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 35 

HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

loi Members. 

Organized June 17, 1896. Annual meeting June 17, to commemorate 
the Battle of Bunker Hill. 

Officers elected June 20, igio. 

President, Dr. Charles Bryant Cooper, 1141 Alaska St Honolulu 

Vice-President, Charles H. Dickey, 35 South King St Honolulu 

Secretary, Perley Leonard Home, Kamehameha School Honolulu 

Treasurer, Fred D. Lowrey, 177 South King St Honolulu 

Registrar, John Effinger, P. O. Box 39 Honolulu 



IDAHO SOCIETY. 

32 Members. 

Organized April 8, 1909. x6o3350 

Officers elected February 22, 1911, 

President, M. W. Wood, Lieut. -Col. U. S. Army (retired) Boise 

Vice-President, D. W. Church Pocatello 

Vice-President, F. S. Harding Boise 

Vice-President, C. A. Hastings Lewiston 

Secretary-Treasurer. Harry Keyser, 332 Sonna Bldg Boise 

Registrar, W. H. Gibson Boise 

Historian, H. L. Chamberlain Boise 

Chaplain, W. S. Hawkes . . Boise 



ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

626 Members. 

Organized January 14, 1890. Annual meeting December 3, to com- 
memorate the admission of Illinois into the Union. 

Officers elected December 3, 1910. 

President, John D. Vandercook, 230 North Park Ave., Austin. . . Chicago 
ist Vice-President, La Verne W. Noyes, 130 Lake Shore Drive. .Chicago 

2d Vice-President, Chancellor L. Jenks, 1217 Ridge Ave Evanston 

Secretary, Louis A. Bowman, Room 1333, 30 N. La Salle St Chicago 

Treasurer, Francis J. Cushing, 1016 Chamber of Com. Bldg.. . Chicago 

Historian, Harlan W. Cooley, 159 La Salle St Chicago 

Registrar, Frederick L. Lothrop, 1834 Larchmont Ave Chicago 

Chaplain, John Timothy Stone, D. D., 71 East Elm St.. Chicago 

Sergeant-at-Arms, James Edgar Brown, 59 Clark St Chicago 



36 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Chapter Officers. 

SPRINGFIELD CHAPTER, NO. I. ORGANIZED FEBRUARY I, 1897. 

President, Charles F. Mills; Secretary, Isaac R. Diller; Treasurer. 
Geo. M. Brinkerhoff. 

OAK PARK CHAPTER, NO. 7. ORGANIZED JUNE, I9O3. 

President, Henry W. Austin; Secretary, W. J. Gallup; Treasurer, 
Louis A. Bowman. 

RIVER FOREST CHAPTER, NO. 8. ORGANIZED JANUARY, I9II. 

President, J. K Ingalls ; Secretary, Edgar L. Cotting; Treasurer, 
Frank C. Haselton. 

Geo. Rogers Clark Chapter, No. 2, Bloomington ; Evanston Chapter, 
No. 3; Rock Island Chapter, No. 5; Monmouth Chapter, No. 6, are not 
now actively maintained, although there are members in each of these 
cities and the charters still exist. 



INDIANA SOCIETY. 

225 Members. 

Organized January 15, 1890. Annual meeting February 25, to com- 
memorate the capture of Fort Sackville, Vincennes, Ind., b}'^ Gen. George 
Rogers Clark. 

Officers elected February 25, 191 1. 

President, Horace C. Starr, 1708 North Penn St Indianapolis 

First Vice-President, James E. Somes Terre Haute 

Second Vice-President, J. E. Vaile Kokomo 

Third Vice-President, Austin F. Denny Indianapolis 

Secretary, Bennett B. Bobbitt, Amer. Nat. Bank Indianapolis 

Treasurer, Stanley Curtis Brooks, 1401 No. Delaware St.. .Indianapolis 

Registrar, Garvin M. Brown, iioi No. Delaware St Indianapolis 

Chaplain, Rev. Christopher S. Sargent, 2115 Talbott Ave.. .Indianapolis 

Chapter Officers. 

ANTHONY WAYNE CHAPTER, NO. I, FORT WAYNE. 

President, James H. Haberly; Vice-President. George Tallman Ladd; 
Secretarj^ Horace G. Granger ; Treasurer, Charles B. Fitch. 

HUNTINGTON CHAPTER. 

President, Charles McGrew ; Vice-President. Frank Felter ; Secretary, 
Morton Tuttle; Treasurer, N. W. Scott; Registrar, E. B. Heiney. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 37 

JOHN MORTON CHAPTER, TERRE HAUTE. 

President, James Ellis Somes ; Vice-President, George Oscar Dix ; 
Secretary, Charles Timothy Jewett ; Treasurer, Horace Tune ; Registrar, 
James B. Harris ; Chaplain, John Patton Kimmel. 



IOWA SOCIETY. 

292 Members. 
Organized September 5, ^893. Annual meeting April 19. 
Officers elected April 19, 191 1. 

President, Elmer Marston Wentworth State Center 

First Vice-President, Rev. Ezra Butler Newcomb, D. D Keokuk 

Second Vice-President, Joseph G. Gardner Des Moines 

Treasurer, William Henry Field Valley Junction 

Secretary, Capt. Elbridge Drew Hadley Des Moines 

Registrar-Historian, Dr. Edward H. Hazen Des Moines 

Chaplain, Rev. James Perkins Burling Des Moines 

Chapter Officers. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, CHARITON. 

President, Col. Warren Scott Dungan ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Elijah H. Lewis ; Chaplain, Dr. David Roberts Dungan. 

BEN FRANKLIN CHAPTER, DES MOINES. 

President, Elbridge Drew Hadley; Vice-President, Dr. Gershom 
Hyde Hill ; Secretary and Treasurer, Lowell H. Stone. 

BUNKER HILL CHAPTER, WATERLOO. 

President, Austin Burt; First Vice-President, Daniel R. Weaver; 
Secretary and Treasurer, George Colvin Kennedy; Historian, Dr. La- 
fayette W. Case. 

LEXINGTON CHAPTER, KEOKUK. 

President, Eugene Silas Baker ; Vice-President, William J. Fulton ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Capt. David Brown Hamill. 

OTTUMWA CHAPTER, OTTUMWA. 

Vice-President, Frank Benjamin Clark; Secretary and Treasurer, 
George Francis Trotter. 

WASHINGTON CHAPTER, AMES. 

President, Dr. E. W. Stanton; Vice-President, Gen. James R. Lin- 
coln; Historian and Registrar, Prof. Benjamin H. Hibbard; Secretary 
and Treasurer, Charles Hamilton. 



38 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WOODBURY CHAPTER, SIOUX CITY. 

President, Alpheus B. Beall; Vice-President, Dr. Stephen B. Hoskins; 
Secretary, Harr}^ S. Snyder; Treasurer, Edwin G. Dilley, 



KANSAS SOCIETY. 

65 Members. 

Organized March 31, 1892. Annual meeting the third Wednesday in 
January. 

Officers. 

President, John M. Meade Topeka 

Vice-President, A. K. Rodgers Topeka 

Secretary-Historian, Daniel W. Nellis Topeka 

Treasurer, David W. Norton Topeka 

Registrar, Joseph Lewis Eldridge Topeka 



KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

125 AIembers. 

Organized April 8, 1889. Annual meeting October 19, to commemorate 
the surrender of Cornwallis. 

Officers elected October 19, 1910. 

President, George Lewis Danforth, Third and Main Sts Louisville 

Vice-President, S. Thruston Ballard, Ballard & Ballard Co. . .Louisville 

Secretary, Robinson A. McDowell, Kenyon Bldg Louisville 

Registrar, Benjamin La Bree, P. O. Box 454 Maysville 

Treasurer, George Twyman Wood, 430 W. Main St Louisville 

Historian, George Griffith Fetter, 412 W. Main St Louisville 

Chaplain, Very Rev. Charles Ewell Craik Louisville 



LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

^d Members. 
Organized ]\Iay 16, 1893. Annual meeting April 13, Jefferson's Birth- 
Officers elected December 10, 19 10. 

President, Edward Rightor New Orleans 

Vice-Presidents : John Day, Thomas Sloo, H. N. Pharr. 

State Sec'y, Thomas Dabney Dimitry, 1117 Euterpe St.... New Orleans 

Financial Secretary, Robert T. Burwell, 818 Gravier St New Orleans 

Treasurer, Col. Charles A. Larendon, 815 Union St New Orleans 



state: societies. 39 

Registrar, Hon. Louis D. Lagarde, Kennen Bldg New Orleans 

Historian, Henry Rightor, 8i8 Gravier St New Orleans 

Chaplain, Rev. John T. Sawyer, D. D New Orleans 



MAINE SOCIETY. 

375 Members. 

Organized March 14, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Dr. Seth C. Gordon Portland 

Senior Vice-President, Capt. Silas B. Adams Waterville 

Vice-Presidents for Counties: Androscoggin, Hon. Edwin P. Ricker, 
South Poland ; Aroostook, Willis B. Hall, Caribou ; Cumberland, 
Robert S. Thomes, Portland ; Franklin, Fred G. Paine, Farming- 
ton ; Hancock, Benj. L. Noyes, M. D., Stonington ; Kennebec, E. C. 
Carle, Augusta ; Knox, Eugene Prescott Webber, Westport ; Ox- 
ford, Chas. L. Hathaway, Norway; Penobscot, Henry N. Fair- 
banks, Bangor ; Piscataquis, John F. Sprague, Monson ; Sagadahoc, 
Wm. B. Kendall, Bowdoinham ; Somerset, Chas. F. Jones, Skowhe- 
gan; Waldo, Ralph Emery, Belfast; Washington, George R. Gard- 
ner, Calais; York, Lieut. Oliver P. Remick, Kittery. 

Secretary, Rev. Joseph Battel! Shepherd Portland 

Registrar, Albert R. Stubbs Portland 

Treasurer, Convers E. Leach Portland 

Librarian, Nathan Goold Portland 

Historian, Hon. Augustus F. Moulton Portland 

Chaplain, Rev. William G. Mann Westbrook 



MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

269 Membeks. 

Organized April 20, 1889. Annual meeting October 19, to commemo- 
rate the burning of the brig "Peggy Stuart" at Annapolis, October 19, 

1774. 

Officers elected October 19, 1910. 

President, Gen. Clinton L. Riggs, 903 N. Charles St Baltimore 

Vice-Presidents: Hon. George R. Gaither, Hon. Henry Stockbridge, 
James E. Hancock, George W. Hyde, T. Murray Maynadier. 

Secretary, Aubrey Pearre, Jr., 207 N. Calvert St Baltimore 

Treasurer, Ira H. Houghton, 12 E. Lexington St Baltimore 

Registrar, Edward F. Arthurs, 628 Equitable Bldg Baltimore 

Historian, Prof. Arthur B. Bibbins, 2600 Maryland Ave Baltimore 

Chaplain, Rev. Henry Branch, D. D Ellicott Citv 



40 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

1,635 Members. 

Organized April 19, 1889. Annual meeting April 19, to commemorate 
battles of Lexington and Concord. 

Officers elected April ig, 191 1. 

President, Edwin San ford Crandon Cambridge 

Vice-President, Luke Stearns Stowe Springfield 

Vice-President, Luther Atwood Lynn 

Vice-President, Frank E. Woodward Wellesley Hills 

Secretary-Registrar, Herbert W. Kimball, 17 Milk St Boston 

Treasurer, Charles Montraville Green, M. D. Boston 

Historian, Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. A. (retired) Lowell 

Chaplain, Rev. Lewis Wilder Hicks Wellesley 

Chapter Officers. 

OLD SALEM CHAPTER, SALEM. CHARTERED OCTOBER 3I, 1895. 

President, Frank V. Wright; Vice-President, William O. Hood; 
Second Vice-President, Albert Robinson ; Secretary, Shepard D. Gil- 
bert; Treasurer, Francis R. Hathaway; Registrar, Andrew Nichols. 

BOSTON CHAPTER. CHARTERED OCTOBER 3I, 1895. 

President, Edward J. Cox ; Vice-President, George W. Austin : Sec- 
retary, Charles C. Littlefield; Treasurer, Edwin B. Gallagher; His- 
torian, Frank E. Sawyer. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, SPRINGFIELD. CHARTERED OCTOBER 3I. 1895. 

President, Henry A. Field : Vice-President, William G. Wheat ; Secre- 
tary, Henry A. Booth ; Treasurer, Henry F. Punderson ; Registrar, 
Frank G. Tobey ; Historian, William F. Emerson ; Chaplain. Rev. New- 
ton M. Hall; Auditor, Edwin G. Rude. 

OLD MIDDLESEX CHAPTER, LOWELL. CHARTERED JANUARY l~, 1896. 

President, James B. Field, M. D. ; Vice-President, Rev. A. C. Ferrin ; 
Secretary, Ralph H. Shaw ; Treasurer, Russell Fox ; Registrar, Warren 
W. Fox ; Historian, Frank W. Hall ; Chaplain, Rev. Wilson Waters ; 
Auditor, George W. Miller. 

OLD ESSEX CHAPTER. LYNN. CHARTERED FEBRUARY /, 1896. 

President, Horace H. Atherton, Jr. ; First Vice-President, Charles 
J. H. Woodbury; Second Vice-President, Henry F. Tapley; Secretary 
and Registrar, Luther Atwood; Treasurer, Webster Bruce; Historian, 
Charles H. Bangs, M. D. 

OLD COLONY CHAPTER, WHITMAN. CHARTERED APRIL 17, 1896. 

President, ; Vice-President, Horatio F. Copeland, M. D. ; Sec- 
retary, Charles E. Lovell, M. D. ; Treasurer, Randall W. Cook; His- 
torian, . 



STATE SOCIETIES. 41 

OLD SUFFOLK CHAPTER, CHELSEA. CHARTERED FEBRUARY 3, 1897. 

President, Hon. Eugene F. Endicott; Vice-President, Charles O. 
Currier; Secretary, Thomas U. Follansbee ; Treasurer, Elmer H. Snow; 
Historian, James F. Thayer. 

WORCESTER CHAPTER, WORCESTER. CHARTERED APRIL 2, 1897. 

President, Winthrop Hammond ; Vice-Presidents, John C. Berry, 
M. D., Paul B.Morgan, Chas. T. Tatman ; Secretary, Edward F. Mann; 
Treasurer, George D. Barber; Historian, John K. Warren, M. D. 

NEWTOWNE CHAPTER, NEWTON. CHARTERED MAY 7, 1897. 

President, Harry B. Walker; Vice-President, Edw. J. Cox; Secretary 
and Treasurer, Frank E. Sawyer ; Registrar, Samuel G. Webber, M. D. ; 
Historian, Edward P. Hunt. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY CHAPTER, PITTSFIELD. CHARTERED JUNE 4, 1897. 

President, James H. Punderson ; Vice-Presidents, Dr. J. F. A. Adams, 
Henry A.Francis, Edward H. Brewer; Secretary and Registrar, Joseph 
E. Peirson ; Treasurer, William C. Stevenson ; Historian, William L. 
Root. 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE CHAPTER, TAUNTON. CHARTERED SEPTEMBER 3, 1897. 

President, Chas. H. Lincoln; First Vice-President, Lewis E. Higgins ; 
Second Vice-President, Enos D. Williams ; Secretary, Clarence F. Boy- 
den; Treasurer, Edward B. Hamlen ; Registrar, James E. Seaver; 
Historian, William M. Emery; Chaplain, Rev. J. Francis Cooper. 

MALDEN CHAPTER. CHARTERED AFRIL 6, I9OO. 

President, William H. Winship ; First Vice-President, Spencer T. 
Williams; Second Vice-President, A. Warren Patch; Secretary, Wal- 
ter K. Watkins; Treasurer, Willard Welsh; Historian, William B. 

Snow. 

CAMBRIDGE CHAPTER. CHARTERED MARCH /, I902. 

President, John Amee ; Vice-President, ; Secretary, Shepard 

Howland; Treasurer, Albert F. Amee; Historian, Edward B. Hutch- 
inson. 

SETH POMEROY CHAPTER, NORTHAMPTON. CHARTERED OCTOBER I3, I905. 

President, Elmer H. Copeland, M. D. ; Vice-President, Frank N. Look; 
Secretary, Louis L. Campbell ; Treasurer, S. Dwight Drury ; Historian, 
George W. Cable; Chaplain, Rev. Henry G. Smith, D. D. 

ROXBURY CHAPTER, BOSTON. CHARTERED APRIL I3, I906. 

President, Frank E. Granger; Vice-President, Wm. E. Briggs; Sec- 
retary, William W. Beal; Treasurer, Arthur L. Foster; Historian, 
Henry C. Whitcomb. 



42 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

379 Members. 
Organized January i8, 1890. Annual meeting April 15. 
Officers elected April 21, 191 1. 

President, Rev. Lee S. McCollester, D.D., 655 John R. St Detroit 

Vice-President, Joseph Greusel, 949 Fort St. W Detroit 

Secretarj^ Williams C. Harris, 610 Wayne Co. Sav. Bk. Bldg. . .Detroit 

Treasurer, Enoch Smith, Peoples State Bank Detroit 

Registrar, Raymond E. Van Syckle, 1022 Ford Bldg Detroit 

Chaplain, Rt. Rev. Charles D. Williams Detroit 

Historian, Clarence M. Burton, 20 Home Bank Bldg Detroit 

Chapter Officers. 

WESTERN MICHIGAN CHAPTER, GRAND R.\PIDS. 

President, William Judson ; Vice-President, H. C. Angell; Secretary, 
C. C. Follmer, 813 Mich. Trust Co. Bldg. 



MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

533 Members. 

Organized December 26, 1889. Annual meeting December 26, to com- 
memorate the anniversary of the Battle of Trenton. 

Officers elected January 11, 1910. 

President, Edward P. Sanborn, St. Paul 

Vice-President, Saxe G. L. Roberts Pine City 

Vice-President, Ambrose D. Countryman Appleton 

Vice-President, Stillman H. Bingham Duluth 

Vice-President, Gen. Lewis A. Grant Minneapolis 

Secretary, Charles H. Bronson, 48 East Fourth St St. Paul 

Assistant Secretary, Ernest A. Countryman St. Paul 

Treasurer, Edward S. Stringer, 306 Nat. Ger. Am. Bank Bldg. . .St. Paul 

Registrar, Charles Stees, 165 East Seventh St St. Paul 

Historian, Henry A. Castle St. Paul 

Chaplain, Rev. M. D. Edwards, D. D St. Paul 



MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 

25 Members. 
Organized May 10, 1909. 

Officers, 1911. 

President, Judge Gordon Garland Lyell Jackson 

Vice-President, Hon. W. D. Anderson Tupelo 

Vice-President, McGehee Porter Aberdeen 

Vice-President, Col. Chalmers M. Williamson Jackson 

Secretary-Registrar, Wm. H. Pullen, Mechanics' Bank Bldg Jackson 

Treasurer, Phillip Stevens Merrill Jackson 



STATE SOCIETIES. ^x 

MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

104 Members. 

Organized April 23,. 1889. Annual meeting March 4, to commemorate 
taking effect of the Constitution of the United States. Annual dinner 
April 19, to commemorate battles of Concord and Lexington. 

Officers elected March 4, 191 1. 

President, Amedee B. Cole, 3705 Lindell Ave St. Louis- 
First Vice-President, Jas. E: Withrow, Court House St. Louis. 

Second Vice-President, Rev. S. J. Niccolls, D. D., 8 Hortense PI. St.Louis 

Third Vice-President, W. B. Homer, 402 Rialto Bldg St.Louis 

Fourth Vice-President, John L. Ro Bards Hannibal 

Secretary, Robert E. Adreon, 1932 N. Broadway St. Louis 

Treasurer, L Shreve Carter, 803 Merchants' Laclede Bldg St.Louis 

Registrar, Linn Paine, Mermod, Jaccard & King Co St. Louis 

Historian, Jno. M. Fulton, Frisco Bldg St. Louis 

Chaplain, Rev. W. W. Boyd, 300 N. Fourth St St. Louis 

Chapter Officers. 

KANSAS CITY CHAPTER. 

President, George P. Gross; Vice-President, Wm. H. Williams; Sec- 
retary, F. C. Spalding; Treasurer, \V. H. H. Tainter; Historian, James 
M. Greenwood ; Registrar, John H. Crum. 

ST. LOUIS CHAPTER. 

(Officers same as State Society.) 



MONTANA SOCIETY. 

29 Members. 
Organized June 5, 1894. Annual meeting February 22, 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Henry C. Arnold Helena 

Vice-President, A. K. Prcscott Helena 

Secretary, Leslie Sulgrove Helena 

Treasurer, Charles J. Brackett Helena 

Registrar, Cornelius Hedges Helena 

Chaplain. Grin T. Walker Helena 

Librarian, W. R. Burroughs Helena 



44 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

122 Members. 

Organized April 26, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1910. 

President, Pressly J. Barr, 5015 California St Omaha 

Senior Vice-President, Dr. John M. Banister Omaha 

Junior Vice-President, George L. Loomis Fremont 

Secretary, Edwin O. Halstead, Box 406 Omaha 

Treasurer, John F. Flack Omaha 

Registrar, David C. Patterson. 7 Patterson Blk Omaha 

Historian, John W. Battin Omaha 

Chapter Officers. 

ETHAN ALLEN CHAPTER, OMAHA. 

President, James Richardson ; Vice-President, Ralph W. Emerson ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Charles L. Ransom ; Historian, Andrew K. 
Gault. 



NEVADA SOCIETY. 

22 Members. 

Organized February 19, 1910. 

Officers elected April 19, 1910. 

President, Robert Martin Price Reno 

Vice-President, Johnson Barton Daniel Reno 

Secretary, Charles Philbrick Eager Reno 

Treasurer, William E. Otis, Jr Reno 

Registrar, Albert D. Ayres Reno 

Chaplain. Rev. Charles Leon Mears Reno 



NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

288 Members. 

Organized April 24. 1889. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected April 20, 191 1. 

President, William F. Whitcher Woodsville 

Vice-President, John R. Eastman Andover 

Vice-President, Franklin W. McKinley Manchester 

Vice-President, Frank J. Pillsbury Concord 

Secretary-Treasurer, Rev. Howard F. Hill Concord 

Historian, Fred W. Lamb Manchester 

Registrar, William P. Fiske Concord 

Chaplain, Rev. Dr. Lucius Waterman Hanover 



STATE SOCIETIES. 45 

Chapter Officers. 

KEENE CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Hon. James S. Taft; Vice-President, Rev. Alfred H. 
Wheeler; Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Gale Shedd ; Historian, 
Rev. Josiah L. Seward, D. D. 



NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

581 Members. 

Organized March 7, 1889. Annual meeting usually January 3 (Battle 
of Princeton) or at such other time as the Society at any annual meeting 
may designate. 

Officers elected January 3, 191 1. 

President, Hon. Edward S. Atwater, 78 Broad St Elizabeth 

First Vice-President, George Rowland Howe Newark 

Second Vice-Pres., T. W. Williams, 78 N. Arlington Ave., East Orange 

Secretary, John Randell Weeks, 192 Market St Newark 

Treasurer, Capt. Oscar H. Condit East Orange 

Registrar, John Jackson Hubbell, 717 Essex Bldg., Clinton St., Newark 

Historian, Prof. William C. Armstrong New Brunswick 

Chaplain, Rev. John Hobart Egbert Irvington 

Chapter Officers. 

EUZABETHTOWN CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Lebbeus B. Miller; Vice-President, C. Symmes Kiggins; 
Secretary, Harry F. Brewer; Treasurer, Moses M. Crane; Historian, 
Miller C. Earl ; Chaplain, Rev. William F. Whitaker, D. D. 

ORANGE CHAPTER, NO. 2. 

President, Dr. G. Herbert Richards ; Vice-President, William J. 
Nevius ; Treasurer, Francis Gilbert ; Secretar}% Richard Tillard ; His- 
torian, David L. Pierson ; Chaplain, Rev. Ferdinand Q. Blanchard. 

The Orange Chapter also includes residents of Glen Ridge and 
Bloomfield. 

MONTCLAIR CHAPTER. NO. 3. 

President, George C. Sterling; First Vice-President, W. I. Lincoln 
Adams; Second Vice-President, John B. Wight; Secretary, Arthur H. 
Churchill : Treasurer, Julius B. Crowell ; Historian, Thomas I. Crowell ; 
Chaplain, Rev. Harry E. Fosdick. 



46 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOIvUTlON. 

NEW MEXICO SOCIETY. 

46 Members 
Organized December 26, 190S. 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, George S. Klock Albuquerque 

Vice-President, Pitt Ross Albuquerque 

Vice-President, Harold H. Hurd Roswell 

Vice-President, Dr. T. P. Martin Farmington 

Secretary, Allen S. Peck Albuquerque 

Registrar, Hon. Frank W. Clanc}- Albuquerque 

"Treasurer, Orville A. Matson Albuquerque 

Historian, R. W. D. Bryan Albuquerque 

Chaplain, C. C. Bateman, U. S. Army Fort Bayard 



NEW YORK. 
THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

1,368 Members. 
Organized February 11, 1890. Annual meeting March 17. 

Officers elected April 18, 191 1. 

President, John H. Burroughs, 15 William St New York 

First Vice-President, Louis Annin Ames, 99 Fulton St New York 

Second Vice-President, Wm. S. Kitchell, 145 Reade St New York 

Third Vice-President. Clinton Rogers Rochester 

Secretary, Capt. Charles A. Du Bois, 220 Broadway New York 

Treasurer, James De La Montanye, 220 Broadway New York 

Registrar, Teunis D. Huntting, 220 Broadway New York 

Historian, Josiah C. Pumpelly, A.M., LL.B., 255 W. io8th St. .New York 
Chaplain, Rev. Chas. L. Goodell, D. D.. 136 W. 130th St New York 

Chapter Officers, 191 1. 

ADIRONDACK CHAPTER, FORT EDWARD. 

President, Robert R. Law ; Secretary, Archibald S. Derby. 

BINGHAMTON CHAPTER, BINGHAMTOX. 

President, Gen. E. Franc Jones; Secretary, A. J. McClary. 

BUFFALO CHAPTER, BUFFALO. 

President, Trucman G. Avery; Secretary, Frank B. Steele. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 47 

FORT JOHNSTOWN CHAPTER, JOHNSTOWN. 

President, Asa B. Peake ; Secretary. Rev. W. W. Ellsworth. 

GANSEVOORT-WILLETT CHAPTER, ROME. 

President, Chas. C. Hopkins; Secretary, G. Lennemann PrescoU. 

HUNTINGTON CHAPTER. HUNTINGTON. 

President, Douglass Conklin ; Secretary, E. Stanley Jarvis. 

MOHAWK VALLEY CHAPTER, HERKIMER. 

President, Hon. Abram B. Steele ; Secretary, F. W. Cristnian. 

newburgh chapter, newburgh. 
President, Albert E. Layman ; Secretary, Nelson B. Lent. 

NEWTOWN-BATTLE CHAPTER, ELMIRA. 

President, William H. Lovell ; Secretary, E. Romaine Clarke. 

THE PAINTED POST CHAPTER, CORNING. 

President, Willard S. Reed; Secretary, John L. Chatfield. 

ROCHESTER CHAPTER, ROCHESTER. 

President, Clinton Rogers ; Secretary, Herbert S. Draper. 

SARATOGA CHAPTER. SARATOGA SPRINGS. 

President, Thomas R. Kneil : Secretary, Dr. Earl H. King. 

SYRACUSE CHAPTER, SYRACUSE. 

President, Newell B. Woodworth ; Secretary. Chas. C. Cook. 

VONKERS CHAPTER. VONKERS. 

President, R. E. Prince. Jr. 



NORTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

31 Members. 

Organized February 22. 191 1. .\nnual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1911. 

President, Hon. Stephen C. Bragaw Washington 

Vice-President, John A. Weddell Tarboro 

Secretary-Registrar, R. T. Bonner Aurora 

Treasurer, Dr. John C. Rodman Washington 

Historian, E. W. Myers Greensboro 

Chaplain, Dr. H. M. Bonner Newbern 



48 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

NORTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

23 Members. 
Organized February 4, 191 1. 

Officers elected February 4, i 11, 

President, Hon. Burleigh F. Spalding Bismarck or Fargo 

First Vice-President, Charles M. Cooley Grand Forks 

Second Vice-President, J. L. Bell Bismarck 

Secretary and Registrar, H. C. Fish Bismarck 

Treasurer, Gen. A. P. Peake Valley City 

Chaplain, R. A. Beard, D. D.. Fargo 



OHIO SOCIETY. 

523 Members. 

Organized April 11-22, 1889. Annual meeting April 19, to com- 
memorate the Battle of Lexington. 

Permanent headquarters of the Society at Columbus under constitu- 
tional provision. 

Officers elected April 19, 191 1. 

President, John X. Van Deman Dayton 

Vice-President, Dr. Wm. F. Peirce Gambier 

Registrar, William L. Curry Columbus 

Secretary, Hugh Huntington Columbus- 
Treasurer, Stimpson G. Harvey Toledo 

Historian, William A. Taylor Columbus 

Chaplain, Rev. Abner L. Frazer Youngstown^ 

Chapter Officers. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CHAPTER, COLU.MBUS. 

President, Dr. Willard B. Carpenter; Vice-President, Dr. Vander 
Veer Taylor; Secretary-Treasurer, Hugh Huntington; Registrar-His- 
torian, John L. W. Henney; Chaplain, E. Howard Gilkey. 

V^'ESTERN RESERVE SOCIETY, CLEVELAND. 

President, Dr. H. G. Sherman ; Vice-Presidents, A. G. Reynolds,, 
Painesville, James M. Richardson, Cleveland, Giles R. Gregory, Nor- 
walk, and W. D. Royce, Cleveland; Secretary, E. M. Hall, Cleveland; 
Treasurer, J. H. Griswold, Cleveland; Registrar, Edward L. Harris, 
Cleveland ; Assistant Treasurer, E. E. Otis, Akron ; Historian, A. T.. 
Brewer; Chaplain, Rev. Lyman H. Royce. 



STAT^ SOCIETIES. 49 

ANTHONY WAYNE CHAPTER, TOLEDO. 

President, Frederick J. Flagg ; First Vice-President, Rollin H. Scrib- 
ner; Second Vice-President, Dr. George Pope MacNichol ; Third Vice- 
President, William H. Moor ; Registrar, John C. Whelan ; Secretary, 
Herbert J. Ellis; Treasurer, Col. Stimpson G. Harvey; Historian, Dr. 
W. A. Dickey; Chaplain, Rev. R. D. Hollington. 

NATHAN HALE CHAPTER, YOUNGSTOWN. 

President, James P. Wilson ; Vice-President and Secretary, Abner L. 
Fraser; Treasurer, John J. Brant; Registrar and Historian, Henry R. 
Baldwin. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, NEWARK. 

President, Robert Mason Davidson ; Vice-President, Edward Kibler ; 
Secretary, Frederick H. King; Treasurer, Channing M. Thompson; 
Registrar, Charles Hempstead. 

SIMON KENTON CHAPTER, KENTON. 

President, Judge Artemas B. Johnson ; First Vice-President, Dr. Jesse 
Snodgrass; Second Vice-President, Dr. David P. Philips; Secretary, 
Hugh E. Pearce ; Treasurer, Hugh L. Runkle ; Registrar, Austin L. 
McKitrick ; Historian, George E. Crane ; Chaplain, Abishai Woodward. 

CINCINNATI CHAPTER. 

President, Dr. E. R. Booth ; First Vice-President, Dudley V. Sut- 
phen ; Second Vice-President, Rev. G. S. J. Browne ; Secretary-Treasu- 
rer-Registrar, Rev. E. P. Whallon. 

NATHANAEL GREENE CHAPTER, XENIA. 

President, Charles C. Shearer ; Corresponding Secretary, William A. 
Galloway; Recording Secretary and Treasurer, Finley D. Torrence; 
Registrar, Clark M. Galloway. 



OKLAHOMA SOCIETY. 

43 Members. 

Organized February 22, 1905. Admitted into the National Society 
May 18, 1905. 

Officers, igii. 

President, Col. Arthur H. Price Oklahoma City 

Vice-President, Charles Henry Parker Enid 

Vice-President, James Monroe Hall Tulsa 

Vice-President, Dr. Charles R. Hume Anadarko 

Secretary, Dr. L. Haynes Buxton Oklahoma City 

Treasurer, Frederick Brasted Oklahoma City 

Registrar, Robert P. Carpenter Oklahoma City 

Historian, Joseph B. Thoburn Oklahoma City 

Chaplain, Carter Helm Jones, D. D Oklahoma City 

4— SR 



50 SONS OF the; American revolution, 

OREGON SOCIETY. 

Ill Members. 

Organized June 6, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to commemo- 
rate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Wallace McCamant, Electric Bldg Portland 

Vice-President, D. W. Wakefield Portland 

Secretary, B. A. Thaxter, 443 Eleventh St Portland 

Treasurer, A. A. Lindsley, Sherlock Bldg Portland 

Registrar, W. H. Chapin, Chamber of Commerce Bldg Portland 



PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

603 Members. 
Organized November 23, 1893. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, James Denton Hancock Franklin 

First Vice-President, William L. Jones, 243 Fourth Ave Pittsburg 

Vice-President, Thomas Stephen Brown, mo Berger Bldg. ... Pittsburg 

Vice-President, H. W. Fernberger Philadelphia 

Secretary, F. G. Paulson, 515 Wood St Pittsburg 

Treasurer, Ogden Russell, 3d Nat'l Bank Pittsburg 

Registrar, F. Armstrong, Jr., 407 Oakland Ave Pittsburg 

Historian, Rev. Charles E. Snyder Pittsburg 

Chaplain, Rev. Warren G. Partridge, D. D., 309 Hallet St Pittsburg 

Chapter Officers. 

PHILADELPHIA CHAPTER. 

President, Moses Veale ; Vice-President, Rev. George D. Adams ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Samuel W. Fernberger ; Registrar, Thomas 
Wynne; Historian, Peter D. Helms. 

NEW CASTLE CHAPTER. 

President, Dr. H. W. McKee ; Vice-President, Dr. W. G. Miller; 
Secretary, F. R. Woods; Treasurer, H. R. Wilkison; Registrar, J. S. 
Du Shane. 



PHILIPPINE SOCIETY. 

Charter granted February 17, 191 1, to 15 eligible members to organize 
a Society. Temporary President, Judge Charles S. Lobingier, Manila. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 5I 

RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

321 Members. 
Organized February i, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Charles Dean Kimball, 459 Washington St Providence 

Vice-President, Joseph Balch, 272 Benefit St Providence 

Secretary, Christopher Rhodes, 290 Benefit St Providence 

Treasurer, Arthur Preston Sumner, 639 Banigan Bldg Providence 

Registrar, Francis Eliot Bates Oak Lawn 

Historian, Robert Perkins Brown, 13 Charles Field St Providence 

Chaplain, Rev. Samuel Heber Webb, 21 Adelaide Ave Providence 

Poet, John Prescott Farnsworth, 42 Tobey St Providence 

Chapter Officers. 

BRISTOL CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Howard Wardwell Church ; Vice-President, William Leon- 
ard Manchester ; Secretary, Joseph Franklin Farrally ; Treasurer, Fred- 
eric Fillmore Gladding; Historian, George Ulric Arnold; Poet, Orrin 
Luther Bosworth. 

PROVIDENCE CHAPTER, NO. 2. 

President, Robert Perkins Brown; Vice-President, Frederic Willard 
Easton ; Secretary and Treasurer, Arthur Preston Sumner ; Historian, 
Wilfred Harold Munro. 

PAWTUCKET CHAPTER, NO. 3. 

President, Henry Clinton Dexter; Vice-President, Charles Henry 
French; Secretary, Nicholas Howard Easton; Treasurer, Theodore 
Everett Dexter. 

KENT COUNTY CHAPTER, NO. 4. 

President, Howard Vernon Allen ; Vice-President, Thomas Wilson 
Chace ; Secretary and Treasurer, Nathaniel Howland Brown ; Regis- 
trar, William Arnold Browning; Historian, Herbert Morton Clarke; 
Chaplain, Rev. Charles Fremont Roper. 



SOUTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

18 Members. 
Organized March 22, 1911. 

Officers elected March 22, 191 1. 

President, Paul Trapier Hayne Greenville 

Vice-President, Oscar K. Mauldin Greenville 

Secretary, David Arnold Henning Greenville 

Registrar, John E. Black Columbia 



52 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOI.UTION. 

SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

i6 Members. 

Preliminary meeting January 31, 191 1. Permanently organized March 
z'j, 191 1. Replaces Society organized in 1899. 

Ofificers elected March 27, 191 1. 

President, R. J. Wells Sioux Falls 

Vice-President, F. M. Mills Sioux Falls 

Secretary-Registrar, T. W. Dwight Sioux Falls 

Treasurer, B. H. Requa Sioux Falls 

Chaplain, Lucius Kingsbury Sioux Falls 

Historian, C. O. Bailey Sioux Falls 

»■ 



TENNESSEE SOCIETY. 

34 Members. 

Organized December 2, 1889. Annual meeting October 7, to com- 
memorate Battle of Kings Mountain. 

^ Officers elected April, 1909. 

President, L. R. Eastman Nashville 

Vice-President, John W. Faxon Chattanooga 

Vice-President, A. A. Lipscomb Columbia 

Vice-President, Jos. W. McGall Huntington 

Secretary, Roger Eastman Nashville 

Treasurer, W. E. Metzger Nashville 

Registrar, Jno. C. Brown Nashville 

Historian, Leland Hume Nashville 



TEXAS SOCIETY. 

74 Members. 
Organized December 8, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, W. G. Bell Austin 

Senior Vice-President, J. T. Trezevant Dallas 

Second Vice-President, F. F. Downs Temple 

Secretary, N. D. Smith Austin 

Treasurer, Wilber H. Young Austin 

Historian and Registrar, E. E. Rice Galveston 

Chaplain, J. T. Huffmaster Galveston 



STATE SOCIETIES. 53 

UTAH SOCIETY. 

72 Members. 
Organized January 29, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers elected February 22, 1911. 

President, Gordon Lines Hutchins, 522 Dooly Bldg Salt Lake City 

Vice-President, Samuel Culver Park, 170 S. Main St Salt Lake City 

Secretary, Chauncey P. Overfield, 522 Dooly Bldg Salt Lake City 

Treasurer, Alfred Holmes Peabody, 1064 3d Ave Salt Lake City 

Registrar, William Dalton Neal, 290 Centre St Salt Lake City 

Historian, Geo. H. Davis, Boston Bldg Salt Lake City 

Chaplain, Joseph Kimball, T]"] Seventh Ave Salt Lake City 



VERMONT SOCIETY. 

277 Members. 

Organized April 2, 1889. Annual meeting second Wednesday in No- 
vember. 

Officers elected November 10, 1910. 

President (William Tarbox Dewey; died May 20, 1911). 

Vice-President, Frank L. Greene St. Albans 

Secretary, Walter Hill Crockett Montpelier 

Treasurer, Clarence Lucius Smith Burlington 

Registrar, Henry Leonard Stillson Bennington 

Historian, Walter Hill Crockett Montpelier 

Chaplain, Rev. Homer Abial Flint Montpelier 



VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

'jd Members. 

Organized July 7, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to commemo- 
rate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1911. 

President, Judge Lunsford L. Lewis Richmond 

Vice-President, J. Staunton Moore Richmond 

Vice-President, Arthur B. Clarke Richmond 

Vice-President, Gen. Charles J. Anderson Richmond 

Secretary-Registrar-Historian, 

Dr. Robert A. Brock, 517 W. Marshall St., Richmond 

Treasurer, Earnest W. Moore, 2606 E. Broad St Richmond 

Chaplain, Norton P. Savage Richmond 



54 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOEUTION. 

Chapter Officers. 

TIDEWATER CHAPTER, NO. I, NORFOLK. 

President, Col. W. H. Sargeant, Jr.; Vice-President, R. C. Aunspaugh; 
Treasurer, Tench F. Tilghman ; Secretary-Registrar-Historian, William 
Henry Sargeant. 



WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 

206 Members. 

Organized June 17, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 191 1. 

President, Overton G. Ellis, Fidelity Bldg Tacoma 

First Vice-President, Robert G. Walker Tacoma 

Second Vice-President, Leander T. Turner Seattle 

Secretary, Edward B. Judson, 954 Commerce St Tacoma 

Treasurer, Augustus V. Bell, 508 Mehlhorn Bldg Seattle 

Registrar, Robert C. Saunders, 610 Central Bldg Seattle 

Historian, Ovid A. Byers Seattle 

Chaplain, Arthur Newton Thompson, D. D Seattle 

Chapter Officers. 

SEATTLE CHAPTER, 44 MEMBERS. 

President, Everett Smith; Vice-President, Hugh A. Garland; Secre- 
tary, H. R. Thompson; Treasurer, F. H. Crowell; Historian, W. E. 
Starr; Chaplain, Rev. Edward Lincoln Smith. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, TACOMA, 27 MEMBERS. 

President, Robert G. Walker ; Vice-President, John D. Fletcher ; 
Registrar, W. E. McCormick; Secretary, H. P. Clark; Treasurer, A. E. 
Grafton. 

SPOKANE CHAPTER, 4I MEMBERS. 

President, C. M. Doland ; Vice-President, Thomas H. Brewer ; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, J. ]\Ielvin Thomas ; Registrar, Richard B. Harris. 



WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

191 Members. 

Organized February 25, 1890. Annual meeting changed from May 29 
to May 24, to commemorate the evacuation of Wisconsin Territory by 
British troops. May 24, 1815. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 55 

Officers, 1911. 

President, Kossuth Kent Kennan, 1017 Wells Bldg Milwaukee 

Second Vice-President, Henry Martyn Ogden Milwaukee 

Secretary, Herbert N. Laflin, New Insurance Bldg Milwaukee 

Treasurer, William Stark Smith, 396 Royall Place Milwaukee 

Registrar, William Ward Wight Milwaukee 

Historian, Rolland Lewis Porter Mukwonago 

Chaplain, Rt. Rev. Gershom Mott Williams Marquette, Mich. 



WYOMING SOCIETY. 

2)2 Members. 

Organized March 28, 1908. Admitted into the National Society April 
30, 1908. 

Officers. 

President, Henry Benjamin Patten Cheyenne 

Vice-President, Floyd Farrington Burchard. 

Secretary, Leander Corning Hills Cheyenne 

Treasurer, Arthur H. Doane Cheyenne 

Registrar, Roscoe Lehi Guernsey Cheyenne 

Historian, William Levi Whipple Cheyenne 




LOUISVILLE CONGF 




ICOUNTRY CLUB 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF • 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS 
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

HELD AT LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, 

May I TO 3, 191 1. 

(57) 



58 



SONS OF rut AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



COMMITTEES ON LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 

Special Committee on Arrangements Appointed by the National Executive: 

Committee. 

Col. Isaac F. Mack, Chairman, Sandusky, Ohio. 
R. C. Ballard Thruston, Louisville, Ky. 
Col. John C. Lewis, Louisville, Ky. 

Committees Appointed by the Kentucky Society. 



Advisory. 

Ex-officio members of all the following 
committees 

R. C. Ballard Thruston, Chairman 
Col. John C. Lewis, Vice-Chairman 
George L. Danforth 
R. A. McDowell 
George T. Wood 

Badge. 

George L. Danforth, Chairman 

Dr. Walter B. Gossett, Vice-Chairman 

Alfred W. Harris 

Jesse McCandless 

C. B. Robinson 

Dr. Granville C. Waller 

Banquet. 

Henry S. Barker, Chairman 
Arthur M. Rutledge, Vice-Chairman 
Alvah L. Terry 
Phillip S. Tuley 

Decoration. 

Lewellyn Lewis, Chairman 

Ivcwis J. Gorin, Vice-Chairman 

Frank C. Carpenter 

E. W. Bentley 

Edward Pope ^IcAdams 

S. J. Hillman 

Entertainment. 

George H. Wilson, Chairman 
J. Adger Stewart, Vice-Chairman 
Mason B. Barret 
William Marshall Bullitt 

Finance. 

George T. Wood, Chairman 
James Ross Todd, \'ice-Chairman 
H. C. Rodes 

Information. 

W. W. McDowell, Chairman 
James F. Buckner, Vice-Chairman 
G. Wilbur Hubley 
J. Morton Morris 



George L. Sehon 
R. A. McDowell 
L. R. Williams 

Press. 

Credo Harris, Chairman 

Col. Ben LaBree, ^'ice-Chairman 

Ladies' Entertainment. 

S. Thruston Ballard, Chairman 

Wm. Marshall Bullitt. \'ice-Chairman! 

Gilmer Speed Adams 

Printing. 

George G. Fetter, Chairman 
Geo. L. Burton, \^ice-Chairman 
J. H. Bentley 
W. C. Sessions 
D. B. Waller 
Roy Cluck White 

Reception. 

Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, Chairman> 
Admiral J. C. Watson, Gen. John B. 

Castleman, Vice-Chairmen, and 43: 

others 

Registration. 

Charles Thruston Johnson, Chairman 

John B. Hundley, \'ice-Chairman 

G. Breaux Ballard 

Francis C. Dickson 

Lewis J. Gorin 

J. Morton Morris 

Lester Sehon 

J. King Stewart 

George D. Todd 

Thomas S. Tuley 

Sunday Entertainment. 

Rev. Charles Ewell Craik, Chairman 
Rev. Wm. Warren Landrum 
Rev. R. L. McCready 

There were also committees of ladies 
on Ladies' Motor Trip, Mrs. James- 
Ross Todd, Chairman; Reception at 
Pendennis Club, Mrs. George L. Dan- 
forth, Chairman; Ladies' Banquet, Mrs. 
S. Thruston Ballard, Chairman. 



\ 



PROCEEDINGS OF TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

HELD AT LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY. MAY 1. 2. AND 3. 1911. 



The Congress was called to order in regular session, at 10.15 a. m., 
in the assembly hall of the Louisville Free Public Library, at Fourth 
and York streets, Louisville, by the President General, William Allen 
Marble, of New York city. 

The President General: Delegates to the Twenty-second Annual 
Congress of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution will please come to order. I have received a telegram from our 
Chaplain General, the Rev. John Timothy Stone, of Chicago, stating 
that, owing to an unexpected delay of his train, he will not be here at 
the opening exercises ; and we shall therefore have the pleasure of 
listening to the Chaplain of the Kentucky Society, the Rev. Dr. Charles 
Ewell Craik, who will now ask a blessing. 

Doctor Craik thereupon led the Congress in repeating the Lord's 
Prayer, and invoked the divine blessing on the Congress and the work 
of the Society. 

The President General : The first order of business will be the re- 
port of the Committee on Credentials. The members of the committee 
present are Teunis D. Huntting, of New York, Chairman ; Dr. Waldo 
E. Boardman, of Massachusetts, and Mr. George W. Hyde, of Mary- 
land. Is the Chairman of the Credentials Committee present? I 
understand the committee is detained for a little while, but will be 
here presently. If it is the pleasure of the Congress, we will defer that 
report to a later hour. 

Compatriots, it was the intention of the Mayor of the city of Louis- 
ville to be present in person and extend a welcome to the National 
Society, but he has been unavoidably detained, and I have the pleasure 
of presenting to you Mr. George Lewis Danforth, President of the 
Kentucky Society, who will extend a welcome in the name of that 
Society. (Applause.) 

Mr. Danforth : Mr. President and delegates to the Twenty-second 
Congress, it was hoped that the Governor of Kentucky would be here 
to welcome you on this auspicious occasion, and also that the Mayor 
of Louisville would be present. Both had promised, and both desired 
to be here ; but the Governor was called out of the State, and the 

(59) 



6o SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Mayor, at the last moment, was called to another part of the city and 
cannot be with us. And so upon me devolves the very pleasant task 
of welcoming you, first, in the name of the Governor, who represents 
Kentucky and all its citizens ; secondly, in the name of the Mayor, who 
represents the city of Louisville and its citizens, and last but not least, 
in the name of the Kentucky Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. (Applause.) I am sure that if these two gentlemen were 
here they would say just what I want to say: that if there is anything 
you see that you want, take it! (Applause and laughter.) If there is 
anything you want that you don't see, ask for it (laughter), and if it 
is not forthcoming immediately, let us know. (Laughter.) 

Compatriots, I give you a hearty Kentucky welcome. (Great ap- 
plause.) 

The President General: Mr. President Danforth, on behalf of the 
National Society I extend to you our most hearty thanks for this most 
cordial welcome. We understood before we came to Louisville that 
everything would be at our service, and we have already realized that, 
and more. Since we have reached here, we feel that the half had not 
been told us. (Applause and laughter.) 

The next order of business, according to the By-Laws, is the report 
of your President General on the work done during the past year. I 
have made this report rather brief, and the detail work done by the 
various committees will be reported by the chairmen. 

ANNUAL ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT GENERAL. 

Compatriots : In accordance with our By-Laws it is the duty of the 
President General to present to you at this time a synopsis of the work 
performed during the year by the national officers, and also to make 
suggestions on the condition and needs of the Society. 

At the outset I wish to extend to the officers and members of the 
various State Societies my sincere thanks for the hearty co-operation 
which they have shown during the past year in matters to which I have 
at various times called their attention and asked their support. There 
have been three meetings of the Executive Committee during the year, 
at which practically every member was present. The first was held in 
Toledo, immediately after the close of the Congress, at which time the 
usual appropriations were made to cover the general expenses, and it 
was ordered that the Official Bulletin should be issued during the 
year on the same plan as during the previous year, and a copy of each 
issue mailed to every member of the Society. It was also decided to 
eliminate from the Year Book the speeches made at the banquet, and 
thus reduce the cost of the Year Book to quite a considerable extent. 

Soon after the adjournment of Congress a request was received from 
the Washington Memorial Association for the privilege of sending to 
every member of our organization a request for contributions toward 
the building of the memorial. I did not consider the matter of serious 
importance enough to call the Executive Committee together, but in- 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 6l 

stead wrote each one of the members, stating what the request was and 
asking them to advise me by mail as to their views regarding it. To 
these letters I received affirmative replies, and, acting on the advice 
thus obtained, directed the Secretary General to authorize the Wash- 
ington Memorial Association to send out the literature as suggested, 
the same to be done at no expense to our Society. 

The second meeting of the Executive Committee was held in New 
York city on November 19, 1910. At that time a resolution was adopted 
to the effect that every effort should be made by the National Society 
to secure from Congress an appropriation to complete the crypt in the 
chapel at Annapolis, in which was to be placed the body of John Paul 
Jones. In carrying out this resolution two bills were prepared and 
presented to Congress, the one to the Senate being presented by Sena- 
tor Rayner, of Maryland, and the one for the House by Compatriot 
General Loud, of Michigan. As soon as these bills were referred to 
the proper committees we obtained the list of the members of the two 
committees and their residences, and a letter was addressed to the 
President of each State Society in which resided a member of the 
committees referred to, with the request that every effort be made to 
induce these members of the committees to report the bills favorably. 
This suggestion was actively taken up by the Presidents of the various 
State Societies, and great pressure was thus brought to bear upon the 
members of the two committees. 

In this connection I would refer to the fact that through the courtesy 
of Vice-President Dewey, of Vermont, a joint resolution was passed 
by the two branches of the Vermont legislature demanding that their 
representatives in Congress make every effort within their power to see 
that the bills above referred to were passed. This joint resolution was 
signed by the Governor, who is also a member of our Society, and it 
had a wide influence in producing the results which we were so anxious 
to obtain. The Naval Committee of the Senate promptly reported out 
the bill, and it was passed without a dissenting voice. The bill in the 
House, however, met with serious delays and failed to be reported out, 
but an amendment was made appropriating the sum of $75,000 instead 
of the $135,000 aske'd for. This was reported to the House just before 
the close of the last session of Congress, and, as the Senate bill called 
for $135,000, a conference between the Senate and House committees 
was necessary ; and it was only after the most strenuous effort on the 
part of Compatriot Loud that such a conference was arranged and an 
agreement made between the two bodies appropriating the $75,000, and 
this was accomplished late at night, only a few hours before the final 
adjournment of Congress. The appropriation bill has since received 
the signature of the President, and there is nothing now to prevent the 
accomplishment of the work so earnestly desired by our organization; 
i. c, that the casket containing the body of John Paul Jones, which has 
so long been exposed to public view, shall within a few months be 
placed in its final resting place. 

In view of the vast amount of work done by Compatriot Loud, of 



62 SONS QF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Michigan, Member of Congress from that State, and the indefatigable 
energy which he displayed in carrying to a successful termination this 
matter, so dear to the heart of every Son of the American Revolution, 
I would suggest that a set of resolutions be prepared by a committee 
during this Congress showing the appreciation of the National organi- 
zation for what Compatriot Loud has accomplished. Rear Admiral 
Baird, the President of the District of Columbia Society, S. A. R., also 
did yeoman service, and it is also owing to his strenuous efforts that 
the statue of John Paul Jones, which is to be placed in one of the 
public parks in Washington, was not placed in juxtaposition to a statue 
of Commander John Barry, it having been suggested by some of the 
influences in Washington that these two statues should be placed near 
each other; but a final appeal to the Art Commission having in charge 
the public grounds of Washington resulted in having the statue of 
Jones placed independently to that of Barry, as we feel it was justly 
entitled to be. Admiral Baird, for the Jefferson Memorial Committee, 
advises that the bill appropriating $100,000 for a statue of Thomas 
Jefferson, to be erected in Washington, was offered in the Senate by 
Senator Bacon on April 11, who on the thirteenth (being the anniversary 
of the birth of Thomas Jefferson) obtained the unanimous consent of 
the Senate to call the bill up without reference to a committee, and it 
was passed unanimously. Further details regarding the work of this 
committee will be found in their report. 

I take great pleasure in reporting that during the year five new State 
Societies have been organized : one each in North and South Carolina, 
North and South Dakota, and the Philippine Islands. The formation 
of the State Societies of North and South Carolina is the result of the 
strenuous efforts of Commander Moore, Chairman of our Committee 
of Organization in the South. He began this work under some of my 
predecessors, and met with great discouragement ; but finally, in Febru- 
ary last, through the aid of some of the members of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution in those two States, the requisite number of 
members was obtained and the Societies formed. The work done by 
the Committee on Organization in the West, of which Compatriot 
Guyer is chairman, als'o calls for special mention. The Society in 
South Dakota, which had been organized some years ago, had passed 
into innocuous desuetude with no hope of resuscitation ; but Com- 
patriot Guyer, ably assisted by Compatriots Tuttle and Keezer, suc- 
ceeded in organizing a new Society in that State, as well as one in 
North Dakota, and these three compatriots have justly earned the title 
of "the dauntless three." 

During the year I have had the pleasure of being the guest at the 
annual meetings of the State Societies of Vermont, District of Colum- 
bia, New Jersey, New York, Illinois, Michigan, and Indiana. I had 
also arranged to be the guest of the Ohio Society, but at the last 
moment was detained by illness. Each of the various State Societies 
visited showed great enthusiasm in the work of the organization, and 
I am indebted to them for many courtesies. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 63 

I have also attended as your representative the unveiling of the 
statue of the Minute Man at Compo Beach, which was erected by the 
•Connecticut State Society in commemoration of the battle fought at 
that point during the Revolution ; also the celebration attending the 
placing of a new flagstaff and flag on the battle-ground at Springfield, 
N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey State Society. It has been 
a matter of great regret to me that I could not accept the invitations 
of more of the State Societies to be their guest at some of their func- 
tions, but as so many of them hold these functions on the same date, 
it was utterly impossible to accept all the invitations, which I would 
have gladly done had it iK)t been for previous engagements. 

My predecessor in his annual report made special reference to the 
successful chapter which had been organized in Montclair, N. J., by 
•Compatriot George C. Sterling. It was my pleasure to attend a meet- 
ing of that chapter, and I can simply re-echo what my predecessor said 
in connection with the work being done in that locality. 

Each succeeding year brings its long list of those of our loved com- 
patriots who have passed into the great beyond, and this year is no 
exception. They number more than 200; and while many of these 
have not been known as among the active workers, yet by their efforts 
as silent workers they had done much to enhance the work of their 
local Societies, and I regret that time and space will not allow me to 
call them by name. I cannot, however, let this opportunity pass with- 
out speaking of our late compatriot, Theodore H. Eaton, of the Michi- 
gan Society, who died November 6, 1910, and who for several years 
had been a member of the National organization, and whose genial 
presence and earnest endeavors for the success of our Society made 
him a welcome guest at so many of our congresses, and in his death 
not only the Michigan Society, but the National Society as well, has 
suffered an irreparable loss. 

The work done by the various standing committees will be presented 
to you in their reports, which will come later in our session, and I 
would call your especial attention to these reports when read. 

The cordial relations existing between ours and the sister society, the 
Daughters of the 'American Revolution, during the past years have 
continued, and in several cases the latter have joined in the celebrations 
undertaken by the Sons. As your President General I was invited by 
the President General of the Daughters to make an address at the 
opening of the recent session of their congress, and also to be the 
•guest of honor at their reception which was to follow. Owing to my 
unfortunate physical condition, however, I was unable to be present, 
but sent a copy of an address which I had prepared for the occasion, 
and which was very flatteringly received. 

I am very glad to be able to report that the permanent fund of the 
National Society, which was established one year ago at the suggestion 
of the District of Columbia Society, now amounts to $2,391.50, of which 
$2,111.00 was the subscriptions made to the fund at the Congress, and 
$280.50 the rebates on rosettes, etc., purchased during the year. The 



64 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOEUTION. 

Finance Committee has purchased two New York city four per cent 
bonds at a cost of $1,987.50, and they are deposited in a safe-deposit 
box in New York city, which can be opened only in the presence of 
two members of the Finance Committee. The balance of the fund is 
deposited in the Broadway Savings Bank, of New York city, which 
pays four per cent interest, and I wish to congratulate the Society upon- 
the prompt manner in which this fund has been accumulated. 

In concluding this brief report, which I heartily regret does not con- 
tain a record of more and better things done by your President General,. 
I wish to extend my personal thanks to my associate officers and the 
members of the Executive Committee for the cordial support which' 
they have given me during my administration, and while I shall at the 
close of this Congress lay aside the great honor which you conferred' 
upon me a j^ear ago, I shall always retain the pleasantest memories of 
what to me has been one of the happiest years of my life and which 
has brought honors far beyond my fondest hopes, and in returning to 
the ranks I shall be more ready than ever to work shoulder to shoulder 
with those who have at heart the interests of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

(The reading of the President's address was received with hearty- 
manifestations of approval.) 

The President General : Is the Committee on Credentials ready to- 
report now? I see the chairman, Mr. Huntting, has arrived. 

Mr. Huntting: Mr. President General, the Committee on Creden- 
tials begs to report that up to this time we have 127 delegates present,, 
including 10 general officers. (Reads the list by States.) 

(Moved and seconded that the report of the committee as far as 
made be accepted and the committee continued, with power to add to- 
the roll such delegates as may come in later. Motion carried.) 

REPORT OF CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE. 

The final report of the Credentials Committee on May 3 showed that 
134 accredited members of the Congress were then in attendance, as 
follows : 

National Society Officers. 

President General, Wm. A. I\Iarble, of New York city; Vice-Presi- 
dent General, R. C. Ballard Thruston, of Louisville, Ky. ; Vice-President" 
General, Wm. T. Dewey, of Montpelier, Vt. ; Secretary-Registrar Gen- 
eral, A. Howard Clark, of Washington, D. C. ; Treasurer General, 
John H. Burroughs, of New York city; Historian General, David L. 
Pierson, of East Orange, N. J. ; Chaplain General, Rev. John Timothy- 
Stone, D. D., of Chicago; ex-Presidents General, Hon. C. A. Pugsley 
of New York, Gen. E. S. Greeley and Hon. Morris B. Beardsley of 
Connecticut, Nelson A. McClary of Chicago, and Hon. Jas. Denton- 
Hancock of Pennsylvania. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 65 

State Society Delegates. 

ARIZONA. 

Rev. Lewis Halsey. 

COLORADO. 

Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, Wardner Williams. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Leverett Belknap, William E. Chandler, Lewis B. Curtis, J. Coolidge 
Hills, Rufus E. Holmes, George W. Jackman, Seymour C. Loomis, 
Clarence H. Wickham, Dr. George C. F. Williams. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Maj. George A. Amies, Rear Admiral George W. Baird, John Mason 
Brown, Wm. A. De Caindry, Col. G. C. Kniffin, Phillip F. Earner, 
Albert D. Spangler, Col. William B. Thompson. 

ILLINOIS. 

Maj. William G. Adkins, Louis A. Bowman, Henry L. Green, Col. 
George V. Lauman, E. L. Monrose, La Verne W. Noyes, Wm. P. Reed, 
Thomas H. Smith, Hart Vance, Rev. Joseph A. Vance, John D. Vander- 
cook, Augustus W. Wheeler, G. Newton Wright. 

INDIANA. 

George O. Dix, Inman H. Fowler, Clarence A. Kenyon, Merrill 
Moores, Dr. J. Rollin Morgan, Horace C. Starr, and one other delegate. 

IOWA, 

Elmer ]\L Wentworth. 

KENTUCKY. 

S. Thruston Ballard, E. T. Burnam, George L. Danforth, Col. John 
C. Lewis, W. W. Stephenson, J. Ross Todd, Rear Admiral J. C. 
Watson. 

MARYLAND. 

Edward F. Arthurs, Maj. George W. Hyde, Dr. James D. Iglehart, 
T. M. Maynadier, James D. Norris, John H. Orem, Jr. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Dr. Waldo E. Boardman, Webster Bruce, Edwin S. Crandon, John 

G. Moseley, Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, T. Julian Silsby. 

# 

MICHIGAN. 

George H. Barbour, Franklin S. Dewey, Richard H. Fyfe, Albert Af. 
Henry, William P. Holliday, Howard A. Ladue. 

5— SR 



66 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MISSOURI. 
Linn Paine, Col. John L. RoBards. 

MONTANA. 

Leslie P. Sulgrove. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Col. Oscar H. Condit, Joseph Holmes, George R. Howe, N. Perry 
Howell. Russell W. Lewis. Charles M. Lum. Lebbeus B. Miller, Dr. 
G. Herbert Richards, Rev. W. F. Whitaker, D. D., Thomas W. Williams. 

NEW YORK (empire ST.\TE SOCIETY). 

Joseph M. Bacon, George D. Bangs. Leslie J. Bennett, William A. 
Galpin, Nath'l T. Hawkins, Norman P. Heffley, Frank L. Hoff, Tennis 
D. Huntting, Abner Ketcham. William S. Kitchell, David A. Morrison, 
Jesse Peterson, Dr. William V. Randall, Clinton Rogers. P. Valentine 
Sherwood, Frank B. Steele, Hon. George R. Sutherland, George L. 
Walker, Charles H. Wight. 

OHIO. 

E. R. Booth, Mozart Gallup. Col. I. F. Mack. Junius H. McHenry. 
C. F. M. Niles, Dr. William F. Pierce, Wm. D. Royce, Dr. Harris G. 
Sherman, Earl D. Van Deman, John N. Van Deman. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Col. R. W. Guthrie. Sani'l D. Hubley, Edward King. J. S. Du Shane. 
Le Moyne L. Parkinson, Col. John P. Penney, William A. Stritmater. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Lieut. Carroll B. Hodges, Gen. Charles L. Hodges, Hon. Charles D. 
Kimball. Wm. Prescott Potter, Louis Franklin Snow. 

VERMONT. 

George H. Cross. 

WISCONSIN. 

K. K. Kennan, Hon. W. J. Turner. 

The President General : The next business in regular order is the 
reading of the minutes of the last annual Congress. 

Judge BeardslEy : Mr. President General, the minutes of our last 
Congress have been published in the Official BiaLETiN and in the 
Year Book, and I move you. sir, that they be considered as read and 
approved. * 

(Motion seconded and carried.) 

The President General: The next thing in order will be the report 
of the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee, which I will ask 
the Secretarv General to read. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 67 

REPORT OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. 

The Board of Trustees elected at the twenty-first Congress held its 
first meeting on Tuesday afternoon, May 3, at the Hotel Secor, Toledo. 
The nominations by the President General for members of the Execu- 
tive Committee were approved by the board. The President General, 
the Treasurer General, and ex-President General Pugsley were ap- 
pointed a committee to have charge of the investment of the Permanent 
Fund. It was voted to accept with thanks an invitation from the Ken- 
tucky Society to hold the Congress of 191 1 at Louisville. Appropria- 
tions were made for expenses of the office of Secretary General and 
Registrar General ; for the publication of the Official Bulletin and 
the National Year Book ; for expenses of the Committees on Educa- 
tion, and on Information for Aliens ; and the usual amount was allotted 
toward the expenses of the twenty-second annual Congress. Various 
matters of the Society were discussed and action thereon referred to 
the Executive Committee. 

On May 4, 19 10, the newly appointed Executive Committee met at 
the Hotel Secor, Toledo, and acted on various matters referred to it 
by the Congress and by the Trustees, including recommendations con- 
cerning advance work, and the locating and marking of the graves &f 
Signers of the Declaration of Independence and of other prominent 
patriots of the Revolutionary period. 

There was also considered the more uniform regulation of local 
Chapters under the State Societies and the advantages of increasing 
the number of these Chapters. 

The increase and investment of the newly established Permanent 
Fund was discussed. The President General was given full authority 
in the appointment of the standing and special committees. 

The next meeting of the Executive Committee was held at Bretton 
Hall. New York, on November 19, 1910, all the members of the com- 
mittee being present; also the Treasurer General and the Secretary 
General. The Treasurer General reported the condition of the Perma- 
nent Fund and the investment of part of the sum in a four per cent 
bond, and it was arranged that the temporarily uninvested portion of 
the fund be kept in a savings bank in a special account. 

The President General reported on the condition of several State 
Societies he had visited, and upon his suggestion a resolution was 
adopted calling upon the State Secretaries to urge the government to 
complete the John Paul Jones crypt at Annapolis. Reports were re- 
ceived from the Societies in New York, New Jersey, and Maryland, 
showing progress made toward the marking of graves of the Signers 
in those States. 

A charter was authorized for the Philippine Society when the requi- 
site number of eligible applicants shall have filed their papers. Reports 
were received showing progress in the formation of new Societies in 
the West and South. 



68 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Reports were also received and considered concerning the work of 
the Committee on Information for Aliens, the Flag Committee, and the 
Committee on Naval Records. A committee of one was authorized to 
take necessary action in regard to the wearing of the Societ3''s insignia 
in France. 

The President General was authorized to appoint a National Com- 
mittee on Arrangements for the Louisville Congress. 

Various other matters of routine business were acted on as recorded 
in the proceedings published in the December Official Bulletin. 

The last meeting of the Executive Committee was held at the Seel- 
bach Hotel, Louisville, April 30, 1911. 

The Board of Trustees met on Maj- i, 1911, at the Seelbach Hotel, 
Louisville. 

( Moved and seconded that the report as read be received, approved, 
and placed on file, and that the various matters referred to and recom- 
mended therein be taken up for discussion later during the Congress. 
Carried.) 

The President General : The next business in order is the report 
of the Treasurer General, Mr. Burroughs. 

The Treasurer General : Delegates to the National Congress, your 
President General has already spoken to you of the Permanent Fund, 
but there is an additional reference to it that I would like to make. 
President Dewey, of the Vermont Society, informs me that his Society 
now contributes $50 towards that fund. (Applause.) This is in addi- 
tion to the subscription of last year. I hope that his example and that 
of the Vermont Society may be followed by such Societies as have not 
heretofore contributed to this fund, and I am sure your President 
General will be ready to hear a response from any Society that may 
wish to contribute to the Permanent Fund. 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER GENERAL. 

President General and Compatriots of the National Society of 
THE Sons of the American Revolution : The Treasurer General has 
the honor to submit the following report of the receipts and disburse- 
ments for the fiscal year ending April 25, 191 1. 

There has been subscribed and paid in to the Permanent Fund $2.111 ; 
also there has been credited to this fund rebates received for insignia 
and rosettes amounting to $280.52. There has been invested $1,987.50 
of the Permanent Fund in two $1,000 New York city 4's, leaving on 
hand to the credit of this fund uninvested $404.02, of which $354.02 is 
deposited in the Broadway Savings Institution, of New York city, at 
four per cent interest. 

Respectfully submitted, John H. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 

April 25, 191 1. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 69 

April 25. 1910, balance on hand $7,764.60 

Receipts. 

.\nrmal dues : 

1907 $1.00 

1908 16.50 

1909 35-50 

1910 499.00 

191T 5,167.00 

■ $5,719. 00 

Certificates 687 . 50 

Application and supplemental blanks 120. 50 

Subscriptions to Permanent Fund 2,111.00 

Rebates received credited to Permanent Fund 280.52 

Medals 18.00 

Interest 181. 51 

9.118.03 



$16,882.63 

Disbursements. 

Appropriation for 191 1 Congress $500.00 

Salary of Secretary General and Registrar General. 1,200.00 

Printing and mailing Year Book 648.91 

Printing and mailing Official Bulletins : 

May. 1910 $45356 

October, 1910 3i9-04 

December, 1910 269.23 

March, 1911 439-37 

1,481.20 

Sundry printing, postage, and expressage 3/8.89 

x\merican Bank Note Co., certificates 201 . 25 

Engrossing certificates, work on records, and cleri- 
cal help to Registrar General 513-66 

Dr. C. N. Guyer, Organization Committee .... 371 . 15 

Com'd'r John H. Moore, Organization Committee 

(South) 46.90 

Reporting 1910 Congress 71 . 00 

Fidelity bond 35-00 

Expenses Secretary General attending Toledo Con- 
gress %. - - 52 ■ 65 

Expenses Secretary General attending meeting 

Executive Committee in New York city 29.70 

Expenses Secretary General, postage and express- 
age 15 - 00 

Sundry expenses. Treasurer General 7- 58 

Rosettes and ribbons 13-93 

Cable message to Manila 5 -60 

Collection out-of-town checks 6.36 

Books 5-26 

Leather bag 9- 00 

Rent safe-deposit safe 5 00 

Filing cases, guides, and folders 44. 30 

Charters for new Societies 8. 50 

Paper tubes 10. 50 

Committee on Aliens 1310 

Immigration information expenses to. 00 



70 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Permanent Fund investment account, $2,000 New- 
York city 4's 1,987.50 

Interest accrued on above 14-33 

7,686.27 

Balance on hand April 25, 191 1 $9,196.36 

$8,842.34 in U. S. Wtge. & T. Co. 
354.02 in Broadway Savings Inst. 

John H. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 

Examined and found correct. 

Wm. a. De; Caindry, Chairman, 

T. W. Williams, 

F. B. Steele, 

John D. Vandercook, 

Auditing Committee 



PROCEEDINGS OF EOUISVIElvE CONGRESS. Jl 

Details of Receipts for Fiscal Year Ending April, 25, 191 1, 



States. 


Annual Dues. 


in 

."2 

u 
V 
U 


Application 

and 
Supplemental 
Blanks. 


Total. 




1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 




Alabama 


















Arizona 










I25-50 

15.00 

215-50 

434.00 


$2.00 




$27.50 
15.00 

230-75 
492.00 

7-40 

261.55 


Arkansas 










California 










9.00 

58.00 

2.00 

500 


$6.25 

5.40 
11-55 


Connecticut .... 






• 




Colorado 










Dist.of Columbia 










245.00 

20.00 

667.00 


Delaware 






I20.00 


I20.00 


Empire State . . . 






134.00 


24.25 


825.25 


Florida 










Hawaii 








46.50 
1.50 








46.50 


Idaho 








14-50 
313-00 
112.50 
145-00 

60.00 






Illinois 








106.00 


5.40 


424.40 
112 =;o 


Indiana 










Iowa 










37.00 
I.OO 

35-00 


5-50 
7.20 


187.50 

5-50 

102^0 


Kansas 








4-50 


Kentucky 








Louisiana 












Maine 










187.50 
134.50 
779.00 
189.50 


26.00 
14.00 
20.00 
28.00 
22.00 
23.00 


2.75 
2.75 
7.10 
3.60 
3.60 


216 2K 


Maryland 










151-25 
806 10 


Massachusetts . . 










Michigan 








183.50 
139.00 


404.60 
164.60 
23.00 
52.00 
44.50 
76.00 


Minnesota 








Mississippi 








Missouri 








19.00 
1500 


33-00 


Montana 




115-50 


14.00 






Nebraska 




61.00 


15.00 




Nevada 










New Hampshire. 










144.00 

286.50 

22.50 

11.50 


9.00 
10.00 


15-05 
2.00 


153-00 
311-55 

45 00 

11.50 

5-60 

224.00 


New Jersey 










New Mexico. . . . 








20.50 


North Dakota. 








North Carolina. . 












5-60 


Ohio 


|i.oo 


. I.OO 


1.50 


9-50 


211.00 




Oklahoma 


Oregon 










55-50 

299.00 

160.50 

38.50 

35-00 

129.00 






55-50 

366.25 

180.50 

44.50 

76.00 

138.00 

2.50 

i'3-25 












61.00 

20.00 

6.00 

I.OO 

9.00 
2.50 


6.25 
■■6.25 


Rhode Island. . . 










Texas 










Utah 








40,00 


Vermont 








Virginia 




















107.00 


Wisconsin 










Wyoniiner 










15-50 
^5,167.00 


32.00 




4750 














|i.oo 


II6.50 


$35-50 


I499.00; 

1 


^687.50 


1 1 20. 50 


^6,527.00 


Permanent Fund 


suhsrrintion.s 


1 


2,111.00 


Rebates received credited to Pe 


rmanent Fund 




280.52 
18.00 


Interest 


s 






181.50 






\ 


^9,118.03 



72 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

-DetAiLS OF Disbursements of the Treasurer General of the 
: National Society, S. A. R., for the Fiscal Year 

! Ending April 25, 1911. 

19 10. 
May 9. A.Howard Clark, salary for Apr., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 
9. A. Howard Clark, salarj^ for Apr., Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

$100.00 

9. A. Howard Clark, expenses attending Toledo Congress 52.65 

16. U. S. Mortgage & Trust Co., collections for April... 1.66 

16. Annin & Company, rosettes 3 . 68 

16. Woodward & Lothrop, Inc., bag 9.00 

16. Judd & Detweiler, envelopes and printing 149-25 

23. Benedict & Benedict, indemnity bond 35-00 

23. Central Law Reporting Co., reporting proceedings of 

Toledo Congress 71 . 00 

June 2. A.Howard Clark, salary for May, Sec. Gen.. $50.00 
2. A. Howard Clark, salary for May, Reg. Gen. . 50.00 

100.00 

15. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, work on records. 105.81 

15. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing May Bulletin 453-56 

15. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing 156.60 

July 5. A. Howard Clark, salary for June, Sec. Gen.. $50.00 
5. A. Howard Clark, salary for June Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

13. Permanent Fund investment account, paid Blake 

Bros. & Co. for $1,000 bond N. Y. city 4's, 1958. . . 990.00 

14. Judd & Detweiler, printing, etc 21.82 

Aug. 2. A. Howard Clark, salary for July Sec. Gen... $50.00 

2. A. Howard Clark, salary for July Reg. Gen. . . 50.00 

100.00 

ID. American Bank Note Co.. certificates 157-50 

10. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work... 67.70 

10. Judd & Detweiler. printing, etc 11.00 

10. North America Safe Deposit Co.. rent of safe 5.00 

Sept. 2. A. Howard Clark, salary for Aug., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 
2. A. Howard Clark, salary for Aug.. Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

Oct. 4. A. Howard Clark, salar}- for Sept., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 

4. A. Howard Clark, salary for Sept., Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

18. John U. Perkins, clerical work on Year Book 25.00 

18. Judd & Detweiler, printing, etc 5- 50 

Nov. 2. Robert A. Jonscher. work on Official Bulletin.... 12.00 
2. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work... 71.85 
2. A.Howard Clark, salary for Oct., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 

2. A.Howard Clark, salary for Oct., Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

28. The Lord Baltimore Press, printing and mailing 

Year Book 648.91 

28. Judd & Detweiler. printing and mailing October 

Official Bulletin 31904 

Dec. 3. A. Howard Clark, salary for Nov., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 

3. A.Howard Clark, salary for Nov., Reg. Gen. . 50. co 

100.00 

3. A. Howard Clark, expenses attending meeting of Ex- 
ecutive Committee, Nov. 19, New York city 29.70 

22. American Bank Note Co., certificates 43-75 

22. Judd & Detweiler. printing, etc 13-95 

22. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work... 55-95 

27. Annin & Company, ribbon i . 25 



PROCEEDINGS OF EOUISVIELE CONGRESS. 'J^i 

Dec. 28. Permanent Fund investment account, paid W. G. 

Wiley & Co. for $1,000 bond, N. Y. city 4's, 1958 $997-50 

28. Interest, I month, 27 days, on above 6.33 

As of July 13. Interest, 2 months, 12 days, accrued on purchase 

N. Y. city 4's on this date 8.00 

1911. 
Jan. 3. A.Howard Clark, salary for Dec, Sec. Gen.. $50.00 
3. A. Howard Clark, salary for Dec, Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

9. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing Dec. Bulletin 269.23 

30. Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., filing cases, etc 44 -30 

Feb. I. A.Howard Clark, salary for Jan., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 
I. A.Howard Clark, salary for Jan., Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

16. W. F. Roberts Co., charters for new Societies 8.50 

16. Annin & Co., rosettes for Organization Committee... 9.00 

16. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work, etc. 47-95 

17. Clarkson N. Guyer, for Committee on Organization.. 37i.i5 

20. A. Howard Clark, cable message to Manila 5.60 

28. A.Howard Clark, salary for Feb., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 

28. A.Howard Clark, salary for Feb., Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

Mar. 7. J. Richard Riggles, Jr., assistance to Reg. Gen. on 

indexes, etc 24 . 00 

7. Judd & Detweiler, printing, etc 20.68 

7. Mrs. Dansky Dandridge, books 5 . 26 

16. George T. Wood, Treas. Kentucky Society, contribu- 
tion of the National Society towards expenses of 

the Louisville Congress 500. 00 

21. The Randolph Paper Box Co., paper tubes 10.50 

23. A.Howard Clark, postage and expressage 15.00 

25. John H. Moore, expenses of Committee on Aliens... 13.10 
25. John H. Moore, expenses of Committee on Organiza- 
tion (South) 46.90 

Apr. 3. A.Howard Clark, salary for Mar., Sec. Gen.. $50.00 

3. A.Howard Clark, salary for Mar., Reg. Gen., 50.00 

100.00 

4. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work, etc 103.40 
7. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing Mar. Bulletin 439-37 
7. J. J. Pauksytis and K. Brazys, immigrant information 

expense 10.00 

14. U. S. Mtge. & Tr. Co., collections, items for March.. 1.88 

24. U. S. Mtge! & Tr. Co., collections for out of town, 

items for May, June, August, September, October, 

November, December, February 2.82 

24. John H. Burroughs, sundry expenses, postage and 

expressage 7 • 58 

$7,686.27 

(Moved and seconded that the report of the Treasurer General be 
received, approved, and placed on file. Carried.) 

The President General : Are there any subscriptions to be made, 
carrying out the suggestion of Treasurer General Burroughs? If so, 
the President General will entertain them at this time. 



74 SONS OP" THE a:merican revolution. 

PRESENTATION OF STAR-SPANGLED BANNER. 

Mr. R. C. B. Thruston, of Kentucky : 'Sir. President General, maj- I 
ask that the regular order be dispensed with for a moment? We have 
a matter that we wish to bring before the Congress at this time. 

The President General : Compatriots, you have heard the request 
coming from the Kentuck}- Society that we dispense with the regular 
order of business for a few moments. What is your pleasure? 

(On motion, unanimous consent is given.) 

Thereupon Mr. Thruston and others escorted to the platform, amid 
the applause of the delegates, Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, of Ken- 
tucky. 

Mr. Danforth, of Kentucky : Compatriots, I do not believe it is 
necessary to introduce to any Kentuckian this old soldier of many wars, 
but I want the honor of introducing to the delegates from the country 
at large Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, of this State, who has fought in 
all the wars I ever heard of in this country! (Applause.) 

General Buckner : Mr. President General, it is a pleasant duty that 
devolves upon me. sir, this morning. It is the custom of all nations to 
appoint some significant emblem which will serve to distinguish their 
nationality from that of all other peoples. The Muscovite has his bear, 
the Prussian his double eagle, the Frenchman his tricolor, the Turk his 
crescent moon. The conquering legions of Rome, following the tri- 
umphant flights of their eagle, overran and subdued to their sway most 
of the nations of antiquity. We, too. sir, have our American eagle. As 
described by a patriotic scion of Revolutionary ancestrj-, this noble bird 
stands with one talon resting on the summit of the x\lleghanies, the 
other grasping the loftiest peaks of the Rocky Mountains. He waves 
one wing over the storm-swept Atlantic, the other over the placid waters 
of the broad Pacific Ocean. He dips his beak in the frozen lakes of 
the north, while his tail feathers flutter over the torrid waters of the 
Gulf of ]\Iexico. (Applause.) It is the efiigy of this remarkable bird 
that sits perched upon the standard that bears aloft our national colors, 
which were selected as an appropriate emblem by our Revolutionary 
sires. 

At the close of the War of Independence each of the thirteen Colo- 
nies was recognized by Great Britain as a free and independent sover- 
eignty. But these several States, instead of pursuing each its separate 
way amongst the nations of the earth, thought it proper to merge their 
own individuality into one greater nationality, choosing for their em- 
blem — and very appropriately — a flag "with thirteen stripes, alternately 
red and white, with thirteen stars on an azure field, thus creating, as has 
been said, a new constellation in the firmament of nations. (Applause.) 

But as the heavenly bodies, in their ceaseless journey through space, 
attract to themselves new particles of matter, so in our own progress 
amongst the nations of the world we have gathered about us new mate- 
rials out of which to form new commonwealths to be added to this 
constellation. When, therefore, in this process of accretion, we added. 




GENERAL BUCKNER PRESENTING THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 75 

in 1792, Vermont and Kentucky to our Union, the flag was changed to 
accord with these modified conditions by adding two stripes and two 
stars to the flag already designed. This continued to be our national 
flag until 1818, when the present law was enacted, by which the stripes 
were reduced to thirteen — typical of the thirteen original States — while 
for each new State admitted to the Union a new star glittered in the 
constellation. (Applause.) But it was the flag of fifteen stars and 
fifteen stripes that waved over our battalions during our last conflict 
with Great Britain. It was under this flag that we captured at New 
Orleans the inspiring air which still cheers our soldiers when they 
break up their camps — "The Girl I Left Behind Me !" (Laughter and 
applause.) It was this flag that floated over the ramparts of Fort 
McHenry during that "perilous fight" — the banner that "so proudly was 
hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming." (Applause.) This was the flag 
that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words of our National 
Anthem. This identical flag is now preserved in the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution, in Washington city. 

Now an exact copy of that flag has been caused to be made by our 
patriotic comrade, Mr. Ballard Thruston (applause), and it is my 
privilege today to present, in the name of the Kentucky Society, this 
flag, thus provided by our compatriots, to the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. (Great applause, which is long- 
continued as the flag is waved before the Congress by President Dan- 
forth, of the Kentucky Society.) And as it waves over the descendants, 
of those who designed it, let it be greeted by the martial strains of the 
air which it inspired, "The Star-Spangled Banner." 

"And long may it wave 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave." 

(Great and prolonged applause greeted the conclusion of General" 
Buckner's remarks in presenting the flag, and in the midst of it, with 
patriotic fervor running at full tide, Miss Florence M. Bertelle, of 
Louisville, came forward in front of the President General's stand and 
began to sing, with, the clear notes of her beautiful and cultivated 
soprano voice, the soul-stirring strains of "The Star-Spangled Banner," 
which were instantly taken up by the convention as one man and carried 
to conclusion with great enthusiasm and spirit. It was the climax to a 
highly dramatic scene, as the venerable hero of many wars, typical 
soldier as he was with his martial bearing, stood beside the flag of his 
country, so rich in suggestion of her glorious history, while the lines 
of the inspired and matchless anthem were sung with patriotic fire.) 

The President General : General Buckner, the series of pleasant 
surprises which have come to us since we arrived in Louisville has now 
been capped by the presentation of this flag from the Kentucky Society, 
and it is doubly dear to us coming from your hands as a man who has 
fought under the two flags. (Applause.) And if, as some believe, the 
spirits of those who have gone before still hover round us, shall we - 



yd SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

not say to the spirit of Francis Scott Key, in answer to his question, 
"Does the star-spangled banner still wave?" "Yes; not the flag as you 
knew it, with but fifteen stars in its blue field, as it floated over Fort 
McHenry, when you wrote those beautiful lines, but a flag with forty- 
eight stars that floats over a nation wide, extending from ocean to 
ocean; yes, and to the isles of the sea." (xA.pplause.) 

It has been well said. General Buckner, that the sun never sets on 
Old Glory, for when the last rays of the setting sun are kissing its 
drooping folds good-night in the Philippines, the first rays of the morn- 
ing sun are gilding its flowing folds in Porto Rico. 

In accepting this flag on behalf of the National Society well may 
we say : 

Where'er an American is today. 

On land or on the sea. 
Whether at home or far away — 

A priest or layman he — 
Let patriotism have full sway ; 

All other thoughts dissever. 
I pledge this toast that, come what may — 
The Stars and Stripes forever ! 

General BuckneR : Mr. President General, permit me a slight digres- 
sion, as you have alluded to this flag. It was my privilege sixty-three 
years ago, after we had occupied the City of Mexico, to lead a party of 
officers to the summit of Mount Popocatapetl, 18,000 feet above the sea. 
There it was my privilege to plant upon that summit, in a clime of 
eternal snow, over a region of perpetual fire in the crater, the flag of 
America, where it was greeted by the first rays of the sun rising over 
tHe Atlantic and received its last parting look as it sank behind the 
waves of the great Pacific Ocean. (Applause.) It was there planted, 
and, in imitation of the Spaniards of the olden time, I claimed for the 
United States government all the lands the flag floated over! (Ap- 
plause.) 

(At the conclusion of the flag presentation, opportunity was given 
to make a flashlight photograph of the President General's stand and 
surroundings, showing General Buckner beside the flag, which was held 
by President Danforth, of the Kentucky Society.) 

The President General : I would like to ask Compatriot Thruston if 
he has any more surprises at this present moment. (Laughter.) Then 
we will resume the regular order of business. The next thing in order 
will be the report of the Secretary General. I have the honor and 
pleasure of presenting our Secretary General, Mr. A. Howard Clark. 
(Applause.) 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL. 

Compatriots : Twenty-one years ago today there was in session in 
this city the First Annual Congress of the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, which was organized on April 30, 1889, in 
the historic Fraunces Tavern, New York, on the one hundredth anni- 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. TJ 

versary of the inauguration of George Washington as the first Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. The Society had been formed 
by the union of nine independent societies of descendants of the patriots 
of the War for Independence, one of the societies, the pioneer of them 
all — the Sons of Revolutionary Sires — formed in San Francisco in 
1875. The new National Society grew rapidlj^ Its first Congress was 
welcomed to Kentucky by our compatriot, the Hon. Simon Bolivar 
Buckner, then Governor of this Commonwealth, who extended hearty 
hospitality to the forty delegates representing twenty-seven State Socie- 
ties with a membership of 2,500. Today the Twenty-second Annual 
Congress is here assembled, with delegates representing fifty Societies 
with a total enrollment of ^j,,^}^^ members. Again we are welcomed to 
the Blue Grass State. Among the delegates at that first Congress, some 
of whom are here today, were Vice-President General Buckner, Hon. 
William Lindsay, Col. Thomas Speed, and Col. E. Polk Johnson, of 
Kentucky; Judge Edgerton and Captain Moffatt, of Minnesota; Don J. 
Whittemore and Capt. Charles King, of Wisconsin ; Hon. William E. 
English, of Indiana ; Hon. Edwin Shepard Barrett, of Massachusetts ; 
Rev. W. R. Parsons, of Ohio; Gen. Alexander S. Webb, John J. Hub- 
bell, J. C. Pumpelly, and P. B. Fairchild, of New Jersey, and other 
well-known members of the organization. 

Among the resolutions adopted at that Congress was one urging upon 
the Federal government to make adequate provision and appropriation 
for the preservation, classification, and indexing of the Revolutionary 
archives then scattered in various department buildings in Washington. 
That work has been done. 

It is not expected of the Secretary General that he review the prog- 
ress of the Society during these intervening years, the accomplishments 
of the organization in promoting the spirit of patriotism, in erecting 
monuments, tablets, and other memorials of the men and events of the 
Revolutionary period. The story is too long to bear recital here. Per- 
haps one of the principal acts of the Congress at Louisville in 1890 was 
the adoption of a constitution that set loose from its fold some two 
score patriotic women who had been enrolled as honorary members of 
the Sons of the Arherican Revolution. A few patriotic women, nothing 
daunted, encouraged by their brothers in the cause of patriotism, 
founded a society of their own, the National Society of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, which has enrolled more than 87,000 
women. These two great bodies of Sons and Daughters, with a com- 
bined present active strength of more than 75,000 men and women, are 
exerting a mighty influence in the land. 

Our compatriots were not backward when the call to arms was heard 
for the War with Spain. Several hundred of them responded to that 
call and, by resolution of our Annual Congress at Detroit, on May i, 
1899, the first anniversary of the capture of Manila, to each of these 
compatriots there has been awarded a diploma and medal of honor for 
their services in that war. During the past year nine of these medals 
have been awarded, as follows : 



78 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Leonard Furlong, Massachusetts Society, private Company A, Seventh 
United States Infantry. 

Norman King Robb, IlHnois Society, served in the Houston Light 
Guards, Company A, First Texas Vohmteers. 

Charles Theodore Wilt. Illinois Society, captain Company G, First 
Illinois Volunteers. 

Harry Bayley Chamberlin, Vermont Society, quartermaster sergeant 
First Vermont Volunteers, captain, assistant quartermaster. 

Edward H. Prouty, Vermont Society, first lieutenant First Vermont 
Infantry. 

James Charles Peabody, Massachusetts Society, petty officer on U. S. 
ship "Lehigh." 

Olin Royal Booth, Massachusetts Society, private and corporal 
Seventh United States Cavalry. 

John W. Clary, Massachusetts Society, private Fifth Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry. 

Philip Rose Crippen, Illinois Society, corporal Company C, First 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

The Secretary General prepared and issued during the year four 
numbers of the Official Bulletin aggregating 149 pages. These have 
been distributed to every member of the organization. The size of each 
issue is necessarily limited to an average of 36 pages in order to keep 
within the appropriation of $1,800 for its publication. It is believed that 
the Bulletin accomplishes much good in keeping the members in- 
formed of the doings of the State Societies and of the national com- 
mittees. It is impossible with the necessary limitation of expenditure 
to include information that would be of interest and valuable, but 
which is beyond the jurisdiction of the Society. The present limita- 
tion may be advisable as well as a necessity. 

The National Year Book Avas published in somewhat condensed form 
at a saving of about $400 over the year preceding. It was distributed 
free to the general officers, the trustees, chairmen of national commit- 
tees, officers of State Societies, and Presidents of local Chapters, and 
the remainder of the total edition of 750 copies was offered to members 
generally at 15 cents each to cover cost of handling and mailing. A like 
condensation and distribution seems advisable for the 191 1 Year Book. 

The several national committees have made satisfactory progress in 
their lines of work. The Organization Committees have been notably 
active. The Committee for the South, under the chairmanship of Com- 
mander John H. Moore, has organized a Society in North Carolina and 
one in South Carolina. In the Northwest the committee under the 
leadership of Doctor Guyer organized new Societies in North Dakota 
and South Dakota. On February 17 a cable message was sent to 
Manila announcing that a charter was granted for the Philippine Soci- 
ety, which had been in formation under the guidance of Judge Lobin- 
gier, of the Nebraska Society. 

The committees on Education, on Information for Aliens, on Dese- 
cration of the Flag, on Muster and Pension Rolls, the Memorial Com- 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 79 

mittee, and the Committee on National Parks will report to this Con- 
gress on the work of the year, and the details need not be repeated by 
the Secretary General. 

The statistical reports as well as the annual statements of the condi- 
tion and operations of the several State Societies show a marked activity 
throughout the country in many lines of patriotic work. Everywhere 
there have been celebrations of anniversaries of events of the War for 
Independence, and brilliant addresses have been made on these occa- 
sions. Many of these celebrations were honored by the presence of 
the President General. All have been reported as fully as practicable 
in the Offici.\l Bulletin,. 

Among the memorials of the Revolution erected by the Societies 
since the Toledo Congress, I may mention the life-size bronze statue of 
"The Minute Man" erected by the Connecticut Society and unveiled on 
June 17 at Compo Beach to commemorate the heroism of the patriots 
who defended their country when the British under General Tryon in- 
vaded Connecticut in April, 1777. The Massachusetts Society has 
placed a handsome bronze tablet on the Hotel Essex, Boston, on the 
site of the birthplace of Gen. Henry Knox, and during the year has 
marked the graves of 102 Revolutionary soldiers in that State. The 
Kentucky Society and the Ohio Society are planning to mark large 
numbers of graves in those States. A pleasing annual custom of the 
Louisiana Society is to assemble on All Saints' Day in the old St. Louis 
Cemetery, New Orleans, to decorate with the colors of the Sons of the 
American Revolution and with ferns and delicate flowers, and with 
American, Spanish, and French flags, the graves of French and Spanish 
soldiers there buried who aided the cause of American independence. 

The Maryland Society has erected a granite monument at the grave 
of William Paca, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, which 
will be dedicated on May 13 with appropriate ceremonies. 

The Colorado and Michigan Societies have given special attention to 
the reading of historical papers and discussions thereon at stated meet- 
ings held during the winter months. 

The National Society officially participated in the dedication of 
statues erected in Washington to the memory of General Pulaski, 
Count Kosciuzsco, and Baron Von Steuben. 

On April 13, 1911, the Senate of the United States appropriated 
$100,000 for the erection of a statue to Thomas Jefferson, a measure 
urged at the Congresses of this Society in Baltimore and Toledo, and 
on the same day the Senate also passed a bill, introduced by our Com- 
patriot Henry Cabot Lodge, appropriating a like amount of $100,000 
for a statue to Alexander Hamilton, both of these statues to be erected 
in the city of Washington. 

There can be no doubt as to the advantage of a fuller development 
of the local Chapter as a means of increasing the general interest in 
this organization. During the last two or three years there has been a 
manifest growth in the active work of the Chapters and many of them 
have held large and enthusiastic gatherings. A number of new Chap- 



8o SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOIvUTlON. 

ters have been organized and others are in process of formation, and 
it seems to be the general experience that the interest of members 
living in viidely separated localities can only thus be kept alive. The 
phenomenal growth of the Daughters of the American Revolution is 
very largely due to its organization into several thousand local chap- 
ters, the chapter being the unit. 

In compliance with a vote of the Toledo Congress, there was sent to 
each of the State Societies a preamble and resolutions calling upon 
each Society to urge the establishment by the States of New Jersey and 
Pennsylvania, with the co-operation of the Federal government, of a 
national park on the Delaware River near Trenton, to commemorate 
the historic crossing by the Continental Army under command of Gen- 
eral Washington. The chairman of the Memorial Committee will re- 
port on progress made in this patriotic project. 

Respectfully submitted, A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

(At the mention of General Buckner's name in the report, where he 
was referred to as the Governor of Kentucky at the time the National 
Society met in Louisville twenty-one years ago, the President General 
said : "Compatriots, arise, and let us give three cheers for Gen. Simon 
Bolivar Buckner !" This was done with a hearty "Hip ! Hip ! Hip t 
Hur-rah! Hur-rah!") 

The President General : Gentlemen, you have heard the report of 
your Secretary General. What is your pleasure? 

Mr. Dewey, of Vermont : I move that the report be accepted and 
placed on file. 

(This motion had several seconds.) 

The President General : Gentlemen, you have heard the motion 
made by Mr. Dewey, of Vermont, properly seconded, that the report 
of the Secretary General be received and placed on file. 

(Motion duly adopted.) 

Admiral Baird: I move that a committee of three be appointed to 
draft suitable resolutions of thanks to Senator Bacon, of Georgia, and 
Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts, for their efforts in securing the 
passage by the U. S. Senate of appropriations for the erection of monu- 
ments to Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, respectively. 

(Motion seconded and carried.) 

The President General : The next order of business will be the 
report of your Registrar General, which will also be presented by Mr. 
Clark, of Washington. 

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL. 

CoMPAT"RioTS : Your Registrar General has the honor to report the 
enrollment of 924 new members during the Society year ended March 
31, 1911, and a total to date of 22,536 members since April 30, 1889. 
The present active membership is 12,471 — a net gain of 400 over the 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 8l 

preceding year. The accession of new members was somewhat less 
than during the years 1909 and 1910, though about 60 above the annual 
average since 1901. Massachusetts continues to rank first in numbers, 
1.635, followed by the Empire State, 1,368; Connecticut, 1,103; Illinois, 
626; Pennsylvania, 603, and New Jersey, 581. The greatest number of 
new members this year comes from New York, 103 ; Illinois is second 
with 89, Massachusetts third with 80. Only three Societies have failed 
to add to their roll. 

One year ago today, at the Toledo Congress, a cordial invitation was 
extended to the National Society to hold the Congress of 191 1 at 
Louisville. The enthusiastic representatives of the Kentucky Society 
said, "Come to Louisville. It will do you good ; it will do us good. It 
will make you better patriots to meet with Kentuckians in a State 
where only one-fortieth of the population is foreign born." We are 
here. We are aroused. Kentuckians are aroused. The Registrar Gen- 
eral takes pleasure in announcing that the Kentucky Society has in- 
creased its membership more than 25 per cent during the year. It has 
outstripped all other Societies in percentage of growth. It has won the 
Traveling Banner. We are proud of Kentucky, and of our entire 
organization. 

Statistics of State Societies, Showing Number of New Members 

Enrolled from April i, 1910, to March 31, 191 1, and Number 

OF Members on the Rolls March 31, 191 1. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Empire State 

Florida 

France 

Hawaii * 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

6 — SR 



New Members. 


Active Members 





30 


3 


51 


I 


29 


27 


431 


30 


257 


48 


1,103 





45 


21 


490 


103 


1.368 


4 


35 





15 


3 


lOI 


7 


32 


89 


626 


18 


225 


32 


292 


5 


65 


36 


125 


4 


76 


22 


375 


15 


269 


80 


1,635 


25 


379 


16 


533 


7 


25 


3 


104 


I 


29 


6 


122 



82 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOEUTION. 



Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

North Carolina. . 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . . 

Philippines 

Rhode Island. . . . 
South Carolina.. . 
South Dakota.. . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



New Members. 


Active Members 


4 


22 


13 


288 


47 


581 


6 


46 


31 


31 


18 


23 


55 


523 


6 


43 


14 


III 


40 


603 


6 


IS 


10 


321 


15 


18 


12 


16 


I 


35 


3 


74 


7 


72 


6 


277 


8 


76 


10 


206 


4 


igi 


2 


Z2 



924 12,471 



The new Societies in North Carolina, South Carolina, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, and in the Philippines have given us 78 new members. 

Two hundred and twenty-five deaths have been reported, some of 
them men of eminence, all of them earnest patriots. Several actual 
sons of soldiers of the Revolution have passed away. One of these, 
Elijah Clark Sears, a relative of your Registrar General, lived to the 
great age of 105 years and 5 months. Among the deceased should be 
mentioned Theodore H. Eaton, of Detroit, a constant attendant at the 
Annual Congress and member of the National Executive Committee; 
Judge George H. Williams, Attorney General of the United States, 
U. S. Senator from 1866 to 1872, and for many years President of the 
Oregon Society; Brig. Gen. Edgar S. Dudley, William Thomas Ward- 
well, Maj. Edmund Kirby Webster, Rear Admiral Francis W. Dickins, 
Judge Francis Marion Crosby, Rear Admiral Bowman Hendry McCalla, 
Col. Oskaloosa M. Smith, Brig. Gen. James Biddle, Judge E. M. P. 
Brister, and Hon. Robert Treat Paine. 

The Registrar General has issued the average number of certificates 
of membership, 625 in all. Under Art. XIV of the By-Laws, every 
member of the Society is entitled to a certificate; but as the cost of 
engraving and engrossing them is necessarily a charge against the State 
Societies, only about two-thirds of the new members receive them. 

Through the generosity of a compatriot a full-sized gold insignia has 
been provided for the past three years, to be awarded to the State 
enrolling the greatest proportional number of sons of present members. 
The intention of the donor was to stimulate greater interest in the 
younger generation of patriots. In 1909 an insignia was thus awarded 
to the Michigan Society; in 1910, to the New Jersey Society. During 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 83 

the past year the enrollment of 53 sons has been reported and the Ken- 
tucky Society has added to its laurels the honor of being entitled to this 
prize insignia. It was proposed by the giver of the badge that the State 
receiving it should present it to one of the sons of members thus 
enrolled. 

The Registrar General has been accustomed each year to call atten- 
tion to the progress made in the publication of records of the Revolu- 
tion, particularly the names of those w^ho served in the army and navy 
in that war. Much has been done in gathering valuable material and 
much has been saved from destruction. Actual publication, however, 
is far from complete in several of the States. Rhode Island and New 
Jersey have the material in hand for an excellent showing of what their 
soldiers did in the Revolution, but it still awaits publication. Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia have found themselves 
possessors of important documents and lists of soldiers that were 
thought to be irretrievably lost. All this priceless historical data should 
be promptly put in print and the information thus permanently pre- 
served, before other calamities such as the Albany Capitol fire shall 
obliterate the material forever. And the Federal government as well 
as the States should do its share of publication. This Society has ac- 
complished great good in securing the enactment of laws for the gather- 
ing and indexing of army and navy rolls, and the Committee on Muster 
and Pension Rolls is active in furthering the compilation of data con- 
tained in the claim papers of the 60,000 pensioners of the Revolution. 

Your Registrar General recommends that this Congress authorize the 
Executive Committee to have prepared at the expense of the Society 
(if after the committee's consideration it is deemed practicable and 
advisable) an alphabetical card index of the pensioners of the Revolu- 
tion, to be compiled from the rolls published by the government in 1835. 
The printed rolls are compiled by States and counties, without indexes, 
in such a manner as to be almost unavailable for reference, and it may 
seem to the committee .that an ofifice reference card index of these 
60,000 names would be of great value for prompt verification of papers 
of applicants and as a source of information for those desiring mem- 
bership. 

In here presenting his nineteenth annual report your Registrar Gen- 
eral again thanks the officers of State Societies and members for their 
uniform courtesy and patience in aiding him to preserve the unimpeach- 
able character of the records of this Society. 

Respectfully submitted, A. Howard Clark, 

Registrar General. 

(The reference in the report to the Kentucky Society having added 
to its laurels the honor of being entitled to the Traveling Banner and 
the prize insignia this year was greeted with hearty applause.) 

The President General : Compatriots, you have heard the report of 
your Registrar General. What is your pleasure? 



84 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(Moved and seconded that the report be received and placed on file. 
Carried.) 

AWARD OF PRIZE INSIGNIA TO KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

The President General: While we are waiting for the Traveling 
Banner to be unboxed, we will proceed with the presentation of the 
prize badge, and I will call on the Rev. Dr. Stone, our Chaplain Gen- 
eral, to present it to the Kentucky Society. (Applause.) 

Dr. Stone: In presenting this badge — which is a recognition of the 
appreciation by the National Society of the State which has brought 
the largest number of sons of present members into the National Soci- 
ety during the year — I wish to say that we live today in a time when 
the great strength of any movement is recognized to be not simply in 
its reflective power, but in its originating power; that it is not simply 
a matter of doing today over again what our fathers did yesterday, but 
it is the power of doing ourselves, and doing for others; and there is 
no greater opportunity or force in our Society than that of inspiring 
our sons with the purposes and aims that have inspired us. Therefore 
we congratulate your Society, sir, upon this splendid honor which you 
have brought to yourselves in bringing so many of your own young men 
into the front rank of the national work of our Society, and I take 
great pleasure in presenting this badge to your Society. (Applause.) 

Chaplain Craik, of Kentucky: Mr. President General and Dr. Stone, 
I suppose it has been as much of a surprise to you to be called on to 
present this badge as it is to me to receive it ; but, although unexpected, 
it is certainly not unappreciated, and it gives me great pleasure, on 
behalf of our local organization, to accept this badge, which is certainly 
a badge of honor. I suppose there is no member of the Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution who does not believe in the value of 
pedigree. If it were not for pedigree this organization would not exist. 
We have it upon the highest authority that the sins of the fathers are 
visited upon the children ; so, also, we can claim that the virtues of our 
ancestors descend from generation to generation. (Applause.) And 
it is in recognition of that fact, therefore, that Kentucky can claim 
the meed of honor and appreciation of that great truth ; and I am glad 
to be able, in her name and that of her Society, to accept this badge 
in recognition of it. It is only because my own eldest son achieved his 
majority on last Saturday, instead of some time earlier during the year, 
that he is not now enrolled among this band of patriots. (Applause.) 

AWARD OF TRAVELING BANNER TO KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

The President General : Gentlemen, arise. I will now ask Com- 
patriot Wardner Williams, ex-President of the Colorado Society, which 
gave the banner to the National Society, to present that flag to the 
Kentucky Society. 

(The flag is here brought forward.) 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 85 

Mr. Williams began by relating the story of the young son of a 
member of the Supreme Court of his State, who came home from 
school for the holidays, and while there became deeply enamored of 
a young miss of fifteen who lived next door. When he was about to 
return to his studies his father urged him to write as soon as he 
arrived, and let his parents know if he had reached his destination in 
safety. The boy demurred at this on the score that he would arrive 
there Thursday, and he always wrote on Sunday, anywa}-. The father 
insisted, however, and agreed to compromise on a postal card instead 
of a letter. The boy relented, and his father received this message : 
"I got here all right; but, "father, it is awfully lonesome down here. 
If you see any of the neighbors, tell her to write." (Applause.) This, 
said Mr. Williams, was the boy's awakening. Mr. Williams then con- 
tinued : 

Mr. Williams: To me the Stars and Stripes are the symbol of the 
awakening of the American people. Those of us who have stood in 
foreign ports and seen the Stars and Stripes floating at the masthead 
of one of our battleships know the thrill it sends to the American 
heart to view that flag, the insignia of liberty, floating over the seas. 
It is said that the ropes of the British Navy are intertwined by a red 
thread, and that no matter where you find a piece of cordage of the 
British Navy — it may be on some deserted island; it may have floated 
from some ship in time of dire distress — there you will find intertwined 
the red thread of the British Navy, and you know by that thread that a 
ship of England has passed that way. I have often thought of the 
impression upon an heir to the throne when his father first says to 
him, "My son, you are the son of royalty." That is royalty's awaken- 
ing. And so if we say to our own sons, "Boys, you are the sons of 
American Revolutionary sires. You are the red thread that runs 
through the entire history of the American people, and it is to you, 
more than to any other class of citizens that live under the folds of 
the Stars and Stripes, that America is looking for great things." I 
have tried to impress upon the membership of my own State Society 
that we must not keep our eyes riveted on the past; for, as desirable 
and as necessary as it is to commemorate the events of American his- 
tory, there are great events before us today and in the future. (Ap- 
plause.) It will take all the strength and all the courage, and all the 
heroism and the patriotism of the rank and file of American citizenship 
to meet these obligations, just as it required all the strength and all 
the courage of our forefathers to meet the obligations that confronted 
them a hundred years ago. If we are worthy sons of our ancestors, 
the founders of this Republic, we will be as ready to don the habili- 
ments of war in our time as they were in theirs. When our com- 
patriot. Admiral Dewey, ran with the sun into Manila Bay on that 
bright May morning and passed the word down the line of his ships, 
"Clear the deck for action," and under his guns the Spanish vessels, 
one by one, were sunk or beached; and when Gen. Irving Hale, a 
member of my own Society, ordered the Spanish flag which floated 



86 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

over the castle in Manila Bay lowered and the Stars and Stripes run 
up — from that moment America became a world power! (Applause.) 
Compatriots, we have tremendous questions to meet — questions of 
grave responsibility and far-reaching influence. First of all, we have 
the principles of honesty, uprightness, and justice in this land to main- 
tain. We have the question of whether our own merchant marine shall 
carry our goods to the markets of the world. We have the question 
of obtaining our rightful proportion of the trade of Central and South 
America. We have the question of the firm maintenance of the Monroe 
Doctrine on this continent. We have many other great and important 
problems to deal with. They are real questions, great questions, and 
they will require our patriotism and all our strength to see that they 
are properly solved. Compatriots, at a time like this it behooves us to 
stand shoulder to shoulder more than any other class of citizens. As 
our forefathers laid down their lives for the founding of this country, 
so we must lay down ours, if necessary, for its maintenance. We have 
here the colors of the Societ}^ of the American Revolution, and it would 
seem eminently appropriate that these colors be intertwined with the 
Stars and Stripes that have just been presented by the Kentucky Soci- 
ety, and I trust they shall never be separated; that wherever the Stars 
and Stripes shall stream, the same spirit of heroism and patriotism 
shall be inspired by the colors of the Sons of the American Revolution ! 
(Applause.) It affords me the greatest pleasure, ]Mr. President, to pre- 
sent this Traveling Banner, designed by the Colorado Society, to your 
splendid Kentucky Society, and as it goes from State to State we trust 
it may carry with it the inspiration of justice, patriotism, and liberty. 
(Great applause.) 

Mr. Danforth : Mr. President General and delegates, I w-ant to say 
that the surprises are beginning to come our way, and that we deeply 
appreciate them you need not be told. I feel sorrj^ for New Jersey; 
but, at the same time, sir, she has got to get up and hump herself if 
she wants to get this flag back. (Laughter and applause.) The last 
speaker said something about entwining this banner with the Stars and 
Stripes, and he looked over at this banner here that we have presented 
to the National Society, and I said to myself then, "Not if we know 
it!" (Laughter.) We shall try to keep this banner. 

(Apropos of the situation in which the Kentucky Society found 
itself, Mr. Danforth told, much to the delectation of his audience, the 
story of "Uncle Ephraim," an old Henry County, Kentucky, darky, who 
occasionally took aboard too much "happiness." On the occasion in 
question Uncle Ephraim, after having imbibed pretty freely, had to 
run the gauntlet of a graveyard on his way to his little cabin home, 
and there his imagination conjured up the "ghost" he was expecting, 
and he took precipitate flight, almost running his heart out, finally 
dropping down by a log on the roadside from sheer exhaustion, where, 
just as he was beginning to revive, his "ghost" sat down beside him 
and said, "We have had quite a race, haven't we?" Uncle Ephraim 
found the breath to reply, "Yes, and we'se gwine to have another right 
now.") (Great laughter and applause.) 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 87 . 

Continuing, Air. Danforth said : 

"And so I say we are going to have another race. (Applause.) 
And we hope to hold the banner, too ; but if any other State wins it, 
we will turn it over with as much grace as it has been turned over to 
us." (Applause.) 

Mr. Howe, of New Jersey: I wish to state, Mr. President General, 
that New Jersey is not afraid of "ghosts." (Laughter.) I want to 
say, too, that it gives us great pleasure to pass this banner over to 
Kentucky. In New Jersey we have an enormous number of foreign- 
born population. Only a small part of our citizenship is eligible to 
membership in the Sons ot the American Revolution. It has been a 
great pleasure to us to hear that only one-fortieth of the population 
of Kentucky is foreign born, and we will admit that you have good 
stock. But we are in the race! (Applause and laughter.) 

The President General : We will now listen to the report of the 
Historian General, who will please come to the platform. 

(Historian General Pierson, of New Jersey, submitted his report 
as follows, reading extracts to the Congress:) 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN GENERAL. 

Mr. President General and Compatriots of the Sons of the 
American Revolution : Patriotism is the keynote — the countersign, as 
it were — of our Society, and we are only loj^al to the institution so 
gloriously builded upon the strong and sure foundation laid by the 
organizers when we keep that lambent flame ever to the fore as a 
beacon for all mankind. 

It is not a difficult matter to exhibit one's love of country in such a 
Commonwealth as that in which we are meeting today. Famous the 
world over for its fair women, its gallant men, its beautiful scenery, 
its courageous pioneers who pushed through the wilderness (men of 
the character of Colonel Shelby, the first Governor of Kentucky and 
the hero of the Battle of Kings Mountain; George Rogers Clark, and 
Daniel Boone), the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln and of Henry Clay, 
its fertile soil, and many other features, it is no wonder that the world- 
wide and popular verses, set to strains of sweet and beautiful music, 
grow richer with the passing of the years — "My Old Kentucky Home." 
And there has been no mistaking the welcome that has been accorded 
us in this most hospitable city ; so we are naturally placed in an environ- 
ment for the consideration of patriotic and higher thoughts of life. 

Few words are more misunderstood in our country than patriotism. 
It can be said with all frankness that we have a duty to perform in 
seeing that those lukewarm citizens, too often found in high places, 
who are negligent of their responsibilities, are brought into a clearer 
vision of their duties to the state and nation. We have a danger from 
foes within more than we have from foes without, it seems. 

Our Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has steadily 
gone forward in its great patriotic work, a glance over the pages of 
our history revealing a noble, consistent band of patriots, who from the 
beginning wrought most delicately, yet firmly, this great fabric, into 
which has since been knit the lives of many compatriots of distinguished 
ancestr}', and, in not a few instances, illustrious sons who have achieved 
fame in one or more of the manj^ avenues of useful endeavor for 
human-kind. We should rejoice today in the firm foothold that the 
Society has in this country. 



88 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

During the year the Societies have been active in one form or another 
contributing to the general welfare of the national organization. The 
future is looming up bright with prophetic assurances of increased 
usefulness by the Sons all over this broad land. 

Through the persistent efforts of President General William Allen 
Marble, assisted by a number of other compatriots, the remains of 
Admiral John Paul Jones will now have a suitable resting-place. Too 
much credit cannot be given our President General for his efforts in 
behalf of this beneficent enterprise, and it is one of the achievements 
of his administration of which he may well feel proud. Too often the 
patriotic work ends when the bands cease playing, and this particular 
effort should be remembered with gratitude bj- the people of the United 
States. 

Another event of great national importance was the recognition of 
the heroic service given this country by that sterling Prussian patriot, 
Baron Frederick Wilhelm von Steuben, the drill-master of the War of 
the Revolution, through the dedication of the magnificent statue in 
bronze at the northwest corner of Lafayette Square, in Washington, in 
the presence of President William Howard Taft, Count von Bernstorff, 
Ambassador to this country from Germany, and many other diplomats, 
under conditions that would have been trying otherwise. That day, 
Wednesday, December 7, 1910, will be marked in history as one of the 
most eventful of all the great pageants held at the capital of our 
country. 

A lofty spirit of patriotism permeated the atmosphere despite the 
inclemency of the weather almost up to the hour of the unveiling, and 
indifferent would be the individual to the nobler attributes of manhood 
if he beheld that wonderful scene without emotion. Tardy though the 
recognition, the statue does prove appreciation of work well done, and 
it would be a difficult matter to single out any of the tributes which 
were more impressive — the one offered by President Taft, in his digni- 
fied oration, and the others who followed him ; the rendering of "The 
Star-Spangled Banner" by an assembled chorus of 1,000 voices of the 
Northeastern Ssengerbund ; or the procession, made up largely of those 
of Teutonic birth, which passed in review before the distinguished 
guests assembled on the grandstand. It was all of an intensely in- 
spirational character and gave a touch of sentiment that was most 
impressive and far-reaching in its lesson. 

It must be remembered that this great demonstration took place 
following a storm which for severity nearly rivaled the one made 
famous of March 4, 1909; yet it was estimated that 80,000 visitors 
counted it not a hardship to stand in the frosty air in the snow-covered 
streets while the ceremonies were in progress. 

All the general officers of the National Society were invited to the 
dedication, and your Historian counted it a rare privilege to be among 
those present. We were also honored by having the ushers all detailed 
from the District of Columbia Society. Our National Society, at its 
Annual Congress in Independence Hall in 1905, called the attention of 
the United States Congress to the appropriate character of this memo- 
rial and urged its prompt completion. 

During the year it was my privilege to correspond with many of the 
officers of the State Societies, with the object of bringing something 
before this Congress in a tangible form which would serve as a help, 
as a guide, in the furtherance of the objects and aims which are so 
dear to our hearts. The results you have seen, or will see. No effort 
has been made to encourage competition, nor is any comparison in- 
vited except that which will give ideas for increasing the activities of 
the compatriots. It is merely meant as an opportunity to view the 
work done in various parts of the country, and to give ideas for further 
work, if possible. Thirty-three Societies are represented in the collec- 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 89 

tion, and others would no doubt have been had there been time enough. 
It is hoped that the plan, if it meets with the approval of the com- 
patriots, will become a fixed part of the Annual Congress. 

History, as far as possible, should be written as it occurs ; the color- 
ing, if needed, can come later. While the duties of the Historian may- 
be increased by this means, it is nevertheless hoped that he will here- 
after be placed on the mailing list of every State Society, so that he 
will be the better enabled to prepare his report in a more leisurely 
manner. It is also recommended that on April i — not later — each 
Society shall send to the Historian a written statement of the year's 
work, so that he can present them to the National Congress in future. 

It would appear from the reports received this year that the day most 
generally observed throughout the country is the natal day of the 
immortal Washington. Truly the spirit of patriotism was rife on the 
twenty-second of February last, from Maine to California, and in 
nearly every State in the Union. 

_ At the Washington Headquarters, Morristown, on this day, the exer- 
cises were of a most dignified character, and while not held directly 
under the auspices of any of the State Societies, many of the com- 
patriots of New Jersey attended. Dr. Edwin A. Alderman, president 
of the University of Virginia, was the orator, and his message was 
most heartily received. This is an annual custom of the Washington 
Association, which has been organized for the purpose of retaining the 
building identically as it existed when Washington made his headquar- 
ters there in the winter of 1779- 1780. It is well worth a visit from any 
of the compatriots who are in the vicinity of New York, and can be 
reached within an hour's travel. It may not be out of order to state 
that Morristown Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, has 
taken up the project of marking Washington's route on his way from 
Princeton to find a camping place for the winter of 1776-1777 at Mor- 
ristown. 

Several of the compatriots of the Empire State Society have taken up 
the proposition of making a historical park at the battlefield of Sara- 
toga. The only battleground of the Revolutionary struggle that has 
been so set aside, I believe, is the one at Guilford Battleground, near 
Greensboro, N. C, and it is to Mrs. Joseph M. Morehead, widow of 
the gentleman who was at the head of the movement, that we are 
indebted for the exhibit which you will note from that State, so lately 
joining our ranks. 

At the battleground of Springfield, in New Jersey, which has, for 
some reason unknown, been given an unimportant place in the annals 
of the Revolutionary War, a further tribute to the memory of the 
patriots of that trying engagement of a century and a third ago was 
given on June 23, 1910, the anniversary of the battle, by the dedication 
of a liberty pole, from which the Stars and Stripes will now be dis- 
-played on many of the anniversaries of battles and patriotic holidays. 

The Connecticut Society dedicated an imposing statue of a Minute 
Man at Compo Beach on June 17, 1910, in memory of the engagement 
on Compo Hill, April 25, 1777, and on Columbus Day, October 12, the 
Massachusetts Society assisted in the unveiling of memorial tablets at 
Bell Rock Memorial Park, and on Washington's Birthday placed a 
"bronze tablet commemorative of the services in the Revolutionary War 
of Maji Gen. Henry Knox, at the site of his birthplace in Boston. Our 
'Compatriots in Maryland are preparing to dedicate this month a hand- 
some memorial to William Paca, Signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, the design being a broad scroll upon a granite block. The 
legislature of New Hampshire has under consideration a bill appropri- 
ating a sum for a statue of Gen. John Sullivan. And there comes 
from the East — from the Massachusetts Society and the other Socie- 
ties — a great wave of patriotism, as we hear of these celebrations of 
Patriots'' Day, April 19. 



90 SONS OF THK AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

One of the mediums through which we could greatly increase the 
interest in our Society would be a more general advocacy of the erec- 
tion of liberty poles. True, our educational forces have accomplished 
a great deal in the way of real practical results, and even larger returns 
are expected in the future ; but the outside world would become better 
acquainted, perhaps, if we paid more attention to the display of the 
colors. In the days of the strife which gave us this glorious govern- 
ment, liberty poles were placed everywhere — on the village green, on- 
home, school, church, factory, and other places of vantage. Is it not 
a most appropriate way to impress upon the newly arrived immigrant 
the fact that the Flag stands for something more than a brilliant dis- 
play; that there is a principle back of it? By a liberal participation in 
this practice by our people he will be taught that we have an abiding 
faith in our government. 

Independence Day is not so generally observed as it was in the early 
days of the Republic. In several of the States there were safe and 
sane celebrations, with parades, orations, etc. This is the day that gave 
us the charter of our liberties, and it may not be among the impossi- 
bilities in the near future to chronicle the fact that a general, dignified 
observance is noted throughout the country by the Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

The ever-mooted question of how to increase our membership is 
always with us. The suggestion is made that, as a trial, neighboring 
Societies invite compatriots to exchange in addressing public meetings 
or private gatherings on the work that is being done by the Society, 
and to emphasize the fact that it is purely American in spirit. We 
ought to have at least 50,000 members enrolled within our ranks, and 
may the day speedily come when the roster will show this number in 
active membership. 

Publicity is positively needed if we are to progress numerically, and 
in no way can those who are without be shown its advantages better 
than in meetings*where its objects are thoroughly exploited. 

Can we justify our existence more sincerely than by placing memo- 
rials at the scenes of historical importance ; in remembering the lives 
of the great men, and of the events in connection with the development 
of our country? The value of statuary in perpetuating history cannot 
be overestimated. Probably no one society in the world offers such an 
excellent opportunity to erect monuments as does the Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and you have shown your apprecia- 
tion of this fact by erecting innumerable memorials in many of the 
battlefields and places having connection with the war and other 
periods of our national history. 

In the past ages we have found our reliable source of history in the 
monuments in marble and bronze left to us by the thoughtful men of 
other times. In fact, in Egypt, where intellectuality reached a high 
plane, a great man frequently prepared in advance of his death for his 
monument that was to survive him for the centuries that were to 
follow. 

Bronze statues in public places and marble statues in the government 
buildings record in the best manner, it seems, the face and appearance 
of those of our national life who have worked for the upbuilding of 
this great nation. Our Society should see to it that not one oppor- 
tunity be lost to commemorate in fitting sculpture the worthy deeds of 
those who have lived and given of themselves freely for the good of 
the whole country. 

We should encourage the people to become familiar with our national 
songs, particularly "America" and the "Star-Spangled Banner." 

We should take up the question of providing historical parks on the 
battlegrounds of the Revolution wherever it is possible. 

We should encourage a more general observance of at least three of 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 9I 

our great days, namely, Washington's Birthday, Flag Day, and Inde- 
pendence Day, at least by a general display of "the colors. 

We should consider the plan of giving assistance to the numerically 
smaller Societies in every way that is compatible with the best interests 
of the national organization. 

We should encourage the reading of American history, not only by 
our own members, but by all who can be reached by the compatriots. 

Would it not be a good plan to have the colors of our National 
Society follow the President General on the same general plan that 
they do the President of the United States? A custodian could be 
secured in the city where the President General has his residence and 
a color-bearer designated. 

The suggestion that there be selected from among our members an 
organizer — one who would not only be in thorough touch and sympathy 
with the Society, but also possess enthusiasm that would enlist others 
to become members, as he went from State to State, attending meet- 
ings arranged under the auspices of the various Societies — is also made. 

Perhaps it is a little too early to even suggest that we have a legis- 
lative committee, which could examine the more important bills pre- 
sented to the National Congress at Washington. With several watch- 
ful compatriots looking over the measures, pernicious legislation or 
that which would retard a healthy growth of our country might be in 
some measure restricted or weeded out entirely. 

While we are remembering Valley Forge, would it not be quite in 
line with the purposes of our Society to place a memorial of some 
character at the headquarters of Washington in Morristown in the 
winter of 1779- 1780? Our Society is not represented as an organization 
in the splendid work that has been done in preserving that mansion, 
where Washington and his generals met so frequently in councils of 
war. 

Recapitulation. 

Some of the activities of our Societies are herewith given in abbrevi- 
ated form according to the information which has reached the His- 
torian : 

Arizona. — Fifteenth annual business meeting and banquet on Wash- 
ington's Birthday. 

Arkansas. — Annual meeting and banquet on Washington's Birthday; 
resolution adopted protesting against sale of old State House at Little 
Rock. 

California. — Banquet in commemoration of last engagement of Revo- 
lutionary War, at Combakee Creek, South Carolina, on August 27, 
1782; President Perkins holds meeting at Petaluma on Washington's 
Birthday for organization of Chapter. 

Colorado. — Compatriots took part in Independence Day safe and 
sane celebration in Denver; annual meeting and banquet on Washing- 
ton's Birthday; services in memory of deceased compatriots at Grace 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Denver, on February 19. 

Connecticut. — Annual business meeting, May 10, at Hartford; dedi- 
cated statue of Minute Man at Compo Beach, Westport, June 17, 1910; 
twenty-second annual dinner, at Hartford, on Washington's Birthday; 
General Silliman Chapter decorated graves of Revolutionary soldiers at 
the cemeteries at Bridgeport, exercises being held afterwards in memory 
of Battle of Bunker Hill ; General David Humphreys Chapter, of New 
Haven, decorated 187 Revolutionary soldiers' graves on Memorial Day, 
June 19, at New Haven. 

District of Columbia.— Spring outing, held at Annapolis, May 21 ; 
entertained President General Marble, January 19; annual meeting at 
noon on Washington's Birthday. 



92 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Empire State Society. — Twenty-first annual banquet, at New York, 
November 19; Broadway Grammar School, Newburg, N. Y., presented 
with bust of Washington on December 12, 1910, and Lenox Avenue 
Collegiate Reformed Church, New York, with portrait of Washington; 
annual church service, at Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church, New 
York, February 19, 191 1. 

Florida. — Grave of widow of George Walton, a Signer of Declara- 
tion of Independence from Georgia, in St. Michael's Cemetery, restored 
and is kept in order. 

Hawaiian Society. — Annual meeting at Honolulu, June 20, 1910. 

Idaho. — Forefathers' Day, anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims, 
observed at Boise, December 21. 

Illinois. — Participated in Chicago safe and sane celebration of Inde- 
pendence Day, and observed Yorktown Day, October 19, 1910, with 
President General Marble as guest; annual meeting December 3, anni- 
versary of admission of State into Union ; Washington's Birthday ob- 
served with annual banquet. 

Indiana. — Annual banquet, at Indianapolis, February 25, to commemo- 
rate capture of Fort Sackville, Vincennes, by Gen. George Rogers 
Clark, President General Marble guest of honor ; Society is planning 
to celebrate looth anniversary of Battle of Fort Harrison on Septem- 
ber 3 and 4, 1912. 

Iowa. — Society bestows fifteen medals on students for best work in 
study of history; Woodbury Chapter, at Sioux Falls, on February 21, 
and Ben Franklin Chapter, on February 22, at Des Moines, observe 
Washington's Birthday with banquet. 

Kansas. — Presents $5 gold piece to Miss Dorothy Wood, of Bethany 
College, for best essay on cause of American Revolution, June 6; July 
4, Independence Day, celebrated ; annual business meeting, January 21, 
and Washington's Birthday, celebrated at Topeka. 

Kentucky. — Delegates on behalf of Society extend invitation, on May 
3, 1910, to National Congress to hold annual meeting at Louisville, 
later accepted by Board of Trustees ; patriotic meeting held at Pewee 
Valley, near Louisville, in commemoration of Independence Day; 
twenty-second anniversary observed on Yorktown Day, October 19, 
1910, at Louisville; arrangements being made to mark Revolutionary 
graves. 

Louisiana. — All Saints' Day observed on November i by decoration 
of graves of soldiers of the Revolution ; annual meeting held on De- 
cember 10, 1910; annual banquet and reunion on Washington's Birth- 
day. 

Maine. — Will aid in erection of memorial to Penobscot Indians ; 
twentieth annual business and banquet, at Riverton, on Washington's 
Birthday. 

Maryland. — Suggests that all vessels entering and leaving harbor of 
Baltimore play "Star-Spangled Banner"; annual meeting on Yorktown 
Day, October 19; Washington's Birthday observed at Baltimore; monu- 
ment to William Paca, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, to 
T)e unveiled at "Old Wye" on May 13, 191 1. 

Massachusetts. — Annual field day, at Maiden, Columbus Day, Octo- 
ber 12, 1910, unveiled tablets at Bell Rock Park; Washington's Birth- 
day observed ; placed tablet in memory of Gen. Henry Knox at birth- 
place in Boston ; announced that monument at Valley Forge in memory 
of Massachusetts soldiers will be ready for dedication June 19, Bunker 
Hill day; Patriots' Day observed with annual business meeting, fol- 
lowed by banquet, on April 19, 191 1. Boston Chapter observed Evacua- 
tion Day, March 17, 191 1: Old Suffolk Chapter observed 135th anniver- 
sary of Battle of Chelsea, May 26. 1910. Old Essex Chapter has dis« 
tinction of being one of the largest Chapters in the country, with 177 
■members. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 93 

Michigan. — Evacuation Day observed November 25, 1910, at Detroit ; 
historical meeting at Detroit January 27; annual banquet celebrated 
Washington's birthdaj^ at Detroit, with President General Marble as 
guest of honor. 

Minnesota. — Annual meeting on January 11. 

Missouri.— Annual meeting held March 4; banquet held on October 
19, anniversary of Yorktown. 

.VfowfoH^.— Seventeenth annual meeting, at Helena, on Washington's 
Birthday, with banquet afterward. 

Nevada. — Shows healthy activity since first banquet, February 19, 
1910. 

Xczv Hampshire. — Annual meeting at Concord, July 12; pushing plans 
for General Sullivan memorial. 

New Jersey. — Exercises at Springfield battleground on 130th anniver- 
sary, June 2s, 1910. Liberty pole dedicated ; banquet afterward ; Presi- 
dent General Marble guest of honor. Orange and Montclair Chapters 
took part in safe and sane Independence Day celebrations; President 
General Marble guest of Montclair Chapter November 18; annual meet- 
ing of Society on January 3, anniversary of Battle of Princeton (Janu- 
ary 3, 1777). President General guest of honor; annual banquet in 
Newark, February 25, in honor of Washington's Birthday; Orange 
Chapter holds annual service in memory of Lexington and Concord, 
Sunday, April 2;^. 

New Mexico. — Annual meeting held at Albuquerque on Washington's 
Birthday, with banquet afterward. 

North Carolina. — Organized on Washington's Birthday at Washing- 
ton, N. C. 

Ohio. — Memories of delightful visit linger with the compatriots of 
the Congress of 1910, held in city of Toledo; Society there is marking 
many graves of Revolutionary soldiers. 

Oregon. — Observed Battle of Germantown, October 5, 1910: also 
Brandywine and Valley Forge, on same date in 1910, at Portland ; 
annual meeting and banquet on Washington's Birthday ; offers $100 in 
prizes to pupils of public schools of Oregon for essays on subjects con- 
nected with War for Independence. 

Pennsylvania. — Takes active measure to prevent desecration of Flag; 
annual meeting and banquet on Washington's Birthday, at Pittsburg; 
handsome souvenir, "Our Presidents," giving a portrait of each occu- 
pant of the White House, is given compatriots ; Philadelphia Chapter 
annually gives prizes to school children for historical essays ; also ob- 
serves Independence Day. 

Rhode Island. — Observes Memorial Day, May 30, at Providence; 
annual business meeting and banquet on Washington's Birthday, at 
Providence ; Society attends patriotic meeting at Brown University in 
afternoon ; Kent County Chapter observed Rhode Island Independence 
Day, at East Greenwich, May 4, 1910. 

South Carolina. — Organization effected March 22. 

South Dakota. — Organized at Sioux Falls, January 31. 

Texas. — Annual meeting and banquet on Washington's Birthday, at 
Houston; decides to hold annual meeting hereafter at different cities, 
so as to arouse interest. 

Utah. — Annual meeting on Washington's Birthday. 

Vermont. — Annual meeting on November 10, with President General 
Marble as guest of honor. 

Virginia. — Annual meeting postponed from Washington's Birthday to 
March 24. on account of illness of Dr. Brock, Secretary; renewed in- 
terest shown and Society decides to publish year book. 

Washington.— Knnua.\ meeting and banquet on Washington's Birth- 
day. 

IV yowing.-AnnnaX meeting held on Washington's Birthday. 



94 SONS OP THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

We have done well in the past. Now let us look to the future, keep- 
ing ever clear before our vision the examples of devotion to country of 
our fathers, so that it might be said of us that we at least performed 
our work to the best of our ability. Opportunity is before us and the 
past is urging us on. 

"Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty." 
Respectfully submitted, 

David L. PiErson, 
Historian General. 

(Moved and seconded that the report of the Historian General be 
received and accepted and printed in full in the Year Book, and motion 
carried.) 

The President General announced the following members of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Society as the Committee on Resolutions of Thanks 
to Senator Bacon, of Georgia, and Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts, 
for their efforts in securing appropriations by the U. S. Senate for the 
erection of monuments in Washington City to Thomas Jefferson and 
Alexander Hamilton, respectively : Admiral George W. Baird, Colonel 
William B. Thompson, William A. De Caindry, Philip F. Larner. 

The President General also announced the following as the Com- 
mittee on Resolution of Thanks to Congressman Loud, of Michigan, for 
his successful efforts in securing an appropriation to provide a suitable 
resting place for the remains of John Paul Jones : Hon. Cornelius A. 
Pugsley, of New York; John H. Burroughs, of New York; George D. 
Bangs, of New York; Admiral George W. Baird, U. S. N., of Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

(On motion, at 12.10 p. m., the Congress took a recess to 2.30 p. m.) 

Afternoon Session, May i, 1911 — 2.45 p.m. 

The Congress was called to order by President General Marble. 

The President General: Compatriots, the Historian General wishes 
to be heard briefly, and his request will doubtless be granted. 

Historian General Pierson : I want to show the delegates here a 
picture of William Richardson Davie, a former Governor of North 
Carolina, at one time a resident of Louisville, and a colonel in the 
Revolutionary War. This picture and the frame were made in 1800, 
III years ago. The people here in Louisville are very proud of it. 

(Mr. Pierson held the picture of Governor Davie up before the mem- 
bers, so all could have a good view of it.) 

The President General : Before taking up the regular order of busi- 
ness, it is my pleasure to recognize ex-President General Hancock, of 
Pennsylvania. 

Judge Hancock : Mr. President General, it has been our experience 
in Pennsylvania that some men will obtain their certificates of member- 
ship and then drop out of the Society for non-payment of dues. We 
have lost considerable membership in our State in that way, and I sup- 
pose other State Societies have suffered in like manner. Now, I have 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 95 

two resolutions here aimed at the correction of this abuse, and I will 
read the first one : 

Resolved, That a clause be inserted in the application for membership 
and incorporated in the certificate granted thereon, by which, when the 
recipient of the certificate shall fail to pay his annual dues for mem- 
bership, he shall surrender his certificate, unless his membership shall 
cease by reason of death or actual disability. 

The second resolution I have to offer reads : 

Resolved, That this subject be referred to a committee of three, of 
which the Registrar General shall be one, to report thereon to this 
Congress. 

The purpose is to get this measure through as quickly as poiisible to 
remedy this trouble. 

Colonel Guthrie : Acting under the instructions of the Pennsylvania 
Society, I desire to second these resolutions. We want to advocate this 
measure with all the power we can bring to bear. 

Mr. Bacon, of New York, also seconded the resolution. 

The President GENER.^L : I would like to ask Judge Hancock if it is 
his judgment that a resolution of this kind can be properly passed by 
this Congress. 

Judge Hancock : I think so ; that is the reason I wanted a second to 
the resolution. 

The Secretary General : It is not an amendment to the Constitution 
or the By-Laws. It is simply a regulation, and the Board of Trustees 
has control of that. The matter could be left in their hands. 

Judge Hancock : I would rather have it adopted at once. This 
■Congress is greater than the Board of Trustees. 

Mr. Hyde : I think that is a good resolution, but I think when a man 
pays for his certificate, if, for some unknown reason he drops out, it 
could hardly be required of him that he return his certificate; it has 
been paid for, and I do not believe we could enforce such a rule. 

(By request, the Secretary General reread the resolutions, and there 
were calls of "Question !") 

A Member: I would like to inquire whether the Constitution and 
By-Laws of this Society provide for the qualifications necessary for 
membership, and the rights of membership touching this point. 

The President General: This is a question of legality, and I think 
that it can all be left with the committee, of which Judge Hancock will 
be the chairman, and the committee can report upon that later. 

The Secretary General : Section 2 of Article III of the Constitution 
says : "Applications for membership shall be made to any State Society, 
in duplicate, upon blank forms prescribed by the Board of Trustees." 

(The resolutions presented by Judge Hancock and duly seconded 
were then put to a vote and carried.) 

The President General: I will appoint on the committee provided 
for in the second resolution just adopted ex-President General James 
Denton Hancock, of Pennsylvania; Registrar General A. Howard 



9^ SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Clark, of Washington City, and ex-President General Cornelius A.- 
Pugsley, of New York. 

The next regular standing committee we shall call upon to make a 
report is that of the Committee on Auditing and Finance, Mr. William 
A. De Caindry, of Washington City, Chairman. 

Mr. DeCaindry: Mr. President General, the Committee on Auditing 
and Finance has carefully examined the accounts of the Treasurer Gen- 
eral for the last year, and has endorsed on the report that they find 
them correct. I desire in addition to say for the committee that the 
accounts have been very elegantly and correctly kept. 

(Moved and seconded that the report of the committee be accepted, 
and motion carried.) 

Mr. Pugsley: The committee wishes to express to our worthy 
Treasurer General the thanks of the Society for his work during the 
past year. 

(Motion duly seconded and carried.) 

The President General: The next report is that of the Memorial' 
Committee, Mr. Howe, of New Jersey, Chairman. 

REPORT OF MEMORIAL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Howe : Mr. President General, we desire to supplement the report 
made by the Secretary General in two particulars. The first, at the 
meeting of the Congress a year ago, the marking of the graves of the 
Signers of the Declaration of Independence was called to our attention. 
The next matter is that of the proposed establishment of a national 
park at the crossing of the Delaware, just above the city of Trenton, 
where Washington and his little army crossed in the ice and attended' 
the Christmas celebration in what is now the center of the city of 
Trenton. In regard to the first matter, that of graves of the Signers 
of New Jersey, one of our members. Professor Arms^trong, gave an 
entire summer vacation to the patriotic duty of locating these graves, 
and he has located all the graves of the Signers, I believe, and reports • 
that the graves of only two of the Signers are not properly marked. 

The New Jersey Society took up the matter and decided it was best 
to refer it to the Legislature and try to secure a proper appropriation ■ 
for the marking of these graves. That matter is receiving considera- 
tion and will continue to do so until these graves are properly marked. 

As to the important matter of the establishment of a national park 
on the banks of the Delaware, to mark the site of the most spectacu- 
lar battle of the whole Revolutionary War, the chairman of the New 
Jersey commission appointed by Governor Fort is United States Sen- 
ator Briggs, whose duties have kept him in Washington and very closely 
occupied for some months past. We have made some progress in New 
Jersey, but we have no official information as to what Pennsylvania 
has done or will do. We hope that with the active co-operation of the 
State of Pennsylvania and the two State Societies we may be able • 
to report real progress towards securing the ground on both sides of 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 97 

the Delaware River— ground which lies today practically in the same 
condition it was in when the battle was fought. It is still possible for 
us to preserve to posterity this battlelield, used ever since as farming 
land, if we can only secure the co-operation of the two States of 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey and that of our Society. (Applause.) 

The President General: Gentlemen, you have heard the report of 
the Memorial Committee. What is your pleasure? 

(Motion made and seconded that the report be accepted and em- 
bodied in the Year Book, with the thanks of the Congress to the com- 
mittee for the work that has been done. Carried.) 

The President General: The next report will be that of the Com- 
mittee on Organization, North and West, Doctor Clarkson' N. Guyer, 
Chairman. 

REPORT OF ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE (NORTH AND 

WEST). 

Dr. Guyer: Mr. President General, before reading this report I 
want to give you a message sent by two compatriots who wanted to 
be here but could not be. One of them was Compatriot Dr. Higley, 
who once lived in Louisville, I believe. He desired me to give you 
his greetings and to say that he was sorry he could not be present at 
this meeting. The other was Compatriot Joseph F. Tuttle, Jr. (Ap- 
plause.) He desired me to remember him to his many friends here 
at this meeting, but there are so many of them it would be hard to 
get around and see them all individually, and so I want to say now 
that he wishes to be remembered to all. 

Denver, Colo., April 19, 191 1. 

Compatriots : I have the honor to herewith submit a final report of 
Committee on Organization in the North and West. 

As previously submitted, it organized the Wyoming State Society 
on March 28th, 1908. at Cheyenne, and had the great pleasure of 
revisiting this society on the 18th of March, 191 1, and found a flourish- 
ing society of over thirty members. On December 26th, 1908, it organ- 
ized the New Mexico Society at Albuquerque, a most earnest and 
active organization today, to build up the new State along the lines 
of patriotic work of our National Society. On April 8th, 1909, the 
Committee went to Boise, Idaho, and under most promising auspices 
organized the Idaho State Society, and at Reno, Nevada, a society was 
organized on February 19, 1910. The splendid reports of the New 
Mexico, Idaho, Nevada, South Dakota, and North Dakota Societies 
in Secretary General Clark's March Bulletin will be most gratifying 
to the members of the Society at large. 

Your Committee, through its most efficient Secretary, Compatriot 
F. M. Keezer. and Joseph F. Tuttle, Jr., had a long correspondence, 
running through many months, with compatriots in South Dakota and 
North Dakota relative to rehabilitation of the old society in the former 
^nd a new organization in the latter State. It was deemed best to 
attempt to reorganize the old South Dakota Society, and, as far qs 
notice could be given, word was everywhere sent, to the old members, 
of a meeting to be held in Sioux Falls on a certain date named. It 
met in Judge Well's office, Tuesday evening, January 31, 191 1. The 
7 — SR 



'98 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REV^OLUTION. 

plan of reorganization was proposed, but not one of the old society 
vvas present. Those attending were compatriots of other State Socie- 
ties, resident in South Dakota, and a large number of eligibles. It 
was the unanimous wish of all present that an entirely new State 
organization be elTected. This was accordingly done with fine spirit 
and enthusiasm, and a new charter was granted' under date of January 
31, 191 1. Patriotic lectures in the interests of our Society were given 
by Mr. Tuttle in the First Presbyterian Church; also in the Sioux 
Falls High School, with over four hundred high school students at- 
tending, as well as in the Whittier School, which was also crowded. 
It was a resonant, clarion note that was struck for the Sons of the 
American Revolution in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

Former Vice-President General Webster and Compatriots Flack and 
Richardson, of the Nebraska State Society, were most gracious in 
hospitalities to your Committee in passing through Omaha, and on 
February 2 the Minnesota State Society entertained the Committee 
at a lunch in Minneapolis. President Edward P. Sanborn and a large 
number of the Minnesota Compatriots showed the "greatest enthusiasm 
in the Committee's work. 

On the following evening the Committee arrived in Fargo, North 
Dakota, the place designated by Judge B. F. Spalding, of the State 
Supreme Court, as headquarters of the new Society in North Dakota. 
The Committee was most fortunate in having enlisted the interest of 
Judge Spalding, and at a banquet at the Gardner Hotel Saturday even- 
ing, February 4, the Society was formally organized with more than 
the required number of Charter Members. Judge Spalding was elected 
President, and as a result of his untiring work and of Compatriot 
F. F. Burchard, of Grand Forks (formerly of the Wyoming State 
Society), a list of fifty-five eligibles was presented and read at the 
meeting. 

And so North Dakota, the last Northern Society to be organized, 
was brought into the fold of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
and the work of the Committee of Organization of North and West 
was completed. Following the custom in the organization in other 
States, a patriotic service was held in the Congregational Church of 
the city the next evening. The Society's Chaplain, Rev. R. A. Beard, 
D. D., presided, and a large audience listened to an address upon one 
of the heroes of the American Revolution, from Mr. Tuttle. 

On the evening of April 15, 191 1, it was my great pleasure as Chair- 
man of Chapters of the Colorado Society, to organize a chapter at 
Fort Collins, Colorado, with eighteen members and a considerable 
number of eligibles almost ready with their papers. In organizing 
this Chapter, precisely the same methods were used as during the past 
three years in the organization of new State Societies, viz : Press 
notices in advance and a patriotic address by Mr. Tuttle, who has 
assisted at all of the State organizations. In Colorado we thoroughly 
believe in the Chapter idea, which has been followed with such marked 
success in many of our State Societies. 

It has been necessary, in compliance with the laws of our National 
Society, to list the new members on the roll of some State Society. 
In the organization of these six new State Societies the new members 
have been enrolled with the Colorado State Society. This enrollment 
and subsequent demission afterwards to the new Society had fallen 
upon the Secretaries of the Colorado Society, Compatriots Stoddard 
and Kirby, who have most willingly and without charge performed 
these extra duties. T most deeply appreciate their work of love for 
our Society. 

Yours very truly, Clarkson N. Guyek,^ 

Chairman. Committee on Organisation, North and JVcsf. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 99 

The President General: You have heard the report of your Com- 
mittee on Organization in the North and West. What is your pleasure? 

Mr. Dewey, of Vermont: I move that the report be accepted and 
that the thanks of the Society be extended to Doctor Guyer and his 
associates on the committee. I do this for one reason especially: He 
speaks of Judge Spalding in his report. Judge Spalding was an old 
tent-mate of mine in the Vermont Militia. 

(Motion seconded by Colonel Guthrie, of Pennsylvania, and carried.) 

The President Gener.^l : Doctor Guyer, you will please receive the 
thanks of this Congress and extend the same to your associates on this 
Committee. 

The next report will be that of the Committee on Organization in 
the South, Commander John H. Moore, of Washington City, Chairman. 

In the absence of the Chairman, the report will be read by the 
Secretary General. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION 
(SOUTH). 

Washington. D. C, April 26, 191 1. 

It is with great pleasure I have to announce the formation of two 
State Societies in the South during the past year. 

On February 22, at Washington, North Carolina, the North Carolina 
State Society was organized with thirty members. This Society, 
through its most energetic and enthusiastic Secretary-Registrar, Mr. 
R. T. Bonner, of Aurora, promises to become a very active and large 
Society. Today its membership is largely in the eastern end of the 
State, but it is extending all over the State and by the time we meet 
again I prophesy it will have reached and passed more than one of 
our other Societies. It has already gathered together a very good 
library of works on the History and War Records of the State of 
North Carolina. The Society is to be congratulated upon its choice 
of a Secretary-Registrar. Mr. Bonner is the right man in the right 
place. 

On March 22, a South Carolina State Society was organized at 
Greenville, South Carolina, with a charter membership of twenty mem- 
bers, mostly from the western section of the State. 

This Society bids- fair to reach its next door neighbor, the North 
Carolina Society. Having organized one month later, it is too early 
to say as much about it as I would like to, but I feel confident that 
with such a leader as Mr. P. T. Hayne, of Greenville, it will make a 
great showing at our next Congress. I would suggest if any member 
reading this report has any relations living in either of these States 
that he kindly communicate their names to Mr. R. T. Bonner, Aurora, 
North Carolina, or Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville, South Carolina. They 
will do the rest. 

Respectfully. Jno. H. Moore. 

Cliainnan, Committee on Organisation (South). 

Doctor Guyer: I move that the report of the Committee on Organi- 
zation in the South be accepted and placed on file, and that a vote 
of thanks be returned to Commander Moore and his associates on 
that Committee for the work they have done. 

(Motion seconded bv Colonel Guthrie, of Pennsylvania, and carried.) 



lOO SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The President General: The next order of business is the report 
of the Committee on Education— Colonel Charles Lyman, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, Chairman. In the absence of the Chairman, this report will 
be presented by our Compatriot Charles Dean Kimball, former Gov- 
ernor of Rhode Island, a member of the Committee. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 

Compatriots : Your Committee on Education takes pleasure in re- 
porting that during the last year there has been marked activity in 
two lines of patriotic and educational work, viz : public addresses at 
banquets and meetings of State Societies and local Chapters, and on 
numerous more public occasions; and the unveiling and dedication 
of monuments, tablets, and other memorials commemorative of historic 
places, events, and persons connected with the Revolutionary period. 
Every speech fitly made on any such occasion is good seed, and while 
here and there it may fall upon stony ground or barren soil and pro- 
duce no fruit, will in the main fall upon good ground and bring 
forth an hundred-fold the fruit of patriotism and good citizenship. 
And as education comes by the seeing of the eye as well as by the 
hearing of the ear, every such tablet, monument, or other memorial 
in bronze or stone is a perpetual preacher of moral and patriotic 
righteousness, for patriotism and morality go hand in hand. 

Among the noteworthy memorials erected during the last year are 
the following : By the Connecticut Societ3\ at Compo Beach, Westport, 
a life-size bronze statue of the "Minute Man." erected to commemo- 
rate the heroism of the patriots who defended their country when 
the British, under General Tryon, invaded Connecticut. The Massa- 
chusetts Society, on October 12, 1910, assisted in unveiling memorial 
tablets at Bell Rock, Memorial Park, Maiden ; and on February 22, 
1911, dedicated a tablet to the memory of General Knox. The Mary- 
land Society has erected a monument at Old Wye. to the memory of 
William Paca, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and first 
Governor of Maryland. The Newburgh Chapter of the Empire State 
Society presented McDonald's bust of Washington to a grammar school. 

This enumeration is incomplete, and these examples are mentioned 
in order to make record of the fact that this form of patriotic work 
still appeals to the members of our Society as fitting to be done. Every 
monument and tablet and statue is an epic in bronze or stone telling 
the story of holy purpose, loyal devotion, patient suffering, heroic 
achievement, and glorious victory. 

Washington, in one or another phase of his character or career, 
still holds chief place as topic for addresses on patriotic occasions, and 
it is natural and fitting that it should be so. for Washington does, and 
forever will, fill the largest place and be the dominant patriotic, moral, 
and educational force in the ante-bellum history of our country. 

Among the topics discussed at functions of our Society the following 
are very suggestive and indicate earnest and thoughtful patriotism : 

"Our country's welfare our private concern, and he who promotes 
that best performs his dut^^" 

"Lest we forget — we pursue the work of educating the men and 
women of tomorrow in patriotism — lest we forget." , 

During the last year the Iowa Society has continued the fine patriotic 
and educational work begun in 1907. and has awarded fifteen medals 
to college students and an equal number to pupils in high schools. The 
purpose in offering these medals is to stimulate patriotic thought in 
the student bodv in the studv of United States history. Other Societies 
have offered and are awarding medals as prizes for best essays on 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. lOI 

Revolutionary subjects in colleges and schools, but Iowa appears to 
be doing this work more systematically and extensively than any other 
State, and is to be commended for its good work. All "our State Socie- 
ties and local Chapters are urged to make that a leading feature of their 
patriotic and educational work, for. to our thinking, there is no more 
promising and fruitful educational work done by the Sons of the 
American Revolution than, first, this, and, next, the persistent and 
intelligent distribution of the two leaflets, "Information for Immi- 
grants" and "Naturalization.'' Confirmation of the importance and 
usefulness of these leaflets was recently had in the statement made to 
the Chairman of this Committee by Dr. Holmes, the Director of the 
Bureau of Mines, that he had met with these leaflets in his wouk ; that 
they were read by the_ imttiigrant miners, and were doing much good, 
and that he hoped their use would become more general. Such testi- 
mony from this source ought to encourage an:' stimulate effort for 
their wider and more thoughtful distribution. 

It is recommended that authority be given to the Chairman of the 
Committee to draw on the Treasurer General of the Society, through 
the Secretary General, for stationery, postage, and other necessary 
expenses, in an amount not to exceed twenty dollars ($20.00). 
Fraternally, 

Cii.vRLES Lym.\n, Chairman. 

Judge BeardslEv : I move that the report be accepted and placed 
on file, with a vote of thanks to the committee, and that the recom- 
mendation as to an appropriation for the Committee be referred to 
the Board of Trustees for action. 

Doctor GuYER : Mr. President General, in seconding that motion I 
would like to state an incident that occurred in connection with our 
work along this line in Colorado. Compatriot Tuttle, accompanied by 
a minister of the Episcopal Church and myself, went down to one 
of the schools in that part of Denver where the foreigners lived and 
presented them with a flag. The school had laid aside their work, and 
the minister and Compatriot Tuttle made admirable addresses upon 
the question of why they should be Americans. A few days afterward 
one of the teachers in the school had a little spare time, and she 
thought to test the children as to the impression that had been made 
upon them, and she called on them to state what nationality their 
parents came from, and what nationality they belonged to. One said: 
"My mother is an Italian ;" another said, "My father is an Irishman ;" 
and so on, until she came to one bright little girl, with face all aglow, 
and she got up and said : "My father is an Irishman and my mother 
is an Italian, but I am an American !"' (Applause and laughter.) 

(The motion as made and seconded was put to a vote and carried.) 

The President General: In that connection. I take great personal 
pride in relating an incident that occurred recently in the city of New 
York. Professor Thomas, whom I have the great honor to claim as 
a brother-in-law, who is a professor of history in one of our colleges, 
has written a history of the United States which is now a text-book 
in the State of New York, as well as in other States. A representative 
of the Hebrew Educational Alliance went to .his publishers and asked 
for the privilege of republishing that history in the English and Yid- 



I02 SOXS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

dish languages, in parallel columns, for use among the Hebrew popu- 
lation on the East Side of New York. This privilege was granted by 
both the author and publisher, and the Hebrew Educational Alliance 
have now undertaken and are doing that work. (Applause ) That 
shows that our Hebrew friends are deeply interested in the subject 
of American patriotism. 

(The motion to accept, with a vote of thanks, was put to a vote and 
carried.) 

The President General: The next committee to report will be that 
of the Flag Committee, of which Compatriot W. V. Cox, of Washing- 
ton City, is Chairman. 

In the absence of the Chairman (who was present in Louisville on 
April 30, but called to Nashville on important business), and no mem- 
ber of the Committee being present. Judge Beardsley read the report, 
at the request of the Secretary General. 

REPORT OF COM^HTTEE ON PREVENTION OF DESE- 
CRATION OF THE FLAG. 

Compatriots : Your Special Flag Committee begs to report that it 
was represented at the last hearing before the Judiciary Committee of 
the United States House of Representatives on Mr. Goulden's bill 
to prevent and punish the desecration or improper use of the flag of 
the United States of America. 

Representatives from various societies were also present. Your 
Chairman argued that as the flag was a creation of Federal law, it 
should be protected from improper uses by a national law. It was 
pointed out that the flags and symbols of all civilized countries but 
ours were protected by law, and as Congress had the power to create, 
it also had the power to protect its creation, and should do so without 
further dela)'. Much interest was manifested by the members of the 
Committee in the facts and illustrations submitted, but without receiv- 
ing any report from the Committee. Congress adjourned without 
action, as it has done many times before. 

To present definite data to Congressional committees, the Flag Com- 
mittee has conducted an extensive correspondence with the Secretaries 
of the various States, to definitely ascertain in what States laws had 
been enacted to prevent the use of the flag for advertising and pur- 
poses other than those intended by the founders of the Republic. 
Courteous replies were received from most of the officials addressed, 
who, in States where laws were in force, enclosed copies of the same, 
expressing a desire to further co-operate with the Committee in 
securing Federal legislation. 

The States that reported having flag laws were Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont. New York, 
New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania. Ohio. Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, 
Michigan. Minnesota, Missouri, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Kansas, North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Nevada, and California. 
It is also understood that Maryland and Montana have such laws, 
though definite replies were not received. 

The States that reported having no flag law were Virginia, West 
Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama. Georgia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Florida. Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, and Wyoming. 

No replies were received from Arizona. Arkansas. Alaska, Hawaii, 
New Mexico. Mississippi. Oregon, Porto Rico and Washington, in 
some of which laws protecting the flag are known to be in force. 



PROCEEDINGS OF EOUISVILEK CONGRESS. lO^ 

The Secretary of State of Georgia says: "Georgia can not legislate 
concerni^ng the National Flag, but we have a law preventing the use 
of the State Flag for advertising purposes." 

The flag laws are nearly identical, all States desiring to protect the 
National Flag by State legislation, made necessary by the absence of 
Federal law. 

The State laws have proven effective. In New York, for instance, 
when the attention of Governor Hughes was called to a certain flagrant 
misuse of the flag in the advertisement of an ammonia company, he 
directed the district attorney, Mr. Whitman, to institute proceedings, 
which he did. To the credit of all concerned, the case did not go to 
trial, the owners agreeing to discontinue the offensive advertisement. 

A case in New Jersey, somewhat similar, was settled in like manner, 
the defendants, manufacturers of spring beds, paying all the costs. 

The Superintendent of the United States Capitol, Mr. Elliott Woods, 
has shown much interest and has been diligently correcting the misuse 
of the representation of the Nation's symbols by removing the same 
from mosaic pavements at the Capitol, over which the lawmakers have 
walked for over a generation. 

The Committee has been in communication with the Librarian of 
Congress with a view of preventing the further misuse of the flag in; 
the issue of copyrights. It is stated by the Librarian that during the- 
last two years all applications to copyright pictures embodying in any- 
way the country's flag have been carefully scrutinized and registration' 
refused to such as resembled a trade-mark or made any objectionable- 
use of the flag. 

The Librarian says that it is only by a broad interpretation of his 
authority that the Register of Copyrights is able to proceed as far as. 
he has done. 

It is recommended that the attention of the President of the United" 
States be called to the defective law mentioned by the Librarian of 
Congress, with a view of securing his recommendation to have the 
act amended, forbidding the Register of Copyrights to issue copyrights 
in which the symbol of government is prostituted to improper uses. 
Congress, by the Act of 1907, forbid the Commissioner of Patents 
to authorize the registration of trade-marks "if such mark consists 
of or comprises the Flag or Coat-of-Arms or other insignia of the 
United States, or any simulation thereof." (34 Stat. L-, 1251.) 

Congress should also forbid the authorization of registration of 
copyrights in which the symbol of government is improperly used. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. V. Cox, Chairman. 

Mr. Stephenson, of Kentucky: I move that the report of the Com- 
mittee be received, with the thanks of this Congress for the work 
which has been done on this most important subject. 

Mr. SuLGROVE, of Montana, suggested a correction of the report as 
to Montana, claiming that that State had a law against desecration of 
the Flag, and Dr. Iglehart suggested a similar correction as to Mary- 
land, making the same claim. The motion of Mr. Stephenson, dul.v 
seconded, and with the understanding that the report would be re- 
ceived subject to the corrections indicated by the gentlemen from 
Montana and Maryland, was put to a vote and carried. 

The President General: The next report is that of the Committee 
on National Parks, and in the absence of the Chairman I will ask 
Treasurer General Burroughs to read that report. 



I04 SOXS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIOX. 

% 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL PARKS. 

Compatriots : The Chairman of your Committee on National Parks 
has the honor to report that at a meeting held several months ago 
the territory constituting the field of the American Revolution was 
divided up between the members and each one requested to investigate 
and report concerning the activities within his jurisdiction in regard 
to public parks relating to the War for Independence. Reports have 
been received only from the following States : 

NEW YORK. 

New York has done much to preserve places identified with her 
Revolutionary annals. Washington's headquarters at Newburgh were 
taken by the State in 1849 for a State reservation. In 1887 the State 
took the famous Senate House at Kingston; in 1895 erected the Sara- 
toga Battle Monument; in 1897 created the Stony Point Battlefield 
Reservation ; in 1898 the Lake George Battlefield Reservation ; in 1900 
took the Clinton House at Poughkeepsie ; in 1904 established the Fort 
Brewerton Reservation. 

It has also created many public parks chiefly of scenic interest, but 
also with historical associations. Among such may be mentioned the 
Niagara Falls Reservation, the Palisades Interstate Park, the Spy Island 
Reservation, the Sir William Johnston Mansion and Block House at 
Johnstown, Watkins Glen Reservation, the Philipse Manor Hall in 
Yonkers. the Fire Island State Park, the Adirondack Forest Preserve, 
the Catskill Forest Preserve, and the St. Lawrence Reservation. During 
the past year it has taken the Schuyler Mansion in Albany for a public 
monument. Many of these undertakings since the organization of the 
S. A. R. have had its hearty endorsement and co-operation. In the 
city of New York the creation of the Washington's Headquarters Park 
in i6oth Street was largely promoted by our Society. We have also 
been instrumental in the erection of various tablets and monuments, 
notably that at Dobbs Ferry and that at Fort Washington, in New 
York City. The Society is now arranging to dedicate, on iMemorial 
Day, a tablet to be placed on old St. Paul's Church in Eastchester, New 
York City, commemorating the history of that venerable church, which 
was used as a hospital during the Revolution and which stands on a 
Revolutionary training ground. 

On account of the many historical events connected with this State, 
there is abundant opportunity for continuing this work of historical 
commemoration. 

Not the least of the recent successful efforts of the Society has been 
the removal of the new State's prison from the proposed site near 
Stony Point to another site without historical associations. 

NEW JERSEY. 

From the Rev. John Hobart Egbert, our Compatriot of Chatham, 
N. J., we learn that there has been some excellent work done at Spring- 
field, N. J., during the year in connection with the Revolutionary ceme- 
tery at that point. The grounds have been graded and beautified, the 
approaches and entrance improved, and they have been adorned by the 
building of broad concrete steps. A flagstaff fifty feet high has been 
erected and bears a beautiful flag on all national occasions. The per- 
manent right of way from the public highway has been secured, and 
a marker large enough to attract the attention of travefers passing 
along the main thoroughfare has been placed conspicuously indicating 
the location of the cemetery. A custodian of the grounds has been 
secured to keep them in order. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUtSVTEEE CONGRESS. I05 

It is suggested that the beautiful tract of from 20 to 50 acres adjoin- 
ing the cemetery at Springfield be purchased, as it is believed that the 
property can be acquired at a very reasonable figure. 

The project for the creation of a National Park on the Delaware 
River at Trenton, to commemorate the crossing of the Delaware by 
Washington on the night of Christmas, 1776, has aroused widespread 
interest, and it is earnestly to be hoped that it will be carried to a 
successful issue. 

PENNSYL\^\NIA. 

From Compatriot Moses Veale, President of the Philadelphia Chap- 
ter, we learn that the S. A. R. have taken an active interest in urging 
the Federal Government and the municipal governments to acquire 
and preserve forest reservations and parks, and that they have met 
with great success. Pennsylvania is interested equally with New Jersey 
in the creation of the reservation to mark Washington's crossing of the 
Delaware. It would be desirable if beautiful parks could be created 
on the two sides of the river, including the termini of the crossing, 
and. if practicable, that some ornamental bridge or passageway be con- 
structed across the river. 

OHIO. 

In Ohio we learn from Compatriot W. L. Curr}- that the S. A. R. 
have located the graves of a number of Revolutionary soldiers during 
the past year and had them marked with bronze tablets. This work 
has been going on for several years, with a result that upwards of 
2,500 graves have been located. The law relating to the marking of 
soldiers' graves, largely through the influence of the Ohio Society 
S. A. R., has been amended to include soldiers of the Revolution. 

Compatriot Curry renews his recommendation that a tablet should 
be placed in the Museum of American History in Patriots' Hall, Val- 
ley Forge, to perpetuate the sacrifices and heroic deeds of the Revolu- 
tionary ancestors of the Ohio Society, S. A. R., who were at Valley 
Forge in the winter of 1777-1778. 

Compatriot A. B. Johnson reports that in Hardin County, Ohio, is 
the site of Fort Mc Arthur, which was built during the War of 1812 
and which it would be desirable to have taken for a public park. It 
is located about three miles west of Kenton, on the south bank of the 
Scioto River. 

perry's victory. 

The approach of the one hundredth anniversary of Perr\^'s victory 
has aroused the interest of many States in its commemoration, and 
various suggestions have been made. One is for the erection of a 
memorial bridge at Niagara Falls; another is the erection of a memo- 
rial tower at Toledo. As the War of 1812 was really an addendum 
of the War for Independence, the Sons of the American Revolution 
might properly take measures for promoting the general commem- 
oration of Perry's victory and a little later the centennial of the 
anniversary of peace with Great Britain, which has remained unbroken 
since the second war with that country. 

Respectfully submitted, Edward Hagaman Hall, 

Chairman. 

The President General: Gentlemen, what is your pleasure regarding 
this report of the Committee on National Parks? 

General GrEElEy : I move that the report be accepted. 

Colonel Mack : Mr. President General, in regard to Perry's Victory, 
Congress has already appropriated $7S.ooo for a monument in Put-in- 



I06 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Bay, where Perry made ready before going out to make his attack 
on the British, and the State of Ohio has also appropriated money for 
that purpose, and so have the States of Kentucky and Indiana and 
other States. That is expected to be one of the greatest celebrations 
of its kind we have ever had. 

(The motion as made and seconded was duly carried.) 

REPORT OF PRESS COMMITTEE. 

**» The President General: The next report is that of the Press Com- 
mittee, of which Secretary General Clark is Chairman, and he will 
make that report. 

Mr. Clark : I have nothing special to say, except that the Press Com- 
mittee has done some work during the j^ear by sending out some arti- 
cles which have been published throughout the country through press 
syndicates, and the work of the Society has been kept before the pub- 
lic in a most dignified way. I would like to call upon one of the mem- 
bers of the Press Committee, Mr. Edwin S. Crandon, President of 
the Massachusetts Society, who can tell us about the good work the 
Boston Evening Transcript has been doing in this line. 

Mr. Crandon : Although this request of ISIr. Clark's that I speak of 
the particular work of the paper with which I am connected comes 
to me unexpectedly, I appreciate very much this opportunity of saying 
a word for the gentlemen of my profession at this time. It is true 
that I am connected with a Boston newspaper, although not in charge 
of what might be called its "patriotic department." But if you will 
allow me to talk impersonalh", as a member of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, and forget for the moment that I am connected with 
a particular paper, but simply that I am a member of the press, I hope 
I may sa}^ a few words that will be helpful. If any of you can get 
up next to the newspaper men, of course 3'ou will do it, always ; but 
those who have come in contact with papers in connection with patriotic 
work realize that there is no work under the heavens that can be 
more properly subjected to criticism' than that of a part of the press 
which is making a great deal of American history for us today. I 
am not going to argue the merits of the "White Press" against the 
"Yellow Press," but I do say that the press is largely what its readers 
demand; and that there are papers, many of them, which do not stand 
for an educational, moral or patriotic tone. I admit that, as a member 
of my profession. That there are others that would drag down and 
debase is equally plain. 

Now. we have a paper in Boston that, years ago, was an eight-page 
paper that sold for four cents. Today it has thirty to over fifty pages 
and sells for three cents. That particular paper has from four to five 
columns of news matter devoted entirely and exclusively to the patriotic 
societies. The idea originated with our paper about the time our 
Societies began to get busy, and it went into it as a matter of news, 
because manv of its readers were interested in these Societies. The 



PROCEEJDINGS OF I.OUISVII.LE CONGRESS. lOJ 

members of our Societies in the Commonwealth, and many in other 
States, learned that there was one newspaper that would print all they 
would give it, subject, of course, to the editorial blue pencil. And so 
we have in the Transcript every week matters received from the mem- 
bers of the Sons of the American Revolution and kindred societies all 
over the country. The idea was found to be a good one. We have 
three other papers in the city of Boston that have departments of 
similar nature, making four dailies in all, besides several weekly papers, 
which have several columns devoted to these patriotic societies. 

I am very glad to have had this privilege of being accorded an oppor- 
timity to say a word for the* press, and I want to conclude by saying 
that as you find the press, as I have indicated, in any one part of the 
country is anxious to co-operate with you, aid your Press Committee by 
remembering and acting on the motto on the seal of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts — the first seal — "Come over and help us." (Applause.) 

Mr. Dewey, of Vermont: The splendid remarks of Mr. Crandon 
remind me that we in Vermont know the value of the work of the 
editor and newspaper man. In Montpelier we have a paper that gives 
us full recognition, for the Secretary of our State Society is a news- 
paper man, and we have held him in that position for fifteen years. 
There is no trouble with us in getting any patriotic work done by us in 
the papers. 

(On motion made and seconded, the report of the Committee was 
ordered received.) 

The President General: The next committee to report will be the 
Committee on Pensions and Muster Rolls, Col. Gilbert C. Kniffin, of 
Washington City, Chairman. 

Colonel Kniffin : Before reading this report, I might say that I am 
in charge of the Revolutionary records in the Pension Office, and they 
are being prepared under my supervision. (Applause.) 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PENSION AND MUSTER 

ROLLS. 

Col. Gilbert C. Kniftin, Chairman, Washington, D. C. ; Zebina Moses, 
Washington, D. C. ; Major E. B. Tolman, Chicago, 111.; Luther Atwood, 
Lynn, Mass.; Col. R. W. Guthrie, Pittsburg. Pa.; Col. D. Russ Wood, 
Terre Haute, Tnd. ; Charles Kingsbury Miller, Chicago, 111. 

Compatriots : There is little to add to the report made last year by 
Compatriot Zebina Moses, then Chairman of this Committee. 

Delay in the completion of the work of carding the records is not 
owing to lack of interest in it on the part of the Commissioner of Pen- 
sions, nor to lack of industry by the clerical force assigned by him to 
the work, but solely to the condition of the papers contained in the 
Revolutionary War claims, which is such as to require the most careful 
handling to prevent irreparable injury. Many are broken at the folds 
and require mending. Every precaution against the loss of the smallest 
scrap of paper is taken, as it mav be a part of an important link in the 
military or personal history of the soldier. 

When in November, 1907. the Revolutionary records were transferred' 



i 



I08 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

from the Old War to the Record Division of the Bureau of Pensions, 
for the purpose of carding, a section was formed under charge of Miss 
Annie E. Wilson, a zealous, intelligent, and most competent clerk. 
Under her management her corps of efficient clerks have pushed the 
work of flat filing the pension claims as rapidly as proper care of the 
papers contained in them would permit. 

There are on file over 74,000 claims for pension filed by Revolutionary 
soldiers and widows. They were originally arranged numerically with- 
out regard to the name of the soldier, the State from which he enlisted, 
or the branch of the service to which he was assigned — infantry, cavalry 
or artillery. 

The ultimate design being to arrange the cards alphabetically, it soon 
developed that this could not be accomplished until the last card was 
written. It was then determined that the most expeditious method that 
could be adopted, in order that the names of all soldiers and their 
widows might be arranged alphabetically, would be to arrange the 
claims in that manner. While this is being done the wrappers are taken 
off, the papers straightened, and, when found to be torn, repaired and 
placed in large square en\elopes endorsed with the name of the soldier, 
and his service, the number of the claim and the name of his widow, if 
one survived. 

These claims thus flat filed are placed in file cases and arranged 
alphabetically. This work is nearly completed, and when done the 
records will be ready for carding. The cards will contain the military 
history of the soldier, the names of his wife and children and relations 
so far as shown in the claims. They will also be filed alphabetically, 
and will form a ready reference from which inquiries for genealogy 
may be promptly answered. During the past year 4,279 such inquiries 
have been replied to. 

In calling for information relating to Revolutionary ancestry, the full 
name of the soldier, the State where he enlisted, the names of his com- 
manding officers, the given name of his wife, with approximate date of 
soldier's death, should, if possible, be given, but if the writer has no 
other knowledge of his ancestry than that the soldier lived in a certain 
State when he enlisted, this fact should be stated, together with any 
other circumstances connected with his service in the army. 

Many letters of inquiry are returned with request for data to guide 
the search for a remote ancestor who may or may not have had Revolu- 
tionary service. 

In 1832 the law was enacted under which Revolutionary soldiers were 
pensioned, and they were called upon for statements of their military 
service. Half a century had passed since these old soldiers had been 
mustered out of service, and like nearly all old soldiers, even those of 
the present day. they were poor in purse, but rich in memories of the 
glorious War for the Independence of their native land and justly 
proud of the part they had performed. A vast amount of unprinted 
history is contained in the simple annals of the times that tried men's 
souls. Thus the sentry on guard in front of the headquarters of General 
Benedict Arnold at West Point tells how Arnold rode up the river 
from an interview with the British fleet commander, entered his room, 
where he remained but a few minutes, mounted his horse and rode 
rapidly away. 

In her petition for a pension Hannah, the widow of Isaac Davis, 
captain of a company of Minute Men. killed at Concord Bridge April 
19. 1/75. who with Abner Hosmer, were the only men killed, after firing 
the shot that was heard around the world, tells the story of this battle. 

The ride of Paul Revere is historic and the battle has been immortal- 
ized in song and story. Captain Davis, hastily collecting his company, 
marched to Concord. His widow thus describes their parting : "He had ! 



PROCKEDIxXGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. IO9 

four children, from one to ten years of age. the)' were all sick. He was 
strongly attached to them and had a presentiment that he would not 
return. He well knew his danger, but he was a stranger to fear. Be- 
tween him and his company there was strong attachment and unlimited 
conhdence. When he had ordered the company to be formed at the 
door of the house and all things were ready for the march, he turned to 
me as if to take leave, but his heart was too full for words. He could 
only say, 'Take good care of the children.' and immediately with firm 
step and voice he was on the march to Concord," where he came to his 
death. 

The personal history of Enoch Crosby, the original of Fenimore 
Cooper's "Spy," under the name of Harvey Birch, is replete with start- 
Hng incidents of his perilous calling. The capture by the Committee of 
Safety of several companies of Tories, forming for the purpose of 
joining the British army at New York, was due to the vigilance and 
dauntless courage of this noted sp3\ 

This is how General Putnam's orderly described the famous ride 
down the stone steps : "A few days after I enlisted, the British, a part 
of General Tryon's forces, attacked our men stationed near the meeting- 
house. A cannon or two opened upon the enemy until they approached in 
so great force and so near that General Putnam ordered the men to 
retreat and save themselves the best they could. 

"He also retreated on his horse at full speed, pursued closely by the 
British horse. He rode down a flight of stone teps, the top of which 
was about sixty rods from the meeting-house. He did not ride down 
more than fifteen or twenty of them (there being, I think, about one 
hundred of them on the whole) and then dismouted and led his horse 
down as fast as possible. I was at the bottom of the steps as soon as he 
was. 

"He then mounted his horse, told me to make my escape to a swamp 
not far off, and he rode away. By this time the British horse, who had 
gone around the hill by the usual traveled road, came in sight in 
pursuit. I ran toward the swamp. One of the dragoons took after me. 
As I was getting over a stone wall, he overtook me. He halloed, 'Stop, 
you little devil, or I'll take your head off.' I surrendered." 

There are graphic narratives of campaigns and battles and suffering by 
soldiers in winter quarters, of the return to their homes, footsore and 
weary. There were no palace cars for soldiers in those days, when 
Johnny came marching home. 

It is probable that a satisfactory report will be made at the next 
Congress. Meantime the flat filing of the claims and the subsequent 
carding of the records will be prosecuted with diligence and with due 
regard to the value to the descendants of the soiled and broken papers 
contained in these pension claims, in many of which there are auto- 
graphs of inestimable value, which are carefully guarded from col- 
lectors. 

With regard to the ultimate publication of the records of the Revolu- 
tion as contained in the personal narratives of the survivors, the papers 
above referred to are not suitable for printer's copy. They are in so 
dilapidated a condition that they cannot be allowed to leave the custody 
of the Government. The autographs of historic characters are of great 
value to collectors, and must be, as they now arc, guarded with jealous 
care. If. after they have been carded, there should be some way de- 
vised, by photography or otherwise, by which the original papers may 
be put in type, I ani confident that the descendants of the brave de- 
fenders of our liberties will consider the cost of publication money well 
expended. 

Gilbert C. Kniffin, 

Chairman. 



no SONS OF THE AMKRICAX REVOLUTION. 

Colonel Kniffin : If there is any question that any delegate would 
like to ask concerning an\- matter I have not made plain in this report, 
I will be glad to answer him. You must understand that these claims 
are very old, and have been rolled up tight like this (indicating). Many 
of them were carried in the pockets of these men that were mustered 
out of service in 1783, carried on their backs, and of course they are 
not in the best condition and have to be handled very carefully. 

Mr. Dewey, of Vermont : I would like to ask a question of Colonel 
Kniffin for information. Some of our Grand Army men had occasion 
to look up some records, and they found where a certain man was in 
the Massachusetts Regiment and became a sergeant. At four different 
times his name appeared on the pension rolls, and three times he was 
dropped. His descendants stated, in taking the oath, that they were not 
able to support themselves. Can you answer why that was done? I 
know of three other cases, w^here the parties had good records — where 
one man was wounded, and his brother was killed, and the other was 
shot in the leg, and afterwards became an elder or preacher at Mont- 
pelier, in the early historic days. None of these ever received a pension, 
or ever applied for one, as far as I know. 

Colonel Kniffin : That may be true. There are a vast number of 
rejected claims. And there is another thing: \'OU must bear in mind 
that these are pension claims, and many of our ancestors were well oft 
and did not care to apply for a pension, and we have only those that 
did apply, where the pension was allowed or rejected. 

Colonel Guthrie : As a member of the Pension Committee, whose 
report has just been made b}^ Colonel Kniffin, I wish to say that this 
is the unanimous report of the committee, but that all the work was 
done by Colonel Kniffin, and therefore I wish to ask the Congress to 
accept the report and spread it upon the minutes, with a vote of thanks 
to Colonel Kniffin. 

Judge Beardsley: One word of information to Colonel Dewey. I 
think no soldier received a Revolutionary pension unless he was in 
needy circumstances, and I know of one or two instances in Connecti- 
cut where men deeded their property away to their children in order 
that they might become eligible. (Laughter.) 

The President General: That puts a little different phase on the 
character of the Connecticut men from that of the Vermont men. 

Mr: MooRES : Over at Frankfort, Ky., in the land office, there are 
records of Revolutionary land grants made by Virginia, issued for a 
thousand acres of land, if I remember. I examined them with a good 
deal of interest. I want to ask if there is any record of the services 
of these men, to whom these grants were made, kept either in Virginia 
or by the Federal government. 

Colonel Kniffin : This would come under the head of Bounty Land 
Claims. 

Mr. MoorES : These grants were from Virginia. One is signed by 
Governor Henry Lee, I remember. 

Colonel Kniffin : There was a vast number of them in mountain 
land claims. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVII.LE CONGRESS. Ill 

Mr. IMoorEs : They could be located in Washington? 

Colonel Kniffin : Yes, sir. 

Mr. SpanglEr: I have had twenty years' experience in the Pension 
Bureau ; and, speaking with reference to the inquiry of Colonel Dewey, 
you will find that many of the pension claims on account of Revolu- 
tionary services were granted on account of destitution and for services 
rendered, and you will find in nearly every case the applicant states the 
value of his property. They were required to explain this and notify 
the Pension Department at the time just what thej' possessed, and in 
nearly every case there is a certified statement as to their property, 
going into the fullest details — into small matters that would not be 
regarded as worth anything at the present time at all. 

Mr. MooRES : Do the land claims granted by the Commonwealth of 
Virginia on account of Revolutionary services give the name of the 
soldier? 

Mr. Sp.\nglEr: Yes; they were granted without regard to property, 
and were granted for services in the Revolutionary War, mostly to 
officers ; and many of these land grants were in what is now other 
States, but granted by Virginia. 

Mr. Wentworth : Is that true of other States? 

Mr. SpanglEr: I think so. 

Mr. Steele : I wish to present to the Congress between now and the 
adjournment a set of resolutions, or a copy of certain resolutions, 
passed by the Daughters of the American Revolution a week ago in 
Washington, and later on I wish to present them, at their request. It 
follows along the line of the petition to Congress at this time, of not 
only publishing, eventually, the pension records, but the land-bounty 
claims, and all other records showing the services of these soldiers in 
the Revolutionary War. I will bring that up at a later time. 

Colonel Guthrie : We have in our Pennsylvania archiv^es almost 
a complete list of all the land grants of the Revolution. These volumes 
are published, and can be easily acquired. 

The Secretary General : The Virginia land grants for service in 
the Revolution were published by the State about the year 1832 or 

1835. 

Mr. SpanglEr: Since that motion has been made, I desire to second 
it, with a vote of thanks to Colonel Kniffin . 

Colonel Thompson : I move to amend that the report be printed 
in the Year Book. 

(Motion as seconded and amended was put to a vote and carried.) 

The President General: The Report of the Committee on Infor- 
mation for Aliens, Commander Moore. Chairman, is next in order. 
In the absence of the Chairman, I will call on Secretary General 
Clark to read tliat report, inasmuch as be is also a member of that 
Committee. 



112 SONS OF the; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON INFORMATION FOR 

ALIENS. 

Washington, D. C, April 26, 191 1. 

The Committee has had quite an active year in distributing leaflets 
and attending to the correspondence which has been constant through- 
out the year. 

It is pleasing to note that greater interest in our leaflets has been 
taken in the night schools of several of our larger cities, and that large 
numbers have been distributed by them. We know of no better way in 
which the alien can be reached than through the night schools. We 
therefore recommend that every effort be made to interest the principals 
of our night schools in their distribution. 

Because we have distributed thousands of leaflets this year is no 
reason why the work should cease during the coming year. 

Such seems to be the reasoning of some of our Chapters and Socie- 
ties. They do magnificent work for one year and then stop. The alien 
comes and goes and we always have them with us, and it is only through 
constant, persistent work that we are to be able to assist them. The 
coming year should see our Society take a new hold of this grand 
work and exceed anything that has been done in the past. 

Last September we received a letter from our compatriot. Senator 
Dillingham, Chairman of the Immigration Commission, which was about 
to make its report to Congress, asking for certain information from our 
Committee. 

We give our answer in full : 

CoAiMiTTEE ON Information for Aliens, 

Sons of the American Revolution, 
Washington, D.C, Septen-iber 20. 1910. 

Com. John H. Moore, U. S. N., Chairman; Hon. Charles Lyman, 
A. Howard Clark. 

Hon. William P. Dillingham, 

Chairman of the Immigration Commission, Washington, D. C, 

My DE-A-R Sir : We thank you for the opportunity you have given to 
the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution to place 
on file the results of its work during the past three years with the alien. 

We will answer your questions seriatim. 

ist. Origin and purpose of the Society's work for immigrants. 

In the constitution of our Society, under the heading of Purposes and 
Objects, will be found, among other provisions, the following: "To 
foster true patriotism and to maintain and extend the institutions of 
American freedom." In 1907, when the immigration to this country 
reached the unparalleled number of one million and a half, the Sons of 
the American Revolution felt that the time had come for them to take 
some action towards aiding the assimilation of this vast and motley 
horde. This question was taken up and discussed at the National 
Congress, held at Denver in 1907. with the result that a Committee on 
Information for Aliens was created. At the meeting of the Executive 
Committee a plan was outlined and over one-half the income of the 
Society was appropriated to carry on the work. 

2d. Character and extent of work done. 

A small leaflet was prepared, written in the most simple English, 
entitled "Information for Immigrants Concerning tlie United States : Its. 
Opportunities. Government, and Institutions," a copy of which is ap- 
pended and marked A. 



1 



proce;edings of louisville congress. 113 

This leaflet was translated and printed in the following languages- 
English, Italian, Yiddish, Polish, Magyar, Slovinian, Slovak. Croatian^ 
Swedish, Greek, Bohemian, German, Norwegian, Danish, and Lithua- 
nian. It was copied entire in a large number of the daily papers through- 
out the country and by most of the papers printed in a foreign language. 

Our State Societies and Chapters took the matter up and local 
committees were appointed to attend to its distribution. 

Manufacturers, mining companies, employers of labor, settlement 
workers, and other patriotic societies became interested in the work, with 
the result that hundreds of thousands of leaflets were distributed among 
our alien population. The night schools in several of our largest 
cities were very helpful, as the leaflet was carried home, where it could 
be read by all members of the family. 

Two years' work showed the need of further instructions, so a second 
leaflet was prepared and printed, entitled "Naturalization of aliens in the 
United States : How to become citizens ; what is required ; rights and 
duties," a copy of which is appended, marked B. 

This leaflet has been distributed in large numbers. It has not been 
printed in any foreign language, as our Committee did not deem it 
wise, in view of the fact that an alien must speak English to a certain 
extent before he can become naturalized. 

3d. Results. 

We can only judge of the results obtained through this work by 
the reports we have received from our numerous State Societies and 
Chapters. Judging by them, we do not hesitate to state that the work 
has been very beneficial. The leaflets in most cases have been grate- 
fully received and often have been sought for. 

4th. What, in your opinion, can the National Government do to 
assist immigrants on their arrival at United States ports? 

After three years' co-operation work with the Division of Infor- 
mation of the Department of Commerce and Labor, we do not hesitate 
to state that its scope should be largely increased by the establishment 
of branch offices in the large cities where the immigrants go upon their 
arrival at the seaboard. The tendency of the immigrant is to remain 
at the port where he lands. Anything that will induce him to go 
inland will be beneficial. At our seaports he is at the mercy of large 
numbers of "Intelligence offices." where he is robbed and in many cases 
treated unmercifully. By increasing the scope of the Division of Infor- 
mation, all this could be largely obliterated. 

5th. What, in your opinion, can the National Government do to pro- 
mote the assimilation or Americanization of immigrants? 

The Government taxes every immigrant four dollars before he is 
allowed to land. This sum is sufficient to admit of the Government 
doing something for the immigrant after he lands. In our opinion, the 
Government should do everything it can to induce the immigrant to 
leave our congested cities and spread out over the land. _ Where there 
are but a few immigrants they quickly become Americanized, and it is 
only a question of time when they become assimilated. We would most 
earnestly recommend for this purpose the establishment of branch 
offices of the Division of Information of the Department of Commerce 
and Labor in all our cities where large numbers of immigrants are 
landed, and. further, that branch offices of the same division be estab- 
lished at Chicago and St. Louis and later at some points in the South 
like Atlanta. 

We do not think it for the best that our Government should go as 
far as the German Government has in the establishment of "Intelligence 
offices." but we do think that our present plan of assisting the immigrant 
through the Division of Information of the Department of Commerce 
and Labor should be expanded and enlarged. 

Respectfully, John H. MoorE, Chairman. 

8— SR 



114 SONS OF the; American revolution. 

It is a pleasure to state that the same pleasant relationship between 
your Committee and the Department of Commerce and Labor con- 
tmues, and when the Department is ready to establish its branch offices 
of the Division of Information, which we hope to see done shortly, 
our Society should lend a helping hand in making them a success in 
their endeavors to transfer the alien from the congested districts to the 
sparsely settled sections. 

Respectfully, Jnq. H. Moore, 

Chairman, Committee on Information for Aliens. 

The President General: What is the pleasure of the Congress as 
to this report? 

Mr. Bacon : I move that the report be accepted and placed on file, 
with the thanks of the Congress to the gentlemen who have made it. 

(Motion seconded by Mr. Dix and Mr. Paine and carried.) 

The President General: The next report is that of the Committee 
on Jefferson Memorial, Rear Admiral George W. Baird, U. S. N.. 
Chairman. I will ask him to read that report. 

COMMITTEE ON JEFFERSON MEMORIAL. 

The President General : Your Committee on the Jefferson Memorial 
begs leave to report that the measure to appropriate $100,000 for the 
purpose of placing a memorial to Thomas Jefferson in the City of 
Washington was passed in the third session of the Sixty-first Con- 
gress in the Senate, but was thrown out in conference. 

During the current session of Congress (first session of the Sixty- 
second Congress) Senator Bacon, of Georgia, succeeded in getting a 
measure through the Senate for the appropriation, and it was done on 
that Senator's recommendation, without reference to a committee. This 
is something very unusual, and but for the fact that it had twice pre- 
viously passed the Senate and for the profound respect Senator Bacon, 
of Georgia, is held in, it would have been impossible. 

The measure is now pending in the House of Representatives, and 
the Senator from Georgia is using his good offices to assist the bill 
there. We believe the appropriation will be made during this Congress. 
With great respect, your servants, 

G. W. Baird. 

George Tully Vaughan. 

Caleb C. Magruder, Jr. 

The President General: What is your pleasure regarding the report 
of this Committee? 

Mr. Williams, of New Jersey: I move that the report be accepted 
and placed on file, and that the Congress pass a vote of thanks to the 
Chairman for the able manner in which he has done his work. 

(Motion duly seconded and carried.) 

The President General: The next report is that of the Committee 
on Advance Work, Compatriot Nelson A. McClary, Chairman. I will 
ask him to present the report. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ADVANCE WORK. 

Your Committee, which under a resolution adopted by the Toledo 
Congress was appointed "to take under advisement some plan of 
work which shall carry out the purposes of the Society, as above 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. II5 

expressed, to the end that the Society shall interest itself in matters 
of present-day importance and by such work attract large numbers to 
membership," begs to report : 

First. That it has, as it was bound to do, taken into consideration 
the resolution adopted by the Congress immediately after the adoption 
of the resolution just quoted, to-wit, that the said resolution "as to 
subject-matter, other than the appointment of the committee, be re- 
ferred to the Executive Committee, in order that the committee to be 
appointed may have the advantage of any suggestions which the Execu- 
tive Committee may be able to give them." 

Second. That it has received no suggestions from the Executive Com- 
mittee concerning any proposed departure or new work. 

Third. That, in the opinion of your Committee, no radical departure 
from the lines of work already laid down by the Society is either neces- 
sary or desirable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin S. Greeley, 

Edwin Warfield, 

James Denton Hancock, 

Morris B. Beardsley, 

Nelson A. McClary, Chairman, 

Committee. 

(Motion made and seconded that the report be received and printed 
in the Year Book. Carried.) 

The President General : The next report is that of the Committee 
on Investment of the Permanent Fund, of which I have the honor to 
be Chairman. The Treasurer General has already submitted a com- 
plete report on this subject. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL BUILDING. 

The President General: The last committee in the regular list is 
that of the Committee on George Washington Memorial Building. In 
the absence of the chairman of that committee, I will ask the Secretary 
General to make a report. 

The Secretary General : The chairman is not present, and no report 
has been submitted. I can state in a general way that there was sent 
out, at the expense pf the Memorial Association, a circular mviting 
contributions to this fund. The result of that, I think, was about $2,750 
received and sent to the George Washington Memorial Association as 
the response of members of this Society. 

Judge Beardsley: As I understand, it is the purpose to devote this 
building to the uses of patriotic and scientific societies, and it is the 
intention to expend two millions of dollars in the erection of the build- 
ing, with half a million more for other purposes. I see from the 
papers that the first half million has been received. 

Historian General Pierson : There has been raised $600,000, I 
think. Mrs. Dimock, with her assistants, has established organizations 
in every State, and a plan is under way to guarantee the entire fund, 
so the building may be started next year. 

The President General: The report of the Committee on Naval 
Records is in the hands of Compatriot Clark and he will read it. 



ii6 SONS OF the; amkrican revolution. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NAVAL RECORDS. 

Washington, D. C, April 26, 191 1. 
During the past year progress has been made in indexing the Naval 
Records of the Revolution and of gathering at the Navy Department 
the Revolutionary Naval Records that have been stored in the other 
Executive Departments. 

Your Committee presented to the Secretary of the Navy a strong 
argument in favor of not only continuing but extending the work, and 
have received assurances that the work will be increased. 

Respectfully, Jno. H. Moore, 

Chairman, Committee on Naval Records. 

(Motion made and seconded that the report be received and pub- 
lished in the Year Book, and motion carried.) 

The President General : The next thing in the order of business 
will be the annual reports from State Societies. 

Judge BeardslEy: What is the usual course in that matter, Mr. 
President General? Can not time be saved here? 

Doctor GuYER : I move that the reading of the reports be dispensed 
with and that they appear as usual in the Year Book. 

The President General: The customary method is to allow the 
Secretary General to make abstracts for publication. 

Judge BeardslEy : I move that the reports be duly accepted and 
printed. 

Doctor Guyer: I second that motion. 

(The motion as seconded was carried.) 

REPORTS OF STATE SOCIETIES. 

(See also Historian General's Report.) 

ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 51 

New members 3 

Deaths 2, demitted i 3 

Gain or loss o 

Membership March 31, igii....". 51 

The fifteenth annual banquet was held at the Country Club, Phoenix, 
on the evening of February 22. Attorney General John B. Wright 
delivered an address on the advantages of the democratic form of 
government; Dr. Mark Rodgers, of Tucson, spoke on the practice of 
medicine during the period of the Revolution ; Mr. W. M. Seabury, 
on the good accomplished by patriotic societies in teaching the doctrine 
of patriotism, and Mr. Isaac T. Stoddard and Governor Sloan made 
patriotic addresses. 

ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 28 

New members i 

Membership March 31, 191 1 29 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. II7 

The Society held its annual meeting on February 22 at Little Rock, 
when the officers of the previous year were re-elected. The Society 
has presented a portrait of Washington to the Kramer School, of Little 
Rock. Progress is being made in organizing local Chapters at several 
points in Arkansas. At the dinner following the business session, re- 
sponses to patriotic toasts were as follows : "The National Congress," 
by Mr. Frank W. Rawles, President; "Lafayette," by Rev. H. N. Hyde; 
"Paul Jones and the American Navy," by Mr. Fay Hempstead, Secre- 
tary; "General Nathanael Greene," by Mr. George Russ Brown. 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 421 

New members 27, transfers 3 30 

Deaths 11, resigned 9 20 

Gain 10 

Membership March 31, 191 1 431 

The California Society is gaining materially in membership and 
prospering generally. The number of members on the roll at present 
is 431, with 14 applications in hand. The activities of the Society 
have not been numerous this year, and have been already reported to 
and published in the monthly bulletins of the National Society. Two 
meetings were planned but fell through owing to failure in perfecting 
arrangements and obtaining speakers. 

An infraction of the law relating to the desecration of the U. S. 
flag by a fruit packing company in this city was discovered through 
the vigilance of two members of this Society, whose prompt action in 
the matter compelled the discontinuance of the use of a print of the 
flag on their package labels. 

An amendment to the Constitution of this Society to bring it in 
conformity with the National Constitution has been submitted and will 
be adopted at the annual meeting April 19th, striking out the words 
"or as a civil officer, either of one of the Colonies or States or of the 
National Government." 

Under date of June 9, 1910, a Chapter was established at San Diego 
with a membership of 16. It is designated "San Diego Chapter No. 2." 

Edwin Bonnell, Secretary. 

.COLORADO SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 257 

New members 30, transfers 3 33 

Deaths 3, resigned 4, demitted 7, dropped 19. . . . 33 

Gain or loss 

Membership March 31, 1911 257 

During the past year the Society has been in a flourishing condition. 
It added new members equivalent to ten per cent of the total member- 
ship one year ago today. A new Chapter was established at Fort 
Collins on April 15. 191 1. The Denver Chapter in particular has been 
full of activity during the year, holding regular monthly meetings at 
the residences of members which have been well attended and well 
worthv of attendance. 

The' Board of Managers held five regular and five special meetings 
since the last election. The Board authorized a quantity of literature 



Il8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

published, including the Chapter's monthly bulletins, the Year Book 
issued last July, and a historical manual. Henceforth the Bulletin, 
issued under the caption "The Spirit of Seventy Six," is to be edited 
by the Educational Committee. 

Special mention should be made of the many patriotic lectures and 
entertainments given under the auspices of Denver Chapter in addi- 
tion to the regular monthly meetings, all of w^hich have been announced 
in the Bulletin from time to time. Particularly worthy of comment 
is the prominent part taken by this Society through its Denver Chapter 
in the last Fourth of July celebration. A safe and sane observance of 
that day was conducted along purely patriotic lines, resulting in much 
pleasure for all and in no loss of life, limb or property. A combina- 
tion of over 30 patriotic, public and civic bodies under the title of "The 
Denver Patriotic League" was responsible for holding probably the 
most entirely successful celebration of this kind in our country. State 
President Wardner Williams is President of the Denver Patriotic 
Leagvie and among its most active workers are members of the Denver 
Chapter, who are planning a bigger, better celebration for this year. 

This is a patriotic work which should peculiarly appeal to members 
of our Society. It could be profitably undertaken by other Chapters 
of Colorado and elsewhere. Commenting on this subject, the Sec- 
retary General in his last report states : "A feature of special interest 
and importance during the year has been the patriotic celebrations by 
local Chapters, particularly in Illinois, New Jersey, Colorado, Massa- 
chusetts, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania. The result has been large 
additions to membership and an incentive to the formation of Chapters 
in other localities. There can be no doubt but that a fuller develop- 
ment of the Chapter plan will increase the Society's numbers and in- 
fluence." 

We need more members and more Chapters in this State. No doubt 
many are eligible for membership in Pueblo, Grand Junction, Boulder 
and other cities of this Commonwealth. If they can be patriotically 
interested in a profitable work — something that appeals to them as 
beneficent and worth while — they will soon seek admission to our 
Society, which will thus extend its patriotic influence in the making 
of good citizens and the promotion of sound American principles. 

Another feature of work undertaken by certain members of the 
Colorado Society should be briefly commented upon with pride. I 
refer to the organization of new State Societies by the Committee on 
Organization of the North and West appointed by the National Society 
and consisting of Compatriots Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, Chairman; Jos. 
F. Tuttle, Jr., and Frank Merriam Keezer. This committee has organ- 
ized no less than six new State Societies in the past three years, as 
follows: March. 1908, Wyoming; December, 1908, New Mexico; April, 
1909, Idaho; February, 1910, Nevada; January, 191 1, South Dakota, 
and Februar}^, 191 1, North Dakota. Compatriot H. T. Vaille also 
assisted in organizing Wyoming. These achievements certainly reflect 
the high degree of accomplishment possessed by some of our members, 
and the record of their successful work should be duplicated by those 
in similar authority in our State Society in the organization of State 
Chapters. W. W. Kirby, Secretary. 

CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 1,081 

New members 48, transfers .1 51 

Deaths 22, resignation i, demitted 6 29 

Gain 22 

Membership March 31, 1910 1,103 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. II9 

The Connecticut Society numbers 1,103 members, which inchides 51 
new members that have been admitted since April i, 1910. 

Five meetings of the Board of Alanagers have been held during the 
year, with good attendance and great interest shown in the proceedings. 
The graves of many Revolutionary soldiers and sailors have been 
marked with the Society marker during the year. 

A Field Day was held at Compo Beach, Westport, on June 17th, 
and after the clam-bake at the beach a life-size bronze statue of "The 
Minute Man" was unveiled with appropriate ceremonies. This statue 
was designed by H. Daniel Webster and erected by the Society to com- 
memorate the heroism of the patriots who defended their country when 
the British, under General Tryon, invaded Connecticut in April, 1777. 

General David Wooster, Colonel Abraham Gould, and more than 
one hundred Continentals fell in the engagement at Ridgefield and 
closing at Compo Hill. The ceremonies included singing by a High 
School chorus and children of other schools and patriotic addresses by 
Hon. Morris B. Beardsley, President Lewis B. Curtis, Selectman Wake- 
man, of Westport; William H. Burr, Mr. Webster, Mrs. Buell, the 
State Regent, and Mrs. Sterling, the Vice-Regent of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, and concluded with a poem on "The 
Minute Man," by Mrs. Agnes Lewis Mitchell. 

The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has 
to its credit in this line the purchase, fitting up and maintenance of 
the old war office at Lebanon ; the purchase and restoration of the 
Nathan Hale school-house at New London, and five bronze tablets 
marking historical sites in different parts of the State. 

Connecticut is not rich in these sites. She furnished about one- 
eighth of the entire Continental Army. Her sons fought on every 
field but little at home. It was her boast — and almost true — that no 
foreign foe remained over night on her soil. 

The Connecticut Society has published an illustrated pamphlet of 
thirty-one pages, entitled "The Minute Man." 

General David Humphreys Branch of New Haven on Memorial Day, 
June 26, 1910, assisted by the Second Company Governor's Foot Guard, 
decorated the graves of one hundred and eighty-seven Revolutionary 
soldiers and patriots in Grove Street Cemetery and elsewhere. 

The exercises included invocation by Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, Jr., 
Chaplain of the Branch; remarks by President Seymour C Loomis, 
and an address by Hon. A. Heaton Robertson. 

The General Silliman Branch, of Bridgeport, held a banquet at the 
Stratfield Hotel on January 19th, over a hundred members and lady 
guests being present. 

President Orlando" H. Brothwell acted as toastmaster, and the 
speakers were the Rev. A. C. Thompson, Rev. John De Peu, Gen. 
E. S. Greeley, and Edward Mallory, of New Haven, 

The Nathan Hale Branch, of New London, took part in the cele- 
bration by the G. A. R. of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the gomg out 
of Company E; also a banquet was held at the Thames Club. Presi- 
dent P. Le Rov Harwood acted as toastmaster. 

The Hartford Branch of the Connecticut Society was formed Janu- 
arv 17th and has a Charter membership of over two hundred. The 
Branch was named the Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth Branch, m honor 
of that most prominent patriot in Hartford during the Revolutionary 
War and his splendid work as Commissary General under General 
Washington. , • , i. 

The fall meeting was held at the Hartford Club, with supper at 
630 p m After the supper a verv interesting paper was read by 
Mr F Clarence Bissell upon "The march of the Rifle Battahons across 
Connecticut in August, 1775," a large amount of the material having 



120 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

been found in an old account book discovered in the office of the 
State Comptroller. 

The winter meeting was held at the Hartford Club, with supper at 
6.30 p. m. After the supper the meeting adjourned to the rooms of 
the Connecticut Historical Society, where the Librarian, Mr. Albert C 
Bates, gave a very interesting lecture and exhibited many letters and 
relics connected with Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth and other Revolution- 
ary officers. 

The spring meeting was held at the residence of President Dr. George 
C. F. Williams, where a very interesting paper on the "Puritan Sunday" 
was read by Mr. Charles Hopkins Clark. 

The summer meeting will be held at the Hartford Club, with a sup- 
per at 6.30 p. m., after which the meeting will adjourn to the State 
Library, where the Librarian, Mr. George S. Godard, will have many 
interesting letters and relics to show us. 

The Connecticut Society held its twenty-second annual dinner at the 
Hotel Garde, Hartford, on February 22. Dr. George C. F. Williams, 
President of the Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth Branch, presided as 
toastmaster. Addresses were made by President Curtis, of the State 
Society; Hon. Edward L. Smith, Mayor of Hartford; Rev. WiUiam 
Douglas MacKenzie, D.D., LL.D. ; Col. Norris G. Osborne, and Rev. 
John Calvin Goddard. 

Mayor Smith said that present-day democracy was a complex thing 
as compared to the days of Washington. This country was a melting- 
pot, and it needed time and a flux to make the component parts unite. 

Charles G. Stone, Secretary. 

Hartford, Conn., April 11, 191 1. 

DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 j6 

Deaths, resigned, and dropped ' 31 

Membership March 31, 1911 45 

The Delaware Society, on April 19, 191 1, held its annual meeting and 
re-elected the officers of the preceding year. The business was followed 
b)^ a dinner at which there were twenty members present. Earnest 
patriotic speeches were made, the speakers dwelling principally on the 
part taken by the Delaware line in the battles of the Revolution. It was 
decided to offer two prizes of $10.00 and $5.00 gold pieces for the best 
essays presented by pupils of the Wilmington High School, on the sub- 
ject of "The Principles Fought for in the Revolutionary War." The 
President urged that the Society place suitable stone monuments to mark 
the position of our Delaware troops at the Battle of the Brandywine 
and a committee was appointed to investigate and report as to what 
could be done, at the next meeting. The question of a monument in 
memory of the 265 brave Delaware soldiers who fell in the Battle of 
Camden. S. C, August 16, 1780, in the short fight of one hour, was also 
discussed with the idea of securing State aid in its erection If the 
brave DeKalb thought it was glorious to die, while leading such troops 
as the Delaware and Maryland soldiers, how proud and ready we should 
be to commemorate their bravery. Attention was called to the part that 
members of our Society had taken in securing a silver service for the 
battleship "Delaware," and in entertaining the officers and men; also 
that the Society had in addition given $100.00 from its treasury_ toward 
the purchase of the silver service. The membership of the Society has 
been greatly reduced by dropping all who failed to take an active interest 
and pay their dues, but we hope to bring many new members in during 
the coming year. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 121 

For many years the Society has labored to secure the pubHcation of 
the Revokitionary muster rolls, which were found in the loft of the old 
court-house at Dover. This work has at last been accomplished, and 
the rolls are now in the printer's hands. The distribution of these 
heretofore inexcessible records will aid greatly in the increase of our 
membership. 

George A. Elliott, President. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 517 

New members 21, transfers 3, reinstated 4 28 

Deaths 9, resignations 7, demitted 6, dropped 35 57 
• — . 
Loss 29 

Membership March 31, 191 1 488 

The above statistics of the District of Columbia Society show a 
decrease in membership which has come about through death, transfer, 
and the dropping of members for non-payment of dues. While the 
number lost is large the Society has gained, in that every one of the 488 
members is an active worker, having a deep interest in the welfare of 
the Society and being ready at a moment's notice to assume any duty 
assigned to him. In other words, the District Society has no dead 
timber among its members. 

The Society year commences with November and ends with an outing 
in May, which last year took the form of an excursion to Annapolis. 

The members have been fortunate in securing the following able 
speakers at their regular meetings : Claude N. Bennett, Esq., Prof. 
Charles E. Munroe, Hon. Lee McClung, Hon. William A. Marble, Hon. 
J. W. Collier, and W. E. Safford. 

The Society is still in a very prosperous condition and is financially 
sound, with a permanent building fund amounting to $4,003.49, and feels 
that it has accomplished a great deal in the work of its past President, 
Rear Admiral George W. Baird, U. S. N., who was instrumental in 
securing legislation for the John Paul Jones Crypt at Annapolis, which 
was reported on as follows by the Secretary General of the Society in 
the Official Bulletin for March, 1911 : 

"The John Paul Jones Crypt at Annapolis has at last been authorized 
and its construction provided for by the Naval Appropriation Act, 
passed by Congress and approved by the President on March 4, 191 1. 
President General Marble and Rear Admiral Baird, of the District of 
Columbia Society, have persistently called attention to this needed 
legislation, and the State Societies have effectually co-operated toward 
accomplishing the proper burial of the remains of Admiral John Paul 
Jones, discovered in Paris after a long search at the personal expense 
of Gen. Horace Porter, former President General of the National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution." 

Paul BrockETT, Secretary. 

FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 35 

New members 4 

Deaths 3, dropped i 4 

Membership March 31, 1911 35 



122 SONS OF the: AMERICAN RDVOI^UTIGN. 

HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 98 

New members 3. 

Gain 3 

Membership March 31, 191 1 loi 

IDAHO SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 24 

New members 7 

Demitted i, dropped i 2 

Gain 5 

Membership March 31, 191 1 29 

The Idaho Societies of "Sons" and "Daughters" united in the observ- 
ance of Forefathers' Day on December 21 by holding a banquet at the 
Owyhee Hotel, Boise, which was attended by about fifty members and 
guests. Col. M. W. Wood, President of the Society, presided as toast- 
master. The program of the evening was as follows : 

"The Citizenship of Idaho," Governor James H. Brady; "The Man- 
ners and Customs of Our Forefathers," Mrs. Charles W. Purcell, State 
Regent of Idaho, D. A. R. ; "The Religion of Our Forefathers," Rev. 
W. S. Hawkes ; "Our Appreciation of Our Forefathers," John H. Up- 
ton ; "The Personnel of the Signers of the Mayflower Compact," Mrs. 
H. L. Chamberlain; "The Laws of Our Forefathers," Harry Keyser; 
"The Morals of Our Forefathers," Hon. J. T. Morrison; "The Priva- 
tions of Our Forefathers," Will H. Gibson; "The Finances of Our 
Forefathers," C. A. Hastings. 

The annual business meeting was held on February 22. 

ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 576 

New members 89, transferred 5, reinstated 3. .. 97 
Deaths 11, resignations 4, demitted 4, dropped 28 47 

Gain 50 

Membership March 31, 191 1 626 

The Illinois Society enrolled 89 new members during the year ended 
March 31, 191 1, a larger number than for any similar period in its 
history, making its active membership 626. On May 27, 1910, the So- 
ciety listened to an address by Prof. C. E. Merriam, of the University 
of Chicago, upon "Municipal Expenditures." At the latter meeting the 
twelve delegates from Illinois to the National Congress at Toledo made 
brief reports, and action was taken indorsing the proposition iov a 
branch office in Chicago of the Information Bureau pertaining to immi- 
grants. 

Several new and valuable volumes have recently been purchased for 
the librar}^ The Society participated in the notable Chicago Sane 
Fourth of July celebration. The Recruiting Committee has compiled 
and published a list of several hundred men eligible for membership, 
and systematic efiforts to interest them are now being made._ 

OnSeptember 16 the Board of Managers, 21 members being present. 



PROCKEDINGS OF LOUISVII^LE; CONGRESS. I23 

were entertained at supper at the River Forest Country Club by Secre- 
tary Bowman and his wife. There were patriotic addresses and music, 
and the guest of honor, Mr. Revere Lincoln, great-grandson of Paul 
Revere, made a few pleasing remarks. 

The Oak Park Chapter arranged for a number of its members to 
deliver addresses in the public schools upon national peace day. The 
Annual Yorktown Day Banquet was held October 19, with President 
General Marble as the guest of honor. 

The annual meeting was held in Chicago on December 3, the anni- 
versy of the admission of Illinois into the Union. An illustrated address 
upon "The Illinois National Guard" was given by Capt. O. D. Steele. 

The January meeting was one of the largest the Society has held. It 
was at the Auditorium Hotel, Chicago, and addresses were given upon 
"The Education of the Immigrant in American Citizenship," by Miss 
Grace Abbott, Superintendent of the Immigrants' Protective League, 
and upon the "Responsibility and Opportunity of Chicago Citizens in 
Relation to Immigrants," by E. A. Halsey, ex-city comptroller of Chi- 
cago. The addresses were given wide newspaper publicity. 

The Society arranged for a celebration of Washington's Birthday by 
a popular meeting in Association Auditorium, in which other patriotic 
societies joined. A new local Chapter has been organized at River 
Forest, 111. 

The Oak Park Chapter held its annual banquet on February 20, with 
Rev. Dr. John Timothy Stone, Chaplain General of the National So- 
ciety, as the guest of honor. He gave an impressive address upon the 
character of Washington under the caption "An Example in States- 
manship." Two interesting addresses by members of the Chapter were 
given as follows : "Washington's Christmas Visit to Trenton," by Col. 
H. R. Brinkerhoff, U. S. A., and "The Discouragements of Washing- 
ton," by F. C. Caldwell, Esq. Owing to the emphasis placed upon the 
display of the flag on national holidays by this Chapter, more flags were 
in evidence in Oak Park than ever before in its history. All the com- 
mittees of the State Society have taken up their year's work with en- 
thusiasm and the outlook is in every way bright. 

The Springfield Chapter of Illinois observed Lincoln's Birthday An- 
niversary on February 12 by holding joint services with the Daughters 
of the American Revolution in the Second Presbyterian Church, where 
an address was delivered by Col. Charles F. Wells, President of the 
Springfield Chapter, and by Rev. Adelbert P. Higley, Chaplain of the 
Chapter. All the patriotic organizations of the city were represented. 

INDIANA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 220 

New members iB, 

Deaths 3, resignations 3, demitted i, dropped 6. 13 

Gain 5 

Membership March 31, 1911 225 

The Indiana Society issued during the year an eight-page recruiting 
circular of directions for tracing ancestry, with references to sources 
of information for Revolutionary service in the various Colonies^ A 
membership committee, with ex-President George Oscar Dix, of Terra 
Haute, as chairman, consists of twenty-six compatriots, scattered in 
twenty-three Indiana cities and towns. 

The annual banquet was held at Indianapolis on February 25 to com- 
memorate the capture of Fort Sackville, Vincennes, by Gen. George 
Rogers Clark. 



124 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Addresses were delivered by President General Marble, responding 
to the toast, "The War of the Revolution" ; Col. Henry A. Greene, 
U. S. Army, on "The Wars to Come" ; Charles W. Moores, on "Lin- 
coln"; Merrill Moores, on "Patriotic Societies," and President Horace 
C. Starr, who outlined the policy of the Indiana Society during the 
ensuing year. 

IOWA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 265 

New members 32, transferred 2 34 

Deaths 4, resignations 3 7 

Gain 27 

Membership March 31, 1911 292 

In order to arouse greater interest in the study of the history of the 
United States, the Society in 1907 authorized the bestowing of a bronze 
medal upon the student of several colleges in Iowa who should during the 
year do the best work in the study of the history of the United States. 
This proposition was made to twenty colleges in the State. As a result 
twelve medals were bestowed on students of as many colleges at com- 
mencement time in 1908. In 1909, sixteen medals were awarded to 
college students and six to students in high schools, the high-school 
medals being gifts of individual members of the Society. At com- 
mencement season of 1910, fifteen medals were awarded to college stu- 
dents and an equal number (of special design) to pupils in high schools. 
In Des Moines the three high schools each embraced the plan of com- 
peting for the history medals. These medals have no intrinsic value to 
appeal to the student, yet are sought with eagerness and highly prized 
by the winners, and the testimony of educators is that these competi- 
tions are exerting a wholesome, stimulating influence in the schools and 
producing the result desired in stimulating patriotic thought among the 
student-body of our people. 

At the annual meeting, on April 19, 191 1, it was decided to continue 
the offering of the history medals to colleges and high schools, and to 
have more frequent meetings of the Board of Managers. It was recom- 
mended that local Chapters be encouraged to hold special meetings, at 
which the State Secretary should be present, or other State officers. A 
further contribution of $50 was voted to the Permanent Fund of the 
National Society. The business meeting was followed by a banquet at 
the Chamberlain Hotel, at which Gov. Warren Garst and Hon. John 
Denison spoke eloquently, and the College Glee Club from the Iowa 
Agricultural College, of Ames, rendered "The Midnight Ride of Paul 
Revere" in oratorio form in fine style. The meeting and banquet and 
all formed an epoch in the history of the Society. 

KANSAS SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 60 

New members 5 

Loss 5 

Membership March 31, 191 1 65 

The Kansas Society has established an annual cash prize of a five- 
dollar gold piece to the history class of Bethany College for the best 
essay on the cause of the American Revolution. The presentation for 
1910 was made on June 6 by J. M. Meade, President of the Society, 
to Miss Dorothy Wood. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. I25 

KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 84 

New members 36, reinstated 5 41 

Gain 41 

Membership March 31, 191 1 125 

The Kentucky Society showed a marked growth in membership dur- 
ing the year and increased interest in the patriotic work of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. On June 17 a "smoker" and business meet- 
ing was held at the residence of President George Lewis Danforth, and 
on July 4 a patriotic meeting was held at the residence of Compatriot 
James F. Buckner, at Pewee Valley, near Louisville. 

The Society celebrated its twenty-second anniversary on October 19 
at the residence of Mr. Samuel Thruston Ballard. 

LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

Members April i, 1910 90 

New members 4 

Deaths 4, resigned 4, dropped 10 18 

Loss 14 

Membership March 31, 191 1 76 

There has been a net loss in membership during the year, the Society 
having lost by death four, two of whom — Charles Patton Dimitry and 
Allan A. Brinsmade — were charter members ; four resignations, and 
dropped ten. We, on this showing, begin the official year with 76 
names on our active roll. I may say in this connection, in justice to 
the esprit de corps of our members, that we are not at all discouraged 
by this reduction in our ranks, and we hope to recruit a new member in 
the early future for every old member we have been with great reluc- 
tance forced to suspend since last report. 

As to patriotic work, we are ever faithful to the memory of the 
father of our country, so commemorated his birthday this year in a 
manner proverbial with the Louisiana Society. By a happy coincident 
and conjunction, we had in port for the Mardi Gras festivities a squad- 
ron of United States warships, and also a like number of our sister 
Republic of France, • which was at the climax of the Revolution our 
friend, in deed. The ships of our country's navy were under the com- 
mand of Rear Admiral Stanton; that of France, Admiral De Lajarte. 
Both admirals were invited to our reunion and banquet ; but, having 
arrived only on the morning and evening of the 22d of February, mani- 
fold duties aboard ship compelled them to offer by letter their excuses, 
couched in most patriotic language and sentiment of appreciation for 
the cordial invitation extended to them to be the guests of the Lou- 
isiana Society on the occasion. It may be of interest to mention that 
our souvenirs of the dinner this year were a silk American flag 12 x 18, 
a stick-pin flag with a portrait of Washington on it, and a song-book 
containing the patriotic songs played by a string band in attendance 
and sung by the Society. At the table this book was tied with the 
colors of the National Society — blue, buff, and white. 

The ceremony of decorating the graves of the three Revolutionary 
soldiers buried in the old St. Louis Cemetery was religously observed 
on All Saints' Day. The Society placed the decoration of the graves 
in the hands of a regular florist, and by the free and artistic use of 



126 SONS OF The; American revolution. 

ferns, flags, and flowers the effect was beautiful and impressive and 
worthy of the heroes who once stood shoulder to shoulder in defense 
of right against oppression, of liberty against tyranny. 

At our last meeting a committee was provided for to confer with 
the superintendent of our schools, to devise a plan for the competition 
between the students under his administration for a S. A. R. medal, 
to be offered by the Louisiana Society for the best essay on some 
historical subject. I hope in my next annual report to give details of 
"something doing," and to record a success of this new undertaking. 

Nothing would give me more pleasure than to be with you on the 
occasion of the near National Congress in Louisville, Ky., April 30 to 
May 3, 191 1 ; but, as I cannot see my way to go, I have only to wish 
you a pleasant and satisfactory sitting. 

Thomas Dabney Dimitry, Secretary. 

MAINE SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 367 

New members 22 

Deaths 7, resigned 2, dropped 5 14 

Gain 8 

Membership March 31, 191 1 375 

The Maine Society is aiding in the erection of a memorial at Old- 
town, telling of the patriotic deeds of the Penobscot Indians during the 
War of the Revolution. Mr. Nathan Goold, the Historian of the Soci- 
ety, has gathered much interesting information concerning the partici- 
pation of the Penobscots in that war, and has published much of it in 
local papers and elsewhere. 

The principal event of the year was the twentieth annual business 
meeting and banquet at Riverton on February 22. It was one of the 
largest meetings in the history of the Society. The principal address 
was by Prof. Henry S. Nash, D. D., of Cambridge, Mass., on "The 
Birth of the New Democracy." He said that he was a hardened optimist, 
and he saw the dawning of a new day. Some of the signs of this great 
change for the better are the steps taken for the redemption of boys, 
the playground movement, and the splendid reforms in city govern- 
ment, which began in Galveston after the flood disaster there. The 
retiring President of the Society, Hon. Melvin P. Frank, told of the 
work being done by the Sons of the American Revolution, particularly 
in the marking of the graves of soldiers and sailors of that War. 

MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 261 

New members 15, transfers 3 18 

Deaths 3, resigned i, demitted i, dropped 5 10 

Gain 8 

Membership March 31, 191 1 269 

The Maryland Society held its annual meeting at Baltimore on Octo- 
ber 19, 1910; and on February 22, 1911, there was a gathering at the 
Hotel Belvedere, when an address was delivered by Mr. W. O. Atwood, 
City Surveyor of Baltimore. He took for his subject the moral char- 
acter of General Washington, and the effect he had upon the early civil 
life of this countrv. Col. W. F. Vernon spoke on the military character 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 12/ 

and genius of General Washington. A. S. Goldsborough, Secretary to 
the Mayor of Baltimore, dwelt on the character of George Washington 
as an example of good citizenship. The speakers were all members of 
the Maryland Society, and their addresses were received with the great- 
est interest. Historian Bibbins announced that the monument recently 
erected by the Society at Old Wye to the memory of William Paca, 
Signer of the Declaration of Independence and first Governor of Mary- 
land, was ready to be unveiled, and that he had arranged to charter a 
steamer to go to Old Wye on May 13, 191 1, if the weather was fine. 
[The details of the dedication are given in the Official Bulletin for 
"May. 1911.] 

MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 1,043 

New members 80, transfers 6, reinstated 5 91 

Deaths 39, resigned 26, demitted 6. dropped 28. 99 

Loss 8 

Membership March 31, 191 1 1,635 

Our loss is nominal, because before closing our year we admitted 22 
new members, thus showing a gain of 14. 

The Massachusetts Society has held three meetings, and the Board of 
"Managers ten, during the year. 

Since last spring we have placed 102 markers at graves of Revolu- 
tionary soldiers and patriots who were buried in the old cemeteries in 
Dorchester and Roxbury. The late Henry A. May had made a research 
of records, which enabled him to identify the war services of 116 addi- 
tional burials in the old Boston cemeteries, and these we propose to 
mark this year. 

We have contributed towards the erection of a memorial flagstaff, 
which the Daughters of the American Revolution in Cambridge propose 
to place in that city. It is most appropriate that the memorial should 
take this form, as the first flag of the United Colonies — the stripes with 
the cross of St. Andrew and St. George in the field — was here first dis- 
played when the Continental Army was organized, January i, 1776. 

We have placed a handsome bronze tablet on the Essex-street side of 
Hotel Essex, marking approximately the site of the birthplace of Major 
General Henry Knox. We have published and distributed to our mem- 
l»ers, free of cost tp them, the eighth volume, or "Register," of our 
Society. 

We have successfully opposed changing the name of historic Court 
Street in Boston to a continuation of State Street, which forms a part 
■of the latter street, but no sufficiently good excuse for changing the 
name has been given. 

The Chapters of our Society in Boston, Chelsea, Lowell, Lynn, Mai- 
den, and Springfield hold regular meetings, which are usually well 
attended. 

Our annual meeting April 19, 191 1, was attended by more than 200 
members. We were honored by the presence of Historian General 
Pierson, who spoke most interestingly at both places, the Old South 
Meeting House and the American House. 

Herbert W. Kimball, Secretary. 



128 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 367 

New members 2t„ transfer i, reinstated i 25 

Deaths 8, resigned 2, demitted 2, dropped i. . . . 13 

Gain 12 

Membership March 31, 191 1 379 

The Michigan Society was organized January 18, 1890, at Detroit. 
Its most rapid growth occurred during the first ten years, within which 
period the country labored under the excitement of the Spanish War, 
and latent patriotism came to the surface. Large numbers of our best 
citizens at this time joined the Society, which acquired a high standing 
from the general character of the membership. The Society appeared 
publicly and was identified with movements of a public and patriotic 
character, such as celebrations of holidays, dedication of public build- 
ings, memorial and historical tablets, and various similar matters. Later,, 
under the influence of more peaceful times, the activities of the Society 
subsided until it assumed the position of a mere social organization, 
serving the taste of its members by an occasional function. Such 
inactivity was not conducive to growth. 

When the late Dr. Rufus W. Clark became President of the Society,, 
he originated the idea of social meetings, where discussion was had of 
historical papers. Programs were mapped out, and for the past five 
years this course has been pursued to the pleasure and profit of those 
participating, but it must be confessed without much public attention or 
benefit. These so-called "Historical Meetings" have not been supported 
by more than a fraction of the membership, and by reason of the fact 
that three-fourths of the members live in Detroit, the meetings have 
always been held in that city. But they have served to keep the Society- 
active, and there has been but a small loss in membership except for 
natural causes. Interest has been maintained and increased, so that a 
large number of comparatively young men have joined the Society. 
Death has, however, made its inroads among the older and more 
prominent men who originally formed and maintained the organization. 
But the great body of members have remained loyal, though compara- 
tively inactive in the proceedings. 

The lapse of twenty years has been sufficient to warrant a few obser- 
vations from one who has kept account of occurrences. Founded as it 
is upon the achievements of the past, it is improbable that the Society 
will ever become a popular or democratic organization. Its original' 
aristocratic tendencies will doubtless always survive to some degree, 
though less mark(;d than formerly, and less than in some of the other 
patriotic societies based on ancestry of members. And such tendencies 
should not hamper the usefulness of the Society in view of the broad, 
unselfish principles declared in its articles of organization. Its activities,, 
however, must be varied and broadened in order to maintain its high 
standing publicly, and to keep up the interest of present and prospective 
members. Its aims must be adjusted to present conditions, for the 
bond of Revolutionary descent among its members is not strong enough 
to give the Society force, unless combined with other things that shall 
make it really useful and furnish a field for the activities of broad- 
minded and patriotic citizens. 

The suggestion must be made that, locally, it would be better for the 
Society to turn its active attention to matters of present-day importance 
than to dwell entirely on past history and achievements. Not forgetting 
what our Revolutionary sires did, but in emulation of their patriotic and' 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 29 

unselfish actions, we should try to do something for better government, 
better citizenship, and a more unselfish treatment of public questions. 
There is always some local matter that needs the discussion and support 
of broad-minded men, and, acting judiciously, the Society can exert a 
great force in some of these matters without incurring criticism as a 
public meddler or "butter-in." 

Williams C. Harris, Secretary. 

MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

The Minnesota Society enrolled 16 new members during the year, 
making its total present membership 533, of whom 278 are reported in 
good standing and 255 delinquent in dues. 

On Flag Day, June 14, 1910, the Society installed a 50-foot flagpole 
at the old Sibley House, Mendota, and presented the pole to the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. 

The annual banquet was held on June 18, at the Town and Country 
Club. The principal speaker was Rev. W. R. Harshaw. 

The Society lost six members by death, including its former Presi- 
dent, Francis Marion Crosby. 

MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 

Membership April i. igio 18 

New members 7 

Membership March 31, 1911 25 

MISSOURI SOCIETY. " 

Membership April i, 1910 105 

New members 2, resigned i, demitted i. 

Membership March 31, 1911 105 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 28 

New member i 

Membership INIarch 31. 191 1 29 

. NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 116 

New members 6, transferred i 7 

Death I 

Gain 6 

Membership March 31, 1911 122 

The Nebraska Society has organized the Ethan Allen Chapter at 
Omaha, and it is proposed to establish Chapters at Lincoln and Fremont 
during the next year. 

The Board of Managers is preparing for an active campaign in 191 1, 
looking to the increase of membership of the Society, beginning with 
the distribution of a news letter to all the newspapers of the State, and 
thereby giving publicity to the scope and intentions of the Society ana 
all necessarv information to those eligible. 

Edwin O. Halstead. Secretary. 



k 



9 — SR 



130 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

NEVADA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 18 

New members 4 

Membership March 31, 191 1 22 

NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1910 281 

New members i ^ 

Deaths 6, resigned 5, dropped 8. demitted i . . . . 20 

Loss 7 

Membership March 31. 191 1 274 

The Society held its annual meeting for 1910 on July 12. when there 
was delivered an address by William Elliot Griffis, D. D.. L. H. D.. on 
"The New Hampshire Brigade in the Sullivan Campaign of 1779," 
which has been published by the Society. Doctor Griffis reviewed the 
deeds of the three New Hampshire regiments that formed a part of 
Sullivan's army in "the great march through the western wilderness, 
which virtually destroyed the Iroquois Confederacy, opening the path 
of civilization westward, and, by putting an end to the flank and rear 
attacks by savages on our settlements along the long frontier, made 
Yorktown possible." It was the battle at Newtown, New York, on 
August 29, 1779, that paralyzed the Indian Confederacy, so that it never 
was again a powerful factor in international politics and war. Doctor 
Griffis concluded his address by calling upon the people of New Hamp- 
shire "to rear on the Newtown battlefield some durable token of their 
appreciation of the services of these brave Continentals, who bore them- 
selves so nobly in one of the most decisive battles of the American 
Revolution." 

The annual meeting for 1911 was held on April 20, when officers were 
elected for the year. 

NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

Membership April r, 1910 558 

New members 47, transferred i, reinstated 4... 52 
Deaths 17, resigned 8, demitted 3, dropped i . . . . 29 

Gain 23 

Membership March 31, 191 1 581 

The aim of the New Jersey Society during the past year has been to 
bring before the public the objects of the Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, to increase the spirit of patriotism in our State, 
to arouse the interest of those eligible for membership, and the en- 
lightenment of foreigners as to American principles. 

The first event was the celebration of the Anniversary of the Battle 
of Springfield, N. J., on June 23, 1910. at the Revolutionary Cemetery in 
Springfield, conveyed to the New Jersey Society some years ago. The 
public school children of Springfield took part in the exercises, and 
raised the flag on the newly-erected flagstaff. The oration delivered by 
Rev. William M. Lawrence on this occasion was most eloquent. Ar- 
rangements have been made for the proper care of the plot and the dis- 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. I31 

play of the Stars and Stripes on holidays and prominent anniversaries 
in our national history. 

Early in the fall our Year Book for 1910 was completed and dis- 
tributed. Among the most interesting items in the book are a roll of 
the members with their genealogical record, information regarding the 
monuments and tablets erected in recent years, either by our Society or 
through the efforts of our members, a chronological list of the battles 
and other events of the Revolution, and a report made by our Historian 
on the Signers of the Declaration of Independence from New Jersey, 
with illustrations. This report was made in accordance with the recom- 
mendation offered by the Memorial Committee at the Toledo Congress. 

On October 18, 1910, on invitation of the Society of Colonial Wars in 
New Jersey, our Society took part with other patriotic societies in the 
celebration of the 250th Anniversary of the First White Settlement in 
New Jersey. 

An illustrated lecture was given under the auspices of the Society on 
November 18, 1910, by William Elliot Griffis. D. D.. L. H. D., on "Sul- 
livan's Expedition against the Indians, A. D. 1779," whicli was well 
attended. 

Considerable interest was evinced by both the State Society and the 
Chapters in the matter of the John Paul Jones crypt, and we did our 
part in the effort made by the S. A. R. Societies to secure the appropria- 
tion by Congress for this purpose, by memorializing the Senators and 
members of Congress from New Jersey. 

At the annual meeting, held January 3, 191 1, the anniversary of the 
Battle of Princeton, President General Marble addressed the Society, 
and the reports of the officers showed activity and progress. The in- 
crease in membership, while not as large as the previous year, was very 
encouraging. As a result of the investigation made by the Historian, 
already referred to in connection with the Year Book, it was found that 
the graves of two of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence 
from New Jersey, namely, Richard Stockton and Francis Hopkinson, 
were unmarked, and at this meeting our Committee on Monuments and 
Memorials was requested to take action looking to the marking of the 
graves of these Signers. 

Much interest has been taken in the work among our foreign popula- 
tion. About 1,500 copies of the leaflet No. i, "The United States, Its 
Opportunities, Government and Institutions," have been given out for 
distribution. One of our members, Rev. M. S. Waters, told at this 
meeting of his work among these people in the night schools of the 
City of Newark. The Board of Managers are now considering the 
publication of a book" for the education of foreigners in American his- 
tory and principles. 

On February 25, 191 1, a banquet was given at Newark in memory of 
the birth of General George Washington, with an attendance of about 
one hundred and fifty members and friends. Stirring and patriotic 
addresses were delivered by Rev. B. Canfield Jones, D. D., on "Wash- 
ington and Lincoln as Guides for Today," and Rev. Dr. Wilham F. 
Whitaker, on "Washington's Worth." The addition of a number of 
new members was one of the results of this most enjoyable gathering. 

An illustrated lecture bv Franklin Matthews, correspondent of the New 
York Sun, on "Around the World with the Atlantic Fleet," was given 
under the auspices of the Society on March 15, 191 1, and a large audi- 
ence thoroughly enjoved the lecture. 

Our Chapters have' also been active, and the more prominent features 
of their work mav be summarized as follows : 

Elizabethtown Chapter has been working for the marking of alt his- 
torical roads and points of interest in Union County, and is plannmg 
further work along these lines. They are also v.-orking for an increase 
in membership. 



132 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOEUTIOX. 

Orange Chapter observed the anniversary of the Battle of Lexington. 
April 19, 1910, by a religious service, and Flag Dav, June 14, igio.'^with 
exercises and an address by Rev. Ferdinand Q. Blanchard. The Chapter 
also took part in the parade at Orange on Independence Day, 1910. At 
the regular meetings of the Chapter various speakers presented patriotic 
themes of both the past and present. 

Montclair Chapter has held a number of meetings, among which was 
a memorial service in x\pril. 1910, the celebration of Independence Day, 
and the annual meeting of the Chapter on Januarv 10, 191 1, all of which 
were of a highly patriotic order. The especial work of the Chapter has 
been "a campaign of enlightenment along patriotic lines" among the 
foreign population of Montclair. A large quantity of the leaflets on 
"Information for Immigrants" has been distributed, and illustrated 
lectures on helpful subjects have been given. 

John R. Weeks, Secretary. 

NEW MEXICO SOCIETY. 

Membership April i. 1910 39 

New members 6, transfer t 7 



Gain 



/ 



Membership ]\Iarch 31, 1911 46 

The New Mexico Society is adding to its membership, and I believe 
that the present year will show an increase of at least fifteen members. 
The Society has an important duty before it in the Territory of New 
Mexico this year. It is our hope that the constitution recently ratified 
by a very large popular majority will be approved by Congress at its 
present session, and that New Mexico will be admitted as a State into 
the Union. A national engagement was made at the time this domain 
was acquired from the Republic of Mexico that a State to be known as 
"New Mexico" should be admitted into the Union at the earliest prac- 
ticable day. The fulfillment of this pledge was repeatedly deferred 
until the enactment of the enabling statute of Congress providing for 
the drafting of constitutions by the Territories of New Mexico and 
Arizona in June. 1910. We anticipate a very large influx of population 
to this Territory as soon as the President issues a proclamation declar- 
ing that the proposed constitution has been approved ; and it is reason- 
able to predict that a considerable per cent of the new population will 
be immigrants from foreign countries. The principles of public liberty 
as regulated by law must be taught to these people. The Society is 
called upon to make a special efifort to the accomplishment of this end. 
Our native people here are well instructed in the essential principles of 
free government. This is especially noticeable by repeated manifesta- 
tions of their interest in public affairs. As citizens, jurors and members 
of civil society they have demonstrated their attachment to free institu- 
tions, and are' guided by that circumspection essential to their preserva- 
tion. The school houses of this Territory all exhibit the splendid deco- 
ration expressed by the Stars and Stripes. The New Mexico Society 
will appreciate suggestions from the National Society _ which tend to 
promote patriotism among our people and which will uplift the standard 
of our citizenship. 

George S. Klock, President. 

Albuquerque, April 19. 191 1. 



PROCEEDIXGS OF LOUISVILLE COXGRESS. I33 

(NEW YORK.) 

EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 i,35r 

New members 103, transfers 8, reinstated 8. . . 119 
Death 30, resigned 33, demitted 12, dropped 28 102 



Gain 



17 



Membership March 31, 1911 1,368 

Of the total membership 1,338 are active, 25 inactive, and 5 honorary. 

Necessarily the report of the Secretary of a Society of this kind will 
be of the same general character each year, the only difference being in 
the figures and some minor points. 

We have held during the past year our three stated meetings, and the 
usual number of those of the Board of Managers. 

The annual election of officers took place April 19, 1910, at which 
time Mr. John H. Burroughs was chosen President in place of Hon. 
C. A. Pugsley; Mr. Louis Annin Ames, first Vice-President in place of 
Mr. Richard T. Davies, and Capt. Chas. A. Du Bois, Secretary in place 
of Mr. Ames. Mr. Cresswell Maclaughlin addressed the compatriots 
upon the duties of citizenship, especially in their relation to the Sons of 
the American Revolution. 

The twenty-first Annual Congress of the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution was held at Toledo, Ohio, on April 
30, May 2 and 3, 1910, at which we had twenty delegates. Our former 
President. Mr. William A. Marble, was elected President General, and 
our President, Mr. Burroughs, Treasurer General. 

The usual Year Book of the Society was published and a copy mailed 
to each member. 

During the year our President has visited a number of the Chapters 
throughout the State, and this has tended to increase the interest among 
the out-of-town members : he proposes to visit other Chapters during the 
coming year. 

At the meeting held October 18, 1910, Mr. William E. Pulsifer read a 
very interesting paper on Daniel Webster. 

(Dn June 14. 1910, our President, with several of the compatriots, at- 
tended the ceremonies of the unveiling of the monument marking the 
birthplace of the State of New York at White Plains, N. Y. 

A committee pf our compatriots was appointed by the Mayor of the 
City of New York to attend the celebration of a "Sane and Safe Fourth 
of July." composed of William A. Marble, Hon. C. A. Pugsley. John H. 
Burroughs. Louis Annin Ames, James de la Montanye. John De W. 
Mowris and others. 

On the Fourth of July the ceremony of decorating the grave of 
Lafayette took place in Paris, France. Compatriot Hanson C. Coxe was 
in charge and made the address; Compatriot William E. IMarble also 
made a few remarks. It is proposed that similar ceremonies shall take 
place each year, and those compatriots that can so arrange their visit to 
Paris are requested to report to Compatriot Coxe at the L^. S. Embassy 
and take part. 

Our annual banquet, which took place at the Waldorf-Astoria on the 
evening of the 19th of November, was the most successful of any yet 
held. 

During the past year we have assisted the Huntmgton Chapter m 
marking the graves of Revolutionary soldiers located in that vicmity. 
Our annual church service was held on February 19, at the Calvary 



134 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, the sermon being preached by its Pastor 
and our Chaplain, Dr. Charles L. Goodell. 

At the meeting of the Society held at the Hotel Astor on February 
21, 191 1, Compatriot Norman P. Heffley gave us his illustrated lecture, 
"Siberia, Russia, and the Islands of the Arctic," which was received with 
much enthusiasm by the compatriots and their friends. 

At the request of the Newburgh Chapter the Society has presented to 
the "Broadway Grammar School," of Newburgh, a plaster bust of 
Washington. At the ceremony of presentation President Burroughs 
made the speech. We have also presented portraits of Washington to 
the Public School of Long Lake, N. Y. ; High School at Johnstown, 
N. Y. ; High School at Canisto, N. Y. ; Lenox Ave. Collegiate Church, 
New York City, and the Silver Bay Association, Lake George, N. Y. 

The protest against the use of the sites of Forts Clinton and Mont- 
gomery being used as a site for a State Prison, made by this Society 
and others, I am pleased to say. was effectual, and the prison will be 
built elsewhere. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. a. Du Bois, Secretary. 

NORTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 
^Membership March 31, 1911 31 

The North Carolina Society was organized at Washington, N. C, on 
the afternoon of February 22, 191 1. There were present Dr. J. C. 
Rodman, L. D. Bonner, R. T. Bonner, F. H. von Eberstein, Lyndon Y. 
Shaw, Frank C. Kugler, W. B. Harding, Dr. John G. Blount. Jr., 
John A. Weddell, Sr., E. W. Myers, R. L. M. Bonner, B. T. Bonner, 
Dr. H. i\L Bonner, and Stephen C. Bragaw. Mr. Bragaw was made 
temporary Chairman and Mr. Shaw temporary Secretary. Mr. Bragaw 
explained the purposes of the meeting and the objects of the Society. 
A constitution and by-laws were read and adopted, and the following 
officers were elected : President, Hon. Stephen C. Bragaw, Washington ; 
Vice-President, Mr. John A. Weddell, Tarboro ; Secretary-Registrar, 
Mr. R. T. Bonner. Aurora ; Treasurer, Dr. John C. Rodman, Washing- 
ton ; Historian, ]\Ir. E. W. Myers, Greensboro; Chaplain, Dr. H. M. 
Bonner, Newbern. 

The Society starts with thirty members, brought together through 
energetic work by Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N., chairman of 
the Organization Committee, South, and Mr. R. T. Bonner, of Aurora, 
N. C. 

NORTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 
Membership March 31, 191 1 23, 

The North Dakota Society was organized at the Gardner Hotel, 
Fargo, North Dakota, on Saturday evening, February 4, under the per- 
sonal direction of Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer, chairman of Committee on 
Organization in North and West ; Mr. Frank M. Keezer, secretary of 
the committee, and Mr. Joseph F. Tuttle, Jr., all of Denver, Colo. 

The following officers were elected : President, Hon. Burleigh F. 
Spalding, Judge of the Supreme Court of North Dakota (address, Bis- 
marck or Fargo) ; First Vice-President, Charles M. Cooley, of Grand 
Forks ; Second Vice-President, J. L. Bell, of Bismarck ; Secretary and 
Registrar, H. C. Fish, of Bismarck ; Treasurer, Gen. A. P. Peake, of 
Valley City ; Chaplain, R. A. Beard. D. D., of Fargo. After the busi- 
ness meeting was concluded the new Society members and the visitors 
enjoyed a banquet, which was given in the hotel. There were several 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. I35 

addresses made by the. organizing officers as well as by nearly all the 
local members, and a pleasant evening was spent. 

Sunday evening, at the First Congregational Church, Mr. Tuttle de- 
livered a lecture on John Paul Jones, the first American Admiral. 
Sunday morning, in the First Presbyterian Church, at the opening of 
Sunday school. Doctor Guyer gave a talk on Sunday-school work and 
patriotism. 

OHIO SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 4-3 

New members 55, transfers 5 60 

Deaths 5 

Gain • 55 

Membership March 31, 191 1 528 

The Ohio Society showed increased activity during the year as a re- 
sult of the holding of the Annual Congress of the National Society at 
Toledo. Much patriotic work is carried on through the Chapters at 
Youngstown, Toledo, Cleveland, and Columbus. The twenty-second 
annual meeting was held on April 10, 1911. 

A committee was appointed to publish the names of all known sol- 
diers of the Revolutionary War who are buried in Ohio. More than 
1,200 are said to be buried in the State, and of this number the graves 
of 250 have been located by Henry R. Baldwin, of Youngstown, who 
worked under the direction of former President Butler. Mr. Butler is 
planning to purchase the ancestral home of the Washington family in 
England. 

The Society has also decided to furnish a room in the birthplace of 
Rufus Putnam, at Rutland, Mass., now commemorated by a national 
park, with Ohio relics, taken from Putnam's later Ohio home. E. O. 
Randall, on behalf of the Ohio Archaeological Society, promised that 
organization's support. Judge John N. Van Deman, of Dayton, Presi- 
dent, acted as toastmaster at the twenty-second annual banquet at the 
Hartman Hotel, and President Butler delivered the address of welcome. 
Former Lieutenant Governor Francis W. Treadway was the speaker of 
the evening, his subject being "What the Revolution Means to Us." 

The Anthony Wayne Chapter, of Toledo, has issued a pamphlet giv- 
ing the names of officers, the constitution, reasons for membership, 
directions for looking up ancestry and for making out application 
papers, and a list of members of the Chapter. 

• OREGON SOCIETY. 

The Oregon Society admitted 14 new members during the year, and 
its active membership on March 31, 191 1, was iii. The annual business 
meeting and banquet was held at the University Club, Portland, on 
February 22, 191 1. Mr. D. W. Wakefield was chosen Vice-President: 
the other officers were re-elected. President Wallace McCamant paid a 
tribute to the memory of George Washington, but he did not excuse 
Washington's faults. 

The Society adopted a well-deserved tribute to the memory of Com- 
patriot George H. Williams, who died April 10, 1910, aged 87 years and 
II days. Judge Williams joined the Oregon Society in 1893 and was its 
President from 1899 to 1905. His career as a jurist and statesman was 
a notable one. In 1853 he was appointed Chief Justice of Oregon 
Territory. From 1866 to 1872 he was a member of the United States 
Senate, and was Attorney General in President Grant's Cabinet (see 
Offici.ai. Bulletin for March, 1911). 



136 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 573 

New members 40, transfers 3 43 

Deaths 6, resigned 2, demitted 5 13 

Gain 30 

Membership March 31, 191 1 603 

The Pennsylvania Society, with a view of arousing interest in its 
work, has inaugurated a series of informal gatherings of members and 
eligible guests. On May 25, 1910, there was a noonday luncheon at the 
Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburg, at which 49 members were present ; June 29, 
a noonday luncheon on the roof garden of the Lincoln Hotel, at which 
65 were present ; October 19, an evening dinner at the Monongahela 
House, at which 52 were present, and on Decem.ber 9 we had an evening 
dinner at the Monongahela House, at which 42 members were present. 
At each one of these meetings we had from three to six of our mem- 
bers make very interesting addresses, which were much appreciated by 
all present. 

The annual business meeting, followed by a dinner, was held on 
February 22, when addresses were made by Rev. George D. Adams, of 
the Philadelphia Chapter, on "Washington, the Unknown Man," and by 
Gen. Willis J. Hulings, on "The American Revolution." 

The Committee on Prevention of Desecration of the Flag was active 
during the year, as indicated by the following report : 

The duties of this committee consist exclusively in seeing to the 
enforcement of the act of the Legislature to prevent and punish the 
desecration of the Flag of the United States and of this State. 

As the existence of this law becomes better known it is the better 
observed. Any violations which do occur are usually just before the 
Fourth of July. 

During the last year we had the following infractions brought to 
our attention : 

First. There was an advertisement of a fireworks manufacturer, by 
a New York firm. The closing paragraph in their last letter says: "We 
thank you for calling our attention to this matter and assure yovi that 
no more of these circulars will be mailed or distributed in your State." 

Second. There was a very objectionable cut which appeared in our 
dailf papers. When the matter was brought to the attention of the 
local firm they replied that it was New York syndicate stuff, and that 
it would not be used again. They also thanked us for calling their 
attention to this matter. 

Third. The next violation was that of a local firm, which advertised 
union suits in a circular from which was a rather conspicuous American 
Flag. The)^ again closed their letter by thanking us for our kindness. 

These expressions are repeated when they occur, that all might see 
in general the respect for the law, its violation being caused by ignorance 
or thoughtlessness. 

The Butler fair advertised by little stick-pins, with a celluloid flag, 
on the reverse side of which was an "advertisement" of the fair. In 
my correspondence with the secretary of the Fair Association appears 
the following paragraph : 

"I have always thought it improper to print anything on our National 
emblem, and heartily approve of legislation to prevent its desecration. 
However. I do not believe the pin in question violates either the letter 
or spirit of the law, but am willing to submit the question to a com- 
mittee of fair-minded, impartial, patriotic citizens, and consider the 
Flag Committee of the Sons of the American Revolution such. Am 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 37 

willing that you consider the matter, and if you come to the conclusion 
that this pin desecrates the American Flag and violates the law, I will 
stop the distribution of the pin." 

As the time for the fair had arrived when this letter was received. 
I did not press the matter, but told him that I did not think his point 
well taken, and advised him not to use the pin further. 

This same pin was distributed during the visit of Roosevelt last fall, 
but was the advertisement of a foreign firm and nothing could be done 
about the matter. 

There have been no formal meetings of the conmiittee during the 
year. As most of the work of this committee must be done by the 
chairman, I would recommend that for the next year the chairman be 
from Philadelphia, as there must certainly be some violations of the 
law in so large a city, and.no matters have been brought to our atten- 
tion from that part of the State. 

RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 324 

New members 10 

Deaths 12, dropped i 13 

Loss 3 

Membership ]\Iarch 31. 191 1 321 

The Rhode Island Society on May 30 held its customary Memorial 
Day exercises at Hopkins Park, Providence, when large numbers of 
Italian school children and their parents paid honor to Commodore 
Esek Hopkins. President Frederic W. Easton, of the Rhode Island 
Society, presided and made the introductory address. The Declaration 
of Independence was read by Compatriot Amasa M.' Eaton, "Song for 
IMemorial Day" was rendered by the school pupils, and an address on 
the day was given by Mr. Rathbone Gardner. The pupils of the fifth 
grade gave the declamation. "Captain, O My Captain," in concert, after 
which a wreath was placed on the Hopkins statue. Prof. Alessandro 
G. Laurenzio followed with an address in Italian on "The Duty of 
Italians to Their Adopted Country." 

The Society's annual business session was held at noon on February 
22. 191 1, in the rooms of the Rhode Island Historical Society, Provi- 
dence. President Frederic W. Easton presided. The Secretary reported 
a present membership of 321. On motion of former Governor Charles 
Warren Lippitt, the Society voted to appropriate $100 for the General 
Greene Memorial Association. Hon. Charles Dean Kimball, former 
Governor of Rhode Island, was elected President of the Society for 
the ensuing year, and Mr. Joseph Balch Vice-President. The other 
officers were re-elected. 

The annual banquet was held at Talma Theater during the evening. 
Among the guests were the Varnvim Continentals, of East Greenwich, 
in blue and white uniforms, as worn by the Rhode Island Line in the 
Revolution. The order of exercises included an introductory address 
by Hon. Frederic Willard Easton. President of the Society: toast, "The 
State of Rhode Island," Hon. Zenas W. Bliss, Lieutenant Governor: 
toast, "The City of Providence," Hon. Henry Fletcher, mayor; histori- 
cal address, "The Perfidy of Lee," Col. Robert Perkins Brown, Hi.*^- 
torian of the Society: address, Rev. William H. P. Faunce. Presiden*^ 
of Brown University; poem, John Prescott F'arnsworth, Esq., Poet of 
the Society: address, Hon. Le Baron Bradford Colt. Judge of the 
United States Circuit Court: address, John R. Ratlmm, Esq., Providence 
Journal: address, "Our Own Dear Lard." Prof. Wilfred Harold Munro. 



138 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

SOUTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

Membership March 31. 191 1 18 

The South Carolina Society was organized on March 22, at Green- 
ville, with nineteen qualified members, and several applicants were pre- 
paring their final papers for admission. Commander John H. Moore, 
U. S. N., chairman of the Committee on Organization in the South, was 
present and urged them to put forward every effort to build up a strong 
Society in South Carolina from the descendants of patriots who fought 
at Kings Mountain and on other historic battlefields of the southern 
campaign during the Revolution. The following ofticers were elected : 
President, Paul Trapier Hayne, of Greenville; Vice-President, Oscar 
K. Mauldin, of Greenville; Secretary, David Arnold Henning, of 
Greenville, and Registrar, John E. Black, of Columbia. 

SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

Membership March 31, 191 1 16 

The South Dakota Society was permanently organized at Sioux Falls 
March 27 with the following officers: R. J. Wells, President; F. M. 
Mills, Vice-President; T. W. Dwight, Secretary and Registrar; B. H. 
Requa, Treasurer; Lucius Kingsbury, Chaplain, and C. O. Bailey, His- 
torian. A preliminary meeting for organization had been held on 
January 31, under the direction of the Committee on Organization in 
the North and West. 

TEXAS SOCIETY. 

Membership April i. 1910 /i 

New members 3 

Membership March 31, 191 1 74 

The annual meeting, held at Houston, Texas, on Washington's Birth- 
day, Wednesday, February 22, 191 1, was fairly well attended, and at 
this meeting it was unanimously agreed that the best interest and future 
growth of the Texas Society demanded that the place of holding the 
annual meeting should change from year to year, being held each year 
in a different city; and it was also agreed that the three principal offi- 
cers should be elected from the members residing in the place of next 
meeting. Thereupon Austin was selected as such place, and the Presi- 
dent, Secretary, and Treasurer were elected from Austin. 

The business meeting was held from 10 a. m. to noon, and in the 
afterfioon the Lady Washington Chapter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution, gave a reception to the Texas Society at the Country Club. 

The annual dinner was held at the Rice Hotel, at which the officers 
of the Lady Washington Chapter, D. A. R.. were the honored guests of 
the Texas Society, and after the dinner the Sons and Daughters at- 
tended a box party at the ]\Iajestic Theater. 

It is believed that the general effect of our meeting this year was to 
awaken a great spirit of enthusiasm for the work of the coming year, 
and it is hoped that the system of shifting the place of meeting to a 
different city each year will greatly increase our membership within the 
next five years. 

John Charles Harris, Secretary. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONXRESS. I39 

UTAH SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 7q 

New members 7, transfer i 8 

Demitted 3, dropped 12 15 

Loss J 

Membership March 31, 191 1 72 

Our work has been of a general nature. We have given the accus- 
tomed medal on Washington's Birthday to the high-school cadet de- 
livering the best oration on a patriotic subject. 

Our annual dinner was held at the University Club on February 28, 
and was a successful feature. 

C. P. OvERFiELD, Secretary. 

VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 67 

New members 3 

Deaths 2 

Gain i 

Membership March 31, 191 1 68 

WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910. 216 

New members 8, transfer i, reinstated 1 10 

Deaths 4, dropped 17 21 

Loss II 

Membership March 31, 1911 205 

Last year the Washington Society reported that in all probability new 
Chapters would be formed within the year at North Yakima, Olympia 
and several other cities in the State. We beg to report that so far we 
have been unable to establish any new Chapters, although having 
worked on it during the past year. It now looks as if we will be able 
to accomplish something this year. 

The State Society has admitted nine new members during the year, 
one of these being received upon demit from another State and eight 
upon original application. Four members have died and seventeen have 
been officially dropped from rolls for non-payment of dues. The ma- 
jority of those eliminated from the rolls have moved out of the State. 

The annual meeting and election was held at Tacoma on the after- 
noon of February 22. 

WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1910 187 

New members 4 

Membership March 31. 191 1 iQi 



140 SOXS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WYOMING SOCIETY. 

Membership April i. 1910 33 

New members 2 

Dropped 2, demitted i 3 

Loss I 

Membership March 31, 191 1 32 

The Wyoming Society gave a banquet at the Inter-Ocean Hotel, 
Cheyenne,' on March 19, when Gen. Irving Hale. Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer. 
Howard T. Vaille, and Dr. Joseph H. Tuttle, of Denver, were guests of 
the evening, two of these gentlemen having assisted in the organization 
of the Wyoming Society three years ago. 

NATIONAL PEACE CONGRESS. 

The President Gener.\l: The Chair takes pleasure in recognizing 
ex-President General Greeley, who has a matter that he wishes to call 
to the attention of the Society. 

General GrEELEy: IMr. President General, as is probably well known 
to you, there is in session in Baltimore the Third National Peace Con- 
gress, and it has occurred to some of our members that it would be 
well for us to recognize that body and extend to it our greeting and 
sympathy, and in view of that fact a resolution has been prepared, 
which I will present to you for your consideration. 

"The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, in 
Congress assembled at Louisville, Ky., desire to extend their most 
hearty greetings to the National Peace Congress assembled at Balti- 
more. Standing under the folds of 'Old Glory,' we pledge with you 
greater loyalty to the government under whose banner it is our privilege 
to live, and assure you of our deepest interest in the movement to 
establish universal peace by arbitration." 

I move, Mr. President, that this be sent to our compatriot, Wardner 
Williams, who is a delegate from the State of Colorado to that con- 
vention. He leaves today, and will be there to attend that Congress. 

(This motion was seconded by Judge Hancock and several other 
members.) 

The President General: Is there any discussion of this question? 
Is there any one who would like to be heard on this proposition? 

(There were calls of "Question I" and the motion was adopted unani- 
mously.) 

INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION. 

Mr. PugslEy: Mr. President General, I am sure we all listened with 
great interest yesterday to the most admirable sermon on International 
Arbitration, by Dr. McCready, at the Cathedral : and I believe there 
has been one act of polic}-^ by President Taft that has met with uni- 
versal approbation, and that is his efforts on behalf of international 
arbitration. And so it would seem eminently fitting, just at this time. 



r 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. I4I 

in connection with what ex-President General Greeley has just pre- 
sented, that we should also pass a resolution thanking the President of 
the United States for his efforts along this line. There is iron in the 
blood of the Sons of the American Revolution, but I believe we want to 
keep step with the thought and vision of the age, and that thought and 
vision look towards the settling of our differences by arbitration, rather 
than by the sword. (Calls of "Good!" and applause.) 

Therefore it gives me pleasure to move that the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, in Congress assembled at Louisville, upon this day, 
heartily thank the President of the United States for his wise action 
looking towards international arbitration. 

General GrEELEY : I would like to say a word in regard to that mat- 
ter. The President of the United States will open the Peace Congress 
at Baltimore. Ex-President General Pugsley is most deeply interested 
in this work, and he is not only entitled to the gratitude of this Na- 
tional Society, but of the world, for the work he has done. (Applause.) 

(The motion of Mr. Pugsley was put to a vote and carried.) 

The following telegram, prepared by Mr. Pugsley, was sent to Presi- 
dent Taft : 

Hon. William H. Taft, 

President of the United States, Washington, D. C: 
The following resolution was this day adopted : The National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, in Congress assembled at 
Louisville, most heartily commends the President of the L^nited States 
for his splendid work and wise efforts in the interests of international 
arbitration. 

William A. Marble, 

President General. 

CHANGE OF DATE OF CONGRESS. 

The President General: I think the time has arrived now when it 
is best for us to adjourn for the day. We have finished all the routine 
work, and we can begin tomorrow morning on new business. I am 
ready to entertain a motion to that effect. 

(Colonel Guthrie so moved, and there were several seconds to his 
motion.) 

Judge BeardslEy : Mr. President General, we have before us the 
question of an amendment to our Constitution, so as to change the 
time for holding our Annual Congress ; and, if the gentleman will 
withdraw for the moment his motion to adjourn, we can dispose of 
that matter at this time. 

The President General: I think we are all agreed on that, and I 
would like to get it out of the way, if possible. I thank Judge Beards- 
ley for calling my attention to the matter. The Secretary General will 
now read the proposed changes in the Constitution in regard to the time 
of holding our Annual Congress, and will follow that by a resolution, 
which has been approved by the Executive Committee and the Board of 
Trustees. 



142 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Secretary General : The motion is to amend Article VII — 
Section i of Article VII of the Constitution — by striking out the words 
"on the thirtieth day of April or on the first day of May," and inserting 
in lieu thereof "on the third Monday of May," so that as amended that 
section of the Constitution will read : 

"The Annual Congress of the National Society for the election of 
the general officers and for the transaction of business shall be held on 
the third Monday of May in each year. The place of such meeting 
shall be designated by the Board of Trustees." 

Doctor Guyer: I move the adoption of that amendment. 

(Judge Beardsley and others seconded the motion.) 

The President General: Moved and seconded that the resolution be 
adopted as recommended by the Executive Committee and the Board of 
Trustees. 

(There were calls of "Question.") 

Judge Hancock : Before that is adopted, I would like to know the 
reason of the proposed change. 

Judge Beardsley: We have found the present meeting time some- 
what inconvenient in practice. In the first place, when the Congress 
meets on the first day of May it may have to meet on Saturday and 
then adjourn over until Monday, while if the first falls on Sunday we 
must have an adjournment until Monday. Then there are a great many 
of our members who are business men and are so situated that they 
find it almost impossible to leave home on the first day of the month, 
and they cannot attend our meeting. Another reason is that if the 
meeting time falls three weeks later in May, it assures us more pleasant 
weather. Our congresses have often been marred by bad weather, as 
you all know, and if we can meet a little later, when we can have more 
pleasant weather, it seems to me it will be a good thing. Besides, it 
will accommodate in a business way many of our members who cannot 
attend under the present arrangement, and I believe this plan will result 
in a much larger attendance. 

General GrEELEy: In confirmation of what Judge Beardsley has said, 
four members of our Connecticut Society are absent from this Congress 
because it came on the first day of the month. Their business is of 
such a character that it is impossible for them to leave home at this 
time, and I am sure that applies to many others. 

(There were calls of "Question.") 

The President General : All in favor of the change in the Constitu- 
tion as proposed — which has already been published, and submitted to 
various State Societies — please say "Aye." 

(Motion was carried unanimously.) 

Colonel Guthrie : Now I will renew my motion to adjourn until 10 
o'clock tomorrow morning. 

(Motion was duly carried.) 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVII^LE CONGRESS. I43 

Morning Session, May 2, 1911 — 10.15 a.m. 

The Congress was called to order by President General Marble. 

The President Gener.al : Compatriots, the first thing in the order of 
business this morning is the taking up of a proposed amendment to the 
Constitution. This was introduced before the Congress last year, and 1 
had the honor of introducing it. The amendment is as follows : 

"Amend Article III of the Constitution, entitled 'Membership,' by the 
insertion of a new Section 2, as follows : 'No one shall be entitled to 
membership in any State Society who has previously been a member of 
any other State Society and dropped for the non-payment of dues until 
the indebtedness of such individual to the first Society shall have been 
adjusted.' Renumber Sections 2 and 3 so as to make them Sections 
3 and 4." 

The President General: This amendment does not prevent any 
State Society from Hquidating its claim against any member before he 
leaves the Society on any basis that Society may see fit to adopt. Is 
there any discussion on this subject? 

(On motion made and seconded, the proposed amendment was adopted 
unanimously.) 

The President General : Before taking up the first regular order of 
business, I will call on the Rev. Mr. Halsey, of Arizona, who would 
like to be heard for a few moments. 

Doctor Halsey : Compatriots, it is with great pleasure that I bring 
you greetings from the Sons of the American Revolution of the Terri- 
tory that had the nerve and the patriotism to refuse Statehood until it 
had the right to her own star upon the Flag. (Applause.) I bring you 
greetings from men who are workers. It is our privilege there to 
have as earnest, faithful workers as can be found anywhere — our 
Governor, our Adjutant General, the Mayor of our city; that is th^ 
kind of men we have in our Society. We are growing, also; we have 
over fifty members now, which is a good percentage as compared with 
other Societies. I do not come direct from Arizona just at present, but 
I would have considered it worth coming from Arizona here to have 
heard the splendid s'peech of General Buckner yesterday, and the 
responses made thereto. (Applause.) We believe in the Flag in 
Arizona, too, and it was my privilege, as Chairman of the Flag Com- 
mittee, to draft the bill for such a law and aid in carrying it through 
the Legislature. And we believe in enforcing the law in Arizona, and 
we have had cases in the court at Phoenix against parties who infracted 
that law. It may be interesting to you to know that the first flag put 
out in Cuba was a flag given by the ladies of Phoenix to the Rough 
Riders. When our star glitters on the Flag— as was so eloquently stated 
yesterday by General Buckner— all we want as Arizonians is to be 
received by our sister States with as kingly cordiality and as queenly 
courtesy as the members of this Congress have been received by the 
Sons and Daughters of Kentucky in Louisville. (Applause.) 

The President General: The Chair will recognize ^Ir. Samuel D. 
Hublev, of Pennsvlvania. 



144 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REV^OLUTION. 

Mr. Hubi.ey: I just want to make a suggestion I think may be of 
benefit to man.v of the State Societies. In Pennsylvania two years ago 
we inaugurated what we called a "Noonday Luncheon."' For several 
years we only met on the 22d of February, for the election of officers 
and an annual banquet, but that did not give much opportunity for 
bringing the members into closer personal acquaintance. Then we made 
arrangements with different hotels for a 50-cent meal, which lasted an 
hour, and at which w^e would have three-minute talks. Finally it grew 
into a six o'clock dinner, at 75 cents, and we would meet at six and 
stay until ten — and I expect Colonel Guthrie and some others of our 
Pennsylvania people will tell you it was hard to get all of them away 
at ten o'clock. (Laughter.) I want to suggest this as a good idea, a 
good move, to get your people personally and better acquainted. 

The President General : The suggestion is a very welcome one. 
The Chair will now recognize Judge Hancock, of Pennsylvania, who 
has a report to make. 

RETURN OF CERTIFICATES. 

Judge Hancock : Gentlemen, I have here the report of the com- 
mittee appointed yesterday with reference to an amendment of the 
By-laws and change in the form of certificate, where persons have 
dropped their membership for non-payment of dues. The report of 
your committee is as follows : 

"To the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution : 

"Your committee appointed to consider and report upon the legality 
and propriety of the following resolution, to-wit : 'That a clause be 
inserted in the application for membership and incorporated in the 
certificate granted thereunder, by which, when the recipient of the cer- 
tificate shall not pay his membership, he shall surrender his certificate, 
unless his membership shall cease by reason of death or actual dis- 
ability, to be determined b}- the Society of which he is a member.' 
unanimously report in favor of its adoption by the Congress, and that 
the Board of Trustees be directed to carry it into effect." 

James D. Hancock, Chairman. 

A. Howard Clark. 

C. A. Pl'GSley. 

Now. this matter needs some little explanation. In the first place, by 
putting this provision in the application, and afterwards in the certifi- 
cate, it becomes a contract, which can be enforced at law in any court 
ft.t the same time it is hoped that in a body of men like the Sons of the 
American Revolution it will never be necessary to enforce the law; it 
is hoped that, as honorable men. they will never want to hold a cer- 
tificate staring them in the face which they know is a sham and a fraud. 
Yet, I have heard of a case from an adjoining State — and it is probably 
true of all the States — where a man became a member of our Society 
and the Secretary paid for his certificate, and he not only never reim- 
bursed the Secretary, but never paid any of his annual dues until quite 
a sum had run up against him, the amount due on account of his mem- 



PROCKEDINGS OF I^OUISVILLK CONGRESS. 



145 



bership having meantime been paid by his State Society to the National 
Society. The adoption of this report will stop that ; and still it will be 
left, as you will see here, in the power of the State Societies to enforce 
these provisions. If the State Society finds that the dues have not been 
paid on account of actual disability, that ends it. If, on the other hand, 
the State Society finds that there is no actual disability, but that the 
purpose is to get the benefit of affiliation with the Society without paying 
for it, it is authorized to act. If their verdict is against him, they can 
call upon him to return the certificate which he has, and he will not 
only be bound in honor, but if necessary he can be compelled to do it 
under the law. That is all I have to say. (Applause.) 

The President General : Gentlemen, you have heard the report of 
your committee. What is your pleasure? 

Judge Hancock : In further explanation of our action I will say 
that we wanted to make this resolution as simple as possible, and to do 
but one thing. If it should become necessary hereafter, it can be 
amended to cover other points. 

(After some further discussion and explanation of the report of the 
committee, it was unanimously adopted.) 

VOTES OF THANKS. 

The President General: We will now hear from Mr. Pugsley, the 
chairman of the Committee on Resolution of Thanks to Congressman 
Loud. 

Mr. Pugsley : The committee recommend the adoption of the follow- 
ing resolution : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Congress be tendered to our cow- 
patriot, the Hon. George A. Loud, Representative from Michigan in the 
Congress of the United States, for his patriotic service in securing an 
appropriation to cover the funeral expenses incident to the honorable 
interment at Annapolis, Maryland, of the body of John Paul Jones, the 
peerless naval hero of the War of the Revolution. 

The President General: Gentlemen, you have heard the report of 
your committee. What is your pleasure? 

General GrEELEy : I move the adoption of the report. 

The President General: The Chair would like to ask to have that 
resolution engrossed and sent to Congressman Loud. 

General GrEELEy: I accept that suggestion. 

(The motion was so put and carried.) 

The President General: Admiral Baird will read resolutions of 
thanks to Senators Bacon and Lodge, as a member of the committee 
appointed at Monday morning's session. 

Rear Admiral Baird: Your committee recommend the adoption of 
the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Congress be tendered to United 
States Senator Augustus O. Bacon, of Georgia, for his patriotic service 
in securing the passage by the Senate of an appropriation to provide for 
a memorial to Thomas Jefferson. 
10 — SR 



146 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOIvUTlON. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Congress be tendered to our com- 
patriot, United States Senator Henrj^ Cabot Lodge, of Massachusetts, 
for his patriotic service in securing the passage by the Senate of an 
appropriation to provide for a memorial to Alexander Hamilton, to be 
erected in the city of Washington. 

(Motion made and seconded that these resolutions be adopted, and 
likewise engrossed and sent to Senators Bacon and Lodge. Carried.). 

The President General : I will now ask the Secretary General to 
read a telegram received by me this morning from the Florida Society. 

Pensacola, Fla., May i, 191 1. 
W. A. Marble, President, 

Natio7tal Society, S. A. R., Seelhach Hotel, Louisville, Ky.: 

The Florida Society send greetings to our compatriots and report 
that although still small, we now have largest membership in Society's 
history. I earnestly request that compatriots who have relations or 
friends in Florida who are eligible for membership will write me their 
names, so that I may send them a personal invitation to join Florida 
Society, S. A. R. 

John H. Cross, President. 

The President General: The Chair would suggest, if it meets with 
the approval of the Congress, that a return telegram be sent the Presi- 
dent of the Florida Society. 

(This suggestion was adopted, on motion of Mr. Dewey.) 
The President General : We have now completed all the routine 
business on the table, and are in a receptive mood for new business. 

PUBLICATION OF RECORDS OF THE REVOLUTION. 

Mr. Steele, of Buffalo : Mr. President General, yesterday I men- 
tioned the fact that I would bring up a resolution in regard to the 
classification and printing of records in Washington. This resolution 
was presented to us by that remarkable and wonderful Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution in Buffalo, consisting of nearly 
700 members, presided over by a Regent whom most of you know 
personally. Mrs. John Miller Horton presented a similar resolution at 
the Continental Congress of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
recently held in Washington. This resolution was presented in this 
form, after conforming to suggestions made by Compatriot Alexander, 
former member of Congress, and Chairman of the Rivers and Harbors 
Committee. Mr. Alexander is not now in the House, but he is deeply 
interested in this matter, and is a member of the Buffalo Chapter. He 
thinks this can be carried through. I doubt whether it can be carried 
through in the exact way I have the resolution here, from what I heard 
from Mr. Clark yesterday, but I think it would be all right to pass this 
resolution at this time. I will read the resolution: 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. I47 

Preambles and Resolutions Relative to the Publication by the United 
States Government of Pension Records, etc., Recommended for 
Adoption by the Twenty-second Annual Congress of the National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

Whereas all persons engaged in genealogical research find great diffi- 
culty in procuring copies from the government of records of pensions, 
land grants, and land rights of soldiers and sailors who have seen 
service under the United States government ; and 

Whereas the members of patriotic societies particularly find it diffi- 
cult to procure these records in anything like the number or promptness 
which they desire for the correct and proper proof of service ; and 

Whereas the United States government departments of State, War, 
and Navy, and Interior are the only places wherein a copy of these 
records may be obtained ; and 

Whereas there has never been published by the government anything 
more than a mere list of the names of those who have received pensions 
for their service, and this list is now out of print and is most difficult 
of access; and 

Whereas the publication by the government of all such records 
would be of the utmost value, not only to all persons engaged in genea- 
logical and historical research, but as a means of preservation for the 
records themselves, which might otherwise easily be destroyed by fire 
or lost : therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this organization of the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, in Congress assembled, do hereby petition 
the government of the United States to publish in full all records of 
pensions, land grants, land rights, or other records of service which 
may be in existence for all soldiers prior to the Mexican War ; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That all State Societies of the National Society, Sons of 
the American Revolution, be requested to endorse this project, and that 
individual members of this Society personally interview their congres- 
sional representatives upon this subject, and urge upon them the neces- 
sity and importance of such action by the government ; and be it further 

Resolved, That the President General of the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution appoint a committee for the purpose 
of presenting the matter of the publication of the aforesaid records to 
the government of the United States, said committee to ascertain 
through the proper channels the necessary amount of appropriation, and 
to petition the government, through the Committee on Appropriations 
of the House of Representatives, for the necessary funds and the 
publications of these Records. 

Mr. Steele (continuing) : I think there is very little to be said on 
this subject. As we all know, there was recently a terrible fire in 
Albany, which destroyed priceless records there. It did not turn out 
quite as bad as we feared, under the circumstances : but very valuable 
records were thrown ruthlessly out of the windows and destroyed — 
records that can never be replaced. And I believe if these records 
could be published by the United States government it would be a big 
thing. It will be a long, hard fight, but we can probably get it in the 
end. I move the adoption of the resolution. 

Colonel Kniffin : I may not have made myself as plain in my report 
of yesterday as I should have done, although I tried to do so. The 
records that are referred to here are historical and genealogical records. 
The Adjutant General has the records of all soldiers mustered in and 



148 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

mustered out; but the records I refer to are on the pension claims. I 
tried to make it plain yesterday that it is impossible to handle these 
claims but by the men engaged in that work. In taking these claims 
apart we look at all the papers, and we have a card something like that 
(indicating), about that size, on which we enter the soldier's name 
and the name of his widow, if he has one, and his service. Then down 
below we give a synopsis of his record, of his actual service, what war 
he was in — not every action, not every campaign in which he was 
engaged. Below that we give the names of all his children, and some- 
times there are a good many of them. People were not ashamed to 
have children in those days. (Laughter.) Sometimes they had 12 or 
13, and they are all there. That card must be completed from the 
claim, and cannot be handled any other way than as it is being handled. 
It is being handled by a corps of competent and industrious clerks. 
Now these claims have been rolled up and the dust of scores of years 
is on them. They are opened up very carefully and examined. Often- 
times there is a very large number of these papers, sometimes 15 or 20 
or 25. They contain priceless autographs — autographs that the collec- 
tor of historical matter would give a hundred thousand dollars for, if 
he could get them. They comprise the names of everybody that any- 
body ever heard of in connection with the Revolutionary War. When 
that card is completed this matter can be put into type; but nothing 
can be done until this information is carded, and that is going on as 
rapidly as can be done. It is entirely practicable to have the informa- 
tion from these records printed when that is done. 

(After some discussion the resolutions offered by Mr. Steele were 
referred to the Executive Committee for consideration and action.) 

MEMORIAL TO GENERAL HENRY LEE. 

Rear Admiral Baird : There are no delegates from Virginia here, but 
Kentucky was a part of Virginia once and I think we are on proper 
ground, and I want to offer the following resolution : 

Whereas the remains of Gen. Henry Lee ("Light Horse Harry 
Lee"), of Virginia, are now buried on Cumberland Island, off the coast 
of Georgia ; and 

Whereas General Lee was one of the most talented and capable 
soldiers of the Revolution, and was chosen to deliver the funeral oration 
over his commander-in-chief, using those famous words so familiar to 
every American boy and girl — "First in war, first in peace, and first in 
the hearts of his countrymen" : therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, assembled in Annual Congress at Louisville, request the 
Congress of the United States to take steps to remove to Virginia or 
Washington city all that remains of Light Horse Harry Lee, and to 
erect a mausoleum or some fitting monument as a memorial of his 
talents and sterling character for the benefit of future generations. 

The President General : Gentlemen, you have heard the resolution 
offered by Rear Admiral Baird, in the interest of the State of Virginia, 
upon a subject we are all interested in. What is your pleasure? 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE: CONGRESS. I49 

Mr. Kimball, of Rhode Island: I move that the resolution be re- 
ferred to the Executive Committee. My reason for doing that is this: 
When the resolutions v^rere originally brought to the attention of some 
of the members of this Congress the name of Major General Nathanael 
Greene was included, as it was supposed that his grave was also upon 
this island, and delegates from Rhode Island were directed to join in 
requesting this Congress to take action. It was altogether an error as 
to General Greene, as his remains are not on that island, and it is 
possible the same error may have taken place in regard to the grave of 
General Lee, since action looking to the removal of his remains has been 
taken by the University at Lexington, Virginia. So I think it would be 
better to have the Executive Committee investigate the facts and thus 
possibly save this Society from making a mistake, as it was about to do 
in regard to General Greene. I think we should have a committee to 
investigate and ascertain the facts in this matter, as the assumption 
here may be incorrect. I move to refer to the Executive Committee. 

(Motion seconded, and vote put on motion to refer to Executive 
Committee for investigation, and for such action as may seem best. 
Carried.) 

The President General: Is there anything else to come up under 
the head of "New Business"? 

INVITATIONS FOR CONGRESSES OF 1913 AND 1915. 

Mr. VandErcook : Mr. President General, Illinois had the second 
greatest gain in membership last year, and also we have come here with 
the second largest delegation, New York having the largest. We sim- 
ply desire to serve notice now that we will invite the National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution to meet in the city of Chicago 
on the third Monday in May, in 1913. (Applause.) 

The Secretary General: The California Society, through its Trus- 
tee, Mr. Mastick, who was unable to attend this Congress, has extended 
an invitation to the Congress of the National Society to meet in San 
Francisco in 1915. 

The President General: Gentlemen, what is your pleasure in regard 
to these invitations. I believe they should be referred to the Board of 
Trutees, in the usual course of business. 

SALE OF FLAGS AT POST OFFICES. 

Mr. Thruston Ballard: At the meeting of the Kentucky Society 
some months ago I had the honor of offering the following resolution 
upon the subject of placing small flags of the United States on sale at 
the diflPerent post-offices in the country : 

"Upon motion by Mr. S. Thruston Ballard, the National Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution is urgently requested to call upon 
the United States government authorities and request that small United 
States flags be placed on sale in all Federal buildings of the United 
States, in order that a patriotic spirit and love of country may be 



1,50 SONS 01* THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

engendered amongst the people of the country, and the corresponding 
respect and regard for the Flag be cultivated among all the citizens of 
the States." 

Mr. Charles Thruston Johnson, Secretary of the Kentucky Society, 
sent a copy of this resolution to the Secretary General on the date of its 
adoption, and this reply was received : 

Washington, D. C, December 5, 1910. 
Dear Sir and Compatriot : Referring to your letter of November 12, 
in regard to the sale of flags in all Federal buildings, the Executive 
Committee, at its meeting on November 19, found that the question was 
one that the Committee could not properly act upon, and suggested that 
it be brought to the attention of the Congress at Louisville. 
Very truly yours, 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

Mr. Ballard (continuing) : I simply wish to say to the members of 
the Congress assembled here that this is a question to which I have 
given a good deal of thought and a good deal of study. I have found 
that the European governments, in their endeavor to encourage a 
patriotic spirit, do it largely through their national flags. In many of 
the countries of Europe each little kingdom of sovereignty has its own 
national flag, and when they go into war each carries its own banner. 
And then they have their general national flag, of course. I am sure 
that the National Flag of our country, the flag under which we all 
merge, does a great deal to increase patriotic unity of thought and idea. 
Now, this resolution is merely a tentative one, and in offering it I can 
say that we hope it will be amended or improved by your Flag Com- 
mittee. We should be glad to see some action taken upon it by this 
Congress. The resolution we have prepared is as follows : 

Whereas the government of the United States of America has a 
beautiful flag, emblematic of the Union of the States; and 

Whereas this flag inspires patriotism wherever unfurled; and 

Whereas it is desirable that the youth of our country should have the 
love of country developed to the greatest extent : Be it 

Resolved, That the Sons of the American Revolution in Congress 
••assembled, do hereby memorialize the President of the United States to 
endeavor to have flags of this country sold at all of the post-offices ; be 
it further 

Resolved, That the President General of this Society appoint a com- 
mittee to present this resolution to the President of the United States 
and the proper committee of Congress. 

Mr. Curtis : I move the adoption of these resolutions. 
(Motion duly seconded and carried.) 

FACSIMILES OF DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

Mr. Wentworth, of Iowa : I regret very much that I was not present 
yesterday when the President General read his address. I want to say 
that the Iowa Society, on the 19th of April, voted an additional $50 for 



PROCEEDINGS OF louisvili^e; congress. 151 

the permanent fund. (Cries of "Good!" and applause.) We do not 
want our State to be surpassed by Vermont or any other State ; we want 
to be on an equality with the rest of the nation in this matter. The 
Iowa Society, in the endeavor to cultivate a patriotic spirit, has recom- 
mended that there be prepared, under the direction of the National 
Society, a facsimile of the Declaration of Independence and a photo- 
gravure copy of Trumbull's great picture of the Signing of the Declara- 
tion, that may be sold to State Societies for presentation to public 
schools and colleges throughout the country. We believe that the best 
way to inspire a patriotic spirit in the youth of the land is to place in 
our school-houses reproductions of such great historic documents and 
pictures as I have indicated. The Iowa Society would like to have this 
Annual Congress provide for pictures of that kind, with copies of the 
Declaration of Independence, with the insignia of the nation placed in 
the corner, bearing the stamp of genuineness, as it will, and place these 
on sale. Many compatriots could well afford to donate them to the 
schools of their respective communities. I offer this suggestion in 
order to bring this matter before the Congress. I move you, sir, that 
the National Society, or the Secretary General of the National Society, 
be instructed to inquire into the cost of procuring reproductions of this 
great picture of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence, taken 
from the original Trumbull picture, as also facsimiles of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, and report to the Board of Trustees, with power 
to act. 

(Motion duly seconded and carried.) 

(At this point Judge Beardsley moved to proceed with the election of 
officers of the Society for the ensuing year, but on the suggestion by 
Colonel Mack, Chairman of the Special Committee on Arrangements, 
that the committee had carefully worked out its program, which had 
been printed and circulated broadcast, and was generally understood 
among the members, and that it would result in confusion and dissatis- 
faction to make any change at this time. Judge Beardsley withdrew his 
motion.) 

The Secretary General read an invitation, received from the library 
officials, to the effect that the museum at the other end of the building 
was open, and that delegates, with their friends, were invited to visit it. 

Mr. Barbour, of Michigan, offered the following resolution, which 
was adopted by a rising vote : 

Resolved, That we extend the thanks of the delegates of this National 
Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution to our Louisville 
members who have so generously entertained us and made this feature 
of our meeting so pleasurable. 

Mr. HuBLEY : Mr. President General, I move that a vote of thanks be 
also extended by this Congress to the ladies of Louisville for the very 
elegant and delightful manner in which they have entertained our ladies. 
(Motion seconded and adopted by a unanimous rising vote.) 
The Secretary General : Mr. President General, the Executive Com- 



¥ 



152 SONS OF THE AMERICAN" REVOLUTION. 

mittee had a meeting on April 30, and passed a resolution commending 
the proposed purchase by Mr. Butler, ex-President of the Ohio Society, 
of the ancestral home of the Washington family in England. I move 
that this Congress take like action — that it commend the purchase, giv- 
ing it moral support ; not financial support, merely moral support. 
(Motion seconded by Mr. Curtis and carried.) 

WASHINGTON MEMORIAL BUILDING. 

Colonel Lauman: Mr. President General, may I revert to the Com- 
mittee on Washington Memorial Building, and offer the suggestion that 
that committee take into consideration the advisability of suggesting to 
the State Societies a special annual meeting on Washington's Birthday, 
with the concrete idea of raising funds for the erection of this memorial 
building. I w^ill suggest that they meet on that day, with the idea of 
forwarding the project of this memorial building at Washington city. 
It would give us a specific subject to work on, in addition to just send- 
ing in our little check subscriptions. In other words, it would popularize 
the idea and let everybody know about it, and we would have something 
definite to work on. I offer this as a suggestion to the Committee. 

The President General : Do you offer it in the form of a resolu- 
tion? 

Colonel Lauman : Yes ; I will change it to a resolution. 

The President General: Will you formulate it in writing later? 

Colonel Lauman : I will do so ; yes. 

The President General: Gentlemen, you have heard the resolution 
offered by our compatriot from Illinois. Is there any second to his 
motion ? 

(There were several seconds to the resolution.) 

The President General: Does anybody now desire to discuss this 
proposition? It is now open for discussion. Perhaps Mr. DeCaindry 
can give us some information on that subject. 

Mr. DeCaindry: I am not sufficiently posted on the matter to speak 
about it. 

Mr. Wentworth : I dislike very much to disagree with our friend 
from Illinois, or any one else, but I am of old-fashioned Yankee 
ancestry, and look upon our "holy day" in the same way they did. I 
object to the financial proposition— to the idea of using this date to raise 
money for this George Washington Memorial Building. 

A Member: So do I. (Applause.) 

Mr. Wentworth : I believe in getting together and celebrating our 
appreciation of what George Washington did for this country— by at- 
tending banquets with the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, as we do and have done ; but I do not think we should have this 
commercial feature mixed up with it; I do not think the memorial 
feature should be connected with the financial feature in any sense 
whatever. 

Mr. Curtis: I fully concur with Mr. Wentworth. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 53 

Mr. WentworTh : I hardly think this Congress wants to pass this 
-resolution in this hasty form. There is a good deal to be said on both 
rSides of the question, and I move that this matter be referred to the 
Executive Committee. 

(There were several seconds to this motion.) 

Colonel Lauman: I accept the gentleman's proposition. In justice 
to myself, however, I want to ask the gentleman from Iowa one ques- 
tion — if it has ever come under his observation that, on holy days, 
there is sometimes a collection taken? (Laughter and cheers.) 

The President General: Gentlemen, you have heard the proposition 
of Colonel Lauman in regard to the Washington Memorial, and the 
motion that the whole subject be referred to the Executive Committee. 
Are you ready for the question? 

(There were calls of "Question." A vote was taken and it was so 
•ordered.) 

The President General: Has anybody else anything to offer? 

Mr. Vandercook : I should like to offer a suggestion to the Educa- 
tional Committee : That is, that each State Society be requested to ask 
its local Chapters to have published on the Fourth of July of each year, 
in a newspaper most popular in the place of publication, a paper on 
some historic or patriotic subject. This is simply a suggestion, and I 
hope the papers would be willing to take it up. 

The President General : The Secretary General will make a note 
loi that and so advise the committee. 

SONS OF MEMBERS. 

Mr. Fyfe, of Michigan : Mr. President General, in looking over this 
'Congress I see the faces of very few young men. Now I have some 
boys at home, and when I go home from this Congress I am going to 
say to them, "You must get ready and take in the next Congress of 
the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution." I hope 
•every delegate here will try to induce some new people to come to our 
'Congress. 

Mr. Wentworth :' Mr. President General, there is something wrong 
with the members of this Congress if their sons are not members of 
the Society. 

Mr. DewEy^ of Vermont: I have been a member of this Society, and 
three generations of my family have been, and I hope this will continue 
until the seventh generation. 

Mr. Wentworth, of Iowa : It is the example we set our sons. I have 
sons, too, and one is old enough to be a delegate here, but business kept 
him away. I would have been prouder than anybody here if he could 
have sat at my side. He is a better man than his father. (Applause.) 

Mr. Chandler, of Connecticut : I would like to say a word as to the 
idea of securing our sons as members of this organization. Secretary 
'Clark said that he had a son that he expected to take his place when 
he arrived at the age of 105. I would like to ask the members if they 



154 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

are making any special efforts with their sons to get them into this- 
organization. I speak from experience. I lost my youngest son two 
years ago, before he was a member of the organization. I have tried 
to secure my oldest son as a member, but have not yet succeeded. Now 
when we have a banquet of our State Society we invite our sons, and 
I would suggest to the members here that they invite their sons to 
their State banquets, and pay their bills, if necessary, to get them there.. 
Let them hear the reports and the speeches made, and after a while we 
will get them in. We want these young men in the Society, and I hope 
the delegates here will see to it when they get home that they invite 
their sons to their State banquets, so that they may see what the Socie- 
ties are doing. 

WORK OF THE SOCIETY. 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, of Illinois : Mr. President General, the pur- 
pose of this organization is not simply to glorify the past and those 
who made it : it is as much to mold and inspire the present generation 
and shape the future. It is present opportunity as well as the great 
events in history that should engage us. It seems to me we would" 
be doing a great work if we could impress upon our Educational. Com- 
mittees the desirability of formulating plans by which the strength of 
our manhood could be brought to bear on the problems of this day,, 
just as the prowess of our forefathers was brought to bear on the 
problems of their day. (Applause.) That is certainly a way in which 
we would prove ourselves worthy sons of noble sires. I believe if our 
Educational Committee would take this suggestion to heart, howevei' 
awkwardly we have brought it before you this morning, it would work 
for the increased usefulness of this organization. I think it should be 
our effort to make the impression that this organization is awake to the 
live questions of the day and do away with any false impression that 
it is a mere picnic affair. I think if any people in the world have ever 
glorified patriotism in the hearts of the rank and file of the people, it 
has been the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Mr. LuM, of New Jersey : I do not think this Congress has failed to 
go on record on any question that has been presented to it in proper 
form; and, referring to the present, its action just taken as to the 
National Peace Congress now assembled at Baltimore, by which it 
unanimously endorsed that movement, is an evidence of that. Most of 
the questions of the day have two sides to them. Up to the present 
time I think this Congress has dealt with every question that they could' 
with propriety and safety deal with. 

Mr. McClary, of Illinois : No one can properly accuse this organi- 
zation of being a self-admiration society. It is as different and as- 
opposite from that as possible. It has done more than any other simi- 
lar society in the United States to promote patriotism in all directions^ 
and those who think otherwise are either misinformed or uninformed. 
A committee has been working for two years endeavoring to get into 



PROCKEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE) CONGRESS. 1 55 

compact form a statement of the accomplishments of this Society, 
through its several State Societies. If we could make our organization 
a closer one we would all be better informed. I suggest that every 
delegate here, when he gets home, make it a point to impress upon his 
State Society the desirability of keeping in touch not only with the 
National Society, but with each of the other State Societies. It will 
tend to bring us together and hold us together. I would also suggest 
that great liberality be exercised in the distribution of the Year Book, 
and that great publicity be given to the fact that it can be had for 
about 15 cents a copy. If you want to help make the Society a unit, 
make out a list of compatriot friends and send it to the Secretary 
General, with the small necessary remittance, instructing him to send 
each of them a copy of the Year Book. I have for years distributed 
20 or 25 copies among compatriot friends, and I think it effective work. 
One thing which we are trying to do here is to make more National 
our State Societies. 

(A proposition was submitted, on behalf of Major Armes, that the 
National Society erect a memorial building in Washington city, and the 
subject was indefinitely postponed.) 

On motion, the Congress adjourned to meet Wednesday morning, at 
10 o'clock, in the convention hall of the Seelbach Hotel, on the top 
floor. 

Morning Session, May 3, 1911 — 10 a.m. 

President General Marble, in opening the session, made an announce- 
ment in regard to a Mammoth Cave trip proposed to be taken by some 
of the members. 

The President General : I want to make an announcement on my 
own personal responsibility. It has come to my knowledge, and possi- 
bly to the knowledge of most of the delegates present, that we are 
honored today in this Congress by the presence of Colonel RoBards, 
of Hannibal, Missouri, who, with Mrs. RoBards, is celebrating the 
fiftieth anniversary of his marriage by making this his golden wedding 
journey. (Applause.) If there are any young married men here who 
would like advice from a veteran, judging from what Colonel RoBards 
has told me this morning, I think he will be glad to give them a lecture 
at any time before he leaves here. (Laughter.) 

(The Congress extended its unanimous congratulations to Com- 
patriot and Mrs. RoBards.) 

The President General: The Chair will recognize Colonel Mack, 
of Ohio. 

VOTES OF THANKS. 

Colonel Mack: Mr. President General, I want to move the adoption 
of a vote of thanks. The gentleman with whom I have been associated 
on the Committee of the National Congress to prepare for this meeting 
is also chairman of a local committee. I refer to Mr. Rogers Clark 



156 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Ballard Thruston, of this city. I have never known, in all my experi- 
ence, such earnest, constant, faithful, and successful work as Mr. Bal- 
lard Thruston has done for us here. (Applause.) Now while we have 
adopted resolutions of thanks in a general way, I want this Congress 
to vote Mr. R. C. Ballard Thruston a special vote of thanks for his 
splendid work in our behalf. (Applause.) 

Colonel RoBards : And I move, Mr. President General, that that vote 
be taken as a standing vote. 

(Vote of thanks carried by a unanimous rising vote.) 

Mr. Curtis : Mr. Chairman, while we are voting thanks to gentlemen 
who are eminently worthy, I want to suggest that there is a man behind 
the gun that should not be overlooked, and I want to move a very extra 
special vote of thanks to Colonel Mack himself. (Applause.) 

Colonel Mack : A soldier always obeys orders from his commander 
to do any special work, and he is not thanked therefor. He receives a 
pat on the back and a "Well done, my boy!" and that is all. That has 
already been given to me by the commander-in-chief of this army. 
Therefore I do not need a special vote of thanks. (Laughter.) It is 
not soldierly to do so. 

The President General : Gentlemen, you have heard the motion of 
Compatriot Curtis, of Connecticut. What is your pleasure? 

(There were calls of "Question.") 

The President General : The Chair will suggest that you pass this 
resolution by a rising vote. Those in favor of it will please stand. 
(All the members arose.) Colonel Mack, it is unanimously carried. 
(Applause.) 

Is there anything else now to offer under the head of "New Busi- 
ness"? 

Colonel Knifpin: Mr. President General, may I request you to ask 
all the grandsons of Revolutionary soldiers to rise and be counted? 
Not the great-grandsons, but the grandsons. 

The President General : It is requested that all the grandsons of 
soldiers who served in the Revolutionary Army shall rise. I take great 
pleasure in being one of them. 

(Thirteen members arose.) 

The President General : One for each of the thirteen original Colo- 
nies ! (Applause.) 

(Two additional members arose.) 

Mr. Dewey: That takes in Kentucky and Vermont. 

Doctor HalsEy : Now, Mr. President General, I would like to request 
those who have sons who are members of their State Societies, or 
members of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, stand up. I presume that will not preclude the grandsons. 

(The members arose to the number of thirty.) 

The President General : That shows that some of us are bringing 
up our sons in the right way. 

Mr. LarnEr, of the District bf Columbia : Mr. President General, 
what about those who have no sons, but have daughters in the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution? 



PROCEEDINGS OE LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 57 

The President General : This is not a Daughters' Congress. We are 
proud of you that have daughters. I have none myself. 

Compatriots, if there is no further business to come before this ses- 
sion, the nomination of officers for the ensuing year is the next order 
of business, and we should be glad to receive nominations for President 
General. It has been customary at times to call the roll of the States 
alphabetically. Is it your wish that that be done at this time? 

(There were cries of "No" from several members.) 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

The President General: The Chair is ready to entertain nomina- 
tions, then, for President General of this Society. 

Mr. Crandon, of Massachusetts: Mr. President General, before pro- 
ceeding to the nomination I desire to make, I want to voice my senti- 
ments of gratitude for all the attentions and courtesies that have been 
showered upon us so liberally by our friends of Kentucky. I arise to 
place in nomination for the office of President General of our Society 
a citizen of Kentucky's sister Commonwealth of Massachusetts. I 
arise to nominate a compatriot who has served faithfully in his local 
Chapter, and built it up from a membership of 25 to nearly a hundred 
in his two years' administration : a man whose love of history, whose 
natural feeling of affection for the traditions of his Commonwealth and 
native town, made him see in our Society an opportunity for useful 
work — a man who saw nothing in the dry accident of ancestry compar- 
able with the opportunities to serve his State, and his brethren, by his 
efforts in their behalf. The tablets and monuments which he began, 
and to which his genius and zeal largely contributed, attest the enthu- 
siasm which our compatriot has shown in the cause we love so well. 
Our State Society, marking well his zeal, placed him on its Board of 
Managers, and elevated him through the Vice-Presidential chairs to the 
Presidential chair of our State Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, and he gave us a splendid administration. You know him 
well, compatriots, you have met him. He is familiar to you all. If 
elevated to the National Presidency, he will give to you the same heart 
and talent and zeal, the same quiet, modest, telling, enthusiastic work 
that he gave to us, that know him and love him for his work. He is the 
unanimous choice of 1,625 out of the 1,626 members who compose the 
Massachusetts Society, he being the other member. He has built into 
the warp and woof of Massachusetts, and he who does that can build 
into the warp and woof of our country. He is a true Massachusetts 
man, and that means a true American! It needs no words of eulogy 
from me to prove his high character and his worth, for his fidelity and 
willingness to serve, as shown by his own history in the Massachusetts 
Society, are his ample testimonial. And he will justify your confidence, 
if you will but call on him, as the exponent of the Commonwealth he 
represents, to gain yet higher honor by yet more service— the only way 
in which men realize on earth their dream of heaven. Mr. President : 



158 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

"We learn from him that rugged truth and zeal 

Win for a man true weal. 
That e'en in midst of selfishness, 
Blighting the world, such good hves bless. 

And to our hearts reveal 
True manhood's noble crown and God's approving seal." 

I place in nomination, Mr. President General, as a tribute from the 
heart of Massachusetts, Moses Greeley Parker, M. D. (Applause.) 

Mr. PugslEy: Mr. President General, I am sure we appreciate the 
spirit of fellowship which has characterized this Congress of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. From all sections of our great land we 
have journeyed to enjoy the courteous hospitality of our compatriots of 
the city of Louisville and State of Kentucky. (Applause.) And we feel 
assured that here upon this common soil of Kentucky there are no 
sectional lines. We rejoice that we may clasp hands. North, South, 
East, and West, as brothers. (Applause.) The charm of this meet- 
ing here has been so great that we would like to continue longer 
with our friends. (Applause.) And I don't know but that we feel 
very much like the young lady of whom Doctor Parker tells us, who 
was riding in a street car in cultured Boston one day. She held a book 
in one hand and had the other in her muff. A young man came in and 
seated himself beside her, and, the situation seeming inviting, he ran 
his own hand into the other end of her muff and clasped the gentle 
hand that lay there. She turned her head and said, "Young man, I will 
give you just twenty minutes to take your hand out of my muff!" 
(Laughter and applause.) 

(A Voice: Was that Doctor Parker?) (Laughter.) 

Mr. PuGSLEY (continuing) : Mr. Chairman, two compatriots, each 
splendidly equipped to preside over this great organization, and each 
splendid in service in his State Society, as well as National, have been 
mentioned for President General. I wish that we of New York, the 
Empire State, could this year rally around that superb representative of 
the Middle West, Col. Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio (applause)— the State 
which has come to be the "mother of Presidents." But this year another 
splendid man from the State of Massachusetts seems to have the call, 
and I want to say, compatriots, that I hope if Doctor Parker should be 
elected this year that next year there will be no question about the 
election of Colonel Mack, of Ohio. I think I voice the sentiments of 
the compatriots of the Empire State when I say that we will rally this 
year to the support of Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, of Massachusetts, for 
President General. (Applause.) 

The President General : Are there any other nominations ? 

Judge Van Deman, of Ohio : Mr. President General and gentlemen : 
I would be exceedingly glad if I had the eloquent tongue of the gentle- 
men who entertained us last night, so that I might speak to you with 
effect on this occasion, because I feel that some word should be spoken 
that would burn into the heart and mind of every man present here. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 59 

Not, I mean, unkind, not angry; but patriotic, if you please. There 
-ought to be in this Society, in my judgment, the highest type of patriot- 
ism, unselfish and as broad as this great land of ours, and not limited to 
any particular part of it. I observe in looking at the record that for the 
22 years of the life of this Society there have been but two men named 
for President General west of the Alleghany Mountains. Does not this 
■Society desire the development of the great central and western States ? 
I contend that there should be no sectionalism in this Society. We 
should take our President General from the East, and from the central 
West, and from the West, and from the South — wherever we can get 
available men in each of these great sections of the country who will 
undertake and do what ought to be done in these various directions. 
(Applause.) I come to present to you a son of Ohio — that is, an 
adopted son; he is a son of New York by birth. I come to present an 
adopted son of Ohio; a faithful man, a man who has always been a 
worker in the cause. He has been a true soldier; he showed that a few 
moments ago by his remarks in connection with the resolution of 
thanks voted to him and another gentleman on the Committee on Ar- 
rangements for this magnificent meeting — arrangements by which he, in 
co-operation with these splendid Kentucky friends, has furnished us an 
entertainment that is unexampled in our history, and one that has been 
so pleasing to us all that it will go down in our memories as one of the 
greenest spots in our lives. (Applause.) Gentlemen, if Col. Isaac F. 
Mack is made President General of this Society, he will do something; 
he will do something for it. He will work for it, as he has the time 
and the opportunity to do, and the ability to do. He will develop it in 
the States that need development. Do not forget, my friends from 
Massachusets, that a great many of your sons are scattered all through 
this broad land of ours. Do not forget that where, perhaps, one boy 
stayed at home, three went to help win the West ; and it is those sons, 
and their sons and their grandsons, who have aided in the building of 
the Empire of the West, who ought to be recognized by this Society, 
and brought into its folds, and thereby be made helpful to you and to 
all of us in the building up and perpetuating of the great principles for 
which we stand. (Applause.) And if you do not stand for patriotic 
principles, and practice them, we are not worthy of being perpetuated. 
Now, compatriots, let me appeal to you, that the thing to do on this 
occasion — now, not putting it off until next year, for we do not know 
what may intervene between now and next year— I say the thing to do 
now is to begin the good work by nominating and electing Col. Isaac F. 
Mack, of Ohio. President General of this Society. (Applause.) 

Mr. Chandler, of Connecticut: Mr. President General. T believe 
every compatriot present will endorse all that has been said about 
Colonel Mack. But, sir, Massachusetts, is my native State ; one-half of 
my life has been lived in Massachusetts and the other half in Con- 
necticut. Many of my dear and warmest friends have been members of 
the Massachusetts State Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
ition. Some of them have now gone to that Congress of States and 



l60 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Nations on the other side of the river. Others are at present members-- 
of the State Society of the S. A. R., and some of them are members of 
the Board of Management of that Society. I have never heard any- 
thing of Doctor Parker other than of his enthusiastic and indefatigable 
work for the cause in Massachusetts and throughout the country ; and I 
sincerely hope, in rising as I do to second his nomination, that this 
Congress will endorse and elect him this morning as the next President: 
General of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

The President General: Do I hear any other name for President- 
General ? 

Judge Hancock, of Pennsylvania: Mr. President General, I arise to 
second the nomination of Col. Isaac F. Mack. This Society has resting 
upon it the duty of looking after the growth and development of its. 
membership. It is not a question of Massachusetts, it is not a question 
of Ohio, nor is it a question of Pennsylvania or of Kentucky, but the- 
man that you want to put in this position is a man who, by his capacity, 
energy and zeal, will place this Society in the very front rank of the- 
societies of these United States. (Applause.) I do not believe 
altogether in sentiment; I believe that above and beyond sentiment is 
efficiency; and you all ought to know by this time, those of you that 
have been here, and have seen his good work in conjunction with that 
of our noble compatriots of Kentucky, that Colonel Mack has given us- 
the finest — away beyond anything — celebration that we have ever had in 
this country. (Applause.) Now, I live west of the Alleghany Moun- 
tains, in the great State of Pennsylvania. In the eastern part of the 
State the Sons of the Revolution were established before we were. We 
Sons of the American Revolution control the western part of the State, 
but east of the mountains it is the Sons of the Revolution. We have 
to meet a competition which you gentlemen in Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut do not have to meet, and that same competition extends over- 
into Ohio. Colonel Mack, from the very beginning of the Ohio Society, 
has been one of its most faithful members. He has filled every position- 
in its gift ; and as editor of a newspaper, there has been no event or" 
happening in the Society which he has not celebrated in his paper, 
thereby lending its material aid. As President of his State Society he- 
was active in every part of the State. We know him in Pennsylvania;- 
we have known him for years. While we may have differed from- 
him in politics, we have always admired his sterling worth. And I want 
to say here to my Southern and Western friends that, during the- 
reconstruction days in the South succeeding the Civil War, when some- 
hard things were said in the North against the Southern people. Colonel' ' 
Mack was never other than magnanimous and liberal in his expressions, 
towards the men who had fought against him. and fought so bravely 
(applause), and his paper always advocated the most gentle and forgiv- 
ing sentiments towards the Southern people; and they are his senti- 
ments today. (Applause.) Now, we had some talk last night about 
Virginia. In the early settlement of this country Virginia had five or" 



PROCKEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. l6l 

six Presidents of the United States, and deserved them all. But the 
time came when she lost her influence in the election of Presidents, and 
that honor has now come to the State of Ohio, a daughter of Virginia. 
Ohio represents the sentiments of Washington and Jefferson and 
Madison and Monroe, and all of the other great Virginians ; and today 
you and I are honest enough to know it is not impossible we will have 
to take another President from Ohio, because we will have to vote on 
both sides to overcome him. (Applause.) Ohio's list of Presidents 
now almost equals, if not quite, that of Virginia. Now, let us place her 
in a higher position still, and make Colonel Mack President General of 
this Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and then put him 
still higher by making him President of the United States! (Applause 
and laughter.) Gentlemen, we have no trade to make; we put him 
before you on his own merits. We will make no trade for next year or 
the year after. We believe that he deserves this honor, and that it will 
work for the prosperity of the Society. 

Now, it has been said that the Middle West, where the great pro- 
portion of the population at the present exists in Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
Illinois, and Indiana — that great, rich, and glorious section of our 
country — has not been properly represented in the offices of this Society. 
I do not believe, personally, that there was ever any such feeling. But 
there is such a claim, and it has affected us in the Middle States 
somewhat injuriously. We have felt its influence; it has impaired our 
growth— this idea that we have not been sufficiently represented in the 
active management of the Society. And so T want to say to you now — 
not because of the member from Ohio, not because of his eloquent op- 
ponent from Massachusetts, but because we need efficient management 
of this Society, and that the greatest good shall be done — that we ought 
to elect a man west of the Alleghanies ; and we know that Col. Isaac F. 
Mack will till the bill, and we know the great section of the Middle West 
will receive an attention it has not heretofore received. I second the 
nomination for President General of Col. Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Dewey: We have here two men so well known in their noble 
work that it seems a pity they cannot both be elected at one time ; but, 
as that cannot be, Vermont seconds the nomination of Dr. Moses- 
Greeley Parker. (Applause.) 

The President General: Are there any other nominations? 
Dr. IglEhart, of Maryland : I move that nominations be closed. 
(Colonel Mack here arose to protest against his own nomination. 
He began by saying that he did not propose to second any nomination, 
because he would have to second the nomination of both parties, and 
he did not want to do that. To illustrate his position, he told the story 
of the old farmer out West who, with his hired man, was mowing hay 
one day. First one of them would take the scythe and cut a swath,, 
and then the other. It was the hired man's turn, and he spied a hornet's 
nest just ahead and he knew it spelt '-trouble." The old farmer made 
light of his fears, and said he would not be stung if he would but cut 



l62 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

right straight through: and, to show how it could be done, he took 
the scythe himself and mowed through, with the result that might be 
expected. The old man had said in his heart. "The wicked flee when 
no man pursueth ; but tfie righteous are bold as a lion." But the hired 
man recalled, "And the foolish pass on and are punished!") (Applause 
and laughter.) 

Colonel Mack then continued : 

Now I don't propose to take the first swath where there is a hornet's 
nest ahead! (Laughter.) I didn't come here as a candidate for 
President General. On the 19th day of April, when my State held its 
annual meeting, one of the members moved that I be the unanimous 
choice of the Ohio Society for President General of the National 
Society, and so the delegates were instructed. It went through with a 
"Hurrah" ; but T said to them at the time. "Boys, I am not a candidate 
for the office of President General, and I don't care to have the office. 
I dread the responsibility of it ; I am afraid of the work to be done ; 
and no man ought to want an office who does not do his duty." He 
has got to do something if he expects to get the honor of the office, 
and I was afraid I could not do what ought to be done; and so I said 
to them, "I am not in it." I came on here last Friday to confer with my 
fellow-committeemen and see that everything was in order. I am happy 
to say that everything was in order, as you have found out. I learned 
soon after I got here that some of my friends from other States were 
talking about this move, and I said to them. "I am not a candidate." 
Finally the Ohio delegation — they were all here — insisted on pushing 
me forward. I said to them, "I wish you would let me alone ; I prefer 
to be just where I am, a private in the ranks, and carry a gun instead 
of a sword." But no: they would not have it. Now what the result 
would be if a vote were taken I do not know : but I do know that I 
don't wish to be as foolish as that old farmer. Therefore I withdraw 
my name from nomination and ask my friends to support Dr. Parker, 
of Massachusetts. 

(There were cries of "No! No!") 

Mr. Curtis : Mr. President General, I have been listening to Mr. 
Pugsley's relation of a personal experience in Boston ; and. living next 
door to Boston, so to speak, it occurs to me that perhaps if we support 
the Massachusetts man we may have some similar experiences. (Laugh- 
ter.) We seem to be up against an embarrassment of riches here. We 
have two candidates that we would like to support 

Colonel Mack : You have but one. 

Mr. Curtis : But Colonel ]\Iack has very magnanimously withdrawn 
his nomination, and I would therefore second the nomination of Dr. 
Parker, on account of the Connecticut Society; and I move you, sir. 
that the polls be closed, and that the Secretary General be instructed 
to cast the ballot of this Society for Dr. Parker for President General. 

Colonel Mack : I second that nomination. 

Colonel Guthrie: The name of Colonel Mack is not withdrawn. 

Colonel Mack : T have withdrawn it. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 163 

Colonel Guthrie : But you can't do it. 

Judge BeardslEy : The gentleman cannot withdraw his name, except 
Tdv unanimous consent. 

The President General: Gentlemen, you will prepare your hallot for 
President General. Colonel Mack, of Ohio, and Dr. Parker, of Massa- 
chusetts, are in nomination. 

Colonel Mack : I don't want to be put up to be knocked down ; T 
never was in my life. Judge Van Deman is my friend and President 
of our State Society. I want to ask him if he is not satisfied with my 
withdrawal. 

Judge Van Deman : At .the earnest request of Colonel Mack, if I 
liave the privilege, I will withdraw his name; but, if T have not the 
privilege, I make a motion that I be granted the privilege. 

The President General : The Chair will rule that the gentleman has 
that privilege, under the circumstances. 

Colonel Mack : Then I make a motion that the Secretary General be 
directed to cast the ballot of this Society electing Dr. Parker, of 
Massachusetts, President General. 

(Motion seconded by Dr. Halsey, of Arizona.) 

The Secretary announced that the ballot had been cast, as directed. 

The President General : Gentlemen, the vote has been cast, and I 
have the honor of announcing that Dr. Moses Greeley Parker has been 
elected President General of your Society. (Great applause.) 

Colonel Mack: Mr. President General, permit me to say one word 
more. I know how Judge Hancock feels. He and I have been personal 
friends for many years. I tried to give him assistance when he was 
President, and I know how kindly he feels towards me, and how others 
feel who have been talking in my favor here. I want to thank them 
all, and I want to assure them that in withdrawing my name at this 
time it is not because of any lack of appreciation of their kindness 
towards me. (Applause.) 

The President General : The Chair will request ex-Presidents Gen- 
eral Greeley, of Connecticut, and Pugsley, of New York, to escort the 
President-elect to the platform. 

( The gentlemen nafned performed this duty, and tlie President Gen- 
eral continued :) 

Dr. Parker, I congratulate you personally. Compatriots, Dr. Moses 
Greeley Parker, of Massachusetts, your President General-elect. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Dr. Parker : Mr. President General and compatriots, T fear that I 
cannot find words to express my gratitude to you for placing me in 
this high office. It is one of the greatest honors that could be conferred 
on any man, and certainly is the greatest honor of my life. I cannot 
take it to myself alone : I take it as a compliment to my State Society, 
the good old State of Massachusetts, and T thank you for it. 

In accepting this office I pledge myself to do all I can for the increase 
of our membership. To my mind we must look to the Chapters for 
the greatest increase in our Society. We must do all we can for the 



164 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Chapters ; we must encourage them in every way. Let them not be 
content with only one or two meetings a year. Let them have more; 
encourage them to have more, and have them use their local, social in- 
fluence to attract local interest. This is the way the Daughters of the 
American Revolution have increased their membership to the very large 
number of 87,000. 

It has been my experience that it is a most difficult thing for the 
yoimg members of our Society to make out their papers. The making 
out of their papers for joining the Society has been hard work for 
them. In some Chapters one man alone has been able to make out a 
large number of papers. For instance, in Massachusetts, Mr. Atwood, 
of the Lynn Chapter, has made out the papers for over 160 applicants, 
and made them members o,f our Society. Mr. Sterling, of New Jersey, 
has done work of the same sort for his Society; and, in Bufifalo, Mr. 
Steele has been doing the same good work. There is one point I want 
to call your attention to in this connection : the Daughters have made 
out their papers for 87,000 members. Those papers are on file. Those 
Daughters have fathers and brothers, and many of them sons that are 
21 years of age. Every one of these are eligible, and their papers are 
all made out. We have only to ask them and encourage them and get 
them interested, and any one can obtain a paper for them to sign. 
Gather them in ! Gather them into our Societ}- ! 

Compatriots, I thank you. (Applause.) 

( President General Marble continued in the chair to the close of the 
session.) 

The President General : The next thing in order will be the election 
of five Vice-Presidents, and nominations are now invited for that ofiice. 

Colonel Thompson, of the District of Columbia : Mr. President Gen- 
eral, I want to nominate for the office of Vice-President a man who 
has alwa3'S been zealous to advance the interests of our local Society, 
and whose efforts have also been exercised on behalf of the National 
Society, as is well known. On behalf of the District of Columbia 
Society, I nominate for the office of Vice-President Commander J. H. 
Moore, of Washington city. 

Mr. Starr, of Indiana: Mr. President General, it has fallen to my 
lot to perform a very pleasant duty — that of presenting the name of a 
gentleman from our State who has been so closely identified, from the 
inception, almost, of our organization in Indiana, that his name is 
known throughout the length and breadth of the State as an enthusi- 
astic worker for the Society. All of us, since we have been in Louis- 
ville, have received a very pretty lesson in support of a great principle 
enunciated by a great Englishman : that "Whatever is worth doing at 
all is worth doing well." It is evident to every person here that the 
Kentucky Society and those identified with the work of this entertain- 
ment proceeded upon that principle ; and in Indiana we do the same 
thing. In bringing forward the name of the gentleman I will mention, 
I have only to say that he, also, has ever acted upon this principle. 
He has performed thoroughly and well all the duties that have de- 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 165 

volved upon him. He has been given the highest honor that our State 
Society could bestow upon him, and in every position he has been 
called upon to fill he has performed the duties of it carefully and well. 

I take great pleasure in placing in nomination for the office of Vice- 
President Mr. George O. Dix, of Indiana. 

Colonel Mack : Mr. President General, I would like to have this 
Congress elect as one of the Vice-Presidents of this Society Joseph G. 
Butler, Jr., of Ohio. He is a man of high standing; has been a member 
of our State Society, and built up one of the best and most enthusiastic 
Chapters in our State. It would please our Society very much to have 
Mr. Butler honored with th« office of Vice-President. 

Dr. GuYER, of Colorado : Mr. President General, I rise to present the 
name of a man in my State who is eminently qualified for this position. 
His name is an influence there. It is the name of a man who, when 
he graduated from West Point, stood the highest in his scholarship of 
any student ever graduated. He holds that unique record to this day. 
Tt gives me pleasure to present to this Congress the name of Gen. 
Irving Hale, of Colorado, for Vice-President General. (Applause.) 

Mr. PuGSLEY : Compatriots, I do not believe that in the whole history 
of the Sons of the American Revolution you have ever received finer 
entertainment or a more delightful time than at this Congress here in 
Louisville, Kentucky. (Applause.) I believe that there is just one 
thing that should not be overlooked at this time, and I want to suggest 
to you the name of a man I believe we shall all be delighted to honor. 
I want to present to you as a candidate for Vice-President of this 
Society the name of Mr. R. C. Ballard Thruston, of Louisville. (Cheers 
and applause.) 

Mr. Curtis : Mr. President General, the time is getting short and we 
have a good deal of business to attend to. I move you, sir, that nomi- 
nating speeches be limited to three minutes. 

This motion was seconded by Colonel Amies, and the Chair said it 
would be so held, without objection. 

Mr. Steele, of New York : I simply want to second the nomination 
of Commander J. H. Moore, who was formerly from my city of 
Buffalo. 

Mr. Bacon, of New York: I desire as a delegate from the Empire 
State to second the nomination of Mr. George O. Dix, of Indiana — a 
young man ! As I look over this assembly and see some with thin hair 
and some with gray, I am impressed that the thing we should do is 
to elect this young man, who has done so much in Indiana to make his 
State Society what it is today. (Applause.) 

Dr. Halsey : Let me second for Arizona the name of Mr. R. C. 
Ballard Thruston for Vice-President General and express the hope 
that I may live long enough to come again to a Congress of the Sons 
of the American Revolution in Louisville. (Applause.) 

General GrEELEy : Mr. President General, I desire to second the 
nomination of a man that has been mentioned here. He is known to 
every member of this organization as one of its hardest workers, and 



l66 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

as a man who has accomplished largely what has been done in Congress 
in the bringing forward and making a success of measures we have 
presented before Congress. I second the nomination of Commander 
J. H. Moore, of Washington. 

Mr. Dewey: Vermont seconds the nomination of Mr. R. C. Ballard 
Thruston, with other nominees. 

Colonel Guthrie: For the Pennsylvania Society I desire to second 
the nomination of Mr. Butler, of Ohio. 

(On motion, nominations were ordered closed.) 

The Secretary General announced the following as being in nomina- 
tion for the office of Vice-President: 

Commander John H. Moore, of Washington, D. C. 

George O. Dix, of Indiana. 

Joseph G. Butler, Jr., of Ohio. 

Gen. Irving Hale, of Colorado. 

Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston, of Kentucky. 

On motion of Mr. Moores, of Indiana, the Secretary General was 
directed to cast the affirmative ballot of the Society for the five gentle- 
men named for Vice-Presidents General. This was done and the Chair 
declared these gentlemen duly elected. 

In this connection the Chair announced that the Constitution required 
that the order of precedence of the Vice-Presidents-elect should be 
determined by lot. On motion of Mr. Wentworth, the several gentle- 
men who had nominated the various Vice-Presidents-elect were selected 
to represent them in drawing for position, which drawing was con- 
ducted by the Secretary General with the following result : 

(i) Joseph G. Butler, Jr., of Ohio; represented by Colonel Mack. 

(2) Gen. Irving Hale, of Colorado; represented by Dr. Guyer. 

(3) R. C. Ballard Thruston, of Kentucky; represented by Mr. 

Pugsley. 

(4) George O. Dix, of Indiana; represented by Mr. Starr. 

(5) Commander John H. Moore, of the District of Columbia; repre- 

sented by Colonel Thompson. 

The President General : The next officer necessary to be elected — 
the filling of which office gives us a great deal of anxiety every year — 
is that of Secretary General. (Laughter.) The Chair will entertain 
nominations for Secretary General. 

Colonel Guthrie: I nominate Mr. A. Howard Clark, of Washington, 
D. C, for Secretary General, and move that nominations be closed. 

(This motion was seconded by Colonel RoBards. of Missouri, and 
others, and carried.) 

The President General: The Chair will entertain a motion that a 
ballot be cast. 

Mr. Curtis: I move that the Secretary General be excused from the 
necessity of voting for himself. 

• Colonel Guthrie: I move that the President General cast that ballot 
f(i)r the Society. 



PROCEEDINGS UE EOUISX II.I.E CONGRESS. 16/ 

(Alotion seconded and carried.) 

The President General: The ballot lias l)cen carried for Mr. Clark 
as Secretary General, and lie will take notice that the instructions are 
that he shall not make a speecli, but shall have permission to print. 

Mr. Clark: Gentlemen, I thank you. (Laughter.) 

(The Chair invited nominations for Registrar General, and Mr. 
Paine, of Missouri, nominated Mr. A. Howard Clark to succeed him- 
self. On motion, nominations were closed, and the President General 
was directed to cast the ballot of the Congress electing Mr. Clark to 
this office. This was done, and the President General announced that 
the ballot had been cast.) 

Mr. Clark: Again I thank yoii. (Laughter.) 

The President General: The next office to be tilled is that of 
Treasurer General. The Chair will be glad to hear nominations. 

Mr. Wentworth : Mr. President General, three years ago, at Buffalo, 
I had the honor of nominating Mr. Secor for the office of Treasurer 
General, a member of the Iowa State Society. This year, as a reward 
for faithful service and efficient performance of duty, it gives me 
pleasure to present the. name of John H. Burroughs, of the Empire 
State Society, to succeed himself. (Applause.) 

On motion of Colonel Guthrie, nominations were closed, and the 
President General was directed to cast the ballot of the Society electing 
Mr. Burroughs to this office. 

The President General : The ballot is cast with the greatest of 
pleasure, as I recognize in Mr. Burroughs his own successor and Presi- 
dent of the Empire State Society. (Applause.) 

Nominations for Historian General is the next order of business. 

Dr. Whitaker: We are little in weight in New Jersey, but we are 
earnest in endeavor. In view of the good work he has done, of which 
j'ou have all known, and in view of the exhibits you have seen at the 
places of our meeting, as well as in view of his manifest fitness for the 
place, I venture to suggest the re-election of our present Historian, Mr. 
David L. Pierson. 

Mr. Crandon : I take the greatest pleasure, on behalf of the Massa- 
chusetts Society — and I believe of the nation — in seconding the nomi- 
nation of the gentleman from New Jersey for Historian General. 

Mr. Burroughs : A year ago I had the pleasure, as a native Jersey- 
man, of seconding the nomination of Mr. Pierson. As I still claim to 
be a Jerseyman, I want to second the nomination again this year. 

Judge BeardslEy : There are some of our officers that we love for 
what they are, and others for what they do. David Pierson we love 
for what he is and for what he has done. I move, therefore, that the 
rules be suspended, and that the Secretary be authorized, on behalf of 
this Congress, to cast one affirmative ballot for Mr. Pierson to succeed 
himself in the office of Historian General. 

It was so ordered, the Secretary General cast the ballot, as directed, 
and the President General declared Mr. Pierson duly elected to the 
office of Historian General. 



j68 soxs of the American revolutiox. 

The President General : The next business in order is the election 
of a Chaplain General. What is your pleasure? 

Mr. Vandercook : Our present Chaplain General was delayed in get- 
ting here from Chicago, and almost immediately received a telegram 
requiring his return. Therefore his stay was very brief. Next year, 
when the meeting time of this Congress will be later, he will be able to 
put in full time with us, and I take pleasure in nominating Rev. John 
Timothy Stone to succeed himself in the office of Chaplain General of 
this Society. 

Dr. IglEhart : I second that motion. 

The President General: Are there any other nominations? If not, 
I will declare nominations closed. 

Dr. HalsEy : I move that the rules be suspended, and that the Secre- 
tary cast the affirmative ballot of this Society electing Rev. Dr. Stone 
Chaplain General for the ensuing year. 

(Motion seconded and carried.) 

The President General : The ballot has been cast, and the Rev. Dr. 
Stone has been re-elected your Chaplain General. 

The Chair will now recognize ]\Ir. Stephenson, of Kentucky. 

MONUMENT TO GEN. GEORGE ROGERS CLARK. 

Mr. Stephenson^ of Kentucky: Mr. President General, I wish to 
offer the following resolution : 

Whereas Senator W. O. Bradley has introduced in the Congress of 
the United States a bill for an appropriation of $300,000 for the erection 
at Louisville, Ky., of a monument to the memory of General Geo. 
Rogers Clark : 

Resolved, That the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, in annual Congress assembled at Louisville, Ky., heartily 
endorses the erection of such a monument to this great patriot of the 
American Revolution as a fitting recognition of his brilliant services, 
which were of immeasurable value to our countr}^ 

Col. RoBards, of Missouri : I arise to second that resolution, Mr. 
President General, under peculiar circumstances. I ask the indulgence 
of the Congress. On hearing the courteous and complimentary remarks 
of President General Marble respecting our golden wedding of a Son 
and Daughter of the American Revolution, my heart goes out to him, 
and I feel that he is not a Marble-hearted man. (Applause.) 

Standing here in this noble assembly of men who stand for blood 
and lineage, I want to congratulate you on your principles. You can 
best serve your country in the domestic circle through your boys and 
girls, well born and well bred. You can give no dearer heritage to your 
country than the perpetuation of the pure blood of the men who 
achieved American Independence. This is a time to express our ad- 
miration of the men who achieved such wonderful success ; it is no time 
for tears. I will tell you my connection with Gen. George Rogers Clark. 

It was my privilege last June. 1910. in company with my friend Col. 



PROCEEDINGS OF LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 169 

Reuben T. Durrctt, of this city, to tell him at his home what T had 
witnessed at Quincy, in our sister State of Illinois. 

In May, 1909, I was an invited guest at the unveiling of a statue that 
the State of Illinois had erected to the memory of Gen. George Rogers 
Clark. Mr. Durrett said : "I would like to have been there : and 
knowing as I do your family history, and in consideration that your 
great-grandsire. Senator Hugh Logan, of Lincoln County, fought 
under him, I wish to present you this steel engraving of Gen. George 
Rogers Clark, with the expression of my personal consideration for 
you." That steel engraving now ornaments my law office. And be- 
cause of the fact of being -Kentucky born and Missouri bred. I stand 
here believing we can make no higher expression of the patriotism of 
our forefathers and the independence of our country than to vote for 
proper memorials to and recognition of the men who achieved it. We 
believe in George Rogers Clark as the Hannibal of the West — the 
general who, by the force of his arms and the heroism of his men. 
saved to us and added to our country the vast territory that stretches 
eastward to Pennsylvania, westward to the Mississippi, and northward 
from the Ohio River to the Great Lakes. And I wish to inform you. 
if }'Ou have not read of it. that there is inscribed on that statue these 
words, "A Son of Virginia, the Sword of Kentucky, the Saviour of 
Illinois." He was a son of Virginia because Virginia was bounded on 
the east by the ocean and on the west by the great Mississippi River. 
He was the sword of Kentucky because from the district of Kentucky 
he started the great movement to capture the northwest. He went to 
Richmond, Virginia, and applied there to Governor Patrick Henry for 
men and money to aid in this great project that his military genius had 
conceived. It was from here, almost on this spot where you stand, that 
famous expedition started out — an expedition by which, through the 
valor of Kentucky and the sons of the Old Dominion, that magnificent 
territory of five States was acquired, and remained in possession until 
the treaty in 1783, when the valor of Kentucky and Virginia was 
recognized in that treaty and that vast northwest territory became a 
part of the United States. 

Now, I second the resolution, and hope we may have here a unani- 
mous approval of it. 

(There were calls of "Question!") 

The President Generai. : Gentlemen, you have heard the question 
called on the adoption of the resolution, which has been duly seconded. 
What is your pleasure? Those in favor of the resolution as presented 
will say "Aye." 

(The resolution was unanimously adopted.) 

ELECTION OF TRUSTEES. 

The President General : The next thing in order will be the election 
of a Board of Trustees. The various State Societies nominate the 
Trustees, and in case of failure of any State to nominate its member of 



170 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

the Board of Trustees, the President of the State Society is named as 
such. We will now hear the list of names that have been sent m from 
the various States for membership on the Board of Trustees. 

The Secretary General : Several State Societies have filed nominees 
for Trustees, others have not sent in their list of names, and therefore 
the Presidents of their State Societies will serve. 

Mr. Dewey : I move that the Secretary be instructed to cast the one 
ballot of this Congress for the nominees as read. 

(There were several seconds to this motion, and it was duly adopted.) 

The Secretary General announced that he had cast the ballot as 
directed, and the President General declared the gentlemen wdiose 
names had just been read duly elected as a Board of Trustees of this 
Societ3\ 

The Secretary General : There is but one more motion to be made, 
that the Secretary General be instructed to cast the ballot of the Society 
for the Presidents of the State Societies as' members of the Board of 
Trustees, where the Societies themselves have not presented names for 
that purpose. 

(So moved by j\lr. Thruston, duly seconded, and carried.) 

(For names of Trustees see page 4 of present Year Book.) 

VOTES OF THANKS. 

Mr. Curtis: Mr. President General, we have enjoyed, and the So- 
ciety has enjoyed, a most prosperous year. VVe have had a Congress 
that I think has never been exceeded, and probably it will be a long 
while before we have any one as good as this. And that has been due 
not only to the ability and efficiency of our Committee on Arrange- 
ments and of our local committees, all of whom have contributed largely 
to the success of this Congress, but a part of it has been due to your 
unfailing efforts, sir. The work you have done in connection with the 
Executive Committee has been tremendous. We know you have done 
everything for the Society that it is possible for any man to have done. 
And before we adjourn here, I want this Congress to pass a vote of 
thanks to our retiring President General Marble, and I ask the Secre- 
tary General to take the sense of this meeting by a rising vote. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Colonel Mack : I want to second that resolution, but I want to add 
a word to it. A wonderful thing about this organization and this 
Congress has been the peace and harmony that have prevailed (ap- 
plause) ; and it has been due to the happy manner in which the Presi- 
dent has presided over our deliberations. (Applause.) He has stopped 
the talk in such a pleasant way that the speaker who had not emptied 
his bottle sat down and carried the rest home with him. (Laughter.) 

Down here in this State of Kentucky there was once an old darky 
preacher, who notified Sambo that he was going to preach a powerful 
sermon on the following Stmday on the subject of "Peace from Heaven 



PROCDKDIXGS t)F U)UIS\ Il.l.K CONGKlCSS. 17I 

in the Form of a Dove." There was a Httlc hole in the ceiling in the 
church above the congregation, and the old preacher said to Sa'iiibo, "1 
want you to get up there in the loft, and when I am in the midst of 
my sermon, and have got the brothers and sisters worked up good and 
strong, I want you to let that white dove down through th-it hole." 
Sambo agreed, and the preacher got up on the appointed day and began 
his sermon ; and finally he got them all worked up, and he got to the 
point where he said, "And the peace of God is coming down on you like 
a white dove from heaven." He looked up, and there he saw, not a 
white dove coming down, but a l)lack cat coming through the hole in 
the ceiling. (Laughter.) The old preacher was dumbfounded, but he 
gathered himself and he said, "Sambo, where is my white dove?" And 
Sambo sung out. "In the cat!" (Laughter and applause.) 

Now, when I got here I looked around for (nn- friend, Ballard Thrus- 
ton, and I said to him, "Have you got any black cats lurking around in 
your back yard?" and he says, "There is one;" and I says, "Go and 
kill it, so the dove won't be swallowed up." (Laughter.) 

Major Armes : I want to amend the motion as made to the effect 
that all the retiring officers be included in this vote. 

The Secretary General: Gentleinen, you have heard the motion of 
Mr. Curtis, of Connecticut. Those in favor of it will please rise. 

(The motion was unanimously adopted.) 

President General Marble : Gentlemen, I return to you my most 
hearty thanks for the compliment you have paid me ; but more especially 
do I thank you for the courtesies you have shown me during the past 
year. As I said in my annual report, I now return to the ranks, and 
you will find me at all the succeeding Congresses, and ready to fight as 
in the past. (Applause.) 

And now, gentlemen of the Congress, I take pleasure in turning over 
to my successor the insignia of office. 

(Suiting the action to the word. President General Marble pinned 
the President's badge on the coat of President General-elect Parker.) 

There being no further business before the meeting, the Twenty- 
second Annual Congress of the National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, on motion of Colonel Guthrie, of Pennsylvania, 
was declared by the Chair to be adjourned sine die. 



1^2 SON'S OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
APRIL 30, 191 1. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee, dul\- called by order of the 
President General, was held at the Seelbach Hotel, Louisville, Ky., at 
9 p. m., April 30, 191 1. Present: President General Marble, w^ho pre- 
sided; Mr. Curtis, Colonel Mack, Doctor Parker, Mr. Wentworth, and 
the Secretary General. The attendance of Judge Atwater and Judge 
Stockbridge was prevented by imperative judicial duties. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Committee in New York City, on 
November 19. were approved as printed in the December Official 
Bulletin. 

The action of the President General in issuing charters to new 
Societies in North Dakota, South Dakota. North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, and the Philippines was formally approved. 

It was voted that the Executive Committee recommend to the Con- 
gress the adoption of an amendment to Article VII, Section i. of the 
Constitution of the National Society, changing the date of the Annual 
Congress as proposed by the Arkansas Society, through notice duly 
issued. The section to be amended by striking out the words "thirtieth 
day of April or on the first day" and insert in lieu thereof the words 
"third Monday" so that the section shall read as follows : 

Sec. I. The Annual Congress of the National Society for the election 
of officers and for the transaction of business shall be held on the third 
Monday of May in each year. The place of such meeting shall be 
designated by the Board of Trustees. 

It was voted that Rear Admiral George W. Baird be requested to 
ascertain, through the Ambassador of France in Washington, whether 
the incorporation of the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution by act of Congress approved June 9. 1906, would make its 
status such that its members would be permitted to wear the rosette 
and badge in France under existing law. 

It was voted that it be recommended to the Annual Congress to 
remit to the Delaware Society its indebtedness to the National Society 
for per capita dues of certain delinquent members who have now been 
dropped from the roll, the roll having been fully revised and the 
National Society dues for all present members having been paid to date. 

It was voted that the Executive Committee give its moral support to 
a proposition of ex-President Joseph G. Butler, Jr.. of the Ohio Society, 
to purchase the ancestral home of the Washington family in England. 

The Committee discussed various reports from National Committee? 
and questions of interest to the welfare of the Society to be considered 
by the Annual Congress, but without further formal action the Com- 
mittee then, at 10.30 p.m., adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark. 

Secretary General. 



MEETINGS OF TRUSTEES. 173 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 

MAY I, 191 1. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees, duly called by direction of the 
President General, was held at the Seelbach Hotel, at 9.15 a. m.. May i, 
1911. Present: President General Marble, who presided; Vice-Presi- 
dents General Thurston and Dewey, Secretary General Clark, Treas- 
urer General Burroughs, Historian General Pierson, Mr. Williams, of 
Colorado; Mr. Curtis, of Connecticut; Rear Admiral Baird, of the 
District of Columbia ; Mr. Wentworth, of Iowa ; Mr. Danforth, of 
Kentucky; Mr. Henry, of -Michigan ; Mr. Pugsley, of New York, and 
Colonel Guthrie, of Pennsylvania; also Mr. Crandon, of Massachusetts, 
and Dr. Guyer, of Colorado, and other compatriots. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board held at Toledo, Ohio. May 
3, 1910, were approved as printed in the May Official Bulletix and 
in the National Year Book for 1910. 

It was voted that the Board approve the action of the Executive 
Committee and the President General in issuing, in the name of the 
Trustees, charters for the organization of new Societies in North 
Dakota, South Dakota, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the Philip- 
pines. 

It was voted to endorse the action of the Executive Committee in 
recommending that the date of the Annual Congress be changed to the 
third Monday in May, and the Board also endorse^l other recommenda- 
tions of that committee at its meeting on April 30 and formally ap- 
proved all action of the Executive Committee at its meetings on May 4 
and November 20, 1910, and April 30, 191 1. 

After informal discussion of business to come before the Annual 
Congress, the meeting adjourned at 9.45 o'clock. 

A. Howard Clark. 

Secretary General. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES, MAY 3, 

1911. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees elected by the Annual Congress 
at its session on Wednesday morning. May 3, duly called by the Presi- 
dent General, was held at the Seelbach Hotel, at 11.45 a- m- May 3, 
1911. Present: President General Parker, who presided; Vice-Presi- 
dent General Thruston, of Kentucky: Mr. Curtis, of Connecticut; 
Colonel Thompson, of the District of Columbia; Mr. Wentworth, of 
Iowa; Mr. Crandon, of Massachusetts: Mr. Pugsley. of New York; 
Colonel Guthrie, of Pennsylvania; Mr. Dewey, of Vermont; Mr. Wood, 
of Kentucky; Colonel Mack, of Ohio, and others. 

It was voted that the following appropriations be made for the 
ensuing year: 

Contribution toward expenses of the Twenty-third Annual Congress, 
$500; for printing and distributing the Official BuLLFTriN, not to ex- 



1/4 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ceed $i,8oo; for printing and distributing the National Year Book for 
igri, not to exceed $i,ooo; for translation and printing of leaflets and 
for other necessary expenses of tlie Committee on Information for 
Aliens, not to exceed $500; for necessary expenses of the Committee 
on Prevention of Desecration of the Flag, not to exceed $50; for 
expenses of the Committee on Education, including engravings of the 
Declaration of Independence and of Trumbull's painting of the Signing 
of the Declaration, to be sold to State Societies for presentation to 
public schools, not to exceed $500. 

It was also voted to compensate the Secretary General and Registrar 
General for his services and necessary office expenses and expenses of 
attendance at the Annual Congress and meetings of the Executive 
Committee and Board of Trustees as during the past year. 

It was voted that the selection of the place of meeting of the Twenty- 
third Congress, in May. 1912, be left to the Executive Committee with 
power to act. 

The thanks of the Board of Trustees were voted to the Illinois 
Society for its invitation extended to the National Society to hold the 
Twenty-fourth Congress, in May, 1913, in the city of Chicago, and to 
the California Society for its invitation to hold the Twenty-sixth 
Annual Congress, in May, 1915, in the city of San Francisco. 

The Board considered the resolution offered by Judge Hancock and 
adopted by the Congress on May 2. providing for the return of certifi- 
cates by members dropped for non-payment of dues, and it was voted 
that the Secretary General and the Registrar General be and are hereby 
directed to carry into effect the requirements of the said resolution. 
The Registrar General was further ordered to give notice that after 
October 31. 191 1. no applications for membership would be accepted by 
the National Society except such as conform to the standard form of 
"blank as now authorized by the Board of Trustees. 

The President General presented the following nominations for mem- 
bers of the National Executive Committee, and they were thereupon 
approved by the Board : Moses Greeley Parker, M. D.. President Gen- 
eral. Chairman ex officio: Mr. William Allen Marble, of New York; 
Col. Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio; Mr. Lewis Beers Curtis, of Connecticut; 
Mr. Elmer M. Wentworth. of Iowa; IMr. R. C. Ballard Thruston. of 
Kentucky, and Mr. Edwin S. Crandon, of Massachusetts. 

It was voted that the President General be authorized to refer to the 
Executive Committee for its action any matters incident to the Louis- 
ville Congress not acted upon by the Trustees and such new business as 
in the judgment of the President General may not require the action of 
the Board of Trustees. 

There being no further business the meeting then, at 12.10 p. m., 
adjourned. 

A. Howard Cl.\rk. 

Secrefarx General. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING. I75 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, MAY 

3, 1911. 

A meeting of the members of the Executive Committee nominated by 
the President General and approved by the Trustees on May 3, 1911, 
was duly called by the President General and assembled at the Seel- 
bach Hotel, Louisville, Ky., at 12.15 P- ni.. May 3, 1911. Present: 
President General Parker, who presided ; Mr. Curtis, Mr. Crandon. 
Colonel Mack, Mr. Wentw^orth, and the Secretary General. 

It was voted that the selection of the place of meeting of the Con- 
gress of 1912 be referred \f> the President General with power to act. 
and that he be authorized to appoint a Committee on Arrangements for 
that Congress. 

The Committee discussed a resolution referred by the Annual Con- 
gress for consideration and action, recommending that the Congress of 
the United States erect a suitable memorial to General Henry Lee, 
^'Light Horse Harry," of Virginia, the valiant cavalry ofificer of the 
War of the Revolution, and it was voted that the Secretary General 
be instructed to ascertain the facts in regard to the burial place of Gen- 
eral Lee, and what steps had so far been taken to erect a memorial to 
that officer, and to report thereon to the Executive Committee at its 
next meeting. 

It was voted that the President General be empowered to act for the 
Executive Committee in matters not already acted upon that may need 
attention after the proceedings of the Louisville Congress and of the 
Trustees' meeting and Executive Committee meeting of this date have 
been written up. 

The Secretary General announced that a compatriot had again offered 
to present a gold ceremonial badge of the Society, to be awarded to the 
State Society that during the coming year shall enroll in proportion to 
its membership the greatest number of sons of present members. It 
was voted to accept the offer with the thanks of the Committee. 

The Committee then informally considered various routine matters 
and measures to promote the growth and broaden the influence of the 
Society. There being no further business the Committee then, at 12.45 

p. m. adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretarv General. 



SOCIAL FUNCTIONS AT LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 

At 4.30 o'clock. Sunday afternoon. April 30. delegates were invited 
to divine service in Christ Church Cathedral, conducted by Very Rev. 
Charles Ewell Craik. Dean of the Cathedral and Chaplain of the Ken- 
tuckv Societv. assisted bv the Rev. Richard L. McCready. 

The Rev. 'Mr. McCready spoke on the subject of "International 
Arbitration and Consequent Universal Peace." He said that it is no 



176 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

longer a Utopian dream — that public sentiment the world over is in 
favor of the idea — and he expressed the hope that the Sons of the 
American Revolution at their present Congress would declare them- 
selves in favor of it. 

Delegates were presented with personal cards extending to them the 
courtesies of the Pendennis Club, the Tavern Club, and the Louisville 
Country Club during their stay in Louisville. 

On Monday afternoon, at 12.15 o'clock, ladies of the party were 
invited to the Louisville Country Club for luncheon, after which they 
were taken on a motor trip, stopping at "Landsdowne," the residence 
of Mrs. S. Thruston Ballard, for tea. 

On Monday evening, from 8 to 10 o'clock, the officers, delegates, 
and accompanying ladies were entertained by a reception at the Pen- 
dennis Club, Mrs. George Lewis Danforth, wife of the President of 
the Kentucky Society, as chairman of a committee of ladies, serving 
as hostess on this occasion. 

On Tuesday, at 12.30 p. m., the delegates were taken in motors to 
the Louisville Countr}- Club, where there was a buffet luncheon, after 
which they were shown some of the country east of Louisville, stop- 
ping at "Landsdowne" for refreshments. 

At 4 p. m. the visiting ladies were entertained at tea by Mrs. Gilmer 
Speed Adams at her residence. 

At 7.30 p. m. the Kentucky Society entertained the general officers 
and delegates with a banquet, and at the same time there was a banquet 
for the accompanying ladies, both at the Seelbach Hotel. 

BANQUET AT THE SEELBACH HOTEL. 

The retiring President General, Mr. Marble, presided as toastmaster. 

The first speaker of the evening was Gen. Basil Wilson Duke, of 
Kentucky, whom Toastmaster Marble introduced as one the mere men- 
tion of whose name in the newspapers during the Civil War had 
"brought terror to the hearts of all of us young fellows in the North," 
but whom they Avere equally glad to welcome now and clasp by the 
hand. 

ADDRESS BY GEN. BASIL WILSON DUKE ON GEN. GEORGE 

ROGERS CLARK. 

Mr. Toastmaster and Compatriots, Ladies and Gentlemen : If I 
ever have inspired anj^ terror in any one, it certainly must have been in 
"the newspapers." However, that is a matter about which I am free 
to confess that many a time the other fellow has inspired terror in me. 
CLaughter.) But that time is all past now; "the sword has been beaten 
into the plowshare" — I forget the rest of it — and we have shaken hands 
over the "bloody chasm." (Laughter and applause.) 

When, Mr. Toastmaster, we reflect upon the inception, the initiatory 
phases of that "hard contest for freedom and struggle for independ- 
ence." for whose splendid consummation Americans can scarcely be 



BANQUET AT LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 77 

sufficiently grateful, it is difficult to determine which of the Colonial 
peoples earliest felt the impulse resulting in achievement so mighty, or 
who among the sages and heroes whose names we so revere first gave 
it definite expression. 

When James Otis, in Massachusetts, manfully opposed the execution 
of the writs of assistance, and Patrick Henry, in Virginia, thundered 
against the Stamp Act, each voiced the feeling not only of his own 
immediate Colony, but that of the people of all the Colonies. 

When on the 5th of September, 1774, the first Continental Congress 
assembled at Philadelphia, it was in obedience to a general demand and 
almost universal sentiment, simultaneously expressed. 

When on the 19th of April, 1775, that "shot which was heard around 
the world" rang out at Concord, it fired a mine already fully charged, 
sounded the note of predetermined revolution, and heralded action for 
which every patriotic heart was prepared. In quick succession, with a 
celerity which proved how ready and how eager all were for the trial, 
every Colony responded with some act indicative of passionate sympa- 
thy or stern defiance of the hated British rule, and the slogan of 
resistance resounded throughout the land, as when in some army ar- 
rayed for battle the roar of the signal gun is answered by the firing 
all along the line. 

It is not easy, therefore, I say, to determine to which particular indi- 
vidual or Colony may be ascribed the credit of having inaugurated the 
struggle out of which a heritage so glorious has come. 

But if we can make no such selection among the authors of our 
independence — among those who made possible the adoption of insti- 
tutions in which, we think, are blended liberty and law, the rights of 
the individual and the just obligations of citizenship, more wisely than 
was ever known before — there can be, I believe, no such difficulty in 
indicating those to whom should be accorded the distinction of having 
done that which, more than aught else, assured the future growth and 
material grandeur, the territorial expansion of this Republic; that 
which enabled the United States, having been established, to attain 
their subsequent almost unexampled power and prosperity. 

Such recognition is unquestionably due George Rogers Clark (ap- 
plause) and the two eminent Virginians who, appreciating his daring 
genius, gave him cordial sympathy and encouragement — they could give 
him little material aid — in what we are almost justified in terming his 
inspired adventure. 

In explanation of this statement, I may be permitted to briefly sketch 
the conditions existing at the date when Clark undertook the expedition 
which has been aptly designated the "Conquest of the Illinois." 

After the termination of the French and Indian War, by which con- 
flict was finally ended the long and fierce debate between France and 
England regarding which of those nations should dominate this conti- 
nent, France relinquished to England not only the Canadas, but all of 
the territory she had previously claimed east of the Mississippi, except 
a few small islands in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence and the island on 
12 — SR 



178 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

which New Orleans is situated. New Orleans and all of the territory 
she had claimed west of the Mississippi, France ceded to Spain. . 

Emigration from the Colonies on the Atlantic by those seeking new r 
homes in the wilderness at once began. Directed at first to more con- 
tiguous territory, it was later attracted, by the glowing accounts of 
their extraordinary fertility, to lands lying beyond the Alleghanies. 
Kentucky and Tennessee, previously visited only by explorers and 
hunters, were entered by bands of immigrants resolved on permanent 
settlement. 

This territory had long been the favorite hunting ground of many 
Indian tribes; of the fierce clans which dwelt north of the Ohio, and 
of others belonging to the powerful Cherokee confederacy, which lived 
farther to the south. Settlement in this region, therefore, was not only 
difficult, but attended with extreme danger. The jealousy and sus- 
picion always felt by the red man towards the white had been inflamed 
by the recent events of Lord Dunmore's War into implacable hatred 
and fury. Moreover, Indian animosity against the white settlers was 
now stimulated by the English, as it had formerly been by the French. 

In 1774 all of the territory included in the great triangle between the 
Mississippi River and the Ohio had been, by order of the Council, 
annexed to the Province of Quebec, and shortly after the beginning of 
the Revolutionary War Colonel Hamilton, the British commander at 
Detroit, organized the northwestern tribes and incited them to attacks 
upon the new settlements south of the Ohio. This fiendish policy had 
such effect that at the close of the year 1776 these incursions had 
become so frequent and so unusually relentless that the whites had 
almost given up hope of maintaining their ground. So incessant were 
they, in the latter part of 1776, during 1777, and part of 1778, that the 
settlers were almost constantly confined to the limits of their stock- 
aded forts, and a few, abandoning the struggle, returned to their 
former homes east of the Appalachian Range. 

In this dire extremity they were saved by the sagacity, the vigor, the 
dauntless courage of George Rogers Clark. Born in Albemarle County, 
Virginia, Clark, when he came first to Kentucky, in 1775, was barely 
twenty-three years of age. His occupation was that of land surveyor, 
but he had some military experience, having commanded a company at 
the battle of Point Pleasant — that battle which, as many of you re- 
member, was an epoch in itself, by which the great tribes of the 
Wyandottes, Shawanese, and Delawares were completely crushed and 
their hostility quenched for the time being. At any rate, he was a born 
captain and leader of men. 

In addition to sound, clear judgment, an unusually audacious and 
enterprising spirit, and capacity for prompt, unhesitating decision, he 
possessed those physical traits and the personal prowess so necessary 
to leadership among rude and reckless backwoodsmen, more than half 
of whose lives had been passed in battle. 

When Clark, having returned to Virginia for some reason, came 
back to Kentucky, in the latter part of 1776, he at once perceived the 



BANQUET AT LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 1 79 

danger and the remedy. He realized that the Kentucky settlements, 
so few in number and scanty in population, so isolated from each other 
and remote from all support, must inevitably be destroyed if the at- 
tacks of the Indians were systematically continued. Already the tide 
of immigration had been checked. He saw, sooner and more clearly 
than any one else, that the wild nature of the Indian was being con- 
trolled by an influence which could give it methodical direction and 
teach persistent effort to his bloody hostility. He saw behind the 
savage the English commander at Detroit, who furnished him with arms 
and ammunition and paid him a bounty for scalps, and the bitter scorn 
and anger with which Clark spoke of that "hair-buying Hamilton" 
evinced both his feeling and his purpose. 

In only one way could the danger be minimized and the settlements 
be saved, and that was by going into the enemy's country and striking 
down the malign power which was impelling the red warriors upon the 
warpath. And it was that which Randolph had in mind when he 
bestowed upon Clark the appellation which so aptly described his mili- 
tary character — the "Hannibal of the West." 

Clark proceeded again to Virginia and submitted his plan to Patrick 
Henry and Thomas Jefferson. Both warmly approved it. It especially 
appealed to the fiery heart of Henry; for he, 

"The forest-born Demosthenes, 
Whose thunder tamed the tyrant of the seas," 

rejoiced at any opportunity of striking a blow at the enemy. 

But Virginia was at that time herself very much straitened, and was 
straining her every resource to the utmost to protect her immediate 
territory and furnish men and munitions to the army of Washington. 
All, therefore, that Governor Henry could do for Clark was to give 
him a commission as major, authority to enlist troops, five hundred 
pounds of gunpowder, and a small sum of money with which to pur- 
chase a few military supplies. 

When we think of the elaborate and costly equipment of modern 
armies, and of how such an expedition would now be fitted out, this 
meager resistance, however well meant, seems almost a mockery. But 
with abundant pluck and hope he undertook the task. It was like the 
son of Jove and Alcumena going forth with only his club and lion- 
skin to perform the mighty labors commanded from Olympus, and in 
his six feet four inches of stalwart manhood Clark, another youthful 
Hercules, started on a mission also destined to shape into concrete form 
and expression the will and purpose of the gods. (Applause.) 

It was not until May 2y, 1778, that he was able to assemble the men 
he could enlist, about one hundred and fifty in number, at the falls of 
the Ohio. This force was composed of four companies, commanded 
by Captains Joseph Bowman, Leonard Helm, William Harrod, and 
John Montgomery. Pardon me, gentlemen from other States, but we 
Kentuckians are proud of these names and cannot well omit them. 
(Applause.) Simon Kenton, one of the typical pioneers, and compeer 



l8o SONS O? THE AMERICAN REVOI.UTION. 

and almost the equal of Boone in reputation and prowess, was the 
guide and hunter for the expedition. Clark, embarking his men on 
flat-boats on the 24th of June, descended the Ohio to a point on the 
Illinois shore nearly opposite the mouth of the Tennessee River, and 
thence marched across forest and prairie to Kaskaskia. He surprised 
and took that village and the fort near by on the night of July 4. That 
was the first occasion, undoubtedly, upon which the Fourth of July 
was ever celebrated in Illinois. (Applause and laughter.) But it was 
the precursor of many such celebrations, perhaps through centuries to 
come, and certainly throughout all the broad lands upon which the sun 
looks down in its course, from the shores of the Atlantic until its 
sinking splendors gleam on the waters of the great Pacific Ocean. 
(Applause.) Two days later Captain Bowman, with a small detach- 
ment, took Cahokia, and Vincennes surrendered August i. Three of 
the English strongholds and centers of Indian hostility had been cap-j 
tured. Clark, however, was unable to adequately garrison these places,' 
as his men were only enlisted for a short period of time, and he was 
compelled to listen to their demands to go back to Kentucky and assist 
in the defense of their own homes; and, relying on the friendship of 
the French inhabitants — and he did so with justice — left only one man 
with Captain Helm at Vincennes, so that that place was retaken in 
December by the British commandant at Detroit. Late in January 
Colonel Vigo, of St. Louis,, brought Clark this news, informing him 
also that Hamilton had then only eighty men, but expected to be rein- 
forced early in the spring, when he intended to march into Kentucky 
with an overwhelming force. Clark at once resolved to act upon this 
intelligence; but his small command was widely dispersed, and it was 
necessary to collect some supplies. 

In that day of diificult communication and more difficult transporta- 
tion, all this necessitated delay. Nevertheless, on the 7th of February, 
nine days after he had learned of its recapture, he was on his way to 
Vincennes. It was the middle of a terrible winter. All the region for 
many miles around Vincennes and through which Clark must march 
was flooded and alternately a quagmire or an ice-field. Hamilton be- 
lieved himself safe. He did not know the man with whom he had 
to deal. 

That march to Vincennes is almost without a parallel, even in the 
annals of pioneer hardship and endurance. For days the men waded 
shoulder deep through the icy waters, and slept at night on the few 
hillocks which were not submerged. With little food, with little fuel 
to provide fires, they pushed unflinchingly on, sustained more than 
anything else by the iron will and buoyant spirit of their leader. Clark 
reached Vincennes on February 24 and immediately began the siege. 
Hamilton asked a parley, but it was sternly refused, and he surren- 
dered the next day. 

The immediate efifect of this expedition was an almost total cessa- 
tion, for nearly two years, of Indian incursions into Kentucky. During 
that period immigration, which had been previously checked, poured 



BANQUET AT I^OUISVILLE CONGRESS. l8l 

rapidly in, and when hostilities were actively renewed, in 1780, the 
settlers were strong enough to maintain themselves. (Applause.) 

Many have believed with Theodore Roosevelt (applause) that, had 
the settlements in Kentucky and Tennessee been destroyed and the 
settlers massacred or driven back beyond the Alleghanies — and but for 
Clark's expedition they would almost certainly have been destroyed — 
that region would have remained permanently in English possession, 
and the American Republic would never have been extended beyond the 
limits of the thirteen original Colonies. I believe that history will 
accept this conclusion. 

Is it probable that Englsfnd, had she been in undisputed possession 
not only of the Canadas, but of all the territory between the Alle- 
ghanies and the Mississippi at the date when the struggle closed, would 
have consented to the terms of the treaty of peace of 1783, by which 
she surrendered that vast territory to the United States? Is it con- 
ceivable that the United States, then so restricted in population and 
resources, could have wrested it from England by another war? 

Is it not easier to believe that England, still holding this territory, 
with the Canadas, would have continued to be a dangerous and menac- 
ing foe in our immediate vicinity, not only retarding our growth, but 
threatening our safety? 

England's pride and prestige had been wounded, but she had suffered 
little material injury by her defeat in America. She was still mighty 
in arms ; indeed, more formidable than ever, in her almost limitless 
resources. 

In any event, perhaps, this continent would have been developed to 
the same extent that we witness today, but it might have been done 
under English and not American auspices. The greater part of it — 
like India, Australia, and Africa — might have become tributary to her 
colonizing genius and imperial dominion. Spain, in impotent decrepi- 
tude, would have yielded her Louisiana, which France could never have 
regained; and Kipling might perhaps have added New Orleans and 
San Francisco to that choir of stately cities which, in his ringing verse, 
chant on so many shores and oceans the praise and testimony of Eng- 
land's wide-reaching sway. (Applause.) 

In this connection, my friends, I trust I may be pardoned for calling 
attention to three notable occasions upon which Virginia expressed and 
emphasized the American determination that there never should be 
permitted autocratic rule or alien occupation upon this continent : First, 
at the beginning of the Revolution; second, during that period, and 
third, in the post-Revolutionary period. First, when she protested so 
promptly and so boldly against the imposition of the Stamp Tax and 
resisted its payment; second, when she sent George Rogers Clark forth 
on this eventful expedition into the wilderness of the West, and third, 
when Jefferson, by the Louisiana Purchase, made it impossible thence- 
forth for any inimical foreign influence to be exerted upon this conti- 
nent. (Applause.) Without forgetting the glorious history of her 
sister States, and with no desire to make invidious comparison, I think 



l82 SONS OF the: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

we may well render this tribute to that valiant Commonwealth "'whose 
well-lab'ring sword hath three times slain the semblance of the King." 

Did Clark, and Henry, and Jefferson realize the full meaning of 
their work? No human mind could then have done so. They were 
building better than they knew. But they understood — Clark best of 
all — that they must do this work to protect and save their brethren 
who had gone forth to subdue the wilderness ; and we cannot help 
believing that Henry's strong sense and Jefferson's prophetic intellect 
had some glimpse and forecast of the wondrous future. (Applause.) 

Clark served his country, in after years, well and faithfully, and died 
in poverty and solitude. In his distress he applied to Virginia for aid — 
some small donation or grant of land. The Legislature of Virginia 
voted him the gift of a sword. He declined it, saying: '"When Virginia j 
needed swords, I gave her mine; now that I need bread, she offers me ; 
a sword." 

He lies in an obscure and almost unnoted grave; but the wide and 
mighty West and its ever-increasing greatness is his real and fitting 
monument. (Great applause, long continued, the Congress rising as 
one man.) 

ADDRESS BY REV. W. W. LANDRUM ON THE CLERGY IN 
THE REVOLUTION. 

The Reverend W. W. Landrum, D. D., of the Broadway Baptist 
Church, Louisville, was the next speaker, and began by saying that so 
much had been said, and so well said, that he would not presume to 
trespass upon the patience of his audience for any considerable length 
of time; that, like most of the railway systems of the country, he was 
blessed with fair "terminal facilities" (laughter), and had no desire to 
place himself in the attitude of the minister who, after a long and 
prosy discourse, began his peroration with the question, "What shall I 
say more?" and thereby moved a little girl in his congregation, already 
weary and worn from his long sermon, to remark to her mother, "Tell 
him to say 'Amen!'" (Laughter.) Dr. Landrum then continued: 

War, said the late William Tecumseh Sherman, is — well, quite a 
different place from that country where you, compatriots, hope to have 
that great Congress by and by. The Revolution, of course, was war, 
and doubtless it had in it many of those elements which General Sher- 
man described as belonging to a warmer country. Notwithstanding 
that fact, however, the clergy of the original Thirteen Colonies were 
almost unanimously in favor of it. They were, to be sure, the servants 
of the Prince of Peace, and they were sometimes reminded that their 
attitude was entirely inconsistent with their calling. The answer which 
they made to their consciences and to their country was something after 
this fashion : "We are men of peace ; we believe in peace ; we are very 
anxious to promote peace in every possible way; in fact, we are de- 
termined to have peace, if we have to fight for it!" (Laughter and 
applause.) 



k 



banqui:t at Louisville; congress. 183 



Washington, at the very outset of the Revolution, appreciated the 
services to be rendered to their country by the ministry. He believed 
that no army would ever move forward to victory that was not swayed 
by lofty conviction — a conviction which involved not only the judgment 
and the conscience and the will, but the affections also. At the outset 
of the war, there was a chaplain for every regiment. The General-in- 
Chief required his troops promptly at the appointed hour on every 
Lord's day to attend public worship, provided the weather and other 
conditions were favorable. Care was taken that the surgeon of each 
regiment should discover and immediately relieve an illness known at 
the time as "morbus sabbaticus," or "Sunday sickness" (laughter) — a 
disease which even now sometimes attacks, in our modern American 
cities, the sons of our sires. (Laughter and applause.) 

Congress, in 1777, made some slight change in the status of chaplains, 
reducing their number, but putting a higher value upon their services 
by raising their rank. In 1778 there were twenty-one brigadier-chaplains 
or chaplains, each one assigned to a brigade. It was especially required 
that the men chosen should be recommended to the high office by the 
brigadier general, and that they should possess character, courage and 
devotion to the cause of the Colonies. Congress approved the nomina- 
tion of the general, and the appointee enjoyed the rank and full pay of 
a colonel of infantry. We Kentuckians have always loved colonels — we 
have made colonels of you tonight! (Laughter.) It is a land — 

"Where the corn is full of kernels, 
And the colonels are full of corn." 

(Laughter and applause.) The chaplains of that day were men of 
influence. They were more potential in arousing the spirit of the men, 
many times, than the beat of drum or the roll of musketry. As a rule, 
they took their texts from the Old Testament, having great care to 
single out and expound such passages as best suited their purposes. 
The experiences of the children of Israel in Egypt, under the hard rule 
of Pharaoh, described the condition of our ancestors. Washington, like 
Moses, was always .the master. The war itself was the wilderness 
through which they were passing to the happy land of Canaan. To 
illustrate their style of preaching in those days, a story is told of a 
soldier of Virginia who went to one of these old chaplains after he had 
listened to his sermon one day, and said : "Chaplain, up to the time I 
heard you, I knew very little of God. and less of the devil ; but since 
hearing you, I have come to the conclusion that I ought to love both, 
and to pray that both should be on our side." (Laughter and applause.) 
It seems to me eminently fitting that this Congress should have held 
its first meeting on the Lord's Day, marching two by two from this 
hostelry to Christ Church Cathedral for the worship of Almighty God. 
(Applause.) There, our own beloved Chaplain, Dean Craik, of the 
Cathedral (applause), had prepared for you an inspiring choral service 
that could not have been surpassed in any cathedral in this country 
(applause), and there Compatriot McCready delivered a noble discourse 



184 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

properly befitting the occasion, and bringing before us a lofty concep- 
tion of our duty in civic life today. (Cries of "Good!" and applause.) 
As I sat there in the house of God, I thought that if the spirits de- 
parted take cognizance of what is going on upon earth, the great 
Chapters and Congress up yonder at headquarters in heaven must have 
been pleased at such an inauguration of this Congress here. 

We are not the men to deify our ancestors. We are not in favor of 
turning our faces backward and declaring that our fathers were unlike 
those of any other group of American citizens. But we are here to say 
that men are always wise when they look backward to see whether the 
ideals of the present reach up to those of the past. Our fathers were 
men of reverence. They believed in God the Father Almighty, maker 
of heaven and earth. They believed in a Lord's Day, which has been 
set apart for rest and for worship. They believed in the Church, which 
has always been the conscience of the community, and which, in every 
moral and intellectual movement, has set four-square to every wind that 
blows. (Cries of "Good!" and applause.) 

We hear much in our day of the "new" theology, of the "new" 
science, of the "new" woman, and even of the "new" Ten Command- 
ments. But we are the men who are pointing backward to the old 
theology, the old science — so far as it relates to civic government, to 
the old church, and to the old woman — if that term can ever be ap- 
plied to woman. (Applause.) Our object is to conserve for the genera- 
tions yet to come what was best in the past. (Applause.) Others may 
direct their attention at this time to the conservation of Alaskan coal- 
fields, or to the water powers of the West, or to the mighty forests of 
the Appalachian Range ; but ours be the task, compatriots, to preserve 
those principles which illuminated the minds of our forefathers, warmed 
their hearts and purified their lives. (Applause.) We believe that we 
are a nation of destiny. We believe that, like Israel of old, we have a 
world-wide mission. As we derive our culture from Greece and our 
law from Rome, so we received our righteousness from Israel. America 
has now reached a world-wide position : she fronts the East and the 
West. The sun never sets upon the soil of our country. We are look- 
ing towards the East and reaching out the hand of arbitration and 
international brotherhood. We reach our hand out towards the West, 
and seek to illustrate a nobler civilization in those vast empires that are 
just emerging from the slow civilization of the past. We are a people, 
therefore, that have a distinctly defined mission. Personally, I believe 
that each and every one of you, as a Son of the American Revolution, 
is as distinctly called of God to make America the civilizing nation of 
the world as I am to preach the Gospel. (Applause.) I am not here 
to debase the ministry or to drag it down to any position lower than 
that accorded it in Holy Scripture ; but I am here to put my arms around 
all my fellow compatriots and lift them up to the same platform that I 
occupy, that they may understand that they are the ministers of God to 
transmit to generations yet to come, and to diffuse all over the world, 
those high principles which throbbed in the breasts of our Revolutionary 
sires. (Applause.) 



\ 



BANQUET AT LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 185 

"Oh who would not brave champions be 
In this the lordUest chivalry ! 
For there are hearts that ache to see 
The day dawn of our victory. 
Fight, brothers, fight with tongue and pen ; 
We'll win the golden day again, 
And love's millennial moon will rise, 
O'er happy hearts and waiting eyes. 
We will brave champions be 
In this the lordliest chivalry. 

And now my benediction : I lift up my hands over your heads, com- 
patriots, and say to each and every one of you — The Lord love you, 
every one (the convention rises as one man) ; the Lord take you, every 
one — but not yet! (Laughter and applause.) 

ADDRESS BY HON. W. W. STEPHENSON, OF 
HARRODSBURG, KY. 

For patriotism and prompt decisive action, for strategic movement 
and dauntless courage, for masterly achievement and far-reaching result, 
Isaac Shelby and his associates, for their victory at King's Mountain, 
deserve to be remembered as heroes. This battle, planned and executed 
by Shelby, Sevier, Campbell, McDowell, Cleveland, Winston, and Wil- 
liams as officers, and a small force of volunteer untrained mountain men, 
is memorable for having changed the face of the Revolution. 

f'ive years had passed since that morning in April 

"When once the embattled farmers stood. 
And fired the shot heard round the world;" 

But Independence was far from achievement. Clinton and Cornwallis, 
unvictorious in the North, had determined to strike a fatal blow in the 
South by attacking its chief city, Charleston, and then extend their 
victories throughout the southland. Charleston fell May 12, 1780. 
Camden and other strategic points of the interior soon followed. A 
policy of confiscation, coercion, cruelty, barbarity towards the patriots 
was adopted in order to crush the rebellious spirit. Whigs were forced, 
as far as possible, by bribery and threats to join the British Army. 
Patriot prisoners on parole were told to help the British or they must 
be "treated as rebels to the government of the King." O, human 
frailty! how few are strong to remain true to the losing side! The 
weak, and they are always many — were cowed into swearing allegiance. 
Clinton reported to the home government: "The inhabitants from 
every quarter, declare their allegiance to the King, and offer their 
services in arms. There are few men in South Carolina who are not 
our friends or in arms with us." Walpole said, "We look at America 
as at our feet." The storm of adversity lowered darkly over the 
patriot cause. The British expected now that North Carolina would be 
an easy prey and Georgia added without resistance. They calculated 
that with possession of the Carolinas, Georgia and New York, Virginia 



l86 SONS OF THi; AMERICAN REVOI^UTION. 

could not maintain resistance, and the rebellion would be crushed. They 
held all of the strategic points. The humiliation of the Colonies seemed 
indeed inevitable. But west of the mountains of North Carolina and in 
Southwest Virginia dwelt a people hard}' and brave and unswerving in 
principle who would not know despair or acknowledge defeat. These 
were Scotch-Irish, of whom Washington once said in the darkest 
moment of the Revolution, "That, if all others failed him, he would 
plant his standard on the Blue Ridge of Virginia, rally around him the 
people of the Valle}^ and make his last stand for the liberties of 
America.'' 

From their mountain fastnesses under the leadership of Williams, 
Pickens, Sumpter and Marion — much in the manner of Scotch High- 
landers — they harried the British Army. 

Cornwallis had advanced by easy conquest until he reached Mecklen- 
burg County, N. C, which had so early made its "Declaration of 
Independence;" but there he found himself in a hornet's nest. He then 
dispatched Col. Patrick Ferguson, a brave and skilful officer, to embody 
the loyalists beyond the Wateree and Broad rivers and intercept the 
mountain men and crush their power. Ferguson sent the word forward 
"that, if the officers west of the mountains did not lay down their 
opposition to the British arms, he would march his army over, burn and 
lay waste their country and hang their leaders." Shelby was in Ken- 
tucky surveying when the message of Ferguson reached him late in 
August. He immediately rode fifty or sixty miles to see Sevier and 
remained with him two days concerting plans. They determined to 
raise all the riflemen they could, march hastily through the mountains 
and surprise Ferguson. Sevier met with enthusiastic response in his 
work of arousing the bordermen ; one-half of the men capable of bear- 
ing arms enlisted for active service, and the other half remained at 
home to protect the settlements. 

Shelby secured the co-operation of Col. Wm. Campbell, of Washing- 
ton County, Va., who raised four hundred men, and also that of Mc- 
Dowell. Notwithstanding Shelby had taken the initiative in organizing 
the little army to repel Ferguson, with unselfish patriotism he nominated 
Campbell for commander-in-chief, taking no thought for self or place, 
but for results that would save the day for the Colonies. Sycamore 
Shoals, on Watauga, was appointed the rendezvous, and the scene there 
September 25 was a memorable one. There were Shelby, Sevier, and 
McDowell as leaders and brave determined men to follow. "Never did , 
mountain recess contain within it a loftier or a more enlarged patriot- 
ism ; never a cooler or more determined courage." The little army 
moved the next morning because Shelby urged that prompt action was 
absolutely essential to success; and it was joined by other volunteers, 
until on the 30th it consisted of 3,000 men, whom Ferguson contempt- 
uously denominated "dirty mongrels," but in whose veins flowed the 
blood of Scotch Covenanters, French Huguenots, and English Sea 
rovers — all animated with one purpose, the destruction of the marauders 
under Ferguson. 



BANQUET AT LOUISVILLE CONGRESS. 187 

Ferguson, learning of the gathering storm of indignant, outraged 
patriots, began a hasty retreat towards the main army, sending ahead 
messengers, who were shot. Finding escape impossible, he selected 
Kings Mountain for defense, a range 1,700 feet high and half a mile 
in width, on the border between the Carolinas. The immense natural 
advantages of the position attest his genius. So secure did he feel 
that on the morning of the 7th he exclaimed, "Well, boys, here is a 
place from which all the rebels outside of hell cannot drive us !" At 
3 o'clock the same day the American advance guard of 1,000 picked 
men arrived at the foot of the mountain. When within three miles of 
Ferguson's camp they met some unarmed men, from whom his exact 
position was ascertained and a plan of attack was agreed upon, which 
was to surround the eminence and make a simultaneous assault upon 
every part of it. They advanced, the right wing led by Sevier and 
Winston, the left by Cleveland and Williams, while Campbell on the 
right and Shelby on the left composed the center. Shelby and Camp- 
bell pushed up to near the crest, when Ferguson opened fire. They 
fell back slightly and then advanced nearer. The British charged with 
bayonets; but their ranks were galled by deadly flank fire, first from 
the division of Sevier and Winston, then from that of Cleveland and 
Williams and McDowell, while the center rallied and attacked now 
their flank. "Shelby, a man of the hardiest make, stiff as iron, among 
the dauntless singled out for dauntlessness, went right onward and 
upward, like a man who had but one thing to do, and but one thought, 
to do it." Thus entrapped, after an hour's desperate fighting, as the 
Americans closed in, Ferguson fell, and his successor demanded and 
received quarter. Of Ferguson's 1,125 men, 389 were killed or wounded, 
and the remainder surrendered. The Americans lost 20 killed and 60 
wounded. 

This brilliant victory resembled that at Bennington in its suddenness 
and completeness. The one was the forerunner of the surrender of 
Burgoyne, the other of that of Cornwallis. No battle of the war was 
more obstinately contested. The Americans were exasperated by the 
cruelties of the Tories. To the latter it was a question of life and 
death. The skill and gallantry of the officers and the valor of the 
men who won the victory were not surpassed during the war. The 
effect was far-reaching. The dark cloud which enveloped the South 
and entire country in gloom was dispelled. Cornwallis was forced to 
retreat. Thomas Jefferson said, "It was the joyful enunciation of that 
turn in the tide of success that terminated the Revolutionary War with 
the seal of our independence." 

ADDRESS BY RIGHT REV. CHARLES E. WOODCOCK. 

The Right Reverend Charles E. Woodcock, Bishop of the Diocese of 
Kentucky, was the final speaker of the evening, and the toastmaster in- 
troduced him as representing the "Tory element" of the Revolution, but 
for which there would have been no opportunity on the part of patriotic 



l88 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Americans today to celebrate the Battle of Lexington, Bunker Hill, the 
Boston Tea incident, the Surrender of Cornwallis, the Declaration of 
Independence, or any other of the great anniversaries of our country's 
early history— no Sons of the American Revolution, and no Kentucky 
Society ! ( Laughter. ) 

Bishop Woodcock said: 

Mr. ToASTMASTER, Ladies and Gentlemen : If it had not been for the 
Tories you would not have been here at all (applause) ; and if the 
Tories had exhibited half the courage that a descendant of the Tories 
exhibits in speaking here at this late hour, you would have been fighting 
still. (Applause and laughter.) But I realize that if I continue to 
speak you may feel somewhat like the man who married a widow, and 
being asked six months afterwards how he was getting along, replied : 
*'I am a whole lot sorrier her husband is dead than she is." (Laughter 
and applause.) 

Now, if there were time, I should like to give you a little good advice. 
What is good advice? That which old men give young men when they 
can no longer set them a bad example! (Great laughter and applause.) 
Though the descendant of a Tory, I am proud to be an American citi- 
zen. (Applause and cries of "Good.") I was born in America, and 
claim all the rights and privileges that you have. (Long applause.) 
While the Tories did not win the thing for which they fought, you are 
the witness that they did not fight in vain, for the Tories gave your 
forefathers of the Revolution a reason for existence, and the Sons of 
the American Revolution something to honor and commemorate. (Ap- 
plause.) As I look over this goodly company, well-kept, well-appareled 
and well-fed, it would seem as though there had been no war since the 
American Revolution. (Laughter.) You need to spell that word 
"Revolution" differently: You need to drop the R and begin that word 
with an B — "Evolution." It is the evolution of brothers, who once 
fought on opposing sides, now welcoming each other in equality, 
liberty and fraternity! (Cries of "Good!" and great applause.) 

Were there time I should take great pleasure in speaking to you on 
the pride of citizenship, on the worth of character, and on the love of 
country — and I would willingly dispute with you, Sons of the American 
Revolution, upon the question of love for this country, and the rights 
and liberties we enjoy here. (A voice: "Right you are!") The recol- 
lection of ancestry is the basis of national greatness; but I can see no 
reason for the existence of an organization like this, unless it con- 
tributes something to the country. It cannot live on family history. 
I know some people who have so many ancestors that they have quit 
work to look them up. (Laughter.) You men of affairs are prone to 
say, in speaking of what a man is worth, that a man is worth so many 
millions of dollars. He is not— he has merely got them. (Laughter and 
applause.) A man is worth no more in the United States than he con- 
tributes to the civic, moral and spiritual welfare of his country. (Cries 
of "Good !" and applause.) The sum total of the character of American 



BANQUET AT LOUISVII^LE CONGRESS. 189 

citizenship is an unimpeachable American manhood! (Great applause.) 
We welcome all peoples to this land, but we believe that America is 
good enough for Americans; and if there be those here who think 
otherwise, we will welcome their exit from this country. (Applause.) 
We need an American citizenship that can withstand the evil forces that 
work against us. We need big men, honest men, men that are true and 
loyal. We should not estimate them by what they may be worth in 
stocks and bonds, for it is a shoddy, plutocratic, un-American standard, 
to estimate a man by his money. (Applause.) I honor and admire and 
congratulate the man who has honestly accumulated money ; and I don't 
care how much he has. A man has as much right to get rich as he has 
to live, and I have no sympathy with those who are so yellow-minded 
as to think because a man is rich there is something suspicious about 
him. But do not measure him by his money; measure him by what he 
would be if he had not a dollar in the world. (Applause.) 

Now, then, we have a character to maintain. And what is character? 
A nation, like an individual, has character, and the sum of individual 
character makes the character of the nation at large. By its character, 
a nation will stand or fall. What is that character here? It is the 
combined, composite character of all the American people. It is not so 
strong as the strongest, and, thank God, it is not so weak as the weak- 
est; it is the average character of the people. And so it is we need 
strong individual character, that the character of the nation may be 
likewise strong. A nation will be judged by the kind of people it turns 
out. The man we need is he who does not fail his brother, who does 
not shame his mother, the man who loves his country, home and God; 
that is the man we need in America. (Applause.) 

If you would endow this land, but not by means of wealth alone ; if 
you would make her strong, but not by army and navy alone; if you 
would give her honor in the eyes of all the nations, but not because of 
our national resources, our population or prosperity — if you would do 
all these things, let it be through and by a people who respect the law, 
and who would give their lives as they do their love for their country. 
Let this be the land where politics shall be a vocation, where public 
service shall be a personal honor, where the life of man is safe and the 
honor of woman is revered. And that land is our land, for, God bless 
her ! it is America. (Great applause.) "God give us men ! A time like 
this demands great hearts, true faith and willing hands. Men whom the 
lust of office does not kill. Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy. 
Men who possess opinions and a will ; men of honor ; men who will not 
lie ; men who can stand before a demagogue and scorn his treacherous 
flatteries without winking. Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the 
fog, in public duty and in private thinking." God give us such men. 
Men descendants of the fathers of the American Revolution! (Great 
and long-continued applause, the members rising to their feet.) 



b 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 
ENROLLED FROM MAY 1, 1910. TO APRIL 30. 1911 

(Continued from 1910 Year Book.) 



ARIZONA SOCIETY. 



HENRY B. GATE, Phcenix, Ariz. (18797). Son of George VV. and Levara 
Serena (Brown) Gate; grandson of Isaac and Clarissa (McKnight) Gate; 
great-grandson of Enoch Cate, Corporal New Hampshire Troops, pensioned. 

WILLIAM MARSTON SEABURY, Phoenix, Ariz. (18798). Son of William 
Jones and Alice Van Wyck (Beare) Seabury; grandson of Thomas Marston 
and Mary Susan (Saltonstall) Beare; great-grandson of Henry Martin and 
Charlotte (Young) Beare; greats-grandson of William and Margaret (Marston) 
Young; greats-grandson of Thomas and Cornelia (Lispenard) Marston; great-- 
grandson of Leonard Lispenard, Member of New York Provincial Congress, 
1775- 

CHALMERS BARBOUR WOOD, Phoenix, Ariz. (12625). Son of E. B. and Helen 
Mary (Strother) Wood; grandson of French and Mary Pendleton (Browning) 
Strother; great-grandson of John and Helen (Piper) Strother, Jr.; great-- 
grandson of John Strother, Sr., Member of Culpeper County, Virginia, Com- 
mittee of Safety. 

ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 

•GEORGE WASHINGTON CLARK, Little Rock, Ark. (18856). Son of Ira and 
Fanny (Hobby) Clark; grandson of Gershom and Freelove (Bull) Clark; 
great-grandson of Lemuel Clark, private, Capt. David Tilden's Militia Com- 
pany, Lebanon, Conn., April, 1775. 

CHARLES JAMES JEWETT, Fort Smith, Ark. (18854). Son of Charles Fred- 
erick and Mary (Lynch) Jewett; grandson of Benjamin Tucker and Julia Ann 
(Mabbett) Jewett; great-grandson of Allyn and Abigail (Tucker) Jewett; 
greats-grandson of Zabdial Rogers and Zibia (Rowe) Jewett; greats-grandson 
of Joseph Jewett, Captain Seventeenth Conn. Continental Regt. 

SAMUEL McCONAUGHY WASSELL, Little Rock, Ark. (18853). Son of 
Samuel S. and Bettie (McConaughy) Wassell; grandson of James W. and 
Albina (McRae) McConaughy; great-grandson of L'onald and Margaret 
(Bracy) McRae; greats-grandson of Jolly and Maria (Darrington) Bracy; 
greats-grandson of John and Martha (Moore) Darrington; great*-grandson of 
Isham and Nancy (Singleton) Moore; greats-grandson of Mathew Singleton, 
Member of Continental Congress, 1774, Captain of Company of South Carolina 
Volunteers under General Marion. 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

ARTHUR STEPHENSON BUGBEE, San Francisco, Cal. (21548). Son of John 
Stephenson and Anna Maxwell (Greene) Bugbee; grandson of Nathaniel and 
Hannah Wells (Eldridge) Greene; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Abby 
Sophia (Casey) Greene; greats-grandson of Christopher Greene, Member of 
Rhode Island Committee of Public Safety, Commander of Kentish Guard. 

(191) 



192 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

FORD ASHMAN CARPENTER, San Diego, Cal. (23283). Son of Lebbeus Ros* 
and Charlotte Baldwin (Eaton) Carpenter; grandson of Joseph James and 
Esther (Walker) Carpenter; great-grandson of Joseph Carpenter; greats-grand- 
son of Ashman Carpenter, private Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

HORACE STEDMAN CLARK, Berkeley, Cal. (22392). Son of Francis L. and 
Esther (Harrison) Clark; grandson of Francis and Louise Griswold (Rackett) 
Clark; great-grandson of Joshua and Louise Griswold (Lay) Rackett; great^ 
grandson of Lee Lay, Captain Conn. Militia. 

HARRY RETZER COMLY, San Diego, Cal. (22393). Son of James M. and 
Sarah L. (Retzer) Comly; grandson of Henry and Rebecca (Worrell) Comly; 
great-grandson of Isaac Worrell, Captain Fourth Company, Second Battalion, 
Philadelphia County Militia. 

ALEXANDER BURNETT COOPER, San Francisco, Cal. (22388). Son of James 
Burnett and Jennett (McNeil) Cooper; grandson of Thomas Jefferson and 
Caroline (Baker) Cooper; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth (Price) 
Baker; greats-grandson of David Baker, Lieutenant, Capt. William Brittin's 
Company Fifth New Jersey Regt. 

FRANCIS VINCENT CORNISH, San Francisco, Cal. (22381). Son of Edwin 
Darius and Mary Ann (Pew) Cornish; grandson of Sanford and Elizabeth 
Green (Eager) Cornish; great-grandson of Gabriel Cornish, private, Colonel 
Hopkinson's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES TEMPLETON CROCKER, San Francisco, Cal. (22376). Son of 
Charles F. and Jennie (Easton) Crocker; grandson of Charles and Mary Ann 
(Deming) Crocker; great-grandson of John Jay and Emily (Read) Deming; 
greats-grandson of Charles John and Rachel L. (Miller) Read; great'-grandson 
of Seth Read, Lieutenant-Colonel Mass. Line, Continental Army. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM CROWELL, San Francisco, Cal. (23281). Son of 
Charles H. and Aurelia A. (Taylor) Crowell; grandson of Jesse and Hannah 
(Campbell) Crowell; great-grandson of Henry Campbell, private, Capt. Daniel 
Runnell's Company, Col. Thomas Tash's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

HENRY DEXTER GUSHING, Oakland, Cal. (22382). Son of John and Annette 
(Farrington) Gushing; grandson of Daniel and Hannah Rice (Townsend) 
Gushing; great-grandson of Hosea and Lydia (Shaw) Gushing; greats-grandson 
of Daniel Cushing, First Lieutenant First Cumberland County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

ELLIOTT B. DAVIS, Oakland, Cal. (22384). Son of Edward Loring and Emily 
Orlina (Sanderson) Davis; grandson of Alpheus and Sally Clossen (White) 
Sanderson; great-grandson of Amos Gates and Abigail (Marvin) White; 
greatS-grandson of Seth Marvin, Captain Cornwall Regt. New York Militia; 
grandson of Washington and Olive Cheney (Morse) Davis; great-grandson of 
Solomon and Relief (Pierson) Davis; greatS-grandson of Richard Davis, pri- 
vate New Hampshire Militia; great-grandson of Jabez and Lucy (Fay) Morse;- 
greatS-grandson of Thomas Morse, private, Col. John Brewer's Mass. Regt. ; 
great-grandson of Stephen and Polixina (Childs) Sanderson; greatS-grandson 
of Isaac and Submit (Montague) Sanderson; greats-grandson of Daniel Mon- 
tague, Member of Massachusetts Provincial Congress; greatS-grandson of David 
and Clarissa (Dickinson) Childs; greats-grandson of Thomas Dickinson, Cap- 
tain Fifth Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HORACE BLY DAY, San Diego, Cal. (23279). Son of Joseph and Margaret 
(Bly) Day; grandson of Josiah and Fanny (Ordway) Bly; great-grandson of 
Moses Bly, private, Col. Enoch Poor's New Hampshire Regt. 

HENRY CUSHING DEXTER, Oakland, Gal. (22383). Son of Asa Allen and 
Laura (Cushing) Dexter; grandson of Daniel and Hannah Rice (Townsend) 
Cushing; great-grandson of Hosea and Lydia (Shaw) Cushing; greats-grand- 
son of Daniel Cushing, First Lieutenant First Cumberland County Regt. New 
York Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 193 

GRAYSON DUTTON, San Francisco, Cal. (21547). Son of William Jay and 
Mary Grayson (Heydenfeldt) Button; grandson of Henry and Frances Gush- 
ing (Stevens) Button; great-grandson of Samuel Edwards and Marcie (Page) 
Button; greats-grandson of Samuel Dutton, private, Col. William Prescott's 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOHN HENRY ELSEFFER, San Biego, Cal. (22394). Son of Jacob Whiteman 
and Bella Eliza (Bonesteel) Elseffer; grandson of John and Catharine (White- 
man) Elseffer; great-grandson of Henry and Rebecca (Sharpe) Whiteman; 
greats-grandson of George Sharpe, Second Lieutenant Butchess County New 
York Militia. 

NEWTON SEYMOUR FARLEY, Oakland, Cal. (22385). Son of Ebenezer and 
Eliza Minerva (Smith) Farley; grandson of Timothy Seymour and Susan C. 
(Crippen) Smith; great-grandson of David Smith, Major Eighth Conn. Line, 
Brigade Major of General Norman's Brigade. 

NORMAN SEAVER FROST, Petaluma, Cal. (21540). Supplemental. Son of 
Norman Seaver and Elizabeth Weeks (Seaver) Frost; grandson of Heman 
and Sarah Cazneau (Rice) Seaver; great-grandson of Noah Rice, private and 
fifer. Col. Banforth Key's Mass. Regt. 
HOWARB GRIFFITH, San Francisco, Cal. (201 71). Supplemental. Son of John 
McKim and Sarah Ann Young (Tomlinson) Griffith; grandson of Howard and 
Ruth (Plummer) Griffith; great-grandson of Howard Griffith, Ensign Upper 
Battalion Montgomery County Maryland Militia. 
JOHN T. GRIFFITH, Los Angeles, Cal. (21538). Supplemental. Son of John 
McKim and Sarah Ann Young (Tomlinson) Griffith; grandson of Howard and 
^ Ruth (Plummer) Griffith; great-grandson of Howard Griffith, Ensign Upper 
■' Battalion Montgomery County Maryland Militia. 

CARVER HOWLANB, San Biego, Cal. (22389). Son of John Andrews and 

Emily (Langley) Howland; grandson of Benjamin and Susannah (Andrews) 

Howland; great-grandson of Zephaniah Andrews, Captain Rhode Island Militia. 

CHARLES LEWIS JOSSELYN, San Biego, Cal. (21542). Son of George Bwelly 

and Alice (Walker) Josselyn; grandson of Elisha K. and Caroline (B"welly) 

Josselyn; great-grandson of Charles Josselyn, private, Capt. Thomas Turner's 

Company Mass. Militia. 

FRANK ALEAMON LEACH, Jr., Oakland, Cal. (22380). Son of Frank Aleamon 

and Mary Louise (Powell) Leach; grandson of Abraham and Louise (Paxon) 

Powell; great-grandson of Abraham and Mary (Sparks) Powell; great^-grand- 

f son of Richard Powell, private, minute man, Gloucester County New Jersey 

Militia. 

JOHN McHENRY, Jr., Berkeley, Cal. (23277). Son of John and Frances V. 

(Reynolds) McHenry; grandson of John and Ellen J. (Metcalfe) McHenry; 

I great-grandson of Jesse McHenry, private South Carolina Troops; great-grand- 
son of Aza Baldwin and Barbara Allen (Harris) Metcalfe; greats-grandson of 
Thomas and Sibyl (Chapin) Metcalfe; greats-grandson of Nathaniel Chapin, 
Ensign Second Company, Colonel Sage's Regt. Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade; 
greats-grandson of John McHenry, private South Carolina Cavalry, killed in 
service in 1778. 
REYNOLBS McHENRY, Berkeley, Cal. (23276). Son of John and Frances V. 
(Reynolds) McHenry; grandson of John and Ellen J. (Metcalfe) McHenry; 
great-grandson of Jesse McHenry, private South Carolina Troops; great-grand- 
son of Aza Baldwin and Barbara Allen (Harris) Metcalfe; greafS-grandson of 
Thomas and Sibyl (Chapin) Metcalfe; greats-grandson of Nathaniel Chapin, 
Ensign Second Company, Colonel Sage's Regt. Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade 
1776; greatS-grandson of John McHenry, private South Carolina Cavalry, 
killed in service in 1778. 
MILES WILSON McINTOSH, San Francisco, Cal. (23282). Son of Elisha and 
Helen M. (Wilson) Mcintosh; grandson of Samuel and Sarah H. (Bavis) Mc- 

• 13— SR 



194 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Intosh; great-grandson of Jeremiah Mcintosh, private, Capt. William Draper's 
Company Second Roxbury, Col. William Heath's Mass. Regt. 

JAMES GRANVILLE MAGANN, Jr., Berkeley, Cal. (22387). Son of James 
Granville and Caroline H. (Thornton) Magann; grandson of Alfred A. and 
Delia (Forbes) Thornton; great-grandson of George Alexander and Frances 
(Gregory) Thornton; greats-grandson of John Thornton, Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Grayson's Additional Continental Regt., Colonel Virginia Militia. 

FRANK WILLIAM MARVIN, San Francisco, Cal. (21549). Son of William 
Waldo and Amelia Louisa Augusta (Le Fever) Marvin; grandson of William 
and Polly (Brayton) Marvin; great-grandson of Ozias and Mary (Bennett) 
Marvin, Jr.; great-grandson of Osias Marvin, Captain Ninth Regt. Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Daniel and Henrietta L. (Von Colson) Le Fever; great- 
grandson of George Le Fever, Ensign York County Penna. Associators. 

ALONZO MASON, San Francisco, Cal. (21550). Son of Edgar and Ann Eliza 
(Blount) Mason; grandson of Daniel Mason, Corporal, Capt. Abel King's Com- 
pany, Colonel Sears's Mass. Regt., pensioned; great-grandson of Joseph Mason, 
private. Col. William Mcintosh's Mass. Regt. ; grandson of William and Anne 
Blount; great-grandson of William Blount, Member of Continental Congress, 
1 782- 1 783, Member of North Carolina Provincial Assembly; greats-grandson of 
Jacob Blount, Member of North Carolina Provincial Assemblies of 1775 and 
1776. 

VICTOR EDWARD MATHEWS, Mill Valley, Cal. (22391). Son of Henry E. 
and Minnie A. Mathews; grandson of Edwin Goodrich and Marcia L. (Kel- 
logg) Mathews; great-grandson of Asahel and Hope (Hollister) Mathews; 
greats-grandson of David Hollister, drummer and private Conn. Militia. 

ORRO EUGENE MONNETTE, Los Angeles, Cal. (22399). Son of Mervin Jere- 
miah and Olive Adelaide (Hull) Monnette; grandson of Abraham and Catha- 
rine (Braucher) Monnett; great-grandson of Jeremiah Crabb and Alley 
(Slagle) Monnett; greats-grandson of Abraham Monnett, private Thirty-third 
Battalion Maryland Militia. 

FRANK COGSWELL MORTIMER, Berkeley, Cal. {2237%). Son of Harry Wil- 
liam and Lucy Cleveland (Smith) Mortimer; grandson of William and Amanda 
(Reed) Mortimer; great-grandson of Lewis Benedict and Maria (Brower) 
Reed; greats-grandson of Jacob Reed, private, Capt. Joseph Dyckman's Com- 
pany Third Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia; greatS-grandson of 
Abraham I. Brower, drummer and fifer New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM WIGHTMAN NORTON, Berkeley, Cal. (21543). Son of Frank Butler 
and Cora B. Norton; grandson of Ichabod and Sarah M. Norton; great-grand- 
son of James and Mary (Riddell) Norton; greatS-grandson of Peter Norton, 
private Mass. Militia. 

FRANK OTIS, San Francisco, Cal. {22377). Son of Stephen and Harriett G. 
(Dennett) Otis; grandson of Joshua and Hannah (Locke) Dennett; great- 
grandson of Joseph Dennett, private Mass. Militia and Continental Line, pen- 
sioned. 

KINGSBURY EASTMAN PARKER, San Francisco, Cal. (22400). Son of Joseph 
K. and Carrie Francis (Stevens) Parker; grandson of Francis Marion and 
Marion Sophia (Skelenger) Stevens; great-grandson of Thomas and Mahala 
(Bartlett) Stevens, Jr.; greatS-grandson of Thomas Stevens, Corporal, Captain 
Treadwell's Company, Colonel Crane's Worcester County Mass. Regt. 

BENJAMIN HORN PENDLETON, Oakland, Cal. (21544). Son of James Oliver 
and Mary Louise (Horn) Pendleton; grandson of Oliver and Mary D. (South- 
worth) Pendleton; great-grandson of Benjamin Pendleton, Jr.; greatS-grandson 
of Benjamin Pendleton, private, Capt. Joseph Pendleton's Company Rhode 
Island Militia, privateersman. 

CHARLES PARKE POSTON, Oakland, Cal. (22390). Son of Newton and Sarah 
A. (Briggs) Poston; grandson of Edwin and Mary T. (Didlake) Poston; great- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 195 

grandson of Edmund and Mildred Gregory (Woodford) Poston; greats-grand- 
son of John T. and Mary (Taliafero) Woodford; greats-grandson of William 
Woodford, Colonel Second Virginia Cavalry, Brigadier-General, taken prisoner 
at Charleston 1780, died on prison ship. 

AARON SCHLOSS, San Francisco, Cal. (22379). Son of Moses Ansel and Rachel 
(Jackson) Schloss; grandson of James Jackson; great-grandson of Solomon 
Jackson, private Virginia Militia, his son pensioned in 1848. 

CHARLES LEONARD SMITH, Oakland, Cal. (21748). Son of Leonard and 
Mary Sally (Lyne) Smith; grandson of Leonard and EHza (.Jamison) Smith; 
great-grandson of John Smith, Ensign First Maryland Battalion of Flying 
Camp. 

SELDEN CORNELIUS SMITH, Berkeley, Cal. (22395). Son of Eben Cornelius 
and Emily Cornelia (Wyman) Smith; grandson of Cornelius and Sarah (Lamb) 
Smith; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Abagail (Steele) Smith; great--grand- 
son of Zadoc and Hannah (Shurtleff) Steele; great'-grandson of James Steele, 
Lieutenant Conn. Militia; grandson of Asahel and Marietta (Adams) Wyman; 
great-grandson of Jasher and Annice (Benson) Wyman; greats-grandson of 
Thomas Wyman, private, Captain Hasley's Camp Mass. Minute Men, died in 
service, 1776. 

JOHN CALVIN SPAULDING, San Francisco, Cal. (23278). Son of Timothy C. 
and Fanny Laurinda (Stowell) Spaulding; grandson of Timothy and Sylvia 
(Cheney) Spaulding; great-grandson of Josiah and Eunice (Skinner) Spauld- 
ing; greats-grandson of Leonard Spaulding, Captain Vermont and Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD GRIFFITH STEVENSON, San Francisco, Cal. (19442). Supple- 
mental. Son of Charles Crawford and Ruth Anna (Griffith) Stevenson; 
grandson of Howard and Ruth (Plummer) Griffith; great-grandson of Howard 
Griffith, Ensign Upper Battalion Montgomery County Maryland Militia. 

WILLIAM THOMAS, San Francisco, Cal. (22398). Son of Benjamin Franklin 
and Mary Ann (Park) Thomas; grandson of Isaiah and Mary (Weld) Thomas, 
Jr. ; great-grandson of Isaiah Thomas, recognized patriot, editor and publisher 
"The Worcester Gazette," or "American Oracle of Liberty," 1775, and of 
"Massachusetts Spy," 1770-1776, 1778. 

ANDREW J. WADLIA, San Diego, Cal. (22396). Son of D'aniel and Mary 
(Serry) Wadlia, Jr.; grandson of Daniel Wadlia, Sergeant, Colonel Bailey's 
Regrt. Mass. Line, pensioned. 

CHARLES HOSKINS WELLER, San Francisco, Cal. (21541). Son of Milo 
James and Martha Ann (Hoskins) Weller; grandson of John Grey and Mary 
M. (Gorton) Hoskins; great-grandson of Charles Chauncey and Sarah (Boss) 
Hoskins; greats-grandson of William Hoskins, Assistant, Commissary General's 
Dept. Continental Army. 

CHARLES HAROLD WILSON, San Francisco, Cal. (22386). Son of John 
Boynton and Mary A. (Burckes) Wilson; grandson of Joseph and Lucy 
(Boynton) Wilson; great-grandson of Joshua Wilson, private, Lieut. Peter 
Poor's Company Mass. Minute Men. 

COLORADO SOCIETY. 

JOHN D. ALLEN, Denver, Colo. (22560). Son of Thomas and Mary (Dayton) 
Allen; grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Gould) Dayton; great-grandson of Daniel 
Gould, private New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

HORACE EASTON BAGLEY, Denver, Colo. (22562). Son of Jam^s Harlow and 
Harriet Delight (Easton) Bagley; grandson of Elijah and Jerusha (Jones) 
Easton; great-grandson of Oliver and Delight (Cook) Easton; greatS-grandson 
of Elijah Easton, private. Captain Harmon's Company, Colonel Wolcott's Conn, 
State Regt. 



196 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIAM LEWIS BARTLETT, Colorado Springs, Colo. (21846). Son of Deni- 
son S. and Martha Jane (Nute) Bartlett; grandson of Moses and Clarissa 
(Nudd) (Pinkham) Nute; great-grandson of William and Mary (Davis) Nute; 
greats-grandson of Jotham Nute, private First Battalion New Hampshire 
Troops. 

CHARLES RISLEY BORST, Denver, Colo. (22559). Son of William Wallace 
and Alice Frances (Hotchkiss) Borst; grandson of Charles Augustus and 
Clarissa Frances Hotchkiss; great-grandson of Amos Carroll and Martha Terry 
(Chittenden) Hotchkiss; greats-grandson of Amos and Hannah (Norton) Hotch- 
kiss; greats-grandson of Amos Hotchkiss, private. Captain Bradley's Company, 
New Haven, Conn. 

RALPH FOOTE BRISTOL, Fort Collins, Colo. (22567). Son of Judson H. and 
Alice M. (Foote) Bristol; grandson of Jared Abernathy and Caroline E. 
(Bristol) Foote; great-grandson of Elijah and Mehitable (Gale) Foote; great-- 
grandson of David Foote, private Fifth Company First Conn. Continental Regt. 

DEANE E. BYERLEY, Fort Collins, Colo. (22566). Son of Benjamin F. and 
Mary Elizabeth (Thayer) Byerley; grandson of Gilbert and Sarah E. (Pratt) 
Thayer; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary Anne (Malonia) Thayer; great-- 
grandson of Elisha Thayer, private, Col. Joseph Read's Mass. Regt. 

LOUIS GEORGE CARPENTER, Fort Collins, Colo. (22575). Son of Charles 
Ketcham and Jennette (Coryell) Carpenter; grandson of George and Eliza 
(Sherwood) Coryell; great-grandson of Abram and Anna (Covert) Coryell; 
great--grandson of Luke Covert, private, minute man, Essex County New Jer- 
sey Militia. 

GEORGE SAMUEL CLASON, Denver, Colo. (22555). Son of Cyrus Seward and 
Mabel L. (Stillman) Clason; grandson of George W. and Naomi (Seward) 
Clason; great-grandson of James and Abigail (Ferris) Clason; greats-grandson 
of Samuel Clason, private Ninth Conn. Militia, Col. John Mead. 

JOHN WILLIAM CONRAD, D'enver, Colo. (22554). Son of Darius and Mary 
Rebecca (Schrock) Conrad; grandson of John William and Martha Patience 
(Shock) Shrock; great-grandson of William and Rebecca Birk (Gibson) Shock; 
greats-grandson of John Shock, private Northumberland County Penna. Militia. 

WARWICK MILLER DOWNING, Denver, Colo. (22568). Son of James Mount 
and Nellie (Summers) Downing; grandson of Miller and Sarah Guinn (Mount) 
Downing; great-grandson of Richard and Elizabeth (Miller) Downing; great-- 
grandson of Richard Downing, Commissary Chester County Penna. Associators 
and Militia. 

WILLIAM RAYMOND FULLER, Fort Collins, Colo. (22563). Son of Cyrenus 
H. and Parsana M. (Howard) Fuller; grandson of John and Martha (Bailey) 
Howard; great-grandson of Eliakim Howard, Captain, Major Eliphalet Carey's 
Regt. 

VINCENT EDMUND GILLETT GREYDENE-SMITH, Denver, Colo. (22553). 
Son of Frederic Greydene and Mabel Agnes (Oldham) Smith; grandson of 
Edmund and Mary Elizabeth (Coes) Oldham; great-grandson of csamuel and 
Celestina (Newton) Coes; greats-grandson of Benjamin and Sabra (Titus) 
Newton; greats-grandson of Noah Titus, private Worcester County Mass. 
Militia. 

WALTER KENE'RICK HOTCHKISS, Denver, Colo. (22564). Son of Charles 
Norton and Lillah Lucy (Watkins) Hotchkiss; grandson of Charles Augustus 
and Clarissa Frances Hotchkiss; great-grandson of Amos Carroll and Mary 
Terry (Chittenden) Hotchkiss; greats-grandson of Amos Hotchkiss, private, 
Captain Bradley's Company of New ^aven, Conn. 

SETH C. LEWIS, Fort Collins, Colo. (22571). Son of Herbert M. and Mary 
(Kitchell) Lewis; grandson of John and Esther (Peck) Kitchell; great-grand- 
son of Peter and Sarah (Colgrove) Peck; greatS-grandson of Jedediah Peck, 
private First Company Sixth Conn. Continental Regt., 1775. 



j REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 197 

I GEORGE CHALMERS McCORMICK, Fort Collins, Colo. (22569). Son of Mont- 
gomery and Harriet (Kitchell) McCormick; grandson of John and Esther 
(Peck) Kitchell; great-grandson of Peter and Sarah (Colgrove) Peck; great-- 
grandson of Jedediah Peck, private First Company Sixth Conn. Continental 
Regt., 1775- 

SYLVANUS OLDFIELD, Fort Collins, Colo. (22570). Son of David Phelps and 
Catherine (Creighton) Oldfield; grandson of Richard and Elmira (Phelps) 
Oldfield; great-grandson of William Oldfield, private Dutchess County and 
Orange County New York Militia, pensioned. 

BURRITT SLAWSON OSBORNE, Denver, Colo. (22558). Son of Henry Bur- 
well and Agnes Hall (Slawson) Osborne; grandson of Amos and Polly (Bris- 
tol) Osborn; great-grandson of Barnum and Olive (Hicock) Osborn; great-- 
grandson of Timothy Osborn, Member of Committee of Inspection and Obser- 
vation of Woodbury, Conn. 

SHEPARD GOODWIN PATRICK, Denver, Colo. (23126). Son of Shepard Good- 

Iwin and Phoebe (Shaw) Patrick; grandson of Alanson Benjamin and Philomila 
(Flower) Shaw; great-grandson of Zephon Fowler, private. Col. Elisha Shel- 
don's Regt. Conn. lyight Dragoons; great-grandson of Jeremiah Shaw, private 
Fourth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

HENRY FOOTE PERRIN, Hartford, Conn. (Colo. 22552). Son of Henry M. and 
Philena ^.Foote) Perrin; grandson of C. D. and Laura Ann (Holbrook) Foote; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Sibbil (Doolittle) Foote; great--grandson of 
Obed and Mary (Todd) Foote; greats-grandson of Samuel Todd, Chaplain 
Mass. Militia. 

SILAS GILBERT PIERSON, Denver, Colo. (21845). Son of John and Elizabeth 
(Halsey) Pierson; grandson of Silas Gilbert and Salome Bartlett (Cook) Pier- 
son; great-grandson of Josiah Pierson, private First Orange County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

WILLIAM DIXON QUACKENBUSH, Colorado Springs, Colo. (21848). Son of 
Peter and Sarah Amelia (Quinn) Quackenbush; grandson of Peter and Hester 
(Demarest) Quackenbush; great-grandson of John and Hannah (Ackerman) 
Quackenbush; greats-grandson of Reynier Quackenbos, Captain of Kakiate 
Company Haverstraw Precinct Regt. New York Militia. 

MICHAEL McDonald RINN, Boulder, Colo. (21847). Son of Thomas M. and 
Ruth (McDonald) Rinn; grandson of Ezekiel and Ann (Colman) McDonald; 
great-grandson of John and Eleanor (Piatt) McDonald; greats-grandson of 
Abraham Piatt, Captain and Quartermaster Somerset County New Jersey 
Militia. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM TAYLOR, Denver, Colo. (22557). Son of William and 
Sophronia Elvira (Isbell) Taylor; grandson of George and Relief (Nichols) 
Taylor; great-grandson of Zebedee and Ruth (Spalding) Taylor; great'-grand- 
son of Reuben Taylor, Captain, Colonel Hazen's Regt. 

ALLYN H. TEDMON, Fort Collins, Colo. (21849). Son of Bolivar S. and Alice 
(Allyn) Tedmon; grandson of Ira and Anna (Carpenter) Allyn; great-grand- 
son of William and Catherine (Dennison) Allyn; greats-grandson of Ephriam 
and Temperance (Morgan) Allyn; great'-grandson of William Morgan, private 
Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

BOB S. TED'MON, Jr., Fort Collins, Colo. (21850). Son of Bolivar S. and Alice 
(Allyn) Tedmon; grandson of Ira and Anna (Carpenter) Tedmon; great- 
grandson of William and Catherine (Dennison) Allyn; greats-grandson of 
Ephriam and Temperance (Morgan) Allyn; greats-grandson of William Mor- 
gan, private Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

LEON W. TRESNER, Fort Collins, Colo. (22572). Son of William and Nancy 
(Strong) Tresner; grandson of Thomas and Jane (Taylor) Strong; great- 
grandson of James Strong, Clerk, Capt. Isaac Coren's Company Penna. Artil- 
lery under General Knox. 



198 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



NATHAN C. WARREN, Fort Collins. Colo. (22573). Son of Charles and Ida M. 
Warren; grandson of Caleb Strong and Maria Celinda (Fleming) Warren; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Susan R. (Willey) Warren; greats-grandson of 
Ahimaaz Willey, private First Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 

THOMAS J. WARREN, Fort Collins, Colo. (22574). Son of Charles and Ida M. 
Warren; grandson of Caleb Strong and Maria Celinda (Fleming) Warren; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Susan R. (Willey) Warren; greats-grandson of 
Ahimaaz Willey, private First Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 

CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

FRANCIS BURKE ALLEN, Hartford, Conn. (21908). Son of William Cathers 
and Louisa Bartello Williams (Burke) Allen; grandson of Francis and Sarah 
(Hands) Burke; great-grandson of Edward De Finnish Burke, private, Capt. 
Jacob Gerrish's Company Seventeenth Mass. Regt. 

NATHAN KING AVERILL, U. S. Army, Woodbury, Conn. (22408). Son of 
Perry and Ada L. (Mosher) Averill; grandson of Phineas B. and Eliza E. 
(Wheeler) Averill; great-grandson of Perry and Eunice Ann (Barnes) Averill; 
greats-grandson of Perry Averill, private Thirteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

LESTER DAVID BAKER, U. S. Arm.y, Detroit, Mich. (Conn. 21909). Son of 
Charles Henry and Alice Redfield (Lockwood) Baker; grandson of David Ben- 
jamin and Caroline (Redfield) Lockwood; great-grandson of David and Abigail 
(Gray) Lockwood; greats-grandson of Reuben Lockwood, teamster, private 
Conn. Coast Guards. 

JOHN HENRY BELDEN, Hartford, Conn. (21910). Son of Henry and Cornelia 
E. (Munson) Belden; grandson of John Joshua and Eunice (Ailing) Munson; 
great-grandson of Caleb Ailing, 2d, Captain Second Regt. Conn. Militia. 

EDWARD STEELE BOYD, Woodbury, Conn. (22415). Son of Pliny Steele and 
Marj' Jane (Allen) Boyd; grandson of Thomas Parsons and Anna (Steele) 
Boyd; great-grandson of EHsha and Anna (Brown) Steele, Jr.; greatS-grand- 
son of Elisha Steele, Sergeant "Bethlem Volunteers" Conn. Militia. 

ROBERT MORGAN BREWSTER, Hartford, Conn. (21911). Son of Elias Mor- 
gan and Lucretia (Harris) Brewster; grandson of Ephraim Morgan and Esther 
(Gorgon) Brewster; great-grandson of Elias (and Margaret Morgan) Brews- 
ter, private. Colonel Selden's Conn. Regt. ; greatS-grandson of James Morgan, 
Captain Conn. Militia; grandson of Robert Brown and Betsy Hillard (Brews- 
ter) Harris; great-grandson of Daniel and Sabina (Brown) Harris, Jr.; greatS- 
grandson of Daniel Harris, private. Captain Storr's Company Third Conn. 
Regt.; great-grandson of Erastus and Esther (Hillard) Brewster; great^-grand- 
son of Benjamin Hillard, Sergeant, Captain Mott's Company Conn. Alilitia. 

CHARLES ORSON BRITTON, Hartford, Conn. (22416). Son of Orson and 
Georgetta (Delaplaine) Britton; grandson of Orson and Marie Marguerete 
(L'Hommedieu) Britton; great-grandson of Charles and Sarah B. (Satterly) 
L'Hommedieu; greatS-grandson of Samuel L'Hommedieu, Captain Second Regt. 
Suffolk County New York Militia. 

RALPH DELAPLAINE BRITTON, Hartford, Conn. (22409). Son of Orson and 
Georgetta (Delaplaine) Britton; grandson of Orson and Marie Marguerete 
(L'Hommedieu) Britton; great-grandson of Charles and Sarah B. (Satterly) 
L'Hommedieu; greats-grandson of Samuel L'Hommedieu, Captain Second Suf- 
folk County Regt. New York Militia. 

ERNEST BEECHER CASTLE, Sea Cliff, N. Y. (Conn. 22401). Son of Henry 
Edward and Harriet Frances (Benedict) Castle; grandson of Cornelius and 
Harriet Elizabeth (Wells) Benedict; great-grandson of Najah and Clara (Judd) 
Benedict; greatS-grandson of Benajah and Hannah (Seelye) Benedict; great-- 
grandson of James Seelye, Lieutenant Sixteenth Conn. Regt., Col. Nehemiah 
Beardsley. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 1 99 

FREDERICK WIEUAM CHESSON, Waterbury, Conn. (21912). Son of Fred- 
erick William and Clara (Cooke) Chesson; grandson of Walter H. and Jennie 
(.McClintock) Cooke; great-grandson of Nathan and Clarrissa (Reynolds) 
Cooke; greats-grandson of Joseph and Anna (Bronson) Cooke; greats-grandson 
of Moses Cook, drummer, Lieut. Isaac Benham's Company Tenth Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 
ROSWELIv JOHN CEAPP, Hartford, Conn. (21913). Son of John Beadle and 
Leila (Blodgett) Clapp; grandson of Roswell and Frances (Church) Blodgett; 
great-grandson of James and Aiary (Wadsworth) Church; greats-grandson of 
Roger Wadsworth, First Lieutenant Fifth Regt. Conn. Line. 
WILLIAM H. CORBIN, Hartford, Conn. (22422). Son of William M. and Jo- 
sephine (Walker) Corbin; grandson of Benjamin and Maria (Potter) Corbin; 
great-grandson of David and Mary (Bugbee) Corbin; greats-grandson of Asahel 
Corbin, private. Lieutenant Morris's Company Eleventh Conn. Regt. ; great- 
grandson of Silas Potter, Sergeant, Colonel Dyer's Rhode Island Regt. 
CARL STONE CRUMMETT, New Haven, Conn. (21914). Son of Joseph Allen 
and Josephine Joanna (Stone) Crummett; grandson of Silas and Sarah W. 
(Giffin) Stone; great-grandson of David and Mary E. (White) Giffin; great-- 
grandson of Josiah and Sally (Rogers) White, Jr.; greats-grandson of Josiah 
i. (and Tabitha Carter) White, private, Colonel Whitcomb's and other Regts. 
: Mass. Militia; great*-grandson of Josiah Carter, Major, Col. Asa Whitcomb's 
I Mass. Regt. ; grandson of Thomas Jefferson and Martha Ruhamah (Frost) 
I Crummett; great-grandson of James and Martha (Russell) Frost, Jr.; great^- 
r grandson of James and Margaret (Lock) Frost, Sr. ; greats-grandson of 
Ephraim and Lydia (Perry) Frost; greats-grandson of Ephraim Frost, Member 
' of Cambridge Committee of Safety and Correspondence, Captain of Mass. 
Militia. 

ROYDEN WINTHROP DAVISON, Trenton, N. J. (Conn. 21915). Son of John 

B. and Mary (Warner) Davison; grandson of George and Math S. (Belding) 

_ Warner; great-grandson of Elehew and Sarah (Clapp) Belding; greats-grandson 

" of Ihomas and Sarah (Field) Clapp; greats-grandson of John Field, Lieutenant 

Mass. Militia. 

MARCENE BREVET DUNBAR, Winsted, Conn. (22402). Son of Lyman and 
Minerva (King) Dunbar; grandson of Ralph and Anna (Starks) E\inbar; 
great-grandson of Joseph Dunbar, Corporal, Colonel Sheldon's Second Regt. 
Continental Light Dragoons, pensioned. 

WALTER COLLYER FAXON, Hartford, Conn. (21916). Son of Hiram and 
Margaret Maria (Collyer) Faxon; grandson of EHhu and Elizabeth (Olcott) 
Faxon; great-grandson of Bbenezer Faxon, private, Lieut. Charles Seymour's 
Company Conn. Militia. 

EDMUND EARLE FREEMAN, Wethersfield, Conn. (21917). Son of Edmund 
Byrd and Emily Louisa (Pudney) Freeman; grandson of Denison Earle and 
Betsey Cordelia (Cole) Pudney; great-grandson of Richard and Emily (Mor- 
gan) Cole; greatS-grandson of Benjamin and Phoebe (Williams) Morgan; 
greatS-grandson of William Williams, Colonel First or Lower Regt. Vermont 
Militia. 

FERDINAND GILDERSLEEVE, Gildersleeve, Conn. (21918). Son of Sylvester 
and Emily Shepard (Cornwall) Gildersleeve; grandson of Philip Gildersleeve, 
Corporal, Capt. David Pierson's Minute Company Suffolk County New York 
Militia. 

EDWARD GILLETTE, Sheridan, Wyo. (Conn. 22410). Son of Edward and Anna 
Frances (Selby) Gillette; grandson of William and Caroline (Gilman) Selby; 
great-grandson of William and Anna (Bumham) Selby; greats-grandson of 
William Selby, Member of East Haddam Commissary Committee. 

JOHN PACKER GRAY, Bridgeport, Conn. (22403). Son of Mason Packer and 
Evelyn (Lamb) Gray; grandson of John and Emma (Packer) Gray; great- 



200 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

grandson of Mason and Polly (Fitch) Packer; greats-grandson of Chester and 
Deborah (Packer) Fitch; greats-grandson of John Packer. 2d, private, Capt. 
Amos Stanton's Company, Colonel Sherburne's and Col. S. B. Webb's Conn. 
Regts. 

WILLIAM HYMAN HOLABIRD, Los Angeles, Cal. (Conn. 2241 1). Son of 
Oscar Fitzland and. Adelia Almeda (Peirson) Holabird; grandson of Hyman 
and Sidney (Peck) Holabird; great-grandson of Timothy and Hannah Robin- 
son (Bacon) Holabird, Jr.; greats-grandson of Timothy Holabird, private, Capt. 
Luther Stoddard's Sixth Company, Col. Charles Burrell's Battalion Conn. 
Militia. 

WALTER ARMOUR HOLDEN, Ansonia, Conn. (22404). Son of Milton Dana 
and Jane (Doonan) Holden; grandson of Dana Seaver and Mary Ann (Pierce) 
Holden; great-grandson of James and Pamelia (Allen) Holden; greats-grand- 
son of Simon and Mary Brown (Pierce) Holden; greats-grandson of Simon 
Holden. Lieutenant Sixth Middlesex Regt. Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD RUFUS HOLMES, Winsted, Conn. (22424). Son of Rufus Edwards 
and Lucy Ann (Coe) Holmes; grandson of Rufus and Belinda (Bass) Holmes; 
great-grandson of Joseph Holmes, private. Colonel Hooker's Conn. Regt. ; 
great-grandson of Nathan and Belinda (Mills) Bass; greats-grandson of Nathan 
Bass, Sergeant Eighteenth Regt. Conn, Militia. 

RALPH WINTHROP HOLMES, Winsted, Conn. (22425). Son of Rufus Ed- 
wards and Lucy Ann (Coe) Holmes; grandson of Rufus and Belinda (Bass) 
Holmes; great-grandson of Joseph Holmes, private, Colonel Hooker's Conn. 
Regt.; great-grandson of Nathan and Belinda (Mills) Bass; greats-grandson of 
Nathan Bass, Sergeant Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM CLIFFORD HOMAN, Meriden, Conn. (23251). Son of William and 
Agusta (Savage) Homan; grandson of Orrin and Nancy (Ames) Savage; 
great-grandson of Samuel Savage, private, Capt. James Arnold's Company, 
Colonel Wooster's Conn. Regt. 

FREDERICK COLLINS HULL, New Haven, Conn. (23252). Son of Azor Bar- 
ber and Mary Elizabeth (Collins) Hull; grandson of Nathaniel Selleck and 
Angeline (Barber) Hull; great-grandson of Denny and Anna (Selleck) Hull; 
greatS-grandson of Denny C. and Mary (Piatt) Hull; greats-grandson of Jede- 
diah Hull, Lieutenant, Captain Dimon's Company Conn. Militia. 

FRANK HENRY HURLBURT, Hartford, Conn. (2 19 19). Son of Edwin and 
Laura Adelia (Grant) Hurlburt; grandson of Aaron and Eleanor (Osborn) 
Grant; great-grandson of Aaron Grant, fifer, Capt. Roswell Grant's Company, 
Colonel Johnson's Conn. Regt., pensioned; grandson of Obadiah and Elizabeth 
(Warriner) Hurlburt; great-grandson of Abner Warriner, Corporal, Capt. 
Chas. Colton's Company, Colonel Greaton's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

FREDERICK LE ROY JEWETT, Brockway, Conn. (21920). Son of Arthur L. 
and Gertrude Mulford (Osborne) Jewett; grandson of Robert F. and Juliette 
(Mulford) Osborne; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Mary (Lee) Mulford; 
greatS-grandson of Edward and Fanny (Risam) Mulford; greats-grandson of 
Ezekiel Mulford, Captain Twelfth Company Colonel Smith's Suffolk County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

FREDERIC T. MURLLESS, Jr., Hartford, Conn. (23253). Son of Frederic T. 
and Mary Ellen (Perrin) Murlless; grandson of John Gladding and Eliza 
(Childs) Perrin; great-grandson of John and Betsy (Thayer) Childs; greats- 
grandson of Elijah Thayer, drummer, Capt. Moses French's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

GEORGE EUGENE OBER, Bridgeport, Conn. (22405). Son of George and Ade- 
lain A. (Eaton) Ober; grandson of Moses and Hannah Thomas (Emmerson) 
Eaton; great-grandson of Ezra D. and Tamar Eaton; greatS-grandson of 
Thomas Eaton, Captain Third Parish Company of Minute Men of Reading, 
Mass. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 20I 

GEORGE FRANCIS OLMSTED, Hartford, Conn. (21921). Son of George 
Howell and Helen Frances (Washburn) Olmsted, Jr.; grandson of George 
Howell and Lucy A. (Phelps) Olmsted; great-grandson of Horace Bigelow and 
Ann (Goodwin) Olmsted; great*-grandson of Aaron Olmsted, Adjutant Second 
Company Fourth Regt. Conn. Light Horse. 
ROBERT DANIELS OLMSTED, Hartford, Conn. (21922). Son of George 
Howell and Helen Frances (Washburn) Olmsted, Jr. ; grandson of George 
Howell and Lucy A. (Phelps) Olmsted; gieat-grand?on of Horace Bigelow and 
Ann (Goodwin) Olmsted; greats-grandson of Aaron Olmsted, Adjutant Second 
Company Fourth Regt. Conn. Light Horse. 
JOHN MARVIN PARKER, Jr., Hartford, Conn. (21923). Son of John Marvin 
and Ellen M. (Hotchkiss) Parker; grandson of Marshfield Sterling and Azubah 
Harvey (Marvin) Parker; gr6at-grandson of John Parker, private. Col. Erastus 
Wolcott's and Col. R. J. Meigs's Conn. Regts., pensioned. 
ALBERT HASTINGS PITKIN, Hartford, Conn. (21924). Son of Albert P. and 
Jane Ann (Hastings) Pitkin; grandson of Henry and Sarah Ann (Dewey) 
Hastings; great-grandson of James and Lydia (Hiscock) Dewey; greats-grand- 
son of Eliab Dewey, private Minute Men of Westfield, Mass. 
CHARLES E. POIND'EXTER, Hartford, Conn. (22412). Son of Cyrus E. and 
Lydia M. Poindexter; grandson of Levi and Nancy (Hastings) Robbins; great- 
grandson of Benjamin and Huldah (Robinson) Robbins; greats-grandson of 
Benjamin Robbins, Lieutenant, Col. Jonas Reed's Mass. Regt. 
EDWARD D. REDFIELD, Hartford, Conn. (22418). Son of Edward W. and 
Louise (Ayrault) Redfield; grandson of Elias and Ann S. Redfield; great- 
grandson of Roswell Redfield, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 
HOSMER P. REDFIELD, Hartford, Conn. (22419). Son of Edward W. and 
Louise (.\yrault") Redfield; grandson of EHas and Ann S. Redfield; great- 
grandson of Roswell Redfield, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 
CHARLES DURRIE RILEY, Hartford, Conn. (23254). Son of James and Char- 
lotte Ann Riley; grandson of James and Esther (Goodrich) Riley; great-grand- 
son of John Riley, Captain Seventh Company Third Regt. Conn. Line. 
ARTHUR WILLIAMS ROBBINS, Waterbury, Conn. (22413). Son of George 
and Lucy Jane (Botsford) Robbins; grandson of Jehiel and Dorothy Edgecomb 
(Williams) Robbins; great-grandson of Joshua and Lydia (Hough) Williams; 
great'-grandson of Joshua Williams, Sergeant, Captain Spalding's Company 
First Conn. Reg^t., Col. John Durkee. 
EUGENE F. RUSSELL, Bridgeport, Conn. (23255). Son of Benjamin H. and 
Frances (Reese) Russell; grandson of Frederick and Catherine (Myers) 
Reese; great-grandson of Mathew and Catherine (Bellinger) Reese; great-- 
grandson of Frederick Bellinger, Corporal, Colonel Bellinger's New York Regt., 
pensioned. 
CURTISS LAUFAIR SHELDON, New Britain, Conn. (22414). Son of Orlando 
and Laura Maria (Curtiss) Sheldon; grandson of Wilson and Phoebe Rebecca 
(Matthews) Sheldon; great-grandson of Jerre and Cati (Laufair) Sheldon; 
greats-grandson of Ashe, Sheldon, Jr., private Seventh Conn. Regt., Col. 
Charles Webb; great-grandson of Joshua and Polly (Gillett) Curtiss; great-- 
grandson of John Gillett, Sergeant and Quartermaster Conn. Troops; great*- 
grandson of Simeon Curtiss, teamster and cook Conn. Troops, pensioned; 
grandson of Philo and Charlotte (Mariott) Curtiss. 
HERBERT WARREN SNOW, New Haven, Conn. (22406). Son of Frederick W. 
and Helen (Morrill) Snow; grandson of George W. and Elizabeth (Springer) 
Snow; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Susan (Dunbar) Snow; greats-grand- 
son of Joseph Snow, private, Capt. Nathaniel Larrabee's Company Mass. 
Militia; great'-grandson of Isaac Snow, Commander Mass. privateer "America" 
in 1776. 



202 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

GEORGE EUGENE SOUTHWORTH, Bridgeport, Conn. (22407). Son of George 
Read and Martha E. (Pratt) Southworth; grandson of Seth and Abagail Lewis 
(Smith) Pratt; great-grandson of Eli and Abagail Doolittle (Hitchcock) Pratt; 
greats-grandson of David Hitchcock, Captain, Col. Thaddeus Cook's Conn. 
Regt. 

JOHN LATIMAR WAY, Hartford, Conn. (22420). Son of John Mirick and 
Elizabeth Jerusha (Welles) Way; grandson of Daniel Shaw and Clarissa 
(Latimer) Way; great-grandson of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Chapel) Latimer; 
greats-grandson of Jonathan Latimer, Colonel Conn. Militia; great-grandson of 
Thomas Way, Jr., Lieutenant in Lexington Alarm List from Lyme, Conn.; 
grandson of James and Nancy (Caulkins) Welles; great-grandson of John 
Howell Welles, Captain Eighth Company Twelfth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

FRANK LANGDON WILCOX, Berlin, Conn. (21925). Son of Samuel Curtis and 
Anna Scoville (Peck) Wilcox; grandson of Benjamin and Betsey (Savage) 
Wilcox; great-grandson of Selah Savage, private Second Conn. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

OGDEN GAGE WILLEY, Bridgeport, Conn. (23256). Son of Ogden Sylvanus 
and Julia Ann (Holbrook) Willey; grandson of Sylvanus Cone and Malenda 
(Atchison) Willey; great-grandson of Alfred and Olive (Cone) Willey; great-- 
grandson of John Willey, Captain First Company Fourth Conn. Battalion. 

EDWARD G. WOOSTER, New Haven, Conn. (23257). Son of William C. and 
Mary L. (Gilbert) Wooster; grandson of Philo M. and Sarah (Cogswell) 
Wooster; great-grandson of Ephraim Wooster, Sergeant, Colonel Whitney's 
Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of Stephen and Anna (Camp) Cogswell; great-- 
grandson of William Cogswell, Major Thirteenth Conn. Regt.; grandson of 
Lucius and Polly (Beard) Gilbert; great-grandson of Thomas Gilbert, Cor- 
poral, Capt. John Stevens's Company, Colonel Burrall's Conn. Regt., pen- 
sioned; great-grandson of Joel and Mercy (Blackman) Beard; greats-grandson 
of Samuel Beard, Sergeant Fourth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

FREDERICK LEWIS WOOSTER, New Britain, Conn. (23258). Son 01 Benja- 
min A. and Esther (Wooster) Wooster; grandson of Jesse and Rhoda (Brock- 
ett) Wooster; great-grandson of Walter Wooster, Sergeant Sixth Regt. Conn. 
Line. 

HENRY J. ZWEYGARTT, Hartford, Conn. (23259). Son of Henry J. and Me- 
lissa Isabel (Candee) Zweygartt; grandson of Samuel Lorenzo and Carroline 
Rebecca (Wheeler) Candee; great-grandson of Samuel and Melissa (Wheeler) 
Candee; greats-grandson of Samuel Candee, Sergeant Conn. Continental 
Troops, pensioned. 

DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

HENRY WHITELEY, Wilmington, Del. (16468). Son of William G. and Nancy 
Potter (Elmer) Whiteley; grandson of William and Margaret Kean (Potter) 
Elmer; great-grandson of Jonathan Elmer, Member of Provincial Congress of 
New Jersey, 1775, Captain and Major New Jersey Militia. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

HARRY FURROW ALLMOND, Washington, D. C. (22129). Son of Alfred Dis- 
mukes and Jane (Blakey) Allmond; grandson of James and Margaret (Rucker) 
Blakey; great-grandson of Angus Rucker, Captain, Col. George Gibson's Regt. 
Virginia Line, pensioned. 

BENTON MAGRUDER BUKEY, St. Louis, Mo. (D. C. 22146). Son of John 
Spencer and Roberta Julia (Magruder) Bukey; grandson of Spencer Tomlin- 
son and Eliza (Hill) Bukey; great-grandson of Alexander and Sarah (Foster) 
Hill; greatS-grandson of Ephraim Foster, Sergeant, Col. Joseph Cilley's New 
Hampshire Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 2O3 

HARRY WOOLFORD CHESLEY, Washington, D. C. (22130). Son of John and 
Ann Rebecca (Tolley) Chesley; grandson of John B. and Virginia (Wil- 
loughby) Tolley; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Woolford) Willoughby; 
greats-grandson of William Willoughby, privateersman on barge "Fearnought" 
in Chesapeake Bay. 

JOHN TOLLEY CHESLEY, Washington, D. C. (22131). Son of John and Ann 
Rebecca (Tolley) Chesley; grandson of John B. and Virginia (Willoughby) 
Tolley; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Woolford) Willoughby; great-- 
grandson of William Willoughby, privateersman on barge "Fearnought" in 
Chesapeake Bay. 

JAMES LE ROY DAVENPORT, Washington, D. C. (22149). Son of Lock Hart 
and Mary Creed (Merrill) Pavenport; grandson of James Hart and Jerusha 
(Stebbins) Davenport; great-grandson of Elihu and Lucretia (Wright) Steb- 
bins; greats-grandson of Eldad Wright, Captain of Company of Minute Men, 
Col. Samuel Williams's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM ALBERT EDWARD DOYING, Washington, D. C. (22132). Son of 
Ira Edward and Sarah Jane (Davis) Doring; grandson of William Wallace 
and Ann (Brown) Doying; great-grandson of Daniel Doying, private. Captain 
Kidder's Company, Colonel Nichols's New Hampshire Regt. 

CHARLES LAMARTINE DU BOIS, Washington, D. C. (22133). Son of Nicholas 
and Louisa (Griffin") Du Bois; grandson of Abraham and Julia (Bowers) Du 
Bois; great-grandson of Minna Du Bois, Sergeant Second Battalion New Jersey 
Militia; greats-grandson of Abraham Du Bois, Captain Second Battalion New 
Jersey Militia. 

W. WALTON EDWARDS, Washington, D. C. (22143). Son of William Props 
and Margaret Elizabeth (Turrentine) Edwards; grandson of Meredith Walton 
and Martha (Props) Edwards; great-grandson of William Edwards, private, 
Col. John Taylor's Virginia Regt., pensioned. 

FREDERICK EUGENE FOWLE, Jr., Washington, D. C. (22150). Son of Fred- 
erick Eugene and Mary (Proctor) Fowle; grandson of John and Abigail Bow- 
man (Hill) Fowle; great-grandson of John and Mary (Parker) Fowle; great-- 
grandson of Jonas Parker, private Lexington Company of Minute Men, killed 
April 19, 1775; great-grandson of William and Mary (Bowman) Hill; great-- 
grandson of Solomon Bowman, Lieutenant, Captain Locke's Middlesex County 
Company Mass. Minute Men, taken prisoner April 19, 1775, pensioned. 

JAMES WILLIAM GILMORE, Lexington, Va. (D. C. 23026). Son of Joseph and 
Catherine Beale (Paxton) Gilmore; grandson of James and Catherine Beale 
(Jordan) Paxton; great-grandson of John Jordan, Captain of Artillery Penna. 
Line, pensioned. 

JOSEPH ISADORE KEEPER, Washington, D. C. (22139). Son of Adolph and 
Elizabeth (Thompson) Keefer; grandson of Israel Ball and Frances (Wilson) 
Thompson; great-grandson of George Wilson, Colonel First Virginia Regt. of 
Volunteers. 

CLAUDE FR.-VNKLIN KING, Washington, D. C. (22134). Son of Montgomery 
S. and Mary Jane Elizabeth (Mofifatt) King; grandson of Hugh and Elizabeth 
Moffatt; great-grandson of Alexander Moffatt, private New York Militia and 
Second Continental Artillery, pensioned. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN LARCOMBE, Washington, D. C. (22140). Son of John 
and Elizabeth (Tench) Larcombe; grandson of Thomas Larkain, seaman Conn, 
ship "Oliver Cromwell." 

WILLIAM McNEIR, Washington, D. C. (23027). Son of Thomas Shephard and 
Emily Ridgley (Schwrar) McNeir; grandson of George and Elizabeth (Thomp- 
son) McNeir; great-grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Cobreth) McNeir; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Nancy (Burgess) McNeir; greats-grandson of 
Edward Burgess, Captain Frederick County Militia, Member of Committee of 
Observation, Member of Maryland House of Delegates. 



204 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

JOHN HENRY MOORE, U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C. (10413). Supplemental. 
Son of George Augustus and Catherine Arvilla (Brown) Moore; grandson of 
Roswell Hopkins and Olive Wade (Nichols) Brown; great-grandson of John 
Nichols, private, Captain Browning's Company Mass. Militia; grandson of John 
and Mary Lerena (Middlebrook) Moore; great-grandson of John Middlebrook, 
private, Capt. David Nichols's Company Conn. Coast Guards, pensioned. 

FRANK EGERTON POWELL, Cumberland, Md. (D. C. 22136). Son of Walter 
and Mary F. (Dart) Powell; grandson of Lewis Fechtig and Mary Naply 
(Cresap) Dart; great-grandson of Hanson and Eliza (Hendrickson) Cresap; 
great--grandson of Thomas and Mary (Briscoe) Cresap; greats-grandson of 
Daniel Cresap, Member of Maryland Committee of Safety; great*-grandson of 
Thomas Cresap, Member of Maryland Committee of Observation and Safety, 
1775. 

JOHN CLAGETT PROCTOR, Brightwood, D. C. (23031). Son of John Clagett 
and Mary Ann (B'avison) Proctor; grandson of Samuel Childs and Mary Ann 
(Strong) Davison; great-grandson of Robert and Margaret (Wallington) Davi- 
son; great'-grandson of Samuel Davison, Commodore Penna. Navy, Master of 
privateer schooner "Greene." 

ALFRED McCALLUM ROBBINS, U. S. Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. 
(22137). Son of Henry Alfred and Elizabeth (MacCallum) Robbins; grandson 
of Zenas Coleman and Mary J. (Tilden) Robbins; great-grandson of Richard 
Swift and Evalina Ellen (Byrd) Tilden; great'-grandson of John Bell Tilden, 
Lieutenant Second Regt. Penna. Line, pensioned; great-grandson of Henry and 
Abigail (Coleman) Robbins; greats-grandson of Zenas Coleman; greats-grand- 
son of Noah Coleman, Surgeon's Mate Second Regt. Conn. Line. 

THEODORE FRELINGHUYSEN SARGENT, Washington, D. C. (23028). Son 
of Levi and Mary Ann (Welch) Sargent; grandson of Thomas and Naomi 
(Westfall) Sargent; great-grandson of Abraham IVestfall, Captain, Lieut. Col. 
A. Pawling's Regt. New York Levies and New York Line, pensioned. 

AUGUSTUS CARRIER TAYLOR, Washington, D. C. (22142). Son of Nathaniel 
Terry and Mary Eliza (Carrier) Taylor; grandson of Nathaniel Terry and 
Laura (Winchell) Taylor; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Terry) Tay- 
lor; greats-grandson of Nathaniel Terry, Major Nineteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

EDWARD THOMAS, Washington, D. C. (23032). Son of Allen C. and Rebecca 
H. (Marble) Thomas; grandson of Russel and Phebe (Almy) Marble; great- 
grandson of Aaron Marble, private Mass. Continental Troops; greats-grandson 
of Enoch Marble, Lieutenant, Captain Sibley's Company Mass. Militia. 

WASHINGTON TOPHAM, Washington, D. C. (22147). Son of James Smith and 
Ann Maria (White) Topham; grandson of Enoch and Eliza (Barron) White; 
great-grandson of Daniel Barron, private, Capt. Belain Posey's Company Mary- 
land Flying Camp. 

WILLIAM ELLEGOOD VAUGHAN, Washington, D. C. (23033). Son of William 
Ellegood and Claudia (Morris) Vaughan; grandson of Thomas and Claudia 
(Ellegood) Vaughan; great-grandson of William and Sarah G. (Matthews) 
Ellegood; greats-grandson of Thomas Matthews, Lieutenant-Colonel, Engineer, 
Virginia Troops, retired as Brigadier-General. 

THOMAS NORRIS VINCENT, Washington, D. C. (23029). Son of Thomas Mc- 
Curdy and Laura Louise (Lancaster) Vincent; grandson of Thomas Carlton 
and Jane (McCurdy) Vincent; great-grandson of John and Agnes (Tait) Mc- 
Curdy; greatS-grandson of John McCurdy, Second Lieutenant, Wilson's Bat- 
talion, Continental Establishment Penna. Line. 

JOHN CATESBY WEEDON, Washington, D. C. (22138). Son of Peter Trone 
and Louisa (French) Weedon; grandson of John Catesby and Elizabeth 
(Trone) Weedon; great-grandson of Augustine Weedon, Sergeant, Colonel 
Brent's Regt. Virginia Line. 



REGISTER OE NEW MEMBERS. 205 

CLIFFORD RIDDLE WHYTE. Washington, D. C. (22135). Son of Thomas D. 
and Rose (Riddle) Whyte; grandson of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth 
(Munger) Whyte; great-grandson of Alexander and Elizabeth (Purvis) Whyte; 
greats-grandson of George Purvis, Quartermaster Battalion Flying Camp, Colo- 
nel Patterson's Delaware Regt. 

FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

ALEXANDER CLEMENTS BLOUNT, III, Pensacola, Fla. (20684). Son of Alex- 
ander C. and Clara Garnier (Dorr) Blount, Jr.; grandson of Alexander C. and 
Julia Elizabeth (Washington) Blount; great-grandson of Frederick and Rachel 
(Heritage) Blount; greats-grandson of James Blount, Captain Second North 
Carolina Regt. ; great--grandson of John Heritage, Captain Second North Caro- 
lina Regt. 

HAYDN WATERS CROSBY, Jackson, Fla. (20685). Son of Joseph Haydn and 
Edith Elida (Day) Crosby; grandson of Joseph Haydn and Zerina (Streeter) 
Crosby; great-grandson of Joseph Ives and Sarah Ann (Barlow) Crosby; great-- 
grandson of Abner and Hannah (Bradley) Crosby; greats-grandson of John 
Crosby, private. Captain Higgins's Company, Colonel Marshall's Mass. Regt. 

FRANCIS WINGATE HAYES, Pensacola, Fla. (20683). Son of Henry Wingate 
and Nancy (Baker) Hayes; grandson of Wingate and Abby Maria (Bowler) 
Hayes; great-grandson of Charles Lee and Hannah Gibbs (Aborn) Bowler; 
greats-grandson of Samuel Bourse and Abigail (Lee) Bowler; greats-grandson 
of Metcalf Bowler, Associate Justice and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court 
of Rhode Island, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

JOHN EDGAR STILLMAN, Pensacola, Fla. (20686). Son of John E. and Mary 
S. (Lashier) Stillman; grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Durfey) Lashier; great- 
grandson of John Durfey, private, Colonel Ely's Regt. Conn. Troops. 

HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

HARRIE CUTLER COBURN, Elule Kauai, Hawaii (20412). Son of J. Milton 
and Abbie M. (Cutler) Coburn; grandson of Aaron G. and Lucy F. (Nourse) 
Cutler; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Millie (Blake) Cutler; greats-grandson 
of Ebeneser Cutler, private Mass. Troops. 

EDWIN AUSTIN JONES, Honolulu, Hawaii (20411). Son of Edwin Austin and 
Isabella (Fuller) Jones; grandson of Peter Cushman and Cornelia (Hall) 
Jones; great-grandson of Peter Cushman and Jane Mcintosh (Baldwin) Jones; 
greatS-grandson of Josiah and Jane (Mcintosh) Baldwin; greats-grandson of 
Isaac Baldivin, Captain First New Hampshire Regt., Col. Isaac Stark; great-- 
grandson of Peter Mcintosh, blacksmith and gunsmith Quartermaster's Dept. 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Edwin Oscar and Sarah Lyons (Williams) 
Hall; great--grandson of Owen and Sophia (Sibley) Hall; great'-grandson of 
Asa and Irene (Carpenter) Sibley; greaf'-grandson of Timothy Sibley, Member 
of Committee of Safety of Sutton, Mass., 1776, Colonel Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD CHARLES MOHR, Honolulu, Hawaii (20403). Supplementals. Son 
of Charles Shoemaker and Katharine (Kershner) Mohr; grandson of Daniel 
and Elizabeth (Umbenhauer) Kershner; great-grandson of John and Katharine 
(Hart) Kershner; great--grandson of Conrad (and Catharine Rieser) Kershner, 
Jr., private First Berks County Regt. Penna. Militia; great--grandson of Conrad 
and Elizabeth (Bertolette) Kershner; great--grandson of Frederick and Esther 
(Levan) Bertolette; great--grandson of Abraham Levan, prisoners' guard. Cap- 
tain deist's Company Fourth Berks County Battalion Penna. Militia; great-- 
grandson of Jacob Rieser, Corporal, Capt. Nicholas Scheffer's Company First 
Berks County Battalion Penna. Militia; great-grandson of Samuel and Magda- 
lena (Leonard) Umbenhauer; great--grandson of Philip and Elizabeth (Shap- 
pelle) Leonard; great--grandson of Jacob Leonard, fifer, Captain Lodick's Com- 
pany, Col. Samuel Ely's Battalion Berks County Militia. 



206 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ILVLPH JOSEPH RICHARDSON, Honolulu, Hawaii (20410). Son of Walter Jay 
and Sarah (Sager) Richardson; grandson of Joseph and Lydia Phelps (Read) 
Richardson; great-grandson of Sampson and Huldah (Bisbee) Read; great-- 
grandson of Sampson and Jane (Ellis) Read; greats-grandson of Sampson Read, 
private, Capt. Jonathan Minott's Company, Colonel Baldwin's Mass. Regt. ; 
greats-grandson of Freeman Ellis, Corporal, Capt. John Bradford's Company, 
Colonel Cotton's Mass. Regt.; greats-grandson of Elisha Bisbee, private, Capt. 
Amos Turner's Company, Col. John Bailey's and other Mass. Regts. ; great-- 
grandson of Charles Bisbee, private, Capt. Freeman Chamberlain's Company, 
Colonel Bailey's Mass. Regt. 

FRANK ADAMS RICHMOND, Honolulu, Hawaii (18946). Supplemental. Son 
of Alfred and Emily (Adams) Richmond; grandson of Samuel and Mary 
Joanna (Moulton) Adams; great-grandson of Jotham Tilden and Mary Joanna 
(Farrar) Moulton; great--grandson of Jotham and Joanna (Tilden) Moulton; 
great--grandson of Jotham Moulton, Brigadier-General Mass. Militia; great-- 
grandson of Humphrey Farrar, private, Col. Eleazer Brooks's Regt. Mass. 
Militia; great--grandson of Samuel Farrar, Member of Committee of Corre- 
spondence and Safety, Eieutenant Mass. Minute Men; great-grandson of Isaac 
and Olive (Wight) Adams; great'-grandson of Samuel Adams, private, Col. 
Enoch Hale's New Hampshire Regt.; great--grandson of Joel Wight, private, 
Colonel Phinney's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

IDAHO SOCIETY. 

EDWARD EVERETT BOWEN, De I.amar, Idaho (21356). Son of Caleb Tilling- 
hast and Lydia Waterman (Knight) Bowen; grandson of Joseph and Abagail 
(Tillinghast) Bowen; great-grandson of Pardon and Mary (Sweet) Tillinghast; 
great--grandson of Charles Tillinghast, Recruiting Officer Rhode Island Troops. 

HORACE EORENZO CHAMBERLAIN, Boise, Idaho (21355). Son of Lorenzo 
and Nancy (Holmes) Chamberlain; grandson of Horace and Deborah Page 
(Moulton) Holmes; great-grandson of Amos Page, private Mass. Continental 
Troops. 

FREDERIC IRWIN, Dewey, Idaho (21352). Son of John and Martha Mary 
(Nevin) Irwin, Jr.; grandson of John and Hannah (Taylor) Irwin; great- 
grandson of John Irwin, Captain First Battalion Second Penna. Regt. Conti- 
nental Line; grandson of John and Martha (McCracken) Nevin; great-grand- 
son of Daniel Nevin, private Penna. Militia; great-grandson of William Mc- 
Cracken, Second Lieutenant, Capt. Matthew Scott's Company Thirteenth 
Penna. Regt. 

WILMOT HENRY GIBSON, Boise, Idaho (21353). Son of Wilmot Byron and 
Helen (Stewart) Gibson; grandson of John and Sarah (Randolph) Stewart; 
great-grandson of Taylor F. and Rebecca (Ulery) Randolph; great--grandson 
of Robert Fits Randolph, private under Col. Wm. Cook in Battle of German- 
town, later, as Robert Randolph, served in New Jersey Minute Men. 

CHARLES AINSWORTH HASTINGS, Lewiston, Idaho (21354). Son of Charles 
and Martha (Tuttle) Hastings; grandson of James and Sally (Mead) Hastings; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Lydia (Nelson) Hastings; great--grandson of 
Samuel Hastings, Major on General Lee's staff, prisoner. 

JOHN HENRY UPTON, Boise, Idaho (21357). Son of Henry Bingham and Janet 
Upton; grandson of John and Sarah (Wetherspoon) Upton, Jr.; great-grandson 
of John Upton, Lieutenant Lynn Company Mass. Militia. 

WILLARD WHITE, Boise, Idaho (21351). Son of Selden and Diadama Hannah 
(Barbour) White; grandson of Giles and Mary (Garrett) Barbour; great-grand- 
son of John and Mary (Case) Garrett, Jr.; great--grandson of John (Wait) 
Garrett, Major Twenty-sixth Conn. Regt., killed at Wyoming Massacre July 13, 
1778- 



I 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 20/ 

IIvUNOIS SOCIETV. 

WILLIAM GRIFFIN ADKINS, Chicago, 111. (22240). Son of William G. and 
Sarah (Matthewson) Adkins; grandson of William and Arabella (Abbey) Ad- 
kins; great-grandson of Peter and Hannah (Alden) Abbey; greats-grandson of 
Thomas Abbe, Captain Third Conn. Line; grandson of Jeremiah Angell and 
Elizabeth (Hazard) Matthewson; great-grandson of Jeremiah Angell and 
Electa (Cross) Matthewson; greats-grandson of Uriah Cross, private, Captain 
Ensign's Company, Colonel Moseley's Conn. Regt. 

DAVIS C. ALTON, Chicago, HI. (22606). Son of William and Caroline (Bain- 
bridge) Alton; grandson of Abijah H. and Eliza (Whipple) Bainbridge; great- 
grandson of Richard Bainbridge, private, Captain Nixon's Troop New Jersey 
Light Horse. 

WILLIAM PRESTON ASA, Springfield, 111. (22343). Son of Jefferson and Mary 
(Davis) Asa; grandson of James and Margaret (Slover) Asa; great-grandson 
of John Slover, private Middlesex County New Jersey Militia, scout in Craw- 
ford's Sandusky Expedition. 
FRED HOLMES ATWOOD, Chicago, 111. (22328). Son of Ephraim Atwood; 
grandson of Benjamin and Mary Abigail (Olney) Atwood; great-grandson of 
John and Betsey (Whitney) Atwood; greats-grandson of Benjamin Atwood, 
private Fourth Orange County Regt. New York Militia; greats-grandson of 
Thomas and Hannah (Parker) Whitney; greats-grandson of Daniel Whitney, 
private Fourth Orange County Regt. New York Militia. 

■CHARLES SCAMMON BARKER, Chicago, 111. (22048). Son of James Scammon 
and Ann (Bean) Barker; grandson of Benjamin and Lydia (Scammon) Barker; 
great-grandson of Noah and Mary Colcord (Philbrick) Barker; greatS-grandson 
of Josiah Barker, private. Captain Weare's Company, Colonel Scammel's Third 
New Hampshire Regt. 

FRANK MARION BARKER, Waukegan, 111. (22932). Son of Thomas Oscar and 
Mary Ann (Needham) Barker; grandson of Joshua Perry and Polly (Cottrell) 
Barker; great-grandson of James Willard and Martha (Perry) Willard; great-- 
grandson of Joshua Perry, Surgeon, Colonel Church's Battalion Rhode Island 
Militia. 

-GEORGE MARSHALL BLACK, Oak Park, 111. (19800). Supplemental. Son of 
John and Rachel (Patterson) Black; grandson of George and Hannah (Ross) 
Black; great-grandson of John Ross, private Fourth Penna. Battalion, Col. 
Anthony Wayne. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH BOWMAN, Minneapolis, Minn. (111. 22336). Son of Joseph 
Pierce and Helen Maria (Day) Bowman; grandson of Thaddeus and Anna 
(Hunt) Bowman; great-grandson of Thaddeus Bowman, Jr., private. Col. John 
Parker's Company Lexington Minute Men, April 19, 1775, and Col. Nathan 
Sparhawk's Mass. Regt., 1777. 

JOHN JAY BRYANT, Jr., Chicago, 111. (22250). Son of John Jay and Matilda 
(Miller) Bryant; grandson of Aaron and Joanna (Hatfield) Lyon; great-grand- 
son of David Lyon, Captain, Colonel Spencer's New Jersey Regt. ; great-grand- 
son of Aaron Hatfield, private Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

■OLIVER NORTH CALDWELL, Oak Park, 111. (22341). Son of Henry Wallace 
and Hannah Ann (North) Caldwell; grandson of Robert F. and Julia (Co- 
mingo) Caldwell; great-grandson of Robert and Margaret (Cook) Caldwell; 
greatS-grandson of Ale.rander Caldwell, private, Lieut. William Nesbitt's Com- 
pany Penna. Frontier Rangers. 

'GEORGE ANGUS CAMERON, Chicago, 111. (22234). Son of Angus and Susan 
(Woodruff) Cameron; grandson of Alonson and Lucy (Shaw) Woodruff; great- 
grandson of Joseph Shaw, private. Captain Smith's Company, Colonel Mar- 
shall's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 



208 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ALFRED ERNEST CASE, Antioch, 111. (22050). Son of Spencer Silas and Han- 
nah Minnie (Wilkinson) Case; grandson of Grove and Alana (Baudell) Case; 
great-grandson of Elisha Case, private, Colonel Huntington's Conn. Regt. 

SETH CATLIX, Chicago, 111. (22331). Son of George and Imogen Blanche Cat- 
lin: grandson of Seth and Helen Mar (Griswold) Catlin; great-grandson of 
Richard and Charlotte (Stebbins) Catlin; greats-grandson of Joseph and Lucy 
(Frary) Stebbins; greats-grandson of Joseph Stebbins, Captain, Col. William; 
Prescott's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ALEXANDER M. CHENEY, Jerseyville, 111. (22933). Son of Prentiss D. and 
Catherine M. (D'Arcy) Cheney; grandson of Edward A. and Mary (Mc- 
Eowen) D'Arcy; great-grandson of John D'Arcy, Dorseyj Surgeon's Mate, 
"Spencer's Regiment," Continental Army. 

BERYL HOWARD CHILDS, Chicago, 111. (22620). Son of Frank Luther and 
Minnie Bernice (Rogers) Childs; grandson of Bernard and Ann Maria (Buck) 
Rogers; great-grandson of James Henry and Ann (Ver Bryck) Rogers; great-- 
grandson of Henry and Jane (Tappan) Rogers; greats-grandson of James Tap- 
pan, private, Capt. Jacob Ten Eyck's Company First Battalion Somerset Regt. 
New Jersey Militia. 

FRANK LUTHER CHILDS, Chicago, 111. (22349). Son of Harvey Harrison and 
Luthera (Atwood) Childs; grandson of Franklin and Arminda (Anderson) At- 
wood; great-grandson of Hiram and Jerusha (Kinney) Anderson; great'-grand- 
son of Daniel Kinney, private Conn. Troops, pensioned. 

JAMES WALTER CLARK, Chicago, 111. (22934). Son of Austin S. and Evelina. 
B. (Dickinson) Clark; grandson of Nehemiah and Julia (Sabin) Dickinson;, 
great-grandson of Joseph Dickinson, Ensign First Company Second Conn. Con- 
tinental Regt.; great-grandson of Jonathan Sabin, Corporal Conn. Militia, Mid- 
shipman Continental frigate "Trumbull," pensioned. 

JOHN LEWIS COCHRAN, Chicago, 111. (22350). Son of John Lewis and Martha 
Tennant (Austin) Cochran; grandson of John Punderson and Susan (Rogers) 
Austin; great-grandson of David Austin, ^d, private Conn. Volunteers in New 
Haven alarm, 1779. 

EDGAR LATHROP COTTING, River Forest, 111. {22330). Son of Charles 
Lathrop and Hannah Amelia (Upson) Cotting; grandson of Thomas Spencer 
and Jane (Burgess) Cotting; great-grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Good- 
ridge) Cotting; great--grandson of Samuel Cutting, Sergeant, Col. Asa Whit- 
comb's Mass. Regt. ; greats-grandson of Asaph and Hannah (Walker) Good- 
ridge; greats-grandson of David Goodridge, Representative Second Provinciar 
Congress at Concord, Cambridge, and Watertown, Mass., 1775. 

PHILIP ROSE CRIPPEX, Chicago, 111. (22226). Son of Arthur Jay and Ella. 
Gertrude (Rose) Crippen; grandson of James Bradley and Mary Ann (Butter- 
worth) Crippen; great-grandson of Lorenzo D. and Ruth H. (Haynes) Crippen; 
great--grandson of Bradley and Esther (Hard) Crippen; greats-grandson of 
Ezra Crippen, Corporal, Capt. George King's Company, Colonel Hopkins's- 
Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

THOMAS STEWART DEXISOX, Chicago, 111. (22928). Son of Alexander Mc- 
Coy and Esther (Stewart) Denison; grandson of James and Agones (Baggs)- 
Dennison; great-grandson of James Dennison, Sergeant Eighth Penna. Regt. 
Continental Line. 

HENRY J. DUDLEY, Springfield, 111. (22607). Son of Franklin Fowler and El- 
vira (Meyers") Dudley; grandson of James Harvey and Eliza Betsy (Bray) 
Dudley; great-grandson of Erastus and Ruth (Fowler) Dudley; great--grandson. 
of Ebenezer Fowler, Lieutenant, Capt. Steven Hall's Company Conn. Militia. 

ALBERT D. EARLY, Rockford, 111. (22621). Son of John and Sophronia H. 
(Brown) Early; grandson of John and Julia A. (Fulmer) Early; great-grand- 
son of Casper Fulmer, private. Capt. Henry Bedkin's Second Troop First- 
Partisan Legion, Colonel Armand. 



\ 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 20g 

CHARLES LEONARD FERRIS, Carthage, 111. (22930). Son of Leonard Thomp- 
son and Helen Minerva Ferris; grandson of Stephen Gano and Eunice (Beebe) 
Ferris; great-grandson of Israel (and Ruth Mead) Ferris, private Conn. 
Militia; greats-grandson of Jonathan Mead, Lieutenant Dutchess County New 
York Militia. 

lEROY FOGLE. Chicago, 111. (22939). Son of I. M. and Cassie T. (Hogg) Fogle; 
grandson of Peter and Annarah H. (Dent) Fogle; great-grandson of John 
Dent, Second Lieutenant Ninth Virginia Regt. 

ENOCH HANSBROUGH FUDGE, Chicago, 111. (22337). Son of Jacob and Elsie 
King (Hansbrough) Fudge; grandson of Conrad and Elizabeth (Persinger) 
Fudge; great-grandson of Jacob Fersinger, scout at battle of Point Pleasant, 
Corporal, Capt. Matthew Arbuckle's Company, Major Nevelle's Regt. Virginia 
Line, pensioned. 

WILLIAM D WIGHT GALPIN, Chicago, 111. {22623). Son of Sylvester and 
Clarissa (Smith) Galpin; grandson of Amos Galpin, Ensign, Captain Stanley's 
Company, Colonel Sherburne's Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

CORBUS PLUMMER GARDNER. Mendota, 111. (22603). Son of George Wash- 
ington and Margaret (Smith) Gardner; grandson of James Smith; great-grand- 
son of James Smith, Member of Pennsylvania Assembly, 1777, and Colonel 
Third Westmoreland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

DE WITT R. GOOCH, Bellflower, 111. (22339). Son of Thomas and Lydia Capen 
(Roulstone) Gooch ; grandson of Thomas and Sallie (Loring) Gooch; great- 
grandson of James and Mary (Davenport) Gooch; great'-grandson of Joseph 
Gooch, Jr., private. Col. Benjamin Lincoln's Mass. Regt.; grandson of John 
and Hannah (Capen) Roulstone; great-grandson of John Capen, private, Capt. 
Lemuel Gill's Dorchester Company Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES HENRY GOODNOW, Chicago, 111. (22927). Son of George F. and 
Hannah A. (Chase) Goodnow; grandson of Henry and Sophia (Dickey) Good- 
now; great-grandson of Matthew and Elizabeth (March) Dickey; greats-grand- 
son of Adam. Dickey, Sergeant, Capt. Wm. Boyes's Company, Colonel Rey- 
nolds's New Hampshire Regt. 

EDWARD EVERETT GORE, La Grange, 111. (22346). Son of David and Cin- 
derella Davis (Keller) Gore; grandson of Michael and Elizabeth (Mitchell) 
Gore; great-grandson of E leaser Gore, private, Capt. Richard Winn's Company 
of Rangers, Col. William Thompson's South Carolina Regt. 

FRANK GREENE. Chicago, 111. (22241). Son of Jesse and Hannah (Rhoads) 
Greene; grandson of John and Barbara (Grove) Green; great-grandson of Ben- 
jamin Green, private Virginia Troops. 

WILBUR CLAY HADLEY, Collinsville, 111. (22230). Son of William and Dia- 
dama (McKinney) Hadley; grandson of John McKinney, private, Morgan's 
Rifle Regt., Corporal and Scout South Carolina Continental Troops. 

WILLIAM EDWIN HADLEY, Edwardsville, 111. (22231). Son of Wilbur Clay 
and Mary Sophonia (Smith) Hadley; grandson of William and Diadama (Mc- 

■ Kinney) Hadley; great-grandson of John McKinney, private, Morgan's Rifle 

^ Regt., Corporal and Scout South Carolina Troops. 

FRANK CHAMBERLAIN HASELTON, Chicago, 111. (22242). Son of Jared 
Munson and Elizabeth (Chamberlain) Haselton; grandson of Moses and Mar- 
tha (Child) Chamberlain; great-grandson of Cephas Child, private, Col. Israel 
Putman's Third Conn. Regt. 

GEORGE BYRON HOLMES, Chicago, .li. {22622). Son of George Winton and 
Sarah P. (Cooke) Holmes; grandson of George Washington and Sara B. 
(Hiland) Cooke; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Martha (Nims) Cooke, Jr.; 
greats-grandson of Ebeneser Cooke, Lieutenant, Capt. John Pratt's Company, 
Col. Ebenezer Walbridge's Vermont Regt. 

14 — SR 



2IO SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

BRUCE LEON HOLTON, Oak Park, 111. (22608). Son of Charles Henry and 
Melissa Amelia (Hogendobler) Holton; grandson of Henry H. and Susan 
(Colton) Holton; great-grandson of Janna and Brices (Smith) Holton; great-- 
grandson of Nehemiah Smith, private, Capt. Abraham Salisbury's Company 
\'ermont Militia. 

CHARLES BABCOCK HOSSACK, Odell, 111. (22609). Son of John and Mary 
(Rabcock) Hossack; grandson of William R. and Myra F. (Marsh) Babcock; 
great-grandson of Charles and Nancy (Pratt) Babcock; greats-grandson of 
Peleg Bill Pratt; greats-grandson of David Pratt, Lieutenant-Colonel Ninth 
Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

HENDERSON M. HUFF, Chicago, 111. {223^7). Son of William and Margaret 
(Davis) Huff; grandson of Aquila and Mary (Rawlins) Huff; great-grandson 
of John Hough, Huff, private Maryland Troops, 1778. 

GEORGE CUYLER HUNT, Chicago, 111. (22049)- Son of William Carleton and 
Ellen (Cuyler) Hunt; grandson of Reuben and Emeline Hunt; great-grandson 
of Salmon and Ruby (Whitney) Hunt; greats-grandson of Russell Hunt, Ser- 
geant. Captain Watson's Company, Col. Heman Swift's Regt. Conn. Line. 

GERALD GARY HUTTON, Chicago, III. (22926). Son of Anson Isaac and Jen- 
nie Ann (Gary) Hutton; grandson of Levi and Eleanor Hutton; great-grand- 
son of John and Elizabeth (Smith) Hutton; greats-grandson of Timothy Hut- 
ton, Ensign, Col. Philip Schuyler's New York Regt. 

RALPH CLAYTON KENT, Chicago, 111. (22228). Son of Henry Robertson and 
'SI. Lillian (McNally) Kent; grandson of Ralph Voorhees and Martha Calloway 
(Robertson) Kent; great-grandson of Clayton and Catherine Ann (Voorhees) 
Kent; great--grandson of Phineas Kent, private, Col. David Herman's Regt. 
New Jersey Militia. 

BENJAMIN F. LANGWORTHY, River Forest. 111. (22335). Son of George Irish 
and Ann Lockhart (Karr) Langworthy; grandson of Benjamin F. and Eliza 
(Irish) Langworthy; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Pendleton) Lang- 
worthy; greats-grandson of Nathan and Amelia (Babcock) Pendleton; great'- 
grandson of James Babcock, Lieutenant-Colonel Rhode Island Militia, Member 
of Rhode Island General Assembly. 

RUDOLPH WENDELL LE BARON, Chicago, 111. (2261 1). Son of John Francis 
and Mary Brown (Kinsman) Le Baron Patch (name changed from Patch to 
Le Baron); grandson of John and Margaret Ann Gurley (Poor) Patch; great- 
grandson of John and Judith (Corning) Patch; greatS-grandson of Nehemiah 
Patch, private, Capt. Robert Perkins's Company Light Horse, Maj. Charles 
Smith's Mass. Regt. 

JAMES ALBERT LEWIS, Oak Park, 111. (,22037). Supplementals. Son of John 
and Julia (Clarke) Lewis; grandson of John and Olive (Jackson) Clarke; 
great-grandson of Deodatus and Nancy (Dunham) Clarke; greatS-grandson of 
Daniel Dunham, private, Capt. Daniel Dewey's Company Conn. Militia; grand- 
son ot Benjamin Lewis; great-grandson of Nathan Lewis, private Second Regt. 
New York Line. 

OLIVER CULVER LORTON, Virden, 111. (22610). Son of James Nance and 
Amy Ann (Baldwin) Lorton; grandson of Thomas and Frances (Nance) Lor- 
ton; great-grandson oi .Robert Lorton, private Fourth Virginia Regt., Col. 
Adam Stephen. 

FRANK ORREN LOWDEN, Oregon, 111. (22326). Son of Oren Lorenzo and 
Nancy Elizabeth (Bryborn) Lowden; grandson of Oren and Jerusha (Loomis) 
Lowden; great-grandson of John Loomis, private Conn, and Mass. Militia, pen- 
sioned. 

CHESTER REUBEN LOWELL, Chicago, 111. {22243). Son of Luzerne Dow and 
Clara Suits (Dickinson) Lowell; grandson of Reuben and Catherine (Seeber) 
Lowell; great-grandson of Abraham and Sally (Inman) Lowell; greatS-grandson 
of Moses Lowell, private New Hampshire Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 211 

ERNEST F. MANROSE, Berwyn, 111. (22236). Son of Fitch and Annie E. (Ris- 
ley) Manrose; grandson of Philander and Sarah (Robertson) Manrose; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Betsey (Piatt) Robertson; great--grandson of Jonas 
Piatt, private Fourth Conn. Militia, prisoner. 

CHARLES EDWARD MERRIAM, Chicago, III. (22244). Son of Charles Edward 
and Margaret Campbell (Kirkwood) Merriam; grandson of Marshall and Susan 
Maria (Wood) Merriam; great-grandson of Amos Merriam, Matross, Capt. 
Jonathan Edes's Company, Colonel Craft's Artillery Regt. 

JOHN HENNON MITCHELL, Evanston, 111. (22612). Son of Joseph Frazier and 
Margaret Jeanette (Hennon) Mitchell; grandson of John and Jean Thompson 
(Ross) Hennon; great-grandson of Thomas Smith and Margaret Cooper (Jack- 
son) Ross; great'-grandson of John Ross, private Fourth Penna. Battalion, Col. 
Anthony Wayne. 

THOMAS RICE MORRILL, Chicago, 111. (22348). Son of John Wesley and 
Frankie (Farrington) Morrill; grandson of Wesley and Helen M. (Kingsley) 
Morrill; great-grandson of Hibbard and Betsey (Bradley) Morrill; great'-grand- 
son of Hibbard Morrill, private. Col. Thomas Tash's and other New Hampshire 
Regts. 

WESLEY FARRINGTON MORRILL, La Grange, 111. (22613). Son of John 
Wesley and Frankie (Farrington) Morrill; grandson of Wesley and Helen M. 
(Kingsley) Morrill; great-grandson of Hibbard and Betsey (Bradley) Morrill; 
greats-grandson of Hibbard Morrill, private, Col. Thomas Tash's and other 
New Hampshire Regts. 

ELIHU BRADFORD MOSHER, Chicago, 111. (,22227). Son of Elihu Mott and 
Adelia Ann (Hathaway Peck) Mosher; grandson of Elihu and Meribah (Shep- 
herd) Mosher; great-grandson of John Mosher, private Second Bristol County 
Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM NEWMAN MOULTON, Two Harbors, Minn. (111. 22625). Son of 
Stillman and Mary J. Moulton; grandson of Zebina and Hannah (Taber) 
Moulton; great-grandson of Nathaniel Moulton; great--grandson of Joseph 
Moulton, Sergeant, Col. David Brewer's Mass. Regt.; great--grandson of Free- 
born Moulton, Captain of Monson, Mass. Company of Minute Men, April 19, 
1775- 

ORETT LYMAN MUNGER, Chicago, 111. (22334). Son of Lyman and Martha 
Stebbins (Whitney) Munger; grandson of Gaius and Abigail (Button) Mun- 
ger; great-grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Worthington) Munger; great-- 
grandson of Elnathan Munger, private. Colonel Brewer's and Colonel Shep- 
hard's Mass. Regts., died in service Oct. S, i777- 

RALPH ERNEST PACKARD, Chicago, 111. (22245). Son of Wm. A. and Jennie 
A. (Preston) Packard; grandson of Horace and Lucy Jane (Wood) Preston; 
great-grandson of Jeremiah and Ann (Proctor) Preston; great--grandson of 
Isaac Preston, Sergeant, Capt. Ebenezer Green's Company, Col. Timothy Be- 
del's Regt. New Hampshire Line. 

CHARLES EMANUEL RANSOM, Lexington, 111. (22605). Son of Thomas Lord 
and Anna (Pierson) Ransom; grandson of Arthur V. and Phebe (Cook) Pier- 
son; great-grandson of John Pierson, private First Essex County Battalion 
New Jersey Militia. 

FRANK MOULTON REDDY, Chicago, 111. (22602). Son of John C. and Jo- 
sephine Venetia (Moulton) Reddy; grandson of Daniel Johnson and Elizabeth 
(Cleveland) Moulton; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary Elizabeth (Johnson) 
Moulton; great--grandson of Stephen Moulton, Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty- 
second Conn. Regt., 1775; prisoner, 1776; Member of Conn. General Court, 
1778-1780. 



212 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

SAMUEL WALTER REYNOLDS, Pinckneyville, 111. (22345). Son of Samuel 
and Phoebe (Wiard) Reynolds; grandson of Jonathan and Martha (Sutliffe) 
Reynolds; great-grandson of Samuel Reynolds, private, Capt. Josiah Child's 
Company Fifth Conn. Regt., Col. Philip B. Bradley. 

PERCY LEE RICHTMYER, Chicago, 111. (22333). Son of Alonzo and Ella C. 
(Kilmer) Richtmyer; grandson of Peter and Helen M. (Netheway) Kilmer, 
Jr.; great-grandson of Peter and Sophia (Butler) Kilmer; greats-grandson of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Dana) Butler; greats-grandson of James Dana, Captain, 
Col. Andrew Ward's Conn. Regt.; grandson of Phillip and Elizabeth (Loucks) 
Richtmyer; great-grandson of William and Eve (Karker) Richtmyer; great-- 
grandson of Christian Richtmyer, private, Capt. Thomas Ackerson's Company 
New York Militia. 

RALPH CLIFTON RILEY, Casey, 111. (22246). Son of Millard F. and Martha 
Wayne (Wands) Riley; grandson of Isaac H. and Harriet (Wayne) Wands; 
great-grandson of James B. and Catherine (Hardenbergh) Wands; great--grand- 
son of Isaac and Rachel (Graham) Hardenbergh; greats-grandson of Johannes 
Hardenbergh. Colonel Fourth Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

NORMAN KING ROBB, Chicago, 111. {22229). Son of Alexander G. and Martha 
J. (Marquis) Robb; grandson of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Lyle) Marquis; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Mason) Lyle; greats-grandson of Robert 
Lyle, private, Capt. John Arndt's Company First Northampton County Bat- 
talion Penna. Associators. 

EDWARD SIDNEY ROGERS, Chicago, 111. {22232). Son of James Harriman 
and Susan Hayden (Fisher) Rogers; grandson of Messenger and Ann Wads- 
worth (Fletcher) Fisher; great-grandson of William and Luna (Wadsworth) 
Fletcher; greats-grandson of Joseph Wadsworth, Ensign Twenty-third Conti- 
nental Infantry, Captain Fourth Mass. Infantry; great-grandson of Ebeneser 
Fisher, private, Col. Benjamin Hawes's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Joseph and 
Joan (Harriman) Rogers; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Swett) Harri- 
man; greats-grandson of Peter Harriman, private Seventh New Hampshire 
Regt. ; greatS-grandson of Shebna Swett, private. Colonel Freeman's Regt. Mass. 
Militia; great-grandson of Joseph and Salome (Nickerson) Rogers; great-- 
grandson of Moses Rogers, private, Capt. Seth Clark's Company Mass. Militia. 

REUBEN FRANCIS RUTH, Springfield, 111. {22238). Son of Reuben Francis and 
Marie Weaver (Diller) Ruth; grandson of Jonathan and Ann (Weaver) Diller; 
great-grandson of Isaac and Susanna (Roland) Diller; greats-grandson of Jona- 
than and Catherine (Huber) Roland; greats-grandson of John Huber, private 
First Penna. Continental Regt. 

JOHN MELOY STAHL, Chicago, 111. (22624). Son of Elias and Ann Elizabeth 
(Nitzell) Stahl; grandson of Jacob and Jane (Meloy) Stahl; great-grandson of 
Henry Stahl, private Eighth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

EDWARD HALL SWITZER, Chicago, 111. {22327). Son of Richard H. and 
Sarah Jane (Hall) Switzer; grandson of Isaac and Experience Lawrence 
(Spofford) Hall; great-grandson of Amos and Experience (Lawrence) Spofford; 
greatS-grandson of Thomas Lawrence, private, Colonel Bradley's Battalion 
Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

BEN F. TAIT, Chicago. 111. (22340). Son of Joseph S. and Martha E. (Dillehunt) 
Tait; grandson of James D. and Susan (Spangler) Tait; great-grandson of Jo- 
seph and Barbara (Beusley) Spangler, Jr.; greats-grandson of Joseph Spangler, 
Major Fifth York County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

BURT EUGENE TILDEN, Chicago, 111. (22247). Son of Charles and Adeline 
Clarissa (King) Tilden; grandson of Mason and Sally (Blackman) Tilden; 
great-grandson of Daniel Tilden, Captain, Colonel McClellan's Conn. Regt., 
pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 213 

WILLIAM BEVERLY TOWLES, Chicago, 111. (22614). Son of Alfred Lewis and 
Jane Pleasants (Vaughan) Towles; grandson of Oliver and Agatha (Lewis) 
Towles; great-grandson of Oliver Towles, Lieutenant-Colonel Fifth Virginia 
Regt. 

HART VANCE, Chicago, 111. (22344). Son of Morgan and Susan Preston (Thomp- 
son) Vance; grandson of George Claiborne and Sarah Simpson (Hart) Thomp- 
son; great-grandson of George Thompson, Major of Virginia Troops, Member 
of Virginia Assembly, Aide-de-Camp to General Lafayette, pensioned. 

JOSEPH ANDERSON VANCE, Chicago, 111. (22604). Son of Charles Robertson 
and Margaret J. (Newland) Vance; grandson of James H. and Jane (Sevier) 
Vance; great-grandson of William K. and Keziah (Robertson) Vance; great"- 
grandson of Patrick Vance, |»rivate Eighth Cumberland County Battalion 
Penna. Militia; great-grandson of Valentine and Nancy (Dinwiddie) Sevier; 
greats-grandson of Robert Sevier, Captain North Carolina Militia, died Oct. 12, 
1780, from wound at Battle of Kings Mountain. 

PERCY ORVILLE WARD, Chicago, 111. (22615). Son of John Alexander and 
Louisa (Patterson) Ward; grandson of Johnathan and Perlina (Karraker) Pat- 
terson; great-grandson of Levi and Jane Penrod (Beggs) Patterson; great-- 
grandson of James Patterson, private. Colonel Rutherford's North Carolina 
Regt., pensioned. 

ADRIAN DUNCAN WARING, Chicago, 111. (22936). Son of James Duncan and 
Marie Josephine (Laflfan) Waring; grandson of William Henry and Kate (Ber- 
nard) Waring; great-grandson of Nathaniel Ferris and Clara Anne (Bennett) 
Waring; greats-grandson of, Henry and Susan (Peck) Waring; greats-grandson 
of Henry Waring, Captain-Lieutenant Second Continental New York Artillery. 

JAMES DUNCAN WARING, Chicago, 111. (22935)- Son of William Henry and 
Kate (Bernard) Waring; grandson of Nathaniel Ferris and Clara Anne (Ben- 
nett) Waring; great-grandson of Henry and Susan (Peck) Waring; great-- 
grandson of Henry Waring, Captain-Lieutenant Second NeNv York Continental 
Artillery. 

GEORGE GARDNER WEST, Chicago, 111. (22601). Son of George W. and M. 
Amelia (Allan) West; grandson of James M. and Susannah D. (Stewart) 
Allan; great-grandson of Roderick R. and Clarissa (Dresser) Stewart; great-- 
grandson of Elisha Stewart, private. Col. Nathaniel Freeman's and Colonel 
Alden's Mass. Regts. 

CARLOS FIELD WHITE, Chicago, 111. (22235). Son of Charles Mason and 
Emily Elizabeth (Field) White; grandson of Horatio Nelson and Charity 
Lamoreaux (Taylor) Field; great-grandson of John and Beulah (Reed) Field; 
greats-grandson of John. Field, Jr., private, Capt. John Hull Jr.'s Company 
Minute Men North Parish, Braintree, Mass. 

BERNARD MOULTON WIEDINGER, Chicago, 111. (22929). Son of Bernard M. 
and Mary Deane (Moulton) Wiedenger; grandson of Jotham Tilden and Ann 
P. (Cooke) Moulton; great-grandson of Jotham and Mary (Farrar) Moulton; 
greats-grandson of Jotham Moulton, Colonel, Brigadier, York County Mass. 
Militia. 

SIDNEY D. WILGUS, Elgin, 111. (22938). Son of Frank Augustus and Margaret 
Anne (Woodcock) Wilgus; grandson of Alfred Waldo and Lavinia (Wheelock) 
Wilgus; great-grandson of William Wilgus, private and Foragemaster New Jer- 
sey Militia; great-grandson of John Gleason and Lavinia (Clark) Wheelock; 
greats-grandson of Jonathan Wheelock, private, Capt. James Crilley's Company 
New Hampshire Militia; greatS-grandson of Gershom Clark, private Lebanon 
Company Conn. Militia; grandson of Frederick and Margaret Stewart (Fitch) 
Woodcock; great-grandson of Francis B. and Eliza Whetten (Dean) Fitch; 
greatS-grandson of Stewart Dean, Commander New York privateer "Beam." 



214 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

STAPLES X. WIELARD, Chicago, 111. (22248). Son of Frank H. and Minnie H. 
(Staples) Willard; grandson of Moses W. and Hannah Thatcher (Otis) Sta- 
ples; great-grandson of Charles Gould and Roxcence (Sheldon) Otis; great-- 
grandson of Charles and Elizabeth (Gould) Otis; greats-grandson of John Otis, 
private, Capt. Ebenezer Jenkins's Company, Colonel Freeman's Mass. Regt. 

MARSHALL PHIFER WILLIAMSON, Chicago, 111. (22619). Son of Marshall N. 
and Sarah Wilfong (Phifer) Williamson; grandson of Caleb and Adline (Ram- 
seur) Phifer; great-grandson of John and Esther (Fulenwider) Phifer; great-- 
grandson of Martin t'hifer, Captain of Light Horse Dragoons in Continental 
service and Colonel of North Carolina State Troops. 

HENRY IRVING WILSON, Oak Park, 111. (22329). Son of Henry C. and Louise 
(Grant) Wilson; grandson of Lazarus B. and Mary Todd (Barbee) Wilson; 
great-grandson of Thomas Wilson, Second Lieutenant First Bucks County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES THEODORE WILT, Chicago, 111. {22252). Son of Charles Thomas 
and Eumerett Amelia (Babcock) Wilt; grandson of George and Lydia (Might) 
Wilt; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Allen) Wilt; greats-grandson of 
George and Abijah (Arden) Wilt; greats-grandson of Jacob Arden, private. 
Col. Hawk Hays's Orange County Regt. New York Militia. 

GEORGE ALEXANDER WORK, Chicago, 111. (22249). Son of Julius Berney 
and Ella Virginia (Smith) Work; grandson of George Sullivan and Sophronia 
(Mayo) Smith; great-grandson of Theophilus and Dorothy (Rollins) Smith, 
Jr.; greats-grandson of David and Judith (Currier) Rollins; greats-grandson of 
Benjamin Ra-wlins, Jr., private Fourth New Hampshire Militia. 

GEORGE FERGUSON WORK, Hastings, Nebr. (111. 22616). Son of John Alex- 
ander and Margaret (Gallaher) Work; grandson of Alexander and Jane (Tag- 
gert) Work; great-grandson of James and Margaret (Ferguson) Taggert; 
greats-grandson of Ebeneser Ferguson, First Sergeant First Cumberland County 
Battalion Penna. Militia, pensioned. 

JULIUS BIRNEY WORK, Chicago, 111. {222^2). Son of Samuel Ebenezer Fer- 
guson and Ruth (Green) Work; grandson of Alexander and Jane (Taggert) 
Work; great-grandson of James and Margaret (Ferguson) Taggert; great-- 
grandson of Ebenezer Ferguson, First Sergeant First Cumberland County 
Battalion Penna. Militia, pensioned. 

FIL\NKLIN WYMAN, Chicago, 111. {22222). Son of Stephen Dow and Ursula R. 
(Forsaith) Wyman; grandson of Timothy and Abigail (Dow) Wyman; great- 
grandson of Stephen and Abigail (Jewett) Dow; greats-grandson of Reuben 
D01L', Captain, Col. William Prescott's Mass. Regt., Chairman of Hollis, N. H., 
Committee of Safety. 

JARED WILSON YOUNG, Chicago, 111. (22931). Son of Jesse Bowman and 
Lucy Minshall (Spottswood) Young; grandson of Wilson Lee and Lucy Ann 
(Minshall) Spottswood; great-grandson of Robert and Lucy (Nimocks) Min- 
shall; greatS-grandson of Richard Nimocks, Sergeant, Capt. Malcolm Henry's 
Company, Col. David Brewer's Ninth Mass. Regt. 

INDIANA SOCIETY. 

WILLIAM WILSON BARNES, Kokomo, Ind. (21094). Son of William and Su- 
sannah (Fowler) Barnes; grandson of Stephen Barnes, private Conn. Militia 
and Sheldon's Dragoons. 

MILTON BELL, Kokomo, Ind. (21096). Son of Nathaniel and Nancy (Endicott)] 
Bell; grandson of Henry and Polly Bell; great-grandson of Nathaniel Bell,\ 
private First Troop First Regt. Penna. Continental Light Dragoons. 

GEORGE FRANCIS BICKNELL, East Chicago, Ind. (21090). Son of William H.l 
and Mary Frances (Myers) Bicknell; grandson of Charles Springer and Eliza 
Jane (Marksbery) Myers; great-grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Ridge) ^ 
Myers; greats-grandson of William Ridge, private Frederick County Maryland 
Militia. 



REGISTER OE NEW MEMBERS. 21 5 

JOHN BROWNFIELD CAMPBELL, South Bend, Ind. (22703). Son of Marvin 
and Lydia Ann (Brownfield) Campbell; grandson of Samuel A. and Harriet 
(Cornell) Campbell; great-grandson of Adam S. and Mary (Adams) Campbell; 
greats-grandson of Hugh Campbell, private, Col. John Stark's First New 
Hampshire Regt. 

MORTON S. HAWKINS, Indianapolis, Ind. (14805). Supplementals. Son of 
Nathan Byrd and Genevra Imogene (Jaqua) Hawkins; grandson of Nathan 
Byrd and Rebecca (Shank or Shunk) Hawkins; great-grandson of John Jay 
and Nancy (Sellers) Hawkins; greats-grandson of Nathan Sellers, private 
Chester County Penna. Militia; greats-grandson of Samuel Hawkins, private 
Virginia State Line; grandson of James Braffett and Eliza Jane (Avery) 
Jaqua; great-grandson of Judson and Lucinda (Braffett) Jaqua; greats-grand- 
son of Gamaliel Jaqua, private, Colonel Waterbury's Conn. Regt.; greatS-grand- 
son of James and Rebecca (Gore) Braffett; greats-grandson of Silas Gore, En- 
sign Fifth Company Twenty-fourth Conn. Regt., killed in Wyoming Massacre. 

ADDISON JENKINS, Kokomo, Ind. (21099). Son of David C. and Anna M. 
(Jones) Jenkins; grandson of David and Hannah (McGinnis) Jones; great- 
grandson of George and Mary (Wood) McGinnis; greatS-grandson of Abinah 
and Susannah (Humphreys) Wood; greats-grandson of Lewis Humphreys, pri- 
vate. Col. John Haslet's Delaware Regt. 

HOWARD C. JENKINS, Kokomo, Ind. (21100). Son of David C. and Anna M. 
(Jones) Jenkins; grandson of David and Hannah (McGinnis) Jones; great- 
grandson of George and Mary (Wood) McGinnis; greatS-grandson of Abinah 
f and Susannah (Humphreys) Wood; great'-grandson of Lewis Humphreys, pri- 

vate. Col. John Haslet's Delaware Regt. 

JOHN ARTHUR KAUTZ, Kokomo, Ind. (21097). Son of Henry and Eliza 
(Baker) Kautz; grandson of Frederick and Catherine (Seechrist) Kautz; 
f great-grandson of John Seechrist, private First Cumberland County Battalion 

Penna. Militia. 

JOHN JAMES MARLETT, Evansville, Ind. (21092). Son of John Jesse and 
, Martha Jane (Starr) Marlett; grandson of Phillip Mortemer and Elizabeth 

I (Adams) Starr; great-grandson of George Starr, Quartermaster Conn. Conti- 

nental Troops. 

ALANSON AUSTIN MILLER, Terre Haute, Ind. (21093). Son of Phillip and 
Carolyn (Austin) Miller; grandson of Alanson Gates and Sarah (Cornwall) 
Austin; great-grandson of Burnell Harrison and Carolyn (Brokaw) Cornwall; 
greatS-grandson of Henry Post and Sarah (Ruble) Brokaw; greats-grandson of 
Bergen and Alche (Post) Brokaw; great*-grandson of John Brokaw, Lieu- 
tenant, Capt. Peter Vroom's Company, Second Somerset County Battalion 
New Jersey Militia; great*-grandson of Henry Post, Sergeant, Capt. Peter 
Vroom's Company Second Somerset Battalion New Jersey Militia; greats-grand- 
son of William and Mary Scott (Swann) Cornwall; greats-grandson of Thomas 
and Jane Byrd (Page) Swann; great*-grandson of Mann and Mary Mason 
(Selden) Page; greats-grandson of Samuel Selden, Captain-Lieutenant Virginia 
Troops. 

J. ROLLIN MORGAN, Kokomo, Ind. (21098). Son of Lewis R. and Lu A. 
(Boyd) Morgan; grandson of Isaac and Mahala (Evans) Boyd; great-grandson 
of John Boyd, private, Col. Daniel Morgan's Virginia Regt. ; great-grandson of 
Edward Evans, Sergeant Thirteenth Virginia Regt. 

CHARLES MYERS, Gosport, Ind. (21085). Son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Ridge) 
Myers; grandson of William Ridge, private Frederick County Maryland Militia. 

ELI H. REDMAN, Terre Haute, Ind. (21095). Son of Hilton P. and Hester R. 
(Briscoe) Redman; grandson of Joseph and Lucy (Bennett) Redman; great- 
grandson of Solomon Redman, private, Capt. Leonard Cooper's Company Third 
and Fourth Virginia Regts. ; grandson of Henry Briscoe, private Fourth Mary- 
land Regt. 



2l6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GEORGE W. ROSS. Kokomo, Ind. (22701). Son of Richard De Armon and 
Sarah Jane (Brown) Ross; grandson of Matthew and Mary Ann (Hanna) 
Brown; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Adair) Hanna; great--grandson 
of Robert Hanna, private South Carolina Troops. 

GEORGE A. SCHAAL, Terre Haute, Ind. (21086). Son of George A. and Mary 
E. (Sibley) Schaal; grandson of Wallace and Harriett Esther (Vickery) Sib- 
ley; great-grandson of John and Mary Elizabeth (May) Sibley; greats-grandson 
of Elisha Sibley, private, Colonel Whitney's and other Mass. Regts. 

ELMER DEMETRIUS SHADDAY, Montpelier, Ind. (22702). Son of Jacob S. 
and Elizabeth (Cotton) Shadday; grandson of Emsley and Polly (Leap) Shad- 
day; great-grandson of John Leap, private. Col. Archibald Mcllroy's Penna. 
Regt. ; great-grandson of John Shadday, private North Carolina Troops, pen- 
sioned. 

RICHARD E. SIBLEY, Terre Haute, Ind. (21087). Son of William F. and Flora 
J. (Beel) Sibley; grandson of Elisha and Phoebe R. (Cole) Sibley; great-grand- 
son of Elisha Sibley, private. Colonel Whitney's and other Mass. Regts. 

BENJAMIN HUGH SMITH, Indianapolis, Ind. (21091). Son of Everett Leslie 
and Amelia Louisa (Fischer) Smith; grandson of James Parham and Jo- 
sephine (Johnson) Smith; great-grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Pierce) 
Johnson; greats-grandson of William and Hadassah (Smith) Johnson; great-- 
grandson of William and Sarah Johnson; great*-grandson of William Johnson, 
private, Col. Philip B. Bradley's Conn. Regt. 

THEODORE PELLETREAU EBERT STEIN, Jr., Indianapolis, Ind. (21089). 
Son of Theodore Pelletreau Ebert and Bertha (Kuhn) Stein; grandson of 
Ernest Christian Frederick and Katharine Elizabeth (Kurzrock) Stein; great- 
grandson of Ernest Christian Clemens and Maria Amalie (Ebert) Stein; great-- 
grandson of John George and Mary Elizabeth (Pelletreau) Ebert; greats-grand- 
son of John Elias Pelletreau, private, Capt. Zephaniah Rogers's Company Suf- 
folk County New York Minute Men. 

HAROLD E. WILDY, Terre Haute, Ind. (21088). Son of William R. and Anna 
L. (Sibley) Wildy; grandson of Elisha and Phoebe R. (Cole) Sibley; great- 
grandson of Elisha Sibley, private, Colonel Whitney's and other Mass. Regts. 



IOWA SOCIETY. 

REUBEN WALKER ANDERSON, Pulaski, Iowa (21645). Son of William W. 
and Susan (Bristol) Anderson; grandson of Reuben and Mary (McKenzie) 
Bristol, Jr.; great-grandson of Reuben Bristol, private. Col. Webb's Seventh 
Conn. Regt. and Fifth Battalion Wadsworth's Brigade. 

GEORGE HORACE BLIVEN, Sioux City, Iowa (21650). Son of Curtis Beriah 
and Sarah (Stormer) Bliven; grandson of Charles Cyrus and Lucinda (Cady) 
Bliven; great-grandson of Beriah and Hannah Jane Bliven; greats-grandson of 
Samuel Bliven, private, Col. Joseph Noyes's Regt. Rhode Island Militia. 

WILLIAM BOWEN, Des Moines, Iowa (21647). Son of William and Lorretta 
(Cooper) Bowen; grandson of Calvin and Charlotte (Watson) Bowen; great- 
grandson of Peter Bowen, private. Colonel Rice's and Colonel Simmons's Mass. 
Regts. 

PHILIP HENRY BRADLEY, Des Moines, Iowa (22501). Son of Philip Burr and 
Cornelia Louisa (Carpenter) Bradley; grandson of Philip Burr and Lucy (Car- 
penter) Bradley; great-grandson of Jesse Smith and Elizabeth (Baker) Brad- 
ley; great-grandson of Philip Burr Bradley, Colonel Fifth Regt. Conn. Line. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 21/ 

EDWARD DAVID CHASSELL, Le Mars, Iowa (2::5i3). Son of William and 
Frances Arabella (Jones) Chassell; grandson of David and Austiss (Olin) 
Chassell; great-grandson of John H. and Anna (Bowen) Olin; great*-grandson 
of Gideon Olin, Major, Col. Samuel Herrick's Regt. Vermont Militia; grandson 
of Edward Wadsworth and Arabella (Bosworth) Jones; great-grandson of 
Israel (and Lois Wadsworth) Jones, Captain Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia; 
greats-grandson of Hezekiah (and Lois Judd) Wadsworth, private, Captain 
Sedgwick's Company Conn. Militia, prisoner; greats-grandson of William Judd, 
Captain Conn. Line; great-grandson of Solomon and Sarah (Olmstead) Bos- 
worth; great'-grandson of David Olmstead, Captain, Col. Roger Enos's Conn. 
Regt. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR CLINGAN, Sioux City, Iowa (21638). Son of Huett B. and 
Caroline Electa (Whittlesey) Clingan ; grandson of Charles R. and Mary 
(Crocker) Whittlesey; great-grandson of Eliphalet Whittlesey, private, Capt. 
Ezra Whittlesey's Company Third Berkshire Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HENRY CURTIS DILLMAN, Oakley, Iowa (21646). Son of Andrew and Eliza 
Frances (Henderson) Dillman; grandson of Andrew and Elizabeth (Bruner) 
Dillman; great-grandson of Andrew Dillman, private, Col. Walter Stewart's 
Penna. Regt., pensioned. 

FRANK STRONG DUNSHEE, Des Moines, Iowa (22522). Son of Amasa T. and 
Ann Eliza (Strong) Dunshee; grandson of Elijah Herkimer and Julia (McGee) 
Strong; great-grandson of Elijah and Katherine (Herkimer) Strong; great-- 
grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth Katharine (Schuyler) Herkimer; great'"*- 
grandson of Henry Herkimer, Captain New York Militia. 

MYRON TAYLOR FLETCHER, Truesdale, Iowa(225ii). Son of Burton and 
Aurelia (Humphrey) Fletcher; grandson of EH and Mariah (Brister) Fletcher; 
great-grandson of Samuel Fletcher, Brigadier General Vermont Militia. 

JAMES DE KALB GAMBLE, Knoxville, Iowa (22515). Son of John and Rachel 
(O'Neal) Gamble; grandson of John and Mary (McClure) Gamble; great- 
grandson of Joseph Gamble, Pilot of "Cheavaux de Frize" on Delaware River, 
1775-1777- 

HENRY GRAY, Des Moines, Iowa (22503). Son of Andrew Jackson and Mary 
(Burton) Gray; grandson of Henry and Margaret (Carpenter) Gray; great- 
grandson of David Carpenter, private Conn. Militia and First Conn. Line. 

ALFRED MARTIN HAGGARD, Des Moines, Iowa (22506). Son of David M. 
and Mary Ann (Smith) Haggard; grandson of David and Elizabeth (Gentry) 
Haggard; great-grandson of William Haggard, private Virginia and North Caro- 
lina Troops, pensioned. 

JOSEPH HUTCHISON HAYES, Denison, Iowa (22505). Son of Samuel and 
Mary (Hutchison) Hayes; grandson of John and Margaret (Gray) Hayes; 
great-grandson of Robert Hayes, First Lieutenant Second Company Fourth 
Northampton County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ALLEN GUSHING HOSKINS, Sioux City, Iowa (21641). Son of Samuel and 
Harriet Byron (Gushing) Hoskins; grandson of Eli (and Rhoda Drake) Has- 
kins, private Mass. Militia; great-grandson of William Hoskins, private Mass. 
Militia; greats-grandson of John Reed, Captain Third Bristol County Regt. 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Daniel (and Lois Reed) Drake, Captain, 
Colonel Drury's Bristol County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

SAMUEL BENNETT HOSKINS, Sioux City, Iowa (21639). Son of John Church 
Gushing and Clarissa Virginia (Bennett) Hoskins; grandson of Samuel and 
Harriett Byrne (Gushing) Hoskins; great-grandson of Eli (and Rhoda Drake) 
Hoskins, private Mass. Militia; greats-grandson of William Hoskins, private 
Mass. Militia; greats-grandson of Daniel (and Lois Reed) Drake, Captain, 
Colonel Drury's Bristol County Regt. Mass. Militia; great'-grandson of John 
Reed, Captain Third Bristol County Regt. Mass. Militia. 



2l8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ALEXANDER BALFOUR JEFFREY, Topeka. Kans. (Iowa 21643). Son of Alex- 
ander Thomas and Nellie Jane (Dungan) Jeffrey; grandson of William Hol- 
land and Margaret Maria (Coe) Dungan; great-grandson of James and Joana 
(Holland) Dungan; great"-grandson of Jesse Dungan, private First Bucks 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

WARREN EMMETT JEFFREY, Chariton, Iowa (21642). Son of Alexander 
Thomas and Nellie Jane (Dungan) Jeffrey; grandson of William Holland and 
Margaret Maria (Coe) Dungan; great-grandson of James and Joana (Holland) 
Dungan; great--grandson of Jesse Dungan, private First Bucks County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

EDWARD DE-^RBORN MERRILL, Des Moines, Iowa (22510). Son of Samuel 
Adams and Fannie Raney (Hyde) Merrill; grandson of Jeremiah Hill and Ann 
Elizabeth (Dearborn) Merrill; great-grandson of Abel and Abigal (Hill) Mer- 
rill, Jr.; greats-grandson of Abel and Elizabeth (Page) Merrill; greats-grandson 
of Samuel Merrill, Lieutenant, Capt. John Elder's Fifth (Buxton) Company 
Third York County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

LUDLOW JEREMIAH MERRILL, Des Moines, Iowa (22509). Son of Samuel 
Adams and Fannie Raney (Hyde) Merrill; grandson of Jeremiah Hill and Ann 
Elizabeth (Dearborn) Merrill; great-grandson of Abel and Abigal (Hill) Mer- 
rill, Jr.; greats-grandson of Abel and Elizabeth (Page) Merrill; greats-grandson 
of Samuel Merrill, Lieutenant, Capt. John Elder's Fifth (Buxton) Company 
Third York County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

SAMUEL ADAMS MERRILL, Des Moines, Iowa (22508). Son of Jeremiah Hill 
and Ann Elizabeth (Dearborn) Merrill; grandson of Abel and Abigal (Hill) 
Merrill, Jr.; great-grandson of Abel and Elizabeth (Page) Merrill; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Merrill, Lieutenant, Capt. John Elder's Fifth (Buxton) 
Company Third York County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WINFIELD SCOTT MOORE, Manilla, Iowa (22520). Son of William and Ruth 
Ann (Graham) Moore; grandson of Nathaniel Davis and Margaret (Dyke) 
Moore; great-grandson of William Moore, private Virginia Militia under Colo- 
nel Christian and Colonel Sevier, pensioned. 

FRANK LUTHER MOTT, Marengo, Iowa (22504). Son of David Charles and 
Mary E. (Tipton) Mott; grandson of George W. and Abigail (Ball) Mott; 
great-grandson of William and Sarah (Edgerton) Mott; greats-grandson of 
Johyi Mott, Captain Third Company Third Battalion New Jersey Line. 

SAMUEL W. NEAL, Washington, Iowa (22521). Son of Calwell and Marie 
Louise (Anderson) Neal; grandson of George Anderson, private Eighth Regt. 
Penna. Line. 

CHARLES NASH PAGE, Des Moines, Iowa (22517). Son of Charles Washington 
and Juliette (Nash) Page; grandson of Elijah and Elizabeth (Robbins) Page; 
great-grandson of Elijah Page, private, Colonel Reid's Second New Hampshire 
Regt.; grandson of John and Betsey (Peck) Nash; great-grandson of John 
Nash, Sergeant Twelfth Albany County Regt. New York Militia; great-grand- 
son of John Peck, private Eighth Company Fifth Regt. New York Line. 

ELMER MANASSEH REEVES, Waverly, Iowa (22519). Son of Norman A. and 
Rhoda Ann (Willy) Reeves; grandson of Manasseh and Esther (Perry) 
Reeves; great-grandson of Purycr Reeves, private Second Conn. Regt., Col. 
Heman Swift. 

PARLEY SHELDON, Ames, Iowa (21648). Son of Parley and Elvira (Litch) 
Sheldon; grandson of Amasa and June (Ellis) Sheldon; great-grandson of Caleb 
Ellis, private New Hampshire Troops. 

EDGAR RUSSELL SMITH, Fairfield, Iowa (22514). Son of J. N. and Isabella 
(Taylor) Smith; grandson of G. and Sarah (Johnson) Smith; great-grandson 
of Ruben and Martha (Hall) Johnson; greats-grandson of John Hall, Orderly 
Sergeant Third North Carolina Regt. 



I 



I 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 219 

SUMMERFIELD SAUNDERS STILL, Des Moines, Iowa (22518). Son of James 
Moore and Rahab Mercy (Saunders) Still; grandson of Abram and Martha 
Poage (Moore) Still; great-grandson of James and Barbara (Taylor) Moore; 
greats-grandson of James Moore, Captain Tazewell County Virginia Militia. 

JACOB M. STINSON, Fairfield, Iowa (22502). Son of John and Margaret (Tom- 
linson) Stinson; grandson of James Stinson, private Morris County New Jersey 
Militia. 

JAMES HENRY STOCKHAM, Des Moines, Iowa (22512). Son of John and Cal- 
furna (Chaffin) Stockham; grandson of Aaron and Ruhama (Sykes) Stockham; 
great-grandson of William Stockham, private. Colonel Hopkins's New York 
Militia; great-grandson of John Jones Sykes, private. Col. Thomas Nixon's 
Mass. Regt. 

ORVILLE B. TALLEY, Sioux City, Iowa (21640). Son of John W. and Amanda 
Jane (Kyle) Talley; grandson of Joseph and Lucretia (Whippey) Kyle; great- 
grandson of John and Sarah Kyle; greats-grandson of Robert Kyle, private, 
Capt. William Huston's Company Fourth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 

CHARLES E. TAYLOR, Ames, Iowa (21644). Son of Nilson and Martha 
(Fletcher) Taylor; grandson of Nathan and Anna (Ross) Taylor; great-grand- 
son of Abraliam Taylor, private, Capt. Daniel Camp's Company, Colonel Can- 
field's Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of Joseph and Polly (Camp) Ross; great''- 
grandson of Perrin Ross, Lieutenant, Capt. Samuel Ransom's Company Conn. 
Militia; grandson of EH and Martha (Brister) Fletcher; great-grandson of 
Samuel Fletcher, Brigadier-General Vermont Militia. 

PAULL BARENT VAN SLYKE, Des Moines, Iowa (22507). Son of Charles 
Barent and Eva (Paull) Van Slyke; grandson of Barent and Elizabeth (Haw- 
ley) Van Slyke; great-grandson of Tunis and Judith (Bronk) Van Slyke; 
greats-grandson of Ephraim Bronk, private. Col. Anthony Van Bergen's Regt. 
New York Militia. 

JACOB ALVIN WAGNER, Des Moines, Iowa (22516). Son of William Alfred 
and Mary Martha (Gauger) Warner; grandson of Jacob and Catharine (Esch- 
bach) Gauger; great-grandson of John William and Anna Margaret (Fulmer or 
Follmer) Gauger; greats-grandson of Jacob Fulmer, or Follmer, Ensign Elev- 
enth Northumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia, Member of Assembly of 
Pennsylvania. 

BENJAMIN DUDLEY WHEELER, Des Moines, Iowa (10463). Supplemental. 
Son of William Henry and Ella Rocelia (Perrin) Wheeler; grandson of Benja- 
min and Luthera Capron (Cristy) Wheeler; great-grandson of James and Han- 
nah (Andrus) Wheeler; greats-grandson of Comfort and Betsey (Wilber) 
Wheeler; greats-grandson of Valentine Wheeler, First Lieutenant Dutchess 
County New York Militia. 

KANSAS SOCIETY. 

MAURICE WALDRON HIATT, Leavenworth, Kans. i22ZS2). bon of Alfred 
Hadley and Sarah (Bostwick) Hiatt; grandson of Elam and Sarah (Horn) 
Hiatt; great-grandson of Ames and Achsah (Willis) Hiatt; greatS-grandson of 
Joel and Hannah (Jessep) Willis; greats-grandson of Thomas Jessup, Jr., Hos- 
pital Service, Battle of Guilford Court House, N. C. 

HENRY WILSON McAFEE, Topeka, Kans. (22351). Son of Josiah and Anna 
Rebecca (Yowler) McAfee; grandson of George and Elizabeth (Bower) Yow- 
ler; great-grandson of William Bower, private, Capt. James Wilson's Company, 
Col. James Chambers's First Regt. Penna. Line. 

JOHN STOUT MAXWELL, Pittsburgh, Kans. (i797S)- Son of Edward L. and 
Dorothy L. Maxwell; grandson of William A. and Nancy Taylor (Guess) Max- 
well; great-grandson of Alexander and Hannah (Armstrong) Maxwell; greatS- 
grandson of Edward Maxwell, private, Col. James McNiel's Georgia Regt. 



220 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

JOHN W. SIDWELU Topeka, Kans. {22353). Son of Harris and Elizabeth 
CDunham) Sidwell; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Pickerill) Dunham; 
great-grandson of Samuel Pickerill, private and drummer, Colonel Brent's 
Regt. Virginia Volunteers, pensioned. 

KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

GILMER SPEED ADAMS, Louisville, Ky. {22293). Son of Thomas and Martha 
Bell (Speed) Adams; grandson of Samuel Griffin and Catherine (Innes) 
Adams; great-grandson of Richard Adams, Member of Virginia House of Dele- 
gates and Senate, and of Virginia Conventions of 1775 and 1776. 

CHARLES THRUSTON BALLARD, Louisville, Ky. (2614). Supplementals. Son 
of Andrew Jackson and Frances Ann (Thruston) Ballard; grandson of Charles 
William and Marj' Eliza (Churchill) Thruston; great-grandson of Charles 
Mynn and Frances Eleanor (Clark) Thruston, Jr.; greats-grandson of Cliarles 
Mynn Thruston, Colonel Virginia Continental Line; great-grandson of Samuel 
and Abigail (Oldham) Churchill; greats-grandson of Armistead Churchill, 
Colonel Second Battalion Fauquier County Militia May 25, 1778; greats-grand- 
son of William (and Penelope Pope) Oldham, Ensign, Daniel Morgan's Vir- 
ginia Regt., later Captain Virginia Troops; greats-grandson of William Pope, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Jefferson County Militia; grandson of James and Susanna 
(Cox) Ballard; great-grandson of Bland Ballard, Corporal, Major Slaughter's 
Battalion Culpeper County Virginia Militia. 

CHARLES MYNN THRUSTON BALLARD, Louisville, Ky. (22296). Son of 
Charles Thruston and Emiline Modest (Breaux) Ballard; grandson of Andrew 
Jackson and Frances Ann (Thruston) Ballard; great-grandson of James and 
Susanna (Cox) Ballard; great-grandson of Bland Ballard, Corporal, Major 
Slaughter's Battalion Culpeper Militia; great-grandson of Charles William and 
Mary Eliza (Churchill) Thruston; greats-grandson of Charles Mynn Thruston, 
Jr., volunteer aid to his father in Virginia Continental service; greats-grand- 
son of Charles Mynn Thruston, Colonel Virginia Continental Troops; great-- 
grandson of Samuel and Abigail (Oldham) Churchill; great*-grandson of 
Armistead Churchill, Colonel Second Battalion Fauquier County Virginia 
Militia; greats-grandson of William (and Penelope Pope) Oldham, Captain 
Virginia Troops; great*-grandson of William Pope, Lieutenant-Colonel Jeffer- 
son County Virginia Militia. 

GUSTAVE BREAUX BALLARD, Glenview, Ky. (22295). Son of Charles 
Thruston and Emiline Modest (Breaux) Ballard; grandson of Andrew Jackson 
and Frances Ann (Thruston) Ballard; great-grandson of James and Susanna 
(Cox) Ballard; greatS-grandson of Bland Ballard, Sergeant, Major Slaughter's 
Battalion Culpeper Militia; great-grandson of Charles William and Mary Eliza 
(Churchill) Thruston; greatS-grandson of Charles Mynn Thruston, Jr., volun- 
teer aid to his father in Frederick County Virginia Militia; greats-grandson of 
Charles Mynn Thruston, Colonel Virginia Continental Troops; greatS-grandson 
of Samuel and Abigail (Oldham) Churchill; greatS-grandson of Armistead 
Churchill, Colonel Second Battalion Fauquier County Virginia Militia; great-- 
grandson of William (and Penelope Pope) Oldham, Captain Virginia Troops; 
great*-grandson of William Pope, l^ieutenant-Colonel Jefferson County Virginia 
Militia. 

SAMUEL THRUSTON BALLARD, Louisville, Ky. (2613). Supplementals. Son 
of Andrew Jackson and Frances Ann (Thruston) Ballard; grandson of Charles 
William and Mary Eliza (Churchill) Thruston; great-grandson of Charles 
Mynn and Frances Eleanor (Clark) Thruston, Jr. ; greatS-grandson of Charles 
Mynn Thruston, Colonel Virginia Continental Line; great-grandson of Samuel 
and Abigail (Oldham) Churchill; greatS-grandson of Armistead Churchill, 
Colonel Second Battalion Fauquier County Militia May 25, 1778; greatS-grand- 
son of William (and Penelope Pope) Oldham, Ensign, Daniel Morgan's Vir- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 221 

ginia Regt, later Captain Virginia Troops; great*-grandson of William Pope, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Jefferson County Militia; grandson of James and Susanna 
(Cox) Ballard; great-grandson of Bland Ballard, Corporal, Major Slaughter's 
Battalion Culpeper County Virginia Militia. 

HENRY STILES BARKER, Louisville, Ky. (22278). Son of Richard Henry and 
Caroline Matilda (Sharp) Barker; grandson of Maxwell and Catherine M. 
(McClure) Sharp; great-grandson of Thomas Sharp, Captain Kentucky Volun- 
teers. 

MAXWELL SHARP BARKER, Louisville, Ky. (19700). Son of Richard Henry 
and Caroline Matilda (Sharp) Barker; grandson of Maxwell and Catharine M. 
(McClure) Sharp; great-grandson of Thomas Sharp, Captain Kentucky Volun- 
teers. 

ALEXANDER GALT BARRET, Louisville, Ky. (22291). Son of Henry Wood 
and Emma (Tyler) Barret; grandson of Lewis and Rachel (Garvin) Barret; 
great-grandson of Francis Barret, Sergeant V^irginia Line, pensioned. 

JEROME HAROLD BENTLEY, Louisville, Ky. (22290). Son of Jairus Jerome 
and Elizabeth Stewart (Beggs) Bentley; grandson of Arnold and Lydia 
(Northrup) Bentley; great-grandson of Nicholas Northrop, private Fourth 
Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, Glen Lily, Ky. (2501). Son of Aylett H. and 
Elizabeth Ann (Morehead) Buckner; grandson of Turner Morehead, Captain 
Virginia Line and in Wayne's Command at storming of Stony Point. 

SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, Jr., Lieutenant U. S. Army, Glen Lily, Ky. 
(22287). Son of Simon Bolivar and Delia (Claiborne) Buckner; grandson of 
Aylett H. and Elizabeth Ann (Morehead) Buckner; great-grandson of Turner 
Morehead, Captain Virginia Line and in Wayne's Command at storming of 
Stony Point; grandson of John H. and Virginia (Bassett) Claiborne; great- 
grandson of George Washington and Betty Burnett (Lewis) Bassett; great-- 
grandson of Robert and Judith (Browne) Lewis; greats-grandson of Fielding 
Lewis, Quartermaster-General Virginia Troops. 

EDMUND TUTT BURNAM, Richmond, Ky. (22284). Son of Curtis Field and 
Sarah Harris (Rollins) Burnam; grandson of Thompson and Lucinda (Field) 
Burnam; great-grandson of John Burnam, private Third South Carolina Regt., 
commanded bj' Colonel Thompson; great-grandson of John Field, Sergeant 
Bedford County Virginia Militia. 

JOHN MILLER BURNAM, Cincinnati, Ohio (Ky. 22283). Son of Edward H. 
and Margaret S. (Miller) Burnam; grandson of Thompson and Lucinda 
(Field) Burnam; great-grandson of John Burnam, private Third South Caro- 
lina Regt. ; great-grandson of John Field, Sergeant Bedford County Virginia 
Militia. 

JAMES GUTHRIE CALDWELL, Louisville, Ky. (22299). Son of William Bev- 
erly and Ann Augusta (Guthrie) Caldwell; grandson of William and Ann 
(Trabue) Caldwell; great-grandson of John Caldwell, private Virginia Line; 
grandson of James and Eliza (Prather) Guthrie; great-grandson of Richard 
and Mary (Churchill) Prather; great--grandson of Armistead Churchill, Colo- 
nel Second Battalion Fauquier County Virginia Militia. 

JOHN HAYS CAPERTON, Louisville, Ky. (22300). Son of John and Mary 
(Guthrie) Caperton; grandson of James and Eliza Churchill (Prather) Guth- 
rie; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Churchill) Prather; greats-grandson 
of Armistead Churchill, Colonel Second Battalion Fauquier County Virginia 
Militia. 

ALLEN ROGERS CARTER, Louisville, Ky. (22298). Son of James Garland and 
Melvilla (Brown) Carter; grandson of Caswell and Lavinia (Jones) Carter; 
great-grandson of Allen and Jane (McClanahan) Jones; greats-grandson of 
Thomas McClanahan, private. Col. Patrick Henry's Kentucky Regt., pensioned. 



222 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

JOHN BRECKINRIDGE CASTLEMAN, Eouisville, Ky. (22281). Son of David 
and Virginia (Harrison) Castleman; grandson of Robert Carter and Ann 
(Cabell) Harrison; great-grandson of Carter Henry Harrison, Member of 
Cumberland County Virginia Committee of Safety, Member of House of Dele- 
gates; great-grandson of Joseph Cabell, Surgeon Virginia Continental Troops, 
Commander Buckingham County Militia. 

RICHARD HENRY COKE, Louisville, Ky. (23001). Son of James Guthrie and 
Amanda Marshall (Blackman) Coke; grandson of Richard and Mary Elizabeth 
(Guthrie) Cocke; great-grandson of Richard and (Polly) Mary (Watkins) 
Cocke; great--grandson of Stephen Cocke, High Sheriff of Amelia County, Va., 
1775-1790. 

FRANK IRWIN DUGAN, Louisville, Ky. (22276). Son of Irwin and Mattie 
Green (Dickson) Dugan; grandson of Francis William and Martha O. (Green) 
Dickson; great-grandson of Edmund Pendleton and Martha (Weems) Green; 
greats-grandson of Armistead and Frances (Pendleton) Green; greats-grandson 
of Henry Pendleton, Member of Culpeper Committee of Safety, 1775, and of 
Virginia Conventions, 1775-1776. 

IvAPSLEY CORNELIUS EWING, Louisville, Ky. (22289). Son of Samuel and 
Julia (Rains) Ewing; grandson of Cornelius and Julia (Tarkington) Rains; 
great-grandson of James Rains, private Virginia Line, pensioned. 

LEWIS JEFFERSON GORIN, Louisville, Ky. (19699). Son of James E. and 
Mary (Rogers) Gorin; grandson of Thomas J. and Mary (Bowman) Gorin; 
great-grandson of John Gorin, Sergeant Virginia Militia, pensioned. 

WALKER BOURNE GOSSETT, Louisville, Ky. (22277). Son of Mathias and 
Kitty (Bourne) Gossett; grandson of Walker and Willey (Jameson) Bourne; 
great-grandson of James Bourne, private Virginia Militia, pensioned. 

CREDO FITCH HARRIS, Glenview, Ky. (22292). Son of Theodore Harding and 
Mary Jane (Schooley) Harris; grandson of Nathaniel S. and Jane (Robinson) 
Schooley; great-grandson of John Schooley, private First Burlington County 
Regt. New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

ROBINSON ADAIR McDOWELL, Louisville, Ky. (222%2). Son of William 
Preston and Kate Goldsboro (Wright) McDowell; grandson of William Adair 
and Maria Hawkins (Harvey) McDowell; great-grandson of Samuel McDowell, 
Jr., private Virginia Militia; greats-grandson of Samuel McDowell, Colonel 
Virginia Militia, Member of House of Burgesses. 

WILLIAM WALLACE McDOWELL, Louisville, Ky. (22288). Son of William 
Preston and Katie Goldsboro (Wright) McDowell; grandson of William Adair 
and Maria Hawkins (Harvey) McDowell; great-grandson of Samuel McDowell, 
Jr., private \'irginia Militia; greats-grandson of Samuel McDowell, Colonel 
and Member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. 

JOHN MORTON MORRIS, Louisville, Ky. (22286). Son of J. H. Morton and 
Fannie (Craik) Morris; grandson of James and Juliet (Shrewsbury) Craik; 
great-grandson of George Washington and Myra Dorcas (Tucker) Craik; 
greats-grandson of James Craik, Surgeon-General of the Continental Army. 

WILLIAM HARVEY RICE, Maysville, Ky. (22280). Son of James Harvey and 
Judith A. (Cooke) Rice; grandson of Jefferson and Nancy (Richards) Rice; 
great-grandson of Fleming and Sarah (Bailey) Rice; greats-grandson of John 
Bailey, private, Captain Doherty's Company Tenth North Carolina Regt. 

JOSEPH KING STEWART, Louisville, Ky. (22294). Son of John Archibald and 
Kitty Tennessee (King) Stewart; grandson of Joseph Lewis and Catharine A. 
King; great-grandson of Joseph and Catharine (Lewis) King; greats-grandson 
of Andrew and, second wife, Margaret (Bryant) Lewis; greats-grandson of 
Andrew Lewis, Brigadier-General Virginia Troops. 



\ 



¥ 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 223 

JOHN CHAPLIN STROTHER, Louisville, Ky. (19698). Son of French and Lu- 
cinda (Maddox) Strother; grandson of George and Mary (Duncan) Strother; 
great-grandson of John F. and Anne Strother; great^^-grandson of John 
Strother, Member of Committee of Safety of Culpeper County, Virginia. 

ROGERS CLARK BALLARD THRUSTON, Louisville, Ky. (2618). Supple- 
mentals. Son of Andrew Jackson and Frances Ann (Thruston) Ballard; 
grandson of Charles William and Mary Eliza (Churchill) Thruston; great- 
grandson of Charles Mynn and Frances Eleanor (Clark) Thruston, Jr.; great*- 
grandson of Charles Mynn Thruston, Colonel Virginia Continental Line; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Abigail (Oldham) Churchill; great--grandson of 
Armistead Churchill, Colonel Second Battalion Fauquier County Militia May 
25, 1778; greats-grandson of William (and Penelope Pope) Oldham, Ensign, 
Daniel Morgan's Virginia Rfegt., later Captain Virginia Troops; greats-grand- 
son of William Pope, Lieutenant-Colonel Jefferson County Militia; grandson 
of James and Susanna (Cox) Ballard; great-grandson of Bland Ballard, Cor- 
poral, Major Slaughter's Battalion Culpeper County Virginia Militia. 

PHILIP SPEED TULEY, Louisville, Ky. (2663). Supplemental. Son of Enos 
Seth and Mary Eliza (Speed) Tuley; grandson of John Wesley and Phoebe 
(Woodruff) Tuley; great-grandson of Seth and Sally (Crane) Woodruff; 
great--grandson of Israel Crane, Cornet Essex Troop of Horse New Jersey 
Militia. 

THOMAS SPEED TULEY, Louisville, Ky. {22297). Son of Enos beth and Mary 
Eliza (Speed) Tuley; grandson of Philip and Emma (Keats) Speed; great- 
grandson of John and Lucy Gilmer (Fry) Speed; great--grandson of James 
Speed, Captain, Colonel Cocke's Virginia Regt. ; grandson of John Wesley and 
Phoebe (Woodruff) Tuley; great-grandson of Seth and Sally (Crane) Wood- 
ruff; great--grandson of Israel Crane, Cornet Essex Troop of Horse New 
Jersey Militia. 

ROY C. WHITE, Richmond, Ky. (22285). Son of Galen J. and Mary Mildred 
(White) White; grandson of Jeremiah and Lucinda (Fox) White, parents of 
Mildred; great-grandson of Galen White, private Virginia Line, pensioned. 



LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

ALEXIS BRIAN, New Orleans, La. (21256). Son of Solomon Morgan and Maria 
(Milling) Brian; grandson of Francis and Salome R. (Causey) Brian; great- 
grandson of Hardy Brian, private. Colonel Benton's South Carolina Regt., and 
scout; grandson of Thomas David and Mary A. (Teddlie) Milling; great- 
grandson of David T, and Maria (Latham) Milling; great--grandson of Hugh 
Milling, Captain Sixth South Carolina Regt. 

ROBERT EDWARD MILLING, Franklin, La. (21257). Son of Thomas David 
and Mary A. (Teddlie) Milling; grandson of David T. and Maria (Latham) 
Milling; great-grandson of Hugh Milling, Captain Sixth South Carolina Regt. 

FENWICK DIMITRY RUTH, New Orleans, La. (21258). Son of Enoch Fen- 
wick and Virginia (Dimitry) Ruth; grandson of Alexander and Mary Powell 
(Mills) Dimitry; great-grandson of Robert and Eliza Barnwell (Smith) Mills; 
great--grandson of John (and Anne Bull) Smith, Colonel Virginia Troops, pen- 
sioned; great--grandson of John Bull, Colonel First Battalion, Adjutant-General 
of Penna. 

SAMUEL ADAMS TRUFANT, New Orleans, La. (21255). Son of George and 
Jane Hanna Trufant; grandson of Seth and Abigail (Adams) Trufant; great- 
grandson of Samuel Adams, Surgeon Eighteenth Continental Infantry and 
Third Continental Artillery. 



I 



224 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MAINE SOCIETY. 

WALTON SAMUEL ADAMS, Richmond, Me. (22059). Son of Frank S. and 
Ella C. Adams; grandson of Samuel and Hannah P. Adams; great-grandson 
of Samuel Adams, private Eleventh Mass. Regt. 

ROGER FREDERIC BRUNEL, Syracuse, N. Y. (Me. i4773)- Supplemental. 
Son of Frederic and Martha Ada (Tobey) Brunei; grandson of Harvey and 
Susan (Woodbridge) Tobey; great-grandson of Benjamin and Mary (Mason) 
Tobey; greats-grandson of William Tobey, Second Lieutenant Alass. Militia. 

WILLIAM TRUE COUSENS, Portland, Me. (22054). Son of Lyman Munson 
and Mary (True) Cousens; grandson of John and Mary (Abbott) True; great- 
grandson of John and Mary (Hammond) Abbott; greats-grandson of William 
Hammond, Sergeant and Commissary, Colonel Whitney's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE FARMER DREW, Brunswick, Me. (22055). Son of Henry and Ellen 
(Farmer) Drew; grandson of William and Caroline (Cleapor) Drew; great- 
grandson of Isaac and Welthea (Bradford) Drew; greats-grandson of Samuel 
Bradford, Captain First Duxbury Company, Colonel Warren's Mass. Regt. 

ALFRED WINSLOW HALL, Dexter, Me. (22060). Son of JosepH Blake and 
Lucinda Evans (Todd) Hall; grandson of Winslow and Ruth (Howland) 
Hall; great-grandson of Enoch Hall, private Mass. Militia, Windham, Me. 

THOMAS ERNEST HARMON, Portland, Me. (22062). Son of Theodore Elwell 
and Hannah C. (Brooks) Harmon; grandson of Thomas and Hannah (Elwell) 
Harmon; great-grandson of Thomas (and Lydia Elden) Harmon, private, 
Colonel Phinney's Mass. Regt.; greats-grandson of John Elden, Captain Third 
York County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WALTER FRANK HASKELL, Westbrook, Me. (22064). Son of Frank and Re- 
becca Jewett (Poole) Haskell; grandson of James and Mary (Poole) Haskell; 
great-grandson of Josiah and Rachel Barber (Tarr) Haskell; great--grandson 
of Daniel Barber Tarr, Lieutenant Sixth Mass. Regt. 

HARRY APPLETON HEALD, Portland, Me. (22053). Son of Thomas G. and 
Carrie E. (Webb) Heald; grandson of Thomas H. and Mary A. (Rogers) 
Heald; great-grandson of Ephraim and Katharine (Houghton) Heald; great-- 
grandson of Ephraim and (Cragin) Heald; greats-grandson of Ephraim 

Heald, Jr., private New Hampshire Men in Col. William Prescott's Mass. 
Regt. ; great*-grandson of Ephraim Heald, private New Hampshire Men in 
Col. William Prescott's Mass. Regt., 1775. 

HERBERT JENKINS LILLY, Portland, Me. (22063). Son of Winship Reed and 
Eunice Colby (Jenkins) Lilly; grandson of Phillip and Betsy (Colby) Jen- 
kins; great-grandson of Thomas Colby, private, Capt. Samuel Nay's Company- 
New Hampshire Continental Troops. 

ROBERT LINCOLN MAYBURY, Saco, Me. (22069). Son of William Jordan 
and Ella Waterman (Berry) Maybury; grandson of Nathaniel and Annarilla 
C. (Stockbridge) Maybury; great-grandson of Jordan and Sally (Hodgdon) 
Maybury; greats-grandson of Richard and Mary (Jordan) Maybury, Jr.; 
greats-grandson of Richard Maybury, Captain, Col. Ebenezer Francis's Mass. 
Regt. 

FREDERICK GARDINER PAINE, Farmington, Me. (18773). Supplemental. 
Son of Simeon Cragin and Caroline Augusta (Handy) Paine; grandson of 
Josiah and Lavenia (Bryant) Paine, Jr. ; great-grandson of Micah and Mary 
(Mitchell) Bryant, Jr. ; greats-grandson of Moses and Dorcas (Dolley) Mitchell; 
great'-grandson of John Dolley, private Fourth Cumberland County Regt. 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Josiah Parker and Sarah (Cragin) Paine; 
greats-grandson of William and Pamelia (Parker) Payne; great'-grandson of 
John Payne, private, Capt. Benjamin Read's Freetown Company, Colonel 
Pope's Mass. Regt. ; greatS-grandson of Simeon and Sarah (McKenney) 
Cragin; greats-grandson of John Cragin, Jr., Sergeant New Hampshire ^Militia;. 



i 



I 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 225 

grandson of Robert Gardiner and Mary Elizabeth (Ames) Handy; great-grand- 
son of Abisha and Zipporah (Eaughton) Handy; greats-grandson of John and 
Lydia (McGraugh) Laughton, Jr.; greats-grandson of John Laughtoii, private, 
Col. William Prescott's Mass. Regt. 

ARTHUR WILLIS PATTERSON, Castine, Me. (22058). Son of George W. 
and Lilla Olive (Davidson) Patterson; grandson of James Willis and Sarah 
Parker (Wilder) Patterson; great-grandson of William and Frances Mary 
(Shepard) Patterson; greats-grandson of Joseph Patterson, private, Colonel 
Baldwin's New Hampshire Regt. 

JAMES HARRIS PIERCE, Portland, Me. (22068). Son of James Harris and 
Eliza (Stockwell) Pierce; grandson of Abner and Eliza (Tufts) Pierce; great- 
grandson of Abner and Grace- (Harrington) Pierce; greats-grandson of Daniel 
and Anna (Monroe) Harrington; greats-grandson of Robert Monroe, Ensign, 
Capt. Joseph Parker's Company, killed on the field at Lexington April 19, 
1775- 

DANIEL THOMPSON RICHARDSON, Baldwin, Me. (22067). Son of Daniel 
Thompson and Eliza Ann (Sawyer) Richardson; grandson of Joseph and 
Charlotte (Thompson) Richardson; great-grandson of Daniel Thompson, pri- 
vate of Woburn Company Mass. Minute Men, killed April 19, 1775, during 
British retreat from Concord. 

JOSEPH PUTNAM STEVENS, Woodfords, Me. (22066). Son of Joseph W. and 
Mary (Ingalls) Stevens; grandson of Benjamin and Camilla (Howard) Ste- 
vens; great-grandson of Ziphion and Amey (Reynolds) Howard; greats-grand- 
son of Joseph Reynolds, private, Capt. Josiah Hayden's Company Mass. 
Militia; greats-grandson of Daniel Howard, private, Capt. Josiah Hayden's 
Company Mass. Militia. 

IL\LPH LEE TALBOT, Lewiston, Me. (22057). Son of Archie Lee and Nina 
Victoria (Adams) Talbot; grandson of Charles Johnson and Delphina Shaw 
(Robbins) Talbot; great-grandson of Archibald and Sophia (Smith) Talbot; 
greatS-grandson of Asa and Abigail (Johnson) Talbot; great^'-grandson of Am- 
brose Talbot, private Mass. Coast Guards at Falmouth; great-grandson of Asa 
and Hannah (Shaw) Robbins, Jr.; greatS-grandson of Asa Robbins, Corporal. 
Colonel Brewer's Mass. Line, pensioned; greatS-grandson of Abraham (and 
Hannah ;\Iiller) Shaw, Captain Tklass. Militia; greats-grandson of Jolin Miller, 
Lieutenant Fourth Plymouth County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ARTHUR GARFIELD VOSE, Caribou, Me. (22061). Son of Sebastian Streeter 
and Sallie Elizabeth (Dunn) Vose; grandson of Thomas and Evelyn (Bridg- 
ham) Dunn; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Greenwood) Bridgham,. 
3d; greatS-grandson of John and Libella (Shaw) Bridgham, 2d; greats-grandson 
of John Bridgham, Captain, Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt. 

JUSTIN ADFER WALLING, Milbridge, Me. (22056). Son of George Henry and 
Phebe (Whiting) Walling; grandson of Benjamin and Ruth (Yates) Whiting;, 
great-grandson of Caleb Whiting, Second Major, Col. Ezra Wood's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

MURRAY BROOKS WATSON, Auburn, Me. (22065). Son of William Whitcomb 
and Elmira Burbank (Lary) Watson; grandson of Stephen Phinney and Han- 
nah Whitcomb (Nourse) Watson; great-grandson of Caiman Watson, private,. 
Col. Reuben Fogg's Regt. Mass. Militia; greatS-grandson of Eliphalet Watson, 
private. Col. Nathan Tyler's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FR.\NCIS MARION WHEELER, Waterville, Me. (22070). Son of Joseph Os- 
good and Mary Elizabeth (Sturtevant) Wheeler; grandson of Reward and Ann 
S. (Heskette) Sturtevant; great-grandson of Lot Sturtevant, Corporal, Colonel 
Bradford's !Mass. Continental Regt. 

15— SR 



226 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

THOMAS CHALKLEY ATKINSON. Baltimore, Md. (23176). Son of Alfred and 
Sarah Augusta (Jones) x\tkinson ; grandson of Edward and Maria Fayette 
(Croxall) Jones; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Long) Croxall; great-- 
grandson of Charles Croxall, Lieutenant Tenth Penna. Regt. 

HENRY FENIMORE BAKER, Mt. Washington, Md. (21741). Son of Milton 
and Henrietta (A.) Baker; grandson of Richard B. and Catherine Baker; 
great-grandson of Samuel Baker; great--grandson of Daniel Baker, private 
Eleventh Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

ALFRED HUNTINGTON BURNHAM, Baltimore, Md. (11470). SupplemenUls. 
Son of Henry Harrison and Sophia Lydia (Bennett) Burnham; grandson of 
Elisha Huntington and Lydia Kent (Burnham) Bennett; great-grandson of 
EHsha and Lydia (Pendleton) Bennett; greats-grandson of Daniel Bennett, 
private Sixth Conn. Continental Regt.; greats-grandson of Benjamin Bennett, 
Sergeant Fifth Regt. Conn. Line; great-grandson of Jedediah and Sophia (Bid- 
well) Burnham; great--grandson of Jedediah Burnham, private Eighth Conn. 
Regt., 1775; great--grandson of Riverius and Phebe (Roberts) Bidwell; great"- 
grandson of Thomas Bidwell, Captain Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES FREDERICK BURNHAM, Baltimore, Md. (21745). Son of Henry 
Harrison and Sophia Lydia (Bennett) Burnham; grandson of Elisha Hunting- 
ton and Lydia Kent (Burnham) Bennett; great-grandson of Jedediah and 
Sophia (Bidwell) Burnham; great--grandson of Jedediah Burnham. private 
Eighth Conn. Continental Regt., 1775. 

JAMES McDowell CRESAP, AnnapoHs. Md. (23178). Son of James Cephas 
and Anna Goodrich (Leavitt) Cresap; grandson of Daniel John and Elizabeth 
(Campbell) Cresap; great-grandson of Joseph Cresap. Second Lieutenant First 
Battalion Maryland Rifles. 

WILLIAM MILLS DAVIS. Baltimore. Md. (21747). Son of W. Mills and Lu- 
cinda M. (Conrad) Davis; grandson of John and Mary Ann (Stonebreaker) 
Conrad; great-grandson of John and Jane (Hyskell) Stonebreaker; great-- 
grandson of Adam Stonebreaker. Corporal German Regt. Lancaster County 
Penna. Militia. 

JOHN EDMUND DRAPER, Baltimore, Md. (21735). Son of Edmund and Cath- 
erine Christina (Tucker) Draper; grandson of Gilbert Ruggles and Evelina 
Christina (Snyder) Tucker; great-grandson of Charles and Welthe (Ruggles) 
Tucker; great--grandson of Reuben and Relief (Farnsworth) Tucker; great"- 
grandson of David Farnswortli, Lieutenant New Hampshire Militia; great- 
grandson of William Stringham and Christina Rustus (.Johnston) Snyder; 
great--grandson of John and Isabella (Hooper) Johnston; great--grandson of 
Robert Lettice Hooper, Assistant Quartermaster New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM ANDREW GAULT. Roland Park, Md. (21744). Son of Matthew and 
Laura C. (Deale) Gault; grandson of Andrew and Sallie (Knox) Gault; great- 
grandson of Mafthezv (and Elizabeth Bunten) Gault, drummer New Hamp- 
shire Militia; great--grandson of Andrew Bunten. Captain, Waldron's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

ALFRED B. GILES, Forest Park, .Md. (21737)- Son of William Tell and Cath- 
erine (Donaldson) Giles; grandson of Jacob W. and ^Martha (Phillips) Giles; 
great-grandson of James Phillips, ]>ri\ate Harford County Maryland Militia. 

JAMES MONROE HOLLANDS. Baltimore. .\ld. (23177). Son of Joseph and 
Margaret Ann (Mountain) Holland; grandson of Joseph Holland, private, 
Colonel Learned's and other Mass. Regts., widow ])ensioned. 

JOHN LLEWELLYN JOHNSON, Frederick. Md. (21736). Son of John Price 
and Ellen (Gilmore) Johnson; grandson of Henry Clay and Catherine (Hine- 
bock) Johnson: great-grandson of John Johnson, private Second Essex County 
Regt. New Jersey ^Militia. 



I 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 22/ 

ALBERT LINDSAV PEARRE, Frederick, Md. (21743). Son of James VV. and 
Anne Marion (Lindsay) Pearre; grandson of James and Eliza (Dudderar) 
Pearre; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Warfield) Pearre; greats-grand- 
son of Charles Warfield, Member of Committee of Observation for Frederick 
County, Md. 

JOHN MILTON REIFSNIDER. Westminster. Md. (21740). Son of John Law- 
rence and Elizabeth Haines f Billingslea) Reifsnider; grandson of Jesse and 
ApoUonia (Zacharias) (Miller) Reifsnider; great-grandson of Daniel and Su- 
sannah (Sherman) Zacharias; great"-grandson of Conrad Sherman, Captain 
Sixth Berks County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

FRANKLIN BUCHANAN SMITH. Frederick, Md. (21738). Son of George and 
Mary (Nixdorff) Smith; grandson of Henry and Susan (Medtart) Nixdorff; 
great-grandson of Samuel Nixdorff, private, Capt. John Nelson's Independent 
Company Penna. Riflemen. 

CHARLES SPENCER WAPLES, Baltimore, Md. (21742). Son of Edward Bas- 
sett and Sarah (Fenney) Waples; grandson of Samuel Waples, Lieutenant 
Ninth \'irginia Regt. 

NICHOLAS WATKINS, Washington, D. C. (Md. 21739). Son of Walter Carr 
and Mary Howard (Stallings) Watkins; grandson of Rizen and Rowena 
(Mead) Watkins; great-grandson of Thomas Watkins. Captain of Matrosses 
Maryland Militia. 

FRANCIS IGNATIUS WHEELER, Lawson, Md. (21750). Son of George Fran- 
cis and Martha Jane (Thatcher) Wheeler; grandson of Francis Ignatius and 
Mary Ann (Macatee) Wheeler; great-grandson of Ignatius Wheeler, Colonel 
Harford County Maryland Militia. 

MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

SAMUEL ABBOTT, Newton Center, Mass. (22481). Son of Samuel Warren and 
Martha Whittlesea (Sullivan) Abbott; grandson of Samuel and Ruth (Winn) 
Abbott; great-grandson of Bixby (and Hepzibah Ames) Abbott. Corporal, Capt. 
Benj. Ames' Company, Col. James Frye's Mass. Regt.; great--grandson of Ben- 
jamin Ames, Captain, Col. James Frye's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Abel 
and Ruth (Richardson) Winn; great--grandson of Joseph Winn. First Lieu- 
tenant Second Middlesex County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES SUMNER ADAMS, Somerville, Mass. (22186). Son of William R. 
and Adelia (Magoun) Adams; grandson of William and Eliza M. (Clark) 
Adams: great-grandson of Jonathan and Ruth (Hall) Adams; great--grandson 
of Jonathan Adams. Lieutenant, Col. John Bell's Regt. New Hampshire ^lilitia. 

WILLIAM RICHARDSON ADAMS, Stoneham, Mass. (22876). Son of John 
Quincy and Harriet Augusta (Forsyth) Adams; grandson of Sewall and Sarah 
(Isley) Adams; great-grandson of Stephen Adams, private. Colonel Titconib's 
Mass. Regt.; great--grandson of Samuel Adams, private. Col. Samuel Johnson's 
Mass. Regt.; grandson of George and Rebecca Brown (Richardson) Forsyth; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Hoar) Richardson; great"-grandson of 
Stephen Hoar, Corporal, Capt. Elisha Jackson's Company Mass. Militia; 
great--grandson of Daniel Hoar, private, Capt. Nicholas Dike's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

W(ILLIS) LLOYD ALLEN, Shirley, Mass. (22889). Son of Elmer Hooker and 
Minnie Laura (McMichael) Allen; grandson of Ephraim K. and Clementine A. 
(Haggett) McMichael: great-grandson of John and Hannah (McFarland Fitch, 
widow) McMichael; great--grandson of James McMichael. private, Colonel 
Jones's and Colonel Wade's Mass. Regts., pensioned; great--grandson of Robert 
and Lydia (Upham) McFarland; great--grandson of Jabez Upham. Sergeant, 
Col. Elisha Porter's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Sarah (Ben- 
ner) Haggett, Jr.; great--grandson of Ebenezer and Sarah (Dodge) Haggett; 
great-'-granilson of Zocliariah Dodge, private. Colonel Mansfield's Mass. Regt. 



I 



22S SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES BROOKS APPLETON, Brookline, Mass. (22482). Son of Charles 
Henry and Jane Williams (Brooks) Appleton; grandson of Benjamin Barnard 
and Catherine (Hooton) Appleton; great-grandson of John Hootoii, Sergeant, 
Capt. Elias Parkman's Company, Col. Joseph Webb's Mass. Regt. ; grandson 
of Charles and Nancy (Dicks) Brooks; great-grandson of Cotton Brown and 
Jane (Williams) Brooks; great--grandson of Edward Brooks, volunteer at Con- 
cord Bridge April 19, 1775, Chaplain on Mass. frigate "Hancock," prisoner at 
Halifax. 

FRANK WILBUR ATKINS, Lynn, Mass. (22890). Son of Thomas and Lucinda 
(Fairbanks) Atkins; grandson of Thomas and Betsey (Dudley) Atkins; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel Dudley, private, Capt. Benjamin Whittier's Company 
New Hampshire Militia; greats-grandson of John Dudley, Speaker of New 
Hampshire House of Representatives, Muster Master and Paymaster. 

CHARLES JACOB BABBITT, Boston, Mass. (22195). Son of Benjamin Bos- 
worth and Mary Elizabeth (Eaton) Babbitt; grandson of Jacob and Abbie 
Eliza (Briggs) Babbitt; great-grandson of Jacob and Bathsheba (Stoddard) 
Babbitt; great'-grandson of Ebeneser Babbitt, Sergeant, Capt. Robert Cross- 
man's Company, Colonel Leonard's Mass. Regt. and other service. 

CHARLES OSCAR BACHELOR, Northbridge, Mass. C4950). Supplementals. 
Son of Joel and Laura (Goldthwait) Bachelor; grandson of Obed and Abi 
(Brown) Goldthwait; great-grandson of John Brown, Sergeant, Col. Ezra 
Wood's Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Stephen Goldthwait. private 
Worcester County Mass. Militia; grandson of Joel and Judith (Burdon) 
Batcheller; great-grandson of John Burdon, Corporal, Capt. Bartholomew 
Woodbury's Company, Colonel Learned's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIS DANA BALLARD, Holyoke, Mass. (4922). Supplemental. Son of 
Dana Lamb and Jane Rebecca (Carpenter) Ballard; grandson of Henry Hol- 
ton and Samantha McMasters (Lamb) Ballard; great-grandson of Henry and 
Anna (Sabin) Ballard; great--grandson of Daniel Ballard, private, Capt. 
Ebenezer Goodall's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Mass. Regt. 

STEPHEN DREW BARTLETT, Allston, Mass. (22187). Son of Hosea Cornish 
and Sarah Frances (Drew) Bartlett; grandson of Abijah and Sarah Faunce 
(Chubbuck) Drew; great-grandson of Timothy and Sarah (Faunce) Chubbuck; 
great--grandson of Thomas Faunce, private. Colonel Cotton's Mass. Regt. 

FRANCIS LEAVITT BEAL, Beachmont, Mass. (22188). Son of Zaccheus Leavitt 
and Maria Priscilla (Tower) Beal; grandson of Zaccheus Lambert and Har- 
riet Souther (Barnes) Beal; great-grandson of Caleb and Sally (Lambert) 
Beal; great'-grandson of Daniel Beal, private. Captain Stoner's (Independent) 
Company and Captain Wild's Company, Colonel Brooks's Mass. Regt. 

JOSEPH JAMES BED LOW, Cambridge, Mass. (22878). Son of James S. and 
Sophia Brazier (Kellogg) Bedlow; grandson of Joseph A. and Sophia (Brazier") 
Kellogg; great-grandson of Elijah Kellogg, drummer, Captain Leonard's Com- 
pany. Col. B. R. Woodbridge's Twenty-fifth Mass. Regt. 

J. C.\RROLL BELL, Boston. Mass. (22476. Son of Julius H. and Ella .M. 
(Crosby) Bell; grandson of William and Zebiah G. (Crane) Bell; great-grand- 
son of Abijah and Rebecca Crane; great--grandson of John Crane, Colonel 
Third Continental Artillery. 

CHARLES EDWIN BELCHER, Brookline, Mass. (23153). Son of Charles Bar- 
rett and Mary Olive (Smith) Belcher; grandson of Joseph and Olive (Moore) 
Smith; great-grandson of Curtis and Polly (Nixon) Moore; great--grandson of 
John and Elizabeth (Haynes) Nixon, Jr.; great--grandson of John Nixon. 
Captain of Minute Men, April 19, 1775, Brigadier-General Continental Army. 

EVERETT CHAMBERLIN BENTON, Belmont, Mass. (22891). Son of Charles 
Emerson and Adda (Chamberlin) Benton; grandson of Abner and Mary 
(Haseltine) Chamberlin; great-grandson of Joseph and Nancy (McAllister) 
Chamberlin; great--grandson of Joseph Chamberlin, Second Lieutenant. Capt. 
John Gideon Bayley's Company. Col. Peter Olcott's Vermont Regt. 



I 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 229 

FREDERICK ELDRIDGE BRAMHALL. Lynn, Mass. (22495). Son of Albert 
Nelson and Mary Abbie (Newhall) Bramhall; grandson of Benjamin Lewis 
and Mary (Weston) Bramhall; great-grandson of Elkanaii and Mary (Droll) 
Weston; greats-grandson of Zabdiel Weston. j)rivate. Capt. .\ndrew Samson's 
Company Mass. Militia. 

FRANCIS STEWART BREED. Lynn, Mass. (22009). Supplemental. Son of 
Joshua Barker Flint and Grace (Newhall) Breed; grandson of James Edwin 
and Persis (Newhall) Breed; great-grandson of .\aron and second wife, Mrs. 
Mary (Kemp) (Fiellbrown) Breed; greats-grandson of Ebeneaer Kemp, pri- 
vate, Capt. Henry Farwell's Company, Col. William Prescott's Rejt. Mass. 
Minute Men. 

PERCY HERBERT BRIGHAM, Boston, Mass. (22494). Son of Daniel T. and 
Ellen Jane (Brown) Brigham; grandson of Franklin and Ann Whitman (Tay- 
lor) Brigham; great-grandson of Jabez and Sophia (Hunt) Brigham; great-- 
grandson of Benajah (and Abigail Bent) Brigham, private, Major-General 
Ward's Mass. Regt. ; great'-grandson of Peter Bent, Member of Mass. Pro- 
vincial Congress. 

CLIFFORD SAMUEL CHAPIN, Great Barrington, Mass. (16023). Supple- 
mentals. Son of Curtis and Jannette Hannah (Nelson) Chapin; grandson of 
John and Harriet (Cushman) Nelson; great-grandson of Edward and Hannah 
(Ranger) Nelson; greats-grandson of Moses Ranger, private. Colonel Leonard's 
Mass. Regt. and other service; great-grandson of Consider and Rhoda (Gains) 
Cushman; great--grandson of Consider Cnslnnan, private. Colonel Woodbridge's 
Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES HENRY CHASE, Northampton, Mass. (22496). Son of Henry R. 
and Mary L. (Wheeler) Chase; grandson of Henry Stewart and Lucy (Wea- 
therhead) Chase; great-grandson of Jonathan and Sophia (Stewart) Chase; 
greats-grandson of Daniel Stezvart, Corporal, Colonel Brooks's Mass. Regt.; 
grandson of Stephen and Mariah (Emerson) Wheeler; great-grandson of Wil- 
liam and Lydia (Pratt) Emerson; greats-grandson of Thomas Emerson, pri- 
vate, Capt. David Emerson's Company, Colonel Wingate's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

ELIOT A. CLARK, Pittsfield, Mass. (17638). Supplemental. Son of Hiram 
Hough and Julia Jeannette (Eliot) Clark; grandson of Calvin and Phebe 
(Hough) Clark; great-grandson of Samuel and Phebe (Post) Hough; greats- 
grandson of Joseph Post, private Conn. Militia. 

JOHN MAXWELL CLARK, North Hadley, Mass. (22892). Son of John Wesley 
and Mary Endicott (Roberts) Clark; grandson of Reuben and Lydia D. (Endi- 
cott) Roberts; great-grandson of Timothy and Mary (Trask) Endicott; great-- 
grandson of Samuel "Endicott, Surgeon's Mate, Col. Nathaniel Wade's Mass. 
Regt. 

.\USTIN ELIOT COOK, Hadley, Mass. (23159). Son of Rufus and Laura 
Sophia (Lyman) Cook; grandson of James and Ruhamah (Doane) Cook; 
great-grandson of Coleman Cook, minute man, Capt. Hezekiah Hubbard's Com- 
pany Mass. Militia; greats-grandson of Elisha Cook, private, Capt. Oliver Ly- 
man's Company Mass. Militia. 

HOMER FRANCIS COOK, Hadley, Mass. C23160). Son of Charles and Eunice 
P. Cook; grandson of Winthrop and Sophia (Smith) Cook; great-grandson of 
Seth and Elizabeth (Stevens) Cook; greats-grandson of Jonathan Cook, pri- 
vate. Col. Elisha Porter's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

RUFUS LYMAN COOK, Hadley, Mass. (23158). Son of Rufus and Laura 
Sophia (Lyman) Cook; grandson of James and Ruhamah (Doane) Cook; 
great-grandson of Coleman Cook, minute man, Capt. Hezekiah Hubbard's Com- 
pany Mass. Militia; greatS-grandson of Elisha Cook, private, Capt. Oliver Ly- 
man's Company Mass. Militia. 



230 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS CURRIER, Fitchburg, Mass. (22893). Son of Festos 
Curtis and Joanna M. (Allen) Currier; grandson of Ebenezer H. and Betsey 
(Pond) Currier; great-grandson of Edward Currier, private, Captain Reynolds's 
Company, Colonel Peabody's New Hampshire Regt.. pensioned. 

FRANK ELLIOT DICKERMAN, Somerville, .Mass. (22023). Son of Quincy E. 
and Rebecca (Perkins) Dickerman; grandson of Israel and Emily (Harris) 
Dickerman; great-grandson of Oliver Harris, Corporal, Lieut.-Col. Enoch Put- 
nam's Mass. Regt. 

HAROLD CLARKE DURRELL, Cambridge. :Mass. (18448). Supplemental. Son 
of Oliver H. and Sophia Gertrude (Eaton) Durrell; grandson of Oliver 
Bourne and Betsey Gooch (Peabody) Durrell; great-grandson of John and 
Elvira (Wentworth) Peabody; great--grandson of James and Miriam (Mitchell) 
Peabody; greats-grandson of Seth Peabody. private, Colonel Scammon's Mass. 
Regt. 

GEORGE ALBERT ELLSWORTH, Boston, Mass. (22024). Son of John Noyes 
and Eliza Howe (Gould) Ellsworth, Jr.; grandson of John Noyes and Nancy 
Elliott (Gilman) Ellsworth; great-grandson of William and Esther (Noyes) 
Ellsworth; great'-grandson of William Ellsworth, private, Capt. Thomas ^llg- 
hill's (Rowley) Company Mass. Minute Men. 

WILLIAM E. ELTON. Dorchester, Mass. (22189). Son of William and Eliza A. 
(Yeamans) Elton; grandson of Nathan N. and Sarah (!Matson) Elton; great- 
grandson of Bradley Elton; great--grandson of Bradley Elton, private, Capt, 
Joseph Churchill's Company. Third Battalion, Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

WILLIAM MORRELL EMERY, Fall River, Mass. (17897). Supplementals. Son 
of Edwin and Louisa Farnham (Wing) Emery; grandson of Samuel Spear and 
Mary (Cook) Wing; great-grandson of Closes and Clarissa (Spear) Wing; 
greats-grandson of Moses and Mary (Chandler) Wing; greats-grandson of John 
Chandler, Member of Committee of Safety of Winthrop, Me.; greats-grandson 
of Simeon Wing, ^Member of Sandwich, Mass., Committees; grandson of Wil- 
liam Leigh and Mary Elizabeth (Prescott) Emery; great-grandson of Ezekiel 
and Betsey (Worcester) Prescott; great--grandson of Jonathan and Sarah 
(Brown) Prescott; great--grandson of Micah Prescott, Associator, recognized 
patriot of Hampton. N. H. ; great--grandson of Philip Worcester, fifer. Col. 
James Scammon's Mass. Regt. 

WILLARD HENRY FOBES. Maiden, Ma.ss. (22483). Son of Henry and Lucy 
Blackman (Bahcock) Fobes: grandson of Cyrus and Hester (Millish) Fobes: 
great-grandson of Benjamin Fobes, Jr., private Easton, Mass., Company of 
Minute Men; great-grandson of John Mellish. private, Colonel Gill's and other 
Mass. Regts., fifer on brig "Tj'ranicide." 

ALBERT GOODWIN FOSTER, Lynn, Mass. (22199). Son of George and Susan 
Maria (Goodwin) Foster; grandson of Albert Thomas and Lydia Maria 
(Richards) Goodwin; great-grandson of Richard and Susan (Whitney) Rich- 
ards; great'-grandson of Joseph Richards, private Second Lynn Company Mass. 
Militia; great--grandson of Stephen Whitney, private, Col. Josiah Whitney's 
Regt. jWass. Militia; great--grandson of Josiah Whitney, Colonel Second Wor- 
cester County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM LONG FOX, Winthrop, Mass. (22477). Son of Edward Sanborn and 
Elizabeth Willis (Long) Fox; grandson of Edward and Lydia (Gilman) Fox; 
great-grandson of Edward Fox, Sergeant, Col. Stephen Evans's New Hamp- 
shire Regt. 

GERALD A. GARDNER, Somervillle, Mass. (22196). Son of Robert Dunbar and 
Jane (Bliss) Gardner; grandson of Warren and Mary (Dunbar) Gardner; 
great-grandson of Jacob Dunbar, private, Capt. Enoch Whiton's Company. 
Col. Benjamin Lincoln's Mass. Regt. 



I 



RKCISTKK Ul" XICW MIC.MIJF.US. 23 1 

ARTHUR PARK GAY. West Newton, Mass. (19756). Supplementals. Son of. 
Richard Lewis and Beulah Anne (Park) (".ay; grandson of Joseph Bates and 
Abigail Morse (Ellis) Gay; great-grandson of Richard and Suzea (Bates) Gay; 
great-grandson of Issacher Bates, private, Capt. Joseph Elliott's Company 
Conn. Militia; grandson of Russell and Anne Williams (Green) Park; great- 
grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Merriam) Park; great--grandson of James 
Russell and Anna (Lealand) Park; great"-grandson of Asaph Lealand, private, 
Ca])t. Ezra Emes's Company, Col. Abner Perry's Mass. Regt. 

RICHARD LEWIS GAY, Brookline, Mass. (19757)- Supplemental. Son of Jo- 
seph Bates and Abigail Morse (Ellis) Gay: grandson of Richard and Suzea 
(Bates) Gay; great-grandson of Issacher Bates. ])rivate, Capt. Joseph Elliott's 
Company Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM PRESCOTT GREE>JLAW, Winthrop, Mass. (22025). Son of Na- 
thaniel Webb and Susan W^oodward (Poole) Greenlaw; grandson of Samuel 
Hale and Sally (Yates) Poole; great-grandson of Jonathan (and Elizabeth 
Hale) Poole, Surgeon's Mate First New Hampshire Regt.; great--grandson of 
John Hale, Surgeon First New Hampshire Regt. ; grandson of Ebenezer and 
Ruth (Webb) Greenlaw; great-grandson of Nathaniel Webb, Corporal, Col. 
Michael Jackson's Mass. Regt., Matross Third Artillery Regt.; great-grandson 
of George James Yates. Captain, Colonel Jones's Third Lincoln County Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM HALE, Gloucester, Mass. (22894). Son of Francis William and Susan 
Hayes (Lord) Hale; grandson of Edwin Parks Stanhope and Maria (Philpot) 
Lord; great-grandson of Nathan Lord, Lieutenant, Col. James Scammon's and 
Col. John Paterson's Mass. Regts. 

CHARLES ARTHUR HARDING, Waltham, :Mass. (22497). Son of Solomon 
and Sarah M. (Briggs) Harding; grandson of Moses and Margaret (Pomeroy) 
Briggs; great-grandson of Arad Hunt and Charity (Emery) Pomeroy; great-- 
grandson of !Medad and Sarah (Hunt) Pomeroy; great--grandson of Seth 
Pomeroy, Brigadier-General Continental Army; great-grandson of Otis and 
Ann W. (Williams) Briggs; great--grandson of Joel Briggs, private, Capt. 
Seth Gilbert's Company, Col. John Daggett's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES HOUGHTON HASTINGS, Lynn, Mass. (21478). Supplemental. Son 
of Horace Nutter and Augusta Ann (Houghton) Hastings; grandson of 
Charles and Mary (Frost) Hastings; great-grandson of Benjamin and Rebecca 
(Clark) Hastings; great--grandson of Richard Clark, private, Capt. Samuel 
Barnard's Company, Col. Thomas Gardner's Mass. Regt. 

WILMOT REED HASTINGS, Lynn, Mass. (22879). Son of Horace Nutter and 
Augusta Ann (Houghton) Hastings; grandson of Charles and Mary (Frost) 
Hastings; great-grandson of Benjamin (and Rebecca Clark) Hastings, private, 
Capt. Phineas Stearns's Company, Col. Samuel Thatcher's Mass. Regt.; great-- 
grandson of Richard Clark, private. Col. Thomas Gardner's Mass. Regt. ; 
great"-grandson of Simon Hastings, private, Col. Thomas Gardner's Mass. Regt. 

HENRY GATES HATHORNE, Danvers, Mass. (22197). Son of Henry G. and 
Helen M. (Fay) Hathorne; grandson of Windsor and Dorcas (Clark) Fay; 
great-grandson of John Fay, private Joseph Fay's Company Mass. Minute Men 
and Col. Jonathan Ward's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM HENRY HAWKINS, Blackstone, Mass. (22479). Son of Oliver Haz- 
ard Perry and Alzada (Irons) Hawkins; grandson of Benjamin Hawkins, pri- 
vate Rhode Island Troops, pensioned. 

N. SEELYE HITCHCOCK, Easthampton, Mass. (22484). Son of Stillman Moody 
and Julia Eleanor (Strangford) Hitchcock; grandson of Charles Merrick and 
Fanny E. (Wright) Hitchcock; great-grandson of George King and Sally 
(Moody) Hitchcock; great-grandson of Godfrey and Abigail (King) Hitch- 
cock; great''-grandson of Luke Hitchcock. Member of Mass. General Court, 
'775- private. Col. John Moseley's Mass. Regt. 



I 



,'232 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES LEWIS HOITT, Lynn, Mass. (22478). Son of Lewis Alfred and 
Angle Khuhama (Gray) Hoitt; grandson of Joshua and Theodatha Batchelder 
(Pillsbury) Hoitt; great-grandson of James and Rhoda (Smart) Pillsbury; 
great-grandson of Edmund and Martha (Hale) Pillsbury; greats-grandson of 
Moses Pillsbury, private, Capt. Caleb Pillsbury's detachment Mass. Militia, 
April 19, 1775- 

JEROME CARTER HOSMER, Dorchester, Mass. (5231). Supplemental. Son of 
Charles and Susannah (Carter) Hosmer; grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Hos- 
mer) Hosmer; great-grandson of Stephen Hosmer, Sergeant, Capt. Joseph 
Hosmer's (Concord) Company, Col. Eleazer Brooks's Mass. Regt. 

ARTHUR CLARK HOWE, North Hadley, Mass. (22895)- Son of John Cutler 
and Helen Eliza (Dickinson) Howe; grandson of Darius and Mary (Clark) 
Howe; great-grandson of John Clark, private, Col. Benjamin Gill's Mass. 
Regt., pensioned. 

FRED JOTHAM HUTCHINSON, Hyde Park, Mass. (22176). Son of Jotham 
Patten and Abigail Elisabeth (Hadley) Hutchinson; grandson of Isaac and 
Abigail (Sevey or Seavey) Hadley; great-grandson of Moses Hadley, private, 
Capt. James Ford's Company New Hampshire Militia; great-grandson of John 
Sevey. private, Capt. Archelaus Towne's Company Twentj'-seventh Regt. of 
Foot and Colonel Hale's New Hampshire Regt. 

GEORGE ABNER INGALLS, Lynn, Mass. (22896). Son of Theodore Lorillard 
and Ellen Maria (Arrington) Ingalls; grandson of Loadman and Elizabeth 
(Allej') Arrington; great-grandson of Nathan Alley, private of militia, matross. 
Col. Thomas Craft's Artillery Regt. 

RUPERT WARD JAQUES, Boston, Mass. (21486). Supplemental. Son of Harry 
Archer and Junie Arvilla (Hicken) Jaques; grandson of Edwin Shepard and 
Caroline Louisa (Robinson) Jaques; great-grandson of Giles Merrill and Mary 
Ann (Smith) Jaques; great--grandson of Stephen and Mary (Bartlett) Jaques; 
greats-grandson of Samuel Jaques, private. Col. Nathaniel Wade's and other 
Mass. Regts. 

WALLACE LOWE KIMBALL, Haverhill, Mass. (22888). Son of Leverett and 
ISIary Lowe (Stevens) Kimball; grandson of Joseph Lowe and Dorothy (Little) 
Stevens; great-grandson of Zachariah Stevens, private. Col. Nathaniel Wade's 
Mass. Regt. 

CH.\RLES EDGAR LAMB, Winthrop, Mass. (22177). Son of Charles Bartlett 
and Marian Maranda (Person) Lamb; grandson of John and Sarah (Nicker- 
son) Lamb, Jr.; great-grandson of John Lamb, private. Colonel Doolittle's and 
Colonel Nixon's Mass. Regts., pensioned. 

EMORY WARREN LANE, Waltham, Mass. (22897). Son of Emory William and 
Ellen Elizabeth (Warren) Lane; grandson of Nehemiah and Sally (Wyman) 
Warren; great-grandson of Nathan Warren, private. Col. Cj'prian Howe's and 
other Mass. Regts. 

CHARLES EDWARD LITCHFIELD, Attleboro, Mass. (22898). Son of Edward 
Merritt and Martha Jane (Morse) Litchfield; grandson of Libya Merritt and 
Chloe (Bates) Litchfield; great-grandson of Comins and Sally (Blanchard) 
Litchfield; greats-grandson of James Litchfield, private. Col. Jeduthan Bald- 
win's Regt. of Artificers. 

GEORGE ALEXANDER LITCHFIELD, Marlboro, Mass. (22178). Son of Lib- 
ertj' Warren and Mattie Susan (Searles) Litchfield; grandson of Pliny Thurs- 
ton and Maria Elizabeth (Sykes) Litchfield; great-grandson of Liberty and 
Catherine Pratt (Thurston) Litchfield; greats-grandson of Comins and Sally 
(Blanchard) Litchfield; great'-grandson of James Litchfield, private. Col. 
Jeduthan Baldwin's Mass. Regt. : greats-grandson of Nathan and Sarah or Sally 
(Campbell) Thurston; great"-grandson of Alexander Campbell. Member of the 
First Mass. Provincial Congress, Member of Oxford Committee of Correspond- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 233 

ence, 1774; great"-grandson of Josiali (and Mary Lamb) BlaiicliarJ, private, 
Col. Jacob Davies's Worcester County Regt. Mass. ^[ilitia; greats-grandson of 
Samuel Lamb, Corporal, Col. William Shepard's Mass. Regt. 

JOHN FREDERIC R.VTES LITCHFIELD, Worcester, Mass. (-'^179). Son of 
Libya Merritt and Chloe (Bates) Lttchfield; grandson of Comins and Sally 
(Blanchard) Litchfield; great-grandson of James Litchfield, private. Col. Jedu- 
than Baldwin's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Josiali (and Mary I.amb) 
Blanchard, private. Col. Jacob Davies's Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia; 
great--grandson of Samuel Lamb, Corporal, Col. William Shepard's Mass. 
Regt.; grandson of Jacob and Sally (Rhodes) Bates; great-grandson of ICzekiel 
and Chloe (Bates) Rhodes; greats-grandson of James Rhodes, private Fifth 
Conn. Regt. ; great=-grandson of Elijah (and Chloe Tyler) Bates, parents of 
Chloe, private. Col. John Efaggett's Mass. Regt.; greats-grandson of Moses 
Tyler. Lieutenant Fourth Bristol County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson 
of Alanson and Comfort (Robinson) Bates, parents of Jacob; great--grandson 
of Silas Robinson, private, Col. Nathan Sparhawk's Mass. Regt.; great"-granil- 
son of John Bates, private. Col. John Daggett's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM ELIAS LITCHFIELD, Newton, Mass. (22899). Son of Joseph Wil- 
liam and Mary Jane (Sloane) Litchfield; grandson of Charles and Deborah 
(Totman) Litchfield; great-grandson of Noah and Sarah (Willcutt) Litchfield; 
great--grandson of James and Hannah (Pratt) Litchfield; great--grandson of 
Josiah Litchfield, private, Col. Josiah Whitney's Mass. Regt. 

CLARENCE BERTRAM LIVINGSTON, Lowell, Mass. (22485). Son of Winfield 
Scott and Frances Eliza Ann (French) Livingston; grandson of Samuel Wil- 
lard and Ann (Oliver) Livingston; great-grandson of Mathew and Martha 
(Wheaton) Livingston; great"-grandson of Benjamin Livingston. Captain First 
Regt. Mass. Militia, Colonel Denny. 

WILLIAM SCOTT LYON, Wellesley, Mass. (22880). Son of Charles Clarke and 
Amanda (Cogswell) Lyon; grandson of Caleb and Martha (Crane) Lyon; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Lyon, private Essex County New Jersey Flight 
Horse. 

EDWARD MARSH, Dedham, Mass. (22180). Son of Francis and Emma I. 
Marsh; grandson of Francis and Eliza Marsh; great-grandson of Martin and 
Elizabeth (Metcalf) Marsh; great--grandson of Jonathan Metcalf, Lieutenant. 
Col. Craft's Artillery Regt., killed in action. 

HENRY ROGERS MAYO, Lynn, Mass. (22190). Son of Frederick David and 
Lucy Ann (Rogers) Mayo; grandson of Warren and Jerusha Green (Cloon) 
Rogers; great-grandson of Thomas Rogers, Sergeant, Capt. Elijah Crocker's 
Company, Col. John 't'homas's Mass. Regt. 

FREDERICK HOWARD NEWHALL, Lynn, Mass. (22881). Son of George 
Thompson and Harriet (Trask) Newhall; grandson of Francis Stewart and 
Lydia (Burrill) Newhall; great-grandson of Winthrop and Elizabeth (Farring- 
ton) Newhall; great--grandson of William Farrington, Captain Second Lynn 
Company, April 19, 1775; great-grandson of Thompson and Lydia (Quiner) 
Burrill; great--grandson of John Burrill, private Fourth Lynn Company, April 
19. 1775; great--grandson of Ebeneaer Burrill, Delegate Mass. Provincial Con- 
gress, 1774; great--grandson of John Quiner, private, Capt. William Blackler's 
Company, Col. John Glover's Mass. Regt.; grandson of John and Delia (Dear- 
born) Trask; great-grandson of Richard and Dolly (Underbill) Dearborn; 
great--grandson of Jonathan Dearborn, private. Col. Thomas Tash's New 
Hampshire Regt. ; great--grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Underbill) Under- 
bill; greaf'-grandson of John Underhill; private, Col. Thomas Stickney's New 
Hampshire Regt. 



234 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GEORGE BVRON NICHOLS, Lynn, Mass. (22498). Son of Joseph Oliver Stod- 
dard and Anna Esther (Steele) Nichols; grandson of Joseph and Harriet Ann 
(Doane) Nichols; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Randall) Doane; 
great--grandson of Ed'ward Doane. private, Capt. David Strout's (Seacoast) 
Company Mass. jNIilitia. 

GEORGE ELVVIN NICKERSON, Lynn, Mass. (22181). Son of Horace Jefferson 
and Mary (Collins) Nickerson; grandson of Alden and Amelia (Chamberlain) 
Nickerson; great-grandson of Warren and Annie (Alden) Nickerson; great-- 
grandson of Austin Alden, Lieutenant, Col. Samuel Brewer's Mass. Regt. ; 
great-grandson of Joshua Chamberlain; great--grandson of Ebenezer Chamber- 
lain, private. Capt. Edward Everett's Company, Colonel Bedel's New Hamp- 
shire Regt. 

PEARL HILDRETH PARKER. Dracut, Mass. (18220). Supplemental. Son of 
Israel Hildreth and Josephine Aurilla (Hodgkins) Parker; grandson of Worthy 
and Mary (Nudd) Parker; great-grandson of Jonathan and Alice (Gutterson) 
Parker; great--grandson of William Gutterson, private, Maj. Samuel Bodwell's 
Company ^lass. Minute Men and Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Mass. Regt. 

JAMES CHARLES PEABODY, Roxbury, Mass. (22480). Son of Timothy How- 
ard and Sarah Ann Thaxter (Williams) Peabody; grandson of Oliver and 
Lydia (Howard) Peabody; great-grandson of John Peabody, private, Col. 
Jacob Gerrish's Mass. Regt., pensioned; great-'-grandson of Richard Peabody, 
Captain, Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Mass. Regt. 

FR-^NK HERVEY PETTINGELL, Colorado Springs, Colo. (Mass. 11521). Sup- 
plemental. Son of Nathaniel Henry and Mary Anna (Felch) Petttingell; 
grandson of Cutting and Olive (Smith) Pettingell; great-grandson of John 
Svuth, seaman on frigate "Alliance," Captain Landais. 

ALFRED PIERCE, Lexington, Mass. (22882). Son of Loring Smith and Frances 
Augusta (Harrington) Pierce; grandson of Lewis and Sarah (Dudley) Har- 
rington; great-grandson of Thaddens Harrington, private. Captain Parker's 
Company Lexington Minute Men, April 19, 1775, Adjutant Third Middlesex 
County Regt., 1776. 

JOHN BUCKBEE OUINN, Lexington, Mass. (23155). Son of Michael and Kath- 
erine (Buckbee) Quinn; grandson of John T. and Frances (Van Dusen) Buck- 
bee; great-grandson of Joseph and Susanna (Betts) Buckbee; great--grandson 
of Benjamin Betts, private. Col. John Mead's Conn. Regt. 

JOHN SAMUEL RICHARDSON, Boston, Mass. (22883). Son of Daniel Thomp- 
son and Eliza Ann Richardson; grandson of Joseph and Charlotte (Thompson) 
Richardson; great-grandson of Joseph Richardson, private, Capt. Jonathan An- 
drews's Company Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Isaac Snow and Sarah 
(Hay) Thompson; great--grandson of Daniel Thompson, of Woburn, Mass., 
killed April 19, 1775. 

RAY RICH:M0ND. Brockton, Mass. (22900). Son of Edwin A. and Lettie (Pratt) 
Richmond; grandson of Jared and Julia A. (Kingman) Pratt; great-grandson 
of Jonathan and ^lalinda (Shaw) Pratt; great--grandson of Samuel and Lydia 
(Cobb) Shaw; great'''-grandson of Thomas Shazv, private Seventh Comjiany 
Twelfth Mass. Continental Regt. 

WILLIAM EDWIN SALOMONS, Lynn. Mass. (22191). Son of George and 
Harriette Frances (Newton) Salomons; grandson of Joel and Harriet (Dud- 
ley) Newton; great-grandson of John and Mary (Whitney) Dudley; great-'- 
grandson of Benjamin Dudley, private, Capt. Jonathan Fisk's (Weston) Com- 
pany, Colonel Brooks's ISIass. Regt. 

CHARLES SIDNEY SANBORN, Lynn, Mass. (22884). Son of John Sidney and 
Frances Lydia (Alexander) Sanborn; grandson of Enoch and Elizabeth 
(Flint) Sanborn; great-grandson of Peter Sanborn, private. Captain Shaw's 
Company, Colonel Fogg's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW .M KM HICKS. 2^^ 

RALPH ROSCOE SANBORN, Lynn, Mass. (22877). Son of .lolin Sidney and 
Frances Lydia (Alexander) Sanborn; grandson of Enoch and Elizabeth (Flint) 
Sanborn; great-grandson of Peter Sanborn, private. Captain Shaw's Conijiany, 
Colonel Fogg's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

HOLUS HUNNEWELL SAWYER, Waban. .Mass. (J..885). Son of Lemuel B. 
and Abby Amelia (Whittemore) Sawyer: grandson of Otis and Susan (Lord) 
Whittemore; great-grandson of Philip and .\bigail (Nye) Lord; great-grand- 
son of Elisha Nye, Captain Mass. Coast Guards. 

ALFRED LONG SENTON. Wellesley, Mass. (22886). Son of Benjamin C. and 
Jennie M. (Long) Senton; grandson of James Henry and Susan E. (Whitney) 
Senton; great-grandson of Benjamin and Hejizibah (Moore) Whitney; great-- 
grandson of Timothy and Hepzibah (Nixon) Moore; greats-grandson of John 
Nixon. Captain of Minute Men at Lexington, .\pril 19, 1775, Brigadier-General 
Continental .\rmy, 1776; grandson of Alfred Jerome and Susan Eleanor (Coul- 
son) Long; great-grandson of Jared and Martha (Barr) Long; great--grandson 
of Levi Long, private. Captain Brigham's Company Eighth Regt. Conn. Line. 

HENRY LY.MAN SHAW. Boston, :Mass. (22182). Son of Joel and Alice (Locke) 
Shaw; grandson of Gilbert and Silence (Cole) Shaw, great-grandson of Abner 
Shaw, Corporal, Col. Paul D. Sargent's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Eleacer 
Cole, drummer, Capt. Josiah Hayden's Company Mass. Minute Men, Colonel 
Bayley's Regt.: grandson of Nathan and Hannah (Goodnow) Locke; great- 
grandson of Ebene::cr Locke, Corporal, Captain Bowman's Company, Colonel 
Bigelow's Mass. Regt. 

WALTER PIERCE SHELDON, Maiden. .Mass. (22486). Son of Israel Augustus 
and Isabella Williams (Masson) Sheldon; grandson of Israel and Sally 
(Peirce) Sheldon; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Nancy (Woodbury) Pierce; 
great--grandson of Joseph and Huldah (Putnam) Woodbury; great-'-grandson 
of Peter Woodbury, Sergeant, Capt. Caleb Dodge's Beverly Company at Lex- 
ington .Alarm. 

EDWIN ERNEST SIBLEY. Chelsea, Mass. (22183). Son of Stephen and Anna 
(Emerson) Sibley; grandson of Parker and Anna (Jones) Emerson; great- 
grandson of Parker Emerson, Sergeant Mass. Militia and Line. 

EZR.V ERNEST SMITH, Boston, Mass. (4805). Supplemental. Son of Ezra E. 
and Mary Elizabeth (Bryant) Smith; grandson of Ebenezer and Freelove 
(Smith) Bryant; great-grandson of Joseph and Thankful (Brewer) Smith; 
great--grandson of Eldad Smith, private. Captain Wells's Company Conn. 
Militia; great-grandson of Timothy Bryant, private, Capt. Timothy Cheney's 
Company Conn. Militia. 

FR.\NK HERBERT SMITH, Hadley, Mass. (18487). Supplemental. Son of 
George Myron and Mary Abby (Cook) Smith; grandson of Caleb and Eliza- 
beth (Williams) Smith; great-grandson of Caleb Smith, private, Capt. Joshua 
Parker's Company, Col. Nathaniel Wadsworth's Mass. Regt., pensioned; grand- 
son of Enos E. and Elizabeth \N . (Nash) Cook; great-grandson of Elihu and 
Elizabeth S. (Hall) Cook; great--grandson of Elihu Cook, Corporal, Colonel 
Woodbridge's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Erastus and Penelope (Gaylord) 
Nash; great--grandson of Samuel Gaylord, Sergeant, Capt. Eliakim Smith's 
Company Mass. Militia. 

FRED GARDNER SMITH, Winthrop, Mass. (23156). Son of Charles Henry and 
Harriet M. (Gardner) Smith; grandson of James M. and Emily Somes (Free- 
man) Gardner; great-grandson of Perez and Sally (Bell) Gardner; great'^- 
grandson of Peres Gardner, private. Col. Joseph Vose's Mass. Reg^t. 

RUFUS M.VY SMITH, Hadley, Ma.ss. (23157). Son of Chester and Mary .\nn 
Smith; grandson of Sereno and Betsey (Stockbridge) Smith; great-grandson 
of David Stockbridge, Corporal. Capt. J»hn Thompson's Company, Colonel 
Leonard's Regt. Mass. !Militia. 



236 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ERNEST BOWKER SOUTHWORTH. Stoughton. :^Iass. (2315 1). Son of Gurdon 
and Sarah B. (Staples) Southworth; grandson of Luther and Sarah Ann 
(Richards) Southworth: great-grandson of Jedediah and Sarah (Hewitt) South- 
worth; great^-gran'dson of Jedediah Southworth, Captain, Col. Joseph Read's 
Mass. Regt. 

WALTER LEVI SPAULDING. Indian Orchard, Mass. (22487). Son of Rufus 
and Ellen Maria (Lawrence) Spaulding; grandson of Levi and Sarah Abigail 
(Haywood) Lawrence; great-grandson of Amos and Lydia (Shattuck) Law- 
rence; great--grandson of Elcazer (and Mary Blood) Sliattuck, private. Colonel 
Prescott's Mass. Regt.; great"-grandson of David Blood, private. Colonel Pres- 
cott's Mass. Regt.; greats-grandson of Charles and Naomi (Stone) Lawrence; 
greats-grandson of Sanittel Lazvrence. private. Colonel Prescott's Mass. Regt.; 
great-grandson of Luther and Hannah (Peirce) Haywood; great--grandson of 
David Hayjcood, private. Colonel Denny's Mass. Regt.; great--grandson of 
Charles H. Haywood, private First Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia; 
great--grandson of Matthew Peirce, private. Col. Moses Little's Twelfth ^Mass. 
Regt.; grandson of Phineas Wright and Rachel (Hadley) Spaulding; great- 
grandson of Zebulon Spaulding, private. Colonel Brooks's Mass. Regt.; great- 
grandson of Jonas Hadley, private. Col. Jonathan Reed's Mass. Regt. ; great-- 
grandson of John Hadley, private. Colonel Brooks's and Colonel Prescott's 
Mass. Regts. 

RUFUS WILLIAM SPRAGUE, Charlestown, Mass. (22488). Son of Rufus Wil- 
liam and Mary (Ford) Sprague; grandson of Archibald and Sarah Colburn 
(Short) Sprague; great-grandson of Rvfiis Sprague, Commissary Rhode Islanfl 
Troops. 

JAMES REUBEN STICKNEY. Atlantic, Mass. (23154). Son of Edwin Percy 
and Lucia Frances (Dunlap) (Thruston) Stickney; grandson of David and 
Nancy P. (Hale) Stickney; great-grandson of David and Hannah (Tuttle) 
Stickney; great--grandson of James Tuttle, Corporal, Col. Perse Long's New- 
Hampshire Battalion; great--grandson of Amos and Mary (Fullington) Stick- 
ney; great'-grandson of David Fullington, private. Colonel Poor's Ninth New- 
Hampshire Regt.; grandson of Whitney and Abby Francis (Hills) Dunlap; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Polly (Wallace) Dunlap; great'-grand'^on of 
Adam Dunlap. private. Col. Jacob Gale's Regt. New Hampshire Volunteers; 
great-grandson of Reuben and Lydia (Fletcher) Hills; great--grandson of 
David and Mehetable (Robinson) Hills; great--grandson of Peter and Sarah 
(Peabody) Robinson; great*-grandson of David Peabody. private. Col. Moses 
Nichols's New Hampshire Regt.; great--grandson of Samuel and Anna (Bod- 
well) Fletcher: great--grandson of Francis Fletcher, private. Col. Enoch Hale's 
New Hampshire Regt. ; great--grandson of William Bodwell. private. Col. 
Ebenezer Francis's New Hampshire Regt. 

IRVING STONE, Lexington, Mass. (22489). Son of Samuel and Philina (Pease) 
Stone: grandson of Samuel Pease, drummer, Captain Kinsman's Company. Col. 
John Stark's New Hampshire Regt. 

J.VMES FRANKLIN THAYER, Chelsea. Mass. (14564). Supplemental. Son of 
Andrew Jackson and Susanna Augusta (Tobey) Thayer; grandson of James 
and Susannah H. (Jones) Tobey; great-grandson of William Tobey, Second 
Lieutenant Mass. Coast Guards at Falmouth, Maine district. 

HARRY AUGUSTIN THOMPSON, Lowell, Mass. (22490). Son of Augustin and 
Sarah (Stewart) Thompson; grandson of James and Harriet (Maxfield) 
Thompson; great-grandson of James and Hannah (Batchelder) Maxfield; 
great--grandson of Nathaniel Maxfield, private. Col. Thomas Stickney's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

JOHN TRULL, Tewksbury, Mass. (2_'49i ). Son of Jesse Turing and Ellen H. 
(Wood) Trull; grandson of Jesse and Olive (Thorndyke) Trull; great-grand- 
son of John Tnill, Captain of Minute Men. Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Mass. 
Militia. 



I 



REGISTER or NEW MEMBERS. 237 

FRANK TUPPER, Worcesten :Mass. (-'2184). Son of George Washington and 
Elizabeth (Baldwin) Tupper; grandson of William and ^Miriam (Shields) Tup- 
per; great-grandson of David Lombard Shields, Sergeant, Capt. David Hol- 
brook's Company, Colonel Shepard's Mass. Regt., pensioned; great-grandson 
of Ichabod Tupper, Sergeant, Capt. Philip Thomas's Company, Colonel Mar- 
shall's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

CHARLES HILLEBOURNE VAN DEUSEN, Springfield, Mass. (22499). Son 
of John and Harriet Sarah (Duxbury) Van Deusen; grandson of John and 
Ann Maria (Whitbeck) Van Deusen; great-grandson of Cornelius Van Deusen, 
Sergeant and Ensign Eighth Regt. First Claverack New York Battalion, widow 
pensioned. 

HARRIE HOLLAND WHITNEY, Arlington, Mass. (22492). Son of Henry F. 
and Sarah H. Whitney; grandson of Silas Gore and Sarah Susan (Penniman) 
Whitney; great-grandson of Silas and Abigail ]\L Whitney; great--grandson of 
Silas Whitney, private, Capt. Amasa Cranston's Company, Col. Eleazer 
Brooks's Mass. Regt. ' 

DORVIL MILLER WILCOX, Lee, Mass. (19745). Supplemental. Son of Henry 
and Susanna (Miller) Wilcox; grandson of Nathaniel Wilcox, private, Colonel 
\'an Dyke's New York Regt. and other service, pensioned; great-grandson of 
Hicl Wilcox, private Seventeenth Albany County New York Regt., pensioned. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS WILLEY, Lynn, Mass. (22198). Son of James Leighton 
and Mary Elizabeth (Scammon) Willey; grandson of Joseph and second wife, 
Abigail C. (Marshall) Scammon; great-grandson of Dominicus and Hannah 
(Tarbox) Scammon; great--grandson of Dominicus Scammon, Member of Com- 
mittee of Inspection of Saco, Maine. 

CHARLES EDWIN WILLIAMS, Northampton, }ilass. (17890). Supplementals. 
Son of John P. and Harriet A. (.Wheeler) \\'illiams: grandson of Peres and 
Desire (Wheeler) Wheeler; great-grandson of Peres and Desire (Randall) 
XN'heeler; greats-grandson of John Randall, private Second Company, Colonel 
Huntington's Conn. Regt.; great-grandson of Nathan and Desire Wheeler, 
parents of Desire; great"-grandson of Hosea and Bridget (Grant) Wheeler; 
great''-grandson of Oliver Grant, Captain Fourth Conn. Battalion under Gen- 
eral Spencer, pensioned; great^^-grandson of Jeremiah Wheeler, private Eighth 
Regt. Conn. Militia; grandson of John P. and Cynthia (York) Williams; great- 
grandson of Jesse and Cynthia (Miner) York; great"-grandson of Jesse York, 
Sergeant Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia; greats-grandson of Charles Miner, private 
First Conn. Regt., 1780; great-grandson of Isaac and Phebe Williams; great-- 
grandson of Warham Williams, private Conn. Troops, pensioned. 

LOUIS MARTIN WINSLOW, Lynn, Mass. (22192). Son of John Martin and 
Martha Denison (Hartshorn) Winslow; grandson of Richard Denison and 
Martha H. (Rhoades) Hartshorn; great-grandson of Richard and Nancy 
(Paine) Hartshorn, Jr.; great--grandson of Richard Hartshorn, Sergeant, Capt. 
Timothy Mann's Company Fourth Suffolk County Regt. Mass. Militia; grand- 
son of George and Olive C. (Smith) Winslow; great-grandson of Nathan and 
Marj' (Nye) Winslow, Jr.; greats-grandson of Nathan Winslow, private, Capt. 
Benjamin Berry's (Harwich) Company, jMaj. Zenas Winslow's Mass. Regt. 

FREDERICK MARSHALL WOOD, Ashmont, Mass. (22193). Son of Nathaniel 
Goodwin and Maria Sizer (Johnson) Wood; grandson of Thomas and Hetty 
(Sizer) Johnson; great-grandson of Enoch Sizer; great'-grandson of Lemuel 
Siser, Sergeant. Capt. Nathaniel Edwards's Company, General Waterbury's 
Conn. State Brigade. 

FRANK VERNON WRIGHT, Jr., Salem. Mass. (23152). Son of Frank Vernon 
and Cornelia L. Wright; grandson of William Augustus and Frances Sophia 
(Huntington) Wright; great-grandson of Benjamin and Caroline (Dolliver) 
Huntington: great-'-grandson of Peter Dolliver. Captain, Col. Henry Jackson's 
Sixteenth ^fass. Continental Regt. 



-238 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

"WILLIAM HENRY WYETH, Chelsea, Mass. (22500). Son of George E. and 
Ruth Jane (Eaton) Wyeth; grandson of Ebenezer and Naomi (Cook) Wyeth; 
great-grandson of Ebeneser Wyeth, private, Capt. Samuel Thatcher's Compan> , 
Col. Gardner's Mass. Regt. 

MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

STEPHEN LEWIS ANGLE, Detroit. Mich. (21721). Son of William Wallace 
and Harriet Elizabeth (Lewis) Angle; grandson of Stephen and Hannah 
(Alderman) Lewis; great-grandson of Abram Curtis and Julia (Judson) Lewis; 
great--grandson of Stephen Lezvis. private Fourth Conn. Regt., 1776. pensioned. 

EDWARD HORACE ASHLEY. Detroit, Mich. (22727). Son of Hiram and Polly 
(Gilbert) Ashley; grandson of Noah and Elizabeth (Sheldon) Ashley; great- 
grandson of William Ashley, Ensign, Capt. Bacon's Company, Col. John Fel- 
lows's Mass. Regt. 

"WILBERT H. BARRETT, Adrian. Mich. 1,22724). Son of Reuben T. and Lu- 
cinda Maxson (Tomlinson) Barrett; grandson of Abel Sheppard and Lois 
(Davis) Tomlinson; great-grandson of Thomas and Rachel (Ayers) Tomlinson; 
greats-grandson of James Tomlinson, First Lieutenant New Jersey Militia. 

HAROLD EDWARD CLARK. Detroit. Mich. (22737). Son of John E. and 
Frances M. (Hutchins) Clark; grandson of Moses P. and Jane (Thorpe) 
Hutchins; great-grandson of Samuel and Rosana (Child) Hutchins; great-- 
grandson of Jeremiah Hutchins, private. Capt. Smith Emerson's Company New 
Hampshire Militia. 

PHILIP TAYLOR COLGROVE, Hastings, Mich. (22733)- Son of Charles H. 
and Rosalia Catherine (Van Zile) Colgrove; grandson of David Mills and El- 
vira Cook (Taylor) Van Zile; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Polly (Cook) 
Taylor; great--grandson of Reuben Cook, private Penna. Militia, pensioned. 

HARRY ARMITAGE CONA^^f, Monroe, Mich. (22735). Son of Harry and 
Maria (Stewart) Conant; grandson of Eleazer Conant, Paymaster Seventh 
Conn. Line. 

FRED GRAY DEWEY, Detroit, Mich. (21718). Son of William Albert and Mary 
(Gray) Dewey; grandson of Birdsey and Sarah (Jersey) Dewey; great-grand- 
son of Gideon Deivey, private. Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Mass. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

HENRY RILEY FULLER. Detroit, Mich. (21714)- Son of Simon Greenleaf and 
Celeste Parmalee (Bostwick) Fuller; grandson of Samuel and Charlotte King- 
man (Greealeaf) Fuller; great-grandson of Simon and Hannah (Kingman) 
Greenleaf; great--grandson of Moses Greenleaf . Captain Eleventh Mass. Regt., 
Col. Ebenezer Tupper. 

•CHARLES WENDELL HARRAIL Detroit. Mich. (21722). Son of William De- 
laney and Hester (Hartzell) Harrah; grandson of William Neill and Deborah 
(Delaney) Harrah; great-grandson of James G. and Margaret (Neill) Harrah; 
great--grandson of Charles Harra, private. Capt. Robert Campbell's Company, 
Col. Thomas Porter's Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

CH.VRLES HARRISON HATCH, Detroit, Mich. (21 716). Son of Herschel Har- 
rison and Eliza E- Hatch; grandson of Julius Wells and Harriet (Bicknell) 
Hatch; great-grandson of Joel and Ruth (Gray) Hatch; great--grandson of 
Jethro Hatch, Major Thirteenth Regt. Conn. Volunteers. 

HERSCHEL HARRISON H.VrCH. Detroit, Mich. (21715). Son of Julius Wells 
and Harriet (Bicknell) Hatch; grandson of Joel and Ruth (Gray) Hatch; 
great-grandson of Jethro Hatch, Major Thirteenth Regt. Conn. Volunteers. 

IRA WAITE JAYNE, Detroit. IMich. (2i7i3')- Son of Daniel G. and Alice 
(Waite) Jayne; grandson of Elihu and Elizabeth (Tarbell) Waite; great-grand- 
son of Elihu and Lydia (Fuller) Waite; great--grandson of Elihti Waite, pri- 



< 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 239 

vate. Colonel Fellows's r^Iass. Regt. : grandson of Benjamin and Anna Marilla 
(Bradford) Jayne; great-grandson of Benjamin Jones and Deliverance (Rooks) 
Jayne; great--grandson of Jotliam Jayne. private Fourth Regt. New York Line. 

CHARLES FARWELL LAWSON, Detroit, Mich. (21725). Son of B. Howard 
and Maria Sophia (Holling) Lawson; grandson of William T,. and Mary I,. 
(Galloway) Holling; great-grandson of James and Emilia (Lewis) Galloway; 
great-grandson of John Gallozvay, private Cumberland County New York 
Militia. 

CHARLES BENAJAH LEONARD, Detroit, Mich. (21712). Son of Charles Henri 
and Cornelius Salome (Williams') Leonard; grandson of Benajah and Hannah 
Maria (Gardner) Williams; great-grandson of Benajah and Jerusha (Smith) 
Williams; greats-grandson o£ Isaiah and Anna (Mattison) Williams; great''- 
grandson of Joseph H^illiaiiis. ^lajor \^ermont Militia, Member of Westminster 
Convention of 1777. 

CORNELIUS WILLIAMS LEONARD. Oklahoma. Okla. ( Mich. j. 7 . i ). Son of 
Charles Henri and Cornelius Salome (Williams) Leonard; grandson of Benajah 
and Hannah Maria (Gardner) Williams; great-grandson of Benajah and 
Jerusha (Smith) Williams; great--grandson of Isaiah and .\nna (Mattison) 
Williams; great"-grandson of Joseph H''i!lia»is, Major W-rmont Militia, Member 
of Westminster Convention of 1777. 

EUGENE McFALL, Detroit. Mich. (21709). Son of William Harrison and Sarah 
(^Nlackey) McFall; grandson of Thomas and .\nn (Murdock) McFall; great- 
grandson of William Murdock, private Bucks County Penna. Associators; 
grandson of Lewis and Margaret (Campbell) Mackey: great-grandson of Mc- 
Donald Campbell, private First Somerset County Battalion New Jersey Militia. 

GUY HARRISON McFALL. Detroit. Mich. (21710). Son of Eugene and Anna 
(Stevens) McFall; grandson of William Harrison and Sarah (Mackey) Mc- 
Fall; great-grandson of Thomas and Ann (Murdock) McFall; great--grandson 
of M'illiam Murdock. private Bucks County Penna. Associators; great-grandson 
of Lewis and Margaret (Campbell) Mackey; great--grandson of McDonald 
Campbell, private First Somerset County Battalion New Jersey Militia. 

'CLARENCE C McKECHNIE, Detroit, Mich. (12.383). Son of William E. and 
Louisa Maria (Kemp) McKechnie; grandson of Joshua and Elizabeth (Kemp) 
Kemp; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary M. (Stanley) Kemp; great--grand- 
son of Frederick Kemp, Member of Maryland Conunittce of Observation. 

.ALLEN B. MORSE, Ionia, Mich. (21720). Son of John Lines and Susan Ann 
Gardner (Cowles) Morse; grandson of Miner and Sally (May) Morse; great- 
grandson of Joint Morse, private. Cant. John Harmon's Comi)any Fourth 
Conn. Battalion. • 

LEWIS CHUBB ROGERS, Detroit. Mich. (22736). Son of Erwin M. and Jessie 
(Chubb) Rogers; grandson of Jonathan Frisbie and Harriet (White) Chubb; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Relief (Frisbie) Chubb; great--grandson of 
Samuel Chubb, private, Capt. David Batchelltr's Comj)any. Col. Ezra Wood's 
Mass. Regt. 

FRANCIS MORTON SESSIONS. Detroit, Mich. (22726). Son of John Q. A. 
and Andelucia E. (Morton) Sessions; grand-on of George and Eunice (Mather) 
Sessions; great-gr.nndson of Robert .'\essiors. T^ieutenant Conn. Militia. 

FRANK CHANDLER SIBLEY, Detroit, Mich. (21724). Son of John Adams and 
Sarah Louise ("Chandler) Sibley; grandson of Josiah and Emma Eve (Long- 
street) Sibley; great-grandson of Joel and Lois (Wood) Sibley; great--grand- 
son of Stephen Sibley, private. Col. Jonathan Holman's Mass. Regt. 

EDWARD WALTON STODDARD, Detroit, Mich. (21710). Son of Oren and 
Sarah (Gibson) Stoddard; grandson of Sylvester and Sally Stoddard; great- 
grandson of Elijah Stoddard, private, Col. Ira Allen's Yerniunt Regt. 



240 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIAM SHERMAN WIGHTMAN, Detroit, Mich. (21717). Son of Solomon 
and !Martha Jerusha (Dickinson) Wightman ; grandson of Oliver Goldsmith 
and Jerusha (Fuller) Dickinson; great-grandson of Simeon Dickinson, drum- 
mer, Colonel Woodbridge's Conn. Regt. and on privateer "Mars," pensioned. 

DENNY ORLANDO WILEY, Detroit, Mich. (22728). Son of Thomas W. and 
Rebecca (Richardson) Wiley; grandson of Derastus and Eleanor (Lane) Rich- 
ardson; great-grandson of Johnathan and Anna (Wright) Lane; great--grand- 
son of Asariah Wright, Captain Vermont Militia. 

JOHN DEXTER WILEY, Detroit, Mich. (22729). Son of Thomas W. and Re- 
becca (Richardson) Wiley; grandson of Derastus and Eleanor (Lane) Richard- 
son; great-grandson of Johnathan and Anna (Wright) Lane; great--grandson 
of Asariah Wright, Captain Vermont Militia. 

PALMER EDWARD WINSLOW, Detroit, Mich. (21723). Son of William and 
Missouri (Lindsay) Winslow; grandson of Erasmus and Sarah (Palmer) 
Winslow; great-grandson of Stephen Fielder and Sarah (Weeks) Palmer; 
great--grandson of Joseph and Sarah Ruggles (Wild) Palmer; great'-grandson 
of Benjamin Palmer, private Fifth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HERBERT WILLIAM YEMANS, Surgeon, U. S. A., Fort Wayne, Detroit, 
Mich. (22730). Son of Charles Chester and Mary Herbert (Chamberlin) 
Yemans; grandson of William and Nancy (Lockwood) Yemans; great-grandson 
of Elijah and Thena (Carpenter) Yemans; great--grandson of Simeon Car- 
penter, private. Col. Joseph Marsh's and Col. Peter Olcott's Vermont Regts. 

ERASTUS T. YEOMANS, Ionia, Mich. {22732). Son of Sanford and Abigail 
(Thompson) Yeomans; grandson of Erastus and Phoebe (Arnold) Yeomans; 
great-grandson of Job Arnold, private Rhode Island Troops, pensioned. 

MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

FREDERICK ROBERTSON BARNES, Wahpeton, No. Dak. (Minn. 21521). Son 
of George Byington and Henrietta Amelia (Rich) Barnes; grandson of Alonzo 
Dean and Louisa (Merriam) Rich; great-grandson of William and Lydia 
(Wright) jNIerriam; great--grandson of Charles Wright, Captain Fourth Conn. 
Regt. 

FIELDER MONTGOMERY MAGRUDER BEALL, U. S. Army, Fort Snelling, 
Minn. (21506). Son of Thomas Birch and Jane Beall (Magruder) Beall; 
grandson of Edward and Teresa (Barron) Magruder; great-grandson of Has- 
well and Charity (Beall) Magruder; great'-grandson of Samuel Magruder, Jr.,. 
Member of Maryland Committee of Observation. 

EARL McMASTER BILL, Minneapolis, Minn. (21510). Son of Fred A. and 
Clara M. (McMaster) Bill; grandson of Epaphras C. and Betsey Orcott 
(Davis) Bill; great-grandson of Hezekiah and Sally (Sanborn) Davis; great-- 
grandson of Theophilus Sanborn, Sergeant, Colonel Senter's and Colonel 
Nichols's Regts. New Hampshire Militia. 

CHARLES INGILA.HAM BUXTON, Owatuma, Minn. (21518). (Name changed 
from Furman to Buxton.) Son of Fayette Searls and Mary Frances (Buxton) 
Furman; grandson of EHsha B. and Almira (Searls) Furman; great-grandson 
of .Abraham and Jerusha (Wood) Searls; great"-grandson of Gideon Searls, Jr., 
private, Col. Thomas Lee's \'ermont Regt.; great''-grandson of Gideon Searls, 
private Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES ADDISON CAVENDER, Tacoma, Wa-sh. (Minn. 21514). Son of 
Abram H. and Elvira H. Cavender; grandson of James and Rachel (Butler) 
Cavender: great-grandson of Charles Cax'ender, Corporal, Col. Thomas Stick- 
ney's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

WILLIAM WESTFALL CLARK, Pine City, Minn. (21516). Son of James Har- 
vey and Eleanor (WestfaU) Clark; grandson of William and Eleanor (Cahill) 
Clark: great-grandson of William Clark, private. Colonel Prescott's and other 
Mass. Regts., pensioned. 



REGISTER OE NEW MEMBERS. 24I 

CHARLES LESLIE CONGER, Mcintosh, Minn. (21524). Son of William and 
Mrs. Susan (Wright) (Foote) Conger; grandson of Asher and Chloe (Gil- 
more) Conger; great-grandson of Grcshom Conger, private, Col. Ira Allen's 
Regt. Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES WHEELER EDDY, St. Paul, Minn. (21513). Son of Albert Matthew- 
son and Margaret Eloise Eddy; grandson of Russell and Zeruah Eddy; great- 
grandson of Matthewson and Anna (Russell) Eddy; greats-grandson of Wil- 
lard Eddy, private Second Rhode Island Regt., Col. Christopher Lippitt, pri- 
vateersman. 

WESLEY SHERMAN FOSTER, Milaca, Minn. (21507). Son of Alonzo and 
Sophia (West) Foster; grandson of Simeon Brackett and Polly (Hill) Foster; 
great-grandson of Daniel Forster, private, Col. Moses Nichols's Regt. New 
Hampshire Militia. 

RICHARD WATSON FREER, Princeton, Minn. (2151 1). Son of Peter A. and 
Jane Ann (Garrison) Freer; grandson of Alexander and Catharine (Kip) 
Freer; great-grandson of Samuel Freer, private First Ulster County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

HARVEY LEE GILLETT, Invergrove, Minn. (21512). Son of George and Helen 
(Barton) Gillette; grandson of Percival and Sarah C. (Paine) Barton; great- 
grandson of Alfred and Sarah (Collins) Barton; great'-grandson of Benjamin 
Collins, private, Col. Michael Jackson's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Josiah 
and Rebecca (Gray) Paine; great--grandson of William Payne, private, Col. 
Michael Jackson's Mass. Regt. 

GIDEON S. IVES, St. Paul, Minn. (21520). Son of Warren and Louisa Buxton 
(Ladd) Ives; grandson of John M. and Mary (Thomas) Ives; great-grandson 
of Joseph Ives, private, Col. Benj. Bellows's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

WALTER B. JORDAN, Jr., Minneapolis, Minn. (23201). Son of Walter Booth 
and Mary Emily (Leighton) Jordan; grandson of Joseph and Mary (Coe) 
Leighton; great-grandson of James and Betsy (Quimby) Leighton; great-- 
grandson of Tobias Leighton, Jr., private, Col. James Scammon's New Hamp- 
shire Regt. 

FRED CARLOS KINNEY, St. Paul, Minn. (21522). Son of EHsha Richard and 
Charlotte (Richard) Kinney; grandson of William and Tryplena (Richards) 
Kinne; great-grandson of Peabody and Elizabeth (Crary) Kinne; great--grand- 
son of Ezra Kinne, Captain Eighth Regt. Conn. Foot. 

ROBERT SHEPARD McCOURT, St. Paul, Minn. (21525). Son of D. W. and 
Lucy (Shepard) McCourt; grandson of George Stevens and Catherine Miranda 
(Smith) Shepard; great-grandson of Ira and Marcia ^liranda Smith; great-- 
grandson of Jacob and Sarah (Ladd) Smith; greats-grandson of John Ladd, 
signer of "The Association" at Kingston, New Hampshire. 

EDWARD LANG PRESCOTT, Seattle, Wash. (Minn. 21519). Son of De Witt 
Clinton and Sarah (Holgate) Prescott; grandson of Daniel Kimball and Lo- 
renda (Lang) Prescott; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Molly (Sanborn) Pres- 
cott; greats-grandson of Jeremiah Prescott, Captain New Hampshire Militia. 

JOSEPH AUGUSTUS ROSS, Princeton, Minn. (21515). Son of Ezekiel L. and 
Maria (Johnson) Ross; grandson of Joseph R. and Nancy (Linscott) Ross; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Ross, private Third Essex County Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

CHARLES SUMNER SIMPSON, Hibbing, Minn. (21523). Son of Daniel Fill- 
more and Sylvira (Shaw) Simpson; grandson of William and Abigail (East- 
man) Simpson; great-grandson of Benjamin Simpson, private, Colonel Stick- 
ney's New Hampshire Regt. 

PERCY MORGAN SWAIN, Stillwater, Minn. (21508). Son of David M. and 
Juliana (Ainsworth) Swain; grandson of Francis Tolman and Juliana (Johns- 
ton) Ainsworth; great-grandson of James and Juliana Johnston; greats-grand- 
son of Archabell Johnston, Captain First Dutchess County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

16 — SR 



242 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

VERNE LEE SWAIN, Peoria, III. (Minn. 21509). Son of David M. and Juliana 
(Ainsworth) Swain; grandson of Francis Tolman and Juliana (Johnston) 
Ainsworth; great-grandson of James and Juliana Johnston; greats-grandson of 
Archabell Johnston, Captain First Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia. 

MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 

ARTHUR CAMPBELL CROWDER, Jackson, Miss. (21246). Son of John Mere- 
dith and Mary Boardman (Jones) Crowder; grandson of Silas B. and Martha 
B. (Thomas) Jones; great-grandson of Charles Word and Elizabeth (Daniel) 
Jones; great--grandson of Campbell Daniel, private Virginia State Troops, pen- 
sioned. 

JOHN FOSTER FRIERSON, Port Gibson, Miss. (23226). Son of William Vin- 
cent and Florence (Foster) Frierson, Jr.; grandson of William Vincent and 
Adaline (Fulton) Frierson; great-grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Wilson) 
Frierson; great--grandson of William Frierson, Captain South Carolina Militia. 

JAMES EVERETT LEA, Jr., Huron, Miss. (21244). Son of James E. and Mag- 
gie (Tate) Lea; grandson of James E. and Frances (Powell) Lea; great- 
grandson of Zachariah and Sabrina Muse (Clay) Lea; great'-grandson of Luke 
and Elizabeth (Wilson) Lea; great--grandson of James Lea, Jr., private Orange 
County North Carolina Militia. 

CHARLES ROBERTS PETTIS, ElHsville, Miss. (21248). Son of William Spen- 
cer and Ada C. Pettis; grandson of William Davis and Elizabeth Narcissa 
(Frierson) Pettis; great-grandson of Thomas James and Annie Witherspoon 
(Blakeley) Frierson; great'-grandson of Robert Frierson, private South Caro- 
lina Militia, known as Kingstree Company, commanded by Captain Monzon. 

WILLIAM SPENCER PETTIS, EUisville, Miss. (21247). Son of William Davis 
and Elizabeth Narcissa (Frierson) Pettis; grandson of Thomas James and 
Annie Witherspoon (Blakeley) Frierson; great--grandson of Robert Frierson, 
private South Carolina Militia, known as Kingstree Company, commanded by 
Captain Monzon. 

WILLIAM SPENCER PETTIS, Jr., Middlesboro, Ky. (Miss. 21250). Son of 
William Spencer and Ada C. (Roberts) Pettis; grandson of Charles and Mar- 
garet (McKee) Roberts; great-grandson of John and Orinda (Fuller) McKee; 
great-grandson of Marvin and Margaret (Harmon) Fuller; great-grandson of 
Peter Fuller, Corporal, Col. Timoth}- Donaldson's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR PIERCE, Lexington, Miss. (21245). Son of Ralph and 
Sarah (White) Pierce; grandson of John Coffin and Susan (Mattoon) White; 
great-grandson of Luther and Joanna White; great--grandson of David White, 
Lieutenant Mass. Militia in Expedition to Canada in 1776. 

WILLIAM RUSSELL SAUNDERS WILBURN, Winona, Miss. (21249). Son of 
Thomas L. and Chloe Bennette (Saunders) Wilbourn; grandson of William 
Russell and Anne Heartgraves (Mills) Saunders; great-grandson of Hubbard 
and Chloe (Russell) Saunders; great--grandson of William Rttssell, Colonel 
Thirteenth Virginia Regt. 

MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

STEPHEN ERNEST CHUBBUCK, St. Louis, Mo. (20706). Son of Stephen 
Lewis and Nellie (Mill) Chubbuck; grandson of Stephen and Lucy (Spauld- 
ing) Chubbuck; great-grandson of Timothy and Sarah (Faunce) Chubbuck; 
great--grandson of Timothy Chubbuck, private, Wareham Company Mass. Min- 
ute Men, April 19, 1775. 

ADDISON LYMAN DAY, St. Louis, Mo. (20705). Son of Addison and Margaret 
(Smith) Day; grandson of Plin and Deborah (Butt) Day; great-grandson of 
Sherebiah Butt, Captain Twenty-first Regt. Conn. Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 243 

GEORGE ZOLLINGER, St. Louis, Mo. (20707). Son of Augustus L. and Louise 
(Mayfield) Zollinger; grandson of George and Catherine (Meyers) Zollinger; 
great-grandson of Peter Zollinger, Captain and Wagon Master General York 
County Penna. Militia. 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

LESLIE BERRY SULGROVE, Helena, Mont. (18159). Son of Leslie and Sophia 
C. (Dithmer) Sulgrove; grandson of Berry Robinson and Mary Moore (Jame- 
son) Sulgrove; great-grandson of Thomas and Sally (Humphreys) Jameson; 
greats-grandson of Thomas Jameson, private. Company H, General Morgan's 
Virginia Brigade, pensioned. 

NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

DEAN WARREN FAY, Blue Hill, Nebr. (21411). Son of Joseph Washington 
and Nancy Percival (Lincoln) Fay; grandson of Warren and Freelove Matilda 
(Palmer) Fay; great-grandson of Ruben and Hepsibah (Kidder) Fay; great-- 
grandson of Joseph Fax, Ensign, Capt. John Greggs's Company Third New 
Hampshire Regt. 

McMillan JONES, Omaha, Nebr. (21413). Son of Owen S. and Dollie (Ten 
Brook) Jones; grandson of John and Jane (Alexander) Ten Brook; great- 
grandson of Andrew and Eleanor (Corney) Ten Brook; great'-grandson of 
John Ten Brook, Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Battalion Hunterdon County New 
Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES K. MORSE, Auburn, Nebr. (2 141 2). Son of Samuel Francis Smith 
and Mary Elizabeth (Kennedy) Morse; grandson of Horace Truworthy and 
Louisa (White) Morse; great-grandson of David and Rebecca (White) Morse; 
great'-grandson of Jesse Morse, Sergeant, Capt. Job Knapp's Company Mass. 
Militia; grandson of John Gray and Mary Clark (Vance) Kennedy; great- 
grandson of Andrew and Elizabeth (Veech) Vance; great--grandson of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth Kaufman (Clark) Veech; greats-grandson of Thomas Clark, 
Captain Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

ALMENGER C. ROWELL, St. Paul, Nebr. (21409). Son of William and Mary 
E. (Bartlett) Rowell; grandson of Rice and Sallie (Dunning) Rowell; great- 
grandson of William Rowell, private. Col. John Stark's Regt. New Hampshire 
Militia. 

JESSE GILBERT STUBBS, Omaha, Nebr. (21408). Son of John J. and Ger- 
trude Irene (Gear) Stubbs; grandson of Ezekiel Gilbert and Mary Yardley 
(How) Gear; great-grandson of Thomas Yardley and Elizabeth (Woodruff) 
How; great'-grandson* of Elias Woodruff. Commissary of Military Stores, Com- 
missary-General's Department, New Jersey Militia. 

HARRY L. SWAN, Omaha, Nebr. (21407). Son of Samuel P. and Calista E. 
(Crandal) Swan; grandson of Justus and Lydia (Holt) Crandal; great-grand- 
son of Jotham Holt, private, Col. John Brooks's Mass. Regt. ; grandson of 
Samuel and Harriet (Smith) Swan; great-grandson of William and Rebecca 
(Bissell) Smith; great'-grandson of Benjamin Bissell, Sergeant Fourth Com- 
pany, Colonel Bradley's Conn. Regt. ; greats-grandson of Zebulon Bissell, pri- 
vate. Captain Beebe's Company, Colonel Bradley's Conn. Regt. 

NEVADA SOCIETY. 

ARTHUR PARKER LEWIS, Reno, Nev. (22171). Son of James Henry and 
Emeline (Carmicheal) Lewis; grandson of Normand and Lucy (Kent) Lewis; 
great-grandson of James and Desire (Remington) Lewis; great'-grandson of 
John Lewis, private, Captain Langdon's Company, Col. H. Jackson's Mass. 
Regt. 



244 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

RALPH FRANKLIN MEEKS, Reno, Nev. (22173). Son of B. F. and Anna 
(Chase) Meeks; grandson of William and Sarah (Tuper) Chase; great-grand- 
son of Charles and Rebecca (Cather) Chase; greats-grandson of Abraham and 
Elizabeth (Cracraft) Chase; greats-grandson of Charles Cracraft, Major under 
General George Rogers Clark in 1781. 

GEORGE W. BROWNELL SANFORD, Reno, Nev. (22172). Son of Frank L. 
and Helen Augusta (Brownell) Sanford; grandson of George Washington and 
Joanna (Gough) Brownell; great-grandson of Ezra and Nancy (Dow) Brow- 
nell; great-grandson of Ezra and Hope (Borden) Brownell; greats-grandson of 
George Brownell, Sergeant, Col. Timothy Danielson's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

RICHARD BRADLEY BARTLETT, Pittsfield, N. H. (22109). Son of Asa W. 
and Finette A. (Doe) Bartlett; grandson of John and Abigal (Davis) Doe; 
great-grandson of Amos and Nancy (Libby) Doe; greats-grandson of Samuel 
Libby, private, Col. Pierce Long's and other New Hampshire Regts., priva- 
teersman, pensioned. 

WARREN TRACY BILLINGS, Dover, N. H. (22107). Son of Emilius G. and 
Lillieore (Tracy) Billings; grandson of Henry R. and Mary Ann (Richardson) 
Tracy; great-grandson of Lathrop and Mary (Hatch) Richardson; great-- 
grandson of Dan Hatch, Sergeant Third Battalion Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade, 
1776, prisoner in New York "Sugar House" and "Hulks," widow pensioned. 

CHARLES RUSSELL DENNING, Concord, N. H. (221 12). Son of Job Cushman 
and Harriet L. (Berry) Denning; grandson of Samuel and Marian (Mitchell) 
Denning; great-grandson of George and Eleuel (Rollins) Denning; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Dennen, Denning, seaman Mass. privateer service, pris- 
oner; grandson of Amos and Mary (Curtis) Berry; great-grandson of William 
and Olive (Stubbs) Curtis; greats-grandson of William Curtis, Sergeant, Cap- 
tain North's Company Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES AMOS DOE, Pittsfield, N. H. (221 10). Son of John and Abigal 
(Davis) Doe; grandson of Amos and Nancy (Libby) Doe; great-grandson of 
Samuel Libby, private. Col. Pierce Long's and other New Hampshire Regts., 
privateersman, pensioned. 

WILLIAM HENRY KNOX, Madbury, N. H. (221 13). Son of William P. and 
Carrie (Porter) Knox; grandson of Moses Edward and Abigail Knox; great- 
grandson of John and Nancy (Cushman) Knox; greats-grandson of Daniel and 
Abigail (Thomas) Knox; greats-grandson of John Knox, private, Col. Daniel 
Moore's New Hampshire Regt. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON LATON NUTT, Manchester, N. H. (22111). Son of 
George Washington and Lucy Rebecca (Senter) Nutt; grandson of Benjamin 
and Sophia (Hale) Nutt; great-grandson of William and Mary (Brewster) 
Nutt; greatS-grandson of Samuel and Eleyath (Dickey) Nutt; greats-grandson 
of William Nutt, private. Colonel Whitcomb's New Hampshire Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

HARRY K. TORREY, Newfields, N. H. (22103). Son of John and Adelaide 
Moore (Anderson) Torrey; grandson of John and Elizabeth Robbins (Petten- 
gill) Torrey; great-grandson of Cutting and Olive (Smith) Pettengill; greats- 
grandson of John Smith, seaman on U. S. S. "Dalton" and "Alliance" under 
John Paul Jones. 

GEORGE CLARENCE WILKINS, Manchester, N. H. (22108). Son of Charles 
Taylor and Emma A. (Stewart) Wilkins; grandson of Rodney and Harriett 
Lewis (Ellinwood) Wilkins; great-grandson of Hezekiah and Margaret (Armor) 
Wilkins; greatS-grandson of Bray Wilkins, Sergeant Twenty-seventh ]\lass. 
Regt.; great-grandson of David and Alice (Aiken) Ellinwood; greatS-grandson 
of Thomas Aiken, private, Capt. Ninian Aiken's Company of Deering, N. H. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 245 

CHARLES PARKER WOODWORTH, Concord, N. H. (22104). Son of Albert 
Bingham and Mary (Parker) Woodworth; grandson of George and Louisa 
(Hovey) Woodworth; great-grandson of Salvenus Woodworth, private Third 
Conn. Regt., Col. Israel Putnam. 

EDWARD KNOWLTON WOODWORTH, Concord, N. H. (22105). Son of Al- 
bert Bingham and Mary (Parker) Woodworth; grandson of George and Louisa 
(Hovey) Woodworth; great-grandson of Salvenus Woodworth, private Third 
Conn. Regt., Col. Israel Putnam. 

JOHN WHITON WOODWORTH, Concord, N. H. (22106). Son of Edward 
Baker and Helen (Whiton) Woodworth; grandson of George and Louisa 
(Hovey) Woodworth; great-grandson of Salvenus Woodworth, private Third 
Conn. Regt., Col. Israel Putnam. 

NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER ADAIR, Elizabeth, N. J. (22320). Son of William 
Alexander and Mary (Irwin) Adair; grandson of John and Hannah (Taylor) 
Irwin; great-grandson of John Irwin, Lieutenant Second Penna. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

CORTLANDT RADLEY BAKER, East Orange, N. J. (22690). Son of Frederick 
L. and Sarah M. Baker; grandson of Cortlandt Radley and Matilda F. (Losey) 
Baker; great-grandson of Henry and Mary Ann S. (Radley) Baker; great-- 
grandson of Daniel Baker, Sergeant First Essex County Regt. New Jersey 
Militia. 

HOBART LEWIS BENEDICT, Union, N. J. (22312). Son of Joshua Purdy and 
Phebe Elizabeth (Sayre) Benedict; grandson of James Lawrence and Chris- 
tiana Grant (Purdy) Benedict; great-grandson of Joseph and Betsey (Brinker- 
hoff) Benedict; great--grandson of Timothy and Phoebe (Rockwell) Benedict; 
greats-grandson of Joseph Benedict, Lieutenant-Colonel Westchester County 
Associated Exempts New York Militia; grandson of Daniel Roff and Abigail 
(Faitoute) Sayre; great-grandson of Daniel Sayre, private Essex County New 
Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES GREY BLISS, Westfield, N. J. (22307). Son of William H. and Mary 
Francis (Fickett) Bliss; grandson of John and Sarah Grey (Barnes) Bliss; 
great-grandson of Abraham Bliss, Quartermaster Second Regt. Conn. Light 
Horse. 

ELIAS HERBERT BONNELL, South Orange, N. J. (22321). Son of David Oli- 
ver and Nancy Maxwell (Winans) Bonnel; grandson of Oliver and Phebe 
Robinson (Winans) Bonnel; great-grandson of Joshua and Sarah (Robinson) 
Winans; greats-grandson of Benjamin Winans, Captain First Essex County 
Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

JAMES MALCOLM BONSALL, Morristown, N. J. (22682). Son of James M. 
and Alida (Beach) Bonsall; grandson of Columbus and Susan E. (Halsey) 
Beach; great-grandson of Chilion and Cornelia (De Camp) Beach; great^-gr^nd- 
son of Joseph F. and Jane F. (Tuttle) De Camp; greats-grandson of Moses 
(and Jane Ford) Tuttle, Member of Committee of Safety for Pequannoc 
Township, N. J.; great-grandson of Samuel B. and Sarah Dubois (Jackson) 
Halsey; greats-grandson of Abraham (and Nancy Beach) Halsey, private New 
Jersey Militia; greats-grandson of Enoch Beach, private New Jersey Militia; 
greats-grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth Piatt (Ogden) Jackson; greats-grand- 
son of Stephen Jackson, Member of Committee of Safety of Hanover Town- 
ship, N. J., Captain Morris County Militia; great*-grandson of Jacob Ford. 
Member of Committee of Observation for Morris County, N. J. 

JOHN HALSEY BONSALL, Morristown, N. J. (22683). Son of James M. and 
Alida (Beach) Bonsall; grandson of Columbus and Susan E. (Halsey) Beach; 
great-grandson of Chilion and Cornelia (De Camp) Beach; great-grandson of 



246 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Joseph F. and Jane F. (.Tuttle) De Camp; greats-grandson of Moses (and Jane 
Ford) Tuttle, Member of Committee of Safety for Pequannoc Township, 
N. J.; great-grandson of Samuel B. and Sarah Dubois (Jackson) Halsey; 
great--grandson of Abraham (and Nancy Beach) Halsey, private New Jersey 
Militia; greats-grandson of Enoch Beach, private New Jersey ]Militia; great-- 
grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth Piatt (Ogden) Jackson; greats-grandson of 
Stephen Jackson, Member of Committee of Safety of Hanover Township, 
N. J., Captain Morris County Militia; great*-grandson of Jacob Ford, Member 
of Committee of Observation for Alorris County, N. J. 

CHARLES FRANCIS BORDEN, Shrewsbury, N. J. (22680). Son of Abram 
Holmes and Emily Julia (Bunn) Borden; grandson of Francis and Hannah 
Lambert (Holmes) Borden; great-grandson of Abraham and Jerusha (Lam- 
bert) Holmes; great--grandson of John and Hannah (Little, widow Dennis) 
Lambert; great--grandson of John Little, Member of Committee of Observation 
of Shrewsbury, N. J.; great--grandson of Jacob and Annie (Russel) Holmes; 
great--grandson of Josiah Holmes, Member of New Jersey Provincial Conven- 
tion and of Committee of Observation of Shrewsbury. 

JAMES HAMILTON BRAINARD, Navesink, N. J. (22317). Son of James Ham- 
ilton and Eliza Jane Brainard; grandson of Abijah and Martha (Arnold) 
Brainard; great-grandson of Jabe:: Arnold, private Second Conn. Regt., Col. 
Joseph Spencer. 

MARION HAMILTON BRAINARD, Navesink, N. J. (22318). Son of James 
Hamilton and Ella (Guian) Brainard; grandson of James Hamilton and Eliza 
Jane Brainard; great-grandson of Abija and Martha (Arnold) Brainard; great-- 
grandson of Jabez Arnold, private Second Conn. Regt., Col. Joseph Spencer. 

ANDREW WATSON BRAY, Newark, N. J. (6009). Supplemental. Son of An- 
drew Watson and Sarah (Thompson) Bray; grandson of John T. and Eu- 
phemia (Armstrong) Braj'; great-grandson of William Armstrong, Ensign, 
Capt. Edward Clifford's Company First Sussex County Regt. New Jersey 
Militia. 

MONROE BUCKLEY, Overbrook, Pa. (N. J. 22^,02). Son of James Monroe and 
Sarah Isabella Staples (French) Buckley; grandson of John and Abby Lons- 
dale (Monroe) Buckley; great-grandson of Clayton and Mary (Yorke) Mon- 
roe; great--grandson of David and Mary (Loveland) Monroe; great--grandson 
of Charles and Mary (Gleason) Loveland; great--grandson of Charles Love- 
land, private, minute man Burlington County New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES F. BURROUGHS, East Orange, N. J. (22691). Son of Charles and 
Catherme (Murphy) Burroughs; grandson of John Stevens and Mary (Can- 
non) Burroughs; great-grandson of Enoch and Phebe (Smith) Burroughs; 
great"-grandson of John Burroughs, Sergeant First Hunterdon Regt. New Jer- 
sey Militia and Continental service, pensioned. 

GEORGE BARBER CALLEN, Newark, N. J. (22306). Son of Josiah and Susan 
(Price) Callen; grandson of Tenriib Price, private Fourth Battalion New Jer- 
sey Volunteers. 

GEORGE WHEELER CARNRICK, East Orange, N. J. (22685). (Name changed 
from Wheeler.) Son of Edmund and Maryette (Carnrick) Wheeler; grandson 
of George and Mahala (Searles) Carnrick; great-grandson of George and Mary 
(Peck) Carnrick; great--grandson of Ichabod Peck, Jr., private, Col. Joseph 
Read's Continental Regt. and Colonel Topham's Rhode Island Regt., pensioned. 

MILLARD CARNRICK, East Orange, N. J. (22686). (Name changed from 
Wheeler.) Son of Edmund and Maryette (Carnrick) Wheeler; grandson of 
George and Mahala (Searles) Carnrick; great-grandson of George and Mary 
(Peck) Carnrick; great--grandson of Ichabod Peck, Jr., private. Col. Joseph 
Read's Continental Regt. and Colonel Topham's Rhode Island Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 247 

LOUIS BUCKMASTER CHANDLER. Elizabeth, N. J. (22323). Son of Walter 
and Louise (Buckmaster) Chandler; grandson of William and Catherine 
(Crane) Chandler; great-grandson of Walter S. and Margaret (Rogers) Chand- 
ler; greats-grandson of John Rogers, Major of Lower Battalion of Prince 
George County, Maryland, Member of Continental Congress Dec., 1775, to 
Aug. I, 1776, voted for Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. 

ARTHUR HALE CONOVER, Newark, N. J. (22679). Son of Stephen and Lucy 
Turner (Hale) Conover; grandson of David and Lucy Sargent (Turner) Hale; 
great-grandson of John and Lucy (Sargent) Turner; great--grandson of Paul 
Dudley Sargent, Colonel Sixteenth Mass. Regt. 

JOHN HALE CONOVER, Newark, N.J. (22684). Son of Arthur Hale and Mary 
Anna (Morehouse) Conover v grandson of Stephen and Lucy Turner (Hale) 
Conover; great-grandson of David and Lucy Sargent (Turner) Hale; great-- 
grandson of John and Lucy (Sargent) Turner; greats-grandson of Paul Dudley 
Sargent, Colonel Sixteenth IMass. Regt. 

VICTOR E. DOWNER, Rutherford, N.J. (22681). Son of Edgar J. and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Williams) Downer; grandson of John J. and Hanah (Palmateer) 
Downer; great-grandson of Obediah L. and Rachel (Yelverton) Downer; 
greats-grandson of John Downer, minute man or sharpshooter Vermont Militia. 

WALTER EVANS EDGE, Atlantic City, N. J. (22316). Son of William and Mary 
E. (Evans) Edge; grandson of Andrew W. and Elizabeth (JefTries) Evans; 
great-grandson of James and Mary R. (Echart) Jeffries; greats-grandson of 
John and Ann (Wilson) Jeffries; greats-grandson of Joseph Jeffries, Colonel 
Fifth York County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

R.WMOND BLAINE FOSDICK, New York, N. Y. (N. J. 21996). Son of Frank 
Sheldon and Annie I. Fosdick; grandson of John Spencer and Mary E. Fos- 
dick; great-grandson of Solomon and Anna (Thorne) Fosdick; great--grandson 
of Samuel Fosdick, private Third and Fourth Regts. New York Line. 

THEODORE HART FREELAND, East Orange, N. J. (22000). Son of David 
Stansbury and Hannah Niles (Miller) Freeland; grandson of William and 
Alice (Niles) Miller; great-grandson of William Niles, private, Capt. Jeremiah 
Fisher's Company Philadelphia Militia. 

FREDERIC MILLS GEER, East Orange, N. J. (22303). Son of Darius and 
Charry (Mills) Geer; grandson of Samuel Frederic Mills, Corporal Conn. 
Militia, pensioned. 

REYNOLD THOMAS HALL, U. S. Navy (N. J. 6106). Supplemental. Son of 
Edward Smyth and Katherine Piercy (Romney) Hall; grandson of Robert 
Shields and Christiana (Crockett) Hall; great-grandson of Samuel and Maria 
(Roth) Crockett; grfcat^-grandson of William (and Christiana Behringer) 
Roth, Lieutenant of Chasseurs, Count Pulaski's Legion; greats-grandson of 
Christopher Behringer, private, Capt. James Hood's Company Philadelphia 
Militia. 

ALFRED STARR HAMILTON, Montclair, N. J. (22310). Son of Robert M. and 
Kate Ball (Downer) Hamilton; grandson of Silas B. and Isabella M. Hamil- 
ton; great-grandson of Paul and Anna (Stevens) Hamilton; great--grandson of 
Esra Stevens {Stephens) , Lieutenant Sixth Company Fifth Regt. Conn. In- 
fantry. 

CHARLES OSCAR HENNION, East Orange, N.J. (21998). Son of. David and 
Elizabeth (Maria) Hennion; grandson of Garrett and Sarah Hennion; great- 
grandson of Cornelius Hennion, First Lieutenant New Jersey Continental Line. 

GEORGE CAMPBELL HUBBARD, Montclair, N. J. (22687). Son of C. Horace 
and Carrie (Campbell) Hubbard; grandson of Calvin and Betsey (Woodberry) 
Hubbard; great-grandson of Calvin and Ruth (Meacham) Hubbard; great-- 
grandson of George Hubbard, Lieutenant, Colonel Webb's Regt. Conn. Militia. 



248 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

DA\ID BRAINARD HUNT, Montclair, N. J. (22319). Son of David Brainard 
and Mary Ann (Gaylord) Hunt; grandson of Martin and Sylvia (Davis) Gay- 
lord; great-grandson of Joseph Davis, Sr., private, Col. Dickenson's Mass. 
Regt. ; greats-grandson of Edward Davis, Jr., Member of Mass. House of Rep- 
resentatives, private Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD McKINNEY HUNT, Montclair, N.J. (22676). Son of David Brainard 
and Ida (McKinney) Hunt; grandson of David Brainard and Mary Ann (Gay- 
lord) Hunt; great-grandson of Martin and Sylvia (Davis) Gaylord; great-- 
grandson of Joseph Davis, private. Colonel Dickenson's Mass. Regt.; great-- 
grandson of Edward Davis, Jr., private. Captain Smith's Company Mass. 
Militia, April 19, 1775, Member of Mass. Provincial Congress. 

ALFRED BAKER JOHNSON, Orange, N. J. (6122). Supplemental. Son of 
Theo F. and Annie E. (Vail) Johnson; grandson of Alfred and Sarah (Baker) 
Johnson; great-grandson of Jonathan Baker; greats-grandson of Lewis and 
Elizabeth (Robinson) Baker; greats-grandson of Daniel Baker, Ensign First 
Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia; grandson of William Penn and Sarah 
(Lock) Vail; great-grandson of John and Rachael (Armstrong) .Lock; great-- 
grandson of George and Sarah (Hunt) Armstrong; greats-grandson of Richard 
Hunt, private Sussex County New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES SYMMES KIGGINS, Elizabeth, N.J. (6142). Supplemental. Son of 
Charles Andrew and Abigail Clark (Crane) Kiggins; grandson of Nathaniel 
and Sarah (Miller) Crane; great-grandson of Moses Miller, private First Essex 
County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

ETHELBERT TRACY LANTERMAN, East Orange, N.J. (22688). Son of Wm. 
G. and Jane Hall (Adams) Lanterman; grandson of Isaiah and Elizabeth 
(Hall) Adams; great-grandson of Levi and Margaret (Cole) Hall; greats-grand- 
son of Daniel Cole, private Dutchess County New York Militia; greats-grand- 
son of Elisha Cole, private Dutchess County New York Militia. 

GEORGE OSCAR LEAVITT, East Orange, N. J. (22678). Son of William P. and 
Caroline Zibiah (Fisher) Leavitt; grandson of Joseph L. and Zibiah Dolbear 
(Blake) Fisher; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Ann (Robinson) Blake; 
greats-grandson of Lemuel Robinson, Colonel of Suffolk and York County Mass. 
Regts. 

RAYMOND NEWMAN LOCKWOOD, East Orange, N. J. (22308). Son of Adol- 
phus Newman and Amelia R. (Clare) Lockwood; grandson of Edmund S. and 
Mary A. (Newman) Lockwood; great-grandson of Harvey and Elizabeth P. 
(Raymond) Newman; greatS-grandson of Enoch Raymond, private Second 
Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER MACY, Montclair, N. J. (22322). Son of Alexander 
W. and Mary (Jessup) Macy; grandson of William and Ruth (Halsey) Jessup; 
great-grandson of Stephen Halsey, Surgeon, Col. Samuel Drake's Regt. New 
York Militia. 

DEWITT CLINTON MATTHEWS, Orange, N.J. (22304). Son of John Harri- 
son and Louisa C. (Smith) Matthews, Jr.; grandson of John Harrison and 
Elima (Meeker) Matthews; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Harrison) 
Matthews; greatS-grandson of William Matthews, private, Capt. Cornelius Wil- 
liams's Company Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES WILLIAM NAULTY, Jr., Perth Amboy, N. J. (21982). Supple- 
mental. Son of Charles W. and Sarah (Steel) Naulty; grandson of Thomas 
and Mary (Jordan) Naulty; great-grandson of Patrick and Susanna (Evans) 
Jordan; greatS-grandson of Ahel Evans, private First Regt. Penna. Line. 

WILLIAM STANLEY NAULTY, Newark, N.J. (14600). Supplemental. Son of 
William Hansel and Genevieve (Arrington) Naulty; grandson of Thomas and 
Mary (Jordan) Naulty; great-grandson of Patrick and Susanna (Evans) Jor- 
dan; greatS-grandson of Ahel Evans, private First Regt. Penna. Line. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 249 

FREDERICK NICHOLS NIXON, Westfield, N. J. (22305). Son of George and 
Sarah (Austin) Nixon; grandson of Joseph and Nancy (Weston) Nixon; great- 
grandson of John Nixon, Colonel Fourth Mass. Continental Infantry and 
Brigadier-General Continental Army. 

CEORGE TOWNLEY PARROT, Elizabeth, N.J. (115). Supplementals. Son of 
Abraham and Sarah Ann (Burrows) Parrot; grandson of Waters and Mar- 
garet Williston (Wood) Burrows; great-grandson of Daniel S. Wood, Captain 
First Essex County Regt. of Foot New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of 
Waters Burrows, private Essex County New Jersey Militia; grandson of 
Squier and Martha (Townley) Parrot; great-grandson of David and Mary 
(Tucker) Townley; greats-grandson of George Townley, private Essex County 
New Jersey Militia and Light Horse. 

RAYMOND TOWNLEY PARROT, Elizabeth, N. J. (21965). Supplementals. Son 
of George Townley and Ella Baker (Tichenor) Parrot; grandson of Abraham 
and Sarah Ann (Burrows) Parrot; great-grandson of Waters and Margaret 
Williston (Wood) Burrows; greats-grandson of Daniel S. Wood, Captain First 
Essex County Regt. of Foot New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Squier and 
Martha (Townley) Parrot; greats-grandson of David and Mary (Tucker) 
Townley; greats-grandson of George Townley, private Essex County New Jer- 
sey Militia and Light Horse; greats-grandson of Waters Burrozis, private Essex 
County New Jersey Militia; grandson of Celim and Helen Maria (Taft) 
Tichenor; great-grandson of Samuel and Gertrude (King) Taft; great-'-grand- 
son of John W. and Magdalene (Spear) King; greats-grandson of Johannes 
Spear, recognized patriot. 

CHARLES RICHARDSON PRATT, Montclair, N. J. (22325). Son of John C. 
and Mary Ann (Richardson) Pratt; grandson of Alfred and Rebecca Richard- 
son; great-grandson of Ezekiel Richardson, private, Capt. John Banister's Com- 
pany, Col. Job Cushing's Mass. Regt. 

LUTHER EDMUNDS PRICE, Montclair, N.J. (21997). Son of Nathan Cozens 
and Roxanna H. (Edmunds) Price; grandson of William and Mary C. (Abell) 
Price; great-grandson of Edward and Sarah (Cozens) Price; greatS-grandson 
of William Price, Captain Third Gloucester County Battalion New Jersey 
Militia. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN QUACKINBUSH, East Orange, N.J. (21999). Son of 
David and Teresa (McCarthy) Quackinbush; grandson of Benjamin and Phoebe 
(Harriott) Quackinbush; great-grandson of James Quackinbush, Sergeant, 
Col. Gilbert Cooper's Orange County Regt. New York Militia; greatS-grandson 
of Reynier Quackinbush, Captain Orange County New York Militia, Member 
of New York Provincial Congress and Committee of Safety. 

•GEORGE HUBERT RICHARDS, Orange, N. J. (11549). Supplemental. Son of 
George Washington and Lydia Amelia (Doland) Richards; grandson of Cyrus 
George and Hannah Smith (Force) Richards; great-grandson of Thomas and 
Sarah (Say re) Richards; greatS-grandson of Ephraim Say re, private Essex 
County New Jersey Militia. 

•CHARLES KEEN SEAMAN, Perth Amboy, N.J. (22689). Son of Anthony and 
Ann (Hadden) Seaman; grandson of Jacob and Sally (Ayers) Hadden; great- 
grandson of Thomas and Mary (Baker) Hadden, Jr.; greatS-grandson of 
Thomas Hadden, 2d, Lieutenant-Colonel First Middlesex County Regt. New 
Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM E. SHAFER, Newark, N.J. (21976). Supplementals. Son of Joseph 
H. and Julia R. (Ely) Shafer; grandson of Peter B. and Amelia L. (Fairchild) 
Shafer; great-grandson of Isaac (and Martha Linn) Shafer, Captain and Con- 
ductor of Team Brigade Sussex County New Jersey Militia; greats-grandson of 
Caspar Shafer, Member of Committee of Safety of Sussex County, New Jersey, 
Member of New Jersey Provincial Congress; greatS-grandson of Joseph Linn, 
Adjutant Second Regiment Sussex County New Jersey Militia. 



250 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON SMITH, Passaic, N. 1.(22311). Son of Samuel and 
Elenor (Vannatta) Smith; grandson of Euke and Mary (McCracken) Smith;, 
great-grandson of Samuel Smith, Quartermaster Sergeant First Regt. New Jer- 
sey Militia. 

DANIEL DU BOIS SMOCK, Red Bank, N.J. (21995). Son of Daniel Polhemus 
and Sarah Jane (Du Bois) Smock; grandson of Aaron and Sarah C. (Schenck) 
Smock; great-grandson of Hendrick and Sarah (Lane) Smock; greats-grandson 
of John Smock, Colonel First New Jersey Continental Regt. 

HENRY HERTEL TRUMAN, Orange, N.J. (22692). Son of Daniel Henry and 
Cordelia (Mead) Truman; grandson of Shadrach F. and Elizabeth (Waite) 
Mead; great-grandson of Titus and Eunice (Hobby) Mead; greats-grandson of 
Titus Mead, private Ninth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

JOHN ALBERT VAN HORN, Jersey City, N.J. (22313). Son of John Albert 
and Julia (Soule) Van Horn; grandson of Daniel E. and Eliza P. (Nooney) 
Soule; great-grandson of George and Electra (Phelps) Nooney; greats-grandson 
of James Nooney, Sergeant, Capt. Richard Abbe's Company Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM STITES WADE, South Orange, N.J. (22677). Son of Uzal N. and 
Mary A. (Morehouse) Wade; grandson of Benjamin and Abigail (Baldwin) 
Morehouse; great-grandson of Benjamin Morehouse, private, Capt. Josiab 
Pierson's Company Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey State Troops. 

CHARLES CONVERSE WEST, Montclair, N.J. (22301). Son of vVilliam Gor- 
don and Mary (Cooke) West; grandson of Royal and Roxanna (Hamlin) 
West; great-grandson of William and Lucy (Kirby) Hamlin; greats-grandson 
of William Hamlin, private, Capt. Samuel Comstock's Company, Col. Heman 
Swift's Regt. Conn. Line. 

ORION LAVELLE YEOMANS, West Orange, N.J. (22314). Son of Reuben P. 
and Augusta (Dederick) Yeomans; grandson of Samuel and Rebecca (Collins) 
Yeomans; great-grandson of Samuel Yeomans, private Second Orange County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

NEW MEXICO soaETy. 

GEORGE RUFUS CRAIG, Albuquerque, New Mex. (21024). Son of Franklin 
Burnett and Ida E. (Gilsen) Craig; grandson of Obadiah B. and Arvilla 
(Fuller) Craig; great-grandson of Benjamin and Naomi (Burton) Fuller; 
greatS-grandson of Enoch Fuller, private. Captain Taylor's Company New 
Hampshire ]Militia. 

CHARLES WILLIAM FAIRFIELD, Santa Fe, New Mex. (21022). Son of 
Jason Williams and Margaret Forbes (Smith) Fairfield, Jr.; grandson of 
Jason Williams and Hannah Dana (Chandler) Fairfield; great-grandson of 
Charles and Hannah (Cleveland) Chandler; greafS-grandson of Solomon Cleaze- 
land, private, Capt. Asa Bacon's Company Sixth Battalion Wadsworth's Conn. 
Brigade. 

HENRY FRANKLIN JACOB Y, Roswell, New Mex. (14936). Supplemental. 
Son of Samuel Rush and Julia A. (Ball) Jacoby; grandson of Henry and 
Julia Ann (Clarke) Jacoby; great-grandson of John and Eleanor (Greene) 
Clarke; greatS-grandson of John Greene, Lieutenant Virginia Line. 

BERT GEER PHILLIPS, Taos, New Mex. (21019). Son of William J. and Eliza- 
beth (Jessup) Phillips; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Best) Jessup; great- 
grandson of William and Ruth (Halsey) Jessup; greats-grandson of Stephen 
Halsey, Surgeon, Col. Samuel Drake's New York Regt. 

HARVEY MILTON SHIELDS, Dawson, New Mex. (21020). Son of John Mil- 
ton and Emily Adelaide (Harvey) Shields; grandson of Andrew and Margaret 
(Leasure) Shields; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Speedy) Shields; 
greatS-grandson of John Shields, private, Capt. William Blaine's Company 
Penna. Troops; great-grandson of John Leasure, private, Captain Spark's 
Company Penna. Militia. 



REGISTER OE NEW :m EMBERS. 25 T 

FRANK L. WALRATH, Belen, New Mex. (21023). Son of Isaac U. and Irene 
Charlotte (Taylor) Walrath; grandson of Francis L. and Charlotte Irene 
(Sternbergh) Taylor; great-grandson of Peter and Catherine (Herkimer) 
Sternbergh; great-grandson of George Herkimer, Captain New York Militia; 
grandson of Moses and Peggy (Wetmosier) Walrath; great-grandson of Jacob 

H. and Nancy (Zoller) Walrath; great--grandson of Henry I. and 

(Bell) Walrath; greats-grandson of George Henry Bell, Captain New York 
Militia. 

NEW YORK. 

EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

THEODORE LOZIER ADEE, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22462). Son of Titus Knapp 
and Sarah Lang (lyozier) Adee; grandson of John and Eliza (Fowler) 
Lozier; great-grandson of Hillebrant Lozier, private, Col. Henry Lee's Parti- 
san Corps Continental Dragoons. 

FRANK WILLIAM ADRIANCE, Elmira, N. Y. {22637)- Son of William and 
Deborah Ann (Angevine) Adriance; grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Hum- 
phrey) Adriance; great-grandson of Rem Adriance, private Second Dutchess 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

GEORGE WALTON HOLKER ALLEN, Cazenovia, N. Y. (22466). Son of 
George Washington and Lydia Jeannette (McMillan) Allen; grandson of 
Thomas and Anne (Russell) Allen; great-grandson of Jonathan and Eunice 
(Williams) Allen; great"-grandson of Thomas ^ //en, private Berkshire County 
Volunteers, and Chaplain, Colonel Simonds's Mass. Regt., known as "the figlit- 
ing parson." 

THOMAS ALLEN, Cazenovia, N. Y. (22578). Son of George Washington and 
Lydia Jeannette (McMillan) Allen; grandson of Thomas and Anne (Russell) 
Allen; great-grandson of Jonathan and Eunice (Williams) Allen; great-- 
grandson of Thomas Allen, private Berkshire County Volunteers, and Cliap- 
lain, Colonel Simonds's Mass. Regt., known as "the fighting parson." 

ALBERT BURT ARMSTRONG, Buffalo, N. Y. (22650). Son of Charles B. and 
Elizabeth Ann (Newton) Armstrong; grandson of Obed and Eliza (Walker) 
Newton; great-grandson of Jason and Betsey (Mcintosh) Walker; great-- 
grandson of James Walker, Lieutenant Mass. Militia from Belchertown. 

JAMES WARING BARNES, Newburgh, N. Y. (22583). Son of Nathaniel and 
Martha (Waring) Barnes, Jr.; grandson of Nathaniel and Effie (Deusenber- 
rie) Barnes; great-grandson of William Deusenherrie, private, Col. Frederick 
Weissenfel's Regt. New York Levies. 

GEORGE ELLSWORTH BARROWS, Buffalo, N. Y. (22907). Son of William 
Almon and Mary (Ellsworth) Barrows; grandson of Almon Z. and Lavancha 
E. (Love) Barrows; great-grandson of Isaac and Charlotte (Hatch) Barrows; 
greats-grandson of Isaac Barrows, Lieutenant, Mansfield Company Conn. Mili- 
tia at Lexington Alarm. 

WARD BROADHEAD BELKNAP, New York, N. Y. (22080). Son of Ward and 
Carrie V. (Broadhead) Belknap; grandson of John Lansing and Elizabeth 
(Tilford) Belknap; great-grandson of Stephen and Elizabeth Payne (Carpen- 
ter) Belknap; greats-grandson of William Belknap, Lieutenant Third New 
York Continental Infantry, Ensign First Regt. Canadian Continental Infan- 
try, under Col. James Livingston. 

OSCAR P. BENSON, Buffalo, N. Y. (22638). Son of EHas W. and Lydia 
(Sprague) Benson; grandson of Ephraim and Polly (Negus) Sprague; great- 
grandson of David Sprague, private Fourth .\lbany County Regt. New York 
Militia. 



252 SONS 0? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES VAN BERGEN, Buffalo, N. Y. (22088). Son of Antony and Julia 
(Pierson) Van Bergen; grandson of Antony A. and Clarine (Peck) Van Ber- 
gen; great-grandson of Peter A. and Hester (Hoogteling) Van Bergen; great-- 
grandson of Antony Van Bergen, Colonel Eleventh Regt. New York Foot. 

FRANK L. BEYER, Buffalo, N. Y. (23105). Son of Louis P. and Emma (De- 
lano) Beyer; grandson of James and Emeline (James) Delano; great-grand- 
son of Isaac Delano, Jr., private Fourteenth Mass. Continental Regt. 

ABNER PAINE BIGELOW, New York, N. Y. (22902). Son of Amariah Paine 
and Clarissa (Kathan) Bigelow; grandson of Asa and Anna Williams (Paine) 
Bigelow; great-grandson of Solomon Bigelow, Corporal, Colonel Doolittle's 
Mass. Regt., Member of Committee of Correspondence. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BIRD, New York, N. Y. (22472). So of Edmund 
and Sarah (Wilson) Bird; grandson of Edmund and Sarah (Hawes) Bird; 
great-grandson of Edmund Bird, Corporal First Mass. Regt., Col. Joseph 
Vose, pensioned. 

WILLIAM N. D. BIRD, Buffalo, N. Y. (22908). Son of John Herman and 
Frances (Blaney) Bird; grandson of William A. and Joanna (Davis) Bird; 
great-grandson of John and Eunice (Porter) Bird; greats-grandson of Joshua 
Porter, Lieutenant-Colonel Fourteenth Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM G. BISSELL, Buffalo, N. Y. (22600). Son of Amos Alanson and 
Susan Amelia (Wiltse or Wiltsey) Bissell; grandson of Blanis and Roxanna 
(Tanner) Wiltse; great-grandson of John Wiltse, private. Col. Marinus Wil- 
lett's Regt. New York Levies. 

CLINTON SUMNER BRADLEY, Buffalo, N. Y. (22910). Son of George M. and 
Josephine (McConnaughty) Bradley; grandson of Heman A. and Chloe Diana 
(Dickerman) Bradley; great-grandson of Simeon Dickerman; greats-grandson 
of Isaac Dickerman, Lieutenant Third Company Fifth Battalion, General 
Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

WILLIAM CLARK CADY, New York, N. Y. (22093)- Son of Almond Babcock 
and Elizabeth (Leary) Cady; grandson of Joseph and Lavinia (Tyler) Cady; 
great-grandson of Samuel Cady, Jr., private. Captain Harvey's Company, Col- 
onel Wright's Mass. Regt.; greats-grandson of Samuel Cady, Sr., private. 
Col. David Leonard's Mass. Regt.; grandson of William James and Eliza Ann 
(Buchanan) Leary; great-grandson of John Leary, private Sixth Company 
Second Regt. New York Line. 

WALTER BARNES CHERRY, Syracuse, N. Y. (22576). Son of Charles E. and 
Ada Gage (Barnes) Cherry; grandson of Ira Gage and Sallie M. (Lewis) 
Barnes; great-grandson of Ezra D. and Artemesia (Gage) Barnes; great-- 
grandson of Justus (and Mary Benjamin) Gage, private Third Dutchess 
County Regt. New York Militia; greats-grandson of Ebeneser Gage, private 
Seventh Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia; great^'-grandson of Cyrus 
Benjamin, private Dutchess County Associated Exempts. 

ALFRED COLERIDGE CLARK, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22468). Son of Francis 
Edwin and Melissa (Wilson) Clark; grandson of Gideon Molineaux and Julia 
Anna (Florance) Clark; great-grandson of Francis Edwin and Hannah Purdy 
(Molineaux) Clark; greats-grandson of Moses Clark, private, Colonel Mal- 
colm's Regt. New York Line. 

JOHN WIGGINS COLLAMER, Schenectady, N. Y. (22458). Son of John Eg- 
bert and Helen (Hall) CoUamer; grandson of William Anson and Harriett A. 
(Wiggins) Collamer, Jr.; great-grandson of William Anson and Anor (New- 
ton) Collamer; greafS-grandson of Barker and Sally (Anthony) Collamer; 
great'-grandson of Anthony Collamer, Sergeant Tenth Mass. Regt., Col. Ben- 
jamin Tupper. 



f 



REGISTER OE NEW MEMBERS. 253 

HERBERT ALLEN COMBES, Buffalo, N. Y. (22630). Son of Eugene and 
Delia (Allen) Combes; grandson of Theodore and Charlotte (Holmes) 
Combes; great-grandson of Preston and Elizabeth (Lund) Holmes; great-- 
grandson of George Holmes, private, Col. Ebenezer Thayer's Mass. Regt. 

ELLIOTT R. COLSON, Buffalo, N. Y. (22636). Son of Fred Augustus and 
Maria (Ransom) Colson; grandson of Augustus and Sarah Ann (Kennedy) 
Colson; great-grandson of Thomas R. and Jane Judith (Ellicott) Kennedy; 
greats-grandson of Samuel Kennedy, Surgeon Fourth Penna. Battalion, killed 
at Monmouth, June 28, 1778. 

ALBERT J. COLTON, Buffalo, N. Y. (22090). Son of Joseph Buck and Abigail 
(Winegard) Colton; grandson of Clinton and Poly (Buck) Colton; great- 
grandson of Benjamin and Phoebe (Herrick) Buck; great--grandson of Daniel 
Buck, Second Major Seventeenth Albany County Regt. New York State 
Militia. 

DOUGLASS CONKLIN, Huntington, N. Y. (14186). Supplemental. Son of 
Jonas Piatt and Hannah (Douglass) Conklin; grandson of Isaac and Hannah 
(Ketcham) Conklin; great-grandson of Timothy Conklin, father of Isaac, Lieu- 
tenant, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt. Suffolk County New York Minute Men; 
great-grandson of Solomon and Rebecca (Piatt) Ketcham; great--grandson of 
Solomon Ketcham, Associator at Huntington, N. Y.; great'-grandson of Jonas 
and Rebecca (Bennett) Piatt; great*-grandson of John Bennett, fifer, Capt. 
John Wick's Company, Col. Josiah Smith's First Suffolk County New York 
Militia; grandson of William and Susan (Conklin) Douglass; great-grandson 
of Thomas Conklin, father of Susan, private First Suffolk County New York 
Regt. 

WILLIAM HENRY CORBUSIER, U. S. Army, New York, N. Y. (4054)- Sup- 
plemental: Son of William Morrison and Mahala (Myers) Corbusier; grand- 
son of James Henry and Eleanor Catherine (Sloat) Corbusier; great-grandson 
of Alexander and Sarah (Layton) Sloat; great--grandson of Cornelius and 
Eleanor (McKinney) Sloat; great--grandson of Arthur McKinney, private 
Second Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

WINTHROP COWDIN, Mt. Kisco, N. Y. (22914). Son of Elliot C. and Sarah 
Katharine (Waldron) Cowdin; grandson of Samuel Wallis and Martha (Mel- 
cher) Waldron; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary Jones (Wallis) Waldron; 
great--grandson of Samuel Wallis, Ensign, Capt. Joseph Parsons's Company 
New Hampshire Militia; grandson of A. and Abby (Carter) Cowdin; great- 
grandson of Thomas Cozvdin, Captain, Colonel Read's Mass Regt. * 

ROBERT SHERIDAN DARBEE, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22457). Son of Robert M. 
and Mary Jane (SJieridan) Darbee; grandson of Abraham and Mary A. 
(Fletcher) Darbee; great-grandson of Levi and Jemima (Hermance) Darbee; 
great--grandson of John and Arietta (Elmendorf) Hermance; great--grandson 
of Benjamin Elmendorf, Third Lieutenant Grenadier Company Ulster County 
New York Militia. 

HARRY PERCY DAVID, New York, N. Y. (22082). Son of Tucker and Miriam 
(Phillips) David; grandson of Jonas N. and Esther (Peixoto) Phillips; great- 
grandson of Naphtali and Rachel (Seixas) Phillips; great--grandson of Jonas 
Phillips, private Philadelphia Militia. 

FRANK EDWIN DAVIS, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22631). Son of Fred Fuller and 
Mary Elizabeth (Rand) Davis; grandson of Darius and Emeline (Finson) 
Rand; great-grandson of William and Sally (Brown) Rand; great--grandson 
of William H. Rand, private New Hampshire Militia and Line; great--grand- 
son of William Rand, private New Hampshire Minute Men, October 12, 1775; 
grandson of Gorham and Adeline Hopkins (Dean) Davis; great-grandson of 
Prince and Betty (Cahoun) Davis; great--grandson of Samuel Davis, private 
Mass. Troops, pensioned. 



254 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

FREDERICK WILLIS DAVIS, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22635). Son of Fred. Fuller 
and Mary Elizabeth (Rand) Davis; grandson of Darius and Emeline (Finson) 
Rand; great-grandson of William and Sally (Brown) Rand; great--grandson 
of William H. Rand, private New Hampshire Militia and Line; greats-grand- 
son of William Rand, private New Hampshire Minute Men, October 12, 1775; 
grandson of Gorham and Adeline Hopkins (Dean) Davis; great-grandson of 
Prince and Betty (Cahoun) Davis; greats-grandson of Samuel Davis, private 
Mass. Troops, pensioned. 

WILLIAM DELAMATER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22091). Son of William and Maria 
(Smith) Delamater; grandson of James Fowler and Sarah (Phillips) Smith; 
great-grandson of Enoch Smith, private Capt. Samuel Keeler's Company, 
Col. Philip B. Bradley's Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

GEORGE MYNARD DEYOE, Johnstown, N. Y. (22599). Son of George Henry 
and Mary Elizabeth (Butler) Deyoe; grandson of George and Eunice G. 
(Downing) Butler; great-grandson of James M. and Malinda R. (Robinson) 
Downing; great'-grandson of Samuel Downing, private Second New Hamp- 
shire Regt., Colonel Fifield. 

JAMES TAYLOR DICKINSON, Rochester, N. Y. (22915). Son of Alfred E. and 
Fannie E. (Taylor) Dickinson; grandson of James B. and Mary (Williams) 
Taylor; great-grandson of Elisha Scott Williams, Adjutant Conn. Militia, 
privateersman. 

PHILIP STEPHENS DODD, Cleveland, Ohio (N. Y. 22463). Son of Jesse G. 
and Sarah Frances (Walton) Dodd; grandson of David C. and Adeline R. 
(Mulford) Dodd, Jr.; great-grandson of James C. and Elizabeth (Harrison) 
Dodd; greats-grandson of Amos and Polly (Canfield) Dodd, Jr.; greats-grand- 
son of Amos Dodd, Captain Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM ELLIOTT DOLD, New York, N. Y. (22469). Son of Samuel Miller 
and Sue J. (Heneberger) Dold; grandson of Peter and Mary (Gibbons) 
Heneberger; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary (Gaugwer) Gibbons; great-- 
grandson of Abel Gibbons, private Second Northampton County Battalion 
Penna. Militia. 

JOSIAH W. DOLSON, New York, N. Y. (22452). Son of Josiah W. and Anna 
Hamilton (Conklin) Dolson; grandson of William and Lydia (Polhemus) 
Dolson; great-grandson of John Dolson, private Fourth Orange County Regt. 
New York Militia. 

WILLIAM HAMILTON DOLSON, New York, N. Y. (22451). Son of Josiah 
W. and Anna Hamilton (Conklin) Dolson; grandson of William and Lydia 
(Polhemus) Dolson; great-grandson of John Dolson, private Fourth Orange 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

HERBERT STONE DRAPER, Rochester, N. Y. (22484). Son of Henry Stone 
and Emeline Aurelia (Barnes) Draper; grandson of Henry and Harriet 
(Stone) Draper; great-grandson of Simeon Draper, private, Capt. Lebbeus 
Drew's Company Fourth Mass. Regt. of Foot. 

ALBERT BIGELOW EASTWOOD, Rochester, N. Y. (22905). Son of William 
and Clara Ellen (Bigelow) Eastwood; grandson of Amariah Paine and Cla- 
rissa (Kathan) Bigelow; great-grandson of Asa and Anna Williams (Paine) 
Bigelow; great--grandson of Solomon Bigelow, private. Colonel DooHttle's 
Mass. Regt., Member of Committee of Correspondence. 

JOHN A. ECKERT, Oyster Bay, N. Y. (22916). Son of John A. and Mary E. 
(Barringer) Eckert; grandson of Edward Nelson and Catharine (Ten Broeck) 
Barringer; great-grandson of Samuel L. and Polly (Miller) Ten Broeck; 
great--grandson of Leonard Ten Broeck, Captain Tenth New York Militia. 

OLIVER M. EDWARDS, Syracuse, N. Y. (22923). Son of Eleazur W. and Amy 
Ann (Murray) Edwards; grandson of Daniel and Margaret (McAllister) Ed- 
wards; great-grandson of John and Margaret (Yanney) Edwards; great-- 
grandson of Henry Yanney, Sergeant, Capt. John Fisher's Company Third 
Tryon County Regt. New York Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 255 

HENRY GAYLORD ELLIOTT, Montclair, N. J. (22315). Son of Henry and 
Anna (Gaylord) Elliott; grandson of Daniel and Rosanna (Seeley) Gaylord; 
great-grandson of Peter and Sarah (Hartvvell) Gaylord; great--grand>on of 
Benjamin Gaylord, private Fifth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

ALBERT HOPKINS ELLIS, Syracuse, N. Y. (23102). Son of James M. and 
Martha (Peck) Ellis; grandson of Aaron and Caroline (Austin) Peck; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Eliza (Ray) Austin; greats-grandson of Roszvell Ray, 
private and fifer, Col. Henry Livingston's New York Regt. 

WOLCOTT WEBSTER ELLSWORTH. Johnstown, N. Y. (22642). Son of 
Pinckney Webster and Julia (Dow) Ellsworth; grandson of William Wolcott 
and Emily (Webster) Ellsworth; great-grandson of Oliver Ellsworth. Delegate 
from Connecticut in Continental Congress. 1777; Executive Councilor, 1778- 
1780; Chief Justice of United States in 1796. 

JOHN C. FARR, Jr., Hoboken, N. J. (N. Y. 22453). Son of John C. and Char- 
lotte (Taylor) Farr; grandson of Alfred A. and Lucinda (Wilcox) Farr; 
great-grandson of Jehiel and Keziah (Houghton) Wilcox; greats-grandson of 
Abijah Houghton, private. Col. Asa Whitcomb's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

FREDERICK STEVENS FRAMBACH, New York, N. Y. (22454). Son of Fred- 
erick and Agnes Emma (Stevens) Frambach; grandson of Joel Owen and 
Hannah M. (Price) Stevens; great-grandson of Ephraim and Jane (Owen) 
Stevens; greats-grandson of Peter Stevens, private Sixth Dutchess County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

■GEORGE GROSS FRYER, Syracuse, N. Y. (23104). Son of George and Mary 
Jane (Smyth) Fryer; grandson of William and Catharine (Anderson) Fryer; 
great-grandson of Enoch Anderson, Captain Eleventh Penna. Regt. 

ALBERT COOLEY FULTON, Syracuse, N. Y. (22917). Son of Harmon H. and 
Maria E. (Newcomb) Fulton; grandson of Horatio Cooley and Eliza (Pa- 
body) Newcomb; great-grandson of Ezra Fitch and Mabel (Butler) Pabody; 
greats-grandson of Chauncey and Demia (Bullen) Butler; great'-grandson of 
Joel Butler, private Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES ASBURY GORSE, Meadowbrook, N. Y. (22084). Son of Charles and 
Eleanor Louisa (Ireland) Gorse; grandson of Thomas and Content (Noxon) 
Ireland, Jr.; great-grandson of Thomas Ireland, private Third Ulster County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

■CHARLES FRANCIS GRADY, Buffalo, N. Y. (22909). Son of Lawrence Pow- 
ers and Susan (Woodin) Grady; grandson of Bushrod Washington and Lois 
(Williams) Woodin; great-grandson of Timothy and Marcia (Grosvenor) 
Woodin; greafS-grandson of Israel and Eunice (Jones) Grosvenor; great*- 
grandson of John and Molly (Lee) Grosvenor, Jr.; greats-grandson of John 
Grosvenor. Chairman of Commissary Committee, private Pomfret Company 
Conn. Militia. 

ORVILLE DANIEL GREEN, New York, N. Y. (22081). Son of Spicer and 
Harriet (Maxson) Green; grandson of Joseph J. and Polly (Gavitt) Green; 
great-grandson of John Greene. Sergeant. Capt. Samuel Shaw's Company Sixth 
Albany Regt. New York Militia. 

CLARENCE STORY GROW, New York, N. Y. (2291 1). Son of Philander E. 
and Roxana (Bigelow) Grow; grandson of Philander and Lydia (Story) 
Grow; great-grandson of Ezekiel and Lydia (Sprague) Story; greatS-grandson 
of Asa Story. Lieutenant First Regt. Conn. Line. 

■CORCELLUS HUBBARD HACKETT, New York, N. Y. (22912). Son of James 
and Hannah Hoyt (Richardson) Hackett; grandson of Ephraim and Mary 
(Corwin) Hackett; great-grandson of Daniel Hackett, private New Hamp- 
shire Militia; grandson of Joshua and Lois (Hoyt) Richardson; great-grand- 
son of William Richardson, Corporal, Capt. Hezekiah Hutchins's Company 
New Hampshire Volunteers. 



256 SONS 01c THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

HAROIvD HUMPHREY HACKETT, New York, N. Y. (22913)- Son of Cor- 
cellus Hubbard and Helen J. (Humphrey) Hackett; grandson of James and" 
Hannah Hoyt (Richardson) Hackett; great-grandson of Ephraim and Mary 
(Corwin) Hackett; greats-grandson of Daniel Hackett, private New Hamp- 
shire Militia; great-grandson of Joshua and Lois (Hoyt) Richardson; great-- 
grandson of WilUam Richardson, Corporal, Capt. Hezekiah Hutchins's Com- 
pany New Hampshire Volunteers. 

HORATIO HALL, Huntington, N. Y. (22645). Son of Horatio and Jane (Kin- 
caid) Hall; grandson of John F. and Sarah (Hunt) Hall; great-grandson of 
John Hall, Second Lieutenant, Captain Snow's Fifth "Harpswell" Company 
Second Cumberland County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM NOWLEN HALLOCK, Bath, N. Y. (22459). Son of William Hub- 
bell and Louise (Nowlen) Hallock; grandson of George W. and Mary (Hub- 
bell) Hallock; great-grandson of William Spring and Maria (McCall) Hubbell; 
greats-grandson of Ansel and Sarah (Weed) McCall; greats-grandson of 
Benajah McCall, private Seventeenth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

FRANK HAMILTON, New York, N. Y. (22585). Son of Morris Robeson and' 
Harriet Pennington (Halsted) Hamilton; grandson of John and Mary (Pen- i 
nington) Halsted; great-grandson of William Sanford (and Phoebe Wheeler) 
Pennington, Major Second New Jersey Artillery; greats-grandson of James 
Wheeler, Captain Second Somerset Battalion New Jersey Militia. 

NORMAN PETER HEFFLEY, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22455). Son of Ananias and' 
Elizabeth (Swope) HefHey; grandson of Peter and Sarah (Johnson) Heffleyr 
great-grandson of George Johnson, fifer, Colonel Buford's Regt. Virginia- 
Line, pensioned. 

GEORGE ALOYSIUS HOYT, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22586). Son of Frederick A. 
and Florence Sarah (Murphey) Hoyt; grandson of William Henry and Anne 
(Deming) Hoyt; great-grandson of Eleazer Hubbell and Fanny Fay (Follett) 
Deming; greats-grandson of Pozvnal Deming, Lieutenant First Regt. Conn. 
Line, 1778; grandson of Peter Umstead and Emily Reunie (Patrick) Mur- 
phey; great-grandson of Archibald Debow and Jane Armistead (Scott) Mur- 
phey; greatS-grandson of Archibald Murphey, Member of Committee of Safety 
of Orangt County, N. C. ; great-grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Flanders) 
Hoyt; greatS-grandson of Joseph Hoyt, Signer of the Association Test in New 
Hampshire. 

CHARLES A. HUDSON, Syracuse, N. Y. (22582). Son of Albert Alonzo and 
Jennette (Ashley) Hudson; grandson of Aaron and Almira (Smith) Ashley; 
great-grandson of Simeon Smith, privatae, Col. Timothy Danielson's Mass. 
Regt. 

EDMUND AARON HUDSON, Syracuse, N. Y. (22592). Son of Albert Alonzo 
and Jennette (Ashley) Hudson; grandson of Aaron and Almira (Smith) Ash- 
ley; great-grandson of Simeon Smith, private, Col. Timothy Danielson's Regt. 
Militia. 

GEORGE WALLACE INGALLS, Syracuse, N. Y. (22924). Son of Leon Wal- 
lace and Martha A. (Phillips) Ingalls; grandson of Daniel Tompkins and 
Sally Malissa (Dake) Ingalls; great-grandson of Benjamin and Anna (Rogers) 
Dake; greatS-grandson of Charles Dake, private Sixteenth Albany County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

RANKIN JOHNSON, New York, N. Y. (22086). Son of James Gibson and Mary 
Abegail (Rankin) Johnson; grandson of Lorenzo Dow and Mary (Burges) 
Johnson; great-grandson of Jeremiah Johnson, private First Regt. New Hamp- 
shire Militia; great-grandson of Abraham and Mrs. Rhoda C. (Taber) Burges; 
greatS-grandson of John Burges, minute man. Lieutenant of Militia of Roches- 
ter, Mass. 

JESSE COVERT JORALEMON, Jersey City, N. J. (N. Y. 22471). Son of Waling 
and Mary Jane (Covert) Joralemon; grandson of John C. and Margaret (Van 
Winkle) Joralemon; great-grandson of Cornells and Janetie (Junianse) Jaral- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 



257 



Oman; greats-grandson of John Jaraloman, Ensign Bergen County New Jersey 
Militia; grandson of Jesse and Sara (Canfield) Covert; great-grandson of 
Alpheus and Betsey (Resseguie) Canfield; greats-grandson of Jacob Resseguie, 
private Seventh and Fifth Regts. Conn. L,ine. 

GEORGE PAUL LEFFLER, New York, N. Y. (22089). Son of B. Franklin and 
Amanda C. (Paul) Leffler; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Wildermuth) 
Eeffler; great-grandson of John and Juliana (Becker) Leffler; greats-grandson of 
Conrad Leffler, Surgeon, Major Sixth Berks County Battalion Penna. Asso- 
ciators, Member of Committee of Safety. 

ARTHUR SCHULTZ LEWIS, Brooklyn. N. Y. (22590). Son of Osborn Horton 
and Emma (Schultz) Lewis; grandson of John and Mary (Horton, widow 
Draper) Lewis; great-grandson of Benjamin and Zinthia (Merritt) Lewis; 
greats-grandson of Eleaser Leis.ns, private Fourth Regt. Conn. Line. 

EBEN ORLANDO McNAIR, Buffalo, N. Y. (4124). Amended record. Son of 
David Anthony and Juliana Trumbull (Willcox) McNair; grandson of Charles 
and Almira (Rood) Willcox; great-grandson of John and Margaret (Kelsey) 
Willcox; greatS-grandson of John Willcox, private Seventh Regt. Conn. Line, 
Col. Heman Swift. 

HAROLD MIDDLETON MARSDEN, New York, N. Y. (22473). Son of Samuel 
and Anna Caroline (Scofield) Marsden; grandson of Samuel Wheaton and 
Caroline (La Fontaine) Scofield; great-grandson of John Edwin and Eliza 
Ann (\'an Amburgh) Scofield; greats-grandson of Rufus and Mary (Wheaton) 
Scofield; greats-grandson of Gershom and Lydia (Bell) Scofield; greats-grand- 
son of Jonathan Bell, Jr., Captain Ninth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HORACE WILLARD MERWIN, Jr., New York, N. Y. (22475). Son of Horace 
Willard and Lillian Ambrosia (Knapp) Merwin; grandson of Horace I. and 
Harriet (Clow) Merwin; great-grandson of Henry E. and Polly (Van Hoesen) 
Clow (or Clough) ; greats-grandson of Jacob C. Van Hoesen, private Eighth 
Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

HARRIE JAY MILLSPAUGH, Corning, N. Y. (22460). Son of Leander M. and 
Mary V. (Davis) Millspaugh; grandson of Leander and Margaret (Christie) 
Millspaugh; great-grandson of Mathias Mtllspaugh, Sergeant, Colonel Johnson's 
Regt. New York Militia. 

NELSON MOORE, Rochester, N. Y. (23101). Son of Linus and Jane (Derenius) 
Moore: grandson of Roger and Jerusha (Kelsey) Moore; great-grandson of 
Roger Moore, Sergeant under Ethan Allen, 1775; First Lieutenant, Colonel 
Enos"s Conn. Regt., 1777. 

EDGAR COIT MORRIS, Syracuse, N. Y. (22644). Son of Edgar F. and Augus- 
tina Caroline (Coit) Morris; grandson of James Jefferson and Augustina 
(Porter) Coit; great-,grandson of James and Anna (Lovett) Coit; greats-grand- 
son of Samuel and Mercy (Clark) Coit; greats-grandson of Samuel Coit, Mem- 
ber of Preston, Conn., Committee of Correspondence, Judge of County and 
Maritime Court. 

FAYETTE ELMER MOYER, Johnston, N. Y. (22591). Son of Charles Mengo 
and Mydia Jane (Hess) Moyer; grandson of Henry F. and Margaret (GallocK) 
Moyer; great-grandson of Frederick and Maria (Rickard) Moyer; greats-grand- 
son of Henry Moyer, Ensign Tryon County New York Militia; greats-grandson 
of John Rickard, private Tryon County New York Militia; great-grandson of 
Charles EHas and Christina (Brookman) Gallock; greatS-grandson of John 
Brookman, private New York Militia; grandson of Henry and Lydia (Wor- 
mouth) Hess; great-grandson of Mathias and Mary (Wolgemuth) Wormouth; 
greatS-grandson of William (and Reghina Speaker) Wormouth, private. Col- 
onel Klock's Regt. New York Militia; greats-grandson of John Wormouth, pri- 
vate. Colonel Campbell's Regt. Tryon County New York Militia; greatS-grand- 
son of William and Maria Wolgemuth; greats-grandson of John Wolgemuth, 
private, Colonel Campbell's Regt. Tryon County New York Militia; great-- 
grandson of George Speaker, private, Colonel Campbell's Regt. Tryon County 

17 — SR 



258 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



New York Militia; great"-grandson of Michael Godfrey Brookman, private Ne/(f 
York Militia. 

JOSEPH WARD NEAL, Syracuse, N. Y. (22918). Son of William H. H. and 
Harriet A. (Baum) Neal; grandson of Benjamin Ward and Cynthia Ann 
(Stanton) Baum; great-grandson of Oliver and Rhoda (Underwood) Stanton; 
great--grandson of Robert and Elizabeth (Palmer) Stanton; great'-grandson of 
Joshua Stanton, Captain, Col. Seth Warner's Conn. Regt. 

CLEMENT ROY NEWKIRK, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22626). Son of Clement Botsford 
and Mary L,. (Seybolt) Newkirk; grandson of Abram Westbrook and Adaline 
(Stickney) Newkirk; great-grandson of Henry and Frances (Reeve) Newkirk; 
greats-grandson of John Newkirk, Captain Second Ulster County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

CHARLES EDWIN OGDEN, Rochester, N. Y. (22627). Son of Darius Adams 
and Judith (Lawrence) Ogden; grandson of Melitiah and Mary (Rewalt) Law- 
rence; great-grandson of John Rewalt, Captain, Assistant Deputy Wagon Mas- 
ter General Lancaster County Penna. Militia. 

HENRY NORTON ORD, Berkeley, Cal. (N. Y. 22587). Son of Capt. E. O. C. 
and Mary Frances (Norton) Ord; grandson of Gen. E. O. C. and Mary Mercer 
(Thompson) Ord; great-grandson of James and Rebecca (Cresap) Ord; great-- 
grandson of Daniel Cresap, First Lieutenant Maryland Riflemen. 

GEORGE HOMER PARTRIDGE, New York, N. Y. (22096). Son of Luther Lee 
and J_aura Adele (Homer) Partridge; grandson of Benjamin Franklin and 
Mary Howard (Wheeler) Partridge; great-grandson of Amos Partridge, pri- 
vate Mass. and New Hampshire Militia. 

PHILIP PEARSALL, Huntington, N. Y. (22919). Son of William and Phebe 
(Ketcham) Pearsall; grandson of Philip and Rosetta (Ketcham) Ketcham; 
great-grandson of Philip and Susanna (Brush) Ketcham; great--grandson of 
Solomon Ketcham, Associator, Huntington, N. Y. 

HARRY LONGYEAR PRESTON, Jordan, N. Y. (22920). Son of Otis Marshall 
and Angeline (Lawrence) Preston; grandson of Ezekiel and Cornelia Laraway 
(Smith) Preston; great-grandson of Otis and Dorotha (Knap) Preston; great-- 
grandson of Amariah Preston, Adjutant, Col. Nathan Tyler's Mass. Regt.; 
great--grandson of Joh Knap, Captain Third Worcester County Regt. Mass. 
Militia; great-grandson of David and Jean (More) Smith; great--grandson of 
John More, private Eleventh Albany County Regt. New York Militia; grand- 
son of George and Abigail Christina (Longyear) Lawrence; great-grandson of 
Andrew and Elizabeth (Rogers) Longyear; great--grandson of Christopher 
Longyear, private First Ulster County Regt. New York Militia; great--grand- 
son of Jacob Longyear, private Fifth Regt. New York Continental Line. 

MARINUS SEYMOUR PURDY, Newburgh, N. Y. (22085). Son of Marinus 
Edgar and Sarah Elizabeth (Ogden) Purdy; grandson of Charles Ross and 
Mary Ann (Van Arsdale) Ogden; great-grandson of Nicholas and Rebecca 
(Mills) Van Arsdale; great'-grandson of Samuel Mills, private. Col. Matthias 
Ogden's New Jersey Regt. and Col. Philip Van Cortland's New York Regt., 
pensioned. 

LOUIS RALSTON, New York, N. Y. (22464). (Name changed to Ralston.) Son 
of Henry and Sarah (Ancker) Rosenham; grandson of Adelph and Abby (Pet- 
tigrew) Ancker; great-grandson of James Pettigrezv, Lieutenant Third and 
Eleventh Regts. Penna. Line, pensioned. 

WILLIAM JOHNS RALSTON, New York, N. Y. (22465). Son of Louis and 
Kate (Johns) Ralston, name changed from Rosenham; grandson of Henry and 
Sarah (Ancker) Rosenham; great-grandson of Adolph and Abby (Pettigrew) 
Ancker; great--grandson of James Pettigrew, Lieutenant Third and Eleventh 
Regts. Penna. Line. 

EDWIN GARFIELD REYNOLDS, Brooklyn, N. Y. (22097). Son of Charles H. 
and Naomi A. (Vandewater) Reynolds; grandson of Henry and Catherine 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 259 

(Lawrence) Reynolds; great-grandson of Elijah and Drusilla (Lockwood) Rey- 
nolds; greats-grandson of Abraliam Lockwood, private Ninth Regt. Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Gilbert C. and Charlotte (Oakley) Vandewater; great- 
grandson of Peter and Naomi (Conkling) Vandewater; great*-grandson of Gil- 
bert and Naomi Conkling; greats-grandson of Hubbard Conkling, Associator at 
Huntington, New York, 1775. 

EUGENE BENTON REYNOLDS. Brooklyn, N. Y. (22098). Son of Charles 
Henry and Naomi A. (Vandewater) Reynolds; grandson of Henry and Cath- 
erine (Lawrence) Reynolds; great-grandson of Elijah and Drusilla (Lockwood) 
Reynolds; greats-grandson of Abraham Lockwood, private Ninth Regt. Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Gilbert C. and Charlotte (Oakley) Vandewater; great- 
grandson of Peter and Naomi (Conkling) Vandewater; great'-grandson of Gil- 
bert and Naomi Conkling: great-'-grandson of Hubbard Conkling, Associator at 
Huntington, New York, 1775. 

ARTHUR HERBERT RICE. Buffalo, N. Y. (22593). Son of Benjamin B. and 
Harriet Ann (Ritterse) Rice; grandson of Isaac J. and Sarah Alden (Car- 
penter) Rice; great-grandson of Benjamin and Charlotte Bartlett (Alden) Car- 
penter; greats-grandson of John Carpenter, Member of Colonial Assembly from 
Orange County, New York, 1778. 

GEORGE CARPENTER RICE. Buffalo. N. Y. (22643). Son of Benjamin B. and 
Harriet Ann (Ritterse) Rice; grandson of Isaac J. and Sarah Alden (Car- 
penter) Rice; great-grandson of Benjamin and Charlotte Bartlett (Alden) 
Carpenter; greats-grandson of John Carpenter, Member of Colonial Assembly 
from Orange County, New York, 1778. 

GEORGE FREDERICK ROOT, Buffalo. N. Y. (22087). Son of Samuel and Mar- 
garet (Cameron) Root; grandson of Samuel and Julia Ann (Mowry) Root; 
great-grandson of Jabez and Candace (Olney) Mowry; greats-grandson of Ste- 
phen Olney, Captain Second Rhode Island Regt. 

WALTER CLARK RUNYON, New York, N. Y. (22470). Son of Clark and T^ura 
J. (Wheelock) Runyon; grandson of Israel and Mary (Polly) (Deeds) Run- 
yon ; great-grandson of Elias Runyon, teamster. Captain Hinman's Team 
Brigade New Jersey Militia. 

FREDERIC BREWSTER SAMMIS, Huntington, N Y. (22921). Son of Fred- 
erick G. and Maria P. (Conklin) Sammis; grandson of Erastus H. and Ruth 
(Wood) Conklin; great-grandson of Esra Conklin, Corporal, Captain John 
Wickes's Company, Col. Josiah Smith's Regt. New York Militia. 

WHEELER SAMMONS, Cambridge, Mass. (N. Y. 22925). Son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Wheeler) Sammons; grandson of Charles Wright and Nancy 
Eleanor (Covenhover) Wheeler; great-grandson of John E. and Elizabeth 
(Van Alstine) Cov^hover; greatS-grandson of Philip Van Alstine, private 
First Tryon County Regt. New York Militia and Seventh Albany County Regt. 

OLIVER GEORGE JOHN SCHADT, Ocean Grove, N. J. (N. Y. 22594)- Son of 
Moses B. and Lucinda Emily (Sterner) Schadt; grandson of John and Maria 
(Berge) Schadt; great-grandson of Christian Berge. private Northampton 
County Penna. Militia. 

JOSEPH BENTLEY SEE. Cranford, N. J. (N. Y. 22632-). Son of Benjamin and 
Lavina (Jennings) See; grandson of John and Eunice (Minor) See; great- 
grandson of Abraham See. private First Westchester County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

JOSEPH RUSSELL SEE. Cranford, N. J. (N. Y. 22633)- Son of Joseph B. and 
Ann L. (Weeker) See; grandson of Benjamin and Lavina (Jennings) See; 
great-grandson of John and Eunice (Minor) See; greatS-grandson of Abraham 
See. private First Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

GEORGE NELSON SEYMOUR. Brooklyn, N. Y. (22639)- Son of Tvouis Nelson 
and Olie (Raine) Seymour; grandson of Oscar R. and Sarah J. (Aymar) Sey- 
mour; great-grandson of Nelson and Rebecca (Grigg) Seymour; greatS-grand- 
son of Henry Grigg, private, Bradley's Battalion Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 



26o SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

JOHN SLOTE, Huntington, N. Y. (22646). Son of Daniel and Ann Jane (Low- 
ery) Slote; grandson of Daniel Slott, private, Lieut. -Col. Lasher Baldwin's 
Regt. "The Line Artificers." 

BURNS LYMAN SMITH, Syracuse, N. Y. (22628). Son of Lyman Cornelius and 
Flora Elizabeth (Burns) Smith; grandson of Lewis S. and EHza Ann (Hurl- 
but) Smith; great-grandson of William and Rebecca (Bissell) Smith; great-- 
grandson of Benjamin and Esther (Benton) Bissell; greats-grandson of Zebu- 
Ion Bissell, private Conn. Militia in Continental service, prisoner, died en route 
home Dec. 26, 1776. 

HOWARD FIL\XKLIN SMITH, Buffalo, N. Y. (22598). Son of Charles Powers 
and Nettie V. (Cook) Smith; grandson of Franklin Warren and Caroline T. 
(Benham) Cook; great-grandson of Lemuel and Susan (Mason) Cook, Jr.; 
great--grandson of Lemuel Cook, private Conn. Continental Troops, pensioned. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM SOUZA, New York, N. Y. (22922). Son of Moses and 
Zipporah (Cohen) Souza; grandson of Jacob I. and Grace (Seixas) Cohen; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Mendes Seixas, Lieutenant New York Militia. 

JOSEPH ANDERSON SOWDON, Yonkers, N. Y. (15370). Supplemental. Son 
of George Harris and EHza Tweed (Gildersleeve) Sowdon; grandson of George 
and Emma Dimock (Van Pelt) Sowdon; great-grandson of Peter and Emma 
(Robinson) Van Pelt; great--grandson of James and Thankful (Dimock) Rob- 
,inson, Jr.; great--grandson of James Robinson, Captain Tenth Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

DANA LEVI SPRING, Buffalo, N. Y. (22596). Son of Alfred and Anna (Tar- 
bell) Spring; grandson of Dana O. and Frances Maria (Wilder) Tarbell; 
great-grandson of James and Hannah (Walker) Tarbell; great-grandson of 
Billings and Hannah (Proctor) Walker; great--grandson of Leonard Proctor, 
Lieutenant, Colonel Reed's Sixth Regt. jMass. Militia. 

GRANT LANSING STANFORD, Schenectady, N. Y. (22581). Son of Welton 
and Katherine Groot (Lansing) Stanford; grandson of Charles and Jane Eliza 
(Page) Stanford; great-grandson of Josiah and Elizabeth (Phillips) Stanford; 
great--grandson of Lyman and Elizabeth (Roberts) Stanford; great"-grandson 
of Abner Stanford, Corporal, Colonel Bailey's !Mass. Continental Regt. and 
other service, pensioned. 

WELTON STANFORD, Schenectady, N. Y. (22579). Son of Charles and Jane 
Eliza (Page) Stanford; grandson of Josiah and Elizabeth (Phillips) Stanford; 
great-grandson of Lyman and Elizabeth (Roberts) Stanford; great--grandson 
of Abner Stanford, Corporal, Colonel Bailey's Mass. Continental Regt. and 
other service. 

WELTON STANFORD, Jr., Schenectady, N. Y. (22580). Son of Welton and 
Katherine Groot (Lansing) Stanford; grandson of Charles and Jane Eliza 
(Page) Stanford; great-grandson of Josiah and Elizabeth (Phillips) Stanford; 
great--grandson of Lyman and Elizabeth (Roberts) Stanford; great--grandson 
of Abner Stanford, Corporal, Colonel Bailey's Mass. Continental Regt. and 
other service. 

WARREN EATON STIMPSON, Brooklyn. N. Y. (22100). Son of Stephen A. 
and Mary Ann (Eaton) Stimpson; grandson of Stephen and Elizabeth (Blaney) 
Stimpson; great-grandson of Stephen Stimpson, private. Col. John Robinson's 
Regt. Militia; great-grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Wait) Blaney; 
great--grandson of Benjamin Blaney, Captain Maiden Company Mass. Militia. 

ROBERT STROBRIDGE, New York, N. Y. (22903). Son of George E. and Kate 
(Kidder) Strobridge; grandson of Daniel P. and Hariette (Smith) Kidder; 
great-grandson of Asabel and Betsy (Adams) Smith; great--grandson of Abel 
Adams, private Second Conn. Continental Regt., 1775. 

WILLIA:M BITTLE SYMMES, New York, N. Y. (22099). Son of William Bittle 
and Ann Elizabeth (Hill) Symmes; grandson of John and Abigail (Green) 
Symmes; great-grandson of Samuel Symmes, private, Capt. Samuel Belknap's 
Company Mass. Minute Men. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 261 

WILLIAM BITTLE SYMMES, Jr., New York, N. Y. (22461). Son of William 
Bittle and Margaret S. (Evans) Symmes; grandson of William B. and Ann 
Elizabeth (Hill) Symmes; great-grandson of John and Abigail (Green) 
Symmes; greats-grandson of Samuel Symmes, private, Capt. Samuel Belknap's 
Company Mass. Minute Men. 

EUGENE THEODORE TANKE, Buffalo. N. Y. (22906). Son of Theodore C. 
and Ella Louise (Noble) Tanke; grandson of John Scott and Mary Jane 
(Shepard) Noble; great-grandson of Ralph and Laura (Tracy) Shepard; great-- 
grandson of Hesekiah Tracy, private, Col. Ira Allen's Regt. Vermont Militia. 

NELSON OTIS TIFFANY, Buffalo, N. Y. (22083). Son of Nelson Arnold and 
Martha Eliza (Whitney) Tiffany; grandson of Benjamin and Achsah (Manly) 
Tiffany; great-grandson of Beitjamin Tiffany, Sergeant New Hampshire Militia; 
grandson of Lewis and Sarah (Kitchen) Whitney; great-grandson of Josiah 
Whitney, Ensign, Colonel Burrall's Conn. Regt. 

ROBERT HULL TIFFT, Buffalo, N. Y. (22640). Son of Wrilson Simon and 
Maria Elizabeth (Maxon) Tifft; grandson of Simon and Ann (Webster) Tifft; 
great-grandson of John and Ann (Vallett) Tifft; greats-grandson of Robert 
Tifft (Tefft), Corporal, Captain Gorton's Company Rhode Island Militia and 
in Colonel Topham's Regt. 

HANFORD COMSTOCK TODD, Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. (22648). Son of 
Hanford Comstock and Mercy Anna (Marclay) Todd; grandson of Darius 
Webb and INIargaret (Comstock) Todd; great-grandson of Aaron and Esther 
(Kellogg) Comstock; great--grandson of Aaron Comstock, Sergeant, Col. John 
Mead's Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

ALBERT HALLER TRACY, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. (22901). Son of Albert Haller 
and Mary (Burhans) Tracy; grandson of Kester and Hannah (Fanning) 
Tracy; great-grandson of Gilbert Tracy, private, Colonel Durkee's Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM CUTLER WALLACE, Niagara Falls, N. Y. (22904). Son of William 
H. and Marietta (West) Wallace; grandson of Luke and Margaret (Partridge) 
Wallace or Wallis; great-grandson of Cnrzi'in IVallis, private. Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES FREDERICK WALTERS, Rochester, N.Y. (22641). Son of Syl- 
vester and Elizabeth (Romer) Walters; grandson of Ardennis and Deborah 
Ann (Free) Romer; great-grandson of John and Leah (Van Tassel) Romer; 
greats-grandson of Cornelius Van Tassel, Lieutenant First Westchester County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

TOM WELTON, Ithaca, N. Y. (22456). Son of Frank Graves and Mary Ella 
(Clark) Welton; grandson of Dexter Gaylor and Sarah Jane (Moore) Clark; 
great-grandson of Elijajj and Sibil (Green) Clark; greats-grandson of Timothy 
Green, Corporal Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM WOLCOTT WIARD, Syracuse, N. Y. (22584). Son of Harry and 
Eleanor L. (Wolcott) Wiard; grandson of William and Sarah Maria (Lewis) 
Wolcott; great-grandson of Arnold and Lucy (Dunham) Lewis; greatS-grand- 
son of Gideon Dunham, private Fifth Regt. Conn. Line. 

HORACE SIMPSON WILKINSON, Syracuse, N. Y. (22589). Son of John Gibbs 
and Mary Ann (Miller) Wilkinson; grandson of EHsha Freeman and Mary 
(Laughery) Wilkinson; great-grandson of Edward Mott Wilkinson, private, 
Capt. Benjamin Durkee's Company, Colonel McClellan's Conn. Regt, pen- 
sioned. 

CHARLES MILLER WILLIAMS, Rochester, N. Y. (22647). Son of Charles 
Henry and Susan (Miller) Williams; grandson of Comfort and Lucy Wil- 
liams; great-grandson of Eliel and Comfort (Morton) Williams; greats-grand- 
son of Elias Williams. Captain Sixth Conn. Militia, 1777. 

JESSE GUERNESY WILLIAMS, Syracuse, N. Y. (22095). Son of James Rhue 
and Jennie L. (Kenyan) Williams; grandson of George and Celia B. (Hitch- 
cock) Kenyan; great-grandson of George W. and Sarah (Wentworth) Hitch- 



262 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

cock; great"-grandson of Sylvanus and Anna (Freeman) Wentworth; great'- 
grandson of Sylvanus Wentworth, private, Col. Benj. Simonds's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

CLARENCE EUGENE WOLCOTT, Syracuse, N. Y. (22649). Son of Oliver 
Cromwell and Esther Maria (Redner) Wolcott; grandson of Oliver Ellsworth 
and Eliza (Woodruff) Wolcott; great-grandson of Abithar and Mary (Warner) 
Wolcott; greats-grandson of Samuel Wolcott, Captain First Regt. Berkshire 
County Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE MARVIN WOODCOCK, Buffalo, N. Y. (22577). Son of Frederick and 
Margaret Stewart (Fitch) Woodcock; grandson of Francis Bushnell and Eliza 
(Dean) Fitch; great-grandson of Stewart Dean, Commander of armed sloo]) 
"Beaver," Member of Albany County "Commission of Conspiracies." 

NORTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

JOHN GRAY BLOUNT, Jr., Washington, N. C. (22779). Son of William Au- 
gustus and Kate (Masters) Blount; grandson of Thomas Harvey and Eliza- 
beth (Mutter) Blount; great-grandson of John Gray and Mary (Harvey) 
Blount; great--grandson of Jacob Blount, Member of the Provincial Congress 
at Halifax, 1776, Paymaster for the Army and Navy of North Carolina. 

THADDEUS HENRY BLOUNT, Belhaven, N. C. (22780). Son of Reading and 
Mary Augusta (Windley) Blount; grandson of John Gray Reading Thomas 
and Polly Ann (Clark) Blount; great-grandson of Samuel and Rebecca (Fore- 
man) Clark; great--grandson of Caleb (and Elizabeth Bonner) Foreman, 
Lieutenant Eighth North Carolina Continental Regt. ; great-grandson of 
Reading Blount, Major Fifth North Carolina Continental Regt.; great--grand- 
son of Jacob Blount, Paymaster for tht Army and Navy of North Carolina, 
Member of North Carolina Provincial Congress, 1775-1776; great--grandson of 
James Blount, Colonel Beaufort County Militia. 

BRYAN TRIPPE BONNER, Aurora, N. C. (22781). Son of Bryan Trippe and 
Clarissa Sparrow (Tripp) Bonner; grandson of John Young and Clarissa 
George Irving (Trippe) Bonner; great-grandson of Henry and Miriam. 
(Young) Bonner; great--grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort 
County North Carolina Regt. 

HENRY MONTAGUE BONNER, Aurora, N. C. (22782). Son of John Bryan 
and Fannie Montague (Hooker) Bonner, Jr.; grandson of Charles William 
and Caroline P. (Redditt) Bonner; great-grandson of John Young and Eliza- 
beth (Bryan) Bonner; great--grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bon- 
ner; great--grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort County North 
Carolina Regt. 

JOHN YOUNG BONNER, Aurora, N. C. (22783). Son of Henry and Rebecca. 
Florence (Guilford) Bonner; grandson of John Young and CHarissa George 
Irving (Trippe) Bonner; great-grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bon- 
ner; great--grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort County North 
Carolina Regt. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE BONNER, Morehead City, N. C. (22784). Son of 
Robert Tripp and Rebecca (Tripp) Bonner; grandson of John Bryan and 
Mary Elizabeth (Tripp) Bonner; great-grandson of John Young and Elizabeth 
(Bryan) Bonner; great--grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bonner; 
great--grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort County North- 
Carolina Regt. 

LEON DE CASTRO BONNER, Bonnerton, N. C. (22785). Son of John Bryan 
and Mary Elizabeth (Tripp) Bonner; grandson of John Young and Elizabeth 
(Bryan) Bonner; great-grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bonner;: 
great"-grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort County North Car- 
olina Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 263 

REDDEN LEWIS MYERS BONNER, Aurora, N. C. (22786). Son of Bryan 
Trippe and Clarissa Sparrow (Tripp) Bonner; grandson of John Young and 
Clarissa George Irving (Trippe) Bonner; great-grandson of Henry and 
Miriam (Young) Bonner; greats-grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the 
Beaufort County North Carolina Regt. 

ROBERT TRIPP BONNER, Aurora, N. C. (22776). Son of John Bryan and 
Mary Elizabeth (Tripp) Bonner; grandson of John Young and Elizabeth 
(Bryan) Bonner; great-grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bonner; 
greats-grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort County North 
Carolina Regt.; great-grandson of Jesse Bryan, Lieutenant Craven County, 
N. C, Company, 1776; grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Sparrow) Tripp; great- 
grandson of Robert Tripp, ^Delegate to the Halifax North Carolina Congress, 
November 12, 1776. 

JOHN GOLDSMITH BRAGAW, Jr., Washington, N. C. (22787). Son of John 
Goldsmith and Annie Cambreleng (Hoyt) Bragaw: grandson of William and 
Anna (Townsend) Bragaw; great-grandson of Richard Bragaw, member of 
WoodhuU's Cavalry operating on Long Island, prisoner on British ship. 

STEPHEN CAMBRELENG BRAGAW, Washington, N. C. {22777). Son of John 
G. and Annie Cambreleng (Hoyt) Bragaw; grandson of Henry (Thurchill and 
Margaret Mutter (Blount) Hoyt; great-grandson of Eli and Mary Ann (Cam- 
breleng) Hoyt; greats-grandson of Stephen and Ann (Patten) Cambreleng; 
greats-grandson of John Patten, Colonel Second North Carolina Continental 
Regt. 

HENRY CLARK BRIDGERS, Tarboro, N. C. (22788). Son of John L. and 
Laura P. (Clark) Bridgers; grandson of Henry Toole and Mary Weeks (Par- 
ker) Clark; great-grandson of James West and Arabella (Toole) Clark; great-- 
grandson of Henry Irwin and Elizabeth (Haywood) Toole; greats-grandson 
of William Haywood, Member of State Congress at Halifax, N. C, in 1776, 
which formed the Constitution of North Carolina. 

FRANK HAVENS BRYAN, Washington, N. C. (22789). Son of Carney John 
and Elizabeth Bryan (Bonner) Bryan; grandson of Charles William and Caro- 
line P. (Redditt) Bonner; great-grandson of John Young and Elizabeth 
(Bryan) Bonner; greats-grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bonner; 
greats-grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort County North 
Carolina Regt. 

WILLIAM TRIPPE BRYAN, Sr., Aurora, N. C. (22790). Son of Joseph Bon- 
ner and Ann Bryan (Bonner) Bryan; grandson of John Young and Clarissa 
George Irving (Trippe) Bonner; great-grandson of Henry and Miriart 
(Young) Bonner; greats-grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of the Beaufort 
County North Carolina Regt. 

OGDEN ELLERY EDWARDS, Blowing Rock, N. C. (22791). Son of Ogden E. 
and Catherine (Shepherd) Edwards; grandson of Thomas and Catherine 
(Tryon) Shepherd; great-grandson of Levi and Mary (Pomeroy) Shepherd; 
greats-grandson of Seih Pomeroy, Senior Brigadier-General of the Continental 
Armies. 

WILLIAM BLOUNT HARDING, Washington, N. C. (22792). Son of Nathaniel 
and Mary Elizabeth (Hughes) Harding; grandson of Nathaniel and Elizabeth 
Ann (Patrick) Harding; great-grandson of Israel Harding, Sergeant Tenth 
North Carolina Continental Regt. 

IRA MAY HARDY, Washington, N. C. i22%32). Son of Jesse H. and Martha 
Ann (Stanton) Hardy; grandson of Washington May and Gatsy Truitt 
(Daniel) Stanton; great-grandson of James and Sallie (May) Stanton; great-- 
grandson of Benjamin May, First Major of Pitt Regt. of North Carolina, 
Member of Committee of Safety and of Provincial Congress. 

FRANK CANNON KUGLER, Washington, N. C, (22793). Son of George Wash- 
ington and Maria Jane (Bennett) Kugler; grandson of James and EHza Bray 
(Rittenhouse) Kugler; great-grandson of Jonathan and Delilah (Bray) Kii- 



264 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

' tenhouse; greats-grandson of Daiiiel Bray, Captain Second Hunterdon County 
Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

ANGUS DHU Maclean, Washington, N. C. (22833). Son of John Allen and 
Mary Virginia (Brown) MacLean; grandson of Sylvester Tillman and Eliza- 
beth Ann (Bonner) Brown; great-grandson of Sylvester and Hannah (HoUi- 
day) Brown; greats-grandson of Nathaniel and Mehetable (Hubbard) Brown; 
greats-grandson of George Hubbard, Captain Second Regt. Conn. Line. 

WILLI.\M THOMAS MARSH, Belhaven, N. C. (22794). Son of Edward Stan- 
ley and Bettie Bonner (Eborn) Marsh; grandson of Samuel Clark and Polly 
Ann (Clark) Eborn; great-grandson of Samuel and Rebecca (Foreman) 
Clark; greats-grandson of Caleb and Elizabeth (Bonner) Foreman; great-- 
grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of Beaufort County North Carolina Regt. 

EDWARD WARREN MYERS, Greensboro, N. C. (22795). Son of William Rod- 
man and Lucy Wheelock (Warren) Myers; grandson of John Gray Blount 
and Mary Olivia Blount (Rodman) Myers; great-grandson of John and Mary 
Har\'ey (Blount) Myers; great-grandson of Reading Blount, Major Fifth 
Regt. North Carolina Continental Line; greats-grandson of Jacob Blount, 
Member of North Carolina Provincial Congress, Paymaster of North Carolina 
Army and Navy. 

JOHN CROOM RODMAN, Washington, N. C. (22796). Son of William Blount 
and Camilla (Croom) Rodman; grandson of William Wanton and Polly Ann 
(Blount) Rodman; great-grandson of John Gray Blount, Deputy Paymaster 
and Commissary North Carolina Troops; greal^^-grandson of Jacob Blount, 
Paymaster for the Army and Navy of North Carolina, Member of North 
Carolina Provincial Congress, 1775-1776. 

WILLIAM BLOUNT RODMAN, Charlotte, N. C. {22797). Son of William 
Blount and Camilla (Croom) Rodman; grandson of William Wanton and 
Polly Ann (Blount) Rodman; great-grandson of John Gray Blount, Paymaster 
and Commissary North Carolina Troops; great--grandson of Jacob Blount, 
Paymaster for the Army and Navy of North Carolina, Member of North 
Carolina Provincial Congress, 1 775-1 776. 

THOMAS HADLEY SANDERS, Tarboro, N. C. (22831). Son of Willis T. and 
Ella (Moye) Sanders; grandson of Samuel H. and Sarah J. (Hadley) Moye; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Millicent (Richardson) Hadley; great--grandson 
of Thomas and Margaret (Parker) Hadley; great--grandson of Thomas Had- 
ley, Captain North Carolina Light Horse, Member of North Carolina Provin- 
cial Congress. 

LYNDON YOUNG SHAW, Washington, N. C. (22798). Son of Robert Bonner 
and Eliza Tripp (Bonner) Shaw; grandson of John Bryan and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Tripp) Bonner; great-grandson of John Young and Elizabeth (Bryan) 
Bonner; great--grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bonner; great-- 
grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of Beaufort County North Carolina Regt. 

CHARLES SMALLWOOD, Washington, N. C. (22799)- Son of John Waller 
and Emily B. (Lucas) Smallwood; grandson of Samuel and Portia (Bonner) 
Smallwood; great-grandson of Henry Snode and Mary Htather (Burbage) 
Bonner; great-grandson of Henry Bonner, Major of Beaufort County North 
Carolina Regt. 

HARDY LEE THOMPSON, Aurora, N. C. (22800). Son of Benjamin Hardy 
and Sallie Tripp (Bonner) Thompson; grandson of Bryan Trippe and Clarissa 
Sparrow (Tripp) Bonner; great-grandson of John Young and Clarissa C^orge 
Irving (Trippe) Bonner; great--grandson of Henry and Miriam (Young) Bon- 
ner; great'-grandson of James Bonner, Colonel of Beaufort County North 
Carolina Regt. 

EDWIN READE TRIPP, Blount Creek, N. C. (22826). Son of William Henry 
and Araminta Clementina (Guilford) Tripp; grandson of Joseph and Sarah 
(Sparrow) Tripp; great-grandson of Robert Tripp, Delegate to the Congress 
at Halifax, N. C, April 12, 1776. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 265 

FREDERICK HARDING VON EBERSTEIN, Chocowinity. N. C. (22827). Son 
of William Henry and Annis (Harding) von Eberstein; grandson of Nathan- 
iel and Elizabeth Ann (Patrick) Harding; great-grandson of Israel Harding, 
Sergeant Tenth Regt. North Carolina Continental Eine. 

JOHN ARCHIBALD WEDDELL, Tarboro. N. C. (22829). Son of Matthew and 
Mary Matilda (Norcom) Weddell; grandson of Tames and Penelope Cathe- 
rine (Hoskins) Norcom; great-grandson of Baker and Martha Ann (Skinner) 
Hoskins; greats-grandson of Richard Hoskins, Member of Chowan County 
Militia; his wife. Winifred Hoskins, was Secretary of the Edenton Tea Party, 
October 25, 1774. 

JOHN ARCHIBALD WEDDEU,, Jr., Tarboro, N. C. (22830). Son of John 
Archibald and Lossie Bake/ (MacNair) Weddell; grandson of Matthew and 
Mary Matilda (Norcom) Weddell; great-grandson of James and Penelope 
Catherine (Hoskins) Norcom; greats-grandson of Baker and Martha Ann 
(Skinner) Hoskins; greats-grandson of Richard Hoskins, Member of Chowan 
County Militia; his wife, Winifred Hoskins, was Secretary of the Edenton 
Tea Party, October 25, 1774. 

NORTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

CHARLES ELMER BATCHELLER, Fingal, N. Dak. (22774). Son of George 
Stillman and Eliza Ann (Lamphear) Batcheller; grandson of Joseph and 
Dorothy (Needham) Batcheller; great-grandson of Abraham and Rebecca 
(Dwight) Batcheller; greats-grandson of Abraham Batcheller, Captain Twelfth 
Company Fifth Worcester Regt. Mass. Militia. 

REUBEN ALVINO BEARD, Fargo, N. Dak. (22757). Son of Philander C. and 
Hetty (Howard) Beard; grandson of Reuben and Eliza (Loveland) Beard; 
great-grandson of Aaron and Susanna (Chapman) Loveland; greats-grandson 
of Elisur Loveland, private. Colonel Wyllys's Conn. Regt., 1776, prisoner. 

THEODORE DAY BECKWITH, Fargo, N. Dak. (22772). Son of Theodore G. 
and Jane S. (Day) Beckwith; grandson of Adonijah and Sophia E. (Titus) 
Day; great-grandson of Billy and Judith (Husted) Titus; greatS-grandson of 
David Husted, Captain Fourth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

ALFRED BLAISDELL, Minot, N. Dak. (22759). Son of Humphrey M. and Hen- 
rietta H. (Crosby) Blaisdell; grandson of Jonah and Mary Bradbury (Foss) 
Crosby; great-grandson of Oliver and Harriet (Chase) Crosby; greatS-grandson 
of Oliver Crosby, Lieutenant Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES GILBERT BOISE, Fargo, N. Dak. (22758). Son of Spencer W. and 
Celestia E. (Gould) Boise; grandson of Asa T. and Elmira (Tenney) Gould; 
great-grandson of John and Lucy (Twitchel) Goold; greatS-grandson of John 
Goold, private, Capt. John Sessions's Company \'ermont Militia and other 
service, pensioned. 

WATSON E. BOISE, Jamestown, N. Dak. (,22-73). Son of Spencer W. and Ce- 
lestia E. (Gould) Boise; grandson of Asa T. and Elmira (Tenney) Gould; 
great-grandson of John and Lucy (Twitchel) Goold; greatS-grandson of John 
Goold, private, INIaj. Ebenezer Allen's detachment Vermont Militia, pensioned. 

WILLL^M J. CLAPP, Fargo, N. Dak. (22760). Son of George L. and Harriet M. 
(Fuller) Clapp; grandson of Joshua and Fanny (Smith) Clapp; great-grandson 
of Joshua Clapp. Lieutenant Mass. Militia. 

JORDAN TYLER LYELL COATES, Rolette, N. Dak. (22761). Son of John B. 
and Elizabeth J. Coates; grandson of William Coates, private Second Virginia 
Regt. 

CHARLES C. CREEGAN, Fargo, N. Dak. (22771). Son of Daniel and Mary Ann 
(McKee) Creegan; grandson of David H. and Mar\' (Reed) McKee; great- 
grandson of John McKee, Ensign First Cumberland County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 



266 SONS OF I'HE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GASHERIE DE WITT DOVVLING, Fargo, N. Dak. (22763). Son of Joseph 
Ivimey and Mary Jane (Sheppard) Dowling; grandson of John and Mary 
Sampson (Perkins) Dowling; great-grandson of Rufus and Rebecca (Johnson) 
Perkins; great--grandson of Thomas and Molly (Lathrop) Johnson; great-- 
grandson of Isaac Johnson, First Major Third Plymouth Company Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

HERBERT CLAY FISH, Bismarck, N. Dak. (22770). Son of Lorenzo Erasmus 
and Lucy A. (Starr) Fish; grandson of Ebenezer and Cynthia (Liscom) Starr; 
great-grandson of Timothy and Damaris (Nichols) Starr; greats-grandson of 
Samuel and Rhoda (Carpenter) Nichols; greats-grandson of Benjamin Car- 
penter, Lieutenant-Colonel Vermont Militia. 

WILLARD BELA OVERSON, Williston, N. Dak. (22768). Son of Thomas and 
Marion Amanda (Allen) Overson; grandson of Bela and Sarah Bradbourne 
(Hovey) Allen; great-grandson of Bela and Naomi (Phelps) Allen; great-- 
grandson of Elijah Phelps, Corporal Fifth Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 

CHARLES ANDREW POLLOCK, Fargo, N. Dak. (22765). Son of John and 
Eunice Elvira (Ellis) Pollock; grandson of Richard Ransom and Emily H. 
(Rice) Ellis; great-grandson of JVilliam Ellis, private, Lieut. Abisha Samson's 
Company Vermont ^Militia. 

BURLEIGH FOLSOM SPALDING, Bismarck, N. Dak. (22551). Son of Benja- 
min Pendall and Ann (Folsom) Spalding; grandson of Noah and Phebe (Pen- 
dall) Spalding; great-grandson of Benjamin (and Azubah Gates) Spalding, 
private. Captain Paine"s Company, Colonel Hazen's New Hampshire Regt., 
pensioned; great-grandson of Jonathan Pendall, Sergeant. Capt. Wm. Pearce's 
Company First Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia; great--grandson of 
Atidreiv Spalding, private Mass. Continental Troops. 

ROSCOE CONKLING SPALDING, Fargo, N. Dak. (22766). Son of Burleigh F. 
and Alida (Baker) Spalding; grandson of Benjamin Pendall and Ann (Folsom) 
Spalding; great-grandson of Noah and Phebe (Pendall) Spalding; great-- 
grandson of Benjamin Spalding, private, Captain Paine's Company, Colonel 
Hazen's New Hampshire Regt., pensioned; great--grandson of Jonathan Pen- 
dall, Sergeant, Capt. William Pearce's Company First Dutchess County Regt. 
New York Militia; great--grandson of Andrew Spalding, private Mass. Conti- 
nental Troops. 

CLARENCE DELOS SPAULDING, Fargo, N. Dak. (22769). Son of John and 
Helen (Lockwood) Spaulding; grandson of John Avery and Amanda (Tracy) 
Spaulding; great-grandson of John Spaulding, fifer, Capt. Samuel Ransom's 
Independent Company, Colonel Durkee's First Regt. Conn. Line; great--grand- 
son of Siynon Spaulding, Captain First Regt. Conn. Line. 

OHIO SOCIETY. 

WILLIAM ROSS ALBAN, Steubenville, Ohio {22262). Son of John and Mar- 
garet J. (Warden) Alban; grandson of George and Nancy (Cox) Alban, Jr.; 
great-grandson of George Alban, private Eighth Virginia Regt., 1776, Com- 
mander-in-Chief's Guard, 1777, Express Rider, 1778. 

HORACE NEWTON ALLEN, Toledo, Ohio (22960). Son of Horace and Jane M. 
(Silly) Allen; grandson of Heber and Anna (Hall) Allen; great-grandson of 
Heber Allen, private, Capt. Zeb. Dewey's Company Vermont Militia. 

WILLARD E. ALLEN, Toledo, Ohio (21943). Son of Chas. W. and Ruth E. 
(Beach) Allen; grandson of Benjamin and Mary L. (Holcomb) Beach; great- 
grandson of Jedediah Holcomb, Jr.; great--grandson of Jedediah Holcomb, Cor- 
poral Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

ELMER LAWRENCE ANDREWS, Montpelier, Ind. (Ohio 22260). Son of 
Daniel F. and Rebecca (Hoffman) Andrews; grandson of Nicholas and Eliza- 
beth (Gotwalt) Hoffman; great-grandson of Andrew and Mary (Schmidt) Got- 



REGISTER OF NliW MlCMHKUS. 267 

wait; great--grandson of Jacob Gotivalt. Sergeant, Capt. Simon Copenhafcr's 
Company First York County Battalion Penna. Associators. 

DAVID TOD ARRFL. Youngstown, Ohio (21953). Son of George Francis and 
Grace (Tod) Arrel; grandson of David and Martha (Moore) Arrel; great- 
grandson of John and Margaret (Stewart) Arrel; great-grandson of David 
Arrel, private Sixth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES R. BUSS, Cleveland, Ohio (22268). Son of Otis B. and Julia E. M. 
(Potter) Bliss; grandson of Benjamin and Amy (Bowen) Bliss; great-grandsoa 
of Ephriam Bliss, private. Captain Bliss's Company Mass. Militia; grandson of 
Olney and Mary (Richardson) Potter; great-grandson of James Potter, Captain 
of Minute Men, Col. Archibald Crary's Regt. 

J. STURGUS BRADLEY, Toledo, Ohio (21945). Son of J. Morrison and Eliza- 
beth (Beazelle) Bradley; grandson of Burr and Esther Williams (Plumer) 
Bradley; great-grandson of Daniel Bradley, Lieutenant Fifth Conn. Regt. 

JOSEPH HENRY VAN DEM AN BUCK, Delaware, Ohio (22270). Son of Henrie 
E. and Jane (Glenn) Buck; grandson of Israel and Sarah Wilson (Van De- 
man) Buck; great-grandson of Edmund and Anna (Hubbell) Buck; great''- 
grandson of Israel Buck, private Dutchess County New York Militia; great-- 
grandson of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Collins) Hubbell; greats-grandson of Ben- 
jamin Collins, private. Colonel Van Rennselear's New York Regt.; great-grand- 
son of Henry and Sarah Wilson (Darlington) Van Deman; greats-grandson of, 
John Van Deman, private, Colonel Neville's Virginia Regt., pensioned; grand- 
son of Isaac Drake and Martha Ann (McClellan) Glenn; great-grandson of 
Edmund Randolph and Jane (Hageman) Glenn; great--grandson of Isaac and 
Elizabeth (Drake) Glenn; great--grandson of Isaac Drake, private New Jersey 
Militia. 

JOHN HINKLE BUHLMAN, Youngstown, Ohio (22955). Son of Ephraim and 
Rebecca (Buzard) Buhlman; grandson of Lewis and Margaret (Hinkle) Buhl- 
man; great-grandson of Anthony Hinkle, Ensign Third Company Seventh York 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES HENRY CARROLL, Toledo, Ohio (22961). Son of Thomas R. and 
Glora Ann (Gary) Carroll; grandson of Joel and Harriet Wickham (Ransom) 
Cary; great-grandson of Russell and Lucrila (Wickham) Ransom; great-- 
grandson of Joseph Ransom, private First Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 

COLIN REED CLARK, Youngstown, Ohio (22956). Son of James and Laura 
(Reed) Clark; grandson of Mathew and Anne (Reed) Clark; great-grandson 
of James and Jane (Anderson) Clark; great--grandson of David and Hannah 
(Baird) Clark; great--grandson of James (and Nancy Reed) Clark, Captain 
Lancaster County Penna. Associators; greaf'-grandson of John Reed, Captain 
Fourth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Associators. 

GARRET HAYES COLEMAN, Milo, Ohio (22258). Son of Garret F. and Louisa 
C. (Hixenbaugh) Coleman; grandson of Klitia and Rebecca (Workman) Cole- 
man; great-grandson of Jesse and Mary Clawson (Whitney) Coleman, Jr.; 
great--grandson of Jesse Coleman, private. Captain Durkee's Company Conn. 
Militia. 
FRED DAVIS CONNOLLEY, Columbus, Ohio (22264). Son of Francis Simmons 
and Emma (Davis) Connolley; grandson of George and Sarah E. (Claypool) 
Davis; great-grandson of Charles and Elizabeth (Hays) Davis; great-grandson 
of James Davis, Captain Third and Seventh Regts. Virginia Line. 
ROBERT COWDEN, Dayton, Ohio (22958). Son of David and Elisabeth (Kitch) 
Cowden; grandson of Robert and Catharine (Stillwagon) Cowden; great-grand- 
son of Robert Cowden, private. Captain Dunn's Company Penna. Militia. 
EDWARD CHELLIS DAONST, Cleveland, Ohio (22253). Son of Charles J. and 
Mary (Hooker) Daonst; grandson of William Chellis and Mary (McQuary) 
Hooker; great-grandson of Harley and Mary (Beardslee) Hooker; great--grand- 
son of Increase Moseley and Lois (Wilcox) Hooker; great--grandson of Wil- 



268 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Ham and Mary (Moseley) Hooker; great*-grandson of Increase Moseley, Colo- 
nel Conn. Militia. 

JOHN FREDERICK DEATRICK, Jr., Defiance, Ohio (22962). Son of Charles 
Lytle and Grace (Harring) Deatrick; grandson of John Frederick and Nancy 
(Taylor) Deatrick; great-grandson of John Jacob Nicholas and Elizabeth 
(Boyer) Deatrick; greats-grandson of Jacob Dietrich, private Sixth Regt. 
Penna. Line. 

ELDRIDGE GRISWOLD DYER, Cleveland, Ohio (21954). Son of Albion Morris 
and Ella Maria (Dunham) Dyer; grandson of Elbridge Gerry and Margaret 
Morris (Teyrer) Dyer; great-grandson of Thomas and Hepsibah (Whitney) 
Dyer; greats-grandson of Jesse Whitney, private Eighteenth Regt. Continental 
Foot and Eleventh Mass. Continental Infantry. 

DANIEL G. FOX, Dayton, Ohio (22959). Son of Daniel C. and Elizabeth (Geb- 
hart) Fox; grandson of Frederick C. and Hannah (Coffman) Fox; great-grand- 
son of Daniel B. and Susan (Chrissman) Fox; greats-grandson of Frederick 
Fox, drummer Tenth Penna. Regt., 1777. 

JULIAN ELIAS GROW, Cleveland, Ohio (22256). Son of P. Elias and Roxanna 
(Bigelow) Grow; grandson of Philander and Lydia (Story) Grow; great-grand- 
son of Ezekiel and Lydia (Sprague) Story; greats-grandson of Asa Story, En- 
sign Fourth Battalion Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

JAMES KENT HAMILTON, Toledo, Ohio (21948). Son of Thomas and Sarah 
Olmstead (Staudart) Hamilton; grandson of George and Lucy (Williams) 
Staudart; great-grandson of Jolm Williams, private, Capt. Abraham Wheeler's 
Company, Col. Lemuel Robinson's Mass. Regt. 

EDWARD LANSING HARRIS, Cleveland. Ohio (22254). Son of David Frank- 
lin and Lucretia E- (Rowley) Harris; grandson of David and Julia (Taylor) 
Harris; great-grandson of Asahel Harris, private Vermont Militia; grandson 
of Isaac and Lois (Jackson) Rowley; great-grandson of Daniel Rowley, pri- 
vate. Colonel Humphrey's New York Regt., pensioned. 

MONTGOMERY LOCKE HART, Akron, Ohio (22273). Son of Oliver Schinkel 
and Carrie (Locke) Hart; grandson of George and Jennie (Davis) Hart; 
great-grandson of Elipha and Eliza (Armstrong) Hart; greats-grandson of 
Oliver Armstrong, private, Capt. Samuel Potter's Company, Rhode Island 
Militia. 

JAMES M. HENGST. Columbus. Ohio (22266). Son of Lewis and Lizzie Jean- 
nette (McCleery) Hengst; grandson of James and Honora Calista (Wilson) 
McCleery; great-grandson of William and Rachel (Wells) Wilson; great-- 
grandson of James Wells, First Lieutenant Fourth Continental Artillery. 

ROGER NEWTON JOHNSTON, Akron, Ohio (22252). Son of Samuel Newton 
and Hesper (Reifsnider) Johnston: grandson of John and Elizabeth R. (New- 
ton) Johnston; great-grandson of Samuel and Eunice Park (Bill) Newton; 
greafS-grandson of Benajah Bill, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

LEWIS RAYMOND JUDSON, Toledo, Ohio (21947). Son of Lewis James and 
Helen (Hogue) Judson; grandson of Lindsey and Nancy Susan (Taylor) 
Hogue; great-grandson of !Mark and Margaret (Amyx) Taylor; greatS-grand- 
son of George Taylor, private Third. Fifth, and Seventh Virginia Regts. 

WILLIAM LEVIS JUDSON, Toledo. Ohio (21946). Son of Lewis James and 
Helen (Hogue) Judson; grandson of Lindsey and Nancy Susan (Taylor) 
Hogue; great-grandson of Mark and Margaret (Amyx) Taylor; greats-grand- 
son of George Taylor, private Third. Fifth, and Seventh Virginia Regts. 

THOMAS W. LATHAM, Monroeville. Ohio (21952). Son of Hiram and Mary 
Ann (Evans) Latham; grandson of Alexander Wolcott and Anna (Wood) 
Latham; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Elizabeth (Smith) Latham; great*- 
grandson of Joseph Latham, private. Captain Mott's Company Conn. ^lilitia. 

EDMUND GARFIELD LAUGHLIN, Euclid. Ohio (22255). Son of Cyrus and 
Mary Ann (Vaughn) Laughlin; grandson of Daniel and Phebe (Morey) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 269 

Vaughn; great-grandson of John Morey, private, Col. Henry Sherburne's and 
Col. Israel Angell's Rhode Island Regts. 

SAMLEE HERRICK LAYTON, Columbus, Ohio (22271). Son of Francis Ma- 
rion and Lucinda Prentice (Herrick) Layton; grandson of Samuel Prentice 
and Minerva (Hopkins) Herrick; great-grandson of Elijah and Lucinda 
(Prentice) Herrick; greats-grandson of Samuel Prentice, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Sixth Conn. Regt., 1775, and Tenth Regt. Conn. Line. 

EDWARD DRUMMOND LIBBEY, Toledo, Ohio (22257). Son of William Lang- 
don and Julia Amanda (Miller) Libbey; grandson of William and Sarahan 
(Hatch) Miller; great-grandson of Prince and Sarah (Mclntyre) Hatch; 
greats-grandson of Elisha Hatch, First Lieutenant, Captain Hunter's Com- 
pany, Third Lincoln County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE POPE MacNICHOL, Toledo, Ohio (21944). Son of Archibald and 
Delia H. (Burrall) MacNichol; grandson of Ovid and Rebecca (Turner) Bur- 
rail; great-grandson of Silas and Jane (Smith) Turner; greats-grandson of 
Stephen Smith, Captain Lincoln County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

NICHOLAS PERKINS OGLESBY, Columbus, Ohio (22265). Son of Nicholas 
Perkins and Sallie Agnes (Crockett) Oglesby; grandson of Nicholas Perkins 
and Jane (Sayer) Oglesby; great-grandson of John Thompson Sayers, Lieu- 
tenant First Virginia Regt. 

ROBERT B. POWERS, Delaware, Ohio (22263). Son of George W. and Mary 
E. (McKinnie) Powers; grandson of Robert and Margaret A. (Dunlap) Mc- 
Kinnie; great-grandson of John F. and Martha C. (McKinnie) Dunlop; 
great--grandson of Josiah and ^Margaret (Celler) McKinnie; greats-grandson 
of John McKinnie, private Fourth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 

EMMETT HALL PRICE, Mansfield, Ohio (22963). Son of George F. and Bes- 
sie B. (Eddy) Price; grandson of Henry and Martha Jane (Adams) Hall; 
great-grandson of John and Jane (Rodgers) Adams; greats-grandson of Jacob 
and Catherine (Lintner) Adams; greats-grandson of James Adams, Captain 
Cumberland County Penna. Militia. 

RICHARD S. QUINN, Washington C. H., Ohio (22267). Son of J. W. M. and 
Ann C. (Seymour) Quinn; grandson of Garrett and Sallie (McNeil) Sey- 
mour; great-grandson of Abel Seymour, private Virginia Rangers. 

STANLEY N. SELLS, Columbus, Ohio (21950). Son of James H. and Cora 
(Needels) Sells; grandson of Francis ."Xsbury and Mary (Walter) Sells; 
great-grandson of William H. and Elizabeth (Ebey) Sells; greats-grandson of 
Ludwick and Katherine (Deardorff) Sells; greats-grandson of John Sells, pri- 
vate Penna. Line; greats-grandson of George and Mary (Elebarger) Ebey; 
greatS-grandson of 'George Ebey, private, Capt. Matthias Slough's Lancaster 
County Battalion Penna. Militia; grandson of Cyrus Fay and Eva (Ruckle) 
Needels; great-grandson of Thomas R. and Catherine Robinson (Warmsley) 
Ruckle; greatS-grandson of John and Mary (Robinson) Warmsley; great*- 
grandson of William Robinson, Adjutant Ninth Virginia Regt. 

HUGH E. SMITH, Denver, Colo. (Ohio 22272). Son of Marshall and Elvira A. 
(Thrall) Smith; grandson of William Cooley and Mary Chase (West) Thrall; 
great-grandson of Samuel (and Tryphosa Cooley) Thrall, Jr., private. Colonel 
Leonard's Mass. Regt.; greatS-grandson of William Cooley, Captain, Colonel 
Moseley's Mass. Regt.; gr^atS-grandson of Samuel Thrall, St., Captain Third 
Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOSIAH WILSON SMITH, Ottawa, Ohio (.22274). Son of Manley B. and Abi- 
gail (Pickerill) Smith; grandson of Josiah Wilson and Ellen (West) Picker- 
ill; great-grandson of Samuel and Jane (Drake) Pickerill, Jr.: greats-grandson 
of Samuel Pickerill, private and drummer. Colonel Brent's Virginia Regt. 

LOREN EDMUNDS SOUERS, Canton, Ohio (21949)- Son of Enos Schlauch 
and Celestia May (Black) Souers; grandson of Franklin Rannels and .\nge- 



270 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

line (Sabin) Black; great-grandson of Guy and Lorana (Eaton) Sabin; great-- 
grandson of Levi Eaton, Corporal New Hampshire and Mass. Troops, pen- 
sioned. 

CHARLES FREDERICK TENNEY, Toledo, Ohio (22251). Son of Charles F. 
and Clara Belle (Reese) Tenney; grandson of Ralph Emerson and Phebe 
Conti (Smith) Tenney; great-grandson of William Tenney, private, Capt. 
Wm. Reid's Company, Colonel Baldwin's New Hampshire Regt. 

LEWIS BLUME THOMPSON, Defiance, Ohio (22261). Son of Charles James 
and Anna Cora (Craig) Thompson; grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Nye) 
Craig; great-grandson of Joseph Brown and Sarah Ann (Matthews) Craig; 
great--grandson of Jacob and Susanna (Lowman) Matthews; greats-grandson 
of John Matthews, private Third Maryland Regt., Col. Mordecai Gist. 

EARL DARLINGTON VAN DEMAN, Delaware, Ohio (22269). Son of William 
Llewellyn and Romie Vinton (Baldwin) Van Deman; grandson of Henry and 
barah Wilson (Darlington) Van Deman; great-grandson of John Van Deman, 
private, Colonel Neville's Virginia Regt., pensioned; grandson of Chauncey 
and Mary Hickey (Holter) Baldwin; great-grandson of William and Lucinda 
(Ladd) Baldwin; greats-grandson of Ashbel Ladd, private, Capt. Daniel Gil- 
bert's Company Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES HENRY WHITAKER, Toledo, Ohio (22259). Son of John Hall and 
Frances Elvira (Grosvenor) Whitaker; grandson of Stephen and Mary (Hall) 
Whitaker; great-grandson of Stephen Whitaker, Lieutenant, Capt. Jacob Ten 
Eyck's Company First Battalion New Jersey Volunteers. 

DUDLEY WALKER WILSON, Girard, Ohio (22957). Son of Hugh P. and 
Thalia (Hine) Wilson; grandson of .Abraham Skinner and Mary (Gibson) 
Hine; great-grandson of Homer and Mary (Skinner) Hine; greats-grandson 
of Noble Hine, Captain, Colonel Canfield's Regt. Conn. Militia; greats-grand- 
son of Abraham Skinner, private, Capt. John Harmon's Company Fourth 
Conn. Line; great-grandson of Robert D. and Lydia (Marshall) Gibson; 
greats-grandson of James Gibson, Captain of Rangers, Cumberland and North- 
umberland Counties, Pa. 

OKLAHOMA SOaETY. 

GUY ELLIOT BLACKWELDER, Oklahoma City, Okla. (18973)- Son of Martin 
Luther and Emma (Elliot) Blackwelder; grandson of Peter and Nellie 
(Scherer) Blackwelder; great-grandson of Isaac Blackwelder, Sergeant, Col. 
George Alexander's North Carolina Regt. 

MARTIN LUTHER BLACKWELDER. Oklahoma City, Okla. (18975)- Son of 
Peter and Nelly (Scherer) Blackwelder; grandson of Isaac Blackzvelder, pri- 
vate. Col. George Alexander's North Carolina Regt. 

WILLIAM LAFAYETTE CRITTENDEN. Stigler, Okla. (18970). Son of Wil- 
liam L- and Laura Lee (Amiss) Crittenden; grandson of John L. and Susan 
James (Eustace) Crittenden; great-grandson of John and Louisa (Boteler) 
Eustace; greats-grandson of Isaac and Susanna (James) Eustace; great'- 
grandson of William Eustace. Lieutenant, Col. W. Blackwell's Virginia Regt.; 
grandson of Richard L. and Mary Catharine (Henry) Amiss; great-grandson 
of Hiram Lorenzo and Emily Elizabeth (Young) .\miss; greatS-grandson of 
Benjamin G. and Mary Elizabeth (Williams) Young; great'-grandson of 
William Williams, First Lieutenant Thirteenth \'irginia Regt. 

ANDREW BARRITT GALLOWAY. Oklahoma City, Okla. (18972). Son of 
Harrison Andrew and Katherine Eliza (Reigart) Galloway; grandson of An- 
drew and Mary (Collins) Galloway; great-grandson of James Galloway, pri- 
vate Fourth Regt. Continental Light Dragoons. Col. Stephen Moylan, pen- 
sioned. 

WILLIAM EDWARD GORDON, Tulsa. Okla. (18974). Son of Seth Reed and 
Frances Eliza (Torrence) Gordon; grandson of John and Catherine (Foster) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 2/1 

Torrence; great-grandson of John Torrcncc, Sergeant Cumberland County 
Penna. Militia. 

TRUMAN GILES HOYT. Cordell, Okla. (18971). Son of .Mbert Olandro and 
Mary Eunice (Giles) Hoyt; grandson of Braman Fitch and Eunice (Folger) 
Giles; great-grandson of Ephraim and Esther (Pratt) Giles; great=-grandson of 
Ebenecer Giles, private, Colonel Bailey's Second Mass Regt., 1779, and other 
service. 

OREGON SOCIETY. 

ROBERT HURD BLOSSOM. Portland, Ore. (21394). Son of James Monroe and 
Elizabeth Louise (Gates) Blossom; grandson of Ansel and Mercy (Ladd) Blos- 
som; great-grandson of James Blossom, First Lieutenant Mass. Coast Guards. 

HERBERT GEORGE CHICKERING, Portland, Ore. (21398). Son of Herman J. 
and Alice G. (Chickering) Futerer; grandson of George Hopkins and Esther 
.^nn (Marsh) Chickering; great-grandson of Elliott and Ruth (Wilson) Chick- 
ering; greats-grandson of John Chickering, Sergeant, Col. James Frye's Mass. 
Regt. 

HARRY M. COURTRIGHT, Portland, Ore. (21399). Son of Morris L. and Eme- 
line (Holmes) Courtright; grandson of Harry and Emeline (Day) Holmes; 
great-grandson of John and Adaline (Sage) Day; great--grandson of Solomon 
and Sallie (Whiting) Day; greats-grandson of Isaac IVhiting, private. Colonel 
Sprout's Mass. Regt. 

HENRY WASHBURN GODDARD, Portland, Ore. (22652). Son of Anson W. 
and Sophronia (Lindsley) Goddard; grandson of Elihu and Elizabeth (Gard- 
ner) Lindsley; great-grandson of Henry and Hannah (Allen) Gardner; great-- 
grandson of Gilbert Allen, private New Jersey Militia. 

ROBERT JAMES GORDON, Portland, Ore. (21395). Son of James Douglas and 
Mary Mercy (Blossom) Gordon; grandson of James Monroe and Elizabeth 
Louise (Gates) Blossom; great-grandson of Ansel and Mercy (Ladd) Blossom; 
great--grandson of James Blossom, First Lieutenant Mass. Coast Guards. 

EDWARD DANIEL KINGSLEY, Portland, Ore. (21388). Son of George Pom- 
eroy and Harriet (Swift) Kingsley; grandson of Daniel and Betsey (Pomeroy) 
Kingsley; great-grandson of Gamaliel and Mary (Tyler) Pomeroy; great-- 
grandson of Lemuel Pomeroy; great--grandson of Seth Pomeroy, Brigadier- 
General Continental Army. 

CHARLES LEVI MASTICK, Portland, Ore. (21396). Son of Edwin Baird and 
Lucretia Mary (Wood) Mastick; grandson of Benjamin and Eliza (Tomlinson) 
Mastick, Jr.; great-grandson of Benjamin Mastick. private. Colonel Ward's and 
Colonel Brooks's Mass. Regts. 

EDWIN MAYS. Portlalid, Ore. (21400). Son of Robert and Lodemma Mays; 
grandson of Elijah and Mary B. Mays; great-grandson of Robert and Sarah D. 
Mays; great--grandson of Benjamin Mays, private. Captain Bellinger's Company 
Virginia Militia. 

JOHN LANGDON RAND. Baker City. Ore. (21389). Son of J. Sullivan and El- 
vira W. (Odiorne) Rand; grandson of Reuben and Olive Rand; great-grandson 
of David Rand: great-grandson of Ephraim Rand, private, Capt. Richard 
Shortridge's New Hampshire Company. 

LEWIS ALTON ROGERS, Portland, Ore. (21392). Son of Lewis and Lucy 
(Ellsworth) Rogers; grandson of Henry D. and Rebecca Rogers; great-grand- 
son of Ransford Rogers; great--grandson of Joseph and Eleanor Rogers; 
great--grandson of Joseph Rogers, private First Company Si.xtli Conn. Regt.; 
grandson of Samuel and Martha Rose (Putnam) Ellsworth; great-grandson of 
Joseph and Sarah .Amelia Ellsworth; great--grandson of Henry Ellsu-ortlt, pri- 
vate .Second Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

VALENTINE MOTT CUYLER SILVA, Portland, Ore. (21397). Son of Francis 
Jean and Hester Walgrove Silva (name changed from Pierre to Silva); grand- 
son of Jean Ignace Pierre. Third Lieutenant T<a Fere Regt. French Artillery, 



2'/2 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

detached to American Army as Captain of Artillery Oct. 21, i7/"6, returned tc 
French service Sept., 17/8. 

FILANK HERON SPEARS, Portland, Ore. (21390). Son of William B. and Min- 
nie B. (Clark) Spears; grandson of Alpheus and Augusta P. (Gibbs) Clark; 
great-grandson of Wm. Leech and Margaret or Peggj' (Rouse) Clark; great-- 
grandson of John Rouse, Captain New York Troops, pensioned. 

LOUIS E. SWETLAND, Mt. Tabor, Ore. (21393). Son of Edwin Payson and 
Laurestine Woodruff (Quimby) Swetland; grandson of Daniel and Polly 
(Woodruff) Quimby; great-grandson of Lot and Hanna (Miller) Woodruff; 
great--grandson of Oliver Woodruff, private, Colonel Wooster's and Colonel 
Bradley's Conn. Regts. 

EUGENE VICTOR THOMPSON, Portland, Ore. (21391). Son of Hubert A. and 
Celeste (Oliver) Thompson; grandson of Palmer Young and Clara Oliver; 
great-grandson of Wm. and Mary (Spraigue) Oliver; greats-grandson of Wil- 
Ham Oliver, private. Col. Samuel McCobb's and other Mass. Regts. 

PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON ACKLIN, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22450). Son of Thomas 
Jefferson and Mary Jane Acklin; grandson of George K. and Elizabeth Acklin; 
great-grandson of Joseph Acklin, private Virginia Troops. 

DAVID JOHN ADAMS. Pittsburgh, Pa. (22428). Son of David and Eliza (Mc- 
Mahon) Adams; grandson of William and Eiizabeth (Blair) Adams; great- 
grandson of John and Ann (Chambers) Adams; great--grandson of James 
Adams, Captain Fifth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

WILLIAM JAMES ASKIN. Jr., Pittsburgh, Pa. (23079). Son of William James 
and ^largaret Lucinda (Kent) Askin; grandson of Jacob and Mary Jane (Shep- 
herd) Kent; great-grandson of John and Jane (Dupui) Watson; great--grand- 
son of Xicholas Dupui, ^lember of General Assembly of Pennsylvania. 

ABNER CLARKE BANE, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22439). Son of John Ferguson and 
Martha (Post) Bane: grandson of William Atkinson and Margaret (Lindley) 
Post; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Martha (Cracraft) Post; great--grandson 
of Charles Cracraft, ^Slajor in George Rogers Clark's Indian Expedition of 
1781. 

ROBERT DUNCAN CARSON, Philadelphia, Pa. (21888). Son of Thomas Dun- 
can and Mary Eliza (Hunt) Carson; grandson of Charles and Mary Gould 
(Fogg) Hunt; great-grandson of Oliver Hunt, Lieutenant, Colonel Vose's Mass. 
Regt. 

WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERS, McKeesport, Pa. (21891). Son of John and 
Ellen Chambers; grandson of William and Lydia Chambers; great-grandson of 
John Chambers, private Penna. Troops, pensioned. 

ANDREW LINN COYLE, Oil City, Pa. (22433)- Son of David Scott and Mary 
iMathilda (Longwell) Coyle; grandson of James and Keziah (Geiger) Long- 
well; great-grandson of William Longwell, private. Colonel HoUingsworth's 
Penna. Regt., pensioned; great-grandson of David and Martha (Linn) Coyle; 
great"-grandson of William Linn, Chaplain Fifth Penna. Battalion. 

HUSTE-^D A. CROW, Fresno, Cal. (Pa. 22434). Son of Isaac B. and Delilab 
(Clemmer) Crow; grandson of Alexander and Sarah Ann (Hustead) Crow; 
great-grandson of Alexander and Eliza Ruth (Maxwell) Hustead; great--grand- 
son of Robert Hustead, Sergeant Penna. Troops, pensioned. 

JOHN CALVIN CUNNINGHAM, Belle Vernon, Pa. (21893). Son of James and 
Rosanna (Muir) Cunningham; grandson of William and Mary (Gallaher) Cun- 
ningham: great-grandson of James Cunningham, private. Captain Calhoun's 
Company Penna. "Flying Camp." 

OLIVER DIEHL. Amber, Pa. (22427). Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Diehl; 
grandson of John and EHzabetli Diehl; great-grandson of Jacob and Barbara 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 273 

Diehl; greats-grandson of Frederick Diehl, private Bucks County Battalion 
Penna. Militia. 

AMERICUS ENFIELD, Bedford, Pa. (21900). Son of George and Delilah (Find- 
lay) Enfield; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Shockey) Findlay; great-grandson 
of Christian Shockey, private Eleventh Penna. Regt., pensioned. 

ROBERT MERTON EWING, Wilkinsburg, Pa. (22441). Son of James Henry and 
Eleanor (Rhea) Ewing; grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Caruthers) Rhea; 
great-grandson of Richard Ewing and Eleanor (Findley) Caruthers; great-- 
grandson of Richard Caruthers, Adjutant Second Cumberland County Battalion 
New Jersey Militia; great--grandson of William Findley, Captain Eighth Bat- 
talion Cumberland County Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE EITTIvE FOLLANSBEE, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22437). Son of Gilbert and 
Maria Jackson (Haynes) Follansbee; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Haynes) 
Follansbee; great-grandson of Thomas Haynes, private. Col. Moses Little's 
Mass. Regt.; grandson of Benjamin and Betsey (Hunting) Haynes; great- 
grandson of Amos Hunting, private Dedham Company Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE WILSON GOSSER, Pittsburgh, Pa. (21894). Son of Henry and Delia- 
hah (Wilson) Gosser; grandson of James and Marjory (Means) Wilson; great- 
grandson of Robert and Ann (McGill) Means; great--grandson of James Mc- 
Gill, private, Captain Butler's Company Westmoreland County Penna. Militia. 

ROBERT BRUCE GREER, Butler, Pa. (22445)- Son of John Morgan and Julia 
Stebbins (Butler) Greer; grandson of John Baker and Harriet Newell (Steb- 
bins) Butler; great-grandson of Elizur Goodwin and Polly (Marshall) Butler; 
great--grandson of Isaac Butler, private. Col. Heman Swift's Conn. Regt.; 
greats-grandson of Samuel Stone Butler, Second Lieutenant Conn. Militia. 

THOMAS CAMPBELL GRIGGS, Bellevue, Pa. (22442). Son of Joseph Franklin 
and Eliza Buchanan (Brooks) Griggs; grandson of John and Mary (Thurston) 
Griggs; great-grandson of Thomas Griggs, Jr., Corporal, Captain Dagget's (Sut- 
ton) Company Mass. Minute Men; great-grandson of Thomas Griggs, Sr., pri- 
vate. Col. Lemuel Robinson's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Nathan and Sallie 
(Campbell) Thurston; great--grandson of Alexander Campbell, Member of 
Mass. Provincial Congress at Concord. 

HENRY HAROLD KERSHNER, Reading, Pa. (22429). Son of W. J. and Emma 
Gorden (Weiser) Kershner; grandson of Jacob and Mary (Lowenberg) Kersh- 
ner; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Kerby) Lowenberg; great--grandson 
of Frederick Lowenberg, private Second Penna. Regt., Sergeant Berks County 
Militia. 

SAMUEL BLACK LINHART, Pittsburgh, Pa. (21899). Son of Daniel and Eliza- 
beth McCullogh (Black) Linhart; grandson of Samuel and Jane (Mansperger) 
Black; great-grandson of John and Rachel (Long) Mansperger; great--grandson 
of George Long, Captain First York County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ALBERT MILLER LONG, Pittsburgh, Pa. (23077)- Son of David Miller and 
Elizabeth (Vemer) Long; grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Miller) Long; great- 
grandson of William Long, Captain Fourth Company Eighth Cumberland 
County Battalion Penna. Associators. 

WINFIELD HEARD McDOWELL, Uniontown, Pa. (21887). Son of James Ed- 
ward and Anna Margaret (Heard) McDowell; grandson of George M. and 
Elizabeth Rosanna (Kyle) McDowell; great-grandson of Joseph and Janet (Mc- 
Farlane) Kyle; great--grandson of James McFarlanc, First Lieutenant First 
Regt. Penna. Line. 

GEORGE FRANK McEWEN, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22440). Son of William B. and 
Josephine (Upperman) McEwen; grandson of George Washington and Mary 
(Jope) McEwen; great-grandson of John and Margaret (Bradley) McEwen; 
great--grandson of John McEwen, Ensign and Quartermaster New Jersey 
Troops. 

18 — SR 



2/4 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES ALFRED MARTIN, Coraopolis, Pa. (22438). Son of Samuel and 
Maria (Cooper) Martin; grandson of John and Sarah (Agnew) Cooper; great- 
grandson of Robert Agnew, private Fourth Penna. Battalion, Col. Anthony 
Wayne. 

EDWARD BERNARD MATHIOT, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22432). Son of Henry Ber- 
nard and Rebecca Ruth (Brownfield) Mathiot; grandson of George Mathiot, 
Sergeant First Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE KEITER MILES, Pittsburgh, Pa. (21892). Son of Edwin and Susan 
Evans (Jones) Miles; grandson of Nathaniel and Sarah (Philips) Miles; great- 
grandson of Josiah Philips, Second Lieutenant Second Company Seventh Ches- 
ter County Battalion Penna. Militia; grandson of Jesse and Elizabeth (Frick) 
Jones; great-grandson of John and Catharine (Grumbacher) Frick; great-- 
grandson of Peter Grumbacher, Member of Chester County Committee of 
Safety. 

HENRY HULL NEGLEY, Grafton, Pa. (22436). Son of Felix C. and Margaret 
(Dickson) Negley; grandson of John Negley, private Penna. Associated Bat- 
talions and Militia. 

ALEXANDER JEFFREY PENTECOST, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22448). Son of John 
D. and Susan (Jeffrey) Pentecost; grandson of Dorsey and Swearingen Pen- 
tecost; great-grandson of Dorsey Pentecost, Member of Supreme Executive 
Council of Pennsylvania, 1781, 1783. 

CHARLES ROSS, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22444). Son of Samuel Brison and Emma 
(McCosh) Ross; grandson of Joshua and Margaret (Emmet) Ross; great- 
grandson of Thomas Ross, private Proctor's Regt. Penna. Artillery Continental 
Line. 

WALTER LAMB SHEPPARD, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22435). Son of Robert J. and 
Lizzie L. (Buhoup) Sheppard; grandson of John L- and Susannah . (Andrews) 
Buhoup; great-grandson of John L. and Mary Ann (Barteton) Buhoup; great-- 
grandson of William and Christina (Fry) Barteton; greats-grandson of Michael 
Fry, private Eighth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE FRANK SLOCUM, Pittsburgh, Pa. (23076). Son of J. Frank and 
Liena May (Green) Slocum; grandson of George W. and Rhoda Cary Court- 
landt (Mantor) Slocum; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary Gardiner (Sher- 
man) Slocum; greats-grandson of Henry Sherman, Captain and Ensign Rhode 
Island Regulars. 

WILLIAM TUCKER, Pittsburgh, Pa. (23078). Son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Higgins) Tucker; grandson of Levi and Catherine Tucker; great-grandson of 
George Tucker, private, Capt. David Crane's Company Mass. Militia, pen- 
sioned. 

EDWIN BURKET TWITMYER, Philadelphia, Pa. (21889). Son of George W. 
and Joanna C. (Reese) Twitmyer; grandson of Christian and Elizabeth 
(Evans) Reese; great-grandson of Elieasor Evans, private. Captain Hallman's 
Company Second Chester County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE R. WALLACE, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22446). Son of William L. and 
Elizabeth R. Wallace; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Baird) Wallace; 
great-grandson of William B. Wallace, Second Lieutenant, Capt. Nathaniel 
Mitchell's Company, Col. William Grayson's Virginia Continental Regt. 

WILLIAM PARKINSON WARNE, Washington, Pa. (22447). Son of James 
and Elizabeth Mary (Dumm) Warne; grandson of James and Mary (Parkin- 
son) Warne; great-grandson of Joseph Parkinson, Justice of the Peace of 
Washington County, Pa., Supply Agent under Col. George Morgan. 

FRANCIS ALLAN WHEELER, Mercer, Pa. (22443)- Son of Frank A. and 
June Everett (Siggins) Wheeler; grandson of Amos and Mary Elizabetu 
(Fuller) Wheeler; great-grandson of Samuel and Hannah (King) Wheeler; 
greats-grandson of Jonas King, Corporal, Capt. Nathan Ward's Company, Col- 
onel Wells's Mass. Regt. 



► 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 275 

HERBERT COEEMAN WHITAKER, Philadelphia, Pa. (21890). Son of Frank- 
lin and Lydia Learning (Ross) Whitaker; grandson of John and Sarah Moore 
(Hand) Ross; great-grandson of Jonathan and Sarah (Moore) (Wilson) Hand; 
greats-grandson of Nathaniel Moore, Sergeant, Third Hunterdon County Regt. 
New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES E. WRENSHALL, Washington, Pa. (22431). Son of Edward and 
Elizabeth J. (Ryan) Wrenshall; grandson of John F. and Mary A. (Cowan) 
Wrenshall; great-grandson of Christopher and Eliza M. (Kirkpatrick) Cowan; 
greats-grandson of Abraham Kirkpatrick, Captain Eighth Virginia Regt. 

JOHN F. WRENSHALL, Washington, Pa. (22430). Son of Edward and Eliza- 
beth J. (Ryan) Wrenshall; grandson of John F. and Mary A. (Cowan) 
Wrenshall; great-grandson T)f Christopher and Eliza M. (Kirkpatrick) Cowan; 
greats-grandson of Abraham Kirkpatrick, Captain Eighth Virginia Regt. 

JAMES HARVEY WRIGHT, Pittsburgh, Pa. (22440). Son of Daniel and Sarah 
(Murdock) Wright; grandson" of Samuel and Mary (Conner) Murdock; great- 
grandson of Cornelius and Conrad Conner; greats-grandson of Cornelius Con- 
ner, Sergeant Thirteenth Virginia Regt. 

PHILIPPINE SOCIETY. 

JOHN R. ARNOLD, Manila, P. I. (22810). Son of Zenas S. Arnold; grandson 
of Isaiah F. Arnold; great-grandson of William Arnold; great--grandson of 
William Arnold, private, Capt. Seth Turner's (Independent) Company Mass. 
Militia. 

CHARLES K. BRADBURY, Legaspi, Albay, P. I (22811). Son of William H. 
and Clara C. (Adams) Bradbury; grandson of Ebenezer and Mary (Tappan) 
Bradbury; great-grandson of Theophilus and Lois (Pilsbury) Bradbury; 
greats-grandson of Joshua Pilsbury, private, Capt. Moses Little's Company 
Mass. Militia, Lexington Alarm. 

ROBERT CHRISTIE COTTON, U. S. Army, Manila, P. I. (22812). Son of 
Chester and Mary. Elizabeth (Christie) Cotton; grandson of Robert James 
and Sarah (Nixon) Christie; great-grandson of Jonathan W. and Julia Nixon; 
greatS-grandson of Joel and Hannah (Milbourne) Nixon; great*-grandson of 
John Nixon, private Tenth Virginia Regt. 

CLIFFORD CABELL EARLY, U. S. Army, Manila, P. I. (22814). Son of John 
Cabell and Mary Washington (Cabell) Early; grandson of Clifford and Mar- 
garet Couch (Anthony) Cabell; great-grandson of Frederick and Alice (Win- 
ston) Cabell; greatS-grandson of John Cabell, Chairman of Buckingham Com- 
mittee, 1775, Member of Virginia Convention of 1776. 

JUBAL ANDERSON EARLY, U. S. Army, Manila, P. I. (22813). Son of John 
Cabell and Mary Washington (Cabell) Early; grandson of Clifford and Mar- 
garet Couch (Anthony) Cabell; great-grandson of Frederick and .Mice (Win- 
ston) Cabell; greatS-grandson of John Cabell, Chairman of Buckingham Com- 
mittee, 177s, Member of Virginia Convention of 1776. 

H. LAWRENCE NOBLE, Manila, P. I. (22815). Son of Joseph Harvey and 
Harriet (Lawrence) Noble: grandson of Evert (Wynkoop) and Eliza (Van 
Wagenen) Lawrence; great-grandson of Merchant and Sarah (Wynkoop) 
Lawrence; greatS-grandson of Hesekiah Wynkoop, private First Ulster County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

RICHARD LEWIS CALDER, Providence, R. L (21573). Son of Charles Gran- 
ville and Florence (Nightingale) Calder; grandson of John Lewis and Julia 
Francis (Eddy) Calder; great-grandson of Barnard Eddy, private Conn. Mili- 
tia, Captain Conn. Navy, pensioned. 



276 



SONS 01^ THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



ROBERT FOSTER CHAMBERS, Providence, R. I. (21565). Son of William 
Spicer and Annie Andrews (Foster) Chambers; grandson of John and Ellen 
Louise (Andrews) Foster; great-grandson of John Adams and Lucretia (Cady) 
Foster; greats-grandson of Abel and Mary (Tucker) Foster; greats-grandson 
of Timothy Foster, Jr., Lieutenant Fifth Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES E. FAIRBANKS, Providence, R. I. (10365). Son of Charles F. and 
Mary Priscilla (Mead) Fairbanks; grandson of Franklin T. and Susan John- 
son Cony (Steawart) Fairbanks; great-grandson of Columbus and Lydia Wood 
(Tinkham) Fairbanks; greats-grandson of Nathaniel Fairbanks, private, Capt. 
Samuel McCobb's Company, Col. John Nixon's Fifth Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE LEWIS FALES, Edgewood, R. I. (21564). Son of Lewis Lazell and 
Jane Taylor (Osborn) Fales; grandson of Obadiah Perry and Sarah (Taylor) 
Osborn; great-grandson of David and Sarah (Perry) Osborn; greats-grandson 
of Samuel Osborn, First Lieutenant, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM IVES JAMES, Providence, R. I. (21560). Son of Hazard and Eme- 
line (Potter) James; grandson of Jonathan and Ruth (Barber) James; great- 
grandson of James Barber, private Rhode Island Troops, pensioned. 

FRANK MANLEY MASON, Providence, R. I. (21571). Son of William C. and 
Ellen A. (Fargo) Mason; grandson of George S. and Betsey (Clarke) Mason; 
great-grandson of William and Sally (Hamilton) Clarke; greats-grandson of 
Thomas Clarke, Major Second Regt. Rhode Island Militia. 

ELISHA CAPRON MOWRY, Providence, R. I (21567). Son of Elisha Capron 
and Hannah (Richardson) Mowry; grandson of Harris Jenks and Fanny 
Capron (Scott) Mowry; great-grandson of William and Susanna Mowry; 
greatS-grandson of Elisha Moivry, Lieutenant-Colonel Second Regt. Providence 
County Militia. 

GEORGE HARWOOD NEWHALL, Providence, R. I (21568). Son of George 
H. and Mary Catharine (Harwood) Newhall; grandson of Napthali and Cath- 
arine (Tripp) Newhall; great-grandson of Napthali Nezvhall, private and 
drummer, Colonel Baldwin's Mass. Regt. 

SUMMER OLDTHWAIT RAND, Providence, R. I. (21566). Son of Edward 
Gillett and Carrie Sayles (Summer) Rand; grandson of Albert Tyler and 
Sophia A. (Chadwick) Rand; great-grandson of Jasper Raymond and Lucy 
(Whipple) Rand; greatS-grandson of Jasper Rand, private. Col. Jonathan 
Smith's and other Mass. Regts., pensioned. 

CHARLES LEVECK STEERE, Harrisville, R. I. (21 551). Son of Syria and 
Sallie (Taft) Steere; grandson of Simeon and Mary (Walker) Steere; great- 
grandson of Jonah Steere, Member of Rhode Island Recruiting Committee. 

CLARENCE MANN STEVENS, Providence, R. I (21572). Son of Albert Eu- 
gene and Florence Bowen (Mann) Stevens; grandson of Caleb Smith and 
i.uldah (Turner) Mann; great-grandson of Stephen and Huldah (Colwell) 
Turner; greats-grandson of Stephen Colwell, private Rhode Island Militia, 
pensioned. 

FREDERICK WHEATON TILLINGHAST, Pawtucket, R. I (21552). Son of 
Pardon E. and Ellen F. (Paine) Tillinghast; grandson of John and Susan 
Caroline (Avery) Tillinghast; great-grandson of Pardon and Mary (Sweet) 
Tillinghast; greatS-grandson of Charles Tillinghast, Recruiting Officer, Rhode 
Island. 

GARDNER BILLINGS WILLIS, Providence, R. I. (21563). Son of Joseph W. 
and Susan (Billings) Willis; grandson of Samuel and Dorcas (Clarke) Bil- 
lings; great-grandson of Jonathan and Rachael Gardner (Pool) Clarke; great-- 
grandson of Thomas Fool, private, Col. Benjamin Lincoln's Regt. Mass. Min- 
ute Men; greatS-grandson of Atkins Clarke, Corporal, Capt. Eliphalet Sa win's 
Company Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Amasa and Eunice (Billings) Bil- 
lings; greats-grandson of Jonathan Billings, private. Colonel Gill's and Colonel 
Jacobs's Mass. Regts.; greats-grandson of Benjamin Billings, Lieutenant, Col- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 277 

onel Brooks's Seventh Mass. Regt.; greats-grandson of Daniel Billings, father 
of Eunice, private, Col. Benjamin Gill's and Col. Lemuel Robinson's Mass. 
Regts. 

SOUTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

JAMES BRADNER ALLISON, Yorkville, S. C. (23326). Son of Robert Turner 
and Martha Barnett (Clinton) Allison; grandson of Joseph and Mary (Bar- 
nett) Clinton; great-grandson of Peter Clinton, Captain South Carolina Troops 
under General Williamson, widow pensioned. 

JAMES BRADNER ALLISON, Jr., U. S. Army, Yorkville, S. C. (23327). Son 
of James Bradner and Susan Baldwin (Meek) Allison; grandson of Robert 
Turner and Martha Barnett (Clinton) Allison; great-grandson of Joseph and 
Mary (Barnett) Clinton; greats-grandson of Peter Clinton, Captain South 
Carolina Troops under General Williamson, widow pensioned. 

SAMUEL CHANDLER BAKER, Sumter, S. C. (23328). Son of Charles Richard 
Furman and Mary Jacqueline (Burch) Baker; grandson of Thomas and Rachel 
(Furman) Baker; great-grandson of Richard Furman, patriot preacher; great-- 
grandson of Wood Furman, Representative from Camden District in South 
Carolina Legislature, 1781. 

WILLIAM SMITH BEAN, Clinton, S. C. (23329). Son of Joseph Sanborn and 
Harriet Craig (Smith) Bean; grandson of Josiah and Olive (Sanborn) Bean; 
great-grandson of Josiah Bean, private. Colonel Badger's and Colonel Stick- 
ney's New Hampshire Regts. 

WILLIAM PRIESTLY CONYERS, Greenville. S. C. (23330). Son of Samuel 
Edward and Mary (Oliver) Conyers; grandson of John and Mary S. R. 
(McCauley) Conyers, Jr.; great-grandson of John and Margaret Riley (Pen- 
dergrass) Conyers; greats-grandson of James Conyers, Jr., Major South Caro- 
lina Troops, killed at Battle of "Round O," 1783; greats-grandson of James 
Conyers, St., Major South Carolina Troops. 

JOHN CARROLL COULTER, Columbia, S. C. (23331). Son of John S. and 
Sarah A. (Harman) Coulter; grandson of Franklin and Orpha M. (Isenhour) 
Harman; great-grandson of John Daniel and Mary M. (Killian) Harman; 
greats-grandson of George and Elizabeth (Eslinger) Harman; greats-grandson 
of William Harman, drummer. Col. Wm. R. Lee's Mass. Regt. 

GUY BUTLER FOSTER, Greenville, S. C. (23332). Son of Richard M. and EHse 
(Butler) Foster; grandson of Pickens P. and Arsinoe (Jeter) Butler; great- 
grandson of William and Jane Tweedy (Perry) Butler; greats-grandson of 
William Butler, Captain South Carolina Mounted Rangers, served in Count 
Pulaski's Cavalry Squadron. 

JAMES WALTER GRAY, Jr., Greenville, S. S. (23333). Son of James Walter 
and Lillie (Vance) Gray; grandson of James Kincaid and Laurens (Walcott) 
Vance; great-grandson of Samuel and Eliza (Kincaid) Vance; greats-grandson 
of James Kincaid, Captain South Carolina Troops under General Marion. 

PAUL TRAPIER HAYNE, Greenville, S. C. (23334). Son of Isaac William and 
Alicia Pauline (Trapier) Hayne; grandson of William Edward and Eloise 
(Brevard) Hayne; great-grandson of Isaac Hayne, Colonel of Colleton County 
Regt. South Carolina Militia; grandson of Paul and Alicia (Shubrick) Trapier; 
great-grandson of Paul Trapier, Member of Committee of Safety, Captain of 
Artillery; great-grandson of Alexander Brevard, Captain and Quartermaster 
North Carolina Continental Troops; great-grandson of Thomas Shubrick, Colo- 
nel Fifth South Carolina Regt. 

DAVID ARNOLD HENNING, Greenville, S. C. (23335)- Son of Isaac Loveland 
and Mary (Arnold) Henning; grandson of Ira and Mary (Saxon) Arnold; 
great-grandson of Lewis Saxon, Captain, Colonel Williams's South Carolina 
Regt. 



278 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

OSCAR KERN MAULDIN, Greenville, S. C. (23337). Son of William L. and 
Eliza Thompson (Kern) Mauldin; grandson of John F. and Eliza Williams 
(Earle) Kern; great-grandson of Robertson and Eliza (Thompson) Earle; 
greats-grandson of Waddy and Eliza Blackburn (Williams) Thompson; great-- 
grandson of James Williams, Captain Sixth Virginia Regt., 1778. 

JOHN HENRY O'NEAEE, Greenville, S. C. (23339). Son of G. P. and Virginia 
O'Neall; grandson of Henry and Mary (Shaw) O'Neall; great-grandson of 
Robert Shaw, private Fourth North Carolina Regt. 

WIEEIAM MOORE SMOAK, Aiken, S. C. (23341)- Son of John H. and Florence 
E. (Vann) Smoak; grandson of John H. and Sallie (Golson) Smoak; great- 
grandson of John Lewis and Elizabeth (Robinson) Golson; great'-grandson of 
John Casper Golson; greats-grandson of Lewis Golson, Major, Col. William 
Thompson's Regt. South Carolina Militia. 

JAMES MIMS SULLIVAN, Greenville, S. C. (23342). Son of James Madison 
and Sarah (Scott) Sullivan; grandson of Hewlet Sullivan, private Georgia and 
South Carolina Militia, prisoner. 

JOHN STEWART TAYLOR, Greenville, S. C. (23343). Son of George Edwyn 
and Emma (Hard) Taylor; grandson of James Henry and Eliza Ann (Tyler) 
Taylor; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth (Taylor) Taylor; great--grand- 
son of John and Elizabeth (Terry) Taylor; greats-grandson of Eldad Taylor, 
Member of Mass. Provincial Congress, died while acting as Governor in 1777; 
greats-grandson of Nathaniel Terry, Major Mass. Militia at Lexington Alarm, 
Color Bearer Nineteenth Mass. Regt. 

HENRY KEITH TOWNES, Greenville, S. C. (23344). Son of George Franklin 
and Mary Isabella (Keith) Townes; grandson of William Laffoon and Mary 
Elizabeth Brown (Reid) Keith; great-grandson of Cornelius and Mary (Laf- 
foon) Keith; greats-grandson of Cornelius Keith, Corporal Fifth South Carolina 
Regt. 

SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

GEORGE SHELDON ADAMS, Y'ankton, So. Dak. (22852). Son of Francis David 
and Jane (Ashley) Adams; grandson of Alanson Sheldon and Persis (Pond) 
Ashley; great-grandson of William and Sarah (Sheldon) Ashley; great--grand- 
son of William Ashley, Lieutenant, Capt. Enoch Noble's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

CHARLES OLIN BAILEY, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22853). Son of Joseph Mead 
and Anna (Olin) Bailey; grandson of Aaron and Maria (Braman) Bailey, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Aaron and Mary (Winchester) Bailey; greats-grandson of 
Jonathan Winchester, private. Col. David Oilman's New Hampshire Regt. 

THEODORE MEAD BAILEY, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22854). Son of Charles 
Olin and Mary (Swan) Bailey; grandson of Joseph Mead and Anna (Olin) 
Bailey; great-grandson of Aaron and Maria (Braman) Bailey, Jr.; great-- 
grandson of Aaron and Mary (Winchester) Bailey; greats-grandson of Jona- 
tluin Winchester, private. Col. David Oilman's New Hampshire Regt. 

FRANK LEVI BLACKMAN, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22867). Son of George W. 
and Sarah C. (Thrall) Blackman; grandson of Harvey and Livy Thrall; great- 
grandson of Worthy and Sarah (Phelps) Thrall; greats-grandson of Samuel 
Thrall, Quartermaster Third Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE THRALL BLACKMAN, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22868). Son of George 
W. and Sarah C. (Thrall) Blackman; grandson of Harvey and Livy Thrall; 
great-grandson of Worthy and Sarah (Phelps) Thrall; greafS-grandson of 
Samuel Thrall, Quartermaster Third Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JAMES WALTER CONE, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22874). Son of Beebe Stewart 
and Lucinda (Davison) Cone; grandson of Jared and Hannah (Beebe) Cone; 
great-grandson of Stewart Beebe, private, Capt. Daniel Caldwell's Company, 
Col. Timothy Robinson's Hampshire County Mass. Regt. 



REGISTER OE NEW MEMBERS. 279 

ROSCOE EDWIN CONE, Mitchell. So. Dak. (22873). Son of James Walter and 
Emily M. (Staples) Cone; grandson of Beebe Stewart and Lucinda (Davison) 
Cone; great-grandson of Jared and Hannah (Beebe) Cone; great--grandson of 
Stewart Beebe, private, Capt. Daniel Caldwell's Company, Col. Timothy Robin- 
son's Hampshire County Mass. Regt. 

THEODORE WILLIAM DWIGHT, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22851). Son of Ed- 
ward Woolsey and Elizabeth (Foote) Dwight; grandson of Benjamin Woolsey 
and Sophia Woodbridge (Strong) Dwight; great-grandson of Timothy Dwight, 
Chaplain, General Parson's Conn. Brigade. 

CALVIN H. FRENCH, Huron, So. Dak. (22S56). Son of Charles P. and Mary 
(Brown) French; grandson of Josiah and Mary (Paris) Brown; great-grandson 
of Adam Faris; great--grahdson of William Paris, private. Captain Bentley's 
Company Third and Fourth Virginia Regts. 

PERRETT FRANKLIN GAULT, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22871). Son of Franklin 
B. and Jennie (Perrett) Gault; grandson of Joseph and Sarah Hanford 
(Brown) Perrett; great-grandson of Thomas and Harriet N. (Jewett) Brown; 
greats-grandson of Benjamin and Lucretia (Richardson) Jewett; greats-grand- 
son of Ichabod Jewett, private, Capt. EHas Buell's Company Conn. Militia. 

ROBERT FLOYD KERR, Brookings, So. Dak. (22870). Son of Andrew Jackson 
and Nancy (Sayers) Kerr; grandson of Samuel and Nancy (Gwynn) Kerr; 
great-grandson of John Kerr, private, James Hamilton's Company First Penna. 
Regt. 

LUCIUS KINGSBURY, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22857). Son of Joseph and Amelia 
(Reynolds) Kingsbury, Jr.; grandson of Joseph Kingsbury, Corporal, Capt. 
Eleazer Hutchinson's Company, Colonel Hosford's Regt. Conn. Militia; grand- 
son of Charles Reynolds, private, Capt. James Horton's Company Conn. Militia, 
widow pensioned. 

WALTER REYNOLDS KINGSBURY, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22858). Son of 
Joseph and Amelia (Reynolds) Kingsbury, Jr. ; grandson of Joseph Kingsbury, 
Corporal, Capt. Eleazer Hutchinson's Company, Colonel Hosford's Regt. Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Charles Reynolds, private, Capt. James Horton's Com- 
pany Conn. Militia, widow pensioned. 

SAMUEL ERNEST LINTON, Jr., Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22872). Son of Samuel 
Ernest and Mary Frances (Mac Rae) Linton; grandson of Samuel and Eliza 
(Vallume) Linton; great-grandson of Edward Perry and Rachel (Soper) Val- 
lume; greats-grandson of Leonard Vallume, private, Capt. John Peyton's Com- 
pany Third Virginia Regt. 

HAYWARD MARSHALL, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22859). Son of Eugene and 
Lizzie (Williams) Marshall; grandson of Hay ward and Almira (Wild) Mar- 
shall; great-grandson of Hay ward and Olive (Hay ward) Marshall; greats-grand- 
son of Joseph (and Olive Manley) Hayward, private Bristol County Mass. 
Militia; greats-grandson of Daniel Manley, private, Nathan Packard's Company, 
Maj. Eliphalet Gary's Mass. Regt. 

FRANK M. MILLS, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22860). Son of Dan and Janet (West- 
fall) Mills; grandson of Jacob Westfall, Lieutenant, Colonel Crocket's Virginia 
Regt., pensioned. 

JOSEPH GREELEY PARSONS, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22861). Son of Seth T. 
and Mary (Greeley) Parsons; grandson of Joseph and Nancy (Hovey) Gree- 
ley; great-grandson of Noah Greeley, private, Capt. Nathan Brown's Company, 
Colonel Long's New Hampshire Regt. 

EDWIN LUCIEN PERKINS, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22862). Son of Loring Au- 
gustus and Julia (Morrill) Perkins; grandson of Hiram and Elizabeth Twom- 
bley (Drown) Perkins; great-grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Gray) Drown; 
greatS-grandson of Samuel Drown, private, Col. John Langdon's Company of 
Light Horse Volunteers of New Hampshire. 



28o SONS OF the: AMERICAN REV0I,UTI0N. 

ROBERT AUGUSTUS PERKINS, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22863). Son of Loring 
Augustus and Julia (Morrill) Perkins; grandson of Hiram and Elizabeth 
Twombley (Drown) Perkins; great-grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Gray) 
Drown; greats-grandson of Samuel Drown, private. Col. John Langdon's Com- 
pany of Ivight Horse Volunteers of New Hampshire. 

WILLIAM GOVE PORTER, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22864). Son of Amos Phelps 
and Mercy Eastman (Gove) Porter; grandson of Enos L,. and Mercy (East- 
man) Gove; great-grandson of Samuel Eastman, private, Col. John Stark's 
New Hampshire Regt. 

BENSON H. REQUA, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22865). Son of James D. and Nancy 
Iv. (Miner) Requa; grandson of Gabriel and Abigail (Tuttle) Requa; great- 
grandson of Daniel and Aeltie (Acker) Requa; greats-grandson of Glode Requa, 
Captain New York Militia, Member of Committee of Safety, prisoner in New 
York Sugar House. 

ROLLIN JOHN WELLS, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. (22866). Son of Lake and Har- 
riet R. Wells; grandson of Rinnah and Rachel Wells; great-grandson of Darnel 
Wells, private, Captain Mix's Company, Colonel Moseley's Conn. Regt. 

TENNESSEE SOCIETY. 

LELAND HUME, Nashville, Tenn. (19838). Son of William and Mary (Leland) 
Hume; grandson of Alfred and Louise (Bradford) Hume; great-grandson of 
John Bradford, private, Capt. Thomas Berry's Company Eighth Virginia Regt. 

TEXAS SOCIETY. 

JOHN STREET HOOVER, Houston, Texas (20764). Son of Wm. and Mattie 
L- Y. (Thompson) Hoover; grandson of Alexander and Dorothy Pryor (Wor- 
mack) Thompson; great-grandson of Alexander and Eunice (Strickland) 
Thompson; greats-grandson of Alexander Thompson, private Georgia Militia. 

WILLIAM CLENDENIN ROBERTSON BOLDRIDGE, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
(Texas 20765). Son of Benjamin F. and Nannie (Myers) Boldridge; grand- 
son of Robert C. and Mary (Harrison) Myers; great-grandson of David and 
Phceby (Mills) Myers; greats-grandson of Jacob Myers, Major South Caro- 
lina Troops. 

SAMUEL PETTIGREW ANCKER, Denison, Texas (20766). Son of Samuel 
Pettigrew and Catherine (Hyams) Ancker; grandson of Adolph and Hettie 
(Pettigrew) Ancker; great-grandson of James Pettigreiv, Lieutenant Eleventh 
Regt. Penna. Line. 

UTAH SOCIETY. 

JOSEPH WILLIS BISHOP, Provo, Utah (19323). Son of Joseph and Laura 
(Baldwin) Bishop; grandson of William C. and Phoebe (Sheldon) Baldwin; 
great-grandson of Jere and Caty (Lanfare) Sheldon; greats-grandson of Asher 
and Hannah (Rogers) Sheldon; greats-grandson of Asher Sheldon, private. 
Col. Charles Webb's Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM DAVID BRENNAN, Superior, Wyo. (Utah 22529). Son of W. D. 
and Laura C. (Smith) Brennan; grandson of EHsha B. and Lucinda (Minor) 
Smith; great-grandson of Thomas and Sally (Boardman) Smith; greatS-grand- 
son of Jonathan and Priscilla (Saflford) Boardman; greats-grandson of Joseph 
Boardman, Captain Second Company, or Train Band, Eighth Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

MORSE STEWART DUFFIELD, Salt Lake City, Utah (19324). Son of Henry 
M. and Frances (Pitts) Duffield; grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Merrill) 
Pitts; great-grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Mountfort) Pitts; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Pitts, Officer of Hancock Cadets, Boston, Mass.; great-- 
grandson of James Pitts, Member of Mass. Council. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 281 

:EDWIN ALBERT LITTLEFIELD, Ogden, Utah (22526). Son of Albert Galla- 
tin and Susan (Bateman) Littlefield; grandson of Jairus and Alathea (Elder- 
kin) Littlefield; great-grandson of John Booth and Lydia (Denison) Elder- 
kin; greats-grandson of Joshua Elderkin, Commissary Conn. Militia. 

JAMES HENRY MARTINEAU, Salt Lake City, Utah (19322). Son of John and 
Eliza (Mears) Martineau; grandson of James and Lois (Sprague) Mears; 
great-grandson of John Mears, Sergeant, Capt. Joseph Boynton's Company, 
Col. Nathaniel Wade's Mass. Regt. 

LYMAN ROYAL MARTINEAU, Salt Lake City, Utah (19325). Son of James 
Henry and Susan Julia (Sherman) Martineau; grandson of John and Eliza 
(Mears) Martineau; great-grandson of James and Lois (Sprague) Mears; 
greats-grandson of John Mears, Sergeant, Capt. Joseph Boynton's Company, 
Col. Nathaniel Wade's Mass. Regt. 

ALFRED HOLMES PEABODY, Salt Lake City, Utah {22^27). Son of Alfred 
S. and Catharine Barr (Holmes) Peabody; grandson of Alfred and Jerusha 
(Tay) Peabody; great-grandson of Nathan and Hannah (Stickney) Peabody; 
greats-grandson of Jedediah Stickney, Second Lieutenant Essex County Mass. 
Militia. 

ELI AS ASAHEL SMITH, Salt Lake City, Utah (22530). Son of EHas and Lucy 
(Brown) Smith; grandson of Asahel and Elizabeth (Schellenger) Smith; 
great-grandson of Asahel and Mary (Duty) Smith; greats-grandson of Samuel 
Smith, Chairman of Committee of Safety at Topsfield, Mass. 

VERMONT SOCIETY. 

HENRY A. BABBITT, Montpelier, Vt. (21064). Son of Ancil C. and Sarah 
Parkhurst (Willson) Babbitt; grandson of Otis and Mary (Parkhurst) Will- 
son; great-grandson of Benjamin Parkhurst, private, Capt. Joseph Parkhurst's 
Company Vermont Militia. 

7USTIN SAMUEL LEACH, Hyde Park, Vt. (21065). Son of Chester Keyes 
and Ann Augusta (Montague) Leach; grandson of Samuel and Hannah 
(Thomas) Montague; great-grandson of Rufus Montague, private, Capt. Wil- 
liam Hutchins's Company Vermont Militia. 

:EDWA'RD HOWE PROUTY, Montpelier, Vt. (21063). Son of Elon Howe and 
Jane L. (Dow) Prouty; grandson of Luther and Hepzibah (Howe) Prouty; 
great-grandson of Uriah Hozve, private, Colonel Nichols's Regt. New Hamp- 
shire Militia. 

ALLEN JARVIS SPRAGUE, Hartford, Vt. (21066). Son of Israel Gillett and 
Elizabeth (Matthews) Sprague; grandson of Jedidiah and Athela (Gillett) 
Sprague; great-graodson of Philip Sprague, private. Col. Samuel Fletcher's 
Battalion Vermont Militia. 

VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

JOHN BAGBY, Richmond, Va. (18598). Son of Alfred and Sarah Jane (Pol- 
lard) Bagby; grandson of John and Juliet (Jeffries) Pollard; great-grandson 
of Joseph Pollard, Sergeant Continental Army, pensioned. 

ROBERT MILLER JEFFRESS, Richmond, Va. (18597). Son of Thomas F. and 
Kate Lee (Miller) Jeffress; grandson of John Green and Anne Catherine 
Miller; great-grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Crigler) Miller; great-- 
grandson of John and Nancy (Hitt) Miller; great^'-grandson of Peter Hitt, 
private Virginia Infantry Continental Line. 

CLARENCE PORTER JONES, Newport News, Va. (18595)- So of John Robert 
and Ann Elizabeth Blackwell (Manson) Jones; grandson of Robert Blackwell 
and Betsy (Blackwell) Jones; great-grandson of Robert and Christiania (Black- 
well) Jones; greats-grandson of Stephen and Anna (Claiborne) Jones; great^"- 
■grandson of Thomas Jones, private. Col. Daniel Morgan's Virginia Regt. 



282 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

EDWARD THOMAS JONES, Bristol, Va. (18596). Son of Richard W. and' 
Cornelia (Thurman) Jones; grandson of Benjamin Stephen and Jane (Jef- 
fries) Tones; great-grandson of Stephen and Anna (Claiborne) Jones; great-- 
grandson of Thomas Jones, private. Col. Daniel Morgan's Virginia Regt. 

HARRY TAEMAN MOORE, Richmond, Va. (18599). Son of Josiah Staunton- 
and Jane Ellen Moore; grandson of James Robert and Maria (Higgins) 
Moore; great-grandson of Josiah and Elizabeth (Pollard) Higgins; great-- 
grandson of Robert and Nancy (Talman) Pollard; great'-grandson of William 
and Elizabeth (Hewlett) Talman; great*-grandson of Henry and Ann (Bal- 
lard) Talman; greats-grandson of William Ballard, private, Colonel Dudley's- 
Command of Virginia Militia, killed at Charles City Court House, Va., Jan- 
uary 8, 1 781, during Tarleton's Raid. 

HENRY ROBINSON POEEARD, Richmond, Va. (.22977). Son of John and' 
Juliet (Jeffries) Pollard; grandson of Joseph Pollard, Sergeant Continental. 
Army, pensioned. 

HENRY ROBINSON POLLARD, Jr., Richmond, Va. (22976). Son of Henry 
Robinson and Jessie (Gresham) Pollard; grandson of John and Juliet (Jef- 
fries) Pollard; great-grandson of Joseph Pollard, Sergeant Continental Army,, 
pensioned. 

JAMES JEFFRIES POLLARD, Richmond, Va. (18600). Son of Henry Robin- 
son and Jessie (Gresham) Pollard; grandson of John and Juliet (Jeffries)- 
Pollard; great-grandson of Joseph Pollard, Sergeant Continental Army, pen-- 
sioned. 

WASHINGTON SOCIETY. 

W. COURTNEY BAKES, Tacoma, Wash. (22208). Son of William Courtney and: 
Mary Hope (Earley) Bakes; grandson of James C. and Deborah (Clark> 
Early; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Matilda de Ford (Donohue) Clark;, 
great'-grandson of Jeremiah Clark, Lieutenant Essex County New Jersey 
Militia. 

DWIGHT CLARK DOUGLASS, Spokane, Wash. (22209). Son of Richard Draper 
and Mary Abby (Lawrence) Douglass; grandson of Ephraim Appleton and 
Clara Pamela (Buttrick) Lawrence; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Abigail. 
(Leavitt) Lawrence; greats-grandson of Thomas Leavitt, Quartermaster, Col.. 
Stephen Evans's New Hampshire Regt. 

CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM HORR, Seattle, Wash. (21000). Son of Leonard-: 
and Harriet (L,atshaw) Horr; grandson of Isaac and Nancy (Smith) Horr; 
great-grandson of Robert (and Sarah Reed) Hoar, Sergeant, Captain Pierce's 
Company Mass. Militia; great"-grandson of William Reed, private, Capt. Isaac 
Wood's Company, Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt. 

THOMAS MACOUGHTRY JUDSON, Tacoma, Wash. (22205). Son of Edward; 
Birdseye and Grace Lee (Macoughtry) Judson; grandson of Charles OverfieldS 
and Chloe (Rust) Judson; great-grandson of Charles and Sarah (Tracey)' 
Rust; greats-grandson of Ebenezer Kingsley Rust, private, Col. Seth Murray's 
Conn. Regt.; greats-grandson of Lemuel Rust, Lieutenant, Col. Ezra May's; 
Conn. Regt. 

FRANK MORRISON MARCH, Spokane, Wash. (22207). Son of Nelson and 
Mary J. (Morrison) March; grandson of George and Hannah (Nelson) March;- 
great-grandson of John March, Second Lieutenant, Col. James Reed's Ne>w 
Hampshire Regt. 

ARTHUR H. PALMER, Spokane, Wash. (22201). Son of EHsha and Eliza* 
(Miner) Palmer; grandson of Elisha Palmer, private, Col. Jonathan Latimer's 
Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

ROBINSON DRAKE PIKE, Seattle, Wash. (22204). Son of Robinson D. and' 
Eva (Johnson) Pike; grandson of Hiram E. and Lucinda (McArthur) John- 
son; great-grandson of Jonathan and Susan (Burwell) Johnson; greats-grandson.' 
of Windsor Johnson, private Eastern Battalion New Jersey Militia. 



RlEGISTER OF" NEW MEMBERS. 283 

WILLIAM H. SWITZLER, Umatilla, Ore. (Wash. 22203). Son of John B. and 
Mary A. (Smoot) Switzler; grandson of John and Mariah (Robinson) Switz- 
ler; great-grandson of Joseph and Peggie (Boyd) Robinson; great--grandson of 
William Robinson, Jr., private Second North Carolina Regt. ; greats-grandson 
of William Robinson, Sr., private Tenth North Carolina Regt. 

JOSEPH S. THOMAS, Tacoma, Wash. (22206). Son of Joseph S. and Martha 
Bennet (Olmsted) Thomas; grandson of John Olmsted; great-grandson of 
David Olmsted, Captain, Col. Roger Enos's Conn. Regt. 

CHARLES HERVEY WILBUR, Seattle, Wash. (22210). Son of Hervey B. and 
Harriet (Holden) Wilbur; grandson of Josiah and Martha (Wetherbee) Hol- 
der! ; great-grandson of Moses Holden, private, Col. Nathan Sparhawk's Mass. 
Regt. 

WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

JOHN WESLEY CARTER, Racine, Wis. (20070). Son of Samuel Wesley and 
Ellen Rebecca (Wilson) Carter; grandson of John and Rebecca (Tift) Wilson; 
great-grandson of Asa Wilson, private Conn. Troops, pensioned. 

WYOMING SOCIETY. 

SAMUEL ALLAN BRISTOL, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20034). Son of Leverett and 
Sarah N. (Field) Bristol; grandson of Anson and Achsah (Benton) Field; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Lucy (Murray) Field; great"-grandson of 
David Field, private, Capt. Daniel Hand's Company, Colonel Talcott"s Conn. 
Regt. 

FRANK LINCOLN MOORE, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20033). Son of Merritt and .Mary 
A. (Wright) Moore; grandson of Luther and Milly (Foster) Wright; great- 
grandson of Jonathan and Hannah (Cutter) Foster; greats-grandson of James 
Foster, private, Col. Moses Nichols's New Hampshire Regt. ; great"-grandson 
of Benjamin Cutter, private, Col. Enoch Hale's New Hampshire Regt. ; great- 
grandson of Abner and Anna (Hunt) Wright; great--grandson of Edward 
(and Thankful Brown) Wright, Lieutenant, Captain Minot's Company Third 
Middlesex Mass. Regt. ; great--grandson of Ephraim Brown, fifer, Capt. James 
Russell's Company, Colonel Brooks's Mass. Regt.; great--grandson of Nehemiah 
Hunt, private Mass. Militia; grandson of Hiram and Eunice (Hutchinson) 
Moore; great-grandson of Solomon Hutchinson, private Albany County New 
York Militia, Member of Committee of Safety. 



Index of New Members and Revolutionary 

Ancestors. 



Revolutionary Ancestors in Italics. 



Abbe, Thomas, 206 

Abbott, Bixby, 227 

Abbott, Samuel, 227 

Acklin, G. W., 272 

Acklin, Joseph, 272 

Adair, W. A., 245 

Adams, Abel, 260 

Adams, C. S., 227 

Adams, D. J., 272 

Adams, G. S., 220 

Adams, G. S., 278 

Adams, James, 269. 272 

Adams, Jonathan, 227 

Adams, Richard, 220 

Adams, Samuel, 206, 223, 224, 227 

Adams, Stephen, 227 

Adams. W. R., 227 

Adams, W. S., 224 

Adee, T. L., 251 

Adkins, W. G., 207 

Adriance, F. W., 251 

Adriance, Rem, 251 

Agnew, Robert, 274 

Aiken, Thomas, 244 

Alban George, 266 

Alban,' W. R., 266 

Alden, Austin, 234 

Allen, F. B., 198 

Allen, Gilbert, 271 • 

Allen, G. W. H., 251 

Allen, Heber, 266 

Allen, H. N., 266 

Allen. J. D., 195 

Allen, Thomas, 251 

Allen, Thomas, 251 

Allen, W. E., 266 

Allen, W. L., 227 

Alley, Nathan, 232 

Ailing, Caleb, 198 

Allison, J. B., 277 

Allison, J. B., Jr.. 277 

Allmond, H. F., 202 

Alton, D. C, 207 

Ames, Benjamin, 227 

Ancker, S. P., 280 

Anderson, Enoch, 255 



Anderson, George, 218 
Anderson. R. W., 216 
Andrews, E. L., 266 
Andreivs, Zephaniah. 193 
Angle, S. L., 238 
Appleton, C. B , 228 
Arden, Jacob, 214 
Armstrong, A. B., 251 
Armstrong, Oliver, 268 
Armstrong^ William, 246 
Arnold, Jabez, 246 
Arnold, Job, 240 
Arnold, J. R., 275 
Arnold, William, 275 
Arret, David, 267 
Arrel, D. T., 267 
Asa, W. P., 207 
Ashley. E. H., 238 
Ashley, William, 238, 278 
Askin, W. J., Jr., 272 
Atkins, F. W., 228 
Atkinson, T. C, 226 
Atzvood, Benjamin, 207 
Atwood, F. H., 207 
Austin, David, 208 
Averill, N. K., 198 
Averill, Perry, 198 

Babbitt, C. J., 228 
Babbitt, Ebcnezer, 228 
Babbitt. H. A., 281 
Babcock, James, 210 
Bachelor, C. O., 228 
Bagley, H. E., 195 
Bagley, John, 281 
Bailey, C. O., 278 
Bailey, John, 222 
Bailey, T. M.. 278 
Bainbridge, Richard, 207 
Baker, C. R., 245 
Baker, Daniel, 226, 245, 248 
Baker, David, 192 
Baker, H. F.. 226 
Baker, L. D., 198 
Baker, S. C, 277 
Bakes, W. C, 282 

(285) 



286 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Baldwin, Isaac, 205 
Ballard, Bland, 220, 221, 222 
Ballard, C. M. T.. 220 
Ballard, C. T., 220 
Ballard, Daniel, 228 
Ballard, G. B., 220 
Ballard, S. T., 220 
Ballard, W. D., 228 
Ballard, William, 282 
Bane, A. C. 272 
Barber, James, 276 
Barker, C. S., 207 
Barker, F. M., 207 
Barker, H. S., 221 
Barker, Josiah, 207 
Barker, M. S.. 221 
Barnes, F. R., 240 
Barnes, J. W., 251 
Barnes, Stephen, 214 
Barnes, W. W., 214 
Barret, A. G., 221 
Barret. Francis, 22r 
Barrett, W. H., 238 
Barron, Daniel, 204 
Barrows, G. E., 251 
Barrozvs, Isaac, 251 
Bartlett, R. B., 244 
Bartlett, S. D., 228 
Bartlett, W. L., ig6 
Bass, Nathan^ 200 
Bates, Elijah, 233 
Bates, Issacher, 231 
Bates, John, 233 
Batcheller, Abraham, 265 
Batcheller, C. E., 265 
Beach, Enoch, 245, 246 
Beal, Daniel, 228 
Beal F. L., 228 
Beall, F. M. M., 240 
Bean, Josiah, 277 
Bean. W. S., 277 
Beard, R. A., 265 
Beard, Samuel, 202 
Beckwith, T. D., 265 
Bedlow, J. J., 228 
Beebe^ Stewart, 278, 279 
Behringer, Christopher, 247 
Belcher, C. E., 228 
Belden, J. H., 198 
Belknap, William, 251 
Belknap, W. B., 251 
Bell. G. H., 251 
Bell, J. C, 228 
Bell^ Jonathan, Jr., 257 
Bell, Milton, 214 
Bell, Nathaniel, 214 
Bellinger, Frederick, 201 
Benedict, H. L., 245 
Benedict, Joseph. 245 



Benjamin, Cyrus, 252 
Bennett, Benjamin, 226 
Bennett^ Daniel, 226 
Bennett, John, 253 
Benson, O. P., 251 
Bent, Peter, 229 
Bentley, J. H., 221 
Benton, E. C, 228 
Berge, Christian, 259 
Betts, Benjamin, 234 
Bej'er. F. L., 252 
Bicknell, G. F., 214 
Bidwell, Thomas, 226 
Bigelow, A. B., 252 
Bigelow, Solomon, 252, 254 
Bill, Benajah, 268 
Bill, E. McM., 240 
Billings, Benjamin^ 276 
Billings, Daniel, 277 
Billings, Jonathan, 276 
Billings, W. T., 244 
Bird, Edmund, 252 
Bird, G. W., 252 
Bird, W. N. D., 252 
Bisbee, Charles, 20O 
Bisbee, Elisha, 206 
Bishop, J. W., 280 
Bissell. Benjamin, 243 
Bissell, Zebnlon, 243, 260 
Bissell, W. G., 252 
Black. G. M., 207 
Blackman, F. L., 278 
Blackman, G. T., 278 
Blackwelder, G. E., 270 
Blackzvelder, Isaac. 270 
Blackwelder, M. L., 270 
Blaisdell, Alfred, 265 
Blanchard, Josiah, 233 
Blaney, Benjamin, 260 
Bliss, Abraham, 245 
Bliss, C. G., 245 
Bliss, C. R., 267 
Bliss, Ephraim, 267 
Bliven, G. H., 216 
Bliven, Samuel, 216 
Blood, David, 236 
Blossom, James, 271 
Blossom, R. H., 271 
Blount, A. C., 205 
Blount, Jacob, 262, 264 
Blount, James, 205, 262 
Blount, J. G.. 264 
Blount, J. G., Jr.. 262 
Blount, Reading, 262. 264 
Blount, T. H., 262 
Blount, William, 194 
Bly. Moses, 192 
Boardman, Joseph, 280 
Bodzvell, William, 236 



INDEX OF NEW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS. 



287 



Boise, C. G., 265 

Boise, W. E., 265 

Boldridge, W. C. R., 280 

Bonnell, E. H., 245 

Bonner. B. T., 262 

Bonner, Henry, 264 

Bonner, H. M., 262 
^ Bonner, James, 262, 263, 264 

Bonner, J. Y., 262 

Bonner, K. P. B., 262 

Bonner, L. De C, 262 

Bonner, R. L. M., 263 

Bonner, R. T., 263 

Bonsall, J. H., 245 

Bonsall, J. M., 245 

Borden, C. F., 246 

Borst, C. R., 196 

Bose, A. G., 225 
' Bourne, James, 2.2.2 
Bowen, E. E., 206 
Bo-duen, Peter, 216 
Bowen, William, 216 
Bower, William, 219 
Bowler, Metcalf, 205 
Bowman, Solomon, 203 
-Bowman, Thaddens, Jr., 207 
Bowman, W. J., 207 
Boyd, E. S., 198 
Boyd, John, 215 
Bradbury, C. K., 275 
Bradley, C. S., 252 
Bradley, Daniel, 267 
Bradley, J. S., 267 
Bradley, P. B., 216 
Bradley, P. H., 216 
Bradford, John, 280 
Bradford, Samuel, 224 
Bragaw, J. G., Jr., 263 
Bragaw, S. C., 263 
Brainard, J. H., 246 
Brainard, M. H., 246 
Bramhall, F. E., 22y 
L Bray, Daniel, 264 
P Bray, A. W., 246 
Breed, F. S., 229 
Brennan, W. D., 280 
Brevard, Alexander, 277 
Brezvster, Elias_ 198 
Brewster, R. M., 198 
Brian, Alexis, 223 
Brian, Hardy, 223 
Bridgers, H. C, 263 
Bridgham, John, 225 
Briggs, Joel, 231 
Brigham, Benajah, 229 
Briscoe, Henry, 215 
Bristol, Reuben, 2t6 
Bristol, R. F., 196 
Bristol. S. A., 283 



Britton, C. O. 198 
Britton, R. d!, 198 
Broeck, L. T., 254 
Brokazc, John, 215 
Bronk, Ephviam, 219 
Brook, J. T., 243 
Brookman, John, 257 
Brookman, M. G., 258 
Brooks, Edward, 228 
Brower, A. Q., 194 
Brovi/n, Ephraim, 283 
Brown, John, 228 
Brownell, George, 244 
Brunei, R. F., 224 
Bryan, F. H., 263 
Bryan, Jesse, 26} 
Bryan, W. T., Sr., 263 
Bryant, J. J., Jr.. 207 
Bryant, Timothy, 235 
Buckley, Monroe, 246 
Buckner, S. B., 221 
Buckner, S. B., Jr., 221 
Buck, Daniel, 253 
Buck, Israel, 267 
Buck, J. H. Van D., 267 
Bugbee, A. S., 191 
Buhlman, J. H., 267 
Bukey, B. M., 202 
Bull, John, 223 
Bunten, Andrea.', 226 
Burdon, John, 228 
B urges, John, 256 
Burgess, Edivard, 203 
Burke, E. De V., 198 
Burnam, E. T., 221 
Biirnam, John, 221 
Burnham, A. H., 226 
Burnham, C. F., 226 
Burnham, Jedediah, 226 
Burrill, John, 233 
Burrill, Ebenezer, 233 
Burroughs, C. F., 246 
Burroughs, John, 246 
Burrows, Waters, 249 
Butler, Isaac, 273 
Butler, Joel, 255 
Butler, S. S., 273 
Butler. William, 277 
Butt, Sherebiah, 242 
Buxton, C. Q., 240 
Byerley, D. E., 196 

Cabell, John, 275 
Cabell, Joseph, 222 
Cady, Samuel, Jr., 252 
Cadv. Samuel, Sr., 252 
Cadv. W. C, 252 
Calder, R. L., 275 
Caldwell, Alexander, 207 



288 



SONS O^ THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Caldwell, J. G., 221 
Caldzvell, John, 221 
Caldwell, O. N., 207 
Callen, G. B,, 246 
Cameron, G. R., 207 
Campbell, Alexander, 232, 2y2, 
Campbell, Daniel, 242 
Campbell, Henry, 192 
Campbell, Hugh, 215 
Campbell, J. B., 215 
Campbell, McDonald, 239 
Candee, Samuel, 202 
Capen, John, 209 
Caperton, J. H., 221 
Carnrick, G. W., 246 
Carnrick, Millard, 246 
Carpenter, Ashman, 192 
Carpenter^ Benjamin, 266 
Carpenter, David, 217 
Carpenter, F. A., 192 
Carpenter, John, 259 
Carpenter, L. G., 196 
Carpenter, Simeon, 240 
Carroll, C. H., 267 
Carson, R. D., 272 
Carter, A. R., 221 
Carter, Josiah, 199 
Carter, J. W., 283 
Caruthers, Richard, 27^ 
Case, A. E., 208 
Case, Elisha, 208 
Castle. E. B., 198 
Castleman, J. B., 222 
Cate, Enoch, 191 
Gate. H. B., 191 
Catlin, Seth, 207 
Cavender, C. A., 240 
Cavcnder, Charles, 240 
Chamberlain, Ebcnezer, 234 
Chamberlain, H. L., 206 
Chamberlin, Joseph, 228 
Chambers, John, 272 
Chambers, W. H., 272 
Chandler, John, 230 
Chandler. L. B., 247 
Chapin, C. S., 229 
Chapin, Nathaniel, 193 
Chase, C. H., 229 
Chassell, E. D., 217 
Chenev. A. M., 208 
Cherry, W. B.. 252 
Chesley, H. W., 203 
Chesley, J. T., 203 
Chesson. F. W., 199 
Chickering, H. G., 271 
Chickering, John, 271 
Child, Cephas, 209 
Childs, B. H., 208 
Childs, F. L., 208 



Chubb, Samuel, 239 

Chubbuck, S. E., 242 

Chubbuck, Timothy, 242 

Churchill, Armistead, 220, 221, 22J. 

Clapp, Joshua, 265 

Clapp, R. J.. 199 

Clapp, W. J., 265 

Clark, A. C., 252 

Clark, C. R., 267 

Clark, E. A., 229 

Clark, Gershom, 213 

Clark, G. W., 191 

Clark H. E., 238 

Clark, H. S., 192 

Clark, James, 267 

Clark, Jeremiah, 282 

Clark, J. M., 229 

Clark, John, 232 

Clark, J. W., 208 

Clark, Lemuel, 191 

Clark, Moses, 252 

Clark, Richard, 231 

Clark, Thomas, 243 

Clark, William, 240 

Clark, W. W., 240 

Clarke, Atkins, 276 

Clarke, Thomas, 276 

Clason, Samuel, 196 

Clason, G. S., 196 

Cleaveland, Solomon, 250 

Clingan, W. A., 217 

Clinton, Peter, 277 

Coates, J. T. L., 265 

Coates, William, 265 

Coburn, H. C, 205 

Cochran, J. L., 208 

Cocke, Stephen, 222 

CogsiveU, William, 202 

Coit, Samuel, 257 

Coke, R. H., 222 

Colby, Thomas, 224 

Cole, Daniel, 248 

Cole, Eleazcr, 235 

Cole, Elisha, 248 

Coleman, G. H., 267 

Coleman, Jesse, 267 

Coleman, Noah, 204 

Colgrove, P. T.. 238 

Collamer, Anthony. 252 

Collamer, J. W., 252 

Collins, Benjamin, 2^7 

Collins, Benjamin, 241 

Colson, E. R., 253 

Combes, H. A., 253 

Colton, A. J., 253 

Comly, H. R., 192 

Comstock, Aaron, 261 

Conant, Eleazer, 238 

Conant, H. A., 238 



INDEX OF XKW .Mli.MHKKS AM) AXCIvSTOUS. 



289 



Conckling, Hubbard, 259 
Cone, J. W., 278 
Cone, R. E.. 279 
Conger, C. L., 241 
Conger, Greshom, 241 
Conklin, Douglass, 253 
Conklin, Ezra, 259 
Conklin, Thomas, 253 
Conklin, Timothy, 253 
Conner, Cornelius, 275 
Connolley. F. D., 267 
Con over, A. H., 247 
Conover, J. H., 247 
Conrad, J. W., 196 
Conyers, James, Jr., 277 
Conycrs, James, Sr., i"/"] 
Conjers. W. P.. 277 
Cook, A. E., 229 
Cook, Coleman, 229 
Cook, H. F., 229 
Cook, Blihu, 235 
Cook, Elisha, 229 
Cook, Jonathan, 22g 
Cook^ Lemuel, 260 
Cook, Reuben, 238 
Cook, R. L., 229 
Cooke, Ebenezer, 209 
Cooke, Moses, 199 
Cooley, William, 269 
Cooper, A. B., 192 
Corbin, Asahel, 199 
Corbin, W. H., 199 • 
Corbusier, W. H., 253 
Cornish, V. V., 192 
Cornish, Gabriel, 192 
Cotting, PI L., 208 
Cotton. R. C, 275 
Coulter, J. C., 277 
Courtright, H. M., 271 
Cousens, VV. T., 224 
Covert, I^uke, 196 
Cowden, Robert, 267 
Cozvden, Robert, 267 
Cowdin, Thomas^ 253 
Cowdin, Winthrop, 253 
Coyle, A. L., 272 
Cracraft, Charles, 244, 272 
Cragin, John, Jr.. 224 
Craig, G. R.. 250 
Craig, James, 222 
Crane, Israel, 223 
Crane, John, 228 
Creegan. C. C, 265 
Cresap, Daniel, 204, 258 
Cresap, J. McD., 226 
Cresap, Joseph, 226 
Cresa(y, Thomas, 204 
Crippen, Ezra, 208 
Crippen, P. R., 208 
19 — SR 



Crittenden, W. L., 270 
Crocker. C. T., 192 
Crosby, H. W., 205 
Crosby, John, 205 
Crosby, Oliver, 265 
Cross, Uriah, 207 
Crow, H. A., 272 
Crowder, A. C, 242 
Crowell, F. W., 192 
Cro.rall, Charles, 226 
Crunnnett, C. S., 199 
Cunningham, James, 272 
Cunningham, J. C, 272 
Ctirrier, Edzvard, 230 
Currier, F. A., 230 
Curtis, William, 244 
Curtis, Simeon, 201 
Ciishing, Daniel, 192 
Cushing, H. D., 192 
Cushnian, Consider, 229 
Cutler, Ebcnecer, 205 
Cutter, Benjamin, 283 
Cutting, .Samuel, 208 

Dake, Charles, 256 
Dana, James, 212 
Daonst, E. C, 267 
Darbee, R. S., 253 
D'Arcy, John, 208 
Davenport, J. Le R., 203 
David, H. P.. 253 
Davis, E. B., 192 
Davis, Edward, Jr., 248 
Davis, F. E., 253 
Davis, F. W.. 254 
Davis, James, 267 
Davis, Joseph, Sr., 248 
Davis, Richard, 192 
Davis, Samuel, 253, 254 
Davis, W. M., 226 
Davison, R. W., 199 
Davison, Samuel, 204 
Dav, A. L., 242 
Dav. H. B., 192 
Dean, Sfezvart, 213, 262 
Dearborn, Jonathan, 233 
Deatrick, J. F.. Jr., 268 
Delamater, William, 254 
Delano, Isaac, Jr., 252 
Deming, Powual, 256 
Denison, T. S., 208 
Dcnnen, Samuel, 244 
Dennett, Joseph, 194 
Denning, C. R., 244 
Dennison, James, 208 
Dent, John, 209 
Deusenbcrrie, William, 251 
Dezvey, Eliab, 201 
Dewey, F. G., 238 
Dewey, Gideon, 238 



290 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Dexter, H. C. 192 
Deyoe, G. M., 254 
Dickerman. F. E., 230 
Dickeriiiaii, Isaac, 252 
Dickey, Adam, 209 
Dickinson, Joseph, 208 
Dickinson, J. T., 254 
Dickinson, Simeon, 240 
Dickinson, Thomas, 192 
Diehl. Frederick, 273 
Diehl. Oliver, 272 
Dictrick, Jacob, 268 
Dill man, Andrezv, 217 
Dillman, H. C, 217 
Dungan, Jesse, 218 
Doane, Udzcard, 234 
Dodd, Amos, 254 
Dodd. P. S., 254 
Dodge. Zachariah. 227 
Doe, C. A., 244 
Dold, W. E., 254 
Doley, John, 224 
DoUiver, Peter, 2yj 
Dolson. John, 254 
Dolson, J. W., 254 
Douglass, D. C. 282 
Dotv, Reuben, 214 
Dowling. G. De W.. 266 
Downer, John, 247 
Downer. V. E.. 247 
Downing, Richard, 196 
Dozvning, Samuel, 254 
Downing, W. jNL. 196 
Doying, Daniel, 203 
Doying, W. A. E., 203 
Drake, Daniel, 217 
Drake, Isaac, 267 
Draper, H. S., 254 
Draper, J. E., 226 
Draper, Simeon, 254 
Drew, G. E.. 224 
Drozun, Samuel, 279, 280 
Du Bois, Abraham, 203 
Du Bois. C. L.. 203 
Du Bois, Minna, 203 
Dudley, Benjamin, 234 
DudleV, H. J., 208 
Dudley, John, 22S 
Dudley, Nathaniel. 228 
Duffieid, M. S.. 280 
Dugan, F. Q., 222 
Dunbar, Jacob. 230 
Dunbar. Joseph, 199 
Dunbar, M. B., 199 
Dunham. Daniel, 210 
Dunham, Gideon, 261 
Dunlap, Adam, 236 
Dunshee, F. S.. 217 
Dupui, Nicholas, 272 
Durfey. JoJni, 20^ 



Durrell, H. C, 230 
Dutton, Grayson, 193 
Dutton, Sainiiel, 193 
Dwight, Timothy, 279 
D wight, T. W., 279 
Dyer. E. G.. 268 

Earlv, A. D.. 208 
Earlv, C. C, 275 
Early, J. A., 275 
Eastman, Samuel, 280 
East on, Elijah, 195 
Eastwood, A. B., 254 
Eaton, Levi, 270 
Eaton. Thomas. 200 
Ebey, George, 269 
Eckert, J. A., 254 
Eddy, Barnard, 27^ 
Eddy, C. W., 241 
Eddy, JVillard, 241 
Edge, W. E., 247 
Edwards, O. E., 26.^ 
Edwards. O. M., 254 
Edwards, William, 203 
Edwards, W. W., 203 
Elden, John, 224 
Elder kin, Joshua, 281 
Elliott. H. G.. 2SS 
Ellis, A. H., 255 
Ellis, Caleb, 218 
Ellis, Freeman, 206 
Ellis, William, 266 
Ellsworth, G. A., 230 
Ellszvorth, Henry, 271 
Ellszi'orth, Oliver, 255 
Ellszvorth, IVilliam, 230 
Ellsworth. W. VV'., 255 
Elmcndorf, Benjamin, 253 
Elmer, Jonathan, 202 
Elseffer, J. H.. 193 
Elton, Bradley, 230 
Elton, W. E., 230 
Emerson, Parker. 235 
Emers'on, Thomas. 229 
Emery, W. INI., 230 
Endicott, Samuel, 229 
Enfield, Americus, 273 
Eustace, William, 270 
Evans, Elieasor, 274 
Evans, Edward. 215 
Evens. Abel, 248 
Ewing, L. W., 222 
Ewing. R. M., 273 

Fairbanks. C. E., 276 
Fairbanks. Nathaniel. 276 
Fairfield, C. W., 250 
Fales. G. L.. 276 
Faris, William, 279 
Farley, X. S.. 193 



INDEX OF NEW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS. 



291 



Faniszuorth, David, 226 
Farr, J. C, Jr., 255 
Farrar, Humphrey, 206 
F array, Samuel, 206 
Farrington, William, 233 
Faunce, Thomas, 228 
Fay, D. W., 243 
Fay, John, 231 
Fay, Joseph, 243 
Faxon, Bbcnezer, 199 
Faxon, W. C 199 
Ferguson, Ebenezcr, 214 . 
Ferris, C. L., 209 
Ferris, Israel, 209 
Field, David, 283 
Field. John, 199. 213. 221 
Findlex, IVilliam, 273 
Fish, H. C, 266 
Fisher, Ebenezcr, 212 
Fletcher, Francis, 236 
Fletcher, M. T., 217 
Fletcher, Samuel, 217, 219 
Fobes, Benjamin, Jr.. 230 
Fobes, W. H., 230 
Fogle, Le Roy, 209 
Follansbee, G. L., 273 
Foote, David, 196 
Ford, Jacob, 245, 246 
Foreman, Caleb, 262 
Forster, Daniel, 241 
Fosdick, R. B.. 247 
Fosdick, Samuel, 247 
Foster, A. G., 230 
Foster. Ephraim, 202 
Foster, G. B., 277 
Foster, James, 283 
Foster. Timothy, Jr., 276 
Foster, W. S., 241 
Fowle, F. E., Jr., 203 
Fowler, Ebenezcr, 208 
Fowler. Zephon, 197 
Fox, D. G., 268 • 
Fox, Edivard, 230 
Fox. Frederick, 268 
Fox, W. L., 230 
Frambach, F. S., 255 
Freeland. T. H., 247 
Freeman, E. E., 199 
Freer, R. W., 241 
Freer, .Samuel, 241 
French, C. H., 279 
Fricrson, J. F.. 242 
Fricrson, Robert, 242 
Fricrson, Williavi, 242 
Frost, Epliriam, 199 
Frost. N. S., 193 
Fry, Michael, 274 
FrVer. G. G., 255 
Fudge. E. H., 209 
Fuller, Enoch. 250 



Fuller, H. R., 238 
Fuller, Peter, 242 
Fuller, W. R., 196 
Fuliington, David, 236 
Fuimer, Caspar, 208 
Fulmer, Jacob, 219 
Fulton, A. C, 25s 
Fttrman, Richard, 277 
Furman, Wood, 277 

Gage, Ebenezcr, 252 
Gage, Justus, 252 
Galloway, A. B., 270 
Galloway, James, 270 
Galloway, John, 239 
Gal pin, Amos, 209 
Galpin, W. D., 209 
Gamble, J. De K., 217 
Gamble. Joseph, 217 
Gardner, C. P., 209 
Gardner, G. A., 230 
Gardner, Perez. 235 
Garrett. John, 206 
Gault. Mattheiv, 226 
Gault, P. F., 279 
Gault, W. A., 226 
Gay, A. P., 231 
Gay, R. L., 231 
Gay lord, Benjamin, 255 
Gaylord. Samuel, 235 
Geer, F. M., 247 
Gibbons. Abel, 254 
Gibson, James, 270 
Gibson, W. H., 206 
Gilbert, Thomas, 202 
Gildcrsleeve, Ferdinand. 199 
Gildersleeve, Philip, 199 
Giles, A. B., 226 
Giles, Ebenezcr, 271 
Gillett, H. L., 241 
Gillett, John, 201 
Gillette, Edward, 199 
Gilmore. J. W.. 203 
Goddard. H. W., 271 
Goldthwait, Stephen, 22S, 
Golson, Lewis, 278 
Gooch, De W. R., 209 
Gooch, Joseph, Jr., 209 
Goodnow, C. H., 209 
Goodridqe, David, 208 
Goold, John, 265 
Gordon, R. J., 271 
Gordon, W. E., 270 
Gore, E. E., 209 
Gore, Eleazer, 209 
Gore, Silas, 215 
Gorin, John, 222 
Gorin, L. J., 222 
Gorse, C. A., 255 
Gosser, G. W.. 273 



292 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Gossett, W. B., 222 
Gotwalt, Jacob, 267 
Gould, Daniel, 195 
Grady, C. F., 255 
Grant, Aaron, 200 
Grant, Oliver, 237 
Gray, Henrj^ 217 
Grav. J. P., 199 
Gray, J. W., Jr., 277 
Grcelcv, Noah, 279 
Green,^ O. D., 255 
Green, Timothy, 261 
Greene, Benjamin, 209 
Greene, Christopher, 191 
Greene, Frank, 209 
Greene, John, 250, 255 
Greenlaw, W. P., 231 
Greenleaf, Moses, 238 
Greer, R. B., 273 
Greyclene-Smith, V. E. G.. 196 
Griffith, Hozvard, 193, 195 
Griffith, Howard, 193 
Griffith, J. T., 193 
Grigg, lienry, 259 
Griggs, T. C, 273 
Griggs, Thomas, Jr., 273 
Griggs, Thomas, Sr., 273 
Grosvenor, John, 255 
Grow, C. S., 255 
Grow, J. E., 268 
Griimbacher, Peter, 274 
Gutterson, William, 234 

Hackett, C. H., 255 
Hackett, Daniel, 255, 256 
Hackett, H. H.. 256 
Haddeii, Thomas, 249 
Hadley, John, 236 
Hadley, Jonas, 236 
Hadley, Moses, 22,2 
Hadley, Thomas, 264 
Hadle'y, W. C., 209 
Hadley, W. E., 209 
Haggard, A. M., 217 
Haggard, William, 217 
Hale, John, 231 
Hale, William, 231 
Hall, A. W., 224 
Hall, Tinoch, 224 
Hall, Horatio, 256 
Hall, John. 218, 2s6 
Hall. R. T., 247 
Hallock, W. N., 256 
Halsey, Abraham, 245, 246 
Halsey, Stephen, 248. 25' 
Hamilton, A. S., 247 
Hamilton, Frank, 256 
Hamilton, J. K.. 268 
Hamlin, William, 250 
Hammond, IVilliam, 22j 



Hanna, Robert, 216 
Hardenbergh, Johannes. 2ii 
Harding, C. A., 231 
Harding, Israel, 263, 265 
Harding, W. B., 263 
Hardy, I. M., 263 
Harmon, William, 277 
Harmon, T. E., 224 
Harmon, Thomas, 224 
Harra, Charles, 238 
Harrah, C. W., 238 
Harriman, Peter, 212 
Harrington, Thaddeus, 234 
Harris, Asahel, 268 
Harris, C. F., 222 
Harris, Daniel, 198 
Harris, E. L., 268 
Harris, Oliver, 230 
Harrison, C. H., 222 
Hart, M. L., 268 
Hartshorn, Richard, 237 
Haselton, F. C., 209 
Haskell, W. F., 224 
Hastings. Benjamin, 231 
Hastings, C. A., 206 
Hastings, C. H., 231 
Hastings, Samuel, 206 
Hastings, Simon, 231 
Hastings, W. R., 231 
Hatch, C. H., 238 
Hatch, Dan, 244 
Hatch, Elisha, 269 
Hatch, H. H., 238 
Hatch, Jethro, 238 
Hatfield, Aaron, 207 
Hathorne, H. G., 231 
Hazvkins, Benjamin, 231 
Hawkins. M. S., 215 
Hazvkins, Samuel, 215 
Hawkins. W. H., 231 
Hayes, F. W., 205 
Hayes, J. H., 217 
Hayes, Robert, 217 
Hayne, Isaac, 277 
Hayne, P. T., 277 
Haynes, Thomas, 273 
Hayzvard, Joseph, 279 
Hayzvood, C. H., 236 
Hayzvood, David, 236 
Hayzvood, William, 263 
Hcald. Ephraim, 224 
Heald. Ephraim, Jr., 224 
Heald, H. A., 224 
Heffley, N. P., 256 
Hengst, J. M., 268 
Henning, D. A., 277 
Hennion, C. O., 247 
Hennion, Cornelius, 247 
Heritage, John, 205 
Herkimer, George, 25] 



INDEX OK Xi:\V M/CMBERS AXD ANCESTORS. 



-93 



Herkimer, Henry. z\j 
Hiatt. AI. W., 2IQ 
Hillard. Bciijaiuiii, 198 
Hi lie, Noble, 270 
H inkle, Anthony, 267 
Hitchcock, David, 202 
Hitchcock, Luke, 231 
Hitchcock. N. S., 231 
Hitt, Peter, 28 r 
Hoar, Daniel, 227 
Hoar Robert, 282 
Hoar, Stephen. 227 • 

Hoitt, C. L.. 232 
Holabird. Timothy. 200 
Holabird, W. H./200 
Holcoinb, Jcdediah, 266 
Holden, Moses, 283 
Holden, Simon, 200 
Holden. W. A., 200 
Hollande, J. M.. 226 
Holland c, Joseph, 226 
Hollister, David, 194 
Holmes, E. R., 200 
Holmes. G. B.. 209 
Holmes. George, 253 
Holmes. Joseph, 200 
Holmes. JosiaJi, 246 
Holmes, R. W., 200 
Holt, Jotliani, 243 
Holton, B. L.. 210 
Homan, W. C, 200 
Hooper, R. L., 226 
Hooton. John, 228 
Hoover, J. S., 280 
Hon-. C. W., 282 
Hoskins, A. C, 217 
Hoskins. Eli, 217 
Hoskins. Richard, 265 
Hoskins. S. B., 217 
Hoskins. IVilliam. 195. 217 
Hosmer, J. C. 232 
Hosmer, Stephen, 2^ 
Hossack, C. B., 210 
Hotchkiss, Amos, 196 
Hotchkiss, W. K., 196 
Hough, John, 210 
Houghton, Abijah. 255 
Hozvard, Daniel, 22s 
Hozvard, Eliakim, 196 
Howe, A. C, 232 
Howe, Uriah, 281 
Howland, Carver. 193 
Hoyt, G. A., 256 
Hoyt, Joseph, 256 
Hovt. T. G., 271 
Hubbard. G. C, 247 
Hubbard. George. 247, 264 
Htiber, John, 212 
Hudson. C. A., 256 
Hudson. E. A., 256 



Huff, H. M., 210 
Hull. F. C, 200 
Hull, Jedediah, 200 
Hume. Leland, 280 
Huinphrcvs, Lezvis, 215 
Hunt, D/B., 248 
Hunt, E. McK., 248 
Hunt, G. C., 210 
Hunt, Nehemiah, 283 
Hunt, Oliver, 272 
Hunt, Richard, 248 
Hunt, Russell, 210 
Hunting, Amos, 273 
Hurlburt, F. H., 200 
Hustead, Robert, 272 
Husted, David, 265 
Hutchins, Jeremiah, 238 
Hutchinson, F. J.. 232 
Hutchinson, Solomon, 283 
Hutton. G. C. 210 
Huttoii, Timnthy, 210 

Ingalls, G. A., 232 
Ingalls, G. W.. 236 

Ireland, Thomas, 255 
Irioin, John, 245 
Irwin, John, 206 
Irwin. Frederick, 206 
Ives, G. S., 241 
Ives, Joseph, 241 

Jackson, Solomon, F95 
Jackson, Stephen, 245, 246 
Jacoby, H. F.. 250 
James, W. T., 276 
Jameson, Thomas, 243 
Jaqua, Gamaliel, 215 
Jaques, R. W., 232 
Jaques, Samuel, 232 
Jaraloman, John, 257 
Jayne, Jotham, 239 
Javne, I. W.. 238 
Jeffress, R. M., 281 
Jeffrey, A. B.. 218 
Jeffrey, W. E.. 218 
Jeffries, Joseph, 247 
Jenkins, Addison, 215 
Jenkins,^ H. C.. 215 
Jcssup. Thomas, Jr., 219 
Jewett, C. J., 191 
Jewett, F. Le R.. 200 
Jewett, Ichabod. 2jg 
Jewett, Joseph, 191 
Johnson. A. B.. 2j8 
Johnson, George, 256 
Johnson, Isaac, 266 
Johnson, Jeremiah. 256 
Johnson, J. L.. 226 
Johnson, John, 226 
Johnson, Rankin, 236 



294 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Johnson, William, 216 
Johnson, Windsor, 282 
Johnston, Archahcll 241. 242 
Johnston, R. N.. 268 
Jones, C. P., 281 
Jones. E. A., 205 
Jones, E. T.. 282 
Jones, Israel, 217 
Jones, IMcMillan. 243 
Jones, Thomas. 281, 282 
Joralemon, J. C, 256 
Jordan, John, 203 
Jordan, W. B., 241 
Josselyn, Charles, 193 
Josselyn, C. L., I93 
Judd, William, 217 
Tndson, L. R., 268 
Judson, T. M., 282 
Judson, W. L.. 268 

Kautz, J. A., 215 
Keef er, J. Q., 203 

Keitli, Cornelius, 278 
Kellogg, Elijah, 228 
Kemp, Bbenezcr, 229 
Kemp, Frederick, 239 
Kennedy, Samuel, 253 
Kent, l^hineas, 210 
Kent, R. C, 210 
Kerr, John, 279 
Kerr, R. F., 279 
Kershner, Conrad, Jr., 205 
Kershner, H. H., 273 
Ketcham, Solomon, 253, 258 
Kiggins, C. S., 248 
Kimball, W. L., 232 
Kincaid, James, 277 
King, C. F., 203 
King, Jonas, 274 
Kingsbury, Joseph, 279 
Kingsbury, Lucius, 279 
Kingsbury, W. K., 279 
Kingsley, E. D., 271 
Kinne, Ecra, 241 
Kinney, Daniel, 208 
Kinney, F. C. 241 
Kirkf'atriek, Abraham, 275 
Knap, Job, 258 
Knox, John, 244 
Knox, W. H., 244 
Kugler, F. C, 263 
Kyle, Robert, 219 

Ladd, .-ishbel, 270 
Ladd, John, 241 
Lamb, C. E., 232' 
Lamb, John, 22,2 
Lamb, Samuel, 233 
Lane, E. W., 232 
Langworthv, B. F.. 210 



Lanterman, E. T., 248 
La r combe, B. F., 203 
Larkam, Thomas, 203 
Latham, Joseph, 268 
Latham, T. W., 268 
Latimer, Jonathan, 202 
Laughlin, E. G., 268 
Laughton, John, 225 
Lawrence, Samuel, 236 
Lawrence, Thomas, 212 
Lawson, C. F., 239 
Lay, Lee, 192 
Layton, S. H., 269 
Lea, James, Jr., 242 
Lea, J. E., Jr., 242 
Leach, F. A., Jr., 193 
Leach, J. S., 281 
Lealand, Asaph, 231 
Leap, John, 216 
Leary, John, 252 
Leasure, John, 250 
Leavitt, G. O., 248 
Leavitt, Thomas, 282 
Le Baron, R. W., 210 
Le Fever, George, 194 
Leffler, Conrad, 2^7 
Leffler, G. P., 257 
Leighton, Tobias, 241 
Leonard, C. B., 239 
Leonard, Jacob, 205 
Levan, Abraham, 205 
Lezvis, Andrezv, 222 
Lewis, A. P., 243 
Lewis, A. S., 257 
Lezvis, Eleaser, 257 
Lezi'is, Fielding, 221 
Leziis, John, 243 
Lewis. J. A., 210 
Lezins, Xafhan, 210 
Lewis. S. C, 196 
Lezvis. Stephen, 238 
L'Hommcdieu, Samuel. 198 
Libbey. E. D., 269 
Libbv. Samuel, 244 
Lilly", H. J., 224 
Linn, Joseph. 249 
Linn, William, 272 
Linhart, S. B., 273 
Linton, S. E., Jr., 279 
Lispenard, Leonard. 191 
Litchfield. C. E., 232 
Litchfield. G. A., 232 
Litchfield, James^ 232, 233 
Litchfield, Josiah, 233 
Litchfield, J. F. B., 233 
Litchfield. W. E., 233 
IJttlc. John, 246 
Littlefield, E. A.. 281 
Livingston, Benjamin, 233 
Livingston, C. B., 233 



INDEX OF .\i:\V MKMBKRS AM) A XCl-.STuKS. 



295 



Locke, Hbeneser, 235 
Lockzvood, Abraham, 25Q 
Lockzvood, Reuben, 198 
Lock wood, R. N., 248 
Loomis, John, 210 
Long, A. M., 273 
Long, George, 2"/^, 
Long, William, 273 
Longycar, Christopher, 258 
Longyear, Jacob, 258 
Longzvell, William, 272 
Lord, Xathan, 231 
Lorton, O. C, 210 
Lorton, Robert, 210 
Love land, Charles, 246 
Loveland, Hlicnr, 265 
Lowden, F. O., 210 
Lowell, C. R., 210 
Lozvell, Moses, 210 
Liizccnberg, Frederick, 273 
Lozier, Hillebrant, 251 
Lyle, Robert, 212 
Lyon, Benjamin, 233 
Lyon, David, 207 
Z,3'on, W. S., 233 

.McAfee, H. W., 219 
McCall, Benajah, 256 
McClanalian, Thomas. 221 
McCormick, J. C, 197 
McCourt, R. S., 241 
McCrackcn, William, 206 
McCiirdy, John, 204 
McDowell, R. A., 222 
McDozvell, Samuel, 222 
)IcDozvell, Samitcl, Jr., 222 
McDowell, W. H., 273 
McDowell, W. W., 222 
McEwen, G. F., 273 
McEzven, John, 272, 
McFall, Eugene, 239 
McFall, G. H., 239 
McFarlanc, James, 273 
McGill, James, 273 
McHenry, Jesse, 193 
McHenry, John, 193 
McHenn-, John, Jr.. 193 
McHenry, Renolds. 193 
Mcintosh, Jeremiah, 194 
Mcintosh, M. W., 193 
Mcintosh, Peter, 205 
McKcchnie, C. C.. 239 
McKce, John, 265 
Mc Kinney, Arthur, 253 
MeKinney, John, 209 
McKinnie, John, 269 
McMichael, James, 227 
AfcNair, E. O.. 257 
McNeir, William, 203 
MacLean, A. D., 264 



MacNichol. G. P.. 269 
^L-icy, W. A., 248 
Magaun, J. G., 194 
Mag ruder, Samuel, Jr., 240 
Man rose, E. F., 211 
Marble, Aaron, 204 
Marble, Enoch, 204 
March, F. M., 282 
March, John, 282 
Marlett, J. J., 215 
Marsden. H. I\L, "257 
Alarsh, Edward, 23^ 
Marsh, W. T., 264" 
Marshall, Hayward, 279 
Martin, C. A., 274 
Martineau, J. H., 281 
Martineau, L. R., 281 
Marvin, F. W., 194 
Marvin, Ozias, 194 
Marvin, Seth, 192 
Mason, Alonzo, 194 
Mason, Daniel, 194 
Mason, Joseph, 194 
Ma stick, Benjamin, 271 
Mastick, C. L., 271 
Mathews, V. E., 194 
Alathoit, E. B., 274 
Mathoit, George, 274 
Matthews, D. "C, 248 
Matthezvs, John, 270 
Matthezvs, Thomas, 204 
Matthew^s, William, 248 
Mauldin, O. K., 278 
Mauley, Daniel, 279 
May, Benjamin, 263 
Maybury, Richard, 224 
Maybiiry, R. L., 224 
Mayo, H. R., 233 
Mays, Benjamin, 271 
Mays, Edwin, 271 
Maxzvell, Edzvard, 219 
Maxwell, J. S., 219 
Maxfield, Xathaniel, 236 
iNLason, F. AL, 276 
Mead, Jonathan, 209 
Mead, J'itus, 250 
Mears, John, 281 
Meeks, R. F., 244 
Meliish, John, 230 
Merriam, Amos, 21 1 
Merriam, C. E., 211 
Merrill, E. D., 218 
iMerrill, L. J.. 218 
Merrill, Samuel, 218 
Merwnn. H. W., Jr., 257 
Metcalf, Jonathan, 2t,t, 
Middlebrook, John, 204 
Miles, G. K., 274 
Miller, A. A., 215 
Miller. John, 225 



296 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Miller, Moses, 248 
Millincj, Hugh, 223 
Milling, R. E., 223 
Mills, F. M., 279 
Mills, Samuel, 258 
Mills, S. M., 247 
Millspaugh, H. J.. 257 
Millspaugh, Mathias, 257 
Miner, Charles, 237 
Mitchell, J. H., 211 
Miners, Charles, 215 
Myers, E. W., 264 
Myers, Jacob. 280 
Merrill, S. A., 218 
Moffatt, Alexander, 203 
Mohr, H. C, 205 
Monett, Abraham, 194 
Monette, O. E., i94 
Monroe, Robert, 225 
Montague, Daniel, 192 
Montague, Rxifus, 281 
Moore, F. L.. 283 
^loore, H. T., 282 
Moore, James, 219 
Moore, J. H., 204 
Moore, Nathaniel, 275 
Moore, Nelson. 257 
Moore, Roger, 2^7 
Moore, W. S.. 218 
Moore, William, 218 
More, John, 258 
Morehead, Turner, 221 
Morehouse, Benjamin, 250 
Morey, John, 269 
Morgan, James, 198 
Morgan, J. R.. 215 
Morgan, JVilliam, 197 
Morrill, Hibbard, 211 
Morrill, T. R., 211 
Morrill, W. F.. 211 
Morris, E. C, 257 
Morris. J. M., 222 
Morse, A. B., 239 
Morse, C. K., 243 
Morse, Jesse, 243 
Morse, John, 239 
Morse, Thomas, 192 
Mortimer. F. C, 194 
Moseley, Increase, 268 
Mosher, E. H., 211 
Mosher, John, 211 
Mott, F. L.. 218 
Mott, John, 218 
Moulton, Freeborn, 211 
Moulfon, Joseph, 211 
Moulton, Jotham. 206, 213 
Moulton, Stephen, 21 t 
Moulton, W. N.. 211 
Mowry, E. C, 276 
Mowry, Elisha. 276 



Moyer, F. E., 257 
Moyer, Henry, 257 
Mill ford, Esekiel, 200 
Munger, Blnathan, 211 
Munger, O. L., 211 
Murdoch, William, 239 
Murlless, F. T.. Jr., 200 
Murphey, Archibald, 256 

Nash, John, 218 
Naulty, C. W., 248 
Naultv. W. S., 248 
Neal, J. W., 258 
Neal, S. W., 218 
Negley, H. H.. 274 
Negley, John, 274 
Neviu, Daniel, 206 
Newhall. F. H., 233 
Newhall, G. H., 276 
Newhall, Napthali, 276 
Newkirk. C. R.. 258 
Newkirk, John, 258 
Nickerson, G. E., 234 
Nichols. G. B.. 234 
Nichols, John, 204 
Niks, William, 247 
Nimocks, Richard, 214 
Nixdorff , Samuel, 227 
Nixon, F. N., 249 
Nixon, John, 228. 235, 249, 27: 
Noble, H. L., 275 
Nooney, James, 250 
Norton, Peter, 194 
Norton, W. W.. 194 
Nutc, Jntham, 196 
Nutt. T. J. L., 244 
Ahitt. William, 244 
Northrop, Nicholas, 221 
Nye, Blisha. 235 

Ober. J. E., 200 
Ogden. C. E., 258 
Oglesby. N. P., 269 
Oldfield, Sylvanus, 197 
Oldficld. William, 197 
Oldham, William, 220, 223 
Olin. Gideon, 217 
Oliver, William, 272 
Olmsfcad, David, 217 
Olmsted, Aaron, 201 
Olmsted, David, 283 
Olmsted, G. F., 201 
Olmsted, R. D.. 20T 
Olncx, Stephen, 2^9 
O'Neall. J. H.. 278 
Ord. H. N., 258 
Osborn, Samuel, 276 
Osborne, B. S., 197 
Osborne, Timothy, 197 
Otis. Frank. 194 



INDEX OF NEW MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS. 



297 



Otis, Jolin, 214 
Overson, \\'. »., 266 

Packard, R. E., 211 
Packer, John, 200 
Page, Amos, 206 
Page, C. N., 218 
Page, Elijah, 218 
Paine, F. G.. 224 
Palmer, A. H.. 282 
Palvier, Benjamin, 240 
Palmer, Elislia, 282 
Parker, J. M., 201 
Parker, K. E., IQ4 
Parker, John, 201 
Parker, Jonas, 203 
Parker, P. H., 234 
Parkhurst, Benjamin, 281 
Parkinson, Joseph, 274 
Parrot, G. T., 249 
Parrot, R. T., 249 
Parsons. J. G., 279 
Partridge, Amos, 258 
Partridge, G. H.. 258 
Patch, Nehemiah, 210 
Patrick, S. G., 197 
Patten, John, 263 
Patterson, A. W., 225 
Patterson, James, 213 
Patterson, Joseph, 225 
Payne, John, 224 
Payne, William, 241 
Peabody, A. H., 281 
Peabody, David, 236 
Peabody, J. C., 234 
Peabody, John, 234 
Peabody, Richard, 234 
Peabody, Scth, 230 
Pearre, A. L., 227 
Pearsall. Philip. 258 
Pease, Samnel, 236 
Peck, Ichabod, Jr., ^246 
Peck, Jedediah, 196, T97 
Peck, John, 218 
Peirce. Matthczc, 236 
Pellctreau, J. E., 216 
Pendall, Jonathan, 266 
Pendleton, B. H., 194 
Pendleton, Benjamin, 194 
Pendleton, Henry, 222 
Pennington, W. S.. 256 
Pentecost. A. J., 274 
Pentecost, Dorsey, 274 
Perkins, E. L.. 279 
Perkins, R. A., 280 
■ Perrin, H. F., 197 
Perry, Joshua, 207 
Pcrsingcr, Jacob, 209 
Pettingell, F. H., 234 
Pettigrew, James, 258. 280 



Pettis, C. R., 242 
Pettis. W. S.. 242 
Phelps, Elijah, 266 
Phifer, Martin, 214 
Philips, Josiah, 274 
Phillips, B. G, 250 
Phillips, James, 226 
Phillips, Jonas, 253 
Piatt. Abraham, 197 
Pickerill. Samuel, 220. 26f) 
Pierce, Alfred. 234 
Pierce, J. H., 225 
Pierce, W. A.. 242 
Pierre, J. I., 27 r 
Pierson, John, 21 t 
Pierson, Josiah; 197 
Pierson, S. G., 197 
Pike, R. D., 282 
Pillsbnry, Moses, 232 
Pilsbnrv, Joshua, 275 
Pitkin. A. H.. 20 r 
Pitts. James, 280 
Pitts, Samuel, 280 
Piatt, Jonas, 211 
Poindexter, C. E.. 20 [ 
Pollock, C. A.. 266 
Pollard, H. R., 282 
Pollard, H. R., Jr.. 282 
Pollard, J. J.. 282 
Pollard, Joseph, 28 r. 282 
Pomeroy, Seth, 231. 263. 271 
Pool, Thomas, 276 
Poole, Jonathan, 231 
Pope, William. 220. 221, 223 
Porter, Joshua. 2^2 
Porter. W. G.. 280 
Post, Henry, 215 
Post, Joseph, 229 
Poston, C. P., 194 
Potter, James, 267 
Potter, Silas, 199 
Powell. F. E., 204 
Powell, Richard, 193 
Powers. R. B., 269 
Pratt, C. R., 249 
Pratt. David, 210 
Prentice, Samuel, 269 
Prescott, E. L., 241 
Prescott. Jeremiah, 24 r 
Prescott, Micah, 230 
Preston, Amariah. 2^8 
Preston, H. L., 258 " 
Preston, Isaac, 21 t 
Price, E. H., 269 
Price, L. E., 249 
Price, Tenrub, 246 
Price, William, 249 
Procter, J. C. 204 
Proctor, Leonard, 260 
Prouty, E. H.. 28 r 



298 



SONS Ol" THE AMERICAN' r:K\OLUTIOX 



J'urvis, Gconje, 20^ 
Purdy, M. S., 258 

Qnackenbos. Reynier, 197 
Quackenbush, W. D., 197 
Quackinbush, B. F., 249 
Qiiackinhush, James, 249 
Quackinbush, Rcy)iier. 249 
Quincr, John, 2^^, 
Quinn, J. B., 234 
Quinn, R. S., 269 

Rains, James, 222 
Ralston, Louis, 258 
Ralston, W. J., 258 
Rand, llphraim, 271 
Rand, Jasper, 276 
Rand, J. L., 271 
Rand, S. O.. 276 
Rand, William, 253, 254 
Rand, W. H., 253, 254 
Randall, John, 237 
Randolph, R. F., 206 
Randolph. Robert, 206 
Ranger, Moses, 229 
Ransom, C. E., 211 
Rauso}n, Joseph, 267 
Rawlins, Benjamin, Jr., 214 
Ray, Roszoell, 255 
Raymojid, Enoch, 248 
Read, Sampson, 206 
Read, Seth, 192 
Reddv, F. M., 211 
Redfield, E. D., 201 
Redfield, Roswell, 201 
Redman, E. H., 215 
Redman, Solomon, 215 
Reed, Jacob, 194 
Reed, John, 217, 267 
Reed, JVilliam, 282 
Reeves, E. M., 218 
Reeves, Puryer, 218 
Reifsnider, J. M., 227 
Requa, B. H., 280 
Reqna, Glode, 280 
Resseguie, Jacob, 257 
Rewalt, John, 258 
Reynolds, Charles, 279 
Reynolds, E. B., 259 
Reynolds, E. G., 258 
Reynolds, Joseph, 225 
Reynolds, Satnitel, 212 
Reynolds. S. W., 212 
Rhodes, James. 233 
Rice, A. H., 259 
Rice, G. C, 259 
Rice, Noah, 193 
Rice, W. H., 222 
Richard. John. 2^/ 



Richards. G. H.. 249 
[■Richards, Joseph. 230 
Richardson, D. T., 225 
Richardson, Ezekiel. 249 
Richardson, J. S., 234 
Richardson, Joseph, 234 
Richardson, R. J., 206 
Richardson, William, 255, 256 
Richmond, F. A., 206 
Richmond, Ra}-, 234 
Richtmeyer, Christian, 212 
Richtmeyer, P. E. L., 212 
Ridge, William, 214, 215 
Reiser, Jacob, 205 
Riley, C. D., 201 
Riley, John, 201 
Rile)', R. C, 212 
Rinn, M. ^IcD.. 197 
Robb, X. K., 212 
Robbins, A. McC, 204 
Rabbins. Asa, 225 
Robbins, A. W., 201 
Robbins, Benjamin, 201 
Robinson, James, 260 
Robinson, Lemuel, 248 
Robinson, Silas, 2^,;^ 
Robinson, William, 269 
Robinson, William, Sr., 28 •; 
Robinson, William, Jr., 283 
Rodman, J. C. 264 
Rodman, W. B., 264 
Rogers, E. S., 212 
Imagers, John, 247 
Rogers, Joseph, 271 
Rogers, L. A., 271 
Rogers, L. C, 239 
Rogers, Moses, 212 
Rogers, Thomas, 233 
Root, G. F., 259 
Ross, Benjamin, 241 
Ross, Charles, 274 
Ross, G. W., 216 
Ross, J. A., 241 
Ross, John, 207, 211 
Ross, Perrin, 219 
Ross, Thomas, 274 
Roth, William, 247 
Rouse, John, 272 
Rowell, A. C, 243 
Rozvell, William, 243 
Rozi'ley, Daniel, 268 
Riicker, Angus, 202 
Riinyon, Eli as, 259 
Runyon. W. C. 259 
Russel, William, 242 
Russell, E. F., 201 
Rust, E. K., 282 
Rust, Lemuel. 282 
Ruth. F. D.. 223 
Ruth. R. F.. 212 



INDKX OF NKW MIi,\JBKRS AND ANCESTORS. 



299 



Sahiii, Jonathan, 208 
Salomons, W. E.. 234 
Sanimis, F. B.. 259 
Sammons, Wheeler, 259 
Sanborn, C. S., 234 
Sanborn, Peter, 234, 235 
Sanborn, R. R., 235 
Sanborn, Theophiiiis. 240 
San ford, G. W. B.. 244 
Sanders, T. H., 264 
Sargent, P. D., 247 
Sargent, T. F., 204 
Savage, Samuel, 200 • 
Savage, Selah, 202 
Sawyer, H. H., 235 
Saxon, Lezvis, 277 
Sayers, J. T., 269 
Sayre, Daniel, 245 
Sayre, Ephraini, 249 
Seainmon, Doniinicus, 2},y 
Schaal, G. A., 216 
Schadt, O. G. J., 259 
Schloss, Aaron, 195 
Sehnoley, John, 222 
Seabury, W. M.. 191 
Seaman, C. K., 249 
Searls, Gideon, 240 
Searls, Gideon, Jr., 240 
See, Abraham, 259 
See, J. B., 259 
See, J. R., 259 
Seechrist, John, 215 
Scelye, James, 198 
Seixas, B. M., 260 
Sells, John, 269 
Sells, S. N._, 269 
Selby, William, 199 
Seldon, Samuel, 215 
Sellers, Nathan, 215 
Senton, A. L., 235 
Sessions, F. M.. 239 
Sessions, Robert, 2^9 
Sevey, John, 232 
Sevier, Robert, 213 
Seymour, Abel, 269 
Seymour, G. N., 259 
Shadday, E. D., 216 
Shadday, John, 216 
Shafer, Casper, 249 
Shafer, Isaac, 249 
Shafer, W. E., 249 
Shot tuck, Eleazer, 2^,6 
Sharp, Thomas. 221 
Sharpe, George, 193 
Shazv, Abner, 235 
Shatv, Abraham, 225 
Shaw. H. L., 235 
Shatv, Jeremiah, 197 
Shazv, Joseph, 207 
Shaw. L. Y., 264 



Shazv, Robert, 278 
Shazv, Thomas, 234 
Sheldon, Ashcr, 280 
Sheldon, A slier, Jr., 201 
Sheldon, C. L., 201 
Sheldon, Parley, 218 
Sheldon, W. P., 235 
Sheppard, W. L,., 274 
Sherman, Conrad, 227 
Sherman, Henry, 274 
Shields, D. L., 22,7 
Shields, H. M., 250 
Shields, John, 250 
Shock, John, 196 
Shockey, Christian, 272, 
Shubrick, Thomas, 277 
Sibley, E. E., 235 
Sibley, Blisha, 216 
Siblev, F. C., 239 
Sibley, R. E., 216 
Sibley, Stephen, 239 
Sibley, Timothy, 205 

Sidwell, J. W., 220 

Silva. V. M. C, 271 
.Simpson, Benjamin, 241 

Simpson, C. S., 241 
Singleton, Matheiv, 191 
Sizcr, Lemuel, 22,7 

Skinner, Abraham, 270 

Slocum, G. F., 274 

Slote, John, 260 

,Slott, Daniel, 260 

Slaver, John, 207 

Smallwood, Charles, 264 

Smith, B. H., 216 

Smith, B. L., 260 

Smith, C. L., 195 

.Smith, Caleb, 235 

Smith, David, 193 

Smith, E. A., 281 

Smith, E. E., 235 

Smith, Eldad, 235 

Smith, Enoch, 254 

Smith, E. R., 218 

Smith, F. B., 227 

Smith, F. G., 235 

Smith. F. H., 235 

Smith. G. W., 250 

Smith, H. E., 269 

Smith, H. F., 260 

Smith, James, 209 

Smith, John, 195 223. 234, 244 

Smi^h. J. W., 269 

Smith, Nehemiah, 210 

Smith, R. M., 235 

Smith, Samuel, 250. 281 

Smith, S. C, 195 

Smith, Simeon, 256 

.Smith, Stephen. 260 



300 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Smoak, W. M., 278 
Smock, D. Du B., 250 
Smock, John, 250 
Snow, H. W., 201 
Snow, Isaac. 201 
Snoii\, Joseph, 201 
Souers, L. E., 269 
Southworth, E. B., 236 
Southworth, G. E., 202 
Southivorth, Jedediah, 236 
SoLiza, F. W., 260 
Sowdon, J. A.. 260 
Speaker, George, 257 
Sbear, Johannes, 249 
Spears, F. H., 272 
Speed, James, 223 
Spalding, Andrea', 266 
Spalding, B. F.. 266 
Spalding, R. C, 266 
Spongier, Joseph, 212 
Spaulding, Benjamin, 266 
Spaulding, C. D., 266 
Spaulding, J. C, 195 
Spaulding, John, 266 
Spaulding, Leonard, 195 
Spaulding, Simon, 266 
Spaulding, W. L., 236 
Spaulding, Zehulon, 236 
Sprague, A. J., 281 
S Prague, David, 251 
Sprague, Philip, 281 
Sprague, Rufus, 236 
Sprague, R. W., 236 
Spring, D. L., 260 
Stahl. Henry, 212 
, Stahl, J. M., 212 
Stanford, Abner, 260 
Stanford. G. L- 260 
Stanford, Welton, 260 
Stanford, Welton, Jr., 260 
Stanton, Joshua, 258 
Starr, George, 215 
Stebbins, Joseph, 208 
Steele, BUsha, 198 
Steele, James, 195 
Steere, C. L.. 276 
Steerc, Jonah, 276 
Stein, T. P. E., Jr., 216 
Stevens, C. M., 276 
Stephen, ColweU, 276 
Stevens, Bzra. 247 
Stevens. J. P., 225 
Stevens, Peter. 255 
Stevens. Thomas, 194 
Stevens. Zachariah, 232 
Stevenson. H. G., 195 
Stewart. Daniel, 229 
Stewart, BUsha, 213 
Stewart, J. K., 222 



Stickney, J. R., 236 
Stickncx, Jedediah, 281 
Still, S; S., 219 
Stillman, J. E., 205 
Stinson, J. M., 219 
Stinson, James, 219 
Stimpson, Stephen, 260 
Stimpson, W. E., 260 
Stockham, J. H., 219 
Stock ham, William. 219 
Stockbridge, David, 235 
Stoddard, J^lijah, 239 
Stoddard, E. W.. 239 
Stone, Irving, 236 
Stonebreaker, Adam. 226 
Story, Asa, 255, 268 
Strobridge, Robert, 260 
Strong. James, 197 
Strother, J. C, 223 
Str other, John, Sr., 191 
Strother. John, 223 
Stubbs, J. G.. 243 
Stiirtevant. Lot, 225 
Sulgrove, L. B., 243 
Sullivan. Howlet. 278 
Sullivan, J. M., 278 
Swain. P. M., 241 
Swain, V. L., 242 
Swan, H. L., 243 
Swetland. L. E., 272 
Szvett. Shebna, 212 
Switzer. E. H., 212 
Switzler. W. H., 283 
Sykes, J. J., 219 
Symmes, Samuel, 260, 261 
Symmes, W. B., 260 
Symmes. W. B., Jr., 261 

Tait. B. F., 212 
Talbot, Ambrose, 225 
Talbot. R. L., 225 
Tallev. O. B., 219 
Tanke, E. T., 261 
Tappan, James, 208 
Tarr, D. B., 224 
Taylor, Abraham, 219 
TaVlor, A. C, 204 
Tavlor. C. E.. 219 
Taylor. Eldad, 278 
Taylor, George, 268 
Taylor. F. W.. 197 
Taylor, J. S., 278 
Taylor, Reuben, 197 
Tedmon, A. H.. 197 
Tedmon, B. S., Jr.. 197 
Tenney, C. F.. 270 
Tenney. William, 270 
Terry, Nathaniel, 204. 278 
Thayer, Blijah, 200 



INDEX OF NEW .MEMBERS AND ANCESTORS. 



301 



Thayer, El is ha, 196 
Thayer, J. F., 236 
Thomas, Edward. 204 
Thomas, Isaiah. 195 
Thomas, I. S.. 283 
Thomas, WilHam, 195 
Thompson, Alexander, 280 
Thompson, E. V., 272 
Thompson, George, 213 
Thompson, H. A., 236 
Thompson, H. L., 264 
Thompson. L. B., 270 
Thompson, Daniel, 225, 234 
Thornton, John, 194 
Thrall, Samuel, 278 
Thrall, Samuel, Sr., 269 
Thrall, Samuel, Jr., 269 
Thruston, C. M., 220, 223 
Thruston, R. C. B., 223 
Tiifanv. Benjamin, 261 
TiffanV. N. O.. 261 
Tifft, Robert, 261 
Tifift, R. H.. 2bi 
Tilden, B. E., 212 
Tilden, Daniel, 212 
Tilden, J. B.. 204 
Tillinghast, Charles, 206, 2^6 
TilHnghast, F. W., 276 
Titus, Noah, 196 
Tobcy, William. 224, 236 
ToddVH. C, 261 
Todd. Samuel, 197 
Tomlinson, James, 238 
Topham, Washington, 204 
Torre nee, John, 271 
Torrey, H. K., 244 
Tozvles, Oliver, 213 
Towles, W. B., 213 
Townes, H. K., 278 
Tozvnley. George, 249 
Tracy, A. H., Jr.,. 261 
Tracy, Gilbert, 261 
Tracy, Hezekiah, 261 
Trapier, Paul, 277 
Tresner. L. W., 197 
Tripp, E. R., 264 
Tripp, Robert, 263, 264 
Trufant, S. A., 22T, 
Trull, John, 236 
Trull. John; 236 
Truman, H. H., 250 
Tucker, George. 274 
Tucker. William. 274 
Tuley, P. S., 223 
Tuley. T. S.. 223 
Tupper, Frank, 237 
Tupper, Ichahod, 237 
Tuttle. James, 236 
Tut tie, Moses, 245, 246 



Twitmyer, E. B., 274 
Tyler, Moses, 233 

Uphaui, Javcz, 22J 
Upton, J. H., 206 
Upton, John, 206 
Underhill, John, 233 

Vallume, Leonard, 279 
Van Alstine, Philip, 259 
I'^an Bergen, Antony, 252 
Van Bergen, C.. 252 
Vance, J. A., 213 
Vance, Hart. 213 
Vance, Patrick, 213 
Van Deman, E. D., 270 
Van Deman, John, 267, 270 
Van Deusen, Cornelius, 237 
Van Deusen, C. H., 237 
Van Eberstein. F. H.. 265 
Van Hoesen. J. C, 257 
Van Horn,- J. A., 250 
Van Slyke. P. B., 219 
Van Tassel, Cornelius. 261 
Vaughan. W. E., 204 
Vincent, T. N., 204 

Wade, W. S., 250 
Wadlia, A. J., 195 
JVadlia, Daniel, 195 
Wadszvorth, Hezekiah. 217 
JVadszvorth, Joseph, 212 
Wadsivorth, Roger. 199 
Wasrner, J. A., 219 
Waite, Blihu. 238 
Wallace, G. R., 274 
Wallace, W. B., 274 
Wallace, W. C. 261 
Walling, J. A., 225 
Wallis, Curzvin, 261 
Wallis. Samuel, 253 
Walker, James, 251 
Walrath, F. L., 251 
Walters, C. F., 261 
'jVVaples, C. S., 227 
Waples. Samuel. 227 
Ward, P. O., 213 
Warfield, Charles. 227 
Waring, A. D.. 213 
Waring, Henry, 213 
Warne, W. P., 274 
IVarren, Nathan, 232 
Warren, N. C, 198 
Warren, T. J.. 198 
Warriner. Abner. 200 
Wassell. S. :McC.. 191 
Watkins. Nicholas. 227 
Watkins. Thomas. 227 
Watson. Caiman. 225 



302 



SONS OV THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Watson, EUphalet, 225 
Watson, M. B., ^5 
Way, J. L., 202 
Way, Thomas, Jr., 202 
Webb, Nathaniel, 231 
Weddell, J. A.. 265 
Weddell, J. A.. Jr.. 265 
Wcedon, Augustine. 204 
Weedon, J. C., 204 
Weller. C. H., 195 
Welles, J. H., 202 
Wells, Daniel, 280 
IV ells, James, 268 
Wells, R. G., 280 
Welton. Tom, 261 
West, C. C, 250 
West, G. G., 213 
Wentzi'orth, Sykanus, 262 
Westfall, Abraham, 204 
Wcstfall, Jacob, 279 
Weston, Zabdiel, 229 
Wheeler, B. D., 219 
Wheeler, F. A., 274 
Wheeler, F. I., 227 
W'heeler, F. M., 225 
Wheeler. Ignatius, 227 
Wheeler, James, 256 
Wheeler, Jeremiah, 237 
Wheeler, Valentine, 219 
Wheelock. Jonathan, 213 
Whitaker. C. H.. 270 
Whitaker, H. C.. 275 
Whitaker, Stephen, 270 
White. C. F., 213 
White, Galen, 223 
White, David, 242 
White. Josiah, 199 
White, R. C, 223 
White. Willard, 206 
Whiteley, Henry, 202 
Whiting, Caleb, 225 
Whiting, Isaac. 271 
Whitney, Daniel. 207 
Whitney. H. H., 237 
Whitney, Jesse, 268 
Whitney, Josiah, 230. 261 
Whitney, Silas. 237 
Whitnev, Stephen, 230 
Whittle'sev, Bliphalci, 217 
Whvte. C. R.. 205 
Wiard, W. W., 261 
Wiedinger. B. 'SI., 213 
Wightman. W. S.. 240 
Wilbur, C. H.. 283 
Wilburn. W. R. S.. 242 
Wilcox, D. M.. 237 
Wilcox, F. L., 202 
Wilcox, Hiel, 237 
Wildv, H. E.. 2t6 



Wilev, D. O., 240 
Wilgus, S. D., 213 
Wilgus, William, 213 
JVilkins, Bray, 244 
Wilkins, G. C., 244 
Wilkinson, B. M., 261 
Wilkinson. H. S., 261 
JVilley, Ahimaaz, 198 
JVillev, John, 202 
Willey, O. G., 202 
Willey. W. A., 237 
Williams, C. E.. 237 
\\'illiams, C M., 261 
JVilliams, Elias, 261 
Williams, E. S., 254 
Williams, J. G., 261 
JJ'illiams, James, 278 
Williams, John, 268 
Williams, Joseph, 239 
Williams, Joshua, 201 
JVilliams, Warham, 237 
Williams, JVilliam, 199 
Williams, William, 270 
Williamson, M. P., 214 
Willard. S. X., 214 
Willcox, John, 257 
Willis. G. B., 276 
Willoughby, William. 203 
Wilson, Asa. 283 
-Wilson. C. H.. 195 
Wilson, D. W.. 270 
JVilson, George, 203 
Wilson, H. I., 214 
Wilson, Joshua, 195 
JVilson, Thomas. 214 
Wilt. C. T., 214 
JJ^iltse. John, 252 
JJlnans, Benjamin, 245 
JJ^inchester, Jonathan. 278 
JVing, Simeon, 230 
IV inn, Joseph, 227 
Winslow, L. M.. 237 
JJ'inslozc. NathoJi. lyj 
Winslow, P. E., 240 
Wolcott, C. E., 262 
JJ'olcott, Samuel, 262 
JJ'olgemuth. John, 257 
Wood, C. B., Tgi 
JJ'ood. D. S.. 249 
Wood, F. M., 237 
JJ^'oodbury, Peter, 235 
Woodcock, G. M.. 262 
JVoodford, JVilliam, 195 
JJ'oodruit, Elias, 243 
JVoodruff. Oliver, 272 
Woodworth. C. P. , 245 
Woodworth. E. K., 245 
JJ^oodz^'crth, Salvenus. 245 
Wooster, E. G., 202 



INDKX OF NEW .ArE^IIJF.US AND ANCESTORS. 



30.5 



H'oostcr. Et>hriaiii. 202 
Wooster. F. L., 202 
IVoostcr, Walter. 202 
Worcester, Philip, 230 
Work. G. R.. 214 
Work. G. F., 214 
Work, J. B.. 214 
J V or 111 on til, John, 257 
JJ'oriiioiif/i. William, 257 
JVorrell, Isaac, 192 
Wrenshall. C. E., 275 
IVright. Aairiah, 240 
J V right, Charles, 240 
Wright, Edward, 28^ 
Wright, Eldad, 20^ 
Wright, F. v., 237 
Wright. J. H.. 275 
ir right. Joel, 206 



Wxeth, Ebenczcr, 238 
Wyeth, W. H.. 238 ^ 
W\man. Franklin, 214 
Wyiitaii, Tlu)iiias, 195 
Wyukoop, Hezc k ia h,' 2-j 

)'aniiey, Henry, 254 
Yates, G. J., 231 
Yemans. H. W., 240 
Yeomans, E. T.. 240 
Ycomans. O. L.. 250 
Yeomans, Samuel, 250 
York, Jesse, 237 
Young, J. \W, 214 

Zollinger, George, 243 
Zollinger. Peter, 243 
Zweygartt, II. J.. 202 



General Index. 



Activities of State Societies, 91 
Advance Work Committee, 114 
Alabama Society, membership, 81 

officers, 30 
Aliens Committee, 14 

report, 112 
Amendments, constitutional pro- 
vision for, 23 

provision in By-Laws for, 28 

to the Constitution, 142, 143 
Appropriations for year, 163 
Arizona Society, delegate, 65 

membership, 81 

officers, 30 

report, 116 
Arkansas Society, membership, 81 

officers, 30 

report, 116 
Auditing Committee, 13 
Award of Prize Insignia, 84 

of Traveling Banner, 84 

Baird, George W., report of Jef- 
ferson Memorial Commit- 
tee, 114 

Ballard, S. Thruston, on Sale of 
Flags at Post-offices, 149 

Banquet, 176 

Biographies of Officers, 5-12 

Bonnell, Edwin, report of Cali- 
fornia Society, 117 

Brockett, Paul, report of District 
of Columbia Society, 121 

Buckner, Gen. Smion Bolivar, 
presentation of Star-Span- 
gled Banner, 74 

Burroughs, John Harris, biogra- 
phy, 10 
elected Treasurer General, 167 
report, 68 

Butler, Joseph G., biography, 6 
elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 166 

By-Laws, 24 

California Society, membership, 81 

officers, 31 

report, 117 
Certificates of Membership, 27 
Chaplain General, biography, 12 

duties, 25 

election, 168 
Charter, National, 16-18 

20 — SR 



Clark, A. Howard, biography, 10 
elected Secretary General and 
Registrar General, 166, 167 
reports, 76, 80, 102, 172-175 
Clark, Gen. George Rogers, monu- 
ment to, 168 
address by Gen. B. W. Duke 
on, 176 
Colorado Society, delegates, 65 
membership, 81 
officers, 31 
report, 117 
Committees, National, 12 
Committees on Louisville Con- 
gress, 58 
Connecticut Society, delegates, 65 
membership, 81 
officers, 32 
report, 118 
Constitution, 19-23 
Crandon, E. S., nomination of 
Moses Greeley Parker, 157 
on Press Committee work, 106 
Credentials Committee, 13 

report, 64 
Cox, W. v., report of Flag Com- 
mittee, 102 

Danforth, Geo. L-, remarks by, 59, 

74 
Date of Annual Congress, change 

in, 141 
Declaration of Independence, fac- 
similes of, 150, 174 
Delegates, list of, 65 
Delaware Society, membership, 81 
officers, 2i3 
report, 120 
Dimitry, T. D., report of Louisi- 
ana Society, 125 
District of Columbia Society, 
delegates, 65 
membership, 81 
officers, 34 
report, 121 
Dix, George Oscar, biography. 9 
elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 166 
Du Bois, Charles A., report of 

New York Society, 133 
Dues of the Society, 22 
Duke, Gen. Basil Wilson, address 
by, 176 

(30s) 



3o6 



SONS 01? the: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Education Committee, 13 

report, 100 
Elections, 22, 24, 157-168 
Elliott, George A., report of Dela- 
ware Society, 120 
Executive Committee, 12 

duties, 26 

meetings of, 172, 175 

report, 67 

Finance Committee, 13 
Flag Committee, 14 

report, 102 
Flags, sale of at post-offices, 149 
Florida Society, membership, 81 

officers, 34 

report, 121 
France Society, membership, 81 

officers, 34 

George Washington Memorial 
Building, 115, 152 

Guyer, Clarkson N., report of 
the Organization Committee 
(North and West), 98 

Hale, General Irving, biography, 7 
elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 166 

Hall. E. H., report of National 
Parks Committee. 104 

Halstead. E. O.. report of Ne- 
braska Society, 129 

Hancock, J. D., resolution by, 94. 

Harris. J. C, report of Texas 

Society, 138 
Harris. Williams C. report of 

Michigan Society, 128 
Hawaiian Society, membership, 81 
officers, 35 
report, 122 
Historian General, duties, 25 
election, 167 
report, 87 
Howe, G. R., report of Memorial 
Committee, 96 

Idaho vSociety, membership, 81 

officers, 35 

report, 122 
Illinois Society, delegates, 65 

membership, 81 

officers, 35 

report, 122 
Indebtedness, provision against, 27 
Indiana Society, delegates, 65 

membership, 81 

officers, 2^ 

report, 123 



Insignia of the Society, 27 
International Arbitration, resolu- 
tion concerning, 140 
Iowa Society, delegates, 65 
membership, 81 
officers, 37 
report,^ 124 

subscription to permanent 
fund, 150 

Jefferson Memorial Committee, 15 
report, 114 

Kansas Society, membership, 81 
officers, 38 
report, 124 
Kentucky Society, delegates, 65 
member'ship, 81 
officers, 38 
report, 125 
Kimball, H. W., report of Massa- 
chusetts Society, 127 
Kirby, W. W., report of Colorado 

Society, 117 
Klock, G. S., report of New Mex- 
ico Society, 132 
Kniffin, Gilbert C, report of Pen- 
sion and Muster Rolls Com- 
mittee, 107 

Landrum, Rev. W. W., address 

by, 182 
Lee. Gen. Henry, memorial to, 148 
Louisiana Society, membership, 81 
officers, 38 
report, 125 
Louisville Congress, banquet at, 
176 
proceedings of, 57 
social functions at, 175 
Lyman, Charles, report of Educa- 
tion Committee, 100 

McClary, Nelson A., report of 
Advance Work Committee, 

"4 

Maine Society, membership, 81 

officers, 39 

report, 126 
Maryland Society, delegates, 65 

membership, 81 

officers, 39 

report. 126 
Massachusetts Society, delegates, 

membership, 81 
officers, 40 
report, 127 
Meetings, constitutional provision 
for, 22 



GENERAL INDEX. 



307 



Membership, constitutional r e - 

quirements, IQ 
Memorial Committee, 13 

report, 96 
Memorial to Gen. Henry Lee, 148 
Michigan Society, delegates, 65 

membership, 81 

officers, 42 

report, 128 
Minnesota Society, membership, 81 

officers, 42 

report, 129 
Mississippi Society, membership, 81 

officers, 42 

report, 129 
Missouri Society, delegates, 66 

membership, 81 

officers, 43 

report, 129 
Montana Society, delegate, 66 

membership, 81 

officers, 43 

report, 129 
Monument to Gen. George Rogers 

Clark, 168 
Moore, Commander John H., bi- 
ography, 9 

elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 166 

report of Aliens Conmiittee, 
112 

report of Naval Records Com- 
mittee, 116 

report of Organization Com- 
mittee (South), 99 
Muster Rolls Committee, 14 

report, 107 

National and State Societies, con- 
stitutional requirements, 20 
National Parks Committee, 14 

report, 104 
National Peace Congress, resolu- 
tion sent to, 140 
Naval Records Committee, 15 

report, 116 
Nebraska Society, membership, 81 

officers, 44 

report, 129 
Nevada Society, membership, 82 

officers, 44 

report, 130 
New Hampshire Society, member- 
ship, 82 

officers, 44 

report, 130 
New Jersey Society, delegates, 66 

membership, 82 

officers, 45 

report, 130 



New Mexico Society, member- 
ship, 82 
officers, 46 
report, 132 
New York (Empire State) Soci- 
ety, delegates, 66 
membership, 81 
officers, 46 
report, 133 
North Carolina Society, member- 
ship, 82 
officers, 47 
report, 134 
North Dakota Society, member- 
ship, 82 
officers, 48 
report, 134 

Officers, general, biographies of, 
5-12 

election of, 21, 157 

list of 1911, 3 

of State Societies, 30-55 
Official Bulletin, appropriation for, 

173. 
Ohio Society, delegates, 66 

membership, 82 

officers, 48 

report, T35 
Oklahoma Society, membership, 82 

officers, 49 
Order of Business of Annual 

Congress, 28 
Oregon Society, membership, 82 

officers, 50 

report, 135 
Organization Committee, 13 

report (North and West), 97 

report (South). 99 
Overfield. C. P.. report of .Utah 
Society, 139 

Parker, Moses Greeley, biography, 

5 

elected President General, 163 

President General's address, 
163 
Pennsylvania Society, delegates, 66 

membership, 82 

officers, 50 

report, 136 
Pension and Muster Rolls Com- 
mittee, 14 

report, 107 
Permanent Fund, Committee, 14 

constitutional provision for, 23 

report on, 68 

subscriptions to, 68, 150 
Philippine Society, membership, 82 

officers, 50 



3o8 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



Pierson, David L-, biography, il 
elected Historian General, 167 
report, 87 
Presentation of Star-Spangled 

Banner, 74 
President General, annual address 
191 1, 64 
duties, 24 
election, 157-164 
Presidents General, past, 15 
Press Committee, 14 

report, 106 
Proceedings of Louisville Con- 
gress, 59 
Purposes and Objects of the So- 
ciety, 19 

Records of the Revolution, Pub- 
lication of, 146 
Registrar General, duties, 25 
election, 167 
report, 80 
Return of Certificates, report on, 

144 
Revolution, Publication of Records 

of, 146 
Rhode Island Society, delegates, 66 
membership, 82 
officers, 51 
report, 137 
RoBards, Colonel, on Monument 
to Gen. George Rogers 
Clark, 168 

Seal of the Society, 27 
Secretary General, duties, 25 

election, 166 

report, 76 
Social Functions at Louisville 

Congress, 175 
South Carolina Society, member- 
ship, 82 

officers, 51 

report. 138 
South Dakota Society, member- 
ship, 82 

officers, 52 

report, 138 
State Societies, activities of, 91 

constitutional requirements, 20 

duties, 26 

membership, 81, 82 

officers, 30-55 

reports, 116 

trustees, 4 
Stephenson, Hon. W. W., address 

by, 185 
Stone, C. G., report of Connecticut 
Society, 118 



Stone. Rev. J. T., address by, 84 
biography, 12 
elected Chaplain General, 168 

Tennessee, membership, 82 

officers, 52 
Texas Society, membership, 82 

officers, 52 

report, 138 
Thruston, R. C. Ballard, biogra- 
phy, 8 

elected Vice-President Gen- 
eral, 166 
Traveling Banner, 84 
Treasurer General, duties, 25 

election, 167 

report, 68 
Trustees, Board of, 4 

duties, 22, 26 

election, 21, 169 

meetings, 173 

report, 67 

Utah Society, membership, 82 
officers, 53 
report, 139 

Vance, Joseph A., on work of the 

Society, 154 
Van Deman, J. N., nomination of 

Isaac F. Mack, 159 
Vermont Society, delegates, 66 

membership, 82 

officers, 53 

subscription to permanent 
fund, 68 
Vice-Presidents General, duties, 25 

election, 164-166 
Virginia Society, membership, 82 

officers, 53 

report, 139 
Votes of Thanks, 145. 146, 155, 170 

Washington Society, membership. 
82 

officers, 54 

report, 139 
Weeks, John R., report of New 

Jersey Society, 130 
Williams, Wardner, address by, 84 
Wisconsin Society, delegates, 66 

membership, 82 

officers, 54 

report, 139 
Woodcock, Right Rev. Charles E., 

address by, 187 
Work of the Society, 154 
Wyoming Society, membership, 82 

officers, 55 

report, 140 

Year Book, printing of, 78, 174 



National Year Book 



1911 



Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution 



y 



SIR'